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United States Coast Guard Auxiliary 7th District Breeze Volume LVIII

http://www.cgaux7.org/

Number 3

Winter 2012


Is the official publication of the United States Coast Guard Auxiliary 7th District

UNITED STATES COAST GUARD District Commander: RADM William D. Baumgartner, USCG Director of Auxiliary District 7 CDR Jose’ Quinones Operations Training Officer CWO Christopher W. Acklin

U.S. COAST GUARD AUXILIARY District Commodore COMO Walter Jaskiewicz District Chief of Staff John Tyson Immediate Past District Commodore COMO Donald L. Frasch District Captain North Robert Weskerna District Captain West Melvin Manning District Captain East Judith Hudson

BREEZE is the official and educational tool of the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary 7th District and is intended as a publication to keep the membership apprised of the activities of the Auxiliary. All articles and photographs submitted must be consistent with the policies of the Coast Guard and the Auxiliary and may not be returned. Electronic submissions are encouraged. Personal information of members is protected by the Privacy Act of 1974. The use of these rosters, addresses and telephone numbers on any computer or online service including the Internet is prohibited by the Act. Comments are encouraged and may be sent to Dorothy Riley, Editor (District OfficerPublications) at: dottieriley1@verizon.net. Articles in the BREEZE may be reprinted provided credit is given and a copy is sent to the above Editor and Publications Officer. Do not send changes of address to the BREEZE. You can obtain a change of member information report (7028) from your Materials Officer and submit it through channels.

http://www.cgaux7.org/

Volume LVIII

Issue 3

Winter 2012

Auxiliary Sector Coordinators

District Staff Officers

ASC Sector Charleston Reginald B. Hollar

Prevention Department Lyle E Letteer …….................................DSO-MS Frank R. Lann ….………...................…..…DSO-MT Ronald D. Foreman……………..............….DSO-PV Grethen Bacon ....……..……...............……..DSO-PE William S. Griswold……..…..............…..…DSO-SL Chuck Kelemen ……....................…………DSO-VE David Cawton …………………....................DSO-NS

ASC Sector St. Petersburg Donald C. Hoge ASC Sector Jacksonville David C. Cawton ASC Sector Key West R. Dewey Jackson ASC Sector San Juan Osvaldo M. Catinchi ASC Sector Miami William V. Tejeiro

Division Commanders 2012 Division 1……...........…………………Angel Benero Division 2….….......…..……....... Loren R. Emery II Division 3….….........….……….. Samuel E. Duda Division 4………..........William J. Sorrentino, Sr. Division 5……….…............…….... Gary P. Barth Division 6……..........……….…….Thomas R. Walker Division 7…..............…..…...….. J. Michael Shea Division 8……........................... Paulette Parent Division 9……….....…….....….. David C. Crockwell Division 10………….............…..Warren M. Wilson Division 11……..............………….. Jimmy R. Ryder Division 12…………............……….Vito W. Giardina Division 13…………….............. Jeffery A. Bronsing Division 14…….…….................…Henry T. Hayden Division 15……….............……………….. Craig Elliot Division 16……….......................…... Lee E. Elvins Division 17……..............……....…..... Carl D. Motes

Response Department Ken Plesser............…………..….................DSO-AV Harry S. Reynolds…..…...…...............…..DSO-CM Dudley W. Davis ......……………..................DSO-OP Jerry Henderson.……......................…..Chief QE Logistics Department David Hastings....…...……...............……...DSO-CS Susan Z. Hastings……...……...…................DSO-IS Constance O. Irvin...…………...............….DSO-PA Dorothy J. Riley…. ……………................…DSO-PB Angela Pomaro .…..…...….............….…..DSO-HR Terry Barth ……………...…...............……..DSO-MA Richard J. Leys………...............…………....DSO-DV Other Lillian G. GaNun …….……………................DSO-SR James Roche ........…...….…..……..................DSSO Dick Petrucci .....…………................……..….DFSO Andrew Anderson………….............….…….DSO-LP Antoinette Borman………….............….……....D-LL James Mayer.......…………................…..…DSO-FN Richard Leys………..….………....................PPDCPA COMO Donald Frasch................Plan Coordinator Thomas Brickey .......…District Materials Center District Administrative Assistant & Aide Carolyn R. Hooley ……...…..........................D-AD Elaine J. Cornell ……………………..................D-AA Barbara Jaskiewicz.....................................D-AA COMO Mary T. Larsen ...………............Advocate

District 7 Directorate Chiefs Logistics James Dennen, DDC-L Prevention David M. Fuller, DDC-P Response Donald A. Zinner, DDC-R

http://d7materials.org/index.php The center is now open Monday & Thursday 1000-1600 You can reach the center by phone during these hours at: (727) 535-2593


Volume LVIII

Issue 3

Winter 2012

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Click on the title below to read an article. Click the ‘Home’ symbol anywhere in this document to return to this table of contents.

In this issue: Commodore Walter Jaskiewicz ....................................................................................................2 Commodore John Tyson, DCOS ....................................................................................................3 Commodore Donald Frasch, IPDCO...............................................................................................4 Auxiliary Division Receives U.S. Coast Guard Meritorious Unit Commendation ..........................5 Thomas Loughlin, Staff Officer-Public Affairs, Division 11 An Example to Us All ....................................................................................................................6 Auxiliary Mass Rescue Operations Specialist: District 7 Pilot Program ........................................7 William Hanlon, Flotilla 38 Plantation Florida District Captain West....................................................................................................................8 Melvin Manning, DCAPT-W District Captain North.................................................................................................................10 Robert Weskerna, DCAT-N, DCOS (e) District Captain-East ...................................................................................................................12 Judith Hudson, DCAPT-E Breaking Barriers ........................................................................................................................14 Irwin Fried, Flotilla Staff Officer-Public Affairs, Flotilla 54 Auxiliary Assists in VOSS Deployment Training ..........................................................................15 Auxiliary Assists With U.S. Army Parachute Jumps on Lake Murray ...........................................20 Photo journal by James Andrews, Flotilla 12-12 Edisto, S.C. Prevention Department .............................................................................................................22 Dave Fuller, DDC-P Vessel Safety Checks: Coast Guard Officer Sets Example ...........................................................23 Logistics Department ..................................................................................................................24 Guest Author: Connie Irvin, District Staff Officer-Public Affairs The Great Portage Race .............................................................................................................26 Barbara Burchfield, Flotilla 12-6 East Cooper, S.C. New Teaching Aid for Water Wise Program ...............................................................................30 2012 District 7 Training Conference............................................................................................31 COMO John Tyson: Leadership With a Focus .............................................................................36 Dorothy Joan Riley, DSO-PB D7 District 7 Sweeps National Public Affairs Awards .......................................................................38 Cover Photo: TAMPA BAY, Fla.—Auxiliary vessels from Division 7 head into open water to conduct a safety and training patrol. Participating vessels and crew include the Sandi Cay with coxswain Dave Perillo and crewmembers Gene Keller and Jim Desanto; the Nu Life with coxswain Louis J. Curcio and crewmembers Greg Horst, Casey McCormick, and George Papabeis; and Miss Marla with coxswain Rick Short and crewmembers Marla Short, David Langdon, and Barry Porter. All except Papabeis are from Flotilla 72 St. Petersburg. Photo by George Papabeis, FSO-PA Flotilla 74.


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U. S. Coast Guard Auxiliary

District 7

Breeze

From the Bridge Commodore Walter Jaskiewicz District Commodore D7

Uncommon Strength­  Unwavering Service Shipmates, The last two years have passed by extremely fast, and it is time for the new District 7 Bridge to step forward. It would take too many pages in our Breeze for me to mention all the accomplishments that you, the members of District 7, have achieved during my watch. As the Olympics Torch is passed from runner to runner, so each of you has been handed the Torch that represents the United States Coast Guard Auxiliary. It was first lit in 1939, and carried with fervor and compassion by Auxiliary volunteers during the dark War years, the Cold War years, and the Post-9/11 years. As I traveled throughout our 17 divisions during my watch, I witnessed your spirit, as you reached out, with equal fervor and compassion, to accept the Torch from our Auxiliary founders to insure that it will be kept burning just a brightly as it did in 1939. Similarly, it is now time for me to pass the torch of leadership to the next generation. Let its flame shine as brightly for them as it has for me. Let it light the way for our incoming Bridge to keep our District the Flag Ship of the Auxiliary, so that they will continue to recognize the future challenges that they will without question face as opportunities for new missions. Just as we must reboot our computers now and then – either by choice or by necessity – so we must, at appropriate times, do the same with our life’s direction. It is now time for me to reboot. As I do, I say to each member – for what you have accomplished, and for your support and your dedication to our District, Thank You, and God Bless this Great Country.” Semper Paratus

V/r, COMO Walter R. Jaskiewicz

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla.– “Fun Night” at the District 7 Training Conference Sep.2023, 2012, in St. Petersburg, Fla., a more relaxed COMO Jaskiewicz and wife, Barbara, appear dressed as 50’s Rockers to match the evening’s Rock and Roll theme. Photo by D. Riley.


Volume LVIII

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Winter 2012

From the Bridge John Tyson District Chief of Staff

District Commodore (e) Thanks to you this has been a most successful year for the District Seven Auxiliary. Collectively you completed many thousands of hours of service while performing a multitude of activities in support of Coast Guard and Auxiliary missions. I can say without hesitation that the Coast Guard is absolutely delighted with your 2012 performance! Importantly, all divisions contributed to this success, and your participation in several large-scale operations that helped maintain maritime and waterway safety and security was unprecedented. The district’s successful development and implementation of an Auxiliary Mass Rescue Operations Specialist training program will have many long-term benefits for the Coast Guard and maritime safety.

There were many smaller, but equally important events that were supported by all divisions. But success in operational missions was just one area of success. Thanks to program staff officers at flotillas, the district had tremendous growth in the number of new Vessel Examiners, Program Visitors, Public Education Instructors and Marine Safety Specialists. The increase is significant because it enhances the likelihood of success in accomplishing the strategic plan for reducing boating accidents and fatalities by two percent a year. There were also important gains in other strategic areas. Thanks to your outreach to friends, associates and persons interested in serving their country, the district’s membership continues to rise, marking early success in the district’s four year goal of increasing diversity and the size of its membership by a net two percent a year. In leadership development, a training team conducted workshops across the district early in the year, and again at DTRAIN in the fall. There were also surveys during the year to determine unit leader’s views on training needs, and the responses to those surveys helped bring greater focus to district training. And starting April 1, performance data from six core mission activities was provided on-line in a “dashboard” format so all units could better assess their progress against goals. Those successes were only a small number of the many noteworthy achievements this year. There were many others I wish I could highlight in this note, including several spectacular search and rescues by Auxiliary surface and aviation units. But none of our success would have been achieved without your dedication to excellence, staying true to core values in the performance of your duties, and enthusiastically supporting our shared vision of being the premier volunteer organization supporting Coast Guard maritime safety and security missions. You and your shipmates are an extraordinarily talented and awesome force within the Coast Guard, and I look forward to the honor of serving as your Commodore for the next two years. Have a wonderful holiday season and a joyous new year!!! Semper Paratus,

John

John Tyson DCO-7 (e) TAMPA, Fla. -- COMO John Tyson (far right) and COMO Walter Jaskiewicz pictured with Darren Hart, member of Flotilla 79, during the flotilla’s 70th anniversary celebration held Nov. 17, 2012, in Tampa. Hart was one of the event organizers and planners. Photo by D. Riley.


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U. S. Coast Guard Auxiliary

From the Bridge

District 7

Breeze

Commodore Donald Frasch

Immediate Past District Commodore

Deputy National Commodore–Recreational Boating Safety First, a personal note: As many of you know, I sought election to the office of Vice National Commodore at NACON this year, but I didn’t get elected. Since then, I’ve had several phone calls and e-mails from members expressing their regrets and asking how I am. I totally appreciate your concerns and support. You all need to know that I’m doing great, and am actually happy about the outcome. I’ve always said that I would continue to seek the next higher office until the electors decided that someone else should have the job. Here, that someone else is both very qualified and a very good friend. COMO Mark Simoni will be our next Vice National Commodore (VNACO). Be assured that I’m not seeking any National Office. Rather, my intent is to “come home” to D-7 and do whatever I can to contribute again to our District’s success. So, “here I am.” Moving forward, I would ask you all to focus on our primary mission of Recreational Boating Safety (RBS). At NACON, the first words from our new Chief Director, CAPT Dave Rokes were, “We need you to focus on RBS.” Similarly, the first words from our Commandant, Admiral Bob Papp, were, “I need you to focus on RBS.” During the last two years, I’ve seen Districts put a special “Spot Light” on their RBS misssions. That generally resulted in a dramatic improvement. Although general economic conditions have been a negative factor, that doesn’t mean we stop trying or stand by to see if things improve. The first and foremost thing we can do is dig down and get the word out about our RBS activities. Advertise our classes, double the number of VE blitzes we do, and find any venue which people visit that will let us set up a PV information site. The issue isn’t that there are no customers; the issue is that we are not getting to them. That we can fix by simply making the effort. A year and a half ago, COMO Vass set up a “Public Education Committee” to study and recommend changes we should make to reinvigorate our entire Public Education program. The committee’s final report was presented to the NEXCOM at our meeting in Washington, DC, last May. As a result of that meeting, COMO Vass established a team to implement those recommendations that NEXCOM believed would work well to achieve our goals. Today we have already begun to implement that new plan, called “Operation New Horizons.” It includes developing a program for the continuous professional development of our instructors; moving our course offerings into the electronic distance learning environment, while we continue to offer our traditional classroom products; creating a centralized customer database and “student tracking” system; and adding seminar “short courses” to our offerings. We have already begun to implement instructor development, using Webinar-based sessions, for our District Staff Officers in Public Education and Member Training. A continuous professional instructor program is currently being defined. The functional specification for the new student tracking system is being put together, and a market research effort should begin very shortly to determine what the market needs in course content and delivery methods. We have been busy, and I’m sure you will like the direction we are taking. However, the key to our future success isn’t in the programs, by themselves. Success is totally dependent on your support and involvement. We need each of you singing the praises and promoting the benefits of Safe Boating. Hopefully, we can make that fun for you to do. §


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Issue 3

Winter 2012

Auxiliary Division Receives U.S. Coast Guard Meritorious Unit Commendation By Tom Loughlin, Staff Officer-Public Affairs Division 11 ST. PETERSBURG, Fla.--U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Division 11 was recently awarded the U.S. Coast Guard Meritorious Unit Commendation in recognition of its exceptional service from January 2007 to December 2011. Division 11’s award is especially notable since this is the first time an Auxiliary unit received the award based solely on its own individual accomplishments rather than by participating along with active Coast Guard missions. The Division is comprised of six flotillas located in Madeira Beach, Clearwater, Dunedin, Tarpon Springs, New Port Richey and Hudson, Florida. These units are extremely active in their support of Coast Guard Station Sand Key in Clearwater, Coast Guard Cutter Vise, Coast Guard Air Station Clearwater and Headquarters, Coast Guard Sector St. Petersburg The U.S. Coast Guard awards the Coast Guard Meritorious Unit Commendation only to units that have distinguished themselves by either valorous or outstanding achievement or service in support of Coast Guard operations not involving combat. Since the inception of the award in 1973, there have only been five occasions when Auxiliary units received this award, with the last previous award made in November 1996. The award is also unique because of the presentation venue. In an unprecedented action, Chief Warrant Officer Morgan B. Dudley, then Commanding Officer of Coast Guard Station Sand Key, chose his formal Change of Command ceremony to present the award to the members of Coast Guard Auxiliary Division 11. Division 11 members, using their own boats, patrol the 128-mile shoreline area of responsibility on a daily basis. Division boat crews fulfill primary search and rescue duties at Coast Guard Station Sand Key two days every week, allowing station personnel to perform other operational duties. They are also very visible during many local events such as sailing regattas, and the numerous water parades and celebrations throughout the area. The Division assisted the Coast Guard Research and Development Center in the planning and conducting of two separate research and development exercises, which tested new search and rescue radar equipment. This support saved the Coast Guard hundreds of thousands of dollars and resulted in the development of air and surface radar performance criteria which is currently in use throughout the Coast Guard. Members of Division 11 volunteered more than 100,000 hours in support of Coast Guard missions –the most in the southeast United States. The Division was also highly visible when providing over 50 percent of the support boats for the International OffShore Boat Races held in the Gulf of Mexico off Clearwater Beach, Florida. Division 11 was credited by Coast Guard Air Station Clearwater in saving them over $525,000 for contracted boat expenses by providing the target Continued on page 6

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Breeze

Continued from page 6 and recovery boats for over 700 sorties for C-130 airdrop training. Additionally, some Coast Guard Auxiliary members own private aircraft and are active in the Auxiliary air program. These members flew many hours transporting critical aviation parts to destinations throughout the southeast United States and the Caribbean. They also donated hundreds of hours, providing critical air support for search and rescue missions. Several members are qualified as Auxiliary chefs and form a cadre that supplements the dining hall staff at various Coast Guard stations and cutters and provides support for special Coast Guard functions. The activities of the members of Division 11 exemplify the missions of the Coast Guard Auxiliary as a Force Multiplier for the Coast Guard. The award of the Coast Guard Meritorious Unit Commendation is formal recognition of these efforts. The award was signed by Rear Admiral W.D. Baumgartner, Commander, US Coast Guard District 7, on behalf of Commandant, U.S. Coast Guard, and was presented by Captain Sheryl Dickinson, Commander, Coast Guard Sector St. Petersburg, Florida. Receiving the award and the accompanying pennant on behalf of the over 330 members of Division 11 were Jim Ryder of Safety Harbor, Florida, current Division 11 Commander, and three past Division 11 Commanders: Commodore Don Frasch of Hudson, Melvin Manning of Belleair Bluffs, and Karen Miller of Palm Harbor.§ ST. PETERSBURG, Fla.- Members of the Coast Guard Sector St. Petersburg and Coast Guard Auxiliary Division 11 display the U.S. Coast Guard Meritorious Unit Commendation banner on July 20, 2012. From left are CWO Morgan Dudley, COMO Donald Frasch, Melvin Manning, Karen Miller, Jim Ryder, Captain Sheryl Dickinson, Commander, Sector St. Petersburg. Photo by Deborah Mallory, Flotilla 11-1 Clearwater, Fla.

An Example to Us All ST. PETERSBURG, Fla.-- One member of Division 11 who exemplifies the division’s contributions to the Coast Guard is Don Hoge, Auxiliary Sector Coordinator, St. Petersburg. At the District 7 Training Conference held September 20-23 in St. Petersburg, Don Hoge was presented the Auxiliary Commendation Medal. Hoge was honored for his numerous services, including but not limited to assisting with planning Auxiliary support to the Coast Guard and coordinating that support. The recent safety and security patrols and other support provided by the Auxiliary to the Coast Guard during the Republican National Convention in August 2012 serve as one instance of his contributions. Shown from left are COMO Don Frasch, Immediate Past District Commodore D7; CDR José Quinones, U.S. Coast Guard, Director of Auxiliary District 7; Don Hoge, Auxiliary Sector Coordinator Sector St. Petersburg; Walter Jaskiewicz, District Commodore D7; and John Tyson, District Chief of Staff D7, on the podium behind them. Photo by Vickie Aponte, Flotilla 6-11 Miami, Fla.


Volume LVIII

Issue 3

Winter 2012

Auxiliary Mass Rescue Operations Specialist:

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District 7 Pilot Program

Miami-- In 2010, two major, Type 1 events, unprecedented in scope and complexity—an earthquake in Haiti and the Deepwater Horizon explosion/oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico—tested the U.S. Coast Guard’s response capabilities like never before. In both cases, as always, the Auxiliary stood Semper Paratus, ever ready, providing much needed support to the Unified Command during those two large scale disasters. The Auxiliary was repeatedly cited for its exemplarily response – supplying much needed personnel and facility resources. However, comprehensive after-action reports also identified significant shortfalls in the Auxiliary’s overall deployment efforts. Consequently, Auxiliary leadership has been asked to remedy the identified performance gaps. District 7 accepted that challenge. In September 2011, Commodore Walter Jaskiewicz and his Executive Committee, including immediate past Commodore Donald Frasch, authorized a unique endeavor titled Auxiliary Mass Rescue Operations Specialist (AMROS). Sector Miami was selected as the initial venue for the pilot program’s roll out.

Thereafter, qualified AMROS will receive additional targeted training, specifically designated in one of four distinct mass rescue disciplines: • • • •

Contingency Planner and Community Liaison On-Scene Coordinator Landing Site Reception Center

In the event of future large-scale incidents requiring an All-Hands response, the USCG certified AMROS members are likely to be deployed on short notice for extended periods of time and – most significantly – for the first time, in an operational ICS Division/Group supervisory role. This AMROS pilot program presents a win-win opportunity to expand the Auxiliary’s role as a force multiplier in support of Team Coast Guard, and this is a challenge that District 7 welcomes. For more information on this topic, please contact William Hanlon at whanlon3@aol.com.§

A select committee of Auxiliary members with various backgrounds was assembled for an informational workshop at Air Station Miami. This committee reviewed more than 60 applications and recommended 25 Auxiliary members for initial AMROS training consideration. Upon approval of Commodore Jaskiewicz, the AMROS candidates began attending specific intermediate level Incident Command System (ICS) educational classes. Other advanced ICS courses and Coast Guard-specific emergency management supervisory level classes are scheduled for 2012-13. Before any Auxiliary member will be designated an AMROS, s/he will be required to demonstrate a series of demanding proficiencies contained in the U.S. Coast Guard - Performance Qualification Standards for Division/ Group Supervisors.

MIAMI, July 18, 2012--In a meeting room at United States Coast Guard Miami Air-Station, several Sector Miami Auxiliary members discuss Auxiliary Mass Rescue Operations Specialist (AMROS) opportunities and tasks involved with Reception Center operations. COMO Walter Jaskiewicz (left, rear) was in Miami to participate in an AMROS informational workshop. Photo: Bill Hanlon, AMROS D7 Coordinator


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District Captain West Melvin Manning, DCAPT-West For the past two years, I have had the honor of serving as the District Captain in the West Region of District 7, during a time of noteworthy events and significant changes. During my tenure, I had the pleasure of working with distinguished Division Commanders Craig Elliot, Amos Johnson, Mike Shea, Jim Ryder, Braxton Ezell, Paulette Parent, Lou Conti and David Crockwell. We have shared the exuberance of seeing our operations programs achieve our goal of becoming increasingly valuable to the Coast Guard Stations at Yankeetown, Sand Key, St. Petersburg, Cortez and Fort Myers Beach. Our regular joint training missions with the Stations, increasing utilization during search and rescue missions, participation in Coast Guard support operations such as Dry Water, and service as stand-by facilities at the stations all mark this achievement. Auxiliary members are now working in all the stations, at Sector St. Petersburg and on Coast Guard surface vessels in varied assignments, including Auxiliary Chefs (AUXCHEFs), Pollution Investigator Assistants, Marine Safety Assistants, Officers of the Day and Watchstanders.

region Auxiliary members perform, Division 11 was awarded the prestigious U.S. Coast Guard Meritorious Unit Commendation during the Change of Command Ceremony at Station Sand Key on July 20th. The award was signed by Rear Admiral W.D. Baumgartner, Commander, US Coast Guard District 7, and presented by CAPT Sheryl Dickinson, Commander, Sector St. Petersburg. The U.S. Coast Guard authorized the Coast Guard Meritorious Unit Commendation in 1973 to recognize an Auxiliary unit that has distinguished itself by either valorous service or meritorious achievement in support of the Coast Guard operations not involving combat. Since its inception, only five Auxiliary units were awarded this distinction, the last being in November, 1996.

(Click on image to view video.)

CLEARWATER, Fla.-- The crew of the Salty from Division 11 participates in an HC-130 Hercules aircraft drop training excercise. Photo by Zach Lessin, ADSO-PB D7

Continued support of Air Station Clearwater has expanded to include HC-130 Hercules aircraft night training missions by surface facilities and participation in the Flight Publications Update by members from several divisions. Auxiliarists from all divisions in the West region often serve in a variety of positions at the Air Station. In short, Auxiliary Air (AUXAIR) has regained traction, serving the St. Petersburg area of responsibility and beyond. In recognition of the increasingly valuable service that West

Even more remarkable, Division 11’s award marks the first time an Auxiliary division received the award based solely on its own, individual accomplishments. “Off the water,” the West region is equally proud of its members who earned the 2011-12 National Awards for the following: Publications - 1st Place Division: Division 7 Intercom, Editor: Dorothy Riley, Staff Officer-Publications; 1st Place Flotilla: Flotilla 79 Intercom, Editor: Dorothy Riley; Flotilla Staff OfficerPublications; Photography - 1st Place Public Affairs: George C. Papabeis, Flotilla 74; Photography - 1st Place Public Education: Albert Bidwick, Flotilla 86; Video - 1st Place, Judi Bidwick, Flotilla 86. Continued on page 9


Volume LVIII

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Winter 2012

Continued from page 8 The region’s Recreational Boating Safety programs have also flourished. Clearwater became the first city in Florida, and only the thirteenth in the nation, to be designated by the Commandant of the Coast Guard as a Coast Guard City. The Republican National Convention took place in Tampa during the week of August 26th. The large number of persons visiting the area, including delegates, protestors, demonstrators, media representatives, and commercial supporters – estimated to exceed sixty thousand people – made security the paramount concern throughout the Tampa Bay area. Maritime Security became the primary responsibility of the Coast Guard. Auxiliary support of the Coast Guard’s mission was the largest operation ever for the Auxiliary. Despite the arrival of Tropical Storm Isaac at the start of the Convention, Auxiliarists participated in over 70 surface patrols, involving 200 personnel and over 625 facility hours on the water, using 31 Auxiliary facilities from four divisions (Divisions 7, 8, 9 and 11) covering Tampa Bay, the Intracoastal Waterway on the Gulf, and search and rescue support of Coast Guard Stations St. Petersburg and Sand Key. Those divisions located in Tampa Bay provided operational facilities and land based facilities as well as personnel. Total operational and support hours exceeded 3,000. In return, the support that our divisions have received from the Commander of Sector St. Petersburg, Commander Coast Guard Air Station Clearwater, the Auxiliary Liaisons, stations and surface vessels, Commanding Officers and Officers-In-Charge, and all the Coast Guard personnel has been superb. Also, the Auxiliary Sector Coordinator, St. Petersburg, has been outstanding in his tireless effort as the Auxiliary representative to the Sector. In summary, our region West Flotilla members have responded to the challenges presented and, in the final analysis, they make the Auxiliary work.§

(Above) TAMPA, Fla.-- The start of the Republican National Convention on Aug. 26 was cancelled due to the threat of Hurricane Issac. When the convention and security patrols resumed on Aug. 27, 2012, it was to rough water with three and four foot seas. Bouncing on these waves for eight hours proved quite a challenge for our members. Photo by George Papabeis, FSO-PA Flotilla 74 Brandon, Fla. (Below) Gene Keller (right) and crewmember Tim Robinson, both from Flotilla 72 in St. Petersburg, Fla., patrol the Howard Frankland Bridge during the Republican National Convention held from Aug. 27-30, 2012. The security for the event was unprecedented and every bridge leading into Tampa was under watch 24 hours a day. Photo by Richard Risk, Flotilla 72 St. Petersburg

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District 7

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District Captain North Robert Weskerna, DCAPT-North District Chief of Staff(e) There are nice people and some that are our heroes. Occasionally, the two groups intersect. This is the case with both Auxiliary members Zoraida Sorrentino from Division 4 and Jim Ramsey from Division 12. Another feature shared by Zoraida (known as Zory) and Jim is their demonstrated volunteerism. Both took a part in Operation Deep Water Horizon in 2010 -the Gulf Oil Spill.

participating in this mission, including Zory, brought great credit to the Coast Guard and the Coast Guard Auxiliary. Her husband, Bill, says, “Zory becomes a perfectionist when it comes to Spanish,” and reminds us that she was a Spanish major at the University of Puerto Rico. Zory continues to help with translations through the present day. Thank you Zory, and all of the members of our Auxiliary Interpreter Corps – and thank you for your thirty-seven years of service with the Auxiliary.

Jim Ramsey, formerly a member of Flotilla 32 Ft. Lauderdale, is now a member of Flotilla 12-6 East Cooper, S.C. Jim is a good friend and a professional mariner, but his first love is radios (sorry Jean). Jim’s deployment as a volunteer with the Coast Guard for Deepwater Horizon began on July 30, 2010, Zory Sorrentino is Division 4’s goodwill ambassador and would last for four weeks. Jim became part of and the first person Jackie and I met while attending a a team of four Auxiliarists assigned to establish a Division 4 meeting in the fall of 2010. Her personality radio station in Gulfport, Mississippi. The clean-up is warm and friendly; she’s a people-person of the forces along the coast were consolidating, and the first magnitude. Zory is also a member of the Auxiliary team’s communications station was to become the Interpreter Corps, and while engaged in work during central station. In just one day, they were operational, the Gulf oil spill, Zory’s job was to translate press using the call sign “VTM Mississippi” (vessel traffic releases from English into Spanish. As we now know, management). Apparently, the decontamination the Interpreter Corps and all of our D7 volunteers vessels were stationed about ten to fifteen nautical miles offshore between Gulfport, Miss. and St. Joe, Florida. The radio system used was called Motobridge, and is made up of a series of high sites along the coast, which Jim says is very similar to Rescue 21, but with certain limitations. If you look carefully at the middle computer screen in the photo of Jim, you’ll notice a few red rectangles. The red boxes are the active radio highsites. Jim and his team controlled the sites from those boxes. The sites were activated as the boats they were guarding came within range of a particular tower, etc., just like Rescue 21. In the last week of his deployment, Jim’s team was relieved by Coastie replacements and four Auxiliarists. On Friday, August 28, Auxiliarists Jim Ramsey, Jim Clark, and Phillip Goodman drove to incident command post GULFPORT, Miss.-- Auxiliarist James C. Ramsey, Staff Officer– (ICP) Mobile and went through Communications Division 12, volunteered to be deployed to the the demobilization process before Gulf in 2010 for an extended tour. He is shown operating a radio for the Coast Guard. Photo by Phillip Goodman, Flotilla 13-1 Key Continued on page 10 West.


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Continued from page 11 flying home on Saturday, August 29. The fourth member of their team, Jim Woodell, extended his deployment and was assigned to a Coast Guard Team in Pensacola, Florida. I’d like to thank all the Deepwater Horizon volunteers, and in particular, my shipmates Zory Sorrentino and Jim Ramsey. I know that neither of you looked for special recognition for your efforts during that time of crisis, but you and all the other volunteers who go beyond what most of us consider usual and customary deserve a little daylight. You’re both special examples of America’s Volunteers. § CHARLESTON, S.C.—The sun sets on Charleston Harbor on July 4, 2012. An hour or so later, the harbor would be packed with approximately 6,000 citizens and their boats to watch the 2012 annual Fourth of July fireworks celebration. Also present are four Auxiliary vessels conducting safety patrols skippered by Ron Foreman and Bob Weskerna, both from Flotilla 12-6 East Cooper, S.C., and Joe Fleming and Richard Daniel, both from 12-8 Charleston, S.C. Photo by Ron Foreman, Flotilla 12-6.

PALM COAST, Fla.--Zoraida Sorrentino, Staff Officer-Secretary of Records Division 4, and Bill Sorrentino, Division 4 Commander, attend the annual 9/11 memorial ceremony in Palm Coast, Florida, in September, 2012. Present for the ceremony were active and retired members of the various armed services. Zoraida, as a member of the Coast Guard Auxiliary, represented the U.S. Coast Guard while Bill, a retired officer of the New York City Police Department Transit Bureau, was part of the Palm Coast Honor Guard and represented the local 10-13 Club chapter of retired New York City police officers. Bill Sorrentino continues to serve as a police officer with the Daytona Beach Police Department. Photo provided by Bill Sorrentino


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U. S. Coast Guard Auxiliary

District Captain-East

District 7

Breeze

Judith Hudson, DCAPT-East Divisions 1, 3, 5, 6, 13, & 16

It is a truly exciting time of the year – reflecting on our District Training Conference success, seeing new leaders elected, preparing for change, setting challenging goals for the future, and reviewing 2012 accomplishments. A renewed energy is in the air and it is infectious. Before we leave 2012, I would like to draw attention to those Division leaders who are moving into the -Immediate Past Division Commander position. In Division 1 (Puerto Rico), Angel Benero has had unforeseen health obstacles this year, so has not been able to accomplish as much as anticipated. He stepped into the Division Commander position when his predecessor resigned in mid-2011, so we thank him for being willing to take the reins and to serve in this capacity on short notice. Division 3 (Broward County) has had the good fortune to be led by Ed Duda for the past two years, benefiting from his skills in operations, teaching, watchstanding, organization, goal setting, reporting, and motivating. Division 3 won the D7 Commodore’s Cup (first place) this year for showing the most growth

and improvement in the Dashboard’s collective format of performance measures over the previous year. Ed uses his “spare time” to serve as Assistant District Staff Officer–Information Services for D7 and BC-UIA (Branch Chief for Users Information in AUXDATA) at the national level. He is also the lead instructor for the C School on AUXDATA, and a District AUXDATA Administrator. Gary Barth is another successful leader whose Division 5 (Palm Beach, Martin, St. Lucie & Okeechobee Counties) membership serves two Coast Guard Stations (Station Fort Pierce & Station Lake Worth Inlet). Division 5 is very active in surface operations, including a Personal Watercraft (PWC) contingent, Coast Guard operational support, public affairs, and Vessel Safety Exams (VSCs). They have added or have in process 50 new members this year. In addition to Division Commander (DCDR) responsibilities, Gary serves as Flotilla Staff OfficerPublications and Assistant District Staff OfficerPublications, and is often on the road teaching CPR & first aid. In the Florida Keys (Monroe Country), Jeff Bronsing has led Division 13 in a most capable manner for the past two years. The Division 13 members who serve Sector Key West have such a proven record that the Coast Guard has made the Auxiliary a complete partner. In addition to supplementing the “gold side” with active duty with patrols, the Coast Guard has implemented a new “shallow water program” under which the Auxiliary performs Search & Rescue (SAR) in areas where Coast Guard vessels cannot go, helps to instruct the public on preparations for emergency and pollution incidents, and participates in myriad fishing and marine events as public affairs professionals. Jeff also serves as Director’s Division Security Liaison -13. These Division Commanders have contributed significantly to their membership, their Coast Guard Sectors and Stations, and their communities. We are grateful for their past leadership, and that they are continuing to serve in new capacities. These five Divisions have elected new DCDRs who are well qualified to lead their members successfully through new and challenging opportunities.

Typical T-boat

Compliments to Division 16 (U.S. Virgin Islands) for embracing current technology in their efforts to improve participation and communication. They now hold many Continued on page 13


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Continued from page 12 meetings through web teleconferencing, with both audio and video available. By introducing this meeting method, they have reduced travel costs and commute time, and improved attendance, information and education opportunities. Obviously, they are improving mission participation also, as they already have logged almost 7,000 more hours this year than they did in all of 2011. When the Virgin Islands Marine Safety Detachment asked to have two Auxiliarists trained as Assistant T-Boat Inspectors, the St. Thomas flotilla volunteered. The Department hopes to have a trained Auxiliarist accompany a Coast Guard Inspector whenever s/ he inspects any of the 135 T-Boats in St. Thomas, effectively doubling the inspection workforce. Pictured (previous page) is a typical T-Boat. In Division 6 (Miami-Dade County), a partnership with the city of Hialeah enabled 97 children to attend Sea Partners programs at five different parks, over two days. Another 168 students graduated from the Division’s four About Boating Safely classes. Needless to say, both city officials and the Auxiliary are very pleased with these first year results and plan to continue this public education program. Also, a fourth Boating Skills & Seamanship class has started with an enrollment of almost 90 students at Terra Environmental Research Institute, where previous

classes graduated 80 to 90 students. All of these classes reflect the effort to take public education to the students on dates and at times the students prefer, rather than to restrict classes to a stationary location and schedule of the Auxiliary’s choosing. Division 6 also is continuing their very productive division recruiting, orientation and processing meetings located at Air Station Miami, in which all flotillas and the active duty Coast Guard participate. Attendees learn not only about Auxiliary history, structure, missions, and fellowship, but also about how much training is required, how long it takes to get vetted, how much volunteering will cost, and what uniforms new Auxiliarists will need. They also discuss what expectations prospective students should have of us, and what expectations we have of each member. Auxiliary members specifically communicate that we do not perform any missions or activities with legal implications, and that most members will not be cruising on Coast Guard cutters or flying Coast Guard fixed wing airplanes or helicopters. This realistic approach to recruiting has improved retention. As always, I am very impressed with all D7- East Divisions. Thank you for each and every contribution, and best wishes for safe and happy holidays! §

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla.-- While Recreational Boating Safety is serious business, sometimes it takes a touch of humor to attract the public’s attention. “BAT-CAT”, the newest addition to the D7 BAT-PAK trailer, was introduced in September at the D7 Training Conference by Bruce Wright, Recreational Boating Safety Specialist, United States Coast Guard, and Stacey Wright, his wife and member of USCG Auxiliary Flotilla 6-11 Miami. Photo by Barbara Burchfield, Flotilla 12-6 East Cooper, S.C.


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U. S. Coast Guard Auxiliary

District 7

Breaking Barriers:

Breeze

The Auxiliary International Outreach Team in Action By Irwin Fried, Flotilla Staff Officer-Public Affairs, Flotilla 54 Delray-Boynton Beach, Florida D7

MIAMI-BOYNTON BEACH-TAMPA Fla.--A phone call awakened Auxiliarist Rinalisa Czerwinski around midnight on July 14, 2012. As a member of the International Outreach team (Formerly International Affairs) and the Interpreter Corps, she was not new to life and death situations that would startle the average person. Below is the story in her own words. On Friday night, July 13, 2012, at around 11:45 PM, I heard my phone ring. The incoming phone number was not on my contact list; Rinalisa Czerwinski (staff photo) however, the number looked familiar—it was US Coast Guard Sector Miami, needing my help to manage an emergency translation from Polish into English. A sailor had suffered a stroke on a 500-ft commercial ship at sea near the port of Tampa, on its way from Poland to Amuay Bay in Venezuela. The US Coast Guard Sector Miami took their S.O.S. When Sector Miami learned that no one on board spoke English, they established four-way phone call between themselves, the Captain of the vessel Aurora, a medical team at Tampa General Hospital, and me. While the Flight Crew and the Medical Team made ready to fly out to the ship, I translated an exchange of information between the parties. The doctor in Miami wanted as much information about the patient as possible – his medical history (his age, what medication the patient was currently taking, etc.) and the current condition (when it happened, how it happened, any pain, etc.). The Captain reported that the patient was their Chief Engineer Leslaw Tokarski, 55 years old. He had been discovered by another crew member lying on the deck floor around 23:10, not moving and not breathing. When the ship’s 2nd officer performed CPR, the patient revived and regained consciousness; he was talking and moving but complained about atrocious pain to his chest, running from his toes up to his forehead. The patient had no related medical history; fortunately, he had been taking aspirin for muscle pains. No one knew what time the patient had fallen to the floor. For their part, Sector Miami wanted to know the safest place on the ship’s deck to drop a rescue basket from their helicopter to pick up the patient. The Captain suggested the stern, on the port side, where the deck was clear. The ship was anchored at the time; the captain hoped to resume his voyage around 08:30 local time the next morning, and continue to his original destination. As the Coast Guard flight crew reached the Aurora, its captain offered to have his crew to shine their spotlights on the deck to help the flight crew find the ship and the proposed landing basket spot, but Sector Miami declined the request, since the flight crew wears their night vision goggles and would have no problem finding the ship and the proposed drop spot. Sector Miami relayed instructions to the captain, which I continued interpreting, to stay on radio channel 22A, to bring the patient and his documents to the proposed deck area, and to let us know when his crew spotted the helicopter. Within 30 minutes, the ship captain spotted the helicopter, and I informed Sector Miami that their helicopter was on site. The helicopter dropped their rescue basket, the crew helped their chief engineer inside, and the USCG team flew the patient back to Tampa General Hospital in Tampa, Fla. Then Sector Miami disconnected our Continued on 15


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Continued from 14 conference call, and turned the rest over to the flight crew, the medial team and the General Hospital team. The entire operation lasted around two hours and ended with another sea patient’s life saved by the US Coast Guard Team. The Captain and his crew were effusive in thanking us for all the help that they received from everyone at Team Coast Guard. I translated many, many repetitions of “Thank you ALL so much for all your prompt and efficient help... We just don’t know how to say Thank You All for what you’ve done for us here….”§ Thanks also go to Auxiliarist translator Rina Czerwinski for being, literally, on call that night – and always. Rina Czerwinski is a member of Flotilla 54 Delray-Boynton Beach, Fla., District 7. In addition to being a qualified member of the Interpreter Corps, she is a certified boat crew member, CPR Provider, and Vessel Examiner. Rina is also Division 5’s Staff Officer –Communication Services and Flotilla 54’s Flotilla Staff OfficerCommunication Services .

Auxiliary Assists in VOSS Deployment Training

TAMPA BAY—Members of Division 7 supported the Coast Guard during an exercise which trained active duty from Sector St. Petersburg in the deployment of the ‘Vessel of Opportunity Skimming System’ (VOSS). The VOSS equipment consists of one 42-foot sectional aluminum outrigger with 100-feet of containment boom, one diesel hydraulic prime mover, and one DESMI 250 weir skimmer. CAPT Sheryl Dickinson, Commander Sector St. Petersburg, watched the exercise from aboard Miss Marla, an Auxiliary vessel from Flotilla 72 St. Petersburg. From left are Flotilla 72 members Nathan Hall, crew; Rick Short, coxswain; and CAPT Dickinson. Photo by Loren D. Reuter, Flotilla 72 Staff Officer-Public Affairs


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U. S. Coast Guard Auxiliary

District 7

Breeze

Coast Guard Auxiliary Assists in Providing SecurityDuring Republican National Convention

Tama Convention Center at dusk. Photo by D. Riley

By Tom Loughlin, Staff Officer-Public Affairs, Division 11 The moment the Republican National Committee chose Tampa, Florida, as the site for its 2012 national convention, a series of events was put into motion – starting with planning and preparations by both private and governmental agencies. One of the most important elements was planning security for the convention center itself, and the tens of thousands of delegates, reporters, and members of the general public who would be attending. Because the convention center is surrounded by water, planning for marine safety was of critical importance. Responsibility for all marine security was assigned to Captain Sheryl Dickinson, Commander, Sector St. Petersburg. She immediately coordinated with key personnel from multiple law enforcement agencies throughout the Tampa Bay area and formed task groups to provide marine security. Her concerns included not only the channels surrounding the convention center, but also the multiple bridges and waterways leading to downtown Tampa and the convention center area. The delegates were staying in over a dozen hotels in several locations, some as far as 60 miles away and some on the many barrier islands in the Tampa Bay area. This required the delegates to rely on approximately 150 buses daily to traverse the many bridges and causeways as they traveled to and from the convention. One of the primary agencies that CAPT. Dickinson called upon was the Coast Guard Auxiliary. She turned to Don Hoge, Auxiliary Sector Coordinator, to be the senior liaison between her and the Auxiliary. Hoge had already proven his capabilities through numerous endeavors, including his assistance in coordinating Coast Guard air support for the Haiti earthquake relief efforts in 2010. Her assignment to him in this venture— provide 24-7 observation of the causeway between Tampa and St. Petersburg, the two bay bridges, and the five intracoastal bridges that delegates would travel over daily. Station Sand Key would oversee securing the approximately 30 miles of Intracoastal waterways leading to the Port of Tampa, while Sector St. Petersburg Continued on page 16


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Winter 2012

Continued from page 16 was charged with providing command and communications from the USCG Cutter Hawk for the approximately 30 miles of the Tampa Bay area. This mission spanned the entire period of the convention---August 25th through August 31st. Hoge formed an operational group within the Auxiliary and began planning. This planning continued until final orders from the Republican National Convention (RNC) fully materialized, in early 2012. Although by then, Hoge already had a base plan, now the planning went into high gear. Within a week, all patrol vessels, coxswains and crew were selected and given their assignments.. Hoge selected Dudley Davis, District 7 Operations Officer, as the RNC Auxiliary Project Officer. The two of them coordinated with the three local Auxiliary divisions (7, 8 and 11) to select a Project Officer from each of the three divisions supporting this event. They selected Rick Short (Division 7), Toni Borman (Division 8) and Bill Clark (Division 11). A Logistics Officer was also needed to ensure food, water and a rest area were available for the volunteers, and they selected Heleyde Aponte, Flotilla Commander of Flotilla 79. Assisting Short from District 7 was Dave Perillo, who had the monumental task of creating a spreadsheet to keep track of the over two hundred Auxiliary volunteers and the 114 patrols.

TAMPA, Fla.--Members from three divisions (7, 8, and 11) meet on the evening of Aug. 18 at Flotilla 79 where they are briefed by LTJG Mike Roberts, Enforcement Division, USCG Sector St. Petersburg and by other members of the Coast Guard on all of the details of their involvement during the Republican National Convention. Photo by D. Riley

Program Visitors from Divisions 7 and 11 also assisted by distributing hundreds of brochures, leaflets and posters to over 138 locations in the Tampa Bay and Pinellas County area. Rick Short observed that he “had the privilege of working with a host of personnel who made this project a huge success story. As far as I know, the scope and complexity of this project is unprecedented as to US Coast Guard Auxiliary contribution and support. This project was successful due to the tremendous dedication and commitment of our District leadership, regional Division leaders and, most importantly, the individual members.�

TAMPA, Fla.--Michael Shea, Division 7 Commander, stops to check the weather on the television set up inside Flotilla 79. The flotilla provided logistical support to Auxiliary and law enforcement boat crews participating in the 2012 Republican National Convention security detail. Photo by D. Riley Continued on page 18


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U. S. Coast Guard Auxiliary

District 7

Breeze

Continued from page 17 And then “Murphy’s Law” showed its face when Hurricane Isaac entered the Gulf of Mexico and headed toward Tampa. High winds and seas required a temporary suspension of activities from August 26 to 28, although the Auxiliary did provide surveillance of the bridges in the protected waters of the Intracoastal Waterway on August 27. Hurricane Isaac also required that both the USCG cutter Hawk and the boats of Station Sand Key be repositioned out of the area. Suddenly without any communication platforms, Hoge deftly moved his entire command and control headquarters to the Sector St. Petersburg communications center and seamlessly continued uninterrupted command and control. So smooth was this transition that very few volunteers hearing the call sign “Hawk” realized that they were actually talking with the communication center at Sector St. Petersburg. Making this even more notable is the fact that the personnel now involved at the new communications section were never in on any of the prior planning, and some, newly assigned to the area, had no knowledge of the bridges and waterways. However, in true Coast Guard fashion, they made it all work flawlessly.

TAMPA, Fla.--In the early dawn hours, an Auxiliary vessel from Division 8 prepares for a long day on the water. The ramp was busy throughout the event, with boats arriving and leaving the dock during both the day and night, as crews came to Flotilla 79 to cool off in the air conditioning or replenish their food and water supplies. Photo by D. Riley

The crews of the widely scattered Auxiliary boats were never without food, water or relief thanks to a well coordinated logistics plan. TAMPA, Fla.-- Gene Keller and Richard Risk, members of Flotilla Flotilla 79 is situated on a public 72 St. Petersburg, watch a boat in the Tampa basin while on patrol aboard Love @ 1st Site during the Republican National Convention ramp located in an inlet to Tampa August 27-30 in Tampa, Fla. Photo by George Papabeis, FSO-PA, Bay. The flotilla maintained a Flotilla 74 Brandon 24/7 posture during the entire Convention with a revolving roster of over 100 Auxiliarists. These volunteers ensured that Auxiliary boats left at the ramp overnight were secure, and they maintained a constant presence on the boat ramps to assist the incoming and departing law Continued on page 18


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Continued from page 18 enforcement and Auxiliary patrol boats. Logistics volunteers ensured that the breakfast, lunch and dinner meals, along with over 1,000 bottles of water, were picked up and delivered by Relief Boats to the boat crews on patrol. Flotilla 79 also provided cots and a sleeping area for the tired volunteers during their offduty rest. Over 200 Auxiliarists participated in what is believed to be the largest and most complex operation ever involving the Auxiliary. They completed 73 patrols, totaling 626 under-way hours, during the 5-day operation. This unprecedented, unwavering Auxiliary support of the Coast Guard was recognized by CAPT. Dickenson, with appreciation for the cooperation, flexibility, and perseverance of all members in the face of long hours and adverse weather conditions. Captain Sheryl Dickensonson says it best in her “BZ for RNC Efforts” letter to the Divisions. She says, “I have come to the realization as I reflect on the RNC maritime efforts: there simply isn’t anything that Sector St. Petersburg auxiliarists won’t do to support the Coast Guard mission. Please allow me to express my gratitude for all of your efforts and leadership as we prepared for and attended to every detail for the largest National Special Security Event with a maritime nexus. The numbers were staggering, the hours put in are incredible, and the dedication is unmatched.” Captain Dickenson ends her letter by saying, “I am humbled to be your Sector Commander; you inspire me every day. Keep up the great work – the next event is right around the corner….Semper paratus.” §

TAMPA, Fla.-- (Top) A member of the Coast Guard Public Affairs Office photographs a portable decontamination unit set up at Davis Island, inside the Tampa basin. The Coast Guard Auxiliary ferried food and water three times a day to the Coast Guard and law enforcement agencies operating on the island. (Below) Auxiliary crew members were able to obtain free parking at the Gandy boat ramp in Tampa thanks to sign boards that they could display inside their vehicles on the dashboard. Because other law enforcement agencies like the Federal Bureau of Investigations parked their vehicles and boats at the Gandy ramp, the parking lot was patrolled at least once an hour during the Republican National Convention. Photos by Darren Hart, FSO-SR Flotilla 79 Tampa


20

U. S. Coast Guard Auxiliary

Auxiliary Assists With U.S. Army Parachute Jumps on Lake Murray Photo journal by James Andrews, Flotilla 12-12 Edisto, S.C.

LAKE MURRAY, S.C. — On September 6, 2012, members of Division 12 in South Carolina assisted the U.S. Army 360th Civil Affairs Brigade (Airborne) in conducting training jumps on Lake Murray. The annual jumps are a great example of inter-agency support and cooperation. Pictured above is the Army support crew arriving for the day’s excercise. Mid-page right is one of the jumpers in the water waiting to be picked up by an Auxiliary vessel. Right: An Auxiliary vessel from Flotilla 12-8 Charleston with Paul Berka and Steve Pstrak unload the U.S. Army paratroopers and their equipment at the dock. On the dock is Perry Moses, Flotilla 12-1 The Inland Sea, Lake Marion.

District 7

Breeze


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Issue 3

Above: A Coast Guard 25-foot Response BoatSmall stops by to watch and assist with providing a safety zone during the U.S. Army 360th Civil Affairs Brigade (Airborne) training jumps on Lake Murray. Behind them is Master Chief. (Crew listed on bottom right.) Top right: Operational facility Dreamer with Ron Foreman, coxswain, and Walter Runck, boat crew, both from Flotilla 12-6 East Cooper, S.C. Be Moore and James Andrews, Flotilla 12-12 Edisto Island ferry one of the jumpers. Auxiliary vessels converge with a Coast Guard 25-foot Response Boat to firm up their duties and stations. Bottom right: Master Chief with COMO Jay Dahlgren, coxswain, Flotilla 12-1 Lake Marion, and Ann Graham, Flotilla 12-6 East Cooper. On the dock is Walter Runck, Flotilla 12-6 East Cooper. Below: Jumpers exit the C-130 Hercules.

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U. S. Coast Guard Auxiliary

District 7

Breeze

Prevention Department Dave Fuller, DDC-P

The District 7 Training Conference in St. Petersburg was held September 20-23, 2012. Many members took advantage of the wide-ranging Member Training opportunities offered at the Conference. In addition to the training opportunities offered, the District Board elected the 2013 EXCOM (Executive Committee). I am humbled and honored to have been elected to the office of District Captain-North for 2013. Although my successor as Chief of Prevention has not been selected, as of this writing, I will work closely with my successor to ensure a smooth transition for 2013 in the Prevention Department. At the Conference, Commodore-elect John Tyson introduced the 2013-2016 District 7 Strategic Plan. This document lays out the District’s vision, priorities, and goals and strategies for the coming year. The number one priority of the plan is to Increase Effectiveness in Recreational Boating Safety Missions, which is the very heart of the Prevention Department. Our goal in implementing this phase of the plan is to reduce boating accidents and resulting fatalities by 2 percent per year—a realistic and achievable goal. The District’s number two priority is Leadership Development and Use of Exemplary Practices. Therefore, there will be many leadership training opportunities offered during 2013. The two remaining priorities of the plan are Grow the District’s Ready Volunteer Force and Joint Planning and Mission Development with the Coast Guard. Every District 7 Auxiliarist should know that we have a Strategic Plan, and should, therefore, know our priorities for 2013. Please use every opportunity to talk about the plan with other members. It will be difficult to successfully implement the plan unless every member is aware of it and understands how their contributions of time and talent contribute to achieving the goals.

Dashboards: Once we set our goals, we need a way to measure our progress. Therefore, in 2012, we implemented the Dashboard. Successful organizations like ours constantly measure their performance, and alter course as required. The Dashboards give us a quick snapshot of how we are doing versus the same quarter a year ago. It measures us against ourselves and helps us evaluate

whether and where to shift our focus. Four of the six areas measured in the Dashboards involve the Prevention area of responsibility. A review of the latest Dashboard results for the District suggests that it’s time to ask ourselves some tough questions. Please visit the website at http://www.uscga-district-7. org/index.html to look at the Dashboards for your individual Divisions and Flotillas. Once at this page, click on “Member Information” and then “District Dashboards.” My review of our individual Flotilla Dashboards quickly reveals Flotillas that are active and vibrant in the areas tracked by the Dashboard, while others stand out as relatively inactive. Although I do not pass judgment based solely on the numbers, I do use the Dashboard as a tool to show me where to look and what questions to ask. Some questions immediately come to mind: 1. Is this timely information? Was the activity reported and captured in AUXDATA in a timely manner? Remember that if an activity occurred, but was not reported in AUXDATA, then, for measurement purposes, it did not happen. 2. Is this information accurate? From time to time, a flotilla officer should look at the AUXINFO quick reports at http://cgaux7.org/auxinfo/. Occasionally, members report activity incorrectly, under the wrong classification/activity code, or make errors during data entry. Review quick reports regularly and question the things that don’t look right. 3. Once we have the information on this “report card,” what are we going to do with it? My recommendation is to share it with all members and ask how we can improve our next quarter reports. The very best ideas come from our members – not the leaders. Also, share your successes up the Chain of Leadership with your Elected and Appointed Officers, since other Flotillas can benefit from your ideas! You will likely have other, more specific questions to ask about your division or flotilla. Some of your questions should come from your members, not just the leaders. As a member or a leader, do you need to become a “cheerleader,” a “mentor,” a “coach,” or something else? The truth is that one solution does not fit every problem, and we need to wear different hats in different situations to improve performance. The overall desired outcome is continuous improvement. As an information tool, the Dashboard will help members focus attention on those areas that most need improvement, and will recognize a job well Continued on page 23


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Continued from page 22 done. Don’t forget that awards for performance can be initiated by any Auxiliarist at any time of the year – not just the end of the year at your Change of Watch. Use the Dashboard to give recognition and thanks for a job well done whenever appropriate. It has been a distinct privilege and high honor for me to have served you during 2012 as the District 7

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Chief of Prevention. Looking forward to 2013, I am enthusiastic about my new duties with the challenges and responsibilities of my new office. I anticipate meeting many Auxiliarists whom I have not previously met, and renewing relationships with many others with whom I’ve worked in the past. §

Vessel Safety Checks: Coast Guard Officer Sets Example For Boaters in U.S. Virgin Islands By Robert A. Fabich, Sr., Christiansted St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands TEAGUE BAY, ST. CROIX. – The Christiansted Coast Guard Auxiliary launched their Fall Vessel Safety Check program for returning seasonal recreational boaters at St. Croix Yacht Club Saturday, September 15, 2012. Lt. Roger Bogert, Commander, USCG Regional Inspection Office St. Croix, was the first boat owner to get the free courtesy check verifying the presence and condition of specific safety equipment required by Federal, state and local regulations. “Being a Coast Guard active duty Officer does not relieve me of responsibilities for operating my personal boat safely,” explained Bogert. “I am having this Vessel Safety Check to ensure my boat meets the regulations and to relay the Coast Guard message that Safe Boats Save Lives.”§

TEAGUE BAY, ST. CROIX – Top: Coast Guard Auxiliary Vessel Examiner Duane Minton conducts a Vessel Safety Check on Lt. Roger Bogert’s personal boat. Bottom right: Lt. Roger Bogert inserts the stern navigation light to be tested during the Vessel Safety Check. Bottom left: Flotilla 16-1 Christiansted member Paul Lordi reviews the Vessel Safety Check handbook with boat owners at the St. Croix Yacht Club September 15, 2012. Photos by Robert A. Fabich, Sr.


24

U. S. Coast Guard Auxiliary

Logistics Department

District 7

Breeze

James Dennen, DDC-L

Taking the Challenge:

Atlantic Search and Rescue (ASAR) Competition 2012 New London, Connecticut

By Constance Irvin, District 7 Staff Officer- Public Affairs This issue’s “Guest Author” The road from Fort Myers, Florida, to the ASAR competition in New London, Connecticut, was long and not without the proverbial question, “Are we there yet?” But we made it and wouldn’t have changed a thing, except maybe who captured the trophy. This adventure began in the latter part of April, when Donna Stull, team captain, from Flotilla 9-10, called and asked if I would be willing to be a part of a team practicing to represent District 7 in the Coast Guard Auxiliary’s premier search and rescue competition. Of course, the obvious question was, “How much time is involved in preparing?”

to properly “spit and polish” our boots and splice line, while John Ghougasian (98) grilled us on navigational charts. The Coast Guard also got involved. Our local Coast Guard Station at Fort Myers Beach let us use their P-6 dewatering device. We struggled through the heat of May, June and July as we practiced successfully starting the engine and pumping water, in times that swung from 29 seconds to a minute and a half. We even soaked one another on numerous occasions— not intentionally, of course. Well, maybe.

However, we took our biggest soakings from our I don’t recall what Donna attempts to stop the flow said, but I agreed, and, of water that erupted, at over the course of the 300psi, from the Damage next three months, the Control Trailer that Sector four-member, all-woman St. Pete sent down to team met – initially for Station Fort Myers Beach. two full days a week, but The stream of water is soon extended the training supposed to replicate a to three, and then four hole in a boat, and our days a week. Donna and I challenge was to stop came from the same flotilla that flow. The trailer has (9-10), while the others, pipes into which holes Jeanne LaFrantz and Mary have been strategically Kennedy (backup), came cut, so that, when the from 98. We traveled water valves are opened, about 30 to 40 miles each water simply gushes practice day to get to our Connie Irvin (l), Jeanne LaFrantz (c) and Donna designated practice events. Stull (r) prepare P6 dewatering pump. Photo by out from various spots. Unfortunately, the station Mary Kennedy There were times when I had only a fire hydrant to wondered – and I am sure hook up those pipes into, the others also did – what we had gotten ourselves and that pushed more water than usual. Although into. The list of events for the competition covers all personnel at the station had never worked with the aspects of surface Auxiliary missions. We spliced Trailer, they did try to help us by offering suggestions. line, heaved towing lines and life rings, practiced Unfortunately for us, their suggestions didn’t help charting rescue missions, studied navigational aids, much. Rather, I’m sure we gave the Active Duty many and responded as bells and gongs and horns went hours of smiles. We were constantly wet. off. We were taught by Dave McDonough (9-10) how Continued on page 25


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Continued from page 24 Although we had been told that our team’s first competition would come at the end of June, to determine who would represent District 7, that didn’t happen. The other two teams from D7 dropped out, so we knew early on that we would be going to the ASAR Competition to represent our district. Although we were disappointed that we didn’t have the chance to hone our skills by competing against others in our District, we kept practicing.

other teams were quicker. We did capture a First in the Mystery Event, which covered medical situations that might happen during a Search and Rescue.

Finally, on July 20th, we boarded our flight to New London, Connecticut.

Yes, it would have been nice to say that we won the contest, but we didn’t. However, we did prove two things: You have to stick to your commitments to achieve anything, and you can look at every outcome as a positive learning experience.

We arrived in New London on Thursday, one day before the events were scheduled to begin, and checked into our Hilton accommodations. We learned that we would face four other teams: Districts 1 (North and South) and Districts 5 (North and South). On Friday, all teams were asked to move into dorm rooms at the University of Connecticut, in order not to give any advantage to any team. Not only were those dorm rooms sparse, but they had no air-conditioning – and it was hot. Because a District 1 team refused to stay in those rooms and was disqualified immediately, we determined that we would accept the challenge and stay through the night. It was anything but pleasant, but we did it.

We were cheered on by both D7 Commodore Walter Jaskiewicz and IPDC Don Frasch. Members Barb Szyamanski and Dorothy Kurtz, a former SPAR (WWII 1943-46), from flotilla 92 and Fernando Licopoli (9-10) also made the trip to New London to support us.

We made new friends in our effort, and the bond that the team developed over those three and a half months of training will not be broken. In addition, we had tremendous help from both active Coast Guard and fellow Auxilarists in preparing for this event. The only way that we can repay their dedication is by helping future District 7 teams to compete in Search and Rescue competitions. It is an experience of a lifetime. We hope others will make the commitment and take the challenge. §

Arriving on the campus of the Coast Guard Academy was a heartening experience. Witnessing the dedication of the new recruits as they sprinted by on early morning training was inspiring. The Campus, seated by the Thames River, is beautiful, but we didn’t have much time to enjoy it. The next day’s competition was fierce. Although we finished all events and got credit for doing so, the

New London, Conn.--Team members pause for photo. From left: COMO Walter Jaskiewicz, Jeanne LaFrantz, Connie Irvin, Donna Stull and Mary Kennedy. Photo by: Barb Szymanski Jeanne LaFrantz studies her Marlin Spike efforts at braiding line. Photo by Mary Kennedy


The Great Portage Race

Auxiliary provides Safety Zone for Sea Cadets on Lake Murray Photos by Barbara Burchfield, Flotilla 12-6 East Cooper, S.C.

LAKE MURRAY, S.C.--Twenty Naval Sea Cadets from Charleston and Columbia assembled at Dreher Island State Park to compete in the 2012 Lake Murray Great Portage Race, sponsored by the Navy League and local sponsors. The course had four land portages and three waterborne paddle sections, testing the knowledge and canoe skills of the Cadets. Their ages ranged from 10 to 18 years old, with an equally wide range of ability. For some cadets, it was their first time navigating the course. Two U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary vessels supported the event by providing both a marine safety zone and communications with Race Control. USCG Sector Charleston provided Radio Communications Guard for the Auxiliary vessels. As there were no other sponsor vessels, the Auxiliary also assisted in locating, identifying, and tracking the cadets and by providing course location sites to the cadets when needed. Festus Burchfield, lead coxswain, attended the advance GPR teleconferences to prepare his crew for race day. The Auxiliarists who supported this event came from five flotillas, three divisions, and two districts.ยง


Volume LVIII

Above: Auxiliary vessel Master Chief, with Jay Dahlgren, coxswain, Flotilla 12-1 Lake Marion, S.C., George Jeandheur, coxswain/crew, Flotilla 26-8 Lake Wylie, N.C. (District 054), and William Hayes, Flotilla 12-1 Lake Marion, crew. Right: Sea Cadets paddle along the course. Below: Auxiliary vessel Voyager with Festus H. Burchfield, lead coxswain, Barbara Burchfield, crew, both from Flotilla 12-6 East Cooper, S.C., and Frank Ciampa, crew, Flotilla 21 Augusta, Ga. Photos by Barbara Burchfield

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U. S. Coast Guard Auxiliary

District 7

Breeze

An Eagle Soars...

By Judith L. Hudson, DCAPT-E, District 7 Photos by Vickie Aponte MIAMI--On 20 May, 2012, event photographer Vickie Aponte (Flotilla Staff Officer–Materials, Miami) and I left a decidedly overcast day – with its large, threatening, rain clouds – outside to enter an elementary school in South Miami-Dade County. Inside, we joined a sunny, bright, and truly happy celebration: we had been invited to participate in an Eagle Scout Court of Honor . Programs on an entry doorway table featured pictures of the boys from Troop 811 and a history of the path that Scout Carlos Anthony Lopez had taken to get to this day, a list of the 31 merit badges he had earned (only 21 badges are required to attain the Eagle rank), a statement of his community service project, his scouting leadership history and his scouting accomplishments. Among others, Carlos had earned badges in canoeing, first aid, aviation, swimming, and physical fitness….all areas where Auxiliarists often have skills and certifications. After introductions by, among others, his proud Mom, Carlos appeared to introduce himself, answer our questions about his more than five years in the Boy Scouts of America, and welcome us to his special day. As the program progressed, it was apparent that all of the approximately one hundred family members and guests had the highest regard for this humble, intelligent, personable, and confident young man. His Scout Leaders presented over a dozen congratulatory letters, including ones from President Obama, Secretary of State Clinton, Florida Governor Scott, Florida’s U. S. Senators and Representatives, and others. When I was introduced to present the letter from our Auxiliary National Commodore, James Vass, I felt it was a distinct privilege to emphasize the commonalities that the Boy Scouts and the Auxiliary share. As most Continued on page 29


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Continued from page 28 of you know, the Boy Scout motto is Be Prepared and the Coast Guard motto is Semper Paratus – Always Ready. The Boy Scout Law states, “A boy scout is trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean and reverent.” The Coast Guard Auxiliary’s Code of Ethics reminds us to be honest, have integrity, honor commitment, be loyal, exhibit fairness, show compassion, display respect, perform our duty, pursue excellence, and be accountable. Also, both organizations use the eagle to inspire us, and to symbolize achievement. It makes perfect sense that our two groups have a Memorandum of Agreement to share data and information, support each other’s activities and events, and share in public outreach and educational activities. Who is Carlos Lopez? He was raised in a home where the family did a lot of things together, including working in the yard from the time he was in the second grade. So, when he needed an Eagle Scout Service Project to attain Eagle Scout rank, he chose a landscaping project. After looking for an appropriate site for some time, he remembered the elementary school that he had attended when he was younger – the very one where his Eagle Court of Honor was now being held. He designed his project; approached the school principal; got his permission; and presented his concept, with drawings, estimate of costs, and all the details of the beautification idea to the local Scout Council and to the leaders of Troop 811 for their approval. Next came fundraising – selling chocolates, having a car wash, and obtaining donors, including Home Depot and several individuals. Once he had collected enough money, he bought all the materials needed and, on a spring day, he gathered about 30 scouts, parents, and friends to help execute the plan. They spent the morning getting everything planted, fertilized, and watered. After several months of dedication and persistence, everyone could see the finished product, and Carlos could take pride in knowing that he created and executed a plan that will be a source of community pride for many years to come. Thomas Edison said, “If we did all the things we are capable of doing, we would literally astound ourselves.” Carlos’ scout leaders, fellow scouts, friends, neighbors, and family were not astounded at what he did, because they knew he could do it. However they were all very proud that he acted on something that he was capable of doing. So, congratulations to Carlos! At that point, I read the letter from the Commodore and presented it to Carlos, to much applause. Many in attendance expressed appreciation that Vickie and I had attended, and we shared a most delightful time commemorating that this new eagle has been soaring for some time.§

Upon achieving the rank of Eagle Scout, Judith Hudson presented Boy Scout Carlos Anthony Lopez a congratulatory letter signed by Coast Guard Auxiliary National Commodore James Vass.


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U. S. Coast Guard Auxiliary

District 7

Breeze

New Teaching Aid for Water Wise Program Photos and story by Doug Johnson

Every project starts with an idea and this project is no exception. For 16 years, Flotilla 95 Marco Island has participated in the Water Wise Program in conjunction with their local YMCA. Every year, the flotilla educates approximately 250 third grade students from Tommy Barfield and Manatee schools. They instruct these children on boating safety, including the importance of wearing a life jacket. They also demonstrate how to make emergency calls on a marine radio using an old VHF radio. This year, Doug Johnson had an idea to make the teaching aids a little more realistic—a small, used steering console on which they could mount a VHF radio and other instruments would make a more effective teaching aid. After many false starts, Johnson was able to find a manufacturer of steering consoles (C&M Marine Products) that would sell the flotilla a small, flats boat steering console way below their cost. With the steering console in place, the team began to gather the other parts they would need. Adriaan terMeulen obtained a steering wheel, throttle and some gauges through the generosity of Intercoastal Marine; Larry Oswald donated a VHF radio; Roger Blau donated some switches and a compass; and Adriaan terMeulen found the other parts needed in his box of used marine parts. With all the parts in hand, terMeulen designed a template to position all of the parts correctly, with the exact dimensions for openings needed to install the parts. Now the real work began, as terMeulen rebuilt many of the parts to fit the console and drilled all of the necessary holes. When installation of all parts was complete, the entire project had taken approximately six weeks from start to finish. The new teaching aid is now located in the flotilla station in Caxambas Park, where it makes a big hit with local students.§

Adriaan terMeulen prepares the openings in the console. The finished product is shown below.


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2012 District 7 Training Conference

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla.--The District 7 leadership stands at attention as the colors are presented at the District 7 Training Conference. From left are CAPT Martin Malloy, Chief of Prevention District 7 USCG; Capt. Richard Moore, Florida Wildlife Commission, CAPT Richard Kenin, Chief of Staff, District 7 USCG; Command Master Chief Lou Kitchin, District 7 USCG; RADM William Baumgartner, Commander District 7 USCG; COMO Walter Jaskiewicz, District 7 USCG Auxiliary; COMO Don Frasch, Immediate Past District Commodore, Deputy National Commodore–Recreational Boating Safety, USCG Auxiliary; John Tyson, District 7 Chief of Staff–District Commodre (e); Judith Hudson, District Captain-East District 7; and Robert Weskerna, District Captain-North / District 7 Chief of Staff (e) in front of the USCG Color Guard from Sector St. Petersburg. Photo by Dottie Riley

Virtual Attendance Jim Dennen, District 7 Logistics Department Chief, attended the District 7 annual business meeting virtually - via the internet and a WiFi connection. Angela Pomaro, District Staff Officer-Human Resources, holds up her iPad to allow Dennen to see his other staff members. Connie Irvin, District Staff OfficerPublc Affairs, and Dennen are seen waving to each other. Later during the same meeting, Dennen was ‘virtually’ presented an award by COMO Jaskiewicz. Photo by Dottie Riley


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E R A

District 7

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AVING FUN H E W Y

ET ?

Karen Miller, Staff Officer-Publications Division 11, fills her plate with salad at the Commodore’s Reception held on Sep. 20, 2012, at Sector St. Petersburg. The food was prepared and served by graduates of the District 7 Auxiliary Chef program. Photo by Dottie Riley

Left: The members from Puerto Rico and Miami always have a great time when they get together. A surprise visitor, Diana Figueroa (front right), former District Captain East, joined them at the Commodore’s Reception. Right: RADM William Baumgartner poses with Stacey Wright, Flotilla 6-11 Miami, and the BAT-CAT, wearing its tiny life jacket. Photos by Vickie Aponte, Flotilla 6-11 Miami


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How about now?

Above: The members of the D7 2012 Coast Guard SAR competition are honored at the District 7 Training Conference in St. Petersburg. From left are Don Frasch, Immediate Past District Commodore, Mary Kennedy, Constance Irvin, COMO Walter Jaskiewicz, Donna Stull, and Jeanne LaFrantz. On the podium behind them is COMO John Tyson, District 7 Commodore (e). Right: John Tyson, newly elected District 7 Commodore, is frocked by RADM William Baumgartner, Commander Seventh District Coast Guard, and COMO Walter Jaskiewicz, District 7 Auxiliary, on Sept. 21, at the District Training Conference in St Petersburg. Bottom right: Robert Weskerna, newly elected District 7 Chief of Staff is frocked by John Tyson and Weskerna’s wife, Jacqueline. Photos by Vickie Aponte

Left: Gary Barth, Division 5 Commander, and Terry Barth, District Staff OfficerMaterials, at the Friday night formal dinner. Both members log hundreds of hours every year teaching First Aid and CPR for the Coast Guard as well as the Auxiliary. Photo by Dottie Riley


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g n i f v u a n h ! e r ’ we U. S. Coast Guard Auxiliary

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District 7

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Rock ‘n Roll

Top: Olga E. Pagan, Flotilla 1-10 Puerto Rico, at the Commodore’s Banquet on Sept. 21, 2012, in St. Petersburg. Midpage: Mariano Velasquez, Flotilla 13 Puerto Rico, also at the Commodore’s Banquet on Sept. 21, in St. Petersburg. Bottom right: Richard and Gwen Leys, Flotilla 34 Pompano Beach, Fla., in a playful mood at the Saturday “Fun Night” event at the District 7 Training Conference. The theme was ‘Rock ‘n Roll’. Bottom left: Wilson and Diane Riggan from Flotilla 59 Stuart, Fla., arrive dressed to rock ‘n roll the night away. All photos this page by Vickie Aponte


Volume LVIII

Issue 3

Winter 2012

The District 7 virtual library is an effort to archive and make available the vast amount of historical documents and pictures that exist within both the USCG Auxiliary District 7 and the Coast Guard District 7. Of course, this library will not build itself. We need your help! If you have documents (old manuals, publications, current and past newsletters, copies of charters and other historical documents or photographs) that you would like to add to this historical collection, please submit them to the library. How to send your materials: Only digital documents are accepted. Scan hard copies of documents and save them either in JPG or PDF file formats. When scanning documents, please set the resolution to 300 dpi. Send your digital documents to d7history@yahoo.com.

Publication officers: Please add this email address to your distribution list.

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U. S. Coast Guard Auxiliary

District 7

Breeze

Commodore John Tyson:

Leadership With a Focus By Dorothy Joan Riley, DSO-PB D7

W

hen John Tyson was elected District 7 Commodore, there was no question where the district would be headed over the next two years. The plan was mapped out over a year ago when COMO Tyson submitted a draft 2013-2016 Strategic Plan to the District Executive Committee for review. That draft went through several updates to include data from district-wide surveys and the thoughts of EXCOM members, and was ultimately approved by the district Executive Committee this past September. The 2013-2016 Strategic Plan defines the district’s priorities for promoting recreational boating safety programs, provides strategies for strengthening support to Coast Guard missions, and emphasizes the importance of leadership development and practices in the district’s performance.


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COMO Tyson prepared the first draft of the first 2013-2016 Strategic Plan while serving as District 7 Chief of Staff. What sets this plan apart from other district plans is that it is a four-year rather than a two-year plan. It demonstrates COMO Tyson’s grasp of program planning and evaluation measures as well as his clarity of thought. A four-year calendar makes perfect sense: not all goals can be accomplished within two years. The 2013-2016 Plan lays out goals and strategies required to complete district and national missions. The goals for 2013-2016 are: •

Increase effectiveness in recreational boating safety missions to achieve a two percent yearly reduction in boating accidents and fatalities within the district. (Education/communication/partnering)

Develop a structured program for training flotilla and division officers in the use of exemplary leadership practices. (planning/measurement/development/succession)

Grow the district’s ready volunteer force by a net two percent a year. (recruiting/mentoring/diversity)

Enhance joint planning and mission development with the Coast Guard. (collaboration)

How these goals were identified also points to the plan’s distinctiveness. The goals were identified by surveying the district’s elected leaders (flotilla and division commanders and the D7 Executive Committee), and by evaluating the district’s strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT Analysis). Also important to development of the plan was consideration of data from surveys of flotilla and division leaders. Building the plan around issues raised by the district’s elected leaders not only demonstrated that flotillas and divisions do have a voice in setting the district’s goals and strategies, but made them stakeholders in achieving those goals. Part of the challenge of leadership development within an all-volunteer organization is to establish measures and methods by which leaders can recognize when their efforts are successful. Based on the premise that effective leadership is linked to measurable unit performance, the District Dashboard was introduced. Using data from AUXDATA and AUXINFO, the Dashboard provides a snapshot of a unit’s performance in six core mission activities from Operations to Recreational Boating Safety. Not only can leaders see at a glance how their unit or department is performing, but they can compare these figures with their own totals for previous quarters or for previous years, and gauge their ongoing progress. (See the D7 Strategic Plan at: http://cgaux7. org/index7.htm?page=members, “What’s New in D7.” Information on the District Dashboard is located on the same page.) COMO Tyson is greatly invested in the district’s success. According to the Commodore, the district’s goals are ‘SMART’: Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant and Timely, and the District Dashboard offers an almost immediate way to measure effectiveness. One cannot talk to the Commodore about the 2013-2016 Strategic Plan without hearing his passion and commitment for achieving the district’s success. If there is another quality that sets him apart, it is his conviction that the flotilla unit is the heart and muscle of the Auxiliary. COMO John Tyson is a member of Flotilla 96 Wiggins Pass (North Naples), Florida. Despite serving as District Chief of Staff, he has maintained currency in eleven qualifications and serves as Flotilla Staff Officer-Information Services for his flotilla. This direct approach from flotilla to district levels, coupled with his personal work ethic and education history, have shaped him into a most pragmatic leader. For the record, that personal history includes several years in the United States Navy, after which he earned bachelor and law degrees at the American University (Washington, D.C.) and an M.B.A. from Northwestern University (Evanston, IL). His acumen in law and business proved to be the underpinning of his insight into planning and leadership and accounts for his collaborative approach to development of the 2013-2016 Strategic Plan. COMO Tyson is married to America or “Meckie” as she is known to her friends. They have been together for forty-nine years (it will be 50 years in September 2013) and have two grown sons and six grandchildren. When asked about how his duties in Auxiliary leadership have changed his life, he talks about the demands of travel, and recounting how strange it felt when he recently attended a Division One meeting in Puerto Rico and the next day visited family and grandchildren in Michigan. We look forward to the next two years. Between the District 7 Strategic Plan and COMO Tyson and his leadership team at the helm, we will witness the impact of leadership with a focus.§


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U. S. Coast Guard Auxiliary

District 7

Breeze

Tampa Bay, Fla. - Clifford Holensworth dials in a shot during the annual Frogman Swim from aboard Miss Marla. He is the Communications Staff Officer for Flotilla 72 St. Petersburg, Florida. Photo by George Papabeis, FSO-PA Flotilla 74 Brandon

District 7 Sweeps National Public Affairs Awards Of the thirteen annual Public Affairs contest awards presented at the Auxiliary National Conference (NACON), eight went to members of District 7:

PHOTOGRAPHY - 1st Place Operations: Scott Dittberner, Flotilla 24

PUBLIC AFFAIRS - 1st Place Division: Nichole Betterson, SO-PA, Division 6

PHOTOGRAPHY - 1st Place Public Education: Albert Bidwick, Flotilla 86

PUBLICATIONS - 1st Place Division: Division 7, Intercom Editor: Dorothy Riley, SO-PB

PHOTOGRAPHY - 1st Place Vessel Examination Patricia Gross, Flotilla 13-8

PUBLICATIONS - 1st Place Flotilla: Flotilla 79, Seven Niner Editor: Dorothy Riley, FSO-PB

VIDEO - 1st Place Judi Bidwick, Flotilla 86

PHOTOGRAPHY - 1st Place Public Affairs: George C. Pababeis, Flotilla 74 (winning photo seen above)

Bravo Zulu!

Breeze Winter 2012 issue  
Breeze Winter 2012 issue  

News magazine for Coast Guard Auxiliary District 7

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