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Volume 1 • Number 1

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The Dog & Hound

Winter 2011-2012


Winter 2011-2012

P.O. Box 332 • Montmorenci, SC 29839-0332 • 803.643.9960 •

www.TheDogAndHound.com • Editor@TheDogAndHound.com

Time Dated Material • Periodicals • Volume 1 • Number 1

The Dog and Hound

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elcome to The Dog and Hound, a newspaper devoted to dogs and hounds of all breeds, types and purposes. When we set out to create this paper, we did it for several reasons. The first was that we love dogs and we wanted to write about them. The second was that there are many dog activities going on in the Aiken area and the Southeast region, and we wanted to give the people devoted to dogs a place to publicize their events and tell their stories. The third was that we recognize that dogs have often found themselves in precarious positions in our society – yes, we love them, but there many dogs in America that don’t have homes. They are sometimes abused, neglected and abandoned. We hope to use the power of the press to help improve the lives of dogs in difficult circumstances, or at least draw attention to their plight. We’d like The Dog and Hound to act as an advocate for dogs in all their positive roles in society, bringing dog lovers together and helping to make our community a better place to have a dog, or to be one. While conducting research for our first issue, it struck me how important dogs are in our society. According to the 2011-2012 American Pet Products Association National Pet Ownership Survey, 46.3 million American households own at least one dog (39 percent of all households in the country). That’s a total of 78.2 million dogs. These dogs may be household pets, or they may be involved in various sporting events and professions. Here in the Southeast, we have dogs that participate in various types of hunting – foxhunters, beagles, retrievers and bird dogs of many descriptions. Then there are dogs that participate in sports designed specifically for them: agility, Schutzhund, dock diving, obedience. And show dogs that are groomed to perfection, the better to exhibit their conformation. There are also herding dogs that practice one of their ancient roles, controlling livestock. Aiken County uses dogs from the Aiken Bloodhound Tracking Team to help them track criminal suspects and find missing persons. Service dogs can improve the lives of people who have impaired vision, cerebral palsy, epilepsy and diabetes. Anyone who has a dog knows that spending time with them can be therapeutic. Now there is a new category of service dogs that are certified therapy dogs. These animals visit hospitals to comfort the patients, and they visit schools to help put children at ease – encouraging children to read stories to dogs is a whole new way to help them overcome reading disabilities.

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Therapy dogs have also found their way into colleges and universities. It all started at Yale, where the librarian at the law school allowed students to “check out” his dog for an hour or two to help alleviate stress at exam time. Now, there are several major universities, as well as some overseas military units, that have dogs available for people who want to spend time with a four-legged friend. Finally, there are police dogs, protection dogs and military dogs. These dogs are trained to perform many duties. They might be required to sniff out illegal drugs, to find bombs, to locate survivors or corpses in a disaster area, or to attack and hold criminals and intruders. They serve as sentries and as a first line of defense. Their jobs are hazardous, and they sometimes give their lives in the line of duty. Military dogs have been indispensable in many wars, including in both world wars, Vietnam and the current actions in Iraq and Afghanistan. A K-9 unit was even given credit for catching Osama bin Laden. There is currently a movement in this country to ensure that the dogs of war are able to come home to the United States with the service members who love them, rather than be left to an uncertain fate in the countries where they have served, as has often happened in the past. There are many reasons that dogs are so important in our society. Perhaps the main one is that dogs and people evolved together. No one knows exactly how far back the canine-human bond goes. Fossil evidence tells us that dogs and people have been living together for 15,000 to 33,000 years, but they may have a much longer history together – as long as 135,000 years, according to estimates that rely on DNA analysis. The old assumption was that people captured and domesticated young wolves, leading to a new species. The current hypothesis is that dogs domesticated themselves by congregating near humans and possibly by hunting with them. Whatever the case, societies all over the globe discovered that they could be more productive when dogs participated in their activities, and dogs discovered they could have better lives if their packs included humans. So, here’s to the blended pack: people and dogs, living and working together. We hope you enjoy our first issue. Please let us know if you have an event that should be in our calendar, or if you have a story you think people should know about. We’d like to be your dog newspaper.

EDITOR & PUBLISHER Pam Gleason ART DIRECTOR Gary Knoll ASSOCIATE EDITOR Jean Berko Gleason LAYOUT & DESIGN Gary Knoll ADVERTISING Theresa King (803.678.9806) Pamela O’Neil (803.644.5580) PHOTOGRAPHERS Pam Gleason Gary Knoll George Buggs

Going Out Of Town? Don’t miss future issues of The Dog and Hound. We will send you a one year subscription (4 issues) for $14.00. Just send us a check or credit card number & your mailing address: P.O. Box 332, Montmorenci, SC 29839 editor@thedogandhound.com Or sign up on the web at www.TheDogandHound.com

About the Cover

Autumn in Aiken: Dominic, a 1-year-old English Pointer, on point in Aiken. Pointers are among the most popular bird hunting dogs in the country. Read our full story on English Pointers starting on page 12. Photography by Gary Knoll

Pam Gleason Editor & Publisher

All contents Copyright 2011 The Dog and Hound The Dog and Hound Policies: The opinions expressed herein are those of the individual authors and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the publishers, editors, or the policies of The Aiken Horse, LLC. The Dog and Hound is owned by The Aiken Horse, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

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Table of Contents

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Physical Therapy: modern medicine

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News and Notes: around the town

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English Pointers: breed spotlight

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Essence of a Dog: lynn carlisle paints

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Animal Rescue: fighting the battle

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Book Reviews: need to know more

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From the Trainer: puppy help

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Calendar of Events: things to do

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Classified Ads: stuff you need

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Winter 2011-2012


d. b. brisbin photography

Pet Portraiture

On Location • Call For Rates www.dbbrisbinphotography.photoreflect.com dbbrisbin@earthlink.net (803) 649-0238

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Physical Therapy for Dogs Rehabilitation, Fitness and Strength By Pam Gleason, Photography by Gary Knoll

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hysical therapy for humans has a long history, dating back as far as the ancient Greeks. Physical therapy for dogs is a younger discipline. About two decades ago, veterinarians and dog owners realized that exercises and treatments designed to help people recover from surgery or trauma could be adapted for animals. The field of canine rehabilitation was born. It got started in Europe in the early 1990s and arrived on this side of the Atlantic by the end of the decade In the realm of canine physical therapy, Aiken is ahead of most small cities and of many larger ones. The city has two separate veterinary practices specifically designed to get injured animals back on their feet. Canine rehabilitation can also help older animals stay active and happy, improving the quality of their lives, minimizing the need for medication, and even making it possible for them to live longer.

CARE: Performance and Recovery

Dr. Maria Glinski is the director of rehabilitation services for the Animal Specialty Center of South Carolina in Columbia. She works there Tuesdays and Thursdays and devotes the remainder of the week to her Aiken practice, Carolina Animal Rehabilitation and Exercise Center. Dr. Glinski has been a small animal veterinarian for decades and she is also certified in human and veterinary acupuncture.

Dr. Glinski applies laser therapy to a dachshund recovering from back surgery. Right: an agility dog is treated with electrostimulation.

The CARE Center, which is at the Houndslake golf course, is a 4,000 square foot animal rehabilitation facility. It includes treatment and exercise rooms, a therapy pool and underwater and land treadmills. Dogs come to Dr. Glinski for evaluation and treatment of injuries, to recuperate from surgery, and to learn to walk again after suffering neurological trauma. They may receive acupuncture, electrostimulation, laser therapy, hydrotherapy, and various kinds of exercise therapy. “The practice is divided into three different areas,” says Dr. Glinski. “There are postoperative dogs, athletic dogs and geriatric dogs.” The postoperative dogs may be animals that were treated at the Animal Specialty Center. One common category of postoperative dog that Dr. Glinski treats includes dogs that have had spinal surgery. Dachshunds, for instance, have a genetic weakness in their backs that makes them prone to herniated disks. The bulging disks impinge on their spinal cords, causing weakness and paralysis. These dogs need surgery to correct the problem, and then they need physical therapy to learn how to walk again. The process might start with Dr. Glinksy supporting the paralyzed dog in a standing position. First she ensures that the dog is standing naturally and correctly (paralyzed dogs, she says, tend to hyperextend

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their knees.) Then she does range-of-motion exercises on all the toes, including 10 to 20 reps of extension and flexion. “Their pads are rich in nerve endings,” she says. “This stimulates healing in the hind feet. Then we go to the knuckles, the knee, the hip and so on. Then we run the feet across the ground, trying to bring back muscle memory. The first stage of learning to walk is learning to stand. What we’re doing is saying ‘this is what it feels like to be a normal dog.’” Dr. Glinsky also uses electro-stimulation and infrared laser treatments to stimulate nerve regeneration and decrease inflammation. It might take anywhere from one to six weeks for dogs to be able to stand and walk on their own. The same techniques can be used to help dogs that have been paralyzed from strokes. According to Dr. Glinski, paralyzed stroke patients have about a 50-50 chance of recovering their motor functions if they start treatment right away. Dr. Glinsky says that CARE, which opened in 2000, was the first private clinic in the nation to offer the full range of rehabilitation services, including acupuncture, electro-stimulation, laser and hydrotherapy. Her clinic quickly became a destination for agility dogs that might have been injured in training or competition. In 2004, she traveled with the American Kennel Club Agility Team to the World Agility Open competition in Italy. Two years later, she was the United States Dog Agility Association (USDAA) team veterinarian at the World Championship in Holland. “Agility is a great sport,” she says. “But there are a lot of injuries involved. It has gotten better in the last few years because owners now are more savvy and aware of their dogs. They assess them and palpate them on a regular basis so they can catch things early. These dogs are so driven, they often won’t tell you if they are injured.” Dr. Glinsky’s involvement with international agility teams gave her a national reputation in that world, and she has had patients from around the country. Several dogs that she has treated have gone on to win prestigious titles. One of these dogs, Nyke (Comebye Just Doin’ It For Fun), a 9-year-old border collie owned by Alison Carter of Columbia, has been the Greater Columbia Obedience Club’s agility dog of the year twice and is a USDAA agility dog champion. Nyke had a shoulder injury in 2005, but after treatment at the CARE Center, she went on to win a national class in Arizona, beating 170 other dogs. This fall, she is being treated for an injury to her iliopsoas muscle, which helps rotate and flex the hips. Her therapy has included the underwater treadmill, as well as acupuncture and an assortment of strengthening and stretching exercises using equipment such as physioballs. She is expected to make a full recovery and return to competition. The final category of dogs that Dr. Glinski works with, old dogs, often need acupuncture and other treatments to help them with arthritis and generalized stiffness. “Dogs have a limited way of telling us they are in pain,” says Dr. Glinski. “A lot of owners think if their dog is in pain it will cry out. But they generally don’t. They often isolate themselves or play a little bit less. Owners might think they are just getting older. But if they come here, a lot of times we can take away that pain and make them feel good again. “The biggest joy for me is seeing these older dogs acting like puppies again,” she continues. “You can add quality to their lives, and that, for me, is the greatest reward.”

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Aiken Pet Fitness and Rehabilitation

“These therapies used to be available only to top athletes,” says Dr. Sybil Davis, who started Aiken Pet Fitness and Rehabilitation in December 2010. “My goal is to bring them to all dogs. I also believe in prevention. I would rather start working with dogs when they are just beginning to have a problem than wait until it is severe.” Located on Willow Run Road near the Aiken Dog Park, Dr. Davis’s clinic is a state-of-the-art rehabilitation center and canine gym. It has two underwater treadmills as well as treatment rooms for massage, ultrasound, electromagnetic stimulation, acupuncture and other therapies. The gym has physioballs in different shapes and sizes, land treadmills, a ramp, a mini trampoline and various different kinds of balance equipment. There is also an outdoor fitness area, where dogs can be taken on “challenged walks,” which are walks that incorporate physical and mental challenges such as obstacles, slopes and uneven ground. Dr. Davis is a small animal veterinarian who is certified in animal rehabilitation and committed to helping improve the lives of the animals in her practice. Like Dr. Glinski, Dr. Davis has patients that are recovering from different kinds of surgery such as spinal or hip surgery. She also treats some agility competitors. The majority of her practice, however, is made up of pet dogs that need help with mobility. “The most common injury is a torn ACL,” says Dr. Davis, referring to the anterior cruciate ligament in the dog’s hind leg, in a joint that is analogous to a human knee. “We do rehab for dogs both before and after surgery. But we also do exercises that can keep dogs from needing surgery.”

Dr. Davis steadies Emma, a 10-year-old German Shepherd on the ball. Right: Emma walks in a underwater treadmill.

Another common type of dog that she sees is an older dog that is starting to slow down and has gained weight. “It’s very common for an older dog to stop being as active because it has arthritis and is sore. If the owner continues to feed the dog in the same way, the dog gains weight and that makes him even more uncomfortable.” Overweight dogs with arthritis become less and less active, which in turn makes them likely to gain more weight. This sets up a vicious cycle that can make a senior dog’s golden years uncomfortable and unhealthy, and may ultimately shorten his life. “Especially when you have a bigger dog that is having a hard time getting up, that can be trouble,” says Dr. Davis. Dogs that need to lose pounds are prescribed a diet and exercise plan that brings them back to a healthy weight. Lean dogs are easier to keep fit and are healthier in general. Although canine patients may be tended to by the clinic staff, Dr. Davis encourages owners to take an active part in their dogs’ treatment.

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Exercises that owners may help with include encouraging their dogs to climb up and down ramps, and helping them to work with balance boards and physioballs. “The balls give the dog isometric exercise,” she explains. “They help with core strengthening.” A dog may be encouraged to stand on the ball. Trying to keep his balance, he contracts his muscles, effectively giving himself a workout without much risk of overstraining himself. Many dogs also take advantage of the underwater treadmills. These treadmills, which are made specifically for dogs, are good for exercising animals with mobility problems. The buoyancy of the water takes much of the weight off the dog’s limbs, which helps prevent further injury. The water provides resistance, which helps to strengthen the muscles. The height of the water in the treadmill can be adjusted for dogs of different sizes and also to give the dog the appropriate balance of buoyancy and resistance.

Dog owners also go home from the clinic with some specific homework. Dr. Davis has prepared a number of different packets with general physical therapy exercises as well as with exercises specifically tailored to each dog. For instance, a dog with an ACL problem needs to be encouraged to use and to strengthen his hind legs. Dogs naturally carry about 60 percent of their weight in their forelimbs, and dogs with hind limb injuries often learn to carry almost all of their weight in the front. Exercises in the ACL packet include the “Happy Butt Rub Dance” in which the owner vigorously scratches the top and sides of the dog’s rear end to encourage him to ‘dance’ from side to side with his rear legs, giving them a workout. Other exercises are designed to get the dog to stand on his hind legs, or to lift the hind legs by walking over obstacles or even through a ladder that is lying on the ground. There are also stretches and flexibility exercises. All of this improves stability and balance and helps strengthen muscles, tendons and ligaments. Dr. Davis’s commitment to helping animals stay fit and healthy extends to the dogs at the Aiken County Animal shelter. This fall, she coordinated a 10-week program at the shelter called “Walk a Hound, Lose a Pound.” The program was billed as a fitness program for people, but it was also designed to help shelter animals get out for daily walks on wooded trails nearby. Participants competed for prizes in a number of different categories, from amount of weight lost, to the number of dogs walked. The awards ceremony is on December 3 at the clinic. According to Dr. Davis, dogs enjoy coming to the rehab center. It is not like going to the vet after all, but more like going to a playground. Some dog owners are intrigued by the concept of the center, but are not sure if they can afford it. An initial consultation costs about the same as any routine veterinary appointment. Ongoing therapy sessions can start to add up, but owners can pay much smaller fees to use the gym equipment and even supervise their own dogs on an underwater treadmill. In the long run, using the rehab center could be very cost effective since it might mean that a dog does not have to have expensive surgery or go on long term medication. For a dog, exercise, especially exercise with his best friend, may very well be the best medicine.

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Dog News & Notes By Pam Gleason

Aiken Dog Activities, Past & Present

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ogs have always been an important part of life in Aiken. This is because the city has always attracted people who love animals and the outdoors. Although some dogs have been stay-at-home pets, Aiken has also been a place for active dog lovers who want to go out and do something with their four-legged friends. Historically, dog activities in Aiken have included many different kinds of hunting –foxhunting, beagling and bird shooting most prominently. In 1923, a group of bird dog enthusiasts started the Aiken Kennel Club for the purpose of holding field trials. A few years later, another set of field trails, strictly for amateur handlers, was organized at Claudia Phelps’s Homerun Plantation south of town. There have also been dog shows, including an annual pet dog show started in 1935 by Mrs. Fitch Gilbert, one of the women who founded the Aiken SPCA. This show was just for fun, a forerunner of the Westmuttster Dog show held

today. There were classes for “dogs in costumes”, “tricks”, “obedience”, “best personality”, “largest and smallest” and finally, “best care and condition.” Many of the handlers in this show were the children of prominent members of Aiken’s Winter Colony. For instance, in 1937, an 8-year-old Norty Knox, who would go on to fame as a polo player, won the “smallest dog” competition with his cocker spaniel puppy. In 1936, a year after the first pet dog show, serious dog enthusiasts started the annual Aiken Kennel show, a bench show which was a benefit for the Aiken County hospital. It was a major event that merited headlines in the Aiken Standard and Review and brought dog fanciers from “as far away as Columbia and Augusta,” according to that paper. The first Aiken Kennel show included classes for toy dogs, sporting and non sporting breeds, and a class for junior

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handlers, which had over 40 entrants. (The winner was a Miss Carol Warren.) The Aiken County Kennel shows were not regular licensed American Kennel Club affairs, although contemporary newspapers claim that several of the top dog experts in the country made Aiken their winter home. The shows were quite popular for a few years, but eventually had trouble competing with other sporting events going on in Aiken over the winter, as well as with newly recognized AKC events that were taking place in Greenville and Columbia. By the outbreak of World War II, they had been discontinued. Aiken’s dog community today is getting more active all the time. At present, most of the public dog events in Aiken are of the “just for fun” variety. These include the Westmuttster and Woofstock Dog shows put on each year to benefit the Aiken SPCA and FOTAS Aiken respectively. There are also pet events and pet fairs, such as this year’s “Reindog Romp and Pet Fair,” (a benefit for the SPCA) which will take place on December 10. However, there are also a number of people involved in serious training and competition who live in Aiken, and organized activities are growing. For instance, people who are involved with agility have several places they can train, as well as a number of different trainers who can help them. Facilities include such places as the Southside Dog Agility Training Center, which offers over 11 acres of space to train dogs, including a classroom building and two fenced agility training areas with jumps and contact equipment. Southside holds some classes and seminars, and trainers and handlers can become members and gain access to the facility to work their dogs on their own schedules. Southside Dog Agility Center is on Range Road, just off Whiskey Road about four miles past the Aiken Mall. (www.southsidedogagility. net) Many dog people in Aiken are excited about Dog Days Workshop, which opened over the summer on Park Avenue across the way from Aiken County Farm Supply. Dog Days is a complete indoor training facility that offers space to trainers and individual dog owners. Dog Days’ motto is “It’s a good day to train,” which, of course, is always true, because you don’t have to worry about the weather or impending darkness when you are indoors. The Dog Days website lists seven different trainers who will be offering their services there this winter. Some of these trainers include Lois Evans, who will be conducting advanced beginner obedience classes and beginner and advanced rally classes on Mondays and Thursdays. Lois Fair and Linda Stoddard will also be teaching obedience, while LeAnn Shank will teach conformation. Mark Fulmer, who owns Sarahsetter Kennels, will be offering a range of different classes. Mark, who specializes in the pointing breeds, has been

training privately for decades. This is the first time his services have been available to the public. His classes will include basic obedience, as well as an introduction to clicker training. Nancy Webster, who owns the facility, will be offering a puppy socialization class. “We’ve been full every evening,” says Nancy, who is also the practice manager at Aiken Animal Hospital. “It’s been a dream of mine forever to have an indoor training center.” For more information, visit the website: www.dogdaysworkshop.com

SPCA Dog Park

The new Aiken SPCA building on Willow Run Road is currently under construction. The state-of-the-art facility will offer Aiken’s companion animals a whole range of services

sure to improve their lives and make Aiken’s animal community a happier and a healthier place. Although that facility won’t be open until next year, Aiken’s dogs have been enjoying some of the amenities on the property for the last two years. The Aiken Dog Park, which is a partnership between the City of Aiken and the SPCA, opened in December 2009. Located adjacent to the site of the new facility, it is a 2-acre fenced area that is open seven days a week, from sunrise to sunset. The park is divided into two sections. One is for little dogs (30 pounds and under) while the other is open to all dogs. The area for all dogs includes a large splash pool. The dog park was an instant success. Over the past two years, it has proven to be a popular place for people to take their dogs, allowing the animals to romp and play and the humans to get to know one another better. Recently, some dog park regulars have been bringing along some agility equipment, such as portable tunnels, so that the dogs can play with some interesting new toys. This fall, the dog park even got its own Facebook page (Friends of the Aiken SPCA Dog Park.) The page is updated several times a week with many pictures of dogs playing so that everyone who is not there can see how much fun everyone who is there is having. (A lot!) If you would like to take your dog to play at the Aiken Dog Park, you will need to buy a membership, which costs $25 per year and is available at the SPCA, Aiken Public Safety, and the Odell Weeks Center on Whiskey

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Road. Dogs must show proof of a current rabies vaccination, and they must be spayed or neutered. www.aikenspca.org

Foxhounds in Aiken

Aiken’s foxhunting season is in full swing, which means that Aiken’s foxhounds are making regular forays into the countryside, pursuing foxes, coyotes, and, in the case of the Aiken Hounds (which is a drag hunt) a cagey gentleman with a bag of scent. Walter Cheatham, who is the joint master of the Edisto River Hounds, reports that the pack that he hunts has some new members this year. According to “The Nose” (which is the appropriately named newsletter of his hunt) Edisto River received drafts of six foxhounds apiece from Johnny Gray of the Hillsboro Hounds in Tennessee and John Eaton of the Shakerag Hounds in Atlanta. Like many hunts in the Aiken area, Edisto

River’s pack has historically been made up primarily of crossbred hounds. The six hounds drafted from Shakerag, however, are PennMarydels, a type of hound developed in the Pennsylvania-Maryland-Delaware area. The Penn-Marydels at Edisto River are handsome black and tan animals. “I had a few openings in the pack,” says Walter, explaining that every pack is composed of a top, a middle and a bottom. There are “strike” hounds, which are the ones with the keenest noses and the most drive and are the first on the scent. The middle hounds have a little less spark. The hounds at the back of the pack are slower, but they are more reliable and might be older hounds that keep the more exuberant members of the pack on the scent once they have found it. “The Penn-Marydels might be a little slower and more deliberate,” says Walter. “They have been getting more popular because hunt country is shrinking and hunt fixtures are becoming smaller. They’re more suited to smaller fixtures – an American hound will run

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for 30 miles on a scent, which doesn’t work as well when you’re hunting in a smaller area.” Penn-Marydels, which are also distinguished by having especially loud, clear voices, have gained a foothold in the Aiken area in recent times. The Aiken Hounds switched out their pack to Penn-Marydels a year ago, and have been very happy with the result. Katherine Gunter, who is the huntsman, says that the hunts themselves have been going well, and that the Aiken Hounds did well in the hound shows last spring. Aiken Hounds also has some new drafts this year. “We have some that are half American hound and half Penn-Marydel,” says Katherine. “They’re a little faster and a little more refined, but they have the same good nose and the same great voice.”

leftovers, and the friendliest ones eventually became socialized. A new hypothesis suggests that the first dogs actually arose from highly socialized wolves that traveled with huntergatherers, and that wolves and humans may have hunted together. If this is true, then the human-canine connection may have started out as an equal and mutually beneficial partnership.

Of Dogs and Hounds

The name of this paper came into being because it was intended to be about all the canines in the Aiken area. Several people have asked “what is the difference between dogs and hounds?” while others have wondered if this means we are only planning to write about male animals.

Ancient Dogs

The Wall Street Journal recently reported on a growing controversy among paleontologists about exactly how and when wolves entered into a partnership with humans and became dogs. Until the mid 1990s, the earliest fossil evidence of dogs living with humans dated back to 15,000 years ago. In 1997, evolutionary biologists proposed that dogs diverged from wolves 135,000 years ago. They came up with this conclusion through an analysis of mitochondrial DNA. Mitochondrial DNA (which resides in an egg) is passed from females to their offspring and does not change much from generation to generation. Analyzing mitochondrial DNA allows biologists to calculate when different populations separated from each other genetically. In 2008, a team of scientists in Belgium reexamined a fossil discovered a century ago and declared it to be a 31,700 year old dog. Then, this July, an international team working in Siberia found the remains of what they said was a 33,000 year old dog. In October, another researcher discovered a 26,000 year

old dog, which had been buried with a bone in its mouth. Researchers say that the discovery of the remains of these ancient “protodogs” or “dogwolves” has called into question some of the assumptions about how dogs became domesticated. The most widely accepted hypothesis is that they gathered around human settlements to dine on trash and

The simple answer is that the paper is called The Dog and Hound because it is proper to call pointers, retrievers, pets and show animals “dogs” but it is improper to call a foxhound a dog and we wanted to write about both of them. Of course, in the hound world, when you say “dog” what you mean is “male foxhound,” so this title could be a bit confusing. If you take a look in the dictionary, you will see that both words come from Middle English terms, though the word “hound” can be traced back through the Greek to IndoEuropean, whereas “dog” goes through Old English to Proto-Germanic. Properly speaking, “dog” is the more common and inclusive term, and can be used to refer to all members of the canine family including wolves, coyotes, African dogs and jackals. “Hound” refers only to the type of hunting dog that tracks or chases game, either through scent, sight or a combination of the two. Interestingly, in 14th century England, “hound” was the more inclusive term, while “dog” referred to a breed similar to the mastiff. It is thought that this breed became so popular, eventually most canines could appropriately be called “dog”. By the 16th century, “dog” had become the general term while “hound” began to be used exclusively for a specific type of hunting dog. Just in case you wanted to know.

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Another Champion comes to Aiken!

CH. KILOHANA’S FENWAY FAITHFUL “MANNY”, BIS, BISS, SDHF 35 BEST IN BREED WINS, SHOW DOG HALL OF FAME! 2008: #21 GOLDEN RETRIEVER IN U.S.

Manny is not only handsome but a wonderful gentle family dog. Manny’s offspring are winning the hearts of judges and families all over the US. Manny is available for breeding to approved females in Aiken from mid January through mid April. Call Paul Silva (802) 356-5134 for details or to arrange a visit to meet Manny.

Kilohana.vt@gmail.com. Kilohanagoldens.com

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English Pointers

Aristocratic Bird Dogs, Loyal Companions By Pam Gleason

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nglish pointers have been so dominant as hunting dogs in the Southeast, they are often referred to simply as “bird dogs.” Pointers are medium to large sized animals standing from 23 to 28 inches at the withers and weighing between 44 and 75 pounds. They are unmistakable athletes, built for speed and endurance and distinguished by their excellent noses and their drive to find game birds. Typically, they are white with patches of contrasting color on their heads and bodies, although the breed standard specifies that they may also be solid colored. They may be black and white, liver and white, lemon and white or orange and white, but color is not important: “a good pointer cannot be a bad color,” reads the American Kennel Club handbook. Pointers are named for their particular method of stalking birds. They run through the brush, tails waving from side to side. When they locate a bird, they freeze, their noses pointing in the direction of their quarry. Although they may raise a foreleg, this is not required. What is required is that they aim their noses at the bird and they remain perfectly motionless. Much of this behavior is instinctive: puppies as young as 8 weeks will point naturally. But to be a useful hunting dog, pointers must undergo extensive training, not just to teach them to hold their point rather than go for the bird, but also to accustom them to being “shot over” after the bird is flushed.

In the early days, it was not customary to shoot game when hunting. Pointers were often used in conjunction with greyhounds. The pointer would locate and flush the prey, after which the greyhound would run it down and catch it. To hunt birds, pointers were sometimes used along with hunting falcons, which were trained to catch and retrieve birds in midair. Bird hunters might also use nets – 18th century hunting manuals emphasized that the nets needed to be thrown over dogs and birds alike, so it was necessary to train hunting dogs to tolerate being netted. In the 19th century, pointers became bird specialists. At this time, wing shooting was a popular sport among the British leisure classes and pointers really came into their own.

Pointers in America

Photo: Westminster Kennel Club / Mary Bloom

Aside from their skill in the field, they are also known for their intelligence and their friendly and easy-going natures. Working hunting dogs often live in kennels, but pointers love to be comfortable and also make excellent household pets. They have a short smooth coat that requires little grooming. They are generally good with children and with other dogs and can be very affectionate. As long as they have an enclosed yard to play in and get ample outdoor exercise, they can be quite happy and calm indoors.

History

As a breed, the pointer was originally developed in England to hunt birds, hare and other small game. Most experts agree that the dog is a mixture of the same genes that produced greyhounds, foxhounds, bloodhounds and bull terriers. Some histories emphasize the importance of the Spanish pointer, which was introduced from the Continent early in the 18th century and may have been crossed with English hunting dogs. However, there are records of pointers in England as early as 1650, which suggests that the pointing breeds may have developed simultaneously on the Continent and in Britain.

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Although some individuals were imported to the Americas as early as the 17th century, pointers really became established in the United States shortly after the Civil War. In the late 19th century, pointers vied with English setters to be America’s hunting dogs of choice. These two breeds were the first to be included in the Field Dog Stud Book of America, which, established in 1874, is the oldest purebred dog registry in the United States. Pointers were also included in the first American Kennel Club studbook, published in 1878. In addition to hunting, pointers also became experts at the field trial, a competition for hunting dogs. They also vied for conformation honors in AKC breed classes. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, it became fashionable for residents of Northern cities to set up winter homes in the Southeast. South Carolina and Georgia were popular destinations for these Northern “tourists.” The Winter Colony in Aiken, which got its start in the late 1800s, was especially devoted to outdoor sports, including various equestrian activities as well as bird shooting. Members of the Winter Colony kept many different types of sporting dog, including foxhounds and beagles. Those who practiced bird shooting generally had either pointers or setters. The Phelps family, who built the spectacular Rose Hill Estate on Greenville Street in Aiken at the turn of the last century, were passionate dog lovers and pointer breeders. The Phelpses owned Homerun Plantation, about 12 miles south of town, where they kept kennels for their pointers. Miss Claudia Phelps was an expert shot and dog handler. In the 1930s, according to Harry Worcester Smith’s Life and Sport in Aiken, she started the Aiken Field Trials club, which held “the most interesting field trials which have been attended by many sportsmen. They are open for shooting dogs only. Winners of field trials barred. Amateurs to handle.” Claudia’s dogs competed locally and nationally with considerable success for decades. For instance in 1960, her 3-year-old liver and white bitch Homerun Bess won the national open pheasant championship in New York. In 1968, Miss Claudia became the first woman ever inducted into the Field Trial Hall Of Fame. Another prominent breeder of pointers in the Southeast was Henry Berol, a New Yorker who owned Di-Lane Plantation in Waynesboro, Ga. (It was named for his daughters, Diane and Elaine.) Berol, who was heir to the Eagle Pencil Company fortune, consolidated numerous small farms to create a 8,100 acre quail preserve where he held field trials for pointing dogs. Waynesboro was already a Mecca for people who loved the dogs and the sport – the Georgia Field Trials began there in 1901.

Winter 2011-2012


Today, Waynesboro proudly declares itself to be the “bird dog capital of the world.” The national Georgia Field Trials take place each February on Berol’s former plantation, now the Di-Lane Plantation Wildlife Management area, which is owned by the Georgia Department of Natural Resources. The plantation is also famous for its unique bird dog cemetery, the final resting place for about 70 of Berol’s favorite pointers.

Famous Pointers

The most famous English pointer in America is probably an animal called Sensation. This dog was bred in England and brought to New York in 1876 by members of the Westminster Club, which was then primarily devoted to shooting rather than to dogs. They hoped that Sensation, a show champion in England (where his name was “Dan”) would help improve the quality of American bird dogs. A handsome lemon and white pointer, Sensation became the subject of a number of drawings and paintings. A head study of him was first used on the cover of the Westminster Club’s second annual dog show catalog in 1878, and soon became the emblem of the club. In the 1930s, Westminster substituted a steel engraving of Sensation on point created by the artist

bred by Robert G. Wehle, who started the Elhew Kennels in 1936. Wehle’s family owned and operated the Genessee Brewing Company in upstate New York, and Robert had extensive interests in both the dog and the horse world. Elhew Kennels had locations in both New York and Alabama, where Wehle had a winter home. When he died in 2002, Thomas Bradley, chairman of the Westminster Kennel Club, described Wehle as “the premier breeder of English pointers in this country, if not the world.” Many pointer breeders today advertise that their dogs are from Elhew lines. If you buy a purebred English pointer puppy from a breeder it will generally cost from $750 to $1,500. The price goes up if the puppy is started on birds, and finished dogs can bring $2,500 or more. There are, however, many other ways to obtain a pointer. Dogs that don’t make it as hunting dogs or are not of show quality might be available for considerably less. There are also always beautiful purebred pointers available from local animal shelters and from specialty pointer rescues. Pointers end up in shelters and in rescues for many reasons. Those that are released to hunt birds before they have a solid recall often get lost. Those that don’t take to hunting right away, those that are gun shy, or those who have grown too old to hunt may be abandoned by owners who don’t understand that the future prospects of a dog surrendered to an animal shelter are often grim. If you are interested in adopting a pointer, there are several excellent resources available. The most comprehensive is Pointer Rescue Organization. This group, based in New Jersey, has a national network of volunteers devoted to re-homing pointers in need. They maintain a website that always includes a number of purebred dogs available for adoption. The group works with animal shelters, private rescuers and foster homes all over the country and can help transport dogs to their new homes. Sometimes they use volunteers in cross-state relays; sometimes they rely on other volunteer organizations, such as Pilots and Paws, a group of pilots who fly rescue dogs to their new homes. Other pointer rescue groups include Dogs Hope Rescue in Midlands, North Carolina, which rescues English pointers and German shorthaired pointers. There are also some Facebook pages devoted to rescuing pointers from shelter environments, such as U.S. Pointers Needing Homes.

Why a Pointer?

If you enjoy hunting birds or participating in field trials, you know why you want a pointer. They are fast, keen, athletic and good at what they Judy receiving her Dickin Medal in 1946

J. Wellstood. Today, the Westminster Kennel Club, which holds one of the most prestigious annual dog shows in the world, still uses an image of Sensation as its emblem. (Pointers have won Best In Show at Westminster just three times: the last time was in 1986.) Judy is an English Pointer famous for quite a different reason. Judy was whelped in Shanghai in 1936 or 1937. She became a mascot for the Royal British Navy, serving on the HMS Grasshopper in World War II. When that ship was torpedoed, the survivors managed to swim to a nearby island. The men thought they were stranded on a barren island without water, until Judy managed to swim to shore. The men said she immediately began digging, working tirelessly until she uncovered an underground spring, saving them. A few days later, the crew commandeered a Chinese junk and sailed to Sumatra, bringing Judy as their guardian angel. In Sumatra, they were all captured by the Japanese and put in a prisoner of war camp. In the camp, Judy was befriended by Leading Aircraftsman Frank Williams, who shared his food with her. She often paid the men back for taking her in by protecting them from the guards, snarling and launching herself at them when they beat the prisoners. She lived in the POW camp for three years, narrowly escaping death many times. When the war was over, she went back to England with Williams. In 1946, she received the Dickin Medal, which honors the work of animals in wartime. She is the only dog ever to be officially registered as a POW.

Finding a Pointer

English pointers are not as common in the Aiken area as they once were, although there are still plenty around. For today’s hunters and field trial enthusiasts, the most prized dogs are descended from animals

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do – finding birds. Perhaps it is because they are so good at their jobs that English pointers are often not thought of as family pets. But anyone who enjoys high energy, intelligent dogs would love a pointer. They are elegant, even-tempered, friendly and loyal, and they love to be with their people. It’s pretty clear that they are not just for the birds. For More Information American Pointer Club: www.americanpointerclub.org American Field: www.americanfield.com Pointer Rescue: www.pointerrescue.org

The Dog & Hound

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The Dog & Hound

Winter 2011-2012


Essence of a Dog

Paintings by Lynn Carlisle By Pam Gleason, Photography by Gary Knoll

“I

f I don’t catch the dog’s soul, if I don’t feel a connection, I can’t do the painting,” says Lynn Carlisle. Lynn is an artist based in Aiken who specializes in animal portraits. “I can paint anything I can see,” she says. “But I much prefer to paint dogs. There are people who can paint people better than me. There are people who can paint horses better. But there aren’t a lot of people who can paint dogs better than me. I think a lot of it is that I have an animal connection. I feel it very keenly with dogs. I can really read them.” Lynn was born in Chicago. When she was a small child, her favorite toys were her easel and her chalk. Her parents recognized her passion for art and enrolled her in her first painting courses when she was just 5. By the time she was 9 years old, she was taking Saturday classes at the Art Institute of Chicago. “That’s when I had my first nude model,” says Lynn. “Today, there would probably be an uproar about that.” When she was 12, her family moved to Cincinnati, which ended her formal artistic training until after she graduated from high school and entered Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. There, she earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts in graphic design. After graduation, she continued to be involved in the college’s art program. She juried shows for the museum and critiqued portfolios of applicants to the art program as part of Miami’s admissions staff. “I’ve always been in it,” she says. “But I got married and then I was parenting. After my kids went to college, that’s when my own art really took off. And I love it. I really enjoy doing it.” If art has been a primary theme in Lynn’s life, then dogs and horses have been a secondary one. When she was growing up, her parents had German shorthaired pointers (“They were very old style, very boxy. My parents raised them for shooting.”) Later, she had a Brittany spaniel and Jack Russell terriers. Her family also loved horses, and she has foxhunted since she was a child. (“I love the hounds,” she says.) As an adult, she whipped in for the Camargo Hunt in Cincinnati and the Iroquois Hunt in Fayette County, Kentucky. Lynn’s involvement with the foxhunting community is what brought her to dog portraits. “What happened was that I was doing oil paintings of people on their horses,” she says. “They might be in front of their house with their dogs. Portraits of horses are pretty narrow. You generally have a horse in a standard position. But the dog in the picture could be a thousand different ways. I started doing studies of people’s dogs to put in those oil paintings, and they took on a life of their own. People would see them and they would want them. And that is how it started.” The paintings themselves are watercolors, and they may be portraits, or they may be paintings of the whole dog, although those are more unusual. Lynn’s creative process starts with photographs. “I take 50 or 60 images,” she says. “Then I discuss how the person wants the dog to look – what kind of pose and so on. And we talk about the dog’s personality. And then I get to work, usually using about ten photographs. I always paint the eyes last, because it’s the eyes that really show the dog’s personality. I leave them blank and then go back to them at the very end.” Lynn says that one advantage of using watercolors and creating simple portraits is that it is much less expensive than doing a full oil canvas that includes many different subjects. Although they may not be cheap, Lynn’s animal portraits are relatively affordable. She says that business has not been adversely affected by the downturn in the economy. “You would think that this would be the last thing that people would do with their money,” she says. “But it’s not. Instead of taking a trip to the Bahamas, they want their dog painted. Then they put the painting in their library and they hunker down and look at their dog.” Although Lynn prefers to work with dogs that she can meet and photograph herself, she has often done portraits of animals that have died. She encourages people who have dogs that they love to allow her to take photographs of them, so that if they decide they want a portrait

Winter 2011-2012

in the future, she will have images she can use. “There are people whose dogs I have photographed that have never had a painting done, and that’s fine with me,” she says. “If you have the photographs, you know you have something you can work with.” Lynn first visited Aiken when she was invited to exhibit some of her paintings at the annual Red Cross benefit sporting art show and sale that takes over the Aiken Center for the Arts each February. Aiken immediately felt like home to her, with its population of horse and dog lovers. “I came down here from Cincinnati where I was living, and I went hunting,” she says. “And I really liked it – I wanted to get out of the cold for one thing. Also, it seemed like I saw everyone I had known since I was 9 years old here – horse show people and foxhunting people. It seemed to fit, and it seemed so easy. I feel like the people in Aiken, many of them are on their second lives. They’ve done what they are going to do. They aren’t trying to prove anything to anyone and they’re very

positive, and multifaceted – they have more than one talent, or more than one thing that they do. I love that.” Lynn moved to Aiken in 2004 and quickly became an integral part of the city’s sporting and artistic worlds. She brought her horses and her Jack Russell terriers and started to ride with the Aiken Hounds. She painted portraits of Aiken’s horses and dogs, capturing the images of many of the city’s most prominent equine and canine citizens. For instance, she painted Dogwood Stable’s racehorse Summer Squall, who won the Preakness Stakes. She did a portrait of Aiken Namon, the lead foxhound from the Aiken Hounds pack who won the national Centennial Foxhounds Performance Trials in 2007. Of course, she also paints many animals who are known only to their owners, whose fame is personal and springs from their quirky personalities and their loving hearts. Lynn prides herself on catching the likeness of the whole dog, not just painting what he looks like on the outside, but capturing his essence and providing a glimpse of his soul. “When the owner first sees the painting, most of the time they cry,” says Lynn. “If I don’t get that kind of reaction, I’ve missed. And I haven’t missed very often.” For more about Lynn Carlisle or to commission a painting, visit her website: www.lynncarlisle.com.

The Dog & Hound

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Animal Rescue:

Many Concepts - One Goal By Loretta Emmons

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he goal of rescuing animals in need is shared by many individuals and organizations across the nation. In Aiken, the format of the various animal rescue groups may be different, but the ultimate goal is to save and improve the lives of more pets. Through education, spay and neuter programs and community events, these groups work tirelessly to end pet overpopulation and stop the euthanasia of unwanted but otherwise healthy and affectionate animals. Many different organizations take on the rewarding but sometimes frustrating task of rescuing, housing, feeding, and rehabilitating forgotten, stray, abused or neglected pets. At times the medical expenses alone would be enough to bankrupt the smaller rescues. But through faith, donations, and hard work they continue the seemingly endless task of animal rescue. The following is a partial listing of some of the animal rescue organizations operating in the Aiken area.

Helping Animals in Shelters

FOTAS (Friends of The Animal Shelter, Aiken, S.C.) was founded in 2009 with the goal of assisting the Aiken County Animal Shelter, which is responsible for animal control throughout the county. This group holds fundraisers, locates foster homes, promotes spay and neuter programs, and coordinates transports of animals for adoption or fostering in other parts of the country. FOTAS volunteers work to improve the shelter where the animals stay until they are adopted or overcrowding forces the shelter to euthanize them. In an effort to make pets more adoptable, volunteers offer hands on attention to give the pets physical contact and human interaction. The group is different from other rescue organizations in Aiken in several respects. First, it does not take in owner surrendered pets, but works only with animals at the Aiken County shelter, promoting adoptions as well as the transfer of adoptable animals to no-kill shelters and rescues in the area and beyond. It also works to make the shelter cleaner, safer, and more accessible to the public. In the two years since FOTAS was established, the euthanasia rate at the Aiken County shelter has dropped significantly, although this rate is still very high. Aiken County is in the process of coming up with a plan to find or build a new shelter to replace the current one which is lacking in space and modern sanitation. FOTAS will pay $100,000 that is has raised in private funds for architectural services. (www.fotasaiken.org) Other rescues that help animals in local shelters include Molly’s Militia, based in North Augusta and founded in 1999. Molly’s Militia, named after a Cocker Spaniel rescued from a Georgia shelter, pulls adoptable animals from three shelters in the CSRA. Pets rescued by Molly’s Militia are available for adoption. Their pictures and stories can be found on the Molly’s Militia website (www.mollysmilitia.org) or on Petfinder (www.petfinder.com)  The Aiken SPCA, established in 1935, is the oldest animal welfare group in the area. The group adopts out over a thousand pets a year. They are a pet partner with PetSmart, and hold adoptions there every Saturday. The SPCA also offers education, spay and neuter programs, and volunteer opportunities. Some of the services offered by the Aiken SPCA include humane education with outreach in the community, low cost microchipping, spay and neuter services, obedience training and a pet therapy program. Its newest contribution to the welfare of animals in the area is the Aiken Dog Park where dog owners can exercise their pets, providing pets and people with a place to socialize. (www. aikenspca.org)

Keeping Animals Out of Shelters

Other groups work to keep animals from being taken to county shelters. They take in unwanted, stray or owner surrendered animals and work to find them new homes. Happy Tales of Aiken, a cat rescue organization, takes in unwanted and abandoned cats and kittens. They maintain a relationship with PetSmart on Whiskey Road, which showcases their

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cats for adoption seven days a week. This makes it possible for Happy Tails to rescue more pets because, in essence, PetSmart acts like a foster facility. Six to eight pets reside at PetSmart until they are adopted. As one cat finds a forever home, another can be brought in from a private foster home to take its place. Heartsong Animal Rescue and Sanctuary, Inc. and Heartsong Spay Neuter Clinics work hand in hand to help end the pet overpopulation problem. Through a network of foster homes, education programs at local elementary schools, and a dedication to spaying and neutering, Heartsong has helped to reduce the number of animals brought to shelters in Aiken as well as in Richmond and Columbia County shelters in Georgia. Heartsong Animal Rescue accepts owner-surrendered dogs, cats, birds, rabbits, guinea pigs, and other small pets and rescues from 11 county shelters. It also offers internships for volunteers and free volunteer training programs. It assists military personnel in housing or re-homing their pets while on deployment and offers puppy STAR training classes, Canine Good Citizen classes and therapy dog programs. Finally, it provides low cost spay, neuter, vaccination, microchip and dental services to the public regardless of income. (www.heartsonganimalrescue.com) (www.heartsongspayneuter.com)

Large Animals

Although most traditional rescues work with cats, dogs and other small pets such as rabbits or guinea pigs on occasion, there are other specialty rescues as well. Equine Rescue of Aiken devotes its time and resources to the rescue, rehabilitation and re-homing of unwanted horses. One significant difference between Equine Rescue of Aiken and other rescue organizations in the area is that, in addition to finding homes for adoptable animals, it also includes a haven for horses that cannot be adopted. These animals reside at Haven Hills Farm on Aiken’s Southside, an 80-acre facility established for horse rescue. Equine Rescue also offers classes in riding and horse care, and relies on dedicated volunteers who help to train and care for animals that have been accepted into the rescue. (www.aikenequinerescue.com) 

National Organizations

Groups such as the American Humane Association work hard to eliminate abuse and neglect of the nation’s pets as well as of its children. Their programs include emergency services, with rapid response to rescue and care for animals in disasters and other emergencies. They also have a farm animal welfare program, which includes the first welfare certification program in the U.S. to ensure the humane treatment of farm animals. The AHA is responsible for No Animals Were Harmed®, which is the entertainment industry’s only officially sanctioned animal monitoring program. Finally, the AHA offers free training and behavior videos to assist new owners in working with and maintaining their pets. These videos are posted on their website and are available to the public. (www.americanhumane.org)

One Goal

All non-profit rescue organizations rely on donations, volunteers, and hard working individuals with the same dedication and love for lost and unwanted pets. Whether a local animal rescue group or a nationally recognized animal welfare organization, the mission statement seen on nearly every website reads the same:“… dedicated to rescuing homeless and abandoned animals from high-kill shelters and owners who can no longer care for them. “ The methods may be different but the goal is always the same. Save lives. 

Winter 2011-2012


The Dog-Lover’s Bookshelf By Pam Gleason

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hese days, books about dogs are hot. There are history books, training books, scientific books and books of dog-lover’s poetry. The hottest trend in dog books, however, is probably the biographical dog book. The Puppy Diaries: Raising a Dog Named Scout (Henry Holt and Company, New York, 2011) belongs to a particularly trendy class of books in which the author details the story of his or her own pet dog. This book was written by Jill Abramson, who is the first female executive editor of the venerable New York Times. It follows in a long line of books written by serious authors about their dogs. The novelist Dean Koontz has one about his dog (A Big Little Life: A Memoir of a Joyful Dog Named Trixie; Bantam Books, New York 2009.) And who could forget Marley and Me: Life and Love with the World’s Worst Dog. ( John Grogan, William & Morrow, 2005.) All of these books are descendants of My Dog Tulip, a memoir of a rescued German shepherd, written in 1956 by her owner, J.R. Ackerley, who was a distinguished British man of letters and one of the earliest correspondents for BBC radio. The Puppy Diaries started out as a series of blog entries for the New York Times website. It tells how the author and her husband Henry decide to acquire a new puppy a few years after the death of their previous dog, a stubborn and spoiled West Highland terrier named Buddy. The Abramsons are wealthy, dual career empty-nesters. They have an apartment in New York City and a country house in Connecticut. Jill Abramson’s position with the newspaper gives her access to all of today’s most celebrated experts on animal behavior and dog training: she meets the dog trainer Cesar Millan and interviews the animal behaviorist Temple Grandin. When she and her husband want to learn more about clicker training, her husband drops everything to fly out to California for a clicker training seminar with Karen Pryor, the godmother of modern clicker training. Scout, the puppy at the center of the book, is a white English golden retriever that the Abramsons buy from a breeder in Massachusetts. The decision to buy a purebred puppy rather than rescue one from a shelter is the first of many things that the Abramsons agonize about. “It seems that almost every aspect of dog ownership has fierce, partisan battles lurking just below the surface,” she writes. “Upon hearing that Henry and I were getting a purebred puppy, several of our friends reacted as if we were . . . doing something fundamentally bad for society. . . The horrified reactions seemed extreme.” Once Scout comes home, the Abramsons sound like nervous firsttime parents. What is the best way to train a dog? Through positive reinforcement, or Cesar Millan-style leader-of-the-pack dominance? How do you make sure a puppy is well socialized? The Abramsons rearrange their schedules so that they can spend their first months with the new puppy in Connecticut where she will be able to run and play before they move her into the big city. They read books about dog training and take Scout to puppy classes. When she is very small, Henry sleeps next to her crate so that he will be able to let her out whenever she needs to relieve herself. Both Abramsons devote many hours taking her to play with other dogs in the neighborhood, making sure she has a puppyhood filled with enriching experiences. Those who claim that dogs often take the place of children in our society would find ample support for that claim in this book. The Puppy Diaries is well written, as one would expect it to be. Although the privileged circumstances of the author might make it hard for more average people to empathize with her, many of her experiences with and feelings about Scout will strike a universal chord. The story moves quickly and it is an engaging and interesting read. It does not, however, pack the same kind of emotional punch as the biographical dog books mentioned earlier. This is mostly, of course, because A Big Little Life, Marley and Tulip are biographies of beloved dogs who live long lives and die at the end. The Puppy Diaries is just about Scout’s first year. Everyone loves puppies, but the real connection between us and our dogs comes from sharing our lives with them. Perhaps there will be a sequel.

Winter 2011-2012

Rin Tin Tin, The Life and Legend, written by Susan Orlean, is another kind of biographical dog book. (Simon & Schuster, New York 2011). Susan Orlean, who is a writer for The New Yorker magazine, has several previous books to her credit, including The Orchid Thief, which was made into the Academy Award winning movie Adaptation. The book begins with the story of the original Rin Tin Tin, a World War I era German shepherd puppy rescued from a bombed-out dog kennel in the Meuse Valley in France, by Lee Duncan, a young American serviceman. Duncan shipped the dog home, trained him, and then shopped him around Hollywood, eventually landing a motion picture contract. Rin Tin Tin went on to be the biggest canine movie star of his time, making 22 silent films with Warner Brothers in the 1920s and then a handful of “talkies” with Mascot Pictures in the early 1930s. He also did a stint on the vaudeville circuit. Rin Tin Tin died on August 10, 1932. Although Orlean does not explain exactly how it happened, in 1933, his body was repatriated to his native France and was buried at the Cimitière des Chiens (dog cemetery) in Paris. That was not, however, the end of the Rin Tin Tin story. By 1932, Rin Tin Tin was no longer just a dog, he was a franchise. “There will always be a Rin Tin Tin,” Lee Duncan is quoted as saying on the first page of the book. Other Rin Tin Tins took his place. Were these future Rin Tin Tins actually descendents of the original movie dog? This is unclear. Some of the dogs who represented Rin Tin Tin after 1932 were his sons, and he did sire a lot of puppies. But it is by no means certain that later dogs that bore the Rin Tin Tin name were actually his direct descendents. Whatever their lineage, subsequent Rin Tin Tins would go on to star in a popular television series that aired on ABC in the 1950s. The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin (1954-1959) ensured that a new generation of Americans would be touched by the Rin Tin Tin legend. There would be Rin Tin Tin toys, thermoses, lunchboxes and comic books. Lee Duncan, now in his 60s, would take the dog on the road for appearances at Boy Scout meetings and visits to orphanages. After Duncan’s death in 1960, the Rin Tin Tin legacy was carried on by two people. The first was Bert Leonard who was the producer of the television series. The second was Daphne Hereford, a Texas dog breeder whose grandmother obtained a number of puppies from Lee Duncan in the 1950s and who has been breeding Rin Tin Tin dogs ever since. This book took Susan Orlean over five years to write. It is a book about the dog and about the legend of the dog. It is also about the people who handled him and those who were affected by him. Along the way, it illuminates a fair amount of canine history, touching on the use of dogs in the motion picture industry, the development of obedience training in the United States and the role of dogs in the military, among other things. Fans of Rin Tin Tin will want to add this book to their libraries. For the rest of us, the book is good, though it is not an especially compelling read. The first part, which deals with the original Rin Tin Tin and a young Lee Duncan, is fascinating. Later chapters have less energy. As the book tells us over and again, Lee Duncan’s connection with the original Rin Tin Tin was deep and magical. After Rinty’s death, Duncan seemed to be on a perpetual quest to see that dog reincarnated, to bring back the magic and the charisma that made Rin Tin Tin a star, but that quest is ultimately futile. Orlean’s book has a bit of the same kind of feeling. The author seems intent on recreating the feelings she had for Rin Tin Tin when she was a child, elevating the dog to legendary status. And yet, although Rin Tin Tin is undeniably a cultural icon, the story of his legacy falls a bit short. Perhaps, however, this is what the book is ultimately about: the quest to make the relationship between people and the things they love last forever.

The Dog & Hound

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From the Trainer

Housebreaking Your Puppy By Loretta Emmons

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t is natural to want our dogs to be well behaved, learn new tricks and be obedient. The key to training a dog successfully, whether he is young or old, is repetition and consistency. Positive reinforcement is the single most powerful training tool we possess. Our pets seek attention and affirmation that we approve of their behavior. Because positive reinforcement uses praise and treats as a reward system, the dog is more likely to repeat the behavior. Obedience training is necessary and agility is the wave of the future, but the number one concern for all dog owners is housebreaking. Crate training has simplified the process, and is the most widely accepted way to house train a puppy. Crate training calls for placing the pet inside a comfortable cage or crate any time you are not able to supervise him directly. Because dogs are denning animals, this is a positive experience for most of them. They prefer to rest in a quiet, safe area. The crate should be the pet’s safe haven, and should never be used as punishment. Do not leave food or water in the crate while you are away, because this may cause the pet to have to go out, and make it more likely that he will have an accident. Potty training your puppy requires consistency and a schedule. Because a puppy cannot go the entire day without going out, if you are not home and able to let him out, it is your job to make sure someone can do this at lunchtime. If you can’t do it, and have no one that can, expect a mess in the crate until the puppy can reasonably control its bladder and bowels. Young puppies will need to go every few hours. As they grow older, they will develop more control. Begin the morning with a jaunt in the yard so the puppy can relieve himself Feed the puppy breakfast. Water should be available whenever the puppy is outside or loose in the house. Then take him back out for another potty time. Just before you leave for the day, take the puppy out one more time. Then put the puppy in a crate with newspaper or clean bedding and a favorite toy. At lunchtime, take the puppy out, feed him a light snack, and then let him go out again before returning him to his crate. Upon returning home in the afternoon or evening, take the pet out again. If there is a mess in the crate don’t be angry. A puppy can’t be expected to hold his bladder more than three hours at a time.

Feed and water the puppy and take him back out again. Just before you go to bed, take the puppy out again. Even if the puppy is sleeping, wake him up to go out so he can eliminate before going to sleep for the night Start the entire process over the next day. If you have acquired an older dog that is not housebroken, the process is much the same, although an older pet is capable of holding its bladder and bowel for longer than a puppy. Never punish a dog or puppy for having an accident. Defecating and urinating are normal body functions, and the pet will not understand or respond to punishment for doing what is natural. It is acceptable to praise and treat your pet each time he or she eliminates outside. If you want the puppy to go in a certain area of the yard, lead him to the area, wait until he goes, then give a treat and lots of verbal praise. Any time the pet goes in an area other than the designated one, lead him back to where you prefer and reward him only when he eliminates there. In future issues, we will interview trainers from the Aiken area and get their insights, ideas and concepts. Are you a trainer who would like to be featured? Send us an e-mail message: editor@thedogandhound.com

Loretta Emmons

Loretta Emmons has been rescuing and caring for animals since she was old enough to walk. Raised on a farm in rural Ohio, she has worked with animals of all kinds. She has held licenses for the rescue of domestic and exotic animals and been a veterinary technician for over 30 years. Involved with training, exhibiting, and judging many different types of animals, she is currently a judge with the American Kennel Club. Loretta is the founder and president of the non-profit Heartsong Animal Rescue and owner of Heartsong Spay/Neuter Clinics, with locations in Aiken and Augusta, and a franchise in Utah. She is a national Canine Good Citizen evaluator and was selected as a Woman of the Year by the National Association of Professional Women.

It all starts with a puppy... 

For 65 years, the  Guide Dog Foundation  has fostered   independence and  mobility  to help us give  We rely on you  d Sight®   the gift of Secon 631‐930‐9000   www.GuideDog.org   371 E. Jericho Turnpike  Smithtown, NY  11787 

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The Dog & Hound

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Winter 2011-2012


Regional Calendar of Events

DECEMBER 1

1,4 2-3 2-3 3 3

3 3-4 3-4

4 6 8 8 9 9 9

Cool Spring Field Trial. Statesville, NC. Craig Deal, 704.450.1886, www. americanfield.villagesoup.com. Savannah Kennel Club AB/O/JSHW/RLY Show. All AKC recognized breeds. Coastal Empire Fair & Expo Center, 4801 Meding St., Savannah, GA. 336.379.9352, mbf@infodog.com, www.savannahkennelclub.org. Beaufort Kennel Club AB/O/JSHW/RLY Show. All AKC recognized breeds. Coastal Empire Fair & Expo Center, 4801 Meding St., Savannah, GA. 336.379.9352, mbf@infodog.com, www.beaufortkennelclub.org. Foothills Beagle Club SPO and Field Trial. Approved Beagle. 417 Oakhill Rd. Belton, SC. Approved Beagle. Mr. W Lewis Wilson, 864.288.3681, lwilson534@char​ter.net, www.foothillsbeagleclub.com. Walk a Hound, Lose a Pound Awards Event. Aiken Pet Fitness and Rehabilitation. 1 pm. Willow Run Rd. Aiken. www,petfintessandrehab.com. 803.226.0012 Lotts Creek Two Couple Pack Hunting Test hosted by the Lotts Creek Beagle Club of East Georgia. Approved Beagle. 22901 Talmadge Lane Pembroke, GA. Mrs. Sybil C. Nease, 912.728.3340, scnease@gmail.c​ om, www.foothillsbeagleclub.com. Coonhound Nite Hunt and Bench Show hosted by the Norway Coonhunters Association. Norway Coonhunters Association Clubhouse, Norway, SC. Donald Nettles, 803.535.2553. Palmetto Retriever Club Hunting Test. Approved HT Retriever. Cooper Black Wildlife Management Area, Cheraw, SC. Jane Doolittle, 803.940.2785, sundaysam1@yahoo.com. Cocker Spaniel Specialty Club of Georgia Hunting Test. Approved HT Spaniel. J. L. Lester Wildlife Management Area, Polk County, Cedartown, GA. Ms. Sue Kelly, 770.256.9989, per4mancek9s@att.net, www. cockerspanielclubofga.org. Winston-Salem Dog Training Club, Inc. Tracking (Outdoors). All AKC recognized breeds. Hilltops, Conrad Road, Lewisville, NC. Susan Hines, 336.409.1413, hines.sj@gmail.com, www.wsdtc.org. Coonhound Nite Hunt hosted by the Orangeburg Coonhunters Association. Orangeburg CHA Clubhouse, Bowman, SC. Larry Toto, 803.682.0097, lptoto@blanchardmachinery.com. Georgia Brittany Club Georgia Brittany Club Field Trial. Approved FT Pointing Breed. Carter Brittany Kennels, 13094 Bowen Mill Road, Ambrose, GA. Mrs. Betty Morgan, 404.429.3602, bettyfmorgan@comcast.net. Coonhound Bench Show hosted by the Edisto River Coonhound Association. Approved Coon Hound. Edisto River CC Clubhouse, New Holland, SC. TC Sox, 803.309.1736. Coonhound Nite Hunt hosted by the Piedmont Coon Club of South Carolina. Approved Coon Hound. Piedmont CC(SC) Clubhouse, Lugoff, SC. Jerry Freezon, 803.600.5695. Coonhound Nite Hunt hosted by the Hell Hole Coon Hunters Association. Approved Coonhound. Hell Hole CHA Clubhouse (SC), Georgetown, SC. Floyd Lambert, 843.264.8093. Tokeena Beagle Club Field Trial. Approved Beagle. Tokeena Beagle Club Running Grounds, Westminster, SC. Adam Blackwell, 864.985.3300, aablackwell03@yahoo.com.

Winter 2011-2012

9 9-10 9-11

10 10 10 10 10-11 10-11 10-11 11 16 16 16 16 17

Greater Hickory Kennel Club, Inc. Show. All AKC-Recognized Breeds. LJV War Memorial Coliseum, 300 Deacon Blvd., Winston-Salem, NC. 336. 379.9352, mbf@infodog.com. Rocky River Gundog Brace. Approved Beagle. The Rocky River Club Running Grounds, Oakboro, NC. Joseph E. Love, 704.788.0515, loves. rosehill@​yahoo.com, www.foothillsbeagleclub.com. Agility Trial hosted by the Yadkinville Carolina Piedmont Agility Club. Lone Hickory Indoor Arena, 1950 Bethel Church Road, Yadkinville, NC. Peggy Franklin, 828.697.2118, pegfranklin@morrisbb.net, www. carolinapiedmontagility.com. Aiken SPCA 1st Annual Reindog Romp. 10-2p. Dog walk and pet fair fundraiser benefitting Aiken SPCA. Odell Weeks Recreation Center, 1700 Whiskey Road, Aiken, SC. 803.648.6863, www.aikenspca.org. Coonhound Bench Show and Nite Hunt hosted by the Greenville County Coonhunters Association. Approved Coonhound. Greenville Co. CHA, Travelers Rest, SC. Brian Kelly, 864.752.5305. Coonhound Nite Hunt hosted by the Orangeburg Coonhunters Association. Approved Coonhound. Orangeburg CHA Clubhouse, Bowman, SC. Larry Toto, 803.682.0097, lptoto@blanchardmachinery.com. Coonhound Nite Hunt hosted by the Tri-county Coonhunters Association. Approved Coonhound. Tri Co CHA SC Clubhouse, Trenton, SC. Ben Brown, 803.643.0002. George Alston Handling Seminar for Beginners, Advanced and Observers hosted by The Dachshund Club of Metropolitan Atlanta. Laura Potash, 770.487.9255, nippersnuk@aol.com. Palmetto Pointing Breed Club Hunting Test. Approved HT Pointing Breed. 106 Whitetail Drive, Walhalla, SC. Debbie Darby, 864.882.0215, whitetailgwp@mindspring.com. Afghan Hound Club Of America, Inc. Lure Coursing Trial. Approved Sighthound. Polo Field, 130 Polo Lane, Camden, SC. Audrey Silverstein, 704.483.6269. Atlanta Obedience Club Tracking (Outdoors). USDA ARS Fields Colham Ferry Road, Watkinsville, GA. Don Mayhall, 770.396.6542, dgmayhall@hotmail.com, www.atlantaobedienceclub.com. Coonhound Nite Hunt hosted by the Three Rivers Coon Hunters Association Of South Carolina. Approved Coonhound. Three Rivers CHA, Elliott, SC. Kevin Bigford, 843.319.9597. Coonhound Bench Show hosted by the Edisto River Coonhound Association. Approved Coonhound. Edisto River CC Clubhouse, New Holland, SC. TC Sox, 803.309.1736. Sandhill Beagle Club Field Trial. Approved Beagle. Sandhill Beagle Club’s Running Grounds, Cheraw, SC. Eddie Brock, 843.250.2871. Spartanburg Beagle Club Field Trial. Approved Beagle. Indian Beagle Club, End of Powell Road, Vale, NC. J. Chris Caston M.D., 864.494.4177. Coonhound Nite Hunt hosted by the Piedmont Coon Club of South Carolina. Approved Coonhound. Piedmont CC(SC) Clubhouse, Lugoff, SC. Jerry Freezon,803.600.5695.

The Dog & Hound

19


17

Coonhound Bench Show hosted by the Orangeburg Coonhunters Association. Approved Coonhound. Orangeburg CHA (SC) Clubhouse, Bowman, SC. Larry Toto, 803.682.0097, lptoto@blanchardmachinery.com. 17-18 GSDA Sheep Dog Trial. Hull, GA. Carol Anne Tholkes, 864.376.5158, cat@redcreekfarm.com, www.usbcha.com. 17-18 Carolina Lure Coursing Society LCTS/LCTR. Approved Sighthound. Polo Field, 130 Polo Lane, Camden, SC. Donna Richards, 704.483.6269, tntskids@aol.com. 19 Photos with Santa. Benefitting SPCA. Cold Creek Nursery, 398 Hitchcock Parkway, Aiken, SC. 803.648.6863, www.aikenspca.org. 22 Coonhound Bench Show hosted by the Edisto River Coonhound Association. Approved Coonhound. Edisto River CC Clubhouse, New Holland, SC. TC Sox, 803.309.1736. 23 Coonhound Nite Hunt hosted by the Hell Hole Coon Hunters Association. Approved Coonhound. Hell Hole CHA Clubhouse (SC), Georgetown, SC. Floyd Lambert, 843.264.8093. 27 Middle Georgia English Setter Club of Milledgeville Field Trial. Approved FT Pointing Breed. Mullis Farm Hwy., Dublin, GA. Mrs. Xantippe Fountain, 478.275.7003, xfountain@bellsouth.net. 30- Jan 1 North Georgia All Breed Herding Dog Association HRTS/HRTR Show. Approved HRD Event Breed. Woods End Farm, 2221 Salem Road, Watkinsville, GA. Ms. Susan Benkiser, 770.354.8645, sugre95@aol.com.

JANUARY 6

7-8 8 12 13 14-15

14-15

14-15 14

20

Poplar Branch Beagle Club Field Trial. Approved Beagle. Poplar Branch Beagle Club Running Grounds, Moore Road, Aiken, SC. Barbara Brooks, 803.360.8024, taylorb@dnr.sc.gov. Vizsla Club of Metro Atlanta Hunting Test. Pended HT Pointing Breed. The Milner Lease, 135 Ethridge Mill Road, Milner, GA. Ms. Kathy Hansen, 404.414.5180, kkhansen30004@yahoo.com, www.atlantavizsla.org. Charlotte Dog Training Club Tracking (Outdoors). All AKC recognized breeds. Rural Hill Farm, 4431 Neck Road, Huntersville, NC. Deborah Mitchell, 704.517.1058, shandiak@aol.com, www.akc.org. Atlanta Beagle Club Field Trial. Approved Beagle. Kennesaw Mountain Beagle Club Running Grounds, Dallas, GA. Jeanne Matthews, 706.445.2807. Third Annual Pheasant Tower Shoot. 2pm. The Hanging Rocks Plantation, Millen, GA. www.boykinspaniel.org. Greater Columbia Obedience Club, Inc. Obedience Show and Rally. All AKC-Recognized Breeds, All American Dogs / Mixed Breeds. South Carolina State Fairgrounds, Rosewood Drive, Columbia, SC. Diane Nero, 803.494.8725, dnero@sc.rr.com, www.gcoc.net. Atlanta Obedience Club, Inc. Obedience Show and Rally. All AKCRecognized Breeds, All American Dogs / Mixed Breeds. Atlanta Obedience Club Building, 1193-D Beaver Ruin Road, Norcross, GA. Becky Haley, 678.893.0536, loveappies@comcast.net, www.atlantaobedienceclub.com. Upland National Field Trial Championship hosted by the Boykin Spaniel Society. The Hanging Rocks Plantation, Millen, GA. www.boykinspaniel. org. Coonhound Bench Show hosted by the Orangeburg Coonhunters Association. Approved Coonhound. Orangeburg CHA (SC) Clubhouse, Bowman, SC. Elliott Shuler, 803.496.3862.

The Dog & Hound

17-20

Three Days of Judges Breed Seminars for the Non-Sporting Group sponsored by the Carolina Dog Judges Study Group. Scheduled seminars: Keeshonden, Tibetan Terriers, Chinese Shar-Pei, Xoloitzcuintli, Schipperkes, French Bulldogs and Norwegian Lundehund. More to be added. Cindy Stansell, 919.606.6569, rocyn@embarqmail.com. 20-21 Rocky River SPO Trial. Approved Beagle. The Rocky River Club Running Grounds, Oakboro, NC. Joseph E. Love, 704.788.0515, loves.rosehill@​ yahoo.com, www.foothillsbeagleclub.com. 20-22 Agility Trial hosted by the Blue Ridge Agility Club. All AKC-Recognized Breeds All American Dogs / Mixed Breeds. McGough Arena WNC Agricultural Center, 1301 Fanning Bridge Road, Fletcher, NC. Jayne Abbot, 828.713.3278, jhabbot@charter.net, www.blueridgeagility.com. 21 Armenia Winds Pointing Breeds Club Hunting Test. Approved HT Pointing Breed. Armenia Hill Fleming Farms, 2917 Armenia Road, Chester, SC. Joy Fleming, 803.377.7937, jmfleming55@yahoo.com. 21-22 Chattahoochee English Springer Spaniel Club Greater Atlanta S/O/ JSHW/SWPC Show. Approved English Springer Spaniel. Gwinnett County Fairgrounds , 2405 Sugarloaf Pkwy., Lawrenceville, GA. Roy Jones Dog Shows, 260.925.0525, rjds@royjonesdogshows.com, www.cesscga.org. 21-22 Are We Having Fun Yet? Presented Betsy Scapicchio & Linda Brennan and hosted by the Durham Kennel Club. Seminar focused on using fun games and positive motivation to get active attention, improve heeling, and speed up recalls. Jan Gray, fundogs@gmail.com, www.durhamkennelclub. com. 24 Coonhound Nite Hunt hosted by the Tri-county Coonhunters Association. Approved Coonhound. Tri Co CHA SC Clubhouse, Trenton, SC. Ben Brown, 803.643.0002. 25 Savannah River Valley Beagle Club Field Trial. Approved Beagle. Club Grounds, Edgefield, SC. Mrs. Jan H Robertson, 803.309.3230, janr@ upthecreek.net. 25 Beagling with Ardrossan Beagles from Radnor, PA. Tailgate party after hunt. Chime Bell Chase Road, Aiken, SC. Rick Wilson and David Trachtenberg, rickwilsonsc@yahoo.com. 25-26 Chattahoochee English Springer Spaniel Club Greater Atlanta Hunting Test. Approved HT Spaniel. Minkiewicz Running Grounds, Bowman, GA. Marilyn Burke, 678.643.3007, marilyn_burke@rhco.com, www.cesscga.org. 27 Georgia Brittany Club Field Trials. Pended FT Pointing Breed. DiLane Plantation, Waynesboro, GA. Betty Morgan, 404.429.3602, bettyfmorgan@ comcast.net. 27 Greater Charleston Weimaraner Club S/JSHW/SWPC Show. Approved Weimaraner. 4129 Chisolm Road, Johns Island, SC. Barbara Glover, 843.425.0895, bb.glover@yahoo.com, www.grchasweimclub.org. 28 Coonhound Nite Hunt hosted by the Millwood Farm Coon Club. Approved Coonhound. Orangeburg, SC. Hane Culler Jr., 803.682.0036, hayneculler@gmail.com. 28-29 Agility Trial hosted by the Border Terrier Club Of America, Inc. BonClyde Learning Center, 3030 Lee Avenue, Sanford, NC. 843.696.2892, karen-w@msn.com. 30 Black Jack Beagle Club Field Trial. Approved Beagle. Club Grounds, Bishopville, SC. David P Boyce, 803.774.3800, dpboyce@ftc-i.net.

FEBRUARY 2

2 3-4 3-4 4 4 4-5

Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Club of Greater Atlanta. Approved Cavalier King Charles Spaniel. Atlanta Exposition Center South, 3850 Jonesboro Road, Atlanta, GA. Onofrio Dog Shows, 405.427.8181, mail@onofrio.com, www.ckcscatlanta.org. Griffin Georgia Kennel Club AB/O/JSHW/RLY Show. All AKC recognized breeds. Atlanta Exposition Center, South. 3850 Jonesboro Road, Atlanta, GA. Onofrio Dog Shows. 405.427.8181. mail@onofrio.com Chow Chow Fanciers of Atlanta. Approved Chow Chow. Atlanta Exposition Center South, 3850 Jonesboro Road, Atlanta, GA. Onofrio Dog Shows, 405.427.8181, mail@onofrio.com. Shetland Sheepdog Club of Georgia, Inc. Approved Shetland Sheepdog. Atlanta Exposition Center South, 3850 Jonesboro Road, Atlanta, GA. Michael Kilgore, 864.905.3799, makilgore@bellsouth.net. Greater Atlanta Pug Club, Inc. Approved Pug. Atlanta Exposition Center South, 3850 Jonesboro Road, Atlanta, GA. Mrs. Vallarie Cuttie, 770.927.6415, vallarie@cuttie.com. Atlanta Golden Retriever Club. Approved Golden Retriever. Atlanta Exposition Center South, 3850 Jonesboro Road, Atlanta, GA. Onofrio Dog Shows, 405.427.8181, mail@onofrio.com, www.smkcga.com. Charlotte Dog Training Club Obedience Show and Rally. Approved all AKC-Recognized Breeds, All American Dogs / Mixed Breeds. Piedmont Kennel Club Showplace, 13607 Choate Circle, Charlotte, NC. Ginger Robertson, 912.308.1007, muttloverx2@gmail.com, www. charlottedogtraining.com .

Winter 2011-2012


Classifieds ADOPTIONS

Adopt a Shelter Dog or Cat from the Aiken County Animal Shelter. Make a friend; save a life. Many beautiful, healthy, friendly animals to choose from. 411 Wire Road, Aiken. See the pets at www.fotasaiken.org. 803.642.1537. Aiken SPCA. Dogs, puppies, cats and kittens for adoption. Hours of operation: Mon-Sat. 11 am - 5 pm. weekly offsite adoptions at Aiken Petsmart, Sat 10 am- 3 pm; Sun 1:30 pm - 6:30 pm. www.spca.org. Shelter location: 401 Wire Road, Aiken. 803.643.0564 . Pointers! More than just bird dogs. Many beautiful purebred Pointers

of all ages available for pets or for hunting. See them on the web at www.pointerescue.org.

ANIMAL CARE

Horses And Hounds Aiken. Pet & Horse-Sitting. Reasonable Rates, Bonded and Insured, Vet Assistant. 803-643-9972/803-443-8303. horsesandhoundsaiken@gmail.com Pet sitting, farm sitting, expert horse care. References available. Mary Jane Howell. 802.295.8294

South Plaza, 722 Silver Bluff Road, Aiken, SC 29803. 803-649-9286 Horse Sense Plus handcrafted English bridle leather dog collars and matching leads. Available at Dog Days Workshop, 1760 Park Ave, Aiken. 803.226.0353

TRAINING

Puppy training classes at reasonable rates. Heartsong Spay Neuter Clinic.

PET PRODUCTS

Natural Pet Products: Thundershirttm applies constant pressure to calm your dog. Perfect for thunderstorms, travel, & fireworks. Available at Herbal Solutions, Centre

Call for appointment: 803-649-3655. www.heartsongspayneuter.com Southside Dog Agility & Training Center is a great place to train your dog. We have a fenced training area with an obedience ring and agility equipment, including rubberized contacts. For more information, see www.SouthsideDogAgility.net

Canine Sculpture and Charcoal Dog Portraits by nationally recognized sculptress Leslie Hutto. Now registering for upcoming sculpture classes & workshops please inquire: ljhutto@gmail.com 803-632-7029 www.lhuttosculpture.com

Advertising in The Dog & Hound Classified ads are $20 for the first 30 words & 40 cents for every word thereafter. Photo Classifieds are $35; (limit 40 words) Business Cards: $70 per issue, or $300 a year (local business discount: $60 per issue or $220 per year)

Winter 2011-2012

Editor@theDogandHound.com The Dog & Hound, P.O. Box 332, Montmorenci, SC 29839 We accept Visa, Mastercard, Discover Pay online: www.TheDogandHound.com Or Call us: 803.643.9960

For detailed rate sheet & publication schedule, visit

www.TheDogandHound.com advertise in the Spring 2012 issue! Advertising deadline: January 6, 2012 Publication date: February 2, 2011

The Dog & Hound

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5

10 10-12 11-12

11-12 12 13-14 16

17 17-18 17-19

17-19 18

Lawrenceville Kennel Club, Inc. AB/O/JSHW/RLY Show. All AKCRecognized Breeds. Atlanta Exposition Center South, 3850 Jonesboro Road, Atlanta, GA. Onofrio Dog Shows, 405.427.8181, mail@onofrio.com, www. lawrencevillekc.org. Sandhill Beagle Club Field Trial. Boy & Chewing Road, Cheraw, SC. Eddie Brock, 843.253.2871. Lazy J Classic Sheep Dog Trial. Carnesville, GA. Dawn Boyce, 706.335.6323, colliegirl@juno.com, www.usbcha.com. Labrador Retriever Club of the Piedmont S/O/JSHW/SWPC/RLY Show. Approved Labrador Retriever. Piedmont Kennel Club Showplace, 13607 Choate Circle, Charlotte, NC. Ms. Libby Flowerree, 704.782.5706, makasi@gmail.com, www.piedmontlabclub.com. Atlanta Terrier Club Earth Dog Trial. Approved all Earthdogs. The Canine Ranch, 165 Doug Smith Lane, Canton, GA. Carolyn Wolters, 770.889.7156, carolynwolters@live.com, www.atlantaterrierclub.org. Durham Kennel Club Tracking Excellent (Outdoors). All AKC recognized breeds. Quail Roost Farm, Roxboro Highway, Rougemont, NC. Elizabeth Rende, 919.381.6755, trackerjean@gmail.com, www.akc.org. Westminster Kennel Club Show. All AKC-Recognized breeds. Madison Square Garden Center, 2 Pennsylvania Plaza, NYC, New York. www. westminsterkennelclub.org. Bulldog Club of Greenville Show. Pended Bulldog. TD Convention Center, 1 Expositon Avenue, Greenville, SC. Libby Sigmon, 704.798.1827, msigmon1@carolina.rr.com, www.bulldogclubofgreenvillesc.org.

19

Hendersonville Kennel Club AB/O/JSHW/RLY Show. All AKC recognized breeds. TD Convention Center, 1 Exposition Avenue, Greenville, SC. 336.379.9352, mbf@infodog.com. Greenville Kennel Club AB/O/JSHW/RLY Show. All AKC recognized breeds. TD Convention Center, 1 Exposition Avenue, Greenville, SC. 336.379.9352, mbf@infodog.com. Savannah Dog Training Club Agility Trial. All AKC-Recognized Breeds, All American Dogs / Mixed Breeds. Guy Minick Youth Sports Complex, 7200 Sally Mood Drive, Savannah, GA. Laurene Galgano, 757.481.4854, gonedoggin@cox.net, www.savannahdogtrainingclub.com. Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show. Madison Square Garden, NY. www. westminsterkennelclub.org. Newfoundland Club of America, Inc. Show. Approved Newfoundland. TD Convention Center, 1 Exposition Avenue, Greenville, SC. 336.379.9352, mbf@infodog.com, www.ncanewfs.org.

24-26

19 19 19 23 24 24 24-25

Shetland Sheepdog Club of Spartanburg, Inc. Show. Approved Shetland Sheepdog. TD Convention Center, 1 Exposition Avenue, Greenville, SC. 336.379.9352, mbf@infodog.com. Spartanburg Kennel Club, Inc. AB/O/JSHW/RLY Show. All AKCRecognized Breeds. TD Convention Center, 1 Exposition Avenue, Greenville, SC. 336.379.9352, mbf@infodog.com, www.spartanburgkc.org. English Cocker Spaniel Club of America, Inc. Show. Approved English Cocker Spaniel. TD Convention Center, 1 Exposition Avenue, Greenville, SC. 336.379.9352, mbf@infodog.com, www.ecsca.org. Winston-Salem Dog Training Club, Inc. Tracking Excellent (Outdoors . All AKC recognized breeds. 3800 Bethania Station Road, Winston-Salem, NC. Louisa Arendt, 336.408.1494, louisaarendt@gmail.com, www.akc.org. German Shorthaired Pointer Club of Atlanta Field Trial. Pended FT Pointing Breed. Luke Weaver’s Farm, Jackson, GA. Ms. Carol Simmons, 770.967.2105, cmsdals@bellsouth.net, www.gspcatlanta.com. Palmetto Retriever Club Field Trial. Approved FT Retriever. H. Cooper Black Jr. Memorial Field Trial Area, Patrick, SC. Julie Janke, 843.362.0406, ccrkennels@earthlink.net. Poplar Branch Beagle Club Field Trial. Approved Beagle. Poplar Branch Beagle Club Running Grounds, Moore Road, Aiken, SC. Ms. Barbara Brooks, 803.360.8024, taylorb@dnr.sc.gov, www.foothillsbeagleclub.com. Poplar Branch Gundog Brace Trial. Poplar Branch Beagle Club Running Grounds, Moore Road, Aiken, SC. Approved Beagle. Ms. Barbara Brooks, 803.564.6551, taylorb@dnr.sc.​ gov, www.foothillsbeagleclub.com.

Winston-Salem Dog Training Club, Inc. and the Carolina Piedmont Agility Club Agility Trial. Lone Hickory Indoor Arena, 1950 Bethel Church Road, Yadkinville, NC. 843.768.8452, karen-w@msn.com. 25 German Shorthaired Pointer Club of Atlanta Field Trial. Approved FT Pointing Breed. Luke Weaver’s Farm, Jackson, GA. Ms. Carol Simmons, 770.967.2105, cmsdals@bellsouth.net, www.gspcatlanta.com. 25-26 Bulldog Club of Metropolitan Atlanta S/SWPC Show. Approved Bulldog. Haralson County Livestock Pavillion, 1812 Macedonia Church Road, Buchanan, GA. Allison Palmer, 404.694.8580, lovemybullies@bellsouth. net. 25-26 Carolina K9 Sport Club Agility Trial. PBH Training Center, 5314 Farrington Road, Chapel Hill, NC. Shannon Jones, www.usdaa.com. 28 Coonhound Nite Hunt hosted by the Tri-county Coonhunters Association. Approved Coonhound. Tri Co CHA SC Clubhouse, Trenton, SC. Ben Brown Jr., 803.643.0002.

Index of Advertisers Advertiser Aiken Animal Hospital Aiken Pet Fitness & Rehabilitation Aiken SPCA

21

Advertiser Heartsong Spay & Neuter Clinic

Page 9

9

Insight

18

9

Kilohana's Fenway Faithful

11

Aiken Veterinary Clinic

21

Lynn Carlisle Sporting Art

11

CSRA Lifesaver

21

Pampered Paws

21

Dog Days Workshop

21

Pointer Rescue

23

Donna Brooks Brisbin Photography

5

Sarahsetter Kennels

9

Fur Kidz Pet Sitting

21

Tender Heart Pet Care

11

Guide Dog Foundation

18

Trinity Farms

11

Heartsong Grooming

22

Page

The Dog & Hound

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Winter 2011-2012


Winter 2011-2012

The Dog & Hound

23


A soft chew supplement designed to meet the unique needs of active and aging dogs.

“POLYCHEWS has extended support to our canine patients in our sports medicine and physical therapy / rehab programs. Upon discharge, dogs continue their recovery at home and progress more rapidly with POLYCHEWS than we have experienced with other products. Dogs readily consume the palatable soft chews.� - Paul M. Shealy, DVM, MS, Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Surgeons

Whether for active athletes or aging pets, POLYCHEWS can help maintain their mobility and restore vigor.

See your Veterinarian or visit www.ArthroDynamic.com 24

The Dog & Hound

Winter 2011-2012

The Dog and Hound  

The inaugural edition of The Dog and Hound, a lifestyle magazine about dogs and the people who love them in Aiken, SC and surrounding areas.

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