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CORPORATE RESPONSIBILITY & SUSTAINABILITY OVERVIEW

Taking care

Banana and pineapple production practices in Latin America


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Welcome

to a voyage of over 100 years of responsible and sustainable practices at Dole The concept of Corporate Responsibility and Sustainability (CR&S) is not new at Dole. Back in 1924, Dole constructed the still existing Vicente d’Antoni hospital in la Ceiba, Honduras. Dole then continued to build infrastructure and develop community programs in the various countries where the Company settled. The 1990s were also an important milestone on the journey towards the formalization of what was formerly known as “Corporate Social Responsibility” programs. At that time, the development of the Internet and its intensive use by campaigners contributed to increased general knowledge about the practices in the supply chain of global companies. This change prompted those firms to develop mechanisms to enforce and improve the monitoring of environmental and labor standards not only in their own operations, but also in those of their suppliers. Dole, as a U.S. multinational leader in its sector, took proactive steps in the same direction. After the Company adopted a strict environmental policy and code of conduct, it started implementing environmental and labor certifications aimed at demonstrating compliance with internationally recognized standards. In 1998, Dole’s division in Costa Rica became the first agricultural company in the world to receive certification according to ISO 14001, the environmental standard, and in 2000, a then Dole-owned division in Spain

became the first agricultural company in the world to receive the SA 8000 certification demonstrating compliance with applicable labor laws and conventions of the International Labor Organization. While certifications are good tools to implement efficient systems aimed at monitoring compliance, they do not necessarily reflect the quality of the relationship with local stakeholders, whether those actors are workers, worker representatives, Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs), suppliers, governments, community leaders, among others. In many countries in which it operates, Dole has spontaneously embarked in high-quality dialogue with all those stakeholders. In the limited countries in which the social dialogue was not sufficient, the Company developed frameworks allowing for a permanent and constructive exchange of views. The main objective of those communication platforms is to identify potential issues affecting workers or the communities and discuss ways to fix them in order to avoid potential escalations. A secondary goal is to agree on common priorities when developing new programs for the communities. In the end, those channels contribute to the achieving of what they were ultimately intended for, namely to create and maintain mutual respect between the Company and its stakeholders. Simultaneously, Dole strongly supported the creation of, and is now actively participating


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in, the World Banana Forum, an international and permanent multi-stakeholder assembly for participants representing the global banana supply chain, to promote open dialogue on challenges facing the banana industry. Gender equity in the banana industry, a fair distribution of value along the supply chain, or water stewardship are among the main

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We believe that endconsumers are increasingly expecting companies to become more transparent.

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topics being discussed within the framework of the World Banana Forum. Finally, we believe that end-consumers are increasingly expecting companies to become more transparent, not only in their policies

and practices, but also by disclosing what is actually occurring on the ground – in our case, at the specific farm where the fruit they bought on the shelves were produced. Back in 2006, Dole had developed a web-based system allowing consumers to track their organic bananas back to the field. Today, this system has been extended and is using the latest Internet-based technology to invite European consumers, by visiting the www.dole-earth.com platform, to embark on a wonderful journey to discover the farm where their banana or pineapple, whether conventional or organic, was grown. This brochure is aimed at inviting any interested Dole stakeholder to go through a voyage of over 100 years of responsible and sustainable practices at Dole.


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History Dole’s first CR&S program dates back to 1924, when the Company constructed the Vicente d’Antoni hospital in Honduras

1924 1927 1954

Dole builds the Hospital Vicente d’Antoni to provide medical services to the communities of la Ceiba in Honduras Dole designs and develops Mazapan, a primary school in Honduras Dole constructs the San Isidro Church in Honduras

1979

Dole launches “The Lives We Touch,” the Company’s first CR&S publication

1989

Dole develops Bananito, a state-of-the-art banana compound in Costa Rica

1998

Standard Fruit de Costa Rica is the first agricultural Company in the world to become ISO 14001-certified

2000

A Dole-owned division in Spain is the first agricultural company in the world to become SA 8000-certified Dole Ecuador creates the Dale Foundation to provide the banana communities with health care and education programs


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2001

Dole begins offering customers organiccertified bananas

2003

Dole begins offering European customers Fairtrade-certified bananas produced by small farmers

2005

Dole creates a worldwide department for Corporate Social Responsibility hosted at Dole’s European Headquarters

2007

Dole begins certifying its banana and pineapple farms in Costa Rica according to the Rainforest Alliance standard Dole signs an agreement with COSIBA-CR (coordinator of banana unions in Costa Rica) Dole signs an agreement with the Ministry of Environment of Costa Rica to support the country’s commitment to become carbon-neutral by 2021

2009

Dole is a Founding Member of the World Banana Forum, a multistakeholder initiative for a sustainable banana production and trade

2010

Dole defines its four “pillars of sustainability” (Carbon Footprint, Water Management, Soil Conservation, as well as Packaging and Waste Reduction)

2012

First certification of a Dole-owned farm by Fair Trade USA (pineapples, Costa Rica)


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Safe use of Crop Protection Products Policy on the Use of Crop Protection Products In Dole’s farming operations, we use Crop Protection Products only when and where necessary, and always with the proper care and in accordance with applicable laws. Dole will not

use, anywhere, any product banned for reasons of unacceptable health or environmental risk by the United States Environmental Protection Agency or by the European Union.

By contract, our growers in Latin America have to comply with Dole’s strict environmental policy setting the rules for the safe use of Crop Protection Products

Good Agricultural Practices In support of its environmental policy, Dole has implemented Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) – guidelines for conserving the environment through limited use of Crop Protection Products. GAP ensures that the scope of Dole’s agricultural practices is in accordance with Integrated Crop Management (ICM) and Integrated Pest Management (IPM), in order to apply Crop Protection Products on an “as necessary” basis. Because Integrated Crop Management (ICM) methods consider the land’s soil, climate, and biological makeup, farmers are better able to preserve their natural assets. Such methods include crop rotations, which hinder the spreading of pests and diseases

(reducing the need of pest control products) and modified tillage practices, which limit soil manipulation (reducing erosion and increasing water intake). Integrated Pest Management (IPM) has long been a way of life at Dole. Through innovative research, Dole has carefully integrated cultural, biological, and, when necessary, chemical control measures into an all-encompassing pest management program that focuses on outbreak prevention. Dole makes extensive use of natural techniques, including biological controls (such as beneficial predatory wasps that


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DID YOU KNOW THAT

The introduction of a brush to do the postharvest treatment in the packing houses contributed to a decrease in fungicide use in the packing plants of 86%


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DID YOU KNOW THAT

The introduction of the eco-weeder used to rationalize herbicide use contributed to reduced herbicide use of up to 60%

attack certain harmful insect pests), bioantagonists (micro-organisms that infect specific pests), and alternative sources for fertilization and soil improvement (such as non-competing cover crops). Dole only uses conventional Crop Protection Products as a last resort, meaning that pests are present in sufficient numbers to cause severe damage to fruit quality.

Training and Medical Monitoring Users of Crop Protection Products must receive training on the safe use and handling of agrochemicals, undergo medical examination and cholinesterase monitoring (if applicable), follow the instructions of the crew supervisor, and comply with the standard operating procedures for safe application contained in the Company’s certified management system (ISO 14001). Application methods and practices are also subject to internal audit.

Monitoring of Field Use On-the-ground technical assistance and monitoring of Company and independently owned farming operations by Dole staff is essential to maintaining the safe use of pesticide products. The countries where Dole sources bananas and pineapples, there are Dole employees on hand working on product assurance in all its dimensions. This involves daily visits to growers by Dole agronomists and technical employees providing recommendations on good agricultural practices, good manufacturing practices, quality, food safety, and environmental protection. Dole farms have dedicated environmental supervisors that inspect Crop Protection Products applications and use. External audits are also performed which gauge adherence to Company standards and those of several voluntary certification schemes.


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Organic Agriculture In addition to embracing the principles of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) at its primary production facilities, Dole has developed novel growing methods that provide consumers with more choices. Dole’s organic program offers consumers an alternative to conventionally produced fruits while continuing to meet the high quality standards that Dole fans have come to expect. Organic agriculture puts the focus on improving soil fertility through the use of mineral and natural fertilizers and enhancing biological cycles for natural insect and disease control.

Dole has been a pioneer in experimental organic farming for bananas and pineapples and is now the largest producer and distributor of organic bananas in the world


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Dole’s four pillars of sustainability In order to protect its greatest assets (people, farms and the environment), Dole has built its sustainability strategy on four pillars.

Years of research at Dole provide the Company with a competitive advantage in these four pillars of sustainability.

The four pillars – Carbon Footprint, Water Management, Soil Conservation and Packaging & Waste reduction For example, some Dole divisions have already calculated the Carbon Footprint of their products from production to distribution. The Company has also implemented programs (like improving some refrigeration systems, using new fertilizers, or providing our truck drivers with driving courses) aimed at reducing its Carbon Footprint. In some countries, Dole is also actively participating in reforestation initiatives, which compensate part of the greenhouse gases emitted during the production process. Regarding water stewardship, Dole uses irrigation only when and where necessary, based on weather conditions and forecasts, crop capacity for water absorption, water availability in the soil, and the “allowable” water deficit for issues such as crop resistance. Dole is also active in better controlling water use, by having numerous packing plants equipped with water

recycling systems. Dole has also implemented natural barriers and plant covers to protect water bodies in canals. In the area of soil conservation, Dole is using organic amendments and implementing minimum tillage, crop rotation, cover crops, and many other initiatives aimed at maximizing the soil’s productivity while minimizing erosion. Throughout the supply chain, Dole uses several forms of packaging and packing materials, some of which are made of plastics, carton, wood, or steel. To achieve its goal of producing minimal waste, the Company follows a “Reuse or Recycle” policy whenever possible, and introduces more environmentally friendly resources, such as those that are biodegradable, as they become available.


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DID YOU KNOW THAT

In Costa Rica, around 40% of the bananas produced on Dole’s farms are transported by train. Train transportation is around 35% more efficient than road transportation


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DOLE’S FOUR PILLARS OF SUSTAINABILITY

DID YOU KNOW THAT

Water recycling systems divide the amount of water used in the packing stations by 18


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Our research Dole’s scope of research covers many areas, including, but not limited to, disease, nematode and insect control, substitutes for nematicides and insecticides, cultivation techniques, new irrigation systems, and waste disposal.

Dole’s scientists specialize in fields such as general agronomy, irrigation, nematology, plant pathology, physiology, horticulture/plant propagation, and spray technology, as well as post-harvest physiology.


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Labor conditions In each country where the Company has operations, it complies strictly with applicable labor codes and requires that its management team reviews working conditions on a regular basis to ensure that compliance is maintained. Dole also works in collaboration with the representatives elected by its workers, practices a non-discriminatory policy, and is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Worldwide, our approach is guided by the Conventions of the International Labor Organization (ILO).

Minimum Age

Non-discrimination

In accordance with ILO Convention 138 regarding the minimum age and ILO Convention 182 on child labor, Dole prohibits child labor. In Latin America for bananas and pineapples, the Company’s policy is even stricter – prohibiting any people younger than 18 years of age from being hired or employed in any form.

Dole’s policies and Code of Conduct prohibit discrimination on the basis of gender, age, religious belief, or political affiliation as in accordance with ILO Convention 100 on equal remuneration and ILO Convention 111 outlining discrimination (employment and occupation). Company policies also prohibit sexual harassment in the workplace.

No Forced Labor

Freedom of Association & Right to Collective Bargaining

In accordance with ILO Convention 29 regarding forced labor and ILO Convention 105 on the abolition of forced labor, Dole does not engage in or condone forced labor of any kind.

In accordance with the International Labor Organization’s (ILO) Convention 87 on freedom of association and the protection of the right to organize, and Convention 98 on the right to organize and participate in Collective Bargaining, Dole employees are free to join labor unions and to participate in


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In 2011, in Ecuador, Dole signed the first ever Collective Bargaining Agreement with 487 workers represented by FENACLE, the National Federation of Agro-industrial Workers, Rural Peasants, and Free Indigenous Peoples of Ecuador, and employed on the Dole “Megabananas” plantation

Collective Bargaining through representatives of their own choosing. In addition, Dole’s personal policies prohibit discrimination against workers who wish to join trade unions or any other form of association.

Health & Safety Mandatory protective clothing for workers is the first safety precaution taken when employees deal with crop protection products. Occupational safety professionals monitor safe handling of these products and correct any problems on-site. Workers who use crop protection products undergo periodic medical exams to monitor potentially hazardous exposure and ensure continuous health. Regardless of position, all field employees undergo training in good practices, environmental programs, and safety techniques, as well as systematic instructions on the safe application of crop protection products.

Wages and Social Benefits In all of Dole’s countries of operation, employees receive at least the legally required compensation and benefits; however, it’s more common to find that the Company-provided benefits exceed those stated by law. Additional benefits can include savings and loans programs, paid time off for illness or injury, maternity leave, health insurance, social assistance, anywhere from one to four months’ extra annual pay, vacation time, retirement plans, and long-term disability insurance.


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LABOR CONDITIONS

Working Hours The average work-week is 48 hours in the Latin American countries where Dole operates, with the exception of Ecuador, where it is 40 hours. Hours are generally spread evenly over a 6-day week that extends from Monday through Saturday, with Sunday being the day of rest. Depending on the country in question, work days are usually limited by law to 10– 12 hours. Because Dole operates in the agricultural sector, the work hours may vary during the year depending on production conditions.

At no point, however, does Dole force its employees to work beyond the accepted maximum work hours outlined by contract, the law, or the agreements signed with our workers’ representatives.


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Working with communities In many of its production areas, Dole offers local residents services provided either directly, such as in Costa Rica, or indirectly through foundations, such as in Ecuador and Peru.

In general, those services focus on the following areas:

 Medical Attention  Education  Infrastructure Development

 Community Empowerment  Environmental Protection

Medical Attention Dole’s contribution to improving access to medical structures consists of:  Constructing hospitals in highly populated areas.  Building health centers and dispensaries in areas where farms are concentrated.  Supplying medical units to communities in remote areas. These structures provide communities with the following services:  Preventative exams for early detection of breast, uterine, or prostate cancer.  Preventative medicine, such as vaccination and inoculation programs against tetanus, hepatitis B, yellow fever, or tuberculosis.  General check-up programs, such as eye exams and physicals.  Surgery, ranging from dentistry in the mobile units to more arduous operations in the hospitals.

 Laboratory analyses in hospitals.  Education programs, including disease prevention or nutrition and wellness, to name a few.

Between Ecuador and Peru the Dale Foundation invests over US$ 3 million per year mainly in education, medical, and community development programs


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WORKING WITH COMMUNITIES

Education

Community Empowerment

Where education infrastructure and learning facilities are lacking, Dole funds the construction and/or maintenance of schools, grants scholarships, trains faculty, donates books and computers, and offers other education-related materials. Dole also provides children with painting, music, or computer classes.

Dole is also very active in training community members, and women in particular, to acquire new skills that can be used in order to generate additional revenues for the family.

Infrastructure Development Dole also builds local amenities, such as churches, parks, recreational areas, and athletic centers that enhance the communities’ everyday standard of living. In some countries, like in Ecuador, Dole also finances the tarring of some nearby plantation roads in order to minimize the dust emitted by the trucks transporting bananas. In the countries, like Peru, where access to potable water is not optimal yet, the Company’s foundation contributes to the financing of water treatment systems.

In Ecuador for example, Dale Foundation has developed a microenterprise program teaching women how to produce some of the protective equipment bought by the Company and used by the workers. In some other countries, like Colombia, the local foundation also provides women with training on how to produce shoes or artifacts. In several countries in which we operate, Dole organizes classes aimed at maintaining harmonious relationships within the community. Those classes can address subjects such as the prevention of sexual abuse and intra-family violence or the prevention of tobacco, drug, or alcohol abuse.

In 1927, Dole designed and developed Mazapan, a primary school in Honduras. Today, Mazapan is a bilingual school taking in 400 students from grades N to 12


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In 2010, Dole inaugurated a mobile medical unit co-financed by Dole and Spar, an Austrian customer, for the benefit of the indigenous communities of the Atlantic Coast of Costa Rica

Environmental Protection Dole also invests in community programs aimed at protecting the environment. During World Environment Day, the Company usually organizes environmental activities in the countries where we are active. Those activities include tree planting with communities, local schools, as well as workers with their children, the conduct of environmental awareness seminars for the children, the collection of trash alongside rivers and roads, or the installation of bird feeders for hummingbirds and others. In Colombia, Fundeban, the foundation run by TECBACO, a Dole supplier, also teaches some community representatives how to plant and maintain gardens. Those

Fundeban was the first foundation established by Dole and its affiliated partners in Latin America. Since 1988, Fundeban has invested over US$ 20 million into community programs representatives also have the opportunity to sell their produce on the local market. Furthermore, the foundation also launched a program aimed at preventing flooding in the last 25 km of the RĂ­o FrĂ­o basin by carrying topographic surveys, dredging works on both margins of the river, and reforesting them with native trees. Those reforestation programs are also aimed at protecting the biodiversity around the basin.

In addition, biodiversity assessments are carried out to monitor bird populations.


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Dole’s certifications Dole is certifying its fruit under high environmental and labor standards. Depending on our customer-specific requirements, those certifications may differ by source and/or market and include:

In 1998, Standard Fruit de Costa Rica was the first agricultural Company in the world to become ISO 14001-certified

GlobalGAP The GlobalGAP (GAP, standing for Good Agricultural Practices) standard is primarily designed to reassure retailers that the farms use production techniques aimed at minimizing detrimental environmental impacts of farming operations, reducing the use of chemical inputs and ensuring a responsible approach to worker health and safety, as well as animal welfare. Supplier certification to GlobalGAP has become a business requirement for most European retailers.

ISO 14001 In the 1990’s, Dole adopted ISO 14001 as its environmental standard. Today, almost all Dole-owned conventional banana and pineapple divisions are ISO 14001-certified. In those divisions, the technical programs for our independent growers are also included in the scope of the certification.

In 2013, Dole had over 12,000 hectares of Company-owned banana plantations certified to GlobalGAP


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DID YOU KNOW THAT

In 2013, in Sweden, Dole signed an agreement with the local Fairtrade organization for the distribution of organic/Fairtrade Dole branded bananas

Organics Dole’s organic production areas are certified by independent certification agencies accredited by the United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) National Organic Program (NOP), and the European Union. Dole’s organic bananas are grown or sourced from Colombia, the Dominican Republic, Ecuador, and Peru, and organic pineapples make their way from Costa Rica.

Fairtrade Fairtrade is a movement seeking improved terms of trade for farmers so they can enhance their standards of living and plan for their futures. Consumers pay a premium price for products carrying the Fairtrade Mark. The additional revenue goes back to producers and is used for their economic and social development. Dole distributes Fairtrade bananas from the Dominican Republic and Peru and Fairtrade-certified pineapples from Costa Rica.

In Peru, Dole buys organic bananas from over 1,600 family farmers who own land ranging from 0.25 hectares to 2.5 hectares


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DOLE’S CERTIFICATIONS

Rainforest Alliance Rainforest Alliance works to conserve biodiversity and ensure sustainable livelihoods. The certification is built on the three pillars of sustainability – environmental protection, social equity and economic viability. Some customers in Europe and North America seek to differentiate their products by using the Rainforest Alliance seal, easily recognized by consumers.

In 2013, Dole sourced bananas from approximately 25,000 hectares of Company-owned or independent farms certified to the Rainforest Alliance SA 8000

BSCI

SA 8000 is a labor standard developed by Social Accountability International, a New-York-based NGO. It demonstrates that companies are in compliance with the applicable labor laws and Conventions of the International Labor Organization.

The BSCI Code of Conduct is based on the International Labor Organization (ILO) Conventions and other important Declarations of the United Nations, the OECD guidelines for multinational enterprises, and the UN Global Compact.

In 1998, a then Dole-owned division in Spain was the first agricultural company in the world to receive SA 8000 certification. Today, all Dole banana and pineapple farms in Costa Rica are SA 8000-certified.

In order to comply with the requirements of some of its European customers, Dole has gone through the BSCI assessment of some of its Company-owned banana farms.

From 1998 to 2011 Dole has served in the advisory board of Social Accountability International, a New York-based NGO promoting Human Rights at work


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Interview with chris wille

ď ž Chris Wille, Chief, Sustainable Agriculture, Rainforest Alliance


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Interview with Chris Wille, Rainforest Alliance

Innovative ways to produce more with less If you look back, how did the industry change in the last 10 years and Dole in particular?

and give workers better training, safe and clean working conditions, fair salaries, and decent housing.

What are the main sustainability challenges for the banana industry today? While we have made impressive progress, there are still difficult challenges. Dole and other fruit companies working with the Rainforest Alliance have stopped deforesting and instead are planting trees. They manage waste, protect rivers, control pollution, protect special wildlife habitats, and provide good housing and services to workers. There are still issues with water conservation, especially as the teeth of climate change begin to bite. The use of pesticides shall be further reduced, even though the growers have abandoned the

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We have come to know Dole as a willing partner.

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The Rainforest Alliance and other NGOs in the Sustainable Agriculture Network began pushing the banana industry to change in the early 1990s. Rather than simply complain about the problems, we worked with the growers, including Dole, and with scientists, farm workers, environmental and community leaders, and other stakeholders to find practical solutions. The problems were big and widespread, including deforestation, pollution, over-use of agrochemicals, poor conditions for workers, and so on. Working together, we agreed to tackle all these problems and many more. Dole, and other progressive companies, began implementing the new and improved practices. Progress was slow, as the issues were complicated and expensive to address but the changes were evident as environmental and social conditions began to visibly improve. In the past ten years, Dole has really increased the pace of change. Bringing together long experience and new science, Dole’s farm managers are finding innovative ways to produce more with less, to conserve natural resources, protect the environment,


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Interview with chris wille

most dangerous ones and use the best known management techniques to apply those products that are still allowed.

Describe the relationship and projects you are engaged in with Dole, and the role you perceive Dole plays in the industry. As the largest company in its sector, Dole has a responsibility to set a good example, to show leadership. We have found it a willing partner in sustainability, especially in recent years. We are working together to demonstrate how farms can adapt to climate change while reducing their own greenhouse gas emissions. This is more ambitious than “carbon neutral.” The goal is to make farms more resilient and work toward becoming a positive force in combating climate change.

An animal-monitoring survey found several endangered species, including an ocelot (Leopardus pardalis) in a Dole pineapple farm in Costa Rica

About the Rainforest Alliance The Rainforest Alliance works to conserve biodiversity and ensure sustainable livelihoods by transforming land-use practices, business practices, and consumer behavior. Its certification is built on the three pillars of sustainability – environmental protection, social equity, and economic viability – and encourages farmers to grow crops and manage ranchlands using supportive methods.


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Multi-stakeholder engagement Dole is committed to providing transparent information on the Company’s Corporate Responsibility and Sustainability practices. In doing so, Dole maintains an open and constructive dialogue with its stakeholders, including customers, suppliers, governmental and non-governmental organizations, employees, trade unions, consumer organizations and community representatives. These discussions address current and future issues facing the agricultural industry and yield effective solutions in overcoming related challenges.

Dole is represented on the World Banana Forum’s Executive Board and Steering Committee and participates actively in the three working groups focusing on environmental, economic, and labor sustainability Dole believes that these open dialogues are crucial for the development of mutual understanding and confidence between involved parties, whether holding similar views or not. In some sectors, such as labor and environmental areas, the Company has signed partnership agreements with local stakeholders that aim to resolve local issues before they expand into bigger problems. Other agreements set a framework to ensure that communities and their representatives can promote their views when developing new community programs.

In addition to frequent communications with local stakeholders, Dole is also an active participant in various international multi-stakeholder initiatives. Most of the initiatives are comparable to think-tank platforms that address challenges on a global level, while some tackle medium- to long-term sustainability issues. For global issues like climate change, Dole believes that the Company can only provide an efficient action plan if it is coordinated with the efforts of other important players that are all aiming to achieve shared objectives.


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MULTISTAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT

The multi-stakeholder initiatives Dole is actively participating in include:

The World Banana Forum In December 2009, a groundbreaking initiative was launched at the Food & Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) headquarters in Rome: the World Banana Forum (WBF). This forum offers a permanent assembly space for participants representing the global banana supplychain, in order to promote open dialogue around sustainable banana production and trade. Its mission is to improve the banana industry through collaboration between producers and their organizations,

trade unions, cooperatives, exporter groups, trading companies, retailers, public agencies, governments, research institutions, and civil society organizations. Additionally, the WBF aims to achieve an industry-wide consensus of best practices regarding workplace matters, gender equality, environmental impact, sustainable production, and economic issues.

The Global Social Compliance Program In 2008, Dole joined the Global Social Compliance Program (GSCP), a businessdriven initiative for companies looking to harmonize current sustainability efforts. The goal is to deliver a universally accepted

DID YOU KNOW THAT

Within the World Banana Forum, Dole is actively participating in a working group looking for solutions to red rust thrips, a tiny insect that leaves red spots on organic bananas, and responsible in Peru alone for a loss in revenues of US$ 1.5 million


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sustainable approach to continuously improving work and environmental conditions across all categories and sectors of the global supply chain. GSCP’s global platform facilitates the exchange of knowledge and practices for optimal comparability and transparency between existing systems. To share information among a greater audience, the GSCP developed a set of reference tools that describe best practices. These tools also provide a common interpretation of working and environmental requirements, complete with descriptions and methods for appropriate implementation.

The Water Footprint Network Dole joined the Water Footprint Network (WFN) in 2009. The mission of this global partner network is to encourage a transition towards sustainable, fair, and efficient use of the world’s fresh water supply. By combining resources and efforts from participating knowledge institutions, government agencies, nongovernmental organizations, and representatives from the private sector, the WFN increases its impact on society.

DID YOU KNOW THAT

100 liters (of rain only) are necessary to produce a kg of pineapple in Costa Rica, while it takes 15,000 liters of water to produce a kg of beef meat


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Johan Lindén, President of Dole Europe, receives the International Supplier Award of the Year 2011 from Bama 

Awards & recognitions Dole Voted Top Company for Worker Equity Practices n 2012, a study carried out by Sustainalytics – a globally responsible investment research firm – presented in a report entitled “Worker Equity in Food and Agriculture” and funded by the Rockefeller Foundation ranked Dole the Top Company for Worker Equity Practices, given the Company’s efforts to eliminate discrimination and its defense of workers’ rights to assemble.

Dole Earth Receives HAMMA Award and Award for the Best Website at the European Excellence Awards 2012 In 2012, Dole Earth, the website allowing consumers to visit the plantation on which the banana or pineapple they bought at the supermarket were grown received two awards: the HAMMA award for the best creative campaign in Hamburg and the European Excellence award for the best website.

Dole Receives Environmental Leadership Award in San Diego, CA. In 2012, the Maritime Alliance distinguished Dole with the Environmental Leadership Award for the Company’s efforts to minimize its environmental impacts on the neighborhood of our port operations in San Diego, California.


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Consumer Organizations Rank Dole Top Banana Company in the Sustainability Area In 2012, ICRT, a group of consumer organizations, surveyed the Corporate Responsibility and Sustainability (CR&S) practices of the most important banana producers. Dole had the highest scores in the areas of CR&S policies, transparency, and community involvement and ranked number 1 for its social performance and for its environmental performance, following a physical check done on the ground by the researchers. The ranking was published by the following consumer organizations: Altroconsumo in Italy, Deco Proteste in Portugal, Konsument in Austria, OCU Ediciones in Spain, and TestAchats/Test-Aankoop in Belgium.

Dale Foundation Wins Prestigious Award In 2012, Dale Ecuador, Dole’s Foundation in Ecuador, was presented with the Segundo Wong Award for outstanding work in the pursuit of the community’s goals.

Bama Names Dole International Supplier of the Year 2011

Dole Recognized by the Costa Rican-American Chamber of Commerce for Excellence in Labor Relations In 2011, Dole in Costa Rica was recognized by the Costa Rican-American Chamber of Commerce for Excellence in Labor Relations for the Company’s contribution to the community through its workforce relations program.

Dole and its CEO Recognized by Trust Across America Trust Across America is a think tank dedicated to unraveling the complexities of trustworthy business behavior. In their 2011 ranking of the most trustworthy companies, Dole ranked number 4 among 2,500 companies surveyed. In 2012, they also ranked Dole’s CEO number 19 in their Top 100 thought leaders in trustworthy business behavior.

“Plan A” Farming Award from Marks & Spencer In 2010, Bananito, a Dole farm in Costa Rica, received a “Plan A” award from British retailer Marks & Spencer. Marks & Spencer’s Plan A farming award recognizes and promotes farmers and growers who are taking steps to improve the sustainability of their business.

Bama Gruppen AS, the leading fresh fruit and vegetables importer and distributor in Norway named Dole their international supplier of the year 2011. The recognition is given to the company that best demonstrates excellence in the areas of product quality, market orientation and development, ethical and environmental practices, food safety, as well as service quality and reliability.

 Renato Acuña, President of Dole Tropical Products Latin America, and representatives from the Dale Foundation receive the Segundo Wong Award


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Information from the divisions In Latin America, Dole produces or buys bananas from Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Guatemala,

Honduras, and Peru and pineapples from Costa Rica, Guatemala, and Honduras.

Colombia Urabรก / Santa Marta

Bananas OPERATIONS

Number of Farms Supplying Dole and Owned by Independent Growers (Urabรก/Santa Marta)

Number of Hectares Supplying Dole and Owned by Independent Growers (Urabรก/Santa Marta)

Bananas

53 / 56

7,308 / 3,784

Organic Bananas

0 / 15

0 / 2,073

CERTIFICATIONS FOR BANANAS (only Cavendish)

Number of Certified Farms Supplying Dole and Owned by Independent Growers (Urabรก/Santa Marta)

Number of Certified Hectares Supplying Dole and Owned by Independent Growers (Urabรก/Santa Marta)

GlobalGAP

53 / 35

7,308 / 3,616

Rainforest Alliance

53 / 15

7,308 / 1,861

SA 8000

53 / 0

7,308 / 0

Organic

0/9

0 / 1,960


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Honduras

Bananas OPERATIONS

Number of Companyowned Farms

Total Company Hectares

Total Company Permanent Farm Workers

Number of Farms Supplying Dole and Owned by Independent Growers

Number of Hectares Supplying Dole and Owned by Independent Growers

Bananas

6

5,637

7,816

7

1,957

Baby Bananas

1

85

80

0

0

CERTIFICATIONS FOR BANANAS (only Cavendish)

Number of Certified Company-owned Farms (or Farms Included in the Certification Scope)

Total Company Hectares Certified (or Included in the Certification Scope)

ISO 14001

6

5,637

GlobalGAP/Costco

6

5,637

Rainforest Alliance

3

3,136

Pineapples OPERATIONS

Pineapples

CERTIFICATIONS FOR PINEAPPLES

Number of Companyowned Farms

Total Company Hectares

Total Company Permanent Farm Workers

Number of Farms Supplying Dole and Owned by Independent Growers

Number of Hectares Supplying Dole and Owned by Independent Growers

1

3,052

1,006

0

0

Number of Certified Company-owned Farms (or Farms Included in the Certification Scope)

Total Company Hectares Certified (or Included in the Certification Scope)

ISO 14001

1

3,052

GlobalGAP/Costco

1

3,052


34 | CR&S

Costa Rica

Bananas OPERATIONS

Number of Companyowned Farms

Total Company Hectares

Total Company Permanent Farm Workers

Number of Farms Supplying Dole and Owned by Independent Growers

Number of Hectares Supplying Dole and Owned by Independent Growers

Bananas

6

5,156

2,273

32

7,207

Baby Bananas

3

42

N/D

31

277

CERTIFICATIONS FOR BANANAS (only Cavendish)

Number of Certified Company-owned Farms (or Farms Included in the Certification Scope)

Total Company Hectares Certified (or Included in the Certification Scope

Number of Certified Farms Supplying Dole and Owned by Independent Growers

Number of Certified Hectares Supplying Dole and Owned by Independent Growers

ISO 14001

6

5,156

6

N/D

GlobalGAP

6

5,156

31

7,122

Rainforest Alliance

4

3,988

10

N/D

SA 8000

6

5,156

0

0

N/D = Not Determined


35 | CR&S

Pineapples OPERATIONS

Number of CompanyOwned Farms

Total Company Hectares

Total Company Permanent Farm Workers

Number of Farms Supplying Dole and Owned by Independent Growers

Number of Hectares Supplying Dole and Owned by Independent Growers

Pineapples

2

1,655

727

6

1,871

Organic Pineapples

1

180

N/D

1

391

CERTIFICATIONS FOR PINEAPPLES

Number of Certified Company-owned Farms (or Farms Included in the Certification Scope)

Total Company Hectares Certified (or Included in the Certification Scope

Number of Certified Farms Supplying Dole and Owned by Independent Growers

Number of Certified Hectares Supplying Dole and Owned by Independent Growers

ISO 14001

2

1,655

0

0

GlobalGAP

2

1,655

7

2,262

Rainforest Alliance

0

0

1

120

SA 8000

2

1,655

1

N/D

Organic

1

180

1

391

Fair Trade USA

3

1,835

1

645

N/D = Not Determined


36 | CR&S

Ecuador

Bananas OPERATIONS

Number of Companyowned Farms

Total Company Hectares

Total Company Permanent Farm Workers

Number of Farms Supplying Dole and Owned by Independent Growers

Number of Hectares Supplying Dole and Owned by Independent Growers

Bananas

5

2,076

1,782

99

11,062

Organic Bananas

1

259

319

15

2,439

Baby Bananas

0

0

0

23 growers + 1 coop (11 farms)

708

Plantain

0

0

0

9 selling groups (403 farms) + 5 growers

2,840

CERTIFICATIONS FOR BANANAS (only Cavendish)

Number of Certified Company-owned Farms (or Farms Included in the Certification Scope)

Total Company Hectares Certified (or Included in the Certification Scope)

Number of Certified Farms Supplying Dole and Owned by Independent Growers

Number of Certified Hectares Supplying Dole and Owned by Independent Growers

ISO 14001

3

1,210

0

2,076

GlobalGAP

3

1,210

69

4,718

Rainforest Alliance

3

1,210

10

1,676

Organic

1

259

11

1,955

Fairtrade (FLO International)

0

0

5

223


37 | CR&S

Guatemala

Bananas OPERATIONS

Number of Farms Supplying Dole and Owned by Independent Growers

Number of Hectares Supplying Dole and Owned by Independent Growers

Bananas

7

5,871

Baby Bananas

1

60

Plantain

2

442

CERTIFICATIONS FOR BANANAS (only Cavendish)

Number of Certified Farms Supplying Dole and Owned by Independent Growers

Number of Certified Hectares Supplying Dole and Owned by Independent Growers

ISO 14001

3

1,280

GlobalGAP

2

2,630

Rainforest Alliance

5

3,241

Number of Certified Farms Supplying Dole and Owned by Independent Growers

Number of Certified Hectares Supplying Dole and Owned by Independent Growers

2

550

Pineapples OPERATIONS

Pineapples

Number of Farms Supplying Dole and Owned by Independent Growers

Number of Hectares Supplying Dole and Owned by Independent Growers

2

550

CERTIFICATIONS FOR PINEAPPLES

GlobalGAP


38 | CR&S

Peru

Bananas OPERATIONS

Organic Bananas

CERTIFICATIONS FOR BANANAS (only Cavendish)

Number of Companyowned Farms

Total Company Hectares

Total Company Permanent Farm Workers

1

198

161

Number of Farms Supplying Dole and Owned by Independent Growers

Number of Hectares Supplying Dole and Owned by Independent Growers

+/– 1,600 (15 orgs.)

1,735

Number of Certified Company-owned Farms (or Farms Included in the Certification Scope)

Total Company Hectares Certified (or Included in the Certification Scope)

Number of Certified Farms Supplying Dole and Owned by Independent Growers

Number of Certified Hectares Supplying Dole and Owned by Independent Growers

GlobalGAP

0

0

1 org.

N/D

Organic

1

198

+/– 1,600 (15 orgs.)

1,735

Fairtrade (FLO International)

0

0

10 orgs.

N/D

N/D = Not Determined

All data valid as of December 2013.


This CR&S overview has been produced by Dole’s Corporate Responsibility and Sustainability department with the support of Dole Fresh Fruit Europe’s marketing department, based in Hamburg. Please visit us: www.dolecrs.com | www.dole.eu kontakt@dole.com


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