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DorsetLife The Dorset Magazine

in

DORCHESTER

AUTUMN 2015


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This copy of Dorset Life in Dorchester is presented to you with the compliments of Dorset Life – The Dorset Magazine: Dorset's longest-established county magazine and the only one to be based in Dorset. Dorset Life – The Dorset Magazine celebrates all that is best in Dorset, including Dorchester and the surrounding area: history, landscape, villages, people, present-day activities, wildlife, historic buildings and gardens. Presented to the highest standards of quality, editorial and photographic, Dorset Life – The Dorset Magazine is essential reading for everyone with an interest in Dorset and is available from all good newsagents and most supermarkets throughout Dorchester and Dorset as well as in app form, for instant download, via the iTunes/ Google Play stores. You can download a copy of this magazine, magazines for Purbeck, Poole and Wimborne or our Senior Living title from www.dorsetlife.co.uk/other-publications/ If you have the the ISSUU App, search for "Dorchester".

THE BEST

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AND PICTURES

EMBER 2015 NO. 440 NOV

BELOW: the October 2015 issue is in the shops until 28/10/2015

£2.80

mmals Dorset's maphot o essay

5 contents Photo essay: Brewery Square Vistas, tiny details and a fountain for youth....5 Forget the Cotton Club, it's the Colliton Club The County Council canteen made good...........10

Giving Dorchester: Poundbury Cancer Institute Taking research 'from bench to bedside'............16

grazers' Hill A 'browsers & ry's Goldland Shaftesbu mark of the iconic A day in the life display l na sig a ts: White Helme als display team l SIgn Blandford's Roya

as two cinem palaces A tale of little and large movie

DorsetLife The Dorset Ma ga

Westbourne's

the sky Reach for Aviation Musuem

THE BEST OF

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e DorsetusLif food!

DS AND PICTU RES

Ten years afte r the merger

food glorio

zine

DORSET IN WOR

Swanage Museu m

azine The Dorset Mag

Dorset's night skies A A stunning phot o essay

SINGLE POPPY NEAR

ber 2015

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Dorset at Aginc ourt Trac ing the fighters

600 years on

Blandford's union s The rise

OUT, TO EATING SET YOUR GUIDE D DOR IN AND AROUN

Where to go and what to see in Dorchester Attractions and the next few months' events...27

PLUS

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Dorchester's property scene What's going on in the lettings/sales market....21 Dorchester family businesses Bathroom Inspirations' Ackerman twins ........23

BLANDFORD

• Sherborne & International Film • Dorset Blind association • Bournemouth 's gin • Dorchester Liter distillery ary Festival • Dorset walk s in Chaldon Herr ing, Eype & Sturmins ter Marshall

A picture of Dorchester Roman mosaic at the Dorset County Museum..18

NO. 439 Octo

rise & fall of Hen ry Mayor

2015

ABOVE: the November issue will be available in the shops from 29/10/2015 – 25/11/2015

in DORCHESTER 2015

Dorchester Lives: Kate Hebditch From new arrival to guardian of heritage.........13

DorsetLife ga The Dorset Ma

Dorset Life

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Thomas Hardye schooldays 110 years of the Old Hardyeans...........................33 Cover photograph: Thomas Hardy's home at Max Gate by Angus Murray Centre-spread image (pages 18-19): Roman mosaic at the County Museum by Peter Booton Publisher: Lisa Richards office@dorsetlife.co.uk Editor: Joël Lacey editor@dorsetlife.co.uk Writer: Nick Churchill info@nickchurchill.org.uk Advertisement Sales Director: David Silk (01305 836440) dave@dorsetlife.co.uk Business Development Manager: Julie Cullen (01258 459090) julie@dorsetlife.co.uk Editorial design: Mark Fudge www.fudgiedesign.co.uk Advertisement design: Hierographics www.hierographics.co.uk Advertisement administration: Eve Baker copy@dorsetlife.co.uk Printing: Pensord, Blackwood www.pensord.co.uk Published by The Dorset Magazine Ltd, 7 The Leanne, Sandford Lane, Wareham BH20 4DY All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part prohibited without permission. Find us online at www.dorsetlife.co.uk/social @dorsetlifemag

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IT'S HIP TO BE SQUARE

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he story of how what was once the county town’s largest place of employment became a mixed retail and residential development could in a sense have been told about almost any town. The Brewery Square development in Dorchester, though, had particular resonance, not least because it was a brewery, but because jobs were lost and because a defining part of the town’s skyline (and indeed defining smell) have forever changed in character. Changed perhaps, but far from obliterated; scattered around the various public spaces in Brewery Square are the reminders of W R Crickmay’s original designs for the once four-acre site. Drift around to the back of the development on Prince of Wales Road and one can still see

kTOP Above the Pizza Express near Weymouth Avenue is one of a number of very interesting roof lines that makes adjusting one's gaze upwards a rewarding activity as one walks around the old and the new parts of the site kABOVE Another aesthetically and geometrically appealing junction of two buildings kLEFT As well as the modern elements of the development, there are the brewery heritage assets like this old copper salted hither and thither around the site

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the encaustic tiles of Eldridge Pope's interlocking E P logo, marked on what was the interior of some former brewery building to which the main chimney was attached and, for now, is the generally unseen side of the façade that sports the flagpole and four finials and a trompe l’oeil in every window. Brewery Square is obviously a work in progress – the section by Dorchester South station is still shrouded in scaffolding. Even now, though, to those willing to tilt their necks up and down a bit, it offers a rich selection of details from bespoke post tops and reproduction lamps to original brewing vats and original artworks, architectural interest and a mix of the heritage and the modern… not to mention a really funky fountain for the kids. Z kTOP The attractive proportions, harmonious use of materials and decorative detail of Crickmay's original 1880 design are still very much in evidence kABOVE Compared with Crickmay's, this is an entirely different, but aesthetically still interesting, take on the building as brewery billboard, this time by the Dorchester South station entrance to the development kLEFT As well as being the focal point for a number of the restaurants in the Brewery Square scheme, the illuminated fountain is also a great favourite with the young, the young at heart and indeed canine visitors kBELOW A figurative rather than representative image of the old brewery can be seen on a number of the elements in and around Brewery Square, not least as finials on the wooden bollards to stop them rotting from the top

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kBrewery

Square â&#x20AC;&#x201C; A photo essay

kABOVE There's a fine dray horse sculpture standing sentinel at the Weymouth Avenue entrance to the Brewery Square development kRIGHT Looking from Prince of Wales Road, one can see the configuration of some of the original buildings, although looking at the same building from the Square itself (BELOW) the wistful woman gazing towards the Screen on the Square cinema seems unaware that she and her surroundings are a trompe l'oeil

9


kColliton Park in 1938 shortly before work started on County Hall. The white house in the centre of the frame is the house that goes with the general manager’s job: ‘It’s a bit too handy sometimes,’ laughs Neil.

FORGET THE COTTON CLUB, IT’S THE COLLITON CLUB The 65 years of the club that sits in a 16th-century building

F

or more than 65 years the Colliton Club has quietly gone about its business, a thriving example of the kind of social club some commentators are far too quick to consign to history. With 17 skittles teams, seven darts and two cribbage sides, it’s also home to various table tennis teams, a couple of Hunt League skittles sides and a 40-strong golf society. A host of Dorchester societies meet there including Lions, Rotary and Moose, metal detectorists, the S&D Railway

kThe skittle alley score board in memory of Lionel James Cozens, the club’s first vice president from its founding in 1949 until his death in 1956

10

Club, Dorchester Drama Society, chess and Scrabble clubs, Dorchester Camera Club and CAMRA. ‘There’s actually some limited availability on some evenings for other clubs,’ says general manager Neil Gatehouse. Built as a smart townhouse in the late 16th century on the site of the dissolved medieval Hospital of St John that was given to John Churchill, a clothier and town bailiff during the reign of Henry VIII, Colliton House takes up the south west corner of the seven-acre Colliton Park. Over time it was extended to incorporate a brewhouse built in 1729 and remained in Churchill hands until the late 1880s, before being used as a Voluntary Aided Detachment Hospital during World War One. In 1933 Dorset County Council acquired it with the rest of Colliton Park and set about planning its new county hall. Work began in 1938. ‘The building would probably have been demolished except by the time County Hall was completed in 1949 employers were being encouraged to provide staff canteens, which is what the ground floor of Colliton House became,’ explains Neil. Thus began a long association with County Hall, the wider Dorset County Council and ultimately Dorset’s entire community of public sector workers, to whom membership was limited until last year. The building is still owned by the council – and the first floor rooms are used by the council during office hours for meetings – but the club is now entirely self-funded and completely independent, though is not run for profit. Its 1600 members are clearly fairly active, but with the newly


kForget

the Cotton Club, it’s the Colliton Club

kThe recently resurfaced skittle alley: ‘They all bowl the Dorset Flop here, two-handed and fall on their bellies, it’s a very strange way to throw a ball,’ says Neil

kThe Colliton Club

relaxed criteria for membership it’s now open to anyone to apply. ‘The licencing laws have all kinds of anomalies, so although we’re not allowed to advertise it other than with a board outside the front door, you don’t have to be a member to walk in off the street and have a coffee, or a breakfast or a soft drink, but only members can buy alcohol. ‘However, back when we were council-run, whenever there was a change in the licencing laws it was tried out on us first. We are still licenced 24/7 as it were, although we rarely use it, but having said that a lot of our members are shift workers so their end of day could be breakfast time for everyone else. This is where they come for a drink after work.’ And if it’s a pint they’re after Neil’s mission is to make sure they have a good one. He’s passionate about real ale and will happily enjoy a misty-eyed nostalgia trip recalling the days when he first came to work as assistant manager at the Colliton Club in 1985. ‘It was tied to Eldridge Pope in those days, but we were paying top whack for it, shame really as it was the town brewer. Since we became a free house we’ve been able to shop around so now we have three regular real ales and another two or three guest ales depending on the time of year. ‘We try to support the Dorset breweries – and we buy as much as we can of our food and produce locally as well – but there are so many we can’t have them all in here all the time.’ It also has to be at the right price and the local artisan and craft brewers can’t always compete with the legendary Glenn – a man with a white van who drives all over the country picking up and dropping off barrels of beer. ‘He works for the Northampton Brewery, but he’s even more passionate about real ale than I am,’ Neil explains, with an admiring smile. ‘It’s all above board, but all he seems to do is carry small orders of beer from one part of the country to another, so we get beers from all over the place. I sometimes meet people from breweries up north who are stunned when I tell them we’ve just had them as a guest ale in Dorchester!’

Although he left to run a Devenish pub for a few years in the late 1980s, Neil says the Colliton Club must be in his genes. He and his wife moved back to Dorchester when they were expecting their first child, just as his old job came up. He was made manager in 1992 and eventually brought both his children to kA bottle of house sauvignon blanc, badged with the work with him – his daughter now manages family crest of the building’s founders the clubhouse at Dorchester Rugby Club. Last year Neil became general manager as the council cut the club loose. There’s not much he doesn’t know about the building and not a great deal that he’d change. ‘There are some original features from the 16th or 17th century, although the oak panel and staircase are not original, they came from Kingston Maurward at some stage. The Maumbury Bar has a 1930s feel and the décor is much brighter than I have seen it – it was all heavy drapes when I first came here – but there’s a fine line between tatty and authentic. ‘I’ll be glad when the council get round to decorating the outside though,’ he says. ‘The Colliton Club is a good business; at least nobody’s told me otherwise and we keep banking the money and paying the bills. I’m left to my own devices, which suits me. There is actually a wine committee to decide what we sell, but I don’t think it has ever sat… not for the last 30 years in any case!’ Z INFORMATION Colliton Club, Colliton Park, Dorchester DT1 1XJ 01305 224503 Open: Mon-Fri 9.00-3.00; 6.30-11.00 Sat 10.30-3.00; 7.00-11.00 kwww.collitonclub.co.uk info@collitonclub.co.uk 11


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FROM NEW ARRIVAL TO GUARDIAN OF HERITAGE We track the 25–plus years that Kate Hebditch has been associated with Dorchester

H

aving been closely involved in the town’s life for more than a quarter of a century, including a stint as its first citizen seven years ago, Kate Hebditch feels about as ‘Dorchester’ as anyone. ‘It’s a tremendously difficult place to leave,’ she concludes, after trying to explain her fondness for the town. ‘I work all over the country now, but I chose to do so from Dorchester, this is my home, it’s where I belong. I met a chap who works in the oil industry in Aberdeen but commutes on a weekly basis from Dorchester and I know of several people who work in Portsmouth and Southampton but live in Dorchester. There’s something about the place that makes you want to stay.’ When Kate came to the county town in 1989 she was simply following the work having landed the post of deputy curator at the county museum. She stayed in the job for 13 years. ‘There aren’t that many jobs in the sector and I thought I knew Dorchester and the area through family connections so applied. Having got the job I soon realised how little I actually knew about the town. ‘From the start I was constantly fielding questions on anything and everything from fossils to smocks to what Thomas Hardy had for breakfast! That’s one of the great things about the county museum, that interaction with the community. And now that it has the Lottery funding for a new collections centre people will be able to see the ninetenths of the iceberg that isn’t on show at the moment.’ Dorset County Museum has secured initial funding to enable a two-year development plan before the final submission in May 2017 of plans to build a new Collections Discovery Centre at the rear of the museum that should open in 2020. ‘It’s very exciting,’ says Kate, ‘but the land was bought for the project 30 years ago; sometimes things take their time.’ No doubt, but Dorchester has changed a great deal since the late 1980s. Elected to the town council in the

kKate opens a skate park during her tenure as Mayor of Dorchester

kOnce a new arrival, Kate Hebditch is now a fixture of Dorchester life

early 1990s Kate has seen many of those changes at close quarters. ‘The biggest must be Poundbury. I think permission had just been given for the first phase when I came here and I remember being taken up there as a new councillor to see the first buildings, which looked very strange in the middle of all that openness. Those buildings have settled into the landscape now, but I think it was the taller buildings and higher density in the next phase that shocked some people, although to an extent that was imposed on us by government.’ More recently the changes to the town centre and the emergence of Brewery Square have been – and continue to be – hotly debated by the townsfolk. ‘I think there is a sense of regret that Dorchester has lost some of its old identity as an agricultural county town, but there’s also a recognition that the town has to change and far better we have some control over that change. Dorchester retains its own character and even though Brewery Square feels somehow separate from the town in time I think it will come to feel more a part of it.’ Kate continues to work with Dorchester Heritage Committee, but no longer serves on the town council. ‘It was a great honour to serve as mayor and I learned a great deal during that year – I thought I knew Dorchester well before but I soon found out how much more there was to know. I met all sorts of people beavering away in their little corners. ‘Dorchester is very good at doing things, but it’s not always so good at telling people about it. There was a 13


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kFrom

blow-in to mayor to guardian of heritage

kThese skeletons are not a comment on the concept of justice delayed being justice denied, but an exhibit at the Shire Hall justice exhibition

kKate with her then mayoral counterpart from Dorchester's German twin-town, Lubbecke

‘Let’s move to…’ feature about Dorchester in the Guardian recently and it mentioned a few places, but nothing about the Roman town house, or the amphitheatre or the town walls, never mind more recent sites and attractions. Things aren’t very well signposted so I’m pleased to be working with the heritage committee on new signs and interpretation panels.’ The committee has recently published a new children’s guide to the town, which is available at the TIC and museums. ‘I’m really pleased with it,’ says Kate. ‘It’s a great way of engaging parents with the history of the town as well so hopefully they will learn something with their children.’ Kate’s passion for the town is further manifested in ‘Kate’s List’, an occasional newsletter that rounds up basic listings information for events in Dorchester, in an attempt to provide a service that’s unavailable elsewhere, but her main focus in the town at the moment is the Shire Hall, best known as the courtroom from which the Tolpuddle Martyrs were tried and sentenced to transportation in 1834. This kFeedback from visitors suggests they do not want the Shire Hall refit summer she is to spoil the 'rough and ready' character of the place

again running guided tours and events at the former court and council building before it closes to undergo works that will see it reopen as a major new visitor attraction in 2017, having secured £1.5 million from the Heritage Lottery Fund. ‘For years it was essentially a corridor between two council buildings, but Shire Hall is a major asset for the town. The public love seeing the court and the cells which have been untouched since the 1830s and all the feedback we get is that any refit should not spoil the character of the place, people like it rough and ready. ‘The Tolpuddle Martyrs are the headline, but there are some great stories to have come out of the research at the records office, including the tale of the young boy* who was transported for stealing shoes, ended up in prison again in Australia where he became the hangman who executed Ned Kelly.’ Although by and large she has left Dorchester civic life behind her, Kate still has high hopes for the town and its heritage. Her ideal, she says, is for a property trust to be established to buy up historic buildings as they become available on the high street. ‘There’s work to be done on the high street as there are some beautiful buildings, but some of them are in a bad way. ‘I like to think of Dorchester as a favourite great aunt who’s had a racy past and has all these amazing stories to tell, but she’s been asleep for a while. Well, it’s time Dorchester woke up and told those stories, maybe even start to be naughty again!’ Z

Shire Hall is open for guided tours on Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays at 11.00 and noon until 18 September.

* Elijah Upjohn was born in Shaftesbury on 1 January 1823. At the age of 11 he was jailed for three months in Dorchester and whipped twice for stealing trousers. Three years later he served six weeks hard labour for stealing rabbits before following in the footsteps of his father Henry when he was sentenced to seven years transportation on 10 May 1838 for stealing shoes. He died in Bourke, Victoria in New South Wales on 28 September 1885.

15


Moses Hoyt

kHRH The Prince of Wales examines a slide sample under the watchful eye of Dr Corrado D'Arrigo

Giving Dorchester

POUNDBURY CANCER INSTITUTE C ancer Research UK analysis published this year suggests half the population will be diagnosed with cancer at some point in their lives. It remains the scourge of our age. However, with 50 per cent of cancer patients surviving for ten years or more, the picture is improving, although much remains to be done. In the last 20 years tremendous advances have been made in understanding cancer biology and treatment, but it has been difficult to translate all this work into frontline clinical practice. Now, work being carried out at the Poundbury Cancer Institute is placing Dorset cancer patients in the forefront of a new age of cancer testing and treatment as such centres help turn research findings into clinical use. Having evolved from the pioneering work of Dorset County Hospital’s Department of Histopathology – the microscopic study of diseased tissue samples – started in 2012, Poundbury Cancer Institute was opened in May by HRH The Prince of Wales. Its stated aim is simple enough: to improve outcomes for cancer patients by supporting the delivery of the most effective treatment for each individual patient. That means providing the targeted tests that will result in the greater use of personalised medicine, unique to every patient. The centre specialises in the use of diagnostics for targeted cancer medicines to treat some of the most common forms of the disease. So rather than using non-specific and highly toxic chemicals – namely chemotherapy – some cancers can be treated by a new generation of innovative therapies. Based on the cancer’s 16

genetic profile, such treatments interact with specific targets on the cancer cells to reduce side effects and improve the effectiveness of the treatment. ‘In 2003 in the G7 countries, eleven per cent of their spend on drugs was on such therapies, the rest was on non-specific treatments. In 2013 that spend had increased to forty-eight per cent and should be at eighty per cent by 2020 – this type of medicine is the present and future of treatment,’ says Dr Corrado D’Arrigo, consultant histopathologist at Dorset County Hospital and director of Poundbury Cancer Institute. ‘These medicines are incredibly effective and more and more of them are being passed for use, but no two cancers are the same. If you give the wrong medicine you can actually make the cancer worse so we have to

kKeith Miller, director of CADQAS talking to colleagues from UK NEQAS, the National External Quality Assessment Service, of which he is also director


kPoundbury

Cancer Institute

kDr Corrado D'Arrigo, director of Poundbury Cancer Institute, takes questions

be certain the medicines we give patients are correct for their particular cancer. Our work here in Poundbury is to develop the tests that will improve the predictability of those treatments.’ Dr D’Arrigo relates the story of a middle-aged mother kDr Sarah Wedden, director of CADQAS, at work in the lab at Poundbury of two with an advanced case of deadly metastatic melanoma. She presented at Poole Hospital on a Friday to take ownership of their treatment,’ adds Dr Sarah afternoon where her oncologist was able to request the Wedden, senior research scientist at DCH and a director support of the Dorchester team who ran the relevant test of CADQAS. ‘I think the NHS has created a mentality in on a tissue sample that two hours later revealed she would us as patients to simply accept what we’re told and not be compatible with a particular drug known to make a become too involved in our treatment.’ significant difference in cases such as hers. The Institute has now taken delivery of a suite of ‘She was given the drug on Saturday afternoon and sophisticated digitising equipment to computerise biopsy walked out of hospital on the Wednesday. Had she not samples so they can be shared instantly online, greatly been given the drug she reducing the waiting time would have deteriorated for tests to take place and ‘We are delighted to be supporting the work of the rapidly at the weekend and Poundbury Cancer institute, as our mission at Roche is their results to be reported to probably would no longer be to do now what the patient needs next. The diagnostic patients. fit to receive treatment. This ‘These are the things that will tools developed at Poundbury will enable scientists to is incredibly powerful science make a difference to people’s take their research from bench to bedside in a more and we’ll work not only with lives,’ says Dr D’Arrigo. personalised way than has previously been possible, the three district general ‘Patients are often at their thus increasing the benefit for patients.’ hospitals in Dorset, but also most vulnerable when they Christopher Hudson, Director of Tissue Diagnostics, Roche Diagnostics UK & Ireland with other hospitals and have just been diagnosed, research centres all over the country and further afield – but time is an absolutely crucial factor in the treatment of it’s too important not to.’ cancer – the quicker we know what we are dealing with Results such as that do not come about by accident. the sooner it can be treated and the greater the chance of Poundbury Cancer Institute is also home to CADQAS – a positive outcome. Cancer Diagnostic Quality Assurance Services – a not‘The work we are doing with circulating tumour cells, for-profit community interest company working with the which exist in tiny numbers in a patient’s blood, is very pharmaceutical and analytical industry to implement new exciting. Now we have the technology to extract those cancer tests across the UK. cells we can track the disease and because the cells are ‘Our aim is to provide training and education about present before a patient is symptomatic, so before there is the tests and to monitor how the tests are performed any sign of a tumour, we can treat much, much earlier.’ and how the results are interpreted so that procedures There are 300,000 new cancer diagnoses in Britain are standardised not just across the country, but across every year and the government has identified personalised the world,’ says CADQAS director Keith Miller. ‘Part of medicine as the way forward, but in these straitened times that work is getting word out there, letting the health the NHS is struggling to find the capacity to accommodate professionals know we are here and interesting the general the expertise. public in our work.’ ‘That has created a vacuum that we aim to fill,’ says Dr There are plans to make tests available to paying D’Arrigo. ‘We want to work with oncologists, surgeons, customers, but also to establish a charity so that provision GPs, patient groups and charities, as well as helping set of timely access to a wide range of high quality cancer up other research centres like this one. We can’t wait to be tests is available to all. fully operational. The first teaching groups should be with ‘It’s about empowering patients, giving them knowledge us in the autumn and we have people waiting to come to to ask questions of their GP or oncologist, enabling them work with us – it’s a tremendously exciting time.’ Z 17


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DORCHESTER PROPERTY What's going on, in and around Dorchester in the residential sales and lettings markets?

A

Brewery Square

s house price indices note The Brewery Square Development record growth due to limited Company has announced apartment supply and increased demand sales of over £50 million in completed driven by rising wages and low buildings and off-plan pre-sales, mortgage rates, Dorchester continues including three sales already in the to present a moving picture on the Barley Building, released in August and property front with plenty of steady comprising sixteen two- and threeactivity at the top, bottom and in the bed apartments and penthouses for middle of the market. completion next summer. According to home.co.uk, the average The Barley Building has interiors price of a house sold in Dorchester over by Conran & Partners in a building the last year is £259,385, up six per designed by architects CZWG. Each cent on the previous twelve months, apartment has secure underground with a genuine boom in prices realised parking with direct lift access and most for terraced homes, up 24 per cent to have balconies and/or terraces, many k A four-bedroom house in Poundbury's north-east quadrant £285,556, while semi-detached homes with great long distance views, some have tailed off, dropping 14 per cent to £251,750. look onto the private Brewery Square Gardens. The development of Poundbury continues to grow apace ‘Brewery Square brings a new standard of apartment design, particularly in the North East Quadrant where Dorchester-based space and specification to Dorchester,’ says Andrew Wadsworth, developers C G Fry & Son are building a mixture of quality two-, director of property developer Waterhouse. ‘The success of three- and four-bedroom homes between Queen Mother Square residential sales and increasingly popular restaurants, shops, and the Great Field. cinema and hotel speak for themselves.’ ‘The first homes have already been handed over and our In the lettings market in the Dorchester area demand remains construction will continue over the next three years,’ says skewed towards smaller two- and three-bedroom properties. managing director Philip Fry. Within Queen Mother Square itself, ‘Throughout the summer there has been a shortage of we are delivering the Royal Pavilion which consists of 20 superb properties generally in the market,’ says Dorset Lettings’ apartments designed by Ben Pentreath to create beautifully Dorchester manager Charlotte Pratt. ‘This has been the case in all proportioned rooms for contemporary living, many of which will categories.’ have private terraces. Details of this stunning building will be The buy-to let market shows signs of recovery prompted by the available in the spring.’ recent pension legislation and more attractive mortgage products Also in Poundbury, this autumn has seen the release of 58 being available; overall demand continues to outstrip supply. new affordable homes in the South West Quadrant delivered ‘Investors often come to us for advice on the types of properties by Stonewater working with West Dorset District Council and to go for, where they might find them and what they need to make regional contractors C G Fry & Son and Morrish Builders. The 47 their investments more attractive to tenants,’ says Charlotte. one-, two-, three- and four-bedroom houses and flats for affordable ‘Property remains a sound investment option and we expect to see rent, and eleven three-bedroom houses for shared ownership sale. further activity in an already competitive market in and around These represent the latest attempt to address the affordability Dorchester.’ gap between wages and house prices (which are over 11 times New legislation has been introduced requiring letting agents higher than the annual average wage) that is driving young people to be more transparent in their pricing and fees must now be and families out of the area in search of cheaper accommodation. displayed clearly in offices and on websites. Z

k Inside a Conran & Partners-designed appartment at Brewery Square

21


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Ground Floor Art Materials Beads & Buttons Silk Painting Framing Art & Craft Books Scrap Booking Craft Kits

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Dorchester's family businesses

TWIN BATHROOMS

W

ith Britons spending an average of a year and a half of their lives in the bathroom it’s no wonder we like to do so in comfort. Twin brothers Paul and Patrick Ackerman of Bathroom Inspirations in Dorchester are passionate about making sure we get the bathrooms we want and deserve. After all, a new or additional bathroom can add considerable value to the home: ‘We know a lot about bathrooms, but it’s the people that matter k Paul (above left) and Patrick (above right) Ackerman most to us – if we can make them feel special then we’ve done our job,’ says Patrick. ‘It’s about making sure people get the bathroom that’s right for them, not selling them something for our own benefit. We always allow people to take the time they need. There’s no pressure to commit,’ says Paul. ‘There are a lot of components to think about when choosing a bathroom,’ adds Patrick.’ It’s so important that customers have that time to ensure every aspect is right.’ Generally, summer is considered the quiet period for supplying and fitting bathrooms, but the team of eight staff at Bathroom Inspirations were rushed off their feet this July: ‘It’s great to be busy’ says Paul. ‘I believe customers like doing business with people that are happy in their work.’ Now with autumn upon us, they’re about to hit their busiest time of the year: ‘People tend to come in from the garden at the end of summer and decide they want to change their bathroom,’ Patrick explains. ‘Then it’s all systems go to get it done before Christmas. We’re finding we’re just as busy from January to March though.’ The Ackermans are certainly busy – and have been all their working lives. They both left school at 16, k A series of different bathroom ideas are on show in this image

but neither was sure of what direction to take. Before long Paul started working for B J White, their uncle’s plumbing and heating business in Bridport. And Patrick soon followed suit: ‘Paul did such a good job that I persuaded Uncle Jack to take me on at 17, just packing orders in the warehouse, that sort of thing.’ In time Paul became manager of the plumbing warehouse and Patrick was in charge of the bathrooms showroom: ‘I started that side of the business out of nothing,’ says Patrick, ‘just selling them to the trade from the warehouse. In time Uncle Jack sold up and we set up our own business.’ Bathroom Inspirations opened in 2004 at the top of the Grove Estate in Dorchester and in 2013 moved down the hill to its current, much larger site opened by Lord and Lady Fellowes who are regular customers. The spacious, airy showroom is carefully laid out to highlight a wide range of beautiful bathrooms and fittings that customers can wander around. Outdoors are working hot tubs and a decked area that overlooks the River Frome. ‘We spent a long time working out the layout before we moved in,’ says Patrick. ‘We could have packed a lot more in, but you want to leave people room to appreciate what they’re looking at.’ Quite so and with all mod cons such as hands-free lighting, digital shower technology, wireless controlled baths and more, many of these bathrooms need the space to be fully appreciated. ‘It’s lovely to be able to surprise people and show them something they never even knew about,’ says Patrick. Paul adds: ‘It was never a conscious decision, but I think it’s fair to say we’ve gradually gone 23


kTwin

bathrooms

kMeet the Ackermans… and the rest of the Bathroom Inspirations team

more up market, although we’re still pricing competitively and are catering for a range of budgets.’ Bathroom Inspirations supplies a range of leading brands available including Villeroy and Boch, Lefroy Brooks, Matki, Kohler, Imperial, Dansani, Laufen and Impey, all of which can be ordered promptly. Styles range from the very traditional and Victorian to the ultra-modern, even futuristic. There are suites for rooms of all sizes, whether it’s a family bathroom to be refitted, a newly created en-suite, or the replacement of a bath with an easy-to-access shower or wet room facility. ‘What a customer needs is our starting point and from that we can work with them to find the bathroom that suits them best,’ says Paul. The twins reckon about half their business is bathroom supply and fitting, the other half is supply only. ‘Some customers want only the bathroom products, but the company regularly supplies and fits bathrooms with recommended and trusted fitters. Customers want to know who they’re dealing with – word of mouth

recommendations are invaluable and we get a lot of repeat business, sometimes updating bathrooms we only put in a few years ago. I think we must have supplied bathrooms in half the houses in Cerne Abbas and the same in Sydling St Nicholas and Bradford Peverell.’ The secret of the brothers' success is quite simple: ‘We love what we do and it shows,’ says Patrick. ‘We’re a close family business – our dad was a driver for us until recently when he retired and we’ve just taken on my daughter Danielle who seems to have inherited our passion for the business and is settling in well. ‘People like to deal with independent businesses. By looking after our customers, giving them quality products at the right prices and doing a great job they’ll tell their friends and they’ll keep coming back.’ Z

Bathroom Inspirations The Mill House, Grove Trading Estate, Dorchester, DT1 1SS 01305 259996 kwww.bathroominspirationsdorchester.com

kThere is an immense selection of different bath and bathroom styles from which to choose these days, whether in terms of freestanding baths or those fitted and chased into the wall

24






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26


WHERE TO GO, WHAT TO SEE What's going on in and around Dorchester Tutankhamun Exhibition

Hardy’s Birthplace Visitor Centre With the aim of improving our understanding, use of and connection to our local woodlands, Hardy’s Birthplace Visitor Centre on the edge of Thorncombe Wood has been designed as a gateway for local people and visitors alike to discover more about the landscape as well as the life and works of Thomas Hardy. Just a short walk from Hardy’s Cottage at Higher Bockhampton where he lived until he was 34 years old, the centre provides opportunities not only to find out what life was like in Hardy’s time, but also to discover what is happening now in the ancient woodland that inspired his writing. Activities to join include wildlife spotting walks, talks and seasonal events from woodland management and greenwood work to social activities and stories from the natural environment. Daily, 10.00 Thorncombe Woods, Higher Bockhampton, 01305 251228, www.dorsetforyou.com/hardys-birthplace

Perennially popular, this long-established and highly individual oasis of Egyptology features compelling recreations of the famous pharoah’s treasures. The antechamber and burial chamber of the boy king’s tomb have been faithfully copied along with much of his burial furniture. The exhibition also includes the first anatomically correct recreation of Tutankhamun’s mummy outside Egypt, which took more than two years of research and experimentation to perfect. For more than a quarter of a century the Tutankhamun Exhibition has provided Dorchester with one of its most singular and highly regarded visitor attractions. Daily, 10.00 High West Street, Dorchester, 01305 269571, www.tutankhamun-exhibition.co.uk

Baxter & Blofeld Having toured Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, Singapore and Malaysia, Blowers and Backers are back with Rogues on the Road, a brand new show crammed full of even more wonderful (and occasionally outrageous) reminiscences and anecdotes from two careers spent broadcasting around the globe. Bastions of the beloved Test Match Special with more than 80 years in the commentary box between them, Peter Baxter and Henry Blofeld have no shortage of tales to tell. And the fun, the games and outlandish characters, from Ian Fleming to Noel Coward, spread well beyond the confines of any cricket ground or studio. The best advice is to come ready to be shocked and entertained by good men behaving badly. 8 November, 8.00 Dorchester Corn Exchange, 01305 266926, www.dorchesterarts.org.uk 27


     ! "   

75 Years of Motor Trade Experience At Chesil Beach Motors the three members of our sales team have amassed a staggering 75 years of local motor trade experience between them.

MEET THE TEAM The CBM sales team has a staggering 75 years of experience under their belts combined. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a whopping 3,900 weeks or 23,400 days worked selling over 25,000 vehicles, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s better than the industry standard. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve supplied cars to more than 3 generations and even today supply cars to customers who bought cars ZKHQ&KHVLO%HDFK0RWRUVĂ°UVWVWDUWHG

Yes, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s correct, between the team of three: 75 years in the Local Motor Trade. These men are WANTED by Dorset's car buyers!

Derek Bascome

Dave England

Derek Bascombe, heading the sales department of CBM Granby, has served local motorists for a staggering 40 years, including over 23 Years with Ford. Derek says, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;My time with Ford has always been the best, from the early days selling Cortinas and Escort XR3is, so from a four car range to todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s amazing 10 car range, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really great to be selling the market-leading product range.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Dave England, owner of Chesil Beach Motors, has now completed 30 years with Ford, 28 years being with Chesil Beach Motors. Dave is still very active within the sales department. Dave adds, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;We have seen many great changes in the motoring world over these years, probably the most important area being how the Ford Range has moved so much in terms of reliability, performance, design and ahead of much of the competition. Customers who have not looked at a Ford recently will be amazed at the WUDQVIRUPDWLRQDQGQRZZLWKVRPDQ\GLĎ&#x192;HUHQWPRGHOVWR choose from, it has never been a better time.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Justin Turner started as an apprentice sales executive in 2009 with CBM Ford and has become a very competent

Justin Turner

member of the sales team and can be found in either of the showrooms. Justin has experienced the introduction of the Ford EcoBoost range of engines and is totally amazed by the responses from customers driving the EcoBoost for the Ă°UVWWLPHZLWKFRPPHQWVOLNH

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;That cannot be a one litre engine?! It drives better than my 1.6! Between them, they have sold well in excess of 25,000 new and used cars, which only goes to show their commitment to local motorists. Many of you reading this article will have had dealings with this trio, some of you may have some great memories, perhaps funny recollections or stories, so why not pop in and have a chat, or contact Chesil Beach Motors via their web site or facebook pages or simply call? Chesil Beach Motors are going to collate these stories and memories and pick the provider of the best story or memory, who will win ÂŁ250 cash. If the winner decides not to accept the cash, it will be donated to a local charity of the winnerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s choice.

www.cbmford.co.uk 28

                

    

     


 

kWhere

To Go, What To See

Henry V (Live) Henry IV is dead and young Hal is King. With England in a state of unrest, he must leave his rebellious youth behind, striving to gain the respect of his nobility and people. Laying claim to parts of France and following an insult from the French Dauphin, Henry gathers his troops and prepares for a war that he hopes will unite his country. Broadcast live to Dorchester in the week of the 600th anniversary of the landmark Battle of Agincourt, the Royal Shakespeare Company’s new production of Henry V is artistic director Gregory Doran’s continuation of his exploration of Shakespeare’s history plays. Following his performance as Hal opposite Sir Antony Sher’s Falstaff in Henry IV Parts I & II, Alex Hassell (pictured) returns as Henry V for some St Crispin's Day action. 21 October, 7.00 Plaza, Dorchester, 01305 262488, www.plazadorchster.com

The Dorset Teddy Bear Museum Dorchester’s cuddliest visitor attraction, the Dorset Teddy Bear Museum is stuffed with amazing bears of all shapes and sizes, from the earliest antique teddy bears to today’s television favourites. Star of the show is the redoubtable Edward Bear who lives in the Edwardian-style Teddy Bear House with his family of people-sized bears who are ready to welcome visitors who want to find out how the bears live and work. The bears are also busy in the Collectors’ Room and the museum boasts a charming period shop stocking the world’s best-known teddy bear brands. Daily, 10.00 Eastgate, Dorchester, 01305 266040, www.teddybearmuseum.co.uk

DORCHESTER LITERARY FESTIVAL. Thursday 24 October 18.00 — The New Hardy Players present A Hardy Welcome at Max Gate Friday 23 October 12.30 — Dom Joly – Here Comes The Clown 14.30 — Tracy Chevalier (interviewed by Paul Atterbury) picks her Desert Island books 16.30 — Saul David – Operation Thunderbolt 19.00 — Julian Fellowes in conversation with Danny Danziger Saturday 24 October 11.00 — Katie Fforde, Natasha Solomons and Professor Barrie Bullen in conversation with Dr Tony Fincham 11.00 — Monster Pop Up Book Workshop with author illustrator Paul Stickland 12.30 — Tom Fort – Channel Shore 14.00 — Children’s event: Short Story Slam for young writers aged 11-16 14.30 — Marc Allum – Allum’s Almanac 16.00 — Crime Time: Minette Walters in discussion with Robert Ryan and Jason Goodwin 18.00 — Catherine Mayer in conversation with Jason Goodwin about her latest unauthorised biography Charles – The Heart of a King 19.30 — Richard Madeley interviews Judy Finnigan about her new book I Do Not Sleep Sunday 25 October 11.00 — Toby Vintcent – Driven 12.30 — Kate Adie: Fighting On The Home Front 14.00 — Allan Mallinson: October 1915 – Why was Victory so Elusive? 16.00 — Martin Johnson Can I Carry Your Bags, the life of a Sports Hack Abroad 18.00 — The New Hardy Players: A Hardy Welcome For tickets and information visit http://dorchesterliteraryfestival.com

29


To Go, What To See Prasanna Puwanarajah

kWhere

Joe Stilgoe

Having made his West End debut earlier this year in feel-good musical High Society as part of Kevin Spacey’s finale season at the Old Vic, jazz pianist and songwriter Joe Stilgoe has embarked on his first solo UK tour. The set list is largely drawn from his third studio album, New Songs For Old Souls, which mixes new songs with his versions of jazz standards and classics from the 1950s to the present day. Joe has twice topped the UK jazz chart and featured on a host of radio programmes including six appearances on Friday Night is Music Night on BBC Radio 2, The Horne Section on BBC Radio 4, In Tune, Loose Ends and The Chris Evans Breakfast Show. He has played all the major international jazz festivals enjoyed two sell out runs at the Edinburgh Fringe and appears regularly at the legendary Ronnie Scott’s club in London. The son of songwriter and broadcaster Sir Richard Stilgoe, Joe has won widespread praise for his accomplished musicianship, theatrical delivery and entertaining repartee. 30 October, 8.00 Dorchester Corn Exchange, 01305 266926, www.dorchesterarts.org.uk

Keep Museum

Richard Budd

The home of more than 300 years of martial history, the Keep Military Museum tells the story of soldiering in Dorset from the Duke of Monmouth’s landing in Lyme Regis in 1685 to the amalgamation of the Devonshire and Dorset Regiment into The Rifles in 2007. Using modern digital technology as well as traditional displays and battle tableaux, it is home to invaluable research materials and fascinating objects that reveal the courage, humour and sacrifice of serving soldiers and their families. Dorset’s soldiers have seen action all over the world, from their own county, throughout Europe to the Middle East and India, as well as Africa and the New Worlds. Dorset men fought with distinction in both World Wars, significantly at Gallipoli, the Somme and D-Day. In the modern era, Falklands War hero Colonel H Jones VC served in the Devon and Dorsets until April 1981.The Keep’s constituent regiments are the Dorset Regiment, the Devonshire Regiment, the Devonshire and Dorset Regiment, Dorset Yeomanry, the Queen's Own Dorset Yeomanry, Dorset Militia, the Royal Devon Yeomanry and 94 Field Regiment RA. Tue-Fri 10.00 Keep Military Museum 01305 264066, www.keepmilitarymuseum.org

Dorset County Museum – George Dannatt exhibition Meet the Weymouth Bay Pliosaur and discover Dorset’s real dinosaurs in the Jurassic Coast gallery. Discover ancient artefacts in the Archaeology Gallery and see the skeletons of the Britons brutally slain at Maiden Castle. Visit the atmospheric Victorian Gallery, one of the few places in Europe you can walk on Roman mosaic floors. Explore the lives of Dorset’s literary greats - see Thomas Hardy’s study and the world’s most important Hardy collection. The museum is also marking the centenary of George Dannatt's birth in 1915, this exhibition will explore one of Dorset’s most significant collections assembled by George and Ann Dannatt. The collection includes a largely unseen and newly conserved group of paintings, drawings, sculptures and prints by key figures associated with the St Ives Group of Close Artists in the 1950s, 60s and 70s. Dannatt was a friend of many of the artists, and was himself an abstract artist. A selection of his own works will be included in the display, as well as archival photographs of the Dannatts with their artist friends and rare artists' books and illustrated volumes.

Until 2 January 2016 Mon-Sat, 10.00 01305 262735, dorsetcountymusuem.org 30


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Dorchester groups

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THE OLD HARDYEANS

Michel Hooper-Immins

f, as the title our annual reunion of the 1950 dinner this year, it Alastair feels as though we Sim/Margaret have turned full Rutherford film circle.’ suggests, school The Old Hardyeans days are really along with the The Happiest current pupils and Days of Your Life staff at Thomas then the existence Hardye School are of long-running part of a timeline old school that stretches back associations at least as far as would be almost 1569 when Thomas certainly the norm. Hardye, a ‘yeoman But it’s not of Frampton’, and the Old opened Dorchester Hardyeans Club Grammar School k Thought to be the 1910 Old Grammarians Dinner in the Casterbridge Room of the King’s Arms Hotel. Standing at the head of the table are celebrating its in South Street 110th anniversary guests of honour Thomas Hardy OM (left) and Sir Frederick Treves GCVO (right). Only men are present. (probably on the this year is more than remarkable, for not only is the club site of an earlier free school) and ten years later left a active, it is positively flourishing. perpetual endowment ‘for the maintenance of one learned ‘We’re very proud to be Old Hardyeans and some of the man to be a schoolmaster and one other to be usher’. friendships that persist through the club have been going It is commonly, though mistakenly, thought that Hardy strong for 60 years or more – our president Peter Foster and and Treves both attended the grammar school. They didn’t. I sat together through most of our time at school and we’re Hardy went to Isaac Last’s rival academy in Durngate still sitting together now, that’s quite something,’ says Street and Treves to the Academy of William Barnes, but secretary and past-president Michel Hooper-Immins. Hardy did become a governor of the grammar school and The club’s 1100-strong membership is drawn largely when it was decided it had outgrown its original premises from those who attended the all-boys Hardye’s School in and a new building should be built in Culliford Road he Culliford Road between 1954, when Dorchester Grammar was called on to lay the foundation stone on 21 July 1927. School was renamed, and 1992 when the new Thomas In his speech the novelist pondered in the nature of Hardye School opened in Queens Avenue. Some of the his Elizabethan near-namesake: ‘In [Thomas] Carlyle's younger members are alumni of the new school, a few of phraseology, what manner of man he was when he walked Dorchester Secondary Modern School and there’s even this earth we can but guess, or what he looked like, what a small minority of female members who went to the allhe said and did in his lighter moments, and at what age girls Green School. he died; but we may shrewdly Founded as the Old conceive that he was a farGrammarians by ‘a large sighted man and would not company of old boys’ of be much surprised, if he were Dorchester Grammar School to revisit daylight, to find on 1 November 1905 at a that his original building had dinner at the Kings Arms been outgrown and no longer Hotel, just a few years later supplied the needs of the the club was proud to hold present inhabitants for the its annual dinner in the due education of their sons.’ august company of Thomas By that reckoning Hardye Hardy OM and Sir Frederick would have approved Treves GCVO, providing an wholeheartedly of the merger impetus that is still felt today. of Hardye’s and the Green School (or Castlefield as it ‘Hardye’s was a special was by the time of the union) place and it feels good to be in 1992 that finally fulfilled part of something with such k Dr Tim Ennion (left, an Assistant Head Teacher at Thomas Hardye School) looks on as Old Hardyeans his vision of a single school a history,’ says Michel. ‘It President Peter Foster welcomes Green School old girl Rev Vicky Thurtell, Exeter Cathedral Canon that offered ‘the necessary was particularly pleasing to Precentor elect – the first female guest speaker in the club's 110 year history – to the annual reunion education and instruction of return to the Kings Arms for dinner in March at the Kings Arms, Dorchester 33


kThe

Old Hardyeans

Children in all degrees in good Discipline’, as proposed in the Deed of Endowment in 1579. ‘Hardye’s had a lovely main building and of course I was sad to dee it go,’ says Michel, ‘but if I’ve learned anything it’s that yearning after what’s gone is pointless, it won’t change. The foundation stone of that building still exists at the new school – I had to ask to have it cleaned up a bit, but it’s there as are the memorial gates in front of which the whole school gathers every 11 November to take part in an act of remembrance just as we did when we were at school. I remember standing out in the snow in 1960 as the headmaster read out the names of old boys who had given their lives in the world wars and I have to say I admire the students who do the same today because some of them don’t wear very much.’ Also there is what is thought to be the only artefact to have been in all three schools – the Spanish oak screen that is now mounted in the Thomas Hardye School theatre had previously been in the library at Hardye’s and before that in the main hall at the original Grammar School. It is reputed to have come from the Santa Maria a prize ship of the Spanish Armada that was taken into Weymouth after its defeat in August 1588: ‘There was a tradition, which I upheld of course, of carving your initials into the wood,’ Michel explains. It’s out of reach now, but it’s also too far away to see the letters or the brass plaque that was made to explain its history.’ Other traditions to have fallen by the wayside in recent times include the club’s annual London dinner, the last being held in 2012, a year after old boy Roger Gale MP hosted the event at the Palace of Westminster before, a few months later, wearing his Old Hardyeans tie as he was knighted by HM The Queen; ‘That showed an admirable commitment to the cause,' says Michel. 'Oddly, there is talk of reviving the London dinner, but there’s no knowing what the future holds. I’m encouraged though that the sixth formers from the Thomas Hardye School who attended our 110th anniversary dinner this year were able

k Sir Roger Gale MP with Lady Suzy Gale received his 2012 knighthood at Buckingham Palace, proudly wearing his blue and gold Old Hardyeans tie to meet HM the Queen.

to converse so freely and find so much in common with grey-haired men from another era. ‘I had no interest in Hardye’s for 20 or 30 years after I left school in 1965, but that’s quite standard, our new members are in their 40s and 50s. The Old Hardyeans is a purely social activity, we have members all over the world, but a lot of us are still in Dorchester and have been in touch all our lives. Much like the Society of Dorset Men, which was founded a year earlier than us, we meet to eat and drink and that’s no bad thing.’ Indeed not and for as long as Hardyeans continue to grow old all the signs are they’ll have a club to call their own. Z kwww.hardyeansclub.com

k The 1957 Memorial Gates were brought from Hardye’s School at Culliford Road to the new Thomas Hardye School in Queens Avenue. Every 11 November, the entire school parades in front of the gates to remember Old Grammarians and Old Hardyeans lost in war. Head teacher Michael Foley (centre) leads the 2014 Act of Remembrance. Councillor Peter Mann, then Mayor of Dorchester, stands third from the right.

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Dorset Life in Dorchester 2015  

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