Page 1


GREEN

WILLOW AND

OTHER

FAIRY

JAPANESE

TALES

BY

GRACE

WITH

JAMES

ILLUSTRATIONS

WARWICK

MACMILLAN ST.

MARTIN'S

IN

COLOUR

BY

GOBLE

AND

CO^

STREET, 1912

LIMITED LONDON


COPYRIGHT

First

EditioHt

4/0,

40

/UuttratumSf

1910.

JVhv

Etiifwn,

8cv,

z6

lUustraiionSt

1913.


178020 GOT -9

\m

"BUG7

TO

MISS

ETSUKO

KATO


LIST

OF

The

Moon

The

Flute

The

Peony

The

Sea

ILLUSTRATIONS

IN

COLOUR

Maiden

Frontispiece FACE

The

PACK

lo

Lantern

King

and

25

Magic Jewels

the

.* .

.

.

Star Lovers

45

65

Reflections

78

The

Story of Susa, the Impetuous

99

The

Bell of

The

Singing

A

Legend

The The

D6j6ji Bird

127

148

of Heaven

of Kwannon

Espousal of

the

Strange Story of

The

Matsuyama

The

Nurse

The

Beautiful

165 Rat's the

Daughter

.

.

.

.

.

.

.171

Comb

Golden

Mirror

.

191 228

243 Dancer

of Yedo

250

Karma

270

zi


NOTE

These

talcs

many

sources.

from

the

which

legends have

and

Ko-ji-ki^ or

from

told

are

of them

Some

mythology being

memory,

from

days, originallyheard or

a

favourite

subjects

for

one

an

this, and

form

are

his

allowed

Daughter," to

others

;

of

lips of

the

in

childish fellow school-

a

again, form

them,

translated

appeared

Many

Japan.

relics

of

Matters^

stories into

now

English

this country

probably

are

the

upon

in to

new

English public. Thanks

has

another

or

been

have

of

representation

number

A

gathered together have ere

of

Certain

nurse.

Japanese stage.

long

the

selected

been

Ancient

of

from

collected

have

Record

the

contains

been

Mrs.

version

T.

of

"

to

H. The

due

to

story, be

Marcus **

The

included

James

for

Matsuyama

vii

B.

Huish, Esq.,who

Espousal in this

of the

collection

permission Mirror.'*

to

use

Rat's ;

and

her


CONTENTS

PAGX

1.

Green

2.

The

Flute

3.

The

Tea-Kettle

4.

The

Peony

5.

The

Sea

6.

The

Good

7.

The

Black

8.

The

Star

9.

Horaizan

Willow

10.

Reflections

11.

The

i

lo

17 Lantern

King

25

and

the

Magic

Jewels

.

The

37

Thunder

50

Bowl

56

Lovers

65 71

78

Story

Susa,

of

Impetuous

the

...

12.

.

Wind

Pine

the

in

Tree

89 loi

....

13.

Flower

14.

The

Mallet

15.

The

Bell

16.

The

Maiden

of

108

Peony

the

116

of

Dojoji of

127

Unai

134 ix


CONTENTS PACK

17. The

Robe

18. The

Singing

19. The

Cold

20.

The

Fire

21.

A

22.

The

Feathers

of

Bird

142

Heaven

of

148

....

Lady

153 161

Quest

Legend

165

Kwannon

of

Espousal

of

Daughter

"

.

Land

24. The

Spring

25. The

Strange

26. The

Jelly-Fishtakes

Yomi

Lover

and

Story

the

the

of

Lover

Autumn

Golden

Comb

Journey

a

.

.

.

.

27. Urashima 28.

the

Fox

Maiden

Matsuyama

228

Mirror

Images

Tongue-cut

33. The

Nurse

34. The

Beautiful

233 Sparrow

238 243

Dancer

of

Yedo

.

.

Hana-Saka-Jiji

36. The

Moon

250

258

Maiden

264

37. Karma

38. The

204

223

32. The

35.

191

215

29. MoMOTARo

31. Broken

185

209

Tamamo,

30. The

171 180

23. The

of

Rat's

the

270 Sad

Story

of

the

Yaoya's X

Daughter

.

276


WILLOW

GREEN

the

ToMODATA, the

He

of Noto.

Lord

had

a

poet.

He

a

noble

form

and

a

beloved

was

his

Now

loyal

"

Are

you

"

My

lord, you

"

Do

"

Ay,

love

you

good

my

"Then

fear

Stay

not

life look

bring

me

do the

for

not

your not

?

then

?

lord,'* said

"

kind.

and

wanted

Noto,

a

chose

He

trust.

presence.

daimyo. Tomodata,

it," answered

know me,

his

the

said

asked

the

daimyo.

kneeling

Tomodata,

;

but any word

message,'*

my

carry

and

Ride

and

"

manly

every

him.

before

"

of of

to

was

poor.

Lord

him

called

and

Tomodata,

by

mission

a

He

generous

and

the

daimyoy

undertake

to

man

and

rich

by

in

excelled

graceful dancer, and He wealthy was sport.

face,

beautiful

a

to

and

courtier,

a

address.

winning

a

He

and

voice

very

allegiance

soldier,

a

was

sweet

a

owed

samurai^

young

not

spare

your

mountains storm

nor

betray maid

not

between

nor

any your

beast. the other

the

said

Ride

again quickly.'*

straight,

enemies'

country. Lose

thing. Above

trust.

the

daimyo.

eyes.

all, do

Ride,

and


WILLOW

GREEN

spokethe

Thus

Tomodata

So rode

he

commands,

and straight, three

been

burst,for

it

rode

and

Tomodata

rode

wind

spoke to drew

he

might

rode

month.

had

tempest

Down

bowed

howled

he

poured his head

in the

pine-tree good horse

typhoon. The scarcelykeep its feet,but it and urged it on. His own

close

about

him

l;)low away,

not

autumn

a

could

lord's

He

Ere

country.

Tomodata

It blew

trembled

that it

The

good beast.

the road the

torrent.

on.

branches.

cloak

enemies'

the ninth

was

a

his

his

to

he

away

afraid of the steep mountain

not

daysupon

the rain in and

sparednot was

horse,and

to

Obedient

quest.

of the

nor

passes

of Noto,

got him

his

upon

Lord

i

and

and

held

it

in this wise

so

he

on.

fierce

The

of the

landmark that he

storm

became

many a familiar buffeted the samurai so

swept away

road,and

almost

tide fainting.Noondark as twilight, was as was as dark twilight and when nightfellit was as black as the as night, night of Yomi, where lost souls wander and cry. By this time Tomodata had lost his way in a wild, where, as it seemed to him, no human lonelyplace,

soul inhabited.

weary

His

horse

to

could

carry him

no

foot throughbogs and and he wandered on longer, marshes,throughrocky and thornytracks,until he fell into deep despair. "Alack and

At

I die in this wilder! '* he cried, ness "must the quest of the Lord of Noto be unfulfilled?''

this

moment

the great winds

blew

away

the


WILLOW

GREEN

I

clouds of the

shone very sky,so that the moon forth,and by the sudden lightTomodata brightly his righthand. a littlehill on saw Upon the hill was

small thatched cottage,and before the cottage

a

three green

grew

weeping-willowtrees. indeed, the gods be thanked

Now, Tomodata, "

and

three willow

over

woman,

"I

I

am

a

a

lonelymoor.

myselfand As

My

and

out

old

a

"

she

benighted

is Tomodata*

in the service of the Lord

Show

of Noto,

hospitality

me

food and shelter

crave

horse.*'

my

stood man young from his garments.

put

and

name

the

streamed

night?

a

lost traveller,

weary

samurai

such

upon

upon whose business I ride. for the love of the gods. I for

an

wills he here ? *'

and what

your

upon

opened by

was

poorlybut neatlyclad.

rides abroad

am

their green threw his horse*s

one

the cottage door

very

asked,"

a

of them, and called for the longed-for shelter.

to

Who

"

of the cottage door, hole in the roof. The

Tomodata

of

branch

once

time.

no

swayedand flungout

trees

a

admittance At

of

out

hill in

said

chinks

in the wind.

streamers

rein

the

curled

the

climbed

from

Light shone and smoke

he

!**

hand

to

hold

speakingthe He

on

reeled

a

water

little,

of by the side-post

the door. "

Come

full of

woman,

fire. You fare

in,come

to

in,young

sir ! "

pity. "Come

very welcome. but it shall be offer, are

great good-will. As

to

in We set

cried the old

have but before you

your horse,I 3

the

to

see

warm coarse

with

you have


WILLOW

GREEN delivered him

to

i

he

daughter;

my

is in

good

hands." behind

him,

round. Just sharply stood a very young light,

in the dim

the

girlwith Her

turned

this Tomodata

At

horse*s rein thrown

garments

streamed

hair

loose

wondered

samurai

the old

blown

were

and

about

upon she had come

how

him

into

her

arm.

her

long

wind.

The

there.

Then

the

out

drew

woman

over

the

cottage and

Before the fire sat the good the door. of the house, and the two old people did They very best they could for Tomodata.

shut man

the

gave rice

dry garments, comforted him with hot wine, and quicklyprepareda good supper him

for him. the daughterof Presently

and retired behind to

dress afresh.

him. Her

She

feet

confined

bare.

forth

came

of

robe

blue

a

were

she

hair

Her

house

comb

to

screen

Then

wore

in

a

the

came

hair and

her

wait upon

to

homespun was

in,

cotton.

tied

not

nor

lay along her smooth and long and black,to cheeks,and hung,straight her very knees. She was slender and graceful. Tomodata judged her to be about fifteen years old, and

knew

had

ever

At

any

well

way,

but

that she

was

length she

at

he

seen.

knelt

her.

When

pouring the wine their glances met,

she and

his side to

pour wine the wine-bottle in two

at

into his cup. She held hands and bent her head. look

the fairestmaiden

had

Tomodata had set

and Tomodata 4

turned

made

an

down

the

looked

at

end

to

of

bottle, her full


WILLOW

GREEN

I

the eyes, for he forgotaltogether the Lord of Noto. warning of his daimyoy " ? ** Maiden/' he said," what is your name the

between

She

answered

They

"

:

call

the

me

Green

Willow/' "The

again

he

dearest

name

looked

her

chin

to

the

between

And

eyes.

long her face grew rosy red, forehead,and though she smiled her

because he looked from

said,and

earth,'*he

on

so

eyes filledwith tears. Ah me, for the Lord Tomodata

Then **

of Noto's quest ! made this little song :

maiden^do Long-haired

you know

That with the red dawn Do you wish

far

me

go f

I must ?

away

maiden^say long-haired maiden^if you know hong-haired Cruel

"

That with the red dawn

Why^ the

And "

oh

why

J

do you blush

maiden, the

The dawn

I must

comes

so

Willow, answered

Green

ifI

go^ '*

?

will

or

no

:

;

Never

leave me^ never go. My sleeve shall hide the blush away. The dawn comes ifI will or no ;

Never

leave me^ Lordy I lift my

"Oh,

Green

never

go. sleeve so. long

Willow,

Green

sighedTomodata. That night he lay before 5

the

.'' .

.

Willow fire "

'* .

"

.

but still,


WILLOW

GREEN with he

eyes, for

wide

was

He

weary. Yet

Willow.

bound

sleepcame

no

him

to

though

sick for love of the Green

was

the rules of his service he was over, to think of no such thing. More-

by

in honour

the quest of the Lord of Noto that his heart,and he longedto keep truth

had

he

i

layheavy on and loyalty.

the firstpeep of

At

day he

rose

He

up.

looked

who had been his host,and upon the kind old man left a purse of gold at his side as he slept. The maiden and her mother laybehind the screen.

saddled and

bridled his horse,and mounting,rode slowlyaway through the mist of the earlymorning. The storm was quite over still as Paradise. The and it was as green grass Tomodata

the

and

the

clear,and

was

flowers

Green

"Ah, and

Willow,'*

lay in holy that he

;

the

when

as

to

twilightfell.

he rose, a

cold

That

his mind

that flowed

his

journey;

the shrine's threshold.

Willow, prone

upon

the

night

placewas so midnighttill

havingit in

stream

go refreshed upon

Green

Green

"

"

deserted shrine,and the from of all he slept in spite

stoppedupon the

was

Willow,'' he Green Willow, Willow, Green

a

Then the dawn. wash himself in 80

it

and

autumn

bow, his saddle-

across

Green

Willow,

"

Willow

Green

sky

sad.

was

noontide

at

The

wet.

path very brightwith

streamed sunlight

the

When

the

with

but Tomodata

;

sighed;

shone

leaves

near

but he

to

by, was

There

lay ground. A

thing she lay,face downwards, hair flungabout her. She lifted a

slender

with

her

black

hand

and

6


GREEN

I

held

Tomodata

by

WILLOW the

lord,"she said,and fell to took her in his

He he

soon

set

her

on

"My lord, my sobbingpiteously.

sleeve.

arms

word, and before him, and

without

his horse

a

togethertheyrode the livelong day. It was little they recked of the road they went, for all the while they looked into each other's eyes. The heat and the cold were nothing to them. They felt not

the

of the

Lord

the rain ; of truth or falsehood nor theythoughtnothingat all ; nor of filialpiety, sun

nor

of Noto's

word. plighted

Alas,for the ways

They

quest, nor

of honour

knew

the

but

nor

thing.

one

of love !

At last

unknown to an city,where theycame carried gold and jewels they stayed. Tomodata in his girdle, built of white so theyfound a house with sweet white mats. In every dim wood, spread there could be heard the sound of the garden room

waterfall,whilst

the

flitted

swallow

and

across

the paper lattice. Here theydwelt,knowing but the one thing. Here theydwelt three years of across

for Tomodata and the happydays,and the years were like garlands of sweet In the

the

autumn

of them

two

shake

Willow

flowers.

of the third year it chanced forth

went

dusk, for theyhad a wish to rise ; and as theywatched, the to

Green

into see

the

the

Green

that

garden at

round Willow

moon

began

and shiver.

dear," said Tomodata, "you shake and is shiver ; and it is no wonder, the night wind in." And he put his arm around her. chill. Come

"My

At

this she gave

a

long and pitiful cry, very 7


WILLOW

GREEN

loud and full of agony, and the cry she failed, and love's breast. "

me

; "

i

had

she

when

droppedher

head

Tomodata,'*she whispered,say "

uttered her

upon

prayer for

a

1 die."

Oh, say

not

so,

!

sweet

sweet, my

my

You

but weary ; you are faint.'* He carried her to the stream's side, where the iris grew like swords, and the lotus-leaves like are

He fields,and laved her forehead with water. said : What Look up and live." is it,my dear ? The tree,"she moaned, the tree they "

"

"

"

have

down

cut

tree.

my

"

"

the Green

Remember

Willow." it seemed, from his as slipped, himself upon the to his feet ; and he, casting arms ground,found onlysilken garments, brightcoloured, and sweet, and straw warm sandals, scarlet-thonged. In after years, when Tomodata was a holy With

that she

he travelled from

man,

shrine

shrine,painfully

to

feet,and acquiredmuch he found Once, at nightfall,

upon

hill,and

on

cottage.

The

old been

and

it the door

down.

stilland silent. "

sad

stood for

8

a

himself:

know

I must

three

long since long time

gentlyto

maiden^do you Long-haired That with the red dawn

little

poor thatched fro with broken

that had

he sang

a

a

a

Before it stood

trees

Tomodata Then

and

to

upon

he beheld

of

ruins

swung

of willow

himself

righthand

creakinghinge.

stumps cut

his

On

moor. lonely

latch

merit.

his

go ?


WILLOW

GREEN

I

far away ? Cruel long-haired maiden^say maiden^ifyou know Long-haired

Do you wish

me

"

That with the red dawn

Why^ oh why^do "Ah, foolish song ! I

should

Dead,"

have

recited

said Tomodata.

I must

you blush

The

the

so

go^

f

'*

mc. godsforgive

Holy

Sutra

.

.

.

for the


II

THE

since, their

Long

FLUTE

lived

Yedo

in

a

of

gentleman

His conversation. good lineage and very honest wife was his secret a gentle and loving lady. To she did But a daughter grief,she bore him no sons. give him, whom they called 0'Yon6, which, being of them Rice Each in the ear." interpreted, is loved this child more than life,and guarded her as the the child And apple of their eye. up grew red and white, and long-eyed, straight and slender "

as

the

bamboo.

green

0'Yon6

When

drooped with pined, and ere the

maples

the

earth.

He

cried

ground broke

the

aloud,

of had

dead

he

beat

the

year, faded from shrouded was

his

comfort,

The

slept.

nor

wild

mother

sickened, the

leaves

of

laid

in

and in

and

his

grief.

lay upon the for days he neither child was quite

breast, and

her

old,

years

and

husband

refused fast

his

red

was

The

and

fall

the

she

twelve

was

he

silent. Time

his business. his

wife's

The

passed by. The

grave.

man

of winter

snows

The

perforce went

beaten 10

fell and

pathway

about covered

from

his


(

The

Flute.-/*,

w.


THE

11

house

dwellingof

the

to

undisturbed and

for the

went

making merry gilded paper,

the dead

also,

snow

was

faint

printsof a child's he girdedup his In the spring-time forth to see the cherry blossom, enough, and writinga poem upon

save

sandalled feet. robe

FLUTE

which

he

hung

to

cherry-tree

a

The flutter in the wind/ poem the of of and saki. Later,he praise spring branch

to

planted and thought of his lilyof forgetfulness,

the orange

wife

But

more.

no

the child remembered.

Before the year was with home, a woman

he

out

her, and

her

that all

father loved with

bride

new

black heart.

a

commended

happy,and

believed

her

because

broughta

fair face and

a

poor fool,was

the man, his child to But

Now

in

was

well.

was

her

0'Yon6,

jealousand deadly hatred,and every dayshe dealt cruelly by the child, whose gentleways and patience onlyangeredher

stepmotherhated

the

more.

did

not

a

of her father's presence she do 0'Yon6 any great ill ; therefore

But because dare

to

The poor child passed she waited, bidingher time. her days and her nightsin torment and horrible fear.

But

of these

her father.

Such

thingsshe

is the

Now, after some

said

not

a

word

to

of children.

manner

that the

time, it chanced

man

called away by his business to a distant city. and from Yedo it of the city, Kioto was the name is many days'journeyon foot or on horseback. was

Howbeit, go three and to

moons

the or

man

more.

needs

Therefore

equippedhimself,and go with

him, with

must,

all II

his

and

stay there

he made

servants

ready,

that

thingsneedful

;

were

and

so


THE

which departure, morning.

be very earlyin the him He called 0'Yon6 to to

was

said

Come

"

:

0'Yon6

and knelt before him.

went

giftshall

"What Kioto

?

But

"

she

hung

her head and did

with

shuttlecocks ? Then

took

it and

her

away

silk,or

-feathered light

many bitter

burst into

break.

father,"she said," I

her.

great battledore

a

weeping, and

upon his knees to soothe her. face with her sleeves and cried

would

heart

bade

**

she

her

answer.

roll of

a

brocade, or

images upon

not

little one," he

goldenfan,or

a

obi of red

new

from

home

bring you

he said.

Shall it be

hid

I

Answer, then, rude

"

a

and

dear little daughter.** So

here, then,my

**

ii

the last nightbefore his

to

came

FLUTE

And,

do

not

"

go

O

But as

he she

if her

father,father,

away

"

do

not

go

"

sweet, I needs must," he answered, " I shall be back and soon it will so soon, scarcely that I am I shall be here again seem gone, when

But, my

"

"

fair gifts in my

with

hand."

Father,take me with you,"she said. "Alas,what a great way for a little girl! Will or mount you walk on your feet,my little pilgrim, "

how

you fare in the inns of Kioto ? Nay, my dear,stay; it is but for a little time, and your kind mother will be with you."

a

? pack-horse

She

And

shuddered

in his

Father, if you

"

would

arms.

go, you

more." 13

will

never

see

me


FLUTE

THE

II

the father felt a sudden

Then

chill about

his

But he would not pause. Must he, a strong man grown,

heart, that gave him heed

it.

!

What

swayed by a child's fancies ? He put 0*Yon6 gentlyfrom him, and she slipped away as silently

be

as

a

shadow. But

in the

sunrise with bamboo

she

him

to

came

little flute in her

a

and

morning

before

hand, fashioned of I made

it self," myin the grove that

smoothlypolished, "

she said," from a bamboo As you is behind our garden. I made it for you. with you, take the little flute, take me cannot father.

honourable

will,and

think

handkerchief wound

and silk,lined with scarlet, cord about it,and gave it to her

put it in his sleeve.

departedand As

on

of white

father,who Kioto.

of me.*'

scarlet

a

it sometimes, if you Then she wrapped it in a

Play

he

went went

After

this he

his way, takingthe road to he looked back thrice,and

beheld his child,standing at the gate,lookingafter Then heir no him. the road turned and he saw more.

The

city of

beautiful,and

so

Kioto

the

was

passinggreat

father of 0'Yon6

found

and it.

duringthe day,which sped very well, and his pleasurein the evening, his sound and sleep at night,the time passed and small thoughthe gave to Yedo, to his merrily, moons home, or to his child. Two passed,and three,and he made no plansfor return. One eveninghe was making readyto go forth And

to

a

what

with

his business

and great supper of his friends, '3

as

he searched


FLUTE

THE

in his chest for certain brave he

intended

to

wear

as

an

ii

silken hakama honour

to

the

which he feast,

which had lain hidden upon the littleflute, all this time in the sleeve of his travelling dress.

came

He

it forth from

drew and

its red and white

chief, handker-

he did so, felt strangely cold with an icychill that crept about his heart. He hung over the live charcoal of the hibachi as one in a dream.

put the flute to his

He it

as

a

when lips,

there

from

came

long-drawnwail. He

the

dropped it hastilyupon

and

mats

clappedhis hands

for his servant, and told him he would not not well, go forth that night. He was After a long time he reached he would be alone. for the flute. Again that long, his hand out He

melancholycry. but

he

Yedo

blew

.

.

Father ! '*

the

into

back

come

.

shook

The

from

flute. to

"

head

to

Come

Yedo.

quaveringchildish

.

foot,

back

to

Father .

voice

.

rose

to

! a

shriek and then broke. A the

horrible and

man,

now foreboding

he

was

as

one

took

of possession

beside himself.

He

flunghimself from the house and from the city, and journeyedday and night, denying himself sleepand food. So palewas he and wild that the and fled from him, peopledeemed him a madman or pitiedhim as the afflictedof the gods. At last he came his journey's to end, travel-stained from head to heel,with bleedingfeet and half-dead of weariness. His He

wife said

:

met "

him

Where

in the gate. is the child ? **


FLUTE

THE

II

"

"

The

child

child

Ay, the

he cried in The

an

? " she answered.

my

"

child

.

.

is she ? "

where

.

agony.

laughed:

woman

should

.

.

"

I know

She

?

she is in the

Nay,

"

is within she

or garden,

she has gone forth with her He said : " Enough ; no

my her

at

lord, how books, or

is

or asleep, mayhap ." or playmates, "

"

of this.

more

Come,

"

where

is my child ? Then afraid. she was

Grove,"

she

There

And, him

said,lookingat

the

In the Bamboo

with

wide

But of the bamboos. green stems find her. He not called,'* Yon6 ! Yon6 '* But he had no again," Yone ! Yon6 !

the

wind

eyes.

sought 0*Yon6

ran, and

man

"

among he

did

! '* and answer

;

leaves. dry bamboo Then he felt in his sleeve and broughtforth the little flute,and very tenderly put it to his lips. faint sighingsound. Then voice There a a was

only the

thin spoke,

the

sighedin

and

: pitiful

wicked

"Father, dear father,my killed She

buried

Grove. will me

Three

me.

You

never more.

With

in the

me

may

see "

"

his

and justice,

me

since

moons

she

killed

me.

clearingof

find my any

stepmother

bones.

more

"

the Bamboo As for me, you

^you will

never

see

man

did

"'*

own

two-handed

sword

the

slew

his wicked

wife, avenging the

he dressed child. Then death of his innocent himself in coarse white raiment, with a great ricehis face. And he took a hat that shadowed straw 15


FLUTE

THE

staffand

a

and feet,

thus he

straw

rain-coat and set

forth upon

ii

bound a

sandals

on

to pilgrimage

his the

holyplacesof Japan, And a

he

carried

the little flute with

fold of his garment, upon

i6

his breast.

him,

in


Ill

TEA-KETTLE

THE

Long

ago,

heard

Fvc

as

temple of Morinji, holy priest. there

Now

First,

man.

and a

observances

great

one

of his

of

Province

Kotsuke,

a

things about this reverend in meditations wrapped up

was

forms

and

for the

Sacred

mystical things.

and

the

the

at

three

were

he

in

dwelt

tell, there

and

doctrines.

Sutras, and

Then

he

had

a

He

was

knew

strange

fine

exquisite

and

much so nothing pleased him of the Cha-no-yu ; and the ancient tea as ceremony both sides for the third thing about him, he knew well coin of a copper enough and loved a bargain. he happened None so pleased as he when upon and ancient tea-kettle, lying rusty an dirty and halfof a shop in a back forgotten in a corner poor taste

street

of his

own,

town.

ugly bit of old metal," says the holy man "but it will do well the shopkeeper; to enough to of an boil humble FU drop of water evening. my he did and This took give you three rin for it." of bronze, fine the kettle home, rejoicing; for it was work, the very thing for the Cha-no^yu. "

An

17

c


TEA-KETTLE

THE A

and

it

out

came

scoured

and

cleaned

novice

pretty

as

iii

the

as

you and that,and

tea-kettle,

please.The

down, upside his finger-naiL He he cried, a bargain! and bargain,"

it this way looked into it,tappedit with

turned priest smiled.

rubbed covered

"

his hands. with

over

times, and

then

the kiettleupon a box purplecloth,and looked at it

He a

firsthe

long that

so

to

And

set

fain

was

and he

then, believe

to

them

close

droppedforward

head

'*

"

A

rub his eyes many altogether.His

slept. wonderful

the

me,

thing

though no hand it. A hairyhead, with two was near brighteyes, lid jumped up and looked out of the spout. The and Four brown and hairypaws appeared, down. down In a minute the kettle was a fine bushy tail. from the box and going round and round looking at things.

happened.The

A

"

tea-kettle moved,

comfortable

very

room,

be

to

sure," says

the tea-kettle.

Pleased

enough

began to

soon

sing

and

dance

the top of its voice. studyingin the next

at

were

is

he

be

at

?"

to

caper Three

room.

or "

four novices

The

old

only hark to him. And they laughed in

lively," theysaid ;

can

lodged,it nimbly and to

find itselfso well

to

"

man

What their

sleeves.

mercy, the noise that the tea-kettle Bang ! bang ! Thud ! thud ! thud ! novices soon stoppedlaughing. One of

Heaven's made

!

The them "

slid aside the kara-'kami and

Arah,

the

devil and i8

peepedthrough.

all's in it ! "

he

cried.


THE

Ill

of

badger.

a

The

for certain

or

shall be lost ! it

third

"

the

So

said since,'*

the Holy reciting

his knees.

on

laughed. he said. hobgoblin/'

the

to

catch it.

a

to

the

books

Ha,

and

ha !

Catch

"

me

ha ! "

if you

rushed

They

breathless.

grew

Ha,

to

kettle up with the teaIt danced and it leapt

it flew up into the air. The novices here and there, slipping upon the mats. "

a

they come

bit of it.

They

in

tea-kettle

and

hot.

of

view

nearer

left their

chase

could a

for

Fm

them

gave

But Not

?

of

lot

twinklingsand

grew

a

"

hour

an

novice, and he fell

another A

not

into

from witchcraft,

godsprotect us

we

I scoured

"And Sutras

old tea-kettle turned

the master's

"Here's sort

TEA-KETTLE

laughed the !

can

"

tea-kettle ; ful laughedthe wonder-

tea-kettle.

the priest awoke, Presently

all rosy, the

holy

man. "

says, all?"

what's the

And "

me disturbing

meaning of this racket,"he at my holy meditations and

Master, master,"cry the novices,pantingand mopping their brows, "your tea-kettle is bewitched. "

It

was

been "

badger,no less. givingus, you'dnever a

Stuflf and ?

Not

And

dance

it has

believe ! "

nonsense,"says a

the

bit of it.

the

There

priest ; it rests

"

as

you

please. There 19

was

its

on

box, good quietthing, justwhere I put it," Sure enough, so it did, lookingas hard cold and innocent

witched be-

and not

a


THE hair of

TEA-KETTLE

badgernear

a

It

it.

iii

the novices

was

that

looked foolish.

likelystory indeed," says the priest. I that took wings to itself have heard of the pestle and flew away, partingcompany with the mortar. That is easily But to be understood by any man. "

a

A

"

kettle that turned

badger no, no ! To from pray to be preserved

into

your books,my sons, and of illusion." the perils

a

"

filledthe kettle very night the holyman from the springand set it on water the

That

with

hibachi to boil for his cup of boil

began to

When

tea.

the

water

"

Ai ! Ai ! " the kettle cried ; " Ai ! Ai ! The And it lost no time at heat of the Great Hell ! " "

all,but hopped oflfthe fire as quickas you please.

Sorcery!

"

A

Help

!

Help

!

of his wits,the

runningto

came

A "

priest. Black magic ! devil ! Mercy on ! me "

Help ! dear good see

what

He

was

the novices

All

man.

was

out frightened

the

matter.

tea-kettle is bewitched," he

The

"

cried the

devil !

A

devil !

"

gasped;

it was a badger badger, assuredly speaksand leapsabout the room." Nay, master," said a novice, see rests upon its box, good quietthing." And sure enough,so it did. was

a

"

"

"

"

reverend

Most

all pray

to

be

sir,"said

the

preservedfrom

.

the

it

it both

.

where

novice,

"

"

let

it

us

perilsof

illusion." The

sold priest

the

tea-kettle

got for it twenty copper coins. 20

to

a

tinker and


TEA-KETTLE

THE

Ill

mighty fine bit of bronze,'*says priest, Mind, Fm givingit away to you, '*

It*s

a

"

I cannot

sure

for

The

bargain!

a

carried home

for."

tell what

tinker

the kettle.

Ah,

was

He

a

he

the

was

Fm one

and

happy man

turned

the

it this way into it.

upsidedown, and looked A pretty piece,"says the tinker ; a very he And that when bed to went good bargain." nighthe put the kettle by him, to see it firstthing in the morning. He awoke at midnightand fell to lookingat the kettle by the bright lightof the moon. hand it moved, though there was no Presently and that,and

"

"

it.

near "

said Strange,"

the tinker ; but he

was

a

man

took

who

thingsas they came. hairy head, with two

A

brighteyes,

looked

of the kettle's spout. The lid jumped up and and hairypaws appeared, and Four brown down. out

a

fine bushy tail.

"

quiteclose

to

the tinker

paw upon him. Well ?" says the tinker. I am not wicked," says the tea-kettle.

and laid "

It came

a

**

No," says the tinker.

"

But

I like

to

be well treated.

I

am

a

badger

tea-kettle."

me

"

So it

"

At

and

seems," says the tinker.

the set me

templetheycalled me on

names,

and beat

the fire. I couldn't stand

it,you

know." "

"

I like your spirit," says the tinker. I think I shall settle down with you." 21


TEA-KETTLE

THE **

Shall I

keep you

in

iii

lacquerbox

a

?"

says the

tinker. "

have

bit of it, keep me with you ; let us and again. I am talk now very fond of a

Not a

a

pipe. I like things." "

"

"

"

as

a

your "

rice

to

eat, and

cup of saki sometimes

and

beans

sweet

"

says the tinker. Well, yes, now you mention it.** Fm willing," says the tinker.

A

?

kindly," says the tea-kettle; and, would beginning, you objectto my sharing bed ? The nighthas turned a littlechilly." Thank

"

you

the least in the

Not

world," says

the tinker.

tinker and the tea-kettle became

The

of friends. kettle knew

the best

They ate and talked together.The a thing or two and was very good

company. One

day :

Are

"

" you poor ? says the kettle.

Yes," says the tinker, middlingpoor." kettle, "Well, I have a happy thought. For a tea"

"

I

reallyvery out-of-the-way

am

"

"

I believe

"

My name princeof

very "

**

you," says the tinker. is Bumbuku'-Chagama ; Tea-Kettles." Badger

Your servant, my If you'll take my

I

plished." accom-

am

the

lord,"says the tinker. advice,"says the tea-kettle,

am you'llcarry me round as a show ; I really and it'smy opinionyou'd make a out-of-the-way, mint of money."

"

"

That

would

Bumbukuj' says

be

hard work

the tinker. 22

for you, my

dear


THE

Ill

**

Not

TEA-KETTLE

all ; let

at

us

forthwith,'* says the

start

tea-kettle.

theydid.

So a

The he

theatre,and

Chagama. fun !

For

tea-kettle

bought hangingsfor

tinker called

the

Bumbuku-

show

people flocked to see the and most the wonderful accomplished the tight danced and sang, and walked the

How

It playedsuch born. rope as to the manner tricks and had such droll ways that the people laughed tilltheir sides ached. It was a treat to the tea-kettle bow as gracefully a lord and as see

peoplefor their patience. The Bumbuku-Chagama was the talk of the and all the gentry came to see it as country-side, well as the commonalty. As for the tinker,he the

thank

waved

fan

a

took

and

fat and

believe that he grew to

much

made princesses

of the wonderful

last the tinker retired from

At

the tea-kettle

him

money. rich. He

You even

may went

great ladies and the royal

the

Court, where

the

came

with

tea-kettle.

and business, in its

tears

to

bright

eyes. "*

I'm much

"

Now,

tinker.

**

afraid it'stime

to

leave

it says. you,'*

don't say that,BumbukUy dear,"says the Well be so happy together we are now

rich." **

I've

come

the end of my time," says the old Bumbuku "You'll not see any to

tea-kettle. more ; henceforth

nothingmore "

Oh, my

or

I shall be

an

kettle, ordinary

less."

dear Bumbuku^ what

cried the poor tinker in

tears.

shall I do ?

"


TEA-KETTLE

THE "

of

I think I should like to be

Morinji,as It

never

a

iii

moved

again.

very sacred treasure and the half of his wealth with it. held the tea-kettle was And Some fame for many a long yean a

it as worshipped

temple

says the very sacred treasure,'*

spokeor

it as presented

the

givento

a

saint.

^

kettle. tea-

So the tinker

to

the

in

temple,

wondrous

persons

even


The

Peony

Lantern.-

P.

25.


IV

PEONY

THE

He

possessed and

noble

a

of

and

openly

in

and

Hagiwara. is of

which

honourable.

most a

of

lady

all He

beautiful

very

a

many

face, both

Yedo,

himself, being yet very

For

secret.

called

hatamoto^

the

figure

beloved

was

the

samurai

of

ranks

samurai

a

of

samurai

a

was

the

dwelt

there

Yedo

In

LANTERN

turned

pleasure rather than and to love, and morning, noon night he was with the gay youth of the to wont disport himself of joyous the leader was prince and city. He his

young,

the

parade boon

of

New

Year

laughing

from

his

suburb

streets

houses

heavy

for

without,

and

long together

he

youths

found and

quite were

the

empty,

stood battledore

in

had

He

quarter

own

himself maidens

shuttlecock.

and

a

streets

and

to

of

with

other

side

more

or

gardens. with

great 25

with

bands

the a

playing

of

Yedo,

less,

Hagiwara skill and

of

Festival

company dore battle-

at

far away

wandered

city, and

the

often

would

companions. bright and wintry day during

One of the

doors

within

revels

his

thoughts

was

now

where the

and

wielded

grace,

in the

quiet his

catching


THE

PEONY

LANTERN

iv

the

into gildedshuttlecock and tossingit lightly the air ; but at lengthwith a careless or an illjudged stroke,he sent it flyingover the heads of and over the players, the bamboo fence of a garden he started after it. Then by. Immediately companionscried, Stay,Hagiwara ; here we

near

his

"

have

than

more "

and

Nay," he said, gilded."

but

"

Foolish

"

have

we

dozen shuttlecocks."

a

this

dove-coloured

was

! " answered

one

his friends ; " here all dove-coloured and

six shuttlecocks

gilded." he

But

full of

paidthem

heed, for he

no

had

become

very strange desire for the shuttlecock he had lost. He scaled the bamboo fence and dropped a

into the

Now

gardenwhich had

he

shuttlecock there ;

fence he

so

was

marked

should

upon

the

very spot where

fallen,but

have

he searched

the farther side.

alongthe

it

was

the not

foot of the bamboo

but no, he could not find it. Up and down his battledore, went, beatingthe bushes with "

his eyes on if he had

the

ground,drawing breath heavilyas

lost his dearest

called him, but he did tired and went to their

own

come,

and

homes.

friends

they grew lightof

The

fail.

Hagiwara,the samurai^looked a few a girlstanding saw yardsaway from She beckoned him with her righthand, and left she held a gildedshuttlecock with

day began up and him. in her

to

dove-coloured The Then

not

His

treasure.

the

feathers.

samurai

shouted

girldrew

away

and joyfully

ran

forward.

from him, stillbeckoning 26

'""Digitized by


IV

him

with

THE

PEONY

LANTERN

the

righthand.

him, and he followed. to them, till theycame

garden,and

three

The

So

shuttlecock the

theywent,

the house

that

was

steps that led up

stone

lured two

of

in the to

it.

the lowest

Beside

step there grew a plum tree in step there stood a upon the highest

blossom,and

fair and very young attired in robes of of water-blue

lady. She was high festival.

most

splendidly

Her

kimono

was

of ceremony so longthat theytouched the ground; her under-dress of brocade was and her great girdle stiff was scarlet,

silk,with

sleeves

pins of heavy with gold. In her hair were gold and tortoiseshelland coral. When Hagiwara saw the lady,he knelt down

and

forthwith

like

ground. lady spoke,smilingwith

the

child.

a

head till his foreobeisance,

the

touched Then

her due

and made

"

Come

pleasure house, Hagiwara

into

my the hatamoto. I am of samurai Sama, 0*Tsuyu,the My dear handmaiden, Lady of the Morning Dew.

0*Yon6,

has

Come to me. in, you Hagiwara Sama, samurai of the hatamoto ; for indeed I am gladto sec you, and happy is this hour.*'

brought

So the samurai to

a

room

for the

of

ten

Lady

in the

him

handmaiden,

mats, of the

ancient beat

theybroughthim where they entertained him ; Morning Dew danced before in,and

went

whilst

manner, a

upon

small

O'Yone,

the

scarlet-tasselled

drum.

theyset

food

rice of the festival and

sweet

Afterwards

ate

and drank of the food

before him, the warm

they gave

27

wine, and him.

red he


PEONY

THE It

dark

was

leave.

said again," "

the

0*Yone

Yea, lord,you

the handmaiden. needs must

come," whispered

Lady of the Morning Dew. samurai The laughed. '*And he said mockingly. What ? "

come

iv

night when Hagiwara took his lord, come again, honourable

Come

"

LANTERN

?

come

The

"

if I do if I do

not not

"

and ladystiffened,

grey, but shoulder.

she

"Then,"

laid

she

her

child's face grew

her

hand

said, "it

Hagiwara's

upon

will

it will be for you and for shuddered other way." 0*Yon6

Death

be

death, lord. There

me.

is

no

and hid her eyes

with her sleeve. samurai

The very much not

end

went

out

into

the

night,being

afraid.

Long, long he soughtfor his home and could find it,wanderingin the black darkness from at last he to end of the sleeping city. When

almost reached his familiar door the late dawn was and wearilyhe threw himself upon his bed. come, Then he laughed. " After all,I have left behind me

my The

said Hagiwara the shuttlecock,"

samurai.

day Hagiwara sat alone in his house had his hands from morning till evening. He but did nothingmore. before him ; and he thought, At the end of the time he said, It is a joke that a couple of geishahave sought to play on me. next

"

but Excellent,in faith, So to

he

theyshall

friends.

have

in his best and went For five or six dayshe

dressed himself

joinhis

not

28

!" forth

me

was

at


PEONY

THE

IV

LANTERN

and junketings, the gayest of the gay. joustings his spirits His wit was wild. were ready, he said, By the gods,I am Then sick deathly of this,"and took to walking the streets of Yedo alone. From end to end of the great cityhe went. wandered He by day and he wandered by night, and by street and alleyhe went, by hill and moat castle wall,but he found not what he sought. He could not come cock upon the gardenwhere his shuttle"

lost,nor

was

Morning

Dew.

His

fell sick

and

took

neither This

season, servant

loose

spirithad

the third

He

rest.

no

bed, where

his

to

of the

Lady

slept,but

nor

about

was

month,

a

ate

the

yet upon

he

spectre-thin.

grew month.

In

the

sixth

of niubai^the hot and rainy of all his faithful he rose up, and, in spite could say or do to dissuade him, he wrapped the

at

time

him

robe about

summer

and

at

went

once

forth. "

Alack

!

Alack

!

"

cried the

"

servant,

the

youth has the fever,or he is perchancemad." Hagiwara faltered not at all. He looked neither to the right nor left. Straight to the forward

he

went,

roads lead past my

for he

said

a

"

of

our

wild stone

The

same,

himself,

love's house."

quietsuburb, and to a garden had a splitbamboo and scaled the laughedsoftly to

to

the very

meeting,"he

same

said.

he

Soon

certain

fence.

house

29

All

came

whose

Hagiwara

fence. shall be the He

found

manner

the

Moss covered the overgrown. plum tree that grew steps. The

and

"

garden three there


LANTERN

PEONY

THE

iv

fluttered its green leaves disconsolate. its shutters still,

was

all closed,it

were

house

The

forlorn

was

and deserted.

samurai

The

wondered. said

came

Sir,what

"

The

the

and

into the

man

garden.

He

She

is

do here ? "

flower has fallen from samurai.

Dew

Morning

^

do you

white

said tree,** '*

stood

Hagiwara :

to

"

the

old

an

he

as

fell.

soakingrain

A

There

cold

grew

?

*'

Where

the

plum Lady of

is the

'*

dead," answered

the old

;

sickness.

of a strange and six moons, She lies in the graveyard the on

0'Yon6,

handmaid, lies by her side.

these

five or her

not

suflFerher

the

long nightof

sake

For

Yomi.

it is little that

dead

are

wander

to

still tend

I would

old and

mistress

indeed.

this I

The

he

set

up, and

do.

can

grass

sweet

odours, and

meet,

and

did

welfare of her Then

of

drew

due

burned made

and hill,

sweet

through spirits*

garden,but

I

their

on

He

took

that oflFering

observance,and

a

upon it,in of his lady.

before it incense

every

am

Oh, sir,they

grows

graves.** home. Hagiwara went to his own slipof pure white wood and he wrote largefair characters,the dear name This

sudden

She could

alone

their

dead

"

man

and was

all for the

departedspirit. near

souls. returning

the Festival of The

good

Bony the

folk of Yedo

time took

visited their graves. Bringingfood and flowers, theycared for their beloved dead. On lanterns and

30


PEONY

THE

IV

the

day of

thirteenth

the seventh

month, which,

Boriyis the dayof days,Hagiwara the samurai

in the

in his

walked

It

coolness.

now shrilly leapedin the never

and

windless

was

of

a

dark.

flower sang

pomegranate and

and

again. Now round pond. For

the

cicala

A

again a

carp

it was

rest

still,

leaf stirred.

a

of the Ox,

the hour

About

the sake of the

gardenby night for

in the heart

hidden

and

LANTERN

of

Hagiwara heard the that laybeyond his

in the lane footsteps gardenhedge. Nearer and nearer theycame. He knew Women's geta^'said the samurai. them by the hollow echoingnoise. Looking over his rose come hedge,he saw two slender women

sound

"

of the dimness

out

carried

lantern

a

samurai

bunch

It was

such

as

the

two

the

one

lantern

a

flowers is used

as

walked, castingan

other

side of the knew

He

of

abreast

they came

turned their faces to him. and gave

of them

of peony

women

light. As upon

One

in the service of the dead.

of the Bon

the time

It swung uncertain

a

with

tied to the handle. at

in hand.

hand

the

hedge, they them

at

once,

great cry.

girlwith the peony lantern held it up so the lightfell upon him. Hagiwara Sama,**she cried, by all that is wonderful ! Why, lord,we told that were

The that "

most

"

dead.

were you Nembutsu '*

Come ?

dailyrecited

for your soul these many

is it indeed hand

have

We

Can

!

in, 0'Yon6," he said

in,come your

moons

mistress

it be my

that

lady? 31

.

.

you .

hold

Oh, my

the

"

;

"

by

and the

love ! "


PEONY

THE

OTone and the

answered,

"

how

it be ?

"

it I lost you ? it I lost you, 0'Yon6

*'

was

was

held

up

hide her face.

to

How

"

else should

came

the

her sleeve

Who

"

iv

in at the gardengate. Lady of the Morning Dew

two

But

LANTERN

said the samurai ; ? **

Lord," she said, we have moved to a little house, a very little house, in the quarter of the were city which is called the Green Hill. We suffered to take nothingwith us there,and we "

"

With

very poor.

grown

are

griefand

want

my

to

draw

mistress is become

pale.'' Then sleeve Hagiwara took his lady's it gentlyfrom her face. Lord," she sobbed, you will "

"

am

not

fair."

But

when

he looked upon

up within him him from head She I go

And A

a

He

said

never

a

flamed shook

word.

drooped. Lord," she murmured, he

I

me,

consuming fire,and

foot.

to

her his love

"

stay?

or

like

love

not

"

shall

"

said, Stay." "

little before

daybreakthe

samurai

fell into

a

and awoke to find himself alone in the deep sleep, of the morning. He lost not an instant, clear light and went but rose forth,and immediatelymade the quarter of the city his way throughYedo to Here he inquired which is called the Green Hill. for the house of the Lady of the Morning Dew, could direct him. but no one High and low he

searched the

It seemed fruitlessly.

second

time

he

had

to

him

lost his dear 3*

that

and lady,

for he


PEONY

THE

IV

turned homewards he

he went

marked

was

hung

by

It

of Bon

"

have moved to

We

.

.

.

with take nothing

poor

.

pale.

.'

.

.

will make

of my

us

'*

room

He

a

:

very little

suffered

were

are

grown very mistress is become

my

not

me

for the

loved

have

We

now

.

.

space of my dear/'

.

home.

faithful servant

Now

want

we

a

.

we

.

.

.

in

one

little

he went His

at

house, a dark house, yet you for me, oh, my beloved,paleone

A

desires.

Then

.

there and

leave existences,

ten

.

griefand

with

.

.

littlehouse

a

as

littleand said

a

upon the Green Hill

house

stand

the samurai

he smiled

Then

*

is used

as

in the service of the dead.

Long, longdid dream.

flowers tied

lantem

a

of

there

monument

of peony

such

was

the other

like the tomb

the

bunch

a

side

were

obscure,but

Before

one.

its handle.

graves that

two

fair monument,

a

lantern with

a

the time

to

despair.His way led certain temple,and a

littleand

was

great

some

marked

One

by side.

to

in bitter

throughthe groundsof

him as

LANTERN

what

said,

"

him

met

and cried

ails you, master

?

:

'*

all.

Why, nothing at

I

...

was

merrier.*'

never

the

But "The

servant

of death

mark

whither these

shall I go

arms

departedweeping,and saying,

?

that

on

bore

seven

lantern peony dwelling. Fair weather or them.

his face him

.

as

.

a

and .

I,

child in

*'

Every night,for with

is

the

They

came

at

nights,the maidens to came Hagiwara*s foul

the hour 33

was

the

of the Ox.

to

same

There D


PEONY

THE

LANTERN

iv

mystic wooing. By the strong the dead were illusion the living and together. the seventh night the On servant

samurai^wakeful

fear and

with

bound of

made

sorrow,

of

bond

was

the

bold

througha crack in the peer into his lord*s room shutters. His hair stood on wooden end and his to

blood

cold

ran

to

fearful thing, smilingup

face, strokingits

fingers.With to a holy man told his

at

dank

tale he ?

the power

sacred

text

Before

the

holy man,

of Karma

girdlea

Tathagata. When Hagiwara being drawn as

his arms,

in

covered

him

languid his way he had for

hope

any

these

stand with-

can

Nevertheless,there

told the

the

him

?

every door and house, and he had

weak

its

was

with

who

"

had

one

set

rolled

in

and lightly,

saw

the

of golden emblem done, thingswere

ways became And his servant

laid him

a

window-placeof

self him-

two

water.

he

what

servant

this nightfall,

silk of his master's

as

there

above

master's

his

that

a

"

is a little hope." So he

do.

robe

green

asked, "Is

Alack," said

must

the horror

of

arms

made daylightthe servant of his acquaintance.When

Hagiwara Sama "

in the

Hagiwara

see

upon him

his

took

bed

fall into

a

and

deep

sleep. At

the

hour

of the

Ox

there

was

heard

the

sound of

in the lane,without the garden footsteps they came. hedge. Nearer and nearer They and slow stopped. grew "

What

means

this,0'Yon6, OTon6 34

?"

said

a


THE

IV

voice. piteous see

**

The

is asleep, and I do

house

not

lord."

my "

LANTERN

PEONY

Come

home,

is

lady,Hagiwara'sheart

sweet

changed/' I will

"That

find

must

a

to

way

Lady, we Writing over "

we

not

may There

0'Yon6, OTon6 bringme to my lord/'

not,

.

cannot

every door here." enter

was

a

here.

enter

and

you

"

the

Holy window-place .

of bitter

sound

See

.

weeping

.

and

.

a

long wail. "

Lord, I have

existences."

ten

the

Then

throughthe space of retreated and footsteps

thee

loved

their echo died away. The next nightit was

quitethe

sleptin his weakness

his

wraiths

;

Hagiwara

same.

watched

servant

;

the

and

in sobbingdespair. departed the The third day, when to Hagiwara went bath, a thief stole the emblem, the goldenemblem from his girdle.Hagiwara did of the Tathagata, It it. But that night he lay awake. mark not his servant that slept, out with watching. worn was a great rain fell and Hagiwara,waking, Presently came

of it upon the roof. The heavens and for hours the rain fell. And it

heard the sound

opened

were

holytext from Hagiwara'schamber. the

tore

the hour

At

over

of the

Ox

sound of

in the footsteps

hedge.

Nearer

grew **

slow and

and

the round window

in

heard

the

there

was

lane without

nearer

they

the

came.

garden They

stopped.

This is the last time, OTon^, 35

OTone,

there-


PEONY

THE

fore

bringme

ten

existences.

There

to

be

must

lord.

my

Great a

way.

of the love of

Think

is the

of

power

Karma.

."

.

.

iv

beloved,"called Hagiwara with

Come, my

"

LANTERN

a

great voice. and I come.'* from his couch. move beloved,"he called for the second

Open, lord open But Hagiwara could not

"

.

.

Come, my

"

.

time. I cannot

"

me

like

sins of

a

moaned

sharp sword. former

a

wounds though the separation

come,

life."

like the

O'Yone

the that

lady spoke she

and But

was.

she said.

window,"

in hand

earth.

suffer for the

we

her hand.

took

Hand

So

lost soul

See the round

**

Thus

from the lightly they passed through the

the

two

Like

rose

vapour The window. unguarded to

" samurai called, Come beloved,"for the third time.

me,

He

was

the grey

In his

master

peony The out

answered,

servant

the

dead.

At

burningwith

shivered,took up

light;

I come."

Lord,

morning Hagiwara'sservant

cold and

lantern

"

for

'*

I cannot

36

a

found

his feet stood weird

the

yellowflame.

the lantern and blew bear

it,"he said.


THE

KING

SEA

AND

THE

MAGIC

JEWELS is

This and a

visit

folk

old

the

by

beloved

talc

a

a

"

to

the

Prince

Sea

by

the

children

tale

of

magical

King's

royal maiden,

the

lady

called

was

made

and

Princess

father

her

But

for

betrothal,

his

Princess not

of

fair), for

this, the

Rocks

he

trees.'*

loved

offspring

frail, fading So

Augustnesses,

it

Prince

of

these

falling

is.

At

the

Heavenly

this

her

at

sister, the

elder this

lady

was

Blossoming-

said,

King

was

Rice-Ear-

Princess

only old

and

her

aside

fair

wrath

augustly

(and, indeed,

the

So

Brightly. be

the

And

bride.

sweetly

so was

put

his

beautiful

a

Blossoming-Brightly-

Augustness,

had

Ruddy-Plenty,

and

jewels

loved

her

as-the-Flowers-of-the-Trees, she.

Japan,

palace.

Rice-Ear-Ruddy-Plcnty

and

of

"

of

Because

deities

heavenly

shall

of

like

the

flowers

day,

the

lives

of

their

Sovereigns,

are

not

the

long. Howbeit,

in

the

fullness

of

time,

the

Blossoming-Brightly-as-the-Flowers-of-the-Trees, 37

lady,


SEA

THE bore

and the younger Fire Flash was

Fire Flash Prince his

luck

upon with his

shore

v

children,and

lovelymen

two

KING

the

wide

Fire Fade.

fisherman,who

a

and

sea,

august

called the elder

garments

ran

got the

upon

And

girded.

again,he tarried all the night in his boat, upon the high wave-crests. he caught things And broad of fin and thingsnarrow of fin,and he was a

deityof

the water

of the fishes of the his luck upon

Fade

was

the mountains

sandals fast upon

bound

of the

and

and

waters

sea.

Fire

Prince

But

weeds

his

hunter,who got and in the forest, who feet,and bore a bow a

he caught And arrows. heavenly-feathered thingsrough of hair and thingssoft of hair,and the trail of the badger and he knew the wild time of flowering.For he was a cherry's deityof

and

the woods. Prince

Now

brother. I

am

now

Prince

Fire Fire

Fade

spoke

Flash, and

to

his

elder

said, "Brother,

of the green hills. Therefore exchangeour luck. Give me thy rod

aweary

let

us

and

I

will go to the cool waters. Thou mayest take my and all my arrows heavenly-feathered great bow

and try the mountains,where, see many strange and beautiful

trust

me,

thou

shalt

unknown things,

to

thee before." But not

Prince Fire Flash answered,

"

Not

so

.

.

.

so."

And

again,after

Prince

Fire Fade

of the

green

not

and

came

hills

.

.

.

days were sighed, I am

many the

38

past,

"

fair

waters

aweary call me.


AND

V

Woe

be

to

THE

MAGIC

JEWELS

younger brother !" And when Prince took no heed of him, but angledwith

a

Fire Flash his

rod,day and night,and caughtthingsbroad of fin and thingsnarrow of fin,Prince Fire Fade droopedwith desire,and let his long hair fall untended upon his shoulders. And he murmured, Oh, to try my luck upon the sea ! till at last Prince Fire Flash,his elder brother,gave him the rod for very weariness,and betook himself to the And mountains. all day he hunted, and let fly "

"

arrows heavenly-feathered ; but rough of hair soft of hair,never or a thing did he catch. And he cried, Fool,fool,to barter the heavenlyluck of the gods ! So he returned. Prince Fire Fade, took the And his Augustness, luck of the sea, and angledin sunshine and in of fin,never a gloom ; but broad of fin or narrow

the

"

"

fish did

he

catch.

And,

brother's fish-hook

in the

he

moreover,

he

So

sea.

lost his

hung

his

head, and returned. And

Fire

Prince

the hunter

own,

to

the

sea

nothing home,

the

to .

.

.

and

his to said, "Each fishermountain, and the man

Flash

for thou this

I have

and

brought night we sleephungry. luck of the gods. And

barter the not may where is my fish-hook ? " now, So Prince Fire Fade replied, sayingsoftly, We

"Sweet

brother, be

not

angry

.

.

.

but, toiling

of fin or with thy fish-hook, broad of fin,not a fish did I catch ; and, at the narrow last,I lost thy fish-hook in the sea." Prince Fire Flash, flew At this his Highness, all

day

39


THE into

SEA

great rage, and

a

KING

stamping his feet,required

the fish-hook of his brother. Prince Fire Fade And made

brother,I

have

sea, whose

bottom

no

man

may I could thee,yet thy fish-hook." his elder brother

But

"

answer,

Sweet

the

thy fish-hook,but

not

die for

should

v

deep search. Though I not givethee back

it required

of him

the

urgently.

more

Then tendrils

Prince Fire Fade which

burst the wild

wistaria

his august ten-grasp sword " he said, to his side. And Farewell,good sword." And he broke it into many and made fragments, five hundred fish-hooks to give to his brother. Prince have

Fire Flash.

But

Prince

Fire Flash

would

of them.

none

And

bound

againPrince

furnace,and

Fire Fade

made

toiled

at

a

great

thousand

fish-hooks ; and one his to upon his knees he humbly offered them brother.Prince Fire Flash. For he loved his brother. Nevertheless Prince Fire Flash would not so much as

look

at

them,

but

sat

moody, his

head on his lost fish-hook will I

hand, saying,"Mine own have, that and no other." So

Prince

Fire

Fade

palacegates,and ;

and

grievingfrom lamentingby the

went

wandered his tears fell and

foam.

mingledwith

the shore sea-

the

And, when night came, he had no heart to return homewards, but sat down, weary, upon a rock amid the salt pools. And he cried,"Alas, all to blame, and through my my brother,I am foolishness has this come But oh, my upon me. 40


AND

V

MAGIC

THE

JEWELS

nursed upon the sweet were brother,together we breast of our mother. Princess Blossoming-Brightlyfor almost hand in as-the-Flowers-of-the-Trees, hand did And

we

the

moon

Land

Central

into the world/'

come

of

Fire Fade

Prince

rose

so

Reed

ceased

that the

Plains not

to

was

the

light. But

lament.

Shiko-Tsuchi-no-Kami, the Lord of Sea with the rising fore tide,and spoke,"Where-

Then came Salt,

" weeps the Heaven's Sky Height ? And Prince Fire Fade made answer

:

"

I have

and I have lost it in brother's fish-hook, And though I have given him many

taken my the sea.

fish-hooks for

other none

and

sea

of them, but Truly, the

he will have compensation, desires only the original hook. fishgods know, I would give my

life to find it ; but how should that serve ?" took him Shiko-Tsuchi-no-Kami And by the sleeve to where a boat moved upon the water, and in the boat and pushedit from the shore, set him

saying, My "

son,

pursue

the

path that pleasant the Moon Augustness,

Tsuki-Yomi-no-Kami, His Night Possessor,has made for thee upon the waters. to a And, at the end, thou shalt come palacemade of fishes' scales,which is the palace of the great King of the there is a clear well, and

Sea.

by

the

Before

the

gate

well-side there

branches. grows a cassia tree with many spreading Therefore climb thou into the branches of the cassia tree, and there wait for the King'sdaughter, who

shall

And

come

Prince

givethee counsel." Fire Fade, standing up to

41

in the

boat,


obeisance,and thanked

made But

KING

SEA

THE

this

one

v

the Lord

6f Sea Salt.

girdedhis august garments

and

pushed

the boat before

in the him, tillhe was thigh-deep he said, Nay, nay, fair youth,no

And

water.

"

thanks,only do my the

bidding." Prince Fire Fade, came So his Augustness, to Sea King*spalace. And he forthwith climbed

the cassia tree and waited among At the day'sdawning came of the Sea

its green branches. the

King'sdaughter,with

to draw vessels,

from

water

made

from

a

And

jewelled as they

Fire Fade leaned

the branches

glory of his august brightness upon the waters

And

tree.

them

their

the well.

Prince stoopedto diptheir vessels.

and watched

handmaidens

the

of the cassia countenance

of the

well.

looked up and beheld his comeliness, But he spoke them fairly, amazed.

So all the maidens

and

were

and desired of them So the maidens

drew

a

littlewater

from their vessels.

him

in

water

a

jewelledcup

clouded,because of the (howbeitthe jewelswere coldness of the well water),and they presented it to

him

with

to

the maidens.

all

Then,

the drinking water. Prince Fire Fade took the royaljewel from his neck, and holdingit between his two lipshe droppedit into the cup, and the cup he gave again reverence.

Now

not

theysaw the great jewel shiningin the it,for it clung fast cup, but theycould not move to the gold. So the maidens departed, skimming like the white birds of the offing.And the water to the Sea King'sdaughter, bearingthe theycame cup and the jewelin it. 4^


AND

V

them, "

And

of the maidens

one

in the sitting is by our well."

some

JEWELS

the Princess, lookingat the jewel,asked "Is there, perchance, a stranger at the

And

gate ?

MAGIC

THE

And

There

"

of the cassia

branches

one

which

answered,

is tree

another

said, It is a very beautiful young

another

said,

"

man."

And than

king.

our

And

respectfully gave

is

He

"

of us, so And in this cup.

he asked

him

glorious

more

even

water

water

we

he

of it,but droppeda jewel into it from Thine his lips. So we have brought them unto drank

none

and the jewel." Princess herself took a vessel and

both Augustness,

Then

draw

to

went

the

sleeves,and

the cup

her long And well. of the folds of her august

the

at

water

certain

garments, floated behind bound

with

a

garlandof

the well she looked

to

the cassia Prince

tree.

And

her, and

up

And

flowers.

sea

through the

her

eyes

head

her

was

coming

branches

of

the eyes of

met

Fire Fade.

the Sea she fetched her father, presently King,saying, Father,there is a beautiful person and out at our gate." So the Sea King came And

"

welcomed the

Prince

August Child leadinghim

Fire

Fade,

of the

and

Heaven's

said,"This Sun

is

Height."

palace he caused the floor to be spreadwith eight layersof rugs of of rugs of silk,and set asses' skins,and eightlayers And

into his

the Prince And

upon them. that night he made 43

a

great

banquet,and


THE

SEA

KING

celebrated the betrothal of Prince

v

Fire Fade

fair Jewel Princess.

daughter,the

to

his

for very

And

daysthere was held high revel and rejoicing in the Sea King'spalace. But one night, as they took their ease upon the silken floor, and all the fishes of the sea brought rich dishes, and sweetmeats in vessels of gold and coral and jade to set before them, the fair Jewel Princess herself sat at Prince Fire Fade's right many

hand

to

the

pour

wine

into

his cup.

And

the

silver scales upon the palacewalls glittered in the moonlight. But Prince Fire Fade looked out

thoughtof what had before,and so heaved a deepsigh. Then the Sea King was troubled,and dost thou sigh? him, saying, Wherefore Prince Fire Fade answered nothing.

across

the Sea Path and

"

"

gone asked But

the fairJewel

his betrothed wife, Princess, came closer,and touched him on the breast,and said softly, Oh, Thine Augustness,my sweet And

"

spouse, where

art

the

thou

not

shadows

happy in

our

water

fall green, that thou Or the Sea Path ?

palace, lookest

do our longinglyacross maidens not move silently, please thee, who like the birds of the offing ? Oh, my lord, what is in thine despiseme not, but tell me so

heart." Then

Prince

lady.Thine from them

Fire Fade

answered,

"

My lovely

Augustness,let nothing be

hidden

And he thee, because of our love." and of his all the story of the fish-hook,

brother's wrath. 44

told elder


The

Sea

King

and

the

Magic

Jewels."

P. 45.


AND

V

"

And

MAGIC

THE

said, will the Jewel Princess

he

now,"

JEWELS

"

counsel ? "

giveme

Princess smiled, and and her hair was so long that it lightly, the

Then

the she

Jewel

edge and passedto

of her

hem

up

hung

silken red robe.

to

And

palacesteps led down standingupon the last step

the

where And

into the water.

rose

the fishes of the sea, and summoned So them, great and small, from far and near. the fishes of the sea, both great and small, swam she called

about

feet,and the

her

scales.

to

water

was

silver with

the

King'sdaughtercried, the august find and bringme

And

O

"

of the sea, of Prince Fire Flash."

their fishes

fish-hook

fishes answered, "Lady, the Tat is in misery,for somethingsticks in his throat so this may be the Perchance that he cannot eat. the

And

august fish-hook

of his

Augustness,Prince

Fire

Flash." the Princess

Then

stoopeddown

and lifted the

the water, and with her white hand she took the lost fish-hook from his throat. And after she took it she had washed and dabbled it for a little,

Tai from

in to Prince "

This is indeed my

restore

it

And

Fire Fade.

he

and said, rejoiced

I go to shall be reconciled."

brother's fish-hook.

and instantly,

we

he loved his brother. But the fair Jewel Princess stood silent and " Now will he depart for she thought, sorrowing, For

and leave And

edge,and

me

lonely."

Prince

hastened

Fire Fade

there bestrode 45

a

valiant

to

the

water's

crocodile,who


THE

KING

SEA

v

And end. ere journey's Fair youth,now he went, the Sea King spoke: If thy brother sow counsel. listen to my rice do thou sow thy rice low, in the upon the uplands, meads. his rice in But if thy brother sow water the water meads, then do thou. Thine Augustness, sow thy rice upon the uplands. And I who rule the rains and the floods will continually prosper the labours of Thine Augustness.Moreover, here two are magic jewels. If thy brother should be moved by envy to attack thee,then put forth the shall arise Tide Flowing Jewel and the waters should

bringhim

to

his

"

if thou shouldst have compassion upon him, then put forth the Tide Ebbing Jewel,and all the waters shall subside,and his life him.

to

drown

be

spared." And

his

thanks with

But

And

obeisance.

in his

long sleeve,and hung

about

his neck. and

near

And

the

"While So and his

for

Sea

gave he hid the fish-hook

the

two

great

jewels

the fairJewel Princess

Then

came

tears. farewell,with many King charged the crocodile, saying,

him

crossingthe

of the

middle

sea,

do

not

him.'*

alarm

head

bade

Fade

Fire

AugustnessPrince

Prince

Fire Fade

sat

upon

the

crocodile's

to his own day he came place shore. And to unsheathing sprang lightly dagger,he hung it upon the crocodile's neck

a

;

and in

one

token.

found his brother, fish-hook that had and gave him back his own because of the two been lost. Nevertheless, great

Hereupon,Prince

Fire Fade

46


AND

V

MAGIC

THE

JEWELS folds of his raiment, his brother,and over

in the which he wore jewels, he had everlasting dominion

flourished in all his

And, after Fire Fade the

doings. time, there

some

daughterof

the

Prince

to

came

fair

King, the

Sea

she came the Sea And across Jewel Princess. Path bearingin her arms child. And she, a young weeping,laid down the child at the feet of His Augustnessand said,"My lord,I have brought thy son."

raised her up and made her welcome, and built for her a palaceon the seashore, And the palace at the limit of the waves. Fire Fade

Prince

But

thatched with

was

feathers. So

cormorant's

they

dwelt there with the August Child. And the fair Jewel Princess besoughther lord, saying," Sweet husband, look not on me in the

night,for

dark with

those of my

look

not

misfortune

on

me,

take my it is ever

land lest I

should follow." So

should

promised her,

I must

then

and

spoke

native

Howbeit,

so.

be

shape;

ashamed

and

Prince Fire Fade fair words of many

assurance.

Prince Nevertheless,there came a nightwhen Fire Fade layawake, and could get no rest. And, when it was at length, very dark, before the dawn, he as

arose

she

and

struck

slept.And

a

lightto

he beheld

with translucent eyes, which And Prince couch's foot.

a

look upon

great scaled

was

Fire

coiled up Fade

for terror, and droppedthe morning broke very grey upon the

aloud

47

his bride

dragon, at

cried

the out

light. Then sea.

And

at


THE

SEA

KING

v

instant the great dragonstirred, and from its coils the Jewel Princess lifted up her lovely the

same

like

the

And

head. a

with

garment.

So

child

upon

her

her

head

ness,

my Sea

and

scales fell away from she stood,in a white

her

green

her breast.

wept, saying,"O

sweet

spouse, I had

Path

a

And

she

hung August-

Thine

thoughtto

robe,

have made

highway between thy land and at pleasure. mine, that we might go and come But now, though I warned thee,thou hast looked upon me in the night. Therefore,my lord,between

the

and thee it is farewell. I go Path, and of this going there is no

me

across

the

return.

Sea

Take

August Child/' She spoke,and departed immediately upon her face with Sea Path, weeping and covering hair and lookingback to the shore. And she thou

the

never

her was

upon the Central Land of Reed Moreover, she shut the gates of the sea

more

Plains.

the

seen

and closed the way

to

her father's palace.But

the

she sent to be a nurse to her maid, her sister, babe, and because,for all that had been, she could restrain her lovingheart, she made little not a song, and sent it to her lord by the maid, her

young

sister. *'

And

Oh^fairare

the song said

:

the red jewels^

on which they are fairis the string strung Even so fairis my babe. But brighter far^and more renowned are the white jewels^ that are like my lord^ The jewels

And

.

^

48

"

.


AND

V

the

Then said "

As To

THE

MAGIC

husband answered,

in

a

song

which

:

whom I took to be for thee^my lady^ the wild duck the island where lights the

I

JEWELS

"

my bride^ the bird

ojing, shall notjorget thee tillthe end ofmy life*^

49

of


VI

Folks

spirit,fearful These

folks

are

and

storm,

speak

all the

Taro,

his

evil

But

son.

the

in

his

was

and

one

In

the

of

cool

Cloud,

and

doings

of

only

upon from men

South

they laughed

they sighed. fro One

son,

a

ramparts

Cloud

a

great

was

the

they Rai-

set

and

Rai-Taro

brave

ramparts

to

Land

the

"

East

oh,

boy,

see

and very

Rai-den of

and

the

and

his

of

;

looked.

sometimes

leaned

children

the Plains.

they

often

of

viewed Reed

West

Rai-

Castle

the

they

Rai-Taro

Sometimes

walls

upon

;

of

Elements.

the

and

Often

and

the

evening

upon

and

castle

Castle

a

the

the

North

the

of

wrong.

He

of

man.

of

and

loving un-

him.

walked

Taro

in

to

tempest

Rai-den

are

heaven.

Lord

a

loved

father

lived

blue

god,

mighty

of

can

they

Sama

Rai-den

high

they

an

afraid

and

lightning

is

cruel

mortally

are

hate

who

revengeful,

and

who

Thunder,

the

Rai-den,

that

say

'thunder

GOOD

THE

that

far went

over

to

earth.

night

Rai-den

Sama 50

said

to

Rai-Taro,


"

GOOD

THE

VI

Child, look

well

THUNDER

this

the

night upon

doingsof

!"

men

Rai-Taro

answered,

Father, I will

**

look

well." From

northern

the

they looked, and saw going forth to great lords and men-at-arnis From battle. the southern rampart theylooked, and saw and acolytes priests servingin a holy templewhere the air was dim with incense,and images of goldand bronze gleamedin the twilight. From the eastern rampart they looked,and saw a and a troop bower, where was a fair princess, lady's of maidens, clad in There for her. were with "

Ah, the pretty children ! the

From

western

peasant

a

saw

colour,that made music children there,too, playing

of flowers.

little cart

a

rose

rampart

"

said Rai-Taro.

they looked, and

rampart

toilingin

a

rice-field. He

enough and his back ached. weary toiled with him by his side. If he it is easy to

believe that she

They

very

were

and

poor

more

was

their

wife

His was

weary,

weary

garments

was

still. were

ragged. "

Have

Rai-den

they

no

children ? *'

said

Rai-Taro.

his head.

shook

you looked well,Rai-Taro ? you looked well this nightupon

Presently,Have "

he said. the

"

Have

doingsof **

men

"

? '*

Father," said Rai-Taro, "indeed, I

have

looked well." "

to

Then

choose,my

take up your

son,

choose,for I send you

habitation upon SI

the earth."


"

Must

"

My child,you

"I

I go among

will

Rai-Taro "

THUNDER

GOOD

THE

not "

;

"

the

with

so,

?

head

my

very ill." Will you go,

?

son

my

then,

"

No," said Rai-Taro,

will I have

men-at-arms/* said

likes me fighting

bower the fair lady's

to

? ** said Rai-Taro.

men

must.'*

go

Oho, say you

vi

I

"

shaved

am

a

to

Neither

man.

and live with

go

priests." "

What, then,do you choose will have

You

Taro." Rai-Taro

a

Go, go in

you have

hard

said, "They

Perhapstheywill "

the poor peasant ? life and scanty fare,Rai-

chosen

have

children.

no

love me."

peace,"said wisely."

Rai-den

Sama

"

;

for

shall I go, my father ? " said Rai-Taro. " " it befits a said his father, as Honourably," Prince of High Heaven." How

"

the

Now

which field,

was

san, in the

rice-fieldwas "

Alack

and what

the dear

at

peasant

provinceof

toiled in his rice-

Ichizen.

the

Hakuafter day

Day

brightsun

shone.

The

dry,and

young rice was burnt up. and alas 1 cried the poor peasant man, shall I do if my rice-crop fails? May "

gods have

With

man

the foot of the mountain

after week

and week "

poor

that he

mercy on all poor sat himself down

people! on

"

stone

a

at

the rice-field's for very weariness edgeand fellasleep and

sorrow.

When It

was

but

he woke

the

skywas

noonday,but

it grew 52

black with as

dark

as

clouds.

night.


GOOD

THE

VI

THUNDER

leaves of the trees

The

birds ceased their

shuddered

! ** cried the peasant. " Raiupon his black horse,beating

storm, a storm den Sama goes abroad

of the Thunder.

the great drum

the

singing.

A

"

togetherand

shall have

We

thanks be." plenty, Rain in plentyhe had, sure enough,for it fell torrents, with blindinglightningand roaring

rain in

in

thunder.

Oh, Rai-den Sama,**said the peasant,

"

"

saving

than sufficient.** more your greatness,this is even flashed anew At this the brightlightning and fell

cracked with

heavens

"

Ai !

Ai !

"

earth in

the

to

**

have

Kwannon

of

bdl

livingfire,and the mighty pealof thunder.

a a

cried

the

mercy

on

a

poor peasant man. sinful soul,for now

the Thunder on

Dragon has me indeed.** And he lay the ground and hid his face. the Thunder Howbeit Dragon sparedhim.

And

up and rubbed his eyes. The ball of fire was gone, but a babe lay upon the wet earth ; a fine fresh boy with the rain upon his cheeks and his hair. he

soon

sat

Oh, Lady, Lady Kwannon,** said the poor this is thy sweet mercy.**And he peasant man, "

"

took

the

in his

boy

arms

and

carried him

still

fell,but

the

every

flower

to

his

home.

own

As

he

in

came

out

the

cooler

the

went

the

rain

sky,and

blue

air shone

and

lifted up

its

head. The

peasant

came

to

his cottage door. 53

sun

in

grateful


GOOD

THE

THUNDER

Wife, wife/*he called, somethinghome.** "

**

What

"

The

eldest

I have

broughtyou

it be ? ** said his wife.

may

answered,

man

son

vi

Rai-Taro,

"

the

little

of the Thunder.**

Rai-Taro

grew

tallest, gayest boy

and strong, the up straight of all that country-side.He

and all the delightof his foster-parents, he was When ten neighboursloved him. years the

was

in the rice-fieldslike a worked the wonderful weather prophet.

old he was "

for

he said, My father,** "

let

father,let

;

there will be

a

or

he

that,

said, My "

that,for to-night and whatever he had said, storm,**

the rather do this

us

do this and

**

shall have fair weather

we

us

He

man.

or

And he brought to pass. enough,it came great good fortune to the poor peasant man, and all his works prospered. Rai-Taro When was eighteenyears old all the his birthdayfeast. bidden to neighbourswere There was plentyof good sakiyand the good folk silent was were enough ; only Rai-Taro merry so,

sure

and sad and sorry. " What ails you,

mother.

"

You

who

the gay, why are you "It is because I

Rai-Taro

? **

said his foster-

be the gayest of sad and sorry ? ** silent, wont

are

must

to

Rai-Taro you,**

leave

said. leave said his foster-mother, never Nay,** Rai-Taro, my son. Why would you leave us ? "

"

"

Mother,

because

I

tears.

54

must,**said

Rai-Taro

us, **

in


THE

VI

have

You

"

have

givenus

What

have I

am

more

Then of

till he

down

to

The

to

Wc

and labour,to suffer,

cloud

gained his

he

love.

scaled heaven's blue

father's castle.

I

And

height Rai-den

of them

stood upon the rampart of the Castle of Cloud and looked earth. foster-mother stood weeping bitterly, but The

two

took her hand.

My dear,'*he said,

"

grow

to

you

learned than the Immortals." from them. And in the likeness he went

her husband "

good fortune ; you have I givenyou ? **

received him. western

great

our

givenyou, Rai-Taro, my son ? answered, "Three thingshave

"

white

a

been

all things. What

Rai-Taro

taught me

THUNDER

GOOD

old

apace.**

55

it will

not

be for

long.


VII

THE

Long

ago,

from

Kioto,

honest

the

the

great In

it

it that

the

full

deceiving

the

kitchens

parties

of

mossy said

they

;

forest

the

in

fairies* children

didn't

mind

were

queer

in

which did as

as

were as

the

and

neat

fine

very a

that

and

poor,

boy

in

housewife

the

;

the

had as

for

that one

all

that

rice-fields, and indeed,

for 56

she

couple was

she

within washed

a

"

that

was

they lived as fair daughter.

princess, and

a

this

warlock

a

it

sure

every

woman

was

the

all

honest

the

man

But

be.

above

the

that

ways,

there

and

that

tea-

that

and

hide-and-seek Over

they

they

;

month,

a

at

that

but

They their

thrice

pretty

foxes

trees.

built ground the elves that long-nosed Tengu had

living soul,

to

pine

that

their

may

harm

no

was

as

was

cottage,

haunted.

was

saying

and

woman,

of

an

said

seven.

they wise

wood

dwelt

their

was

wood

deep

a

played

before

morning

lonely place

remote

very

there

city,

gay

of

was

beneath

a

not

country

outskirts

had

Folks

of the

part

a

couple.

upon

said

in

BOWL

BLACK

her

worked doors

and

they poor She

manners as

hard

she

was

cooked


BLACK

THE

vii

drew

and

She

water.

BOWL

went

barefoot

homespun gown, and tied her tough wistaria tendril. Brown

a

grey

hair with

back she

in

and

was

a

thin,

beggar-maidthat ever made shift and no supper. with a bed of dry moss her father dies,and By-and-bythe good man

but the sweetest

the wise

her

woman

mother

the

sickens within

she lies in a corner year, and soon waitingfor her end, with the maid

of the near

cottage

her

crying

bitter tears.

Child,**says the mother, do you know you ? as pretty as a princess I that ? says the maid, and goes on with Am "

"

"

are

'*

"

her

crying.

that your manners fine ? ** are you know says the mother. " Are they,then ? '* says the maid, and goes on with her crying. " My own baby,"says the mother, " could you "

Do

stop your

by her

to be pretty. If she but the innocent,none

will

help you,

of

way from

The "

the

It is a bad

remember.

bowl

to

?"

me

stoppedcryingand put her mother's on the poor pillow.

listen,"says

"Now

a

and listen

minute

the maid

So close

cryinga

my besides.

mother, "and

thingfor

a

head wards after-

poor

girl

is pretty and lonelyand gods will help her. They

poor child,and I have thought Fetch me the great black rice-

the shelf."

girlfetched

See, now,

it.

I put it on

beautyis hidden away." 57

your head and

all your


BLACK

THE

BOWL

vii

"Alack, mother/* said the poor child,"it

is

heavy/* "It

will

from

save

you the said mother. bear,** that you will not " I promise! I

me

know

the time

when

what

a

to

If you love me, promise it tillthe time comes.**

"

move

promise!

shall I

how

But

? **

comes

And now help you shall know. outside,for the sweet morning dawns and Fve as they fancyto see the fairies*children once again, "That

me

is heavier

.

.

.

in the forest.**

run

So the

child,havingthe black

head, held her the

near

mother

in her

bowl in

arms

a

upon her grassy place

great trees, and

fairies*children dark trunks

as

the

presently they saw threadingtheir way between

at theyplayed

hide-and-seek.

the

Their

and theylaughedlightly brightgarments fluttered, smiled to see them ; mother The as they went. before seven she died very sweetlyas she smiled. When

the wooden

with she

must

of rice was

her little store

starve

bowl or

well

knew

go and

done,the

find

enough

maid that

So firstshe

more.

tended her father*sand mother's graves and poured for the dead,as is meet, and recited many a water kilted holytext. Then she bound on her sandals, her grey skirts to show her scarlet petticoat, tied her household gods in a blue printed handkerchief, and set out all alone to seek her fortunes, the brave

girl! For a

all her slenderness and

and rarelyodd sight,

The

great black

bowl

soon

pretty feet she she

covered 58

was

her

to

know head

was

it.

and


THE

VII

shadowed two

BOWL

BLACK

her face.

she looked up from

women

As

througha village washingin the stream, went

stared and

laughed. It's a boggartcome

alive/*says one. Out upon her,"cries the other, for a shameless

"

"

"

wench

upon her false modestyto roam the country thus with her head in a black bowl, as * who should cry aloud to every passing Come man, and

!

Out

wholesome On

!'

is hidden

what

see

It is

enough to

make

a

body sick.** the the poor maid, and sometimes and pebblesfor peltedher with mud

went

children

she

Sometimes

sport.

handled

was

roughly by

louts,who scoffed and caught at her dress village laid hands upon the bowl as she went ; they even itselfand soughtto drag it from her head by force.

theyonlyplayedat that game once, for the bowl stung them as fiercely as if it had been a nettle, and the bullies ran away howling. The beggar-maidenmight seek her fortune, but it was very hard to find. She might ask for But

work

;

but

wishful

to

see,

would

employ a

None she get it ? were girlwith a black bowl on

her head. At

she

sat

on last,

a

her upon

heart would

day when she was tired out, and began to cry as if her stone

fine a

break.

rolled her

Down

under

the black

bowl.

cheeks

and reached her white

They

tears

rolled down

from her

chin.

that way, with wanderingballad-singer passed had a sharp He biwa slung across his back.

A

his eye

and

marked

the

tears

59

upon

the maid*s white


THE chin.

It

"Oh,

girlwith

BLACK

all he

was

"

do

I

of her

sec

bowl

face,and, your head,'*

on

sit weeping

you

weep,*'she answered, I

giveme

hungry and

am

work

"Now that's for he had singer, of my own, sorry for you. do for you is

m

that he

whips

his

and fingers

the

tears

"

vii

by the

side road-

''

is hard. will

could

the black

quothhe, "why ?

BOWL

on

or

or

.

.

"

No

one

money."

unfortunate,"said

the

ballad-

kind

heart ; " but I haven't it would be yours. Indeed I am a

In the circumstances

make

to

the world

because

tired.

me

pay

"

you

his Aiwa starts

little

song."

round, thrums

as

your white

a

the best I

easy

as

on

a

can

With

it with

please. To says, and sings: "

you

chin," he

blooms by the roadside^ cherry black is the canopy ofcloud I How The wild cherry droops by the roadside Beware ofthe black canopy ofcloud. Harky hear the rain^hear the rainfall From the black canopy ofcloud. are Alasy the wild cherryits sweet flowers marred^ Marred are the sweet flowers on the sprayT* forlorn TAe white

^

^

^

"

Sir,I

girlwith "

and

Yet

do not

the bowl

understand on

his way. passingrich farmer. to "

song,"said

the

her head.

it is plainenough,"said the

went

him

your

He

came

to

ballad-singer,

the

house

of

a

he went, and theyasked singbefore the master of the house.

With

all the

In

will

in the 60

world," says

the


BLACK

THE

VII

BOWL

ballad-singer.I will sing him a So he sang I have just made." "

cherryand When

song that of the wild

new

the great black cloud. he had made an end, "Tell

of your song," says interpretation

the

the

us

of

master

the house. With

"

all the will in the

ballad-singer.The "

maiden

I

whom

saw

world," quoth the

cherryis the face of a sitting by the wayside. She wild

great black wooden

bowl

her

head,

wore

a

which

is the great black cloud in my song, and under it her tears flowed like rain,for I saw

from the

her white chin.

dropsupon

she wept for giveher work

hunger,and

upon

And

because

no

she said that one

would

pay her money." Now I might help the poor I would the bowl on her head," said the master

"

with

nor

girl of

the house. That

"

you may if you wish," quoththe balladShe sits but a stone's throw from your

singer. gate." The long and "

to

put

labour

All the with back

that the maid was short of it was in the rich farmer's harvest-fields.

day long she

in the

waving rice,

grey skirts kilted and her sleeves bound All day long she pliedthe with cords. her

sickle,and

the

sun

bowl

she

had

; but

night,and She

kept

worked

was

found

her

in

gatheredin.

shone down upon the black food to eat and good rest at

well content. favour in her

the Then

master's eyes, and fields till all the harvest he

took 6i

her

into his

he was

house,


THE there

where

plentyfor

was

happilyas

bird, and

a

labours.

And

gods for

her

her

do, for his wife

to

went

fortune.

lived well

and

singingabout

her

thanked

nightshe

every

good

vii

the maiden

sickly.Now

but

was

BOWL

BLACK

the august

Still she

upon her head. the New Year time, "

the

wore

black bowl At

Bustle,bustle,** says

scrub and cook and the farmcr*s wife ; dear, for your best foot foremost, my "

have

look

the house

sew

;

put

must

we

its very neatest."

at

be sure, and with all my heart,"says the and she put her back into the work ; " but, girl, "

To

she says, if I may be mistress," are we havinga party,or what ? "

so

bold

to

as

ask,

"

of them," says the " farmer's wife. My son that is in Kioto, the great and gay, is coming home for a visit." home he comes, the handsome Presently young "

Indeed

we

Then

man.

are,

the

and many

called in, and

neighbourswere

merry-making.They Feasted and they danced, theyjestedand they sang, many a bowl of good red rice theyate, and many a cup of with good saki theydrank. All this time the girl, bowl her head, pliedher work on modestlyin great

the

the

was

kitchen,and well

farmer's wife same,

saw

fine

one

to

day

of the way

out

she

was

that, good soul !

the company

the

"

All

called for

the

more

of the

wine, and

the

house

up the saki bottle and goes with it should he see there the kitchen. What

himself

wine

done, so

was

the

son

takes to

but the maiden

fanningthe

sitting upon

kitchen fire with 62

a

and pileof faggots, bamboo fan ! a split


THE

VII

I must

but My life,

"

what

sec

bowl," says the handsome

black

himself.

And

and

care,

BOWL

BLACK

enough

sure

much

peepedas

young made

he

as

is under

he

that to

man

it his

daily

could,which

was

enough for very much ; but seeminglyit was of Kioto, the great him, for he thought no more

not

to do his and gay, but stayed at home His father laughedand his mother

courting. the fretted,

up their hands,all to no purpose. Oh, dear,dear maiden with the wooden bowl, I must other. and she shall be my bride and no

neighboursheld "

her," cried

will have

the

impetuousyoung

man,

he fixed the wedding-day himself. and very soon the time came, the young maidens of the When went to array the bride. village They dressed her in

fair and

a

of white

robe costly

brocade,and

in

hakama of scarlet silk, and on her shoulders trailing they hung a cloak of blue and purpleand gold.

They chattered,but a

word.

She

as

for the bride she said

and bridegroomnothing,

of

his choice

at

sore

nothing,but

the

she

sad because

was

tears

because a

never

brought her

his parentswere

beggar-maid. She said glistenedon her white

chin. "

maidens to to

off with the

Now "

;

do it with the

bowl

it is time

to

ugly old bowl,"

cried

dress the bride's hair and

goldencombs."

So

and

lifted it away,

would

the

have

hands

they laid

but

it. theycould not move Try again,"theysaid,and tugged at it with all their might. But it would stir. not There's witchcraft in it,"theysaid ; try a "

"

"

63


THE

BOWL

BLACK

vii

third time/* They tried a third time,and stillthe bowl stuck fast,but it gave out fearsome moans and cries. "

Ah

!

be, let be for pity's sake,"said the

Let

" poor bride, for you make my head ache/* They were forced to lead her as she was

bridegroom's presence. My dear, I am "

bowl," said the young So

"

mystic

man.

saki from

the silver cup the Three

Times

the

afraid of the wooden

not

theypouredthe

and from

to

two

Three"

the silver flagon, of them drank the

that made

them

man

and wife. Then

the black bowl

noise,and fell to With

the

it fell a shower

burst asunder with

ground in

a

of silver and

been

a

rich and But the

face.

"

dowry that

for

a

loud

thousand

pieces. gold,and pearls jewel of price.

and rubies and emeralds,and every Great was the astonishment of the company

gazedupon

a

as

would princess

they have

rare.

bridegroom looked

My dear," he said,

that shine like your

"

eyes."

64

into

there

arc

the no

bride's

jewels


'


VIII

THE

All

that

you

gods

the

of the

upon

rain,

creeping

nor

sad

the

Hear

you seventh

the

pray

night

moon.

neither

thunder,

them

fair weather

for

patience' sake and and be pitiful that

be

may

lovers, I beseech

true

are

seventh

For pray,

for

LOVERS

STAR

that

upon

hail,

nor

love's

sake,

night

there

cloud,

nor

nor

mist. of

tale

dear

the

prayers. your Maiden The Weaving

Star

Lovers

the

was

and

give of

daughter

a

Her the dwelling was Light, upon which is the of the shore Milky Way, Bright the of Heaven. All River day long she sat at and loom her plied her shuttle, weaving the gay and of the woof, hour gods. Warp garments till it lay fold on web by hour the coloured grew Still she feet. fold piled at her ceased her never

of

Deity

labour, for she "

Sorrow,

spare.

she But

afraid.

age-long

Maiden

Weaving So

was

she

sorrow,

when

laboured,

She

and

she the

herself, poor 65

had

heard

shall leaves

gods

come

saying

a

loom."

had

garments

maiden,

the

upon

her

was

:

to

ill-clad F

;


STAR

THE

LOVERS

she recked nothingof her attire She went that her father gave hen

hang down

her hair

fell upon

long lock it

She

celestial youthsand or

She

weep.

into the

her He

angry. much." "

.

.

wove

a

flung

love

not

sorry.

She

her

being

father,the Deity of Light,grew too said, "Daughter, you weave

It is my duty," she said. At your age to talk of duty!

Out

she

did

She

and

anon

play with the pleasurewith

glad nor .

let

web. many-coloured

Now

"

did not take her

neither

was

and

Ever

maidens.

weaving,weaving

sat

"

or

jewels

and barefoot,

loom, and back

the

of Heaven,

children

of the

or

unconfined.

her shoulden

over

viii

upon

you !

"Wherefore father ? *'

said her father.

"

are

she

"

with me, my displeased her fingersplied the

you

said,

and

shuttle. "

Are

you

a

stock

or

a

stone,

or

pale flower

a

"

by the wayside? Nay," she said, "

"

"

Then

be pleasure,

take your

wherefore

And

"

leave your

I

am

of these."

none

child,and

loom, my as

live ;

others are."

should

I be

as

others

are

?

"

she said. Never

"

dare

to

Come,

me. question

will you

"

leave your loom ? She said," Sorrow, age-long sorrow,

upon

the

Weaving

Maiden

when

she

shall

come

leaves her

loom." "A

foolish

saying,"cried 66

her

father,"not


THE

VIII

worthy of

credence.

her

took

covered

do

from

with

her

of agelong

With

that

and gently,

And

her to be very richly and attired, upon her and garlandedher head

Paradise.

"

hand

cloth.

a

know

we

gods ?

not

we

shuttle

the loom

LOVERS

What

Are

?

sorrow

he

STAR

he

caused

they put jewels with

flowers of

her father gave her for spouse the Herd Boy of Heaven, who tended his flocks upon the banks of the BrightRiver. Now

And

the

Maiden

changed indeed. Her and her lipswere stars were ruddy. She dancingand singingall the day. Long hours

eyes went

was

playedwith the children of Heaven, and she took her pleasure with the celestial youths and maidens. Lightly she went ; her feet were shod with silver. Her lover, the Herd Boy, held her by the hand. She laughed so that the very gods laughed with her, and High Heaven she

re-echoed with

sounds of mirth. of

duty or

As for her

loom,

littledid she think

gods.

the

it from

I have

"

it into

a

And his

it

garments of wept

never

near

another.

to

she said ; live,*'

*'

111

weave

Boy, her lover,claspedher

face

all

was

his breast.

on

of the she

careless ;

was

more."

no

Her

arms.

tears

So

she

and

in

smiles,and

lived her

life.

father,the Deity of Light,was angry. It is too much," he said. " Is the girlmad

her **

She

web

end

life to

my

the Herd

she hid But

moon's

one

She

will

become

Besides,who of the

gods ?

is to

the weave

?

of Heaven. laughing-stock the new springgarments

"

67


THE

LOVERS

STAR

Three

times he warned

Three

times she

viii

his

daughter. and shook laughedsoftly

her

head. **

hand

Your

said, but of "

mortal

surety no

a

said, You "

of

god or

shall find it otherwise

banished

he

to

ever

either of

the Herd the farther side of the

And

cost."

hand

father,"she

shut it.''

can

He

and

openedthe door,my

to

your

for

ever Boy Bright River.

from far and near, and magpiesflew together, theyspreadtheir wingsfor a frailbridgeacross the over river,and the Herd Boy went by the frail the magpiesflew away bridge. And immediately to the ends of the earth and the Weaving Maiden the saddest thingin could not follow. She was Heaven. Long, long she stood upon the shore, and held out her arms to the Herd Boy, who desolate and in tears. tended his oxen Long, long she layand wept upon the sand. Long, long she brooded, lookingon the ground.

The

She

and

arose

went

to

her

cloth that covered

aside the

loom.

She

it.

She

cast

took

her

shuttle in her hand.

Age long sorrow," she said, age long ! sorrow Presentlyshe dropped the shuttle. the pain of it,"and she Ah," she moaned, the loom. leaned her head against "

"

-

-

"

"

"

in

But not was

be

as

a

I

once

neither

she

little while was.

gladnor glad,and

I am weep" Her tears

I did

said, Yet "

not

love

I would

or

weep, I love and

sorry. Now I am sorry."

fell like 68

rain, but

she

took

I I

up


THE

viii

shuttle and

the

with

LOVERS

laboured

of the

garments grey

STAR

gods.

weaving diligently, Sometimes

grief,sometimes The gods were

dreams.

it

was

fain

web

rosy

was

with

strangely Deity of Light,

to

Maiden's

The

the

the

go

father,the for once well pleased. was is my "That child," he said. good, diligent Now you are quietand happy." she said. The quietof dark despair," Happy ! clad.

"

"

I

"

the saddest

am

I

"

thingin Heaven." said the Deityof Light ; sorry,"

am

"

what

shall I do?" back my Nay, child,that I Give

" "

for

and

ever

lover."

me

ever

by

do.

cannot

is banished

He

of

the decree

Deity,that

a

be broken."

cannot "

I knew

"

Yet

it,"she

said.

something I

can

do.

On

Listen.

the

day of the seventh moon, I will summon from the ends of the earth, the magpiestogether the Bright River and theyshall be a bridge over of Heaven, so that the Weaving Maiden shall lightlycross to the waiting Herd Boy on the seventh

farther shore." So it

On

was.

magpiesfrom theyspreadtheir wings for a the Weaving Maiden went moon

the

came

bridge. Her like

a

eyes were bird in her bosom.

there to meet

And

so

her upon it is

day of

the seventh

the seventh

far and

near.

And

frail bridge. And over

by

the

frail

like stars, and her heart And the Herd Boy was the farther shore.

oh, true still, 69

lovers

"

upon

the


THE

LOVERS

STAR

viii

these two keep day of the seventh moon their tryst. Only if the rain fallswith thunder and is cloud and hail,and the BrightRiver of Heaven make swollen and swift, the magpies cannot a Alack, the bridge for the Weaving Maiden. drearytime ! Therefore,true lovers,pray the gods for fair

seventh

weather.

70


IX

HORAIZAN

JoFUKU he

read,

All

the

the

of

knew

he

hand.

his

and

what

he

as

He

metals.

not

lines

and

trees,

and

magic

full of years him

and

but

;

written

in

from

secrets

knew

He philosophy. grew All the people honoured happy, for he had a word

wisdom.

the

knew

flowers

and

herbs

them.

in

was

learned

He

books

Many

and

poetry

was

forgot

beasts, and

rocks

of China,

Man

never

characters

and

and

he

and

palm

birds

Wise

the

was

he

his

upon

heart.

word

The and

day

in

with Mutability. It was him. night, and sorely it troubled the days of Jofuku a tyrant ruled and

China,

he

made

he

"Jofuku/* my

wood

poets." Jofuku "

of my

the

sing

to

could

give

the

me

not

it you,

the

said,

"

all his

ask

though

a

over, Moreover

burden.

nightingales of

songs

it for

do

life

Man's

Wise

said, "teach

Alas, liege,*'he I will

and

him

was

me

it cost

of

Chinese

the

wisdom. another me

thing blood

the

heart."

"Have

a

care," said

the 71

Emperor,

"look

to


HORAIZAN

IX

Wise men arc your ways. " ? to be dishonoured one

another

"

Ask

"

Well, then,scent

me

cheap in

thing,"said

China

the Wise

I

; am

Man.

the peony with the scent imperial ; peony is brilliant,

me

of the

jessamine.The is small,pale, foolish. Nevertheless, jessamine

the

Scent

its perfumeis sweet.

the peony with the

me

of the

jessamine." But Jofuku stood silent and downcast. By the gods,"cried the Emperor,

scent

"

"

is

man

fool !

a

Here,

this wise

of you, off with

some

his

head." *'

Liege,"said

lifeand I will

the Wise

Man,

spare

set sail for Horaizan

Immortality.I will

the herb

"

me

my

where

grows this herb and pluck

bringit back to you again,that you may live and reignfor ever." The Emperor considered. "Well, go," he said,"and lingernot, or it for you." will be the worse Jofuku went and found brave companionsto go with

him

junk with he

took

had made

the great adventure,and he manned a the most famous mariners of China, and

on

stores

all

on

thingsreadyhe

month, about the The

board, and

Emperor

time

the herb

and when

he

sail in the seventh

set

of the full moon.

himself

he

Man,"

and Immortality,

presently.If you return companionsshall die the

down

came

"Speed, speed.Wise me

gold;

see

without death." 72

to

the

shore. sea-

said; "fetch

that you do it it,you and your


HORAIZAN

IX

"

So

The

called Jofukufrom the junk. Farewell,liege," with

theywent

fairwind

a

for their white sails.

the water creaked,the ropes quivered, splashed againstthe junk'sside,the sailors sang as panions eastward, the brave comthey steered a course boards

But

were

looked

merry. forward and

because

of the

the Wise

looked

word

back,

written

of China

Man

upon

and

was

sad

his heart

"

Mutability. for many days upon The junk of Jofukuwas He and the wild sea, steering eastwards. a course the sailors and the brave companionssuffered many things.The great heat burnt them, and the great cold froze them. Hungry and thirsty theywere, and

of them

some

fell sick and died.

More

were

the fightwith pirates. Then came that swept dread typhoon,and mountain waves the junk. The and the sails were washed masts lost away with the rich stores, and the gold was slain in

for

a

Drowned

ever.

and the brave

were

the

companions every

famous one.

mariners,

Jofuku was

left alone.

east

Far to the he looked up. In the grey dawn he saw a mountain, very faint,the colour of

and pearl,

on

the

mountain

top there grew

tall,with

spreadingbranches.

murmured

:

"The

Island of Horaizan

The

is

east

Wise

Mountain. there is Fusan, the Wonder there grows the heightsof Fusan tree a branches hide the Mysteriesof Life."

and weary 73

and could

not

tree,

Man

of the

and

Jofukulayweak

a

east,

On whose lifta


HORAIZAN

IX

finger.Nevertheless,the junk glidednearer the

to

nearer

shore.

Still and

blue

and the

grew

of the sea, and Jofuku saw the brightgreen flowers of the island. grass and the many-coloured Soon there came and maidens troops of young men

waters

bearinggarlandsand singingsongs of welcome ; into the water and they waded and drew the out and of the sweet junk to land. Jofuku was aware spicyodours that clungto their garments and their hair. At their invitation he left the junk,which drifted away

and

said,

He

no

was

more

have

I

"

seen.

come

to

the

Horaizan

that the trees Blest." Looking up he saw full of birds with blue and golden feathers. birds filledthe air with

were

The

On

delightful melody.

all

the citron,the persimmon and the pomegranate, the peachand the plum and the loquat. The ground at his feet was sides there

hung

the

orange

and

rich brocade,embroidered with every flower that is. The happy dwellers in Horaizan took him

as

by

a

the hands and "

How

spokelovinglyto him. strange it is,"said Jofuku,

"

I do

not

old age any more." What is old age ? theysaid.

feel my ** "

"

do I feel any what is pain?

Neither

theysaid. longerwritten on my you speakof,beloved

Now

"

The

*'

What

"

is the Mutability

"

And

"Tell death ?

pain."

"

"

word word

is no do

heart." ?

"

word." "

what

? may be its interpretation Man, "is me," said the Wise

"

74

this


HORAIZAN

IX

have

"We

of

heard

never

death,''said

the

Wasobiobe.

He

inhabitants of Horaizan. The

Wise

full

was

wise

as

of

Man

Japan was

the Wise

as

The

old but young. Often and loved him. not

was

It

boat

his

was

to

out

watery

he

was

pleasureto there

sea,

Once

waste.

of China.

Man

peoplehonoured him happy enough. in

alone

venture

frail

a

in the wild and

meditate

to

He

that

he did this it chanced

as

in his boat,and he slept he fellasleep all nightlong, while his boat drifted out to the eastward. So,

when

he awoke

in the

found

himself

beneath

brightlightof morning,he of Fusan, the

the shadow

of His boat layin the waters Mountain. river of Horaizan, and he steered her amongst a the floweringiris and the lotus,and sprang on

Wonder

shore. The

"

spot in the world !

sweetest

think I have Soon

to

come

the

came

island,and with and

young "

"

When fruit of

to

So

dear

to

in

hunted, or

hear

sweet

the woods

I

of the

of China,

Man

as

brother,"theycried, to

Youth."

eat

of the delicious

them

down

music.

and

bathed in the

feasted and

the

maidens

the Island of Eternal

of flowers

rode and

"

happy as they.

theyhad givenhim the island, theylaid

theywandered They

the Wise

Welcome, welcome,

welcome

bank

as

he said.

the Blest."

Horaizan

youths and

them

**

upon a Afterwards

groves. warm

They

sea-water.

pleasure. enjoyed every delightful and there was no long day lingered, night, 75


HORAIZAN for there

and

weariness

The of China. "

I

"

What

want

no

said

the Wise

to

Man

:

"

*'

You

boat here."

brother,I do.

Indeed, my

take

to

was

find my boat.*' said Jofuku. matter, brother ?

cannot

no "

of Japan came

Man

He

sleep,there

pain.

no

Wise

of

need

no

was

IX

home.

me

I

I

my boat There's

want

sick for home.

am

the truth.'* "

"

The

*'

? you not happy in Horaizan No, for I have a word written upon my heart. word is Humanity.Because of it I am troubled Are

and have

peace." Strange,"said the

"

"

Once

I

no

too

had

a

word

Wise

written

of

Man on

China.

heart.

my

The

but I have forgotten what it Mutability^ Do you too forget." means. said the Wise Man Nay, I can never forget," of Japan. He sought out the Crane, who is a great and besoughther, "Take home to me traveller, word

was

"

land."

own

my

"

Alas," the

die. know

you and "

This

Crane

said, if I "

is the Island of Eternal

did

you would Youth ; do you so

you have been here for a hundred years ? If go away you will feel old age and weariness

pain,then you will die." No matter," said Wasobiobe,

"

take

me

home." Then

the Crane

took

him

76

on

her

strong back


HORAIZAN

IX

tarried and

never "

him.

flew with

and Do

Day

nightshe

tired.

never

the shore ?

you see And he said, ** I

and

At

flew and

last she

said,

"

see

it.

Praise

be

to

the

gods.*' said, Where

She

have but **

shall I carry you ? littletime to live.** "

a

Good

country, under the fisherman

sand

"

of

You

my

pine,there spreading

mending his

net.

Take

laid Wasobiobe

So the Crane

feet. And

arms.

And

me

sitsa poor that to him

I

laid his head

Wasobiobe

againstthe

breast.

have lived for ever,"he said," but that is written on my heart."

might

for the word "

What

word

?

"

Humanity

is

murmured. the

the poor man's fisherraised him in his

at

the fisherman

fisherman's humble

Ah,

dear

.

die in his arms."

I may

"

the

Crane, upon

.

I

"

pain.

"

am

""

said the fisherman. the

word," the

grown He

old

"

hold

Wise me

Man closer.

gave a great cry. he smiled. Then his breath left Afterwards dead. him with a sigh,and he was " said the fisherman. It is the way of all flesh," .

.

77


REFLECTIONS

Long

enough of

journey mind

the

and

rest

her

the

good

his

had

in

They

kept

nothing

their

bothering of

pair The

day

truth

is

be

say

they and

peony

or

their

twist

days

plum,

these

At

to

forth

the

or

as

them

that

wife, and

years,

and

with

quiet

their

and

winning

had

and

they

Sometimes

Other

spring, the

is

long.

fields.

and

of

good from

obi

or

steady

set

never

scarlet

a

His

women-kind,

They

or

simple

on

eyes

morning

night.

till

or

sleeves

long

of

either

house,

of

many

peace

clear

ways. their

estate.

these

great

all

at

in

men-servants

dead

day's

a

gentleman

a

good

lived

man son.

Kioto

been

within

dwelt

but

nianners,

knew

a

of

city

soul,

only

there

ago

and

blue

jolly

as

nay.

admire

they lotus, would

the

tenegui

please,

Often

as

for

enough 78

might

case a

little

about

there

they

sak^y

their was came

the

flower the

view

the rice-

In

cherry

to

out

drink

white

you

set

the

as

the

in

a-fishing.

went

to

later

they

times

they

happy

as

laboured

they

went

the

were

iris

be. and

heads no

one

home


REFLECTIONS

X

their oldest clothes, by lantern light. They wore and were at their meals. mightyirregular But the pleasures of life are fleetingmore's the the father feltold age creeping pity! and presently "

"

upon him. One night, as he hands

the

over

smoking and warming

sat

his

charcoal, "Boy," says he, "it's

high time

you got married." the gods forbid ! " cries the young man. Now Father,what makes you say such terrible things? "

"

Or

are

You

joking?

you

be

must

joking,"he

says. "

joking at all,"says

not

spoke a truer enough."

never soon "

" "

Fm

Fm "

"

But, father,I And

and

that

the

same

?

"

sorry for you, my boy." Then I marry what for must of

In the way

the

nature

wife

a

to

I

"

;

you'llknow

afraid of mortally

am

I not

am

need you'll

and

word,

father

the

women."

says the father. ?"

says the son. I shall die before long, take care of you."

stood in the young man's eyes for he was tender-hearted ; but he heard this,

Now

when

tears

all he said was,

"

I

can

take

care

of

myselfvery

well." "

That's

the very

thing you cannot,"says

his

father. The

long and

the young

man

a

short of it was wife.

She

that

was

theyfound

young,

and

as

was Tassel,just pretty as a picture.Her name that,or Fusa, as they say in her language.

After

theyhad

drunk

down 79

the

"

Three

Times


REFLECTIONS "

Three

and together

so

became

stood alone, the young man girl. For the life of him

say to her. stroked it with

took

He

to

x

at

the

he did not know what bit of her sleeve and Still he

said

mighty foolish. The and pale,turned red again,

looked red,turned

and

wife,they

lookinghard a

his hand.

and

man

nothing girl turned burst into

tears. "

Tassel,don't

Honourable

gods'sake,"says "

"

I suppose

do

the young man. you don't like

that,for the

me,"

dear

sobs the

girl.

I suppose you don't think I'm pretty." " than the My dear," he says, " you'reprettier

bean-flower in the field;

than the you'reprettier hen in the farm-yard prettier ; you're I be the in pond. hope you'll carp

littlebantam than the

rose

happy with

my

father and me."

laugheda little and dried her eyes. Get on another pairof hakama^^ she says, and give me those you'vegot on you ; there's a great I was hole in them it all the time of the noticing wedding ! and taking Well, this was not a bad beginning, one thingwith another they got on pretty well, not as they had though of course thingswere At this she

"

"

"

"

been

in that blessed time

his father did sleeves

or

an

not

the young

man

and

pairof long morning tillnight.

set

obi from

when

eyes upon

a

the way of nature, the old man died. It is said he made a very good end, and left that in his strong-box made the his son which

By

richest

and

man

by,in

in the

But country-side. 80

this

was

no


REFLECTIONS

X

comfort

all to the poor young his father with all his heart. at

paid reverence

to

who

man,

Day

the tomb.

mourned

and

nighthe sleepor rest

Little

he got, and littleheed he gave to his wife,Mistress to the delicate Tassel,and her whimsies, or even

dishes she what

for

Kioto

a

It

little?

to

on

she

says, that

she

'*

as

a

to

were

to

go

"

he says. to

answer,

it would

saw

never

fashions,so

as

to

of

kind

a

duty. They

his country should

loves

say every man Kioto ; and besides,you the

said, "My

say that.

Oh,"

"

if you

it be

to

pale, know

"

but enjoyyourself,"

To

last she

At

for should I do that ? the tip of her tongue

what

was

thin and

grew

her wits* end

at

him.

would

how

And

"

with

do

to

dear, and

do

He

she, poor maid, was

and

"

before him.

set

might give an

tell

what

me

see

eye

like

to

theyare

she says, " are My things," you get home. sadlybehind the times ! Fd like well enough to

when

peopleare wearing!

what

know "

Fve '*

man,

no

and

heart to go to Kioto," says the young if I had, it*s the planting-out time of

the rice,and the

get

the

out

his best hakama

same,

a

Kioto,"he Well, I "

And

may

after

All

his bento for

"

not thing's

to

be

done, so there's

end of it."

an

to

"

what

two

dayshe

and

haouriyand

journey.

"

Fm

bids his wife

make up thinkingof going to

tells her. am

surprised," says

put such

Mistress

idea into your

an

Tassel.

head, if I

ask ? " 8l

G


REFLECTIONS

the young

Mistrefes Tassel

for she

nothingmore, And

duty,"says

man.

Oh, indeed,"says

"

of

kind

thinkingit's a

I've been

"

x

had

this,and

to

grainsof sense. she packs her

some

the next

morning as ever was husband off brightand earlyfor Kioto, and betakes she little matter of house cleaning herself to some has

hand.

on

steppedout along the road, and before long a littlebetter in his spirits, feeling he saw he reached Kioto. It is likely many things wonder to at. Amongst temples and palaceshe and marched He castles and gardens, went. saw fine streets of shops,gazing about up and down The

man

young

his eyes wide open, and his mouth too, a simplesoul. very like,for he was fine day he came At length, one upon a shop in the sunshine, full of metal mirrors that glittered with

him

"

Oh,

the

simple soul near

sat

pretty silver himself.

to

!"

moons

he

And

says

dared

and take up a mirror in his hand. The next minute he turned as white down

him

holdingthe "

mirror

in his hand

and

"

You

are

But

and well.

You

you look. to

come

home

with

did you

?

Now

Yet

I

it.

come

the dear could

are

have

here alive

but how somethingpale still, You and move father, your lips,

speak,but

seem

rice and

as

lookinginto

matter, since you

no

are

that !

come

shop door, still

how

dead, then

not

praisedfor

be

sworn

young

the

seat

Why, father,"he said,

here ?

gods

in

the

on

to

the

me,

I

do

not

dear,and 82

hear

you.

live with

us

You'll

justas


REFLECTIONS

X

you used well." Fine

"

one

of the

you

are

"

said gentleman,"

young

best that

the

smile,that

smile, you

You

mirrors,my

shopman,

best of the

be

can

lot you

is

the

made, and that's

have there.

I

see

judge."

a

The

do ?

to

clutched his mirror

man

young

tightand

enough no doubt. He trembled. stupidly staring he whispered. much Is it for sale ? How ? in a takinglest his father should be snatched He was

sat

"

"

from

him.

For sale it is,indeed,most shopman, " and the priceis

noble

"

It*s almost "

giving it ^//"

Two

praisedfor

bu !

as

Now

"

it was

three bu

and girdle, twinkling. the shopman who

or

even

five.

and tied it up with Father," said the young box

got away

buy

must

my

the

of his

with some

it, before "

gaudsfor

we

the ear,

wished

young about

why, man

but

when

never

buyinghis

said

came

a

word

he out

he put in a fine

mirror

set

out

to to

he

when

man,

old father for two

83

and

green cords.

the young

he

happy

he had

same

for home

had we

there,

woman

wife,you know." Now, for the life of him, he could

told

gods be

the money

All the

good face upon it,and packedthe

white

understand." you'll

" cried mercy ! smiled from ear to

He

the purse out of his purse, in a

asked

I am,

away

only two

had

Now

a

sir,"said the trifle, only two bu.

this their

man.

young

a

"

"

not

his home Mistress

have the Tassel

bu in the Kioto


REFLECTIONS

shop. That thingsturned She

was

as

her fine new him

see "

so

but I

to

and

well

his mistake,as

her he took

happy,"she been mighty

so

say he's after all.

must

quickto get over his sorrow are just like children." unbeknown

made

you like with her coral " obi from Kioto. And

pleasedas

herself;

to

he

out.

and hair-pins, Fm glad to said

where

was

x

But

men

for her husband, bit of green silk from

As a

spreadit in the cupboard of There he placedthe mirror in its

treasure-box and

her

the toko no ma. box of white wood. he

Every morning earlyand the cupboard of to went

every the

evening late,

toko

no

ma

and

his father.

Many a jollytalk they and the had and many a heartylaugh together, of all that countrythe happiest was son side, young man soul. for he was a simple Tassel had a quick eye and a But Mistress sharpear, and it was not long before she marked spokewith

her husband's "

What

ma^^

I

beingone

ways. for does he go

often

to

the toko

no

herself,"and what has he got should be gladenough to know." Not

to

suffer much

asked her husband He

so

asked

she

there ?

new

these

told her the

in silence, she very

things. truth,the good young

soon

same

I have

man.

again, my dear old father home I'm as happy as the day is long,"he says. " H'm," she says. " bu cheap,"he says, " and wasn't two And

"

And

now

wasn't it a strange thingaltogether ?"

84


REFLECTIONS

X

Cheap,indeed,"says she,

**

and

"

and

why, if I may ask," she nought of all this at the first? The

man

young Tm

"

says.

turned,and

wings of the with a clang. at a

once

;

an

What

box.

with

minute

his

she flew

ma

flungopen

on

the doors

"

he

keep in it ? box quickly enough. flat shiningthing! she said,

opened the

What

**

the

and

"

white wooden She

dear,"he

! she cried green silk for sleeve-linings " but I don't see any old father here,only

My

"

and

wind

the

Tassel

the toko no

to

say

"

tell you, my

cannot

Mistress

Up jumped was

did you

"

sorry, but I don't know," out to his work.

that he went

back

says,

red.

grew

Indeed,then, I

"

passing strange;

can

"

odd

the mirror, looked into it. she said nothingat all,but moment of anger and jealousy stood in her

and, takingup For

a

tears

great

the

pretty

eyes, and her face flushed from forehead to chin. ! " she cried,"a woman "A woman ! So that is his secret A

!

He

keepsa

pretty at

girlfrom Kioto,

"

FU

face is scarlet

be bound

;

and

?

cooked

Ah, it's a

With case,

and

Oh

miserable

! oh ! oh !

too ill-tempered

she

could have

his daikon and mended

times.

;

oh, how

little spitfire. Ah, who him

cupboard.

and very pretty-^no, not young A dancingall,but she thinks herself so.

very

woman,

her

in this

woman

girlI

"

frowns, nasty

thought it am

and

"

his hakama

a

of

I've

hundred

"

that, she

threw

slammed-to

the

85

the

mirror

cupboarddoor

into

its

upon

it.


REFLECTIONS Herself

she

sobbed

"

Fve

and in

her, and

to

down

was

get her face up is it,my

"

Tour

darling!

own

through her

sobs ; and

"

from

"

beside

the floor where

answers

want

?

comfort

to

? darling

she I

his knees

on

own "

in the world

he could

doing what

keptit. Why, what

sandal,"says he,

my

But what

instant he

an

Tassel

"

cried and

break.

thong of

the to

come

Mistress she

and

mats,

her husband.

comes

Tve broken

and

the

flungupon

if her heart would

as

In "

x

to

"

says he. very fierce

go home," she

cries. "

sweet, husband."

own

your "

on,

But, my

Prettyhusband

with

are

at

home,

in

that thinks herself beautiful

has my green

there sleeve-linings

Now, what's

with

says,"and prettygoingsthe cupboard! A hateful,

ugly woman "

and

!" she

woman

a

you

all this about

with her women

;

and she

to

boot."

and sleeve-

Sure you wouldn't grudgepoor old father that little green rag for his bed ? Come, my dear,

? linings ril

buy

you twenty

At

that

she

danced

with

rage.

"

The was

"

;

am

with my

woman

on

jumped

to

her

I

a

feet and

father ! old father ! " fool or a child ? I saw

father ! old

Old

screamed

sleeve-linings."

fairly she the

eyes."

own

didn't know whether he poor young man his head or his heels. " Is it possible that

my father is gone ? from the toio no ma.

"

he

said,and 86

he took the mirror


REFLECTIONS

X

"

That's well

bought

for

;

stillthe

bu.

two

nay, then, smile

You

I do.

as

Tassel

Mistress

same

old father that I

seem

worried, father

;

There, that's well." like

came

little

a

fury and

snatched the mirror from his hand. She gave but look into it and hurled it to the other end of one the

It made

room.

that in to

see

such and

servants

what

work, the woodclangagainst neighbourscame rushing a

the matter.

was

It is my father,"said the young bought him in Kioto for two bu.^^ "

"

He

keepsa

stolen my

in the

cupboardwho has sobbed the wife. sleeve-linings," woman

green this there

After

great to-do. the neighbourstook the man's part and

woman's, with such never

as

and

was

none

;

I

"

man.

was

a

some

the

clatter and chatter and

noise

but settle the

of them

of

Some

a

would

thingtheycould

look

the

into

not,

mirror,

they said it was bewitched. They might have gone on the way theywere of them said, Let us till doomsday,but that one ask the Lady Abbess, for she is a wise woman." And off they all went to do what theymight have because

"

done

sooner.

Lady Abbess was of holy nuns. convent

The

of

a

at

prayers

the at

and

"This

She

meditations

she

and

the great

was

at

the head one

of mortifyings

was

she held it in her

long time.

piouswoman,

the less, the clever one, none affairs. They took her the mirror, and

and flesh,

human

a

At last she

poor

and

hands

looked

into it for

a

spoke:

woman," 87

she

said, touchingthe


REFLECTIONS

mirror, woman

for it's as

"

this poor

"

mind

x

that plainas daylight woman

so

was

troubled

the disturbance that she caused in

at

it is

a

in her

quiet

a

house, that she and become

a

has taken vows, shaved her head, Thus she is in her right holynun.

I will

placehere.

keep her, and

instruct her in

Go home, prayers and meditations. you and forget, be friends." children ; forgive all the

Then

peoplesaid, "

The

Lady

my

Abbess

is the wise woman." she

And

kept the

Mistress

mirror

and

Tassel

in her treasure.

her husband

went

home

hand in hand. "

So I

was

"Yes, yes, my man,

"

of

never

But

course.

old father would was

much

after all,"she said. dear," said the simple young

right, you

get of

a

on one

see,

I

wonderinghow at the holyconvent. for religion."

88

was

my He


XI

STORY

THE

When

Izanagi,

back

the

upon

the

Lord

unclean

journeyed

Rice

who

the

and

and

by the side of a clear perform purification. And Izanagi-no-Mikoto reach. reach

is too

reach

;

is

he

but

said,

So

and

And

as

bathed the

deities

"

the

in

there Ama

Then "

who

the

shall

taking

the

-

three

great

upper

of

the

be

bathed

middle

reach

the

from

no

-

the

lower

reach

for the

third

of

river.

the

his

beautiful

three

sublime

of the

Lord

Mikoto

jewels

89

; ;

Sea.

rejoiced, saying,

children

illustrious

of

lower

Glory of High Heaven Moon-Night-Possessor

august

string

upper

the

in

created

Impetuous,

also

the

down

the

Izanagi

Behold

in

went

Terassu,the

Susa, the

bathed

of

were

Tsuki-Yomi-no-Kami, and

might

dropped

water

countenance

he

water

he

he

And

that

he

The

"

the

more

glad.

water

Then

rapid."

had

he

once

to

river

said, "The

sluggish."

too

time

he

But

whither

was

rested

farewell

bade

beheld

Ears,

his

Invites, turned

Dead,

he

quest,

IMPETUOUS

THE

place,

of a

upon of Fresh

Land

SUSA,

World

the

Yomi,

OF

that

are

for

ever."

from

his

mine, And,

neck, he


STORY

OF

bestowed

SUSA,

it upon

IMPETUOUS

THE

xi

Terassu, the Glorious, and

Ama

her, Do Thine Augustnessrule the Plain of High Heaven, shiningin thy beautyby day/'

said to

"

in the

So she took the august jewelsand hid them storehouse of the gods.

And

of Invitation commanded

the Lord

Tsuki-

Thine saying,"Do Augustness of the Night." Now this was rule the Dominion countenance. a youthof a fair and pleasant his AugustAnd to the youngest of the deities, ness the Lord Izanagi gave the Sea Plain.

Yomi-no-Kami,

day,and Tsuki-Yominight. But Susa, the the ground and upon

Terassu ruled the

So Ama

softlyruled the Impetuous,flung himself violently wept, for he said, "Ah, no-Kami

dwell for So

he

ever

in his

not

his tears, and the withered

placeswere

green

sea

took

weeping, and

valleyfor

of the

moisture

the confines of the cold

upon

ceased

miserable,to !" the

that the

so

rivers and

dried up. And evil deities increased and as theyswarmed and flourished, upon the earth streams

were

their noise moon

;

and

was

as

far and

the

noise

wide

of flies in the

there

arose

fifth

portents of

woe.

the Lord of Invitation, came father, and stood terribly by him and said, What is this that I do see and hear ? Why dost thou not rule I charged thee, but with which the dominions ? lie here, like a child,with tears and wailings his

Then

"

Answer."

Susa, the Impetuous,answered,

And because

I

am

in

miseryand QO

love

not

this

"

I wail

but place,


STORY

XI

would

OF

departto

divine

a

IMPETUOUS

who

rules the Nether

is called the

Queen of Yomi,

of the Dead."

the World Then

mother

my

who

Land,

Distant

THE

SUSA,

wroth and expelled him with was Izanagi and chargedhim that he should expulsion,

departand

his face

show

no

more.

Susa,the Impetuous,answered,

And

"

first I will ascend to High Heaven leave of Her who sister, Augustness, my But

Glory of Heaven, So he

went

and then to

up

I will

Heaven

his

So be it. to

take

is the

depart."

with

a

noise and

great

speed,and

shook

every land and country quaked. And Terassu, the Light of Heaven, she also

mountains

coming,and said, This coming Augustness, my brother,is of no good intent, lay hold of mine inheritance,and to take

trembled

of His it

going all

and

Ama

but

at

the

a

to

by

at

force.

his

"

For

this alone

does

he

invade

fastness of High Heaven." And forthwith she divided the hair that

the

hung

her shoulders and rolled it in two august upon and the left the a nd adorned it bunches to to right,

with of a

a

warrior.

young

great bow

and

and five hundred a

she made

jewels. So

bamboo

a

her head

And

she

quiverof

arrows,

like the head

slungupon arrows,

one

her back

thousand

and she took in her hand

staffand brandished

it and

stampedupon

groundwith her armed feet,so that the earth So she came the to flew like powdered snow. and stood bank of the TranquilRiver of Heaven and waited. like unto a mighty man, valiantly, And Susa,the Impetuous, spokefrom the farther the

9"


OF

STORY bank

:

IMPETUOUS

THE

SUSA,

xi

Thine Augustness, My lovelysister, why thou thus armed ? me against she answered, "Nay, but wherefore

"

"

comest

And

ascendest thou And

Susa

hither ? "

"There replied,

is

nothing evil

in

Because I desired to dwell in the Land my mind. of Yomi, therefore has my father deignedto expel with a divine expulsion, and I thoughtto take me leave of thee, and so I have ascended hither. I

have

evil intention."

no

she,bendingher great eyes

And "

on

said

him,

Swear.*' he swore,

And

by

girded on him, and jewelsin her hair.

the ten-graspsword after that he swore

that

by

she suffered him

Then

to

was

the

cross

TranquilRiver of Heaven, and also to the FloatingBridge. So Susa, the cross over the Impetuous,entered the dominions of his sister, the

over

Sun

Goddess. But

his wild

never spirit

fair lands

ceased of Ama

to

chafe.

And

Terassu and the divisions of the rice-fieldswhich broke down and filled in the ditches. Still she had planted,

he

pillagedthe

Light of Heaven upbraidedhim not, but said, "His Augustness, my brother,believes that the land and should not be wasted by ditches and divisions, the

rice

should

be

and

more

everywhere,without her soft words distinction." But notwithstanding continued in his evil ways and Susa,the Impetuous, that

became

more

Now, maidens

as

in

sown

violent.

the

great Sun

the

awful

Goddess

Weaving 92

sat

Hall

with

of

her

High


STORY

XI

OF

the

Heaven, seeing to garments of the chasm

he

And

of

brother

of the

chasm

through the piebald horse.

IMPETUOUS

weaving

gods,her roof

the

in

THE

SUSA,

made

a

august

mighty and

Weaving Hall, down

let

the

the

horse

heavenly

a

fled hither

and

thither in terror, and wrought great havoc amongst the weaving maidens. the looms and amongst

And and all

himself followed

Susa like

a

of

storm

confusion

was

Sun

Goddess

shuttle.

So with

the

and

horror.

was

wounded

a

a

And with

cry she fled from a

cave

;

in the

and

she

her

High

press

golden Heaven

rolled

a

rock

the cave's mouth.

across

dark

Then black

dark

eternal earth

the Plain of Land

High Heaven,

of Reed

night prevailed.Hereupon

were

from

Therefore assemble

was

the Central

the deities as

and

rushingtempest floodingthe hall,and

and

herself in

hid

waters

like

theywandered

like

unto

far and did the

with

a

near

the

over

there

arose

Plains,and the voices

the

fliesin the

and

of

face of the fifth moon,

portents of

woe.

Eight Hundred Myriad Deities divine assemblyin the dry bed

of the

Tranquil River of Heaven, there to hold and to make decision what should be done. parley, And His Augustncssthe Lord of Deep Thoughts commanded them. So they called togetherthe Singing Birds of Eternal Night. And they chargedAma-tsu-mara, the Divine Smith, to make them of shiningwhite metal. And a mirror they to charged Tama-noya-no-mikoto stringtogether of curved jewels. And, having hundreds many

performeddivination by 93

the shoulder-blade

of

a


STORY

OF

stag of Mount

IMPETUOUS

THE

SUSA,

branches

lower

of white

streamers

bore the

Goddess

And

was.

Then

birds sang.

a

all

with

offerings, blue,and they

of

streamers

before the rock

tree

And

branches.

they covered and

theyhung tree, and they

of the

jewelsupon the branches hung the mirror upon its

a

And

branches.

the

the

sacred tree,

Kagu, theyuprooteda

sakakiyof five hundred

xi

the Sun

where

cavern

assembled

immediatelythe

of fair renown,

divine maiden

for grace and skill in dancinghad no sister, either in the Land of Rice Ears or upon the Plain of

who

And door. High Heaven, stood before the cavern there was hung about her for a garlandthe club from Mount moss Kagu, and her head was bound with

leaves

the

of the

and

-tree spindle

flowers of

and goldand flowers of silver, bamboo-grasswas in her hands.

green

danced heaven

before the and

earth

have

dancing. It was more waving in the wind or the cloud

race

door

cavern

upon

not

as seen

sheaf of And

she

for possessed,

one

the

lovelythan

a

with

like of her

the

pine-tops

of sea foam, and floating Plain of High Heaven is

the

the

be

compared with it. And the earth quaked and High Heaven shook, and all the Eight Hundred Myriad Deities laughedtogether. Now Ama Terassu, the Glory of Heaven, lay and the brightlightstreamed in the rock cavern, from her fair body in rays, so that she was as a gleamed great jewelof price. And poolsof water

not

to

in the floor of the cavern, and the slime walls gleamed with many colours,and

flourished rock-plants

in the unwonted 94

upon the

heat,so

the small that


STORY

XI

OF

IMPETUOUS

THE

SUSA,

slept.And she awoke because of the song of the Eternal Singing Birds,and she raised herself and flungthe hair back the

bower

ladylayin a heavenly

over

her

that

singin

and

poor birds there came to

shoulder,and said, Alack, the "

"

the

And longnight! her the sound of dancingand of high revel and of of the gods,so she was still and the merriment listened. And she felt the Plain of High presently Heaven shake, and heard the Eight Hundred Myriad Deities as they laughed together.And she

and

arose

rolled back

the

of the

the door

to

came

stone

great

little way.

a

and

cavern,

And

a

of

lightfell upon the dancingmaiden where she stood,panting, in all her array ; but the other deities were yet in darkness, and they looked at each other and were still. Then spoke the Fair Gloryof Heaven : Methought that because I was hidden the Plain of High Heaven should be dark,

beam

"

and

black

dark

Central Land

the

then, doth

of Reed

Plains.

the

Dancing Maiden go thus, adorned with garlandsand her head tired ? And why do the Eight Hundred Myriad Deities laugh ? together Then the Dancing Maiden O made answer : Thine that art the sweet Augustness, delightof all How,

"

"

the with We more

behold deities, flowers,and

divine

the

maidens

are

decked

the

gods assemble with shouts. and are glad because there is a goddess rejoice illustrious than Thine Augustness.** And

Ama

she covered

Terassu

heard

her face with

the deities should

not

and

her

was

long sleeves,so

her tears ;

see

95

wroth.

And that

howbeit, they


STORY

OF

fell like the

Then

stars. falling

Court

of Heaven

hung

the mirror

stood that

IMPETUOUS

THE

SUSA,

by the made

was

the Divine

Smith.

And

and behold

the

paragon

And

in the mirror. dazzled

was

peer, she

Heaven, and

as

her

own

forth

And

the

all the

Dancing with

she looked, and

not

cherryrushed deities joinedtheir hands

Maiden should

with

looked

beheld,and

waved

ears

wild

cavern

and in

**

Deity be

joy they

bore

born ?

the

a

Sun, Then

shut.

cried, O Lady,Thine any

shook

into flower.

of the

was

thee, the Glory of Heaven So

and

countenance

Terassu, the Goddess

Ama

how

!"

of Heaven

beauty,that was without slowlyfrom the rocks of the light of her flooded High

the door of the rock

ness,

by Ama-tsu-Mara, "

the rice

below

themselves,and the about

sakaki tree, where

they cried, Lady,look

her

And

by

came

cavern.

And

the

let slipthe Nevertheless,she presently

that covered

sleeves

youthsof

said,"Indeed, I will

Terassu

Ama

behold."

new

the

xi

to

ring and

the

Augustcompare

"

goddess to

her

place. But

the

Susa,the Swift,the Brave, the Impetuous,

Long-Haired,the

of the trial in

Sea, him

the

Unhappy, the Lord deities arraignedto stand of the TranquilRiver of

Thrice

dry bed Heaven. And they took counsel, and fined him with a great fine. And, having shorn him of his it was hair,which was his beautyand his pride(for and hung below his knee), blue-black as an iris, from the heavenly they banished him for ever precincts. the

96


XI

OF

STORY So

descended

Susa

IMPETUOUS

THE

SUSA,

earth

to

by

the

Floating

Bridgewith bitterness in his heart,and for many he knew not whither. dayshe wandered in despair, By fair rice-fieldshe came, and by barren moors, heedingnothing; and at last he stayedto rest by the

side of the

river called

Hi,

is in the

which

land of Izumo. And and

sat, moody, his head on his down at the water, he beheld a he

as

looked

hand,

chop-

the surface of the stream. So on floating Susa, the Impetuous,arose saying, immediately, And he "There are peopleat the river head." pursuedhis way up the bank in quest of them.

stick

And an

when old

man

he had

not

gone

a

great way, he found

weepingand lamentingvery grievously,

the reeds and willows by the water-side. among And there was with him a ladyof great state and the daughterof a deity; but her like unto beauty, marred with many fair eyes were tears, and she And her hands. and wrung moaned continually them these twain had between a young maid of her face Susa very slender and delicate form ; but could not see, for she covered it with a veil. And ever or

and seemed

anon

to

beseech

pluckedthe lady by last but shook

and

she moved

the

old

man

the sleeve ;

their heads

fear, or earnestly,

trembled

at

with

which

and sorrowfully,

their lamentations. And Susa, full of wonder, drew art thou ? the old man, " Who

these

returned

to

near

and asked

"

And the old man answered, " I am This is my deityof the mountains. 97

earthly wife, who an

"


OF

STORY

SUSA,

THE

IMPETUOUS

xi

and the child is by the water-side, my youngest daughter." of him again, What And Susa inquired is the of your weeping and lamentation ? cause

with

weeps

me

"

"

And

he

sir,that I

answered, "Know,

deityof renown, earthly eightfairdaughters. But land,for every year

at

and a

I

the

was

it is

an

father of

horror broods

this time

am

over

the

ravagedby

monster, the eight-forked serpent of Koshi, that in the flesh of young delights virgins.In seven a

children been devoured. sweet years have my seven the time of my youngest-born is at hand. And now Therefore do we weep, O Thine Augustness." Then

said

Susa,the Impetuous, "

likeness of this

monster

?

the deities of the mountain

And

What

is the

"

made

answer

:

and red as the akakagachi (that fiery is,the winter cherry).He has but one body,with eightheads and eightscalytails. Moreover, on his body grows moss, together with the fir and the of the forest. In his going he covers cryptomeria and eighthills, and upon his under eightvalleys side he is red and gory." Then the Lord Susa, the Impetuous,cried, My lord,giveme thy daughter." And the earthly and deity, seeinghis strength and the brightness of his countenance, great beauty knew that he was all a god,and answered, With "

His

eyes

are

"

"

do

reverence

know

not

And

exile of

I offer her

unto

thee.

thine august name." Susa said," I am Susa, the

High

Heaven."

98

Howbeit, Sea

God,

I

the


a

a


STORY

XI

OF

the mountain

And

spoke,saying, "

So

IMPETUOUS

THE

SUSA,

deityand

also his fair wife

it.Thine

take Augustness,

be

the young maid." And immediatelySusa saw

And "

the face of his he

touched

her

the

on

in winter.

forehead, and

Fair and beloved,fair and belovedAnd the maid flushed faintly to

barefaced.

Howbeit,

had

she

little

.

.

enough Dear

for her

and

said,

."

stand

thus

need, for the

that stood in my

tears

"

the veil and

flungaway bride,paleas the moon

lord Susa's eyes were modesty. And he said

shall be our beautiful, pleasure

veil

again, hereafter,

may not tarry." So he took the young maid at once, and changed her into a crown Susa wore for his head. And

now

we

gallantly.And he instructed the earthly and together fold theybrewed saU^ refined eightdeity, the saki theyfilledeightvats and ; and with all was in readiness ; and when set them prepared there was a mighty theywaited. And presently

the

crown

noise,like the sound of

and earthquake,

an

the hills

valleysshook. And the serpent crawled in deities huge and horrible,so that the earthly sight,

and

hid their faces for fear.

gazedupon Now

But

the serpent with

the

mediatelyhe

serpent had head

Susa,the Impetuous, his sword

drawn.

eight heads, and into each

im-^

of sak^

vat dippeda drunken and drank long. Thereupon he becamA with the distilled liquor,and all the i^eads lay down and slept. Then the Lord Susa brandished his tfen-grasp and c^t off the sword, and leaptupon the monster

99


STORY

OF

eight heads

with

serpent

slain with

was

IMPETUOUS

THE

SUSA,

eightvaliant great

a

xi

strokes.

So

the

and slaying,

the

And flowed on, a river of blood. Susa the tails of the serpent also,and as he struck cut the fourth tail the edge of his august sword was river Hi

turned found as

a

he

So

probed with great jewelledsword with

known

no

the

back.

sword

Goddess,

smith and

his

sent

point,and blade sharp

its a

could temper it. And he took it for an offering to the Sun This

august sister.

is the

herb-

sword. quelling And the

built him Susa,the Impetuous,

placecalled Suga, and

bride.

And

curtain

round

the

clouds

Susa sang this song "

the

about

dwelt

of heaven

a

palaceat

there with

hung

palace. Then

his

like

a

the Lord

:

Many clouds arise. The manifold clouds fenceofthe forth-issuing Makes a manifold fence ^

For the spousesto be within. Ohy the mangold fence. .'* .

ICO

.


XII

It

from

Deity

a

was

IN

WIND

THE

So and

long

the

the

that

ago

knows

tortoise

said, "I

He

Reed

Plains.

Rice

Ears.

the

planted

the

It

sea

Then

Harima.

of the

way

the

But

there

grew,

Reed

beneath In

is

the

his

hand.

Floating

Lightly,

the

to

land

which

is

the

Fresh

of

sound

Province

High

to

the

satisfied."

am

the

in

again

up

I

within

Tree

of

Land

;

of

Land

of

Heaven

Floating Bridge.

was

spread

came

from

descended.

the

the

to

good

it,

earth.

the

Pine

of

right

come

a

deity

way

his

in

went

Pine

sweet

by

come

flourished.

Tree not

trunk

Its a

brown

nights hand

in

greater

a

Plains. it

Woods

he

only by hearsay

heavenly

have

I have

remember

cannot

crane

it

planted the at Takasaga,

he

And

the

that

Heaven

High

great-grandmother, the Lightly, lightly he came Bridge, bearing the tree lightly his feet touched

the

TREE

Tree.

Pine

by

PINE

THE

was

carpet of

lOI

all

to

Land

rosy of fallen

red,

the

of and

needles.

Children Pine

it

great

the

the

summer

in hand

So

Tree

of

by


THE

IN

WIND

PINE

THE

TREE

xii

their slim dark feet upon the moonlight,slipping and tossing back their longgreen hair. moss, The Children of the Water came by moonlight, all drenchingwet their sleeves,and the bright

dropsfellfrom

The

and

the

from

faces veiled and

theyhung

the Pine Tree

upon

all the

night. live-long crept up the yellow

confines of Yomi

the

came

"

grey forms,theycame, the air about the placewhere thin

so

was,

of

branches,and

Sounds and the Scents of the Dark

the Mysteries, with

Tree's

of the Sea Foam

Children

sands ; and

Pine

music

murmuring

Children

The finger-tips.

rested in the

the Air made

their

that the

placewas

holy and

haimted. the beach at Takasaga of Spirits hear the great company singing

Lovers would

wanderingupon

together. "Joy of

another, my heart,"they said to one " do you hear the wind in the Pine Tree ? and Poor souls lyingsick a-bed would listen, fishermen far out at sea would pause in their labour "

to

whisper,"The

Tree

for the

As

coming

of the

that she great-grandmother in Takasaga. The Maiden slender

;

in face and form

hung down to help her mother drew with

over

in

the

the

water

Maiden, the

Pine

! ** crane

it,but the tortoise has it of his

remember

cannot

wind

the

the sound carries

How

!

wind,

her ;

knees.

born of poor parents brown and tall and

was was

most

She

lovely.Her rose

at

dawn

hair to

she she found sticks for the fire,

She could spinand weave the well. the best ; and for long,long hours she sat

water

at

102


THE

XII

and

WIND

pliedher

IN

wheel

THE

PINE

TREE

her shuttle in the

or

of

shade

the great Pine Tree, whilst her ears heard the sound of the wind in its branches. her eyes Sometimes looked

out

and

waits

pathsof

the

over

watches.

She

than grave gay, seldom. Her voice was

the

as

sea,

calm,

was

who

one

restless,

not

she smiled not voice of a Heavenly

though

more

the

Being. concerningthe the crane of him province, the

is

crane

the streams

and

she says, when

slowlyin He

she

saw

rice-fields.

green

She

of valleys

the

the

The

upon

far

over flying so province,

was

the far

Youth

at

work

in the

lingered,circling

crane

stood up. tlie valleys and streams ; he

brightair.

looked round

looked into the

the

the

something,for

knows

great traveller.

a

from

Youth

Now

Youth

The

sky.

I hear the call,"he said. " I may tarry no longer. Voice in my heart,I hear and I obey." "

that he left the

With to

and

down

came

to

each

to

other.

his friends.

the The

unknown

sped the pathsof

flew behind

pushedthe strong wings. At

one last,

Youth rest

took

of them

a

boat

and

went

stood upon

the the

for many And the sea.

the white

when

the wind

failed,

the wind

of her

boat

the boat.

she

All

together, they seashore,weeping and clinging

away to sea, and the beach. On

well fare-

bade

and his father and his sistersand

his mother

his brothers

and rice-field,

And

boat forward

eveningabout 103

with

a

day over

the hour

crane

of sunset,


WIND

THE

sound

pathsof

boat,and and the

from

him

to

came

the

over

the

it travelled

stood up

He

strong white

her

in his

wings

the shore tillits keel touched

to

the sea-beach of had

Takasaga. ashore he pushed

come

and watched it the waves, The he turned his face inland.

the boat out

againwith

drift away.

Then

of music

still in his

was

was

like the voice of

and

were mystical

^^

xii

singing.The

sweet

land,and

sea.

beat

crane

the Youth

When

the

the

guidedhis boat yellowsand of

sound

of

heard the sound

the Youth

TREE

PINE

THE

IN

The

ears.

voice

HeavenlyBeing,and strange

a

the words

of the song

:

"

to his mistress^ a love gift brought yewelsofjadeupon a silken string ; fFe/l-^arvedJewelsj Well-roundedjewels,

The lover

Green

the grass

as

^

silken string.

Upon a know not one another The jewels The string theyknoWy ! Ohy the strength ofthe silkenstring y

"

The

Youth

Pine Tree and

went to

inland and

the Maid

that

came

sat

to

the

great

beneath,weaving

and singing. The crane came diligently flying with her strong white wings,and perched upon The the Tree^s topmost branches. tortoise lay below

the

on

brown

carpet of

He

his little eyes, but he said nothing, beingvery silent by nature. The Youth stood before the Maiden, waiting.

watched

and

saw

much

with

needles.

104


WIND

THE

XII

Whence

"

eyes. "I

come

And

"

That

she said,lifting up her the

across

I have

path.

sea

afar." wherefore

"

**

TREE

PINE

THE

you ?

come

have from

come

IN

voice that sang in my

"

best,seeingit was

know

must

you

you ?

came

your

heart." "

she said. ? bringme the gift Indeed, I bringyou the completegift, jewels of jadeupon a silken string." Do

"

you

"

Come," she said,and

"

the hand.

And

made

were

theywent

they drank

So

the

tranquillity many, AH

by

Times

Three," and

lived

in

sweet

years. dwelt

crane

branches,and

topmost

him

took

her father's house.

wife, and

many

the time the

to

Three

"

and

man

and

rose

the

in the Pine

tortoise

on

Tree's

the

brown

once

were,

carpet of needles below. last the Youth

At

and Maiden, that

white-haired,old, and

became

withered, by

swift,relentless passage of years. Fair love,"said the old man, "

It is sad

!

grow

Say

"

the old

not

dear "

woman

;

how

I

weary

be old."

to

so,

"

the

say

delightof not

heart,"said

my

so, the best

of all is

to

come." "

to

see

listen

" I have a desire the old man, great Pine Tree before I die, and to the song of the wind in its to more

My dear,"said the once

branches." "

by

Come, then,"she said,and

the hand. 105

rose

and

took

him


THE

WIND

IN

PINE

THE

and faint and worn, with steps,and hand in hand theycame.

Old

I

faint I

How

"

afraid !

am

hand.

"

"

dark

layon the soft brown boughs ; and the wind

She

who

his love

was

and sheltered him.

him

Hold

lie

There,

stilland listen

love ; be the Pine Tree."

Tree's

Ah,

"

man.

you

my

."

down, dear He

old

it is !

I have it fast in mine.

"

xii

feeble, tottering

grow,"said the

How

TREE

to

down, lie

the wind

bed beneath

in

the Pine

sang. his wife

and

bent

over

he suffered the great

And

change. opened his eyes and looked at her. She was and slender, tall and straight in face and form most and each of them was lovely, young as the gods are young. He his hand and put out Your touched ." he her. long black hair Then

he

"

.

.

said. Once

more

she

bade

him,

"

Come."

Lightly

theyleft the ground. To the sound of the wind's music theyswayed,theyfloated, theyrose into the air. Higher theyrose and higher. The branches of the Pine Tree received them, and theywere no seen.

more

Still,in the Children Pine

Tree

feet upon

of the Woods

come

hand

the

summer,

in hand

to

the

by moonlight,slippingtheir slim dark the moss, and tossingback their long

green hair. The Children all

nights of

sweet

drenchingwet

of the Water their 1

06

by moonlight, sleeves,and the bright come


THE

XII

WIND

dropsfallfrom

IN

their

PINE

THE

TREE

The finger-tips.

of

Children

the Air rest in the Pine

murmuring sands

;

music

of the

Children

and

Tree's branches,and make all the live-long night. The

from

the Mysteries,

Sea

creep up the yellow the confines of Yomi the come

Sounds

with faces veiled and and

theyhang

the

Pine

Tree

Foam

upon

and the Scents of the Dark

"

thin grey forms, theycome, the air about the placewhere

is,so

that

the

placeis holy and

haunted. Lovers

wanderingupon

the beach

Takasaga of Spirits hear the great company singing together. "Joy of my heart,"they say to one another, "

do you hear the wind

in the Pine

107

at

Tree

i"


XIII

FLOWER

Aya,

maid,

sweet

the

Province

her

father

was

at

with

at

the

was

was

the

and

of

had

she

Shogun, he

capital, or

armies

child

and

lord

of the

Court

only

Mother

noble

a

PEONY

THE

of Omi.

the

affairs

OF

his

He

weighty and

here

went

overcame

had

he

of

and

none,

warrior.

a or

daimyo

a

enemies.

there

Aya

saw

little of him.

Long maidens

walls

High

was

flowers

lotus

the

foray, and

she

in as

the

"

My

Child,

Sixteen

which

moat

castle. and

was

at

with

rosy

month.

was

sixteen

some

years from victorious

home her

maidens

dressed

father,'* she

and

to

her

in

old

him

meet

bravest, and

said,

"

is

sweet

your

return." how

said, astonished. "

was

father's

her

her

rank.

lord

honourable "

She

her

became

with

and

nurse

well-guarded,

seventh

went

gate.

of

and

Lady Aya daimyo came

her

with

walls

they deep

all the

father

her

a

the

When

dwelt

the

were

foot

their

she

years within

years

you "

How

have old

are

old, lord," she io8

!

grown you,

said.

"

father

her

Aya

f

"

a


FLOWER

XIII

THE

OF

PEONY

all the

gods,you arc become a littlegreat a baby and young lady,and I thought you were broughtyou home a doll for a home-coming gift." He laughed, but presentlyafterwards grew into the castle. grave, and in deep thoughthe went Soon after this he began to look about him, to husband for his daughter. find a fitting "

By

"

Best it should be done

wonder

has

the land

daimyoin

every

at

am

and it will

"

a

peace with last."

not

of Ako, in Harima, had

Lord

The

pass, and I

to

come

now," he said,'* for

three, tall

and warriors all. young men The eldest is over old,"said the Lord

sons, fine "

"

The

youngest is a It

brother ?

do well.

should are

best,"said So

Lady

"

to

seems

set

The

the Lord

there

eyes

sat

with

on

the

man

come

the

brother

thoughts

and

gone, the Lord of young

in rejoicing and

all the

the maiden

had

another.

one

came

the

great

was

Lady Aya

presents that She

say that- second of Omi.

They

for all country-side, never

that the middle

me

after messengers had Aya was betrothed to

Ako, and

of the middle

but what

boy

of Omi.

very gladwhen she saw the from her bridegroom's house.

was

of the castle and

seamstress

the soft stuffsof her fine new

robes.

For

fingered the rest,

playedwith her maidens the live-long day,or took her broidery frame, plyingthe needle and long silken thread. It was the month of May, and very often they took the air in a gardengallery, where and Aya and her maids laughed together, sometimes they spoke of the young Lord of Ako she

109


xiii

and beautiful he was, how in war, rich. When and how

and how

brave

and

art

PEONY

THE

OF

FLOWER

skilful in

evening

the gallery down theyslipped steps and into garden,where they went hither and thither,

came

the

hand, to enjoythe

hand

in

scent

of the flowers.

cool

air and

walked

One

nightthe Lady Aya The to her wont. according

moon

the

in the

sweet

garden

rose, round

and

silver.

"Ah

mc," sighed one

is

moon

a

love-lorn

she goes, and

lady.

she will hide her eyes with

now

even

of the maidens, "the Look how paleand wan

long sleeve of cloud." You speaksooth,"returned Aya,

her

"

"

the

moon

her faint you seen " sister who is sadder and fairer than she ? " " Who, then,is the moon's sister ? asked all the maidens at once. come.** Aya said," Come and see

is

love-lorn

a

lady;

but

have

"

along the pathsof the dancing the gardento the stillpond,where were fireflies and the frogs that sang musically.Holding them

that she drew

With

looked down into each other's hands,the maidens the water, and one and all they beheld the moon's

and they laughed softly sister, together. While they playedby the water's brim, the Lady Aya's foot

stone, and most assuredly have fallen into the pond. But all of a

slipped upon

she would

a

smooth

youth leaptforward out of the sweet and caught her in his arms. secrecy of the night, For a moment all the maidens beheld the glimmer Then he was of his garments. Aya stood gone. sudden

a

no


FLOWER

XIII

THE

OF

alone, trembling. Down

gazed the

eyedand sorrowful ; and sweet, upwardsgazedthe saw

a

PEONY

still more moon's

band of silent maidens

who

widesorrowful and moon,

palesister. They stood in

a

ness wilder-

of

blossomingpeony flowers,that grew the Lady Aya who water's edge. It was them

and had them

to

the

loved

so. planted

lady turned without a word and moved along the pathsof the gardenvery slowly, she came to the garden hangingher head. When she left all her maidens save gallery one, and went to her bower. silently for a longspace, saying There she was nothing. the

Now

She the was

sat

and

traced

the

pattern

on

her

robe with

point of her finger.And Sada, her maiden, her. over against said Aya. At length, He was a great lord," "

"

Truth, lady."

"

He

was

"

He

was

"

Alas ! he saved my

thank "

young.'* well-favoured." passing and I had life,

not

time

to

hini." The

shone

moon

upon

the

jewelled mounting

of his sword." "

his robe that

And

flowers

"

my

peony

broidered with

was

hour

very late."

"

Lady,the

"

Well, then, imtie my

''

You

"

Small

"

Lady,what

of Ako

"

What

not

look

peony

flowers." grows

girdle."

pale,lady."

marvel, I

weary."

am

of the young Lord of him ? Why, I have Ill

seen

?" him.


FLOWER

Enough,

let be

drowsy,I

know

OF no

"

PEONY

THE

of him.

more

xiii

Alas ! I

am

I

what

say." Lady Aya, that had been of the so fresh and fair and dancinggay as a wave pale melancholy. By day she sea, fell into a sighed,and by night she wept. She smiled no she beheld her rich wedding-garments, more as and she would not playany more with her maidens like a upon the garden gallery.She wandered And in her bower. all shadow, or layspeechless After this

the

wise

not

night the

and

men

were country-side

all the able

not

wise *

to

women

heal her

of that of her

sickness. Then

Sada, weeping and hidingher the Lord of the her sleeve,went to

the maid

face with

told him

and

House

of the

moonlightadventure

and the fair youthof the peony "

Ah

me,"

she

said, "

my

bed. mistress

sweet

pines

and dies for the love of this beautiful young man." " " how you talk ! My Child,"said the daimyOy

daughter's gardenis well guardedby walls and by that any stranger It is not possible men-at-arms. should

and

moon

it.

enter

What, then, is

samurai

a

in peony

this tale of the

garments

and

all

of other foolishness, and how will such tale sound in the ears of the Lord of Ako ? " manner

Sada

But

wept

said,"My

and

a

mistress will

die." to flatterat Court fightin the field, said to speak in Council, all these are easy," daimyOy but preserve me from the affairsof "

To

"

women,

for

theyare

too

hard for me." 112

and the

my


xiii

FLOWER

OF

PEONY

THE

search of all the castle that he made With a but not a trace did he find and the castle grounds, of any stranger in hiding. for That nightthe Lady Aya called piteously to her the cooler air,so they bore her out on A where she layin O Sada's arms. gardengallery, took his biwa^ and to minstrel of the household

soothe her he made "

this song

:

Music ofmy lute Is it born^does it die^ "

Is it truth

or

a

lie?

W hence y whence and where ^

Enchanted air ? Music ofmy lute Is mute. **

Sweet scents in the night do theyseem^ Do they floaty "

theyessence ofdream^ said Or thus are they The thoughts ofthe Dead? Sweet scents in the night Delightr

Are

Now, while the minstrel sang and touched his the rosy sea a fair youthstood up from instrument,

peoniesby the pond. All there saw him clearly, his brighteyes, his sword, and his dress broidered with flowers. The Lady Aya gave a wild cry and to the edge of the gardengallery, ran holdingout of

her

white

arms.

immediatelythe

And "3

vision I


and sang

more

once

Love

"

PEONY

xiii

minstrel took

the

But

passedaway.

THE

OF

FLOWER

up

his biwa

:

strangethan death

more

"

than Is it longer

life^ ? Is ithotter than strife Strongs strongand blind^ kind Transcending Love

more

"

strangethan death

Or breath:'

stood

eyes

mysteriousknightof the flowers and his shining and tall, againstraight fixed upon the Lady Aya. of the daimyo^ of the company a gentleman

this the

At

once were

Then who

forthwith

do battle with his master's

the

across

sudden The

was

face

moon's

at

if

as

his sword

a

cloud drew

from

of

a

the south.

the garden gallery, while their garments together

the

the peony troubled sea, and the

sleeves floated out.

tossed about

that

and by faery,

blew

wind

upon

held their

long gossamer bed

daughter. And

great hot

a

drew

amongst the peoniesto the bold stranger that so gazedupon

lightsdied

maidens

of war,

mighty man and leaptdown

a

was

like

a

All

petalsflew like foam. A mist, over-sweet, hung upon the wind, so that there grew faint and clung to one all who were another,trembling. When recovered,they found the they were The soldier undimmed. nightstilland the moon stood pantingand white as of the daimyo^s company

pink and damp and

white

114


FLOWER

XIII

death

righthand a

steps of the

the

at

I have

escape

garden gallery.In

shouted

he

I have him Give

Aya said, "

it her without

sword, in his

his left

flower.

him,"

me.

Then

PEONY

he held his unstained

perfect peony "

THE

OF

a

Aya

the flower

word,

**

he

"

; and

could

not

fast."

me as

in

one

her

to

went

;

he gave

dream.

a

bower

and

sleptwith

the peony upon her breast and was satisfied. For nine daysshe kept the flower. The sweet colour

She

her

face,and

healed perfectly

was

She not

to

came

set

the

peony

droop or fade,but

all the nine

ridingin great long-promised lady. in the midst

a

grew

the

thrown

bronze

and it did

vase

largerand

more

lovely

same

the young

Lord

of Ako

and state to claim his pomp So he and the Lady Aya were

of much

Howbeit, they say And

in

days.

came

wed

her eyes.

lightto

of her sickness.

the end of this time

At

the

day

she

and rejoicing. feasting but a pale bride. made

the peony

away.

"5

withered

and

was


XIV

MALLET

THE

There

and

plant

to

backs

thousand

a

when

sickle

poured down their digging rain

straw

they

eat

The

From

a

had

and

too,

with

his

all

cup

for

bread.

elder

of the

and

a

had

not

a

year

his

rice, and

with of

tea

beggar

there

for

a

be so

He

money.

but

he

that

much

wayfarer, His

ii6

He "

as

a

or

a

children

did

and

believed.

Cho. rich.

a

big

well, what

his

granaries

of

show

to

was

good

cake

him,

had

nothing

was

did

with

way

silk-worms,

But

not

man.

of

mint

a

brows

passing

was

at

rice-

called

was

saving

a

in their

of their

he

hard

rain

still

were

up

brothers

so

had

by

they

sweat

two

laboured he

the

in

this, if it will

man

sour a

for

their

boy

there

the

when

;

like, huddled

such

or

shone

sun

torrents,

storehouses.

and for

in

put

farm,

hot

seed-time

in

knee-deep in their rice, bending the ; they wielded

hour

an

were

stood

young

times

coats,

he

all

For

the

the

hard

They

out

who

men

worked

harvest-time.

in

water

of them

Both

brothers.

farmer

two

once

were

a

day cold

whimpered

mean, "

and rice

when


THE

XIV

he

came

MALLET

them, and his wife

near

much

was

be

to

pitied. The Kan^. as

For

mouse.

died,and

spiteof

this he

was

brothers

two

all he laboured

church

a

of the

younger

hard he

so

called

was was

as

poor his his worms silkwas luck, his rice would flourish. In not Bad

a

merry

fellow,a bachelor who His roof, cup of saki.

song and an honest his pipe,his meagre supper, all these he would with the first-comer. He had share,very gladly,

loved

a

tongue for

nimblest

the

a

comical

kindest heart in the world.

But

joke,and

it is a true

the

thing,

cannot though it is a pityall the same, that a man live on love and laughter, Kan^ was and presently

in

a

bad way. "There's

nothing for it,''he says, "but pride (forhe had some) and go "

pocketmy

"

to

and

my brother Cho will do for me, and I'm mistaken if it will be much." greatly clothes from a friend for So he borrows some see

what

off in very neat hakama^ looking gentleman,and singinga song to keep

and the visit,

quite the

sets

his heart up. He sees his brother

standingoutside

and

he

the

first minute

Cho boggart, he singsout,

is in such "

You're

You're

"

May

"

Yes," says Cho,

I

come

he

raggedgear. Cho." early,

Kane," early,

"

thinks

you

can

a

bit ? ;

But

seeinga presently

"

asks Kani.

but you won't

to eat at this time of day, nor anything be avoided." so let disappointments

117

is

says Cho.

in and talk "

his house,

yet

to

find

drink,


THE

Very well,"

"

not

food Fvc When

on

the

come

says Kane for."

xiv

;

"

as

inside the

they were

it

happens,it's

house

says, "That's

Cho

mats,

clothes

MALLET

and

sitting

fine suit

a

of

You be must you, Kane. doingwell. It'snot me that can afford to go about the muddy roads dressed up like a prince. Times bad, very bad." are

youVe got

on

spiteof this not being a good beginning, Kane plucks up his courage and laughs. And he says : presently In

here, brother.

Look

"

clothes,my

will

own

These

borrowed

are

hardlyhold together. My

rice crop was ruined,and my silk-worms I have not a rin to buy rice seed or new at

am

end, and

wits'

my

I have

dead.

are

I

worms.

to

come

you For have the sake of it. the begging, now you that bore us both, give me mother handful of a seed and a few silk-worms' eggs." so

this Cho

At

astonishment *'

Alack

made

and

!

as

if he

faint with

would

dismay.

Alack

!

"

he

says.

Must

I

"

am

I rob

a

poor wife and

very poor man. my " And thus he bewailed my miserable children ? himself and talked for half an hour. a

man,

But

out

make

long story short,Cho

says that and because of the blessed mother of filial piety, to

of them

a

both, he

must

make

shift to

giveKane

the

silk-worms' eggs and the rice. So he gets a handful of dead eggs and a handful of musty and mouldy rice.

"

These

the old fox

to

are

no

good to

himself,and ii8

he

man

or

beast," says

laughs.

But

to

his


THE

XIV

MALLET

blood-brother

It's says, "Here, Kani. the best silk-worms* eggs I am givingyou, and the best rice of all my poor store, and I cannot afford

own

it at all ; and may

he

the

poor wife and my children." Kani thanks his brother with

my

for

me godsforgive

robbing

all his heart for

his great generosity, and bows his head to the mats three times. Then off he goes, with the silk-worms' and jumping eggs and the rice in his sleeve,skipping with joy,for he thought that his luck had turned at

last.

careful

was

in the

But

hold

to

muddy parts of

the

his hakama^ for

up

road

he

theywere

borrowed. he reached home

When

he

of green mulberryleaves. that were going to dead eggs. silk-worms that

was

lost

no

And to

he

sat

for the silkworms be hatched out of the This

was

and waited

down

And

come.

gatheredgreat store

for the

theydid,too, and

come

dead very strange, because the eggs were The lot ; silk-worms were a lively eggs for sure. and theyate the mulberryleaves in a twinkling, into

time

that

cocoons

happy

man.

fortune

to

all,but began to wind

at

He all the

went

his mistake.

who

did his rounds to

take

out

and

Kan^

was

told

his

neighbours. This

made

message

Then

minute.

to

And

he

found

themselves

was a

the

good

where

he

peddlarman

in those parts,and gave him a his brother Cho, with his compliments

thanks,that the silk-worms respectful were doing uncommonly well. This was where he made a biggermistake. It was a pityhe could and

not

let well done. 119


THE When

MALLET of his brother's luck

heard

Cho

he

pleased.Prettysoon

not

sandals and he

when He

he

when

got there,but Cho

themselves

took

a

have

he

When

Kanfe

as

many before.

the silk-worms When

Cho

silk-worms

own

cut

every

to

to

his head

and

for that.

care

And

of them

one

And

a

bit queer.

he

says. Then

that

mulberryleaves. and

to

there

up the

ate

just

were

spinningaway was

there

as

very strange, because

dead for sure. heard of this he goes and were

in two

throw

with

them

away

sowed

a

chopshis

sharpknife

next

;

but he

silk-worms as

dead, and

rice-field. 120

his

morning.

the young

as

Kane's

never

the rice seed that he had

his brother,and when

and settled on

he

out

rice

green as you pleasehe plantedit out and soon care, and it flourished wonderfully, formed in the ear. rice was of swallows One day an immense flight up

in

says, "It almost of them has been cut in

silk-worms

After this Kan^ from

out

was

! away home, the bad man look after his silk-worms he

gainednothing by that,for the moved again,but stayedas dead wife had

not

straw

silk-worms.

goes and gathersa great lot of And all those half silk-worms set mulberry leaves, and after that were

Kan^

was

beginning to spin he neat as you please,

appears as though each half. They seem dead," he

twice

his

on

help thinkingtheylooked

not

scratches

He

as

and

went

came

he

they were

sharp knife Then

did the

at

into cocoons,

two.

could

look

a

how

saw

tied

off to Kane's farm.

was

to

went

xiv

came

with the

came


MALLET

THE

XIV

"

!"

! Arah

Arah

He

shouted.

Kane

clapped

So stick. his hands and beat about with a bamboo In two flew away. minutes back the swallows

theycame. !*'Kane

! Arah

**Arah

and

his hands

beat about

shouted,and with

flew away.

So the swallows

he

clapped

his bamboo

stick.

In two

minutes

shouted.

He

back

theycame. "

! '' Kane

I Arah

Arah

beat about

and

his hands

with In

flew away.

So the swallows

clapped stick.

his bamboo

back

minutes

two

theycame. time, "

This

scared them

he had

When

into

grows

minutes back

he says. habit,**

a

the swallows

came

for the ninth

and wipes tenegui

takes his

Kane

away

face.

his

But

in two

for the tenth time.

"

Kanfe shouted, and he chased hill and dale,hedge and ditch,rice-field them over till at last theyflew away from and mulberry-field,

"

Arah

!

Arah

!

sight,and he found himself in a mossy dell shaded by spreading Being very tired pine trees. with running he lies down his full lengthupon and snoring. fallsfast asleep the moss, and presently He that he dreamed. The next thing was

his

thoughthe saw for mossy glade, well

where

he

and there among as

a

troop of children

in his dream

had

very children fluttered here

butterflies. One

or

dancingbare

long,loose and black the plum blossom.

;

feet ; their hair their skins

121

the

he remembered

trunks. They pine-trees*

the

pretty as flowers

them

The

was.

to

come

were

and

were

all of

hung down, white

like


MALLET

THE For

" "

seen

them

there

the

upon

!"

Leader

or

children made

The sat

for evil,"says Kan^ the fairies*children."

good

I have

himself,

ground in

a

and dancing, ring. Leader ! "

Fetch us the mallet." Then beautiful boy, about fourteen or

a

up

to

end of their

an

theycried.

rose

xiv

"

fifteen years old,the eldest and the tallest there. He lifted a mossy stone quiteclose to Kane's head. Underneath

was

a

plainlittlemallet

of white wood.

it up and went and stood within the circle of children. He laughedand cried," Now

The

boy

what

took

will you

have ?

kite,

"A

"

kite,"

a

calls

out

of

one

the

children.

boy shakes

The

the mallet,and lo and behold of it I a great kite with a tail

he shakes

a

kite out

it,and

a

good ball

to

"

what

Now

of twine

else ?

and

"Battledore

"

"

as

asks the

shuttlecock

well.

boy. for me,"

says

a

little girl.

And

sure

the best,and and

enough there theyare, a battledore of meetly feathered twenty shuttlecocks,

gilded. what

"

Now

"

A

"

Greedy !

"

this

says the

boy.

lot of sweets." "

mallet,and there "

else ? " says the are

boy, but

he

shakes

the

the sweets.

red crepe frock and a brocade c?^/." Miss Vanity!" says the boy,but he shakes all A

gravelyout

of the mallet.

Books, story books." "That's better,"says "

122

the

boy, and

out

come


MALLET

THE

XIV

and score, all open

by the dozen lovelypictures.

the books the

show

the children had their hearts'desires,

Now, when the leader

to

put away

beneath

the mallet

its mossy

time they stone, and after theyhad playedfor some tired ; their bright attires melted became away and their of the the into wood, gloom pretty then

voices grew distant and It was very still.

Kan^

awoke, good

darkness

and

mossy stone and there was

heard

were

found

and

man,

no

the

fall. There

beginningto rightunder his

hand.

more.

He

set

sun

the

was

lifted it,

the mallet.

said Kane, takingit up, " beggingthe pardon of the fairies'children,I'll make bold to

Now,"

"

and

sleeve

spent

a

in his

took it home

he

So

that mallet."

borrow

pleasanteveningshakinggold

it,and saki^ and new clothes,and farmers' tools,and musical instruments,and who of

piecesout

what

knows

^1 !

he believe that pretty soon farmer in all that the richest andjolliest became Sleek and fat he grew, and his heart country-side.

It is

not

hard

biggerand

was

But

what

kinder

like

of all this ?

wind turned

green

to

with

than

was

Ay,

ever.

Cho's

there's the

envy,

as

mallet,too,"he fairy nothing. Why should that have all the good fortune ? have

a

"

says,

123

"

he

got

question.Cho I'll and be rich for

as

green

grass.

"

idiot

Kane spendthrift So he goes and begs his brother giveshim

his brother,which a good sackful. willingly,

rice from

very

heart when

And

he waits

for


MALLET

THE

xiv

ripen,quitewild with impatience.It ripens of swallows sure enough,and sure enough a flight and settles upon the good grainin the ear. comes shouted Cho, clappinghis Arah ! Arah I aloud for joy. The swallows hands and laughing it to

"

"

flew away, and Cho hill and them over

after them.

was

He

dale, hedge and

chased

ditch,rice-

till at last they flew away mulberry-field, and he found himself in a mossy his sight, shaded by spreadingpine-trees.Cho looks

fieldand from dell

about him. should

This

"

and

lies down one

place,"says he. So he one wily eye shut and

be the with

waits

wily eye

open. who should Presently

fairies*children ! moved "

Up

! Fetch

as

they

the mallet,"they steppedthe leader and lifted away the behold

And

stone.

mossy

the dell but the

Very fresh they were trunks. pine-tree

the among Leader I Leader

cried.

tripinto

us

there

was

no

mallet

there !

the fairies*children became

Now

very angry.

stampedtheir littlefeet,and cried and rushed

They wildly to and fro,and were because the mallet altogether "

See," cried the leader

old farmer Let

us

man

pullhis

With

a

; nose

shrill

he

must

beside was

at

themselves

gone.

last, "

have taken

see our

this

ugly

mallet.

for him." the

scream

fairies*children

set

They pinched him, and pulledhim, upon Cho. and buffeted him, and set their sharpteeth in his Worst of all,they flesh till he yelledin agony. 124


THE

XIV

laid hold of his and

longer.

MALLET

and

nose

pulledit. Long

It reached

his waist.

it grew,

It reached

his

feet.

theylaughed,the fairies'children I theyscamperedaway like fallen leaves before

Lord, how Then

the wind. and sighed,

Cho

he

and groaned,

he cursed,and

he swore,

but for all that his

shorter.

So, sad and sorry, he gatheredit up

his

hands

two

"

and how

;

he

kind

was

yet he

went

not

was

inch

an

in

Kane's house.

to

very sick,"says he.

Kanfe,I am Indeed,so

"

nor

and

nose

I

see,"says Kane,

did you catch it ?

that he never

"

a

ness terrible sick-

"

he says. And so laughedat Cho*s nose,

never

smiled,but there

were

tears

in

his eyes at his brother's misfortunes. Then Cho's heart melted and he told his brother all the tale, he

and

never

kept back

how

about

the dead

silk-worms'

other

thingsthat

have been

Kane

to

"

him forgive

and

to

he

mean

had

been

eggs, and about the told of. And he asked

helphim.

you stilla minute," says Kan^. goes to his chest,and he bringsout

Wait

He mallet.

Cho's

And

long

the

he rubs it very gently up and down nose, and sure enough it shortened up

very quickly.In two minutes it was a natural size. Cho danced for joy. looks at him and says, " If I were Kane you, home and be different." rd justgo try to Cho had gone, Kan^ sat stilland thought When for he

a

long time.

went

out

and

When took

the the 125

moon

mallet

rose

that

night

with

him.

He


THE to

came

the

mossy

MALLET dell

pine trees, and spreading old placeunder the stone. **

be

Fm

the last

man

to the unfriendly

xiv

that

was

shaded

he laid the mallet

in the

in its

world/* he said,

fairies*children/*

126

with

"

to


The

Bell

of

Dojoji.-P.

127.


XV

DOJOJI

OF

BELL

THE

but old in years hours he read scholarship. Every day for many of the Good Law and Books the Great never Anchin

monk

The

holiness

in

he

;

countenance

his

smile

an a

to

He

angel's.

of

monastery

mystic

the

his

old

"My sandals

a

with

the

strictest

his an

upon son, to

bind your

errand your

a

sent

day

of

mercy. fast sandals

girdle, take 127

your

hat

autumn

;

like in

men

learned

was

bound content, trees

and

streams.

in

the

;

he

was

of the

smooth

was

pine

great

water

Abbot,

He but

His

holy

where

the

on

in

of

score

vows,

of

as

voice

Gods.'*

running happened that

man,

a

the

shade

his

;

mountains, of

and

pool

Buddha

dwelt

Way by the the

in

it

Now

Anchin

of

brown

a

as

acquainted

was

meditations.

ivory

as

of the

sound

the

"

order

rejoicing the

white

that

was

He

prayers. of sublime

deep

were

eyes

his

long

was

him.

to

in but old young years his body under by fastingsand

blessedness

the

hard

not

were

was

kept

and

watchings with

Anchin

monk

The

in

young

characters

hard

and

wearied,

was

spring-time, monk

young And and and

he tie

your

said, spare staff


THE

DOjOjI

OF

BELL

xv

and your rosary and begging bowl, for you have and stream, and across mountain far to go, over the

great plain." Anchin

So the monk "

My son," the

do you

the

ready. said, if any wayfarer

Abbot

"

not kindness,forget

a

him

commend

to

him

to

so

he

the space of nine existences." I will remember," said the monk, and

gods for "

set

made

his way. mountain and

forth upon Over

he

and as he passed, his spirit and went was wrapped in contemplation, he recited the Holy Sutras aloud in a singing voice. stream

Birds called and twittered from branch to branch of the tall trees,the birds that One beloved of Buddha. bird chanted the are the

And

Wise

of grandScripture

the Nicheten,the Praise of the Sutra of the Lotus, of the Good Law, and the for he other bird called upon his Master's name, cried "

:

thou

O

Mind Compassionate

!"

Mind monk

The he said. And

the

smiled. bird

Mind Mind

I

I

Sweet

"

answered, "

.

.

O

and "

thou

O

happy bird," thou

passionate Com-

Compassionate

"

When the plain, blue and

the monk sun

was

Anchin

weary, Mere, where

came

high in the

goldenflowers

the noon-tide very

O thou Compassionate

!

of the

to

the

great

heavens,and all the plainlanguishedin

heat. The monk likewise became and when he beheld the Marshy were

bulrush 128

and

sedge that

cooled


THE

XV

DOjOjI

OF

BELL

he

their feet in the water, under a sycamore tree

laid him

that grew

down

to

rest

by the Marshy

Mere. Over

and upon the farther side of it haze. glittering

the

mere

there

hung a Long did the monk Anchin lie ; and as he lay he looked through the glittering haze,and as he looked the haze quiveredand moved and grew and At gatheredupon the farther side of the mere. the last it drew into a slender column of vapour, and forth a very dazzling out of the vapour there came woven, robe of green and gold,intera lady. She wore and goldensandals on her slender feet. In hands

her

jewellike

jewels

were a

"

star.

Her

in each

hair

was

hand

bright

one

tied with

a

braid

and she had a crown of scarlet flowers. of scarlet, the Marshy Mere. She came, She came, skirting glidingin and out of the bulrush and the sedge. In the silence there could be heard the rustle of her green skirt upon the green grass. The monk stumbled to his feet Anchin he trembling, Nearer

and

leaned nearer

the against came

the

sycamore

and,

tree.

lady,tillshe

stood

before Anchin and looked into his eyes. With the jewel that was in her righthand she touched his forehead and his lips. With the jewelthat was in her left hand she touched his rice-straw hat and his staff and his rosary and his begging bowl. After this she had him safe in thrall. Then the blew a tress of her hair across his face,and when he felt it he gave one sob. For the rest of his journey the monk went as a

wind

129

K


THE in

man on

Once

dream.

a

threw

horseback

begging bowl

OF

BELL

rich

woman

a

xv

traveller

silver coin

a

once

;

a

DOJOJI

riding

into Anchin*s

gave

him

a

piece

of cake made of millet ; and once a littleboy knelt of his sandal that had down and tied the fastening But each time the monk become loose. passedon for he forgot without the a word, to commend souls of these

for the space of In the tree-topsthe Wise nine existences. Birds of Buddha sang for him no more, only from the heard the cry of the HototqgisUy thicket was the bird lovelorn and forsaken.

compassionateones

Nevertheless, well errand of mercy another way.

Howbeit,

sweet

he

had

in which

The

Mere. him

and

no

Great

longer;

no

performedhis the monastery by

ill,he

or

returned

to

peace left him from the hour the lady of the Marshy seen of the Good

Books more

was

he

sufficed

Law

with acquainted

His heart blessedness of divine meditations. hot within him ; his eyes burned and his soul was longedafter the ladyof the green and goldenrobe. the

and he murmured She had told him her name, !" it in his sleep." Kiohim^ Kiohime Waking, he repeated it instead of his prayers to the great "

"

of the brethren,who and said," Is our brother mad scandal

whisperedtogether ?"

lengthAnchin went to the good Abbot, and ear pouredforth all his tale in a passionof mingled love and grief, humbly askingwhat he At in his

must

do. The Abbot

said,"Alack, my 130

son,

now

you


THE

XV

BELL

suffer for sin committed Karma

in

needs be worked

must

Not

very great strait." " Are you angry with "

former

a

life,for

out."

asked him, " Then is it past help? " that,"said the Abbot, " but you are in

Anchin "

DOJOJI

OF

Nay,

forbid, my

Heaven

**Then

what

?"

me

I do ?

must

said Anchin.

poor son." "

Fast and pray, and for a penance ice-cold water of our mountain torrent

stand in the

"

sunrise and

hour

an

purged from

a

hour

an

at

Thus

at sunset.

carnal affection and

shall you be escape the perils

of illusion." fasted and

So Anchin

body,and ice-cold

hour

after hour of the

water

breast. He could not faithful to his love. brethren

monk he a

Anchin,

bewitched

he

did

as

like flames. be faithful to

was

by a

fox

learned

so

a

or

trouble

raged his

wondered, "What

who

ghost he

a

His

battle

A

in the

penance

Wan

torrent.

grew, and his eyes were leave him. would not

The

he scourgedhis prayed,

badger,or

and

vows

can

and

in his

so can

ail the

holy "

is

he have

devil ? " But

the Abbot

Now

on

a

said,

hot

"

Let be."

night of

the monk

summer,

in his cell, he was visited by being sleepless The Kiohim6, the magic lady of the mere. moonlightwas on her hands and her long sleeves. Her robe was ; golden green and gold,interwoven were

her

sandals.

scarlet and adorned

hair

Her

was

braided

with scarlet flowers. 131

with


"

DOJOJI

OF

BELL

THE

Long, long have

xv

for thee

I waited

the

on

she said. The nightwind sighsin the plains," sedge the frogs sing by the Marshy Merc. "

"

Come, lord. But "

he

that I have vowed I keep faith and that I love.

cried,"My

^alas! the

love

the loyalty,

come." She

"'*

"

"

bird in my

smiled, May "

bosom

not

that she liftedthe monk

?"

I may

...

said,and with

she

Anchin

not

in her

arms.

all his strength tore he, gathering together,

But

himself from

fled from

her and

bareheaded

and

through the flying, the

where

vows

air

was

he

the

went,

footed place. Bare-

robe

his white

halls of the monastery, heavy with incense and sweet dark

rested upon with prayers, where the goldenAmida her lotus,ineffably smiling. He leapedthe grey from her shrine and stone steps that led down

gained the pine

trees

he fled on

the

and the

mountain

path.

Down,

down

Kiohim6

pursuing. As for her, her feet never the ground, and she spread her green like wings. Down, down gether, they fled to-

touched sleeves

and

so

close

was

she behind

felt her breath upon

monk "

As

a

young

rough way,

him

the

nymph

that the

his neck.

she goddess,

is fleetof foot

.

." "

he moaned. At

last

they came

Dojoji,which

was

to

upon

the famed the

temple of plains. By this

Anchin sobbed and staggered as he ran ; his knees failed him and his head swam. " I am lost,"he cried," for a hundred exist132


ences.*'

But

with

DOjOjI

OF

BELL

THE

XV

that

he

bell of

Dojojithat hung but a ground. He cast himself down it,and

so

Then the did

Kiohim6,

moonlight shone not sigh, nor cry,

stood

still for

great

littleway and

a

the

Merciless

her

upon

temple

from

the

crept beneath

himself sheltered and

deemed came

the

saw

secure.

Lady,and

long sleeves.

She

her love.

She

call upon little space and nor

smiled.

Then

she sprang to the top of the great bronze lightly and with her sharp teeth she bit bell of Dojoji, throughthe ropes that held it, so that the bell to the ground and the monk was came a prisoner.

And She

Kiohime

crept about

green robe flowed with a thousand from the

the bell with

embraced

it,she crawled

arms.

it and

her

Her

green robe glittered golden scales;long flames burst

over

it.

about

her

some lipsand from her eyes ; a huge and fearDragon,she wound and coiled herself about bell of Dojoji. With her Dragon'stail she her

and lashed it tillits bronze lashed the bell, hot. while the monk Stillshe lashed the bell,

for piteously

And

when

he

was

red

called

quiet she did not stop. All the night long the frogs and the wind sighedin sang by the Marshy Mere the the sedges. But the Dragon Lady was upon and she lashed it furiously with bell of Dojoji, mercy.

her tail tilldawn.

133

was

very


XVI

of

Maiden

The

the

but

dwelt

cheer

mother

who

tended

her.

The

black

her

and

him

honour. and

here

pattering a

great

with

green lifted

stranger After water,

and

silver

sand

and his

taking he

father's rice

house

sat

feet

and

let

eaten,

from it

and he his

in

wallet

slip through 134

made whilst

mistress,

little

or

maid

the

for a

his

a

to

was

sleeve,

bouncing And

corner.

marked called

sore foot-

tea,

mats,

her

to

mother's

a

old,

was

the

her the

ball

scarlet

eyes

at

who

came,

with

and

her

years

He

the

over

and

hanging

house.

soul

a

nurse

traveller,

by,

catching

bare

had

he

a

with

not

seven

and

Meanwhile

there,

ancient

about

man,

her

of the

master

this.

loose

ancient

an

was

and

house,

kept watch, her

was

hair

to weary, served

welcome,

do

maid

father's

and

She

her.

live-long day

who

cause

earthly deity,

an

behold

her

the

father

her

the

shoulder,

made

as

not

in

place

kept ward,

When

with

might

she

tell, but

could

fair

was

man

hidden

a

of what

the

of

eyes in

Unai

UNAI

OF

MAIDEN

THE

the

child. bowl

of clear

handful

fingers

of and

fine it


sank

lord," he

house, "I fed

said

is hard for

show

to

me

I

am

a

I

kindness

your

have

of

and

poor

and it

man

I

far-famed

Therefore, in looked

into the

the have

you

gratitude.Now

my

divination.

little he

a

master

weary,

soothsayer by profession, very

skill of my

In

the

to

me.

UNAI

bowl.

hungry and

was

and refreshed

me

OF

of the

the bottom

to

spoke. "My

a

MAIDEN

THE

XVI

am

for the for

return

future

of

"

? your child. Will you hear her destiny The child knelt in a corner of the

bouncingher The

master

green and scarlet ball. of the house bade the

room

soothsayer

speakon. This

looked

one

the sand

where

down

was,

and

into the said

:

"

bowl The

of

water

Maiden

of

up fairer than the children of beautyshall shine as the beautyof an

shall grow

Unai

Her

men.

her who looks upon earthlydeity. Every man shall pinewith love and longing, she is and when

fifteen years old there shall die for her sake a mighty hero from near, and a valiant hero from afar. because

sound

there

And

of

her, loud

and

sorrow

and

so grievous, shall reach High Heaven the gods.**

of it

the peace of The master

divination ?

shall be

mourning that and

of the House said," Is this

the

offend

a

true

"

it is lord,"said the soothsayer, true." And with that he bound on his sandals, too and takinghis staffand his great hat of rice-straw, his ways ; neither he spokeno other word, but went "

Indeed, my

"

135


THE he any

was

MAIDEN

more

seen

OF heard

nor

UNAI

xvi

tell of upon

that

country-side. the child knelt in

And

a

of the room,

corner

bouncingher The

green and scarlet ball. father and mother took counsel.

The

mother

who

wept, but she said, Let be, for "

alter the pattern

can

of the weaving father cried, "I

up upon of Heaven ? "

women

will

fight.

I

thingshall not come I that I should give credence am lies in his teeth ? who soothsayer portent

;

counsel So

heed, for

no

theyhid

old

an

her head

wise

he

and was

the child in woman

to

the

Who dog of

a

And

moaned, a

avert

the

pass.

to "

looms

But

will

the

his wife shook

the

set

he

a

though gave her

man.

chamber, where her, fed her, bathed

a secret

tended

her hair,taught her to make songs sing,to dance so that her feet moved like

her, combed and

to

the white mats, or rosy butterflies over frame with of needlework wonder a

upon it,drawingthe needle hour after hour.

and

to

sit

at

a

stretched

the silken thread

For

eight years the maid set eyes upon no human being save her father,her mother, and her nurse, these three only. All the dayshe spent in from the sights her distant chamber, far removed and the sounds of the world. Only in the night forth into her father's garden,when the she came shone and the birds sleptand the flowers moon And with every season that passed had no colour. the maid beautiful. Her hair hung grew more down

to

her

knees

and

was

136

black

as

a

thunder-


THE

XVI

cloud.

forehead

Her

cheek

MAIDEN

the wild

OF the

was

and cherry,

UNAI

plum blossom, her

her

mouth

flower

the

of the pomegranate. At fifteen years old she was the loveliest thingthat ever the light, and the saw sun

sick with

was

because only the jealousy

might shine upon her. In spite the ot all, and

known,

because

fame

of her

she

beautybecame kept so guarded

was

thought of her the more, and might not be seen men longed to

men

And

of

because

the

mystery

and gallants

warriors and

far and

and flocked

near

they made a hedge about their brightswords ; and would the

leave the

not

maid,

favour

and

the

must,

and he

down.

So

"

her.

the

maiden, from

came

of Unai

and

;

and

themselves

silk and

and

did

even

as

he

bring the maid went, takingwith her a of brocade, a great girdle

the mother

maid

house

her mother

gold; and in her daughter, sitting The

behold

that they they swore placetill they had sightof have either by they would of the

master

sent

of grey

green

she

note

the house it with

because

by force.

or

Then

robe

this

and of

men

to

moon

she

to

found

chamber

secret

sang thus

the

maid,

her

singing.

:

Nothinghas changedsince the time ofthe gods Neither the running ofwater nor the way ofloveJ^ ^

And "

What

the

a

thingas

astonished

was

of song

manner

you of such

mother

is

this,and

love ? 137

"

and

where

said, heard


THE

And

MAIDEN

she answered,

OF "

UNAI

xvi

read of it in

I have

a

book." Then

theytook her, her mother and the wise and theytied her hair and pinned it high woman, and held upon her head with gold and coral pins, it with a great lacquercomb. She said,"How heavyit is ! While they dressed her in the robe of grey silk, and tied the girdleof brocade,first she shuddered Then and said,"I am cold." they would have her a mantle thrown broidered with plum over blossom and pine,but she would have none of it, saying, No, no, I burn." They paintedher lipswith beni^and when she "

"

saw

it she

my

lips!

murmured, "

"

they led

But

is blood upon and out on down

Alack, there her

assembled where the men who were balcony, might see her. She was fairer than the children of men, and her beauty shone like the beauty of an earthly deity.And all the warriors who were for already there looked upon her and were silent, theywere faint with love and longing. And the maid stood with eyes cast down, and slowly the to

a

hot

blush

rose

and she

her cheek

to

lovelier

was

than before.

Three

or

four

score

of

men

soughther

name

for love of her, and amongst hand, beingdistraught them The

two

were one

came

braver

from

afar and

Chinu, and the other of Unai. haired.

They They were

and

came

were

nobler was

than

the

from near, young,

equalin 138

the rest.

champion of the champion

strong, and

years, in

black-

and strength,


THE

XVI

MAIDEN

Both

in valour.

OF

UNAI

and

girdedwith full-charged quiverswere upon

and

six-foot bows

hands.

great swords,

were

of white

their backs,

wood

Together they stood

beneath

their

in

were

the

balcony in beauty

of the maiden

of Unai, like twin brothers and attainments. Together theycried aloud

with

of their eternal love, and voices,telling passionate biddingthe maiden choose between them. She lifted up her eyes and them, but spokeno word. Then

theydrew

fightthe matter father spoke:

looked

fixedly upon

their swords and made there and then

out

;

if to

as

but the maid's

your swords, fair sirs ; I have devised a better way for the decision of this thing. If it pleaseyou, enter my house.*' a

up

part of the house of Unai

Now

upon It was

Put

"

the

platformover fifth month

the

blossom

nearlyinto

the

and

apart, and

and the wise hid

sky,and

to

the was

and

in

was

brought the

house

But

there also.

little way

a

long

droppedfrom

fro upon

past.

swift and

was

stood

woman

water-bird

rocked

river

out

downwards

hung

faces in their

their

a white Presently

the wistaria

The

water.

deep. Here the master of champions,and the maiden the mother

river that flowed

and trellis,

the

upon

built

was

the

sleeves.

the blue

water

of the

river.

champions,"cried

"Now,

maiden, you upon

an

"

draw

arrow

the

and prove

me

at

river.

himself

the

father of the

and let your bows yonder white bird that

He to

be

flyeach that

floats

shall strike the

the better marksman, 139

of

bird he


MAIDEN

THE

shall wed Unai."

immediatelythe of white

their bows

true.

cried,

let

flyeach

of them

the

tail

so

Then

that the the

white

champions

of this

There is but trifling. again their brightswords leapt

Enough And

way."

one

in

scattered.

were

"

champions drew

two

and

of

arrow

her

struck

feathers

xvi

sped swift ; each arrow The champion of Chinu struck the in the head, but the champion of

water-bird Unai

wood

Each

arrow.

struck

UNAI

Maiden daughter,the peerless

my

Then

an

OF

their scabbards. the maid stood But

from

of the

gnarledstem

and shook

trembled

flowers fell about

wistaria

her.

not,"she but

"

that,stillholdingto

river. deep and swift-flowing "Weep dies to-day. It is cried, for no woman "

child that is lost." And so she sank. Down into the sprang the champion of Chinu a

in the

champion of arms

that

entangledin three of them But dead

My lords,my lords,"she beautiful heroes of fame, it "

the wistaria, and dropped herself clear of the balcony

flood,and the

that the

so

She frail

one

I honour I am. farewell." With she swung into the

hands.

of you should die for such as therefore you ; I love you both

that

meet

in her

the branches

cried,"oh, brave and is not

trembling,holding the

at

rose,

same

instant down

sprang

the

Alack, theywere heavywith they bore, and they sank and were

Unai. the were

long water

weeds.

And

so

the

drowned.

night when to floating

the

moon

shone, the pale

the surface of the 140

water.


THE

XVI

The

hand in his own, with his head her

to

layhe

but

long hair

;

they lifted from togetherupon a bier of

theystrewed

wood, and over them flowers,and laid a silk.

incense. her

of her

tress

heart,bound

three corpses

and laid them

And

Gallants

loved the

who

maiden's

right lay

and

as

he

smiled.

The

white

held

againstthe

by a

UNAI

the maiden*s the champion of Chinu

of Unai

champion

close

OF

MAIDEN

veil

bier and made

their faces of fine

over

warriors

maiden, alive a

hedge

water, fair white

herbs and sweet

they lightedfires and

the

and

and

burned of

men

dead, stood

or

with

themselves

note

about and

and brightswords. And there was sorrow that the sound of so mourning,loud and grievous, and offended the peace of it reached High Heaven the gods. A grave was dug wide and deep,and the three maid buried therein. The were they laid in the middle, and the two champions upon either side. Idzumo the native placeof the champion of was Chinu, so they brought earth from thence in a junk,and with this earth they covered him. So the maid sleptthere in the grave, the guardingher, for they had championsfaithfully their

buried

with

them

their bows

of white

wood

and

their spears and and their good armour that is bright swords. Nothing was forgotten their

needful for adventure

in the Land

141

of Yomi.


XVII

Mio

Strand

sand

is

the

ebb

lean

all

wind

is

tide.

pine

way, Before

with

trees

are

the

is Mio

the

the

Its

shells

rose

and the

that

at

they wild

sea,

and

sacred,

the

deep

most

Small

mountains.

Suruga.

ancient

way

rolls

Fugi,

rises

of

of

fine, strewn

Its

Mio

FEATHERS

Province

which

one

mountain

the

in

and

yellow

wills.

behind

OF

ROBE

THE

that

marvel

the

Mio. to come Strange People should much is known, Of the Strange People not there. it is sure at Mio, though even they come the It seems pity. shy indeed, more's they arc the through the blue air, or across They come Their footprints are mysterious paths of the sea. the wet beach, for they seen never never, upon in their tread too dancing lightly. But sometimes

they ribbed

This

is

a

true

the

Once

fisherman

enough,

and it

leave

may

it be

Mio. is

upon talked with eyes

;

sand

upon often so,

robes

rufHed

and at

seen

their

sweep

all.

not a

maiden

her

thing,

a

of

and

made

and

thus

the

her it 142

came

of

Mio

set

Strange People, and do his bidding. This about.


THE

XVII

The He

cast

OF

ROBE

fisherman his

FEATHERS

here and

net

in his boat

out

was

he

cast

his

all

night.

there,but

net

he caughtnothingat all for his pains. It may be believed that he grew weary enough before the In the cold of the dawn

morning. boat

to

shore and

Then,

foot

Mio

on

he

so

says, a warm through his garments

blew

he flushed and comfort to his a

set

of

a

and

him

met

and

his hair,so that full of very sand was the

wind

warm

borne, cedar and vervain,and

hundred

Flowers

wind

feet. Upon chilly

was fragrance

scent

The

glowed.

broughthis Strand,shivering. he

the

flowers.

through the droppedsoftly

air like

brightrain. The fisherman stretched out his hands and pomeand caught them, lotus and jessamine granate. And

all the while

This is never

"

I have

"

thousand times Alack, I fear me a

Isles unawares,

or

music

sounded.

Strand,"cried the fisherman,

Mio

bewildered, where

sweet

flown

or

I have

kites upon sailed to the

to unwilling

come

boat ashore

pulledmy

a

holiday.

Fortunate

the Sea

King's

garden; or very like I am dead and never knew it, and this is Yomi. O Yomi, Land of Yomi, how like thou art to Mio Strand,my dear home !" After he had said this,the fisherman looked up the beach and down the beach, and he turned and saw Fuji,the mountain of mountains, and then he turned and Mio

at

was

the

saw

and

no

deep rollingsea and other place,

and knew gave

a

he

long

sigh. Thanks

"

saw

a

be,"

he

robe of feathers

his eyes he said,and lifting

hangingupon H3

the branch of


THE a

ROBE

OF

FEATHERS

In the robe

pinetree.

birds that

fly, every the goldenpheasant,

feathers of all the

were

; the

one

xvii

and kingfisher

the

bird,the swan, the crow, the dove,the bullfinch, the falcon, love

the cormorant, and the heron. the plover,

**

Ah, the pretty fluttering thing! said the fisherman,and he took it from the pinetree where "

it hung. "

Ah, the

"

sweet, fairy thing! said the take it home for a treasure, sure no

warm,

fisherman ; " TU could buy it,and FU show it to all the folk money And oflfhe set for home with the of the village.'* feathers over fairy

with the White

Children She

looked

throughthe cold clear water and marked that branch. robe hung no longeron the pine-tree "

Alas, alas !

robe !

"

her

"

she

cried,** my

robe,my feather

Swifter than

the water, sand. The

and

she sprang from any arrow sped,fleet of foot,along the wet

Children

White

heels. flashing

of the Foam

followed

Clad in the cloak of her

long

up with the fisherman. " Give me and held my feather robe," she said, her hand for it. " " Why ? said the fisherman.

hair,she out

StrangePeople had

that live in the salt sea.

of the Foam

at

of the

playingall this time

been

her

arm.

the maiden

Now

up

his

came

I

it.

I

"

'Tis mine.

"

Oho," said the fisherman, "

and he didn't "

"

want

am

have

a

144

it.**

finding's keeping,'*

giveher the feather robe.

Fairy,"she said. said the Farewell,Fairy,'* I

must

fisherman.


THE

xvii

OF

FEATHERS

Fairy,"she said. said the fisherman, "Farewell, Moon Fairy,** he made to take his way alongMio Strand. At

and

Moon

A

"

snatched

she

that

and

droppedupon "I

do

wouldn't

I

am

feathers fluttered

that," said

the

fisherman.

dawn

I

cannot

in back to my place, my home Therefore give me my feathers."

without

;

my

to

came

fair Mio

Heaven.

Strand

at

playupon go

out

pieces."

and Fairy,

Moon

a

the

robe, but

the sand.

You'll have it all to "

feather

the

at

fast. The

held

fisherman

"

ROBE

feathers I

High

No," said the fisherman. Oh, fisherman,fisherman,giveme my robe." "I couldn't think of it," said the fisherman. "

"

this the

At

droopedlike her

arms

and

as

her

she held she

tears

the fisherman

clung to

upon

him

I A

am

a

felt

him, he beseeching

:

bird with broken

diefarfrom

For the Five Woes

Faintness comes

wings^

home^

are

come

in my hair The red flowers My robe is made unclean ; I cannot

knees,

bird^a frailbirdy

wounded

I must

about the

his bare feet.

wept and said

She ^^

a

fell upon her knees and lilyin the heat of the day. With maiden

upon

me

upon me. are

fadedi

;

dear sight see"farewell^ ofmy

eyes;

/ have lostjoy. 145

L


ROBE

THE

FEATHERS

OF

xvii

and happybirdsy clouds^ Ohy blessedflying And golden dust in the wind^ And flying and flying thoughts prayers ! ^^ I have lostall joy.

"

"

may

your robe."

have

she cried.

"

Give,"

"

said the fisherman. Softly, softly," I will give you your robe if you

fast, for

Oh, stop,"said the fisherman, you

here

me "

What

"

You

Mio

on

?

dance the

must

the Palace of the Moon She

said, "Give

dance it.

Not

so

will dance

Strand."

I dance

must

"

"

she asked.

mysticdance

turn me

my

that makes

round," feathers and

I will

my feathers." " if you cheat me, what if you break What and to the moon your promiseand flyimmediately I

dancingat

no

"Ah,

Fairy!

without

all ? "

fisherman,"she said,"the

faith of

a

"

Then

Now, back

dance

cannot

her

he gave her the robe. when she had arrayed herself and

hair,the Fairybegan

to

dance

flung

upon

the

yellowsand. In and out of the feather robe crept her fairy she went with folded feet. Slowly, softly, wings and sang : **

Oh J

And

the goldand silvermountains ofthe the sweet

Birds ofHeaven Singing

Moon^ !

Theysingin the branches ofthe cinnamon tree^ To entertainthe thirty kingsthat are there. 146


THE

XVII

ROBE

FEATHERS

OF

Fifteen kingsin white garments To reign teen days. forJif Fifteen kingsin black garments To reign forff teen days. I hear the music ofHeaven ; Awayy away^ I flyto FairyPlaces^^ y

j

At

this the

the

wings,and

Fairyspreadher rainbow-coloured that they made fluttered the wind

red flowers in her hair.

Out

the robe of

streamed

feathers brightand gay. The

Fairylaughed. of the

waves

flowers

the

branches "

he At

sea

;

her

no

the

They

the grass and the high touched

pinesand then the white

Farewell, fisherman !

saw

feet touched

her feet touched

inshore.

of the

Her

"

the

clouds.

Fairycried,and

more.

Long, long he stood gazing up lengthhe stoopedand pickedup

into the a

sky.

little feather

from the shore,a grey dove's feather. He smoothed and hid it in his girdle. it out with his finger Then

he

went

to

his home.

147


XVIII

descend

shall

of

Land shall

land.

For

the

stood looked

For

and

down,

back

turned

be

And who

had

her

head

Ears, land

this

descend

not

the

of the

Land

Reed blood

strife,and

made

war

there

that

saw

High

to

even

arose,

of

August Child, the heavenly born, the Floating Bridge, and swore

across

would

of

he

the

deities

sounds

the

So

Heaven.

should

earthly

fearful

and

of

of

August Child, Floating Bridge

the

upon

great unquietness upon

Plains.

Rice

So

Autumns.

High

Land

a

of Fresh

Land

a

is

it

of

Augnstness, Conqueror,

the

called

is

Augustness,

and

a

"His

saying,

Plains,

his

Heaven

he

Light

king.*'

Conqueror,

ran,

the

Thousand

a

be

Now

was

Glorious,

the

to

Reed

Luxuriant

he

HEAVEN

who

Child,

August

my

OF

commanded,^

Heaven,

a

the

Terassu,

Ama

BIRD

SINGING

THE

rule

the

Light

of

to

land

until

it

cleansed.

Terassu,

Ama

the

with

together in a the Tranquil

set

sun

the

fast between

jewels, divine

River

her

and

gathered assembly, to hold

Bed.

And

148

she

Heaven,

High

bound

eyes, the

deities

council

spoke

and

in

said,


The

Singing

Bird

of Heaven.

-P.

148


"

SINGING

THE

XVIII

Who

the

shall subdue

August Child And

all the

ness, send

the

down

?

BIRD

OF

HEAVEN

the land that I have

givento

''

deities cried," O Thine Augustthe Lord of Spears.'* Therefore

of

Lord

down Spearswent by the lightly bound FloatingBridge; and there were upon his back eighthundred spears. Howbeit, he made a of the Reed and for three years there

truce

with the Lord

there

;

Therefore, once called him

whom

feet.

Ama

the

more

Plains and tarried was

report.

no

Queen

of

Heaven

Wonderful, and gods name she called the Lord of Deep Thoughts,and likewise she called every deity of Heaven, and they came to council in the TranquilRiver Bed, so that upon left the printof their august the sand there was Lord to

And

of

rule

Terassu

said, Behold

Spearsis faithless. the

answered, O "

ness,

the

land ?

**

Mother

send me.''

And

"

Whom

shall

the And Young of Heaven, Thine

now we

the

send Prince

August-

all the deities assented with

accord and cried," Send him, send him," till like thunder in the River Bed. there was a sound one

and Young Prince bound on his sandals, theybroughtto him the great bow that stands in the Hall of High Heaven, and bestowed it upon So the

they gave him many heavenly-feathered So theymade him ready, and theybrought arrows. him to the Floating Bridge.And the Young Prince while his garments shone with descended lightly, But when he touched the the gloryof Heaven. his heart beat fast and his tops of the high hills, Therefore he cut the fastening blood ran warm. him,

and

149


THE

SINGING

BIRD

of his sandals and ran

the

to

came

Now,

them

cast

palaceupon

xviii

him,

and

he

and earthlydeity,

an

the Reed

Plains.

of the

the door

at

HEAVEN behind

feet,like

his bare

upon

OF

palacethe Princess growing flower. So the

stood,like a Undershining Young Prince beheld her and loved her, and he built him a dwellingupon the Reed Plains,and took

for his bride.

the Princess

And, because he loved her and her earthly children,he brought no the waiting report to High Heaven, and he forgot deities.

For

Heaven

was

to

vague

him

as

a

dream. But the

And

gods were

weary.

Terassu

Ama

said,"Long, long tarries

messenger, and bringsno Lord, the August Child, waxes

our

word

again. My impatient ; whom shall we send ? Thereupon,all the deities, the Lord of Deep Thoughts,replied,Send of High the Singing Bird, the beloved "

now

and

"

down

Heaven.** So Ama

Terassu

took the

goldenSingingBird, and said, Sweet music of the divine gods,spread thou thy bright wings,and flyto the Land of Reed Plains,and there search out the Young Prince, the "

of Heaven, and, when thou hast found him, singin his ear this song : * Ama Terassu,the fares How Goddess of the Sun, has sent me saying. messenger

the

quest of

message So to

High Heaven,

and

how

fares the

is the report of the gods ? * " the bird departed, singing. And she came ?

the Land

the branch

Where

of the Reed of

a

Plains,and perchedupon

fair cassia ISO

tree

which

grew

hard


by

SINGING

THE

XVIII

the

Young

BIRD

Princess

again,but

not

sat

and

night, thoughtlong for

gods in Heaven SingingBird. Howbeit

sweet

HEAVEN

dwelling. Day

she sang, and the

their

OF

the branch

upon

she returned of the cassia

tree.

the

Prince

gave no heed. She that SpeakethEvil heard the words And that the bird sang. And she whisperedin the But

Young

Princess ear, " See now, my lord,this is an evil bird,and evil is its cry ; therefore take thou and go forth and slay thine arrows it.*' So she urged

Young

and, by glamour,she prevailed continually, upon Then the Young Prince arose, and took his him. and he let bow and his heavenly-feathered arrows, into the branches of the cassia tree. flyan arrow And suddenlythe sweet sound of singingceased, and the goldenbird fell dead,for the aim was true. took wing But the heavenly-feathered arrow and pierced the floor of Heaven, and reached the where sat the Sun Goddess, together high place, in the TranquilRiver with her August Counsellors, the god called Wonderful And Bed of Heaven. took up the arrow, and beheld the blood upon its feathers. And the Lord of Deep Thoughts said, "

This

is the

arrow

that

was

given to

the

Young

it to all the deities. And Prince has shot this arrow

and he showed Prince,*' he said, If the Young at the evil deities, accordingto our command, let it do him no hurt. But, if his heart be not pure, "

then let the Young Prince perishby this arrow." back to earth. And he hurled the arrow Now

the

Young

Prince

lay upon

a

couch,


THE

SINGING

sleeping.And

OF

BIRD the

HEAVEN

xviii

and pierced his heart fell,

arrow

that he died.

no

SingingBird of Heaven gods were sorrowful. Young Prince laydead wailingof his spouse, the

Yet the sweet more ; and the Howbeit, the

returned

upon his bed ; and the Princess re-echoed in the wind, and was heard Undershining, in Heaven. So the Young Princess father descended with

cries and

lamentations,and there

mourning house upon and the Young Prince

the Land was

was

of Reed

built

a

Plains,

laid there.

for him the wild And there came to mourn and the kingand the pheasant, fisher. goose of the river, for him eightdaysand And theymourned

eightnights.

152


XIX

THE

Onc" in

old

an

LADY

a

man

and

man

young

order

in

company,

COLD

make

to

laid

had

they

of

because

or

war,

All

known.

forgotten. It is they accomplished winter

Now

as

their

missed

country, no

and

black the

The

wandered soul

that

say

longer

no

long it

that

is

since

likely

ferry.

no

clouds

dry

and

flakes

happened that they in a lonely part of the all the day long and came Near nightfall guide them.

to

themselves

swift-flowing

ford,

very

vow

they turned the about setting-in of the for wayfarers. evil time is an

they journeyed, and, being way,

they good

found

they

were

for

knows.

Heaven

upon

great is

a

desires, for

their

which

season,

or

into

of love

money,

souls, it

things to enough

homewards

faces

their

small

some

their

upon these

of

matters

village

journey they went

a

whether

Now, province. for pleasure or for profit, distant

or

left their

There

and

a

little

the

no

night,

shrewd

wind

Presently the

scanty reeds. fell upon

was

the

came

of

brink

the

upon

river.

Down

it

dark 153

water

a

broad

bridge, with

pitch-

that snow

of the

no

blew came.

river.


THE

white, how

How

"

LADY

COLD white

xix

! " cried the

theyare

man.

young But bitter

old

the

In truth it

shivered.

man

cold, and they were

in

a

bad

was

Tired

case.

down sat him out, the old man upon the ground ; he drew his cloak round him and clasped his hands to fingers

warm

and little,

at

by

a

Bad

He

last he found

it is

went

the

up

his

upon bank

a

hut,deserted

small poor

ferryman.

or

best,"said

the

at

a

blew

man

young

them.

charcoal-burner

"

"

The

his knees.

about

the young

man,

for any shelter on such a praised carried his companion to the hut.

yet the gods be

night." So he They had no

food

and

no

of dried leaves in the

bundle

rain-coats ; and in

spiteof

the

was

Here

corner.

and covered themselves

laydown

there

fire,but

they

their

with

a

straw

cold,they soon

fell

asleep. About

by

an

midnightthe

icy air

upon

young his cheek.

man

awakened

was

The

door

of the

hut stood wide

open, and he could see the whirling " It was A without. not snow-storm very dark. " " It has pest upon the wind ! said the young man. has drifted in blown open the door,and the snow and he raised himself upon and covered my feet," that there was his elbow. Then he saw a woman in the hut.

She knelt and almost

white

met. were

by

the side of the old man,

bent

low

White her

white with the

over

him

trailing garments

snow

;

her

that had fallen upon 154

panion, com-

till their faces

her face and

was

his

beautiful hair it.

was

Her

;


THE

XIX

hands

COLD

LADY

stretched forth

were

the

over

that

man

slept,

and

Her brighticicles hung from her finger-tips. breath was quite plainlyto be seen as it came firom her partedlips. It was like a fair white end of leaning smoke. she made an Presently old

the

over

slender.

and

man,

rose

fell from

Snow

up

her in

a

very tall and shower she as

moved. That

"

was

the young his hand

in

before,he

was

man,

she murmured, and came easy," and sinking down beside him If the

hers. colder

He

now.

head

to

It seemed

blood

froze,and his heart

heel.

stood stillin his bosom.

grew

him

to

as

took cold

was

from

numb

if his very of ice that

lump deathlysleepstole over a

was

A

man

young

to

him. "

This

death,'*he thought.

is my Thank

"

Can

this

the

gods there is no pain." But Cold Lady spoke. A pretty boy," It is only a boy,"she said. kill him." I cannot his hair ; said,stroking

be all ?

the

"

"

she

^^

"

The

Listen,"she said.

"You

must

night,"she

moaned. young man speak of me, nor of this

never

said.

Not

father,nor

mother, nor sister,nor brother,nor to betrothed maid, nor to wedded wife,nor to boy child,nor to girlchild, to sun, nor nor wind, rain, nor water, fire, moon, Now

snow.

He

it.

swore

warm

sun

to

it."

swear

he murmured, When he the

"

"

Fire

^wind

"

"

rain

"

and fell into a deep swoon. himself it was to came shone.

A 155

kind

snow

high

countryman

.

.

."

noon,

held


THE him

in his

COLD

LADY

him

and made

arms

xix

drink from

a

ing steam-

cup.

Now, boy/*said the countryman,

"

you should

"

do.

in time, By the mercy of the gods I came though what broughtme to this hut, a good three ri out of my way, the August Gods alone know. So you may thank them and your wondrous youth. As for the good old man, your companion,it is a He different matter. is past help. Already his feet have come to the Partingof the Three Ways.'* the

! *' cried the young and the storm, and the

Alack

"

snow

Alack, for

"

man.

bitter night! bitter,

friend is dead."

My

he said

But

no

broughthim day's journey For he remembered

words "

were

You

must

home

his oath.

in his

did

then,nor

more

his

to

when

he

village.

own

the Cold

And

a

Lady's

ear.

speak of

never

of this

nor

me,

father,nor

nor mother, nor sister, to wedded brother, nor to betrothed maid, nor wife, nor to boy child,nor to girlchild,nor to .*' nor wind, rain,snow. water, fire, sun, nor moon, Some years after this, in the leafy summer time,

night,not

to

"

.

it chanced

the young

that

abroad

alone,and as he about sundown, he was the

path a though she

little way

had

come

was aware

young

went man

wearily. It should

It seemed

for distance,

some

kilted up, she wore and she carried a bundle.

his walks

returninghomewards, of a girlwalking in

before him.

was

and

took

man

sandals tied

to

Moreover, she was

not

come presently

156

as

her

robe

her

feet,

drooped

strange that the up with her,nor


COLD

THE

XIX

LADY

that he should pass the time of day. He at saw that the girlwas and slender. once very young, fair,

Young maiden,"

"

bound

?

said, whither "

are

you

''

answered, "Sir, I

She

I intend

where

he

to

will find

there who

take

service.

me

place.''

a

'*

I have

Yedo,

a

sister

he asked.

"

What

"

My

"

O'Yuki,'*said the young

? is your name is OTuki." name

for

bound

am

man,

"

you look very

pale." Alas ! sir,"she murmured, " I faint with the heat of this summer day." And as she stood in the pathher slender body swayed,and she slid to *^

his feet in

a

swoon.

The

young her in his arms

man

lifted her

to

his mother's

carried

and gently,

house.

Her

head

and as he looked upon her face, his breast, he shivered slightly. " All the same," he said to himself," these

layupon

chillyabout sundown,

daysturn

summer

to

seems

O'Yuki

was

the

continue

her

house.

In

the

she had little strength to

of Yedo

streets

beautiful

hands, for

as

she passedthe nightin their journey, truth she passedmany nights there,

man grew young wife ere many moons more

it

recovered of her swoon, she and his mother man sweetly

young for their kindness,and

and

so

me."

When

thanked

or

"

to

her, and made

love

out.

were

fairshe was,

all she used them 157

her, for the

knew

never

her

Dailyshe

and white.

for work

his

became

Her

little

in the house


THE and

in the

work

flowers ; the hot

LADY

fields, were

as

white

burn

her

could

sun

not

xix

jasmine

as

neck,or her

In the fulness of time

delicate cheek.

paleand bore

COLD

she

children,all as fair as she,and theygrew

seven

tall and strong with straight noble limbs ; their equalcould not be found upon that country-side.

up

mother

Their

for them.

loved

;

dimness

no

All the

women

line upon her forehead, to her eyes, and no grey hairs. of the placemarvelled at these

there

no

came

talked of them

things,and 0'Yuki*s

husband

till the

was

they

tired.

were

man happiest

round, what with his fair wife and

miles

children.

said,

"

On

the

not

for

his fair

evening he prayed and

and

Morning

Let

much

godsvisit it upon

if I have

me

joy." certain

a

put her children with

was

them, laboured

spiteof passingyears, in spiteof the painsof motherhood, she looked like a

slender maiden

too

reared

In

joys and

But

them,

her

eveningin winter,0*Yuki, having to bed and warmly covered them,

husband

in

the

The all the doors of the next

room.

glowed in the hibachi ; house were shut, for it was bitter cold,and closely outside the first big flakes of a snow-storm had at little begun to fall. O'Yuki stitched diligently An andon stood on the bright-coloured garments. floor beside her, and its lightfell full upon her charcoal

face. Her "

I

am

many

husband

Dear," he reminded

looked

at

her, musing.

.

said, when I look at you of an adventure that came "

years since."

158

.

.

to-night to

me


O^Yuki It

"

spokenot

all,but stitched it

I

was

man

telL

cannot

I did not

I think

dream, yet

a

as

was

diligently.

dream," said the

a

or

which

her husband, "and

Strangeit

at

adventure

an

was

LADY

COLD

THE

XIX

sleep/* O'Yuki

went

sewing.

onlythen, I

Then,

"

on

you are and very like you.'*

beautiful was

as

"Tell

white

as

who

woman,

was

as

indeed,she

.

.

.

her," said OTuki,

about

me

a

saw

lifting

not

her work.

her eyes from

I have never spoken Why," said the man, of her to anybody." Yet he spoke then to his and how he and undoing. He told of his journey, his companion,being benightedin a snow-storm, took shelter in a hut. He spokeof the white Cold Lady,and of how his friend had died in her chill "

"

embrace. but she

me,

boy she

she

Then

"

*

said,

I

...

was

swear. "

.

.

You

cold.

how

she

before

swear,

me

It is

only a boy .

.

leaned

side and

my

kill him.*

cannot .

.

.

to

came

.

left

"

.

!

Gods

cold

How

she made

Afterwards me

pretty

a

.

she

over

made

me

." must

never

speak of

me,

nor

of this

nor mother, nor said, not to father, maid, nor to to betrothed nor brother,nor sister, to girlchild, to boy child,nor wedded wife,nor wind, rain, nor to sun, nor water, fire, nor moon, to me, my husband, even All this you swore snow.

OTuki night,"

to

me.

your

And oath.

"

after all these yearsyou have and Unkind, unfaithrul, 159

untrue

broken !"

She


folded her work she

went

face

to

the

she drew

turn.

Cold

"

quiltup

"

.

Cold

.

"

.** .

his shoulder.

over

*'

"

.

.

"

and threw

his littlearms.

out

She said," I have grown more." With "

Then

and bent her

were,

youngest cried, Mother

The

xix

laid it aside.

the children

where

eldest murmured

The so

togetherand

each in

over

LADY

COLD

THE

that

she

back

came

Farewell,"she said.

you for my well." The White

man was

;

her

to quiteplainly partedlips. It was

be

seen

like

a

Farewell

Farewell

!

thin

and

voice

grew

wind.

form grew vaporous cloud.

white

the air.

Her

Then

hole in the

Guard

it

white

was

fallen upon

was

"

hair

rose

and ceiling

it

as

!

"

she

chill like as

vague For

an

a

were

i6o

no

her were

breath her

smoke.

cried,and

her

piercingwinter

a snow

wreath

or

a

instant it hung upon

slowlythrough the was

it

from

came

fair white

her.

saw

as

kill

them

Her

it.

any

husband.

I cannot

now

lifted up his eyes and her face and beautiful ; white that had

snow

Even

"

her

to

little children's sakes.

trailing garments with

cold to weep

too

more

seen.

smoke-


XX

FIRE

THE

Wise

The

Poet

taper.

It

cicala

sang

frog

sang

the

stars,

But

the

the

was

the

air

rainbow-tinted. Fire

Quest in

wings

one

;

and

flame

the

light

the

of

month.

his The the

pomegranate,

moon

and for

and

out

was

all

sweet-scented. moths

by

came

light of his taper ; not moths only, and their wings dragon-flieswith and all they came One the upon and all they burned their bright

the

cockchafers

but

The

the

seventh

heavy happy,

was

not

was

to

score

of

flower

pond.

the

Poet

of the

night

the

in

by

reading by

sat

a

QUEST

died.

so

And

the

Poet

was

grieved. said,

harmless

Little

"

why

"

Never,

will

Foolish

Firefly Queen The

the

fly upon heard

never

you

night,'*he Fire Quest ?

strive

the

and

die.

story of the

''

and

moths

fluttered

flies

?

the

attain, yet you

you

have

ones,

still

you

can

never

of

children

the

about

cockchafers

the

and and

taper

the

paid

dragonhim

no

heed. "

"

They

have

yet it is old

never

enough.

heard Listen l6l

it," said

the

Poet

: M

;


THE

FIRE

QUEST

xx

"The

the brightest and Queen was Firefly that fly. She dwelt beautiful of small things

most

in the heart of stilllake,and

it

like the reflectionof

was

You

"

know,

must

in the water. oh, little children of a

It

star

the

Queen had many suitors. Firefly cockchafers and dragon-flies able innumer-

and

flew

lotus grew on a and fro upon the lakers

the

night,that Moths

The

swayed to the Firefly Queen sleptwithin.

while

bosom

rosy lotus.

a

to

the

lotus

on

the

lake.

And

their

filled with

love. *Have passionate flies, they cried, Queen of the Firepity,have pity,* BrightLight of the Lake.' But the Firefly Queen sat and smiled and shone. It seemed that hearts

were

*

she

not

was

about

last she

all,what make house

arose

her. At

"

sensible of the incense of love that

?

Prove

said, Oh, you *

you here

lovers,one

and

idly, cumbering my

your love,if you

Go, you lovers,and bring me

love

and fire,

lotus

indeed.

me

then

I will

answer.'

Then, oh,

"

a

was

swift whirr of

cockchafers and the

wings,for

night,there

the moths

and

the

innumerable swiftly dragon-flies Fire Quest. But the Firefly

departedupon the Queen laughed. Afterwards of her laughter. reason "

of the

little children

I will tell you

So the lovers flew here and

the

there in the still

night,takingwith them their desire. They found lightedlattices ajarand entered forthwith. In one there was chamber a girlwho took a love-letter from

her

pillowand

read it in tears, by the 162

lightof


THE

XX

In another

taper.

a

close

to

'

*

Alack

she

great white

A

! I

holdingthe light looked and painted

sat

woman

a

tremblingcandle-flame "

QUEST

mirror, where

a

face.

her

FIRE

moth his

with

put

wings.

afraid/shrieked

am

the horrible dark !

the

out

the

woman

;

'

placethere laya man dying. He said, For pity'ssake lightme the lamp, for the black nightfalls.' have lighted We it,'theysaid, long since. It is close beside you, and a legionof moths and "

In another

*

"

'

'

flutter about it.' dragon-flies I cannot see anythingat all,'murmured *'

*

"

But

the

man.

those that flew

their frail wings in

lay dead by

the Fire

Quest burnt the fire. In the morning they on

and

the hundred

forgotten. The Firefly Queen "

and

swept away

were

safe in her lotus bower

was

her beloved,who was as brightas she, for he No need had he a great lord of the Fireflies.

with was

the Fire

Quest. He carried the living flame beneath his wings. Thus the Firefly Queen deceived her lovers, and therefore she laughedwhen she sent them from to

go upon "

her

on

"

a

Be

vain adventure."

not

deceived," cried

little children is

alwaysthe But

the

of the same.

moths

dragon-flies paid no

the Wise

night. Give

and

over

the

heed

to

163

The

Poet, oh, Queen Firefly "

the Fire

cockchafers the words

Quest." and

the

of the Wise


THE Poet.

FIRE

QUEST

they fluttered about their brightwings in

Still

they burnt

xx

his

taper, and

the flame and

so

died.

Presentlythe must

needs

Poet

sit in the

blew

out

the

dark," he said ;

only way."

164

light. "I "

it is the


A

Legend

of Kwannoii."

/^. W5.


XXI

LEGEND

A

KWANNON

OF

.

In

was days of the gods, Ama-no-Hashidate of this the Floating Bridge of Heaven. By way from the heaven deities earth, to bridge came and bearing their jewelled spears, their great bows and their wonder robes heavenly-feathered arrows,

the

their

closed

was

way

and

heaven, of

Land

the

Fresh

of

Views

with

covered There

Zenji.

great

youth

Buddha

well

;

philosophies

and

the

ineffable he

pass

man

He

up.

in

;

he

the

the

where like

upon still called of

the a

happy

Three

Fair

of

strip

a

and

earth

sake

of

direct

land

floating bridge

a

trees.

followed

and

would

holy

a

had

He

sea,

pine

the

one

is

blue

dark

was

his

It

the

into

is

more

people

for

place

Yamato.

out

no

Ears, the

Rice

when

between

been

walked

deities

This

memory.

from

had

that

Ama-no-Hashidate,

place

runs

Afterwards,

mirrors.

magic

was

versed knew

of

Kioto

the

Way

also was

the

a

called

of

the

disciple he

Gods of

the

doctrines

in

perils

joys of Nirvana. mystic meditation, 165

Saion

of

Long and

illusion hours

many

of


A

LEGEND

he Scriptures pilgrimagehe

the

had

a

came

heart.

by

his eyes. said,"The

xxi

When

he

was

Ama-no-Hashidate,

to

thanks

offered up

he

KWANNON

OF

the

because

on

and

place was

so

lovelyin He

that trees

and

and

blind

the

rocks and

ignoranthave

green

it

sea-water

are

things,but the wise know that they also sing aloud and praisethe Tathagata. Here will I take up my voice with rest, and join my and will not see my home theirs, again." So Saion Zenji, the holyman, climbed NariaiAma-no-Hashidate. San, the mountain over against And when he had come the placeof the Lone to sentient

not

Pine, he

built

Merciful,and All

dawn

a

day he

to

him

hut

to

eventide

he

in

his voice grew The blue marvel.

bowed

reverence

distilled incense

own

head.

Holy

Sutras.

From

sang, till his very beingwas float in an ecstasyof praise.

to

Then

the

the

Kwannon

to

his

cover

chanted

exalted and seemed

a

shrine

a

loud and clear that it was

so

campanula of

its head

from

;

the

the mountain

great white

lily

deep heart; the cicala Forsaken Bird gave a long note its

shrilled aloud ; the from the thicket. About

the hermit^s hut

fluttered

butterflies innumerable,

which

and dragon-flies

there

the souls of the

happy dead. In the far the peasant peoplewere comforted in their valleys toil,whether they plantedout the green young The and the sun rice,or gatheredin the ears. wind were tempered,and the rain fell softly upon and climbed their faces. Ever the again they are

steep hillside

to

kneel

at

i66

the

shrine of Kwannon


A

XXI

the

LEGEND

Merciful, and

whose

down

came

KWANNON

speak with

to

the

holy man7

theywould fillwith rice or beans. Sometimes he or barley-meal and went where through the villages,

wooden

millet,or

OF

bowl

he soothed the sick and touched

the littlechildren.

said that his very garments shone. in that country there came Now

Folks

the like of which

season

of

the memory

ing snow

the

First

man.

been within

the wind

came

blow7

the the north, and then came in great flakes which ceased to fallfor never period of nine days. All the folk of the

and those that had ill.

But, ah

heightsof

doors

drifted. could

no

be

more

lived for

man,

hut, the

shrine of

in his wooden

some

Saion

the

upon the food that was he drew about him Then

bowl.

thought,and passedmany and drink and

it

man

earth

and

Merciful

Zenji,the holy

illusion.

to

piledand

was

daysin meditation,which was Howbeit, even sleepto him. the clouds of not dispel utterly came

none

time

garment of

warm

snow

Kwannon

seen.

fared

stores

bitter cold upon the the Lone Pine, and

At

!

might be,

as

warm

for the

me,

Nariai-San

The

as

their winter

the hermit*s

about

the

not

winter

wildly from

valleyskept within so

there had

a

all the

meat

his clear

could spirit At length

trembled

with

bodilyweakness. the Merciful,"said Forgiveme, O Kwannon that if I Saion Zenji; but verily it seems to me "

"

have

no

food I die."

Slowlyhe

rose, and

the door of his hut.

he pushed painfully The

167

snow

had

open ceased ; it


A

clear and

was

of the

Pine, and

Bridge. Forgiveme, Saion Zenji; I

O

"

"

loath

xxi

were

all white

the

branches

the

Floating

the Merciful," said the reason, but I am

Kwannon

know

departand

to

White

cold.

Lone

KWANNON

OF

LEGEND

not

the Shades of Yomi. the Merciful."

be with

O Kwannon life, Turning, he beheld a dappledhind lying on his the snow, newly dead of the cold. He bowed Poor head. gentlecreature,"he said, never in the hills, and nibble the shalt thou run more Save

this

me

"

"

flowers." And grass and the sweet hind's soft flank,sorrowing. "

not

deer, I would

Poor

forbidden

by the forbidden by

it not

Merciful he

mused

him, "

?

"

to

the

of

mused.

Is it ?

even

that

Is the

Kwannon

But

voice

a

as

he

spoke to

:

if thou Alas, Saion Zenji,

cold, what

thy flesh.

eat

word

hear

and the voice said

stroked the

of the Blessed One

Law he

Thus

seemed

not

he

die of

hunger and people,the poor

of my Shall theynot

shall become

folk of the

be comforted ? valleys by the Sutras of the Tathagata? Break any more the law to keep the law, beloved, thou that the world well lost for a divine song." countest Saion Zenjitook a knife,and Then presently him cut a piece of flesh from the side of the and dappledhind. And he gatheredfir cones made

a

littlefireand

iron pot. his And

When

it

cooked was

the

deer's flesh in

readyhe

ate

an

half of it.

him to strengthcame again,and he the Tathagata, to opened his lipsand sang praises i68


in

hear him.

to

I must

"Howbeit

Zenji. So

Saion

dying fire leaptup

of the

and the very embers

flame

KWANNON

OF

LEGEND

A

XXI

But

look

hind

did

went

he

where he

he

bury

sec,

to

might

the

poor

deer," said

the

door

of his hut.

deer

no

of

yet the mark

nor

dappled

nor

in the

one

deepsnow. he It is passing strange,"

"

As

from

the

as

throughthe snow gods send he be

" The and the stormy weather. dead of cold or hunger," not

they said one to another. chantingin his hut, and had

eaten

of the flesh of

satisfied. " I cut but

a

wondered.

the poor folk up came their hermit had fared

might be, valleyto see how

soon

said,and

But he

a

they found

told

them

dappledhind

hand's breadth

him

how and

he was

of the meat," he

and half of it is yet in the iron pot." look in the pot, they But when to they came found there no flesh of deer,but a piece of cedar

said, "

the

wood

gilded upon greatly, theycarried

it

the Merciful,and when deep snow, all of them the

of

one

to

side.

theyhad went

the

Marvelling

the shrine of Kwannon in

to

cleared away the worship. There

heavenlylady, golden among her golden flowers. In her right the gildedwood side there was was a gash where Then the poor folk from the valley cut away. brought that which theyhad found in reverently the hermit's pot, and set it in the gash. And immediatelythe wound was healed and the smooth goldshone over the place. All the peoplefell on smiled

image

169

sweet


A

LEGEND

KWANNON

OF

but the hermit stood their faces, of Kwannon the Merciful. praise

The

from softly

the Lone

upon the

made Saion an

in

and

shrine

The

cold

Pine

her

valleyfolk crept

moon

and

the

rent

down

went

and

their

to

the stars shone

FloatingBridge and

in the shrine^s roof

the face of Kwannon

visible

singingthe high

glory. The

Through a

sea.

illumined

"

the

homes.

own

in

set

sun

xxi

manifold

the arms

they

Merciful,and of love.

servant, stood before her ecstasy,with tears upon his face :

Zenji,her

Yet

singing

wonder-womariy strongand beautiful^ and thousand-armed! Tender-hearted^ pitiful^

O

Thou hast fed me

with thine ownjlesh "

! Mysteryofmysteries Poor dead

hind thou cam'st to me ; dappled In the deepofmine own heart thou spoketo me To keep^ keepthylaw yet breaksand breakings ! Mysteryofmysteries Kwannon^ the Merciful Lady^staywith me^ Save me from the perils ofillusion; Let me not be afraid ofthe snow or the Lone Fine. Mysteryofmysteries Thou hast refused Nirvana^ Help me that I may losethe worldscontent And singthe Divine Song.'' "

"

y

170


XXII

ESPOUSAL

THE

OF

RATS

THE

DAUGHTER

in

the

in

his

from

whom

he

not

of his

one

the

him

horse

of

the

was

generations cosy

fields and

Rat

on

where

bank, the

precedence

the

of the

gods

well-to-do been hard

the

been

Daikoku,

great

one

country-side,where in spring he could 171

most

crops nibble

the had

the ? had

home

His a

had

even

and

Fortune

in

a

companion

revered

life.

of the

into

being

chosen

of Good in

For,

tiger, and the gods,

most

established

by

intimate

first animal

the

as

in

ancestors

itself; for

time

as

so

was

back

went

dragon, the intimacy with

forebears

of his

Mr.

and

his

to

was

Good^Fortune.

selected

hours,

of their

to

the

beneficent

most

far

as

the

of

ancestry

been

over

As

? one

for

fact

race

of

cycle

given not

gods his

past, in

remote

in

the

remembered,

it

and

descended,

he

This line

long

personage

least

at

"

estimation.

the

to

was

with

association

important

an

lived

wife*s

due

course,

was

he

his

and

own

of

Rat,

where

hamlet

part,

be

the

Nedzumi,

Mr.

warm snug, fertile rice-

never

his

failed, fill of

the


DAUGHTER

RATS

THE

green shoots,and in of the storerooms supplies

young

for all his

gatherinto his ripenedgrainsufficient duringthe coming winter.

his needs

For cost

wants

him

but

the smallest

xxii

not

were

autumn

Entertainment

great.

and, unlike his fellows,he had little, in fact a family of families, of one only.

than regardsthat one, qualitymore for it consisted of a compensated for quantity, daughter,of a beautyunsurpassedin the whole of envy province. He himself had been the object for he had had the good fortune in his married life, to marry into a familyof a very select piebald

But,

as

breed,which

seldom

condescended

to

its blood

mix

his ordinaryself-coloured tribe,and now white, and had daughterhad been born a peerless of Yuki, owing to her resemreceived the name blance

with the

to

pure

snow.

then, that as she grew up her father^sambitions feature,

It is little wonder,

beautiful in form and were

to marry fired,and that he aspired

in the land. highest As it happened, the not

very far removed

and

Mr.

her to the

hamlet where he lived was from a celebrated temple,

Rat, havingbeen broughtup in the odour

had all his life long been accustomed to sanctity, he There make pilgrimages to the great shrine. of an old priest, had formed the acquaintance who was good enough to providefor him out of the for gossip in return as to the doings templeofferings of his village, which happenedto be that in which had been born and bred. To him the the priest

of

rat

had

often unburdened 172

his mind, and

the

old


XXII

THE

had priest

come

RATS

DAUGHTER his friend*s

self-importance and his littleweaknesses,and had in vain impressed upon him the virtues of humility. Now

to

Mr.

Rat

see

could

had

become

now

him

insatiable

an

amongst

one

no

inform

village companionsto what

find

where

to

his

attain

desire, namely,

fine

marriagefor his daughter. So he turned and one to the templecustodian for advice, summer found him morn hammering on the gong which summoned his friend the priest. a

"

Mr.

Welcome,

for your visit ? had

shown

'*

him

Rat

; to

what

I indebted

am

for experience said the old priest, that his friend seldom came far so

afield unless he had

Thereupon Mr.

request to make.

some

unburdened

Rat

himself of all

and of the in his mind, of his aspiration, he had in ascertaining in what manner he difficulty

that

was

could

obtain it. did the

Nor

he

third

day

There

is

the

a

was

oracle

gave

answer

doubt that apart from

no

for

difficultone, and would consideration. However, on the

said the matter

requiremuch **

him, priest immediately satisfy

follows

as

the

:

gods there

exercises so beneficent or who powerful, Had I a a rule over us, as His Majestythe Sun. and did I aspire to such daughter, heightsfor her is no

one

so

my suit to him, and I you do, I should make of so doingwhen should take the opportunity he down earth at sundown, for then it is to our comes as

that he decks himself in his most moreover,

day'swork

he is is

more

done,

gorgeous

apparel;

approachedwhen readily and

he is about 173

to

take

his his


THE

well-earned but

DAUGHTER

RAT'S rest.

xxii

I would

I you

Were

lose

no

myselfin company with your wife and daughterto him honourable this very evening at the end of the great Cryptomeria it Avenue he especially honours at the hour when it with his beams." by flooding time,

"A

thousand

thanks/' said

is to be lost if I

time at

present

the time

placeyou

fortune

Good

"

and

to

am

I hail you the next time I to His Majestythe Sun." At to

were

the

be

get my

see

appointedhour seen

clothes ; and

as

rays illumined

folk

the

together

you

as

priest ;

"

may

father-in-law

parents and

in the avenue, the sun came

the

"No

Rat.

mention."

you,"said

to

Mr.

daughter

robed in their finest earthwards

and

his

the great pines, Mr. Rat, noway abashed, addressed His Majesty and at oncp informed him of his desire.

gloom

under

consideringthat one Majesty,evidently business personage addressing another should not time in beatingabout the bush, repliedas waste follows : I am extremelybeholden to you for to wed your kind intention of allowingme your and beautiful daughter,O Yuki honourable San, but may I ask your reason for selecting to be me His

**

your honourable

son-in-law

?"

replied,We have determined is the most to our daughter to whoever marry powerfulpersonage in the world, and that is why desire to oiFer her to you in marriage." we Yes," said His Majesty, you are certainly be the without in imagining me not to reason To

this Mr.

Rat

**

"

"

.

174


RAT'S

THE

XXII

DAUGHTER

august and

powerful person in the world ; but, it has been my misfortune to discover unfortunately, that there is one other even more powerfulthan I have no whose against plottings myself, power. It is to him that you should very certainly marry your daughter." "And ask you who that honourably may we most

potentatemay "

be ? " said Mr.

rejoinedthe Certainly,**

Cloud.

Oftentimes

illumine

the world

so

personage bestow It

her

on

across

my

no

one

is the

whom

honourable

It

is the

myselfto path and

O

you Yuki

hour

most

powerful

seek for your

San, you

must

else than the Cloud.*'

for both

father

of the Sun's advice, his suggestion they determined to wait to see

upon the Cloud

an

set

requiredlittle consideration

and mother

at

"

I have

comes

in the world

daughter,the

on

he

If, therefore,it

power.

and

when

Sun.

my face so that my subjects may not see me, in his long as he does this I am altogether

covers

and

Rat.

the wisdom

the very earliest opportunity, and before he rose from his bed, which he at

usuallymade on the slopesof a mountain some leaguesremoved from their village.So theyset out, and a longjourney theyhad, so long that Mr. Rat decided that if he was to present his daughter she was when lookingher best,the journeymust instead of arriving not be hurried. Consequently, at earlydawn, it was full afternoon when they neared the summit where the Cloud was apparently But he roused himself as he wrappedin slumber. and bade them welcome the family saw approaching, 175


THE in

urbane

so

a

DAUGHTER

this

honoured

the

xxii

that the Rat

manner

layhis requestbefore

to

To

RATS

Cloud

at

once

ceeded pro-

him.

answered, "I

condescension

am

indeed

in

proposingthat I should marry your beauteous daughter, O Yuki San. It is quitetrue, as His August Majestythe Sun says, that when I so desire I have the strength from exercising his power to stay him upon his and I should much the privilege esteem subjects, of wedding your daughter. But as you would singleout for that honour the most powerful person seek out His Majestvthe in the world, you must for as I have no Wind, againstwhom strength, by

your

he competes with me for supremacy fain flyaway to the ends of the earth." soon

as

"

You

word

your

whether

said the Rat,

me," surprise for it.

His

I would,

and shortly,

where

I may

I

afraid I

cannot

"

when

am

he

best

will be

meet

who subjects

act

theyare

all

now

this moment, in the Eastern at

as

my

outposts, but, as

moment

usually of my you

see,

restingquietly. His Majestyis I believe,holdinga court far out Seas.

Were

down to the seashore and is often somewhat inclined he

this way

him."

likelyto be his coming by harryingsome

announces

the time

but I take

tell you at the He this way.

is

must

ask you therefore,

Wind

Majestythe

"

I

I you await his

to

be

I would

go He

coming. short-tempered by

gets up into these mountainous

parts,

owing to the obstructions he has met with on his and he will have had few of these vexatious journey, the sea." annoyances duringhis ride over 176


THE

XXII

DAUGHTER

RAT'S

Now, althoughfrom the

looked

sea

of slopes

the

the mountain

it was very far distant,

not

in

reality

delicately-nurtured young ladysuch Yuki, and every mile of the journeythat she as Her had to traverse increased her querulousness. father had often boasted of the journeysthat he

a

for a

longway

taken down

had in

the coast, free of cost, concealed

to

of rice,and she would that there was to the no railway

truck-load

a

excuses

which

they were

no

pointat

Highnessthe Wind,

await His

to

take

althoughhad there been it would never have done for a party engaged on such an embassyto ride in truck. Nor was her humour a railway improved by the time theyhad to wait in the very secondafforded by a fishing rate accommodation hamlet,as of them

none

were

accustomed

to

a

fish fare.

But

after many

signsthat the great days there were with and they watched arriving, personage was the sea, although his passage over some trepidation when, in due time, he neared the shore theycould as to his strength, hardlycredit the Cloud^s assurance for he seemed of all that was the personification Rat at once the interposed gentle; and Madame remark that you should never judge a person^s character by what you hear, and that the Cloud owed the Wind a grudge. evidently So

Wind

the

it

as

making

knows

at

came

once over

in as

himself

unburdened the

towards

water

its face

itselfwas the Rat

Rat

with smiles. ripple the fairestgood humour

follows

:

"

Mr.

fullwell that I have 177

Cloud no

And

to

the

him,

the Wind

and addressed

and is a flatterer,

power

againsthim N


THE he

when

RAT'S

comes really

thunderous

moods.

from ?

come

is

daughtermust

sorry I

am

I

but

cannot

not

am

one

of his

powerful

Where

nonsense.

do you villagethere is

high wall that of your good neighbour. If fain marry the strongestthing

in the world, wed her to the wall. him a very stalwart spouse. I wish

I

in

the most

me

in that very the me, namely,

fences in the house your

call

Why,

stronger than

one

To

xxii

againstme

up

in the world

person

DAUGHTER

oflFeryou the

going in

You

will find

you

good day.

in my chariot, direction of that wall a

seat

to-day,else I should have had much pleasurein introducing your honourable self to my powerful antagonist." heartened, By this time the party was gettingmuch disand

the

of the

journeyand the were chagrinof so many disappointments beginning O Yuki San's beauty. But Mr. Rat said to tell on there was home nothing for it but to return ; he knew the wall in question very well, but had no idea it stood so high in the world's estimation he had alwaysthoughtof it as somewhat of a dullard. So theytrudgedhomewards, and it was weary stress

"

work, for the Cloud Wind

had

had

hidden

fretted the Cloud,

the Sun, and the who his illshowed

humour

of moisture he a surplusage by discharging had in his pocket, and theyapproached their home As luck out. wet through,bedraggledand worn would have it,justas they gainedthe wall which the wind had singled for its power, a heavier out and they were on downpour than ever came glad to

take

shelter under

the lee of the wall. 178

Now


Mr.

Wall

Mr.

it is

for his

known

from

said,arose

one

inquisitive side of his

being able to see what was going on on his leeward side addressing other ; and so hearing from that he had come Rat, and ascertaining

face the

alwaysbeen

had

which,

nature,

DAUGHTER

RAT'S

THE

XXII

never

sea, the

the

side

windward

at

whether

asked

once

of that scoundrel the Wind, who tidings alwayscoming and chafinghis complexion.

he had was

any

said Mr.

"Why," and recently,

he desired

to

the

said, was

he

who,

Rat,

"we

met

but

him

be remembered

to

strongest person

in

you, the

world." I the

"

his

It shows

strongest I

ignorance.

Why, onlyyesterday your nephew, the big brown rat, because he would not be at the trouble of going The round, must needs gnaw a hole through me. strongest thingin the world ! Why, next time the this way he'll rush through the hole wind comes and be telling your nephew that he's the strongest person in the world." rolled

the

this moment

At

the

by,and

rain

shone

sun

stopped,the

out, and

Mr.

themselves congratulating

clouds

and Mrs. that

they themselves by proposing had not had to demean their daughterin marriageto a neighbour with Rat went

such

her

false character. afterwards O And a month a

determination

parents not

home

were

fain

to to

provedhimself

in the world

her

marry

givetheir to

be the

?

179

Yuki

San

expressed

cousin, and

consent, for had

most

her he

powerfulperson


XXIII

LAND

THE

From

the

glorious

divine

the

of

of Invitation, and

with

Izanami,

the

mists

For

to

swirled

confusion

in

had

them to

been

given

consolidate

make,

driftinglands. had granted them

the

Her

the Lord

August-

And

this

to a

Floating down

end

the

feet.

their

arid

give

where

to

beneath

power and

Bridge

ment command-

birth

august

heavenly jewelled

the

to

powers And

spear.

the deities, standing upon Floating Bridge lowered the Heaven, jewelled spear head-first two

into

so

that

waited,

the

chaos,

they

the

mists

brine

divided.

were

dripped

And

by

His the

Invitation, his

Augustness, the Lord Her hand Augustness, lovely Younger 1

80

And,

from

the

of the

Sister, and

as

jewels

formed

there the was spear-head, and upon of Onogoro. is the island island. This

took

great

forth

issued

Lady of Invitation. the Together they stood upon and High Heaven, they looked

of

the

the

ness,

the

and

Augustncss,

him,

from

Heaven,

essence,

His

Izanagi,

"

of

vital

High

deities, there

eternal

heavenly pair

of

clouds

ether, the

concourse

YOMI

OF

an

Invitation,

Lady of together


THE

xxiii

they And

OF

LAND

descended

to

they made

the

YOMI

island that

the

islands of

created.

was

the land of

Japan;

lyo,which is called Lovely Princess ; the land of Toyo, which is called Luxuriant Sun Youth ; the Prince Boiled land of Sanuki,which is called Good Rice ; and Great Yamato, the Luxuriant Island of

the were

and many

Dragon Fly ;

more,

of which

to

tell

weariness.

Furthermore, theygave birth to many myriads the earth,and the air,and of deities to rule over the

deep

sea

;

and

for every

and every placewas deities, were

like the needles of the

Now,

when

the

time

season

there

sacred,for

the

pine trees

were

deities

in number.

for the Fire God,

came

be born, his mother, the Lady burned, and suffered a change ; and

Kagu-Tsuchi,to Izanami,

was

she laid herself upon the ground. Then Izanagi, the Prince who is it that asked, " What Invites, has

come

to

And

she

draws departure my ofYomi.^' And

His

droppinghis pillow. And deities. Then was

and

'*

lovelyYounger Sister ? time answered, weeping, "The

thee, my

near

I go

...

Augustness Izanagiwept

land

aloud,

her feet and upon her upon and became all his tears fell down

tears

the Lady Izanami Nevertheless, His

the

to

of

the Augustness,

wroth, and

Prince who lifted his face to High

departed. Invites, Heaven,

Thine cried, O Augustness,my lovely Younger Sister,that I should have given thee in "

exchangefor

this

singlechild

!"

And, drawingthe ten-grasp sword i8i

that

was


THE

LAND

YOMI

OF

xxiii

girdedupon him, he slew the Fire God, and bindingup his long hair,he followed Izanami

the

to

his child ; the Lady

of Yomi, the world

entrance

of the

And

she, the Princess who Invites, ing appearshe when forth as was to came alive, lovely

dead. as

she lifted up

And

greet him.

Palace of Hades

the

of the

curtain

that

theymight speaktogether. And the Lord Izanagisaid, I weary for thee, and the lands that thou lovelyYounger Sister, I created togetherare not finished making. "

my and

Therefore Then

back."

come

the

made

Lady

lord,and my

sweet

that thou

of the baked

eaten

"

spouse, it is very

not

camest

saying, My

answer,

sooner

unto

me,

of Yomi.

meats

lamentable

for I have

Nevertheless,

honoured in thy coming me dearly Elder Brother, here.Thine Augustness, my lovely if it may be, I will return with thee. I go to lay as

thou

hast

desire before the

my here

until I

again,and,

come

look upon me she spokeand left him.

seek

not

of Yomi.

Gods

if thou

love

till the time."

to

thou

Wait And

me, so

of the upon a stone at the entrance Palace of Hades until the sun set, and he was of gloom. And because she weary of that valley and plucked a comb tarried long,he arose from

Izanagisat

of his hair,and broke off a tooth from

the left tress one

he But

end of the drew he

round Thunder.

back

comb, the

and

about

her

They

of the

curtain

his beloved

saw

it to lighting

are

be

Palace

a

torch,

of Yomi.

and lying in corruption, the eight deities of

were

the 182

Fire

Thunder,

and

the


LAND

THE

xxiii

Black

Thunder, and the Earth Thunder, and

the

the

CleavingThunder, and and the Roaring Thunder, the Thunder, and Young

Couchant And

Thunder.

YOMI

OF

her

by

terrible

head

the

was

Great Thunder. And

Izanami

but

away,

put

to

me

seen

who

take and

Invites.

But

the

defilement.

my

on.

him

; so

But

toothed

then

Females the he

hair,and

cast

took

from

comb

stayedto a

the

wreath

his

of grapes, which he devour. And still pursued

multitudinous him.

from

and it fell to the

righttresses

it behind

of

ran

of Yomi

Females

Females

for his life, in the rocks of the valley he

gloom stumblingupon And tearingthe vine long hair he flungit behind him, groundand became many bunches fled

hast

slayHis Augustness,

of Yomi.

the Hideous

flee

thine also."

see

and bade them

the Lord

to

cried, "Thou

she called to her the Hideous

And

Yomi,

and

arose

shame, for thou hast

I will

Now

turned

Izanagi,being overawed,

When

and

close-

of his

long

it touched

ground it became a groove of bamboo shoots, and again the females stayedto devour ; and Izanagifled on, panting. his Younger But, in her wrath and despair, Sister sent after him the Eight Thunders, together the

with Hades

a

;

thousand

five hundred

warriors

drew yet he, the Prince of Invitation,

ten-grasp sword

him, and

and that

of the

augustlygirded upon it behind him gained at last brandishing was

Pass base of the Even of Yomi. he And mouth the

183

of Hades, the

black

plucked there

three


THE

peachesthat

LAND

YOMI

OF

xxiii

his upon a tree, and smote enemies that they all fled back ; and the peaches called Their Divine Great were Augustnesses, grew

Fruit.

Then,

last of

Princess who

all,his Younger Sister,the to out Invites,herself came pursue.

Izanagitook a rock which could not have been lifted by a thousand men, and placed it between them Pass of Hades. in the Even And standing and behind the rock,he pronounceda leave-taking words of separation. But, from the farther side of called to him, "My the rock, Izanami lovely of small avail Elder Brother, Thine Augustness, shall be thy making of lands,and thy creatingof for I, with my powers, shall strangle deities, every day a thousand of thypeople.** So she cried, him. taunting But he answered her, "My lovelyYounger if thou dost so, I shall Sister,Thine Augustness, day, fifteen hundred to be born. cause, in one So

Farewell." the Lady who Invites,is Augustness, called the Queen of the Dead. But the great lord.His Highness,the Prince who Invites, departed, crying, Horror ! Horror ! Horror ! I have come to a hideous and polluted he lay still by the river-side, until land.'* And So Her

"

such time

as

he should

recover

purification.

184

to perform strength


XXIV

THE

SPRING

LOVER LOVER

AUTUMN

This

gods and

story

of the

still walked

upon

is

a

took

pleasure

THE

AND

the

the

in

of

youth

of the

Land fresh

when

Yamato,

and

Reed

waving

the Plains

rice-ears

of the

country-side. There of was a lady having in her something and earth She a something of heaven. was king's She was daughter. augustly radiant and renowned. She called the Dear the was Delight of the World, of the She Fair. was Greatly Desired, the Fairest and slender at once mysterious and strong, gay, fickle yet faithful, gentle yet hard The to please. gods loved her, but men worshipped her. The this Delight was coming of the Dear on wise. Ama Boko red Prince had a jewel of one of his enemies. The a jewel was peace-oifering. Prince He

said,

jewel Her Prince

Boko

Ama "

This

set

is

a

it in

name

the

was

Ama

Boko

of

jewel

transformed

was

into

an

of

Lady took

casket

a

her 185

upon

price.**

a

Then

stand. the

exceeding fair lady. Red the Jewel, and to

wife.

There

was


SPRING born

to

them

LOVER

AUTUMN

AND

only daughter,who

one

GreatlyDesired,the Fairest of It is true that eightymen and

hand.

her

seek

deities.

from far.

Princes

They

Across

came

the Sea Path

the

was

the Fair.

of

name

and

theywere, from

xxiv

near

and

theycame

to

came

warriors,

theycame in great brave and

white sails or creakingoars, with ships, lustysailors. Through the forestsdark and dangerous made their the to Princess,the they way Desired ; or lightly, theydescended lightly Greatly by way of the FloatingBridge in garments of glamour and silver-shod. They broughttheir gifts with them gold,fair jewelsupon a string, light of feathers, singingbirds,sweet thingsto garments eat, silk cocoons, oranges in a basket. They brought and dancers and tellersof tales minstrels and singers "

to

the Greatly entertain the Princess, Desired. she sat still in her white As for the Princess,

bower

with

wood,

and

her

maidens

about

her.

Passingrich her robe,and ever and anon her maidens spread was the mats, set out her deep sleeves, it afresh over or her long hair with a goldencomb. combed about the bower was of white Round a gallery here the

presence of their

suitors

came

and

knelt

in the

liegelady.

and

Many many a time the carp leaptin the gardenfish-pond. Many and many a time a scarlet pomegranate flower flutteredand droppedfrom the tree. Many and many a time the ladyshook her head and Now went

to

his way, sad and sorry. it happened that the God of Autumn

a

lover went

try his fortune with i86

the

Princess.

He


SPRING

XXIV

was

brave

a

the

AND

flamed

colour

;

was

girdedwith

Ardent

in his dark

sword

a

LOVER

indeed.

man

young

eyes

AUTUMN

that

ten

cheek. could

men

his

were

He not

lift. The his his

of autumn burned upon chrysanthemums in cunning broidery. He came and bent coat proud head to the very ground before the

then Princess,

raised it and

eyes. She opened her said nothing but shook

red

sweet

of Autumn

the God

waited

lips "

"

her head.

"

So

her full in the

looked

forth from

went

presence, blinded with his bitter tears. He found his younger brother,the

her

of

God

Spring. fares it with

How

"

of

the God

Spring.

111,ill indeed,for

"

is the

Ah, my

"

You'd with

But "

she will not

proudlady. Mine

"

over

brother ? *' said

you, my

brother best

of

What,"

home

with

Spring. for all is

me,

of Autumn.

the God

I stay here." is it likely, then,

Springsaid,

"

cried his

heart.'* of

said the God

She

me.

is the broken

'*

come

us," said

the God

!

have

brother,

"

of me ? you if she'll have none the smooth cheeks of a child and

that she will take Will

she

flout the brother ? "

"

"

A

full grown

She'll

wager " I'll

!

A

give you

in grief

!"

wager a

merry

lose her, the

my

Will

?

laugh at you go," said the

saki for the

If you drown

man

Still I will

cried. her

love

you go

to

her,

for your pains." God of Spring. the God

of Autumn

cask of saki if you win feast of your wedding.

saU

it."

187

will

be

for

me.

I'll


SPRING

AUTUMN

AND

LOVER of

"Well, brother,"said the God

xxiv

"

Spring,

I

You'll have your saki like enough take the wager. indeed." of Autumn, I think," said the God "And so his ways. and went of Springwent Then the young God to his

mother, who "

Do

loved him.

you

love me,

answered,

She

mother

my

?

"

than

"More

he said. hundred

a

existences."

Mother," he said, get me for my wife the the Fairest of the Fair. She is called the Princess, do I desire oh, greatly, GreatlyDesired ; greatly, "

"

her." "

You

*'

More

love

her,my

than

a

?"

son

hundred

said his mother.

he said. existences," son, my best beloved,lie

lie down, my and I will work for you." down and sleep, So she spreada couch for him, and when was asleepshe looked on him. "

Then

face,"she said,"is the

"Your

sweetest

he

thing

in the world." There

but she

sleepfor her the live-long night, she knew where to a place of, swiftly droopedover a stillpool. She plucked

was

went

the wistaria

no

her sprays and tendrils and broughthome as much she could carry. The wistaria was white and as

purple,and

you flower,but hidden she

also,and

in the

magicallya

wove a

In the

bow

know

must

and

it

was

not

unopenedbud.

robe.

She

yet in From

it

fashioned sandals

arrows.

morning she

waked i88

the God

of

Spring.


SPRING

XXIV

robe

LOVER

son," she said,"let

Come, my

"

AUTUMN

AND

put this

me

you."

on

of

God

The

Springrubbed courting,"he said.

suit for

mother

bade him.

his eyes. " A But he did

he bound

And

the

sober

his

as

sandals

on

and slungthe bow and the arrows in their feet, quiveron his back. Will all be well,my mother ? he said. will be well, beloved," she answered "All his

"

"

him. of

So the God

of the Fair. said

And

before the Fairest

Springcame

of her maidens

one

laughedand

:

"

See, mistress,there

little plainboy,all in sober

onlya But

the

The "

wistaria

burst into flower.

and

white

grey."

lifted up her eyes of Spring. And in the

the God

upon

moment

clothed

to-day

you

the Fairest of the Fair

and looked same

to woo

comes

purplefrom

Princess

from

rose

He

head

Lord," she said,

"

I

which

with

was

sweet-scented,

was

to

he

heel.

the white am

mats.

if you

will

togetherto

the

yours

have me." Hand

of the God

mother "

with

me.

from

won

He

My

they went of Spring.

mother," he said,

Ah, my ?

now

hand

in

"

brother He

will

him

in

will seek to take "

Be

the God not a

our

is angry the saki I have

Great

lives."

is his rage.

,

beloved," said his mother, still,

not." 189

shall I do

of Autumn

give me

wager.

what

"

and fear


SPRING She took

a

AND

AUTUMN

LOVER

xxiv

cane

of hollow

bamboo, and

in the

she put salt and stones wrapped the cane round with

hollow

the smoke The

"

do, my

of the fire.

sink,you

she hung it in leaves,

said

:

must

you sink. like the ebb tide." fail, so

must

You

must

The must

the tale is told,and all the world knows Spring is fresh and merry and young, and

Now

why

she had

green leaves fade and die. So you eldest bom, the God of Autumn.

sinks in the sea,

stone

She

and when

;

Autumn

the saddest

thingthat

190

is.


XXV

STORY

STRANGE

THE

GOLDEN

In

North.

Hasunuma Now

of

and

of

house

Or

the

And

as

comb

very

he

and

The

day,

born

child

the

to

selfsame

Aiko,

called

girl they

Saito.

born

was

boy

arms.

other

was

there

of the

in

the

the

upon

hour,

Sendai

brothers

daughter

a

and

son.

the

wife

the

to

they which

away fine work,

the

aroused

was

her

Saito

the

shall

called means

in

a

chest.

It

was

well and

ire

but

;

his house, of

his 191

innocent another.

one

gave

a

golden

For the saying : Aiko's enough." handkerchief, and "

old

be

with

to

Saito

comb

adorned

very

of

Hasunuma,

she

their

over

betrothed wife

of

when

in

it

passed

were

the

wrapped

upon

had

a

the

This came

a

token

hair

mother

named,

that

year children

a

to

child^s

and

in

of Love.

ever

heads

laid

Saito

Child

the

friends

selfsame

and

Konojo,

dwelt

Hasunuma,

the

in

samurai

was

happened

it

house

one

THE

COMB

days two They were

ancient

OF

of

gold lacquer,

golden dragon-flies. before

long

for, by

feudal

sad

misfortune

mischance,

lord, and

he

was


STORY fain

OF

THE

flyfrom

to

GOLDEN

Sendai

and by night,

him, and the child.

with

COMB

No

xxv

his wife knew

man

was

where

of them, nor of how theywent, or had any news they fared,and for long,long years Hasunuma heard

not

child Aiko

The

had

She

Sendai.

she

and city,

the

She

seen.

of the

as

a

than

maiden

dancer graceful of the sea,

wave

bamboo

or

a

and light,

the Water

ladyin

cloud

Sendai.

Aiko

but

streets

moon

ever

Iris ; and

of Sendai, folk said,"There and the south wind."

the

in

grass in the wind. than she, younger

moons

Aiyame, or

any

brown, quick,and Aiyam6 was laughing. When theywent abroad in

white,

was

the most

was

the second loveliest

was

be the loveliest ladyin

longerhair

the wild

called

to

grew

sister eleven

a

was

she

moved

sky,or

She had who

of them.

word

one

idle

the

go

day when all the air was the cicala sang ceaselessly as he swung the pomegranate bough, the maidens rested on on of their ladymother^s bower. the cool white mats Upon an and languid,

Their

dark locks

summer

loose,and their slender feet

were

them ancient bare. They had between an Bride Box of their lady chest of red lacquer, a mother's, and in the chest they searched and were

rummaged "

for

said Aiyam6, See, sister,"

thongs,the what

very

is this ?

beautiful ! Aiko this

treasure.

A

thing for

my

here

"

sandals

crystal rosary, I

scarlet

are .

declare !

.

.

and

How

"

said, My

lengthof

"

violet

mother, I pray you giveme silk,it will make me very fine 192


STORY

XXV

OF

undersleeves let

to

have

me

THE

grey gown for a crimson

the

dragged silver !

"

do

need

not

an

it from

petticoat ; and

this little bit of

cried Aiyam6, as obi^'^ the chest, "grass green she

Springinglightly up,

lengthabout

her

slender

body.

shall be the she

daughterof

this wonder

sees

the rich

she and

wound

the

behold

"Now

for the finest ladyin all Sendai.

me

and, mother,

;

"

what

"And

COMB

new

my

mother, you surely, brocade ?

GOLDEN

Very

envious

Hachiman, when

obi ; but I shall be calm

and say, lookingdown careless,

thus

and

humbly, Your that I wear this foolish trifling pardon,noble lady, for your great presence I obi^unmeet Mother, mother, giveme the obi'^ Arab ! Arab ! Little pirates said the ! mother, and smiled. *

*

"

"

thrust

Aiko chest. "

a

Here

"

littlecasket

How

her

hand

the

to

is somethinghard," she

wrapped in

a

it smells of orris and

of the

bottom

murmured,

silken handkerchief. ! spices

ancient

now

"

"

the she unwound So saying, may it be ? kerchief and openedthe casket. "A goldencomb !*' what

she said,and laid it on her knee. " Give it here,child,"cried the mother " it is not for your eyes." But

the

the maiden

golden comb.

fine work, adorned For her

a

time

her eyes upon quitestill, of gold lacquer, It was very with goldendragon-flies. sat

the maiden

mother, though she

lightLady of the

quickly;

South

was

said

a

troubled

Wind 193

not

seemed

word, ;

and

did

nor

the

even

stricken into o


STORY

OF

and silence,

and

COMB

GOLDEN

THE

the scarlet sandal

drew

xxv

thongsthrough

through her fingers.

Aiko

at

of this

what

Mother,

"

and

said

last.

My sweet, it is Konojo, the son

"

?"

golden comb

the love-token

of Saito, for you But

in your cradles. fifteenyears since Saito went

betrothed

night,he

all his

and

between

house,

two

and

were

it is full

now

from

you

Sendai in the left no trace

behind." love dead ? " said Aiko.

Is my

"

that

"Nay,

I know

not

but

"

he

will

never

of him, my I beseech you, think no more pretty bird. There, get you your fan,and dance and for your sister." for me come

; so,

Aiko

Then

she

like

a

first set

flungopen

her fan to dance.

of the sea,

wave

in her

goldencomb

the

or

a

She moved

cloud of the

She had grass in the wind. long before she droppedthe fan,with a that hour she

From

in her bed She

could

nor

her

South

her

mother, Wind, were

she Presently is

more

was

than

I

nor

she had

her

turned can

long cry,

to

pleasure rain at night no

her father, the Lady of the sister,

more.

any

able

danced

lovelorn and forsaken.

sunrise and the sound of

nothingto

were

not

length upon the ground. in a piteous way, and lay

like a maid sighing, not eat nor sleep;

in life. The

the

sky,or

wild bamboo

and she herself fell her

hair.

Not

giveher

her face

to

any

ease.

the wall.

"

understand,"she said,and

It so

died. When

the they had prepared 194

poor young

maid


STORY

XXV

OF

COMB

GOLDEN

THE

for her grave, her mother crying,to look at came, her for the last time. And she set the golden in the maid's

comb

My

"

hair,saying: littlechild,I pray that

dear

own

in other

know happiness.Therefore take may your goldentoken with you ; you will have need the wraith of your lover." of it when you meet lives you

she believed that

Konojo was

But, alas,for Karma

that is

For

had

moon

brave young at

the maid man,

so

in her

been

dead. one pitiless,

grave

her betrothed,came

to

short

when

the

claim

her

her father's house.

of Saito,alas, brave young late you have come ! too man, my Your joy is turned to mourning,for your bride lies Alas and

"

in the

moonlightto spoke Hasunuma

the

water pour the samurai.

weeping

of the dead.*'

there are Lord," said the brave young man, and the sword, the strong girdle, ways left, "

"

three the

son

the green grass, and her sister goes

under

Thus

alack,Konojo,the

river.

These

are

the

short roads

to

Yomi.

Farewell." held the young man by the arm. Nay, then, thou son of Saito,"he said," but hear road to the fourth way, which is far better. The But Hasunuma

"

Yomi

is

short,but

it is very dark ; moreover,

the confines of that country few return. stay with me, Konojo,and comfort me

age, for I have So

no

from

Therefore in my

old

sons."

Konojo entered

the household

the samurai^and dwelt in the

gate. 195

of Hasunuma

gardenhouse by the


STORY Now

wife

THE

OF in the

and

the

GOLDEN

third

month

daughterthat

earlyand dressed and presently were temple they were

COMB

xxv

Hasunuma

and

left them

was

his

arose

in garments of ceremony, borne away in kago^for to the

them

and

bound,

to

their ancestral

theyoffered prayers and incense the live-long day. It was when theyreturned, and brightstarlight cold the nightwas, stilland frosty.Konojo stood and waited the garden gate. He waited for at He drew his their home-coming, as was meet. tombs, where

cloak about

evening.

and gave ear to the noises of the heard the sound of the blind man's

him He

whistle,and the off he

Far

heard

staffupon

the

laugh twice

;

blind man's

heard

a

child

singingin chorus, as

men

cheer themselves

in their

of song he heard

the

that the

bore

men

men

stones.

then

who

he

sing to

labour,and in the pauses creak,creak of swingingkago upon their shoulders,and he

said, They come.'* "

"

I go to the house ofthe Beloved^ Her plum tree stands by the eaves

;

It isfullofblossom. The dew So

liesin the heart

theyare

of the flowers^ the drinking-cups ofthe sparrows.

do you go to your love's house ? wind. Even upon the wingsofthe night

How

road leads to your love's house ? All the roads in the world.*^

Which

This

was

the song of the

196

kagomen.

First the


OF

STORY

XXV

GOLDEN

THE

COMB

the samurai turned in at the kago of Hasunuma garden gate, then followed his lady; last came Upon the roof of Aiyame of the South Wind. her kagothere laya blossomingbough. Rest well, lady," said Konojo,as she passed, "

and had

back.

answer

no

Howbeit

it seemed

that

kago^and fell with a little noise to the ground. He stooped comb. and picked up a woman's of gold It was lacquer,very fine work, adorned with golden and warm Smooth it layin the hand dragon-flies. he went of Konojo. And his way to the garden lightthing droppedfrom

some

of the

the hour

the

the

samurai young his book of verse, laid himself upon his threw down bed, and blew out his light. And the selfsame house.

At

he heard

moment

a

wanderingstep without.

it be that visits the garden may " by night? said Konojo,and he wondered. the wanderingfeet till at and about went

And

"

house About

who

and lengththey stayed, an

Konojo !

Konojo !

"

What

is it ?

**

Open, open

**

Who

"

I

am

with

'*

"

said the samurai. I

;

am

afraid.*' *'

why are you afraid ? night. I am the daughter the samurai. Open to me for gods." .

the love of the

Konojo undid the

face,for she

to

find

threshold.

held

.

.

the latch and slid back

gardenhouse

lady upon

touched

was

you, and afraid of the are

of Hasunuma

of the

the door

hand.

uncertain

"

rat

her

a

He

slender and

could

long sleeve 197

the door

so

drooping

not as

to

see

her

hide it


STORY from

him

OF but

;

frailshoulders "Let

asked her Are

xxv

swayedand trembled,and with sobbing.

perplexed,Konojo

:

Aiyam6,whom

you

I

"

Lady,you

am

The

theycall

the

Lady

Wind?"

"

she." comb

do

!

"

me

much

honour."

she

said, "

the

goldencomb

she said this,she threw the veil from face,and takingthe robe of Konojo in both As

littlehands,she looked

into his eyes as forth his very soul. The

draw

would

her

forthwith

in," .she moaned, and

gardenhouse. smiling and much

South

"

COMB

GOLDEN

the

Half

ofthe

she

shook

me

entered

"

THE

!" her

her

though she lady was

and

quick and light. Her eyes and her for laughing,and passingstrange made lipswere then. she looked in the guisethat she wore The comb ! she said, the goldencomb ! I have it here," said Konojo ; only let go brown

"

"

"

"

"

my

"

I will fetch it you."

robe,and

lady cast herself down upon the white mats in a passion of bitter tears, and Konojo, his hands together, pressed quite poor unfortunate, At

this the

beside himself. do ? " he said ; " what to do ? " At last he raised the lady in his arms, stroked her littlehand to comfort her. "

"

What

to

Lord,"

she

said,as simplyas

a

and

child, lord, "

"

do you love me ? And he answered more

than many

her in

lives,O

" I love you moment, Lady of the South Wind."

198

a


STORY

XXV

"

said,"

answered

her,

COMB

GOLDEN

THE

she

Lord,"

then ?

OF

will

with

come

you

me

"

He

Yomi,"

"

Even

of

land

the

to

and took her hand.

theywent into the night,and theytook the road together.By river-side they went, and over plainsof flowers ; theywent by rockyways, or through the whispering pines,and when they had wandered far enough,of the green bamboos they built them a little house to dwell in. And theywere there for a year of happydaysand nights. Now a morning of the third month upon with Konojo beheld men kago come swinging throughthe bamboo grove. And he said : "What have they to do with us, these men and their kago? to bear us Lord," said Aiyam6, theycome Forth

"

"

"

to

father's house."

my He

will

cried,

not

Indeed, and

"

Go

to

I

am

go,"said Konojo ;

the "

lady. for me,

as

I

happy."

Ah, lord,"she said, ah, my dear, do you love me less,who vowed to go with me, even "

the Land

Then broke

must

we

you, then," said

stay here where then

We

go."

"

"

is this foolishness ?

What

"

a

of Yomi did

?

"

all that

she

blossomingbough

from

he

by and laid it upon the swiftly theywere Swiftly, a men sang as they went, light. near

199

would. a

And

that grew

tree

roof of her

kago.

borne, and song

to

he

make

the

kago-

labour


OF

STORY

GOLDEN

THE

COMB

I go to the house ofthe Be loved ^ Her plum tree stands by the eaves

'*

xxv

;

It isfullofblossom.

liesin the heart

The dew

oftheflowers the drinking-cups ofthe sparrows. j

So

they

are

do you go to your lovers house ? wind. upon the wingsofthe night

How Even

Which road leads

your lovers house ? All the roads in the world.^' This

the song of the

was

kagomen. nightfall they came

About

the

to

house

Go

you

the South

dear

in,my

Wind.

"

lord,"said

I will wait

Lady of

the

if my him the

without

;

father is very wroth with you, only show with that she took And goldencomb." hair and

her

gave hand.

his

lay in

of

the samurai.

Hasunuma "

to

it him. Then

and

Smooth

Konojo

it from warm

it

into

the

home, Konojo, son

of

went

house.

"Welcome, Saito !

"

cried

welcome Hasunuma.

adventure knightly Knightly adventure I

with your "

How

"

"

?

it fared

has

"

said

Konojo,

and

blushed. "

It is

a

year since your

sudden

and departure,

supposedthat you had gone upon a quest, or laid upon your soul." of some in the expiation vow Alas, my good lord,"said Konojo, I have sinned against And your house." you and against we

"

"

he told Hasunuma When

what

he had made

he had done. an 200

end of his tale

:


OF

STORY

XXV

THE

GOLDEN

Boy," said the samurai^ jestis ill-timed. Know

"

COMB

"

merry

as

even

dead.

one

sickness and

none

jest,but

your

that my child lies year she has aeither risen She is visited by a heavy

a

smiled.

spoken nor

nor

For

you

heal her.

can

Sir," said Konojo, your child,the Lady of the South Wind, waits in a kago without your "

"

gardenwall. I will fetch her in presently." the young man Forth they went and together, the samuraiy but they found no kago without the and no lady. Only a gardenwall, no kagoA"t,zxtx% blossom broken bough of withered lay upon the ground. Indeed, indeed, she

"

here

was

but

now

her comb me Konojo. "She gave See, my lord,here it is." goldencomb. is this,Konojo ? Where What comb

cried

"

"

you

this comb

and

buried

that

with

set

was

her

in

beneath

a

dead the

maid's

!" her

got

hair,

grass ? Where got you the comb of Aiko, the Lady of the Moon, that died for love ? Speak,Konojo,son of This

Saito.

is

a

strange

green

thing."

Konojo stood amazed, and leaned bewildered againstthe garden wall, a She moved lightly through the trees.

whilst

Now silent and

ladycame

of the sea, or a cloud of the sky,or the wild bamboo grass in the wind. "Aiyam6," cried the samurai^ "how are you able to leave your bed ? " said nothing,but fell on his The man young as

a

wave

knees came

beside

the

garden wall.

him

and

bent

to

so 201

There

that her

the

hair and

lady her


OF

STORY

COMB

GOLDEN

THE

garments overshadowed

xxv

him,

and

her

I

the

of spirit

held

eyes

his. "

Lord/# she said, I

your love.

pityon for

with

went

I

tears.

my

short year sister. And now

one

my

am

The

to

Aiko dwell

took

dead

very

return, and sweet body of

permittedto

was

inhabit

to

heart

broken

a

of Yomi.

the shades

with

"

the is

time

my

I go my

come.

the grey country. I shall be the happiest Now I have known soul in Yomi you, beloved. in your arms, for I grow very faint." take me

ways

to

"

that she sank

With

put his

His

his heart.

ground,and Konojo laid her head against

the

and

her forehead.

fell upon

tears

me," she said, that you the Lady of wife Aiyam6,my sister, Promise

"

to

her

about

arms

to

*'

will the

take

South

Wind." "

"

Ah," he cried, my ladyand she said. Promise, promise," "

Then

he

After

a

"

What

promised.

littleshe stirred in his is it ?

soft her

So

** love 1

my

"

arms.

he said.

voice

silence but floated upon " The comb," she

that

it did

not

break

the

it.

murmured,

"

the

golden

comb." And A

Konojo set

burden, pale but breathing, Konojo carried of Hasunuma

into the house

white hours

it in her hair.

mats a

and

young

and

silken cushions.

maid

sat

up 202

and

laid upon the And after three

rubbed

her

sleepy


STORY

XXV

eyes.

She

OF

brown

was

laughing. Her

hair

cheeks, unconfined stared firstat that

man

was

THE

GOLDEN and

COMB

quick and

tumbled

was

any braid her father,and then in

by

her

bower.

lightand

about

comb.

or

She

her rosy

at

the

She young

smiled, then

flushed,and put her little hands before her face.

Greeting,O Lady of Konojo. "

203

the

South

Wind,"

said


XXVI

THE

Once

as

upon fellow.

the

and

full

these.

as

He

walk

upon was

his

little

feet

the

land

as

end,

school.

he

he

he

She

right.

would

It all

and

that

fins than

he

in

could

the

sea.

beloved of

spite

this, to

come

a

books

at

in

this

about

came

and

all

his

mind

not

round

more

would

he

said

had

was

In

King.

because

and

scales

so

some hand-

very

swim

as

gay,

always

was

well,

well

Dragon

he

but

as

was

a

glittering

have,

had

grandmother

bad

had

fishes

and

JOURNEY

beautiful,

was

He

other

A

jelly-fishwas

form

His

merry of the

trusted

the

time

a

moon.

tail

a

He

TAKES

JELLY-FISH

wise.

The the

Dragon

took

folk

in

last

day

near,

and

good nor

Lady

young

She

at recover

The

King

to

bed

Dragonland was

at

they

all could

and

hand. dosed

they

her

of her

Dragon

King

their Doctors

her

and

do

fell

heads came

they

her, the

bled

poor

204

beside

sick.

and

wise

and

said

her

from

far

and

her, young

sickness. was

when

very

there,

stayed

shook

wed

lately

wife

his

Dragon

her

but

was

himself.

but

no

thing,


THE

XXVI

JELLY-FISH

Heart's Desire," he said to his would givemy lifefor you/' "

Howbeit, if you

"

I will

will fetch

monkey'sliver

monkey'sliver

A

it do

1

"

me,'* she answered.

me

monkey'sliver

a

it and live."

eat

A

"

"

good would

Little

"

palebride,

!"

cried the

You

!

talk

Dragon King. wildly,O light

of mine

shall I find a monkey'sliver ? How eyes. Know one, that monkeys dwell in you not, sweet whilst we the trees of the forest, in the deep are sea

?

"

Tears

down

ran

the

Dragon Queen's lovely

countenance. "

If I do

not

have

the

monkey'sliver,I

shall

die," she said. the

Then

the

Dragon went

jelly-fish. The Queen must

have

"

said,

"

"

to

cure

a

to

him

monkey'sliver,"he

her of her sickness."

will she do with

What

forth and called

the

monkey'sliver ?

"

asked the

jelly-fish. Why, she will eat it,"said the Dragon King. Oh ! said the jelly-fish. said the King, "you must "Now," go and fetch me live monkey. I have heard that they a "

"

"

dwell swim

with "

with "

in the

tall

of the forest. Therefore and bring a monkey jelly-fish,

trees

quickly,O you back again." How me

Tell

?

"

will I get the monkey said the jelly-fish.

him

Dragonland.

to

of all the beauties and

Tell him ^

he will be 20S

come

back

of pleasures

happy here

and


THE that he

JELLY-FISH

play with

may

xxvi

mermaids

all the

day

long/' said the

"Well,"

FU jelly-fish,

tell him

"

that."

Off

jelly-fish ; and

till at last he reached

swam,

the

the

set

tall

of the

trees

he

and

swam

the shore where

forest.

And,

he

grew

enough,

sure

in the branches of a monkey sitting persimmon tree, eatingpersimmons. The very thing," said the jelly-fish to himself; there

a

was

"

"

I'm in luck."

monkey," he said, Dragonlandwith me ?

will you

should I get there ? "

said the

"

Noble

"

come

to

"

"

How

sit

"Only "

on

and 111 take you

at

my

back,"

there ;

said the

have you'll

monkey. jelly-fish, trouble

no

all." "

Why

monkey. "

should I go there,after all ? " I am very well off as I am."

Ah," said

little of all

know

Dragonland. is long. You Besides,you "

said the

it's plainthat you jelly-fish, the beauties and pleasures of you will be happy as the day "

great riches and

will win

play with

I'll come," said the

the

honour.

mermaids

from

monkey.

down from the persimmon tree slipped back. jumped on the jelly-fish's of them were When the two about half-way the jelly-fish to Dragonland, laughed. Now, jelly-fish, why do you laugh? said the jelly-fish. I laugh for joy," When And

over

There

may tilleve."

morn

and

the

"

he

"

"

"

"

206


THE

XXVI

JELLY-FISH

master, the Dragon King,will get your liver,and giveit to my mistress the Dragon Queen to eat, and then she will recover from her sickness."

Dragonland, my

to

come

you

"

My liver ? said the monkey. Why, of course,"said the jelly-fish.

"

"

**

alack," cried the

and

Alas

if it'smy

grievedindeed,but it with

I haven't

monkey, Vm liver you'rewanting "

To

tell you the truth,it I justtook it out and hung

me.

weighspretty heavy,so branch of that

persimmon tree where you found me. Quick,quick,let's go back for it." Back they went, and the monkey was up in the persimmon tree in a twinkling. "Mercy me, I don't see it at all,"he said. it upon

"

a

Where

if some surprised

rascal has stolen had jelly-fish

if the

Now

he

school,would

been

have

monkey ? You may believe alwayssaid he would I shall be

"

monkey. land.

"

The

The

best be

King

would

best of

You

monkey

it,"he said.

minded

his books

hoodwinked

at

by the mother grand-

not.

But

his

come

to

bad end.

a

for you to be call for me another day. be

can

and

findingit,"said the home to Dragongetting

the

loath

partedon jelly-fish

the

Dragon King set eyes on the monkey ?" he said.

the

terms.

The

minute

the

"Where's jelly-fish, "

be

not

time

some

You'd

after dark.

out

I should

mislaid it ?

I have

can

I'm

to

call for him

And jelly-fish.

another

day,"said

he told all the tale. 207

the


THE The

JELLY-FISH

Dragon King

flew into

called his executioners

He

and

a

xxvi

toweringrage.

bid them

beat the

jelly-fish. "

"

Break

beat him

every to

a

in his

bone

As to

he ! Jelly jelly-fish

this very day.' for the young Dragon to

Queen, she

she heard the story. If I can't have a monkey'sliver I

was

fain

laughwhen "

Give it," she said. and I will get up, for brocade gown do

cried ;

jelly."

Alas for the sad fate of the remains

body,"he

without

"

deal better."

208

me

must

my

I feel a

needs best

good


XXVII

URASHIMA

Urashima

was

night

Every both

fishes

fisherman

of the

he

his

small,

Upon a certain night the making plain the paths of the kneeled the

his

in

and

boat

the upon that listed

spread

waves,

boat

or

drifted And

he

him

made

moon

the

Then she

took

him. her

the

upon She sea

He

said,

She

told

right

till his

paid to

came

of the

fisherman

in

hand

in

hair

lay

heed

no

to

haunted

a

his He

place.

sleeping, for

nor

cold

Deep

Sea

arose,

arms,

and

sank

sea

the

and

long did she him, spell upon held

his

eyes

and with

She

cave.

and

sea

him

Who

her

her

to

her

to "

Urashima

trailingfishing-net.

Daughter

cast

songs

his

he

brightly,

And

sea.

sea

Thus

shone

moon

he

waking

sandy bed,

a

the

mad.

down,

down,

him, him

neither

was

his

to

caught

He

upon darkness.

leaned,

and

till he

his boat

in

he

Sea.

trade.

dabbled

Low

water.

green

Inland

being

of

hours

long living.

his

plied

and

great the

through made

a

look and

with

laid

upon sang hers.

"

are

him, "The

lady ? Daughter of you,

209

the

Deep

Sea." p


URASHIMA Let

"

wait and

go home," he said ; tired."

me are

"

Nay, rather stay with me,"

"

"

XXVII

littlechildren

my

she said

:

Urashima^ Thou Fisherman

ofthe

Inland Sea^

Thou art

beautiful ; Thy longhair is twisted round Go not from me^ Onlyforgetthyhome.'^ "

Ah, now," said the fisherman, let be, for the "

gods*sake.

dear

she said

But "

my heart ;

I would

...

go

to

mine

own."

again:

Urashima^ Thou Fisherman

ofthe

Inland Sea^

thycouch with pearl; ril spread thycouch with seaweed and seafowers; Thou shalt he King ofthe Deep Sea^ And we will reign together. ril

set

^^

"

Let

me

littlechildren wait and But "

she said

Urashima

said

home,"

go

Urashima

"

;

my

tired."

are

:

:

ofthe Inland Sea, he afraid ofthe Deep Sea tempest;

Thou Fisherman

Never We

will rollrocks about

Neither be

afraidofthe

our

cavern

doors ;

drowned dead;

Thou shalt not die''

"Ah,

now,"

said the 210

fisherman,"let

be, for


URASHIMA

XXVII

the

dear

gods' sake.

I would

...

mine

to

go

own/*

Staywith me this one Nay, not one." Then the Daughterof

night."

"

"

Urashima

I will stay with you So after the nightwas the sand and

to

Are

"

Deep

Sea wept, and

her tears.

saw

this

he said. night," she broughthim passed,

"

up

the

we

the seashore. ? " she said.

your home

near

one

told her, " Within a stone's throw." "Take of me." this,"she said,"in memory He

She

gave him rainbow-tinted

a

casket and

its

of

mother-of-pearl ; it was of coral and of were clasps

jade. Do

"

not no

open more

seen,

As to

" O fisherman,do open it,"she said ; with that she sank and was it." And

not

come

the

for Urashima, he ran his dear home. to

laughed for joy. catch the "

And

he

And

"

Soon

he he

they do

Now

the as

tossed up

pine trees

he

he

went

the casket

to

sweet

scent

of

the

he went

So

call that

strange

Sea.

Deep

sun. "

note.

the

beneath

Ah, me," he said, the

pines! a

Daughterof

when

to his children with calling had taught them, like a sea-bird's It is ? said, Are they yet asleep "

not

he

me."

answer

to

came

his house

he found

four

Nightshadeflourished threshold, death lilies by the hearth, soul was there. and ladyfern. No living

lonelywalls, moss-grown. on

the

dianthus "

Now

what

is this ? " 211

cried Urashima.

"

Have


URASHIMA wits ?

I lost my sea

?

down

sat

dear

eyes in the

deep

children ? He

the grassy floor and thought " he said. gods help me !

wife,

is my

Where

and

where

are

my

little

"

to

went

the

where village,

he

knew

the

in the way, and every tiled and tilted eave familiar ; and here he found folk him most

stones to

and

walking to But

upon

The

"

long.

was

I left my

Have

"

He

"

XXVII

fro, going upon

their business.

all strange to him.

theywere "Good

morrow," they said,"good wayfarer.Do you tarry in our town ?

morrow,

"

He

children

saw

beneath

put his hand

their

at

often he

play,and

their chins

to

turn

their

Alas ! he did it all in vain. faces up. " " Where are my little children,"he said, O the Merciful ? Peradventure the Lady Kwannon the

gods know

meaning of

all this ; it is

too

much

for me:" When

sunset

stone, and he

ways "

know

by the

We

and

stood

town.

As

sleeve

at

the

men

heavy as partingof the passed by he was

:

Friend," he said, I ask your pardon,did you "

a

fisherman of this

And "

went

outside the

pulledthem

his heart

came,

never

the

that

men

heard

"

placecalled Urashima ? him, passedby answered

of such

an

one."

people from the Some rode on mountains. went a-foot,some singingtheir patientpack-horses.They went There

passedby

country songs, and

the peasant

they carried 212

baskets of wild


URASHIMA

XXVII

strawberries backs.

sheaves of lilies bound

or

And

the lilies nodded

passedby,all clad

in

as

their

upon

grims Pil-

they went.

white, with

hats,sandals fast bound

and

staves

gourds of water. Swiftly theywent, softly theywent, thinking of holythings. And lords and ladies passedby, in brave attire and great array, borne in their gilded kago. The nightfell. I lose sweet said Urashima. hope,*' rice-straw

and

"

But

Oh, old,old man,"

"

have

passedby an old,old-man.

there

seen

In this

days; know

many the

that name,

you

fisherman, you "

oughtof Urashima

?

he born and bred."

placewas

Then

cried the

old

said,"There

man

but, sir,that

of

one

drowned

was

one

was

long

could scarce remember My grandfather years ago. little boy. Good him in the time that I was a

stranger,it was Urashima

dead

said, "

No

man

and

their

"

many

many, more sons

He

is dead

dead are

ago."

years ?

he.

His

sons

Good

even

to

than

dead.

"

are

you,

stranger." Urashima

Then must

And

was

afraid.

But

he

said,

where the dead go to the green valley he took his way. to the valley He

said,

"

How

chill the

night wind

"

sleep." blows

The shiver and trees grass ! leaves turn their palebacks to me." that showest me He said,^^ Hail, sad moon,

through

the

the

quietgraves.

the

moon

He

Thou

art

I

the all

nothingdifferent from

of old."

said, "

Here

are

my 213

sons* graves and

their


URASHIMA

Urashima, there

sons* graves. Poor dead than he. more

ghosts.

will comfort

Who

"'

he

Then

will comfort

?

me

**

and

to

the seashore.

cried Urashima. the mountain

from out

"I

But

it a

to

his sleeve and faint white smoke

casket."

opened it.

very

weary,"said

his hair turned

that had

been

as

He

am

made

What He

sea

And There

Urashima.

white

as

and

snow.

grew

In

a

He dim.

lustyswayedand

old,"said Urashima. to

saying,"Nay, ever.

so

young he stood.

tottered where I

sky

that floated away

trembled, his body shrank, his eyes

"

the

the far horizon.

grow

moment

He

"Who

of the

waves

is the

said,"There

he took it from and

the

lonelyamong

on.

Urashima

rose

man

? " said Urashima.

me

back

went

unmoved,

rolled

I

am

no

nightwind sighedand nothingmore.

The

was

Yet

is

.''

.

.

XXVII

but shut the casket lid, the

matters

laid down

vapour it ? his

of smoke

droppedit, is gone

for

"

lengthupon

died.

214

the sand

and


XXVIII

THE

TAMAMO, A

found

child

a

"Well,

and

a **

do

pack, I

the

sell

wayside

said

sandals

the

?

Kioto,

gauds

my

?

child,

outworn

for

bound

to

the upon city of Kioto.

pack

the

to

by

you,"

and

am

Palace,

his

Ah,"

"

What

said

I have

"

Whence

"

"

"

"

I

to

"

with

"

How

be

the

the

ladies

here

you been

long more

Pedlar

too."

me

little

girl?

"

"

about

seven

?

years

"

waiting

you." "

have than

for

a

waited ? you hundred years."

laughed. 215

staff

Mikadoes

and

age."

no are

I have

The

to

seem

Why

take

my

you ? nowhere."

come

I have

"

name,

from

You

For

child,

a

"

name."

no

come

"

"

the

is your

"

He

"

Court" "

great

sittingall alone by the wayside. what little girl," he said, "and my

all alone

you What

"

leads

which

high-road

make

with

journeyed

PEDLAR

MAIDEN

FOX

old."

of

the


"

Take

"

You

MAIDEN

FOX

THE

TAMAMO,

xxviii

Kioto/' said the child. if you will,"said the Pedlar. come

to

me

may

they went to they came

in

and together,

their ways

So

time

Palace. the child danced in the august presence of Here She was the Son of Heaven. as lightas the seaWhen she had made an bird upon a wave's crest. end of

the dancing,

Little

"

?

giveyou O

"

Ask

The So

called her

Mikado

to

him.

guerdon shall I

maid," he said, what "

!"

Ask

I

...

ask.

cannot

the

child,

"

I

...

am

Son

afraid."

fear,"said the Mikado. Let me child murmured, stay without

"

brightpresence **

the Mikado's

to

DivinelyDescended," said

of the Gods "

and

Kioto

be

of your

it,"said

in the

Augustness."

the

and he

Mikado,

received he called her

And

the child into his household. Tamamo. she Very speedily lovelyart. She could

became

sing,and

she

could

play

more

skill

She had

any instrument of music. than any painter in the land in painting upon

wonder The

of every

mistress

with

the needle and

poetry that she made

a

wonder

moved

men

;

at to

she

was

a

the loom. tears

and

laughter.The many thousand characters were she child's playto her,and all the hard philosophies She knew Confucius well ends. had at her fingers' of Buddha, and the lore of enough,the Scriptures Perfection, Cathay. She was called the Exquisite the Jewel without Flaw. the Gold Unalloyed, to

And Soon

the Mikado he

clean

loved her.

forgothonour 216

and

duty and


kinglystate.

MAIDEN

night he keptTamamo by rough and fierceand passionate,

and

Day

He

his side.

FOX

THE

TAMAMO,

XXVIII

grew

approachhim. He and languid, he pined,and his grew sick,listless, could do nothingfor him. physicians and alack,'* "Alas they cried,"what ails the DivinelyDescended ? Of a surety he is bewitched.

so

feared

that his servants

! for he will die upon

! woe

Woe

Out

"

Mikado,

to

upon for a

"

them,

pack of

every

hands."

our

one," cried

tedious fools.

As

the

for me,

I will do my own will and pleasure." He was mad for love of Tamamo.

her

his Summer Palace,where he To the feast prepareda great feastin her honour. bidden all the highestof the land,princes and were lords and ladies of high estate ; and, willy-nilly, to took

He

the Summer

to

Palace

the Mikado,

where they all repaired,

and

wild,and mad with love,and side,attired in scarlet and cloth of

wan

by his gold. Radiantlyfair

Tamamo

saki

Mikado's

was

of

out

she was,

and she

poured the

goldenflagon.

a

looked into her eyes. " feeble toys beside you,"he Other women are here that's fit to said. " There's not a woman He

the end of your I love you. ..."

touch

sleeve.

spokeloudlyso when laughedbitterly Now

sky moon

lord

My

as

became and

the

.

.

.

the

he had

stars

how

my

spoken. ..."

lord

with

hid.

were

217

said Tamamo.

the feasted, black clouds,and the

high company

overcast

Tamamo,

that all could hear him, and

He

"

O

sat

and

Suddenlya

fearful


wind

FOX

THE

TAMAMO,

throughthe

tore

MAIDEN

Summer

Palace and put out of Feasting.And

every torch in the great Hall down in torrents. the rain came darkness fear and horror fell upon The

courtiers

full of

and fro in

to

ran

cries,the

tables

xxviii

In

the

the

pitchy assembly.

panic,the

a

air

overturned.

were

was

The

dishes and

the crashed together, drinking-vessels Then and soaked into the white mats. spilled

saki a

radiance

made

was

placewhere

Tamamo

flames of firefrom Mikado

The "

And

was,

body.

cried

aloud

he had

when

and

her

! Tamamo

Tamamo

It

visible.

from

it streamed in

a

this he

in

the

long

terrible voice, ! three times. **

! Tamamo done

came

fell in

deathly

a

upon the ground. And for many dayshe was thus,and he seemed him either asleep or dead,and no one could recover swoon

from

his

swoon.

and together, they called to said

them

Ab6

and

land

the

Yasu, the Diviner.

met

gods, They

: "

for

when

Holy Men of the they had prayed to

the Wise

Then

Ab6

O

Yasu, learned

in dark

find out things,

the cause, and if it may be, the cure, of our Lord's strange sickness. Perform divination for us,

O

us

Ab6

Yasu."

Then

Ab6

Yasu

and performeddivination,

before the Wise

came

"

Men

and said

:

The wine is sweety but the aftertaste is bitter. Set not your teeth in the golden persimmon ^

It is rotten at the

core.

218

he


THE

TAMAMO,

XXVIII

MAIDEN

FOX

Fair is the scarletflowerofthe Death

Lily^

it not.

Pluck What

is beauty ?

What

is wisdom ?

What

is love ?

Be not deceived.

threads in the fabricof

Theyare

illusion!''

Men

said, Yasu, for your sayingis dark,and Then

the Wise

Speak

"

out, Ab6

cannot

we

stand under-

it." I will do

than

speak,"said Ab6 Yasu. he spent three daysin fasting and in prayer. And Then he took the sacred Gohei from its placein the him to he Temple, and callingthe Wise Men "

sacred Gohei and with

the

waved

of them.

one

more

And

bower, and Ab6

it touched

together theywent

Tamamo's

the sacred Gohei in his

took

Yasu

to

each

righthand. was

in her bower

were

with her.

Tamamo

her maidens

My lords,"she said, "

"

would

What

the

"

I have

Chinese.

made

You

song

a

who

me

all unbidden.

come

?

"

said Ab6

lady Tamamo,"

"My Diviner,

you

with

have

you

and adorningherself,

are

Yasu

the

after the fiishionof learned

in poetry, I

pray you hear and "

I

am

in

dear lord

my

'"

judge my song." she said, mood for songs," no lyingsick to death."

Nevertheless,my you needs

mine "

"

must

Why, then, if I

ladyTamamo,

this song

hear." must

219

..."

with

she said.

of


spokeAh6

Then "

MAIDEN

FOX

THE

TAMAMO,

Yasu

xxviii

:

is bitter. The wine is sweety the aftertaste Set not your teeth in the golden persimmon ^ It is rotten at the core. Fair is the scarletflowerofthe Death Pluck

it not.

What

is beauty ?

What

is wisdom ?

What

is love ?

Be

not

deceived.

illusionI Ab6

When

threads in the fabricof

Theyare

"

the

Yasu

Diviner

and he

Tamamo

to

came

Lily^

had

touched

spoken,he

her

with

the

sacred Gohei. gave a loud and terrible cry, and instant her form was changedinto that of She

fox

having nine long

fox fled from Tamamo's

The

wire.

hair like

tails and

on

the

great

a

golden

bower, away

of Nasu, and and away, until it reached the far plain that was it hid itselfbeneath a great black stone upon

that

But

plain.

the

Mikado

was

immediatelyrecovered

from his sickness.

Soon, strange and

terrible

the great stone of Nasu. A concerning flowed from under it and water poisonous the brightflowers of the plain. All who the

stream

died,both

nothingcould traveller who and

go

near

man

the

and

beast.

stone

rested in its shadow

the birds that

perched upon 220

told

thingswere

and arose

of

stream

withered drank of

Moreover, live. no

it fell dead

The more,

in

a


People named

moment.

called for

thus it was

it chanced

Then

MAIDEN

FOX

THE

TAMAMO,

XXVIII

it tl"eDeath Stone, and than a hundred years.

more

Genyo, the High Priest, and his who was indeed,took his staBf a holy man beggingbowl and went upon a pilgrimage. he

When O

Death

thou Stone

while

shall all

Holy Man," they said, "

of Nasu.

and staff,

Death

he ;

sunder.

there

a

She /

am

I

am

I

From

to

the Death

the stone

Stone.

with

cried,"Come forth.Spiritof come forth,I conjurethee.'* was

the

great flame

a

the Stone

rending noise, and

I

the

"

his way incense, he struck

Stone

Then

I

beware

in its shade."

not

that he took

burnt

I

Rest

into Nirvana.*

enter

With

"

the

is written in the my children,what * Law of the Good : Herbs, trees and rocks

Book

came

upon

Know,

"

He

the dwellers

Genyo, the High Priest,havingremained thus : in thought,made answer

But a

Nasu,

to

came

rice into his bowl.

plainput "

that

burst

and

from

Holy

Man.

stone

his the

of fire and and

a

splitin

the fire there

woman.

stood before the

Tamamo^

once

called the Proud

She said

Perfection ;

the

Fox ; golden-haired know the Sorceriesofthe East; was by the Princes of Ind worshipped was s undoing ; great Cathay* wise and beautiful^ was

;

Evil incarnate. The power

ofthe

Buddha 221

has

:

^me ; changed


THE

TAMAMO, / have dwelt in

Let

MAIDEN

xxviii

hundred years ; and my sin. my beauty

grief for a

Tears have washed

Shrive me^

FOX

away

Genyo^shrive me^ Holy Man

;

^^

have peace.

me

Take said Genyo. Spirit," my staff and my priestly robe and my beggingbowl and set of repentance.** forth upon the longjourney Tamamo robe and put it upon took the priestly "

Poor

"

in the other the her ; in one hand she took the staff, bowl. And when she had done this,she vanished

for

men. sightof earthly O and thou, Tathagatha,"said Genyo, thou, Kwannon, Merciful Lady,make it possible ever

from

the

*'

that

"

one

day even

she may

222

attain Nirvana."


XXIX

MOMOTARO

If

believe

you'll

fairies

were

when

time

there

were

every

day,

be

to

and

they

as

dug

to

and

up,

when

men,

and

magic

of

store

great

was

That

now.

are

talked

the

when

time

a

enchantments

there

when

was

beasts

spells

treasure

shy

so

none

the

was

there

me

hidden

for

adventures

the

asking. that

At an

old

time,

lived

woman

were

good

and

at

all.

children One

fine

morning,

good

"Oh," sticks

for

wife

"

? "

Oh," to

stream

she

my fire.

the

says

wash

are

old

And

old

old

what

are

you

"

woman,

It's

clothes.

my

had

doing off

gather

to

They no

this

woman.

"Fm

man,

billhook

and

man

they

you

the

says

the

and

poor

'*

old

Fm

to

the

faggot of doing, good a

off

to

the

day,"

washing

adds. So

old

our

were

an

themselves.

by

"What ?

man

says with

mountains

alone

they

day,

know,

must

you

woman

the

old went

went

man

to

the

to stream,

223

the

mountains

and

the


MOMOTARO while she

Now,

she

should

see

down floating enough,and

was

rosy red

morning,"said the dame, peach to shore with a split

stick.

bamboo

her

when By-and-by,

good man the peach

hills,she set Eat, good man," she said

from "

both sides.

on

this

pulled the

she

and

what washing the clothes, but a fine ripepeach that came ? The the stream peach was big

in luck

"Fm

XXIX

the

and

I found in the stream But the old man And

did he

why All

there

the

of

not

this is a

luckypeach broughthome for you." got a taste of the peach. ;

been.

"

Mercy me ! says the old Mercy me ! says the old The boy baby firstate up one "

he

then

and

ate

this he

done **

Truth born

was

was

in he

soon

half of the

!" cries the old

a

peach

man

;

peach."

it is indeed,"says the old

woman

"

;

he

peach."

Both of them that

Momotaro

of the

son

man.

he had up the other half. When finer and stronger than ever. !

Momotaro

the eldest "

woman.

"

"

"

him.

peach burst in two and it,but a fine boy babywhere

should have

stone

before

the

to

stone

home

?

sudden

a

no

was

never

"

came

was

took such the

stoutest

good care

of Momotaro

and bravest

boy of

all

credit to them, you He was a country-side. neighboursnodded their heads may believe. The is the fine young man !" and theysaid,"Momotaro one Mother," says Momotaro day to the old make me a good store of kimi-dango woman, that

"

"

"

224


MOMOTARO

XXIX

(which is the in those

theycall

millet

dumplings

parts). "

for do you

What

"

that

way

? kimi-dango

want

says his

mother.

"Why,** says Momotaro, "Fm going on a journey,or as you may say, an adventure,and I shall be needingthe kimi-dango the way/' on Where ? are says his you going,Momotaro '*

"

mother. off to the

Fm

Ogres'Island,"says Momotaro, if to get their treasure, and I should be obliged as soon as you'dlet me have the kimi-dango may "

"

be," he says.

theymade

So

them

in

a

him

the

and kimi-dango^

he

tied the wallet

wallet, and

girdleand off he set. and good luck ^^Sayonara^ cried the old "

Sayonara! hadn't

He

! Sayonara

"

to

his

woman.

cried Momotaro.

far when

gone

put

you, Momotaro!"

to

and the old

man

he

he

fell in with

a

monkey. "

Kia !

Kia !

"

says the

you off to, Momotaro

?

Says Momotaro, for

an "

your

"

Where

are

"

I'm off

to

the

Ogres'Island

adventure." What

have

? girdle

"Now

"

;

dumplingsin Give

go with

you

got in the wallet

me

hangingat

"

you're asking me

Momotaro "

"

monkey.

sure,

I've

some

something," says of the

best millet

all Japan."

one," says the monkey,

"

and I will

you." 225

Q


MOMOTARO So

XXIX

Momotaro

gave a millet dumpling to the monkey, and the two of them joggedon together.

They hadn't pheasant. are

!

Ken

"

far when

they fell in

with

!'' said the

pheasant.

Where

gone Ken

you off to, Momotaro

SaysMomotaro, for

?

Fm

'*

off

to

the

Ogres*Island

adventure."

an

"What ? "

"

"

a

have

taro got in your wallet, Momo-

you

'*

IVe

got

of the best millet

some

dumplingsin

all Japan." Give

"

go with

me

"and one," says the pheasant,

I will

you." Momotaro

So

gave a millet dumpling to the and the three of them joggedon together. pheasant, They hadn't gone far when they fell in with a

dog.

are

"Bow! Wow! Wow! you off to, Momotaro

SaysMomotaro, have

"What ?

Give

me

dog, and

taro got in your wallet,Momo-

of the best millet

one," says

the

dog,

"

dumplings

and I will go

the

gave a millet dumplingto the four of them jogged on together.

theycame By-and-by my

Ogres'Island."

you."

So Momotaro

"

off to the

"I'm

you

I've got some in all Japan."

with

?

"Where

"

"

"

"

"saysthe dog.

Now,

plan.

to

the

Ogres'Island.

brothers,"says Momotaro, The

pheasantmust 226

flyover

"

listen to the castle


MOMOTARO

XXIX

gate and climb The

peck the

over

dog

the

Ogres.

The

monkey must pinch the Ogres.

and

castle wall

and I will break the bolts and

will bite the

Ogres,and

I will

bars.

fightthe Ogres."

the great battle. The pheasant the castle gate : flew over " Ken ! Ken ! Then

there

was

broke

Momotaro

He

dog leapt into

bolts and

the

the

castle

"

Ken

!

bars,and the

courtyard.

**

Bow

!

Wow!"

Wow!

companionsfoughttillsundown and that were the Ogres. Those left alive overcame a they took prisonersand bound with cords wicked lot they were. Now, brothers,"says Momotaro, bringout the Ogres'treasure." So they did. The treasure worth having, indeed. There was were magic jewels there, and caps and coats to make was gold and silver, you invisible. There and jadeand coral,and amber and tortoise-shelland mother-of-pearl. The

brave

"

*^

"

"

"

my

for

riches

my

Ken

Lord "

Kia ! "

Kia !

Lord "

"

Here's

all," says

Momotaro.

Choose, brothers,and take your fill."

"

Bow

says the

monkey.

"

Thanks,

Momotaro." !

Ken

!

"

says the

pheasant. Thanks, "

Momotaro." !

Thanks, my

Wow

!

dear Lord

Wow

!"

Momotaro."

227

says

the

dog.


XXX

THE

A a

time

long

LONG,

and

man

young

little

daughter,

their

hearts.

have

they of

the

the

MIRROR

MATSUYAMA

there

whom I

long

tell

cannot

been

since

of

Province

They

in

their

you

lived

child,

one

;

for

names,

the

but

name

in

Matsuyama,

was

a

all

with

loved

forgotten

they Echigo.

quiet spot

a

had

both

they

where

place

lived

ago his wife.

It

still the little girl was happened once, while obliged to go to the a baby, that the father was business. some great city, the capital of Japan, upon It was far for the mother and her little baby to too he out set alone, after bidding them bye goodgo, so and home to promising bring them some

present.

pretty

mother

The than a

the

little

had

frightened

taking

such

proud

too,

she

village,and

next

a

the

who his

he

was

had

great

could

thought

long journey

for

country-side the king and

at

farther

been

never

;

and

been lords 228

to

of

yet she

first

the

not

the

lived,

man

from

home

help being her was

in

big

town

and

where

husband a

all

little

that

where there


were

so

MIRROR

MATSUYAMA

THE

XXX

beautiful and

many

curious

thingsto

be

seen.

At

last the time

husband

her best

back,

clothes,and she knew

which You

so

herself put her husband

on

a

might expect the baby in its

pretty blue dress

liked.

gladthis good wife safe and sound, and

home

come

she

she dressed

fancyhow

may

him

see

when

came

was

how

to

the

girlclapped her hands, and laughed with delightwhen she saw the pretty toys her father He had much had brought for her. to tell of all the wonderful thingshe had seen upon the journey, little

in the

and "

I

said he

have to

itself.

town

brought you

his wife

"

;

a

very

it is called

a

pretty

thing," Look

mirror.

you sec inside.'* He gave to her she a box, in which, when plainwhite wooden had opened it,she found a round pieceof metal. and tell me

One

side

what

was

white, like frosted silver,and

mented orna-

of birds and flowers ; figures the other was brightas the clearest crystal.Into mother looked with it the young delight and astonishment,for,from its depthswas lookingat her with partedlipsand brighteyes, a smiling happy face. do you see ? What againasked the husband, and gladto show that at her astonishment pleased he had learned somethingwhile he had been away. I see a pretty woman lookingat me, and she and her lipsas if she was dear moves speaking, how odd, she has on a blue dress just like me, with

raised

"

"

"

"

mme

1 229


"

Why,

MIRROR

MATSUYAMA

THE

it is your

silly woman,

you

xxx

face

own

'*

said the husband,proudof knowing " That round somethingthat his wife didn't know. that you

!

see

In

the

everybodyhas one, although we have them in this country-place before."

not

piece of

wife

The for

a

few

for you

the firsttime

a

own

wonderful

use, and

soon

with

she

her

that

remember

had

seen

a

she had

pretty face.

thing far

But

as

seen

seen

often

this

mirror, so, of

ever

town

present, and

look into the mirror

not

must

the firsttime

of her

mirror.

a

charmed

was

dayscould

enough ; it was

is called

metal

was

course,

the reflection

she considered such

preciousfor everyday in its box againand put

too

shut it up

her most valued treasures. it away carefully among Years passedon, and the husband and wife still lived

happily.The who little daughter, her mother, and who

joy

of their

grew was

so

life

was

their

up the very image of dutiful and aflfectionate

everybodyloved her. Mindful of her own little passingvanityon findingherself so lovely, the mother hidden away, kept the mirror carefully that the use of of it might breed a spirit fearing pridein her little girl. She never spokeof it,and as for the father he had forgotten all about it. So it happened that the daughter had grew up as simpleas the mother been, and knew nothing of her own good looks, that

or

of the

mirror

which

would

have

reflected

them. But to

this

by-and-bya terrible misfortune happened good, kind happy little family. The 230


THE

XXX

fell sick

mother

waited

MATSUYAMA

upon

;

MIRROR

and, although her

her, day and night,with

and worse, until she got worse die. doubt but that she must

When her

she

husband

daughter lovingcare,

found

and

she

that

at

last there

must

child,the poor

so

was

no

leave

soon

felt very

woman

for those she was sorrowful, grieving going to leave behind, and most of all for her little daughter. She called the girl to her and said, My darlingchild,you know that I am very sick ; soon "

I

die and

must

alone. will

When

look

leave I

am

dear

your

gone,

into this mirror

there you will

morning ; stillwatching over am

father and

you that you

promise every night and

see

me

me,

and know

every that I

you." With these words and gave she took the mirror from its hiding-place child promised,with it to her daughter.The calm many tears, and so the mother, seemingnow died a short time after. and resigned, this obedient and dutiful daughternever Now forgother mother's last request, but each morning and eveningtook the mirror from its hiding-place, she There and looked in it long and earnestly. the bright and smilingvision of her lost saw Not in her last days, mother. as pale and sickly of long ago. To but the beautiful young mother her at night she told the story of the trials and difficulties of the day ; to her in the morning she in whatever looked for sympathyand encouragement might be in store for her. So day by day she lived as in her mother's her as she had done in stillto please sight, striving 231


THE

MIRROR

MATSUYAMA

and careful alwaysto lifetime, might painor grieveher. her

Her

greatestjoy was

to

xxx

avoid whatever

be able

look in the

to

and say, " Mother, I have been to-day what to be." you would have me Seeing her look into the mirror every night and hold to fail,and seem morning without mirror

converse

with of

the

reason

she

said,

length asked

at

her strange behaviour.

I look

"

father

it,her

in the

mirror

"

every her."

Father,"

day to

and to talk with Then my dear mother told him of her mother's dyingwish, and how had

failed to fulfilit.

never

Touched

by

her

so

see

she she

much

such faithful, lovingobedience,the father shed tears of pityand affection. Nor could and simplicity, he

find it in his heart

image she of

her

saw

own

sympathyand dead

mother's

tell the

to

in the mirror sweet

was

child

but the reflection

face,becoming by

association

more

dayby day.

232

that the

and

more

constant

like her


XXXI

IMAGES

BROKEN

there

Once in

dawn

dark

to

he

could

himself

his

the

the It all

way,

a

fair

day early

of

bright-

dreamer dark

and

would

Sweetly

of

or

war,

his

;

he

thoughts.

fairies

the

arrows.

and

a

to

his

or

of

to

of

took

yellow the

is

woods,

his

by

book

the

of

green

the

the

joys smiling. he

holy

hunter

as

time

his

stream's

betook

his

was

in

wont.

hand,

and,

side, where

mimulus.

fairies*

the

a

the

summer

the

to

wandered

he

when

And 'came

love,

tell stories

very dreamer

musing,

buy

of

was

dawn

with

or

his

strong

brother

from

went

and

was

loved

gods.

Upon

"

he

;

He

He

bow

From

book

sing

fields, and of the

run

gentle. his

chase.

his

younger

were

sit with

the

with

could

Swiftly he eyed. The

grew

princes

were

hunter.

a

was

and

woods

deep

But

brother

elder

The

eyes

who

brothers

two

land.

the

the

lived

of

had

money,** fairyland ! continued

shrine. ^33

And

he **

said

So

for

"

;

he

went

will on

time, he

some

there

it

led

to

the


IMAGES

BROKEN

xxxi

and grey. steps, moss-grown guardianlions,carved in steps were

hundred

shrine

a

Beside

the

stone.

Behind

shrine

the

Fugi, the Mystic and all the lesser beautiful,

and

Mountain, white

was

softly up like prayers, '*0 peerless Fugi,*'said the dreamer, "O mountain wonder ! To see thee is to passionless hills

hear

rose

music

sweet

without

of silence.*'

harmony Then

he

climbed

the

rose

up

him

to

the lions that were and followed him, and

the

inner

and

steps,moss-grown carved

And

grey.

blessed

sound, the

in

stone

with

they came

gates of the shrine and

stayed

there. the

In

smoke

The

shrine

there

of incense

was

a

hush

curled and

of

hung

noonday. upon

the

Dimly shone the gold and the bronze, the and the mysticmirrors. lights sound There of singingin the shrine, was a and turning, the dreamer saw who stood at a man The taller than any his right hand. was man air.

child of earth. Moreover, his face shone with the He held gloryof a youththat cannot pass away. and hushed child upon his arm it to a year-old the singinga strange melody. When sleep, and smiled. well pleased, he was fell asleep "

"

"

What

babe is that ?

'*

babe

said the dreamer.

O

dreamer,it is no babe, but a spirit." said the Then, my lord, what are you ? "

dreamer. "

I

am

children.

Jizo,who It is

most

guards the to pitiful

^34

souls

of little

hear their

crying


BROKEN

XXXI

when

IMAGES the

sandy river-bed, the Sai'-no^kawara. O dreamer, they come alone, as needs they must, wailingand wandering, stretching their pretty hands. out They have a task,which of prayer. But in the is to pilestones for a tower the Oni to throw down the towers and nightcome to

they

to

come

So the children

all the stones.

scatter

and their labour is lost." afraid, What then,my lord Jizo? "

then I come, I call And

Why,

"

leave.

me

souls.* And

on

my

breast,where

lightand

cold

for the '

Come

made

said the dreamer. Great

One

gives hither,wandering

that I may hide I carry them in my arms

theyflyto

long sleeves.

in my

'*

are

me

them and

they lie lightand cold, as the morning mist the upon "

as

mountains.** When

he had

and murmured

:

and fro in the

child spoken,the year-old so

he

rocked

stirred

it,and wandered

quiettemplecourt

and hushed

to

it

as

he went. So

the

swift

flew and

moments

passedaway. there came to the Presently gentleand beautiful. Grey was had

silver sandals

called The

on

Merciful.

shrine

the

a

noontide

lady most

her

robe,and she her feet. She said,"I am For mankind's dear sake,I

refused eternal peace. The Great One has givento me a thousand lovingarms, arms of mercy. full of gifts. O hands are And dreamer, my when you dream your dreams you shall see me in have

my

lotus

boat

when

I

mere.'* 23s

sail upon

the

mystic


BROKEN

Lady,Lady Kwannon

"

Then a

IMAGES

clothed

one

came

.

.

in

xxxi

"'*said the dreamer.

blue,speakingwith

voice. sweet, deep,well-known " I am Benten, the Goddess of the Sea and

of

Goddess

about

Song. My dragonsare

and

me

feet.

See their green scales and O dreamer ! " Greeting,

beneath my

opaleyes.

After her there

came

band of

a

the

their

bloomingboys,

laughingand holdingout the

are "

of

Sons

" their rosy arms. We Sea Goddess," they said.

the

Come, dreamer, come of

God

The

hands, for

his

Three

he

could

see

the three

were

apes covered

three

his

and

came,

first ape

The

messengers.

cool caves."

our

Roads

him.

with

messengers

to

his eyes with evil thing. The

no

second ape covered his ears with his hands, for he third ape covered could hear no evil thing. The with his hands, for he could speak no his mouth

thing.

evil

Then

who

takes the

able

to

pay

came

She, the fearful of the

clothes

dead

their toll,so that of the the entrance

at shivering Ways. They

who

woman

not

are

stand they must mysteriousThree

unfortunate indeed.

are

saw many and many a vision the dreamer in that enchanted shrine. and tempest And dark night fell,with storm

And

and

the

dreamer

never

of

sound

sound

the roof. Yet the rain upon stirred. a Suddenlythere was

of

hurryingfeet

without.

loud, My brother,my brother,my "

In sprang

the hunter

A

voice

called

brother !

.

.

."

through the golden temple

doors.

236


IMAGES

BROKEN

XXXI

"

Where

"

he cried,** my brother, you ? He had his swinginglantern in

arc

brother ! **

my

and

his hand

held

hair back

blown

brightwith the as an eagle's.

high,as

rain upon

"

he

flunghis long

his shoulder.

over

brother

'*0

it

it,his eyes

." said the

.

face

His were

was

keen

as

dreamer, and

ran

him.

to meet

the dear

Now

"

gods be

thanked

that I have

" Half the you safe and sound," said the hunter. nightI have soughtyou, wandering in the forest all to blame for and by the stream's side. I was

leavingyou

.

.

.

my

he took his brother's

little brother."

face between

With

his

two

that, warm

hands.

sighed,**I

dreamer

the

But

have

he said,"and gods all night," still. The placeis holy."

the them

the

Then

hunter

flashed his

been

I think

with

I

lightupon

templewalls,upon the gildingand he said. I see no gods,"

see

the

the bronze.

"

What

see

"

I

a

with

him

see

scent "

"

images,grey,

feet." grey because

theyare sad,theyare because theyare forgotten," said the dreamer. But the hunter took him by the hand and led into the night. They

The the

you, brother ? of stones, broken row

moss-grown

"

sad

"

"

Now

are

dreamer

said, O brother,how "

sweet

is

of the bean fieldsafter the rain." bind your

and I'll run

you

a

sandals on," said the hunter, home." to our race 3^37


XXXII

THE

Once

TONGUE-CUT

and

world.

the cross

not

the

sing

and

was

say,

and

sour

and

all

sad,

all the

as

side. country-

for

and

ever,

of

time

kind

for

smile

in

the

pass

and

a

growled

day

head

on

all

the

home,

side,

one

with

kept tricks, man

night.

at

the

on

he

master," and

talk

old

his work

pert

as

the

twittering

sparrow

Welcome

of

manner

So

from

home

be "

do

he

could

sparrow

company.

came

that

sparrow

The

and

good

and

pet

a

eye.

dance

would

his

his

he

when

doorstep,

had

of

very

There

and as

man

apple

and

and

found

be

who

woman

merry

was

lived

folk.

old

The

was

woman

much

so

respectable

found

old

The

man

who

man

old

an

word

good

a

patch as could She grumbled

a

would

as

with

gentle,

old

an

was

old

The

all alone.

lived

was

there

And

alone.

all

there

time

a

upon

SPARROW

pretty

would as

you

please. One the home

day

the

it

was

her

off

went

man

The

mountains.

for

old

old

washing 238

woman,

day.

to

cut

she She

wood

in

stayed made

some

at


TONGUE-CUT

THE

XXXII

good starch door

and

she put it outside her

he

But

she

said

made

a

the bamboo littlesparrow flew over lightedon the edge of the starch bowl.

the starch with

pecked at

his littlebeak.

peckedand he pecked till all gone, and a good meal he made, to

the

He

Then to

she it,**

readywhen I want that's just where

The

mistake. fence and And

bowl

It will be all

herself.

to

a

cool.

to

"

in

SPARROW

out

the old

came

starch

was

be sure. for the starch

woman

starch her clothes. You

believe she

She caught angry. roughlyin her hand, and, alas

may

the little sparrow and alack ! she took and

Away

hill and over " And a old

sharp,sharpscissors

a

she let him

Then

his littletongue.

away dale.

was

flew the

and

go.

little sparrow,

!"

good riddance,too

cut

over

said the cruel

woman.

the old

When

man

from the

home

came

tains moun-

his pet sparrow gone. And before long he knew all the tale. He lost no time, the good old man ; he set out at once on foot,calling " Sparrow,sparrow, where are you, my tongue-cut he

found

" sparrow ? hill and Over "

dale

over

Sparrow,sparrow, where

sparrow At

?

sparrow

calling

went,

you, my

tongue-cut

**

last and

at

lengthhe

house, and the sparrow flew Then

are

he

there

was

a

to

came

out

to

^39

and

sparrow's

greet his

to twittering,

called his brothers

the

be

master.

sure.

sisters and

The

his


TONGUE-CUT

THE

his wife

children and

and

his mother

his

out

him

into the house

mats

of silk.

and

xxxii

his mother-in-law

they all They brought

honour.

man

and

they set him down upon theyspreada great feast ; red

Then

and who daikon and fish^ besides,and the very best saU rice and

knows

what all drink. The

to

sparrow waited upon the good old man, brothers and sisters and his children and and his mother and his mother-in-law with grandmother

After

and

grandmother. And

do the old

flew

to

SPARROW

and

his his wife and

his

him.

sparrow danced, whilst his grandmotherplayedthe samisen and the good old the

supper

beat time.

man

It

was

evening. good thingscome

a

merry last,"All

At

says the old

"

man

;

to

I fear 'tislate and

end,"

an

hightime

I

home." getting

was

without

"Not

"Ah, But

littlepresent," says the sparrow.

dear," says the old

sparrow

have

sooner

a

than yourself

the sparrow

any

shook

"Fd

man,

present."

his head.

Presently theybroughtin two wicker is heavy,"says the of them One the other is light. Say, master, "and take the heavybasket or the light? "

baskets. sparrow, will you

"

"Fm

not

good old the

have carry

"

So When

man.

so

as

young "

I

was," says

once

Fd Thanking you kindly,

lightbasket

;

it will

suit

me

the

sooner

better

to

that is,if it'sthe same to you,"he says. home with he went the light basket. he

opened it,wonderful 240

to

it was tell,

full


SPARROW

TONGUE-CUT

THE

XXXII

tortoise-shell and

gold and silver and jade and fine rolls of of

silk.

So

the

coral and

good old

man

rich for life.

was

all

this,she

road

tied

took

skirts and hill and

over

the

to

the

when

Now,

bad old her

on

stout

a

sandals and

stick in her

dale she went,

tell of

heard

woman

and

kilted her

took the

sparrow'shouse.

Over

hand.

There

straight the

was

his brothers and sisters sparrow, and there were and children and his wife and his mother and his mother-in-law and his grandmother. They were not

too

to pleased

the bad old woman,

see

but

they

couldn't do less than ask her in as she'd come so far. They gave her red rice and white rice and

fish,and who

daikon and she

gobbledit up of saki.

cup

Then

time

more

any

in

a

knows

what

and twinkling,

up

here,"

she got. she

says,

presents." They broughtin two wicker

bringout One

and besides, drank

"

a

I can't

"

so

good waste

you'd best

your

of them

baskets.

is

heavy,"says the sparrow, and the other is light. Say,mistress, will you take the heavy basket or the light? I'lltake the heavy one," says the old woman, quickas a thought. So she heaved it up on her Sure enough it was back and off she set. as heavy "

"

"

**

as

lead. When

did

she

was

gone, Lord

! how

the sparrows

laugh ! No

sooner

did she reach home

than she undid

the cords of the basket. *'

Now

for the

she said,and gold and silver,"


TONGUE-CUT

THE

smiled

though

"

she

SPARROW hadn't

smiled

she lifted up the lid. Kowai! Ai! Obaki da I

xxxii

for

a

month. twelve-

And ''Ai!

Oiai^ r' she

screeched. The

basket

pixiesand

demons

the old wqman, push her and to

tease to

was

of fright

her

full of

uglyimps and elves and and devils. Out they came to to pullher and to poke her, pinch her. She had the fine

I warrant life,

242

you.


XXXIII

THE

samurai

the

Id"

NURSE

wedded

was

called

only child, a boy of war, man mighty an

from

away lord.

So

the and

mother Matsu the

home

her

was

and

strong

often

as

the

the

Pine

and

of

woman,

which

is, in

Tree.

And

was

his

reared

was

had

he

not

as

faithful

was

liege his

by

his the

a

nurse.

of

speech

even

the

as

pine

she, unchanging

was

evergreen,

Ide

business

Fugiwaka

name,

the

country,

tree,

child

fair wife

a

Fugiwaka.

and

upon

by

to

and

enduring. In

the

Aforetime

sword.

and-forty battle. He

kept

of

The

to

make

to

reverence

Morning O

Matsu,

my

there

sword

with

and

Id6's

was

in

away

a

evening glorious

the

nurse,

in

place

with

the

child

Fugiwaka of

knelt

by "

his

Show

Fugiwaka.

one

treasure.

his

household

memory

243

sword

safe

the

said

clan

this

precious slew eight-

very

sacred

evening,

nurse,"

a

most

before

the

and

was

of Id6*s

hero

enemies

salutations

Matsu,

Id^ a

his

it laid

gods. Morning

And

of

house

hold house-

came

gods, his

and

ancestors.

side. me

the

sword,


THE And

O

Matsu

NURSE

made

lord,I will show

xxxiii

'*

answer,

Of

surety, my

a

it to

you." from its place, she brought the sword Then of red and goldbrocade. And wrapped in a covering she drew off the coveringand she took the sword the bright from its golden sheath and displayed steel to Fugiwaka. And the child made obeisance tillhis forehead touched bedtime

At She

O

Matsu

sang this song "

the mats. and

sang songs

lullabies.

:

little child^ sleep sweetly

Sleepy my

"

Would you know The secret

of the

the secret

hare

o

^

Nennin

Tama

?

littlechild^ sleepsweetly

Sleepy my

shall know

Tou

the secret.

Ohy the august hare of Nennin Tama^

longare augustly

Why

should this be^ohybest beloved? shall know

Tou

His mother

ate

His mother Hush

And O

the

seed. loquat

ate

the

!

Hush

you know

Matsu

Fugiwaka

the bamboo seed.

! "

Now O

the secret.

little childy sweetly sleep

Sleepy my

Then

!

Hush!

Hush!

lord

his ears

How

?

said, "

the secret.^* Will

you

sleepnow,

my

**

child answered,

"

I will

sleepnow,

Matsu." "

Listen,my

lord,"she said, and, sleepingor "

^44


THE

XXXIII

NURSE The

waking,remember.

sword

is your The sword

sword

The

is your trust. Cherish it,guard it,keep it."

fortune.

Sleepingor waking,I

"

treasure.

is your

remember,*' said

will

Fugiwaka. in

Now

evil

an

day the And

fell sick and died. of Id^. the house

past,the samurai took son

by

her and

himself

Id^

there

Fugiwaka mourning in

was

Howbeit, when years another bride,and he

called him slain

was

of

mother

had

a

after this

Goro.

And

an

ambush,

in

were

and

his

and laid him with retainers broughthis body home his fathers. Fugiwaka was chief of the House of Ide. But was Lady Sadako, his stepmother,

the

Black mischief stirred in her and she brooded brows as

bearingher babe in her

heart she

;

ill-pleased. she

bent

her

her

went

ways, At nightshe tossed

arms.

her bed.

upon

child is a

My

"

beggar,"she

is chief of the House

It is

!

him

too

of Id6.

much,"

spoke and tossed upon plan. When Fugiwaka was

she

turned

him

"

Why

out

his back, nor

sup

Evil fortune

a

"

.

.

."

Thus

her bed, thinking of

a

fifteen years old she house with a poor garment

of the

with barefooted,

goldpieceto

see

him

never

"

"

? birthright MS

a

bite

nor

a

his way.

on

Ah, ladymother," he said, you do you take my

betide

proud lady. I beggar! I would

it ; my child a him with my hands. strangle

rather

Fugiwaka

"

said the

brook

will not

upon

said.

use

me

ill.


NURSE

THE

I know

"

of

nought

xxxiii

she birthrights,"

said.

fortune if you can. your own of Id6." brother Goro is chief of the House make

Go,

"

that she bade them

With

shut

the

Your

door

in his

face. and Fugiwaka departedsorrowfully, O

cross-roads had

Matsu,

herself

made

ready for

had

kilted,she

was

his nurse,

a

met

him.

staff in her

hand

the She

her

journey:

a

at

robe

and sandals

her feet.

on

'*

the world's

to

you

she said, I lord,'*

My

"

Then

follow

to

come

end." and

Fugiwaka wept

the woman's

am

laid his head

upon

breast.

! And," my nurse " father's sword ? he I have The of IdL sword lost the precioussword is

Ah," he said, my said, what of my "

"

my

treasure, the

my

fortune.

I

keep

it.

it,to

I

! ofId6!"

is

me

"

"

Oh, say

sword

is my

bound

am

But

to

I have

now

undone, and not

so,

trust, the sword is cherish it,to guard

so

lost it.

is all the

lord," said O

my

Woe House Matsu.

gold; go you your way and I will return guard the sword of Id6." his way with the goldthat So Fugiwaka went

Here

and

am

nurse,

is

gave him. and took As for O Matsu, she went straightway the sword from its placewhere it lay with the household gods, and she buried it deep in the

his

nurse

ground

until such

to safety

her young

time

as

lord.

246

she

might

bear

it in


THE

XXXIII

But

Lady Sadako

the

soon

the sacred sword It is the

"

was

that

aware

gone. !

nurse

.

.

Then

"

she cried.

"

The

has

nurse

bringher to me.'* peoplelaid their hands and brought her before Matsu for all they could do O But She sealed. a spoke never

Some

.

O

roughly upon mistress.

Matsu^s

became

of you the Lady Sadako's

stolen it.

their

NURSE

lipswere

word,

neither

where

the

could

sword

Lady Sadako her She pressed

the

was.

find

out

thin

lips

together. The

"

matter

for such

;

obstinate,"she said.

is

woman

fault I know

a

the

No

"

sovereign

cure."

Lady dungeon.

Sadako

Well,"

"

Will

she

you say ? But

O

darkness

" "

went

in

nor

a

dark

drink.

"

dungeon Every day

of the dark

the door

to

said, where

is the sword

answered

not

she wept and Alas ! Alas !

a

word.

sighedto never

herself in the

alive may I come have the sword

young lord. Yet he must of Id6, and I shall find a way." Now after seven days the Lady Sadako

to

my

the

garden-house The

summer. saw

a

garden flowers

and

the

she

slow

woman

;

as

was

came

in

herself,for it was she evening. Presently her through the towards Frail and

trees. came

sat

cool

to

time that

woman

of Ide ?

"

Matsu

Howbeit

Matsu

food

neither

and gave her

the

O

locked

she

So

her

steps faltered. 247

slender

body swayed and

was

her


NURSE

THE "

"

this is strange !

Why, is O

Here

dungeon," O

But

Matsu, that And

she

Matsu

her

locked

was

the

to

she was, the earth.

draggingat hands and they bled. earth and found

the

at

The

at

with

Woman, Sadako, and "

"

she

in its

was

it to clasped

loud cry. I have you now," shrieked the a

the

of Id6

sword

well !

as

And

and ran leapedfrom the garden-house speed. She stretched forth her hand to O Matsu by the sleeve,but did not have

full

at

catch her

or

cither,for both of them were gone in a she the ladybeat the empty air. Swiftly

the sword and flash,

body of poor O Matsu, dungeon floor. Send

she

dark

dungeon,and as peopleto bringtorches.

the

called her

"

Lady

"

she

sped to

the

away

It

last.

and wrapping of gold and scarlet, her bosom

tore

her

cut

stones

Still she

the sword

she had

groundwith weeping and moaning

fingers.There

and

dark

in the

placewhere

and scratched

buried the sword

Lady Sadako.

said the

still, watching.

sat

went

**

xxxiii

me

the

Wise

cold and

went

There dead

laythe

upon

said the

Woman,"

she the

Lady

Sadako. So

Lady dead ? The

theysent Sadako

for the Wise

asked,

"

And

Woman.

How

long

has

she

the been

"

Wise

Woman

said, She "

death ; she has been dead two you gave her fitburial ; she

for the sword

was

starved

to

days. It were well a good soul." was

found. of Id6,it was not Fugiwaka tossed to and fro upon his lowlybed

As

248


THE

XXXIII

in

his

he

nurse

to

came

it seemed

And

waysidetavern.

a

NURSE

him

and knelt

by his

to

him

side.

that Then

soothed.

was

O

Matsu

Fugiwaka ? And

said, "

Will

you

sleepnow,

my

lord

"

he

answered,

"

I

will

sleep now,

O

Matsu." "

she said, and, sleeping or lord,''

Listen,my

"

waking,remember.

The

sword

is your The sword

The

sword is your trust. fortune. Cherish it,guard it,keep it.*' The

sword

and scarlet,

she

boy turned

over

sword

treasure.

is your

wrapping of gold and laid it by Fugiwaka'sside. The and his hand claspedthe to sleep,

was

in

its

of Id^.

"Waking

or

he sleeping,"

remember."

249

said,"I

will


XXXIV

BEAUTIFUL

THE

This

the

is

who

Cherry,

of

Sakura-ko,

the

beautiful

tale was

geisha^ born herself into bondage her mother might

She

was

sold that the

of

The

it !

Namida

called

of

the

Yedo. that

daughter,

her

have

food that

that

Kani^

no

of

dancer

after

money

YEDO

Flower

samurais

a

a

pity

OF

DANCER

father to

died,

is

Ah,

eat.

her

bought "the

so

was

of

money

tears.*' dwelt

She

the

where

plum

trees

the gets Aa there

in

the

in

red

and

flourish

street

narrow

white

lanterns

the

low

is full of music,

for

by

bkoa^

kottOy the could

make

long,

her

and

it too

She the

;

geisha^ and

swing The

eves.

they play

the

of

street

the

samisen

she the

and sing them. Her songs hair was black, her hands

dusk

to

dawn the

she cool

could

of

was

and to

skilful

samisen^ the

hand-drum.

small

power

In

indeed

played

wonderful, beauty was dawn to please. From

heart.

the

all

day long. Sakura-ico played lovely art. every

Her

of

She

eyes were

wonderful

dusk, and

were

white. her

from

go smiling and hide her the stand day she would 250


The

Beautiful

Dancer

of

Yedo.

P.

250.


THE

XXXIV

DANCER

OF

YEDO

of gallery

her mistress's house, and muse down into the street of the as she stood and looked geisha.And the folk that passed that way said the

upon

another,

See,

yonder stands Sakura-ko, of the Cherry,the beautiful dancer of Flower without peer/* Yedo, the geisha to

one

Little

"

looked

Sakura-ko

But

said,

"

full of vain and

love

and

hopes

mused

vain

regrets ; The

and

geisha^ paved houses

are

youth

and

hearts,your

here.

griefdwell

and

of the

street

narrow

bitterness and broken

with

down

flowers in your

watered with tears.*' are gardens needs have their The gentlemenof Yedo must served at feasts every night. so Sakura-ko pleasure, They whitened her cheeks and her forehead,and silk attires, gildedher lipswitH beni. She wore goldand purpleand grey and green and black,obi Her hair was of brocade tied. magnificently pinnedwith coral and jade,fastened with combs of gold lacquerand tortoise-shell. She pouredsak^y she made More merry with the good company.

this,she danced.

than

Three "

She

is

of her

poets sang

lighterthan

dancing.

One

rainbow-tinted

the

said,

dragon-

fly.'" And the

the third

the river of the But The

He

"

the

morning when And

was

She

said,

another

moves

brightsun

said, "

She

like the mist

of

shines.**

is like the shadow

in

waving willow-branch."

it is time

to

first lover

tell of her three lovers. was

neither

passingrich,and 2SI

a

old

great

man

nor

young. in Yedo.


He

his servant

sent

You

are

lost your

of the

street

O

me,

"

have

should there

master

you.**

Must

?

**

she

master

himself.

came

a

"Come

he said, Cherry,**

of the

Flower

the

dolls here.**

no

arc

in

have

to

gone

toy-shopsand bought your

have

must

door

the

"

You

doll ; let him know After this the to

shut

with geisha

she said, you fellow,**

wrong,

way.

xxxiv

of the

street

girdle.Sakura-ko

money in his his face. "

the

to

YEDO

OF

DANCER

THE

"

said,and looked

down

with

for I her

long eyes. he said, Aye,** the Cherry.** "

of

"

"

What

"

Fine

and

mats

will you cool

"

Flower

? ** she said.

giveme

galleries ; servants

goldhairpins what "

O

word,

silk and brocade,a house, white attires,

"

"

is the

must

What

to

wait

on

you,

you will.'* '*

do I

giveyou ? she Yourself, justthat,O Flower Body and soul ? she said.

said. of the

Cherry.**

'*

he answered

her, Body and soul.'* Now, fare you well,**she said, I have a she fancyto remain a geisha.It is a merry life," said,and she laughed. And

"

"

"

So that The wise "

the end of the firstlover.

was

second

is very

lover

old.

was

well, but

he

was

To old

Sakura-ko,"he cried, ah, cruel "

be

and

one,

I

old

and

foolish. am

mad

'*

for love of you ! " My lord,"she said," I He

said, "

I

am

not

so

252

can

believe easily

very old."

it."


THE

XXXIV

told

the

By

"

him,

divine

old

the

But

counsel.

nightto

a

home

and

would

lover

they had

when

feast she danced before him and

a

robe of

made that who

her

gold brocade.

sit beside him

the

time read

gods,"she prepare for good law."

to

the

nothing of

hear

Instead,he bade great feast which

And

her.

yet have

you may Go

YEDO

compassionof

"

end.

your

OF

DANCER

her

his house

to

he

had

made

her

by

preparedfor end

an

of

the

wearingscarlet hakama After the dancinghe and

he

called for

wine,

they might drink together. And the geisha pouredthe saki was called Silver Wave, When they had drunk together,Sakura-ko old

her

and cried "

lover, he

drew

her

to

him

are

mine

and

:

Come, my

bride,you

love, my

the time of many

existences ; there

for we the cup. Be not afraid, Come with me to the Meido." But

Sakura-ko

Wave, and

I

are

was

shall die

for

poisonin together.

said,"My sister,the Silver not children,neither are we old

and foolish to be deceived. I drank no saki and no the Silver Wave, poured fresh poison. My sister, tea so

Howbeit in my cup. I am I will stay with you till you and He died in her arms alone

way "

But

to

"

was

cried the Flower

her sister. Silver

"

fain

to

take his

was

of the

Cherry.

Wave, gave her counsel you will yet have cause

Keep your tears, for weeping. Waste not grief that

die."

the Meido.

Alas ! alas !

And

sorry for you, and

the end

such

as

of the second

253

thus

he." lover.

:

for


THE The

DANCER

third lover

Impetuous he

OF

YEDO

xxxiv

young and brave and beautiful. He

and

was

was,

of the

eyes on the Flower his father's house.

Cherryat

Afterwards

her out in the street of the she leaned againstthe as

he

a

gay. first set

festivalin

went

seek

to

geisha.He found railingof gallery

her her

mistress's house.

She looked

down

and sang this song *'

of the

into the street

geisha

:

My

mother bade

Out

ofthe yellowsea

finethread spin

me

sand

"

hard taskya hard task. May the dear godsspeedme A

My fathergave

me

saidj Draw

He

*

basket ofreeds

a

water

carry it a mile

And

!

from

the

;

spring

' "

hard task^a hard task. May the dear godsspeedme A

!

My heart would remember^ My heart must forget; Forgety my heartyforget "

A

hard

the dear

May When lover **

of

saw

Do

the

task^a

she had

hard task.

made

that her eyes you remember

Cherry ?

I

! *'

godsspeedme end

an

were

of

full of

singing,the

tears.

me,*'he said, O

Flower

"

saw

you

last

night

at

my

father'shouse." "

Aye, my

remember

young lord,"she answered

you very well." 254

him,

"

I


DANCER

THE

XXXIV

said, I

He

"

O

you,

so

of the

Flower

this she flushed neck

At

Be

Cherry.

I love

And

very young.

gentle,hear

dear wife."

free,be my

be

me,

not

am

YEDO

OF

and

chin,cheeks and

forehead.

dear," said

"My are

"

no

of the

Flower

I

Old

!

"No,

His

eat,

year

no

"

drink,nor

nor

house.

at

There

lived in

He

One street

dawn

his house

stayedwith

him

there

for both

"

he

time

no

of

more

fire. He

could

He

torment

weak

;

festival in She

he

was

said

a

great

word, outside Yedo, and

full three nursed

the swiftly, Swiftly,

no

And

moons.

back

ruddy glad days sped by to

of them.

This

happy time of gods,"said Flower

is the

thank the dear one

a

she found him. to

eternity,"

an

at night he fell fainting of the geisha.Sakura-ko

from

him

health.

year

pinedand grew his heart heavy night,

sleep.

but she bore after that

a

thoughtof nothing on

was

day and

grew, and weaker. of the the entrance home

lover

blood

young

pale,he wandered with longing.

came

lies*not

year, but of the Cherry. " Think a

me," she said ; but the else.

me

you."

as

why, there

"

of

"

not

said Flower

"

and think

old for such

he said ;

!

us

you

Cherryindeed."

too

am

"

"now

man,

"

between

not

young

Child," she said, go home

more. "

the

evening. My dear,"the

young hither your samisen and let 255

man me

all my

life. I

of the

bade hear you

her,

Cherry "

fetch

sing."


DANCER

THE she

So

song you have "

She

did.

heard

YEDO

OF

said,

'^

xxxiv

I shall

sing you

a

already."

My

mother bade

Out

ofthe yellowsea

thread spinjine

me

sand

"

hara task^a hard task. May the dear godsspeedme A

My fathergave

me

saidy Draw

He

'

A

basket

a

water

And

carry it a mile hard task^a hard

!

ofreeds ;

from

the

spring

* "

task.

May the dear godsspeedme My heart would remember ; My heart must forget ty my hearty forget Forge

!

y

"

hard task^a hard task. me May the dear godsspeed

A

Sweet," he said, what does this song "

"

and

! '*

why She

leave

do you

singit ?

answered, and

you,

forgetyou

;

"

Mv

lord,it means

therefore

you

do

I

that I

sing it.

forgetme.

must

mean,

"

I

That

must must

is my

desire."

said,"I

He

thousand

will

never

forgetyou,

cried, "

but yours, O "

world

The

in

a

existences."

She smiled, " Pray the gods you wife and have children." sweet He

not

No

Flower

wife

but you, and

of the us."

256

no

wed

a

children

Cherry."

gods forbid, my dear,my

lies between

may

dear.

All the


THE

XXXIV

The

OF

DANCER

day

next

she

YEDO

High and low lamentingand

was

gone. the lover wandered, weeping and seekingher both near and far. It for he found her no

more

Yedo

knew

her

Sakura-ko,the beautiful dancer.

"

her

And Howbeit

at

for him

cityof

The

not.

all in vain,

was

a

mourned

lover

last he

very

was

sweet

many

comforted, and

fairladywhom

days.

many

they found

he took

to

wife

enough, and soon she bore him a son. willingly And he was glad,for time dries all tears. five years old he sat in Now when the boy was gate of his father's house.

the that

alms.

The

would

have

it chanced

that way begging for of the house broughtrice and

wandering nun

a

And

came

servants

put it into her begging bowl, but the

child said, Let me give." So he did as he would. "

he

As

down the

filled the

the rice with nun

a

caught him

begging wooden

by the

bowl

spoon

and and

sleeve and

patted laughed,

held him

and looked into his eyes. "

Holy

nun,

why

do

you

look

at

so

me

? *'

cried the child. had a little boy like She said," Because I once you, and I went away and left him." " Poor littleboy ! " said the child. "

It

was

better for him, my

dear, my

dear

"

far,

far better." And

when

she she had said this,

2S7

went

her way.


XXXV

HANA-SAKA-JIJI

hard-working, their

Now

in

make

both But

They went

be

fond

of

One

clever.

woman

went

garden,

and

out

the

they ground, and

the

earth "

old

He

old

do

bit

of

with

went

working

presently his

can

the

he

to

of

bit

a

If

the

was

the

do

they

nothing

their

it with

a

could

ever

about

house

dog,

it.

you

for

they faithful, good, the

and

man

digging

old

their

in

them. the

dog

began

sniflHng

was

scratch

to

up

paws. be

dog

about

?

now

'*

says

the

woman. "

"

What

with

said in

sup

poor.

creatures. not

evening to

were

or

and

been

long.

they

him.

dog

While the

hungry

or

is

day

bite they had sure they shared

very

and

cold

the

if

it, and

were

as

old

poor

complain,

not

merry bed

to

may

did

they

the

meet,

couple.

honest

long

ends

were

old

good

a

been they had but they had always old it was all they age

lives

their

All

lived

there

early days

the

In

he's

Oh,

just nothing

at

all,*' says

playing." 258

the

old

man

;


HANA-SAKA-JIJI

XXXV

than playing," It's more says the old woman, belief he's found It's my something worth "

"

having." So

off she

went

to

what

see

the

dog would

be

followed her and leaned on his at, and the old man spade. Sure enough the dog had dug a pretty big this time, and he went with on scratching his paws for dear lifeand barkingshort and sharp. The old man helped with his spade,and before a on big box of hidden treasure, long theycame hole

by

silver and

gold and jewelsand

It is easy

good old couple clever dog,and he

that the

believe

to

rich stuffs.

glad. They pattedtheir jumped up and licked their faces. were

After this

carried the treasure into the house. to and fro and barked.

Now,

next

another old

door

to

the

good

The

old

they dog ran

couplelived

but envious goodas they, the dog found the hidden and discontented. When treasure theylooked througha hole in the bamboo hedge and saw the whole affair Do you think theywere pleased? Why, not a bit of it. They were so angry and envious that theycould get no pleasure by day nor rest at night. At last the bad old man to the good old came not couple,

so

man. "

Fve

he says. " With "

take him So

him

to

come

to

all my

ask for the loan of your

heart,"says

the

good old

dog,** man

;

and welcome."

the bad old their best

man

room.

took And 259

the

dog and brought

the bad old

man

and


HANA-SAKA-JIJI

xxxv

his wife put a supper, of all manner to eat, before the dog,and bade him

of fine things fall to.

Honourable Dog,'*theysaid, you are good and wise, cat and afterwards find us treasure.** "

*'

dog would

But the

All the

"

not

eat.

left for us,** said the

more

greedyold

couple,and they ate up the dog*ssupper in a round his neck twinkling.Then theytied a string and draggedhim into the gardento find treasure. But

never

a

morsel

glintof gold,nor

a

he find,nor shred of rich stuflF. treasure

did

a

devil's in the beast,** cries the bad old and he beat the dog with a big stick. Then The

"

man,

dog began to

the

of

scratch

up

the

earth

with

his

paws. " V

Oho

wife,

"

But a

!

now was

Oho

to

it treasure

It was tell of. But

the bad

and

hidingtheir

old

man

to

his

for the treasure.**

bit of it.

bad

! ** says the bad

old

Arab, arah

dog dug

up ?

Not

rubbish,too heap of loathly theysay it smelt most vilely fain to run couplewere away, a

with

noses

that the

their sleeves.

!**

theycried, the dog has deceived us.** And that very nighttheykilled the poor dog and buried him at the foot of a tall pinetree. Alack for the good old man and the good old when woman they heard the dog was gone ! It was theythat wept the bitter tears. They pulled flowers and strewed them on the poor dog*sgrave. They burned incense and they spreadout good thingsto eat, and the vapour that rose from them comforted the poor dog*s spirit. "

"

260


HANA-SAKA-JIJI

XXXV

the

Then

good

a tree, and made rice in the mortar

old

down

the

of its wood.

He

cut

man

mortar

and

pounded

the

pine put

rice with

a

pestle. of wonders," cried the old woman, lookingon, " wonder of wonders, good

Wonder

"

who

was

man,

our

So it

rice is all turned into broad

in Presently,

the loan of the Fm

"For

Take

"

the bad old

comes

to

man

ask for

mortar.

needing a

special," says

"

enough.

sure

was

goldpieces!

somethingvery

mortar

he.

good old

the

it,"says

"

man

;

Fm

sure

you'rewelcome." took away the he had got it home

So the bad old

man

his arm, and when with rice in a twinkling. And at

he

mortar

under

he filled it

pounded away

it for dear life'ssake. Do

"

Never

"

gold coming ? lookingon.

see

you his wife, who

was a

bit," she says,

queer." Queer enough it was, use

to

man

or

deceived

under

us."

"

he

says

to

but the rice looks

mildewed

and rotten,

no

beast.

Arab, arah !

"

"

any

"

And

they cried, the they didn't let the "

their feet, but

lit

a

fire and

mortar

has

grass grow

burnt

the

mortar.

Now mortar.

old

folk.

good old couplehad lost their fairy said a word, the patient But theynever took some of the The good old man

the

ashes of the

mortar

and

went

261

his way.


HANA-SAKA-JIJI it

Now

yet

time, and

mid-winter

There

bare.

were

not

was

flower

a

all the trees

be seen,

to

nor

little green leaf.

a

does the

What a

was

xxxv

good old

and scatter

cherrytree

the branches

In

?

a

a

do but climb

man

into

handful of his ashes the tree

moment

over

covered

was

with blossoms. and down It will do,'*says the good old man, he gets from the tree and off he sets for the Prince's "

he

where palace,

knocks

at

the

gate

bold

as

as

brass. "

Who

**

I

am

makes

who

man

is with

** you ?

theyask him. Hana^saka-jijij* says the are

dead

trees

old man,

blossom

to

the

business

my

the Prince.** when

Mighty pleasedthe Prince was cherrytrees and his peach trees

his

;

"

and

he his

saw

plum

rush into blossom.

trees

'*Why,**he said,"it is mid-winter, and we And he called forth his have the joysof spring.** ladywife and her maidens and all his own retainers of Hana^saka-jiji. At last he sent to see the work home with a passing rich reward. the old man what of the bad old couple? Were Now they content

to

let well alone ?

Oh

no.

all the They gatheredtogether

ashes that

theyhad put them in a about the town crying: We the Hana^saka-jiji. **We are

and when left, went

dead

trees

they make

can

blossom.**

out Presently

company

basket

were

to

see

the

comes

the show. 262

Prince

And

the

and

all his

bad old

man


HANA-SAKA-JIJI

XXXV

climbs

into

up

a

forthwith

tree

and

scatters

his

ashes. But the

tree

never

ashes flew into the flew into bad

old

and

sorry

a

rage.

couplewere

blossomed,never Prince's

There

was

eyes, and a

caughtand

a

bit. The

the

Prince

prettyto-do. well beaten.

The

Sad

theycrept home at night. It is to be hoped that theymended their ways. Howbeit the good people,their neighbours, grew rich and lived happy all their days.

263


XXXVI

MOON

THE

There

He

Tori.

was

an

hard-working,

and

in

cottage

a

he

the

on

Tak^ and

Tori

for he

sold

he

thus

gained the

Up bamboo

age, a

upon

fair

a

humble he

hillside

!

**

he the to

He

pity."

said.

I

"

good wife help us sighed as

not

am

so

the

he

to

got

to

came

work,

the

his blue

took

age,

and

town,

for

young there's

old

our

his wont,

Alack

either, and in

souls.

was

He "

none,

morning,

and

went,

wife

had

summer

price in living.

old

good

poor

as

out. quite wearied wiped his forehead,

child

nor

old

and

poor

they

grove

nor

was,

his

steep

teneguiand bones

for

them

his

bamboos

cut

to

very

Children

their

early

rose

man,

with

lived

hills. in

forth

went

old

Tak6

called

cutter

honest

little comfort

and

bamboo

old

an

was

MAIDEN

as

old

my I

no

once

chick

the

more's

Tak6

poor

Tori. he

Soon

green "

it

was

"Is

stems

What dim it

the

saw

a

bright light shining

of the

bamboos.

is this

?

and

"

Tak6

said

shady enough

sun?''

said

Tak6 264

in

Tori, for the

Tori.

the

among

as

bamboo

"No,

a

rule

grove.

that


THE

XXXVI

well

cannot

stems

to

Sure

be, for

he

Very soon

it

ground."

through the brightlightcame

from

Tak6

bamboo.

the

bamboo

way

the

what

see

from

comes

pushedhis

enough it came

green down

MAIDEN

MOON

the

of

root

his

took

Tori

a

from.

great and

axe

the great big green bamboo, and there fine shininggreen jewel,the size of his

a

big cut was

two

fists. "

Wonder

IVe

of

Wonder

"

of wonders bamboo.

cut

!"

wonders !

For

This

Tak6

cried

Tori.

five-and-thirty years

is the

very

first time

Fve found a great big green jewel at the root of one of them." With that he takes up the jewel in his hands,and as soon he does that,it bursts as in

with

two

of it

out

came

loud

a a

noise,if you'llbelieve it,and

young

and

person

stood

Tak6

on

Tori's hand. You

must

understand

but very beautiful.

small

the young She

was

person was dressed all in

green silk. "

easy

Greetingsto you, as you please.

Tak6

Tori," she says,

"

as

Thank Mercy me ! says Tak6 Tori. you I he be a fairy," kindly. suppose, now, you'll ? says, if I'm not making too bold in asking You're right,"she says, it's a fairyI am, and I'm come to live with you and your good wife "

**

"

"

"

for

a "

"

little."

Well, now," says Take

pardon,we're very poor. Our enough,but I'm afraid therc'd be a ladylike you." 265

beggingyour cottage is good

Tori,

"

no

comforts for


THE **

Where's

Take

"

will do

and now, Home

xxxvi

to

Tak6

Tori, let

they

went.

here's

with,**says

on

go

Wife

the

fairy. Why, fairy ;

for home."

make

us "

''

says the halves. "

big green jewel?

picksup the two he says. goldpieces,"

That

Tak6

the

MAIDEN

Tori

it'sfull of "

MOON

wife ! "

!

cried

live with us, to come fairy and she has broughtus a shining jewelas big as a persimmon,full of goldpieces." The good wife came running to the door. believe her eyes. She could hardly What is this,"she said, about a persimmon I have seen and gold pieces? Persimmons often it is the season but gold enough moreover, piecesare hard to come by."

Tori,

"

a

"

"

"

"

be, woman," said Take

Let

"

dull."

he

And

into broughtthe fairy

fast the

Wondrous

"

you

are

the house.

Before many fine tall maiden, as fresh

fairygrew.

a gone she was fair as the morning,as

dayswere and

Tori,

day, brightas the noonand still as the evening, and as deep as sweet the night. Tak6 Tori called her the Lady as of the because she had come out Beaming Bright, shining jewel. Take Tori had the goldpieces out of the jewel grew rich,and spent his money every day. He like a man, but there was always plenty and

to

as

spare.

servants

to

Brightwas was came

famed to

He

built him

wait

near

an

and

fine house, he The

him.

on

lodged like both

a

Lady Beaming

empress.

far,and

seek her hand. 266

had

scores

Her

beauty of lovers


MOON

THE

XXXVI

But

she

would

Tori and the dear she said

I will

"

;

MAIDEN

have

of them.

none

good wife

are

live with

"Tak6

lovers/*

true

my

and

them

be

their

daughter/* So

three

third year

happy

years went Mikado himself

the

Lady Beaming Bright.

He

by

and

;

to

came

the the

woo

brave lover,

the

was

in

indeed.

Lady,"he said, I bow before you, my soul salutes you. Sweet lady, be my Queen." Then the Lady Beaming Bright sighed and "

"

great tears stood in her eyes, and she hid her face with her sleeve.

"Lord, I;cannot," she said. "

O

Cannot

dear

?

"

Mikado

said the

Lady Beaming Bright?

;

**

and

why

not,

"

and see, lord,"she said. Now about the seventh month she grew very sorrowful,and would go abroad no more, but was "

for

Wait

long upon

house. There

There she

sat

and the stars. the moon was

gardengalleryof Tak6 Tori's she sat in the daytimeand brooded. at night and gazed upon the moon There she was fine nightwhen one the

at

its full.

Her

maidens

were

with

her, and Take Tori and the good wife, and t^^ Mikado, her brave lover. "

How

brightthe

moon

shines ! "

said Ta

Tori. **

Truly,"said

the

good wife,

"

it is like

brass saucepan well scoured." "

"

See how

it is like

a

paleand wan it is,"said the sad despairing lover." 267

Mikac


THE How

"

MOON

MAIDEN

long and brighta

"It

is like

beam

xxxvi

! **

quoth Take

highway from the moon reachingto this gardengallery/' O dear foster-father," cried the Lady Beaming Bright. You speaktruth,it is a highwayindeed. And countless heavenly along the highway come bear me home. to beingsswiftly, swiftly, My father is the King of the Moon. I disobeyed his Tori,

a

"

"

He

behest.

The

in exile.

earth three years to dwell three years are past and I go to mine

sent

to

me

Ah, I am sad at parting." The mist descends,"said Tak6 Tori. Nay," said the Mikado, " it is the cohorts of

country.

own **

"

the

King

of the Moon."

in their hundreds and their theycame thousands, bearing torches. Silently they came, round about the garden gallery.The and lighted chief among them brought a heavenly feather robe. Up rose the Lady Beaming Brightand put

Down

the robe upon

her.

"Farewell, Tak6

Tori," she

said, "farewell,

dear foster-mother,I leave you my jewel for a As for you, my lord,I would remembrance. with me but there is no feather you might come .

...

"

I leave you a phial of the pure for you. elixir of life. Drink, my lord,and be even the as Immortals." robe

spreadher bright wings and the closed about her. Together cohorts of Heaven and were they passed up the highwayto the moon, Then

no

more

The

she

seen.

Mikado

took the elixir of lifein his 268

hand,


MOON

THE

XXXVI

and he

went

to

MAIDEN

the top of the And he made

highestmountain

in

that country. a sume great fire to confor he said," Of what profit the elixir of life, shall it be to me to live for ever, beingpartedfrom the

Lady Beaming Bright? So the elixir of life was

vapour

said, "

floated up Let

my and reach the

to

"

consumed,

Heaven.

And

and its blue the

Mikado

message float up with the vapour of my Lady BeamingBright/* ears

269


XXXVII

KARMA

Ito

The

man, young after a homeward

city of foot, and

the on

he

with

his

weighed

him

went

cares

full

of

the

and

rocks was

wild

a

across

it

stones,

summer

dark

pine boughs.

tree,

before

woman

him

with

time,

and

with

gnarled

him

in

here

the

in a simple girl dressed along Lightly she went deepening twilight. "

I

say

gentle

some "

should

The

such

a

So

is

way child the

as

young

she

of

was

trunk

of

gown

lonely

lady," Tatewaki solitary and the

mind

him

to

ing leadwere

flowers, for a

grew

and

It

the

his

there

and

way.

the

the

moor

beheld

and

upon

lonely road

abundance

an

and

taken

the

to

alone

and

had a

taken

bent

down

Upon

up

had

way

eyes

upon

moor.

looked

Tatewaki a

found

his

which

business

Night

he

made

returning

was

which

He

for

Kioto.

journey

Kioto.

ground, was

Tatewaki,

crooked

the

figure

was

a

slender

blue

cotton.

road

in

the

serving-maid said time

to

is

quickened 270

his

pace

of

himself.

dreary

she." man

of

and

came

for


/"

s u

Id


KARMA

XXXVII

maiden.

the

with

up

gently, since "

us

"

tread

we

the

very lonelyroad let

same

for now fellow-travellers,

be

the

be dark/* and it will soon The pretty maiden turned

said

he

Child,"

twilight passes

him

to

with

bright

eyes and

smilinglips. "Sir," she said, **my

mistress

be

will

glad

indeed." mistress ?

"

said Tatewaki.

**

Your

**

Why, sir,of a suretyshe I

? '*

"

Because

"

Indeed,and indeed the

am

come

said the serving-maid ; that." of more the

by

went

"

has been

time

but

maiden's

long,"

she will think

now

she not ? " said Tatewaki.

Will

"

gladbecause

come."

are

you

will be

And

side,walking

as

on

no

he in

one

a

dream.

Presentlythe house,

of them

two

far from

not

the

came

roadside.

to

little

a

Before

the

fair

small

garden,with a stream runningthroughit and a stone bridge. About the house and the garden there was a bamboo fence,

house

a

was

and in the fence "

the

dwells

Here

maid.

a

wicket-gate. my

said mistress,"

And

they went wicket-gate.

Now house.

Tatewaki He

saw

a

into the

to

came

the

the

serving-

garden through threshold

ladystandingupon

of the

the threshold

waiting. She

giveme

said, "

You

have

come

comfort." 271

at

last, my

lord,to


KARMA And

he

When

"

had

O

"

and

Before

the

vessel of

woman

and she

needful. "Three

time

is not

by the hand, and theywent with togetherand into a room

house

mats

And

was. "

she took him

the

Here

loved her since love

we."

as

Then white

that he loved

love, love," he murmured,

for such into

said this he knew

had

lady,and

the

I have come."

answered, he

XXXVII

round latticed window.

a

there

window

stood

lilyin

a

a

water.

the

held

two

together.

converse

after some

time

that

with

there

*was

an

saki in

old ancient

silver

flagon; and all things broughtsilver drinking-cups came

Tatewaki

And Times

Three"

and

a

the

ladydrank the together.When theyhad

done

this the ladysaid," Love, let us go out into the shine of the moon. See,the nightis as green as

an

emerald.

." .

.

they went and left the house and the small Or ever fair gardenbehind them. theyhad closed the wicket-gate the house and the gardenand the itself all faded away, dissolving in a wicket-gate faint mist, and not a signof them was left. So

"

"

Alas ! what

"

Let be, dear

is this ?

they pass, for we Then

Tatewaki

the

ladyupon

grew

about

cried Tatewaki.

love,"said have saw

the wild them

"

in

no

the

moor.

need

more

that

lady,and

he

was

And

smiled ;

of them." alone the

tall lilies

ring. So they stood touching one another

a

live-longnight,not lookinginto each other's 272

eyes

most

with

the but

steadfastly.


KARMA

XXXVII

dawn

When

ladystirred and

the

came,

one

gave

deep sigh. *'

said, Lady,why do you sigh? her when he asked her this,she unclasped

Tatewaki And

"

which fashioned after the form was girdle, goldenscaled dragonwith translucent eyes. she took the girdle and wound it nine times

about

her

part

and she love's arm, these are the years until touched

the

Then are

Tell

you ? She

with

me

the

you

.

and

I ?

plains.Do

...

not

love, who

."

I go seek for me

when

the

lady had

to

Tatewaki

my people there. .

ethereal,like grew the cast himself upon

his hand

to

hold her sleeve.

a

When

the

"The

he said,"the plains,"

sun

wound

his arm, the plains.He came saw

about

folk

up he

was

there will I find her."

the

.

.

ground But

meadow-sweet. banks called

the And

to

and

put

he could

not

laystill

arose.

low

to

the broad

.

.

.

river,where

the green banks.

river there floated boats of fresh and

And

plains So, with the goldentoken he sped down, down fleetly

on standing

red dianthus

faded

mist.

stay her. And his hand grew cold and he as one dead, all in the grey dawn.

he

do

to

we

spoken she

slowly and

to

she

for me/'

And

out

"O

have

love, what

:

arm.

aloud, .

a

And

again." So

his

name.

your

love, we

meet

we

cried

said, "O

names,

upon Wait

"

goldencircles on

Tatewaki

O

said,

of

And

on

the flowers,

campanula,goldenrod and the people upon the river

Tatewaki

:

273

T


KARMA

XXXVII

Staywith us. Last nightwas the Night of where earth and wandered Souls. to They came To-day theywould, the kind wind carried them. theyreturn to Yomi. They go in their boats of the river bears them. flowers, Stay with us and bid the departing Souls good speed." And Tatewaki cried, May the Souls have I cannot sweet stay." passage. So he came but did not at last, to the plains find his lady. Nothing at all did he find,but a *'

"

...

wilderness of ancient graves, with nettles overgrown and the So

waving green Tatewaki

nine

long years happinessof home

grass. his to went he lived a

and

place,and for The lonely man. own

little children

he

never

knew.

love," he

"Ah,

I wait patiently,

said,

for you.

"not

.

.

.

not patiently, Love, delay not

your coming." the nine years were And when past he his gardenupon the Night of Souls. And he

up

saw

a

that

woman

was

looking

towards

came

in

him,

threadingher way through the paths of the slender a garden. Lightlyshe came ; she was girl,dressed in a simple gown of blue cotton. Tatewaki stood up and spoke: "

the for

Child," he same

now

said very lonelyroad let

the

gently,since "

be

us

twilightpasses

and

we

tread

fellow-travellers, it will

soon

be

dark." The

maid

turned

to

him

smilinglips: 274

with

brighteyes

and


KARMA

XXXVII

"

Sir,"she

mistress

said, my "

will be

glad

indeed." "

Will

she be

"

The

time

**

Long

"

But

that.

.

now

Guide

"

said Tatewaki.

has been

and very

long." weary,"said will

you

Tatewaki.

think

no

more

of

." .

"Take "

glad?

me

me,

for my afraid. am

limbs

to

for I

your cannot

fail. Do Take

me

mistress,"said Tatewaki. see

any

more.

leave go my

not

to

your

Hold

me,

hand, for I

mistress," said

Tatewaki. found morning his servants dead, quietly lyingin the shade of

In

and

the

him the

garden

trees.

27s

cold

T2


XXXVIII

OF

STORY

SAD

THE

YAOYA'S

THE

DAUGHTER

There a

house

great

ballad-singer who where they wished

wandering

a

was

Yedo

in

to

came

be

to

entertained. Will

"

ballad-singer people

the

"

Oh,

"

Will

bade

be

a

tale

I tell

of

the

said "

The

story.

a

tale

a

or

"

story ?

a

tell

love

?

song

you

him

of love,** have

you

of

war

?

'*

tale

sad

a

they

said. or

a

merry

?

"

asked

ballad-singer. all

were

that

agreed

they

hear

would

a

tale.

"Well, and

house

tale

a

They sad

shall

a

or

ballad-singer.

the

said

it

dance

a

or

"

;

of the

Shall

"

have

you

I

will

then," tell

said

the sad

the

you

ballad-singer, "listen, story

of

the

Yaoya*s

daughter." So

The

his

he

told

Yaoya

daughter

this

was was

tale-

a

hard-working sweetest thing

poor

the

276

man,

in

but Yedo.


THE

XXXVIII

You

YAOYA'S

she

know

must

DAUGHTER one

was

of the five beauties of

in the city,that grew like five cherry-trees of the springblossoming.

the time

In

the hunters lure the wild deer with

autumn

the sound

of the flute. The

they

believe

mates.

So

calls to

deer

are

deceived,for

they hear the voices of their theytrappedand slain. For like calls to youth, beauty to Youth

that

are

like.

beauty,love to love. This is law, and this the undoingof the Yaoya'sdaughter. was When

there

more

than

that

was

the

a

great fire in Yedo,

half of the

so

law

great

burned,

citywas

ruined also. And the Yaoya'shouse was Yaoya and his wife and his daughterhad no roof over them, nor anywhere to laytheir heads. So they went to a Buddhist temple for shelter and stayedthere many days,tilltheir house should be Ah me, for the Yaoya's rebuilt. daughter! Every morning at sunrise she bathed in the springof the temple. Her that was clean water near eyes and her cheeks Then she were ruddy. bright and sit by the waterwould put on her blue gown side her long hair. She was and to comb sweet a fifteen years old. Her slender thing,scarce name the

O

was

Schichi.

"Sweep

the

temple

her father bade her. much So O

for the

and

*Tis well

*'

who good priests

Schichi took the broom laboured

the

she

and

temple courts," we

should

give us swept.

merrily,and of the templegrew bright. precincts there was Now a young acolytewho she

sang

277

do

so

shelter." And the

as

grey

served in


YAOYA^S

THE

DAUGHTER

xxxviii

and beautiful. holy place. Gentle he was Not a day passedbut he heard the singingof O Schichi ; not a day passedbut he set eyes upon her, going her ways, so lightand slender,in the of the temple. ancient courts It was not long before he loved her. Youth love to love. It calls to youth,beautyto beauty, not long before she loved him. was together in the temple Secretlythey met Hand in hand theywent, her head against grove.

the

his

arm.

be !

I

"

a

thing should

happy and unhappy. Why

am

?

own

you, my

such

she cried,"that

"Ah,"

of the

Because

do

I love

"

power

acolyte. Nevertheless,we we sin,and I know grievously "

of Karma," said the sin,O heart's desire, not

what

may

come

of it." "

with "

Alas," us, and I cannot

Then

and to

she we

the

said,

"

will ?

so

young tell,"he said

two

of them

weeping.

But

the

gods

be

angry

"

"

;

but I

afraid."

am

ling trembclungtogether,

they pledgedthemselves

each other for the space of many existences. The Yaoya had his dwellingin the quarter of

his house citycalled Honjo,and presently rebuilt which had been destroyed by the fire. and his wife were glad,for they said, Now

the

"

was

He we

shall go home." O

Schichi

hid her

face with

her sleeve and

wept bitter tears. "

Child,what

ails you ?

278

"

said her mother.


THE

XXXVIII

YAOYA'S

DAUGHTER "

" Oh ! oh ! oh ! she cried, Schichi wept. and swayedherself to and fro. ** " Why, maid, what is it ? said her father.

O

Schichi wept. cried,and swayedherself Still O

"

to

! oh ! oh j ** she and fro. Oh

nightshe went to the grove. There beneath acolyte, very pale and sorrowful,

That

the

was

the

trees. "

They

part us," she cried, O

will

heart's desire. and dear

The

dear

gods are

young."

so

we "

my dear angry with us, "

afraid. Ah," he said, I was maid, O little maid, sweet

Farewell,

"

Remember

we

pledgedto

are

.

.

.

and

slender. another for the

one

space of many

existences." the two of them

Then

and

weeping,

thousand

day they bore O languid and grew

next

She

Honjo.

white

grew,

drooped

the

as

farewell

the

with

Schichi

a

home

to

listless. White

buckwheat

failed.

she

and

numbered likened

bade

they

times.

The

she

and

ling trembclungtogether,

No

flower.

She she

longer was

five beauties

of Yedo,

nor

in the time of the spring cherry-tree blossoming. All the day long she brooded in her low bed. At nightshe layawake silently. "

to

a

! oh !

Oh

night! Shall longing? Oh

"

I

she

moaned, see

never

him

"

the weary, weary Must ? I die of

! oh ! the weary, weary

night. .

"

."

Her "

eyes grew largeand burningbright. Alas ! poor maid," said her father.

**I

am

afraid

.

"

." said her 279

mother.

"She


THE

YAOYA'S

lose her

will

wits.

DAUGHTER "

.

She

.

xxxviii

does

not

weep

any

straw

and

more." made

it into

the

in

of

and

the

0

all the

I shall

;

a

gallery fire

set

to

the whole

burnt

of her

father's

burnt

was

him

!

"

to

the

shrieked

that she had

So she

be tried for her

was

set

fire

taken before the

wrong-doing. "

thing?

the

swoon.

Child," said the judge,

"

this

see

cityknew

her father's house.

judge to

house

the

charcoal

put

she

Then the wood

Schichi,and fell in Howbeit

to

him

see

she

charcoal,and

merrily. Furthermore house took lightand ground. I shall

took

it beneath

father's house.

straw

*^

and

;

laid

and

and

arose

bundle

a

bundle

her

the

Schichi

last O

At

what

made

you

do

"

said, I did it for love's sake. the house, we shall have 1 said,'I will burn shall take nowhere to lay our heads, then we "

I

mad,"

was

shelter

the

at

Lord, I have "

"

not

him

seen

nor

"

is your lover ?

Who

will

I

temple;

see

lover.'

my

heard of him

Then

she told him.

Now

as

for the

law

said the

of the

judge.

city,it

the be altered. Death was for the crime of the Yaoya'sdaughter. "

might escape. My little maid,"

the

years old ?

perhapstwelve Nay, lord,"she "

judge said,

"

answered. 280

hard

was

and could not

child

these

moons."

many

many,

she

"

penalty

Only

are

a

you


YAOYA'S

THE

xxxvm

Thirteen, then, or fourteen ?

"

be fourteen.

you may "

"

You

The

gods send

littleand slender."

are

Lord,**she said,*' I am fifteen." Alas, my poor maid," said the judge, you *'

all

are

DAUGHTER

old."

too

So

her

they made

Nihonbashi. There

she

upon

the

for all the world

was

the

bridgeof

theytold her story aloud ; they so that all might hear. house-tops

And

called it from

stand

to

look upon.

Every day for seven days she stood upon the bridgeof Nihonbashi, and drooped in the glareof the sun and of men's glances. Her face was white as

of the buckwheat.

the flower

and

wide

burning bright. thing under the sky. piteous to

wept

see

her.

daughterthat

They said, "

was

one

of

Her

She

was

eyes

were

the

most

tender-hearted

The

Is this the

the

Yaoya's

five beauties

of

Yedo?" After O

the

Schichi

days were

seven

to

a

stake,and

about her and

wood

the thick smoke "

It

voice. CC'

was

And

The

set

the

passedtheybound of they piledfaggots faggotsalight. Soon

rose.

all for when

tale is

love," she cried with a she had said this,she died. told," said

the

loud

ballad-singer. calls to youth,beauty to beauty, love to Youth This is law, and this law was the undoing love. of the Yaoya's daughter.*' *'

PrintMthy R. " R. Clark, Limitkd. ReRnhmrgk,


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