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the transportation costs for the 65 m blade were viewed as highly representative of current market conditions. Transportation costs for the 65 m blade were estimated as shown in Table 7-1.

Table 7-1 Estimated transportation costs for 65 m blade 65 m blade transport costs ($/Blade)

Montana

Michigan

Long-haul truck

$40,085

$52,330

Rail + short-haul truck

$31,574

$51,775

Note: The lower value of rail + short-haul truck was used in the analysis. Includes costs to transfer from rail to truck.

Blade specific LCOE was then calculated for the Baseline turbine using the Total Cost of Delivered Blade (considering off-site manufacturing costs shown in Figure 7-1, and the lower-cost rail and short-haul truck transport costs shown in Table 7-1), Turbine AEP, blade-specific O&M cost, and fixed charge rate (7.9%). (See Appendix A for summary of LCOE calculation methodology.) Then, holding the Baseline blade-specific LCOE as a constant and adjusting for the AEP for each of the larger study turbines, a “Total Cost of Delivered Blade Target” was derived for the 75 m, 95 m, and 115 m blades. In calculating this Target, impacts of taller hub heights, larger swept area, and increased wind speeds associated with larger wind turbines are accounted for in the AEP for each turbine. Moreover, using the scaled manufactured blade costs shown in Figure 7-1, we can split the “Total Cost of Delivered Blade Target” into two components: blade costs and budget for transportation and other costs. This Total Cost of Delivered Blade Target represents the threshold or “budget” for pathways to compete. Pathways that result in Total Delivered Blade Costs more or less expensive than the Target value will influence the blade’s contribution to overall system LCOE accordingly. Pathways equal to the Target have no impact on system level LCOE but may still enable LCOE improvements in other turbine systems. Figure 7-2 presents the calculated Total Cost of Delivered Blade Targets for each of the project locations. The cost target in Michigan is greater than in Montana due to older infrastructure, increased number of local jurisdictions to travel through, and other transportation costs in the Great Lakes region being slightly more expensive than similar costs in Montana. An unexpected finding in this process was that although the transportation cost element (for neutral LCOE impact) to transport supersized blades increases with blade and turbine size, the transportation cost element as a percentage of total delivered blade cost decreases slightly with increasing size. To illustrate this point further, for Montana, the transportation cost element increases 172% from $31,574 to $85,941 per blade for the 65 m and 115 m blades, respectively. For Michigan, the transportation cost element increases 230% from $51,775 to $171,008 per blade for the 65 m and 115 m blades, respectively. However, as a percentage of the total delivered blade cost target, the transportation cost element is 22% to 20% of the total target for Michigan and 14% to 11% of the total target for Montana.

DNV GL – Document No.: 10080081-HOU-R-01, Issue: C, Status: FINAL www.dnvgl.com

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Supersized wind turbine blade study  

R&D pathways for supersized wind turbine bladesSupersized wind turbine blade studyLawrence Berkeley National LaboratoryDocument Number: 1008...

Supersized wind turbine blade study  

R&D pathways for supersized wind turbine bladesSupersized wind turbine blade studyLawrence Berkeley National LaboratoryDocument Number: 1008...

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