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GREEN

WILLOW AND

OTHER

FAIRY

JAPANESE

TALES

BY

GRACE

WITH

JAMES

ILLUSTRATIONS

WARWICK

MACMILLAN ST.

MARTIN'S

IN

COLOUR

BY

GOBLE

AND

CO^

STREET, 1912

LIMITED LONDON


COPYRIGHT

First

EditioHt

4/0,

40

/UuttratumSf

1910.

JVhv

Etiifwn,

8cv,

z6

lUustraiionSt

1913.


178020 GOT -9

\m

"BUG7

TO

MISS

ETSUKO

KATO


LIST

OF

The

Moon

The

Flute

The

Peony

The

Sea

ILLUSTRATIONS

IN

COLOUR

Maiden

Frontispiece FACE

The

PACK

lo

Lantern

King

and

25

Magic Jewels

the

.* .

.

.

Star Lovers

45

65

Reflections

78

The

Story of Susa, the Impetuous

99

The

Bell of

The

Singing

A

Legend

The The

D6j6ji Bird

127

148

of Heaven

of Kwannon

Espousal of

the

Strange Story of

The

Matsuyama

The

Nurse

The

Beautiful

165 Rat's the

Daughter

.

.

.

.

.

.

.171

Comb

Golden

Mirror

.

191 228

243 Dancer

of Yedo

250

Karma

270

zi


NOTE

These

talcs

many

sources.

from

the

which

legends have

and

Ko-ji-ki^ or

from

told

are

of them

Some

mythology being

memory,

from

days, originallyheard or

a

favourite

subjects

for

one

an

this, and

form

are

his

allowed

Daughter," to

others

;

of

lips of

the

in

childish fellow school-

a

again, form

them,

translated

appeared

Many

Japan.

relics

of

Matters^

stories into

now

English

this country

probably

are

the

upon

in to

new

English public. Thanks

has

another

or

been

have

of

representation

number

A

gathered together have ere

of

Certain

nurse.

Japanese stage.

long

the

selected

been

Ancient

of

from

collected

have

Record

the

contains

been

Mrs.

version

T.

of

"

to

H. The

due

to

story, be

Marcus **

The

included

James

for

Matsuyama

vii

B.

Huish, Esq.,who

Espousal in this

of the

collection

permission Mirror.'*

to

use

Rat's ;

and

her


CONTENTS

PAGX

1.

Green

2.

The

Flute

3.

The

Tea-Kettle

4.

The

Peony

5.

The

Sea

6.

The

Good

7.

The

Black

8.

The

Star

9.

Horaizan

Willow

10.

Reflections

11.

The

i

lo

17 Lantern

King

25

and

the

Magic

Jewels

.

The

37

Thunder

50

Bowl

56

Lovers

65 71

78

Story

Susa,

of

Impetuous

the

...

12.

.

Wind

Pine

the

in

Tree

89 loi

....

13.

Flower

14.

The

Mallet

15.

The

Bell

16.

The

Maiden

of

108

Peony

the

116

of

Dojoji of

127

Unai

134 ix


CONTENTS PACK

17. The

Robe

18. The

Singing

19. The

Cold

20.

The

Fire

21.

A

22.

The

Feathers

of

Bird

142

Heaven

of

148

....

Lady

153 161

Quest

Legend

165

Kwannon

of

Espousal

of

Daughter

"

.

Land

24. The

Spring

25. The

Strange

26. The

Jelly-Fishtakes

Yomi

Lover

and

Story

the

the

of

Lover

Autumn

Golden

Comb

Journey

a

.

.

.

.

27. Urashima 28.

the

Fox

Maiden

Matsuyama

228

Mirror

Images

Tongue-cut

33. The

Nurse

34. The

Beautiful

233 Sparrow

238 243

Dancer

of

Yedo

.

.

Hana-Saka-Jiji

36. The

Moon

250

258

Maiden

264

37. Karma

38. The

204

223

32. The

35.

191

215

29. MoMOTARo

31. Broken

185

209

Tamamo,

30. The

171 180

23. The

of

Rat's

the

270 Sad

Story

of

the

Yaoya's X

Daughter

.

276


WILLOW

GREEN

the

ToMODATA, the

He

of Noto.

Lord

had

a

poet.

He

a

noble

form

and

a

beloved

was

his

Now

loyal

"

Are

you

"

My

lord, you

"

Do

"

Ay,

love

you

good

my

"Then

fear

Stay

not

life look

bring

me

do the

for

not

your not

?

then

?

lord,'* said

"

kind.

and

wanted

Noto,

a

chose

He

trust.

presence.

daimyo. Tomodata,

it," answered

know me,

his

the

said

asked

the

daimyo.

kneeling

Tomodata,

;

but any word

message,'*

my

carry

and

Ride

and

"

manly

every

him.

before

"

of of

to

was

poor.

Lord

him

called

and

Tomodata,

by

mission

a

He

generous

and

the

daimyoy

undertake

to

man

and

rich

by

in

excelled

graceful dancer, and He wealthy was sport.

face,

beautiful

a

to

and

courtier,

a

address.

winning

a

He

and

voice

very

allegiance

soldier,

a

was

sweet

a

owed

samurai^

young

not

spare

your

mountains storm

nor

betray maid

not

between

nor

any your

beast. the other

the

said

Ride

again quickly.'*

straight,

enemies'

country. Lose

thing. Above

trust.

the

daimyo.

eyes.

all, do

Ride,

and


WILLOW

GREEN

spokethe

Thus

Tomodata

So rode

he

commands,

and straight, three

been

burst,for

it

rode

and

Tomodata

rode

wind

spoke to drew

he

might

rode

month.

had

tempest

Down

bowed

howled

he

poured his head

in the

pine-tree good horse

typhoon. The scarcelykeep its feet,but it and urged it on. His own

close

about

him

l;)low away,

not

autumn

a

could

lord's

He

Ere

country.

Tomodata

It blew

trembled

that it

The

good beast.

the road the

torrent.

on.

branches.

cloak

enemies'

the ninth

was

a

his

his

to

he

away

afraid of the steep mountain

not

daysupon

the rain in and

sparednot was

horse,and

to

Obedient

quest.

of the

nor

passes

of Noto,

got him

his

upon

Lord

i

and

and

held

it

in this wise

so

he

on.

fierce

The

of the

landmark that he

storm

became

many a familiar buffeted the samurai so

swept away

road,and

almost

tide fainting.Noondark as twilight, was as was as dark twilight and when nightfellit was as black as the as night, night of Yomi, where lost souls wander and cry. By this time Tomodata had lost his way in a wild, where, as it seemed to him, no human lonelyplace,

soul inhabited.

weary

His

horse

to

could

carry him

no

foot throughbogs and and he wandered on longer, marshes,throughrocky and thornytracks,until he fell into deep despair. "Alack and

At

I die in this wilder! '* he cried, ness "must the quest of the Lord of Noto be unfulfilled?''

this

moment

the great winds

blew

away

the


WILLOW

GREEN

I

clouds of the

shone very sky,so that the moon forth,and by the sudden lightTomodata brightly his righthand. a littlehill on saw Upon the hill was

small thatched cottage,and before the cottage

a

three green

grew

weeping-willowtrees. indeed, the gods be thanked

Now, Tomodata, "

and

three willow

over

woman,

"I

I

am

a

a

lonelymoor.

myselfand As

My

and

out

old

a

"

she

benighted

is Tomodata*

in the service of the Lord

Show

of Noto,

hospitality

me

food and shelter

crave

horse.*'

my

stood man young from his garments.

put

and

name

the

streamed

night?

a

lost traveller,

weary

samurai

such

upon

upon whose business I ride. for the love of the gods. I for

an

wills he here ? *'

and what

your

upon

opened by

was

poorlybut neatlyclad.

rides abroad

am

their green threw his horse*s

one

the cottage door

very

asked,"

a

of them, and called for the longed-for shelter.

to

Who

"

of the cottage door, hole in the roof. The

Tomodata

of

branch

once

time.

no

swayedand flungout

trees

a

admittance At

of

out

hill in

said

chinks

in the wind.

streamers

rein

the

curled

the

climbed

from

Light shone and smoke

he

!**

hand

to

hold

speakingthe He

on

reeled

a

water

little,

of by the side-post

the door. "

Come

full of

woman,

fire. You fare

in,come

to

in,young

sir ! "

pity. "Come

very welcome. but it shall be offer, are

great good-will. As

to

in We set

cried the old

have but before you

your horse,I 3

the

to

see

warm coarse

with

you have


WILLOW

GREEN delivered him

to

i

he

daughter;

my

is in

good

hands." behind

him,

round. Just sharply stood a very young light,

in the dim

the

girlwith Her

turned

this Tomodata

At

horse*s rein thrown

garments

streamed

hair

loose

wondered

samurai

the old

blown

were

and

about

upon she had come

how

him

into

her

arm.

her

long

wind.

The

there.

Then

the

out

drew

woman

over

the

cottage and

Before the fire sat the good the door. of the house, and the two old people did They very best they could for Tomodata.

shut man

the

gave rice

dry garments, comforted him with hot wine, and quicklyprepareda good supper him

for him. the daughterof Presently

and retired behind to

dress afresh.

him. Her

She

feet

confined

bare.

forth

came

of

robe

blue

a

were

she

hair

Her

house

comb

to

screen

Then

wore

in

a

the

came

hair and

her

wait upon

to

homespun was

in,

cotton.

tied

not

nor

lay along her smooth and long and black,to cheeks,and hung,straight her very knees. She was slender and graceful. Tomodata judged her to be about fifteen years old, and

knew

had

ever

At

any

well

way,

but

that she

was

length she

at

he

seen.

knelt

her.

When

pouring the wine their glances met,

she and

his side to

pour wine the wine-bottle in two

at

into his cup. She held hands and bent her head. look

the fairestmaiden

had

Tomodata had set

and Tomodata 4

turned

made

an

down

the

looked

at

end

to

of

bottle, her full


WILLOW

GREEN

I

the eyes, for he forgotaltogether the Lord of Noto. warning of his daimyoy " ? ** Maiden/' he said," what is your name the

between

She

answered

They

"

:

call

the

me

Green

Willow/' "The

again

he

dearest

name

looked

her

chin

to

the

between

And

eyes.

long her face grew rosy red, forehead,and though she smiled her

because he looked from

said,and

earth,'*he

on

so

eyes filledwith tears. Ah me, for the Lord Tomodata

Then **

of Noto's quest ! made this little song :

maiden^do Long-haired

you know

That with the red dawn Do you wish

far

me

go f

I must ?

away

maiden^say long-haired maiden^if you know hong-haired Cruel

"

That with the red dawn

Why^ the

And "

oh

why

J

do you blush

maiden, the

The dawn

I must

comes

so

Willow, answered

Green

ifI

go^ '*

?

will

or

no

:

;

Never

leave me^ never go. My sleeve shall hide the blush away. The dawn comes ifI will or no ;

Never

leave me^ Lordy I lift my

"Oh,

Green

never

go. sleeve so. long

Willow,

Green

sighedTomodata. That night he lay before 5

the

.'' .

.

Willow fire "

'* .

"

.

but still,


WILLOW

GREEN with he

eyes, for

wide

was

He

weary. Yet

Willow.

bound

sleepcame

no

him

to

though

sick for love of the Green

was

the rules of his service he was over, to think of no such thing. More-

by

in honour

the quest of the Lord of Noto that his heart,and he longedto keep truth

had

he

i

layheavy on and loyalty.

the firstpeep of

At

day he

rose

He

up.

looked

who had been his host,and upon the kind old man left a purse of gold at his side as he slept. The maiden and her mother laybehind the screen.

saddled and

bridled his horse,and mounting,rode slowlyaway through the mist of the earlymorning. The storm was quite over still as Paradise. The and it was as green grass Tomodata

the

and

the

clear,and

was

flowers

Green

"Ah, and

Willow,'*

lay in holy that he

;

the

when

as

to

twilightfell.

he rose, a

cold

That

his mind

that flowed

his

journey;

the shrine's threshold.

Willow, prone

upon

the

night

placewas so midnighttill

havingit in

stream

go refreshed upon

Green

Green

"

"

deserted shrine,and the from of all he slept in spite

stoppedupon the

was

Willow,'' he Green Willow, Willow, Green

a

Then the dawn. wash himself in 80

it

and

autumn

bow, his saddle-

across

Green

Willow,

"

Willow

Green

sky

sad.

was

noontide

at

The

wet.

path very brightwith

streamed sunlight

the

When

the

with

but Tomodata

;

sighed;

shone

leaves

near

but he

to

by, was

There

lay ground. A

thing she lay,face downwards, hair flungabout her. She lifted a

slender

with

her

black

hand

and

6


GREEN

I

held

Tomodata

by

WILLOW the

lord,"she said,and fell to took her in his

He he

soon

set

her

on

"My lord, my sobbingpiteously.

sleeve.

arms

word, and before him, and

without

his horse

a

togethertheyrode the livelong day. It was little they recked of the road they went, for all the while they looked into each other's eyes. The heat and the cold were nothing to them. They felt not

the

of the

Lord

the rain ; of truth or falsehood nor theythoughtnothingat all ; nor of filialpiety, sun

nor

of Noto's

word. plighted

Alas,for the ways

They

quest, nor

of honour

knew

the

but

nor

thing.

one

of love !

At last

unknown to an city,where theycame carried gold and jewels they stayed. Tomodata in his girdle, built of white so theyfound a house with sweet white mats. In every dim wood, spread there could be heard the sound of the garden room

waterfall,whilst

the

flitted

swallow

and

across

the paper lattice. Here theydwelt,knowing but the one thing. Here theydwelt three years of across

for Tomodata and the happydays,and the years were like garlands of sweet In the

the

autumn

of them

two

shake

Willow

flowers.

of the third year it chanced forth

went

dusk, for theyhad a wish to rise ; and as theywatched, the to

Green

into see

the

the

Green

that

garden at

round Willow

moon

began

and shiver.

dear," said Tomodata, "you shake and is shiver ; and it is no wonder, the night wind in." And he put his arm around her. chill. Come

"My

At

this she gave

a

long and pitiful cry, very 7


WILLOW

GREEN

loud and full of agony, and the cry she failed, and love's breast. "

me

; "

i

had

she

when

droppedher

head

Tomodata,'*she whispered,say "

uttered her

upon

prayer for

a

1 die."

Oh, say

not

so,

!

sweet

sweet, my

my

You

but weary ; you are faint.'* He carried her to the stream's side, where the iris grew like swords, and the lotus-leaves like are

He fields,and laved her forehead with water. said : What Look up and live." is it,my dear ? The tree,"she moaned, the tree they "

"

"

"

have

down

cut

tree.

my

"

"

the Green

Remember

Willow." it seemed, from his as slipped, himself upon the to his feet ; and he, casting arms ground,found onlysilken garments, brightcoloured, and sweet, and straw warm sandals, scarlet-thonged. In after years, when Tomodata was a holy With

that she

he travelled from

man,

shrine

shrine,painfully

to

feet,and acquiredmuch he found Once, at nightfall,

upon

hill,and

on

cottage.

The

old been

and

it the door

down.

stilland silent. "

sad

stood for

8

a

himself:

know

I must

three

long since long time

gentlyto

maiden^do you Long-haired That with the red dawn

little

poor thatched fro with broken

that had

he sang

a

a

a

Before it stood

trees

Tomodata Then

and

to

upon

he beheld

of

ruins

swung

of willow

himself

righthand

creakinghinge.

stumps cut

his

On

moor. lonely

latch

merit.

his

go ?


WILLOW

GREEN

I

far away ? Cruel long-haired maiden^say maiden^ifyou know Long-haired

Do you wish

me

"

That with the red dawn

Why^ oh why^do "Ah, foolish song ! I

should

Dead,"

have

recited

said Tomodata.

I must

you blush

The

the

so

go^

f

'*

mc. godsforgive

Holy

Sutra

.

.

.

for the


II

THE

since, their

Long

FLUTE

lived

Yedo

in

a

of

gentleman

His conversation. good lineage and very honest wife was his secret a gentle and loving lady. To she did But a daughter grief,she bore him no sons. give him, whom they called 0'Yon6, which, being of them Rice Each in the ear." interpreted, is loved this child more than life,and guarded her as the the child And apple of their eye. up grew red and white, and long-eyed, straight and slender "

as

the

bamboo.

green

0'Yon6

When

drooped with pined, and ere the

maples

the

earth.

He

cried

ground broke

the

aloud,

of had

dead

he

beat

the

year, faded from shrouded was

his

comfort,

The

slept.

nor

wild

mother

sickened, the

leaves

of

laid

in

and in

and

his

grief.

lay upon the for days he neither child was quite

breast, and

her

old,

years

and

husband

refused fast

his

red

was

The

and

fall

the

she

twelve

was

he

silent. Time

his business. his

wife's

The

passed by. The

grave.

man

of winter

snows

The

perforce went

beaten 10

fell and

pathway

about covered

from

his


(

The

Flute.-/*,

w.


THE

11

house

dwellingof

the

to

undisturbed and

for the

went

making merry gilded paper,

the dead

also,

snow

was

faint

printsof a child's he girdedup his In the spring-time forth to see the cherry blossom, enough, and writinga poem upon

save

sandalled feet. robe

FLUTE

which

he

hung

to

cherry-tree

a

The flutter in the wind/ poem the of of and saki. Later,he praise spring branch

to

planted and thought of his lilyof forgetfulness,

the orange

wife

But

more.

no

the child remembered.

Before the year was with home, a woman

he

out

her, and

her

that all

father loved with

bride

new

black heart.

a

commended

happy,and

believed

her

because

broughta

fair face and

a

poor fool,was

the man, his child to But

Now

in

was

well.

was

her

0'Yon6,

jealousand deadly hatred,and every dayshe dealt cruelly by the child, whose gentleways and patience onlyangeredher

stepmotherhated

the

more.

did

not

a

of her father's presence she do 0'Yon6 any great ill ; therefore

But because dare

to

The poor child passed she waited, bidingher time. her days and her nightsin torment and horrible fear.

But

of these

her father.

Such

thingsshe

is the

Now, after some

said

not

a

word

to

of children.

manner

that the

time, it chanced

man

called away by his business to a distant city. and from Yedo it of the city, Kioto was the name is many days'journeyon foot or on horseback. was

Howbeit, go three and to

moons

the or

man

more.

needs

Therefore

equippedhimself,and go with

him, with

must,

all II

his

and

stay there

he made

servants

ready,

that

thingsneedful

;

were

and

so


THE

which departure, morning.

be very earlyin the him He called 0'Yon6 to to

was

said

Come

"

:

0'Yon6

and knelt before him.

went

giftshall

"What Kioto

?

But

"

she

hung

her head and did

with

shuttlecocks ? Then

took

it and

her

away

silk,or

-feathered light

many bitter

burst into

break.

father,"she said," I

her.

great battledore

a

weeping, and

upon his knees to soothe her. face with her sleeves and cried

would

heart

bade

**

she

her

answer.

roll of

a

brocade, or

images upon

not

little one," he

goldenfan,or

a

obi of red

new

from

home

bring you

he said.

Shall it be

hid

I

Answer, then, rude

"

a

and

dear little daughter.** So

here, then,my

**

ii

the last nightbefore his

to

came

FLUTE

And,

do

not

"

go

O

But as

he she

if her

father,father,

away

"

do

not

go

"

sweet, I needs must," he answered, " I shall be back and soon it will so soon, scarcely that I am I shall be here again seem gone, when

But, my

"

"

fair gifts in my

with

hand."

Father,take me with you,"she said. "Alas,what a great way for a little girl! Will or mount you walk on your feet,my little pilgrim, "

how

you fare in the inns of Kioto ? Nay, my dear,stay; it is but for a little time, and your kind mother will be with you."

a

? pack-horse

She

And

shuddered

in his

Father, if you

"

would

arms.

go, you

more." 13

will

never

see

me


FLUTE

THE

II

the father felt a sudden

Then

chill about

his

But he would not pause. Must he, a strong man grown,

heart, that gave him heed

it.

!

What

swayed by a child's fancies ? He put 0*Yon6 gentlyfrom him, and she slipped away as silently

be

as

a

shadow. But

in the

sunrise with bamboo

she

him

to

came

little flute in her

a

and

morning

before

hand, fashioned of I made

it self," myin the grove that

smoothlypolished, "

she said," from a bamboo As you is behind our garden. I made it for you. with you, take the little flute, take me cannot father.

honourable

will,and

think

handkerchief wound

and silk,lined with scarlet, cord about it,and gave it to her

put it in his sleeve.

departedand As

on

of white

father,who Kioto.

of me.*'

scarlet

a

it sometimes, if you Then she wrapped it in a

Play

he

went went

After

this he

his way, takingthe road to he looked back thrice,and

beheld his child,standing at the gate,lookingafter Then heir no him. the road turned and he saw more.

The

city of

beautiful,and

so

Kioto

the

was

passinggreat

father of 0'Yon6

found

and it.

duringthe day,which sped very well, and his pleasurein the evening, his sound and sleep at night,the time passed and small thoughthe gave to Yedo, to his merrily, moons home, or to his child. Two passed,and three,and he made no plansfor return. One eveninghe was making readyto go forth And

to

a

what

with

his business

and great supper of his friends, '3

as

he searched


FLUTE

THE

in his chest for certain brave he

intended

to

wear

as

an

ii

silken hakama honour

to

the

which he feast,

which had lain hidden upon the littleflute, all this time in the sleeve of his travelling dress.

came

He

it forth from

drew and

its red and white

chief, handker-

he did so, felt strangely cold with an icychill that crept about his heart. He hung over the live charcoal of the hibachi as one in a dream.

put the flute to his

He it

as

a

when lips,

there

from

came

long-drawnwail. He

the

dropped it hastilyupon

and

mats

clappedhis hands

for his servant, and told him he would not not well, go forth that night. He was After a long time he reached he would be alone. for the flute. Again that long, his hand out He

melancholycry. but

he

Yedo

blew

.

.

Father ! '*

the

into

back

come

.

shook

The

from

flute. to

"

head

to

Come

Yedo.

quaveringchildish

.

foot,

back

to

Father .

voice

.

rose

to

! a

shriek and then broke. A the

horrible and

man,

now foreboding

he

was

as

one

took

of possession

beside himself.

He

flunghimself from the house and from the city, and journeyedday and night, denying himself sleepand food. So palewas he and wild that the and fled from him, peopledeemed him a madman or pitiedhim as the afflictedof the gods. At last he came his journey's to end, travel-stained from head to heel,with bleedingfeet and half-dead of weariness. His He

wife said

:

met "

him

Where

in the gate. is the child ? **


FLUTE

THE

II

"

"

The

child

child

Ay, the

he cried in The

an

? " she answered.

my

"

child

.

.

is she ? "

where

.

agony.

laughed:

woman

should

.

.

"

I know

She

?

she is in the

Nay,

"

is within she

or garden,

she has gone forth with her He said : " Enough ; no

my her

at

lord, how books, or

is

or asleep, mayhap ." or playmates, "

"

of this.

more

Come,

"

where

is my child ? Then afraid. she was

Grove,"

she

There

And, him

said,lookingat

the

In the Bamboo

with

wide

But of the bamboos. green stems find her. He not called,'* Yon6 ! Yon6 '* But he had no again," Yone ! Yon6 !

the

wind

eyes.

sought 0*Yon6

ran, and

man

"

among he

did

! '* and answer

;

leaves. dry bamboo Then he felt in his sleeve and broughtforth the little flute,and very tenderly put it to his lips. faint sighingsound. Then voice There a a was

only the

thin spoke,

the

sighedin

and

: pitiful

wicked

"Father, dear father,my killed She

buried

Grove. will me

Three

me.

You

never more.

With

in the

me

may

see "

"

his

and justice,

me

since

moons

she

killed

me.

clearingof

find my any

stepmother

bones.

more

"

the Bamboo As for me, you

^you will

never

see

man

did

"'*

own

two-handed

sword

the

slew

his wicked

wife, avenging the

he dressed child. Then death of his innocent himself in coarse white raiment, with a great ricehis face. And he took a hat that shadowed straw 15


FLUTE

THE

staffand

a

and feet,

thus he

straw

rain-coat and set

forth upon

ii

bound a

sandals

on

to pilgrimage

his the

holyplacesof Japan, And a

he

carried

the little flute with

fold of his garment, upon

i6

his breast.

him,

in


Ill

TEA-KETTLE

THE

Long

ago,

heard

Fvc

as

temple of Morinji, holy priest. there

Now

First,

man.

and a

observances

great

one

of his

of

Province

Kotsuke,

a

things about this reverend in meditations wrapped up

was

forms

and

for the

Sacred

mystical things.

and

the

the

at

three

were

he

in

dwelt

tell, there

and

doctrines.

Sutras, and

Then

he

had

a

He

was

knew

strange

fine

exquisite

and

much so nothing pleased him of the Cha-no-yu ; and the ancient tea as ceremony both sides for the third thing about him, he knew well coin of a copper enough and loved a bargain. he happened None so pleased as he when upon and ancient tea-kettle, lying rusty an dirty and halfof a shop in a back forgotten in a corner poor taste

street

of his

own,

town.

ugly bit of old metal," says the holy man "but it will do well the shopkeeper; to enough to of an boil humble FU drop of water evening. my he did and This took give you three rin for it." of bronze, fine the kettle home, rejoicing; for it was work, the very thing for the Cha-no^yu. "

An

17

c


TEA-KETTLE

THE A

and

it

out

came

scoured

and

cleaned

novice

pretty

as

iii

the

as

you and that,and

tea-kettle,

please.The

down, upside his finger-naiL He he cried, a bargain! and bargain,"

it this way looked into it,tappedit with

turned priest smiled.

rubbed covered

"

his hands. with

over

times, and

then

the kiettleupon a box purplecloth,and looked at it

He a

firsthe

long that

so

to

And

set

fain

was

and he

then, believe

to

them

close

droppedforward

head

'*

"

A

rub his eyes many altogether.His

slept. wonderful

the

me,

thing

though no hand it. A hairyhead, with two was near brighteyes, lid jumped up and looked out of the spout. The and Four brown and hairypaws appeared, down. down In a minute the kettle was a fine bushy tail. from the box and going round and round looking at things.

happened.The

A

"

tea-kettle moved,

comfortable

very

room,

be

to

sure," says

the tea-kettle.

Pleased

enough

began to

soon

sing

and

dance

the top of its voice. studyingin the next

at

were

is

he

be

at

?"

to

caper Three

room.

or "

four novices

The

old

only hark to him. And they laughed in

lively," theysaid ;

can

lodged,it nimbly and to

find itselfso well

to

"

man

What their

sleeves.

mercy, the noise that the tea-kettle Bang ! bang ! Thud ! thud ! thud ! novices soon stoppedlaughing. One of

Heaven's made

!

The them "

slid aside the kara-'kami and

Arah,

the

devil and i8

peepedthrough.

all's in it ! "

he

cried.


THE

Ill

of

badger.

a

The

for certain

or

shall be lost ! it

third

"

the

So

said since,'*

the Holy reciting

his knees.

on

laughed. he said. hobgoblin/'

the

to

catch it.

a

to

the

books

Ha,

and

ha !

Catch

"

me

ha ! "

if you

rushed

They

breathless.

grew

Ha,

to

kettle up with the teaIt danced and it leapt

it flew up into the air. The novices here and there, slipping upon the mats. "

a

they come

bit of it.

They

in

tea-kettle

and

hot.

of

view

nearer

left their

chase

could a

for

Fm

them

gave

But Not

?

of

lot

twinklingsand

grew

a

"

hour

an

novice, and he fell

another A

not

into

from witchcraft,

godsprotect us

we

I scoured

"And Sutras

old tea-kettle turned

the master's

"Here's sort

TEA-KETTLE

laughed the !

can

"

tea-kettle ; ful laughedthe wonder-

tea-kettle.

the priest awoke, Presently

all rosy, the

holy

man. "

says, all?"

what's the

And "

me disturbing

meaning of this racket,"he at my holy meditations and

Master, master,"cry the novices,pantingand mopping their brows, "your tea-kettle is bewitched. "

It

was

been "

badger,no less. givingus, you'dnever a

Stuflf and ?

Not

And

dance

it has

believe ! "

nonsense,"says a

the

bit of it.

the

There

priest ; it rests

"

as

you

please. There 19

was

its

on

box, good quietthing, justwhere I put it," Sure enough, so it did, lookingas hard cold and innocent

witched be-

and not

a


THE hair of

TEA-KETTLE

badgernear

a

It

it.

iii

the novices

was

that

looked foolish.

likelystory indeed," says the priest. I that took wings to itself have heard of the pestle and flew away, partingcompany with the mortar. That is easily But to be understood by any man. "

a

A

"

kettle that turned

badger no, no ! To from pray to be preserved

into

your books,my sons, and of illusion." the perils

a

"

filledthe kettle very night the holyman from the springand set it on water the

That

with

hibachi to boil for his cup of boil

began to

When

tea.

the

water

"

Ai ! Ai ! " the kettle cried ; " Ai ! Ai ! The And it lost no time at heat of the Great Hell ! " "

all,but hopped oflfthe fire as quickas you please.

Sorcery!

"

A

Help

!

Help

!

of his wits,the

runningto

came

A "

priest. Black magic ! devil ! Mercy on ! me "

Help ! dear good see

what

He

was

the novices

All

man.

was

out frightened

the

matter.

tea-kettle is bewitched," he

The

"

cried the

devil !

A

devil !

"

gasped;

it was a badger badger, assuredly speaksand leapsabout the room." Nay, master," said a novice, see rests upon its box, good quietthing." And sure enough,so it did. was

a

"

"

"

"

reverend

Most

all pray

to

be

sir,"said

the

preservedfrom

.

the

it

it both

.

where

novice,

"

"

let

it

us

perilsof

illusion." The

sold priest

the

tea-kettle

got for it twenty copper coins. 20

to

a

tinker and


TEA-KETTLE

THE

Ill

mighty fine bit of bronze,'*says priest, Mind, Fm givingit away to you, '*

It*s

a

"

I cannot

sure

for

The

bargain!

a

carried home

for."

tell what

tinker

the kettle.

Ah,

was

He

a

he

the

was

Fm one

and

happy man

turned

the

it this way into it.

upsidedown, and looked A pretty piece,"says the tinker ; a very he And that when bed to went good bargain." nighthe put the kettle by him, to see it firstthing in the morning. He awoke at midnightand fell to lookingat the kettle by the bright lightof the moon. hand it moved, though there was no Presently and that,and

"

"

it.

near "

said Strange,"

the tinker ; but he

was

a

man

took

who

thingsas they came. hairy head, with two

A

brighteyes,

looked

of the kettle's spout. The lid jumped up and and hairypaws appeared, and Four brown down. out

a

fine bushy tail.

"

quiteclose

to

the tinker

paw upon him. Well ?" says the tinker. I am not wicked," says the tea-kettle.

and laid "

It came

a

**

No," says the tinker.

"

But

I like

to

be well treated.

I

am

a

badger

tea-kettle."

me

"

So it

"

At

and

seems," says the tinker.

the set me

templetheycalled me on

names,

and beat

the fire. I couldn't stand

it,you

know." "

"

I like your spirit," says the tinker. I think I shall settle down with you." 21


TEA-KETTLE

THE **

Shall I

keep you

in

iii

lacquerbox

a

?"

says the

tinker. "

have

bit of it, keep me with you ; let us and again. I am talk now very fond of a

Not a

a

pipe. I like things." "

"

"

"

as

a

your "

rice

to

eat, and

cup of saki sometimes

and

beans

sweet

"

says the tinker. Well, yes, now you mention it.** Fm willing," says the tinker.

A

?

kindly," says the tea-kettle; and, would beginning, you objectto my sharing bed ? The nighthas turned a littlechilly." Thank

"

you

the least in the

Not

world," says

the tinker.

tinker and the tea-kettle became

The

of friends. kettle knew

the best

They ate and talked together.The a thing or two and was very good

company. One

day :

Are

"

" you poor ? says the kettle.

Yes," says the tinker, middlingpoor." kettle, "Well, I have a happy thought. For a tea"

"

I

reallyvery out-of-the-way

am

"

"

I believe

"

My name princeof

very "

**

you," says the tinker. is Bumbuku'-Chagama ; Tea-Kettles." Badger

Your servant, my If you'll take my

I

plished." accom-

am

the

lord,"says the tinker. advice,"says the tea-kettle,

am you'llcarry me round as a show ; I really and it'smy opinionyou'd make a out-of-the-way, mint of money."

"

"

That

would

Bumbukuj' says

be

hard work

the tinker. 22

for you, my

dear


THE

Ill

**

Not

TEA-KETTLE

all ; let

at

us

forthwith,'* says the

start

tea-kettle.

theydid.

So a

The he

theatre,and

Chagama. fun !

For

tea-kettle

bought hangingsfor

tinker called

the

Bumbuku-

show

people flocked to see the and most the wonderful accomplished the tight danced and sang, and walked the

How

It playedsuch born. rope as to the manner tricks and had such droll ways that the people laughed tilltheir sides ached. It was a treat to the tea-kettle bow as gracefully a lord and as see

peoplefor their patience. The Bumbuku-Chagama was the talk of the and all the gentry came to see it as country-side, well as the commonalty. As for the tinker,he the

thank

waved

fan

a

took

and

fat and

believe that he grew to

much

made princesses

of the wonderful

last the tinker retired from

At

the tea-kettle

him

money. rich. He

You even

may went

great ladies and the royal

the

Court, where

the

came

with

tea-kettle.

and business, in its

tears

to

bright

eyes. "*

I'm much

"

Now,

tinker.

**

afraid it'stime

to

leave

it says. you,'*

don't say that,BumbukUy dear,"says the Well be so happy together we are now

rich." **

I've

come

the end of my time," says the old Bumbuku "You'll not see any to

tea-kettle. more ; henceforth

nothingmore "

Oh, my

or

I shall be

an

kettle, ordinary

less."

dear Bumbuku^ what

cried the poor tinker in

tears.

shall I do ?

"


TEA-KETTLE

THE "

of

I think I should like to be

Morinji,as It

never

a

iii

moved

again.

very sacred treasure and the half of his wealth with it. held the tea-kettle was And Some fame for many a long yean a

it as worshipped

temple

says the very sacred treasure,'*

spokeor

it as presented

the

givento

a

saint.

^

kettle. tea-

So the tinker

to

the

in

temple,

wondrous

persons

even


The

Peony

Lantern.-

P.

25.


IV

PEONY

THE

He

possessed and

noble

a

of

and

openly

in

and

Hagiwara. is of

which

honourable.

most a

of

lady

all He

beautiful

very

a

many

face, both

Yedo,

himself, being yet very

For

secret.

called

hatamoto^

the

figure

beloved

was

the

samurai

of

ranks

samurai

a

of

samurai

a

was

the

dwelt

there

Yedo

In

LANTERN

turned

pleasure rather than and to love, and morning, noon night he was with the gay youth of the to wont disport himself of joyous the leader was prince and city. He his

young,

the

parade boon

of

New

Year

laughing

from

his

suburb

streets

houses

heavy

for

without,

and

long together

he

youths

found and

quite were

the

empty,

stood battledore

in

had

He

quarter

own

himself maidens

shuttlecock.

and

a

streets

and

to

of

with

other

side

more

or

gardens. with

great 25

with

bands

the a

playing

of

Yedo,

less,

Hagiwara skill and

of

Festival

company dore battle-

at

far away

wandered

city, and

the

often

would

companions. bright and wintry day during

One of the

doors

within

revels

his

thoughts

was

now

where the

and

wielded

grace,

in the

quiet his

catching


THE

PEONY

LANTERN

iv

the

into gildedshuttlecock and tossingit lightly the air ; but at lengthwith a careless or an illjudged stroke,he sent it flyingover the heads of and over the players, the bamboo fence of a garden he started after it. Then by. Immediately companionscried, Stay,Hagiwara ; here we

near

his

"

have

than

more "

and

Nay," he said, gilded."

but

"

Foolish

"

have

we

dozen shuttlecocks."

a

this

dove-coloured

was

! " answered

one

his friends ; " here all dove-coloured and

six shuttlecocks

gilded." he

But

full of

paidthem

heed, for he

no

had

become

very strange desire for the shuttlecock he had lost. He scaled the bamboo fence and dropped a

into the

Now

gardenwhich had

he

shuttlecock there ;

fence he

so

was

marked

should

upon

the

very spot where

fallen,but

have

he searched

the farther side.

alongthe

it

was

the not

foot of the bamboo

but no, he could not find it. Up and down his battledore, went, beatingthe bushes with "

his eyes on if he had

the

ground,drawing breath heavilyas

lost his dearest

called him, but he did tired and went to their

own

come,

and

homes.

friends

they grew lightof

The

fail.

Hagiwara,the samurai^looked a few a girlstanding saw yardsaway from She beckoned him with her righthand, and left she held a gildedshuttlecock with

day began up and him. in her

to

dove-coloured The Then

not

His

treasure.

the

feathers.

samurai

shouted

girldrew

away

and joyfully

ran

forward.

from him, stillbeckoning 26

'""Digitized by


IV

him

with

THE

PEONY

LANTERN

the

righthand.

him, and he followed. to them, till theycame

garden,and

three

The

So

shuttlecock the

theywent,

the house

that

was

steps that led up

stone

lured two

of

in the to

it.

the lowest

Beside

step there grew a plum tree in step there stood a upon the highest

blossom,and

fair and very young attired in robes of of water-blue

lady. She was high festival.

most

splendidly

Her

kimono

was

of ceremony so longthat theytouched the ground; her under-dress of brocade was and her great girdle stiff was scarlet,

silk,with

sleeves

pins of heavy with gold. In her hair were gold and tortoiseshelland coral. When Hagiwara saw the lady,he knelt down

and

forthwith

like

ground. lady spoke,smilingwith

the

child.

a

head till his foreobeisance,

the

touched Then

her due

and made

"

Come

pleasure house, Hagiwara

into

my the hatamoto. I am of samurai Sama, 0*Tsuyu,the My dear handmaiden, Lady of the Morning Dew.

0*Yon6,

has

Come to me. in, you Hagiwara Sama, samurai of the hatamoto ; for indeed I am gladto sec you, and happy is this hour.*'

brought

So the samurai to

a

room

for the

of

ten

Lady

in the

him

handmaiden,

mats, of the

ancient beat

theybroughthim where they entertained him ; Morning Dew danced before in,and

went

whilst

manner, a

upon

small

O'Yone,

the

scarlet-tasselled

drum.

theyset

food

rice of the festival and

sweet

Afterwards

ate

and drank of the food

before him, the warm

they gave

27

wine, and him.

red he


PEONY

THE It

dark

was

leave.

said again," "

the

0*Yone

Yea, lord,you

the handmaiden. needs must

come," whispered

Lady of the Morning Dew. samurai The laughed. '*And he said mockingly. What ? "

come

iv

night when Hagiwara took his lord, come again, honourable

Come

"

LANTERN

?

come

The

"

if I do if I do

not not

"

and ladystiffened,

grey, but shoulder.

she

"Then,"

laid

she

her

child's face grew

her

hand

said, "it

Hagiwara's

upon

will

it will be for you and for shuddered other way." 0*Yon6

Death

be

death, lord. There

me.

is

no

and hid her eyes

with her sleeve. samurai

The very much not

end

went

out

into

the

night,being

afraid.

Long, long he soughtfor his home and could find it,wanderingin the black darkness from at last he to end of the sleeping city. When

almost reached his familiar door the late dawn was and wearilyhe threw himself upon his bed. come, Then he laughed. " After all,I have left behind me

my The

said Hagiwara the shuttlecock,"

samurai.

day Hagiwara sat alone in his house had his hands from morning till evening. He but did nothingmore. before him ; and he thought, At the end of the time he said, It is a joke that a couple of geishahave sought to play on me. next

"

but Excellent,in faith, So to

he

theyshall

friends.

have

in his best and went For five or six dayshe

dressed himself

joinhis

not

28

!" forth

me

was

at


PEONY

THE

IV

LANTERN

and junketings, the gayest of the gay. joustings his spirits His wit was wild. were ready, he said, By the gods,I am Then sick deathly of this,"and took to walking the streets of Yedo alone. From end to end of the great cityhe went. wandered He by day and he wandered by night, and by street and alleyhe went, by hill and moat castle wall,but he found not what he sought. He could not come cock upon the gardenwhere his shuttle"

lost,nor

was

Morning

Dew.

His

fell sick

and

took

neither This

season, servant

loose

spirithad

the third

He

rest.

no

bed, where

his

to

of the

Lady

slept,but

nor

about

was

month,

a

ate

the

yet upon

he

spectre-thin.

grew month.

In

the

sixth

of niubai^the hot and rainy of all his faithful he rose up, and, in spite could say or do to dissuade him, he wrapped the

at

time

him

robe about

summer

and

at

went

once

forth. "

Alack

!

Alack

!

"

cried the

"

servant,

the

youth has the fever,or he is perchancemad." Hagiwara faltered not at all. He looked neither to the right nor left. Straight to the forward

he

went,

roads lead past my

for he

said

a

"

of

our

wild stone

The

same,

himself,

love's house."

quietsuburb, and to a garden had a splitbamboo and scaled the laughedsoftly to

to

the very

meeting,"he

same

said.

he

Soon

certain

fence.

house

29

All

came

whose

Hagiwara

fence. shall be the He

found

manner

the

Moss covered the overgrown. plum tree that grew steps. The

and

"

garden three there


LANTERN

PEONY

THE

iv

fluttered its green leaves disconsolate. its shutters still,

was

all closed,it

were

house

The

forlorn

was

and deserted.

samurai

The

wondered. said

came

Sir,what

"

The

the

and

into the

man

garden.

He

She

is

do here ? "

flower has fallen from samurai.

Dew

Morning

^

do you

white

said tree,** '*

stood

Hagiwara :

to

"

the

old

an

he

as

fell.

soakingrain

A

There

cold

grew

?

*'

Where

the

plum Lady of

is the

'*

dead," answered

the old

;

sickness.

of a strange and six moons, She lies in the graveyard the on

0'Yon6,

handmaid, lies by her side.

these

five or her

not

suflFerher

the

long nightof

sake

For

Yomi.

it is little that

dead

are

wander

to

still tend

I would

old and

mistress

indeed.

this I

The

he

set

up, and

do.

can

grass

sweet

odours, and

meet,

and

did

welfare of her Then

of

drew

due

burned made

and hill,

sweet

through spirits*

garden,but

I

their

on

He

took

that oflFering

observance,and

a

upon it,in of his lady.

before it incense

every

am

Oh, sir,they

grows

graves.** home. Hagiwara went to his own slipof pure white wood and he wrote largefair characters,the dear name This

sudden

She could

alone

their

dead

"

man

and was

all for the

departedspirit. near

souls. returning

the Festival of The

good

Bony the

folk of Yedo

time took

visited their graves. Bringingfood and flowers, theycared for their beloved dead. On lanterns and

30


PEONY

THE

IV

the

day of

thirteenth

the seventh

month, which,

Boriyis the dayof days,Hagiwara the samurai

in the

in his

walked

It

coolness.

now shrilly leapedin the never

and

windless

was

of

a

dark.

flower sang

pomegranate and

and

again. Now round pond. For

the

cicala

A

again a

carp

it was

rest

still,

leaf stirred.

a

of the Ox,

the hour

About

the sake of the

gardenby night for

in the heart

hidden

and

LANTERN

of

Hagiwara heard the that laybeyond his

in the lane footsteps gardenhedge. Nearer and nearer theycame. He knew Women's geta^'said the samurai. them by the hollow echoingnoise. Looking over his rose come hedge,he saw two slender women

sound

"

of the dimness

out

carried

lantern

a

samurai

bunch

It was

such

as

the

two

the

one

lantern

a

flowers is used

as

walked, castingan

other

side of the knew

He

of

abreast

they came

turned their faces to him. and gave

of them

of peony

women

light. As upon

One

in the service of the dead.

of the Bon

the time

It swung uncertain

a

with

tied to the handle. at

in hand.

hand

the

hedge, they them

at

once,

great cry.

girlwith the peony lantern held it up so the lightfell upon him. Hagiwara Sama,**she cried, by all that is wonderful ! Why, lord,we told that were

The that "

most

"

dead.

were you Nembutsu '*

Come ?

dailyrecited

for your soul these many

is it indeed hand

have

We

Can

!

in, 0'Yon6," he said

in,come your

moons

mistress

it be my

that

lady? 31

.

.

you .

hold

Oh, my

the

"

;

"

by

and the

love ! "


PEONY

THE

OTone and the

answered,

"

how

it be ?

"

it I lost you ? it I lost you, 0'Yon6

*'

was

was

held

up

hide her face.

to

How

"

else should

came

the

her sleeve

Who

"

iv

in at the gardengate. Lady of the Morning Dew

two

But

LANTERN

said the samurai ; ? **

Lord," she said, we have moved to a little house, a very little house, in the quarter of the were city which is called the Green Hill. We suffered to take nothingwith us there,and we "

"

With

very poor.

grown

are

griefand

want

my

to

draw

mistress is become

pale.'' Then sleeve Hagiwara took his lady's it gentlyfrom her face. Lord," she sobbed, you will "

"

am

not

fair."

But

when

he looked upon

up within him him from head She I go

And A

a

He

said

never

a

flamed shook

word.

drooped. Lord," she murmured, he

I

me,

consuming fire,and

foot.

to

her his love

"

stay?

or

like

love

not

"

shall

"

said, Stay." "

little before

daybreakthe

samurai

fell into

a

and awoke to find himself alone in the deep sleep, of the morning. He lost not an instant, clear light and went but rose forth,and immediatelymade the quarter of the city his way throughYedo to Here he inquired which is called the Green Hill. for the house of the Lady of the Morning Dew, could direct him. but no one High and low he

searched the

It seemed fruitlessly.

second

time

he

had

to

him

lost his dear 3*

that

and lady,

for he


PEONY

THE

IV

turned homewards he

he went

marked

was

hung

by

It

of Bon

"

have moved to

We

.

.

.

with take nothing

poor

.

pale.

.'

.

.

will make

of my

us

'*

room

He

a

:

very little

suffered

were

are

grown very mistress is become

my

not

me

for the

loved

have

We

now

.

.

space of my dear/'

.

home.

faithful servant

Now

want

we

a

.

we

.

.

.

in

one

little

he went His

at

house, a dark house, yet you for me, oh, my beloved,paleone

A

desires.

Then

.

there and

leave existences,

ten

.

griefand

with

.

.

littlehouse

a

as

littleand said

a

upon the Green Hill

house

stand

the samurai

he smiled

Then

*

is used

as

in the service of the dead.

Long, longdid dream.

flowers tied

lantem

a

of

there

monument

of peony

such

was

the other

like the tomb

the

bunch

a

side

were

obscure,but

Before

one.

its handle.

graves that

two

fair monument,

a

lantern with

a

the time

to

despair.His way led certain temple,and a

littleand

was

great

some

marked

One

by side.

to

in bitter

throughthe groundsof

him as

LANTERN

what

said,

"

him

met

and cried

ails you, master

?

:

'*

all.

Why, nothing at

I

...

was

merrier.*'

never

the

But "The

servant

of death

mark

whither these

shall I go

arms

departedweeping,and saying,

?

that

on

bore

seven

lantern peony dwelling. Fair weather or them.

his face him

.

as

.

a

and .

I,

child in

*'

Every night,for with

is

the

They

came

at

nights,the maidens to came Hagiwara*s foul

the hour 33

was

the

of the Ox.

to

same

There D


PEONY

THE

LANTERN

iv

mystic wooing. By the strong the dead were illusion the living and together. the seventh night the On servant

samurai^wakeful

fear and

with

bound of

made

sorrow,

of

bond

was

the

bold

througha crack in the peer into his lord*s room shutters. His hair stood on wooden end and his to

blood

cold

ran

to

fearful thing, smilingup

face, strokingits

fingers.With to a holy man told his

at

dank

tale he ?

the power

sacred

text

Before

the

holy man,

of Karma

girdlea

Tathagata. When Hagiwara being drawn as

his arms,

in

covered

him

languid his way he had for

hope

any

these

stand with-

can

Nevertheless,there

told the

the

him

?

every door and house, and he had

weak

its

was

with

who

"

had

one

set

rolled

in

and lightly,

saw

the

of golden emblem done, thingswere

ways became And his servant

laid him

a

window-placeof

self him-

two

water.

he

what

servant

this nightfall,

silk of his master's

as

there

above

master's

his

that

a

"

is a little hope." So he

do.

robe

green

asked, "Is

Alack," said

must

the horror

of

arms

made daylightthe servant of his acquaintance.When

Hagiwara Sama "

in the

Hagiwara

see

upon him

his

took

bed

fall into

a

and

deep

sleep. At

the

hour

of the

Ox

there

was

heard

the

sound of

in the lane,without the garden footsteps they came. hedge. Nearer and nearer They and slow stopped. grew "

What

means

this,0'Yon6, OTon6 34

?"

said

a


THE

IV

voice. piteous see

**

The

is asleep, and I do

house

not

lord."

my "

LANTERN

PEONY

Come

home,

is

lady,Hagiwara'sheart

sweet

changed/' I will

"That

find

must

a

to

way

Lady, we Writing over "

we

not

may There

0'Yon6, OTon6 bringme to my lord/'

not,

.

cannot

every door here." enter

was

a

here.

enter

and

you

"

the

Holy window-place .

of bitter

sound

See

.

weeping

.

and

.

a

long wail. "

Lord, I have

existences."

ten

the

Then

throughthe space of retreated and footsteps

thee

loved

their echo died away. The next nightit was

quitethe

sleptin his weakness

his

wraiths

;

Hagiwara

same.

watched

servant

;

the

and

in sobbingdespair. departed the The third day, when to Hagiwara went bath, a thief stole the emblem, the goldenemblem from his girdle.Hagiwara did of the Tathagata, It it. But that night he lay awake. mark not his servant that slept, out with watching. worn was a great rain fell and Hagiwara,waking, Presently came

of it upon the roof. The heavens and for hours the rain fell. And it

heard the sound

opened

were

holytext from Hagiwara'schamber. the

tore

the hour

At

over

of the

Ox

sound of

in the footsteps

hedge.

Nearer

grew **

slow and

and

the round window

in

heard

the

there

was

lane without

nearer

they

the

came.

garden They

stopped.

This is the last time, OTon^, 35

OTone,

there-


PEONY

THE

fore

bringme

ten

existences.

There

to

be

must

lord.

my

Great a

way.

of the love of

Think

is the

of

power

Karma.

."

.

.

iv

beloved,"called Hagiwara with

Come, my

"

LANTERN

a

great voice. and I come.'* from his couch. move beloved,"he called for the second

Open, lord open But Hagiwara could not

"

.

.

Come, my

"

.

time. I cannot

"

me

like

sins of

a

moaned

sharp sword. former

a

wounds though the separation

come,

life."

like the

O'Yone

the that

lady spoke she

and But

was.

she said.

window,"

in hand

earth.

suffer for the

we

her hand.

took

Hand

So

lost soul

See the round

**

Thus

from the lightly they passed through the

the

two

Like

rose

vapour The window. unguarded to

" samurai called, Come beloved,"for the third time.

me,

He

was

the grey

In his

master

peony The out

answered,

servant

the

dead.

At

burningwith

shivered,took up

light;

I come."

Lord,

morning Hagiwara'sservant

cold and

lantern

"

for

'*

I cannot

36

a

found

his feet stood weird

the

yellowflame.

the lantern and blew bear

it,"he said.


THE

KING

SEA

AND

THE

MAGIC

JEWELS is

This and a

visit

folk

old

the

by

beloved

talc

a

a

"

to

the

Prince

Sea

by

the

children

tale

of

magical

King's

royal maiden,

the

lady

called

was

made

and

Princess

father

her

But

for

betrothal,

his

Princess not

of

fair), for

this, the

Rocks

he

trees.'*

loved

offspring

frail, fading So

Augustnesses,

it

Prince

of

these

falling

is.

At

the

Heavenly

this

her

at

sister, the

elder this

lady

was

Blossoming-

said,

King

was

Rice-Ear-

Princess

only old

and

her

aside

fair

wrath

augustly

(and, indeed,

the

So

Brightly. be

the

And

bride.

sweetly

so was

put

his

beautiful

a

Blossoming-Brightly-

Augustness,

had

Ruddy-Plenty,

and

jewels

loved

her

as-the-Flowers-of-the-Trees, she.

Japan,

palace.

Rice-Ear-Ruddy-Plcnty

and

of

"

of

Because

deities

heavenly

shall

of

like

the

flowers

day,

the

lives

of

their

Sovereigns,

are

not

the

long. Howbeit,

in

the

fullness

of

time,

the

Blossoming-Brightly-as-the-Flowers-of-the-Trees, 37

lady,


SEA

THE bore

and the younger Fire Flash was

Fire Flash Prince his

luck

upon with his

shore

v

children,and

lovelymen

two

KING

the

wide

Fire Fade.

fisherman,who

a

and

sea,

august

called the elder

garments

ran

got the

upon

And

girded.

again,he tarried all the night in his boat, upon the high wave-crests. he caught things And broad of fin and thingsnarrow of fin,and he was a

deityof

the water

of the fishes of the his luck upon

Fade

was

the mountains

sandals fast upon

bound

of the

and

and

waters

sea.

Fire

Prince

But

weeds

his

hunter,who got and in the forest, who feet,and bore a bow a

he caught And arrows. heavenly-feathered thingsrough of hair and thingssoft of hair,and the trail of the badger and he knew the wild time of flowering.For he was a cherry's deityof

and

the woods. Prince

Now

brother. I

am

now

Prince

Fire Fire

Fade

spoke

Flash, and

to

his

elder

said, "Brother,

of the green hills. Therefore exchangeour luck. Give me thy rod

aweary

let

us

and

I

will go to the cool waters. Thou mayest take my and all my arrows heavenly-feathered great bow

and try the mountains,where, see many strange and beautiful

trust

me,

thou

shalt

unknown things,

to

thee before." But not

Prince Fire Flash answered,

"

Not

so

.

.

.

so."

And

again,after

Prince

Fire Fade

of the

green

not

and

came

hills

.

.

.

days were sighed, I am

many the

38

past,

"

fair

waters

aweary call me.


AND

V

Woe

be

to

THE

MAGIC

JEWELS

younger brother !" And when Prince took no heed of him, but angledwith

a

Fire Flash his

rod,day and night,and caughtthingsbroad of fin and thingsnarrow of fin,Prince Fire Fade droopedwith desire,and let his long hair fall untended upon his shoulders. And he murmured, Oh, to try my luck upon the sea ! till at last Prince Fire Flash,his elder brother,gave him the rod for very weariness,and betook himself to the And mountains. all day he hunted, and let fly "

"

arrows heavenly-feathered ; but rough of hair soft of hair,never or a thing did he catch. And he cried, Fool,fool,to barter the heavenlyluck of the gods ! So he returned. Prince Fire Fade, took the And his Augustness, luck of the sea, and angledin sunshine and in of fin,never a gloom ; but broad of fin or narrow

the

"

"

fish did

he

catch.

And,

brother's fish-hook

in the

he

moreover,

he

So

sea.

lost his

hung

his

head, and returned. And

Fire

Prince

the hunter

own,

to

the

sea

nothing home,

the

to .

.

.

and

his to said, "Each fishermountain, and the man

Flash

for thou this

I have

and

brought night we sleephungry. luck of the gods. And

barter the not may where is my fish-hook ? " now, So Prince Fire Fade replied, sayingsoftly, We

"Sweet

brother, be

not

angry

.

.

.

but, toiling

of fin or with thy fish-hook, broad of fin,not a fish did I catch ; and, at the narrow last,I lost thy fish-hook in the sea." Prince Fire Flash, flew At this his Highness, all

day

39


THE into

SEA

great rage, and

a

KING

stamping his feet,required

the fish-hook of his brother. Prince Fire Fade And made

brother,I

have

sea, whose

bottom

no

man

may I could thee,yet thy fish-hook." his elder brother

But

"

answer,

Sweet

the

thy fish-hook,but

not

die for

should

v

deep search. Though I not givethee back

it required

of him

the

urgently.

more

Then tendrils

Prince Fire Fade which

burst the wild

wistaria

his august ten-grasp sword " he said, to his side. And Farewell,good sword." And he broke it into many and made fragments, five hundred fish-hooks to give to his brother. Prince have

Fire Flash.

But

Prince

Fire Flash

would

of them.

none

And

bound

againPrince

furnace,and

Fire Fade

made

toiled

at

a

great

thousand

fish-hooks ; and one his to upon his knees he humbly offered them brother.Prince Fire Flash. For he loved his brother. Nevertheless Prince Fire Flash would not so much as

look

at

them,

but

sat

moody, his

head on his lost fish-hook will I

hand, saying,"Mine own have, that and no other." So

Prince

Fire

Fade

palacegates,and ;

and

grievingfrom lamentingby the

went

wandered his tears fell and

foam.

mingledwith

the shore sea-

the

And, when night came, he had no heart to return homewards, but sat down, weary, upon a rock amid the salt pools. And he cried,"Alas, all to blame, and through my my brother,I am foolishness has this come But oh, my upon me. 40


AND

V

MAGIC

THE

JEWELS

nursed upon the sweet were brother,together we breast of our mother. Princess Blossoming-Brightlyfor almost hand in as-the-Flowers-of-the-Trees, hand did And

we

the

moon

Land

Central

into the world/'

come

of

Fire Fade

Prince

rose

so

Reed

ceased

that the

Plains not

to

was

the

light. But

lament.

Shiko-Tsuchi-no-Kami, the Lord of Sea with the rising fore tide,and spoke,"Where-

Then came Salt,

" weeps the Heaven's Sky Height ? And Prince Fire Fade made answer

:

"

I have

and I have lost it in brother's fish-hook, And though I have given him many

taken my the sea.

fish-hooks for

other none

and

sea

of them, but Truly, the

he will have compensation, desires only the original hook. fishgods know, I would give my

life to find it ; but how should that serve ?" took him Shiko-Tsuchi-no-Kami And by the sleeve to where a boat moved upon the water, and in the boat and pushedit from the shore, set him

saying, My "

son,

pursue

the

path that pleasant the Moon Augustness,

Tsuki-Yomi-no-Kami, His Night Possessor,has made for thee upon the waters. to a And, at the end, thou shalt come palacemade of fishes' scales,which is the palace of the great King of the there is a clear well, and

Sea.

by

the

Before

the

gate

well-side there

branches. grows a cassia tree with many spreading Therefore climb thou into the branches of the cassia tree, and there wait for the King'sdaughter, who

shall

And

come

Prince

givethee counsel." Fire Fade, standing up to

41

in the

boat,


obeisance,and thanked

made But

KING

SEA

THE

this

one

v

the Lord

6f Sea Salt.

girdedhis august garments

and

pushed

the boat before

in the him, tillhe was thigh-deep he said, Nay, nay, fair youth,no

And

water.

"

thanks,only do my the

bidding." Prince Fire Fade, came So his Augustness, to Sea King*spalace. And he forthwith climbed

the cassia tree and waited among At the day'sdawning came of the Sea

its green branches. the

King'sdaughter,with

to draw vessels,

from

water

made

from

a

And

jewelled as they

Fire Fade leaned

the branches

glory of his august brightness upon the waters

And

tree.

them

their

the well.

Prince stoopedto diptheir vessels.

and watched

handmaidens

the

of the cassia countenance

of the

well.

looked up and beheld his comeliness, But he spoke them fairly, amazed.

So all the maidens

and

were

and desired of them So the maidens

drew

a

littlewater

from their vessels.

him

in

water

a

jewelledcup

clouded,because of the (howbeitthe jewelswere coldness of the well water),and they presented it to

him

with

to

the maidens.

all

Then,

the drinking water. Prince Fire Fade took the royaljewel from his neck, and holdingit between his two lipshe droppedit into the cup, and the cup he gave again reverence.

Now

not

theysaw the great jewel shiningin the it,for it clung fast cup, but theycould not move to the gold. So the maidens departed, skimming like the white birds of the offing.And the water to the Sea King'sdaughter, bearingthe theycame cup and the jewelin it. 4^


AND

V

them, "

And

of the maidens

one

in the sitting is by our well."

some

JEWELS

the Princess, lookingat the jewel,asked "Is there, perchance, a stranger at the

And

gate ?

MAGIC

THE

And

There

"

of the cassia

branches

one

which

answered,

is tree

another

said, It is a very beautiful young

another

said,

"

man."

And than

king.

our

And

respectfully gave

is

He

"

of us, so And in this cup.

he asked

him

glorious

more

even

water

water

we

he

of it,but droppeda jewel into it from Thine his lips. So we have brought them unto drank

none

and the jewel." Princess herself took a vessel and

both Augustness,

Then

draw

to

went

the

sleeves,and

the cup

her long And well. of the folds of her august

the

at

water

certain

garments, floated behind bound

with

a

garlandof

the well she looked

to

the cassia Prince

tree.

And

her, and

up

And

flowers.

sea

through the

her

eyes

head

her

was

coming

branches

of

the eyes of

met

Fire Fade.

the Sea she fetched her father, presently King,saying, Father,there is a beautiful person and out at our gate." So the Sea King came And

"

welcomed the

Prince

August Child leadinghim

Fire

Fade,

of the

and

Heaven's

said,"This Sun

is

Height."

palace he caused the floor to be spreadwith eight layersof rugs of of rugs of silk,and set asses' skins,and eightlayers And

into his

the Prince And

upon them. that night he made 43

a

great

banquet,and


THE

SEA

KING

celebrated the betrothal of Prince

v

Fire Fade

fair Jewel Princess.

daughter,the

to

his

for very

And

daysthere was held high revel and rejoicing in the Sea King'spalace. But one night, as they took their ease upon the silken floor, and all the fishes of the sea brought rich dishes, and sweetmeats in vessels of gold and coral and jade to set before them, the fair Jewel Princess herself sat at Prince Fire Fade's right many

hand

to

the

pour

wine

into

his cup.

And

the

silver scales upon the palacewalls glittered in the moonlight. But Prince Fire Fade looked out

thoughtof what had before,and so heaved a deepsigh. Then the Sea King was troubled,and dost thou sigh? him, saying, Wherefore Prince Fire Fade answered nothing.

across

the Sea Path and

"

"

gone asked But

the fairJewel

his betrothed wife, Princess, came closer,and touched him on the breast,and said softly, Oh, Thine Augustness,my sweet And

"

spouse, where

art

the

thou

not

shadows

happy in

our

water

fall green, that thou Or the Sea Path ?

palace, lookest

do our longinglyacross maidens not move silently, please thee, who like the birds of the offing ? Oh, my lord, what is in thine despiseme not, but tell me so

heart." Then

Prince

lady.Thine from them

Fire Fade

answered,

"

My lovely

Augustness,let nothing be

hidden

And he thee, because of our love." and of his all the story of the fish-hook,

brother's wrath. 44

told elder


The

Sea

King

and

the

Magic

Jewels."

P. 45.


AND

V

"

And

MAGIC

THE

said, will the Jewel Princess

he

now,"

JEWELS

"

counsel ? "

giveme

Princess smiled, and and her hair was so long that it lightly, the

Then

the she

Jewel

edge and passedto

of her

hem

up

hung

silken red robe.

to

And

palacesteps led down standingupon the last step

the

where And

into the water.

rose

the fishes of the sea, and summoned So them, great and small, from far and near. the fishes of the sea, both great and small, swam she called

about

feet,and the

her

scales.

to

water

was

silver with

the

King'sdaughtercried, the august find and bringme

And

O

"

of the sea, of Prince Fire Flash."

their fishes

fish-hook

fishes answered, "Lady, the Tat is in misery,for somethingsticks in his throat so this may be the Perchance that he cannot eat. the

And

august fish-hook

of his

Augustness,Prince

Fire

Flash." the Princess

Then

stoopeddown

and lifted the

the water, and with her white hand she took the lost fish-hook from his throat. And after she took it she had washed and dabbled it for a little,

Tai from

in to Prince "

This is indeed my

restore

it

And

Fire Fade.

he

and said, rejoiced

I go to shall be reconciled."

brother's fish-hook.

and instantly,

we

he loved his brother. But the fair Jewel Princess stood silent and " Now will he depart for she thought, sorrowing, For

and leave And

edge,and

me

lonely."

Prince

hastened

Fire Fade

there bestrode 45

a

valiant

to

the

water's

crocodile,who


THE

KING

SEA

v

And end. ere journey's Fair youth,now he went, the Sea King spoke: If thy brother sow counsel. listen to my rice do thou sow thy rice low, in the upon the uplands, meads. his rice in But if thy brother sow water the water meads, then do thou. Thine Augustness, sow thy rice upon the uplands. And I who rule the rains and the floods will continually prosper the labours of Thine Augustness.Moreover, here two are magic jewels. If thy brother should be moved by envy to attack thee,then put forth the shall arise Tide Flowing Jewel and the waters should

bringhim

to

his

"

if thou shouldst have compassion upon him, then put forth the Tide Ebbing Jewel,and all the waters shall subside,and his life him.

to

drown

be

spared." And

his

thanks with

But

And

obeisance.

in his

long sleeve,and hung

about

his neck. and

near

And

the

"While So and his

for

Sea

gave he hid the fish-hook

the

two

great

jewels

the fairJewel Princess

Then

came

tears. farewell,with many King charged the crocodile, saying,

him

crossingthe

of the

middle

sea,

do

not

him.'*

alarm

head

bade

Fade

Fire

AugustnessPrince

Prince

Fire Fade

sat

upon

the

crocodile's

to his own day he came place shore. And to unsheathing sprang lightly dagger,he hung it upon the crocodile's neck

a

;

and in

one

token.

found his brother, fish-hook that had and gave him back his own because of the two been lost. Nevertheless, great

Hereupon,Prince

Fire Fade

46


AND

V

MAGIC

THE

JEWELS folds of his raiment, his brother,and over

in the which he wore jewels, he had everlasting dominion

flourished in all his

And, after Fire Fade the

doings. time, there

some

daughterof

the

Prince

to

came

fair

King, the

Sea

she came the Sea And across Jewel Princess. Path bearingin her arms child. And she, a young weeping,laid down the child at the feet of His Augustnessand said,"My lord,I have brought thy son."

raised her up and made her welcome, and built for her a palaceon the seashore, And the palace at the limit of the waves. Fire Fade

Prince

But

thatched with

was

feathers. So

cormorant's

they

dwelt there with the August Child. And the fair Jewel Princess besoughther lord, saying," Sweet husband, look not on me in the

night,for

dark with

those of my

look

not

misfortune

on

me,

take my it is ever

land lest I

should follow." So

should

promised her,

I must

then

and

spoke

native

Howbeit,

so.

be

shape;

ashamed

and

Prince Fire Fade fair words of many

assurance.

Prince Nevertheless,there came a nightwhen Fire Fade layawake, and could get no rest. And, when it was at length, very dark, before the dawn, he as

arose

she

and

struck

slept.And

a

lightto

he beheld

with translucent eyes, which And Prince couch's foot.

a

look upon

great scaled

was

Fire

coiled up Fade

for terror, and droppedthe morning broke very grey upon the

aloud

47

his bride

dragon, at

cried

the out

light. Then sea.

And

at


THE

SEA

KING

v

instant the great dragonstirred, and from its coils the Jewel Princess lifted up her lovely the

same

like

the

And

head. a

with

garment.

So

child

upon

her

her

head

ness,

my Sea

and

scales fell away from she stood,in a white

her

green

her breast.

wept, saying,"O

sweet

spouse, I had

Path

a

And

she

hung August-

Thine

thoughtto

robe,

have made

highway between thy land and at pleasure. mine, that we might go and come But now, though I warned thee,thou hast looked upon me in the night. Therefore,my lord,between

the

and thee it is farewell. I go Path, and of this going there is no

me

across

the

return.

Sea

Take

August Child/' She spoke,and departed immediately upon her face with Sea Path, weeping and covering hair and lookingback to the shore. And she thou

the

never

her was

upon the Central Land of Reed Moreover, she shut the gates of the sea

more

Plains.

the

seen

and closed the way

to

her father's palace.But

the

she sent to be a nurse to her maid, her sister, babe, and because,for all that had been, she could restrain her lovingheart, she made little not a song, and sent it to her lord by the maid, her

young

sister. *'

And

Oh^fairare

the song said

:

the red jewels^

on which they are fairis the string strung Even so fairis my babe. But brighter far^and more renowned are the white jewels^ that are like my lord^ The jewels

And

.

^

48

"

.


AND

V

the

Then said "

As To

THE

MAGIC

husband answered,

in

a

song

which

:

whom I took to be for thee^my lady^ the wild duck the island where lights the

I

JEWELS

"

my bride^ the bird

ojing, shall notjorget thee tillthe end ofmy life*^

49

of


VI

Folks

spirit,fearful These

folks

are

and

storm,

speak

all the

Taro,

his

evil

But

son.

the

in

his

was

and

one

In

the

of

cool

Cloud,

and

doings

of

only

upon from men

South

they laughed

they sighed. fro One

son,

a

ramparts

Cloud

a

great

was

the

they Rai-

set

and

Rai-Taro

brave

ramparts

to

Land

the

"

East

oh,

boy,

see

and very

Rai-den of

and

the

and

his

of

;

looked.

sometimes

leaned

children

the Plains.

they

often

of

viewed Reed

West

Rai-

Castle

the

they

Rai-Taro

Sometimes

walls

upon

;

of

Elements.

the

and

Often

and

the

evening

upon

and

castle

Castle

a

the

the

North

the

of

wrong.

He

of

man.

of

and

loving un-

him.

walked

Taro

in

to

tempest

Rai-den

are

heaven.

Lord

a

loved

father

lived

blue

god,

mighty

of

can

they

Sama

Rai-den

high

they

an

afraid

and

lightning

is

cruel

mortally

are

hate

who

revengeful,

and

who

Thunder,

the

Rai-den,

that

say

'thunder

GOOD

THE

that

far went

over

to

earth.

night

Rai-den

Sama 50

said

to

Rai-Taro,


"

GOOD

THE

VI

Child, look

well

THUNDER

this

the

night upon

doingsof

!"

men

Rai-Taro

answered,

Father, I will

**

look

well." From

northern

the

they looked, and saw going forth to great lords and men-at-arnis From battle. the southern rampart theylooked, and saw and acolytes priests servingin a holy templewhere the air was dim with incense,and images of goldand bronze gleamedin the twilight. From the eastern rampart they looked,and saw a and a troop bower, where was a fair princess, lady's of maidens, clad in There for her. were with "

Ah, the pretty children ! the

From

western

peasant

a

saw

colour,that made music children there,too, playing

of flowers.

little cart

a

rose

rampart

"

said Rai-Taro.

they looked, and

rampart

toilingin

a

rice-field. He

enough and his back ached. weary toiled with him by his side. If he it is easy to

believe that she

They

very

were

and

poor

more

was

their

wife

His was

weary,

weary

garments

was

still. were

ragged. "

Have

Rai-den

they

no

children ? *'

said

Rai-Taro.

his head.

shook

you looked well,Rai-Taro ? you looked well this nightupon

Presently,Have "

he said. the

"

Have

doingsof **

men

"

? '*

Father," said Rai-Taro, "indeed, I

have

looked well." "

to

Then

choose,my

take up your

son,

choose,for I send you

habitation upon SI

the earth."


"

Must

"

My child,you

"I

I go among

will

Rai-Taro "

THUNDER

GOOD

THE

not "

;

"

the

with

so,

?

head

my

very ill." Will you go,

?

son

my

then,

"

No," said Rai-Taro,

will I have

men-at-arms/* said

likes me fighting

bower the fair lady's

to

? ** said Rai-Taro.

men

must.'*

go

Oho, say you

vi

I

"

shaved

am

a

to

Neither

man.

and live with

go

priests." "

What, then,do you choose will have

You

Taro." Rai-Taro

a

Go, go in

you have

hard

said, "They

Perhapstheywill "

the poor peasant ? life and scanty fare,Rai-

chosen

have

children.

no

love me."

peace,"said wisely."

Rai-den

Sama

"

;

for

shall I go, my father ? " said Rai-Taro. " " it befits a said his father, as Honourably," Prince of High Heaven." How

"

the

Now

which field,

was

san, in the

rice-fieldwas "

Alack

and what

the dear

at

peasant

provinceof

toiled in his rice-

Ichizen.

the

Hakuafter day

Day

brightsun

shone.

The

dry,and

young rice was burnt up. and alas 1 cried the poor peasant man, shall I do if my rice-crop fails? May "

gods have

With

man

the foot of the mountain

after week

and week "

poor

that he

mercy on all poor sat himself down

people! on

"

stone

a

at

the rice-field's for very weariness edgeand fellasleep and

sorrow.

When It

was

but

he woke

the

skywas

noonday,but

it grew 52

black with as

dark

as

clouds.

night.


GOOD

THE

VI

THUNDER

leaves of the trees

The

birds ceased their

shuddered

! ** cried the peasant. " Raiupon his black horse,beating

storm, a storm den Sama goes abroad

of the Thunder.

the great drum

the

singing.

A

"

togetherand

shall have

We

thanks be." plenty, Rain in plentyhe had, sure enough,for it fell torrents, with blindinglightningand roaring

rain in

in

thunder.

Oh, Rai-den Sama,**said the peasant,

"

"

saving

than sufficient.** more your greatness,this is even flashed anew At this the brightlightning and fell

cracked with

heavens

"

Ai !

Ai !

"

earth in

the

to

**

have

Kwannon

of

bdl

livingfire,and the mighty pealof thunder.

a a

cried

the

mercy

on

a

poor peasant man. sinful soul,for now

the Thunder on

Dragon has me indeed.** And he lay the ground and hid his face. the Thunder Howbeit Dragon sparedhim.

And

up and rubbed his eyes. The ball of fire was gone, but a babe lay upon the wet earth ; a fine fresh boy with the rain upon his cheeks and his hair. he

soon

sat

Oh, Lady, Lady Kwannon,** said the poor this is thy sweet mercy.**And he peasant man, "

"

took

the

in his

boy

arms

and

carried him

still

fell,but

the

every

flower

to

his

home.

own

As

he

in

came

out

the

cooler

the

went

the

rain

sky,and

blue

air shone

and

lifted up

its

head. The

peasant

came

to

his cottage door. 53

sun

in

grateful


GOOD

THE

THUNDER

Wife, wife/*he called, somethinghome.** "

**

What

"

The

eldest

I have

broughtyou

it be ? ** said his wife.

may

answered,

man

son

vi

Rai-Taro,

"

the

little

of the Thunder.**

Rai-Taro

grew

tallest, gayest boy

and strong, the up straight of all that country-side.He

and all the delightof his foster-parents, he was When ten neighboursloved him. years the

was

in the rice-fieldslike a worked the wonderful weather prophet.

old he was "

for

he said, My father,** "

let

father,let

;

there will be

a

or

he

that,

said, My "

that,for to-night and whatever he had said, storm,**

the rather do this

us

do this and

**

shall have fair weather

we

us

He

man.

or

And he brought to pass. enough,it came great good fortune to the poor peasant man, and all his works prospered. Rai-Taro When was eighteenyears old all the his birthdayfeast. bidden to neighbourswere There was plentyof good sakiyand the good folk silent was were enough ; only Rai-Taro merry so,

sure

and sad and sorry. " What ails you,

mother.

"

You

who

the gay, why are you "It is because I

Rai-Taro

? **

said his foster-

be the gayest of sad and sorry ? ** silent, wont

are

must

to

Rai-Taro you,**

leave

said. leave said his foster-mother, never Nay,** Rai-Taro, my son. Why would you leave us ? "

"

"

Mother,

because

I

tears.

54

must,**said

Rai-Taro

us, **

in


THE

VI

have

You

"

have

givenus

What

have I

am

more

Then of

till he

down

to

The

to

Wc

and labour,to suffer,

cloud

gained his

he

love.

scaled heaven's blue

father's castle.

I

And

height Rai-den

of them

stood upon the rampart of the Castle of Cloud and looked earth. foster-mother stood weeping bitterly, but The

two

took her hand.

My dear,'*he said,

"

grow

to

you

learned than the Immortals." from them. And in the likeness he went

her husband "

good fortune ; you have I givenyou ? **

received him. western

great

our

givenyou, Rai-Taro, my son ? answered, "Three thingshave

"

white

a

been

all things. What

Rai-Taro

taught me

THUNDER

GOOD

old

apace.**

55

it will

not

be for

long.


VII

THE

Long

ago,

from

Kioto,

honest

the

the

great In

it

it that

the

full

deceiving

the

kitchens

parties

of

mossy said

they

;

forest

the

in

fairies* children

didn't

mind

were

queer

in

which did as

as

were as

the

and

neat

fine

very a

that

and

poor,

boy

in

housewife

the

;

the

had as

for

that one

all

that

rice-fields, and indeed,

for 56

she

couple was

she

within washed

a

"

that

was

they lived as fair daughter.

princess, and

a

this

warlock

a

it

sure

every

woman

was

the

all

honest

the

man

But

be.

above

the

that

ways,

there

and

that

tea-

that

and

hide-and-seek Over

they

they

;

month,

a

at

that

but

They their

thrice

pretty

foxes

trees.

built ground the elves that long-nosed Tengu had

living soul,

to

pine

that

their

may

harm

no

was

as

was

cottage,

haunted.

was

saying

and

woman,

of

an

said

seven.

they wise

wood

dwelt

their

was

wood

deep

a

played

before

morning

lonely place

remote

very

there

city,

gay

of

was

beneath

a

not

country

outskirts

had

Folks

of the

part

a

couple.

upon

said

in

BOWL

BLACK

her

worked doors

and

they poor She

manners as

hard

she

was

cooked


BLACK

THE

vii

drew

and

She

water.

BOWL

went

barefoot

homespun gown, and tied her tough wistaria tendril. Brown

a

grey

hair with

back she

in

and

was

a

thin,

beggar-maidthat ever made shift and no supper. with a bed of dry moss her father dies,and By-and-bythe good man

but the sweetest

the wise

her

woman

mother

the

sickens within

she lies in a corner year, and soon waitingfor her end, with the maid

of the near

cottage

her

crying

bitter tears.

Child,**says the mother, do you know you ? as pretty as a princess I that ? says the maid, and goes on with Am "

"

"

are

'*

"

her

crying.

that your manners fine ? ** are you know says the mother. " Are they,then ? '* says the maid, and goes on with her crying. " My own baby,"says the mother, " could you "

Do

stop your

by her

to be pretty. If she but the innocent,none

will

help you,

of

way from

The "

the

It is a bad

remember.

bowl

to

?"

me

stoppedcryingand put her mother's on the poor pillow.

listen,"says

"Now

a

and listen

minute

the maid

So close

cryinga

my besides.

mother, "and

thingfor

a

head wards after-

poor

girl

is pretty and lonelyand gods will help her. They

poor child,and I have thought Fetch me the great black rice-

the shelf."

girlfetched

See, now,

it.

I put it on

beautyis hidden away." 57

your head and

all your


BLACK

THE

BOWL

vii

"Alack, mother/* said the poor child,"it

is

heavy/* "It

will

from

save

you the said mother. bear,** that you will not " I promise! I

me

know

the time

when

what

a

to

If you love me, promise it tillthe time comes.**

"

move

promise!

shall I

how

But

? **

comes

And now help you shall know. outside,for the sweet morning dawns and Fve as they fancyto see the fairies*children once again, "That

me

is heavier

.

.

.

in the forest.**

run

So the

child,havingthe black

head, held her the

near

mother

in her

bowl in

arms

a

upon her grassy place

great trees, and

fairies*children dark trunks

as

the

presently they saw threadingtheir way between

at theyplayed

hide-and-seek.

the

Their

and theylaughedlightly brightgarments fluttered, smiled to see them ; mother The as they went. before seven she died very sweetlyas she smiled. When

the wooden

with she

must

of rice was

her little store

starve

bowl or

well

knew

go and

done,the

find

enough

maid that

So firstshe

more.

tended her father*sand mother's graves and poured for the dead,as is meet, and recited many a water kilted holytext. Then she bound on her sandals, her grey skirts to show her scarlet petticoat, tied her household gods in a blue printed handkerchief, and set out all alone to seek her fortunes, the brave

girl! For a

all her slenderness and

and rarelyodd sight,

The

great black

bowl

soon

pretty feet she she

covered 58

was

her

to

know head

was

it.

and


THE

VII

shadowed two

BOWL

BLACK

her face.

she looked up from

women

As

througha village washingin the stream, went

stared and

laughed. It's a boggartcome

alive/*says one. Out upon her,"cries the other, for a shameless

"

"

"

wench

upon her false modestyto roam the country thus with her head in a black bowl, as * who should cry aloud to every passing Come man, and

!

Out

wholesome On

!'

is hidden

what

see

It is

enough to

make

a

body sick.** the the poor maid, and sometimes and pebblesfor peltedher with mud

went

children

she

Sometimes

sport.

handled

was

roughly by

louts,who scoffed and caught at her dress village laid hands upon the bowl as she went ; they even itselfand soughtto drag it from her head by force.

theyonlyplayedat that game once, for the bowl stung them as fiercely as if it had been a nettle, and the bullies ran away howling. The beggar-maidenmight seek her fortune, but it was very hard to find. She might ask for But

work

;

but

wishful

to

see,

would

employ a

None she get it ? were girlwith a black bowl on

her head. At

she

sat

on last,

a

her upon

heart would

day when she was tired out, and began to cry as if her stone

fine a

break.

rolled her

Down

under

the black

bowl.

cheeks

and reached her white

They

tears

rolled down

from her

chin.

that way, with wanderingballad-singer passed had a sharp He biwa slung across his back.

A

his eye

and

marked

the

tears

59

upon

the maid*s white


THE chin.

It

"Oh,

girlwith

BLACK

all he

was

"

do

I

of her

sec

bowl

face,and, your head,'*

on

sit weeping

you

weep,*'she answered, I

giveme

hungry and

am

work

"Now that's for he had singer, of my own, sorry for you. do for you is

m

that he

whips

his

and fingers

the

tears

"

vii

by the

side road-

''

is hard. will

could

the black

quothhe, "why ?

BOWL

on

or

or

.

.

"

No

one

money."

unfortunate,"said

the

ballad-

kind

heart ; " but I haven't it would be yours. Indeed I am a

In the circumstances

make

to

the world

because

tired.

me

pay

"

you

his Aiwa starts

little

song."

round, thrums

as

your white

a

the best I

easy

as

on

a

can

With

it with

please. To says, and sings: "

you

chin," he

blooms by the roadside^ cherry black is the canopy ofcloud I How The wild cherry droops by the roadside Beware ofthe black canopy ofcloud. Harky hear the rain^hear the rainfall From the black canopy ofcloud. are Alasy the wild cherryits sweet flowers marred^ Marred are the sweet flowers on the sprayT* forlorn TAe white

^

^

^

"

Sir,I

girlwith "

and

Yet

do not

the bowl

understand on

his way. passingrich farmer. to "

song,"said

the

her head.

it is plainenough,"said the

went

him

your

He

came

to

ballad-singer,

the

house

of

a

he went, and theyasked singbefore the master of the house.

With

all the

In

will

in the 60

world," says

the


BLACK

THE

VII

BOWL

ballad-singer.I will sing him a So he sang I have just made." "

cherryand When

song that of the wild

new

the great black cloud. he had made an end, "Tell

of your song," says interpretation

the

the

us

of

master

the house. With

"

all the will in the

ballad-singer.The "

maiden

I

whom

saw

world," quoth the

cherryis the face of a sitting by the wayside. She wild

great black wooden

bowl

her

head,

wore

a

which

is the great black cloud in my song, and under it her tears flowed like rain,for I saw

from the

her white chin.

dropsupon

she wept for giveher work

hunger,and

upon

And

because

no

she said that one

would

pay her money." Now I might help the poor I would the bowl on her head," said the master

"

with

nor

girl of

the house. That

"

you may if you wish," quoththe balladShe sits but a stone's throw from your

singer. gate." The long and "

to

put

labour

All the with back

that the maid was short of it was in the rich farmer's harvest-fields.

day long she

in the

waving rice,

grey skirts kilted and her sleeves bound All day long she pliedthe with cords. her

sickle,and

the

sun

bowl

she

had

; but

night,and She

kept

worked

was

found

her

in

gatheredin.

shone down upon the black food to eat and good rest at

well content. favour in her

the Then

master's eyes, and fields till all the harvest he

took 6i

her

into his

he was

house,


THE there

where

plentyfor

was

happilyas

bird, and

a

labours.

And

gods for

her

her

do, for his wife

to

went

fortune.

lived well

and

singingabout

her

thanked

nightshe

every

good

vii

the maiden

sickly.Now

but

was

BOWL

BLACK

the august

Still she

upon her head. the New Year time, "

the

wore

black bowl At

Bustle,bustle,** says

scrub and cook and the farmcr*s wife ; dear, for your best foot foremost, my "

have

look

the house

sew

;

put

must

we

its very neatest."

at

be sure, and with all my heart,"says the and she put her back into the work ; " but, girl, "

To

she says, if I may be mistress," are we havinga party,or what ? "

so

bold

to

as

ask,

"

of them," says the " farmer's wife. My son that is in Kioto, the great and gay, is coming home for a visit." home he comes, the handsome Presently young "

Indeed

we

Then

man.

are,

the

and many

called in, and

neighbourswere

merry-making.They Feasted and they danced, theyjestedand they sang, many a bowl of good red rice theyate, and many a cup of with good saki theydrank. All this time the girl, bowl her head, pliedher work on modestlyin great

the

the

was

kitchen,and well

farmer's wife same,

saw

fine

one

to

day

of the way

out

she

was

that, good soul !

the company

the

"

All

called for

the

more

of the

wine, and

the

house

up the saki bottle and goes with it should he see there the kitchen. What

himself

wine

done, so

was

the

son

takes to

but the maiden

fanningthe

sitting upon

kitchen fire with 62

a

and pileof faggots, bamboo fan ! a split


THE

VII

I must

but My life,

"

what

sec

bowl," says the handsome

black

himself.

And

and

care,

BOWL

BLACK

enough

sure

much

peepedas

young made

he

as

is under

he

that to

man

it his

daily

could,which

was

enough for very much ; but seeminglyit was of Kioto, the great him, for he thought no more

not

to do his and gay, but stayed at home His father laughedand his mother

courting. the fretted,

up their hands,all to no purpose. Oh, dear,dear maiden with the wooden bowl, I must other. and she shall be my bride and no

neighboursheld "

her," cried

will have

the

impetuousyoung

man,

he fixed the wedding-day himself. and very soon the time came, the young maidens of the When went to array the bride. village They dressed her in

fair and

a

of white

robe costly

brocade,and

in

hakama of scarlet silk, and on her shoulders trailing they hung a cloak of blue and purpleand gold.

They chattered,but a

word.

She

as

for the bride she said

and bridegroomnothing,

of

his choice

at

sore

nothing,but

the

she

sad because

was

tears

because a

never

brought her

his parentswere

beggar-maid. She said glistenedon her white

chin. "

maidens to to

off with the

Now "

;

do it with the

bowl

it is time

to

ugly old bowl,"

cried

dress the bride's hair and

goldencombs."

So

and

lifted it away,

would

the

have

hands

they laid

but

it. theycould not move Try again,"theysaid,and tugged at it with all their might. But it would stir. not There's witchcraft in it,"theysaid ; try a "

"

"

63


THE

BOWL

BLACK

vii

third time/* They tried a third time,and stillthe bowl stuck fast,but it gave out fearsome moans and cries. "

Ah

!

be, let be for pity's sake,"said the

Let

" poor bride, for you make my head ache/* They were forced to lead her as she was

bridegroom's presence. My dear, I am "

bowl," said the young So

"

mystic

man.

saki from

the silver cup the Three

Times

the

afraid of the wooden

not

theypouredthe

and from

to

two

Three"

the silver flagon, of them drank the

that made

them

man

and wife. Then

the black bowl

noise,and fell to With

the

it fell a shower

burst asunder with

ground in

a

of silver and

been

a

rich and But the

face.

"

dowry that

for

a

loud

thousand

pieces. gold,and pearls jewel of price.

and rubies and emeralds,and every Great was the astonishment of the company

gazedupon

a

as

would princess

they have

rare.

bridegroom looked

My dear," he said,

that shine like your

"

eyes."

64

into

there

arc

the no

bride's

jewels


'


VIII

THE

All

that

you

gods

the

of the

upon

rain,

creeping

nor

sad

the

Hear

you seventh

the

pray

night

moon.

neither

thunder,

them

fair weather

for

patience' sake and and be pitiful that

be

may

lovers, I beseech

true

are

seventh

For pray,

for

LOVERS

STAR

that

upon

hail,

nor

love's

sake,

night

there

cloud,

nor

nor

mist. of

tale

dear

the

prayers. your Maiden The Weaving

Star

Lovers

the

was

and

give of

daughter

a

Her the dwelling was Light, upon which is the of the shore Milky Way, Bright the of Heaven. All River day long she sat at and loom her plied her shuttle, weaving the gay and of the woof, hour gods. Warp garments till it lay fold on web by hour the coloured grew Still she feet. fold piled at her ceased her never

of

Deity

labour, for she "

Sorrow,

spare.

she But

afraid.

age-long

Maiden

Weaving So

was

she

sorrow,

when

laboured,

She

and

she the

herself, poor 65

had

heard

shall leaves

gods

come

saying

a

loom."

had

garments

maiden,

the

upon

her

was

:

to

ill-clad F

;


STAR

THE

LOVERS

she recked nothingof her attire She went that her father gave hen

hang down

her hair

fell upon

long lock it

She

celestial youthsand or

She

weep.

into the

her He

angry. much." "

.

.

wove

a

flung

love

not

sorry.

She

her

being

father,the Deity of Light,grew too said, "Daughter, you weave

It is my duty," she said. At your age to talk of duty!

Out

she

did

She

and

anon

play with the pleasurewith

glad nor .

let

web. many-coloured

Now

"

did not take her

neither

was

and

Ever

maidens.

weaving,weaving

sat

"

or

jewels

and barefoot,

loom, and back

the

of Heaven,

children

of the

or

unconfined.

her shoulden

over

viii

upon

you !

"Wherefore father ? *'

said her father.

"

are

she

"

with me, my displeased her fingersplied the

you

said,

and

shuttle. "

Are

you

a

stock

or

a

stone,

or

pale flower

a

"

by the wayside? Nay," she said, "

"

"

Then

be pleasure,

take your

wherefore

And

"

leave your

I

am

of these."

none

child,and

loom, my as

live ;

others are."

should

I be

as

others

are

?

"

she said. Never

"

dare

to

Come,

me. question

will you

"

leave your loom ? She said," Sorrow, age-long sorrow,

upon

the

Weaving

Maiden

when

she

shall

come

leaves her

loom." "A

foolish

saying,"cried 66

her

father,"not


THE

VIII

worthy of

credence.

her

took

covered

do

from

with

her

of agelong

With

that

and gently,

And

her to be very richly and attired, upon her and garlandedher head

Paradise.

"

hand

cloth.

a

know

we

gods ?

not

we

shuttle

the loom

LOVERS

What

Are

?

sorrow

he

STAR

he

caused

they put jewels with

flowers of

her father gave her for spouse the Herd Boy of Heaven, who tended his flocks upon the banks of the BrightRiver. Now

And

the

Maiden

changed indeed. Her and her lipswere stars were ruddy. She dancingand singingall the day. Long hours

eyes went

was

playedwith the children of Heaven, and she took her pleasure with the celestial youths and maidens. Lightly she went ; her feet were shod with silver. Her lover, the Herd Boy, held her by the hand. She laughed so that the very gods laughed with her, and High Heaven she

re-echoed with

sounds of mirth. of

duty or

As for her

loom,

littledid she think

gods.

the

it from

I have

"

it into

a

And his

it

garments of wept

never

near

another.

to

she said ; live,*'

*'

111

weave

Boy, her lover,claspedher

face

all

was

his breast.

on

of the she

careless ;

was

more."

no

Her

arms.

tears

So

she

and

in

smiles,and

lived her

life.

father,the Deity of Light,was angry. It is too much," he said. " Is the girlmad

her **

She

web

end

life to

my

the Herd

she hid But

moon's

one

She

will

become

Besides,who of the

gods ?

is to

the weave

?

of Heaven. laughing-stock the new springgarments

"

67


THE

LOVERS

STAR

Three

times he warned

Three

times she

viii

his

daughter. and shook laughedsoftly

her

head. **

hand

Your

said, but of "

mortal

surety no

a

said, You "

of

god or

shall find it otherwise

banished

he

to

ever

either of

the Herd the farther side of the

And

cost."

hand

father,"she

shut it.''

can

He

and

openedthe door,my

to

your

for

ever Boy Bright River.

from far and near, and magpiesflew together, theyspreadtheir wingsfor a frailbridgeacross the over river,and the Herd Boy went by the frail the magpiesflew away bridge. And immediately to the ends of the earth and the Weaving Maiden the saddest thingin could not follow. She was Heaven. Long, long she stood upon the shore, and held out her arms to the Herd Boy, who desolate and in tears. tended his oxen Long, long she layand wept upon the sand. Long, long she brooded, lookingon the ground.

The

She

and

arose

went

to

her

cloth that covered

aside the

loom.

She

it.

She

cast

took

her

shuttle in her hand.

Age long sorrow," she said, age long ! sorrow Presentlyshe dropped the shuttle. the pain of it,"and she Ah," she moaned, the loom. leaned her head against "

"

-

-

"

"

"

in

But not was

be

as

a

I

once

neither

she

little while was.

gladnor glad,and

I am weep" Her tears

I did

said, Yet "

not

love

I would

or

weep, I love and

sorry. Now I am sorry."

fell like 68

rain, but

she

took

I I

up


THE

viii

shuttle and

the

with

LOVERS

laboured

of the

garments grey

STAR

gods.

weaving diligently, Sometimes

grief,sometimes The gods were

dreams.

it

was

fain

web

rosy

was

with

strangely Deity of Light,

to

Maiden's

The

the

the

go

father,the for once well pleased. was is my "That child," he said. good, diligent Now you are quietand happy." she said. The quietof dark despair," Happy ! clad.

"

"

I

"

the saddest

am

I

"

thingin Heaven." said the Deityof Light ; sorry,"

am

"

what

shall I do?" back my Nay, child,that I Give

" "

for

and

ever

lover."

me

ever

by

do.

cannot

is banished

He

of

the decree

Deity,that

a

be broken."

cannot "

I knew

"

Yet

it,"she

said.

something I

can

do.

On

Listen.

the

day of the seventh moon, I will summon from the ends of the earth, the magpiestogether the Bright River and theyshall be a bridge over of Heaven, so that the Weaving Maiden shall lightlycross to the waiting Herd Boy on the seventh

farther shore." So it

On

was.

magpiesfrom theyspreadtheir wings for a the Weaving Maiden went moon

the

came

bridge. Her like

a

eyes were bird in her bosom.

there to meet

And

so

her upon it is

day of

the seventh

the seventh

far and

near.

And

frail bridge. And over

by

the

frail

like stars, and her heart And the Herd Boy was the farther shore.

oh, true still, 69

lovers

"

upon

the


THE

LOVERS

STAR

viii

these two keep day of the seventh moon their tryst. Only if the rain fallswith thunder and is cloud and hail,and the BrightRiver of Heaven make swollen and swift, the magpies cannot a Alack, the bridge for the Weaving Maiden. drearytime ! Therefore,true lovers,pray the gods for fair

seventh

weather.

70


IX

HORAIZAN

JoFUKU he

read,

All

the

the

of

knew

he

hand.

his

and

what

he

as

He

metals.

not

lines

and

trees,

and

magic

full of years him

and

but

;

written

in

from

secrets

knew

He philosophy. grew All the people honoured happy, for he had a word

wisdom.

the

knew

flowers

and

herbs

them.

in

was

learned

He

books

Many

and

poetry

was

forgot

beasts, and

rocks

of China,

Man

never

characters

and

and

he

and

palm

birds

Wise

the

was

he

his

upon

heart.

word

The and

day

in

with Mutability. It was him. night, and sorely it troubled the days of Jofuku a tyrant ruled and

China,

he

made

he

"Jofuku/* my

wood

poets." Jofuku "

of my

the

sing

to

could

give

the

me

not

it you,

the

said,

"

all his

ask

though

a

over, Moreover

burden.

nightingales of

songs

it for

do

life

Man's

Wise

said, "teach

Alas, liege,*'he I will

and

him

was

me

it cost

of

Chinese

the

wisdom. another me

thing blood

the

heart."

"Have

a

care," said

the 71

Emperor,

"look

to


HORAIZAN

IX

Wise men arc your ways. " ? to be dishonoured one

another

"

Ask

"

Well, then,scent

me

cheap in

thing,"said

China

the Wise

I

; am

Man.

the peony with the scent imperial ; peony is brilliant,

me

of the

jessamine.The is small,pale, foolish. Nevertheless, jessamine

the

Scent

its perfumeis sweet.

the peony with the

me

of the

jessamine." But Jofuku stood silent and downcast. By the gods,"cried the Emperor,

scent

"

"

is

man

fool !

a

Here,

this wise

of you, off with

some

his

head." *'

Liege,"said

lifeand I will

the Wise

Man,

spare

set sail for Horaizan

Immortality.I will

the herb

"

me

my

where

grows this herb and pluck

bringit back to you again,that you may live and reignfor ever." The Emperor considered. "Well, go," he said,"and lingernot, or it for you." will be the worse Jofuku went and found brave companionsto go with

him

junk with he

took

had made

the great adventure,and he manned a the most famous mariners of China, and

on

stores

all

on

thingsreadyhe

month, about the The

board, and

Emperor

time

the herb

and when

he

sail in the seventh

set

of the full moon.

himself

he

Man,"

and Immortality,

presently.If you return companionsshall die the

down

came

"Speed, speed.Wise me

gold;

see

without death." 72

to

the

shore. sea-

said; "fetch

that you do it it,you and your


HORAIZAN

IX

"

So

The

called Jofukufrom the junk. Farewell,liege," with

theywent

fairwind

a

for their white sails.

the water creaked,the ropes quivered, splashed againstthe junk'sside,the sailors sang as panions eastward, the brave comthey steered a course boards

But

were

looked

merry. forward and

because

of the

the Wise

looked

word

back,

written

of China

Man

upon

and

was

sad

his heart

"

Mutability. for many days upon The junk of Jofukuwas He and the wild sea, steering eastwards. a course the sailors and the brave companionssuffered many things.The great heat burnt them, and the great cold froze them. Hungry and thirsty theywere, and

of them

some

fell sick and died.

More

were

the fightwith pirates. Then came that swept dread typhoon,and mountain waves the junk. The and the sails were washed masts lost away with the rich stores, and the gold was slain in

for

a

Drowned

ever.

and the brave

were

the

companions every

famous one.

mariners,

Jofuku was

left alone.

east

Far to the he looked up. In the grey dawn he saw a mountain, very faint,the colour of

and pearl,

on

the

mountain

top there grew

tall,with

spreadingbranches.

murmured

:

"The

Island of Horaizan

The

is

east

Wise

Mountain. there is Fusan, the Wonder there grows the heightsof Fusan tree a branches hide the Mysteriesof Life."

and weary 73

and could

not

tree,

Man

of the

and

Jofukulayweak

a

east,

On whose lifta


HORAIZAN

IX

finger.Nevertheless,the junk glidednearer the

to

nearer

shore.

Still and

blue

and the

grew

of the sea, and Jofuku saw the brightgreen flowers of the island. grass and the many-coloured Soon there came and maidens troops of young men

waters

bearinggarlandsand singingsongs of welcome ; into the water and they waded and drew the out and of the sweet junk to land. Jofuku was aware spicyodours that clungto their garments and their hair. At their invitation he left the junk,which drifted away

and

said,

He

no

was

more

have

I

"

seen.

come

to

the

Horaizan

that the trees Blest." Looking up he saw full of birds with blue and golden feathers. birds filledthe air with

were

The

On

delightful melody.

all

the citron,the persimmon and the pomegranate, the peachand the plum and the loquat. The ground at his feet was sides there

hung

the

orange

and

rich brocade,embroidered with every flower that is. The happy dwellers in Horaizan took him

as

by

a

the hands and "

How

spokelovinglyto him. strange it is,"said Jofuku,

"

I do

not

old age any more." What is old age ? theysaid.

feel my ** "

"

do I feel any what is pain?

Neither

theysaid. longerwritten on my you speakof,beloved

Now

"

The

*'

What

"

is the Mutability

"

And

"Tell death ?

pain."

"

"

word word

is no do

heart." ?

"

word." "

what

? may be its interpretation Man, "is me," said the Wise

"

74

this


HORAIZAN

IX

have

"We

of

heard

never

death,''said

the

Wasobiobe.

He

inhabitants of Horaizan. The

Wise

full

was

wise

as

of

Man

Japan was

the Wise

as

The

old but young. Often and loved him. not

was

It

boat

his

was

to

out

watery

he

was

pleasureto there

sea,

Once

waste.

of China.

Man

peoplehonoured him happy enough. in

alone

venture

frail

a

in the wild and

meditate

to

He

that

he did this it chanced

as

in his boat,and he slept he fellasleep all nightlong, while his boat drifted out to the eastward. So,

when

he awoke

in the

found

himself

beneath

brightlightof morning,he of Fusan, the

the shadow

of His boat layin the waters Mountain. river of Horaizan, and he steered her amongst a the floweringiris and the lotus,and sprang on

Wonder

shore. The

"

spot in the world !

sweetest

think I have Soon

to

come

the

came

island,and with and

young "

"

When fruit of

to

So

dear

to

in

hunted, or

hear

sweet

the woods

I

of the

of China,

Man

as

brother,"theycried, to

Youth."

eat

of the delicious

them

down

music.

and

bathed in the

feasted and

the

maidens

the Island of Eternal

of flowers

rode and

"

happy as they.

theyhad givenhim the island, theylaid

theywandered They

the Wise

Welcome, welcome,

welcome

bank

as

he said.

the Blest."

Horaizan

youths and

them

**

upon a Afterwards

groves. warm

They

sea-water.

pleasure. enjoyed every delightful and there was no long day lingered, night, 75


HORAIZAN for there

and

weariness

The of China. "

I

"

What

want

no

said

the Wise

to

Man

:

"

*'

You

boat here."

brother,I do.

Indeed, my

take

to

was

find my boat.*' said Jofuku. matter, brother ?

cannot

no "

of Japan came

Man

He

sleep,there

pain.

no

Wise

of

need

no

was

IX

home.

me

I

I

my boat There's

want

sick for home.

am

the truth.'* "

"

The

*'

? you not happy in Horaizan No, for I have a word written upon my heart. word is Humanity.Because of it I am troubled Are

and have

peace." Strange,"said the

"

"

Once

I

no

too

had

a

word

Wise

written

of

Man on

China.

heart.

my

The

but I have forgotten what it Mutability^ Do you too forget." means. said the Wise Man Nay, I can never forget," of Japan. He sought out the Crane, who is a great and besoughther, "Take home to me traveller, word

was

"

land."

own

my

"

Alas," the

die. know

you and "

This

Crane

said, if I "

is the Island of Eternal

did

you would Youth ; do you so

you have been here for a hundred years ? If go away you will feel old age and weariness

pain,then you will die." No matter," said Wasobiobe,

"

take

me

home." Then

the Crane

took

him

76

on

her

strong back


HORAIZAN

IX

tarried and

never "

him.

flew with

and Do

Day

nightshe

tired.

never

the shore ?

you see And he said, ** I

and

At

flew and

last she

said,

"

see

it.

Praise

be

to

the

gods.*' said, Where

She

have but **

shall I carry you ? littletime to live.** "

a

Good

country, under the fisherman

sand

"

of

You

my

pine,there spreading

mending his

net.

Take

laid Wasobiobe

So the Crane

feet. And

arms.

And

me

sitsa poor that to him

I

laid his head

Wasobiobe

againstthe

breast.

have lived for ever,"he said," but that is written on my heart."

might

for the word "

What

word

?

"

Humanity

is

murmured. the

the poor man's fisherraised him in his

at

the fisherman

fisherman's humble

Ah,

dear

.

die in his arms."

I may

"

the

Crane, upon

.

I

"

pain.

"

am

""

said the fisherman. the

word," the

grown He

old

"

hold

Wise me

Man closer.

gave a great cry. he smiled. Then his breath left Afterwards dead. him with a sigh,and he was " said the fisherman. It is the way of all flesh," .

.

77


REFLECTIONS

Long

enough of

journey mind

the

and

rest

her

the

good

his

had

in

They

kept

nothing

their

bothering of

pair The

day

truth

is

be

say

they and

peony

or

their

twist

days

plum,

these

At

to

forth

the

or

as

them

that

wife, and

years,

and

with

quiet

their

and

winning

had

and

they

Sometimes

Other

spring, the

is

long.

fields.

and

of

good from

obi

or

steady

set

never

scarlet

a

His

women-kind,

They

or

simple

on

eyes

morning

night.

till

or

sleeves

long

of

either

house,

of

many

peace

clear

ways. their

estate.

these

great

all

at

in

men-servants

dead

day's

a

gentleman

a

good

lived

man son.

Kioto

been

within

dwelt

but

nianners,

knew

a

of

city

soul,

only

there

ago

and

blue

jolly

as

nay.

admire

they lotus, would

the

tenegui

please,

Often

as

for

enough 78

might

case a

little

about

there

they

sak^y

their was came

the

flower the

view

the rice-

In

cherry

to

out

drink

white

you

set

the

as

the

in

a-fishing.

went

to

later

they

times

they

happy

as

laboured

they

went

the

were

iris

be. and

heads no

one

home


REFLECTIONS

X

their oldest clothes, by lantern light. They wore and were at their meals. mightyirregular But the pleasures of life are fleetingmore's the the father feltold age creeping pity! and presently "

"

upon him. One night, as he hands

the

over

smoking and warming

sat

his

charcoal, "Boy," says he, "it's

high time

you got married." the gods forbid ! " cries the young man. Now Father,what makes you say such terrible things? "

"

Or

are

You

joking?

you

be

must

joking,"he

says. "

joking at all,"says

not

spoke a truer enough."

never soon "

" "

Fm

Fm "

"

But, father,I And

and

that

the

same

?

"

sorry for you, my boy." Then I marry what for must of

In the way

the

nature

wife

a

to

I

"

;

you'llknow

afraid of mortally

am

I not

am

need you'll

and

word,

father

the

women."

says the father. ?"

says the son. I shall die before long, take care of you."

stood in the young man's eyes for he was tender-hearted ; but he heard this,

Now

when

tears

all he said was,

"

I

can

take

care

of

myselfvery

well." "

That's

the very

thing you cannot,"says

his

father. The

long and

the young

man

a

short of it was wife.

She

that

was

theyfound

young,

and

as

was Tassel,just pretty as a picture.Her name that,or Fusa, as they say in her language.

After

theyhad

drunk

down 79

the

"

Three

Times


REFLECTIONS "

Three

and together

so

became

stood alone, the young man girl. For the life of him

say to her. stroked it with

took

He

to

x

at

the

he did not know what bit of her sleeve and Still he

said

mighty foolish. The and pale,turned red again,

looked red,turned

and

wife,they

lookinghard a

his hand.

and

man

nothing girl turned burst into

tears. "

Tassel,don't

Honourable

gods'sake,"says "

"

I suppose

do

the young man. you don't like

that,for the

me,"

dear

sobs the

girl.

I suppose you don't think I'm pretty." " than the My dear," he says, " you'reprettier

bean-flower in the field;

than the you'reprettier hen in the farm-yard prettier ; you're I be the in pond. hope you'll carp

littlebantam than the

rose

happy with

my

father and me."

laugheda little and dried her eyes. Get on another pairof hakama^^ she says, and give me those you'vegot on you ; there's a great I was hole in them it all the time of the noticing wedding ! and taking Well, this was not a bad beginning, one thingwith another they got on pretty well, not as they had though of course thingswere At this she

"

"

"

"

been

in that blessed time

his father did sleeves

or

an

not

the young

man

and

pairof long morning tillnight.

set

obi from

when

eyes upon

a

the way of nature, the old man died. It is said he made a very good end, and left that in his strong-box made the his son which

By

richest

and

man

by,in

in the

But country-side. 80

this

was

no


REFLECTIONS

X

comfort

all to the poor young his father with all his heart. at

paid reverence

to

who

man,

Day

the tomb.

mourned

and

nighthe sleepor rest

Little

he got, and littleheed he gave to his wife,Mistress to the delicate Tassel,and her whimsies, or even

dishes she what

for

Kioto

a

It

little?

to

on

she

says, that

she

'*

as

a

to

were

to

go

"

he says. to

answer,

it would

saw

never

fashions,so

as

to

of

kind

a

duty. They

his country should

loves

say every man Kioto ; and besides,you the

said, "My

say that.

Oh,"

"

if you

it be

to

pale, know

"

but enjoyyourself,"

To

last she

At

for should I do that ? the tip of her tongue

what

was

thin and

grew

her wits* end

at

him.

would

how

And

"

with

do

to

dear, and

do

He

she, poor maid, was

and

"

before him.

set

might give an

tell

what

me

see

eye

like

to

theyare

she says, " are My things," you get home. sadlybehind the times ! Fd like well enough to

when

peopleare wearing!

what

know "

Fve '*

man,

no

and

heart to go to Kioto," says the young if I had, it*s the planting-out time of

the rice,and the

get

the

out

his best hakama

same,

a

Kioto,"he Well, I "

And

may

after

All

his bento for

"

not thing's

to

be

done, so there's

end of it."

an

to

"

what

two

dayshe

and

haouriyand

journey.

"

Fm

bids his wife

make up thinkingof going to

tells her. am

surprised," says

put such

Mistress

idea into your

an

Tassel.

head, if I

ask ? " 8l

G


REFLECTIONS

the young

Mistrefes Tassel

for she

nothingmore, And

duty,"says

man.

Oh, indeed,"says

"

of

kind

thinkingit's a

I've been

"

x

had

this,and

to

grainsof sense. she packs her

some

the next

morning as ever was husband off brightand earlyfor Kioto, and betakes she little matter of house cleaning herself to some has

hand.

on

steppedout along the road, and before long a littlebetter in his spirits, feeling he saw he reached Kioto. It is likely many things wonder to at. Amongst temples and palaceshe and marched He castles and gardens, went. saw fine streets of shops,gazing about up and down The

man

young

his eyes wide open, and his mouth too, a simplesoul. very like,for he was fine day he came At length, one upon a shop in the sunshine, full of metal mirrors that glittered with

him

"

Oh,

the

simple soul near

sat

pretty silver himself.

to

!"

moons

he

And

says

dared

and take up a mirror in his hand. The next minute he turned as white down

him

holdingthe "

mirror

in his hand

and

"

You

are

But

and well.

You

you look. to

come

home

with

did you

?

Now

Yet

I

it.

come

the dear could

are

have

here alive

but how somethingpale still, You and move father, your lips,

speak,but

seem

rice and

as

lookinginto

matter, since you

no

are

that !

come

shop door, still

how

dead, then

not

praisedfor

be

sworn

young

the

seat

Why, father,"he said,

here ?

gods

in

the

on

to

the

me,

I

do

not

dear,and 82

hear

you.

live with

us

You'll

justas


REFLECTIONS

X

you used well." Fine

"

one

of the

you

are

"

said gentleman,"

young

best that

the

smile,that

smile, you

You

mirrors,my

shopman,

best of the

be

can

lot you

is

the

made, and that's

have there.

I

see

judge."

a

The

do ?

to

clutched his mirror

man

young

tightand

enough no doubt. He trembled. stupidly staring he whispered. much Is it for sale ? How ? in a takinglest his father should be snatched He was

sat

"

"

from

him.

For sale it is,indeed,most shopman, " and the priceis

noble

"

It*s almost "

giving it ^//"

Two

praisedfor

bu !

as

Now

"

it was

three bu

and girdle, twinkling. the shopman who

or

even

five.

and tied it up with Father," said the young box

got away

buy

must

my

the

of his

with some

it, before "

gaudsfor

we

the ear,

wished

young about

why, man

but

when

never

buyinghis

said

came

a

word

he out

he put in a fine

mirror

set

out

to to

he

when

man,

old father for two

83

and

green cords.

the young

he

happy

he had

same

for home

had we

there,

woman

wife,you know." Now, for the life of him, he could

told

gods be

the money

All the

good face upon it,and packedthe

white

understand." you'll

" cried mercy ! smiled from ear to

He

the purse out of his purse, in a

asked

I am,

away

only two

had

Now

a

sir,"said the trifle, only two bu.

this their

man.

young

a

"

"

not

his home Mistress

have the Tassel

bu in the Kioto


REFLECTIONS

shop. That thingsturned She

was

as

her fine new him

see "

so

but I

to

and

well

his mistake,as

her he took

happy,"she been mighty

so

say he's after all.

must

quickto get over his sorrow are just like children." unbeknown

made

you like with her coral " obi from Kioto. And

pleasedas

herself;

to

he

out.

and hair-pins, Fm glad to said

where

was

x

But

men

for her husband, bit of green silk from

As a

spreadit in the cupboard of There he placedthe mirror in its

treasure-box and

her

the toko no ma. box of white wood. he

Every morning earlyand the cupboard of to went

every the

evening late,

toko

no

ma

and

his father.

Many a jollytalk they and the had and many a heartylaugh together, of all that countrythe happiest was son side, young man soul. for he was a simple Tassel had a quick eye and a But Mistress sharpear, and it was not long before she marked spokewith

her husband's "

What

ma^^

I

beingone

ways. for does he go

often

to

the toko

no

herself,"and what has he got should be gladenough to know." Not

to

suffer much

asked her husband He

so

asked

she

there ?

new

these

told her the

in silence, she very

things. truth,the good young

soon

same

I have

man.

again, my dear old father home I'm as happy as the day is long,"he says. " H'm," she says. " bu cheap,"he says, " and wasn't two And

"

And

now

wasn't it a strange thingaltogether ?"

84


REFLECTIONS

X

Cheap,indeed,"says she,

**

and

"

and

why, if I may ask," she nought of all this at the first? The

man

young Tm

"

says.

turned,and

wings of the with a clang. at a

once

;

an

What

box.

with

minute

his

she flew

ma

flungopen

on

the doors

"

he

keep in it ? box quickly enough. flat shiningthing! she said,

opened the

What

**

the

and

"

white wooden She

dear,"he

! she cried green silk for sleeve-linings " but I don't see any old father here,only

My

"

and

wind

the

Tassel

the toko no

to

say

"

tell you, my

cannot

Mistress

Up jumped was

did you

"

sorry, but I don't know," out to his work.

that he went

back

says,

red.

grew

Indeed,then, I

"

passing strange;

can

"

odd

the mirror, looked into it. she said nothingat all,but moment of anger and jealousy stood in her

and, takingup For

a

tears

great

the

pretty

eyes, and her face flushed from forehead to chin. ! " she cried,"a woman "A woman ! So that is his secret A

!

He

keepsa

pretty at

girlfrom Kioto,

"

FU

face is scarlet

be bound

;

and

?

cooked

Ah, it's a

With case,

and

Oh

miserable

! oh ! oh !

too ill-tempered

she

could have

his daikon and mended

times.

;

oh, how

little spitfire. Ah, who him

cupboard.

and very pretty-^no, not young A dancingall,but she thinks herself so.

very

woman,

her

in this

woman

girlI

"

frowns, nasty

thought it am

and

"

his hakama

a

of

I've

hundred

"

that, she

threw

slammed-to

the

85

the

mirror

cupboarddoor

into

its

upon

it.


REFLECTIONS Herself

she

sobbed

"

Fve

and in

her, and

to

down

was

get her face up is it,my

"

Tour

darling!

own

through her

sobs ; and

"

from

"

beside

the floor where

answers

want

?

comfort

to

? darling

she I

his knees

on

own "

in the world

he could

doing what

keptit. Why, what

sandal,"says he,

my

But what

instant he

an

Tassel

"

cried and

break.

thong of

the to

come

Mistress she

and

mats,

her husband.

comes

Tve broken

and

the

flungupon

if her heart would

as

In "

x

to

"

says he. very fierce

go home," she

cries. "

sweet, husband."

own

your "

on,

But, my

Prettyhusband

with

are

at

home,

in

that thinks herself beautiful

has my green

there sleeve-linings

Now, what's

with

says,"and prettygoingsthe cupboard! A hateful,

ugly woman "

and

!" she

woman

a

you

all this about

with her women

;

and she

to

boot."

and sleeve-

Sure you wouldn't grudgepoor old father that little green rag for his bed ? Come, my dear,

? linings ril

buy

you twenty

At

that

she

danced

with

rage.

"

The was

"

;

am

with my

woman

on

jumped

to

her

I

a

feet and

father ! old father ! " fool or a child ? I saw

father ! old

Old

screamed

sleeve-linings."

fairly she the

eyes."

own

didn't know whether he poor young man his head or his heels. " Is it possible that

my father is gone ? from the toio no ma.

"

he

said,and 86

he took the mirror


REFLECTIONS

X

"

That's well

bought

for

;

stillthe

bu.

two

nay, then, smile

You

I do.

as

Tassel

Mistress

same

old father that I

seem

worried, father

;

There, that's well." like

came

little

a

fury and

snatched the mirror from his hand. She gave but look into it and hurled it to the other end of one the

It made

room.

that in to

see

such and

servants

what

work, the woodclangagainst neighbourscame rushing a

the matter.

was

It is my father,"said the young bought him in Kioto for two bu.^^ "

"

He

keepsa

stolen my

in the

cupboardwho has sobbed the wife. sleeve-linings," woman

green this there

After

great to-do. the neighbourstook the man's part and

woman's, with such never

as

and

was

none

;

I

"

man.

was

a

some

the

clatter and chatter and

noise

but settle the

of them

of

Some

a

would

thingtheycould

look

the

into

not,

mirror,

they said it was bewitched. They might have gone on the way theywere of them said, Let us till doomsday,but that one ask the Lady Abbess, for she is a wise woman." And off they all went to do what theymight have because

"

done

sooner.

Lady Abbess was of holy nuns. convent

The

of

a

at

prayers

the at

and

"This

She

meditations

she

and

the great

was

at

the head one

of mortifyings

was

she held it in her

long time.

piouswoman,

the less, the clever one, none affairs. They took her the mirror, and

and flesh,

human

a

At last she

poor

and

hands

looked

into it for

a

spoke:

woman," 87

she

said, touchingthe


REFLECTIONS

mirror, woman

for it's as

"

this poor

"

mind

x

that plainas daylight woman

so

was

troubled

the disturbance that she caused in

at

it is

a

in her

quiet

a

house, that she and become

a

has taken vows, shaved her head, Thus she is in her right holynun.

I will

placehere.

keep her, and

instruct her in

Go home, prayers and meditations. you and forget, be friends." children ; forgive all the

Then

peoplesaid, "

The

Lady

my

Abbess

is the wise woman." she

And

kept the

Mistress

mirror

and

Tassel

in her treasure.

her husband

went

home

hand in hand. "

So I

was

"Yes, yes, my man,

"

of

never

But

course.

old father would was

much

after all,"she said. dear," said the simple young

right, you

get of

a

on one

see,

I

wonderinghow at the holyconvent. for religion."

88

was

my He


XI

STORY

THE

When

Izanagi,

back

the

upon

the

Lord

unclean

journeyed

Rice

who

the

and

and

by the side of a clear perform purification. And Izanagi-no-Mikoto reach. reach

is too

reach

;

is

he

but

said,

So

and

And

as

bathed the

deities

"

the

in

there Ama

Then "

who

the

shall

taking

the

-

three

great

upper

of

the

be

bathed

middle

reach

the

from

no

-

the

lower

reach

for the

third

of

river.

the

his

beautiful

three

sublime

of the

Lord

Mikoto

jewels

89

; ;

Sea.

rejoiced, saying,

children

illustrious

of

lower

Glory of High Heaven Moon-Night-Possessor

august

string

upper

the

in

created

Impetuous,

also

the

down

the

Izanagi

Behold

in

went

Terassu,the

Susa, the

bathed

of

were

Tsuki-Yomi-no-Kami, and

might

dropped

water

countenance

he

water

he

he

And

that

he

The

"

the

more

glad.

water

Then

rapid."

had

he

once

to

river

said, "The

sluggish."

too

time

he

But

whither

was

rested

farewell

bade

beheld

Ears,

his

Invites, turned

Dead,

he

quest,

IMPETUOUS

THE

place,

of a

upon of Fresh

Land

SUSA,

World

the

Yomi,

OF

that

are

for

ever."

from

his

mine, And,

neck, he


STORY

OF

bestowed

SUSA,

it upon

IMPETUOUS

THE

xi

Terassu, the Glorious, and

Ama

her, Do Thine Augustnessrule the Plain of High Heaven, shiningin thy beautyby day/'

said to

"

in the

So she took the august jewelsand hid them storehouse of the gods.

And

of Invitation commanded

the Lord

Tsuki-

Thine saying,"Do Augustness of the Night." Now this was rule the Dominion countenance. a youthof a fair and pleasant his AugustAnd to the youngest of the deities, ness the Lord Izanagi gave the Sea Plain.

Yomi-no-Kami,

day,and Tsuki-Yominight. But Susa, the the ground and upon

Terassu ruled the

So Ama

softlyruled the Impetuous,flung himself violently wept, for he said, "Ah, no-Kami

dwell for So

he

ever

in his

not

his tears, and the withered

placeswere

green

sea

took

weeping, and

valleyfor

of the

moisture

the confines of the cold

upon

ceased

miserable,to !" the

that the

so

rivers and

dried up. And evil deities increased and as theyswarmed and flourished, upon the earth streams

were

their noise moon

;

and

was

as

far and

the

noise

wide

of flies in the

there

arose

fifth

portents of

woe.

the Lord of Invitation, came father, and stood terribly by him and said, What is this that I do see and hear ? Why dost thou not rule I charged thee, but with which the dominions ? lie here, like a child,with tears and wailings his

Then

"

Answer."

Susa, the Impetuous,answered,

And because

I

am

in

miseryand QO

love

not

this

"

I wail

but place,


STORY

XI

would

OF

departto

divine

a

IMPETUOUS

who

rules the Nether

is called the

Queen of Yomi,

of the Dead."

the World Then

mother

my

who

Land,

Distant

THE

SUSA,

wroth and expelled him with was Izanagi and chargedhim that he should expulsion,

departand

his face

show

no

more.

Susa,the Impetuous,answered,

And

"

first I will ascend to High Heaven leave of Her who sister, Augustness, my But

Glory of Heaven, So he

went

and then to

up

I will

Heaven

his

So be it. to

take

is the

depart."

with

a

noise and

great

speed,and

shook

every land and country quaked. And Terassu, the Light of Heaven, she also

mountains

coming,and said, This coming Augustness, my brother,is of no good intent, lay hold of mine inheritance,and to take

trembled

of His it

going all

and

Ama

but

at

the

a

to

by

at

force.

his

"

For

this alone

does

he

invade

fastness of High Heaven." And forthwith she divided the hair that

the

hung

her shoulders and rolled it in two august upon and the left the a nd adorned it bunches to to right,

with of a

a

warrior.

young

great bow

and

and five hundred a

she made

jewels. So

bamboo

a

her head

And

she

quiverof

arrows,

like the head

slungupon arrows,

one

her back

thousand

and she took in her hand

staffand brandished

it and

stampedupon

groundwith her armed feet,so that the earth So she came the to flew like powdered snow. and stood bank of the TranquilRiver of Heaven and waited. like unto a mighty man, valiantly, And Susa,the Impetuous, spokefrom the farther the

9"


OF

STORY bank

:

IMPETUOUS

THE

SUSA,

xi

Thine Augustness, My lovelysister, why thou thus armed ? me against she answered, "Nay, but wherefore

"

"

comest

And

ascendest thou And

Susa

hither ? "

"There replied,

is

nothing evil

in

Because I desired to dwell in the Land my mind. of Yomi, therefore has my father deignedto expel with a divine expulsion, and I thoughtto take me leave of thee, and so I have ascended hither. I

have

evil intention."

no

she,bendingher great eyes

And "

on

said

him,

Swear.*' he swore,

And

by

girded on him, and jewelsin her hair.

the ten-graspsword after that he swore

that

by

she suffered him

Then

to

was

the

cross

TranquilRiver of Heaven, and also to the FloatingBridge. So Susa, the cross over the Impetuous,entered the dominions of his sister, the

over

Sun

Goddess. But

his wild

never spirit

fair lands

ceased of Ama

to

chafe.

And

Terassu and the divisions of the rice-fieldswhich broke down and filled in the ditches. Still she had planted,

he

pillagedthe

Light of Heaven upbraidedhim not, but said, "His Augustness, my brother,believes that the land and should not be wasted by ditches and divisions, the

rice

should

be

and

more

everywhere,without her soft words distinction." But notwithstanding continued in his evil ways and Susa,the Impetuous, that

became

more

Now, maidens

as

in

sown

violent.

the

great Sun

the

awful

Goddess

Weaving 92

sat

Hall

with

of

her

High


STORY

XI

OF

the

Heaven, seeing to garments of the chasm

he

And

of

brother

of the

chasm

through the piebald horse.

IMPETUOUS

weaving

gods,her roof

the

in

THE

SUSA,

made

a

august

mighty and

Weaving Hall, down

let

the

the

horse

heavenly

a

fled hither

and

thither in terror, and wrought great havoc amongst the weaving maidens. the looms and amongst

And and all

himself followed

Susa like

a

of

storm

confusion

was

Sun

Goddess

shuttle.

So with

the

and

horror.

was

wounded

a

a

And with

cry she fled from a

cave

;

in the

and

she

her

High

press

golden Heaven

rolled

a

rock

the cave's mouth.

across

dark

Then black

dark

eternal earth

the Plain of Land

High Heaven,

of Reed

night prevailed.Hereupon

were

from

Therefore assemble

was

the Central

the deities as

and

rushingtempest floodingthe hall,and

and

herself in

hid

waters

like

theywandered

like

unto

far and did the

with

a

near

the

over

there

arose

Plains,and the voices

the

fliesin the

and

of

face of the fifth moon,

portents of

woe.

Eight Hundred Myriad Deities divine assemblyin the dry bed

of the

Tranquil River of Heaven, there to hold and to make decision what should be done. parley, And His Augustncssthe Lord of Deep Thoughts commanded them. So they called togetherthe Singing Birds of Eternal Night. And they chargedAma-tsu-mara, the Divine Smith, to make them of shiningwhite metal. And a mirror they to charged Tama-noya-no-mikoto stringtogether of curved jewels. And, having hundreds many

performeddivination by 93

the shoulder-blade

of

a


STORY

OF

stag of Mount

IMPETUOUS

THE

SUSA,

branches

lower

of white

streamers

bore the

Goddess

And

was.

Then

birds sang.

a

all

with

offerings, blue,and they

of

streamers

before the rock

tree

And

branches.

they covered and

theyhung tree, and they

of the

jewelsupon the branches hung the mirror upon its

a

And

branches.

the

the

sacred tree,

Kagu, theyuprooteda

sakakiyof five hundred

xi

the Sun

where

cavern

assembled

immediatelythe

of fair renown,

divine maiden

for grace and skill in dancinghad no sister, either in the Land of Rice Ears or upon the Plain of

who

And door. High Heaven, stood before the cavern there was hung about her for a garlandthe club from Mount moss Kagu, and her head was bound with

leaves

the

of the

and

-tree spindle

flowers of

and goldand flowers of silver, bamboo-grasswas in her hands.

green

danced heaven

before the and

earth

have

dancing. It was more waving in the wind or the cloud

race

door

cavern

upon

not

as seen

sheaf of And

she

for possessed,

one

the

lovelythan

a

with

like of her

the

pine-tops

of sea foam, and floating Plain of High Heaven is

the

the

be

compared with it. And the earth quaked and High Heaven shook, and all the Eight Hundred Myriad Deities laughedtogether. Now Ama Terassu, the Glory of Heaven, lay and the brightlightstreamed in the rock cavern, from her fair body in rays, so that she was as a gleamed great jewelof price. And poolsof water

not

to

in the floor of the cavern, and the slime walls gleamed with many colours,and

flourished rock-plants

in the unwonted 94

upon the

heat,so

the small that


STORY

XI

OF

IMPETUOUS

THE

SUSA,

slept.And she awoke because of the song of the Eternal Singing Birds,and she raised herself and flungthe hair back the

bower

ladylayin a heavenly

over

her

that

singin

and

poor birds there came to

shoulder,and said, Alack, the "

"

the

And longnight! her the sound of dancingand of high revel and of of the gods,so she was still and the merriment listened. And she felt the Plain of High presently Heaven shake, and heard the Eight Hundred Myriad Deities as they laughed together.And she

and

arose

rolled back

the

of the

the door

to

came

stone

great

little way.

a

and

cavern,

And

a

of

lightfell upon the dancingmaiden where she stood,panting, in all her array ; but the other deities were yet in darkness, and they looked at each other and were still. Then spoke the Fair Gloryof Heaven : Methought that because I was hidden the Plain of High Heaven should be dark,

beam

"

and

black

dark

Central Land

the

then, doth

of Reed

Plains.

the

Dancing Maiden go thus, adorned with garlandsand her head tired ? And why do the Eight Hundred Myriad Deities laugh ? together Then the Dancing Maiden O made answer : Thine that art the sweet Augustness, delightof all How,

"

"

the with We more

behold deities, flowers,and

divine

the

maidens

are

decked

the

gods assemble with shouts. and are glad because there is a goddess rejoice illustrious than Thine Augustness.** And

Ama

she covered

Terassu

heard

her face with

the deities should

not

and

her

was

long sleeves,so

her tears ;

see

95

wroth.

And that

howbeit, they


STORY

OF

fell like the

Then

stars. falling

Court

of Heaven

hung

the mirror

stood that

IMPETUOUS

THE

SUSA,

by the made

was

the Divine

Smith.

And

and behold

the

paragon

And

in the mirror. dazzled

was

peer, she

Heaven, and

as

her

own

forth

And

the

all the

Dancing with

she looked, and

not

cherryrushed deities joinedtheir hands

Maiden should

with

looked

beheld,and

waved

ears

wild

cavern

and in

**

Deity be

joy they

bore

born ?

the

a

Sun, Then

shut.

cried, O Lady,Thine any

shook

into flower.

of the

was

thee, the Glory of Heaven So

and

countenance

Terassu, the Goddess

Ama

how

!"

of Heaven

beauty,that was without slowlyfrom the rocks of the light of her flooded High

the door of the rock

ness,

by Ama-tsu-Mara, "

the rice

below

themselves,and the about

sakaki tree, where

they cried, Lady,look

her

And

by

came

cavern.

And

the

let slipthe Nevertheless,she presently

that covered

sleeves

youthsof

said,"Indeed, I will

Terassu

Ama

behold."

new

the

xi

to

ring and

the

Augustcompare

"

goddess to

her

place. But

the

Susa,the Swift,the Brave, the Impetuous,

Long-Haired,the

of the trial in

Sea, him

the

Unhappy, the Lord deities arraignedto stand of the TranquilRiver of

Thrice

dry bed Heaven. And they took counsel, and fined him with a great fine. And, having shorn him of his it was hair,which was his beautyand his pride(for and hung below his knee), blue-black as an iris, from the heavenly they banished him for ever precincts. the

96


XI

OF

STORY So

descended

Susa

IMPETUOUS

THE

SUSA,

earth

to

by

the

Floating

Bridgewith bitterness in his heart,and for many he knew not whither. dayshe wandered in despair, By fair rice-fieldshe came, and by barren moors, heedingnothing; and at last he stayedto rest by the

side of the

river called

Hi,

is in the

which

land of Izumo. And and

sat, moody, his head on his down at the water, he beheld a he

as

looked

hand,

chop-

the surface of the stream. So on floating Susa, the Impetuous,arose saying, immediately, And he "There are peopleat the river head." pursuedhis way up the bank in quest of them.

stick

And an

when old

man

he had

not

gone

a

great way, he found

weepingand lamentingvery grievously,

the reeds and willows by the water-side. among And there was with him a ladyof great state and the daughterof a deity; but her like unto beauty, marred with many fair eyes were tears, and she And her hands. and wrung moaned continually them these twain had between a young maid of her face Susa very slender and delicate form ; but could not see, for she covered it with a veil. And ever or

and seemed

anon

to

beseech

pluckedthe lady by last but shook

and

she moved

the

old

man

the sleeve ;

their heads

fear, or earnestly,

trembled

at

with

which

and sorrowfully,

their lamentations. And Susa, full of wonder, drew art thou ? the old man, " Who

these

returned

to

near

and asked

"

And the old man answered, " I am This is my deityof the mountains. 97

earthly wife, who an

"


OF

STORY

SUSA,

THE

IMPETUOUS

xi

and the child is by the water-side, my youngest daughter." of him again, What And Susa inquired is the of your weeping and lamentation ? cause

with

weeps

me

"

"

And

he

sir,that I

answered, "Know,

deityof renown, earthly eightfairdaughters. But land,for every year

at

and a

I

the

was

it is

an

father of

horror broods

this time

am

over

the

ravagedby

monster, the eight-forked serpent of Koshi, that in the flesh of young delights virgins.In seven a

children been devoured. sweet years have my seven the time of my youngest-born is at hand. And now Therefore do we weep, O Thine Augustness." Then

said

Susa,the Impetuous, "

likeness of this

monster

?

the deities of the mountain

And

What

is the

"

made

answer

:

and red as the akakagachi (that fiery is,the winter cherry).He has but one body,with eightheads and eightscalytails. Moreover, on his body grows moss, together with the fir and the of the forest. In his going he covers cryptomeria and eighthills, and upon his under eightvalleys side he is red and gory." Then the Lord Susa, the Impetuous,cried, My lord,giveme thy daughter." And the earthly and deity, seeinghis strength and the brightness of his countenance, great beauty knew that he was all a god,and answered, With "

His

eyes

are

"

"

do

reverence

know

not

And

exile of

I offer her

unto

thee.

thine august name." Susa said," I am Susa, the

High

Heaven."

98

Howbeit, Sea

God,

I

the


a

a


STORY

XI

OF

the mountain

And

spoke,saying, "

So

IMPETUOUS

THE

SUSA,

deityand

also his fair wife

it.Thine

take Augustness,

be

the young maid." And immediatelySusa saw

And "

the face of his he

touched

her

the

on

in winter.

forehead, and

Fair and beloved,fair and belovedAnd the maid flushed faintly to

barefaced.

Howbeit,

had

she

little

.

.

enough Dear

for her

and

said,

."

stand

thus

need, for the

that stood in my

tears

"

the veil and

flungaway bride,paleas the moon

lord Susa's eyes were modesty. And he said

shall be our beautiful, pleasure

veil

again, hereafter,

may not tarry." So he took the young maid at once, and changed her into a crown Susa wore for his head. And

now

we

gallantly.And he instructed the earthly and together fold theybrewed saU^ refined eightdeity, the saki theyfilledeightvats and ; and with all was in readiness ; and when set them prepared there was a mighty theywaited. And presently

the

crown

noise,like the sound of

and earthquake,

an

the hills

valleysshook. And the serpent crawled in deities huge and horrible,so that the earthly sight,

and

hid their faces for fear.

gazedupon Now

But

the serpent with

the

mediatelyhe

serpent had head

Susa,the Impetuous, his sword

drawn.

eight heads, and into each

im-^

of sak^

vat dippeda drunken and drank long. Thereupon he becamA with the distilled liquor,and all the i^eads lay down and slept. Then the Lord Susa brandished his tfen-grasp and c^t off the sword, and leaptupon the monster

99


STORY

OF

eight heads

with

serpent

slain with

was

IMPETUOUS

THE

SUSA,

eightvaliant great

a

xi

strokes.

So

the

and slaying,

the

And flowed on, a river of blood. Susa the tails of the serpent also,and as he struck cut the fourth tail the edge of his august sword was river Hi

turned found as

a

he

So

probed with great jewelledsword with

known

no

the

back.

sword

Goddess,

smith and

his

sent

point,and blade sharp

its a

could temper it. And he took it for an offering to the Sun This

august sister.

is the

herb-

sword. quelling And the

built him Susa,the Impetuous,

placecalled Suga, and

bride.

And

curtain

round

the

clouds

Susa sang this song "

the

about

dwelt

of heaven

a

palaceat

there with

hung

palace. Then

his

like

a

the Lord

:

Many clouds arise. The manifold clouds fenceofthe forth-issuing Makes a manifold fence ^

For the spousesto be within. Ohy the mangold fence. .'* .

ICO

.


XII

It

from

Deity

a

was

IN

WIND

THE

So and

long

the

the

that

ago

knows

tortoise

said, "I

He

Reed

Plains.

Rice

Ears.

the

planted

the

It

sea

Then

Harima.

of the

way

the

But

there

grew,

Reed

beneath In

is

the

his

hand.

Floating

Lightly,

the

to

land

which

is

the

Fresh

of

sound

Province

High

to

the

satisfied."

am

the

in

again

up

I

within

Tree

of

Land

;

of

Land

of

Heaven