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Alex Diaz

68 John St. Providence, RI 02906 (617) 447-8688 http://alexdiaz.us adiaz@risd.edu


Copyright Š Alexander D. Diaz 2013 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, without the prior permission in writing of the copyright holder.

2


Alexander Domingo Diaz born on 10.30.1984 in Tokyo Received Masters of Architecture at the Rhode Island School of Design [RISD] . In the past studied Biology with a specialization in Neuroscience at Boston University, and abroad studies with University California, Santa Barbara [UCSB] aiding Maori Tribes. Worked in different fields such as Architecture and Construction, Biology and Research, Journalism and Film, Branding and Design. This little book is a compilation of work documenting my transition from biology into architecture.

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www.alexdiaz.us

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Contents 6

Vastu Potential A Library for Baton Rouge

24

Integrated Building Systems

42

New York Tall Building

58

Jewelry for Specific Elicitation

78

Bus Stop in Pile, Ecuador

84

Urban Housing Project in Providence

90

Refract

104

2011 RISD Lecture Series Poster

110

Garden Retreat in Pawtucket

112

Etch - Y - Zee

118

Photo Archive of Vrindavan, India

124

Labyrinth for a Minotaur

130

Folding Cardboard Chair

142

Analyzing Alvar Aalto's Summer House

148

Drawing Music

154

Taxidermy + Trail Casting

156

Paintings of a Vase and Bottles

158

5


Vastu Potential 5.2013 Many societies in the world show a coexistence of traditional and modern cultures, as old techniques and methods have been revived or updated to stand alongside newer systems. Thatching is a building technique that goes back centuries and is still in use in modern Europe . The continued use of such techniques, however, is not an indication of continuance of the culture or lifestyle of the past, for they sit on the modern palette alongside other techniques as one of many. Herein lies a difference in the coexistence of tradition and modernity between Europe and, say, India. Aspects of traditional lifestyles are still followed by the most modern and ‘hi-tech’ communities in India, not in a bid for revival, but as part of a world view or belief system. For instance, a calendar that gives both solar and lunar dates, which lists auspicious and inauspicious days, and marks all the festivals to reminds us of associated rituals. This is the most popular format that is sold every year. These calendars also carry information about government holidays and recipes for microwave cooking. The two sets of information are recognizably traditional and modern but sit alongside each other without conflict, and are read not as alternatives but as aspects of one whole. Textiles, dress, food, music and dance are all strands of Indian culture where this kind of coexistence flourishes. The story of architecture, however, is different. Studying the relationship between traditional and modern building paradigms in India, I am exploring the possibility for an expanded role of Vastu Shastra, an ancient architectural code that defines the South Asian vernacular architecture. Through formal and programmatic lenses, I am testing the potential and capability of Vastu Shastra to evolve with the developing Indian context.

6


7


8


9


10


11


Original Grid

The original grid is a strict grid that only allows for certain programs to exist in specific zones.

Transformed Grid

Inflections on the extrusions of gridded spaces allows for intersections of program to occur.

12


13


14


15


CIRCULATION The hierarchy of roads does not address actual traffic patterns. As a result, all cars, buses, are packed in a stand-still

PROXIMITY

1500’

For a city that is densely populated,

1000’

the locality of programs is far. Coupled

5 Minutes

500’

10 Minutes

with the circulation patterns, it is a

20 Minutes

hassle to commute. Walking is often the best way to move.

EXISTING VASTU Using the existing Vastu elements of the city, a vastu grid formulates on to the site establishing program and organizational structure. Transport Residential Religious

SCATTERED PROGRAMS

Eatery

A multitude of programs exist in the

Market Textiles

city and often don’t relate to adjacent

Guest

programming. i.e. bus stops on a farm.

Medical Education Public

16


Urban Center

17


Vastu Grid: Aligntment With Context

Parks

Spire Extrusion

Spire Inflection 1: Train Station

Spire Extrusion Train Housing

Spire Inflection 2: Commerce

Spire Inflection 3: Housing

Formulation of Public Programs

Site Boundaries

Train Orientation + Subtraction

Building Heights

18


19


20


21


22


23


A Library for Baton Rouge 12.2012 The effects of Hurricane Katrina in 2005 sparked a migration from New Orleans to Baton Rouge. As a refuge for those who lost their homes, libraries gave access to communication tools and references that reconnected people with their families. The city continues to grow, the demand for education becomes higher thus making the library a place to start development. This is a proposal for the redevelopment of the Baton Rouge Library Extension. Looking at the various typologies of libraries and the existing context of the site, the design distinguishes between the public and private realms of the library while using continuous circulation to connect the spaces of the building.

24


25


S

9 27

16

31 1

22

10 17

M

28

2 23 3

18

29

19

30

33

11 4 12

L

5

34

24

13 6 20

25 35

14 7

8

21

15

26

32

36

XL

37

39

38

1. Glasgow School of Art Library [Glasgow, UK]

11. Municipal Library [Viana Do Castelo, Portugal]

21. Bibliotheque Multimedia [Caen, France]

31. University Library [Utrecht, The Netherlands]

2. Jussieu Libraries [Paris, France]

12. Biblioteca Parque Espana [Medellin, Colombia]

22. Jose Vasconcelos Library [Brasilia, Brazil]

32. Jose Vasconcelos Library [Mexico City, Mexico]

3. Eberswalde Library [Eberswalde, Germany]

13. Mediatheque de Venissieux [Venissieux, France]

23. Viipuri Library [Vyborg, Russia]

33. Seattle Public Library [Seattle, USA]

4. Bibliotheque Nationale, Rue Richelieu [Paris, France]

14. Juame Fuster [Barcelona, Spain]

24. University Library [Delft, The Netherlands]

34. Czech National Library Extension [Prague, Czech Republic]

5. Luckenwalde Library [Luckenwalde, Germany]

15. Tama Art University Library [Tokyo, Japan]

25. National Library of Kosovo [Pristina, Kosovo]

35. National Library [Astana, Kazakhstan]

6. Ryotaro Shiba Museum Library [Osaka, Japan]

16. Cottbus University Library [Cottbus, Germany]

26. National Technical Library [Prague, Czech Republic]

36. Boston Public Library [Boston, USA]

7. Middle East Centre Library [Oxford, UK]

17. Exeter Library [Exeter, USA]

27. Urban Library of the Future [Gent, Belgium]

37. Staatsbibliothek Berlin [Berlin, Germany]

8. Bibliotheque Ste. Genevieve [Paris, France]

18. Brabant Library [Utrecht, The Netherlands]

28. Kortrijk Library [Kortrijk, Belgium]

38. Tres Grande Bibliotheque [Paris, France]

9. Peckham Library [London, UK]

19. Stockholm Public Library [Stockholm, Sweden]

29. Sendai Mediatheque [Sendai, Japan]

39. Bibliotheque Nationale de France [Paris, France]

10. History Faculty Library [Cambridge, UK]

20. Beinecke Rare Books Library [New Haven, USA]

30. Geisel Library [San Diego, USA]


By Size

By Time

1850 ce

1

8

2

4

3

Size

S

M

L

3k-30k

30k-100k

100k-600k

600k-3500k

1

XL

19

4 Floor Area

5

23

6

# of Buildings

10

9

18

3

20

7

Average GSF

14k

67k

280k

2700k

10

8

30

9

17

10

36

11

37

12

25

13

38

14

2

15

39

16

6

17

24

18

3

19

9

x 1000

Size Comparison

20

13

=

21

29

22

18

23

31

24

33

25

11

Form Evolution

14

26 27

1850

16

2012

28

12

29

15

30

100 Books PSF

22

1 PSF

32

31

5

Book Density

32

26

33

1850

34

2012

28

35

21

36

27

37

7

38

34 35

39

Present

0 3.5m

500k 3.0m

1.0m 2.5m

1.5m 2.0m

2.0m 1.5m

GSF

2.5m 1.0m

3.0m 500k

3.5m 0


E UG RO N TO BA

MIS

SIS

SIP

PI

RIV

ER

MIS

BA

N TO SIS

SIP

PI

RIV

ER

V CI E UG RO BA

N TO

MIS

SIS

SIP

PI

RIV

ER

SIS

BA

MIS

N TO

Reinforced Edges

RO

UG

E

Urban Context + Edge Conditions

IC

CE

NT

ER

BE

A

UR

EG

A

RD

DO

TO

W

W

NT

N

OW

N

Desired Views

RO

UG

E

Directionality of Traffic + Approach

SIP

PI

RIV

ER

28


Area of High Activity Town Center Mall N 3rd St. Entrance High Visibility

Old State House Civic Park Concert Stage Entrance High Visibility

Courthouse Backside Low Visibility

City Hall Backside Some Visibility

29


Library

Public

Public / Common Areas 2,880 sf

Max Floor Plate 18,300 sf

Total Program Area 43,303 sf

Meeting / Conference Rooms 7,080 sf

Inner Lobby / Circulation 3,356 sf

3

2

1

4

5

1 3

2

56

23

1

Teens 4,380 sf

1

3

2

45 6

2

Reference / Information Services 4,106 sf

5 67

4

1

Children Services 5,360 sf

4

34

1 23

4

5 6 7

7

8

10 8 9 11 12

9 10

5 6 8 9 10 7

4 Adult Browsing Collection 7,168 sf

Adult Literacy / Lifelong Learning Center 267 sf Building Support 1,741 sf

30

1 2

3

1

1 2 3 4 56 7 8

5

6


Public

Private

Cafe

Reference + Information Teens Adults Children Conference Rooms

Restrooms Building Services

31


32


Lot Size

Public

Private

Roof Relocation

Dipped Edges // Ramped Circulation

18,300 sf

Setback Edge Conditions

ROOF

Recessed Ground For Entry

Flanged Landscape

Added Program

AUDITORIUM

33


Core

5

Roof Conference Room

4

Meeting Room

Children Services Teens

3 Adults + LLL

Roof / Cafe

2

Public

Makers Rooms

1 Core

G East

North

West

South

34

East

North

West


35


36


Auditorium Children

Teens

Adults

Roof Cafe

Reference Makers Rooms

Public Restrooms

37


Slab

Glass Mullions Racks Shading Device

38


39


40


41


Integrated Building Systems 12.2012 This project aims at developing strategies to analyze and improve performative constraints of natural and mechanical systems within a building. Focusing more on the develomental stages of construction, a drawing set was created to enhance understanding of detailing, HVAC, structuring, and authoring in building design. The concept of this proposal is to use functional programs such as circulatory paths as a means of building more efficient building envelopes. I developed a laboratory space that used a circulatory core to protect the building from direct sunlight and to heat the building with Solar Wall material. The Solar Wall helped act as a shading device, but also as an HVAC system that acquired its resources naturally.

42


43


Side

Area

A. North B. West C. East D. South E. Roof

Exposure

12,254 Sf 2,726 Sf 909 Sf 11,787 Sf 8,086 Sf

Area

20% 40% 40% 90% 27%

20% 40% 40% 90% 27%

Area Exposed 2,450 Sf 1090 Sf 909 Sf 10668 Sf 2203 Sf

R-values For Interior S Glass = 4.00 Air = 1.00

Aluminum Sheet = 0.6 Aerogel = 3.75 Tyvek = 0.60

Providence Jewelry District Laboratory

Plywood = 0.50

200 Dyer Street Providence, RI 02903

Cellulose Insulation (6

Total = 48.96

E

Project References Owner: Architect: Structural: MEP:

City of Providence Team Beige Architects Yoder Architecture Barnes + Associates

Type of Occupancy:

Educational Laboratory

A

D B

Ground Floor SqFt: 6100 2Ft Typ. Floor (5) SqFt: 8100 2Ft Total: 46600 2Ft Energy Loads Specific Space Heat Demand: Heating Load: Cooling Load:

Concrete = 1.00

C

4.20 kBTU/(ft ²yr) 3.33 BTU/(ft ²yr) 3.06 BTU/(ft ²yr)

Massing Diagram Side: A. North B. West C. East D. South E. Roof

44

Area (sf): Exposure(%): Area Exposed: 12,254 2,726 909 11,787 8,086

20 40 40 90 27

2,450 1,090 909 10,668 2,203

sf sf sf sf sf


45


TEMPERATURE Providence is in a humid continental climate. Highest temperatures in the summer have a mean of 90 F and winters have a lowest mean of 29 F.

DIRECT SOLAR RADIATION Direct sunlight is consistent throughout the year with the summer gaining more solar radiation. Maximum ranges of DSR range from 550 to 650 W/m2

CLOUD COVER Mean of 50% in the summer of 85% in the winter. Clouds usually fill the sky during the afternoon after 3: 00 pm, while the least amount of coverage occurs in morning until noon.

WEEKLY RAINFALL Highest readings are during the early summer with about 28-35 mm/day and the lowest in the winter with 8 mm/day. Rain events occur over long spans rather than scattered showers.

HUMIDITY Humidity is consistent throughout the year. The highest point of humidity is 75% in the morning and lowest 57% in the afternoon. Summers are more humid than the winters.

46


SUMMER MONTHS

WINTER MONTHS

Sun Angle East View

South View

Shading Area

Wind Source

47


Downtown

N P ro vid enc r i ve eR

Jewelry District

0’

48

200’


Ground Floor

Typical Floor

Roof

Mechanical

49


50


Southern Facade

Eastern Facade

Western Facade

51


West - East Section

South-North Section

52


53


1.0 0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2 0.0

Solar Wall Inter-changing Mechanical Room Solar Wall Heat Collector Main Mechanical Room Intake Pipe Output Pipe

54


Ground

Typical Floor

55


Aerogel Aluminum Sheet

Tyvek Plywood Cellulose

Glass

Air

Floor Board

R-Values for Interior Solar Wall Glass:

4.00

Air:

1.00

Aluminum Sheet:

0.61

Aerogel:

3.75

Tyvek:

0.60

Plywood:

0.50

Cellulose 6�: Concrete: Total:

Concrete

37.50 1.00 48.96

56


Section Details

57


New York Tall Building 5.2012 A proposal for a skyscraper adjacent to Trinity Church in the Financial District of Manhattan, New York. Through different typologies of skyscrapers, I explored intersections of programs, allowing for urban movement to occur throughout the building. By adding programs atypical to the Financial District, connecting the World Trade Center and Wall Street through circulation becomes a possibility. Subway access, a supermarket, a gym, library, museum and theatre are among the many public programs for the users. On macro and microscales, the proposal created openings marking the resurgence of open parks, addressing overcrowding, providing activities, and reminding the public of the history of this area. It stands approximately 850 feet high and provides around 1,000,000 square feet of space.

58


PROPOSAL

59


PROGRAMS The resurgence of park spaces allows for more public spaces to develop. This growth will continue into the site through

BRO

CIT

Y

H

AL

AY ADW

L

elevated public spaces.

CH ST. U PA RC U H L’S YA R D

CONNECTIVITY

TRINIT

LIB PA ERT R Y K

ST.

AY BROADW

GR

EEN

HU

WIC

DS

LIBERTY ST.

CEDAR

H ST.

ON

W

O

GR R ST. RIVEWEST

EE

AY NW

R LD CE FIN N AN TE C R IA

L

Y PLA

CE

The proposal will connect the primary sites

S ST.

N ST.

THAME

PINE ST.

WALL ST.

WA

SH

TO ING

of the Financial District: Wall Street and

W LO

R ST.

RECTO

K PA R R TO EC R

ON DS

HU

N TA AT

NH

RIV

MA

ER

ER

the World Trade Center.

N R

4 5 6

2 3 A C

E

SUBWAY ACCESS

J Z

4 5

Multiple subway lines cross the site and therefore has the potential to become a

1

transportation hub.

NEIGHBORHOODS The site exists in the heart of the financial district. This would be an opportunity for diverse programs to spread from Tribeca and Chinatown.

60

4 5 N R


BR

OA

DW AY

Trinity Church serves as a link between the World Trade Center and Wall Street

CITY HALL

N WAY

WORLD FINANCIAL CENTER

ST. PAUL’S CHURCHYARD

PL

AC

E

H U DS

LIBERTY PARK

ST .

IC H

DW AY

ES

OA

AM

ST.

RECTOR PARK

BR

IN G TO N

TH

WAS H

CE

DA

LI R

GRE

E NW

AT TA N

ST.

TR

IN

ITY

MAN H

H U DS

LOW E R

O N R IV ER

T ST.

ON R IV E R GREE W ES

WORLD TRADE CENTER

RE

CT OR

TRINITY CHURCH

ST.

1

N R

PI

W AL

Subway Wtc Wall Street Trinity

Work Force Tourists

General Public Residents Employees

BE

ST .

Trinity Link

L

Residential Offices Public

61

N

E

RT

Y

ST .

ST .

ST .

Residential Amenities Office Amenities Public Programs Trinity Programs

Local Gardens Laundromat Parks Museum Theatre Grocery Athletic Center Retail Charlotte’s Place School


G-g 452'1"

564'1-1/4"

856'0"

E F

A-a

D-d

G H b

H-h

62

c

B-b

E-e

313'6-1/2"

222'1-1/2"

73'0-3/4"

608'1-1/4"

D

466'8-3/4"

350'9-1/2"

1020'7-1/2"

C

170'10-1/4"

167'8-3/4"

732'6"

1143'10-1/2"

B

82'1-1/2"

72'0"

117'4"

181'10"

A

147'8-1/2"

164'9-1/2"

a d

I-i

e f g h

I

C-c

F-f

i


63


Continuous Continuous Streeets Streeets + + Open Open Views Views

Connection Connection Of Of Wall Wall St., St., Trinity, Trinity, WTC WTC

Retail Retail And And Public Public Amenity Amenity // // Reflection Reflection

Wall Wall St. St.

WTC WTC

Public Amenities Amenities +museum +museum Public

Horizontal Extrusion Extrusion For For Theatre Theatre Horizontal

Sky Sky Lobby Lobby Provides Provides Access Access To To Terrace Terrace

Offices Offices

Residential Residential

Sky Sky Lobby Lobby 22

64


Subw

ay

Trinity

Cont

inuity

Subw

ay En

try

Cont

inuity

World Cent Trade er

65

Of St

reet

Of St

reet


Shading Study

Last Iteration

66

Iteration 3

Iteration 2

Iteration 1

N


Mechanical Water Tower

Program Stack Sheet Athletic Center

15000

X

1

=

15000

Residential

15000

X

25

=

375000

Offices

15000

X

17

=

255000

Sculpture Garden

15000 20000

X X

1 1

= =

15000 20000

Theatre Museum

20000 15000

Public Amenity + Retail

Athletic Complex

Residential

Library

Offices

Sculpture Garden

X

1 1

15000

X

Retail Extension

15000

Basement + Subway

15000

Total Floors

Museum Theatre

Public Amenity Retail Theatre + Museum Lobby Subway Trinity Bridge Supermarket

Private Program Public Program

67

=

20000 15000

10

=

150000

X

4

=

60000

X

4

=

60000

X

=

60

Total Allowable Area

1,188,000

Total Area

1,013,400


68


69


c

a

b

b a

c

70


Residential

Offices

Cantilevered Theatre

71


a-a

72


b-b

c-c

73


74


West Elevation + Layering

Facade

Glazing

Secondary Structure: Bracing

Primary Structure: Trusses

Floor Slabs

Core

75


North-South City Section

West-East City Section

76


77


Jewelry for Specific Elicitation 3.2012 Jewelry is architecture realized at a wearable scale. I wanted to create work that would synthesize my knowledge in neuroscience with architecture. An experience is highly specific and in architectecture can trigger a multitude of emotions. I created tools that elicit specific nerves to trigger emotions by poking specific parts of the palm and the ear.

78


79


80


Complimenting Earings Silver

81


82


Specificity Brass

83


Bus Stop in Pile, Ecuador 1.2012 A design-build project in Pile, Ecuador, a small town, where masterweavers of the Panama Hat still live. The centuries old skill of hat weaving is dying market as consumers and middle-men buyers purchase underpriced hats from the local townspeople, draining the potential of the hat weaving economy. Considered as national treasures, the masterweavers have begun to receive recognition from their country, resulting in programs to promote the art. Given a site to build, our a team of 12 students decided a stop and information center were needed to inform passerbys about the significance of the town. Using techniques in bamboo construction, we built a sustainable structure in 5 weeks.

84


85


86


87


88


89


Urban Housing Block in Providence 12.2011 A proposal for a mixed-use urban project located in the Jewelry District of Providence, Rhode Island. The site is within Brown University’s emerging Medical Campus. As a solution to connect the main Brown campus with the Rhode Island Hospital, I proposed a Brown University Medical complex consisting of housing for elderly, students, and guests that are all connected to a sports medicine facility. The intersections within the complex and city allows this site to be a primary node in the urban environment of Providence.

90


91


Jewelry District is a link connector of Brown University and Rhode Island Hospital

Cranston

Car

Eastside

Bicycle

Olneyville Pawtucket

Brown U. Main Campus Jewelry District

Downcity

Downcity Walk

Jewelry District Brown Main Campus

Rehoboth

Bus

Seekonk

Train

Rhode Island Hospital

Johnson And Wales U. Rhode Island Hospital

PROGRAMS:

Brown Jwu Research Restaurant/Bar Office Space Fine Art Related

Supplant Brown's presence by inserting the medical campus in to the area, promoting educational institutions to expand while allowing local artists to display their work.

CONNECTIVITY:

Pedestrian Bike Brown Shuttle Ripta

Connect pathways between Brown Main Campus and Rhode Island Hospital, JWU Dormitories and its main campus, and finally Downcity and the Jewelry District.

EMERGING GREEN SPACES: Open green spaces have been appearing in Providence due to the relocation of Interstate-95.The spaces will allow for open views, access, and interactivity. Green spaces will flow through the site into the Jewelry District.

92


Brown University

Downcity

JEWELRY DISTRICT

Rhode Island Hospital

93


Form Development

Increased Circulation

Open Green Space

Programmatic Elements

Exposure

Programmatic Elements

Proposed Form

94


Sports Medicine Complex Dormitory

Elderly Center Hotel

Communal Living Space Personal Living Space

Private Programs Lecture Hall And Library Cafeteria And Bookstore

Elderly Care Unit Hotel Lobby Restaraunt And Bar

Health Center And Studios Athletic Center

Dow

Public Programs ncit

y

Garden Space

C Co am nn pus ec to r

Jewelry District

wn Bro ing rk Pa 95


96


a b Hotel

a

Private Programs

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

b

97


98


a-a

99


Dormitory Units

Single

Double

Triple 6

6 4

3

2

2

3

4

4

6

2 2 2

2 5

5

5

Elderly Unit

Single

2

Hotel Unit

Single 1. Living 2. Bedroom 3. Storage 4. Bathroom 5. Balcony 6. Study 7. Kitchen

2

100


b-b

Elderly Housing Dormitory

Hotel

101


102


103


Refract 12.2011 Presented on www.notcot.org {4.2012} Brown Granoff Center {3.2012} Gelman Gallery {12.2011} Refract is designed to embrace and deploy the phenomena of light. Triangulated planar surfaces of acrylic modules are the receivers of reflection and refraction from precise folds, which respond to light in an entirely different, more concentrated manner. The transparent acrylic has the capability of existing as both seen and unseen, dependent upon the presence of light. Natural and synthetic sources of light accentuate the refractive characteristics produced by the acrylic material. Naturally, through its exposure to sun light. Synthetically, by the means of installed LED bulbs that are triggered by movement and light intensities read by Arduino programmed iPhone accelerometers and light sensors hidden in the installation.

104


105


120 Degrees

90 Degrees

72 Degrees

Overall Form Expands

Overall Form Remains Linear

Overall Form Contracts As Angle Decreases

106

60 Degrees

45 Degrees


107


108


109


2011 RISD Fall Lecture Series 9.2011 The poster was designed to emanate the sentiment of RISD Architecture’s core principles. Using paper folding methods, the poster collapses from an 18” by 24” format into a letter sized envelope. Personally, it was an exploration of how conventional means of folding [i.e. horizontal and vertical creases] can be superseded by more advanced techniques to create a more three-dimensional yet functional poster.

110


111


Garden Pavillion in Pawtucket, RI 5.2011 Featured on www.inhabitat.org {5.2011} This is a 12-week studio that introduces students to the relationship between design and construction. This project was designed to meet the needs of three groups of clients that share the site: the Chinese Christian Church, the Roosevelt Community Housing Complex, and the Heritage Park YMCA. Looking to bridge these diverse constituencies, the studio built two pavillions with radiating garden beds. Recycled pressure treated wood and steel were used to transform a busy parking lot in an industrial area for rest and reconnection.

112


113


River Pavilion

1.

2.

Picnic Area

3.

4.

1.

2.

Pavilion

3.

4. River Perch

4'’ 12'’

20'

114


115


Garden Pavilion 1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

Garden Beds

Pavilion

1.

2.

3.

4.

5. 6.

4'’ 12'’

116

20'


117


Etch-Y-Z 3.2011 It was always hard for me to draw curves on an Etch-A-Sketch.This was made to ease the difficulty of making curves. The device was inspired by the ocular vestibular system within the human nervous system, which helps orient a person so that he or she will understand what is up, down, and sideways movement. Etch-Y-Z excersies this human capacity for direction by taking a simple childrens toy and combining it with sense detecting machinery. It tests drawing capacity and physical coordination.

118


Y X Z X

Y

119


120


121


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Photo Archive of Vrindavan, India 1.2011 The documentation of a city undergoing change as a result of India’s booming industries. A study done under the direction of photographers Michael Beuhler-Rose and Kent Rogowski. Vrindavan is a holy city for a certain sect of Hinduism. It was the site of his birth and a place where Krishna developed into a man. Like many developing urban environments this city is confused: architectural abandonment, sites of quick modernisation and high densities of people. Over 5 weeks, I created an archive of different objects that captured the identity of old Vrindavan. The following pages display five series out of thirty that I monitored and shot.

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Water Processes: Part 3

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Empty Alleys

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Roof Exits

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Merchants

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Brick With Paint

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Labyrinth for a Minotaur 12.2010 Selected for RISD Trienniel Exhibition {1.11} Extracting the spatial characteristics the Carrick’s Bend, a nautical knot. The fundamentals of RISD Architecture are taught in this core class. It explores design principles common to architecture and landscape architecture. The elements of compositional, formal, spatial, and tectonic manipulation are observed. From a knot, a translations where made through paper folding techniques which further aggregated into spatial interpretation.

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6’ by 4’ charcoal drawing

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Folding Cardboard Chair 7.2010 Certain materials have potential forms and functions that have remained unexplored. The goal of this experiment was to test the limits of cardboard and turn it into a functional object. Inspired by the chair-less and desk-less schools in the Philippines, I developed a folding solution to transform an abundant resource such as cardboard into furniture that could serve as a tool for students. I want young Filipino children to learn more efficiently and for teachers to have more order in their classrooms.

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14" by 6" table

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Holds up to 230 pounds

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No cuts, just creases

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Folds into 14" by 14" by 6" package

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Analysis of Alvar Aalto's Summer House 9.2008 Design rationalizes each step of a process. It is a tool by which architects justify, determine and express their ideas on where, why and how a building should exist. In this study, I analyze Alvaar Aalto’s Summer house in Muuratsalo, Finland through drawing, modeling and research. It was amazing to discover the relationships that he formed with this house. The intended experience, design, and construction are an example of sound logic in beautiful architecture.

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10 a.m. 12 p.m. 2 p.m. 4 p.m. 6 p.m.

wooden slats, tiles, brick, glass, metal wooden slats, tiles, glass wooden slats wooden logs

8 p.m.

The angle of the roof relates to the corners of the the addition just as they do with the sauna’s. It twists on an axis at the angle of the roof, which is also used to derive the log house turn.

The material use would have to be modern as the hierchy of material use simplifies as you go up the hill.

The addition to Aalto’s house would be positioned at the starting point of circulation and light path to keep the flow of movement constant.

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The size of the building and its angle are exactly the same as the “ruin” courtyard.


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Interpretation Through Drawing 4.2008 An interpretation of music. Drawn while listening to Beethoven’s Symphony No. II. I was curious as to how information can be translated across different mediums. In this case, sound to drawing, two formats that exist in different dimensions. This was drawn as an axonometric, representing a form conceived while listening.

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Taxidermy + Casting 10.2006 Boston University Department of Zoology {10.2006} Cotton stuffed skins with wire frame. Since Carolus Linneus’ establishment of binomial nomenclature, it became clear that we must understand our ecological world and the organisms which inhabit it. Referencing and preserving skins is a way by which future generations can study the progression of an organism through evolution. It is capturing design in biology. These samples are more than half a decade old. I learned this skill when I was studying Biology at Boston University. Some of the skins and casts were sent to the Harvard Museum of Zoology.

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Peromyscus leocopus white-footed mouse

Clethrionomys gapperi red-backed vole

Cricetus Cricetus hamster

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Epiteicus fuscus big brown bat

Sylvilagus floridanus eastern cotton tail


Paintings of a Vase and Bottles 2.2004 Still life painting series of objects in my parents’ home in the Philippines.

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One oil on 14” by 20” canvas

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Two oil on 14” by 20” canvas

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Three oil on 14” by 20” canvas

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www.alexdiaz.us



Alex Diaz Portfolio 2013-2014