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DEFENDING OUR PLANT EVERYWHERE

BLACKBERRY DREAM & AFGOO LEMON OG UHI? PEANUT BRITTLE

ALIVE IN MUSIC LEON HENDRIX INTERVIEW

THE HIDDEN BUSH & THE HERBERY

ROA D T R I P THE GREENING OF VEGAS

WO M E N OF WEED A GRAND SOCIAL EXPERIMENT


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䤀一 匀吀 伀刀䔀匀  一伀圀 ℀ 吀栀 椀 猀  瀀 爀漀 搀 甀 挀 琀  栀 愀 猀  椀 渀琀漀砀 椀 挀 愀琀 椀 渀 最  攀 û攀 挀 琀 猀  愀 渀 搀  洀 愀礀  戀 攀  栀 愀 戀 椀 琀  昀漀 爀 洀 椀 渀 最⸀  䴀 愀 爀 椀 樀 甀 愀 渀 愀  挀 愀 渀  椀 洀 瀀 愀 椀 爀  挀漀 渀 挀攀 渀琀 爀愀琀 椀 漀 渀 Ⰰ  挀漀 漀 爀搀 椀 渀 愀琀 椀 漀 渀 Ⰰ  愀 渀 搀   樀 甀 搀 最 洀 攀 渀 琀 ⸀   䐀 漀   渀 漀 琀   漀 瀀 攀 爀 愀 琀 攀   愀   瘀 攀 栀 椀 挀 氀 攀   漀 爀   洀 愀 挀 栀 椀 渀 攀 爀 礀   甀 渀 搀 攀 爀   琀 栀 攀   椀 渀 渀 甀 攀 渀 挀 攀   漀 昀   琀 栀 椀 猀   搀 爀 甀 最 ⸀  吀 栀 攀 爀 攀   洀 愀 礀   戀 攀   栀 攀 愀 氀 琀 栀   爀 椀 猀 欀 猀   愀 猀 猀 漀 挀 椀 愀 琀 攀 搀   眀 椀 琀 栀   挀 漀 渀 猀 甀 洀 瀀 琀 椀 漀 渀   漀 昀   琀 栀 椀 猀   瀀 爀漀 搀 甀 挀 琀 ⸀   䘀漀 爀   甀 猀 攀   漀 渀 氀 礀   戀 礀   愀 搀 甀 氀 琀 猀   ㈀ ㄀   愀 渀 搀   漀 氀 搀 攀 爀⸀   䬀 攀 攀 瀀   漀 甀 琀   漀 昀   琀 栀 攀   爀攀 愀 挀 栀   漀 昀   挀 栀 椀 氀 搀 爀攀 渀 ⸀


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Ph: 509 796 3601 | Web: buddyboyfarm.com | Email: buddyboyfarms@yahoo.com Cannabis has intoxicating effects & may be habit forming. Smoking is hazardous to your health. There may be health risks associated with consumption of marijuana. Should not be used by women who are pregnant or breast feeding. For use by adults 21 & older. Keep out of the reach of children. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, & judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery while under the influence of cannabis. Please enjoy responsibly.


WASHINGTON | JANUARY 2016

CONTENTS

•THE DOPEST ISSUE•

ISSUE # 53 | FREE

DEFENDING OUR PLANT EVERYWHER E

STRAINS

BLACKBERRY DREAM & AFGOO

CONCENT RATE LEMON OG

EDIBLE

ISSUE 53 | JANUARY 2016 THE DOPEST ISSUE

UHI? PEANUT BRITTLE

STORES

ALIVE IN MUSIC

LEON HENDRIX INTERVIEW

THE HIDDEN BUSH & THE HERBERY

ROA D T R I P THE GREENING OF VEGAS

WO M E N OF WEED

A GRAND SOCIAL EXPERIMENT

COVER PHOTO

Purple Haze Properties, LLC

IN EVERY ISSUE

48

14 MEDICAL STRAIN Blackberry Dream

16 RECREATIONAL STRAIN

16

Afgoo Berry

18 EDIBLES

UHi? Peanut Brittle

38 STORE

18

The Hidden Bush

42 STORE The Herbery

48 CONCENTRATE Lemon OG

NEWS 20

114

24

HEALTH

Dosage in Edibles

24 BRANDING BUD

Playing it Safe - Child Resistant Packaging

32 CANNA-NEWS Homelessness and Cannabis

76 CANNA-NEWS Eating Disorders and Cannabis

128

81 TECHNOLOGY Vaping Revolutionized

114 BUSINESS

Changing the Game

52

70

FEATURES 52

88

ON THE COVER!

Jimi Hendrix - Alive in Music

70 GARDEN Buddy Boy Farms

86

PIECES

88

PRODUCT

Doshworld

Cannabis Basics Lip Balm

96 GROW

Growing with Success

106 PRODUCT

Pre-Roll Comparison - Inflorescence and Sky High Gardens

110 EVENT RECAP 2015 Dope Industry Awards

128 ART

GD Gardner

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EDITOR’S LETTER It’s a new year and you know what that means... You can’t start 2016 without at least contemplating a handful of appropriate resolutions for the year ahead. I recently quizzed my friends and family, and the conversation revealed the top two cliché resolutions perched atop those peoples’ lists: 1. 2.

Lose weight and/or work out more. Drink less

This got me thinking—maybe a resolution to add to the aforementioned list would be to smoke more cannabis. As research progresses and science improves, cannabis seems to be an increasingly popular topic around the subjects of weight management and alcohol consumption. Stories abound with surprising truths about cannabis smokers being thinner than non-partakers. Reports of cannabis’ therapeutic potential for injuries and soreness related to physical activity are almost common-place. Stories of people “smoking themselves sober” to beat a powerful opiate or alcohol addictions are more frequent. Indeed, it appears we are saying goodbye to the long-held stereotypes of “lazy potheads” who lust after inebriation, and are replacing it with a wellness-based conversation that involves Mary Jane’s potential to dramatically improve quality of life. Which brings us to 2016, new beginnings, and our DOPE Magazine NewYear’s resolution for you. Enjoy more cannabis and see if it reaps tangible benefits in your life. May 2016 high-light the DOPEst year to date for opening minds, spreading the truth, and elevating lives. Happy New Year. Stay DOPE.

EVAN CARTER PRESIDENT

DAVID TRAN

CEO

CHARM DOMACENA

DESIGN DIRECTOR

JAMES ZACHODNI

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

BRANDON PALMA

ART DIRECTOR

ABIGAIL ROSS NATIONAL CONTENT MANAGER ALISON BAIRD MANAGING EDITOR MEGHAN RIDLEY ONLINE EDITOR JONATHAN TEETERS DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS KATE KELLY OPERATIONS ASSOCIATE ANTHONY DAVIS VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES EMMETT FRASER REGIONAL SALES MANAGER ZAK HUGHES DIGITAL AD TRAFFIC COORDINATOR DALLAS KEEFE SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER NATHAN CHRYSLER BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT TREK HOLLNAGEL STRATEGIC ADVISOR JENIKA MAO ADMIN EVENT COORDINATOR KINSEY LITTON OFFICE MANAGER CHRISTINA HEINTZELMAN EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT

JESUS DIAZ STATE DIRECTOR JORDAN BAER STATE EDITOR ALLIE BECKETT LEAD PHOTOGRAPHER CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

TAYLOR ORMS ANGELA BOGSCH MARK COFFIN EMILY NICHOLS

KENTON BRADLEY SEAN CORBOY TINA BALLEW KELLY TURSO

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

SHARON LETTS MEGHAN RIDLEY ABIGAIL ROSS DAVE HODES MELANIE BIGALKE DAVID PALESCHUCK

R.Z. HUGHES DAVID BAILEY JESSICA ZIMMER STEVE ELLIOT BRITTANY DRIVER DEBBY GOLDSBERRY

MYCHAL TRAWICK SALES MANAGER SALES EXECUTIVES

ERIC ERLANDSEN ANGEL AHMAD

BRAD FRYE

WWW.DOPEMAGAZINE.COM

@DOPEMAGAZINE

QUESTIONS? COMMENTS?

EMAIL US AT INFO@DOPEMAGAZINE.COM

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DEFENDING OUR PLANT EVERYWHERE DOPE is a free publication dedicated to providing an informative and wellness-minded voice to the cannabis movement. While our foundation is the medical cannabis industry, it is our intent to provide ethical and research-based articles that address the many facets of the war on drugs, from politics to lifestyle and beyond. We believe that through education and honest discourse, accurate policy and understanding can emerge. DOPE Magazine is focused on defending both our patients and our plant, and to being an unceasing force for revolutionary change.

EMAIL US AT ADS@DOPEMAGAZINE.COM DOPE Magazine and the entire contents of this magazine are copyright 2016 DOPE MAGAZINE LLC, all rights reserved and may not be reproduced in any manner, in whole or part without the written permission from DOPE Magazine LLC.


HAPPY N E W YEAR FROM ALL OF US AT GREEN-THEORY

+ C  C $ á ÷ C  ߞ ߜ ߝ ߢ  $Į  ‰ ° v Ÿ v Ÿ b  ÷ m C  b á C C Ÿ ࡷ C  v ÷ C ࡋ 

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GREEN-THEORY

Bellevue’s Retail Marijuana Store

ߝߜߢߥߣ›ŏǞȘëɾɟƚƚɾëʕǞɾƚߞ$ƚȀȀƚʲʕƚࡈĦߥߤߜߜߠ Ħ Ħ Ħࡏb á C C Ÿ ࡲ÷ m C ° áĮࡏ+° › THIS PRODUCT HAS INTOXICATING EFFECTS AND MAY BE HABIT FORMING. MARIJUANA CAN IMPAIR CONCENTRATION, COORDINATION, AND JUDGMENT. DO NOT OPERATE A VEHICLE OR MACHINERY UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF THIS DRUG. THERE MAY BE HEALTH RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH CONSUMPTION OF THIS PRODUCT. FOR USE ONLY BY ADULTS TWENTY-ONE AND OLDER. KEEP OUT OF THE REACH OF CHILDREN.


MED STRAIN

WRITER

• R.Z. HUGHES

| PHOTOS • ALLIE BECKETT

BLACKBERRY DREAM FROM ELEV8 SEEDS GENETICS Bred by Elev8 Seeds, Blackberry Dream is one of their flagship strains – a potent cross of Kimbo Kush and Super Silver Haze. A Washington native, this cultivar has brought together an old-school sativa classic with one of the hottest indica strains out there, resulting in a balanced hybrid. The haze adds an uplifting kick to the resin-heavy kush.

EFFECTS This strain consists of a relaxed body accompanied by a bold, mind-altering euphoria. It lends a creative spark and stimulates the imagination to an intermingling of revelries. This bud promotes relaxation and may be slightly sedative, with higher levels producing an effect not unlike sleepwalking through the day, so a couple of puffs should be plenty for most.

AROMA The most surprising aspect of Blackberry Dream is the apparent lack of an aroma. This strain has an outstanding taste, potent effect, and beautiful bud structure with a fragrance that is unobtrusive and mild. Once ground, it has hints of spices and earth.

FLAVOR Richly flavored with a potpourri of flowers and spices, this strain has a distinct taste. Herbaceous notes tingle the tongue and balance nicely with the sweeter fruit flavors. The taste of blackberry, a classic trait of Kimbo Kush, is at the forefront of the experience, outlasting and overpowering the complex flavors of hash and herb.

LOOKS Featuring tight buds with almost no leaves, Blackberry Dream has serious jar appeal. Lime green colas are coated in stark white trichomes, so much so that it looks like it’s been powdered in kief, leaving a dusting behind on the table. Judging on mere looks alone, this strain is bound to be a Washington State favorite in no time.

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TESTED BY: STEEP HILL LABS

16.28% THC 0.03% CBD

THERAPEUTIC BENEFITS A great tool for those battling depression and anxiety, this strain washes away any feelings of despair as the cannabinoids seep through the deep recesses of the mind. The high THC levels may benefit individuals with deep aches and chronic pain, since it has long been known as an effective analgesic for some.

AVAILABLE AT • ELEV8SEEDS.COM


REC STRAIN

WRITER

• R.Z. HUGHES

AFGOO BERRY FROM FINE DETAIL GREENWAY (FDG) GENETICS A pairing of Blueberry and Afgoo, Afgoo Berry is an indica-dominant hybrid that brings out the best of its parents. Blueberry, known for its unbelievable sweet flavor, has been a favorite ever since DJ Short released it in the late 1970s. Afgoo, on the other hand, has gained a following as one of the stickiest strains around.

EFFECTS A heavily sedative indica, the effects don’t disappoint. Afgoo relaxes the mind and body into a cozy bliss, perfect for a quiet night at home. Larger amounts can make movement difficult, or at best, extremely unappealing. The munchies are ruthless with this one, so make sure to stock the larder before sampling.

AROMA The fragrance is sweet and fruity with undertones of hops. There are hints of blueberry and pine with an earthier aroma towards the end. If purple had a smell, this would be it: richly sweet and full of complexities. This strain is a robust treat for the nose, filling the air with its intoxicating perfume.

FLAVOR Producing a thick smoke resplendent with blueberries and exotic spices, Afgoo Berry is a great strain for anyone with a sweet tooth. It starts off fruity and is followed up by a mixture of pine and earth. The combination of organic flavors delights the taste buds with a lasting aftertaste that never gets old.

AVAILABLE AT • TOP SHELF CANNABIS

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LOOKS Dark vibrant purple with wisps of lime green curling out from the flower, the bud is frosted with innumerable spindly trichomes, sparkling with potency. FDG did something right in the curing process, as Afgoo Berry is dry enough to roll, but it retains the stickiness that has made it so popular in recent years.

THERAPEUTIC BENEFITS This strain may assist with falling asleep and staying asleep through the night. Afgoo Berry has shown promise in helping with insomnia as well as chronic issues, ranging from arthritis to MS. The high feels like a warm blanket, commonly providing a comfortable relaxed feeling, free of anxiety or agitation.

PROVIDED BY: TOP SHELF CANNABIS TESTED BY: STEEP HILL LABS

13.31% THC 0.02% CBD

| PHOTOS • ALLIE BECKETT


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WRITER

EDIBLES

• R.Z. HUGHES

| PHOTOS • ALLIE BECKETT

PEANUT BRITTLE – UHi?

CHEWY CHEEBA WITH A SALTY SNAP PROCESSOR FROM TACOMA is producing a delicious peanut brittle that’s gaining momentum in recreational stores around the state. A small-batch bakery, “UHi” specializes in great tasting, premium cannabis infused treats that do just as their name implies. Anyone who loves peanuts, brittle, or cannabis should try this edible. Honey-roasted peanuts are generously distributed throughout the golden ribbon of candy, lending a salty crunch to every bite. The sweet and savory confection breaks with a shattering snap before melting. It has a glistening, sugary sheen, beckoning those who see it dangling on a display to purchase and consume it immediately. Shared amongst friends, this is the perfect treat for a light dose of

THC and a night full of laughs. With 10mg of THC distributed through such a large area, first-time users will find it forgiving and enjoyable. Who knew cannabis could taste as good as your grandma’s peanut brittle? The bakers at “UHi”? clearly know a thing or two about making effective treats that taste as good as any family recipe. The candied peanuts, dusted in salt and sugar, might be the best part about this stuff. They are incredibly flavorful and add a salty component that balances out the cloying caramelized sugar. The taste is not unlike a popular ballgame snack, exalted during each and every seventh-inning stretch, and after eating a whole chunk, you might not care if you ever come ® back either.

BRITTLE Believed to be one of the world’s oldest types of candy making, brittle variations of heated sugar and nuts have been popular in many cultures. Often mistaken to be an American original, peanut brittle has become our nation’s first choice when it comes to cracked sugar delights.

AVAILABLE AT • OZ • URBAN BUD • CLEAR CHOICE

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HEALTH

THE DOSAGE DILEMMA

Rel ax...Th e An a lysts Are Here

E

DIBLE MAKERS are quickly

becoming the fastest growing part of the industry (there are nearly 200 edible makers across the country now), but the emphasis today is more about getting and maintaining the right dosage of THC or CBD than actually inventing a new product. The process starts from the top down, according to Jaime Lewis, owner and executive chef of Mountain Medicine in Colorado. A graduate of the California Culinary Academy, Lewis began her career in the cannabis industry in 2006, making edibles for patients living with HIV and AIDS. “Cooking with

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cannabis starts with really well-defined recipes, and with training,” she said. The baking process for most edibles is much like any other baking process, in which cannabis butter replaces dairybased butter. After chefs test for contaminants and determine the plant’s THC levels, they activate the THC by either decarbing or roasting the bud. When cooking with cannabis, it’s important to keep all of the ingredients, especially the THC, evenly dispersed in order to establish homogeneity in the product. “Getting the right homogeneity is a simple process of making sure that the recipe and the batches are mixed


WRITER •DAVID HODES

properly,” she added. Lewis uses decarbed cannabis butter, which has a precise cooking time, water content, and temperature. “It’s a stirring process in there as well. I stir it every 30 minutes, and then during the straining process it’s stirred again.” Lewis then tests it for homogeneity to confirm consistency before it goes into Mountain Medicine’s baked breads. “Each recipe has a defined mixing process. For our pie bars, it’s mixed seven and a half minutes to the left, and seven and half minutes to the right. It’s really that defined.” Cooks are generally told to taste what they cook as they go, but that’s not the case in the cannabis business. In Colorado, edibles cannot be consumed on site. “I can’t taste my product after it has cannabis in it,” Lewis said. “My staff doesn’t taste anything in my kitchen. We don’t have that luxury.” Instead, Lewis’ team provides samples to dispensaries and asks them to fill out surveys on the products. “From that, we are able to gauge if it’s going to be a flavored product.” “Cannabis, to some consumers, has a very pungent flavor that we don’t generally try to mask in the baked goods,” she said. “But in the chocolates, we just do added things, like add ginger which is actually good at helping cover the flavor of the cannabis.” The biggest issue in this unregulated industry is consistency: a product must have the same level of THC in every bite. If a regulator identifies inconsistency in a product’s strength, the makers face serious consequences. There’s another challenge to consistency, according to Guy Rocourt, a lead extraction artist and partner in Neos. “While the products may be consistent in dosages, especially

when it comes to edibles, the physiology of the consumer is different, so if you have two pieces of chocolates, two different people have a different experience. It’s likely that they just need a different dosage based on their physiology,” he clarified. “We have to understand this, and have to start getting data on how cannabis affects users based on a bunch of other metrics.” The industry is seeking regulation not only to increase understanding of the plant, but also to make edibles predictable for recreational consumption and, more importantly, safer for those with health conditions. This effort is getting a boost from the American Oil Chemists’ Society (AOCS), a nonprofit based in Urbana, Illinois. The AOCS studies fats, oils, detergents, and related materials, and has been looking for an unmet need in the industry, according to Cynthia Ludwig, the AOCS director of technical services and former research scientist for Monsanto. “Cannabis people started calling about a year and a half ago asking if some of our official testing methods would work on THC and CBD oils, and we were like, ‘We really don’t know,’” she said. “We don’t want people to have heavy metals and pesticide residue or any other contaminants in the product. This is about patient safety. So we say, let’s develop some investigative analytic lab procedures to make sure that these things are safe and that the dosage is correct. This is something that’s in our wheelhouse.” In order to determine a validated method for testing cannabis, the AOCS is working with several cannabis labs to do a large-scale collaborative study of hops (the closest cousin to cannabis). Once

GRAPHICS • BRANDON PALMA

“While the products may be consistent in dosages, especially when it comes to edibles, the physiology of the consumer is different,” cannabis is federally legalized, the AOCS hopes to have its method adopted by the industry as a whole. Lewis said that working with the AOCS is one of the most exciting pieces of news she has heard. “We have three to five years of data that we can bring to the table. Smarter people than ourselves can help guide us in terms of taking the cannabis and treating it, just like they do for oils in any other industry,” she said. “This company can bring that knowledge of the standardization process that they have done for every other industry before us.” Ludwig said that she would really like to see industry regulators talk to analytical chemists more before they write their regulations. “They should work together to get things on the books that are enforceable, that are traceable, and that are reasonable,” she said. “Analytical chemists have been around forever. We know how to do this. So let’s look to the people who do this and quit reinventing the wheel.”

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CA MER A S

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AC CE S S C ON T R OL

CannaGuardSecurity.com

|

AL ARMS

1.844.CannaGuard


[ Cannapaq’s child-resistant standup pouch ]

BRANDING BUD

PLAYING IT SAFE Cann a bis Brand s Get Creati ve With Ch i ld-Resistant Packag i ng TRAGIC NUMBERS PALM N TURN

A

S THE Canadian director of poison control, Dr. Henri J. Breault was instrumental in creating the first child-resistant container. He established the Ontario Association for the Control of Accidental Poisoning in 1962, paving the way for the 1967 invention of the “Palm N Turn” cap design, which has since become the standard in child-resistant packaging. Although child-resistant (CR) packaging is a part of everyday life, poisoning still remains a hazard to children, causing about 30 pediatric deaths each year. In 2014, the American Association of Poison Control Centers received about 3 million calls from consumers for poison exposure treatment or information. CR packaging is required by regulation for prescription drugs, over-the-counter medications, pesticides, and household chemicals. Some jurisdictions require unit packaging such as blister packs for child safety.

Cheeba Chews child-resistant blister pack

[ A “Palm N Turn” child-resistant cap]

Every 30 seconds, an accidental poisoning is reported in the United States and Europe. More than 800,000 children are rushed to a hospital with symptoms of poisoning. Of these, 100,000 are actually hospitalized. In Europe alone, 3,000 young children die each year from medicine or household chemical poisoning, and children under six account for the majority of all poisoning accidents. When selecting packaging materials and components for solid oral drugs, drug manufacturers (and now cannabis processors) must balance the needs of both children and adults. Under the Poison Prevention Packaging Act of 1970, manufacturers must design packages that help protect children from potentially toxic prescription drugs and make sure that adults who have limited dexterity can use the packages properly. Devising such a package isn’t always a scientific endeavor: manufacturers must base their selections on unpredictable factors like marketplace opinions and child testers. They are also burdened by the United States Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), which hopes to eliminate child poisonings through regulation but offers manufacturers little guidance in package selection.

THE NEED FOR EVOLUTION Despite the established designs of CR packaging, companies are looking for new designs because of changes in varying industries. There are more products that require CR packaging now because of cannabis legalization, widespread publicity about poisoning incidents related to detergent pods, and an ongoing shift from rigid containers

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to flexible packaging. An example of a child-resistant option for flexible packaging is Presto’s Child-Guard zipper, which unzips the pouch when the slider tongue is simultaneously aligned with a groove, depressed, and pulled. PPi Technologies also uses a re-closable CR zipper for its Cannapaq standup pouch for cannabis.

ISSUE 53 THE DOPEST ISSUE dopemagazine.com

[ Child-Resistant Cannapaq Standup Pouch, by PPi Technologies ]


WRITER •DAVID PALESCHUCK, MBA, CLS

“Designers of child-resistant packaging must always work against the paradox that a package that is difficult for a child to open can often be difficult for the adult patient it is intended to treat.” CREATIVE COMPLIANCE

To comply with state guidelines, cannabis companies must ensure that their packages are tamper-proof, childresistant, and within accordance of their local laws. Unfortunately, because the laws are constantly changing, businesses are forced to keep up with the perpetual tweaks made to remain in compliance and to protect the safety and security of the general public. Designers of child-resistant packaging must always work against the paradox that a package that is difficult for a child to open can often be difficult for the adult patient it is intended to treat. In fact, up to 90 percent of adults struggle to open child-vresistant packaging, according to a report in the journal of the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council. While there’s no consistent set of guidelines for cannabis packaging, there are resources available that help maintain the brand’s look and feel while following state rules and requirements. Assurpack, Locked4Kids, and CoolJarz are but just a few of the firms that have formed to assist cannabis brand owners with state rules and regulations of child-resistant packaging. For example, cities and counties can have more stringent cannabis packaging restrictions than the state of California in general. Recreational packaging laws in Washington and

Colorado also vary greatly, causing mass customization across state lines as brands now grow nationally. Dixie is a solid example. Working closely with a pharmaceutical and consumer product packaging industry expert, Dixie leveraged years of experience to create child-resistant packaging for their “Toasted Rooster” and “Crispy Kraken” chocolate bars. Lindsey Topping, Dixie’s director of marketing, asserted that their multi-state, child-resistant solution remained true to the Dixie brand. It’s in the industry’s best interest not to reinvent the wheel. Instead, it should take the best practices that already exist from relevant sectors (pharmaceuticals, cosmetics) and utilize them. The companies that stay true to their brand while adhering to state regulations will rise above the rest. The onus is on cannabis brands to create safe, consistent products in the most effective child-resistant packages available. It’s on the CPSC to do a better job showing people how to use child-resistant packaging and explaining why it’s important to put all medications away after use. The only way to protect children is to teach adults how to properly use child-resistant packages, but the bottom line is that no package is 100 percent safe.

[ Child-resistant packaging on two of Dixie’s cannabis-infused chocolate bars] dopemagazine.com ISSUE 53 THE DOPEST ISSUE

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CANNANEWS

PUBLIC VULNERABILITY WHY CANNABIS USERS ARE MORE SUSCEPTIBLE TO PERPETUITY IN HOMELESSNESS

I

N THE United States, drug use

is often cited as a cause and perpetuating factor of homelessness. Unfortunately, our society still has trouble separating cannabis from drugs like methamphetamines and crack, so when dispossessed people use cannabis in public encampments, they are seen in a negative light: seen as not responsible enough to work, to take care of their children, to have adequate housing, or to receive federal benefits. Due to unfortunate (and false) connections between the supposed cause and effect of cannabis use and homelessness, advocacy groups for cannabis and homelessness have come to realize that they must work together in order

to promote their respective causes and improve the lives of their beneficiaries. Their intention is to shed light on the truth about cannabis and homelessness, and show evidence that the use of one does not lead to the other. While cannabis use can perpetuate homelessness, it does so not because of its effect on the user, but because of the public’s imagined effect on the user. “Homeless people have to perform activities in public that would go unnoticed in a private residence,” said Eric Tars, senior attorney at the National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty (NLCHP). “They are more vulnerable to being caught and punished than people who have housing.” There are a plethora of negative consequences if someone is caught with cannabis or its paraphernalia, aside from the risk of going to jail. A drug charge affects a person’s finances, credit history, driving record, federal benefits like housing and student loans, employment opportunities, and child custody. “Every time a homeless person is cited or gets arrested, that’s one more barrier between that person and exiting homelessness. Homeless people have a much better chance of success if they are engaging in marijuana use from a sheltered situation versus an unsheltered situation,” said Tars. For that reason, the NLCHP supports putting people into housing without a requirement to be drug free. “If we can get people into housing, their arrest rates go down and their health improves,” said Dr. Barbara DiPietro, senior director of policy at the National Health Care for the Homeless Council. “There is a greater likelihood of them getting a job and being reunified with their family, if these are their goals.” Both Tars and DiPietro said it is con-

cerning that the general public views cannabis as a contributing factor to homelessness. “When people can see and smell marijuana smoke coming from a homeless encampment, it reinforces the stereotype that all homeless people are drug addicts,” said DiPietro. Tars said he is concerned that law enforcement officers could cite cannabis use in a homeless encampment as a pretext to search it or shut it down. “It only disperses people further and takes them away from a community that they may have built. The appropriate approach is to get people into social services instead of the criminal justice system.” Don Duncan, California director of Americans for Safe Access (ASA), had suggestions for how to help solve the problem. “Two things need to happen. One is an educational campaign for homeless cannabis users, so they can know their rights and risks. This will help them minimize their risk. The other is training for law enforcement and security officers to show them how to interact with homeless people.” Duncan said it is a major concern that many religious organizations require a person receiving shelter or social services to be drug free. “Some communities of faith see cannabis as a drug of intoxication and not as a medicine,” he said. “I think education needs to come from within those communities. Medical service providers who are part of the communities must educate others.” Some religious organizations already welcome those who use cannabis. Captain Dana Libby, social services secretary for the Western territory of The Salvation Army, said the organization’s low-barrier and long-term shelters welcome people who are active cannabis users. In states that have legalized medi-


WRITER

cal cannabis, residents of the shelter are permitted to store their medicine there. “In the low-barrier shelters, people have a mat and a blanket. They tend to keep their stuff next to them. In the long-term shelters, they’ve got a locker. There’s also a medical refrigerator at the front desk made of steel with a padlock on it where people can store their medicine.” Libby said The Salvation Army requires those who store cannabis in the refrigerator to treat it as medication. “They can bring in edibles, tinctures, creams, and Marinol or cannabis in other pill forms. If they come in with loose plant material, they can still stay at the shelter, but we ask them to store that somewhere else. We don’t let people smoke or vape anything in the building. We don’t want to burn the building down or expose other people to second-hand smoke.” While The Salvation Army has responded to state legalization by allowing patients to store their medicine in shelters, it does not allow people to stay at its rehab centers while using cannabis. The Portland Rescue Mission (PRM), a Christian organization, is a little more forgiving with its guests, though it doesn’t offer storage for medical cannabis. “Anyone who is non-violent and needs a meal or a place to use the bathrooms or rest is welcome to use the Mission’s non-smoking facilities,” said Ron Arp, the organization’s spokesperson. Allan St. Pierre, executive director of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), said it would be helpful for cannabis advocacy organizations to engage in more con-

versations with homeless advocacy organizations. St. Pierre and Duncan separately acknowledged that NORML and ASA have not had many of these conversations, though both indicated their respective organization had an interest in having conversations in the future. St. Pierre also advocated the creation of a safe place for homeless people to use cannabis for recreational or medical purposes. “These individuals need unfettered access to that space at reasonable hours. Not 24-7, but at minimum, at least as available as liquor. The space should not be treated as a place to ‘shake down’ or have heightened enforcement. It should be treated like a sanctuary. Why not come up with a way [for people to use cannabis] that’s creative, humane, and constitutional?” He said legalization has led to an increase in communication between cannabis advocacy organizations and the state’s local government. “It’s night and day between the states that have legalized it and those who treat it as illegal. In the states where it’s been legalized, they are so much more open and amenable to conversations. Individuals like myself are not treated as political lepers,” he said. Duncan said that by changing the public’s perception of homeless cannabis users, we could find solutions to the problem. “Cannabis is much less harmful, much less of an obstacle for homeless people wanting to move forward than other drugs, like alcohol,” said Duncan. Libby agreed. “They smoke marijuana because it makes life less horrible. That tends not to be

• JESSICA ZIMMER

|

DESIGN

• RANDON PALMA

the reason they’re homeless.” “I think there’s a misperception by the public that if homeless people are using medical marijuana, that they’re somehow not helping themselves—that they have to be busy every hour of the day,” said Duncan. “That’s not a realistic expectation. The vast majority of people who are using medical marijuana are using it to treat medical concerns. That’s not wasting time.” Duncan argued that educating Americans about homeless cannabis users would improve the perceptions the public has of both cannabis and homeless people. Likewise, DiPietro said now is an excellent time to start more conversations. “I think there’s certainly less of a stigma around marijuana because our social and cultural views are changing,” she said. “I’m excited about the changes that we’re seeing in jurisdictions changing these laws. It’s an exciting time.”

“It is a major concern that many religious organizations require a person receiving shelter or social services to be drug free. Some communities of faith see cannabis as a drug of intoxication and not as a medicine. ” dopemagazine.com ISSUE 53 THE DOPEST ISSUE

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THE HERBERY A PERFECT BLEND

THE PLACE If you are looking for a shining example of cannabis going mainstream, look no further than The Herbery. With two locations in the southwest corner of the Evergreen State, this store attracts traffic from Vancouver, WA, and Portland, OR, alike. Their eastside store is on the main drag in

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Vancouver, featuring an exquisitely decorated showroom with several displays that invite customers to peruse the vast array of cannabis products offered. As one customer describes, “The Herbery feels like the Nordstrom of weed stores. It’s clean, bright, and very impressive.”

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THE PEOPLE Speaking with Jim Mullen, co-owner of The Herbery who also walked away from a 30-year career to become a first-time entrepreneur, he describes the growing cannabis industry as “a marketplace much larger than we can even comprehend.” Every day, he observes people frequent The Herbery, who haven’t consumed cannabis in 20-30 years, with newfound enthusiasm for the plant. The customer base here is between ages 45 to 65 for the most part, but you’ll find all age demographics making the highest and happiest of purchases at The Herbery. With the enthusiastic assistance of what are affectionately referred to as “herbtenders,” every customer that walks through the doors can expect to step into a world of shared excitement for the cannabis industry.

A shining example of cannabis going mainstream.

THE PLANTS There is a gorgeous selection of cannabis at The Herbery, with hard-to-find flower such as Blue City Diesel and Pre 98 Bubba Kush from Fairwinds, which are definite top-shelf standouts. They are also the only SW Washington shop to carry the chronic better known as Phat Panda, whose strains such as OG Chem consistently impress. Products from Vancouver-local grower Cedar Creek also come highly recommended, with their cultivation of classic strains such as OG Kush and Jack Herer being notably potent. Their flower ranges from $8-a-gram value strains to $20-a-gram premium products, so there’s bud for every budget. Add in their immaculate selection of everything edible and all things concentrates, and you have yourself a one-stop cannabis shop® ping experience.

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THE HIDDEN BUSH WHERE SASQUATCH STASHES HIS FINEST

THE PLACE As legend has it, the reason the infamous creature better known as Sasquatch has never been found is because he’s hiding in Port Angeles, more specifically, behind The Hidden Bush. The Hidden Bush is nestled at the foot of the Olympic Mountain Range. It is a premier location for tourist traffic and locals alike, featuring old school Seahawks blue with the new-age lime green outside, which most definitely captures Pacific Northwest spirit. You’ll find a large mural facing the highway, where a ninefoot depiction of the legendary Sasquatch sits, appropriately leaning over a cannabis plant. There’s also a Sasquatch statue and the Squatch Mart in the works, where visitors can take pictures and peruse a variety of cannabis-themed apparel and memorabilia.  3230 EAST HWY 101 PORT ANGELES, WA THEHIDDENBUSHWA.COM

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“The Hidden Bush strives to “bring the best product for the best price” and always keeps their customers as their highest priority.”

THE PEOPLE The individuals that make up the team at The Hidden Bush are a close-knit group of family and friends. It is owned by Heather and Anthony Owen, with Heather’s brother Randy Stark tending to the majority of management duties. This staff of ten has deep roots and strong relationships in the medical cannabis community, making them a compendium of cannabis information. And with customer demographics at this fine shop ranging from 21 to 80+, you can rest assured there’s something for anyone and everyone that walks through the door.

THE PLANTS Anthony and Randy are quick to say that The Hidden Bush strives to “bring the best product for the best price” and always keeps their customers as their highest priority. This is likely why you can find everything from $25 specials on eighths, edibles in the five-dollar range, and a ridiculously large wax selection. They also carry the full line of Omega Concentrates and gorgeous flowers from Canna Organix, both strong reasons to make your way to The Hidden Bush for your next ® cannabis shopping experience.

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WRITER

CONCENTRATE

• R.Z. HUGHES

| PHOTOS • ALLIE BECKETT

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GENETICS Legendary Las Vegas Lemon Skunk is crossed with OG #18 here to arrive at the creation of Lemon OG. A favorite among connoisseurs of tasty indica strains, the LV Skunk has been a Sin City favorite for decades due to its sour funk and potent high. OG #18 is OG Kush backcrossed, resulting in a more flavorful and bulky flower.

EFFECTS One dab in and strong psychotropic effects take hold of the mind. It’s a cheerful buzz, spurring the user to giggle with glee. While it starts in the head, after about twenty minutes, a sensation of immense bodily relaxation sinks in. The effect has an aspect of creativity that makes just about anything more enjoyable.

AROMA An unmistakable fragrance of lemon candy issues forth from the container – so strong it can be smelled through the silicone jar. It has almost the same aroma as lemon sherbet or custard, all citrus and sweet cream. This is one of the best bouquets of a concentrate that we have tried, full of mouth-watering terpenes and volatile oils.

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STEEP HILL LABS

LOOKS The oil is a cloudy golden orange, and the thick consistency of putty. Held up to the light, it looks like a shard of stained glass or perhaps a bar of soap. Tiny granules within the oil give it some structure and keep it together, while its nonstick quality makes it much easier to work with.

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FLAVOR A burst of fresh lemon hits the palate as soon as the first inhale passes the lips. This is truly a tasty extract, because the terpenes are completely retained, amplifying the taste of the original sweet flower. Intense and pleasurable, the aftertaste is long lasting and smacks of OG funk, one of our favorite strains.

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IMI HENDRIX’S iconic and self-de-

scribed love song, Purple Haze, is often thought of as a nod to a psychedelic trip on acid, inspiring the genre of psychedelic rock during the late 1960s. He had been fingering the unmistakable opening riff for a while, writing down lyrics before allegedly finishing the melody in the dressing room of a London club in 1966. He then went on to record the song in 1967 with his band, The Jimi Hendrix Experience. Later he would say he wrote the song from a dream in which he was walking under the sea. “[Purple Haze] had a thousand words. I had it all written out. It was about going through, through this land. This mythical ... because that’s what I like to do is write a lot of mythical scenes. You know, like the history of the wars on Neptune,” he trailed during an interview.

“Jimi was obsessively, compulsively, addicted to playing his guitar,” Leon laughed. “He would go to sleep with it on his chest, and when he woke up in the morning—before brushing his teeth—he’d play his guitar.”


WRITER

• SHARON LETTS

|

PHOTOS

• PURPLE HAZE PROPERTIES LLC

FEATURE

SLEEPING UNDER THE STAGE

BRANDING A LEGEND

Today, Jimi’s brother Leon Hendrix is in partnership with Andrew Pitsicalis of Rockin Artwork, LLC, to form Purple Haze Properties, LLC, in an effort to license and market merchandise under the iconic name that is already a brand. Hendrix and Pitsicalis are laying out multiple platforms globally. Merchandise will be marketed under Jimi’s Cannabis Collection, with cannabis products, such as infused lavender macaroons, marketed under Jimi’s Edibles, further defining the Purple Haze strain (among others to come) in packs of pre-rolled joints under Jimi’s Genetics. The farmer involved in the California operation is Scott McPhail of California’s Finest, who has been doing well sourcing for packs of pre-rolls since 2012. Purple Haze lounges are planned in Las Vegas with Pitsicalis in association with the owner and creator of Hard Rock Café and House of Blues. One building, in the shade of Capitol Records on Sunset Boulevard in Hollywood, was in acquisition at the time of press. When discussing keeping his brother’s name alive through branding, Leon scoffed at the concept. “He’s already a legend,” he said during a phone conversation from his home in Los Angeles. “He’s the greatest guitarist that ever lived. There’s nothing I can do to improve on that. It’s done and he’s not going away. He’s here to stay like Mozart or Beethoven.”

[ Jimi’s brother Leon Hendrix ]

Leon, who is four years younger than his brother Jimi, idolized his older brother. When Jimi first began playing guitar with Ray Charles at 16, Leon was there. “We drove my dad’s old Plymouth 30 miles out to Spanish Castle and slept under the stage at night so he could play.” Jimi would later write a song about the historic castle-like venue outside Seattle proper, but Leon remembers being a wide-eyed young man, proud to be in the shadow of his talented brother. Leon was in prison while his older brother became a rock star. He was ironically serving time due to going AWOL in order to be with his brother as he toured. “When he played the Star Spangled Banner the prison warden was so angry at what they called the disrespecting of the song, they treated me very

badly,” he remembered. “I must have peeled 15 tons of potatoes after that.” His brother’s notoriety made him famous in prison, much to the warden’s dismay. “The warden called me into his office and told me, ‘There’s only one general here, and that’s me.’” Leon remembered being put in his place, “but everyone loved my brother.” When his brother passed, he said he felt alone, though many in prison shared his grief. “They called my name over the loud speaker, told me to go to the chaplain’s office,” he said, adding that it was the longest walk he ever made. “Everything stopped for me then.” Leon has fought with his own demons over the years. While Jimi worked his out with music, Leon turned to drugs, alcohol, and women, with his problems worsening after Jimi’s death.

OBSESSED WITH MUSIC Immediate rumors of Jimi’s demise were that he died of a heroin overdose like his tragic counterparts, Joplin and Morrison. But a little known fact is that the young woman he was dating at the time of his passing was actually the daughter of the owner of a prominent pharmaceutical company in Germany. Jimi overdosed by taking nine prescription sleeping pills, which his girlfriend provided, with alcohol. The cause of death was asphyxiation: the pills stopped his heart. Jimi was not a heroin addict, nor was he a drug addict. The only addiction his brother said he had was playing music on his guitar. “Jimi was obsessively, compulsively, addicted to playing his guitar,” Leon laughed. “He would go to sleep with it on his chest, and when he woke up in the morning—before brushing his teeth—he’d play his guitar.”

The path to addiction or obsession often lies in a family’s lineage, and the brothers’ father was a known alcoholic, making Jimi and Leon what are called “adult children of an alcoholic,” with a lifetime of dysfunctions to overcome. Leon has been in recovery for 15 years and has come to terms with his pratfalls and weaknesses. He attends Alcoholic Anonymous (AA) meetings regularly, but he won’t give up the herb. “I have to smoke a joint just to get in the door—to go into those meetings,” he laughed. “I know it is medicine and good. It relaxes me and takes the edge off. There is no way I would ever compare it to alcohol or any of the other drugs I played around with over the years, and I’m sure my brother would agree,” he surmised. “Jimi loved the herb. Oh, yes he did.”

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Pu rpl e h a ze a l l i n my bra i n Lately th i ng s don’t s eem th e s a me Act i n’ fu nny but I d o n’t k now w hy Excu s e m e w h i l e I k is s th e sky — J i m i H end ri x (1 9 4 2 – 1 9 7 0)

TAKE TWO LEAVES AND CALL ME IN THE MORNING

Amanda Reiman, manager of Marijuana Law and Policy at the Drug Policy Alliance, lectures on the successes of studies on “harm reduction,” in which alcohol, prescription medications, and street drugs are replaced by ingesting or smoking cannabis. During her lectures, Reiman sites many studies on the subject, explaining how withdrawal symptoms from drug and alcohol addictions are quelled with the beneficial effects of cannabis in an often smooth transition to sobriety. Studies cited include patients’ accounts of the efficacy of cannabis as superior to many drugs prescribed by a doctor for other ailments. California physician Tod H. Mikuriya, MD, led many studies on the subject and came to the conclusion that 12-step programs under AA should incorporate cannabis as a beneficial substitute for alcohol and other addictive substances. In other words, Leon is on the right path. He should keep smoking that joint before and after meetings; it’s all good. Leon continues to tour, playing his brother’s songs and more on the road. He is bent on doing good work for the greater good and making his big brother proud, continuing the tradition of helping others in their hometown of Seattle. This past Thanksgiving, as per usual, Leon teamed up with the food bank of Seattle, delivering turkey sandwiches to the needy in Pioneer Square. “He’s still here with me,” Leon concluded. “I can go anywhere and his music will be there with me. He tells me to ‘bend them strings’ when I’m in trouble on stage.”

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CANNANEWS

Cann a bis Use In th e Sex Indu stry

N

EVADA RANKS high

for health issues in the United States, and infectious diseases are at the top of the list of preventable ailments, alongside the heart disease, diabetes, and cancer statistics that plague the rest of the country, according to a study done at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Being the only state in the country that allows prostitution, it’s telling that infectious disease is at the top of the list. Ironically, Cook County is one of the counties in Nevada that doesn’t allow the world’s oldest profession, yet Las Vegas is one of the top workplaces for both male and female prostitutes in the Silver State. Traditional casino, hotel, and food service gigs rank second, and they don’t pay nearly as much. And though gun violence and drug abuse play huge roles in Nevada’s deaths and illness, the emotional issues associated with prostitution are often overlooked.

PTSD WITH OR WITHOUT CONSENT Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is very real in the lives of strippers and prostitutes of both sexes. Melissa Farley, clinical psychologist and founder of the San Francisco-based non-profit, Prostitution Research & Education, has spent a career studying, writing about, and advocating for prostitutes abused by sex trafficking and violence—with a focus on PTSD within the profession. Of the hundreds of sex workers interviewed on the streets, in brothels, and in strip clubs, Farley found 68 percent had been diagnosed with

PTSD from violence, rape, or slavery. Her findings put an end to the myth of consent in the business, finding that many enter into the field due to a history of abuse within the family, financial dependency, or drug addiction. Farely’s 2007 book, Prostitution and Trafficking in Nevada, found that 90 percent of prostitution took place in Las Vegas and Reno, where it’s illegal. A staggering 81 percent of sex workers interviewed in legal brothels said they wanted to leave for a better life but were physically prevented from doing so. Corroborating the violence, Farley writes that she was even threatened at gunpoint by a brothel owner.


WRITER & PHOTO •SHARON LETTS

MEDICATING THE PAIN Ashley, a Las Vegas dancer and occasional prostitute, said she sought to leave the world of prostitution for good and enter the healthier workplace of the cannabis industry. She’s looking forward to legalization and the opportunities it may bring. “I’m 27 and have been dancing since I was 19 years old,” she explained. “I grew up fast in Vegas and soon moved on to prostitution. My mother used to smoke bud. It was like smoking ciga-

BONNIE AT BUNNY RANCH The Moonlight Bunny Ranch, located east of Carson City, is one of several legal brothels located in Nevada. First opened in 1955 as The Moonlight Ranch, it recently gained notoriety by being included in HBO’s America Undercover special, Cathouse. Bonnie came for two months in the fall of 2014, then recently came back to stay longer. She originally hails from Washington. No stranger to cannabis, she has grown it herself in the past, keeping track via a high-tech remote system to keep her day job. “I was diagnosed with chronic kidney disease at the age of 24, and was told I could use cannabis for pain,” she shared. “Doctors are so quick to prescribe pain medication, and they kill your liver. I have seen

GRAPHICS • BRANDON PALMA

rettes in our family, and I started smoking at the age of 13. Cannabis has been my ultimate release from the things I had to do down the road from stripping—the kind of stuff the whole world knows about, but no one wants to talk about—or at least they never tell the truth.” Ashley said she specifically chooses cannabis to medicate for emotional issues connected to her work, because it is effective. “I was what they call a ‘renegade,’ a girl who answers to no one and never gives her money to any man for protection,” she continued. “To me, protection was carrying my little handgun in my purse, pepper spray, and a Taser. Can-

nabis always helped calm me down if I was uncomfortable or if I was just feeling bad about myself for choosing the crazy things I did for money—but a girl’s gotta eat.” Ashley said she never apologized for the work she did, but that cannabis helped her remain in control and stay safe. “Bud was the best thing to use when you deal with the men and women I’ve dealt with in this business,” she concluded. “The best part was how empowered I felt. I was in control and I decided what the rules were, and how far things would go. Cannabis helped me with that.”

people really regain their life due to using cannabis.” In Washington, Bonnie said she uses Kush Creams topically for migraines, applying the lotion to the base of her neck and temples. “I’ve also rubbed it on my abdomen for menstrual cramps, and it really, truly works!” she exclaimed. “I’ve also used it on my runner’s knee. The girls at the ranch and I talk about cannabis as medicine all the time. I’m also a big supporter of CBD products.” Bonnie said that not all illnesses are visible, and though she’s a cannabis patient, she’s actually in line for dialysis or a kidney transplant very soon.

Not knowing about ingesting, I informed both of them of the many ways they could further use the plant as medicine. For Bonnie, I advised that ingesting the strong cannabis oil has been reported to cleanse and heal organs, possibly making her pending kidney transplant surgery unnecessary. Hopefully, she’ll keep in touch on her path to recovery. As for the many ailments that can be associated with prostitution, such as myriad infections and the stress of the job, there are cannabis products out there for purchase in legal and medically legal states—many able to ship across state lines because of their sole CBD base.

A SEX WORKER’S CANNABIS REFERENCE

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2

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Think “inflammation and infection” when using cannabis to medicate issues related to sex work.

Smoking or vaporizing can provide immediate relief from anxiety, panic attacks, depression, sleep disorders, nightmares, and symptoms related to PTSD.

Medicated salves or lotions can be used topically for inflammation caused by chafing, minor infections such as yeast infections, personal lubricants, and to enhance the senses.

Ingesting tincture or capsules (CBD- or THC-activated) can help you sleep, ease nightmares, and prevent infection.


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ROAD TRIP

NTERESTINGLY, LAS

Vegas translates to “the meadows,” despite the fact that it is now a barren valley. The last watering hole after the glaciers of the ice age melted, Vegas was once a lush, green valley that formed the pools of water that now flow through the Hoover Damn. In the late 1930s, Thomas Hull, owner of the historic Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel in Los Angeles, had his eye on the desert and built the first casino in downtown Las Vegas. The fancy Westernthemed El Cortez Hotel opened in 1941. At the time, Vegas was a weekend getaway from Los Angeles for rebel rousers—a place to drink, gamble, and get a quick divorce. Once El Cortez was a hit, Hollywood reporter Billy Wilkerson built the Flamingo Hotel in an attempt to attract high rollers. It was the long, skinny legs of Bugsy Malone’s starlet (and sometimes mob courier) girlfriend, Virginia Hill, that inspired the name. Funded by mobsters, The Flamingo became the start of a string of hotels along what is still

referred to as the Strip. As a child visiting Vegas with my parents in the 1960s, I remember Highway 15 cutting straight through town and into the lights. It was, and still is, a magical experience to arrive in Vegas, with its metropolis of fun rising up from the desert floor. The casinos were built as gaudy palaces, with winding driveways circling fountains overlooked by Greek Gods. Star-struck visitors milled about, hoping to strike it rich on the card tables and slot machines. My sister and I were only welcome poolside at the casinos or inside Circus, Circus. We played our own slots on rows of pinball machines upstairs and watched the adults in the casino below. There, my dad played Keno and my mom camped out in front of a nickel slot machine. Our coffee table at home held ashtrays from The Flamingo, Caesar’s Palace, and The Golden Nugget: relics from the old strip, where casino lights still give the illusion of daytime at 3 a.m. and light shows entertain out front for free.

“Nevada has the potential to become the next major source of cannabis information & research.” WINNING GREEN

Since medical cannabis was voted into effect through Nevada Senate Bill 374 with a 17:4 vote during its State Legislative session in 2013, Vegas has embraced the culture. A year prior to legalization, the historic Bonanza Gift Shop (the city’s block-sized tourist attraction) added ashtrays and shot glasses emblazoned with cannabis leaves, putting a whole new meaning to the term “high roller.” My anti-hippie dad would roll over in his grave at the sight. Just four retail shops were open by the time the city’s second annual Marijuana Business Conference & Expo took place. I was able to visit two of them: ReLeaf and Inyo, both beautiful, stateof-the-art facilities staffed with knowledgeable and friendly reps. As a patient from another medically legal state, I’m in luck in Nevada, as they recognize my rights to safe access of my good medicine; all I needed was a letter of recommendation and my I.D.

GETTING RELEAF

While in ReLeaf, I had the good fortune to chat with Mr. Johnston, a longtime Vegas resident who arrived


in the city in 1959 as a working musician. Not allowed to enter the casinos through the fancy circular driveways I traversed with my family years ago due to the color of his skin, Mr. Johnston had to enter through the back. I mentioned that I was working on an article for the Jimi Hendrix issue of this magazine, and he shared with me that he once had the good fortune of playing with the late guitarist, recounting Jimi Hendrix’s last performance at The Monterey Pop Festival in California. It was a surreal encounter, as the lineage of the stigma with black musicians and cannabis runs deep. One can imagine Sammy Davis, Jr. burning one outside the rear entrance with some of the great entertainers of the time, both black and white, for the herb knows no color. An outspoken proponent of the plant, Louis Armstrong was no stranger to the herb or to Vegas, and once stated, “I just won’t carry on with such fear over nothing, and I don’t intend to ever stop smoking it, not as long as it grows. And there is no one on this earth that can ever stop it all from growing. No one but Jesus—and he wouldn’t dare, because he feels the same way I do about it.”

HEALING AT INYO

While filling out my patient intake form at Inyo Fine Cannabis Dispensary, I noticed a woman in a wheel chair attempting to fill out her paperwork with the help of her grown daughter. She had dropped the clipboard on her leg and was sobbing in extreme neuropathy pain. My heart sank and I handed her my vape pen for quick relief. Cameras were watching and patients are not allowed to medicate inside, nor are they allowed to share, so she took my pen outside. I soon learned she was there just for flower to smoke. We laughed at the thought of her being able to pop an oxy inside a pharmacy, but taking a hit of a natural plant-based medicine in a dispensary is off-limits. Despite having a morphine pump implanted in her body, smoking gave

WRITER •SHARON LETTS

her the most relief. As is common with opiates and other pain killers, cannabis enhances their effect. Patients can still have pain while on up to 300mg of morphine, but when they smoke, relief is immediate. Patients are just beginning to learn that they can do away with the morphine and solely ingest cannabis for complete pain relief. I made a deal with her and said I would help pay for a topical cream or edible tincture if she’d like to try it. She ended up buying flower and a transdermal patch from Mary’s Medicinals, a Denver-based company that produces CBD-only products (from cannabis) that can be shipped across state lines, due to their low THC count of 0.03 percent. She told me to keep my money and was grateful for the help.

TESTING, TO BE SURE

One evening, Susan and Curtis Bunce were watching the news when they saw a laboratory in Nevada getting licensed to test medical cannabis. Susan said a light bulb went off in her head, as she surmised it probably would take more than one lab to test all of Nevada’s finest. One thing led to another, and as is often the case in this seemingly magical industry, someone knew someone who “used to work at a lab.” That someone turned out to be none other than Savino Sguera, who holds a bachelor’s in biomedical engineering from Columbia University. He was the former laboratory director for Steep Hill Labs, the first cannabis-testing lab in California. Not a bad connection. Encouraged by her new alliance, Susan started DB Labs. Sguera is the laboratory director and his business partner, Marco, is the laboratory manager. The team they put together has a combined lab experience of 80 years, and the majority of them are women. The 20 samples DB Labs currently tests per week will soon jump to 60 samples per day in the immediate future, but it won’t stop there. “That number will soon expand to 100 samples per day as the production increases in the

GRAPHICS • BRANDON PALMA

New Year,” Bunce explained. Nevada currently has the most stringent testing in the world’s cannabis market. DB Labs uses the most state-of-the-art equipment available, with rigorous standards. Sguera, who also consults for the cannabis industry on the topics of extraction and analysis, said the lab is currently “opti-mixing” its output efficiency and refining its methods in order to make room for the onslaught of samples to come. “We are also looking at the possibility of seeing more analytes: new cannabinoids, more required pesticides, lower tolerance levels, and so forth,” he explained. “With such an expansive market due to open in Las Vegas and elsewhere, Nevada has the potential to become the next major source of cannabis information and research.” The advantage of coming in to the game behind Colorado and Washington, Sguera said, is being able to share information. “When different doctors, cultivators, producers, and especially laboratories begin to pool the information gathered on this enormous set of samples, we will have an invaluable new insight into the cannabis plant. For instance, how does the plant handle different chemical additives and contaminants? How can we identify strains based on chemical profile? How do growing conditions control this profile, and how do these chemical profiles translate to the pharmacodynamics of cannabis medicine?” One thing Sguera said we must remember about cannabis is that it is still a plant, and unlike pharmaceuticals, its effects cannot be narrowed down and attributed to one or two chemicals that can be isolated and purified—although some companies do take that approach. “A majority of cannabis’ medicinal qualities stem from the as-of-yet unknown interplay between hundreds of cannabinoids and terpenes that currently only living plants can produce in the correct amounts,” he said. “As such, the best cannabis will come from the healthiest plants, and healthy plants are in constant symbiotic balance with thousands of different bacteria, fungi, and even parasites—with most of these microbes easily kept at bay by a healthy human immune system.”


GOING GREEN

FARMING NEVADA

Former attorney Chris Van Hook is the founder, program director, and chief inspector for Clean Green, a certification program for farmers. Clean Green is a start-to-finish inspection program, covering all areas in which crops would be worked, stored, or cured. Prior to its inception in 2004, the company was working closely with the USDA National Organic Program, certifying organic farms, so the transition to cannabis was natural. With nine inspectors working separate regions, Clean Green has been able to spread out. Currently certifying five states, they have applications pending in five more. “Eighty farmers were certified last year alone, but all told, we’ve helped more than 1,000 come into compliance since we began,” he said. Green Life Productions, operated in Parhump, was the first farm to be certified in Nevada. Parhump is a small town about an hour out of Las Vegas proper, and to the east of Death Valley. The farm is indoors, a result of the harsh conditions of the Nevada desert, which has snow and frost in the winter and a short outdoor season before temperatures climb to 120 degrees in August. “The facility is an excellent example of how top quality indoor cannabis can be grown in a manner with very low consumption—and in a remarkably sustainable manner,” Van Hook said. Green Life Productions uses LED lighting, which does not need to be cooled, making the reduction of energy in Nevada’s harsh environment easy. Producing a high quality flower with the lowest electricity possible is quite a feat in a region that demands constant energy use. “Its continual reuse and rebuilding of the soils in place further reduces the overall footprint of the facility by not having to replace their soils with each crop, which would require trucking it in and out of the valley,” he explained.

The cannabis market is still developing in Nevada, with farms and product being procured as I write, leaving dispensary shelves a bit wanting at the moment. Green Life Productions has been able to acquire a license and a step up in the market. The difference between Green Life Productions and a traditional indoor cannabis farm is that they grow in large, square beds with cover crops to feed the soil. They regenerate soil through organic composting—otherwise known as sustainable farming. But the real story lies in its cofounder’s past. Steve Cantwell was born and raised in the tiny desert town of Parhump. Bored and challenged, Cantwell speaks of his time as a “troubled youth” before he began training in martial arts as a diversion. At 17, Floyd’s Ace Hardware sponsored his move to Las Vegas to live, train, and compete as a professional. It was a good move, and by the time he was 20 Cantwell was signed by the WEC, and soon after won his first title. At 21, he was the WEC Light Heavy Weight Champion. Then the injuries came. “I started fighting with serious injuries,” he explained. “I knew the dangers of pain pills from what close friends and family had been through with them, and knew I had to find an alternative way to manage what was sure to be a lifetime of chronic pain.” Cantwell began researching, studying, and testing cannabis as medicine, realizing the benefits of the plant. With reservations, he enlisted his wife, Kouanin Villa, to help him. “Steve and I met when we were 17, when he moved into the gym where I worked,” Villa explained. “Twelve years later we are still happily working together, growing cannabis in the former hardware building where it all began.” Villa shared that Cantwell’s attention to farming wasn’t always focused on cannabis. His love of farming started with fruits and vegetable gardens at home before transitioning to coral reef fish tanks, then to hydroponics and working with nutrients. “I began growing in soil first with rock wool cubes, then coco coir and bottled nutrients,

to mixing and recycling super soil, to finally what I believe to be the safest, most sustainable style on the planet earth—no till, organic, living soil.” Cover crops are used as companion planting, just as backdoor, organic farming dictates. The outcome is biodiversity and rich soil with fewer pests. “Our goal is to introduce and grow healthy, beneficial life that outcompetes negative pests and pathogens, creating symbiotic relationships above and below our soil,” he concluded. What this means is that Green Life Productions’ bud and the medicine it makes is clean and pure, loaded with beneficial compounds. Truth and wellness go hand in hand in this industry, and both Cantwell and Villa say they are in this for the long haul. Putting off kids for three Rottweilers, they intend to focus on growing some of Nevada’s finest. Cantwell shared, “We feel true healing can only take place when we first free ourselves from the legal and moral convictions both society and our legal system has put on cannabis.”

FROM SILVER TO GOLD, AND THEN TO GREEN

Nevada has had the advantage of watching what other states do for a very long time. We already know the money is there and the green tourist trade is a given, so the state is preparing in a very smart way. Starting with testing all products from seed to shelf and farming with the cleanest and most efficient methods, they make medicine for real ailments, not just prepping for recreation. Now five states into my Road Trip series, I’ve noticed that when a state legalizes, more people get help and heal. Legalizing helps a medicine maker feel safe to come out of the green closet and to share for the greater good. Whether you are a high roller or just heavily medicated in Sin City, you will experience healing with this plant— fiscally or otherwise. Inevitably, the plant, with its people, prevails.


CANNANEWS

[ Women of Weed members celebrate the association’s second birthday in May 2015 ]

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A Grand Socia l Experi ment!

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cannabis is a gift that we have been historically robbed of. As weed smokers, cannabis activists, and entrepreneurs, we have been forced to live in the shadows and hide our relationship with the queen of plants. I encourage everyone to come out of the cannabis closet and speak openly. Only then can we wash away more than 70 years of prohibition and the stigma of the past, evolving into a new era of exploration and reverence for this plant. I am honored and proud to be the founder of Women of Weed (WOW). Among our ranks are activists, growers, patients, naturopaths, nurses, herbalists, extractors, hash makers, entrepreneurs, political analysts, agronomists, inventors, scientists, graphic designers, nationally published writers, photographers, and publishers. We are CEOs, COOs and CFOs, 502 producers, processors, and retailers, lawyers, lobbyists, international cannabis experts, and policy advisors. Currently, there are 128 participants. At full capacity there will be 200 members in

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Washington and 100 honorary members from around the country and the world, totaling 300 altogether. In May of 2013, nine brave female souls gathered at my house in Magnolia for the first Women of Weed celebration. We have continued to gather monthly for almost three years. We have had clothing exchanges, jewelry-making and slumber parties, bonfires, extraction demonstrations, and karaoke nights. Throughout those events, lots of beautiful food, cocktails, and weed has been shared. About half of our events are members only, so members can bring a guest to several events every year. We have an annual holiday mixer and welcome husbands, boyfriends, and partners (all privacy boundaries still apply). Women of Weed is the result of my own need for community within the cannabis space. From 1995 to 2007, I ran a hemp company, and my only cannabis support came from my best friend Kelley. Kelley has yet to come to a single Women of Weed event, despite being a true woman of weed. A felony conviction for growing cannabis,


WRITER & PHOTOS

along with the imposed social shame and financial burden, has kept this goddess closeted and timid about being “out” in any way, even today. The vast majority of participants may not have a problem being photographed, but let us not forget that people are still going to prison and losing their children over cannabis use. For this, Women of Weed is now private, and will remain so. Media has never been allowed inside our celebrations. While photography is permitted at our events, sharing photos publically is prohibited, unless every single person in the photo agrees to it. Call me old school, but I believe that the best parts of life still happen, even when they’re not posted on social media. Sometimes all that picture taking and posting takes away from the joy of the moment. Women of Weed is a Washington state private social club that’s intended to provide a private, celebratory respite and source of empowerment for its dedicated cannabis industry and movement participants. I have fought to keep my vision intact, making Women of Weed a social club where we simply enjoy, support, and love each other. We have taken great effort to keep the focus on the individual women and their particular dreams, not on the group itself. In an act of empowerment, each of the original 100 members has one spot in the second 100 to give to the cannabis woman of her choice. These new members should be women who have sacrificed personally and given themselves freely for the greater good of the cannabis community. NORML Women of Washington, MJBA Women’s Alliance, and Hempfest are all great places where work is actually being done. Get involved in any cannabis organization and you will naturally find us. Women of Weed sisters are everywhere and there are still 83 spots available for Washington women. My goal is to clear up misconceptions and illustrate that Women of Weed is actually all about being inclu-

•AH WARNER

“Among our ranks are activists, growers, patients, naturopaths, nurses, herbalists, extractors, hash makers, entrepreneurs, political analysts, agronomists, inventors, scientists, graphic designers, published writers, photographers, and publishers. We are CEOs, COOs and CFOs, 502 producers, processors, and retailers, lawyers, lobbyists, international cannabis experts, and policy advisors.” sive, but the most important message is to encourage others to form their own social groups. We are here for fun and support, and our intent is to get together away from the pressures that we carry in the worlds of business and activism. Spending real time in a community—not virtual time—will benefit everyone involved. The larger cannabis community will be stronger, healthier, and happier for it. I am grateful to all of the women taking part in this grand social experiment. I am excited to see all of their accomplishments, and look forward to the ones we will share in the future. These women have been there for me, supporting me and bringing joy to my journey. I am forever grateful and in their debt. dopemagazine.com ISSUE 53 THE DOPEST ISSUE

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Women of Weed does not accept event sponsorships of any kind: there is no buy-in. Events are voluntarily hosted by signed participants. There are no dues or membership fees. However, every member must sign an agreement that covers everything from liability waivers and use of the association’s logo to inviting event guests and sponsoring new members.

Women of Weed does not promote, endorse, condemn, or condone anything, except the removal of cannabis from the Controlled Substances Act.

Women of Weed is not a business association or an activist group. The only agenda at our gatherings is to have no agenda.

“Call me old school, but I believe that the best parts of life still happen, even when they’re not posted on social media.”

Women of Weed is not a secret society. There is no clandestine activity, no women smoking weed in lingerie, and no plots are being forged to push away our cannabis brothers. If you are a cannabis brother who supports, loves, and respects your cannabis sisters, we support, love, and respect you right back.

Women of Weed has no email list, even for use by members themselves. All personal requests, business pitches, and activist pleas are not allowed at celebrations. Instead, we use our private Facebook group, where all signed members can network freely.

Ah Warner is the Founder and CEO of Cannabis Basics, Seattle’s own since 1995. She has a bachelor’s in Gender and Women’s Studies from the University of Washington. As a guiding member of NORML Women of Washington, she recently received a special MJBA Women’s Alliance award for focus and dedication to the women in Washington’s cannabis industries.

WOMEN OF WEED SEPTEMBER 20, 2015 6PM-10PM AVA QUEEN ANNE ROOFTOP 330 3RD AVE W, SEATTLE WA 98119

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P R O U D LY H O S T E D B Y T H E W O W T R I N I T Y O F

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BUDDY BOY FARMS PURITY REACHES A NEW LEVEL IN THE NW CASCADES

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“Organic farmers certainly don’t do it for the money. It takes a lot to get ahead in the organic farming world.”

RGANIC FARMING IS TOUGH. It takes skill and years of trial and error to perfect a system of sustainable and ecological farming that gives us our farm-totable produce or garden-to-pipe cannabis. Farmers at Buddy Boy Farms work yearround in rain, snow, or sweltering heat six or seven days a week, seemingly impervious to the challenges implicit to organic farming in Washington. Organic farmers certainly don’t do it for the money. It takes a lot to get ahead in the organic farming world. The owners of Buddy Boy Farms are driven by their passion for the organic lifestyle, real farming, and love of earth. Farming without chemicals means more work with more expensive organic fertilizers like compost and manure. Organic farms are typically less mechanized, giving their plants more individual attention and love, and typically choosing to hand sort, clip, and jar their flowers. It’s not without struggle and strife that this organic homestead has succeeded. Buddy Boy Farms works with nature rather than against it. Practicing values that hold true to the roots of Mother Nature’s intentions, it is

not a surprise that the products that come out of this Eastern Washington farm are nothing short of high quality. Growing multiple strains with the most natural and organic techniques, this farm supplies beds that you can rest assured have been nourished with love, sunshine, and wholesome nontoxic nutrients. The grow masters have perfected the meticulous techniques it takes to grow plush green plants without harsh chemicals such as pesticides and herbicides. Co-owner Steve or “ big man,” as his friends and family refer to him, has been organic farming for over forty years and his partner DJ has been in the cannabis industry since as long as he can recall. A fierce force to reckon with, together they make a perfectly balanced team. Steve, aka “big man,” has perfected soil science and mastered the art of growing organic veggies, fruits, and grains. DJ has perfected the flow of streamlined operations tailored to large-scale cannabis grows. One is a true-blue certified organic farmer; the other is a cannabis plant guru. Together they’ve sought out a solid team of experts to help out on the numbers

and marketing side. Lucky for us, they are now here to provide us with some of the purest bud this side of the Cascades. To gush even more about this farm, the water they feed their plants is straight out of a spring located on the farm property. Buddy Boy Farms encompasses the definition of wholesome farming. Going organic isn’t just about ensuring the bud you are smoking isn’t riddled with chemicals, it reduces the potential for chemical leaching and protects our environment and water sources for future generations too. Organic farming creates nontoxic habitats for native animals, promoting the balance of native ecosystems, lost through decades of conventional farming practices. Cannabis is a medicinal herb and a medicine. Tainting it with anything more than cool spring water, rich dark earth, or buttery sunshine dilutes its powerful medicinal properties. Like many people now, I am picky about the foods and medications I ingest, and this ultra-pure, earth-friendly bud is a true Northwest treat, certain to be relished in the ® recreational stores it graces.

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UDGING BY the overwhelm-

ing New Year’s resolutions about weight loss, it is quite possible that a few Americans may be experiencing some level of “food-based guilt.” With just eight percent of us actually sticking to our resolutions, it’s clear that the voice of reason commonly overcomes strict dieting and it’s back to the daily grind. For some, though, the voice of reason never shows up and the topic of food puts people in their own personal kind of hell. Using cannabis for eating disorders


WRITER

seems like a no-brainer, since cannabis can help relieve anxiety and induce appetite. Unfortunately, the variety of issues that make up eating disorders makes it more complicated than a “one-size-fits-all treatment.” For some, cannabis is the silver bullet for their eating disorders, but for others it can lead them deeper into the disease. Eating disorders affect 20 million women and 10 million men in the United States. The most common eating disorder for Americans is binge eating disorder (BED), with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa following close behind. These disorders are typically laden with multiple issues, as most people who suffer from them experience symptoms of anxiety, depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and perfectionism. Over half the individuals diagnosed with them are prescribed pharmaceutical psychotropic drugs for these underlying issues. If a person is severely underweight, they are more susceptible to cardiac irregularities and seizures. However, some major brand-name pharmaceuticals prescribed to underweight patients are infamous for these side effects. In the case of cannabis use for eating disorders, it is important to take each individual’s experience into account. Some have reported that cannabis eases their anxiety around food and helps them gain an appetite. However, due to differing ways the body metabolizes cannabis, underweight users may experience more intense reactions to cannabis that could be harmful. Cannabis can increase heart rate, which may not greatly affect the average person, but for someone with poor heart function, it may produce a negative reaction. While cannabis may increase appetite in the short-term, it could lead to binge eating and guilt in the long-term. Post-binge guilt can have dangerous repercussions on individu-

als whose eating disorders are more dependent on bingeing. As a result, dosing for each individual should be carefully monitored, and guilt or binge-like behaviors must be taken into account. Most eating disorders affect young women, and some medical professionals are worried about the effects cannabis can have on a young person physiologically. Be that as it may, young patients with eating disorders statistically end up on some sort of medication. Currently SSRIs and benzodiazepines are the most common medications given to patients with eating disorders, which, as mentioned, could have adverse effects as well. At the end of the day, it’s up to the doctor to decide which options are best for the patient. There aren’t many options for medical professionals to prescribe due to the lack of funding for eating disorder research. According to the US Department of Health and Human Services, only $30 million is budgeted for this research per year, yet eating disorders account for the highest mortality rate of any mental illness. This amount pales in comparison to the $259 million budgeted for schizophrenia and the $404 million designated for depression. Dronabinol, a synthetic form of THC, is a pharmaceutical that originated as a way to help cancer and AIDS patients with nausea and appetite, but smaller studies have been conducted to determine its effects when used for anorexia nervosa. Most studies reveal there is only a small amount of weight gain in the participants who received the synthetic THC as opposed to those who received placebos. However, when a person’s body is severely underweight, a couple pounds can mean the difference between life or death. The type of cannabis given to someone with an eating disorder is also an important factor when using the plant

• ABIGAIL ROSS

“For some, cannabis is the silver bullet for their eating disorders, but for others it can lead them deeper into the disease.” for medicinal use. For example, strains that are high in CBD may counteract the desire to eat, but mitigate heart rate and anxiety. Conversely, THC-dominant strains may encourage a person’s appetite, but may offset with higher heart rates and leave the user more susceptible to anxiety attacks. When the human body is undergoing intense stress from disordered eating, it will react differently to cannabis than the average body. The importance of taking into account an individual’s underlying issues cannot be overstated. Cannabis can be the right option for a person struggling with an eating disorder if the underlying issues are fully established and it is deemed safe by a physician. The best way to start identifying the root cause and find the ideal solution is to reach out for help.

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TECHNOLOGY

WRITER

• HEATHER COONS

|

PHOTOS

• COURTESY OF LOTO LABS

VAPING REVOLUTIONIZED

S

Smart Tec h nology Bri ngs Ulti mate Control O YOU say you want a

revolution...a revolution in vaping technology, that is. We’ve found an amazing product for you! It’s called the Evoke, and it’s the very first smart vaporizer that uses induction technology. “This is the first true innovation in vaping technology,” Andrew Bleloch, Evoke’s CTO, states. “Everything else is resistive heating. Combining induction with a microprocessor and a Bluetooth makes Evoke a 21st century product.” Created by Loto Labs, the Evoke stands out from other vaporizers in three distinct ways. First, it’s a healthier way to vape cannabis. A traditional vaping system uses a coil and wick, and as the coil heats, chemicals like formaldehyde are present in the vapor. The Evoke’s entire vapor path is made with medical-grade materials, and thanks to its induction heating, no harmful particles end up in the vapor. Bleloch explains, “Evoke uses a magnetic metal wick... Picture a copper coil in the shape of a cylinder. When passing an alternating current

through the copper coil, a magnetic field is generated inside of the cylinder. Because the wick itself is the heat source and the wick is heated evenly by the magnetic field, a uniform precise temperature can be achieved. This means no burning and no hot spots, just great-tasting vapor.” Evoke uses smart technology. “Evoke’s circuit board has a microprocessor that regulates temperature, and Bluetooth so temperature adjustments are made via smartphone with the Evoke app. Bleloch says he plans to offer customizable profiles and usage tracking for medical purposes on the app as well.” Just what is the big deal about vaping temperature? According to Neeraj Bhardwaj, Loto Labs’ founder, it’s not about voltage anymore. “We want you to be able to control the heating pattern. If you’re using a special kind of shatter and need a different voltage, the Evoke can offer that. It’s almost like a hack on your own vaporizer.” According to Bleloch, the Evoke’s heating technology has another major

advantage for the consumer. “One of the coolest things is the heating element isn’t attached to the vaporizer; it’s held in the capsule with the material to be vaporized. This means that you can instantly swap capsules for one of a different flavor, and also swap capsules for one containing a different material, because Evoke vaporizes concentrate, dry leaf, and e-liquid.” Evoke sets itself apart from most with the design itself. It was created to be beautiful and luxurious, and not roll off a table. “I, personally, don’t want to smoke out of a pen,” Bhardwaj explained. “So we built the Evoke to stand out as a luxurious vaporizing pipe, not something you have to hide.” The road to building one of the world’s best vaporizers hasn’t been without its bumps. “Developing a new technology with limited resources has been very challenging... It’s been a difficult, expensive, and timeconsuming process; we believe that induction is the future of vaping.”

MEET THE LOTO LAB TEAM Andrew Bleloch CTO, PhD Physics Cambridge University

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Neeraj Bhardwaj Founder, over 11 years experience in high-tech marketing

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Matthew Greenfield Marketing and communications specialist

Gabe Brown Multimedia Artist, designer and autodidact


Evoke’s Un iq ue Featu res

Customize the vapor from any smartphone.

Swap induction cores to vaporize favorite materials.

The induction core generates a magnetic field, heating material evenly and producing the smoothest vapor possible.

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PIECES

WRITER

•MEGHAN RIDLEY

DOSHWORLD CREATING NEW-AGE ARTIFACTS OOKING AT A PIECE OF ART by glassblower Dosher is quite similar to having a psychedelic experience. It’s easy to lose yourself for a moment contemplating the complex forms within his work. The intricacies of his patterns have the power to mesmerize, which is obvious after gazing into these artistic dreamscapes. Known as a Gypsy Renaissance Warrior to many, Dosher hails from the notoriously gorgeous and mountainous north Idaho lake town of Sandpoint. Rooted in the Pacific Northwest, his travels have taken him from the galactic landscape of Burning Man to mural hunting in Denmark. According to Dosher’s website, “The rules and limitations set forth by the world of men have always been a myth.” Always managing to push the mind-bending boundaries of the glass world with concepts such as this trebuchet dab rig, he incorporates a unique blend of materials. Pronounced traybushay, these ancient siege engines were compound machines once upon a time. Known for housing potential energy with destructive punch, trebuchets were used between the 12th and 15th centuries to launch heavy projectiles into enemy territory during battle, making this functional art not only a great conversation piece, but interac® tive as well.

“The rules and limitations set forth by the world of men have always been a myth.” 86 86

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| PHOTOS • EMILY NICHOLS


PRODUCT

WRITER

• R.Z. HUGHES

| PHOTOS • TAYLOR ORMS

PRE-ROLL COMPARISON

IN SEARCH OF THE ULTIMATE DOOBIE Our second installment of joint reviews finds us trying out two from Seattle-based producer Sky High Gardens, as well as a monster doobie from Inflorescence, based in Spokane and known for its potent and heavy indicas. It’s our duty to review the best in cannabis products, and these two companies are producing some of the best prerolls around. It’s a tough job, but somebody’s got to do it.

INFLORESCENCE This goliath joint weighs in at four grams and contains some seriously strong herb. The strain featured is Black Russian, an 80/20 indica-dominant cultivar that is known for its high THC, coming in at 24%. When shared between three people, it took two sessions to finish the entire joint, which is a mammoth undertaking for any smoker, no matter their tolerance. As with any colossal preroll, it had slight issues with burning evenly and canoeing, but the amount lost was negligible. This joint is a special treat for a special occasion, something to be shared and experienced among friends in all of its stupendous glory. Inflorescence’s joints are also pure flower, which is very apparent, as the taste is great and the effects are instantaneous. Make sure you’ve got a comfy couch nearby before sparking up this one. 106 88

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SKY HIGH GARDENS At two entirely different ends of the spectrum, Sky High Gardens’ Green Crack and Pineapple Chunk joints are outstanding pre-rolls, both at over 20% THC. The Green Crack is a pure sativa with a citrus and piney flavor, while the Pineapple Chunk is a full indica, tasting like cheese and tropical fruit. They are expertly rolled, tightly packed, but never too tight to deliver a smooth puff. These two strains burn evenly the whole time and both taste incredible down to the crutch. Rolled with a RAW crutch and papers, the pure organic hemp touch puts these in the upper echelon of pre-rolls. Sky High Gardens goes the extra mile with their joints: a half gram of pure flower–no shake or stems–that doesn’t ® disappoint. Five stars!


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A R E A L C L A S SY J O I N T

W W W . 4 2 0 H IG H S O C I E T Y . CO M FA C E B O O K . C O M / 4 2 0 H I G H S O C I E T Y


CANNANEWS

Navigati ng th e Tran sition to th e Bu si ness World

M

ANY CANNABIS

entrepreneurs do not yet hold degrees from major universities in their trade. However, it’s likely that cannabis businesswomen and men will emerge via the time-honored academic track in the future. The

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cannabis industry is at an interesting crossroad though, where the majority of successful emerging businesses didn’t begin in conventional ways. Also, cannabis businesses are evolving quickly and require more infrastructure than basic growing and


WRITER •ABIGAIL ROSS

”In some ways everyone is figuring it out in real time.”

selling. As a result, entrepreneurs face the challenge of combining years of cultivated cannabis experience with traditional business models. One common issue for developing cannabis businesses is finding quality staffing. Running a business is timeconsuming, and the last thing an employer wants to deal with is a high turnover rate or lack of quality staffing. Additionally, if potential candidates have worked in the industry previously, chances are they will expect higher payment and responsibilities than what newly regulated companies can provide. Training and background can vary immensely depending on which methods of selling/growing they have experienced, and though there are some cannabis-specific staffing agencies out there, one must proceed with caution when using them. For example, a recreational grow facility (that chooses to remain anonymous based on the content of this topic) hired a “professional staffing agency” to staff employees for the production of a recreational facility. The agency attempted to staff work-release inmates to work in the facility. Upon their arrival, a manager realized the situation and the potential workers were promptly dismissed. The “staffing agency” was cutting corners by hiring inmates to work in the cannabis facility without telling anyone. The repercussions from such negligence could have been irreversible, but thankfully the mistake was caught early and the inmates were asked to leave. There are some legitimate staffing agencies out there than can provide extensive services to developing cannabis businesses. Be that as it may, when choosing an outside company to work with, it is important to make sure their claims have the track record to back them up. Cannabis is a new industry, and that means no one has been working on this side of the business all that long. In some ways everyone is figuring it out in real time.

GRAPHICS • BRANDON PALMA

Other concerns for employers are the debilitating taxes and payroll issues. Frequently, employers will higher third-party payrolls to mitigate their employees’ state and federal tax contentions. However, according to the IRS’ 280E section of the tax code, cannabis businesses are not allowed to deduct federal taxes in the same way countless big businesses are. This inability to subtract industryrelated expenses leaves cannabis business owners paying an exuberant amount of taxes to the government. If the cannabis industry is going to be regulated so heavily, it only seems fair that business owners receive the same tax breaks as their conventional counterparts. Section 280E is clearly a dinosaur in the land of cannabis legislature and is in need of some serious revising. Taxes and staffing are obvious concerns in cannabis’ legal transition. However, arguably the most important component of establishing a legitimate business is hiring someone experienced in human resources. Generally, businesses require candidates to have a degree in human resources or business administration in order to be considered for the position, because whoever holds this position is responsible for a massive amount of liability. The responsibilities of human resources are extensive, but essentially they ensure that a business is adhering to legal compliances at all times. This task is crucial in an industry that is so scrutinized by the Liquor and Cannabis Board. One misstep could risk a cannabis business its license. Certainly, some of the aspects of starting a cannabis business can seem daunting. No doubt, there will be kinks to work out in the system, but legislation will figure it out, because Americans voted to make cannabis legal. Now is a rewarding time to be working with cannabis because today’s business practices will ultimately dictate the future.

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GROW

GROWING WITH W SUCCESS Love fo r Knowl edg e Co nq uers Al l

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HAT DEFINES a ‘good grower’ and what makes a great one? None of us start out on top, and although a cruel reality, most don’t make it there, especially when it comes to growing cannabis. Despite talking to personal friends in the industry and lead growers in both the recreational and medical markets, I was unable to get a definitive answer. What they offered instead were their life sto-


WRITER

“Ultimately, the largest common factor that rings true with successful growers is their determination to never miss an opportunity, and a will to always strive to be better.

ries, which revealed almost all of them shared some similar core experiences. It would seem like a first time home grow is everyone’s first stepping stone, but in reality gardening and working with other plants is a great preparation. Planting flowers in Grandmother’s garden, or pruning the bushes, even mowing the grass, can teach unique lessons that apply to cannabis. My first pruning lessons were on a tomato plant, which allowed for mistakes without too much risk. How can we understand a specialized plant, or a plant we’re breeding to be specialized, if we don’t understand the broader scope of plant life? There is much to learn, not just water and nutrients, but airflow, growth structure, pest problems, and mold too. Many of us are very comfortable in our perfectly controlled rooms, but what happens when the AC fails, or a fan falls and crushes a plant, or the importance of controlling humidity is discovered the hard way? When these disasters reared their ugly heads, these experienced growers had already tackled these problems, but with plants one-tenth as expensive. A broken AC, remedied with greenhouse-like airflow, the craziest shoestring-tied success plant I’ve ever seen a picture of, and the baking soda botrytis stopper – these may have been the inspiring successes that encouraged these growers to do it for one more day. How one responds to difficulty is as much a part of success as how things were planned it in the first place. Ultimately, the largest common factor that rings true with successful growers is their determination to never miss an opportunity, and a will to always strive to be better. A friend of mine, who happens to be the head grower of one of the larger medical grows in WA, had never even grown cannabis when he was offered the job. On the other hand, he has a master’s degree in horti-

• DAVID BAILEY

|

GRAPHICS

• BRANDON PALMA

culture with a focus in closed-environment plant production. He couldn’t have been more suited for the job, and for him it was an opportunity to grow beyond what he had learned and experienced in school. On the flipside, my former boss in Colorado, also a head grower for a large medical/recreational company, never even had interest in cannabis as a drug or medicine until later in life. Ironically, he started growing at way too young of an age because he saw it as a way to make money off his much older brother. As he got older, he worked at nurseries and completed an associate’s degree before landing his grand opportunity in the cannabis industry. By the time he was offered a job, he had been growing for ten years and was only in his early twenties. Because the cannabis community is developing so quickly, everyone is always on their toes. It amazes me to watch self-educated growers conversing with mechanical engineers about lighting before turning around to give tips to professional horticulturalists on pest management. That’s the dedication and passion it takes to succeed. That’s the energy I am proud to be a part of. Most people in the cannabis industry took a giant leap to get here. The more I get to know the people and the stories that brought them this far, the more I am encouraged to push myself. After visiting with and interviewing some of the people I respect most in the cannabis world, it became clear it wasn’t just their growing tips or perseverance I walked away with. From funding veteran rehabilitation to supporting autism awareness, every person was giving back in some form. The love for life that these people share is what I believe brought them this far, and will ensure their continued success in the future.

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CANNANEWS

ROCKIN’ ROSIN

Why Th is Solvent-Free, Heat-Ba sed Extract Is Taki ng th e Cann a bis Indu stry By Storm

F

ROM BUDS to dabs in 30

seconds – is it too good to be true? The rapid growth of a new concentrate manufacturing process known as “rosin tech” is turning heads in the cannabis industry. Rosin tech came onto the cannabis scene this year and has spread rapidly, partially due to videos and photos on Instagram, originating with a user named “Soilgrown.” It has quickly disrupted the cannabis extract market due to the fact that it’s so inexpensive

and accessible for medical cannabis patients and recreational users. Basically, partakers take a piece of silicon-coated parchment paper — baking paper — and fold it in half; then they place a cannabis flower, kief, or bubble hash in there. Soilgrown’s original method was to take a flat iron — just a basic hair straightener — and squeeze the cannabis inside the parchment with the hot iron. The result smells great, looks beautiful, and is eminently dab-worthy. Rosin can be on par with hash oil produced by highly specialized and expensive hydrocarbon extraction technology — yes, I mean butane hash oil — but unlike BHO, solvent residue isn’t an issue, since no solvents are used.

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Rosin tech uses only heat and pressure, making it significantly safer than butane extraction, which relies on flammable gases that could potentially explode. Lab tests have shown rosin clocking in at as high as 86% THC, according to SF Evergreen. This puts it on par with top-shelf BHO in terms of potency, and don’t forget that fragrant flood of floral flavonoids that greets the rosin-dabber. “It is changing everything,” says Duncan Cameron, chief production officer at Denver medical and recreational dispensary Good Chemistry, who just entered the market with rosin. “We saw this bubbling up from trim tables,” Cameron, a master cultivator, tells us. “Good ideas bubble up, they don’t trickle down.”


WRITER

“This was something totally new, totally solvent-free, no extraction equipment, and here’s another great plus: It maintains the integrity of the flower.”

“This was something totally new, totally solvent-free, no extraction equipment, and here’s another great plus: It maintains the integrity of the flower,” Cameron says. “So it has the same flavor as the flower, the same terpenes, unlike BHO, where what you get is an undifferentiated sludge.” According to Cameron, the terpenes are an important part of cannabis’ “entourage effect,” the synergistic powers of all the compounds in cannabis working together. He explains, “You can take vitamin C, and potassium, and fiber, but that doesn’t make an orange. You can take all those separately, and you’re still not getting the total benefit of eating an orange. It’s the same with cannabis. Nothing is the same as experiencing the flower in its original state, unadulterated — and that’s essentially what you do when you experience rosin.” “A lot of people took a lot of resources, time, and capital, investing

• STEVE ELLIOTT

|

PHOTOS

• GOOD CHEMISTRY

into a BHO machine, or especially the CO2 machines, which can run six figures,” Cameron says. “We bought a BHO machine, but we never turned it on. Because we saw, after we bought it — and our timing was good, just due to luck — the regulations changed and we never used it. Whether it’s better or worse, now, as a new company coming in, BHO is probably not what you want to do. Countries in Africa aren’t putting up telephone poles, they’re putting up cell phone towers. No one’s going back.” The democratization represented by rosin tech is bringing back the essence of the mom-and-pop cannabis industry, according to Cameron. “Now, we’re a commercial company, and I’m not going to try to hide that fact,” he says. “But it kind of warms my heart to see the little guys beat the system. You know, I don’t need to spend $60 on a half-gram. I can press it from buds I have right here in my house.” “We’ve had rosin in the stores for about three weeks now, and every week it doubles in sales,” Cameron told us in early November. Meanwhile, solvent-based concentrate sales have remained flat. “Once you learn, who in their right mind would say, ‘I’ll take my chance on that stuff that has a little butane left in it’? What if 20 years down the line, we find out 80 parts per million of butane is a crazy number, and you’re guaranteed to get cancer from it? Who’s to say? I just know that I would not take that chance. Once people become connoisseurs of [cannabis], they are learning what they like with rosin tech. I think that’s great! It’s one of the most exciting things to happen this year.”

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safety meeting Cannabis was first used thousands of

be ready with dawgstar cannabis

checklist

years ago as a medicine by the ancient Egyptians, who believed their gods came from the brightest star in the sky. They called this The Dog Star. Today we know that its actually two stars, Sirius A and B. According to the legend, a magical plant was brought down from these stars as a gift to mankind. It is believed this is the story of how cannabis got its name. Canna meaning “dog” and bis meaning “two”, the two Dawg Stars. Now thousands of years later Dawg Star will once again share cannabis with the world.

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available at the following locations: Sativa Sisters Seattle Cannabis Co. Whidbey Island Cannabis Co. Clear Choice Cannabis Cannabis City Rainier on Pine Satori Green Theory Rainier Downtown Have A Heart Green Collar Loving Farms Green Life Kushery Local Roots Smokane Bud Nation Sparket Herbal Nation Marijuana Merchantile The Pot Shop Smuggler Brothers #Hashtag Dockside Kaleafa Millcreek Natural Foods Local Cannabis House

DAWG STAR CANNABIS

MIND

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mind SATIVA plants can grow upwards of 25 feet tall but most stay under 12 feet. Light green leaves that are long and thin, the stereotypical marijuana icon. The high from sativa strains are more cerebral, often described as energetic and best for daytime use.

Body

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INDICA plants are short, usually under six feet, and have fat deep green leaves. The high from a quality indica strain leaves you relaxed and social. The stronger varieties will numb your body and put you to sleep. Great for relaxation, stress relief, and “couchlock”.

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This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. For use only by adults twenty‑one and older. Keep out of the reach of children.


CANNANEWS

C

ANNABIS IS hotter than

ever in America, according to a new study. Use in the United States has more than doubled between 2001 and 2013, according to researchers using data from two large national surveys on alcohol, tobacco, and illegal drug use, called the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC). The surveys ask questions “meant to identify marijuana use disorders such as abuse or dependence.” So, of course, the leading questions help to create suitable answers for those who need to portray cannabis as a menace; I mean, of course, for those who seek more government funding for their research, which unfortunately depends upon coming up with negative talking points about cannabis in the face of a nationwide demand for legalization. Also ecstatic about the cash infusion coming their way are the bogus “cannabis rehab” services that prey almost entirely upon those forced into “drug treatment” by ignorant judges who enforce the corrupt and senseless cannabis laws. According to the survey, the percentage of people who had used cannabis during the past year more than doubled from 4.1% in 2001 to 9.5% in 2013. Tellingly, even with these skewed questions and thus distorted statistics, the rate of cannabis abuse and addiction actually went down as the numbers of active cannabis users went up. Additionally, as the number of users went up, the percentage of users who had a cannabis use disorder decreased. “As is the case with alcohol, many individuals can use [cannabis] without becoming addicted,” wrote the study’s authors. “However, the clear risk for [cannabis] use disorders among users (approximately 30%) suggests that as the number of U.S. users grows, so will the numbers of those experiencing problems related to such use.”

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RESPONSIBLE USE A Ba l anced Lifestyl e

MOST AMERICANS SAY RESPONSIBLE ADULTS CAN SMOKE CANNABIS Most Americans (59%) agree that you can smoke cannabis and be a responsible adult, according to a 2014 poll. Contrary to the tired old stereotype of the lazy stoner — inculcated by decades of “reefer madness” propaganda — most cannabis consumers are instead hardworking members of society, that just happen to prefer a substance safer than alcohol or prescription drugs. While we can’t erase the unhappy past and its negative stereotypes of the cannabis community, what we can do is demonstrate, by our conduct, that cannabis smokers can have full, rich lives with rewarding intellectual, artistic, and professional pursuits. Getting high is just one part of that picture. Responsible adults consume recreational substances, including cannabis, in responsible ways. Those with addictive personalities or a lack of motivation will tend to form an abusive relationship with almost any substance or activity. The fact remains that, for most of us, it’s relatively easy to use cannabis

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as part of a healthy, balanced, and responsible lifestyle; we’ve freely made the decision to use cannabis, not as the result of social pressure. Sure, cannabis can produce a euphoric experience, but many of us find it helps make us more social or outgoing. Remember that novice users can also feel uncomfortable or withdrawn, or have anxiety symptoms such as elevated heart rates. Part of being a responsible, seasoned cannabis user is being kind and tolerant to newbies having a difficult time. Cannabis use that puts you or others at risk, including legal risk, such as when driving, or at work, or in public places, should be avoided. Remember, use of cannabis while driving or in public is still illegal pretty much everywhere, and the penalties are stiff. Don’t forget that cannabis use around children is not only very controversial, but also legally risky. Discretion is key; don’t take the risk of losing custody of your own kids, or being ejected from a friend’s home for smoking around theirs.


WRITER

“When you use cannabis as part of positive social interactions, you are more fully utilizing the potential of a consciousnessexpanding plant than if you use it as a remedy for negative feelings.”

• STEVE ELLIOTT

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GRAPHICS

• BRANDON PALMA

JUST SAY ‘KNOW’ Modern, mature cannabis users inform themselves about its effects, which should include both legal and potential health risks, along with personal consequences, including the impact on your finances. Never use cannabis as an excuse, or as a cue, or for antisocial or irresponsible behavior. You’re conflating cannabis with alcohol when you do that, and cannabis deserves better. Learning the differences between indica and sativa strains of cannabis, and between flowers, concentrates, and infused products such as edibles and topicals is part of being a responsible cannabis consumer. Some heavy indicas, which can literally be the cat’s pajamas as an evening smoke, often aren’t that great an idea to start the day.

When you use cannabis as part of positive social interactions, you are more fully utilizing the potential of a consciousness-expanding plant than if you use it as a remedy for negative feelings. If you’re interested in masking your feelings, rather than exploring them, you may be better off trying alcohol. Cannabis, when used properly, contributes to, rather than detracts from your quality of life, your health, your mental wellbeing, your creativity, your work, your relationships, and your social obligations. Adults who take responsibility for their own behavior, and for their own cannabis intake, treat themselves, and the herb, with respect.

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WRITER

PRODUCT

• R.Z. HUGHES

| PHOTOS • ALLIE BECKETT

SIMPLY NATURAL THERAPY

NAKED LIP BUTTER FROM CANNABIS BASICS

S TEMPERATURES DROP outdoors and the winds start to howl, one thing Washingtonians need is lip protection they can trust. A product that is able to stay on for a long time, moisturize while it protects, and withstand the bitter cold. This is a must-have for anyone hoping to avoid cracked lips in the coming months. Cannabis Basics, a Seattle-based topicals company, has a lip butter that effectively soothes while it heals, leaving skin feeling refreshed. Originally formulated to help patients manage herpes simplex, the potent concoction of herbs and oils shows positive anecdotal results in providing relief from eczema, psoriasis, burns, and an assortment of other dermatological issues. It contains ten different oils, two types of butter, and over five other medicinal herbs including Arnica montana. Tea tree, echinacea, and shea butter are boldly presented on the packaging, highlighting their ability to help trap in moisture and heal damaged or sensitive skin. The base of organic hempseed oil is nutrient-rich and gives skin the vitamin E and amino acids needed for optimum health. It nourishes and deeply moisturizes for long-lasting relief from chapped skin or use as a part of a daily skin care routine. Cannabis Basics’ Naked Lip Butter is fragrance-free and doesn’t leave any grease or sheen on the lips. It has an herbaceous flavor that is not unpleasant, but it does taste faintly like a combination of ® healthful natural remedies.

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HEALTHY HERBAL SKIN CARE ECHINACEA – This herb prevents damage to collagen from free radicals, thus decreasing wrinkles, increasing hydration, and keeping skin looking youthful and clear. It also helps heal and protect sunburned, damaged skin. HEMPSEED OIL – The essential fatty acids in which hempseed oil is so rich help to prevent premature aging and promote healthy cell production. It also has shown promise in treating acne and eczema. TEA TREE – This has been shown to be an effective antiviral and antifungal agent, making it a good choice for cracked, exposed skin. It also softens skin, helping with dandruff, acne, and psoriasis. SHEA BUTTER – Rich in vitamin A, shea butter is known to help virtually all issues with the skin and is one of the best natural moisturizers on the planet.

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CANNANEWS

CANNABIS RETAILERS Make For Great Neig h bors After Al l

W

HEN IAN Eisenberg first

opened Uncle Ike’s at 23rd and Union, some neighbors worried that the I-502 recreational cannabis shop was going to be detrimental to the neighborhood. During the shop’s first month, protesters gathered outside the business carrying signs with messages like, “why set up a drug house next to a church?” The neighboring church, Mount Calvary Christian Center, filed for a temporary restraining order and preliminary injunction to prevent Uncle Ike’s from opening. “The protesters really helped my business,” says Eisenberg. “The best way to launch a

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“Property values are up, crime hasn’t increased, and people aren’t loitering on the block smoking.”

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WRITER •LAEL HENTERLY

new store is to find people to protest; everybody knew exactly who I was.” Back in 2013 the Capitol Hill Seattle Blog reported that Seattle zoning laws might lead to a “little Amsterdam” along East Union Street, one of the few areas in Seattle where zoning allowed for a recreational cannabis shop. Eisenberg says that the way I-502 is crafted won’t allow for anything vaguely reminiscent of Amsterdam. Some people expressed fears that property values would go down. Eisenberg says, “23rd and union has been troubled since the ‘80s. It wasn’t zoned to build high and it wasn’t valuable enough to develop; when I bought the property all three corners had chain-link fences.” More than a year after Uncle Ike’s grand opening, none of the dour predictions have come true: property values are up, crime hasn’t increased, and people aren’t loitering on the block smoking. In fact, the blocks surrounding Uncle Ike’s in Seattle’s Central District are attracting an unprecedented amount of non-cannabis-related economic activity. Across the street from Uncle Ike’s, a 90-unit apartment building will begin leasing in January, so will the 40-someodd unit Stencil apartment project at the corner of 24th and Union. Eisenberg says, “On the brochures for those developments, they list some of the more popular businesses in the neighborhood, and we’re right there with Chuck’s, Neighbor Lady, and Central Cinema. They’re embracing us, not shying away.” Crime is down too. Eisenberg says that he used to clean graffiti off the building on the Uncle Ike’s lot every week. He credits his bright lights and security cameras with driving crime away from the corner. He hasn’t had to remove graffiti from Uncle Ike’s glossy façade once since. Meanwhile, a sense of community has developed amongst Uncle Ike’s and the neighboring businesses. The shop brings people to the neighborhood and many end up visiting the bar next-door for a drink, or the nearby theatre for a movie. “Perceptions are a lot harder to change than reality,” says Eisenberg. “People perceive more danger than there is. With Uncle Ike’s open, thousands walk down from Capitol Hill and see

GRAPHICS • BRANDON PALMA

that it’s a nice safe neighborhood.” Tom Gordon, a real estate broker who specializes in finding suitable locations for cannabis businesses, says it’s likely the neighboring apartment buildings were in the works long before Uncle Ike’s opened. Gordon has been finding locations for cannabis retailers since long before I-502 was on the books. During that time he hasn’t come across a better location than 23rd and Union, he says. “It’s getting much nicer over there because the State is like his 50% partner; it’s like a police station up there, with people all around, and you’re on the TV screen 24 hours a day,” says Gordon. Gordon suspects other businesses– usually coffee shops, restaurants, or retailers, in his experience–open up next to I-502 shops because the foot traffic guarantees customers. “There’s other examples where it’s led to more businesses opening up. You’ve got Clear Choice in Tacoma, a place in Granite Falls, a place by Thrasher’s Corner in Bothell, and another place in Edmonds.” Last year in Denver, researchers at the University of Colorado Denver’s School of Public Affairs conducted a study to determine if dispensaries should be designated as a locally undesirable land use, or LULU. The researchers concluded that, although dispensaries tended to be located in neighborhoods with higher crime rates, they didn’t lead to increased crime. Eisenberg says he’s just happy to see so much positive activity in the neighborhood, “It’s completely reversed from where it was a decade ago.”

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THE BIGGEST NIGHT IN THE

CANNABIS INDUSTRY

SATURDAY DECEMBER 19, 2015 8PM SHOWBOX SODO | SEATTLE , WA HOSTED BY

KITTY KITTY BANG BANG

T

WRITER

• ALISON BAIRD

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PHOTOS

• MARK COFFIN

HIS YEAR’S DOPE Industry Awards of 2015 hosted by Kitty Kitty Bang Bang was a unique event many will reminisce over in their warmed wintertime hearts for quite some time. The only black tie, red carpet event of the cannabis industry, this is a favorite anticipated evening in Seattle. A night set aside to showcase the strength and size of our growing industry in Washington and celebrate how far we have come, special guests included Dr. Carl Hart, and Ed Rosenthal who was presented with the Marc Emery Award for his numerous efforts and sacrifice for the plant. Pride and warm vibes filled the venue making this feel more like a giant family reunion as we celebrated and reconnected on this memorable night presented by Dutch Master Nutrients with support from Evergreen Extracts, Buddy Boy Farms, and Suspended Brands.


PHOTOGRAPHER OF THE YEAR

BEST GLASS COMPANY

BESS BYERS

MOTHERSHIP

JOURNALIST OF THE YEAR

BEST HEAD SHOP

WES ABNEY - NW LEAF

PIECE OF MIND

BEST CONSULTANT

BEST TOPICAL BRAND

AMBER LEWIS

CANNABIS BASICS

BEST LIGHTING COMPANY

BEST CONCENTRATE BRAND

GAVITA

X-TRACTED

BEST NUTRIENT COMPANY

BEST EDIBLE BRAND

EMERALD HARVEST

LOADED SODA

BEST SECURITY COMPANY

BEST NEW PRODUCT

CANNAGUARD SECURITY

BUDDER BLOCKS - POCKET SQUARE

BEST TECH PRODUCT

BEST STAFF

LEAFLY

SEATTLE CANNABIS COMPANY

BEST BRAND MARKETING

THE EMERY AWARD

SUSPENDED BRANDS

ED ROSENTHAL

BEST OVERALL BRAND

BEST COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

SOLSTICE

DOCKSIDE

ACTIVIST OF THE YEAR

BEST MEDICINE SELECTION

BRIAN CALDWELL

THE CPC

BEST CANNABIS ASSOCIATION

BEST EDIBLE SELECTION

NWPPR

THE NOVEL TREE

BEST TESTING FACILITY

BEST STORE MERCHANDISING

INTEGRITY LABS

SATORI

BEST LAW FIRM

BEST NEW RECREATIONAL STORE

ASHBY LAW GROUP

STASH POT SHOP

BEST PROCESSOR

BEST STORE ATMOSPHERE

X-TRACTED

THE NOVEL TREE

BEST PRODUCER

FEMALE BUDTENDER OF THE YEAR

FORBIDDEN GARDENS

ARIANA RAMIREZ - TRIPLE C CANNABIS

BEST OUTDOOR GROW

MALE BUDTENDER OF THE YEAR

WASHINGTON’S FINEST CANNABIS

EASTON MORGAN - TRIPLE C CANNABIS

BEST INDOOR GROW

RECREATIONAL STORE OF THE YEAR

SOLSTICE

GREENSIDE RECREATIONAL

BESTGLASS BLOWER

MEDICAL CO-OP OF THE YEAR

ERAN PARK

TRIPLE C CANNABIS


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BUSINESS

WRITER •MELANIE BIGALKE | PHOTO • RYAN LEBRIERE

CAMILLE MESSINA

CHANGING THE GAME SIX CANNABIS ENTREPRENEURS TO WATCH

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AMY PERADOTTA

OREGON - AMY PERADOTTA

The end of cannabis prohibition signals a shift in the social conversation on cannabis, and a rising awareness of the issues of social justice. Cannabis represents freedom for human beings. Entrepreneurs entering the space are excited about the potential for innovation, community, and change that cannabis represents, and they’re willing to do whatever it takes to make this industry work. From leaving high-paying jobs to moonlighting, these motivated and innovative souls are creating the future of cannabis now.

Amy Peradotta is an independent project manager specializing in industrial hemp. She has a master’s degree in public administration, and wrote her senior thesis on the “asinine” policies preventing industrial hemp from being utilized as a major renewable resource in the United States. Amy is passionate about the difference that cannabis can make in the world. “I believe in advocating for the entire cannabis genus. There is a use for every strain, every cultivar, every variety. In whatever composition its cannabinoids, whatever that ratio might be, there is value that can be useful.” Peradotta has been involved with projects all over the country, and is especially interested in her home state of Illinois, where she is currently coordinating a research project on industrial hemp economies with Western Illinois University. In Oregon, she is working with farmers, industry leaders, and legislators to develop the foundation for a robust hemp industry. She’s also been managing film shoots for Doug Fine’s upcoming documentary on hemp, and working with Oregon Hemp Works on the 2016 launch of their hempcrete workshop in Oregon City, Oregon (The Oregon Trail Hemporium) while holding down a full-time job. Amy is definitely passionate and articulate. “My goal is to create regional hemp economies state by state,” she says. “I think that cannabis represents freedom for humans. If people knew that they could grow their home, their food, that they could make paper, fuel, power sources, and batteries. If people really knew and understood the full potential of the cannabis plant, from hemp to recreational use, we would create a direct threat to corporate capitalist consumerism. Those in power are terrified of absolute cannabis freedom because it is a direct threat to the existing structures of society.”

OREGON - CAMILLE MESSINA, MESSINA BITTERS Camille Messina founded Messina Bitters in May 2015 in Portland, Oregon. Her company is the first legal, cannabis-infused bitters company in the world. “Plants are my passion. When I was a kid, my mother and I created an herb sanctuary. We grew medicinal plants, hung them in the kitchen to cure, and mixed them together in novel creations of leaves, roots, and flowers. One plant that particularly interested me was cannabis. My father was a strong advocate for legalization, and he used it to help treat his pain from cancer when he was diagnosed with multiple myeloma. I saw firsthand how [cannabis] allowed him to live out the rest of his life with dignity. It inspired me to learn more about how plants could help people.” With numerous dispensaries already carrying her products, Camille is poised to expand further into the Portland market, and she has her eye on expansion to Eugene, Oregon. She’s currently running a one-woman operation with the occasional help of contractors and advisors, such as the chemist she consults with to maintain consistent dosage levels and purity. dopemagazine.com dopemagazine.com ISSUE ISSUE 53 53 THE THE DOPEST DOPEST ISSUE ISSUE

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Jason Hinojosa, CEO and founder of Budbuds, is a graduate of Pinchot University with an MBA in sustainable business. He created Budbuds, an app that provides curated cannabis recommendations based on your desired experience. Hinojosa explains, “Whether you’re treating a medical condition or looking to unwind with friends, Budbuds takes the guesswork out of buying cannabis. Just answer a few questions and let us do the rest.” Passionate about cannabis access and change he explains “I didn’t become a regular user until I encountered health problems a few years ago. In lieu of taking prescription painkillers, I medicated with cannabis to assist in my recovery after removing a kidney because of a cancerous tumor. Since that time, I’ve witnessed the power the plant has on the mind and spirit. Carl Sagan said it best when he wrote that cannabis use helped him ‘produce a very rich array of insights.’ When used responsibly, cannabis can enhance many activities, and Budbuds gives me a platform to share that information with the world.” Budbuds is a part-time passion project for Hinojosa, who also holds down a full-time job but he clarifies “I was born to be an entrepreneur. As far back as I can remember I’ve always enjoyed envisioning all the possibilities the future could hold.” Budbuds is set to launch in early 2016.

“THE TIME IS NOW. THE TALENT, DRIVE, AND PASSION OF FOUNDERS ENTERING THE MARKET NOW REALLY HAS US EXCITED ABOUT THE FUTURE OF THE INDUSTRY.” OREGON - DAN MAHR, STORYWYZE STRATEGIES Dan Mahr and his business partner Peter Zuckerman founded StoryWYZE Strategies in 2015 and are serving cannabis businesses with a combination of communications strategies, storytelling, and marketing. According to Mahr, “Having a killer product doesn’t guarantee success. Today’s cannabis consumers have options. It’s their connection to the brand that makes it stand out.” StoryWYZE is focusing on businesses that give back to the drug policy reform movement. “We’re lucky that we get to choose who we work with,” says Mahr. “Businesses that are doing it the right way – helping the movement while making money – that’s where cannabis consumers want to spend their dollars.” In 2014, Mahr managed Oregon’s Measure 91 campaign that legalized cannabis for adults over 21. With a background in politics and campaigning, he doesn’t shy away from a good policy fight. “Coming from the legalization campaign, we’re committed to advancing good [cannabis] policy and continuing to fight the drug war. This is about improving culture. Politics and cannabis are now inextricably linked, and it’s vital to understand both worlds.” With nearly 30 years of combined experience in communications and campaigns, the StoryWYZE guys know how to help other cannapreneurs craft their strategy – and win.

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EMILY PAXHIA

WASHINGTON - JASON HINOJOSA, BUDBUDS

CALIFORNIA - EMILY PAXHIA, POSEIDON ASSET MANAGEMENT Emily Paxhia is a founding partner and the Director of Relations for Poseidon Asset Management, a California-based personal asset management and hedge fund firm specializing in the cannabis industry. With over ten years experience working as a brand consultant and researcher, her work has included primary and secondary marketplace research and consulting in a number of categories and industries. Paxhia and her brother chose to enter the cannabis space based on their own experience of loss. “We lost both of our parents to cancer very early in our life,” Emily says. “Our dad had really wanted to gain access to cannabis for nausea when he was sick, but didn’t because of the stigma against it. We know cannabis would have helped him. That’s something that has made a permanent impact on us. Why should anyone not have access to a plant that can help to alleviate symptoms and suffering with very little side effects?” In 2013, the siblings launched Poseidon, now considered a pioneer in the cannabis hedge fund space. “We knew that this industry was the right place to step out as entrepreneurs, as we understood that any entrepreneurial endeavor would require passion and dedication. We are all very passionate about cannabis,” Emily adds. The partners are most excited by the young professional management teams that are entering the space. “The time is now. The talent, drive, and passion of founders entering the market now really has us ® excited about the future of the industry.”

DAN MAHR


CANNANEWS

NORML WOMEN OF WASHINGTON Sen ior Citizen Cann a bis 101

N

ORML, THE National Organization

for the Reform of Marijuana Laws, is the Nation’s oldest pro-cannabis lobby. NORML Women of Washington is a women’s group dedicated to cannabis education and outreach in the State of Washington. This year, we started visiting senior centers and we’re not stopping. For a long time fighting for cannabis consumers meant fighting for basic civil rights and social justice, it was about over-incarceration, racial disparity, reefer madness and basic dignity. Consumer protection is beginning to mean something different for cannabis users in about half the United States. In states where cannabis laws are changing there are still ongoing prosecutions of cannabis consumers: people still lose their jobs, lose their children, and even go to jail for cannabis, but in the legalized states consumers are also facing new risks.  New devices, concentrated products, exaggerated health claims, mislabeling, deceptive advertising, and inconsistent testing. Cannabis has not yet lost its taboo, and not everyone is comfortable getting accurate information. There is still a lot of misinformation about the law and facts.  Seniors are the fastest growing demographic of cannabis consumers. About 6% of seniors report using the plant. It’s up from 1.9% and the numbers are growing. While the soccer mom was the target vote of Washington’s I-502, senior citizens made up the key demographic in Florida’s 2014 bid for legalization. That initiative failed to pass, even though it garnered 57% support (the largest margin of any statewide legalization initiative). Older Americans say they are interested in cannabis for pain relief, relaxation, and entertainment.

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[ L-R: Joy Beckerman, Danica Noble, Darianne Clark and Claire MacKenzie ]


WRITER

“All cannabis topics are on the table at our discussions, we cover the basics of cannabis history, the law, the products, industrial uses, and presidential politics.” Cannabis laws are even believed to be driving retirement location decisions for increasing numbers of retiring seniors. Policy analysts wonder if Washington and Oregon’s cannabis laws have some seniors, especially seniors with chronic health conditions, retire-migrating to the Northwest. At the senior centers we have visited there is a lot of curiosity about what’s legal and what’s safe… and what the hell is a dab. We try to answer their questions with accurate information. Most of the seniors we’ve met are familiar with cannabis. After all, they lived through the highly formative years during the 60’s. As cliché as it is, we end up learning as much as they do. They have wisdom to share. All cannabis topics are on the table at our discussions, we cover the basics of cannabis history, the law, the products, industrial uses, and presidential politics. Plenty of seniors want to know if they can get any of the medical benefits of cannabis without the high. Learning about CBD products and non-intoxicating topical

• NORML WA

|

PHOTOS

• NORML WA

[ L-R: Ah Warner, Stephanie Viskovich, Jennifer Chan, Emily Spahn, Danica Noble, Karie Ann Castleberry ]

products is one of the most popular issues. Meanwhile, plenty of the seniors think the THC is the point The I-502 marketplace can be overwhelming and disorienting for the growing number of Washingtonians who are trying pot again for the first time. There is definitely confusion about the integration of the medical and adult-use markets, as well as all the new products. Tinctures, transdermal patches, R.S.O., edibles, drinkables, concentrates; it can be intimidating. Some seniors visiting stores and dispensaries have felt uncomfortable and even left. The one thing they have in common? Everyone wants to talk about vaping. There are folks who share their disapproval for cannabis legalization and we welcome the chance to listen to the reasons why. Sometimes it is based on personal experiences, or deeply held beliefs, and some just don’t want anything cannabis their neighborhood. For the most part, those fears appear to be misplaced. The I-502 businesses are making positive additions to the neighborhoods they serve for the most part. Uncle Ike’s has helped transform one of the most infamously dangerous corners in Seattle into a popular tourist destination that brings in hundreds of thousands of tax dollars. That’s productive, and the rest of the sky hasn’t fallen since legalization either. Myth busting is some of the best dialogue with senior groups. Old ideas based in rhetoric or conclusively false assumptions have been skillfully, elegantly, and decisively disproven.

We enjoy talking about modern research. Like the study, put on by the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration, that spent a ton of money over 20 months and 9000 drivers to study the cause of accidents, the largest study of its kind. The results showed that drinking to a .08% alcohol level in the blood increases the likelihood of an accident by 400%, and at a .15% blood alcohol level, drivers have 12x the risk of causing an accident. In fact, having more than a few people in the vehicle, or eating while driving, can increase crash likelihood by as much as 80%. This mega-study found no evidence that cannabis use caused an increased likelihood of causing an accident. This was a serious longterm, expensive study. They were not expecting to find out there was no correlation. Turns out, cannabis is safer. Way safer than alcohol, and even safer than driving while snacking.  We have had totally wonderful experiences with the women, and so far they have all been women, at our senior center conversations. NORML Women of Washington is committed to sharing wisdom between generations and across perspectives. We are also committed to ensuring that justice is relevant as this movement becomes an industry. If you’d like NORML Women to facilitate a conversation in your community contact NORML Women of Washington on their website www. normlwomenwa.com or email them at normlwomenwa@gmail.com.

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CANNANEWS

GETTING SMART ABOUT PRISON EDUCATION

In mates Who Get Educated Stay Free

E

VERYTHING CHANGED

after 20-year-old Michael Santos watched Scarface. “I saw the movie when I was twenty and got on a plane to Miami,” says Santos. He arrived in Miami and started looking for cocaine suppliers. It was the mid-1980s and cocaine was flowing like water through Southern Florida, so Santos found a solid connection quickly. He contacted a few of his friends from Shorecrest High School up in Washington and asked if they’d be interested in flying to Miami – on his dime – and then driving back up to Seattle with some cocaine. They were, and they did, and everything was going wonderfully until the feds showed up at Santos’ door one sunny day in 1987 and told him

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WRITER

he was being indicted as the leader of a Continuing Criminal Enterprise – minimum sentence: 20 years. He couldn’t believe it; he’d done everything right. “Thinking I could minimize exposure to arrest, I hired others to transport,” says Santos. The testimonies of those others were the nails in his coffin at trial. The judge could have sentenced Santos to life behind bars – better known as the Kingpin statute, as CCE is among the most serious charges in the War on Drugs arsenal – but instead sentenced him to just over 26 years, which was longer than he’d been alive. “I anticipated being released someday,” wrote Santos in a tell-all article for VICE Magazine. “I believed that a time would come when I’d return to society.” He had 9,500 days to prepare for that time. He could do a lot with all those days: play pinochle, watch television, lift weights, find god. Instead, Santos went hard on learning, spending 16 hours each day reading and studying. He applied for a Pell grant and earned his bachelor’s degree; then he began writing letters to universities beseeching them to allow him to pursue additional education. “I heard back from two out of a hundred,” says Santos. Finally, Hofstra University bit and he went on to earn his master’s degree there. Next, Santos published a book, then another book. Upon release he knew he’d still be branded a cocaine trafficker. Any time he applied for a job or an apartment, it would be there, but now that wasn’t his only credential. Santos isn’t the only inmate to earn a degree while behind bars. In 1993 the Department of Education reported awarding $34 million in Pell grants to prisoners. In that same year, approximately 25,000 of the nation’s 170,000 or so inmates were pursuing higher education using federal financial aid. You won’t find many recent examples of inmates

• LAEL HENTERLY

obtaining life-changing education behind bars, though. In 1994 Congress passed legislation eliminating federal financial aid for prisoners. Inmates can still fund their own higher education through correspondence courses, but, as fewer inmates enroll in these programs, and universities move distance-learning curriculum online, it’s increasingly difficult. In July, Education Secretary Arne Duncan and Attorney General Loretta Lynch announced a plan to experiment with offering Pell grants to prisoners. The Second Chance Pell Pilot Program

“Of the 107 of inmates who have been released since graduating, only seven have ended up back in prison. That’s a readmission rate of just 6.5%” will allow a test group of inmates in Maryland to obtain federal financial aid to pay for college courses while behind bars. A study by the RAND Corporation in 2013 found that inmates who participated in educational programs

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GRAPHICS

• BRANDON PALMA

were 43% less likely to return to prison. In 2008 the Washington State Penitentiary received an education grant from the Sunshine Lady Foundation and partnered with Walla Walla Community College to offer an associate’s degree program. The program expanded to the Coyote Ridge Corrections Center the next year and, as of August, 256 inmates have earned degrees through the program. Of the 107 of inmates who have been released since graduating, only seven have ended up back in prison. That’s a readmission rate of just 6.5%, says Washington Department of Corrections spokesman Andrew Garber – a dramatic reduction from the state’s average recidivism rate of around 30%. It’s too early to know for sure if the rate will remain so low, “but it’s in-line with national research,” says Garber. If the dramatically reduced recidivism rate holds true, Washington could save a lot of money by educating more offenders. “It costs $47,000 a year to incarcerate and between $2,000 and $3,000 a year to educate that same inmate,” says Washington State Penitentiary Director of Education Carol Fitzgerald. Tech companies are starting to get into the in-prison education game too. The startup Edovo released a “learning tablet” featuring personalized GED programs earlier this year. Founder Brian Hill says that 1,000 tablets are currently in use at facilities in four states; the tablets are free to those incarcerated. “Mass incarceration is one of the great social injustices of our time,” says Santos, who has been working as a prison consultant, professor, and podcaster since he was released at age 49 in 2013. “As a consequence of me having access to formal education I was able to open opportunities while in prison and when I got out as well.”

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CANNANEWS

A FOND FAREWELL, L SEATTLE Leavi ng Th e Emera ld City

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IKE MANY others in the

Northwest, I’m an East Coast transplant. I moved out West for a job, but stayed for the people and the unique, open-minded culture. The city where that bicoastal romance began was Seattle, which I discovered had way more than just rain. Growing up in the New England suburbs, there was massive pressure to fit in. Run with the herd, and get a 9-5 desk job that will do your hometown proud. Obsessing over computer games rather than sports didn’t exactly make me friends with the bullies unwittingly tasked with enforcing this social order. Marred with distaste for the homogenous suburban culture of my childhood, I often returned


WRITER

• JOHNNY HALFHAND

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GRAPHICS

• BRANDON PALMA

“I still remember Brad at CCC Ballard showing me the various strains in giant glass containers, examining the buds under magnifying glasses, and weighing out the medical benefits of sativa versus indica.”

home from a bad day at school to wonder what it would be like to live in a city where anything is possible. It turns out that city of dreams was Seattle, lovingly nicknamed the Emerald City. After living here for five years, I’ve found it definitely merits such a magical nickname. I saw sumo wrestling, museums, Buddhist temples, board game bars, enjoyed the Seattle Go Center, our monumental Central Library, Oktoberfests, burlesque shows, and many more things that would be considered ‘wicked weird’ back east. Everyone is at least a little bit weird hours to get some financial wiggle quintessential sketchy dealer would here. It felt like home very quickly. room, but I inevitably bit off more than show up with a backpack full of who It was here in Seatown that I lost my body could chew. So, this year, my knows what from who knows where. a job due to my illness and applied lovely lady and I made the decision to Adding high-quality cannabis to my for disability, despite my internalized leave Seattle and move south to Tapain management arsenal helped cut shame of becoming a welfare recipicoma, beyond the great wall of traffic. back on fraying pharmaceuticals and ent. While back in New England, I had Intellectually, it is easy to understand injected some much-needed reverie interpreted my worsening arthritis as that those on fixed incomes will have into my daily life, so hampered with a personal or moral failing. The Pacific to leave first, but actually being forced rheumatoid arthritis. Now, several Northwest, however, provided a gentle out by Adam Smith’s invisible hand of environment to gradually come to terms years later, going into the dispensary economics hurts in a real way. Unless to see my favorite budtenders feels like with my physical limitations, as well as you’re on Reddit, no one explicitly says, a relaxed, stonier version of Cheers. years of internalized ableism, uncon“you can’t afford to live here anymore,” sciously cultivated self-loathing directed What a time to be alive, right? but the Northwest aversion to painTogether, cannabis and technology at the destruction left in my illness’ ful, necessary discussions is effectively are ushering in a new Golden Age for wake. Seattle’s many doctors, clinics, Seattle. The city’s quickly changing face, empowering the status quo and letting acupuncturists, and therapists, as well as the outstanding public transit system, punctuated with cranes and glossy-faced the developers do whatever they want, while renters are slowly pushed out made this city an ideal place to “be sick” skyscrapers, easily evokes thoughts of starting from the bottom up, like me. sci-fi metropolises. Here, the future and seek holistic medical treatments, So, with all that considered, my is not far from the present, and thouin both traditional and non-traditional final words to Seattle, especially all sands upon thousands of transplants modes. The many natural wonders surthe budheads: thank you so much for like me are drawn to this Golden Age rounding Seattle also made for great being there for me, for helping me and want to call Seattle home. Among adventures, even if I could only amble get myself right at a hard time in my them, my lovely lady arrived and met along trails at a snail’s pace. The beauty life, and for providing such a wide arme, for which I am eternally grateful. here is truly special. Settling into this ray of healthcare, culture, friends, and With droves of other migrants seekCascadian rhythm of things helped me good herb. Please don’t lose sight of ing homes in the Emerald City, rent is get anxiety and stress under control, the others around you while enjoying skyrocketing at a dizzying rate, a claswhich, over the years, I have identified paradise on earth. Remember to take sic example of supply versus demand as a trigger for flares of inflammation. part in local politics and make sure in effect; prices are also increasing Seattle was also the first place I that our beloved emerald gem doesn’t steadily. The formless phenomenon of discovered the world of legit cannabis go the way of San Francisco, a play‘gentrification,’ which seemed like an vendors. I still remember Brad at CCC ground for the wealthy only. over-politicized issue when first arrivBallard showing me the various strains ing, suddenly became all but unavoidin giant glass containers, examining able. Making rent each month felt like the buds under magnifying glasses, and trying to tread water in a riptide, even weighing out the medical benefits of while working and receiving social sesativa versus indica. This was such a curity payments. I tried to work more far cry from my college days, when the

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WRITER

ART

• R.Z. HUGHES

| PHOTOS • ALLIE BECKETT

GD GARDNER THE GLOBETROTTING ARTISTIC VISIONARY

HEN TRYING TO DESCRIBE what GD Garner creates, art doesn’t quite capture it all. He is an entrepreneur, a vagabond, a dreamer, and a philanthropist who just so happens to make some wild, mindbending pieces of art that have found favor on the red carpets of Hollywood. We spoke with the ebullient Garner from his current base in Puerto Rico. A seemingly nomadic artist, Garner has spent time in Seattle, Park City, Los Angeles, and has travelled extensively throughout all seven continents.  How can a man–who mingles with, and successfully sells his work to, some of the nation’s rich and famous–travel so much and continue to produce without a studio? Simple: His studio is his journal, mobile and with him wherever he goes. With over twenty handmade tomes already filled, Garner’s prolific hand is free to write and draw his life stories whenever inspiration strikes, even if it’s in the midst of a Maasai village. Since his art is so psychedelic, he gets a lot

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of questions about enhancing his creative process with the help of cannabis or other mindaltering substances. He says, of this, “Honestly, I’ve never done cannabis or a drug in my life, this [art] is all natural.” While he may not be a smoker, Garner sees inherent good in the resurgence of the cannabis industry. “The people are so warm, welcoming, and open-minded,” he says, commenting on the obvious relief it provides to patients that have been failed by Big Pharma. His medium is whatever is available at the time, whether it’s chicken blood, mustard, or a pen, and all of his “paintings” are interactive. Touching is encouraged. When asked about his inspiration, Garner reflects on his travels and experiences explaining that he almost died on Mt. Everest, “It’s impossible to come back the same person after that happens.” He says that art is his therapy, his place to escape, it helps him relax, and it’s the only thing in his life he ® “can do with no intent.”

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