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Metamorphosis, an Hermès story

« Zebra Pegasus » silk twill scarf « Faubourg » watch in rose gold set with diamonds 1-800-441-4488 Hermes.com


CHANEL BOUTIQUES 800.550.0005 chanel.com ©2014 CHANEL®, Inc.


CHANEL BOUTIQUES 800.550.0005 chanel.com ©2014 CHANEL®, Inc.


CHANEL BOUTIQUES 800.550.0005 chanel.com ©2014 CHANEL®, Inc.


RAF SIMONS / STERLING RUBY


©2014 COACH®

FALL 2014

Studded Edie in oxblood Biker Jacket on Gracie Studded Coach Taxi Tote in black

Coach proudly supports the High Line. coach.com


©2014 COACH®

FALL 2014

Rhyder 24 and 33 in gunmetal Shearling Coat on Lexi

Coach proudly supports the High Line. coach.com


Fall/Winter 2014 N O. 3 2

N O. 8 2

N O. 1 2 6

Editors’ Letter

Stacy Martin by Verde Visconti

Stephen Sprouse’s Fashion Diaries

P H OTO G R A P H Y BY D R I U & T I AG O

TEXT BY DEBBIE HARRY

N O. 3 4

Contributors & their Documents PROFILES & FEATURES N O. 3 8

Portraits by Ce´dric Rivrain

N O. 8 6

N O. 1 3 0

Gaspard Ulliel by Lucas Ossendrijver

Hedi Slimane’s Sonic

P H OTO G R A P H Y BY D R I U & T I AG O N O. 9 2

N O. 1 3 4

Susanne Bartsch by Joey Arias

OBJECT OF DESIRE

P H OTO G R A P H Y BY D R I U & T I AG O

T E X T BY DA N I E L E BA L I C E

N O. 9 6

N O. 5 8

Marco de Vincenzo

Doug Abraham by Fabien Baron

INTERVIEW BY GIULIA RUBERTI P H OTO G R A P H Y BY D R I U & T I AG O

P H OTO G R A P H Y BY D R I U & T I AG O

N O. 1 0 0

N O. 6 2

Tom of Finland by Peter Marino

Wendy Whelan by Christopher Wheeldon

T E X T BY D R E W SAW Y E R

P H OTO G R A P H Y BY D R I U & T I AG O

N O. 1 0 8

N O. 6 5

Poems by Glenn O’Brien

Stuart Comer by Zackary Drucker P H OTO G R A P H Y BY D R I U & T I AG O N O. 7 2

Juliette Binoche by Francesco Vezzoli P H OTO G R A P H Y BY D R I U & T I AG O N O. 7 8

Lady Bunny by Jimmy Paul P H OTO G R A P H Y BY D R I U & T I AG O

T E X T B Y E M I LY S I N G E R PHOTOGRAPHY BY HEDI SLIMANE

N O. 1 1 0

Avery Singer: Computer World T E X T BY D R E W SAW Y E R

Amma Studio TEXT BY ANN BINLOT PHOTOGRAPHY BY JAMIE CHUNG N O. 1 3 6

The Michel & Ryan Show T E X T BY DA N T H AW L E Y PHOTOGRAPHY BY DOUG INGLISH N O. 1 4 2

The New Generation by Bjarne Melgaard T E X T BY K E V I N M c GA R RY N O. 1 5 4

Volition by Gregg Bordowitz N O. 1 8 8

Anne Collier: Woman with a Camera

N O. 1 1 4

T E X T BY D R E W SAW Y E R

Sturtevant: Double Trouble

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANNE COLLIER

C U R AT E D B Y P E T E R E L E E Y

Celebrating Hairstylist Guido’s New Book

N O. 1 2 4

Strike a Pose A RT WO R K BY K 8 H A R DY TEXT BY ANN BINLOT

N O. 2 3 8

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y FA B I E N B A R O N HAIR BY GUIDO FA S H I O N E D I T O R J AY M A S S A C R E T

ON THE COVERS

Saskia De Brauw

Photography by Collier Schorr. Fashion Director James Valeri. Make Up Artist Dick Page. Hair Stylist Peter Gray. Set Design by Peter Klein. Casting by Samuel Ellis Scheinman at DM Casting. Coat by Melitta Baumeister. Beret by JJ Hat Center.

Daria Werbowy

Photography by Richard Prince. Fashion Director James Valeri. Casting by Samuel Ellis Scheinman at DM Casting. Stylist Assistant Kadeem Greaves. Retouching by Urban Studio.

Binx Walton

Photography by Roe Ethridge. Fashion Editor Robbie Spencer. Hair Stylist Akki. Make Up by Sil Bruinsma. Set Design by Andy Harman. Lighting design by David Diesing. Casting by Samuel Ellis Scheinman at DM Casting. Location


COMME DES GARÇONS 520W 22ND STREET DOVER STREET MARKET 160 LEXINGTON AVENUE NEW YORK DOVERSTREETMARKET.COM


Fall/Winter 2014 FASHION N O. 1 5 6

What is the relation between power and description? PHOTOGRAPHY BY COLLIER SCHORR

N O. 2 74

N O. 3 3 4

Is there a better metaphor for progress more accurate than forward movement?

What role does attraction play in composition?

PHOTOGRAPHY BY CEDRIC BUCHET

FA S H I O N D I R E C T O R J A M E S VA L E R I

FA S H I O N E D I T O R S A B I N A S C H R E D E R

N O. 1 9 4

N O. 2 9 0

Are all these questions the urgent concerns of art? BY RICHARD PRINCE FA S H I O N D I R E C T O R J A M E S VA L E R I N O. 2 1 4

Mixed Media ARTIST LINDER STERLING JEWELRY DESIGNER VICTOIRE DE CASTELLANE

N O. 2 3 8

Celebrating Hairstylist Guido’s New Book P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y FA B I E N B A R O N HAIR BY GUIDO FA S H I O N E D I T O R J AY M A S S A C R E T N O. 2 6 0

How is continuity of style maintained? PHOTOGRAPHY BY HARLEY WEIR FA S H I O N E D I T O R J A C K B O R K E T T

What can we be to each other standing together facing something indescribable? PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOHAN SANDBERG FA S H I O N E D I T O R M A U R I C I O N A R D I N O. 3 0 2

How to return to the question of art? PHOTOGRAPHY BY AMY TROOST FA S H I O N E D I T O R T O N Y I R V I N E N O. 3 1 2

How is a new beginning a matter of location?

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARIPOL FA S H I O N E D I T O R R O N A L D B U R T O N I I I

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y M A X FA R A G O FA S H I O N D I R E C T O R J A M E S VA L E R I N O. 3 5 9

How does a work of art take shape? P H OTO G R A P H Y BY B R E T T L LOY D FA S H I O N E D I T O R L O T TA V O L KO VA N O. 3 7 6

How can I touch creation as a principle without reproach? PHOTOGRAPHY BY RICHARD BUSH

FA S H I O N E D I T O R E L I S S A S A N T I S I

FA S H I O N E D I T O R S A R A H R I C H A R D S O N

N O. 3 2 4

How does gratitude unfold from virtue? P H OTO G R A P H Y BY DA N TO B I N S M I T H FA S H I O N E D I T O R R O N A L D B U R T O N I I I

Stella Tennant

Photography by Mario Testino. Artwork by Isa Genzken. Special thanks to Urban Studio.

N O. 3 4 6

Do you lose your bearings when a stranger approaches you for directions?

P H OTO G R A P H Y BY K AC P E R K AS P R Z Y K

OBJECT OF DESIRE

ON THE COVERS

SOURCE MATERIALS N O. 4 0 2

Sleepless by Michael Cunningham PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOEL STERNFELD

Raquel Zimmermann

Photography by Fabien Baron. Hair by Guido. Fashion Editor Jay Massacret. Make Up by Frankie Boyd.

Edie Campbell

Photography by Richard Bush. Fashion Editor Sarah Richardson. Hair Stylist Chi Wong at Julian Watson. Make Up Artist Petros Petrohilos at Streeters London using Laura Mercier. Retouching by Andy at Love Retouch. Special thanks Natalie Hand at Viva London. Edie wears jumper and skirt by Louis Vuitton.


Editors-in-Chief & Creative Directors

Nick VogelsoN & James Valeri

Editorial Consultant & Online Editor Hilary moss Contributing Editors Peter mariNo, gleNN o’BrieN, cHarles reNfro, mariPol, Drew sawyer, aNN BiNlot

European Editor-at-Large DaNiele Balice West Coast Editor-at-Large sHay NielseN Art Editors BJarNe melgaarD, alissa BeNNett Literary Advisors DaViD mccoNNell, Darrell crawforD Art Advisors aNDrea scHwaN Copy Editor t.J. carliN Art and Editorial Assistant max HirscHBerger Art and Design Intern elyaNNa Blaser-goulD Transcriber keely weiss Fashion and Market Editor roNalD BurtoN Fashion Assistants kaDeem greaVes, giorgia fuzio Contributing Fashion Editors: saraH ricHarDsoN, roBBie sPeNcer, Jay massacret,

saBiNa scHreDer, elissa saNtisi, Jack Borkett, lotta VolkoVa, mauricio NarDi, toNy irViNe, gilliaN wilkiNs, akari eNDo-gaut, omaima salem Casting Directors: samuel ellis scHeiNmaN at DmfasHioNstuDio, ros okusaNya, alexaNDra saNDBerg, sHelley DurkaN Fashion Interns: giNeVra ValeNte, isaBella aNselmi, JaDe Vallario, susaNa Pereyra

Associate Publisher James NaVarrete International Advertising Director salaVatore caPuto Type Design commercial tyPe Production Consultant greig scott Production Director keViN roff Contributing Artists

ricHarD PriNce, isa geNzkeN, mario testiNo, faBieN BaroN, guiDo Palau, collier scHorr, roe etHriDge, ricHarD BusH, mariPol, liNDer sterliNg, Driu & tiago, ceDric BucHet, Harley weir, k8 HarDy, kacPer kasPrzyk, JoHaN saNDBerg, max farago, DaN toBiN smitH, Brett lloyD, amy troost, céDric riVraiN, aVery siNger, aNNe collier, Doug iNglisH, Joel sterNfelD, Jamie cHuNg

Contributing Writers & Interviewers

HiltoN als, cHristoPHer wHeelDoN, faBieN BaroN, DeBBie Harry, lucas osseNDriJVer, Jimmy Paul, VerDe ViscoNti, fraNcesco Vezzoli, Joey arias, raquel zimmermaNN, zackary Drucker, keViN mcgarry, Peter eleey, DaN tHawley, giulia ruBerti, emily siNger, gregg BorDowitz, DaN tHawley, micHael cuNNiNgHam, max freemaN

Document Journal is published semi-annually in the fall and spring by Document Publishing, LLC. For all inquiries, e-mail inquiry@documentjournal.com aDVertisiNg For all inquiries, e-mail ad@documentjournal.com suBscriPtioNs Subscription info can be found at www.documentjournal.com Document Publishing, LLC. 110 Lafayette, Suite 203. New York, NY 10013 DistriButioN United states

SpeedImpex—Jennifer DiMaggio JDimaggio@speedimpex.com

UK, eUrope, WorldWide

WhiteCirc Ltd.—Stuart White Stuart@whitecirc.com

Document No. 5 Printed in August, 2014. Copyright © Document Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-88-6208-259-4 ISSN 2280-8701 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical—including photocopying, recording or by any information storage or retrieval system— without prior permission in writing from the publisher. sPecial tHaNks

Valeri family, Vogelson family, Matthew Adams, Georgina Phillips, Jessie and Ashok Childs, Darrell Crawford, David McConnell, Cédric Rivrain, Rose in Paris, Balice-Hertling Gallery, Michele Saunders, Christine Lavigne, Danielle Palma, Lisa Weatherby, Alexander Galan, Scott Kraenzlein, Luke P. Brown, Jen Ramey, Kyle Hagler, Peter Cedeno, Natalie Hand, Viva London, David Bonnouvrier, Lorenzo Re, Nicole Lepage, Timothy Williams, Mina Viehl, Sally Borno, Stewart Searle, M.A.P., Artist Commission, Shea Spencer, Felix Frith, Christian Schwartz, Jean-Marc Houmard, Florent Belda, Marissa Pucci, Daniel Motta Mello, Malena Bach, Filippo Weck, Pietro Beccari, Billy Dalley, Joshua Gaynor, Ashley West, Felix Burrichter, Juan Carlos Mendez, Fabiola Alondra, Alberto Ruiz, Louis Colabella, Kina Poon, Duke Dang, Mina Viehl, Lia Gangitano, Paul Monroe, Jeff Stalnaker, Bryce Ebel, Vanessa Munier, Adam Leon, Greig Scott, Jacob Arkaah, Roy De Souza, Jackie Chachoua, Shawn Brydges, Bridget Flagerty, Kim Pollock


D O C U M E N T N O. 3 2

Editors’ Letter

D

ocument No. 5 is a special issue, the marker of our second anniversary. We’ve asked our amazing contributors to celebrate the journey we’ve been sharing together with our readers. Instead of giving answers, they initiated a process that has made us even more curious: that of generating eternal questions about existence. Beauty and creativity are the nutrients of life, the never-ending engine—they make us grow, question ourselves and others, pushing the ever-changing human experience. For this issue we wanted to ask questions, and we did that with the help of artist Gregg Bordowitz and his book Volition (starting on p. 154). Each of our fashion stories are introduced by a question of his. From Volition: What does it mean to be an artist in the 21st century? What does anything mean now if nothing means anything at all? Does nothing mean anything at all? How can anything mean something as reflection without being? Is it possible to become reflection without being? How does the question of being possess urgency at the moment? In an era when everyone seems to be looking for answers, we feel the real attention should be focused on questions, a seed for our consciousness. We’ve looked to the past and to the present for people who continually ask questions, and have filled this special issue with the fruits of their labor. Ask yourself a question, and see where it leads you. Nick Vogelson & James Valeri


D O C U M E N T— F/ W 2 0 1 4

2. 13.

3.

14.

1. 4.

10. 99.

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D O C U M E N T N O. 3 4

Original Documents WE ASKED OUR C O N T R I B U TO R S FOR SOME OF THEIR M O S T I M P O RTA N T D O C U M E N T S.

“Me in full leather gear in front of Mapplethorpe photos that I own.” 2) “Message from a homeless person found on the streets of New York.” 3) BRETT LLOYD: “The photo that I saw that made me fall in love with the location that I shot for my story.” 4) RONALD BURTON III: “What I love most about self expression / art is that it has no boundaries. ‘He refuses to be defined by one thing, so he does everything’.” 5) JOHAN SANDBERG: “Alexandra in her favorite element.” 6) BINX WALTON: [photo]. 7) RAQUEL ZIMMERMANN: “No matter where I go, I’m always with myself. Himalaya, 2014. 5AM.” 8) WENDY WHELAN: “I took this self-portrait before a performance of George Balanchine’s ballet Diamonds (from Jewels). It was a moment of self-reflection and a realization that I’d truly made it. I felt so blessed to be living the life of a ballerina.” 9) RICHARD PRINCE : “I paint the protest.” 10) VERDE VISCONTI: “This is one of my quirky shadows on location. It reminds me to never step into anyone else’s shadow.” 11) BJARNE MELGAARD: “‘Only in art will the lion lie down with the lamb, and the rose grow without thorn.’ —Martin Amis.” 12) SUSANNE BARTSCH: “I was born in Switzerland, spent my salad days in London, but this New Yorker cartoon sealed the deal for me as to what city I identify as home !!!” 13) PETER ELEEY: “An invitation to Stanley Brouwn’s show at the Institut d’art contemporain in Villeurbanne that never happened.” 14) ROBBIE SPENCER: “This photo is from one of my first trips to Tokyo, one of my favourite places to visit.” 1) PETER MARINO:

SASKIA DE BRAUW:

N O. 3 4


BALICE HERTLING Gallery 47 rUe raMPOneaU 75020 PariS t +33 1 40 33 47 26 CédriC rivrain “alexander May, Untitled, 2013”

630 nintH ave SUite 403 neW yOrK, ny 10036 t +1 (646) 682-7268 www.balicehertling.com


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1) HILTON ALS: “This was taken in a London photo booth at a club my friend, the great British-based raconteur and What publisher, Karen Binns, had me meet her at. My sadness was a hangover mixed with Karen not being in the photograph with me.” 2) DRIU + TIAGO: “Here’s a polaroid of our little squirrel Squilo. Tiago found him on the sidewalk during a thunderstorm in Canada. He was tiny, with his eyes and ears still sealed. We raised him from a baby and he was with us almost 10 years. We loved him like crazy. He used to jump out of his basket in the morning onto our bed and play in Driu’s hair, purring like a cat. He would hide nuts all over the place, in our shoes, jacket pockets and bags, which to our amusement we would then find during our meetings or on shoots. He changed our lives. Loving him was the reason we became vegetarian.” 3) HARLEY WEIR: “Confiscated Badness from my classroom.” 4) KADEEM GREAVES: “The only talent is being human.” 5) GUIDO PALAU: “Me Disneyfied, about to get Minnie ready for her runway debut!” 6) CÉDRIC RIVRAIN: “One of my father’s old medicine books that I used to go through, as a child, to draw from the anatomical illustrations.” 7) SARAH RICHARDSON: “This photo preserves the moment of me being a pre teen when the whole world was an open

book and impossible was never an option.” 8) RICHARD BUSH: “‘I hate cameras. They interfere, they’re always in the way. I wish: if I could work with my eyes alone.’ I recently came across this humorous yet poignant quote from Richard Avedon. Shooting 10x8 format is the closest I can come to getting the camera out of the way, especially now we are immersed in the digital era of photography where the camera is probably in the way more than ever!” 9) GREGG BORDOWITZ: “Here’s a photo from my 50th birthday party in Wellfleet. I’m showing off a new ring on my left hand, and holding a hardcover copy of Derek Jarman’s Dancing Ledge in my right. Presents from friends.” 10) MAURICIO NARDI: “The only time I modeled, with LOVE from Mickey Mouse.” 11) STUART COMER: “This photo was taken by Vaginal Davis at her Club Sucker in the mid-nineties, part of my full immersion in Los Angeles’s queer and trans vanguard.” “This photo shows my first and only band c. 1974. We would lip synch to songs played at a faster rpm than intended. We were early adapters to Accelerationism.” 12) LADY BUNNY: “I call this my good luck ring, although I have several in different colors. It’s made by a company called Dragon Lady from Dallas and people joke that it’s as large as a dinner plate.”

N O. 3 6


Retouching • Ad Preparation and Distribution • CGI Print and Animation Motion Color • Motion Graphics • Motion Editing • Broadcast Production URBAN Print and Motion 122 W27th 11th FL • NY NY 10001 • 212.691.2521 www.urbanstudionyc.com www.cvltproduction.com


Making portraits is a tricky territory for any artist. An artist can make portraits to represent powerful people, or just characters that inspire him. A commissioned portrait has often been used by the establishment as a way to be immortalized or elevated to the status of an artwork. The good portrait is one that translates through the painting, sculpture, or photograph the personality of the subject matter; the honest portrait is the one that translates the energy that surrounds the sitter and the artist. Paris-based illustrator Ce´ dric Rivrain belongs to this very special category of artist who, through a drawing, can represent more than the physiognomy of a person. And it does not matter who that person is, as long as they get the attention of his sharp blue eyes. Though he flirts with the fashion world, Rivrain is not a fashion person: you will more likely see him at an an art gallery opening or at a concert in some edgy night club than at a fashion show. His voracious curiosity brings him into an array of creative fields; and he has assembled a community of friends that has always been the central focus of his practice. Incredibly well done, his portraits project the energy of this unique group of people that surround him. For Document, Ce´dric has created a series of portraits, drawn from life, of some his friends: musicians, artists, and comedians that populate his inner world, his gallery of characters that he loves. You may think that some are more famous than others, but for Ce´dric it does not matter, they are all part of his own universe, his own cosmos of creative energy. And looking into the eyes of those portraits, you will probably find the reflection of Ce´dric’s unique gaze.

D O C U M E N T N O. 3 8

Portraits by Ce´dric Rivrain “Every portrait that is painted with feeling is a portrait of the artist, not of the sitter.” —OSCAR WILDE, THE PICTURE OF DORIAN GRAY TEXT BY

DA N I E L E B A L I C E

D R AW I N G S BY

CÉDRIC RIVR AIN


D O C U M E N T— F/ W 2 0 1 4

LOU DOILLON N O. 3 9

wears SAINT LAURENT.


D O C U M E N T— F/ W 2 0 1 4

MYKKI BLANCO

wears KENZO. N O. 5 6


D O C U M E N T— F/ W 2 0 1 4

SAMANTHA URBANI N O. 57

wears STELLA MCCARTNEY.


D O C U M E N T— F/ W 2 0 1 4

K8 HARDY

wears PRADA. N O. 4 0


D O C U M E N T— F/ W 2 0 1 4

BOYCHILD

wears HOOD BY AIR. N O. 4 1


D O C U M E N T— F/ W 2 0 1 4

JULIANA HUXTABLE

wears RICK OWENS. N O. 4 2


D O C U M E N T— F/ W 2 0 1 4

CLÉMENCE POÉSY N O. 4 3

wears CHLOÉ.


D O C U M E N T— F/ W 2 0 1 4

OSCAR TUAZON N O. 4 4

wears LANVIN.


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MADEMOISELLE YULIA

wears MOSCHINO. N O. 4 5


D O C U M E N T— F/ W 2 0 1 4

GASPARD ULLIEL

wears LANVIN. N O. 4 6


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LISSY TRULLIE N O. 4 7

wears HERMÈS.


D O C U M E N T— F/ W 2 0 1 4

EMILY SUNDBLAD

wears PROENZA SCHOULER. N O. 4 8


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CHLOË SEVIGNY N O. 4 9

wears LOUIS VUITTON.


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SKY FERREIRA

wears SAINT LAURENT. N O. 5 0


D O C U M E N T— F/ W 2 0 1 4

TINK N O. 5 1

wears CHANEL.


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TILDA SWINTON

wears HAIDER ACKERMANN. N O. 5 2


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DEVONTÉ HYNES N O. 5 3

wears DIOR HOMME.


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JOANA PREISS

wears LOUIS VUITTON. N O. 5 4


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AHMAD LARNES N O. 5 5

wears RAF SIMONS.


FABIEN —I have to tell you, I really like what you’ve been doing on your Instagram page and I think you should do that in a bigger way really, and do a show about that because it’s really, really good. DOUG —I appreciate your compliment. FABIEN —And you were one of the first people I followed on Instagram. When did you start with Instagram? At first it was Bess alone, Bess New York, right? DOUG —Not that long ago. Bess NYC is actually my wife’s Instagram account because her name is Bess (also the name of our store). And then I think my first one was @bessNYC1, but that was three Instagram accounts ago, since they kept taking them down. I’d try to do a different thing when I would have to make a new one, you know. FABIEN —Describe the first one, because from what I recall, you were posting three pictures together. DOUG —Right, which I still do. FABIEN —Really? Oh, yeah, but like they were very beautiful. It seemed to me to be like all about the colors and feelings and emotions. All the colors were pastel and amazing pinks. DOUG —Yeah FABIEN —And everything was beautiful. DOUG —I remember I did pink for two or three months. And I was into sunsets and a strict color palate, and then I was exploring dark themes in a sort of pastel way.

FABIEN —I thought that was amazing because you were posting pictures of the sea with beautiful colors, and then a nude of this guy with a bit of his dick visible. It was all different, soft and gentle colors, and cropped very interestingly as well. DOUG —I was combining different kinds of ideas in color, editing them by color and looking for a range of vibes. FABIEN —You had a blue period. DOUG —Yeah, and there was a period that was only black and red. FABIEN —It got really dark, sexual and tough, and that’s why they took you down? DOUG —Yes, I remember becoming private at a certain point so that they would stop taking down my pictures. FABIEN —But you’re @bessNYC4 now, so they’ve taken you down three times? DOUG —Yeah they took me down recently again, but this time, I’ve been fortunate enough to meet people at Instagram. I begged them to help me out and turn it back on. FABIEN —Yeah, you were posting things that were quite out there. DOUG —People find it to be edgy, now. I try to keep it pretty tame. I mean, comparatively. FABIEN —Totally, I agree with you, I think you made a deal with Instagram then? DOUG —Well, I know in terms of body parts what they don’t want you to do, but then I did one of new CK One collage campaign where there were a lot of drug images, which is kind of a gray area, you know? Pictures of drugs are somehow like pornography I guess. Which is odd. FABIEN —I think Instagram is very American. And what I find very interesting is that people who use Instagram in other countries say ‘oh my god, you cannot do anything on Instagram,’ it’s so Americanized. And I find it a little strange that some people can put pictures of extreme violence on Instagram and that’s fine. Nobody is going to say anything about that, but if you show a breast or anything that involves sexuality, it’s an issue. I find that very bizarre, myself. DOUG —Well, a nipple is worse than a decapitated head on Instagram, which is saying something about America in general, I don’t know.

D O C U M E N T N O. 5 8

“I think direct access to the public is the only way to do something where you’re not going to be censored.” — D OU G A B R A H A M , A K A @B E SSN YC 4 A N D OW N E R O F T H E B E S S N YC C L OT H I N G S TO R E , D I S C U S S E S FA S H I O N A N D C O N T R OV E R S Y W I T H I M AG E M A N FA B I E N BA RON PHOTOGRAPHY BY

D R I U & T I AG O

FA S H I O N E D I T O R

ARTWORK BY

DOUG ABRAHAM

A K A R I E N D O - G AU T

H A I R : S H I N A R I M A . M A K E U P : I T S U K I . P H OTO A S S I S TA N T: A D R I E N P OT I E R . FA S H I O N A S S I S TA N T: E S T H E R M AT I L L A . P R O D U C T I O N : M A X H I R S C H B E R G E R . L O C AT I O N : AC M E S T U D I O S .

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lurring the lines between found images, fashion campaigns, bondage, and cyborg, Doug Abraham, owner of the Bess NYC clothing store in New York’s SoHo, has gained a cult following in the fashion and art worlds for his image mashups on Instagram @bessnyc4 (@bessnyc1-3 were deleted by Instagram for breaking terms of service). Calling on advertising images including Chanel, Dior, Givenchy, and Saint Laurent, Abraham devours images as quickly as they’re in the world. For Document, Doug sat down with creative director Fabien Baron who has been called by Vanity Fair “the most sought-after creative director in the world” and has been an admirer of Doug’s work on Instagram, to discuss making images and controversies. 


I like violence, too, so I’m glad that can be explored on Instagram, at least somewhat. FABIEN —Yeah, and you’ve done that, can you tell me about the type of imagery you’ve used with that? DOUG —I would just look at different images on the internet, saving a lot of them and later I would go back and make a sort of mood board. FABIEN —And then you would take those images and change the color, making them pastel, or pink, or— DOUG —Or I would literally search for pink images. Now, when I do the collage ones, I usually don’t have that much time so I’ll think of something and see how quickly I can find an image to go with it. Sometimes I’ll do it in reverse. FABIEN —So are you first inspired by the company itself, the brand, or do you get interested in the image that the brand is putting out there? DOUG —Well, it’s hard to say. Honestly, I’m never interested in the brand. I think there are campaigns that I find interesting for whatever reason and there are logos that I like. Sometimes the identity the brand is trying to put forth in an ad is interesting to me in terms of what it’s saying overtly and then what I think it’s kind of trying to say. FABIEN —But I don’t think that people read it in the same way. I think you’ve done some of the companies I’ve worked on. I think some of your images are actually more interesting than the way I’ve done them, because they just push the idea way further than the brand could go. But when pushing imagery that far out and attaching it to a very big company, such as Calvin Klein or Prada or Givenchy, these big luxury companies, the message becomes really interesting and much bigger. What you’ve done with Calvin Klein makes sense for Calvin Klein. It’s very smart, bright and very well put together, and the collages are usually very powerful and meaningful, and it’s meant for the brand.

DOUG —I appreciate that. Once I establish a vibe for a brand, I’ll try to return to that. Particularly with something like with Calvin Klein, where I feel a consistent vibe from advertising, it seems to make sense. I try to do it in a collective unconscious kind of way. FABIEN —The thing I really like about your work is that in fashion advertising there’s always a slight sense of pretentiousness about it. A lot of companies are in some way trying too hard to pass a message and polish all of the details, I find that what you do is very pure. I think you take all the pretension out of what we’re trying to do. It becomes very direct. DOUG —That is kind of what the intention is, to make it more of an immediate or visceral response. A lot of what I’m doing on Instagram is not a collaborative thing, it’s something that you do that can become public very immediately, so there’s no process to this, like with real advertising images. FABIEN —For us to make an advertising page, the team is at least 30 people and you end up on the set with 60 people and everyone has something to say. The client has something to say, the hair, the makeup, and so on. But then it becomes as public as Instagram, which is now is very powerful and your images are seen almost like a page of advertising when you have that logo present there on the bottom of the page. What kind of feedback do you get from people? DOUG —I think people are interested in it, because even though my account was private, there were a lot of fashion people following it. I was trying to figure out how to get people to really pay attention, to have a sense of immediacy in what they’re looking at. FABIEN —Absolutely. You definitely got that down, I think. I see in your work a need that is impactful, provocative, and memorable. The way that you’re using the brands and their visuals directly, the meaning becomes more powerful, that’s the way I’m reading your things. So, what made you think, oh, I want to take this advertising and mess around with it? DOUG —Right, well I was messing around with appropriating images and putting my own logo on them, sort of branding images. I’m interested in the idea of branding images that aren’t products. In doing that, I started looking at actual advertising in a different way. And as I said, there were many fashion people following me, so I started thinking more about what other people do, literally sorting images on my iPhoto next to the other images that I was collecting for random reasons. I started to see an interplay between the advertising images and I wanted to mess around with putting them together, you know? And I think I also felt like I was a little lazy by not making Instagram more of an art platform. I felt like I had gone as far as I could just reposting pictures, or not reposting. Even if I was doing it in an intentional way, by color story or by sort of thematic or whatever my intention was, I felt like I needed to make each thing more of an art thing. FABIEN —You had to create something of your own, yes. DOUG —Yeah, because I was not taking full advantage of what I could be doing on Instagram. I felt like the art world, the institution of it, freaked me out too much. And I felt like Instagram was a great way for me to have direct access to. FABIEN —So you were educated as an artist to start with? DOUG —Yeah, the reason I came to New York in the first place was to go to a fine arts school, and be a nineties art kid. I was doing exactly that until I started to get an insider look at what the art scene was, and I couldn’t deal. FABIEN —Where did you study? What did you study? DOUG —I went to Hunter College for graduate school circa ’95 or something, which is when I came here. FABIEN —And then you started to work for an artist? DOUG —No, I went to graduate school, and then I was working at Kim’s Video and was doing group shows and stuff. Then, to pay back my student loans I started doing some jewelry design for people that I knew. So that’s sort of how I got into doing fashion stuff. But even in

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art school, people would call my stuff too ‘fashion-y’. FABIEN —Oh really? DOUG —Not so dissimilar to what I do with photographs. I was into photographically drawing film stills and appropriating images and sort of reconceptualizing them, only I would physically draw the images instead of just taking images from photography. I remember doing a series of Belle De Jour pencil drawings and a critic saying that it looked too much like fashion advertising, which is ironic. FABIEN —I don’t understand why people would have an issue with the fashion thing. DOUG —Well, when you’re in art school, someone’s always got something negative to say about your work. But, again, I was drawing film stills from horror movies or would redraw another film still from Belle Du Jour and put it next to a film still from like Alien or something. It was not so dissimilar from the kind of thing that I do now, providing a personal narrative. In a way I’m talking about the branding, and expressing myself through the choices that I make. FABIEN —It’s definitely personal, and Instagram allows that. I wish there were more people doing interesting things with Instagram. I think it’s a lot of dogs, food, I’m with this one, I’m sitting next to that one, and I’m going to this party, you know? DOUG —Yeah, I almost never like food. That’s the only thing I will rarely get into. But, you know, I think what people like about what I do is that it subverts something that’s corporate, it’s a little bit naughty. I think it’s good for people to get into some rebellion. FABIEN —It is pushing buttons, and is controversial, in a way. DOUG —Well, I don’t really know a lot of fashion people, so it didn’t feel personal, I wasn’t getting paid by corporations or anything, so I felt comfortable doing whatever I wanted to do. FABIEN —You were free enough to be able to do what you did to the artwork, which I cannot do because my hands are tied with brands. DOUG —I felt like I was getting a good response from photographers whose work I was manipulating. FABIEN —Even Mert and Marcus say they love it because you’re putting the pictures in a much better place. DOUG —Well, sometimes. FABIEN —All the ads that you’ve done are cooler than the original. DOUG —I appreciate that. When they’re good, they’re good, you know? There was a moment in the nineties where advertising was a bit more progressive in terms of the boundaries than where it is now. FABIEN —I agree. DOUG —There was a lot more nipple in the nineties in Calvin Klein. FABIEN —But you know at that time, Calvin was there and he liked to push things. I remember proposing advertising campaigns and he would say, ‘oh, that’s good, I like that, let’s do it,” and he would just do it. It was great! Now the corporation takes over, so it’s not the same focus. DOUG —Yeah, I think, ironically, as the internet makes real pornographic images so available to people, there’s a strange backlash in terms of the establishment being much more puritanical with its imagery. FABIEN —In the nineties, you couldn’t see sexy pictures like you can today. You have your own retail store and, do you want to talk about that? DOUG —Retail in SoHo, New York City, is really the dumbest thing you could possibly do. I’ve been doing this for a long time, but really nobody has any business spending their own money to have stores in SoHo because it is in the thick of corporate branding. These corporate flagships don’t need to make any money because they’re basically advertising in real estate. But unfortunately, my store has to pay its rent and make money like a mom and pop business, which is almost extinct in this day and age in New York City. And ironically, I was interested in retail in the same way as Instagram because it’s direct access to the public. Bess NYC quickly grew like a brand, editorially. Suddenly, in 2010 or something, we were in lots of fancy

“I haven’t gotten negative feedback from a brand. I’ve gotten plenty of negative feedback from the public, but I think that’s the result of having a large audience. Instagram does that somewhat.” international magazines without having PR or a showroom or anything, I think it was because we gave stylists immediate access to whatever we were doing in real-time, which I think is sort of exciting when they were used to going to show rooms and sending a million emails. It’s just getting worse in that regard, too, for stylists. FABIEN —There’s not a lot of freedom in magazines these days. DOUG —No, but I think that was part of my motivation for doing retail. I knew I would never be able to succeed the way you’re supposed to because it would be too disheartening for me. FABIEN —It’s really about having direct access to the public, that seems to be very important to you. DOUG —I think it’s the only way to do something where you’re not going to be censored. I think the reality of both fashion and art is that there’s a whole networking scheme and you have to be somewhat socially skilled. I always felt that I didn’t know how to do things the right way or know how to be at the right party. I think in art I always felt like I had to go to openings because everyone was going to be there. I just felt like a phony and that it would never be an effortless thing for me. FABIEN —I know exactly what you’re talking about. I hate all the social parties. It seems that today, though, it’s a real job. Being successful requires a big social life, being at all the parties with this person or that person, making sure you’re Tweeting it, Instagramming it. What do these people do, really, apart from being out at 4 o’clock in the morning? To me, it’s about work, it’s about doing things and producing things. And the rest, I’m not really a pro at it. And some people are amazing at it. DOUG —It’s difficult for me, but I feel like it’s also counterproductive. I’m very anxious and uncomfortable in those situations, so I feel like it’s not the best way for me to interface with people. I’m either going to consume massive amounts of alcohol or I just have to go, you know? So I think that you have to figure out another avenue to participate. FABIEN —Yeah, and that’s why you’re doing what you’re doing. Has anyone ever gotten upset by your treatment of the images? I mean, every time I see anything you’ve done of mine, I always think ‘oh my god, it’s much better.’ I wish I could have done it myself! DOUG —Well, I always appreciate when people say that. I haven’t gotten negative feedback from a brand. I’ve gotten plenty of negative feedback from the public, but I think that’s the result of having a large audience. Instagram does that somewhat. I did an Alexander Wang one recently where they reposted it and then I got a lot of requests for interviews from political blogs about why I’m a misogynist. FABIEN —Oh really? DOUG —But, you know, I like stuff like that anyway. Calvin Klein had a good understanding of how to use some controversy in advertising. It is certainly what I’m trying to do when I’m reworking ads, going to some place that is going to make people upset because that’s good branding for me. And I think that’s what gets lost with public companies because they can’t do anything that is incites controversy. They are missing out on the greatest thing about access to the public consciousness: mixing things up a little bit for people.

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NICK —How is Restless Creature’s tour to London going?

WENDY —We just had our first night last night [at the Royal Opera House’s Linbury Studio Theatre]—we have four more to go. NICK —Oh my god, so it was the premiere. How exciting. I was just talking to [Guggenheim Works & Process manager] Duke Dang, and he mentioned that Restless Creature started as a collaboration four years ago out at the Fire Island Dance Festival? WENDY —The idea was starting to build. I was there doing a work of Chris’s, actually, and I saw Kyle Abraham perform out on Fire Island, same show, and I saw Brian Brooks’s company in the same show, so I got really inspired. We all saw each other working. You know, one of the things that really got me intrigued with working with choreographers was my experience with Chris, working closely in the studio with him, and following and mimicking his movements. I performed with him when we were both in the company [New York City Ballet],

but never with him in his own choreography, and I had a secret desire to put it onstage, our studio time. So that’s what I did with these guys [for Restless Creature]. Chris was totally an inspiration for the whole idea, to work and dance with a choreographer. CHRISTOPHER —I love that. WENDY —Did you know that? CHRISTOPHER —No, I didn’t. I’m really glad you didn’t ask me to be part of it though, because these tennis shoes were hung up a long time ago. Nobody wants to see that onstage anymore. [laughs.] WENDY —Yeah, they would! CHRISTOPHER —I would have to have a very thick costume. Possibly a burqa. WENDY —Shut up! No, so it was weirdly full-circle, and it all happened at the Fire Island Dance Festival. NICK —I love that. Chris, I heard you met your husband at the Fire Island Dance Festival? CHRISTOPHER —I did—it was that weekend, actually. WENDY —It was a big love fest. CHRISTOPHER —Wendy was getting inspired onstage, I was planning my future. It was a good weekend all in all. [laughs.] WENDY —Yeah, it really steered us to our futures, that Fire Island weekend. CHRISTOPHER —Having Wendy dancing in the performance actually gave me some collateral too, because it turns out Ross [Rayburn,

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“I think you made that duet in one day, and it changed my life. It was a new way of expressing myself through dance and I thank you for allowing that part of myself out of myself.” — DA N C E R WENDY W HELAN D I S C U S S E S F U T U R E C O L L A B O R AT I O N S, L I F T S, A N D FIRE ISLAND WITH CHOREOGRAPHER C H RI STO PHER WHEELD ON M O D E R AT E D B Y

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FA S H I O N E D I T O R

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

A K A R I E N D O - G AU T

D R I U & T I AG O

H A I R : S H I N A R I M A . M A K E U P : I T S U K I . C A S T I N G : S H AY N I E L S E N . P R O D U C T I O N : M A X H I R S C H B E R G E R . L O C AT I O N : S H I O S T U D I O S . S P E C I A L T H A N K S TO K I N A P O O N , D U K E DA N G, A N D K AT H A R I N A P L U M B .

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alled “America’s greatest contemporary ballerina,” by The New York Times, Wendy Whelan, whose 30-year career with New York City Ballet will come to an end this fall when she officially retires from the company, will continue new projects and her ongoing tour of Restless Creature. Whelan catches up with choreographer Christopher Wheeldon at the Royal Opera House in London. Together, the two have shared one of the most celebrated and fruitful artistic partnerships in history.


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“It’s kind of like putting on a new outfit when you’re getting choreographed. Sometimes you’re in something a little too baggy or a little too tight and it just doesn’t work. Sometimes the clothes are tailored perfectly, and that’s when you know you’re with a good choreographer.”

Wheeldon’s husband] was a big dance fan and he loved the piece, so when we were sort of wooing one another it was— WENDY —I helped sell Chris. CHRISTOPHER —Gave me some street cred. [laughs.] NICK —I would love to chat about when you guys first met, your favorite performance— CHRISTOPHER —When I first got in the company I danced with Wendy in Dances at a Gathering. It was probably my first year, so I must have been 20. WENDY —And I was probably 26 or 27. CHRISTOPHER —Wendy was already a star and I was just this ballet boy— WENDY —Bursting with talent. CHRISTOPHER —And we got put together— WENDY —By Jerome Robbins. The dance is called the giggle dance— CHRISTOPHER —It’s high energy—very swing. WENDY —It’s brother-sisterly, it’s very cute. CHRISTOPHER —So I got to do the dance with Wendy, which was a big deal for me. And there was one step in the middle—just a tiny bit of partnering, an overhead press lift. WENDY —Chris was a baby! [laughs.] Wasn’t that one of your first featured roles with us? CHRISTOPHER —Yeah, it was my first— WENDY —So that’s stressful! [laughs.] CHRISTOPHER —And it was with Wendy Whelan, who, you know, was notoriously very mean in rehearsal. [laughs.] WENDY —Yeah, and overweight—everything. [laughs.] CHRISTOPHER —So here I am [rehearsing] with Wendy and we get to this moment and I can’t do the lift. I can’t get her over my head because I was weak and I hadn’t really had any intense partnering. It was ridiculous because you weigh nothing. WENDY —It’s a coordination thing! CHRISTOPHER —It was very embarrassing. WENDY —Well, we practiced a bunch of times and we did do it! CHRISTOPHER —But I spent sleepless nights worrying about that, sweaty, like, oh my god. WENDY —I didn’t worry about it. I was like, Chris Wheeldon, you can’t get me over your head, just plop me on your chest! We’ll be fine! Not a big deal!

CHRISTOPHER —You were so sweet with me. I thought, oh my god, this is it, I’m never going to be in a Robbins ballet again, Wendy’s never going to want to dance with me again. WENDY —I remember during a full run-through of Dances at a Gathering, we were backstage, and Chris has this little notebook and he’s sketching, listening to music, and I’m like, ‘Hey, kid! What are you doing?’ He’s like, ‘Oh, you know, working on some choreography. I really love to choreograph—I started doing it a little bit, I’d like to do more.’ And I was like, ‘Oh yeah, well, good luck with that.’ [laughs.] And then, needless to say, I actually started dancing in some of his ballets— CHRISTOPHER —I’m trying to think about Polyphonia. WENDY —I think you made that duet in one day, and it changed my life. It was a new way of expressing myself through dance and I thank you for allowing that part of myself out of myself. I think that’s where this confidence and desire to work with all these choreographers and find these new parts of myself started, really, because you were the first artist to allow me to really bring my voice. And you helped celebrate that and I can’t thank you enough. CHRISTOPHER —Oh, that’s really nice. I think the huge thing that we both discovered—I mean, I certainly discovered it through that process with you and Jock [Soto, Wendy’s partner in Polyphonia]—was that it was actually okay to open the studio in a creative way that involved collaboration. Because I think up until then, I’d made ballets where I couldn’t do that. You approach things as a ballerina of now, this generation. Although we’re kind of on the verge of there being a generation under us, or two. [laughs.] WENDY —But we’re still on top of them! Whatever that means! [laughs.] CHRISTOPHER —[Polyphonia] felt like a modern-day dialogue between choreographer and dancer. WENDY —Very refreshing from both sides, I think. CHRISTOPHER —Yeah, and then we went on to do quite a lot more after that. WENDY —We did 13 pieces together, not all at New York City Ballet, but just, you know, studio time and getting something onstage—13 pieces is a lot. With one guy, god. [laughs.] CHRISTOPHER —It is a lot. WENDY —We’re hoping to do another piece or two in the next year.

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Dress by PRADA.

CHRISTOPHER —It’s going to be 15 by the end of ’15. WENDY —Yeah! I like that.

NICK —So you’re already working on new pieces together?

WENDY —We’re discussing a couple new things. One will be for my farewell at New York City Ballet—I asked Chris to create a little something new just for that night. I’m really excited for that because my whole future’s about making new things, and I’d like to leave my past with the idea of new. So, he’s going to help me do that. And then hopefully for my second project after Restless Creature, Chris will be one of my choreographers with the great dancer Ed Watson, who is a principal with The Royal Ballet. We’re going to collaborate on a piece for London next year, and then in New York the year after. NICK —What have been some of your other favorite collaborations together as choreographer and dancer? WENDY —Well, for me—After the Rain, when he took me off pointe and had me do movement that I’d never done before. I actually was almost discouraged by it and afraid of it, like, I don’t get this! And then all of a sudden I got it and I loved it. It took a while, but I like that. CHRISTOPHER —Could you really not understand it? I mean, it was— WENDY —I took it a little bit like a, well, I guess you can’t dance in [pointe] shoes anymore, like, oh, Chris is thinking I’m old! But in fact, that was the opposite. And it was a real thrill once I figured out what he was doing. It was the same thing with The Nightingale and the Rose. CHRISTOPHER —I loved that. That’s really my favorite in a way. After the Rain was amazing but it was, for me, the easiest piece I’ve ever made. Like that happened even faster than Polyphonia, remember? It was one of those experiences where you have no idea where it comes from, you pull it together and suddenly…That [pas de deux] makes people cry and I understand it because— WENDY —You didn’t plan on that. CHRISTOPHER —I didn’t plan on that. It’s danced by a lot of people,

and it’s always different, it always kind of works, although there’s no one like Wendy Whelan. And I’m not just saying that because she’s sitting right here. Even, like, you dancing with [different partners], you seem different each time you do it, yet it’s always still you. It kind of brings up a strange little life of its own, that piece. But actually The Nightingale and the Rose, I kind of wish it had come back— WENDY —It was a narrative ballet that Chris made—I’d never been in a narrative ballet of yours before. It was such a beautiful story, the Oscar Wilde Nightingale and the Rose, and how in the hell is he going to put this story into a ballet—it’s hard! CHRISTOPHER —Yeah, it’s really hard. WENDY —But you did it! And I remember we got quite the ovation. It was really interesting choreographically and I remember you were given the music, which was hard because you didn’t get to choose your music. CHRISTOPHER —By [Bright] Sheng, yeah. WENDY —But you made the best of it! You made it work somehow and I thought you really did some brilliant things. I think when we get in the studio together, it’s so special because some seed gets planted, and no matter what the seed is, it feels like watching a flower blossom. And it’s a bigger flower or a smaller flower or more of a bouquet or more of, like, a four-leaf clover, whatever, but we actually get to watch something go through this growth and transition and become something. That’s the thing I love most about what I do. CHRISTOPHER —Yeah, it is amazing. WENDY —And you don’t always feel that way with people. It’s kind of like putting on a new outfit when you’re getting choreographed. Sometimes you’re in something a little too baggy or a little too tight and it just doesn’t work. Sometimes the clothes are tailored, perfectly and that’s when you know you’re with a good choreographer. CHRISTOPHER —What must have been super nice for you as well was when Alexei [Ratmansky] came along and made [Concerto] DSCH for you, and Namouna and Russian Seasons. Because the way he choreographs for you is totally on the other end of the spectrum from me, and that experience must have been very satisfying, I would imagine. WENDY —Well, I compared him to you at first. CHRISTOPHER —Only slightly jealous. WENDY —I love his work and I love what he does for a ballet that he’s making, but it couldn’t be more different than Chris. Chris allows me more freedom so I feel more comfortable— CHRISTOPHER —But being pushed— WENDY —Yeah, getting pushed is also good. It’s like playing with lava, getting in the room with both of you guys. NICK —What’s something about the other that most people don’t know? WENDY —This is a damn funny guy. He enjoys himself in the studio. I always say this but when Chris is creating, he’s always playful. There’s not a lot of stress or determination to make a masterpiece. He’s just seeing what happens and I love that. It’s like throwing the dice and, you know, taking the next move, and usually he throws a good game. [laughs.] CHRISTOPHER —I’m a good gambler, I think. [laughs.] WENDY —Yeah! He plays his cards right. CHRISTOPHER —I don’t know, I think people wouldn’t know how sensitive you are, because you’re such a presence onstage that, probably, audiences don’t know that you think through things a lot, and, sometimes, you have to talk yourself into being okay with something. You’re incredibly open-minded and willing to try stuff, but you question a lot, and question what you can and can’t do, which I think is what makes you incredibly textured onstage. But, you know, we all see Wendy as this rare beauty and I think people think, oh, it must come really easy and she’s just that beautiful creature, that beautiful restless creature. And they don’t see the restless part, which is part of what makes you really interesting as an artist.

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ecently appointed as the Chief Curator of Media and Performance Art at MoMA, and recently relocated from London where he was the Tate’s first curator of film, Stuart Comer has had a very busy year. After curating the top floor at the Whitney Biennial, Comer prepares his first show at MoMA this fall. Here, he sits down with artist Zackary Drucker, herself a part of the Biennial, to discuss public raction, which city is best, and his new exhibition, Cut to Swipe.

ZACKARY —In 2014, Stuart Comer moved from the Tate Modern to MoMA, from London to New York, curated a section of the Whitney Biennial, and took over the world in general. STUART —Maybe we should begin with, I think that my studio visit of you was the first studio visit I ever had that began with margaritas. ZACKARY —[Laughs] Really? That’s funny. That was a good evening, wasn’t it? STUART —Maybe that’s too much information. ZACKARY —It was in the evening, wasn’t it? It was margaritas at a very decent hour, I’m sure. STUART —A very respectable hour. ZACKARY —And it wasn’t exactly a margarita. I think it was some sugary gin cocktail that Rhys [Zackary’s partner] was making for us. STUART —That’s very possible. But you were living in [artist] Ron Athey’s old house [at the time]. ZACKARY —Yes, I was. Yeah, probably a house you’d been in before, right? STUART —I think I originally met you through Ryan Trecartin, so it was nice to see you bookended by an old-school figure like Ron and a new-school figure like Ryan. ZACKARY —Absolutely. Ron, you know, I consider my chosen father. He let me live in that place for years. STUART —Exactly, because I, I think I qualify as nineties LA, [laughs] which I think Ron does too. But you are definitely— ZACKARY —When did you live in LA? You’re definitely noughties LA. [laughs] I’ve lived here now for nine years and I still consider myself the new girl in town. Really I’m like a dinosaur. STUART —Why did you move to LA? ZACKARY —I moved to LA to go to CalArts in 2005. When did you leave? STUART —2000. I went to London in 2000. But I was there, I was there for ten years. I moved in ’91, just before the riots.

ZACKARY —So you and I haven’t actually done a recap of the Whitney Biennial, we haven’t seen each other since I believe the opening. STUART —I think that’s true. Yeah, it was clearly very intense. It was funny because I went straight from the final performance on the last day of the show by Pauline Oliveros to JFK and flew to Berlin for the opening of the Berlin Biennial, so I think I have a biennial addiction. But it was interesting because the reactions and the conversation I had there were very different than the ones I had in New York, and I think it made me realize that my point of view is definitely more European at this point, from having spent the last 13 years in London. It was a great experience, re-situating myself in the US and understanding a lot of the shifts that have happened both in New York and LA and across the country. ZACKARY —What do you think those ideological differences are? STUART —It’s not so much ideological, but I think it’s that the conditions of the cities are so radically different now, and both are getting gentrified but New York is much further ahead of the curve on that, so it is getting really difficult for young artists in particular to make things happen here, which I think is a big concern for a lot of people. Los Angeles used to provoke looks of horror when you mentioned it [laughs] you know, years ago, but now I feel like half the people I know want to move to LA so things are changing very quickly. And I feel like Los Angeles more than ever now feels like a really plausible alternative now to New York for a lot of people. And it’s not just the artists but also the institutions are growing up quickly there. In terms of the Biennial, though, it was a very intense experience and you forget how much the show is the target—it’s just an excuse to take out everybody’s frustrations on the art world as a whole. I think the Whitney Biennial more than any other exhibition seems to serve that function, for whatever reason. But that said, I had very exciting connections with pretty much every artist in the show and I think really great responses from those people I spoke to, and we did tell a story as much as we did an exhibition. But how do you feel, because you [and partner Rhys] got a lot of press and we had discussed even before the show what kind of press response we were anticipating. ZACKARY —Well, that’s a complicated question. There’s so many layers and the fundamental schism between what the press is saying versus what you’re hearing on an interpersonal level is really magnified in that case. I think I experienced a fair amount of disassociating and not necessarily feeling connected to the representation that’s

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“I was trying very hard to connect any issues that related to political or philosophical questions with how identities and systems in general are changing fundamentally now.” — ST UA RT COMER, C H I E F C U R ATO R O F M E D I A A N D P E R F O R M A N C E A RT AT Mo M A , D I S C U S S E S N E W YO R K A N D N E W WO R K W I T H A RT I S T ZACK ARY D RU C K E R. M O D E R AT E D B Y

N I C K VO G E L S O N

FA S H I O N E D I T O R

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

A K A R I E N D O - G AU T

D R I U & T I AG O


“It reminds me of the energy that used to be produced in the clubs and in other situations in New York in the eighties, which does not exist here anymore, and so I do think something got relocated, that has everything to do with living in an internet age I think.” being created of Rhys and me. I felt there was a kind of glorification of our relationship. It very quickly became this narrative about romance when really imbued in the work was a whole range of feelings that come with a relationship, including pain and conflict. STUART —There were a few articles that were lumping together a lot of trans people from various creative industries, not just the art world. How did you feel about being pigeonholed that way? I talked to you and to Yves Laris Cohen, who was also in the show and is approaching his trans identity in very different ways than you and Rhys are. ZACKARY —Definitely. I mean, the thing that trans people share with all public figures is a resistance to being defined by the external world, and that’s something I talk about a lot. The minute that you surrender your ability to self-define is the moment in which you’re submitting to a really violent culture. It’s incredible, the exposure that trans people are experiencing right now, and I think that it’s long overdue. Trans people have always been present in our cultural conversation and in many cases their trans identities or histories have been erased or concealed, sometimes electively, sometimes not. STUART —A lot of people referred to the top floor of the [Whitney] Biennial as the queer floor, and there were certainly some very strong queer voices on it, maybe it was half the artists on the floor. I was trying very hard to connect any issues raised in your work that related to a lot of other political questions or philosophical questions that don’t necessarily have to do with the blatantly queer identity but more with how identities and systems in general are just changing fundamentally now. ZACKARY —For me it’s about an identity of the human, it’s about the human identity. STUART —But how do you feel now, because for a while you were more of a photographer, then you were more of a filmmaker, throughout that time you were also a performance artist, and I get the sense now you are potentially more interested in working in pop-cultural forms. ZACKARY —I feel free. I think that a big part of my life approach is to not ever get locked into anything, which is why I switch media as often as possible or as often as the idea allows for. I sometimes feel that my trans identity usurps my identity as an artist and actually I feel like my identity is first and foremost an artist and that’s how I’m approaching the other structures in my life, like my gender. STUART —So which city is more fun for you now, New York or LA? ZACKARY —Los Angeles, always. [laughs] How about you? STUART —I love both cities. I left New York in ‘91, so it’s a totally different city now. And I think I come at it from the point of view of Los Angeles and also from London, and it’s kind of handy that it’s right in between the two for me, but it has changed so much. I’m actually really enjoying getting reacquainted with it as somebody who actually lives here rather than just visiting. But I do feel the gravitational pull of Los Angeles too—and London, you know; I think they’re both super dynamic cities. ZACKARY —I have a very Los Angeles-centric perspective at this point. My feeling was always that people could be crazier here because you’re less connected to public space. It’s possible to be really crazy in a cathartic way, you’re more isolated and communities form in a really organic way. STUART —I do kind of feel like what you and Stewart Uoo and Ryan Trecartin are doing out there—it reminds me of the energy that used

to be produced in the clubs and in other situations in New York in the eighties, which does not exist here anymore, and so I do think something got relocated, but it’s not in the clubs there, it’s in your private lives, and in the way those private lives are made public, that has everything to do with living in an internet age I think. ZACKARY —Yeah, and it has everything to do with our economy as well. I think we as a generation worked very hard to, you know, I think we’ve probably worked much harder just because the numbers are stacked against us, and Los Angeles still has affordable space and ample space, and has more opportunities to show work and get sort of involved and less removed from the economy of the art world in a way that creates freedom to experiment. STUART —I hate to say it and no New Yorker will ever agree with me but the food is much better in LA and London than it is here. [Laughs] I don’t think anybody will ever agree to that but it’s true. We need to kick it back into gear here. ZACKARY —New York might just become a financial city, a financial center. STUART —Well, I think that already happened, now it’s a matter of how does the city respond to that. Does it just settle into that or does somebody kick back a bit? Which I’m hoping they will so we’ll see. ZACKARY —Whereas Los Angeles, Hollywood is basically the core of our economy here, which is more conducive and more supportive of a creative lifestyle. Most people here freelance and that’s just a different way of living and structuring your time. STUART —It’s true, yeah. It’s a different clock. But at the same time I think people do actually work as hard there as they do here, it’s just a different clock. ZACKARY —Yeah, that is what I was trying to say, if I’m going to be working as hard as I am I like to at least have some nature and sunshine around me and some kind of tranquility or space. NICK —What are you both working on in the future? Stuart, I’d love to hear about your upcoming show with MoMA and, Zackary, projects you’re working on. STUART —I’m doing a lot at the moment, we’re going to be rehanging the collection next year in a very different way than it’s been traditionally displayed at MoMA, so we’re going to be rethinking the institution’s own history, how the museum and New York connect to a much more global narrative at the moment. And then we’ve been making a lot of new acquisitions in my department, so I’m doing a show opening in October called Cut to Swipe [opening October 11], dedicated to all of those and the artist who’s really at the core of the show is Dara Birnbaum. ZACKARY —Wow. I love Dara Birnbaum. STUART —She’s a hero, absolutely. An incredibly inspiring woman. But what about you, Zackary? I know you’re busy too. ZACKARY —Yeah, I’m pretty busy right now. I’m working on a restaging of the work that was at the Whitney Biennial for my gallery here in LA. We’re adding new images that have been made since the biennial was installed.And I’m writing a lot, just, it’s the next thing coming down the pipe. [Laughs] And I don’t necessarily know what it will turn into, but, yeah, I’m thinking big. STUART —I mean, I want all the gossip but I don’t know how much Zackary will give. [Laughs] ZACKARY —I’m gonna give you the gossip next month, Stuart.

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Blazer by DIOR HOMME. Shirt by CHARVET. N O. 7 1


FRANCESCO —Anyway I think there is an interesting resemblance between you and Anna Magnani because you are this kind of French heroine being the only French woman to win an Academy Award with Simone Signoret. Am I correct? JULIETTE —Yes she did. FRANCESCO —But with all the respect for Anna I think you have survived the curse of the Academy Award much better. JULIETTE —[laughs] FRANCESCO —For Anna it became like a burden on her shoulders but you seem to have escaped the restraint of Hollywood. May I say that? JULIETTE —Yes in a way I resisted it because I think it’s better to be open to the world more than to one system. Anna Magnani is one of my heroes. There are three actresses that I really admire and are great inspirations and I go back to see their films. One of them is Anna Magnani, there’s also Liv Ullmann and Gena Rowlands. This triangle of women is an inspiration because they never really worked in the system. They were very independent even though Liv Ullmann worked more than 30 years with (Ingmar) Bergmann. The independence of soul and being is key because movies are about life, about intimacy, about entering into yourself and discovering things through a story, meeting a director, through actors. It’s a sort of jump into one’s self, revealed by the confrontation of others. So I’m looking for directors that are mostly strong and independent. FRANCESCO —They are heroes for me too, but I love the fact that at least two of them, if not Liv Ullmann as well, had a strong relationship with a male director. JULIETTE —Its true. FRANCESCO —Anna with Rossellini , Gena had Cassavetes and Liv had Bergmann. I’m just saying this for the readers. I like that you picked three women strongly in love metaphorically or for real with three men who changed the history of cinema. JULIETTE —That’s true. In a way, working with Leos (Leos Carax) as a young director, and me as a young actress, we had this common dream of making films together but we didn’t carry on. Sometimes you have to accept that things don’t go the way you dream them.

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“The independence of soul and being is key because movies are about life, about intimacy, about entering into yourself and discovering things through a story.” —AC TO R JU L I ETTE B I N O C H E T E L L S A RT I S T F R A N C E SCO VEZZ O L I PHOTOGRAPHY BY

D R I U & T I AG O

FA S H I O N E D I T O R

OMAIMA SALEM

E M M A N U E L L A FAY. S T Y L I S T A S S I S TA N T: F I O N A H I C K S . A S S I S TA N T S TO M S . B I N O C H E : S U Z E L P I E T R I A N D T I N A B O L L A N D.

FRANCESCO —So you are in Italy? I am personally curious to what brings you here. You’re filming a movie with an Italian director? JULIETTE —Yes, he’s Sicilian and he makes a point of being Sicilian and so we’re shooting there. It’s his first feature film. I read the script and I liked it very much. I saw one of his short films and I think he’s very talented so I wanted to do a picture with him. Since Blue (Kieslowski’s movie Blue), I was avoiding films with the death of a child because I didn’t want to repeat myself so I was resistant but this script was so strong and I’ve never played that character before that I was inclined to go with the film with him. FRANCESCO —Are you playing an Italian woman? JULIETTE —No, I’m playing a French woman living in Sicily. FRANCESCO —So you’re like Anna Magnani in Stromboli fighting with Rossellini [laughs]? JULIETTE —[laughs] When I think of Stromboli actually I’m thinking of Ingrid Bergmann. FRANCESCO —Yes, exactly. JULIETTE —Yeah but you’re right that two women were there. FRANCESCO —For me that story is heartbreaking. I am totally obsessed with that moment of history in cinema that she’s there on one island (Stromboli) with Rossellini and Anna decided to make a movie on the island next to it (Vulcano Island), because she was very competitive and jealous of her ex-fiancé’, Rossellini, making a movie in Italy with Ingrid.

JULIETTE —It’s heartbreaking.

H A I R : A L E X A N D R Y C O S TA AT A R T L I S T. M A K E U P : C E L I N E P L A N C H E N A U LT. C A S T I N G : S H AY N I E L S E N . P H OTO A S S I S TA N T S : S A N D R O V O L P E A N D N I C O L A S R I VA L S . D I G I TA L A S S I S TA N T:

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rench actress Juliette Binoche has appeared in more than 40 feature films, been the recipient of numerous international accolades, is also a published author and has appeared on stage across the world. She won an Academy Award for her performance in  Anthony Minghella’s  The English Patient, Best Actress Award at the Cannes Film Festival for her role in Abbas Kiarostami’s Certified Copy, and Best Actress Award at Venice Film Festival for Krzysztof Kieślowski’s Three Colors: Blue.  We’ve asked Italian artist Francesco Vezzoli, who himself has been featured at MoMA, MOCA, the Guggenheim, and the Venice Biennale to sit down with Juliette to discuss, among other things, Hollywood and staying true to oneself. 


Coat by YOHJI YAMAMOTO.


Top by J.W. ANDERSON.


“You have to understand that the Hollywood system is very political. I was not that aware when I started having some propositions from Hollywood, but after thirty years, I’m more aware of it now. The women in Hollywood are used for a purpose. Of course there are exceptions.”

FRANCESCO —This answer is very touching because in my personal and professional life, there’s always a dream, especially when you are young, of being in love with someone you can work with. Reading your biography I noticed the first love of your public life was Leos, and I was really touched. I’m glad you brought it up. I’m in love with him as a director. I’m happy that you had that in your life. It’s like being revolutionaries or like fighters when love mixes with the enthusiasm of doing work together. Do you agree with me that working in Hollywood is very different from working in Europe? JULIETTE —You have to understand that the Hollywood system is very political. I was not that aware when I started having some propositions from Hollywood, but after thirty years, I’m more aware of it now. The women in Hollywood are used for a purpose. Of course there are exceptions. There are wonderful directors in America that are really interested in the feminine sides of themselves, but it’s very rare. When you see Scorsese, Spielberg, Sergio Leone, those big visionaries, they are more interested in the world of violence they come from, and are not really entering into the feminine side...their films are shown worldwide, their input changes the world so much… Because the movies are shown around the world and promoted so strongly. They bring a sort of violence in the world. In a way, I’m waiting for them to wake up. FRANCESCO —[Laughs] Well certainly if I think of Sergio Leone, Once upon a time in America, the perspective is very masculine, even on a visual level. It’s as though it’s all through the eyes of Robert de Niro. The female role in the epic is romantic but it’s merely visual. JULIETTE —[interrupts] I’ve been resisting being used for a masculine purpose because I think that if the feminine part is not really lived and you’re missing half of yourself. FRANCESCO —No, no, I can totally see that. I can see that from the choice of the people that you’ve been working with. Just like an artist’s career, the exhibition he does, the institutions he chooses and the projects he pursues. These choices become his own embroidery. When I see your list, I see your movies, your directors. I see your effort to create your own endless performance, your story. JULIETTE —Yes because for me it’s no different from painting or dancing. You have to create your own world. What is fascinating to me in movies is that you have a camera, which is an object outside of yourself. It allows you to get in. And the combination of the two, inside and outside, is a movement that has been fascinating me for years. I’m still in search of “Who are we?” “Who am I?” “How do we behave? How do we let go? How do we transform? How do we get stuck?” It’s all those questions that are fascinating. And they allow you not to be in a system, but into an interrogation of life and I think an art form, any art form is about a huge question that you ask yourself. Not always with answers but certainly with other questions. FRANCESCO —I totally agree. When in my work they say to me “Can you give an explanation?” I say “Artists ask questions, they don’t

necessarily provide answers, sometimes maybe they do but its for critics. As an artist, I worked a lot on the identity of the actress, and any movies where an actress accepts to take the risk, to some degree, of interpreting different stages of her career in the same movie, is very fascinating. As soon as it came out I saw Maps to the Stars with Julianne Moore, playing Avanna Sigren. I know you worked with David Kronenberg as well, and it was interesting that both you and Kronenberg were making movies about the role of the actress at the same time. Did you see Maps to the Stars? JULIETTE —No, they were showing it in Cannes but I was there only for two days, so I didn’t. FRANCESCO —Ok, well I’ll email you when I see yours, and then I can ask you an extra question. Maps of the Stars is a movie where Julianne Moore plays the role of an actress aging in the Hollywood system, and I think she does a magnificent job. I think she’s one of the few people that have this sensibility in the Hollywood system. JULIETTE —I agree FRANCESCO —What was it like working with Kronenberg? I think his last two movies are amongst the finest work he’s ever done, and to be honest I loved your moment in “Cosmopolis”, because you play an art advisor, and I hate art advisors [laughs]. JULIETTE —[laughs] I only shot two or three days. The atmosphere was like being in a green box, because he was making most of the movie with the green screen. It was almost like an operating room but he was very open to any kind of suggestions. We rehearsed and then he would let me move in front of the camera the way I wanted. He’d just tell me to avoid being here, or there. Everything was extremely precise, the camera was operated by the DP, while Kronenberg was keeping track of the blocking off to the side. So it was only me and the other actor, Robert Pattinson, in this room followed by the camera. It was easy because it was like being free in a small space. I just had to come as a woman in two worlds with the need of being loved and feeling sex, while at the same time dealing with the media and dealing with her business. I felt the combination was interesting. It makes the relationship sort of tortured in a way and at the same time human. It was a pleasure to work with Kronenberg. He’s very mellow, calm and controlled. He knows what he wants and what he doesn’t want, so its easy when you have someone as clear as he is. FRANCESCO —If I may ask, does he tell his actors what the rest of the movie is about? Or does he do it a bit like Fellini that you know your part but don’t know the rest of the script? JULIETTE —I had the book, I had the script. We didn’t see each other before really, but it’s like working with a family. I think his sister is the set designer and he’s been working with the same DP for many films. It’s very calm and comfortable. FRANCESCO —I know you were playing Pirandello in a London theatre and now you are in Sicily. I have a special love for Pirandello, I made one of my projects about his theatre. Are you attached to his work?

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JULIETTE —I love Pirandello. When I was 18 I did a play of his, Henry IV, which was my first job as an actress. What I love is that he’s always combining fiction and reality, he always has this kind of back and forth between two worlds that I love very much. It’s what I’ve been exploring in different movies, for instance in Certified Copy by Kiarostamim about a couple that doesn’t know each other. At some point she’s making him her husband, so you never know if they will stay together, or if it was a fiction. And in Clouds of Sils Maria, there’s a relationship between the actress and the assistant, but you don’t know if it’s a love relationship or they’re just rehearsing scenes. Two worlds that are playing with the reality and a vision. I think it’s close to life in a way, because what is reality? There are a lot of different realities, when you sleep you’re in the reality of dreams and you’re acting into it, in life you have sometimes different layers. Is it a real feeling or is it a projection? In acting there’s always this layer of need, which you develop as a child. There are needs you have and you build yourself bit by bit with education, with protection of what’s inside and how you’re viewed. All these layers are always in us and we play with them, but to try and find your inner self is the search of a life, its like finding a little needle in a haystack, you have to try and find this at the end to know how to manage yourself and what it is to live. FRANCESCO —I totally agree and I was really touched by your analysis of Pirandello. I worked on this play of his—Right You Are (If You Think So)—which is totally centered around the woman. The whole play is in three acts with the entire village debating whether she’s one person or the other person. She never appears until the end of the play, and says—“I am both, this is the truth”. I think you unfolded the core of Pirandello’s analysis. I think you would enjoy this play and you would be the perfect actress to play the role. One day you should be in this show. JULIETTE —Its true that when a play poses an existentialist question, it allows the audience to really open up and relive pain or questions, because we’re all on a journey, we all want a transformation. This existentialist possibility in any art form or medium is the purpose of it, because it allows to link the visible with the invisible, and acting is really about invisible. The words are not interesting, its what’s underneath. What is not said is really what it is about. FRANCESCO —It’s very interesting you brought up the audience as an answer to my observation because in one staging of this Pirandello play, Franco Zeffirelli decided that they would pick 20 or 30 people from the audience and put them on stage with the actors and so the reaction of the audience was part of what Pirandello considered part of his art work. It goes perfectly back to the idea of the artist posing questions that open up new emotions for the audience. Can I ask some lighter questions? Otherwise they will complain we made the interview too intellectual. JULIETTE —[Laughs]. FRANCESCO —To the best known living French actress I will ask “François Truffaut or Luc Godard?” I know you’ve worked with Godard in Hail Mary. What was your take in that moment of French cinema.

JULIETTE —I was a young actress. It was one of my first films. I just came out of theatre classes where the teachers were helping me open up and so when I started shooting Hail Mary, I was surprised that he was not interested in helping the actors, he was concentrating on finding a way of filming the struggle inside himself. He was making the movie as we were going along. I was stuck in a hotel for five months. We were at his complete disposal whenever he wanted to shoot and that was his way. He didn’t want to have any make up and would change his mind all the time. We would come on set but then we would go back to the hotel because he didn’t know what to do. When you are very young you want to be led, but with him I had the experience of being alone and not knowing. In a way it taught me a lot because afterwards when I came on set I didn’t expect anything from the director or look for security, because he, himself was insecure! It taught me in a very deviant way that I have to be independent and know what I am doing. I have to come on set with my own luggage. It taught me to know better. FRANCESCO —Voilà, I personally think you would have been perfect for Truffaut [laughs] because unlike those directors you mentioned in the beginning, I think he was a great womanizer but I think he was in touch with his feminine side. Don’t you think? JULIETTE —Yes he was. At the same time, I fell that Truffaut had an intellectual craft. He needed to be comforted by work, comforted by getting control through work. Godard, even though he reads a lot, he puts a lot of extracts from books. He was more genuine, I feel. Also, talking about being with an actress like Anna Karina, he did the most beautiful films when he was in love with her. Even when they were separated they were making beautiful films together. You feel the tension, the needs not being fulfilled, and the lightness he lived with Anna Karina. Having filmed A Woman is a Woman, he created something quite light and full of love. FRANCESCO —So, what do you think of social media? How do you relate to it? I am very ignorant about these things and have a bit of a problem with it. I am curious to hear your thoughts. Do you have an Instagram account? JULIETTE —No, I don’t. FRANCESCO —[Laughs]. JULIETTE —You have to choose where you have to put your energy and time. I have two kids and I’d rather spend time with them. FRANCESCO —You don’t have to say more. That’s a perfect answer! Thank you. I think this was a very interesting conversation and you’ve been very generous. I have a naughty compliment on your life. In 2000, a film critic for Sight and Sound, Madame Vincendeau, suggested you were the tragic, despairing muse for movie directors. “The ultimate romantic icon for the audience.” You have had in your life some of the most fascinating men that have ever existed, so while I think that you may be a romantic icon, there is a very obvious sensuous and sensual side to your persona. I’d like to compliment you for that. JULIETTE —Well, I don’t know what to say… thank you [laughs]. FRANCESCO —I think Madame Vincendeau was confusing life with cinema. I wish you a beautiful stay in Sicily.

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Sweater by 3.1 PHILLIP LIM. Skirt by YANG LI. N O. 7 7


“The reason that my look is so identifiable is, after years of not having a dime and not having any know-how, I finally got it right. So it’s certainly not changing now.”

H A I R : S H I N A R I M A . M A K E U P : I T S U K I . P H OTO A S S I S TA N T: A D R I E N P OT I E R . FA S H I O N A S S I S TA N T: E S T H E R M AT I L L A . P R O D U C T I O N : M A X H I R S C H B E R G E R . L O C AT I O N : AC M E S T U D I O S .

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prostitution but Reba McEntire also covered it and that’s the version that a lot of people know. JIMMY —I was very angry when Reba did it because, to me, she stole your song and everybody knew and how could she have done it. LADY BUNNY —We all borrow a little though, don’t we. JIMMY —I certainly borrow from you in my hairdressing career because your hair is always so spectacular. One time you referred to your makeup as your paint and there was a young queen who did your paint, and it is so identifiable and I got to see it evolve. I think anybody that even saw you just once would remember. LADY BUNNY —I try to be! [laughs]. I’m not one of those people that can look good in everything in pictures, I would never kid myself that I could try any lady’s style. Through years of looking at photographs, and drag makeup, it’s essentially corrective makeup [laughs], if you apply something and if it looks good, you stick with it. It’s not like, JIMMY —I remember your first night in New York at the Pyramid if that trick goes out of style you’re going to stop doing it—no, you [club], it was maybe 1983, and I just remember you coming in with have to look your best! My theory is get a lot on and keep moving, this crew and there was a magic to all of you guys, it was a really like, honey, because it’s gonna be dark and exciting thing to see. I mean, the Pyramid D O C U M E N T N O. 7 8 they’re gonna be drunk! was magic and then in walks this crew What I’m trying to say is the reason that from Georgia who had an incredible vibe my look is so identifiable is, in my opinion, and just fit so well. And then I remember after years of not having a dime and not seeing you perform for the first time, I having any know-how I finally got it right. think that it was Gloria Gaynor? And then, So it’s certainly not changing now [laughs]! I Will Survive— There were so many years where we had LADY BUNNY —Yes, a rousing lip sync of I nothing, we didn’t have custom-made cosWill Survive where I was so drunk that I lost tumes that suit us, or custom-made jewelry a shoe and a wig and I think maybe fell and, or, you know, five wigs on top of each other. in that low of the music where she comes I just wanted to go to a club, get drunk, and back triumphantly [laughs], I managed to look good. Don’t give me too much credit hobble back up and put on the wig crooked for an old look, I just finally got it right. and the crowd went wild. JIMMY —Well, for me it was an electrifying JIMMY —Well, I agree, you got it right. performance and it seemed like everything But I just always, always, always loved it. was planned. You’re just a master at your Anyway, I want to talk about a story when craft and I just fell in love in that moment. we first met and you told me you would go One thing I wanted to ask you is where to a little drag club in Chattanooga, TN, do you think this little white girl from that was basically a shack. And that you Chattanooga got that? loved this one performer and she was one —FA M E D D R AG Q U E E N of your first big inspirations to do drag. LADY BUNNY —First of all I’m not little. I grew up in Tennessee, and Tennessee is the LADY BUNNY —That was Chattanooga’s L ADY B U NN Y T E L L S R E N OW N E D home of Memphis which is the blues capiown bubbling brown sugar, Miss Tasha H A I R D R E S S E R JI M M Y PAU L tal and the Memphis horns were played Crime, who you can look up on Facebook, in many famous soul recordings of the and, she was dazzling but what she taught M O D E R AT E D B Y N I C K VO G E L S O N seventies, and they had an incredible soul me the most was about stage presence and P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y D R I U & T I AG O sound. Growing up around there I always a way to connect with the audience. She gravitated towards soul music, and I don’t just had it and the crowd went nuts every FA S H I O N E D I T O R A K A R I E N D O - G AU T care what it is, from Aretha Franklin to time she walked on the stage. James Brown to Jennifer Hudson [laughs]. I got into that drag club and here I was seeing these queens with big wigs, false eyelashes and sequined JIMMY —I love your voice when you sing, you have an incredible tone gowns, which you just didn’t see in Chattanooga, so I fell in love and I’m so happy on your last one-woman show that you sang. When instantly and you could tell that all these men—some of them might I first heard you sing Fancy [by Bobbie Gentry], it was a watershed be a tranny chaser but some of them might—when you’re serving moment for me because I didn’t really know that kind of music, so that much interest they kind of know that you’re really one of them I had such an education from you with Bobbie Gentry and also your [laughs]. They recognize their kind like a vampire. I got into that club friends like Floyd. at 13. LADY BUNNY —Well, Floyd loved Bobbie Gentry too but she was unusual because she was a country singer-songwriter but she often JIMMY —Oh my god, that’s amazing, I didn’t know that. used those Memphis horns to give her country a very snazzy rough LADY BUNNY —I had, yeah, I had to have it. Vegas feeling which she also added gospel vocals too. You know, if JIMMY —I think that’s really interesting that you snuck in to the club, I’m not mistaken, the Muscle Shoals [a group of Memphis-based I didn’t know that, and the queens in Chattanooga and you seeing musicians] played the horns for for Dusty in Memphis. the gowns and the wigs is crucial to me. I’ve met your mom and she is adorable and that you have the support of your family and that you JIMMY —I’m sure you’re right. have this really nice, really bright, smart, educated family is such LADY BUNNY —But there was kind of a blue-eyed soul link to Bobbie a fascinating thing too because, you know, to me it’s like you were Gentry, most people know that song Fancy, which is a story about Fancy, and really it’s that you were surrounded by love, you’re really a young white-trash girl whose mom sends her to be a prostitute surrounded by the support of our families. because the prospects there are so bleak. And it’s really about frequent columnist for the “worst dressed” section, Lady Bunny snuck into her first drag club when she was just 13. She was a small town girl from Chattanooga, TN, destined for the big city. Driving from Georgia in drag, she found herself as a backup dancer with RuPaul at the Pyramid Club and in 1985 founded Wigstock, the annual event, held every year until 2005. Hairdresser Jimmy Paul is known for his big, sexy, and sculptural styles and once remarked, “hairdresser equals fantasy.” With 18 Vogue covers to his credit and frequent collaborations with Mario Testino and Steven Meisel, Jimmy Paul has a huge influence on the way we see hair today. Document caught up with Lady Bunny and Jimmy Paul to talk about the first time they met and the influence Bunny has had on Jimmy Paul’s work.


All clothing and accessories Lady Bunny’s own. N O. 7 9


LADY BUNNY —When I moved here I was in my early 20s, and of course I always loved my mom but that’s an age when you’re trying to distance yourself from your parents and say, no, that’s who they are and this is who I am, you know? When I got to New York and saw how many of my friends in New York didn’t even tell their parents they were gay, much less explaining being a drag queen, and mine knew exactly what I had done and had seen me do it, I realized how lucky I was. JIMMY —And you’re one of the few people I’ve met that had that. You’re one of the few people whose parents know exactly what’s going on and accepted it and— LADY BUNNY —Well, they don’t know everything that was going on. JIMMY —True, true. Back to the beginning, the first time you came to New York was with a band from Georgia, called The Now Explosion.     LADY BUNNY —They got a gig in New York and we rode up and arrived at the Pyramid, I arrived from Georgia in drag. Of course, I don’t drive, so they forced me to entertain them [laughs] and they got a real kick

out of seeing me shave through my makeup at a truck stop, and they wanted to go thrift shopping in DC and me, being dyslexic, could not find the van, and this was at a time when I had no cell phone. So there I was, in DC, lost, in drag, without a dime. JIMMY —No, shit. And they found you? LADY BUNNY —Somehow. JIMMY —Oh my god, you must have been terrified. LADY BUNNY —So yeah, I arrived at the Pyramid in drag. JIMMY —I had no idea, that’s unbelievable, that’s unbelievable. It felt very, very new to me. It felt very funny and fresh. LADY BUNNY —We were more like get-down, you know, psychedelic—but let’s just say so they hear it, there was a band called The Now Explosion, Bunny and RuPaul were the dancers—Ru and I were the backup dancers. JIMMY —RuPaul, that’s very remarkable. LADY BUNNY —RuPaul and the U-Haul. Two big fat girls. JIMMY —Ah, heaven. I never heard that either. So then you stayed in

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“We rode up and arrived at the Pyramid, I arrived from Georgia in drag. Of course, I don’t drive, so they forced me to entertain them and they got a real kick out of seeing me shave through my makeup at a truck stop.” New York from that time? LADY BUNNY —I did, my sister was living here and I briefly had a day job here so, at a plasticine company, but… JIMMY —And then you were working at, like, a transsexual phone line for a while? Yes, I remember that was— LADY BUNNY —Honey, it wasn’t just transsexual, it was real-woman, okay? [laughs]. I was employed as a real woman, and if there was a particularly irritating caller, we’d be like, ‘oh, shoot your hot load, yes, daddy, and then, [drops voice] okay, have a good one’ after they came. Nothing withers your cock like that. [laughs] You’ve just cum with a dude! Can you imagine? JIMMY —Okay, so you and I live in the same neighborhood and if we run into each other and chat, a few topics come up and one of them usually is transsexual, transgender women. Those of us seem to be enchanted, obsessed with trans women, and I just think, can we touch on that a little bit because I, I know for me it’s an absolute obsession. And we both love and respect— LADY BUNNY —From this whole trans activist perspective versus RuPaul or any drag queen using the word tranny, its foolish because I think the drag community has always been the most supportive of the trans community, so I think that there are members of it like me who feel like we kind of have one big foot potentially touching the tip of that puddle ourselves. JIMMY —So let’s talk a little bit about Wigstock, which I am lucky enough that I got to go to every single one of them. What you did there is history. I mean, I could just name a few of my favorites off the top of my list, I think it was incredible when Deee-Lite came back after their success and came and to see them perform was amazing. And then what about Leigh Bowery giving birth? I thought that was a remarkable moment, with all the sausages flying. LADY BUNNY —It was. Wasn’t that rancid? It was brilliant. You know, I don’t know what to say about it except watch the movie Wigstock and see what an amazing talent and how lucky I am to have formed a bond with him. Not many people know this but Leigh died before the movie came out, and had to sign papers saying that we could rerecord his songs because he’d used a Beatles song and we couldn’t clear it. So Antony was then not known—of Antony and the Johnsons—and he actually recorded the song that Leigh performs in the movie to have a similar sound to the Beatles song. JIMMY —I mean, that’s a lot of pageantry at once right there. LADY BUNNY —I know! I know. JIMMY —I mean, it was so shocking, it was the last thing—it was a total surprise, like all of a sudden he’s singing a Beatles song and trust me, that was enough! It was enough for him to be standing there in that outfit singing the Beatles song, then he gives birth with sausages and blood flying, and a whole person comes out [laughs]—it was that poor girl was inside the outfit for hours! LADY BUNNY —And if you happened to be on drugs and catch that happening, I’m told that it would really send you into the stars. [laughs] JIMMY —Well, I think whether you were on drugs or not at Wigstock you had a contact high. It was just that kind of thing. I was at work yesterday and there was this guy who was saying he

knows your tranager, he called her a tranager because she manages drag acts and, he asked me, ‘How does Bunny keep those wigs on?’ They’re so huge and they must be so heavy! I have to say as long as I’ve known you it still has me full of goose bumps the moment I see you. How do you get around? LADY BUNNY —Well, getting around in cabs is no fun with a ‘do, especially arriving at some fancy residence or red carpet-ish thing, the crunchdown in the cab is giving you a cowlick on your immaculate coiffure, it’s definitely not easy getting around. And I think keeping them on is a challenge, I use this silicone medical adhesive to glue them onto my scalp. JIMMY —Wow. LADY BUNNY —But I appreciate it when I sling it around because I have to wear bigger and bigger wigs with stronger and stronger glue, and I’m actually ripping my own hair out as I remove it. [laughs] JIMMY —Sometimes as a hairdresser watching you perform if you’re really getting down, I’m watching the wig like, is it gonna fly off ? LADY BUNNY —It’s not going to fly off but this silicone junk is no joke, it requires a remover and it is flammable so it’s not anything you’re even supposed to travel with. The spirit gum stops working when you get hot, but not this shit [laughs]. JIMMY —Wow. LADY BUNNY —Ru gave me the glue and only told me about the remover after, thank god, because I’ve got real hair, okay?! [Laughs] But when I took it off the first time it yanked a chunk of hair right out in the front, it looked like a reverse mohawk and after a year people were asking, “Is that a style choice?” [laughs] JIMMY —What you do for your audience, my dear! And I don’t know how, seeing you DJ at the Monster the other day was so much fun. And back to our transsexual obsession, the transgender community coming out to show up for you, because, you know, we don’t get to see those girls every day, so to see them all out, and your one friend who is disabled, who has the amazing beautiful face, to see her come down those stairs with her crutches, and then perch and then every word to every song you played, I have to say I could have just, I was in heaven. To me that’s a little slice of— LADY BUNNY —Well, I see her, I love seeing her happy because it’s hard to get out. For anyone now, we won’t leave computer screens, we won’t leave cell phones, even when you’re at a club if you bother to not go on Grindr and actually go to a club to meet people, if we do that we’re constantly out taking pictures and video to suck the life out of the party and put it back on the internet so that we can gain more fans or whatever. So, the party is a crutch because people aren’t there in the moment. JIMMY —I agree, I agree. LADY BUNNY —So my friend’s a DJ in DC and he says people just don’t dance, they just run around the dance floor taking selfies and then get off the floor, I said, ‘when you DJ in Switzerland and France do they dance there?’ He said, ‘yeah, but that’s because these are big events on the outskirts of town or in castles with thick walls,’ and I just said, ‘oh, so you think—if the internet connection drops, you take it away, people will actually make eye contact, get drinks, socialize and dance?’ Revolutionary!

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VERDE —I feel like she’s part of the family, but even more because sometimes family is a bitch. You are part of my elected family which I will carry with me for the rest of my life. STACY —It was so amazing. I was so nervous; I didn’t know how it was going to go. We were flying to New York and it was quite a big deal. As soon as I knew that Verde was going to be there, it was such a relief! You meet someone and you don’t have to know much about them, but you instantly connect. It’s so natural. VERDE —That’s so sweet. When you are going to meet someone, you don’t know if they’re going to be a tough cookie. I saw her amazing performance in Lars Von Trier’s movie [Nymphomaniac] and I was so impressed. Then I met with her and we clicked. We both ride bikes, talk about dogs and try to be cultivated sometimes but it often goes

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“Some people see acting in a lucrative way. To me it was the chance to do what I love and not to have the pressure to earn enough money. I was able to just let go and be myself” —AC TO R STACY MARTIN T E L L S V E R D E V I S CON TI, D I R E C TO R O F C O R P O R AT E P R E S S O F F I C E A N D S T R AT E G I C P R O J E C T S F O R P R A DA A N D M I U M I U M O D E R AT E D B Y

N I C K VO G E L S O N

FA S H I O N E D I T O R

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

GILLIAN WILKINS

D R I U & T I AG O

A S S I S TA N T: H A N N A H W I L S O N . S T Y L I S T A S S I S TA N T: A S H L E E H I L L . L O C AT I O N : A N G E L S PAC E , L O N D O N .

VERDE —We’ve been trying to meet up for four weeks now exchanging lovely and heartfelt emails and it’s finally happened! We first met in March [for the F/W 14 Miu Miu campaign] and it was such a revelation. I’ve been obsessed with you ever since.

STACY —Likewise.

H A I R S T Y L I S T: Y U M I N A K A DA- D I N G L E U S I N G AV E DA . M A K E U P : L A U R E N PA R S O N S AT P R E M I E R H A I R A N D M A K E U P. P H OTO A S S I S TA N T: GA B B Y L A U R E N T. M A K E U P

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ranco-English actor Stacy Martin, known for her breakthrough role  in  Lars von Trier’s  drama  film  Nymphomaniac, has  modeled for the fashion brand Miu Miu’s  advertising campaign. We asked  Verde Visconti, the Director of Corporate Press Office and Strategic Projects for Prada and Miu Miu, part of the Milanese aristocratic Visconti family related to the famous Italian director Luchino Visconti, to converse about being an actor, their friendship and modeling for a fashion brand under the lens of Steven Meisel.


Sweater by MIU MIU.


Jacket by MIU MIU. N O. 8 4


in the other direction [laughs]. STACY —At least we try and that’s the important thing [laughs]! VERDE —Then we went to the Met Ball together which was so much fun. In a few months we’ve had a lot of experiences together and then on the campaign, we managed to make work fun, too. NICK —Stacy, I want to ask you, being an actor, how it feels to be a model and muse of Miuccia while shooting the campaign? STACY —It’s quite strange because when it was all happening, I was concentrated on going to New York, being on set with Steven. It was gratifying that a brand supporting so much existing and emerging talent would bring me into that world. Verde and everyone in that scene are so fascinating and Steven is the same way. It was such a surprise to be inspired by people who I didn’t expect would inspire me. I was approaching it as a job but then it became a much bigger thing. VERDE —When I was a young girl, I never thought I would be in a PR job so far from my desires. You know when you are a kid you want to do things that you think might change the world. I’ve been working for Prada for quite some time and one of the best parts of my job is meeting a lot of people. Some of them don’t change a thing but then I find someone who changes everything and becomes part of my life. It’s exciting to meet creative, but also real, people. People say the fashion world is all fake but every world is made of people and when you find a connection, it makes everything so much more important. STACY —You want to nurture it. Do you sometimes feel quite protective as well? VERDE —Totally! I’m so jealous about everything and everyone. STACY —Beware, Verde is out! VERDE —I become very protective of the people I care for, but that’s natural. I’m fascinated because even if a job can be repetitive, the person who is in front of you is always a puzzle. There is a way to get through and have fun. STACY —Otherwise, what’s the point of it if you don’t find the people that inspire you, you connect with, that you love and want to work with? NICK —What inspired you to become an actor? STACY —I’ve always been drawn to acting. I liked the classics. It was a hobby going to acting classes rather than a job and not what I imagined I would be doing to earn a living. Then I came to London and the more I was doing it, the more it made sense to me, doing it unconsciously on a day-to-day basis. I did my training and once I graduated I didn’t want a job in an office. Then it sort of just started from there and happened without even me realising that it was happening, meeting Lars and acting in Nymphomaniac. So my hobby became my job and it was a transition I thought I would never do. It feels strange in a way because I didn’t make a decision to be an actor. As much as I love what I do and I don’t really consider it as a job. It feels great to be paid to do your hobby! VERDE —It was really that amazing that you pulled off your hobby in that way. STACY —Some people see acting in a lucrative way. To me it was the chance to do what I love and not to have the pressure to earn enough money. I was able to just let go and be myself. VERDE —Pretty amazing any way you think about it. STACY —Is there anything else you would like to talk about? NICK —I’d love to talk about shooting the Miu Miu campaign and working with Steven Meisel. STACY —Yes he’s amazing, where does he come from? VERDE —I think he’s American. STACY —He’s a mystery... You two have such a lovely relationship VERDE —I know. He’s such a mystery but he’s divine though. I think he’s amazing and I love him so much. Did I tell you about the first

Sweater and skirt by MIU MIU.

time we met? Everyone terrified me by saying he’s very reclusive and shy so not to upset him. So I said the only way for me to speak to one of my heroes is to go up and hug him in my Italian way! He was very sweet to me. In fact he’s such a genius. We had a laugh. Pat McGrath was doing the makeup and Guido the hair and it’s like a family because they have been working together so many years. Either you jump in or you think those guys are completely crazy. STACY —But it works really well as everyone has their little position in the family. There’s nothing unsaid and everything runs so smoothly. NICK —How long was the shoot? STACY —It was three days. The first day was when they brought the magician in, and then when they brought the puppies. And then there was the day they brought the tarot card reader in. VERDE —Oh you’re right, you’re right! STACY —It was too short anyway. VERDE —We had the magician in but we found out all the tricks [laughs]. We were concerned about the puppies running around. Instead of being entertaining they were causing drama all day. You were the only one who got your tarot cards read. STACY —Oh no it wasn’t just me, Steven had them read too, and we took pictures as well. I’ve never had that done before. I thought it would be an old man with a beard with crystals and all that sort thing, but instead it was a young guy. VERDE —And apparently very well renowned. NICK —What did he tell you? STACY —I’m not going to tell you that...[laughs] It wasn’t negative at all, in fact everything was quite positive and just really insightful. It gave me the shivers. VERDE —I know it’s terrifying. I go and see shamans as well. I have to send you to this guy I see, but energy-wise it exhausts you. He tells you about your previous lives and everything, it’s crazy bizarre. STACY —I love that!

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Sweater and skirt by MIU MIU.


“There are actors who can do multiple films in a year, which I can’t do. I need to take a break in between roles and experience real life again. I need a slow pace.” —AC TO R GA SPA RD U L L I E L T E L L S LANVIN MEN’S WEAR DESIGNER LU C A S OSSE N D RI JVE R M O D E R AT E D B Y

H I L A RY M O S S FA S H I O N E D I T O R

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

D R I U & T I AG O

OMAIMA SALEM

S T Y L I S T: O M A I M A S A L E M . H A I R : S H U KO S U M I DA . M A K E U P : S A R A Ï F I S Z E L . P H OTO A S S I S TA N T: E M M A N U E L L A FAY. S T Y L I S T A S S I S TA N T: P H I L I P P I N E B R E U I L .

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Sweater by CERRUTI. Trousers by LANVIN.


G

aspard Ulliel, who played the role of Yves Saint Laurent in the biopic film by Bertrand Bonello, talks with Lucas Ossendrijver, Dutch-born men’s wear designer of Lanvin, about the challenges of his industry, the admiration for fashion designers, and his aspirations to be a movie director.

GASPARD —It was a new experience to be a fashion designer, though both of my parents worked in fashion. My father designed sportswear and I have childhood memories of watching him, seated at the table, drawing for hours. For this role, I gathered as much information as possible to understand what it means to be a great couturier, and attempt to trace how this man, Saint Laurent, became a visionary, because I think that’s what a designer does—tries to see beyond the current fashion, and transform the entire silhouette and the way people wear clothes, to change the lifestyle, even. LUCAS —When I think of that period, I think of the freedom they had, because the big groups that now dominate fashion didn’t exist—they had the opportunity to invent and interact directly with the clients. How did you study Saint Laurent? GASPARD —Research is the base of my work. I found The Beautiful Fall, a book written by fashion journalist Alicia Drake, and it contains a lot of intimate details from Saint Laurent’s life, and she described well the period we portrayed in the film, from 1964, ’65 to 1976, right after the sexual liberation and before the arrival of AIDS. I tried to find images and video interviews, but there’s few visual documents— LUCAS —He didn’t do a lot of interviews, did he? GASPARD —No, he protected himself from the media, so I found some interviews on Ina’s [Institut national de l’audiovisuel] website, and I could see him moving and talking—my first steps in developing this character involved getting close to him; then, suddenly, following a few months of research, I felt imprisoned by all of the information and I needed to find a space to create my own version of Yves Saint Laurent. If I were doing a simple imitation, nothing would be felt. I was looking for sincerity. But, the script was really, really strong. It’s one of the best scripts I’ve received during my career—it was a well-written and incredibly intelligent response to the

biopic genre, which is typically full of constraints. Saint Laurent is more a film about an artist and his inspiration; it’s more about artistic creation. LUCAS —When people think of fashion designers, they think of this glamorous style of living, but my job isn’t at all glamorous. I’m in the studio each day with my team; I go to the factory. It’s very hands-on and almost like being a scientist—you have an idea and you have to make it work. You convince people. It’s a complex process and it’s all about communication. GASPARD —And, you drive such a big team of people. LUCAS —I do. At the same time, a motor for me is the doubt. I constantly doubt. I’m always afraid that nobody’s going to come to the show, that no one’s going to like what we do, that it’s not going to sell—but doubt makes you go further. It makes you question all of it. And, I enjoy the speed of fashion. Every six months, you have to reinvent yourself. You have to start again. GASPARD —In acting, it’s not the same rhythm. We have more time— a shoot can be three, four months. And, there are actors who can do multiple films in a year, which I can’t do. I need to take a break in between roles and experience real life again. I need a slow pace, but you probably have no choice. LUCAS —You know, it’s addictive, because you want to do better each time. It’s difficult, but you become used to it, and then you can’t do without it. GASPARD —Sure, because when you have too much comfort in creation, it’s dangerous. LUCAS —When you play a character, does it stay with you afterward or do you forget about it? GASPARD —Well, it depends on the role, but ending a film is usually tricky, because your days are so different when you are shooting—it’s so organized, you have precise hours, and you can forge very intimate bonds with the crew. And, when it ends, there’s a void, which is hard. It’s always a bit funny after a shoot because pieces of the character remain inside of you and it sometimes takes a few weeks, or months, to get rid of it. My friends and family have said on occasion, “Oh, you’ve changed slightly.” It’s part of the game, I think. When

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(Clockwise, top left): Jacket by LANVIN. Trousers by LANVIN. Sweater by CERRUTI. Trousers by LANVIN. Jacket by LANVIN.


“I have a tendency to observe. When I was a kid, I could stay mute for hours, looking around me. I was a dreamy child—I’m an only child and I was in my own world. I’ve grown up, obviously, but I still like to watch what’s happening.” you do a collection, how do you proceed? Do you distance yourself from it and try a totally different approach, or do you follow-up with what you’ve created and try to push it further? LUCAS —After the week of the show, with the sales briefings and receiving clients, I’m so tired of it. I always feel this kind of shame…I want to say, “I’m sorry, this is what it is and next time I want to do better.” [laughs]. It’s also like having a baby, and then it becomes a number—it has to be sold and it’s not yours anymore. It’s somebody else’s. GASPARD —And, it’s not your job. Do you have people around you who can be truthful about your work? When a designer becomes increasingly important, I assume most of the people around him try to be on his side and don’t tell him exactly what they think. LUCAS —I surround myself with people I trust; for example, when I talk with Alady bunnyer [Elady Bunnyaz, creative director at Lanvin], it’s very valuable. He gives his opinion, even though I might not like it. GASPARD —Can Alady Bunnyer be harsh sometimes? LUCAS —Sure, sure. We don’t always agree—we’re different people, but we’ve built rapport and are comfortable with each other. I’ve been at Lanvin for almost ten years, and I wouldn’t have lasted if the house wasn’t this personal. And, there’s complete freedom—but, I’m not crazy. You have to know what you’re doing; I know exactly what we sell and what we don’t sell. In the end, I’m not an artist, I’m a designer. I make a product that clients would like to have—my role is to create Trousers by LANVIN. functional items that they want to buy, and not merely present my fantasy on the runway. You spoke about emotion and touching the audience with your interpretation of Saint Laurent, and as a designer, you want to do that, as well, and the only way to touch people is to introduce a new idea. GASPARD —It seems there’s a lot more to invent in terms of menswear, and it’s now embedded in men’s culture to follow fashion and explore different types of dressing. It used to be always the same. LUCAS —It’s true—there’s a lot going on and a lot to discover. And men nowadays are changing and are interested in fashion. I didn’t grow up in an environment where there was fashion. I went to art school when I was 18, and in the first year you have to do different disciplines, so I did sculpture, graphics, and fashion—and I realized that was my talent. At that time, I didn’t know what it meant

to be a designer; I just liked creating clothes. And I remember how I first encountered menswear—I found a tailor-made jacket at the flea market in Amsterdam and I took it apart. Inside, there were these layers of horse hair and all kinds of tape that you don’t see, and I became fascinated by the construction of garments. GASPARD —My first thought, when I turned 16 or 17, and decided I wanted to work in this industry, was to direct. I wanted to be able to express myself through my own films, so I started studying cinema at a university. Then, I got more and more offers to act and I thought I would give it a shot and try directing later on. And, I’m happy with acting, though I still dream of directing a film one day. As I get older, I have different expectations of what a film should be, and it seems harder for me to try directing. For now, I don’t feel ready. But, when I studied at the university, I read a lot about cinema and saw many old films, and nurtured a real passion for cinema. I see other actors who are passionate about acting, but not so much about the history of cinema, and I think it’s a pity—as an actor, you should try to embrace the entirety of the industry and be immersed in the creation. LUCAS —I understand. I’m nearly a workaholic. GASPARD —I would guess you don’t have much free time with your job. It’s not like me—I can decide to take a break. LUCAS —No, I can’t, but I do like to go out. I will go to clubs for a half an hour to listen to the music and see the people, and then relocate to another club, or someplace else. I’m eclectic in the things I do, I’d say. GASPARD —With your job, it’s important to go out and meet people. And, maybe it’s also a method for finding inspiration—seeing how the world is around you, how people dress. It’s the same for me. I can be in a club or at a party, and sit in the corner and observe those around me. It can give me a lot of ideas for my next character—to see how somebody walks and behaves. LUCAS —Do you always observe people, or do you shut off ? GASPARD —I have a tendency to observe. When I was a kid, I could stay mute for hours, looking around me. I was a dreamy child— I’m an only child and I was in my own world. I’ve grown up, obviously, but I still like to watch what’s happening. LUCAS —It’s a good trait to be able to observe. GASPARD —Yes, with our jobs, it’s a good trait.

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gUtter credit goeS Here

advertiSement

16 Rue Dupetit-Thouars 75003 Paris

NnO. o.991 1


“I had a line around the block with a huge attendance and that was the first time I knew I liked to bring people together and have a spectacle. It was really magical to see everybody.” —P R O D U C E R SUSANNE BARTSC H T E L L S P E R F O R M A N C E A RT I S T JOEY ARIAS M O D E R AT E D B Y

N I C K VO G E L S O N

PHOTOGRAPHY BY FA S H I O N E D I T O R

D R I U & T I AG O

A K A R I E N D O - G AU T

R

esurrecting nightlife countless times over, Susanne Bartsch and Joey Arias’ friendship spans more than 30 years. Moving from Switzerland to London when she was just 17, and then to New York in 1981, Susanne has had an incalculable influence on design and fashion worldwide, first as an early introducer of British designers to New York, including John Galliano, Vivienne Westwood, and Stephen Jones, via her store on Thompson Street, and then with her founding of the Love Ball (which became the inspiration for the Life Ball, held each year in Vienna supporting HIV/AIDS). Joey Arias; singer, artist, and performer, catches up with Susanne in her apartment in the Chelsea Hotel and recalls their very first meeting on the street in Soho.

NICK —I would love to go back to when you first met. Susanne, were you doing your store, and Joey, were you at Fiorucci? SUSANNE —Fiorucci! I was having an affair with Mr. Fiorucci whilst Joey sold T-shirts. [Laughs.] JOEY —I sold T-shirts but I was working, I was working with Klaus [Nomi] and I had just done Saturday Night Live with David Bowie so all of a sudden we’re part of the art world. I’m with Kenny Scharf, Keith Haring, Jean-Michel, Ann Magnuson and the whole group, and one day we all went out, my friend said, “I want you to meet my friend Susanne,” she says, “you’re gonna love her, I think she’s Swiss or something or English, I’m not quite sure.” All of a sudden I remember getting out and seeing this tall, statuesque woman with a white turban and no eyebrows and very stiff, and Susanne said “Hullo” [deep voice, Susanne laughs]. And I go, “nice to meet you,” and I looked like an alien because I was doing drag— SUSANNE —I think I was wearing a chemise from the BodyMap and I couldn’t move, it was similar to that Rick Owens dress in the photo. JOEY —She was a tower, she could not move, and I looked more like an alien because of Klaus [Nomi], and I was looking at her and she’s like, “is he for real,” and then my friend says, “that’s Susanne.” But then we got in the car and turned on the car and she says, “Joey, I went to the party with that vibrating egg, and I stuck it up this guy’s ass and I pulled it out and there was shit on it and I said, “whose

dirty ass does this belong to?” And I looked at Susanne and I was like, I’m in love with her, I thought, I’m going to have a lot of fun. SUSANNE —Right up your alley, eating garlic and— JOEY —Eating garlic and having an egg with shit on it, farting and— SUSANNE —Farting and toasting marshmallows, that’s my biggest memory of Joey, when he used to do that, he had this show where he would eat garlic and then a marshmallow, pull up his ass and fart and light the fart and then he toasted the marshmallow. Could it get any grosser? JOEY —[Laughs] That was a character, that’s when I started doing drag because—I did drag for the first time and Susanne saw me at Wigstock and she was like, “Joey, I need you to come.” I was like, I don’t do drag. Somehow my career was winnowing down I used to go to the Copacabana and I remember saying, I need a job, I need something. I called Susanne and she said, “go to Copa, put on the tits and the heels, come and join me.” And I went as Justine and that was the beginning of my drag, and Susanne pulled me into her world. SUSANNE —And we traveled a lot, we went all over the world. Paris, Japan, Milan…all over the place. JOEY —Exactly. I remember there was a big, gigantic—huge Giorgio Armani party, like thousands of people, the walls were covered in roses! SUSANNE —They made a portrait out of my face with the whole thing, it was massive, out of roses they flew in from Morocco, special roses, the portrait was in this huge theatre, the whole wall was my face. It was incredible. I don’t have a picture of it! JOEY —That’s art! You’re art again, just say Susanne is art, and for art, fashion, personality, love, and you came out looking at what Susanne loves about art and fashion and a strong personality, that’s what I love about Susanne because she is a strong woman, and I always tell people, Susanne’s someone you don’t fuck with, she’s direct and I love this very much about this lady. SUSANNE —I mean, I think I’m pretty serious. JOEY —You are! SUSANNE —I’m very forgiving, too. I do get all, “hey, what the fuck,” but then I don’t. I don’t hold grudges. JOEY —Exactly. I’ve seen Susanne give people so many different opportunities as people’s careers have grown and I always feel like—you know, I did Cirque de Soleil and Susanne called me to do something, I always come back and just whatever you want Susanne, I’m always here for Susanne and whatever she needs—it could be Carnegie Hall and with Susanne and her huge events, but I love to support because it’s always giving back and supporting your friends and I feel like a lot of people don’t give back to Susanne. SUSANNE —No, and I’ve been very instrumental in a lot of people’s careers and some of them I don’t hear from anymore, you know, it’s actually quite amazing how—you’re one of those people who just, you know, I was there for you and I mean I’ll never forget when you were doing the Carnegie Hall— JOEY —First time. SUSANNE —What was the thing, Billie Holiday in a suit, and I said put on a dress. And you did and from there it took off and the dress was the key. JOEY —Exactly. Susanne’s like my drag mother. SUSANNE —I’m not even, it wasn’t even about drag, it was just— JOEY —She saw it. She just said the suit is good but a dress would be better. “Joey, a dress would be better,” and I was afraid of drag, but she was right, she saw it. SUSANNE —I mean, the whole drag movement wasn’t respected and people looked down on it, and I brought it out from the underground and put it on the mainstream by having—I love the whole drag movement then and now but I’ve moved on already. I mean, a lot of people still think of me as a drag queen because, you know, that was a very strong thing I did, I had the Love Ball AIDS benefit, I created this ball and I had this house ball and I sold a house ball and I used the house

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H A I R : R AQ U E L M A R T U S C E L L I AT S O L O A R T I S T S . M A K E U P :   D E N E Y A DA M . P H OTO A S S I S TA N T: A D R I E N P OT I E R . FA S H I O N A S S I S TA N T: E S T H E R M AT I L L A . P R O D U C T I O N : M A X H I R S C H B E R G E R . L O C AT I O N : AC M E S T U D I O S .

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Headpiece by

MICHAEL COSTIFF .


ball for that— JOEY —She brought Harlem downtown. SUSANNE —I brought the Voguers out and the servers were all drag queens, they were pouring champagne to these $10,000 ticket people from Calvin Klein to Donna Karan to the CEO of whatever. JOEY —Madonna. SUSANNE —She came, yeah. It was scandalous, but they liked it. It was incredibly amazing, wasn’t it, the Love Ball? JOEY —It was fantastic. SUSANNE —This was in 1989. JOEY —And you did what, four of them? Three or four? SUSANNE —Four. I did a 1989 Love Ball at Roseland and then I did the Bal de l’Amour at the Folies Bergère in Paris, and then I did the opening at the Playboy Mansion and then I did another Love Ball here, so those were four, and then I wanted to do another one and then it just got too complicated and somehow—I mean, eight isn’t bad. We were early, I was a pioneer. JOEY —I remember sometime after the Love Ball, in the back crying on each other’s shoulders— SUSANNE —So many people. JOEY —So happy that Susanne was doing it, we looked at each other and she said, “I’m fighting this, I’m fighting this, I’m trying, I’m pushing.” SUSANNE —Out of depression, you know, I was depressed, I lost so many friends. Half of my address book was empty. Crossed out, I mean. And I was depressed, what could we do, and then actually a friend said, “oh, why don’t we give the proceeds from the Copacabana Bodysuit by SAGA NYC . one night.” I said that’s “not enough, what’s that gonna do, buy one, one pill for somebody?” They didn’t even have pills yet. And I said, “no, this has to be something major, it’s not about money only, it’s about celebrating life and creating awareness, get the people to rally around this, it’s something we need to get together and fight, because there was still a bit of it’s a gay thing.” It was the first event that the fashion community really came together to fight AIDS, that was the Love Ball. JOEY —You brought amazing people together. SUSANNE —Oh my god, everybody was involved. JOEY —Every house from Paris, all of Wall Street, it was mindboggling. And people, you know, then of course years later— SUSANNE —Hollywood was involved. We had Susan Sarandon, JeanPaul Gaultier, Sandra Bernhardt, Mugler. JOEY —But then somebody else picked up the ball and turned it into the life ball. SUSANNE —Yeah, it inspired them I guess. JOEY —Well, Gery Keszler was the makeup artist for Mugler and I will never forget we were walking on 14th Street and he goes, “Joey, can I talk to you about something? Joey, I’m such a fan of Susanne and I really wanna try something in Europe and you think she’s gonna get mad at me?” I was like, why don’t you just tell her? SUSANNE —Why would I, are you insane? What, he wanted to do a Love Ball and I would be mad? JOEY —He told me that, I was like, just call her up! SUSANNE —Maybe because he wanted to do the same thing.

JOEY —He wanted to copy your format.

SUSANNE —I guess that’s what it was, I don’t remember, I’m happy he did it, it’s amazing, it’s huge, the Life Ball, you know, it’s a big, big thing. But that was his inspiration, my Love Ball, and he still says publicly that’s what inspired him and it was the baby. NICK —Tell me a time in your life or your career where you realized that you love what you do and this is what you want to do, if it’s an amazing party, something that you did together? SUSANNE —I definitely never planned on coming here [to New York]. I came here for a love affair, London I went to get away and if I’d stayed in Switzerland I’d be ending up as a banker’s wife with a bloody house and children and a car, Switzerland was very conservative then. I fell in love in New York, and I would go to the Met and I was like head to toe with looks like—nobody was dressed up. Bill Cunningham used to go wild when he saw me, bangles everywhere, gold bracelets all the way up, and I was missing that in London at that time in the late seventies, every week there was a new look. I’ll never forget sitting [in the Hotel Chelsea] right where I’ve been ever since I got to New York and realizing, “why not import what I miss?” I’m going to open a store—just like I’m doing with the arts thing, I had no idea what I’m doing—I’m gonna open this store, I’m gonna go to London, I’m gonna bring Stephen Jones, John Galliano, Leigh Bowery, Andrew Logan, Mr. Pearl I didn’t know yet, and I’m going to bring their clothes to New York and sell them here. And I went to SoHo and I found this little store on Thompson Street and it was an empty space and I found out the landlord, and I told him I haven’t got a lot of money but I brought my stock of this really cool movement which was not happening here in New York. He was a very creative guy, he saw it and said, “I’ll give you the space for very small rent.” I took the space and I went to London, I didn’t even have any designers yet [Laughs]! I went to London on a tourist visa! Can you imagine, with no social security number, nothing? I don’t know how I did it. So if you have passion you can do it all. Passion is the key, love and passion. Then I went to the design houses behind the scene and I picked people that I liked that weren’t actually out there designing, I said, “hey, make some stuff for me, I’m going to sell this for you in New York.” Galliano was still at college and I saw his collection, French Revolution, I was just gagging. So I didn’t go the conventional way. It was an instant success, Donna Karan dropped in, Norma Kamali came in every five minutes buying all my jewelry. I went back to London mid-’82 and I knew I was going to have to do something, so I went over there and I got all these people, 25 designers, to sign with me, and in return I told them I’m producing a show in New York. I have no idea what or where, but I’m going to have my own show in Fashion Week, I’m going to call it New London in New York. They all loved the idea and when I came back we had the first show at the Roxy in April ’83. I had a line around the block with a huge attendance and that was the first time I knew I liked to bring people together and have a spectacle. It was really magical to see everybody. JOEY —Isn’t Susanne like the Diana Vreeland of the night world?

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Dress by RICK OWENS.

SUSANNE —Now, there’s the exhibition at FIT [a retrospective of Susanne’s fashion for Fall 2015]. The kids want to have an exhibition for the younger generation, they’re loving the idea of corsets. They said they added corsetry classes and there’s a big demand for corsetry again. I have so many corsets and they said the kids are going to love seeing this, they come to my parties, you know, and they dress up for it and they see this now in an exhibition so that was one of the attractions for them as well. I’m really also glad to have had a part of my life—most of my life—in a non-technology, world. I mean, if we had social media we’d probably be superstars. The things I did in the eighties, it’s beyond, you can’t even imagine. There’s no pictures, no nothing. I’m so glad I have that history of no social media, because people don’t talk on the phone anymore, it’s all about that square, the TV, the—it’s all in that square and I’m glad I have the history of not being in the square because it helps to be organic. Do you know what I mean?

JOEY —It’s right on, you’re perfect.

SUSANNE —So I think that’s also attractive to the generation that just is that. Can you imagine we didn’t have email? JOEY —I know, it was crazy. SUSANNE —Can you imagine we didn’t have— JOEY —Nothing! SUSANNE —I’ll never forget when the fax, [Joey laughs] the first fax machine, Peter Gatien called me up and said, “Susanne, I got a machine now. Come over and have a look at the fax” It was so wild. The answer machine was the most we had. JOEY —Exactly. SUSANNE —I didn’t even have an answer machine for years, I remember not having— JOEY —Exactly, but we got around. SUSANNE —We still did so much. JOEY —I think we did more then than we do now.

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D O C U M E N T N O. 9 6

“I’ve allowed myself to be free, to create and do different things without excessively worrying over coherence. Today I’m very happy with this choice because I’ve avoided labels and categorizations.” —MARCO D E VI N C E N Z O T E L L S C L O S E F R I E N D G I U L I A RU B E RT I M O D E R AT E D B Y

G I U L I A RU B E RT I

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

D R I U & T I AG O


All clothing Marco’s own. N O. 97


“I create in a very instinctual manner. Only once I see the final result I am able to make a connection to a particular references. The night before the fashion show, when it all comes together, I am able to tell you the story of my collection.”

M

arco de Vincenzo’s story, as he admits, is something of a fairy tale. Born in Messina, Sicily, the Italian fashion designer has—since his last collection—rose to stardom, catching so much attention that in February LVMH invested in his brand, in addition to being a consultant for Fendi’s leather goods. For Document, Marco spoke with close friend, Giulia Ruberti, who lives and works in Paris at Gagosian Gallery, Le Bourget.

GIULIA —Ciao Marco, as we’re doing this interview on the phone could you tell me where you are right now? MARCO —Well…I just came back to Rome from the Marche (a region in Italy home of national leather manufacturers). I had an appointment there for the shoes of the upcoming collection. As soon as we hang up I have to run to a meeting at Fendi and tomorrow I’ll be going to Soncino (where Marco’s collection is produced) for the last part of the fitting of the S/S 15 collection I’ll present in September. GIULIA —Wow. Tight schedule. Is the collection coming together? How is it going? MARCO —Really well. I started working on it a little bit ahead of time so now I’m not too stressed. I don’t feel excessive pressure even though expectations are high this time. There is a big group backing me up and a lot of attention on me. People really like my story; it’s a sort of fairytale, a dream come true… Also my work team is changing and growing, so I feel less alone, and that helps, but at the same time I feel the necessity to exceed myself. GIULIA —Tell me something about the new collection. MARCO —It’s as if with each season I learn more about how to make clothes. You know most of my knowledge has come through practice! My background is leather goods and accessories… So my challenge for this collection—especially after the commercial success of the F/W 14 collection—is to keep working and experimenting with texture without losing the lightness of certain fabrics. I’m trying to achieve a light tri-dimensionality. Since last season a really good energy has accompanied me, I’ve felt positive vibes and this optimism is what I’m bringing to the new collection—colors, positivity… It’s happier and more playful than in the past. Also, as compared to previous collections, this one is slightly more romantic. GIULIA —You’ve mentioned texture. This is a recurrent theme in all of your collections. MARCO —Yes. Last season’s success has been a new and interesting feeling. After the show, I observed press and buyers trying out my clothes and this made me realize that I was receiving a new sort of attention. The fetishization and the obsessive research of textures that goes into my collections make of each piece of clothing an accessory. And realizing that these will be worn by a larger public has encouraged me to find a balance between my ideal and something not too constraining or suffocating. I’ve been dedicating a lot of time and thought to this. GIULIA —We’ve often talked about art and I know it influences your daily life. Has something in particular been inspiring you lately? Has an artist inspired this last collection? MARCO —I love art very dearly. And I’m dedicating always more time

to it. But rarely do I approach a collection with a specific reference/ inspiration in mind. I’m like a sponge; I absorb very quickly what surrounds me. But it is only later in time that I realize how much an artist or something I’ve observed has affected me. I create in a very instinctual manner and only once I see the final result I am able to make a connection to a particular references. Working in this way— without a specific inspiration in mind - grants me more freedom. It’s very instinctual and undisciplined at least for the first 2 months. The night before the fashion show, when it all comes together, I am able to tell you the story of my collection. For example, someone defined last season’s mood as Sonia Delaunay going dancing with Ettore Sottsass. I loved this suggestion as I adore them both and I was surprised that someone was able to perceive it. Or other times I’ve been told that my creations reminded them of the work of a certain artist that I had no knowledge about! It may seem odd, but for now this way of creating works out for me. I don’t like to make choices from the start; it’s almost an inverted process. GIULIA —Are you concerned about being coherent in your collections? MARCO —I’ve experimented a lot in the past. I’ve allowed myself to be free, create and do different things without excessively worrying over about. Today I’m very happy with this choice because I’ve avoided labels and categorizations. I know where I stand and it is very clear that there is an underlying vision connecting all of my collections. What defines me is infinite creativity and texture—two concepts wide enough for me to work with sufficient freedom. GIULIA —Your choice of working in Rome may as well appear a bit different. MARCO —You know I didn’t really decide to live in Rome. It happened. I moved here to study and then I immediately got the job at Fendi. As time went by I started working and travelling more and more, and Rome became the place I would come back to. I cherish my time in Rome; its stillness—which at times can be frustrating - is actually what I need to recharge myself. Rome is where I stop and integrate what I’ve encountered in my travels. GIULIA —Last question, if you could pick a dream team, you can choose anyone, contemporary or not, who would you collaborate with? MARCO —Let me think… I always find it difficult to pick a favorite. My taste and preferences are in constant evolution; I’m always reading new books, listening to new music...My curiosity is almost childlike—what I’m most attracted to is the unknown. So ideally I would always pick that which I still have to discover. This said there is one person I would have loved to meet and work with and that is Walt Disney. I have a great passion for old hand-made cartoons and, in particular, I find Fantasia to be a creative masterpiece. Walt Disney had this capacity to create other extraordinary worlds solely through the power of his imagination. In everyday objects he could glimpse a magical quality that would open up other dimensions. I relate to this sense of imagination very closely. I often catch myself observing something quite mundane and being fascinated by it, finding a certain beauty in it or imagining it in a different way…Maybe this is the reason why I’m happy almost anywhere.

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R O B E R T M A P P L E T H O R P E F O U N DAT I O N U S E D B Y P E R M I S S I O N . C O U R T E SY P E T E R M A R I N O C O L L E C T I O N .

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Leather Men N E W YO R K A R C H I T E C T P ETE R M AR I NO S E L E C T S R A R E LY S E E N I M AG E S F R O M TOM OF FI NLAND’S OW N A R C H I V E , A N D T R AC E S T H E I C O N I C A RT I S T ’ S I N F L U E N C E O N A RT I S T R O B E RT M A P P L E T H O R P E A N D H I M S E L F. TEXT BY

D R E W S AW Y E R

I M AG E S

TO M O F F I N L A N D F O U N DAT I O N

& PETER MARINO COLLECTION


D O C U M E N T— F/ W 2 0 1 4

(Left): Robert Mapplethorpe, Untitled (Boots/Gloves), 1971. 10″ × 8″ paper collage and acrylic. Courtesy Peter Marino Collection. (This page): Tom of Finland (Touko Laaksonen, Finnish, 1920– 1991). Untitled, mixed media on paper. Tom of Finland permanent collection. N O. 1 0 1


R

obert Mapplethorpe’s 1979 portrait of Bryan Ridley and Lyle Heeter provides an fitting surrogate for the seemingly contradictory aesthetics of New York architect Peter Marino. In one of the photographer’s most well-known images, a couple’s black leather clothing (and chains) is juxtaposed with their high-end domestic interior, replete with a wingback chair, oriental rug, and white antler end table. Marino, who is a collector of Mapplethorpe’s work, is not only the leading architect for fashion brands and upscale residences but also renowned for his head-totoe leather biker gear. Mapplethorpe’s photographs and Marino’s attire are similarly indebted to motorcycle culture and the drawings of Tom of Finland, which both reflected a growing discontent with mainstream American culture after WWII. Born Touko Laaksonen, Tom

Tom of Finland (Touko Laaksonen, Finnish, 1920–1991). Untitled, mixed media on paper. Tom of Finland permanent collection.

of Finland began producing drawings of idealized and hypersexualized men for beefcake magazines such as Physique Pictorial. The artist was particularly attracted to the stylized masculinity of leather-clad bikers, popularized by the actor Marlon Brando in the 1953 film The Wild One. Tom of Finland’s now iconic pictures of leathermen have provided inspiration for Marino’s custom made wardrobe, and, in a Document exclusive, the architect has selected several pages from the artist’s own private reference binders of photo-collages. The pages reveal (as similarly demonstrated by an exhibition at Los Angeles’ Museum of Contemporary Art last winter) that Tom of Findland was more than an illustrator, but a powerful artist who continues to influence our contemporary aesthetics and desires. This winter, see Marino’s own collection at Miami’s Bass Museum of Art.


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Tom of Finland (Touko Laaksonen, Finnish, 1920–1991). Untitled, mixed media on paper. Tom of Finland permanent collection.


R O B E R T M A P P L E T H O R P E F O U N DAT I O N U S E D B Y P E R M I S S I O N . C O U R T E SY P E T E R M A R I N O C O L L E C T I O N .

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(Above): Robert Mapplethorpe, Leather Crotch, 1980. 29″ × 28.75″silver gelatin print. (Below and opposite): Tom of Finland (Touko Laaksonen, Finnish, 1920–1991). Untitled, mixed media on paper. Tom of Finland permanent collection. N O. 1 07


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ew York artist Avery Singer paints everyday scenes of what she calls “figures and still lifes occupying the realm of unrealized buildings.” Composing her images in Google SketchUp, a 3D rendering software that the artist began using while an undergraduate student at Cooper Union, Singer transfers them onto canvas with a projector, an airbrush, and lots of tape. The resulting painstakingly-produced grayscale paintings simultaneously recall the styles of the early 20th-century avant-garde and the simplified geometry of nascent computer graphics. She cites Albert Oehlen’s Computer Paintings from the early nineties as an important touchstone. Yet, while Oehlen used his laptop to create pixelated all-over abstractions, Singer remains wedded to both the figural and the historical. Her pictures often humorously portray the lives and inner selves of artists, combining past and present clichés and ideals of bohemia and professionalized practices, as in her recent series The Artists. Happening (2014), for example, depicts a group of wooden-like figures earnestly performing basic creative acts: painting at an easel, sculpting on a stool, and playing a recorder. Other works show banal performance art, awkward studio visits, and late night drinking sessions that manage to evoke 19th-century genre and history paintings. Singer, even at the young age of 27, intimately knows a thing or two about the subject: she grew up in a family of artists in the once bohemian enclave of TriBeCa and her father worked at The Museum of Modern Art for over 40 years. With an upcoming solo-exhibition this winter at the renowned Kunsthalle Zürich in Switzerland and several U.S. museum projects slated for 2015, Singer will have more than enough inspiration for years to come. Singer’s first solo-exhibition in an art institution opens Friday, November 21, 2014, at the Kunsthalle Zürich.

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Computer World A RT I S T AVERY S IN G E R R E A L I Z E S P E R F O R M AT I V E F I G U R E S W I T H I N U N R E A L I Z E D B U I L D I N G S, C R E AT E D V I A G O O G L E S K E TC H U P A N D R E N D E R E D BY H A N D. TEXT BY

D R E W S AW Y E R


( O P E N I N G S P R E A D ) : H A P P E N I N G , AC R Y L I C O N C A N VA S , 2 0 1 4 . ( T H I S PAG E ) : U N T I T L E D ( M AG E N TA ) , AC R Y L I C O N PA N E L , 2 0 1 3 . C O U R T E SY K R A U PA-T U S K A N Y Z E I D L E R , B E R L I N .

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S A D W O M A N P R OJ E C T I N G L I B I D I N A L T H O U G H T S , AC R Y L I C O N C A N VA S , 2 0 1 4 . C O U R T E SY K R A U PA-T U S K A N Y Z E I D L E R , B E R L I N .

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Double Trouble A RT I S T STU RTEVANT C H A L L E N G E D T H E N OT I O N S O F AU T H O R S H I P BY M A K I N G V E R S I O N S O F T H E WO R K S O F C O N T E M P O R A R I E S I N C L U D I N G A N DY WA R H O L , J A M E S

E X H I B I T I O N O R G A N I Z E R P E T E R E L E E Y, C U R ATO R A N D A S S O C I AT E D I R E C TO R O F E X H I B I T I O N S A N D P R O G R A M S F O R M O M A P S 1 , S E L E C T S T H E H I G H L I G H T S O F T H E S H OW. TEXT BY

PETER ELEEY

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C O U R T E SY GA L E R I E T H A D DA E U S R O PAC , PA R I S – S A L Z B U R G. © E S TAT E S T U R T E VA N T, PA R I S

M O M A P R E S E N T S T H E F I R S T A M E R I C A N OV E RV I E W O F H E R WO R K .

S T U R T E VA N T. WA R H O L F LO W E R S . 1 9 6 4 – 6 5. SY N T H E T I C P O LY M E R S C R E E N P R I N T O N C A N VA S . 2 2 1 / 1 6 × 2 2 1 / 1 6 ” ( 5 6 × 5 6 C M ) . E S TAT E S T U R T E VA N T, PA R I S .

R O S E N Q U I S T, J A S P E R J O H N S, A N D M A R C E L D U C H A M P. T H I S FA L L ,


S T U R T E VA N T. ST U DY F O R R O S E N Q U I ST ’ S S PAG H E T T I & G R A S S . 1 9 6 5 – 6 6 . O I L O N C A N VA S . 4 0 7/8 × 4 0 1 /8 ” ( 1 0 3 . 8 × 1 0 1 . 9 C M ) .

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ne day in 1964, Sturtevant began “repeating” the works of her contemporaries, annexing the styles of the art around her. Her first examples were a Jasper Johns Flag and a series of Andy Warhol Flowers, for which she employed Warhol’s own silkscreen. She described that she was using familiar things “as catalysts to dispose of representation,” giving us something new that somehow avoided the appearance of newness. “I wanted to use an object that was not an object, and yet presented itself as an object,” she said, “as a means of probing the understructure.” Over the next five decades, she continued to make use of some of the most iconic art of her time—by Joseph Beuys, Marcel Duchamp, Keith Haring, and Frank Stella, among many others—in her own project. Describing her work as “the immediacy of an apparent content

being denied,” Sturtevant enacted a kind of double trouble that challenged notions of originality and authorship, and encouraged us to look harder. “What you see is what you see,” Stella famously asserted the year Sturtevant began making her art the art of others, but she makes clear that it is never so simple. Her art complicates the ways we look, and the manner in which we understand what we see, demonstrating that what we see is in fact obscured by what we know, what we like, and what we think we are supposed to like. For a Sturtevant work to do its work, we realize, it first has to appear as what it is not. Her art is a lesson in non-conformity, paradoxically dressed up as everything else. Sturtevant: Double Trouble opens at The Museum of Modern Art, New York, November 9, 2014.

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N O. 1 1 6 KO L O D N Y FA M I LY C O L L E C T I O N . P H OTO : P E T E R B U T L E R . © E S TAT E S T U R T E VA N T, PA R I S

S T U R T E VA N T. D U C H A M P WA N T E D . 1 9 6 9. P H OTO G R A P H C O L L AG E . 1 1 7/ 1 6 × 9 ” ( 2 9 × 2 2 . 8 C M ) .

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S T U R T E VA N T. H A R I N G TAG J U LY 1 5 1 9 8 1 . 1 9 8 5. S U M I I N K A N D AC R Y L I C O N C L OT H . 9 1 3 / 1 6 × 1 2 1 3 / 1 6 ” ( 2 5 × 3 2 . 5 C M ) . E S TAT E S T U R T E VA N T, PA R I S .

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S T U R T E VA N T. WA R H O L B L AC K M A R I LY N . 2 0 0 4 . SY N T H E T I C P O LY M E R S I L K S C R E E N A N D AC R Y L I C O N C A N VA S . 1 5 1 5/ 1 6 X 1 3 7/8 I N . ( 4 0. 5 X 3 5. 2 C M ) .

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P R I VAT E C O L L E C T I O N , S W I T Z E R L A N D. C O U R T E SY GAV I N B R O W N ’S E N T E R P R I S E . P H OTO : T H O M A S M U E L L E R . © E S TAT E S T U R T E VA N T, PA R I S

S T U R T E VA N T. E L A ST I C TA N G O . 2 0 1 0. N I N E - C H A N N E L V I D E O I N S TA L L AT I O N . 8 7 3 /8 X 1 5 8 X 2 7 I N . ( 2 2 1 . 9 X 4 0 1 . 3 X 6 8 .6 C M ) ; V I D E O : C O L O R , S O U N D, 1 1 M I N . , 2 S E C .

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Uncovering the Genius of Claude Cahun CALLED ONE OF THE MOST INQUIRING MINDS OF O U R T I M E BY A N D R É B R E TO N, A N D S I M U LTA N E O U S LY P E R S E C U T E D BY T H E N A Z I S, T H E I N F L U E N C E O F S U R R E A L I S T A RT I S T CLAUDE CAHUN’ S G E N D E R- I N Q U I R I N G WO R K C A N R E A D I LY B E S E E N TO DAY. U N F O RT U N AT E LY F O R O U R H I S TO RY B O O K S, S H E ’ S B E E N W R I T T E N O U T O F M O S T AC C O U N T S O F T H E P E R I O D. F I L M M A K E R S M A X F R E E M A N A N D M A R G A R E T S I N G E R R E L E A S E A T R I B U T E TO T H E A RT I S T A N D H E R PA RT N E R M A R C E L M O O R E . TEXT BY

MAX FREEMAN & MARGARET SINGER

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f the Surrealists working in France in the twenties and thirties, none was more original than Claude Cahun. She wrote an experimental novel; she produced stunning photographs and collages; she expressed radical ideas about gender and sexuality; her fearless anti-Nazi propaganda campaign landed her in a Gestapo prison, sentenced to die. It’s a crime that you’ve never heard of her. Born Lucy Schwob in Nantes, France in 1894, she assumed the gender-ambiguous name Claude Cahun and worked on the fringes of Surrealism. Her work is formally experimental, politically conscious, and rejects assumptions about gender dominance even among fellow Surrealists. Her writing is witty and sly. Her collages are intelligent and unsettling. And along with her lover Suzanne Malherbe, aka Marcel Moore, she made a series of self-portraits that have made her fame. Cahun’s notion of gender, apparent in her writing, her photographs, and her collages, has a distinctly contemporary flavor. She writes: “Masculine? Feminine? It depends on the situation. Neuter is the only gender that always suits me.” This situational gender is on display in the self-portraits. Sporting elaborate, homespun costumes, Cahun transforms herself into characters all over the gender map. She takes the markers of gender (clothing, hairstyle, make-up, gestures) not primarily as strictures, but as invitations to play. Take the circus strongman she impersonates in one famous photograph. She’s flat-chested but dolled-up; she poses coquettishly but on her shirt she’s written “don’t kiss me i’m in training.” And to underline the cartoonish nature of these gender signifiers, she has written totor + popol on her barbells—characters in the first comic strip by Hervé. She’s not trying to “pass” as either gender, but to call attention to the artificial conventions by which the genders are popularly defined. Claude’s work is not without an indication of the potential pitfalls of playing around with identity. Of the many masks she wears, she writes, “wearing the mask plays into the hands of those who, for material or psychological reasons, have an interest in not behaving in an open-faced way.” As the Nazis came to power in Germany, her work became more urgent and less abstruse. The voice of another Cahun emerges, one profoundly disturbed by the ugliness she sees in capitalism, in civilization, in war, in other people, in her body, in her self. Early in her career, she expresses the horror of war and questions the wisdom of drafting all physically-fit men without regard to their

moral fitness. These concerns became very real in 1940, when she and her lover found themselves living under the Nazi occupation in Jersey, one of the Channel Islands. Half the island’s population relocated to England to escape the Germans, but Cahun and Moore stayed on. A target twice-over (Jewish and lesbian), Cahun didn’t quietly hole up; she mounted a fearless campaign of “revolutionary defeatism.” In leaflets the two snuck into soldiers’ coat pockets, cars, the officers’ mess and the barracks, they impersonated an imaginary German officer (the Soldier with No Name) who had experienced a change of heart and urged his fellow German soldiers to mutiny. It’s impossible to exaggerate the bravery shown by Cahun and Moore. They were on a small island filled with German troops. There was no chance of escape. The risk of detection was high. And when the Gestapo inevitably identified them as subversives, the Germans refused to believe that these two women acting on their own could be responsible for what seemed to be a widespread resistance. They believed Cahun and Moore were only accomplices, that they were protecting the men in charge. As Claude wrote later, “They were forced to condemn us without believing in our existence.” Anticipating their arrest, Cahun and Moore had set aside “a mortal dose of barbiturates” and were discovered unconscious in their cell the night of their arrest. But their suicide attempt saved them from death in a prison camp: they lay in the hospital recovering when the final boatload of prisoners left Jersey for the continent. Cahun and Moore were found guilty of inciting soldiers to mutiny, which carried a death sentence, and of listening to radio broadcasts, which carried a prison sentence of six months. Uncowed, Cahun asked the judge which of the sentences they would serve first. The pair spent a year in prison, and were freed when the island was liberated in May 1945. But Cahun’s health suffered in prison, and she never recovered. She died in 1954. Moore lived until 1972, when she took her own life. André Breton, the so-called Pope of Surrealism, wrote to Cahun in September 1938: “It seems you are endowed with extensive powers….You know very well that I consider you one of the most inquiring minds of our time…” And yet in Maurice Nadeau’s authoritative History of Surrealism, published in 1945, Cahun is not even mentioned. She disappeared from history, only to be rediscovered later by scholars sensitive to the historical forces responsible for her obscurity—sexism, homophobia, and the dispersal of her work by the Nazis. Margaret Singer and I made the short film Zoetrope in tribute to Cahun’s life and work. Margaret plays Cahun in the film, and Casey Legler appears as an artist struggling with Cahun’s legacy. The two characters enact a surreal drama of artistic collaboration, between peers and across time. The black-and-white film is set to Charlie Piper’s song “Zoetrope,” performed by Alarm Will Sound. Lady Amanda Harlech designed the wardrobe, drawing inspiration from the costumes in the portraits of Cahun: the circus strongman; the devil with wings, skirt and a headdress; the buddha; the woman wearing a star of David; the butch figure in a checkered coat with a head painted gold. Make-up artist Francelle Daly completed the looks, transforming Margaret into a living likeness of Claude Cahun. If the making of the film reveals anything, it’s how very contemporary and relevant Cahun’s images remain.

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“Cahun and Moore were found guilty of inciting soldiers to mutiny, which carried a death sentence, and of listening to radio broadcasts, which carried a prison sentence of six months.”

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Strike a Pose R E N OW N E D A RT I S T K 8 H A R DY I N T E R P R E T S C OAC H ’ S F/ W ’ 1 4 C O L L E C T I O N ARTWORK BY

K 8 H A R DY

TEXT BY

A N N B I N L OT

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s an artist, fashion stylist, designer, and music video director, Brooklyn-based multi-hyphenate K8 Hardy fuses style and art effortlessly, blurring the lines between the two. Hardy turned heads in 2012 when, as part of the Whitney Biennial, she sent a top made of found bras down a runway conceived by fellow artist Oscar Tuazon. So when Coach and its newly-appointed creative director Stuart Vevers were looking for a way to invigorate the accessories label with some fresh energy, Document turned to the rising artist, who injected a dose of shock value into the brand by giving a select number of its F/W ’14 pieces a starring role in her latest work.

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I’m glad Stephen Sprouse’s drawings and ideas were found and now are being presented in a book. Some of my best times were spent hanging around with Stephen. We giggled and laughed a lot. One of my favorite things to do with him was just to watch him draw with his fluid hands and wrists. The fashions seemed to flow right out of the pen or marker (whatever he was using) almost like an animation. Fascinating. He was always drawing. Fortunately I have some of his work, which he gave me so many years ago. It was through his drawings that Stephen communicated to me his ideas for combining accessories, pants, jackets, boots, dresses, jewelry and other things for my tours. He would make sketches of which things would go together but also gave me license to mix it up if I was so inspired. So I could open my suitcase and the drawings were there first thing. I think one of the first dresses Stephen gave me was sewn by Joanne, his mother and the second may have even been made in the Halston studio. The fact that all of the material included in this book was found in a dumpster on 14th Street in New York City in front of the loft where Stephen lived does not speak well of the landlord who had him evicted from the building. It does not speak well for the way the arts are considered generally by the public or for the care New York City extends to the people who create these works. I am glad that Carol and Javier saved all this material and were in the right place at the right time. Sadly, they could only save as much as they found. This archive could have easily sailed away on a garbage barge down the mighty Hudson and from there I couldn’t say.

Stephen Sprouse: Xerox/Rock/Art will be published by Damiani in 2015.

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Stephen Sprouse’s Fashion Diaries DE B BIE H ARRY R E M E M B E R S T H E D E S I G N E R A N D H E R C L O S E F R I E N D, A S A N E W C O L L E C T I O N O F H I S S K E TC H E S E M E R G E S TO I N S P I R E T H E N E X T G E N E R AT I O N. TEXT BY

D E B B I E H A R RY

C O U RT E SY T H E C O L L ECT I O N O F

ARTWORK BY

STEPHEN SPROUSE

C A R O L Mc C R A N I E & J AV I E R M AG R I


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Sonic Youth H EDI S L I M A NE S H A R E S A N E XC L U S I V E P R E V I E W O F H I S F O RT H C O M I N G FA L L E X P O S I T I O N, C H R O N I C L I N G 15 YEARS OF MUSIC. PHOTOGRAPHY BY TEXT BY

HEDI SLIMANE

E M I LY S I N G E R

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aint Laurent Paris creative director Hedi Slimane has been cataloging his collection of black and white photographs on his blog, Hedi Slimane Diary, for nearly a decade. With a pared-down rock aesthetic that is aligned with his clothing designs, Slimane’s photographs offer an intimate glimpse into the London, New York, and Los Angeles rock music scenes. As the subject of the Fondation Pierre Bergé-Yves Saint Laurent’s fall exposition, Sonic, Slimane’s 15 years of photographic archives focus on both performers and their fans, and feature studio portraits of music giants such as Lou Reed, Keith Richards, and Amy Winehouse alongside images from Los Angeles’ alternative music scene. The previously unseen studio portraits will be presented alongside images culled from Slimane’s 2011 California Song solo show at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, which came to define a new visual vocabulary for indie rock imagery. “Sonic” juxtaposes the rock music realms of London and California through still photographs and documentary-style video installations, traversing oceans, generations, and musical currents to reveal a universal grittiness, vulnerability, and creative passion. Sonic opens September 18th, 2014, 5 Avenue Marceau, Paris.

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OBJECT OF DESIRE

Drum and Base PHOTOGRAPHY BY TEXT BY

JA M I E CHU NG

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hen Samuel Amoia and Fernando Mastrangelo joined forces to create AMMA Studio, the duo set out to redefine design. AMMA Studio takes the ordinary—cement, coffee, salt, metal, wood—and transforms these materials into enduring objects that merge sculpture with design. For these pieces AMMA hand-dyed cement, pouring it in layers to form patterns and textures that turn into a narrative on concrete. The result is a symphony of contradictions— stools that are both masculine and feminine, rough yet smooth, and a table that is sturdy, yet charmingly delicate. ammastudionyc.com

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The Michel & Ryan Show P OW E R H O U S E D J M ICHE L GAU B E RT A N D PA RT N E R RYA N AG U IL A R F I R S T C R O S S E D PAT H S L A S T D E C E M B E R A N D H AV E B E E N I N S E PA R A B L E E V E R S I N C E , C U L M I N AT I N G I N A N E N G AG E M E N T PA RT Y O N T H E E V E O F PA R I S C O U T U R E . A S T H E Y E M B A R K O N T H E I R N E W J O U R N E Y TO G E T H E R , DOCU M E N T C ATC H E S U P W I T H T H E DUO POOLSIDE, WHERE THEY OFFER A RARE GLIMPSE INSIDE THEIR T R A N S C O N T I N E N TA L WO R L D. TEXT BY

DA N T H AW L E Y

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

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ore often than not, you’ll find the mirror-lensed cool cat Michel Gaubert behind the decks of the worlds most talked about fashion shows, where he spins soundscapes for avant-garde designers from J.W. Anderson and Proenza Schouler to the Paris powerhouses of Chanel, Dior, and Louis Vuitton. Add half of New York and Milan’s designer melting pot to this busy Frenchman’s quarterly roster and you’ll understand that Gaubert is a 21st-century man, whose thirst for knowledge, diversity, and newness has propelled him from buying records for Paris record store Champs Disques into the upper echelons of the fashion world where he has stayed for over three decades, continuing to shape the sonic continuum of fashion as both a tastemaker and a veritable sponge. He soaks up the audiovisual zeitgeist through a sardonic lens (not to mention his cult instagram account), remixing references old and new, high and low, each informed by his sweeping memory bank of history that stretches from Castle Noise, his Paris base in the 16th arrondissement, to a newfound home away from home in Los Angeles, California. That West Coast sea change has a singular source in a chance reunion with California native Ryan Aguilar last December—the pair crossed paths in LA and have barely parted since, embarking on the latest chapter of Gaubert’s illustrious and dynamic career together as a collaborative duo in life and love. A fellow music buff and pop culture junkie, Aguilar’s arrival was an unexpected spark of joy that arrived nigh on two years after the passing of Gaubert’s life partner Steven Brinke, reigniting a mischievous zest for life that has led them back and forth across the globe from Helsinki to Dubai. Fresno-born Aguilar’s career has crossed its own time zones too, from years spent under New York art magnate Simon Watson and gallerist Barbara Gladstone to curatorial stints in contemporary and decorative arts back in Cali. Throughout his artistic pursuits he calls out music above all as a driving force, ‘a starting point and a unifying factor in my relationships. Music for spaces, music for people, it finessed my way of connecting with artists and designers…’ words that synchronize with Gaubert’s own philosophy sans probleme. The rest, as they say, is history, and on July 3rd this year Michel and Ryan preempted Paris couture with the engagement party of the year, taking over the Lynchian basement of 16th district brasserie Le Petit Victor Hugo with a night of drinks and dancing for an enchanting cross section of characters from the worlds of fashion, music, art and design. They called it UNITED STATES / ETATS UNIS, playing on their Franco-American alliance in all its red, white and blue glory, for a culture clash of family and friends that saw, amongst other surreal anachronisms, Parisian ladies swinging to LA psych pop in vintage Saint Laurent, and a sparkling cake-cutting ceremony that made it all the way to Style.com. Riding on the back of this joyous occasion and serving kitsch where kitsch is due, Document have teamed with the theme, serving up a scattered smorgasbord of transcontinental questions for Michel and Ryan. It’s a skittish roller coaster ride through their wavelength of pop culture above and below, so read it backwards, forwards or upside-down. Michel and Ryan won’t mind. They are already listening to something new. Edited from an interview with Dan Thawley poolside in Los Feliz, California in the high summer of 2014. IF YOU WERE A SUPERHERO, WHO WOULD YOU BE?

MG —Super Mario! I would like to be able to travel from one galaxy to the other through drainpipes and erectile mushroom heads. RA —I would be any superhero that fights for the rights of the marginalized and disenfranchised. I’m a populist and definitely in the underdog corner. Aside: its not easy looking tight in a Lycra bodysuit so credit to all superheroes out there fighting crime and working a sexy look simultaneously!

A BOOK THAT CHANGED YOUR LIFE: MG —Andy Warhol’s Index. My English teacher gave it to me when I was studying in California and it was the first time a teacher gave me a book I would die for. I still have it and at the time it meant the world to me. It still does in a way. RA —Jack Pierson’s monograph All of a Sudden—the images in that book introduced me to a way of looking and living that I found enormously inspiring and which would persuade me to seek out my own adventure in the locales romanticized in that book; namely Provincetown, New York, and Los Angeles. As fate would have it I met Jack my very first visit to Provincetown for Thanksgiving 1998 whereupon we became friends. A few years ago things came a bit full circle when I was asked to curate a Provincetown exhibition in San Francisco that featured his work. FIRST MEMORY OF THE INTERNET? MG —A peep show.

RA —If memory serves correctly my homeroom class in high school paid a visit to the campus library for a presentation on “the  world wide web” and how to perform research. The illustration included things like typing a lot of text onto a black screen to yield  articles about botany, space and things like that. This is before search engines for the masses so the process was laborious and boring. Enchantment and eye-opening impressions of the Internet aren’t my earliest memories. YOUR FIRST JOB? MG —Printing timetables in my grandparent’s business office (with no printers as we know them). RA —Landscaping with my father during the summer months under the hot sun of the central San Joaquin valley.  A GUILTY PLEASURE? MG —Walmart as much for shopping as people watching.

RA —I largely abhor conventional fast food of any kind so this answer is not representing my day to day consumption in any way—but somewhere early in adolescence i became obsessed with placing an order at Taco Bell of two bean burritos, no onions and extra red sauce. I feel lucky the only time this happens now is when I’m traveling through California on the interstate and pull over to satisfy the need on a rare occasion. YOUR FAVORITE BODY PART? MG —Depends on whose, but I usually go for the upper echelon. RA —I love what strong and shapely calves have to say.

DESCRIBE THE CONTENTS OF ONE ROOM AT CASTLE NOISE: MG —The Dining room Established & Sons ‘Caruso’ table ( 180 x 180 ) Jasper Morrison bookshelves 1294 books Achille Castiglioni ‘Toio’ lamps ( 2) Nymphenburg porcelain hippo, elephant & rhino Barber Osgerby’s ‘Lanterne Marine’ vase Andy Warhol Interview book collection ( 7 l ) Eero Saarinen side table A cat scratcher that looks like a Frank Gehry building RA —The kitchen A juice machine Water fountain for the cats Large stainless steel refrigerator A closet dedicated to dry goods, snacks and lots of chocolate tablets Paper white dining table + 4 dining chairs to match Giant rear view mirror

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Fashion Editor LIZZIE BARROIS. Groomer RAMSELL MARTINEZ. Producer GIANINA JIMENEZ BARRANTES. Digital Tech MAXFIELD HEGEDUS.

“As of today there are so many remixes of remixes of original songs that the idea of remixes gets lost in translation. A good song is always a good song whether raw or remixed.”

Untold number of kitchen cookware and utensils A unique collection of teapots (all in white) Various shelves of crockery, flower vases and decorative arts collected over the years A very charming pair of windows that open to a view of the Musée de la Contrefaçon. A REMIX THAT IS BETTER THAN THE ORIGINAL SONG: MG —As of today there are so many remixes of remixes of original songs that the idea of remixes gets lost in translation. A good song is always a good song whether raw or remixed. RA —I’m going to interpret this as a cover that is better then the original version as I like that better, and to this I would say Robert Wyatt’s heart-wrenching cover of ‘At Last I Am Free’ by Chic which for me performs the arduous task of transcending the sublime original. 

LIGHTS ON OR OFF? MG —Dimmed

RA —This completely depends on what might be happening in the room. For me atmosphere is paramount so I’m inclined to say lights on but only if dimmers are involved. I’m also not one to sit in the dark for long, literally or otherwise.

YOUR BEST NIGHTCLUB MOMENT:

YOUR SIGNATURE DISH:

MG —The Mudd club in 1981 when I heard Soft Cell’s ‘Tainted Love’

Michel Gaubert’s Dressed Crab 1 layer of chopped and seeded tomatoes 1 layer of diced avocados 1 layer of fresh king crab 1 layer of cocktail sauce (light mayonnaise/ketchup/tabasco) 1 layer of chopped boiled eggs

playing for one hour nonstop watching a drag queen dressed as Jackie O in the infamous pink suit complete with blood stains. It was not irreverent and there was this feeling that the feeling would never go away. I first saw Karl Lagerfeld at the Club 7 in Paris one night when Jerry Hall, Antonio Lopez, and David Bowie were all there—I was mesmerized to say the least. RA —One summer in Ibiza in the early 00’s they had a Sunday party that ran 24 hours and into Monday whereby most revelers would cart themselves over to the daytime party at DC-10 called Circo Loco to carry on well into Monday afternoon. It sounds rather debauched now, and it was I guess but what I enjoyed most about any of that is laying on the beach afterward sunkissed and blissed out watching kids from all over the world mix and mingle without a care in the world.

Ryan Aguilar’s Beet Salad 10 lbs red beets 1/2 cup balsamic vinegar 3/4 cup canola oil 2 tablespoons olive oil 3 1/2 tablespoons pepper *plus 3 tablespoons of salt for cooking water

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WHAT WAS YOUR FAVORITE DECADE OF THE 20TH CENTURY? MG —They’re

all good for different reasons but I will definitely choose the 80’s. Growing up in France was not so open and in 1981 the government opened the airwaves to many radio stations and new television stations, Le Palace was happening in Paris, the fashion was bold and full on. It was about freedom and power, or at least it seemed that way. RA —I’m going to go with the eighties too. I’m a child of the eighties and definitely feel the pop culture aesthetics produced during this decade greatly inspired me. MTV was hitting big at this time and like most American teens I was completely obsessed with the programming. Beyond the music I would imagine MTV was my first exposure to pop artists like Keith Haring and Robert Longo, both of whom I remember had work featured as animation breaks between the music videos. It may have been a naive point of view of the overall landscape during that time but my personal experience as a California teen during the eighties was one of optimism and color.

in a car within the park to see all the art. III: The James Turrell retrospective last January. It was my first day with Ryan in Los Angeles and I knew it was love. MICHEL’S THREE MUSICAL EUPHORIAS:

I: Definitely the Kraftwerk concert i saw in Paris in 1981, as soon after I was in New York and I heard ‘Numbers’ being played at Paradise Garage and all the black kids dancing to it felt that music was finally crossing over in a big way leading the way to Afrika Bambaataa and other luminaries. II: When Ryan sent me the track ‘Nature Boy’ by Gandalf.

MG —1. ‘Sunset People (Hot Chip

Re-edit)’ by Donna Summer 2. ‘Little Red Corvette’ by Prince 3. ‘The Chauffeur’ by Duran Duran 4. ‘Drive’ The Cars 5. ‘Take my Breath Away’ by Berlin 6. ‘Deeper and Deeper’ by Madonna RA —1. ‘Time of the Season’ by Zombies 2. ‘Today’ by Jefferson Airplane 3. ‘Dreams’ by Mark & Suzann Farmer 4. ‘I Only Have Eyes For You’ by Flamingos 5. ‘Everybody Loves The Sunshine’ by Roy Ayers 6. ‘Don’t Let Me Down’ by Charlotte Dada

MG —A portrait of Elvis Presley on a burnt toast, it does not mean anything and I do not even know who did it. It is quirky as you could get. RA —I’m not one to buy extravagant things but in the category of decorative arts I am rather keen on an exceptionally cool set of Ettore Sottsass dining chairs I scored from a friend at a very reasonable price, which otherwise would have cost a small fortune.

MICHEL ,YOUR THOUGHTS ON À L’AMERICAINE?

A MOVIE THAT MAKES YOU CRY?

YOUR FAVORITE MUSEUM? MG —Neues Museum in Berlin. I like David Chipperfield’s interior design, the meeting of old and new. I stared at Nefertiti for a good half hour. RA —I’m strongly attracted to emerging talents—to new things in all categories—so the Whitney Museum was and continues to be a very inspiring place for me to get connected and see bold moves from rising stars, midcareer artists and icons of the establishment.  MICHEL’S THREE ART ATTACKS:

I: My first trip to Naoshima blew me away, it felt like I was in a movie with an endless plot. II: The Jeff Koons exhibition in Versailles that I had the privilege to view on a Monday when the chateau is closed and was driven around

MG —Going to the Tutankhamun exhibition at the Petit Palais with my mother in 1967. It sparked my curiosity. RA —A family trip from Fresno to San Francisco in 1984 when I was ten years old. I remember being glued to the car window as we drove through the city, completely mesmerized by the colourful self-expression in the streets and the charming architecture, which seemed like a storybook backdrop to what I instinctively interpreted as a city of freedom. At that age I had no idea what counterculture was all about but I definitely sensed feeling inspired, stimulated and highly attracted to what I was taking in.

PLAYLIST:

PURCHASE?

RA —Running on Empty by Sidney Lumet starring River Phoenix (1988).

YOU?

SIX TRACKS FOR AN LA ROADTRIP

YOUR MOST EXTRAVAGANT ART

MG —Cléo from 5 to 7, by Agnes Varda (1962).

A CHILDHOOD MEMORY THAT HAS SHAPED

III: Prince at the Palace, when he was smaller than Prince singing Controversy to 200 people who did not know who he was. He gave as much as he did later in front of 20,000 people. RYAN’S THREE ART ATTACKS:

I: The recent James Turrell retrospective at LACMA. II: Christian Marclay’s ‘The Clock’ (2010). III: Charles Atlas & Antony Hegarty’s collaboration ‘Turning’ at Saint Anne’s Warehouse (2004).

There is a style in France that we call ‘à l’américaine,’ it goes from art to food via style and lifestyle, it usually means more relaxed than the French style that is supposed to be stiff by definition. I lived in America for a year when I was 16, and that was the beginning of a long story with a new chapter opening on December 14th 2013. A l’Américaine always meant alter ego for me, culture sharing, breaking frontiers and limits, mind-opening experiences that have never stopped. It’s also the sense of freedom that Ryan and I celebrated as our very own ‘United States’ on July 3rd this year, one day before July 4th and ten days before July 14th. AND RYAN, YOUR THOUGHTS ON THE

RYAN’S THREE MUSICAL EUPHORIAS:

FRENCH STYLE?

I: Genesis Breyer P-Orridge, every time I have ever seen him perform or speak in public. II: A night at Optimo, Glasgow in 2002. III: The Orb live at the Warfield in San Francisco in the early 90’s.

Mostly I notice the balance between sophistication and a casual attitude. Also, confidence—the French definitely know what they like and what they don’t.

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The New Generation by Bjarne Melgaard F E W A RT I S T S WO R K I N G I N N E W YO R K TO DAY A R E A S PROLIFIC OR INFLUENTIAL AS N O RW E G I A N P OW E R H O U S E BJAR NE M E LGA AR D, N OT O N LY FOR HIS ENGROSSING AND D I S T U R B I N G I N S TA L L AT I O N S, B U T F O R H I S OW N C U R ATO R I A L E F F O RT S A N D W E L L- K N OW N E M B R AC E O F A YO U N G E R G E N E R AT I O N O F A RT I S T S. H E R E ARE SOME OF THE NAMES HE T H I N K S YO U S H O U L D K N OW. C U R AT E D B Y TEXT BY

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BJARNE MELGAARD K E V I N Mc G A R RY

M OV I E STA R M A P S , 2 0 1 4 . H A N D PA I N T E D M U R A L . P H OTO : M I C H A E L U N D E R W O O D. F E AT U R E P R O D U C T I O N : M A X H I R S C H B E R G E R .

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L E N S ( B L U E ) , 2 0 1 3 . U V P R OT E C T I V E AC R Y L I C . P H OTO : J E A N – B A P T I S T E B E R A N G E R .

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Alex Israel

From monolithic sunglass lenses and prefab paintings of sunsets to his talk show As It LAys—which summoned cult specters like Kato Kaelin, Molly Ringwald, and Vidal Sassoon to the couch—Alex Israel subjects the iconographies of Los Angeles to an idolatry that injects their intrinsic flatness with depth. “His work to me is about the real, complete configuration of superficiality in all ways, both artistically and in terms of context.” N O. 1 4 3


Andra Ursuta

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B R O K E N O B E L I S K , 2 0 1 3 . AQ U A R E S I N A N D C H A I R . P H OTO : P E E P - H O L E , 2 0 1 4 .

From humanoid figures to psychologically informed shapes, Andra Ursuta casts sculptures that evoke her innermost fears and at once are universally resonant as monuments to archetypal forms of anguish. “At times Ursuta manages to capture the complexity and endless problems of existential loneliness we all are trying so hard to pretend we don’t feel. A sorrowful Klu Klux Klan member staring out of a window into nothing? How much more precise can questions about the ruins of our civilization get?”

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Haribo

H E L L I S W H E R E I D I E . P H OTO : J E S S I E S T E A D, J A N U A R Y 2 0 1 4 .

Haribo is a band made up of the artists Raul de Nieves, Jessie Stead, and Nathan Whipple. Their shows are maximally destructive, sloppily straddling art and performance in such a way that gives hope to an anti-commercial union of the two in our postLady Gaga era. “They are a reminder of how some people just can’t stop being compulsively creative, and they are good at it in a really kind of bad way that gives a fresh feel to a rather dying art landscape called New York.”

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L A M P I N C O L L A B O R AT I O N W I T H S E A N G E R S T L E Y. V O LC A N O C U R TA I N I N C O L L A B O R AT I O N W I T H K AT E F OX . P H OTO : C L E M E N S KO I S .

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Katie Stout

The furniture and furnishings Katie Stout makes serve recognizable purposes, like holding a plant or covering a floor, but her sculptural extrapolations pull them away from terrestrial functions and towards absurdity. “Lacking any pretense of skillfulness or creative meaning, Stout perverts anything she touches with a sublime hand. She makes objects that are there to delete your whole atmosphere, objects for evenings where everything goes wrong and you secretly enjoy it.”

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L A M P I N C O L L A B O R AT I O N W I T H S E A N G E R S T L E Y. P H OTO : C L E M E N S KO I S .

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DOUBLE SHADOW, 2013-2014.

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Lucas Blalock

Lucas Blalock’s vibrant still lifes freeze time in order to extend it indefinitely. He shoots analog 4x5 photographs and imports them into Photoshop where a single moment can be elaborated upon for hours and a flat image can become a vessel for an unbounded sequence of additive enhancements. He runs humor through a vacuum: bright and buoyant, without contextual frames or stylistic continuity his subjects—hotly lit hot dogs, digitally abstracted wood grain, limbs draped on Pantone paper, a ball and chain juxtaposed by musical notes on a crumpled sheet—are simultaneously presented as inviting and unnervingly plastic. N O. 1 4 8


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Raul De Nieves

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P E N A & J O ( T H E A R T O F C O M F O R T ) . I M AG E C O U R T E SY O F T H E A R T I S T.

Whether painstakingly adorning impossibly crystalline women’s shoes (with more crystals), or eviscerating the stage or some manifestation of himself in an unruly performance, Raul De Nieves is squarely on his own path, developing a lived vocabulary of objects and events that propose questions about identity, glamour, pleasure, and chaos. “The idea of the shiny object and making things for boys that look like they’re done for girls makes Raul one of the most intense players of gender and feminine motions versus masculine gestures in New York today.”

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U N T I T L E D B Y T Y L E R D O B S O N A N D W H I T N E Y C L A F L I N , 2 0 1 4 . D I G I TA L I M AG E .

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Tyler Dobson

Dried up leaves, deflated river rafts, photorealistic cotton weavings, and New Yorker cartoons are some of the oddly familiar miscellany that Tyler Dobson enlists to make a show. He maintains a deliberately inscrutable practice and yet at the same time there’s a generosity to the way he coalesces cultural and emotional referents that avail themselves to viewers without explanation. “Tyler Dobson’s installations are a world inhabited by dumb objects, mishaps, and badly made jokes about bands we all start to hate. Dobson shows us that the unintentional still has an effect on us.”

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S O U T H O F T H E B O R D E R H E E L S , 2 0 1 2 . W O O D, PA I N T, A N D L E AT H E R .

MISHA KAHN

Misha Kahn

Branded by the design world as bizarre, in art terms Misha Kahn’s sculptural furniture pieces play a role that is uncommon but perfectly relatable: they serve the function of furniture, and if they look like and feel like furniture, they must be furniture. And yet, the alchemy that goes into each of his pieces imbues them with such a dynamic formal profile that they are often pose more questions that conventional art objects. “Kahn’s objects are like lamps and sculptures that invite you into a landscape where you suddenly realize you can’t escape. Always in control and giving up at the same time, his ideas encapsulate worlds we didn’t know we needed.” N O. 1 5 2


S AT U R D AY M O R N I N G FA N , 2 0 1 3 . R E S I N , P I G M E N T, A N D FA N . P H OTO : C L E M E N S KO I .

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MISHA KAHN

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Volition TEXT BY

G R E G G B O R D OW I T Z

What does it mean to be an artist in the 21st century? What does anything mean now if nothing means anything at all? Does nothing mean anything at all? How can anything mean something as reflection without being? Is it possible to become reflection without being? How does the question of being possess urgency at the moment? How is meaning being and being nothing something anytime soon but not now? What is the question now? How? How do I proceed now in a way that recalls what it was to proceed before proceeding was a question? How could proceeding be a question other than what I have posed just now? Which principle must I combine with what difficulty to make a virtue? How is virtue appreciated now? How is quality achieved? Is quality achieved as a matter of volition? Is volition a cause or an effect, both or neither? Does anything at all originate with me? In what sense am I original? How is originality a principle? Can originality be encompassed by anything other than the concept itself?

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When we say that something is original what are we saying? What are we feeling? Are saying and feeling two distinct movements? Is it possible for an inanimate object to say anything? Is it possible for an object to possess feeling? How is possession felt and feeling possessed? Is emotion an object to have and to share? If we are both sad looking at the same thing, like a painting, can we say that our sadness is one substance of which we both partake? Is sadness a principle or an element? How do we breathe as we feel? What do we gain by saying an object, the object, any object, possess nothing intrinsically? What do we gain by saying that no object exists unless we create it for ourselves? Can we share what we ourselves do not create? Who are we that we create as we share without volition? What do we gain by saying we lack volition? How do we repeat ourselves? What is the question of belief? Do I believe? How do I believe?

Gregg Bordowitz is an artist and writer who lives in New York. Volition was originally published by Printed Matter in 2009. It is now available as an e-book through Badlands Unlimited: badlandsunlimited.com/books/volition/

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What is the relation between power and description? by Collier Schorr & Fashion Director James Valeri


Fur stole by BALENCIAGA. Shoes by CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN.


Leather jacket by BALMAIN. Leather trousers by EMANUEL UNGARO. Shoes by CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN.


Dress by J.W. ANDERSON. Leggings and boots by MAISON MARTIN MARGIELA.


Coat by MELITTA BAUMEISTER. Beret by JJ HAT CENTER.


Jacket by BOSS. Leggings by MAISON MARTIN MARGIELA. Belt by BALENCIAGA.


(This Page and Opposite): Men’s Jacket by PRADA. Trousers by GIVENCHY BY RICCARDO TISCI. Customized tie by MARTIN KEEHN.


Blazer, trousers, and bowtie by SAINT LAURENT BY HEDI SLIMANE.

Bodysuit by AMERICAN APPAREL. (Opposite): Men’s Jacket by PRADA.


(This Page and Opposite): Jumpsuit by JACQUEMUS. Shoes by J.W. ANDERSON. Customized tie by MARTIN KEEHN.


Blazer and trousers by VIONNET. Shirt by THOMAS PINK. Scarf (worn as tie) by PRADA.


Model SASKIA DE at DNA. Make Up Artist DICK PAGE. Hair Stylist PETER GRAY. Set Design by PETER KLEIN. Casting by SAMUEL ELLIS SCHEINMAN at DM CASTING. Stylist Assistants GIORGIA BRAUW

FUZIO, GINEVRA VALENTE,

and

ISABELLA ANSELMI.

Digital Technician Photo Assistants PJ SPANIOL, CAL CHRISTIE, and

BENEDICT BRINK.

GRAYSON VAUGHAN.

Location ACME Retouching by

STUDIOS.

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(This Page and Opposite): Fur stole by BALENCIAGA. Shoes by CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN. Diamond ring (worn throughout) by CARTIER.


(This Page and Opposite): Leather jacket by BALMAIN. Leather trousers by EMANUEL UNGARO.

Cuff by SAINT LAURENT BY HEDI

Shoes by CHRISTIAN

SLIMANE.

LOUBOUTIN.


(This Page and Opposite): Coat by MELITTA BAUMEISTER. Beret by JJ HAT CENTER. Shoes by SAINT LAURENT BY HEDI SLIMANE.


Top by MARC JACOBS.


Top and trousers by HAIDER Shoes by J.W.

ACKERMANN.

ANDERSON.


Jacket, vest, and trousers by

CHRISTOPHER KANE. Shoes by J.W. ANDERSON.


(This Page and Opposite): Astrakhan coat by DIOR. Blazer and trousers by VIONNET. Shirt by THOMAS PINK. Scarf (worn as tie) by PRADA.


Blazer, leather shirt, trousers, and pocket square by HERMĂˆS. Customized tie by MARTIN KEEHN.


(This Page and Previous): Blazer, trousers, and pocket square by HERMĂˆS. Mask by KIKI DE MONTPARNASSE.


Blazer, leather shirt, trousers, and pocket square by HERMĂˆS. Customized tie by MARTIN KEEHN.


T

he photographer Walker Evans once remarked that all photographs are, in essence, found objects or ready-mades, transforming the everyday into art through decontextualization. New York-based artist Anne Collier has taken this dictum to a logical, art-historical conclusion with her deadpan pictures of print ephemera--from magazines and postcards to LP covers and movie stills. Unlike artists of the so-called Pictures Generation, who appropriated images from their contemporary mass media, Collier sources her objects from flea markets and eBay and shoots them at a distance against an austere white or black background. The resulting still lifes return our gaze to these forgotten artifacts of vision, desire, and power. Collier, who was born in 1970, often focused her lens on representations of women—both in front of and behind the camera—during the first decade of her youth. Those years witnessed both the liberation and objectification of women. The artist ambivalently highlights this paradox by focusing on moments when female subjects seem to take control of the camera: a postcard featuring a bare-breasted Kenyan woman wielding a large camera that masks her face; the cover of a 1978 issue of European photo magazine Zoom depicting a naked woman with her head replaced by a camera; film stills from the 1978 film The Eyes of Laura Mars featuring the actress Faye Dunaway peering through a viewfinder; or even photographs of her own eye. In an increasingly rapid and disposable contemporary visual culture, Collier’s images challenge viewers to look as closely as she does, both at the past and in the present. Anne Collier opens at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, November 22, 2014.

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Woman with a Camera A RT I S T ANN E CO L L IE R ’ S F I R S T M U S E U M S U RV E Y, O R G A N I Z E D BY T H E M C A C H I C AG O, H I G H L I G H T S H E R U N I Q U E C O N T R I B U T I O N TO 2 1 S T- C E N T U RY A RT W H I L E L O O K I N G TO T H E V I S UA L C U LT U R E O F T H E PA S T. ARTWORK BY

ANNE COLLIER

TEXT BY

D R E W S AW Y E R


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( O P E N I N G S P R E A D ) : O P E N B O O K # 1 0 ( L I P S ) , 2 0 1 4 . © C O U R T E SY O F T H E A R T I S T; A N TO N K E R N GA L L E R Y, N E W YO R K ; C O R V I - M O R A , L O N D O N ;


M A R C F OX X GA L L E R Y, L O S A N G E L E S ; T H E M O D E R N I N S T I T U T E / TO B Y W E B S T E R LT D. , G L A S G O W.

( T H I S S P R E A D, L E F T ) : W O M A N W I T H A C A M E R A ( P O ST C A R D , V E R S O R E C T O ) , 2 0 1 3 . ( T H I S S P R E A D, R I G H T ) : ZO O M 1 97 8 , 2 0 0 9. © C O U R T E SY O F T H E A R T I S T; A N TO N K E R N GA L L E R Y, N E W YO R K ; C O R V I - M O R A , L O N D O N ;

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L O S A N G E L E S ; T H E M O D E R N I N S T I T U T E / TO B Y W E B S T E R LT D. , G L A S G O W.

A N TO N K E R N GA L L E R Y, N E W YO R K ; C O R V I - M O R A , L O N D O N ; M A R C F OX X GA L L E R Y,

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Are all these questions the urgent concerns of art? by Richard Prince & Fashion Director James Valeri


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Clothing and jewelry Daria’s own.


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Model DARIA WERBOWY at Casting by SAMUEL ELLIS SCHEINMAN at DM CASTING. Stylist Assistant KADEEM GREAVES. Location RICHARD PRINCE STUDIOS. Retouching by URBAN STUDIO. IMG.

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Fur coat by MARNI.

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Fur jacket by SACAI.

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(This Page and Opposite): Vintage T-shirt (worn underneath) from BESS. Shirt Daria’s own. Hat by Richard Prince.

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(This Page): Vintage T-shirt (worn underneath) from BESS. Hat, shirt, and jeans model’s own. Sneakers by CONVERSE. (Opposite): Bra by HANRO.

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(This Page): Vintage shirt from BESS. Jewelry Daria’s own. (Opposite): Bra and panty by HANRO .

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S

ince the mid 1970s, Linder Sterling has engaged in a dedicated inquiry into the cultural mechanisms that inform desire. Our collective appetite for beauty, Linder suggests, is shaped through a series of assaultive visual and psychological processes that occur both within and outside of ourselves, a series of suggestions that eventually inform both who we are and what we want. Linder directly addresses this concept via her use of collage, a medium that recontextualizes the syntax of extant printed imagery in ways that are, by nature, excessive and additive. The resulting images offer a kind of unification between disparate ephemeral artifacts, a marriage between the body and the objects that render identity. For her new collaboration with Dior Fine Jewelry, the artist wed imagery of Victoire de Castellane’s jewelry to photographs from Dior’s archives. Combining, as Linder states, “both abstract and figurative juxtaposition,” the collaboration offers a commentary on the inextricable connections between fantasy, the body, and identity. De Castellane’s own generative approach marries gorgeously to this partnership rife with surreal surprises: “[Inspiration comes] from everywhere: art, exhibitions, films, photography, the street, the female world, love, sexuality, psychoanalysis, life itself…The jewels I create are like characters to whom I give names.” Striking an uncanny harmony between the past and the present, the images reiterate Linder’s mastery of her medium while imbuing de Castellane’s objects with both life and legacy.

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Mixed Media A RT I S T LI NDE R ST E R LI NG E X P L O R E S T H E H A R M O N Y B E T W E E N PA S T AND PRESENT IN ARCHI DIOR, THE NEW COLLECTION FROM D I O R F I N E J E W E L RY, D E S I G N E D BY V I C TOI R E DE C AST E LLANE . ARTWORK BY

LINDER STERLING

TEXT BY

ALISSA BENNETT


With all their charm, 2014. ‘‘Archi Dior Ailée Diamant’’ bracelet by DIOR FINE JEWELRY. Cyclone dress, Autumn-Winter 1948 Collection, Ailée line, by DIOR HAUTE COUTURE.


P H OTO W I L LY M AY WA L D. © A S S O C I AT I O N W I L LY M AY WA L D /A DAG P, PA R I S 2 0 1 4 .

To pursue truth, 2014. ‘‘Archi Dior Verticale Godet Saphir’’ earrings by DIOR FINE JEWELRY. Panier percé dress, Spring-Summer 1950 Collection, Verticale line, by DIOR HAUTE COUTURE. N O. 2 1 6


P H OTO W I L LY M AY WA L D. © A S S O C I AT I O N W I L LY M AY WA L D /A DAG P, PA R I S 2 0 1 4 .

I have had my vision, 2014. ‘‘Archi Dior Milieu du Siècle Diamant’’ earrrings by DIOR FINE JEWELRY. Junon dress, Autumn-Winter 1949 Collection, Milieu du siècle line, by DIOR HAUTE COUTURE. N O. 2 1 7


Nothing need be said, 2014. ‘‘Archi Dior Corolle Soir Rubis’’ ring by DIOR FINE JEWELRY. Soirée dress, Spring-Summer 1947 Collection, Corolle line, by DIOR HAUTE COUTURE. N O. 2 1 8


Veiled by memory, 2014. ‘‘Archi Dior Trompe L’Oeil Diamant Jaune’’ ring by DIOR FINE JEWELRY. Marly dress, Spring-Summer 1949 Collection, Trompe-l’oeil line, by DIOR HAUTE COUTURE. N O. 2 1 9


In the face of the flowing, 2014. ‘‘Archi Dior Ailée Emeraude’’ necklace by DIOR FINE JEWELRY. Amour dress, Autumn-Winter 1948 Collection, Ailée line, by DIOR HAUTE COUTURE. N O. 2 2 0


The setting of her beauty, 2014. ‘‘Archi Dior Envol Drapé Diamant Jaune’’ ring by DIOR FINE JEWELRY. Drag dress, Spring-Summer 1948 Collection, Envol line, by DIOR HAUTE COUTURE. Special Thanks STUART SHAVE MODERN ART, LONDON. N O. 2 2 1


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Stella Tennant by Mario Testino & Isa Genzken Meeting somewhere between his uncalculated cool and her controlled chaos, powerhouses Mario Testino and Isa Genzken collaborate on an exclusive series of images starring perennial favorite Stella Tennant. The results document their joyful alchemy, proof that the collision of two visions can sometimes celebrate the best of both.


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Special thanks to Daniel Buchholz and Filippo Weck at Galerie Daniel Buchholz, Urban Studios, Malena Bach, and David Bonnouvrier at DNA Models.


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’m trying to remember the specifics of Greer, the way her legs and arms moved in her summer dresses. Because that’s the season I associate her with, and I associate her, too, with something diaphanous, but I wonder if that impression is based on Nan Goldin’s famous photographs of her, and the one I’m thinking of specifically was taken against a brick wall where Greer sort of sits and sort of leans, smoking, looking, at first, like another down on her luck artist, but something more, too, like a ruined movie star having a movie star moment in the photograph that was happening just now, first to Goldin and then to us. But no artist is down on her luck when she has her art. It’s what Greer fed on, even when she ate no other food at all. Her dolls were starved for our attention. They had thin arms but lips or eyes that competed with the klieg lights one saw inside their living minds. What was the name of that place where Greer displayed her dolls? It was at—what would you call Einstein’s in the East Village? A boutique? I remember it was on First or Second Avenue, and I remember the windows filled with Greer, her dolls attenuated limps stretching this way and that, and those incredible faces, the manifestation of some dream of femaleness, usually, that reflected Greer’s own ideas about her own femaleness, a hard journey that didn’t make her any happier but gave her herself, a maker of females in her own emotional image. Sometimes, looking at Greer’s dolls in that window at Einstein’s, I had to turn away, they bordered on a kind of drag that I don’t particularly feel comfortable with—woman as an object of ridicule rather than celebration—and when I think of that I wonder what Greer was thinking, largely about herself ? About her past, as the daughter of a pastor? A native of Flint, Michigan who transitioned from Greg to Greer based on funds her father collected from his congregation—that’s a very public way to come out, and I’m sure not free of guilt: how could Greer ever repay them? Well, one way, of course, is by becoming the artist she was, it’s all there in the work, her various complications, dreams, and beliefs, all produced during a time when spotting someone like Greer on Second Avenue, or in a bar, was not unusual and unusual, all at the same time. It’s so hard to look back and see what’s been erased of New York when artists like Greer lived in New York but isn’t it marvelous to know that their imaginations live in the concrete, still, like some old and nourishing song, or the very art Greer created out of her tortured, whole, and vibrant self ? Greer Lankton, LOVE ME opens November 2, 2014, at Participant Inc, 253 East Houston Street, New York.

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Doll Parts H I LTO N A L S R E C A L L S S O M E O F HIS MOST POIGNANT MEMORIES OF A RT I S T G R E E R L A N KTON . TEXT BY

H I LTO N A L S


(Clockwise, from top left): Freddie, 1981, and Ellen, circa 1980 (photo by Greer Lankton 1983 for the civilian warfare show). Diana Vreeland, circa 1989 (photo by Paul Monroe). Clockwise from top: Edie Sedgwick, 1981 (photo by Greer Lankton). Grandma and Suzanne, Palm Beach, 1985 (photo by Greer Lankton). Jackie Kennedy, 1985 (photo by Greer Lankton). Rachel, 1986 (photo by Greer Lankton). Sissy, Prince Street Station, circa 1983 (photo by Greer Lankton).


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(Clockwise, from top left): Candy Darling, 1985 (Photo by Greer Lankton); Jezus!, 1984 (Photo by Greer Lankton); Sissy and Cherry in front of Einsteins, NYC, 1988 (Photo by Paul Monroe); Ethyl Eichelberger, 1986 (Photo by Greer Lankton) (Opposite): Peter Hujar, Greer Lankton in Bed, 1983. Courtesy of the Peter Hujar Archive. Special thanks to Paul Monroe and Lia Gangitano N O. 2 3 2


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ome people follow trends, others make them. For three decades, the legendary hair stylist Guido Palau has twisted chignons, woven braids and pinned the tresses on the runways that dictate what’s next in fashion. Supermodel Raquel Zimmermann talks to Palau about meditation, inspiration, and his new Rizzoli book, Hair: Guido.

RAQUEL —Guido, I’ve always admired your work because of its unique vision. You’re always ahead, avant-garde. You take in the vision of the designer, or the artist, or the photographer, but then you make more out of it. GUIDO —I think that comes from my beginning, when I didn’t technically know how to do hair the “right” way, so I did it my own way, and then it became a kind of idea or aesthetic. RAQUEL —And a discovery. GUIDO —The off-way to do a chignon or the off-way to do an updo became my style in a way. It was a different point of view. But, in this book, I wanted to show perfection because I felt that other type of hairdressing—that undone kind—is very of-the-moment and what everybody thinks is modern hair, so I wanted the book to go against that. I wanted to show another sort of beauty and another sort of person that could be in my fantasy, but all of the references in this book are from my days in England in the seventies or the eighties, or my experiences, say, with Alexander McQueen and his inspirations. It’s a combination of those things that come out in this sort of visual way. RAQUEL —I appreciate when I’m just as pretty in a photograph as I am naturally, but I get more satisfaction as a model from becoming a character, and that’s the beauty of working with you. It’s like I’m a creature. GUIDO —I always look at the different person in the room, the person who is more unusual or has her own style, so when I’m left to do my own thing, I want to create something that raises questions. What is it? Is it really beautiful? RAQUEL —What is beauty? GUIDO —Yes, what is beauty? And, the idea of the book is to question things. Now, I think we’ve come to a point where things are very safe and very acceptable, so it’s nice to do a project like this and really express my ideas, and not edit myself, but be free. I think what I like about working with you—and we have worked together for so long

now—is that you take on a role, look very intently at what I’m doing, and you make it work; that’s a great creative process and it’s why I still enjoy doing what I do. It’s a small group of three or four, and it goes into a magazine that lots of people see —but the actual process is very small. It’s like making a record or doing a performance—you can only do it with certain people. RAQUEL —It’s true; we all get there together. GUIDO —But, I also think what excited me about fashion was looking at the amazing transformations of models in the sixties, and the seventies, and the eighties. I love that way you can transform a person into some kind of fantasy—that’s what I enjoy, that’s why I got into this business. And, of course, now my role is different because I have to sometimes do simpler things, but, in its pure form, I love the creation of a character. RAQUEL —It’s funny, because when I was about 13, it was the first time I thought about modeling as this fantasy world—I was a kid in Brazil and I saw a picture of Naomi Campbell on the catwalk when she was wearing those extreme Vivienne Westwood shoes, and I thought, Wow, this is different.  GUIDO —What do you think about being a model? RAQUEL —I feel similar to what you just described, especially when I am able to do something different and be creative, because I can also be photographed just as I am.  GUIDO —It’s nice that you can do both—you’re lucky that you can be very simple and natural, and your face allows people to be really creative. It’s almost as though I cannot put enough wigs on you and makeup, but you still come through; you don’t get drowned in it, which is a really amazing quality for a model because some models can’t take it. That’s probably why people love working with you and why you’ve had such a long career. People probably think of stories and work them around what you can bring to it, and it’s very nice for creative people to have a muse. It feels like when you come into the studio you’re bringing your creative side. RAQUEL —You described it so well, with that small group of people— that’s probably where I find the most joy in my job, when you feel that the group of people is in the moment and creating. And then, after, you don’t know if it’s going to be criticized. GUIDO —I think that’s artistic; when you put yourself on the line, you can be criticized. But that’s fine, because that’s what people do. The

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Celebrating Hairstylist Guido’s New Book with Raquel & Kameron Photography by Fabien Baron, Hair by Guido, & Fashion Editor Jay Massacret


Models RAQUEL ZIMMERMANN at DNA and KAMERON ZANE at CLICK . Hair Stylist Assistants SANDY HULLETT , BENJAMIN MULLER , and MARISA BOLLMAN . Make Up by FRANKIE BOYD . Make Up Assistant RYO YAMAZAKI . Fashion Assistant OLIVIA KOZLOWSKI . Nail Technican NAOMI YASUDA . Lighting Director ROB KASSABIAN . Digital Technician. CLINT HILD . Photography Assistants DAVID SCHINMAN , PAVEL WOZNICKI . BARON & BARON Executive Producer MINA VIEHL . BARON & BARON Producer SARAH SAUL . All clothing stylist’s own. (This

spread, left to right): LUDWIG PERSIK , COLE MOHR , and IRIS STRUBEGGER all photographed by DAVID SIMS from Hair: Guido published this fall by Rizzoli.

real test of it is when you look back five years later at the pictures you did or the hair I might have done—I’m my own worst critic anyway, so nobody can critique my work as bad as I can. And I’m sure it’s the same with you. If people are critical or critiquing it, at least it means you’ve created some kind of impression. It might not always be, “Oh, she looks so beautiful in that picture,” and, instead, that you look strange, but there’s a reaction. If you just do pretty pictures the whole time, you always look pretty. After a while, people are kind of like, Ugh. And that’s what I wanted to do with the book—not always the most classically beautiful girls. To me, all of the people in the book are very great-looking and I’m very inspired by them. Their hair was designed around them—I would see them and then I would work out a hairstyle. RAQUEL —What made you want to do your job and how did you start? GUIDO —Well, a few of my friends were hairdressers and I didn’t know what else to do. I wasn’t very qualified at school, I didn’t do many exams, so I just thought, I’ll do hairdressing. So I went to London, got a job at Vidal Sassoon, which didn’t last long—I got fired—and then I went around to different salons learning, and at one salon, there was a girl going on a photo shoot (this was the mid-eighties) and I went with her as her assistant. That’s when I discovered there was this job that existed. As soon as I saw that, I thought,  “Yeah, I like this creative process.” I don’t think I could have worked in a salon; I don’t think it was my destiny. When I found the studio environment and fashion, that’s when I felt comfortable, so then I began to work in different studios and I learned hairdressing—but, still now, my training isn’t immense. I don’t have the best technical skills; it’s more of wanting to achieve it and asking how it becomes achievable. Then, I just worked and worked and worked, and worked hard. When you work hard at your job, you meet other people who work hard at their jobs and you form little teams, and your work becomes better. On the way, I met these great people, like David Sims and Steven Meisel who taught me different aspects of fashion—it’s not like I had all of that in me. Now, I feel more confident to say what I think. That took a lot of years of nurturing, and confidence, and mistakes, and all that. So, I was lucky, I could’ve taken a different turn and I could be in a regular salon. RAQUEL —You could be in a chain of salons. GUIDO —Oh, not even. I could have ended up in a local salon, but your fate takes you— RAQUEL —And your intuition and— GUIDO —And that brings us nicely to meditation. We have to explain that we both do meditation, so we both go to— RAQUEL — Transcendental meditation. GUIDO —And we didn’t know we both did but we— RAQUEL —Figured out later on. GUIDO —I started about three years ago, but I think you’re more fullon than I am. RAQUEL —I guess I have a lot of questions in my mind and it’s a technique—it’s like a scientific thing—you just sit down and close your eyes and you get in touch with yourself. And you really feel who you are and what direction you want to take.

GUIDO —The meditation helps me to calm down, so, in a way, it helps me be creative because it just stilled my mind. Those two times in a day quiet me down; I let go of some anxieties and some fears. It’s a personal thing that I needed to have for myself. You know, when you’re in this business, you’re working a lot and you’re traveling, and it’s very difficult to have your own time, and it gives you energy. Every aspect of your life works better. RAQUEL —I feel that—I’m from a small town in the south of Brazil and then I just took this jump and then I was traveling all over the world and meeting so many people and it’s great and it’s wonderful, it’s changed my life. But now I just feel like there’s so much information all the time through the internet, Facebook, Instagram, television, noise all the time in New York and I get anxiety and these distractions, a lot of distractions, so I feel that when I meditate I can calm down, relax and then be still for a moment and let my own creativity and intuition talk to me, not what’s coming from outside but what’s coming from in. GUIDO —And I think anything that can help anybody become more in touch with themselves or calm them down and give them some moments of peace through New York or cities anywhere in the world. People are very stressed, so we need some more things that can help us that are good for us, not just like, “I want to go out and get drunk and relax,” you know what I mean? RAQUEL —Yeah, because that’s an escape—which is fine, sometimes you need an escape, but it’s a different thing. I hear more and more people are getting into it and it’s a great thing. GUIDO —What else is there to talk about? RAQUEL —Who are your favorite artists and movie directors? GUIDO —I like Fellini and I like David Lynch and I love anyone who has an opinion of visual things, and the same with artists. I love seeing imagery, but I’m as inspired by the street as I am by a movie. RAQUEL —Anything could inspire you. GUIDO —Could be anything, it doesn’t have to be a great movie director even though when you look at great movies they’re inspiring, but I can just look at a woman on the street and she’s inspiring, or a guy

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on the street as inspiring, and I get as much inspiration from that as I do a great painting. I find when I look at great paintings I’m slightly removed from them because they’re not in my world. When I see someone on the street I can relate to them. I can be inspired by anything or by getting lost in my thoughts or listening to some music. I think you have to be aware, keep your eyes open and never think that you’ve said everything. There’s always something new to say. RAQUEL —Things can change every day. They’re changing all the time. It’s funny, with music I’m always changing, every day I like a different thing, yesterday I found myself listening to Chopin, like classical piano playing and I was like, “I love this, this rocks.” Not Metallica anymore, now it’s Chopin. It’s great, just keep yourself open to everything and all different experiences. GUIDO —Music is so important to people because it can give you an energy and it can give you a moment and that’s why often in creative places they have music playing because it can be a very inspiring kind of trigger to something and it sets the mood a lot of the time. But my personal musical taste can go from A-to-Z and you don’t even want to know what that is because—[Racquel laughs]. GUIDO —What do you think about your hair, personally? RAQUEL —For girls, it’s so funny. I hear of girls that are like, “I went and I cut my hair and I was crying for a week,” and I thought, “yeah, they cut a little piece of hair,” and it’s so intense for girls to change. I think it’s quite liberating as a girl to just let go. GUIDO —I try to explain to people that models are the model for that moment, for that one second that you see them on the runway or in a thing, but the second before they might not feel great but then there’s that one moment that is captured and it’s great, and all those women that inspire me, all the women that inspire me or men are those men that, if you ever see a woman come out here now and she’s got an elaborate style you’re “like, wow, look how amazing is that!” I always want to encourage that when I talk to women about their hair, like, “try it, who knows. It might be great.” RAQUEL —Tell me about your book. This is the second one, how long did it take to prepare?

GUIDO —The book, it took about two-and-a-half years and it started with one picture, the cupboard picture that I did, and then I was very inspired by that and then I was thinking about doing a book and that was the starting point. The whole just visual side of the book, how I wanted the girls and boys to look, took maybe five shootings, about five shootings over two years when I had a free day and David was free, and we’d do some casting and then we’d work out, me and my team would work out the hair. RAQUEL —The casting is interesting—the characters. GUIDO —Yeah, so then we’d do the different characters, and then we’d work out between us what hair they should have and then on the day of the shoot it was kind of worked out so we’d have maybe six hairdressers and each one would be working and then we’d shoot more, so it was like a big production, but we got it done quite quickly. RAQUEL —What is a great memory, a funny episode of your career or highlight of your career that you can share? GUIDO —I’ve been lucky enough to work with all the people that I ever really thought I wanted to work with. I was very lucky that I’ve worked with great photographers like Richard Avedon, Irving Penn and Steven Meisel and all the people that I’d looked up to and then I was suddenly working with them. It was really incredible, and then to still be working in the industry and people seem to like what I do, so that’s a very nice thing, it’s not like one pivotal…I suppose I always think of the George Michael video which I did with the supermodels in the nineties. RAQUEL —You did that! Wow! GUIDO —With Christy, Linda, Naomi, Tatiana, and Cindy, that was incredible because I look at it now and I didn’t realize at the time what a big deal it was going to be, and it was at the moment at the height of the supermodels and it was a great thing to have done and look back at. RAQUEL —A moment in history. GUIDO —Yeah, it was a moment, and it’s something people put on and everyone seems to know it and love it and it seems to have inspired a lot of people to get into fashion.

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How does the unexpected surprise? by Roe Ethridge & Fashion Editor Robbie Spencer


Coat by CHRISTOPHER KANE. Lace jumpsuit (worn underneath) by MEADHAM KIRCHHOFF. Briefs by AMERICAN APPAREL. (Opposite): Shoes by CHRISTOPHER KANE.


Jacket, skirt, and sneakers by CHANEL. Shirt by MEADHAM KIRCHOFF. Earrings by SARAH HO. Tights by EMILIO CAVALLINI.


(This Page and Opposite): Leather dress and shirt by ALEXANDER WANG. Tights by EMILIO CAVALLINI. Shoes by SAINT LAURENT BY HEDI SLIMANE. Models BINX WALTON at NEXT and CARLA CIFFONI at IMG MODELS. Hair Stylist AKKI. Make Up by SIL BRUINSMA. Set Design by ANDY HARMAN. Lighting design by DAVID DIESING. Lighting Assistant LUCAS FLORES PIRAN. Digital Technician JONATHAN NESTERUK. Casting by SAMUEL ELLIS SCHEINMAN at DM CASTING. Fashion Assistants VICTOR CORDERO and LIZY CURTIS. Location BATH HOUSE STUDIOS Retouching by TWO THREE TWO.


Carla wears coat and sweater by COACH. Underwear by AMERICAN APPAREL. Shoes by CHRISTOPHER KANE.


Jacket, skirt, and sneakers by CHANEL. Shirt by MEADHAM KIRCHOFF. Earrings by SARAH HO. Tights by EMILIO CAVALLINI.


Tights by EMILIO CAVALLINI. Sneakers by CHANEL.


(This Page and Opposite): Sweater, skirt, briefs, and handbag by MIU MIU. Socks by JONATHAN ASTON. Shoes by STELLA MCCARTNEY.


Dress by VALENTINO.


Sweater by COACH. Skirt by MIU MIU.


Jacket and skirt by J.W. ANDERSON. Gloves by VERONIQUE BRANQUINHO. (Opposite): Carla wears leather dress and knit dress (worn underneath) by  KENZO.


Coat, scarf, and shoes by PRADA. Dress (worn underneath) by BOTTEGA VENETA.


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How is continuity of style maintained? A closer look at Bottega Veneta’s F/W 2014 Collection by Harley Weir & Fashion Editor Jack Borkett


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Models KIM PEERS at NEXT, HELENA BICKLEY at STORM, and AGNES KAY at MODELS 1. Fashion Assistants KATE IORGA and BOJANA KOZAREVIC. Hair Stylist MARTIN CULLEN. Make Up by AYAMI. Casting by SAMUEL ELLIS SCHEINMAN at DM CASTING. Location THE MILL CO PROJECT, ROSE LIPMAN BUILDING.

Men’s trousers by BOTTEGA VENETA. (Opposite Page): Skirts by BOTTEGA VENETA.

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Dress by BOTTEGA VENETA. Turtleneck (worn underneath) stylist’s own. (Opposite Page): Men’s coat by BOTTEGA VENETA.

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Men’s track jacket and pants by BOTTEGA VENETA. (Opposite Page): Dress by BOTTEGA VENETA. N O. 2 6 7


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Men’s suit by BOTTEGA VENETA. (Opposite Page): Agnes wears sweater by BOTTEGA VENETA. Tights stylist’s own.

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Dress by BOTTEGA VENETA. (Opposite Page): Agnes wears fur coat by BOTTEGA VENETA. N O. 2 7 1


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Helena wears slip dress by BOTTEGA VENETA. (Opposite Page): Sweater by BOTTEGA VENETA. N O. 2 7 3


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Is there a better metaphor for progress more accurate than forward movement? by Cedric Buchet & Fashion Editor Sabina Schreder


Dancers HAVOC and MARTINA HEIMANN. Hair Stylist KEVIN RYAN. Make Up Artist PEP GAY. Casting by ROS OKUSANYA. Stylist Assistant STACIE CARRINGTON . (Opening Spread): Martina wears sweater by JEREMY SCOTT FOR ADIDAS. Skirt and sneakers by Y-3. Hat and gloves stylist’s own Sunglasses by JEREMY SCOTT FOR LINDA FARROW . Havoc wears tank and hat stylist’s own. Pants by JEREMY SCOTT FOR ADIDAS. Sunglasses by MYKITA. Backpack by ADIDAS SPORT PERFORMANCE. Scarf stylist’s own. Gloves by SERMONETA. Sneakers by MAISON MARTIN MARGIELA. (This Spread): Jacket by JEREMY SCOTT FOR ADIDAS. Dress by BURBERRY PRORSUM. Briefs by ERES. Hat by NIKE. Gloves and socks stylist’s own. Sneakers by PIERRE HARDY.

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Martina wears top & gloves by KTZ. Shorts by MM6. Leggings by ADIDAS ORIGINALS. Hat stylist’s own. Sneakers by FEIT. Havoc wears t-shirt by NIKE. Pants by HOOD BY AIR. Hat stylist’s own. Gloves by SERMONETA Sneakers by FEIT.

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Sweater and pants by

BERNHARD WILLHELM . Hat

by SUPREME. Sunglasses by MYKITA. Gloves by SERMONETA. Sneakers by FEIT.

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Coat, sweater, and leggings by CHANEL. Hat by SUPREME. Gloves stylist’s own. Fanny pack by MISSONI. Sneakers by FEIT. N O. 2 8 1


Jacket by TOMMY HILFIGER. Leggings by ADIDAS ORIGINALS BLUE. Goggles by KTZ. Shoes by Y-3. Gloves stylist’s own.

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Jacket and pants by PORSCHE DESIGN. Top (worn underneath) by ELECTRIC LOVE ARMY. Hat by Y-3. Sunglasses by LINDA FARROW FOR AGENT PROVOCATEUR.

Gloves, socks, and towel stylist’s own. Sneakers by ADIDAS ORIGINALS.

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Cardigan and shoes by MOSCHINO. Jeans by ASHISH. Gloves stylist’s own.

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Martina wears coat and pants by SONIA RYKIEL. Blouse by MARNI. All accessories stylist’s own. Havoc wears sweater and shorts by COMME DES GARÇONS HOMME PLUS. Tank (worn underneath) and hat stylist’s own. Sunglasses by MYKITA. Sneakers by FEIT.

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Martina wears shirt and pants by CREATURES OF COMFORT. T-shirt (worn underneath) and backpack by KENZO. Hat by VIVIENNE WESTWOOD GOLD LABEL. Sunglasses by LINDA FARROW. Gloves stylist’s own. Sneakers by FEIT. Havoc wears sweatshirt and pants by KENZO. Tank (worn underneath) and hat stylist’s 0wn. Gloves by SERMONETA. Sneakers by FEIT.

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(This page and Opposite): Martina wears coat, shirt, and skirt by MIU MIU. Headband and gloves stylist’s own. Sneakers by FEIT. Havoc wears jacket by NIKE. Top and pants by KENZO. Sweatband stylist’s own. Gloves by SERMONETA. Sneakers by FEIT. N O. 2 8 9


D O C U M E N T N O. 2 9 0

What can we be to each other standing together facing something indescribable?

by Johan Sandberg & Fashion Editor Mauricio Nardi


(This Page and Opposite): Shirt by DIOR HOMME.


(This Page and Opposite): Coat by HERMÈS. Shoes by JUNYA WATANABE .


Model MAARTJE VERHOEF at WOMEN . Hair Stylist TOMOHIRO OHASHI . Make Up by CHRISTINE CORBEL . Casting by ALEXANDRA SANDBERG. Stylist Assistant DEBORAH DE GROOT.


Top by CÉLINE .


Dress by LANVIN. Shoes by JUNYA WATANABE.


(This Page): Dress by STELLA MCCARTNEY . Shirt (worn underneath) by DIOR HOMME. (Opposite): Coat by DIOR HOMME. Top and skirt by CÉLINE. Shoes by JUNYA WATANABE .


(This Page): Vest by SONIA RYKIEL. T-shirt stylist’s own. Skirt by CÉLINE. Shoes by JUNYA WATANABE. (Opposite): Denim jacket stylist’s own. Jacket (worn underneath) and skirt by CHANEL.


(This Page): Coat and trousers by JUNYA WATANABE. (Opposite): Dress by DIOR. T-shirt (worn underneath)stylist’s own. Trousers by MAISON MARTIN MARGIELA . Shoes by REEBOK.


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How to return to the question of art? by Amy Troost & Fashion Editor Tony Irvine


Sweater by PAUL SMITH. Skirt by

STELLA MCCARTNEY . Shoes (worn

throughout) by VALENTINO.

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Model LARISSA HOFMANN at DNA. Hair Stylist SHINGO SHIBATA . Make Up by BENJAMIN PUCKEY. Stylist Assistant SUSAN WALSH. Coat and belt by CÉLINE. N O. 3 0 4


Coat by SAINT LAURENT BY HEDI SLIMANE. Sweater by PAUL SMITH. Necklace (worn throughout) stylist’s own.

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Top and skirt by JIL SANDER .

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Sweater by J.W.

ANDERSON. Skirt by MARC JACOBS. N O. 3 07


Sweater by CHRISTOPHER KANE . Skirt by ACNE. N O. 3 0 8


Dress and bag by STELLA MCCARTNEY.

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Top by HERMÈS.

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Dress by MARC JACOBS. Top (worn underneath) by SONIA RYKIEL. N O. 3 1 1


D O C U M E N T— F/ W 2 0 1 4

D O C U M E N T N O. 3 1 2

How is a new beginning a matter of location? by Kacper Kasprzyk & Fashion Editor Elissa Santisi

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D O C U M E N T— F/ W 2 0 1 4

Blouse by DEREK LAM RESORT ‘15.

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D O C U M E N T— F/ W 2 0 1 4

Models STEPHANIE JOY FIELD at NEXT MODEL MANAGEMENT and WILLIAM LEVERETT at VNY MANAGEMENT. Hair Stylist TOMI KONO. Make Up Artist LISA HOUGHTON. Set Design by KATE MCCOLLOUGH. Casting by SAMUEL ELLIS SCHEINMAN at DM CASTING. Photo Assistants NICHOLAS ONG and MARU TEPPEI. Stylist Assistant LACEY LENNON. Location INDUSTRIA STUDIOS.

William wears sweater, shirt, and trousers by GUCCI. Stephanie wears sweater by REED KRAKOFF RESORT ‘15.

Skirt by ACNE . Handbag by

THE ROW . Belt by DEREK LAM.

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D O C U M E N T— F/ W 2 0 1 4

Turtleneck by RALPH LAUREN . Skirt by BALENCIAGA RESORT ‘15. Scarf by FENDI. Watch by CARTIER. Shoes by TABITHA SIMMONS.

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D O C U M E N T— F/ W 2 0 1 4

Shirt by TRADEMARK RESORT ‘15. Jeans and earrings by VALENTINO RESORT ‘15. Scarf and cuffs by HERMÈS.

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D O C U M E N T— F/ W 2 0 1 4

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D O C U M E N T— F/ W 2 0 1 4

Jacket, cardigan, and dress by MIU MIU. Cuffs by HERMÈS.

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D O C U M E N T— F/ W 2 0 1 4

Shirt, trousers, and scarf by PRADA.

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D O C U M E N T— F/ W 2 0 1 4

William wears shirt and trousers by Stephanie wears dress and belt by LOUIS VUITTON.

PRADA.

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D O C U M E N T— F/ W 2 0 1 4

Jacket and trousers by STELLA Scarf by MARNI. Bangle stylist’s own.

MCCARTNEY RESORT ‘15.

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D O C U M E N T— F/ W 2 0 1 4

Jacket, shirt, and skirt by VERONIQUE BRANQUINHO

Scarf by HERMÈS. Bracelets by TIFFANY & CO. Rings by DINNY HALL.

RESORT ‘15.

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D O C U M E N T— F/ W 2 0 1 4

Blouse by DEREK LAM RESORT ‘15. Trousers by CÉLINE. Cuffs by HERMÈS. Shoes by PIERRE HARDY.

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D O C U M E N T N O. 3 2 4

OBJECT OF DESIRE

How does gratitude unfold from virtue? by Dan Tobin Smith & Fashion Editor Ronald Burton III

Handbag by PRADA.


Paperweight by HERMÈS.


Handbag by LOUIS VUITTON.


Handbag by CHANEL.


Shoe by MARCO DE VINCENZO.


Handbag by CHRISTOPHE LEMAIRE.


 Python Handbag by LOEWE.


Shoe by ALEXANDER WANG.


Shoe by CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN.


Handbag by JIL SANDER.


D O C U M E N T N O. 3 3 4

What role does attraction play in composition? Haute Couture by Maripol & Fashion Editor Ronald Burton III


Embroidered bustier, skirt, and gloves by MAISON MARTIN MARGIELA ARTISANAL.

(Opposite): Feathered headpiece, embroidered bolero, and silk crepe dress by SCHIAPARELLI HAUTE COUTURE.

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(This Page and Opposite): Embroidered coat, wool top, and pants by DIOR HAUTE COUTURE.

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Model GRACE HARTZEL at NEXT PARIS. Director of Photography VANESSA MUNIER. Hair Stylist KEI TERADA at JULIAN WATSON AGENCY. Make Up Artist PEP GAY at STREETERS LONDON. Casting Director SAMUEL ELLIS SCHEINMAN at DM CASTING. Fashion Assistants JULIANA SAGAT and WINNIE RILEY. Retouching by URBAN STUDIO. Special thanks to DANIELE BALICE and ALBERTO MARANI.

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(This Page and Opposite): Chiffon bustier dress and veil by GIORGIO ARMANI PRIVÉ.

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Tulle dress and leather ribbons by VALENTINO HAUTE COUTURE.

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Alpaca coat and headpiece by SCHIAPARELLI HAUTE COUTURE.

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(Above): Muslin and lace top and leather pencil skirt by GAULTIER PARIS. (Below): Embroidered top, tulle skirt dress, and fox stole by ELIE SAAB HAUTE COUTURE.

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Embroidered tulle dress and hat by CHANEL HAUTE COUTURE.

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Swarovski bustier and silk dress by ATELIER VERSACE.

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Swarovski bustier and silk dress by ATELIER VERSACE. Leather jacket by EACH X OTHER (MARIPOL COLLECTION).

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D O C U M E N T N O. 3 4 6

Do you lose your bearings when a stranger approaches you for directions? Document’s exclusive look at the Fendi Archives in Rome by Max Farago & Fashion Director James Valeri


Russian Breitschwanz coat by FENDI F/W ’86/’87. Fur hat by FENDI F/W ‘14/’15.

Hosiery (used throughout) by FALKE. Shoes (used throughout) by FENDI.

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Model NADJA BENDER at NEW YORK MODELS. Hair Stylist MARK HAMPTON. Make Up Artist PEP GAY. Casting by SAMUEL ELLIS SCHEINMAN at DM CASTING. Stylist Assistant GIORGIA FUZIO. Photography Assistant CORENTIN THEVENET. Special Thanks to MELINA DE STEFANO, SABRINA CIPRIANI, and GIUSEPPE SPERANDIO.

Fox cape by FENDI ‘83. Jewelry (used throughout) stylist’s own. (Opposite Page): Suede and mongolian fur coat by FENDI F/W ‘79/’80.

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Baschino Vajo jacket by FENDI F/W ‘84/’85. Baguette handbag by FENDI F/W ‘01/’02. (Opposite Page): Fox coat by FENDI F/W ‘04/’05. Fur hat by FENDI F/W ‘14/’15.

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Gold fox cape by FENDI F/W ‘02. Bodysuit with metal embroidery by FENDI S/S ‘03.

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Pekan Yeti coat by FENDI F/W ‘82/’83. (Opposite Page): Vajo and Mongolian coat by FENDI F/W ‘83/’84.

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Gold Fox coat by FENDI F/W ‘04/’05. Fur hat by FENDI F/W ‘14/’15. (Opposite Page): Greenland White Fox coat by FENDI ‘74.

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Jacket by MATCHLESS LONDON. Shirt by BLESS. Turtleneck (worn underneath) by HUGO BOSS. Pants by NO EDITIONS. Boots by NO EDITIONS. (Opposite Page): Shirt, trousers, shoes, and scarf by PRADA. Knitted waistband stylist’s own. N O. 3 5 8


D O C U M E N T N O. 3 5 9

How does a work of art take shape?

by Brett Lloyd & Fashion Editor Lotta Volkova


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Models ROGIER BOSSCHAART at SUCCESS MODELS and HAAVARD KLEPPE at NISCH MANAGEMENT. Hair Stylist LOUIS GHEWY at THE BOOK AGENCY. Make Up by THOMAS DE KLUYVER at D+V MANAGEMENT. Set Design by MIGUEL BENTO. Casting by SHELLEY DURKAN at D+V MANAGEMENT. Fashion Assistant ELLE BRITT. Retouching by POSTMEN LONDON. Location ROYAL ACADEMY OF ARTS LONDON. Haavard wears top and trousers by DRIES VAN NOTEN . Knitted waistband by NO EDITIONS. Shoes by PRADA. (Opposite Page): Rogier wears top by BLESS. Trousers by DRIES VAN NOTEN. N O. 3 6 1


Sweater and trousers by J.W. ANDERSON. Turtleneck (worn underneath) by BRIONI. Scarf by PRADA. (Opposite Page): Jacket by MATCHLESS LONDON. Vintage top stylist’s own.

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Sweater and trousers by J.W. ANDERSON. Turtleneck (worn underneath) by BRIONI. Leggings stylist’s own. Scarf and shoes by PRADA. N O. 3 6 5


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Customized sweater stylist’s own. Trousers and shoes by LOUIS VUITTON. (Opposite Page): Vintage cardigan by PRADA. Tank (worn underneath), highwaisted pants, and knit top by DRIES VAN NOTEN.

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Jacket, trousers, and t-shirt by GOSHA RUBCHINSKIY. Tank top (worn over t-shirt) by DRIES VAN NOTEN. (Opposite Page): Trousers by ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA. Knitted waistband stylist’s own. Shoes by MAISON MARTIN MARGIELA.


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Coat and shoes by BRIONI. Customized sweater stylist’s own. Trousers by VETEMENTS. Socks by FALKE. N O. 3 7 1


Sweater by LOUIS VUITTON. Trousers by ACNE. Shoes by PRADA. N O. 3 7 2


Sweater by DIOR HOMME. Coat by PRADA. Cut-out top (worn over sweater) customized by stylist. Trousers by GIVENCHY BY RICCARDO TISCI. Shoes by PRADA. N O. 3 7 3


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Knitted waistband stylist’s own. Trousers by ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA. Shoes by MAISON MARTIN MARGIELA. (Opposite Page): Cut-out sweater customized by stylist. Thank you to LABYRINTH

PHOTOGRAPHIC and THE ROYAL

ACADEMY OF ARTS LONDON .

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D O C U M E N T N O. 3 7 6

How can I touch creation as a principle without reproach? By Richard Bush & Fashion Editor Sarah Richardson in collaboration with Viva London


Stella wears sweater, skirt, earring, and belt by LOUIS VUITTON.


Jean wears coat, cropped top, leggings, and sneakers by CHANEL. Socks customized into top by MIKI FUKAI.


Sports sock customized into top by MIKI FUKAI. Trousers and boots by MARC BY MARC JACOBS. Socks by O’NEAL.

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Jessica wears sportswear customized into dress by MIKI FUKAI. Socks by O’NEAL. Sneakers by Y-3.

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Lena wears vintage zip up top from stylist’s archive worn over top by PACO RABANNE. Bra by MIU MIU. Pants by CHRISTOPHER SHANNON. N O. 3 97


Edie wears jacket by GIVENCHY BY RICCARDO TISCI.

Customized stripes by ADIDAS. Top and shorts by MARC BY MARC JACOBS.

Vintage track jacket by PUMA from BLITZ. Customized earring stylist’s own.

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Stella wears jacket and trousers by Vintage track jacket by PUMA from BLITZ. Sneakers by CHANEL.

CÉLINE.

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Coat by CÉLINE. Sport socks customized into dress by MIKI FUKAI. Sneakers by Y-3.


Kati wears sleeveless jacket by DIOR. ADIDAS sportswear customized into dress by LARA JENSEN.

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Rianne wears sweater by BALENCIAGA. Sport badges stylist’s own. Turtleneck by PIERRE CARDIN and pants by ADIDAS, both from 80S CASUAL CLASSICS. Jacket (worn around waist) by MARC BY MARC JACOBS. Socks (worn as gloves) by ALPINESTARS. Customized earring stylist’s own.

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Models STELLA TENNANT, CODIE YOUNG, OLYMPIA CAMPBELL, EDIE CAMPBELL, LENA HARDT, JESSICA CLARKE, MISHA HART, KATI NESCHER, RIANNE VAN ROMPAEY, VANESSA AXENTE, ELEONORA BAUMANN, CHRISTINA CAREY, IMAAN HAMMAM,

and JEAN CAMPBELL at Hair Stylists CHI WONG at JULIAN WATSON and ( for Jean Campbell) MARTIN CULLEN at STREETERS LONDON. Make Up Artists KIRSTIN PIGGOTT at JULIAN WATSON using RIMMEL and (for Kati Nescher, Rianne Van Rompaey, Vanessa Axente, Eleonora Baumann, Christina Carey, and Jean Campbell) PETROS PETROHILOS at STREETERS LONDON using LAURA MERCIER. Retouching by ANDY at LOVE RETOUCH. Stylist Assistant ALICE LEFONS. Special thanks NATALIE HAND at VIVA LONDON. LINN ARVIDSSON, VIVA LONDON.

Christina wears sweater by J.W. ANDERSON. Turtleneck by ADIDAS. Jersey by TROY LEE DESIGNS from CI SPORT. Jacket by MARC BY MARC JACOBS. Sportswear customized into skirt by ERNEST. Pants by ADIDAS from 80S CASUAL CLASSICS. Sneakers by VERSACE.

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Edie wears coat by DIOR. Socks customized into bodysuit by DR NOKI NHS. Sneakers by Y-3.


Imaan wears men’s jacket by CALVIN KLEIN COLLECTION.

Sportswear customized into top by stylist. Sport badges stylist’s own.

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Codie wears shirt, top (worn as cape), top (worn around waist), and harness bag by DR NOKI NHS. Pants and customized headband by TROY LEE DESIGNS from CI SPORT. Socks by ALPINESTARS and ONE INDUSTRIES. Sneakers by CHANEL.


Olympia wears quilted jacket, nylon jacket, bra, and skirt by MIU MIU. Vintage track jacket and necklace stylist’s own. N O. 3 8 4


Christina wears sweater by BOSS over track jacket by FILA. Jersey by TROY LEE DESIGNS from CI SPORT. Pants by ADIDAS ORIGINALS. Customized earring stylist’s own. N O. 3 8 5


Jean wears coats by STELLA MCCARTNEY. Sportswear customized into dress by MIKI FUKAI. Sneakers by Y-3.


Misha wears top and shirt (used as hat) by DR NOKI NHS. Sweater by SAINT LAURENT BY HEDI SLIMANE.

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Rianne wears quilted jacket by MIU MIU. Track jacket by FILA. Turtleneck by PIERRE CARDIN from 80S CASUAL CLASSICS. Customized earring stylist’s own.


Imaan wears vintage cycling tops customized into dress by MICHELA CARRARO. N O. 3 8 9


Eleonora wears dress by CHRISTOPHER KANE.

Sport badges stylist’s own. Track jacket by ELLESSE, layered over sweater by BALENCIAGA. Pants by ADIDAS from 80S CASUAL CLASSICS. Hat by LANVIN. Sneakers by VERSACE. N O. 3 9 0


Vanessa wears sleeveless jacket by MIU MIU. Sportswear customized into bodysuit by ALEX NOBLE.


Linn wears sleeveless jacket by EMPORIO ARMANI. Sports badges stylist’s own. Sportswear customized into top PREEN BY THORNTON BREGAZZI. Vintage swimsuit ADIDAS from ROKIT.

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Imaan wears men’s jacket by CALVIN KLEIN COLLECTION. Sportswear customized into top by stylist. Sport badges stylist’s own. Shorts vintage CHAMPION from stylist’s archive. Socks by O’NEAL. Boots by MARC BY MARC JACOBS.

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D O C U M E N T N O. 4 0 2

Sleepless E XC L U S I V E N E W F I C T I O N F R O M AU T H O R MIC HA E L CU NN I NG HAM ; TA K I N G A J O U R N E Y B AC K H O M E TO D I S C OV E R YO U WO N ’ T F I N D A N Y P L AC E BETTER THAN HERE. PHOTOGRAPHY BY

JOEL STERNFELD

W

e’ve been awake three or four days now. It isn’t the drugs or the music or the dying dog. It isn’t only that. It’s more because we’ve gotten too nervous and interested to sleep. We’ve been so many places. We stopped setting our clocks long ago, when we realized it was always going to be too late. That doesn’t mean we abandoned hope. We just settled into other ambitions. A day’s pay for a day’s work; a safe place to park for the night; the pure windy nowhere of a proper high. We had Pilot, our shepherd-retriever mix, who took everything that happened with the same baffled good cheer. We had Heather, our sistermother, who’d had the good sense to jump into our truck and leave it all behind—the waitress apron, the Pittsburgh rain. If you’re willing to call us pilgrims, you could say we were taking the little path. Wherever you look for us, we’ve always just left. But when your dog starts sighing into herself, when you know from her eyes that she’s ready to disappear, you stop driving and pick her a spot. You get her a little stillness. You make her a bed out of quilts and towels. You use the last of your money to rent her a house. This house is far north, far enough that in summer, night brushes across it all like a silk scarf. It’s granite and sky here, witch pines, the blue-black mirror of the ocean, and us, a strange dream this old house is having, Pilot panting softly in her corner, no longer paying attention to the food and water we keep putting out, Trask and I still using and Heather not, she’s got a plan, massage school, Swedish or shiatsu, there are arguments for both. Tonight, our third or fourth sleepless one, Trask and I make out on the sofa, sit with Pilot as she huffingly contemplates her final mystery, watch the ocean turn black, read the bloated old magazines and play the old music we’ve found here, our favorite being John Coltrane blowing into his horn, do you love me, do you love me, do you love me? Trask and I do a slow snaky dance to the Coltrane, blissed out on the last of the Dilaudid we copped in Burlington. Heather says, “You boys are too much.” It’s a surprising thing for her to say. I’d assumed we were too little. Heather stands solidly in her lace-up boots, hands on hips. Her platinum hair is the brightest spot in the room. She could be the wife of the music. Everything about her is famous to us. Trask says, “Our careers as modern dancers were tragically cut short by circumstances beyond our control.” Heather shakes her head over the oddness of us. I could say something like, Don’t go, but we all know it’s time. She’s ready for a mailbox and a washing machine. She can’t survive anymore on whatever Trask and I don’t need for ourselves. Later, Trask stands with me on the front porch, gaunt and blue-white as a medieval saint. Heather’s inside, sitting in a murky pool of lamplight, reading one of her holy books. Out here, it’s strands and helixes of stars, it’s the single hour of true night, and I know what Trask is thinking

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D O C U M E N T— F/ W 2 0 1 4

Trask says, “It might be nice to stay somewhere. For a while.” Which is not what I was thinking. “Should we stay here?” I ask. Trask hoots out a laugh. “Right,” he says. “And we pay for the castle how, exactly?” I laugh along with him. Money is one of the questions I tend to forget about. We have a good long laugh together, each of us cracking the other one up. We seem to be laughing about the joke of the world – its avenues and palaces, its immaculate stores, blazing and trumpeting along as Trask and I cavort on the edges, little clownish guys, all battered hat and broken shoe, shuffle-dancing, laughing at each other, when we’d once expected to become kings. “Pilot is disappearing,” I say. “Yeah,” Trask answers. “She’s been a good dog.” “Where should we go if we don’t stay here?” “Where would you like to go, little friend?” “Someplace warmer, maybe.” “Okay. We’ll head south.”

T

hen it’s us, driving into a future that looks like a preview of the past. Pilot is wrapped in her quilt, underground. Heather is on her bus. I sneak a look at Trask’s profile as he shifts gears and curses the dying transmission. It still surprises me – the fact of him. Here is his glowy pallor, his modest jut of nose. Trask and I are lovers, but we’re not boyfriends. We’re too brotherly for romance. We’re twins, born of different mothers. Kissing Trask, poking around with him, is like kissing my improved self. I felt strange about it, at first. Strange, though, always turns out to be the new normal. Our radio plays the passing songs. Trask finger-drums the steering wheel in time to the music, which is his way of keeping the truck alive. If there’s enough music in the truck, if there are maps and Slim Jims and crushed Coke cans, if he taps the wheel and smacks the dashboard every now and then, the truck won’t blow its transmission. We’re rumbling through the endless forests of Massachusetts, which turns its woods to the highway. In there, on the far side of the trees, the mansions of dead millionaires give back birds and branches from their blind windows. Cracked fountains offer little cups of sky. Here, on the highway, it’s wind-stirred trash and the occasional deceased raccoon. Here, inside the cab, it’s music and tapping and silent prayer. Live on, transmission, at least until we’ve got more cash. Trask says, “Let’s stop in Fall River.” It’s the first thing he’s said in more than three N O. 4 0 4

hundred miles. “Okay,” I answer. I could ask him why, but I decide not to. I’ve learned that all my questions have answers attached, and the answers arrive in their own time, as if they’re on a line that stretches only so far before it snaps back. Sometimes it’s best to wait for that to happen.

W

e pull into Fall River at that hour of early evening when the lowering sun sets it all ablaze, when the humblest of human works is exalted. When it’s most obvious that something, even if it’s only sunlight, pays attention to every Mobil station and McDonald’s, every auto salvage yard. The sky is thumbed and streaked with gold. As we drive across the rust-scabbed bridge it throws its net of lattice-shadow over us, while Fall River shines on its hills like a consecrated city. “It’s Fall River,” I say. “It is,” Trask agrees. We drive down Central Street, past the stores that haven’t gone out of business yet. Fall River is dying the way Pilot did, sighing its days away, growling softly into itself. Fall River was born when beaver pelts were treasures, and it hasn’t been born again since. People amble along Central, unhurried, because there’s no place to go that they haven’t already been. Right away, I think I see my mother, but it’s not her, it’s a woman who looks like her, wobbling along in two sweaters, wearing whatever grace she’s got left to muster, carrying a bag of empty cans. “That’s not my mother,” I say, by way of observation. “Nope,” Trask answers. “It’s not.” We give ourselves a brief tour. It is all still precisely itself, minus a few shops and diners. We drive by Dunkin Donuts, where younger versions of us still hang out, sucking cigarettes and clocking the passing cars. There’s a particular kid who resembles me, same ratty hair and bad skin, pulling on a cigarette and talking away, telling the daily beads. He is speaking into the silence of the others, like I used to do. Grubby as he may be, he shines with an optimism the others don’t care to put out. He believes there are things to talk about, places to leave to. I put a silent blessing on him as we drive on. “There’s more than one of me,” I say. “Buddy, one of you is more than enough,” Trask answers. I never thought Trask was responsible for the accident. How can anyone be responsible for an accident? You’re motoring along, happy and free. You’re blasting your favorite song on the dashboard radio and Trask passes you the joint as you narrate the new

© J O E L S T E R N F E L D ; C O U R T E SY O F T H E A R T I S T A N D L U H R I N G A U G U S T I N E , N E W YO R K .

I’ve learned that all my questions have answers attached, and the answers arrive in their own time, as if they’re on a line that stretches only so far before it snaps back. Sometimes it’s best to wait for that to happen.

“South is good,” I say. “Well, south is south,” he answers. Task believes there’s no home in the world, not for anybody, but I maintain that it’s exactly the opposite. It’s all homes. Some of them are rich and comfortable and some of them are bleak but even the worst of them, even the parking lot behind the Stuckey’s where we got robbed by the handsome young hitchhiker on the hottest day of the year, even that gas station men’s room in Nashville, they were homes. We stand quietly, watching the wavelets curl and the stars caught in the trees. Trask makes the soft click of sorrow in the back of his throat. He is tired of being tired. To remind him that he’s not disappearing, I run my finger down the buttons of his spine. He tousles my head. Inside the house, Heather puts on a new old record. It’s Bruce, singing Thunder Road. He’s driving out tonight to case the promised land. He was somewhere when he sang that song. He’s somewhere else now. And we’re here, right here. I have Trask’s backbone to touch, he has the hair on my head.

( O P E N I N G S P R E A D ) : K A N S A S C I T Y, K A N S A S , M AY 1 9 8 3 . N E GAT I V E : 1 9 8 3 , P R I N T: 2 0 0 3 . D I G I TA L C - P R I N T: 4 2 X 5 2 . 5 I N C H E S

because I’m thinking the same thing. The earth is forgetting us. Look at all that it’s forgotten already. Look at what it chooses to remember: wind-gnarled trees and rocks washed by tides, a single star riding a pool of tide-water. Trask says, “Hey.” I say, “Hey yourself.” Trask and I don’t need to converse much. We’re thinking now about burying Pilot in the pine grove we found above the house. We’re thinking of ourselves as two figures in a bus station parking lot, getting smaller and smaller as we wave goodbye to Heather’s bus.


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the world of money and surprises was too much for her. Here and there, we pass people we used to know. Here is Deranged Mike, sitting on a playground swingset, wondering over his shoes. There is pretty-enough Darlene, in cowgirl boots. There are Mr. Floyd, who has no known first name, and the Dutra twins, and Edie, who got in the paper for turning a hundred and still being vicious. We do not stop for any of these people, and they don’t seem to see us driving by. We have become less visible from being gone. When dark comes, we go and park behind the school, a big elephant-colored building haunted only by itself. I wonder if we’re going to break in and have a ramble through the

We drive by my old building, which is still defiantly yellow, still offering to passersby its womanly porches and its garden of thriving thorn. It is now untenanted by anyone we know. I wonder if we’re here to look for my mother, though there’s no reason to think she’d come back. “A dump,” I say, though I don’t exactly mean it. On rare occasions, I tell Trask something that isn’t quite true. The truth is, I love that old wreck of a building. Our apartment smelled like perfume and wet dog. My mother made dinner almost every night, even on the bad ones. It wasn’t her fault that

hallways, but it seems we’re going to keep sitting in the truck. We smoke for a while in silence. Then Trask says, “What do you think we’ll do when we get south?” “The same as we’ve always done, right?” By which I mean, we’ll get jobs, doing whatever. Maybe we’ll meet another girl for Trask. “We’re just bums, you know.” “No. You’re Trask, and I’m Billy.” Trask leans over and kisses me, harder than usual. I kiss back but he’s crushing his teeth into mine, it’s more like a mouth-punch N O. 4 0 6

than a kiss. There’s no returning it. I can only hold on. I put my hand in his hair. When he pulls his mouth away I say, “There’s nothing to do about love, huh.” Trask just nods, and lights another Camel. We sit there for a while, watching the school get that much older. The lower windows sport construction paper flowers. We can see the upper half of a globe. Planet earth, right where it’s always been. Then we are off to the Bluepoint. It’s sparse, this early. Harry and Everett and Little Harry are on their stools, where we left them however long ago. They nod to us, as if we saw them only last night. Noreen stands behind the bar, grandly enormous, coral-lipped. She says, “Well, as I live and breathe.” “Hey,” Trask says. I smile. “And just exactly where have you motherfuckers been?” she asks. She is like a land mass, Noreen. She’s geological. You could moor a ship to her flanks. “Here and there,” Trask answers. Noreen’s gray hair won’t stay in its rubber band; her personal bigness will barely stay in her flesh. She’s wearing the flower-covered dress. Behind her, bottles glow amber in the light. “And you didn’t find anyplace better than here?” She laughs, a big raucous sound that comes hackingly out of her smoky depths. Trask doesn’t answer that, and I don’t either. Trask sidles up to Little Harry, slips him one of our last twenties, gets the tiny envelope in return, discreetly, under the bar. This hasn’t changed, either. Before we duck into the men’s room, Trask leans over the bar and speaks to Noreen, softly, too soft for me to hear. Noreen listens, nods. She wears an uncertain look. Trask motions me into the men’s. We do the coke in two big hits, under the fluorescence. The walls are full of messages. Lit up from the coke, Trask says, “Fall River isn’t so bad. We’ve been to worse places, wouldn’t you say?” We have. But we’ve been to better places, too. I say, “I miss the house in Newfoundland.” “It was a shithole, Billy,” Trask says. “And we couldn’t even afford that.” “Pilot is buried there. We danced to John Coltrane’s horn.” We fall briefly back into our customary silence, but I decide not to let it hold. I say, “Heather was like the music.” “Yeah, if music could complain, and steal

( T H I S PAG E ) : C O E B U R N , V I R G I N I A , A P R I L 1 9 8 1 . N E GAT I V E : 1 9 8 1 , P R I N T; 2 0 0 4 . D I G I TA L C - P R I N T 4 2 X 5 2 . 5 I N C H E S © J O E L S T E R N F E L D ; C O U R T E SY O F T H E A R T I S T A N D L U H R I N G A U G U S T I N E , N E W YO R K . ( F O L L O W I N G PAG E ) :

details of your amazing future and you drop the joint and suddenly there’s a tree in front of you. That happens sometimes. Trask has been with me ever since. That’s the saintliness of him. I do my best to resemble myself, but it gets harder over time. I wonder if that’s why we’ve come to Fall River. To remind me of who I used to be. I don’t have the language or the ambition to put that thought into a sentence. Instead I say, “Fall River is disappearing, too.” “No, buddy,” Trask answers. “We’re disappearing. Fall River is right where it’s always been.” We’ve been gone a year, or maybe it’s more like two. Time doesn’t obey the calendar when you live the way we’ve been living.

M A R C H 1 3 , 2 0 0 6 , T H E E A ST M E A D O W, N O R T H A M P T O N , M A S S AC H U S E T T S . N E GAT I V E : 2 0 0 6 ; P R I N T: 2 0 0 8 . D I G I TA L C - P R I N T 7 2 X 8 8 1 /2 I N C H E S © J O E L S T E R N F E L D ; C O U R T E SY O F T H E A R T I S T A N D L U H R I N G A U G U S T I N E , N E W YO R K .

D O C U M E N T— F/ W 2 0 1 4


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And then I’m out in back, under the Fall River stars, which shine like they do everywhere, the same for the victorious and the fallen, the same for the people who are neither, who are just marking their time.

your drugs.” “You loved her. You miss her.” “Hey, it was only a matter of time. I mean, right. Driving nowhere with two losers, that’s a future a girl would want.” I say, “It’ll be nice to be in the south.” “It’s pretty nice here.” I don’t know how to answer that. Trask has always been unenthusiastic about Fall River, until now. He turns around, unbuttons to piss. As he’s pissing, the toilet seat falls and spatters him with his own pee. “Fuck,” he says. He kicks the toilet bowl. His boot slides squealingly across the porcelain. More piss splatters around. Peeing, Trask pivots and bangs his head against the towel dispenser. His forehead makes a melony sound on the metal. I grab him from behind. I hold him, just close. “Fuck,” he whispers. Softly, like an endearment. “It’s all right,” I tell him. This is not entirely true, but it’s the thing to say, like saying good night when we go to bed. Trask shrugs me away, not ungently. He tucks back into his jeans, and walks out. I follow. In the bar, Noreen has set up two shots for us. She says, “Drinks for the conquering heroes.” We down the shots. Trask talks quietly again to Noreen, who nods her vast head. I am not meant to listen. I tune in on the jukebox, which is playing an old song about a good woman gone wrong. After a while Trask says to me, “I’m going to go see if Kathy‘s still around.”

Kathy was his girlfriend. Maybe she’s still around. Maybe she isn’t mad anymore. “I’ll come?” I ask. “Better if I see her alone,” he answers. He stands with me for a moment. We can’t kiss, not in front of Everett and the Harrys. “See you soon,” he says. “Yes,” I answer. There is something I’d like to tell him, something about love and crazy gratitude, something about a forgiveness we share. I want to hold him, which we can’t do here. I want to bite his ear off. I want to put a benediction on his suffering wounded head. My lips are sewn shut, though, and my boots are soldered to the floor. All I can manage is a modest smile. He does his best to smile back, but his mouth won’t move that way at present. He looks at me. And then he is gone. “Would you like another drink, sweetheart?” Noreen asks. Trask has our little bit of money in his pocket, but I don’t tell her that. I just say, “Thanks, I’m not thirsty now.” Noreen says, “How about you go in the back and bring in those cases of beer that’re out there? I’m getting too old to heft cases of beer around like I’ve been doing.” I say okay. I go out the back, past the toilet stalls, past the little room called office, where Noreen figures the orders and the money and whatever else she does. I look in. The room is cozy, in its way, comfortably cluttered, with a modest window perfectly centered on the moon of a streetlight. It smells like Noreen, N O. 4 0 8

like petrified tulips. There’s a cot there. Narrow, but fine for one small-ish person. And then I’m out in back, under the Fall River stars, which shine like they do everywhere, the same for the victorious and the fallen, the same for the people who are neither, who are just marking their time. Here are three cases of beer, neatly stacked by the deliveryman. Here is the parking lot with its veins of weed and the black hulk of the dumpster and the chain link fence and the rear end of the Walgreens. And here’s that buzz in the air, like plucked wires, mixed in with the low huff huff huff. This sound is always in my ears. It is, I think, the sound the earth makes as it spins through the black, chucked at by fists of dust and ice. After the accident, a looseness opened in my skull that lets me hear it. It’s the only thing I’ve never told anyone. It’s the last thing I hear at night and the first in the morning. The earth turning, blowing through me. I am like a horn, being played. I stand another minute in the brightened dark. There’s the beer to bring in, and Trask’s pee to mop up off the men’s room floor. I can wipe down the bottles, and refill the peanut bowls. Noreen is stingy with her peanuts. I won’t be like that. I will be generous, and kind to people, even the ones who take kindness as an insult. I will be steadfast. I will listen to the sound of the world. I will practice, every day, at being myself. I will wait here, right here, for Trask, so he knows where to find me when he comes back. I lift a case of beer and carry it inside.


D O C U M E N T— F/ W 2 0 1 4

N O. 1


Profile for Nick Vogelson

Document Issue 5  

Document Issue 5