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2012-2013 Catalog

11605 132nd Avenue NE Kirkland, Washington 98034 (425) 739-8100 www.lwtech.edu 2 0 1 2 - 2 0 1 3

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President’s Message On behalf of the Board of Trustees, faculty, staff and administration I welcome you to the Lake Washington Institute of Technology. LWIT has changed lives for more than six decades, providing students with access to today’s careers and tomorrow’s opportunities. Through practical and hands-on education, we proudly provide the valuable professional and technical skills required in today’s workforce.

Dr. David Woodall

This is an exciting time for the college. We recently received bachelor’s level accreditation by our regional accrediting agency. We are excited to offer these higher level degrees, which allow students who hold technical associates degrees to support their continued professional development and career advancement through the baccalaureate level. We also recently opened a state-of-the-art Allied Health Building, allowing us to provide world-class, hands-on training in nursing, physical and occupational therapy, funeral services, massage and dental hygiene. In addition, we continue to build and maintain our popular programs in manufacturing, transportation, engineering technology, computing, business, culinary and baking arts, environmental horticulture and many other high-demand disciplines in our state and region. Do your dreams reach beyond our halls? No problem. We partner with the state’s two- and four-year colleges to help you transfer classes and degrees toward your ultimate goals. Take a look through this catalog to explore all we offer and discover for yourself how we can help you meet your career plans. Welcome to the Lake Washington family! Dave Woodall, President

Board of Trustees The Board of Trustees is the governing body of the Lake Washington Institute of Technology. Trustees are appointed to multi-year terms by the Governor with the consent of the state Senate. The Trustees represent communities in the service area of Lake Washington, including Bellevue, Bothell, Carnation, Duvall, Fall City, Issaquah, Kirkland, Mercer Island, Redmond, Skykomish, Snoqualmie, and Woodinville. The Board of Trustees activities include policy and the strategic direction of the Institute, as well as hiring a President and Chief Executive Officer. The President is the Chief Executive Officer and responsible for the operation of the Institute.

Bruce J. Reid Chair

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Darrell S. Mitsunaga Vice Chair

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Lynette D. Jones

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Janis M. Machala

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Sang I. Chae

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General Information President’s Message. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Board of Trustees. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Our Mission. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 About Lake Washington Institute of Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Accreditation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Lake Washington College Foundation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 We Guarantee Our Graduates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Selecting a Program of Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Frequently Asked Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

PROGRAMS OF STUDY Programs by Area of Study. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Core Academic Requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Global Outcomes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Accounting Accounting – AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Accounting Paraprofessional – Certificate of Proficiency . . . . 26 Practical Accounting – Certificate of Proficiency. . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Entrepreneurship – Certificate of Proficiency. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Accounting Assistant – Certificate of Completion. . . . . . . . . . . 28 I-Best Accounting Assistant – Certificate of Completion. . . . . 28 Applied Design Bachelor of Technology in Applied Design (BTAD) . . . . . . . . . . 18 Architectural Graphics Architectural Graphics – AAS Transfer Degree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Architectural Graphics – Certificate of Proficiency . . . . . . . . . . 30 Revit – Certificate of Completion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Auto Collision Repair Technician Auto Collision Repair Technician – AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Auto Collision Repair Technician – Certificate of Proficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Auto Repair Technician Auto Repair Technician – AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Auto Repair Technician – Certificate of Proficiency. . . . . . . . . . 36 General Service Technician – Certificate of Completion . . . . . 37 I-BEST General Service Technician – Certificate of Completion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Baking Arts Baking Arts – AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Business Business DTA/MRP – AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Business Administration Support Business Administration Support – AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Business Administration Support – Certificate of Proficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Human Resources – Certificate of Proficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 2 0 1 2 - 2 0 1 3

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Project Management Support – Certificate of Proficiency. . . 43 Microsoft Office Applications – Certificate of Completion . . . 44 Office Assistant – Certificate of Completion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Web Maintenance – Certificate of Completion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 I-BEST Business Administration Support – Certificate of Completion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 I-BEST Web Maintenance – Certificate of Completion. . . . . . . 46

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Child Care Manager Child Care Manager – AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Child Care Manager – Certificate of Proficiency. . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Early Childhood Education Assistant Teacher – Certificate of Completion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 I-BEST Early Childhood Education Assistant Teacher – Certificate of Completion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Civil Engineering Graphics Civil Engineering Graphics Emphasis – AAS Transfer Degree . . . . 50 Civil Engineering Graphics Emphasis – Certificate of Proficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Civil 3D – Certificate of Completion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Computer Security & Network Technician Computer Security & Network Technician – AAS . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Computer Security & Network Technician – AAS Transfer Degree. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 IT Support Technician – Certificate of Proficiency. . . . . . . . . . . 55 Network Support Technician – Certificate of Proficiency. . . . .56 Culinary Arts Culinary Arts – AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Culinary Arts – Certificate of Proficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Dental Assistant Dental Assistant – AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Dental Assistant – Certificate of Proficiency. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Dental Hygiene Dental Hygiene – AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Diesel & Heavy Equipment Technician Diesel & Heavy Equipment Technician – AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Diesel & Heavy Equipment Technician – Certificate of Proficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Digital Gaming and Media Digital Gaming and Media – AAS Transfer Degree . . . . . . . . . . 66 Electronics Technology Electronics Technology – AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Electronics Technology – AAS Transfer Degree. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Electronics Technician – Certificate of Proficiency. . . . . . . . . . . 69 Digital Electronics – Certificate of Completion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Electronic Automation – Certificate of Completion . . . . . . . . . 70 Electronics, Manufacturing Specialist – Certificate of Completion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 PCB Design Technician – Certificate of Completion . . . . . . . . . 71

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Table of Contents continued Energy & Science Technician Energy & Science Technician – AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Bio-Energy – Certificate of Completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Energy Technology – Certificate of Completion. . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Industrial/Laboratory – Certificate of Completion. . . . . . . . . . .75 I-BEST Bio-Energy – Certificate of Completion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 I-Best Energy Technology – Certificate of Completion. . . . . . . 76 I-Best Industrial/Laboratory – Certificate of Completion. . . . . 76 Engineering Graphics Engineering Graphics – Mechanical Design Emphasis – AAS Transfer Degree. . . . . 77 Engineering Graphics Technician – Certificate of Proficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Tool Design Graphics – Certificate of Completion. . . . . . . . . . . 79 AutoCAD – Certificate of Completion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 CATIA – Certificate of Completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 SolidWorks – Certificate of Completion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Environmental Horticulture Environmental Horticulture – AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Environmental Horticulture – Certificate of Proficiency . . . . . 82 Fitness Specialist/Personal Trainer Fitness Specialist/Personal Trainer – AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Fitness Specialist/Personal Trainer – AAS Transfer Degree . . . 84 Fitness Specialist/Personal Trainer – Certificate of Proficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 Funeral Service Education Funeral Service Education – AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Human Resources Management Human Resources Management – Certificate of Completion. . . 88 Machine Technology Machine Technology – AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Machine Technology – Certificate of Proficiency. . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Principles of Precision Machining – Certificate of Completion . . 91 Massage Practitioner Massage Practitioner – AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Massage Practitioner – Certificate of Proficiency. . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Massage Practitioner – Certificate of Completion. . . . . . . . . . . 94 Medical Assisting Medical Assisting – AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Medical Assisting – Certificate of Proficiency. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 Medical Assisting Office Administration – Certificate of Completion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Medical Billing & Coding Professional – Certificate of Proficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98

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Motorcycle, Marine & Power Equipment Service Technology Motorcycle, Marine & Power Equipment Service Technology – AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Harley-Davidson® Option – AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 Motorcycle, Marine & Power Equipment Service Technology – Certificate of Proficiency. . . . . . . . . . 101 Multimedia Design & Production Digital Design – AAS Transfer Degree. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Video and Web Production – AAS Transfer Degree. . . . . . . . . Digital Publishing – Certificate of Proficiency. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Video and Web Production – Certificate of Proficiency. . . . . Web and Mobile Design – Certificate of Proficiency. . . . . . . . Digital Audio/Video editing – Certificate of Completion. . . . Illustrator/Photoshop Specialty – Certificate of Completion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Digital Publishing Specialty – Certificate of Completion. . . . Web Page Development – Certificate of Completion. . . . . . . Web Server Applications – Certificate of Completion. . . . . . . Web and Mobile Design Specialty – Certificate of Completion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Nursing Pre-Nursing DTA/MRP – AAS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Nursing – AAS Transfer Degree. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 Practical Nursing – Certificate of Proficiency. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Nursing Assistant – Certificate of Completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 Occupational Therapy Assistant Occupational Therapy Assistant – AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 Physical Therapist Assistant Physical Therapist Assistant – AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 Social & Human Services Social & Human Services – AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 Social & Human Services – Certificate of Proficiency. . . . . . . 119 Language Interpreting Services – Certificate of Completion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 Technology Technology DTA/MRP – AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Welding Technology Welding Technology – AAS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 Welding Technology – Certificate of Proficiency. . . . . . . . . . . 122

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High School Programs Lake Washington Technical Academy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Running Start. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . General Education Development. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . High School Completion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech Prep. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gateway to College. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Extended Learning Extended Learning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Continuing Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Corporate Education and Customized Education . . . . . . . . . . eLearning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Global Program and Partnerships International Programs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127 International High School Completion Program. . . . . . . . . . . 129

Support Services for Students Support Services for Students. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Advising. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Assessment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Counseling and Special Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Disability Support Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TRiO Student Support Services Projects. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Worker Retraining. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . WorkFirst Programs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Opportunity Grant Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Job Search Assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Student Conduct Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Student Government and Activities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Enrollment Services Admissions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Degree- or Certificate-Seeking Students. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transferring Courses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Prior Learning Assessment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transfer Rights & Responsibilities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Registration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Student Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Tuition and Financial Aid Tuition and Fees. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Student Payment Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Refund Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2012-2013 Tuition Rates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Financial Aid. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Veterans Benefits. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Financial Aid Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maintaining Eligibility for Financial Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Academic Information General Requirements for Degrees and Certificates. . . . . . . . Cooperative Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Developmental Education Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adult Basic Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . General Education Development. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . English As A Second Language. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . High School Programs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Credits and Credit Load. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Full- and Part-Time Student Status. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Graduation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Grading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Honors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Program Closure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

160 162 162 162 162 162 163 163 163 163 164 167 167

Course Descriptions Key to Course Prefixes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170 Key to Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170 Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171

Directory College Calendar 2012-2013. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Faculty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Administrators and Support Staff. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . College Phone Numbers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maps. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Index. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Credits. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Our Mission To prepare students for today’s careers and tomorrow’s opportunities. Core Themes In support of our mission, the following core themes state the essential work done at LWIT to achieve its mission:

PATHWAYS

EXTERNAL ENGAGEMENT

Lake Washington Institute of Technology serves as a college that is accessible to the community by providing multiple entrance points and educational pathways. The college is a conduit for students to upgrade their skills, transition into a new career, or further their education and training. Pathways include basic skills transition, high school programs, certificates of proficiency and completion, apprenticeships, associates degrees, professional and technical direct transfer agreements, applied baccalaureate degrees, and continuing education.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology maintains strong ties with business, labor, educational organizations, and the community at-large in order to form and nurture partnerships to support the college’s mission. College connections at the local, state, national and international levels support responsive educational programs and services, institutional and student funding and opportunities for student and staff learning.

STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT The college enables students to gain the skills and knowledge needed to achieve their goals and participate as citizens in the global workforce.

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COLLEGE COMMUNITY The Lake Washington Institute of Technology community models personal and social responsibility through good stewardship of human, financial, and natural resources. It promotes environmental, cultural, and social awareness and recognizes and responds to the diversity of students and staff. The college supports services and educational opportunities that provide professional development and lifelong learning for students and staff.

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Lake Washington Institute of Technology

Specialized Program Accreditations and Certifications

Lake Washington Institute of Technology (LWIT), formerly Lake Washington Technical College and founded in 1949, is one of Washington State’s 34 community and technical two-year institutions of higher education. We offer affordable professional and technical training for today’s job market and LWIT is now offering a four-year degree: the Bachelor of Technology in Applied Design. Training is available in 36 programs, with more than 100 professional/ technical degree and certificate options in: ƒƒ Bachelor & Transfer Degrees ƒƒ Applied Design ƒƒ Business & Service ƒƒ Computer/Information Technology

ƒƒ Energy & Technology ƒƒ Food & Hospitality ƒƒ Health & Fitness ƒƒ Manufacturing ƒƒ Transportation Technology

The college currently has over 370 experienced faculty members and serves more than 9,000 students every year. We are centrally located in Washington State’s high tech corridor, with a main campus in Kirkland and branch campus near Marymoor Park in Redmond. The college features small class sizes, modern equipment and hands-on training that simulates an actual job environment. Our programs provide you with high-tech, comprehensive training that will keep you in constant demand and open doors to numerous types of career opportunities. Whether you’re a recent high school graduate, a worker looking to upgrade skills or begin a new career or want to take your skills to the next level with a Bachelor of Technology in Applied Design degree, LWIT will provide a pathway to get you the skills you need to quickly find a well-paying job in a high-demand field.

Several of Lake Washington’s technical programs enjoy accreditation or certification status by state and national organizations:

General Information

About Lake Washington Institute of Technology

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Automotive

National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation Dental Assistant Commission on Dental and Dental Hygiene Accreditation Certified Nursing Washington State Department Assistant of Social and Human Services/ Washington State Department of Health Culinary Arts American Culinary Federation Funeral Service American Board of Funeral Education Service Education Massage Therapy Washington State Department of Health – Board of Massage Medical Assisting Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Programs Motorcycle, Marine, Equipment and Engine Training & Power Equipment Council Certification Occupational Accreditation Council for Therapy Assistant Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) Physical Therapist Commission on Accreditation in Assistant Physical Therapy Education Registered Nursing Washington State Department of Health

Accreditation Lake Washington Institute of Technology is accredited by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities at the associate degree level and at the baccalaureate degree level. Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities (NWCCU) 8060 165th Avenue NE, Redmond, WA 98052-3981 2 0 1 2 - 2 0 1 3

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For all the latest information, follow us on social media. Facebook.com/LWITech Twitter.com/LWITech

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We Guarantee Our Graduates LAKE WASHINGTON COLLEGE FOUNDATION (425)739-8134 or email foundation@lwtech.edu The mission of the Lake Washington College Foundation is to support Lake Washington Institute of Technology’s educational excellence. The Foundation is dedicated to increasing student access and success at Lake Washington Institute of Technology through raising funds, building partnerships, and advocating for students and the college. The Foundation offers scholarships and also provides emergency financial assistance to students with pressing needs through the Student Emergency Fund which is administered by the Financial Aid Director. The Lake Washington College Foundation currently manages a variety of accounts and endowments on behalf of generous donors and the college departments for the benefit of students and programs. A volunteer board of directors composed of representatives of community leaders, business and industry, and education governs the Lake Washington College Foundation. Please call the Lake Washington College Foundation office or check the website for further information at www.lwtech.edu/foundation.

About our community Lake Washington Institute of Technology directly serves the communities of Kirkland, Redmond, Bellevue, Kenmore, Mercer Island, Bothell, Woodinville, Carnation, Duvall, North Bend, Fall City, Sammamish, Issaquah, Snoqualmie, Skykomish, Clyde Hill, and Medina. The college also serves students from outside our service area, as well as international students from around the world. The college’s main campus is located in the city of Kirkland, which is situated on the eastern shore of Lake Washington and has a population of more than 49,000. The surrounding area offers numerous outdoor recreational opportunities and a wealth of diverse arts, entertainment and cultural attractions. Kirkland is located just 15 miles east of Seattle and less than an hour from the foothills of the Cascade Mountains. Kirkland has a strong local economy with a healthy mix of small business, corporate headquarters, light industrial and manufacturing, and a growing base of high-tech, biotech and home-based businesses. It is also close to the major employment centers of Seattle and Bellevue, and major employers such as Boeing, PACCAR, and Microsoft. 8

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Lake Washington Institute of Technology guarantees that its graduates will have the job skills necessary for entry-level employment in the technical field for which they are trained. If an employer judges a graduate as lacking in skills identified as program competencies, up to 15 tuition-free credit hours of additional training will be provided. The guarantee will apply to students earning an Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree, a Certificate of Proficiency or a Certificate of Completion awarded in December of 1999 or thereafter. Conditions which apply to this guarantee are as follows: 1. The graduate must have earned the AAS degree, the Certificate of Proficiency or Certificate of Completion from Lake Washington Institute of Technology beginning December 1999 or thereafter and must have completed the graduation requirements within a five-year span. 2. The graduate must be employed full-time in an area directly related to the area of program concentration within 12 months of graduation. 3. The employer must certify in writing that the employee is lacking entry-level skills identified by the college as the exit-level program competencies and must specify the areas of deficiency within 90 days of the graduate’s initial employment. 4. The employer, graduate, dean, adviser and appropriate faculty member will develop a written educational plan for retraining. Retraining will be limited to 15 credit hours related to the identified skill deficiency and to those classes regularly scheduled during the period covered by the retraining plan. 5. All retraining must be completed within a calendar year from the time the educational plan is agreed upon. 6. The graduate and/or employer are responsible for the cost of books, insurance, uniforms, fees and other course-related expenses. 7. The guarantee does not imply that the graduate will pass any licensing or qualifying examination for a particular career. 8. The student’s sole option through Lake Washington Institute of Technology to remedy skill deficiencies shall be limited to 15 credit hours of tuition-free coursework under conditions described above. 9. Activation of the graduate guarantee program may be initiated by the graduate through contact with the registrar within 90 days of the graduate’s initial employment.

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Starting a New Career

Your Values

Deciding which career is best for you can be a very difficult decision. LWIT’s professional advisers and counselors are available to help you match your interests and abilities with the career that fits you best. The first step in starting your new career decision process is to take a self-inventory of what is most important to you. Below are some of the major things you need to consider: Your Interests

Your interests play an important role in career selection. When you enjoy what you do, you increase your chances for success because you find your work satisfying and fulfilling.

You make all kinds of personal value decisions–where to live, what to do for entertainment, what kind of clothes to wear or food to eat. Think about these choices and by assessing them, you will help identify the priorities in your life.

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Selecting a Program of Study

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Your Lifestyle

The kind of career you choose can influence the kind of life you live. For example, some health care workers often work weekends, but they find the work rewarding and good for their self-esteem because it fulfills a personal value. Advising and Counseling Services

Your Skills and Abilities

Identify what you are good at and then talk to others about your strengths. Your skills and abilities are the key to knowing yourself better and making a positive career decision. When you enter a program that features your strengths, class work will be easier for you. Your Work Style

The college’s counselors and advisers are available to offer academic, career, and personal counseling to students and prospective students. Appointments are available by calling Student Development at (425) 739-8300. Advising services are also available online, and at advising@lwtech.edu.

Think about the kind of work structure and the kind of environment you want to work in. Consider the amount of responsibility you want and the amount of stress you can handle. These personal characteristics affect your career success. Think about whether you prefer to work alone or with others, be your own boss, work outdoors, work in a large company or a small business, or interact with the public.

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Frequently Asked Questions Can I Take Just A Few Classes Or Short-Term Training To Upgrade My Skills?

How Much Will My Education Cost?

Yes. Lake Washington Institute of Technology offers a full range of technical higher education options, including individual classes, special short-term training programs, professional certification preparation and adult continuing education options.

Is Financial Aid Available? Yes. The college participates in many forms of financial aid, including scholarships, loans and work study opportunities. More financial aid information is available in the Financial Aid section of this catalog.

Will I Receive Personal Attention From My Instructors? A commitment to individualized instruction is one of the aspects that sets Lake Washington Institute of Technology apart from others. Our college features small class sizes and personalized, one-one-one instruction from teachers who truly care about your success.

What Other Educational Options Do You Offer? We offer online distance learning classes, adult basic education, English as a Second Language courses and adult high school completion courses. For the latest information on the college’s educational offerings, visit our Class Schedule section on the college website at www.lwtech.edu or call (425) 739-8100 to obtain a printed Class Schedule.

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The answer depends upon the program you select, and whether you’re working toward a certificate, an AAS degree, our BTAD degree or just want to take a few skill-building classes. For more information on program costs, see the Tuition Rates on page 152.

What Credentials Will I Receive At The End Of My Program? Lake Washington Institute of Technology offers programs of study that will lead to Associate of Applied Science (AAS), Associate of Applied Science-Transfer (AAS-T), Bachelor of Technology in Applied Design (BTAD), and Certificates of Completion and Proficiency. The length of time to completion varies depending on the program you choose and the number of classes you take each quarter.

How Can I Be Sure I’ll Be Able To Find A Job In The Career Area I Select? The college has some of the highest job placement rates of any college in the area, in part because of strong links with business and industry. While we cannot guarantee a job for every graduate, we make every effort to provide relevant training in areas with employment demand.

Will My Degree Or Certificate Be Recognized Among Potential Employers? Graduates of Lake Washington Institute of Technology have a high job placement rate because employers recognize their training and skills as valuable. Business and industry leaders serve on the college’s advisory committees to assure the training students receive is of the highest quality.

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Can I Get Started At Any Time? Some programs permit students to enroll any quarter. Others enroll at the beginning of each quarter while still others admit students once a year. To learn more about when a particular program is open for enrollment, please make an appointment with a student development adviser by calling (425) 739-8300. Placement testing is required for all students who are seeking degrees and certificates, and for students enrolling in English, math, and many technical classes. For more information, contact the assessment center at (425) 739-8115 or at www.lwtech.edu/assessment.

Is Lake Washington Institute of Technology an accredited College? Lake Washington Institute of Technology is accredited by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities at the associate degree level and also at the baccalaureate degree level for a Bachelor of Technology in Applied Design.

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Frequently Asked Questions continued

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Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities (NWCCU) 8060 165th Avenue NE, Suite 100, Redmond, WA 98052-3981 For information on specialized accreditations and certificates, see page 7.

How Do I Find Updated Information? The material in this catalog has been compiled and organized to provide the reader with a comprehensive view of the programs and courses at Lake Washington Institute of Technology. It includes academic requirements and procedures necessary for admission and graduation. Information on programs and courses is arranged in alphabetical order. A listing by area of study is also available online. Because curriculum revisions and program changes usually occur during the period the catalog is in circulation, students should contact the college for specific information. The quarterly Class Schedule gives information on courses offered, class hours, and class locations and has the latest calendar dates, fees and details on registration. Both the Lake Washington Institute of Technology Catalog and the Class Schedule are regularly updated online at www.lwtech.edu, or you may obtain a copy by calling the college at (425) 739-8100. All announcements in the college catalog are subject to change without notice and do not constitute an agreement between Lake Washington Institute of Technology and the student.

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Programs by Area of Study aCADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS Mission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 For Associate of Applied Science Degree. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 For Certificate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

GLOBAL OUTCOMES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

Programs of Study

Bachelor and Transfer Degrees Architectural Graphics Associate of Applied Science Transfer degree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Bachelor of Technology in Applied Design. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Business Direct Transfer Agreement/ Major Related Program degree. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19–20 Civil Engineering Graphics Associate of Applied Science Transfer degree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Computer Security and Network Technician Associate of Applied Science Transfer degree . . . . . 54 Digital Gaming and Media Associate of Applied Science Transfer degree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Electronics Technology Associate of Applied Science Transfer degree. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Engineering Graphics Associate of Applied Science Transfer degree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Fitness Specialist/Personal Trainer Associate of Applied Science Transfer degree. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Multimedia Design and Production Digital Design Associate of Applied Science Transfer degree . . . . 102 Nursing Associate of Applied Science Transfer degree. . 111 Pre-Nursing Direct Transfer Agreement/ Major Related Program degree/ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21–22 Technology Direct Transfer Agreement/ Major Related Program degree. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23–24 Video and Web Production Associate of Applied Science Transfer degree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103

Applied Design Architectural Graphics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29–31 Bachelor of Technology in Applied Design. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Civil Engineering Graphics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50–52 Digital Gaming and Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Engineering Graphics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77–80 Engineering Graphics Technician . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Multimedia Design & Production. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102–110

BUSINESS & SERVICE Accounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25–28 Business Administration Support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40–46 Business DTA/MRP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19–20

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Child Care Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47–49 Environmental Horticulture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81–82 Funeral Service Education. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86–87 Human Resource Management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Social & Human Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118–120

Computer/Information Technology Architectural Graphics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29–31 Bachelor of Technology in Applied Design. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Civil Engineering Graphics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50–52 Computer Security & Network Technician . . . . . . . . . . . 53–56 Digital Gaming and Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Engineering Graphics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77–80 Engineering Graphics Technician . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Multimedia Design & Production. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102–110

Energy & Technology Energy & Science Technician. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72–76 Technology DTA/MRP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23–24

Food & Hospitality Baking Arts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Culinary Arts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57–58

Health & Fitness Dental Assistant. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59–60 Dental Hygiene. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61–62 Fitness Specialist/Personal Trainer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83–85 Funeral Service Education. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86–87 Massage Practitioner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92–94 Medical Assisting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95–97 Medical Billing and Coding. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 Nursing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111–114 Occupational Therapy Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115–116 Physical Therapist Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 Pre-Nursing DTA/MRP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21–22

Manufacturing Electronics Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67–71 Machine Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89–91 Welding Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121–122

Transportation Technology Auto Collision Repair Technician. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32–34 Auto Repair Technician. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35–38 Diesel & Heavy Equipment Technician. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63–65 Motorcycle, Marine & Power Equipment Service Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99–101

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Academic Core Requirements

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www.lwtech.edu/academiccore

Mission

The Academic Core program at Lake Washington Institute of Technology helps our students develop foundational skills in written and oral communication, quantitative reasoning, social science, and the humanities. These skills prepare our students for success in technical programs and careers, cultivate critical thinking, and foster the values of life-long learning. The Academic Core Department supports student skill development in the global outcomes areas of communication, critical thinking, and intercultural appreciation. For more information on the global outcomes program, please see page 17.

WRITTEN COMMUNICATION

Quantitative Reasoning

Students who complete required courses in the Written Communication distribution area will write clear, coherent, and well-organized prose; employ critical thinking in evaluating and expressing ideas; and demonstrate effective use of sources following accepted academic conventions.

Students who successfully complete courses in the Quantitative Reasoning distribution area will be able to gather, organize and interpret data; develop and use mathematical models to describe and to evaluate physical situations; and communicate ideas succinctly using mathematical abstraction.

Department

Courses Accepted

Department

Courses Accepted

ENGL&

101, 102, 235

MATH

102, 111, 145, 147

MATH&

107, 141, 142, 146, 148, 151, 152,

PHIL&

120

HUMANITIES

Humanities distribution courses examine the creativity, expressiveness, historical perspective, social interaction and aesthetics of people and societies. Emphasis is placed on creating, interpreting, performing and valuing creativity in art, dance, film, history, language, literature, music, philosophy, religious thought, story-telling and theater. Students who complete Humanities distribution courses will demonstrate an understanding of vocabulary, concepts, historical perspectives and progress, materials, techniques and methods of intellectual inquiry central to the selected Humanities course of study. Department

Courses Accepted

ART&

100

ART

102, 103, 111, 112, 113, 121, 124, 201, 202, 203, 205, 255, 256, 257

ASL&

121, 122

CHIN&

121, 122

CMST&

210, 220, 230

HUM

110

KREA&

121, 122

SPAN&

121, 122, 123

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ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE Degree

Applicable course list to satisfy Academic Core Requirements for the AAS degree:

SOCIAL SCIENCE

Students who complete required courses in the Social Science distribution area will be able to explain at least one social science theory; describe methods used in social science research; analyze social issues and problems in the context of social science; and articulate the importance and influence of diversity within and among cultures and societies. Department

Courses Accepted

BUS&

101

CJ&

101

ECON&

201, 202

PSYC&

100, 200, 220

SOC

260

SOC&

101

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Certificate

Programs of Study

Applicable course list to satisfy Academic Core Requirements for the certificate:

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WRITTEN COMMUNICATION

SOCIAL SCIENCE

Students who complete required courses in the Written Communication distribution area will write clear, coherent, and well-organized prose; employ critical thinking in evaluating and expressing ideas; and demonstrate effective use of sources following accepted academic conventions.

Students who complete required courses in the Social Science distribution area will be able to explain at least one social science theory; describe methods used in social science research; analyze social issues and problems in the context of social science; and articulate the importance and influence of diversity within and among cultures and societies.

Department

Courses Accepted

BUSA

103

Department

Courses Accepted

ENGL

092, 093, 100

BUS&

101

101, 102, 235

CJ&

101

ECON&

201, 202

QUANTITATIVE REASONING

PSYC

099

Students who successfully complete courses in the Quantitative Reasoning distribution area will be able to gather, organize and interpret data; develop and use mathematical models to describe and to evaluate physical situations; and communicate ideas succinctly using mathematical abstraction.

PSYC&

100, 200, 220

SOC

260

SOC&

101

ENGL&

Department

Courses Accepted

BUSA

100

MATH

080, 090, 098, 099,102, 111, 145, 147

MATH&

107, 141, 142, 145, 146, 147 148, 151, 152

PHIL&

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NOTE: Students enrolled in CSNT, Electronics, Architectural Graphics, or Engineering Graphics, must complete MATH 090 or higher to receive credit.

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Global Outcomes

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www.lwtech.edu/global_outcomes

All programs at Lake Washington Institute of Technology provide students with workplace skills that include communication, critical thinking, intercultural appreciation, teamwork, and technical and information literacy. Each program includes coursework used to assess student performance in these global outcomes: INTERCULTURAL APPRECIATION

Recognize, interpret and respond to the differences and commonalities among people in the workplace and the learning environment. These cultural differences and commonalities include, but are not limited to: ethnicity, age, gender, cognitive ability, life experiences, economics, family situation, race, and sexual orientation.

CRITICAL THINKING

Gather and evaluate information, draw inferences, arrive at conclusions and create solutions based on objective analysis of the evidence.

TEAMWORK

Work cooperatively in a group to advance a common goal. TECHNICAL AND INFORMATION LITERACY

Choose the appropriate tools to locate, effectively gather and evaluate required information.

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COMMUNICATION

Understand, interpret, and respond appropriately to information conveyed in verbal, non-verbal, written, and symbolic ways using a variety of formats.

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Bachelor of Technology in Applied Design www.lwtech.edu/btad

Applied Design Bachelor of Technology (BTAD)

Programs of Study

90 credits

The Bachelor of Technology in Applied Design prepares students to lead and collaborate with teams of creative and technical professionals. Graduates will able to produce quality design solutions using technology effectively. They will be prepared to manage teams and projects, and create competitive advantages for business enterprises. Bachelor of Technology in Applied Design graduates will: ƒƒ demonstrate ability to actively participate in and lead a team through a creative process in an organizational setting ƒƒ possess a broad theoretical knowledge of a range of design disciplines ƒƒ develop a personal design aesthetic that informs and enriches a student’s future contributions to the field ƒƒ demonstrate mastery in some and familiarity with many tools, techniques, and technologies associated with design and its applications in the workplace ƒƒ speak, write and present effectively, leveraging technology to enhance communications ƒƒ identify important business processes, economic factors, and considerations in operating or managing a business or team within a business ƒƒ employ creative and critical thinking to enhance problem solving ƒƒ employ sound principles of organizational behavior ƒƒ exhibit analytical thought, informed judgment, ethical behavior, and an appreciation for diversity ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, intercultural appreciation, teamwork, information and technical literacy, and communication skills

Program Requirements APDZ 311 Intro to Applied Design. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 APDZ 321 The Business of Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 APDZ 331 Managing Creativity & Innovation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 APDZ 332 Entrepreneurship & Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 APDZ 333 Applied Design Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 APDZ 441 Project Management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 APDZ 451 Design Team Practicum. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 APDZ 461 Senior Capstone Project. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CMST 302 Mass Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ENGL 335 Technical Writing for Designers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 HUM 311 Design Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 -ORHUM 312 Industrial Design Theory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MATH 341 Mathematics of Design. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PHIL 321 Ethics of Design. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PSYC 441 Psychology of Creativity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 STEC 351 Principles of Sustainability. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Any lab science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 technical electives * Any approved upper division electives including: APDZ APDZ APDZ APDZ APDZ APDZ ART

321 334 335 381 382 497 324

Business of Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Applied Design Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Intro to Computational Design. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Theory of Interactivity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Brand Communication & Marketing. . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Design Practice Internship. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5 Printmaking for Designers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Total Program Credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90

It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Prerequisites: Associate of Applied Science (AAS) in a design-related field, including 5 college-level credits each: English Composition, Quantitative Reasoning, Social Science, and Humanities. Admission Dates: fall

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Business DTA/MRP

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www.lwtech.edu/business_dta_mrp

Business DTA/MRP Associate of Applied Science Degree 90 credits

Business DTA/MRP graduates will: ƒƒ describe and discuss the measurement of economic performance, national income accounting, aggregate supply and demand, fiscal policy, money creation/ Federal Reserve system, monetary policy, inflation, and unemployment ƒƒ analyze resource and income distribution, assess consumer and business behavior, and evaluate price determination and production cost ƒƒ recognize the social and behavioral nature of law and the structure and function of the American legal system and to assess and articulate basic legal principles and processes ƒƒ analyze and evaluate accounting information as part of the control, planning, and decision-making processes ƒƒ describe and discuss functions and their graphs, linear programming, matrices, combinatorics, logic, statistics, and the applications of math to finance and economics ƒƒ recognize applications of differential and integral calculus to business problems ƒƒ demonstrate communication, intercultural appreciation, teamwork, information and technical literacy, and critical thinking ƒƒ meet Social Science, Humanities, Written Communication, and Quantitative Reasoning distribution area outcomes

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W A S H I N G T O N

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer COMMUNICATION SKILLS – 10 credits ENGL& 101 English Composition I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ENGL& 102 English Composition II 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 -ORENGL& 235 Technical Writing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

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QUANTITATIVE REASONING – 10 CREDITS MATH 145 Finite Mathematics for Business. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MATH& 148 Business Calculus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Programs of Study

The Business DTA/MRP Associate of Applied Science degree is a pathway for students planning to prepare for various business majors at universities in Washington. This agreement meets all the requirements of Washington’s Direct Transfer Agreement. This agreement is between the baccalaureate institutions offering a bachelor’s of science or bachelor’s of arts in business administration including accounting, management, and management information systems. Baccalaureate institutions that are party to this agreement are: CWU, EWU, UW (all campuses), WSU (all campuses), Gonzaga, Heritage, PLU, SMU, SPU, SU, and WWU.

NATURAL SCIENCES – 15 CREDITS MATH& 146 Statistics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Please select 10 credits from the list below BIOL& 175 Human Biology w/Lab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BIOL& 211 Cellular Biology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BIOL& 241 Human A & P 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 BIOL& 242 Human A & P 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 BIOL& 260 Microbiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CHEM& 121 Intro to Chemistry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CHEM& 131 Introduction to Organic/Biochemistry. . . . . . . . . . . 5 CHEM& 161 General Chemistry with Lab I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PHYS& 114 General Physics I w/Lab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

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SOCIAL SCIENCES – 15 CREDITS ECON& 201 Micro Economics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ECON& 202 Macro Economics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Please select 5 credits from the list below PSYC& 100 General Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PSYC& 200 Lifespan Psychology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SOC& 101 Introduction to Sociology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BUSINESS COURSE WORK – 20 CREDITS ACCT& 201 Principles of Accounting I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT& 202 Principles of Accounting II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT& 203 Principles of Accounting III. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BUS& 201 Business Law 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 continues on next page…

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Programs of Study

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HUMANITIES – 15 CREDITS

To meet EWU requirements, the 2nd English Composition course must be ENGL& 102.

Please select 15 credits from the following list – (no more than 10 credits per discipline area)

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ART& 100 Art Appreciation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ART 102 Beginning Two-Dimensional Design. . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ART 111 Beginning Painting for Non Art Majors. . . . . . . . . . . 5 ART 112 Intermediate Painting for Non Art Majors. . . . . . . . 5 ART 113 Advanced Painting for Non Art Majors. . . . . . . . . . . 5 ART 121 Introduction to Drawing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ART 124 Introduction to Printmaking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT& 201 Principles of Accounting I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT& 202 Principles of Accounting II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT& 203 Principles of Accounting III. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ART 205 Human Life Drawing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CMST& 210 Interpersonal Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CMST& 220 Introduction to Public Speaking. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CMST& 230 Small Group Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 (no more than 5 credits per world language) ASL& 121 American Sign Language I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ASL& 122 American Sign Language II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CHIN& 121 Chinese I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CHIN& 122 Chinese II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 KREA& 121 Korean I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 KREA& 122 Korean II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SPAN& 121 Spanish I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SPAN& 122 Spanish II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SPAN& 123 Spanish III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

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Students intending to pursue the manufacturing management major at WWU should consult WWU regarding the selection of natural science courses required for admission to the major. Universities with a lower division Business Law requirement: UW (all campuses), WSU (all campuses) EWU, CWU, WWU, Gonzaga, SMU, SPU, Whitworth.

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Heritage, PLU, SU, and Walla Walla University do not require a lower division Business Law course and agree to accept the course taken as part of the degree as a lower division elective, but generally not as an equivalent to the course required at the upper division. Students intending to pursue the international business major should consult their potential transfer institutions regarding the level of world language required for admission to the major. Five credits in world language may apply to the Humanities requirement.

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Fully transferrable as defined by receiving institution.

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ELECTIVES – 5 credits (Select courses appropriate for intended major and intended bachelor’s institution.)

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Total Program Credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90

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Programs of Study

Pre-Nursing DTA/MRP

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www.lwtech.edu/prenursing_dtamrp

Pre-Nursing DTA/MRP Associate of Applied science degree 92 credits

Pre-Nursing DTA/MRP graduates will: ƒƒ use the scientific method to analyze natural phenomena and acquire skills to evaluate authenticity of data/information relative to the natural world ƒƒ describe organic compounds and metabolism as they apply to the human body ƒƒ perform literature reviews and identify and locate appropriate resources to answer questions about the human body and its pathologies ƒƒ apply A&P principles to clinical human physiology and pathophysiology ƒƒ describe and explain the principle of homeostasis as it applies to the human body ƒƒ describe the importance of diet on the body and health ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, intercultural appreciation, information and technical literacy, communication, and teamwork ƒƒ meet Social Science, Humanities, Written Communication, and Quantitative Reasoning distribution area outcomes

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L A K E

W A S H I N G T O N

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring Program Requirements COMMUNICATION SKILLS – 10 CREDITS ENGL& 101 English Composition I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ENGL& 102 English Composition II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 -ORENGL& 235 Technical Writing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

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QUANTITATIVE REASONING – 5 CREDITS (must also demonstrate intermediate algebra proficiency) MATH& 146 Statistics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

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Programs of Study

This pathway offers a broad selection of academic courses which prepare students for upper division coursework leading to the Bachelor of Science, Nursing degree (Entry-to-practice/basic BSN). Pre-nursing graduates are prepared to apply to BSN programs at various institutions across Washington state including the following baccalaureate institutions offering an entry-to-practice/basic BSN program and the community and technical colleges system: University of Washington, Seattle; Washington State University; Northwest University; Seattle University; Seattle Pacific University; Pacific Lutheran University; Walla Walla College, and the Washington State University Intercollegiate College of Nursing (WSU-ICN), a consortium whose members include Eastern Washington University, Gonzaga, and Whitworth. Associate degree transfers to WSU-ICN are admitted through WSU, not through the other consortium institutions. EWU participated in the development of this agreement.

NATURAL SCIENCES – 37 CREDITS BIOL& 211 Cellular Biology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BIOL& 241 Human A & P 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 BIOL& 242 Human A & P 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 CHEM& 121 Introduction to Chemistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CHEM& 131 Introduction to Organic/ Biochemistry. . . . . . . . . . . 5 BIOL& 260 Microbiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 NUTR& 101 Nutrition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

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SOCIAL SCIENCES – 15 CREDITS PSYC& 100 General Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PSYC& 200 Lifespan Psychology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 5SOC& 101 Introduction to Sociology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

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HUMANITIES – 15 CREDITS CMST& 220 Introduction to Public Speaking. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Please select 10 credits from the following list (max one language or additional communication class or performance/skills class) CMST& 210 Interpersonal Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CMST& 230 Small Group Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CHIN& 121 Chinese I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CHIN& 122 Chinese II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 KREA& 121 Korean I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 KREA& 122 Korean II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SPAN& 121 Spanish I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SPAN& 122 Spanish II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SPAN& 123 Spanish III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 continues on next page…

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Programs of Study

www.lwtech.edu/prenursing_dtamrp

ASL& ASL& ART& ART ART ART ART ART ART ART ART

121 122 100 102 111 121 124 201 202 203 205

American Sign Language I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 American Sign Language II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Art Appreciation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2-D Graphic Design. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Beginning Painting for Non-Art Majors . . . . . . . . . . 5 Introduction to Drawing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Introduction to Printmaking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Survey of Western Art-Ancient. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Survey of Western Art-Medieval & Ren. . . . . . . . . . . 5 Intermediate Drawing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Human Life Drawing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

ELECTIVES – 10 credits (max 5 credits in college-level courses as defined by LWIT, remainder fully transferable as defined by receiving institution)

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TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Take ENGL& 102 if planning to attend Northwest University or Walla Walla University.

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See adviser for additional math requirements if planning to attend the University of Washington or Seattle University.

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See adviser for additional requirements if planning to attend Northwest University or the University of Washington.

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A curriculum that provides students with an understanding of and sensitivity to human diversity is encouraged (required by Washington State University). The credits in sociology, the humanities, and the electives provide opportunities for such a curriculum. See an adviser for suggested courses.

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Northwest University requires a course in cultural anthropology (sociology does not substitute). Students may be admitted to the BSN without cultural anthropology if they agree to complete the course at NU in the summer prior to the junior year.

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See adviser for suggestions.

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Programs of Study

Technology DTA/MRP

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www.lwtech.edu/technology_mrp_dta/

Technology DTA/MRP Associate of Applied science degree 93 credits

Technology DTA/MRP graduates will: ƒƒ use the scientific method to analyze natural phenomena and acquire skills to evaluate authenticity of data/information relative to the natural world ƒƒ apply mathematical knowledge through pre-calculus ƒƒ explain the fundamentals of chemistry, including matter and measurement, the structure of atoms, periodicity and the electron structure of atoms, ionic and covalent bonding, mass relationships, and chemical reactions ƒƒ define the basic concepts of Introductory Mechanical Physics ƒƒ write simple programs to demonstrate mastery of C++ programming fundamentals ƒƒ demonstrate basic AutoCAD and Solid Works for Engineering skills ƒƒ demonstrate communication, intercultural appreciation, teamwork, information and technical literacy, and critical thinking ƒƒ meet Social Science, Humanities, Written Communication, and Quantitative Reasoning distribution area outcomes

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring Program Requirements COMMUNICATION SKILLS – 10 CREDITS ENGL& 101 English Composition I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ENGL& 235 Technical Writing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 QUANTITATIVE REASONING – 10 CREDITS Choose 10 credits from the list below MATH& 141 Pre-Calculus I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MATH& 142 Pre-Calculus II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MATH& 151 Calculus I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MATH& 152 Calculus II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Programs of Study

The Technology DTA/MRP Associate of Applied Science degree is for students planning to prepare for industrial/ mechanical technologies and mechanical/electrical/ computer engineering technology majors at Central Washington University (CWU), Eastern Washington University (EWU), and Western Washington University (WWU). The Technology DTA/MRP agreement meets all the requirements of Washington’s Direct Transfer Agreement. This agreement is between the baccalaureate institutions offering a bachelor’s of science in technology (such as Industrial Technology, Mechanical Technology, Applied Technology, Technology with various options (manufacturing, electronics, design and construction), and technology education) and the community and technical colleges system. Baccalaureate institutions that are party to this agreement are: CWU, EWU, WWU.

NATURAL SCIENCES – 15 CREDITS CHEM& 161 General Chemistry with Lab I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PHYS& 114 General Physics I w/Lab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 236 C++ Programming I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SOCIAL SCIENCES – 15 CREDITS PSYC& 100 General Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PSYC& 200 Lifespan Psychology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SOC& 101 Introduction to Sociology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TECHNOLOGY COURSE WORK – 8 CREDITS ENGT 131 AutoCAD I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 225 Solid Works for Engineering I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 HUMANITIES – 15 CREDITS ** Please select 5 credits from the following communication courses CMST& 210 Interpersonal Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CMST& 220 Introduction to Public Speaking. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CMST& 230 Small Group Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ** Please select 10 credits from the following list – (max one language – or performance/skills class) A second communication course from the list above can count for 5 of these credits. ASL& 121 American Sign Language I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ASL& 122 American Sign Language II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 continues on next page…

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Technology DTA/MRP continued

Programs of Study

www.lwtech.edu/technology_mrp_dta/

CHIN& 121 CHIN& 122 KREA& 121 KREA& 122 SPAN& 121 SPAN& 122 SPAN& 123 ART& 100 ART 102 ART 111 ART 121 ART 124 ART 201 ART 202 ART 203 ART 205

Chinese I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Chinese II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Korean I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Korean II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Spanish I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Spanish II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Spanish III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Art Appreciation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2-D Graphic Design. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Beginning Painting for Non-Art Majors . . . . . . . . . . 5 Introduction to Drawing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Introduction to Printmaking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Survey of Western Art – Ancient. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Survey of Western Art – Medieval & Ren . . . . . . . . . 5 Intermediate Drawing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Human Life Drawing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

ELECTIVES – 20 credits (max 10 credits in college-level courses as defined by LWIT, remainder fully transferable as defined by receiving institution). Select courses appropriate for intended major and intended bachelor’s institution.

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Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Students should contact an adviser and the potential transfer institution regarding their interests and specific course choices

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Programs of Study

Accounting

2

www.lwtech.edu/accounting

accounting Associate of Applied Science Degree 97 credits

Accounting AAS degree graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒƒ apply manual methods and software tools to prepare accounting statements and reports ƒƒ complete the accounting cycle, including end-of-period adjustments ƒƒ complete federal income tax returns ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills ƒƒ meet Social Science, Humanities, Written Communication, and Quantitative Reasoning distribution area outcomes Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

Program Requirements ACCT 105 QuickBooks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ACCT 111 Introduction to Accounting I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT 112 Business Calculator Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ACCT 210 Introduction to Accounting II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT 255 Income Tax I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT 256 Income Tax II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT 275 Ethics in Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT 280 Accounting Projects. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ACCT& 201 Principles of Accounting I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT& 202 Principles of Accounting II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT& 203 Principles of Accounting III. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 105 Keyboarding I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BAS 112 Excel I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 114 Access. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 120 Business Computer Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 212 Excel II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ECON& 202 Macro Economics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Programs of Study

Program Mission: The Accounting AAS degree prepares students to gain a solid and extensive background in accounting. Academic Core courses, economics courses, business courses, and computer skills related to accounting such as spreadsheets, computerized accounting software, and tax systems complete the curriculum. Students find jobs in companies ranging from small proprietorships to corporate accounting departments, governmental organizations, and public accounting firms.

ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 20 CREDITS Written Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Humanities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program credits. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 See page 15 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring

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Accounting www.lwtech.edu/accounting

Accounting Paraprofessional Certificate of Proficiency

Programs of Study

87 credits

The Accounting Paraprofessional certificate program prepares students to gain extensive training in accounting through continuous application of their accounting knowledge in many phases of the program. Students find jobs in companies ranging from small proprietorships to corporate accounting departments, governmental organizations and public accounting firms Keyboarding skill of 30 wpm or concurrent enrollment in a keyboarding class highly recommended. Accounting Paraprofessional certificate graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒƒ apply manual methods and software tools to prepare accounting statements and reports ƒƒ complete the accounting cycle, including end-of-period adjustments ƒƒ complete federal income tax returns ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

Program Requirements ACCT 105 QuickBooks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ACCT 111 Introduction to Accounting I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT 112 Business Calculator Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ACCT 210 Introduction to Accounting II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT 255 Income Tax I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT 256 Income Tax II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT 275 Ethics in Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT 280 Accounting Projects. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ACCT& 201 Principles of Accounting I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT& 202 Principles of Accounting II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT& 203 Principles of Accounting III. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 105 Keyboarding I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BAS 112 Excel I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 114 Access. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 120 Business Computer Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 212 Excel II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 15 CREDITS BUSA 103 Business Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BUSA 100 Business Math . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 See page 16 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring

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Practical Accounting Certificate of Proficiency

entrepreneurship Certificate of Completion

69 credits

38 credits

Program Requirements ACCT 105 QuickBooks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ACCT 111 Introduction to Accounting I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT 112 Business Calculator Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ACCT 210 Introduction to Accounting II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT 275 Ethics in Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT& 201 Principles of Accounting I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT& 202 Principles of Accounting II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 105 Keyboarding I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BAS 112 Excel I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 114 Access. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 120 Business Computer Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 212 Excel II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

The Entrepreneurship program is designed to prepare individuals to start their own business. Students will acquire knowledge regarding the principles of accounting, marketing, and management as they pertain to starting and managing a small business. Students will write a business plan and gain exposure to the laws governing business (with a regional focus). Finally, students will learn how to manage financial and human resources as well as market their business. Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

Programs of Study

The Practical Accounting Certificate program prepares students to gain practical training in accounting through continuous application of their accounting knowledge in many phases of the program. Students find jobs in companies ranging from small proprietorships to corporate accounting departments, governmental organizations and public accounting firms. A keyboarding skill of 30 wpm or concurrent enrollment in a keyboarding class highly recommended. Practical Accounting certificate graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒƒ apply manual methods and software tools to prepare accounting statements and reports ƒƒ complete the accounting cycle, including end-of-period adjustments ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring

Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring Program Requirements ACCT 105 QuickBooks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ACCT 111 Introduction to Accounting I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT 210 Introduction to Accounting II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 120 Business Computer Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BUSA 180 Small Business Management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BUSA 210 Entrepreneurship: Starting a Business . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BUS& 101 Introduction to Business. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TECHNICAL ELECTIVES - 5 credits Choose Technical Elective from one of the following: ACCT 275 Ethics in Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BUSA 220 Successful Business Marketing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BUSA 230 Business Investment: Financing a New Venture. . . 5 ECON& 201 Microeconomics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ECON& 202 Macro Economics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 15 CREDITS BUSA 103 Business Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BUSA 100 Business Math . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 See page 16 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above. 2 0 1 2 - 2 0 1 3

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Accounting

Programs of Study

www.lwtech.edu/accounting

Accounting Assistant Certificate of Completion

I-Best Accounting Assistant Certificate of Completion

31 credits

40 credits

The Accounting Assistant certificate program prepares students for an accounting career by training, retraining or upgrading skills. Students learn the basic accounting cycle, journals, ledgers and financial statements. They are prepared for an accounting clerk position or, with some experience, to keep books for a small business.

The I-BEST Accounting Assistant certificate prepares an increasingly diverse workforce to begin accounting careers in order to meet business demands. It provides ESL and ABE students with the opportunity to pursue the Accounting Assistant Certificate of Completion while continuing their progress in Basic Skills, and it is intended to be an articulation option to the Accounting Paraprofessional Certificate of Proficiency or the Accounting AAS degree.

Keyboarding skill of 30 wpm or concurrent enrollment in a keyboarding class highly recommended. Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring Program Requirements ACCT 105 QuickBooks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ACCT 111 Introduction to Accounting I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT 112 Business Calculator Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ACCT 210 Introduction to Accounting II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT& 201 Principles of Accounting I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 112 Excel I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 120 Business Computer Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

Corequisites: ƒƒ EASL 077 is a corequisite for ACCT 111, 112 and BAS 120 ƒƒ EASL 078 is a corequisite for ACCT 210 and BAS 112 ƒƒ EASL 079 is a corequisite for ACCT 105 and ACCT& 201 It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall Program Requirements ACCT 105 QuickBooks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ACCT 111 Introduction to Accounting I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT 112 Business Calculator Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ACCT 210 Introduction to Accounting II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT& 201 Principles of Accounting I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 112 Excel I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 120 Business Computer Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 EASL 077 ESL Accounting Applications I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 EASL 078 ESL Accounting Applications II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 EASL 079 ESL Accounting Applications III. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40

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Architectural Graphics

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www.lwtech.edu/architectural_graphics

Architectural Graphics Associate of Applied Science TRANSFER Degree

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

105 Credits

Program Mission: The Architectural Graphics AAS-T degree prepares students for careers with architecture firms, construction companies, city, county, and state architectural and civil engineering departments and corporate architectural and civil engineering departments. Technicians are needed to develop site plans, construction details, building designs, cost estimates, specification plans for new buildings, and for remodeling and additions to existing buildings.

Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring

Architectural Graphics AAS-T degree graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared for entry-level positions in the architectural, engineering or construction field with the ability to be independent and self-directed ƒƒ demonstrate teamwork and collaboration skills and processes in the workplace ƒƒ apply knowledge to create drawings by hand and using technology ƒƒ read architectural prints and solve common architectural problems ƒƒ complete a comprehensive design project ƒƒ demonstrate industry ready skills in basic drafting fundamentals, concepts and techniques ƒƒ employ creative and critical thinking to enhance problem solving ƒƒ exhibit analytical thought, informed judgment, and ethical behavior ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills ƒƒ meet Social Science, Humanities, Written Communication, and Quantitative Reasoning distribution area outcomes

Programs of Study

Graduates are prepared in translating the rough sketches, layouts, and written specifications of architects, engineers, or designers into a drawing using current technology and showing the complete details and specifications for the finished product.

Program Requirements ARCH 201 History of American Architecture. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ARCH 205 Theory of Architecture. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ARGT 111 Architectural Print Reading I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ARGT 112 Construction Techniques. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ARGT 121 Architectural Graphics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ARGT 131 Revit Architecture I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ARGT 132 Revit Architecture II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ARGT 211 Architectural Print Reading II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ARGT 221 Residential Design Drawings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ARGT 222 Residential Construction Documents. . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ARGT 225 Construction Management & Estimating. . . . . . . . . 3 ARGT 231 Commercial Building Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ARGT 232 Commercial Design Drawings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ARGT 233 Commercial Construction Documents. . . . . . . . . . . 4 ARGT 261 Architectural Problems I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ARGT 262 Architectural Problems II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 101 Engineering Introduction & Orientation. . . . . . . . . 4 ENGR 111 Engineering Graphics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGR 113 Dimensioning with Drawings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 131 AutoCAD I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 132 AutoCAD II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 202 Specialized Technical Employment Prep.. . . . . . . . . 2 TECHNICAL ELECTIVES – 3 CREDITS May be taken from ARGT CEGT or ENGT areas. Student should consult an academic adviser. ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 25 CREDITS PHYS& 114 General Phys w/Lab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 -ORPHYS& 121 General Physics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ENGL& 101 English Composition I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MATH 111 College Algebra with Applications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Humanities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 See page 15 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Architectural Graphics www.lwtech.edu/architectural_graphics

Architectural Graphics Certificate of Proficiency

Programs of Study

69 Credits

The Architectural Graphics certificate prepares students for careers with architecture firms, construction companies, city, county and state architectural and civil engineering departments and corporate architectural and civil engineering departments. Technicians in this certificate program are trained to develop site plans, construction details, building designs, cost estimates, specification plans for new buildings, remodeling, and additions to existing buildings under the close direction of a supervisor. Architectural Graphics certificate graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared for entry-level positions in the architectural engineering field with limited responsibilities and scope ƒƒ demonstrate familiarity with many tools and techniques associated with design and its application in the work place ƒƒ identify and explain common symbols, materials, scales, and terminology used in the field ƒƒ demonstrate an ability to perform common workplace duties as directed in the architecture and engineering field ƒƒ exhibit analytical thought, informed judgment and ethical behavior ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills

Program Requirements ARCH 201 History of American Architecture. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ARCH 205 Theory of Architecture. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ARGT 111 Architectural Print Reading I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ARGT 112 Construction Techniques. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ARGT 121 Architectural Graphics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ARGT 131 Revit Architecture I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ARGT 132 Revit Architecture II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ARGT 221 Residential Design Drawings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ARGT 222 Residential Construction Documents. . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ARGT 225 Construction Management & Estimating. . . . . . . . . 3 ENGT 101 Engineering Introduction & Orientation. . . . . . . . . 4 ENGR 111 Engineering Graphics I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGR 113 Dimensioning with Drawings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 131 AutoCAD I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 132 AutoCAD II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 15 CREDITS Written Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Intro to Algebra (MATH 090) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 See page 16 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring

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Revit Certificate of Completion 8 credits

Programs of Study

The Revit certificate is designed to prepare students for skill set upgrades and is well suited for current AutoCAD or MicroStation users looking to expand new career options in the architecture industry. The certificate is designed to help participants gain experience in Building Information Modeling (BIM), a current trend in the architecture field. Upon completing the certificate, students will have gained the skills required to create professional architectural drawings and be ready to undertake similar projects on their own. Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Prerequisite: Completion of ARGT 121 or instructor approval. Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring Program Requirements ARGT 131 Revit Architecture I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ARGT 132 Revit Architecture II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

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Auto Collision Repair Technician www.lwtech.edu/autobody

Auto Collision Repair Technician Associate of Applied Science Degree

Programs of Study

116 credits

Program Mission: The Auto Collision Repair Technician AAS degree prepares students with entry-level skills to compete in the auto collision repair industry and provides an option for specializing in restoration or custom painting. This program consists of six quarters of collision auto body repair and auto paint training. Students will spend their first quarter of training in a transportation core curriculum. Students have the option of specializing in restoration, or custom painting. The laboratory area is designed to simulate an actual industry repair environment and includes a state-of-the-art painting booth with the latest in high-tech equipment. The Auto Collision Repair Technician AAS degree graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared for employment in the auto collision repair and paint industry ƒƒ dismantle collision related components, replace damaged parts, and perform metal straightening, welding, and plastic repair techniques ƒƒ evaluate refinishing needs, prime and prepare the auto surface for refinishing and properly apply topcoats ƒƒ demonstrate advanced collision repair and paint techniques for production purposes ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills ƒƒ meet Social Science, Humanities, Written Communication, and Quantitative Reasoning distribution area outcomes

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Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. ƒƒ TRAN 110, 112, 113, and 125 must be taken in the first quarter. ƒƒ CWEX Cooperative Work Experience may be completed in the student’s last 2 quarters of training by instructor permission only. Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring Program Requirements TRAN 110 Computer Basics/ Transportation Trades. . . . . . . . . 2 TRAN 112 Shop & Business Practices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TRAN 113 Basic Electrical Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 TRAN 125 Mechanical Principles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACRT 121 Basic Body Repair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 122 Basic Body Refinishing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 123 Vehicle/Damage Identification & Analysis. . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 124 Basic Detailing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 131 Metal Straightening Techniques. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 132 Auto Body Welding. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 133 Refinish & Surface Preparation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 134 Auto Finishes/ Paint Application I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 211 Body Panel Replacement & Adjustment I. . . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 212 Minor Unibody & Frame Alignment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 213 Auto Finishes/Paint Application II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 214 Paint Tinting & Matching I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 continues on next page…

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www.lwtech.edu/autobody

TECHNICAL ELECTIVES - 32 CREDITS Choose From List Below - Instructor Permission Required

Programs of Study

ADVANCED COLLISION FOCUS ACRT 221 Body Panel Replacement & Adjustment II. . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 222 Mechanical & Electrical Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 223 Auto Finishes/Paint Application III. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 224 Paint Tinting & Matching II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 231 Major Unibody & Frame Alignment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 232 Advanced Collision Repair Procedures. . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 233 Specialized Paint Finishes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 234 Paint Problems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 RESTORATION FOCUS ARST 211 Introduction to Automotive Restoration. . . . . . . . . 2 ARST 212 Automotive Restoration Research. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ARST 213 Restoration Skills I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ARST 214 Introduction to Automotive Interior Restoration. . 2 ARST 215 Wood & Metal Surface Preparation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ARST 216 Paint Fundamentals, Properties, & Applications . . 4 CUSTOM PAINTING FOCUS ACPT 211 Introduction to Custom Painting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACPT 212 Custom Painting Product/Data Research. . . . . . . . . 4 ACPT 213 Custom Painting Design & Layout. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACPT 214 Custom Paint Applications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS 20 CREDITS Written Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Humanities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 See page 15 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Auto Collision Repair Technician www.lwtech.edu/autobody

Auto Collision Repair Technician Certificate of Proficiency

Programs of Study

79 credits

Auto Collision Repair Technician certificate consists of four quarters of collision auto body repair and auto paint training. Students will spend their first quarter of training in a transportation core curriculum. Students have the option of continuing their education by pursuing an AAS degree in collision repair and specializing in restoration or custom painting. Auto Collision Repair Technician certificate graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared for employment in the auto collision repair and paint industry ƒƒ dismantle collision related components, replace damaged parts, and perform metal straightening, welding, and plastic repair techniques ƒƒ evaluate refinishing needs, prime and prepare the auto surface for refinishing and properly apply topcoats ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

Program Requirements TRAN 110 Computer Basics/ Transportation Trades. . . . . . . . . 2 TRAN 112 Shop & Business Practices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TRAN 113 Basic Electrical Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 TRAN 125 Mechanical Principles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACRT 121 Basic Body Repair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 122 Basic Body Refinishing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 123 Vehicle/Damage Identification & Analysis. . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 124 Basic Detailing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 131 Metal Straightening Techniques. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 132 Auto Body Welding. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 133 Refinish & Surface Preparation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 134 Auto Finishes/Paint Application I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 211 Body Panel Replacement & Adjustment I. . . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 212 Minor Unibody & Frame Alignment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 213 Auto Finishes/Paint Application II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 214 Paint Tinting & Matching I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 15 CREDITS Written Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 See page 16 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

ƒƒ TRAN 110, 112, 113, and 125 must be taken in the first quarter. ƒƒ CWEX Cooperative Work Experience may be completed in the student’s last 2 quarters of training by instructor permission only. Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring

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Auto Repair Technician

2

www.lwtech.edu/autorepair

Auto Repair Technician Associate of Applied Science Degree 117 Credits

Program Mission: The Auto Repair Technician AAS degree prepares students for employment in automotive dealership service centers, independent repair shops, and specialty or customized shops.

Auto Repair Technician AAS degree graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared for employment in automotive dealership service centers, independent repair shops, and specialty or customized shops ƒƒ be prepared to succeed on the ASE Certification exam ƒƒ diagnose mechanical malfunctions and performance problems and make necessary repairs ƒƒ operate precision automotive diagnostic and repair equipment ƒƒ interpret repair manuals and computer-based programs dealing with specifications and repair procedures ƒƒ demonstrate good public relations with customers and colleagues ƒƒ skillfully use tools and equipment ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills ƒƒ meet Social Science, Humanities, Written Communication, and Quantitative Reasoning distribution area outcomes Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. 2 0 1 2 - 2 0 1 3

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Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring Program Requirements TRAN 110 Computer Basics/ Transportation Trades. . . . . . . . . 2 TRAN 112 Shop & Business Practices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TRAN 113 Basic Electrical Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 TRAN 125 Mechanical Principles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 AUTO 120 Electrical/Electronics Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 AUTO 124 Maintenance Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 AUTO 134 Engine Performance – Ignition. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 AUTO 135 Engine Performance – Fuel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 AUTO 136 Engine Performance – Emission. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 AUTO 138 Engine Performance – Computer Controls . . . . . . . 4 AUTO 140 Brake Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 AUTO 144 Suspension, Steering & Alignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 AUTO 210 Engines, Cylinder Blocks, Cooling Systems . . . . . 10 AUTO 215 Air Conditioning Service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 AUTO 220 Automatic Transmission & Transaxles. . . . . . . . . . . . 8 AUTO 225 Manual Transmission & Axles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 AUTO 298 Job Search & Employment Skills. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

Programs of Study

Today’s automobile is designed and engineered at a higher level of technology than ever before. This produces a high demand for trained repair technicians who can meet the increased technical challenges and demonstrate advanced knowledge–particularly in the electrical and electronics areas. As a well-trained technician with current skills, you can expect rapid employment and a steady rising income. In addition, this program includes preparation for the ASE (Automotive Service Excellence) certification.

ƒƒ TRAN 110, 112, 113, and 125 must be taken in the first term. ƒƒ AUTO 120 Electrical/Electronics must be completed before Engine Performance Series (AUTO 134, 135, 136 and 138). ƒƒ AUTO 298 must be completed in the last term of training. ƒƒ CWEX Cooperative Work Experience may be completed in the student’s last 2 terms of training, used as a requirement for classes within the term the student is registered for by instructor permission only.

ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 20 CREDITS Written Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Humanities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 See page 15 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Auto Repair Technician www.lwtech.edu/autorepair

Auto Repair Technician Certificate of Proficiency

Programs of Study

89 Credits

Today’s automobile is designed and engineered at a higher level of technology than ever before. This produces a high demand for trained repair technicians who can meet the increased technical challenges. This program prepares students for employment in independent repair shops, and specialty or customized shops. The auto repair technician field is rapidly changing and relies more and more on advanced knowledge – particularly in the electrical and electronics areas. As a well-trained technician with current skills, you can expect rapid employment and a steadily rising income. In addition this program includes preparation for parts of the ASE (Automotive Service Excellence) certification.

ƒƒ TRAN 110, 112, 113, and 125 must be taken in the first term. ƒƒ AUTO 120 Electrical/Electronics must be completed before Engine Performance Series (AUTO 134, 135, 136 and 138). ƒƒ AUTO 298 must be completed in the last term of training. ƒƒ CWEX Cooperative Work Experience may be completed in the student’s last 2 terms of training, used as a requirement for classes within the term the student is registered for by instructor permission only.

Auto Repair Technician certificate graduates will:

Program Requirements TRAN 110 Computer Basics/ Transportation Trades. . . . . . . . . 2 TRAN 112 Shop & Business Practices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TRAN 113 Basic Electrical Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 TRAN 125 Mechanical Principles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 AUTO 120 Electrical/Electronics Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 AUTO 124 Maintenance Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

ƒƒ be prepared for employment in automotive dealership service centers, independent repair shops, and specialty or customized shops ƒƒ diagnose mechanical malfunctions and performance problems and make necessary repairs ƒƒ operate precision automotive diagnostic and repair equipment ƒƒ interpret repair manuals and computer-based programs dealing with specifications and repair procedures ƒƒ demonstrate good public relations with customers and colleagues ƒƒ skillfully use tools and equipment ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring

TECHNICAL ELECTIVES Select a minimum of 42 credits with Instructor approval AUTO 134 Engine Performance – Ignition Systems. . . . . . . . . . 4 AUTO 135 Engine Performance – Fuel Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 AUTO 136 Engine Performance – Emission Systems. . . . . . . . . 4 AUTO 138 Engine Performance – Computer Controls . . . . . . . 4 AUTO 140 Brake Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 AUTO 144 Suspension, Steering & Alignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 AUTO 210 Engines, Cylinder Blocks, Cooling Systems . . . . . 10 AUTO 215 Air Conditioning Service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 AUTO 220 Automatic Transmission & Transaxles. . . . . . . . . . . . 8 AUTO 225 Manual Transmission & Axles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 AUTO 298 Job Search & Employment Skills. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 15 CREDITS Written Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 See page 16 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Programs of Study

Auto Repair Technician

2

www.lwtech.edu/autorepair

General Service Technician Certificate of Completion 32 credits

Program Requirements TRAN 110 Computer Basics/ Transportation Trades. . . . . . . . . 2 TRAN 112 Shop & Business Practices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TRAN 113 Basic Electrical Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 TRAN 125 Mechanical Principles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 AUTO 120 Electrical/Electronics Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 AUTO 124 Maintenance Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

Programs of Study

Today’s automobile is designed and engineered at a higher level of technology than ever before. According to many automotive industry estimates, there is a critical shortage of technicians. Industry is turning to education to attract individuals into the career field and provide the training needed for employment. Many employers say they need entry-level technicians who have the essential knowledge and skills required for fundamental service and maintenance tasks including a general understanding of all automobile systems with a solid foundation in electrical/electronic systems, while others prefer to hire technicians with a broad skill set from an automotive program with more depth and breadth. The General Service Technician certificate is intended to be an articulation option to the Automotive Repair Technician Certificate of Proficiency or AAS degree program. In addition, this program includes preparation for two of the ASE (Automotive Service Excellence) certifications. Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. ƒƒ TRAN 110, 112, 113, and 125 must be taken before AUTO 120 and 124. Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring

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Auto Repair Technician www.lwtech.edu/autorepair

I-BEST General Service Technician Certificate of Completion

Programs of Study

38 credits

Today’s automobile is designed and engineered at a higher level of technology than ever before. According to many automotive industry estimates, there is a critical shortage of technicians. Industry is turning to education to attract individuals into the career field and provide the training needed for employment. Many employers say they need entry-level technicians who have the essential knowledge and skills required for fundamental service and maintenance tasks including a general understanding of all automobile systems with a solid foundation in electrical/electronic systems, while others prefer to hire technicians with a broad skill set from an automotive program with more depth and breadth. The I-BEST General Service Technician certificate prepares an increasingly diverse workforce to meet employer demands in the automotive industry and is intended to be an articulation option to the Automotive Repair Technician Certificate of Proficiency or AAS Degree program. It provides ESL and ABE students with the opportunity to pursue the General Service Technician certificate while continuing their progress in Basic Skills.

Program Requirements TRAN 110 Computer Basics/ Transportation Trades. . . . . . . . . 2 TRAN 112 Shop & Business Practices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TRAN 113 Basic Electrical Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 TRAN 125 Mechanical Principles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 AUTO 120 Electrical/Electronics Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 AUTO 124 Maintenance Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 EASL 074 ESL Transportation Applications I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 EASL 076 ESL Transportation Applications II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. ƒƒ TRAN 110, 112, 113, and 125 must be taken before AUTO 120 and 124. ƒƒ EASL 074 is a corequisite for TRANS 110, 112, 113, and 125. ƒƒ EASL 076 is a corequisite for AUTO 120 and AUTO 124. Admission Dates: summer, winter

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Programs of Study

Baking Arts

2

www.lwtech.edu/baking

Baking Arts Associate of Applied Science Degree 102 credits

Program Mission: The Baking Arts AAS degree prepares students for employment opportunities in a professional pastry kitchen, bakeshop, or business with professional product lines.

Baking Arts AAS degree graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared for a range of entry level positions in the field ƒƒ properly manipulate chocolate and sugar ƒƒ create a wide-range of pastries including cakes, candies, sugar, chocolate, and centerpieces demonstrating advanced techniques ƒƒ obtain basic culinary skills ƒƒ be prepared for certification from the American Culinary Federation as a Certified Pastry Culinarian ƒƒ obtain basic management skills including costing and menu planning, safety and sanitation, and employee supervision ƒƒ apply marketing and profitability concepts in a bakeshop environment ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, global and cultural awareness, and technical and information literacy skills ƒƒ meet Social Science, Humanities, Written Communication, and Quantitative Reasoning distribution area outcomes

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Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring Program Requirements BAKE 110 Cake Decoration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAKE 114 Artisan Chocolate & Confections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 BAKE 120 Specialty Cakes and Design. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 BAKE 122 Artisan Breads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 BAKE 124 Centerpiece Construction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 CULA 116 Culinary Skills & Concepts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 CULA 124 Introduction to the Front of the House. . . . . . . . . . . 9 CULA 127 Introduction to Baking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 CULA 128 Food Service Safety & Sanitation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CULA 130 Supervision & Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CULA 137 Nutrition in Food Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CULA 142 Costing & Menu Planning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CULA 195 Capstone, Portfolio, & Masterpiece Dinner . . . . . . . 5 CULA 196 Internship, Externship/Cooperative. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Programs of Study

Students develop academic knowledge and occupational skills that are required for job acquisition, retention and advancement. The Baking Arts program and degree is recognized and accredited by the American Culinary Federation (ACF). In addition, graduates will earn a variety of National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation (NRAEF) certifications to add to their portfolio. Upon graduation, students will be eligible to receive their initial ACF certifications at the Certified Pastry Culinarian (CPC) level.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

TECHNICAL ELECTIVE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Technical Elective to be taken from CULA or BAKE courses ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 20 CREDITS Written Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Humanities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 See page 15 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Business Administration Support www.lwtech.edu/bas

Business Administration Support ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE

Programs of Study

99 CREDITS

Program Mission: The Business Administration Support AAS degree prepares students to meet the growing need for trained business support professionals. The primary goal of the degree is to prepare students to use various software applications in the work environment as a support tool to enhance day-to-day business operations. Business Administration Support AAS degree graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared for entry-level positions as a business support professional ƒƒ carry out office administration procedures and management support using office technology ƒƒ use Microsoft Project software to produce Gantt charts, Network Diagrams, and reports ƒƒ use Microsoft Office software to produce complex integrated documents and spreadsheets ƒƒ identify good customer service skills and work well with internal and external customers ƒƒ experience carrying out a Capstone project that uses the skills gained to serve as a support for a real office or business ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills ƒƒ meet Social Science, Humanities, Written Communication, and Quantitative Reasoning distribution area outcomes

Program Requirements BAS 106 Keyboarding II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BAS 110 Office Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 111 Word I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 112 Excel I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 114 Access. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 115 Publisher. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 120 Business Computer Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 124 PowerPoint. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 BAS 130 Business English I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 135 Outlook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 BAS 191 Customer Service/ Help Desk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BAS 195 Capstone Project. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BAS 198 Job Search Skills. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 BAS 225 Integrated Applications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 281 Project Management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BUS& 101 Introduction to Business. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 118 HTML. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELECTIVES – 5 CREDITS Up to 5 additional credits of which all must be in college-level courses as defined by the technical institute or as accepted as fully transferrable as defined by the state system. ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 20 CREDITS Written Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Humanities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

See page 15 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring

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Business Administration Support

2

www.lwtech.edu/bas

Business Administration Support Certificate of Proficiency 81 CREDITS

Business Administration Support certificate graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared for entry-level positions as a business support professional ƒƒ carry out office administration procedures and management support using office technology ƒƒ use Microsoft Project software to produce Gantt charts, Network Diagrams, and reports ƒƒ use Microsoft Office software to produce complex integrated documents and spreadsheets ƒƒ identify good customer service skills and work well with internal and external customers ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills

Program Requirements BAS 105 Keyboarding I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BAS 110 Office Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 111 Word I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 112 Excel I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 114 Access. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 115 Publisher. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 120 Business Computer Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 124 PowerPoint. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 BAS 130 Business English I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 135 Outlook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 BAS 191 Customer Service/Help Desk. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BAS 198 Job Search Skills. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 BAS 225 Integrated Applications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 281 Project Management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 118 HTML. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Programs of Study

The Business Administration Support certificate is designed to meet the growing need for trained business support professionals. The primary goal of the certificate is to prepare students to use various software applications in the work environment as a support tool to enhance day-to-day business operations.

ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 15 CREDITS Written Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 See page 16 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring

2 0 1 2 - 2 0 1 3

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W A S H I N G T O N

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2

Programs of Study

Business Administration Support www.lwtech.edu/bas

Human Resources Certificate of Proficiency

Programs of Study

85 Credits

This program prepares students to meet the growing need for Human Resources (HR) professionals. This program prepares students to use various software applications and business knowledge in conjunction with entry-level HR content areas to enhance business operations. The Human Resources Certificate of Proficiency graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared for entry-level positions in HR and office administration ƒƒ carry out office and HR procedures and management using technology ƒƒ explain HR’s role in developing human capital and its impact on an organization’s success ƒƒ recognize the partnership of managers and HR professionals in business ƒƒ identify the importance, impact, and role of social responsibility and diversity in organizations ƒƒ leverage technology in today’s environment to support HR and business activities ƒƒ identify measurement strategies that link HR practices to achieving bottom-line business results ƒƒ identify employment decisions and strategies to build and maintain a diverse talented workforce ƒƒ recognize the implications associated with employment laws and their effects on organizations ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills

Program Requirements ACCT 111 Introduction to Accounting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 105 Keyboarding I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BAS 111 Word I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 112 Excel I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 114 Access. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 115 Publisher. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 120 Business Computer Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 124 PowerPoint. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 BAS 135 Outlook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 BAS 191 Customer Service/Help Desk. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BAS 225 Integrated Applications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BUHR 210 HR’s Role in Organizations & Program Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 BUHR 215 HR Ethics & Diversity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 BUHR 230 Staffing: Recruitment, Selection, & Placement. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 BUHR 250 HR Info Systems & Measuring HR Outcomes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 BUHR 255 Employment Law I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 BUHR 260 Employment Law II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 15 CREDITS Written Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 See page 16 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring

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Programs of Study

Business Administration Support

2

www.lwtech.edu/bas

Project Management Support Certificate of Proficiency 55 Credits

Project Management Support Certificate graduates will: ƒƒ use Microsoft Project software to produce Gantt charts, Network Diagrams, and reports ƒƒ use Microsoft Office software to produce attractive, modern, and useful documents and spreadsheets. ƒƒ use office equipment, i.e. FAX machines, photocopiers to carry out typical office procedures ƒƒ identify good customer service skills and work well with internal and external customers

Program Requirements BAS 105 Keyboarding I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BAS 110 Office Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 111 Word I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 112 Excel I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 114 Access. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 120 Business Computer Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 135 Outlook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 BAS 191 Customer Service/Help Desk. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BAS 281 Project Management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 15 CREDITS Written Communication (BUSA 103 Business Communications). . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55

Programs of Study

The Project Management Support certificate is designed to serve students seeking job transitions, skills upgrades, and continuing industry education. The primary goal of the certificate is to prepare students to use various software applications in the work environment as a support tool to enhance day-to-day business operations. Graduates will find entry-level jobs as project management coordinators, project management assistants, events or conference coordinators.

See page 16 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring

2 0 1 2 - 2 0 1 3

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W A S H I N G T O N

I N S T I T U T E

O F

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2

Programs of Study

Business Administration Support

Programs of Study

www.lwtech.edu/bas

Microsoft Office Applications Certificate of Completion

Office Assistant Certificate of Completion

28 Credits

39 Credits

The Microsoft Office Applications certificate is designed to meet the needs of students who want to increase their computer knowledge. This certificate is directed towards people who have work experience and want to upgrade their skills by learning the current software applications used in the business community.

The Office Assistant certificate is designed to meet the needs employers for trained office assistants. Students learn Microsoft Office applications as well as how to use calculators, phones, fax and photocopy machines. Students may find jobs as receptionists or clerical support.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring

Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring

Program Requirements BAS 111 Word I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 112 Excel I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 114 Access. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 120 Business Computer Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 124 PowerPoint. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 BAS 135 Outlook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Program Requirements BAS 106 Keyboarding II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BAS 110 Office Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 111 Word I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 112 Excel I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 114 Access. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 120 Business Computer Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 124 PowerPoint. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 BAS 135 Outlook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 BAS 191 Customer Service/Help Desk. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

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Programs of Study

Business Administration Support

2

www.lwtech.edu/bas

I-BEST Business Administration Support Certificate of Completion

39 Credits

32 credits

The Web Maintenance certificate is designed to serve students seeking job transitions, skills upgrades, and continuing industry education. The primary goal of the certificate is to prepare students to use the various software applications in the work environment as a support tool to enhance day-to-day business operations. Graduates will find entry-level jobs as Web assistants, Web maintenance support, Web specialists, Web designers, and webmasters.

The I-BEST Business Administration Support certificate prepares students for positions in beginning administrative support, reception, customer care, and sales/marketing support. Graduates will also be eligible for entry into a variety of certificate programs (Web maintenance; publication/sales/marketing support; project management support; customer service/product support; or Microsoft Office applications) as well as the full degree program.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring

Admission Dates: winter

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS BAS 105 Keyboarding I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BAS 111 Word I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 120 Business Computer Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 191 Customer Service/Help Desk. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 MMDP 118 HTML. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 122 Image Editing 1 with Photoshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 133 Web Authoring with Dreamweaver. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 153 Web Design. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 238 JavaScript . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Program Requirements BAS 111 Word I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 112 Excel I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 114 Access. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 120 Business Computer Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 124 PowerPoint. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 BAS 198 Job Search Skills. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 EASL 070 Computer Applications I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 EASL 072 Computer Applications II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Programs of Study

Web Maintenance Certificate of Completion

Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

2 0 1 2 - 2 0 1 3

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Programs of Study

Business Administration Support www.lwtech.edu/bas

I-BEST Web Maintenance Certificate of Completion

Programs of Study

40 credits

The I-BEST Web Maintenance Support Certificate prepares an increasingly diverse workforce to begin an educational/career pathway in business administration support. It provides ESL and ABE students with the opportunity to pursue the Web Maintenance Certificate of Completion while continuing their progress in Basic Skills (ESL and ABE), and it is intended to be an articulation option to the Business Administration Support (BAS) Associate of Applied Science degree as well as to the Multimedia Design and Production (MMDP) Associate of Applied Science degree. The primary goal of the certificate is to prepare students to use the various software applications in the work environment as a support tool to enhance day-to-day business operations.

Program Requirements BAS 105 Keyboarding I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BAS 111 Word I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 120 Business Computer Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 191 Customer Service/Help Desk. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 MMDP 118 HTML. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 122 Image Editing 1 with Photoshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 133 Web Authoring with Dreamweaver. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 238 JavaScript . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 EASL 070 ESL Computer Applications I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 EASL 082 ESL Web Applications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40

All professional-technical courses (BAS, and MMDP) are taught with a 50% overlap of the professional-technical faculty and the basic skills (ESL) faculty. In addition to the professional-technical courses, I-BEST students are required to enroll in EASL 070 (ESL Computer Applications I) and EASL 082 (ESL Web Applications). Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring

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Programs of Study

Child Care Manager

2

www.lwtech.edu/childcare

Child Care Manager Associate of Applied Science Degree 94 credits

This program prepares students to seek new employment or update professional skills and knowledge as a family care provider; program supervisor of a child care center; child care manager; and lead teacher in child care, preschool and Headstart programs. Theoretical knowledge is gained through evening classroom lectures; practical experience takes place in college labs and in family-and center-based programs where students are employed. Child Care Manager AAS degree graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared for a lead teacher or entry level management position in the child care field ƒƒ plan, implement, and evaluate children’s programs using current child development knowledge ƒƒ apply developmentally appropriate guidance techniques ƒƒ teach developmentally appropriate guidance techniques to colleagues ƒƒ document childrens’ skill development and plan programs based on documented observations ƒƒ be prepared to create a learning environment that fosters language, social, cognitive and motor skills in young children ƒƒ be prepared to communicate in verbal and written format with the parents ƒƒ be prepared to plan and monitor food service in an early childhood program ƒƒ be able to create and maintain a safe and healthy environment, both indoors/outdoors ƒƒ follow the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) as it relates to early childhood programs ƒƒ be prepared to develop and maintain staff and fiscal policies of an early childhood program ƒƒ be prepared to appropriately hire, mentor and supervise staff

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W A S H I N G T O N

ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills ƒƒ meet Social Science, Humanities, Written Communication, and Quantitative Reasoning distribution area outcomes Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring Program Requirements ECEM 111 Intro to Early Childhood Education. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ECEM 112 Child Development. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ECEM 113 Guidance Techniques. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ECEM 121 Diversity Issues. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 ECEM 122 Creative Activities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ECEM 124 Language Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ECEM 125 Science & Math Activities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ECEM 131 Advocacy/Legal Issues. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 ECEM 132 Parent Interactions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ECEM 133 Program Design. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ECEM 134 Safety/Health/Nutrition. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ECEM 212 Policies & Procedures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ECEM 213 Staff Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ECEM 214 Financial Planning & Records. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Programs of Study

Program Mission: The Child Care Manager AAS degree prepares students to develop competencies necessary to plan, implement and evaluate a quality program for children, following National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) standards.

ELECTIVES – 10 CREDITS Up to 10 additional credits of which all must be in college-level courses as defined by the technical institute or as accepted as fully transferrable as defined by the state system. ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 20 CREDITS Written Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Humanities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 See page 15 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Programs of Study

Child Care Manager www.lwtech.edu/childcare

Child Care Manager Certificate of Proficiency

Programs of Study

74 Credits

48

Theoretical knowledge is gained through evening classroom lectures; practical experience takes place in college labs and in family- and center-based programs where students are employed. Students develop competencies necessary to plan, implement and evaluate a quality program for children, following National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) standards. Program prepares students to seek new employment or update professional skills and knowledge as a family care provider; program supervisor of child care center; child care manager; and lead teacher in child care/ preschool programs. Child Care Manager certificate graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared for a lead teacher or entry-level management position in the child care field ƒƒ be able to plan, implement and evaluate programs for young children ƒƒ be able to document children’s growth and skill development ƒƒ be able to apply developmentally appropriate guidance techniques ƒƒ plan and implement activities that promote social, cognitive, language and motor skills ƒƒ be able to apply Washington Administrative Code (WAC) requirements to work environment ƒƒ be able to work in a cooperative and supportive manner with parents ƒƒ maintain a safe and healthy environment for young children ƒƒ follow a work guideline as outlined in staff operations manual ƒƒ participate willingly in staff development activities ƒƒ follow the fiscal guidelines of the place of employment ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills

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Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring Program Requirements ECEM 111 Intro to Early Childhood Education. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ECEM 112 Child Development. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ECEM 113 Guidance Techniques. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ECEM 121 Diversity Issues. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 ECEM 122 Creative Activities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ECEM 124 Language Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ECEM 125 Science/Math Activities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ECEM 131 Advocacy/Legal Issues. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 ECEM 132 Parent Interactions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ECEM 133 Program Design. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ECEM 134 Safety/Health/Nutrition. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ECEM 212 Policies & Procedures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ECEM 213 Staff Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ECEM 214 Financial Planning & Records. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENT – 10 credits Written Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science (taught within the ECEM curriculum) Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 See page 16 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Programs of Study

Child Care Manager

2

www.lwtech.edu/childcare

Early Childhood Education Assistant Teacher Certificate of Completion

I-BEST Early Childhood Education Assistant Teacher Certificate of Completion

16 credits

19 credits

Admission Dates: fall

This certificate will prepare students to seek an entry level aide/assistant position in a center or family based child care center. Theoretical knowledge about child observations/documentations, assessments, and developmentally appropriate practices is gained through evening classroom lecture; practical experience to apply knowledge gained will take place in college lab or in a licensed center or family based program as agreed upon by the instructor and students.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS ECEM 111 Introduction to Early Childhood Education. . . . . . . 5 ECEM 112 Child Development. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ECEM 113 Guidance Techniques. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

The I-BEST Early Childhood Education Assistant Teacher program provides ESL and ABE students with the opportunity to pursue a certificate of completion while continuing their progress in Basic Skills, and it is intended to be an articulation option to the certificate of proficiency and/or AAS Degree. All professional (ECEM) courses are taught with a 50% overlap of the professional-technical faculty and the Basic Skills faculty.

Programs of Study

This certificate will prepare students to seek an entry level aide/assistant position in a center or family based child care center. Theoretical knowledge about child observations/documentations, assessments, and developmentally appropriate practices is gained through evening classroom lecture; practical experience to apply knowledge gained will take place in college lab or in a licensed center or family based program as agreed upon by the instructor and students.

Admission Dates: fall PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS ECEM 111 Introduction to Early Childhood. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ECEM 112 Child Development. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ECEM 113 Guidance Techniques. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 EASL 066 ESL Child Care Applications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

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Civil Engineering Graphics www.lwtech.edu/civil_engineering

Civil Engineering Graphics Emphasis Associate of Applied Science TRANSFER Degree

Programs of Study

104 Credits

Program Mission: The Civil Engineering Graphics AAS-T degree prepares students for careers with civil engineering firms (e.g.: construction, transportation, water resources & wastewater treatment, bridges, etc.) Civil Engineering Graphics Technicians translate the rough sketches, layouts, CAD designs, and written specifications of engineers, architects, and designers into drawings and CAD databases showing the complete details and specifications for the finished project. Civil Engineering Graphics Emphasis AAS-T degree graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared for a range of entry-level positions in the civil engineering field with the ability to be independent and self-directed ƒƒ identify the elements and principles of civil engineering graphics design ƒƒ complete comprehensive design projects ƒƒ demonstrate industry ready skills and basic drafting fundamentals, concepts and techniques ƒƒ demonstrate fundamental industry demand skills in: surveying, quantity calculation, data research, collection, and analysis for engineering projects ƒƒ exhibit analytical thought, informed judgment, and ethical behavior ƒƒ produce a professional resume, cover letter, and industry ready portfolio ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills and processes in the workplace ƒƒ meet Social Science, Humanities, Written Communication, and Quantitative Reasoning distribution area outcomes

Program Requirements ARGT 111 Architectural Print Reading I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 CEGT 100 Introduction to Civil Engrg Technology . . . . . . . . . . 4 CEGT 211 Civil Engineering Graphics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 CEGT 221 Surveying. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 CEGT 231 Civil 3D Computer Aided Design I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 CEGT 232 Civil 3D Computer Aided Design II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 CEGT 233 Civil 3D Computer Aided Design III. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 -ORENGT 259 MicroStation II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 CEGT 241 Civil Engineering Materials. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 CEGT 251 Boundary Surveys & Plat Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 CEGT 261 Roadway Design & Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 CIVE 205 Theory of Urban Design & Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CEGT 280 Civil Engrg Graphics Capstone Project . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGR 111 Engineering Graphics I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGR 113 Introduction to Dimensioning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 101 Engineering Intro & Orientation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 131 AutoCAD I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 132 AutoCAD II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 133 AutoCAD III. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 258 MicroStation I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 202 Specialized Tech Employment Prep. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 GISA 211 Geographic Information Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Academic Core Requirements – 25 credits PHYS& 114 General Phys w/Lab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 -ORPHYS& 121 General Physics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ENGL& 101 English Composition I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MATH 111 College Algebra with Applications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Humanities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 See page 15 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring 50

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Civil Engineering Graphics

2

www.lwtech.edu/civil_engineering

Civil Engineering Graphics Emphasis Certificate of Proficiency 72 Credits

Civil Engineering Graphics Emphasis certificate graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared for a range of entry level positions in the civil engineering field with limited responsibilities and scope ƒƒ identify the elements and principles of civil engineering graphics design ƒƒ identify and explain common symbols, materials, scales, and terminology used in the field ƒƒ demonstrate familiarity with the many tools and techniques associated with design and its application in the work place ƒƒ exhibit analytical thought, informed judgment, and ethical behavior ƒƒ produce a professional resume, cover letter, and industry ready portfolio ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills

Program Requirements ARGT 111 Architectural Print Reading I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 CEGT 100 Introduction to Civil Engrg Technology . . . . . . . . . . 4 CEGT 211 Civil Engineering Graphics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 CEGT 221 Surveying. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 CEGT 231 Civil 3D Computer Aided Design I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 CEGT 241 Civil Engineering Materials. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 CIVE 205 Theory of Urban Design & Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ENGR 111 Engineering Graphics I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGR 113 Introduction to Dimensioning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 101 Engineering Intro & Orientation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 131 AutoCAD I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 132 AutoCAD II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 133 AutoCAD III. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 258 MicroStation I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 GISA 211 Geographic Information Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Programs of Study

The Civil Engineering Graphics Certificate of Proficiency program is a one-year program designed to prepare a graphics technician to work directly under the supervision of an engineer, architect or designer producing detailed drawings. Civil engineering graphics technicians are specialists in translating the rough sketches, layouts and written specifications of architects, engineers, and designers into a drawing showing the complete details and specifications for the finished project under the close direction of a supervisor.

Academic Core Requirements – 15 credits Written Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Intro to Algebra (MATH 090) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 See page 16 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring

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Civil Engineering Graphics www.lwtech.edu/civil_engineering

Civil 3D Certificate of Completion

Programs of Study

12 credits

The Civil 3D certificate is designed to prepare students for skill set upgrades in the civil engineering field. After completing the Civil 3D certificate, the student will be able to use Civil 3D in their specific engineering field successfully. Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Prerequisites: Completion of ENGT 131, CEGT 211 Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring Program Requirements CEGT 231 Civil 3D Computer Aided Design I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 CEGT 232 Civil 3D Computer Aided Design II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 CEGT 233 Civil 3D Computer Aided Design III. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

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Computer Security & Network Technician

2

www.lwtech.edu/csnt

Computer Security & Network Technician Associate of Applied Science Degree 105 credits

Program Mission: The Computer Security & Network Technician AAS degree prepares students for a career in the area of microcomputer technical support.

Our program has a strong emphasis on hands-on training and uses a variety of methods to deliver the course material in a relaxed and enjoyable learning environment. Our participants include high-school students, veterans, worker re-trainee’s, and those looking to transfer to four-year institutions. Our program philosophy is “Work hard, be challenged, have fun, and be flexible!” Computer Security & Network Technician AAS degree graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in the IT field ƒƒ perform successfully as computer technicians, Network technicians, installers, troubleshooters, help desk support, and network administrators ƒƒ create and troubleshoot physical networks ƒƒ demonstrate proficiency with using current popular network & client operating systems ƒƒ demonstrate proficiency with implementing and troubleshooting network communication protocols ƒƒ demonstrate knowledge of data protection and network hardening techniques ƒƒ demonstrate a working knowledge of industry trends and emerging technologies (eg; VoIP, 4G, Cloud computing) ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills ƒƒ meet Social Science, Humanities, Written Communication, and Quantitative Reasoning distribution area outcomes

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Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring Program Requirements CSNT 115 A+ Software Essentials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 CSNT 116 A+ Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 CSNT 117 Exploring Command Line Interfaces. . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CSNT 123 Current Operating Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 CSNT 124 Open Source Operating Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 CSNT 125 Shells & Scripts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CSNT 231 Network Fundamentals I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 CSNT 232 Network Fundamentals II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 CSNT 233 Network Design. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CSNT 241 Network Security & Encryption. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 CSNT 242 VoIP & Wireless Computing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 CSNT 243 Cloud & Emerging Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CSNT 251 Network Administration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 CSNT 253 Capstone. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Programs of Study

Technical and network support personnel may perform a wide variety of duties, such as service technicians, software technicians, network technicians, computer operators, installers, trouble shooters, salespersons, help desk support, and network administrators. Students will enhance their computer skills to assist in network design, security implementation and forensics investigations.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

Technical Electives – 10 credits May be taken from BAS, CSNT, or MMDP areas and must be approved by faculty Adviser. ACademic CORE REQUIREMENTS – 20 credits Written Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CMST&** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 ** CMST&210 or CMST&220 or CMST&230 See page 15 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Programs of Study

Computer Security & Network Technician www.lwtech.edu/csnt

Computer Security & Network Technician Associate of Applied Science transfer Degree ƒƒ meet Social Science, Humanities, Written Communication, and Quantitative Reasoning distribution area outcomes for transfer students

90 credits

Programs of Study

Program Mission: The Computer Security & Network Technician AAS-T degree prepares students for a career in the area of microcomputer technical support. Technical & Network support personnel may perform a wide variety of duties, such as service technicians, software technicians, network technicians, computer operators, installers, trouble shooters, salespersons, help desk support, and network administrators. Students will enhance their computer skills to assist in network design, security implementation and forensics investigations. In addition, this degree prepares students interested in pursuing a degree at the baccalaureate level. Our program has a strong emphasis on hands-on training and uses a variety of methods to deliver the course material in a relaxed and enjoyable learning environment. Our participants include high-school students, veterans, worker re-trainee’s, and those looking to transfer to four-year institutions. Our program philosophy is “Work hard, be challenged, have fun, and be flexible!” Computer Security & Network Technician AAS-T degree graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in the IT field ƒƒ perform successfully as computer technicians, Network technicians, installers, troubleshooters, help desk support, and network administrators ƒƒ create and troubleshoot physical networks ƒƒ demonstrate proficiency with using current popular network & client operating systems ƒƒ demonstrate proficiency with implementing and troubleshooting network communication protocols ƒƒ demonstrate knowledge of data protection and network hardening techniques ƒƒ demonstrate a working knowledge of industry trends and emerging technologies (eg; VoIP, 4G, Cloud computing) ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills

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Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring Program Requirements CSNT 231 Network Fundamentals I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 CSNT 232 Network Fundamentals II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 CSNT 233 Network Design. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CSNT 241 Network Security & Encryption. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 CSNT 242 VoIP & Wireless Computing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 CSNT 243 Cloud & Emerging Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CSNT 251 Network Administration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 CSNT 253 Capstone. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ACademic/Science REQUIREMENTS – 35 credits ENGL& 101 English Composition I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ENGL& 102 English Composition II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MATH& 1071 Math in Society . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PHIL& 106 Introduction to Logic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CMST&2 Oral Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Lab Science3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TECHINICAL ELECTIVES Technical Electives4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 See page 15 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above. 1

Take Math& 146 Statistics if pursuing a Healthcare IT track

2

CMST&210 or CMST&220 or CMST&230

3

Take BIOL& 175 if pursuing a Healthcare IT track and take PHYS& 121 or CHEM& 121 if pursuing a Management IT track.

Technical electives must be approved by faculty adviser.

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Computer Security & Network Technician

2

www.lwtech.edu/csnt

IT Support Technician Certificate of Proficiency 60 credits

The IT Support Technician certificate graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in the IT field ƒƒ use basic operating systems tools and utilities in a GUI and command line environment ƒƒ install, configure, and administer current desktop operating systems ƒƒ identify, install, and configure PC hardware effectively ƒƒ utilize file editing tools in a network environment to publish and support Web-based applications ƒƒ identify maintenance issues of both closed and open source systems ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills

Program Requirements CSNT 115 A+ Software Essentials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 CSNT 116 A+ Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 CSNT 117 Exploring Command Line Interfaces. . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CSNT 123 Current Operating Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 CSNT 124 Open Source Operating Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 CSNT 125 Shells & Scripts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CSNT 231 Network Fundamentals I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 CSNT 232 Network Fundamentals II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 CSNT 233 Network Design. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Academic Core Requirements – 15 credits Written Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60

Programs of Study

The IT Support Technician certificate is designed to prepare technicians to work in a wide variety of computer-related industries and has a strong emphasis on A+ Certification and Networking. Graduates will be prepared for entry-level jobs such as computer field service technicians, software technicians, computer operators, installers, troubleshooters, technical salespersons, help desk support and network technicians

See page 16 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring

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Programs of Study

Computer Security & Network Technician www.lwtech.edu/csnt

Network Support Technician Certificate of Proficiency

Programs of Study

60 Credits

The Network Support Technician certificate is designed to prepare technicians to work in a wide variety of computer-related industries and has a strong emphasis on Network+ Certification, Network Administration, and Network Security. Graduates find entry-level jobs as computer field service technicians, software technicians, computer operators, installers, troubleshooters, technical salespersons, help desk support and network technicians.

Program Requirements CSNT 231 Network Fundamentals I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 CSNT 232 Network Fundamentals II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 CSNT 233 Network Design. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CSNT 241 Network Security & Encryption. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 CSNT 242 VoIP & Wireless Computing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 CSNT 243 Cloud & Emerging Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CSNT 251 Network Administration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 CSNT 253 Capstone. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Academic Core Requirements – 15 credits Written Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Student wishing to enter this certificate program need to have completed the IT Support Technician certificate OR have earned an A+ Industry certification OR have instructor approval.

Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60

Network Support Technician certificate graduates will:

See page 16 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

ƒƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in the IT field ƒƒ create and troubleshoot physical networks ƒƒ demonstrate proficiency with using current popular network operating systems ƒƒ demonstrate proficiency with implementing and troubleshooting network communication protocols ƒƒ demonstrate knowledge of data protection and network hardening techniques ƒƒ demonstrate a working knowledge of industry trends and emerging technologies (eg; VoIP, 4G, Cloud computing) ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring

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Culinary Arts

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www.lwtech.edu/culinaryarts

Culinary Arts Associate of Applied Science Degree 104 credits

Program Mission: The Culinary Arts AAS degree prepares graduates to work in a commercial kitchen including restaurants, bakeries, cafeterias, delis, hospitals and other specialty shops.

This program is certified by the American Culinary Federation (ACF). Upon graduation, students will be eligible to receive their initial ACF certifications in either culinary arts or baking arts, depending on their area of specialization. Culinary Arts AAS degree graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared for employment as cooks, short order cooks, pantry cooks, prep cooks, front line cooks, sauté cooks, and grill cooks ƒƒ obtain certification from the American Culinary Federation as a Certified Culinarian ƒƒ meet the Skills Standards of American Culinary Federation ƒƒ demonstrate excellent customer service ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills ƒƒ meet Social Science, Humanities, Written Communication, and Quantitative Reasoning distribution area outcomes

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Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring Program Requirements CULA 116 Culinary Skills & Concepts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 CULA 119 Intermediate Culinary Skills & Concepts. . . . . . . . . . 9 CULA 120 Restaurant Fundamentals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 CULA 124 Introduction to the Front of the House. . . . . . . . . . . 9 CULA 127 Introduction to Baking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 CULA 128 Food Service Safety & Sanitation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CULA 130 Supervision & Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CULA 137 Nutrition in Food Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CULA 142 Costing & Menu Planning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CULA 144 American, Regional, International, & Classical Cuisine. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 CULA 146 Garde Manger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 CULA 154 Food & Beverage Procurement. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CULA 195 Capstone, Portfolio, & Masterpiece Dinner . . . . . . . 5 CULA 196 Internship/Externship/Cooperative. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Programs of Study

Students will gain skills in every facet of running a commercial restaurant as they learn basic cooking principles, terminology and food handling practices. Practical experience is provided with all stations of line cooking, inventory, daily specials production, garde manger work, sauce preparation and commercial equipment maintenance. Students will be prepared to work in a commercial kitchen of a restaurant, catering company, cafeteria, deli or other specialty shop. Students must always have a valid Washington State Health Card and Serve Safe Certificate.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

TECHNICAL ELECTIVE – 3 credits To be taken from CULA courses Academic Core Requirements – 20 credits Written Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Humanities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 See page 15 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Culinary Arts www.lwtech.edu/culinaryarts

Culinary Arts Certificate of Proficiency

Programs of Study

54 credits

The Culinary Arts certificate prepares students for a wide variety of entry-level positions in the culinary arts field. Students gain experience with stations of line cooking, inventory, production of daily specials, sauce preparation and basic butchering, as well as the basic function and structure of the cold kitchen. Curriculum includes basic cooking principals, terminologies and food handling practices. Students must always have a valid Washington State Health Card and Serve Safe Certificate. Culinary Arts certificate graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field as prep cooks and/or front-line cooks ƒƒ demonstrate excellent customer service ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills

Program Requirements CULA 116 Culinary Skills & Concepts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 CULA 119 Intermediate Culinary Skills & Concepts. . . . . . . . . . 9 CULA 120 Restaurant Fundamentals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 CULA 128 Food Service Safety & Sanitation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CULA 137 Nutrition in Food Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CULA 142 Costing and Menu Planning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CULA 154 Food and Beverage Procurement. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS Written Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 See page 16 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring

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Programs of Study

Dental Assistant

2

www.lwtech.edu/dental_assisting

Dental Assistant Associate of Applied Science Degree 90 Credits

Program Mission: The Dental Assistant AAS degree prepares students with the necessary background, knowledge, and specialized skills for a career in the field of the dental professional.

Dental Assistant AAS degree graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒƒ perform four-handed chairside dentistry on general chairside procedures ƒƒ perform expanded functions such as rubber dam isolation, sealant placement, coronal polish, fluoride application, oral hygiene instruction, fabricate provisional restorations and crown, cord packing, radiographs, matrix system, alginate impressions and pouring study models ƒƒ apply appropriate sterilization and infection control techniques ƒƒ perform basic dental front office skills ƒƒ be prepared to become a registered dental assistant ƒƒ be prepared to take the California Dental Association (CDA) exam ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills ƒƒ meet Social Science, Humanities, Written Communication, and Quantitative Reasoning distribution area outcomes

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Admission Dates: fall, spring Prerequisite: high school diploma or GED Program Requirements DENT 111 Introduction to Dental Assisting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DENT 112 Introduction to Chairside Procedures. . . . . . . . . . . . 6 DENT 113 Dental Practice Theory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 DENT 114 Ethics & Law, Office Management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DENT 115 Oral Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DENT 117 Dental Materials I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DENT 121 Dental Assisting Practicum I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 DENT 124 Study of the Human Body. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 DENT 126 Radiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DENT 127 Dental Materials II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DENT 131 Dental Assisting Practicum II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 DENT 133 Restorative Dentistry Dental Assist. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DENT 136 Radiography. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DENT 137 Dental Specialties. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 DENT 211 Dental Assisting Practicum III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 DENT 214 Pharmacology/Nutrition. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DENT 215 Workplace Preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DENT 294 Dental Assisting Internship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Programs of Study

Students learn theory and skills from classroom lectures, laboratory practice, and hands-on practice in the Lake Washington Institute of Technology Dental Clinic. Additional experiences in private dental practices are part of the four to six week required internship phase of training. Upon completion of this American Dental Association (ADA) accredited program, students will be eligible to take the Dental Assisting National Board (DANB) Dental Assisting Certification Examination.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

TECHNICAL ELECTIVES – 3 credits See faculty adviser/instructor for pre-approval. Academic Core Requirements – 20 credits Written Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Humanities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 See page 15 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Dental Assistant www.lwtech.edu/dental_assisting

Dental Assistant Certificate of Proficiency

Programs of Study

82 Credits

Students learn theory and skills from classroom lectures, laboratory practice, and hands-on practice in the Lake Washington Institute of Technology Dental Clinic. Additional experiences in private dental practices are part of the four to six week required internship phase of training. Upon completion of this American Dental Association (ADA) accredited program, students will be eligible to take the Dental Assisting National Board (DANB) Dental Assisting Certification Examination. Dental Certificate of Proficiency graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒƒ perform four-handed chairside dentistry on general chairside procedures ƒƒ perform expanded functions such as rubber dam isolation, sealant placement, coronal polish, fluoride application, oral hygiene instruction, fabricate provisional restorations and crown, cord packing, radiographs, matrix system, alginate impressions and pouring study models ƒƒ apply appropriate sterilization and infection control techniques ƒƒ perform basic dental front office skills ƒƒ be prepared to become a registered dental assistant ƒƒ be prepared to take the California Dental Association (CDA) exam ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills

Program Requirements DENT 111 Introduction to Dental Assisting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DENT 112 Introduction to Chairside Procedures. . . . . . . . . . . . 6 DENT 113 Dental Practice Theory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 DENT 114 Ethics & Law, Office Management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DENT 115 Oral Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DENT 117 Dental Materials I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DENT 121 Dental Assisting Practicum I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 DENT 124 Study of the Human Body. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 DENT 126 Radiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DENT 127 Dental Materials II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DENT 131 Dental Assisting Practicum II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 DENT 133 Restorative Dentistry for Dental Assist. . . . . . . . . . . 3 DENT 136 Radiography. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DENT 137 Dental Specialties. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 DENT 211 Dental Assisting Practicum III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 DENT 214 Pharmacology/Nutrition. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DENT 215 Workplace Preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DENT 294 Dental Assisting Internship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Academic Core Requirements – 15 credits Written Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 See page 16 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, spring Prerequisite: high school diploma or GED

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Dental Hygiene

2

www.lwtech.edu/dental

Dental Hygiene Associate of Applied Science Degree 120 credits (plus 57 credits of prerequisites)

Dental Hygiene AAS degree graduates will:

Program Philosophy: The Lake Washington Institute of Technology Dental Hygiene program believes the function of the dental hygienist is to provide safe and effective dental hygiene care to help people retain and improve their oral health for greater quality of life. It is the philosophy of the Dental Hygiene program at LWIT to foster the acquisition of dental hygiene skills in a safe learning environment that supports communication, collaboration, and critical thinking, and to promote culturally sensitive, ethical, and compassionate care in the dental workplace. This program has received accreditation status from the Commission on Dental Accreditation which allows students, upon graduation, to take the National Board Examination and the clinical licensing examination in the state where she or he plans to practice. Clinical experience is provided at the Lake Washington Institute of Technology dental clinic under the supervision of licensed dentists and licensed dental hygienists. Additional clinical experience occurs in a variety of off-campus settings located in the greater Seattle area. There is a formal admissions process for entry into this program. The curriculum in the Dental Hygiene program consists of seven quarters, including a six-week summer quarter of full-time professional and clinical education preceded by 57 credits of prerequisite courses. The prerequisite science courses must be at least seven years current upon program entry; be measured by a proficiency examination; or be waived by special petition to the Dental Hygiene Director. The dental hygiene courses must be taken successively. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. 2 0 1 2 - 2 0 1 3

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ƒƒ provide quality, evidence-based patient care demonstrating their ability to perform safe, effective, and ethical entry-level dental hygiene services ƒƒ apply the basic principles of evidence-based research and decision making in the delivery of dental hygiene care ƒƒ be prepared to successfully complete all licensing exams required to practice in Washington State and obtain an entry-level position as a dental hygienist ƒƒ be prepared to engage in life-long learning and career development as a dental hygienist ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation and technical and information literacy skills ƒƒ meet Social Science, Humanities, Written Communication, and Quantitative Reasoning distribution area outcomes

Programs of Study

Program Mission: The mission of the Lake Washington Institute of Technology Dental Hygiene program is to prepare students to enter the healthcare workforce as entry-level dental hygienists who are competent in the provision of safe, ethical and effective dental hygiene care. The program aims to provide students with high quality didactic and clinical education in the cognitive, psychomotor, and affective skills of dental hygiene as well as the promotion of life-long learning.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, by special admissions Prerequisites BIOL& 241 Human A & P 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 BIOL& 242 Human A & P 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 BIOL& 260 Microbiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CHEM& 121 Intro to Chemistry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CHEM& 131 Introduction to Organic/Biochemistry. . . . . . . . . . . 5 CMST& Oral Communication – College Level . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ENGL& 101 English Composition I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MATH Quantitative Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 NUTR& 101 Nutrition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PSYC& 100 General Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SOC& 101 Introduction to Sociology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 continues on next page…

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Dental Hygiene continued

Programs of Study

www.lwtech.edu/dental

Program Requirements DHYG 111 Medical Emergencies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 DHYG 112 Dental Hygiene Practice I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 DHYG 113 Restorative Dentistry I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DHYG 114 Principles & Issues in Dental Hygiene I. . . . . . . . . . . 2 DHYG 115 Head & Neck Anatomy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DHYG 116 Radiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DHYG 118 Periodontology I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DHYG 119 Tooth Morphology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DHYG 121 Preventive Dentistry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DHYG 122 Dental Hygiene Practice II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 DHYG 123 Restorative Dentistry II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 DHYG 124 Principles & Issues in Dental Hygiene II . . . . . . . . . . 1 DHYG 127 Histology & Embryology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DHYG 137 Radiographic Interpretation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DHYG 139 Pathology I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DHYG 132 Dental Hygiene Practice III. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 DHYG 133 Restorative Dentistry III. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 DHYG 134 Principles & Issues in Dental Hygiene III. . . . . . . . . . 2 DHYG 135 Community Dental Health I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DHYG 136 Pharmacology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DHYG 138 Pain Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DHYG 142 Dental Hygiene Practice IV. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 DHYG 143 Restorative Dentistry IV. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 DHYG 145 Community Dental Health II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DHYG 212 Dental Hygiene Practice V. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 DHYG 213 Restorative Dentistry V . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DHYG 214 Principles & Issues in Dental Hygiene IV. . . . . . . . . . 2 DHYG 215 Community Dental Health III. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DHYG 218 Periodontology II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DHYG 219 Pathology II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DHYG 222 Dental Hygiene Practice VI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 DHYG 223 Restorative Dentistry VI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DHYG 224 Principles & Issues in Dental Hygiene V . . . . . . . . . . 2 DHYG 225 Community Dental Health IV. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DHYG 229 Pathology III. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DHYG 232 Dental Hygiene Practice VII . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 DHYG 233 Restorative Dentistry VII. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DHYG 234 Principles & Issues in Dental Hygiene VI. . . . . . . . . . 1 DHYG 235 Community Dental Health V . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 DHYG 239 Pathology IV. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 Academic Core Requirements – 57 credits (All Prerequisites previously listed)

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Diesel & Heavy Equipment Technician

2

www.lwtech.edu/diesel

Diesel & Heavy Equipment Technician Associate of Applied Science Degree 117 Credits

Diesel & Heavy Equipment Technician AAS degree students learn how to diagnose problems and perform repairs on various vehicle components including engines, fuel, cooling, electrical, electronic, hydraulic, brake, suspension, undercarriage, power-shift and drive-train systems in the trucking and heavy equipment industry. Students will spend their first term training in a transportation core curriculum. The laboratory area simulates an industry environment. Students who have met the course objectives may be placed in a cooperative work experience to further develop their skills on the job. Diesel & Heavy Equipment Technician AAS degree graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level repair technician position in their field ƒƒ perform repairs on various diesel vehicles, vehicle components and equipment ƒƒ develop lifelong educational and employment goals ƒƒ establish an appreciation for life-long learning ƒƒ be prepared to succeed on the ASE certification and OEM certification exams ƒƒ meet minimum competency in eight categories identified as essential for employability: adherence to policy and procedure, technical knowledge, skill application, work planning, quality of work, quantity of work, interpersonal skills, oral and written communication ƒƒ demonstrate advanced skills in: diagnostics, repair and maintenance, electronics, hydraulics, power train, engines, pneumatics, undercarriage, brakes and welding.

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ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills ƒƒ meet Social Science, Humanities, Written Communication, and Quantitative Reasoning distribution area outcomes Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. TRAN 110, 112, 113, and 125 must be taken in the first quarter.

Programs of Study

Program Mission: Diesel & Heavy Equipment Technician AAS degree educates and mentors students in the latest technology, equipment, ideals, and fuel systems that power the diesel and heavy equipment industry today and in the future both close to home and at locations worldwide. It prepares students for lifelong learning and skill development, help students realize their potential to be successful at their careers and improve our community, economy and environment.

CWEX Cooperative Work Experience may be completed in the students last 3 quarters of training by instructor permission only. Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring Program Requirements TRAN 110 Computer Basics/ Transportation Trades. . . . . . . . . 2 TRAN 112 Shop & Business Practices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TRAN 113 Basic Electrical Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 TRAN 125 Mechanical Principles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 DHET 122 Welding Applications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 DHET 123 Heavy Duty Electrical Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 DHET 124 Electronic Applications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 DHET 125 Basic Maintenance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DHET 131 Engine Principles/Components. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DHET 132 Gasoline/Liquid Propane Gas Systems. . . . . . . . . . . 3 DHET 133 Diesel Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DHET 134 Fuel Injection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DHET 135 Diagnostics/Adjustments/Emissions. . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DHET 211 Hydraulic Fluid Power I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 DHET 213 Hydraulic Fluid Power II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

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Diesel & Heavy Equipment Technician continued

Programs of Study

www.lwtech.edu/diesel

DHET 214 Diesel Mechanical Practices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DHET 221 Power Trains/Standard. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 DHET 222 Power Trains/Power Shift . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 DHET 223 Traction & Components. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DHET 231 Steering/Suspension/Frames. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 DHET 232 Pneumatics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 DHET 233 Foundation Brakes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 IFAD First Aid Elective* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 CWEX 190 Cooperative Work Experience Seminar. . . . . . . . . . . 1 CWEX 197 Cooperative Work Experience. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Academic Core Requirements – 20 credits Written Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Humanities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 See page 15 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above. FIRST AID ELECTIVE – 1 credit * First Aid elective may be taken from any IFAD courses(s)

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Programs of Study

Diesel & Heavy Equipment Technician

2

www.lwtech.edu/diesel

Diesel & Heavy Equipment Technician Certificate of Proficiency 89 Credits

Diesel & Heavy Equipment Technician certificate graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level maintenance technician position in their field ƒƒ perform maintenance tasks on various diesel vehicles, vehicle components and equipment ƒƒ meet minimum competency in eight categories identified as essential for employability: adherence to policy and procedure, technical knowledge, skill application, work planning, quality of work, quantity of work, interpersonal skills, oral and written communication ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

Program Requirements TRAN 110 Computer Basics/ Transportation Trades. . . . . . . . . 2 TRAN 112 Shop & Business Practices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TRAN 113 Basic Electrical Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 TRAN 125 Mechanical Principles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 DHET 122 Welding Applications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 DHET 123 Heavy Duty Electrical Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 DHET 124 Electronic Applications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 DHET 125 Basic Maintenance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DHET 131 Engine Principles/Components. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DHET 132 Gasoline/Liquid Propane Gas Systems. . . . . . . . . . . 3 DHET 134 Fuel Injection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DHET 211 Hydraulic Fluid Power I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 DHET 214 Diesel Mechanical Practices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DHET 221 Power Trains/Standard. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 DHET 223 Traction & Components. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DHET 231 Steering/Suspension/Frames. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 DHET 232 Pneumatics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 DHET 233 Foundation Brakes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CWEX 197 Cooperative Work Experience. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

Programs of Study

Diesel & Heavy Equipment Technician certificate students learn how to identify problems and perform maintenance on various vehicle components including fuel, cooling, electrical, hydraulic, brake, suspension, and drive-train systems in the trucking and heavy equipment industry. Students will spend their first term of training in a transportation core curriculum. The laboratory area simulates an industry environment. Students who have met the course objectives may be placed in a cooperative work experience to further develop their skills on the job.

Academic Core Requirements – 15 credits Written Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 See page 16 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring

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Digital Gaming and Media www.lwtech.edu/digitalgaming

digital gaming and media Associate of Applied Science TRANSFER Degree

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

Programs of Study

104 credits

Program Mission: The Digital Gaming and Media AAS-T degree is designed to train students for entry-level positions in the game/media field. Graduates will be able to create animated graphics applicable to gaming, marketing, advertising, educational, and interactive media that use 3D animation.

Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring

Courses are delivered through face-to-face, online, and hybrid methods allowing students to practice skills necessary in industry. Students will conduct industry research to identify career pathways, learn professional practices including copyright, file management, portfolio development and workplace ethics. Students culminate their learning experience at the end of their studies with a showcase of their portfolio to industry professionals. Digital Gaming and Media AAS-T degree graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒƒ demonstrate technical proficiency and creative skills as related to the digital gaming field ƒƒ manage files and content in a manner suitable for industry ƒƒ convey characters and concepts through traditional art methods ƒƒ compare, and evaluate electronic games taxonomy and design theory ƒƒ mod game levels in current level editing tools ƒƒ create and edit basic scripts in related software ƒƒ rig and animate characters and props in current industry tools ƒƒ create props, levels, and textures in current 3D tools ƒƒ present ideas, pitches, and portfolios to industry and peers ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills ƒƒ meet Social Science, Humanities, Written Communication, and Quantitative Reasoning distribution area outcomes

Program Requirements ART 121 Introduction to Drawing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ART 203 Intermediate Drawing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 -ORART 205 Human Life Drawing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 101 Digital Design Survey. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 105 Storyboard Development. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 108 Introduction to Game Design. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 113 Computer Programming Fundamentals. . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 122 Image Editing 1 with Photoshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 124 Introduction to 3D with Maya. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 127 Level Editing I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 130 Concept Art – Characters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 134 3D Materials & Textures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 137 Lighting & Effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 138 Introduction to Environmental Art. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 148 Concept Art – Environments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 150 Character Animation I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 165 3D Character Design. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 190 Portfolio/Job Search. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 210 High Resolution Sculpting I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 technical electives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 (tHE FOLLOWING COURSES ARE recommendED) MMDP 142 MMDP 170 MMDP 172 MMDP 182 MMDP 215

Academic Core Requirements – 20 credits ENGL& 101 English Composition I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MATH& 107 Math in Society1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Humanities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program Credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 See page 15 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above. 1

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Photoshop II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Motion Graphics with After Effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Concept Art – Team Project. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Level Editing II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 High Resolution Sculpting II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Or any college level math course with intermediate algebra as a prerequisite

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Programs of Study

Electronics Technology

2

www.lwtech.edu/electronics

Electronics Technology Associate of Applied Science Degree 120 credits

The Electronics Technology AAS degree exposes students to a basic core of skills through advanced electronics principles and applications. By focusing on the idea that a career in high-tech involves constant and continuing education, the student learns the importance of life-long learning. Through this, the program prepares its graduates for entry level positions in the rapidly growing high-tech industries of the 21st century. Electronics Technology AAS degree graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared to obtain entry-level positions as electronics technicians, installers, assemblers and troubleshooters ƒƒ be prepared with the skills to perform standard workplace functions with minimal supervision ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills ƒƒ meet Social Science, Humanities, Written Communication, and Quantitative Reasoning distribution area outcomes Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

Program Requirements ELEC 110 Introduction to Electronics I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ELEC 111 Computer Literacy for Electronics Professionals . . 2 ELEC 113 Career Planning & Leadership I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ELEC 114 Electronic Testing Processes & Techniques I . . . . . . 2 ELEC 115 Electronics Manufacturing Testing Techniques I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 116 Introduction to Programmable Logic Controllers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 120 Introduction to Electronics II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ELEC 126 Electronics Manufacturing Testing Techniques II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 130 Electricity & Electronics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ELEC 137 Introduction to Semi & Analog. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 211 Digital Electronics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ELEC 213 Career Planning & Leadership II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ELEC 214 Troubleshooting Electronic Circuits. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ELEC 216 Mechatronics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ELEC 217 Data Acquisition & Analysis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 221 FCC/CET Preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 ELEC 223 Communication Electronics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 224 Electronic Circuits. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 225 Linear Circuits. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 226 Introduction to Automation/ Electromechanical. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ELEC 237 Intro to Microprocessors Microcontrollers. . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 239 Printed Circuit Board Layout & Design. . . . . . . . . . . 6 ELEC 297 Electronic Capstone, Degree Level. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Programs of Study

Program Mission: The Electronics Technology AAS degree prepares students to utilize the skills learned in this program to enter into either the electronics manufacturing industry as engineering technicians, electronics specialists, inspectors, managers, and testers, or into any of the high-tech industry maintaining multi-million dollar machines and devices utilized in almost all high-tech fields today.

ACADEMIC CORE Requirements – 20 credits Written Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Humanities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 See page 15 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Electronics Technology www.lwtech.edu/electronics

Electronics Technology Associate of Applied Science Transfer Degree

Programs of Study

105 credits

Program Mission: The Electronics Technology AAS Transfer degree prepares students to utilize the skills learned in this program to enter the electronics manufacturing industry as engineering technicians, electronics specialists, inspectors, managers, and testers or to pursue further education at the baccalaureate level. This degree is intended for students who may wish to transfer to specific colleges who accept the credits – check with your adviser. Achievement of this degree will prepare the transfer student for further study. Graduates will also be able to utilize the skills learned in this program to enter into either the electronics manufacturing industry as assemblers, inspectors, managers and testers, or into any high-tech industry maintaining one of the many multi-million dollar machines and devices utilized in almost all high-tech fields today.

Program Requirements ELEC 110 Introduction to Electronics I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ELEC 114 Electronic Testing Processes & Techniques . . . . . . . 2 ELEC 116 Introduction to Programmable Logic Controllers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 120 Introduction to Electronics II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ELEC 130 Electricity & Electronics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ELEC 137 Introduction to Semi & Analog. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 211 Digital Electronics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ELEC 214 Troubleshooting Electronic Circuits. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ELEC 217 Data Acquisition & Analysis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 224 Electronic Circuits. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 225 Linear Circuits. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 239 Printed Circuit Board Layout & Design. . . . . . . . . . . 6 ELEC 297 Electronic Capstone, Degree Level. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Academic Core Requirements – 40 credits MATH& 141 Pre-Calculus I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MATH& 142 Pre-Calculus II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ENGL& 101 English Composition I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PSYC& 100 General Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CMST& 220 Introduction to Public Speaking. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CHEM& 121 Intro to Chemistry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PHYS& 114 General Physics I w/Lab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PHYS& 115 General Physics II w/Lab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Electronics Technology AAS-Transfer degree will: ƒƒ be prepared to obtain entry-level positions as electronics technicians, installers, assemblers and troubleshooters ƒƒ be prepared with the skills to perform standard workplace functions with minimal supervision ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills ƒƒ meet Social Science, Humanities, Written Communication, and Quantitative Reasoning distribution area outcomes

Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 See page 15 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring

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Programs of Study

Electronics Technology

2

www.lwtech.edu/electronics

Electronics Technician Certificate of Proficiency 85 credits

Electronics Technician certificate graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared to obtain entry-level positions as electronics technicians, installers, assemblers and troubleshooters ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring

Program Requirements ELEC 110 Introduction to Electronics I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ELEC 111 Computer Literacy for Electronics Professionals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ELEC 113 Career Planning & Leadership. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ELEC 114 Electronic Testing Processes & Techniques . . . . . . . 2 ELEC 115 Electronics Manufacturing Testing Techniques I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 120 Introduction to Electronics II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ELEC 126 Electronics Manufacturing Testing Techniques II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 130 Electricity & Electronics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ELEC 137 Introduction to Semi & Analog. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 211 Digital Electronics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ELEC 213 Career Planning & Leadership II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ELEC 214 Troubleshooting Electronic Circuits. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ELEC 216 Mechatronics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ELEC 217 Data Acquisition & Analysis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 237 Intro to Microprocessors Microcontrollers. . . . . . . . 5

Programs of Study

Electronics Technician certificate students develop a basic core of electronics skills and are eligible to take the Associate Certified Electronics Technician examination. Graduates are qualified for entry-level positions as testers, maintenance technicians, service laboratory technicians, and satellite up-link or down-link technicians, cable TV installers, and service telecommunications technicians.

Technical Elective – 5 credits See faculty adviser/instructor for pre-approval . . . . . ………….5 Academic Core Requirements – 15 credits Written Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 See page 16 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Electronics Technology

Programs of Study

www.lwtech.edu/electronics

Digital Electronics Certificate of Completion

Electronic Automation Certificate of Completion

36 credits

32 credits

The Digital Electronics certificate introduces students to the technical foundations of current digital technologies and will enable them to explore these technologies in more depth and to work with them more adeptly in the workplace. This certificate is intended for students desiring to upgrade their skills in this industry.

The Electronic Automation certificate introduces the student to these automated manufacturing principles, systems and hands-on practices required to effectively work with, install, and troubleshoot automated manufacturing systems. This certificate is intended for students desiring to upgrade their skills in this industry.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring

Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring

Program Requirements ELEC 110 Introduction to Electronics I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ELEC 114 Electronic Testing Processes & Techniques I . . . . . . 2 ELEC 120 Introduction to Electronics II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ELEC 197 Electronic Capstone, Certificate Level. . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 211 Digital Electronics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ELEC 232 Digital Electronics Lab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ELEC 237 Intro to Microprocessors Microcontrollers. . . . . . . . 5

Program Requirements ELEC 110 Introduction to Electronics I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ELEC 114 Electronic Testing Processes & Techniques I . . . . . . 2 ELEC 116 Introduction to Programmable Logic Controllers. 5 ELEC 120 Introduction to Electronics II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ELEC 197 Electronic Capstone, Certificate Level. . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 216 Mechatronics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ELEC 226 Introduction to Automation/ Electromechanical. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

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Electronics Technology

2

www.lwtech.edu/electronics

PCB Design Technician Certificate of Completion

20 credits

35 credits

The level of sophistication of electronics has grown exponentially over the past few years. The Electronics, Manufacturing Specialist certificate prepares graduates for opportunities in the area of state-of-the-art electronics manufacturing. Internationally recognized certification is possible through successful completion of IPC-A-610 and IPC/WHMA-A-620 Certification.

The PCB Design Technician certificate provides a foundation to those individuals that seek employment opportunities in the lucrative exciting niche market of printed circuit board (PCB) design. Students will learn and use state-of-the art software while in this program. This certificate is intended for students desiring to upgrade their skills in this industry.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring

Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring

Program Requirements ELEC 115 Electronics Manufacturing Testing Techniques I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 126 Electronic Manufacturing Testing Techniques II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 233 IPC-A-610 Certification Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 234 IPC/WHMA – A-620 Certification Program. . . . . . . . 5

Program Requirements ELEC 110 Introduction to Electronics I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ELEC 114 Electronic Testing Processes & Techniques . . . . . . . 2 ELEC 120 Introduction to Electronics II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ELEC 197 Electronic Capstone, Certificate Level. . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 217 Data Acquisition & Analysis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 237 Intro to Microprocessors Microcontrollers. . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 239 Printed Circuit Board Layout & Design. . . . . . . . . . . 6

Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

Programs of Study

Electronics, Manufacturing Specialist Certificate of Completion

Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

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Energy & Science Technician www.lwtech.edu/energyscience

Energy & Science Technician Associate of Applied Science Degree

Programs of Study

93-99 credits

Program Mission: The Energy & Science Technician AAS degree prepares students to meet the increasing demand for jobs related to green technology, alternative energy, and laboratory sciences. The program prepares students for employment as technicians in areas such as biomedical and industrial laboratories, manufacturing, energy services, and environmental positions in public and private institutions. Students will receive a well-rounded education that includes courses in mathematics, written and oral communication, social sciences, energy sciences, biology, chemistry, physics, and computers. Technical electives also allow students to direct their studies toward specializations in bio-energy & environmental sciences, alternative & renewable energy technology, and industrial/laboratory sciences. Stand alone certificates are also available for each specialization. Energy & Science Technician AAS graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared for a range of entry level technician positions in energy and laboratory/industrial employment areas ƒƒ explain the concepts of electrical energy and how energy is used within various applications ƒƒ explain the impact of local, national, and global energy usage with regards to the environment ƒƒ measure and rate different sources of alternative energy and analyze these for the suitability of a particular application ƒƒ apply the basic principles of science including theory, observation, hypothesis, and experimentation ƒƒ calculate using metric measurements, scientific notation, significant figures and conversion factors ƒƒ examine and communicate the relationship between chemistry and living systems including the role of chemistry in laboratory and energy sciences ƒƒ apply basic computer skills to academic and work-related operations ƒƒ acquire employment skills in a particular industry through the internship requirement

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ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills ƒƒ meet Social Science, Humanities, Written Communication, and Quantitative Reasoning distribution area outcomes Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring Program Requirements CHEM& 121 Introduction to Chemistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ETEC 110 Introduction to Alternative Energy & Energy Management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PHYS& 114 General Physics I w/Lab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 STEC 198 Cooperative Work Seminar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 STEC 199 Cooperative Work Experience. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Choose 5 credits of BIOL& or NUTR& BIOL& 211 Cellular Biology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 NUTR& 101 Nutrition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Choose 10 credits of BAS BAS 111 Word I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 112 Excel I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 114 Access. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 281 Project Management with Microsoft Project . . . . . 5 technical ELECTIVES 28-34 CREDITS Bio Energy Focus Elective suggestions BIOL& 260 Microbiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CHEM& 131 Introduction to Organic /Biochemistry. . . . . . . . . . . 5 ETEC 121 Biomass and Bio-fuels Basics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 STEC 200 Good Laboratory Practice. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 STEC 220 Environmental Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 STEC 221 Hazardous Waste Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 STEC 225 Quality and Statistical Process Control. . . . . . . . . . . 5 continues on next page…

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Energy & Science Technician continued

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Programs of Study

Renewable Energy Focus Elective Suggestions ELEC 114 Electronic Testing Processes & Techniques I . . . . . . 2 ELEC 120 Introduction to Electronics II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ETEC 123 Introduction to Photovoltaic Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ETEC 124 Fundamentals of Water and Wind Power. . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 211 Digital Electronics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 STEC 225 Quality and Statistical Process Control. . . . . . . . . . . 5 Industrial Laboratory focus elective suggestions CHEM& 131 Introduction to Organic /Biochemistry. . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 110 Introduction to Electronics I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 STEC 200 Good Laboratory Practice. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 STEC 220 Environmental Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 STEC 225 Quality and Statistical Process Control. . . . . . . . . . . 5 no more than 8 credits may be chosen from below ARGT 111 Architectural Print Reading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ARGT 112 Construction Techniques. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ARGT 121 Architectural Graphics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ARGT 225 Construction Management & Estimating. . . . . . . . . 4 Academic Core Requirements Written Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Humanities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93-99 See page 15 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Programs of Study

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Bio-Energy Certificate of Completion

Energy Technology Certificate of Completion

19 credits

19 credits

The Bio-Energy certificate will prepare the student for a career in energy, environmental toxicology, and industrial practices, and provide a general understanding of the new biological technology in the energy sector. The certificate is targeted at individuals seeking fundamental knowledge that can be applied in the energy and biological technology industry as well as for those interested in learning more about the biological energy systems of the future. Students have the option of continuing their education by pursuing an AAS degree in Energy & Science Technician and specializing in bio energy, renewable electric energy, or industrial laboratory.

The Energy Technology certificate prepares students for a career in energy management, site assessment or technician level by training, retraining or upgrading skills. Students will learn the basics of energy site assessment, the technologies behind renewable energy and apply the trade-offs associated with implementation of each, both economic and environmental. The certificate is targeted at individuals seeking fundamental knowledge that can be applied in the field of alternative energy. Students have the option of continuing their education by pursuing an AAS degree in Energy & Science Technician and specializing in bio energy, renewable electric energy, or industrial laboratory.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring

Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring

Program Requirements ETEC 110 Introduction to Alternative Energy & Energy Management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ETEC 121 Biomass and Bio-fuel Basics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 STEC 200 Good Lab Practice. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 STEC 220 Environmental Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Program Requirements ETEC 110 Introduction to Alternative Energy & Energy Management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ETEC 121 Biomass and Bio-fuels Basics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ETEC 123 Introduction to Photovoltaic Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ETEC 124 Fundamentals of Water and Wind Power. . . . . . . . . 5

Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

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Energy & Science Technician

2

www.lwtech.edu/energyscience

I-BEST Bio-Energy Certificate of Completion

19 credits

25 credits

The Industrial/Laboratory certificate will prepare the student for employment in the Industrial or Laboratory sectors. Students will learn the basics behind good lab practices that will be useful for managing and working within a laboratory setting such as healthcare, agricultural labs, wet labs, or other analysis careers, as well as information about energy, process control, and the impact of industry/laboratory on the environment. The certificate is targeted at individuals seeking fundamental knowledge that can be applied in the industrial or laboratory sciences. Students have the option of continuing their education by pursuing an AAS degree in Energy & Science Technician and specializing in bio energy, renewable electric energy, or industrial laboratory.

The I-BEST Bio-Energy Certificate of Completion is targeted at individuals seeking fundamental knowledge that can be applied in the energy and biological technology industry as well as at those interested in learning more about the biological energy systems in the future. It prepares an increasingly diverse workforce for employment opportunities in energy, environmental toxicology, and industrial practices. This certificate provides ESL/ABED students with a general understanding of the new biological technology in the energy sector. All-professional-technical classes are taught with a 50% overlap of instruction between the ESL faculty and the professional-technical faculty.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring Program Requirements STEC 200 Good Lab Practice. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 STEC 220 Environmental Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 STEC 221 Hazardous Waste Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 STEC 225 Quality and Statistical Process Control. . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

Corequisites:

Programs of Study

Industrial/Laboratory Certificate of Completion

ƒƒ EASL 085 is a corequisite for ETEC 110 and ETEC 121 ƒƒ EASL 086 is a corequisite for STEC 200 and STEC 220 Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall ETEC ETEC STEC STEC EASL EASL

110 121 200 220 085 086

Introduction to Alternative Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Biomass and Bio-fuel Basics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Good Laboratory Practices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Environmental Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ESL Energy Technology Applications I. . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ESL Energy Technology Applications II. . . . . . . . . . . 3

Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

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Energy & Science Technician

Programs of Study

www.lwtech.edu/energyscience

I-Best Energy Technology Certificate of Completion

I-Best Industrial/Laboratory Certificate of Completion

28 credits

25 credits

The I-BEST Energy Technology certificate is intended for individuals seeking a career in energy management or site assessment: students learn the basics of energy site assessment, the technologies behind renewable energy, and apply the trade-offs associated with implementation of each, both economic and environmental. This certificate prepares an increasingly diverse workforce for employment opportunities in the field of alternative energy. It provides ESL/ABED students with fundamental knowledge that can be applied in the field of alternative energy. All-professional-technical classes are taught with a 50% overlap of instruction between the ESL faculty and the professional-technical faculty.

The I-BEST Industrial/Laboratory certificate is targeted at individuals seeking employment in the Industrial or Laboratory sectors. It prepares an increasingly diverse workforce for employment opportunities in laboratory settings such as healthcare, agriculture, or the environment. This certificate provides ESL/ABED students with fundamental knowledge that can be applied in the industrial or laboratory sciences. All-professionaltechnical classes are taught with a 50% overlap of instruction between the ESL faculty and the professionaltechnical faculty.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Corequisites: ƒƒ EASL 085 is a corequisite for ETEC 110 and ETEC 121, ƒƒ EASL 086 is a corequisite for ETEC 124 ƒƒ EASL 087 is a corequisite for ETEC 123 It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall Program Requirements ETEC 110 Introduction to Alternative Energy & Energy Management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ETEC 121 Biomass and Bio-fuel Basics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ETEC 123 Introduction to Photovoltaic Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ETEC 124 Fundamentals of Water and Wind Power. . . . . . . . . 5 EASL 085 ESL Energy Technology Applications I. . . . . . . . . . . . 3 EASL 086 ESL Energy Technology Applications II. . . . . . . . . . . 3 EASL 087 ESL Energy Technology Applications III . . . . . . . . . . 3

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Corequisites: ƒƒ EASL 086 is a corequisite for STEC 200 and STEC 220 ƒƒ EASL 087 is a corequisite for STEC 221 and STEC 225 It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: winter Program Requirements STEC 200 Good Lab Practice. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 STEC 220 Environmental Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 STEC 221 Hazardous Waste Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 STEC 225 Quality and Statistical Process Control. . . . . . . . . . . 5 EASL 086 ESL Energy Technology Applications II. . . . . . . . . . . 3 EASL 087 ESL Energy Technology Applications III . . . . . . . . . . 3 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

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Engineering Graphics

2

www.lwtech.edu/engt

Engineering Graphics – Mechanical Design Emphasis Associate of Applied Science TRANSFER Degree 103 Credits

Graduates are trained in engineering graphics with a design emphasis to work for companies which manufacture machinery, electrical equipment, computers and fabricated products. Engineering Graphics Mechanical Design Emphasis AAS-T degree graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared for a range of entry level positions in the mechanical engineering field with the ability to be independent and self-directed ƒƒ identify the elements and principles of mechanical design ƒƒ complete comprehensive design projects ƒƒ demonstrate industry ready skills and basic drafting fundamentals, concepts and techniques ƒƒ exhibit analytical thought, informed judgment, and ethical behavior ƒƒ produce a professional resume, cover letter, and industry ready portfolio ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills ƒƒ meet Social Science, Humanities, Written Communication, and Quantitative Reasoning distribution area outcomes

Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring Program Requirements ENGR 111 Engineering Graphics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGR 113 Dimensioning with Drawings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGR 121 Graphic Problem Solving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGR 123 Applied Dimensioning & Tolerancing. . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 101 Engineering Introduction and Orientation. . . . . . . 4 ENGT 225 SolidWorks for Engineering I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 226 SolidWorks for Engineering II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 131 AutoCAD I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 132 AutoCAD II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 141 Applied Materials Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 202 Specialized Technical Employment Preparation. . . 2 ENGT 211 Applied Industrial Graphics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 251 Industrial Design Graphics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 253 Machine Design Graphics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 255 Tool Design Graphics I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 271 Engineering Graphics Problems & Analysis I. . . . . . 4 ENGT 272 Engineering Graphics Problems & Analysis II. . . . . 4 ENGT 291 Applied Design Analysis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MACH 108 Fundamentals of Machining for Engineering. . . . . 4

Programs of Study

Program Mission: The Engineering Graphics Mechanical Design Emphasis AAS-T degree prepares students for careers with mechanical engineering firms (e.g.: aeronautics, aerospace, medical, industrial manufacturing, etc.). Technicians are needed to translate the rough sketches, layouts, 3D design models, CAD designs, and written specifications of the engineer or designer into drawings and CAD databases showing the complete details and specifications for the finished product.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

Technical Elective – 5 credits See faculty adviser/instructor for pre-approval . . . . . ………….4 Academic Core Requirements – 25 credits PHYS& 114 General Phys w/Lab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ENGL& 101 English Composition I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MATH 111 College Algebra with Applications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Humanities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 See page 15 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Engineering Graphics www.lwtech.edu/engt

Engineering Graphics Technician Certificate of Proficiency

Programs of Study

73 Credits

The Engineering Graphics Technician certificate is a one-year program designed to prepare a graphics technician to work directly under the supervision of an engineer or designer producing detailed drawings. Engineering Graphics Technicians are specialists in translating the rough sketches, 3D design models, layouts and written specifications of engineers and designers into a drawing showing the complete details and specifications for the finished product under the close direction of a supervisor. Engineering Graphics Technician certificate graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared for a range of entry level positions in the mechanical engineering field with limited responsibilities and scope ƒƒ identify and explain common symbols, materials, scales, and terminology used in the field ƒƒ demonstrate familiarity with the many tools and techniques associated with design and its application in the work place ƒƒ exhibit analytical thought, informed judgment, and ethical behavior ƒƒ produce a professional resume, cover letter, and industry ready portfolio ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills

Program Requirements ENGR 111 Engineering Graphics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGR 113 Dimensioning with Drawings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGR 121 Graphic Problem Solving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGR 123 Applied Dimensioning & Tolerancing. . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 101 Engineering Introduction and Orientation. . . . . . . 4 ENGT 225 SolidWorks for Engineering I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 226 SolidWorks for Engineering II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 131 AutoCAD I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 132 AutoCAD II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 141 Applied Materials Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 202 Specialized Technical Employment Preparation. . 2 ENGT 211 Applied Industrial Graphics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 255 Tool Design Graphics I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MACH 108 Fundamentals of Machining for Engineering. . . . . 4 Technical Elective – 5 credits See faculty adviser/instructor for pre-approval . . . . . ………….4 Academic Core Requirements – 15 credits Written Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Intro to Algebra (MATH 090) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 See page 16 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring

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Programs of Study

Engineering Graphics

2

www.lwtech.edu/engt

AutoCAD Certificate of Completion

36 credits

8 credits

The Tool Design Graphics certificate is intended for professionals in fields such as design, engineering, aerospace, automotive and manufacturing. Tool design is the process of designing and developing the tools, methods, and techniques necessary to improve manufacturing efficiency and productivity. A typical part-time student would need two to four terms to finish all course work. A student’s individual needs are taken into consideration. Students may complete deficiencies concurrently with first course in program.

The AutoCAD Certificate is designed to prepare students for skill set upgrades in the mechanical, civil or architectural fields. After completing the AutoCAD certificate, the student will be able to use AutoCAD in their specific engineering field successfully.

Prerequisites: Math 99 or 102 & ENGT 211 or instructor permission.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Prerequisite: Completion of ENGR 113 or instructor approval.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

Program Requirements ENGT 131 AutoCAD I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 132 AutoCAD II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring

Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring

Programs of Study

Tool Design Graphics Certificate of Completion

Program Requirements ENGR 123 Geometric Dimensioning & Tolerancing. . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 141 Applied Materials Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 211 Industrial Graphics I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 233 Computer Illustration Applications II. . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 255 Tool Design Graphics I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 256 Tool Design Graphics II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 257 Tool Design Graphics III. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MACH 108 Fundamentals of Machining for Engineering. . . . . 4 ENGT 133 Computer Aided Drafting & Design III. . . . . . . . . . . . 4 -ORENGT 222 CATIA V5 for Engineering I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 -ORENGT 225 Parametric Solid Design I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

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Programs of Study

Engineering Graphics

Programs of Study

www.lwtech.edu/engt

80

CATIA Certificate of Completion

SolidWorks Certificate of Completion

12 credits

12 credits

The CATIA certificate is designed to prepare students for skill set upgrades in the mechanical engineering field. After completing the CATIA certificate, the student will be able to use CATIA in mechanical engineering field successfully.

The SolidWorks certificate is designed to prepare students for skill set upgrades in the mechanical design field. After completing the SolidWorks certificate, the student will be able to use SolidWorks in mechanical design field successfully.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

Prerequisite: Completion of ENGT 133 or instructor approval.

Prerequisite: Completion of ENGT 133 or instructor approval.

Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring

Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring

Program Requirements ENGT 222 CATIA V5 for Engineering I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 223 CATIA V5 for Engineering II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 224 CATIA V5 for Engineering III. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Program Requirements ENGT 225 SolidWorks for Engineering I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 226 SolidWorks for Engineering II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 227 C3D Parametric Solid Design III. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

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Programs of Study

Environmental Horticulture

2

www.lwtech.edu/horticulture

Environmental Horticulture Associate of Applied Science Degree 102-105 Credits

Program Mission: The Environmental Horticulture AAS degree provides students with knowledge and skills needed for jobs with nurseries, greenhouses, landscape firms, garden centers, and park departments.

The classroom setting includes individual and small group instruction with a hands-on focus of horticultural practices. The program emphasizes a sustainable approach to horticultural principles. A diverse population of students enjoys working in a 1200 sq. ft. state-of-theart growing facility. Environmental Horticulture AAS degree graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared to obtain various positions in the field of horticulture ƒƒ be prepared for Washington State Nursery and Landscape Association Certified Professional Horticulturists exams ƒƒ demonstrate professional knowledge of horticultural skills ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills ƒƒ meet Social Science, Humanities, Written Communication, and Quantitative Reasoning distribution area outcomes

Programs of Study

Students learn plant identification, plant propagation, sustainable landscape practices, soil science, practical pruning and botanical concepts. Through time spent in practical hands-on training, students will learn to propagate, seed, transplant, design landscape plans, and maintain a variety of plants. Students will participate in an industry based training experience.

Program Requirements HORT 111 Botany . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 HORT 112 Tools & Equipment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 HORT 113 Propagation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 HORT 115 Plant ID Fall. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 HORT 116 Fall Horticulture Lab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 HORT 121 Soils. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 HORT 122 Pruning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 HORT 123 Pest Management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 HORT 125 Plant ID Winter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 HORT 127 Winter Horticulture Lab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 HORT 131 Landscape Design I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 HORT 132 Landscape Materials. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 HORT 134 Horticulture Marketing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 HORT 135 Plant ID Spring. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 HORT 137 Spring Horticulture Lab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 HORT 211 Landscape Design II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 HORT 212 Turfgrass Management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 HORT 225 Career Exploration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 HORT 215 Plant ID Summer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 HORT 216 Greenhouse Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 HORT 217 Summer Horticulture Lab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Technical Elective – 1 CREDIT First Aid Elective may be taken from any IFAD course(s) electives – 12-15 credits Up to 15 additional credits of which all must be in college-level courses as defined by the technical institute or as accepted as fully transferrable as defined by the state system. Academic Core Requirements – 20 credits Written Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Humanities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102-105

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

* Student should consult a faculty adviser. See page 15 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring

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Programs of Study

Environmental Horticulture www.lwtech.edu/horticulture

Environmental Horticulture Certificate of Proficiency

Programs of Study

84 Credits

Students learn plant identification, plant propagation, sustainable landscape practices, soil science, practical pruning and botanical concepts. Through time spent in practical hands-on training, students will learn to propagate, seed, transplant, design landscape plans, and maintain a variety of plants. Students will participate in an industry based training experience. Graduates find jobs with nurseries, greenhouses, landscape firms, garden centers, and park departments. The classroom setting includes individual and small group instruction with a hands-on focus of horticultural practices. The program emphasizes a sustainable approach to horticultural principles. A diverse population of students enjoys working in a 1200 sq. ft. state-of-the-art growing facility. Environmental Horticulture certificate graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared to obtain various positions in the field of horticulture ƒƒ be prepared for Washington State Nursery and Landscape Association Certified Professional Horticulturists exams ƒƒ demonstrate professional knowledge of horticultural skills ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills ƒƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills

Program Requirements HORT 111 Botany . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 HORT 112 Tools & Equipment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 HORT 113 Propagation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 HORT 115 Plant ID Fall. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 HORT 116 Fall Horticulture Lab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 HORT 121 Soils. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 HORT 122 Pruning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 HORT 123 Pest Management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 HORT 125 Plant ID Winter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 HORT 127 Winter Horticulture Lab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 HORT 131 Landscape Design I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 HORT 132 Landscape Materials. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 HORT 134 Horticulture Marketing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 HORT 135 Plant ID Spring. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 HORT 137 Spring Horticulture Lab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 HORT 211 Landscape Design II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 HORT 212 Turfgrass Management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 HORT 225 Career Exploration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 HORT 215 Plant ID Summer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 HORT 216 Greenhouse Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 HORT 217 Summer Horticulture Lab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Academic Core Requirements – 15 credits Written Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 See page 16 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring

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Programs of Study

Fitness Specialist/Personal Trainer

2

www.lwtech.edu/fitness

Fitness Specialist/Personal Trainer Associate of Applied Science Degree 96 credits

The curriculum is designed to help students prepare for the American Council on Exercise Personal Trainer, the National Academy of Sports Medicine Certified Personal Trainer, and the National Strength and Conditioning Association Certified Personal Trainer certification exams. One hundred fifty-four hours of industry-based internship or cooperative work experience is required for program completion. Fitness Specialist/Personal Trainer AAS degree graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level to mid-management position in their field ƒƒ demonstrate ability to instruct a variety of clientele on proper exercise form and technique. ƒƒ demonstrate proficiency at basic fitness assessment and program design ƒƒ demonstrate ability to communicate appropriately with and develop programming for special populations ƒƒ assess and program for advanced athletes ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills ƒƒ meet Social Science, Humanities, Written Communication, and Quantitative Reasoning distribution area outcomes Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

Program Requirements BIOL& 175 Human Biology w/Lab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 FTNS 112 Principles of Sport & Exercise. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FTNS 118 Health Promotions & Wellness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 FTNS 121 Kinesiology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 FTNS 124 Functional Assessment & Corrective Exercise. . . . . 4 FTNS 137 Professional Skills in Fitness. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 FTNS 152 Exercise Physiology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 FTNS 153 Clinical Fitness Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 FTNS 154 Exercise for Special Populations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 FTNS 191 Fitness Internship I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FTNS 210 Fitness Internship II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FTNS 215 Business & Risk Management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 FTNS 218 Human Performance I Cardio & Respiratory Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 FTNS 219 Human Performance II Strength Training . . . . . . . . 4 FTNS 220 Human Performance III Adv Training Strategies. . . 4 FTNS 230 Fitness Externship. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 NUTR& 101 Nutrition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Programs of Study

Program Mission: The Fitness Specialist/Personal Trainer AAS degree prepares students for entrepreneurial pursuit or employment as fitness instructors or personal trainers in entry-level to mid-management positions in health and fitness clubs, athletic clubs, strength training gyms, retirement centers, corporate fitness centers, and nonprofit and recreation organizations.

Technical Electives – 5 credits (See faculty adviser/instructor for pre-approval) FTNS 120 Responding to Emergencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FTNS 126 Sport & Exercise Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FTNS 128 Intro to Athletic Training. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FTNS 142 Certification Review. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 FTNS 144 Nutrition for Sports Performance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FTNS 170 Group Exercise Instructor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 FTNS 199 Special Projects. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5 FTNS 299 Special Projects. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5 Academic Core Requirements – 20 credits Written Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Humanities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 See page 15 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring

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Programs of Study

Fitness Specialist/Personal Trainer www.lwtech.edu/fitness

Fitness Specialist/Personal Trainer Associate of Applied Science Transfer Degree

Programs of Study

103 Credits

The Fitness Specialist/Personal Trainer AAS-T degree program prepares students for entrepreneurial pursuit or employment as fitness instructors or personal trainers in entry-level to mid-management positions in health and fitness clubs, athletic clubs, strength training gyms, retirement centers, corporate fitness centers, and nonprofit and recreation organizations. In addition, it prepares students interested in pursuing a degree at the baccalaureate level. The curriculum is designed to help students prepare for the American Council on Exercise Personal Trainer, the National Academy of Sports Medicine Certified Personal Trainer, and the National Strength and Conditioning Association Certified Personal Trainer certification exams. One hundred fifty-four hours of industry-based internship or cooperative work experience is required for program completion. Fitness Specialist/Personal Trainer AAS-T degree graduates will:

Technical Electives – 5 credits* (See faculty adviser/instructor for pre-approval) FTNS 120 Responding to Emergencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FTNS 126 Sport & Exercise Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FTNS 128 Intro to Athletic Training. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FTNS 142 Certification Review. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 FTNS 144 Nutrition for Sports Performance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FTNS 170 Group Exercise Instructor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 FTNS 199 Special Projects. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5 FTNS 299 Special Projects. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5 * May also include a transferable academic class

ƒƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒƒ demonstrate proficiency at fitness assessment and program design ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills ƒƒ meet Social Science, Humanities, Written Communication, and Quantitative Reasoning distribution area outcomes Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring

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Program Requirements BIOL& 241 Human A & P 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 BIOL& 242 Human A & P 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 FTNS 112 Principles of Sport & Exercise. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FTNS 118 Health Promotions & Wellness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 FTNS 121 Kinesiology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 FTNS 124 Functional Assessment & Corrective Exercise. . . . . 4 FTNS 137 Professional Skills in Fitness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 FTNS 152 Exercise Physiology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 FTNS 153 Clinical Fitness Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 FTNS 154 Exercise for Special Populations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 FTNS 191 Fitness Internship I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FTNS 210 Fitness Internship II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FTNS 215 Business & Risk Management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 FTNS 218 Human Performance I Cardio & Respiratory Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 FTNS 219 Human Performance II Strength Training. . . . . . . . . 4 FTNS 220 Human Performance III Adv Training Strategies. . . 4 FTNS 230 Fitness Externship. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 NUTR& 101 Nutrition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Academic Core Requirements – 20 credits Quantitative Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Humanities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ENGL& 101 English Composition I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PSYC& 100 General Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 See page 15 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Programs of Study

Fitness Specialist/Personal Trainer

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www.lwtech.edu/fitness

Fitness Specialist/Personal Trainer Certificate of Proficiency 56 Credits

The curriculum is designed to help students prepare for the basic certified personal trainer certifications offered through the American Council on Exercise Personal Trainer and the National Strength and Conditioning Association. Eighty-eight hours of industry-based internship or cooperative work experience is required for program completion.

Academic Core Requirements–15 credits Written Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Fitness Specialist/Personal Trainer certificate graduates will:

Programs of Study

Program Requirements BIOL& 175 Human Biology w/Lab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 FTNS 112 Principles of Sport & Exercise. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FTNS 121 Kinesiology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 FTNS 137 Professional Skills in Fitness. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 FTNS 152 Exercise Physiology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 FTNS 153 Clinical Fitness Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 FTNS 191 Fitness Internship I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FTNS 210 Fitness Internship II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FTNS 218 Human Performance I Cardio & Respiratory Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 FTNS 219 Human Performance II Strength Training. . . . . . . . . 4

Fitness Specialist/Personal Trainer certificate prepares students for employment as fitness instructors or personal trainers in entry-level positions in health and fitness clubs, athletic clubs, strength training gyms, retirement communities, and nonprofit and recreation organizations.

Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56

ƒƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒƒ demonstrate ability to instruct clientele on basic, proper exercise form and technique ƒƒ demonstrate proficiency at basic fitness assessment and program design ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills

See page 16 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring

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Funeral Service Education www.lwtech.edu/funeralservice

Funeral Service Education Associate of Applied Science Degree 109 CREDITS

Programs of Study

Program Mission: The Funeral Service Education AAS degree prepares students to achieve entry-level proficiency as embalmers and funeral directors. Funeral service professionals provide counsel, service, and emotional support for those who have experienced the death of a loved one. Students also learn how to manage a successful business in the high-tech global economy. The Funeral Service Education program at Lake Washington Institute of Technology is accredited by the American Board of Funeral Service Education, 3414 Ashland Ave., Suite G, St. Joseph, MO, 64506, (816) 233-3747 Funeral Service Education AAS degree graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared for entry level positions as a funeral director and embalmer ƒƒ recognize the historical roots of contemporary funeral service practices ƒƒ use appropriate terminology to facilitate communication with members of allied professions, the public, and the funeral service industry ƒƒ differentiate among the representative chemicals in embalming fluid (arterial, cavity, and accessory) and describe their respective functions and chemical principles ƒƒ discuss and demonstrate safe environmental work practices through proper disposal of contaminated materials, and proper methods of disposal of blood and body fluids during and following the embalming process ƒƒ explain and demonstrate the preparation of the infant, autopsy and non-autopsy embalming techniques and procedures while demonstrating and describing the use of embalming instruments, equipment and sundries, and embalming techniques and procedures ƒƒ comply with OSHA’s hazard communication standard, formaldehyde standard, and bloodborne pathogens standard

ƒƒ identify the purpose of the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), describe its effect on funeral service and who must comply with the FTC Funeral Industry Practices Rule, explain how to comply and follow the FTC Rule ƒƒ identify the pathological conditions and etiological factors which require special procedures in the removal, handling, preparation, and disposition of human remains. ƒƒ identify the laws, rules, regulations and management practices affecting funeral service and adhere to a standard of ethical behavior in personal and professional conduct ƒƒ be prepared to succeed on the National Board Exam and the state board exam ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills ƒƒ meet Social Science, Humanities, Written Communication, and Quantitative Reasoning distribution area outcomes The FSE program has as its central aim the recognition of the importance of funeral service personnel as: ƒƒ members of a human services profession, ƒƒ members of the community in which they serve, ƒƒ participants in the intimate relationship between bereaved families and those engaged in the funeral service profession, ƒƒ professionals knowledgeable of and compliant with federal, state, provincial/territorial, and local regulatory guidelines (in the geographic area where they practice), as well as ƒƒ professionals sensitive to and knowledgeable of the responsibility for public health, safety, and welfare in caring for human remains. The program has the following purposes: ƒƒ to enlarge the background and knowledge of students about the funeral service profession. ƒƒ to educate students in every phase of funeral service, and to help enable them to develop the proficiency and skills necessary to become functional members of the profession. continues on next page…

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Funeral Service Education continued

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www.lwtech.edu/funeralservice

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Prerequisites

High school completion or GED or satisfactory completion of nine post-secondary credits, exclusive of developmental courses.

Program Requirements ACCT 111 Introduction to Accounting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 101 Computer Applications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 BIOL& 175 Human Biology w/Lab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BUSA 180 Small Business Management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BUS& 201 Business Law. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CHEM& 121 Intro to Chemistry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ENGL& 101 English Composition I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 FSE 101 Introduction and History of Funeral Service. . . . . . 3 FSE 130 Funeral Service Sociology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FSE 140 Funeral Directing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 FSE 141 Funeral Service Ethics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FSE 148 Funeral Service Law & Compliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FSE 250 Funeral Service Management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 FSE 251 Embalming I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 FSE 255 Embalming Chemistry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

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Funeral Service Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Introduction to Restorative Art. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Embalming II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Funeral Service Microbiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Funeral Home Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Restorative Art. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Embalming III. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Funeral Service Pathology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Funeral Service Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Funeral Service Internship. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Academic core REQUIREMENTS – 20 credits ENGL& 101 English Composition I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CMST& 220 Introduction to Public Speaking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SOC 260 Sociology of Death & Dying. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109

Admission Dates: fall, spring

2 0 1 2 - 2 0 1 3

FSE FSE FSE FSE FSE FSE FSE FSE FSE FSE

Programs of Study

ƒƒ to educate student concerning the responsibilities of the funeral service profession to the community. ƒƒ to emphasize high standards of ethical conduct. ƒƒ to provide a comprehensive curriculum at the post secondary level of instruction. ƒƒ to encourage research in the field of funeral service.

CAUTION: Students enrolling in the Funeral Service Education program should contact their respective state board of funeral service regarding that state board’s approval of this particular program of instruction.

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Human Resources Management www.lwtech.edu/hrmanagement

Human Resources management Certificate of Completion

Programs of Study

44 Credits

The Human Resource Management certificate is designed for the working professional wishing to enter the Human Resource (HR) field, professionals wanting to enhance their HR and personnel knowledge, HR professionals wishing to advance in their field, certified HR professionals seeking re-certification hours, and managers wanting to get a better understanding of HR. Certified HR professionals may qualify for re-certification hours toward their Professional in Human Resources (PHR), Senior Professional in Human Resources (SPHR) and Global Professional in Human Resources (GPHR) certifications from the HR Certification Institute (HRCI). Lake Washington Institute of Technology is a HR Certification Institute (HRCI®) Approved Provider. As a HRCI® Approved Provider, many of our classes qualify for PHR®/SPHR®/GPHR®/PHR-CA®/SPHR-CA® recertification credits. Individuals may want to take one class, several classes or complete the certificate.

Program Requirements BUHR 210 HR’s Role in Organizations & Program Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 BUHR 215 HR Ethics & Diversity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 BUHR 220 Employee Benefits & Risk Management. . . . . . . . . . 4 BUHR 230 Staffing: Recruitment, Selection, & Placement. . . . 4 BUHR 235 Total Rewards (Compensation). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 BUHR 240 Employee & Labor Relations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BUHR 245 Training, Workforce Planning, Perf & Talent Mgt. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 BUHR 250 HR Information Systems & Measuring HR Outcomes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 BUHR 255 Employment Law I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 BUHR 260 Employment Law II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 BUHR 270 Global HR & Mergers & Acquisitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 BUHR 275 Strategic HR Mgt & Organizational Strategy. . . . . . 4 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

Depending on background and education level, a student will be able to find jobs in entry to mid-level positions as a generalist or in the areas of human resource management, employment and recruitment, total rewards/compensation, benefits, employee and labor relations, risk management/safety and security, and training and development. LWIT has an active SHRM Student Chapter, which is a SHRM Superior Merit Award winner. This program is focused on evening courses, thus allowing people who are employed to upgrade their skills and receive a certificate. Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring

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Machine Technology

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www.lwtech.edu/machining

Machine Technology Associate of Applied Science Degree 111 credits

Program Mission: The Machine Technology AAS degree prepares students to be well positioned to begin a career in the machine trades by gaining basic machining competencies.

Machine Technology AAS degree graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared with skills to perform entry-level CNC machining and manual machining ƒƒ gain a thorough grounding in shop theory and applied math ƒƒ perform CAD/CAM programming and manual programming ƒƒ combine manual and CNC skills to produce a capstone project of complex parts ƒƒ demonstrate math and communication skills ƒƒ set up and operate machine tools with a minimum of supervision ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, intercultural appreciation, information and technical literacy, and communication ƒƒ meet Social Science, Humanities, Written Communication, and Quantitative Reasoning distribution area outcomes

Technical Electives – 8 credits * See faculty adviser/instructor for approved courses.

Programs of Study

Graduates will be well positioned to begin a career in the machine trades by gaining basic machining competencies through their work on projects along with a thorough grounding in shop theory, applied math, and a special emphasis on CAD/CAM programming and CNC machining.

Program Requirements ENGT 225 SolidWorks for Engineering I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 226 SolidWorks for Engineering II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MACH 110 Fundamentals of Machining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 MACH 112 Machining Practice C-Clamp & Paper Punch. . . . . . 8 MACH 120 Materials – Measuring & CNC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 MACH 122 Mach Practice Tools – Tap Handle, Clamp & Punch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 MACH 124 CNC and MasterCam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 MACH 130 Blueprints, Trigonometry & CNC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 MACH 132 Mach Pract – Threading Project, Precision Grinding. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 MACH 134 CNC Manual Practice, Programming. . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 MACH 222 Capstone Project – Machining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

Academic Core Requirements – 20 credits Written Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Humanities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 See page 15 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring

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Machine Technology www.lwtech.edu/machining

Machine Technology Certificate of Proficiency

Programs of Study

79 Credits

Machine Technology certificate students will be well positioned to begin a career in the machine trades by gaining basic machining competencies through their work on projects along with a thorough grounding in shop theory, applied math, and a special emphasis on CAD/CAM programming and CNC machining. Machine Technology certificate graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared with skills to perform entry-level CNC machining and manual machining ƒƒ gain a thorough grounding in shop theory and applied math ƒƒ perform CAD/CAM programming and manual programming ƒƒ set up and operate machine tools with a minimum of supervision ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, intercultural appreciation, communication and technical and information literacy skills

Program Requirements MACH 110 Fundamentals of Machining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 MACH 112 Machining Practice C-Clamp & Paper Punch. . . . . . 8 MACH 122 Mach Practice Tools – Tap Handle, Clamp & Punch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 MACH 124 CNC and MasterCam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 MACH 120 Materials, Measuring & CNC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 MACH 132 Mach Pract – Threading Project, Precision Grinding. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 MACH 130 Blueprints, Trigonometry & CNC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 MACH 134 CNC Manual Practice, Programming. . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Academic Core Requirements – 15 credits Written Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 See page 16 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring

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Machine Technology

2

www.lwtech.edu/machining

Principles of precision machining Certificate of COMPLETION 42 Credits

Principles of Precision Machining certificate graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared with skills to perform entry-level CNC machining and manual machining ƒƒ gain a thorough grounding in shop theory and applied math ƒƒ perform CAD/CAM programming and manual programming ƒƒ set up and operate machine tools with a minimum of supervision Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

Program Requirements MACH 110 Fundamentals of Machining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Select 8 credits from below: MACH 120 Materials – Measuring & CNC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 MACH 124 CNC and MasterCam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 MACH 130 Blueprints, Trigonometry & CNC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Select 16 credits from below: MACH 112 Machining Practice C-Clamp & Paper Punch. . . . . . 8 MACH 122 Mach Practice Tools – Tap Handle, Clamp & Punch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 MACH 132 Mach Pract – Threading Project, Precision Grinding. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Academic Core Requirements – 10 credits Written Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42

Programs of Study

Principles of Precision Machining certificate students will be well positioned to begin a career in the machine trades by gaining basic machining competencies through their work on projects along with a thorough grounding in shop theory, applied math, and a special emphasis on CAD/CAM programming and CNC machining.

See page 16 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Massage Practitioner www.lwtech.edu/massage

Massage Practitioner Associate of Applied Science Degree

Programs of Study

92 Credits

Program Mission: The Massage Practitioner AAS degree prepares students for the National Certification Board for Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork (NCBTMB) exam and the Washington State licensing exam and to enter the job market as licensed massage practitioners. The program will provide high-quality training in the profession of Massage Therapy and assist graduates in finding employment, as desired, within the profession. The program also aims to enhance the understanding of massage practitioner as a viable method of treatment for a variety of pathological conditions within the medical and private sectors/communities. The American Massage Therapy Association defines Massage Therapy as “a profession in which the practitioner applies manual techniques and may apply adjunct therapies with the intention of positively affecting the health and well-being of the client”. Massage is often used to aid in recovery from injury, to promote health and well-being, and as a treatment for illness or pain. LWIT students will have a Swedish massage foundation with exposure to treatment and other massage modalities. Graduates will find employment in institutions such as clinics, spas, hospitals, as well as private practice. The program has been developed in accordance with the standards and guidelines outlined by the Washington State Board of Massage and the Commission on Massage Therapy Accreditation (COMTA) and will adhere to the requirements outlined by the Washington State Department of Health, Health Professions Quality Assurance Board of Massage for curriculum components and clinical sites, in order to ensure that students will be eligible to sit for the Washington State Massage Practitioners License exam (RCW 18.108.070) upon completion. Massage Practitioner AAS degree graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared for an entry level position in the field of massage with the skills to be independently employed ƒƒ be prepared for NCTMB and state certification exams ƒƒ demonstrate industry ready skills in business planning, billing, and record keeping

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ƒƒ demonstrate collaboration skills and communicate effectively with other health care professionals ƒƒ apply knowledge to create a network of complementary providers within the field and provide excellent client care ƒƒ exhibit ethical behavior and analytical thought ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills ƒƒ meet Social Science, Humanities, Written Communication, and Quantitative Reasoning distribution area outcomes Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall Prerequisite: HIV/AIDS/CPR Program Requirements MAST 105 Fundamentals of Massage Therapy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MAST 115 Fundamentals of Massage Therapy II . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MAST 125 Fundamentals of Massage Therapy III. . . . . . . . . . . 6 MAST 135 Hydrotherapy & Injury Management . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MAST 145 Pathologies for Massage Therapy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MAST 155 Treatment Massage I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MAST 165 Massage Clinic I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MAST 175 Complementary Massage Modalities I . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MAST 185 Massage Curriculum Review & Exam Prep. . . . . . . . 2 MAST 205 Spa Massage Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 MAST 215 Business Development & Professional Relations. . 5 MAST 255 Treatment Massage II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MAST 265 Massage Clinic II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MAST 275 Complementary Massage Modalities II. . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 20 credits Humanities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Written Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 See page 15 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Programs of Study

Massage Practitioner

2

www.lwtech.edu/massage

Massage Practitioner Certificate of Proficiency 62 Credits

Massage Practitioner certificate graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒƒ be prepared to pass the NCTMB and state licensing exam ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills

ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 15 credits Written Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program Credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

Programs of Study

Program Requirements MAST 105 Fundamentals of Massage Therapy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MAST 115 Fundamentals of Massage Therapy II . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MAST 125 Fundamentals of Massage Therapy III. . . . . . . . . . . 6 MAST 135 Hydrotherapy & Injury Management . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MAST 145 Pathologies for Massage Therapy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MAST 155 Treatment Massage I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MAST 165 Massage Clinic I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MAST 175 Complementary Massage Modalities I . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MAST 185 Massage Curriculum Review & Exam Prep. . . . . . . . 2

Massage Practitioner certificate prepares students to become a professionally licensed massage practitioner. Students will develop a strong Swedish massage foundation with exposure to treatment and other massage techniques. Graduates will be prepared for employment in settings such as clinics, spas, hospitals, as well as private practice.

See page 16 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

Admission Dates: fall, winter Prerequisites: HIV/AIDS/CPR

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Massage Practitioner www.lwtech.edu/massage

Massage Practitioner Certificate of COMPLETION

Programs of Study

19 Credits

The Massage Practitioner certificate exposes the student to advanced massage techniques. The student will also acquire the skills necessary to treat an increased variety of functions. They will also obtain the business skills necessary to operate a successful massage practice. Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Prerequisite: ƒƒ Completed the 62-credit certificate program or licensed massage therapist or instructor permission. ƒƒ HIV/AIDS/CPR Admission Dates: summer Program Requirements MAST 205 Spa Massage Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 MAST 215 Business Development & Professional Relations. . 5 MAST 255 Treatment Massage II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MAST 275 Complementary Massage Modalities II. . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program Credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

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Medical Assisting

2

www.lwtech.edu/medicalassistant

Medical Assisting Associate of Applied Science Degree 90 Credits

Program Mission: The Medical Assisting AAS degree prepares students for high demand medical office positions including front and back-office positions.

The Lake Washington Institute of Technology Medical Assistant program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (www.caahep.org) upon recommendation of the Curriculum Review Board of the America Association of Medical Assistants Endowment (AAMAE). Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs 1361 Park Street Clearwater, FL 33756 (727)210-2350 Medical Assisting AAS degree graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒƒ be prepared to work in ambulatory settings performing administrative and clinical duties. ƒƒ meet CAAHEP Standards in the areas of cognitive and psychomotor skills ƒƒ be prepared to pass the CMA (AAMA) exam ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills ƒƒ meet Social Science, Humanities, Written Communication, and Quantitative Reasoning distribution area outcomes 2 0 1 2 - 2 0 1 3

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Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring Program Requirements BIOL& 175 Human Biology w/Lab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 115 Law & Ethics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 MEDA 116 Medical Terminology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 118 Exam room & Patient Preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 121 Medical Office Skills. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 125 Phlebotomy & Bloodborne Pathogens. . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 129 Pharmacology & Medical Math. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 136 Coding/Billing/Insurance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 139 Assist with Exam & Administer Medication. . . . . . . 5 MEDA 211 Medical Computer Applications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 212 Diagnostic Testing in Medical Office. . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 214 Disease Conditions & Community Health . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 293 Externship Seminar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 MEDA 294 Medical Assisting Externship. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Programs of Study

Graduates of the program are eligible to take the Certified Medical Assistant examination offered by the American Association of Medical Assistants. The program will provide students with a knowledge base that includes anatomy, physiology, medical terminology, pharmacology, medical billing and coding, medical office assessments and procedures, patient care and education. Medical Assistants are highly versatile professionals in both clinical and administrative realms. Medical Assistants need to effectively communicate with a wide variety of people including doctors, nurses, clients, medical billing staff, insurance representatives, and pharmacists. The program will culminate the theory, clinical and lab skills in an intern experience in a physician’s office.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

Electives – 5 CREDITS Up to 5 additional credits of which all must be in college-level courses as defined by the technical institute or as accepted as fully transferrable as defined by the state system. Academic Core Requirements – 20 credits Written Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science (PSYC& prefix). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Humanities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 See page 15 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Medical Assisting www.lwtech.edu/medicalassistant

Medical Assisting Certificate of Proficiency

Programs of Study

85 Credits

The Medical Assisting certificate prepares the students for high demand medical office positions including front and back office positions. Graduates of the program are eligible to take the Certified Medical Assistant examination offered by the American Association of Medical Assistants. The program will provide students with a knowledge base that includes anatomy, physiology, medical terminology, pharmacology, medical billing and coding, medical office assessments and procedures, patient care and education. Medical Assistants are highly versatile professionals in both clinical and administrative realms. Medical Assistants need to effectively communicate with a wide variety of people including doctors, nurses, clients, medical billing staff, insurance representatives, and pharmacists. The program will culminate the theory, clinical and lab skills in an intern experience in a physician’s office. The Lake Washington Institute of Technology Medical Assisting program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (www.caahep.org) upon recommendation of the Curriculum Review Board of the America Association of Medical Assistants Endowment (AAMAE). Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs 1361 Park Street Clearwater, FL 33756 (727)210-2350 Medical Assisting certificate of proficiency graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒƒ be prepared to work in ambulatory settings performing administrative and clinical duties. ƒƒ meet CAAHEP Standards in the areas of cognitive and psychomotor skills ƒƒ be prepared to pass the CMA (AAMA) exam ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills

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Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring Program Requirements BIOL& 175 Human Biology w/Lab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 115 Law & Ethics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 MEDA 116 Medical Terminology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 118 Exam room & Patient Preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 121 Medical Office Skills. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 125 Phlebotomy & Bloodborne Pathogens. . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 129 Pharmacology & Medical Math. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 136 Coding/Billing/Insurance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 139 Assist with Exam & Administer Medication. . . . . . . 5 MEDA 211 Medical Computer Applications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 212 Diagnostic Testing in Medical Office. . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 214 Disease Conditions & Community Health . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 293 Internship Externship. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 MEDA 294 Medical Assisting Externship. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Electives – 5 CREDITS Up to 5 additional credits of which all must be in college-level courses as defined by the technical institute or as accepted as fully transferrable as defined by the state system. Academic Core Requirements – 15 credits Written Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PSYC& 100 General Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program Credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 See page 16 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Medical Assisting

2

www.lwtech.edu/medicalassistant

Medical Assisting Office Administration Certificate of Completion 30 credits

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

electives – 5 credits Up to 5 additional credits of which all must be in college-level courses as defined by the technical institute or as accepted as fully transferrable as defined by the state system. Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 See page 16 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

Programs of Study

Program Requirements BAS 101 Computer Applications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 MEDA 115 Law & Ethics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 MEDA 116 Medical Terminology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 121 Medical Office Skills. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 136 Coding/Billing/Insurance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 211 Medical Computer App. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

The Medical Assisting Office Administration certificate will prepare students with the necessary skills and knowledge to obtain entry-level positions as front office assistants and general clerical support in medical settings. The certificate of completion will include basic medical office skills, medical terminology, medical law, billing & insurance coding skills, and medical computer skills.

Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring

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Medical Billing & Coding www.lwtech.edu/mbcp

Medical Billing & Coding Professional Certificate of Proficiency

Programs of Study

63 credits

Medical Billing & Coding Professional certificate will prepare students with the necessary skills and knowledge to obtain an entry-level position in medical insurance coding and office administration within a variety of healthcare settings. Medical Billing & Coding Professional certificate graduates will: ƒƒ apply medicolegal principles when working with protected health information (PHI) ƒƒ accurately code diagnoses and procedures for the medical office ƒƒ accurately prepare insurance billing forms ƒƒ competently use software commonly used in the medical practice ƒƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills

Program Requirements BIOL& 175 Human Biology w/Lab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 115 Law & Ethics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 MEDA 116 Medical Terminology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 121 Medical Office Skills. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 136 Coding/Billing/Insurance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 140 Medical Reimbursement Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 154 Intermediate Medical Coding. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 211 Medical Computer Applications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 214 Disease Conditions & Community Health . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 254 Advanced Medical Coding. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Academic Core Requirements – 15 credits (Student must take classes indicated for individual programs of study) PSYC& 100 General Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ENGL& 101 English Composition I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program Credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 See page 16 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall

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Programs of Study

Motorcycle, Marine & Power Equipment Service Technology

2

www.lwtech.edu/mmpe

Motorcycle, Marine & Power Equipment Service Technology Associate of Applied Science Degree 107 credits

Students have some options of specializing in one or more areas after completion of basic instruction. Students will spend their first term of training in a transportation core curriculum. Cooperative work experience is available with instructor permission. Motorcycle, Marine & Power Equipment Service Technology AAS degree graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared for a wide range of entry-level positions in their field ƒƒ be able to maintain, diagnose and repair the following systems: Electrical, Engine, Power Transmission, Chassis, Suspension, Brake, Induction/Exhaust and Engine Management with minimal supervision ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills ƒƒ meet Social Science, Humanities, Written Communication, and Quantitative Reasoning distribution area outcomes Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

Program Requirements TRAN 110 Computer Basics/Transport Trades. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 TRAN 112 Shop & Business Practices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TRAN 113 Basic Electrical Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 TRAN 125 Mechanical Principles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMPE 122 Electrical System Applications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MMPE 123 Charging Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MMPE 124 Ignition Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMPE 134 Power Transmission Applications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMPE 135 Transaxles Transmissions, and Drive Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MMPE 137 Induction/Exhaust Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMPE 213 Chassis, Suspension, & Rigging. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 MMPE 214 Two and Four-Cycle Gas Engines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MMPE 215 Diesel Engines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 MMPE 221 Advanced Electrical Applications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMPE 223 Advanced Motorcycle, Marine & Power Equip Apps I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MMPE 231 Advanced Motorcycle, Marine & Power Equip App II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMPE 232 Advanced Motorcycle, Marine & Power Equip App III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 CWEX 197 Cooperative Work Experience or Technical Electives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Programs of Study

Program Mission: The Motorcycle, Marine & Power Equipment Service Technology AAS degree provides students with a broad range of entry-level technical skills by working on representative models of equipment serviced in the motorcycle, marine and power equipment industries.

Academic Core Requirements – 20 credits Written Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Humanities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program Credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 See page 15 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring

2 0 1 2 - 2 0 1 3

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Motorcycle, Marine & Power Equipment Service Technology www.lwtech.edu/mmpe

Harley-Davidson® Option Associate of Applied Science Degree

Programs of Study

113 credits

Program Mission: The Harley-Davidson® Option to the Motorcycle, Marine & Power Equipment Service Technology AAS degree uniquely positions successful graduates to enter Harley® dealerships in a variety of capacities. The intent of the program is to provide the types of pre-employment training that is currently only available as incumbent worker training in a Harley-Davidson® dealership and better prepare them for their initial employment. The Harley-Davidson® Option to the Motorcycle, Marine and Power Equipment Service Technology AAS degree graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared for a wide range of entry-level positions in their field ƒƒ be able to maintain, diagnose and repair the following Harley-Davidson® motorcycle systems: electrical, engine, power transmission, chassis, suspension, brake, induction/exhaust and engine management. ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills ƒƒ meet Social Science, Humanities, Written Communication, and Quantitative Reasoning distribution area outcomes Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

Program Requirements TRAN 110 Computer Basics/Transport Trades. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 TRAN 112 Shop & Business Practices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TRAN 113 Basic Electrical Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 TRAN 125 Mechanical Principles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMPE 122 Electrical System Applications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MMPE 123 Charging Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MMPE 124 Ignition Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMPE 134 Power Transmission Applications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMPE 135 Transaxles Transmissions, and Drive Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MMPE 137 Induction/Exhaust Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMPE 213 Chassis, Suspension, & Rigging. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 MMPE 214 Two and Four-Cycle Gas Engines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MMPE 215 Diesel Engines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 MOHD 221 Harley-Davidson® Electrical Diagnosis . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MOHD 223 Intro to Harley-Davidson® Electronic Control Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 MOHD 225 Harley-Davidson® Service Procedures. . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MOHD 231 Advanced Harley-Davidson® Electronic Control Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 MOHD 233 Harley-Davidson® Chassis Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MOHD 235 Harley-Davidson® Air-Cooled Powertrains. . . . . . . . 6 Academic Core Requirements – 20 credits Written Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Humanities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program Credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 See page 15 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring

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Programs of Study

Motorcycle, Marine & Power Equipment Service Technology

2

www.lwtech.edu/mmpe

Motorcycle, Marine & Power Equipment Service Technology Certificate of Proficiency 78 credits

Motorcycle, Marine & Power Equipment Service Technology certificate graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared for a wide range of entry-level positions in their field ƒƒ be able to maintain, diagnose and repair the following systems: electrical, engine, power transmission, chassis, suspension, brake, induction/exhaust and engine management with supervision. ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

Program Requirements TRAN 110 Computer Basics/Transport Trades. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 TRAN 112 Shop & Business Practices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TRAN 113 Basic Electrical Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 TRAN 125 Mechanical Principles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMPE 122 Electrical System Applications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MMPE 123 Charging Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MMPE 124 Ignition Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMPE 134 Power Transmission Applications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMPE 135 Transaxles, Transmissions, & Drive Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MMPE 137 Induction/Exhaust Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMPE 213 Chassis, Suspension, & Rigging. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 MMPE 214 Two and Four-Cycle Gas Engines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MMPE 215 Diesel Engines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Programs of Study

The Motorcycle, Marine & Power Equipment Service Technology certificate provides students with a broad range of entry-level technical skills by working on representative models of equipment serviced in the motorcycle, marine and power equipment industries. Students have some options of specializing in one or more areas after completion of basic instruction. Students will spend their first term of training in a transportation core curriculum.

Academic Core Requirements – 15 credits Written Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program Credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 See page 16 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring

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Multimedia Design & Production www.lwtech.edu/mmdp

Digital Design Associate of Applied Science Transfer Degree

ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills ƒƒ meet Social Science, Humanities, Written Communication, and Quantitative Reasoning distribution area outcomes

Programs of Study

102 credits

Program Mission: The Digital Design AAS-T degree prepares students to plan, analyze, and create visual solutions to produce websites, content for mobile devices, and design layouts and interactive documents for print or screen-based publishing using industry standard software. Courses are delivered through face-to-face, online, and hybrid methods allowing students to practice skills necessary in industry. Students will conduct industry research to identify career pathways, learn professional practices including copyright, file management, portfolio development and workplace ethics. Students culminate their learning experience at the end of their studies with a showcase of their portfolio to industry professionals. Digital Design AAS-T degree graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared for entry-level jobs in digital publishing, web design and mobile content design ƒƒ demonstrate superior technical skills in industry standard software ƒƒ create effective solutions to design challenges using the elements and principles of design ƒƒ apply drawing skills and principles of color theory to projects and exercises ƒƒ create, edit and integrate vector and raster graphics within a variety of layouts for web, mobile device, print and interactive projects ƒƒ describe the historical significance and current design standards for typographic design, and effectively use type in print and screen-based publications ƒƒ apply basic coding skills to projects using HTML, CSS and other scripting languages ƒƒ demonstrate an understanding of content management systems through use in projects ƒƒ describe the importance of site navigation and usability in web and mobile design ƒƒ prepare project deliverables for commercially printed materials, interactive documents and ePublications ƒƒ produce a professional resume, cover letter and industry ready portfolio

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Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring Program Requirements ART 102 Beginning Two-Dimensional Design. . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ART 121 Introduction to Drawing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ART 252 Advanced Two-Dimensional Design. . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 101 Digital Design Survey. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 117 Typography. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 118 HTML. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 121 Vector Illustration 1 with Illustrator. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 122 Image Editing 1 with Photoshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 123 Multimedia Authoring with Flash. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 126 Page Layout 1 with InDesign. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 133 Web Authoring with Dreamweaver. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 153 Introduction to Web and Mobile Design . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 154 Electronic Publishing with Acrobat. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 158 Prepress and Digital; Publishing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 168 Introduction to Content Management Systems. . . 4 MMDP 170 Motions Graphics with After Effects. . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 190 Portfolio/Job Search. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP Technical Electives* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Academic Core Requirements – 20 credits ENGL& 101 English Composition I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MATH& 107 Math in Society1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Humanities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program Credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 Or any college level math course with intermediate algebra as a prerequisite

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See page 15 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Multimedia Design & Production

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www.lwtech.edu/mmdp

Video and Web Production Associate of Applied Science Transfer Degree 100 Credits

The curriculum has been updated to reflect the growing synergy between web design and video production as organizations seek to add compelling video content to their websites and develop a social media presence. Students will learn digital storytelling and web design principles, and develop strong video and web production skills through software such as Final Cut Studio, After Effects, Dreamweaver and Flash. Video content distribution through different digital formats will be explored. Video and Web Production AAS-T degree graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒƒ edit video in a wide variety of genres including: narrative, documentary, and commercials ƒƒ conceptualize story ideas and present them before an audience ƒƒ think critically about the films they watch ƒƒ properly operate a video camera and sound equipment ƒƒ properly compress media for different distribution methods ƒƒ describe the importance of site navigation and usability in web design ƒƒ produce a professional resume, cover letter and industry ready portfolio

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ƒƒ correctly write HTML code and create cascading style sheets (CSS) ƒƒ demonstrate technical proficiency and creative skills ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills ƒƒ meet Social Science, Humanities, Written Communication, and Quantitative Reasoning distribution area outcomes Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

Programs of Study

Program Mission: The Video and Web Production AAS-T degree educates and mentors students in the tools and techniques required to produce and distribute videos in the digital age. We prepare students to be well versed in a variety of software so that they can produce videos in both small and large-scale production companies, as well as take on projects in a wide variety of genres including corporate video, documentary, narrative, music videos, and commercials.

Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring Program Requirements ART 102 Beginning Two-Dimensional Design. . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 HUM 110 Introduction to Film. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 101 Digital Design Survey. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 107 Digital Storytelling. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 118 HTML. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 119 Video Production. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 120 Digital Content Delivery. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 121 Vector Illustration 1 with Illustrator. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 122 Image Editing 1 with Photoshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 123 Multimedia Authoring with Flash. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 133 Web Authoring with Dreamweaver. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 139 Digital Video Editing with Final Cut Pro . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 153 Web Design. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 159 Advanced Production and Editing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 160 Digital Sound. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 170 Motions Graphics with After Effects. . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 190 Portfolio/Job Search. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TECHNICAL ELECTIVES – 7 Credits * Technical Electives may be taken from ART or MMDP areas.

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Multimedia Design & Production continued

Programs of Study

www.lwtech.edu/mmdp

Recommended electives ART& 100 Art Appreciation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ART 203 Intermediate Drawing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ART 255 Beginning Painting for Art Majors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 HUM 110 Introduction to Film. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 128 Digital Photography. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 139 Digital Video Editing with Final Cut Pro . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 141 Vector Illustration 2 with Illustrator. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 142 Image Editing 2 with Photoshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 143 Actionscript with Flash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 146 Page Layout 2 with InDesign. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 234 XML/XSL. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 235 PHP Scripting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 238 JavaScript . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 297 Multimedia Internship. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Academic Core Requirements – 20 credits ENGL& 101 English Composition I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MATH& 107 Math in Society1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Humanities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program Credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 1

Or any college level math course with intermediate algebra as a prerequisite

See page 15 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Multimedia Design & Production

2

www.lwtech.edu/mmdp

Digital publishing Certificate of Proficiency 71 credits

Digital Publishing certificate graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared for entry-level jobs as graphic designers or production artists in print or digital publishing ƒƒ create, edit, and integrate a variety of high quality vector and raster graphics within single and multiple page-layout projects for print or tablet ƒƒ prepare project deliverables for commercially printed materials, interactive documents, and ePublications ƒƒ create effective solutions to design challenges using the elements and principles of design ƒƒ effectively use type in print-based and screen-based publications ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

Program Requirements ART 102 Beginning Two-Dimensional Design. . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ART 252 Advanced Two-Dimensional Design. . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 117 Typography I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 118 HTML. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 121 Vector Illustration 1 with Illustrator. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 122 Image Editing 1 with Photoshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 126 Page Layout 1 with InDesign. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 146 Page Layout 2 with InDesign. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 153 Introduction to Web and Mobile Design . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 154 Electronic Publishing with Acrobat. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 158 Prepress and Digital Publishing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 168 Introduction to Content management Systems. . . 4 MMDP 190 Portfolio/Job Search. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Technical Electives – 4 credits *Technical Electives may be taken from MMDP or ART areas.

Programs of Study

The Digital Publishing certificate prepares students to create graphics and design layouts for a variety of digital publishing formats such as commercial printing, interactive documents and ePublications. Students begin study with theory courses and progress to learn software tools associated with vector and raster graphic creation, page layout, prepress, and digital publishing methods. Students seeking web and mobile design and coding skills should pursue the Digital Design AAS-T degree program or the Web and Mobile Design Certificate of Proficiency.

Recommended electives ART 121 Introduction to Drawing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 128 Digital Photography. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 141 Vector Illustration 2 with Illustrator. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 142 Image Editing 2 with Photoshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 170 Motion Graphics with AfterEffects. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 297 Multimedia Internship. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Academic Core Requirements – 15 Credits Written Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program Credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 See page 16 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring

2 0 1 2 - 2 0 1 3

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Multimedia Design & Production www.lwtech.edu/mmdp

Video and Web Production Certificate of Proficiency

Programs of Study

85 Credits

The Video and Web production certificate educates and mentor students in the tools and techniques required to produce and distribute videos in the digital age. We prepare students to be well versed in a variety of software so that they can produce videos in both small and large-scale productions companies, as well as take on projects in a wide variety of genres including corporate video, documentary, narrative, music videos, and commercials. ƒƒ Video and Web production certificate graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒƒ edit video in a wide variety of genres, including narrative, documentary, and commercials ƒƒ conceptualize story ideas and present them before an audience ƒƒ properly operate a video camera and sound equipment ƒƒ properly compress media for different distribution methods ƒƒ describe the importance of site navigation and usability in Web design ƒƒ correctly write HTML code and create cascading style sheets (CSS) ƒƒ demonstrate technical proficiency and creative skills ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills

Program Requirements ART 102 Beginning Two-Dimensional Design. . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 101 Digital Design Survey. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 107 Digital Storytelling. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 118 HTML. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 119 Video Production. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 120 Digital Content Delivery. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 121 Vector Illustration 1 with Illustrator. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 122 Image Editing 1 with Photoshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 123 Multimedia Authoring with Flash. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 133 Web Authoring with Dreamweaver. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 139 Digital Video Editing with Final Cut Pro . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 153 Introduction to Web and Mobile Design . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 159 Advanced Production and Editing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 160 Digital Sound. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 170 Motion Graphics with After Effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Academic Core Requirements – 15 credits Written Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program Credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 See page 16 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring

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Multimedia Design & Production

2

www.lwtech.edu/mmdp

Web and mobile Design Certificate of Proficiency 73 credits

Web and Mobile Design certificate graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared for entry-level jobs as web designers and mobile content designers ƒƒ create, edit and integrate a variety of vector and raster graphics, data, and text within web, mobile and interactive projects ƒƒ describe the importance of site navigation and usability in web and mobile design ƒƒ demonstrate basic coding skills using HTML, CSS, and scripting languages ƒƒ demonstrate an understanding of content management systems through use in projects ƒƒ create effective solutions to design challenges using the elements and principles of design ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills

Program Requirements ART 102 Beginning Two-Dimensional Design. . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 113 Computer Programming Fundamentals. . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 118 HTML. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 121 Vector Illustration 1 with Illustrator. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 122 Image Editing 1 with Photoshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 123 Multimedia Authoring with Flash. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 133 Web Authoring with Dreamweaver. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 143 Actionscript with Flash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 153 Introduction to Web and Mobile Design . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 168 Introduction to Content Management Systems. . . 4 MMDP 234 XML / XSL. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 -ORMMDP 235 PHP Scripting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 238 JavaScript . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Technical Electives – 4 Credits *Technical Electives may be taken from MMDP or ART areas.

Programs of Study

The Web and Mobile Design certificate prepares students to design, build, and maintain websites and screen-based interactive content for mobile devices. Students begin study with theory courses and progress to learn software tools associated with web authoring, content management systems, creation and integration of digital media, and basic scripting for web and mobile devices. Students seeking digital publishing, prepress or page layout skills should pursue the Digital Design AAS-T degree program or the Digital Publishing certificate of proficiency.

Recommended electives ART 121 Introduction to Drawing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ART 252 Advanced Two-Dimensional Design. . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 117 Typography. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 128 Digital Photography. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 141 Vector Illustration 2 with Illustrator. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 142 Image Editing 2 with Photoshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 297 Multimedia Internship. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Academic Core Requirements – 15 Credits Written Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program Credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

See page 16 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring

2 0 1 2 - 2 0 1 3

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Multimedia Design & Production

Programs of Study

www.lwtech.edu/mmdp

Digital audio/video editing certificate of completion

Illustrator/PhotoShop Specialty Certificate of Completion

15 credits

16 credits

The Digital Audio/Video Editing certificate is designed to prepare students for job transitions, skills upgrades, and continuing industry education to remain current in post-production.

The Illustrator/PhotoShop Specialty certificate is designed to prepare students for job transitions, skills upgrades, and continuing industry education to remain current in their chosen field, multimedia design and production.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring Program Requirements MMDP 159 Advanced Production and Editing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 160 Digital Sound. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 170 Motions Graphics with After Effects. . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program Credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring Program Requirements MMDP 121 Vector Illustration 1 with Illustrator. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 122 Image Editing 1 with Photoshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 128 Digital Photography. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 141 Vector Illustration 2 with Illustrator. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 -ORMMDP 142 Image Editing 2 with Photoshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

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Multimedia Design & Production

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www.lwtech.edu/mmdp

Web page development Certificate of Completion

17 credits

15 Credits

The Digital Publishing Specialty Certificate is designed to prepare students for job transitions, skills upgrades, and continuing industry education to remain current in the digital publishing field.

The Web Page Development certificate prepares students to work as Web page developers. Students will acquire skills to design, implement, and maintain dynamic websites that use industry standard languages for scripting and data representation on the Web.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring

Program Requirements MMDP 126 Page Layout 1 with InDesign. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 154 Acrobat. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 158 Prepress and Digital Publishing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP Technical Elective* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Program Requirements MMDP 113 Computer Programming Fundamentals. . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 234 XML/XSL. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 238 JavaScript . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Total program Credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

Programs of Study

Digital Publishing Specialty Certificate of Completion

Technical Elective – 4 credits *Choose Technical Elective from one of the following: ART 252 Advanced Two-Dimensional Design. . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 117 Typography. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 121 Vector Illustration 1 with Illustrator. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 122 Image Editing 1 with Photoshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 146 Page Layout 2 with InDesign. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 153 Introduction to Web and Mobile Design . . . . . . . . . 5

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Multimedia Design & Production

Programs of Study

www.lwtech.edu/mmdp

Web server applications Certificate of Completion

Web and Mobile Design Specialty Certificate of Completion

15 Credits

17 credits

The Web Server Applications certificate is designed to prepare students to work as Web server applications developers. Students will acquire skills to design, implement, and maintain websites that require server-side scripting such as processing user input from forms and storing and retrieving data from SQL databases.

The Web and Mobile Design Specialty certificate is designed to prepare students for job transitions, skills upgrades, and continuing industry education to remain current in the web and mobile design field. Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring Program Requirements MMDP 113 Computer Programming Fundamentals. . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 118 HTML. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 235 PHP Scripting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

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Program Requirements MMDP 123 Multimedia Authoring with Flash. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 133 Web Authoring with Dreamweaver. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 153 Introduction to Web and Mobile Design . . . . . . . . . 5 TECHNICAL ELECTIVES - 4 credits Choose Technical Elective from one of the following: MMDP 118 HTML. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 238 JavaScript . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 234 XML / XSL. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 168 Introduction to Content Management Systems. . . 4 MMDP 143 Actionscript with Flash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 121 Vector Illustration 1 with Illustrator. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 122 Image Editing 1 with Photoshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Total program Credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

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www.lwtech.edu/nursing

NURSING Associate of Applied Science TRANSFER Degree 92 Credits

Graduates of the program are eligible to take the examination for licensure as a registered nurse (NCLEX-RN).

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

Minimum admission requirements: Completion of application for admission to the nursing program, minimum GPA 3.0, Entrance Test results, 2 professional recommendations, and national background check. Nursing AAS-T degree graduates (RN) will: ƒƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒƒ be competent in skills and knowledge necessary for the professional nursing role ƒƒ communicate and collaborate effectively with individuals from a wide variety of ethnic and cultural backgrounds ƒƒ use effective communication for initiating teaching for patients, families, and staff ƒƒ use critical thinking for decision-making across the entire nursing process in relationship to caring for individuals and families ƒƒ assess, analyze data, develop a nursing plan of care, implement therapeutic nursing interventions, and evaluate client outcomes to assist the individuals and families toward optimal functioning health

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ƒƒ maintain technical and information literacy to support direct care, and evidence based practice and the value of research in nursing ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills ƒƒ meet Social Science, Humanities, Written Communication, and Quantitative Reasoning distribution area outcomes

Programs of Study

Program Mission: The Nursing AAS-T degree prepares students who are highly educated, technically advanced, competent and caring individuals to practice professional nursing in a variety of settings and participate in lifelong learning. In addition it may prepare students interested in pursuing a degree at the baccalaureate level.

Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring Prerequisite requirements Valid Washington State Certified Nursing Assistant License BIOL& 241 Human A & P 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 BIOL& 242 Human A & P 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 CHEM& 121 Intro to Chemistry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ENGL& 101 English Composition I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MATH& 146 Introduction to Statistics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PSYC& 200 Lifespan Psychology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total required credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

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www.lwtech.edu/nursing

Program Requirements NURS 110 Introduction to Pathophysiology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 NURS 111 Nursing Foundations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 NURS 112 Nursing Foundations Practicum. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 NURS 113 Health Assessment & Promotion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 NURS 116 Communication Processes in Nursing. . . . . . . . . . . . 2 NURS 117 Skills Lab I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 NURS 121 Medical-Surgical Nursing I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 NURS 122 Medical-Surgical Nursing I Practicum. . . . . . . . . . . . 5 NURS 128 Skills Lab II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 NURS 129 Gerontological Nursing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 NURS 131 Medical-Surgical Nursing II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 NURS 132 Medical-Surgical Nursing II Practicum . . . . . . . . . . . 5 NURS 134 Introduction to Pharmacology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 NURS 135 Mental Health Nursing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 NURS 139 Mental Health Nursing Practicum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 NURS 221 Nursing & the Childbearing Family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 NURS 222 Nursing & the Childbearing Family Practicum. . . . 3 NURS 225 Nursing of Children. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 NURS 226 Nursing of Children Practicum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 NURS 241 Medical-Surgical Nursing III. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 NURS 242 Medical-Surgical Nursing III Practicum. . . . . . . . . . . 5 NURS 243 Leadership and Nursing Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 NURS 244 Leadership and Nursing Practice Preceptorship. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Academic Core Requirements** BIOL& 260 Microbiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CMST 210 Interpersonal Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 -ORCMST 230 Small Group Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 NUTR& 101 Nutrition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 ** All Academic Core courses are required to be completed prior to the sixth term of the Associate Degree Nursing program.

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www.lwtech.edu/nursing

Practical Nursing Certificate of Proficiency 68 credits

Admission requirements: Completion of application for admission to the nursing program, entrance test results, 2 professional recommendations, and national background check.

Prerequisite recommendations PSYC& 100 General Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Prerequisite requirements Valid Washington State Certified Nursing Assistant License BIOL& 241 Human A & P 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 BIOL& 242 Human A & P 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ENGL& 101 English Composition I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MATH 099 Intermediate Algebra. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PSYC& 200 Lifespan Psychology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total required Credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

Practical Nursing certificate graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒƒ communicate and collaborate effectively with individuals from a wide variety of ethnic and cultural backgrounds ƒƒ use effective communication for initiating teaching for patients, families, and staff ƒƒ use critical thinking for decision-making within selected aspects of the nursing process in relationship to caring for individuals and families ƒƒ gather data, contribute to the development of a nursing plan of care, implement therapeutic nursing interventions, and assist with the evaluation of client outcomes ƒƒ maintain technical and information literacy to support direct care ƒƒ be competent in skills and knowledge necessary for the practical nursing role ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

Program Requirements NURS 110 Introduction to Pathophysiology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 NURS 111 Nursing Foundations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 NURS 112 Nursing Foundations Practicum. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 NURS 113 Health Assessment & Promotion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 NURS 116 Communication Processes in Nursing. . . . . . . . . . . . 2 NURS 117 Skills Lab I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 NURS 121 Medical-Surgical Nursing I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 NURS 122 Medical-Surgical Nursing I Practicum. . . . . . . . . . . . 5 NURS 128 Skills Lab II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 NURS 129 Gerontological Nursing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 NURS 131 Medical-Surgical Nursing II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 NURS 132 Medical-Surgical Nursing II Practicum . . . . . . . . . . . 5 NURS 134 Introduction to Pharmacology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 NURS 135 Mental Health Nursing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 NURS 139 Mental Health Nursing Practicum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 NURS 213 Leadership and Practice for the LPN. . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 NURS 214 Nursing Practice & the Family Unit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 NURS 215 Nursing Practice & the Family Unit Practicum . . . . 2 NURS 219 Medical-Surgical Nursing III Preceptorship. . . . . . . 3

Programs of Study

The Practical Nursing certificate prepares students for employment as Practical Nurses in hospitals, clinics, long-term care facilities, home healthcare agencies, schools and doctor’s offices. Graduates of the program are eligible to take the licensing examination to become licensed practical nurses (NCLEX-PN).

Academic Core Requirements1 CMST& Oral Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 NUTR& 101 Nutrition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total Program Credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 All Academic Core courses are required to be completed prior to completion of the third term of the Practical Nursing program.

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Nursing www.lwtech.edu/nursing

Nursing Assistant Certificate of Completion

Programs of Study

11 credits

The Nursing Assistant certificate prepares students for employment as Nursing Assistants in hospitals, clinics, long-term care facilities, and home healthcare agencies. Additionally, this program prepares students for continuation on into practical or registered nurse programs. Graduates of the program are eligible to take the certification examination to become Certified Nursing Assistant. Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission requirements:

ƒƒ COME 120 7-Hour HIV AIDS Training or equivalent ƒƒ ENGL 093 or equivalent placement score ƒƒ CPR for the Health Care Provider Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring Program Requirements NURS 107 Nursing Assistant Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 NURS 108 Nursing Assistant Laboratory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 NURS 109 Nursing Assistant Practicum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Total Program Credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

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Occupational Therapy Assistant www.lwtech.edu/ota

Occupational Therapy Assistant Associate of Applied Science Degree 99 Credits

Occupational Therapy Assistant AAS degree graduates will:

In congruence with the mission of the college at large, the focus is on successful workforce education of individuals from diverse backgrounds and life experiences, giving them the skills, knowledge and attitudes to successfully gain employment and cope successfully with ever-changing workforce requirements. We will provide our students with an engaging curriculum which encourages life-long learning, and high standards of occupational therapy assistant practice. The Occupational Therapy Assistant AAS degree prepares students to work in a variety of settings including hospitals, private practices, outpatient clinics, client homes, long term care facilities, retirement communities, assisted living facilities, school systems, and mental health centers. Occupational therapy assistants (OTAs) provide occupational therapy services with the direction and supervision of occupational therapist. The Occupational Therapy Assistant (OTA) Program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), which is located at 4720 Montgomery Lane, PO Box 31220, Bethesda, MD 20824. AOTA’s phone number is 301-652-AOTA. Graduates of the Program will be able to sit for the national certification examination for OTAs administered by the National Board for Certification of Occupational Therapy (NBCOT) located at 800 South Frederick Avenue, Suite 200, Gaithersburg, MD 20877. After successful completion of this examination, the graduate will become a certified occupational therapy assistant (COTA). Washington State requires licensure to practice as a COTA.

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ƒƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒƒ be eligible to take the National Registration Examination for Occupational Therapy Assistants ƒƒ teach patients or clients to manage basic activities of daily living, such as dressing and grooming ƒƒ teach exercise and purposeful activities to increase coordination, strength, and work tolerance ƒƒ assist the occupational therapist with assessments of patient function ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills ƒƒ meet Social Science, Humanities, Written Communication, and Quantitative Reasoning distribution area outcomes

Programs of Study

The mission of the OTA Associate of Applied Science Degree Program at LWIT is to prepare students with the skill base, fund of knowledge, ethical base, understanding and demonstration of the behaviors required to successfully assume the roles required of occupational therapy assistants in the current environments of OT Practice.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall Program Prerequisites: ƒƒ High school completion or GED ƒƒ 50 hours of observation in two community or health care settings where occupational therapists or assistants are employed ƒƒ Minimum of a 3.0 grade in each of the course prerequisites for OTA 101

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The following courses are prerequisites for OTA 101: ENGL& 101 English Composition I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BIOL& 175 Human Biology w/Lab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 116 Medical Terminology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PSYC& 200 Lifespan Psychology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 The following are required prior to the start of 2nd quarter: IFAD 162 First Aid/CPR for Health Care Providers (or equivalent) IFAD 216 HIV/AIDS Training or equivalent National criminal background check documentation

ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS1 – 10 credits CMST& 220 Introduction to Public Speaking. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 -ORCMST& 230 Small Group Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 1

Total credits. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 These must be completed by the beginning of Term VI. It is recommended that these core requirements be taken before the student enters the program.

Program Requirements OTA 101 Conditions in Occupational Therapy. . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 OTA 110 OT in the Health Care System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 OTA 111 Applied Therapeutic Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 OTA 112 Functional Movement & Kinesiology . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 OTA 113 Adaptive Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 OTA 120 Professional Communication & Behavior. . . . . . . . . 3 OTA 121 Principles of Occupational Therapy: Physical Disabilities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 OTA 122 Principles & Practice of OT in Mental Health. . . . . . 5 OTA 123 Fieldwork, Level 1 – Physical Disabilities. . . . . . . . . 1 OTA 124 Seminar I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 OTA 210 Fundamentals of OT in Pediatrics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 OTA 212 Fieldwork, Level 1 – Pediatrics/Mental Health. . . . 1 OTA 213 Seminar II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 OTA 214 Neurocognitive Aspects of Daily Life . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 OTA 220 Fundamentals of OT: Older Adults. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 OTA 222 Seminar III. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 OTA 221 Fieldwork Level 1 – Older Adults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 OTA 223 Health Promotion & Wellness in OT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 OTA 224 Occupational Therapy Assistant Capstone. . . . . . . . 4 OTA 230 Fieldwork, Level 2 Clinical Exper A. . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 OTA 231 Seminar IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 OTA 240 Fieldwork, Level 2 – Clinical Exper B. . . . . . . . . . . 10 OTA 241 Seminar V. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

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Physical Therapist Assistant

2

www.lwtech.edu/pta

Physical Therapist Assistant Associate of Applied Science Degree 92 credits

The Physical Therapist Assistant program at Lake Washington Institute of Technology is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE), 1111 North Fairfax Street, Alexandria, Virginia 22314; telephone: 703-706-3245; email: accreditation@apta.org; website: www.capteonline.org. Physical Therapist Assistant AAS degree graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒƒ perform safe, effective, and ethical entry-level physical therapy services under the direction and supervision of a physical therapist ƒƒ be prepared to engage in lifelong learning and career development as a physical therapist assistant in order to maintain industry competitiveness ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills ƒƒ meet Social Science, Humanities, Written Communication, and Quantitative Reasoning distribution area outcomes Admission to the PTA program is selective. In order to be considered for admission applicants must complete prerequisite courses with a GPA of 2.5 or higher and fulfill PTA program application requirements. 2 0 1 2 - 2 0 1 3

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Admission Dates: summer Prerequisites MEDA 116 Medical Terminology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BIOL& 175 Human Biology w/Lab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PHYS& 114 General Physics I w/Lab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ENGL& 101 English Composition I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 High School Diploma or GED Certificate HIV/AIDS Training Certificate (7 hr training) Completed Program Application Packet Program Requirements PTA 110 PTA Procedures I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PTA 120 Topics in Physical Therapy I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 PTA 130 Clinical Biomechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 PTA 141 Pathophysiology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 PTA 121 Topics in Physical Therapy II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 PTA 140 PTA Procedures II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 PTA 150 PTA Procedures III. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 PTA 160 PTA Procedures IV. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 PTA 170 PTA Procedures V. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 PTA 220 Clinical Affiliation I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 PTA 230 Seminar I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 PTA 122 Topics in Physical Therapy III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 PTA 240 PTA Procedures VI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 PTA 250 PTA Procedures VII. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 PTA 221 Clinical Affiliation II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 PTA 222 Clinical Affiliation III. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 PTA 231 Seminar II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

Programs of Study

The Physical Therapist Assistant AAS degree prepares students to work as a PTA in a variety of settings including hospitals, long-term care facilities, outpatient clinics, pediatric facilities and home-health agencies. PTAs provide physical therapy interventions under the direction and supervision of a physical therapist to people of all ages with health-related conditions which limit their ability to move and perform functional activities in their daily lives. Students are trained in procedural interventions such as exercises for mobility, strength, balance or coordination, training for functional activities, therapeutic massage, and the use of modalities and physical agents. Students are trained in nonprocedural interventions such as communication, education, coordination of care and documentation. Clinical affiliations occur in a variety of off-campus settings.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

Academic Core Requirements – 15 CREDITS Quantitative Reasoning1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CMST& Oral Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PSYC& 100 General Psychology -ORPSYC& 200 Lifespan Psychology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 See page 15 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above. 1

Any Quantitative Reasoning course which has MATH 098 or MATH 099 as a prerequisite.

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Social & Human Services www.lwtech.edu/socialservices

Social & Human Services Associate of Applied Science Degree

Programs of Study

120 Credits

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Program Mission: The Social & Human Services AAS degree provides the generalist education for employment in a wide variety of social service agencies. The student will develop the professional values, skills, and knowledge to assist individuals and groups with personal, interpersonal, and situational problems. In this occupational area students will be prepared for employment as case managers in rehabilitation, employment services, corrections, educational programs, and community based organizations serving youth, seniors, and individuals with disabilities. Social & Human Services AAS degree graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared for a wide range of entry level positions in the social services field ƒƒ demonstrate highly effective communication skills with clients, both verbally and in writing ƒƒ apply theoretical psychological frameworks to client thoughts and behaviors ƒƒ maintain ultimate confidentiality of all client information ƒƒ employ advanced helping skills acquired from two community internships ƒƒ gather client information for social history and intake file ƒƒ facilitate client groups and effectively resolve conflicts ƒƒ interact with clients and coworkers with cultural mindfulness ƒƒ remain current with a variety of documentation processes and software ƒƒ assist clients in developing alternative strategies and informed choices for solving interpersonal problems ƒƒ guide clients to become aware of underlying issues impacting their behavior ƒƒ encourage client development of self-advocacy skills and techniques ƒƒ identify crises, diffuse immediate situation while following the protocol for referral and reporting ƒƒ Interview, assess, and appropriately refer clients to community resources ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills 2 0 1 2 - 2 0 1 3

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ƒƒ collaborate with clients and other service providers according to the professional code of ethics ƒƒ meet Social Science, Humanities, Written Communication, and Quantitative Reasoning distribution area outcomes Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring Program Requirements PSYC 099 Human Relations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PSYC& 100 General Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PSYC& 200 Lifespan Psychology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PSYC& 220 Abnormal Psychology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SHSV 110 Intro to Social & Human Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SHSV 120 Case Management & Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SHSV 130 Therapeutic Approaches & Techniques. . . . . . . . . . . 5 SHSV 136 Issues in Aging: Boomers & Beyond. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SHSV 138 Field Practicum I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SHSV 140 Disability Issues & Practice. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SHSV 142 Behavioral Health & Wellness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SHSV 146 Leadership Development & Ethics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SHSV 210 Group Process & Dynamics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SHSV 212 Intro to Chemical Dependency. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SHSV 218 Field Practicum II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SHSV 220 Advanced Therapeutic Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SHSV 222 Multicultural Counseling. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SHSV 238 Field Practicum III. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SOC& 101 Intro to Sociology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Electives – 10 CREDITS Up to 10 additional credits of which all must be in college-level courses as defined by the technical institute or as accepted as fully transferrable as defined by the state system. Academic Core Requirements – 20 credits Social Science (included in required courses). . . . . . Written Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Humanities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 See page 15 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Programs of Study

Social & Human Services

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www.lwtech.edu/socialservices

Social & Human Services Certificate of Proficiency 75 Credits

Social & Human Services certificate graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared for a wide range of entry level positions in the social services field ƒƒ apply historical development of social services to today’s delivery system ƒƒ define and incorporate terminology of the helping professions ƒƒ create and maintain current network of community agencies and staff ƒƒ initiate intake interview and assess client needs ƒƒ interact with clients using helping skills in an on-campus field practicum ƒƒ record, collect and compile client data using documentation system of the agency ƒƒ maintain ultimate confidentiality of all client information ƒƒ appreciate unique needs of targeted populations, e.g. disability, seniors, chemically dependent ƒƒ research and peer reviewed literature to prepare grant proposals ƒƒ outreach to potential clients to increase awareness of available services ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills

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Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring Program Requirements PSYC& 100 General Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PSYC& 200 Lifespan Psychology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SHSV 110 Intro to Social & Human Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SHSV 120 Case Management & Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SHSV 130 Therapeutic Approaches/Techniques. . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SHSV 136 Issues in Aging: Boomers & Beyond. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SHSV 138 Field Practicum I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SHSV 140 Disability Issues & Practice. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SHSV 142 Behavioral Health & Wellness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SHSV 146 Leadership Development & Ethics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SOC& 101 Intro to Sociology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Programs of Study

The Social & Human Services certificate provides the generalist education for employment in a wide variety of social service agencies. The student will develop the professional values, skills, and knowledge to assist individuals and groups with personal, interpersonal, and situational problems. In this occupational area students will be prepared for employment as case managers in rehabilitation, employment services, corrections, educational programs, and community based organizations serving youth, seniors, and individuals with disabilities.

Electives – 5 CREDITS Up to 5 additional credits of which all must be in college-level courses as defined by the technical institute or as accepted as fully transferrable as defined by the state system. Academic Core Requirements – 15 credits Social Science (PSYC 099). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Written Communication (ENGL 100). . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 See page 16 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Programs of Study

Social & Human Services www.lwtech.edu/socialservices

Language Interpreting Services Certificate of Completion

Programs of Study

16 credits

The Language Interpreting Services certificate prepares students for the DSHS screening examination in medical and social services language interpreting. Students will learn interpreter terminology, grammatical skills and professional ethics needed for successful employment in the high demand occupation of language interpreting. Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring Program Requirements SHSV 110 Introduction to Social & Human Services. . . . . . . . . 5 SHSV 112 Exploring Medical Interpreting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 SHSV 114 Exploring Social Service Interpreting . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 SHSV 222 Multicultural Counseling. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

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Welding Technology

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www.lwtech.edu/welding

Welding Technology Associate of Applied Science Degree 95 Credits

Students receive in-depth knowledge of the nature of metals as it relates to welding, fabricating, and the application of heat. Students also prepare to take the Washington Association of Building Officials (WABO) certification test.

TECHNICAL ELECTIVES – 30 CREDITS* *Instructor permission required STRUCTURAL AND PLATE WELDING FOCUS WELD 201 Shielded Metal Arc Pipe Welding. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 WELD 202 Gas Tungsten Arc Pipe Welding. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 WELD 203 Layout and Fabrication Techniques. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 WELD 204 WABO Test Prep and Weld Testing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

Welding Technology AAS degree graduates will: ƒƒ be prepared for a range of entry-level positions as welder apprentices, welders, welder fabricators, welding fitters ƒƒ be prepared to succeed on the WABO certification and similar industry exams ƒƒ demonstrate proficiency in most major industrial welding and cutting processes common in the construction, manufacturing, maintenance, shipbuilding, and aerospace industries. ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills ƒƒ meet Social Science, Humanities, Written Communication, and Quantitative Reasoning distribution area outcomes

PIPE WELDING FOCUS WELD 201 Shielded Metal Arc Pipe Welding. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 WELD 202 Gas Tungsten Arc Pipe Welding. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 WELD 203 Layout and Fabrication Techniques. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 WELD 205 Advanced Pipe Welding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 AEROSPACE/GTAW MANUFACTURING FOCUS WELD 202 Gas Tungsten Arc Pipe Welding. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 WELD 203 Layout and Fabrication Techniques. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 WELD 220 Advanced Das Tungsten Arc Welding I. . . . . . . . . . . 8 WELD 221 Advanced Das Tungsten Arc Welding II. . . . . . . . . . . 7

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring

Programs of Study

Program Requirements WELD 101 Oxy/Acetylene Cutting & Welding. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 WELD 102 Shielded Metal Arc Welding. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 WELD 103 Flux Core Arc Welding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 WELD 104 Gas Metal Arc Welding. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 WELD 105 Gas Tungsten Arc Welding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 WELD 106 Carbon Arc, Plasma, & Oxy-Acetylene Cutting. . . . 8

Program Mission: The Welding Technology AAS degree provides students with skills to weld and fabricate complex projects.

WELDING FABRICATION FOCUS WELD 203 Layout and Fabrication Techniques. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 WELD 204 WABO Test Prep and Weld Testing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 WELD 230 Metal Forming I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 WELD 231 Metal Forming II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Academic Core Requirements – 20 Credits Written Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Humanities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 See page 15 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Welding Technology www.lwtech.edu/welding

Welding Technology Certificate of Proficiency

Programs of Study

75 Credits

Welding Technology certificate students learn welding skills used in construction projects, manufacturing, industrial plants, and in maintenance industries. Using the latest welding processes and techniques, students learn to read blueprints and fabricate products in a variety of shapes and sizes. Students prepare to take the Washington Association of Building Officials (WABO) test. Welding Technology certificate graduates will:

Program Requirements WELD 101 Oxy/Acetylene Cutting & Welding. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 WELD 102 Shielded Metal Arc Welding. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 WELD 103 Flux Core Arc Welding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 WELD 104 Gas Metal Arc Welding. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 WELD 105 Gas Tungsten Arc Welding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 WELD 106 Carbon Arc, Plasma, & Oxy-Acetylene Cutting. . . . 8 WELD 203 Layout and Fabrication Techniques. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 WELD 204 WABO Test Prep and Weld Testing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Academic Core Requirements – 15 credits Written Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

ƒƒ be prepared for a range of entry-level positions as welder apprentices, welders, welder fabricators, welding fitters ƒƒ demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills

Total program credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75

Lake Washington Institute of Technology does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with an adviser or counselor. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

See page 16 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

Admission Dates: summer, fall, winter, spring

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High School Programs

Lake Washington Technical Academy

To be eligible for Lake Washington Technical Academy, students must: ƒƒ Have a GPA at or above 2.0 ƒƒ Register and attend a HOP (High school Options) session ƒƒ Obtain a copy of high school transcript and bring to the HOP session ƒƒ Meet all other eligibility requirements (these will be covered at HOP session) Register for an information session by calling (425) 739-8107.

Running Start

Running Start is a program designed for high school juniors and seniors, who are ready for college-level work, want to take college-level courses, and want to receive both college and high school credit while completing high school. Admission to Lake Washington Institute of Technology for Running Start students requires the approval of the high school that the student attends, a 2.5 GPA in high school, and minimum COMPASS scores of 70 writing (English 100/101), and 39 pre-algebra (math 80 or meet the higher math requisite for the technical program). A reading score of 85 is recommended and is used for advising & placement. Some Running Start tuition is paid by the student’s local school district. Students are generally responsible for the balance and for course fees, textbooks and additional required course supplies. For information, contact the Running Start coordinator in the West Building, W210, or call (425) 739-8107.

Programs of Study

West Building, W210 (425) 739-8107 Lake Washington Technical Academy offers eligible high school junior and senior students, ages 16 to 21, the opportunity to train for a career and work toward a high school diploma. Students must be 16 years old or younger than 21 years old before September 1 to enter that academic year. Lake Washington Technical Academy is accredited by the Northwest Accreditation Commission and is a full-time high school program on the campus of Lake Washington Institute of Technology. Eligible students must enroll full-time in a technical training program and general education classes to complete the high school diploma.

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General Education Development

General Education Development (GED) is a series of five tests developed by the American Council on Education to enable persons to obtain the equivalency of a high school diploma. Earning a GED provides students with greater access to employment, advancement and higher education opportunities. The Academic Skills Center offers GED preparation classes and pre-tests. All students under the age of 19 will need to obtain a release from their school district to test for the GED. Two pieces of ID are required at the time of testing. The college is a designated testing center for GED exams. Testing appointments must be scheduled in advance either by visiting the Assessment Center, West Building, W204, or by calling (425) 739-8115. For more GED information, please visit www.lwtech.edu/assessment.

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High School Programs continued

Programs of Study

High School Completion

This is a program which allows students 18 years of age or older to take college-level classes to meet Washington state high school diploma requirements. The student must meet Washington State minimum graduation requirements. A five-credit college course equals one high school credit. Prospective students must submit an official high school transcript for evaluation, complete an admissions application and take at least one class at LWIT to qualify. This option is only recommended for students who need 1-3 classes to meet diploma requirements. Upon completion of all requirements, the student will be awarded an Adult High School completion diploma by Lake Washington Institute of Technology. Students age 21 or older who earn an associate degree from LWIT can be awarded the high school diploma without any additional requirements but must request the diploma in writing. For further information call (425) 739-8107 or visit our website at www.lwtech.edu/academy

International High School Completion Program

See page 129 for information on this program.

Tech Prep

Tech Prep is a partnership between Lake Washington Institute of Technology, the Northeast Tech Prep Consortium, and 27 high schools. This partnership allows students taking classes in a high school with courses that are articulated with Lake Washington Institute of Technology to receive college credit while attending their home high school.

Gateway to College

Lake Washington Institute of Technology has been selected to join a national network of community and technical colleges to offer Gateway to College, a national dropout recovery program originally developed by Portland Community College in Oregon. The Gateway to College program is for 16-20 year olds who have either dropped out of high school or on the verge of dropping out and are interested in returning to school and completing their high school diploma. Students simultaneously accumulate high school and college credits, earning their high school diploma while progressing toward a certificate, diploma, or associate degree. Students selected to participate in the Gateway to College program will receive a scholarship for tuition and books. Enrollment is limited. To be eligible for GTC students must: ƒƒ Have a GPA below 2.0 and be behind in high school credits for age and grade ƒƒ Be at least 16 years old but not yet 21 by September 1 to enter for the academic year ƒƒ Register and attend a HOP (high school options) session ƒƒ Obtain a copy of a high school transcript and bring to the HOP ƒƒ Meet all other eligibility requirements (these will be covered at the HOP) For more information or to register for a HOP session, call (425) 739-8107.

Northeast Tech Prep Consortium staff visit the high schools to enroll and register students in selected college courses. College credit is awarded to students who receive a B grade or higher in their high school courses. Students who have received Tech Prep credit and complete high school will be eligible to register as a continuing student at the college. For more information please see our website at www.lwtech.edu/techprep.

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Extended Learning

EXTENDED LEARNING

We understand that earning a college degree can be difficult with your busy schedule and obligations. We offer programs to fit your lifestyle. We provide you the opportunity to explore your learning style and help make the most of your education through a variety of innovative programs such as online courses, telecourses and hybrid courses. Extended Learning is comprised of: ƒƒ Continuing Education ƒƒ Corporate Education & Customized Training ƒƒ eLearning

CONTINUING EDUCATION

(425)739-8112 ce@lwtech.edu www.lwtech.edu/ce

Wherever you’re coming from and wherever you’re going in life, Lake Washington Institute of Technology has the classes and programs to get you there. Our role is to make high-quality education accessible to everyone, creating pathways for our students, and contributing to the economic development of our community. We offer a wide range of technical, cultural, educational, and social opportunities for adult lifelong learners in the community. Workforce development and personal enrichment courses are offered on-campus or at convenient locations. They can also be brought to your business or be taken online. Enroll in a course and receive pragmatic, relevant instruction that will put you ahead both personally and professionally.

Programs of Study

Extended Learning at Lake Washington Institute of Technology provides individuals with access to a variety of life-long learning opportunities for career change, career advancement, or personal growth. The office of Extended Learning focuses on developing partnerships with international academic institutions, governments, and corporations to provide opportunities for professional development and global engagement.

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Courses in accounting, business management, computers and computing, health and fitness, sewing, travel, and more offer working adults the opportunity to stay current in their fields, get the additional education they need to advance in their careers, or enrich their personal lives.

CORPORATE EDUCATION AND CUSTOMIZED TRAINING

Whether it is skill training, consultative services, credit based or non-credit based, we provide you with cost-effective workforce training solutions. We meet your needs for employee assessment, training, design and delivery of training and training products and services on campus or at your place of business.

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Extended Learning continued eLEARNING

Programs of Study

elearning@lwtech.edu At Lake Washington Institute of Technology, we understand that working professionals like you are busy and anxious to advance your education as quickly and conveniently as possible. That is why we offer over 445 courses in more than 20 subjects throughout the year through eLearning. LWIT is a member of Washington Online (WAOL), which includes 34 participating colleges that work together to provide the best online learning experiences to our students. eLearning programs gives you the flexibility to finish your degree or certificate from any location and at your own pace. The LWIT eLearning courses are taught through the Internet, allowing you to receive and submit assignments and interact with your instructors and classmates through your personal computer. You will receive excellent support from the program staff and faculty as well as the peer support from your classmates via online chats, emails, and other interactive means. The eLearning department at LWIT is committed to offering online courses that meet the same quality and outcomes standards as traditional on-campus classes. These classes require the same time commitment to the coursework but without the travel time. Whether you just want to take classes for personal fulfillment or to complete a certificate or degree, we can help you get started!

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Global Programs and Partnerships

INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS

East Building, E126 (425)739-8145 international.students@lwtech.edu

International students are welcome to enter the more than 100 degree and certificate programs at LWIT. International students can participate in and complete requirements for the Bachelor of Technology in Applied Design (BTAD) degree, Associate of Applied Science degrees, Certificates of Completion, or Certificates of Proficiency. (Additional application may be necessary for competitive admission programs after acceptance to LWIT.)

1. An international student application and application fee. 2. Copy of Passport information pages (visa and I-94 upon approval) 3. Proof of financial independence. Financial aid in the form of scholarships, loans, and grants is generally not available to international students, especially during the first quarter of attendance. The amount required for this document is subject to changes in tuition and fees.

Programs of Study

Lake Washington Institute of Technology is committed to providing an excellent educational experience for international students. We value the diversity of perspectives and experiences that international students bring to the college, and are dedicated to making the international student experience rewarding and memorable. International Programs provides international student orientation, workshops and seminars, highly personalized individual attention, and immigration and visa support. No TOEFL score is required.

The application and visa procurement process for international students may take as long as a quarter, so students should apply early. The priority application deadline is one quarter prior to the quarter of enrollment. Late applications are accepted and processed on a rolling basis. Every attempt is made to process application materials as quickly as possible. International students applying for an F1 or M1 visa must submit the following to the international program office:

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4. Official transcripts from all previous colleges attended.

LWIT provides many opportunities for international student involvement in campus activities. Leadership skills may be gained by participation in student government. We have a large and active International Club to enable students to connect with each other and the campus.

5. Results of the TOEFL exam taken during the past year with a score of 480 (Paper Based Test), 157 (Computer Based Test), or 54 (Internet Based Test) for admissions to professional-technical programs. Lower test scores or students without TOEFL scores will be considered for acceptance to the Intensive English Program. 6. Evidence of enrollment in an approved health insurance plan. Health plan options are available through the college at time of enrollment. 7. Other information as required.

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MAINTAINING IMMIGRATION STATUS

Programs of Study

The International Programs office will issue a Form I-20 form to the student, following acceptance to the college. Additionally, international students must: 1. Meet all general admission requirements. 2. Agree to comply with all college regulations. 3. Agree to attend all quarters on a full-time basis as prescribed by Lake Washington Institute of Technology and U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Credit loads may vary depending on program requirements. 4. Maintain grade point average and credit completion requirements necessary for graduation and to remain in status. 5. Agree to file a yearly tax return with the United States Internal Revenue Service.

Certain professional-technical programs have specific admissions requirements, such as minimum test scores, satisfactory performance in prerequisite courses, and other screening criteria. Enrollment Services and the instructional divisions have current program admissions requirements. Applicants pursuing transfer to a bachelor’s program or full-time English Language training must apply for an F1 visa.

TUITION COSTS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS

Non-resident tuition is charged to the following visa holders: B, C, F, H, J, and M. Documentation of visa status is established by Enrollment Services. Refer to the current tuition schedule for costs. The college may enter into contract training with other organizations and establish a different rate of tuition or fees in some cases.

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Our International Programs office can recommend local organizations that will assist international students with housing. Contact Information: Global Programs and Partnerships International Programs Lake Washington Institute of Technology 11605 132nd Avenue NE Kirkland, WA 98034 Telephone: (425) 739-8145 Fax: (425) 739-8148 international.students@lwtech.edu www.lwtech.edu/international

The following visa holders are eligible for resident tuition: A, E, G, I, K, E3, H1, and those who hold a lawful non-immigrant status such as a spouse or child of a person with an E3, H1 or L visa.

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For one quarter (3 months): Tuition (15 credits) $3,055.00 Cost of living $2,750.00 Other (books, etc) $200.00 Mandatory medical insurance $225.00 Total $6,230.00 For three quarters (9 months): Tuition (15 credits) $9,165.00 Cost of living $8,250.00 Other (books, etc) $600.00 Mandatory medical insurance $675.00 Total $18,690.00

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ESTIMATED COSTS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS INCLUDE (2012–2013 ESTIMATES IN USD):

International students are required to inform the International Programs office of change of address immediately to stay in status. A Change of Address Form must be completed and submitted online to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). Lake Washington Institute of Technology’s International Programs office can assist with any questions you may have.

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STUDENT INSURANCE INFORMATION

The LWIT insurance provider is Lewer-Mark. Lewer-Mark insurance is $225 per quarter this academic year for students. Additional insurance for your dependent children or spouse can be purchased as well. Insurance payment is always due the first day of the quarter. The coverage dates are the first day of the quarter to the day before the next quarter so you will always be covered. If you choose not to buy insurance from LWIT, you will need to bring in proof of insurance that is valid for the whole quarter on or before the first day of the quarter. If you do not bring in proof of insurance that is valid the whole quarter, you will be automatically enrolled in LWIT insurance and will be charged the full $225. Information about your insurance policy can be found online at www.lewermark.com. With this policy, you have access to the 24 hour Nurse Line: 866-549-5076 for free medical advice. They have translators available in your native language.

INTERNATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL COMPLETION PROGRAM

Complete high school and college requirements at the same time! To be eligible for the International High School Completion program, students must be: ƒƒ 16 years old - OR ƒƒ a junior or senior in high school, but have not graduated. To earn the Washington State High School Diploma students will be required to complete the state graduation requirements. College classes will count towards high school graduation requirements, and most will count towards both an associate degree AND the high school requirements.

Programs of Study

International students are required to have medical insurance the whole time they study at LWIT—including during periods of Optional Practical Training. LWIT allows students to provide their own insurance, or purchase insurance at LWIT. Medical insurance does not include dental coverage, but additional insurance plans just for dental can be purchased through Smart Smile.

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Students with TOEFL scores 54 (Internet Based), 157 (Computer Based) or 480 (Paper Based) will be admitted directly into academic level classes. Students without TOEFL scores will take placement tests at LWIT. Some intensive English classes may be required before admission into academic classes. Students in the International High School Completion Program will: ƒƒ Submit official transcripts of high school classes (in English) with the application. ƒƒ Take all required classes and tests for the state high school requirements. ƒƒ Live with a relative or host family until the age of 18. ƒƒ Take a minimum of 15 credits each quarter. Non-resident tuition rates will apply. Other fees, including medical insurance and books are not included. For more information please contact: Global Programs and Partnerships International Programs Office East Building, E126 (425) 739-8145 international.students@lwtech.edu www.lwtech.edu/international

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Support Services for Students Advising

CLEP

Support Services

West Building, W207 (425)739-8300 advising@lwtech.edu www.lwtech.edu/advising As part of the college’s focus on student success we provide advisers to help each student understand placement tests, determine academic readiness in math and English, and help select appropriate classes. An adviser can help any student determine degree and certificate requirements, a sequence of courses, and select general education courses. During your first appointment with an adviser, please discuss the transfer of any other college credits. Quality planning will help each student select the right program and the right classes at the right time. Students planning to apply for the Bachelor of Technology in Applied Design (BTAD) or any Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree or certificate should meet with an adviser to review degree planning steps and degree requirements, degree progress, and to complete the college admissions application. Advisers can refer students to an array of college services designed to support student success. It remains the responsibility of each student to plan for program completion including degree requirements, certificate requirements, and transfer requirements. Early meetings with an adviser will make certain that educational plans stay on target.

Assessment West Building, W204 (425) 739-8115 www.lwtech.edu/assessment A variety of assessments are offered to both students and the community. PLACEMENT TESTING

The college requires COMPASS placement testing for enrollment in English, math and many technical and academic classes. Students pursuing a degree or certificate must take the compass test before enrolling.

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Students working towards an AAS degree may earn college credits by taking a computer-based College Level Examination Program (CLEP) exam. Check with an adviser for CLEP eligible courses. A passing score earns credit only-not a grade. CLEP scores do not impact GPA. GED

The college offers General Education Development (GED) in English and Spanish. TEAS

Dental Hygiene, Nursing and other allied health programs require the TEAS test as part of the admission process. MOS & MCAS

The college runs an authorized certification testing center for Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) and Microsoft Certified Applications Specialist (MCAS). VOCATIONAL ASSESSMENT

Selecting a career and an appropriate training program are major life decisions. Whether it is your first time in the employment field or you are changing careers, you are making an investment with both your time and money. Make sure it is the right decision before you start training! To assist you in your career exploration, the Employment Resource Center at Lake Washington Institute of Technology offers a free Career Choice Workshop. Explore your interests, research current occupational information and learn about resources to assist you in exploring your career options. Additional interest and personality assessments are available on an individual basis. Contact the Employment Resource Center at (425) 739-8113 for more information.

Counseling West Building, W207 (425) 739-8300 Counselors can assist students with educational, career, or personal needs so students can successfully complete their college training. Short-term counseling services are confidential and available at no charge to students. The emphasis is on providing support to students, teaching new coping skills, and accessing community resources. Counselors work with community agencies and organizations. When appropriate they make referrals to other agencies to support the student. I N S T I T U T E

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Disability Support Services West Building, W207 (425) 739-8300 TDD: (425) 739-8109 dssinfo@lwtech.edu www.lwtech.edu/dss The college is committed to providing support services to students with disabilities in compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. Students who need assistance should make an appointment with the Disability Support Services office by calling (425) 739-8300, in person in room W207, or via email at dssinfo@lwtech.edu.

TRiO Student Support Services Projects West Building, 207N (425) 739-8361 TRiO Student Support Services (SSS) Project: Provides academic support for eligible first-generation and/or low-income students

To be eligible for TRiO Projects, you must: ƒƒ Be a citizen, national, or permanent resident of the United States. ƒƒ Be enrolled or accepted for enrollment at LWIT and in a technical program ƒƒ Be a first-generation and/or low-income student OR be a student registered with LWIT Disability Support Services. (A student is considered first-generation if neither parent – or the custodial parent – has a bachelor’s degree.)

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All services are through grants from the U.S. Department of Education. However, the contents have not been reviewed by the Department and no endorsement should be inferred. The Lake Washington Institute of Technology Student Support Services TRiO Projects are 100% federally funded annually at $444,522.00

Worker Retraining

Services may include tuition assistance, books, and educational planning, as well as the development of an individual training plan.

WorkFirst Programs West Building, W207 (425) 739-8339 or (425) 739-8131 WorkFirst is an innovative partnership involving the college, the Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS), Employment Security Department (ESD), community-based organizations, business and labor.

Support Services

LWIT’s two Student Support Services Projects are federally funded and established for the purpose of assisting eligible students in achieving their postsecondary ambitions. Students are encouraged to complete their associate degree or certificate program and, whenever feasible, transfer to a 4-year institution. TRiO provides supportive services such as tutoring, learning labs, academic counseling, educational planning, study skills workshops, transfer, career planning, financial education, scholarship workshops and counseling.

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ƒƒ Be able to meet the need for academic services criteria as established by LWIT’s TRiO Projects. ƒƒ Complete a TRiO application packet and entry interview. ƒƒ Be able to meet with TRiO staff at least three times per quarter. Applications are available in W207N or by calling (425) 739-8361 or (425) 739-8353.

West Building, W207 (425) 739-8206 worker.retraining@lwtech.edu The college provides special services to people who have been laid off from work, are displaced homemakers, or were self-employed and are now unemployed.

TRiO Support Services for Students with Disabilities (SSSD) Project: Provides academic support for eligible students with documented disabilities

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The goal of WorkFirst is to assist TANF families, through training and basic education, to move permanently off all forms of public assistance and to become self-sufficient. There are a number of options within the WorkFirst program to help families attain this goal. TANF families may be eligible for: ƒƒ Tuition and books ƒƒ Individualized support to reach their goals ƒƒ Educational and career planning ƒƒ Job search assistance and resources

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The Opportunity Grant Program

by a partnership between the college, the Associated Student Government, and representatives from community-based organizations.

West Building, W207 (425) 739-8100, x8448 opportunitygrant@lwtech.edu

Services include: ƒƒ An extensive list of current job postings. ƒƒ Career Services Online-Search for current jobs, apply online and post your résumé. ƒƒ Job search resources and assistance. ƒƒ Career exploration workshops and resources. ƒƒ Résumé, interview and networking assistance. ƒƒ Computer, fax, copy machine and phone are available to assist in job search. ƒƒ On-campus employer recruiting opportunities and information on local job fairs.

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Support Services

The Opportunity Grant is designed to help low income students in high demand pathways to reach their educational and employment goals. Students in the Opportunity Grant program may receive: ƒƒ Tuition and fees for up to 45 credits or up to 3 years, which ever comes first. ƒƒ Up to $1,000.00 per academic year for books and related supplies. ƒƒ Support services, academic advising, and career planning from an Opportunity Grant adviser. ƒƒ Job search assistance and resources

JOB SEARCH ASSISTANCE IN THE CLASSROOM The training programs at Lake Washington Institute of Technology are practical and reality-based, relying on strong ties between industry and faculty. Job-search methods, including interviewing techniques, résumé writing, and application methods, are taught in the classroom specific to the type of industry or skill that is being learned. Instructors assist students in looking for work using industry-specific job-search methods.

JOB SEARCH ASSISTANCE IN THE EMPLOYMENT RESOURCE CENTER West Building, W207 (425) 739-8113 www.lwtech.edu/erc The Employment Resource Center offers career exploration and job search assistance to students, alumni, and community members. The center is staffed

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Eligibility guidelines for Opportunity Grant include: ƒƒ Low income as determined by the FAFSA and 12-13 income guidelines. ƒƒ Washington resident for at least 1 year. ƒƒ Must be in Business, Accounting, Healthcare or I-BEST programs.

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East Building, E128 (425) 739-8108 Fax: (425) 576-0033 www.lwtech.edu/bookstore The bookstore sells textbooks for all classes. If you are considering textbook rental, we rent many titles, both in physical and digital form. Some digital titles are for sale as well. In addition, the bookstore stocks course related supplies such as notebooks, binders, software, and class required kits. Most course related items are available on our website, enter www.bkstr.com, and then follow directions to LWIT Bookstore. Web orders can be shipped or picked up in the store. Store hours are posted on the website and in quarterly class schedules. The store also stocks snacks, chips, sodas, energy drinks, candy, gum, and sundries.

EARLY LEARNING CENTER South Portable, S2 (425) 739-8117 or 739-8565 www.lwtech.edu/elc Convenient, quality care is available at the campus Early Learning Center for children from age 18 months through six years. Children receive an active, stimulating program that encourages learning through experience and accomplishment. Funding programs are accepted. Please call to register a child.

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DENTAL CLINIC

ACADEMIC SKILLS CENTER

East Building, E107 (425) 739-8130 www.lwtech.edu/dentalclinic Students receive quality dental care at a low cost in the college’s modern, fully equipped dental clinic. Licensed dentists are available by appointment to provide a wide range of dental procedures. The clinic provides students in the dental assisting and dental hygiene programs with a practical experience environment. Please call to make an appointment.

Technology Center, T217 (425) 739-8656 If you need help in keeping up with your classes or require remedial assistance before proceeding into a program, the Academic Skills Center is the place to go. Open to all college students on a walk-in or teacherreferral basis, the Center offers a variety of services to assist you in becoming a self-sufficient learner. Services include: ƒƒ Adult Basic Education ƒƒ English as a Second Language ƒƒ Math Lab ƒƒ Tutoring Center and eTutoring ƒƒ Writing Center

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library – LEARNING COMMONS Technology Center, T213 (425) 739-8320 www.lwtech.edu/library The Library – Learning Commons at Lake Washington Institute of Technology offers a comfortable, flexible learning space for active learning, research, multi-media presentations, and working on collaborative projects. We combine traditional library services, academic support services, faculty development, and technology services in one location. In addition we offer: ƒƒ Academic Skills Center (Adult Basic Education, ESL Math Lab, Tutoring Center, and Writing Center) ƒƒ Online databases, available on and off campus ƒƒ Computers ƒƒ DVDs ƒƒ Local, regional, national and international newspapers ƒƒ Learning studios, conference, and study rooms

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Programs are designed to meet the specific needs of individuals at no fee.

TEACHING and LEARNING CENTER The TLC is dedicated to the professional development of our faculty and staff. Our class offerings are designed to further develop the pedagogical and the technology skills needed in today’s classroom. The TLC also prepares faculty for professional/vocational certification, and the AAS-T degree.

Parking The college provides free parking facilities for visitors and students in both day and evening programs. Parking is not allowed along roadways or traffic lanes.

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Students have several choices on campus for snacks and meals. Nutritious, quality food service is available in the cafeteria, offering well-balanced entrees daily as well as beverages and snacks. In addition, the college operates a training restaurant for students in the Culinary Arts program. It is open to the public for full meal service. Hours of operation in the food service programs are shorter during the summer quarter. Vending machines for snacks and beverages are also available on campus.

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Designated spaces are available for disabled persons who display a state-issued parking sticker. For a carpool parking permit application form, please visit the Safety & Security Office in the East Building, 1st floor, room E145.

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Safety and Security

Student Protections

Your safety and security are taken seriously at the college. Trained college security and commissioned Kirkland police officers patrol the campus and are available for assistance and criminal investigations during the following: Mon–Thu 7:30am–10:30pm Sat 7:30am–12:30pm Fri 7:30am–7pm Sun 7am–12pm Information provided by law enforcement agencies concerning registered sex offenders attending the college may be obtained from the Vice President of Student Services office.

No one in the college community shall suffer recrimination or discrimination because of participation in the due process grievance procedure. Confidentiality will be observed pending resolution. A grievance shall be considered resolved if timelines are not maintained.

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CRIME STATISTICS FOR 2011*:

Murder/Non-negligent manslaughter Forcible sex offenses (incl. forcible rape) Nonforcible sex offenses Robbery Aggravated assault Burglary Motor vehicle theft Arson Negligent manslaughter Simple assault Thefts Hate Crimes–Gender

0 cases reported 0 cases reported 0 cases reported 0 cases reported 0 cases reported 0 cases reported 2 cases reported 0 cases reported 0 cases reported 0 cases reported 10 cases reported 1 case reported 0 case reported

Drug law violations

2 cases reported

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0 case reported

HARASSMENT

If you believe you have been subjected to harassment by anyone on campus or at an off-campus event, you may report it to the Vice President of Student Services at (425) 739-8102 or the Executive Director of Human Resources at (425) 739-8251. Your concerns will be promptly investigated and you will not suffer retaliation for reporting your concerns.

Additional information can be found on our website at www.lwtech.edu/safety. *Data available at the time of publication.

Smoking

STUDENT COMPLAINTS If you believe you have been treated unfairly or wronged in some way, you should take the following steps: ƒƒ Try to resolve the issue with the person involved ƒƒ Talk to the person’s direct supervisor ƒƒ Request an appeal through the appropriate Vice President 136

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Lake Washington Institute of Technology has special expectations regarding the conduct of those involved in the college community. Students are expected to comply with the college student conduct code, WAC 495D-121, and failure to do so may result in disciplinary actions, up to and including expulsion from the college. The student conduct code is available in the student handbook, on the college website and in the college Policy and Procedure Manual located in the library.

Harassment is unacceptable, against the law, and will not be tolerated on campus or at any off-campus events. The college strictly forbids harassment based on types of unlawful discrimination such as race, national origin, sex, marital status, sexual orientation, age, religion, disability, or veteran status. Sexual harassment is defined as unwelcome verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature that may offend the recipient, cause discomfort, or humiliation and interfere with school or job performance.

Arrests/Disciplinary Actions/Judicial Referrals: Liquor law violations

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Smoking on campus is not a right. LWIT is a smoke-free campus; however, the college nonetheless recognizes the privilege of personal choice. Smoking on campus is limited to the following areas ONLY—the fenced areas on the west and east wings of the East Building (facing north), the North parking lot, the South parking lot, the West parking lot, the Horticulture (SW) parking lot, and the Tech Building outside parking lot (outside parking area only).

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Student Life Although Washington state law prohibits smoking within 25 feet of any campus building entry door, window, or building air intake, smoking is prohibited on ALL fire lanes, campus roads, and sidewalks. Do not litter the grounds with cigarette or cigar butts; put all cigarette and cigar butts in ashtrays provided for that purpose. Failure to comply with LWIT smoking regulations may result in student conduct code violations.

The Kirkland campus is conveniently located on Metro bus route 238. The Redmond campus is located on Metro bus route 253 and on ST Express Bus 545.

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Associated Student Government www.lwtech.edu/studentlife “To enhance the student experience by planning activities and providing representation to build a feeling of community.” An active student government at LWIT provides excellent leadership opportunities for students as well as a forum for student issues. Student government consists of an Executive Board with a President, Vice President, Records Officer, Finance Officer, and a Public Relations Officer. All officer positions are open each year for selection in spring quarter. Check with Student Programs for those opportunities.

ASG Committees Throughout the year ASG looks for students to serve on various college committees, including College Council and faculty tenure committees. Other committees include: ASG Budget, Elections and Activities and Marketing.

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Any student may charter a club, through the Student Programs office. Clubs offer leadership and learning opportunities by being involved with college business and student government. Many clubs are funded through ASG with the services and activities fee paid through student tuition. Meetings are open to all. For more information, contact the Student Programs office.

Services & Activities Fee The ASG and college trustees annually approve a per credit services and activities fee. Among other things, these fees make up the student government budget which is used to fund clubs, meetings, conferences, lectures, student employment, childcare services and emergency grants for students. Please take advantage of these and more opportunities by getting involved. For more information, contact the Student Programs office.

Student ID Cards Photo identification cards are available at no extra charge for currently enrolled students at the Enrollment Services office in West Building room 201, during posted hours. ID cards serve as the Library card and give access to the Academic Skills Center. To receive an ID card bring picture identification, student identification number, and a current class schedule copy. Cards are valid throughout enrollment, up to 2 years. If an ID card is lost, a replacement fee of $2 will apply.

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East Building, 214 (425) 739-8314 There are many ways to be involved in student life at the college. Representing student issues by being a student government officer, joining or starting a club, or being involved with an academic program are some ways students can get involved. Student Programs houses several components of student life including ASG, student clubs, club lockers, sponsorship of various campus activities, leadership development and the student lounges.

ASG Sponsored Student Activities To fulfill their mission of supporting campus activities to build a feeling of community, ASG sponsors a variety of student oriented activities throughout the year. Look for advertisements on fliers or the website. Different activities have been: social activities, charitable events, speakers, leadership and skill-based workshops.

Student Clubs

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Student Email Currently enrolled students may request a free email account for academic and personal use. To sign up for an account, go to the Library circulation desk T213. Students may access the account from any computer with internet access, including computers in the Library and Computer Lab.

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Admissions Extended Learning

West Building 201 (425) 739-8104 admissions@lwtech.edu Admission to Lake Washington Institute of Technology (LWIT) is open to anyone who: ƒƒ has a high school diploma, or ƒƒ General Education Development (GED) certificate - OR ƒƒ is at least 18 years old and is able to benefit from the college’s curriculum

People interested in personal enrichment, college workshops and customized training, non-degree or non-certificate programs or learning assistance programs are not required to apply for admission, except as previously stated for accumulated credits.

High School Programs

An application for admission should be submitted to Enrollment Services by prospective students who seek a degree or certificate, or enroll in 15 or more credits in a given quarter, or have a total of 25 cumulative college-level credits at LWIT. The application is available online at our website, www.lwtech.edu. Additionally, applications may be found in our Enrollment Services Office either by calling the college at (425) 739-8104, or by emailing admissions@lwtech.edu. To assure the highest quality education and training, the number of students who may enroll in a program may be limited. Admission to the college does not guarantee that all classes or all programs can accept new students. Because of the demand for programs, those interested in attending the college are encouraged to apply early.

Enrollment Services

Some programs, such as Dental Hygiene, Nursing, and Physical Therapist Assistant have additional procedures and requirements that must be met before enrollment. Enrollment Services will inform students if this is the case.

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The lowest age eligible for admission is 18 unless the student possesses a high school diploma or GED. Students who qualify as high school juniors or seniors are referred to the Lake Washington Technical Academy or Running Start to explore eligibility through those programs. If a student is not participating in these programs and wishes to register for a course at the college that is not specifically designed for a younger student, he/she may be considered in cases of exceptional circumstances. Persons requesting this exception consideration must be at least 14 years of age and in the ninth grade at the time of enrollment at the college. The student must request special enrollment for each course, each quarter. This does not constitute admission to the college. Please contact the high school programs office at (425) 739-8107 for more information.

Degree- Or Certificate-Seeking Students Lake Washington Institute of Technology requires that persons seeking admission to a degree or certificate program of study demonstrate their ability to perform entry-level reading, writing and math skills before enrolling in a technical training program by completing a placement assessment. Additional testing in math, reading, writing, and listening skills for Adult Basic Education and English as a Second Language (ESL) placement is administered by the basic skills program using a different assessment tool. The purpose of these placement tests is to assess each student’s academic strengths and weaknesses, help determine proper course placement and to determine possible learning needs before enrollment. Test results are used by students and advisers to select appropriate basic skill, academic and technical courses.

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An official college transcript indicating satisfactory completion with a 2.0 or better in English and/or math from an accredited college may be accepted in lieu of the placement tests. An evaluation of official transcripts from an accredited college may also result in transfer of other college credits to Lake Washington Institute of Technology. Students must submit official copies of transcripts from all former colleges to Enrollment Services for an official evaluation. The college requires a minimum placement score in English and/or math for enrollment in many technical courses and programs. Placement score requirements for English, math and technical programs are available in student services, and the student assessment center where tests are administered.

Students who place into Adult Basic Education (ABE) or English as Second Language (ESL) classes must satisfactorily complete those courses at an appropriate level before enrolling in a technical program or college level course that has basic skill minimum requirements. Students who have not completed courses or placement tests in all subject areas (math, English) need to be tested or have placement scores in those areas for appropriate placement into courses. Placement assessment tests are administered regularly at no charge. Drop in and scheduled times are posted at the assessment center or on the assessment center Web page.

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If you have completed classes at other colleges or universities, transferring credit to LWIT may help you complete requirements here. The easiest way to transfer your credits is to contact the transcript office of your previous college(s), and have your official (sealed) transcripts sent to: Lake Washington Institute of Technology Enrollment Services 11605 132nd Avenue NE Kirkland WA 98034

Transferring Courses to LWIT from International Institutions Students who wish to transfer courses from institutions outside of the United States will need to have a course-by-course evaluation of their transcripts performed by an international credential evaluation agency. A list of agencies is available online. Once the agency evaluation is complete, submit the officially sealed evaluation along with an English translation of your international transcript to Enrollment Services W201 (see address above). A copy of your transcript will be made and the original will be returned to you. In order to match courses with specific LWIT courses, students may be required to obtain course descriptions in addition to submitting the agency evaluation.

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Note: If you would like to go over your transcripts with an adviser, bring the sealed transcripts or an unofficial copy to room W207. An adviser will unofficially evaluate your credits. Based on this unofficial evaluation, the adviser can help you choose your classes.

Exceptions to the published requisite scores for enrollment into specific courses and, in extraordinary cases, programs of study are made by the Dean(s) of the area of study or designee.

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Admissions continued Transfer Credit Process

Advanced Placement

Enrollment Services Staff will evaluate your transcript based on your current program of study, specifically looking for courses that satisfy LWIT Academic Core requirements (see the note below for the types of courses that can transfer to satisfy Academic Core requirements) and/or prerequisite requirements for one of our Selective Admissions Programs (BTAD, Dental Hygiene, Physical Therapist Assistant, and Nursing.)

Students who complete college-level work in high school may receive credit at LWIT based on scores on the Advanced Placement examination administered by the College Board. In most subject areas credit is awarded for scores of 3.0 or higher. Information on transfer credit awarded for AP exams can be found online.

Due to high demand for evaluation services students are encouraged to submit official transcripts at the time they apply to LWIT. Evaluation results will be available 2-4 weeks after the receipt of official transcripts. The total number of credits transferred in and the institution from which the credits were transferred from will be posted to your LWIT transcript. The results of the evaluation can be viewed by running a degree audit (SID and PIN required) for your current program of study.

CLEP provides students the opportunity to earn college credit for knowledge obtained in non-traditional settings (self study, job training, internships, personal interest, etc.) Additional information about CLEP exams can be found at the College Board. Information about taking CLEP exams at LWIT and transfer credit award can be found online: www.lwtech.edu/assessment

International Baccalaureate Lake Washington Institute of Technology recognizes the International Baccalaureate (IB) program as a challenging course of study and responds individually to each participant’s request for award of college credit. Students may be awarded credit for completing individual areas of study within the IB program. IB students should submit official IB transcripts to the Enrollment Services office (W201). Information on transfer credit award for IB exams can be found on line.

Enrollment Services

If you would like to go over your transcripts with an adviser, bring the sealed transcripts or an unofficial copy to Student Development (W207). An adviser will unofficially evaluate your credits and help you with course selection. For additional information about advising, course selection, and creating an academic plan please visit our Advising page.

College-Level Examination Program (CLEP)

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Prior Learning Assessment Prior learning is the knowledge and skills gained through work and life experience; through military training and experience; and through formal and informal education and training from in-state and out-of-state institutions including foreign institutions. LWIT recognizes that students may come to the college with skills and knowledge acquired through work experience, some of which could meet regular credit course requirements. Identifying credit for prior learning can be accomplished by an assessment process conducted by qualified faculty and may result in a course or several courses being posted to your transcript. Current accreditation standards suggest that no more than 25% of the credits earned through the PLA process may be applied toward degrees or certificates. Credit for Prior Learning assessment and Credit by Examination are two processes students may follow to gain non-traditional credit. Forms are available in the appropriate dean’s office or you may contact Enrollment Services for more information.

Transferring Courses From LWIT General education and technical courses may transfer to other community and technical colleges or four-year universities. The receiving institution should be consulted to determine which courses will be accepted.

Transfer to The Evergreen State College Many of LWIT’s Associate of Applied Science degrees transfer to The Evergreen State College’s Upside Down Bachelor’s Degree program. For a complete list, please see the transfer website at www.lwtech.edu/transfer.

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The following AAS degrees are eligible for transfer to The Evergreen State College, provided students take one of the following academic courses as one of their required electives: ƒƒ Computer Security and Network Technician Technical electives accepted by Evergreen as academic credit: MMDP 113, 115, 135, 157, 201, 202, 234, 235, 236, 237, or 238. ƒƒ Dental Assisting Electives accepted by Evergreen as academic credit: (Note: students must take a 5-credit course to total 25 credits of general education): BIOL& 100, 175, 241, 242, 260; CHEM&121, 131; ENGL& 102; MATH& 107, 141, 146; PSYC& 100, 200; SOC& 101; SPAN& 121; CMST& 210, 220 or 230.

List of One Year Transfer Courses – “Washington 45” A student who completes courses selected from within the general education categories listed below at Lake Washington Institute of Technology will be able to transfer and apply a maximum of 35 quarter credits toward general education requirement(s) at any other public and most private higher education institutions in the state. For transfer purposes, a student must have a minimum grade of C or better (2.0 or above) in each course completed from this list. Students who transfer Washington 45 courses must still meet a receiving institution’s admission requirements and eventually satisfy all their general education requirements and their degree requirements in major, minor and professional programs. NOTE: The list of courses in Washington 45 does not replace the Direct Transfer Agreement or any Major Related Program agreement, nor will it guarantee admission to a four-year institution. For a list of First Year Transfer general education courses please visit www.lwtech.edu/washington45.

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Antioch University Seattle, Argosy University, Bastyr University, City University, DeVry University, ITT Technical Institute, Les Roches School of Hotel Management, University of Phoenix, Seattle Pacific University, Strayer University, the University of Washington–Bothell, and the University of Washington–Tacoma accept Associate of Applied Science degrees into specific baccalaureate programs. For more information, please refer to the transfer website at www.lwtech.edu/transfer.

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Transfer Rights & Responsibilities Student Rights and Responsibilities

College and University Rights and Responsibilities 1. Colleges and universities have the right and authority to determine program requirements and course offerings in accordance with their institutional missions. 2. Colleges and universities have the responsibility to communicate and publish their requirements and course offerings to students and the public, including information about student transfer rights and responsibilities. 3. Colleges and universities have the responsibility to communicate their admission and transfer related decisions to students in writing (electronic or paper).

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1. Students have the right to clear, accurate, and current information about their transfer admission requirements, transfer admission deadlines, degree requirements, and transfer policies that include course equivalencies. 2. Transfer and freshman-entry students have the right to expect comparable standards for regular admission to programs and comparable program requirements. 3. Students have the right to seek clarification regarding their transfer evaluation and may request the reconsideration of any aspect of that evaluation. In response, the college will follow established practices and processes for reviewing its transfer credit decisions. 4. Students who encounter other transfer difficulties have the right to seek resolution. Each institution will have a defined process for resolution that is published and readily available to students. 5. Students have the responsibility to complete all materials required for admission and to submit the application on or before the published deadlines. 6. Students have the responsibility to plan their courses of study by referring to the specific published degree requirements of the college or academic program in which they intend to earn a bachelor’s degree. 7. When a student changes a major or degree program, the student assumes full responsibility for meeting the new requirements.

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Registration ENROLLMENT SERVICES OFFICE West Building 201 (425) 739-8104 registration@lwtech.edu Registration is the process of enrolling in classes. Dates for classes are announced in both the printed and online quarterly Class Schedules. Course updates are distributed frequently to campus staff.

How To Register New students seeking a degree or certificate make an appointment with staff advisers to complete registration forms and learn about online registration. Continuing students register online or complete registration forms with the assistance of a faculty adviser or counselor. There are a number of ways to register for classes. See the current Class Schedule for all options. PLEASE NOTE: LWIT registration procedure allows you to register for one section of a course. If you register for more than one section of a course, the college will drop you from all sections except the most recent registration transaction. The college will notify you by email after making schedule changes.

Currently Enrolled Degree- And Certificate-Seeking Students 1. Meet with a faculty adviser to review courses for next quarter. 2. Register for courses (students may register for most courses by Web, mail, or in person). See the Class Schedule or Enrollment Services for methods of registration. 3. Students pay tuition and fees via the Web, at the Cashier’s Office, or other modes offered by the college. Textbook and supply costs are in addition to tuition. To register via the Internet, go to www.lwtech.edu/studenttoolbox. A Student Identification Number (SID) and a personal identification number (PIN) are required. For registration, this number is the student’s date of birth until the PIN is changed by the student. Online registration may not be available for all students or classes. See Enrollment Services for details. To register in person, go to Enrollment Services during business hours which are published in each quarter’s Class Schedule.

Change Of Registration (Add/Drop)

Also see the Programs of Study section for information about program start dates. These are subject to change.

Students must add or drop courses on the Web, or at Enrollment Services to make the change official.

Full-Time Status

A refund will occur only when a student officially withdraws or drops within the refund period. See page 151 for refund policy.

The college considers students to be full-time if they are registered in 12 or more credits.

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Late Adds

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Courses added after the third day of the quarter require instructors’ approval. Adding courses after the 10th day of the quarter requires payment of a $50 late registration fee. Adding after the 10th day of the quarter (or of a class) may require special petitions.

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Enrollment Services

Registration continued Payments

Complete Withdrawal (Drop All Courses)

The quarterly Class Schedule lists fee payment requirements. Tuition and fees are due by the first day of the quarter. Students who have not paid tuition and fees or enrolled in the Student Payment Plan will be dropped from their classes after the fifth day of the quarter. Students who owe tuition and fees will not be able to register for future quarters, receive official transcripts, or graduate until their account has been paid.

A student may withdraw from all courses through the eighth week of the quarter, or the equivalent proportion for shorter courses or courses with irregular start and end dates. The refund rate, if any, would be determined by the longest course being dropped. That rate would then be applied to the other courses dropped at that time. It is the student’s responsibility to drop all classes. Further information is available in the Class Schedule.

Waiting Lists If a class is full, students have the option to be put on a waiting list. This list automatically adds students to openings as they appear prior to the first day of each quarter. Students should check online, with Enrollment Services, or with the course instructor during the first week of classes to see if they are enrolled in the class. Students should remove themselves from the waiting list if they decide not to enroll in the class. See details in the Class Schedule.

After the eighth week, an unofficial withdrawal from the college will result in each instructor assigning the appropriate grade. Depending on the start date and length of the class, an early withdrawal during the first two weeks will not be recorded on the transcript.

Administrative Withdrawals Many courses at Lake Washington Institute of Technology require completion of prerequisites prior to registration. Prerequisites are listed as a component of each course description and are in place to assist students achieve success. If a student does not meet the requirements of a course either by grade, transfer course work, or test placement score, he or she will be administratively withdrawn from a course. Additionally, students may be administratively withdrawn for non-attendance or as a result of a conduct sanction.

Enrollment Services

PLEASE NOTE: You may not register for a course (example: ENGL& 101 item # XXXA) and hold a place on the wait list for another section of the same course (ENGL& 101 item # XXXB).

Official withdrawals occurring after the tenth instructional day of the quarter are posted with a W on the student’s transcript. A grade of W does not count in GPA calculations. Not attending a class does not withdraw a student or make one eligible for a refund.

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Student Records In accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), Lake Washington Institute of Technology enforces guidelines concerning information about the student’s educational record, and governs the conditions of disclosure. Except as otherwise indicated, the college will not provide information contained in student records unless the expressed written consent of the student has been given. Students may declare their entire record confidential, in which case no information can be released, and the college will not normally acknowledge the student’s presence at the college. Exceptions may be made if knowledge of the information is necessary to protect the health or safety of the student or other individuals. Contact Enrollment Services or the Class Schedule for further information. In compliance with state law, the college does not use the social security number as a student ID number, though it is required and collected for other purposes authorized by law.

Gainful Employment Disclosure For more information about our graduation rates, the median debt of our students who completed the program, and other important information, please visit our website at http://www.lwtech.edu/GEdisclosure.

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Tuition & Financial Aid

Tuition Tuition and fees

Agency or employer payments

When you register for courses at LWIT, you are obligated to pay the associated tuition and related fees for those classes unless you drop your classes by the fifth day of the quarter. Students are encouraged to pay at the time of registration or to enroll in the Student Payment Plan. www.lwtech.edu/pplan.

Students whose tuition and/or books will be paid by a third party, such as Labor & Industries, Department of Vocational Rehabilitation, WIA, or the student’s employer, need to contact the Student Accounts Office, W201E at (425) 739-8184, fax (425) 739-8182, email studentaccounts@lwtech.edu.

ƒƒ All tuition and fees are due by the first day of the quarter unless previously arranged by a college office, such as Financial Aid, Worker Retraining, or Student Accounts (includes Student Payment Plan). ƒƒ Students with tuition and fees that have not been received by the end of the fifth day of the quarter are subject to being dropped from classes. ƒƒ For students enrolling after the fifth day of the quarter, tuition and fees are due at the time of registration. ƒƒ A late registration fee of $50 is assessed for students who register after the 10th day of the quarter. ƒƒ Students who have paid or who are enrolled in the Student Payment Plan will need to withdraw by the scheduled refund dates to receive the level of reimbursements outlined in the college’s refund policy.

Student Payment Plan The Student Payment Plan allows students to pay tuition and fees on an installment basis. The Student Payment Plan covers your tuition and course fees for every quarter you enroll in the program. Payments are made in monthly installments each academic quarter. For more information, see www.lwtech.edu/pplan.

Guaranteed Education Tuition (GET) Program Payments Contact the Student Accounts Office, West Building W201E, at (425) 739-8184 or studentaccounts@lwtech. edu if your GET payments may arrive after the start of the quarter or for questions regarding coordination of Guaranteed Education Tuition (GET) payments.

PAYMENT OPTIONS Please use your student ID number for all payments so that we can apply your payment to the correct account. Payments may be made: 1. On-line at www.lwtech.edu under Student Toolbox, and Credit Card Payment, using your student ID and PIN. This method does not allow partial payments. Visa and MasterCard only. 2. At the Cashier’s Office, West Building W201F. Pay by cash, check, debit, Visa, MasterCard or American Express credit cards. 3. Call the Cashier’s Office at (425) 739-8403 to pay by Visa, MasterCard or American Express credit cards. 4. Mail a check to: LWIT, 11605 132nd Ave. NE, Kirkland, WA 98034. 5. Cashier’s drop box outside Cashier’s Office after hours. Envelopes are available. NOTE: Partial payments are not accepted without an established payment plan.

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Exceptions

If you withdraw early in the quarter, you might receive a full or partial refund. Not attending a class does not make you eligible for a refund. A refund will occur only when you officially drop within the refund period by completing an Add/Drop form. Refunds cannot normally be arranged by telephone. Students forfeit all claims to refund of tuition and fees if they fail to withdraw from a course, or are suspended or terminated for misconduct. Refunds are distributed depending on how you pay. If you pay with a credit card, the refund will go to that credit card account; if you pay by cash or check, the refund check will be mailed to you. Refunds of online Student Payment Plan payments will be made by check from the college. Refunds of less than $5 will not be mailed. Allow up to six weeks for processing. For federalor state-funded students, financial aid will be returned to aid programs on a pro-rata basis consistent with applicable federal and state rules. NOTE: Refund percentages are based on prior full payment of tuition and fees. If you have not paid in full, you may still owe a balance if you withdraw from a class during a partial or non-refund period. Refund Schedule

Cancellation of a course. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100% State-supported Credit Courses

First five business days of the quarter. . . . . . . . . . . . . 100% After the fifth business day of the quarter and through the twentieth business day of the quarter. . . . . . . . . . 50% Self-Supported Courses

To receive 100% refund students must: If a one session class

ƒƒ Refunds for state-supported classes that start after the first week of the quarter or short courses that end early will be made using the same refund percentages as above. The refund schedule will be adjusted based on a ratio of the number of classes that have occurred at the time of withdrawal to the total number of class sessions. ƒƒ Washington On-Line courses use Washington On-Line quarter dates for refund percentages. ƒƒ If a student is withdrawing from all courses, the college will use the longest course to calculate the refund percentage for all courses.

Tuition & Financial Aid

Refund Policy

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Official Withdrawal Definition

Official withdrawal occurs when a student drops all classes. Refund requests must be made in person, in writing, or via the Web. At the time of withdrawal, the longest course sets the refund rate for all courses being dropped at that time. Pass-Through Fees Refund

Fees such as insurance that are passed through to another agency may be refunded at 100 percent through the first week of the quarter only. No refund will be made if any insurance claim has been filed.

Estimated 2012–2013 Degree & Certificate Program Costs Please visit www.lwtech.edu/programcost for estimated 2012–2013 degree and certificate program costs. Projected estimated costs are subject to change. Estimated program costs do not apply to international students. For International Student estimated costs, see page 128.

Withdraw prior to class start

If class meets twice or more Withdraw prior to second session start Materials/supplies for class Withdraw at least 3 days prior to class start Dance class

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Tuition Rates Lake Washington Institute of Technology has adopted Washington State community college tuition rates effective Fall 2012 as authorized by the legislature and the State Board for Community and Technical Colleges (SBCTC). NOTE: Tuition and fees are subject to change without prior notice.

2012–2013 TUITION RATES Cost Per Credit Includes Student Activity Fee, Comprehensive Fee, Facility Fee, Safety & Security & Building Fee

# of Credits

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Fall/Winter/Spring 12-13

Fall/Winter/Spring 12-13

Fall/Winter/Spring 12-13

Fall/Winter/Spring 12-13

Resident AAS & certificate

Non-Resident AAS & Certificate

Resident Applied Baccalaureate

Non-resident Applied Baccalaureate

1-10 Credits @ $116.50 11-18 Credits @ $62.65 Over 18 Credits @ $105.92

1-10 Credits @ $288.50 11-18 Credits @ $67.66 Over 18 Credits @ $277.92

1-10 Credits @ $255.11 11-18 Credits @ $19.54 Over 18 Credits @ $244.53

1-10 Credits @ $608.08 11-18 Credits @ $20.23 Over 18 Credits @ $597.50

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$116.50

$288.50

$255.11

$608.08

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$233.00

$577.00

$510.22

$1,216.16

3

$349.50

$865.50

$765.33

$1,824.24

4

$466.00

$1,154.00

$1,020.44

$2,432.32

5

$582.50

$1,442.50

$1,275.55

$3,040.40

6

$699.00

$1,731.00

$1,530.66

$3,648.48

7

$815.50

$2,019.50

$1,785.77

$4,256.56

8

$932.00

$2,308.00

$2,040.88

$4,864.64

9

$1,048.50

$2,596.50

$2,295.99

$5,472.72

10

$1,165.00

$2,885.00

$2,551.10

$6,080.80

11

$1,227.65

$2,952.66

$2,570.64

$6,101.03

12

$1,290.30

$3,020.32

$2,590.18

$6,121.26

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$1,352.95

$3,087.98

$2,609.72

$6,141.49

14

$1,415.60

$3,155.64

$2,629.26

$6,161.72

15

$1,478.25

$3,223.30

$2,648.80

$6,181.95

16

$1,540.90

$3,290.96

$2,668.34

$6,202.18

17

$1,603.55

$3,358.62

$2,687.88

$6,222.41

18

$1,666.20

$3,426.28

$2,707.42

$6,242.64

19

$1,772.12

$3,704.20

$2,951.95

$6,840.14

20

$1,878.04

$3,982.12

$3,196.48

$7,437.64

21

$1,983.96

$4,260.04

$3,441.01

$8,035.14

22

$2,089.88

$4,537.96

$3,685.54

$8,632.64

23

$2,195.80

$4,815.88

$3,930.07

$9,230.14

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$2,301.72 $2,407.64

$5,093.80 $5,371.72

$4,174.60 $4,419.13

$9,827.64 $10,425.14

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The college may charge other fees to cover costs such as registration, late fees, insurance, supply, lab fees and parking fees. For the most current tuition and fee information please visit the website at www.lwtech.edu/tuition. A list of estimated degree and certificate costs by program can be found at www.lwtech.edu/ programcost.

Tuition Waivers Lake Washington Institute of Technology offers tuition waivers in accordance with State of Washington law and policies authorized by the State Board for Community and Technical Colleges for several categories of students including but not limited to the following:

Tuition & Financial Aid

Please note that all tuition and fee rates are set by the Washington State Legislature, the State Board for Community and Technical Colleges and the Board of Trustees and are subject to change. LWIT reserves the right to change, without notice, any fees to comply with the state or college policies.

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ƒƒ Non-resident students who are U.S. citizens will receive a waiver resulting in resident tuition rates plus required non-resident building fees. ƒƒ Children and Spouses of Totally Disabled or POW/ MIA or deceased eligible veterans or national guard members. ƒƒ Children of Deceased or disabled law enforcement officers or firefighters. ƒƒ Adult Basic Education, English as a second language, and GED preparation. ƒƒ Eligible veterans or national guard members. ƒƒ High School Completion. ƒƒ Senior Citizens. ƒƒ State Employees. ƒƒ Apprentice students. ƒƒ Running Start students. ƒƒ Some students with program requirements exceeding 18 quarterly credits. Please check with Enrollment Services to determine eligibility and current waiver policy.

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Financial Aid Financial Aid

Financial Aid Application Procedure

West Building, W209 (425) 739-8106 To help finance your education, we encourage you to inform yourself about financial aid through our website www.lwtech.edu/financialaid, by reading the available literature, or by contacting the Financial Aid Office. Lake Washington Institute of Technology believes people should have the opportunity to achieve their educational goals and the Financial Aid Office is here to help support you in your educational efforts. Financial aid is available for eligible students who enroll either to earn a certificate or a degree. Students and their families need not be low-income to qualify for some kinds of financial aid. By applying for financial aid as early as possible and meeting the institutional priority date, students have the best chance of being reviewed before the beginning of each quarter, and the best chance of maximum funds eligibility each financial aid year. Financial aid is intended to add to but not replace a person’s financial resources. If combined resources are not sufficient to cover expenses, you may be eligible for financial aid in the form of grants, scholarships, low-interest loans and student employment. You must demonstrate a financial need to be eligible for most types of assistance. Financial need is calculated as the difference between the cost of attending school and what you and your family can afford to pay. Sample Calculation:

Cost of Attendance - Expected Family Contribution = Financial Need The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is the basic form to apply for assistance and is your passport to financial aid. Information on this form determines your eligibility for grants, scholarships, work study and low-interest loans.

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ƒƒ Complete and submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to the federal processor. This application collects financial data and other information used to calculate the Expected Family Contribution (EFC) that determines a student’s eligibility for aid. Students may complete their FAFSA on-line at www.fafsa.ed.gov, and many of the forms needed may be downloaded from the Financial Aid website at www.lwtech.edu/financialaid. ƒƒ Stay in touch with the Financial Aid Office to be certain that all information has been received to complete your file. ƒƒ Students must reapply for financial aid each year after January 1 for the new award year beginning with summer quarter. The financial aid year begins with summer quarter and ends with spring quarter. Eligibility Requirements

Students are eligible for financial aid if they are: ƒƒ Attending for the purpose of obtaining a degree or certificate at the college. (Some certificate programs may not be eligible for certain types of aid. Check with the Financial Aid Office to verify program eligibility.) ƒƒ A U.S. citizen or an eligible non-citizen. ƒƒ Making satisfactory academic progress in a program of study as defined by the institution’s satisfactory progress criteria. ƒƒ Not in default on any previous student loans or owing a refund on any grants. ƒƒ Registered for the draft with Selective Service (if male), as required by law. ƒƒ A high school graduate or have a GED. ƒƒ Aid may only be offered for classes required for the student’s program. Students who have the equivalent of a bachelor’s degree (including degrees earned in a foreign country) are limited to applying for loans and work-study assistance. Students will be notified of their financial aid award by mail. Awarding begins in May.

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Tuition & Financial Aid

Worker Retraining, Opportunity Grant And WorkFirst Programs

See the Support Services for Students section of this catalog. To determine your eligibility, check with the Worker Retraining, WorkFirst or Opportunity Grant programs in room W207. Other forms of financial aid are available through non-profit agencies and community-based organizations. Veterans Benefits

Lake Washington Institute of Technology has been authorized by the Department of Veterans Affairs to certify veterans for educational benefits. In order to be eligible for educational benefits, you must be enrolled in a certificate- or degree-granting program that has been pre-approved by the Department of Veterans Affairs. Most programs that are two quarters or more in length at Lake Washington Institute of Technology are eligible, but some are not. For more information please log onto our website at www.lwtech.edu/financialaid. You may contact the Veterans Adviser at (425) 739-8106, for additional information. The Veterans Adviser is located in the Financial Aid office in the West Building, W209.

To apply for benefits under Chapter 30, 33, 35, 1606 and 1607, you will need the following documents: 1. Completed “Application for VA Benefits” or “Request for Change of Program or Place of Training”, whichever one is applicable. 2. Copy of your DD-214 (unless you are applying for Chapter 1606-reservist, or Chapter 35-dependent on survivor’s benefits.) Please do not submit original copies. 3. You will need to submit official transcripts, by your third quarter of attendance, for both military experience and colleges that you had after high school to determine if credits will go toward your program of study. You may request that these be sent directly to the Admission’s office. You must also request that the Admission’s office evaluate the transcript and have the transcript forwarded to the Veterans Adviser. Please note that it may take at least 40 days after the start of the quarter to receive your first check. If you have any questions regarding check disbursements or the application process, log onto the website www.gibill.va.gov (opens new window) or contact the Department of Veterans Affairs at 1(888) 442-4551.

Tuition & Financial Aid

Federal Financial Aid Refund Policy

Students that receive federal financial aid are subject to the federal Return to Title IV Funds regulations. These regulations state that aid eligibility for a student receiving federal aid must be recalculated under most circumstances if the student withdraws from classes early or ceases to attend during the quarter. Some students may owe a repayment to the federal aid programs. These regulations and any resulting amounts owed are separate from and may be in addition to the college’s own tuition refund policy. For a copy of the Return to Title IV Funds refund policy, please contact the Financial Aid Office.

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Veterans who have received an honorable discharge or are members of the National Guard or Reservists called to active duty may also be available for a 25% waiver of tuition costs. Veterans may apply for this waiver at the Enrollment Services office. For more information regarding the Veterans Waivers, please contact Enrollment Services. Children or spouse of a Disabled/Deceased/MIA/POW veteran may be eligible to receive a waiver of all tuition and fees. Contact the Financial Aid office in W209 or Enrollment Services office in W201 for more information.

If you are applying for Vocational Rehabilitation benefits (Chapter 31), you will need to contact a VA case manager at the Seattle regional office at (206) 220-6128 for further requirements regarding benefits.

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Financial Aid Programs Federal Pell Grant

Stafford and PLUS Student Loans

The federal Pell Grant is aid that is free monetary assistance for educational expenses. Students who have earned a baccalaureate degree are no longer eligible. Like other grants, the Pell Grant is adjusted for less than full-time enrollment.

The federal Stafford loan is a student loan guaranteed by the federal government; students do not need to have established credit to qualify. Student repayment begins up to 6 months after you leave school or drop below half-time. The Parent PLUS Loan is available for dependent students, and parents may borrow up to the cost of the student’s budget, minus any other aid, with this loan if approved.

Federal SEOG Grant

(Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant) This grant is awarded to high need students who apply early in the year (funds are limited). Students must be eligible for the Pell Grant to receive this assistance. Washington State Need Grant

This grant is available for Washington residents only. The State Need Grant is adjusted for less than full time enrollment and may not exceed the amount of allowable tuition and fees each quarter. Although this is a state grant, eligibility is determined by FAFSA. Scholarships

Scholarships, like grants, offer free monetary assistance for educational needs. Scholarships are offered by organizations associated with the college and by outside agencies. For a current list of resources, please visit our website at www.lwtech.edu/financialaid. Student Work Study

Work Study is part time employment funded by federal or state financial aid funds. Students apply by marking they are interested in work study on their FAFSA. Funds are limited and are awarded to students on the basis of need who apply early. Students may work up to a max. of 19 hours a week. Students must be enrolled at least half-time. For more information, please visit our website.

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Veterans Benefits

Veterans benefits are available for qualifying veterans, including chapters 30, 31, 33, 35, 1606 and 1607. Students must be in a program approved for these benefits by the Department of Veterans Affairs (most programs at LWIT are approved). For more information on veterans benefits, see page 155. LAKE WASHINGTON COLLEGE FOUNDATION

The Foundation offers scholarships and also provides emergency financial assistance to students with pressing needs through the Student Emergency Fund which is administered by the Financial Aid Director. The Lake Washington College Foundation currently manages a variety of accounts and endowments on behalf of generous donors and the college departments for the benefit of students and programs. For more information on Foundation scholarships and/or the Student Emergency Fund, please contact the Financial Aid Office at (425) 739-8106 or financialaid@lwtech.edu.

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Satisfactory Academic Progress Requirements for Financial Aid Recipients

Reinstatement

To continue to receive financial aid, students must meet Satisfactory Academic Process (SAP) requirements. Satisfactory Academic Progress includes qualitative and quantitative measures, as well as maximum time frame requirements. The information below is a summary of key requirements. Qualitative Measure

All students on or applying for financial aid must complete a minimum number of credits, with a quarterly and cumulative G.P.A. of at least 2.0. Quantitative Measure

Full-time students need to complete at least 12 credits per quarter, three-quarter time students at least 9, and half-time students at least 6. Less than half-time students must complete all credits attempted. Students who fail to meet the quarterly or cumulative G.P.A. requirements or who fail to complete the minimum number of credits for their enrollment status for one quarter may be placed on warning status for the next quarter and may receive aid; however, certain limitations apply. Students who fail SAP requirements for 2 consecutive quarters, or fail to complete at least 50% of credits (or all credits for less than half-time students), for the minimum enrollment level attempted in any one particular quarter will be placed on suspended status and will be ineligible for further aid.

Financial aid may be re-instated after students have completed, at their own expense, a quarter at the minimum level they were enrolled in (full-time, half-time, etc.), during the quarter for which their aid was cancelled (this does not apply to students who have reached the maximum time frame limitation). The classes must be at LWIT and the student must meet all applicable satisfactory academic progress requirements while completing the required credits. Awarding of financial aid for reinstated students is on a funds-available basis only.

Tuition & Financial Aid

Maintaining Eligibility for Financial Aid

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Appeal Process

In some cases there may be extraordinary circumstances (beyond the student’s control), which may be considered for students whose aid has been suspended. A written petition, along with supporting documentation, may be submitted for consideration. Students whose aid is reinstated through the appeal process will be placed on probation status in their next quarter of attendance. Awarding of financial aid for reinstated students is on a funds-available basis only. The Financial Aid Office reserves the right to determine continued eligibility. Other conditions to maintain satisfactory academic progress for financial aid may apply. To view or print the complete policy, visit: www.lwtech.edu/financialaid.

Maximum Time Frame and Program Limitations

Students must complete the program they are pursuing in no more than 150% (or 125% for the State Need Grant) measured in attempted credits. For example, if a student is pursuing an AAS degree which requires 100 credits to complete, the maximum timeframe would be 150 attempted credits (125 for the State Need Grant), regardless of whether the credits were funded by financial aid or not. Students must also meet pace of progression standards, indicating they will complete their program within the maximum time frame allowed (please see the complete policy for details). Students may receive financial aid at LWIT for a maximum of 2 programs.

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Academic Information Degrees and Certificates

DTA/MRP Associate of Applied Science

General Requirements For Degrees And Certificates

Requirements

Lake Washington Institute of Technology awards a Bachelor of Technology in Applied Design (BTAD) for completion of at least 90 credits of appropriate 300 and 400 level coursework. Lake Washington Institute of Technology awards an Associate of Applied Science degree (AAS) for completion of a technical program of study. Certificates of Proficiency and Completion are awarded for completion of a program of specialized technical training. Academic Core requirements for degrees and certificates can be found on the Programs of Study/Academic Core page.

Bachelor of Technology in Applied Design Requirements

The Bachelor of Technology in Applied Design (BTAD) degree is awarded for completion of at least 90 credits of appropriate 300 and 400 level coursework. An applied associate degree (AAS or equivalent) in a design-related field with the required distribution of academic core coursework in written communication, quantitative reasoning, social science, and humanities is a prerequisite for program admission. Other program admission requirements can be found on the website, www.lwtech.edu/btad. To submit an application for a BTAD degree, a minimum of the last 30% of upper division credits must be earned in residence, and the final quarter must be in residence at Lake Washington Institute of Technology. A minimum passing numeric grade (2.0 or higher) in each upper division course that receives a numeric grade, and a cumulative average of 2.0 in all upper division courses, is required for the BTAD degree. Students can choose to graduate under the catalog currently in effect or the catalog in effect when they started in the program, as long as that catalog is no more than seven years old.

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The DTA/MRP Associate of Applied Science degree is a transfer degree for students wishing to pursue a bachelor’s degree at a four year institution. Completing this degree prepares students to transfer with junior status to a participating college or university. Degrees available are in Pre-Nursing and in Technology. The AAS degree must contain a minimum of 20 credits of academic core courses, including instruction in written communication (5 cr.); quantitative reasoning (5 cr.); social science (5 cr.); and humanities (5 cr.). To submit an application for a DTA/MRP degree, a minimum of the last 30% of the technical credits must be earned in residence. A minimum passing numeric grade (2.0 or higher) in each course that receives a numeric grade, and a cumulative average of 2.0 in all courses, is required for the DTA/MRP degree. Students can choose to graduate under the catalog currently in effect or the catalog in effect when they started the program

THE ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE TRANSFER DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

The AAS-T degree must contain a minimum of 90 credits. The number required varies with each program. An Associate in Applied Science-Transfer (AAS-T) degree is built upon the technical courses required for job preparation but also includes a college-level general education component, common in structure for all such degrees. The general education courses for the degree are drawn from the same list as those taken by students completing the Direct Transfer Agreement (DTA) associate degree. These degrees are consistent with the dual purpose of transfer and preparation for direct employment.

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Certificate Of Proficiency

The AAS-T degree must contain a minimum of 20 credits of generally transferable academic core courses including written communication (ENGL& 101) (5cr); quantitative reasoning (any generally transferable math course with Intermediate Algebra as a prerequisite) (5cr.); social science (5cr.); and humanities (5cr.).

A Certificate of Proficiency is issued to students completing a program of specialized occupational training of 45 credits or longer. The number of credits varies with each program.

To submit an application for an AAS-T degree, a minimum of the last 30% of the technical credits must be earned in residence, and the final quarter must be in residence at Lake Washington Institute of Technology.

At least fifteen (15) credits of academic core, including instruction in written expression (5 cr.); quantitative reasoning (5 cr.); and social science (5 cr.) are required along with the technical requirements listed in the catalog.

A minimum passing numeric grade (2.0 or higher) in each course that receives a numeric grade, and a cumulative average of 2.0 in all courses, is required for the AAS-T degree.

To submit an application for a Certificate of Proficiency, a student must have completed a minimum of the last 30% of the technical credits at Lake Washington Institute of Technology.

Students can choose to graduate under the catalog currently in effect or the catalog in effect when they started in the program.

A minimum passing numeric grade (2.0 or higher) in each course that receives a numeric grade, and a cumulative average of 2.0 in all courses, is required for the Certificate of Proficiency.

Requirements

Academic Information

Associate Of Applied Science Degree

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Students can choose to graduate under the catalog currently in effect or the catalog in effect when they started in the program.

Requirements

An AAS degree must contain a minimum of 90 credits. The number required varies with each program. The AAS degree must contain a minimum of 20 credits of academic core courses, including instruction in written communication (5 cr.); quantitative reasoning (5 cr.); social science (5 cr.); and humanities (5 cr.).

Certificate Of Completion Requirements

To submit an application for an AAS degree, a minimum of the last 30% of the technical credits must be earned in residence.

A Certificate of Completion is issued by Enrollment Services to students who satisfactorily complete the competencies and requirements for programs of less than one academic year, less than 45 credit hours in length, which does not necessarily include related instruction.

A minimum passing numeric grade (2.0 or higher) in each course that receives a numeric grade, and a cumulative average of 2.0 in all courses, is required for the AAS degree.

To submit an application for Certificate of Completion, a student must have completed all technical credits in residence at Lake Washington Institute of Technology.

Students can choose to graduate under the catalog currently in effect or the catalog in effect when they started in the program.

A minimum passing numeric grade (2.0 or higher) in each course that receives a numeric grade, and a cumulative average of 2.0 in all courses is required for a Certificate of Completion. Students can choose to graduate under the catalog currently in effect or the catalog in effect when they started in the program.

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Cooperative Education

Adult Basic Education

Cooperative education is a process that draws upon community resources to expand students’ learning outside the classroom. It offers students the opportunity to blend classroom theory with planned, supervised field experience in areas relating to their career choices. They work with a cooperative education coordinator, faculty member and employer to identify and develop specific skills and learning goals to be gained through the encounter.

Adult Basic Education (ABE) class instructors offer assistance in developing basic skills in reading, writing, speaking, spelling, vocabulary, grammar, problem solving and math. Emphasis is on developing useful knowledge and applied skills such as financial and health management, parenting and raising a family, and finding and keeping a job. The ABE program welcomes all adults who want to improve their skills. Each student discovers where his or her learning level is, and a personal program is developed. All learning levels, from the very basic to GED, can be accommodated. For more information, please call the college at (425) 739-8656.

Students work on paid, or in some cases, unpaid training assignments while integrating specific periods of on-campus study with employment. Students may be able to apply their current job experience, if related to a career choice, toward a certificate or degree. Cooperative education experience may substitute for some coursework to meet personal needs. For more information on Cooperative Education, students should contact their faculty adviser.

Developmental Education Services Students come to Lake Washington Institute of Technology with skills at varying levels, yet they want to become more successful in everyday life or in training programs. The college offers developmental education to many students who: ƒƒ Have been out of school a long time and wish to brush up on basic or study skills ƒƒ Need to improve basic reading, writing and mathematics skills before enrolling in other college courses ƒƒ Are from non-English speaking countries and wish to improve their English abilities ƒƒ May already have adequate skills but wish to improve them further ƒƒ Wish to finish their high school education or obtain the General Education Development (GED) certificate

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General Education Development General Education Development (GED) is a series of five tests developed by the American Council on Education to enable persons to obtain the equivalency of a high school diploma. Earning a GED provides students with greater access to employment, advancement and higher education opportunities. To support students in passing the GED examination, the Adult Basic Education program offers GED preparation classes and pre-tests. All students under the age of 19 need to obtain a release from their school district in order to take the test. Two pieces of ID are required at the time of testing. The college is a designated testing center for GED exams. Testing appointments must be scheduled in advance either at the Assessment Center, West Building, 2nd floor, room W204 or by calling (425) 739-8115. For more information, go to www.lwtech.edu/assessment.

English As A Second Language The college serves a highly diverse population of students from around the world, many with limited English-speaking skills. For residents who want to improve their proficiency in English for personal, employment, or educational reasons, the college offers English as a Second Language (ESL) classes. For more information about English as a Second Language classes, please call the ESL instructional assistant at (425) 739-8359.

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High School Programs

Graduation

Lake Washington Institute of Technology offers a number of options for high school age students. As requirements for entry and completion are subject to change, please visit High School Programs on the Web at www.lwtech. edu/academy for current information.

The student is responsible for working with his or her adviser to meet all degree or certificate requirements. Automated degree checks are available for various academic programs and time periods through online services on the campus website.

The academic year is divided into three quarters of approximately eleven weeks each, while also running an eight-week summer quarter (the length of individual courses may differ). In order to complete certificate or degree requirements in the prescribed number of quarters, a suggested course load per quarter will be approximately 15 to 20 credits. A lecture class which meets five hours per week for one quarter will yield five quarter credits. Lab courses require ten hours of class time per week for five credits. Special permission is needed to carry more than 25 credits.

Full- And Part-Time Student Status Students enrolled in 12 or more credits are considered full-time. Some programs may require higher quarterly credit loads to complete requirements in a specified time period. Some external agencies may use different credit values to calculate full-time status. Students registered for fewer than full-time credits as defined above are considered part-time.

To receive a preliminary evaluation before the final quarter starts, students must apply to graduate by the second week of the preceding quarter. Students should apply to graduate by the fourth week of the preceding quarter. Applications received after that may be deferred to a future quarter. Commencement is held yearly in June. Students who complete a program during the preceding fall, winter and spring quarters, or the following summer, are invited to participate. Graduation is recorded on student transcripts two-to-four weeks after the end of the student’s final quarter. Diplomas are sent to students four to six weeks after the end of the final quarter.

Academic Information

Credits And Credit Load

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Some programs offer other special awards that are not posted to the transcript. In accordance with state law, students are expected to complete their degree and certificate programs within a suitable length of time or number of credits. See Enrollment Services or the student handbook for details.

NOTE: For financial aid purposes, the financial aid office should be consulted for definitions of three-quarter time, half-time, and less than half-time since the level of enrollment affects aid eligibility.

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Grading

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Lake Washington Institute of Technology uses a numeric grading system for most courses. Instructors may report grades from 4.0 to 0.7 in 0.1 increments and the grade of 0.0. Grades in the range of 0.6 to 0.1 are not assigned. A grade of 0.7 earns credits; however, a minimum grade of 2.0 is required for a number of purposes including technical courses, academic core requirements, progression in a sequence of classes, to satisfy a prerequisite, and graduation requirements. Numerical grades may be considered equivalent to letter grades as follows:

When an I (Incomplete) grade is given by an instructor, a contract is filed with Enrollment Services stating the work necessary to remove the Incomplete, a date for completion, and the grade earned if not completed. Incomplete coursework must be completed by the required date as established by the instructor (this date may be no later than the end of the subsequent quarter of enrollment). At the time of graduation, the Incomplete will be changed to a 0.0 or to the grade assigned on the contract. N – Audit

Points Letter 4.0 A Excellent performance 3.9-3.7 A- 3.6-3.3 B+ 3.2-3.0 B Above-average performance 2.9-2.7 B- 2.6-2.3 C+ 2.2-2.0 C Average performance 1.9-1.7 C- 1.6-1.3 D+ 1.2-1.0 D Minimum performance 0.9-0.7 D- 0.6-0.0 F Unsatisfactory performance

Audit means the student registered on a space-available basis to attend the class and to listen, but not do graded work. The N grade does not earn credit and does not affect the GPA. The audit grade option must be approved by the instructor and submitted to Enrollment Services by the eighth week of the quarter.

I – Incomplete

R – Repeating A Course

An incomplete grade may be given if the student is doing passing work, is unable to complete the requirements of the course during the quarter and can complete the requirements within a contracted period of time. The student does not reregister for the course in a later quarter to remove the incomplete within the contracted period of time.

The qualifier R on a transcript means a course has been repeated, and is excluded from credits and grade point average. A student may repeat any course taken at LWIT in which a grade of less than 2.0 or a U was earned. All grades will still appear on the transcript whether repeated or not. If the most recent grade is lower than the earlier grade, the student may request the registrar to count just the higher grade in the GPA.

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NG – No Grade

NG means the course is “not graded” for any student taking the course. This applies, for example, to some non-credit courses. It would not appear on graded, credit courses. NG does not affect the GPA and does not earn credits. It does not indicate whether a student attended, just that the student enrolled.

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* (Asterisk)

This symbol (asterisk) means the grade has not been assigned yet. The student should consult with his or her instructor. This grade does not affect the GPA and does not earn credits. Note however that a * grade could prevent a student from receiving honors, impede financial aid eligibility, block graduation, or result in a student being considered in academic difficulty. It is important that all enrolled courses be assigned valid grades.

W – Withdrawal

Academic Grade Forgiveness Policy

A student may officially withdraw from any course through the eighth week of the quarter (or the equivalent for a short course or courses with irregular start or end dates) by completing a withdrawal form and submitting it to Enrollment Services. Official withdrawals occurring after the tenth instructional day of the quarter are posted with a W on the student’s permanent transcript. Withdrawals do not count in the GPA calculations and cannot be assigned by faculty in the grading process.

In order to compensate for the effects of circumstances in a student’s past that may have negatively affected his or her GPA, LWIT offers a grade forgiveness policy. This procedure can be accomplished through an appeal filed with the registrar. The following criteria must be met to be eligible for such an appeal:

Y – In Progress

A Y grade is given to students who are doing passing coursework in basic skill classes (ABE, ESL, etc.) but need additional instruction and time to complete course requirements. Students are required to re-register for the course and pay all tuition and any other charges. The Y remains on the transcript for the quarter assigned, while the final grade will be posted to the quarter in which the student re-enrolled in the course. The Y grade earns no credit and does not affect the GPA. Z – Unofficial Withdrawal

Students who attend briefly, rarely, or not at all, and who fail to withdraw from a course with a W grade, may be assigned a grade of Z if appropriate in the judgment of an administrator. The Z grade does not earn credit and does not count in the GPA calculation.

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1. Grades must be three or more years old. 2. Only quarters including credits graded below a 2.0 may be forgiven. 3. Grade forgiveness can include one or several quarters from a prior census point back, as requested by the student. 4. The student must demonstrate a 2.0 GPA in all decimal graded courses taken after the last date of the period for which a student is requesting forgiveness. All courses in a given quarter are removed from the GPA but remain on the student’s transcript. This appeal can be requested by turning in a letter of appeal to the registrar in Enrollment Services. A determination will be made whether grade forgiveness is appropriate on a case-by-case basis.

Academic Information

S/U – Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory

S/U grading is used for work experience, clinical, and skill development courses. The S indicates a satisfactory level of performance by the student. By assigning an S grade, the instructor certifies a performance level of at least a 2.0 or higher. Credit is earned but the S does not affect the GPA calculation. A U grade is assigned when the level of performance is below 2.0. A U grade does not earn credit and does not affect the GPA.

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NOTE: Grade forgiveness can only be granted once. Grades previously forgiven will not be reinstated. Also if a student is transferring to another college, that college may not recognize the grade forgiveness previously granted at Lake Washington Institute of Technology.

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Grade Appeal Process

Grade Point Average (GPA)

Students are responsible for maintaining standards of academic progress and following course procedures established by their instructors. The purpose of the grade appeal is to protect students from prejudiced, arbitrary or capricious academic evaluation.

The grade point average indicates the general achievement of the student. The quarterly GPA includes only classes for that specific quarter; the cumulative GPA includes all classes which comprise the student’s academic history at LWIT. GPA is calculated by dividing the grade points by the number of credits of the courses for which the student was awarded a decimal grade. Grade points are calculated by multiplying the number of credits by the numeric value of the grade for each course. The calculation does not include courses for which the student was awarded Z, Y, N, W, I, S, U, or other non-decimal grades.

A grade appeal only applies to the final course grade. The assignment of a grade is the right and responsibility of the instructor. Students have the right to appeal a grade deemed arbitrary or capricious. In a grade appeal, the appropriate instructional division dean will meet only with the student and instructor. No other advocate may be present. The student is responsible for knowing and initiating the grade appeal process. The student must file grade appeals within the first three weeks of the academic quarter following the quarter in which the grade was received. The student must first meet with the instructor who assigned the grade. The instructor will explain the rationale for awarding the grade. The student is responsible for demonstrating grade error or that arbitrary or capricious assignment of the final course grade occurred. If the result of the student’s meeting with the instructor does not produce a satisfactory resolution of the student appeal, the student may appeal to the appropriate division dean. The dean will meet with the student, review the course materials and grade assigned, and render a decision to deny, approve, or modify the appeal within ten working days. The decision of the dean is final.

Example: Course Credits Grade ENGL 100 5 3.7 ABED 040 5 S PSYC& 100 5 4.0 5 credits x 3.7 = 18.5 grade points. 5 credits x 4.0 = 20 grade points. Total grade points: 18.5 + 20 = 38.5. Total credits taken for a decimal grade: 5 + 5 = 10. GPA: 38.5 grade points divided by 10 credits = 3.85. The GPA is calculated for each quarter and also for all quarters combined, which is referred to as a cumulative GPA. Contact Enrollment Services if you have questions about your GPA. Grade Changes

Grades may be changed by instructors only in cases of clerical errors or subsequent completion of coursework. It is the student’s responsibility to initiate a grade change with the instructor. A grade change form must be completed, signed by the instructor, and submitted to Enrollment Services before a grade change becomes official. Students have 60 days from the end of the quarter to request a grade change (deadlines for Incomplete grades differ).

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Grade Reports

Academic Information

After the end of each quarter, grades can be accessed through the college’s online services. Grades are not mailed out. Official transcripts are available through Enrollment Services and unofficial transcripts are available on the Web. It is important that students check grades at the end of each quarter and address questions promptly. See grade changes above.

Honors Honor Roll

ƒƒ President’s List requires a 4.0 quarterly grade-point average with a minimum of 12 college-level credits earned cumulatively and 12 credits earned for the quarter. ƒƒ Dean’s List requires a 3.7 quarterly grade-point average with a minimum of 12 college-level credits earned cumulatively and 12 credits earned for the quarter. ƒƒ Both lists require a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 in all coursework. Honors are awarded at graduation for students who achieve the following cumulative grade point averages: ƒƒ Cum Laude = 3.5 – 3.69 ƒƒ Magna Cum Laude = 3.7 – 3.99 ƒƒ Summa Cum Laude = 4.00 Each candidate for graduation is assessed at the time graduation is finally approved. Please contact Enrollment Services for further information.

Program Closure If a program is closed, the college will provide a method for current students to finish the degree or certificate. Students must fulfill the requirements within six years of the date of initial enrollment in the closed program. Substitutions for discontinued courses will be permitted upon approval of the Dean of the closed program.

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ABED Adult Basic Education ACBT Auto Collision Body Technician ACCT Accounting ACPT Auto Collision Paint Technician ACRT Auto Collision Repair Technician APDZ Applied Design APPR Apprenticeship ARCH Architectural Graphics ARGT Architectural Graphics ARST Auto Restoration ART, ART& Art ASL& American Sign Language AUTO Automotive Repair Technician BAKE Baking BAS Business Administration Support BIOL, BIOL& Biology BUHR Human Resources BUSA, BUSA& Business CEGT Civil Engineering Graphics CFOR Information Assurance & Computer Forensics CHEM, CHEM& Chemistry CHIN& Chinese CIVE Civil Engineering Graphics CJ& Criminal Justice CMST, CMST& Oral Communication CSNT Computer Security & Network Technician CULA Culinary Arts CWEX Cooperative Work Experience DENT Dental Assistant DHET Diesel & Heavy Equipment Technician DHYG Dental Hygiene EASL English as a Second Language ECEM Child Care Manager ECON& Economics EDUC Education, Professional Technical ELEC Electronics 2 0 1 2 - 2 0 1 3

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ENGL, ENGL& English ENGR Engineering Graphics ENGT Engineering Graphics ETEC Energy and Science Technician FSE Funeral Service Education FTNS Fitness Specialist/Personal Trainer GEOG Cartography GEOL& Geology GISA Geographic Info Systems HMDS College Strategies HORT Environmental Horticulture HUM Humanities IFAD First Aid/CPR INTL International KREA& Korean MACH Machine Technology MAST Massage Therapy MATH, MATH& Mathematics MEDA Medical Assisting MMDP Multimedia Design & Production MMPE Motorcycle, Marine & Power Equipment Technology MOHD Motorcycle, Harley-Davidson® NURS Nursing NUTR& Nutrition OTA Occupational Therapy Assistant PHIL& Philosophy PHYS, PHYS& Physics PSYC, PSYC& Psychology PTA Physical Therapist Assistant SHSV Social & Human Services SOC, SOC& Sociology SPAN& Spanish STAT Statistics STEC Energy & Science Technician TRAN Transportation Core WELD Welding Fabrication & Maintenance Technology I N S T I T U T E

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Course Descriptions Course prefix & number Description Courses that must be taken prior to this class

Course Title

ABED 040 Adult Basic Education Math II 5CR This course covers fractions, decimals, percents, and ratios through the use of the four basic mathematical operations (add, subtract, multiply, divide) in both numeric and story problems. Content includes numeric, symbol, and word representations of numbers and the US measurement system. Prerequisite: ABED 030, equivalent placement score, or instructor permission.

Course Credits

Key ACBT 121 basic body repair 10cr Provides an understanding of product and repair… Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, CISA 101 or instructor permission.

ABED 010 ABE Orientation 1CR This course is for students who plan to enroll in the ABE program at Lake Washington Institute of Technology. Topics covered include LWIT campus resources, programs, courses, and educational and professional goal-setting. Prerequisites: CASAS placement test and WABERS demographic form, or instructor permission. ABED 024 Writing Fundamentals 6CR This course is exclusively for students with sufficient reading, listening, and speaking skills and developing writing skills. It is intended to prepare students for entry into the ABED 046 and developmental English sequence. Prerequisites: Appropriate CASAS and writing scores and instructor’s permission.

ABED 035 Basic Skills Level I 1-5CR Improve writing, reading, spelling, arithmetic, and English language speaking skills in an individualized self-paced learning environment. Prerequisites: Instructor permission and equivalent placement test scores. ABED 036 Basic Skills Level II 1-5CR Improve writing, reading, spelling, arithmetic, and English language speaking skills in an individualized self-paced learning environment. LRC instructor permission required; go to E214 to register. Prerequisites: Instructor permission and equivalent placement test scores. ABED 037 Basic Skills Level III 1-5CR Improve writing, reading, spelling, arithmetic, and English language speaking skills in an individualized self-paced learning environment. Prerequisites: Instructor permission and equivalent placement test scores.

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ABED 043 GED Math Review 5CR This course reviews math topics on the GED exam. Both lecture and individualized work are offered. Prerequisite: Appropriate placement test score. ABED 045 Reading Improvement 5CR An introductory Adult Basic Education reading skills class where students will focus on the sentence, including basic sentence types, usage, and punctuation. Students will practice writing sentences that relate to the same topic, which will be used to lead the student into the development of paragraphs that are unified under a topic and a thesis sentence. Prerequisite: Equivalent placement score or instructor permission. ABED 046 Writing 5CR An introductory Adult Basic Education writing skills class where students will focus on the sentence, including basic sentence types, usage, and punctuation. Students will practice writing sentences that relate to the same topic, which will be used to lead the student into the development of paragraphs that are unified under a topic and a thesis sentence. Prerequisite: Equivalent placement score or instructor permission. ABED 047 Job Skills Training 1-15CR Students strengthen worker readiness skills through learning modules, group discussion and reading. General content includes effective communication, motivation, time management, financial management, workplace values, and worker portfolio development. Prerequisite: Placement in class is by WorkFirst staff. ABED 048 Self-paced GED 1-5CR Set up an individual study plan to guide you through self-paced lessons; tutoring available when necessary. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

Course Descriptions

ABED 030 Adult Basic Education Math I 2CR Students gain mastery of whole number concepts and methods through the use of the four basic mathematical operations (add, subtract, multiply, divide) in both numeric and story problems. Students also study numeral and word representations of numbers, and the US standard measurement system. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

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ABED 049 Structured GED Preparation 5CR This class is designed to prepare students to take all five parts of the GED EXAM. This is a non-graded, continuous enrollment class. The class offers a combination of lecture and lab work. Prerequisites: Minimum CASAS Reading score and instructor permission. ABED 053 Healthcare Bridge II 6CR Students will practice and improve their reading, writing, and study skills in the context of Health/ Healthcare to prepare for entry into LWIT Allied Health programs. Prerequisite: Completion of ESL level 5 or equivalent placement scores.

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Course Descriptions ABED 054 Online Grammar & Writing for Advanced ESL 3CR This writing class delivered on-line builds grammar skills in areas(such as verb tenses and clauses) that remain a barrier to nonnative English speakers’ success in ABED and English 093 classes. Prerequisite: EASL 050 or equivalent placement. ABED 055 Online GED Writing Preparation 3CR Builds skills related to successfully passing the LA: Writing portion of the GED test. Students improve sentence skills (grammar, usage, and mechanics) and develop five-paragraph essays. Prerequisite: Appropriate placement test score or instructor permission. ACBT 121 Basic Body Repair/Refinish 10CR Provides an understanding of product and repair skills. Tool safety and safe handling of both auto body and auto paint products will be emphasized, and products commonly used in the collision industry will be covered. Hands-on training will be provided. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. ACBT 122

Collision Estimating/Electronic Disarm Procedure 6CR Course covers collision estimating with lecture and hands-on written estimating. The use of Collision Estimating Guides and how to select parts and labor amounts will be taught. Safe handling of electrical components will also be taught. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission.

Course Descriptions

ACBT 131 Metal Straightening Techniques 6CR Course covers the application of common metal straightening techniques and outer body panel cosmetic repairs. Combines brief lecture sessions with intensive hands-on labs. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125. ACBT 132 Surface Preparation 5CR Course combines steps of surface defect causes and cures. Instruction will be provided on how to use plastic filler materials and tools. Students will determine and apply plan to prepare surface for refinishing. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125. ACBT 133 Measuring Systems 5CR Provides fundamentals of vehicle construction, measuring principles and systems, including interpreting body dimension specification charts. Students will demonstrate classroom techniques in lab. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125. ACBT 211 Auto Body Welding 4CR Integrates the operation, maintenance, safe practices and vehicle protection when MIG welding, brazing, and using a plasma arc cutter. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125. ACBT 212

Damage Identification and Analysis 5CR Course offers estimating and measuring principles used in damage analysis. The course combines classroom lecture and demonstration with group and individual practice via shop setting. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125. ACBT 213 Panel Replace & Adjust I 6CR Course combines replacement and alignment of outer body panels with the alignment hinges, latches, bolted-on panels and common hands-on tasks. Includes hands-on practice. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125.

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ACBT 221 Panel Replace & Adjust II 8CR Includes various straightening, replacement and alignment techniques commonly used on structural panels. Student applies classroom instruction in shop setting. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125. ACBT 222 Unibody & Frame Alignment 7CR Course covers the setup, measurement and repair of various types of unibody and frame damage. Consists of lecture sessions followed by group and individual hands-on lab applications. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125. ACBT 231 Mechanical and Electrical Systems 5CR Course examines drive train and wiring diagrams, flowcharts, and various diagnostic procedures. Consists of lecture sessions followed by shop application of sequential techniques taught in the lectures. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125. ACBT 232 Glass Replacement 5CR Course examines various types of automotive movable and stationary glass replacement, alignment, seal and hardware problems. Includes guided group and individual hands-on application. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 125. ACBT 233 Advanced Shop Procedures 5CR Course covers restoration and fabrication, including advanced characteristics and techniques of metal, plastic body filler and fiberglass. Incorporates lecture material in shop application. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 125. ACCT 105 QuickBooks 3CR QuickBooks is a popular accounting program designed for both business and personal use. Instruction includes how to create and use a variety of accounts and forms pertaining to customers, vendors, banks, inventory, check printing, reports and charts. Prerequisites: ACCT 111, BAS 105, BAS 120, or instructor permission. ACCT 111 Introduction to Accounting I 5CR This is an introductory course emphasizing double entry bookkeeping for a sole proprietor. Students learn how to record business transactions, detect and correct errors, and prepare financial statements. A practice set provides the opportunity to maintain records for a business. Prerequisites: MATH 070, ENGL 093, or equivalent placement score. ACCT 112 Business Calculator Applications 3CR Students learn to use the desktop calculator by touch with a proficiency in speed and accuracy. Students use the desktop calculator to solve a variety of business-related problems. Prerequisite: MATH 070, or equivalent placement score. ACCT 210 Introduction to Accounting II 5CR Covers basic accounting concepts, principles, and financial statement preparation for a sole proprietorship. The course emphasizes merchandising operations, special journals, payroll, and payroll taxes. Prerequisites: ACCT 111, BUSA 100 or MATH 080, or instructor permission. ACCT 255 Income Tax I 5CR Introduction to federal income tax laws for individuals. Course covers gross income, deductions, and tax credits with emphasis on in-depth preparation of individual tax returns. This course also covers items related to sole proprietorship business income (schedule C). Prerequisite: ACCT 210.

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Course Descriptions ACCT 256 Income Tax II 5CR Beyond the basics of ACCT 255 individual income taxes. Course covers business expenses, cost recovery (tax depreciation), capital gains and losses, disposition of business assets, partnership taxation, and standard corporate income tax including subchapter S corporations. In addition the course will cover payroll and withholding tax procedures, general tax planning, and IRS procedures and penalties. Prerequisite: ACCT 255. ACCT 275 Ethics in Business 5CR This course introduces ethical decision making processes used in business. Through group interaction and case scenarios, students learn moral philosophies and social responsibilities as they pertain to working in business. Prerequisites: BUSA 103 or ENGL& 101, and ACCT 210. ACCT 280 Accounting Projects 3CR A capstone simulation a student develops with the instructor to give the student more depth or breadth in application or theory in accounting. Prerequisite: Term V or Term VI accounting student, or instructor permission. ACCT& 201 Principles of Accounting I 5CR (Previously ACCT 220) The first course in the accounting transfer sequence. This course introduces basic principles, concepts, theories and procedures of recording, analyzing, and interpreting financial data. Prerequisite: ACCT 210 recommended. ACCT& 202 Principles of Accounting II 5CR (Previously ACCT 230) The second course in the accounting transfer sequence. This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of accounting with application to sole proprietorship and corporate forms of business organization Prerequisite: ACCT& 201 or instructor permission.

ACPT 211 Introduction to Custom Painting 4CR Study and application of knowledge of various finishes including set-up, primer, sealer, single stage, and base coat-clear coat systems. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125. ACPT 212

Custom Painting Product/ Data Research 4CR Course allows the student to apply knowledge of paint mixing formulas and procedures learned in previous courses. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125. ACPT 213 Custom Painting Design & Layout 4CR Study and application of knowledge of color movement and tint color to obtain a blendable match along with a solid and metallic color characteristics. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125. ACPT 214 Custom Paint Applications 4CR This course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge and tool skills to complete beginning custom painting tasks. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ACPT 211, ACPT 212, ACPT 213.

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ACRT 121 Basic Auto Body Repair 4CR This intensively hands on course focuses on the diagnosing, repair procedures, and product knowledge needed to accomplish basic auto body repair. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ACRT 122, ACRT 123, ACRT 124. ACRT 122 Basic Auto Body Refinishing 4CR This course focuses on the diagnosing, repair procedures, and product knowledge needed to accomplish basic auto body repair. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ACRT 121, ACRT 123, ACRT 124. ACRT 123 Vehicle/Damage Identification & Analysis 4CR This course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge, tool skills, and computer skills to complete estimates and complete simple collision repairs. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ACRT 121, ACRT 122, ACRT 124. ACRT 124 Basic Detailing 4CR This course focuses on the diagnosing, repair procedures, and product knowledge needed to properly detail vehicles. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ACRT 121 ACRT 122, ACRT 123. ACRT 131 Metal Straightening Techniques 4CR This course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge and tool skills needed to straighten metal and do basic surface preparations. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ACRT 132, ACRT 133, and ACRT 134. ACRT 132 Auto Body Welding 4CR This course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge and tool skills needed to properly complete welding tasks needed in the collision repair shop. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ACRT 131, ACRT 133, ACRT 134. ACRT 133 Refinish & Surface Preparation 4CR This course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge and tool skills needed to properly prepare finishes for painting. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ACRT 131, ACRT 132, ACRT 134. ACRT 134 Auto Finishes/ Paint Application I 4CR This course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge and tool skills needed to properly paint vehicles. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ACRT 131, ACRT 132, ACRT 133.

Course Descriptions

ACCT& 203 Principles of Accounting III 5CR (Previously ACCT 270) The third course in the accounting transfer sequence. Students learn presentation and interpretation of financial data for managerial use. Applications of accounting output to managerial control and planning are emphasized. Prerequisite: ACCT& 202, or instructor permission.

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ACRT 211

Body Panel Replacement & adjustment I 4CR This course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge and tool skills needed to adjust body and panels, bumper, and doors. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ACRT 212, ACRT 213, ACRT 214. ACRT 212

Minor Unibody and Frame Alignment 4CR This course focuses on the diagnosing, repair procedures, and product knowledge needed to use frame and measuring equipment to properly straighten unibody and frame vehicles. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ACRT 211, ACRT 213, ACRT 214.

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Course Descriptions ACRT 213

Automotive Finishes/ Paint Application II 4CR This course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge and tool skills needed to complete advance painting procedures. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ACRT 211, ACRT 212, ACRT 214. ACRT 214 Paint Tinting & Matching I 4CR This course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge and tool skills needed to a properly complete paint mixing and matching procedures. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ACRT 211, ACRT 212, ACRT 213. ACRT 221

Body Panel Replacement & Adjustment II 4CR This course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge and tool skills needed to a remove, replace and adjust body panels. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ACRT 222, ACRT 223, ACRT 224. ACRT 222 Mechanical and Electrical Systems 4CR This course focuses on the diagnosing, repair procedures, and product knowledge needed to accomplish mechanical and electrical system repairs. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ACRT 221, ACRT 223, ACRT 224.

Course Descriptions

ACRT 223 Auto Finishes/ Paint Application III 4CR This course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge and tool skills needed to complete advance auto finish and paint application procedures. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ACRT 221, ACRT 222, ACRT 224. ACRT 224 Paint Tinting & Matching II 4CR This course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge and tool skills needed to complete advanced paint tinting and matching procedures. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ACRT 221, ACRT 222, ACRT 223. ACRT 231 Major Unibody & Frame Alignment 4CR This course focuses on the diagnosing, repair procedures, and product knowledge needed to accomplish advance measuring and frame straitening tasks. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ACRT 232, ACRT 233, ACRT 234. ACRT 232

Advanced Collision Repair Procedures 4CR This course focuses on the diagnosing, repair procedures, and product knowledge needed to complete estimates. Students will also perform general collision shop procedures such as welding, filling and finishing metal. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ACRT 231, ACRT 233, ACRT 234. ACRT 233 Specialized Paint Finishes 4CR This course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge and tool skills needed to complete specialized finish tasks. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ACRT 231, ACRT 232, ACRT 234.

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ACRT 234 Paint Problems 4CR This course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge and tool skills to identify and fix paint problems. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ACRT 231, ACRT 232, ACRT 233. APDZ 311 Intro to Applied Design 5CR A survey course of concepts and issues in applied design. Design terminology will be reviewed and contemporary design-related concepts such as human factors, interaction design, usability, and heuristics will be examined. Through these lenses students will gain an overview of the Applied Design program. They will assess their technical, design, and academic skills; identify areas for improvement; and undertake a research project related to their area of interest and specialization. Students will consider and begin refining their personal design aesthetic. Prerequisite: Admission to BTAD program or instructor permission. APDZ 321 The Business of Design 5CR This course provides an overview of business vocabulary, functions, processes, and the design segment for students in the BTAD program. It also addresses aspects of management and leadership, law, contracts, and human resources. Case studies of design businesses are included. Prerequisite: Admission to the BTAD Program. APDZ 331 Managing Creativity & Innovation 5CR The unique role of the manager who is responsible for creation and design is examined. Particular attention is paid to the skills needed to lead a team of creative professionals. Prerequisite: Admission to the BTAD Program. APDZ 332 Entrepreneurship & Design 5CR A practical study of how design innovations lead to new opportunities. Issues of copyright, patent, license, marketing, securing capital and freelancing will be discussed. Students will create a business plan for an entrepreneurial design venture. Prerequisite: Admission to BTAD program or instructor permission. APDZ 333 Applied Design Technology 5CR Course designed for BTAD students to learn a new or updated technology software taught in a lower-division course while working directly with an upper-division faculty adviser to ensure lower-division technology outcomes and upper-division communication, problem solving and project design outcomes are met. Prerequisite: Admission to the BTAD Program. APDZ 334 Applied Design Theory 5CR Course designed for BTAD student to learn or enhance a skill, technique or theoretical understanding taught in a lower-division course while working directly with an upper-division faculty adviser to ensure lower-division course skills outcomes and upperdivision, critical thinking, analytical and project design outcomes are met. Prerequisites: Admission to BTAD Program and instructor permission. APDZ 335

Introduction to Computational Design 5CR Computational design emphasizes the use of pre-established rules or parameters to generate multiple designs. The designer learns to critically assess each design and determine which designs meet the desired idea or concept. This course provides a survey of the discipline of computational design as it relates to theory and application. Prerequisites: Admission to BTAD program or instructor permission, HUM 311 or HUM 312 recommended.

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Course Descriptions APDZ 381 Theory of Interactivity 5CR This course provides a survey of the field of interaction design from historical, cultural and industry practice perspectives. Students will study the basics of human perception, explore the rules that govern interaction design, and examine principles of humancomputer interaction. Prerequisite: Admission to the BTAD Program or instructor permission. APDZ 382 Brand Communication and Marketing 5CR This course provides a survey of the field of Brand Communication design and marketing from historical, cultural and industry practice perspectives. Students will study the principles of brand communication and contemporary marketing theory. Prerequisite: Admission to the BTAD Program or instructor permission. APDZ 441 Project Management 5CR Examines essential strategies and methods for managing projects. Students apply a step-by-step methodology to develop plans, apply project management concepts, demonstrate presentation skills and perform a post project review for projects specific to the design field. Prerequisite: Admission to BTAD program. APDZ 451 Design Team Practicum 5CR Under the direction of their instructor, students will work in teams to perform design tasks in partnership with real-world design projects. Some on-site work at a partner organization may be required. Prerequisites: Admission to the BTAD Program and instructor permission.

APDZ 497 Design Practice Internship 1-5CR Professional practice design internship designed to expand student learning in the workplace. Students work with a faculty member and internship site supervisor to formalize the academic component of the experience through development of learning objectives, professional projects, timesheets, work samples and written reviews. Prerequisites: Admission to the BTAD Program and instructor permission. ARCH 201 History of American Architecture 3CR History of architecture in America from the 17th century colonial beginnings through the 20th century. Topics include European influence, vernacular styles, architectural terminology, and an introduction to the architects who influenced design and construction in America. Prerequisite: ENGT 101 or instructor permission. ARCH 205 Theory of Architecture 3CR This course investigates and studies architectural theories of importance. Lecture and research assignments will expand awareness of architectural values and principles, including influential theorist and theories throughout history. Prerequisite: ENGT 101 or instructor permission.

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ARGT 111 Architectural Print Reading I 2CR This course is an overview and introduction to print reading and interpretation, layout, terminology, dimensions, symbols, and building codes. Actual professional construction documents will be reviewed and studied. Prerequisite: ENGT 101 or instructor permission. ARGT 112 Construction Techniques 3CR This course covers residential construction methods and techniques, terminology, materials, codes, permits, and costs. Includes study of wood framing systems, foundation systems, stair design, and roof systems. Prerequisite: ARGT 111. ARGT 121 Architectural Graphics 4CR Fundamentals of architectural graphics including: terminology, media, line conventions, architectural lettering, scaling, sketching, floor plans, sections, elevations, and dimensioning techniques. Emphasis is placed on architectural standards and conventions. Prerequisite: ENGT 101 or instructor permission. ARGT 131 Revit Architecture I 4CR This is a basic course in Autodesk Revit Architecture. Students will learn how to produce an instructor directed architectural project utilizing basic Revit operations such as walls, roofs, annotations and dimensions. Revit is an architectural program and uses architectural elements and terminology. Prerequisites: ARGT 222 and ENGT 131, or instructor permission. ARGT 132 Revit Architecture II 4CR This is a continuation course in Revit Architecture. Students will focus on the model building process and create more advanced architectural models. To accomplish this, students will use: massing, file linking, site tools, rendering, custom content and other trades like lighting and HVAC. Students will use other tools to review and verify information in their model with a focus on constructability, design, and sustainability. Prerequisites: ENGT 131, ARGT 131. ARGT 211 Architectural Print Reading II 2CR Advanced print reading and interpretation of architectural construction documents are covered in this course. Students will demonstrate their knowledge of layout, terminology, materials, construction methods, dimensions, symbols, building codes, and notes through professional presentations. Prerequisite: ARGT 222 or instructor permission. ARGT 212

Residential Construction Techniques 3CR This course researches different construction methods and techniques, terminology, materials, and building systems. It includes research of new and innovative construction materials, technologies, and applications. Prerequisite: ARGT 112.

Course Descriptions

APDZ 461 Senior Capstone Project or Internship 5CR Students will complete a culminating project integrating all of their coursework and resulting in an employment portfolio piece that involves all steps in the design process from ideation to proof of concept, showcasing their abilities. Prerequisites: Admission to the BTAD program and instructor permission.

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ARGT 215 Construction Materials 4CR Study of construction materials for residential and commercial architecture including wood, steel, plastics, composites, masonry and concrete. Prerequisite: ARGT 112 or instructor permission. ARGT 221 Residential Design Drawings 4CR This course covers residential design beginning at a conceptual stage through the design development phase of a project. Design drawings are produced utilizing common architectural graphic media techniques. Prerequisites: ARGT 211 and ARCH 201, or instructor permission.

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Course Descriptions ARGT 222

Residential Construction Documents 4CR This is a continuation of ARGT 221 and the course covers residential architectural graphics standards, floor plans, sections, elevations, stairs, roofs, and foundations. Primary focus is on developing and refining production of construction documents. Various architectural graphics media and software applications are utilized. Prerequisite: ARGT 221, or instructor permission. ARGT 223 Residential Project - Advanced 4CR This is an advanced class for students to create an additional residential project: Students will develop a complete set of design and/or working drawings applying local building codes. Various architectural graphics media and software applications are utilized. Prerequisite: ARGT 222 or instructor permission. Construction Management and Estimating 3CR This course covers construction units of measure, estimating techniques, methods of preparing construction estimates, and management of a construction project. Office practices and construction scheduling are covered. Prerequisites: MATH 098 or MATH 099, ARGT 112, or instructor permission.

Course Descriptions

ARGT 225

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ARGT 261 Architectural Problems I 4CR Students develop and define a project while coordinating with faculty. The architectural project begins at a conceptual stage and will develop through the design phase of a project. Students work individually or on teams, explore and document their work through sketches, study models, and design and present their drawings. Prerequisites: ENGT 132, ARGT 222. ARGT 262 Architectural Problems II 4CR This is a continuation of Architectural Problems I. Student will continue project development while coordinating with faculty. The student’s architectural project begins at the design phase and will continue through design development. Students working individually or on teams, explore and document their project process through sketches, study models, presentation, and working drawings. Prerequisite: ARGT 222. ARST 211 Intro to Automotive Restoration 2CR This course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge and tool skills to expose students to the principles of automotive restoration. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ARST 212, ARST 213, ARST 214, ARST 215, ARST 216.

ARGT 228 Construction Specifications 4CR This course is a study of the construction contract process, methods, materials, contractual relationships, specifications, construction document organization, and the Construction Specifications Institute (CSI) – Masterformat 2004. Prerequisite: ARGT 222 or instructor permission.

ARST 212 Automotive Restoration Research 2CR This course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge and computer skills needed to research information to complete automotive restoration tasks. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ARST 211, ARST 213, ARST 214, ARST 215, ARST 216.

ARGT 231 Commercial Building Systems 3CR This course is a study of commercial construction techniques: materials, standards, codes, permits, and costs. Various concrete construction systems and steel frame systems are investigated and presented. Prerequisite: ARGT 112.

ARST 213 Restoration Skills I 2CR This course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge and tool skills to complete beginning restoration tasks. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ARST 211, ARST 212, ARST 214, ARST 215, ARST 216.

ARGT 232 Commercial Design Drawings 4CR This course covers commercial design beginning at a conceptual stage through the design development phase of a project. A set of design drawings are produced utilizing common architectural graphic media techniques. Prerequisites: ENGT 131, ARGT 222.

ARST 214

ARGT 233

Commercial Construction Documents 4CR This course is a continuation of ARGT 232 covering commercial architectural graphics standards, floor plans, sections, elevations, stairs, roofs, and foundations. Primary focus is on production of construction documents. Various architectural graphics media and software applications are utilized. Prerequisite: ARGT 232.

Introduction to Automotive Interior Restoration 2CR This course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge and tool skills to complete simple interior restoration tasks. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ARST 211, ARST 212, ARST 213, ARST 215, ARST 216. ARST 215 Wood & Metal Surface Preparation 4CR This course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge and tool skills to complete basic wood and metal preparation tasks. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ARST 211, ARST 212, ARST 213, ARST 214, ARST 216.

ARGT 241 Architectural Illustration 4CR This course covers architectural illustration techniques and includes: orthographic, axonometric and oblique projection; and 2- point perspectives. Lettering and rendering techniques with emphasis on a variety of media and software are covered. Prerequisite: ENGT 131 or ARGT 131.

Paint Fundamentals Properties and Applications 4CR This course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge and tool skills to complete basic refinishing tasks. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ARST 211, ARST 212, ARST 213, ARST 214, ARST 215.

ARGT 245 Architectural Model Building 3CR This is a basic course in architectural model making. Emphasis is placed on current model making techniques used by architectural and engineering firms for marketing their professional services and proposals. Prerequisite: ARGT 221.

ART 102 Beginning Two-Dimensional Design 5CR This course covers exploration of the two-dimensional design process including problem identification, creative ideation, and design solutions. Students will engage in critical dialogue exploring the content and context of design solutions. The principles and elements of 2D design will be examined, and students will execute designs based on them.

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Course Descriptions ART 111

Beginning Painting for Non-Art Majors 5CR Introduces students to traditional and contemporary concepts and techniques in oil/acrylic painting. Students learn to organize form, color, and tone while practicing various methods of application, color mixing, and surface preparation. ART 112

Intermediate Painting for Non Art Majors 5CR Students further the skills taught in ART 111 and investigate painting as a means for self-expression. Explores advanced compositions and use of various materials. Prerequisite: ART 111. ART 113

Advanced Painting for Non Art Majors 5CR Provides advanced instruction in painting using objectives taught in ART 112. Students demonstrate advanced compositional theories and painting methods. Prerequisite: ART 112. ART 121 Introduction to Drawing 5CR In-depth study of basic drawing skills, sketching principles, and visual communication through the drawn object and imagination. Composition, black and white media, subject matter and drawing genres will be examined in both representational and non-representational projects and exercises. ART 124 Introduction to Printmaking 5CR This course explores the fundamentals of repeatable print media, including relief, monotype, monoprint, intaglio (dry and wet techniques) and stencil printing. Students create repeatable matrix and edition prints.

ART 202

Survey of Western Art – Medieval & Renaissance 5CR This course examines the arts of the Byzantine Empire, Islam, and Western Christendom through 1520 AD. This course traces the artistic creativity of the people who lived during the Early Christian, Medieval and Renaissance periods of history, that is, from about 1 AD to about 1540. ART 203 Intermediate Drawing 5CR This course builds on existing skills and terminology learned in Intro to Drawing. Advanced approaches to composition, color media, subject matter and drawing genres will be examined in both representational and non-representational projects and exercises. Prerequisite: ART 121. ART 205 Human Life Drawing 5CR This advanced drawing class focuses on the human form as a basis for learning about composition, anatomy (including skeletal and muscular structure), and movement. Students will exit the class with the ability to draw the human form accurately in proportions, gesture, balance, structure, foreshortening, and surface anatomy. Prerequisite: ART 121 or instructor permission. This class draws from the nude human form.

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ART 252 Advanced Two-Dimensional Design 4CR This course is designed to build on learning from ART 102, TwoDimensional Graphic Design. Exercises are intended to stimulate imagination, develop capacity for critical thinking, envision design solutions, explore conceptual design, and foster an understanding of the creative process. Students will review the elements and principles of design, marketing, branding, logos, and symbols. Class projects will help build upon student portfolio. Prerequisite: ART 102. ART 255 Beginning Painting for Art Majors 5CR Covers theory as well as practice and encourages originality and creativity. Furthers student understanding of the methods, materials, and ideas that are central to the practice of painting still lifes, figures, and landscapes. Prerequisite: ART 121, ART 113, or instructor permission. ART 256

Intermediate Painting for Art Majors 5CR Students continue to develop their skills in painting by focusing on advanced composition theories and abstract concepts. Explores value, pattern, tone, mood, and color theories to stretch and refine abilities. Prerequisite: ART 255. ART 257 Advanced Painting for Art Majors 5CR Explores traditional and contemporary approaches to theory and practice of painting. Emphasizes evoking emotional responses through effects of light, color, and abstraction. Students produce a series of paintings and further explore materials and subject matter. Prerequisite: ART 256. ART 324 Printmaking for Designers 5CR This course explores relief, monotype, monoprint, intaglio (dry and wet techniques), and stencil printmaking. Additional media are introduced for historical background. Students research the historical evolution of print graphic arts and forge connections between traditional print media and modern commercial print design. Prerequisite: Admission to the BTAD program or instructor permission. ART& 100 Art Appreciation 5CR Art Appreciation is an introduction to the diverse foundations of visual art. Course objectives primarily focus on students’ recognition of and conversation about the basic concepts, styles, techniques, terminology and principles of visual art and art history. ASL& 121 American Sign Language I 5CR The student will learn the basic manual alphabet, vocabulary, numbers and phrases used in everyday communication, while developing an understanding and appreciation of Deaf Culture.

Course Descriptions

ART 201 Survey of Western Art – Ancient 5CR Major achievements in painting, sculpture, architecture, and the decorative arts in Europe, the Near East, and North Africa, from prehistoric times to the beginnings of Christianity. This course also offers some preliminary training in visual analysis and a practical introduction to the critical vocabulary of art history.

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ASL& 122 American Sign Language 2 5CR The student will build on skills developed in ASL& 121. The focus is on more advanced vocabulary, and more conversational dialogues. Prerequisite: ASL& 121. AUTO 120 Electrical/Electronics Systems 14CR This course focuses on the understanding and repair of automotive electrical, electronic systems utilizing industry standards and techniques. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. AUTO 124 Maintenance Procedures 2CR This course focuses on the understanding of periodic maintenance intervals and procedures utilizing industry standards, techniques, and equipment. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisite: AUTO 120.

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Course Descriptions AUTO 134 Engine Performance – Ignition 4CR This course focuses on the understanding, analysis and repair of automotive ignition systems utilizing industry standards and techniques. This course teaches to the global outcome of commmunication. Prerequisites: AUTO 120, AUTO 124, or instructor permission. Corequisites: AUTO 135, AUTO 136, AUTO 138.

AUTO 225 Manual Transmission & Transaxles 8CR This course focuses on the understanding, diagnosis and repair of automotive manual transmissions, transaxles, clutches, differentials and drive axles utilizing industry standards, techniques and equipment. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125. Corequisite: AUTO 220.

AUTO 135 Engine Performance – Fuel 4CR This course focuses on the understanding and repair of automotive fuel delivery systems utilizing industry standards, techniques, and equipment. Prerequisites: AUTO 120, AUTO 124, or instructor permission. Corequisites: AUTO 134, AUTO 136, AUTO 138.

AUTO 298 Job Search & Employability Skills 1CR Students develop job search objectives and practice employability skills needed for successful employment. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

AUTO 136 Engine Performance – Emissions 4CR This course focuses on the understanding, repair and service of automotive emission systems and devices utilizing industry standards and techniques. Prerequisites: AUTO 120, AUTO 124, or instructor permission required. Corequisites: AUTO 134, AUTO 135, AUTO 138. AUTO 138 Engine Performance – Computer Control 4CR This course focuses on the understanding and repair of the Onboard Diagnostic system and automotive computer controls utilizing industry standards, techniques and equipment. Prerequisites: AUTO 120, AUTO 124, or Instructor permission required. Corequisites: AUTO 134, AUTO 135, AUTO 136.

Course Descriptions

AUTO 140 Brake Systems 10CR This course focuses on the diagnosis, repair and service of automotive brakes and anti-lock brake control systems utilizing industry standards, technique and equipment. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125. Corequisite: AUTO 144. AUTO 144 Suspension, Steering & Alignment 6CR This course focuses on the understanding, diagnosis and repair of automotive suspension, steering and alignment principles utilizing industry standards, equipment and techniques. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125. Corequisite: AUTO 140. AUTO 210 Engines, Cylinder Blocks, Cooling Systems 10CR This course focuses on the understanding, diagnosis, repair and servicing of automotive engines and cooling systems utilizing industry standards, techniques and equipment. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125. Corequisites: AUTO 215, AUTO 220, AUTO 225. AUTO 215 Air Conditioning Service 6CR This course focuses on the understanding, diagnosis and repair of automotive air conditioning and heating systems utilizing industry standards, techniques and equipment. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125. Corequisites: AUTO 210, AUTO 220, AUTO 225. AUTO 220 Automatic Transmission & Transaxles 8CR This course focuses on the understanding, diagnosis and repair of automotive automatic transmissions and transaxles utilizing industry standards, techniques and equipment. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125. Corequisites: AUTO 210, AUTO 215, AUTO 225.

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BAKE 102

Cake Decorating & Working Chocolate 15CR Introduction of mixing methods, leavening agents, decorating and piping skills. Chocolate tempering, decorative work and production of truffles and other candy. Prerequisite: BAKE 101. BAKE 103 Advanced Bakery Technique 15CR Students will learn the advanced techniques for decorated cakes, specialty bread, chocolate and sugar work design. Prerequisite: BAKE 101. BAKE 110 Cake Decoration 5CR This course is an introduction to cake decorating skills. Students will learn piping skills and techniques. Buttercream, fondant and gum paste methods will be explored to create special occasion cakes and design wedding cakes. Prerequisite: CULA 127. Corequisites: BAKE 120. BAKE 114

Artisan Chocolates and Confections 7CR This course is an introduction to specialty chocolates and confections. Students will explore the creation, design, and marketing of truffles, candies, caramel and confections. Students will learn chocolate handling, tempering, and origin. Prerequisite: CULA 127. Corequisite: BAKE 122. BAKE 120 Specialty Cakes and Design 6CR This course is an introduction to specialty cakes. Students will learn construction and a variety of techniques to create classical cakes. The focus is on formulas, fillings, icings and finishing to produce salable bakery items. Prerequisite: CULA 127. Corequisite: BAKE 110. BAKE 122 Artisan Bread 7CR Students will learn the advanced techniques for making specialty bread using preferment techniques and starters. Breads from other cultures will be explored. Prerequisite: CULA 127. BAKE 124 Centerpiece Construction 2CR Students will learn the advanced techniques for constructing specialty centerpieces and showpieces. Advanced techniques for chocolate, sugar and bread sculpture construction will be learned. Prerequisite: CULA 127. Corequisites: BAKE 110, BAKE 120. BAS 100

PREPARING FOR SUCCESSFUL ONLINE LEARNING 2CR This class prepares students to be successful learners in an online environment. Students will utilize computers, software, a learning management system, and other technology that they may encounter as online students. Students will also be instructed in general organizational skills.

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Course Descriptions BAS 101 Computer Applications 2CR This class is an introduction to using computers, software, and understanding computer terminology. It covers an introduction to Windows and basic word processing (Microsoft Word), spreadsheets (Microsoft Excel) and presentation software (Microsoft PowerPoint). Students will gain an understanding of what the programs are and how to create, print and save files. BAS 102 Office Administration 3CR This course develops the foundation for the Administrative Assistant position. It includes the areas of office Systems, finance, business law, and management. BAS 105 Keyboarding I 3CR The major objectives are to develop touch control of the keyboard, develop proper keyboarding techniques, build basic speed and accuracy, and provide concentrated practice. The student must show competency by keyboarding at 30 words a minute for 3 minutes, with 3 or fewer errors. BAS 106 Keyboarding II 3CR Continue to develop touch control of the keyboard, develop proper keyboarding techniques, build speed and accuracy, through concentrated practice. The student must show competency by keyboarding at 50 words a minute for 3 minutes, with 3 or fewer errors. Prerequisite: BAS 105 or instructor permission. BAS 107 Keyboarding III 3CR Develop touch control of the keyboard and proper keyboarding techniques, build speed and accuracy. The student must show competency by keyboarding at 60 words a minute for 3 minutes, with 3 or fewer errors. Prerequisite: BAS 106 or instructor permission.

BAS 110 Office Technology 5CR The student will develop the knowledge and skills to become an office professional in a changing work environment. The course covers current office procedures, document creation, communication, records management, and telephone skills. BAS 111 Word I 5CR Beginning and intermediate word processing course covering document creation, retrieval, character and paragraph formatting, multi-page documents, columns, tables, graphics, and form letters. BAS 112 Excel I 5CR Beginning and intermediate course in spreadsheets. Topics covered include document creation, retrieval, entering text, numbers, and formulas, formatting, financial functions, what-if analysis, graphs, and charts. Prerequisite: BAS 120 or instructor permission. BAS 114 Access 5CR Beginning to intermediate course on databases. Topics covered include design of tables, forms, reports and queries; update, add, delete, and modifying data; and creating custom reports and forms using filters and queries. Prerequisite: BAS 120 or instructor permission.

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BAS 115 Publisher 5CR Students learn the basic elements of desktop publishing using Microsoft Publisher to produce brochures, business cards, catalogs, flyers, newsletters, and invitations. BAS 120 Business Computer Management 5CR This course will develop skills to manage desktop productivity tools and systems. Content includes file management – archiving, storing, security, sharing. Additional content includes cookies, FTP, email, and use of internet. BAS 124 PowerPoint 4CR Beginning to intermediate course in presentation software. Topics covered include design of slides, slide sort, slide show. Learn to import and edit graphics, import data from spreadsheets, and use 3D effects to create slide presentations. BAS 130 Business English I 5CR This course covers punctuation and grammar rules which govern business communications, composition of business letters and memos, and proofreading techniques. BAS 135 Outlook 4CR This course is designed to teach the elements of the current version of Outlook, including email, calendar, contacts and tasks. Prerequisite: BAS 120 or instructor permission. BAS 172

E-Commerce/ Business On The Internet 4CR Introduction to how to conduct business on the Internet. Students will examine the impact of the Internet on our economy, look at typical business uses, see the effects of nonsales E-Commerce, and look at marketing, advertising and customer service on the Internet. Prerequisite: BAS 120. BAS 191 Customer Service/Help Desk 3CR The student will acquire and enhance his/her communication, listening, problem solving, and decision making skills which will assist the student on the job to provide customer satisfaction. BAS 198 Job Search Skills 2CR Designed to develop knowledge and skills that will be demanded on the job to provide the student a high degree of success. Course covers how to write a resume, dependable strengths report and cover letter; searching and applying for a job, interviewing for a job, and how to follow-up on the job search. BAS 211 WORD II 5CR A continuation of BAS 111. Students learn advanced word processing skills that the Microsoft Certified Application Specialist Word exam assesses. Prerequisite: BAS 111 or instructor permission.

Course Descriptions

BAS 108 Keyboarding IV 3CR The major objectives are to develop touch control of the keyboard, develop proper keyboarding techniques, build basic speed and accuracy, and provide concentrated practice. The student must show competency by keyboarding at 75 words a minute for 3 minutes, with 3 or fewer errors. Prerequisite: BAS 107.

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BAS 212 Excel II 5CR This course covers in-depth theory and application of spreadsheets. Topics include macros, databases, what-if analysis, pivot tables, import/export, advanced formulas and creating and managing files. Prerequisites: BAS 112 and BUSA 100 or equivalent placement score, or instructor permission. BAS 225

Integrated Application for Business Productivity 5CR This course is designed to give understanding of the integration of word processing, desktop publishing, database, and spreadsheet technology by using simulations to produce documents. Prerequisites: BAS 111, BAS 112, BAS 124, and BAS 114, or instructor permission.

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Course Descriptions BAS 230 Business English II 5CR Course covers review of English grammar usage and style; review and practice punctuation, capitalization, number usage, abbreviations, plurals, and word division; and practice editing skills. Business documents currently used in industry will be edited for correct spelling, punctuation, consistency, and organization. Prerequisite: BAS 130. Project Management with Microsoft Project 5CR Use Microsoft Project to assist in the development and monitoring of a project. Prerequisite: BAS 120.

BPMT 120 Mechanical Systems Servicing 10CR This course focuses on the diagnosing, repair procedures, product knowledge and tool skills needed to service mechanical systems utilizing industry standards, techniques and equipment. Prerequisites: ABED 040 or MATH 070, and ABED 046 or equivalent placement scores. Corequisite: BPMT 115.

BIOL& 175 Human Biology w/Lab 5CR An introductory survey of human anatomy and physiology designed for non-science majors or pre-allied health students not going into nursing or dental hygiene. Relationships between structures and functions in each body system are emphasized. Prerequisites: ENGL 092 or ENGL 093, MATH 070.

BPMT 125 Electrical Principles and Operation 6CR This course focuses on electrical principles and operations needed to diagnose, service and repair electrical systems. Prerequisites: ABED 040 or MATH 070 and ABED 046 or equivalent placement scores. Corequisite: BPMT 130.

BIOL& 211 Cellular Biology 5CR An examination of the biology of life which includes chemistry, organic molecules, cell structure, membrane transport, metabolic processes, mitosis and meiosis, nucleic acid structure and function, genetics, and introduces the concept of biotechnology. Includes laboratory. Prerequisite: ENGL 092 or 093 or equivalent placement score.

BPMT 130 Motor Controls Principles & Operation 10CR This course focuses on motor control principles and operations needed to diagnose, service and repair electrical systems. Prerequisites: ABED 040 or MATH 070, and ABED 046, or equivalent placement scores. Corequisite: BPMT 125.

Course Descriptions

BAS 281

BIOL& 241 Human A & P 1 6CR The first quarter of a two-quarter sequence designed to give students a working knowledge and understanding of the basic systems of the human body. Includes a basic introduction to chemistry as well as a detailed study of cytology and histology and examines the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, and sensory systems. Prerequisite: BIOL& 211 or instructor permission. BIOL& 242 Human A & P 2 6CR The second quarter of a two-quarter sequence designed to give students a working knowledge and understanding of the basic systems of the human body. The systems covered are Endocrine, Cardiovascular, Lymphatic, Respiratory, Digestive, Urinary, and Reproductive. The themes of homeostasis and system interactions are interwoven into the course and are continually stressed as each system is introduced and discussed. Prerequisite: BIOL& 241 or instructor permission. BIOL& 260 Microbiology 5CR Introduces students to the major concepts of the microbiological science. These concepts include basic anatomy, physiology and the differences between eukaryotic, prokaryotic and viral systems, growth factors and curves, techniques in microbial control, microbial interrelationships and host defenses. Includes laboratory. Prerequisites: BIOL& 211, CHEM& 121 or instructor permission. BPMT 105 HVAC Principles and Operation 6CR This course focuses on heating, ventilation and air conditioning principles and operations needed to diagnose, service and repair HVAC systems. Prerequisites: ABED 040 or MATH 070, and ABED 046 or equivalent placement scores. Corequisite: BPMT 110. BPMT 110 HVAC Servicing 10CR This course focuses on the diagnosis, repair procedures, product knowledge and tool skills needed to service HVAC systems utilizing industry standards, techniques and equipment. Prerequisites: ABED 040 or MATH 070, and ABED 046 or equivalent placement scores. Corequisite: BPMT 105.

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BPMT 115 Mechanical Principles & Operation 6CR This course focuses on the mechanical principles and operations needed to diagnose, service and repair mechanical systems. Prerequisites: ABED 040 or MATH 070, and ABED 046 or equivalent placement scores. Corequisite: BPMT 120.

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BPMT 135 Boiler Principles and Operation 6CR This course focuses on an entry level understanding of boiler safety principles, design, construction, applications, operations, ASME Codes, and training necessary to learn to operate boilers & their electrical & mechanical support systems in commercial applications. The course will prepare students to sit for a minimum Municipal Boiler Operators’ license. Prerequisites: ABED 040 or MATH 070, and ABED 046 or equivalent placement scores. Corequisite: BPMT 140. BPMT 140 Boiler Servicing and Licensing 10CR This course focuses on entry level hands on oil fired Boiler operations, diagnosing, repair procedures, product knowledge, and tool skills needed to service and maintain boilers according to ASME code requirements using a working model commercial boiler and standard practice classroom experiments with a live residential heating boiler. Prerequisites: ABED 040 or MATH 070, and ABED 046 or equivalent placement scores. Corequisite: BPMT 135. BPMT 200 Refrigeration Principles And Operation 6CR This course focuses on refrigeration principles and the operations needed to diagnose, service, and repair refrigeration systems. Prerequisites: ABED 040 or MATH 070 and ABED 046 or equivalent placement scores. Corequisite: BPMT 205. BPMT 205 Refrigeration Servicing And Licensing 10CR This course focuses on the diagnosing, repair procedures, product knowledge and tool skills needed to service refrigeration systems and attain an appropriate refrigeration license. Prerequisites: ABED 040 or MATH 070, and ABED 046 or equivalent placement scores. Corequisite: BPMT 200. BPMT 210 Electric Principles and Operation 6CR This course focuses on electronic principles and operations needed to diagnose, service, and repair electronic systems. Prerequisites: ABED 040 or MATH 070, and ABED 046 or equivalent placement scores. Corequisite: BPMT 215.

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Course Descriptions BPMT 215 Programmable Controls Principles and Operation 10CR This course focuses on programmable control principles and the operations needed to diagnose, service, and repair programmable control systems. Prerequisites: ABED 040 or MATH 070, and ABED 046 or equivalent placement scores. Corequisite: BPMT 210. BUHR 210 HR’s Role in Organization & Program Overview 1CR This course explores the field of human resources (HR) and its role in organizations. An overview of the LWIT HR programs is also covered. BUHR 215 HR Ethics and Diversity 4CR This course covers the importance of ethics in human resources (HR) and an organization’s social responsibility. The role of diversity in HR and how a diverse workforce can drive business results are also covered. BUHR 220 Employee Benefits and Risk Management 4CR This course covers the strategic considerations that should guide the design of benefit programs and the cost implications and strategies to control them. Also covered in this course are risk management and measures that create a safe and secure work environment. BUHR 230 Staffing: Recruitment, Selection, & Placement 4CR This course covers employment decisions concerning building a staff and maintaining a talented workforce. Various methods of locating qualified job candidates and assessment methods for identifying a candidate’s suitability for employment are covered.

BUHR 240 Employee and Labor Relations 3CR This course examines how employee relations can create a positive organizational culture. Students also explore facets of the labor relations process: collective representation, union organization, bargaining, and negotiations. BUHR 245 Training, Workforce Planning, Perf & Talent Mgt 4CR This course covers the principles of learning and how to facilitate training to link training objectives to organizational goals. Students also learn how to build an effective performance management program by understanding the advantages of integrating human resource (HR) and strategic planning. BUHR 250 HR Information Systems & Measuring HR Outcomes 4CR This course covers how to leverage technology in today’s environment to support human resource (HR) activities. Measurement strategies that link HR practices to achieving bottom-line business results are also covered. BUHR 255 Employment Law I 4CR This course covers employment laws and their effects on the first half of the employment life cycle. The creation and management of a diverse workforce are also included.

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BUHR 260 Employment Law II 4CR This course covers employment laws and their effects on the second half of the employment life cycle, including benefits, compensation, performance, terms and conditions of employment, and termination. Prerequisite: BUHR 255. BUHR 270 Global HR & Mergers & Acquisitions 4CR This course covers legal, political, cultural, and economic factors that affect global human resource (HR) management. HR’s crucial role in mergers and acquisitions is also included. BUHR 275 Strategic HR Mgt & Organizational Strategy 4CR This course covers business strategies and human resource (HR) best practices and their application to all HR disciplines. Effective human capital strategies and practices that give business a sustainable competitive advantage are emphasized. This is the capstone course for the HR Generalist Program and should be taken the student’s last quarter. Prerequisite: BUHR 260, or Professional in Human Resources (PHR) or Senior Professional in Human Resources (SPHR) with instructor permission. BUS& 101 Introduction to Business 5CR The course covers the survey of American business, business and economic terminology, forms of business ownership, franchising, small and international business, management and marketing concepts, and business environment. Prerequisites: MATH 080, ENGL 100 or equivalent placement scores. BUS& 201 Business Law 5CR This is an introductory course which covers the basic study of the structure and function of the American legal system as it relates to business transactions. Emphasis is placed on U.S. contract law, the Uniform Commercial Code, and negotiable instruments. Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or equivalent placement score. BUSA 100 Business Math 5CR Course will cover basic math skills needed for accounting with emphasis on solving business problems related to percentages, discounts, payroll, inventory, depreciation, simple and compound interest, present value, annuities, stocks and bonds. Prerequisite: ABED 040 or MATH 070 or equivalent placement score. BUSA 103 Business Communications 5CR This course covers listening, speaking, and writing skills used in the business environment. Students entering the class should have word processing skills and access to a computer. Prerequisite: ENGL 093 or equivalent placement score.

Course Descriptions

BUHR 235 Total Rewards (Compensation) 4CR This course reviews the total rewards of organizations by exploring their total compensation strategies. Methods to properly pay employees in a cost-effective, competitive, equitable, and legal manner are also addressed.

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BUSA 180 Small Business Management 5CR This course is an overview of contemporary principles and presentation of specific small business management tools; development of skills in analyzing and solving small business management problems. BUSA 189 Principles of Management 5CR Modern management is both exciting and challenging today. This course is organized around the four traditional functions of management: planning, organizing, leading and controlling. Contemporary topics, such as technology, empowerment, diversity, and Total Quality Management (TQM), will also be discussed.

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