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REFLECTIONS ON THE PUBLIC INTERIOR TWO ARCHITECTURE CHAIRS IN DISCUSSION TU BERLIN | TU DELFT SYMPOSIUM TU DELFT 20.|21. JANUARY 2015


Imprint Symposium: „Reflections on the public interior. Two architecture chairs in discussion“ Publisher Layout

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Kai Nikolaus Grüne Susanne Pietsch Romina Falk Larissa Preuss Lukas Specks TU Berlin, Vervielfältigungsstelle der Fakultät VI, Helmut Weik Berlin 2014

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Reflections on the public interior Two architecture chairs in discussion Date

20-21 January 2015

Place

TU Delft, Faculty of Architecture

Organisation

Kai Nikolaus Gr端ne Fachgebiet Baukonstruktion und Entwerfen Prof. Leibinger | Gastprof. Ballestrem TU Berlin, Institut f端r Architektur Susanne Pietsch The Architecture of the Interior TU Delft, Faculty of Architecture

Participants

Partners

Matthias Ballestrem, TU Berlin Jitse van den Berg, noAarchitecten, Brussels Mark Pimlott, TU Delft Thomas Schneider, Brandluber +, Berlin Goethe-Institut Niederlande

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PROGRAM TUESDAY 20 JANUARY 2015 08.30 TU Delft, departure round trip, program to be confirmed: SOMA Slachthuisterrein Anderlecht, ORG Budafabriek Kortrijk, 51N4E Vlasmuseum, noA architecten Stadhuis Menen, noAarchitecten Market Hall Gent, Robbrecht en Daem De Singel Antwerpen, Leon Stynen|Stephane Beel PROGRAM WEDNESDAY 21 JANUARY 2015 10.00 - 16:00 TU Delft, lectures|discussions. Contributions by: Matthias Ballestrem, TU Berlin Jitse van den Berg, noAarchitecten, Brussels Mark Pimlott, TU Delft Thomas Schneider, Brandluber +, Berlin Moderated by Kai Nikolaus Gr端ne and Susanne Pietsch

The event will be held in English. Detailed information about the excursion and the symposium will be provided after registration. Admission is free, please subscribe to InteriorArchitecture-BK@tudelft.nl As spaces are limited and are allocated on a first come, first serve basis, please submit your participation as soon as possible. Registration deadline for the excursion is 12 January 2015. 4

CONTENTS


CONTENTS P. 06

Abstracts Introduction The Architecture of the Interior, TU Delft noAarchitecten Robust Architecture, TU Berlin Brandluber + Emde, Schneider

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Catalogue Design Projects TU Berlin TU Delft Contact Information

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CONTENTS

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KAI NIKOLAUS GRĂœNE SUSANNE PIETSCH

REFLECTIONS ON THE PUBLIC INTERIOR

The idea of this symposium was raised by a meeting at the Goethe Institute in Rotterdam and a subsequent joint project in which the foundation for an ongoing exchange of ideas was laid: The question of the role of the public interior in the architectural design and thus the educational approach of the two chairs at TU Delft and TU Berlin, at those we teach and research. We asked ourselves, what constitutes a public interior and how do we question it from different academic positions: What makes an interior part of the public realm of the city? How does it accommodate different kinds of public activity without being generic or unspecific? What 6

is it made of , what does it represent and to which degree can it anticipate appropriation and change? How can strong spatial qualities be designed without implicitly predetermining the program – how do you create clearly defined and characteristic spaces that are still flexible and open to public use? The debate will be lead from two different directions, one starting from the inner building space and the needs of the user, on the other hand, from the robust building structure of the building, which can enable large multi-use interiors. The strategies of the two chairs, the main topics, reference frameworks and didactic approaches are taken


into consideration, affinities and differences should emerge and be discussed against the background of the different cultural and academic contexts. We expect that this meeting will evoke a stimulus for further joint research and as well impulses for future design seminars at TU Berlin and TU Delft. The symposium will be organized on three levels: on the first day a joint excursion to buildings in Belgium, which integrate different scales and strategies of public interiors. On the second day our two academic positions of architectural education concerning public interior space will be presented. Furthermore we would like to open up the discussion to the architectural practice, thus we will host the architects Jitse van den Berg from Brussels and Thomas Schneider from Berlin who will give lectures on their work.

Susanne Pietsch is trained as an interior architect and architect. Her practice is based in Rotterdam. She has taught at Trier University of Applied Sciences and conduced research at the University of Buenos Aires. Since 2006 she has been engaged at the Architecture Faculty of the TU Delft as a teacher and coordinator in chair of the Architecture of the Interior. Kai Nikolaus Gr端ne is an Berlin based architect. Since 2011, he has been teaching as assistant at the Architecture Faculty, first at TU Cottbus and then at TU Berlin at the Chair for Architectural Design and Construction. He has been a scholar at the German Academy Villa Massimo in Rome and an architectin-residence at the Goethe Institut Rotterdam.

The conference language is English. Both the lectures and discussions will be published after the symposium through a joint publication of the TU Berlin and TU Delft.

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SUSANNE PIETSCH MARK PIMLOTT

TU DELFT THE ARCHITECTURE OF THE INTERIOR

The Chair of The Architecture of the Interior is part of the Department of Architecture at TU Delft and is currently running a two-year pilot project to investigate an educational programme that fulfills the requirements of both the architecture and interior architecture professions. When we speak of the interior, we do not refer to the domestic interior, but a space continuous with the public spaces of the city; not as an extension of the body, a layer of clothing or a shell into which one retreats from the World, but as an environment very much tied to and in the World. In our view, the interior is architectural, and integral to the architectural project. This 8

view runs counter to that often used to explain the discipline of interior architecture, and this difference is what we feel distinguishes this Chair from those of interior architecture elsewhere. Essential to this position is the significance of context and the connectedness of the interior to larger conditions, structures and territories. We challenge the status held by the design of the interior within the conventions of the building process, in which it is considered as a separately organized and mutable ‘layer’ added to a given or new architectural shell. Although practical from a functional point of view–– particularly in the Netherlands where the entire building industry operates

CONFERENCE ABSTRACTS


with this principle––this tendency inevitably leads to accumulations of generic structures containing interiors of little significance. We believe that a durable and specific contribution to the built environment needs a broader approach that integrates disciplines and spaces rather than separating them from each other. The current situation, in which building supply is saturated, and the transformation of existing buildings is necessary and urgent, is the moment best suited for the approach we advocate in our course. In the Chair, we make architecture from within, beginning with considerations of the experience and the needs of the user. We pay equal attention to all those elements and figures that constitute the space, and acknowledge that aspects that might initially be thought of as minor can assume great significance. Aspects of perception, use and ideas within culture are balanced with those of structure and space, leading to new hierarchies and new paradigms. Attention and sympathy for context is central to our way of working. The central focus of study since we began the new Course has been the public interior: those interior realms connected to public space, health

facilities, educational institutions, cultural venues and places of work, and infrastructures. A core principle is that the humane treatment of the city’s public environment is central to making a home in the world for all. It follows that architecture has the capacity and responsibility to act in realising it. Two frameworks of knowledge––phenomenology and material culture––guide our approach to education and research. Phenomenology gives priority to the experience of things, spaces, atmospheres, and materials through the senses; while material culture posits that a history of meaning is embedded in things, their substance, appearances and arrangements. In our teaching, this has led to our close attention to the culture, language and material of buildable architecture, and the nurturing of suitable sensibilities and skills in students’ work. In this Chair, students have to appreciate and learn how to design, and learn about how design comes about: its history, its contexts and its users; and that many fields of knowledge, disciplines and people, are brought together to make architecture.

CONFERENCE ABSTRACTS

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Jitse van den Berg

NOAARCHITECTEN

noAarchitecten was established in 2000 by Jitse van den Berg, Philippe ViĂŠrin and An Fonteyne. The practice has earned an international reputation for designing contemporary public buildings, often in a historic context. noAa has first earned public attention with its first project, the Town Hall in Kortrijk, which was the result of a competition in 2000. The practice is interested in working on a wide range of projects of very different scales, both public and private. Recent realisations include the Faculty of Law for Hasselt University (nominated for the Mies van der Rohe Award 2015), the Town Hall in Lo and the museum Texture in Kortrijk. The extension of the 10

Museum Plantin Moretus in Antwerp, a youth institution in Mechelen and a housing project in Brussels are currently under construction. noAarchitecten is a team of approx. 15 people. The office is located in Brussels in a 1930s paper factory, converted to studio use by the practice itself, and in Bruges. The three partners are teaching at TUDelft, St-Luc Tournai and Hasselt University. noAarchitecten is interested in building tradition and does research on how contemporary architecture can achieve an equivalent presence. The buildings emerge out of a close engagement with the requirements of the building context and the activities they are to house.

CONFERENCE ABSTRACTS


Research is done to profoundly understand the brief, in order to entirely acknowledge functional and social demands and their spatial opportunities. This exploration often uncovers unexpected relations and reveals new possibilities. It is an ongoing process of drawing and redrawing, thinking and rethinking. noAarchitecten is looking for an architecture that is responsive, where form and atmosphere are discovered from within the project itself rather than imposed from without. Context, scale, material, detail and association play an important role. The aim is to create an architecture that has something immediately familiar about it, and yet is distinctly

contemporary. While making places, familiar things are collected: things that were there before, things that can be recognised by a wide range of people, things that communicate a cultural and social meaning. There is an attempt to integrate a certain degree of the unexpected into the work and to consider each building as an individual character, with a personality of its own. noAarchitecten does not desire to establish stylistic consistency, but is driven to create buildings and places that have their own individual expression as a result of the specifics of time and place, of associations in appearance and detail, as well as of quiet intuition.

CONFERENCE ABSTRACTS

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MATTHIAS BALLESTREM

TU BERLIN ROBUST ARCHITECTURE

The main focus in teaching and research at the Chair for Architectural Design and Construction over the past semesters has been on the conditions for the longevity of buildings both in the past and in the future. The term “robust architecture” describes the aim of designing future buildings that are simultaneously resistant and adaptable, sluggish and flexible; all in all “smart”, thus permanent and sustainable. The design studios addressed different aspects: The “Egon Eiermann Preis 2013” competition asked for a house of materials research with a “smart skin”. The design task asked how a monolithic, robust exterior wall, through designbased and energetic aspects, can 12

become an intelligent building envelope. During the winter semester of 2013/14, “RUINS” designated a decaying, listed ruin in the northern part of Brandenburg as the starting point for the development of new usage scenarios. The preexisting structure was to be treated simply and irreverently as building mass, to be expanded with infralightweight concrete, an insulating type of concrete. The prescribed concrete material could, following our thesis, act as “glue” for the ruinous preexisting structure. By widening, molding or infusing, the preexisting structure would be stabilized, preserved and insulated. The monolithic material’s interior and exterior surfaces would automatically

CONFERENCE ABSTRACTS


formulate a visible contrast to the preexisting structure. The design project “MAX” in the summer semester of 2014, asked for an urban hybrid revolving around a market hall and addressed the fungibility of a large, designed public interior: Students designed new market halls for Berlin, and were asked how “smartly” and robustly an innercity building can be conceived in order to enable it to accommodate the juxtaposition, superposition and frequent changes of uses in the future; be it through its structure or typology, its integration in the city context, its flexibility or useneutrality, or its characteristic spatial qualities. We wondered whether an open, wide spanning construction or a robust, modular, and easily extensible structure with redundant elements would be more efficient for our purpose, and whether, for example, oversized interiors used as buffer zones are both climatically and programmatically beneficial. The current design seminar “BIG INN”, in the winter semester of 2014/15, is interested in the strength large interiors can possess. We ask, which qualities are needed for these spaces to become special locations in the city. We don’t believe in neutral, flexible spaces; but in clearly defined, fixed, formulated and specified, yet

variable spaces. We believe that functionalism cannot cope with today’s developments, in which uses change much more quickly and dynamically than spaces. The architecture should therefore not solely develop its strength through the program. Oswald Mathias Ungers, whom, as a pioneer of this approach, we focus on during this semester, aptly wrote: “An array of differing spaces is ultimately more variable than a so-called flexible system which, although allowing spatial enlargement and reduction through use of partitions, offers no possibility of changing the actual spatial quality”.1

1 Oswald Mathias Ungers: Architekturlehre. Berliner Vorlesungen 1964–65 Neuauflage von ARCH+ 179, Aachen 2010

CONFERENCE ABSTRACTS

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THOMAS SCHNEIDER

APPROPRIATION

Buildings and their interior fitting are often created in an incompatibly opposition to each other. Perfect surfaces without defects are compensated by the users with ‚shabby chic’. Space and object fit neither in an aesthetic nor in a functional way. The latest projects of Brandlhuber+ try to avoid this conflict by rather creating a processed and qualified shell construction. The interior

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design as an architectural effort is consciously negated. Therefore the buildings are robust in a way that they allow different types of uses. Apart from client and architect, the user also decides about the possible kinds of adaption. Whereas in the project „Antivilla“ and the conversion of St. Agnes the main focus was to reduce the building stock to its supporting structure in order to enable a continuation of

CONFERENCE ABSTRACTS


building the approach of the design of the gallery and studio building in Brunnenstrasse 9 was different: In the sense of a process of appropriation merely a shell construction was erected which does not predetermine any specific use. Thomas Schneider was trained as an architect both at TU Dresden and RWTH Aachen. He collaborated with BeL in Cologne in the field of conversion and re-programming.

Since 2010 he is associate at Brandlhuber + Emde, Schneider in Berlin, currently researching on contextuality and mixed-use typologies such as living and working. In addition he founded schneideroelsen in 2013 also focusing on conversion of existing structures. Since 2014 he is also teaching at TU Berlin as assistant at the departement of Prof. Donatella Fioretti.

CONFERENCE ABSTRACTS

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REINER BEELITZ LUBOMIR PEYTCHEV

VAULT 2.0 The building houses an institute for materials research. Over centuries, the vault has proven itself to be a robust construction method. It serves as a starting point for this design, combining the traditional method with the current, modern possibilities of architectural engineering. Standardized supporting elements are prefabricated, enabling complex threedimensional shapes.

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The massive vaults serve as thermal mass and buffer, causing a reduction in energy consumption. The term “smart skin” is not limited to the the treatment of surfaces, but is perceived as an entirely spatial system. The interplay between the transparent façade and the space-forming, thermally regulating structure results in a clear yet flexible spatial concept.

TU BERLIN | ROBUST | SPRING 2013


VAULT 2.0

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longitudinal section 1:500

first floor 1:500

ground floor 1:500

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TU BERLIN | ROBUST | SPRING 2013


VAULT 2.0

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TU BERLIN | ROBUST | SPRING 2013


VAULT 2.0

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KAREN KRÖGER PHILIPP WINKLER PHILIPP RUST

BLACK BOULDER The envelope of the house for materials research is selfsupporting and, at the same time, offers directed views and optimal light intake: In the lower part of the opening light flows indirectly into the building; the upper part of the opening, however, offers directed views. The envelope is to act as an exhibit in both the exterior and the interior, emphasizing the exhibition pieces’ presence. The dark stone, the offset floor levels and walls as well

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the precise control of light create an alternating enfilade in the exhibition space. The permanent exhibition area is located on the two uppermost floors; the second floor and the lowered basin, which is visible from street level, are available for temporary exhibitions. The directorship is located at the building’s end. Below sits a workshop and conference area as well as a lecture hall for presentations of the latest research findings.

TU BERLIN | ROBUST | SPRING 2013


BLACK BOULDER

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longitudinal section 1:500

first floor 1:500

Lightshelf: consistent natural lighting of the exhibition space LIGHTSHELF

GLEICHMÄSSIGE BELICHTUNG DES AUSSTELLUNGSRAUMS

Object slide: for alternating illumination and projections OBJEKTTRÄGER

FÜR WECHSELNDE LICHTSITUATION UNTERSCHIEDLICH BESPIELBAR

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TU BERLIN | ROBUST | SPRING 2013


BLACK BOULDER

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TU BERLIN | ROBUST | SPRING 2013


BLACK BOULDER

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LUKAS SPECKS ONUR OEZDEMIR

BĂ–GEN As a first step, the existing building is stabilized by an internal skeleton of infra-lightweight concrete. Corresponding to the material which primarily tolerates compressive stresses, the skeleton is comprised of arches. The heat-insulating qualities of the concrete subsequently enable the thermal separation of individual cells of the skeleton by using prefabricated wooden elements or windows, thus successively reusing them

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as temperature-controlled interior spaces. In this process, special areas of the interior space may remain in their ruinous state and be preserved. From the outside, the new inner structure remains highly unobtrusive. By defining new floors and juxtaposing a symmetrical grid to the asymmetric architecture of the castle, it is clearly legible and emphasizes openings, offsets and damages of the preexisting structure.

TU BERLIN | RUINS | AUTUMN 2013


BÖGEN

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basement 1:500

ground floor 1:500

first floor 1:500

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TU BERLIN | RUINS | AUTUMN 2013


BÖGEN

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TU BERLIN | RUINS | AUTUMN 2013


BÖGEN

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JULIA DOMAŃSKA ROMINA FALK ANNIKA FALKSTEDT

MARKTHALLE +

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TU BERLIN | MAX | SPRING 2014


The design of the market hall is based on the idea of a robust structure which allows the building to stay adaptive for ever-changing uses and their spatial needs. When used as a market, the open corners have the function of providing a basis for the market stalls. Correspondingly, the closed rooms accommodate service functions, such as storage or sanitary facilities. The generous market is complemented by a sports landscape and gastronomical venues on the upper floor and the roof. While the upper floor is an interior space, the market on the ground floor is primarily designed as an exterior space. Two atria are designed as interior spaces connecting the usable floor space.

section perspective 1:500 MARKTHALLE +

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+16,62 +13,32

+6,66

± 0,00 -3,93 -4,53

section, ground floor, first floor 1:1000

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TU BERLIN | MAX | SPRING 2014


site plan 1:10000

interior space exterior space

MARKTHALLE +

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TU BERLIN | MAX | SPRING 2014


MARKTHALLE +

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REIDAR MESTER

MARKTHALLE XV

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TU BERLIN | MAX | SPRING 2014


The “Market Hall XV� is a hybrid building, which, in addition to its function as a market hall, also accommodates living spaces for students as well as office and co-working spaces. The hall is alternatively used for sports activities, such as basketball or football, with housing and office spaces surrounding it. The interior is dominated by an open shedroof structure. The reinforced concrete structure provides a planar, cool and weathershielded space allowing for the trade of perishable foods. The building blends into the urban context of the surrounding areas while the setback from Hertzallee creates a forecourt for the market.

section perspective 1:500 MARKTHALLE XV

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site plan 1:7500

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TU BERLIN | MAX | SPRING 2014


ground floor, section 1:1000

MARKTHALLE XV

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TU BERLIN | MAX | SPRING 2014


MARKTHALLE XV

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HAMISH WARREN

STADSCAMPUS TILBURG The Stadscampus is part of a transformation of a former railway workshop in the north of the inner city of Tilburg. Its layout is characterised by both an urban typology and relatively high density. As a spatial phenomenon, the Stadscampus can be understood as a sequence of public and semi-public spaces rather than an accumulation of distinct single buildings. The Stadhal is the central

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space in Hamish Warren’s design. It is a civic interior where events and manifestations will take place, forming a counterpart to the dense adjacent programmes. Its identity is formed by a structure that assimilates the existing construction of the hall and contributes to its emancipation as a special room at the same time.

TU DELFT | INTERPRETATIONS OF THE PULIC INTERIOR | AUTUMN 2013


interior view

STADSCAMPUS TILBURG

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TU DELFT | INTERPRETATIONS OF THE PULIC INTERIOR | AUTUMN 2013


STADSCAMPUS TILBURG

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TU DELFT | INTERPRETATIONS OF THE PULIC INTERIOR | AUTUMN 2013


STADSCAMPUS TILBURG

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NIEK DE ROND

MARKET HALL OSS The project deals with the transformation of the remnants of a former carpet factory in the provincial town of Oss, which is intended to become into a new point of urban focus, hosting a market as a central activity. The proposal elaborates upon the characteristics of the existing structure and remodels the space from its suggestions. Remnants and vestiges of the former building and the Ĺ“uvre of the architect Oscar Leeuw serve as the core for the patterns of a new architectural language.

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TU DELFT | INTERPRETATIONS OF THE PULIC INTERIOR | SPRING 2014


MARKET HALL OSS

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Market Hall Oss

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TU DELFT | INTERPRETATIONS OF THE PULIC INTERIOR | SPRING 2014


Architecture of the interior MSc 1 Niek de Rond

MARKET HALL OSS

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TU DELFT | INTERPRETATIONS OF THE PULIC INTERIOR | SPRING 2014


MARKET HALL OSS

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LAURA HUERTAS SANTAMARIA

HOTEL BRITANNIA In May 2014 a group of students visited the ruins of Hotel Britannia, a 50s beach pavilion and hotel, and set about to rebuild the existing structure in 1:20 models. The design task was the reinterpretation of the existing interior as captured in a series of photographs, taken after the opening in 1955. The ambition for this project was to enrobe the space with a new outfit and highlight the strong aspects of the past. The floor pattern suggests a play of shadows and blurs the separation of structural and decorative elements. The lines aspire to form a harmonious 58

composition with the calm, regular faรงade, which in itself is less prominent. The association with a ballroom lifts the status of the room.

TU DELFT | INTERIOR TERRITORIES | SPRING 2014


HOTEL BRITANNIA

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TU DELFT | INTERIOR TERRITORIES | SPRING 2014


HOTEL BRITANNIA

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Caption 2mm under the picture

HOTEL BRITANNIA

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JAN PAULUS HOOGTERP

DOLL‘S HOUSE The MSc2 Doll’s House studio was an experiment that merged the world of Architecture with the world of architectural representation. The model represents its own making. A sourcebook of fine interiors served as the basis for the final model, on a scale of 1:30. The use of wood as a material for constructing shape and rhythm as well as formulating

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space was the theme for the design. The material is used in a gradation, starting at the base with the pure material scale 1:1. There is even a small garden growing to expose the character of the natural material. To expose the way of this construction there is a possibility to unfold the tower and transform it into a patio house that surrounds a central garden.

TU DELFT | INTERIOR TERRITORIES | SPRING 2014


DOLL‘S HOUSE

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TU DELFT | INTERIOR TERRITORIES | SPRING 2014


DOLL‘S HOUSE

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SONG LIANG

ZUIDAS The MSc3/4 graduation studio is concerned with the ‘ZuidasDok’ in Amsterdam: a major infra-structural, corporate and institutional node that accommodates and suggests many diverse functions. The circumstances make it a potential location not only for commercial facilities, but more substantial elements that profit from and feed the dynamics of the location. It can host and generate a specific public interior that extends and gives

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meaning to the difficult fabric of the context. The public realm around Amsterdam-Zuid station are re-configured as an urban island with its own scale, spaces and and hierarchies. The buildings and spaces conform to an architectural order that is distinct from all the building complexes– –‘circus characters’––that surround them, much in the manner of the Palais Royale in Paris.

TU DELFT | NEW DIRECTIONS FOR THE PUBLIC INTERIOR | AUTUMN 2013


ZUIDAS

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TU DELFT | NEW DIRECTIONS FOR THE PUBLIC INTERIOR | AUTUMN 2013


ZUIDAS

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TU DELFT | NEW DIRECTIONS FOR THE PUBLIC INTERIOR | AUTUMN 2013


ZUIDAS

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MATTEO MESCHIARI

ZUIDAS The spaces of train stations as places of great transitions are important media of infrastructural and sociopublic exchange. The delicate transition dictated by the station and its passage between the two sides of Amsterdam-Zuid led to an austere intervention with

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clearly defined edges and an ‘anatomical’ orchestration of movement within. Megalithic monumentality and precise materiality were used to stir emotional responses and ‘a sense of un-rooted belonging’.

TU DELFT | NEW DIRECTIONS FOR THE PUBLIC INTERIOR | AUTUMN 2013


ZUIDAS

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ZUIDAS

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TU DELFT | NEW DIRECTIONS FOR THE PUBLIC INTERIOR | AUTUMN 2013


ZUIDAS

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CONTACT INFORMATION

Kai Nikolaus GrĂźne, Dipl.-Ing. Architekt TU Berlin Fachgebiet Baukonstruktion und Entwerfen Prof. Regine Leibinger | Gastprofessor Matthias Ballestrem TU Berlin, Sekr. A 43 StraĂ&#x;e des 17. Juni 152, 10623 Berlin gruene@tu-berlin.de www.fgl.tu-berlin.de Ir. Susanne Pietsch The Architecture of the Interior TU Delft, Faculty of Architecture Julianalaan 134 2628 BL Delft T +31 6 5380 4142 InteriorArchitecture-BK@tudelft.nl www.tudelft-architecture.nl/chairs/interiors

Reflections on the Public Interior  

TWO ARCHITECTURE CHAIRS IN DISCUSSION TU BERLIN | TU DELFT SYMPOSIUM TU DELFT 20. | 21. JANUARY 2015

Reflections on the Public Interior  

TWO ARCHITECTURE CHAIRS IN DISCUSSION TU BERLIN | TU DELFT SYMPOSIUM TU DELFT 20. | 21. JANUARY 2015

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