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DOMAIN OFFICE Selected Works

Macro Plaza Monterrey, Mexico

DATUM Dorrance, Pennsylvania

Losa Rota Lima, Peru

CCdC Tampa, Florida

Riordan Ranch Napa, California

The Need for (re)Definition Belgrade, Serbia

No Labour / All Work Skopje, Macedonia


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P u b l icat ions / Acad e mic Res e arc h Rep o rts / Le ct u re s & E x h ib it ions / S e l e ct e d P res s & I n ter v i ew s

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E x hib it ions & Hono u r s / I n v i te d Ju ro r

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The Rise to a Global Power Mexico is changing in ways that will profoundly affect its big northern neighbour, and unless America rethinks its outdated picture of life across the border, both countries risk forgoing the benefits promised by Mexico’s rise. Critical Adjacencies & Proximities The first place where Americans will notice these changes is in their shopping malls. China (with more than 60 mentions in the presidential debates) is by far the biggest source of America’s imports. But wages in Chinese factories have quintupled in the past ten years and the oil price has trebled, inducing manufacturers focused on the American market to set up closer to home. Mexico is already the world’s biggest exporter of flat-screen televisions, BlackBerrys and fridge-freezers, and is climbing up the rankings in cars, aerospace and more. On present trends, by 2018 America will import more from Mexico than from any other country. “Made in China” is giving way to “Hecho en México”. The doorway for those imports is a 2,000-mile border, the world’s busiest. Yet some American politicians are doing their best to block it, out of fear of being swamped by immigrants. They could hardly be more wrong. Fewer Mexicans now move to the United States than come back south. America’s fragile economy (with an unemployment rate nearly twice as high as Mexico’s) has dampened arrivals and hastened departures. Meanwhile, the make-up of Mexican migration is changing. Monterrey’s proximity to the ‘Border’, was perhaps a liability, but now is evident, that this proximity is a crucial attribute, which

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could potentially shift the centre of the Mexico from the South to the North... a centre not in terms of geographical position, but the intellectual and production centre of this powerful and still growing Nation. North of the border, legal Mexican residents probably now outnumber undocumented ones. The human tide may turn along with the American economy, but the supply of potential borderhoppers has plunged: whereas in the 1960s the average Mexican woman had seven children, she now has two. Within a decade Mexico’s fertility rate will fall below America’s. The growth of Monterrey In the 19th century, after the Mexican Independence War, Monterrey rose as a key economic centre for the newly formed nation, especially due to its balanced ties between Europe. In 1824, the “New Kingdom of León” became the State of Nuevo León, and Monterrey was selected as its capital. The city has hosted international events such as the 2002 United Nations Conference on Financing for Development with the participation of more than 50 heads of state and government, as well as other ministers and senior delegates from over 150 countries. The conference resulted in the adoption of the Monterrey Consensus, which has become one relevant reference point for international development and cooperation. In 2004, the OAS Special Summit of the Americas was attended by almost all the presidents of the Americas. In 2007, Monterrey held the Universal Forum of Cultures with four million visitors and in 2008 Monterrey held the Final World Junior Championships.

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Mountains

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ESCOBEDO 6,325 MN 2.2%

GARCIA 4,641 MN 1.6%

APODACA 398,237

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SAN NICOLAS 33,786 MN 11.8%

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MONTERREY SANTA CATARINA

SANTA CATARINA 16,099 MN 5.6%

GUADALUPE

MONTERREY 137,375 MN 48.1%

SAN PEDRO 44,373 MN 15.5%

SAN PEDRO JUAREZ

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GUADALUPE 16,667 MN 5.8%

JUAREZ 516 MN 0.2%

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Monterrey Hard We can define Hard Infrastructure as the primary components that allow cities to function: transportation, utilities, roads, mobility, etc. Monterrey could stand to improve in the above. The city of Monterrey is 540 meters (1,770 ft.) above sea level and located in the northeastern Mexican state of Nuevo León. The Santa Catarina River—dry most of the year on the surface but with flowing underground water—bisects Monterrey from East to West, thus separating the city into north and south halves, and drains the city to the San Juan River and Rio Grande. Monterrey lies north of the foothills of the Sierra Madre Oriental Mountain Range. A small hill, the smaller Topo Chico are located in the suburbs of San Nicolás de los Garza and Escobedo. West of the city rises the Cerro de las Mitras, which resemble the profileo of several bishops with their Mitres. Cerro de la Silla dominates the view east of the city. Cerro de la Loma Larga - South of the Santa Catarina river—separates Monterrey from the suburb of San Pedro Garza García. At the summit of the Cerro del Obispada, north of the river, is the historic Bishopric Palace, site of one of the most important battles of the Mexican-American War. Monterrey is connected with the USA border the sea and inland Mexico through different roads, including the Carretera Nacional that runs from the Nuevo-Laredo to Mexico City and south, and the Carretera Interoceanica connecting Matamoros with the port of Mazatlan on the Pacific; it is also crossed by highways 40, 45, 57. The divided highway Monterrey-Saltillo-Matehuala-Mexico City is the main land corridor to interior Mexico. Monterrey is also connected by at least three important railroad freight lines: Nuevo Laredo-Mexico City, Monterrey-Tampico, and Monterrey-Pacific Monterrey is linked through frequent non-stop flights to many Mexican cities and to key United States hubs (Atlanta, ChicagoO’Hare, Dallas/Fort Worth, Detroit, Houston-Intercontinental, JFK/ New York, and Las Vegas). Monterrey is the second most important city for the operating routes of Aeromexico.

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Monterrey Soft By Soft Infrastructure we can refer to the cultural, legal, and economics activities that exist in cities. From this standpoint, Monterrey is saturated. It excels in its intellectual and cultural production. Monterrey, is the capital and largest city of the northeastern state of Nuevo Leon. The City is anchor to the 3rd largest Metropolitan are in Mexico and is ranked as the north-largest city in Mexico. Monterrey serves as a commercial center for the North of Mexico and is the base for many significant International Companies, e.g. BMW, Mercedes, Samsung, Whirlpool, GE, Boeing, Toshiba, and many more. It is the second wealthiest city in Mexico and the ninth in Latin America with a GDP of 130.7 Billion in 2012. Monterrey’s GDP PPP per capita of 31,051 dollars is the highest in the country and second of Latin America. It is considered a Beta World City. Rich in History and culture, Monterrey is often regarded as the most developed & livable city in Mexico. Downtown With the rapid growth and expansion outside urban centres in the latter half of the 20th century, and the violence of the drug wars in the beginning of this century. Paralleling this growth has shifted the cultural & economic heart of the city from its historic center to the ever-expanding periphery. Consequently, what were once vital elements of the city have gone fallow. Macro Plaza once the center of Monterrey, is today nothing more of a reminder of a rich past, which was quickly left behind for the ‘safer’ alternatives. In recent years, numerous Masterplans and attempts to redevelop the site have been proposed with no results. Unable to overcome the site’s many constraints, City Hall Plaza has languished undeveloped, disconnected from the areas surrounding it, a void in the urban fabric of Monterrey. City Hall Plaza - Site A site of conflicting potential – an open expanse of underutilized land, advantageously situated within Monterrey’s historic urban center yet constrained by emptiness and perception How to overcome the site’s many limitations and capitalize on the opportunities it affords, re-integrating it into both Monterrey’s urban fabric and culture. To once again, become the literal and figurative center of Monterrey. 1 2


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In 2008, for the first time in history, 50% of the global population now lives in cities. But something else happened in 2008, and perhaps this is the key to our future cities and how a way to move forward. 1.There were more mobile hand help devices in than traditional computers, and 2. there were more ‘things’ than people connected to the internet. These events, coupled with our desire to be more ‘urban’ has resulted in the insatiable desire to produce and move data and thus the proliferation of the Data Centre. However, the production of these large factory like buildings have escaped architects and the profession, yet they are fundamental to our ‘urban’ way of life and perhaps provide insights to what are future cities will truly be. The future of our cities and desire to be urban, is deeply dependent on technologies and the processing of data, therefore, the Data Centre and other such industrial production complexes must be a type architects pursue with great ambition and vigor...

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therwise, we will be facing a future, were we will have little input. Our approach to the Data Centre, is twofold: eliminate the inherent waste and redundancies in the standard design approach; how can the Data Centre be represented in an honest way, thus exposing its rather ‘real’ and physical presence, yet, register the very people its serves. The essence of the proposal consists of four distinct volumes that are unified via a Datum, which runs 200m, north to south, whilst simultaneously negotiating the topography of the site. The four programmatically distinct volumes, servers, technical equipment, offices & VIP, are integrated, via a primary circulation route, that is embedded within the Datum, each volume is designed to function both structurally and mechanically as independent, however, they have been inserted to allow for deliberate contamination, specifically at the edges, which will allow for the rooms to collectively perform as a singular machine, without diminishing the function of each.

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When presented with a void, as described in the brief, our initial response was to accept the expert approach and use ‘standards’ to fill the void. The obvious solution was once again the pure, abstract, clean, white box. As we have seen globally, the Museum is typically stripped of any regional or cultural specificity, and instead, is been reduced to an object which is almost offensively un-offensive. When using this ‘expert’ method in Lima, Peru, i.e. a simple box, the building literally collapsed due to its own ideology. Unable to adapt and react to local materials, context, climate, culture, and behaviour, the proposal literally broke under its own ideological burden to be perfect and autonomous. However, the break, though at first appeared as failure is precisely the opposite. The Break is simply the beginning. The proposition that the “true beginning only arrives at the end” should thus be understood in a literal fashion: the act — the “thesis’ , e.g.The Box,-is necessarily ‘premature’; it is a ‘hypothesis’ condemned to failure, and the dialectical reversal takes place when the failure of this ‘thesis’ - the ‘antithesis’ e.g.The hidden box,-reveals the true ‘thesis’. ‘Synthesis’ , e.g., The Broken Box, is the signification of the thesis emerging from its failure. Our proposal was driven by the values stated in the brief e.g. Design, Context, Flexibility, Maintenance, Sustainability, & Feasibility, but we have expanded the demands as we cannot ignore the effects of the Market Economy on the contemporary Art Museum.

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City Since 1980, the population of metropolitan Lima has doubled, increasing from approximately five million residents to almost 10 million in 2015. As a result, greater Lima - confined by the Andes to the east and the Pacific Ocean to the west - has stretched and contorted along almost 125 miles of coastline. Lima is now the sixthlargest metropolitan area in Latin America and 30th largest in the world. However, the challenges of rapid urbanization (30 percent of the Peruvian population live in the capital and more arrive daily) has been accompanied by significant social and environmental concerns: the most polluted air in Latin America, the contamination of the Rimac River and incredible traffic congestion. The museum project in conjunction with the proposed park improvements can both symbolically and practically confront these issues. Therefore, to address Lima’s pressing needs our proposal will integrate wellness and lifestyle into the very fabric of our proposal. The design organizes the entire site into a unified landscape, dedicated to various forms of leisure, culture and sociability. Park Though attractive and lively, the 12-hectare Parque de la Exposicion, in its current configuration, does not enjoy a cohesive plan organizing the various attractions in order to take full advantage of its incredible potential. It has been diminished over time through conversion of park land to automobile uses and other careless alterations. In response our goal is to create an overall master plan that will guide future park improvements with the prime objective being to enhance the park as a place for human enjoyment and engagement. The first set of proposed improvements are a series of strategic moves to amplify the beauty and comfort of the park. The two existing surface parking lots are eliminated. These parking spaces will be more than compensated for by the new metro stop to be located at the northwest corner of the site.

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The existing south automobile entry will also be removed and a new entrance ramp to the underground parking garage is proposed at the intersection of Avenida Garcilosa de la Vega and Jiron Chincha. The oversized and under-utilised water plaza at the northeast corner of the park will also be removed in favor of landscaping. Finally, four new pedestrian entries will be created at the east and west sides of the park. As for the master plan the intent is to discover a latent order within the existing park. The park has an important history within the city and contains an impressive collection of historic buildings, monuments and destinations. Rather than impose an alien geometry that could not possibly hope to work with the existing distribution of elements, the park plan simply inscribes a distributed network of hierarchical walkways across the western and northeastern quadrants. To improve the distribution of nodes, two of the existing monuments on the west half of the park have been relocated to the east. At first glance the resulting pattern recalls neo-classical park plans. But in fact it is democratically non-centralized and nonsymmetrical. The functional goal is to simply connect the various destinations as efficiently as possible. Visually it is hoped that something interesting, if not quite beautiful, can arise out of the quotidian. The central north-south spine divides the park into two functional halves. The active eastern half focuses on large group activities. The western half will be more quiet and contemplative with the emphasis on individuals and small groups. The large-scaled improvements in the southwest quadrant of the park will remain. In the northeast area a new one-hectare event lawn will host a wide range of public activities for up to 4,000 people. The western park is envisioned to be a dense, lush forest of indigenous trees both connecting and separating the Museo de Arte de Lima and the Museo Metropolitano de Lima. In walking from one to the other the ultimate destination will be concealed. Instead one will navigate from landmark to landmark as if discovering each monument anew with each journey through the woods.

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Site The museum site plan is conceived of as a series of outdoor spaces which mediate the abutting conditions of busy city streets to the north and west, existing museum to the east and park to the south. Adding to the mix is the proposed metro station to be located at the northwest corner of the site. A covered breezeway adjacent to the metro station entry provides entry to the education wing and is activated by a small café with outdoor tables. We propose to integrate the metro elevator into the building thereby providing protected access to the adjacent sidewalks and public plaza. The main public space is a roof plaza laid over the new subterranean museum. This open public space is necessitated by the site’s prominent location as the gateway to the historic city center as well as our understanding of the 21st century museum’s role as a more active agent in public life. The plaza is both porous and contained. It has three openings allowing for the free flow of people through the space. But the building’s unique geometry situates it as a place protected from the noise and congestion of the nearby busy streets. The plaza is activated by the students, museum visitors, the café and the metro station. As the two wings of the museum rise up a series of terraces are carved into the roof planes thereby providing opportunities for both planned and spontaneous activities. The two museum buildings are separated by a six meters wide pedestrian walkway. A discreet curb cut on Paseo Colon allows for service vehicles to use this space as a loading zone when needed. Program Programmatically the museum can be divided into three roughly equal areas – exhibition, education and support. The Exhibition Wing is located to the south thereby relating to the existing museum entrance and the new forest enveloping the western half of the park. Reflecting its role as a civic responsibility the Education Wing faces north onto the city and enjoys a direct connection to the metro station. Along the eastern edge of the building, adjacent to the historic museum, runs the support zone servicing and connecting the two primary wings. Although out of necessity the new building rests largely below ground it is important to retain a physical presence at both the north and south ends of the site. The south end is dominant with the rising slab creating a monumental entry to the museum.

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Directly on axis with the entry is the Event Stairhall. This dramatically scaled skylit space mainly serves to connect the three museum levels. But it is also a room in and of itself capable of hosting artwork, video projections, performances or lectures. Each of the gallery levels has a Large Gallery and a Small Gallery. In addition, the upper level contains the Video Projection Room. The ceiling for most galleries is 4-meters high except for the large Upper Gallery which has a soaring ceiling ranging from 4-meters to 11-meters in height. Rising above the Exhibition Wing we have expanded the brief’s multipurpose space into a full service restaurant enjoying expansive views of the park. This location coupled with Lima’s world famous food scene creates an opportunity for a destination restaurant that will not only serve as a beautiful location for museum functions, but can also be a revenue source for the institution. The much smaller above ground projection of the north wing serves to mark the boundaries of the site, house a small café and serve as entry to the Education Wing. Whereas the Exhibition Wing is 36-meters wide and 2 levels below grade, due to the metro station, the Education Wing is 24-meters wide and extends 3 levels below grade. A generous Education Stairhall carved into the earth also functions as the main circulation path (and social space) for this zone. 3 6


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The Need for (re) Definition WHAT IS A CITY? The essay will investigate core concepts of urbanization to develop a historical narrative and appreciate all the intellectual production that has already been developed. We believe in evolution, not revolution, thus we will work with existing ideas and innovations to develop our ideas, instead of trying to reinvent the wheel. We begin this process, with understanding the city: the contemporary notion is typically defined through its population and size. In China, for example, a city can only be considered so if it has an ‘official’ population greater than or equal to 6 million; a megacity must have at least 10 million inhabitants . However, anyone who has spent substantial time in these new mega-cities knows that the single-statistic metric (the number of human beings who technically take up space there) does not take into account the ephemeral attributes of urbanization.

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The truth is that an actual city is more complex. Population, density, and the height of buildings do not make a city. Intellectual production and cultural activities created our cities, and it is these crucial characteristics that truly make cities. Cities have now attracted over 50% of the global population . And why? The answer is obvious: they are centres of culture, diversity, education, civic institutions, and freedom of thought. However, with rapid urbanization, we have witnessed the erosion of cities from centres of cultural production to generic onedimensional, consumption-based theme parks. It is my hope, that this essay will not only begin to develop a method for how we approach cities, but ideally expand our current definition of what is a city. City Making The current understanding of our cities began with the end of

the French Revolution, as this was the break from the feudal system to capitalism and the first time in History the notion of ‘free-will’ and ‘individuals’ was a universal concept; citizens were now free to choose how to live they chose cities . The end of the French Revolution resulted in the end of Monarchies across Europe, the rise of the Republic, and the development of cities that were governed, organised and planned by its citizens. The next critical moment in city making was the industrial revolution and the invention of the Skyscraper. The tower was born almost 160 years ago, when the elevator made it possible to have access to previously unimaginable heights. Steel made it possible to build even higher and faster, engineers learnt how to stabilise even taller towers, and technology allowed us to create the “perfect” artificial environment high up in the sky . Chicago and its incredible


boom at the end of the 19th Century was the finest example of the rapid growth and urban prosperity during this period. The middle of the 20th Century ushered in a new love for the City. Following the end of WWII and the glorious defeat of fascism, Europe had the responsibility to rebuild cities, and in an effort to erase the memories of two tremendous wars, the task to rebuild was done with Utopian, top down Masterplans in an attempt to create fair and just societies…we all know how these cities worked out. Our current love affair with the city is the result of the Asian Boom. Since China opened its Market in 1978, the world has urbanised at a historical rate, and in 2008 for the first time in history, 50% of the global population now lived in cities . But something else happened in 2008, and perhaps this is the key to our future cities and a way to move forward.

In 2008 two major milestones were achieved with technology: 1. There were more mobile handheld devices than traditional computers . 2. There were more ‘things’ than people connected to the internet . These critical events will be looked at with the same importance as Otis’ elevator or perhaps even the end of Feudalism with the birth of Capitalism. The Future City “Since the days of the industrial revolution, cities have been the engines of economic growth. The revolution was effective in developing prosperity for many countries, but the development was not always “smart,” sacrificing health conditions, for instance, for greater productivity.” Steffen Sorrel We do not know the answer at this time, but we do know that the solution will be found through a

thorough understanding of our shared histories and appreciating how we have come to our contemporary city. To discover the most intelligent solution for project, we must begin without a manifesto or agenda; we insist on a method that explores the very nature of the site, city, users, and environment. We must discover new questions, as opposed to recycling existing answers; the method of investigation must transcend the legal definition of the brief and site. Via a method of ‘unpacking’ we attempt to expose the multiple layers, the hard & soft, the critical & physical in order to identify new hierarchies or hidden actors. This process demands an intense investigation into the local, an abject surrender to the existing, and the rejection of any singular ‘vision’. The concepts which have driven our method embrace the concepts

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we believe critical for the future of cities: clusters, networks, integration, sustainability, connectivity, efficiency, and performance, but we must not forget the fundamental attributes that made our cities 300 years ago: culture, diversity, education, institutions, integrity and the right to pursue purpose . We believe we are at a crucial moment in history, where once again the city is in desperate need for definition Project Seoul When we first me the client, they asked us to achieve the impossible: “the new way of city making for Seoul,” as well as find a new concept of city that understands the goals, demands and responsibilities for the 21st century. Therefore, we began with a new definition for our project: our method will approach the site not as a ‘development’ or a ‘masterplan’, but as a city. The intent of our proposal was to develop fundamental needs for

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a city to be liveable, profitable, integrated, enjoyable and sustainable, in essence a place to live. We identified four values to achieve this ambition:

1. Integration 2. Clusters 3. Performance 4. Flexibility

Integration The 20th century had conflicting ideologies regarding our cities: Modernise or Preserve. For Project Seoul we embraced both. The city of the 21st century is not one that draws a line between old and new; natural and artificial; but integrates everything into one system, which appreciates the values of the past without nostalgia, and embraces technology with a critical eye. Our strategy begins with the simple idea to co-exist. Via a method of unpacking the conditions of the site ,we used the existing context as the foundation for our

planning strategy. Tracing the site conditions allowed us to precisely determine what will remain and were we can insert the ‘new’. This process resulted in the formation of six islands that are defined by their ecological condition. The ambition is to integrate the natural features with the islands to retain the authenticity of the site while blurring the edges between what is existing and what is to come. Clusters Using the Diamond Model of competitive economics , we articulated the newly defined islands with a programmatic cluster. As a result, each island / cluster has a specific brand or theme, e.g. Agricultural Research, Biotech etc., allowing each to function independent of the others, yet can organise as a collective to compete as a unified region. The concept of “Lifetime Community” is imperative to the success of our Project Seoul.


Therefore, each cluster will have a commercial centre, icons, which are within a 500m radius of each resident and will provide universal needs , e.g. daycare, pharmacy, super markets, healthcare, education, etc., for every resident. The elements to achieve a healthy lifestyle will always be within a 5-minute walk; the desire to travel or commute will not be a necessity but a choice.

and addiction to computer games and pornography . In addition by 2050 the convergence between the percentage of elderly (38%) and the working class (52%) is quite alarming . Rather than seeing this as a liability, we see an opportunity to address several issues that South Korea is currently facing.

Performance South Korea has witnessed a historic rate of urbanization between 1960-1990; currently 82% of the population lives in cities . As a result, South Korea has become an economic success with the 13th largest economy driven primarily by a strong IT and technology sector .

Therefore, to address Seoul’s immediate needs the Project integrated wellness and lifestyle into the very fabric of the strategy. The design organised the entire site into a unified landscape, dedicated to forms of leisure, sport, wellness and entertainment. The Performative Landscape allows for easy connection between the clusters as well as water and walking paths to the newly developed River Walk.

However, the rapid urbanization has been accompanied by social concerns: highest rates of suicide in OECD ; high rates of alcoholism, obesity, plastic surgery

The site performs in every sense. In addition to providing a sustainable and healthy lifestyle for the residents, it site was intelligently planned to optimise

and produce its own energy needs. By taking advantage of existing ecological ‘problems,’ such as the yearly flooding, we integrated a catchment system within the landscape to capture water runoff during the heavy rain seasons. The on-site water source allows for the re-use and recycling of grey water, greatly reducing on site water consumption. This will have tremendous cost savings and lower the overall environmental impact of the development. In addition to the water strategy we have integrated green roof systems and smart energy grids into the landscape design. Flexibility Seoul’s pressure to develop in the latter of half of the 20th Century eliminated the ability to plan and design its own growth . The result has been a city saturated by the ill effects of urbanisation: sprawl, overpopulated city centres, inadequate housing, lack of accessible green space, suburban

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satellite developments, and severe congestion . Therefore, we begin not by working with an unrealistic composition of predictable urban gestures, but instead by establishing zoning principles, that optimise the natural and artificial features of our site. Our intent is to develop an intelligent system that anticipates the unpredictability of urbanization. Cities contract or expand as a result of market demands and changes in economic sectors . Rejecting a top down masterplan, we will develop a framework that can respond and adjust to the future developments around the site and the metro region. A flexible grid system will be able to accommodate increases in densities, as well as lower densities in the unfortunate event of decline. Concept Project The existing use of the site consisted

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primarily of infrastructure, agricultural plots, and natural terrain. At the very centre of the site was a large development that we could not move. The existing landscape, development and its related functions define the quality of the overall site. So, we asked: what if, rather than attempting to suppress or insulate these uses from our development, they are considered as latencies capable of forming the identity of a new site, with multiple centres? Can the introduction of new urban conditions benefit from and reinforce the existing conditions of the site? The design organises the site into an archipelago, composed of six islands, each defined by particular types of knowledge based industries. The irregular physical definition of the islands is reinforced with icons that provide universal needs for all residents. The icons form a continuity of irregularity, each varying in terms

of architectural form, function, density, and materialisation. The six islands, with a combined GFA of 10.3 million m2 and average FAR of 2.3, are programmatically defined by a cluster. The cluster are dedicated themes unique to Project Seoul: International Finance, Wellness & Lifestyle, Agricultural Research, Information Technology, Manufacturing and Biomedical. The clusters are closely related through innovation and research, and provide the basis for strategic and economic cooperation for the metro region. In addition, eight primary functions define the majority of the program: office, residential, hotel, healthcare, retail, education, industry, and laboratories. The eight program types are distributed in formations that overlap and weave tightly with each other to generate a rich and diverse mix. In this way, every programmatic typology finds its most appropriate location and retains an efficient coherence within the whole.


Unifying the archipelago is a performative landscape. Whereas clusters and supporting icons provide difference and diversity, the landscape through sports & activity provides cohesion and unity. The desire for people to run, cycle, and perform on the landscape serves as the proverbial glue for the overall site. By reorganising the streets and consolidating utilities, transportation, and logistics to an infrastructural core, which could be hidden beneath the landscape, the entire site is transformed into an environment which allows for a seemingly paradoxical condition: a Rural City. Our Project eliminates the need for one to choose between city or nature, modernisation or preservation. We reject a binary approach to living and embrace paradox as the essential quality of the 21st Century City.

Method Metro Strategy The site is situated between critical centralities of the Seoul-Incheon Metropolitan area. To the east and west, Yonsang Station, Incheon International Airport, and Gimpo Airport. And to the north and south Gimpo City and Songdo International City. Due to its central location, its position is of strategic significance in the metro region. The site renders inevitable its emergence as a new centre. The question is not whether our site will develop, but how? If successful, a new city centre in Seoul could achieve Project Dubai ambitions as well as establish itself as a critical hub at a international, national, city and neighbourhood scale. Site Strategy When touring the project area with the client, we discovered a development that we cannot

move. The site’s geographical centre is occupied by a concrete island. However, this condition has become rather fortunate. Upon further examination, we realised the ‘site’ is not one cohesive area but rather a composition of urban, suburban, infrastructural and agricultural leftovers that happened to be located within a boundary, which is simply by condition of ownership. Therefore, we have used the existing development as a metric to form six additional islands that will organise our site into an archipelago; instead of water, our site is carved by the existing terrain and infrastructure. Each island’s physical definition is traced from the residual space between the existing conditions. Though autonomous and isolated, to allow for independent development, each island is strategically programmed and located to reinforce a coherent and unified development.

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Program Strategy The clusters vary in density, program and architectural typology to provide differentiation throughout the site and embrace the variation and complexity of the newly defined islands. The specific definition of each Island’s program, architectural language and density are derived via its prescribed cluster. (re)Definition We believe Project Seoul can transcend the demands of conventional developments and serve as a catalyst for a as to how we approach cities in the coming year. We began with the ambition to explore what the ‘future’ city will be or more precisely what it could be, we investigated core concepts of urbanisation to develop a historical narrative and appreciate all the intellectual production that has already been developed. Thus, working with existing ideas and innovations has

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led us to a vision while utopian in ambition, is composed of realistic and viable elements. The contemporary notion of ‘city’ is typically defined through market derived metrics. As we all know, an actual city is much more. Before we discuss cities and our roles in relation to them, we must re-examine our cities in an effort to transcend these simplistic and ‘rational’ empirical qualifiers that do not in any way capture why we all desire to be in cities.…the city in this moment is desperately in need for a ‘new’ definition.


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CCDC T A R P O N ,

F L O R I D A

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C C D C

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C C D C

Concept Florida Style*, the quintessential coastal Mediterranean Modern home plan has its roots in Spanish and/or Mediterranean styles. The massing in Mediterranean Modern home plans is bold and noble, and often includes a two-story entry flanked by columns. Low-slung roof lines clad with red-clay tiles are common, as is stucco exterior. The interior is open and unhindered by walls, which allows for good air circulation. The “footprint” of Mediterranean Modern home plans often focuses on the backyard area, which usually includes a terrace, lanai, deck or patio that borders a pool. Exotic, elegant and energy-wise, coastal Floridian home plans boast a popularity that hasn’t waned for decades. Also called Spanish Revival, this style was very popular in the United States from 1915 to 1945. The Spanish style has a stucco exterior, a clay-tile roof, exposed beams, wrought-iron details and repeated arches around an entry walkway. Front doors are of heavy carved wood and porches sometimes feature spiral columns. Walls and floors are often covered with patterned tiles. The floor plan may also include an enclosed courtyard. Since its first housing boom and subsequently burst in 1925, Florida, has had little regard for its own landscape, in fact, one could argue there was contempt for its own natural beauty: too hot, too marshy, too many insects, too much rain, too humid, etc. As we have seen with the spread of Global Capital, local attributes are often perceived as ‘problems’ and experts are brought into to ‘develop’ these areas. The truth is, these ‘experts’ are simply transforming these cities to make them more livable, i.e. generic, for those who want to be in the latest ‘desired’ city, without actually being in said city. Thus the very things that makes these cities interesting and desirable, is erased simply to appease its Foreign Invaders, i.e. Market Economy. In this case Florida, its lush, tropical, dense, saturated and intense landscape has been erased with joy! Perhaps Florida, could be seen as now the first attempts at globalization, in that, a systematic elimination of local cultures and native landscapes in an effort to attract Foreign Investment.

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D O M A I N

Office

The development of Florida in the 20th Century is a clear illustration of man’s desire to control and manipulate ‘nature’ for our benefit. We now know, empirically, this method is wrong. The 21st Century has ushered in a more sustainable and organic approaches to development, however, advances in science and the digital are attempting something far more perverse then controlling nature they want to mimic it. Therefore, we shall draw a clear distinction between nature and man. The Bauhaus artist Joseph Albers, is said to have used the square for his color studies for one simple reason: the square is the obvious presence of Man, i.e. humanity. Thus, we have chosen the cube as the ideal geometry to satisfy the two fundamental demands of the project: respect and preserve the endangered Floridian landscape; provide a home whose exterior representation is anonymous, distant and detached, yet the austerity of the exterior is corrupted by an internal domestic complexity which celebrates a life dedicated to joy, passion & family.

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C C D C

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D O M A I N

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Required Massing in Site

Volume Lowered per existing

Volume cut at Flood Level

Insertion

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C C D C

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level 2 +10.5 m

roof +14 m

ground +3.5 m

level 1 +7 m

basement -3.5 m

patio 0m


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cube

interior

levels stairs split levels core

base

CCdC

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C C D C

Process Casa Cubo de Corte, which will find its home along Lake Tarpon, in Tarpon Springs, Florida and will exists in an environment which has managed to remain intact from the multiple housing booms and bust, which have become as much a part of Florida’s culture, as its beaches, Disney World and High school football. CCdC’s site is one of the few parcels on the Gulf in which one can still experience Florida’s indigenous vegetation, flora and wildlife. In an effort to satisfy conflicting desires: anonymous vs. domestic; engaged vs. foreign; respectful vs. iconic, we have studied countless interpretations of the cube, in effort to achieve the multitude of desires with one shape. The 14m cube has achieved this ambition. Casa Cubo de Corte The activities of the CCdC, circulation, functions, services, events, and density are hidden within a form that at once appears to be known, but is not. CCdC’s urban strategy consists of a concreted encrusted cube that sits as a foreign yet respectful visitor in an environment, with the sole ambition to simply provide a viewing platform amid the sublime chaos of a raw environment. The entrance into CCdC is uncomfortably torn from the lush tropical plane, to create an intimate threshold between the known and unknown: a gateway into an autonomous architectural heterotopia in constant levitation.

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D O M A I N

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We have carefully studied, the existing contorts of the site, so the building can ‘drop’ into a position, which understands the demands of coastal living, like hurricanes and flooding. CCdC will be the ultimate object of man’s desire to control yet preserve. It is perhaps a new paradigm for our epoch of the anthropocene? At the south edge of the building is the functional core of the building. The core wall has been designed to function both structurally and mechanically as an independent body, thus liberating the domestic space from any technical or structural demands and allowing the interior to be an intense and chaotic demonstration of the domestic. Embracing Nietzsche’s Apollonian and Dionysian dialectic, i.e. rational v. chaotic, the stoic and rigid exterior adheres to the Apollonian archetype, rational- as opposed to the interior, which follows the Dionysian Archetype - chaos - with a large open plan that is strategically punctured to provide a cohesive volume, yet at the same time an ability to accommodate series of smaller conditions that allow for individual discovery and focus regardlessly of others. CCdC turns the necessity of a narrative into the choice for one: allowing the family to be productively lost within the cube, we break apart the seemingly coherent dogma of what is a home and how one must live in a home. Rejecting domesticity from a prescribed ideology or value, the volume is composed to allow for a multitude of complexities, desires, interests, and needs.

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N o L a b o u r / A l l Wo r k

Even the most modest survey of the current political discourse would quickly reveal that we as a society are lost. It seems we have exhausted our available resources and systems for civic discussions and have reduced all ‘discourse’ to slogans, insults, and hyperbole. Perhaps it is due to the fact that overwhelming majority of the world is ‘proletariat’, but no longer think or behaves as such. The lack of true alternatives or new frameworks to understand the current modes of production has led us to a society which cannot find a way forward. Both the left and the right are guilty of not providing a way forward: the former clings to the benefits of a neo-liberal life style, i.e. consumption without guilt, whereas the right has simply given up and to quote the 90’s rap metal band, Rage Against the Machine, have reduced their part line to: “fuck you I won’t do what you tell me”. How Ironic, it is now

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the far right that demands for new regimes and ideologies whilst the left clings to the very institutions which they waged war on in the late 1960’s. At this moment, perhaps the most profound action we could take is to simply stop…. STOP. We must stop, the same way one would profess their own ignorance when debating Socrates, after he had exposed their argument false, which then led to the adversary to become paralyzed by their own confusion. However, this profession of ignorance, “I do not Know” was a necessary first step in a process to achieve the impossible…enlightenment. Collectively we are all confused, without the benefit of being brought to such a feeling of despair by Socrates. Even without the wise guidance of Socrates and his namesake method, we should all, at this moment, say out loud: I DO NOT KNOW.

So where do we begin? Perhaps we start with the rise of the machine, technology and information. The process technology has created a new route out, which the remnants of the old left – and all other forces influenced by it – have either to embrace or die. Capitalism, it turns out, will not be abolished by forced-march techniques. It will be abolished by creating something more dynamic then that exists, at first, almost unseen within the old system, but which will break through, reshaping the economy around new values and behaviors. This is called post-capitalism. As with the end of feudalism 500 years ago, capitalism’s replacement by post-capitalism will be accelerated by external shocks and shaped by the emergence of a new kind of human being. And it has started. Post-capitalism is possible because of three major changes information technology has brought about in the past 25 years.


First, it has reduced the need for work, blurred the edges between work and free time and loosened the relationship between work and wages. The coming wave of automation, currently stalled because our social infrastructure cannot bear the consequences, will hugely diminish the amount of work needed – not just to subsist but to provide a decent life for all. Second, information is corroding the market’s ability to form prices correctly. That is because markets are based on scarcity while information is abundant. The system’s defense mechanism is to form monopolies – the giant tech companies – on a scale not seen in the past 200 years, yet they cannot last. By building business models and share valuations based on the capture and privatization of all socially produced information, such firms are constructing a fragile corporate edifice at odds with the most basic need of humanity, which is to use ideas freely. Third, we’re seeing the spontaneous rise

of collaborative production: goods, services and organizations are appearing that no longer respond to the dictates of the market and the managerial hierarchy. The biggest information product in the world – Wikipedia – is made by volunteers for free, abolishing the encyclopedia business and depriving the advertising industry of an estimated $3bn a year in revenue. How does this effect architecture and architects? How will our cities be effected? What tools will we need? How will new modes of production and labor effect not only what we make, but how we make…or even more radical how we actually manifest our very ideas? Hegel’s radical break from traditional philosophy began with his notion of Historical Materialism and its relation to freedom. Hegel argued that freedom is the thing that makes you a human being; without freedom, one cannot be a human. Since each generation will have their own struggles and

wars to overcome that will liberate them from oppression, every generation will have to define freedom for themselves. This is important for architecture as well. Each generation of architects must define what is architecture for them; Our generation is in desperate need of definition, which addresses the true complexity of our times. Our current world is built on a foundation of profit and growth. Our urbanism—and the infrastructure and architecture with which it is constructed, including the tens of millions of homes spread thin across the landscape—is the result of a centuries-old economic system. And that system has consistently sought to segregate sites of labor and production from sites of dwelling. So, the impending end of work raises the most fundamental questions about what it means to be human. To begin with, what

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purposes could we choose if the job – economic necessity – didn’t consume most of our waking hours and creative energies? What evident yet unknown possibilities would then appear? How would human nature itself change as the ancient, aristocratic privilege of leisure becomes the birthright of human beings as such? Sigmund Freud insisted that love and work were the essential ingredients of healthy human being. Of course, he was right. But can love survive the end of work as the willing partner of the good life? Can we let people get something for nothing and still treat them as our brothers and sisters – as members of a beloved community? Can you imagine the moment when you’ve just met an attractive stranger at a party, or you’re online looking for someone, anyone, but you don’t ask: ‘So, what do you do?’

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R I O R DA N RANCH N A P A

VA L L E Y ,

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DOWN

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100’ 50’ 25’ 10’ 0’

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R I O R D A N

R A N C H

In 2017, The Riordan Family commissioned DOMAIN Office to design a new home for their family on a 2 acre parcel located in the city of Napa, in Napa Valley, California. DOMAIN has designed barn like ranch which is deformed per programmatic, environmental, and performance desires. The result is a form that is both foreign and recognisable. The Riordan Ranch is located in the city of Napa, which was founded in 1847. It is the largest city and county seat of Napa County, California, and neighbour to some of the most prestigious vineyards in the world. It serves as the county seat for one of the world’s Great Wine Capitals. However, for the past 30 to 40 years, the City of Napa has been in transition. Historically the city was a sleepy town known more for its heavy industrial manufacturing facilities and a State Hospital; today’s workforce is mostly white collar and the economy is increasingly based on tourism. Today Napa is a vibrant and modern town. The site sits at the edge of the literal border between this transform: from agricultural to urban. The site has a unique opportunity to negotiate two extremes: living v. production. In order to allow for the two extremes, urban v. agriculture to co-exist and not blur the edges, a series of ecological, urban, and performative studies resulted in an ‘urban’ framework that dictated were we could build and what would be left for agricultural production.

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D O M A I N

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In essence, the site would mimic the larger context in which is resides: the absurd proximity between living and producing. We have used two existing principles to drive the overall planning of the site: ecological regulations and the existing home. Regarding the former, via a rigours mapping exercise, we were able to define the different zones of engagement, i.e. none to full design. The existing home has been used to derive the basic module of the home, as to create a formal continuity throughout the site. Located in a rural setting, a pavilion in the woods, the building is both introverted and extroverted: each space has a relationship either to the internal platform or to the surrounding greenery and agriculture, while certain moments provide views of the Napa Valley Vineyards. With a pitched roof and a consistent floor level the new home shows a respect for the existing structure. Instead of a series of isolated rooms, the building is designed as a sequence of pavilions that create clearly distinguished area - an arrangement that minimises the need for corridors and hallways and allows the rooms to flow. The plan has been organised for the spaces to feel casual, almost carefree, allowing one to feel at ease and at home. At the same time the design also provides spaces for more personal moments - either in the intimate setting of the bedrooms, or in smaller nooks and private spaces.

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R I O R D A N

R A N C H

1) The logic of the existing home is extended as a central bar with a gable roof. The bar serves as the primary public spine of the new residence.

PA RE N

PO O

L

TS

2) The central bar is kinked to react to the shape of the site as well as views and sunlight.

CARPARK

CHILDREN

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3) The central bar is contaminated with perpendicular side bars - reacting to necessary programs, solar orientation, and views.


D O M A I N

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4) The resulting geometry is new and unfamiliar - derived through various contextual and performative considerations.

5) The 5 enclosed volumes create an inherent urbanism in the site - a composition of individual parts.

6) Each volume is equipped with a central utility core with housing services such as bathrooms, storage, and mechanical rooms.

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R I O R D A N

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P roje c ts (20 1 2 - 2 0 1 8 ) Th e Box S yr ac use, New Yo r k (2 0 1 8 ) Print Hub, Constr u c t i o n. 1 0 0 m2 Riordan Ranc h Napa California, United States (2017) Residential. 600m2

Tampa Tower Tampa, Florida (2016) Mix-use. Visual Concept. 54, 000 m2

L osa Rota M use o de A r t e L im a ; L im a , Per u (2 0 1 6 ) C o mpe t i t i on . 6, 400 m 2

Tropicana Field St. Petersburg, United States. Urban, Masterplan. 85 Acres PA125 New York City, United States. (2015) Office. 80, 000 m2

200 Central Tampa, Flor ida ( 20 1 6 ) Master plan. Visual C o nc e pt . 1 5 0 , 0 0 0 m2

Proje ct Seoul Seoul, South Korea. (2015) Masterplanning. 10.3 million m2

Det roit E ast Rive r f ront D etr o it, USA (2016) Master plan. 100 acr e s

The Rural City Marfa, United States (2014) Urban, Housing. 3, 900 m2

Datum Dorrance County, Pennsylvania (ongoing) Industrial. 2, 130 m2

Roma Contro Rome Rome, Italy. (2015) Urban. 43, 000 m2

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Macro Plaza Monterrey, Mexico (2015) Urban, Office. 170, 000 m2

PLANTA Lleida, Spain (2013) Culture. 13, 500 m2

C CdC Tarpon Springs, USA (2015) Housing 630 m2

C CC Chemelot, The Netherlands (2013) Education, Office. 14, 700 m2

Planta Exhibition Venice, Italy (2014) Culture, Exhibition. 250 m2

Twin Towers Tianjin, China (2013) Housing. 120, 000 m2

Paco Park Sao Bernardo do Campo, Brazil (2014) Masterplanning. 1, 1 million m2

X LW9 Tianjin, China (2013) Urban, Housing. 800, 000 m2

BMW - FIZ FUTURE Munich, Germany (2014) Office, Manufacturing. 2 million m2 Shenzhen Energy Shenzhen, P.R.C. Urban, Masterplan. 1.8 m2

Building Z Antwerp, Belgium (2012) Education. 8, 000 m2 TPMC Taipei, Taiwan (2009) Culture, Education. 114, 750 m2

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P ublications (authore d )

Ac a de m ic R e se a rch R e p o rts (e dit or )

2017 “On Process” STRAND Conference Journal (December 2017, issue 04)

2018 Syracuse University School of Architecture Thesis Publication

2016 “The Need for (re)Definition” STRAND Conference Journal (December 2016, issue 04) 2016 “Being There” in IN Chicago (March 2016, issue 01) 2016 “Decline” in In Chicago (March 2016, issue 01) 2015 “Complex Projects” in DOMUS (June 2015, issue 992) pp 06-09 2015 “Ambitions” in Complex Projects Manual (vol 2, issue 01) 2014 “Complex Projects” in Complex Projects Manual (vol 1, issue 01)

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2016 IN Chicago: Decline (Delft: TU Delft & ARCHEWORKS, 2016) 2014 Southworks: Projects (Delft: TU Delft, 2014) 2014 VCA 2014: Mumbai Research Book (Delft: TU Delft, 2014) 2014 Architecture of Violence: Borders Atlas (Delft: TU Delft, 2014) 2013 VCA 2013: Hanoi Research Book (Delft: TU Delft, 2013) 2013 Midwest Studio: The Midstad (Delft: TU Delft, 2013) 2012 Midwest Studio: Midwest Atlas (Delft: TU Delft, 2012)


Exhibitions & Le c ture s (curate d / mo d erat e d)

Se le ct e d P re ss & Inte r v i ew s

2018 “St. Pete... Next”, Studio620, St. Petersburg, Florida

2017 “Slice of Life: Mitesh Dixit”, Daily Orange, Syracuse, NY (December 5, 2017)

2018 “Material Contours”, Syracuse University, School of Architecture, Syracuse, NY

2017 “POSIT Live with Mitesh Dixit”, Syracuse, NY (October 19, 2017)

2015

“SOM & Legacy”, Chicago, Illinois

2015 “Critical Regionalism... Still” Chicago, Illinois 2015

“In Chicago”, Chicago, Illinois

2014 “PLANTA” 14th International Architecture Exhibition of teh Biennale di Venezia, Venice, Italy 2013 “Light, Structure, Em20ergence”, Delft, NL 2012

“Everything Ages”, Delft NL

2012 “The Direction of Being Lost... the work of 2x4”, Delft NL

2017 “Conversation with Mitesh Dixit”, IAM (February 2017. volume 10, edition 1): 04-13 2017 “Process”, ARHITEK (January 2017. volume 07, edition 1) 2016 “Morning Interview”, Good Morning Niš (December 01, 2016) 2015 “Morning Wall”, B Nieuws (September 2015. volume 49, edition 2): 06-11 2014 “The Top 25 Exhibitions to Visit”, Wallpaper Magazine (May 2014) 2014 “PLANTA”, DOMUS (September 2014, issue 983) : 40-43 2012 “Everything ages”, B Nieuws (September 2012. volume 46, edition 12): 08-11

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Exhibitions & Hon o ur s 2017 President of the Jury “On Architecture” International Competition, STRAND 2017 “CCdC”, STRAND Conference, Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Belgrade, Serbia 2015 “In Chicago”, ARCHEWORKS Chicago, USA 2015 “Decline”, Inaugural Chicago Architecture Biennale 2014 The Top 25 Exhibitions 2014, Wallpaper Magazine 2014 “Planta”, 14th International Architecture Exhibition of the Biennale di Venezia 2014 France

“Paco Park”, MIPIM 2014, Cannes,

2014 “Cities & Visions”, FRAC Centre, Orleans, France 2014 Vertical Cities Asia Design Competition - 2nd Place 2013 Vertical Cities Asia Design Competition - 2nd Place Design 2012 “Everything Ages”, TU Delft Faculty of Architecture, Delft, NL 2012 Vertical Cities Asia Design Competition - First Place

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2012 Distinguished Alumni, DePaul University Magazine 2011 Vertical Cities Asia Design Competition - 2nd Place Design Competition 1998 Inducted into Pi Sigma Alpha, National Political Science Honour Society 1998 Inducted into Phi Sigma Tua, National Philosophy Honour Society


I nv ite d Juror 2018 University American College, Skopje, Macedonia

2014 Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia, Barcelona, Spain

2017 Serbia

2014

Faculty of Architecture, Belgrade,

2017 Faculty of Architecture, Skopje, Macedonia 2017 Harvard University Graduate - C. Waldheim Advance Studio 2017 University of Cincinnati DAAP, Cincinnati, Ohio 2017 Syracuse University Schol of Architecture, Syracuse, New York 2016 Filozofski Fakultet, Skopje Univerzitet, Skopje, Macedonia 2016 University of Niš, Faculty of Civil Engineering & Architecture, Niš , Serbia 2016 Universidad de Monterrey, Monterrey, Mexico 2016 University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 2016 University of Florida School of Architecture, Gainesville, Florida 2016 GSAPP - Columbia University, New York, New York 2015 Tecnológico de Monterrey, Monterrey, Mexico

The Berlage, Delft, The Netherlands

2014 Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri 2014

AOA Mumbai, Mumbai, India

2014 Kamala Raheja Vidhyanidhi Institute for Architecture, Mumbai, India 2013 School of the Art Institute in Chicago , Chicago, Illinois 2013 Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 2013 University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 2013 University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 2013 Virgina Tech University, The Chicago Studio, Chicago, Illinois 2012 Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri 2012 National University of Singapore, Singapore 2012 Politechnika Slaska Technical Institute, Warsaw, Poland 2006 University of California, Berkeley, California

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I nv ite d Public Le ct ure s 2018 “After Marx: Material Contours”, University American Collage, Skopje, Macedonia 2017 “Principles of Housing”, 2nd Year students, Faculty of Architecture, Belgrade, Serbia 2017 “After Marx: Material Contours”, Faculty of Architecture, Belgrade, Serbia 2017 “The Need for (re)Definition”, Faculty of Architecture, Skopje, Macedonia 2017 “NO Scale”, Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Belgrade, Serbia - Key Note 2017 “The Need for (re)Definition”, STRAND Conference, Belgrade, Serbia Keynote 2017 “The Need for Definition”, University of Cincinnati DAAP,Cincinnati, Ohio 2017 “Process”, Studio 620, St. Petersburg, Florida 2016 “Violence”, Knjižara Karver, Podgrica, Montenegro 2016 “Death of Modernity”, Kolarceve, Belgrade, Serbia 2016 “Process”, Filozofski Fakultet, Skopje Univerzitet, Skopje, Macedonia

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2016 Serbia

“Freedom”, FABRICA, Novi Sad,

2016 “Failure”, University of Niš Faculty of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Niš ,Serbia 2016 “On Heritage”, KreNi2 Conference, Niš, Serbia 2016 “On Process”, Universidad de Monterrey, Monterrey, Mexico 2016 “Freedom”, ARCHEWORKS, Chicago, Illinois 2016 “On Process”, GSAPP - Columbia University, New York, New York 2015 “On Process”, Hangyang University, Seoul, South Korea 2015 “The Need for Definition”, Korea National University of Arts, Seoul, South Korea 2015 “The Need for Definition”, Universidad de Monterrey, Monterrey, Mexico 2015 “On Process”, Tecnológico de Monterrey, Monterrey, Mexico 2015 “The Need for Definition”, MOVIEMENT, Barcelona, Spain 2015 “The Death of Modernity”, MOVIEMENT, Barcelona , Spain


2015 “On Cities”, Scapes.Lab. Think BG, Belgrade, Serbia

2013 “No Scale”, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California

2014 “Theory & Praxis”, Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia, Barcelona, Spain

2013

2014 “Complex Projects”, The Berlage, Delft, The Netherlands 2014 “An Introduction to Critical Theory” la Biennale di Venezia, Venice, Italy 2014 “On Process”, University of Venice, Venice, Italy 2014 “The Intellectual Crisis”, The Berlage, Delft, The Netherlands 2014 “The Need for Definition”, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri 2013 “On Process”, Virginia Tech University - The Chicago Studio, Chicago, Illinois 2013 “No Scale”, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 2013 “On Process”, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 2013 “No Scale”, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois

“No Scale”,SOM, Chicago, Illinois

2013 “No Scale”, AOA Mumbai, Mumbai, India 2013 “No Scale”, Kamala Raheja Vidhyanidhi Institute for Architecture, Mumbai, India 2013 “Complex Projects” School of the Art Institute in Chicago , Chicago, Illinois 2012 “The Death of Modernity”, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands 2012 “Hyper-Urbanism”, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri 2012 “Everything Ages”, National University of Singapore, Singapore 2012 “No Scale”, Politechnika Slaska Technical Institute, Warsaw, Poland 2012 “6x6x6”, DePaul University, Chicago, Illinois 2011 “6x6x6”, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri

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Mitesh Dixit

Mitesh Dixit is an archite ct, philosopher, e ducator, and note d public sp e aker with wide interest in the inter se ction of design with gover nment p olicy, so ciety, and culture. In 2012, Dixit founde d D OMAI N Office, an archite cture and urbanism studio base d in Belgrade, Serbia and Sy racuse, New York. Dixit’s cur rent rese arch is fo cuse d on ter ritorial investigations in the are a that is cur rently define d as the Balkans. The rese arch intends to do cuments the inter se ction of conf licting ide ologies at sp e cific moments in the region, to obje ctively illustrate the effe cts of ide olog y in the transfor mations of the built environment. Previously, Dixit was on the faculty of T U D elft in the Netherlands as a visiting professor of archite cture and urbanism. There, he also ser ve d

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as e ditor for the Chair of Complex Proje cts and help e d to develop cur riculum. Throughout 2016, Dixit le cture d inter nationally, conducte d workshops, and seminar s on b ehalf of the US D ep artment of State. After completing under graduate and graduate work in p olitics and philosophy, Dixit complete d the master of archite cture from the Washington Univer sity in St. Louis and then b egan his care er at the San Francisco office of Skidmore, O wings, and Mer rill. Prior to D OMAI N, Dixit worke d with Rem Ko olhaas’ Office for Metrop olitan Archite cture as a proje ct le ader. While at OMA, Dixit le d multiple inter national proje cts, such as the MahaNaKhon Tower in Bangkok, Holland Gre en in London, East Blo ck 30 in Cairo, and the Kuala Lumpur Financial District in Malay sia.


S and ra Subic

Sandra Subić le ads the Belgrade studio and ser ves as the Cre ative Dire ctor for D OMAI N. Op erating at the inter se ction of archite cture, fashion, fabrication and graphic design, Subić has fo cuse d her crossdisciplinar y appro ach within the re alm of sp atial design, bringing together the rese arch foundations of anthrop olog y, design rese arch, and archite ctural and art histor y. Subić complete d a Bachelor D egre e in Archite cture from the Faculty of Archite cture, Univer sity of Belgrade and Master of archite cture from the Royal D anish Academy of Fine Arts, in Cop enhagen, D enmark. Subić

b egan her care er at Fo olscap Studio, an indep endent cross-disciplinar y design practice in Melb our ne, Australia. Prior to D OMAI N, Subić worke d for the Neri & Hu D esign and Rese arch Office in Shanghai, China. Subić worke d on multiple inter national proje cts, publications, and exhibition designs, as well as le ading the conceptual development for various cultural and commercial hospitality proje cts. She worke d as a lighting designer for The F laming Be acon, and later as an interior archite ct Sandra has since worke d on a numb er of self-initiate d design proje cts in Belgrade, Serbia.

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DOMAIN Office Recent Works Issue #2 Belgrade, Serbia 2018 Editor in Chief: Mitesh Dixit Editor: Sandra Subić Art Director: Sandra Subić Research Team: Floris van Burght Alice Colombo George Distefano Ezekiel J. Fairbanks Katharina E. Köerber Roland Reemaa Hrvoje Smidihen Fabienne Tjia Davi F. Weber James Westcott Tim Clemmons Eric LaMunion Brian Poling Text Editors: Davi F. Weber James Westcott Graphic Design: DOMAIN Office

Typeface: Linux Libertine Linux Libertine Light Garamond Paper: Arctic Paper G-Print 130 Bulk 1.0 Publisher: Galak Galaksijanis Sijanis Publishers, Nîs, Serbia Contributers: SOM SF Syracuse University School of Architecture CMG Landscape US Embassy Serbia States Department United States FORMAT Enginers Special Thanks: Brian Lee, FAIA - SOM Dean Prof. Michael Speaks - Syracuse University Associate Dean Prof. Julia Czerniak - Syracuse University Reinier de Graaf - OMA Prof. Charles Waldheim - Harvard Graduate School of Design


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DOMAIN OFFICE Sele cte d Works


The office works internationally on projects ranging from residential to public buildings and masterplans. Its work has been presented at the Venice Architectural Biennale (2014), Franc Centre in Orleans Museum (2014), and MIPIM Conference in Canes, France (2014), The National University of Singapore (2012), and the Inaugural Chicago Architectural Biennale (2015). DOMAIN has been in numerous publications including Domus, Metropolis Magazine, and Wallpaper.

S e l e c t e d Wo r k s

DOMAIN operates within the contemporary art realm and has collaborated with artists such as Wim Wenders, Armin Linke, Vincent de Rijk, Ari Versluis (Exactitudes) and Antonio Lopez Garcia, as well as curators including Chris Dercon and Julio Vaquero.

DOMAIN OFFICE

DOMAIN is an architecture and urbanism studio based in Belgrade, Serbia and Syracuse, New York, led by Mitesh Dixit and Sandra Subić. DOMAIN deliberately works without a manifesto or agenda, but insists on a method that explores the very nature of a question. We aim to discover ‘new’ questions, as opposed to recycling existing solutions. Our method of investigation transcends scale. We describe this method as ‘unpacking' - exposing the multiple layers, the hard & soft, the physical & critical in order to identify new hierarchies or hidden actors. This process demands an intense investigation into the local, an abject surrender to the existing, and the rejection of any singular ‘vision’.

Profile for DOMAIN Office

DOMAIN Works 2016-2018  

DOMAIN Works 2016-2018  

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