Issuu on Google+

2010-2011 Catalog

11605 132nd Avenue NE Kirkland, Washington 98034-8506 (425)739-8100 www.lwtc.edu 1


General Information

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General Information

President’s Message On behalf of the faculty, staff and Board of Trustees, I welcome you to Lake Washington Technical College. LWTC has been an active part of the community since 1949. We provide affordable professional and technical training that prepares you for today’s careers and tomorrow’s opportunities. Our hands-on learning environment features multiple pathways to help you reach your educational goals – from degrees and certificates in high-demand fields to a four-year applied baccalaureate degree. We believe we’re more than an education and training college. We are really a “changing lives college.” Students come to us for different reasons: to change careers; keep abreast of changing technologies; learn English or brush up on math skills; graduate high school; prepare to transfer to a university or simply take a class for fun. Our advisers are here to help guide you in selecting the pathway that’s right for you and our outstanding faculty and supportive staff are committed to your success.

Dr. Sharon M. McGavick President

As part of our efforts to continuously improve the student experience, we have added several new programs and expanded facilities. In 2009, we introduced our first Baccalaureate Degree in Applied Design (BTAD) serving web, graphic and multimedia designers looking for career advancement. Other new program offerings include Funeral Service Education, Occupational Therapy Assistant, Physical Therapist Assistant, Energy and Science Technician, and Wine Technology. We also opened a third campus in Duvall (joining campuses in Kirkland and Redmond), offering Massage Practitioner and Esthetics.

OUR MISSION

To prepare students for today’s careers and tomorrow’s opportunities.

Our goal is to help you succeed on your chosen pathway. We look forward to welcoming you into the Lake Washington Technical College family! Dr. Sharon McGavick President

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General Information

1 ABOUT LAKE WASHINGTON TECHNICAL COLLEGE

President’s Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 About Lake Washington Technical College . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Accreditation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 We Guarantee Our Graduates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Selecting a Program of Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Frequently Asked Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

General Information

Table of Contents

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2 PROGRAMS OF STUDY

Programs by Area of Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Accounting Accounting - AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Accounting - Paraprofessional - Certificate of Proficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Practical Accounting - Certificate of Proficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Accounting Assistant - Certificate of Completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 I-Best Accounting Assistant - Certificate of Completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Animation Game Design Animation Game Design - AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Applied Design Bachelor of Technology in Applied Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Architectural Graphics Architectural Graphics - AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Architectural Graphics - Certificate of Proficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Auto Collision Repair Technician Auto Collision Repair Technician - AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Auto Collision Repair Technician - Certificate of Proficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Auto Repair Technician Auto Repair Technician - AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Auto Repair Technician - Certificate of Proficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 General Service Technician - Certificate of Completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 I-BEST General Service Technician - Certificate of Completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Baking Arts Baking Arts - AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Building & Plant Maintenance Building & Plant Maintenance - AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Building & Plant Maintenance - Certificate of Proficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Business Administration Support Business Administration Support - AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Business Administration Support - Certificate of Proficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Human Resources - Certificate of Proficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Project Management Support - Certificate of Completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Microsoft Office Applications - Certificate of Completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Office Assistant - Certificate of Completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Web Maintenance - Certificate of Completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 I-BEST Business Administration Support - Certificate of Completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 I-BEST Web Maintenance - Certificate of Completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Child Care Manager Child Care Manager - AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Child Care Manager - Certificate of Proficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Civil Engineering Graphics Civil Engineering Graphics Emphasis - AAS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Civil Engineering Graphics Emphasis - Certificate of Proficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Landscape Design Graphics - Certificate of Proficiency. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

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Computer Security & Network Technician Computer Security & Network Technician - AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 IT Support Technician - Certificate of Proficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Network Support Technician - Certificate of Proficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Linux Security & Networking - Certificate of Completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Cosmetology Cosmetology - Certificate of Proficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Culinary Arts Culinary Arts - AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Culinary Arts - Certificate of Proficiency. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Wine EDUCATION - Certificate of Completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Dental Assistant Dental Assistant - AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Dental Assistant - Certificate of Proficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Dental Hygiene Dental Hygiene - AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Diesel & Heavy Equipment Technician Diesel & Heavy Equipment Technician - AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Diesel & Heavy Equipment Technician - Certificate of Proficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Electronics Technology Electronics Technology - AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Electronics Technology Associate of Applied Science Transfer Degree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Electronics Technician - Certificate of Proficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Digital Electronics - Certificate of Completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Electronic Automation - Certificate of Completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Electronics, Manufacturing Specialist - Certificate of Completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 PCB Design Technician - Certificate of Completion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Emergency Medical Technician – Basic Emergency Medical Technician – Basic - Certificate of Completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Energy & Science Technician Energy & Science Technician - AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Bio-Energy - Certificate of Completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Energy Technology - Certificate of Completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Industrial/Laboratory - Certificate of Completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 I-Best Energy Technology - Certificate of Completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 I-Best Industrial/Laboratory - Certificate of Completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Engineering Graphics Engineering Graphics – Mechanical Design Emphasis - AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Engineering Graphics Technician - Certificate of Proficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Tool Design Graphics - Certificate of Completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Environmental Horticulture Environmental Horticulture - AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Environmental Horticulture - Certificate of Proficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Esthetician Esthetician - Certificate of Completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Fitness Specialist/Personal Trainer Fitness Specialist/Personal Trainer - AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Fitness Specialist/Personal Trainer Associate of Applied Science Transfer Degree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Fitness Specialist/Personal Trainer - Certificate of Proficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Funeral Service Education Funeral Service Education - AAS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Healthcare Informatics Healthcare informatics - Certificate of Completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78

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Human Resources Generalist Human Resources Generalist - Certificate of Completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Machine Technology Machine Technology - AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Machine Technology - Certificate of Proficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Massage Practitioner Massage Practitioner - AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Massage Practitioner - Certificate of Proficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Massage Practitioner - Certificate of Completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Medical Assisting Medical Assisting - AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Medical Assisting - Certificate of Proficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 Medical Billing & Coding Professional Certificate of Proficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Medical Assisting Office Administration - Certificate of Completion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Motorcycle, Marine & Power Equipment Service Technology Motorcycle, Marine & Power Equipment Service Technology - AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Harley-Davidson速 Option - AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Motorcycle, Marine & Power Equipment Service Technology - Certificate of Proficiency . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Multimedia Design & Production Multimedia Design & Production - AAS Video and Web Production - AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Print Design - Certificate of Proficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Video and Web Production - Certificate of Proficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Web Design - Certificate of Proficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Digital audio/video editing - Certificate of Completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Illustrator/PhotoShop Specialty - Certificate of Completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Print Specialty - Certificate of Completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 Web page development - Certificate of Completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 Web server applications - Certificate of Completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Web Specialty - Certificate of Completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Nursing Pre-Nursing MRP, DTA - AS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Nursing - AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 Practical Nursing - Certificate of Proficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Nursing Assistant - Certificate of Completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100 Occupational Therapy Assistant Occupational Therapy Assistant - AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101 Physical Therapist Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 Physical Therapist Assistant - AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .102 Professional-Technical Education Professional-Technical Education Associate of Applied Science Transfer Degree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .104 Social & Human Services Social & Human Services - AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105 Social & Human Services - Certificate of Proficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .106 Language Interpreting Services - Certificate of Completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .107 Technology Technology MRP, DTA - AS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Welding Fabrication & Maintenance Technology Welding Fabrication & Maintenance Technology - AAS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .108 Welding Fabrication & Maintenance Technology - Certificate of Proficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .109 Wine Technology Wine Technology - AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .110 Academic Core Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .111

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3 SUPPORT SERVICES FOR STUDENTS AND COMMUNITY

Support Services for Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .114 Advising . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .114 Counseling and Special Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115 Disability Support Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115 Job Placement Assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .116 Student Government and Activities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .120 Student Conduct . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .119 Services to the Community . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121 Continuing Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121 Corporate Education/Customized Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121 eLearning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121

4 ENROLLMENT SERVICES Admissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .124 Degree- or Certificate- Seeking Students. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .124 Course Transferability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .125 Registration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .127 Student Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .128 High School Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .129 Lake Washington Technical Academy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .129 Running Start . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .129 General Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .129 High School Completion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .130 Tech Prep . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .130 Gateway to College . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .130 International Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .131

5 TUITION AND FINANCIAL AID

Tuition and fees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .136 Student Payment Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .136 Refunds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .137 2010-2011 Tuition Rates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .137 Financial Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .140 Veterans Benefits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .141

6 ACADEMIC INFORMATION

General Requirements for Degrees and Certificates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .146 Graduation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .148 Grading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .149 ESL, English as a Second Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .148

7 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

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Key to Course Prefixes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .154 New Course Names/Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .155 Key to Course Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .156 Course Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .156

DIRECTORY Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .210 Board of Trustees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .211 Faculty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .212 Administrators and Support Staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .217 College Phone Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .218 Maps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .219 Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .220 Credits. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .223

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LAKE WASHINGTON TECHNICAL COLLEGE Lake Washington Technical College (LWTC), founded in 1949, is one of Washington State’s 34 community and technical two-year institutions of higher education. We offer affordable professional and technical training for today’s job market and in 2009 LWTC was given approval to offer a four-year degree: the Bachelor of Technology in Applied Design. Training is available in 40 programs, with more than 100 professional/technical degree and certificate options in: ƒ Bachelor & Transfer Degrees ƒ Applied Design ƒ Business & Service ƒ Computer/Information Technology

ƒ Energy & Technology ƒ Food & Hospitality ƒ Health & Fitness ƒ Manufacturing ƒ Transportation Technology

The college currently has over 250 experienced faculty members and serves more than 5,000 students every year. We are centrally located in Washington State’s high tech corridor, with a main campus in Kirkland and branch campuses near Marymoor Park in Redmond and downtown Duvall. The college features small class sizes, modern equipment and hands-on training that simulates an actual job environment. Our programs provide you with high-tech, comprehensive training that will keep you in constant demand and open doors to numerous types of career opportunities. Whether you’re a recent high school graduate, a worker looking to upgrade skills or begin a new career or want to take your skills to the next level with a Bachelor of Technology in Applied Design degree, LWTC will provide a pathway to get you the skills you need to quickly find a well-paying job in a high-demand field.

ACCREDITATION Lake Washington Technical College is accredited by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities at the associate degree level and has been granted candidacy at the baccalaureate degree level. Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities (NWCCU) 8060 165th Avenue NE, Redmond, WA 98052-3981

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SPECIALIZED ACCREDITATIONS AND CERTIFICATES

Several of Lake Washington’s technical programs enjoy accreditation or certification, status by state and national organizations: Automotive

National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation Dental Assistant Commission on Dental and Dental Hygiene Accreditation Certified Nursing Washington State Department Assistant of Social and Human Services/ Washington State Department of Health Culinary Arts American Culinary Federation Engineering American Design Drafting Graphics Association Esthetician Washington State Department of Licensing Massage Therapy Washington State Department of Health – Board of Massage Medical Assisting Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Programs Motorcycle, Marine, Equipment and Engine Training & Power Equipment Council Certification Registered Nursing Washington State Department of Health

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About Lake Washington Technical College

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Specialty accreditation or certification indicates that these programs meet industry standards for preparing our students to be job ready. The College has achieved candidacy status in the following new programs: Funeral Service Education Occupational Therapy Assistant Physical Therapist Assistant

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American Board of Funeral Service Education American Council for Occupational Therapy Education (Developing Program Status) Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education

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We Guarantee Our Graduates ABOUT OUR COMMUNITY Lake Washington Technical College directly serves the communities of Kirkland, Redmond, Bellevue, Kenmore, Mercer Island, Bothell, Woodinville, Carnation, Duvall, North Bend, Fall City, Sammamish, Issaquah, Snoqualmie, Skykomish, Clyde Hill, and Medina. The college also serves students from outside our service area, as well as international students from around the world. The college’s main campus is located in the city of Kirkland, which is situated on the eastern shore of Lake Washington and has a population of more than 80,000. The surrounding area offers numerous outdoor recreational opportunities and a wealth of diverse arts, entertainment and cultural attractions. Kirkland is located just 15 miles east of Seattle and less than an hour from the foothills of the Cascade Mountains. Kirkland has a strong local economy with a healthy mix of small business, corporate headquarters, light industrial and manufacturing, and a growing base of high-tech, biotech and home-based businesses. It is also close to the major employment centers of Seattle and Bellevue, and major employers such as Boeing, PACCAR, and Microsoft.

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Lake Washington Technical College guarantees that its graduates will have the job skills necessary for entry-level employment in the technical field for which they are trained. If an employer judges a graduate as lacking in skills identified as program competencies, up to 15 tuition-free credit hours of additional training will be provided. The guarantee will apply to students earning an Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree, a Certificate of Proficiency or a Certificate of Completion awarded in December of 1999 or thereafter. Conditions which apply to this guarantee are as follows: 1. The graduate must have earned the AAS degree, the Certificate of Proficiency or Certificate of Completion from Lake Washington Technical College beginning December 1999 or thereafter and must have completed the graduation requirements within a five-year span. 2. The graduate must be employed full-time in an area directly related to the area of program concentration within 12 months of graduation. 3. The employer must certify in writing that the employee is lacking entry-level skills identified by the college as the exit-level program competencies and must specify the areas of deficiency within 90 days of the graduate’s initial employment. 4. The employer, graduate, dean, advisor and appropriate faculty member will develop a written educational plan for retraining. Retraining will be limited to 15 credit hours related to the identified skill deficiency and to those classes regularly scheduled during the period covered by the retraining plan. 5. All retraining must be completed within a calendar year from the time the educational plan is agreed upon. 6. The graduate and/or employer are responsible for the cost of books, insurance, uniforms, fees and other course-related expenses. 7. The guarantee does not imply that the graduate will pass any licensing or qualifying examination for a particular career. 8. The student’s sole option through Lake Washington Technical College to remedy skill deficiencies shall be limited to 15 credit hours of tuition-free coursework under conditions described above. 9. Activation of the graduate guarantee program may be initiated by the graduate through contact with the registrar within 90 days of the graduate’s initial employment. T E C H N I C A L

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STARTING A NEW CAREER

YOUR VALUES

Deciding which career is best for you can be a very difficult decision. LWTC’s professional advisers and counselors are available to help you match your interests and abilities with the career that fits you best. The first step in starting your new career decision process is to take a self-inventory of what is most important to you. Below are some of the major things you need to consider:

You make all kinds of personal value decisions–where to live, what to do for entertainment, what kind of clothes to wear or food to eat. Think about these choices and by assessing them, you will help identify the priorities in your life.

YOUR INTERESTS Your interests play an important role in career selection. When you enjoy what you do, you increase your chances for success because you find your work satisfying and fulfilling.

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YOUR LIFESTYLE The kind of career you choose can influence the kind of life you live. For example, some health care workers often work weekends, but they find the work rewarding and good for their self-esteem because it fulfills a personal value.

YOUR SKILLS AND ABILITIES

ADVISING AND COUNSELING SERVICES

Identify what you are good at and then talk to others about your strengths. Your skills and abilities are the key to knowing yourself better and making a positive career decision. When you enter a program that features your strengths, class work will be easier for you.

The college’s counselors and advisers are available to offer academic, career, and personal counseling to students and prospective students. Appointments are available by calling Student Development at (425)7398300. Advising services are also available online, and at advising@lwtc.edu.

YOUR WORK STYLE Think about the kind of work structure and the kind of environment you want to work in. Consider the amount of responsibility you want and the amount of stress you can handle. These personal characteristics affect your career success. Think about whether you prefer to work alone or with others, be your own boss, work outdoors, work in a large company or a small business, or interact with the public.

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Frequently Asked Questions CAN I TAKE JUST A FEW CLASSES OR SHORT-TERM TRAINING TO UPGRADE MY SKILLS? Yes. Lake Washington Technical College offers a full range of technical higher education options, including individual classes, special short-term training programs, professional certification preparation and adult continuing education options.

IS FINANCIAL AID AVAILABLE? Yes. The college participates in many forms of financial aid, including scholarships, loans and work study opportunities. More financial aid information is available in the Financial Aid section of this catalog.

WILL I RECEIVE PERSONAL ATTENTION FROM MY INSTRUCTORS? A commitment to individualized instruction is one of the aspects that sets Lake Washington Technical College apart from others. Our college features small class sizes and personalized, one-one-one instruction from teachers who truly care about your success.

WHAT OTHER EDUCATIONAL OPTIONS DO YOU OFFER? We offer online distance learning classes, adult basic education, English as a Second Language courses and adult high school completion courses. A technical high school, Lake Washington Technical Academy, is also located on the college campus. For the latest information on the college’s educational offerings, visit our Class Schedule section on the college website at www.lwtc.edu or call (425)739-8100 to obtain a printed Class Schedule.

HOW MUCH WILL MY EDUCATION COST? The answer depends upon the program you select, and whether you’re working toward a certificate, an AAS degree our BTAD degree or just want to take a few skill-building classes. For more information on program costs, see the Tuition Rates on page 138.

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WHAT CREDENTIALS WILL I RECEIVE AT THE END OF MY PROGRAM? Lake Washington Technical College offers programs of study that will lead to Associate of Applied Science (AAS), Associate of Applied Science-Transfer (AAS-T), Bachelor of Technology in Applied Design (BTAD), and Certificates of Completion and Proficiency. The length of time to completion varies depending on the program you choose and the number of classes you would take each quarter.

HOW CAN I BE SURE I’LL BE ABLE TO FIND A JOB IN THE CAREER AREA I SELECT? The college has among the highest job placement rates of any college in the area, in part because of its strong links with business and industry. While we cannot guarantee a job for every graduate, we make every effort to provide relevant training in areas with employment demand.

WILL MY DEGREE OR CERTIFICATE BE RECOGNIZED AMONG POTENTIAL EMPLOYERS? Graduates of Lake Washington Technical College have a high job placement rate because employers recognize their training and skills as valuable. Business and industry leaders serve on the college’s advisory committees to assure the training students receive is of the highest quality.

CAN I GET STARTED AT ANY TIME? Some programs permit students to enroll any quarter. Others enroll at the beginning of each quarter while still others admit students once a year. To learn more about when a particular program is open for enrollment, please make an appointment with a Student Development adviser by calling (425)739-8300. Placement testing is required for all students who are seeking degrees and certificates, and for students enrolling in English, math, and many technical classes (see page 124). For more information, contact the assessment center at (425)739-8115 or at www.lwtc.edu/assessment.

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HOW DO I FIND UPDATED INFORMATION?

WHAT ARE GLOBAL OUTCOMES?

The material in this catalog has been compiled and organized to provide the reader with a comprehensive view of the programs and courses at Lake Washington Technical College. It includes academic requirements and procedures necessary for admission and graduation. Information on programs and courses is arranged in alphabetical order. A listing by division is also available.

All programs at LWTC provide students with workplace skills that include communication, critical thinking, global and cultural awareness, teamwork, and technical and information literacy. Each program will include coursework used to assess student performance in these global outcomes:

Because curriculum revisions and program changes usually occur during the period the catalog is in circulation, students should contact the college for specific information. The quarterly Class Schedule gives information on courses offered, class hours, and class locations and has the latest calendar dates, fees and details on registration. Both the Lake Washington Technical College Catalog and the Class Schedule are regularly updated online at www.lwtc.edu, or you may obtain a copy by phoning the college at (425)739-8100. All announcements in the college catalog are subject to change without notice and do not constitute an agreement between Lake Washington Technical College and the student.

IS LAKE WASHINGTON TECHNICAL COLLEGE AN ACCREDITED COLLEGE? Lake Washington Technical College is accredited by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities at the associate degree level and has been granted candidacy at the baccalaureate degree level. Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities (NWCCU) 8060 165th Avenue NE, Suite 100, Redmond, WA 98052-3981 For information on specialized accreditations and certificates, see page 7.

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COMMUNICATION

The ability to understand, interpret, and respond appropriately to information conveyed in verbal, non-verbal, written, and symbolic ways using a variety of formats. CRITICAL THINKING

The cognitive process of gathering and evaluating information, drawing inferences, arriving at conclusions and creating solutions based on objective analysis of the evidence. GLOBAL AND CULTURAL AWARENESS

The ability to understand, interpret, interact, and respond to the differences and commonalities among people. These differences and commonalities include, but are not limited to, ethnicity, age, gender, cognitive ability, life experiences, socio-economic, family situations, and sexual orientation. TEAMWORK

An ability to work cooperatively in a group to advance a common goal. TECHNICAL AND INFORMATION LITERACY

A set of abilities requiring individuals to recognize when information is needed, to choose the appropriate tools to locate, effectively gather and evaluate the required information.

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Programs of Study

BACHELOR AND TRANSFER DEGREES Bachelor of Technology in Applied Design . . . . . . . .15 Electronics Technology Associate of Applied Science Transfer degree . . . . . . . . . . . . .58 Fitness Specialist/Personal Trainer Associate of Applied Science Transfer degree . . . . . . . . . .75 Pre-Nursing Major Related Program/ Direct Transfer degree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 Professional-Technical Education Associate of Applied Science Transfer degree . . . . . . . . .104 Technology Major Related Program/ Direct Transfer degree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17

APPLIED DESIGN Animation Game Design. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 Architectural Graphics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23–24 Bachelor of Technology in Applied Design . . . . . . . .15 Civil Engineering Graphics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42–44 Engineering Graphics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68–70 Engineering Graphics Technician . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69 Multimedia Design & Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90–97

BUSINESS & SERVICE Accounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18–21 Business Administration Support. . . . . . . . . . . . . 34–39 Child Care Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40-41 Cosmetology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48 Environmental Horticulture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71–72 Esthetician . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73 Funeral Service Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77 Human Resources Generalist. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79 Professional-Technical Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .104 Social & Human Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105–107

COMPUTER/INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Animation Game Design. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 Architectural Graphics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23–24 Bachelor of Technology in Applied Design . . . . . . . .15 Healthcare Informatics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78 Civil Engineering Graphics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42–44 Computer Security & Network Technician . . . . . 45–47 14

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Engineering Graphics Technician . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68–70 Engineering Graphics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69 Multimedia Design & Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90–97

ENERGY & TECHNOLOGY Energy & Science Technician . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63–67 Technology MRP/DTA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17

FOOD & HOSPITALITY Baking Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 Culinary Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49–50 Wine Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .110

HEALTH & FITNESS Dental Assistant. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51–52 Dental Hygiene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53–54 Emergency Medical Technician – Basic . . . . . . . . . . .62 Fitness Specialist/Personal Trainer . . . . . . . . . . . . 74–76 Funeral Service Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77 Healthcare Informatics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78 Massage Practitioner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82–83 Medical Assisting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84–86 Nursing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98–100 Occupational Therapy Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101 Physical Therapist Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .102–103 Pre-Nursing MRP/DTA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16

MANUFACTURING Building & Plant Maintenance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32–33 Electronics Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57–61 Machine Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80–81 Welding Fabrication & Maintenance Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . .108–109

TRANSPORTATION TECHNOLOGY Auto Collision Repair Technician . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25–26 Auto Repair Technician . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27–30 Diesel & Heavy Equipment Technician . . . . . . . . 55–56 Motorcycle, Marine & Power Equipment Service Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87–89

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Bachelor of Technology in Applied Design

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APPLIED DESIGN BACHELOR OF TECHNOLOGY (BTAD) 90 CREDITS

It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Prerequisites: Associate of Applied Science (AAS) in a design-related field, including 5 college-level credits each: English Composition, Quantitative Reasoning, Social Science, and Humanities. Admission Dates: fall

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS APDZ 311 Intro to Applied Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 APDZ 321 The Business of Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 APDZ 331 Managing Creativity & Innovation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 APDZ 332 Entrepreneurship & Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 APDZ 333 Design Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 APDZ 441 Project Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 APDZ 451 Design Team Practicum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 APDZ 461 Senior Capstone Project or Internship . . . . . . . . . . 5 CMST 302 Mass Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ENGL 335 Technical Writing for Designers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 HUM 311 Design Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PHIL 321 Ethics of Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PSYC 441 Psychology of Creativity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 STAT 451 Statistics & Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 STEC 351 Principles of Sustainability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Any lab science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Elective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Programs of Study

The Bachelor of Technology in Applied Design is designed to prepare students to lead design teams and serve as project managers. Graduates will be able to use technology, manage teams and projects, and create competitive advantages for business enterprises.

TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90

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Programs of Study

Pre-Nursing MRP, DTA PRE-NURSING ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE DEGREE

Programs of Study

92 CREDITS

This pathway offers a broad selection of academic courses which prepare students for upper division coursework leading to the Bachelor of Science, Nursing Degree (Entry-to-practice/basic BSN). Pre-nursing graduates are prepared to apply to BSN programs at various institutions across Washington state including the following baccalaureate institutions offering an entry-to-practice/basic BSN program and the community and technical colleges system: University of Washington, Seattle; Washington State University; Northwest University; Seattle University; Seattle Pacific University; Pacific Lutheran University; Walla Walla College, and the Washington State University Intercollegiate College of Nursing (WSU-ICN), a consortium whose members include Eastern Washington University, Gonzaga, and Whitworth. Associate degree transfers to WSU-ICN are admitted through WSU, not through the other consortium institutions. EWU participated in the development of this agreement. All programs at LWTC provide students with workplace skills that include Communication, Critical Thinking, Global and Cultural Awareness, Teamwork, and Technical and Information Literacy. Each program will include coursework used to assess student performance in these global outcomes. Lake Washington Technical College does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

NATURAL SCIENCES – 37 CREDITS BIOL& 211 Cellular Biology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BIOL& 241 Human A & P 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 BIOL& 242 Human A & P 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 CHEM& 121 Introduction to Chemistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CHEM& 131 Introduction to Organic/ Biochemistry . . . . . . . . . . 5 BIOL& 260 Microbiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 NUTR& 101 Nutrition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 3

SOCIAL SCIENCES – 15 CREDITS PSYC& 100 General Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PSYC& 200 Lifespan Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 5 SOC& 101 Introduction to Sociology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 4

HUMANITIES – 15 CREDITS CMST& 220 Introduction to Public Speaking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 **Please select 10 credits from the following list (max one language or additional communication class or performance/skills class) CMST& 210 Interpersonal Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CMST& 230 Small Group Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SPAN& 121 Spanish I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SPAN& 122 Spanish II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SPAN& 123 Spanish III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ASL& 121 American Sign Language I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ASL& 122 American Sign Language II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ART 100 Art Appreciation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ART 102 2-D Graphic Design. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ART 105 Human Life Drawing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ART 201 Survey of Western Art-Ancient . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ART 202 Survey of Western Art-Medieval & Ren . . . . . . . . . . 5 4

ELECTIVES – 10 CREDITS (max 5 credits in college-level courses as defined by LWTC, remainder fully transferable as defined by receiving institution) 6

TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 1

2

Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

3

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

4

COMMUNICATION SKILLS – 10 CREDITS ENGL& 101 English Composition I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ENGL& 102 English Composition II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 -ORENGL& 235 Technical Writing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 1

QUANTITATIVE REASONING – 5 CREDITS (must also demonstrate intermediate algebra proficiency) MATH& 146 Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

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Take ENGL& 102 if planning to attend Northwest University or Walla Walla College. See adviser for additional math requirements if planning to attend the University of Washington or Seattle University. See adviser for additional requirements if planning to attend Northwest University or the University of Washington. A curriculum that provides students with an understanding of and sensitivity to human diversity is encouraged (required by Washington State University). The credits in sociology, the humanities, and the electives provide opportunities for such a curriculum. See an adviser for suggested courses. Northwest University requires a course in cultural anthropology (sociology does not substitute). Students may be admitted to the BSN without cultural anthropology if they agree to complete the course at NU in the summer prior to the junior year. See adviser for suggestions.

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Programs of Study

Technology MRP, DTA

2

TECHNOLOGY ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE DEGREE 93 CREDITS

All programs at LWTC provide students with workplace skills that include Communication, Critical Thinking, Global and Cultural Awareness, Teamwork, and Technical and Information Literacy. Each program will include coursework used to assess student performance in these global outcomes. Lake Washington Technical College does not offer every course each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the class schedule and work out an individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS COMMUNICATION SKILLS – 10 CREDITS ENGL& 101 English Composition I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ENGL& 235 Technical Writing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 QUANTITATIVE REASONING – 10 CREDITS Choose 10 credits from the list below MATH& 141 Pre-Calculus I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MATH& 142 Pre-Calculus II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MATH& 151 Calculus I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MATH& 152 Calculus II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

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NATURAL SCIENCES – 15 CREDITS CHEM& 161 Introduction to Chemistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PHYS& 121 General Physics I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 236 C++ Programming I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SOCIAL SCIENCES – 15 CREDITS PSYC& 100 General Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PSYC& 200 Lifespan Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SOC& 101 Introduction to Sociology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TECHNOLOGY COURSE WORK – 8 CREDITS ENGT 131 AutoCAD I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 225 Solid Works for Engineering I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 HUMANITIES – 15 CREDITS **Please select 5 credits from the following communication courses CMST& 210 Interpersonal Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CMST& 220 Introduction to Public Speaking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CMST& 230 Small Group Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 **Please select 10 credits from the following list - (max one language – or performance/skills class) A second communication course from the list above can count for 5 of these credits. SPAN& 121 Spanish I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SPAN& 122 Spanish II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SPAN& 123 Spanish III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ASL& 121 American Sign Language I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ASL& 122 American Sign Language II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ART 100 Art Appreciation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ART 102 2-D Graphic Design. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ART 105 Human Life Drawing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ART 201 Survey of Western Art – Ancient . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ART 202 Survey of Western Art – Medieval & Ren . . . . . . . . 5

Programs of Study

The Technology DTA Associate of Science degree is for students planning to prepare for industrial/ mechanical technologies and mechanical/electrical/ computer engineering technology majors at Central Washington University (CWU), Eastern Washington University (EWU), and Western Washington University (WWU). The Technology DTA/MRP agreement meets all the requirements of Washington’s Direct Transfer Agreement. This agreement is between the baccalaureate institutions offering a bachelor’s of science in technology (such as Industrial Technology, Mechanical Technology, Applied Technology, Technology with various options (manufacturing, electronics, design and construction), and technology education) and the community and technical colleges system. Baccalaureate institutions that are party to this agreement are: CWU, EWU, WWU.

ELECTIVES – 20 CREDITS (max 10 credits in college-level courses as defined by LWTC, remainder fully transferable as defined by receiving institution). Select courses appropriate for intended major and intended bachelor’s institution. 1

TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 1

Students should contact an adviser and the potential transfer institution regarding their interests and specific course choices

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Programs of Study

Accounting ACCOUNTING ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE

Programs of Study

94 CREDITS

The Accounting AAS degree prepares students to gain a solid background in accounting. Academic Core courses, business courses, and computer skills related to accounting such as spreadsheets, computerized accounting software, and payroll systems complete the curriculum. Students find jobs in companies ranging from small proprietorships to corporate accounting departments, governmental organizations, and public accounting firms. Accounting AAS degree graduates will: ƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒ be able to apply manual methods and software tools to prepare accounting statements and reports ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring

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PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS ACCT 105 QuickBooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ACCT 111 Introduction to Accounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT 112 Business Calculator Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ACCT 210 Financial Accounting I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT 220 Financial Accounting II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT 230 Financial Accounting III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT 255 Income Tax I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT 256 Income Tax II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT 270 Managerial/Cost Accounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT 275 Ethics in Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT 280 Accounting Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BAS 101 Computer Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 BAS 105 Keyboarding I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BAS 112 Excel I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 114 Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 212 Excel II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ECON& 202 Macro Economics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 20 CREDITS Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Accounting

2

ACCOUNTING PARAPROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATE OF PROFICIENCY 84 CREDITS

Keyboarding skill of 30 wpm or concurrent enrollment in a keyboarding class highly recommended. Accounting Paraprofessional certificate graduates will: ƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring

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PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS ACCT 105 QuickBooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ACCT 111 Introduction to Accounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT 112 Business Calculator Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ACCT 210 Financial Accounting I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT 220 Financial Accounting II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT 230 Financial Accounting III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT 255 Income Tax I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT 256 Income Tax II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT 270 Managerial/Cost Accounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT 275 Ethics in Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT 280 Accounting Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BAS 101 Computer Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 BAS 105 Keyboarding I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BAS 112 Excel I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 114 Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 212 Excel II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Programs of Study

The Accounting Paraprofessional certificate program prepares students to gain extensive training in accounting through continuous application of their accounting knowledge in many phases of the program. Students find jobs in companies ranging from small proprietorships to corporate accounting departments, governmental organizations and public accounting firms.

ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 15 CREDITS BAS 103 Business Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BUSA 100 Business Math . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Accounting PRACTICAL ACCOUNTING CERTIFICATE OF PROFICIENCY

Programs of Study

66 CREDITS

The Practical Accounting certificate program prepares students to gain extensive training in accounting through continuous application of their accounting knowledge in many phases of the program. Students find jobs in companies ranging from small proprietorships to corporate accounting departments, governmental organizations and public accounting firms. Keyboarding skill of 30 wpm or concurrent enrollment in a keyboarding class highly recommended. Practical Accounting certificate graduates will: ƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS ACCT 105 QuickBooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ACCT 111 Introduction to Accounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT 112 Business Calculator Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ACCT 210 Financial Accounting I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT 220 Financial Accounting II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT 230 Financial Accounting III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT 275 Ethics in Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 101 Computer Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 BAS 105 Keyboarding I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BAS 112 Excel I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 114 Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 212 Excel II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 15 CREDITS BUSA 103 Business Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BUSA 100 Business Math . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring

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Programs of Study

Accounting I-BEST ACCOUNTING ASSISTANT CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION

28 CREDITS

37 CREDITS

The Accounting Assistant certificate program prepares students for an accounting career by training, retraining or upgrading skills. Students learn the basic accounting cycle, journals, ledgers and financial statements. They are prepared for an accounting clerk position or, with some experience, to keep books for a small business.

The I-BEST Accounting Assistant certificate prepares an increasingly diverse workforce to begin accounting careers in order to meet business demands. It provides ESL and ABE students with the opportunity to pursue the Accounting Assistant Certificate of Completion while continuing their progress in Basic Skills, and it is intended to be an articulation option to the Accounting Paraprofessional Certificate of Proficiency or the Accounting AAS degree.

Keyboarding skill of 30 wpm or concurrent enrollment in a keyboarding class highly recommended. It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS ACCT 105 QuickBooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ACCT 111 Introduction to Accounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT 112 Business Calculator Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ACCT 210 Financial Accounting I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT 220 Financial Accounting II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 101 Computer Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 BAS 112 Excel I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

Corequisites: ƒ EASL 077 is a corequisite for ACCT 111, 112, and BAS 101 ƒ EASL 078 is a corequisite for ACCT 210 and BAS 112 ƒ EASL 079 is a corequisite for ACCT 220, 105

Programs of Study

ACCOUNTING ASSISTANT CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION

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It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS ACCT 105 QuickBooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ACCT 111 Introduction to Accounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT 112 Business Calculator Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ACCT 210 Financial Accounting I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACCT 220 Financial Accounting II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 101 Computer Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 BAS 112 Excel I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 EASL 077 ESL Accounting Applications I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 EASL 078 ESL Accounting Applications II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 EASL 079 ESL Accounting Applications III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

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Animation Game Design ANIMATION GAME DESIGN ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE

Programs of Study

102 CREDITS

The Animation/Game Design AAS degree has a strong emphasis on game development and is also designed to prepare students to work in a variety of settings. Graduates will be able to create animated graphics applicable to gaming, marketing, advertising, educational, and interactive media that use 3D animation. Animation/Game Design AAS degree graduates will: ƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒ demonstrate technical proficiency and creative skills ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS MMDP 103 Intro to Drawing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 104 Color Theory I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 105 Storyboard Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 114 Human Life Drawing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 122 Photoshop I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 124 3D Animation I with MAYA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 127 Unreal I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 130 Cartooning I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 134 3D Materials & Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 137 Lighting & Composition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 138 Introduction to Level Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 148 Cartooning II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 150 Character Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 157 Introduction to Game Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 165 3D for Games I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 210 ZBrush I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 142 Photoshop II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 -ORMMDP 172 Cartooning III -ORMMDP 215 ZBrush II MMDP 190 Portfolio/Job Search . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 162 Photoshop III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5 -ORMMDP 170 Motion Graphics -ORMMDP 182 Unreal II MMDP 250 Character Rigging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 20 CREDITS Written Expression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Oral Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Programs of Study

Architectural Graphics

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ARCHITECTURAL GRAPHICS ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE 116 CREDITS

Architectural Graphics AAS degree graduates will: ƒ be prepared for entry-level positions in the architectural engineering field. ƒ complete a design project relating to their discipline ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS ARCH 201 History of American Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ARGT 111 Architectural Print Reading I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ARGT 112 Construction Techniques. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ARGT 121 Architectural Graphics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ARGT 131 Revit Architecture I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ARGT 132 Revit Architecture II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ARGT 205 Theory of Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ARGT 211 Architectural Print Reading II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ARGT 221 Architectural Graphics – Residential I . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ARGT 222 Architectural Graphics – Residential II . . . . . . . . . . 4 ARGT 225 Construction Management & Estimating . . . . . . . . 4 ARGT 231 Architectural Graphics – Commercial I . . . . . . . . . . 4 ARGT 232 Architectural Graphics – Commercial II. . . . . . . . . . 4 ARGT 233 Architectural Graphics – Commercial III . . . . . . . . . 4 ARGT 261 Architectural Problems I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ARGT 262 Architectural Problems II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 CEGT 211 Civil Engineering Graphics I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 101 Engineering Graphics Orientation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 ENGT 105 Engineering Computer Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ENGR 111 Engineering Graphics I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGR 113 Introduction to Dimensioning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGR 115 Engineering Graphics II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 131 AutoCAD I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 132 AutoCAD II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 202 Specialized Technical Employment Prep. . . . . . . . . 2

Programs of Study

The Architectural Graphics AAS degree prepares students for careers with architecture firms, construction companies, city, county and state architectural and civil engineering departments and corporate architectural and civil engineering departments. Technicians are needed to develop site plans, construction details, building designs, cost estimates, specification plans for new buildings, remodeling and additions to existing buildings.

TECHNICAL ELECTIVES – 4 CREDITS May be taken from ARGT CEGT or ENGT areas. Student should consult an academic adviser. ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 25 CREDITS General Physics (PHYS& 121) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 College Algebra with Applications (MATH 111) . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Architectural Graphics ARCHITECTURAL GRAPHICS CERTIFICATE OF PROFICIENCY

Programs of Study

78 CREDITS

The Architectural Graphics certificate prepares students for careers with architecture firms, construction companies, city, county and state architectural and civil engineering departments and corporate architectural and civil engineering departments. Technicians are needed to develop site plans, construction details, building designs, cost estimates, specification plans for new buildings, remodeling and additions to existing buildings. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Architectural Graphics certificate graduates will: ƒ be prepared for entry-level positions in the architectural engineering field ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS ARCH 201 History of American Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ARGT 111 Architectural Print Reading I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ARGT 112 Construction Techniques. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ARGT 121 Architectural Graphics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ARGT 205 Theory of Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ARGT 221 Architectural Graphics – Residential I . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ARGT 222 Architectural Graphics – Residential II . . . . . . . . . . 4 ARGT 225 Construction Management & Estimating . . . . . . . . 4 ARGT 231 Architectural Graphics – Commercial I . . . . . . . . . . 4 ARGT 232 Architectural Graphics – Commercial II. . . . . . . . . . 4 CEGT 211 Civil Engineering Graphics I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 101 Engineering Graphics Orientation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 ENGT 105 Engineering Computer Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ENGR 111 Engineering Graphics I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGR 113 Introduction to Dimensioning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGR 115 Engineering Graphics II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 131 AutoCAD I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 132 AutoCAD II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 15 CREDITS Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Intro to Algebra (MATH 090) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Auto Collision Repair Technician

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AUTO COLLISION REPAIR TECHNICIAN ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE 116 CREDITS

The Auto Collision Repair Technician AAS degree graduates will: ƒ be prepared for employment in the collision body and/ or collision paint repair industry ƒ meet ASE and I-CAR skill standards. ƒ dismantle collision related components, replace damaged parts, and straighten dents. ƒ evaluate surface substrates in planning sequences needed in prepping a surface for required surface coatings. ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. ƒ TRAN 110, 112, 113, and 125 must be taken in the first quarter. ƒ CWEX Cooperative Work Experience may be completed in the student’s last 2 quarters of training by instructor permission only. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS TRAN 110 Computer Basics/ Transportation Trades . . . . . . . . 2 TRAN 112 Shop & Business Practices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TRAN 113 Basic Electrical Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 TRAN 125 Mechanical Principles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACRT 121 Basic Body Repair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 122 Basic Body Refinishing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 123 Vehicle/Damage Identification & Analysis . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 124 Basic Detailing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 131 Metal Straightening/ Plastic Repair Techniques . . 4 ACRT 132 Auto Body Welding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 133 Refinish & Surface Preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

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Auto Finishes/ Paint Application I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Body Panel Replacement & Adjustment I. . . . . . . . 4 Minor Unibody & Frame Alignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Auto Finishes/Paint Application II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Paint Tinting & Matching I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Technical Electives: choose from list below . . . . . 32

ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS 20 CREDITS Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above. TECHNICAL ELECTIVES (INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION REQUIRED)

Programs of Study

The Auto Collision Repair Technician AAS degree consists of six quarters of collision auto body repair and auto paint training. Students will spend their first quarter of training in a transportation core curriculum. Students have the option of specializing in Restoration, or Custom Painting.

ADVANCED COLLISION FOCUS ACRT 221 Body Panel Replacement & Adjustment II . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 222 Mechanical & Electrical Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 223 Auto Finishes/Paint Application II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 224 Paint Tinting & Matching II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 231 Major Unibody & Frame Alignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 232 Advanced Collision Repair Procedures . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 233 Specialized Paint Finishes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 234 Paint Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 RESTORATION FOCUS ARST 211 Introduction to Automotive Restoration . . . . . . . . 2 ARST 212 Automotive Restoration Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ARST 213 Restoration Skills I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ARST 214 Introduction to Automotive Interior Restoration . 2 ARST 215 Wood & Metal Surface Preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ARST 216 Paint Fundamentals, Properties, & Applications . 4 CUSTOM PAINTING FOCUS ACPT 211 Introduction to Custom Painting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACPT 212 Custom Painting Product/ Data Research . . . . . . . 4 ACPT 213 Custom Painting Design & Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACPT 214 Custom Paint Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

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Auto Collision Repair Technician AUTO COLLISION REPAIR TECHNICIAN CERTIFICATE OF PROFICIENCY

Programs of Study

79 CREDITS

Auto Collision Repair Technician certificate consists of four quarters of collision auto body repair and auto paint training. Students will spend their first quarter of training in a transportation core curriculum. Students have the option of continuing their education by pursuing an AAS degree in Collision Repair and specializing in Restoration, Custom Painting, or Industrial Coatings. Auto Collision Repair Technician certificate graduates will: ƒ be prepared to obtain entry level positions as automotive collision body/paint technicians ƒ dismantle collision related components, replace damaged parts, and straighten dents. ƒ evaluate surface substrates in planning sequences needed in prepping a surface for required surface coatings. ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS TRAN 110 Computer Basics/ Transportation Trades . . . . . . . . 2 TRAN 112 Shop & Business Practices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TRAN 113 Basic Electrical Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 TRAN 125 Mechanical Principles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACRT 121 Basic Body Repair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 122 Basic Body Refinishing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 123 Vehicle/Damage Identification & Analysis . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 124 Basic Detailing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 131 Metal Straightening/ Plastic Repair Techniques . . 4 ACRT 132 Auto Body Welding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 133 Refinish & Surface Preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 134 Auto Finishes/Paint Application I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 211 Body Panel Replacement & Adjustment I. . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 212 Minor Unibody & Frame Alignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 213 Auto Finishes/Paint Application II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACRT 214 Paint Tinting & Matching I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 15 CREDITS Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

ƒ TRAN 110, 112, 113, and 125 must be taken in the first quarter. ƒ CWEX Cooperative Work Experience may be completed in the student’s last 2 quarters of training by instructor permission only. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

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Auto Repair Technician

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AUTO REPAIR TECHNICIAN ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE 117 CREDITS

Auto Repair Technician AAS degree graduates will: ƒ be prepared for employment in automotive dealership service centers, independent repair shops, and specialty or customized shops ƒ be prepared to succeed on the ASE Certification exam ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS TRAN 110 Computer Basics/ Transportation Trades . . . . . . . . 2 TRAN 112 Shop & Business Practices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TRAN 113 Basic Electrical Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 TRAN 125 Mechanical Principles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 AUTO 120 Electrical/Electronics Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 AUTO 124 Maintenance Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 AUTO 134 Engine Performance – Ignition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 AUTO 135 Engine Performance – Fuel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 AUTO 136 Engine Performance – Emission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 AUTO 138 Engine Performance – Computer Controls . . . . . . 4 AUTO 140 Brake Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 AUTO 144 Suspension, Steering & Alignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 AUTO 210 Engine Repair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 AUTO 215 Heating & Air Conditioning Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 AUTO 220 Automatic Transmission & Transaxles . . . . . . . . . . . 8 AUTO 225 Manual Transmission & Axles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 AUTO 298 Job Search . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

Programs of Study

Today’s automobile is designed and engineered at a higher level of technology than ever before. This produces a high demand for trained repair technicians who can meet the increased technical challenges. This program prepares students for employment in automotive dealership service centers, independent repair shops, and specialty or customized shops. The auto repair technician field is rapidly changing and relies more and more on advanced knowledge–particularly in the electrical and electronics areas. As a well-trained technician with current skills, you can expect rapid employment and a steady rising income. In addition, this program includes preparation for the ASE (Automotive Service Excellence) certification.

ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 20 CREDITS Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

ƒ TRAN 110, 112, 113, and 125 must be taken in the first term. ƒ AUTO 120 Electrical/Electronics must be completed before Engine Performance Series (AUTO 134, 135, 136 and 138). ƒ AUTO 298 must be completed in the last term of training. ƒ CWEX Cooperative Work Experience may be completed in the student’s last 2 terms of training, used as a requirement for classes within the term the student is registered for by instructor permission only. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

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Auto Repair Technician AUTO REPAIR TECHNICIAN CERTIFICATE OF PROFICIENCY

Programs of Study

89 CREDITS

Today’s automobile is designed and engineered at a higher level of technology than ever before. This produces a high demand for trained repair technicians who can meet the increased technical challenges. This program prepares students for employment in independent repair shops, and specialty or customized shops. The auto repair technician field is rapidly changing and relies more and more on advanced knowledge – particularly in the electrical and electronics areas. As a well-trained technician with current skills, you can expect rapid employment and a steadily rising income. In addition this program includes preparation for the ASE (Automotive Service Excellence) certification. Auto Repair Technician certificate graduates will: ƒ be prepared for employment in automotive dealership service centers, independent repair shops, and specialty or customized shops ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. ƒ TRAN 110, 112, 113, and 125 must be taken in the first term. ƒ AUTO 120 Electrical/Electronics must be completed before Engine Performance Series (AUTO 134, 135, 136 and 138). ƒ AUTO 298 must be completed in the last term of training. ƒ CWEX Cooperative Work Experience may be completed in the student’s last 2 terms of training, used as a requirement for classes within the term the student is registered for by instructor permission only.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS TRAN 110 Computer Basics/ Transportation Trades . . . . . . . . 2 TRAN 112 Shop & Business Practices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TRAN 113 Basic Electrical Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 TRAN 125 Mechanical Principles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 AUTO 120 Electrical/Electronics Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 AUTO 124 Maintenance Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 TECHNICAL ELECTIVES Select a minimum of 42 credits with Instructor approval AUTO 134 Engine Performance – Ignition Systems . . . . . . . . . 4 AUTO 135 Engine Performance – Fuel Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 AUTO 136 Engine Performance – Emission Systems . . . . . . . . 4 AUTO 138 Engine Performance – Computer Controls . . . . . . 4 AUTO 140 Brake Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 AUTO 144 Suspension, Steering & Alignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 AUTO 210 Engine Repair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 AUTO 215 Heating & Air Conditioning Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 AUTO 220 Automatic Transmission & Transaxles . . . . . . . . . . . 8 AUTO 225 Manual Transmission & Axles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 AUTO 298 Job Search . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 15 CREDITS Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

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Auto Repair Technician

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GENERAL SERVICE TECHNICIAN CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION 32 CREDITS

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS TRAN 110 Computer Basics/ Transportation Trades . . . . . . . . 2 TRAN 112 Shop & Business Practices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TRAN 113 Basic Electrical Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 TRAN 125 Mechanical Principles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 AUTO 120 Electrical/Electronics Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 AUTO 124 Maintenance Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

Programs of Study

Today’s automobile is designed and engineered at a higher level of technology than ever before. According to many automotive industry estimates, there is a critical shortage of technicians. Industry is turning to education to attract individuals into the career field and provide the training needed for employment. Many employers say they need entry-level technicians who have the essential knowledge and skills required for fundamental service and maintenance tasks including a general understanding of all automobile systems with a solid foundation in electrical/electronic systems, while others prefer to hire technicians with a broad skill set from an automotive program with more depth and breadth. The General Service Technician certificate is intended to be an articulation option to the Automotive Repair Technician Certificate of Proficiency or AAS degree program. In addition, this program includes preparation for two of the ASE (Automotive Service Excellence) certifications. It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. ƒ TRAN 110, 112, 113, and 125 must be taken before AUTO 120 and 124. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

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Auto Repair Technician I-BEST GENERAL SERVICE TECHNICIAN CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION

Programs of Study

38 CREDITS

Today’s automobile is designed and engineered at a higher level of technology than ever before. According to many automotive industry estimates, there is a critical shortage of technicians. Industry is turning to education to attract individuals into the career field and provide the training needed for employment. Many employers say they need entry-level technicians who have the essential knowledge and skills required for fundamental service and maintenance tasks including a general understanding of all automobile systems with a solid foundation in electrical/electronic systems, while others prefer to hire technicians with a broad skill set from an automotive program with more depth and breadth. The I-BEST General Service Technician certificate prepares an increasingly diverse workforce to meet employer demands in the automotive industry and is intended to be an articulation option to the Automotive Repair Technician Certificate of Proficiency or AAS Degree program. It provides ESL and ABE students with the opportunity to pursue the General Service Technician Certificate while continuing their progress in Basic Skills.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS TRAN 110 Computer Basics/ Transportation Trades . . . . . . . . 2 TRAN 112 Shop & Business Practices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TRAN 113 Basic Electrical Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 TRAN 125 Mechanical Principles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 AUTO 120 Electrical/Electronics Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 AUTO 124 Maintenance Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 EASL 074 ESL Transportation Applications I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 EASL 076 ESL Transportation Applications II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

In addition, this program includes preparation for two of the ASE (Automotive Service Excellence) certifications. It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. ƒ TRAN 110, 112, 113, and 125 must be taken before AUTO 120 and 124. ƒ EASL 074 is a corequisite for TRANS 110, 112, 113, and 125. ƒ EASL 076 is a corequisite for AUTO 120 and AUTO 124. Admission Dates: winter, summer

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Programs of Study

Baking Arts

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BAKING ARTS ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE 108 CREDITS

This program is certified by the American Culinary Federation. Upon graduation, students will be eligible to receive their initial ACF certifications in either culinary arts or baking arts, depending on their area of specialization. Baking Arts AAS degree graduates will: ƒ be prepared for a range of entry level positions in the field ƒ be prepared for certification from the American Culinary Federation as a Certified Pastry Culinarian ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS BAKE 110 Cake I (Cake Decorating) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAKE 114 Artisan Chocolate & Confections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 BAKE 120 Cake II (Specialty Cakes ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 BAKE 122 Artisan Breads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 BAKE 124 Centerpiece Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 CULA 116 Introduction to Culinary Skills & Concepts. . . . . . . 9 CULA 120 Restaurant Fundamentals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 CULA 127 Introduction to Baking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 CULA 128 Food Service Safety & Sanitation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 CULA 130 Supervision & Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CULA 137 Nutrition in Food Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CULA 142 Costing & Menu Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CULA 160 Beverage Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CULA 195 Capstone, Portfolio, & Masterpiece Dinner . . . . . . 5 CULA 196 Internship, Externship/Cooperative . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Programs of Study

The Baking Arts AAS degree prepares students for employment opportunities in a professional pastry kitchen, bakeshop, or business with professional product lines. Students develop academic knowledge and occupational skills that are required for job acquisition, retention and advancement. The Baking Arts degree is recognized and accredited by the American Culinary Federation. Baking Arts students are eligible to receive CPC certifications upon graduation. In addition, graduates will earn a variety of NRAEF certifications to add to their portfolio.

ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 20 CREDITS Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

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Programs of Study

Building & Plant Maintenance BUILDING & PLANT MAINTENANCE ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE

Programs of Study

116 CREDITS

Building Plant Maintenance AAS degree graduates will be prepared to work in building and office complexes, food processing plants, and a wide variety of industrial and manufacturing plants. This program includes preparation for Boiler and Refrigeration certifications. Students will also receive instruction on lean manufacturing techniques, sustainable energy practices, and will be prepared to pursue other educational and certification opportunities in these fields. Building Plant Maintenance AAS degree graduates will: ƒ be prepared for a range of entry level positions in the field ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS BPMT 105 HVAC Principles & Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 BPMT 110 HVAC Servicing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 BPMT 115 Mechanical Principles & Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 BPMT 120 Mechanical System Servicing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 BPMT 125 Electrical Principles & Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 BPMT 130 Motor Control Principles & Operation . . . . . . . . . . 10 BPMT 135 Boiler Principles & Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 BPMT 140 Boiler Servicing & Licensing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 BPMT 200 Refrigeration Principles & Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 BPMT 205 Refrigeration Servicing & Licensing . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 BPMT 210 Electronic Principles & Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 BPMT 215 Programmable Controls Principles & Operation 10 ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 20 CREDITS Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

CWEX Cooperative Work Experience may be substituted for one course in the student’s last quarter of training by instructor permission only. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

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Building & Plant Maintenance

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BUILDING & PLANT MAINTENANCE CERTIFICATE OF PROFICIENCY 79 CREDITS

Building Plant Maintenance certificate graduates will: ƒ be prepared for a range of entry level positions in the field ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS BPMT 105 HVAC Principles & Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 BPMT 110 HVAC Servicing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 BPMT 115 Mechanical Principles & Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 BPMT 120 Mechanical System Servicing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 BPMT 125 Electrical Principles & Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 BPMT 130 Motor Control Principles & Operation . . . . . . . . . . 10 BPMT 135 Boiler Principles & Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 BPMT 140 Boiler Servicing & Licensing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 15 CREDITS Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

Programs of Study

Building Plant Maintenance certificate graduates will be prepared to work in building and office complexes, food processing plants, and a wide variety of industrial and manufacturing plants. This program includes preparation for Boiler and Refrigeration certifications.

Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

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Business Administration Support BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SUPPORT ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE

Programs of Study

102 CREDITS

The Business Administration Support AAS degree is designed to meet the growing need for trained support professionals. The primary goal of the degree is to prepare students to use the various software applications in the work environment as a support tool to enhance day-to-day business operations. Business Administration Support AAS degree graduates will: ƒ be prepared for entry-level positions in their area of expertise: office software, customer service, project management, and Web maintenance ƒ carry out office administration procedures and management support using technology ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS BUS& 101 Intro to Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 105 Keyboarding I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BAS 106 Keyboarding II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BAS 110 Office Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 111 Word . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 112 Excel I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 114 Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 120 Business Desktop Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 124 PowerPoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 BAS 130 Business English I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 135 Outlook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 BAS 191 Customer Service Help Desk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BAS 195 Capstone Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BAS 198 Job Search . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 BAS 215 Publisher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 225 Integrated Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 281 Project Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 118 HTML. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Technical Elective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS – 20 CREDITS Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Business Administration Support

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BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SUPPORT CERTIFICATE OF PROFICIENCY 79 CREDITS

It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS – 15 CREDITS Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79

Business Administration Support certificate graduates will:

Programs of Study

ƒ be prepared for entry-level positions in their area of expertise: office software, customer service, project management, and Web maintenance ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS BAS 105 Keyboarding I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BAS 110 Office Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 191 Customer Service Help Desk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BAS 111 Word . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 112 Excel I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 114 Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 120 Business Desktop Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 124 PowerPoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 BAS 130 Business English I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 135 Outlook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 BAS 198 Job Search . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 BAS 215 Publisher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 225 Integrated Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 281 Project Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 118 HTML. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

The Business Administration Support certificate is designed to meet the growing need for trained support professionals. The primary goal of the certificate is to prepare students to use the various software applications in the work environment as a support tool to enhance day-to-day business operations.

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Business Administration Support HUMAN RESOURCES CERTIFICATE OF PROFICIENCY

Programs of Study

85 CREDITS

The Human Resources certificate is designed to teach Human Resources (HR) and basic office skills needed for office and entry-level HR positions. These office skills include basic administrative procedures, computer skills, and records processing. HR specialty topics include ethics, diversity, staffing, HR information systems, outcomes measurement, and employment law. Students may find jobs as Human Resources Assistants or in general clerical support. Human Resources certificate graduates will: ƒ be prepared for a range of entry level positions in the field ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS ACCT 111 Introduction to Accounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 105 Keyboarding I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BAS 111 Word . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 112 Excel I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 114 Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 120 Business Desktop Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 124 PowerPoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 BAS 135 Outlook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 BAS 191 Customer Service Help Desk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BAS 215 Publisher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 225 Integrated Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BUHR 210 HR’s Role in Organizations & Program Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 BUHR 215 HR Ethics & Diversity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 BUHR 230 Staffing: Recruitment, Selection, & Placement . . . 4 BUHR 250 HR Info Systems & Measuring HR Outcomes . . . . . 4 BUHR 255 Employment Law I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 BUHR 260 Employment Law II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS – 15 CREDITS Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Programs of Study

Business Administration Support MICROSOFT OFFICE APPLICATIONS CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION

55 CREDITS

28 CREDITS

The Project Management Support certificate is designed to serve students seeking job transitions, skills upgrades, and continuing industry education. The primary goal of the certificate is to prepare students to use the various software applications in the work environment as a support tool to enhance day-to-day business operations. Graduates will find entry-level jobs as Project Management Coordinators, Project Management Assistants, Events or Conference Coordinators.

The Microsoft Office Applications certificate is designed to meet the needs of students who want to increase their computer knowledge. This certificate is directed towards people who have work experience and want to upgrade their skills by learning the current software applications used in the business community.

It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS BAS 191 Customer Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BAS 111 Word . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 112 Excel I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 120 Business Desktop Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 114 Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 110 Office Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 281 Project Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 135 Outlook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 BAS 105 Keyboarding I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS BAS 111 Word . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 112 Excel I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 120 Business Desktop Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 114 Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 124 PowerPoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 BAS 135 Outlook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Programs of Study

PROJECT MANAGEMENT SUPPORT CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION

2

TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS – 15 CREDITS Written Communication (BUSA 103 Business Communications) . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Programs of Study

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Programs of Study

Business Administration Support OFFICE ASSISTANT CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION

WEB MAINTENANCE CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION

42 CREDITS

37 CREDITS

The Office Assistant certificate is designed to meet the needs employers for trained office assistants. Students learn Microsoft Office applications as well as how to use calculators, phones, fax and photocopy machines. Students may find jobs as receptionists or clerical support.

The Web Maintenance certificate is designed to serve students seeking job transitions, skills upgrades, and continuing industry education. The primary goal of the certificate is to prepare students to use the various software applications in the work environment as a support tool to enhance day-to-day business operations. Graduates will find entry-level jobs as Web Assistants, Web Maintenance Support, Web Specialists, Web Designers, and Webmasters.

It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS BAS 112 Excel I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 191 Customer Service Help Desk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BAS 111 Word . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 120 Business Desktop Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 124 PowerPoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 BAS 114 Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 105 Keyboarding I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 -ORBAS 106 Keyboarding II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BAS 106 Keyboarding II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 -ORBAS 107 Keyboarding III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BAS 110 Office Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 135 Outlook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42

It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS BAS 105 Keyboarding I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BAS 111 Word . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 120 Business Desktop Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 191 Customer Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 MMDP 118 HTML. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 122 Photoshop I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 133 Dreamweaver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 153 Web Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 MMDP 238 JavaScript . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Programs of Study

Business Administration Support I-BEST WEB MAINTENANCE CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION

32 CREDITS

40 CREDITS

The I-BEST Business Administration Support certificate prepares students for positions in beginning administrative support, reception, customer care, and sales/marketing support. Graduates will also be eligible for entry into a variety of certificate programs (Web maintenance; publication/sales/marketing support; project management support; customer service/product support; or Microsoft Office applications) as well as the full degree program.

The I-BEST Web Maintenance Support certificate prepares an increasingly diverse workforce to begin an educational/career pathway in business administration support. It provides ESL and ABE students with the opportunity to pursue the Web Maintenance certificate of Completion while continuing their progress in Basic Skills (ESL and ABE), and it is intended to be an articulation option to the Business Administration Support (BAS) Associate of Applied Science degree as well as to the Multi Media Design and Production (MMDP) Associate of Applied Science degree. The primary goal of the certificate is to prepare students to use the various software applications in the work environment as a support tool to enhance day-to-day business operations.

It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: winter PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS BAS 198 Job Search . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 BAS 111 Word . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 112 Excel I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 114 Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 120 Business Desktop Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 124 PowerPoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 EASL 070 Computer Applications I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 EASL 072 Computer Applications II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

All professional-technical courses (BAS, and MMDP) are taught with a 50% overlap of the professional-technical faculty and the basic skills (ESL) faculty. In addition to the professional-technical courses, I-BEST students are required to enroll in EASL 070 (ESL Computer Applications I) and EASL 082 (ESL Web Applications).

Programs of Study

I-BEST BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SUPPORT CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION

2

It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS BAS 105 Keyboarding I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BAS 191 Customer Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BAS 111 Word . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 120 Business Desktop Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ITAD 122 DHTML/JavaScript. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 118 HTML. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 122 Photoshop I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 133 Dreamweaver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 EASL 070 ESL Computer Applications I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 EASL 082 ESL Web Applications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40

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Programs of Study

Child Care Manager CHILD CARE MANAGER ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE

Programs of Study

94 CREDITS

Theoretical knowledge is gained through evening classroom lectures; practical experience takes place in college labs and in family-and center-based programs where students are employed. Students develop competencies necessary to plan, implement and evaluate a quality program for children, following National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) standards. This program prepares students to seek new employment or update professional skills and knowledge as a family care provider; program supervisor of a child care center; child care manager; and lead teacher in child care, preschool and Headstart programs. Child Care Manager AAS degree graduates will: ƒ be prepared for a lead teacher or entry level management position in the child care field ƒ plan, implement and evaluate children’s programs ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS ECEM 111 Intro to Early Childhood Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ECEM 112 Child Development. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ECEM 113 Guidance Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ECEM 121 Diversity Issues. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 ECEM 122 Creative Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ECEM 124 Language Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ECEM 125 Science & Math Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ECEM 131 Advocacy/Legal Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 ECEM 132 Parent Interactions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ECEM 133 Program Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ECEM 134 Safety/Health/Nutrition. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ECEM 212 Policies & Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ECEM 213 Staff Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ECEM 214 Financial Planning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Technical Electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 20 CREDITS Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above. TECHNICAL ELECTIVES – 10 CREDITS Choose a minimum of 10 elective credits from the following list. (In addition to the following courses, other business, computer or technology courses may be taken with instructor permission.) BUSA 100 Business Math . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BUSA 103 Business Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ECEM 150 S.T.A.R.S. Basic Guidebook Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ECEM 199 Independent Study* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5 ECEM 299 Independent Study* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5 IFAD 151 First Aid/CPR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 * These courses are by instructor permission only.

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Programs of Study

Child Care Manager

2

CHILD CARE MANAGER CERTIFICATE OF PROFICIENCY 74 CREDITS

Child Care Manager certificate graduates will: ƒ be prepared for a lead teacher or entry level management position in the child care field ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS ECEM 111 Intro to Early Childhood Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ECEM 112 Child Development. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ECEM 113 Guidance Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ECEM 121 Diversity Issues. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 ECEM 122 Creative Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ECEM 124 Language Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ECEM 125 Science/Math Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ECEM 131 Advocacy/Legal Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 ECEM 132 Parent Interactions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ECEM 133 Program Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ECEM 134 Safety/Health/Nutrition. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ECEM 212 Policies & Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ECEM 213 Staff Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ECEM 214 Financial Planning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENT – 10 CREDITS Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science (taught within the ECEM curriculum)

Programs of Study

Theoretical knowledge is gained through evening classroom lectures; practical experience takes place in college labs and in family- and center-based programs where students are employed. Students develop competencies necessary to plan, implement and evaluate a quality program for children, following National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) standards. Program prepares students to seek new employment or update professional skills and knowledge as a family care provider; program supervisor of child care center; child care manager; and lead teacher in child care, preschool and Headstart programs.

TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

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Programs of Study

Civil Engineering Graphics CIVIL ENGINEERING GRAPHICS EMPHASIS ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE

Programs of Study

120 CREDITS

The Civil Engineering Graphics AAS degree is designed to prepare a graphics technician to work directly under the supervision of an engineer, architect or designer producing detailed drawings. Civil Engineering Graphics Technicians are specialists in translating the rough sketches, layouts and written specifications of architects, engineers, or designers into a drawing showing the complete details and specifications for the finished product. Civil Engineering Graphics Emphasis AAS degree graduates will: ƒ be prepared for entry-level positions in the civil engineering graphics field ƒ be well grounded in basic drafting fundamentals, concepts and techniques ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS ARGT 111 Architectural Print Reading I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 CEGT 211 Civil Engineering Graphics I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 CEGT 212 Civil Engineering Graphics II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 CEGT 221 Surveying. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 CEGT 231 Civil 3D Computer Aided Design I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 CEGT 241 Civil Engineering Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 CEGT 251 Boundary Surveys & Plat Design I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 CEGT 252 Boundary Surveys & Plat Design II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 CEGT 261 Roadway Design & Layout I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 CEGT 262 Roadway Design & Layout II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 CIVE 205 Theory of Urban Design & Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ENGR 111 Engineering Graphics I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGR 113 Dimensioning & Tolerancing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGR 115 Engineering Graphics II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGR 121 Descriptive Geometry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGR 122 Engineering Graphics III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 101 Introduction to Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 ENGT 102 Technical Employment Preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 ENGT 105 Engineering Computer Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ENGT 131 Computer Aided Drafting & Design I . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 132 Computer Aided Drafting & Design II . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 133 Computer Aided Drafting & Design III. . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 202 Specialized Tech Employment Prep . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 GEOG 251 Cartography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 GISA 211 Geographic Information Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Technical Electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 25 CREDITS Physics (PHYS&121) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above. TECHNICAL ELECTIVES May be taken from ARGT, ENGT or GISA areas. Student should consult an academic adviser.

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Civil Engineering Graphics

2

CIVIL ENGINEERING GRAPHICS EMPHASIS CERTIFICATE OF PROFICIENCY 83 CREDITS

Civil Engineering Graphics Emphasis certificate graduates will: ƒ be prepared for entry-level positions in the civil engineering graphics field ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS ARGT 111 Architectural Print Reading I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 CEGT 211 Civil Engineering Graphics I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 CEGT 212 Civil Engineering Graphics II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 CEGT 221 Surveying. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 CEGT 241 Civil Engineering Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 CEGT 251 Boundary Surveys & Plat Design I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 CEGT 261 Roadway Design & Layout I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 CEGT 262 Roadway Design & Layout II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGR 111 Engineering Graphics I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGR 113 Dimensioning & Tolerancing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGR 115 Engineering Graphics II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGR 121 Descriptive Geometry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGR 122 Engineering Graphics III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 101 Introduction to Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 ENGT 102 Technical Employment Preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 ENGT 105 Engineering Computer Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ENGT 131 Computer Aided Drafting & Design I . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 132 Computer Aided Drafting & Design II . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Technical Electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Programs of Study

The Civil Engineering Graphics Emphasis certificate is designed to prepare a graphics technician to work directly under the supervision of an engineer, architect or designer producing detailed drawings. Civil Engineering Graphics Technicians are specialists in translating the rough sketches, layouts and written specifications of architects, engineers, or designers into a drawing showing the complete details and specifications for the finished product.

ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 15 CREDITS Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above. TECHNICAL ELECTIVES Technical electives may be taken from ARGT, ARCH, CEGT, CIVE, ENGT, GEOG, or GISA areas. Student should consult an academic adviser.

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Programs of Study

Civil Engineering Graphics LANDSCAPE DESIGN GRAPHICS CERTIFICATE OF PROFICIENCY

Programs of Study

32 CREDITS

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The Landscape Design Graphics certificate is designed to give Environmental Horticulture students and professionals the computer aided drafting and design skills required in industry. In addition to learning multiple CAD techniques, students will gain skills in land description and planning. Prerequisites: Completion of Environmental Horticulture degree or certificate or Instructor permission. It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS ARGT 111 Architectural Print Reading I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 CEGT 211 Civil Engineering Graphics I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 CEGT 212 Civil Engineering Graphics II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 CEGT 281 Landscape Design Graphics I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 CIVE 205 Theory of Urban Design & Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ENGT 108 Introduction to Drafting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 -ORENGR 115 Engineering Graphics II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 131 Computer Aided Drafting & Design I . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 132 Computer Aided Drafting & Design II . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Technical Elective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

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Programs of Study

Computer Security & Network Technician

2

COMPUTER SECURITY & NETWORK TECHNICIAN ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE 105 CREDITS

Computer Security & Network Technician AAS degree graduates will: ƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in the IT field ƒ perform successfully as computer technicians, Network technicians, installers, troubleshooters, help desk support, and network administrators ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS CSNT 114 PC Tech Fundamentals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 CSNT 121 PC Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 CSNT 127 Internet Fundamentals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CSNT 128 Operating Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 CSNT 130 Advanced Operating Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 CFOR 215 Data Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CSNT 235 Network Fundamentals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 CFOR 255 Network Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 CSNT 245 Network Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Technical Electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS - 20 CREDITS Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Programs of Study

The Computer Security & Network Technician AAS degree is designed to prepare the student for a career in the area of microcomputer technical support. Technical support personnel may perform a wide variety of duties, such as service technicians, software technicians, network technicians, computer operators, installers, trouble shooters, salespersons, help desk technicians, and network administrators. Students will enhance their computer skills to assist in network design, security implementation and forensics investigations. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above. TECHNICAL ELECTIVES – 10 CREDITS May be taken from CFOR, BAS, CSNT, or MMDP areas and must be approved by faculty Adviser.

It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

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Programs of Study

2

Programs of Study

Computer Security & Network Technician IT SUPPORT TECHNICIAN CERTIFICATE OF PROFICIENCY

NETWORK SUPPORT TECHNICIAN CERTIFICATE OF PROFICIENCY

60 CREDITS

60 CREDITS

The IT Support Technician certificate is designed to prepare technicians to work in a wide variety of computer-related industries and has a strong emphasis on A+ Certification and Networking. Graduates will be prepared for entry-level jobs such as computer field service technicians, software technicians, computer operators, installers, troubleshooters, salespersons, help desk technicians and network technicians

The Network Support Technician certificate is designed to prepare technicians to work in a wide variety of computer-related industries and has a strong emphasis on Network+ Certification, Network Administration, and Network Security. Graduates find entry-level jobs as computer field service technicians, software technicians, computer operators, installers, troubleshooters, salespersons, help desk technicians and network technicians.

The IT Support Technician certificate graduates will: ƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in the IT field ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS CSNT 114 PC Tech Fundamentals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 CSNT 121 PC Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 CSNT 127 Internet Fundamentals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CSNT 128 Operating Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 CSNT 130 Advanced Operating Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 CFOR 215 Data Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CSNT 235 Network Fundamentals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 15 CREDITS Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60

Network Support Technician certificate graduates will: ƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in the IT field ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS CSNT 235 Network Fundamentals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 CFOR 255 Network Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 CSNT 245 Network Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 15 CREDITS Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Computer Security & Network Technician

2

LINUX SECURITY & NETWORKING CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION 19 CREDITS

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS CFOR 250 Linux Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CFOR 257 Linux Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CFOR 259 Linux+ Certification Prep . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CSNT 130 Advanced Operating Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

This certificate prepares students to successfully pass the CompTIA Linux+ exam. Prerequisite: Completion of CSNT 127 Internet Fundamentals or instructor approval. Admission Dates: fall, winter spring

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The Linux Security & Networking certificate is designed to prepare the student with additional skills in Open Source operating systems and technical support for server applications. Technical support personnel may perform a wide variety of duties, such as service technicians, software technicians, network technicians, computer operators, installers, trouble shooters, salespersons, help desk technicians, and network administrators. Students will be trained in Linux, Apache Server, MySQL and Perl.

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Cosmetology COSMETOLOGY CERTIFICATE OF PROFICIENCY

Programs of Study

88 CREDITS

The Cosmetology certificate prepares students to meet state requirements, including hair styling, manicuring and permanent waving. The program consists of practical training offered offsite in collaboration with Kirkland Beauty School which is state accredited. Cosmetology certificate graduates will: ƒ be prepared for a range of entry-level positions as stylists, colorists, company representatives, platform artists, and salon managers ƒ meet the Skills Standards of Washington for Cosmetology as set forth in RCW 18.16 It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS COSM 111 Cosmetology Theory I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 COSM 112 Cosmetology Practice I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 COSM 121 Cosmetology Theory II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 COSM 122 Cosmetology Practice II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 COSM 131 Cosmetology Theory III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 COSM 132 Cosmetology Practice III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 COSM 211 Cosmetology Theory IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 COSM 212 Cosmetology Practice IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 450 hours per 13-week term. Students participate in classroom activities 40 hours per week. The required Written Communication, Quantitative Reasoning, and Social Science are taught within the Cosmetology curriculum.

Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

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Culinary Arts

2

CULINARY ARTS ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE 115 CREDITS

This program is certified by the American Culinary Federation. Upon graduation, students will be eligible to receive their initial ACF certifications in either culinary arts or baking arts, depending on their area of specialization. Culinary Arts AAS degree graduates will: ƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field as Cooks, Short Order Cooks, Pantry Cooks, Prep Cooks, Front line Cooks, Sauté Cooks, and Grill Cooks ƒ meet the Skills Standards of the American Culinary Federation ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS CULA 116 Culinary Skills & Concepts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 CULA 120 Restaurant Fundamentals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 CULA 127 Introduction to Baking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 CULA 128 Food Service Safety & Sanitation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 CULA 130 Supervision & Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CULA 137 Nutrition in Food Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CULA 142 Costing & Menu Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CULA 144 American, Regional, International, & Classical Cuisine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 CULA 146 Garde Manger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 CULA 150 Culinary Administration & Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CULA 154 Food & Beverage Procurement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CULA 155 Restaurant Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 CULA 156 Nutritional Cooking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CULA 160 Beverage Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CULA 195 Capstone, Portfolio, & Masterpiece Dinner . . . . . . 5 CULA 196 Internship/Externship/Cooperative . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Programs of Study

The Culinary Arts AAS degree prepares graduates to work in a commercial kitchen including restaurants, bakeries, cafeterias, delis, hospitals and other specialty shops. Curriculum includes basic cooking and basic baking principals, terminology and food handling practices. The program incorporates every facet of running a commercial restaurant and/or bakery. Line cooking, station rotations, wait staff, inventory, production of daily specials, manager work, sauce preparation, and maintenance of commercial equipment are included. Students must always have a valid Washington State Health Card and Serve Safe Certificate.

ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 20 CREDITS Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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2

Programs of Study

Culinary Arts CULINARY ARTS CERTIFICATE OF PROFICIENCY

WINE EDUCATION CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION

65 CREDITS

19 CREDITS

The Culinary Arts certificate prepares students for a wide variety of entry-level positions in the culinary arts field. Positions include all stations of line cooking, baking, and inventory, production of daily specials, sauce preparation and basic butchering, as well as exposure to entry-level manager duties. Curriculum includes basic cooking and basic baking principals, terminologies and food handling practices.

The Wine Education certificate provides an extensive wine knowledge to prepare students for rapid advancement into the Service Industry with an emphasis on Sommelier Certification. Students gain expertise in all wine styles and countries of origin, production, sales and food pairing.

Culinary Arts certificate graduates will: ƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field as Cooks, Short Order Cooks, Pantry Cooks, Prep Cooks, Front line Cooks, Sauté Cooks, and Grill Cooks ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

Prerequisite: Must be 21 years of age or older Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS CULA 140 Introduction to Wine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CULA 143 Wine & Food Pairing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CULA 145 Anthropology of Wine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CULA 160 Beverage Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CULA 196 Internship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS CULA 116 Culinary Skills & Concepts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 CULA 120 Restaurant Fundamentals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 CULA 127 Introduction to Baking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 CULA 128 Food Service Safety & Sanitation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 CULA 130 Supervision & Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CULA 137 Nutrition in Food Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CULA 146 Garde Manger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Dental Assistant

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DENTAL ASSISTANT ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE 90 CREDITS

Dental Assistant AAS degree graduates will: ƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒ be prepared to take the CDA exam ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, spring Prerequisite: high school completion or GED

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PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS DENT 111 Introduction to Dental Assisting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DENT 112 Introduction to Chairside Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . 6 DENT 113 Dental Practice Theory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 DENT 114 Ethics/Law, Office Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DENT 115 Oral Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DENT 117 Dental Materials I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DENT 121 Dental Assisting Practicum I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 DENT 124 Study of the Human Body. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 DENT 126 Radiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DENT 127 Dental Materials II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DENT 131 Dental Assisting Practicum II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 DENT 133 Restorative Dentistry Dental Assist . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DENT 136 Radiography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DENT 137 Dental Specialties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 DENT 211 Dental Assisting Practicum III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 DENT 214 Pharmacology/Nutrition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DENT 215 Workplace Preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DENT 294 Dental Assisting Internship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Technical Electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Programs of Study

The Dental Assistant AAS degree is designed to prepare the student with the necessary background, knowledge, and specialized skills for a career in the field of the dental professional. Students learn theory and skills from classroom lectures, laboratory practice, and hands-on practice in the Lake Washington Technical College Dental Clinic. Additional experiences in private dental practices are part of the four to six week required internship phase of training. Upon completion of this American Dental Association (ADA) accredited program, students will be eligible to take the ADA Dental Assisting Certification Examination. There is a formal admissions process for entry into this program. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 20 CREDITS Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above. ELECTIVES – 3 CREDITS See faculty adviser/instructor for pre-approval.

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Dental Assistant DENTAL ASSISTANT CERTIFICATE OF PROFICIENCY

Programs of Study

82 CREDITS

Dental Assistant certificate students will learn theory and skills from classroom lectures, laboratory practice, and hands-on practice in the Lake Washington Technical College Dental Clinic. Additional experiences in private dental practices are part of the four to six week required internship phase of training. Upon completion of this American Dental Association (ADA) accredited program, students will be eligible to take the ADA Dental Assisting Certification Examination. Dental Assistant certificate graduates will: ƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS DENT 111 Introduction to Dental Assisting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DENT 112 Introduction to Chairside Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . 6 DENT 113 Dental Practice Theory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 DENT 114 Ethics/Law, Office Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DENT 115 Oral Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DENT 117 Dental Materials I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DENT 121 Dental Assisting Practicum I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 DENT 124 Study of the Human Body. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 DENT 126 Radiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DENT 127 Dental Materials II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DENT 131 Dental Assisting Practicum II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 DENT 133 Restorative Dentistry for Dental Assist . . . . . . . . . . 3 DENT 136 Radiography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DENT 137 Dental Specialties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 DENT 211 Dental Assisting Practicum III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 DENT 214 Pharmacology/Nutrition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DENT 215 Workplace Preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DENT 294 Dental Assisting Internship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Admission Dates: fall, spring

ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 15 CREDITS Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Prerequisite: high school completion or GED

TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Programs of Study

Dental Hygiene

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DENTAL HYGIENE ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE 120 CREDITS (PLUS 57 CREDITS OF PREREQUISITES)

There is a formal admissions process for entry into this program. The curriculum in the Dental Hygiene program consists of seven quarters, including a six-week summer quarter of full-time professional and clinical education preceded by 57 credits of prerequisite courses. The prerequisite science courses must be at least seven years current upon program entry; be measured by a proficiency examination; or be waived by special petition to the Dental Hygiene Director. The dental hygiene courses must be taken successively. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Dental Hygiene AAS degree graduates will: ƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒ be prepared to complete all licensing exams required to practice in Washington State ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Admission Dates: fall, by special admissions

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PREREQUISITES BIOL& 241 Human A & P 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 BIOL& 242 Human A & P 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 BIOL& 260 Microbiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CHEM& 121 Introduction to Chemistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CHEM& 131 Introduction to Organic/Biochemestry. . . . . . . . . . 5 CMST& Oral Communication - College Level . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ENGL& 101 English Composition I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MATH Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 NUTR& 101 Nutrition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PSYC& 100 General Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SOC& 101 Introduction to Sociology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS DHYG 111 Medical Emergencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 DHYG 112 Dental Hygiene Practice I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 DHYG 113 Restorative Dentistry I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DHYG 114 Principles & Issues in Dental Hygiene I . . . . . . . . . . 2 DHYG 115 Head & Neck Anatomy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DHYG 116 Radiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DHYG 118 Periodontology I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DHYG 119 Tooth Morphology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DHYG 121 Preventive Dentistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DHYG 122 Dental Hygiene Practice II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 DHYG 123 Restorative Dentistry II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DHYG 124 Principles & Issues in Dental Hygiene II . . . . . . . . . 1 DHYG 127 Histology & Embryology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DHYG 137 Radiographic Interpretation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DHYG 139 Pathology I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DHYG 132 Dental Hygiene Practice III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 DHYG 133 Restorative Dentistry III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 DHYG 134 Principles & Issues in Dental Hygiene III . . . . . . . . . 2 DHYG 135 Community Dental Health I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DHYG 136 Pharmacology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DHYG 138 Pain Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DHYG 142 Dental Hygiene Practice IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 DHYG 143 Restorative Dentistry IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 DHYG 145 Community Dental Health II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DHYG 212 Dental Hygiene Practice V. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 DHYG 213 Restorative Dentistry V . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DHYG 214 Principles & Issues in Dental Hygiene IV . . . . . . . . . 2 DHYG 215 Community Dental Health III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DHYG 218 Periodontology II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DHYG 219 Pathology II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DHYG 222 Dental Hygiene Practice VI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 continues on next page… T E C H N I C A L

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Programs of Study

The Dental Hygiene AAS degree prepares the student for employment as a dental hygienist including the expanded duties allowed by Washington State Law. This program has received accreditation status from the Commission on Dental Accreditation which allows students, upon graduation, to take the National Board Examination and the clinical licensing examination in the state where she or he plans to practice. Clinical experience is provided at the Lake Washington Technical College dental clinic under the supervision of licensed dentists and licensed dental hygienists. Additional clinical experience occurs in a variety of off-campus settings located in the greater Seattle area.

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Programs of Study

Dental Hygiene continued DHYG DHYG DHYG DHYG DHYG DHYG DHYG DHYG DHYG

223 224 225 229 232 233 234 235 239

Restorative Dentistry VI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Principles & Issues in Dental Hygiene V . . . . . . . . . 2 Community Dental Health IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Pathology III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Dental Hygiene Practice VII . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Restorative Dentistry VII . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Principles & Issues in Dental Hygiene VI . . . . . . . . . 1 Community Dental Health V . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Pathology IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 57 CREDITS (All Prerequisites previously listed)

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Programs of Study

Diesel & Heavy Equipment Technician

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DIESEL & HEAVY EQUIPMENT TECHNICIAN ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE 117 CREDITS

Diesel & Heavy Equipment Technician AAS degree graduates will: ƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒ perform repairs on various diesel vehicles, vehicle components and equipment ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS TRAN 110 Computer Basics/ Transportation Trades . . . . . . . . 2 TRAN 112 Shop & Business Practices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TRAN 113 Basic Electrical Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 TRAN 125 Mechanical Principles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 DHET 122 Welding Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 DHET 123 Heavy Duty Electrical Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 DHET 124 Electronic Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 DHET 125 Basic Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DHET 131 Engine Principles/Components. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DHET 132 Gasoline/Liquid Propane Gas Systems . . . . . . . . . . 3 DHET 133 Diesel Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DHET 134 Fuel Injection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DHET 135 Diagnostics/Adjustments/Emissions . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DHET 211 Hydraulic Fluid Power I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 DHET 213 Hydraulic Fluid Power II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 DHET 214 Diesel Mechanical Practices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DHET 221 Power Trains/Standard. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 DHET 222 Power Trains/Power Shift . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 DHET 223 Traction & Components. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DHET 231 Steering/Suspension/Frames. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 DHET 232 Pneumatics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 DHET 233 Foundation Brakes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 IFAD 151 First Aid/CPR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 CWEX 190 Cooperative Work Experience Seminar . . . . . . . . . . 1 CWEX 197 Cooperative Work Experience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Programs of Study

Diesel & Heavy Equipment Technician AAS degree students learn how to diagnose problems and perform repairs on various vehicle components including fuel, cooling, electrical, hydraulic, brake, suspension, and drive-train systems in the trucking and heavy equipment industry. Students will spend their first term training in a transportation core curriculum. The laboratory area simulates an industry environment. Students who have met the course objectives may be placed in a cooperative work experience to further develop their skills on the job.

ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 20 CREDITS Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Programs of Study

Diesel & Heavy Equipment Technician DIESEL & HEAVY EQUIPMENT TECHNICIAN CERTIFICATE OF PROFICIENCY

Programs of Study

89 CREDITS

Diesel & Heavy Equipment Technician certificate students learn how to diagnose problems and perform repairs on various vehicle components including fuel, cooling, electrical, hydraulic, brake, suspension, and drive-train systems in the trucking and heavy equipment industry. Students will spend their first term of training in a transportation core curriculum. The laboratory area simulates an industry environment. Students who have met the course objectives may be placed in a cooperative work experience to further develop their skills on the job. Diesel & Heavy Equipment Technician certificate graduates will: ƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS TRAN 110 Computer Basics/ Transportation Trades . . . . . . . . 2 TRAN 112 Shop & Business Practices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TRAN 113 Basic Electrical Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 TRAN 125 Mechanical Principles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 DHET 122 Welding Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 DHET 123 Heavy Duty Electrical Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 DHET 124 Electronic Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 DHET 125 Basic Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DHET 131 Engine Principles/Components. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DHET 132 Gasoline/Liquid Propane Gas Systems . . . . . . . . . . 3 DHET 134 Fuel Injection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DHET 211 Hydraulic Fluid Power I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 DHET 214 Diesel Mechanical Practices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DHET 221 Power Trains/Standard. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 DHET 223 Traction & Components. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DHET 231 Steering/Suspension/Frames. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 DHET 232 Pneumatics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 DHET 233 Foundation Brakes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CWEX 197 Cooperative Work Experience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 15 CREDITS Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Programs of Study

Electronics Technology ELECTRONICS TECHNOLOGY ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE

It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 20 CREDITS Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120

120 CREDITS

The Electronics Technology AAS degree exposes students to a basic core of skills through advanced electronics principles and applications. By focusing on the idea that a career in high-tech involves constant and continuing education, the student learns the importance of life-long learning. Through this, the program prepares its graduates for entry level positions in the rapidly growing high-tech industries of the 21st century. Graduates will be able to utilize the skills learned in this program to enter into either the electronics manufacturing industry as assemblers, inspectors, managers and testers, or into any high-tech industry maintaining one of the many multi-million dollar machines and devices utilized in almost all high-tech fields today. Electronics Technology AAS degree graduates will:

Programs of Study

ƒ be prepared to obtain entry-level positions as Electronics Technicians, Installers, Assemblers and Troubleshooters ƒ be prepared with the skills to perform standard workplace functions with minimal supervision ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS ELEC 110 Introduction to Electronics I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ELEC 111 Computer Literacy for Electronics Professionals . 2 ELEC 113 Career Planning & Leadership I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ELEC 114 Electronic Testing Processes & Techniques I . . . . . 2 ELEC 116 Introduction to PLC’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 120 Introduction to Electronics II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ELEC 115 Electronic Manufacturing Processes & Techniques I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 126 Electronic Manufacturing Processes & Techniques II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 130 DC/AC Electricity & Electronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ELEC 137 Introduction to Semiconductors & Analog Electronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 216 Mechatronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ELEC 211 Digital Electronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ELEC 214 Troubleshooting Electronic Circuits . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ELEC 217 Data Acquisition & Test Automation . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 237 Microcontrollers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 224 Electronic Circuits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 221 FCC/CET Preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 ELEC 223 Communication Electronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 225 Linear Circuits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 213 Career Planning & Leadership II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ELEC 226 Introduction to Automation/ Electromechanical. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ELEC 239 Intro to PCB layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ELEC 297 Electronic Tech Capstone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

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Electronics Technology ELECTRONICS TECHNOLOGY ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE TRANSFER DEGREE

Programs of Study

105 CREDITS

The Electronics Technology AAS-Transfer degree is intended for transfer to specific baccalaureate programs based on locally negotiated articulation agreements. Achievement of this degree will prepare the transfer student for upper division study. Graduates will also be able to utilize the skills learned in this program to enter into either the electronics manufacturing industry as assemblers, inspectors, managers and testers, or into any high-tech industry maintaining one of the many multi-million dollar machines and devices utilized in almost all high-tech fields today. Electronics Technology AAS-Transfer degree graduates will: ƒ be prepared to obtain entry-level positions as Electronics Technicians, Installers, Assemblers and Troubleshooters ƒ be prepared with the skills to perform standard workplace functions with minimal supervision ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS ELEC 110 Introduction to Electronics I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ELEC 114 Electronic Testing Processes & Techniques . . . . . . 2 ELEC 116 Introduction to PLCs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 120 Introduction to Electronics II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ELEC 130 DC/AC Electricity & Electronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ELEC 137 Introduction to Semiconductors & Analog Electronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 211 Digital Electronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ELEC 214 Troubleshooting Electronic Circuits . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ELEC 217 Data Acquisition & Test Automation . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 224 Electronic Circuits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 225 Linear Circuits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 239 Intro to PCB layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ELEC 297 Electronic Tech Capstone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 40 CREDITS MATH& 141 Pre-Calculus I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MATH& 142 Pre-Calculus II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ENGL& 101 (English Composition I) Written Expression. . . . . . 5 PSYC& 100 General Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CMST& 220 Introduction to Public Speaking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CHEM& 121 Intro to Chemistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PHYS& 121 General Physics I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PHYS 122 Physics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

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Electronics Technology

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ELECTRONICS TECHNICIAN CERTIFICATE OF PROFICIENCY 85 CREDITS

Electronics Technician certificate graduates will: ƒ be prepared to obtain entry-level positions as Electronics Technicians, Installers, Assemblers and Troubleshooters ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS ELEC 110 Introduction to Electronics I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ELEC 111 Computer Literacy for Electronics Professionals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ELEC 113 Career Planning & Leadership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ELEC 114 Electronic Testing Processes & Techniques . . . . . . 2 ELEC 120 Introduction to Electronics II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ELEC 115 Electronic Manufacturing Processes & Techniques I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 126 Electronic Manufacturing Processes & Techniques II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 130 DC/AC Electricity & Electronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ELEC 137 Introduction to Semiconductors & Analog Electronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 216 Mechatronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ELEC 213 Career Planning & Leadership II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ELEC 211 Digital Electronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ELEC 214 Troubleshooting Electronic Circuits . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ELEC 217 Data Acquisition & Test Automation . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 237 Microcontrollers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Technical Elective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Programs of Study

Electronics Technician certificate students develop a basic core of electronics skills and are eligible to take the Associate Certified Electronics Technician examination. Graduates are qualified for entry-level positions as testers, maintenance technicians, service laboratory technicians and satellite up-link or down-link technicians, cable TV installers and service telecommunications technicians. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 15 CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above. TECHNICAL ELECTIVE – 5 CREDITS See faculty adviser/instructor for pre-approval.

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Electronics Technology DIGITAL ELECTRONICS CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION

ELECTRONIC AUTOMATION CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION

36 CREDITS

32 CREDITS

Digital Electronics certificate introduces students to the technical foundations of current digital technologies and will enable them to explore these technologies in more depth and to work with them more adeptly in the workplace. It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

The Electronic Automation certificate introduces the student to these automated manufacturing principles, systems and hands-on practices required to effectively work with, install, and troubleshoot automated manufacturing systems. It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS ELEC 110 Introduction to Electronics I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ELEC 114 Electronic Testing Processes & Techniques I . . . . . 2 ELEC 120 Introduction to Electronics II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ELEC 197 Electronic Tech Capstone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 211 Digital Electronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ELEC 232 Digital Electronics Lab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ELEC 237 Microcontrollers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS ELEC 110 Introduction to Electronics I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ELEC 114 Electronic Testing Processes & Techniques I . . . . . 2 ELEC 116 Introduction to PLCs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 120 Introduction to Electronics II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ELEC 216 Mechatronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ELEC 226 Introduction to Automation/ Electromechanical. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ELEC 197 Electronic Tech Capstone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

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Electronics Technology PCB DESIGN TECHNICIAN CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION

20 CREDITS

35 CREDITS

The level of sophistication of electronics has grown exponentially over the past few years. The Electronics, Manufacturing Specialist certificate prepares graduates for opportunities in the area of state of the art electronics manufacturing. Internationally recognized certification is possible through successful completion of IPC-A-610 and IPC/WHMA-A-620 Certification. It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

The PCB Design Technician certificate provides a foundation to those individuals that seek employment opportunities in the lucrative exciting niche market of printed circuit board (PCB) design. Students will learn and use state-of-the art software while in this program. It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS ELEC 110 Introduction to Electronics I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ELEC 114 Electronic Testing Processes & Techniques . . . . . . 2 ELEC 120 Introduction to Electronics II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ELEC 197 Capstone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 217 Data Acquisition & Test Automation . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 237 Microcontrollers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 239 Intro to PCB layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS ELEC 115 Electronic Manufacturing Processes/Techniques I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 126 Electronic Manufacturing Processes/Techniques II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 233 IPC-A-610 Certification Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 234 IPC/WHMA – A-620 Certification Program. . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

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Programs of Study

ELECTRONICS, MANUFACTURING SPECIALIST CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION

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TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

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Emergency Medical Technician – Basic EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN – BASIC CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION

Programs of Study

10 CREDITS

The Emergency Medical Technician–Basic certificate at Lake Washington Technical College is the entry level certification course into the field of Emergency Medical Services. EMT-Bs provide the majority of pre-hospital emergency medical care for victims of illness and injury. As such, this course prepares students with the skills necessary to provide emergency medical care at a basic life support level with an ambulance service or other specialized service.

PREREQUISITES IFAD 158 CPR for the Health Care Provider or equivalent . . . 5 PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS EMTB 110 Emergency Medical Technician – Basic . . . . . . . . . 10 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

The program at LWTC follows the U.S. Department of Transportation, National Standard Curriculum as well as the Washington State Department of Social and Health Service standards, and teaches to the protocols of King, Skagit, and Snohomish County Emergency Medical Services. Upon completion of approximately 165 program hours that make up this course, students will be prepared to fulfill Washington State Registry requirements for certification as an EMT-Basic (when he/she meets the state requirements of affiliation). Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring

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Energy & Science Technician ENERGY & SCIENCE TECHNICIAN ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE 91-99 CREDITS

Energy & Science Technician AAS degree graduates will: ƒ be prepared for a range of entry level technician positions ƒ be capable of pursuing advanced education opportunities ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS CHEM& 121 Introduction to Chemistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ETEC 110 Introduction to Alternative Energy & Energy Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CWEX 190 Cooperative Work Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 CWEX 197 Cooperative Work Experience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 PHYS& 121 General Physics I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CHOOSE 5 CRS. OF BIOL& OR NUTR& BIOL& 100 Survey of Biology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BIOL& 211 Cellular Biology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 NUTR& 101 Nutrition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CHOOSE 10 CRS. OF BAS BAS 111 Word . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 112 Excel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 281 Project Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CHOOSE 24 TO 36 CREDITS OF THE FOLLOWING TECHNICAL ELECTIVES BIO ENERGY FOCUS CHEM& 131 Introduction to Organic /Biochemistry . . . . . . . . . . 5 BIOL& 260 Microbiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 STEC 200 Good Laboratory Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 STEC 220 Environmental Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 STEC 221 Hazardous Waste Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 STEC 225 Quality and Statistical Process Control . . . . . . . . . . 5 ETEC 121 Biomass and Bio-fuels Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Programs of Study

The Energy & Science Technician AAS degree prepares students to meet the increasing demand for jobs related to green technology and alternative energy. The program prepares students for employment as technicians in areas such as biomedical and industrial laboratories, manufacturing operations, energy companies, and environmental positions in public and private institutions. Graduates will be qualified to serve as technical representatives across a range of industries that include developmental technologies in the renewable energy field. Students will receive a well-rounded education that includes courses in math, statistics, written and oral communication, social science, alternative energy, biology, chemistry, physics, and computers. Electives also allow students to direct their studies toward environmental, chemical, bioenergy, energy technology, and industrial/laboratory specializations. Stand alone certificates are also available for each specialization.

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ENERGY TECHNOLOGY FOCUS STEC 225 Quality and Statistical Process Control . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 114 Electronic Testing Processes & Techniques I . . . . . 3 ELEC 120 Introduction to Electronics II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ELEC 211 Digital Electronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ETEC 120 Fundamentals of Water Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ETEC 122 Introduction to Wind Power Systems . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ETEC 123 Introduction to Photovoltaic Systems . . . . . . . . . . . 2 INDUSTRIAL LABORATORY CHEM& 131 Introduction to Organic /Biochemistry . . . . . . . . . . 5 STEC 200 Good Laboratory Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 STEC 225 Quality and Statistical Process Control . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELEC 110 Introduction to Electronics I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ENGR 113 Dimensioning & Tolerancing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 STEC 220 Environmental Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91-99

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Programs of Study

Energy & Science Technician BIO-ENERGY CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION

ENERGY TECHNOLOGY CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION

19 CREDITS

17 CREDITS

The Bio-Energy certificate will prepare the student for a career in energy, environmental toxicology, and industrial practices, and provide a general understanding of the new biological technology in the energy sector. The certificate is targeted at individuals seeking fundamental knowledge that can be applied in the energy and biological technology industry as well as for those interested in learning more about the biological energy systems of the future. Students have the option of continuing their education by pursuing an AAS degree in Energy & Science Technician and specializing in Bio Energy, Renewable Electric Energy, or Industrial Laboratory.

The Energy Technology certificate prepares students for a career in energy management, site assessment or technician level by training, retraining or upgrading skills. Students will learn the basics of energy site assessment, the technologies behind renewable energy and apply the trade-offs associated with implementation of each, both economic and environmental. The certificate is targeted at individuals seeking fundamental knowledge that can be applied in the field of alternative energy. Students have the option of continuing their education by pursuing an AAS degree in Energy & Science Technician and specializing in Bio Energy, Renewable Electric Energy, or Industrial Laboratory.

Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring

Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS ETEC 110 Introduction to Alternative Energy & Energy Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ETEC 121 Biomass and Bio-fuel Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 STEC 200 Good Lab Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 STEC 220 Environmental Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS ETEC 110 Introduction to Alternative Energy & Energy Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ETEC 120 Fundamentals of Water Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ETEC 121 Biomass and Bio-fuels Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ETEC 122 Introduction to Wind Power Systems . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ETEC 123 Introduction to Photovoltaic Systems . . . . . . . . . . . 2

TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

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Energy & Science Technician

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INDUSTRIAL/LABORATORY CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION 19 CREDITS

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS STEC 200 Good Lab Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 STEC 220 Environmental Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 STEC 221 Hazardous Waste Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 STEC 225 Quality and Statistical Process Control . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

Programs of Study

The Industrial/Laboratory certificate will prepare the student for employment in the Industrial or Laboratory sectors. Students will learn the basics behind good lab practices that will be useful for managing and working within a laboratory setting such as healthcare, agricultural labs, wet labs, or other analysis careers, as well as information about energy, process control, and the impact of industry/laboratory on the environment. The certificate is targeted at individuals seeking fundamental knowledge that can be applied in the industrial or laboratory sciences. Students have the option of continuing their education by pursuing an AAS degree in Energy & Science Technician and specializing in Bio Energy, Renewable Electric Energy, or Industrial Laboratory. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring

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Energy & Science Technician I-BEST ENERGY TECHNOLOGY CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION

Programs of Study

26 CREDITS

The I-BEST Energy Technology certificate is intended for individuals seeking a career in energy management or site assessment: students learn the basics of energy site assessment, the technologies behind renewable energy, and apply the trade-offs associated with implementation of each, both economic and environmental. This certificate prepares an increasingly diverse workforce for employment opportunities in the field of alternative energy. It provides ESL/ABED students with fundamental knowledge that can be applied in the field of alternative energy. All-professional-technical classes are taught with a 50% overlap of instruction between the ESL faculty and the professional-technical faculty.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS ETEC 110 Introduction to Alternative Energy & Energy Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ETEC 120 Fundamentals of Water Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ETEC 121 Biomass and Bio-fuel Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ETEC 122 Introduction to Wind Power Systems . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ETEC 123 Introduction to Photovoltaic Systems . . . . . . . . . . . 2 EASL 085 ESL Energy Technology Applications I . . . . . . . . . . . 3 EASL 086 ESL Energy Technology Applications II . . . . . . . . . . 3 EASL 087 ESL Energy Technology Applications III . . . . . . . . . 3 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

Corequisites: ƒ EASL 085 is a corequisite for ETEC 110, ETEC 120, and ETEC 121 ƒ EASL 086 is a corequisite for ETEC 122 ƒ EASL 087 is a corequisite for ETEC 123 It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall

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Energy & Science Technician

2

I-BEST INDUSTRIAL/LABORATORY CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION 25 CREDITS

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS STEC 200 Good Lab Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 STEC 220 Environmental Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 STEC 221 Hazardous Waste Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 STEC 225 Quality and Statistical Process Control . . . . . . . . . . 5 EASL 086 ESL Energy Technology Applications II . . . . . . . . . . 3 EASL 087 ESL Energy Technology Applications III . . . . . . . . . 3 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

Corequisites: ƒ EASL 086 is a corequisite for STEC 200 and STEC 220 ƒ EASL 087 is a corequisite for STEC 221 and STEC 225

Programs of Study

The I-BEST Industrial/Laboratory certificate is targeted at individuals seeking employment in the Industrial or Laboratory sectors. It prepares an increasingly diverse workforce for employment opportunities in laboratory settings such as healthcare, agriculture, or the environment. This certificate provides ESL/ABED students with fundamental knowledge that can be applied in the industrial or laboratory sciences. All-professionaltechnical classes are taught with a 50% overlap of instruction between the ESL faculty and the professionaltechnical faculty.

It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: winter

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Programs of Study

Engineering Graphics ENGINEERING GRAPHICS – MECHANICAL DESIGN EMPHASIS ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE

Programs of Study

106 CREDITS

The Engineering Graphics – Mechanical Design Emphasis AAS degree prepares students to be technicians specializing in translating the rough sketches, layouts, CAD designs, and written specifications of the engineer or designer into drawings and CAD databases showing the complete details and specifications for the finished product. Persons trained in engineering graphics with a design emphasis work for companies which manufacture machinery, electrical equipment, computers and fabricated products. Engineering Graphics Mechanical Design Emphasis AAS degree graduates will: ƒ be prepared for a range of entry level positions in the field ƒ complete design projects related to their design discipline ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS ENGT 101 Engineering Graphics Orientation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 ENGT 105 Engineering Computer Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ENGR 111 Engineering Graphics I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGR 113 Introduction to Dimensioning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGR 115 Engineering Graphics II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGR 121 Graphic Problem Solving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGR 123 Applied Dimensioning & Tolerancing . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 225 SolidWorks for Engineering I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 226 SolidWorks for Engineering II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 131 AutoCAD I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 132 AutoCAD II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 133 AutoCAD III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 141 Applied Materials Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 202 Specialized Technical Employment Preparation. . 2 ENGT 211 Applied Industrial Graphics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 251 Industrial Design Graphics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 253 Machine Design Graphics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 255 Tool Design Graphics I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 271 Engineering Graphics Problems & Analysis I . . . . . 4 ENGT 272 Engineering Graphics Problems & Analysis II . . . . 4 ENGT 291 Applied Design Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MACH 108 Fundamentals of Machining for Engineering . . . . 4 ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 25 CREDITS Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 College Algebra with Applications (MATH 111) . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Physics (PHYS&121) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above. TECHNICAL ELECTIVES – 7 CREDITS Technical electives may be taken from ARGT, ARCH, CEGT, CIVE, ENGT, GEOG, GISA, or MACH areas. Student should consult a faculty adviser.

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Engineering Graphics

2

ENGINEERING GRAPHICS TECHNICIAN CERTIFICATE OF PROFICIENCY 76 CREDITS

Engineering Graphics Technician certificate graduates will: ƒ be prepared for a range of entry level positions in the field ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS ENGR 111 Engineering Graphics I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGR 113 Introduction to Dimensioning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGR 115 Engineering Graphics II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGR 121 Graphic Problem Solving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGR 123 Applied Dimensioning & Tolerancing . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 101 Engineering Graphics Orientation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 ENGT 105 Engineering Computer Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ENGT 225 SolidWorks for Engineering I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 226 SolidWorks for Engineering II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 131 AutoCAD I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 132 AutoCAD II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 133 AutoCAD III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 141 Applied Materials Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 202 Specialized Technical Employment Preparation. . 2 ENGT 211 Applied Industrial Graphics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 255 Tool Design Graphics I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MACH 108 Fundamentals of Machining for Engineering . . . . 4

Programs of Study

The Engineering Graphics Technician certificate is a one-year program designed to prepare a graphics technician to work directly under the supervision of an engineer or designer producing detailed drawings. Engineering Graphics Technicians are specialists in translating the rough sketches, layouts and written specifications of architects, engineers, or designers into a drawing showing the complete details and specifications for the finished product.

ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 15 CREDITS Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Intro to Algebra (MATH 090) Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Engineering Graphics TOOL DESIGN GRAPHICS CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION

Programs of Study

36 CREDITS

The Tool Design Graphics certificate is intended for professionals in fields such as design, engineering, aerospace, automotive and manufacturing. Tool design is the process of designing and developing the tools, methods, and techniques necessary to improve manufacturing efficiency and productivity. A typical part-time student would need two to four terms to finish all course work. A student’s individual needs are taken into consideration. Students may complete deficiencies concurrently with first course in program. Pre-requisites: Math 99 or 102 & ENGT 211 or instructor permission. It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS ENGR 123 Geometric Dimensioning & Tolerancing. . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 141 Applied Materials Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 211 Industrial Graphics I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 233 Computer Illustration Applications II. . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 255 Tool Design Graphics I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 256 Tool Design Graphics II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 257 Tool Design Graphics III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MACH 108 Fundamentals of Machining for Engineering . . . . 4 ENGT 133 Computer Aided Drafting & Design III. . . . . . . . . . . 4 -ORENGT 222 CATIA V5 for Engineering I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 -ORENGT 225 Parametric Solid Design I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

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Programs of Study

Environmental Horticulture

2

ENVIRONMENTAL HORTICULTURE ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE 102-105 CREDITS

Environmental Horticulture AAS degree graduates will: ƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒ be prepared for Washington State Nursery and Landscape Association Certified Professional Horticulturists exams ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS HORT 111 Botany . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 HORT 112 Tools & Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 HORT 113 Propagation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 HORT 115 Plant Identification – Fall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 HORT 116 Horticulture Laboratory – Fall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 HORT 121 Soils . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 HORT 122 Pruning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 HORT 123 Pest Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 HORT 125 Plant Identification – Winter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 HORT 127 Horticulture Laboratory – Winter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 HORT 131 Landscape Design I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 HORT 132 Landscape Materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 HORT 134 Horticulture Marketing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 HORT 135 Plant Identification – Spring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 HORT 137 Horticulture Laboratory – Spring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 HORT 211 Landscape Design II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 HORT 212 Turfgrass Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 HORT 225 Career Exploration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 HORT 215 Plant Identification – Summer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 HORT 216 Greenhouse Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 HORT 217 Horticulture Laboratory – Summer . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 IFAD 151 First Aid/CPR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Technical Electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12-15

Programs of Study

Learn plant identification, greenhouses, plant propagation, landscaping, soils, pruning and botany. Through time spent in practical hands-on training, students will learn to propagate, seed, transplant, design landscape plans, and maintain a variety of plants. The Environmental Horticulture AAS degree provides students with knowledge and skills needed for jobs with nurseries, greenhouses, landscape firms, garden centers, and park departments. Industry-based training experience is an option.

ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 20 CREDITS Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .102-105 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above. TECHNICAL ELECTIVES – 12–15 CREDITS ACCT 210 Financial Accounting I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ENGT 131 Computer Aided Drafting & Design I . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 SOC& 101 Introduction to Sociology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CHEM& 121 Intro to Chemistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BIOL& 100 Survey of Biology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CWEX 197 Cooperative Work Experience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-5 BAS 101 Computer Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 PSYC 099 Human Relations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 HORT 299 Special Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .varies* * Student should consult a faculty adviser.

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Environmental Horticulture ENVIRONMENTAL HORTICULTURE CERTIFICATE OF PROFICIENCY

Programs of Study

84 CREDITS

The Environmental Horticulture certificate provides students with knowledge and skills needed for jobs with nurseries, greenhouses, landscape firms, garden centers, and park departments. Industry-based training experience is an option. Students learn plant identification, greenhouses, plant propagation, landscaping, soils, pruning and botany. Through time spent in practical hands-on training, students will learn to propagate, seed, transplant, design landscape plans, and maintain a variety of plants. Environmental Horticulture certificate graduates will: ƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS HORT 111 Botany . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 HORT 112 Tools & Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 HORT 113 Propagation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 HORT 115 Plant Identification – Fall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 HORT 116 Horticulture Laboratory – Fall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 HORT 121 Soils . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 HORT 122 Pruning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 HORT 123 Pest Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 HORT 125 Plant Identification – Winter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 HORT 127 Horticulture Laboratory – Winter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 HORT 131 Landscape Design I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 HORT 132 Landscape Materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 HORT 134 Horticulture Marketing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 HORT 135 Plant Identification – Spring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 HORT 137 Horticulture Laboratory – Spring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 HORT 211 Landscape Design II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 HORT 212 Turfgrass Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 HORT 225 Career Exploration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 HORT 215 Plant Identification – Summer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 HORT 216 Greenhouse Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 HORT 217 Horticulture Laboratory – Summer . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 15 CREDITS Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Programs of Study

Esthetician

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ESTHETICIAN CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION 40 CREDITS

Esthetician certificate graduates will: ƒ Be prepared for a range of entry-level positions as salon or day spa estheticians, make-up artists, retail specialists, and company representatives ƒ Complete the hourly requirements needed to take the esthetician written and practical exams ƒ Meet the Skills Standards of Washington for esthetics as set forth in RCW 18.16

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS CMES 100 Esthetics Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CMES 102 Esthetics Practice I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 CMES 104 Skin Physiology & Histology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 CMES 106 Body Care & Body Wraps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CMES 108 Makeup Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CMES 110 Esthetics Practice II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 CMES 112 Chemistry for Esthetics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 CMES 114 Facial Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CMES 116 Temporary Hair Removal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CMES 118 Salon Management & State Laws . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40

Programs of Study

The Esthetician certificate prepares students to apply for the Washington State Board of Esthetician Licensing Examination. Training includes the history of skin care and the sciences and principles of esthetics, including facials, waxing, and makeup. Business practices in the skin care industry are also covered. Successful graduates will be prepared to take the State Board exam.

It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, spring

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Fitness Specialist/ Personal Trainer FITNESS SPECIALIST/PERSONAL TRAINER ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE

Programs of Study

96 CREDITS

Fitness Specialist/Personal Trainer AAS degree prepares students for entrepreneurial pursuit or employment as fitness instructors or personal trainers in entry-level to mid-management positions in health and fitness clubs, athletic clubs, strength training gyms, retirement centers, corporate fitness centers, and nonprofit and recreation organizations. The curriculum is designed to help students prepare for the American College of Sports Medicine Health/ Fitness Instructor, American Council on Exercise Personal Trainer, the National Academy of Sports Medicine Certified Personal Trainer, and the National Strength and Conditioning Association Certified Personal Trainer certification exams. One hundred fifty-four hours of industry-based internship or cooperative work experience is required for program completion. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Fitness Specialist/Personal Trainer AAS degree graduates will: ƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒ demonstrate proficiency at fitness assessment and program design ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS BIOL 111 Survey of Anatomy & Physiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 FTNS 112 Principles of Sport & Exercise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FTNS 118 Health Promotions & Wellness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 FTNS 121 Kinesiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 FTNS 124 Functional Assessment & Corrective Exercise . . . . 4 FTNS 137 Professional Skills in Fitness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 FTNS 152 Exercise Physiology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 FTNS 153 Clinical Fitness Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 FTNS 154 Exercise for Special Populations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 FTNS 191 Fitness Internship I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FTNS 210 Fitness Internship II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FTNS 215 Business & Risk Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 FTNS 218 Human Performance I Cardio & Respiratory Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 FTNS 219 Human Performance II Strength Training . . . . . . . . 4 FTNS 220 Human Performance III Adv Training Strategies . . 4 FTNS 230 Fitness Externship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 NUTR& 101 Nutrition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 20 CREDITS Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

TECHNICAL ELECTIVES – 5 CREDITS (See faculty adviser/instructor for pre-approval) FTNS 120 Responding to Emergencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FTNS 126 Sport & Exercise Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FTNS 128 Intro to Athletic Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FTNS 142 Certification Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 FTNS 144 Nutrition for Sports Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FTNS 170 Group Exercise Instructor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 FTNS 199 Special Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5 FTNS 299 Special Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5

Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Programs of Study

Fitness Specialist/ Personal Trainer

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FITNESS SPECIALIST/PERSONAL TRAINER ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE TRANSFER DEGREE 103 CREDITS

The curriculum is designed to help students prepare for the American College of Sports Medicine Health/ Fitness Instructor, American Council on Exercise Personal Trainer, the National Academy of Sports Medicine Certified Personal Trainer, and the National Strength and Conditioning Association Certified Personal Trainer certification exams. One hundred fifty-four hours of industry-based internship or cooperative work experience is required for program completion. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Fitness Specialist/Personal Trainer AAS-T degree graduates will: ƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒ demonstrate proficiency at fitness assessment and program design ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS BIOL& 241 Human A & P 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 BIOL& 242 Human A & P 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ENGL& 101 English Composition I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 FTNS 112 Principles of Sport & Exercise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FTNS 118 Health Promotions & Wellness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 FTNS 121 Kinesiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 FTNS 124 Functional Assessment & Corrective Exercise . . . . 4 FTNS 137 Professional Skills in Fitness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 FTNS 152 Exercise Physiology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 FTNS 153 Clinical Fitness Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 FTNS 154 Exercise for Special Populations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 FTNS 191 Fitness Internship I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FTNS 210 Fitness Internship II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FTNS 215 Business & Risk Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 FTNS 218 Human Performance I Cardio & Respiratory Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 FTNS 219 Human Performance II Strength Training . . . . . . . . 4 FTNS 220 Human Performance III Adv Training Strategies . . 4 FTNS 230 Fitness Externship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 NUTR& 101 Nutrition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PSYC& 100 General Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Programs of Study

The Fitness Specialist/Personal Trainer AAS-T degree program prepares students for entrepreneurial pursuit or employment as fitness instructors or personal trainers in entry-level to mid-management positions in health and fitness clubs, athletic clubs, strength training gyms, retirement centers, corporate fitness centers, and nonprofit and recreation organizations. In addition, it prepares students interested in pursuing a BS degree in Exercise Science.

ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 20 CREDITS Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ENGL& 101 English Composition I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PSYC& 100 General Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TECHNICAL ELECTIVES – 5 CREDITS* (See faculty adviser/instructor for pre-approval) FTNS 120 Responding to Emergencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FTNS 126 Sport & Exercise Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FTNS 128 Intro to Athletic Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FTNS 142 Certification Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 FTNS 144 Nutrition for Sports Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FTNS 170 Group Exercise Instructor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 FTNS 199 Special Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5 FTNS 299 Special Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5 *May also include a transferable academic class TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Fitness Specialist/ Personal Trainer FITNESS SPECIALIST/PERSONAL TRAINER CERTIFICATE OF PROFICIENCY

Programs of Study

56 CREDITS

Fitness Specialist/Personal Trainer certificate prepares students for employment as fitness instructors or personal trainers in entry-level positions in health and fitness clubs, athletic clubs, strength training gyms, retirement communities, and nonprofit and recreation organizations. The curriculum is designed to help students prepare for the American College of Sports Medicine Health/ Fitness Instructor, American Council on Exercise Personal Trainer, the National Academy of Sports Medicine Certified Personal Trainer, and the National Strength and Conditioning Association Certified Personal Trainer certification exams. Eighty-eight hours of industry-based internship or cooperative work experience is required for program completion. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Fitness Specialist/Personal Trainer certificate graduates will:

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS BIOL 111 Survey of Anatomy & Physiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 FTNS 112 Principles of Sport & Exercise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FTNS 121 Kinesiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 FTNS 137 Professional Skills in Fitness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 FTNS 152 Exercise Physiology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 FTNS 153 Clinical Fitness Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 FTNS 191 Fitness Internship I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FTNS 210 Fitness Internship II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FTNS 218 Human Performance I Cardio & Respiratory Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 FTNS 219 Human Performance II Strength Training. . . . . . . . 4 ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS–15 CREDITS Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

ƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

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Programs of Study

Funeral Service Education

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FUNERAL SERVICE EDUCATION ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE 110 CREDITS

Funeral Service Education AAS degree graduates will: ƒ be prepared for entry level positions as a funeral director and embalmer ƒ be prepared to succeed on the National Board Exam and the state board exam ƒ demonstrate Global and Cultural Awareness, Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, and Technical and Information Literacy skills The FSE program has as its central aim the recognition of the importance of funeral service personnel as: ƒ Members of a human services profession, ƒ Members of the community in which they serve, ƒ Participants in the intimate relationship between bereaved families and those engaged in the funeral service profession, ƒ Professionals sensitive to and knowledgeable of the responsibility for public health, safety, and welfare in caring for human remains. The program has the following purposes: ƒ To enlarge the background and knowledge of students about the funeral service profession. ƒ To educate students in every phase of funeral service, and to help enable them to develop the proficiency and skills necessary to become functional members of the profession. ƒ To educate student concerning the responsibilities of the funeral service profession to the community. ƒ To emphasize high standards of ethical conduct. ƒ To provide a comprehensive curriculum at the post secondary level of instruction. ƒ To encourage research in the field of funeral service.

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Prerequisites: high school completion or GED Admission Dates: winter, summer PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS ACCT 111 Introduction to Accounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BAS 101 Computer Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 BUSA 180 Small Business Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BIOL& 231 Anatomy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 BUS& 201 Business Law. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CHEM& 121 Principles of Chemistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CMST& 220 Public Speaking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ENGL& 101 English Composition I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 FSE 101 Introduction to Funeral Service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FSE 130 Funeral Service Sociology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FSE 140 Funeral Directing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 FSE 141 Funeral Service Ethics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FSE 148 Funeral Service Law & Compliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FSE 250 Funeral Service Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 FSE 251 Embalming I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 FSE 255 Embalming Chemistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FSE 256 Funeral Service Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FSE 258 Introduction to Restorative Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FSE 261 Embalming II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 FSE 262 Funeral Service Microbiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FSE 264 Funeral Home Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 FSE 268 Restorative Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FSE 271 Embalming III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FSE 274 Funeral Service Pathology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FSE 275 Funeral Service Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FSE 296 Funeral Service Internship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 SOC 260 Sociology of Death & Dying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Programs of Study

The Funeral Service Education AAS degree prepares students to achieve entry-level proficiency as an embalmers and funeral directors. Funeral service professionals provide counsel, service, and emotional support for those who have experienced the death of a loved one. Students also learn how to manage a successful business in the high-tech global economy. The program is designed to be completed in 7 quarters of full-time study.

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS - 20 CREDITS ENGL& 101 English Composition I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CMST& 220 Public Speaking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SOC 260 Sociology of Death & Dying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 CAUTION: Students enrolling in the Funeral Service Education program should contact their respective state board of funeral service regarding that state board’s approval of this particular program of instruction. See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Healthcare Informatics HEALTHCARE INFORMATICS CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION

Programs of Study

18 CREDITS

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Healthcare Informatics certificate provides a comprehensive foundation for understanding technical healthcare infrastructure and its relevance to the implementation of the electronic medical record. Individuals with previous work experience in related fields will benefit the most from this program. Emphasis is on current issues in healthcare, delivery systems, patient privacy, security, data mining, clinical vocabularies, project management, technical standards and decision support.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS MHIT 115 Healthcare Fundamentals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MHIT 225 Health IT Data Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MHIT 235 Application of Healthcare IT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MHIT 299 Special Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

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Programs of Study

Human Resources Generalist

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HUMAN RESOURCES GENERALIST CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION 44 CREDITS

Depending on background and education level, a student will be able to find jobs in entry to mid-level positions as a generalist or in the areas of human resource management, employment and recruitment, total rewards/compensation, benefits, employee and labor relations, risk management/safety and security, and training and development.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS BUHR 210 HR’s Role in Organizations & Program Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 BUHR 215 HR Ethics & Diversity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 BUHR 220 Employee Benefits & Risk Management . . . . . . . . . 4 BUHR 230 Staffing: Recruitment, Selection, & Placement . . . 4 BUHR 235 Total Rewards (Compensation) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 BUHR 240 Employee & Labor Relations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BUHR 245 Training, Workforce Planning, Perf & Talent Mgt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 BUHR 250 HR Information Systems & Measuring HR Outcomes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 BUHR 255 Employment Law I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 BUHR 260 Employment Law II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 BUHR 270 Global HR & Mergers & Acquisitions . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 BUHR 275 Strategic HR Mgt & Organizational Strategy . . . . . 4 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

Programs of Study

The Human Resources Generalist certificate is designed for the working professional wishing to enter the Human Resource (HR) field, professionals wanting to enhance their HR and personnel knowledge, HR professionals wishing to advance in their field, certified HR professionals seeking re-certification hours, and managers wanting to get a better understanding of HR. Certified HR professionals may qualify for re-certification hours toward their Professional in Human Resources (PHR), Senior Professional in Human Resources (SPHR) and Global Professional in Human Resources (GPHR) certifications from the HR Certification Institute (HRCI).

This program is focused on evening courses, thus allowing people who are employed to upgrade their skills and receive a certificate. It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

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Machine Technology MACHINE TECHNOLOGY ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE

Programs of Study

120 CREDITS

Machine Technology AAS degree students will be well positioned to begin a career in the machine trades by gaining basic machining competencies through their work on projects along with a thorough grounding in shop theory, applied math, and a special emphasis on CAD/CAM programming and CNC machining. Machine Technology AAS degree graduates will: ƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒ be prepared with skills to perform as manual and CNC operators ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS ENGT 131 CAD Drafting & Design I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ENGT 233 Computer Illustrations Apps I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MACH 110 Fundamental of Machining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 MACH 112 Machining Practice Punch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 MACH 120 Materials Measuring & CNC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 MACH 122 Machining Practice Tools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 MACH 124 CNC & Mastercam I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 MACH 130 Blueprints – Trigonometry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 MACH 132 Machining Practice Thread . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 MACH 134 CNC Manual Practice, Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 MACH 222 Machining Capstone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Technical Electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 25 CREDITS Written Expression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Physics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above. TECHNICAL ELECTIVES – 12 CREDITS See faculty adviser/instructor for approved courses.

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Machine Technology

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MACHINE TECHNOLOGY CERTIFICATE OF PROFICIENCY 80 CREDITS

Machine Technology certificate graduates will: ƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring

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PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS MACH 110 Fundamental of Machining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 MACH 112 Machining Practice Punch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 MACH 122 Machining Practice Tools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 MACH 124 CNC & Mastercam I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 MACH 120 Materials Measuring & CNC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 MACH 132 Machining Practice Thread . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 MACH 130 Blueprints-Trigonometry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 MACH 134 CNC Manual Practice, Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Technical Elective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 15 CREDITS Written Expression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80

Programs of Study

Machine Technology certificate students will be well positioned to begin a career in the machine trades by gaining basic machining competencies through their work on projects along with a thorough grounding in shop theory, applied math, and a special emphasis on CAD/CAM programming and CNC machining.

See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above. TECHNICAL ELECTIVES – 1 CREDIT See faculty adviser/instructor for approved courses.

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Massage Practitioner MASSAGE PRACTITIONER ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE

Programs of Study

92 CREDITS

Massage Practitioner ASS degree prepares students to enter the job market as licensed massage practitioners. The American Massage Therapy Association defines Massage Therapy as “a profession in which the practitioner applies manual techniques and may apply adjunct therapies with the intention of positively affecting the health and well-being of the client”. Massage is often used to aid in recovery from injury, to promote health and well-being, and as a treatment for illness or pain. LWTC students will have a Swedish massage foundation with exposure to treatment and other massage modalities. Graduates will find employment in institutions such as clinics, spas, hospitals, as well as private practice. The program has been developed in accordance with the standards and guidelines outlined by the Washington State Board of Massage and the Commission on Massage Therapy Accreditation (COMTA) and will adhere to the requirements outlined by the Washington State Department of Health, Health Professions Quality Assurance Board of Massage for curriculum components and clinical sites, in order to ensure that students will be eligible to sit for the Washington State Massage Practitioners License exam (RCW 18.108.070) upon completion.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS MAST 105 Fundamentals of Massage Therapy . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MAST 115 Fundamentals of Massage Therapy II . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MAST 125 Fundamentals of Massage Therapy III . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MAST 135 Hydrotherapy & Injury Management . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MAST 145 Pathologies for Massage Therapy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MAST 155 Treatment Massage I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MAST 165 Massage Clinic I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MAST 175 Complimentary Massage Modalities I . . . . . . . . . . 5 MAST 185 Massage Curriculum Review & Exam Prep . . . . . . . 2 MAST 205 Spa Massage Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 MAST 215 Business Development & Professional Relations . 5 MAST 255 Treatment Massage II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MAST 265 Massage Clinic II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MAST 275 Complimentary Massage Modalities II . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 20 CREDITS Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 English Composition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

Massage Practitioner ASS degree graduates will: ƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒ be prepared to pass the state licensing exam ƒ demonstrate Global and Cultural Awareness, Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall Prerequisite: HIV/AIDS/CPR

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Programs of Study

Massage Practitioner MASSAGE PRACTITIONER CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION

62 CREDITS

19 CREDITS

Massage Practitioner certificate prepares students to become a professionally licensed massage practitioner. Students will develop a strong Swedish massage foundation with exposure to treatment and other massage techniques. Graduates will be prepared for employment in settings such as clinics, spas, hospitals, as well as private practice.

The Massage Practitioner certificate exposes the student to advanced massage techniques. The student will also acquire the skills necessary to treat an increased variety of functions. They will also obtain the business skills necessary to operate a successful massage practice.

Massage Practitioner certificate graduates will: ƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒ be prepared to pass the state licensing exam ƒ demonstrate Global and Cultural Awareness, Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter

Admission Dates: summer Prerequisites: ƒ Completed the 62-credit certificate program or licensed massage therapist or instructor permission. ƒ HIV/AIDS/CPR PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS MAST 205 Spa Massage Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 MAST 215 Business Development & Professional Relations . 5 MAST 255 Treatment Massage II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MAST 275 Complimentary Massage Modalities II . . . . . . . . . . 5

Programs of Study

MASSAGE PRACTITIONER CERTIFICATE OF PROFICIENCY

2

TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

Prerequisites: HIV/AIDS/CPR PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS MAST 105 Fundamentals of Massage Therapy . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MAST 115 Fundamentals of Massage Therapy II . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MAST 125 Fundamentals of Massage Therapy III . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MAST 135 Hydrotherapy & Injury Management . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MAST 145 Pathologies for Massage Therapy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MAST 155 Treatment Massage I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MAST 165 Massage Clinic I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MAST 175 Complimentary Massage Modalities I . . . . . . . . . . 5 MAST 185 Massage Curriculum Review & Exam Prep . . . . . . . 2 ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 15 CREDITS Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Programs of Study

Medical Assisting MEDICAL ASSISTING ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE

Programs of Study

90 CREDITS

The Medical Assisting AAS degree prepares the students for high demand medical office positions including front and back office positions. Graduates of the program are eligible to take the Certified Medical Assistant examination offered by the American Association of Medical Assistants. The program will provide students with a knowledge base that includes anatomy, physiology, medical terminology, pharmacology, medical billing and coding, medical office assessments and procedures, patient care and education. Medical Assistants are highly versatile professionals in both clinical and administrative realms. Medical assistants will learn to effectively communicate with a wide variety of people including doctors, nurses, clients, medical billing staff, insurance representatives, and pharmacists. The program will culminate the theory, clinical and lab skills in an intern experience in a physician’s office. The Lake Washington Technical College Medical Assistant program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (www.caahep.org) upon recommendation of the Curriculum Review Board of the America Association of Medical Assistants Endowment (AAMAE). Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs 1361 Park Street Clearwater, FL 33756 (727)210-2350

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS BIOL 111 Survey of Anatomy & Physiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 115 Law & Ethics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 MEDA 116 Medical Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 118 Exam room & Patient Preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 121 Medical Office Skills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 125 Phlebotomy & Bloodborne Pathogens . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 129 Pharmacology & Medical Math . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 136 Coding/Billing/Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 139 Assist with Exam & Administer Medication . . . . . . 5 MEDA 211 Medical Computer Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 212 Diagnostic Testing in Medical Office . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 214 Disease Conditions/Community Health . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 293 Externship Seminar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 MEDA 294 Medical Assisting Externship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Technical Elective* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 20 CREDITS Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PSYC& 100 General Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 * 5 credits of any college level course(s) See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

Medical Assisting AAS degree graduates will: ƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒ be prepared to pass the CMA (AAMA) exam ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

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Programs of Study

Medical Assisting

2

MEDICAL ASSISTING CERTIFICATE OF PROFICIENCY 85 CREDITS

The Lake Washington Technical College Medical Assisting program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (www.caahep.org) upon recommendation of the Curriculum Review Board of the America Association of Medical Assistants Endowment (AAMAE).

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS BIOL 111 Survey of Anatomy & Physiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 115 Law & Ethics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 MEDA 116 Medical Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 118 Exam room & Patient Preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 121 Medical Office Skills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 125 Phlebotomy & Bloodborne Pathogens . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 129 Pharmacology & Medical Math . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 136 Coding/Billing/Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 139 Assist with Exam & Administer Medication . . . . . . 5 MEDA 211 Medical Computer Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 212 Diagnostic Testing in Medical Office . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 214 Disease Conditions/Community Health . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 293 Internship Externship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 MEDA 294 Medical Assisting Externship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Technical Elective* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Programs of Study

The Medical Assisting certificate prepares the students for high demand medical office positions including front and back office positions. Graduates of the program are eligible to take the Certified Medical Assistant examination offered by the American Association of Medical Assistants. The program will provide students with a knowledge base that includes anatomy, physiology, medical terminology, pharmacology, medical billing and coding, medical office assessments and procedures, patient care and education. Medical Assistants are highly versatile professionals in both clinical and administrative realms. Medical assistants will learn to effectively communicate with a wide variety of people including doctors, nurses, clients, medical billing staff, insurance representatives, and pharmacists. The program will culminate the theory, clinical and lab skills in an intern experience in a physician’s office.

ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 15 CREDITS Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MATH 080 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PSYC& 100 General Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 * 5 credits of any college level course(s) See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs 1361 Park Street Clearwater, FL 33756 (727)210-2350 Medical Assisting certificate graduates will: ƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

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Programs of Study

Medical Assisting MEDICAL BILLING & CODING PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATE OFPROFICIENCY

MEDICAL ASSISTING OFFICE ADMINISTRATION CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION

63 CREDITS

30 CREDITS

Medical billing and coding Professional certificate will prepare students with the necessary skills and knowledge to obtain an entry-level position in medical insurance coding and office administration within a variety of healthcare settings.

The Medical Assisting Office Administration certificate will prepare students with the necessary skills and knowledge to obtain entry –level positions as front office assistants and general clerical support in medical settings. The certificate of completion will include basic medical office skills, medical terminology, medical law, billing & insurance coding skills, and medical computer skills.

Medical billing and coding Professional certificate graduates will: ƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS MEDA 115 Law & Ethics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 MEDA 116 Medical Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 121 Medical Office Skills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 136 Coding/Billing/Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 140 Medical Reimbursement Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 154 Intermediate Medical Coding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 211 Medical Computer Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 212 Disease Conditions/Community Health . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 254 Advanced Medical Coding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS BAS 101 Computer Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 MEDA 115 Law & Ethics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 MEDA 116 Medical Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 121 Medical Office Skills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 136 Coding/Billing/Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 211 Medical Computer App . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Technical Elective* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 * 5 credits of any college level course(s)

ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 20 CREDITS (Student must take classes indicated for individual programs of study) BIOL 111 Survey of Anatomy & Physiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PSYC& 100 General Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ENGL& 101 English Composition I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Programs of Study

Motorcycle, Marine & Power Equipment Service Technology

2

MOTORCYCLE, MARINE & POWER EQUIPMENT SERVICE TECHNOLOGY ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE 111 CREDITS

Motorcycle, Marine &Power Equipment Service Technology AAS degree graduates will: ƒ be prepared for a wide range of entry-level positions in their field ƒ be prepared to perform standard workplace tasks ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS TRAN 110 Computer Basics/Transport Trades. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 TRAN 112 Shop & Business Practices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TRAN 113 Basic Electrical Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 TRAN 125 Mechanical Principles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMPE 122 Electrical System Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MMPE 123 Charging Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MMPE 124 Ignition Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMPE 134 Power Transmission Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMPE 135 Transaxles/Constant Variable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 MMPE 136 Marine Gearcases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 MMPE 137 Induction/Exhaust Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMPE 212 Fluid Power Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 MMPE 213 Chassis, Suspension & Rigging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMPE 214 2 & 4 Cycle Gas Engines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MMPE 215 Diesel Engines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 MMPE 221 Advanced Electrical Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMPE 223 Advanced MMPE Applications I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MMPE 231 Advanced MMPE Applications II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMPE 232 Advanced MMPE Applications III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 CWEX 297 Cooperative Work Experience or Technical Electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Programs of Study

The Motorcycle, Marine & Power Equipment Service Technology AAS degree provides students with a broad range of entry-level technical skills by working on representative models of equipment serviced in the motorcycle, marine and power equipment industries. Students have some options of specializing in one or more areas after completion of basic instruction. Students will spend their first term of training in a transportation core curriculum. Cooperative work experience is available with instructor permission.

ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 20 CREDITS Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Motorcycle, Marine & Power Equipment Service Technology HARLEY-DAVIDSON® OPTION ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE

Programs of Study

113 CREDITS

The Harley-Davidson® Option to the Motorcycle, Marine and Power Equipment Service Technology AAS degree will uniquely position successful completers to enter Harley® dealerships in a variety of capacities. The intent of the program is to provide the types of pre-employment training that is currently only available as incumbent worker training in a Harley-Davidson® dealership and better prepare them for their initial employment. The Harley-Davidson® Option to the Motorcycle, Marine and Power Equipment Service Technology AAS degree graduates will: ƒ be prepared for a wide range of entry-level positions in their field ƒ be prepared to perform standard workplace tasks ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS TRAN 110 Computer Basics/Transport Trades. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 TRAN 112 Shop & Business Practices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TRAN 113 Basic Electrical Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 TRAN 125 Mechanical Principles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMPE 122 Electrical System Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MMPE 123 Charging Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MMPE 124 Ignition Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMPE 134 Power Transmission Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMPE 135 Transaxle/Constant Variable Transmissions . . . . . . 3 MMPE 136 Marine Gearcases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 MMPE 137 Induction/Exhaust Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMPE 212 Fluid Power Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 MMPE 213 Chassis, Suspension & Rigging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMPE 214 2 & 4 Cycle Gas Engines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MMPE 215 Diesel Engines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 MOHD 221 H-D® Electrical Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MOHD 223 Intro to H-D® Electronic Control Systems . . . . . . . . 3 MOHD 225 H-D® Service Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MOHD 231 Advanced H-D® Electronic Control Systems . . . . . 3 MOHD 233 H-D® Chassis Service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MOHD 235 H-D® Air-cooled Powertrains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 20 CREDITS Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Programs of Study

Motorcycle, Marine & Power Equipment Service Technology

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MOTORCYCLE, MARINE & POWER EQUIPMENT SERVICE TECHNOLOGY CERTIFICATE OF PROFICIENCY 78 CREDITS

Motorcycle, Marine & Power Equipment Service Technology certificate graduates will: ƒ be prepared for a wide range of entry-level positions in their field ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS TRAN 110 Computer Basics/Transport Trades. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 TRAN 112 Shop & Business Practices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TRAN 113 Basic Electrical Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 TRAN 125 Mechanical Principles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMPE 122 Electrical System Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MMPE 123 Charging Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MMPE 124 Ignition Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMPE 134 Power Transmission Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMPE 135 Transaxles/Constant Variable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 MMPE 136 Marine Gearcases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 MMPE 137 Induction/Exhaust Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMPE 212 Fluid Power Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 MMPE 213 Chassis, Suspension & Rigging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMPE 214 2 & 4 Cycle Gas Engines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MMPE 215 Diesel Engines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Programs of Study

The Motorcycle, Marine & Power Equipment Service Technology certificate provides students with a broad range of entry-level technical skills by working on representative models of equipment serviced in the motorcycle, marine and power equipment industries. Students have some options of specializing in one or more areas after completion of basic instruction. Students will spend their first term of training in a transportation core curriculum. Cooperative work experience is available with instructor permission.

ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 15 CREDITS Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Multimedia Design & Production MULTIMEDIA DESIGN & PRODUCTION ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE

Programs of Study

98 CREDITS

The Multimedia Design & Production AAS degree is designed to prepare students to work in a variety of settings as graphic designers, web designers, desktop publishers, and graphic art technicians. Graduates will be able to plan, analyze, and create visual solutions to produce websites, printed materials, and interactive online experiences. Multimedia Design & Production AAS degree graduates will: ƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒ demonstrate technical proficiency and creative skills ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS MMDP 099 Intro to Windows & Mac . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 MMDP 102 2D Graphic Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 103 Intro to Drawing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 104 Color Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 117 Typography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 118 HTML I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 121 Illustrator I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 122 Photoshop I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 123 Flash I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 126 InDesign I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 133 Dreamweaver I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 152 Layout Graphic Design. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 153 Web Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 154 Acrobat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 158 Prepress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 170 Motion Graphics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 190 Portfolio/Job Search . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP Electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 20 CREDITS Written Expression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above. TECHNICAL ELECTIVES – 7 CREDITS Technical Electives may be taken from ART or MMDP areas. RECOMMENDED ELECTIVES ART 100 Art Appreciation MMDP 128 Digital Photography MMDP 139 Video Editing 1 MMDP 141 Illustrator II MMDP 142 Photoshop II MMDP 143 Flash II MMDP 146 InDesign II MMDP 168 Dreamweaver II MMDP 234 XML/XSL MMDP 235 PHP Scripting MMDP 238 JavaScript

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Multimedia Design & Production

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VIDEO AND WEB PRODUCTION ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE 97 CREDITS

Video and Web Production AAS degree graduates will: ƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒ demonstrate technical proficiency and creative skills ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

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PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS MMDP 099 Intro to Windows & Mac . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 MMDP 102 2D Graphic Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 107 Digital Storytelling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 118 HTML. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 119 Video Production. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 120 Digital Content Delivery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 121 Illustrator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 122 Photoshop I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 123 Flash I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 133 Dreamweaver 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 139 Digital A/V Editing with Final Cut Pro I . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 153 Web Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 159 Digital A/V Editing with Final Cut Pro II. . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 160 Digital Sound . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 170 Motion Graphics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 190 Portfolio/Job Search . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 205 Film Studies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Programs of Study

The Video and Web Production AAS degree is designed to address the growing need in the marketplace for individuals with skills in video and web production. Program graduates will be prepared to hold traditional media jobs such as video editor, motion graphics designer, web designer, sound designer, and media author. Additionally graduates will be prepared to serve in evolving fields as social media administrator, blog administrator, digital media technician, and multimedia storyteller. Graduates will possess strong technical ability in both video and web production skills.

ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 20 CREDITS Written Expression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Multimedia Design & Production PRINT DESIGN CERTIFICATE OF PROFICIENCY

Programs of Study

71 CREDITS

The Print Design certificate meets the need for workers who design, lay out, and produce material for printed publications such as magazines, newspapers, brochures, ads, and books. Students begin study with theory courses and progress to learn tools associated with page layout, graphics, and print production. Graduates will be prepared for entry-level jobs as desktop publishers, print production artists, prepress/preflight technicians, print graphic artists/designers, and electronic document production specialists. The Print Design certificate graduates will: ƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒ demonstrate technical proficiency and creative skills ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

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PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS MMDP 099 Introduction to Windows & Mac . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 MMDP 102 2-D Graphic Design. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 103 Intro to Drawing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 104 Color Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 117 Typography I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 121 Illustrator I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 122 Photoshop I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 126 InDesign I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 146 InDesign II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 152 Layout Graphic Design. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 154 Acrobat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 158 Prepress I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 190 Digital Portfolio Presentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 15 CREDITS Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above. TECHNICAL ELECTIVES – 4 CREDITS Technical Electives may be taken from MMDP areas. RECOMMENDED ELECTIVES MMDP 142 Photoshop II MMDP 141 Illustrator II MMDP 128 Digital Photography

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Multimedia Design & Production

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VIDEO AND WEB PRODUCTION CERTIFICATE OF PROFICIENCY 82 CREDITS

Multimedia Design & Production certificate graduates will: ƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒ demonstrate technical proficiency and creative skills ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS MMDP 099 Intro to Windows & Mac . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 MMDP 102 2D Graphic Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 107 Digital Storytelling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 118 HTML. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 119 Video Production. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 120 Digital Content Delivery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 121 Illustrator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 122 Photoshop I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 123 Flash I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 133 Dreamweaver 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 139 Digital A/V Editing with Final Cut Pro I . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 153 Web Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 159 Digital A/V Editing with Final Cut Pro II. . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 160 Digital Sound . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 170 Motion Graphics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Programs of Study

The Video and Web Production certificate is designed to address the growing need in the marketplace for individuals with skills in video and web production. Program graduates will be prepared to hold traditional media jobs such as video editor, motion graphics designer, web designer, sound designer, and media author. Additionally graduates will be prepared to serve in evolving fields as social media administrator, blog administrator, digital media technician, and multimedia storyteller. Graduates will possess strong technical ability in both video and web production skills.

ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 15 CREDITS Written Expression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Multimedia Design & Production WEB DESIGN CERTIFICATE OF PROFICIENCY

Programs of Study

77 CREDITS

The Web Design certificate is designed to meet the need for workers who design, build, and maintain websites. Students begin study with theory courses and progress to learn tools associated with Web authoring, content creation, and digital media. Graduates will be prepared for entry-level jobs as Web designers. Web Design certificate graduates will: ƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒ demonstrate technical proficiency and creative skills ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS MMDP 099 Introduction to Windows & Mac . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 MMDP 102 2-D Graphic Design. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 103 Intro to Drawing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 104 Color Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 118 HTML. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 122 Photoshop I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 153 Web Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 121 Illustrator I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 133 Dreamweaver I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 123 Flash I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 168 Dreamweaver II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 143 Flash II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 154 Acrobat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 190 Digital Portfolio Presentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 15 CREDITS Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above. TECHNICAL ELECTIVES – 4 CREDITS Technical Electives may be taken from MMDP areas. RECOMMENDED ELECTIVES MMDP 128 Digital Photography MMDP 142 Photoshop II MMDP 117 Typography MMDP 152 Layout Graphic Design MMDP 234 XML/XSL MMDP 235 PHP Scripting MMDP 238 JavaScript

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Multimedia Design & Production ILLUSTRATOR/PHOTOSHOP SPECIALTY CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION

15 CREDITS

16-17 CREDITS

The Digital Audio/Video Editing certificate is designed to prepare students for job transitions, skills upgrades, and continuing industry education to remain current in post-production.

The Illustrator/PhotoShop Specialty certificate is designed to prepare students for job transitions, skills upgrades, and continuing industry education to remain current in their chosen field, multimedia design and production.

Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS MMDP 159 Digital A/V Editing with Final Cut Pro II . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 160 Digital Sound . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 170 Motion Graphics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS MMDP 121 Illustrator I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 122 PhotoShop I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 128 Digital Photography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP Technical Elective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-17

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DIGITAL AUDIO/VIDEO EDITING CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION

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Multimedia Design & Production PRINT SPECIALTY CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION

WEB PAGE DEVELOPMENT CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION

17-18 CREDITS

15 CREDITS

The Print Specialty certificate is designed to prepare students for job transitions, skills upgrades, and continuing industry education to remain current in their chosen field, multimedia design and production.

The Web Page Development certificate prepares students to work as Web page developers. Students will acquire skills to design, implement, and maintain dynamic websites that use industry standard languages for scripting and data representation on the Web.

Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS MMDP 126 InDesign I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 154 Acrobat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 158 Prepress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP Technical Elective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-18

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Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS MMDP 113 Computer Programming Fundamentals. . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 234 XML/XSL. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 238 JavaScript . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

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Multimedia Design & Production WEB SPECIALTY CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION

15 CREDITS

17-18 CREDITS

Web Server Applications certificate is designed to prepare students to work as Web server applications developers. Students will acquire skills to design, implement, and maintain websites that require server-side scripting such as processing user input from forms and storing and retrieving data from SQL databases.

The Web Specialty certificate is designed to prepare students for job transitions, skills upgrades, and continuing industry education to remain current in their chosen field, multimedia design and production.

Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS MMDP 123 Flash I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 133 Dreamweaver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MMDP 153 Web Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Technical Elective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS MMDP 113 Computer Programming Fundamentals. . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 118 HTML. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MMDP 235 PHP Scripting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-18

TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

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Nursing NURSING ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE

Programs of Study

92 CREDITS

The Nursing AAS degree prepares students who are highly educated, technically advanced, competent and caring individuals to practice professional nursing in a variety of settings. Graduates of the program are eligible to take the examination for licensure as a registered nurse (NCLEX-RN). Minimum admission requirements: Completion of application for admission to the nursing program, minimum GPA 3.0, Entrance Test results, 2 professional recommendations, and Washington state background check Nursing AAS degree graduates (RN) will: ƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒ be competent in skills and knowledge necessary for the practical nursing role ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring PREREQUISITE RECOMMENDATION PSYC& 100 General Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PREREQUISITE REQUIREMENTS High School Chemistry, CHEM&121, or Equivalent Certified Nursing Assistant BIOL& 241 Human A & P 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 BIOL& 242 Human A & P 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ENGL& 101 English Composition I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MATH& 146 Introduction to Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PSYC& 200 Lifespan Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS NURS 110 Pathophysiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 NURS 111 Nursing Foundations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 NURS 112 Nursing Foundations Practicum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 NURS 113 Health Assessment & Promotion I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 NURS 116 Communication Processes in Nursing . . . . . . . . . . . 2 NURS 117 Skills Lab I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 NURS 121 Medical-Surgical Nursing I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 NURS 122 Medical-Surgical Nursing I Practicum . . . . . . . . . . . 5 NURS 128 Skills Lab II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 NURS 129 Health Assessment & Promotion II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 NURS 134 Pharmacology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 NURS 131 Medical-Surgical Nursing II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 NURS 132 Medical-Surgical Nursing II Practicum . . . . . . . . . . 5 NURS 137 Mental Health Nursing I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 NURS 221 Nursing & the Childbearing Family . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 NURS 222 Nursing & the Childbearing Family Practicum . . . 3 NURS 225 Nursing of Children. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 NURS 226 Nursing of Children Practicum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 NURS 241 Medical-Surgical Nursing RIII . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 NURS 242 Medical-Surgical Nursing RIII Practicum. . . . . . . . . 4 NURS 235 Mental Health Nursing II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 NURS 236 Mental Health Nursing II Practicum . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 NURS 243 Professional Nursing Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 NURS 244 Professional Nursing Practice Preceptorship . . . . . 3 ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS** BIOL& 260 Microbiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CMST& Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 NUTR& 101 Nutrition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 ** All Academic Core courses are required to be completed prior to the sixth term of the Associate Degree Nursing program.

TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

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Nursing

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PRACTICAL NURSING CERTIFICATE OF PROFICIENCY 68 CREDITS

Admission requirements: Completion of application for admission to the nursing program, entrance test results, 2 professional recommendations, and Washington state background check. Practical Nurse certificate graduates will: ƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒ be competent in skills and knowledge necessary for the nursing role ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, spring

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS NURS 110 Pathophysiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 NURS 111 Nursing Foundations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 NURS 112 Nursing Foundations Practicum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 NURS 113 Health Assessment & Promotion I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 NURS 116 Communication Processes in Nursing . . . . . . . . . . . 2 NURS 117 Skills Lab I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 NURS 121 Medical-Surgical Nursing I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 NURS 122 Medical-Surgical Nursing I Practicum . . . . . . . . . . . 5 NURS 128 Skills Lab II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 NURS 129 Health Assessment & Promotion II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 NURS 134 Pharmacology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 NURS 131 Medical-Surgical Nursing II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 NURS 132 Medical-Surgical Nursing II Practicum . . . . . . . . . . 5 NURS 137 Mental Health Nursing I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 NURS 213 Professional, Vocational Relationships . . . . . . . . . . 3 NURS 214 Nursing Practice & the Family Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 NURS 215 Nursing Practice & the Family Unit Practicum . . . 2 NURS 219 Medical-Surgical Nursing PIII Preceptorship . . . . . 3

Programs of Study

The Practical Nursing certificate prepares students for employment as Practical Nurses in hospitals, clinics, long-term care facilities, home healthcare agencies, schools and doctor’s offices. Graduates of the program are eligible to take the licensing examination to become licensed practical nurses (NCLEX-PN).

ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS** CMST& Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 NUTR& 101 Nutrition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 ** All Academic Core courses are required to be completed prior to completion of the third term of the Practical Nursing program.

PREREQUISITE RECOMMENDATIONS PSYC& 100 General Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PREREQUISITE REQUIREMENTS Certified Nursing Assistant BIOL& 241 Human A & P 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 BIOL & 242 Human A & P 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ENGL& 101 English Composition I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MATH 099 Intermediate Algebra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PSYC& 200 Lifespan Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

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Nursing NURSING ASSISTANT CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION

Programs of Study

11 CREDITS

100

The Nursing Assistant certificate prepares students for employment as Nursing Assistants in hospitals, clinics, long-term care facilities, and home healthcare agencies. Additionally, this program prepares students for continuation on into practical or registered nurse programs. Graduates of the program are eligible to take the certification examination to become Certified Nursing Assistant.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS NURS 107 Nursing Assistant Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 NURS 108 Nursing Assistant Laboratory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 NURS 109 Nursing Assistant Practicum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

Admission requirements: ƒ COME 120 7-Hour HIV AIDS Training or equivalent ƒ ENGL 093 or equivalent placement score Corequisites: CPR for the Health Care Provider Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

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Occupational Therapy Assistant

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OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY ASSISTANT ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE 105 CREDITS

Lake Washington Technical College is seeking accreditation by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE). The Program was granted “Developing Program Status” in April of 2009. The earning of “Developing Program Status” by ACOTE does not guarantee that the program will be granted Accreditation. For more information contact ACOTE: PO Box 31220 Bethesda, MD 20824-1220, phone 301-652-2682, Fax 301-652-7111. Website www.aota.org, email accred@oata.org. Once the program is accredited, Occupational Therapy Assistant AAS degree graduates will: ƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒ be eligible to take the National Registration Examination for Occupational Therapy Assistants ƒ demonstrate Global and Cultural Awareness, Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

change pending input from the national accreditation body, ACOTE. Admission Dates: fall Prerequisite: high school completion or GED The following courses are prerequisites for OTA 101: BIOL 111 Survey of Anatomy & Physiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MEDA 116 Medical Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PSYC& 200 Lifespan Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS OTA 101 Conditions in Occupational Therapy . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 OTA 110 OT in the Health Care System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 OTA 111 Applied Therapeutic Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 OTA 112 Functional Movement & Kinesiology . . . . . . . . . . . 5 OTA 113 Adaptive Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 OTA 120 Professional Communication & Behavior . . . . . . . . 4 OTA 121 Principles of Occupational Therapy: Physical Disabilities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 OTA 122 Fieldwork Level I: Physical Disabilities. . . . . . . . . . . 1 OTA 123 Seminar I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 OTA 124 Fieldwork, Level 1 – Pediatrics/ Mental Health . . . 1 OTA 210 Fundamentals of OT in Pediatrics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 OTA 211 Principles & Practice of OT in Mental Health . . . . . 5 OTA 212 Seminar II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 OTA 213 Seminar III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 OTA 214 Neurocognitive Aspects of Daily Life . . . . . . . . . . . 4 OTA 220 Fundamentals of OT: Older Adults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 OTA 221 Fieldwork Level 1 – Older Adults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 OTA 223 Health Promotion & Wellness in OT . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 OTA 224 Occupational Therapy Assistant Capstone. . . . . . . 4 OTA 230 Fieldwork, Level 2 Clinical Exper A . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 OTA 231 Seminar IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 OTA 240 Fieldwork, Level 2 – Clinical Exper B . . . . . . . . . . . 10 OTA 241 Seminar V. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Programs of Study

Occupational therapy assistants (OTAs) provide occupational therapy services with the direction and supervision of an occupational therapist. Graduates of the OTA Program will work in a variety of settings including hospitals, private practices, outpatient clinics, client homes, long term care facilities, retirement communities, assisted living facilities, school systems, and mental health centers. Graduates of the OTA Program will be able to teach patients or clients to manage basic activities of daily living, such as dressing and grooming; teach exercise and purposeful activities to increase coordination, strength, and work tolerance; and assist the occupational therapist with assessments of patient function. One of the main tenets of occupational therapy is the belief that purposeful and meaningful activity, guided by the OT Clinician, with the participation of the client, is transformative.

*ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 15 CREDITS Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 * These must be completed by the beginning of Term VI. It is recommended that these core requirements be taken before the student enters the program.

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Physical Therapist Assistant PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTANT ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE

Programs of Study

92 CREDITS

The Physical Therapist Assistant AAS degree prepares students to work as a PTA in a variety of settings including hospitals, long-term care facilities, outpatient clinics, pediatric facilities and home-health agencies. PTAs provide physical therapy interventions under the direction and supervision of a physical therapist to people of all ages with health-related conditions which limit their ability to move and perform functional activities in their daily lives. Students are trained in procedural interventions such as exercises for mobility, strength, balance or coordination, training for functional activities, therapeutic massage, and the use of modalities and physical agents. Students are trained in nonprocedural interventions such as communication, education, coordination of care and documentation. Clinical affiliations occur in a variety of off-campus settings. Lake Washington Technical College has been granted Candidate for Accreditation status by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education of the American Physical Therapy Association (1111 North Fairfax Street, Alexandria, VA, 22314; phone: 703-706-3245; e-mail: accreditation@apta.org). Candidacy is not an accreditation status nor does it assure eventual accreditation. Candidate for Accreditation is a pre-accreditation status of affiliation with the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education that indicates the program is progressing toward accreditation. Once accredited, graduates of the program are eligible to take the licensing exam (National Physical Therapy Exam for the Physical Therapist Assistant (NPTAE)) and to apply for state licensure.

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Physical Therapist Assistant AAS degree graduates will: ƒ be prepared to obtain an entry-level position in their field ƒ be prepared to pass the National Physical Therapy Examination (NPTE) ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission to the PTA program is selective. In order to be considered for admission applicants must complete prerequisite courses with a GPA of 2.5 or higher and fulfill PTA program application requirements. Admission Dates: summer PREREQUISITES MEDA 116 Medical Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 BIOL 111 Survey of Anatomy & Physiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PHYS& 121 General Physics I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ENGL& 101 English Composition I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 High School Diploma or GED Certificate CPR Certificate HIV/AIDS Training Certificate (7 hr training) Completed Program Application Packet continues on next page…

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Programs of Study

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS PTA 110 PTA Procedures I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PTA 120 Topics in Physical Therapy I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 PTA 130 Clinical Biomechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 PTA 141 Pathophysiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 PTA 121 Topics in Physical Therapy II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 PTA 140 PTA Procedures II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 PTA 150 PTA Procedures III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 PTA 160 PTA Procedures IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 PTA 170 PTA Procedures V . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 PTA 220 Clinical Affiliation I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 PTA 230 Seminar I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 PTA 122 Topics in Physical Therapy III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 PTA 240 PTA Procedures VI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 PTA 250 PTA Procedures VII. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 PTA 221 Clinical Affiliation II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 PTA 222 Clinical Affiliation III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 PTA 231 Seminar II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

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ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS Oral Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PSYC& 100 General Psychology -ORPSYC& 200 Lifespan Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above. * Any Quantitative Reasoning course which has MATH 099 as a prerequisite

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Professional-Technical Education PROFESSIONAL-TECHNICAL EDUCATION ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE TRANSFER DEGREE

Professional-Technical Education AAS degree graduates will:

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS EDUC 201 Teaching & Facilitating Learning I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 EDUC 202 Developing & Reviewing Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 EDUC 206 Teaching & Facilitating Learning II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 EDUC 211 Planning for Instruction (Curriculum Development) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 EDUC 215 Best practices in Distance Learning . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 EDUC 216 Assessment of Learning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 EDUC 235 Emerging Technology in Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 IFAD 151 First Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 EDUC 251 Teaching Practicum I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 EDUC 252 Teaching Practicum II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 EDUC 295 Professional-Technical Education Capstone . . . . . 5

ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills

TECHNICAL ELECTIVES – 10 CREDITS See faculty adviser/instructor for pre-approval. EDUC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 20 CREDITS Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Programs of Study

90 CREDITS

The Professional-Technical Education AAS-T degree provides a structured degree pathway in education for post-secondary professional-technical educators, providing them with an educational continuum toward a baccalaureate in education. The degree structure– designed around the Washington State Skill Standards for Professional-Technical College and Customized Trainers– will provide leadership and technical skills beyond those required for professional-technical certification.

Admission Dates: fall

TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Social & Human Services

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SOCIAL & HUMAN SERVICES ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE 120 CREDITS

Social & Human Services AAS degree graduates will: ƒ be prepared for a wide range of entry level positions in the social services field ƒ interview, assess, and appropriately refer clients to community resources ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS PSYC 099 Human Relations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PSYC& 100 General Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PSYC& 200 Lifespan Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PSYC& 220 Abnormal Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SHSV 110 Intro to Social & Human Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SHSV 120 Case Management & Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SHSV 130 Therapeutic Approaches & Techniques. . . . . . . . . . 5 SHSV 136 Issues in Aging: Boomers & Beyond . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SHSV 138 Field Practicum Seminar I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 SHSV 139 Field Practicum I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 SHSV 140 Disability Issues & Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SHSV 142 Behavioral Health & Wellness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SHSV 146 Leadership Development & Ethics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SHSV 210 Group Process & Dynamics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SHSV 212 Intro to Chemical Dependency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SHSV 218 Field Practicum Seminar II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 SHSV 219 Field Practicum II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 SHSV 220 Advanced Therapeutic Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SHSV 222 Multicultural Counseling. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SHSV 238 Field Practicum Seminar III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 SHSV 239 Field Practicum III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 SOC& 101 Intro to Sociology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Programs of Study

The Social & Human Services AAS degree provides the generalist education for employment in a wide variety of social service agencies. The student will develop the professional values, skills, and knowledge to assist individuals and groups with personal, interpersonal, and situational problems. In this occupational area students will be prepared for employment as case managers in rehabilitation, employment services, corrections, educational programs, and community based organizations serving youth, seniors, and individuals with disabilities.

ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 20 CREDITS Social Science (included in required courses) . . . . 5 Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above. TECHNICAL ELECTIVES – 10 CREDITS Electives may be selected from BAS, PSYC, and HMDS areas and must be approved by the SHSV faculty adviser.

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Social & Human Services SOCIAL & HUMAN SERVICES CERTIFICATE OF PROFICIENCY

Programs of Study

75 CREDITS

The Social & Human Services certificate provides the generalist education for employment in a wide variety of social service agencies. The student will develop the professional values, skills, and knowledge to assist individuals and groups with personal, interpersonal, and situational problems. In this occupational area students will be prepared for employment as case managers in rehabilitation, employment services, corrections, educational programs, and community based organizations serving youth, seniors, and individuals with disabilities. Social & Human Services certificate graduates will: ƒ be prepared for a wide range of entry level positions in the social services field ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

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PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS PSYC& 100 General Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PSYC& 200 Lifespan Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SHSV 110 Intro to Social & Human Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SHSV 120 Case Management & Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SHSV 130 Therapeutic Approaches/Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SHSV 136 Issues in Aging: Boomers & Beyond . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SHSV 138 Field Practicum Seminar I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 SHSV 139 Field Practicum I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 SHSV 140 Disability Issues & Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SHSV 142 Behavioral Health & Wellness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SHSV 146 Leadership Development & Ethics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SOC& 101 Intro to Sociology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 15 CREDITS Social Science (PSYC 099) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Written Communication (ENGL 100) . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above. TECHNICAL ELECTIVES – 5 CREDITS Electives may be selected from BAS, PSYC, and HMDS areas and must be approved by the SHSV faculty adviser.

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Social & Human Services

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LANGUAGE INTERPRETING SERVICES CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION 16 CREDITS

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS SHSV 110 Introduction to Social & Human Services . . . . . . . . 5 SHSV 112 Exploring Medical Interpreting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 SHSV 114 Exploring Social Service Interpreting . . . . . . . . . . . 3 SHSV 222 Multicultural Counseling. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

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The Language Interpreting Services certificate prepares students for the DSHS screening examination in medical and social services language interpreting. Students will learn interpreter terminology, grammatical skills and professional ethics needed for successful employment in the high demand occupation of language interpreting. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length.

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Programs of Study

Welding Fabrication & Maintenance Technology WELDING FABRICATION & MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE

Programs of Study

95 CREDITS

The Welding Fabrication & Maintenance Technology AAS degree provides students with skills to weld and fabricate complex projects. Students receive in-depth knowledge of the nature of metals as it relates to welding, fabricating, and the application of heat. Graduates become proficient in most major industrial welding and cutting processes common in the construction, manufacturing, maintenance, shipbuilding, and aerospace industries. Students also prepare to take the Washington Association of Building Officials (WABO) certification test. Welding Fabrication & Maintenance AAS degree graduates will: ƒ be prepared for a range of entry-level positions as welder apprentices, welders, welder fabricators, welding fitters ƒ be prepared to succeed on the WABO certification and similar industry exams ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS WELD 101 Oxy/Acetylene Cutting & Welding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7  WELD 102 Shielded Metal Arc Welding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8  WELD 103 Flux Core Arc Welding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 WELD 104 Gas Metal Arc Welding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 WELD 105 Gas Tungsten Arc Welding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 WELD 106 Carbon and Plasma Cutting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 WELD 201 Shielded Metal Arc Pipe Welding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7  WELD 202 Gas Tungsten Arc Pipe Welding. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8  WELD 203 Layout and Fabrication Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 WELD 204 WABO Test Prep and Weld Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 20 CREDITS Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95  See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

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Welding Fabrication & Maintenance Technology

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WELDING FABRICATION & MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY CERTIFICATE OF PROFICIENCY 75 CREDITS

Welding Fabrication & Maintenance certificate graduates will: ƒ be prepared for a range of entry-level positions as welder apprentices, welders, welder fabricators, welding fitters ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS WELD 101 Oxy/Acetylene Cutting & Welding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 WELD 102 Shielded Metal Arc Welding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 WELD 103 Flux Core Arc Welding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 WELD 104 Gas Metal Arc Welding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 WELD 105 Gas Tungsten Arc Welding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 WELD 106 Carbon and Plasma Cutting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 WELD 203 Layout and Fabrication Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 WELD 204 WABO Test Prep and Weld Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 15 CREDITS Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

Programs of Study

Welding Fabrication & Maintenance Technology certificate students learn welding skills used in construction projects, manufacturing, industrial plants, and in maintenance industries. Using the latest welding processes and techniques, students learn to read blueprints and fabricate products in a variety of shapes and sizes. Students prepare to take the Washington Association of Building Officials (WABO) test.

It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

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Wine Technology WINE TECHNOLOGY ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE

Programs of Study

90 CREDITS

The Wine Technology AAS degree coursework includes horticulture/viticulture, enology, wine-making, state and federal regulations and compliance testing, customer service, wine sales and marketing, food and wine pairing, wine evaluation, and event management. Wine Technology AAS degree graduates will: ƒ be prepared for a range of entry-level positions in the field ƒ demonstrate Critical Thinking, Teamwork, Communication, Global and Cultural Awareness, and Technical and Information Literacy skills It is the student’s responsibility to discuss sequencing and work out their individual schedule with a counselor or adviser. Any developmental coursework a student may be required to complete may increase the program length. Admission Dates: fall, winter, spring, summer

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS BIOL& 260 Microbiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CHEM& 131 Introduction to Organic/ Biochemistry . . . . . . . . . . 5 CULA 143 Food & Wine Pairing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 HORT 121 Soils . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 WINE 101 Enology I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 WINE 102 Enology II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 WINE 103 Wine-Making Theory I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 WINE 104 Wine-Making Theory II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 WINE 105 Wine-Making Theory III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 WINE 107 Wine Production Practicum I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 WINE 108 Wine Production Practicum II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 WINE 109 Wine Production Practicum III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 WINE 117 Intro to Sustainable Viticulture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 WINE 140 Introduction to Wine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 WINE 145 Anthropology of Wine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 WINE 241 Wines of the World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 WINE 242 Northwestern Wines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 WINE 243 The Business of Wine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 WINE 244 Wine Marketing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 WINE 245 Wine Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 WINE 246 Restaurant Wine Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 WINE 262 Tasting Room & Event Management . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ACADEMIC CORE REQUIREMENTS – 20 CREDITS Quantitative Reasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Written Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 See page 111 for a list of all applicable courses for each of the categories listed above.

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Academic Core Requirements

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MISSION

The Academic Core program at Lake Washington Technical College helps our students develop the global and foundational skills of written and oral communication, quantitative reasoning, and human relations. These skills prepare our students for success in technical programs and careers, cultivate critical thinking, and foster the values of life-long learning.

ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE

CERTIFICATE

Applicable course list to satisfy Academic Core Requirements for the AAS degree:

Applicable course list to satisfy Academic Core Requirements for the certificate:

WRITTEN COMMUNICATION ENGL& 101 English Composition I ENGL& 102 English Composition II ENGL& 235 Technical Writing

WRITTEN COMMUNICATION BUSA 103 Business Communications ENGL 092 Reading Improvement ENGL 093 Beginning English ENGL 100 Introduction to Writing ENGL& 101 English Composition I ENGL& 102 English Composition II ENGL& 235 Technical Writing

ORAL COMMUNICATION CMST& 210 Interpersonal Communication CMST& 220 Public Speaking CMST& 230 Small Group Communication QUANTITATIVE REASONING MATH 102 Quantitative Reasoning MATH& 107 Math in Society MATH& 146 Introduction to Statistics MATH& 141 Precalculus I MATH& 142 Precalculus II MATH& 151 Calculus I MATH& 152 Calculus II PHIL& 106 Introduction to Logic SOCIAL SCIENCE CJ& 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice PSYC& 100 General Psychology PSYC& 200 Lifespan Psychology SOC& 101 Introduction to Sociology

Programs of Study

The Academic Core department supports student skill development in the global outcomes areas of communication, critical thinking, and global and cultural awareness, more information on the global outcomes program, please see page 9.

QUANTITATIVE REASONING BUSA 100 Business Math MATH 080 Basic Math MATH 090 Introduction to Algebra MATH 099 Intermediate Algebra MATH 102 Quantitative Reasoning MATH& 107 Math in Society MATH& 146 Introduction to Statistics MATH& 141 Precalculus I MATH& 142 Precalculus II MATH& 151 Calculus I MATH& 152 Calculus II PHIL& 106 Introduction to Logic SOCIAL SCIENCE CJ& 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice PSYC 099 Human Relations PSYC& 100 General Psychology PSYC& 200 Lifespan Psychology SOC& 101 Introduction to Sociology NOTE: Students enrolled in CSNT, Electronics, Architectural Graphics, or Engineering Graphics, must complete MATH 090 or higher to receive credit.

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Support Services for Students

Support Services

ADVISING

CLEP

West Building, W207 (425)739-8300 E-mail: advising@lwtc.edu www.lwtc.edu/advising Assessing readiness for college programs is an important part of student success, and advisers are available to help each student understand placement tests, determine academic readiness in math and English, and help select appropriate classes. An adviser can help each student determine degree and certificate requirements, a sequence of courses, and select general education courses.

Students working towards an AAS degree may earn college credits by taking a computer-based College Level Examination Program (CLEP) exam. Check with an adviser for other courses eligible for CLEP. A passing score earns credit only-not a grade. GPA is not impacted by CLEP scores.

The first appointment with an adviser is also a good time to discuss the transfer of any other college credits. Quality planning will help each student select the right program and the right classes at the right time. Students planning to apply for the Bachelor of Technology in Applied Design (BTAD) or Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree or certificate should meet with an adviser to review degree planning steps and degree requirements, degree progress, and to complete the college admissions application.

The TEAS test is required as part of the admission process for the Dental Hygiene, Nursing and other allied health programs.

Advisers can refer students to an array of college services designed to support student success. It is the responsibility of each student to plan for program completion including degree requirements, certificate requirements, and transfer requirements. Early meetings with an adviser will make certain that educational plans are on target.

Selecting a career and an appropriate training program are major life decisions. Whether it is your first time in the employment field or you are changing careers, you are making an investment with both your time and money. Make sure it is the right decision before you start training!

ASSESSMENT West Building, W204 (425)739-8115 www.lwtc.edu/assessment A variety of assessments are offered to both students and the community. PLACEMENT TESTING

The COMPASS placement test is required for enrollment in English, math and many technical and academic classes. Students pursuing a degree or certificate must take the compass test before enrolling. The college also accepts ASSET and SLEP results taken within the past two years.

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GED

General Education Development (GED) testing is available in English and Spanish. TEAS

MOS & MCAS

The college is an authorized certification testing center for Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) and Microsoft Certified Applications Specialist (MCAS). VOCATIONAL ASSESSMENT

To assist you in your career exploration, the Employment Resource Center at Lake Washington Technical College offers a free Career Choice Workshop the first and third Friday of every month from 10:00 a.m. to noon. Explore your interests, research current occupational information and learn about resources to assist you in exploring your career options. Additional interest and personality assessments are available on an individual basis. Contact the Employment Resource Center at (425)739-8113 for more information.

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COUNSELING West Building, W207 (425)739-8300 Counselors are available to assist students with educational, career, or personal needs so students can successfully complete their college training. Short-term counseling services are confidential and available at no charge to students. The counseling emphasis is on providing support to students, teaching new coping skills, and accessing community resources. Counselors work with community agencies and organizations. When appropriate they make referrals to other agencies to support the student.

DISABILITY SUPPORT SERVICES

TRIO SUPPORT SERVICES FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES West Building, 207N (425)739-8361 Support Services for Students with Disabilities (SSSD) is a federally funded TRiO grant project established at Lake Washington Technical College for the purpose of assisting students with disabilities in achieving their postsecondary ambitions. Students are encouraged to complete their associate degree or certificate program and, whenever feasible, transfer to a 4-year institution. This is accomplished by providing supportive services such as tutoring, career planning, academic action plans, advising, transfer assistance, mentoring, and success workshops.

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To be eligible for Support Services for Students with Disabilities, you must: ƒ be enrolled or accepted for enrollment at LWTC ƒ be registered with LWTC Disability Support Services ƒ be able to meet the criteria for academic need as established by the SSS Project ƒ be a citizen, national or permanent resident of the United States Tutoring is the basis of TRiO services and students can receive 2 hours a week of free one-on-one tutoring for each course in which academic assistance is needed. In addition, for programs requiring high GPAs for admittance or transfer courses, TRiO will tutor a B to an A! Applications are available in room W207N and by calling (425)739-8361, 739-8249 or 739-8353. The following statement refers to the Support Services for Students with Disabilities grant from the U.S. Department of Education. However, the contents have not been reviewed by the Department and no endorsement should be inferred. The Lake Washington Technical College Student Support Services TRiO Project is 100% federally funded annually at $231,330.00.

WORKER RETRAINING West Building, W207D (425)739-8206 worker.retraining@lwtc.edu The college provides special services to people who have been laid off from work, are displaced homemakers, or were self-employed and are now unemployed.

Support Services

West Building, W207 (425)739-88300 TDD: (425)739-8109 dss@lwtc.edu www.lwtc.edu/dss The college is committed to providing support services to students with disabilities in compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. Students who need assistance should make an appointment with the Disability Support Services office by calling (425)739-8300, in person in room W207, or via e-mail at dss@lwtc.edu.

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WORKFIRST PROGRAMS West Building, W207H & I (425)739-8339 and (425)739-8131 WorkFirst is an innovative partnership involving the college, the Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS), Employment Security Department (ESD), and community-based organizations, business and labor.

Support Services

STUDENT PERSISTENCE

TANF or former TANF families may be eligible for: ƒ Tuition and books ƒ Individualized support to reach their goals ƒ Educational and career planning ƒ Job search assistance and resources

The student Persistence program provides support services to low income, first generation college students and students with disabilities. Services include: ƒ Academic Advising – creating educational plan and registering for classes ƒ Career counseling ƒ Assistance with filling out financial aid and scholarship applications ƒ referrals to college and community resources ƒ Individualized support services and an oncampus advocate

For more information contact the WorkFirst program in room W207H and I or call (425)739-8339 or (425)739-8131.

JOB SEARCH ASSISTANCE IN THE CLASSROOM

The goal of WorkFirst is to assist TANF or former TANF families, through training and basic education, to move permanently off all forms of public assistance and to become self-sufficient. There are a number of options within the WorkFirst program to help families attain this goal.

THE OPPORTUNITY GRANT AND STUDENT PERSISTENCE PROGRAMS West Building, W207 (425)739-8100 x448 or (425)739-8390 Opportunitygrant@lwtc.edu OPPORTUNITY GRANT

The Opportunity Grant is designed to help low income students in high demand pathways to reach their educational and employment goals. Students in the Opportunity Grant program may receive: ƒ Tuition and fees for up to 45 credits or up to 3 years, which ever comes first. ƒ Up to $1,000.00 per academic year for books and related supplies. ƒ Support services, academic advising, and career planning from an Opportunity Grant adviser. ƒ Free tutoring as needed.

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Eligibility guidelines for Opportunity Grant include: ƒ Low income as determined by the FAFSA and 09-10 income guidelines. ƒ Washington resident for at least 1 year. ƒ Must be in Business, Accounting, Healthcare or I-BEST programs.

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The training programs at the college are practical and reality-based, relying on strong ties between industry and faculty. Job-search methods, including interviewing techniques, résumé writing, and application methods, are taught in the classroom specific to the type of industry or skill that is being learned. Instructors assist students in looking for work using industry-specific job-search methods.

JOB SEARCH ASSISTANCE IN THE EMPLOYMENT RESOURCE CENTER West Building, W207 (425)739-8113 www.lwtc.edu/erc The Employment Resource Center offers career exploration and job search assistance to students, alumni, and community members. The center is staffed by a partnership between the college, the college’s Associated Student Government, and representatives from community-based organizations.

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Services include: ƒ An extensive list of current job postings. ƒ Career Services Online-Search for current jobs, apply online and post your résumé using our online service. ƒ Job search resources and assistance. ƒ Career exploration workshops and resources. ƒ Résumé, interview and networking assistance. ƒ Computer, fax, copy machine and phone are available to assist in job search. ƒ On-campus employer recruiting opportunities and information on local job fairs.

BOOKSTORE East Building, E128 (425)739-8108 The bookstore sells course-related supplies such as notebooks, spirals, software, art and engineering supplies, class required kits, snacks and clothing.

EARLY LEARNING CENTER South Portable, S2 (425)739-8117 or 739-8100 ext. 565 Convenient, quality care is available at the campus Early Learning Center for children from age 12 months through six years. Children receive an active, stimulating program that encourages learning through experience and accomplishment. Funding programs are accepted. Please call to register a child.

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DENTAL CLINIC East Building, E107 (425)739-8130 Students receive quality dental care at a low cost in the college’s modern, fully equipped dental clinic. Licensed dentists are available by appointment to provide a wide range of dental procedures. The clinic provides students in the dental assisting and dental hygiene programs with a practical experience environment. Please call to make an appointment.

EVERGREEN HEALTHCARE ACCESS PROGRAM West Building, W101 (425)739-8400 The Evergreen Healthcare Access Program has partnered with the college to bring health services to the college and Eastside communities. A registered nurse, an employee of the Evergreen Healthcare Access Program, offers nursing evaluation and assistance for minor illnesses or injury to college staff during regularly scheduled hours. Schedule changes relating to the Health Room will be posted on the Health Room door, and college staff will be notified by e-mail. In addition to staffing the Health Room, the Evergreen Healthcare Access Program is pleased to be able to offer the following services to eligible students, staff, and families in the community: ƒ free health screenings and assessments ƒ well-child exams ƒ childhood immunizations

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The store sells textbooks for all classes. Starting Fall quarter 2010, the store will start renting select textbook titles. Textbooks for rental will be available on www.efollett.com. Starting August 2010, the bookstore will have additional details concerning textbook rental.

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Low-cost sports physicals with subsidies are available upon request. An advanced registered nurse practitioner provides these services and an appointment is required. Case management services, providing information and referral linkages, are made available through the Evergreen Care Network.

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LIBRARY

Students have several choices on campus for snacks and meals. Nutritious, quality food service is available in the cafeteria, offering well-balanced entrees daily as well as beverages and snacks. In addition, the college operates a training restaurant for students in the Culinary Arts program. It is open to the public for full meal service. Hours of operation in the food service programs are shorter during the summer quarter. Vending machines for snacks and beverages are also available on campus.

Technology Center, T213 (425)739-8320 The library offers comfortable, flexible learning space for active learning, research, multi-media presentations, and working on collaborative projects. In addition we offer: ƒ Online databases, available on and off campus ƒ Computers ƒ DVD’s ƒ Local, regional, national and international newspapers ƒ Learning studios, conference, and study rooms

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The Learning Commons at Lake Washington Technical College is designed to foster active learning for students. We combine traditional library services, academic support services, faculty development, and technology services in one location. The Learning Commons consists of the following areas: ƒ Academic Skills Center (Adult Basic Education, ESL Math Lab, Tutoring Center, and Writing Center) ƒ Library ƒ Teaching and Learning Center (TLC) ƒ Computer Lab

ACADEMIC SKILLS CENTER Technology Center, T217 (425)739-8100, ext. 656 If you need help in keeping up with your classes or require remedial assistance before proceeding into a program, the Academic Skills Center is the place to go. Open to all college students on a walk-in or teacherreferral basis, the Center offers a variety of services to assist you in becoming a self-sufficient learner. Services include: ƒ Adult Basic Education ƒ English as a Second Language ƒ Math Lab ƒ Tutoring Center and eTutoring ƒ Writing Center Programs are designed to meet the specific needs of individuals at no fee.

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TEACHING AND LEARNING CENTER Technology Center, T315 (425)739-8100, ext. 303 The TLC is dedicated to the professional development of our faculty and staff. Our class offerings are designed to further develop the pedagogical and the technology skills needed in today’s classroom. The TLC also prepares faculty for professional/vocational certification, and the AAS-T degree.

PARKING The college provides free parking facilities for students in both day and evening programs. Parking is not allowed along roadways and traffic lanes. Designated spaces are available for disabled persons who display a state-issued parking sticker. For a carpool parking permit application form, please visit the Safety & Security Office in the East Building, 1st floor, room E145.

SAFETY AND SECURITY Your safety and security are taken seriously at the college; we have a very low incidence of crime on the campus. Although the college has no security force of its own, the campus is patrolled regularly by the Kirkland Police Department and a security patrol and all incidents of confirmed or suspected crimes are reported. Information provided by law enforcement agencies concerning registered sex offenders attending the college may be obtained from the vice president of student services office.

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CRIME STATISTICS FOR 2009*:

Murder/Non-negligent manslaughter

0 cases reported

Forcible sex offenses (incl. forcible rape)

0 cases reported

Nonforcible sex offenses

0 cases reported

Robbery

0 cases reported

Aggravated assault

0 cases reported

Burglary

3 cases reported

Motor vehicle theft

7 cases reported

Arson

0 cases reported

Negligent manslaughter

0 cases reported

Simple assault

1 case reported

Arrests/Disciplinary Actions/Judicial Referrals: 2 cases reported

Drug law violations

4 cases reported

Illegal weapons possessions

1 case reported

Additional information can be found on our website at www.lwtc.edu/policies/safety. * Data available at the time of publication.

STUDENT DUE PROCESS If you believe you have been treated unfairly or wronged in some way, you should take the following steps: ƒ Try to resolve the issue with the person involved ƒ Talk to the person’s direct supervisor ƒ Request an appeal

HARASSMENT Harassment is unacceptable, against the law, and will not be tolerated on campus or at any off-campus events. The college strictly forbids harassment based on types of unlawful discrimination such as race, national origin, sex, marital status, sexual orientation, age, religion, disability, or veteran status. Sexual harassment is defined as unwelcome verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature that may offend the recipient, cause discomfort, or humiliation and interfere with school or job performance. If you believe you have been subjected to harassment by anyone on campus or at an off-campus event, you may report it to the vice president of student services at (425)739-8102 or the executive director of human resources at (425)739-8251. Your concerns will be promptly investigated and you will not suffer retaliation for reporting your concerns.

SMOKING Those who wish to smoke may do so at the designated smoking areas on the campus. In accordance with state law, no smoking is allowed within 25 feet of any entrance.

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STUDENT PROTECTIONS No one in the college community shall suffer recrimination or discrimination because of participation in the due process grievance procedure. Confidentiality will be observed pending resolution. A grievance shall be considered resolved if timelines are not maintained.

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The college has special expectations regarding the conduct of those involved in the college community. Students are expected to comply with the college student conduct code, WAC 495D-121, and failure to do so may result in disciplinary actions, up to and including expulsion from the college. The student conduct code is available in the student handbook, on the college website and in the college Policy and Procedure Manual located in the library.

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The Kirkland campus is conveniently located on Metro bus route 238. The Redmond campus is located on Metro bus route 253 and on ST Express Bus 545. The Duvall campus is located on Metro bus routes 929, 232 and 311.

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Student Life STUDENT PROGRAMS

ASG SPONSORED STUDENT ACTIVITIES

(425)729-8100 x661 East Building, 214 There are many ways to be involved in student life at the college. Running for student government, joining or starting a club, or being involved with an academic program are some of the ways students can get involved.

To fulfill their mission of planning activities to build a feeling of community, ASG plans or sponsors a variety of student oriented activities throughout the year. Look for advertisements on fliers or the website. Different activities have been: social activities, charitable events, speakers, and leadership workshops.

Student Programs houses several components of student life including ASG, student clubs, club lockers, sponsorship of various campus activities and the Student Lounge.

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ASSOCIATED STUDENT GOVERNMENT

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www.lwtc.edu/student_life.xml “To enhance the student experience by planning activities and providing representation to build a feeling of community.” An active student government at LWTC provides excellent leadership opportunities for students as well as a forum for student issues and student activities. Student government consists of two bodies: an Executive Board with a President, Vice-President, Records Officer, Finance Officer, and a Public Relations Officer. They work with the Student Senate, a group made up of two students from each instructional division, with two at-large representatives. All officer positions are open each year for election in spring quarter. All senate positions are available throughout the year as openings occur. Check with Student Programs for those opportunities. Whether a senator or an elected officer, students must have a 2.0 grade point average, be enrolled for 6 or more credits, and have no pending student conduct issues.

ASG SENATE The ASG Senate is one way for all students to have issues or concerns formally addressed. Any concerns may be presented to the student Senate, through a representative or ASG officer.

ASG COMMITTEES Throughout the year ASG looks for students to serve on various college committees, including college cabinet and faculty tenure committees. Other committees include: ASG Budget, Elections and Activities and Marketing. 120

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Any student may charter a club, through the Student Programs office. Clubs offer leadership and learning opportunities by being involved with college business and student government. Many clubs are funded through ASG with the services and activities fee paid through student tuition. Meetings are open to all. For more information, contact the Student Programs office.

SERVICES & ACTIVITIES FEE The ASG, student senate, and college trustees annually approve a per credit services and activities fee. Among other things, these fees make up the student government budget which is used to fund clubs, meetings, conferences, lectures, work-study positions, childcare services and emergency grants for students. Please take advantage of these and more opportunities by getting involved. For more information, contact the Student Programs office.

STUDENT ID CARDS Photo identification cards are available at no extra charge for currently enrolled students at the Enrollment services office in West Building room 201, during posted hours. ID cards serve as the Library card and give access to the Academic Skills Center. To receive an ID card bring picture identification, student identification number, and a current class schedule copy. Cards are valid throughout enrollment, up to 2 years. If an ID card is lost, a replacement fee of $2 will apply.

STUDENT E-MAIL Currently enrolled students may request a free e-mail account for academic and personal use. To sign up for an account, go to the Library circulation desk T213. Students may access the account from any computer with internet access, including computers in the Library and Computer Lab. T E C H N I C A L

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Services to the Community CONTINUING EDUCATION (425)739-8112 www.lwtc.edu/ce e-mail: ce@lwtc.edu Wherever you’re coming from and wherever you’re going in life, Lake Washington Technical College has the classes and programs to get you there. Our role is to make high-quality education accessible to everyone, creating pathways for our students and contributing to the economic development of our community. We offer a wide range of technical, cultural, educational, and social opportunities for adult lifelong learners in the community. Workforce development and personal enrichment courses are offered on-campus or at convenient locations. They can also be brought to your business or be taken online. Enroll in a course and receive pragmatic, relevant instruction that will put you ahead both personally and professionally. Convenient start dates are offered during the day, evening, and weekend.

CORPORATE EDUCATION/ CUSTOMIZED TRAINING Whether it is skill training, consultative services, credit based or non-credit based, we provide you with cost-effective workforce training solutions. We meet your needs for employee assessment, training, design and delivery of training and training products/ services on campus or at your place of business.

eLEARNING We provide “anywhere at any time” learning opportunities to time-and-place bound students. Existing and emerging technologies help provide convenient and flexible access to accredited courses and life-long learning opportunities to students and the community.

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Courses in accounting, business management, computers and computing, health and fitness, sewing, travel, and more offer working adults the opportunity to stay current in their fields, get the additional education they need to advance in their careers, or enrich their personal lives. For more information visit the Continuing Education website at www.lwtc.edu/ce or call (425)739-8112 or e-mail ce@lwtc.edu

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Admissions West Building 201 (425)739-8104 admissions@lwtc.edu Admission to Lake Washington Technical College (LWTC) is open to anyone who: ƒ has a high school diploma, or ƒ General Education Development (GED) certificate - or ƒ is at least 18 years old and is able to benefit from the college’s curriculum An application for admission should be submitted to Enrollment Services by prospective students who seek a degree or certificate, or enroll in 15 or more credits in a given quarter, or have a total of 25 cumulative college-level credits at LWTC. The application is available online at our website, www.lwtc.edu. Additionally, applications may be found in our Enrollment Services Office, by calling the college at (425)739-8104, or by e-mailing admissions@lwtc.edu. To assure the highest quality education and training, the number of students who may enroll in a program may be limited. Admission to the college does not guarantee that all classes or all programs can accept new students. Because of the demand for programs, those interested in attending the college are encouraged to apply early. Some programs, such as Dental Hygiene, Nursing, and Physical Therapist Assistant have additional procedures and requirements that must be met before enrollment. Enrollment Services will inform students if this is the case.

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People interested in personal enrichment, college workshops and customized training, non-degree or non-certificate programs or learning assistance programs are not required to apply for admission, except as stated above for accumulated credits.

HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAMS Students under 18 who have not graduated from high school may enroll in classes through Lake Washington Technical Academy or the Running Start program. See the Lake Washington Technical Academy or Running Start adviser for details and information in this catalog on page 129. 2 0 1 0 - 2 0 1 1

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DEGREE- OR CERTIFICATE- SEEKING STUDENTS Lake Washington Technical College requires that persons seeking admission to a degree or certificate program of study demonstrate their ability to perform entry-level reading, writing and math skills before enrolling in a technical training program by completing a placement assessment. Additional testing in math, reading, writing, and listening skills for Adult Basic Education and English as a Second Language (ESL) placement is administered by the basic skills program using a different assessment tool. The purpose of these placement tests is to assess each student’s academic strengths and weaknesses, help determine proper course placement and to determine possible learning needs before enrollment. Test results are used by students and advisers to select appropriate basic skill, academic and technical courses. An official college transcript indicating satisfactory completion with a 2.0 or better in English and/or math from an accredited college may be accepted in lieu of the placement tests. An evaluation of official transcripts from an accredited college may also result in transfer of other college credits to Lake Washington Technical College. Students must submit official copies of transcripts from all former colleges to Enrollment Services for an official evaluation. The college requires a minimum placement score in English and/or math for enrollment in many technical courses and programs. Placement score requirements for English, math and technical programs are available in student services, and the student assessment center where tests are administered. Exceptions to the published requisite scores for enrollment into specific courses and, in extraordinary cases, programs of study are made by the Dean(s) of the area of study or designee. Students who place into Adult Basic Education (ABE) or English as Second Language (ESL) classes must satisfactorily complete those courses at an appropriate level before enrolling in a technical program or college level course that has basic skill minimum requirements. Students who have not completed courses or placement tests in all subject areas (math, English) need to be tested or have placement scores in those areas for appropriate placement into courses. T E C H N I C A L

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Placement assessment tests are administered regularly at no charge. Drop in and scheduled times are posted at the assessment center or on the assessment center Web page.

TRANSFERRING COURSES TO LWTC Students should submit official transcripts in sealed envelopes from all former colleges to Enrollment Services. Evaluation results are posted to the student’s transcript approximately 2 weeks after submission and may be viewed by accessing the unofficial transcript online. The timeframe for evaluation is affected by the evaluation complexity–foreign, more technical courses, and a greater number of transcripts take longer.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT Students who complete college-level work in high school may receive credit or placement at LWTC on the basis of performance on the Advanced Placement examinations administered by the College Board. Scores on AP examinations range from a high of 5 to a low of 1. In most subject areas, credit and/or placement is awarded for scores of 3 or higher. Test scores and course equivalencies are approved by the faculty and maintained in the Enrollment Services office.

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TRANSFERRING COURSES FROM LWTC General education and technical courses may transfer to other community and technical colleges or four-year universities. The receiving institution should be consulted to determine which courses will be accepted. Antioch University Seattle, Argosy University, Bastyr University, City University, DeVry University, Les Roches School of Hotel Management, University of Phoenix, Seattle Pacific University, Strayer University and the University of Washington–Bothell accept Associate of Applied Science degrees into specific baccalaureate programs. In addition, DigiPen Institute of Technology accepts specific courses toward specific programs. Please refer to the transfer website for more information, www.lwtc.edu/transfer.

TRANSFER TO THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE Many of LWTC’s Associate of Applied Science degrees transfer to The Evergreen State College’s Upside Down Bachelor’s Degree program. For a complete list, please see the Transfer website at www.lwtc.edu/transfer. The following AAS degrees are eligible for transfer to The Evergreen State College, provided students take one of the following academic courses as one of their required electives: ƒ Computer Security and Network Technician Technical electives accepted by Evergreen as academic credit: ITAD 111, 121, 123, 128, 133, 135, 142, 152, 271; MMDP 115, 135, 157, 201, or 202. ƒ Dental Assisting Electives accepted by Evergreen as academic credit: (Note: students must take a 5-credit course to total 25 credits of general education): BIOL 111; BIOL& 100, 241, 242, 260; CHEM&121, 122; ENGL& 102; MATH& 107, 141, 146; PSYC& 100, 200; SOC& 101; SPAN& 121; CMST& 210, 220 or 230.

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Lake Washington Technical College recognizes the International Baccalaureate (IB) program as a challenging course of study and responds individually to each participant’s request for award of college credit. Students may be awarded credit for completing individual areas of study within the IB program. IB students should submit official IB transcripts to the Enrollment Services office (W201) where the program of study will be reviewed with the appropriate division dean for acceptance of examination scores.

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Transfer Rights and Responsibilities STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES 1. Colleges and universities have the right and authority to determine program requirements and course offerings in accordance with their institutional missions. 2. Colleges and universities have the responsibility to communicate and publish their requirements and course offerings to students and the public, including information about student transfer rights and responsibilities. 3. Colleges and universities have the responsibility to communicate their admission and transfer related decisions to students in writing (electronic or paper).

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1. Students have the right to clear, accurate, and current information about their transfer admission requirements, transfer admission deadlines, degree requirements, and transfer policies that include course equivalencies. 2. Transfer and freshman-entry students have the right to expect comparable standards for regular admission to programs and comparable program requirements. 3. Students have the right to seek clarification regarding their transfer evaluation and may request the reconsideration of any aspect of that evaluation. In response, the college will follow established practices and processes for reviewing its transfer credit decisions. 4. Students who encounter other transfer difficulties have the right to seek resolution. Each institution will have a defined process for resolution that is published and readily available to students. 5. Students have the responsibility to complete all materials required for admission and to submit the application on or before the published deadlines. 6. Students have the responsibility to plan their courses of study by referring to the specific published degree requirements of the college or academic program in which they intend to earn a bachelor’s degree. 7. When a student changes a major or degree program, the student assumes full responsibility for meeting the new requirements.

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Registration West Building 201 (425)739-8104 registration@lwtc.edu Registration is the process of enrolling in classes. Dates for classes are announced in both the printed and online quarterly Class Schedules. Course updates are distributed frequently to campus staff.

CHANGE OF REGISTRATION (ADD/DROP) Students must add or drop courses on the Web, or at Enrollment Services before the change is official. A refund will occur only when a student officially withdraws or drops within the refund period. See page 137 for refund policy.

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HOW TO REGISTER New students seeking a degree or certificate make an appointment with staff advisers to complete registration forms and learn about online registration. Continuing students register online or complete registration forms with the assistance of a faculty adviser or counselor. There are a number of ways to register for classes. See the current Class Schedule for all options. Also see the Programs of Study section for information about program start dates. These are subject to change.

FULL-TIME STATUS The college considers students to be full-time if they are registered in 12 or more credits.

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Courses added after the third day of the quarter require instructors’ approval. Adding after the 10th day of the quarter (or of a class) may require special petitions. The quarterly Class Schedule lists fee payment requirements. Students are expected to pay tuition by the first day of the quarter. Students who have not paid tuition and fees or enrolled in the Student Payment Plan will be dropped from their classes after the fifth day of the quarter. Students who owe tuition and fees will not be able to register for future quarters, receive official transcripts, or graduate until their account has been paid.

WAITING LISTS If a class is full, students have the option to be put on a waiting list. This list automatically adds students to openings as they appear through the third day of each quarter. Students should check online, with Enrollment Services, or with the course instructor during the first week of classes to see if they are enrolled in the class. Students should remove themselves from the waiting list if they decide not to enroll in the class. See details in the Class Schedule.

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1. Meet with a faculty adviser to review courses for next quarter. 2. Register for courses (students may register for most courses by Web, mail, or in person). See the Class Schedule or Enrollment Services for methods of registration. 3. Students pay tuition and fees via the Web, at the Cashier’s Office, or other modes offered by the college. Textbook and supply costs are in addition to tuition. To register via the Internet, go to www.lwtc.edu/studenttoolbox. A Student Identification Number (SID) and a personal identification number (PIN) are required. For registration, this number is the student’s date of birth until the PIN is changed by the student. Online registration may not be available for all students or classes. See Enrollment Services for details. To register in person, go to Enrollment Services during business hours which are published in each quarter’s Class Schedule. 2 0 1 0 - 2 0 1 1

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COMPLETE WITHDRAWAL (DROP ALL COURSES)

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A student may withdraw from all courses through the eighth week of the quarter, or the equivalent proportion for shorter courses or courses with irregular start and end dates. The refund rate, if any, would be determined by the longest course being dropped. That rate would then be applied to the other courses dropped at that time. It is the student’s responsibility to drop all classes. Further information is available in the Class Schedule.

In accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), Lake Washington Technical College enforces guidelines concerning information about the student’s educational record, and governs the conditions of disclosure. Except as otherwise indicated, the college will not provide information contained in student records unless the expressed written consent of the student has been given. Students may declare their entire record confidential, in which case no information can be released, and the college will not normally acknowledge the student’s presence at the college. Exceptions may be made if knowledge of the information is necessary to protect the health or safety of the student or other individuals. Contact Enrollment Services or the Class Schedule for further information.

Official withdrawals occurring after the tenth instructional day of the quarter are posted with a W on the student’s transcript. A grade of W does not count in GPA calculations. Not attending a class does not withdraw a student or make one eligible for a refund. After the eighth week, an unofficial withdrawal from the college will result in each instructor assigning the appropriate grade. Depending on the start date and length of the class, an early withdrawal during the first two weeks will not be recorded on the transcript.

In compliance with state law, the college does not use the social security number as a student ID number, though it is required and collected for other purposes authorized by law.

ADMINISTRATIVE WITHDRAWALS

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Many courses at Lake Washington Technical College require completion of prerequisites prior to registration. Prerequisites are listed as a component of each course description and are in place to assist students achieve success. If a student does not meet the requirements of a course either by grade, transfer course work, or test placement score, he or she will be administratively withdrawn from a course. Additionally, students may be administratively withdrawn for non-attendance or as a result of a conduct sanction.

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High School Programs LAKE WASHINGTON TECHNICAL ACADEMY

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West Building, W210 (425)739-8107 Lake Washington Technical Academy offers eligible high school junior and senior students, ages 16 to 21, the opportunity to train for a career and work toward a high school diploma. Students must be 16 years old or younger than 21 years old before September 1 to enter that academic year. Lake Washington Technical Academy is accredited by the Northwest Association Accredited Schools and is a full-time high school program on the campus of Lake Washington Technical College. Eligible students must enroll full-time in a technical training program and general education classes to complete the high school diploma.

Running Start is a program designed for high school juniors and seniors, who are ready for college-level work, want to take college-level courses, and want to receive both college and high school credit while completing high school. Admission to Lake Washington Technical College for Running Start students requires the approval of the high school that the student attends, a 2.5 GPA in high school, and minimum COMPASS scores of 70 writing (English 100/101), and 39 pre-algebra (math 80 or meet the higher math requisite for the technical program). A reading score of 85 is recommended and is used for advising & placement.

To be eligible for Lake Washington Technical Academy, students must: ƒ Have a GPA at or above 2.0 ƒ Register and attend a HOP (High school Options) session ƒ Obtain a copy of high school transcript and bring to the HOP session ƒ Meet all other eligibility requirements (these will be covered at HOP session) Register for an information session by visiting the High School Programs website at www.lwtc.edu/academy or call (425)739-8107 for further information.

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A Running Start student’s tuition is paid by the student’s local school district. Students are generally responsible for course fees, textbooks and additional required course supplies. For information, contact the Running Start coordinator in the West Building, W210, or call (425)739-8107.

GENERAL EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT General Education Development (GED) is a series of five tests developed by the American Council on Education to enable persons to obtain the equivalency of a high school diploma. Earning a GED provides students with greater access to employment, advancement and higher education opportunities. The Academic Skills Center offers GED preparation classes and pre-tests. All students under the age of 19 will need to obtain a release from their school district to test for the GED. Two pieces of ID are required at the time of testing.

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The college is a designated testing center for GED exams. Testing appointments must be scheduled in advance either by visiting the Assessment Center, West Building, W204, or by calling (425)739-8115. For more GED information, please visit www.lwtc.edu/assessment.

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HIGH SCHOOL COMPLETION

GATEWAY TO COLLEGE

This is a program which allows students 18 years of age or older to take college-level classes to meet Washington state high school diploma requirements. The student must meet Washington State minimum graduation requirements. A five-credit college course equals one high school credit. Prospective students must submit an official high school transcript for evaluation, complete an admissions application and take a minimum of 5 credits at LWTC to qualify. This option is only recommended for students who need 1-3 classes to meet diploma requirements. Upon completion of all requirements, the student will be awarded an Adult High School completion diploma by Lake Washington Technical College. Students who earn an Associate’s Degree from LWTC can be awarded the high school diploma without any additional requirements but must request the diploma in writing.

Lake Washington Technical College has been selected to join a national network of community and technical colleges to offer Gateway to College, a national dropout recovery program originally developed by Portland Community College in Oregon.

For further information call (425)739-8107 or visit our website at www.lwtc.edu/academy

The Gateway to College program is for 16-20 year olds who have either dropped out of high school or on the verge of dropping out and are interested in returning to school and completing their high school diploma. Students simultaneously accumulate high school and college credits, earning their high school diploma while progressing toward a certificate, diploma, or associate’s degree. Students selected to participate in the Gateway to College program will receive a scholarship for tuition and books. Enrollment is limited Lake Washington Technical College plans to serve a total of 310 youth through this innovative program through the 2010-2011 school year. For more information please call the High School Programs office at (425)739-8107.

INTERNATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL COMPLETION PROGRAM See page 133 for information on this program.

TECH PREP

Enrollment Services

Tech Prep is a partnership between Lake Washington Technical College, the Northeast Tech Prep Consortium, and 27 high schools. This partnership allows students taking classes in a high school with courses that are articulated with Lake Washington Technical College to receive college credit while attending their home high school.

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Northeast Tech Prep Consortium staff visit the high schools to enroll and register students in selected college courses. College credit is awarded to students who receive a B grade or higher in their high school courses. Students who have received Tech Prep credit and complete high school will be eligible to register as a continuing student at the college. For more information please see our website at www.lwtc.edu/techprep.

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International Students

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East Building, E126 (425)739-8145 international.students@lwtc.edu Lake Washington Technical College is committed to providing an excellent educational experience for international students. We value the diversity of perspectives and experiences that international students bring to the college, and are dedicated to making the international student experience rewarding and memorable. International Programs provides international student orientation, workshops and seminars, highly personalized individual attention, and specialized immigration and visa support. No TOEFL score is required. International students are welcome to enter the more than 100 degree and certificate options available at Lake Washington Technical College. International students have an opportunity to earn a Certificate of Proficiency, Certificate of Completion, or an Associate of Applied Science degree upon completion of their full-time technical program. LWTC provides many opportunities for international student involvement in campus activities. Leadership skills may be gained by participation in student government. We have a large and active International Club to enable students to connect with each other and the campus.

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The application and visa procurement process for international students may take as long as a quarter, so students should apply early. The priority application deadline is one quarter prior to the quarter of enrollment. Late applications are accepted and processed on a rolling basis. Every attempt is made to process application materials as quickly as possible. International students applying for an F1 or M1 visa must submit the following to the international program office: 1. An international student application and application fee. 2. Copy of Passport information pages (visa and I-94 upon approval) 3. Proof of financial independence. Financial aid in the form of scholarships, loans, and grants is generally not available to international students, especially during the first quarter of attendance. The amount required for this document is subject to changes in tuition and fees.

4. Official transcripts from all previous colleges attended. 5. Results of the TOEFL exam taken during the past year with a score of 480 (Paper Based Test), 157 (Computer Based Test), or 54 (Internet Based Test) for admissions to professional-technical programs. Lower test scores or students without TOEFL scores will be considered for acceptance to the Intensive English Program. 6. Evidence of enrollment in an approved health insurance plan. Health plan options are available through the college at time of enrollment. 7. Other information as required.

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Enrollment Services

MAINTAINING IMMIGRATION STATUS The international program office will issue a Form I-20 form to the student, following acceptance to the college. Additionally, international students must: 1. Meet all general admission requirements. 2. Agree to comply with all college regulations. 3. Agree to attend all quarters on a full-time basis as prescribed by Lake Washington Technical College and U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Credit loads may vary depending on program requirements. 4. Maintain grade point average and credit completion requirements necessary for graduation and to remain in status. 5. Agree to file a yearly tax return with the United States Internal Revenue Service.

PROGRAM ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

The following visa holders are eligible for resident tuition: A, E, G, I, K, E3, H1, and those who hold a lawful non-immigrant status such as a spouse or child of a person with an E3, H1 or L visa. Non-resident tuition is charged to the following visa holders: B, C, F, H, J, and M. Documentation of visa status is established by Enrollment Services. Refer to the current tuition schedule for costs. The college may enter into contract training with other organizations and establish a different rate of tuition or fees in some cases.

ESTIMATED COSTS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS INCLUDE (2010–2011 ESTIMATES IN USD): For one quarter (3 months): Tuition (15 credits) $2,910.00 Cost of living $2,793.00 Other (books, etc) $200.25 Mandatory medical insurance $258.75 Total $6,162.00 For three quarters (9 months): Tuition (15 credits) $8,730.00 Cost of living $8,379.00 Other (books, etc) $600.25 Mandatory medical insurance $776.25 Total $18,486.00

International Programs

Certain professional-technical programs have specific admissions requirements, such as minimum test scores, satisfactory performance in prerequisite courses, and other screening criteria. Enrollment Services and the instructional divisions have current program admissions requirements. Applicants pursuing transfer to a bachelor’s program or full-time English Language training must apply for an F1 visa.

TUITION COSTS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS

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HOUSING Our International Program Office can recommend local organizations that will assist international students with housing. Contact Information: International Programs Lake Washington Technical College 11605 132nd Avenue NE Kirkland, WA 98034 Telephone: (425)739-8145 Fax: (425)739-8148 E-mail: international.students@lwtc.edu Web: www.lwtc.edu/international International students are required to inform the International Program Office of change of address immediately to stay in status. A Change of Address Form must be completed and submitted online to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). Lake Washington Technical College’s International Program Office can assist with any questions you may have.

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INTERNATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL COMPLETION PROGRAM Complete high school and college requirements at the same time! To be eligible for the International High School Completion program, students must be: ƒ 16 years old - or ƒ a junior or senior in high school, but have not graduated. To earn the Washington State High School Diploma students will be required to complete the state graduation requirements. College classes will count towards high school graduation requirements, and most will count towards both an Associate’s Degree AND the high school requirements. Students with TOEFL scores 54 (Internet Based), 157 (Computer Based) or 480 (Paper Based) will be admitted directly into academic level classes. Students with no TOEFL scores will take placement tests at Lake Washington. Some intensive English classes may be required before admission into academic classes. Students in the International High School Completion Program will: ƒ Submit official transcripts of high school classes (in English) with the application. ƒ Take all required classes and tests for the state high school requirements. ƒ Live with a relative or host family until the age of 18. ƒ Take a minimum of 15 credits each quarter. Non-resident tuition rates will apply. Other fees, including medical insurance and books are not included. International Programs Office East Building, E126 Telephone: (425)739-8145 E-mail: international.students@lwtc.edu website: www.lwtc.edu/Admission/International_ Programs/International_High_School_Completion.xml

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For more information please contact:

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Tuition TUITION AND FEES

AGENCY OR EMPLOYER PAYMENTS

When you register for courses at LWTC, you are obligated to pay the associated tuition and related fees for those classes unless you drop your classes by the fifth day of the quarter. Students are encouraged to pay at the time of registration or to enroll in the Student Payment Plan. www.lwtc.edu/pplan.

Students whose tuition and/or books will be paid by a third party, such as Labor & Industries, Department of Vocational Rehabilitation, or the student’s employer, need to contact the Student Accounts Office (W201E) at (425)739-8184 or e-mail studentaccounts@lwtc.edu.

ƒ All tuition and fees are due by the first day of the quarter unless previously arranged by a college office, such as Financial Aid, Worker Retraining, or Student Accounts (includes Student Payment Plan). ƒ Students with tuition and fees that have not been received by the end of the fifth day of the quarter are subject to being dropped from classes. ƒ For students enrolling after the fifth day of the quarter, tuition and fees are due at the time of registration. ƒ Students who have paid or who are enrolled in the Student Payment Plan will need to withdraw by the scheduled refund dates to receive the level of reimbursements outlined in the college’s refund policy.

GUARANTEED EDUCATION TUITION (GET) PROGRAM PAYMENTS

STUDENT PAYMENT PLAN The Student Payment Plan allows students to pay tuition and fees on an installment basis. The Student Payment Plan covers your tuition and course fees for every quarter you enroll in the program. Payments are made in monthly installments each academic quarter. For more information, see www.lwtc.edu/pplan.

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Contact the Student Accounts Office, West Building W201E, at (425)739-8184 or studentaccounts@lwtc. edu if your GET payments may arrive after the start of the quarter or for questions regarding coordination of Guaranteed Education Tuition (GET) payments.

PAYMENT OPTIONS Please use your student ID number for all payments so that we can readily apply your payment to the correct account. Payments may be made: 1. On-line at www.lwtc.edu under Paying for College, Student Toolbox/Credit Card Payment, using your student ID and PIN numbers. This method does not allow partial payments. 2. At the Cashier’s Office, West Building W201F. Pay by cash, check, debit, Visa, MasterCard or American Express credit cards. 3. Call the Cashier’s Office at (425)739-8100 ext. 445 to pay by Visa, MasterCard or American Express credit cards. 4. Mail a check to: LWTC, 11605 132nd Ave. NE, Kirkland, WA 98034. 5. Cashier’s drop box outside Cashier’s Office after hours. Envelopes are available.

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EXCEPTIONS

If you withdraw early in the quarter, you might receive a full or partial refund. Not attending a class does not make you eligible for a refund. A refund will occur only when you officially drop within the refund period by completing an Add/Drop form. Refunds cannot normally be arranged by telephone. Students forfeit all claims to refund of tuition and fees if they fail to withdraw from a course, or are suspended or terminated for misconduct. Refunds are distributed depending on how you pay. If you pay with a credit card, the refund will go to that credit card account; if you pay by cash or check, the refund check will be mailed to you. Refunds of online Student Payment Plan payments will be made by check from the college. Refunds of less than $5 will not be mailed. Allow up to six weeks for processing. For federalor state-funded students, financial aid will be returned to aid programs on a pro-rata basis consistent with applicable federal and state rules. REFUND SCHEDULE

Cancellation of a course . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100% STATE-SUPPORTED CREDIT COURSES

First five business days of the quarter . . . . . . . . . . . . .100% After the fifth business day of the quarter and through the tenth business day of the quarter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50% After the tenth business day of the quarter and through the twentieth calendar day of the quarter . . . . . . . . . . 40% SELF-SUPPORTED COURSES

ƒ Refunds for state-supported classes that start after the first week of the quarter or short courses that end early will be made using the same refund percentages as above. The refund schedule will be adjusted based on a ratio of the number of classes that have occurred at the time of withdrawal to the total number of class sessions. ƒ Washington On-Line courses use Washington On-Line quarter dates for refund percentages. ƒ If a student is withdrawing from all courses, the college will use the longest course to calculate the refund percentage for all courses. OFFICIAL WITHDRAWAL DEFINITION

Official withdrawal occurs when a student drops all classes. Refund requests must be made in person, in writing, or via the Web. At the time of withdrawal, the longest course sets the refund rate for all courses being dropped at that time. PASS-THROUGH FEES REFUND

Fees such as insurance that are passed through to another agency may be refunded at 100 percent through the first week of the quarter only. No refund will be made if any insurance claim has been filed. NOTE: See “Refund for Tuition and Special Course- and Program-Connected Fees.” See also exceptions under “Official Withdrawal Definition.”

ESTIMATED 2010-2011 DEGREE & CERTIFICATE PROGRAM COSTS

Class meets 2 or more times; refund request must be received by registration prior to second class meeting.

Please visit www.lwtc.edu/programcost for estimated 2010-2011 degree and certificate program costs.

Class meets just once; refund request must be received prior to class meeting.

Projected estimated costs are subject to change.

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Estimated program costs do not apply to international students. For International Student estimated costs, see page 132

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Tuition Rates Lake Washington Technical College has adopted Washington State community college tuition rates effective Fall 2010 as authorized by the legislature and the State Board for Community and Technical Colleges.

2010-2011 TUITION RATES COST PER CREDIT INCLUDES STUDENT ACTIVITY FEE, COMPREHENSIVE FEE, FACILITY FEE, SAFETY & SECURITY & BUILDING FEE

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FALL/WINTER/SPRING 10-11 RESIDENT AAS & CERTIFICATE 1-10 CREDITS @ $95.00 11-18 CREDITS @ $43.00 OVER 18 CREDITS @ $86.40

FALL/WINTER/SPRING 10-11 NON-RESIDENT AAS & CERTIFICATE 1-10 CREDITS @ $267.00 11-18 CREDITS @ $48.00 OVER 18 CREDITS @ $258.40

FALL/WINTER/SPRING 10-11 RESIDENT APPLIED BACCALAUREATE 1-10 CREDITS @ $204.00 11-18 CREDITS @ $14.51 OVER 18 CREDITS @ $195.40

FALL/WINTER/SPRING 10-11 NON-RESIDENT APPLIED BACCALAUREATE 1-10 CREDITS @ $581.00 11-18 CREDITS @ $15.20 OVER 18 CREDITS @ $572.40

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95.00

$267.00

$204.00

$581.00

2

$190.00

$534.00

$408.00

$1,162.00

3

$285.00

$801.00

$612.00

$1,743.00

4

$380.00

$1,068.00

$816.00

$2,324.00

5

$475.00

$1,335.00

$1,020.00

$2,905.00

6

$570.00

$1,602.00

$1,224.00

$3,486.00

7

$665.00

$1,869.00

$1,428.00

$4,067.00

8

$760.00

$2,136.00

$1,632.00

$4,648.00

9

$855.00

$2,403.00

$1,836.00

$5,229.00

10

$950.00

$2,670.00

$2,040.00

$5,810.00

11

$993.00

$2,718.00

$2,054.51

$5,825.20

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$1,036.00

$2,766.00

$2,069.02

$5,840.40

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$1,079.00

$2,814.00

$2,083.53

$5,855.60

14

$1,122.00

$2,862.00

$2,098.04

$5,870.80

15

$1,165.00

$2,910.00

$2,112.55

$5,886.00

16

$1,208.00

$2,958.00

$2,127.06

$5,901.20

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$1,251.00

$3,006.00

$2,141.57

$5,916.40

18

$1,294.00

$3,054.00

$2,156.08

$5,931.60

19

$1,380.40

$3,312.40

$2,351.48

$6,504.00

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$1,466.80

$3,570.80

$2,546.88

$7,076.40

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$1,553.20

$3,829.20

$2,742.28

$7,648.80

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$1,639.60

$4,087.60

$2,937.68

$8,221.20

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$1,726.00

$4,346.00

$3,133.08

$8,793.60

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$1,812.40

$4,604.40

$3,328.48

$9,366.00

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$1,898.80

$4,862.80

$3,523.88

$9,938.40

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The college may charge other fees to cover costs such as registration, late fees, insurance, supply, and lab fees. For the most current tuition and fee information please visit the website at www.lwtc.edu/tuition. A list of estimated degree and certificate costs by program can be found at www.lwtc.edu/programcost.

TUITION WAIVERS Lake Washington Technical College offers tuition waivers in accordance with State of Washington law and policies authorized by the State Board for Community and Technical Colleges for several categories of students including but not limited to the following:

Tuition & Financial Aid

Please note that all tuition and fee rates are set by the Washington State Legislature, the State Board for Community and Technical Colleges and the Board of Trustees and are subject to change. LWTC reserves the right to change, without notice, any fees to comply with the state or college policies.

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ƒ Non-resident students who are U.S. citizens will receive a waiver resulting in resident tuition rates plus required non-resident building fees. ƒ Children and Spouses of Totally Disabled or POW/ MIA or deceased eligible veterans or national guard members. ƒ Children of Deceased or disabled law enforcement officers or firefighters. ƒ Adult Basic Education, English as a second language, and GED preparation. ƒ Eligible veterans or national guard members. ƒ High School Completion. ƒ Senior Citizens. ƒ State Employees. ƒ Apprentice students. ƒ Running Start students. ƒ Some students with program requirements exceeding 18 quarterly credits. Please check with enrollment services to determine eligibility and current waiver policy. NOTE: Tuition and fees are subject to change without prior notice.

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Financial Aid FINANCIAL AID

FINANCIAL AID APPLICATION PROCEDURE

West Building, W209 (425)739-8106 To help finance your education, we encourage you to inform yourself about financial aid through our website www.lwtc.edu/financialaid, by reading the available literature, or by contacting the Financial Aid Office. Lake Washington Technical College believes people should have the opportunity to achieve their educational goals and the Financial Aid Office is here to help support you in your educational efforts. Financial aid is available for eligible students who enroll either to earn a certificate or a degree. Students and their families need not be low-income to qualify for some kinds of financial aid. By applying for financial aid as early as possible and meeting the institutional priority date, students have the best chance of being reviewed before the beginning of each quarter, and the best chance of maximum funds eligibility each financial aid year. Financial aid is intended to add to but not replace a person’s financial resources. If combined resources are not sufficient to cover expenses, you may be eligible for financial aid in the form of grants, scholarships, low-interest loans and student employment. You must demonstrate a financial need to be eligible for most types of assistance. Financial need is calculated as the difference between the cost of attending school and what you and your family can afford to pay. SAMPLE CALCULATION:

Cost of Attendance - Expected Family Contribution = Financial Need The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is the basic form to apply for assistance and is your passport to financial aid. Information on this form determines your eligibility for grants, scholarships, work study and low-interest loans.

ƒ Complete and submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to the federal processor. This application collects financial data and other information used to calculate the Expected Family Contribution (EFC) that determines a student’s eligibility for aid. Students may complete their FAFSA on-line at www.fafsa.ed.gov, and many of the forms needed may be downloaded from the Financial Aid website at www.lwtc.edu/financialaid. ƒ Stay in touch with the Financial Aid Office to be certain that all information has been received to complete your file. ƒ Students must reapply for financial aid each year after January 1 for the new award year beginning with summer quarter. The financial aid year begins with summer quarter and ends with spring quarter. ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS

ƒ Students are eligible for financial aid if they are: ƒ For most aid programs, attending for the purpose of obtaining a degree or certificate at the college. (Some certificate programs may not be eligible for certain types of aid. Check with the Financial Aid Office to verify program eligibility.) ƒ A U.S. citizen or an eligible non-citizen. ƒ Making satisfactory academic progress in a program of study as defined by the institution’s satisfactory progress criteria. ƒ Not in default on any previous student loans or owing a refund on any grants. ƒ Registered for the draft with Selective Service (if male), as required by law. ƒ A high school graduate, have a GED or passing scores on an approved ability-to-benefit test. ƒ Aid may only be offered for classes required for the student’s program. Students who have the equivalent of a bachelor’s degree (including degrees earned in a foreign country) are limited to applying for loans and work-study assistance. Students will be notified of their financial aid award by mail. Awarding begins in May.

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Students that receive federal financial aid are subject to the federal Return to Title IV Funds regulations. These regulations state that aid eligibility for a student receiving federal aid must be recalculated under most circumstances if the student withdraws from classes early or ceases to attend during the quarter. Some students may owe a repayment to the federal aid programs. These regulations and any resulting amounts owed are separate from and may be in addition to the College’s own tuition refund policy. For a copy of the Return to Title IV Funds refund policy, please contact the Financial Aid Office. WORKER RETRAINING, OPPORTUNITY GRANT AND WORKFIRST PROGRAMS (LOW-INCOME WORKING PARENT)

See the Support Services for Students section of this catalog. To determine your eligibility, check with the Worker Retraining WorkFirst or Opportunity Grant programs in West 207, Monday-Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Other forms of financial aid are available through non-profit agencies and community-based organizations. VETERANS BENEFITS

Lake Washington Technical College has been authorized by the Department of Veterans Affairs to certify veterans for educational benefits. In order to be eligible for educational benefits, you must be enrolled in a certificate- or degree-granting program that has been pre-approved by the Department of Veterans Affairs. Most programs that are two quarters or more in length at Lake Washington Technical College are eligible, but some are not. For more information please log onto our website at www.lwtc.edu/financialaid. You may contact the Veterans Adviser at (425)739-8100, ext. 475, for additional information. The Veterans Adviser is located in the Financial Aid office in the West Building, W209.

To apply for benefits under Chapter 30, 33, 35, 1606 and 1607, you will need the following documents: 1. Completed “Application for VA Benefits” or “Request for Change of Program or Place of Training”, whichever one is applicable. 2. Copy of your DD-214 (unless you are applying for Chapter 1606-reservist, or Chapter 35-dependent on survivor’s benefits.) Please do not submit original copies. 3. You will need to submit official transcripts, by your third quarter of attendance, for both military experience and colleges that you had after high school to determine if credits will go toward your program of study. You may request that these be sent directly to the Admission’s office. You must also request that the Admission’s office evaluate the transcript and have the transcript forwarded to the Veterans Adviser. Please note that it may take at least 40 days after the start of the quarter to receive your first check. If you have any questions regarding check disbursements or the application process, log onto the website www.gibill.va.gov (opens new window) or contact the Department of Veterans Affairs at 1(888)442-4551.

Tuition & Financial Aid

FEDERAL FINANCIAL AID REFUND POLICY

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Veterans who have received an honorable discharge or are members of the National Guard or Reservists called to active duty may also be available for a 25% waiver of tuition costs. Veterans may apply for this waiver at the Enrollment Services office. For more information regarding the Veterans Waivers, please contact Enrollment Services. Children or spouse of a Disabled/Deceased/MIA/POW veteran may be eligible to receive a waiver of all tuition and fees. Contact the Financial Aid office in W209 or Enrollment Services office in W201 for more information.

If you are applying for Vocational Rehabilitation benefits (Chapter 31), you will need to contact a VA case manager at the Seattle regional office at (206) 220-6128 for further requirements regarding benefits.

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Financial Aid Programs FEDERAL PELL GRANT

STUDENT WORK STUDY

The federal Pell Grant is aid that is free monetary assistance for educational expenses. Students who have earned a baccalaureate degree are no longer eligible. Like other grants, the Pell Grant is adjusted for less than full-time enrollment.

Work Study is part time employment funded by federal or state financial aid funds. Students apply by marking they are interested in work study on their FAFSA. Funds are limited and are awarded to students on the basis of need who apply early. Students may work up to a max. of 19 hours a week. Students must be enrolled at least half-time. For more information, please visit our website.

FEDERAL SEOG GRANT

(Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant) This grant is awarded to high need students who apply early in the year (funds are limited). Students must be eligible for the Pell Grant to receive this assistance. WASHINGTON STATE NEED GRANT

This grant is available for Washington residents only. The State Need Grant is adjusted for less than full time enrollment and may not exceed the amount of allowable tuition and fees each quarter. Although this is a state grant, eligibility is determined by FAFSA.

STAFFORD AND PLUS STUDENT LOANS

The federal Stafford loan is a student loan guaranteed by the federal government; students do not need to have established credit to qualify. Student repayment begins up to 6 months after you leave school or drop below half-time. The Parent PLUS Loan is available for dependent students, and parents may borrow up to the cost of the student’s budget, minus any other aid, with this loan if approved. VETERANS BENEFITS

SCHOLARSHIPS

Scholarships, like grants, offer free monetary assistance for educational needs. Scholarships are offered by organizations associated with the college and by outside agencies. For a current list of resources, please visit our website at: www.lwtc.ctc.edu/financialaid

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Veterans benefits are available for qualifying veterans, including chapters 30, 31, 33, 35, 1606 and 1607. Students must be in a program approved for these benefits by the Department of Veterans Affairs (most programs at LWTC are approved). For more information on veterans benefits, see page 141

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SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS REQUIREMENTS FOR FINANCIAL AID RECIPIENTS

To continue to receive financial aid, students must maintain Satisfactory Academic Process (SAP) requirements. SAP has two standards: Qualitative Measure and Quantitative Measure. QUALITATIVE MEASURE

All students on or applying for financial aid must complete a minimum number of credits, with a quarterly and cumulative G.P.A. of at least 2.0. QUANTITATIVE MEASURE

Full-time students need to complete at least 12 credits per quarter, three -quarter time students at least 9, and half-time students at least 6. Less than half-time students must complete all credits attempted. Students who fail to meet the quarterly or cumulative G.P.A. requirements or who fail to complete the minimum number of credits for their enrollment status for one quarter may be placed on probation status for the next quarter and may receive aid, however, certain limitations apply. Students who fail SAP requirements for 2 consecutive quarters, or fail to complete at least 50% of credits (or all credits for less than half-time students), for the minimum enrollment level attempted in any one particular quarter will be placed on suspended status. Suspended students are not eligible for financial aid until they meet the requirements for reinstatement or an appeal, if appropriate, is approved (see sections below).

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MAXIMUM TIME FRAME AND PROGRAM LIMITATIONS

Students must complete the program they are pursuing in 125% of the length of the program measured in attempted credits. For example, if a student is pursuing an AAS degree which requires 100 credits to complete, the maximum timeframe would be 125 attempted credits, regardless of whether the credits were funded by financial aid or not. Students may receive financial aid for a maximum of 2 programs.

Tuition & Financial Aid

Maintaining Eligibility for Financial Aid

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APPEAL PROCESS

In some cases there may be extraordinary circumstances (beyond the student’s control), which may be considered for students whose aid has been suspended. A written petition, along with supporting documentation, may be submitted for consideration. The financial aid office reserves the right to determine continued eligibility. REINSTATEMENT

Financial aid may be re-instated after students have completed, at their own expense, the number of credits for the level they were enrolled in (full-time, half-time, etc.), during the quarter for which their aid was cancelled (this does not apply to students who have reached the maximum time frame limitation). The classes must be at LWTC and the student must meet all applicable satisfactory academic progress requirements while completing the required credits. Awarding of financial aid for reinstated students is on a funds-available basis only. Other conditions to maintain satisfactory academic progress for financial aid may apply. To view the entire policy, visit www.lwtc.edu/financialaidforms.

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Academic Information DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES

ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES

REQUIREMENTS

Lake Washington Technical College awards a Bachelor of Technology in Applied Design (BTAD) for completion of at least 90 credits of appropriate coursework. Lake Washington Technical College awards an Associate of Applied Science degree (AAS) for completion of a technical program of study. Certificates of Proficiency and Completion are awarded for completion of a program of specialized technical training. General Education requirements for degrees and certificates can be found on the Programs of Study/General Education page.

BACHELOR OF TECHNOLOGY IN APPLIED DESIGN REQUIREMENTS

The Bachelor of Technology in Applied Design (BTAD) degree is awarded for completion of at least 90 credits of appropriate coursework. An applied associate degree (AAS or equivalent) in a design-related field with the required distribution of academic core coursework in written communication, quantitative reasoning, social science, and humanities is a prerequisite for program admission. Other program admission requirements can be found on the website, www.lwtc.edu/btad. To submit an application for a BTAD degree, a minimum of the last 30% of upper division credits must be earned in residence, and the final quarter must be in residence at Lake Washington Technical College. A minimum passing numeric grade (2.0 or higher) in each upper division course that receives a numeric grade, and a cumulative average of 2.0 in all upper division courses, is required for the BTAD degree. Students can choose to graduate under the catalog currently in effect or the catalog in effect when they started in the program, as long as that catalog is no more than seven years old.

An AAS degree must contain a minimum of 90 credits. The number required varies with each program. The AAS degree must contain a minimum of 20 credits of general education courses, including instruction in written communication (5 cr.); quantitative reasoning (5 cr.); social science (5 cr.); and oral communications (5 cr.). To submit an application for an AAS degree, a minimum of the last 30% of the technical credits must be earned in residence, and the final quarter must be in residence at Lake Washington Technical College. A minimum passing numeric grade (2.0 or higher) in each course that receives a numeric grade, and a cumulative average of 2.0 in all courses, is required for the AAS degree. Students can choose to graduate under the catalog currently in effect or the catalog in effect when they started in the program.

CERTIFICATE OF PROFICIENCY REQUIREMENTS

A Certificate of Proficiency is issued by Enrollment Services to students completing a program of specialized occupational training of 45 credits or longer. The number of credits varies with each program. At least fifteen (15) credits of general education, including instruction in written expression (5 cr.); quantitative reasoning (5 cr.); and social science (5 cr.) are required along with the technical requirements listed in the catalog. To submit an application for a Certificate of Proficiency, a student must have completed a minimum of the last 30% of the technical credits at Lake Washington Technical College, and the final quarter must be in residence. A minimum passing numeric grade (2.0 or higher) in each course that receives a numeric grade, and a cumulative average of 2.0 in all courses, is required for the Certificate of Proficiency. Students can choose to graduate under the catalog currently in effect or the catalog in effect when they started in the program.

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CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION

PRIOR LEARNING ASSESSMENT COURSE CHALLENGE/CREDIT BY EXAMINATION

REQUIREMENTS

To submit an application for Certificate of Completion, a student must have completed all technical credits in residence at Lake Washington Technical College. A minimum passing numeric grade (2.0 or higher) in each course that receives a numeric grade, and a cumulative average of 2.0 in all courses is required for a Certificate of Completion. Students can choose to graduate under the catalog currently in effect or the catalog in effect when they started in the program.

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION Cooperative education is a process that draws upon community resources to expand students’ learning outside the classroom. It offers students the opportunity to blend classroom theory with planned, supervised field experience in areas relating to their career choices. They work with a cooperative education coordinator, faculty member and employer to identify and develop specific skills and learning goals to be gained through the encounter. Students work on paid, or in some cases, unpaid training assignments while integrating specific periods of on-campus study with employment. The employer pays the student. You may be able to apply your current job experience, if related to a career choice, toward a certificate or degree. Cooperative education experience may substitute for some coursework to meet personal needs. For more information on Cooperative Education, contact your faculty adviser.

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Prior Learning Assessment is a method whereby learning gained through an individual’s life experience is considered as credit toward a college degree program. This learning can come from a variety of sources, including work, volunteer, hobbies, and/or family responsibilities. Students may receive Lake Washington Technical College credit if an acceptable level of competence in the course material is demonstrated. Up to 25% of the credits required for a degree or certificate may be earned through prior learning experience (PLA). Awarding of PLA credits by Lake Washington Technical College does not guarantee or imply that other institutions will accept such credit. See an adviser for further information.

DEVELOPMENTAL EDUCATION SERVICES Students come to Lake Washington Technical College with skills at varying levels, yet they want to become more successful in everyday life or in training programs. The college offers developmental education to many students who:

Academic Information

A Certificate of Completion is issued by Enrollment Services to students who satisfactorily complete the competencies and requirements for programs of less than one academic year, less than 45 credit hours in length, which does not necessarily include related instruction.

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ƒ Have been out of school a long time and wish to brush up on basic or study skills ƒ Need to improve basic reading, writing and mathematics skills before enrolling in other college courses ƒ Are from non-English speaking countries who wish to improve their English abilities ƒ May already have adequate skills but wish to improve them further ƒ Wish to finish their high school education or obtain the General Education Development (GED) certificate

ADULT BASIC EDUCATION Adult Basic Education (ABE) class instructors offer assistance in developing basic skills in reading, writing, speaking, spelling, vocabulary, grammar, problem solving and math. Emphasis is on developing useful knowledge and applied skills such as financial and health management, parenting and raising a family, and finding and keeping a job. The ABE program welcomes all adults who want to improve their skills. Each student discovers

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where his or her learning level is, and a personal program is developed. All learning levels, from the very basic to GED, can be accommodated. The Academic Skills Center offers group classes and individualized instruction. For more information, please call the college at (425)739-8100, ext. 656.

GENERAL EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT General Education Development (GED) is a series of five tests developed by the American Council on Education to enable persons to obtain the equivalency of a high school diploma. Earning a GED provides students with greater access to employment, advancement and higher education opportunities. The Academic Skills Center offers GED preparation classes and pre-tests. All students, under the age of 19, need to obtain a release from their school district in order to take the test. Two pieces of ID are required at the time of testing. The college is a designated testing center for GED exams. Testing appointments must be scheduled in advance either at the Assessment Center, West Building, 2nd floor, or by calling (425)739-8115. For more information, go to www.lwtc.edu/assessment.

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE The college serves a highly diverse population of students from around the world, many with limited English-speaking skills. For those who want to improve their proficiency in English either for personal or educational reasons, the college offers two programs of instruction: English as a Second Language (ESL) and our Intensive English Program (IEP). For more information about English as a Second Language classes, please call the ESL instructional assistant at (425)739-8359. For more information about our IEP program, please contact our International Student Services Office at (425)739-8145.

HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAMS Lake Washington Technical College offers a number of options for high school age students (see pages 129-130. As requirements for entry and completion are subject to change, please visit High School Programs on the Web at www.lwtc.edu/academy for current information.

CREDITS AND CREDIT LOAD The academic year is divided into four quarters of approximately eleven weeks each (the length of individual courses may differ). In order to complete certificate or degree requirements in the prescribed number of quarters, a course load per quarter will be approximately 15 to 20 credits. A lecture class which meets five hours per week for one quarter will yield five quarter credits. Lab courses require ten hours of class time per week for five credits. Special permission is needed to carry more than 25 credits.

FULL- AND PART-TIME STUDENT STATUS Students enrolled in 12 or more credits are considered full-time. Some programs may require higher quarterly credit loads to complete requirements in a specified time period. Some external agencies may use different credit values to calculate full-time status. Students registered for fewer than full-time credits as defined above are considered part-time. Note: For financial aid purposes, the financial aid office should be consulted for definitions of three-quarter time, half-time, and less than half-time since the level of enrollment affects aid eligibility.

GRADUATION The student is responsible for working with his or her adviser to meet all degree or certificate requirements. Automated degree checks are available for various academic programs and time periods through online services on the campus website. To receive a preliminary evaluation before the final quarter starts, students must apply to graduate by the second week of the preceding quarter. Students should apply to graduate by the fourth week of the preceding quarter. Applications received after that may be deferred to a future quarter. Commencement is held yearly in June. Students who complete a program during the preceding fall, winter and spring quarters, or the following summer, are invited to participate. Graduation is recorded on student transcripts two-to-four weeks after the end of the student’s final quarter.

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Diplomas are sent to students four to six weeks after the end of the final quarter. Some programs offer other special awards that are not posted to the transcript.

GRADING Lake Washington Technical College uses a numeric grading system for most courses. Instructors may report grades from 4.0 to 0.7 in 0.1 increments and the grade of 0.0. Grades in the range of 0.6 to 0.1 are not assigned. A grade of 0.7 earns credits. However, a minimum grade of 2.0 is required for a number of purposes including technical courses, general education requirements, progression in a sequence of classes, to satisfy a prerequisite, and graduation requirements. Numerical grades may be considered equivalent to letter grades as follows: Points 4.0 3.9-3.7 3.6-3.3 3.2-3.0 2.9-2.7 2.6-2.3 2.2-2.0 1.9-1.7 1.6-1.3 1.2-1.0 0.9-0.7 0.0-0.6

Letter A Excellent performance AB+ B Above-average performance BC+ C Average performance CD+ D Minimum performance DF Unsatisfactory performance

I – INCOMPLETE

An incomplete grade may be given if the student is doing passing work, is unable to complete the requirements of the course during the quarter and can complete the requirements within a contracted period of time. The student does not reregister for the course in a later quarter to remove the Incomplete within the contracted period of time. When an I (Incomplete) grade is given by an instructor, a contract is filed with Enrollment Services stating the 2 0 1 0 - 2 0 1 1

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NG – NO GRADE

NG means the course is “not graded” for any student taking the course. This applies, for example, to some non-credit courses. It would not appear on graded, credit courses. NG does not affect the GPA and does not earn credits. It does not indicate whether a student attended, just that the student enrolled. N – AUDIT

Audit means the student registered on a space-available basis to attend the class and to listen, but not do graded work. The N grade does not earn credit and does not affect the GPA. The audit grade option must be approved by the instructor and submitted to Enrollment Services by the eighth week of the quarter.

Academic Information

In accordance with state law, students are expected to complete their degree and certificate programs within a suitable length of time or number of credits. See Enrollment Services or the student handbook for details.

work necessary to remove the Incomplete, a date for completion, and the grade earned if not completed. Incomplete coursework must be completed by the required date as established by the instructor (this date may be no later than the end of the subsequent quarter of enrollment). At the time of graduation, the Incomplete will be changed to a 0.0 or to the grade assigned on the contract.

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R – REPEATING A COURSE

The qualifier R on a transcript means a course has been repeated, and is excluded from credits and grade point average. A student may repeat any course taken at LWTC in which a grade of less than 2.0 or a U was earned. All grades will still appear on the transcript whether repeated or not. If the most recent grade is lower than the earlier grade, the student may request the registrar to count just the higher grade in the GPA. S/U – SATISFACTORY/UNSATISFACTORY

S/U grading is used for work experience, clinical, and skill development courses. The S indicates a satisfactory level of performance by the student. By assigning an S grade, the instructor certifies a performance level of at least a 2.0 or higher. Credit is earned but the S does not affect the GPA calculation. A U grade is assigned when the level of performance is below 2.0. A U grade does not earn credit and does not affect the GPA. Z – UNOFFICIAL WITHDRAWAL

Students who attend briefly, rarely, or not at all, and who fail to withdraw from a course with a W grade, may be assigned a grade of Z if appropriate in the judgment of an T E C H N I C A L

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administrator. The Z grade does not earn credit and does not count in the GPA calculation.

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W – WITHDRAWAL

A student may officially withdraw from any course through the eighth week of the quarter (or the equivalent for a short course or courses with irregular start or end dates) by completing a withdrawal form and submitting it to Enrollment Services. Official withdrawals occurring after the tenth instructional day of the quarter are posted with a W on the student’s permanent transcript. Withdrawals do not count in the GPA calculations and cannot be assigned by faculty in the grading process. Y – IN PROGRESS

A Y grade is given to students who are doing passing coursework in basic skill classes (ABE, ESL, etc.) but need additional instruction and time to complete course requirements. Students are required to re-register for the course and pay all tuition and any other charges. The Y remains on the transcript for the quarter assigned, while the final grade will be posted to the quarter in which the student re-enrolled in the course. The Y grade earns no credit and does not affect the GPA. * (ASTERISK)

This symbol (asterisk) means the grade has not been assigned yet. The student should consult with his or her instructor. This grade does not affect the GPA and does not earn credits. Note however that a * grade could prevent a student from receiving honors, impede financial aid eligibility, block graduation, or result in a student being considered in academic difficulty. It is important that all enrolled courses be assigned valid grades. ACADEMIC GRADE FORGIVENESS POLICY

In order to compensate for the effects of circumstances in a student’s past that may have negatively affected his or her GPA, LWTC offers a grade forgiveness policy. This procedure can be accomplished through an appeal filed with the registrar. The following criteria must be met to be eligible for such an appeal: 1. Grades must be three or more years old. 2. Only quarters including credits graded below a 2.0 may be forgiven. 3. Grade forgiveness can include one or several quarters from a census point back, as requested by the student. 150

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4. The student must demonstrate a 2.0 GPA in all decimal graded courses taken after the last date of the period for which a student is requesting forgiveness. All courses in a given quarter are removed from the GPA but remain on the student’s transcript. This appeal can be requested by turning in a letter of appeal to the registrar in Enrollment Services. A determination will be made whether grade forgiveness is appropriate on a case-by-case basis. Note: Grade forgiveness can only be granted once. Grades previously forgiven will not be reinstated. Also if a student is transferring to another college, that college may not recognize the grade forgiveness previously granted at Lake Washington Technical College. GRADE APPEAL PROCESS

Students are responsible for maintaining standards of academic progress and following course procedures established by their instructors. The purpose of the grade appeal is to protect students from prejudiced, arbitrary or capricious academic evaluation. A grade appeal only applies to the final course grade. The assignment of a grade is the right and responsibility of the instructor. Students have the right to appeal a grade deemed arbitrary or capricious. In a grade appeal, the appropriate instructional division dean will meet only with the student and instructor. No other advocate may be present. The student is responsible for knowing and initiating the grade appeal process. The student must file grade appeals within the first three weeks of the academic quarter following the quarter in which the grade was received. The student must first meet with the instructor who assigned the grade. The instructor will explain the rationale for awarding the grade. The student is responsible for demonstrating grade error or that arbitrary or capricious assignment of the final course grade occurred. If the result of the student’s meeting with the instructor does not produce a satisfactory resolution of the student appeal, the student may appeal to the appropriate division dean. The dean will meet with the student, review the course materials and grade assigned, and render a decision to deny, approve, or modify the appeal within ten working days. The decision of the dean is final.

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GRADE REPORTS

The grade point average indicates the general achievement of the student. The quarterly GPA includes only classes for that specific quarter; the cumulative GPA includes all classes which comprise the student’s academic history at LWTC. GPA is calculated by dividing the grade points by the number of credits of the courses for which the student was awarded a decimal grade. Grade points are calculated by multiplying the number of credits by the numeric value of the grade for each course. The calculation does not include courses for which the student was awarded Z, Y, N, W, I, S, U, or other non-decimal grades.

After the end of each quarter, grades can be accessed through the college’s online services. Grades are not mailed out. Official transcripts are available through Enrollment Services and unofficial transcripts are available on the Web. It is important that students check grades at the end of each quarter and address questions promptly. See Grade Changes above.

Example: Course Credits Grade ENGL 100 5 3.7 ABED 040 5 S PSYC& 100 5 4.0 5 credits x 3.7 = 18.5 grade points. 5 credits x 4.0 = 20 grade points. Total grade points: 18.5 + 20 = 38.5. Total credits taken for a decimal grade: 5 + 5 = 10. GPA: 38.5 grade points divided by 10 credits = 3.85. The GPA is calculated for each quarter and also for all quarters combined, which is referred to as a cumulative GPA. Contact Enrollment Services if you have questions about your GPA. GRADE CHANGES

Grades may be changed by instructors only in cases of clerical errors or subsequent completion of coursework. It is the student’s responsibility to initiate a grade change with the instructor. A grade change form must be completed, signed by the instructor, and submitted to Enrollment Services before a grade change becomes official. Students have 60 days from the end of the quarter to request a grade change (deadlines for Incomplete grades differ).

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HONORS HONOR ROLL

ƒ President’s List requires a 4.0 quarterly grade-point average with a minimum of 12 college-level credits earned cumulatively and 12 credits earned for the quarter. ƒ Dean’s List requires a 3.7 quarterly grade-point average with a minimum of 12 college-level credits earned cumulatively and 12 credits earned for the quarter. ƒ Both lists require a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 in all coursework. Honors are awarded at graduation for students who achieve the following cumulative grade point averages:

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ƒ Cum Laude = 3.5 - 3.69 ƒ Magna Cum Laude = 3.7 - 3.99 ƒ Summa Cum Laude = 4.00 Each candidate for graduation is assessed at the time graduation is finally approved. Please contact Enrollment Services for further information.

PROGRAM CLOSURE If a program is closed, the college will provide a method for current students to finish the degree or certificate. Students must fulfill the requirements within six years of the date of initial enrollment in the closed program. Substitutions for discontinued courses will be permitted upon approval of the Dean of the closed program.

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Key to Course Prefixes

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PREFIX

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COURSE NAME

ABED ACBT ACCT ACPT ACRT APDZ APPR ARCH ARGT ARST ART ASL& AUTO BAKE BAS BIOL, BIOL& BPMT BUHR BUS& BUSA CEGT CFOR

Adult Basic Education Auto Collision Body Technician Accounting Auto Collision Paint Technician Auto Collision Repair Technician Applied Design Apprenticeship Architectural Graphics Architectural Graphics Auto Restoration Art American Sign Language Automotive Repair Technician Baking Business Administration Support Biology Building Plant Maintenance Human Resources Business Business Civil Engineering Graphics Information Assurance & Computer Forensics CHEM, CHEM& Chemistry CIVE Civil Engineering Graphics CJ& Criminal Justice CMES Esthetician CMST& Oral Communication COSM Cosmetology CSNT Computer Security & Network Technician CULA Culinary Arts CWEX Cooperative Work Experience DENT Dental Assistant DHET Diesel & Heavy Equipment Technician DHYG Dental Hygiene EASL English as a Second Language ECEM Child Care Manager ECON& Economics EDUC Education, Professional Technical 2 0 1 0 - 2 0 1 1

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ELEC EMTB ENGL, ENGL& ENGR ENGT ETEC FSE FTNS GEOG GISA HMDS HORT HUM IFAD MACH MAST MATH, MATH& MEDA MHIT MMDP MMPE

Electronics Emergency Medical Technician – Basic English Engineering Graphics Engineering Graphics Energy and Science Technician Funeral Service Education Fitness Specialist/Personal Trainer Cartography Geographic Info Systems College Strategies Environmental Horticulture Humanities First Aid/CPR Machine Technology Massage Therapy Mathematics Medical Assisting Healthcare Informatics Multimedia Design & Production Motorcycle, Marine & Power Equipment Technology Motorcycle, Harley-Davidson® Nursing Nutrition Occupational Therapy Assistant Philosophy Physics Pre-Employment Training Psychology Physical Therapist Assistant Social & Human Services Sociology Spanish Statistics Energy & Science Technician Transportation Core Welding Fabrication & Maintenance Technology Wine Technology

MOHD NURS NUTR& OTA PHIL& PHYS, PHYS& PRET PSYC, PSYC& PTA SHSV SOC, SOC& SPAN& STAT STEC TRAN WELD WINE

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New Course Names/Numbers As of summer quarter 2008, LWTC adopted Common Course Numbering (CCN). Called the Common Course Numbering Project, the same courses will be titled and numbered in a similar way at every Washington community college. These changes have been made to ease the transfer of credits among the 34 community and technical colleges within Washington state. The changes should help you, the student, know that a course you have taken at one Washington school is

NEW COURSE NUMBER

121 122 100 211 241 242 260 101 201 105 121 122 101 210 220 230 202 101 102 235 107 141 142 146 151 152 101 106 121 100 200 220 101 121 122 123

the same at another Washington school and the course will transfer easily. Courses that do not appear on the “common” list will still transfer under the Direct Transfer Agreement as in the past. The chart below displays new course names and numbers, as compared with LWTC’s previous course names and numbers. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact the LWTC Enrollment Services Office at (425)739-8104.

OLD COURSE NAME

NUMBER

American Sign Language I American Sign Language 2 Survey of Biology Cellular Biology Human A & P 1 Human A & P 2 Microbiology Intro to Business Business Law Chemical Concepts Intro to Chemistry Intro to Organic Chemistry Intro to Criminal Justice Interpersonal Communication Intro to Public Speaking Small Group Communication Macro Economics English Composition I English Composition II Technical Writing Math in Society Pre-Calculus I Pre-Calculus II Statistics Calculus I Calculus II Nutrition Intro to Logic General Physics General Psychology Lifespan Psychology Abnormal Psychology Intro to Sociology Spanish I Spanish II Spanish III

none none BIOL BIOL BIOL BIOL BIOL BUSA BUSA CHEM CHEM CHEM CJUS SPCH SPCH SPCH ECON ENGL ENGL ENGL MATH MATH MATH MATH MATH MATH BIOL PHIL PHYS PSYC PSYC PSYC SOCI SPAN SPAN SPAN

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101 114 211 212 215 102 250 100 101 102 201 101 220 225 201 101 102 106 107 114 115 120 124 125 106 120 114 101 105 110 110 101 102 103

T E C H N I C A L

NAME

Biology Cellular Biology Anatomy &Physiology I Anatomy &Physiology II Microbiology Intro To Business Business Law Intro To Chem Principles Of Chemistry Intro To Organic Chemistry Intro Criminal Justice Interpersonal Communication Intro To Public Speaking Small Group Communication Macro Economics Written Expression Research Writing Technical Writing Math For Non-Sci Majors Pre-Calculus I Precalculus II Statistics Calculus I Calculus II Nutrition Intro To Logic General Physics General Psychology Psych Of Human Development Deviant Behavior Intro To Sociology Beg. First-Year Spanish Interm First Yr Spanish Adv First Yr Spanish C O L L E G E

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ASL& ASL& BIOL& BIOL& BIOL& BIOL& BIOL& BUS& BUS& CHEM& CHEM& CHEM& CJ& CMST& CMST& CMST& ECON& ENGL& ENGL& ENGL& MATH& MATH& MATH& MATH& MATH& MATH& NUTR& PHIL& PHYS& PSYC& PSYC& PSYC& SOC& SPAN& SPAN& SPAN&

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Courses that must be taken prior to this class

Course Title

Course Credits

KEY ACBT 121 BASIC BODY REPAIR 10CR Provides an understanding of product and repair… Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, CISA 101 or instructor permission.

Course Descriptions

ABED 030 ADULT BASIC EDUCATION MATH I 2CR Students gain mastery of whole number concepts and methods through the use of the four basic mathematical operations (add, subtract, multiply, divide) in both numeric and story problems. Students also study numeral and word representations of number, and the US standard measurement system. Prerequisite: Instructor permission and equivalent placement score. ABED 040 ADULT BASIC EDUCATION MATH II 5CR Covers fractions, decimals, and percents through the use of the four basic mathematical operations in both numeric and story problems. Students learn numeric symbol and word representations of numbers. American household measurement covered. Prerequisite: ABED 030, equivalent placement score, or instructor permission. ABED 045 READING IMPROVEMENT 5CR An introductory Adult Basic Education reading skills class where students will focus on the sentence, including basic sentence types, usage, and punctuation. Students will practice writing sentences that relate to the same topic, which will be used to lead the student into the development of paragraphs that are unified under a topic and a thesis sentence. Prerequisite: Equivalent placement score or instructor permission. ABED 046 WRITING 5CR An introductory Adult Basic Education writing skills class where students will focus on the sentence, including basic sentence types, usage, and punctuation. Students will practice writing sentences that relate to the same topic, which will be used to lead the student into the development of paragraphs that are unified under a topic and a thesis sentence. Prerequisite: Equivalent placement score or instructor permission. ABED 047 JOB SKILLS TRAINING 1-15CR Students strengthen worker readiness skills through learning modules, group discussion and reading. General content includes effective communication, motivation, time management, financial management, workplace values and worker portfolio development. Prerequisite: Placement in class is by Workfirst staff.

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ABED 048 SELF-PACED GED 1-5CR Set up an individual study plan to guide you through self-paced lessons; tutoring available when necessary. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. ABED 049 STRUCTURED GED PREPARATION 5CR This class is designed to prepare students to take all five parts of the GED EXAM. This is a non-graded, continuous enrollment class. The class offers a combination of lecture and lab work. Prerequisite: Minimum CASAS Reading score of 221 and instructor permission. ABED 053 HEALTHCARE BRIDGE II 6CR Students will practice and improve their reading, writing, and study skills in the context of Health/Healthcare to prepare for entry into LWTC Allied Health programs. Prerequisite: Completion of ESL level 5 or equivalent placement scores. ABED 054

ONLINE GRAMMAR & WRITING FOR ADVANCED ESL 3CR This writing class delivered on-line builds grammar skills in areas (such as verb tenses and clauses) that remain a barrier to non-native English speakers’s success in ABED and English 093 classes. Prerequisite: EASL 050 or equivalent placement. ABED 055 ONLINE GED WRITING PREPARATION 3CR Builds skills related to successfully passing the LA: Writing portion of the GED test. Students improve sentence skills (grammar, usage, and mechanics) and develop five-paragraph essays. Prerequisite: Appropriate placement test score or instructor permission. ACBT 121 BASIC BODY REPAIR/REFINISH 10CR Provides an understanding of product and repair skills. Tool safety and safe handling of both auto body and auto paint products will be emphasized, and products commonly used in the collision industry will be covered. Hands-on training will be provided. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. ACBT 122

COLLISION ESTIMATING/ ELECTRONIC DISARM PROCEDURE 6CR Course covers collision estimating with lecture and hands-on written estimating. The use of Collision Estimating Guides and how to select parts and labor amounts will be taught. Safe handling of electrical components will also be taught. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. ACBT 131 METAL STRAIGHTENING TECHNIQUES 6CR Course covers the application of common metal straightening techniques and outer body panel cosmetic repairs. Combines brief lecture sessions with intensive hands-on labs. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125.

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Course Descriptions ACBT 132 SURFACE PREPARATION 5CR Course combines steps of surface defect causes and cures. Instruction will be provided on how to use plastic filler materials and tools. Students will determine and apply plan to prepare surface for refinishing. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125. ACBT 133 MEASURING SYSTEMS 5CR Provides fundamentals of vehicle construction, measuring principles and systems, including interpreting body dimension specification charts. Students will demonstrate classroom techniques in lab. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125. ACBT 211 AUTO BODY WELDING 4CR Integrates the operation, maintenance, safe practices and vehicle protection when MIG welding, brazing, and using a plasma arc cutter. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125. ACBT 212 DAMAGE IDENTIFICATION & ANALYSIS 5CR Course offers estimating and measuring principles used in damage analysis. The course combines classroom lecture and demonstration with group and individual practice via shop setting. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125. ACBT 213 PANEL REPLACE & ADJUST I 6CR Course combines replacement and alignment of outer body panels with the alignment hinges, latches, bolted-on panels and common hands-on tasks. Includes hands-on practice. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125.

ACBT 222 UNIBODY & FRAME ALIGNMENT 7CR Course covers the setup, measurement and repair of various types of unibody and frame damage. Consists of lecture sessions followed by group and individual hands-on lab applications. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125. ACBT 231 MECHANICAL & ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS 5CR Course examines drive train and wiring diagrams, flowcharts, and various diagnostic procedures. Consists of lecture sessions followed by shop application of sequential techniques taught in the lectures. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125. ACBT 232 GLASS REPLACEMENT 5CR Course examines various types of automotive movable and stationary glass replacement, alignment, seal and hardware problems. Includes guided group and individual hands-on application. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 125. ACBT 233 ADVANCED SHOP PROCEDURES 5CR Course covers restoration and fabrication, including advanced characteristics and techniques of metal, plastic body filler and fiberglass. Incorporates lecture material in shop application. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN , TRAN 125. 2 0 1 0 - 2 0 1 1

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ACCT 105 QUICKBOOKS 3CR QuickBooks is a popular accounting program designed for both business and personal use. Instruction includes how to create and use a variety of accounts and forms pertaining to customers, vendors, banks, inventory, check printing, reports and charts. Prerequisites: ACCT 111, BAS 105, and BAS 101 or instructor permission. ACCT 111 INTRODUCTION TO ACCOUNTING 5CR This is an introductory course emphasizing double entry bookkeeping for a sole proprietor. Students learn how to record business transactions, detect and correct errors, and prepare financial statements. A practice set provides the opportunity to maintain records for a business. Prerequisites: MATH 070, ENGL 093, or equivalent placement test scores. ACCT 112

BUSINESS CALCULATOR APPLICATIONS 3CR Students learn to use the desktop calculator by touch with a proficiency in speed and accuracy. Students use the desktop calculator to solve a variety of business-related problems. Prerequisite: MATH 070 or equivalent placement test scores. ACCT 210 FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING I 5CR Course covers basic accounting concepts, principles, and financial statement preparation for a sole proprietorship. Special journals are used in conjunction with a merchandising business. A computerized practice set culminates the quarter. Prerequisites: ACCT 111, BUSA 100 or MATH 080, or its equivalent placement test score, or instructor permission. ACCT 220 FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING II 5CR This course is a continuation of basic accounting concepts, principles, and procedures for sole proprietorships and merchandising. The course emphasizes current assets, fixed assets, and current liabilities. Prerequisite: ACCT 210 or instructor permission. ACCT 230 FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING III 5CR Course covers accounting concepts, principles and procedures for partnerships and businesses. Emphasis on long term liabilities, stockholder’s equity and statement of cash flows. Prerequisite: ACCT 220 or instructor permission. ACCT 255 INCOME TAX I 5CR Introduction to federal income tax laws for individuals. Course covers gross income, deductions, and tax credits with emphasis on in-depth preparation of individual tax returns.

Course Descriptions

ACBT 221 PANEL REPLACE & ADJUST II 8CR Includes various straightening, replacement and alignment techniques commonly used on structural panels. Student applies classroom instruction in shop setting. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125.

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ACCT 256 INCOME TAX II 5CR Beyond basics of ACCT 255. Covers: business expenses, cost recovery (tax depreciation), capital gains and losses, disposition of business assets and personal residences, partnership taxation and corporate income tax. Prerequisite: ACCT 255. ACCT 265 GOVERNMENTAL ACCOUNTING 5CR This course covers the concepts, objectives and principles of accounting for local and state governments. Students use special revenue funds and learn general fund and government fund accounting. Prerequisite: ACCT 230 or instructor permission.

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Course Descriptions ACCT 270 MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING 5CR Analysis of accounting data as a part of the managerial process of planning, decision-making and control. Theory and application of cost accounting for materials, labor and factory overhead. Emphasis on cost allocation, analysis, and control using standard costing, variance analysis and direct costing. Prerequisite: ACCT 230.

VEHICLE/DAMAGE IDENTIFICATION & ANALYSIS 4CR This course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge, tool skills, and computer skills to complete estimates and complete simple collision repairs. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instruct or permission. Corequisites: ACRT 121, ACRT 122, ACRT 12.

ACCT 275 ETHICS IN BUSINESS 5CR This course introduces ethical decision making processes used in business. Through group interaction and case scenarios, students learn moral philosophies and social responsibilities as they pertain to working in business. Prerequisite: Placement into ABED 046 or its equivalent.

ACRT 124 BASIC DETAILING 4CR This course focuses on the diagnosing, repair procedures, and product knowledge needed to properly detail vehicles. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, and TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ACRT 121 ACRT 122, ACRT 123.

ACCT 280 ACCOUNTING PROJECTS 3CR A capstone simulation a student develops with the instructor to give the student more depth or breadth in application or theory in accounting. Prerequisite: Term V or Term VI accounting student or instructor permission.

ACRT 131 METAL STRAIGHTENING TECHNIQUES 4CR This course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge and tool skills needed to straighten metal and do basic surface preparations. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ACRT 132, ACRT 133, ACRT 134.

ACPT 211

INTRODUCTION TO CUSTOM PAINTING 4CR Study and application of knowledge of various finishes including set-up, primer, sealer, single stage, and base coat-clear coat systems. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125. CUSTOM PAINTING PRODUCT/ DATA RESEARCH 4CR Course allows the student to apply knowledge of paint mixing formulas and procedures learned in previous courses. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125.

Course Descriptions

ACPT 212

ACPT 213 CUSTOM PAINTING DESIGN & LAYOUT 4CR Study and application of knowledge of color movement and tint color to obtain blendable match along with a solid and metallic color characteristics. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125. ACPT 214 CUSTOM PAINT APPLICATIONS 4CR This course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge and tool skills to complete beginning custom painting tasks. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ACPT 211, ACPT 212, ACPT 213. ACRT 121 BASIC BODY REPAIR 4CR This course focuses on the diagnosing, repair procedures, and product knowledge needed to accomplish basic body repair. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ACRT 122, ACRT 123, ACRT 124. ACRT 122 BASIC BODY REFINISHING 4CR This course focuses on the diagnosing, repair procedures, and product knowledge needed to accomplish basic body refinishing. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ACRT 121, ACRT 123, ACRT 124.

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ACRT 123

ACRT 132 AUTO BODY WELDING 4CR This course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge and tool skills needed to properly complete welding tasks needed in the collision repair shop. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ACRT 131, ACRT 133, ACRT 134. ACRT 133 REFINISH & SURFACE PREPARATION 4CR This course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge and tool skills needed to properly prepare finishes for painting. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ACRT 131, ACRT 132, ACRT 134. ACRT 134 AUTO FINISHES/PAINT APPLICATION I 4CR This course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge and tool skills needed to properly paint vehicles. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ACRT 131, ACRT 132, ACRT 133. ACRT 211

BODY PANEL REPLACEMENT & ADJUSTMENT I 4CR This course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge and tool skills needed to adjust body and panels, bumper, and doors. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ACRT 212, ACRT 213, ACRT 214. ACRT 212

MINOR UNIBODY & FRAME ALIGNMENT 4CR This course focuses on the diagnosing, repair procedures, and product knowledge needed to use frame and measuring equipment to properly straighten unibody and frame vehicles. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ACRT 211, ACRT 213, ACRT 214.

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Course Descriptions ACRT 213

AUTOMOTIVE FINISHES/ PAINT APPLICATION II 4CR This course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge and tool skills needed to complete advance painting procedures. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ACRT 211, ACRT 212, ACRT 214. ACRT 214 PAINT TINTING & MATCHING I 4CR This course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge and tool skills needed to a properly complete paint mixing and matching procedures. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ACRT 211, ACRT 212, ACRT 213. ACRT 221

BODY PANEL REPLACEMENT & ADJUSTMENT II 4CR This course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge and tool skills needed to a remove, replace and adjust body panels. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ACRT 222, ACRT 223, ACRT 224. ACRT 222 MECHANICAL & ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS 4CR This course focuses on the diagnosing, repair procedures, and product knowledge needed to accomplish mechanical and electrical system repairs. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ACRT 221, ACRT 223, ACRT 224. ACRT 223

ACRT 224 PAINT TINTING & MATCHING II 4CR This course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge and tool skills needed to complete advanced paint tinting and matching procedures. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ACRT 221, ACRT 222, ACRT 223. ACRT 231

MAJOR UNIBODY & FRAME ALIGNMENT 4CR This course focuses on the diagnosing, repair procedures, and product knowledge needed to accomplish advance measuring and frame straitening tasks. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ACRT 232, ACRT 233, ACRT 234. ACRT 232

ADVANCED COLLISION REPAIR PROCEDURES 4CR This course focuses on the diagnosing, repair procedures, and product knowledge needed to complete estimates. Students will also perform general collision shop procedures such as welding, filling and finishing metal. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ACRT 231, ACRT 233, ACRT 234.

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ACRT 233 SPECIALIZED PAINT FINISHES 4CR This course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge and tool skills needed to complete specialized finish tasks. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ACRT 231, ACRT 232, ACRT 234. ACRT 234 PAINT PROBLEMS 4CR This course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge and tool skills to identify and fix paint problems. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ACRT 231, ACRT 232, ACRT 233. APDZ 311 INTRO TO APPLIED DESIGN 5CR A survey course of concepts and issues in applied design. Design terminology will be reviewed and contemporary design-related concepts such as human factors, interaction design, usability, and heuristics will be examined. Through these lenses students will gain an overview of the Applied Design program. They will assess their technical, design, and academic skills and identify areas for improvement, and undertake a research project related to their area of interest and specialization. Students will consider and begin refining their personal design aesthetic. Prerequisite: Admission to BTAD program or instructor permission. APDZ 321 THE BUSINESS OF DESIGN 5CR A review of the design industry and the evolving profession of “designer.” The economic and political factors influencing the design process are studied. Prerequisite: Admission to BTAD program or instructor permission. APDZ 331

MANAGING CREATIVITY & INNOVATION 5CR The unique role of the manager who is responsible for creation and design is examined. Particular attention is paid to the skills needed to lead a team of creative professionals. Prerequisite: Admission to BTAD program or instructor permission. APDZ 332 ENTREPRENEURSHIP & DESIGN 5CR A study of the how design innovations can lead to new opportunities. Issues of copyright, patent, license, and freelancing will be discussed. Students will complete a project demonstrating how a design can create a new line of business or create an opportunity for an entrepreneurial designer. Prerequisite: Admission to BTAD program or instructor permission.

Course Descriptions

AUTO FINISHES/ PAINT APPLICATION III 4CR This course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge and tool skills needed to complete advance auto finish and paint application procedures. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ACRT 221, ACRT 222, ACRT 224.

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APDZ 333 DESIGN TECHNOLOGY 5CR Students will have hands-on experience with some of the latest digital design tools. Students will complete a project integrating new learning with their previous design-related skills. Prerequisite: Admission to BTAD program or instructor permission. APDZ 441 PROJECT MANAGEMENT 5CR An introduction to the tools and techniques of modern project management. Student learning will be reinforced through the use of simulations and case studies. Prerequisite: Admission to BTAD program or instructor permission.

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Course Descriptions APDZ 451 DESIGN TEAM PRACTICUM 5CR Under the direction of their instructor, students will work in teams to perform design tasks in partnership with real-world organizations. Some on site work at a partner organization may be required. Prerequisite: Admission to BTAD program or instructor permission. APDZ 461

SENIOR CAPSTONE PROJECT OR INTERNSHIP 5CR Students will complete an individual project integrating all of their coursework and culminating in an employment portfolio showcasing their abilities. Alternatively, students gain work experience as a design intern within a qualifying organization. A final paper or project demonstrating the work-based learning is required. Prerequisite: Admission to BTAD program or instructor permission. ARCH 201

HISTORY OF AMERICAN ARCHITECTURE 3CR History of architecture in America from the 17th century colonial beginnings through the 20th century. Topics include European influence, vernacular styles, architectural terminology, and an introduction to the architects who influenced design and construction in America. Prerequisite: ENGT 101 or instructor permission.

Course Descriptions

ARCH 205 THEORY OF ARCHITECTURE 3CR Critical thinking, writing and sketching to investigate issues of importance in architectural design. Lectures and reading assignments used to expand awareness of architectural values and principles. Prerequisite: ARCH 201 or instructor permission. ARGT 111 ARCHITECTURAL PRINT READING I 2CR Introduction to print reading and interpretation, layout, terminology , materials, construction methods, dimensions, symbols, building codes. ARGT 112 CONSTRUCTION TECHNIQUES 4CR Course covers residential construction techniques, terminology, materials, contracts, codes, permits and costs. Includes hands-on experience involving common construction applications. Prerequisite: ARGT 111. ARGT 121 ARCHITECTURAL GRAPHICS 4CR Fundamentals of architectural graphics including: terminology, media, line conventions, architectural lettering, scaling, sketching, floor plans, sections, elevations and dimensioning techniques. Emphasis is placed on architectural standards. ARGT 131 REVIT ARCHITECTURE I 4CR A basic course in Autodesk Revit Architecture. Students will learn how to produce an architectural project utilizing Revit software in 3D. Prerequisites: ENGT 131 and ENGT 132, or instructor permission. ARGT 132 REVIT ARCHITECTURE II 4CR An advanced course in Autodesk Revit Architecture. Students will learn how to produce an architectural project utilizing Revit software in 3D. Prerequisite: ARGT 131 or instructor permission. ARGT 211 ARCHITECTURAL PRINT READING II 2CR Advanced print reading and interpretation, layout, terminology, materials, construction methods, dimensions, symbols, building codes and notes. Prerequisite: ARGT 111.

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ARGT 212

RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION TECHNIQUES 4CR Course covers residential construction techniques, terminology, materials, construction methods, dimensions, symbols, building codes and notes. Prerequisite: ARGT 111. ARGT 215 CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS 4CR Study of construction materials for residential and commercial architecture including wood, steel, plastics, composites, masonry and concrete. Prerequisite: ARGT 112 or instructor permission. ARGT 221

ARCHITECTURAL GRAPHICS – RESIDENTIAL I 4CR Course covers residential architectural graphics standards, fixtures, floor plans, sections, elevations, stairs, roofs and foundations. Primary focus on wood construction. Various architectural graphics media and software applications are utilized. Prerequisites: ARGT 211 and ARCH 201, or instructor permission. ARGT 222

ARCHITECTURAL GRAPHICS – RESIDENTIAL II 4CR Course covers residential architectural graphics beginning at a conceptual stage through the design development phase of a project. Various architectural graphics media and software applications are utilized. Prerequisites: ARGT 221 and ARCH 205, or instructor permission. ARGT 223

ARCHITECTURAL GRAPHICS – RESIDENTIAL III 4CR Residential architectural graphics: development of a complete set of working drawings applying local building codes. Various architectural graphics media and software applications are utilized. Prerequisites: ARGT 211, ARCH 205, or instructor permission. ARGT 225

CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT & ESTIMATING 4CR Estimating techniques and methods of preparing estimates. Management of a construction project and the costs involved. Office practices. Prerequisite: ARGT 212 or instructor permission. ARGT 228 CONSTRUCTION SPECIFICATIONS 4CR Study of the construction contract process, methods, materials, contractual relationships, and construction document organization. Prerequisite: ARGT 112 or instructor permission. ARGT 231

ARCHITECTURAL GRAPHICS – COMMERCIAL I 4CR Commercial construction techniques: materials, standards, fixtures, codes, permits and costs. Development of a complete set of working drawings. Various architectural graphics media and software applications are utilized. Prerequisites: ENGT 131, ARGT 221. ARGT 232

ARCHITECTURAL GRAPHICS – COMMERCIAL II 4CR Commercial construction techniques: materials, standards, fixtures, codes, permits and costs. Development of a complete set of working drawings. Various architectural graphics media and software applications are utilized. Prerequisites: ENGT 131, ARGT 221. T E C H N I C A L

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Course Descriptions ARGT 233

ARCHITECTURAL GRAPHICS – COMMERCIAL III 4CR Advanced concepts in commercial construction techniques. Emphasis is placed on architectural standards. Continuation of Architectural Graphics - Commercial II. Prerequisite: ARGT 232. ARGT 241 ARCHITECTURAL ILLUSTRATION 4CR Architectural illustration techniques including: orthographic, axonometric and oblique projection; perspectives. Lettering and rendering techniques with emphasis on a variety of media and software. Prerequisite: ENGT 131. ARGT 245 ARCHITECTURAL MODEL BUILDING 3CR A basic course in architectural model making. Emphasis is placed on current model making techniques used by architectural and engineering firms for marketing their professional services and proposals. Prerequisite: ARGT 221. ARGT 261 ARCHITECTURAL PROBLEMS I 4CR Advanced problem solving methods in architectural graphics. Student will develop and define project while coordinating with faculty. The student’s architectural project begin at a conceptual stage and will develop through the design phase of a project. Students working individually or on teams, explore and document their work through sketches, study models, presentation and design drawings. Prerequisites: ENGT 131, ARGT 232.

ARST 211 INTRO TO AUTOMOTIVE RESTORATION 2CR This course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge and tool skills to expose students to the principles of automotive restoration. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ARST 212, ARST 213, ARST 214, ARST 215, ARST 216. ARST 212

AUTOMOTIVE RESTORATION RESEARCH 2CR This course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge and computer skills needed to research information to complete automotive restoration tasks. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ARST 211, ARST 213, ARST 214, ARST 215, ARST 216. ARST 213 RESTORATION SKILLS I 2CR This course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge and tool skills to complete beginning restoration tasks. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ARST 211, ARST 212, ARST 214, ARST 215, ARST 216.

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ARST 214

INTRODUCTION TO AUTOMOTIVE INTERIOR RESTORATION 2CR This course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge and tool skills to complete simple interior restoration tasks. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ARST 211, ARST 212, ARST 213, ARST 215, ARST 216. ARST 215

WOOD & METAL SURFACE PREPARATION 4CR This course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge and tool skills to complete basic wood and metal preparation tasks. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ARST 211, ARST 212, ARST 213, ARST 214, ARST 216. ARST 216

PAINT FUNDAMENTALS PROPERTIES & APPLICATIONS 4CR This course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge and tool skills to complete basic refinishing tasks. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisites: ARST 211, ARST 212, ARST 213, ARST 214, ARST 215. ART 100 ART APPRECIATION 5CR Art Appreciation is an introduction to the diverse foundations of visual art. Course objectives primarily focus on students’ recognition of and conversation about the basic concepts, styles, techniques, terminology and principles of visual art and art history. ART 102 2-D GRAPHIC DESIGN 5CR This course covers exploration of the two-dimensional design process including problem identification leading to the development of alternate solutions. Students will engage in critical dialogue exploring the content and context of creative work. Students will examine essential two-dimensional surface design concepts and processes throughout the course by completing conceptual exercises. ART 105 HUMAN LIFE DRAWING 4CR This class focuses on how to draw the human form, including skeleton, muscle structure, and movement. These skills are essential to good character design, realistic movement for animation, and gesture drawing for storyboarding. Students will exit the class with the ability to draw the human form accurately in proportions, gesture, balance, and structure.

Course Descriptions

ARGT 262 ARCHITECTURAL PROBLEMS II 4CR Advanced problem solving methods in architectural graphics. Continuation of Architectural Problems I. Student will continue project development while coordinating with faculty. The student’s architectural project begin at the design phase and will continue through design development, and conclude with the construction document phase. Students working individually or on teams, explore and document their work through sketches, study models, presentation and working drawings. Prerequisite: ARGT 261.

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ART 201 SURVEY OF WESTERN ART – ANCIENT 5CR Major achievements in painting, sculpture, architecture, and the decorative arts in Europe, the Near East, and North Africa, from prehistoric times to the beginnings of Christianity. This course also offers some preliminary training in visual analysis and a practical introduction to the critical vocabulary of art history. ART 202

SURVEY OF WESTERN ART – MEDIEVAL & RENAISSANCE 5CR This course examines the arts of the Byzantine Empire, Islam, and Western Christendom through 1520 AD. This course traces the artistic creativity of the people who lived during the Early Christian, Medieval and Renaissance periods of history, that is, from about 1 AD to about 1540.

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Course Descriptions ASL& 121 AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE I 5CR The student will learn the basic manual alphabet, vocabulary, numbers and phrases used in everyday communication, while developing an understanding and appreciation of Deaf Culture. AUTO 120 ELECTRICAL/ELECTRONICS SYSTEMS 14CR This course focuses on the understanding and repair of automotive electrical, electronic systems utilizing industry standards and techniques. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. AUTO 124 MAINTENANCE PROCEDURES 2CR This course focuses on the understanding of periodic maintenance intervals and procedures utilizing industry standards, techniques, and equipment. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, or instructor permission. Corequisite: AUTO 120. AUTO 134 ENGINE PERFORMANCE – IGNITION 4CR This course focuses on the understanding, analysis and repair of automotive ignition systems utilizing industry standards and techniques. This course teaches to the global outcome of communication. Prerequisites: AUTO 120, AUTO 124, or instructor permission. Corequisites: AUTO 135, AUTO 136, AUTO 138.

Course Descriptions

AUTO 135 ENGINE PERFORMANCE – FUEL 4CR This course focuses on the understanding and repair of automotive fuel delivery systems utilizing industry standards, techniques, and equipment. Prerequisites: AUTO 120, AUTO 124, or instructor permission. Corequisites: AUTO 134, AUTO 136, AUTO 138. AUTO 136 ENGINE PERFORMANCE – EMISSIONS 4CR This course focuses on the understanding, repair and service of automotive emission systems and devices utilizing industry standards and techniques. Prerequisites: AUTO 120, AUTO 124, or Instructor permission required. Corequisites: AUTO 134, AUTO 135, AUTO 138. AUTO 138

ENGINE PERFORMANCE – COMPUTER CONTROL 4CR This course focuses on the understanding and repair of the Onboard Diagnostic system and automotive computer controls utilizing industry standards, techniques and equipment. Prerequisites: AUTO 120, AUTO 124, or Instructor permission required. Corequisites: AUTO 134, AUTO 135, AUTO 136. AUTO 140 BRAKE SYSTEMS 10CR This course focuses on the diagnosis, repair and service of automotive brakes and Anti-lock brake control systems utilizing industry standards, technique and equipment. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125. Corequisite: AUTO 144. AUTO 144

SUSPENSION, STEERING & ALIGNMENT 6CR This course focuses on the understanding, diagnosis and repair of automotive suspension, steering and alignment principles utilizing industry standards, equipment and techniques. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125. Corequisite: AUTO 140.

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AUTO 210

ENGINES CYLINDER BLOCKS COOLING SYSTEMS 10CR This course focuses on the understanding, diagnosis, repair and servicing of automotive engines and cooling systems utilizing industry standards, techniques and equipment. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125. Corequisites: AUTO 215, AUTO 220, AUTO 225. AUTO 215 AIR CONDITIONING SERVICE 6CR This course focuses on the understanding, diagnosis and repair of automotive air conditioning and heating systems utilizing industry standards, techniques and equipment. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125. Corequisites: AUTO 210, AUTO 220, AUTO 225. AUTO 220

AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION & TRANSAXLES 8CR This course focuses on the understanding, diagnosis and repair of automotive automatic transmissions and transaxles utilizing industry standards, techniques and equipment. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125. Corequisites: AUTO 210, AUTO 215, AUTO 225. AUTO 225

MANUAL TRANSMISSION & TRANSAXLES 8CR This course focuses on the understanding, diagnosis and repair of automotive manual transmissions, transaxles, clutches, differentials and drive axles utilizing industry standards, techniques and equipment. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125. Corequisite: AUTO 220. AUTO 298 JOB SEARCH & EMPLOYABILITY SKILLS 1CR Students develop job search objectives and practice employability skills needed for successful employment. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. BAKE 102

CAKE DECORATING & WORKING CHOCOLATE 15CR Introduction of mixing methods, leavening agents, decorating and piping skills. Chocolate tempering, decorative work and production of truffles and other candy. Prerequisite: BAKE 101. BAKE 103 ADVANCED BAKERY TECHNIQUE 15CR Students will learn the advanced techniques for decorated cakes, specialty bread, chocolate and sugar work design. Prerequisite: BAKE 101. BAKE 110 CAKE I 5CR This course is an introduction to cake decorating skills. Students will learn piping skills and techniques. Buttercream, foundant and gumpaste methods will be explored to create special occasion cakes and design wedding cakes. Prerequisite: CULA 127. Corequisites: BAKE 114, 120. BAKE 114

ARTISAN CHOCOLATES & CONFECTIONS 2CR This course is an introduction to specialty chocolates and confections. Students will explore the creation, design, and marketing of truffles, candies, caramel and confections. Students will learn chocolate handling, tempering, and origin. Prerequisite: CULA 127. Corequisites: BAKE 110, 120.

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Course Descriptions BAKE 120 SPECIALTY CAKES & DESIGN 6CR This course is an introduction to specialty cakes. Students will learn construction and a variety of techniques to create classical cakes. The focus is on formulas, fillings, icings and finishing to produce salable bakery items. Prerequisite: CULA 127. Corequisites: BAKE 110, 114. BAKE 122 ARTISAN BREAD 7CR Students will learn the advanced techniques for making specialty bread using preferment techniques and starters. Breads from other cultures will be explored. Prerequisite: CULA 127. Corequisite: BAKE 124. BAKE 124 CENTERPIECE CONSTRUCTION 7CR Students will learn the advanced techniques for making specialty centerpieces and showpieces to include chocolate, sugar and bread sculpture construction. Prerequisite: CULA 127. Corequisite: BAKE 122. BAS 100 PREP FOR ONLINE LEARNING 2CR This class prepares students to be successful learners in an online environment. Students will utilize computers, software, a learning management system, and other technology that they may encounter as online students. Students will also be instructed in general organizational skills. BAS 101 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS 2CR This class is an introduction to using computers, software, and understanding computer terminology. It covers an introduction to Windows and basic word processing (Microsoft Word), spreadsheets (Microsoft Excel) and presentation software (Microsoft PowerPoint). Students will gain an understanding of what the programs are and how to create, print and save files.

BAS 108 KEYBOARDING IV 3CR The major objectives are to develop touch control of the keyboard, develop proper keyboarding techniques, build basic speed and accuracy, and provide concentrated practice. The student must show competency by keyboarding at 75 words a minute for 3 minutes, with 3 or fewer errors. Prerequisite: BAS 107 or instructor permission. BAS 110 OFFICE TECHNOLOGY 5CR The student will develop the knowledge and skills to become an office professional in a changing work environment. The course covers current office procedures, document creation, communication, records management, and telephone skills. BAS 111 WORD 5CR Beginning and intermediate word processing course covering document creation, retrieval, character and paragraph formatting, multi-page documents, columns, tables, graphics, and form letters. BAS 112 EXCEL I 5CR Beginning and intermediate course in spreadsheets. Topics covered include document creation, retrieval, entering text, numbers, and formulas, formatting, financial functions, what-if analysis, graphs, and charts. Prerequisite: BAS 120 or instructor permission. BAS 114 ACCESS 5CR Beginning to intermediate course on databases. Topics covered include design of tables, forms, reports and queries; update, add, delete, and modifying data; and creating custom reports and forms using filters and queries. BAS 120 or instructor permission. BAS 115 PUBLISHER 5CR Students learn the basic elements of desktop publishing using Microsoft Publisher to produce brochures, business cards, catalogs, flyers, newsletters, and invitations.

BAS 105 KEYBOARDING I 3CR The major objectives are to develop touch control of the keyboard, develop proper keyboarding techniques, build basic speed and accuracy, and provide concentrated practice. The student must show competency by keyboarding at 30 words a minute for 3 minutes, with 3 or fewer errors.

BAS 120 BUSINESS DESKTOP MGMT 5CR This course will develop skills to manage desktop productivity tools and systems. Content includes file management-archiving, storing, security, sharing. Additional content includes cookies,FTP, e-mail, and use of internet.

BAS 107 KEYBOARDING III 3CR Develop touch control of the keyboard and proper keyboarding techniques, build speed and accuracy. The student must show competency by keyboarding at 60 words a minute for 3 minutes, with 3 or fewer errors. Prerequisite: BAS 106 or instructor permission.

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BAS 124 POWERPOINT 4CR Beginning to intermediate course in presentation software. Topics covered include design of slides, slide sort, slide show. Learn to import and edit graphics, import data from spreadsheets, and use 3D effects to create slide presentations.

Course Descriptions

BAS 102 OFFICE ADMINISTRATION 3CR This course develops the foundation for the Administrative Assistant position. It includes the areas of office Systems, finance, business law, and management.

BAS 106 KEYBOARDING II 3CR Continue to develop touch control of the keyboard, develop proper keyboarding techniques, build speed and accuracy, through concentrated practice. The student must show competency by keyboarding at 50 words a minute for 3 minutes, with 3 or fewer errors. Prerequisite: BAS 105 or instructor permission.

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BAS 130 BUSINESS ENGLISH I 5CR This course covers punctuation and grammar rules which govern business communications, composition of business letters and memos, and proofreading techniques. BAS 135 OUTLOOK 4CR This course is designed to teach the elements of the current version of Outlook, including e-mail, calendar, contacts and tasks. Prerequisite: BAS 120 or instructor permission.

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Course Descriptions BAS 172

E-COMMERCE/BUSINESS ON THE INTERNET 4CR Introduction to how to conduct business on the Internet. Students will examine the impact of the Internet on our economy, look at typical business uses, see the effects of nonsales E-Commerce, and look at marketing, advertising and customer service on the Internet. BAS 120 or instructor permission. BAS 191 CUSTOMER SERVICE/HELP DESK 3CR The student will acquire and enhance his/her communication, listening, problem solving, and decision making skills which will assist the student on the job to provide customer satisfaction. BAS 195 CAPSTONE PROJECT 3CR Students apply the skills and competencies they have acquired to a project in a simulated professional setting. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. BAS 198 JOB SEARCH SKILLS 2CR Designed to develop knowledge and skills that will be demanded on the job to provide the student a high degree of success. Course covers how to write a resume, dependable strengths report and cover letter; searching and applying for a job, interviewing for a job, and how to follow-up on the job search.

Course Descriptions

BAS 211 WORD II 5CR A continuation of BAS 111. Students learn advanced word processing skills that the Microsoft Certified Application Specialist Word exam assesses. Prerequisite: BAS 111 or instructor permission. BAS 212 EXCEL II 5CR This course covers in-depth theory and application of spreadsheets. Topics include macros, databases, what-if analysis, pivot tables, import/export, advanced formulas and creating and managing files. Prerequisites: BAS 112 and BUSA 100 or equivalent placement score, or instructor permission. BAS 225

INTEGRATED APPLICATION FOR BUSINESS PRODUCTIVITY 5CR This course is designed to give understanding of the integration of word processing, desktop publishing, database, and spreadsheet technology by using simulations to produce documents. Prerequisites: BAS 111, BAS 112, BAS 124, BAS 114, or instructor permission. BAS 230 BUSINESS ENGLISH II 5CR Course covers review of English grammar usage and style; review and practice punctuation, capitalization, number usage, abbreviations, plurals, and word division; and practice editing skills. Business documents currently used in industry will be edited for correct spelling, punctuation, consistency, and organization. Prerequisite: BAS 130. BAS 281

PROJECT MANAGEMENT WITH MICROSOFT PROJECT Use Microsoft Project to assist in the development and monitoring of a project. Prerequisite: BAS 120.

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BIOL 111 SURVEY OF ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY 5CR A one-quarter introductory survey of human anatomy and physiology designed for non-science majors. Relationships between structures and functions in each body system are emphasized. The course starts with anatomical terms and basic cellular biology and then emphasizes the organ systems of the body. The inter-relationships among all body systems in the maintenance of homeostasis is a unifying concept for this course. BIOL& 100 SURVEY OF BIOLOGY 5CR A study of the basic biological principles and processes for nonscience majors. Topics include chemistry concepts, structure and function of cells, photosynthesis, cell divisionmitosis-meiosis, DNA technology, human genetics, inheritance and evolution. Includes laboratory activities. BIOL& 211 CELLULAR BIOLOGY 5CR An examination of the biology of life which includes chemistry, organic molecules, cell structure, membrane transport, metabolic processes, mitosis and meiosis, nucleic acid structure and function, genetics, and introduces the concept of biotechnology. Includes laboratory. Prerequisite: ENGL 092 or 093 or equivalent placement score. BIOL& 231 HUMAN ANATOMY 6CR First quarter of a two-quarter sequence of Anatomy/Physiology designed for biology and allied health majors. Can also be taken as a one-quarter anatomy class for students in the Funeral Services program. Cat dissection is included in the laboratory. Prerequisite: BIOL& 211 or instructor permission. BIOL& 241 HUMAN A & P 1 6CR The first quarter of a two-quarter sequence designed to give students a working knowledge and understanding of the basic systems of the human body. Includes a basic introduction to chemistry as well as a detailed study of cytology and histology and examines the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, and sensory systems. Prerequisite: BIOL 114 or BIOL& 211 or instructor permission. BIOL& 242 HUMAN A & P 2 6CR The second quarter of a two-quarter sequence designed to give students a working knowledge and understanding of the basic systems of the human body. The systems covered are Endocrine, Cardiovascular, Lymphatic, Respiratory, Digestive, Urinary, and Reproductive. The themes of homeostasis and system interactions are interwoven into the course and are continually stressed as each system is introduced and discussed. Prerequisite: BIOL&241 or instructor permission. BIOL& 260 MICROBIOLOGY 5CR Introduces students to the major concepts of the microbiological science. These concepts include basic anatomy, physiology and the differences between eukaryotic, prokaryotic and viral systems, growth factors and curves, techniques in microbial control, microbial interrelationships and host defenses. Prerequisite: CHEM&121 or instructor permission.

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Course Descriptions BPMT 105 HVAC PRINCIPLES & OPERATION 6CR This course focuses on heating, ventilation and air conditioning principles and operations needed to diagnose, service and repair HVAC systems. Prerequisites: ABED 040 or MATH 070, ABED 046 or equivalent placement scores. Corequisite: BPMT 110. BPMT 110 HVAC SERVICING 10CR This course focuses on the diagnosis, repair procedures, product knowledge and tool skills needed to service HVAC systems utilizing industry standards, techniques and equipment. Prerequisites: ABED 040 or MATH 070, and ABED 046 or equivalent placement scores. Corequisite: BPMT 105.

BPMT 205

REFRIGERATION SERVICING & LICENSING 10CR This course focuses on the diagnosing, repair procedures, product knowledge and tool skills needed to service refrigeration systems and attain an appropriate refrigeration license. Prerequisites: ABED 040 or MATH 070, and ABED 046 or equivalent placement scores. Corequisite: BPMT 200. BPMT 210 ELECTRIC PRINCIPLES & OPERATION 6CR This course focuses on electronic principles and operations needed to diagnose, service, and repair electronic systems. Prerequisites: ABED 040 or MATH 070, and ABED 046 or equivalent placement scores. Corequisite: BPMT 215.

BPMT 115

MECHANICAL PRINCIPLES & OPERATION 6CR This course focuses on the mechanical principles and operations needed to diagnose, service and repair mechanical systems. Prerequisites: ABED 040 or MATH 070, ABED 046 or equivalent placement scores. Corequisite: BPMT 120.

PROGRAMMABLE CONTROLS PRINCIPLES & OPERATION 10CR This course focuses on programmable control principles and the operations needed to diagnose, service, and repair programmable control systems. Prerequisites: ABED 040 or MATH 070, and ABED 046 or equivalent placement scores.

BPMT 120 MECHANICAL SERVICING 10CR This course focuses on the diagnosing, repair procedures, product knowledge and tool skills needed to service mechanical systems utilizing industry standards, techniques and equipment. Prerequisites: ABED 040 or MATH 070, and ABED 046 or equivalent placement scores. Corequisite: BPMT 115.

BUHR 210

BPMT 125

BPMT 130

MOTOR CONTROLS PRINCIPLES & OPERATION 10CR This course focuses on motor control principles and operations needed to diagnose, service and repair electrical systems. Prerequisites: ABED 040 or MATH 070, and ABED 046,or equivalent placement scores. Corequisite: BPMT 125. BPMT 135 BOILER PRINCIPLES & OPERATION 6CR This course focuses on boiler principles and the operations needed to diagnose, service, and repair boiler systems. Prerequisite: ABED 040 or MATH 070, and ABED 046 or equivalent placement scores. Corequisite: BPMT 140. BPMT 140 BOILER SERVICING & LICENSING 10CR This course focuses on the diagnosing, repair procedures, product knowledge and tool skills needed to service boilers and attain a boilers license. Prerequisites: ABED 040 or MATH 070, and ABED 046 or equivalent placement scores. Corequisite: BPMT 135. BPMT 200

REFRIGERATION PRINCIPLES & OPERATION 6CR This course focuses on refrigeration principles and the operations needed to diagnose, service, and repair refrigeration systems. Prerequisites: ABED 040 or MATH 070 and ABED 046 or equivalent placement scores. Corequisite: BPMT 205.

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BPMT 215

HR’S ROLE IN ORGANIZATIONS & PROGRAM OVERVIEW 1CR This course explores the field of human resources (HR) and its role in organizations. An overview of the LWTC HR programs is also covered. BUHR 215 HR ETHICS & DIVERSITY 4CR This course covers the importance of ethics in human resources (HR) and an organization’s social responsibility. The role of diversity in HR and how a diverse workforce can drive business results are also covered. BUHR 220

EMPLOYEE BENEFITS & RISK MANAGEMENT 4CR This course covers the strategic considerations that should guide the design of benefit programs and the cost implications and strategies to control them. Also covered in this course are risk management and measures that create a safe and secure work environment. BUHR 230

STAFFING: RECRUITMENT, SELECTION, & PLACEMENT 4CR This course covers employment decisions concerning building a staff and maintaining a talented workforce. Various methods of locating qualified job candidates and assessment methods for identifying a candidate’s suitability for employment are covered.

Course Descriptions

ELECTRICAL PRINCIPLE & OPERATION 6CR This course focuses on electrical principles and operations needed to diagnose, service and repair electrical systems. Prerequisites: ABED 040 or MATH 070 and ABED 046 or equivalent placement scores. Corequisite: BPMT 130.

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BUHR 235 TOTAL REWARDS (COMPENSATION) 4CR This course reviews the total rewards of organizations by exploring their total compensation strategies. Methods to properly pay employees in a cost-effective, competitive, equitable, and legal manner are also addressed. BUHR 240 EMPLOYEE & LABOR RELATIONS 4CR This course examines how employee relations can create a positive organizational culture. Students also explore facets of the labor relations process: collective representation, union organization, bargaining, and negotiations.

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Course Descriptions BUHR 245

TRAINING, WORKFORCE PLANNING, PERFORMANCE & TALENT MGT 4CR This course covers the principles of learning and how to facilitate training to link training objectives to organizational goals. Students also learn how to build an effective performance management program by understanding the advantages of integrating human resource (HR) and strategic planning. BUHR 250

HR INFORMATION SYSTEMS & MEASURING HR OUTCOMES 4CR This course covers how to leverage technology in today’s environment to support human resource (HR) activities. Measurement strategies that link HR practices to achieving bottom-line business results are also covered. BUHR 255 EMPLOYMENT LAW I 4CR This course covers employment laws and their effects on the first half of the employment life cycle. The creation and management of a diverse workforce are also included. BUHR 260 EMPLOYMENT LAW II 4CR This course covers employment laws and their effects on the second half of the employment life cycle, including benefits, compensation, performance, terms and conditions of employment, and termination. Prerequisite: BUHR 255. GLOBAL HR & MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS 4CR This course covers legal, political, cultural, and economic factors that affect global human resource (HR) management. HR’s crucial role in mergers and acquisitions is also included.

Course Descriptions

BUHR 270

BUHR 275

STRATEGIC HR MGT & ORGANIZATIONAL STRATEGY 4CR This course covers business strategies and human resource (HR) best practices and their application to all HR disciplines. Effective human capital strategies and practices that give business a sustainable competitive advantage are emphasized. This is the capstone course for the HR Generalist Program and should be taken the student’s last quarter. Prerequisite: BUHR 260, or Professional in Human Resources (PHR) or Senior Professional in Human Resources (SPHR) with instructor permission. BUS& 101 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS 5CR The course covers the survey of American business, business and economic terminology, forms of business ownership, franchising, small and international business, management and marketing concepts, and business environment. Prerequisites: MATH 080, ENGL 100 or equivalent placement score. BUS& 201 BUSINESS LAW 5CR This is an introductory course which covers the basic study of the Uniform Commercial Code. Emphasis is placed on U.S. contract law and commercial paper. Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or equivalent placement score.

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BUSA 100 BUSINESS MATH 5CR Course will cover basic math skills needed for accounting with emphasis on solving business problems related to percentages, discounts, payroll, inventory, depreciation, simple and compound interest, present value, annuities, stocks and bonds. Prerequisite: ABED 040 or MATH 070 or equivalent placement test score. BUSA 103 BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS 5CR This course is designed to develop proficiency in the use of listening, speaking, and writing skills in the business environment. Students should have typing and/or word-processing skills, and access to a computer or typewriter. Prerequisite: ENGL 093 or equivalent placement score. BUSA 111 BUSINESS COMPUTER APPLICATIONS 3CR This introductory course gives hands-on experience in performing basic Internet searches and in using Microsoft software applications such as Windows, Word, Power Point, and Access or Excel. Prerequisite: BAS 105 or type a minimum of 35 words per minute. BUSA 180 SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 5CR This course is an overview of contemporary principles and presentation of specific small business management tools; development of skills in analyzing and solving small business management problems. BUSA 189 PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT 5CR Modern management is both exciting and challenging today. This course is organized around the four traditional functions of management: planning, organizing, leading and controlling. Contemporary topics, such as technology, empowerment, diversity, and Total Quality Management TQM, will also be discussed. BUSA 210 ENTREPRENEURSHIP 5CR An overview of the basics of creating a new business venture. Topics covered include identifying and evaluating opportunities, success and failure factors, and market, financial, and legal considerations. Prerequisite: BUS&101 or instructor permission. BUSA 220 BUSINESS PROMOTIONS 5CR An overview class focusing on how to promote a small business. Topics covered include product, pricing, promotion, distribution, and customer considerations. Students learn professional sales techniques and cost effective advertising strategies. Prerequisite: BUS& 101 or instructor permission. BUSA 230 BUSINESS INVESTMENT 5CR This course focuses on how to fund a small business venture. Topics covered include acquisition and use of funding, money management, financial analysis and long-term budgeting. Prerequisite: BUS& 101 or instructor permission. CEGT 211 CIVIL ENGINEERING GRAPHICS I 4CR Basic concepts involved in civil engineering graphics, including location and direction, scales, map symbols, plot plans, legal descriptions, contours, profiles and street layouts. Prerequisites: ENGR 115, and ENGT 131, or instructor permission.

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Course Descriptions CEGT 212 CIVIL ENGINEERING GRAPHICS II 4CR Advanced concepts in civil engineering graphics. Builds on concepts of Civil Engineering Graphics I. Prerequisite: CEGT 211. CEGT 221 SURVEYING 4CR Fundamentals of surveying including: use of instruments and tools, field note recording and computations, transversing, leveling, topography and GPS. Emphasis is placed on basic techniques in the field. Prerequisite: CEGT 211. CEGT 231 CIVIL 3D COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN I 4CR A course in advanced civil engineering graphics using state of the art civil 3D software. Students learn coordinate geometry, digital terrain modeling and design methods using profiles, cross sections and templates. Prerequisites: ENGT 131, and CEGT 211, or instructor permission. CEGT 232 CIVIL 3D COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN II 4CR A course in advanced civil engineering graphics using state of the art civil 3D software. Students learn advanced terrain design, grading and profiling techniques and calculations. Continuation of Civil 3D Computer Aided Design I. Prerequisite: CEGT 231 or instructor permission. CEGT 233 CIVIL 3D COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN III 4CR A course in advanced civil engineering graphics using state of the art civil 3D software. Students work on advanced design projects. Continuation of CEGT 232. Prerequisite: CEGT 232.

CEGT 251

BOUNDARY SURVEYS & PLAT DESIGN I 4CR A study of the system of public lands, legal descriptions and boundary survey, site and subdivision planning and design including contours, profiles, topography. Prerequisite: CEGT 212. CEGT 252

BOUNDARY SURVEYS & PLAT DESIGN II Advanced site and subdivision planning and design. Continuation of CEGT 251. Prerequisite: CEGT 251.

4CR

CEGT 261 ROADWAY DESIGN & LAYOUT I 4CR Fundamentals of roadway and infrastructure design and layout, preliminary surveys, design specifications, horizontal and vertical alignment and layout, rights-of-way, easements and plan detail. Prerequisite: CEGT 212. CEGT 262 ROADWAY DESIGN & LAYOUT II 4CR Advanced roadway and infrastructure design and layout. Continuation of CEGT 261. Prerequisite: CEGT 261. CEGT 281 LANDSCAPE DESIGN GRAPHICS I 4CR Basic landscape design and layout techniques emphasizing manual and/or CAD skills. Design of private and public use areas. Prerequisites: ENGT 132 and CEGT 211, or instructor permission.

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CEGT 282 LANDSCAPE DESIGN GRAPHICS II 4CR Advanced landscape design and layout techniques emphasizing manual and/or CAD skills. Design of private and public use areas. Prerequisite: CEGT 281. CFOR 215 DATA COMMUNICATIONS 3CR Students build a strong foundation in basic network data communications, design, technologies, and terminology, including hardware and software components, protocols, and the OSI network model. Prerequisites: CSNT 121 and ENGL 093 or instructor permission. CFOR 250 UNIX PROGRAMMING 5CR Fundamentals of the Unix operating system for the PC user, including the basics of Perl/CGI/C/C++ programming and how to execute these programs. Special emphasis will be on scripting and security issues. Prerequisite: CSNT 114 or instructor permission. CFOR 255 NETWORK SECURITY 15CR Course focuses on network security concepts including defining security principles, terminologies and components. Students will examine packet structures and analysis, routing and access control lists, wired and wireless security, authentication and encryption, network traffic monitoring and intrusion detection techniques. Additional subjects will include security and acceptable use policies, and gathering data to support forensic review. Prerequisite: CSNT 235, ENGL 100 or instructor permission or industry experience. CFOR 257 LINUX ADMINISTRATION 5CR Hands-on administration of common services in the LAMP environment. (LAMP refers to a set of free software programs commonly used together to run dynamic websites or servers.) The outcomes match directly to specific domains of the CompTIA Linux+ certification exam objectives. Prerequisites: CSNT 127 Internet Fundamentals, or instructor permission of previous Linux, HTML or Internet experience. CFOR 259

LINUX+ CERTIFICATION PREPARATION 3CR Prepares advanced students for taking the CompTIA Linux+ certification exam. The outcomes match directly to the six domains of CompTIA’s exam objectives. Prerequisites: CSNT 130 and CFOR 250, or instructor permission. CHEM 120 GENERAL CHEMISTRY I 5CR Study of elementary concepts including matter, measurement, elements, compounds stoichiometric relationships, chemical calculations, atomic structure, periodic trends, chemical structures, bonding, nuclear chemistry, thermochemistry, and physical states of matter. Prerequisite: CHEM 101, MATH 099.

Course Descriptions

CEGT 241 CIVIL ENGINEERING MATERIALS 4CR A study of civil engineering materials including gravel, asphalt, and concrete. Introduction to basic soil properties and classifications, plastic, concrete, metal piping and structures. Prerequisite: CEGT 211 or instructor permission.

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CHEM 130 GENERAL CHEMISTRY II 5CR Continuation of General Chemistry I with emphasis on quantitative analytical methods. Topics include chemical kinetics, equilibria, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, volumetric and gravimetric analyses. Lab complements the theoretical concepts. Prerequisite: CHEM 120.

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Course Descriptions CHEM 210 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I 5CR Structure, nomenclature, and reactions with stereochemistry and mechanisms of hydrocarbons, alcohols, ethers, aldehydes and ketones. Lab portion involves technique experiments for separations and purifications and procuring physical properties. Prerequisite: CHEM 130.

CHEM& 161 GENERAL CHEMISTRY WITH LAB I 5CR This course provides a survey of major functional classes of compounds in organic and biochemistry. Topics include structure, properties, and key metabolic reactions of the major organic and biological molecules of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Includes laboratory. Prerequisite: CHEM& 121.

CHEM 220 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II 5CR Structure, nomenclature and reactions of carboxylic acids, amines, and phenols, with spectral methods and organic chemistry of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. Laboratory portion involves preparative experiments and organic qualitative analyses. Prerequisite: CHEM 210.

CIVE 205

CHEM 230 BIOCHEMISTRY 5CR A one-quarter survey of the chemical foundations of biology. Topics include DNA and genetics, metabolic pathways and processes of carbohydrates, lipids and proteins, enzymes and enzyme kinetics, and cellular functions. Prerequisites: CHEM 220, BIOL&260. CHEM 240 INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS I 5CR Principles of modern chemical instrumentation. Topics include theory and principles of spectroscopic, electro- analytical and chromatographic techniques. Prerequisites: MATH 120, CHEM 220.

Course Descriptions

CHEM& 105 CHEMICAL CONCEPTS 5CR This course is designed to give a broad exposure to the basics of chemistry in one quarter. This lab course requires experiments done at home using consumer products. Prerequisite: MATH 090 or higher or instructor permission. CHEM& 121 INTRO TO CHEMISTRY 5CR This course will cover the basics of chemistry, including matter and energy, chemical nomenclature, chemical reaction equations, simplified atomic and molecular theory, and general laws of matter and energy. Includes lecture, guided laboratory exploration, and discussion. Prerequisite: MATH 099 or higher, or instructor permission. CHEM& 122

INTRODUCTION TO ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 5CR This course is a continuation of CHEM 121, and uses the concepts learned to understand the molecular nature of living. Organic chemistry studies all things made of carbon, including proteins, carbohydrates, hydrocarbons, plastics, and other substances. Prerequisite: CHEM&121 or instructor permission. CHEM& 131

INTRODUCTION TO ORGANIC/ BIOCHEMISTRY 5CR First in a three-course chemistry sequence for science and engineering students. This course introduces fundamentals of chemistry, including matter and measurement, the structure of atoms, periodicity and the electron structure of atoms, ionic and covalent bonding, mass relationships, and chemical reactions. Includes laboratory investigation of these topics. Prerequisites: One year of high school chemistry or CHEM& 121, and concurrent enrollment in MATH& 141 or placement into MATH& 142.

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THEORY OF URBAN DESIGN & PLANNING 3CR Critical thinking, writing and sketching to investigate issues of importance in environmental and urban design and planning including lectures, reading and research assignments used to expand awareness of planning values and principles. Prerequisite: CEGT 211 or instructor permission. CJ& 101

INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE 5CR Overview of the criminal justice system and its basic policies, institutions, and dilemmas, examining the role of police, courts, and corrections. Students analyze sociological theories and perspectives to issues in law enforcement, adjudication, and corrections. Prerequisite: ENGL 093. CMES 100 ESTHETICS THEORY I 3CR This course teaches the basic principles of facial manipulations, product knowledge, infection control, effective communication, professionalism, the history of esthetics, and salon management. Corequisites: CMES 102, CMES 104, CMES 106, CMES 108. CMES 102 ESTHETICS PRACTICE I 10CR This course teaches the application of principles learned in Esthetics Theory: basic facial manipulations, infection control, effective communication, and product knowledge. Corequisites: CMES 100, CMES 104, CMES 106, CMES 108. CMES 104 SKIN PHYSIOLOGY & HISTOLOGY 2CR This course teaches the physiology and histology of the epidermis and dermis, general human anatomy and physiology, and the basics of nutrition. Corequisites: CMES 100, CMES 102, CMES 106, CMES 108. CMES 106 BODY CARE/WRAPS 3CR This course teaches body care techniques, including masque and scrub applications, lash and brow tinting, body treatment protocols, and client comfort and draping techniques. A discussion of various body treatments in today’s market is included. This course also teaches related first aid, safety, and sanitation. Corequisites: CMES 100, CMES 102, CMES 104, CMES 108. CMES 108 MAKEUP APPLICATION 3CR This course teaches color theory as it relates to the skin, the psychology of color, and basic makeup application techniques. Related first aid, safety, and sanitation are also covered. Corequisites: CMES 100, CMES 102, CMES 104, CMES 106.

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Course Descriptions CMES 110 ESTHETICS PRACTICE II 9CR This course is a continuation of Esthetics Practice I. Students apply makeup to and perform facials, body treatments, body wraps, and body waxing on clients, models, and mannequins. Students apply safety and sanitation procedures in a clinical environment. Prerequisites: CMES 100, CMES 102, CMES 104, CMES 106, CMES 108. Corequisites: CMES 112, CMES 114, CMES 116, CMES 118. CMES 112 CHEMISTRY FOR ESTHETICS 2CR This course teaches a basic overview of fundamental chemistry as it pertains to the practice of esthetics, including pH scale, product ingredients and their use, and FDA regulations regarding cosmetic claims and product safety. Prerequisites: CMES 100, CMES 102, CMES 104, CMES 106, CMES 108. Corequisites: CMES 110, CMES 114, CMES 116, CMES 118. CMES 114 FACIAL PROCEDURES 3CR This course teaches treatments and basic treatment protocols. Students practice cleansing, exfoliation, extraction, and manipulation techniques for beautifying the skin of the face and body. Related first aid, safety, and sanitation are also covered. Prerequisites: CMES 100, CMES 102, CMES 104, CMES 106, CMES 108. Corequisites: CMES 110, CMES 112, CMES 116, CMES 118. CMES 116 TEMPORARY HAIR REMOVAL 3CR This course teaches temporary hair removal, including tweezing and hot and cold waxing methods. Also taught are contraindications for waxing and all related first aid, safety, and sanitation. Prerequisites: CMES 100, CMES 102, CMES 104, CMES 106, CMES 108. Corequisites: CMES 110, CMES 112, CMES 114, CMES 118.

CMST 098

INTRODUCTION TO COLLEGE COMMUNICATION 4CR This course assists students who speak English as a second language to improve their oral communication skills in order to function successfully in academic and professional-technical classes. Prerequisites: ABED 045 and ABED 046 or equivalent placement score. CMST 302 MASS MEDIA 5CR This course focuses on mass media’s history and cultural, social, and economic impacts. Examines how Internet, television, radio, film, and print media affect public and private life. CMST 302 studies legal,ethical, and commercial dimensions of mass communication, including First Amendment issues. Prerequisite: Admission to BTAD program or instructor permission. CMST& 210 INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION 5CR Learn greater self-awareness, more effective communication, and improve one-to-one relationships. Prerequisite: ABED 045 or ABED 046 or equivalent placement test score. 2 0 1 0 - 2 0 1 1

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CMST& 220 INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC SPEAKING 5CR This course sets forth the essentials of effective public speaking including: selecting your topic, library research methods, analysis, oral style, use of visual aids, preparation and delivery of various types of speeches. Prerequisite: ABED 045 or ABED 046 or equivalent placement test score. CMST& 230 SMALL GROUP COMMUNICATION 5CR Through theory and practice, students will learn how to become more effective, competent small group participants and communicators. Prerequisite: ABED 045 or ABED 046 or equivalent placement test score. COSM 111 COSMETOLOGY THEORY I 3CR First in a series of four theory classes and serves as an introduction to the principles of manicuring, pedicuring, hairstyling and shaping, permanents, waving, relaxing and coloring. Proper writing concepts and mathematic calculations appropriate to cosmetology are introduced. Basic salon management skills are introduced. COSM 112 COSMETOLOGY PRACTICE I Practice principles learned in Cosmetology Theory I. Corequisite: COSM 111.

19CR

COSM 121 COSMETOLOGY THEORY II 3CR Second in a series of four theory courses and serves as a continuation in the study of cosmetology. Greater emphasis is placed upon haircutting, hairstyling and permanent wave. Prerequisites: COSM 111, COSM 112. COSM 122 COSMETOLOGY PRACTICE II 19CR Practice principles and applications learned in Cosmetology Theory II. Corequisite: COSM 121. COSM 131 COSMETOLOGY THEORY III 3CR This course is the third in a series of four theory courses and serves as a continuation in the study of all phases of cosmetology. Greater emphasis is placed upon advanced permanent waving and hair color. Prerequisites: COSM 121, COSM 122. COSM 132 COSMETOLOGY PRACTICE III 19CR Practice principles and applications learned in Cosmetology Theory III. Corequisite: COSM 131. COSM 212 COSMETOLOGY PRACTICE IV 19CR Completion of objectives as reviewed in Cosmetology Theory I - IV. Corequisite: COSM 211.

Course Descriptions

CMES 118 SALON MANAGEMENT & STATE LAW 2CR This course teaches the Washington State Department of Licensing laws and regulations. Reception desk duties, including handling money and transactions, tracking service and retail sales, customer service, and marketing techniques and strategies are also included. Prerequisites: CMES 100, CMES 102, CMES 104, CMES 106, CMES 108. Corequisites: CMES 110, CMES 112, CMES 114, CMES 116.

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CSNT 114 PC TECH FUNDAMENTALS 6CR A basic foundation of how computers work, how to use computer applications, and an introduction to operating systems, memory configuration and batch files. The Command Line Interface as a troubleshooting tool is emphasized. Prerequisite: MATH 080 or equivalent placement score. CSNT 121 PC HARDWARE 6CR A top-to-bottom study of all PC components installed within or connected to the computer. Students will become knowledgeable with all component technologies and proficient at installing components and troubleshooting hardware problems. Prerequisite: Math 80 or equivalent placement score.

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Course Descriptions CSNT 127 INTERNET FUNDAMENTALS 3CR An introduction to the applications used for the Internet; Browsers, E-mail, Web Pages, and file transfers. Also covers basic Linux and web management issues. Prerequisite: Math 80 or equivalent placement test score or instructor permission. CSNT 128 OPERATING SYSTEMS 6CR A technical overview of the graphical user environment of current operating systems, including system installations, user and network configuration issues. Prerequisites: CSNT 114, and ENGL 093, or instructor permission. CSNT 130 ADVANCED OPERATING SYSTEMS 6CR This course is a continuation of CSNT 128. Students will install, configure, and become knowledgeable with various versions of the latest operating systems. Students learn the OS from the client perspective to become competent with the system in a networked environment. Prerequisites: CSNT 127 and ENGL093 or instructor permission. CSNT 170

A+ CERTIFICATION TEST PREPARATION 5CR Designed to prepare the student for the industry CompTIA A+ certification exams. Includes instruction and details for both the Core Technologies and the OS Technologies exams. Prerequisite: CSNT 121 or instructor permission. NETWORK+ CERTIFICATION PREPARATION 3CR CSNT 171 prepares students familiar with computer network technology for the CompTIA Network+ Industry certification exam. Prerequisite: CFOR 215 or instructor permission.

Course Descriptions

CSNT 171

CSNT 235 NETWORK FUNDAMENTALS 15CR This course is a strong foundation for how networks work including design, setup, cabling installations and troubleshooting. Students will also cover the material needed to acquire the CompTIA Network+ Industry certification. Prerequisites: CFOR 215 and MATH 090 or instructor approval. CSNT 245 NETWORK ADMINISTRATION 15CR This course includes a look at networking from an administrative side. Students will setup and manage all the main components and services of today’s most popular network operating systems. Prerequisites: CFOR 255 and either (MATH 099 or MATH 102) or instructor approval. CSNT 294 RESUMES & INTERVIEWS 2CR Students prepare an individual report on a technology project proposed, planned and worked out with the instructor. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. CULA 116 CULINARY SKILLS & CONCEPTS 9CR Students will demonstrate proficiency in: basic kitchen preparations and procedures, stocks, sauces, and soups, meat and fish breakdown, including structure, composition, inspection, grading, purchasing and storage. Prerequisites: ABED 046 and MATH 070 or equivalent placement score, or instructor permission. Corequisite: CULA 128 or instructor permission.

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CULA 120 RESTAURANT FUNDAMENTALS 12CR Students experience the entire restaurant operation, from the front line to the dining room. Students will learn current culinary trends and styles, food and beverage presentation, food preparation techniques, expediting, and alcohol and wine production methods. Prerequisites: CULA 116 and CULA 128, or instructor permission. Corequisite: CULA 137 or instructor permission. CULA 124

INTRODUCTION TO THE FRONT OF HOUSE 4CR This course focuses on training and hands-on experiences in a restaurant and dining room facility. Alcohol and wine education including production methods, state and local testing for MAST training permit. Course includes the introduction to a restaurant, including food and beverage presentation, restaurant operations, dining room setup and breakdown, cash register, reservations and procedures, expediting. Guest service includes wait staff training, scheduling, guest comment cards, banquet arrangements, and catering functions and point of sales training. Prerequisites: CULA 116 and CULA 128, or instructor permission. Corequisites: CULA 120, CULA 137. CULA 127 INTRODUCTION TO BAKING 12CR The student will learn baking basics and theories including preparation of doughs such as tart, pie, cookies, rolled-in doughs, basic yeast leavened doughs, pastry, restaurant desserts and basic finishing techniques. Prerequisites: MATH 070, CULA 116, CULA 128, or instructor permission. Corequisite: CULA 130. CULA 128 FOOD SERVICE SAFETY & SANITATION 4CR Principles of bacteriology, food borne illness, sanitation, safety, personal hygiene, housekeeping and health regulations and inspections. The use, cleaning and maintenance of equipment is also stressed. Recognition for certification or re-certification by the American Culinary Federation is given upon successful completion of the Federation approved examination. Corequisite: CULA 116. CULA 130 SUPERVISION & MANAGEMENT 3CR The course focuses in managing people from the hospitality supervisor’s viewpoint. The emphasis is on technique from increasing productivity, controlling labor costs, time management, and managing change. It also stresses effective communication and explains the responsibilities of a supervisor in the food service operation. Student will develop personal career objectives, self promotion skills and strategies for conducting an effective job interview in the food service industry. Emphasis will be placed on skills to effectively manage people, provide leadership, communication and decision making. Prerequisites: CULA 120, CULA 124, CULA 137, or instructor permission. Corequisite: CULA 127. CULA 135 FRONT LINE COOKING 15CR Emphasis on responsibilities and functions of the front line. Proficiency gained in designing, costing, preparation and plate presentation of menu items, application of cooking technique. Prerequisite: CULA 116.

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Course Descriptions CULA 137 NUTRITION IN FOOD SERVICE 3CR This course explains the basic principles of nutrition and its relationship to good health and healthful dining practices with emphasis on health-conscious and heart-healthy menu concepts and recipe development. Includes the functions of nutrients (proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, vitamins, and minerals). Prerequisites: CULA 116 and CULA 128 or equivalent placement score, or instructor permission. Corequisites: CULA 120, CULA 124. CULA 142 COSTING & MENU PLANNING 3CR Students learn how to calculate food costs and design menus for various food service establishments. Students learn to use a POS system and input orders for food on the Food Service of America website. Students will adhere to safety and sanitation guidelines when ordering food and receiving. Students will have the opportunity to build menus for buffets, winemakers dinners, cafes, hospitals and other establishments. All students will be encouraged to visit local restaurants and or hotels to view and critique menus using procedures learned in class. Prerequisite: CULA 130 or instructor permission. CULA 143 WINE & FOOD PAIRING 3CR Wine and food pairing, wine marketing and sales. Building a restaurant wine list, pricing, and profit-making strategies. Wine tasting, elements of character and key components of wine. Age requirement of 21 years. Prerequisites: CULA 140 and instructor permission. CULA 144

CULA 145 ANTHROPOLOGY OF WINE 3CR History of wines and growing regions of the world. Introduction to Enology and Viticulture with an overview and emphasis on Washington and California wines. Blind wine tasting will be involved. Age requirement of 21 years. Prerequisite: CULA 143. CULA 146 GARDE MANGER 7CR Students are introduced to the basic function and structure of the cold kitchen, pantry, reception foods, a la carte appetizers, and grand buffet arrangements. Students learn how to prepare sandwiches, salads, dressings, cold sauces, canapés, hot and cold hors d’ oeuvres, appetizers. Students will apply techniques of pickling, brining, curing and smoking and the preparation of forcemeats and mousses. Modern ways of designing, arranging and decorating food platters for practical and show purposes are emphasized and practiced. Prerequisite: CULA 130.

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CULA 150

CULINARY ADMINISTRATION & SERVICES 3CR This course focuses on the fundamentals of business management of a restaurant and food service industry. Students receive hands on, working knowledge of specific computer software and applications applicable to the food service industry. Students will obtain leadership and organizational skills associated to first line of culinary management serving in the capacity of Sous Chef. Prerequisite: CULA 142 or instructor permission. Corequisites: CULA 154, CULA 155, CULA 156. CULA 154 FOOD & BEVERAGE PROCUREMENT 3CR This course introduces students to basic principles of purchasing food, beverage, equipment and paper goods, contract services and supplies. Primary focus is on product identification, supplier selection, ordering, receiving, proper storage and issuing process and inventory management. Corequisites: CULA 150, CULA 155, CULA 156. CULA 155 RESTAURANT OPERATIONS 6CR Students learn in a real-life environment the skills and techniques of the traditional brigade (pantry, grill, sauté) stations of a public dining facility with an emphasis on quality, preparation, and timing of an a la carte menu. Prerequisites: CULA 142, CULA 144, CULA 146 or instructor permission. Corequisites: CULA 150, CULA 154, CULA 156. CULA 156 NUTRITIONAL COOKING 3CR An explanation of the basic principles of nutrition and their relationship to good health. Students learn, discuss, and practice the structure, functions and source of nutrients including proteins, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins, minerals and water. Prerequisites: CULA 142, CULA 144, CULA 146, or instructor permission. Corequisites: CULA 150, CULA 154, CULA 155. CULA 160 BEVERAGE MANAGEMENT 5CR Course highlights the opportunities and challenges in managing a bar, lounge, or food service establishment serving alcoholic beverages. Significant product knowledge orientation, as well as cost control and purchasing, production, and service issues are addressed. Prerequisite: BAKE 124 or CULA 156 or instructor permission, age: 18 years or older. Corequisites: CULA 195 and CULA 196 or instructor permission. CULA 195

CAPSTONE, PORTFOLIO, AND MASTERPIECE DINNER 5CR Students take menu driven concepts and derive a business plan that outlines the acquisition of a food service property by analyzing demographics, locations, and financial requirements for such a venture and its overall feasibility in the market. Students construct a professional portfolio of all culinary experience obtained to date. Each Capstone Portfolio class is required to plan, manage and execute a 5-6 course Masterpiece Dinner for a minimum of 65 guests. Prerequisite: BAKE 124 or CULA156 or instructor permission. Corequisites: CULA 160, CULA 196.

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Course Descriptions

AMERICAN, REGIONAL, INTERN & CLASSIC CUISINES 12CR This course is an in-depth study of the regional cuisines of the United States, Classical, French and International cuisines. Through lectures, demonstrations and hands-on cooking, students will learn the products and ingredients that are indigenous to the regions of each cuisine. Prerequisite: CULA 130 or instructor permission. Corequisite: CULA 142 or instructor permission.

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Course Descriptions CULA 196

INTERNSHIP/EXTERNSHIP/ COOPERATIVE 5CR Students work under a professional chef or manager in a related field at an approved food service establishment or on campus. The externship will apply and provide practical experiences and professional exposure to acquired subject matters, career and professional skills in a real and practical environment. Students have the opportunity to observe and participate in the operations of a successful business related to the food service industry. Students will gain invaluable experience necessary to enter the culinary field upon graduation. Prerequisite: HOSP 101, CULA 116 or instructor permission. CULA 241 WINES OF THE WORLD 1 1CR A survey of wine and winemaking techniques across the globe. History of wine by region, as well as cultural significance. CULA 242 WINES OF THE WORLD II 2CR A survey of wine and winemaking techniques across the globe. History of wine by region, as well as cultural significance. How to taste and evaluate wine, with an eye on pairing with food. A small sampling of wines from each region on a weekly basis. Prerequisite: Must be 21 to register. CULA 244 TASTING EUROPEAN WINE 1CR Enhance your enjoyment of wine with a sampling from France, Italy, Spain, Portugal and Germany. Each week we’ll taste and talk about the wines of a given region. Low-key but informative, and definitely fun. Prerequisite: Must be 21 to register.

Course Descriptions

CWEX 190

COOPERATIVE WORK EXPERIENCE SEMINAR I 1CR Seminar topics may include legal issues of the workplace, interviewing techniques, and conflict resolution. Students have the opportunity to openly discuss issues they face at their workplace in a learning environment. Corequisite: CWEX 197. CWEX 197 COOPERATIVE WORK EXPERIENCE I 1-5CR Cooperative work experience offers students the opportunity to further their skills by working at an approved job site. Training plan will be developed to enable the student to acquire on-the- job skills while earning an income. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. CWEX 290

COOPERATIVE WORK EXPERIENCE SEMINAR II 1CR Seminar topics may include legal issues of the workplace, interviewing techniques, and conflict resolution. Students have the opportunity to openly discuss issues they face at their workplace in a learning environment. Corequisite: CWEX 297. CWEX 297 COOPERATIVE WORK EXPERIENCE II 1-5CR Cooperative work experience offers students the opportunity to further their skills by working at an approved job site. Training plan will be developed to enable the student to acquire on-the-job skills while earning an income. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

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DENT 111

INTRODUCTION TO DENTAL ASSISTING 2CR Students learn terminology, Washington State Dental Practice Act policies, ethics and jurisprudence, dental specialties and an introduction to the clinical aspects of being a dental auxiliary. Professional organizational structures will be included. Prerequisite: Admission to the Dental Assisting Program. DENT 112

INTRODUCTION TO CHAIRSIDE PROCEDURES 6CR Course covers maintenance of dental equipment and operatory instrumentation. Students will learn home care, patient instructions, assess oral hygiene, procedural prophylaxis fluoride and pit and fissure sealant application. Prerequisite: Admission to the Dental Assistant Program. DENT 113 DENTAL PRACTICE THEORY 4CR Basic concepts and principles of dental practice are presented in this lecture/lab course. The emphasis is on preparation and assessment procedures. Prerequisite: Admission into the dental assisting program. DENT 114 ETHICS LAW & OFFICE MANAGEMENT 2CR Students are introduced to professional ethics and legalities and the responsibilities of the dental assistant to the community, dental profession, dental team and patient. Management of front office procedures are presented. Prerequisite: Completion of an application for admission and admission to the Dental Assisting program. DENT 115 ORAL SCIENCE 3CR Students are introduced to basic dental sciences including oral anatomy, Tooth Morphology and Oral Microbiology. Prerequisite: Completion of application for admission and admission to the Dental Assisting program. DENT 117 DENTAL MATERIALS I 3CR This theory and laboratory course introduces the student to selected dental materials and to basic restorative dentistry procedures and techniques, and is designed to give students a working knowledge of skills required for restorative dentistry. Prerequisite: Completion of application for admission and admission to the Dental Assistant program. DENT 121 DENTAL ASSISTING PRACTICUM I 6CR Course covers assessing oral hygiene, stains, dental deposits; procedural prophylaxis, fluoride, and pit and fissure sealant application; and instrumentation of auxiliary expanded duties. Clinical implementation and practical application of procedures permitted by the Washington State Dental Practice Act in the campus dental clinic under the supervision of dentists and dental faculty Prerequisites: DENT 112, DENT 114, DENT 117 or instructor permission. DENT 124 STUDY OF THE HUMAN BODY 4CR Students continue their study of the basic sciences including human anatomy/physiology, head and neck anatomy, and histology/embryology. Histology/Embryology forms the basis for the future study of general, oral and periodontal pathologies. Prerequisite: Minimal ASSET scores of 40 in reading and 44 in numeral skills or instructor permission.

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Course Descriptions DENT 126 RADIOLOGY 3CR This course introduces radiology as a diagnostic aid, and includes the concepts and principles of x-radiation, x-ray generation and radiation protection. Prerequisites: DENT 112, DENT 113, DENT 114, DENT 117. DENT 127 DENTAL MATERIALS II 3CR This theory and laboratory course continues from DENT 117. Students are introduced to principles of restorative dentistry. Additional dental assisting skills are introduced. Prerequisites: DENT 115, DENT 117 or instructor permission. DENT 131 DENTAL ASSISTING PRACTICUM II 7CR Clinical implementation and practical application of procedures permitted by the Washington State Dental Practice Act, in the campus dental clinic under the supervision of dentists and dental faculty. Prerequisites: Successful completion of DENT 112, DENT 114, DENT 117, DENT 121, DENT 127, DSCI 112, DSCI 126 or instructor permission. DENT 133

RESTORATIVE DENTISTRY DENTAL ASSISTING 3CR Students will continue chairside procedures with the emphasis on theory and skills related to the expanded functions such as impression taking and amalgam polishing. Students will gain a fuller understanding of fixed and removable prosthodontics and the role that they play in assisting the dentist in the fabrication of dental prosthesis. The laboratory portion of this course will introduce related exercises as well as other advanced assisting skills necessary for employment in Washington State. Prerequisites: DENT 115, DENT 117, DENT 127, DSCI 112, or instructor permission.

DENT 137 DENTAL SPECIALTIES 4CR This course emphasizes the special needs of patients. Dental specialty practices and armamentarium are discussed. This course will also introduce the student to common pathology of the oral cavity which they may encounter. Prerequisites: DENT 111, DENT 112, DENT 115, DENT 124, DSCI 112, DSCI 126, or instructor permission. DENT 211 DENTAL ASSISTING PRACTICUM III 4CR Clinical implementation and practical application of procedures permitted by the Washington State Dental Practice Act, in the campus dental clinic under the supervision of dentists and dental faculty. Prerequisites: DENT 112, DENT 114, DENT 117, DENT 127, DENT 131, DENT 133, DENT 136, DENT 137, or instructor permission. DENT 214 PHARMACOLOGY/NUTRITION 2CR This course presents general concepts of dental pharmacology. General nutrition is also discussed. The six essential nutrients are reviewed. Prerequisites: DENT 112, DENT 114, DENT 117, DENT 127, DENT 131, DENT 133, DENT 136, DENT 137, or instructor permission.

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DENT 215 WORKPLACE PREPARATION 3CR This course will cover career and educational opportunities and the employment process. Computerized dental office management will be discussed. In addition, students will gain an understanding of issues related to leadership, self-esteem, and goal setting. This course teaches to the Global Outcome of Global and Cultural Awareness. Prerequisites: DENT 112, DENT 114, DENT 117, DENT 127, or instructor permission. DENT 294 DENTAL ASSISTING INTERNSHIP 6CR Clinical practice designed to perfect students’ competence in dental assisting functions, performed under direct supervision of a dentist in private practice, specialty offices and dental clinics. Prerequisites: DENT 131, DENT 133, DENT 136, DENT 137, DENT 211, DENT 214, DENT 215. DHET 122 WELDING APPLICATIONS 4CR A study of welding procedures with a focus on developing skills needed for fabrication and repair of heavy equipment and trucks. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125. Corequisites: DHET 123, DHET 124, DHET 125. DHET 123 HEAVY DUTY ELECTRICAL 4CR The study of heavy duty electrical systems and sub-systems with a focus on design, repair, inspection, removal and installation. Hands-on troubleshooting and test equipment usage. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125. Corequisites: DHET 122, DHET 124, DHET 125. DHET 124 ELECTRONIC APPLICATIONS 4CR The study of electronic systems and sub-systems used with a focus on design, repair, inspection, removal and installation. Hands-on troubleshooting and test equipment usage. This course teaches to the global outcome of communication. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125. Corequisites: DHET 122, DHET 123, DHET 125. DHET 125 BASIC MAINTENANCE 3CR The study of maintenance requirements and recommended procedures related to heavy equipment and trucks. Hands-on guided practice on customer equipment and program training aids. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125. DHET 131 ENGINE PRINCIPLES/COMPONENTS 3CR The study of internal combustion engine operating principles for both two cycle and four cycle application. Includes major component identification and function as well as OEM terminology. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125.

Course Descriptions

DENT 136 RADIOGRAPHY 2CR This course builds on the science foundation established in DSCI 126. Students begin to take radiographs on clinical patients and study advanced techniques of radiography such as extra-oral techniques. Prerequisites: Successful completion of DENT 115, DENT 124,DSCI 112, DSCI 126, or instructor permission.

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DHET 132

GASOLINE/LIQUID PROPANE GAS SYSTEMS 3CR The study of gasoline and liquid propane fueled engines. Combustion processes, engine subsystems maintenance, repair, adjustments. Includes application and installation requirements. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125 and completion of, or enrollment in DHET 131. DHET 133 DIESEL SYSTEMS 3CR The study of diesel fueled engines. Combustion processes, engine subsystems maintenance, repair, adjustments. Includes application and installation requirements. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125 and completion of, or enrollment in DHET 131 and DHET 132. T E C H N I C A L

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Course Descriptions DHET 134 FUEL INJECTION 3CR The study of fuel injection systems. Includes operating principles, component identification, maintenance, repair, installation, and application. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125 completion of, or enrollment in DHET 131, DHET 132, DHET 133.

DHET 232 PNEUMATICS 5CR A study of pneumatic system components such as wiper motors, brake valves, air springs and locking mechanisms. Includes instruction in application, maintenance, repair, installation and schematic interpretation. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125.

DHET 135

DHET 233 FOUNDATION BRAKES 5CR The study of foundation brake systems and components including purpose, nomenclature, repair, maintenance, adjustment, and drivability complaint diagnosis. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125 and completion of , or concurrent enrollment in DHET 232.

DIAGNOSTICS/ADJUSTMENTS/ EMISSIONS 3CR The study of electronically controlled engine subsystems. Includes operating principles, component identification maintenance, trouble-shooting, computer diagnostics, repair, installation techniques, Emissions and controls. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125 and completion of, or enrollment in DHET 131, DHET 132, DHET 133, DHET 134. DHET 211 HYDRAULIC FLUID POWER I 6CR An introduction to fluid power basic laws and fluid characteristics. System components, identification and application. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125.

Course Descriptions

DHET 213 ADVANCED HD FLUID POWER 6CR A continuation of the study of fluid power with focus on troubleshooting, maintenance, and system integration. Includes schematic interpretation. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125, completion of, or concurrent enrollment in DHET 211 Fundamentals of Hydraulic Fluid Power and DHET 212. DHET 214 DIESEL MECHANICAL PRACTICES 3CR A study of the concepts of force and work applied to mechanical, fluid, and thermal energy systems. The course includes problem-solving and workplace applications. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125. DHET 221 POWER TRAINS STANDARD 6CR The study of clutches, manual transmissions, drivelines, U- joints and differentials. Includes operation, maintenance, disassembly, re-assembly and installation. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125. DHET 222 POWER TRAINS/POWER SHIFT 6CR The study of power shift transmissions, torque converters and machine steering systems. Includes instruction in maintenance, repair, installation and application. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125. DHET 223 TRACTION & COMPONENTS 3CR The study of traction and related components and undercarriage systems used in heavy duty applications. Includes instruction in maintenance, adjustment, removal and installation. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125. DHET 231 STEERING SUSPENSION FRAMES 5CR The study of heavy duty steering, suspension, and frame systems. A focus on terminology, application, inspection, repair and adjustment procedures. Prerequisites: TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, TRAN 125.

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DHYG 111 MEDICAL EMERGENCIES 1CR This course introduces the student to various medical emergency situations that may arise in the dental setting. Through presentations and lab experiences students will learn to work with the dental team to identify, evaluate, and respond to medical/dental emergencies. Prerequisite: Admission to the Dental Hygiene program. DHYG 112 DENTAL HYGIENE PRACTICE I 6CR Basic concepts and principles of dental hygiene practice are presented. The emphasis is on preparation and assessment procedures with an introduction to dental hygiene diagnosis and planning; and selected implementation, evaluation and practice management procedures. Prerequisite: Admission to the Dental Hygiene program. DHYG 113 RESTORATIVE DENTISTRY I 3CR This course introduces the student to selected dental materials and to basic restorative dentistry procedures and techniques. The course is designed to give students a working knowledge of skills required for restorative dentistry. Prerequisite: Admission to the Dental Hygiene program. DHYG 114 PRINCIPLES & ISSUES I 2CR This course is designed to introduce the student to the profession of dental hygiene, including professional ethics, legalities, and responsibilities. Current concepts of dental hygiene practice are examined with emphasis on the problemsolving process. Prerequisite: Admission to the Dental Hygiene program. DHYG 115 HEAD & NECK ANATOMY 2CR In this course students are introduced to structures of the head and neck and the oral cavity. The course focuses on the healthy, normal end of the health/disease continuum and provides a foundation for further dental science study. Prerequisite: Admission to the Dental Hygiene program. DHYG 116 RADIOLOGY 3CR This course introduces radiology as a diagnostic aid, and includes the concepts and principles of x-radiation, x-ray generation and radiation protection. Prerequisite: Admission to the Dental Hygiene program. DHYG 118 PERIODONTOLOGY I 2CR In this course, students are introduced to the structure and function of the periodontium. The course focuses on the healthy, normal end of the health/disease continuum and provides a foundation for further dental science study. Prerequisite: Admission to the Dental Hygiene program. T E C H N I C A L

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Course Descriptions DHYG 119 TOOTH MORPHOLOGY 2CR Students are introduced to different aspects of the primary and secondary human dentition. Focuses on the healthy, normal end of the health/disease continuum and provides a foundation for further dental science study. Prerequisite: Admission to the Dental Hygiene program. DHYG 121 PREVENTIVE DENTISTRY 2CR In this course students are introduced to basic principles of dental diseases and their prevention. Students learn concepts of preventive oral health and patient oral self-care. Prerequisites: DHYG 111, 112, DHYG 113, DHYG 114, DHYG 115, DHYG 116, DHYG 118, DHYG 119. DHYG 122 DENTAL HYGIENE PRACTICE II 8CR This lecture/lab course is a continuation of Dental Hygiene Practice I. The concepts of teaching and learning, and problem solving are integrated into clinical practice. Prerequisites: DHYG 111, 112, DHYG 113, DHYG 114, DHYG 115, DHYG 116, DHYG 118, DHYG 119. DHYG 123 RESTORATIVE DENTISTRY II 1CR This course is a continuation of Restorative Dentistry I. Students are introduced to principles of restorative dentistry and restorative dentistry armamentarium. Additional dental assisting skills are introduced. Prerequisites: DHYG 111, 112, DHYG 113, DHYG 114, DHYG 115, DHYG 116, DHYG 118, DHYG 119.

DHYG 127 HISTOLOGY & EMBRYOLOGY 2CR In this course students broaden their focus of the healthdisease continuum through the study of Histology/Embryology. The course forms the basis for the further study of general, oral and periodontal pathologies. Prerequisites: DHYG 111, 112, DHYG 113, DHYG 114, DHYG 115, DHYG 116, DHYG 118, DHYG 119. DHYG 132 DENTAL HYGIENE PRACTICE III 7CR This lecture/lab course continues from Dental Hygiene Practice II. Students expand their focus to include unhealthy and abnormal oral conditions and the special needs of patients in today’s diversified communities. Prerequisites: DHYG 121, 122, DHYG 123, DHYG 124, DHYG 127, DHYG 137, DHYG 139. DHYG 133 RESTORATIVE DENTISTRY III 1CR This laboratory course builds on the skills introduced in Restorative Dentistry I and II. Students develop restorative dentistry skills by practicing on mannequins in preparation for patient clinics during the summer program. Prerequisites: DHYG 121, DHYG 122, DHYG 123, DHYG 124, DHYG 127, DHYG 137, DHYG 139.

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DHYG 134 PRINCIPLES & ISSUES III 2CR This course focuses on concepts of wellness and researchbased dental hygiene practice. The student is introduced to the special needs of patients, dental specialties, and to the concept of multi-disciplinary health care consultations and referrals. Prerequisites: DHYG 121, DHYG 122, DHYG 123, DHYG 124, DHYG 127, DHYG 137 and DHYG 139. DHYG 135 COMMUNITY DENTAL HEALTH I 3CR Students study the health/disease continuum from the viewpoint of the community. Included are basic concepts of community dental health and an introduction to the multi-cultural nature of communities. Covers the assessment, planning and implementation phases of community health programming. Prerequisites: DHYG 121, DHYG 122, DHYG 123, DHYG 124, DHYG 127, DHYG 137 and DHYG 139. DHYG 136 PHARMACOLOGY 2CR Students are introduced to general principles of pharmacology, including terminology, drug action and uses, physiological and therapeutic effects, classification, interactions, side effects and oral manifestations. Drugs encountered in dentistry are emphasized. Prerequisites: DHYG 122, DHYG 123, DHYG 124, DHYG 127, DHYG 137, DHYG 139. Corequisites: DHYG 132, DHYG 133, DHYG 134, DHYG 135, DHYG 138.” DHYG 137 RADIOGRAPHIC INTERPRETATION 2CR Students take radiographs on mannequins and clinical patients. Students learn to interpret radiographs to assist with dental hygiene diagnosis and planning. Prerequisites: DHYG 111, DHYG 112, DHYG 113, DHYG 114, DHYG 115, DHYG 116, DHYG 118, DHYG 119. DHYG 138 PAIN CONTROL 2CR This course covers the theory and practice of pain control in dental hygiene and restorative dentistry. Students learn concepts of local anesthetic and nitrous oxide administration. Prerequisites: DHYG 121, DHYG 122, DHYG 123, DHYG 124, DHYG 127, DHYG 137, DHYG 139. DHYG 139 PATHOLOGY I 2CR This course builds on the science foundation established in DHYG 118 and 127. The focus along the health/disease continuum shifts towards basic concepts of disease. General concepts of pathology and periodontal pathology are discussed. Prerequisites: DHYG 111, DHYG 112, DHYG 113, DHYG 114, DHYG 115, DHYG 116, DHYG 118, DHYG 119.

Course Descriptions

DHYG 124 PRINCIPLES & ISSUES II 1CR This course builds on Principles and Issues I and introduces the student to concepts of research-based dental hygiene practice and health promotion. Prerequisites: DHYG 111, 112, DHYG 113, DHYG 114, DHYG 115, DHYG 116, DHYG 118, DHYG 119.

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DHYG 142 DENTAL HYGIENE PRACTICE IV 5CR This course continues from the first year courses. Students participate in weekly seminars integrating values, knowledge and skills learned from other courses. Prerequisites: DHYG 132, DHYG 133, DHYG 134, DHYG 135, DHYG 136, DHYG 138. DHYG 143 RESTORATIVE DENTISTRY IV 1CR This laboratory course builds on the skills introduced in Restorative Dentistry I, II and III. Students develop restorative dentistry skills by practicing on mannequins. Prerequisites: DHYG 132, DHYG 133, DHYG 134, DHYG 135, DHYG 136, DHYG 138.

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Course Descriptions DHYG 145 COMMUNITY DENTAL HEALTH II 2CR In this course students concentrate on the implementation phase of their community health projects. Students will also begin their clinical procedures at extern rotations. Prerequisites: DHYG 132, DHYG 133, DHYG 134, DHYG 135, DHYG 136, DHYG 138.

DHYG 224 PRINCIPLES & ISSUES V 2CR Course will cover career and educational opportunities, the employment process, licensure and continuing education requirements in Washington and across the U.S., and the role of practice standards for quality assurance. Prerequisites: DHYG 212, DHYG 213, DHYG 214, DHYG 215, DHYG 219.

DHYG 212 DENTAL HYGIENE PRACTICE V 9CR This lecture and clinical course continues from the first year courses. Students expand their focus of practice to include more periodontally involved patients/clients. Emphasis is given to comprehensive dental hygiene care. Prerequisites: DHYG 142, DHYG 143, DHYG 145, DHYG 218.

DHYG 225 COMMUNITY DENTAL HEALTH IV 3CR This course is a continuation of the previous community dental health courses. Students study global multi-cultural issues and concerns, and continue their clinical/health promotion community internship project. Prerequisites: DHYG 212, DHYG 213, DHYG 214, DHYG 215, DHYG 219.

DHYG 213 RESTORATIVE DENTISTRY V 3CR In this course students provide restorative dentistry care to their clinical patients/clients. In addition, students incorporate the administration of local anesthesia and nitrous oxide. Prerequisites: DHYG 142, DHYG 143, DHYG 145, DHYG 218.

DHYG 229 PATHOLOGY III 2CR Disease aspects of the health/disease continuum are further explored through the continuing study of Oral Pathology and periodontics. Advanced concepts of immunology are presented. Case studies help students prepare for their presentations of clinical cases in the spring quarter. Prerequisites: DHYG 212, DHYG 213, DHYG 214, DHYG 215, DHYG 219.

DHYG 214 PRINCIPLES & ISSUES IV 2CR This course examines concepts introduced in the first year courses. The primary focus is on wellness in the aged and geriatric dental health. Communication skills relating to special needs patients, assertion and group dynamics are studied. Prerequisites: DHYG 142, DHYG 143, DHYG 145, DHYG 218.

Course Descriptions

DHYG 215 COMMUNITY DENTAL HEALTH III 3CR Students are introduced to concepts of epidemiological trends, community health research, and marketing strategies for community dental health education and promotion. Prerequisites: DHYG 142, DHYG 143, DHYG 145, DHYG 218. DHYG 218 PERIODONTOLOGY II 2CR This course builds on DHYG 118.The focus along the health/ disease continuum shifts toward basic concepts of disease at the cellular level. The study of periodontics is broadened to include common periodontal pathologies and their microbiological basis. Prerequisites: DHYG 132, DHYG 133, DHYG 134, DHYG 135, DHYG 136, DHYG 138. DHYG 219 PATHOLOGY II 2CR This course builds on the first year dental science courses and continues to focus on aspects of the health/disease continuum. Oral pathology is introduced and concepts are related to the continued study of periodontal pathologies. Prerequisites: DHYG 142, DHYG 143, DHYG 145, DHYG 218. DHYG 222 DENTAL HYGIENE PRACTICE VI 10CR This lecture and clinical course is a continuation of Dental Hygiene Practice V. The student demonstrates competence with various procedures. Prerequisites: DHYG 212, DHYG 213, DHYG 214, DHYG 215, DHYG 219. DHYG 223 RESTORATIVE DENTISTRY VI 3CR This course is a continuation of Restorative Dentistry V. Students are given opportunity to provide restorative dentistry care to clinical patients/clients, Prerequisites: DHYG 212, DHYG 213, DHYG 214, DHYG 215, DHYG 219.

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DHYG 232 DENTAL HYGIENE PRACTICE VII 10CR This course continues from Dental Hygiene Practice VI and gives the student the opportunity to utilize knowledge and skills learned in previous courses. Prerequisite: Successful completion of DHYG 222, DHYG 223, DHYG 224, DHYG 225, DHYG 229. DHYG 233 RESTORATIVE DENTISTRY VII 2CR This course provides the student with clinical opportunities to demonstrate competence in restorative dental hygiene services including the application of amalgam and composite restorations. Prerequisites: Successful completion of DHYG 222, DHYG 223, DHYG 224, DHYG 225, DHYG 229. DHYG 234 PRINCIPLES & ISSUES VI 1CR This course is a continuation of Principles and Issues V. Students focus on dental hygiene professional issues and trends in dental and dental hygiene care. Prerequisites: DHYG 222, DHYG 223, DHYG 224, DHYG 225, DHYG 229. DHYG 235 COMMUNITY DENTAL HEALTH V 1CR Students continue providing clinical services to special populations at various extern sites using knowledge and skills developed in previous community dental health courses. Prerequisites: DHYG 222, DHYG 223, DHYG 224, DHYG 225, DHYG 229. DHYG 239 PATHOLOGY IV 1CR This course provides an opportunity for students to synthesize knowledge developed in previous dental science courses, particularly in periodontics. Students will present the Oral Pathology research project. Prerequisites: DHYG 222, DHYG 223, DHYG 224, DHYG 225, DHYG 229. EASL 010 ESL ORIENTATION 0.5CR This course is for students who took the ESL appraisal and plan to enroll in the English as a Second Language program. It teaches to the global outcome of Technical and Information Literacy. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

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Course Descriptions EASL 015 BEGINNING ESL LITERACY 1-12CR This course is for students beginning to study English as a second language. It teaches survival English, with a focus on speaking and listening. Prerequisite: Appropriate placement test score. EASL 016 LOW BEGINNING ESL 1-12CR This course continues teaching basic functional English but has an increasing emphasis on beginning reading and writing. Prerequisite: Appropriate placement test score. EASL 017

BEGINNING ENGLISH LANGUAGE CIVICS 3CR This content-based class familiarizes beginning ESL students with campus and community resources and the concept of civic participation. All four language skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) are addressed. EASL 018

INTERMEDIATE ENGLISH LANGUAGE CIVICS 3CR This content-based class familiarizes students with the basic notions of US government, history, and the concept of civic participation, while providing numerous debate topics. EASL 024 WORKPLACE COMMUNICATIONS I 1-8CR This course is designed to improve workplace communication for beginning level ESL and ABE students. Topics will include beginning phonics and pronunciation, helpful reading techniques for the workplace, interpretation of safety procedures, general work procedures. Prerequisite: Appropriate placement test score.

EASL 028 ACCENT CORRECTION 1 1CR This independent-study class is intended for intermediate ESL learners. Students will practice different vowel sounds through various types of pronunciation exercises at both word and connected speech levels. Prerequisite: EASL 030 or equivalent placement test score. EASL 029 ESL ACCENT CORRECTION II 1-5CR This independent-study class is intended for intermediate ESL learners. Students will practice different consonant sounds through various types of pronunciation exercises at both word and connected speech levels. Prerequisite: EASL 030 or equivalent placement test score. EASL 030 HIGH-BEGINNING ESL 1-15CR In this course students will practice and improve communication skills with an equal emphasis on listening, speaking, reading and writing. Prerequisite: EASL 016 or equivalent placement. EASL 032 ESL COMPUTER LITERACY 3CR ESL students will become familiar with basic computer functions and introduced to Microsoft Office while developing the necessary language skills to read and follow instructions. Prerequisite: EASL 016 or equivalent placement. 2 0 1 0 - 2 0 1 1

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EASL 035 ESL WORLD OF WORK II 10CR This course is intended to provide students with proficiency in English as a second language and Adult Basic Education skills necessary to function in the American workplace. The course covers basic English as a second language competencies such as listening, speaking, reading, and writing, and specific competencies in language and culture for the workplace. In addition, students develop basic word processing skills. Prerequisite: English as a Second Language State of Washington Core Competences Level 2, Refugee Status. EASL 038 CITIZENSHIP PREPARATION 3CR This course is for ESL students who qualify and intend to apply for US Citizenship. Prerequisite: EASL 016 and instructor permission. EASL 039 ESL FAMILY LITERACY 2CR This course is for ESL students level 3 and 4 who want to improve knowledge and understanding of family literacy skills in child guidance, being their child’s first teacher, school readiness, and navigating the public school system. Prerequisite: EASL 016 or equivalent placement score. EASL 040 LOW-INTERMEDIATE ESL 1-15CR Students continue improving their communication skills with an emphasis on reading and writing to enhance their participation in the community and on the job. Prerequisite: EASL 030 or equivalent placement score. EASL 042 ESL WRITING FUNDAMENTALS 1-9CR Teaches organization/other aspects of the writing process integrated with grammar, reading, and critical thinking skills. Prerequisite: EASL 030 or equivalent placement score. EASL 050 HIGH INTERMEDIATE ESL 1-15CR Students will practice and improve communication skills to function effectively in various life situations and to explore program opportunities. Prerequisite: EASL 040 or equivalent placement. EASL 053 HEALTHCARE BRIDGE I 6CR This course is designed to assist ESL students in their transition into Allied Health Programs, by offering language instruction in the context of Health/Healthcare. Prerequisite: Completion of level 4 or equivalent placement scores and interest in one of the Allied Health Programs at LWTC.

Course Descriptions

EASL 025 WORKPLACE COMMUNICATIONS II 1-8CR This course is designed to improve workplace communication for intermediate ESL and ABE students. Topics will include the interpretation of work-related vocabulary, safety procedures, handbooks, charts, performance reviews and benefits. Prerequisite: Appropriate placement test score.

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EASL 055

TECHNICAL INTEGRATED ESL WRITTEN COMMUNICATION 1-5CR Improve spelling of technical/industry specific vocabulary; use vocabulary in sentences and descriptive and narrative paragraphs while working on sentence structure and basic grammar. Prerequisite: EASL 040 or equivalent placement test score. EASL 056

TECHNICAL INTEGRATED ESL WRITTEN COMMUNICATION 1-5CR Improve pronunciation of technical/industry specific vocabulary; use such vocabulary in sentences while working on stress and intonation. Practice describing a process and reporting problems. Prerequisite: EASL 040 or equivalent placement test score.

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Course Descriptions EASL 057 ESL WRITING HIGH/INTERMEDIATE 3CR This online class improves reading and writing skills through learning and practicing new grammar and writing topics. Assignments are based on online reading texts. Prerequisite: EASL 040 or equivalent placement test scores. EASL 060 CONNECT WITH ENGLISH 1CR In this independent-study course, students will practice listening and writing skills, and some basic grammatical structures to complement or prepare for regular ESL classes. Prerequisite: EASL 030 or equivalent placement test score. EASL 062 WRITING IMPROVEMENT 1CR This independent-study class is intended for intermediate ESL learners. Students will work on their writing at the sentence level and then at the paragraph level, while reviewing and practicing grammatical structures and relationships. Prerequisite: EASL 030 or equivalent placement test score. EASL 064 ESL WORKSKILLS 1CR This is an independent-study course designed to improve the language skills necessary to function well in an American workplace setting. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in EASL 030 or EASL 040 or current employment.

Course Descriptions

EASL 065 ADVANCED ESL 1-15CR In this course, students will continue improving communication skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing to prepare them for transitioning into college programs. Prerequisite: EASL 050 or equivalent placement. EASL 070 ESL COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I 1-3CR This course is exclusively for ESL students who qualify and enroll in the I-BEST Business Administration Support certificate of completion. Improve pronunciation, spelling, and meaning of Windows, Word, Excel, Internet vocabulary and use Microsoft programs to write and edit sentences, paragraphs, and business letters. Prerequisite: EASL 040 or equivalent placement. EASL 072 ESL COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II 1-3CR This course is exclusively for ESL students who qualify and enroll in the I-BEST Business Administration Support certificate of completion. Improve pronunciation, spelling, and meaning of Access and PowerPoint vocabulary and use computers to write paragraphs, cover letters, resumes and presentations. Job search techniques will also be covered. Prerequisite: EASL 040 or equivalent placement. EASL 074

ESL TRANSPORTATION APPLICATIONS I 1-3CR This course is exclusively for ESL students who qualify and enroll in the I-BEST General Service Technician certificate of completion. It addresses industry specific vocabulary and language skills covered in the first term technical courses (TRAN 110, TRAN 112, TRAN 113, and TRAN 125). Prerequisite: Completion of EASL 030 or equivalent placement, and instructor permission.

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EASL 076

ESL TRANSPORTATION APPLICATIONS II 1-3CR This course is exclusively for ESL students enrolled in the I-BEST General Service Technician certificate of completion. It addresses industry specific vocabulary and language skills covered in the second term technical courses (AUTO 120 and AUTO 124). Prerequisite: EASL 074. EASL 077 ESL ACCOUNTING APPLICATIONS I 3CR This course is exclusively for ESL students who qualify and enroll in the I-BEST Accounting Assistant Certificate of Completion. It addresses industry specific vocabulary and language skills covered in the first term technical courses (ACCT 111, ACCT 112, and BAS 101). Prerequisite: EASL 040 or equivalent placement scores and instructor permission. EASL 078 EASL ACCOUNTING APPLICATIONS II 3CR This course is exclusively for ESL students who are enrolled in the second term of the I-BEST Accounting Assistant Certificate of Completion. It addresses specific vocabulary and language skills covered in the second term technical courses (BAS 112 and ACCT 210). Prerequisite: EASL 077. EASL 079 EASL ACCOUNTING APPLICATIONS III 3CR This course is exclusively for ESL students who are enrolled in the third term of the I-BEST Accounting Assistant Certificate of Completion. It addresses specific vocabulary and language skills covered in the third term technical courses (ACCT 220 and ACCT105) as well as employment skills. Prerequisite: EASL 078. EASL 080 ESL/ABED COLLEGE TRANSITION 1-3CR This course assists ESL/ABED student transition into technical programs. It is comprised of five modules - Reading and Study Skills, College Orientation, College Oral Communication, Grammar, and Digital Literacy. Students can take any module or combination of modules according to their needs, skills, and availability. Prerequisite: EASL 030 or equivalent testing placement. EASL 082 ESL WEB APPLICATIONS 3CR This course is exclusively for ESL/ABE students who qualify and enroll in the I-BEST Web Maintenance Certificate of Completion. It addresses industry specific vocabulary and language skills covered in the ITAD and MMDP courses that are part of this certificate. Prerequisites: Completion of EASL 070 and instructor permission. EASL 085

ESL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS I 1-4CR This course is exclusively for ESL/ABED students who qualify and enroll in the I-BEST Bio-Energy Certificate of Completion and/or the Energy Technology Certificate of Completion. It addresses industry specific vocabulary and language skills covered in the first term technical courses (ETEC 110, ETEC 120, and ETEC 121) Prerequisites: Completion of EASL 040 or equivalent placement scores and instructor’s permission.

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Course Descriptions EASL 086

ESL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS II 1-4CR This course is exclusively for ESL/ABED students who are enrolled in the second term of the I-BEST Bio-Energy Certificate of Completion and/or the Energy Technology Certificate of Completion and/or the first term of the Industrial Laboratory Certificate of Completion. It addresses specific vocabulary and language skills covered in the second term technical courses (ETEC 122, STEC 200, STEC 220). EASL 087

ESL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS III 1-4CR This course is exclusively for ESL/ABED students who are enrolled in the third term of the I-BEST Energy Technology Certificate of Completion and/or the Industrial Laboratory Certificate of Completion. It addresses specific vocabulary and language skills covered in the third term technical courses (ETEC 123, STEC 221, STEC 225). ECEM 111

INTRODUCTION TO EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 5CR An overview of the early childhood profession and the principles of environmental planning and child observation techniques. Basic early childhood/school age teaching techniques, professional standards and ethics as defined by NAEYC are discussed in depth. Current research is reviewed and students begin developing a portfolio.

ECEM 113 GUIDANCE TECHNIQUES 5CR Study of early childhood/school age basic teaching and guidance techniques that foster a positive self image. Focus on relationship between development and behavior, affect of inappropriate adult expectations, cultural expectations and classroom management techniques. Effective communication skills explored and practiced.

ECEM 125 SCIENCE & MATH ACTIVITIES 5CR Study of basic math/science concepts including classification, comparison, ordering, measuring, graphing, estimating and problem solving techniques. Students learn principles and methods of introduction of concepts and providing practice using basic materials present in every program. ECEM 130

MATHEMATICAL METHODS FOR PRESCHOOL TEACHERS 5CR Students learn how to successfully teach mathematics to children ages 2 through 6 and how to play with the mathematical ideas that define the content standards for preschool mathematical skills: number and operations; patterns, functions and relations; geometry and measurement; and problem solving and data analysis. ECEM 131 ADVOCACY/LEGAL ISSUES 1CR Techniques for advocacy for ECE/School Age community and professional letter writing. Study of legal issues including confidentiality, DSHS regulations, employee rights and anti-discrimination policies. ECEM 132 PARENT INTERACTIONS 5CR Techniques for positive and supportive interactions with parents. Focus on parent support, conferences, conflict resolution, and written materials for parents. Study of current research on child care’s role as a family resource. ECEM 133 PROGRAM DESIGN 5CR An in-depth study and application of programs for children from birth through age twelve. Students develop schedule and curriculum for infant, toddler, preschool and school age programs (both summer and school year). ECEM 134 SAFETY HEALTH & NUTRITION 5CR Study of child safety and health practices for home and center-based programs. Topics included are accident prevention, first aid/emergency procedures, disease, and child neglect/abuse. Food preparations and basic menus planning following DSHS guidelines.

ECEM 121 DIVERSITY ISSUES 1CR General introduction to incorporating cultural, ethnic, personal and physical diversity into the program with parent education component. Focus on methods for infusion of concepts into all areas of curriculum.

S.T.A.R.S. BASIC GUIDEBOOK TRAINING 2CR A guidebook based course providing basic child care training for family child care providers and lead center staff. Purpose is to provide people who work with young children a basic core knowledge. Course includes the recommended learning outcomes required for Washington State training and Registry System (S.T.A.R.S.) initial training.

ECEM 122 CREATIVE ACTIVITIES 5CR Focus is on the development of activities and interest centers to enhance creativity and self- esteem. Hands on exploration of art, sensory, construction activities and the development and enhancement of dramatic play and block centers.

ECEM 212 POLICIES & PROCEDURES 5CR Elements of program management, including statement of program philosophy, program objectives and all program procedures. Students develop an operations manual and a personnel policies manual.

ECEM 124 LANGUAGE ACTIVITIES 5CR Course explores techniques for enhancement of language development. Focus on co-active language experiences, verbal/ written expression, story extensions, selection of literature, music/movement, curriculum and environmental planning. Verbal expression techniques for staff explored. Resource development opportunities.

ECEM 213 STAFF MANAGEMENT 6CR Study of procedures for staff selection, staff development and evaluation. Students develop job descriptions, interview questions, participate in mock interviews, develop plan for staff development plan and staff evaluation procedures.

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ECEM 112 CHILD DEVELOPMENT 6CR Study of developmental tasks for children birth to age twelve. In-depth study of major developmental theories and their application to child care. Fundamentals of using developmental information to observe and record the behavior of young children. Two comprehensive exams measure child development knowledge.

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Course Descriptions ECEM 214 FINANCIAL PLANNING & RECORDS 5CR Study of the budget development process for child care centers. Students work in cooperative groups to complete comprehensive budget plans. Budget back-up sheets, status reports, break even analysis and full costs of care statements are included in the curriculum. ECON& 202 MACRO ECONOMICS 5CR This is an introductory course emphasizing how the markets operate from the big (macro) picture. The course covers measurement of economic performance, national income accounting, aggregate supply and demand, fiscal policy, money creation/Federal Reserve system, monetary policy, inflation and unemployment. Prerequisites: MATH 070 or ABED 040 or equivalent test scores, and ENGL 093A or ENGL 093B or ENGL 092 or equivalent test scores. EDUC 135 MASTER ADVISING 1CR The Master Advising course provides faculty and staff with the core skills necessary to advise students toward the successful completion of their certificate or degree program and overcome any barriers along the way. EDUC 201

TEACHING & FACILITATING LEARNING LEVEL I 3CR New instructors will practice implementing a variety of instructional strategies and student assessments to meet course outcomes. Instructors will actively practice their teaching skills to begin to implement learner-centered instructional activities and lessons that they have devised.

Course Descriptions

EDUC 202

DEVELOPING & REVIEWING PROGRAMS 3CR Create, review and/or modify program plans and approve core and support program coursework and assessments working with program advisory committee and accreditation standards. EDUC 206

TEACHING & FACILITATING LEARNING LEVEL II 3CR Instructor-learners will further examine and fine tune multiple modes of instruction beyond those in Level 1. Prerequisite: EDUC 201. EDUC 211 PLANNING FOR INSTRUCTION 5CR Students plan for the delivery of adult instruction by developing the skills required to create, evaluate or modify a program/course. EDUC 215

BEST PRACTICES IN DISTANCE LEARNING 3CR Faculty learn how to use distance learning tools more effectively to design and develop distance learning courses that deliver the same quality of instruction as the traditional classroom. The pedagogical implications of new technology and tools are emphasized. EDUC 216 ASSESSMENT OF LEARNING 5CR Students will design and develop assessments to be integrated into the learning process, including performance-based and portfolio assessments.

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EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES IN HIGHER EDUCATION 2CR An exploration of emerging technology tools to enhance learning, collaborative work, and the integration of technology into the curriculum. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. EDUC 295

PROFESSIONAL TECHNICAL EDUCATION CAPSTONE 5CR This Capstone course is designed to provide opportunities for instructors to augment their professional skills in accordance with Washington State Skill Standards for Professional-Technical Educators. This is the final required course of an AAS-T degree in Professional-Technical Education. Prerequisite: Initial certification as a professional-technical instructor and approval by Dean. Corequisite: EDUC 252. ELEC 110

INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRONICS I (SURVEY COURSE) 6CR Electronics impacts all of our lives, this complete introduction to basic electricity/electronics principles with an emphasis on hands-on application of theory provides a solid foundation to anyone in the “ high-tech” workforce. A good look into how these electronics products really work. ELEC 111

COMPUTER LITERACY FOR ELECTRONICS PROFESSIONALS 2CR An introductory course, which develops an understanding of basic computer operations as they pertain to the electronics technical professional. Hardware and basic software applications are studied as well as industry specific software applications. Basic computer operations are studied. ELEC 113 CAREER PLANNING & LEADERSHIP I 2CR Focus on career objectives for the diverse electronics industry, leadership/team skills, customer relations, occupational safety, hazardous material regulations, hiring practices and techniques, and workplace ethics unique to the electronics industry. ELEC 114

ELECTRONICS TESTING PROCESSES & TECHNIQUES I 2CR A practical study of techniques and methods of basic electrical testing and parameter measurement. Component identification, technical methodology and practices that are utilized throughout the electronics industry are studied. Testing emphasis is on portable hand-held electronic test equipment, including VOMs and DMMs. Prerequisites: MATH 080 and ENGL 093 or placement by assessment, or instructor permission. ELEC 115

ELECTRONIC MANUFACTURING PROCESSES & TECHNIQUES 5CR Introduction to techniques and methods of fabrication that are utilized throughout the electronics industry. Basic manual electronic manufacturing techniques, safety procedures, and shop practices and techniques are explored, as well as proper hand tool selection, care and utilization. Prerequisites: MATH 080 and ENGL 093 or placement by assessment, or instructor permission.

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Course Descriptions ELEC 116

INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMMABLE LOGIC CONTROLLERS 5CR Due to industry shift students will be familiarized with PLCs and learn Automated Manufacturing techniques and practices used to keep these machines operational. Prerequisite: ELEC 110 or Instructor Permission. ELEC 120 INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRONICS II 6CR Continuation of the Introduction to Electronics course in which semiconductors circuits both analog and digital electronics are explored. A variety of hands-on lab activities with applications enforce the classroom learning. Prerequisite: ELEC 110. ELEC 126

ELECTRONIC MANUFACTURE PROCESSES & TECHNIQUES II 5CR Introduction to surface mount techniques and advanced methods of fabrication that are utilized throughout the electronics industry. Basic manual electronic manufacturing techniques, safety procedures and shop practices and techniques are explored, as well as proper hand tool selection, care and utilization. Prerequisite: ELEC 115. ELEC 130 ELECTRICITY & ELECTRONICS 6CR Fundamentals of physics as it relates to electricity and electronics are studied. Basic DC/AC theory including basic and intermediate circuit identification and analysis are explored. Prerequisite: ELEC 120. ELEC 137 INTRODUCTION TO SEMI & ANALOG 5CR An introductory study of basic semiconductor theory as it applies to electronics applications. Basic PN junctions through operational amplifier configurations and applications are explored. Prerequisite: ELEC 136 or instructor permission. ELECTRONICS CAPSTONE – CERTIFICATE LEVEL 5CR All students are required to complete a capstone project prior to graduation as a final check of competency. Details are negotiated between the instructor and student to best fit the students’ individual area of interest within the field. This course is to be taken the final quarter of a certificate program. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. ELEC 211 DIGITAL ELECTRONICS 6CR This course covers an introduction to logic fundamentals, numbering systems, codes, gates, truth tables, DeMorgan’s theorems, basic Boolean theorems, combination logic circuits. The course combines lecture sessions with intensive hands-on lab experiments. ELEC 213 CAREER PLAN & LEADERSHIP II 2CR Continuation of ELEC 113. Focus on continued development of career objectives for the electronics industry including leadership/team skills, occupational safety, hazardous material regulations, hiring practices and techniques, and workplace ethics. Prerequisite: ELEC 113. ELEC 214

TROUBLESHOOTING ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS 4CR Covers troubleshooting techniques in a wide variety of circuits found in electronic systems. DC and AC voltage analysis are used to troubleshoot to component level in power supplies, bipolar/FET audio and RF amplifiers, oscillators, and op-amp circuits. Prerequisite: ELEC 137 or instructor permission. 2 0 1 0 - 2 0 1 1

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ELEC 216 MECHATRONICS 4CR Continuation of SOLID-STATE I. Covers AC analysis of bipolar small-signal transistors, including computer modeling of circuits. DC/AC analysis of large-signal amplifiers is also included. The course combines lecture sessions with intensive hands-on lab experiments. Prerequisite: ELEC 215 or instructor permission. ELEC 217 DATA ACQUISITION & ANALYSIS 5CR Course exposes students to data acquisition principles involving monitoring and/or controlling signals with a computer in a scientific, testing, or manufacturing environment. Students gain experience in real-world data acquisition applications. Prerequisites: ELEC 114, ELEC 137. ELEC 221 FCC/CET PREPARATION 1CR This course is designed to aid the electronics student to pass the FCC “General Radiotelephone” license exam (FCC Element I and III). Also covered are topics covered in the CET “Associate” level exam enabling students to be certified by ETA, International. Both the FCC and CET license examinations are offered at Lake Washington Technical College for additional fees. See instructor for details. Prerequisite: ELEC 225 or instructor permission. ELEC 223 COMMUNICATION ELECTRONICS 5CR This course is an introduction to electronic communications covering topics on electrical noise, AM/FM modulation and demodulation techniques, transmission lines, electromagnetic wave propagation, antenna systems, and basic fiber optic techniques. The course combines lecture sessions with intensive hands-on lab experiments. Prerequisite: ELEC 225. ELEC 224 ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS 5CR Course covers DC/AC analysis of basic FET devices with DC/AC amplifier analysis and a study of the thyristor family. Computer modeling of FET amplifiers is used to enhance understanding. Also includes a study of frequency effects on amplifier operation, and a study of oscillator and regulated power supply circuits. Prerequisite : ELEC 137 or instructor permission. ELEC 225 LINEAR CIRCUITS 5CR Course covers basic and advanced topics on differential amplifiers and op-amp IC circuits. Op-amp negative feedback is covered. Also includes the study of several selected linear and non-linear op-amp circuits, including active filters. Prerequisite: ELEC 224 or instructor permission.

Course Descriptions

ELEC 197

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ELEC 226

INTRODUCTION TO AUTOMATION/ ELECTOMECHANICAL 4CR Operation and maintenance of an Automated Manufacturing Cell is explored, with plenty of hands on experience. Prerequisite: ELEC 216. ELEC 232 DIGITAL ELECTRONICS LAB 6CR Students apply previously studied theory and circuits in the planning, development and prototyping of a digital system. The digital system developed will have a direct application to an identified branch of the electronics industry. Prerequisites: ELEC 211,& ELEC 237 or instructor permission.

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Course Descriptions ELEC 233 IPC-A-610 CERTIFICATION PROGRAM 5CR Attain this coveted industry based Electronics certification. This training and certification has immediate recognition, legitimacy and value throughout the electronics industry. This certification will demonstrate your commitment to customer requirements and greatly assist any company dedicated to ISO-9000 or other quality assurance initiatives. ELEC 234

IPC/WHMA-A-620 CERTIFICATION PROGRAM 5CR Attain this internationally recognized industry based Electronics certification that has immediate recognition, legitimacy and value throughout the electronics industry. This certification includes many aspects of cable and harness fabrication. Candidates must meet IPC requirements to attain certification. Students are required to pass the IPC/ WHMA-A-620 certification to receive a passing grade. Prerequisite: ELEC 126 or instructor permission. ELEC 237

INTRODUCTION TO MICROCONTROLLERS 5CR Introduces the microcontroller and its applications. Students learn how to program, analyze, troubleshoot, interface, and design electronic systems based on micro-technology, including industrial, consumer, and microcomputer systems. Prerequisite: ELEC 232. PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARD LAYOUT & DESIGN 6CR Introduction to Printed Circuit Board Layout and Schematic capture. Students will modify and create libraries from part datasheets and use them to create schematics and layout PCB’s for various circuits. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission.

Course Descriptions

ELEC 239

ELEC 297

ELECTRONICS CAPSTONE DEGREE LEVEL 4CR Capstone course for 200 Level electronics classes and degrees. All students are required to complete a capstone project prior to graduation as a final check of competency. Exact details are negotiated between the instructor and student to best fit the students’ individual area of interest within the field. This course is to be taken the final quarter of a degree program. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. EMTB 110

BASIC EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN 10CR Designed to prepare the student to function effectively in the emergency environment, and properly care for sick and injured patients, within the guidelines and protocols of the state of Washington and local jurisdictions. ENGL 065 SPELLING IMPROVEMENT 1-2CR In this course students will work with an instructor to complete an independent self-study program designed to improve spelling proficiency. This course will help students sound out new words by applying basic phonic principles, provide practice in applying four basic spelling rules, and introduce techniques for memorizing words that are not spelled entirely by sound. Individual instruction and testing will be given on all the major rules and concepts in this course. Prerequisite: ASC Instructor permission.

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ENGL 067 VOCABULARY DEVELOPMENT 1-3CR In this course students will work with an instructor to complete an independent self-study program designed to increase their vocabulary. This course will help students learn new words through the application of basic learning principles, context cues, association, and inference. Vocabulary Development carefully leads the student from easier to harder words, exercises and quizzes. Individual instruction and testing will be provided throughout the course. Prerequisite: ASC Instructor permission. ENGL 092 READING IMPROVEMENT 5CR This course presents reading strategies and techniques to improve understanding of written materials. Instruction is provided in reading rate and comprehension, vocabulary development, and paragraph writing. The skills developed in these courses are prerequisite to English 100. Prerequisite: ABED 046 or appropriate placement test scores or instructor permission. ENGL 093 BEGINNING ENGLISH 5CR Instruction in basic sentence grammar and the essentials of writing sentences and paragraphs; an introduction to essays. Review of study skills necessary for college success also provided. Prerequisite: ABED 046 with a 2.0 or better or equivalent placement test score. ENGL 093A WRITING IMPROVEMENT 5CR This course presents basic sentence grammar, the essentials of writing sentences and paragraphs, and an introduction to essays. 093A is intended for native speakers of English. 093B is intended for non-native English Speakers. The skills developed in these courses are prerequisite to English 100. Prerequisite: ABED 046 or equivalent placement test score or instructor permission. ENGL 093B WRITING IMPROVEMENT 5CR This course presents basic sentence grammar, the essentials of writing sentences and paragraphs, and an introduction to essays. 093A is intended for native speakers of English. 093B is intended for non-native English speakers. The skills developed in these courses are prerequisite to English 100. Prerequisite: ABED 046 or equivalent placement test score or instructor permission. ENGL 095 LANGUAGE MECHANICS 1CR Covers language mechanics, including capitalization, grammar and usage, punctuation, and spelling. Prerequisite: Appropriate placement test scores. ENGL 096 THE GRAMMAR OF WRITING 1CR Covers more advanced grammar and writing skills, including a review of language mechanics, plus proper language usage, sentence structure, and an introduction to clear writing and paragraphs. Prerequisite: ENGL 095 or equivalent placement test scores. ENGL 097 READING COMPREHENSION 1CR Covers reading skills, including vocabulary building, word knowledge, and reading comprehension. Prerequisite: ENGL 095, ENGL 096, or equivalent placement test scores.

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Course Descriptions ENGL 098 TEXTBOOK READING 2CR This course is designed for students who want to improve their ability to follow directions and understand the materials they read for both technical and academic work at a college level. Students currently taking English 100 or 101 will find additional support for their reading improvement in this course. Prerequisites: ENGL 092, and ENGL 093A or 093B; or equivalent placement test score. ENGL 100 INTRO TO ESSAY WRITING 5CR This course presents grammar and paragraph review and instruction in writing thesis-driven essays. Students will write a minimum of 3500 words of finished composition during the quarter. Prerequisites: ENGL 092 or equivalent placement test score, and ENGL 093A or 093B or equivalent placement test score. ENGL 108 TECHNICAL EDITING 5CR Editorial skills needing for revising scientific/technical writing and visual content by checking grammar, sentence structure, clarity and style (for writing) and layout, structure and design (for visual content). Prerequisite: ENGL 100. ENGL 195 CAPSTONE PROJECT IN ENGLISH 2CR The project should demonstrate ideas and techniques learned in previous courses of the technical communication certificate; an accompanying portfolio should include all important projects and be presented orally and electronically. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

ENGL& 101 ENGLISH COMPOSITION I 5CR Advanced expository writing, reading and evaluating essays, and critical thinking are covered in this course that fulfills the written communication requirement for an AAS degree. Students will write a minimum of 5000 words of finished composition during the quarter. Four 750+ word essays required. Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or equivalent placement score. ENGL& 102 ENGLISH COMPOSITION II 5CR Students learn to write fully documented research papers using critical thinking and reading skills. The class will emphasize logical argumentation from evidence and research skills necessary to collect relevant information. Students will write a minimum of 5000 words of finished composition during the quarter. Prerequisite: ENGL& 101. ENGL& 235 TECHNICAL WRITING 5CR Students will learn to design, format, and produce documents common in business and industry. Emphasis will be placed on efficiently developing accurate, clear, concise, and visually accessible technical communication. Research techniques for technical writing will be introduced. Includes layout and design, citation, and the use of statistics, charts, and graphs. Prerequisite: ENGL& 101.

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ENGR 111 ENGINEERING GRAPHICS I 4CR Fundamentals of engineering graphics including: introduction to equipment, terminology, media, line conventions, technical lettering, scaling, sketching, geometric construction, and basic orthographic projection. Emphasis is placed on ANSI/ASME, DOD, and ISO standards. Prerequisite: ENGT 101. ENGR 113 DIMENSIONING & TOLERANCING 4CR Dimensioning and Tolerancing concepts and procedures per ANSI/ASME, DOD, and ISO standards including: size, location, features, limits and fits. Prerequisite: MATH 080. ENGR 115 ENGINEERING GRAPHICS II 4CR Fundamentals of engineering graphics including: orthographic projection, layout techniques, view selection and applied dimensioning and tolerancing. Emphasis is placed on ANSI/ ASME, DOD and ISO standards. Prerequisite: ENGR 113. ENGR 121 GRAPHIC PROBLEM SOLVING 4CR Principles and techniques of descriptive geometry, including the use of direct projections and revolutions to resolve spatial relationship problems. Apply concepts such as true length, true shape and point location. Includes primary and secondary auxiliary views. Prerequisite: ENGR 115. ENGR 122 ENGINEERING GRAPHICS III 4CR Fundamentals of engineering graphics including: section views, intersections, developments, and isometric drawing. Emphasis is placed on ASME, DOD and ISO standards. Prerequisite: ENGR 121. ENGR 123

APPLIED DIMENSIONING & TOLERANCING 4CR Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing per ANSI/ASME, DOD and ISO standards. Dimensioning, tolerancing and related practices used on engineering drawings with emphasis placed on applied design, production standards and interchangeability. Prerequisite: ENGR 113 or instructor permission. ENGT 101

ENGINEERING GRAPHICS ORIENTATION 1CR Overview and survey of a cross-section of engineering fields. Includes an introduction to all phases of engineering graphics technology; role of the technician in industry; and career survey. ENGT 102

TECHNICAL EMPLOYMENT PREPARATION 1CR An introductory course in employment preparation for the engineering graphics technology industry. Job search techniques including: resume writing, cover letters, job applications, interviewing techniques, industry visits and portfolio preparation. Prerequisites: ENGT 101, ENGT 105, ENGR 112.

Course Descriptions

ENGL 335 TECHNICAL WRITING FOR DESIGNERS 5CR Students will learn to convey written technical information in appropriate formats for various audiences. They will learn how to gather information, document sources, edit and format writing, and collaborate in order to produce effective technical communications. An emphasis will be placed on refining research skills. Prerequisite: Admission to BTAD program or instructor permission.

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ENGT 105

ENGINEERING COMPUTER APPLICATIONS 2CR An introduction to the use of personal computers and file management specific to the engineering environment. Course will include hands-on experience with Windows, Word, Excel, Power Point, plus various basic programs as they relate to graphic programs.

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Course Descriptions ENGT 108 INTRODUCTION TO DRAFTING 4CR Fundamentals of drafting including: sketching techniques, orthographic projection, layout techniques and dimensioning. This is a basic course for non engineering graphics majors. ENGT 131 AUTOCAD I 4CR An introductory course in Computer Aided Drafting and Design using state of the art software. Emphasis is placed on using the basic commands such as coordinate system, editing, screen, text, and dimensioning commands.

Course Descriptions

ENGT 132 AUTOCAD II 4CR An advanced course in Computer Aided Drafting and Design. This is a 2D class that has its focus on architectural, civil, and mechanical scaling for engineering drawings. Prerequisite: ENGT 131 or instructor permission.

ENGT 214 INDUSTRIAL GRAPHICS II 4CR Application of advanced engineering graphics skills to create assembly drawings of metal, sheet metal and plastic parts from engineering sketches with emphasis of ASME, DOD, and ISO standards. Includes research, use of various reference material and vendor resources. Prerequisites: ENGT 211, ENGT 132, or instructor permission.

ENGT 133 AUTOCAD III 4CR An advanced course in Computer Aided Drafting and Design that introduces the student to 3D surfacing and modeling. The students will also learn how to create 2D dimensional drawings from 3D modeling.

ENGT 222 CATIA V5 FOR ENGINEERING I 4CR Introduction to 3D modeling and parametric design using CATIA Version 5 software. Application of advanced engineering graphics skills to create basic parts and assemblies in both solids and wireframe. Prerequisite: ENGT 133 or instructor permission.

ENGT 141 APPLIED MATERIALS TECHNOLOGY 4CR Relationships between properties, structure and processes of engineering materials. Discussion of surfaces, finishes and manufacturing processes. Various engineering materials are included with an emphasis on metals. Prerequisite: ENGT 101, ENGR 115, or instructor permission.

ENGT 223 CATIA V5 FOR ENGINEERING II 4CR Advanced 3D modeling and parametric design using CATIA software. Application of advanced engineering graphics skills to create complex parts and assemblies in both solids and wireframe. Prerequisite: ENGT 133 or ENGT 222 or instructor permission.

ENGT 151 APPLIED MACHINE METAL PROCESSES 4CR Introduction to machining processes and technology. Identification of metals, use and care of hand tools, thread forms, work location and holding devices. Practical application of measuring, drilling, grinding, sawing, and milling with an introduction to CNC milling and turning processes. Prerequisite: ENGT 141 or instructor permission.

ENGT 224 CATIA V5 FOR ENGINEERING III 4CR Advanced 3D modeling and parametric design using CATIA software. Application of advanced engineering graphics skills to create complex parts and assemblies in both solids and wireframe. Continuation of ENGT 223. Prerequisite: ENGT 133 or ENGT 223 or instructor permission.

ENGT 202

SPECIALIZED TECHNICAL EMPLOYMENT PREPARATION 2CR An advanced course in specialized employment preparation for the technology industry. Course covers job search techniques including resume writing, cover letters, job applications, interviewing techniques and portfolio preparation. Use of joblines and developing networks is included. Prerequisite: ENGT 102. ENGT 211 INDUSTRIAL GRAPHICS I 4CR Application of advanced engineering skills to create complex detail drawings of machined and cast metal parts from engineering sketches with emphasis on ASME, DOD and ISO standards. Includes research and use of various reference materials and vendor resources and media selection. Prerequisites: ENGT 122, ENGT 131 or instructor permission. ENGT 212 INDUSTRIAL GRAPHICS – SHEETMETAL 4CR Application of advanced engineering graphics skills to create complex detail drawings of sheet metal parts including flat patterns, from engineering sketches with emphasis on ASME, DOD and ISO standards. Includes research and use of various reference material and vendor resources. Prerequisites: ENGT 211, ENGT 132 or instructor permission.

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ENGT 213 INDUSTRIAL GRAPHICS – PLASTICS 4CR Application of advanced engineering graphics skills to create detail drawings of formed and molded plastic parts from engineering sketches with emphasis on ASME, DOD and ISO standards. Includes research and use of various reference material and vendor resources. Prerequisites: ENGT 132, ENGT 211 or instructor permission.

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ENGT 225 SOLIDWORKS FOR ENGINEERING I 4CR An advanced course in engineering graphics using feature based, parametric, state of the art software. Students will learn and apply parametric solid modeling techniques to create machined and cast metal, sheetmetal and plastic parts working from engineering sketches and/or prototypes. Prerequisite: ENGT 131 or instructor’s permission. ENGT 226 SOLIDWORKS FOR ENGINEERING II 4CR An advanced course in engineering graphics using feature based 3D parametric, state of the art software. Students will learn and apply parametric solid modeling techniques to create machined, cast metal, sheetmetal and plastic parts and mated assemblies working from engineering sketches and/or prototypes. Prerequisite: ENGT 225 or instructor permission. ENGT 227 3D PARAMETRIC SOLID DESIGN III 4CR An advanced course in engineering graphics using feature-based 3D parametic, state-of-the-art software. Students will learn and apply parametric solid modeling techniques to create machined, cast metal, sheet metal and plastic parts and mated assemblies working from engineering sketches and or prototypes. Students will apply these skills to create top-down, bottom-up assemblies and multiple part configurations. This course uses SolidWorks. Prerequisite: ENGT 226 or instructor permission.

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Course Descriptions ENGT 231 TECHNICAL ILLUSTRATION I 4CR Introduction to pictorial drawing with emphasis on isometric drawing including oblique and inclined surfaces. Isometric sketching. Prerequisite: ENGR 122 or instructor permission. ENGT 232 TECHNICAL ILLUSTRATION II 4CR Axonometric projections including: isometric, diametric and trimetric, oblique projection and perspectives. Lettering and rendering techniques with an emphasis on a variety of media and software. Prerequisite: ENGT 231. ENGT 233 PRESENTATION GRAPHICS I 4CR This course is an introduction to methods for creating professional-quality technical presentations, utilizing various manual and software-assisted techniques. Emphasis will be placed on creating customer-focused, audience-centered, presentations. Prerequisite: ENGT 225 or instructor permission. ENGT 234 PRESENTATION GRAPHICS II 4CR Advanced technical illustration techniques. Axonometric and perspective exploded assembly drawing. Advanced rendering and shading techniques with an emphasis on a variety of media and software. Creation of documents that combine text, graphics and images. Prerequisite: ENGT 233. ENGT 251 INDUSTRIAL DESIGN GRAPHICS 4CR This advanced class has an emphasis on different media, software and techniques used to create innovative solutions for two and three-dimensional design problems. Fundamental product design principles and the human interface are explored. Focus is on team approach to design. Prerequisites: ENGT 214 and ENGT 225 or instructor permission.

ENGT 255 TOOL DESIGN GRAPHICS I 4CR Introduction to tooling design graphics: types and functions of jigs and fixtures, supporting and locating principles. Focus on team approach to design. Prerequisites: ENGT 214, ENGT 131 or instructor permission. ENGT 256 TOOL DESIGN GRAPHICS II 4CR Advanced concepts involved in tool design graphics. Continuation of Tool Design Graphics I. Focus is on individual approach to design. Prerequisite: ENGT 255. ENGT 257 TOOL DESIGN GRAPHICS III 4CR Advanced concepts involved in tool design graphics. Continuation of Tool Design Graphics II. Focus is on individual approach to design. Prerequisite: ENGT 256. ENGT 261 ENGINEERING SCHEMATICS 4CR Introduction to analog and digital schematics graphics using manual sketching. Development of schematics and extraction of netlists, partlists, develop symbols and preparation of data base for printed circuit graphic design using a variety of media and software. Prerequisite: ENGT 211 or instructor permission.

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ENGT 271

ENGINEERING GRAPHICS PROBLEMS & ANALYSIS I 4CR Capstone Project: Integrating and applying skills of previous courses. Engineering graphics problem solving to create innovative solutions for two and three dimensional design problems. Focus is on new product design. Prerequisites: ENGT 214, ENGT 225. ENGT 272

ENGINEERING GRAPHICS PROBLEMS & ANALYSIS II 4CR Engineering graphics problem solving, with an emphasis on various media, software and techniques to create innovative solutions to two and three dimensional design problems. Fundamental design of machine, molded and cast parts with a focus on a team approach. Prerequisite: ENGT 271. ENGT 281 LAND DEVELOPMENT DESKTOP I 4CR Introduction to Land Development Desktop. Students learn coordinate geometry, digital terrain modeling and design methods using profiles, cross sections and templates. Prerequisites: ENGT 132 and ENGT 133 or instructor permission. ENGT 282 LAND DEVELOPMENT DESKTOP II 4CR Advanced Land Development Desktop. Students learn advanced design techniques using terrain model, 3Dgrading, grading object, survey coordinate systems and hydrology. Continuation of ENGT 281. Prerequisite: ENGT 281. ENGT 291 PRACTICAL DESIGN ANALYSIS 4CR Design and construction of maps including manual and computer mapping techniques, including major elements, concepts, and methods of cartography. Prerequisites: ENGR 111 and ENGT 131, or instructor permission. EPCB 211 PRINT CIRCUIT BOARD DESIGN I 4CR General overview of the basic skills necessary to design a printed circuit board. Emphasis is placed on building CAD library parts and teamwork. Prerequisites: ENGT 131 and ELEC 120 or instructor permission. ETEC 110 INTRO TO ALTERNATIVE ENERGY 5CR The fundamentals of energy and energy conservation are key to providing alternative energy sources for the home or businesses. In this class, students will gain a fundamental understanding of energy, the energy grid, how electrical energy is measured, and where/how it is being consumed. Prerequisites: MATH 090 and ABED 046 or equivalent placement scores or instructor permission.

Course Descriptions

ENGT 253 MACHINE DESIGN GRAPHICS 4CR Introduction to machine design graphics with emphasis on techniques necessary to graphically solve linkage, cam, belt drive, chain drive, and gearing problems. Includes fundamental kinematics. Prerequisites: ENGT 214 and ENGT 225 or instructor permission.

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ETEC 120 FUNDAMENTALS OF WATER POWER 3CR Water power is one of several viable energy sources that will reduce carbon emissions in the coming century of global energy transitioning. Students will gain the skills necessary to analyze a site and determine if requisite conditions have been met to support a viable water power generation system. Prerequisite: ETEC 110 or instructor permission. ETEC 121 BIOMASS AND BIOFUEL BASICS 5CR Students learn the various processes for the creation and use of biomass as a fuel/energy source and the creation and use of biofuels. Topics include combustion, gasification, pyrolysis, anaerobic digestion, as well as the production of biofuels (ethanol, biodiesel, and methanol). Includes laboratory. Prerequisite: ETEC 110 or instructor permission. T E C H N I C A L

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Course Descriptions ETEC 122 INTRO TO WIND POWER SYSTEMS 2CR Wind power is one of several viable energy sources that will reduce carbon emissions in the coming century of global energy transitioning. Students will gain the skills necessary to analyze a site and determine if requisite conditions have been met to support a viable wind power generation system. Prerequisite: ETEC 110 or instructor permission. ETEC 123

INTRODUCTION TO PHOTOVOLTAIC SYSTEMS 2CR Direct conversion solar (Photovoltaic) is one of several viable alternative energy sources. In this course, students will gain the skills necessary to analyze a site and determine if requisite conditions have been met to support a viable Photovoltaic power generation system. Prerequisite: ETEC 110 or instructor permission. FSE 101

INTRODUCTION & HISTORY OF FUNERAL SERVICE 3CR This course is a survey of the history of funeral service. Emphasis is placed on individuals and events which influenced contemporary funeral principles and practices. Prerequisite: ENGL 093.

Course Descriptions

FSE 130 FUNERAL SERVICES SOCIOLOGY 3CR This course is a survey of the basic principles of sociology as they relate to funeral service. Especially stressed are family structures, social structures, and the factors of change that relate to funeralization. Prerequisite: ENGL 093.

FSE 255 EMBALMING CHEMISTRY 3CR This is a survey of the basic principles of chemistry as they relate to funeral service. The chemical principles and precautions involved in sanitation, disinfection, public health, and embalming practice will be stressed. Prerequisites: BIOL& 231, CHEM&121. FSE 256 FUNERAL SERVICE OPTIONS 3CR This course examines services which are alternative to traditional funeral services and final disposition. Specific areas include, but are not limited to cremation, green burial, and anatomical donation. Prerequisites: FSE 130, FSE 140, FSE 141, FSE 148. FSE 258 INTRODUCTION TO RESTORATIVE ART 3CR This course is a survey of the basic principles of restorative art as they relate to funeral service. Especially stressed are the techniques and importance of creating an acceptable physical appearance of the deceased for the benefit of the surviving family members. Prerequisites: BIOL& 231, FSE 140, FSE 141, FSE 145.

FSE 140 FUNERAL DIRECTING 4CR This course covers general funeral service practice, such as notification of death, transfer of remains, and conduct of the arrangement conference. Prerequisites: FSE 101, BUSA 180.

FSE 261 EMBALMING II 4CR This course covers the process of chemically treating the dead human body to reduce the presence and growth of microorganisms, to temporarily inhibit organic decomposition, and to restore an acceptable physical appearance. Prerequisites: FSE 251, FSE 255.

FSE 141 FUNERAL SERVICE ETHICS 3CR This course strives to develop within the funeral service student a sense of morality, which will guide his/her decisions and actions in proper treatment of the deceased and professional service to the bereaved. Prerequisite: FSE 101.

FSE 262 FUNERAL SERVICE MICROBIOLOGY 3CR This course covers the basic principles of microbiology as they relate to the funeral profession, especially as they pertain to sanitation, disinfection, public health, and embalming practice. Prerequisites: BIOL& 231, CHEM&121, FSE 251.

FSE 145 FUNERAL SERVICE PSYCHOLOGY 3CR This course is a survey of the basic principles of psychology and counseling as they relate to funeral service. The areas of grief, bereavement, mourning, aftercare, and crisis intervention with particular emphasis on the roles of the funeral director are stressed. Prerequisites: FSE 101, FSE 130.

FSE 264 FUNERAL HOME MGT 4CR This course is designed to introduce the basics of merchandising products and services as they apply to the funeral profession. Prerequisites: FSE 101, FSE 130, BUSA 180, FSE 140.

FSE 148

FUNERAL SERVICE LAW & COMPLIANCE 3CR This course is designed to familiarize the student with state and federal laws which govern funeral service, including the Federal Trade Commission Funeral Rule. Prerequisite: BUS&201. FSE 250 FUNERAL SERVICE MANAGEMENT 4CR This course examines the daily operations management of a funeral home. Each area of the business is addressed, including human capital management, vendor relations, and finance. Prerequisites: ACCT 111, BUS&201, BAS 101, FSE 101, FSE 130, BUSA 180.

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FSE 251 EMBALMING I 4CR This course includes the study of the phenomenon of death in the human body, government regulations applicable to the embalming process, and embalming analysis, reports, and instrumentation. Prerequisite: BIOL& 231, CHEM& 121.

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FSE 268 RESTORATIVE ART 3CR This course builds upon the knowledge gained in FSE 258 and addresses the basic principles of restorative art as they pertain to funeral service. Students will learn how to properly apply cosmetics and perform basic hair styling to create an acceptable physical appearance of the deceased. Prerequisites: FSE 251, FSE 258. FSE 271 EMBALMING III 3CR This class is a continuation of FSE 251 and FSE 261. The subject includes the study of the phenomenon of death in the human body, government regulations applicable to the embalming process, embalming analysis and reports, and instrumentation. Prerequisite: FSE 261.

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Course Descriptions FSE 274 FUNERAL SERVICE PATHOLOGY 3CR This course covers pathological disease conditions and how they affect various parts of the body. Particular emphasis is given to those conditions which relate to or affect the embalming or restorative art processes. Prerequisites: BIOL&231, CHEM&121, FSE 261, FSE 262. FSE 275 FUNERAL SERVICE ISSUES 3CR This course reviews all 13 subjects that will be tested on the National Board Examination (NBE). The NBE is the nationallyrecognized standard for FSE graduates, and taking the NBE is one requirement of graduation from the FSE program at Lake Washington Technical College. This course is taken during the student’s last quarter. Prerequisites: Instructor permission. FSE 296 FUNERAL SERVICE INTERNSHIP 6CR Preparation for a funeral service career is facilitated with on-site observation and participation. Instruction in equipment use, procedures, and functions in the daily operation of a funeral home occurs in affiliated clinical sites as well as in lecture. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. FTNS 112 PRINCIPLES OF SPORT & EXERCISE 3CR This course is an introduction to the discipline of exercise science. The class will examine all aspects associated with the personal training and exercise industry, and is an introduction to the fitness specialist program.

FTNS 128

INTRODUCTION TO ATHLETIC TRAINING 3CR This is an introductory course for the personal trainer dealing with the recognition, prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation of injuries related to sports and fitness. Topics include risk management, injury prevention, basic sports/exercise trauma, and management of emergency procedures. Prerequisite: FTNS 121. FTNS 137

PROFESSIONAL SKILLS IN THE FITNESS INDUSTRY 5CR This course examines the skills and behaviors necessary for success in the fitness industry. Topics include work habits, ethics, teamwork, communication, diversity, customer service, sales, and job preparation. FTNS 142 CERTIFICATION REVIEW LAB 2CR This course offers preparation for certifications offered by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), the American Council on Exercise (ACE), and the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. FTNS 144

NUTRITION FOR SPORTS PERFORMANCE This course examines nutrition in relation to athletic performance. Prerequisite: NUTR 101.

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FTNS 152 EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY 5CR This course focuses on alterations in body systems and organs during physical activity with an emphasis on energy producing systems. Students examine adaptations to the cardiorespiratory and muscular systems during exercise. Prerequisites: FTNS 112, FTNS 121, BIOL 111.

FTNS 120 RESPONDING TO EMERGENCIES 3CR The course provides fitness specialists with basic first aid, CPR skills, as well as knowledge to care for athletic injuries. All students will receive American Red Cross certifications upon successful completion.

FTNS 153 CLINICAL FITNESS ASSESSMENT 4CR This course introduces students to clinical fitness testing. Students conduct a systematic assessment to obtain objective and subjective client information. Prerequisite: FTNS 152.

FTNS 124

FUNCTIONAL ASSESSMENT & CORRECTIVE EXERCISE 4CR Students are introduced to techniques used to improve stabilization, endurance, and functional strength. In addition, students will design integrated programs to improve overall work capacity, enhance joint stabilization, and increase lean body mass. Prerequisites: FTNS 112 and FTNS 121. FTNS 126 SPORT & EXERCISE PSYCHOLOGY 3CR This course examines psychological theories and research related to sport and exercise behavior. Prerequisite: FTNS 112.

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FTNS 154

EXERCISE PRESCRIPTION FOR SPECIAL POPULATIONS 5CR Students are introduced to conditions, dysfunctions, and diseases common in special populations, such as arthritis, diabetes, obesity, and hypertension. Also covered are the effects of these conditions on clientele and training variables and how to alter program design for clients with these various conditions. Prerequisite: FTNS 153.

Course Descriptions

FTNS 118 HEALTH PROMOTION & WELLNESS 5CR This course addresses strategies for improving the state of wellness through healthier lifestyles. Topics include: behavioral intervention, lifestyle changes, maintaining a healthy lifestyle, stress management, health-related fitness, and the implication for a fitness program design.

FTNS 121 KINESIOLOGY 5CR This course covers the structure and function of the skeletal and muscular systems of the human body, including the origins, insertions, and actions of the muscles, and an understanding of the mechanical qualities of movement.

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FTNS 170 GROUP EXERCISE INSTRUCTION 4CR This class will provide the student with the fundamental knowledge and instructional techniques to lead group fitness classes. Components that make up an organized and safe class, such as proper technique, music cueing, and choreography are covered. Studio time for practical skill acquisition is included. FTNS 191 FITNESS INTERNSHIP I 3CR This course prepares the student to be an employee in a health, fitness, or recreational facility. Students observe certified industry professionals at health, fitness, recreational, or therapeutic facilities and learn the daily operational duties associated with a fitness center. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

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Course Descriptions FTNS 210

FITNESS INTERNSHIP II – PERSONAL TRAINING 3CR This course provides an opportunity for students to gain the skills necessary to become a personal trainer through 44 hours of supervised personal training in the LWTC Fitness Center. Prerequisites: FTNS 191, CPR/First Aid Certification. FTNS 218

HUMAN PERFORMANCE I CARDIO & RESP SYSTEMS 4CR This course examines the adaptations of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems to aerobic and anaerobic training modalities. Acute and chronic adaptations as a result of sub-maximal, maximal, and resistance training programs will be explored in depth. Prerequisites: FTNS 112, BIOL 111. FTNS 219

HUMAN PERFORMANCE II STRENGTH TRAINING 4CR This course examines the scientific principles of resistance training and various resistance training techniques used to enhance muscular fitness. Strategies for designing and implementing resistance training programs are included. Prerequisite: FTNS 218.

Course Descriptions

FTNS 220 HUMAN PERFORMANCE III 4CR This course introduces students to the utilization of scientific exercise principles to determine appropriate strategies for developing complete athleticism. Training strategies for reactive, ballistic, and power training are explored. Speed, agility and quickness (SAQ) training is also included. Prerequisite: FTNS 219. FTNS 230 FITNESS EXTERNSHIP 2CR The Fitness Externship provides an opportunity for students to work in a health, fitness, recreational, or therapeutic facility of interest to the student. The focus of this course is on the student’s ability to integrate delivery of training with teamwork, and leadership. Prerequisite: FTNS 210. GEOG 251 CARTOGRAPHY 4CR Design and construction of maps including manual and computer mapping techniques, including major elements, concepts, and methods of cartography. Prerequisites: ENGR 111 and ENGT 131 or instructor permission. GISA 211 GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS 4CR An overview of all phases of GIS, the role of a GIS technician in industry; and career survey, an introduction to geographic software, data creation, management, manipulation, analysis and visualization. Prerequisite: ENGT 105. HMDS 101 INFORMATION LITERACY STRATEGIES 2CR Learn to find, evaluate, and use information through problemsolving and the research process. Learn to use information effectively and efficiently in daily life. Students will be working online. Students must have an LWTC student e-mail and must be familiar with common computer commands in Windows. Prerequisite: ABED 045 or ABED 046 or equivalent placement score or instructor permission.

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HMDS 111 COLLEGE STRATEGIES 2CR New and returning students will learn the skills necessary to succeed as a student in their technical and academic courses. Topics explored include college resources, online learning platform, time management, reading and note-taking, stress management, career choices and diversity. Prerequisite: ABED 046. HMDS 114 TUTOR TRAINING I 1CR First course in a three course sequence designed to develop students’ skills and abilities as effective tutors through experiential learning. This course will train students in collaborative learning, learning strategies, communication skills, and tutoring diverse populations. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. HMDS 115 MASTERING MATH 1CR Increase confidence and skills in the successful study of mathematics. Students will assess their anxiety, gather information about and evaluate their current coping styles, develop and apply study skills and alternative coping strategies. HMDS 121

LEADERSHIP IN STUDENT GOVERNMENT I 2CR Term one in a three term sequence designed to develop students’ professional leadership abilities through participation in student government, including Associated Student Government meetings and programs and other college committees; examines students’ Leadership styles. Prerequisite: Instructor permission or holding student leadership position on campus. HMDS 122

LEADERSHIP IN STUDENT GOVERNMENT II 2CR Term two in a three term sequence designed to develop students’ professional leadership abilities through participation in student government, including Associated Student Government meetings and programs and other college committees; examines communication, time management and teamwork. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. HMDS 123

LEADERSHIP IN STUDENT GOVERNMENT III 2CR Term three in a three term sequence designed to develop students’ professional leadership abilities through participation in student government, including Associated Student Government meetings and programs and other college committees; examines decision-making and meeting facilitation skills. Prerequisite: Instructor permission or holding student leadership position on campus. HMDS 124 TUTOR TRAINING II 1CR Course two in a three course sequence designed to enhance students’ skills and abilities as effective tutors through experiential learning and meeting the guidelines for Level II Tutor certification prescribed by the College Reading and Learning Association. Prerequisite: HMDS 114 or instructor permission.

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Course Descriptions HMDS 134 TUTOR TRAINING III 1CR Third course in a three course sequence designed to develop students’ skills and abilities as effective tutors through experiential learning and meeting the guidelines for Level III Tutor certification as prescribed by the College Reading and Learning Association. Prerequisite: HMDS 124.

HORT 123 PEST MANAGEMENT 4CR Focuses on understanding the biology of pests in order to help determine their control. Understanding the chemistry of pesticides will aid in determining their proper usage. We also focus on integrated pest management and plant health in the greenhouse, nursery, arboretum, and grounds.

HORT 111 BOTANY 5CR This course introduces how plants grow, how they are structured internally, and how their parts function. Emphasis is placed on the application of plant growth principles to our environment and plant diversity.

HORT 125 PLANT ID WINTER 4CR Plant ID Winter/HORT 125 consists of the identification of deciduous and evergreen trees, shrubs, vines and ground covers used in landscapes throughout the Pacific Northwest. Perennials are also covered. Key identification characteristics, culture, and landscape usage is emphasized.

HORT 112 TOOLS & EQUIPMENT 1CR Provides an overview of horticulture hand tools and equipment, focusing on identification and practical uses. Construction, care and safety are discussed. HORT 113 PROPAGATION 5CR Provides an introduction to sexual and asexual methods of reproducing plants. Students apply principles taught in class during laboratory. HORT 115 PLANT ID FALL 4CR Consists of the identification of deciduous and evergreen trees, shrubs, vines and ground covers used in landscapes throughout the Pacific Northwest. Perennials are also covered. Key identification characteristics, culture, and landscape usage is emphasized.

HORT 120

LANDSCAPE DESIGN USING A CAD PROGRAM 3CR This class provides in-depth study and hands-on experience essential to landscape design graphics using the DynaSCAPE design program. Students will gain exposure to CAD based estimating techniques, databases, and plant selection programs. Prerequisite: Working knowledge of landscape plant material, drafting and design fundamentals, and basic computer skills. HORT 121 SOILS 4CR Explores the physical and chemical properties of soil that affect a plant’s ability to survive, grow and thrive. Course surveys soil water and the roles of nutrients in maintaining healthy plant growth. Corequisite: HORT 127. HORT 122 PRUNING 2CR Includes the most current theories and techniques of proper pruning. Students learn how pruning a plant affects its growth processes, flowering, fruiting, rejuvenation, and aesthetics. The focus is on plants of western Washington. Corequisite: HORT 127.

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HORT 127 WINTER HORTICULTURE LAB 3CR WINTER HORTICULTURE LAB/HORT 127 provides hands-on application of principles and concepts taught in class. The focus is on practices commonly used in the horticulture industry in landscape management and greenhouse operations. Corequisites: HORT 121, HORT 122, HORT 123, HORT 125. HORT 131 LANDSCAPE DESIGN I 6CR Provides an overview of landscape design principles and design elements applied to practical situations. Students are provided with an introductory understanding of the role of good design as applied to residential and commercial landscapes and landscaping projects. HORT 132 LANDSCAPE MATERIALS 2CR Introduces students to the types and uses of hard goods in the creation of a successful landscape. Field trips will be a major component of this course as we meet professionals who use and create these hard goods. HORT 134 HORTICULTURE MARKETING 1CR Covers a wide range of business skills including costing and quality control. Topics include creating quality products, researching and finding niche markets, and producing a major retail event. HORT 135 PLANT ID SPRING 4CR Consists of the identification of deciduous and evergreen trees, shrubs, vines and ground covers used in landscapes throughout the Pacific Northwest. Perennials are also covered. Key identification characteristics, culture, and landscape usage is emphasized.

Course Descriptions

HORT 116 FALL HORTICULTURE LAB 3CR Provides hands-on application of principles and concepts taught in class. The focus is on practices commonly used in the horticulture industry in landscape management and greenhouse operations.

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HORT 137 SPRING HORTICULTURE LAB 4CR SPRING HORTICULTURE LAB/HORT 137 provides hands-on application of principles and concepts taught in class. The focus is on practices commonly used in the horticulture industry in landscape management and greenhouse operations. Corequisites: HORT 131, HORT 132, HORT 134, HORT 135. HORT 138 TOPICS IN ARBORICULTURE 3CR Students will gain an understanding of topics and issues essential to working with trees in urban landscapes. Some topics covered include tree biology, nutrition, pruning, plant health care, and soils. The ISA Arborists Certification Study Guide will be the text. This class would be helpful for anyone taking the ISA exams. ISA continuing education credits available, CPH credit available.

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Course Descriptions HORT 211 LANDSCAPE DESIGN II 1CR A continued overview of landscape design principles and design elements to practical situations. Students will have gained an understanding of the role of good design as applied to residential and commercial projects upon completion of the course.

IFAD 156 8-HOUR FIRST AID/CPR 0.5CR Designed for people in office settings (e.g. banking, retail sales and computer operators) within 4-6 minutes of emergency health services. First Aid and CPR certification valid for two years. Text Required, review prior to start. Course covers basic first aid and CPR instruction.

HORT 212 TURFGRASS MANAGEMENT 3CR Covers the identification, care, and maintenance of cool season turfgrasses. Topics include soil preparation, nutrition, thatch, pest management, installation, and renovation. Special attention is given to weeds.

IFAD 158

HORT 215 PLANT ID SUMMER 4CR Consists of the identification of deciduous and evergreen trees, shrubs, vines and ground covers used in landscapes throughout the Pacific Northwest. Perennials are also covered. Key identification characteristics, culture, and landscape usage is emphasized. HORT 216 GREENHOUSE OPERATIONS 3CR Surveys the construction choices available in greenhouses. Efficient use of environmental controls and cropping will be discussed. Students gain plant growing experience throughout the year.

Course Descriptions

HORT 217 SUMMER HORTICULTURE LAB 3CR Provides hands-on application of principles and concepts taught in class. The summer work experience will be included in this class. Corequisites: HORT 211, HORT 212, HORT 225, HORT 215, HORT 216. HORT 225 CAREER EXPLORATION 3CR Provides an introduction to the breadth of employment opportunities in the horticulture industry and the job search skills needed to successfully secure employment. HUM 311 DESIGN THEORY 5CR This course provides a survey of the field of design from historical, cultural, and multi-disciplinary perspectives. The shifting definition of design and its influence on and by society provides a unifying theme. Prerequisite: Admission to BTAD program or instructor permission. Prior completion of APDZ 311, Intro to Applied Design, is recommended. HUM 312 INDUSTRIAL DESIGN THEORY 5CR This course provides a survey of the field of industrial design from historical, cultural, and multi-disciplinary perspectives. Students will explore theories underlying industrial design, assess products for usability, and examine the design process--including iteration, process documentation, project definition, scheduling, and team member roles. Prerequisite: Admission to BTAD program or instructor permission. APDZ 311 is recommended. IFAD 151 18-HOUR FIRST AID/CPR (HIGH-RISK) 1CR Course covers the standard first aid and CPR skills a person needs to know as a first link in the emergency medical services chain. The focus of the course is to prepare participants to respond correctly in emergency situations.

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CPR FOR THE HEALTHCARE PROVIDER 0.5CR CPR certification meets AHA guidelines for healthcare providers. Course specifically designed for individuals in the medical or dental fields, and students in the college pre-professional programs. Text required, review prior to start of course. IFAD 161

12-HOUR FIRST AID/CPR/ DAYCARE & FOSTER CARE 1CR Meets Washington State Department of Social and Health Services requirements for day or foster care licensing; also recommended for adults who participate in activities involving children. Program includes accident safety and prevention, infant and child care, obstructed airway management and first aid. First aid certification valid for two years; CPR certification valid for two years. Review text prior to the start of class. IFAD 162

FIRST AID/CPR FOR HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS 1CR Includes adult, child and infant skills in airway management and CPR; Bag Valve Mask Resuscitation practical exercises, AED awareness and familiarization, and first aid. First aid certification valid for two years; CPR certification meets AHA guidelines for healthcare providers; recommended renewal is one year. Course is designed for students in allied health programs. Review text prior to the start of class. MACH 108

FUNDAMENTALS OF MACHINING FOR ENGINEERING 4CR Students will learn theoretical and practical knowledge of shop safety, machine tools, tool geometry, blueprints, speed and feeds, precision measuring, and basic shop math. This course is designed for engineering graphics majors. Prerequisites: MATH 80 and ABED 46 or equivalent placement scores or instructor permission. MACH 110 FUNDAMENTALS OF MACHINING 8CR Students will learn theoretical and practical knowledge of shop safety, machine tools, tool geometry, blueprints, speed and feeds, precision measuring, and basic shop math. Prerequisite: MATH 080 and ABED 046 or equivalent placement scores or instructor permission. MACH 112

MACHINING PRACTICE C-CLAMP & PAPER PUNCH 8CR While making a C-Clamp and a Paper Punch students learn tooling processes common to the machine trades, including grinding, turning, milling and drilling. Prerequisites: MATH 080 and ABED 046 or equivalent placement scores and MACH 110 or instructor permission.

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Course Descriptions MACH 120 MATERIALS – MEASURING & CNC 8CR An intermediate-level overview of precision measurement including the use of height gauges, bore gauges, comparators, and surface table gauging, inspection techniques and shop math. Materials study includes identification of different kinds and types of metals, along with their physical and chemical properties. Prerequisite: MACH 110 or instructor permission. MACH 122

MACH PRACTICE TOOLS – TAP HANDLE, CLAMP & PUNCH 8CR While making a tap handle, parallel clamp and center punch, students learn more advanced tooling processes common to the machine trades. Prerequisite: MACH 110 or instructor permission. MACH 124 CNC & MASTERCAM 8CR This course covers basic G-code programming, introduction to MasterCam, CNC machine operations, Coordinate systems, and PC to CNC communication, as well as shop math. Prerequisite: Mach 110 or instructor permission. MACH 130 BLUEPRINTS,TRIGONOMETRY & CNC 8CR This course covers instruction and practice using sketches and prints. Working drawing interpretations applied to manufacturing processes will be introduced. The student will also be introduced to geometric tolerancing and dimensioning. Prerequisite: MACH 124 or instructor permission. MACH 132

MACH 134

CNC MANUAL PRACTICE, PROGRAMMING 8CR This course covers more advanced G-code programming, continued work with MasterCam and CNC machine operations, Coordinate systems, and PC to machine communication. The student will also work with more advanced manual machining processes, and will combine manual and CNC skills. Prerequisite: MACH 124 or instructor permission. MACH 210 PRACTICAL CNC APPLICATIONS I 3CR Students will take the CNC and MasterCam skills they have learned and start adding to their understanding of computerized machines by combining many of the individual skills they have learned to create more advanced projects as well as writing and editing of G and M code. Prerequisites: MATH 90 and ABED 46 or equivalent placement scores or instructor permission or previous MasterCam/CNC experience or MACH 124.

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MACH 215

PRACTICAL MASTERCAM APPLICATIONS I 3CR This course is aimed at students who have a basic understanding of MasterCam and are ready to start creating more complex geometry. We will focus on working in multiple axes on multiple surfaces, and create tool paths on surfaces and wire frames. Prerequisites: MATH 90 and ABED 46 or equivalent placement scores or instructor permission or previous MasterCam/CNC experience or MACH 124. MACH 220 PRACTICAL CNC APPLICATIONS II 3CR Students will take the CNC skills they have learned and acquire some of the finer details as well as develop speed. They will add to their understanding of CNC’s by combining skills they have learned to create more advanced projects, as well as continue to write and editing of G and M code. MACH 222 CAPSTONE PROJECT – MACHINING 11CR This capstone project lets students prove job readiness by giving them a set of drawings and materials needed to build a working assembly. Prerequisites: MATH 080, ENG 093 or higher or equivalent placement scores or instructor’s permission and Machining Level 5 MACH 212. Corequisite: Concurrent 5 credits of Machine Theory. MAST 105

FUNDAMENTALS OF MASSAGE THERAPY 6CR This course introduces the student to the history, theory, and practice of Swedish massage. It also addresses professional ethics and communication. Corequisites: MAST 115, 125. MAST 115

FUNDAMENTALS OF MASSAGE THERAPY II 6CR This course introduces the students to muscles, bones, tendons, ligaments and how they interact to create movement at the joints. Corequisites: MAST 105, MAST 125. MAST 125

FUNDAMENTALS OF MASSAGE THERAPY III 6CR This course introduces students to the basic functions and structures of the body and the effects of massage on each of these systems. Corequisites: MAST 105, MAST 115. MAST 135

HYDROTHERAPY & INJURY MANAGEMENT 5CR This course teaches self-care techniques, correct body mechanics and the physiology of healing as they relate to treating sprains, strains and repetitive stress injuries. This includes instruction in specific hydrotherapy techniques. Prerequisites: MAST 105, MAST 115, MAST 125. Corequisites: MAST 145, MAST 155.

Course Descriptions

MACH PRACT-THREADING PROJECT, PRECISION GRINDING 8CR While making threading project students learn to calculate thread measurements, grind threading tool, set up and cut threads of various pitches. While making precision triangles, students will learn heat treating and learn how to grind perpendicular surfaces within .0002 inch tolerances. Prerequisite: MACH 124 or instructor permission.

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MAST 145

PATHOLOGIES FOR MASSAGE THERAPY 5CR This course introduces an array of pathological conditions commonly encountered in massage practice. The effects, benefits, and contraindications of massage are also covered. Prerequisites: MAST 105, MAST 115, MAST 125. Corequisites: MAST 135, MAST 155.

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Course Descriptions MAST 155 TREATMENT MASSAGE I 6CR This course teaches students the mechanics of deeper massage techniques, postural assessment, and the charting process. Prerequisites: MAST 105, MAST 115, MAST 125. Corequisites: MAST 135, MAST 145. MAST 165 MASSAGE CLINIC I 6CR This course offers a supervised environment where students can practice professionalism and ethical conduct, as well as learn charting, client communication and massage skills. Prerequisites: MAST 135, MAST 145 MAST 155. Corequisites: MAST 175, MAST 185. MAST 175

COMPLIMENTARY MASSAGE MODALITIES I 5CR This class introduces the students to a variety of massage techniques, including pregnancy massage, chair massage, and sports massage. Prerequisites: MAST 135, 145, 155. Corequisites: MAST 165, 185. MAST 185

MASSAGE CURRICULUM REVIEW & EXAM PREP 2CR This course offers a comprehensive review of anatomy, physiology, pathology, kinesiology, ethics, and massage techniques in preparation for the Washington State Licensing Exam. Prerequisites: MAST 135, MAST 145, MAST 155. Corequisites: MAST 165, MAST 175.

Course Descriptions

MAST 205 SPA MASSAGE TECHNIQUES 3CR This course explores spa massage techniques from ancient through modern times. Prerequisites: MAST 165, 175, 185. Corequisites: MAST 215, 255. MAST 215

BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT & PROFESSIONAL RELATIONS 5CR This course introduces billing practices, licensing requirements, available insurance options, proper record organization and retention, and practical methods for operating a massage practice. Prerequisites: MAST 165, 175, 185. Corequisites: MAST 205, 255. MAST 255 TREATMENT MASSAGE II 6CR This course further develops assessment skills, palpation skills, and treatment techniques to address a wider variety of conditions. Prerequisites: MAST 165, MAST 175, MAST 185. Corequisites: MAST 205, MAST 215. MAST 265 MASSAGE CLINIC II 6CR This course offers a supervised environment where students can demonstrate their knowledge of massage and practice fundamental business skills. Prerequisites: MAST 205, 215, 255. Corequisite: MAST 275. MAST 275

COMPLIMENTARY MASSAGE MODALITIES II 5CR This course introduces the student to a variety of specialty massage techniques, including but not limited to trigger point, myofascial release, cranial-sacral, and reflexology. Prerequisites: MAST 205, MAST 215, MAST 255. Corequisite: MAST 265.

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MATH 070 ELEMENTS OF ARITHMETIC 5CR In this course the student will study fractions, decimals, percents, and ratio and proportion through the use of the four basic mathematical operations in both numeric and story problems. Students learn numeric symbol and word representations of number. American household measurement will also be covered. Story problem strategies will be emphasized. Prerequisite: ABED 030 or equivalent placement test score. MATH 080 PRE-ALGEBRA 5CR Topics covered include fractions, decimals, ratio and proportion, percents, graphs, geometry, measurement, trigonometry, signed numbers, and solving simple algebraic equations. Students are taught a systematic approach to solving word problems and the use of a scientific calculator. Prerequisite: ABED 040 or MATH 070 or equivalent placement score. MATH 085 PRE-ALGEBRA REVIEW 1-2CR This is an independent study course for students who have completed MATH 080 but want stronger pre-algebra skills before taking MATH 090. The course is broken into 5 modules: fractions, ratios and proportions and percents, geometry, signed numbers, and simple algebraic equations. Students may sign up for 1-2 of the modules. Prerequisites: MATH 080 and instructor permission. MATH 090 INTRODUCTION TO ALGEBRA 5CR An introduction to basic algebraic concepts and operations. Equivalent to one year of high school algebra and requires a considerable time commitment. Includes solution of first and second degree equations, linear graphs, inequalities, systems of equations, exponents, polynomials, and factoring. Prerequisite: MATH 080 or equivalent placement test score. MATH 090A INTRODUCTION TO ALGEBRA PART 1 2CR Introduction to Algebra covers basic algebraic concepts and operations, including solution of first and second degree equations, linear graphs, inequalities, systems of equations, exponents, polynomials, and factoring. MATH 90A covers Part 1 of MATH 90 (5 cr.) Prerequisites: MATH 080 or equivalent placement test score, and instructor permission. MATH 090B INTRODUCTION TO ALGEBRA PART 2 3CR Introduction to Algebra covers basic algebraic concepts and operations, including solution of first and second degree equations, linear graphs, inequalities, systems of equations, exponents, polynomials, and factoring. MATH 90B covers Part 2 of MATH 90 (5 cr.). Prerequisites: MATH 090A and instructor permission. MATH 095 FACTORING MODULE 1CR Topics covered include factoring polynomials, solving quadratic equations through factoring, and applications using quadratic equations and factoring. This is a self-paced, independent study class which will help students improve their factoring skills in preparation for MATH 099. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

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Course Descriptions MATH 099 INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA 5CR A one-quarter course in intermediate algebraic concepts and operations. The course includes solution of equations of second and higher degree, factoring, rational expressions, roots and exponents, complex numbers, functions, and graphing. Rigorously paced, requiring a considerable time commitment, it is equivalent to second year high school algebra. Prerequisite: MATH 090 or equivalent placement test score. MATH 099A INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA PART 1 2CR Intermediate Algebra covers rational expressions, roots and exponents, complex numbers, functions, graphing, and the solution of quadratic equations. MATH 99A covers Part 1 of MATH 99. Prerequisites: MATH 090 or equivalent placement test score and instructor permission. MATH 099B INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA, PART 2 3CR Intermediate Algebra covers rational expressions, roots and exponents, complex numbers, functions, graphing, and the solution of quadratic equations. MATH 99B covers Part 2 of MATH 99. Prerequisites: MATH 099A and instructor permission. MATH 102 QUANTITATIVE REASONING 5CR This course covers topics from trigonometry, set theory and logic, and exponential and logarithmic functions. Applications to industry and general applications will be stressed. Prerequisite: MATH 090 or equivalent placement test score. MATH 111

MATH& 107 MATH IN SOCIETY 5CR This terminal course in practical mathematics, designed for students who do not intend to take additional mathematics courses, and for programs not requiring additional coursework in mathematics. Course content emphasizes critical thinking, problem solving, and both qualitative and quantitative reasoning in areas of logic, combinatorics, probability, statistics, finance, and geometry. Prerequisite: MATH 99 or equivalent placement test score. MATH& 141 PRE-CALCULUS I 5CR Precalculus I includes the study of polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Students will solve multi-step problems and use a graphing calculator. Prerequisite: MATH 099 or equivalent placement test score. MATH& 142 PRE-CALCULUS II 5CR Pre-calculus II includes the study of the trigonometric functions and their inverses, vectors, systems of equations and inequalities, conic sections, polar coordinates, and parametric equations. Prerequisite: MATH& 141.

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MATH& 146 STATISTICS 5CR This course covers organization and graphical representation of data, probability theory and distributions, sample size computations, Central Limit Theorem, hypothesis testing, confidence interval estimation, linear regression, correlation analysis goodness-of-fit tests. Prerequisite: MATH 099, or equivalent placement score. MATH& 151 CALCULUS I 5CR This first-quarter calculus course includes the study of function limits, and emphasizes differential calculus and its applications. Prerequisite: MATH& 142. MATH& 152 CALCULUS II 5CR This second-quarter calculus course includes the study of integral calculus and its applications and an introduction to differential equations. A graphing calculator is required. Prerequisite: MATH&151 or equivalent placement score. MEDA 115 LAW & ETHICS 3CR Addresses ethical concerns and legal considerations for medical office staff and medical records management. Gain knowledge of medical contracts, explore workplace legalities, historical and social issues, and workplace responsibilities. Prerequisite: ENGL 100, equivalent test score, or instructor permission. MEDA 116 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY 5CR Basic structure of medical terms including Greek and Latin roots, prefixes, suffixes, word analysis, spelling, and pronunciation. An overview of anatomical terms with an introduction to the basic concepts of health and disease. Equivalent to NURS 105 Prerequisite: ENGL 093, equivalent test score, or instructor permission. MEDA 118

EXAMINE ROOM & PATIENT PREPARATION 5CR Introduction to clinical procedures in the medical office. Includes medical asepsis, Universal Precautions, vital signs, charting, preparing patient and rooms for examinations, first aid, and nutrition. Prerequisite: ENGL 093 or equivalent placement score, MEDA 116 pre or corequisite, or instructor permission. MEDA 121 MEDICAL OFFICE SKILLS 5CR Medical office procedures including scheduling guidelines and telephone techniques related to the medical office, filing, accounts receivable/payable, payroll, inventory control, billing procedures, collections. Prerequisites: ENGL 093 or equivalent placement score, BAS 101 or test out or experience, MEDA 116 pre or corequisite, or instructor permission.

Course Descriptions

COLLEGE ALGEBRA WITH APPLICATIONS 5CR This course provides a comprehensive review of algebra, graphs, and functions, and introduces exponential functions and logarithms, geometry and trigonometry, trigonometric functions, vectors and matrices. Industrial and practical applications are emphasized. Prerequisite: MATH 099 or equivalent placement test score.

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MEDA 125

PHLEBOTOMY/ BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS 5CR An overview of phlebotomy and the role of the phlebotomist in health care. Study includes circulatory system, infection control, clinical laboratory safety, and phlebotomy procedures and equipment. Laboratory hours provide students with hands on activities to gain skill competency in venipuncture and capillary specimen collection. Prerequisite: MEDA 116 or instructor permission.

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Course Descriptions MEDA 129 PHARMACOLOGY/MEDICAL MATH 5CR Basic concepts of pharmacology including legal issues, dosage calculation, drug reactions and an overview of the most frequently prescribed medications. Prerequisites: MEDA 116, MATH 080 or equivalent test score, or instructor permission. MEDA 136 CODING/BILLING/INSURANCE 5CR Introduction of insurance terminology, terms, phrases and abbreviations. Learn ICD-9 coding, CPT coding, and HCFA-1500 billing forms, and basics of claims management. Prerequisite: MEDA 116. Pre or corequisite: MEDA 121, or instructor permission. MEDA 139

ASSIST W/EXAM & ADMINISTER MEDICATIONS 5CR Intermediate clinical skills including infection control, sterilization and disinfection techniques, minor surgery assisting, wound care, administration of injections, safety practices for administering medications, therapeutic modalities, eye and ear procedures. Prerequisites: MEDA 116, MEDA 118 pre or corequisite.

Course Descriptions

MEDA 140 MEDICAL REIMBURSEMENT SYSTEMS 5CR A review of various types of health insurance plans, such as state, federal and managed care. Students will learn insurance claims processing cycle, billing systems and required documentation. The students will have the opportunity to apply their knowledge in a laboratory setting utilizing billing software. Prerequisites: MEDA 136, MEDA 211 or instructor permission. MEDA 154 INTERMEDIATE MEDICAL CODING 5CR Introduction to coding in ambulatory care settings using CPT, HCPCS Level 1. Common practices and problems associated with insurance organizations will be explored in relation to coding ICD-9-CM and CPT. Patient classifications and their relationships to coding assignment and finances will also be explored. Coding practice. Lecture and lab. Prerequisites: MEDA 136 or instructor permission. MEDA 211 MEDICAL COMPUTER APPLICATIONS 5CR Computerized medical billing simulation includes scheduling patients, establishing accounts, posting charges, changes to the accounts, month-end activity, insurance tracking and basic use of electronic medical records software programs for charting, tracking lab orders and prescriptions. Prerequisites: MEDA 121, MEDA 136. MEDA 212

DIAGNOSTIC TESTING IN MEDICAL OFFICE 5CR Advanced clinical skills including, ECGs and Spirometry, plus the following laboratory CLIA waived tests: hematology, microbiology, immunology, chemistry, and urinalysis. Prerequisite: MEDA 116, MEDA 125 pre or corequisite, or instructor permission.

MEDA 214

DISEASE CONDITIONS & COMMUNITY HEALTH 5CR An overview of the disease processes of major conditions, including infectious diseases, major neoplastic conditions, and major congenital diseases. The focus is on human diseases that are first diagnosed in the clinical setting. Community health and preventative patient education will also be presented. Prerequisite: MEDA 116, BIOL 111 or A&P series, ENGL 100, or instructor permission. MEDA 216 HIV/AIDS TRAINING 1CR Overview of AIDS including concepts of immunity and related diseases. In class lecture for 7 hours of education with an additional 4 hours of online instruction. Exceeds Washington state seven-hour minimum requirement for healthcare workers. Participants will be given a certificate of attendance and training upon completion of course requirements. MEDA 254 ADVANCED MEDICAL CODING 5CR Students will develop advanced skills in the use of the Physician’s Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) and HCPCS coding system in ambulatory and inpatient healthcare settings. Prerequisites: MEDA 140 and MEDA 154, or instructor permission. MEDA 293

MEDICAL ASSISTING EXTERNSHIP SEMINAR 2CR Discussion, problem-solving, and evaluation of experience gained in internship. Development of professional communication skills, resume development and job seeking strategies. Preparation for CMA Exam and overview of developmental psychology. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. MEDA 294 MEDICAL ASSISTANT EXTERNSHIP 5CR A supervised clinical work experience for a total of 165 hours, in an outpatient ambulatory facility that provides an opportunity to apply administrative and clinical skills in the role of a medical assistant. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. Corequisite: MEDA 293. MHIT 115 HEALTHCARE FUNDAMENTALS 5CR This course serves as an introduction to the U.S. health care system with a focus on the organizational, financial and quality issues that are germane to health information technology (HIT) professionals. MHIT 225 HEALTH IT DATA STANDARDS 5CR This course covers the fundamentals of health care standards as they relate to patient records, coding and classification systems, privacy and security, technical infrastructure and medical device integration. MHIT 235 APPLICATION OF HEALTHCARE IT 5CR This final course in the Healthcare Informatics Certificate Program encompasses the conceptual and applicable knowledge and skills that are at the core of designing and implementing health information technology in care delivery organizations. MMDP 099 INTRODUCTION TO WINDOWS & MAC 1CR Introduction to Windows and Macintosh operating systems covering basics such as navigation, application launching, file- saving, and searching. Students also explore elementary networking, file-sharing, and printer configuration.

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Course Descriptions MMDP 102 2D GRAPHIC DESIGN 5CR This course covers exploration of the two-dimensional design process including problem identification, creative ideation, and design solutions. Students will engage in critical dialogue exploring the content and context of design solutions. The principles and elements of 2D design will be examined, and students will execute designs based on them. MMDP 103 INTRODUCTION TO DRAWING 4CR In-depth study of basic drawing skills, sketching principles, and visual communication through the drawn object. Culminates in execution of a storyboard in a team setting. The final objective is to express a project concept on paper to an employer, client, or fellow designer. MMDP 104 COLOR THEORY 4CR In-depth study of color, a foundation essential to multimedia careers. Both subtractive (print) and additive (screen) color properties will be examined. Students will use paints and illustration paper to explore hue, saturation, and value. Relationships between colors in the color wheel will be explored. MMDP 105 STORYBOARD DEVELOPMENT 4CR This course will continue with hands-on drawing exercises that explain a concept on paper through drawing, and finally, several concepts in sequence. Gain a further understanding of the communication visually between employee and employer, graphic designer and client, and designer to designer. Prerequisites: MMDP 103.

MMDP 107 DIGITAL STORYTELLING 5CR An introduction to the process of storytelling in the digital age. In the class, students will learn a variety of formats (linear, non-linear, news) and methods (storyboarding, screenwriting) to aid in the process of clear and compelling storytelling. Students will complete the process of conceptualizing their stories and presenting them to an audience. MMDP 113

COMPUTER PROGRAMMING FUNDAMENTALS 5CR A general introduction to computer programming logic and concepts related to designing and writing computer programs and procedures. Students learn problem-solving techniques as well as important programming concepts such as data types, data structures, and object-oriented programming. Prerequisites: MATH 080 and ENG 093 or equivalent placement score.

MMDP 114 HUMAN LIFE DRAWING 4CR This class focuses on how to draw the human form, including skeleton, muscle structure, and movement. These skills are essential to good character design, realistic movement for animation, and gesture drawing for storyboarding. Students will exit the class with the ability to draw the human form accurately in proportions, gesture, balance, and structure. (Same as ART 105) Prerequisite: MMDP 103 or instructor permission. MMDP 117 TYPOGRAPHY 4CR This course covers typographic principles, type history, design considerations when working with type for print and web, font design, typeface identification strategies, and font formats/ management. Recommended completion or concurrent enrollment in any of the following: MMDP 121, MMDP 126. MMDP 118 HTML 5CR This course is an introduction to HyperText Markup Language (HTML). Students examine the key components of HTML for creating web pages that incorporate links, images, tables, cascading style sheets (CSS), and forms. Topics also include HTML/XHTML tag syntax, differences between Web browsers, and design considerations. Prerequisites: MATH 080, ENGL 093, and completion of or concurrent enrollment in BAS 120, MMDP 099, or CSNT 114; or instructor permission. MMDP 119 VIDEO PRODUCTION 5CR Students will learn principles of video writing, storyboarding, scripting for commercials, and basic director definitions to identify and justify program concepts. MMDP 120 DIGITAL CONTENT DELIVERY 5CR Students will learn the fundamentals of media compression using Apple’s Compression software. Students will also learn to design and distribute the media through podcasts, DVDs, and web streaming. Prerequisites: MMDP 118, MMDP 139, or instructor permission. MMDP 121 ILLUSTRATOR I 4CR This course covers basic and intermediate illustration tools and techniques available in Adobe Illustrator. Students will learn skills to produce vector-based artwork for web, multimedia, and print graphics. Emphasis is placed on proficiency with Illustrator’s pen tool. MMDP 122 PHOTOSHOP I 4CR This course covers basic image editing tools and techniques available in Adobe Photoshop. Students will learn skills to produce raster-based images for web, multimedia, and print.

Course Descriptions

MMDP 106 COLOR THEORY II 3CR Students continue in-depth study of color, with the goal of improving design skills for print, online, and interactive multimedia in the context of a mural project. Students produce work for public display, beginning with conceptualization, proceeding to sketching, transfer to the wall surface, application of color, and completion. Prerequisite: MMDP 104.

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MMDP 123 FLASH I 4CR This course covers the basics of the Flash authoring program, including environments, drawing tools, symbols, and scenes. Action script is introduced. Basic animation techniques including tweening and importing outside materials are covered. MMDP 124 3-D ANIMATION I WITH MAYA 4CR Introduction to 3-D imaging and animation with emphasis on construction and rendering of images. This course will provide the animation student with a broader range of employment opportunities. Maya certified training curriculum will be utilized. Prerequisites: MMDP 103,MMDP 122.

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Course Descriptions MMDP 126 INDESIGN I 4CR This course covers page layout design and production using Adobe InDesign. Simple to moderately complex page design will be completed using tutorials and projects. Students will improve knowledge of layout, typography, and production methods. Prerequisites: MMDP 121 or MMDP 122, or instructor permission. MMDP 127 THE UNREAL ED 4CR This course leads students through moving 3D content into a game engine. Students will learn the basic functionality of the UNREAL Editor, including modeling, 3D art placement, textures, and triggers. The resulting levels will be tested in the UNREAL Engine. Prerequisites: MMDP 134, MMDP 137, MMDP 138, MMDP 144, MMDP 165. MMDP 128 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY 4CR This course covers a basic exploration of photography using digital cameras to shoot and edit original photo content. Understanding and applying manual camera controls, creative and technical shooting strategies, composition theory, lighting, and workflow will be addressed using industry standard Adobe software, including Photoshop, Lightroom, and Camera RAW. Access to a digital camera with manual settings is required. Prerequisite: MMDP 122 or instructor permission.

Course Descriptions

MMDP 130 CARTOONING I 4CR Introduction to the art of cartooning. Students will learn how to draw animation and design characters. They will learn more storyboarding and Anime (Japanese animation techniques) so popular in the computer animation field, as well as using Photoshop to help express these characters. Prerequisites: MMDP 103, MMDP 104, MMDP 114, MMDP 122. MMDP 133 DREAMWEAVER I 4CR Students will learn to create interactive websites with Dreamweaver in this course, developing site-design skills as they learn the basic building tools and become familiar with the advanced tool set, which includes style sheets, layers, behaviors, libraries, and extensions. Prerequisite: MMDP 118 and MMDP 122 or instructor permission. MMDP 134 3D MATERIALS & METHODS 4CR Students learn the skills necessary to apply bitmap images onto 3D models as well as create various special effects. The student will practice how to craft their own material/textures in Photoshop and then apply them to 3D models. Students will focus on UV mapping and shading networks. Prerequisites: MMDP 103, MMDP 104, MMDP 105, MMDP 122, MMDP 124. MMDP 137 LIGHTING & COMPOSITION 4CR This course will introduce students to the basics of lighting. Students will learn the techniques as behind successfully lighting as well as learning how to position 3D objects in a scene in order to maximize shadow and reflection. Students will also learn to light a scene that will render most efficiently. Prerequisites: MMDP 104, MMDP 105, MMDP 122, MMDP 124.

MMDP 139

DIGITAL A/V EDITING I WITH FINAL CUT PRO 5CR This course covers basic audio/video editing using Final Cut Pro. MMDP 141 ILLUSTRATOR II 4CR This course covers intermediate and advanced illustration tools and techniques available in Adobe Illustrator. Students will learn skills to produce moderately complex vector-based artwork for web, multimedia, and print graphics. Interoperability with Photoshop and Flash will be examined. Prerequisite: MMDP 121. MMDP 142 PHOTOSHOP II 4CR Advanced application of Photoshop techniques including photo retouching, seamless compositing, collage techniques, color correction, layer manipulation, and image size/resolution optimization. Painting with the Photoshop tools is introduced. Prerequisite: MMDP 122. MMDP 143 FLASH II 4CR Create interactive websites using Flash software and ActionScript. Students will build on the skills acquired in Flash 1 and go from simple animation to interactivity. Topics will include managing internal and external projects and controlling sound and video with ActionScript. Students will create user interfaces and dynamic navigation. Prerequisite: MMDP 123. MMDP 146 INDESIGN II 4CR Course covers intermediate/advanced page-layout design and production techniques using Adobe InDesign. Students will refine design and production skills for print publishing. Emphasis on working with client to produce portfolio-ready work. Prerequisite: MMDP 126. MMDP 148 CARTOONING II 4CR Course will center on the creation and embellishment of a single character and that character’s environment. Students will study character design and landscape drawing techniques. Prerequisites: MMDP 122, MMDP 114, MMDP 130. MMDP 150 CHARACTER STUDY 4CR Companion to 3D Animation I and II. Emphasis on animating characters and the articulation of emotions and personality of a character through the use of a high-end 3D animation package. Students will animate a character as well as learn lip sync. Prerequisites: MMDP 114 and MMDP 124. MMDP 152 LAYOUT GRAPHIC DESIGN 4CR This course is designed to build on learning from MMDP 102, 2D Graphic Design. Exercises are intended to stimulate imagination, develop capacity for critical thinking, envision design solutions, and foster an understanding of the creative process. Review of elements and principles of design, overview of marketing, branding, logos and symbols. Prerequisite: MMDP 102.

MMDP 138 INTRODUCTION TO LEVEL DESIGN 4CR This course will introduce students to the basics of Level Design. Students will learn the techniques as behind Level Design as well as Level Design theory. Current software will be used. Prerequisites: MMDP 105, MMDP 130, MMDP 144, MMDP 157.

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Course Descriptions MMDP 153 WEB DESIGN 5CR This course teaches the fundamentals of designing websites and graphics for digital media. Topics include navigation, color schemes/digital color theory, accessibility, layout techniques, managing projects, web design contracts, copyright law, image production, drop down menus, managing assets. Client relationships, audience identification, and search engine placement are explored. Knowledge of HTML and/ or Dreamweaver recommended. Prerequisite: MMDP 121 or MMDP 122. MMDP 154 ADOBE ACROBAT 5CR This course covers electronic publishing techniques using Adobe Acrobat. Students will design an interactive presentation with multimedia effects such as buttons, sounds, and movies. They will learn to create, navigate, and modify cross-platform pdfs; optimize electronic documents designed for online viewing and/or printing, and use Acrobat’s prepress tools to prepare files for commercial printing. Prerequisites: MMDP 121, MMDP 126, or MMDP 129. MMDP 157 INTRODUCTION TO GAME DESIGN 4CR Introduction to basic concepts: storyboards, project planning, marketing, and principles of creating a prototype for interactive media, organization of resources and procedures essential to producing presentation images. Discovering the workflow necessary to effective presentations. Prerequisites: MMDP 103, MMDP 122.

MMDP 159

DIGITAL A/V EDITING II WITH FINAL CUT PRO 5CR Advanced audio/video editing with Final Cut Pro. Skills will be taught through a production group atmosphere. Skills will be demonstrated by successfully completing a full production demo project that will be output to video, CD, or DVD. Prerequisite: MMDP 139. MMDP 160 DIGITAL SOUND 5CR Students will learn the basic processes of both music recording and post-production sound for film. Soundtrack Pro 2 and Pro Tools LE will be used to record and manipulate music and sound effects. MMDP 162 PHOTOSHOP III 4CR Advanced use of PhotoShop, integrated with Illustrator and other graphics programs. Emphasis will be placed on and defining and interpreting client needs and creating compelling images that demonstrate integration of compatible software. Prerequisites: MMDP 142 and either MMDP 141 or MMDP 115.

MMDP 165 3D FOR GAMES I 4CR Students construct and map “Low Polygon” 3D characters of their own design. Students practice various modeling and skinning techniques, construct their own texture map for this character in Photoshop, animate and render this character in various small sequences. Prerequisites: MMDP 105, MMDP 130, MMDP 144. MMDP 168 DREAMWEAVER II 4CR Students will explore the software’s advanced toolset, including CSS layout techniques, dynamic web pages, database integration via PHP, and web applications, accessibility standards, site management, group site development, extensions, and setting up testing sites. Students will create a fully functional dynamic website that is 508 compliant. Completion of or concurrent registration in MMDP 153 is recommended. Prerequisite: MMDP 133. MMDP 170 MOTION GRAPHICS 5CR This class teaches students how to create a smooth workflow using various professional software applications to create a motion graphics production. Students will learn how to work between Photoshop, Acrobat, PowerPoint and Final Cut Pro. Prerequisites: MMDP 119, MMDP 139, MMDP 154. MMDP 172 CARTOONING III 4CR This course will introduce students to an advanced level of pre-production art and visuals as related to the development of a video game. Prerequisites: MMDP 122 or MMDP 130, and MMDP 148. MMDP 182 UNREAL II 4C