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MAY 2018 | THE SUSTAINABILITY ISSUE

EDITOR’S LETTER

TOP VIDEOS

DOPE LIFE MACY GRAY

T

he word “sustainability” conjures thoughts of eco-conscious lifestyles in a world where less than “green” options are the norm. Opting to go paperless, choosing reusable bags, deciding to use mass transit over a personal gas-guzzling car, buying local—the list goes on. In the world of cannabis, we’re also being asked to make sustainable choices. Businesses are re-examining lighting, soil mediums, watering practices and packaging options in an effort to go green. In DOPE’s first Sustainability Issue, we take a different approach to sustainability. We meet up with Macy Gray to discuss what it takes to maintain a career in music for upwards of three decades, and chat about her favorite experiences abroad. We also tap into what it takes to die in a sustainable way; as the global population soars, it’s simply no longer feasible for us to be buried six feet under. We examine the group turning Detroit’s abandoned lots into apiaries, how to create the perfect wave and chat with a saxophonist who holds a world record for the longest sustained musical note.

EAT WITH THE SUPER TROOPERS

INFUSED FRIED CHICKEN & WAFFLES

This issue is inventive, unexpected and will keep you on your toes. Throughout these pages, we’ve incorporated facts pertaining to eco-consciousness and sustainability. For instance, did you know one recycled plastic bottle saves enough energy to run a 100-watt bulb for four hours? Stay DOPE!

INVESTIGATIVE JOURNALISM

WATER PROTECTORS

The DOPE Editorial Team

To view these and more DOPE videos, visit: DOPEMAGAZINE.COM/VIDEOS

RECENTLY CORRECTED ARTICLES We would like to note an error in our April 2018 420 Issue. In the Eastern Washington edition, we misspelled the last name of the TreeHouse Club manager. Her name is Jennifer Bordoy.

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DOPE MAGAZINE MAY 2018 | THE SUSTAINABILITY ISSUE The word “sustainability” conjures thoughts of eco-conscious lifestyles in a world where less than “green” options are the norm. In DOPE’s first Sustainability Issue, we take a different approach to sustainability. We meet up with Macy Gray to discuss what it takes to maintain a career in music for upwards of three decades and chat about her favorite experiences abroad. Throughout these pages, we’ve incorporated facts pertaining to eco-consciousness and sustainability. For instance, did you know one recycled plastic bottle saves enough energy to run a 100-watt bulb for four hours?

SUSTAINABILITY

CULTURE

MUSIC

CULTURE

SUSTAINABILITY

THE SUSTAINABILITY OF DEATH

DOPE ON THE ROAD: THE UNTOLD STORY OF HAWAII

DETHRONING KENNY G

DETROIT’S INNER-CITY STRIKES GOLD—HONEY, THAT IS!

PLASTIC-EATING MUSHROOMS

DEFENDING OUR PLANT EVERYWHERE

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EFENDING UR LANT VERYWHERE As a lifestyle publication, DOPE Magazine is dedicated to creating purposeful, relevant conversations. We’ve built a steadfast framework of inclusivity when speaking about gender, race, class, politics, family and culture—with the ethos DEFEND. At DOPE, we don’t just defend our plant, but our people, patients and planet. Our highly curated content continues to focus on those who maintain a relationship with— and advocate on behalf of—cannabis. While cannabis remains the central theme of our brand, it is our belief that creating conversations about real people and relatable experiences is the best way to normalize the role that cannabis plays in society. Our aim is to continue to illuminate issues that deserve our attention and must be addressed if we wish to both promote and create change. We are grateful for your time, we welcome your feedback and are ever appreciative of your participation and dedication in creating positive, lasting change in the cannabis community.

Subscribe for home delivery at dopemagazine.com/subscribe


T H E S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y I S S U E

TABLE OF CONTENTS

FEATURES 030 MUSIC

DETHRONING KENNY G

VANN BURCHFIELD’S QUEST FOR THE LONGEST SUSTAINED MUSICAL NOTE 036 CULTURE

“WORK HARD, STAY BUMBLE”

DETROIT’S INNER-CITY STRIKES GOLD—HONEY, THAT IS! 040 SUSTAINABILITY

THE SUSTAINABILITY OF DEATH

UNE

HOW TO MINIMIZE YOUR CORPSE’S ECOLOGICAL FOOTPRINT 046 SUSTAINABILITY

TAKING OUT (AND BREAKING DOWN) THE TRASH PLASTIC-EATING MUSHROOMS 050 CONTEST

DOPE SHOTS

WINNER ELVIN BONILLA 054 GROW

POT ZERO

COLORADO’S ZERO WASTE OUTDOOR CANNABIS FARM 056 #SCOUTEDBYDOPE

#SCOUTED BY DOPE

SAVE THE PLANET (AND YOUR SANITY!) WITH THESE SUSTAINABLE PRODUCTS 060 EDITOR'S CHOICE

MAÏTRI SMOKE ACCESSORIES

SIMPLE, ELEGANT PIECES FOR THE REFINED CONSUMER 062 CULTURE

SUN POWERED, MAN-MADE WAVES WIPING OUT ENERGY WASTE AT THE SURF RANCH 066 PRODUCT REVIEW

HATCH23 BACKPACK

8HZ AND SABER UPCYCLE IN STYLE 070 CULTURE

DOPE ON THE ROAD

AMERICANS BY FORCE:THE UNTOLD STORY OF HAWAII

020 COVER FEATURE

MACY GRAY 16

FOR THE LOVE OF MUSIC

PHOTOGRAPHY LILLY LAWRENCE


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YVETTE SHELTON | PAM FARMER | NONJA MCKENZIE


here is a common misconception that Macy Gray rose to fame overnight. There are few people who can’t recall the lyrics to Gray’s “I Try,” released almost 20 years ago—a song that snagged her a 2001 Grammy for Best Female Pop Vocal Performance. Gray will be the first to admit she had no idea the level of success “I Try” would garner. She was thrust into the limelight and quickly began touring the world. When I ask what she misses about making music in the early years, before fame, she chuckles and quickly retorts, “Nothing! Of course, there is a purity to being young and you don’t know much, so that is beautiful, but it’s good to grow up, too…it’s good to be in a real studio with real producers and equipment.” Those years made for good stories, but she doesn’t want to jump into a time capsule any time soon. Prior to her globetrotting, Macy attended the School of Dramatic Arts at USC. The film school and music kids comingled in the courtyard, and it was there Macy embarked on a project that would change her career trajectory. She made a friend who had a 4-track in his dorm and played guitar; this led to her first introduction to greats like Frank Sinatra, Billie Holiday and Nat King Cole. She memorized lyrics and began playing gigs at a local Ramada Inn—she recalls having been 17 or 18 at the time. The Ramada Inn gigs led to a rock band, then a jazz band, then to the Sunset Strip, where she would play at famous clubs like the Roxy to crowds of eight people. I’m sure there were nights when more than eight people showed up, but Gray’s ability to joke about the size of the audience is evidence of her humbleness. On one particular evening, Tom Carolan from Atlantic Records happened to be drinking a beverage at the Roxy. Macy wowed him, and he offered her a showcase for Atlantic that led to Gray’s first record deal. A marriage, three kids and eventual divorce put her promising music career on hold, and it wasn’t until years later Gray would land a deal with Epic Records, the label that produced her debut album, On How Life Is. Macy and I meet in a small loft in West Hollywood—a converted air hangar that buttresses up to a quaint courtyard. Trees are bursting with the first evidence of spring; oranges weigh down tree limbs and California Mock Orange flowers bloom on nearby branches, turning the courtyard into an aromatic paradise. Macy is sitting legs crossed in an oversized vintage peacock chair. In classic Macy style, she’s donning colossal shades and coral lipstick—the glasses give Gray an air of mystery. Her presence in a room is palpable before you’ve even seen her. She spent most of the morning in hair and make-up, playing a mix of hits on a portable speaker she towed into the studio. The room burst into life, and Gray was the driving force behind the dancing that ensued.

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A new album is on the horizon for Gray, and it’s become one of her favorite works to date; a massive tour is scheduled to launch in the fall of this year. When I press her to tell me more, she responds, “It’s hard to talk about music, you gotta hear it. I could say, ‘Oh My God. It’s so dope!’ But you still haven’t heard it. It’s a proper album, and I’m proud of it.” Gray says we can expect to start hearing singles drop in late May or early June. Despite a new record and the usual hustle and bustle of everyday life, Gray has found time to champion some noteworthy projects. She’s setting up a foundation called “My Good,” a positive spin on my bad, the widely-used phrase borrowed from pick-up basketball. The foundation will shed light on and help reduce the negative stigmas often associated with mental illness—especially as it pertains to the youth in our country. The project is a personal and intimate endeavor for Gray. “I think mental illness is attached to negativity,” she notes. “I am so close to it, and I see what’s missing and why people go so long without the real care that they need. I feel like I can make a real difference.” The foundation will be an ongoing project for Gray, and she’ll use her new album to bring awareness to the campaign. “A portion of ticket sales from the tour and some of the album sales will be dedicated to the cause as well,” Gray shares with pride.

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I can’t help but wonder if, in the age of pixels, our young folks will miss out on the types of experiences Macy describes. “I will go out to dinner with people,” Gray recounts, “and they’re on their phones, and I’m like, ‘I am going to go home and you can have a conversation with your phone.’” As a mother, Gray hasn’t had to force her kids to step away from the screen. “As a parent, you want to encourage your kids to go out and do stuff. I don’t have to tell my kids [to go out], they do it naturally,” Macy remarks with gratitude in her voice. With wide eyes, she makes one last comment about her travels: “In Tokyo,” she explains, “the waitresses are fucking robots. A robot dressed in a waitress outfit, and they bring your food to you!” For a moment, Macy’s tone changes and she mentions something about Uber having helicopters. Then she pauses, laughs and says, “It looks like we’re gonna be the Jetsons!” This HannaBarbera-esque world doesn’t seem that far off, and I have to laugh with her at the idea of a “Space Age” future. Gray has had the pleasure of working with some of the most influential musicians of our time. Matt Chamberlain, who has worked with many greats like Elton John, Pearl Jam and Bill Frisell, accompanied Gray as the drummer on the live and unplugged version of On How Life Is. “I don’t know any other drummer that has the kind of swing that [Chamberlain] has,” Gray asserts. “Whatever he does, it works, and you can dance to it. It’s cool. I love it.” At first, Gray didn’t realize who Chamberlain was, and was pushing to have her own drummer in the studio.

More than 1 billion people still do not have access to fresh water


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This issue of DOPE Magazine is all about sustainability, and it would be silly not to ask Macy what she’s done to sustain such a lengthy career in the music industry. “You just keep doing it,” she posits. “If you really love it, there is no reason to stop. You are going to have crazy ups and downs, but no matter how crazy things get, how many times people tell you no, how broke you get or disappointed, you just keep going.” Gray’s message is clear—each day is another opportunity to shine and show the world what you’re made of.

A L B U M S WORT H N OT IN G

THE I D Released: September 17, 2001 A remix of “My Nutmeg Phantasy” appeared in the 2002 film Spider-Man.

THE TROU BL E W I T H BEI NG MYS E L F Released: April 28, 2003 Beck sang back-up vocals and played guitar on Track 2, “It Ain’t the Money.”

BI G Released: March 21, 2007 Producers of Big include Justin Timberlake and will.i.am—the track “What I Gotta Do” made the soundtrack of Shrek the Third.

COV ERED Released: March 26, 2012 In tow with a Parental Advisory warning, a first for Gray, Covered offers Macyesque renditions of greats like the Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Arcade Fire, Metallica nd Radiohead.

STRI P P ED

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Released: September 9, 2016 Recorded live in a Brooklyn church, Stripped debuted at No. 3 on the Billboard Jazz Album chart.

D O P E M AGA Z I N E .CO M


MUSIC

VANN BURCHFIELD’S QUEST FOR THE LONGEST SUSTAINED MUSICAL NOTE SCOTT PEARSE COURTESY OF VANN BURCHFIELD

Y

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ou likely recall Kenny G as the curly-haired musician who inexplicably made the saxophone and smooth jazz a pop staple of the late ‘90s. If you don’t recognize the name, know that his music has undoubtedly soundtracked an elevator ride or visit to a hotel lobby at some point in your life. In 1998, Kenny G was a guest on the Tonight Show with Jay Leno and made the bold statement he was going to set a world record for the longest sustained note. When quizzed by Leno about how long this note may be, Kenny replied, “about 20 minutes.” Leno promptly lost his mind.

D O P E M AGA Z I N E .CO M


The secret Kenny G kept behind his confident, wry smile as he spoke to Leno was that it would be possible to exceed a 20-minute sustained note with a breathing method known as circular breathing. Circular breathing is accomplished by breathing in through the nose while simultaneously pushing breath out through the mouth using air stored in the cheeks; think of the sustained sound of an indigenous Australian playing a didgeridoo. The same effect can be performed on any wind instrument. The claim of a 20-minute sustained note didn’t sound so outrageous to fellow saxophonist Vann Burchfield of Hoover, Alabama. As Vann describes, “I had already learned how to circular breathe back in junior high, so I thought, shoot, I’m going to set a personal challenge and see if I can go twenty minutes.” The next year Kenny G went before the Guinness judges and set a record at 45 minutes and 47 seconds. Burchfield first picked up the saxophone at his grandparents’ home. “When I put the mouthpiece on and started to play,” he recalls, “it felt different to playing other instruments. The saxophone let me express myself, and I literally felt something deep in my soul when I played it. The saxophone is the instrument that most emulates the human voice. Which means, if I

want, I can play hauntingly beautiful melodies. If I’m in a different mood, I can play some upbeat, groovin’ kind of music.” Describing himself as “a man on a mission when I set my mind to do something,” he knew he “could break Kenny G’s record.” Over the next six months, Burchfield worked his way up to 20 minutes, then 40 minutes; he claims to have once played a note for one hour, eight minutes and 22 seconds. But no record is complete, of course, without the seal of the Guinness World Record committee, and on February 17, 2000, Burchfield made his formal attempt. “During the Guinness record,” he tells me, “you have to stand the whole time and the note has to maintain constant pitch and volume. You can’t go five decibels above or below your note. And the note can’t go sharp or flat. After about 30 minutes, your mouth fills with saliva; on a trumpet, you’ve got a spit valve and you can release that saliva. But on the saxophone I had to learn the art of circular breathing while swallowing saliva. I had to tilt my whole body back, swallow the saliva, maintain note and pitch—all while circular breathing.” Burchfield managed to hold his C# for a new Guinness World Record time of 47 minutes and five seconds, surpassing the mark set by Kenny

I HAVE SO MUCH RESPECT FOR KENNY G. HE SAW ME PLAYING ONE TIME, AND HE LITERALLY WALKED ACROSS THE ARENA . . . HE SAID, ‘DO YOU MIND IF I SEE YOUR HORN?’ AND I THOUGHT TO MYSELF, ‘IT AIN’T THE HORN, BROTHER!’

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G by almost two minutes. He wants to be clear, however, that his pursuit of the record was never to be perceived as anything but honoring Kenny G’s contribution in raising the profile of saxophone musicians everywhere. “I never did this to be like, ‘You’re not as good as me,’” he posits. “I have so much respect for Kenny G. He saw me playing one time, and he literally walked across the arena and was clapping and encouraging me. He said, ‘Do you mind if I see your horn?’ And I thought to myself, ‘It ain’t the horn, brother!’ He said, ‘Well, you have a great tone. And you’re very good.’ That was in my twenties—he encouraged me to do great things. One of them was to go on and surpass his record. But breaking the record was never to knock off his crown.”

D O P E M AGA Z I N E .CO M

Subsequent to Vann’s record, Kenny G told HuffPost Live that he planned to regain his title by partnering with an airline, and hold a note for the entire length of an hour-long flight to raise money for charity. But these plans were scuttled when Guinness World Records decided to rest the category. According to Elizabeth Montoya, Assistant Public Relations Manager at Guinness World Records, “When a category is rested, it means that we are no longer monitoring it for new record holders. As the category is rested, Vann Burchfield is now the former record title holder.” When asked why the category was rested, Montoya confirmed, “This category has been rested due to the dangers associated with circular breathing, as confirmed by medical examiners.” She then cited an article published in the British Medical Journal, which concludes that circular breathing for extended periods of time can be dangerous, as the brain is depleted of oxygen. But for Burchfield and Kenny G, there’s still hope to find their way back into the Guinness Book of World Records. Montoya confirmed that a new category exists: “Longest sustained note on a wind or brass instrument, in which the musician must employ a nose plug during the attempt, as circular breathing is not permitted.” The current record holder is Philip Palmer, who played the longest sustained note of one minute and 13 seconds on a clarinet. Vann Burchfield might be ready to set himself another personal challenge. “I have it documented that I’ve gone one minute and 45 seconds on a saxophone,” he notes. “People can deep dive for up to four minutes—that record has a long way to go.”


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COURTESY OF TIMOTHY PAULE

D O P E M AGA Z I N E .CO M


D

etroit birthed Motown Records, techno music, Diana Ross, Smokey Robinson and so much more. It was once the world’s automotive capital—also known as “Motor City”—but when the automotive industry moved from assembly-line positions to automation, tens of thousands of jobs were lost, leaving the once-booming city in crisis. After the great recession, property values plummeted. Detroit continued to over-value homes while simultaneously failing to lower taxes to meet falling property values. In 2010, eighty-five percent of homes in Detroit were over-assessed. Many evaluations were so high they violated the state

of Detroit Hives. They hope to heal the city medicinally, environmentally and socially by taking its vacant lots and turning them into beekeeping apiaries. The idea blossomed after a Detroit market owner suggested Paule try local honey to get over a cold. When the honey helped his sickness subside, he realized their neighborhood needed access to the benefits of raw, organic honey. “When we found out about local honey,” Lindsey explains, “we thought, ‘ Why not bring this to Detroit, because a lot of apiaries are further out, like two to three hours away . . . why not bring this type of apiary to the inner city of Detroit?’” “Detroit has well over 90,000 vacant lots,”

constitution, which has led to one in three Detroit properties being foreclosed on. When the automobile factories shut down, many were left abandoned. Homes are foreclosed on and often never reoccupied, left to rot right before the eyes of Detroit residents. The ensuing neglect has left many locals suffering, resulting in a city with the highest concentration of poverty in any large city in America, proliferating Detroit’s extreme urban blight—when a functioning city, or part of a city, visually deteriorates and decays. But one couple, Timothy Paule and Nicole Lindsey, are creating a buzz around the blight. Paule and Lindsey are Co-Founders

...A LOT OF APIARIES ARE FURTHER OUT, LIKE TWO TO THREE HOURS AWAY...WHY NOT BRING THIS TYPE OF APIARY TO THE INNER CITY OF DETROIT? – NICOLE LINDSEY, DETROIT HIVES CO-FOUNDER

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Mentor young people. It’s a thoughtful, inspiring and powerful way to guide someone towards a better future.


Paule adds. “We wanted to take these vacant lots and offer the same product to help other people like myself.” Now they have two lots. The first, on East Warren Avenue, houses three hives but will have closer to ten this upcoming season. The second is a commercial parking lot on State Fair and Hoover that they project will have closer to twenty hives. “The first vacant [lot] we purchased was an eyesore,” Paule recalls. “It was literally a dumping ground, loaded with tires, trash and debris.” But they didn’t have to clean it alone. Family, friends and local community organizers heard about what they were doing and came out to lend a helping hand. W i t h c o n t r i b u t i o n s f ro m o t h e r l o c a l organizations, these lots have become more than apiaries; they’re a source of optimism and opportunity in the community. Detroit Hives not only takes blighted areas and cleans them up, it also informs and invests in communities that have been disregarded for far too long. “Peace Tree Parks is a community organization,” Paule notes. “We partnered with them, and they brought two garden plots of

vegetables. We took those vegetables and gave them away to the community.” Detroit Hives will be working with local beekeepers and gardeners to keep this outreach going i n t h e s e c o n d l o t a s we l l . “A l o t o f t h e produce there will go to a homeless shelter or residents,” Paule continues. “It will also be educating the community about pollinators, their importance to our environment, and the importance of organic food.” For those at Detroit Hives, this is bigger than bees. As Lindsey puts it: “We wanted to revitalize our neighborhood.” And it seems they’ve begun to do just that. “Since we’ve been in the community,” Lindsey observes, “we’ve been inspiring people there to clean up their property.” Looks like the bees aren’t the only ones contributing to a blossoming Detroit future. FOR AN EXTENDED PHOTO GALLERY, PLEASE VISIT DOPEMAGAZINE.COM/DETROIT-BEE-KEEPERS DETROITHIVES.COM @DETROITHIVES @DETROITHIVES

BUSY A S A BE E K E E PER Backyard beekeeping has become a common hobby among many Americans, particularly with the decline in the honey bee population since 2012—as much as 60% of all colonies have been wiped out. Here are a few simple steps to jump-start backyard beekeeping in your neighborhood. ZONING REGULATIONS Before you begin building, make sure your local ordinances and zoning codes allow for backyard beekeeping.

JOIN A LOCAL BEEKEEPING CLUB Join a beekeeping club near you— they’re filled with people who have a wealth of knowledge you can apply to your building and beekeeping efforts.

SAFETY CLOTHING AND TOOLS Buy safety clothing. Not every beekeeper uses the safety clothing, but for a new beekeeper it’s the safest way to begin. You will also need a smoker, a device that breaks down communication between bees and forces them to disperse, making it easier to gather honey.

IT’S TIME TO BUILD! Take what you’ve learned from your beekeeping club, as well as the research you’ve done, and get started! There are so many different hive shapes and sizes. You can even go the easy route and buy online, or the less expensive route and buy a used hive.

CHOOSING YOUR BEES

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The three kinds of bees typically suggested for beginners are Italian, Carniolan and Russian; they’re all known to be gentle and easier to manage. Happy beekeeping!

D O P E M AGA Z I N E .CO M


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S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y

HOW TO MINIMIZE YOUR CORPSE’S ECOLOGICAL FOOTPRINT KATIE CONLEY

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n their 1976 classic, “(Don’t Fear) The Reaper,” Blue Öyster Cult sang that “40,00 men and women” die every day. Today, that number is more like 151,600. That’s a lot of bodies, and frankly, we’re running out of places to store them all. Ignoring sustainability entirely, how we dispose of our deceased is becoming a big problem. In Sweden, for instance, your grave is dug up twenty-five years after burial, your corpse is pushed farther into the ground, and another body is added on top—there simply isn’t space for new bodies. The Swedes are known for their compartmentalization (I see you, IKEA! Love your meatballs!) but when it comes to our final resting place, there’s got to be a better way. Environmental activist Edward Abbey, famously buried in the desert in a sleeping bag, stated that “[After] the moment of death . . . we should get the hell out of the way, with our bodies decently planted in the earth to nourish other forms of life—weeds, flowers, shrubs, trees, which support other forms of life, which support the ongoing human pageant—the lives of our children. That seems good enough to me.” And today, you can do just that. Although cremation remains the number one choice of disposal in North America, and traditional burial a close second, green practices are quickly catching up. D O P E M AGA Z I N E .CO M


GREEN POSTMORTEM GLOSSARY If you decide on a green burial, you’ll get to choose exactly how your body returns to the earth. Here’s a quick look at a few of the more popular methods.

RESOMATION

PROMESSION

Also known as water cremation, resoma is a “Greek/Latin derivation for ‘rebirth of the human body.’” The results are the same as traditional cremation, with remains becoming a “bone white ash,” but the process involves water and “alkalibased solution” to break down the body in a chamber for 3-4 hours, rather than fire.

From the Italian promessa (“promise”), the body is cryogenically frozen postmortem, then vibrated “by sound at an amplitude that reduces it to powder.” The remaining particles are freezedried. This material is “nutrient-dense,” and, if placed in soil, will continue the decomposition process and can be used as fertilizer.

RESOMATION.COM

BEATREE.COM

RECOMPOSITION/ COMPOSTING Exactly what it sounds like—your body is, well, composted. Methods are still in the works, and the Urban Death Project is at the forefront of this new movement, but facilities have not yet opened. Bodies would be placed in a compost-ready environment, called a “core,” then covered with woodchips and other compost materials. The body then breaks down naturally. The resulting soil can be used as fertilizer.

CAPSULA MUNDI Better known as the “tree pod” burial. The body or ashes are placed in an egg-like pod, which is then “buried as a seed in the earth.” You can choose the tree that will be planted on top of the pod; the tree then acts as your tombstone marker. Your loved ones can tend to the tree as it grows. CAPSULAMUNDI.IT

DUNGENESS CRABS Ok, this last one isn’t real, but it’s fun (?) to think about. Mary Roach wrote in “Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers,” that a retired science teacher, Phillip Backman, told her the “cleanest, quickest and most ecologically pure thing to do with a body would be to put it in a big tide-pool of Dungeness crabs, which apparently enjoy eating people as much as people enjoy eating crabs.” Yum!

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PREFERRED BURIAL TYPES Green burials are gaining popularity, but according to the Cremation Association of North America, cremation has seen an impressive rise in popularity since the ‘70s and remains the number one choice of body disposal on the continent.

300 BCE The year historians believe purposeful cremation began, “most likely in Europe and the Near East.”

1876 The year the first crematory was built in America by Dr. Julius LeMoyne. Europe’s first crematories followed in 1878 in Germany and England.

5% Percentage of bodies cremated in North America in 1972.

50.1%

TIP

NOT SURE WHERE TO START? T he Green Burial Council is t he leading green death standards board. They certify “funeral homes, burial grounds and burial products” as green and provide a helpful interactive map of GBC providers so you can see if there are alternative funeral services near you. You don’t need to be buried out in the woods somewhere—there are over 300 green-certified cemeteries in Canada and the United States. A nyo n e c u r i o u s a b o u t h av i n g a sustainable death should make this their first stop. GREENBURIALCOUNCIL.ORG

Cremation does indeed create less waste than a traditional casket and land plot, but the “natural gas that goes into a cremation is [equivalent to] two full tanks of an SUV, or a 500-mile car trip,” as mortician, author and “Good Death” advocate Caitlin Moran told Jezebel. Perhaps more disturbing is the amount of mercury released into the atmosphere during cremation due to… brace yourself…our dental fillings. You don’t see a pamphlet about that at the dentist’s office. Best-selling author Mary Roach notes in “Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers” that “the average amount of mercury released into the atmosphere” is “three grams per cremation.” Maybe we all should have flossed more? If you lived your life sustainably, why wouldn’t you die sustainably? We’ve provided an intro to green burials, but this is just the tip of the iceberg. You can be buried on a funeral pyre, thanks to the help of organizations like the Crestone End-of-Life Project; you can donate your body to science, perhaps at The Body Farm, where your decomposition will help forensic scientists solve crimes; or you can go full-on Edward Abbey and decompose back to the earth. (The legality on that last one is iffy, but hey, chase your bliss). We’ve all got to go sometime. Know your options, create a plan with your loved ones and research, research, research. Make your memorialization an eco-conscious testament to the way you lived your life.

Percentage of bodies cremated in the United States in 2016.

70.2 PERCENT

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Percentage of bodies cremated in Canada in 2016.

D O P E M AGA Z I N E .CO M


[AFTER] THE MOMENT OF DEATH . . . WE SHOULD GET THE HELL OUT OF THE WAY, WITH OUR BODIES DECENTLY PLANTED IN THE EARTH TO NOURISH OTHER FORMS OF LIFE—WEEDS, FLOWERS, SHRUBS, TREES, WHICH SUPPORT OTHER FORMS OF LIFE, WHICH SUPPORT THE ONGOING HUMAN PAGEANT— THE LIVES OF OUR CHILDREN. THAT SEEMS GOOD ENOUGH TO ME. – EDWARD ABBEY, ECO ACTIVIST

W H AT CO NSTITUT ES A GR E E N BUR IA L?

To be considered “green,” according to Ellen Newman of the Good Green Death Project and TalkDeath, a burial must adhere to a few basic standards:

FOR THE BODY: No embalming fluid. Natural shrouds or compostable/recyclable “basket caskets” are utilized. You can have a casket, but it must be made from biodegradable materials. Remains (if in powder form) must be in a biodegradable container.

FOR THE GRAVESITE: No grave markers. Naturally occurring markers like trees or stones are fine. No vaults or grave liners. No non-native species planted on burial grounds; no maintenance for the plants or grounds.

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magine all the plastic trash you accumulate from one trip to the grocery store, from water bottles and children’s toys to clamshell containers and cosmetic microbeads. Now imagine enough trash to equal the weight of one billion elephants, and you’ll have some sense as to the amount of plastic we’ve discarded since the 1950s. Plastics are now humanity’s number one source of pollution, accounting for 20-30 percent of landfill volume worldwide, while an additional 12 million metric tons are dumped annually into our oceans. As each piece can take millennia to decompose completely, our discarded plastics form vast trash islands called “gyres”—there’s even one the size of Texas—where marine species mistake the toxic, increasingly-microscopic particles for plankton and other food sources. With plastic consumption still on the rise, it’s a fast-compounding problem no one quite knows how to solve, but Peter McCoy is one of many who believe the answer has been under our feet the whole time. “Plastics have been known as

susceptible to fungal degradation since they were first manufactured over 100 years ago,” explains McCoy, who founded the grassroots research organization Radical Mycology, which advocates for underutilized applications of mushrooms and other fungi. Maybe the most underutilized of all is a process called mycoremediation, whereby fungi are used to decontaminate the environment. Distinct from plants, animals and bacteria, fungi are responsible for 90 percent of all decomposition on Earth, and their natural talent for colonizing and breaking down compounds too complex for other organisms has been harnessed to clean up manmade toxins such as TNT, herbicides, synthetic dyes and, yes, even plastic. McCoy explains how early plastics manufacturers tested their products’ longevity by burying pieces in the ground to see what would happen. Af ter digging the

plastic up, experimenters discovered colonies of fungi beginning to naturally digest the decidedly-unnatural substance. So why aren’t we already spraying our plastic-clogged landfills with mushroom spores? “That applies to so much of mycology,” laments McCoy. “We know they have this potential, so why hasn’t it taken off?” In much of the West, and particularly in the U.S., mushrooms are little-understood and often even feared, which is why Radical Mycology makes disseminating knowledge about their many uses a priority. The research is often there, but not the public awareness and acceptance necessary to make an impact. So it goes with plastic remediation. Our understanding has come a long way since 2012, however, when a group of Yale students noticed one of their fungal samples from the Amazon was eating the plastic petri dish around it. Pivoting in their research, they discovered this random fungus—an endophytic form that occurs only inside plants—could survive with plastic as its sole food source, even in oxygen-deprived environments like landfills. Before this, one of the biggest roadblocks to plastic remediation was that other fungal species wouldn’t decompose as rapidly in isolation, but instead worked best together, with numerous species fulfilling different functions throughout the decomposition process. Endophytes may be one of the most diverse and mysterious of all

GROWTH SPHERE ACCESS NOZZLES PLASTIC DIGESTING AGAR FUs HUMIDITY AND TEMPERATURE CONTROL ACTIVATION CYLINDER

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The average American throws away approximately 185 pounds of plastic per year.


DISTINCT FROM PLANTS, ANIMALS AND BACTERIA, FUNGI ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR 90% OF ALL DECOMPOSITION ON EARTH . . .

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fungal niches, so the Yale students’ discovery has kicked off a new wave of interest in this previously neglected branch of mycology. Endophytic fungi may have inherited this supercharged decomposing ability from their lichen ancestors, known for degrading even volcanic rock with their digestive enzymes for a food source. McCoy speculates that focusing on lichen-derived genera of fungi like Penicillium and Aspergillus may thus provide the best path forward for mycoremediating plastics on a larger scale. But there are many variables in cultivating mushrooms outside of a controlled environment. Thus, McCoy posits, it may be most effective to grow fungi in a lab and isolate their digestive enzymes separately, then spray high concentrations on landfills and floating gyres. Cultivators can even “train” a mushroom to create stronger, specialized enzymes by giving it increasing concentrations of the targeted pollutant—i.e., plastic—to consume. Mycology may still be neglected compared to other sciences, but its usefulness in combatting our plastics problem and other environmental crises has become increasingly evident in the past five years. It just remains to be seen how and when humanity will put our new fungal knowledge to good use. “I have high hopes,” assures McCoy, “that someone—whether it’s an academic, private company, or some guy in his garage—will come up with the best way to break down plastics.”

D O P E M AGA Z I N E .CO M


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eep in the boondocks of Gypsum is Pot Zero, the only zero carbon footprint garden in Colorado. At 8,200 feet, they’re also one of the most elevated commercial grows in the state! The farm is like something out of a dream—nestled at the top of a hill, surrounded by panoramic canyon views. A 1200-foot fence protects their roughly 6,000 plants from deer, bears (they love those sticky, resinous leaves) and moles. Pot Zero’s owner, Robert Trotter, explained that due to katabatic air flow, the plants live a bipolar temperature life and are extremely resilient; the plants experience temperatures ranging from 25 degrees at night to 75 degrees or higher during the day. Trotter is one of the most interesting, knowledgeable and passionate human beings I’ve had the pleasure of conversing with. He and his wife built their beautiful home on their Gypsum ranch 15 years ago and turned their love for farming and sustainable living into a full-fledged cannabis business. Trotter is 85 percent blind, but knows his land like the back of his hand and can navigate it without the slightest hesitation. Along with their family, they share the ranch with dogs, cats, horses and a herd of Scottish Highlanders, the oldest known breed of cattle in the world. Trotter refers to their cows as “Mordus,” which stands for Mobile Organic Recycling Distribution Units. The cows not only fertilize the soil, but act as a compost system for the field once the plants have been harvested. The result is a regenerated, recycled soil full of phosphorus, potassium and other micronutrients they wouldn’t have access to otherwise.

TROTTER IS 85 PERCENT BLIND, BUT KNOWS HIS LAND LIKE THE BACK OF HIS HAND AND CAN NAVIGATE IT WITHOUT THE SLIGHTEST HESITATION.

Pot Zero uses genetics from The Bank in Denver and has had phenomenal success cultivating their unique, carefully selected strains. They specialize in the production of rare cannabinoids, specifically CBG, which is non-psychoactive and significantly decreases the feeling of paranoia so many people experience when they consume cannabis. For electricity, they have a hydroelectric turbine which uses snowmelt water to power the entire ranch. This pristine water flows down a 12,500-foot mountain, directly past the farm and down the hill to the ranch; Trotter joked that their water is even cleaner than what they get down at Coors Brewery! He noted that they treat the land with the fullest amount of integrity possible, and have been rewarded by mother nature because of their efforts. POTZERO.CO

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aïtri means benevolence, loving kindness and friendliness in the Buddhist faith, as well as in Hinduism and Jainism. Phil Dépault, co-founder of Maitrileaf, dedicates much of his time to yoga; it wasn’t until his physical condition plummeted, however, that he discovered the connection between cannabis and maïtri. As he revealed to the Direct Cannabis Network, Dépault suffers from “fibromyalgia, chronic pain, irritable bowel syndrome [and a] sleep disorder.” After being prescribed cannabis to treat his symptoms, Dépault’s life trajectory dramatically changed. He set out to create a line of cannabis accessories “designed to be sober, simple, with noble materials and handmade in Canada.”

Maïtri products are sleek, functional and showcase excellent craftsmanship. Ceramists mold each pipe, and cabinet makers engineer and finish each piece by hand for a refined, polished look. I personally love the Karuna Stash Jars, which you can write on with chalk to keep your strains straight. If you have the capital to invest in these impressive accessories, the Maïtri collection is the perfect addition to a chic coffee table display, complete with a card game perfect for an evening smoke sesh.

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n the history of technological arms races, the quest to create a rippable, barreling, manmade wave is probably least likely to change the course of human history. But in terms of using technology to create stoke, joy and happiness, this movement is unrivaled. When surfers first laid eyes on Kelly Slater’s Surf Ranch, they found their first genuinely rippable, barreling, man-made marvel. There are other contenders building wave pools, of course, but none have created waves that rival the ones unveiled by Kelly Slater. The facility in Lemoore, California, is currently invite-only, unavailable to the public at large. Initial tests for the man-made wave pool were made using a 1:15 scale, donut-shaped tank located in a restricted warehouse in Los Angeles. And they focus on issues close to many a salty-haired surfer’s heart: environmental sustainability. Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) announced in a statement that “Kelly Slater Wave Company is one of the first California businesses to partner with PG&E’s Solar Choice to go 100 percent solar, purchasing renewable energy with zero greenhouse gas emissions and lowering their carbon footprint.” As Noah Grimmett, General Manager of Kelly Slater, puts it: “This [solar] program allows Kelly Slater Wave Company to act environmentally while building the best man-made wave.” KSWAVECO.COM

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EVERYBODY’S GONE SURFIN’… Ok, maybe not everyone—at least, not yet. The Surf Ranch is a one-of-a-kind facility with loads of moving parts needed to create their sustainable, rippable waves.

TWO THOUSAND Length (in feet) of the test site at Lemoore. 500 feet wide, the man-made lake was originally built for water skiing.

18 Miles per hour the hydrofoil wave track can clock, aided by more than 150 truck tires.

FIFTEEN Number of waves the pool can produce per hour.

3

Minutes it takes for the surf pool water to calm down and return to a completely static state.

6.5 Number of feet high the waves at the Surf Ranch can reach. Wave height can be adjusted to fit beginner, intermediate and advanced surfers, however.

2-20 Millions of dollars estimated it takes to install a Surf Ranch, depending on the size of the park.

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C U LT U R E

AMERICANS BY FORCE THE UNTOLD STORY OF HAWAII JONAH TACOMA

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the ground like a scene from a James A. Michener novel. Jurassic Park was filmed nearby, and it was easy to see why. More than 2,000 miles from the mainland, the eight-island chain is one of the most remote in the world. We turned off the two-lane road into the parking lot of a small BBQ spot, the droning voice of the GPS announcing our arrival. The smell of island pork filled the car. I found my contact waiting at a small picnic table outside, eating his lunch from a Styrofoam clam shell. He quickly briefed me on what was about to go down. Turns out my tales of men with machine guns were not too far from the truth. “You are about to meet a man who many people recognize as the King of Hawaii,” he explained, his voice somber. I briefed the crew as we fell in line behind his 4x4, all the humor gone from my voice. “We have to make sure we carry ourselves with respect,” I said, turning to face my business partner, Jeremy, and his wife, Mari, in the back seat. “I have the feeling they don’t get many visitors.”

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stared out the backseat window of our rented Jeep Wrangler as the concrete sprawl of Honolulu gave way to lush jungle. We had spent the last three days working the Hawaiian Cannabis Expo, and all four of us were happy to be getting out of the city. I jokingly prepared the crew for what was to come. “There’s probably going to be men with machine guns,” I warned, playing on the anxiety that was building in the car. “They may make you wear a blindfold for the last part of the trip.” We were on our way to see our first large-scale Hawaiian grow, and none of us knew just what to expect. Large-scale grows are almost unheard-of on the islands and never spoken of, especially to off-islanders. This was my fourth year working the cannabis scene on Oahu, and while we had seen our share of home grows and good island weed, this was a step beyond—a step into a world few people even knew existed. Steep mountain peaks rose up into the clouds, bursting out of

JESS LARUE

D O P E M AGA Z I N E .CO M


Veering off the one-lane road we followed the 4x4 onto a winding private drive, diving straight into the jungle, the mountain peaks now looming over us like protective giants. An eight-foot tall iron security gate halted our procession. An armed guard in a small security shack buzzed the gate and two trucks hummed to life, backing out of the way to let our procession through before retaking their positions. A series of small houses lined the dirt road. Massive caged Pit Bulls crossed with a breed I didn’t quite recognize greeted our arrival with howls and bays, clawing at their wire enclosures as we passed. We pulled to a stop in front of a large community building. One of the massive dogs ran up to me untethered as I stepped out of the Jeep, her face scarred but friendly. I ventured out a hand, holding it in front of her giant wet nose as she gave me a lick of approval. Our contact motioned us into the building, leading our small party to a conference room. A giant, weathered table encircled by office chairs dominated the space. We took our seats only to quickly rise again as two large Hawaiians entered the room and stepped briskly to the side to make way for a third, an older, heavy-set, muscular man who introduced himself as “Uncle Bumpy,” extending his oak tree of an arm to shake my hand. “Welcome to the Hawaiian Nation, my brotha,” he said. He motioned for us to take our seats and one of the men, who he introduced as his nephew, Brandon, began to pass out small, handprinted pamphlets bearing the seal

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A rec y c led a lum i n u m can i s back on t he s hel f wi t hi n 6 0 days .


of the Sovereign Nation of Hawaii. I flipped through mine. The carefully typed print was highlighted in yellow, outlining a timeline of events leading up to the establishment of the Pu‘uhonua o Waimanalo, loosely translated as place of refuge. “I told them we were going to take all this land back, but it all started with our occupation of the beach at Sea Life Park some 300 strong.” Bumpy’s tone was low and serious, almost ceremonial, and our group sat quiet as he went on. “We just camped out. We built wooden structures up. This was a major tourist destination, and we stayed there for over 15 months, from 1994 to 1995. By the time they offered us the land I didn’t want to sign, but I was worried because the beach was becoming crowded with unknowns using the beach to hide from the law.” I checked my recorder to make sure I was getting the audio. Uncle Bumpy went on. “I wanted to hold them accountable. It was like having your most prized possession taken away. We were colonized, brah. They taught us American ideals and American purpose. They tried to take our culture away, the same way they have tried to do to all Indigenous Peoples throughout time.”

his voice surprisingly powerful, easily filling the small room. “In April we will speak before the United Nations. We want to present our issues, but then quickly pivot to the solutions we already have in place. This is applicable to all Indigenous Peoples. They can do what we have done, if properly supported.” He motioned to the 50-acre compound around us. Bumpy leaned in, locking eyes with me from across the table. “Imagine helping to create a country . . . Inside our country, inside these gates, we can do what we need to do. We have a monetary system; we are embracing cryptocurrency. The stuff we grow over here is helping people all over the place—real Hawaiian medicine, brah.” The energy in the room was rising, and I could feel the hairs on my arms starting to stand up.

IMAGINE HELPING TO CREATE A COUNTRY . . . INSIDE OUR COUNTRY, INSIDE THESE GATES, WE CAN DO WHAT WE NEED TO DO. – DENNIS "BUMPY" PU‘UHONUA KANAHELE

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Hawaii had remained an independent monarchy until January 17, 1893, 100 years to the day before Dennis “Bumpy” Pu‘uhonua Kanahele, AKA Uncle Bumpy, would lead his band of 300 Hawaiian natives to the occupation at Sea Life park, the eight-island nation taken over by a handful of American religious missionaries with the backing of a small contingent of U.S. Marines. Thenpresident Grover Cleveland reacted by rejecting the illegal takeover of a sovereign nation, demanding that power be returned to ruling queen Lili'uokalani. Seven months later, Congress declared the coup an “Act of War” on a friendly and independent nation. In spite of the lobbying, commercial and religious interests managed to per vade and the temporary republic was eventually adopted as the fiftieth U.S. state. Bumpy went on. “We had treaties with over 20 different countries, trade, navigation—we had all of this, brah.” His tone was somber now, and you could feel the loss in his voice. “We are no longer looking for a win, brotha— we are looking to survive.” His nephew Brandon spoke up for the first time,

D O P E M AGA Z I N E .CO M


“We into making justice show up again,” said Bumpy, his hands raised in exasperation. “It’s been around the corner hiding for too long, because it’s been suppressed. Your tattoos give you away, brotha—you are one of us. Cannabis, cryptocurrency, they are the same; they need a country to embrace them, and we will be that country, brotha.” With that he stood, motioning for us to rise as well. “Come, we will show you the land and then you can see what you came here to see,” he said, smiling. We exited the building into a pair of waiting ATV’s and raced off further into the jungle. We spent the rest of the afternoon touring the kingdom, smoking oversized joints, and exploring the community cannabis gardens. As we hugged our goodbyes and promised to return again, one thing was certain: what they’re doing here is groundbreaking. This little-publicized victory in the jungle was a win for the people. Like the cannabis movement, this land represented a chink in the armor of the powers that be. Whatever the future would hold, we all left wishing our best to this tiny sovereign nation holding its own in the South Pacific. DABSTARS.COM @JONAH_TACOMA

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UP has come on the re c s c e n e w i t h a n a l l natural, cannabis-infused protein bar designed for the active cannabis user. YUP bars currently come in three delicious flavors: Lemon Lavender Zest, Peppery Dark Chocolate and (Bacon Free) Bacon Rosemary Bliss, with a Mexican Dark Chocolate bar on the way! Each 220-calorie bar is packed with 12 grams of protein, 5mg of THC and 20mg of CBD. These bars are the perfect snack for your busy life! The Lemon Lavender bar was calling out to me during one of my latest spring ski trips. The texture was moist, with a toasted-oats crunch (they twice-bake their bars). There is a bit of a cannabis flavor, but it’s nicely offset by the zingy lemon zest and mellow lavender aftertaste. I found the CBD effects a welcome calm after a chaotic day of skiing. If you’re sick of cannabis junk food in your life, try these healthy, delicious options from YUP!

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In the hustle and bustle of Raleigh Hills, a neighborhood in SW Portland, there’s a little weed shop where all the budtenders know your name and beg you to “ask more questions.” The Parlour Cannabis Shop, managed by Shannon Ayers, is an oasis where employees strive to “make it easy” to buy cannabis. Ayers has about a dozen budtenders who have tried every single item in the shop, so they know what they’re talking about.The store boasts hours from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. daily, convenient for busy customers who live and work in the neighborhood. Ayers encourages vendors to host pop-up sample nights, allowing customers to experience new products, and she scours the cannabis scene with a knowing eye that brings in quality product to Parlour.

The Parlour Cannabis Shoppe helps new cannabis consumers navigate their first shopping trip by asking them what experience they’d like to have allowing for interactive learning. Medical clients will be reassured to have knowledgeable budtenders help them find the right edible or tincture for their ailments. Framed posters throughout the dispensary inspire shoppers to “Choose Joy” and “Let It Go” and “Want Better, Not More.” Novices and regular consumers alike will love shopping in this upscale, informative boutique!

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An atmosphere of community is apparent between the staff and customers, as they’re welcomed by name and greeted with a wide assortment of cannabis products at multiple price points. If you’re looking for something special, just ask Ayers and she’ll procure it for you; she believes if one customer wants something, that’s enough for her to invest in stocking the product in her store. She wants her clientele to be consistently satisfied and create a loyal, dependable customer base. Cannabis is meant to be enjoyed, after all!

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4702 SW SCHOLLS FERRY RD PORTLAND, OR 97225 (503) 477-4540 HOURS: MON-SUN: 8AM-10PM @PARLOURSHOPPE PARLOURCANNABIS.COM

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BLUE J STUDIO

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L

ocated in the countryside of Canby, Oregon, with snow-capped Mt. Hood in the distance, is Gnome Grown. Head Grower Dan McAllister has over 25 years of experience in cannabis cultivation, displaying an impressive balance of meticulous perfectionism and a healthy passion for the plant. McAllister led us around the massive farm, noting it consists of “30 acres of mixed mature forest, wetlands, fruit orchards and open meadows, fed by a pristine, year-round spring-fed creek originating just a few miles upstream from our draw point.” He clearly takes great pride in the plot of land, and it’s easy to see why. “One of our early milestones was selecting the best possible piece of land upon which to grow,” McAllister asserts. Gnome Grown implemented a growing style called hugelkultur (pronounced “hoogle culture”), in which woody biomass establishes a micro-environment ideal for plants to receive nutrients; the team goes into the woods to gather limbs and sticks to make the bedrock layer for their custom living soil mediums. They also utilize an onsite orchard to provide nutrient-rich compost—the definition of sustainability.

…[THE FARM] CONSISTS OF ‘30 ACRES OF MIXED MATURE FOREST, WETLANDS, FRUIT ORCHARDS AND OPEN MEADOWS, FED BY A PRISTINE, YEAR-ROUND SPRING-FED CREEK . . . ’ – DAN MCALLISTER, GNOME GROWN HEAD GROWER

Three state-of-the-art greenhouses house all their flower and veg: 18 strains in four rows of 90-foot raised beds. The flower house was a week or so away from harvest, and the scent was dizzying to the senses. The room exploded with different shades of green, and almost every intoxicating, fragrant terpene was represented. McAllister’s current favorite is Gnome Walker, a powerful in-house hybrid. He takes their strains seriously—a few members of the team will soon be off to Brazil to help the government conduct scientific studies on the effects of cannabis in a controlled setting, a first for the country. We’re looking forward to seeing the results! GNOMEGROWNORGANICS.COM @GNOMEGROWNORGANICS

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GROW

ECO-FRIENDLY CULTIVATION WITH ECO FIRMA FARMS

90

JAKE UITTI

SAM GEHRKE

D O P E M AGA Z I N E .CO M


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t’s a phrase many of us were taught in middle school chemistry class, but it’s also one Jesse Peters, CEO of Canby, Oregon’s Eco Firma Farms, holds dear to this day. “Garbage in, garbage out,” the CEO states. This maxim is important to Peters, whose farm produces large amounts of well-regulated plants. Because, as he’ll tell you simply, “You get out what you put in.”

ECOFIRMAFARMS.COM @ECOFIRMAFARMS

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GROW

Peters founded Eco Firma Farms in 2013. Before that, in 2011 and 2012, he’d spent time working in the medical cannabis world. “Everything was still pretty new,” he explains. “We would watch people come in with grocery bags, zip lock bags, trash bags, just trying to sell their weed.” Peters concluded that his company needed a name, a brand and some solid numbers to back up their promise of potent product. “Out of nowhere, I decided to tell people I was with Eco Firma Farms,” he laughs. “And it took.” But assuming such an eco-friendly name meant Peters had some work to do. “I started looking at studies,” he recalls, “seeing how many pounds of CO2 [were] put in the atmosphere to produce one pound of marijuana. And it was bad. I thought, ‘What do I say when an outdoor farm says we’re terrible on the environment?’ So, it was the right thing to do to try and find a way to be better.” In 2014, Peters took a look at his PGE energy bill and noticed there was a number on the side to call about renewable energy. So he called it. Now, Eco Firma Farms relies almost entirely on power generated from Oregon wind turbines and no longer

I STARTED LOOKING AT STUDIES . . . SEEING HOW MANY POUNDS OF CO2 [WERE] PUT IN THE ATMOSPHERE TO PRODUCE ONE POUND OF MARIJUANA. AND IT WAS BAD.

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releases CO2 in the atmosphere from electricity usage. “We pay the money, and PGE buys that electricity from wind farms and sells it to us,” he explains. “And that enables the wind farmers to set up more turbines.” And, in 2017, the farm earned PGE’s Green Mountain Energy Gold Certification for their efforts. The response to Eco Firma’s wind-powered pot has been “really interesting,” Peters notes. “On a consumer level, we get really good responses from being responsible,” he acknowledges. “We also haven’t used pesticides in years—we don’t spray our plants with anything. But at the dispensary level, it’s about 50/50.” Peters says a lot of dispensaries “don’t care” about how the product is made, they just want the cheapest option. Others, however, do care, and the eco-friendly work benefits their brand. And while he strives to make his product as consistent and useful as possible, there are always ways to improve. Power aside, Peters says good cannabis requires three ingredients: experience, time and care. “You have to pay attention to the plants,” he underscores. “We’re always striving for the next step, how to be better at what we do.”

D O P E M AGA Z I N E .CO M


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SCIENCE

DISPOSING OF DISPOSABLE VAPE PENS CAN WE PUT AN END TO THIS WASTEFUL TREND

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SARA BRITTANY SOMERSET

D O P E M AGA Z I N E .CO M


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alifornia’s regulations for child-resistant packaging— at least with cannabisinfused products like edibles and topicals—make it nearly impossible to stay sustainable. According to Dr. Kerklaan of the cannabis topicals company Dr. Kerklaan Therapeutics, they’re one hundred percent behind sustainable packaging, but said their company “can’t make it happen with the current regulations.” An anonymous industry source also weighed in: “Unfortunately, i t ’s n o t a t o p i c t h a t a l o t o f companies want to talk about, because they ’re aware of the environmental implications…” Some of the cannabis industry’s biggest environmental offenders are the manufacturers of “disposable vapes.” While many of these products look cool and sleek, and are a hit with consumers who want to covertly self-medicate, they can’t be refilled—or recycled. You don’t have to look far to find companies who are selling disposable vape pens like hot cakes. Unfortunately, many of these products will ultimately end up in a landfill. This is where purchasing power comes into play. As a consumer, where you spend your money informs companies as to where they should spend their research and development bucks. C u r i o u s l y, m a n y o f t h e s e products don’t list what materials they’re made from. Just as many of us have demanded to know what’s inside of our cartridges we too should have the option of knowing what materials our vape pens are

made from. While the external shell of some disposable vapes are made from aluminum and can theoretically be recycled like soda cans, each one also most likely contains an internal lithium ion battery that provides power to the atomizer. Lithium batteries, of course, should always be recycled separately. I t i s u n k n ow n a t t h e p re s e n t time which waste management companies are willing to recycle disposable vapes. Conscientious consumers should inquire with their local recycling company if they live in a state where marijuana is legal. (Nobody wants to get busted for pot for trying to recycle a vape pen.) B u y i n g a re u s a b l e , re f i l l a b l e vape pen is a far better option for those who are conscious of the environment and want to reduce their carbon footprint. Another alternative course of action is to call on cannabis companies to implement a disposable vape return program, similar to how Apple accepts dead computers for recycling. It’s a challenge to come up with an alternative use for a spent vape pen. Perhaps a robot dog could play fetch with it? An enterprising artist can collect and build them into a sculpture at Burning Man? COLORS Magazine once stated that the number of disposed chopsticks each year, if placed end to end, would circle the globe twice. Hey, at least the wooden ones are biodegradable! Disposable vapes may not be far behind that figure, and pollute the planet for centuries to come.

IT’S A CHALLENGE TO COME UP WITH AN ALTERNATIVE USE FOR A SPENT VAPE PEN. PERHAPS A ROBOT DOG COULD PLAY FETCH WITH IT?

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In a lifetime, the average American will throw away 600 times his or her adult weight in garbage.


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ECONOMICS

HOW CAN WE KEEP OUR CITIES AFFORDABLE?

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JEFFREY RINDSKOPF

D O P E M AGA Z I N E .CO M


WE CALL THE HOUSING MARKET A GAME OF CRUEL MUSICAL CHAIRS...IF THERE AREN’T ENOUGH CHAIRS SOMEONE’S GOING TO END UP ON THE GROUND, AND IT’S CRUEL BECAUSE IT’S NOT WHEN THE MUSIC STOPS—IT’S WHO HAS THE MONEY.

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n the past five years, average rent for a one-bedroom apartment in Seattle spiked 35 percent. The city’s median home price now stands at $757,000, the highest it’s ever been. But if you’ve ever wondered how it became so damn expensive to live in Seattle and other prosperous cities across the country, you’re not alone. Alan Durning has been studying the subject for decades, first at the Worldwatch Institute and then as Founder and Executive Director of the Sightline Institute, a nonprofit thinktank founded in 1993 to study the Northwest’s most pressing public policy issues. DOPE caught up with Durning in March to get his perspective on the causes and potential solutions behind America’s affordability crisis. DOPE Magazine: What do you see as the biggest problems facing American cities? Alan Durning: The problems facing the world, which are divisions between us, both political and economic; huge disparities in wealth and income. Second is climate change. The way our cities are sprawling is both a reflection of the divisions and a cause of climate change. A solution to help with both of those problems is to build more compact, walkable, transit-oriented neighborhoods that provide housing for a mix of incomes.

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What are the origins of single-family housing policies, and why are they so damaging to affordability? In most American cities, zoning started in the 1920s, and it’s become stricter since, limiting the construction of anything other than single-family homes in large sections of our cities. In Seattle, more than half of the land is preserved for single-family detached homes, so the land for building apartments is squeezed, and as the city becomes more prosperous, investors bid up home prices and rents. There’s just not enough housing to go around. You end up with these astronomical housing prices and long commutes for folks to get to more affordable housing, which is worse for climate. Single-family zoning was put in place to protect property values for single-family homeowners concerned about apartment buildings and other developments. It lined up closely with racial exclusion, so to guard against lower-income, typically darker-skinned people from moving into white neighborhoods, zoning policies were imposed that made basically only the most expensive form of housing legal. Now, almost a hundred years after American cities started to zone huge areas of their land, the consequences are pretty stark. In the Bay Area, there’s not a single home you can purchase for under $1 million, and it’s heading that way in Seattle, Portland, Austin, Boston… What are the other factors that drive up housing prices? There are lots of lots of things, but the biggest is [a large number of] people are choosing [a select number of] homes. We call the housing market a game of cruel musical chairs. It’s musical chairs because if there aren’t enough chairs someone’s going to end up on the ground, and it’s cruel because it’s not when the music stops—it’s who has the money. It’s made worse by widening income disparities. It’s all kinds of other zoning restrictions as well, like limiting the construction of small apartments. Most cities have minimum apartment sizes that mean you can’t build old-fashioned rooming houses, which used to provide affordable housing for a large share of single adults— maybe a third of city residents lived in those a hundred years ago, and we’ve basically banned them. How can people combat those entrenched housing policies? A major trend in our most expensive cities is the emergence of a movement led by young people called the “Yes, in My Backyard,” or YIMBY, movement. It really started in the Bay Area, but it’s spread all over the country. In the long term, I see that as a huge source for hope, because the policies we have in place are mostly just sitting there in the background. There’s a vocal minority who speak up to prevent construction of additional housing, but there’s never been a vocal counterbalance supporting it. Are there any cities we can look to as a model for keeping a growing city affordable?

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There are a lot of cities that have done a good job of providing abundant housing. Montreal is a great example—it’s fast-growing, and housing prices are about a third as high there as in Toronto, Vancouver or Seattle. They have two- and three-story walk-up flats—low-rise buildings, but more homes in each—covering huge shares of the metropolitan area. Another example is Vienna, where they do it mostly through nonprofit and public housing. Something like 62 percent of the residents live in public apartments. The key variable is just to build enough, and that’s the message the YIMBY movement is trying to get across. Whatever else we need to do, we need to build enough housing for the people who want to be our neighbors.

D O P E M AGA Z I N E .CO M


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GLASS

ALL HAIL THE PRAYING MANTIS

KENNETH KIEBLER’S BEAUTIFUL, BUGGY RIG WIND HOME

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his stunning piece by Oregon glass artist Kenneth Kiebler immediately caught my eye. Who doesn’t want a rig that looks like a praying mantis? Kiebler didn’t give this insect-themed creation a name, but says the piece was greatly inspired by his love for nature and all things wildlife. “I want to concentrate on making art that makes me feel good,” he told me, “and hopefully people will love it as much as I do.” My favorite element of this rig is the complex assembly, which Kiebler executed with precision; the purple and green wig wag (a technique where colors look like they’re melting into one another), as well as his use of ultraviolet colors, are quite pleasing to the senses. The piece stands about 10 inches tall and comes with a made-to-match carb cap and dabber. Kiebler started blowing glass in 2009, stating that his inspiration to do so came from watching his glass artist friends hard at work. He’s been working full-time in the studio ever since.

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RECIPE

STRAWBERRY RHUBARB CANNA-CRUMBLE CELEBRATE SPRING WITH SEASONAL PRODUCE! LAURIE AND MARYJANE

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his infused rhubarb strawberr y crumble showcases the first finds of the season: luscious early strawberries and crazy-tart rhubarb. Rhubarb is not worth tasting without sugar, and when baked with strawberries it’s over-the-moon delicious. And it packs a bunch of health benefits, to boot! Don’t over-sweeten; a hit of tartness is required to create the perfect balance. Crumbles are a terrific way to showcase these players, and the crunchy, butter y topping is a perfect foil for the filling. I use a generous amount of topping because I love the crumbs all coated with the syrupy juice from the fruit. There was a time when I kept a bag of topping in my freezer, for last-minute crumble needs. You can (nay, should) do that, too. For more of Laurie and MaryJane, visit:

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LAURIEANDMARYJANE.COM

INSTRUCTIONS

INGREDIENTS Yield: Serves 6-8

1.

Heat oven to 340°F.

2 cups flour 2 cups quick cook oats 1 cup brown sugar 1 tsp. baking powder 1/2 tsp. cinnamon 1/2 tsp. salt 11/2 stk. butter, cold and cut in cubes 1/2 stk. canna-butter, cold and cut in cubes 4 cups rhubarb, cleaned, dried and cut in 1/3 inch slices 4 cups strawberries, cleaned, dried and cut in half if large 3/4 cup granulated sugar 3 tbs. cornstarch 2 tbs. orange juice 1 tbs. grated orange zest 2 tsp. vanilla

2.

In a food processor combine the flour, oats, brown sugar, baking powder, cinnamon and salt. Pulse to blend. Add the butters and pulse until the mixture forms large clumps. Chill.

3.

In a large bowl combine the rhubarb, berries, sugar, cornstarch, juice, zest and vanilla. Mix well, coating everything as evenly as possible.

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4. Turn the fruit mixture into an 8”x11” baking pan. Spread the topping over the fruit. Bake until the topping is golden brown and the sauce is bubbling, about 40-45 minutes.


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PRODUCT

GREEN PHOENICIAN GRINDERS NEVER BUY ANOTHER GRINDER AGAIN! JESSE PERRY

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hoenician Engineering is a Mesa-based company founded in 2014 by brothers Dane and Colton Dukot. Phoenician engineers and manufactures high-quality, medical-grade grinders made from domestically-sourced, aerospace aluminum. Their motto? “It’s the last grinder you’ll ever need to buy.” And they mean it. Talk about sustainable! With more than 20 projects going at any given time, 90 percent of which are industry-related, the Dukots understand the meaning of the daily grind. But “working efficiently and providing a clean, sustainable product with as small a footprint as possible” is a big part of Phoenician’s philosophy. The coolant liquid used in their machining process is 95 percent water, five percent oil-based and entirely biodegradable. In addition to domestically-sourced aluminum, the spent shavings from the machining process are completely recyclable. Their factory is also illuminated solely by LED lights, reducing their energy use by nearly 90 percent. This sturdy grinder gets the job done, and it feels good knowing you’ll never have to buy another grinder again. Investing in products that’ll last a lifetime is a simple way to be green while grinding up your green! Sold in Tobacco Shops and Dispensaries Across the U.S. PHOENICIANENGINEERING.COM @GRIND_PHOENICIAN @GRINDPHOENICIAN

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SM 4-PIECE GRINDER $49.99

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PHOTOGRAPHY CONTEST Photographers, want to see your work in the pages of dope magazine? As a lifestyle publication, DOPE Magazine is committed to cultivating creative expression within the cannabis community. We’re looking to feature your creative work in the next issue of DOPE Magazine! There are no limitations or restrictions—hit us with your best shot! HOW TO ENTER Head to www.dopemagazine.com/dope-contests and submit your favorite capture and win the chance to have your work featured in a beautiful 2-page spread in our National publication. Shoot what inspires you. Ready. Set. GO! WHAT TO ENTER To ensure eligibility for the contest, please submit files of at least 300 dpi in landscape format. Entries may originate in any format - digital files, digital prints, color transparencies, color prints, or black and white prints - so long as they are submitted electronically in a .JPEG .jpg or .png form. Entries should include full name of photographer and a brief caption. ELIGIBILITY Dope Shots (“Photo Contest”) is open to all professional and amateur photographers who have reached 21 years of age at the time of entry. By submitting an entry to the Photo Contest, entrants certify that their submission in the Photo Contest gives DOPE Magazine the right to publish this photo. DOPE will provide artist credits. By entering, you agree to release and hold harmless DOPE and affiliates from and against any claim or cause of action arising out of participation in the Photo Contest. ENTRY PERIOD The Photo Contest is recurring; beginning on the tenth of each month and ending the last day of each month. JUDGING Photos will be judged on the originality, composition, technical excellence as well as overall impact and artistic merit.


DOPE Magazine - Oregon - The Sustainability Issue - May 2018  
DOPE Magazine - Oregon - The Sustainability Issue - May 2018