Issuu on Google+

Vacant Land Use Recommendation

Annual Meeting Question: Possible Sale of the Vacant Land Owned by the Mequon-Thiensville School District


District Office Demond Means, Ed.D., Superintendent Matthew Joynt, Assistant Superintendent of Educational Services Gail Grieger, Executive Director of Business Services Sarah Zelazoski, Executive Director of Human Resources Melissa McCrady, Executive Director of Communications Michelle Ferris, Executive Director of Student Services 5000 W. Mequon Rd. Mequon, WI 53092 262.238.8500 Homestead High School Brett Bowers, Principal 5000 W. Mequon Rd. Mequon, WI 53092 262.238.5900 Lake Shore Middle School Kate Dunning, Principal 11036 N. Range Line Rd. Mequon, WI 53092 262.238.7600 Steffen Middle School Deborah Anderson, Principal 6633 W. Steffen Dr. Mequon, WI 53092 262.238.4700 Donges Bay Elementary Allison Rudich, Principal 2401 W. Donges Bay Rd. Mequon, WI 53092 262.238.7920 Oriole Lane Elementary Mary Jo Tye, Principal 12850 N. Oriole Ln. Mequon, WI 53097 262.238.4220 Wilson Elementary Jocelyn Sulsberger, Principal 11001 N. Buntrock Rd. Mequon, WI 53092 262.238.4600 M-T Recreation Dept. Ryan Mangan, Director 11040 N. Range Line Rd. Mequon, WI 53092 262.238.7535

TABLE OF CONTENTS Executive Summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 3 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 4 Contextual Background. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 4 Current Status of the Property. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 4 Frequently Asked Questions. . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 5 – 9 Timeline of Events. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 10 Conclusion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 11 Educational Space Needs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 12 Educational Space Needs – Elementary School. Page 13 Educational Space Needs – Middle School . . . . Page 14 Educational Space Needs – High School. . . . . . Page 15


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Mequon-Thiensville School District owns approximately 111.7 acres of land ½ mile south of Mequon Road between Wauwatosa and Swan roads. The District purchased the land (including its 105 tillable acres) in two phases. The first purchase was made in December 1964 for 42.11 acres at a cost of $48,000. The second purchase was completed in April 1965 for 70 acres at a cost of $84,000. The District sold 0.17 acres of the land (approximately 20 feet) for a total of $500 in January 1994. The District purchased the land fifty years ago with the intent to construct a second high school in the community. Based on projections of continued declining enrollment, excess capacity in existing buildings and cost-prohibitive challenges associated with new school construction, the District has deemed no future use for the vacant land. Currently, the land is used for agricultural purposes. The District has a current lease through October 15, 2014 for a total of $19,635 ($187 per acre). The District had a market appraisal completed in February 2013, and at that time two scenarios were offered as it pertains to the value of the land. In scenario #1, if the zoning for the property was R-1 Rural Residential (fiveacre minimum lot size), the value was set at $1,660,000. The zoning of R-1 Rural Residential was the zoning at the time of the appraisal. Scenario #2 was a hypothetical situation, assuming the zoning could be modified to an R-4 Suburban Residential (3/4-acre minimum acre lot size). The value of the property increased to $1,990,000. The vacant land that the District owns is located in the Central Growth Area, an area designated for growth and development by city officials. There have been recent modifications to the City of Mequon zoning requirements in this area, in accordance with the City of Mequon’s Central Growth Area planning. The modifications have increased the value of the vacant land owned by the school district, hence the timing and desire to pursue the sale of the land. The District, per state statute, must seek the approval of the electors at an Annual Meeting to pursue the sale of the vacant land. If the electors grant the Board of Education the authority to sell the land, the board unanimously determined, after analyzing multiple options, that the most prudent use of the possible revenue generated from the sale would be to retire (payoff) the non-referendum debt of approximately $1,600,000. The retirement of the non-referendum debt would provide budget relief to the school district, which in turn would help maintain academic programming and services for students. The Annual Meeting is an opportunity for community members to cast their vote related to the question of: Should the school district sell the vacant land? The purpose of the meeting is to allow community members to share their opinions on the possible sale of the vacant land. The information in this document has been prepared to provide contextual background for community members. The Annual Meeting is scheduled for Monday, July 21, 2014 at 7 p.m. in the Homestead High School Auditorium. Please come and participate in this important process.

Vacant Land Use Recommendation

Mequon-Thiensville School District | 3


INTRODUCTION The proposal of relinquishing an asset is always an important topic that requires the engagement of the community. The Mequon-Thiensville School District is proposing to pursue the sale of the Swan Road property, vacant land the school district owns between Swan and Wauwatosa roads in the City of Mequon. The information enclosed is meant to provide community members with contextual background related to the subject. All eligible electors in the community are invited to attend the July 21, 2014 Annual Meeting to cast their vote on the following question: Should the school district sell the vacant land?

CONTEXTUAL BACKGROUND • The Mequon-Thiensville School District owns approximately 111.7 acres of land about ½ mile south of Mequon Road, between Wauwatosa and Swan roads. • The land was purchased in two phases. • The first purchase was executed in December 1964 for 42.11 acres at $48,000. • The second parcel of land, an additional 70 acres, was purchased in April 1965 for a total cost of $84,000. • A market appraisal from February 2013 valued the property at $1,990,000 assuming zoning modifications of ¾-acre lot sizes. This assumption seems likely based on other recent developments in the central growth area.

CURRENT STATUS OF THE PROPERTY • Currently, the land is used for agricultural purposes. • The District is in a contract that extends through October 15, 2014 for a total of $19,635.

City of Mequon - Central Growth Area (approximately 400 total acres)

4 | Mequon-Thiensville School District

Vacant Land Use Recommendation


FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS 1) QUESTION:

Does the District foresee any future need for the vacant land?

ANSWER:

Administration does not see a future need for the land. The land was purchased with the intent of eventually building a second high school on the property. As student enrollment continues to decline, it becomes highly unlikely that the District will need the land for new construction purposes. Based on the June 2012 Plunkett Raysich Architects (PRA) report to the board, the construction of a new facility would be cost-prohibitive for the community. The most fiscally responsible path for upgrading facilities would be to address current assets used by students and the community.

2) QUESTION:

What are the population trends for school-aged children in the community?

ANSWER:

Demographic information shows that the number of school-aged children living in the Mequon-Thiensville community has been declining for the past 10 years. Projected student enrollment from the Applied Population Lab study showed a continued decline for the next decade. The APL concluded that its findings were, “based on models that incorporate recent past and current demographic information, as well as the district’s own enrollment data and assumptions about future housing development in the school district area.”

3) QUESTION:

What is the space capacity at all six MTSD schools?

ANSWER:

Information from the June 2012 Plunkett Raysich Architects (PRA) study shows that all six schools in the Mequon-Thiensville School District have space for student expansion (if necessary). The report demonstrated that the District’s elementary schools are at or near capacity, based on new educational delivery models (e.g., computer labs, Special Education services). The report reflects that there is capacity at the middle school and ample capacity at the high school. In the case of an influx of new students into the school district, there is space to serve them and rearrange other grouping options, if necessary.

4) QUESTION:

What are the costs associated with the construction of a new school building?

ANSWER:

In Addendums B, C and D (on pp. 13, 14, and 15), readers will find costs ranging from $21 million for a newly constructed elementary school and up to $58 million for a newly constructed high school. The District has determined that the footprint of the six existing school sites offer ample space for additions. Fiscally, the most prudent direction for taxpayers is to construct additions to existing buildings — not a new building on the current vacant land — if space is needed.

5) QUESTION:

What were the findings from the options presented by PRA in the June 2012 report?

ANSWER:

The District requested a review of facility options from its architectural firm, Plunkett Raysich Architects (PRA), in June 2012. The options in the PRA study support the concept that the District has excess capacity within its existing schools. The options presented by PRA focused on grade reconfiguration. Only Option #7 from the report suggested the construction of a new school, which was deemed cost-prohibitive by the board and administration. It is important to note that most of the options from the PRA report called for grade reconfiguration, which the administrative team has deemed premature.

6) QUESTION:

If there were a need for additional space, the vacant land would be the logical location for new school building, right?

ANSWER:

It is the analysis of the administrative team that there is simply no need for a newly constructed building in the Mequon-Thiensville community. However, if the need ever presented itself, the western portion of the City of Mequon would be a logical site for a new school.

Vacant Land Use Recommendation

Q&A Mequon-Thiensville School District | 5


7) QUESTION:

What is the Central Growth Area?

ANSWER:

The Board of Education and administration met with the Mequon Common Council, Mayor of Mequon and City of Mequon administrative staff in August 2013. At the time of the meeting, city officials shared with the school district that the Swan Road property was located in what was designated by the city as the Central Growth Area. This area has been targeted for potential development by the city. Any change in zoning or availability to sewer and water services is being explored independently from the District’s interest in the property. The Central Growth Area designation will impact 21 parcels owned by 20 different owners. The District owns two parcels on the north side of the area.

8) QUESTION: ANSWER: Property Name

What is the market value of other District property?

Based on 2013 market appraisal by Vitale Realty Advisors, LLC: Building Size (SF)

Year Built

Site Size (Acres)

Land Value

Final Opinions of Value

$/SF

Lake Shore Middle School

92,900

1969

12.94

$2,320,000

$25.00

Range Line School

57,500

1949

11.03

$1,610,000

$28.00

Lake Shore & Range Line

150,270

23.97

$1,200,000

$3,000,000

$20.00

Steffen Middle School

78,800

1965

11.81

$2,050,000

$26.00

Wilson School

64,690

1957

17.77

$1,940,000

$30.00

Steffen & Wilson

143,490

29.58

$1,480,000

$3,010,000

$21.00

Donges Bay School

63,660

1965

15.38

$615,000

$1,910,000

$30.00

Oriole Lane School

53,440

1965

36.97

$1,480,000

$1,870,000

$35.00

Vacant Land between. Wauwatosa Rd and N. Swan Road

110.42

Scenario One: $1,660,000 Scenario Two: $1,990,000

Homestead

*The school district did not have a market appraisal conducted on the site in 2013.

9) QUESTION:

Won’t new development translate into an influx of children to the school district?

ANSWER:

The fundamental reason for this dire financial situation is declining resident student enrollment. The District peaked in resident student enrollment in 1997-98, with a total of 4,061 resident students. Currently, the District has a total of 3,504 resident students. Fewer students enrolled results in less tax authority, which in turn results in reduced revenue. The District would benefit from an increase of resident school-aged children. However, the timing of an influx of new children living in the community would take time and would not immediately help the District. However, the possibility of new development would help the school district in the long term. In addition, based on the PRA study, it is evident that the school district has the space capacity to serve more students, if necessary.

Q&A

The Mequon-Thiensville School District is seeking to sell the Swan Road property because of the severe financial situation we find ourselves in annually. The District has reduced its operating budget for the past 10 years. Eventually, the reductions will begin to impact the quality of the #1 K-12 school district in Wisconsin.

6 | Mequon-Thiensville School District

Vacant Land Use Recommendation


10) QUESTION:

Please clarify the process for the possible sale of the land.

ANSWER:

If the electors approve the pursuit of the sale of the land, the District would begin necessary preparations for the receipt of offers. The board may reject or approve an offer to purchase the vacant land. Please see page 10 for a flow chart of the process the District would use if the electors approve to grant the Board of Education the authority to pursue the sale of the Swan Road property.

11) QUESTION: ANSWER:

Why is now the right time to pursue a sale of the land?

The vacant land is located in an area described as the Central Growth Area by the City of Mequon.

• The Central Growth Area has had its zoning requirements modified and access to water & sewer services have been directed to the entire area, making the District’s vacant land desirable for future development. • The District is seeking to generate the greatest net revenue for the property. There is no preconceived notion for who could be a possible buyer of the vacant land. • The sale of the vacant land to a developer has a two-fold advantage to the District: (1) The greatest amount of one-time revenue and (2) the increase of school-aged children into the community. • The City of Mequon recently approved zoning changes for a 95-lot proposed subdivision in the Central Growth Area.

12) QUESTION: ANSWER:

What would MTSD do with the proceeds of the sale of vacant land?

The Board of Education considered several options (see page 8).

The board considered the following objectives when arriving at its decision: • Maximizes the district’s ability to provide comprehensive educational programming, including co-curricular and extracurricular activities. • Maximizes the district’s ability to employ a systematic approach to addressing the long-range facilities plan. • Minimizes additional costs to taxpayers associated with supporting public education. • Maximizes the value of remaining district assets. • Maximizes the district’s ability to implement long-term solutions to current debt obligations. • Maximizes the district’s ability to implement strategies to address operational budget shortfalls. • Maximizes the likelihood of public approval.

The Board of Education utilized the TregoEd analytical decision-making process to qualitatively and empirically compare the options. This process allowed board members to weigh each option against the needs of the district, the community and each other.

Ultimately, through the weighted ranking, board members chose Option #3 - Retire Non-Referendum Debt - meaning proceeds from the land sale would be designated to payoff the approximately $1,600,000 of non-referendum debt (Fund 38).

Vacant Land Use Recommendation

Q&A Mequon-Thiensville School District | 7


Options Considered Option #1

Option #2

Option #3

Option #4

Budget Stabilization Fund (Offset projected budget shortfalls)

Fund Balance

Retire Non-Referendum Debt – (Fund 38)

Fund Capital Maintenance Projects (Per long range facilities plan)

Advantages:

Advantages:

Advantages:

Advantages:

• Provides budget assistance with the District’s ongoing budget shortfalls.

• Enhances the district’s financial position.

• Reduces district debt obligations.

• Improves cash position, which reduces shortterm borrowing.

• Eliminates district principal & interest payments currently funded within the revenue limit. Provides direct budget relief of approx. $260,000.

• Appears to be politically acceptable to use proceeds from disposal of district asset to maintain other district asset.

• Asset remains on district balance sheet until needed. • The funds in the reserve may be designated for future use.

• Reduces list of capital project needs. • Proceeds used for non-recurring projects. • If done in conjunction with referendum, may potentially help passage by reducing amount. • Allows for flexibility for the Board of Education to establish either: (a) a Fund 49 Capital Projects Fund or (b) a General Fund designation for Capital Projections • If done in conjunction with referendum and the referendum passes, it could provide temporary budget assistance by reducing the Buildings & Grounds budget.

Disadvantages:

Disadvantages:

Disadvantages:

Disadvantages:

• Short-term solution.

• Justification for larger fund balance pressures will increase.

• Does not address the list of capital projects.

• If not done in conjunction with referendum for remaining capital projects and/or referendum fails, only addresses a small percentage of capital project needs. Not enough would be removed from list to justify temporarily reducing the Buildings & Grounds budget to provide operational budget relief.

• The option will appear to be shortsighted by the community.

• Without a fund balance designation for use of funds, plan may not be defined enough for public to support the sale (i.e., with designation for use of funds, fund balance becomes temporary holding place to utilize other options).

Q&A 8 | Mequon-Thiensville School District

Vacant Land Use Recommendation


13) QUESTION: What are the implications of selling the land or not? ANSWER:

This question is presented to the community because the school district is in need of additional revenue. The issue is not as simple as “living within your means.” The District has been providing the community with a superior educational product, despite facing massive budget shortfalls for 10 years. The level of reductions implemented in the school district eventually will begin to have an adverse impact on the educational services delivered in our schools. Frankly, the number of offerings and opportunities has already been sacrificed in the District in recent years. The educational experience that a student in 2006 was offered is significantly different than the experience we are able to offer a student in 2014. The student today has fewer offerings to consider and is likely paying more in student fees.

The opportunity to generate approximately $2 million for the District’s operating budget should not be minimized. The additional revenue would greatly assist the organization in maintaining a high level of educational services for our students. Without the additional revenue, the District would continue to generate approximately $20,000 from agricultural rental fees for use of the land. In short, the District can generate 100 times the revenue with the possible sale of the land versus the continued rental. In a time of unrelenting financial pressure, the selling of the asset is a logical business transaction.

14) QUESTION:

Why is there a need for additional revenue in the school district?

ANSWER:

As a result of declining enrollment, the school district has faced budget shortfalls for the past 10 years. The number of resident students enrolled in the school district either positively or negatively impacts the available revenue for school operations through the state funding formula.

Because declining enrollment has impacted the Mequon-Thiensville School District, there have been fewer funds available for educational services. In short, the formula does not provide sufficient funds to operate our District at the level of quality expected from our parents, students and community members.

The District has reduced operating expenditures for the past 10 years. Ongoing reduction of expenditures without any prospect of revenue generation will result in increased student-to-teacher ratios, as well as reduced course offerings, programs and services to students. This would also impact the school district’s ability to attract and retain high-performing staff members who work directly with the students.

The possible sale of the vacant land has the potential to assist in managing the budget of the Mequon-Thiensville School District without any costs to taxpayers or adversely impacting programming and services for students for the next three to four years.

15) QUESTION:

What is the current interest rate on the Fund 38 debt?

ANSWER:

The interest rates for the non-referendum debt ranges from 2.30% in 2015 up to 4.00% in 2020. It was refinanced in 2012.

16) QUESTION:

What would be the savings for paying off Fund 38 early?

ANSWER:

The estimated savings realized after payoff (assuming funds were received in next fiscal year) would be approximately $57,000.

17) QUESTION:

Is the District able to invest the proceeds into high-yield stock or financial options that could generate revenue?

ANSWER: Per state statute 66.0603, the school district is prohibited from investing in the stock market. The District

Q&A

investment options are primarily limited to fixed-income money market vehicles.

Vacant Land Use Recommendation

Mequon-Thiensville School District | 9


Timeline of Events

10 | Mequon-Thiensville School District

Vacant Land Use Recommendation


CONCLUSION The Mequon-Thiensville School District Board of Education used the TregoEd analytical process in its decision to use any proceeds from the potential sale of its vacant land to retire non-referendum debt obligations. The nonreferendum debt is located in a fund titled Fund 38. The retirement of this debt would reduce the District’s debt obligations and eliminate principal and interest payments currently funded within the revenue limit. The retirement of the debt provides a one-time direct budget relief of approximately $260,000. The school district has reviewed educational space needs and determined that there is no additional need for educational space at this time (please see the chart below). School

2005-2006 School 2013-2014 School 2020-2021 School Capacity Based on Year Enrollment Year Enrollment Year Enrollment Max. Class Size

Donges Bay Elementary

505

437

373

413

Oriole Lane Elementary

449

417

326

389

Wilson Elementary

509

568

418

500

Range Line Elementary

0

0

—

300

Steffen Middle School

478

407

369

507

Lake Shore Middle School

430

417

349

507

Homestead High School

1,617

1,288

1,265

1,800

Combined Elementary

1,463

1,422

1,116

1,301

908

824

718

1,014

Combined Middle School

The selection to use the proceeds from a potential sale of the vacant land came after considerable deliberation and evaluation of four different options. The Board of Education exercised its due diligence in arriving at the decision to use the possible proceeds to retire the non-referendum debt. The community electors must now decide if they will grant the school district the authority to pursue the sale of the vacant land that has been deemed unnecessary for future educational use. We invite all community members to attend the Annual Meeting on July 21, 2014 to cast their vote on this important issue.

Vacant Land Use Recommendation

Mequon-Thiensville School District | 11


ADDENDUM A Mequon - Thiensville School District Educational Space Needs

Enrollment  Capacity

05-­‐06

06-­‐07

07-­‐08

08-­‐09

09-­‐10

10-­‐11

11-­‐12

12-­‐13

13-­‐14

14-­‐15

15-­‐16

16-­‐17

17-­‐18

18-­‐19

19-­‐20

20-­‐21

Donges  Bay  Elementary

505

488

482

481

480

480

444

440

423

414

413

396

398

388

378

372

Oriole  Lane  Elementary

449

454

459

417

420

401

408

396

388

379

374

368

349

340

331

326

Wilson  Elementary

509

491

492

521

485

530

524

511

505

494

467

441

448

436

425

418

Steffen  Middle  School

478

474

406

411

403

432

414

427

418

424

416

421

412

396

377

369

Lake  Shore  Middle   School

430

414

409

398

406

407

416

409

412

398

387

382

366

366

349

349

Homestead  High  School

1617

1571

1526

1493

1436

1405

1359

1360

1355

1368

1371

1374

1339

1332

1327

1265

3988

3892

3774

3721

3630

3655

3565

3543

3501

3477

3428

3382

3312

3258

3187

3099

05-­‐06

06-­‐07

07-­‐08

08-­‐09

09-­‐10

10-­‐11

11-­‐12

12-­‐13

13-­‐14

14-­‐15

15-­‐16

16-­‐17

17-­‐18

18-­‐19

19-­‐20

20-­‐21

505

488

482

481

480

480

444

440

423

414

413

396

398

388

378

372

413

413

413

413

413

413

413

413

413

413

413

413

413

413

413

413

05-­‐06

06-­‐07

07-­‐08

08-­‐09

09-­‐10

10-­‐11

11-­‐12

12-­‐13

13-­‐14

14-­‐15

15-­‐16

16-­‐17

17-­‐18

18-­‐19

19-­‐20

20-­‐21

449

454

459

417

420

401

408

396

388

379

374

368

349

340

331

326

389

389

389

389

389

389

389

389

389

389

389

389

389

389

389

389

05-­‐06

06-­‐07

07-­‐08

08-­‐09

09-­‐10

10-­‐11

11-­‐12

12-­‐13

13-­‐14

14-­‐15

15-­‐16

16-­‐17

17-­‐18

18-­‐19

19-­‐20

20-­‐21

509

491

492

521

485

530

524

511

505

494

467

441

448

436

425

418

500

500

500

500

500

500

500

500

500

500

500

500

500

500

500

500

05-­‐06

06-­‐07

07-­‐08

08-­‐09

09-­‐10

10-­‐11

11-­‐12

12-­‐13

13-­‐14

14-­‐15

15-­‐16

16-­‐17

17-­‐18

18-­‐19

19-­‐20

20-­‐21

478

474

406

411

403

432

414

427

418

424

416

421

412

396

377

369

507

507

507

507

507

507

507

507

507

507

507

507

507

507

507

507

05-­‐06

06-­‐07

07-­‐08

08-­‐09

09-­‐10

10-­‐11

11-­‐12

12-­‐13

13-­‐14

14-­‐15

15-­‐16

16-­‐17

17-­‐18

18-­‐19

19-­‐20

20-­‐21

430

414

409

398

406

407

416

409

412

398

387

382

366

366

349

349

507

507

507

507

507

507

507

507

507

507

507

507

507

507

507

507

05-­‐06

06-­‐07

07-­‐08

08-­‐09

09-­‐10

10-­‐11

11-­‐12

12-­‐13

13-­‐14

14-­‐15

15-­‐16

16-­‐17

17-­‐18

18-­‐19

19-­‐20

20-­‐21

1617

1571

1526

1493

1436

1405

1359

1360

1355

1368

1371

1374

1339

1332

1327

1265

1800

1800

1800

1800

1800

1800

1800

1800

1800

1800

1800

1800

1800

1800

1800

1800

05-­‐06

06-­‐07

07-­‐08

08-­‐09

09-­‐10

10-­‐11

11-­‐12

12-­‐13

13-­‐14

14-­‐15

15-­‐16

16-­‐17

17-­‐18

18-­‐19

19-­‐20

20-­‐21

1463

1433

1433

1419

1385

1411

1376

1347

1316

1287

1254

1205

1195

1164

1134

1116

1301

1301

1301

1301

1301

1301

1301

1301

1301

1301

1301

1301

1301

1301

1301

1301

05-­‐06

06-­‐07

07-­‐08

08-­‐09

09-­‐10

10-­‐11

11-­‐12

12-­‐13

13-­‐14

14-­‐15

15-­‐16

16-­‐17

17-­‐18

18-­‐19

19-­‐20

20-­‐21

908

888

815

809

809

839

830

836

830

822

803

803

778

762

726

718

1014

1014

1014

1014

1014

1014

1014

1014

1014

1014

1014

1014

1014

1014

1014

1014

Donges  Bay  Elementary Actual/Projected   Enrollment Capacity  Based  on  Max.   Class  Size Oriole  Lane  Elementary Actual/Projected   Enrollment Capacity  Based  on  Max.   Class  Size Wilson  Elementary Actual/Projected   Enrollment Capacity  Based  on  Max.   Class  Size Steffen  Middle  School Actual/Projected   Enrollment Capacity  Based  on  Max.   Class  Size Lake  Shore  Middle   School Actual/Projected   Enrollment Capacity  Based  on  Max.   Class  Size Homestead  High  School Actual/Projected   Enrollment Capacity  Based  on  Max.   Class  Size Combined  Elementary   Actual/Projected   Enrollment Capacity  Based  on  Max.   Class  Size Combined  Middle   School Actual/Projected   Enrollment Capacity  Based  on  Max.   Class  Size

12 | Mequon-Thiensville School District

Vacant Land Use Recommendation


ADDENDUM B

Vacant Land Use Recommendation

Mequon-Thiensville School District | 13


ADDENDUM C

14 | Mequon-Thiensville School District

Vacant Land Use Recommendation


ADDENDUM D

Vacant Land Use Recommendation

Mequon-Thiensville School District | 15


Mequon-Thiensville School District 5000 West Mequon Road Mequon, WI 53092

Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage PAID Thiensville, WI Permit No. 8058

Resident Mequon-Thiensville 53092 & 53097

Resolution to Approve District Land Sale:

BE IT RESOLVED that the School Board of the Mequon-Thiensville School District is hereby authorized, during the current fiscal year, to sell and dispose of approximately 112 acres of vacant land located ½ mile south of Mequon Road between Wauwatosa and Swan Roads in the City of Mequon belonging to the School District that is determined by the School District to be no longer needed for school purposes, on such terms and conditions as are deemed reasonable and necessary by the School Board. The Annual Meeting is scheduled for Monday, July 21, 2014 at 7 p.m. in the Homestead High School Auditorium.


MTSD Land Sale Document