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PO Box 1, Guelph, ON Canada N1H 6J6 Telephone: 519 836 9147, Internet: www.guelphhiking.com

Volume 41, #1 - March, 2013

Many gracious landowners, both private and corporate, allow our hiking trails to pass through their land. Without this permission, the trail system would not exist. The Guelph Hiking Trail Club extends sincerest appreciation to our landowners for their continued generosity and support for allowing us the privilege of hiking on their properties. As trails exist only by virtue of landowners’ permission, it is incumbent upon every user to ensure that this privilege is not abused. Thus, hikers must always abide by the Trail Users Code. Look How Far We’ve Come! Excerpt from GHTC Newsletter #3, Oct., 1972. “Pictures along the proposed Speed River route, taken and shown by Pat O'Brien, indicated that this area has abundant scenic appeal. After considering its resources of personnel and finances, the Guelph Club approved undertaking the making of a trail from Guelph to Preston with Jill Leslie leader of the project.”

and just one year later

In the photo at the bottom of the previous column, Guelph Mayor Norm Jary, centre-right in the light shirt and hat, and Cambridge Alderman Gordon Chaplin, wearing the checkered pants, were on hand for the official opening of the Speed River Trail on Sunday, May 27, 1973. NOW be certain to bookmark International Trails Day Saturday, June 1st , 2013

to come out and celebrate the Speed River Trail’s 40th Anniversary E2E plus section hikes and BBQ Watch for final details in via GHTC e-notes and in the local press.

Archive materials courtesy of Dave Hull


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Message from the President

GHTC Newsletter Vol 41, #1, March, 2013 The GHTC Newsletter, published in M arch, July and October, is sent to all of the club members, other trail organizations, landowners who provide access for our trails, advertisers and club supporters. Opinions and views expressed in this newsletter are those of the individual writers or advertisers and do not necessarily reflect those of the Guelph Hiking Trail Club executive, members, or affiliated bodies such as Hike Ontario. Check the club web site or blog for details on advertising rates, merchandise for sale and club contacts. www.guelphhiking.com www.guelphhiking.blogspot.com Mail: PO Box 1, Guelph, N1H 6J6 Club members and others are encouraged to submit articles, notices and photographs to the newsletter editor for possible publication in your club’s newsletter. Deadlines for receiving material for publication from members, hike leaders and other contributors are: February 15 for the March issue, June 15 for the July issue and September 15 for October issue.

GHTC Contacts for 2013 President Bill Mungall wmungall0809@rogers.com Past President Kathy Somers, ksomers@uoguelph.ca Vice President position open Secretary Christine Bando, christinebando@gmail.com Treasurer Henry Graupner, graupner@rogers.com M embership Dave Culham, dculham@gmail.com Hike Ontario Mike Curtis, mikecurtiserin@yahoo.ca Publicity Susan Atkinson, 519 837 susanatkinson19@sympatico.ca Hike Schedule Gayle Jeffery, Gaylej@sentex.ca Social Jane Shifflett, janeshifflett@hotmail.com W ebsite Pat Scott, patzscott@gmail.com Newsletter Gord King, gking@uoguelph.ca Advertising Ben Polley ben@evolvebuilders.ca Trail Captains Radial Line John Fisher, jhnfshr62@gmail.com Speed River Bill Mungall wmungall0809@rogers.com Kissing Bridge Mike Curtis, mikecurtiserin@yahoo.ca

519 836 5567 519 836 9147

519 822 8332 519 763 5842 519 716 8273 905 877 4134 9740 519 856 1012 519 822 3229 519 763 4275 519 824 0787 519 265 6546 519 853 1719 519 836 5567 905 877 4134

E-notes Many GHTC members receive the club’s twice monthly, e-mail reminders of upcoming events. If you are not currently and would like to receive these notices, please send your request and e-mail address to Dave Culham at:

dculham@gmail.com

The GHTC is becoming known for its “interesting” trails. These run along surprisingly wild river valleys over a variety of terrain, are well maintained and easy to walk thanks to the hours put into maintenance by our trail captains, and have many unusual points of interest. They are useful, allowing you to walk continuously from the Bruce Trail to Acton, Eden Mills, Guelph and Cambridge and onward to the Grand River. They are also largely on private lands, at the pleasure of some three dozen owners. The Club sincerely thanks the landowners for their steadfast support of the trail; this year we will be even more focused on showing our appreciation to the owners and in consistently communicating with them. 2013 marks the 40 th year of the opening of the Speed River Trail and the Starkey Hill Sidetrail. Join us June 1 for a BBQ picnic at Silvercreek Park to cap off a day of several hikes along the 3 sections of the SRT. Take the opportunity to personally thank the 12 landowners, who are all being invited. And come out to Starkey on April 27 for our 4 th season of Trails Open (in conjunction with Doors Open Guelph), when we will schedule several guided hikes. Once again Gayle Jeffery has elicited from the certified hike leaders an excellent slate of hikes for you to choose from. In most cases, we offer three hikes a week, in a few weeks, even more. Our leaders report that they are most encouraged by the increasing turnout coming out for their hikes. And that they are getting to know some most interesting participants! Finally, I want to pay tribute to the well organized leadership shown by our Past President, Kathy Somers. Kathy encouraged others to forward their good ideas and contributed many of her own. She then “gave legs” to these ideas though facilitating these through the executive committee and delegation to ad hoc committees such as those that have organized our successful kids hikes series and our slate of social activities. And Kathy is already a very active Past President, carrying on with a number of initiatives. Bill

Fairy Tails et al. Little girl: “Daddy, do all fairy tails begin with ‘Once upon a time’?” Daddy: “Oh no dear, a great many begin with ‘After I am elected’!”


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Where in the GHTC World Is This?

Spectacular river view from the end of one of our newer side trails. Check it out during the 40 th anniversary celebrations!

The Guelph Hiking Trail Club seeks a Volunteer to take on the responsibilities of

TREASURER The Treasurer is responsible for managing the Club’s financial affairs and funds. In broad outline, he/she will: 1. Maintain a record of income and expenditures, and 2. Receive payments made to the Club and make bank deposits, and 3. Write and distribute cheques against invoices and out-of-pocket expense claims, and 4. Sort and maintain all supporting documentation, and 5. Prepare regular financial reports including the year end report. The Volunteer should have some familiarity with basic bookkeeping processes but does not require a formal accounting accreditation. Experience with computer spreadsheets and access to appropriate computer equipment, would be essential. The accounts are presently kept using Microsoft Excel. The new Treasurer would commence her/his duties on September 1, 2013, at the commencement of the 2013/2014 financial year. Prior to this, handover assistance will be provided by the current treasurer. A detailed statement of job responsibilities is available. For further information, please contact: Bill Mungall, President, at 519-836-5567 or wmungall0809@rogers.com or Henry Graupner, Treasurer, at 519-763-5842 or graupner@rogers.com

Help Wanted: Section leader for the Kissing Bridge Trailway between Katherine St (Grand River) and Wollis Rd. (2 km of rail trail) Contact Mike Curtis at mikecurtiserin@yahoo.ca or 905 877- 4134 for job specifications, rates of pay including benefits, and travel opportunities!!

This year’s Hike Ontario Summit, held in Kitchener in conjunction with the 40 th Anniversary of the Grand Valley Trails Association, was a splendid success. One of the highlights was recognition of Janna and Stan Stanek as Hike Ontario Volunteers of the Year. The Staneks are receiving congratulations from GHTC President, Bill Mungall, and Mike Curtis, our club’s Hike Ontario Representative.


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Hike Ontario Volunteer of the Year Award his November's Hike Ontario Summit held in Kitchener featured one of HO's three Volunteer of the Year Awards being given to Stan and Jana Stanek, Trail Captains of Section 1 of the Speed River Trail. The Staneks, ever so humble, accepted their award on behalf of all of the Trail Captains of the GHTC. Their citation for the award was read to the assemblage as follows:"

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Stan and Jana Stanek Stan and Jana are long-time trail captains who have built, improved and maintained the most challenging and heavily used Section 1 of the Speed River Trail (and the John Wood Sidetrails), running from the Guelph Humane Society to Whitelaw Road on the edge of Guelph. The Staneks were obliged to leave their native Czechoslovakia in 1968 during the Soviet crackdown on “Prague Spring” (i.e. an important antecedent or model for “The Arab Spring”) but they brought their love of hiking the Tatras, Carpathians and the big Bohemian hills with them to Canada. They also may be the most traveled hikers in the Club, bringing back insights about trails from their travels all over the world.

Their trail section includes challenges from floods, erosion, tall weeds, deadfall, trailhead dumping, creek crossings, and even debris left by homeless persons living in the woods near the trail. In 2005, and largely on their own, Stan and Jana built 6 bridges over seasonal creeks that discharge under the trail. All these issues have been “managed away” through the Staneks’ diligent efforts in maintaining the trail for the dozens of runners and walkers that frequent it every day of the year. The Staneks have also been key in working closely with the landowners to improve the route of the trail and to create a new series of sidetrail loops, such that their section is now truly “optimized.” They even drafted their own house guests from Quebec to brush out kilometers of new sidetrails! The GHTC considers itself most fortunate that the Staneks have devoted so much of their spare time to the trail and also to leading hikes for the Club and the local Czech community.

The Importance of Exercise I joined a health club last year, spent about 400 bucks. Haven't lost a pound. Apparently you have to go there.


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Jim Hoare led a number of club members and friends on the traditional Boxing Day Hike at Starkey Hill.

Lots of people also joined club President Bill Mungall on January 1st for the annual Clear the Cobwebs Hike.

Hiking the Finger Lakes By Jane Shifflett

In June 2012 I persuaded my sister to do a 5 day hiking trip with me in the Finger Lakes Area of New York State. This was a Road Scholar trip – www.roadscholar.org. Not only did we hike the beautiful Finger Lakes trail but we also visited wineries, hiked through amazing State Parks and visited museums including Corning Glass Museum. Our accommodations were hotel type rooms at a retreat center. An Olympic size pool soothed any sore muscles. Contrast participants in the latest hikes with the turn-out for GHTC’s first Clear the Cobwebs, held on January 1st,1975.

Road Scholar’s mission is to provide learning adventures so we had talks on Leitchworth park, area forestry, the Iroquois Nation, and experienced a climbing wall and making ice cream. Our hiking leader also explained facts and quirks of the area as we rode the bus to our hiking spots. And the hiking – through forests, along rivers, up and down hills, beside vineyards – beautiful! The Finger Lakes Hiking Trail starts at the Allegheny State Park in the west of New York State and ends in the Catskills. The main trail is 558 miles and has 400 miles of sidetrails. It is a well- marked footpath and like our trails is maintained by volunteers. There is even a connecting link to the Bruce Trail. Information about the trail can be found at www.fltconference.org . We thoroughly enjoyed our trip and plan to visit the Finger Lakes Area again to walk more miles.


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Battle of the Buckthorn By Mike Curtis s coordinator of the Kissing Bridge Trailway, there is always something to be done, depending on the urgency of the situation. On my “list” was to cut back the small sapling growth between km 2 and 3, where the trailway has become quite enclosed. I planned to do it sometime in the fall. Imagine my pleasant surprise when I was contacted by Ruth Robinson of the Wellington County Stewardship Council asking if we (GHTC) minded if they cut back the invasive buckthorn in the very section which I intended to clear. “Yes please!” was my response and we proceeded to plan the attack.

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about 20 m of it due to extreme bushiness of the branches. The residual will be attended to later on in the fall. Only two very minor injuries (scratches) were suffered requiring a mere cleaning and no bandages. This was very good, considering the number of sharp tools in use and the pointed nature of the enemy. Ruth invited all the volunteers back to her place near Ariss for a barbeque lunch and the day was a great success!

Check the GHTC e-mail messages for opportunities to participate in future trail maintenance parties!

Some of the trees required a chainsaw (no problem) while others could be cut with loppers, but it was the in-between ones which I thought could be a challenge. They were too small for a chainsaw and too large for loppers. I had purchased a battery powered reciprocating saw (sawsall), with pruning blades, in the spring for household use, but the battery lasted only 30 minutes – rather of limited use on the trailway. Saws with extension cords could be used, but power was a problem. The solution was to rent a portable generator capable of powering two saws with long extension cords (one on either side of the trailway) mounted on a pickup truck (ease of movement) which also pulled a chipper to get rid of the brush! On October 13th (cool and breezy) 8 GHTC volunteers and 10 WCSC volunteers met at Ariss. I met another volunteer with a pickup truck at Royal Rentals where we picked up the generator and the chipper and off we went to war. We worked from 9:00 until 12:00 and managed to clear about 80m of buckthorn but could only chip


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GHTC Christmas Party - December, 2012

Social Activities - 2012 By Jane Shifflet

Kids Hikes

What do a skating party, a solstice picnic and a Christmas potluck have in common? They were social activities enjoyed by GHTC members in 2012. In January 2012 a skating party was held at the new skating rink in front of Guelph City Hall. Twelve enthusiastic skaters tried out the ice amid flashing coloured lights. Afterwards, skaters and non-skaters enjoyed refreshments and great talk at a local pub. The summer solstice picnic was held at Riverside Park. The weather was perfect, the food delicious and the talk enthusiastic. A gentle hike around the park led by Bill Mungall helped to excuse any overindulgence in food. Our first Christmas party was a great success. The union hall on Silvercreek was festively decorated and 45 people shared a wonderful potluck dinner. We are great cooks! We got to know each other better when we played our get-acquainted game. Thanks Gitta for getting (forcing) us all to play the game! Thanks to Dave Wallace for being our MC and to Terry Spittle and Norm Sailian for leading two hikes before the party so that everyone could truly enjoy the food. Thanks to everyone who attended. Do you have a great idea for a social activity or constructive suggestions about last year’s activities? If so we would love to hear all about it. Share your thoughts with any social committee member – Jane Shifflett, Kathy Somers, Christine Bando and Gitta Housser.

The December hike was cancelled due to rainy weather, so our last hike was on October 14th last year with 13 kids and their 8 adults on the hare hike plus 19 kids with their 12 adults on the tortoise hike. With leaders, this made a total of 58 hikers (32 kids!) on our Starkey Trail hike. We gave pedometers to the children and they really liked that. Generally the hares took 5,000 steps to walk the full Starkey loop, and the tortoises did part of the trail taking about 7,000 steps. Next Kids Hike is on Sunday May 5 at 1:00 pm on the Radial Line Trail, Section One. Check e-notes and posters for final details.


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Welcome New Members! Those joining GHTC since August, 2012 John Ambrose, Nancy Atwood, Jean Burrows, Brenda Chomiak, Dave & Doreen Clarke, Marco Durepos, Heather Embree, Douglas England, Moira Ferguson, Lori Gallaugher, David & Sarah Greisman , Beth Hasson, Astrid & Trevor Hearn, Frebis Hoffmeyer. Aphra Hughes, Jan Ingham, Pamela Jacobs, Stan Kania & Family, Marion Kelly, Catherine Killen & Karl Baader, Elizabeth Kovacs, Dr. Stanley Litch, Li Fang Ma, Linda Markle, John Marsden, Linda & Dan McCarthy, Barbara McKivor, Anne Nederend, Grace Peters, Lesley Anne Ratky, Leonie & Steven Reinhart, Erika Samu, Souhaila Sarkis & Gordon Skinner, Raymond & Kathy Soucy, Jane Sutherland, Susan & Paul Tesar. Vincent & Teresa Wall, Mark & Sandra Wilson, Lorna Wojcicki, Sunghwan Yi, Barbara & Stephen Zibotics, Karen Zorzi.

Habits 4 Health ....... Good!! Christine Wenzler and Jana Stanek Homewood/GTHC programme co-ordinators. Throughout the spring and summer seven GTHC members worked with the Guelph A.C.T. Team (Homewood Health Centre community outreach) to facilitate weekly 1 hour group hikes for clients participating in a Habits 4 Health Programme. The hikes, in Preservation Park, Royal City Trails and various Guelph City Trails, usually had about a dozen clients and staff in attendance. Jana and Stan Stanek, Paul White, Bill Mungall, Mary Henderson and Christine Wenzler led fun and informative hikes that included plant I.D., harvesting puff balls, tasting chicory coffee, as well as bits of history and geology. Results were very rewarding as walkers’ stamina for the exercise and level of social interaction increased over the weeks. At least 2 are now GTHC members and it is hoped several more will attend some club activities. Completion of the spring and summer modules of the Habits 4 Health programme was marked and achievement celebrated on Sept. 25 at Rockwood Conservation Park. For many in the group it was an exciting first visit to the park, for others it was a happy return trip to enjoy the rugged scenery, caves and aquatic life. The weather was perfect for enjoying the hike and the fine picnic lunch provided by the A.C.T. Team. All of us who assisted with this endeavour feel it is a very worthwhile programme and would participate again at some future time. In addition, GHTC received this note (along with a second honorarium): "Thank you for your wonderful support to facilitate our weekly hikes! Your enthusiasm has been contagious and our clients have really enjoyed the hikes. Thank you so much for donating your time to our program - your efforts have made it very successful and much-loved by all! Many, many thanks! Vikki and the Guelph ACT Team staff and clients"

Invitation to Join Voyageur Trail 40th Anniversary Celebrations The Voyageur Trail Association (VTA) extends an invitation to all hikers/trail users to help celebrate their 40th anniversary. Plans include an end-to-end hike (over 12 months) of the 600+ km of completed trail, starting in fall 2013. [The completed trail extends (discontinuously) from Spanish, west of Sudbury, to Nipigon, east of Thunder Bay.] One of our challenges living in the north is the relatively sparse population. VTA volunteers do a wonderful job in maintaining our trails, but there are some areas that have become neglected. If you are able to join us for a few days, a weekend or even a day, please get in contact. We'll be putting together a list of work party events this winter. If you can only come at a specific time, let us know and we'll try to accommodate your schedule. It would also be great to have you join us for one or more of the many 40th anniversary hikes and snowshoe outings we will be planning (starting in late August 2013). If you would like to help, please send your name, address, email and phone # to: Carole Blaquiere at caroleblaquiere@yahoo.ca or Steve Dominy at sdominy1203@gmail.com. We'll put you on our list to receive regular updates of work parties and 40th anniversary activities. Of course, we'd also love to see you anytime you can come to explore our trail system. Our current outing schedule is posted at: www.voyageurtrail.ca.


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DID YOU KNOW? How the Rivers Got Their Names By Janet Baine, GRCA Communications Specialist Reproduced, with permission, from Grand Actions [vol. 17, No, 6], the Grand River Conservation Authority newsletter.

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here are 11,000 km of rivers and creeks flowing through the Grand River watershed and we take them for granted. Ever wonder where the names of these rivers and creeks come from?

With a little delving and the kind help of some librarians, this is part of the story of how the rivers got their names. According to the Geographical Names of Canada set up in 1897, there are three Grand rivers in Canada, but only one Conestogo, Nith, Speed and Eramosa. The Grand Native residents in the area called the Grand River the Tintactuo. History books say that French priest and geographer René de Galinée was among the first explorers to encounter the Grand River and in 1669 he named it “La Rapide”. French cartographer Jacques-Nicholas Bellin published the first map that showed the river, and he named it,“R. d’Urse ou la Grand Rivière”. Governor John Graves Simcoe christened it the “Ouse”in the 1790s. This is a river in Yorkshire, England, and this name is still commemorated by a road called Ouse Street on the riverfront road in Cayuga. However, it is the Anglicized version of Jacques Bellin’s “laGrand Rivière” that the Grand River is known by today. James Gordon wrote a song about the Grand River called “She is Fickle.” The Conestogo The Conestogo River that runs through Drayton is spelled differently from Conestoga College in Kitchener. In 1809,Conestoga wagons took early Mennonite settlers to the village of Conestogo, located just north of Waterloo and the river was likely named after these wagons. Perhaps it was a spelling error. The Nith The troublesome Nith River has no reservoir and floods occasionally around New Hamburg. It is named after the seventh longest river in Scotland that flows through Dumfries, Scotland. The Speed John Galt named the Speed River because he was impressed by the power of the river's current. The name was intended to connote success, fortune and prosperity, according to the book Cambridge: the Making of a Canadian City, by Kenneth McLaughlin. There’s a Tragically Hip song called the Speed River.

The Eramosa Local history books say it is named after Un-ne-mo-sah, an Indian word meaning dog. There is also evidence from books and the internet that it could mean a specific kind of dog: black dog, dead dog, ornery dog, old dog or dog leg. Exactly which native language is a little murky. Virve Wiland, the librarian at the Woodland Cultural Centre, discovered that there is no “m” in any of the Six Nations languages. So she checked the Ojibway dictionaries which give “animosh” as the translation for dog. She also looked into a book The Dog’s Children: Anishinaabe Texts Told by Angeline Williams and found that many Ojibwe/Anishinaabe stories are about half-dog people. Did you know that all of these rivers are designated as Canadian Heritage Rivers? When the Grand River was designated in1994, its four major tributaries were also designated. If you can shed further light on the origin of other names of local waterways, please e-mail jbaine@grandriver.ca. To subscribe to Grand Actions by e-mail, send a blank message to: GrandActions-Subscribe@grandriver.ca. To receive it in the mail, send a request with your address to jbaine@grandriver.ca. There is no cost.

Hike for your Heart’s Sake hen thinking of heart disease, one tend to imagine a sudden event - a heart attack. But usually, that's only a small part of the story. In fact, the good news is that most people recover after their first heart attack. The bad news is that a first heart attack is often the start of life with heart disease.

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The Conference Board of Canada estimates that heart disease and stroke costs the Canadian economy more than $20.9 billion every year in physician services, hospital costs, lost wages and decreased productivity. What are the costs per person? One US study estimated that over a person's lifetime, the direct and indirect cost of heart disease is more than $1 million. Direct medical cost can rack up quickly. After a heart attack there are immediate charges: ambulance transportation, tests, hospitalization, and possibly surgery. Long-term maintenance of heart disease is also expensive, including medications, testing, and continued cardiologist appointments. Indirect costs are harder to grasp but they can be enormous. The biggest are lost productivity and income. Those without good disability insurance


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could be financially ruined. But even if one does not develop heart disease, it's still costing through taxes and additional health insurance premiums. One way that can help reduce your risk of heart disease is to improve your lifestyle. Try these 5 tips: 1. Get more physical activity. Regular exercise can improve blood pressure and cholesterol concentrations, control weight, and reduce the risk of heart disease. The Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada estimates that if you are inactive and become physically active, you can reduce heart attack risk by 35 to 55%. Thirty minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity, such as brisk walking or biking five days per week, is a reasonable goal. 2. Improve your diet. Eat more vegetable and cereals but always remember that no matter how healthy a food might be, eating too much of it will make you gain weight and obesity increases risk. 3. Eat less salt. Sodium contributes directly to high blood pressure which in turn, promotes more

cardiovascular disease. Salt, if discovered today and submitted to Health Canada for testing, would never be approved for human consumption! Cutting out salt isn't easy. Start by gradually reducing the amount added to food and pay attention to sodium on nutritional labels. Packaged or processed foods can account for 75% to 80% of salt intake. 4. Control other risk factors like high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or diabetes and work with your doctor to get them controlled. If you smoke- stop! 5. Reduce stress. Researchers aren't sure how chronic stress contributes to heart disease, but the two are linked. Do what you can to reduce tension through breathing exercises, meditation, yoga or just walking along a trail. F course, many of us have seen, and ignored, the suggestions for heart disease reducing, lifestyle changes before. Yet they really can make a difference. That $25 GHTC annual membership is infinitesimal compared to the lifetime costs of treatment for cardiovascular disease.

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BOOK REVIEW Will Ferguson. Beyond Belfast: a 560-mile walk across Northern Ireland on sore feet. Viking Canada, 2009. 398 pp. When I last traveled in Newfoundland I came across two loquacious elderly gentlemen in a café north of St. John's. I must have been in an Irish area of The Rock for the following account by Will Ferguson on his trek in Northern Ireland is almost verbatim to my encounter. To Ferguson: "Is it hard unnerstannin us? The accent an' all?" Ferguson: "Well you speak fast in Northern Ireland." To Ferguson: "Ach, we don't speak fast. You lot listen slow." Ulstermen are never at a loss for words. As Ferguson points out, the longest distance between point A and point B is two Ulstermen in conversation. Partly a hiking travelogue, partly a search for mysterious ancestors, this book is full of history and myth, sometimes outright funny, sometimes angry, sometimes wistful or elegiac and never afraid to ask the question "why?" The Ulster Way, set up in the 1970s and early 1980s, is 520-630 miles long depending on your source of information. Notes Ferguson, " If they cannot agree on the length, how can they agree on the actual route." It runs through some of the most glorious countryside in the world – sea cliff tops, mountains, green-green-green farmland, inland loughs and pretty towns. Offsetting all this beauty is the fact that guide books probably cannot be trusted, way markings are sometimes non existent, local knowledge can be infuriatingly vague and the weather can be wet, wet, WET. "Turns out in Ulster, unless you are drenched to the bone and facing imminent hypothermia, you didn't get rained on." Thank goodness for Ordnance Survey maps – they saved Ferguson's bacon on several occasions. The locating of a telephone booth on an O.S. map turned out to be invaluable. In the year 2000 he took about two months to complete the Ulster circuit. Originally he had intended to trek through, camp out and carry a large rucksack, but the weather soon changed all that. Day hikes of up to 25 miles became the norm. At the end of a day he would catch a bus or hitch hike back to his B & B, then reverse the procedure the next day. A couple of incidents left him lucky to be alive. He only just escaped the tide in absolutely foul weather close to the cliff base at St. John's Point in County Down. Another time in a pub, after a few drinks of an evening, he got into a political slanging match with a

couple of rowdies; they followed him outside and into an alley where heaven knows what might have happened had not a group of "the other side" come along and sorted out the rowdies. Ferguson's take on the Northern Irish was as follows. "Over the course of my trek, the one thing I learned to rely on, other than the unpredictability of the weather, was the kindness of the people, whether Protestant or Catholic, Prod or Fenian. Why they couldn't show the same generosity of spirit to each other I never was able to reconcile. "Aye, we love visitors and hate our neighbours" was how it was explained to me." There are four pages of background material listed at the back of the book, mostly referring to Irish history, should you wish to read more. In addition Ferguson has provided decent maps of the seven sections into which he breaks up the Ulster Way. As this book went to press in 2009 it was announced that the Ulster Way would be re-launched with a new route, improved signage and an emphasis on promoting shorter, "quality" sections. All this sounds great but, as Ferguson might have said, be forewarned and remember that this is Ulster! For those of us who have done any long distance hiking, this is a must read. For those of us who don't understand the Northern Irish, this is a must read. For those of us who revel in travel literature, this book should be a very high priority read (and it's by a Canadian!). [Dave Hull ]

Potpourri of Resources Listed below is a no-particular-order bunch of websites or book stores encountered in the last while that are useful in support of hiking. If you have your own favorite lists or discoveries of this sort of thing, send it off to our newsletter editor for the next issue! A Trails Map of the Hanlon Creek Conservation Area (and Preservation Park) – as compiled by Stew Hilts, past Chair of the U of G Geography Dept. First time anyone has attempted to make such a map, despite public ownership of this area going back 35+ years. Should prevent folks from getting lost as much as they do in there! And he nicely gives credit to GHTC for originally opening up some of the trails. http://hanloncreekjournal.blogspot.ca/2010/01/trails-ofhanlon-creek.html Toronto Hiking Website: http://www.torontohiking.com/tohi/ A surprisingly good website with all kinds of features,


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and excellent maps. The hikes listing focuses on the GTA and variations of Bruce Trail hikes along the escarpment, but also cherry picks some other interesting hikes from other parts of SW Ontario. Oddly, nothing from GHTC trails, though, many of which are more interesting than some of their other picks, IMHO. Greg Vincent’s Website: Features some of the best practical advice on hiking, by a local GVTA member and accomplished hike leader, famous for his Pennsylvania hiking holidays. http://home.golden.net/~gvincent/ The Adirondacks: This site is by an engaging couple who are “peak baggers” (isn’t everyone who goes to this upstate NY park?) from Quebec who have seen it all. A six hour drive to Lake Placid from here. http://www.go.to/adirondack Finger Lakes Trail: http://fltconference.org This 550 mile long trail runs through the “southern tier” of New York, from the Allegheny Mountains to the Catskill Mountains and can be reached in as little as an hour south of Buffalo. Maps can be bought on line by the page. Some of our members have been saying parts of the trail are reminiscent of hillier bits of England. Open Air Books: if you are heading out of country anywhere, this store is an excellent resource, with very hard to find titles, if impossibly cramped. Adelaide St. E. in Toronto, about 2 blocks east of Yonge. (A good backup after you have checked out The World’s Biggest Bookstore travel section …located just west off Yonge, one block north of Dundas.) City of Waterfalls (Hamilton): a local marketing individual has created a stunning site, succeeding in increasing local awareness of the beauty spots around the region. This has triggered much of the recent enthusiasm at “waterfall-bagging” (i.e. seeing every last waterfall) not only in Hamilton, but along the Escarpment, and throughout Ontario. http://www.cityofwaterfalls.ca [Bill Mungall]


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HIKING SCHEDULE Mar 2013 through mid July 2013 Over the years the GHTC has enjoyed permission from the generosity of private landowners for footpaths through their property. The friendship, respect and trust of these landowners are the Club's most important assets. Let us continue to care for and properly use their property while maintaining the objectives of the Club. All hikers should check the GHTC web site www.guelphhiking.com for detailed advice and information on Terrain Rating System, Hike Speed, special seasonal instructions and other timely recommendations. Hikes from other clubs are listed. Please check their websites for their terrain and speed ratings, as they may be different than GHTC's. • To avoid disappointment due to cancellation, please notify the hike leader if you intend to join a scheduled hike. • Cancelled or rescheduled hikes will be posted on the GHTC web site. The leader may choose to post a rain date here. Be sure to check for updates and impromptu hikes! • Occasionally it proves more convenient for a hike leader to select a meeting place that is not in Guelph. If you cannot arrange a ride to get there, call the hike leader who may know of someone who is willing to take you. In other out-of-town hikes the leader will meet at a local location to carpool. If the distance is considerable, it is customary to offer to help pay for gasoline. • It is important to stay with the group while hiking, alerting the leader of intentions to ‘drop-out' at the beginning a necessity and appreciated. NOTE: HIKE Dates and TITLES in BOLD are conducted by the Guelph Hiking Trail Club. Once again the GHTC hike leaders have put together a great hiking schedule that address different interests and hiking levels. If you have a hike location that you would like to see in a future schedule, please email me. GayleJ@sentex.ca. Hikes from other clubs are also listed. Please check their websites for details or cancellation notices. And just a reminder that the times listed with hikes are departure times so please arrive 5-10 minutes earlier. W e would be disappointed if we left without you. Sat M ar 02 GOLDIE M ILL 1-1½ hr A "Beginner's Hike", in the north/central area of Guelph. Meet at 10:00am in the parking lot at Exhibition Park Arena on Exhibition St / Division St. This will be an urban hike, in a figure of 8, so there will be a drop-out point halfway through the hike if needed. Bring water & snack & icers for your shoes if the streets are icy. Leader: Susan Atkinson 519-837-9470 evenings before 10 p.m. formerbrit@hotmail.com Level 1. Speed Casual Sun M ar 03 KOLAPORE UPLANDS SKI TRAILS 5 hr Challenging, semi-wilderness trails on the Escarpment, 90 minutes north of Guelph. For adventuresome and reasonably fit skiers. XC ski only. Meet at 8am. Leader: Call Bill Mungall at 836-5567 for transportation info. Level 3 Sat M ar 09 ROYAL RECREATION TRAIL 1-1½ hr This is the second "Beginner's Hike". Also good to start to get back in shape if you have been idle over the winter. Meet 10:00am at the Guelph covered bridge on Gordon Street to hike from Gordon street to Victoria Road then back. Leader: Gayle 519 856-1012 Level 1. Speed Casual Sun M ar 10 PRESERVATION PARK 2 hr Meet at 1 pm. in the city parking lot on the North side of Kortright Rd (just west of Edinburgh Rd) Come and enjoy the maze of trails that can be found in the 67 acres of forest. All are welcome. Leader: Paul 519 824-6241 Level 2. Speed Moderate Sat M ar 16 PRIVATE PROPERTY TRAILS 2 hr By the generosity of a property owner south of Guelph in the cranberry bog, come enjoy discovering the trails meandering over hills and meadows, in and out of woods, a weather-dependent chance to hike, ski or snowshoe. Meet at the ‘Y' parking lot for a 2pm. start. Bring water Leader: Susan Bard 519-836-6570 Level 2. Speed Moderate Sun M ar 17 ROYAL RECREATIONAL TRAIL - PHOTO HIKE 2 - 2½ hr This will be the first of 3 Photo Hikes. W e will take an easy stroll along the River Trails for a total of about 5 Km. Meet at the Covered Bridge Parking Lot on Gordon St. at 2:30pm. W e will start and finish there. W e will travel at a slow pace pointing out many photogenic scenes and providing lots of time for composing and taking pictures. The time of day was chosen with a view to the probability of good, low angle dramatic lighting. Bring a camera that you are comfortable with, fresh batteries and a memory stick with room for perhaps 50 or more high resolution pictures. Do not be put off by overcast skies or light drizzle, etc. If it is raining heavily, or a thunder storm is underway, we would probably not want to proceed, but otherwise there can be some great photo opportunities even if the day is not bright and sunny. Leader: Bob Fanning 519 822-5181 or bobfan@idirect.com Level 1 Easy pace


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Thu M ar 21 GHTC SLIDE NIGHT Zehr's Community Room, Imperial and Paisley Roads 7-9pm. More details will be provided in GHTC "Upcoming Events" email prior to event. Sat M ar 23 CALEDON TRAILW AY 15 - 20 km 5-6 hrs W e will explore the Caledon Trailway, part of the National Trail, an abandoned rail-line between Caledon East and Terra Cotta. This will be an easy hike over 5 or 6 hours. Bring water and a lunch. W e will meet near Georgetown around 9:30am. Call Mike for details of the rendezvous place. Optional drop out after 8km at Ingelwood needs to be arranged in advance with leader. Leader: Mike Curtis 1-905-877-4134 Level 2. Speed Moderate Sat Mar 23 GVT PINNACLE SECTION, HIKE 1 OF 6 Elora area . For more details see www.gvta.on.ca GVTA leader

11km Level 2. Speed Moderate

Sun M ar 24 ELM IRA RESERVOIR AT FLORADALE 8 km, 2 hr Flat ,varied topography including Lion's Club Sugar Bush operation around reservoir on Canagagiue River. Old order Mennonite farm country. Meet on Florapine Rd just west of Arthur St N for a 2pm departure. Guelph carpool location is Golden Griddle parking lot by W oodlawn Rd. with a 1:15pm departure. Leader: Stan Litch 519-843-5915, Guelph carpool Suzanne Gates 519-265-3962, sgates14@hotmail.com Level 2. Speed Moderate Sat M ar 30 K/W UNIVERSITY GROUNDS 8 km, 2 hr Meet at railway museum parking lot on Father Bauer Drive and Erb Street, 10 a.m. W alking north through university grounds. Bring water. Suggested lunch at Sole, Erb Street. Contact Susan to arrange carpool. Leader: Donald Hughes, Susan Bard 519-836-6570 Level 1. Speed Moderate. M on Apr 01 IGNATIUS JESUIT CENTRE HIKE 1 OF 5 2 km, 1 hr Catherine Donnelly W alk - Stations of the Cross & of the Cosmos. A slow meditative walk. Meet in the parking lot by the Labyrinth and Jesuit Cemetery for a 6:30pm departure. Leader: Vanessa Hyland, 519-821-5335, vhyland@rogers.com Level 1. Slow M on Apr 01 HURON NATURAL PARK 8 km, 2 hr Meet at 10am at Huron Natural Park entrance. Reach Park by Homer W atson Boulevard, Beasley Drive, Trillium Drive. Bring water, lunch. Contact Susan to arrange carpool. Leader: Donald Hughes, Susan Bard 519-836-6570 Level 2. Speed Moderate. W ed Apr 03 GUELPH LAKE CONSERVATION 1½ hr Meet at the entrance to the park on Conservation Road for a 6:15 pm start. W e will hike the trail through woods and walk some of the roadways in park. Leader: Gayle 519 856-1012 Level 1. Speed Moderate. Sat Apr 06 GVT PINNACLE SECTION, HIKE 2 OF 6 Elora area . For more details see www.gvta.on.ca GVTA leader

10.3km Level 2. Speed Moderate

Sat Apr 06 ELORA GORGE AREA (GVTA TRAIL) 4km, 1hr Spectacular views of the Grand. Meet at parking lot of ball diamond on west side Ct.Rd7 (Elora Rd) and Middlebrook Rd. for a 10am departure. Guelph carpool location is Golden Griddle parking lot by W oodlawn Rd. with a 9:30am departure. Leader: Stan Litch 519-843-5915, Guelph carpool Suzanne Gates 519-265-3962, sgates14@hotmail.com Level 2. Speed Moderate Sun Apr 07 CAM BRIDGE TO PARIS RAIL TRAIL 10 km Meet at 10am in Churchill Park off W ater Street. Bring water, lunch. Contact Susan to arrange carpool. Leader: Donald Hughes, Susan Bard 519-836-6570 Level 1. Speed Moderate. M on Apr 08 IGNATIUS JESUIT CENTRE HIKE 2 OF 5 1½ hr, 5 km Great Auk W etland Trail goes through woodlot and wetlands behind Marymount Cemetery. Meet in the parking lot by the Labyrinth and Jesuit Cemetery for a 6:30pm departure. Leader: Vanessa Hyland, 519-821-5335, vhyland@rogers.com Level 2. Speed Moderate W ed Apr 10 SPEED RIVER SECTION 1 2 hr Meet for a 6pm departure at the parking just outside of Guelph Humane Society. W e will follow Speed River sect 1 to Niska Rd. and return on the John W oods Side trail. Leader: Norm 519-836-3668 Level 2. Speed Moderate Thu Apr 11 ELORA/FERGUS HIKE 1 OF 3: GORGE LOOP For more details see www.gvta.on.ca GVTA leader

6.8km Level 2. Speed Moderate


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Sat Apr 13 HALTON AGREEM ENT FOREST 3 hr, 8-10km W e enter on the 4th Line of Nassagaweya and hike along fire road and woodland trails. Lots of wildflowers in this section, including green and white Trilliums. Meet at Guelph covered Bridge for a 12:30pm car pool departure. Bring water and snacks. Trails may be wet. Leader: Norm 519-836-3668; Gayle 519 856-1012 Level 2. Speed Moderate M on Apr 15 IGNATIUS JESUIT CENTRE HIKE 3 OF 5 1½ hr., 5 km Chardin and Martin Royackers Trails explore the old gravel pit. Meet in the parking lot by the Labyrinth and Jesuit Cemetery for a 6:30pm departure. Leader: Vanessa Hyland, 519-821-5335, vhyland@rogers.com Level 2. Speed Moderate Tue Apr 16 DUFFERIN HI-LAND SECTION, PRIM ROSE, M AP 20 13.4 km A 13.4 km car shuttle hike at a medium pace with some hills. Hiking boots recommended. Bring water, snack and lunch, and no dogs please. Depart: 9:30 am from the meeting point at km 15.2 on Hurontario St. where there is roadside parking on the south side of Hwy. 89 at least 30 metres from the intersection. Take Highway 10 north from Orangeville to Primrose (junction of 10 and 89), then east one concession to Hurontario St. Park just south of this intersection. From the meeting point, we will car shuttle to km 29.2 and then hike back taking in W alkers W oods and the Boyne Valley. W e will look out for signs of spring. Leader: Leader: Susan Atkinson 519-837-9470 evenings before 10 p.m. formerbrit@hotmail.com Level 2. Speed Moderate W ed Apr 17 ROCKW OOD CONSERVATION 1½ hr Hike the Rockwood Conservation area trails and view some of the 200 glacial potholes found here. W e'll pass by some of the 12 caves, the ruins of a woollen mill and 500 year old cedars as we follow the Eramosa River. Park on Fall Street S. in Rockwood for a 6:30pm departure. Leader: Gayle 519 856-1012 Level 2. Speed Moderate Thu Apr 18 ELORA/FERGUS HIKE 2 OF 3: MUSEUM LOOP For more details see www.gvta.on.ca GVTA leader

8.6 km Level 1. Speed Moderate

Sat Apr 20 M IKE'S TRADITIONAL SPRING HIKE & W ALK FOR W ILDLIFE 6hrs This is a great hike, looping along the Bruce Trail near Scottsdale Farm, north of Georgetown. The meeting place is on Trafalgar Road north of Hwy 7, opposite the Cango gas Station (Silvercreek) at 10:00am, and a three minute drive takes us to the parking lot at Scottsdale Farm. W e will follow the Bruce and a couple of side trails returning to the cars around 4:00ish. W eather appropriate clothing, and footwear (rocks can be slippery), lunch and water are essential. Our kilometers walked will be added to the Canada-wide total kilometers of the Canadian W ildlife Federation's 2013 W alk for W ildlife. (The goal of W alk for W ildlife is to encourage people to spend time outdoors.) Leader: Mike Curtis 905-877-4134 Level 2. Speed Moderate Sat Apr 20 W ILDW OOD CA 10 km Meet for a 10am departure in W ildwood CA, located 16 km west of Stratford on hwy 8, cross dam, turn left at intersection, turn left again at first road. You may be required to pay admission. Suggest lunch at W oolfy's at intersection. Contact Susan to arrange carpool. Leader: Donald Hughes, Susan Bard 519-836-6570 Level 2. Speed Moderate Sun Apr 21 RLT SECT 2 - PHOTO HIKE 2 - 2½ hr Our second photo hike will take place on RLT Section 2. Meet at the Guelph Covered Bridge Parking lot on Gordon for a 2:30pm departure to the Starkey Hill parking lot. W e will hike along the side trail to the main trail in section 2, going east along the main trail and then returning the same way, to finish at the parking lot. The turnaround point would be determined by the groups progress, such that we would finish by about 5:00 PM. Bring a camera that you are comfortable with, fresh batteries and a memory stick with room for perhaps 50 or more high resolution pictures. Do not be put off by overcast skies or light drizzle, etc. If it is raining heavily, or a thunder storm is underway, we would probably not want to proceed, but otherwise there can be some great photo opportunities even if the day is not bright and sunny. Leader: Bob Fanning 519 822-5181 or bobfan@idirect.com Level 2 Easy pace M on Apr 22 IGNATIUS JESUIT CENTRE HIKE 4 OF 5 1½ hr, 5 km Back 40 and River Chardoner Trails explore the bee hives, the willow dome and the hermitages. Meet in the parking lot by the Labyrinth and Jesuit Cemetery for a 6:30pm departure. Leader: Vanessa Hyland, 519-821-5335, vhyland@rogers.com Level 2. Speed Moderate W ed Apr 24 ROYAL CITY RECREATION TRAIL 2 hr Meet at the covered bridge for a 6:30 PM start along the RRT. W e will head toward Victoria road on north side of Eramosa river and return on south side. Leader: Norm 519 836-3568 Level 1. Speed Moderate Thu Apr 25 ELORA/FERGUS HIKE 3 OF 3: FERGUS LOOP For more details see www.gvta.on.ca Leader: GVTA leader

8.5km Level 1. Speed Moderate


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Sat Apr 27 TRAILS OPEN / DOORS OPEN GUELPH 1½ hr. Join the GHTC and GRCA in celebrating the 40th anniversary of Starkey Trail. Wild flowers such as Trilliums, Hepatica, Spring Beauty and Dutchman's Breeches are found along the Starkey Hill trails and chickadees will take food from your hand. Meet in Starkey Hill parking lot, south side of Arkell Rd., about 1km east of Arkell Village. Four hikes departing at 9:30, 11:30, 1:30, 3:30 Leader: various GHTC leaders Level 2. Speed Casual Sat Apr 27 WOODSTOCK 10 km Use Hwy 401, exit 236 to Tower Line Road. Turn right onto Oxford Road 4. Meet at trail entrance on left just past bridge for a 10am departure. Bring water, lunch. Contact Susan to arrange carpool. Leader: Donald Hughes, Susan Bard 519-836-6570 Level 1. Speed Moderate Sun Apr 28 FERGUS HISTORIC HIKE 1½-2hr We will walk the streets of Fergus, passing by homes, churches, mills and commercial buildings built in 1800s. Are journey will provide some great views of the Grand River. After our walk we can lunch at the Brew House on the Grand, originally built as a home circa 1851, it was converted into a flour mill, electrical generating plant, chicken hatchery, Police department and finally an Inn and pub. Meet in Golden Griddle parking lot close to Woodlawn Rd. for a 10:00am carpool to Fergus. Wear shoes suitable for sidewalk walking. Leader: Gayle 519 856-1012 Level 1 Easy pace Sun Apr 28 CRAWFORD LAKE/RATTLESNAKE POINT LOOP For more details see www.gvta.on.ca GVTA leader

14 km Level 2/3. Speed Moderate

M on Apr 29 IGNATIUS JESUIT CENTRE HIKE 5 OF 5 2½ hr, 10 km Villa by the Speed Trail - a walk along Marden Creek to where it joins the Speed, and then out to Victoria Rd. and back. Meet in the parking lot by the Labyrinth and Jesuit Cemetery for a 6pm departure. Leader: Vanessa Hyland, 519-821-5335, vhyland@rogers.com Level 2. Speed Moderate Sat M ay 04 HOCKLEY VALLEY 14km For a challenging hike in beautiful Hockley Valley we will be hiking the Bruce Trail between Hockley Road and Dunby Road through fields and forests and enjoying the sights. Bring water, snacks, lunch and wear hiking boots. We will carpool at 9:00 a.m. from Guelph's covered bridge parking lot east of Gordon. Pub stop after hike. Returning around 5:00p.m. Leader: Lynn Glover, 519-780-0342 Level 3, Speed Moderate Sat May 04 GVT, PINNACLE SECTION, HIKE 3 OF 6 Lake Belwood area. For more details see www.gvta.on.ca GVTA leader

10.3km Level 2. Speed Moderate

Sun M ay 05 SPEED RIVER TRAIL 2½ hr, 9 km We will hike Section 2 of our Speed River Trail and John Wood Sidetrails on Section 1. Meet at the Humane Society parking lot south of Wellington Str. (west of Hanlon) at 1:30 PM. Leader: Stan & Jana, 519-821-7996 Level 2. Speed Moderate Sun M ay 05 KIDS HIKE - RADIAL LINE TRAIL, SECTION ONE 1½ hr Introduce the young people in your life to the fun of hiking as we hunt for signs of spring along the river, the meadow and ancient coral reef cliffs found on the Radial Line Trail right in Guelph! Meet prior to the 1:00 pm hike start in the parking area just outside the Barber Scout Camp at 733 Stone Road E. Enter via the laneway on the south side of Stone Road E, immediately east of the railroad track (between Victoria Road and Watson Road). You will not see a 733 sign at the roadside, instead there is a small blue "Barber Scout Camp" sign on the telephone pole on Stone Road near the laneway. Children must be accompanied by an adult on the Tortoise or Hare hikes. Dress for the weather. Bring water and sunscreen. No strollers and no pets. Refreshments provided. For details and to register, please call Kathy at 519 836-9147 or ksomersghtc@gmail.com. Leader: Guelph Hiking Trail Club Leaders Level 1, hiking at an easy pace Wed M ay 08 UNIVERSITY ARBORETUM 1½ to 2 hr Come join us for the " Sights and Smells of Spring in the Arboretum". Park at the Arboretum Centre for a 6:30pm departure. The entrance to the Arboretum Centre is off College Ave., a short distance west of Victoria Rd. Leader: Martin mronda188@gmail.com or cell is 226 979 1495 Level 1. Speed Moderate Sat M ay 11 TORONTO BT LIM EHOUSE LOOP 2+ hr This area always intrigues any season with its novel "Hole in the Wall" and heritage lime kilns being refurbished. Bring water and snacks. Poles are helpful with some up and down passages. Meet for a 1:00pm departure at the Guelph covered bridge parking lot east of Gordon Street for carpooling to trail head. Leader: Norm 519-836-3668 Level 2. Speed Moderate Sun M ay 12 BACKUS WOODS 14km The crown jewel of Carolinian Canada is under 90 minutes away. Ideal time to see early growth, and before bug life makes for tougher hiking. Bring lunch. Meet 8:30 a.m. at Guelph covered bridge parking lot. Leader: Bill Mungall wmungall0809@rogers.com Level 2. Speed Moderate


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M on M ay 13 ARKELL RESEARCH STATION 4 km Enjoy the best views over Guelph from the open ridge. Meet at 6:30pm at Meghan Crescent and Clair Rd., one block west of Victoria S. Leader: Bill Mungall wmungall0809@rogers.com Level 2. Speed Moderate Sat M ay 18 W ILSON'S FLATS 8-9 km, 2½ hr W e will start down river on the Grand at W ilson's Flats ending up at the ball diamond at Middlebrook Rd. and the Elora Rd.( on GVTA trail on the north side of the river) Meet at ball diamond for a 2pm departure to W ilson's Flats. Guelph carpool location is Golden Griddle parking lot by W oodlawn Rd. with a 1:30pm departure. Leader: Stan Litch 519-843-5915, Guelph carpool Gayle 519 856-1012 Level 2. Speed Moderate Sat M ay 18 NEW HAM BURG 6 km This is a new trail to explore. Following hwy 7 and 8 to the third set of traffic lights, turn left onto Haysville Road. Trail begins on the right at the second entrance to new development. Meet for a 10am departure. Suggest lunch at W aterlot Inn. Contact Susan to arrange carpool. Leader: Donald Hughes, Susan Bard 519-836-6570 Level 1. Speed Moderate M on M ay 20 STRATFORD 8 km Meet at 10am in parking lot of Art Gallery on Romeo Street, walking east along Avon River. Suggest lunch at Mercer Hall on Ontario Street. Contact Susan to arrange carpool. Leader: Donald Hughes, Susan Bard 519-836-6570 Level 1, 2. Speed Moderate W ed M ay 22 SM ITHS SIDE TRAIL 2 hrs Meet at the Guelph covered bridge for a 6:00 PM carpool departure, or 6:15 at the trail head on W atson Rd. W e will hike along the rail bed to the dam then up to a scenic view. Bring water, snacks and good footwear. Dogs Ok Leader: Norm 519 836-3568 nsailian@hotmail.com Level 2. Speed Moderate Sat M ay 25 SPEED RIVER TRAIL 3hr, 13km Hike the Speed River Trail between the covered bridge on Gordon Street and the trail head at Roszell Road. The footing can be wet so wear appropriate boots. Bring lunch, snacks and water. Meet at the Guelph covered bridge parking lot on Gordon Street at 12 noon for car pooling to the Roszell Rd. trail head. Possible pub stop afterwards. Leader: Terry Spittles 519-265-6203 Level 2. Speed Moderate Sat M ay 25 UNIVERSITY ARBORETUM - PHOTO HIKE 2 - 2½ hr Our third photo hike will be an exploration of the demonstration gardens at the Arboretum, plus some of the woods trails along the south side, including the trail past some old quarry ponds. W e would meet at the Arboretum Centre Parking lot just off College Ave and start at 2:30pm. W e will finish at the same spot. Bring a camera that you are comfortable with, fresh batteries and a memory stick with room for perhaps 50 or more high resolution pictures. Do not be put off by overcast skies or light drizzle, etc. If it is raining heavily, or a thunder storm is underway, we would probably not want to proceed, but otherwise there can be some great photo opportunities even if the day is not bright and sunny. Leader: Bob Fanning 519 822-5181 or bobfan@idirect.com Level 1. Easy pace Sat May 25 PARIS TO CAMBRIDGE RAIL TRAIL, PART 1 OF 2 For more details see www.gvta.on.ca GVTA leader

20 km Level 2. Speed Moderate

Sun M ay 26 HANLON CREEK CONSERVATION AREA 2-3 hr Meet in the parking lot in front of The Fat Duck restaurant at the SW corner of Kortright and Edinburgh for a 1:30pm departure. W e will hike from there through Preservation Park, down to wander the web of trails in the Hanlon Creek Conservation Area. All welcome. Leader: Suzanne Gates 519-265-3962, sgates14@hotmail.com Level 2. Speed Moderate M on M ay 27 SECTION 2, SPEED RIVER TRAIL 3.8 km Prettiest section of the SRT, right along the river, from the gas compressor station on 124 to end of W hitelaw/Sideroad 10N. W e will shuttle cars to make this possible as an evening hike. Meet at Guelph covered bridge parking lot at 6:30pm. Leader: Bill Mungall wmungall0809@rogers.com Level 2. Speed Moderate Sat Jun 01 SPEED RIVER TRAIL 40TH ANNIV. (INTERNATIONAL TRAILS DAY) various Come out and help us celebrate the founding of the Speed River Trail in 1973. BBQ at 4:30 at Silvercreek Park (south of W ellington, off Edinburgh). 14.5 km end to end hike (12:00 start at Silvercreek Pk.), plus 3 hikes for each individual section, of 5 km, 4 km and 3.5 km., all with afternoon starts. Dignitaries, past presidents and landowners will be invited to the event. (W atch for email update notices for start times or call Bill.) Pace moderate for all hikes, all ending at approx. 4:30 for BBQ. Leader: Bill Mungall and other leaders wmungall0809@rogers.com 836-5567 Level 1-2. Speed Moderate Sun Jun 02 CALENDAR GIRLS THEATRE HIKE AND EATS 1hr By popular demand, we'll stretch on a hike after an afternoon of theatre giggles, stopping at Eggcetera for refreshment and a tasty meal. Meet in the lobby by 1:45p.m. to group and receive tickets. Tickets are $19. Recommend registering early to guarantee a seat! Leader: Susan Bard 519-836-6570 Level 1. Speed Casual.


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Sun Jun 02 FORKS OF THE CREDIT LOOP For more details see www.gvta.on.ca GVTA leader

8.6 or 9.8 km Level 2/3. Speed Moderate

M on Jun 03 EDINBURGH RD TO M ARDEN TRACT 4km W e will walk one possible connection from Guelph to the Kissing Bridge Trailway head. See it before it's converted to a private road to service the new Cargill flour mill. Meet behind Swiss Chalet at corner of W oodlawn and Edinburgh at 6:30pm, and shuttle cars to Marden Tract. Leader: Bill Mungall wmungall0809@rogers.com Level 1. Easy pace Sat Jun 08 BRIDGE TO BRIDGE 25.5km Meet at the Guelph covered bridge for 9:00AM departure to bus to W est Montrose Kissing bridge. From there we will hike back to the Guelph covered bridge a distance of about 20 km. Refreshments will be provide at checkpoints. Pre registration and a participation fee are required. Badges will be available. More details will be provided in "Guelph Hiking Trail Club Upcoming Events" email or contact leader. Leader: Norm 519 836-3568 nsailian@hotmail.com Level 2. Speed Moderate Sat Jun 08 M ITCHELL 10 km Follow hwy 8 west of Stratford to Mitchell, turn right at second set of lights (St. George Street). Continue to Frances Street. Turn left and park at end of street. 10am departure. Bring water, lunch. Contact Susan to arrange carpool. Leader: Donald Hughes, Susan Bard 519-836-6570 Level 1, 2. Speed Moderate. Sun Jun 09 RIM PARK, W ATERLOO 8 km Follow University Street, turn right onto Park Road to meet at 10am in the parking lot. Bring water, lunch. Contact Susan to arrange carpool. Leader: Donald Hughes, Susan Bard 519-836-6570 Level 1. Speed Moderate. M on Jun 10 SPEEDVALE AVE TO THE BOATHOUSE 3.5km An easy beginner hike, all on the TransCanada Trail with excellent views of rapids along the river. Possible historic and current event vignettes along the way. Meet at Guelph covered bridge parking lot at 6:30pm. Leader: Bill Mungall wmungall0809@rogers.com Level 1. Easy pace W ed Jun 12 TW O RIVERS HIKE 5km, 1.5 hr Meet at the Guelph covered bridge for a 6:30 PM start along the RRT. W e will head toward Victoria road on north side of Eramosa river and return on south side. Leader: Norm 519 836-3568 Level 1. Speed Moderate Sat Jun 15 HILTON FALLS 6hr, 21km W e will hike sections of the Bruce Trail and side trails on the Niagara Escarpment and Halton Conservation area. Meet at the Guelph covered bridge on Gordon Street for a 9:00 am departure. Bring lunch snacks and water. Possible pub stop afterwards. Leader: Terry Spittles 519-265-6203 Level 3. Speed Moderate Sun Jun 16 SHADES M ILLS, CAM BRIDGE 8 km Many favoured hardwood forest trails are here to hike along Mill Creek. Meet 10am in parking area inside the CA, 412 Avenue Road east of Franklin Blvd in Cambridge. CA admission fee. Bring water, lunch. Contact Susan to arrange carpool. Leader: Donald Hughes, Susan Bard 519-836-6570 Level 1, 2. Speed Moderate. M on Jun 17 GUELPH'S KETTLE LAKES 2½ km Some of the prettiest views within the City are along the edge of several deep ponds nestled under tall pines on the surrounding hills. See it all before it becomes surrounded by industrial parks! Some bushwhacking. Meet at the front lot of Bishop Macdonell High School at 6:30pm. Leader: Bill Mungall wmungall0809@rogers.com Level 2. Speed Moderate JUNE 21-23, 11 th ANNUAL ORCHID ADVENTURE, TOBERMORY For more details see www.gvta.on.ca GVTA leader

Level 1. Leisurely

Sat Jun 22 TORONTO BT SPEYSIDE LOOP 10 km Here is a lovely area close to home for a loop hike along Bruce main and side trails with variable terrain, rocky sections as well as a great lookout. W ear proper footwear and seasonal protective clothing. Bring water and snacks. Meet for a 1:00pm departure at the Guelph covered bridge parking lot east of Gordon Street for carpooling to trail head. Leader: Norm 519-836-3568 Level 2. Speed Moderate Sun Jun 23 GO BUS HIKE 28 km Just to prove it can be done, we will board a GO bus to Acton, use the new Moroz sidetrail leading out of south Acton to the Radial Line Trail, and walk back to downtown Guelph! No car shuttle necessary! (Note, during the weekdays, you can also take a GO Train to the new Acton station and do the same hike.) Meet at Via/GO station no later than 7:00 a.m. to buy a one way ticket and board the 7:10 bus. Leader: Bill Mungall wmungall0809@rogers.com Level 3, moderate to brisk pace


GHTC Newsletter - March 2013 - Page 19

W ed Jun 26 GUELPH CORRECTIONAL CENTRE GROUNDS 1½ hrs The Guelph Correctional Centre other than once the home for prisoners, has been the site for movies and TV shows. In 2007 a paranormal investigation was filmed there. W e walk by the buildings and through the fields and park-like areas created by the former prisoners. W e will meet at 6:30 in the south end of the old Legion parking lot, located off York Rd. (highway 7), just east of W atson Parkway. Leader: Gayle 519 856-1012 Level 1. Speed Moderate Sat Jun 29 ELORA TO FERGUS ON THE CATARACT RAIL TRAIL 2 hr, 8 km Hike the Cataract Rail Trail between Elora and Fergus. Meet at the Canadian Tire Store parking lot on W oodlawn for a 1:00 pm departure. Drive to Fergus and then do a loop hike on the two rail trails with a brief stop in Elora to window shop. Bring snacks and water. Possible pub stop in Fergus afterwards. Leader: Terry Spittles 519-265-6203 Level 1. Speed Moderate Sat Jun 29 ST. M ARY'S 8 km Can be reached by Hwy 7 or 8. Park at tennis courts on W ater Street for a 10am departure. Suggest lunch at a restaurant in city centre. Contact Susan to arrange carpool. Leader: Donald Hughes, Susan Bard 519-836-6570 Level 1. Speed Moderate. M on Jul 01 SPEED RIVER, GUELPH LAKE AND FIREW ORKS!! 1½ - 2 hr Join in a lovely loop hike close to home along the Speed River to Guelph Lake depending on numbers as we will want to be back to enjoy the dazzling 9:00-9:30 p.m. fireworks at Riverside Park. W ear proper footwear and seasonal night clothing. Bring water, snacks and a flashlight. Meet 7:30 p.m. at the Golden Griddle Parking Lot off W oodlawn Rd. E. Leader: Suzanne Gates 519-265-3962 Level 2. Speed Causal/Moderate M on Jul 01 PERTH M USEUM AND AVON RIVER 10 km Meet 10am in parking lot of Perth Museum just west of Stratford on Hwy 8 for a brief walk in the grounds; then, move cars to natural area to hike along Avon River. Bring water, lunch. Contact Susan to arrange carpool. Leader: Donald Hughes, Susan Bard 519-836-6570 Level 1. Speed Moderate. Sat Jul 06 FORKS OF THE CREDIT 10 km Meet at the Guelph covered bridge for a 9:00AM departure. W e will hike the Bruce Trail along the Credit river to the Forks Of the Credit Provincial Park to view the Cataract Falls and ruins of an Hydro Station. W ear proper footwear and bring water and snacks and lunch. Leader: Norm 519-836-3568 Level 3. Speed Moderate M on Jul 08 DOW NTOW N GUELPH – SATURDAY LATE NIGHT! 3-4 km A repeat of our infamous downtown tour from 2012, exploring the underbelly of street life after dark. A very different Guelph you probably have never seen! Meet at Guelph covered bridge lot at 10:30 pm. Pub stop afterward. Leader: Bill Mungall wmungall0809@rogers.com Level 1. Easy pace Sat Jul 13 GUELPH LAKE - GORBA TRAILS 2½ -3 hr Meet at 1:30p.m. in the Tim Horton's parking lot at the NW corner of Victoria and W oodlawn Roads. From here we can walk to trail head on Victoria Rd. W e will then walk along the maze of bicycle trails and view Guelph Lake from the top of the dam. Leader: Suzanne Gates 519-265-3962 Level 2. Speed Moderate Sat Jul 20 BRUCE TRAIL BETW EEN HOCKLEY ROAD AND DUNBY ROAD 14 km For a challenging hike in beautiful Hockley Valley we will be hiking the Bruce Trail between Hockley Road and Dunby Road through fields and forests and enjoying the sights. Bring water, snacks, lunch and wear hiking boots. W e will carpool at 9:00 a.m. from Guelph's covered bridge parking lot east of Gordon. Pub stop after hike. Returning around 5:00p.m. Leader: Terry Spittles 519-265-6203 and Lynn Glover 519-780-0342 Level 3. Speed Moderate

Information on joining a Club hike, the hike rating system, what to bring on a hike, etc., can be found on the Club web site under "Safe Hiking" (www.guelphhiking.com/Safe_Hiking.com).

GHTC thanks Rita Ladjansky for designing this badge. Join the group on June 8 to earn one.


GHTC Newsletter - March 2013 - Page 20

2013 Organized End-to-End Hikes There is a registration fee to participate in most of these organized hikes. For most of these hikes pre-registration is required. For more hike details visit hosting club's website. Dufferin Hi-Land Saturday, April 20 – Dufferin Hi-Land 3 Day End-to-End, Hike 1 Saturday, May 25 – Dufferin Hi-Land 3 Day End-to-End, Hike 2 Saturday, June 1 – Dufferin Hi-Land 3 Day End-to-End, Hike 3nh May 4th 2013 9:30 am Dufferin Hi-Land 20 Km Challenge June 8: Dufferin One-Day End-to-End (Rick McCoy) June 15-16: Peninsula End-to-End, Hikes 1 and 2 (Rick McCoy) July 13-14: Peninsula End-to-End, Hikes 3 and 4 (Rick McCoy) Details at: dufferinbrucetrailclub.org Ganaraska Trail E2E Sun. May 12, 2013 - Ganaraska Trail - Orillia Section, Hike 14 of 21. Level 2: Moderate ~ 15.8 km Sat. June 8, 2013 - Ganaraska Trail - Orillia Section, Hike 15 of 21. Level 2: Moderate ~ 19.5 km Sat. June 8, 2013 - Ganaraska Trail - Orillia Section, Hike 15 of 21. Level 2: Moderate ~ 19.5 km Sat., July 13, 2013 - Ganaraska Trail - Barrie Section, Hike 17 of 21. Level 2: Moderate ~ 20.7 km Sat. July 13, 2013 - Ganaraska Trail - Barrie Section, Hike 17 of 21. Level 2: Moderate ~ 20.7 km Sun. July 14, 2013 - Ganaraska Trail - Barrie Section, Hike 18 of 21. Level 2: Moderate ~ 13.1 km Details at: gvta.on.ca For more hikes go to other Clubs website: Maitland Trail Association - maitlandtrail.ca/upcoming.htm Halton Outdoor Club - outdoor.spectranet.ca/index.html Iroquoia Bruce Trail Club - iroquoia.on.ca/hikes.html Dufferin Bruce Trail Club - dufferinbrucetrailclub.org Thames Valley Trail Association - tvta.ca Halton Hills Bruce Trail Chapter - on a link at media6.magma.ca/www.torontobrucetrailclub.org/indexhttps.php

Jim Hoare and Terry Spittle brief the hikers who turned out for the traditional Boxing day hike, held this year at Starkey hill.


GHTC Newsletter - March 2013 - Page 21

Best Lens to Take Hiking? photographer's dilemma when planning to go on any GHTC hike - “I’ve graduated beyond the simple point and shoot camera so what lens or lenses should I take?” Pack weight and volume are always at a premium, often leaving room for only limited photography gear. Considering weight, function and quality, which lens might best handle all the many requirements one might encounter and help bring back images that warrant entry into a photo contest?

A

expensive, often costing more than the camera body to which they attach.

Wide angle lens, i.e. those with a focal length of 35 mm or less, are ideal for landscapes. These work great for the sweeping vistas or flower beds, but what about capturing the fine details of individual blooms or bugs? A macro lens allows very close focusing on the subject but is only useful in these specialized situations. Since most digital SLR cameras have a close-up function incorporated into the body that works with a variety of compatible lenses, this should negate the need for carting a dedicated macro.

The question then becomes: Is it better to have one very long lens with a broad coverage, or a few zooms that cover smaller but more specific focal-length ranges? The answer really depends on shooting style and ones willingness (or unwillingness) to carry gear. If you like to travel light but still want a good zoom range, nothing beats a quality zoom lens with a wideangle-to-telephoto range. Rather than spending time changing lenses, you can just keep shooting – very convenient!

Capturing pictures of wildlife is perhaps the most demanding type of nature photography since it must usually be done quickly and at a considerable distance from the subject. Thus, a telephoto lens with a focal length approaching 200mm is needed to get those up-close views of wild animals or birds.

On the other hand, if you like to work within specific ranges for specific subjects - such as wide-angle lenses for landscapes and a telephoto zoom for wildlife - and you spend a lot of time shooting those subjects, it’s worth owning a few separate zooms. There is no point in carrying a 28-300mm lens every day if you’re mainly going to be working in the wide-angle range. You’re better off owning a dedicated wide-angle zoom because you can probably get broader coverage, along with a faster lens of better optical quality.

Fortunately, camera manufacturers produce zoom lenses that can vary in focal length. With the long focal length, one can get close-up images of an animal without getting too close, particularly important for animals with teeth, scent or attitude. Employing the shorter focal lengths allows capturing wider fields, ideal for scenery or a hiking group picture. Not that long ago, a travel photographer on the road probably had so many camera cases that a Sherpa was required just to get to the airport. Zoom lenses have drastically changed this scenario. Today, one might easily travel the world with just one zoom lens and never miss a shot. If cost is not a factor, the best compromise might be something like an 18 to 200 or even 300mm zoom lens which, at 18mm, is wide enough to capture the landscape panorama, and will get you close to wildlife when stretched out to 200mm or more. Unfortunately, these very versatile lenses are

Thus, the two or three lens compromise, while somewhat bulkier, may be preferable. Digital SLR packages include a body plus lens, often one with a variable focal length between about 18 to 55mm. This can be combined with a second lens ranging from 55 to around 250mm, probably for less cost than a single 18 to 200+ lens.

On an assignment, professional photographers might often have three zooms: a 10-20mm wide angle, an 18-70mm, and a 70-300mm. These three lenses will cover everything from 10mm to 300mm, and that is a huge range for three lenses. Before zooms, the same photographer might carry six or eight lenses to blanket the same range. However, most would also own a 18-200mm lens for days when they were only out for a hike! One problem is that when shooting in anything less than the brightest sunlight, the image obtained at 200 mm or higher will likely be blurred without some camera support. Rather than lugging a bulky, heavy tripod, include a carbon-fibre monopod in your gear. This can also double as a hiking stick when not supporting the camera,. And don’t forget to send your best pictures for inclusion in future newsletters.


GHTC Newsletter - March 2013 - Page 22

Hike Ontario’s Long Distance Hiker Awards Summit 2012 Update: Hike Ontario was pleased to announce that a record-breaking twelve individuals successfully received their Long Distance Hiker Awards at the annual summit held in Kitchener this past November. These prestigious awards celebrate dedicated hikers who logged long distances on multiple Ontario trails. The awards are: Red Pine Award The red pine is noted for its two needles, representing two trail systems to be hiked extensively. One must hike a total of 550 kilometers with 150 kilometers or more on at least two trails. Trillium Award The trillium is Ontario 's provincial flower, with three petals. These represent three trails one must hike for a minimum of 150 kilometers. Recipients must log a total of 950 kilometers. Tamarack Award The tamarack, is known for its multiple needles, representing the multiple trails one needs to hike to log the required 1500 kilometers. Recipients must hike at least 150 kilometers on each of at least three trails. Awards Process Keep a hiking log (upload the appropriate form from Hike Ontario’s web site), have your log verified by an executive member of an Ontario hiking club and submit it to Hike Ontario . Badges cost $15. For more award information, visit the Hike Ontario web site: www.hikeontario.com

Remember when we had something called winter, and our club President, Bill Mungall, could take people out on cross-country skiing adventures?

Want to Give Up Carrying Water? If you have a $100 to spend a water bottle, this is it: CamelBak’s All Clear Microbiological UV Water Purifier. As its name suggests, this is an all-in-one purification and drinking system, handy when you’re in the great outdoors. Cleaning trail-side water is quite simple: screw the cap in; hold the power button down for two seconds; and rotate the bottle while the UV rays do their work. The LCD screen counts down and lets you know when the process is complete and the water safe to drink. The UV system is claimed to zap 99.9999 percent of bacteria, 99.99 percent of viruses and 99.9 percent of protozoa in 25 ounces (0.75 liter) of water in 60 seconds time. The rechargeable battery that comes with the All Clear bottle is good for about 80 purification cycles per charge, and the purifying bulb can last 10,000 cycles — enough to clean three liters of water a day for almost seven years, according to CamelBak. The package includes a protective case for the All Clear cap, mini-USB charging cable and a classic bottle cap for drinking.

Caution, probably not for use on night hikes!


GHTC Newsletter - March 2013 - Page 23

The Trails.com app For Smart-phone owners, the Trails.com app offers over 48,000 trail guides from top outdoor publishers. Trail guides cover over twenty-four different outdoor activities including everything from mountain bike trails to off-road trails. Apparently, one can search for trails, view details and get up-to-date weather conditions. The app is free but requires a paid Trails.com subscription to access the trail guides. If anyone has experience with this app/subscription, please forward your assessment of suitability for our or other areas to the newsletter editor so this can be shared with other club members in future newsletters.

Be Careful Where You Walk and What You Carry! Parry Sound is more than the home of hockey legend Bobby Orr. The local OPP detachment reported that a man picked up some sausages at a wild game dinner in the local community centre before making his way over to Don Cherry’s Sports Grill for a drink. While later walking home, the man was followed and attacked by another man who had also been at the grill, with the packaged meat allegedly stolen during the altercation. An investigation of the sausage incident led them to the home of a third man, who they say was seen wearing bloodstained clothes while cooking a sausage. The two men were arrested and the sausages were seized at the scene. Toronto Star, Thursday January 03, 2013

penalty" as smoking does; • cease smoking, eat a healthy diet, and being active will add 6.9 years to your life; reduce; stress and excessive alcohol consumption and you add another 1-2 years; • active people also have many more years free of disability; • trails, and organized hiking groups can help us to be more "active"; • for a life-expectancy calculator, see www.rrasp-phirn.ca/risktools

How Some Select a Dining Spot A group of chaps, all age 40, decided to meet for lunch at least once per decade and discussed locations. Finally it was agreed that they would go to the Old Marina restaurant on Puslinch Lake because the waitresses were pleasant and glamorous. Ten years later, at age 50, the friends once again discussed where they should meet. After some considerable debate, it was agreed that they would meet at the Old Marina restaurant because the service was good and the food not overpriced. A decade later, the Old Marina restaurant was still their choice because they could dine in peace and quiet with a beautiful view of the lake. At age 70, again it was agreed that they would meet at the Old Marina restaurant because one could park near the entrance and there was a ramp. At age 80, the Old Marina restaurant was chosen – because they had never been there before.

Hiking Keeps You Healthy

Exercising in Cold Weather

Or, "Move More and Sit Less: Live Longer in Good Health" was the actual title of the keynote presentation at the Hike Ontario Summit held in Kitchener in November. Dr. Liana Nolan, the Medical Officer of Health for Waterloo Region made these simple but stunning points:

Most people can exercise comfortably in cold weather, assuming they bundle up. The prime concern is preventing hypothermia -- the loss of too much body heat.

• walking 3 mph is considered to be "moderate"• level physical activity; a minimum of 150 minutes a week of moderate to vigorous physical activity is needed to be considered "active"; • bone and muscle strengthening activity is also required, twice a week; • add balance enhancement activity if over 65 and with poor mobility, to prevent falls; • being "active" by itself will add on average 2.4 years to your life; • being inactive carries about the same "death

The American Council on Exercise offers these suggestions for exercising safely in the cold: - Wear layers of clothing that you can peel away as you warm up. - Keep your head, hands and feet warm with a hat, gloves and socks. - Always check the weather before heading out. Don't exercise outdoors in dangerous conditions. - Avoid cotton or tightly woven clothing, which may retain moisture next to the skin. - If it's very cold, wear a scarf or mask to cover your nose and mouth.


Vice President Wanted A vacancy on the GHTC Executive Committee has arisen out of the 2012 AGM, and the Club is searching for willing volunteers. No previous executive experience is necessary, and there is no implied obligation to become the President in 2015 at the end of the incumbent’s current 3 year term. Nor is there a formal job description! A willingness to engage in, lead or initiate occasional "special projects" that are priorities for the Club by involving the executive, member volunteers and other stakeholders and that are within the comfort zone of the individual is the main requirement. To be a "sounding board" on initiatives for the President and other executive members. And to act for the President in his absence (none planned!). Contact any member of the club executive if interested.

COVERED BRIDGE TO COVERED BRIDGE HIKE Saturday, June 8th

Meet at the Guelph covered bridge for 9:00AM bus departure to the West Montrose Kissing Bridge. From there we will hike back to the Guelph covered bridge, a distance of about 25 km (a Level 2, Speed Moderate hike). Refreshments will be provide at checkpoints. Pre registration and a participation fee are required. Badges will be available. More details will be provided in "GHTC E-notes� or contact the hike leader.

Leader. Norm, 519 836-3568 nsailian@hotmail.com

GHTC News, March 2013  

GHTC Newsletter

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