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DONGAH CHO

dcho1009@gmail.com I 25 Longfellow Road, Cambridge, MA 02138 I +1.213.399.9667

EDUCATION Sep. 2013 - May. 2015 Sep. 2007 - Apr. 2012

Havard University Graduate School of Design, Cambridge, MA Master in Archtecture II Southern California Institute of Architecture (SCI-Arc), Los Angeles, CA Bachelor of Architecture

RECOGNITION Mar. 2015 Jan. 2015

Harvard University Graduate School of Design : Soft Structured Chair Work selected for School Open House Exhibition Work Published on GSD Platform 7

Sep. 2012 Apr. 2011 Feb. 2011

Southern California Institute of Architecture (SCI-Arc) : BCAM REDUX Work presented in “Advances in Architectural Geometry” Film, Centre Pompidou, Paris Work selected for school spring show exhibition Work selected for NAAB accreditation exhibition

Apr. 2010

Southern California Institute of Architecture (SCI-Arc) : Lucio Fontana Museum Work selected for school spring show exhibition

EXPERIENCE Sep. 2013 - Dec 2014

25 Longfellow RD House, Cambridge MA I Personal Work - Participated in housing renovation, Worked on steel staircase design and managing fabrication

Dec. 2012 - Jun. 2013

Tom Wiscombe Architecture, LOS ANGELES CA I Architecture Intern - Participated in design competition team for Collider Activity Center and Taichung City Cultural Center - Participated in design development and contructed developed models, and construction documents for MOCA PAVILION in Los Angeles

Dec. 2009 - Jan. 2010 Jun. 2009 - Sep. 2009

Testa/Weiser INC, VENICE CA I Architecture Intern - Participated in the project, Unite TYO, Multi-unit Housing - Collaborated with NASA AMES Research Center during the schematic design phase of NASA/OMEGA Project

Aug. 2004 - Aug. 2006

Republic of KOREA Army - Performed military duties, Volunteered for a troop dispatch to Iraq in 2005 for 6 months (Zaytun Division)

SKILLS

Software Proficiency : Auto CAD, Rhinoceros (Grasshopper, V-Ray), Maya (Mental-Ray), Sketchup, Revit Architecture, Zbrush, Adobe CS (Illustrator, Photoshop, After Effects, In Design) / Knowledgeable in laser cutter, CNC fabrication, and 3D color print Language Proficiency: English / Korean


UNFINISHED WORK III CAMBRIDGE, SPRING 2015

Harvard GSD Option Studio

PROJECT DESCRIPTION

ADVISOR : Ben Van Berkel RESPONSIBILITIES : Research, Schematic Design, Design Development __Maya2014 3D Modeling Mental Ray __Auto CAD/ Rhinoceros 3D Modeling Drawing Sets __Adobe Illustrator/ Photoshop Diagram and Presentation Materials

In 21st century, the invention of internet, and social network service which is the evolution of it brought huge impacts on the paradigm of advertising industry. The number of media type that had been created before the era of internet is less than the media type that has created after internet era, so there is too many media type to deal with for the creative agencies. With the fast growing of the media type, agencies don’t have time to adapt to each of the platform so they become less creative for their products and less communicative with their audiences. The goal for the studio is to create the new workspace for the advertising industry, and I focused on how I can transfer the idea of transme-

UNFINISHED WORK III

dia into the architectural elements, so that the architecture can help to form the new environment of the industry. First, I looked into the new program elements that are production of advertisement space, and exhibition/live event space, and the relationships between the programs. Unlike the old typical workspace, as situating the atrium in the middle, I put the office space towards the center of the building. The big idea of the advertisement comes from the office space which is centralized and that connects to the production space to the exhibition space.

CAR

Overhoeks Tower Centeral Station

MAIN ENTRANCE

SITE

FERRY

Eye Film Institute


NATIVE ADVERTISING, FACEBOOK MOBILE - 2012 TWITTER - 2010 MOBILE APPS - 2009 ONLINE ARTICLES (IN-TEXT ADS), LINKEDIN - 2008 YOUTUBE, FACEBOOK, MOBILE WEBSITES(GOOGLE ADSENSE) - 2007 BLOGS(GOOGLE ADSENSE) - 2003 POP-UPS - 2001 MOBILE SMS, PPC - 2000 BANNER ADS, EMAIL - 1994 TELEMARKETING - 1970 JUNK MAIL - 1954 TV - 1941

DIGITAL

PRE-DIGITAL

RADIO - 1922 CATALOGS - 1872 BILLBOARDS - 1867

PRINT

MAGAZINES - 1844 NEWSPAPERS - 1704

218 years

72 years

1700’s

1800’s

1920’s

1704

1843

1920

The fisrt newspaper

Volney Palmer opens

announcement seeking a buyer for an Oyster Bay, Long Island, estate, is published in the

agency in philadelphia.

becomes the first radio

1930’s

1940’s

1950’s

1938

1941

Radio surpasses magazines as a source

With 7,500 TV sets in New York City, NBC's WNBT begins

the first to broadcast the results of the 1920

1960’s

22 years

1970’s

1980’s

1990’s

1954

1971

1981

1993

CBS becomes the

The Four A's, ANA and

MTV debuts with

The Internet becomes a reality as 5 million users worldwide get online.

medium in the world.

first TV spots, featuring a Bulova watch that

Review Board to

that change the nature of commercials.

2000’s

1999 breaks the $2 billion mark and heads toward $3 billion as the industry, under prodding from Procter & Gamble, moves to standardize all facets of the industry.

taste and social responsibility in

signals for the day's schedule.

1956 1742

1861

1864

The first magazine

New York City, The

appeared in the May 1741 issue of General Magazine.

trade, emerged as the

William James Carlton begins selling advertising space in religious magazines. James Walter Thompson (JWT) soon joins the firm, which today is the oldest Ameriacan ad agency.

major agencies opened up shop : N.W.Ayer&Son(1869), J.WATER THOMPSON(1871) BBDO(1891), Bates Agency(1893)

Videotape recording makes prerecorded commercials possible.

1922 New York offers 10 anyone who would pay $100. The Queensboro Corp., a Long Island real estate firm, buys the first commercials in .

1948 1888

YOUNG & RUBICAM

1958

1923 C. H. Shaten Studios (to become Cato Johnson) opens

JWT 1864

1877

WPP

OGILVY & MATHER Hewitt, Ogilvy, Benson, & Mather opens

1964

Mather & Crowther Ltd. of London opens

98,759

Wunderman Ricotta & Kline opens

worldwide employees

1919 1952

Renamed to James Walter Thompson Co.

$$$$$$$$$$$ $13.60B

MediaEdge splits from Y&R

Burson-Marsteller opens

Founded as Carlton and Smith

worldwide revenue

MINDSHARE 1997

CIA Medianetwork

1989

headquarters

DUBLIN

MEC INTERACTION 2002 TEAM DETROIT 2006

TAXI

1992

SCHEMATIC 1999

BERLIN CAMERON 1999

Intergrated planning

Experience

media / platform

Experience

media / platform Engagement

Experience

media / platform Engagement

Public Relation

Advertising

media & platform Communication Idea

Interactive Experience

Engagement

Retail

NEW IDEAS

NARRATIVE

NEW IDEAS

Direct Marketing

Staff

Transmedia planning

increasing audience enegagement STAGE OF ENGAGEMENT

DISCOVERY

EXPERIENCE

EXPLORATION

Public Relation

Advertising Brand Community

SMELL

TASTE

TOUCH

SEE

LISTEN Interactive Experience

SENSE ENGAGED

THOUGHT IN MIND OF AUDIENCE

SHOUD I RISK IT?

WILL I LIKE IT?

I’M IN

NOW I SEE IT FOR WHAT IT IS

AM I ALONE?

Direct Marketing

Retail

Staff


special-use shooting space

main circulation / exhibition space

production studios event / exhibition space

hybrid space for producers and audience

public

audience / experience

private

producers / producing

A-A Section


Roof Level

Ampi-theater, Outdoor Event area

Level 4.5

Open Exhibition area

Level 5

Audience Gallery Event area, Gallery

Level 3

Event area, Gallery

Level 4

Event area, Gallery

Level 3.5

Terrace Cafe

Level 3

Audience gallery Event area, Gallery

Level 2.5

Open Exhibition area

Level 2

Audience gallery Event area

Level 1

Main entrance, Lobby

Entrance to production area, oďŹƒce area, and exhibition area

Level B1

Main auditorium, ampi-theater, multi-use rooms holding a special event(International Advertising Festival)


N

Gallery / Event Space

Open To Below

A

Audience Gallery

A

Production Studio

Third Floor Plan

N Gallery / Event Space

Open To Below

A

A

Terrace Cafe

Forth Floor Plan


N

Gallery / Event Space

+52.8 ft

+55.2 ft +50.4 ft

Open To Below

A

A Production Studio +57.6 ft

Audience Gallery

+60 ft

+54.6 ft

Fifth Floor Plan

Gallery / Event Space


CITY OF ARTIFICIAL EXTRUSIONS REDONDO BEACH, FALL 2014

Harvard GSD Seminar

PROJECT DESCRIPTION

ADVISOR : Sharon Johnston Mark Lee RESPONSIBILITIES : Schematic Design, Design Development __Rhino 5.0 3D Modeling Redering Drawing Sets __Auto CAD Drawing Sets __Adobe Illustrator/ Photoshop Diagram and Presentation Materials

While recent research in design has generated a set of theoretical inquiries into the dissolution of boundaries; this trajectory is being countered by the opposite phenomenon of privatized, isolated programs. Rather than viewing such autonomous and detached monocultures as fissures within the inclusive mentality of globalization, the project will embrace these organizational models as opportunities to promote another form of connectivity through the precise demarcation and delineation of borders. The tower and the socle will be utilized as the primary building type to investigate the model of the detached city. Although assembly techniques in high-rises have been evolving steadily, the programmatic

City of Artificial Extrusions

1:100 Site Model

1 : 100 Site Model

effects caused by economics, zoning regulations, cultural identities, and geographies has been developing in a state of flux. These two trajectories propagate two design predilections. The first adheres to the efficiencies gained from repetition and interchangeability. The second relies on the idiosyncrasies gained from simulation and dynamics. I n seeking to explore a third, alternative model; the project proposes the exacerbation of extrusion for the massing of the tower and socle type, one that privileges the investment of design energy on the plan over the section. Instead of treating the tower and the socle type as directionally neutral, the vertical predilection intrinsic within this type will be explored to the extreme.


UNIT D 2 bedroom 2 bathrooms 2020 SQFT

Elevation

UNIT C 2 bedroom 2 bathrooms 1910 SQFT

UNIT B 2 bedroom 2 bathrooms 1930 SQFT

UNIT A 2 bedroom 2 bathrooms 1990 SQFT

Perspective Section

Axonometric view


Prefabricated Concrete exterior Panel

1:50 Detail Physical Model

Prefabricated Concrete Panel Finish

1 : 100 Physical Model

Prefabricated Modular Concrete Window Frames

Window Jamb and Sill


Typical Floor Plan


HARVARD YARD PEELING PAVILION CAMBRIDGE, SPRING 2015

COMPETITION BRIEF

Harvard GSD Seminar

In Search of Design through Engineers

It should be open to transformation: the building will be complete through the projects and actions within it. It must allow different kinds of work to be displayed inside. At the same time it must enable the building’s content and activities to be projected strongly to the outside world, and to welcome the outside world in. It will, perhaps, have some of the qualities of a “billboard”, a ”forum”, a “chapel” and a “museum”. The building’s presence can include conceptual strength, sensual effect, technological agendas or visual spectacle.

ADVISOR : Hanif Kara, Andreas Georgoulias COLLABORATOR : Harsha Sharma Dayita Kurvey RESPONSIBILITIES : Schematic Design, Design Development __Rhino 5.0 3D Modeling Drawing Sets Redering images __Adobe Illustrator/ Photoshop Diagram and Presentation Materials

ter. At the same time the requirements of exhibition galleries are for limited external glazing. The façade concept and design should respond to these conditions, giving the building’s envelope a key position in the whole design. Internally “communication” or “privacy” between levels and spaces must be demonstrable.

The design must engage passers-by and encourage them to en-

?

?

?

?

Building above ground

?

?

Building on ground

Extruding

Scooping

Building subsurface

Peeling

Stepping

Carving

D’

Ra

mp

C’

B’

Outdoor Cafe seating

Flexible Space

p

Ram

Ramp

Cafe Office

Kitchen Reception

Toilets

A

B

A’ Ramp

D

C Plan

Exhibition / Gallery space


skylights placed centrally over the structural slab provide diffused lighting to interior spaces

tree relocated green roof prevents runoff and preserves atmosphere of quad

gravel roof at thinner slab edges railing boundary to restrict loading on thin slab edges

thermal mass of ground reduces heating/cooling loads material pallete preserves character of ground

maximum railing offset at longest cantilevered edges

rainwater collected in cistern below grade

Environmental Strategy

A SKI SLOPE

DEC-MAR

Skylights / Edge Condition

A STEPPED THEATER

APR-JUL

A PARK

AUG-NOV


+5.75M

+0.00M -2.32M

SECTION BB’

+5.75M

+0.00M -2.32M

Section B - B

SECTION BB’

+5.75M

+0.00M -2.32M

Section D - D

SECTION DD’


+5.75M +5.25M

+0.00M

YEAR ROUND CONTEXTUAL RESPONSE A SKI SLOPE.....

A STEPPED THEATRE.....

A PARK.....

SECTION AA’

DEC-MAR

APR-JULY

AUG-NOV

ENVIRONMENTAL STRATEGY

+5.75M +5.25M

MASSING STRATEGY +0.00M

Stepped Green Roof

Section A - A

SECTION AA’

trees relocated

Transpaent Envelope

green roof prevents runoff and preserves atmosphere of quad

thermal mass of ground reduces heating/ cooling loads

Structural Cores

material pallete preserves character of ground rainwater collected in cistern below grade

+5.75M

+0.00M

Excavated Footprint

-1.82M -2.32M

Section C - C

SECTION CC’


SOFT STRUCTURED CHAIR CAMBRIDGE, SPRING 2014

Harvard GSD Seminar

Computational Material Distributions ADVISOR : Panagiotis Michalatos COLLABORATOR : Haemin Kim RESPONSIBILITIES : Design Development,1:1 Physical model __Grasshopper Design development, 3D modeling __Rhino 5.0 3D Modeling Drawing Sets __Adobe Illustrator/ Photoshop Diagram and Presentation Materials

Grasshopper Script

Structural Stress Diagram

PROJECT DESCRIPTION This project explores the role of computational structural analysis and form finding methods in design and fabrication problems. Such techniques give us indication on how to assemble and distribute materials in a structurally consistent way with implication on the geometric, aesthetic and tectonic expression of the structure. Traditionally we have thought of buildings as minimum compliance structures characterized by a high degree of rigidity. We have also thought of mechanical and kinetic architecture as objects made out of mostly friction-less hinges. This binary conceptualization of material assemblies is reflected in the two disciplines of structural

engineering and mechanical engineering. However the increased use of buckling and nonlinear deformations in structures opens up the space of solution where rigidity and flexibility are managed and distributed throughout the structure. New analysis, design and fabrication techniques allow us to think of the problem of rigidity not within the binary system of the rigid part and the friction-less joint but rather through compliant and flexible mechanism as a gradient of controlled and intentional deformations. In that sense the compliance of the structure, the way it responds and deforms under different loads can become an object of design.


1'-2 1/4"

1'-2 1/4"

C-01

1'-5 1/8" 1'-5 1/8" 1'-5 1/8"

1'-5 1/8" 1'-5 1/8" 1'-5 1/8"

5 3/4" 2 1/4" 5 3/4" 2 1/4" 5 3/4" 2 1/4" 5 3/4"

1'-10 7/8" 1'-7"

5 3/4"

4 1/4"

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13.41°

1'-10 7/8"

5 3/4"

5 3/4"5 3/4"5 3/4"

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15.68°

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C-01

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11 3/4" 2" 1/ 1'-0

15.68° 15.68° 15.68°

C-01 C-01 C-01

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11 3/4"

1/2"

2 1/4"2 1/4"2 1/4"

1'-0 1/4" 11 3/4"

1'-2 1/4"

1/2"

1'-0

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4 1/4"

1'-0 1/4"

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1/2"

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4 1/4" 4 1/4"

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4 1/4"4 1/4"4 1/4"

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1'-2 1/4"

1'-10 7/8"

1'-2"

C-02

1'-5 1/8" 1'-5 1/8" 1'-5 1/8"

5 3/4"

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1'-10 7/8"

1'-10 7/8"

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5 3/4"

5 3/4"5 3/4"5 3/4"

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2 1/4"2 1/4"2 1/4" 5 3/4"5 3/4"5 3/4"

15.68° 15.68°

1'-10 7/8" 1'-7 1/8"

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3 7/8" 3 7/8"

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3 7/8"

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3 7/8"3 7/8"3 7/8"

1'-0 1'-7 1/8" 5/8" 10

10.71Â

1'-7 1/8" 1'-10 7/8"

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3 7/8"3 7/8"3 7/8"

1/2"

1/2"

9.52°

1'-0 5/8" 11105/8"

1/2"

9.52°

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10.71Â

1'-10 7/8"

1'-7 1/8"

9.52°

1'-7 1/8" 1'-10 7/8"

1'-0

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1'-0

5/8" 11105/8" 1'-0 1/2"

15.68°

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C-02

10 5/8"-0 1/2" 1'

11 5/8" 1'-2" 1'-0 1/2"

15.68°

C-02

2"

1/ 1'-0

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C-02 C-02 C-02

10 5/8"

1/2"

1'-0

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15.68° 15.68° 15.68°

C-02 C-02 C-02

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10 5/8"

11 5/8" 9.52° 9.52° 9.52°

11 5/8" 10 5/8"

1'-2" 1'-0 1/2"

1/2"

1'-0 1/2" 11 5/8"

3 7/8"3 7/8"

11 5/8"

1'-0

1/2"

15.68°

1/2"

1'-0

11.1311 .13 2 1/4"2 1/4"2 1/4" 511 3/4" 5 ° 3/4"5 3/4" °.13 °

1/2"

1'-2"

1'-2"

1'-5 1/8" 1'-5 1/8" 1'-5 1/8"

3 7/8"3 7/8"3 7/8"

1'-0

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1'-0

1'-0 1/2" 11 5/8"

1'-2"

5 3/4"5 3/4"5 3/4"

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3 7/8"3 7/8"3 7/8"

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1'-10 7/8"

1'-1 3/4"

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1'-10 7/8" 1'-7 1/8"

1'-10 7/8"

5 3/4" 1'-5 1/8" 1'-5 1/8" 1'-5 1/8"

5 3/4" 2 1/8" 5 3/4" 2 1/8" 5 3/4" 2 1/8" 5 3/4"

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1'-5 1/8" 1'-5 1/8" 1'-5 1/8"

5 3/4"5 3/4"5 3/4"

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°

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5 3/4"5 3/4"5 3/4"

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1'-10 7/8"

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1'-11"

1'-7 1/4"

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1'-1 1/4"

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5 3/4" 1'-5 1/8"

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2 1/8" 1/2"

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C-04

1'-0

1'-7 1/8" 1'-10 7/8"

1'-10 7/8"

1'-0

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1/2"

5 3/4"

3 1/2"

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1'-7 1/8" 9 1/2"

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5 3/4"5 3/4"5 3/4"

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1'-1 1/2"

C-04

2 1/8"2 1/8"2 1/8"

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9 1/2" 1'-0 1/

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C-03

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9 1/2"

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1'-0

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3 1/2"3 1/2"3 1/2"

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° 1'-7 1/4"

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C-04

1'-1 1/4"

1'-1 1/4"

1'-1 1/4"

5 2" 2" 5 3/4"

1'-5 1/8"

1'-5 1/8"

5 3/4"

5 3/4"

5 3/4"5 3/4"

5 3/4" 5 3/4" 1 7/8" 5 3/4"

1'-5 1/8"

5 3/4"

1'-5 1/8"

5 3/4" 1 7/8"

1 7/8"1 7/8"

5 3/4"

5 3/4"5 3/4"

1 7/8" 5 3/4"

1'-5 1/8"

1 7/8"1 7/8" 1/2"

° 6 9.4 15.618°

1'-7 3/4"

1'-0

1/2"

15.68°

1'-11 3/8"

1'-5 1/8"

1'-0

6"

5 3/4" 1 7/8"

1/2"

1'-11 3/8"

1'-11 3/8"

1'-5 1/8" 1'-5 1/8"

6"

1/2"

1'-7 3/4"

1'-11 3/8"

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5 3/4"

1'-0

1'-7 3/4"

1 3/4"

15.68°

° 56Â

1 7/8"1 7/8" 6. 1'-0

5 3/4"5 3/4"

1 3/4" 1 3/4"

1/2"

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1 3/4"1 3/4"

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1/2"

° ° 6 6 19.4 19.4 15.68° 15.68°

° ° 6 6 19.4 19.4 15.68° 15.68°

1'-0

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57.38°

57.38° 57.38°

57.38° 57.38°

6"

1'-0

1'-0 3/4" 1'-0 1/2" /8"

85

5 3/4"5 3/4"

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3/4"5 3/4" 6.5 56Â °

/8"

85

1'-0 3/4"

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85

1 3/4"1 3/4"

1'-0

85

1/2"

15.68°

1'-0

1'-5 1/8" 1'-5 1/8"

1/2"

15.68° 15.68°

1/2"

1 3/4"

/8"

6.56 6.56 ° °

1'-0

85

1 3/4"1 3/4"

15.68° 15.68°

6.56 6.56 ° °

1'-0

C-07

1'-11 3/8" 1'-7 3/4"

C-07

1'-11 3/8"

15.68°

1'-8"

1'-11 5/8"

1'-11 5/8"

5 3/4"

1'-11 5/8"

1'-0 1/2" 1'-0 1/2"

5 3/4"

15.68° °

1'-0 1/2"

74Â

1'-0 1/2"

1 3/8"

1'-0 1/2"

1'-5 1/8"

1 3/4" 5 3/4"

1'-11 5/8" 1'-8"

1'-11 5/8"

1'-11 5/8"

1'-5 1/8"

1/2"

5 3/4"5 3/4"

1'-8"

5 3/4" 1 3/4"

1'-0

1 3/4"1 3/4"

1/2"

5 3/4"

15.68°

1'-5 1/8" 1'-5 1/8"

1 3/4"1 3/4"

1 3/8" 1 3/8"

1'-0

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1 3/8"1 3/8"

1/2"

 .77 15.68° 31

1'-0

1'-8"

1/2"

°

1'-0

 .77 31 °

1'-8"

1/2"

74.87Â

1'-8"

1/2"

° ° .77 .77 15.68° 31 31 15.68°

° ° .77 1.7715.68° 15.68° 3

31

1'-0

1/2"

1'-0

81

/4"

°.87° 74.8774

°.87° 74.8774 1'-0

/4"

° 74.87Â

/4"

5 3/4"5 3/4"

1/2"

/4"

81

1'-0 1/2" 1'-0 1/2"

81

1'-5 1/8" 1'-5 1/8"

1/2"

15.68°

11.7 5 3/4"5 3/4" 4 4° °

/4"

81

1'-0

11.7

1 3/8"

81

1'-0

5 3/4"5 3/4"

1/2"

15.68° 15.68°

1/2"

1'-0 1/2"

1 3/8"

/4"

11.7 11.7 4° 4°

1'-0

81

1 3/8"1 3/8"

15.68° 15.68°

11.7 11.7 4° 4°

1'-0 1/2"

1'-0

1'-0 1/2"

1'-0 1/2"

1'-0 1/2"

1 3/8"1 3/8"

1'-5 1/8" 1'-5 1/8"

1'-11 1/4" 1'-7 5/8"

1'-0 3/4"

1'-7 3/4"

1 3/8"1 3/8"

1/2"

1'-0 3/4"

1'-0 3/4"

1'-7 3/4"

C-08

1'-0

1'-11 1/4"

6"

C-08 C-08

2"

° 2.03 ° 2.03

1 7/8"1 7/8"

1'-11 1/4"

15.68°

1'-11 1/4"

1'-11 1/4"

6"

C-08 C-08

1/2"

1'-7 5/8"

1'-11 1/4"

/8"

C-08

5 3/4"5 3/4"

15.68°

1'-7 5/8"

1'-0

5 3/4"5 3/4"

2 1/4"

63

°

2 1/4"

/4"

1/2"

9.86

2 1/4"2 1/4"

63

1/2"

15.68°

1'-7 5/8"

1/2"

/4"

°

1'-0

4"

43.24°

1'-0

9 1/

9.86

15.68° 15.68°

15.68° 15.68°

1'-7 5/8"

1'-0

° ° 9.86 9.86

1'-0

/4"

4"

43.24°

/4"

63

1/2"

1'-1" 1'-0 1/2" 9 1/

1'-5 1/8" 1'-5 1/8"

4"

1'-0 3/4"

1 3/4"1 3/4"

1/2"

2.03 2.03 ° °

2 1/4"

9 1/

1/2"

1'-7 5/8"

C-06

1/2"

63 1'-0

° ° 9.86 9.86

2 1/4"2 1/4"

4"

° ° 43.24Â 43.24Â

/4"

63

1'-0

9 1/

° ° 43.24Â 43.24Â

/4"

63

C-06

1'-0

2 1/4"

1/2"

5 3/4"5 3/4"

2.03 2.03 1/4"2 1/4" ° 2 °

1/2"

1'-1"

5 3/4"5 3/4"

1'-1"

1'-0

4"

C-07 C-07

2"

1'-11 1/8" 1'-7 3/8"

15.68°

1'-1"

1'-1"

15.68° 15.68°

15.68° 15.68°

2 1/4"2 1/4"

1'-1"

1'-0

4"

9 1/

C-07 C-07

1/2"

1'-11 1/8"

9 1/

C-06 C-06

1'-0

1/2"

15.68°

1'-11 1/8"

C-05

C-06 C-06

1.94°

2"

1'-7 3/8"

1'-0

1'-5 1/8" 1'-5 1/8"

5 3/4"5 3/4"

15.68°

8"

7 5/

° 2.55

2 5/8"

8"

7 5/

1/2"

1'-11 1/8"

1'-11 1/8"

1/2"

15.68°

1'-7 3/8"

1/2"

° 2.55

2 5/8"

1'-0

1'-7 3/8"

1'-11 1/8"

C-05

1'-0

"

5 3/4"5 3/4"

1/2"

2"

2 5/8"

1/2"

9 3/4

15.68° 15.68°

2 5/8"2 5/8"

1'-0

1'-0

31.97°

1'-0

"

31.97°

8"

7 5/

15.68° 15.68°

1'-7 3/8"

8"

7 5/

1'-1 1/4" 1'-0 1/2" 9 3/4

1.94°

9 3/4"

° ° 2.55 2.55

° ° 2.55 2.55

1'-7 3/8"

1/2"

1.94° 1.94°

9 3/4"

1/2"

31.97° 31.97°

8"

7 5/

2 5/8"2 5/8"

1'-0

31.97° 31.97°

8"

7 5/

C-05 C-05

1'-1 1/4"

1'-0

1/2"

1'-5 1/8" 1'-5 1/8" 15.68°

9 3/4"

1/2"

5 3/4"5 3/4"

1'-0

2 5/8"

1'-0

15.68° 15.68°

1'-1 1/4"

2 5/8"2 5/8" 1.94° 1.94 °

2 5/8"2 5/8"

15.68° 15.68°

1'-11"

9 3/4"

C-05 C-05

1/2"

1'-0

5 3/4"

3"

1'-11"

° 3.03Â

1'-11"

1'-11"

15.68°

1'-11"

C-04

15.68°

C-04 C-04

°

C-04 C-04


M1-6D

Manhattan, SPRING 2015

SCI-Arc Vertical Studio

PROJECT DESCRIPTION

Undergraduate Thesis Project

In the essay, Bigness by Rem Koolhaas, he says “If Bigness transforms architecture, its accumulation generates a new kind of city” and he defi nes the Bigness is equal to urbanism versus architecture”. Based on his principal, my thesis explores the idea of “BIGNESS” and re-organizing the urban elements into the one big architecture using negative space of urban context which has become residue.

ADVISOR : Devyn Weiser RESPONSIBILITIES : Research, chematic Design, Design Development __Maya2012 3D Modeling Mental Ray __Auto CAD/ Rhinoceros Drawing Sets Diagram __Adobe Illustrator/ Photoshop Diagram and Presentation Materials

1

1

2

Concept Diagram

2

M1-6D is a new zoning district that exists within Manhattan. The main initiative for this regulation is to enable a wider range of community activities. Any increase in population would activate

2

3

3

this zone on a constant basis through mixed-use programs. Therefore, M1-6D stands as a new opportunity to envision the future of Manhattan. By experimenting with the interplay of positive and negative zoning, the potentials for urban interstitially suggested by M1-6D are not merely programmatic, but support further densifi cation, deeper activation and radical zoning, As well, interstitial and residual spaces provide the opportunity to preserve the character of the existing site condition. Through the reversal of positive and negative space the injection of architecture into the voids will create a new urban layer to complete the vision of M1-6D.

3

Zoning Diagram


(exisƟng condiƟon)

(existi ng conditi on) (exisƟng condiƟon)

(Plaza with bonus FAR regulati on) (Plaza with bonus FAR regulaƟon)

Modernist Highrisewith with Elevated Modernist Highrise ElevatedPlaza Plaza

(Plaza with bonus FAR regulaƟon)

Modernist Highrise with Elevated Plaza

Elevated Plaza + BonusFAR FAR to ng building Elevated Plaza + Bonus to existi exisƟng building

Air rights transfers(Transferable Development Rights) Air rights transfers(Transferable Development Rights)

Zoning Diagram Process

Elevated Plaza + Bonus FAR to exisƟng building

Air rights transfers(Transferable Development Rights)

Over the last decades, many of the manufacturing districts south of Midtown have transitioned from manufacturing districts to important centers of Class B and C commercial office space that house diverse sectors of New York City’s economy. Increasingly, these districts are home to emerging media, professional services, non-profit, health care, arts, design, and other business that are attracted by affordable rents and the central location. Nonetheless, these areas have received little new investment, lack a variety of retail services, and are often characterized by surface parking lots, despite the fact that they have some of the best transit access in New York City and are surrounded by neighborhoods that have continued to experience development and growth.


unt Zoning Plan To approach this problem, zoning is re-organized, inversed and transfered from the previous zoning regulation of Manhattan.

Currunt Currunt Zoning Zoning Plan Plan

The diagrams are showing how zoning regulation has been modified based on the certain rule set. By doing so, I can maximize theair rightsand bonus FAR regulation which helps to create new zoning regulation into the negative space of urban and have opportunity to build the new city on the top of old Manhattan. Unlike the current zoning plan, the negative zoning will be divided with elevation grid line and elevated Street will be situated on the boundary of different zoning area. Zoning Zoning NegaƟve NegaƟve Plan Plan

Ɵve Zoning Plan M1-6D(N) M1-6D(N)

M1-6D(N)

MixedMixed ResidenƟal ResidenƟal & Commercial & Commercial zone zone

Indust Ind u Ind Indust rialu / rial Manu / uManu faccturi ctur urfac in ncturi ng cgtur zone zon rin nge zon ng zonee

Mixed ResidenƟal & Commercial zone Open Ope nOpe Open sp nespac spac spzone e zone

Indust Ind u rial / Manu ufaccturi cturrin ng zon ng zonee

M1 1M1 -6 61D-6 6D

M1 1M1 -6 61D-6 6D

Commercia Commercia iall zoine all zone

Open Ope n spac sp e zone

M1 1-6 6D

M1 1-6 6D

MulƟ-F Mul ƟMul Ɵ-F MulƟ-F Fami amily ami Ɵ ly Ɵ-F Fami amily ami ly

Resid Res idence ide Resid Res nce idence nce Commercia ial lide zozone ne zone

MulƟ-F MulƟ-F Ɵ Fami amily ami ly Resid Res idence ide nce zone


possible growing zoning

new ground zero

support for new ground zero

attached to current building

extension of current condition


BCAM REDUX LOS ANGELES, FALL 2010

SCI-Arc Vertical Studio BCAM REDUX

ADVISOR : Tom Wiscombe RESPONSIBILITIES : Schematic Design, Design Development __Maya2009 3D Modeling Mental Ray __Auto CAD/ Rhinoceros 3D Modeling __Adobe Illustrator/ Photoshop Diagram and Presentation Materials __Z BRUSH Envelope Development

PROJECT DESCRIPTION These experiments will exceed simple expressionism towards the tectonic, material, metabolic, programmatic, and urban pote tials of surface-to-volume morphologies. The bias toward interiority, and loose, unfurling confi gurations of space on the one hand has implications for the city, in terms of creating microclimates and public spaces, and on the other hand, mysterious and enthralling architectural atmospheres. The dragon and skull- the skull in a figure nested within an implied (or partial) outer shell. One thing to notice is that there are two parts which are interwoven but different. The two parts

could be a great way to do our project rather than by homogenizing everything. Surface patierning, color, relief, and materiality will be used to heighten the sense of irresolution between fl atness and depth as well as correlate graphic/pattern effects with mass infl ections. Studies will include stuffed surfaces, nested fi gures, delineation of multiplematerials/components, multilayer shell formations, depth effects through variable opacity and implied outer shells.


IMPLIED OUTER SHELL The ‘implied outer shell’ is a subset of surface-to-volume morphology, where a figure is nested loosely within an outer envelope which is incomplete. One implication of the implied outer shell model of architecture is the extension of a buildings interiority out into the civic realm.

PATTERN The ‘implied outer shell’ is a subset of surface-to-volume morphology, where a figure is nested loosely within an outer envelope which is incomplete. One implication of the implied outer shell model of architecture is the extension of a buildings interiority out into the civic realm.The ‘implied outer shell’ is a subset of surface-to-volume morphology, where a figure is nested loosely within an outer envelope which is incomplete. One implication of the implied outer shell model of architecture is the extension of a buildings interiority out into the civic realm.


BCAM REDUX Wiscombe, Fall 2011

Dongah Cho


outdoor gathering space

cafe small auditorium

gallery space oďŹƒce space

gallery space

main auditorium


LUCIO FONTANA MUSEUM LOS ANGELES, FALL 2009

PROJECT DESCRIPTION

SCI-Arc Vertical Studio Lucio Fontana Museum

A saddle polyhedron is a closed figure formed by a finite

ADVISOR : Marcelo Spina number of saddle polygons bounded by straight edges. COLLABORATOR : Yeonsu Kim Although, as with plane faced polyhedra, there can be an RESPONSIBILITIES : infinite number of saddle polyhedra, only those figures Schematic Design, Design Development which are __Maya2009 plan plan grid can be used to build infinite periodic structures elevation elevation grid grid of plan gridgrid elevation grid concern in this exercise. 3D Modeling Mental Ray __Auto CAD/ Rhinoceros “The saddle figure must be generated from an existing Drawing Sets network of lines. It is a problem of partitioning some funda3D Modeling mental volumetric region or set of regions with saddle faces Process Process 02_massing 02_massing development development with with geometry geometry __Adobe Illustrator/ Photoshop Process 02_massing development with geometry to form a space filling figure or a set of space filling figures. Diagram and Presentation Materials

01 0101

02 02 02

03 0303

We shall refer to this fundamental spatial region [or set of regions] as the interstitial domain of the network. The interstitial domain is formed by spanning with a minimal surface the group of polygonal circuits that a nonintersecting set will combine to from closed polyhedra.� Peter Pearce, describing Saddle Surface Geometry

04 0404

05 05 05

06 06 06

Massing Development

Process Process 03_envelope 03_envelope development development Process 03_envelope development 01

0101

02

02 02

03 03 03

04 04 04

05 05 05

03 03 03

04 04 04

05 05 05

Envelope Development

Process Process04_envelope 04_envelopedevelopment development Process 04_envelope development 0101

01

02 02

02


5 point surface

Placing Saddle Surfaces

Subdividing methods

6 point surface

Opening Development

4 point surface


Site Plan


18 X 020

X 060

X100

X 140

X 180

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X 260

10

X300

11

06 12

17

13

OPEN TO BELOW OPEN TO BELOW

14 08 03

07

02

OPEN TO BELOW

15 09 04 01

OPEN TO BELOW

05

Ground Level Floorplan

16

X 340


X 020

X 060

X100

X 140

X 180

X 220

X 260

X300

Y 300

01

OPEN

Y 260

E TO B LOW

04 03

OPE

N TO

BELO

W

Y 220

02

Y 180

05 Y 140

06

Y 100

OPEN TO BELOW

Y 060

Y 020

Third Level Floorplan

X 340


CONSULTANTS

Y 280

Y 260

Y 240

Y 220

Y 200

Y 180

Y 160

Y 140

Y 120

Y 100

Y 080

Y 060

Y 040

Y 020

Y 000

BUILDING HEIGHT 29’-0”

14’-0”

2’-0”

-13’-0”

3B COMPREHENSIVE DE SEP 20TH 2009 -32’-0”

ALEXANDRO HERNANDEZ FONTANA RECORDS 1100 Wilshire Blvd #2008 Los Angeles, CA 90027

Lucio Fontana Museum

Longitudinal Section

Rosario, Argentina 1100 Wilshire Blvd #2008 Los Angeles, CA 90027 TITLE

SECTION

EP DESIG PROJECT

2009-01-01

SCALE

1:100

Dongah Cho SHEET NUMBER

DATE

& Yeons

1100 Wilshire Blvd #2008 Los Angeles, CA 90027 213-407-8080

A 2-2

DRAWN BY

2009-09-01

DESIGNER NAME

Y 240

Y 220

Y 200

Y 180

Y 160

Y 140

Y 120

Y 100

Y 080

Y 060

Y 040

Y 020

Y 000

CONSULTANTS

BUILDING HEIGHT 100’-0”

83’-0”

68’-0”

51’-0”

34’-0”

17’-0”

0’-0”

3B COMPRE SEP 20TH 20

-17’-0”

ALEXANDRO HER FONTANA RECOR 1100 Wilshire Blvd #2008 Los Angeles, CA 90027 -36’-0”

Lucio Font Museum

Rosario, Argen 1100 Wilshire Blvd #2008 Los Angeles, CA 90027 TITLE

SECTION

Cross Section PROJECT

2009-01-01

SCALE

1:100

DRAWN BY

2009-09-01

SH


TORRI DI VENEZIA LOS ANGELES, FALL 2010

SCI-Arc Core Studio

PROJECT DESCRIPTION

City Operation

ADVISOR : Gregory Walsh RESPONSIBILITIES : Schematic Design, Design Development __Maya2009 3D Modeling Mental Ray __Auto CAD/ Rhinoceros Drawing Sets 3D Modeling __Adobe Illustrator/ Photoshop Diagram and Presentation Materials

Venice no longer exists as a city for contemporary living. The place now exists to sell nostalgic images of its past for the viewing pleasure of tourists seeking romanticism. This transient yet ever-present flow of outsiders has influenced the cultural identity of the entire city, so much so that today’s Venice relies completely on the continued interest of outsiders in order to sustain itself as a cultural relic. Tourism has become Venice’s existential Other, and the nostalgia of tourism has frozen Venice’s architecture within an artificial snap shot of its own past. A city frozen by nostalgia becomes an elaborate theater where

NATURAL LIGHT WELL

TRAIN STATION

MAIN HALL

COMMCERCIAL RETAIL SPACES

artifacts become props and residents become actors, similar to what one would see in the theatrical clockwork of Disneyland. Venice’s economy has survived so far by maintaining this theatrical value. However, Venice’s success as a hub for tourism has come at the expense of the city’s viability as a lasting community. Since tourism dictates that their city must remain frozen in its past, Venice’s residents do not have the opportunity to create their own contemporary culture. For Venice’s permanent residents, there is no escape from theatricality, no opportunity for individualism or cultural identity; nothing progresses beyond the images and attributes that tourism has become so enamored with.


RESIDENTIAL SPACES

COMMON SPACES

MECHANICAL SPACES

COMMON SPACE

WATER RECLAIMA-

ELECTRICITY DISTRI-

MINERAL COLLEC-

REVERSE OSMODESALINATION

H20 RECLAIMATION


PHASE 1 (2010-2060)

PHASE 2 (2060-2110)

PHASE 3 (2110-2160)


PHASE 1 (2010-2060)

PHASE 2 (2060-2110)

PHASE 3 (2110-2160)


TAICHUNG CITY CULTURAL CENTER TAICHUNG, TAIWAN 2013

TOM WISCOMBE ARCHITECTURE

Professional Work

RESPONSIBILITIES : Design Development,1:1 Physical model __Maya2009 3D Modeling Maxwell Rendering __Rhino 5.0 Drawing Sets __Adobe Illustrator/ Photoshop Diagram and Presentation Materials

PROJECT DESCRIPTION This proposal seeks to create a cultural space which is simultaneously a destination and a gateway. By dividing the program into two distinct Figures, rather than a monolithic subdivided block, we allow for a visual and physical connection between the city to the north and Gateway Park to the south. The different character and silhouette of each Figure, along with their verticality, creates visually arresting interstitial spaces and views of city and nature. A third object, the Canopy, connects the two Figures without fusing them into a homogeneous mass. The Museum Figure

squishes up into the Canopy, while the Library Figure squishes down into the Canopy from above, creating mysterious elastic formal effects and complex sectional spaces. Despite these local deformations, the cornice height of the Canopy remains at 30M., which is the projected height of the convention center to the north, and also the height limit of the park side setback. This datum creates visual continuity with the urban corridor, helping to avoid the sense of detachment often associated with iconic buildings.


MOCA PAVILION Los Angeles, 2013

TOM WISCOMBE ARCHITECTURE

Professional Work

RESPONSIBILITIES : Design Development,1:1 Physical model __Maya2009 3D Modeling __Rhino 5.0 Drawing Sets __Adobe Illustrator/ Photoshop Diagram and Presentation Materials

PROJECT DESCRIPTION This inhabitable pavilion is a study of surface-to-volume transformations, where mass is achieved by pushing into a surface like a fist through a rubber sheet. In this case, chunky objects are pushed into exterior skins, creating volumetric effects on the interior. The perimeter edges of the three components of the piece are razor-thin, creating visual tension between the realms of 2D/flat and 3D/massive. Through the triangular arrangement of the three super-components, the piece also reads as an series of objects nested within an implied outer enclosure. Placing objects inside other objects creates the effect of depth and internalized figuration like in an aquarium.

The construction of the piece, like the wing of a stealth fighter, is a composite monocoque construction with variable-depth honeycomb core material to provide graded structural performance. What at first appears to be a single thin surface is in fact two surfaces which sometimes fuse and sometimes delaminate. The material matrix is an advanced water-based polymer with Kevlar weave reinforcement; it is commonly used by the aerospace industry in the construction of 1:1 prototypes due to its lightness, strength, and the fact that it is a ‘green’ composite system. It is non-toxic and fireproof, solving two technical hurdles composites have consistently faced in architectural applications.


COLLIDER ACTIVITY CENTER TAICHUNG, TAIWAN 2013

TOM WISCOMBE ARCHITECTURE

Professional Work

RESPONSIBILITIES : Design Development,1:1 Physical model __Maya2009 3D Modeling Maxwell Rendering __Rhino 5.0 Drawing Sets __Adobe Illustrator/ Photoshop Diagram and Presentation Materials

PROJECT DESCRIPTION This design aspires to make Walltopia into a 21st brand center as well as a destination for sports and recreation. Our belief is that this cannot be achieved without re-thinking the status of building as a neutral container of active furnishings in favor of building as active and distinct. Successful contemporary brand centers create a new and unexpected world, something that exceeds a collection of wares. Our proposal is to take the idea of ‘boulders’ produced by Walltopia and re-interpret them as architectural objects. These objects are squished and nested into a multi-layered

enclosure, creating three-dimensional external and internal climbing surfaces with both hard and soft features. The inner liner surface is articulated with computational tattoos, implying systems of climbing holds and routes. The result is a space which is abstract and alien, but also discernable as a contemporary climber’s paradise.


25 LONGFELLOW HOUSE CAMBRIDGE, 2014

HOUSE RENOVATION Personal Work

RESPONSIBILITIES : Design Development __Auto CAD/ Rhinoceros Drawing Sets 3D Modeling __Adobe Illustrator/ Photoshop Diagram and Presentation Materials

PROJECT DESCRIPTION 25 Longfellow road is a two family house built in early 1900. The goal for this project was to re-organize and utilize whole layout of the house. To do so, relocating the staircase was a main idea to utilize the house layout. The staircase is connected from the first level to attic level. To take advantage of the leftover spaces, steel is used for the materials. Using steel as a meterials gives

First Floor Plan

more open atmosphere to the kitchen and living area. The stringers are cut with plasma cutting, and threads are made of 1� metal tube and welded to each other. Mostly the parts are assembled with bolts and nuts.


Second Floor Plan


Steel Stair Elevation

Steel Stair Detail


Construction photo

Detail Axon Drawing A

Detail Axon Drawing B

A

Stringer / Structural Connections

B

Threads / Railing Post Connections


Dongah Cho Graduate Schoold of Design, Harvard University M.Arch II

dcho1009@gmail.com +1 213.399.9667 25 Longfellow Rd, Cambridge, MA 02138

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