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OREGON• MARCH 2016

•THE ADVOCACY ISSUE•

FREE

DEFENDING OUR PLANT EVERYWHERE

#END420 SHAME

STRAIN

A VETERAN’S FIGHT

GRAPE APE

CONCENTRATE ROYAL GREEN CRACK

EDIBLE LIFTED CHOCOLATES WITH COFFEE BEANS

DISPENSARY CALYXES

FOR CANNABIS

COMMUNICATION AND CHRONIC ILLNESS HOW-TO GUIDE ON EMPATHY AND CONNECTION

BERNIE SANDERS A GROWING MOVEMENT


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EDITOR’S LETTER Here at DOPE we believe in the healing power of cannabis, as well as the cultural, social and economical benefits the plant cultivates in our communities. As the cannabis movement continues to expand and contract through changes in legislation and business, advocacy has become more than simple jargon. For legalization to continue, it is important that patients and recreational users stand up not only for themselves, but also for each other. Because of this, we decided to put Bernie Sanders on the cover of our March Advocacy issue. His presidential campaign takes a firm stance on cannabis legalization; a stance that is a clear reflection of the principles behind DOPE Magazine. We’ll let Bernie say it best: “In my view, states should have the right to regulate marijuana the same way that state and local laws now govern the sale of alcohol and tobacco. And among other things, that means that recognized businesses in states that have legalized marijuana should be fully able to use the banking system without fear of federal prosecution.” Not so long ago, DOPE stood for Defending Our Patients Everywhere. As recreational markets opened up in Washington and Colorado, so did DOPE Magazine. We stand behind the fact that medical cannabis is critical to public health, and strive to convey the diverse array of benefits created by the freedom of recreational use. For some, there is a tension between the medical and recreational markets. A tension that breeds a fear that the growth of recreational may be a detriment to established medical. We believe that there is room for everyone in the cannabis movement. These days, we are Defending Our Plant Everywhere, and that means defending your rights to cannabis at every level. Our second national issue of DOPE Magazine is dedicated to advocacy in all its forms. This issue brings the spotlight to those who are working to improve cannabis access. The feature story #End420Shame highlights one veteran’s effort to change the conversation about cannabis within one of the United States most restrictive institutions, the military. Witnessing the great lengths required from most to access cannabis lends perspective to the fortunate few who have a recreational shop in their neighborhood. Undeterred by inequality, we hope you’ll join us as we look forward to a dope future for the cannabis community. So after a crazy national launch last month, it looks like we are finally prepared for a clean “takeof”.* *Yes, we now realize we spelled ‘takeoff’ wrong in the last editor’s letter. As you may know (since you clearly can read past the 4th grade level), the unedited version of the Editor’s Letter last month had a few typos sneak its way through our “perfect” editing process.

DEFENDING OUR PLANT EVERYWHERE

EVAN CARTER PRESIDENT DAVID TRAN CEO JAMES ZACHODNI EDITOR-IN-CHIEF BRANDON PALMA ART DIRECTOR ABIGAIL ROSS NATIONAL CONTENT MANAGER MAKENNA O’MEARA MANAGING EDITOR LAUREN KRZYZOSTANIAK NATIONAL EDITOR MEGHAN RIDLEY ONLINE EDITOR GLACE BONDESON WEB DIRECTOR JAN DOMACENA PRODUCTION DESIGNER JONATHAN TEETERS DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS KATE KELLY DISTRIBUTION MANAGER JESUS DIAZ NATIONAL STATE DIRECTOR ZAK HUGHES DIGITAL AD TRAFFIC COORDINATOR DALLAS KEEFE SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER NATHAN CHRYSLER BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT DAVID PALESCHUCK V.P. LICENSING & BRAND PARTNERSHIPS TREK HOLLNAGEL STRATEGIC ADVISOR JENIKA MAO ADMIN EVENT COORDINATOR CHRISTINA HEINTZELMAN EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT KINSEY LITTON OFFICE MANAGER

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

SHARON LETTS R.Z. HUGHES DAVID HODES DAVID PALESCHUCK DAVID BAILEY HEATHER COONS KELLY VO

LINDSEY RINEHART JOHNNY HALFHAND BIANCA FOX MIKE FRANCIS MEGHAN RIDLEY

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DOPE is a free publication dedicated to providing an informative and wellness-minded voice to the cannabis movement. While our foundation is the medical cannabis industry, it is our intent to provide ethical and research-based articles that address the many facets of the war on drugs, from politics to lifestyle and beyond. We believe that through education and honest discourse, accurate policy and understanding can emerge. DOPE Magazine is focused on defending both our patients and our plant, and to being an unceasing force for revolutionary change.

DOPE Magazine and the entire contents of this magazine are copyright 2016 DOPE MAGAZINE LLC, all rights reserved and may not be reproduced in any manner, in whole or part without the written permission from DOPE Magazine LLC.


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FROM OUTLAW TO ELEGANT MARCH 2016

•THE ADVOCA CY ISSUE•

FREE

Few products embody the cultural shift cannabis has been going through better than AnnaBís (pronounced Anna-Bee). From outlaw to elegant, their spin on how to store a stash is more stylish COMMUNICA TIO than ever. AND CHRONIC N #END ILLNE

CONTENTS

DEFENDING

OUR PLANT EVERYWHERE

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HOW-TO GUIDE ON EMPAT HY AND CONN ECTIO

420 SHAME

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MARCH 2016 THE ADVOCACY ISSUE

B E RN IE SAN D E RS A GROW ING MOVEME NT

DOPE_MARCH_2016

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LEGGINGS ($49.99) & SHIRT ($47.9

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A VETER AN’S FIGHT FOR CANN ABIS

SUB TITLE TWO

WHAT MAKES IT DOPE

COVER PHOTO Darrell Lloyd Organizational COVER DESIGN features make for a t stash Palma Brandon

Odor-Loc technology means no whif weed

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FEATURES

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Stylish design ensures class and discre

30 ON THE COVER

BERNIE SANDERS : A GROWING MOVEMENT

PRICE: $120–$295

12 PRODUCT Annabís

14 CANNA-NEWS Drug Policy Reform

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18 DOPE NEWS 22 BRANDING BUD

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The Color of Cannabis

26 TECH

A Look Into Live Resin

28 INTERVIEW Fiona Ma

34 ROAD TRIP

While most cannabis enthusiasts would agr the smell of herb is a glorious scent, not everyone so a little discretion goes a long way. This is wh airtight zipper—which doesn’t look like a zipper and odor-blocking layers of material come in a down any possibility of smell leakage. The inside Italian leather piece of amazingness contains and organization galore, as well as the perfec for lots of cannabis and associated gadgetry. The bags are sure to get compliments when ed out and about, with everyone from grand perfect strangers sure to comment on the ha ® swag.

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Denver

NEWS ART

42 GROW

Grow Basics

44 TECH

31 VOSE AV SOUTH ORANGE, N 1-844-AN

WRITER •JENNIFER INGRAM | PHOTO • COURTESY OF SNIC BARNES

SNIC BARNES MIXED MEDIA ARTIST TECH

Social Media Advocates

ANNABISSTYL

44 WRITER

•BRANDON KRENZLER

| PHOTOS • CHRIS RYAN

46 CANNA-NEWS

An Advocate In Oregon: What It Means Now

50 BUSINESS

The Challenge of Tax Codes For Cannabusinesses

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52 PIECE

Snic Barnes

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54 INTERVIEW Dr. Sue Sisley

56 LEGALIZATION OUTLOOK

States Potentially Joining Cannabis Freedom

60 #END420SHAME

A Veteran’s Fight For Cannabis

64 CANNA-NEWS

CAPTURING THE ESSENCE OF

How To Communicate With Chronically Ill People

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NIC BARNES DRAWS INSPIRATION from technological advancement, urban decay, and natural environments. Having gained much acclaim for his electro-forming techniques as a mixed media pipe maker, his recent body of work focuses back on his roots in the glass medium. Incorporating new color pallets, transparent glass blending techniques, and color experiments into his new body of work, the artist has found himself reinvigorated through showcas-

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A LOOK INTO LIVE RESIN

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robust flavor have been top-shelf buds are proc closed-loop extraction s temperatures. They the filtration methods befor solvent residue with d vacuum ovens. Preferred butane has cosity ranging from com known as shatter to a called clear. Live resin is butane h duced using a specific ing material is complete bud. The genesis of live Colorado native and lon named William “Kind Bi to smoke a hash that ta cannabis essential oils re ding flower, he began e harvest technique and p primarily “open blasting extraction. After a coup than-ideal results, Kind aside and was soon hire founder Giddy Up as a consultant. Giddy Up ne fine-tuning and finessing closed-loop extraction sy Giddy’s modern hydro technology with Kind B fresh ideas, the duo intro uct that looked like gl


WRITER

PRODUCT

• MEGHAN RIDLEY

| PHOTOS • ALLIE BECKETT

ANNABÍS

FROM OUTLAW TO ELEGANT Few products embody the cultural shift cannabis is going through better than AnnaBís (pronounced Anna-Bee). From outlaw to elegant, their spin on how to store a stash is more stylish than ever. LEGGINGS ($49.99) & SHIRT ($47.99)

MISS MARY JANE CO - MMJCO.COM

WHAT MAKES IT DOPE Organizational features make for for a tidy Organizational features make astash tidy stash Odor-Loc means no no whiffs of Odor-Loctechnology technology means whiffs of weed weed

Stylish design ensures class and discretion

WhileWhile mostmost cannabis enthusiasts wouldwould agree agree that that cannabis enthusiasts the smell the smellofofherb herbisisaaglorious gloriousscent, scent, not not everyone agrees, soso aa little discretion goes a long way. ThisThis is where thethe little discretion goes a long way. is where airtight zipper—which doesn’t look likelike a zipper at at all— airtight zipper—which doesn’t look a zipper all— and odor-blocking layers ofof material come and odor-blocking layers material comein inand andshut shut down any possibility ofof smell leakage. The inside of of thethe down any possibility smell leakage. The inside Italian leather piece of of amazingness contains storage Italian leather piece amazingness contains storage and organization galore, as as wellwell as the perfect place and organization galore, as the perfect place lots cannabis and associated gadgetry. forfor lots ofof cannabis and associated gadgetry. The bags are to sure tocompliments get compliments flauntThe bags are sure get whenwhen flaunted edand outabout, and about, with everyone from grandmas to out with everyone from grandmas to perfect strangers sure to comment on the handbag’ s perfect strangers sure to comment on the ® handbag’ swag. s swag.

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CANNANEWS

DRUG POLICY REFORM IGNITING A FLASH BANG OF CHANGE

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he war on drugs, by all accounts a dismal, costly failure, has been thrust more firmly into the spotlight in recent years as cannabis decriminalization and legalization kicks into high gear. It has been drawing more diverse social and political thinkers who are stepping up the dialogue, wanting to define what law enforcement should be today, and why that’s important to the future of a citizenry who know that the freedom to pursue happiness can’t happen under the heavy-handed oppression of a jack-booted, heavily armed police force of Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) warriors who use fear and intimidation as a way of enforcing misguided drug war objectives. “I think that public opinion is shifting firmly in the direction of increased transparency and oversight in the use of militarized equipment by police,” said Seema Sadanandan, criminal justice director for the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) of the Nation’s Capital. “However, what I don’t think has caught on yet is an interrogation of the militarized culture of policing, and how tactics and strategies are informed by a militarized culture,” she said. “We are not there yet, but I do think we need to get there.” According to a 2014 report by the ACLU, War Comes Home, officers are still being trained to adopt a warrior mentality, thinking of the people they are supposed to serve as enemies, using equipment like flash grenades in serving warrants for drug searches. Armored vehicles, such as the $250,000, 20- foot, 17,000-pound BearCat, complete with gun turrets and a battering ram, have been made available to

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law enforcement in the cities of Denver, Dallas, and Honolulu, and for dozens of other law enforcement organizations across the country, for free, under the 1033 Program, which authorizes the Department of Defense to give new and used military equipment to law enforcement. The program has given local law enforcement materials worth $4.3 billion as of 2013, according to the report. Terrorized citizenry are injured and killed when law enforcement decides to toss grenades into their homes and batter down their doors just to serve a warrant. Most of these citizens are people of color. Dismantling the war on drugs was at the heart of cannabis legalization efforts in Washington, D.C. For 18 months, Sadanandan, along with Adam Eidinger, legalization activist and owner of Capital Hemp, a clothing and smoking product company, were part of the campaign to legalize cannabis in D.C. with Ballot Initiative 71, a document that exposed the criminal injustice system with a call to dismantle “this racist war on drugs,” Sadanandan said. The initiative passed with over 70% of the vote. “D.C. became the first place in the country where marijuana reform was not about marijuana,” she said. “It was the first time that it was about justice.” Seeking justice and a new mission for law enforcement away from militarization is the goal of a new advocacy organization of mostly retired law enforcement officers who saw the failure of the War on Drugs firsthand and want to do something about it. Law Enforcement Against Prohibition (LEAP) was founded in 2002 as an international organization of cops, criminal prosecutors, judges, and prison wardens around the world. It advocates not just for ending the War on Drugs, but also ending prohibition on all drugs. Diane Goldstein, a LEAP speaker and board member, said that the drug war changed the very nature of policing. The drug war has evolved into a war on terrorism, based on fear and rhetoric in order to sustain institutional power, she said. “What you have to re-

member is that the military has a mission. They are at war with people and they kill people. That is their mission. That is not law enforcement’s mission.” That military-style enforcement has led to wholesale violations of American civil liberties, she said. “We are at the point where we have to ask what does our constitution stand for, and what is our law enforcement supposed to evolve to.” We need more social worker cops, which was the original job of law enforcement, she added. “Law enforcement’s effectiveness shouldn’t be judged by how many people we arrest, or how many narcotic search warrants we issue, but that’s how law enforcement has been incentivized to get their funding for the war on drugs,” she said. She said that part of the problem is that people don’t understand that law enforcement uses the easiest, fastest, most efficient tool to solve problems short-term. “We in law enforcement have to start looking at our role in our society not in a short-term basis but in a long-term basis,” she said. “We can’t incarcerate our way out of a drug issue.” Patrisse Cullors, co-founder of Black Lives Matter, said that the current enemy in this War on Drugs is black people, people on the margins, and undocumented people. “There are real live people interacting with a militarized police force every day,” she said at a panel on the topic at the International Drug Policy Reform Conference in D.C. in November. “That erodes the feeling that they have dignity and can live in a dignified way in this country.” “What we have seen in the last two years is that people are rising up, saying enough is enough, we will fight back,” Cullors said. She said that means occupying police precincts, showing up at the homes of mayors and telling the world that their lives are worth fighting for. “What we have seen is a militarized response,” she said. “We have seen communities teargassed. We have seen communities maced. We have seen police come out with high-powered weaponry. We have

allowed that. Collectively, we have allowed for the employment of a militarized police force. It’s our moment to shut it down and to change the narrative. Our work is to develop and imagine a new way, with new possibilities.”

“Collectively, we have allowed for the employment of a militarized police force. It’s our moment to shut it down and to change the narrative.”

dopemagazine.com MARCH 2016 THE ADVOCACY ISSUE

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WRITER

INFOGRAPHIC

• R.Z. HUGHES

6 GREEN WAYS TO CELEBRATE MARCH MARCH 2

MARCH 15

NATIONAL READ ACROSS AMERICA DAY (DR. SEUSS DAY )

Dr. Seuss is now celebrated by young and old alike as a day of reading across the nation. It’s the perfect day to bust out old picture books, indulge in some psychedelic sativa, and enjoy the ageless classics of Theodor Geisel. Dress up like a Lorax and enjoy some trees or fry up one fish, two fish, a red fish, or a blue fish for a Seussinspired dinner—just make sure not to be a Yertle the Turtle.

THE IDES OF MARCH

Traditionally a week of festivals marking the Roman new year, the March 15 is the infamous date that Julius Caesar was assassinated and Rome was thrown in a tumult that eventually led to a global empire. While hard evidence of Roman cannabis use is scant, Emperor Aurelian imposed a tax on Egyptian cannabis in the third century AD and dried plant material has been found in the tombs of mothers that died during childbirth, hinting at an early use in easing labor pains.

MARCH 17-23

MARCH 20 FIRST DAY OF SPRING

MARCH 17 ST. PATRICK’S DAY

A day to celebrate all things green— clothes, beer, leprechauns, and most definitely cannabis. With clear and deep roots as a feast day of the Catholic Church, St. Patty’s Day has grown into a multicultural event that draws revelers from all walks of life together to drink, be merry, and celebrate the Emerald Isle. Ireland took progressive public health measures last year as the nation started moving toward decriminalizing cannabis as well as small amounts of hard drugs such as cocaine and heroin.

MARCH 27 EASTER

TIPS FOR PLANTING SUN-GROWN GANJA

Cannabis is a warm weather annual, meaning that it doesn’t do well in cold conditions and needs favorable moisture and warmth to sprout. It is generally a good idea to start the seeds indoors and move them outside after the last threat of frost. If planting with the full moon, get the seedlings in the ground between March 17 and 23, which should be a few weeks after the last frost as far north as British Columbia.

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The spring equinox falls on Sunday this year, a perfect day to clean out the cupboards and start fresh. Observed by cultures across the globe, the spring equinox is traditionally a day of celebration when day and night are approximately the same length and there are 12 hours of daylight to enjoy. March 20 is also the International Day of Happiness, so take a hike with some sticky Sour Diesel or smoke a bowl and check out the young budding blooms that will be peeking out to greet the new season.

MARCH 2016 THE ADVOCACY ISSUE dopemagazine.com

The springtime theme of renewal and rebirth is once again present on Easter. Get together with some friends for an adultthemed Easter Nug Hunt with edible chocolates and fragrant buds. Plan a meal including cannabis-infused deviled eggs or resurrect some of that stash that has been bogarted for months and share it with those less fortunate than yourself.


WRITER•ALEX HALPERIN OF WEED WEEK

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resident Obama said he would not take up legalization during his last months in office. It was only during his administration’s hands-off approach that the legal cannabis industry began to gain momentum, but he has never endorsed legalization. This all but ensures that the next president will have to make key decisions. Most of the remaining candidates in both parties appear willing to co-exist with legal cannabis.

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llinois Gov. Bruce Rauner, Republican, declined to expand the state’s medical marijuana program to include patients with chronic pain, PTSD, and six other conditions. As a result, industry representatives say some cannabis businesses in the state will fail. The governor’s decision came despite an active social media campaign and a protest by veterans who traveled to Springfield but were denied a meeting with the governor.

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he controversy over pesticides continued in Denver, where a city agency released 28,000 products that it had recalled last year back to the market. The news came as the city has issued 19 pesticide recalls in 19 weeks. Colorado requires pesticide testing but there are not yet enough certified labs. This piles on unresolved arguments over what amount of which chemicals are permissible in pot.

igarette maker Philip Morris invested $20 million in Syqe Medical, an Israeli company that invented a metered-dose vaporizer for medical use. The deal represents one of the higherprofile forays by a big American company into the cannabis space. It was also a coup for Israel’s cannabis industry. Many believe that the country’s strong agriculture and technology sectors could make it a capital of cannabis innovation. Syqe will also work on technology to make smoking tobacco safer.

MARCH 2016 THE ADVOCACY ISSUE dopemagazine.com

.S. legal cannabis sales totaled $5.4 billion in 2015, according to a report from The ArcView Group and New Frontier. Recreational sales reached $998 million up from $351 million in 2014. It went on to predict that sales will exceed $6.7 billion this year and rocket past $21 billion in 2020. To put these numbers in perspective, the NFL and its 32 teams combined grossed about $12 billion last year.

acramento became the biggest city in California to allow largescale industrial grows. City and county governments statewide have been scrambling to create their own guidelines ahead of a deadline when state rules for the medical cannabis industry will take effect. One of the issues is that many local governments are not equipped to formulate rules for a business they do not yet understand. This has led to cities like Thousand Oaks banning the industry even though its lawmakers expressed sympathy with the cause.


DOPE EVENTS

WRITER

• JENIKA MAO

| PHOTOS • DOUG FARRA, TOM HOEFFT, DAVID FISHER

DOPE EVENTS LIGHTING UP THE MONTH OF MARCH MARIJUANA INVESTOR SUMMIT MARCH 3RD SAN FRANCISCO, FR ANCISCO, CA MARCH 3 - 5- SAN CA

A summit where entrepreneurs, investors, and service providers gather to learn the basics of raising capital and work to grow their businesses to their highest potential. “As investors have gained confidence in the industry, publicly traded cannabis companies have soared to well over 200 from a handful two years ago,” said Frank Marino. For a better understanding of the industry, the market, and the risks, this summit is the answer.

THC FAIR MARCH 12-13TH - ROSEBURG, OR

This smaller event gives local manufacturers and small business owners a chance to network and establish relationships for collaboration. Attendees from previous events have said that it’s a great way to network with other passionate cannabis business owners.

CANNABIS GRAND CRU MARCH 19TH - SEATTLE, WA

“Cannabis Grand Cru represents cannabis “Cannabis Grand Cru represents cannabis culture, lifestyle, business, and communiculture, lifestyle,event business, and Acommuty in a premier setting.” day at nity Cannabis in a premier event the Grand Crusetting.” means A a day day at of the Cannabis Grand Cru with meansinnovative a day of workshops and sessions workshops sessions industry, with innovative pioneers of and the cannabis as well as new product demonstrations hear pioneers of the cannabis industry,and as well talks on product the cannabis movement. Those as new demonstrations and upwho year will be given the opdatesattend on thethis cannabis movement. Those portunity to witness a cooking and exwho attend this year will given the opportraction demonstration and talks on the tunity to witness a cooking and extraction future of edibles, cannabis safety, laws, demonstration and talks the future of regulations, business, andonpolitics.

edibles, cannabis safety, laws, regulations, business, and politics.

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BRANDING BUD

WRITER

• DAVID PALESCHUCK

THE COLOR OF CANNABIS

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ost shoppers—93% of them— make purchase decisions based on color and visual appearance. With a statistic like that, cannabis brand owners are spending time and money selecting the right colors for their logos, packaging, websites, and other brand assets in the race for buyer’s attention—the cannabis consumer.

THE SCIENCE BEHIND COLOR AND EMOTION Color resonates with people in different ways. We all have a favorite color or colors. That said, the color used by brands says a lot about the brand itself. The science behind our emotional connections to color is complicated, but it is becoming clear through anecdotal knowledge and scientific experimentation. Is it possible that our brains are wired to like (or dislike) certain colors? It all relates to emotional responses when we see (a) color. A study by researchers at Wellesley College (Neural basis for unique hues) links neural processes to color. It further relates some of the things we already know, such as that color context changes based on other colors in the field of vision and emotion is a big factor when thinking about color.

COLOR IMPACTS INTUITION The research into color is not a new phenomenon. It can be traced to works that are hundreds of years old. One of the most relevant today remains Theory of Colors by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, which was first published in 1810. While this was not a “scientific work” per se, it set the course for much of what we know about color and the basis for future research. Goethe published one of the first color wheels and associated color with more than hue; he also showed psychological impact. His theory about how color im-

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pacts our emotions and thoughts is still widely used and applies to how we think about color. The book is a great read for anyone with an interest in color theory. The truth of the matter is that color is too dependent on personal experiences to be universally translated to specific feelings. Research shows that it’s likely because elements such as personal preference, experiences, upbringing, cultural differences, and context often muddy the effect individual colors have on us. There are broader messaging patterns to be found in color perceptions. For instance, colors play a fairly substantial role in purchases and branding. In an appropriately titled study called Impact of Color in Marketing, researchers found that up to 93% of snap judgments made about products can be based on color alone, depending on the product. In regard to the role that color plays in branding, results from studies show that the relationship between brands and color hinges on the perceived appropriateness of the color being used for the particular brand. The study Exciting red and competent blue also confirms that purchasing intent

MARCH 2016 THE ADVOCACY ISSUE dopemagazine.com

is greatly affected by colors due to the impact they have on how a brand is perceived. This means that colors influence how consumers view the “personality” of the brand in question. Additional studies have revealed that our brains prefer recognizable brands, which makes color incredibly important when creating a brand identity. It has even been suggested that it is of paramount importance for new brands to specifically target logo colors that ensure differentiation from entrenched competitors (if the competition all uses blue, brands will stand out by using purple). When it comes to picking the “right” color, research has found that predicting consumer reaction to color appropriateness in relation to the product is far more important than the individual color itself. Certain colors do broadly align with specific traits, such as brown with ruggedness and red with excitement. Nearly every academic study on colors and branding will conclude that it is far more important for a brand’s colors to support the personality it wants to portray instead of trying to align with stereotypical color associations.


BEYOND RED, YELLOW, AND GREEN

LOGO COLOR AFFECTS CONSUMER HABITS “The specific colors used in a company’s logo have a significant impact on how that logo, and the brand as a whole, is viewed by consumers,” according to a study conducted by researchers at the University of Missouri-Columbia. The study found specific links and ties to colors within logos and how people felt about those brands. The findings change some of the ideas that we associate with specific colors. “Of all the feelings associated with logo colors, the feelings associated with red logos were the most surprising,” wrote one researcher. “Traditional emotions based on red include aggression and romance, but red logos did not invoke those emotions in study participants. This can probably be attributed to the fact that red is used in logos of many well-established brands such as State Farm, McDonalds and Coca-Cola, so consumers have pre-existing emotions associated with brands using that color.”

How are cannabis brands using color in their logos and marketing materials to differentiate themselves from the crowd? While many have followed the expected and stereotypical path, others have consciously thought through their color palette, brand essence, and strategy. Not surprising is that most new cannabis brands use blue and green tones and shades more than any other colors. Some brands—such as Mary’s Medicinals—intentionally use black and white exclusively to differentiate themselves. Others use visual cues and anchors that we associate with the history of cannabis such as tiedye or the red, yellow, and green of Rastafarianism. More typical uses of color are in the scales defining indica versus sativa used to denote the efficacy of a cannabis strain. Typically, colors span from dark greens, blues, and purples on the indica side to yellows, oranges, and reds on the sativa side, representing the restful, mellowing effects of indica strains and the uplifting, energetic results from sativa strains. Mixing color, science, and emotion can be a tricky game, and while science is teaching packaging designers and consumers more every day, it’s also opening up more questions about how we see and feel about color and accordingly about the brands that use certain colors to convey their brand essence. If the data is correct, brands will continue to use color to appeal to their consumers’ desires, as well as conscious and unconscious affinities.

“The specific colors used in a company’s logo have a significant impact on how that logo, and the brand as a whole, is viewed by consumers.” David Paleschuck dopemagazine.com MARCH 2016 THE ADVOCACY ISSUE

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RED

+ Physicality, courage, strength, warmth, energy, excitement Defiance, aggression, visual impact, strain

There are four psychological primary colors: red, blue, yellow, and green. They relate respectively to body, mind, and emotions and the balance between the three. THE PSYCHOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF THE 11 BASIC COLORS ARE AS FOLLOWS:

Being the longest wavelength, red is a powerful color. Although not technically the most visible, it has the property of appearing to be closer than it is and therefore grabs our GREEN attention first, hence its universal effectiveness + in traffic lights and stop signs. Its effect is Harmony, balance, love, physical: it stimulates us and raises the pulse reassurance, equilibrium, peace rate, giving the impression that time is passing faster than it is. It relates to the masculine principle and can activate the “fight or flight” Boredom, stagnation, blandness, enervation instinct.

PINK

+ Physical tranquility, nurture, warmth, femininity, love, sexuality Inhibition, emasculation, physical weakness Being a hue of red, pink also affects us physically, but it soothes, rather than stimulates. Pink is a powerful color, psychologically. It represents the feminine principle and survival of the species and is nurturing and physically soothing. Too much pink is physically draining and can be somewhat emasculating.

ORANGE

+ Physical comfort, food, warmth, sensuality, passion Deprivation, frustration, frivolity, immaturity Since it is a combination of red and yellow, orange is stimulating and reaction to it is a combination of the physical and the emotional. It focuses our minds on issues of physical comfort such as food, warmth, shelter, and sensuality. It is a “fun” color. Negatively, it might focus on the exact opposite: deprivation. This is particularly likely when warm orange is used with black. Equally, too much orange suggests frivolity and a lack of serious intellectual values.

WHITE

+ Hygiene, sterility, purity, simplicity, sophistication, efficiency Sterility, coldness, barriers, unfriendliness, elitism Just as black is total absorption; white is total reflection. In effect, it reflects the full force of the spectrum into our eyes. Thus it also creates barriers, but differently from black, and it is often a strain to look at. White is purity and, like black, uncompromising; it is clean, hygienic, and sterile. The concept of sterility can also be negative. Visually, white gives a heightened perception of space.

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Green strikes the eye in such a way as to require no adjustment whatever and is, therefore, restful. Being in the center of the spectrum, it is the color of balance: a more important concept than many people realize. When the world about us contains plenty of green, it indicates the presence of water, so we are reassured by the color on a primitive level. Negatively, it can indicate stagnation and, incorrectly used, will be perceived as being too bland.

VIOLET

+ Spiritual awareness, vision, luxury, authenticity, truth, quality Introversion, decadence, suppression, inferiority The shortest wavelength is violet, often described as purple. It takes awareness to a higher level of thought, even into the realms of spiritual values. It is highly introversive and encourages deep contemplation or meditation. It has associations with royalty and usually communicates the finest possible quality. Being the last visible wavelength before the ultra-violet ray, it has associations with time and space and the cosmos. Excessive use of purple can bring about too much introspection and the wrong tone of it communicates something cheap and kitschy.

BLUE

+ Intelligence, trust, efficiency, serenity, logic, reflection, calm Coldness, aloofness, lack of emotion, unfriendliness Blue is the color of the mind and is essentially soothing. It affects us mentally, rather than the physical reaction we have to red. Strong blues will stimulate clear thought and lighter, softer blues will calm the mind and aid concentration. It is serene and mentally calming. It is the color of clear communication. In research, blue trends to be the world’s favorite color. However, it can be perceived as cold, unemotional, and unfriendly.

MARCH 2016 THE ADVOCACY ISSUE dopemagazine.com

YELLOW

+ Optimism, confidence, selfesteem, friendliness, creativity Irrationality, fear, emotional fragility, depression, anxiety The yellow wavelength is relatively long and stimulating. In this case the stimulus is emotional, therefore yellow is the strongest color, psychologically. The right yellow will lift our spirits and our self-esteem; it is the color of confidence and optimism. Too much of it, or the wrong tone in relation to the other tones, can give rise to fear and anxiety.

GREY

+ Psychological neutrality Lack of confidence, dampness, depression, lethargy Pure grey is the only color that has no direct psychological properties. It is, however, quite suppressive. A virtual absence of color is depressing and when the world turns grey we are instinctively conditioned to draw in and prepare for hibernation. Unless the precise tone is right, grey has a dampening effect on other colors used with it.

BLACK

+ Sophistication, glamour, security, emotional safety, efficiency Oppression, coldness, menace, heaviness Black is all colors, totally absorbed. The psychological implications of that are considerable. It creates protective barriers, as it absorbs all the energy coming towards you, and it enshrouds the personality. Black is essentially an absence of light, since no wavelengths are reflected and it can, therefore be menacing; many people are afraid of the dark. Positively, it communicates absolute clarity, with no fine nuances. It communicates sophistication and uncompromising excellence and it works particularly well with white. Black creates a perception of weight and seriousness.

BROWN

+ Seriousness, warmth, nature, earthiness, reliability, support Lack of humor, heaviness, lack of sophistication Brown usually consists of red and yellow, with a large percentage of black. Consequently, it has much of the same seriousness as black, but is warmer and softer. It has elements of the red and yellow properties. Brown has associations with the earth and the natural world. It is a solid, reliable color and most people find it quietly supportive, more positively than the ever-popular black, which is suppressive rather than supportive.


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•BRANDON KRENZLER

| PHOTOS • CHRIS RYAN

CAPTURING THE ESSENCE OF CANNABIS

A LOOK INTO LIVE RESIN

ULLY FLOWERING PLANTS LINED in rows like imperial soldiers fill a pristine, expansive white room from wall to wall and swollen colas bask beneath the radiant heat of 1,000-watt high-pressure sodium lights. Aromas of fresh citrus and pine are overwhelming. Microscopic analysis reveals light cloudiness that will transition to light amber trichomes: the optimum harvest time for the plants. The average trim crew that surrounds a grow at this time is nonexistent. There will be no trim party here and no trim bins await laps. Buds won’t be manicured and dried. A different approach has been decided, a relatively new hydrocarbon solvent processing technique that yields a product known as live resin. A solitary trimmer deftly moves about the garden, clipping the large, discolored fan leaves off the plant and into paper bags. A second trimmer follows through clipping fresh buds into another bag, gathering the flower before the plant is cut down. The buds that have been freshly harvested are hastily put into a cryogenic freeze. Capturing the freshest, most pristine essence of the cannabis plant and preserving the terpene-

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rich essential oil ensures optimal freshness. No degradation is the goal. Aromatic hydrocarbons called terpenes are responsible for the palate and fragrance of cannabis flower. Over 100 different terpenes have been identified in the cannabis plant, each strain possessing its own rich composition. Two of the most identifiable types are monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. Monoterpenes such as myrcene, limonene, and alpha-Pinene are lighter in molecular weight than sesquiterpenes, which are more prevalent and familiar. Sesquiterpenes such as beta-caryophyllene, farnesol, and humulene are responsible for the fragrances in black pepper, hops, and oregano. On average, approximately 85% of all terpenes are lost during the drying and curing stage of harvest. Butane hash oil is produced from hydrocarbon-extracted dried and cured cannabis flower or the sugary, trichome-bearing trim left over from harvest. These concentrates range in color and clarity depending on the freshness and quality of the beginning material used. Concentrate aficionados prefer terpene-rich concentrates. Those bearing

MARCH 2016 THE ADVOCACY ISSUE dopemagazine.com


robust flavor have been carefully produced: top-shelf buds are processed in high-end, closed-loop extraction systems at subzero temperatures. They then undergo several filtration methods before being purged of solvent residue with digitally controlled vacuum ovens. Preferred butane hash oil varies in viscosity ranging from completely stable glass known as shatter to a transparent syrup called clear. Live resin is butane hash oil that is produced using a specific method. The starting material is completely fresh, high-grade bud. The genesis of live resin begins with a Colorado native and longtime hash master named William “Kind Bill” Fenger. Wanting to smoke a hash that tasted of the freshest cannabis essential oils reminiscent of a budding flower, he began experimenting with harvest technique and processing methods, primarily “open blasting,” or open-end tube extraction. After a couple of years of lessthan-ideal results, Kind Bill set the idea aside and was soon hired by EmoTek Labs founder Giddy Up as a hash and extract consultant. Giddy Up needed assistance in fine-tuning and finessing his new high-end closed-loop extraction system. After pairing Giddy’s modern hydrocarbon extraction technology with Kind Bill’s experience and fresh ideas, the duo introduced a new product that looked like glistening sugar and smelled of freshly trimmed bud. Live resin took the cannabis scene by storm. Winning numerous awards under

various extraction outfits, this fresh-tasting cannabis concentrate has been in high demand. The low yield offered by the extraction method has resulted in a higher value being attached to the product, but the phenomenal quality of the product and the experience provided by the preserved terpenes makes the few extra dollars well worth it. “Many consumers compare the experience as the difference between eating fresh fruit and dried fruit,” said Jarrod Kaplan, founder of SugarTop Buddery. “The taste and smell of live resin is considerably more intense and flavorful than what you get from shatter, which has been processed using standard industry methods.” Kaplan and the team at SugarTop decided to enter one of their live resin strains into a competition last year, and they won. SugarTop Buddery won Best Live Resin with the Lodi Dodi strain, extracted by Regis Philburn, founder of Echo Electuary. Philburn also extracted Echo Electuary’s own 707 Headband, which won runner-up in the same category. I asked what knowledge the founders of the two companies could provide. “As a grower for live resin extraction, it’s critical that the canopy is leafed regularly and the under canopy particularly is kept clear of debris just prior to harvest,” said Kaplan. “Here at SugarTop, we believe in allowing as much light as possible to penetrate throughout the plants, inspiring as much even growth top to bottom as

possible, encouraging maximum airflow and low humidity. Ideally, nothing can be sprayed during the flower cycle, as any residues would ultimately be augmented in the concentration process. We take many precautions to avoid any issues with molds, mildew, or pests.” Philburn discussed the nuances of live resin extraction from a hash maker’s perspective. “Live resin best captures the terpene profile of the living plant, which can be a unique and invigorating experience to most users who are used to a dried and cured terpene profile,” Philburn said. “A significant amount of terpenes that are expressed by the living plant are lost during the drying process. Live resin is harvested, flash frozen, and then extracted with hydrocarbons in a closed-loop extractor at under 32 degrees within a few days for the best representation of the aroma of a living plant. The process is both difficult and laborious and is a feat for even the experienced extractor.” “A good live resin must be nurtured from growing to harvesting to freezing to extraction,” he added. “Every step counts. Water is the enemy.” Few companies specialize in the concentrate because of its production difficulty. Just as cream rises to the top, so do the Oregon companies that produce connoisseurgrade live resin extracts, impressing con® sumers across the state.

TO FOLLOW THE WORK OF SUGARTOP BUDDERY AND ECHO ELECTUARY, CHECK OUT THEIR INSTAGRAM PAGES: @SUGARTOP_BUDDERY + @ECHOELECTUARY

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INTERVIEW

FIONA MA STANDING UP FOR TH E CANNABIS INDUSTRY

T

he cannabis industry has the potential to bring billions of dollars into the California budget as it becomes regulated and permitted, and yet business owners are still working to build legitimacy for the industry. Cannabis businesses are no different than any other business when it comes to providing jobs, products, and revenue for the state of California. Responsible business owners want to enjoy the benefits of good schools, safe roads, and clean water as provided by tax dollars. They want to contribute to the betterment of their communities, but they are pushed into the shadow of false illegitimacy. With the recent passage of legisla-

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tion in California providing a legal structure for the medical cannabis industry, business owners are working hard to come into compliance. Taxes are only collected and paid on the retail side, but cultivators and manufacturers must obtain permits and report their wholesale transactions just like any other business. One of the major components of legal product sales is a seller’s permit from the Board of Equalization. Coming out of the shadows will provide recognition and legitimacy for the cannabis industry, but it will take a trusting relationship between government officials and business owners. A

MARCH 2016 THE ADVOCACY ISSUE dopemagazine.com

few government leaders have stepped up this last year to start building these relationships, one of whom is one of the process’s fiercest leaders: Fiona Ma, CPA and 2nd District representative for the California State Board of Equalization. When I first met Fiona Ma, I had an overwhelming feeling that fate was at hand. I had a flashback to my early days as an activist reading Jack Herer’s book, The Emperor Wears No Clothes. Herer writes about “Ma,” the Chinese word for hemp. At that moment, I knew that Fiona Ma was fulfilling her place in history as an advocate for legitimate legal cannabis businesses.


WRITER•KIMBERLY CARGILE

Fiona has spent the last year visit- cannabis started in San Francisco,” she ing cannabis businesses to learn more said. “It started there because of the about who we are, what we are do- AIDS crisis and the need to alleviate ing, and why we are doing it. “I’m im- pain and suffering. It never occurred to pressed with everyone in the industry me there were issues around the state. [and their] level of compliance,” Ma When I got to the legislature, nobody said. “Wanting to do the right thing, talked about medical cannabis. The ineven though you can’t bank—and you dustry didn’t feel comfortable coming are still trying to pay your taxes in out. San Francisco did not have many cash, which is shocking to me.” issues, so it was only when I started in Just after the passage of the Medi- this job when someone said we were cal Marijuana Regulation and Safety supposed to be collecting taxes from Act last October, I had the honor to cannabis dispensaries. I asked how take Fiona and her staff with me to pay much we [were supposed to] collect my taxes in cash. They say a picture is and nobody knew the answer. It was worth a thousand words; in this case, revealed to me that many people were it’s worth 20,000 words. Fiona was not registering because they did not able to experience firsthand the fear of have access to banking.” looking over her shoulder as we car Fiona is dedicated to making a ried a bag of cash down to the Board change necessary to provide banking of Equalization office. That day she to the cannabis industry. She has been stood in the shoes of a cannabis busi- holding regular stakeholder meetings ness owner suffering from discrimina- on banking and transportation for the tion. Access to banking is a win-win cannabis industry and has been educatsituation for cannabis businesses and ing legislators, regulators, and stakethe state of California. holders on the need for banking in our Fiona started out as an advocate industry on a regular basis. Education over 20 years ago and has served in is the important first step in changing many different roles within the govern- laws and policies. “Number one: we ment, including on the San Francisco need to better educate the elected ofBoard of Supervisors and the Califor- ficials, the decision makers,” she said. nia State Assembly. “As a CPA and the “We need to hear them say, ‘I didn’t president of a small business associa- know this was a problem. What are tion, I really started to understand how we going to do about it?’” Fiona is difficult it is to own a small business, diligent in her efforts, regularly travelhow many agencies could potentially ing throughout the nation to educate be involved in just opening and run- government officials about this public ning a small business, and the amount safety issue. Now that is taxation with of paperwork that is required to stay representation! compliant,” she said. As an advocate, When I asked Fiona what we can she vocalized her knowledge of the do as an industry to produce a posiconcerns of small business owners and tive change, she said that we all have remembered where her fight began. a responsibility to open up the con“[It started out] on behalf of small busi- versation and to be proud about what nesses in Sacramento testifying on bills we do. Instead of saying that we run and at the local level before the County health care clinics, we should say we Board of Supervisors, trying to make run cannabis healing clinics. “It forces sure that there were more contracting people to ask, ‘Well, what does that opportunities for female and minority- mean,’ and ‘What do you do, and how run small businesses. Twenty years lat- is that safe?’ Until the industry comes er, it is ironic that I am back doing tax out and self-identifies and is proud to work and advocating on behalf of small say that they are in this industry probusinesses and non-profits again.” viding a valuable service to the com Fiona genuinely cares about pa- munity, then it is going to continue to tients and believes that cannabis busi- be a taboo.” ness owners are no different than any other small business owner. “Medicinal

“Until the industry comes out and selfidentifies and is proud to say that they are in this industry providing a valuable service to the community, then it is going to continue to be a taboo.”

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BERNIE SANDERS

A GROWING MOVEMENT WILL BERNIE SANDERS’ HISTORIC POLITICAL PLATFORMS CATAPULT HIM TO COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF STATUS? Bernie Sanders’ pursuit to simultaneously turn down the noise and crank up the conversation surrounding American politics has earned him reputations ranging from a champion for equality to a liberal zealot. Regardless of opinion, his historic grassroots campaign could very well earn him the Democratic nomination and potentially make him the next POTUS. Mapping out the landscape of the Sanders campaign, you’ll find a handful of complex, history-making plat-

forms that lay the foundation of his 2016 Presidential bid. Platforms you might not expect from an unimposing 74-year old senator, who at first glance looks like another old, white man who thinks he should be president. With approximately 6 months to the Democratic National Convention and roughly 8 until the election, a closer look at the platforms that set Sanders apart from the pack provide a revealing glimpse of the oldest and most liberal presidential contender we’ve seen in years.


WRITER

Growth Rate of Campaign Bernie Sanders is unapologetic in his viewpoint that the 1% have hijacked American politics by greedily monopolizing the process from start to finish. Naturally he has no affiliation with a super Pac, making his grassroots funding the best political match-up for Donald Trump’s billionaire bucks should Trump end up with the Republican nomination. With the luxury of being able to fund his own campaign, Trump’s presidential bid also comes sans super Pac. Needless to say, if the race ends up as Clinton versus Trump, one can expect the super Pac button pushed over and over to aggravate the Clinton campaign. Sanders has eloquently demonstrated that billionaire bucks from special interest groups are not just immoral, but also unnecessary for funding a successful presidential bid. In December, Sanders became the first non-incumbent candidate in United States history to exceed the 2 million-campaign donations benchmark, where contributions averaging $27.16 have piled up. Sanders made sure to point out the distinction between rejecting or accepting money from big business, saying, “You can’t level the playing field with Wall Street banks and billionaires by taking their money.” The Sanders’ campaign raised $33.6 million dollars in the final three months of 2015. This impressive sum was followed up by $20 million additional donations in January of 2016 alone.

Socialism, Redefined Capitalism versus socialism rears its ugly head with the war between the 1% and the 99% becoming a cornerstone of American conversation. Sanders remains firm on his stance that there is nothing acceptable about the level of income inequality in the United States-where the top  one-tenth of 1% are in possession of almost as much wealth as the bottom 90%. Traditionally, the United States of America does not have a track record of electing presidents who express viewpoints so closely associated with

• MEGHAN RIDLEY

the philosophies of socialism. It’s fair to say that the term socialism creates skeptical apprehension, which is likely the result of the word’s connotation being distorted by generations of political rhetoric. A June 2015 Gallup poll clearly displayed the general disdain the American public has for the term socialist. Only 47% of individuals polled said that they would vote for a socialist presidential candidate. This poll even determined atheists and homosexuals to be more electable, with respective rates of 58% and 74% potential “yes” votes. Sanders is aware of the stigma the word has retained and explains, “I don’t myself use the word socialism because people have been brainwashed into thinking socialism automatically means slave-labor camps, dictatorship and lack of freedom of speech.” More recently, Sanders stated, “I don’t believe government should own the grocery store down the street or control the means of production, but I do believe that the middle class and the working families who produce the wealth of America deserve a fair deal.” So, is Bernie Sanders a socialist or not? The term currently en vogue is Democratic Socialist, which conveys ideas far more like those of Franklin D. Roosevelt than Stalin. In a 2015 speech at Georgetown University, Sanders tackled the topic, saying: My view of Democratic Socialism builds on the success of many other countries around the world who have done a far better job than we have in protecting the needs of the working families, the elderly citizens, children, the sick, and poor. Economic rights must be a central part of what America stands for…. This is not a radical idea, it is a conservative idea. It is an idea and practice that exists in every other major country on Earth. Garrison Nelson, University of Vermont political science professor, clarifies Sander’s political stance by explaining: The key to understanding Bernie Sanders is that he’s different from other socialist candidates. Most socialist candidates do not want to win. They want to lose and blame the system for their defeat. They revel in their defeats. Bernie believes that

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to be absurd. Whatever your take on the aforementioned political positioning, most people would agree that the 99% have problems. Bernie Sanders just isn’t one of them.

Mary Jane & Mass Incarceration Bernie Sanders as president would instantly paint the political landscape with a more progressive brush. Sander’s main conversations with media outlets continue to address racial and economic discrepancies, which include both legalizing cannabis and defunding private prisons. The need for cannabis policy in the United States is increasing exponentially, and while Bernie Sanders isn’t exactly a green rush advocate, he’s not afraid to talk about the hot topic with a progressive punch. His November 2015 move to end the federal prohibition of pot, through the senate bill known as “Ending Federal Marijuana Prohibition Act of 2015”, attempts to remove cannabis from the Controlled Substances Act which currently dictates American drug policy. Sanders is seeking clarification of the murky system of emerging state policies that conflict with draconian federal laws. As Sanders has said, “We have far, far too many people in jail for nonviolent crimes, and I think in many ways the war against drugs has not been successful.” This brings us to the issue of over-incarceration. The militarized police tactics used in the War on Drugs have led to mass imprisonment of non-violent offenders and as a direct consequence, prison overflow. These continued practices show federal prohibition policy to be increasingly ineffective and inhumane. Sanders has emerged as a bold opponent of the existence of private prisons. His blunt stance on the matter included a bill entitled the “Justice is Not For Sale Act of 2015” that would put an end to the for-profit system of imprisonment, with his website addressing the issue matter-of-factly: I have recently introduced legislation that will put an end to for-profit prisons. My bill will prevent federal, state, and

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local governments from contracting with private companies who manage prisons, jails or detention facilities. It is wrong to profit from the imprisonment of human beings and the suffering of their families and friends. It’s time to end this morally repugnant process, and along with it, the era of mass incarceration. Bottom line, Sanders is the most realistic candidate to prioritize ending cannabis prohibition during his term. He could indeed be the politician that pushes the envelope and provocatively redefines the title Commander in Chief. Only time will tell if we’re approaching a new age in which cannabis is not considered an illegal drug, and the so-called ‘offenders’ will find themselves freed from the constraints of private prisons.

The Oldest President in History If elected, Bernie Sanders would be the oldest person to serve as President in America history. However, his progressive platform breaks the age-old, stereotypical idea of the old, white, male politician as President. Sanders has been making his unabashed viewpoints known since his college years. As he wrote in the Liberal Union Party newsletter Movement in 1972, “A handful of people own almost everything, and almost everybody owns nothing.” Sanders political career officially began when he was elected mayor of Burlington, Vermont by the narrow margin of ten votes. This 1981 victory being his first-ever election win. The down to the wire race received international attention and he served four terms between 1981 and 1989. He moved onto the United States House of Representatives from 1991 to 2007, and has served in the Senate from 2007 until present day. In 2010, Sanders grabbed headlines with a filibuster against extending Bush-era tax cuts that lasted 8 hours. If elected President, Bernie Sanders will be 75 years old at the time of his inauguration.

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Where my Ladies at? Taking the Female Vote from Clinton. An awkward side note to the Sander vs. Clinton primary has ignited commentary around the female voters turning their backs on Hillary during her second history-making bid for the title of first female president in United States history. The whole ‘first female President in United States history’ issue is a delicate conversation – especially amongst females in the party who are not supporting the Clinton campaign. Although the outcome of the Sanders vs. Clinton political jousting remains to be seen, watching Clinton get swatted from her presidential bid by yet another grassroots campaign could be painful to watch. In the New Hampshire primary alone, Sanders beat out Clinton 53% to 46% with female voters overall, with the astonishing statistics growing to Sanders claiming 82% of the female vote in millennials under 30.

Race to the Finish Hypothesizing about the potential of a Sanders vs. Trump race to the White House curates vivid imagery of the social activist versus the business tycoon. A recent USA Today/Rock the Vote poll showed millennials to be highly in favor of the aforementioned Presidential face-off, with 46% supporting Sanders to Clinton’s 35% if the primary were held today. On the Republican side, 26% of millennials want to see Trump take the nomination, with Ben Carson claiming just 11% of that demographic. It is an undeniable fact that some people consider Donald Trump to be an asshole—plain and simple. Bernie Sanders seems to stand closer to the neighborhood of your cute and curmudgeon-esque grandpa. While likability does not define a President, there’s something to be said for the potentiality of this epic showdown, and that it is something the people appear to be craving. In fact, there is likelihood that just by simply placing these two candidates next to one another on an international stage, some uncomfortable truths behind income inequality in the United States stand to be exposed.

MARCH 2016 THE ADVOCACY ISSUE dopemagazine.com

Some feel the state of politics in the United States has evolved into a charade—a stage upon which politicians are untrustworthy brokers of power, leaving citizens in a state of misinformed frustration. Within the cast of players bringing the production to life, we find characters as diverse as the people they are fighting to represent. Whichever side you’re leaning toward, the candidate that can locate the pulse of American politics will likely prevail. And hopefully resuscitate the spirit of social progress necessary to manage the forthcoming cultural evolution so many of us see on the horizon.

Highly-qualified vice presidents? Elizabeth Warren is prime suspect number one for potential Sanders VPs. He has openly praised the fellow senator, being quoted as saying, “She is a great US Senator. She has stood up to Wall Street. She has stood up to big money interests. So, she uh, she and I will work together.”

1

Could we actually see a Sanders-Clinton team take on the GOP? Sanders has mostly scoffed at the scenario, and the minimal likelihood of this pairing likely depends on how nicely they play through the primaries.

2

Remember when John McCain plucked the little-known Alaskan governor and catapulted her to international fame and stardom? Perhaps once again a now-unknown player two will enter the presidential game. Indeed, we could find ourselves, potentially, with a youthful politician designed to give the momentum of the Sanders campaign a quick jolt to the finish line.

3

What about an out of liberal left field move with a politically vocal celeb? Unlikely, yes, but the fantasies are tempting. Placing some liberally-minded star power like Jon Stewart or Bill Maher next to Sanders could be a game-changer. The public has been known to get behind non-politician candidates, with Trump being the most obvious example.

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ROAD TRIP

WRITER & PHOTOS•SHARON LETTS

DENVER

SEX, PAINT, AND WEDDED EUPHORIA PUFF, PASS & PA I NT !

Mike Eymer, CEO of Colorado Cannabis Tours, hosts a packed bus to some of Denver’s finest.

F

FR EEDOM TOU RS

or those lucky enough to be one of the tourists arriving at the Denver Airport seeking the unalienable right of having a heavily medicated good time, Colorado Cannabis Tours has just the package. California bride-to-be Justice LaPrade and her fiancé Cory Schafer booked a full weekend trip specifically to plan their upcoming 420 wedding on April 20 in Oregon. Lodgings were at the nationally known Hampton Inn downtown, with vaporizers available at the front desk for use in the rooms. Schafer said he went along with the weekend to please his love, but admitted he dreaded the entire thing prior. “I ended up having one of the most fun and memorable experiences of my life,” he fessed up. “The freedom of it all was mind-blowing. In California, you still have to keep weed hush-hush just a little bit, but Colorado is an amazing place. It was great meeting so many people from the industry.” The couple’s adventure included boarding a party bus soon after landing in Denver, with more than 30 peo-

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ple from both legal medical and prohibition states alike filling the comfortable limo-style bus. Stops were meant to impress and included Medicine Man’s 30,000-square-feet stateof-the-art grow facility, hosting both medical and recreational dispensaries out front. Tour CEO and co-owner Mike Eymer hosted the ride that lasted nearly three hours, stating that its next stop, Peak Dispensary had been on the tour since the company began booking. The shop was stocked to capacity with more medibles, flowers, topical lotions, oils, and other products than I had seen anywhere in a very long time, partly due to Denver’s steady flow of cannabis tourists. Next door to Peak, participants were given a chance to purchase their own pieces from one of Denver’s largest glass shops, Illuzions, with spectacular art pieces priced in the tens of thousands of dollars. Yet another stop was the chance to observe fine glass artist Chris Schultz as he worked at Glass Craft, a retail shop offering classes on glass blowing.

MARCH 2016 THE ADVOCACY ISSUE dopemagazine.com

Heidi Keyes is part owner of Colorado Cannabis Tours, but her heart’s passion can be found on canvas, with cannabis playing a big role in her artistic life. After receiving a Bachelor of Arts in drawing and painting in 2009, she said she took a leap of faith and started Puff, Pass & Paint with great success. As of this writing, she’s expanding with a studio in Portland, Oregon. “I began using cannabis as a teenager in Wisconsin,” she shared. “It has always been a huge part of the way that I make art. It helps me relax artistically into my work and life, allowing me to enjoy the process of creating instead of just focusing on the end result. For this reason, cannabis and art are the perfect combination for folks who want to make art, but are nervous or simply don’t know where to begin.” Her studio filled with more than 20 hopeful artists—a mix of locals and outof-state participants from the bus tour earlier in the day. A surprising amount of people were over 50, all from prohibition states such as Georgia, Texas, and South Carolina. The tables were full of art supplies, paints, and easels with blank canvases. A generous amount of ground plant material sat in the middle of each table, next to glass pipes and joints rolled by Keyes’ assistant that never seemed to stop passing by. One painting Keyes created of a Colorado rocky mountain scene was used as an example as she instructed the class on how to achieve each stroke: a meadow here, mountains there, snow here. It was a fun and a relaxing way to create a painting, with each finished piece of work uniquely different. “Cannabis encourages them to laugh and find their creativity again,” Keyes informed. “Everyone has the ability to freely make art, but many of us start to


lose that quality in adulthood because we’re so concerned about other people’s reactions.” On a more serious note, Keyes said that even though her class is recreational, she has witnessed many coming to town for real healing. “I talk to people every day who are coming here to try different medical treatments and explore different options with cannabis for pain relief and healing,” she said. “It does make me sad that people must travel from all over the world to come here to use it medicinally because they would be sent to prison if they utilized it at home.” Keyes added she is grateful that the tours and classes such as hers are helping to normalize the plant for many, so that it becomes less of a negative stigma.

A majority of students were from illegal states, many on full tours, which included the popular art class.

P U N GE N T N U P TIALS The date has been set and daddy (or sugar mama) has laid out a huge amount of cash toward the big day. There will be cake, there will be a big dress, there will be food, and there will be romance. Worst case scenario, there will also be alcohol and drunkenness, and perhaps by the end of the evening, the beautiful dress will be crumpled at the base of the toilet bowl with the bride puking her guts out from too many toasts while the groom is passed out on the bed. Unless, of course, the bride and groom are savvy cannabis aficionados who have chosen to forgo alcohol for bud. In legal, recreational states, guests no longer have to crouch behind the hall by the trash cans to partake of their favorite celebratory herb: hosts can offer it up inside.

Denver event organizers Bec Koop and Phil Wolf offered up the first Cannabis Wedding Expo with great success. While mainstream media was trying to wrap its head around the event, longtime cannabis farmers, patients, and recreational users arrived with pen and paper in hand, making note of the many options available to create a green and chill wedding. “If the herb is already in your life on a regular basis, then it should be in your wedding,” shared founder of Denver’s Cannabis Concierge Events, Bec Koop. Koop said she had been working in the wedding industry since 2011, and by 2013 she had the “aha” moment to add cannabis to her floral designs, creating Buds & Blossoms. Soon she was adding long stemmed buds to bouquets and creating “budonniers” for the men’s lapels. “From your bouquet to your bowl” has become a tagline, offering up custom “his and hers” glass pieces for the occasion. Due to the difficulty of finding venues and vendors open to the idea of hosting cannabis weddings, Koop created Cannabis Concierge Events, teaming up with other event planners to offer party packages of all shapes and sizes for the cannabis connoisseur. “Some businesses simply had no interest,” Koop shared. “Many thought the idea was interesting, and some were simply afraid to have their business names attached to something that would change our history.” With the stigma against the plant still intact in the minds of mainstream businesses, the two mavericks forged ahead, knowing the first time around would be the most difficult sell. “Trying to get the first group of people to get on board for anything is always difficult,” Koop continued. “Many of the vendors don’t even do traditional wedding expos, so we felt very blessed that they were interested in participating.” The irony was, Koop explained, those vendors who participated felt the cannabis crowd were “their type of preferred clients.” She and expo partner Phil Wolf teamed up naturally with their respective skill sets, coming together in the fall of 2015 to put together others brave enough to cross over.

Vintage inspired hemp and silk pillows by Janay A Eco Bridal.

Wolf began community organizing while studying for a degree in telecommunications at the University of Colorado at Boulder. He worked in both radio and television on campus, winning an Outstanding Service Award for work done. Though he didn’t continue with a career in media, when the cannabis industry took off in Colorado he quickly became involved, opening up the first dispensary in Colorado Springs in 2009. This led to establishing the medible company High Country Healing, which he is still part of today. A random meeting with a Wall Street investor who had moved to Colorado specifically to start start-up cannabis businesses led Wolf to tourism options. Soon he was involved with the start-up of several companies. Cultivating Spirits then emerged with Wolf facilitating some of Denver’s most highprofile, customized gourmet cannabis tours and tastings to date, pairing food, wine, and fragrant buds and garnering mainstream media attention. “The terpenes and flavonoids that give cannabis its color, taste, and fragrance we also use to pair with the same flavor profiles in food,” Wolf explained. “Terpenes are essential oils that can enhance your mood. It’s not about getting high and satisfying munchies. Pairing takes cannabis to an intellectual high and a true coming together of all the senses.”

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H I G H ART For the location, Koop and Wolf chose the beautiful and cannabis-friendly Point Gallery on Santa Fe Avenue, coowned and curated by Frank Martinez, located south of downtown Denver, otherwise known as “SoDo.” Outside, a stretch limo by Sunset Limo offered an example of a cannabis-friendly ride, while inside the usual vendors lined up, offering 420-friendly services within classic offerings. Music, photography, food, and honeymoon options via Bud & Breakfast, an international online booking service similar to traditional b ​ed-and-breakfast accommodations with a twist: the home owners are copasetic to the herb. Four-twenty bride and groom Justice LaPrade and fiancé Cory Schafer headed to the green room to sit and talk with reporters while noted “wandering musicians” Happy Couple Duo played violins. LaPrade said she and Schafer wanted a cannabis-themed wedding, due to the importance the plant plays in their lives. “We love working with the plant every day, so adding it to our wedding was only natural,” she explained. “We really don’t drink alcohol either, so being able to choose cannabis is even more meaningful.” LaPrade said Schafer’s tux will be made from micro-photos of a Cherry Pie nug, as will the train of her wedding dress, which will also be replete with embroidered green leaves throughout the white gown. A set of custom glass via bongs and dab rings are being created for the special day, with dab, edible, and rolling stations set up in the reception hall. Table runners and plates will both be printed with cannabis camo designs. “The expo gave me a lot of ideas,” LaPrade said. “Janay A Eco Bridal is making me a second bridal dress! We are even considering having Phil Wolf of Cultivating Spirits coordinate our bachelor and bachelorette parties with weed and wine pairings.” Downstairs in the three-story gallery, Budtender Andrew Mieure explained how his kiosk could supply flower to smoke, oil to vape, or small, edible treats for any event. Foria and

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Pink Puff reps discussed the latest in sex play trends with specialty strains and topical oils to stimulate.

From the biggest display, to the smallest offering of bud on the table, anything goes at a cannabisfriendly wedding.

CAN NASEXUALIT Y Los Angeles Sex Educator turned “Cannasexual” advisor Ashley Manta further discussed intimacy in the expo’s lecture room, displaying said products. To the young married couples just starting out, she shared, communication is key to a happy relationship. “The most important thing I’m going to teach you is how to open your mouth and make words come out,” Manta laughed. “Communication is the key to everything in relationships. For a young couple about to be married, being able to process difficult emotions together in a supportive way is crucial.” Cannabis, Manta added, is the perfect substance for a honeymoon for many reasons. Manta said alcohol is a big variable, stating it could be a social lubricant, as many claim, or it could lead to arguments, withdrawing behavior, and leading to the typical hangover. She further stated that there is no way to imbibe alcohol without having the typical side effects, other than intentionally consuming only a small amount, which rarely happens during a traditional alcohol-laden wedding reception. “Cannabis allows more customization,” Manta explained. “A couple could begin the day with a back rub using medicated lotion, then shotgun a hit off of a joint as a foreplay tool. Foria’s topical could be added, with a 30-minute makeout session while waiting for the effect. The happy couple could then vape with sleepy indica and curl up together and cuddle.”

MARCH 2016 THE ADVOCACY ISSUE dopemagazine.com

The abovementioned scenarios don’t have analogs for alcohol use, and Manta added that cannabis is highly conducive to experimentation and creative playfulness, helping couples feel more present in their bodies by heightening sensation.

“We love working with the plant every day, so adding it to our wedding was only natural.” LOVE, SEX, AND M O NE Y According to Bloomberg Business, the wedding industry is a $51 billion dollar industry, employing more than 800,000 people in the U.S. yearly. With the growing popularity and freedom allowed to cannabis users as more get educated to its positive benefits, it’s easy to predict the plant will seep into even more mainstream markets, with great success—and continued healing. “We definitely plan to host at least one or two more expos here in Colorado in 2016,” Koop said. “Plans are already in the works to expand to Washington, Oregon, California, and Washington D.C. by next January. We also realize the following expos will be larger, but it’s important to us that we keep them as intimate feeling as possible.” Koop said that just as a glass of wine can knock the edge off of the big day for a stressed couple, so can cannabis. “The bottom line is, your wedding day is meant to be special, not stressful,” Koop surmised. “If cannabis helps that couple feel at ease, then it should not only be allowed on their wedding day, it should be welcomed!”


眀眀眀⸀猀栀椀渀攀瀀愀瀀攀爀猀⸀挀漀洀         䀀猀栀椀渀攀瀀愀瀀攀爀猀                               


WORLD NEWS

NO MORE DEATH PENALTY FOR CANNABIS MEET TH E ACTIVISTS FIGHTING FOR CHANGE IN ONE OF TH E WORLD’S MOST REPRESSIVE REGIMES

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elcome to Malaysia, a diverse, vibrant kingdom of over 30 million inhabitants situated in Southeast Asia. Here, if you are caught and convicted of trafficking illegal drugs, you will be subject to a mandatory death sentence. Between 1960 and 2011, the ironfisted authorities executed 441 people, 228 of whom were convicted of drug trafficking offenses. As of May 2015, approximately 1,043 prisoners are remanded on death row. In 2013, one particular campaign briefly caught the attention of the global cannabis community: the case of Thitima Khongnun, a single mother from Thailand who was arrested in Alor Setar, Malaysia in October 2011 with just 18 grams (0.64 ounces) of cannabis and sentenced to death by hanging—the typical method of execution in Malaysia.

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Thitima’s case was publicized in an Avaaz petition brought by cannabis activists from the major Southeast Asian nations of Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, and Indonesia. We decided to get in touch with those activists to find out how Thitima’s case was progressing and to ask a few general questions about what it’s like to be a cannabis advocate in some of the world’s most repressive anti-drug regimes. Turns out, this task was not as simple as it first appeared. Due to the often dangerous and constantly changing nature of activism in these countries, we didn’t hear anything back from most of the activists we contacted. When we managed to track down some activists in Malaysia, we learned that their previous group had disbanded after their leader was caught by the authorities.

MARCH 2016 THE ADVOCACY ISSUE dopemagazine.com

However, our Malaysian advocates Fen and Huo (a husband-and-wife team with a serious passion for the cause) were happy to talk to us about their advocacy work. The couple is now part of a whole new advocacy group, MCare, which focuses on research and education to help end widespread negative attitudes toward cannabis.

“Here, if you are caught and convicted of trafficking illegal drugs, you will be subject to a mandatory death sentence.”


WRITER

• SESHATA

Jen Amsterdam: Can you briefly describe the laws relating to cannabis and the death penalty in Malaysia?

JA: Has your safety or the safety of your friends, family, and associates been at risk in any way due to your activism? If so, how?

MCare: Cannabis use is strictly prohib-

MC: In 2015, there was a police report

ited in Malaysia. The law states that any form of the plant is illegal, including the seeds. Anyone caught with any amount below 200 grams will be charged or imprisoned. Anyone caught with 200 grams or more will be sentenced to death by hanging.

JA: How long have you been involved in cannabis activism?

MCare: Together with everyone at MCare, we’ve been actively involved since September 2014.

JA: What does your activism work involve? MC: We are focused on research and

education on cannabis and have hosted a number of conferences to meet and share scientific knowledge on cannabis use. We have also managed to publish the first research study in Malaysia containing data from cannabis users.* The research also holds significant information that may explain and treat the increasing problem of neuropsychiatric illness witnessed around the world lately.

JA: What’s happening with cannabis activism in the ASEAN countries? MC: Activism in Malaysia itself is growing,

but we have to be careful of the authorities. We can’t just openly and aggressively publicize our activity. There are also some restrictions when it comes to spreading awareness via the Internet. Ganja is quite taboo among the Malaysian community.

made against a Facebook site used by activists to share evidence-based scientific research studies published in countries like the United States. The report was made by a government body, Cure & Care, which provides addiction treatment for users of drugs. They stated that the act of sharing information online promotes the use of the plant and has to be stopped. However, MCare’s mission is to conduct authorized local research to obtain definitive facts regarding cannabis use and its effects. So far, we have managed to meet many doctors and researchers through our activism and are progressing positively. We maintain good terms with law enforcement as we are focused only on education.

JA: Does Malaysia have a history of cannabis use? MC: Yes, as do many Asian countries. Malaysia has a rich history of cannabis use that has been hidden due to the fear imposed over it.

JA: Does traditional cannabis use still persist in any areas of the country? MC: Not really. Perhaps to a small extent in rural areas, or discreetly within the community.

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GRAPHICS

• NARISSA-CAMILLE PHETHEAN

MC: Yes. We believe from our studies that

although the plant is said to be so dangerous and feared, it is still used and supported by many people around the world because it has remarkable potentials. The only hiccup is that there is no definitive scientific research or data to educate the masses in the country. Our efforts aim to provide the education that the public so desperately needs, and to help the government understand cannabis better. Furthermore, our published research study could contribute majorly to the global scientific community.

JA: Do you believe Malaysia will ever legalize cannabis? MCare: Yes. As we move on towards the

future, humans will begin to uncover the science of nature. Psychedelics are bound to change the perception of the world, and with more intriguing scientific discoveries made by scientists daily, cannabis will be among the first herbs that will be accepted as natural supplements for the human mind and body.

JA: What’s happening with the case of Thitima Khongnun? Is she still incarcerated? MCare: We have no update on Thitima.

The authorities will not release any information, and it seems that the media is not interested in this news. However, interested members of the public can check out and sign the petition made for her on the Avaaz website.

JA: Do you think your efforts are leading to meaningful change in Malaysia?

While it is certainly true that very little information regarding Thitima Khongnun can be found online, we did manage to discover that Thitima has put out a request for international pen pals to write to her at Pengkalan Chepa, one of the most notoriously harsh prisons in the country. The good news is that Thitima was still alive as of November 2015, when the page was last updated, although she is obviously still imprisoned and there is no news regarding an appeal or pardon. She is desperate to communicate with the outside world. To contact Thitima and offer support during this devastating time, check out her letter on supportpage.org. dopemagazine.com MARCH 2016 THE ADVOCACY ISSUE

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WE ARE YOUR VOICE

YOUR DONATION SUPPORTS CANNABIS LEGALIZATION

terpthesuperpac.com Truth Ends Reefer Prohibition (TERP) is a political action committee, registered with the Federal Election Commission, acting in accordance with, and accepting contributions pursuant to, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, 558 U.S. 310 (2010) & SpeechNOW.org v. Federal Election Commission, 599 F.3d 686 (2010) that promote political campaigns through independent expenditures. Please direct all communication to: treasurer@terpthesuperpac.com.


GROW

WRITER

• DAVID BAILEY

GROW BASICS HOW TO CLONE CANNABIS PLANTS DIFFERENT METHODS, SAME PURPOSE AND RESULT (DIFFERING

NEEDS OF MEDIUM PREP: ROCKWOOL AND AERO)

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hen most of us think of cloning, everything from herds of identical sheep to people with multiple limbs comes to mind. Cloning is definitely a stretch for mammals, but for plants, it is no new thing. Grass, strawberries, vines, and some trees all naturally clone themselves. Rather than waiting for a full cycle to breed seeds, cloning is just growing roots on branches cut from the best plant! There are benefits of starting from both clone and seed, but starting from seed is more like picking a dog from the litter. Even though they had the same parents, they all look different and act different, and will ultimately be different. A grower has no way of determining how the strains will grow or what their sex will be with a room started from seeds. Starting with a clone means knowing exactly what strain is growing, what the sex is, and knowing that the plants will grow the same. Best of all, they are ready to go to vegetative growth in just two weeks: half as long as most seed starts!

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Even though we are taking cuttings started by sticking branches in the dirt and keeping the successful ones, we’ve developed much more consistent ways of doing it these days. While some of it seems like over-engineered, all we’re trying to achieve is the same thing that soil provides: no light and an even blend of oxygen and water. Whether a grower chooses the traditional soil route, the adaptive rockwool, or makes the jump to aeroponics, the outcome will be about the same thing: roots!

DIFFERENT METHODS, SAME PURPOSE AND RESULT For beginners’ sake, I recommend using either peat cubes or rockwool. They come with complete instructions and are easy to prepare. What you’ll need: • Soil or a soilless medium (rockwool, peat cubes, coconut husks) • Rubbing alcohol • Rooting hormone (powder, gel, or liquid) • Cloning tray • Humidity dome • Light source • Cup of water • Scissors • Microbial inoculants (optional)

MARCH 2016 THE ADVOCACY ISSUE dopemagazine.com

SELECTING THE MOTHER (SIZE, AGE, HEALTH, GROWTH PROFILE)

Choosing the mother or mothers to clone from is the most important part of the process. Every plant taken from her will be identical in almost every way! When selecting my mothers, I start with the strains I’ve had the fewest issues with, have given the biggest yields, and of course, have the best quality product. From there, I select the healthiest and largest plants. It’s best if they are above two feet in height and in at least a three-gallon pot, though small clones can successfully be taken once the process is perfected.

SELECTING GOOD CUTTINGS (PART OF PLANT, SIZE, HEALTH, AND APPEARANCE)

Once the plant is chosen, I like to start taking clones at the bottom of the mother for a few reasons. Typically, bottom branches carry more of the rooting hormones, are larger in thickness, and won’t affect my final yield if removed early. The branch should be at least a quarter inch thick, undamaged, and healthy, and preferably six to eight inches tall, or three nodes in length. Choosing the best quality branches will help ensure healthy surviving clones. They are literally the future, so choose wisely!


SELECTING GOOD CUTTINGS (PART OF PLANT, SIZE, HEALTH, AND APPEARANCE)

Once the plant is chosen, I like to start taking clones at the bottom of the mother for a few reasons. Typically, bottom branches carry more of the rooting hormones, are larger in thickness, and won’t affect my final yield if removed early. The branch should be at least a quarter inch thick, undamaged, and healthy, and preferably six to eight inches tall, or three nodes in length. Choosing the best quality branches will help ensure healthy surviving clones. They are literally the future, so choose wisely!

MAKING THE CUT AND PLACING THEM IN THE MEDIUM (CLEANING

UP THE BRANCH AND TRIMMING LEAVES FOR TRANSPIRATION)

The surgical preparation here is crucial. Before making a cut, be sure to have all the tools lined out. Place the rooting medium in the cloning tray and use a pencil to poke a small hole, roughly a half inch deep, in the center of each rooting medium. This keeps the fresh cut from being further damaged as it is pushed into the soil. Next, sanitize the razor blade and scissors with rubbing alcohol. Be sure to have a cup of water nearby. It’s time for the cut! With one hand holding the base of the branch and the other working the blade, cut the branch level with the stem it is being removed from, careful not to notch or harm the parent branch. Holding the clone straight up, slice the base of the stem at a 45-degree angle, through the lowest node. Immediately place the cutting in the cup of water. The new roots will grow from this cut, so we want to make sure we always have clean cuts, clean equipment, and a glass of water close by to keep air from traveling up the stem. Repeat until the cup is filled or the desired number of clones is met. Be-

cause the new clones don’t have roots yet, we want them to keep as much water inside as possible. We actually do this by trimming the leaf tips. One by one, pull a clone out, trim off roughly 20% of the leaf tip, quickly dip in the rooting hormone, and slide the stem into its new home in the rooting medium. If the cutting won’t stand on its own, gently pinch the sides of the rooting medium or push the clone a little deeper. The plants have just endured the most treacherous part of their lives and need to be provided with the recovery space. If the clones did not fill the tray, place the clones close to one another to help maintain even humidity and carefully place the humidity dome over the top.

NURSING THE CUTTINGS THROUGH THE TRAUMA: CLONE MAINTENANCE

(HUMIDITY, LIGHTING, HOW LONG IT TAKES, NO TOUCHING)

Watching and waiting with clones is always the hardest part. All the clones need now is low light and moisture. A single fluorescent or placing the clones in the shade of the mothers works great—just make sure they get at least 18 hours of light or they will have little flowering babies! Keep a small amount of water sitting in the ridges of the tray and gently spray leaves with water when the dome gets too dry. I know it’s exciting, but try not to touch them until they are ready to transplant. Most failed clones I see occur when the grower is too eager and checks on them three times a day. Just like boiling water, a watched clone never roots.

PREPARING THE MEDIUM SOIL Being the easiest to prep, all soil needs is a little neutral water (pH 7) evenly mixed in and a small cup with holes in the bottom. ROCKWOOL This is a great medium to start with, because it can go into soil or hydroponic systems once the process is complete. Because of how they’re made, rockwool cubes have a high pH and a lot of salt. To balance that, first rinse and soak the cubes in fresh water for roughly one hour. While they’re soaking, prepare a second bath, but make sure the pH of the water is roughly 5.5. Gently drain and transfer the cubes into the second bath. After two hours, stir and check the pH. If it is between 5.5 and 6.5, it is good! AEROPONIC Because water is the primary ingredient, the only prep for aeroponic systems is high quality water and a clean setup. After a good sanitizing scrub and rinse, fill the system and don’t forget to PH TEST the water.

“The importance of maintaining a proper plant climate is absolutely necessary, but understanding how to take advantage of the native climate will ensure the purchase of tools and not toys.” dopemagazine.com MARCH 2016 THE ADVOCACY ISSUE

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TECH

SOCIAL MEDIA ADVOCATES US ING TEC HNOL OG Y TO P ROM OTE CANNA B IS C U LTU R E

T

his month’s issue is all about advocacy and reaching out to the masses with a positive message that will help influence the cannabis culture. The best technology available to promote advocacy today is at our fingertips. It’s something that we already use a few times a day. What is this super way of spreading messages to the masses? Social media. According to Statista, an online statistics portal, Facebook had 1.55 billion active accounts in November 2015. Considering there are only about 7 billion people on planet earth, that’s a pretty decent percentage of the world’s population. And while Facebook is the undisputed winner when it comes to social media platforms, it most certainly isn’t the only one. Instagram has 400 million active users; Twitter has 316 million. With astounding numbers like that, it’s no wonder that social media is the best technology to help promote advocacy. So let’s take a look at the different types of social media sites out there and discuss ways that all of us can get in on cannabis advocacy.

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MARCH 2016 THE ADVOCACY ISSUE dopemagazine.com


WRITER

SOCIAL NETWORKS Without a doubt, the most popular types of social media are the networks, and Facebook is the undisputed ruler of this category. To get involved with a group or start a new one, networking sites are the way to go. These networking sites are great for connecting with others with similar interests and backgrounds and they have multiple ways in which users can interact. Just about every major cannabis advocacy group has a Facebook page, from the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML) to Medical Marijuana Advocates Group. There are also some great lesserknown groups that do a fantastic job when it comes to education and advocacy, and one of the very best out there is The Weed Blog. The Weed Blog is constantly sharing the latest in cannabis news, laws, and medical research. There are even online petitions to sign.

SOCIAL NEWS The social news sites allow users to post news items or articles which can then be “voted” on. Those with the highest votes get displayed the most prominently. In essence, the community decides which stories get displayed. The three most popular social news sites are Reddit, Digg, Newsvine. All three are cannabis friendly’. Regardless of what type of social media users prefer, by liking, following, or posting a comment, all of us can become cannabis advocates thanks to the technology available.

• HEATHER COONS

MICROBLOGGING Microblogging focuses on sending out short updates. The most popular microblogging site is Twitter. On Twitter, cannabis advocacy groups send tweets to all their subscribers, which is an excellent way to round up troops quickly. If there was something great just uploaded to YouTube, groups can send that out on Twitter, too. A great cannabis advocacy group to follow is the National Cannabis Industry Association, which offers a lot of great benefits upon joining. The NCIA is leading the way to ensure that the cannabis sector is treated fairly under the law.

MEDIA SHARING Media sharing sites are also excellent tools that can be used for cannabis advocacy. The most popular of this type of social media are YouTube and Flickr. Flickr doesn’t really have anything to offer in the way of cannabis advocacy, but YouTube is a gold mine. Users don’t have to upload to keep up with what’s being posted, and all users can “like” and share the videos they find interesting.

BLOG FORUMS An often overlooked avenue for sharing advocacy issues is in blog forums. If people read an article about something they agree with, they can post a comment. If there is an issue they are exceedingly opposed to, they can develop a wellthought argument and speak up. There are numerous cannabis advocacy forums out there, and one of the top rated is Grasscity. They have almost 20,000 articles on the topic of cannabis news in the United States alone. That is sure to keep readers educated and informed.

GRAPHICS

• BRANDON PALMA

“The best technology available to promote advocacy today is at our fingertips.” FOUR SKILLS NEEDED TO DRIVE SOCIAL CHANGE ON SOCIAL MEDIA There are a lot of great books on the subject of social media, but there are few books that focus on how social media can promote social change. In The Dragonfly Effect: Quick, Effective, and Powerful Ways to Use Social Media to Drive Social Change, authors Andy Smith and Jennifer Aaker combine their knowledge in consumer psychology, marketing, and entrepreneurship to develop social media strategies designed purely for advocacy. Here are the four skills they recommend: FOCUS: Hatch a goal that will make an impact GRAB ATTENTION: Stick out in an overcrowded, over-messaged, noisy world ENGAGE: Make people connect with your goal TAKE ACTION: Empower others, enable them, and cultivate a movement

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CANNANEWS

WRITER

• LINDSEY RINEHART

AN ADVOCATE IN OREGON WHAT IT MEANS NOW

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hen hundreds of Oregonians nabis Association, one of the state’s on the conceptual part, but aren’t also amassed on the Burnside leading cannabis industry groups, as paying attention to how this would be Bridge to celebrate the of- well as a partner at the cannabis- practically applied,” she said. “What ficial legalization of cannabis in the focused firm Emerge Law Group. At drives me right now is: how do we crestate on July 1, 2015, the smoky rev- Emerge’s Fox Tower offices, where ate a system that works?” elry represented the culmination of cannabis magazines and the Oregon That means, for instance, getting decades of cannabis advocacy. For State Bar Bulletin share space on the cannabis businesses access to bankthose at the forefront of the move- waiting area coffee table, Margolis ing. Right now, because cannabis is ment to end Oregon’s prohibition, the says she originally got into cannabis still illegal on the federal level, fedstroke of midnight was an especially advocacy to keep people from going erally regulated banks cannot serve climactic moment, but after the smoke to prison because of cannabis: “To me, cannabis operations. That forces discleared, the warm night gave way to this is a social justice issue.” In 2013, pensaries and other outfits to deal in a hot new day in Oregon cannabis ac- after the Oregon Legislature regulated huge amounts of cash—a logistical tivism. The end of the campaign for medical dispensaries without giving headache and a big security risk. The legalization merely marked the begin- growers the same certainty, she co- continued federal prohibition also ning of new battles: wonky yet cru- founded the Oregon Growers Associa- means cannabis businesses cannot cial fights over the implementation of tion, which became the OCA last year deduct business expenses on their fedMeasure 91, the landscape of the rec- and expanded to include dispensaries eral taxes, which significantly impacts reational cannabis industry, and the and other cannabis businesses. their bottom line. OCA members travfate of the medical marijuana system. Despite the revolution that has tak- eled to Washington, D.C., twice last In the post-legalization era, cannabis en place since then—indeed, because year to lobby members of Congress on advocacy is more multifaceted, more of it—Margolis and her organization federal issues like these. “The industechnical, and more mainstream—but arguably have more to work on today try moves forward because we make no less busy. than they did before legalization. The small changes and broader changes, Just ask Amy Margolis, who devil is in the details: in many practi- and a lot of those broader changes squeezed an interview into her sched- cal ways, Margolis argued, Oregon’s need to happen at the federal level,” ule on New Year’s Eve. The curly- fledgling legal cannabis system is un- Margolis said. haired, straight-shooting attorney is workable. “I think a lot of times, adexecutive director of the Oregon Can- vocates in this space are so focused

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“My role as an activist now is trying to give growers a chance of staying in it. It’s clear that the recreational marijuana system in itself is not going to protect patients.” Anthony Johnson, the executive director of New Approach Oregon Other changes can only happen here Over coffee at a North Portland in Oregon. Margolis bemoaned what cafe, Johnson, a Missouri transplant she called “hyper-regulation” of the with a slight Southern drawl who state’s cannabis industry, from the en- sported both a Royals cap and T-shirt, tirely separate licensing processes for brought up many of the same probthe medical and recreational systems, lems as Margolis, from inconsistency which she said are “absolutely fuck- to over-regulation. Also among his top ing ridiculous,” to the requirement concerns were looming restrictions on that not only owners of cannabis op- the medical marijuana system that erations, but also their investors, have could lead to thousands of patients Oregon residency. She also criticized losing access to medication. the patchwork of regulations from On March 1, the number of patients counties and cities making their own allowed to register at a grow site will rules about cannabis businesses. In be limited to 12 in urban residensome places, these rules are so broad tial areas and 48 outside those areas. or restrictive that they effectively Right now, there are no such limits. stamp out the burgeoning industry, Under the current system, growers she said. “I think many of the local commonly supply both paying and governments have gone too far.” nonpaying patients, subsidizing the Local red tape isn’t just bad for latter by selling excess cannabis from mom-and-pop cannabis, it is “counter their shares to dispensaries. When the to what the voters passed,” said An- number of patients growers can supthony Johnson, the executive director ply is limited this spring, Johnson exof New Approach Oregon, the main plained, “the economics of it put them group behind Measure 91 (New Ap- in the position to drop the patients proach changed its name to “Yes on that can’t afford to [pay] and keep the Measure 91” during the campaign). patients that do.” These days, Johnson spends a lot of Johnson pointed out that Measure his time policing the implementation 91 was not supposed to affect the of his group’s hard-won ballot mea- medical marijuana system, and argued sure. that new tracking, reporting, and po “There’s still injustice, there’s still tential inspections of grow sites makes waste, and voters should definitely patient caps unnecessary. “We need to be concerned about what they voted take any changes to the medical marifor being implemented effectively and juana program very slowly and caunot unnecessarily changed,” he said. tiously, to ensure that we don’t harm

our most vulnerable patients,” he said. Protecting patients by protecting growers is at the top of the post-legalization agenda for John Sajo, a veteran cannabis activist. “My role as an activist now is trying to give growers a chance of staying in it,” said Sajo, speaking by phone from his home in rural southern Oregon. Like Johnson, he wants a more gradual transition to the new regime in order to give growers and patients more time to adapt. “It’s clear,” he said, “that the recreational marijuana system in itself is not going to protect patients.” Sajo campaigned for the first measure to legalize cannabis in Oregon back in 1982. “It was a simpler picture when the goal was to end marijuana prohibition,” he recalled. “Even five or six years ago, there were a few dozen activists in Oregon, and we all knew each other.” Today, Sajo said, the fight has “really shifted to the details.” It can be overwhelming, he admitted, but the longtime advocate isn’t retiring yet. In fact, he recently started the Umpqua Cannabis Association to represent cannabis users and businesses in Douglas County. “There’s plenty of work to be done,” he said.

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BUSINESS

WRITER

• REGINA UNEGOVSKY AND MELANIE BIGALKE

GRAPHICS

•BRANDON PALMA

DOUBLE STANDARDS TH E CHALLENGES OF TAX CODES FOR O

ver the past several months, there has been a significant surge in the number of cannabis-related business owners seeking tax guidance. The industry as a whole faces a byzantine array of laws governing its activity, with everyone from unincorporated municipalities to the federal government paying attention to the money flowing through cannabis operations. While cannapreneurs are not losing too much sleep over the DEA,

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CANNABUSINESS they very well might worry about the good old IRS—after all, they eventually rolled Al Capone for tax evasion. In 2015, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals upheld earlier rulings that preclude cannabis businesses from the ability to claim most ordinary business expenses for tax purposes, a common right afforded to other American businesses. Even if a state has passed laws to allow for either medicinal or recreational cannabis sales, the IRS has pre-

MARCH 2016 THE ADVOCACY ISSUE dopemagazine.com

empted any taxing schematics that allow for the deductions most people expect on their business returns. With its decision last year, the court (which is just below the United States Supreme Court) has echoed the United States Tax Court in upholding that IRS restriction. In your average American business, just about every dollar spent for the production of income can find a home in some type of lawful deduction. This


BY THE NUMBERS: CANNABUSINESS VS. “NORMAL” BUSINESS The cost of goods sold concept renders the simplest definition of profit. Buying goods for $100 and selling them for $250 equals a profit of $150. In cannabis industries, the direct cost typically will include: the cost of the raw good itself; its transport for acquisition; the production material (seed, plants); and direct labor costs for its production (cultivation labor, harvesting).

right has been denied to the average cannabis business. Under Oliver v. Commissioner and Section 280E of the Internal Revenue Code, the vast majority (if not all) of ordinary business expenses are not eligible for deduction. When a business is trafficking in “controlled substances” prohibited by federal law, regardless of policy pursuit for criminal prosecution, Section 280E prohibits eligibility to deduct ordinary business expenses. As such, even a legally operating and state-licensed dispensary is still subject to these punitive tax measures because its activity is still federally illegal. Further hindering any attempts at claiming deductions is the fact that many cannabusinesses, operating in a cash-only system, are not great at keeping detailed records. Even when these businesses might have legal access to an income adjustment like cost of goods sold (COGS), poor recordkeeping or a total lack of records prevent many businesses from effectively claiming these deductions. Besides tax preparation being a nightmare for determining what costs to associate with COGS at a living, breathing dispensary, auditing becomes rather challenging. As the industry grows and professionalizes, record keeping is the taxpayer’s responsibility and the IRS will continue to penalize poor efforts to do so, bank access or not. The end result is a very high net

For cannabusiness, only a few small indirect costs could be considered in addition to these costs. One can take the cost associated with the production of the good itself— but those general expenses associated with the operation of the business, like wages, rent and marketing, are not included among those expenses eligible for deduction. Here is an easy example to see what happens to cannabis businesses versus those that are not locked out of the tax-deduction system:

tax profile for most industries working with cannabis. At the moment, Congress is considering measures that would reduce the effective tax rate for cannabis businesses to 50%. That would be an improvement; current schematics frequently render businesses either unviable or in the 70% and up bracket. To add insult to injury, both state and federal agencies very frequently assess a 10% penalty for paying taxes, such as the state and federal payroll tax, manually or without use of electronic systems like the Electronic Federal Tax Payment System (EFTPS), the preferred method for paying payroll tax to the IRS. That’s a simple penalty assessed on the total tax burden—and, just like that, millions are created in tax revenues at the expense of an industry denied the ability to utilize the systems required to prevent the penalty from being assessed. Ultimately, the best way to work toward reducing your tax burden is to create systems for recordkeeping. Though it can be onerous, strong record-management systems maintain the good health of your business. With states continuously working toward different types of licensing rubrics, compliance with state and federal tax requirements may be one area that differentiates applicants.

“AS the industry grows and professionalizes, record keeping is the taxpayer’s responsibility” CANNABIS BUSINESSES Gross Receipts: $1,000,000 Cost of Goods Sold: -$400,000 Gross Profit: $600,000 Ordinary Business Expenses: -$300,000 (Non-deductible) Net Taxable Income: $600,000 Income Taxes (45% Rate): -$270,000 Net Income After Taxes: $30,000

OTHER BUSINESSES Gross Receipts: $1,000,000 Cost of Goods Sold: -$400,000 Gross Profit: $600,000 Ordinary Business Expenses: -$300,000 (Tax-deductible) Net Taxable Income: $300,000 Income Taxes (45% Rate): -$135,000 Net Income After Taxes: $165,000 Does your business only focus on the production or sale of cannabis? There may be a light at the end of the tunnel for businesses whose services are more varied in nature. For example, businesses that provide wellness services and serve other roles beyond cannabis may be able to separate their activities and deduct the ordinary business expenses associated with non-cannabis related services.

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ART

WRITER •JENNIFER INGRAM | PHOTO • COURTESY OF SNIC BARNES

SNIC BARNES MIXED MEDIA ARTIST

S

NIC BARNES DRAWS INSPIRATION from technological advancement, urban decay, and natural environments. Having gained much acclaim for his electro-forming techniques as a mixed media pipe maker, his recent body of work focuses back on his roots in the glass medium. Incorporating new color pallets, transparent glass blending techniques, and color experiments into his new body of work, the artist has found himself reinvigorated through showcasing the diversity in his skill sets. Snic Barnes pushes forward with the creation of more technically advanced, intricate, and transparent works. He continues to challenge himself as an artist. “With other materials you can hide. With glass, there is no hiding,” he exclaimed. The artist’s current focus is on continuing to push the envelope and to be able to manifest his reality through the glass medium. Snic’s goal is to move forward in a positive manner both personally and artistically, creating innovative works that highlight the inherent beauty of the ® glass itself. @SNICBARNES SNICBARNES.COM

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INTERVIEW

IN FOCUS DR. SUE SISLEY

D

r. Sue Sisley, MD, has made herself a warrior for the warriors. As a physician working in Arizona authorized to practice in psychiatry and internal medicine, she is strictly focused on the science and research of medical cannabis. She has been taking care of military veterans for 20 years and is considered a leading researcher on the potential uses of medical cannabis to treat post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). She is the principal investigator for the only FDA-approved randomized controlled study looking at the use of whole-plant cannabis for treating PTSD. She has been

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featured in reports on CNN, Washington Post, The New York Times and others, and speaks about her work in medical cannabis to research groups all over the world. When DOPE caught up with Dr. Sisley in January, she was making a presentation to the Viridian Cannabis Investor Symposium about medical cannabis and veterans and then heading to the office of New York Governor Andrew Cuomo to discuss the need for putting PTSD on the list of qualifying conditions for medical cannabis, which the state recently rejected. The following interview has been edited for clarity and space.


WRITER

DOPE: What working on?

are

you

• DAVID HODES

currently

Sue Sisley, MD: I have been talking

about the lack of good treatment for PTSD and other veterans’ ailments, and then about the ways that the U.S. government has systematically impeded marijuana efficacy research in this country. There are only two medications that are FDA certified for treating PTSD—Zoloft and Paxil— but there are also a mountain of prescriptions I can give them, like any of the antidepressants and diazepam. It’s nauseating and demoralizing. They feel like guinea pigs. We are putting them through this gauntlet of drugs, and some of these drugs are highly toxic and highly addictive prescriptions.

DOPE: Why is the government impeding research? Shouldn’t any help for veterans be a priority? SS: I was stunned when I first embarked

on this research project. I assumed that the government would expedite a study that could possibly uncover a new treatment for PTSD. This is a true public health crisis. The data from Veterans Affairs is that we lose 22 veterans a day to suicide, but we believe that that number is actually falsely low and doesn’t represent all of the suicides that may be labeled as accidents.

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PHOTOS

• KEVIN SEIGERT - BIOMEDICAL COMMUNICATIONS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA

Only half the states reported on that data, which is already a horrific number. The government, rather than expediting this kind of research, has stonewalled it at every turn.

DOPE: Medical marijuana rules and restrictions are all over the board. Illinois, for example, recently changed the conditions that qualify a patient for medical marijuana, and has other demands on registering patients that some say makes medical marijuana patients look like criminals. SS: There are only about 3,000 patients in

Illinois because of those restrictions. If you are a sick, debilitated patient, why would you even go through the hassle of visiting a dispensary? You will likely stay in the black market and continue to seek out medicine there. That is what is so frustrating. We think that veterans should have no barriers to access, meaning that they shouldn’t have to pay for a medical card, and they shouldn’t have to seek out a separate physician because the government is not able to get their card from a VA doctor. These guys have to pay some doctor from the community to certify them, and often that can be really cost prohibitive for them.

“Until the plant is allowed to go through the FDA process, physicians will never be capable of wrapping their heads around the idea of CANNABIS as medicine. They just can’t. They don’t want that job anyway. They never wanted to be gatekeepers for a plant that has never been properly tested.”

DOPE: What is your hope for the work you are doing in New York with the governor’s office? SS: What we are trying to do is replicate a

bill that was passed in Illinois. It’s the only state in the country where there is a workaround for veterans where they can circumvent the doctor certification. Veterans in Illinois simply send their medical charts and their form that confirms their veteran status to the health department in Illinois. The state department will review the chart to verify that they have one of the qualifying conditions, and then they are issued a card. It’s that simple. That is what we want to see. We want doctors to be removed as gatekeepers for these state programs because this is a ridiculous situation.

DOPE: How will your study impact that goal? SS: Our study represents the first step to

putting the whole plant through a proper FDA drug development process. Until the plant is allowed to go through the FDA process, physicians will never be capable of wrapping their heads around the idea of marijuana as medicine. They just can’t. They don’t want that job anyway. They never wanted to be gatekeepers for a plant that has never been properly tested.

DOPE: What is your hope for this election year and the evolution of the cannabis industry? SS: I hope that we start at the top and

elect a president who is going to be able to bring some sanity to drug policy reform and to sentencing reform. I am a lifelong Republican, but I am a social Libertarian. My feeling is that we need a president that is going to take a humane approach to sick and debilitated patients in this country who need safe, legal access to lab-tested cannabis. Let’s end this failed drug war, or at least the failed war on cannabis.

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LEGALIZATION OUTLOOK

WRITER

• LINDSEY RINEHART

LEGALIZATION AROUND THE NATION: STATES POTENTIALLY JOINING CANNABIS FREEDOM

F

ive states are considering passing cannabis legalization in November 2016, when they will each likely place the subject on the ballot for residents. The acts mentioned here are either on the ballot or have an extremely likely chance of making it to the ballot based off endorsements, funding, and signature gathering deadlines. All of these acts would permit adults over the age of 21 to possess and use cannabis. All but California’s are part of the Marijuana Policy Project Campaign to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol.

ARIZONA THE BASICS: The Regulation and Taxation of Marijuana Act was proposed for Arizona voters by the CRMLA and is close to qualifying for the ballot. With a signature requirement of 150,642 valid signatures, the campaign is reportedly setting their signature goal for 230,000 signatures by the mandated date of July 7, 2016. The act would set possession limits for cannabis in public at one ounce of cannabis and five grams of concentrate. Possession of one to two and a half ounces would be a misdemeanor punishable by a $300 fine, and possession of over two and a half ounces would remain a felony. Adults over 21 would be allowed to personally cultivate up to six plants, with a limit of 12 plants per household. Adults may possess the yield of the harvest in the privacy of their home. This act does not offer employment or housing protections for cannabis users, but does offer protections for custody disputes and organ transplants.

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LICENSING All commercial licensing has an initial $5,000 application fee. Fees are set for all licenses and include the following: $7,500 to $30,000 for cultivation, $15,000 for product manufacturing, $10,000 for testing facilities, $15,000 for distribution, and $20,000 for recreational retailers. Cultivation licenses are to be issued in three tiers, with only one cannabis retailer per 10 liquor stores until 2021, when the commission may add more. Any applicant with a felony within the last five years will not be granted a license. TAXES There is a 15% tax on cannabis to the consumer, which is applied at the point of sale. DRIVING AND PUBLIC CONSUMPTION The state may not charge someone with a DUI simply for having cannabis metabolites in their blood: impairment must be proven. Public cannabis consumption is not allowed, and the offense is punishable by a $300 fine. Cannabis social clubs are currently not allowed, but the act allows the Arizona Stature Legislature to begin approving them in 2020. MORATORIA Local ordinances are allowed to be placed on cannabis businesses, but existing medical cannabis dispensaries are allowed to move into recreational business licensing. FIRST LEGALIZATION IMPACT TO MEDICAL All cannabis would all be regulated under a combined agency. If recreational licensing is stalled, there are provisions for medical dispensaries to provide safe access to recreational consumers.

MARCH 2016 THE ADVOCACY ISSUE dopemagazine.com

CALIFORNIA THE BASICS: Although there are several cannabis initiatives currently seeking enough signatures for the November ballot in California, the Adult Use of Marijuana Act has notable support and is likely to achieve the ballot. This act is endorsed by the MPP in California, Drug Policy Action (DPA), Students for Sensible Drug Policy (SSDP), Law Enforcement Against Prohibition (LEAP), and several others. Signature gathering began in January 2016 with a goal of 365,880 signatures. If passed, the laws would take effect January 1, 2018. The act sets public possession limits at one ounce of cannabis and four grams of concentrate. Edibles have a THC milligram limit of 10mg per serving, or must be delineated by dose if there is more than one edible serving per package. Possession of over one ounce of cannabis or four grams of concentrate is a misdemeanor punishable by a $500 fine and six months in jail, but felonies from possession would be a thing of the past. Adults are allowed to homegrow up to six plants per household, and the household would be allowed to possess the harvest. The act does not offer employment, landlord, transplant, or custody protections (although there is a medical custody protection). This act also adds regulations for hemp. LICENSING Licenses will be available in 13 areas of cultivation, two areas of manufacturing, and in the areas of testing, retailer, distributor, and microbusiness. Fees will be determined in the rule-making process.


TAXES Producers will have to pay a cultivation tax of $9.25 per ounce of flower and $2.75 per ounce of leaves before the product can be transferred to a dispensary. There is also a 15% excise tax due to the consumer at the point of purchase. DRIVING AND PUBLIC CONSUMPTION Driving under the influence of cannabis is illegal in California but must be proven through impairment. Local municipalities may allow cannabis consumption in licensed retailer locations or microbusinesses. Public consumption is not allowed and is punishable by a $100 fine and an additional $250 open container fine if the cannabis is within the passenger area of the car. MORATORIA Local governments may regulate the cannabis industry by ordinance, including the taxation of all cannabis businesses or the complete prohibition of cannabis businesses. FIRST LEGALIZATION IMPACT The act would be integrated with existing medical cannabis laws.

MAINE THE BASICS: The office of Maine’s Secretary of State, Matthew Dunlap, said they expected to receive signatures in February on the Marijuana Legalization Act. The effort is the result of two legalization groups, Legalize Maine and the CRMLA, who joined forces on one petition. Once validated, the act would go to the state’s legislature for review. If the legislature doesn’t approve the language during session, the act would go on the state’s November ballot. The initiative allows for possession of two and a half ounces of cannabis and concentrates outside of the home (it didn’t set a different limit for concentrates). Adults over 21 may grow, possess, and transport up to six mature plants and an unlimited amount of seedlings. Growers may possess what is harvested within their residence. Possession of more than two and a half ounces is a crime, punishable by six to 12 months in jail, with possession of over 16 ounces a felony.

Consumers may not be discriminated against for employment, custody disputes, or housing simply for being a cannabis consumer, although a landlord may dictate that a tenant may not cultivate or possess cannabis on their property. There are no organ transplant protections for cannabis users in the initiative. LICENSING The initial application fee for recreational cannabis licenses would be between $10 and $250. Licensing fees are set for $250 and $2,500 for retail stores, $10 to $100 per square foot for cultivation, $100 to $1,000 for production, $500 for testing facilities and $250 to $2,500 for social clubs. Cultivation licenses are limited to 800,000 square feet for the entire state and are issued in two tiers. A crime involving drugs that resulted in five or more years of incarceration within the last 10 years disqualifies applicants from a license. TAXES A 10% sales tax is applied at the point of sale in recreational cannabis stores and recreational cannabis social clubs. DRIVING AND PUBLIC CONSUMPTION Driving under the influence of cannabis is illegal in Maine, although impairment must be proven. Public consumption is not allowed and is punishable by a $100 fine. Licensed retail marijuana social clubs are allowed, and adults over 21 may purchase and use cannabis in these clubs. MORATORIA Local control is allowed and local municipalities do not have to allow recreational cannabis retailers. The state is also not allowed to cap recreational cannabis dispensaries. FIRST IMPACT ON MEDICAL CANNABIS The language of this initiative was not intended to affect Maine’s medical cannabis program.

MASSACHUSETTS THE BASICS: The CRMLA has already surpassed the signature goal of 64,750 on the Regulation and Taxation of Marijuana Act with over 70,000 valid signatures, as reported by the campaign. The next step would be for the act to be adopted by the state legislature onto the ballot. If the legislature does not adopt the act, then the campaign would seek an additional 10,792 signatures in June 2016, which would then qualify the act for the November ballot. If passed, the act would take effect December 15, 2016. Public possession limits would be set at one ounce of flower and five grams of concentrate outside of the home. Possession over an ounce would be a $100 fine, with felonies for cannabis possession removed. Adults over 21 are allowed to grow up to six plants in their homes, with a limit of 12 plants per household. The possession limit within the household reflects the amount harvested plus 10 ounces of additional cannabis. The act does not include protection from housing or employment discrimination for consumers, but does offer new protections for consumers with custody issues or organ transplants.

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MASSACHUSETTS LICENSING There is an initial $3,000 application fee for commercial licenses. Additional licensing fees are $10,000 for testing facilities and $15,000 for cultivation, product manufacturers, and retailers. Only 75 licenses each for retail and manufacturing may be issued until October 2018, and only 75 licenses for growers until October 2019. Disqualification rules for cannabis licenses are the same as for alcohol, with the exception that a conviction for cannabis would not disqualify an applicant from a license. TAXES There is a tax to the consumer at the point of sale set at 3.75% and a local tax set at 2%. DRIVING AND PUBLIC CONSUMPTION Driving under the influence of cannabis is illegal, but impairment must be proven. Lounges where adults over 21 can consume cannabis are permitted, but public consumption is not. Public consumption is a violation with a $100 fine, as well as a $500 open container fine if the cannabis is in the passenger area of the car. MORATORIA number of medical dispensaries, or below 20% of the amount of liquor licenses. FIRST IMPACT ON MEDICAL CANNABIS Medical and recreational cannabis would be regulated under one system. If recreational licensing stalled, provisions in the act would allow medical dispensaries to provide safe access to cannabis until recreational licenses were available.

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NEVADA THE BASICS: The Initiative to Regulate and Tax Marijuana is already on the ballot and, if passed, would take effect on January 21, 2017. The initiative allows adults to possess one ounce of cannabis and three and a half grams of concentrate in public and at home. Possession over the limit remains a felony, punishable by a mandatory minimum of one to four years in prison. If there is no recreational cannabis store within 25 miles of a resident’s home, the initiative allows residents to grow six plants per adult with a limit of 12 per household. Residents are permitted to retain the harvest within the home. There are no discrimination protections for custody disputes, housing, organ transplants, or employment. LICENSING There is an initial application fee of $5,000 for recreational licenses. Additional licensing fees include $10,000 for product manufacturing, $15,000 for testing and distributing, $20,000 for retail, and $30,000 for cultivation. The state will only allow 106 retail licenses, focused by population. Applicants with Class A felonies or two felonies in the last 10 years will be denied a license. TAXES There is a 15% excise tax to the cultivator and local municipalities may charge taxes as well.

MARCH 2016 THE ADVOCACY ISSUE dopemagazine.com

DRIVING AND PUBLIC CONSUMPTION Driving under the influence of cannabis is illegal in Nevada and may be determined by the mere presence of cannabis in one’s blood. “Per se” DUIs will be given for two active nanograms of THC in the blood or 10 nanograms in the urine. The legislature could allow cannabis social clubs in the future, since it specifically states that retail space is not a public place. MORATORIA Local municipalities may zone cannabis businesses, but bans aren’t an issue for residents since license locations are determined by population. FIRST IMPACT ON MEDICAL CANNABIS This initiative is not intended to affect medical cannabis.


#END420SHAME

A

A VETERAN’S FIGHT FOR CANNABIS

pproximately 20% of veterans are disabled, according to the Department of Veterans Affairs. It’s an astounding number that continues to grow. The shame associated with cannabis keeps many veterans from receiving the treatment they need. The National Center for PTSD cannot condone the use of medical cannabis because there have been no official controlled studies about its effectiveness, and there will be no studies until the U.S. government decriminalizes cannabis. The many veterans who have been able to get the treatment they need are

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working to promote awareness and access for all. Michael Krawitz went into the military in 1981 because it was his perfect fit, allowing him to be a part of the bigger world. Just a few years in, his new career took an unexpected turn when he rode his motorcycle on a poorly constructed roadway in Guam. Suddenly, his life path changed completely. “It took a long time to go from the point where I was a broken Air Force troop to a disabled veteran, and then finally a medical marijuana patient,” Michael said.

MARCH 2016 THE ADVOCACY ISSUE dopemagazine.com

His path wasn’t easy. “The VA put me through a ringer of treatments,” he revealed. “I had stomach injuries, a broken hip, and more. They tried 20 different treatments, but nothing worked.” It wasn’t until 1996 when Michael was on a trip in Holland that he discovered how medicinal-grade cannabis could help. “Here I was, an Air Force vet, but my country didn’t seem to care about me or give a damn about my medical needs. Yet, I was in Holland as a tourist, and they treated me with so much more respect,” he shared. From that point on, Michael became an advocate for cannabis use. For him, it’s


WRITER

“It’s about giving vets and all Americans access to the medicine they need to enjoy life. “Cannabis may not be everyone’s path to healing, but for veterans that choose it, they deserve to be able to use cannabis.”

Michael Krawitz is the executive director for the Veterans for Medical Cannabis Access, an organization committed to protecting the rights of veteran patients and health care professionals. The organization advocates for safe and legal access to cannabis for all appropriate therapeutic uses and encourages research on cannabis as a treatment alternative.

about getting veterans access to whatever medicine they need. “Law enforcement has inappropriately started to leak into that doctor-patient relationship,” Michael said. “That’s when you get these situations where a patient says, ‘Oh, I was just kicked out of my treatment as a punishment because I use medical marijuana.’ The whole society has crossed a line without realizing it. It’s a human rights issue.” It’s difficult for Michael to imagine his life without cannabis. The medications he was originally prescribed had debilitating side effects, but cannabis helped him reduce the pain. “I tell people that it feels like Gulliver’s Travels with those strings that hold Gulliver down,” he said. “In the story, it’s not just one string that holds him down, but hundreds. That’s how it felt to me—hundreds of little strings holding me down every day. Cannabis cuts those strings and allows me to move and function normally.” For Jake Scallan, a security policeman for the Air Force, being deployed to Iraq in 2009 was what changed his life. Like many military personnel, he came back with PTSD and was given Zoloft, Klonopin, Seroquel, and opiates as treatment. His life became a blur. “I was sleepy a lot with no motivation or enthusiasm for life,” he said. “I just sat around and played video games. I felt the regimen of my medication controlled my life. I couldn’t sleep without it and never thought I would be able to.” It wasn’t until he tried cannabis that things started to change. “Cannabis gives me a chance to take a step back from the past and live in the here and now,” Jake said. “Cannabis greatly relieves my general anxiety, stress, and depression [and] allows me to still enjoy activities and life.” For Jake and Michael, providing access to veterans is just one step in the right direction. It’s about giving vets and all Americans access to the medicine they need to enjoy life. “Cannabis may not be everyone’s path to healing, but for veterans that choose it, they deserve to be able to use cannabis,” Jake said.

• KELLY VO

|

GRAPHICS

• BRANDON PALMA

Michael, Jake, and other veterans are fighting to give the millions of Americans who suffer from PTSD and other injuries the access they need. “Just about every vet has told me at one point that I’m doing this for all the patients, not just for me, not just for them, but for all the patients that need this,” shared Michael. “We don’t mind taking the point if we can help everyone. Vets are doing this for everybody.” If you have a personal story to share about how cannabis use changed your life, post about it on social media using the hashtag #End420Shame. Or you can email your story to kellyv@dopemagazine.com.

Jake Scallan is a part of the SC Veterans Alliance, whose mission is to provide qualified California military veterans with top quality, lab-tested medical cannabis, grown by fellow military veterans.

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SUSTAINABILITY

WRITER

•MEGHAN RIDLEY

| PHOTOS • TINA BALLEW

BACK INTO THE LIGHT SUN-GROWN GAME CHANGERS AT TANTALUS LABS

120,000-square-foot facility in

British Colombia

AKING THE TREK THROUGH the winding Canadian backroads to Tantalus Labs leaves one feeling as if they are on the cusp of a unique experience. Upon arriving at the sprawling 120,000-squarefoot facility of greenhouse revolution, there is an immediate understanding that the people and processes here involve nothing but game-changing conversations regarding cannabis cultivation. The environmental impact of cannabis cultivation too often goes undiscussed, and often over-discussed sits the reputation for greenhouse and outdoor cultivated cannabis being inferior in potency and bag appeal to their indoor-grown counterparts. At Tantalus Labs, the team refers to the latter claim as “categorical BS,” and has been keeping their eyes focused on innovation in the sun-grown and greenhouse world. Tantalus Labs is currently on pace to be the fourth largest cannabis production facility in the world. While that alone is impressive, combining that with progressive technologies poised to change the cannabis cultivation game qualifies the lab as obviously ahead of its time. The Sun Lab,

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as they call it, took approximately three years to design and another 20 months to construct—its staggering size a testament to the big ideas being brought to life on this discreet patch of British Columbia wilderness. “[Tantalus Labs is] North America’s first cannabis-tailored industrial greenhouse,” said Dan Sutton of Tantalus Labs. “What we mean by that is that it’s the first time someone has built a greenhouse from the ground up that has the closed-system environmental controls that this facility has. All our intake air is filtered. All of the exhaust air is filtered. Every environmental parameter is controlled.” At the essence of the culture of Tantalus Labs is their understanding that cannabis cultivation is an agricultural conversation. The massive carbon footprint left by indoor cannabis grow operations—which were founded on outlaw mentalities and a need to conceal the gardens—are no longer acceptable or sustainable alongside current options to approach the situation anew. Basically, now that we don’t have to waste energy hiding cannabis, we can invest en-


ergy in how to optimize plant health while keeping environmental factors in mind. It is also important to note that the team at Tantalus Labs functions legally under Canadian law. They have been operating as one of Health Canada’s licensed producers, where medical marijuana is dispensed via an e-commerce platform rather than the dispensary model known in the United States. However, there are numerous cannabis shops lining the streets of Vancouver that operate illegally, but do not pose as enough of a public threat to cause law enforcement to pay too much attention. Nevertheless, these fractured gray areas remain. “The future belongs to those who build it,” said Dan Sutton as we sat chatting in the modern, yet rustic, living room of the mid-century home that overlooks the enormous facility. This stylish hideaway serves as the occasional home base when team members are on site, but could just as easily one day be a swagged-out Airbnb destinabecome tion for cannabis cultivation connoisseurs. Dan Sutton and Alex Close both bring strong professional backgrounds to the table at Tantalus Labs. Once college roommates, Dan went on to work for what he described as the “dark side of the force” in careers in finance, nuclear fuel, and highfield magnetics. He now focuses on the operational end of the spectrum at Tantalus, while Alex’s focus is in the branding arena, where his previous work in digital market-

ing undoubtedly comes in handy. Their choice to reunite in the name of advancing the frontiers of cannabis cultivation now manifests in cutting-edge technologies. Admittedly “obsessed with systems,” the team here is regularly crunching the numbers and interpreting the data associated with large-scale technical agriculture. Robust systemic planning is the name of the game here, with a strong focus on standardizing environments that can later be replicated to produce quantifiable results—and likely industry-redefining progress. As energies in the cannabis movement find room to shift from more fight to more function, the ideas at Tantalus Labs are ® poised to be pioneers.

Tantalus Labs show Dope around their

120,000-square-foot facility near Vancouver, BC.

“THE Future belongs to those who build it.”

ALEXANDER CLOSE

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

DAN SUTTON

MANAGING DIRECTOR

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CANNANEWS

WRITER

• JOHNNY HALFHAND

HOW TO COMMUNICATE WITH THE CHRONICALLY ILL I

n this issue, we will consider chronic illness from a different perspective: communicating with a friend, family member, or loved one who deals with illness on a daily basis. Let’s be honest: it’s easier to put your foot in your mouth than to create a compassionate, positive dialogue. Those suffering from chronic illness struggle with physical issues that many people will never fully understand. However, honest and thoughtful communication can strengthen relationships and help build a foundation for social, mental and emotional health. Empathy for the chronically ill takes root in understanding that while these individuals have become slower in some ways, they also have the strength it takes to wake up each morning and face their private struggle head-on. These tips will help you become better equipped to support those in need. If you are ill, this language can help you take control of the conversation and develop honest relationships with a foundation of common understanding.

REACH OUT Spoonies (the chronically ill) only have so many spoons to give—that is why we may seem to drop out of a given social scene. Take the initiative and contact your sick pal who you haven’t heard from in a month. Don’t worry about disturbing them: they can take a voicemail. A kind email, impromptu coffee, or medical blaze session can make a spoonies week and ward off loneliness.

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YOU ARE NOT A DOCTOR “Have you tried yoga? A change in diet? Vigorous hiking?” You name the platitude, we’ve heard it. This is one of the most frustrating topics to deal with as a chronically ill person. While it is meant well, trust that your friend already has a doctor and a health plan in place. These conversations are pretty personal in nature and shouldn’t be lingered on too long. If you have one thing you really think will help, stick to that. If you rattle off a list, we’ll stop listening.

MARCH 2016 THE ADVOCACY ISSUE dopemagazine.com

YOU ARE NOT A SOCIAL WORKER Catching up with your sick buddy might reveal some difficulties they’re facing: trouble at work, trouble keeping work, insurance, medical bills, et cetera. It’s not necessary to fix all these problems personally. Recommending every program you’ve heard of is similarly distressing for many chronically ill people. If you would like to offer assistance, ask, “How can I help?” There’s a good chance they know what area they need a hand with already.


VALIDATE STRUGGLES If your sick pal seems to be complaining about something repeatedly, they might desire validation of their difficulties. For the chronically ill, battling with insurance, doctors, supervisors, judgmental family, or coworkers can all be very frustrating, confusing experiences that make you question yourself and your own judgment. A good friend can see through this and say, “Hey, that sounds really rough. What a messed up situation.” Communicating that you see the difficulty before trying to fix it is essential. In fact, just seeing it can help your pal find the way to fix it.

MAINTAIN A DEGREE OF LEVITY From what I’ve found, the chronically ill have hilarious, twisted senses of humor. We can have a riot and get weird with the rest of them. I encourage you to find that vein of hearty banter with your friend, but there is a very fine line between this step and the previous one. Keeping things light is important without writing off your friend’s experiences.

ASK AND SHARE

“SHOULD” AND “JUST” ARE DIRTY WORDS It is horrible to watch someone suffer, but note that giving advice can sometimes be taken the wrong way. In particular, overuse of “should” and “just” can grind someone’s gears pretty quickly. When dealing with life-altering degeneration, it’s insulting to hear things like, “Just take more naps,” or “You should be going to a gym,” which, while good general health tips, may be too dismissive of someone’s personal struggle. Chronic illnesses have far-reaching negative consequences that add up internally.

HOLD SPACE This is a skill practiced by hospice caregivers, simply being present with someone who is struggling. Being on bed rest or housebound for long periods of time can be extremely lonely. It’s not necessary to always have a witty remark or a juicy tidbit prepped when with a spoonie. Being fully present and holding space openly is the best way to set the tone.

While spoonies might be knocked out of commission quite often, we do interesting things with this downtime: read books, listen to music, watch movies or shows, play games, et cetera. In this regard, a chronic illness is like the Devil’s Master of the Arts. There’s a very good chance you share a passion, interest, or even great stories from your pasts. Learning each other’s histories can be really satisfying, build a great personal bond, and will help your friend feel seen and appreciated.

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STATE DIRECTOR LETTER

It’s almost that time again! March marks the first days of spring, and the beginning of nature’s renewal in the Northern Hemisphere. DOPE Magazine focuses this issue on advocacy, and the people making the cannabis This February issueup, marks therow National Launch Magazine.debate. I am The movement stand front and center, in of thisDOPE international most proud that thissomovement started right here in the flowers are of in the full fact bloom, and is cannabis in politics. Cheers to Great defendNorthwest.This ing our plant! simply would not have happened without your belief in us. You’re holding in your hands a piece of cannabis history.

Oregon is the epicenter of the cannabis industry, and DOPE Magazine Our cover speaks volumes how faronDOPE Magazine come by is dedicated in continuing to about shine our light the beacon that has already stayingThe true to of ourDOPE’ roots,s movement and Defending Everywhere! Presidential exists. core is notOur just Plant producing a magazine, it is a hopeful, and a great defender and advocate of the plant, Bernie Sanders, lifestyle.

graces our cover this month. In the running for chief of staff while staying DOPE. Bernie is the real deal, the fact that he is green, along with red The names in theshows column to scope the right arethe myreach brothers sisters today. here atWe’ve white and blue, the and of and cannabis DOPE Magazine. We laugh. We fight. We play. We create, We smoke WEED. gone International!

We work our tales off to present you with the best cannabis magazine in the month after It is because yourisbelief in usup andwith the a Ted On world, the local level, ourmonth. Portland Mayoralofrace heating impression stories have I amsome confident is the beginning of Wheeler vsyour Jules Bailey Q left & A,that asking directthis questions about their stance cannabis it’s industry. am excited that Oregon is leading a largeron DOPE family. and We welcome youI to join us in this world wide battle theDefend country in Plant advocacy, seeingDOPE all of isthe dedicatedofcannabis warriors to Our Everywhere! a collection your voices being all over this state makes me proud to be an Oregonian! heard from all corners of Oregon, together, we are growing the DOPE family daily.

March’s Strain of the month is Birdhouse Farms’, Grape Ape. Our family at Birdhouse Farms puts their spirit into every harvest, it is their tradition to Our thisbell month is Island Sweet grown by our at ring featured a Tibetanstrain prayer for every bud, and Skunk I swear you can feelfamily the sweet Hi Fi Farms.ifIt you has ajust euphoric effect, whileApe also take known to help vibrations let their Grape you away.ease Ourdepression featured and pain. We all “Coffee know athletes take a These beating ongive andyou off the field. Our high edible is, Lifted Bean Bites.” will a nice mellow featured story is on former NFL offensive tackle Kyle Turley, and hard hittingis with a caffeine kick, the best of both worlds. Dispensary ofathe month Calyxes, a John Bayes effects production his personal attention organic look at the long lasting from where concussions and injuries due totothe detail is sublime. extreme nature of football. We recently showed and received love at Industry We’re always out here waving the flag so andmuch defending our the plantDOPE and patients, Awards. It is an event honor allThis of you incredible advocates andfeatured defendbut we never forget toto celebrate. month we celebrate with our ers of this amazing plant! I am humbled by all of your love and dedication, artist Flocka, frommy activism to positive imageryour through music, he plants is a and itWaka has only stoked personal fire to defend patients and prime example someone is Keeping DOPE! wherever I mayofroam. Withwho spring comesitnew life, you all have planted a seed in my heart, stay DOPE, and may the love grow and grow!

Remember, DOPE as a lifestyle is conscious consumption and representing our plant in a positive light. Cannabis has a valuable place in society and I am proud to be a part of this time in history. While our state is reaping the benefits of cannabis acceptance there is still a long way to go in America as a whole. On Feb 27, the DOPE industry awards will be celebrating the best of the best, look forward to seeing all my DOPE family there. Peace and Love, Michael W. Fox Oregon State Director

DEFENDING OUR PLANT EVERYWHERE EVAN CARTER PRESIDENT DAVID TRAN CEO JAMES ZACHODNI EDITOR-IN-CHIEF EVAN CARTER PRESIDENT BRANDON PALMA ART DIRECTOR ABIGAIL ROSS NATIONAL CONTENT MANAGER DAVID TRAN JAMES ZACHODNI MAKENNA O’MEARA MANAGING EDITOR CEO EDITOR-IN-CHIEF LAUREN KRZYZOSTANIAK NATIONAL EDITOR CHARM DOMACENA BRANDON PALMA MEGHAN RIDLEY ONLINE EDITOR DESIGN DIRECTOR ART DIRECTOR GLACE BONDESON WEB DIRECTOR JAN DOMACENA PRODUCTION DESIGNER CONTENT MANAGER ABIGAIL ROSS NATIONAL MANAGING EDITOR KATE KELLY DISTRIBUTION MANAGER ALISON BAIRD NATIONAL EDITOR JESUS DIAZ NATIONAL SALES MANAGER LAUREN KRZYZOSTANIAK ONLINE EDITORCOORDINATOR ZAK HUGHES DIGITAL AD TRAFFIC MEGHAN RIDLEY GRAPHIC JAN DOMACENA DALLAS KEEFE SOCIAL MEDIADESIGNER MANAGER DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS JONATHAN TEETERSBUSINESS NATHAN CHRYSLER DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATE KATE HOLLNAGEL KELLY OPERATIONS TREK STRATEGIC ADVISOR PRESIDENT OF SALES ANTHONY DAVIS JENIKA MAO ADMINVICE EVENT COORDINATOR NATIONAL SALES MANAGER JESUS DIAZHEINTZELMAN CHRISTINA EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT REGIONAL SALES MANAGER EMMETTLITTON FRASER KINSEY OFFICE MANAGER WA DIGITAL AD TRAFFIC COORDINATOR ZAK HUGHES NUSHEEN BAKHTIAR OFFICE MANAGER OR DALLAS KEEFE SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT NATHAN CHRYSLER MICHAEL FOX STATE DIRECTOR STRATEGIC ADVISOR TREKMARTIN HOLLNAGEL JEFF STATE EDITOR JENIKA MAO ADMIN EVENT COORDINATOR CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT CHRISTINA HEINTZELMAN KINSEY LITTON OFFICE MANAGER ALEX FALLENSTEDT CHRIS RYAN MELISSA MANKINS JASON HORVATH MICHAEL FOX STATE DIRECTOR CONTRIBUTING ARTIST JEFF MARTIN STATE EDITOR

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CHRIS RYAN ALEX FALLENSTEDT LINDSEY RINEHART SHARON LETTS MELISSA MANKINS JOHNNY HALFHAND MEGHAN RIDLEY JOE SCHOFIELD CONTRIBUTING R.Z. HUGHES WRITERS SHARON LETTS R.Z.BRANDON HUGHES KRENZLER DAVID HODES LUKE ZIMMERMAN MEGHAN RIDLEY LINDSEY RINEHART DAVID PALESCHUCK HILARY SAUNDERS DAVE HODES JOHNNY HALFHAND JOE SCHOFIELD LEAH MAURER JOE SCHOFIELD SARAH JANE GALLEGOSBRANDON KRENZLER DAVID PALESCHUCK JONATHON FROCHTZWAJG NATE WILLIAMS SALES MANAGER NATE WILLIAMS SALES MANAGER SALES EXECUTIVES SALES EXECUTIVES

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DOPE a free to providing anindustry, informative wellness-minded to the ment. isWhile ourpublication foundationdedicated is the medical cannabis it is and our intent to providevoice ethical andcanresearch-based nabis movement. Whilethe ourmany foundation industry, it istoour intentand to provide ethical articles that address facets isofthe themedical war on cannabis drugs, from politics lifestyle beyond. We believe that and research-based articles thatdiscourse, address the many facets the war on drugs,can fromemerge. politics DOPE to lifestyle and is focused through education and honest accurate policy of and understanding Magazine beyond. We believe thatpatients throughand education andand honest discourse, accurateforce policyforand understanding can on defending both our our plant, to being an unceasing revolutionary change. emerge. DOPE Magazine is focused on defending both our patients and our plant, and to being an unceasing force for revolutionary change.

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DOPE Magazine and the entire contents of this magazine are copyright 2016 DOPE MAGAZINE LLC, all rights reserved and may not be reproDOPE Magazine and the entireorcontents of thisthe magazine are copyright duced in any manner, in whole part without written permission 2016DOPE DOPEMagazine MAGAZINE LLC, all rights reserved and may not be reprofrom LLC. duced in any manner, in whole or part without the written permission from DOPE Magazine LLC.


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WRITER •LINDSEY RINEHART

STRAIN

| PHOTOS •ALEX FALLENSTEDT

BIRDHOUSE FARMS: GRAPE APE THE EFFECT WE DESIRE GENETICS Landrace strains are named after the regions that they originate from, and Grape Ape has many present within its lineage. It comprises three heavy-hitting strains: the landrace indicas Afghani and Mendocino Purps and Skunk, a hybrid that is composed of two landrace sativas, Acapulco Gold and Columbian, and one landrace indica strain, Afghani.

EFFECTS This very potent feeling strain leaves a mellow and soothing feeling that is felt right between the eyes after the first hit and lasts for several hours after consumption. It quickly produces a noticeable head change characterized by a genuine, creative, happy high.

AROMA The bud’s initial earthiness is quickly followed by a sweet grape aroma. When snapped open, it emits a strong, skunky fragrance, a likely indicator of its landrace origins. The grape smell remains on the fingers after contact with the bud.

FLAVOR A savory taste is produced when smoking or vaporizing the buds. The delightfully sweet grape taste at the beginning of the puff is accented by earthy undertones that would be expected from the strain’s Afghani and Purps lineage.

LOOKS This flower is visually interesting, highly appealing, and attractive. The thick, dense nugs sparkle brightly from an abundance of crystals that coat them in their entirety. The long, bright orange hairs peek out through the crystals on these dark purple and light green buds.

THERAPEUTIC BENEFITS This strain, which produced happiness and euphoria during the review process, is commonly known for its pain, stress, and anxiety-relieving properties. People suffering from those symptoms would likely appreciate this strain. Consuming this strain at night is probably best, as these buds leave the consumer feeling quite relaxed.

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Jade Jacobs, family farm matriarch of BirdHouse Farms, is passionate about the farm’s cannabis. “There is a lot of love and light in our buds,” Jacobs said. “We really do ring a Tibetan prayer bell for each bud at harvest. Each one has a voice when it’s cut or pops. They are like humans: individual, but with a deep understanding of being one. I talk to them and they talk back. Some are funny, some are stoic. Like humans, they are individuals. Their world is infinitely interesting.”

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elegance and the sleek décor is a clean canvas showcasing an impressive selection. Customer retention, and thus customer service, are both a high priority here, making this a shop that has patrons leaving happy and feeling cared for. Sothy Low concludes, “If we won’t smoke it, we won’t sell it. We stand behind the products we sell. We want to set the standard for the recreational [cannabis] industry, from how the product should be marketed and sold, to how the product should be tested, and how tax dollars should be spent to ben® efit our community.”

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EDIBLES

WRITER

• LINDSEY RINEHART

| PHOTOS • ALEX FALLENSTEDT

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IFTED CHOCOLATES are simple and tasty square-shaped chocolate pieces, filled with coffee beans made in Portland by Local Roasting Co. The package is portioned conveniently for consumption, leaving out guess work in dosing, and it’s also resealable for ease. Five pieces of this treat per package provide 10 coffee beans covered in chocolate goodness. Beginning with just two squares, I felt effects within 30 minutes during the review process. These candies provide a functional head change that left me with a strong urge to accomplish my tasks for ® the day. dopemagazine.com MARCH 2016 THE ADVOCACY ISSUE

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WRITER

DISPENSARY

• SARAH JANE GALLEGOS

| PHOTOS • ALEX FALLENSTEDT

GIVING IT AWAY

AT CALYXES, THE MISSION IS CLEAN MEDICINE

HEN NICK ISAAC AND JOHN BAYES formed Calyxes, the mission was clear: bring the cleanest medicine to those in need. With a focus on organics, all products offered at Calyxes are Clean Green certified. But being the only fully Clean Green certified dispensary isn’t the only way they are taking care of patients. Isaac and Bayes recognized a demand in the community for safe, affordable, effective, high-dosage cannabis-based products. They vowed to produce and give away high-CBD cannabis to patients in need. Cannabidiol (CBD) has been a popular cannabinoid for use in pediatrics, and in treatment

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of epilepsy and cancer. At Calyxes, stories from patients and from the media that tout the benefits of high-CBD treatments strike a familiar chord. These narratives drive Bayes to give back. In story after story, children with autism and epilepsy found relief with CBD, and it resonated with him. “The kid’s writhing in pain … and ACDC makes it so he can live and he can smile, makes him function,” he said. “That’s why I do it.” The ACDC strain, known for its low THC and high CBD content, was a natural fit. Over 2 million milligrams of cannabidiol-based medicine has been extracted from

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the ACDC strain by Green Bodhi, Bayes’ garden and the supplier to Calyxes. Using a Clean Green-certified carbon dioxide extraction, the raw product can be modified for a variety of uses, including tinctures and vapor pen cartridges. Giving away medicine is second nature to Bayes. “It’s what I’ve always done,” he said. “I’ve always given back a portion of my profits to those in need by giving away medicine, or giving to organizations or people in need.” It could be a by-product of Bayes’ Buddhist background. “The whole system is based off bodhicitta. Everything I’m trying to teach or transcend into others is based on a Buddhist philosophy. It all comes back to intentional horticulture.”   Intentional horticulture is the overarching theme behind everything Calyxes does. “In my perspective, when you are working organics and probiotic mediums, it’s all intentional then, anyway,” Bayes said. “You’re intending a better thing for yourself, you’re intending a better thing for the plant to bring the potential from the plant.” The intention is apparent in what Calyxes has to offer. The storefront is beautiful, with attention to detail at every turn. Boutique buds are displayed like jewelry. High-quality scientific glass and heady pieces line the shelves, showcasing the craftsmanship of each item. But the focus isn’t just aesthetics: all flower, extracts, concentrates, and edibles are organic and Clean Green certified. Growers will enjoy the selection of clones, all certified and grown without pesticides.   For Calyxes, giving away millions of milligrams of medicine and creating the best customer experience possible is a way to give ® back to the community. dopemagazine.com MARCH 2016 THE ADVOCACY ISSUE

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GARDEN

WRITER •SARAH JANE GALLEGO | PHOTOS •XX WRITER •SARAH JANE GALLEGOS | PHOTOS •CHRIS RYAN

TRICHOME FOREST SAVING OREGON’S FORESTS, ONE POUND AT A TIME

N OREGON, WE LOVE TREES. We make national news and attract celebrity conservation efforts with our battles to save them. Ever steeped in controversy, conservation of the old-growth forests of Oregon has been something of an uphill battle. The state has been known for logging throughout its history and is often a battleground for issues of deforestation. Eugene-based Trichome Forest is facing the battle head-on.   “I like to consider us a small business with big ideas,” beamed Trichome co-owner Nate Gosney. The plan is simple. Trichome aims to buy and plant trees on one acre of land for every pound of cannabis it sells.

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With over 10,000 trees already planted on 80 acres of protected forestland, Trichome hopes to conserve as much of Oregon’s ancient forest as possible. Gosney’s vision started in Michigan over a decade ago, when he decided to move to Oregon to grow cannabis for cancer patients. He was drawn to the temperate weather and the optimal conditions to grow cannabis. Soon, Gosney was moved by the beauty of the forest and set out to preserve it.   Together with the other members of a patients’ collective, Gosney formed Trichome under a general mission of preservation. The team, a mix of Oregon natives and transplants, sought to respect the Oregon spirit. The aim was to not only preserve forests, but also a way of life.      “In the future, we are going to expand the area into a multiple-use

forest retreat,” Gosney said. “There will be hiking trails, things like that, so everyone can come and appreciate it. Hopefully, with the budding industry, less logging will have to be done.” By sharing the land with visitors, Gosney hopes to inspire others to fall in love with the forest the way he has. It is Trichome’s way of growing a community of nature lovers.       This isn’t the farm’s sole effort to save the environment. Sustainability is very important to Trichome’s mission, and everyday growing practices are done with this in mind. Organic nutrients in a soilbased medium are the workhorse of this cannabis farm. Soil is recycled after each crop, minimizing environmental impact. Plants are watered with gravity-fed spring water in an effort to leave the smallest ® footprint possible.

NATE GOSNEY

CO-OWNER

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WRITER •TRISTA OKEL

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AROMA Aromatherapy is said to help with everything from mood disorders to insomnia by way of the brain’s olfactory center. The therapeutic effects of RGC’s pungent combination of beta-caryophyllene and myrcene, complimented with a dash of pinene and limonene, imparts a skunky, tangy aroma with notes of mango, lemon, and pine that are sure to lift spirits.

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LOOKS RGC is golden hued and shelf stable at room temperature. It’s malleable and not too sticky, has lovely clarity, and is packaged like a high-end deck of cards geared towards a playful 30-something crowd. The attention to detail in the packaging matches the excellence of the product, making for an exceptional value for the consumer.

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FLAVOR Aroma and flavor go hand-in-hand and RGC doesn’t lack either. Upon first taste, bright, tangy mango and lemon flavors fill the mouth, while a heavy, musky flavor lingers in the background. The combination of the flavors is complex and balanced: highly recommended for connoisseurs who seek a touch of “zing” in their cannabis experience.

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CANNANEWS

WRITER

• LUKE ZIMMERMAN

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GRAPHICS

• BRANDON PALMA

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY AND CANNABIS, PART II LESSONS FROM HIP-HOP: BRAND PROTECTION IS VITAL

I

n 2000, I had the opportunity to attend the inaugural Hip-Hop Generation: Hip-Hop as a Movement Conference, held at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. One of the panels that made a lasting impact on me was a lecture by hip-hop legend Afrika Bambaataa. During the lecture, Bambaataa said the future of hip-hop depended on the community expanding to include people who were involved in things other than the elements of hip-hop, like emceeing, DJing, breaking, and graffiti writing. In order for hip-hop to grow as a cultural movement, there was a need for doctors, lawyers, store owners, and professors to identify as hip-hop. This statement is as applicable to the canna-

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bis industry today as it was to the hiphop movement in 2000. I would argue that the elements of the cannabis industry—activism, medical uses, cultivation, extraction, and glass blowing—may be different from hip-hop, but the need for more people to identify with cannabis culture is the same as it was for hip-hop. The cannabis industry needs supportive doctors, lawyers, shopkeepers, and scientists as much as it needs farmers and activists. It needs entrepreneurs who will develop the industry, both directly advancing the cannabis plant and the ancillary businesses. The way these new businesses will stand out from other businesses is through branding. The way

MARCH 2016 THE ADVOCACY ISSUE dopemagazine.com

that these brands will be protected is through registering trademarks. A trademark is a logo, name, slogan, symbol, color, or in rarer cases a sound, that identifies the product’s or service’s point of origin to a consumer. Trademark protection is indicated by adding the symbols ™, ®, or SM for a service mark. The ® symbol may only legally be placed by trademarks that are registered with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). This is a problem for the cannabis industry because the USPTO will not register a trademark that is in violation of the federal Controlled Substances Act. If you attempt to register a federal trademark for a business engaged in the produc-


“Seeking trademark protection restricts other businesses from using the same or similar trade names.”

tion, sale, or processing of cannabis, the application will be rejected. While the last statement is true, cannabis businesses still hold federally registered trademarks. Examples of cannabis businesses with federally registered trademarks are Leafly, Weedmaps, Harborside Health Center, and SPARC. The reason this is possible is that for each of the businesses, trademark protection was obtained on trademark categories that are not directly involved with the cannabis plant. While that separation is obvious for Leafly, which operates as an app for your computer or phone, it is less obvious for Harborside Health Center, which operates as a medical cannabis dispensary. For those considering seeking federal trademark protection for a cannabis business, the short answer is that owners will need a creative business structure and they will have to work with a competent intellectual property attorney. There is also the option of pursuing a state trademark. A state trademark grants protection only in the state in which the trademark is registered. Alaska, Colorado, Oregon, and Washington currently allow for state trademarks to be registered from cannabis products and services. This means that an Oregon dispensary may register its name as a service mark for the purpose of dispensing cannabis.

Seeking trademark protection restricts other businesses from using the same or similar trade names. This allows businesses to build consumer confidence and protect consumers from products that might be inferior in quality. It also allows for businesses to enter into licensing agreements, which allow other entities to use a trademark in exchange for royalty payments. This is important for the cannabis industry because moving intellectual property across state lines is legal, whereas moving cannabis plants and products is still federally illegal. Through the use of licensing agreements, some companies are already building national cannabis brands. Now is the time to grow and protect cannabis brands through trademarks. The urgency for this should be considered immediate and imminent. As for the future of brands in the cannabis industry, consider this quote by Afrika Bambaataa: “Somewhere down the line, the evil ones stole the legacy of hip-hop and flipped it to a corporate type of hiphop. They decided to tell everybody, ‘Well, this is what hip-hop is,’ instead of coming back to the pioneers and getting the true definition of what hip-hop is and what it was and what we been pushing for all these years.”

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FEATURE

THE DOPE Q&A

TED WH EELER AND JULES BAILEY

O

ne of the most important things about advocacy for the cannabis industry is being involved with our legislators and their decisions. Before we can have a cannabis industry, we must have sound cannabis policy. As the 2016 election season nears, it’s important for Oregonians to inform themselves about the candidates who will be on the ballot. In Portland, there are two major candidates for mayor: Ted Wheeler and Jules Bailey. DOPE recently met with each candidate to discuss cannabis policy and industry in Oregon. Responses have been edited for brevity and clarity.

WHY DO YOU WANT TO BE MAYOR? WHEELER:

Our community is facing some very significant challenges, including an escalating homelessness crisis, a housing affordability crisis. We are now six years into an economic recovery, but I hear every single day from people who aren’t feeling that recovery and who, in fact, are feeling like they’re being left farther and farther behind. And even when it comes to the basics. For example, maintaining infrastructure in our community. The city is really struggling to find the right answers, and I believe that the timing is right for me because what I’m hearing from people is they want a mayor who has experience bringing the community together and they want a mayor who is a pragmatic problem solver, who can help make progress in these and other areas.

BAILEY:

I think Portland’s really at a turning point right now, and I love this city, but we have to really come to a decision about what this city is going to be

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like in the future. It’s not a city that’s working for working families right now, and we’ve had a real challenge here where we have a crisis of affordability. We’ve got a crisis of job creation. We have a lot of high wage jobs, a lot of low wage jobs, not a lot of good family-supporting jobs. We have a city that, frankly, has a little bit been coasting on fumes on sustainability and some of the things that we care about. I think that we need a mayor who’s going to dig in for the long run, with the experience and the track record of taking tough votes, and can lead on making this a place that works for everybody. I didn’t see another candidate in the race who met that profile for me, so I decided to get in and run myself.

HAVE YOU BEEN AN ADVOCATE FOR REGULATION AND LEGALIZATION OF CANNABIS IN THE PAST? WHEELER:

I didn’t come to this industry as an advocate for cannabis. I personally don’t use the product. I don’t judge those who do. That’s not my concern. What I’m seeing here is a rip-roaring economic opportunity for our state, and we’re early in and we’re being smart about it. We’re learning from the experience of Washington and Colorado that led us, at least as far as the legalization of the recreational side of the industry, and when I meet with entrepreneurs in this industry, I am infused with their sense of vision and optimism and energy around what this industry means in terms of economic opportunity for our community. So I’m approaching it as the treasurer, as a former local elected official, very much as a bottom-line opportunity for our community. So, while I may not use the product personally,

MARCH 2016 THE ADVOCACY ISSUE dopemagazine.com

TED WHEELER

people shouldn’t take that to mean that I’m not very enthusiastic about what the opportunity is for this industry.

BAILEY:

I was not, and actually I’m happy to say that I was wrong. I was not an advocate against it, but I actually personally voted “no” on the ballot measure. I’ve been in government a long time, and I was looking at Colorado and Washington, and thinking, “Okay, they’re a little bit ahead of us. Maybe we should give them another year and see what they come up with, and then we can have more experience to work on.” I’m very delighted to say that the cannabis industry and the folks that have been working on this have absolutely proved me wrong. It looks like folks are ready out of the gates. This is a great industry, and I’m really happy to see what’s happened so far.


WRITER

JULES BAILEY

• LEAH MAURER

|

PHOTOS

• ALEX FALLENSTEDT AND CHRIS RYAN

ON THE 1,000-FOOT RULE: WHEELER: When Ballot Measure 91 was passed and created this 1,000foot rule, there are already dispensaries that exist and existed prior to 91’s passage, in violation of that 1,000-foot rule. What I would argue today is that regulators should use some common sense. I don’t see any reason why those dispensaries shouldn’t be grandfathered and so I’d at least like to start with a clean slate and not disrupt the business patterns of established business enterprises in our community.

BAILEY:

ON REGULATION: WHEELER:

The industry’s already been legitimized in my opinion. It’s already legal. It’s a regulated industry and, in my opinion, therefore it deserves a level playing field with any other business that’s legal and regulated in our community.

BAILEY:

What we really need to do is make sure that we’re working directly with the cannabis industry to make sure that we’re not stifling the innovation and creativity that’s making these local, small businesses pop up around Portland, and that is really allowing for adults who want to have that recreational outlet to be able to access that, and be able to enjoy that.

ON BANKING: WHEELER:

It’s an obvious public safety problem. When you have a highvolume cash industry that can’t bank, you’ve got people who are not only collecting cash, they’re distributing cash. They’re transporting cash, and criminals are smart enough to know that. It creates some potentially very dangerous situations for people working in the cannabis industry, people who are in the community, and that should be unacceptable to all of us.

BAILEY:

Voters voted to legalize cannabis for many reasons, but I think among those reasons was certainly improved public safety. We cannot then have a backwards step on public safety by having big armored cars, and a lot of money … everywhere. That leads to less safe streets. We need more safe streets, and I think that that’s in keeping with the voters’ intent.

I wouldn’t want on a 1,000-foot rule, or on any sort of regulation, something that could potentially hamstring the ability for businesses to be near each other to create a brand, or a whole that’s greater than the sum of its parts in order to be able to create that brand, and to attract tourism. I’d be open to the conversation of, “What is the right regulation set?”

ANY LAST THOUGHTS? WHEELER: I want people to understand that I support the cannabis industry, that I take it seriously, that I believe it’s here to stay and it represents a great opportunity for all of us, and I will pledge to work with leaders in the industry to make sure it’s as successful as possible. I come to this race as a proven pragmatic problem solver. I come to this race with a lot of experience in local government, both as the former chair of Multnomah County and currently as the state treasurer for many years, and I believe my strongest attribute has been my ability to bring the community together to solve problems and work through the problems together. Given that this is still an industry that’s defining its role in our community and in our state, there’s a lot of work that we need to do together, and I want the cannabis industry to know, and I want DOPE readers to know, that they have an ally in me.

BAILEY: I think I’m somebody that is always open to any new industry and new idea that’s going to make Portland better. I believe in innovation. I’m part of a younger generation that sees what this is able to do, and I think being dope is about seeing what creative people are doing in this town, and making it a place where creative, entrepreneurial people can afford to live, can start a business, and can make this town great again. I think if we’re able to do that, that’d be pretty dope. dopemagazine.com MARCH 2016 THE ADVOCACY ISSUE

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WRITER •HILARY SAUNDERS

HEALTH

| PHOTOS • ALEX FALLENSTEDT

BOOK REVIEW

HERB

MASTERING THE ART OF COOKING WITH CANNABIS

HE MUNCHIES. They’re one of the most familiar consequences of partaking in the great herb. But not all cravings have to result in haphazard culinary concoctions that wreak havoc on your insides. Some choices can be healthy and others can be downright fancy. The team behind Herb: Mastering the Art of Cooking with Cannabis doesn’t necessarily try to upend the munchies’ role in the stoner stereotype with this new cookbook, but chefs Laurie Wolf and Melissa Parks and photographer Bruce Wolf strive to increase readers’ proficiency in cooking with cannabis and decrease the stigma associated with the herb. With insight and support from edibles site HERB, Herb: Mastering the Art of Cooking with Cannabis serves as the first comprehensive cannabis cookbook. An aesthetically pleasing, hardback coffee table-style book, it includes more than 200 pages of recipes, images, and background information about the medical and recreational usage of cannabis. In fact, the book is so easily accessible that it wouldn’t be embarrassing on display in even a prudish kitchen. To cover all the bases, legally and otherwise, the book begins with a two-page introduction about the realities and practicalities of using cannabis. “Sorry, we know we sound like a Cialis ad,” the publishers write, recommending that readers make sure they are healthy enough to enjoy cannabis before trying the recipes. Next, the book delves into the science of cooking with cannabis. “When you’re

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eating cannabis or using it in food preparation,” the introduction reads, “it is important that the cannabis is decarboxylated first, to release its full psychoactive effect.” Baking the herb at 240 degrees for 30 to 40 minutes helps facilitate that process. After baking, the herb can be prepared in butters or other fats and oils—the best way for the liver to absorb and process the cannabis. As such, the recipes in Herb are all rooted in one of three lipids: cannaoil, cannabutter, and coconut cannaoil, which can also be used to make things like canna-mayonnaise and canna-ghee. From there, the book is organized like a traditional cookbook: categories include dips and appetizers, soups and salads, sandwiches, pizzas, pastas and risotto, entrées, drinks, baked goods, and finally, cookies and desserts. Wolf’s stunning and detailed photography provides eye candy while the stomach grumbles. His work ranges from macro shots of buds to wide-angle images showcasing a variety of herbs like parsley leaves and rosemary needles laid out on Kinfolkstyle linens. There are detailed shots that show desserts like Peanut Butter Thumbprint Cookies so closely that you want to grab them and make sure not a single morsel is lost. The recipes accommodate a wide range of diets and experience levels. Plenty are suitable for vegetarians and many are easily adapted for vegans, including Cream of Asparagus Soup with Frizzled Leeks, White Bean Curry Dip, and Spaghetti with Arugula Pesto. More intricate and involved

MARCH 2016 THE ADVOCACY ISSUE dopemagazine.com

recipes include the expert-level Carrot Cake and BBQ Pork Spaghetti with Dill Pickle Pico De Gallo. Dips, desserts, and drinks seem easiest to consume and most pleasantly paired with the effect of cannabis. Dips range from simple hummus and guacamole made with cannaoil to classy bacon-wrapped dates, and no fewer than five different kinds of party-worthy chicken wings. The sweet treats (including the aforementioned cookies and cake) are likely cheaper than buying artisan edibles but just as delicious. And for new users, or at least ones who are more familiar experimenting with alcohol than cannabis, drinks like the healthy Green & Oh-So-Groovy Smoothie or indulgent Mexican Hot Chocolate will likely be the most accessible. Certain entries in Herb seem like overindulgent pairings for cannabis. In particular, heavy entrees like Tomahawk Rib Eye and Seared Sirloin with Savory Bread Pudding seem overly gratuitous to dilute or change with cannabis. Additionally, snacks like nachos and meals like mac and cheese seem like dangerous candidates with high potential for overeating. Herb ultimately represents a breakthrough for the possibilities of cooking with cannabis. Users can experiment with dosage, flavor, and portioning based on the book’s recipes, and Herb lays out the culinary necessities with its clean design, clear instructions, and approachable examina® tion of culinary cannabis.


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WILDFIRE GARDENS MAKING CANNABIS ACCESSIBLE TO ALL

ET ON 114 ACRES in southern Oregon, Wildfire Estate looks like something out of a winery magazine. This is no coincidence. With roots in the wine industry, Wildfire is entering the recreational cannabis market with the branding of a highend winery—one with an earthy feel. “It is our mission to present sustainable living as a lifestyle,” Wildfire CEO Michael Horner said. “We want a connoisseur experience without connoisseur knowledge and a way for consumers to interface with the brand directly.” At the estate, a beautifully curved and lit cabinet showcases hourglass-shaped jars of prepackaged flower and small, custommade glass vials holding pre-rolled joints. Embedded in the display is a tablet with the Terpenality app. The team at Wildfire researched and held focus groups to identify the issues consumers had when choosing and obtaining cannabis. After hours of focus groups, they discovered many common concerns. According to their findings, people sometimes felt overwhelmed when speaking to budtenders and said they received conflict-

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ing information from different budtenders. Others reported being turned off to cannabis use because the effects weren’t what they had expected or desired. To Wildfire, the data showed that there were potential customers who would like to use cannabis, but don’t because they are intimidated by the retail experience. This finding led to the development of a pointof-purchase display that ran Terpenality.          Customers can use the tablet-based app to choose from Wildfire’s current selection. The app asks a series of questions that helps match the consumer with the proper terpene profile. “Most people are unfamiliar with what smells mean,” Horner explained. Most consumers choose cannabis by smell, gravitating toward what’s appealing, but most are unaware of the link between aroma and effect.   Terpenes are what give cannabis its signature odor. Citrus aromas signal the presence of limonene, and floral notes are a telltale sign of linalool. These compounds produce different effects, and to a new user, this could spell disaster. “Customers want to have a predictable and high-end experi-


ence,” Horner said. Wildfire took the terpene profiles present in cannabis and broke them into four main categories, or “flames”: Aurelian, Titian, Mazarine, and Clarion—each with different terpene profiles and effects. The Terpenality quiz assigns consumers a flame based on their desired effect and flavor preferences and provides a measure of predictability. The inspiration for the four flames comes from Wildfire’s winery past. Just as cabernets and chardonnays have different flavor profiles, cannabis differs from strain to strain. Aurelian’s effects are described as “relaxed, sleepy and calm,” with tasting notes listed as “malty hops, spicy cloves.” Mazarine offers “cheerful, focused and imaginative” effects with flavors “of white flowers, lavender, and blueberries.” By taking hundreds of strains and categorizing them into four distinct profiles, Terpenality helps customers make informed choices.       Better-educated customers could mean more cannabis aficionados. By using technology to improve the customer experience, Wildfire is providing a simple and meaningful way to interact with its brand.

MICHAEL HORNER

WILDFIRE CEO

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MEDICAL & RECREATIONAL CUSTOMERS, REFER TO THIS AD & RECEIVE A

$1 GRAM WITH 1/8TH PURCHASE

*Limit 1 per person, per day. Limited time only, while supplies last. Please enjoy all cannabis products responsibly and in compliance with Oregon laws.


PIECE

WRITER •BRANDON KRENZLER | PHOTO • ALEX FALLENSTEDT

NORTHWEST BORO FROG CRAFTED BY SEBASTIAN ERCHED ATOP A BRILLIANT, gold-colored pedestal, a speckled tree frog peers through the center of a crown disc, studying the transition of solid concentrate to smoke. Looking into the frog’s eye is slightly mesmerizing, with intricate detail giving life to the borosilicate. Long, thin, amphibious fingers grasp the piece, giving an illusion of an actual frog clinging to the base and disc as if it were a tree branch. Fiery red-orange spirals are intermittently layered with soothing sky blue as well as the goldenrod base. Edges are defined by ebbs and flows of translucent and shadowy indigo blue. A secondary defining feature to the right of the frog is a unique leaf-shaped handle, which gives width and security in the palm of the hand during use. Sebastian Case has crafted the rare and elusive “Northwest Boro frog,” which is accompanied by a banded, medium-themed marble comprised of intertwining primary colors that meld together and give a texture-rich interior to the smooth glass sphere. Bring this frog along ® to your next gathering of friends and create a conversation. @SEBASTIANCASE

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Synergy Skin Wo 24 hour time release transdermal patch Synergy Skinworx transdermal patches were created by a team of professionals consisting of:

Synergy Skin Wo THC 1 Transdermal Patch 2-70% Isopropyl Prep Pads Single Time Use

THC - 61mg CBD - 2mg

Accurate and Quick Dosing 24hr Time Released Medication

Doctors, Chemists, and Cultivators to develop a safe, quick, clean,

Synergy Skin Wo CBD 1 Transdermal Patch

Synergy Skinworx transdermal patches were created by a team of professionals consisting of: Doctors, Chemists, and Cultivators to develop a safe, quick, clean, and accurate dose of cannabis. Transdermal patches allow the delivery of cannabis straight into the blood stream. Synergy Skin Worx THC patch is best used for: pain relief, PTSD, nausea and vomiting, appetite stimulation, asthma, glaucoma, and insomnia.

2-70% Isopropyl Prep Pads Single Time Use Accurate and Quick Dosing

THC - 19.1mg CBD - 30.2mg CBN - .9mg

24hr Time Released Medication

Synergy Skin Worx transdermal patches were created by a team of professionals consisting of: Doctors, Chemist, and Cultivators to develop a safe, quick, clean, and accurate dose of cannabis. Transdermal patches allow the delivery of cannabis straight into the blood stream. Synergy Skin Worx CBD patch is best used for: pain relief, cancer cell retardation, seizures, anxiety, PTSD, diabetes, crohn’s, and any autoimmune disease or disorder.

and accurate dose of cannabis. Transdermal patches allow the delivery of cannabis straight into the blood stream. • Discrete medicating • Water proof and Sweat proof • Accurate dosing

EXCLUSIVELY AT OREGON MEDICAL MARIJUANA DISPENSARIES FOR WHOLESALE INQUIRIES CONTACT synergyskinworx@gmail.com

@synergyskinworx

New Products Launching Soon

synergyskinworx.com


™ Cannabis Oils Natural Terpenes Enjoy the pure nature of Oregon. Be true and stay pure.

We Encourage you to Keep the world pure please recycle our products. Just Put the cartridge in the tube and leave them with the Dispensary and we will do the rest!

NowAvailable in the VesicA™ dab tool ALWAYS CO2 EXTRACTED BY

Winners of the “Best Co2 Cartridge thc” at the 2015 Portland, OR DOPECUP Extracted from OG KUSH grown by Locally Baked Farms

Critical Seperations

We Support Local Farms

FOLLOW US


Savor our nuts.

Not just any nuts - These are winners! Awarded “Best Savory Edible” – 2015 Dope Cup Oregon. There are a multitude of ways to enjoy our Roasted Almond Rations, and all of them help provide long-lasting relief from whatever ails you. Available in sweet and savory flavors at fine dispensaries across the great state of Oregon. Lunchbox Alchemy uses top-quality Oregon grown cannabis to handcraft all extracts. Independent lab testing verifies the elevated standards we strive for: high potency product with no residual solvent, pesticides, fungus, or mold. Here at LBA, we aim to provide high-caliber medicinals that are as safe as they are effective. What’s in your lunchbox?

#lunchboxalchemy | 541-241-6786 | For more information visit lunchboxalchemy.com

“crafted”


GREELEY GALLERY

premium flowers

concentrates

infusions

accesories

Exclusively offering GRAND MASTER CHEM (30.6% THC) by Kelron Hubbard (“Strain of the Month February”) – Oregon Leaf Magazine

NEW YORK PINEAPPLE DIESEL

(25.9% THC) by Trillium (“Strain of the Month July”) – Dope Magazine

NYPD SHATTER

(96.7% Total Cannabinoids) by Franco’s (”Concentrate of the Month July”) – Dope Magazine

Collective Finest

503 889 0729 • info @ greeleygallerypdx.com • greeleygallerypdx.com 6512 north greeley ave. portland, oregon 97217


Dope Magazine - March 2016 - The Advocacy Issue - Oregon  

We decided to put Bernie Sanders on the cover of our March Advocacy issue. His presidential campaign takes a firm stance on cannabis legaliz...