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from about 11.5% to 14.5% of the monolithic blade, respectively, for 75 m and 115 m blades. Assembly costs for modular blades are accounted for in Section 8.2.

Table 6-2 Summary weight and cost for off-site monolithic and modular blades Blade Radius (m) (m)

Monolithic

Spanwise Joint

Root Cuff

Segmented Blade

Mass (kg)

Cost

Mass (kg)

Cost

Mass (kg)

Cost

Mass (kg)

Cost

65

67

18,640

$194,788

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

75

77

25,314

$264,531

2,905

$30,252

N/A

N/A

28,219

$294,783

95

97

42,071

$439,638

4,828

$50,277

370

$4,479

47,268

$494,394

115

117

63,546

$664,059

7,292

$75,942

1,857

$20,827

72,695

$760,828

6.3 On-site monolithic blade manufacturing 6.3.1 On-site manufacturing assumptions The following assumptions were applied to estimate the cost for on-site manufacturing: •

On-site manufacturing method is similar to current conventional blade-in-mold techniques.

Blade weights are the same as conventional off-site production.

Project site has available water, power, wastewater, gas/propane to enable operation of temporary factory.

Land owner and community acceptance of a temporary factory is achieved.

Environmental and building permits are approved and presence of on-site factory does not prevent

Sufficient space is available within proximity to project for building the temporary factory (within ~5

Truck transport costs for “micro haul” of blade from factory to turbine pad is estimated as 25% of

wind project development. miles of turbine pad locations – same for airship staging/landing). short haul truck costs. •

Labor force composed of 15% skilled travelling workers; 85% locally trained workers.

Serial blade production begins prior to project construction and there is no impact on wind plant construction schedule.

One example full scale blade article is produced for training and to demonstrate plant commissioning (blade is not installed on turbine).

Local workers require 10-week training period plus time for plant commissioning.

Production quality is same as achieved in off-site factories.

After start-up period the on-site factory can achieve the same production efficiencies and rates as off-site serial production.

Note that many of these assumptions may be considered optimistic, particularly those involving availability of suitable land/building space with available utilities within 5 miles of turbine pads along with community acceptance, environmental impact assessment/approval for hazardous materials, and other permitting. DNV GL acknowledges that many assumptions used to study on-site manufacturing have significant impacts DNV GL – Document No.: 10080081-HOU-R-01, Issue: C, Status: FINAL www.dnvgl.com

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Supersized wind turbine blade study  

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