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GAME OF THRONES GOES BROADWAY

THE NEW FACE OF HEART SURGERY

Dominican Republics’ Best Golf Resorts

Graphic Photos

New Medical Technology Can Change Heart Surgery Surprise Inside


She wants to show you what she has on.


CONTENTS March 2013

Heart Surgery New Technology

140

What if you were faced with a grim decision -- risk your life by having surgery, or shorten your life by not having surgery? B y: C o r e y W i l k s

Google’s Lary Page 126

Lary page has guided Google to the top of the market in many areas and we will see what he says about going all out. B y: W i l l i a m B r au d

How Yahoo Blew It 132

Yahoo has struggled for the last decade in trying to keep its users and had made a horible corporate decision. B y: S a r a h D u n n

Heart Surgery New Technology 140

What if you were faced with a grim decision -- risk your life by having surgery, or shorten your life by not having surgery?

B y: C o r e y W i l k s

Zany Art of Marques Hudson 144

Yahoo has struggled for the last decade in trying to keep its users and had made a horible corporate decision. B y: J o s h S t e i n

Heart Surgery Technology 132

Los Angeles Union Station

122

Yahoo has struggled for the last decade in trying to keep its users and had made a horible corporate decision.

Yahoo has struggled for the last decade in trying to keep its users and had made a horible corporate decision.

B y: S a r a h D u n n

B y: S a r a h D u n n

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EDITOR IN CHIEF SARI ANNE TUSCHMAN GROUP PUBLISHER ALISON MILLER DEPUTY EDITOR KATHRYN ROMEYN SENIOR MANAGING EDITOR DEBORAH L. MARTIN ART DIRECTOR FRYDA LIDOR FASHION AND ACCESSORIES EDITOR REBECCA MALINSKY ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR JULIE BENSMAN BEAUTY EDITOR ANNE-MARIE GUARNIERI PHOTO EDITOR ELIZABETH HAZARD SENIOR COPY EDITOR WENDIE PECHARSKY RESEARCH EDITOR LEANNE PHILIP ART ASSOCIATE ART DIRECTORS LOU CORREDOR, HAMILTON HENDRICK, JESSICA SARRO, ANASTASIA TSIOUTAS DESIGNERS GIL FONTIMAYOR, JENNIFER LEDBURY SENIOR DIGITAL IMAGING SPECIALIST JEFFREY SPITERY DIGITAL IMAGING SPECIALIST JEREMY DEVERATURDA FASHION FASHION AND ACCESSORIES EDITORS MADALYN ROTHMAN, AMANDA WEINER FASHION AND ACCESSORIES ASSISTANT HILLARY BARBAKOFF PHOTO PHOTO EDITORS LISA ROSENTHAL BADER, LAUREN EISENBERG, JODIE LOVE PHOTO ASSISTANT KIMBERLY RIORDAN COPY COPY EDITORS JENNIFER DEMERITT, TOM GOTTLIEB, JULIA STEINER RESEARCH RESEARCH EDITORS MEGHAN BLALOCK, CHRISTOPHER BUONINCONTRI, JOSEPHINE CUSUMANO MARKET MANAGERS TINA POZZI, KATIE SURNOW ASSOCIATE MARKET MANAGER JANE KELLOGG SENIOR FEATURES EDITOR LAURIE BROOKINS SHELTER AND DESIGN EDITOR SUE HOSTETLER TIMEPIECE EDITOR ROBERTA NAAS SPECIAL PROJECTS, WEST COAST JEFF VESPA PHOTO ASSISTANT AT LARGE ANDREA COLLINS ONLINE EXECUTIVE ONLINE EDITOR INGRID SKJONG ONLINE PRODUCER JANA FLYNN ONLINE MARKET EDITOR MICHELLE WARD EMAIL MARKETING COORDINATOR BRIGID TOUEY ASSISTANT ONLINE EDITOR APRIL WALLOGA ASSISTANT ONLINE PRODUCER ANNA BEN YEHUDA NATIONAL SALES VP, ADVERTISING SALES/NATIONAL ACCOUNTS SUZANNE RUFFA ACCOUNT DIRECTORS SUSAN ABRAMS, MICHELE ADDISON, KATHLEEN FLEMING, DINA FRIEDMAN, SALES ASSISTANTS ANA BLAGOJEVIC, CATHERINE FLANAGAN, JENNIFER HUNHOLZ MARKETING AND PROMOTIONS VP, MARKETING LANA BERNSTEIN BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR ROBIN KEARSE BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANT HEATHER MAROLDA MARKETING AND EVENTS MANAGER EUNICE KIM EVENT MARKETING DIRECTOR JOANNA TUCKER DIRECTOR, CREATIVE PROJECTS SCOTT ROBSON PROMOTIONS ART DIRECTOR MORGAN REARDON PROMOTIONS ART ASSISTANT JESSICA CANTOR MARKET RESEARCH CHAD HARDWOOD NICHE MEDIA HOLDINGS, LLC PRESIDENT, CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER KATHERINE NICHOLLS VICE PRESIDENT, CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER JOHN P. KUSHNIR DIRECTOR, EXECUTIVE OPERATIONS MICHAEL CAPACE EXECUTIVE OFFICE AND FACILITIES MANAGER MATTHEW STEWART Senion Maverick Brian Abeer FOUNDING EDITOR RANDY DUNBAR EDITORIAL DIRECTOR STEVE REEVES

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Tomorrow’s technology...today Code magazine is your way into a new world of tech gear, science, entertainment, design and more...

magazine

www.code.com 6

CODE | March 2013


Welcome! C

ode magazine has become the gift that just won’t stop giving. In this issue we look into the new technologies that the medical field has to offer, specifically in the arena of heart surgery. While I seek to inform and enlighten everyone reading this issue, I also want to warn you. This issue has some shocking images and information that I feel is necessary. Before I became the editor in chief of Code Magazine I worked in the entertainment business for several years as a prop master. One show that I always remember working on was called Crossing Jordan. While at crossing Jordan, as a prop master, I was responsible for allof the blood and guts that this show was all so famous for. Never did I once think that I would one day be holding a real heart in my hands. There I was in the medical assets wing of Cedar Sinai Medical Center, holding a real human heart in my hands. I visited the hospital to gather information for the cover story of this month’s issue. While there listening to the doctor and trying to take notes, it dawned on me. I thought, “Wow, how fragile the human body is”. Holding that persons heart in my hands helped me realize that we all are just that fragile. We could be a few beats away from, well, you know. I found it a must to try and put you, the reader in that place where I was. I think in reading this issue and seeing the graphic images in our cover story, that you will come to realize how precious and fragile our lives are. I hope these stories inform and enlighten you as much as they do for me. And if you ever get a chance to go see an actual human heart in person, go do it! It can be life changing.

Dominique James Editor-in-Chief Code Magazine

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CODE | Feb 2013


OPEN

H0 2

Distilled?

Spring? Purified?

Libation

Epicuria

Sojourn

Culturati

O

What’s in the water, what isn’t, and how it tastes play a role in deciding which to use. By Chanie Kirschner Photograph By Micheal Boen

Water is the chemical substance with chemical for-

mula H2O: one molecule of water has two hydrogen

atoms covalently bonded to a single oxygen atom

S

trictly speaking, water is water. That is to say, all water on Earth is a compound of two hydrogen and one oxygen molecule. The difference between various types of bottled waters lies mainly in where the source is located and what processes the water goes through before it is sold to consumers. Not all bottled waters are recommended for drinking, so it is important to know the difference if your health plan includes increasing water intake or avoiding certain types of beverages. Some types of bottled water, such as well or spring, get their designation from their original source. Mineral water must contain a specified amount of trace minerals natural and clean.

9


OFat PEN Epicuria

-N-

Juicy

New Research On Fat and The Effect On the Brain

N

o offense, but you have a fat head! About two-thirds of your brain is composed of fats. But not just any kind. Your brain cells require very specialized fats – the same ones that built the brains of your prehistoric ancestors and enabled them to learn and evolve at such a fast rate. These same fats are even now being incorporated into the very structure of your brain. Your brain cells require very specialized fats – the same ones that built the brains of your prehistoric ancestors and enabled them to learn and evolve at such a fast rate. These same fats are even now being incorporated into the very structure of your brain. Your brain cells require very specialized fats – the same ones that built the brains of your prehistoric ancestors and enabled them to learn and evolve at such a fast rate. These same fats are even now being incorporated into the very structure of your brain.

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CODE | March 2013


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CODE | March 2013


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O

PEN Sojourn

Travel

The Dominican Republic’s

10 Best Golf Resorts

Punta

Sosau

Cana Resort

Plum Resort

Know for Beautiful

Know for Beautiful

Sunsets and Great Food.

Punta

Punta

Cana Resort

6

T

Know for Beautiful

Sunsets and Great Food.

7

he PUNTACANA Hotel is located on the beach in Punta Cana’s Bavaro Beach neighborhood, close to Indigenous Eyes Ecological Park and Reserve, Indigenous Eyes Ecological Park, and Corales Golf Course. La Cana Golf Course is also a point of interest near this golf resort. Dining options at The PUNTACANA Hotel include 6 restaurants. A poolside bar and a bar/lounge are open for drinks. Room service is available during limited hours. The resort serves a complimentary buffet breakfast. Recreational amenities include a golf course. Also located on site are an outdoor pool, a children’s pool.

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CODE | March 2013

Know for Beautiful

Know for Beautiful

Sunsets and Great Food.

Sunsets and Great Food.

4

5

3

Cana Resort Know for Beautiful

Punta

Cana Resort

Sunsets and Great Food.

2 Sunsets and Great Food.

Punta

Cana Resort

Know for Beautiful

coconut trees and sky.

1

Punta

Cana Resort

Punta

Punta

Punta

Cana Resort

Cana Resort

Cana Resort

Know for Beautiful

Sunsets and Great Food.

8

Know for Beautiful

Sunsets and Great Food.

9

Know for Beautiful

Sunsets and Great Food.

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O

PEN Culturati

H

udson Marquez is one of the most gifted raconteurs I’ve ever met. He has the kind of gift for gab that only comes from living a nomadic life peppered with thorny characters. His voice is loud but oddly soothing, with just the gentlest Louisiana lilt. Hudson has a salty tongue, and appears to have no internal filter. He’s not concerned with political correctness. He is possessed of a raw honesty that is tempered by an immense capacity for compassion. He’s hilarious and poignant, often at the same time. On top of all that, he’s a bloody brilliant artist. I’ve only ever met one other person like that, my grandfather. I pretty much fell in love with Hudson right away.

The glorious “series of tubes” that is the internet has been woefully negligent in chronicling the life of Hudson Marquez. Oh sure, if you Google his name, a plethora of things come up, but you only get snapshots of the man. You’ll see that he was one of the key figures in the Ant Farm

16

CODE | March 2013

The Zany Art

of Marquez Hudson

art collective who designed and erected Cadillac Ranch. You may find a link to some archived footage from the groundbreaking work he did with TVTV. You’ll stumble upon various exhibitions of his paintings over the years. You may be able to dig up a screenwriting credit or an audio interview in which Hudson recounts his yearlong effort to pluck Professor Longhair out of obscurity. But there’s no Wikipedia page, there’s no website, no one place where you can go to get a comprehensive understanding of the man’s life and accomplishments. Maybe that’s just because it would be too daunting a task. You might neglect to mention that he designed shoes for Bette Midler, was the tour manager for Canned Heat, or that he produced a Gene Taylor record with Dave Alvin (of The Blasters). The man has done a lot, and without being too obnoxious about saying so. Hudson’s paintings are brimming with acer-

bic wit, and have vintage comic roots, echoing the work of Chester Gould, Al Capp and maybe a bit of Reverend Howard Finster. They are filled with deceptively simple, genius little touches; sweat popping off one figure, the swaying hips indicated by simple black lines in another, or the snaky white pattern on a shirt. Hudson’s latest exhibit, “High Humidity“, an ode to New Orleans, opens January 4th, 2013 at La Luz De Jesus, so it seemed like a good time to sit down with the man and try to scan the expanse of his oeuvre, and chat about the new work. It ended up taking two sessions, and I still didn’t get to ask him everything I wanted. Fine by me, it gives me an excuse to hang out with him again. ry 4th, 2013 at La Luz De Jesus, so it seemed like a good time to sit down with the man and try to scan the expanse ry 4th, so the expanse . there’s no website, no one place where you can go to get a comprehensive understanding of the.


New Must-Have Gadgets New iMac Ones et, iur sam as autemos explaut es evernatem quid qui officiis expelibus ea perion nam, veror simet

Beat Speakers Ones et, iur sam as autemos explaut es evernatem quid qui officiis expelibus ea perion nam, veror simet eum rest, sinverum nusament repudipsam eic tem

iPod Dock Ones et, iur sam as autemos explaut es evernatem quid qui officiis expelibus

Watch T.V. Ones et, iur sam as autemos explaut es evernatem quid qui officiis expelibus ea perion nam, veror simet eum rest, sinverum nusa-


PlayStation 4 Ones et, iur sam as autemos explaut es evernatem quid qui officiis expelibus ea perion nam, veror simet

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iPhone Lense Ones et, iur sam as autemos explaut es evernatem quid qui officiis expelibus ea perion nam, veror simet

Tech Shoes Ones et, iur sam as autemos explaut es evernatem quid qui officiis expelibus ea perion nam, veror simet eum rest,


CODE | Feb 2013


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Heart

SurgEry What if you were faced with a grim decision – risk your life by having surgery, or shorten your life by not having surgery? CODE | Feb 2013


New Medical Technology Can Change Heart Surgery By: Robert Moore Photography by: Mandy Diaz

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N

EW ORLEANS -What if you were faced with a grim decision -- risk your life by having surgery, or shorten your life by not having surgery? That is a decision that heart patients and their families have had to make. But now, new technology is making that decision easy while saving lives. Bill Massey, 81, of Picayune, Miss., has been through lot of health problems with his heart. “It scared me because I couldn’t breathe. I couldn’t get enough breath. I just felt like I was going to die really,” Massey recalls. Since 2009, he’s had a heart attack, congestive heart failure, multiple blockages, stents in the arteries and bypass surgery. You can see his scars and the internal wires holding his chest bone together that remain. He wears the LifeVest, an external defibrillator with paddles, just in case his heart needs to be shocked back into a beating rhythm. But this past fall, when he began having shortness of breath and needed another heart procedure to save his life, doctors said his heart was too weak for surgery. Like Massey, a Covington heart patient has a similar health problem. “He did an angiogram and found that I had two major blockages and, but I was not a candidate for surgery because my heart is very bad,” said Gail DeLeon. DeLeon, 67, had one artery 100 percent blocked, the other 60 percent. No one should face such a grave decision in life -- die from the blockages, or risk dying in the surgery to open them up. Both patients faced an impossible choice. But Massey and DeLeon were in the right place at the right time. Technology offered them a new choice using the world’s smallest heart pump. “It takes some of the load off the heart. It takes some of the load for pumping the blood out of the heart when the heart muscle is weak,” explained Dr. Ali Amkieh, an interventional cardiologist on the Northshore. It’s called the Impella 2.5 by Abiomed. Here’s how it works: During your procedure, a thin catheter is put in a vessel in the groin. Doctors run it all the way up

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CODE | March 2013

No one should face such a grave decision in life -- die from the blockages, or risk dying in the surgery to open them up.


Watch the videos www.code/heartvideos


What if you were faced with a grim decision -- risk your life by having surgery, or shorten your life by not having surgery? That is a decision that heart patients and their families have had to make. But now, new technology is making that decision easy while saving lives. Bill Massey, 81, of Picayune, Miss., has been through a lot of health problems with his heart. “It scared me because I couldn’t breathe. I couldn’t get enough breath. I just felt like I was going to die really,” Massey recalls. Since 2009, he’s had a heart attack, congestive heart failure, multiple block-

It takes some of the load for pumping the blood out of the heart when the heart muscle is weak,” explained Dr. Ali Amkieh, an interventional cardiologist on the Northshore side of town. It’s called the Impella 2.5 by Abiomed. Here’s how it works: During your procedure, a thin catheter is put in a vessel in the groin. Doctors run it all the way up through that vessel and into the heart. On the catheter is a tiny pump that helps make sure enough blood is being

Impella and getting the two arteries open, because one of the arteries is the one they call the widow maker, and it was pretty well blocked,” DeLeon said. Massey said the Impella changed his outlook on life, from having no hope for the future, to one that’s giving him more retirement years to fish and garden back home in Mississippi. “I’m feeling a lot better everyday. I’m going to cardiac rehab twice a week and I’m getting stronger all the time. I’m not

pumped out of the heart, bringing all the organs enough oxygen. That is attached to a machine next the patient in the operating room. Without this pump, the patients weak heart muscle is just not strong enough to do the job during surgery. The Impella was approved by the FDA in 2008 but is still not common practice in hospitals. Massey and DeLeon were the first two patients to have surgery using the Impella in the Northshore area. Their doctors did the procedure at the Louisiana Heart Hospital in Lacombe. “I would have died a lot earlier, and being able to have the surgery with the

having any shortages of breath at all. I’m still weak. My legs are weak but I’m gaining strength,” said Massey. Bad heart conditions are more common in this area. “Louisiana in general have a high risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke, heart attack, high blood pressure, diabetes, smoking, all the risk factors for arthrosclerosis and heart disease,” said Dr. Amkieh. Jan. 13, Massey and his wife celebrated their 61st wedding anniversary. One of their favorite pastimes is going to the casino, only now, Massey makes sure he puts in his half hour on the treadmill before he goes on to tell the doctor.

DeLeon, 67, had one artery 100 percent blocked, the other 60 percent. ages, stents in the arteries and bypass surgery. You can see his scars and the internal wires holding his chest bone together that remain. He wears the LifeVest, an external defibrillator with paddles, just in case his heart needs to be shocked back into a beating rhythm. All this in vein. But this past fall, when he began having shortness of breath and needed another heart procedure to save his life, doctors said his heart was too weak for surgery. Like Massey, a Covington heart patient has a similar health problem. “He did an angiogram and found that I had two major blockages and, but I was not a candidate for surgery because my heart is very bad,” said Gail DeLeon. DeLeon, 67, had one artery 100 percent blocked, the other 60 percent.

75% Occur in Men Over 50 No one should face such a grave decision in life -- die from the blockages, or risk dying in the surgery to open them up. Both patients faced an impossible choice. But Massey and DeLeon were in the right place at the right time. Technology offered them a new choice using the world’s smallest heart pump. “It takes some of the load off the heart.

26

CODE | March 2013


Insurance companies do pay for using the Impella pumping device during heart procedures. This Is all for health. An Ochsner Medical Center spokesperson says Ochsner doctors have had the Impella Technology since 2009 and have “I would have died a lot earlier, and being able to have the surgery with the Impella and getting the two arteries open, because one of the arteries is the one they call the widow maker, and it was pretty well blocked,” DeLeon said. Massey said the Impella changed his outlook on life, from having no hope for the future, to one that’s giving him more retirement years to fish and garden back home in Mississippi. “I’m feeling a lot better everyday. I’m going to cardiac rehab twice a week and I’m getting stronger all the time. I’m not having any shortages of breath at all. I’m still weak. My legs are weak but I’m gaining strength,” said Massey. Bad heart conditions are more common in this area. “Louisiana in general have a high risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke, heart at-

Since 2009, he’s had a heart attack, congestive heart failure, multiple blockages...

tack, high blood pressure, diabetes, smoking, all the risk factors for arthrosclerosis and heart disease,” said Dr. Amkieh. Jan. 13, Massey and his wife celebrated their 61st wedding anniversary. One of their favorite pastimes is going to the casi-

no, only now, Massey makes sure he puts in his half hour on the treadmill before he goes on to tell everyone. Insurance companies do pay for using the Impella pumping device during heart procedures.


Train Spotting For better or for worst, L.A.’s classic Union Station continues to move us forward into the future. By: Daniel Quon

L

os Angeles’ Union Station (LAUS)

retains a history that rivals that of the city whose name it bears. With its

grand opening in May of 1939, LAUS, originally known as the “Los Angeles Union Passenger Terminal”, was intended to serve as a consolidation of the two local railroad terminals and the railroads they had served (Southern Pacific, Union Pacific and Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe) with construction costs shared by these railroads. With Los Angeles in the midst of a population boom that began in the 1920s, the new station became a necessity. Shortly thereafter, World War II presented further opportunity for wide-scale use of the LAUS facilities for troop movement. As America’s defense industries increased accordingly with the needs of the military, so did job opportunities in the Los Angeles area. LAUS was also utilized as a major hub through

CODE | Feb 2013


2929


these defense workers arrived in California. arrived in California. The station that exists today was designed in part by John Parkinson and Donald Parkinson, the famous father and son duo who founded The Parkinson Firm of Los Angeles. Their combination of Spanish Colonial, Mission Revival and Art Deco designs was used to accentuate Los Angeles’ personal history and heritage alongside its newly found modernity. The station itself is a reflection of the grandeur that is Los Angeles. In the waiting room, beautiful enclosed garden patios and courtyards made the wait for a train quite pleasant. Travelers who strolled to their trains along the terra cotta tiled floors with their inlaid marble strips would walk beside the extravagant interior walls that were designed with both travertine marble and early models of acoustical tiles. If passengers wish they can visit the famous Harvey House restaurant, located in the southern area of the main building. Designed by famous Southwestern architect Mary Coulter, the restaurant located at LAUS was the last of this line of restaurants to be constructed in a passenger terminal. There was an increasing dependency on airline travel in the decades following World War II, which resulted in a decline in rail patronage in the 1950s and 60s. However, growing Amtrak and transit usage has led LAUS to be revitalized, allowing the station to once again serve as a major transportation hub for people from all over America. This newfound viability was due in part to

30

CODE | March 2013


“With Los Angeles in the midst of a population boom that began in the 1920s, the new

station became a necessity.


CODE | Feb 2013


line of restaurants to be constructed in a passenger terminal. There was an increasing dependency on airline travel in the decades following World War II, which resulted in a decline in rail patronage in the 1950s and 60s. However, growing Amtrak and transit usage has led LAUS to be revitalized, allowing the station to once again serve as a major transportation hub for people from all over America. This newfound viability was due in part to the efforts of the Catellus Development Corporation. Originally developed in 1984 as the Santa Fe Pacific Realty Corporation and designed with the intent of handling all non-railroad real estate interests for the Santa Fe Industries and Southern Pacific Company, the company became Catellus in 1990, the same year that it purchased LAUS. Catellus has embarked on a major renovation project for LAUS. The tile and marble used on both the walls and floors will undergo extensive rejuvenation, as will the station's brass chandeliers and wooden seats. The project also entails waterproofing and repairing interior and LAUS is also improving its transportation efficiency. In response to varied congestion on the available tracks, the California Department of Transportation and the Federal Railroad Administration have adopted plans to create runthrough tracks that will connect Union Station to nearby Burlington Northern Santa Fe tracks. Also, the station became a host to the FlyAway Bus service in March 2006, carrying passengers between LAUS and Los Angeles International Airport. This station is also a hub for the Metrolink commuter train service and is a stop on the Red Line and Gold Line light rail service. Outside of the station itself, Catellus has developed two new office towers and an apartment complex on the 51-acre site. Future plans for the site involve utilizing an additional 6.5 million square feet for development of office, retail, entertainment and residential space. Today, LAUS is considered a national landmark, as well as a historic Los Angeles monument. Only serving to highlight its popularity, the station has been a background for numerous film and television productions. On April 14, 2011, the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (LACMTA) completed the purchase of LAUS for $75 million. The purchase, which includes 38 acres and 5.9 million square feet of development rights, will allow LACTMA to build on the property to meet the stations current and future transportation needs. Station use is expected to grow as a result of several factors, including the Regional Connector transit project through downtown, an expanding retail presence and future high-speed rail plans for the Los Angeles area. The magnificent history of this station is fitting, seeing as it sits adjacent to the site of the original Los Angeles settlement, where the famous Olvera Street is located today. The city was founded in1781 by Felipe de Neve, a Spanish governor. The small pueblo, whose original title was “The Town of Our Lady, the Queen of the Angels of Porciúncula,” consisted of 44 settlers of mixed cultural backgrounds. Control of Los Angeles would shift hands quite often. It remained under Spanish

33


measure was placed on the ballot giving Los Angeles voters the choice between the construction of a vast network of elevated railways or the construction of a much smaller Union Station to consolidate different railroad terminals. The election would take on racial connotations and become a defining moment in the development of Los Angeles. The proposed Union Station was located in the heart of what was

The Narrow Margin Pearl Harbor Private Eye (1987 TV movie starring Josh Brolin) Raise Your Voice The Rebel Set Show Them No Mercy Silver Streak Southside 1-1000 Speed Star Trek: First Contact Them! Through the Fire (Chaka Khan music video) Watch on the Rhine The Way We Were The Undercover Man Under the Rainbow You’re Never Too Young The Dark Knight Rises 2012 The Scarecrow trial courtroom.

The facility served as a backdrop for the 1950 film Union Station,which starred William Holden and Nancy Olson. It has been used inThe facility served as a backdrop for the 1950 film Union Station, which starred William Holden and Nancy Olson. It has been used in many vintage motion pictures, many of the film noir variety. many vintage motionMovies that have featured Union Station as a filming location include: pictures, many of the film noir variety.

Armored Car Robbery Behave Yourself! Blade Runner

Blondie Plays Cupid Can’t Hardly Wait Collateral

Criss Cross

Cry Danger

The Company She Keeps Dead Men Don’t Wear Plaid Drag Me to Hell The Driver

Gable and Lombard Highway 301 The Hustler The Island

In the Mood

The Italian Job

To Live & Die in L.A.

May 4, 1939: Union Station opens. A Union Station was proposed as early as 1906 as part of Charles Mulford Robinson’s City Beautiful project. It sometimes takes a while to get things done in Los Angeles.

Los Angeles’ original Chinatown. Reflecting the prejudice of the era, the conservative Los Angeles Times, a lead opponent of elevated railways, argued in editorials that Union Station would not be built in the “midst of Chinatown” but rather would “forever do away with Chinatown and its environs.” Voters approved demolishing much of Chinatown to build Union Station by a narrow 51 to 48 percent. or the construction of a much smaller Union Station to consolidate different railroad terminals. The election would take on racial connotations and become a defining moment in the development of Los Angeles. The proposed Union Station was located in the heart of what was Los Angeles’ original Chinatown. Reflecting the prejudice of the era, the conservative Los Angeles

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CODE | March 2013


To find out more visit: www.code/unionstation



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