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Table of Contents 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26

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27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45

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Introduction Grading Policy Eligibility/Code of Conduct Rubric for Student Offenses Rubric for Student Offenses 2 Bobcat Citizen of the Month Homework Bobcat Buck Restroom Expectations Lesson Plan Restroom Expectations Teacher Script Hallway Expectations Lesson Plan Hallway Expectations Teacher Script Lunchroom Expectations Lesson Plan Lunchroom Expectations Teacher Script Lunchroom Expectations Teacher Script 2 Lunchroom Expectations Teacher Script 3 Busline Expectations Lesson Plan Busline Expectations Teacher Script Bus Expectations Lesson Plan Bus Expectations Teacher Script Classroom Expectations Lesson Plan Classroom Expectations Teacher Script R.O.A.R. Call Ticket Incident Report Explanation Incident Report Example Homework Room Policy / Detention Room Policy R.O.A.R. Poster Drinking Fountain Poster Hallway Poster Lunch Poster Bus Line Poster Bus Poster Classroom Poster Restroom Poster Western Dubuque P.O.P. Drexler Middle School P.O.P. Black On-A-Roll Certificate Red On-A-Roll Certificate White On-A-Roll Certificate Bobcat Citizen Poster Certificate of Study Session Completion P.B.S. Bobcat Buck Brain Booster P.B.S. Bobcat Buck Brain Booster Key Reflection Sheet P.B.S. Kick-Off 2009


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W.D.C.C.S.D. Drexler Middle School A Guide for Teaching School Rules and Behavioral Expectations Across Iowa and the U. S., schools are reviewing their approach to school-wide discipline. School officials are moving away from the school of thought that all students enter school with the knowledge and skills necessary to meet behavioral expectations that lead to social success in classrooms and other school settings. School-wide Positive Behavior Support (PBS) is being implemented in thousands of schools across the country, resulting in improved school climate, reductions in problem student behavior, enhanced instructional time and increased efficiency in school-wide discipline. Drexler Middle School (DMS) personnel have committed themselves to this philosophy and are enthusiastic about th success PBS will have with the students they serve. The PBS mission statement aligns with Drexler Middle School’s Mission state to empower adolescents to achieve their personal best. This mission binds prevention, teaching and effective behavioral practices into a school-wide climate that will allow students to reach their learning potential.

Drexler Middle School PBS Teams Core Team Tim Showalter, Principal Ellen Hoefer, School Counselor Beth Berning, 6th grade teacher/PBS Coach Terri Elhers, 7th grade teacher/PBS Coach Kelly Simon, 8th grade teacher

MikeYilek, 7th & 8th grade teacher Jim Roberts, Technology teacher Kim Crouse, Special Education Sara Kluesner, AEA Social Worker/PBS Coach Family Representative

Committees Each faculty member is expected to be a member of at least one P.B.S. committee during the school year. If a faculty member does not sign-up for a committee, s/he will be assigned to a committee. Committees are Socials/Incentives (D.J., reserve gym, permission slips, concessions, teacher sign-up, posters, activities), Awards Assemblies (Fish Bowl, organize assemblies, contact sponsors/coaches, gather data, arrange school day), Student of the Month/On-A-Roll (Collect nominations, information for posters, write-up for paper/newsletter, gather data, information to P.R., certificates), Fundraising (community involvement, “OGrams”, creative idea, game concessions), Public Relations (newspaper, newsletter, website, flyers, parent information, school board, Open House, Parent Nights, orientation for new students), and Bobcat Store (Bobcat Bucks, store purchases, maintenance, set prices, worker schedule).

“Empowering Adolescents to Achieve Their Personal Best” Respectful * On Your Honor * Accepting * Responsible


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Grading Scale The following grading scale will be used by all teachers at Drexler Middle School: Letter A A-

Percent 95-100 90-94

G.P.A. 4.0 3.67

B+ B B-

87-89 83-86 80-82

3.33 3.0 2.67

Letter C+ C C-

Percent 78-79 75-77 73-74

G.P.A. 2.33 2.0 1.67

D

68-72

1.0

F

67 & Below

0.0

Letter grades/percentages are based on grade level curriculum and benchmarks. “A”-Excellent: Means a student has chosen to empower himself/herself to master the concepts and skills presented, as evidenced by his/her consistent and extraordinary application of the knowledge. “B”- Above Average: Means that a student has chosen to empower himself/herself to attain a substantial degree of mastery of the concepts and skills presented, as is evidenced by his/her consistent and high quality application of the knowledge. “C”- Average: Means that a student has chosen to empower himself/herself to acquire the basic skills and concepts of the subject presented and is able to apply them in a satisfactory degree. “D”- Below Average: Means that a student has chosen not to empower himself/herself to do their personal best and/or lacks sufficient knowledge of the basic skills and concepts of the subject presented and, therefore, has difficulty applying them in a satisfactory degree. “F”- Failing: Means that a student has chosen not to empower himself/herself to do their personal best and/or has not acquired basic skills and concepts of the subject presented and, therefore, does not apply them in a satisfactory degree. “P”- Passing: Means that a student has chosen to empower himself/herself to do their personal best and/or has acquired basic skills and concepts of the subject presented in a pass/fail course. “I”- Incomplete: Means that a student has chosen not to empower himself/herself to do their personal best and/or has not completed the required academic work. The student must complete all required work in a reasonable amount of time or at the teacher’s discretion.

“Empowering Adolescents to Achieve Their Personal Best” Respectful * On Your Honor * Accepting * Responsible


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R.O.A.R. Code of Conduct It is a privilege and an honor for any student to represent Drexler Middle School in competitive, performance, and leadership roles. DMS offers numerous opportunities for students to become involved in school activities with a wide range of teams, organizations, and positions. Our school has a strong tradition of pride and sportsmanship, and we dedicate ourselves to these ideals by “empowering adolescents to achieve their personal best” through hard work, citizenship, and positive attitudes. DMS students and staff believe that responsibility, respect, honor, and acceptance of others characterize what it means to be a Bobcat.

DMS Eligibility Policy Eligibility for a student at Drexler Middle School participating in extra-curricular/co- curricular activities* will be based on the student’s weekly grades. The student must be passing (68% and above) each class by 7:00 A.M. of the last day of the school week to be eligible for activities. The ineligibility list will be sent to the teachers/coaches. The students will have a probationary week to fulfill the following requirements. Ineligibility will occur the week following the probationary week if the requirements are not met. Coaches/Sponsors will inform students that they are ineligible. Students WILL be allowed to participate in activities only if they: • • •

Attend a before school study session from 7:30-8:00 a.m. for 4 consecutive M-Th attendance days ** AND receive a passing grade from the affected class(es), OR Attend one after school study session from 3:20-5:15 p.m., M-Th ** AND receive a passing grade from the affected class(es), OR Attend an in-school study session consecutive M-Th attendance days ** AND receive a passing grade from the affected class(es),

Example: Ineligibility Report is posted Friday, Sept. 18. Student must fulfill one of the above study sessions the week of Sept. 21-24. If the student fulfills and is receiving a passing grade by Friday, Sept. 25 (7:00 a.m.), s/he IS eligible for full participation the week of Sept. 28. If the student DOES NOT fulfill the above study session requirement OR is still receiving a nonpassing grade by Friday, Sept. 25 (7:00 a.m.), s/he WILL NOT be able to participate in ALL competitions/performances the week of Sept. 28. but will still need to attend practices/rehearsals. Upon completing the required study session(s), the student must present a certificate of completion signed by the supervising teacher of the study session to their coach/sponsor. If a student does NOT meet the above requirements, s/he will not be allowed to participate in the activity. Students must be on time and stay for the entire session. Students are required to meet the guidelines of the session supervisor or they will be ineligible to participate the week following the study session(s). Students with failing grades at the end of the school year will be required to attend summer school sessions to be determined at a later date. ** If a probationary week is a shortened week of scheduled classes, the student may only be required to attend the days that classes are held M-Th. Students with behavioral issues will report to the Intervention Room during the last period of the school day for 4 consecutive attendance days. * Extra-Curricular Football Volleyball Cross Country Girls Basketball Wrestling Boys Basketball Girls Track Boys Track Quiz Bowl Drama (play/musical at DMS/WDHS/CHS)

* Co-Curricular Band Extravaganza Solo Ensemble Musical Field Trips (nonperforming) Flag Corps Jazz Band Show Choir Music Honor Festivals Invention Convention Spelling Bee Geography Bee Technology Convention Math Competitions

Ineligible students are expected to attend practices and home games/performances.

“Empowering Adolescents to Achieve Their Personal Best” Respectful * On Your Honor * Accepting * Responsible


RUBRIC FOR STUDENT OFFENSES Below are the recommended guidelines in the disposition of discipline situations. Depending on the circumstances of the offense and the history of the offender, the action taken may vary at the administrator’s discretion.

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DOCUMENT EVERYTHING!

Problem Area

Definition

Action To Be Taken Repeated

Inappropriate/Abusive Language (school year)

The use of profanity on school Reteach (1st Occurrence - Minor) property, which does not have to be Intervention Room (2nd Occurrence – Major) specifically directed at a person After School (3rd Occurrence – Major) Team Meeting (4th Occurrence – Major) Parent Contact (5th Occurrence – Major) In-School Suspension (6th Occurrence – Major) Parent Meeting (7th Occurrence – Major)

Physical Aggression

The student strikes or touches another person with her/his body, an object connected to her/his body or an object propelled by her/his body with the intent of causing pain, discomfort, or physical harm.

Major Send student to office.

Defiance/Disrespect/ Noncompliance

* Noncompliance means overt refusal to comply with a reasonable adult command directed to the student or group of students within 30 seconds. * Overt disrespect means the student responds to an adult in a manner that is rude.

Major Send student to office.

Disruption

Disruption of instruction or school activity means the student behaves in a manner that a) causes the cessation of teacher led instruction or a teacher led activity and b) results in an adult attending to and/or redirecting the student’s behavior.

Reteach (1st Occurrence - Minor) Intervention Room (2nd Occurrence – Major) After School (3rd Occurrence – Major) Team Meeting (4th Occurrence – Major) Parent Contact (5th Occurrence – Major) In-School Suspension (6th Occurrence – Major) Parent Meeting (7th Occurrence – Major)

Verbal or physical conduct that creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive environment.

Reteach (1st Occurrence – Minor) Intervention Room (2nd Occurrence – Major) Parent Meeting (3rd Occurrence – Major)

Property Damage/Vandalism

Destruction of property means breaking, tearing, destroying, or writing graffiti on any school property.

Major Send student to office.

Theft

Taking another student’s property without their verbal or written permission.

Major Send student to office.

(school year)

Harassment/Teasing/Bullying (school year)


- Rubric for Student Offenses -

5 Problem Area

Definition

Action To Be Taken Repeated

Lying/Cheating/ Forgery (school year)

* Lying is not telling the truth. * Cheating is taking credit for homework, assignments, or tests that someone else created. * Forgery is signing someone else’s name without their permission.

Reteach/ “0” Grade (1st Occurrence - Minor) Parent Contact/ “0” Grade (2nd Occurrence – Major) Parent Meeting / “0” Grade (3rd Occurrence – Major)

Possession of a Controlled Item

* Possession of a weapon means a Major student has a weapon on school Send student to office. property. (gun, knife, matches, lighter, combustible or items that are capable of causing bodily harm or property damage) * Possession of alcohol or drugs means the possession of any alcoholic substance or illegal drug on school property. (drug paraphernalia, alcohol, tobacco, drugs) * Possession of picture or graphics of questionable content

Skip Class/Truancy

* Truancy means a student is not in attendance at school and a parent/guardian has not presented an excusable reason within 24 hours.

Major 3 or more absences report to Counselor via email. Inform Counselor AND student of the number of absences.

* Incomplete work means schoolwork that is either not complete, missing, or submitted after the expected due date.

Reteach (1st and 2nd Occurrence - Minor) Homework Room (3rd and 4th Occurrence – Major) Intervention Room (Noncompliance - 5th Occurrence. 4 days Intervention)

* Tardy means a student’s body has not passed the plane of the door at the time that the bell rings to start class.

Reteach (1st – 3rd Occurrences - Minor) Intervention Room (4th Occurrence – Major) After School (5th Occurrence – Major) Team Meeting (6th Occurrence – Major) Parent Contact (7th Occurrence – Major) In-School Suspension (8th Occurrence – Major) Parent Meeting (9th Occurrence – Major)

(per quarter) MUST BE DOCUMENTED IN CAMPUS!!! Incomplete School Work (per quarter)

Tardy (per quarter) MUST BE DOCUMENTED IN CAMPUS!!!

* Homework/Intervention Room – Use of electronic devices during homework time is the discretion of supervisor/teacher.


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Bobcat Citizen of the Month Each month, teachers at each grade level will choose students per month who best demonstrates R.O.A.R. traits. A male and a female will be chosen each month. The teachers will choose these students at a team meeting using whatever voting criteria they prefer to use. The names of the students chosen should be given to the P.B.S. team co-coaches (Terri and Beth). The students photos will be taken and a short written autobiography will be filled out by the students. This information will be included on posters that will be displayed throughout the school. The students photos will be displayed on the Bobcat Citizen of the Month wall in the Middle School foyer. When the next month’s student is chosen, the previous month’s students will continue to be displayed. Teachers should complete the voting process by the 3rd Friday of each month. Students selected will be recognized at an academic assembly. The selected students will be given an opportunity to be a part of various school activities. Parents of the selected students will be invited to attend the academic assembly where they are recognized.

“Empowering Adolescents to Achieve Their Personal Best” Respectful * On Your Honor * Accepting * Responsible


Homework 7 Drexler Middle School staff and students believe homework is an integral and relevant part of every student’s instructional program. Homework is one strategy for extending the school day and increasing the amount of time students spend learning. It contributes to good study habits, self-discipline, personal initiative, independence, and responsibility as well as providing a vital, cooperative link between the teacher, child, and parent(s)/guardian(s). We reprint this article from the Telegraph Herald to illustrate the importance of homework completion and its impact on a student’s future success. Homework Valuable Lesson By Kathy Mathers of Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph I’d like to pass along some advice from Lee Canter, author of Homework Without Tears, a book I highly recommend. His program is based on the research-supported idea that your enthusiasm, interest and involvement are the keys to your child’s success in school, and that one of the most effective ways you can be involved in their education is through homework. Research also supports the idea that homework really does make a difference in your child’s performance at school. Consider these recent findings:  

By doing homework, students can improve academic achievement in all subjects. Homework improves academic achievement of both high and low achievers.

When your children were young, you made most of their decisions for them. You structured their activities, planned their meals, and made sure they got to bed on time. Even when you began to guide them into making their own choices, you probably kept close tabs on those choices. When your children began school, their teachers offered much of the same guidance. Then, they started assigning homework. For many children, homework is the first time they have a responsibility of their own. Think about it:   

It’s up to them to bring it home. It’s up to them to do the work. It’s up to them to see that the work gets back to school

This responsibility rests heavily on your children’s shoulders, and has important repercussions in their lives:   

Through homework, children learn skills they must develop if they are to become independent, motivated and successful adults. They learn to follow directions, work on their own, begin and complete a task, manage their time, and work to their full potential. They learn it’s up to them, that they are accountable for their own actions.

You can see that if you choose not to make homework a priority in your home, your children’s chances to develop this sense of responsibility will be diminished. Do keep the benefits in mind, especially when your children are given homework assignments which to you (or them) seem meaningless. Don’t dismiss this homework as unimportant. It’s teaching your children something valuable. (Reprinted in November 9, 1993 Dubuque Telegraph Herald Newspaper)

As parents and teachers cooperate in monitoring homework completion throughout the year, students will grow in their self-initiative and independence.


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Bobcat Buck

The P.B.S. program is designed to recognize students who display qualities and traits that reinforce the high expectations of the faculty and staff of Drexler Middle School. Positive words to a student or group of students are one way to reinforce your expectations and help maintain your classroom expectations. Another method of positive reinforcement is the use of Drexler’s “Bobcat Buck”. Each teacher and staff member will receive a supply of Bobcat Bucks at the beginning of the school year and may pick-up more in the office. The Bobcat Bucks can be given to any student who demonstrates positive behaviors of any kind. All teachers and staff members are encouraged to distribute the Bobcat Bucks. It is important that the students realize they are not “entitled” to receive Bobcat Bucks. If they ask for a Bobcat Buck, they will not receive one. A Bobcat Buck must be earned. It is the student’s responsibility to keep track of his/her Bobcat Bucks. If s/he loses them, they are not replaceable. Please remind the students of this throughout the school year. During the school year, students will have the opportunity to redeem their Bobcat Bucks for a variety of items and/or opportunities. Bobcat Bucks for the 2009-2010 year: 8th Grade – Blue 7th Grade – Pink 6th Grade – Green Expo/Other Staff - Red

“Empowering Adolescents to Achieve Their Personal Best” Respectful * On Your Honor * Accepting * Responsible


Drexler Middle School Restroom Expectations Lesson Plan Respectful

*

On Your Honor

Area: Restroom/Drinking Fountain Materials Needed: Computer

*

Accepting

*

9

Responsible

Time Allotted: 20-30 Minutes

Expectations

Respectful * Keep restroom clean and neat

On Your Honor * Go directly to and from the restroom

Accepting * Greet others kindly

* Respect the privacy of others

* Flush

* Use proper hygiene

* Use only when needed

* Pick up after yourself

* “Go where you ask to go”

* Wash hands

* Single file * Hands to yourself

Responsible * Use at appropriate time

* Keep mouth off fountain Step 1 – Define the expectations Step 2 – Provide the rationale a. safety of students b. time will not be wasted c. students will be on time to class d. the need to conserve resources (water, soap, towels) Step 3 – Teach the acceptable behavior a. go to the restroom/drinking fountain b. while in the restroom, review the expectations c. “Think and Learn” – Think “2” (2 minutes, 2 towels) d. use appropriate voice and leave promptly e. be safe – keep water in sink, use soap, keep feet on ground, keep hands/feet/objects to self f. male staff member – boys / female staff member - girls Step 4 – Acknowledgements and Consequences A. Acknowledgements 1. verbal acknowledgement for students who follow the expectations 2. “Bobcat Bucks” may be used for students modeling the expectations B. Consequences 1. if problems occur or continue, recess time will be used as a “refresher” time 2. a second reprimand - completing a reflection sheet during recess time 3. supervised restroom use 4. detention which will follow handbook policy All staff will closely monitor the restroom activities. Possible Bobcat Time Activities: • Students design poster illustrating the appropriate expectations • Students perform a skit which demonstrates the appropriate expectations in the restroom and when getting a drink of water from the water fountain. The skits will be videotaped and used as a training video.


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Restroom & Drinking Fountain Expectation Script Facilitator: “We are going to learn what it means and looks like to show respect, honor, acceptance, and being responsible in the restrooms and at the drinking fountain.” Show poster with expectations. Remind them there are posters are located throughout the building stating restroom and drinking fountain expectations. Facilitator: “Even if you may have heard this information before, we all need reminders about what is expected and how we can model it so that the restroom and drinking fountain area is an environment that is respectful, where we honor and accept each other and where we are making it a safe and pleasant place for everyone.” Facilitator: “In the restroom and drinking fountain areas, you will be responsible young adults. This means doing what is right, what you ought to do, being accountable for your own behaviors and obligations. This would include using the restroom and drinking fountain at the appropriate times, using proper hygiene, picking up after yourself, and washing your hands.” Model * and encourage discussion: What does this look like? Sound like? Feel like? Why are these important? *use restroom/drinking fountains at appropriate times * use proper hygiene *pick up after yourself *wash hands Facilitator: “In the restroom and drinking fountain, you will show respect by keeping the restroom clean and neat, respecting the privacy of others, using single file lines, keeping your hands to yourself, and your mouth off of the fountain.” Model* and encourage discussion: What does this look like? Sound like? Feel like? Why are these important? *keep restroom clean and neat *respect the privacy of others *form single file lines *keep your hands to yourself *keep your mouth off of the fountain Facilitator: “In the restroom and at the drinking fountain, you will honor and accept one another. This means going directly to and from the restroom or drinking fountain, flushing, using only when needed, going to the location where you asked to go, and greeting others kindly.” Model* and encourage discussion: What does this look like? Sound like? Feel like? Why are these important? *go directly to and from the restroom and drinking fountain *flush *use only when needed *go to where you ask to go *greet others kindly


Drexler Middle Hallway Expectations Lesson Plan Respectful Area: Hallway

*

On Your Honor

*

Accepting

*

11

Responsible

Time Allotted: 20-30 Minutes

Materials Needed: Computer

Expectations

Respectful * Hands & Feet to self

On Your Honor * Only use your locker

* Appropriate voices

* Go directly where you are supposed to go

Accepting * Greet others positively

* Walk

Responsible * Keep to right side of hallway * Keep supplies inside the locker

* Excuse yourself if you bump into someone

Step 1 – Define the expectations Step 2 – Provide the rationale a. students will be safe and courteous b. time will not be wasted c. students will be punctual and prepared for class/transportation home d. students will show respect for other classes e. create a positive learning environment Step 3 – Teach the acceptable behavior a. taught at beginning of school year, following holiday breaks b. all staff use preventive prompts prior to dismissing students throughout the school year c. if a problem arises, brief review of procedures and corrective teaching d. teachers should make available to substitutes/aides the expectations and supervision responsibilities e. students will be allowed in classroom hallways at 8:00 a.m. f. students take care of breakfast, lunch account, and preparing for the day prior to 8:10 a.m. g. students report to homeroom by 8:10 a.m. h. follow appropriate dismissal procedure at the end of the school day 1. students that participate in after-school activities should report directly to room/gym/locker room 2. report to bus line-up at the correct dismissal time Step 4 – Acknowledgements and Consequences A. Acknowledgements 1. verbal acknowledgement for students who follow the expectations 2. “Bobcat Bucks” may be used for students modeling the expectations B. Consequences 1. if problems occur or continue, recess time will be used as a “refresher” time 2. a second reprimand - completing a reflection sheet during recess time 3. detention which will follow handbook policy All staff will closely monitor the hallway activities. Possible Bobcat Time Activities: • Students design poster illustrating the appropriate expectations • Students perform a skit which demonstrates the appropriate expectations in the hallway when arriving for and dismissing from classes. The skits will be videotaped and used as a training video.


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Hallway Expectation Script Facilitator: “We are going to learn what it means and looks like to show respect, honor, acceptance, and being responsible in the hallways.” Show poster with expectations. Remind them that there are posters throughout the building that state the hallway expectations. Facilitator: “Even if you may have heard this information before, we all need reminders about what is expected and how we can model it so that the hallways are environments that are respectful, where we honor and accept each other, and where we are making it a safe and pleasant place for everyone.” Facilitator: “In the hallways, we will be responsible young adults. This means doing what is right, what you ought to do, and being accountable for your own behaviors and obligations. This would include keeping to the right side of the hallway, and keeping supplies inside the lockers and on the appropriate shelves.” Model* and encourage discussion: What does this look like? Sound like? Feel like? Why are these important? *keep to the right side of the hallway *keep supplies inside of the locker Facilitator: “In the hallways, you will show respect by keeping your hands and feet to yourself, use an appropriate voice, walk, and excuse yourself if you bump into someone.” Model* and encourage discussion: What does this look like? Sound like? Feel like? Why are these important? *keep hands and feet to yourself *use an appropriate voice *walk *excuse yourself if you bump into someone or walk between two conversing people Facilitator: “In the hallways, we will honor and accept one another. This means only using the locker that was assigned to you, going directly to where you are supposed to go, and greeting others positively.” Model* and encourage discussion: What does this look like? Sound like? Feel like? Why are these important? *only use the locker that is assigned to you *go directly to where you are supposed to go *greet others positively


Drexler Middle School Lunchroom Expectations Lesson Plan Respectful

*

On Your Honor

Area: Lunchroom

*

Accepting

*

13

Responsible

Time Allotted: 20-30 Minutes

Materials Needed: Computer

Expectations

Respectful * Talk quietly

On Your Honor * Use appropriate language

Accepting * Clean your own spills, food, crumbs, garbage, etc.

Responsible * Table Manners

* Use manners (please, thank you, etc.)

* Be patient

* Help keep the cafeteria clean

* Keep the cafeteria clean

* Stand patiently and quietly in line

* Take only the food that you will eat

* Wait quietly until dismissed * Demonstrate proper table manners (appropriate use of utensils, chew with mouth closed, don’t talk with food in mouth) Step 1 – Define the expectations Step 2 – Provide the rationale a. safety of students b. time will not be wasted c. students will be on time to recess/class Step 3 – Teach the acceptable behavior a. go to the lunchroom b. while in the lunchroom, review the expectations c. discuss how disruptions caused by a noisy lunchroom interfere with other classes d. ask students for their suggestions on how to create a quiet, orderly lunchroom e. have posters that illustrate the expected behaviors f. model the correct, acceptable behavior Step 4 – Acknowledgements and Consequences A. Acknowledgements 1. verbal acknowledgement for students who follow the expectations 2. “Bobcat Bucks” may be used for students modeling the expectations B. Consequences 1. if problems occur or continue, recess time will be used as a “refresher” time 2. a second reprimand - completing a reflection sheet during recess time 3. silent lunch in a removed setting 4. detention which will follow handbook policy Lunch staff will closely monitor the lunchroom activities to acknowledge students who are demonstrating the expectations and note which students need more practice. Possible Bobcat Time Activities: • Students design poster illustrating the appropriate expectations • Students perform a skit which demonstrates the appropriate expectations in the lunchroom. The skits will be videotaped and used as a training video.


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Lunchroom Teaching Script

Area: Cafeteria

Time Allotted: 20 minutes

Definition: Middle school students are in the lunchroom for breakfast, lunch, and anytime a staff member accompanies them to the cafeteria area. Materials Needed: -Scripted expectations -Lunchroom passes -TV/VCR -Posters illustrating the expectations for the lunchroom -Bobcat Bucks Rules that need to be communicated: 1.) Lunch money paid before school day begins 2.) Clean up after yourself Suggested Activities: 1.) Lunchroom supervisors/cooks/students role play appropriate behaviors in cafeteria: used as reinforcement or reteaching a. Follow directions without arguing b. Use of appropriate language, tone and volume of voice c. Proper lunchroom behaviors 2.) All students practice the expectations as they eat a. Recognize students that are exhibiting appropriate behaviors b. Reteach/remodel expectations as needed Follow-Up Activities/ Teaching Focus 1.) Discussion Activity a. You are in lunch line waiting to get your tray and the student behind you begins to push you and tease you. How would you feel? b. You go to your lunch table expecting to have fun conversation. However, you are ignored and everyone seems to be having a good time but you. How would this make you feel? If the roles were reversed, how would you make sure to include everyone at your table? c. Reflect on the importance of adult supervision in the lunchroom. What would lunch be like? Would you have time for recess or to finish your lunch? Would you enjoy your lunch if it were not organized? How should those supervisors be treated? 2.) Real world application a. Dining out b. Going out with friends c. Weddings d. School sponsored banquets e. Visiting family and friends 3.) Special Events a. Mix-it-up Lunch Day Facilitator: “We are going to learn what it means and looks like to be respectful, on my honor, be accepting, and responsible.” Show poster with expectations. Remind them that the posters are posted throughout the building area expectations. Facilitator: “Even if you may have heard this information before, we all need reminders about what is expected and how we can model is so that our lunchroom is an environment that is respectful, on your honor, accepting, and responsible. As well as being a pleasant place for anyone who enters our school.” Encourage discussion: Why is this important? What should it look like, sound like, feel like?


15 Facilitator: In the lunchroom, we will be respectful young adults. We will show respect by treating others, as you would have them treat you and to value the worth of every person including yourself. We can do this be following adult direction and using good manners. Model the following scenarios: 1.) Lunchroom supervisor/student interactions 2.) Manners at table (please, thank you, don’t talk with mouth full, “excuse me”, don’t reserve seats) Encourage discussion and emphasize the following: 1.) Listen to those in charge 2.) Respect people’s things 3.) Give people space 4.) Keep hands and feet to self Facilitator: In the lunchroom you will be on your honor. This means that: 1.) Keep your area clean and remind others to do the same 2.) Only take what you will eat Model the following scenarios: 1.) Not taking food from other’s trays 2.) Picking up garbage around you Encourage discussion: 1.) Why eating area should be cleaned 2.) Why food shouldn’t be shared between students 3.) Why food shouldn’t be wasted

Facilitator: In the lunchroom we will be accepting of others and ourselves. This means being sensitive to the well being of others, to work with and help others, to tell the truth and to act in such a way in which you are worthy of trust. We will show this in the lunchroom by having positive peer interactions, having pleasant and appropriate conversations, and by inviting others to sit with you.

Model the following scenarios: 1.) Inviting others to sit 2.) Lunchroom supervisors, cooks, and students interacting and thanking each other. 3.) Students in line quietly talking and laughing Encourage discussion and emphasize the following: 1.) Invite others to sit with you 2.) Thanking other people 3.) Listening 4.) Engaging other people in your discussions


16 Facilitator: In the lunchroom we will be responsible young adults. This means doing what is right, what you ought to do, being accountable for your own behaviors and obligations. This would include cleaning up your area, obeying the lunchroom rules, putting away your tray, utensils and trash in the proper areas. Model the following scenarios: 1.) Lunchroom money being paid before school day begins 2.) Walking quietly around to get trays, food, entering lunch number, condiments 3.) Quietly find your seat 4.) Students being reminded of low lunch balance account 5.) Sitting down, not trading food 6.) Clean up and dismissal Encourage discussion and emphasize the following: 1.) Lunch money paid before school 2.) All food is eaten in lunchroom 3.) Everyone is responsible for washing tables 4.) Food stays on your tray


Drexler Middle School Bus Line Expectations Lesson Plan Respectful

*

On Your Honor

Area: Bus Line

*

Accepting

*

17

Responsible

Time Allotted: 20-30 Minutes

Materials Needed: Computer

Expectations

Respectful * stay behind the white line

On Your Honor * report to your assigned line

* treat bus drivers with respect

* stay in your line

* follow bus rules

* be honest with the shift you are assigned

Accepting * be accepting of all students (DMS, Seton, Elementary, etc.) * line up by grade – oldest grade to youngest

* listen to teachers on bus duty

Responsible * watch for cars * stay behind the white line * don’t run between buses

* hands and feet to yourself

* when your bus arrives, get on the bus and be seated

* use respectful language and behavior

* stand only on the sidewalk

Step 1 – Define the expectations Step 2 – Provide the rationale a. being respectful of all students, bus drivers, and teachers on bus duty b. safety of students c. students are representing the school district Step 3 – Teach the acceptable behavior a. go to the bus stop at assigned time b. line-up appropriately c. load/unload bus using correct procedure (oldest grade to youngest grade) d. students are to proceed to bus area through the front doors Step 4 – Acknowledgements and Consequences A. Acknowledgements 1. verbal acknowledgement for students who follow the expectations 2. “Bobcat Bucks” may be used for students modeling the expectations B. Consequences 1. if problems occur or continue, recess time will be used as a “refresher” time 2. a second reprimand - completing a reflection sheet during recess time 3. supervised loading 4. detention which will follow handbook policy All staff will closely monitor the bus line activities and dismissal times. Possible Bobcat Time Activities: • Students design poster illustrating the appropriate expectations • Students perform a skit which demonstrates the appropriate expectations in the bus line. The skits will be videotaped and used as a training video.


18

Bus Line Expectations Script

Facilitator: “We are going to learn what it means and looks like to show respect, honor, acceptance, and responsibility while waiting in your bus line.” Show poster with expectations. Remind them that posters are posted throughout the building stating area expectations. Facilitator: “Even if you may have heard this information before, we all need reminders about what is expected and how we can model it so that we all stay safe while waiting for our busses to arrive.” Facilitator: “In the bus line, we will be responsible young adults. This means doing what is right, what you ought to do, being accountable for your own behaviors and obligations. This would include watching for cars or other vehicles, staying behind the white line until busses are at a complete stop and ready for you to board, standing only on the sidewalk, and staying seated once you board your bus. Model* and encourage discussions: What does it look like? Sound like? Feel like? Why is it important? * Stand behind white line, in a straight line oldest grade to youngest grade * Look both ways before boarding bus (especially if crossing into the second bus lane) * Stay in your seat once on the bus Facilitator: “In the bus line, we will show respect by treating others as you would what them to treat you and to value the worth of every person including yourself. We can do this by staying behind the white line, treating bus drivers with respect, following the rules set by the district, school, and bus drivers, listening to teachers on bus duty, keeping your hands and feet to yourself, and using respectful language and behavior.” Model* and encourage discussion: What does this look like? Sound like? Feel like? Why is it important? * Stand behind white line, in a straight line oldest grade to youngest grade * Keep your hands and feet to yourself * Listen to teachers on bus duty * Use respectful language and behavior * Treat bus drivers with respect and follow bus rules Facilitator: “In the bus line, we will honor and accept one another. This means being aware of the well being of others and helping others. This means reporting to your assigned line, staying in your line, and being honest with the shift your are assigned. It also includes being accepting of all students (DMS, Seton, Beckman, DES, etc.), and lining up by grade – oldest grade to youngest grade.” Model* and encourage discussion: What does this look like? Sound like? Feel like? Why is it important? * Leave for shift one or two depending on which one you are assigned * Report directly to your assigned line * Stay in your line until boarding the bus * Accept all students in bus lines * Line up oldest to youngest


Drexler Middle School Bus Expectations Lesson Plan Respectful

*

On Your Honor

Area: Bus

Accepting

*

Responsible

Time Allotted: 20-30 Minutes

Materials Needed: Computer, District rules Respectful * Talk quietly

*

19

Expectations

On Your Honor * Follow the bus rules

Accepting * Treat others as you want to be treated

Responsible * Help younger students

* Sit where there is an open seat or where you are assigned

* Leave the bus the way you found it

* Respect authority * Hands & feet to self * Respect the bus driver * Treat the bus with care

* Allow others to sit with you

Step 1 – Define the expectations Step 2 – Provide the rationale a. have students share why they feel the need for the expectations b. safety of students c. treating all students with respect Step 3 – Teach the acceptable behavior a. review the District’s expectations and rules b. practice correct bus behavior Step 4 – Acknowledgements and Consequences A. Acknowledgements 1. verbal acknowledgement for students who follow the expectations 2. “Bobcat Bucks” may be used for students modeling the expectations B. Consequences 1. if problems occur or continue, recess time will be used as a “refresher” time 2. a second reprimand - completing a reflection sheet during recess time 3. detention which will follow handbook policy All bus drivers will closely monitor the bus activities. Possible Bobcat Time Activities: • Students design poster illustrating the appropriate expectations • Students perform a skit which demonstrates the appropriate expectations on the bus. The skits will be videotaped and used as a training video.


20

Bus Expectations Script

Facilitator: “We are going to learn what it means and looks like to show respect, honor, acceptance, and responsibility while on the bus.” Show poster with expectations. Remind them that posters are posted throughout the building stating area expectations. Facilitator: “Even if you may have heard this information before, we all need reminders about what is expected and how we can model it so that we all stay safe while riding the bus. Remember – riding on the bus is like being in a mobile classroom – the same rules apply.” Facilitator: “On the bus, we will be responsible young adults. This means doing what is right, what you ought to do, being accountable for your own behaviors and obligations. This would include helping younger or less able students and leaving the bus the way you found it.” Model* and encourage discussions: What does it look like? Sound like? Feel like? Why is it important? * help younger students * clean up the area where you sat, leave the bus the way you found it Facilitator: “On the bus, we will show respect by treating others as you would what them to treat you and to value the worth of every person including yourself. We can do this by talking quietly, respecting authority, keeping hands and feet to yourself, and treating the bus with care.” Model* and encourage discussion: What does this look like? Sound like? Feel like? Why is it important? * talk quietly * respect authority * hands and feet to self * respect bus driver * treat bus with care Facilitator: “On the bus, we will honor and accept one another. This means being aware of the well being of others and helping others. This means following the bus rules, treating others as you want to be treated, sitting where there is an open seat or assigned seat, allowing others to set with you if necessary.” Model* and encourage discussion: What does this look like? Sound like? Feel like? Why is it important? * follow bus rules * treat others as you want to be treated * sit where there is an open seat * allow someone else set with you


Drexler Middle School Classroom Expectations Lesson Plan Respectful

*

On Your Honor

Area: Classroom

*

Accepting

*

21

Responsible

Time Allotted: 20-30 Minutes

Materials Needed: Computer

Expectations

Respectful * Accept direction

On Your Honor * Do your own work

Accepting * Greet others positively

* Raise hands

* Be honest

* Compliment others

Responsible * Put forth your best effort * Participate positively

* Treat others as you want to be treated

* Be patient * Complete homework

* Use good listening skills

* Bring materials

* Use please and thank you

* Be on time

* Keep room neat and clean

* Participate and ask questions * Be organized

Step 1 – Define the expectations Step 2 – Provide the rationale a. students will be safe and courteous b. time will not be wasted c. students will be punctual and prepared for class d. students will show respect for other classes e. create a positive learning environment Step 3 – Teach the acceptable behavior a. taught at beginning of school year, following holiday breaks b. if a problem arises, brief review of procedures and corrective teaching c. teachers should make available to substitutes/aides the expectations and supervision responsibilities Step 4 – Acknowledgements and Consequences A. Acknowledgements 1. verbal acknowledgement for students who follow the expectations 2. “Bobcat Bucks” may be used for students modeling the expectations B. Consequences 1. if problems occur or continue, recess time will be used as a “refresher” time 2. a second reprimand - completing a reflection sheet during recess time 3. detention which will follow handbook policy All staff will closely monitor their classroom activities. Possible Bobcat Time Activities: • Students design poster illustrating the appropriate expectations • Students perform a skit which demonstrates the appropriate expectations in the classroom. The skits will be videotaped and used as a training video.


22

Classroom Expectations Script

Facilitator: “We are going to learn what it means and looks like to show respect, honor, acceptance and responsibility.” Show poster with expectations. Remind them that posters are posted throughout the building stating area expectations. Facilitator: “Even if you may have heard this information before, we all need reminders about what is expected and how we can model it so that the classroom is an environment that is respectful, where we honor and accept each other and where we make it a safe and pleasant place for everyone.” Facilitator: “In the classroom, we will be responsible young adults. This means doing what is right, what you ought to do and being accountable for your own behaviors and obligations. This would include being prepared, being on time, and keeping eyes on own paper.” Model* and encourage discussion: What does this look like? Sound like? Feel like? Why is this important? *Bringing supplies needed to class *Be in seat when bell rings *Doing one’s own work Facilitator: “In the classroom, we will show respect by treating others as you would have them treat you and to value the worth of every person including yourself. We can do this by valuing the opinions or differences of others, being teachable, and being courteous.” Model* and encourage discussion: What does this look like? Sound like? Feel like? Why is this important? *Be considerate when wrong answers are given *Sit up, listen, and pay attention during class *Use please and thank you Facilitator: “In the classroom, we will honor and accept one another. This means being sensitive to the well being of others, to work with and help others, to tell the truth and to act in such a way in which you are worthy of trust . We will show this by working cooperatively with peers and adults, being kind and polite, and being truthful.” Model* and encourage discussion: What does this look like? Sound like? Feel like? Why is this important? *Appropriate cooperative group work *Using manners *Being honest about what you have done


24

Drexler Middle School Teacher Referral Form Incident Reports It has become a reality in education that a teacher must have a “paper trail” when dealing with all students. The Incident Report that we adopted last year is one way to help you create a paper trail that may assist you in the future if the need would arise. If a student is not fulfilling one of your classroom procedures and/or requirements, you may need to fill out an Incident Report form. To do this, go to: http://www.aea1.k12.ia.us/drexler/incidentreports.htm Click on the category that best describes the behavior that you feel has become an issue. Once you have done this, the Incident Report referral form you requested will be displayed on the screen. Answer all of the required fields that are listed with a red *. Once completed, click on the “Submit” button at the bottom of the page. If you haven’t answered all of the required fields, a screen will appear informing you of the fields you need to complete. Complete the fields and click the “Submit” once again. ONCE YOU CLICK THE SUBMIT BUTTON, DO NOT CLICK IT AGAIN EVEN IF THE THANK YOU WINDOW DOES NOT APPEAR! Your data has (probably) been entered and clicking again will record the incident you are reporting a second time. Your input is greatly appreciated when you use the Incident Reports. We gather the information gained through the Incident Reports to assess which areas of our Middle School need our attention. Please record ALL incidents that occur in your classroom/lunchroom/hallway/restroom, etc. Always remember that the behavior you exhibit may, also, be exhibited in other areas of the school. Mr. Showalter, Ms. Hoefer, and the office need this information. You will receive a spreadsheet weekly with the data that has been collected. Every effort will be made to delete teacher names from this report as well as other information that will identify individual teachers. Please view this information, organize it, and manipulate it so you can see which students need our attention and what the areas of concern are. This will assist you in working with the students and identifying what we should be focusing on.


25

Drexler Middle School Teacher Referral Form Incident Reports Once you arrive at http://www.aea1.k12.ia.us/drexler/incidentreports.htm, you will see:

Fill in the Incident Report using the fields provided. Last, First Click applicable Find your name on pulldown menu. Click applicable position from menu. If you selected “Staff” from “Person Referring:”, type your name here. Click the calendar and choose date of incident. Click Use this pulldown menu if the student used a negative behavior in reaction to the Primary Student Behavior. Select the consequence you used in this incident. Select the consequence you used if a Secondary Incident occurred. Select the time of the incident. Select the location of the incident. Provide information that will help explain the incident. Be accurate. (Optional)


26

Study Session Room Policy

The Study Session Room is during the designated study hall period. Students will need to attend if they have 3 and 4 missing, late, or incomplete assignments for a class. This does not include work if the student was absent. Teachers will be responsible for contacting the teacher in charge of the homework room via email or phone. The Study Session Room teacher will then need to document each student participating that day and be responsible for contacting parents or guardians and documenting contact made. Students will report to the homework room at the beginning of the study hall period, students will be responsible for handing in their late or missing work directly to the teacher at 3:10 p.m. for which it was missing. After contact with that teacher, they are then able to return back to the Study Session Room. If not all late work or missing work is completed during that time, the student will be expected to return the following day and/or until work is caught up. Students may choose this option to fulfill their ineligibility requirement. Study Session times will be held from 7:30-8:00 a.m., Last Period, 3:20-5:15 p.m. Guidelines for the Homework Room: • Quiet work environment • Electronic devices are at the discretion of the supervising teacher • Students will remain in the room for the duration of the session • Work is to be completed to teachers’ expectations

Intervention Room Policy The Intervention Room will be used as a means of reflecting and/or correcting unacceptable behaviors in all areas of the school. This includes classroom, hallways, restrooms, lunchroom, bus, and bus lines. Intervention will be given if a student has received a major report for a specified behavior, and/or 5+ missing, late, or incomplete assignments. Teachers will need to contact Mr. Showalter and discuss situations regarding homework/behaviors. Mr. Showalter will determine if intervention is necessary and parent/guardian contact will be made and documented. Intervention is served Monday – Thursday during the study hall period or after school from 3:20-5:15 under the supervision of a designated teacher. Students will receive a temporary activity bus pass in order to ride the activity bus home at 5:30. Students will then need to be picked up from the designated activity bus stops for each town. Guidelines for Intervention: • Reflection sheet to be completed if not done so already • Quiet work environment • Electronic devices may be used at the discretion of the supervising teacher • Students will remain in the room for the duration of the session • If nothing to do, students are to read


Certificate of Study Session Completion __________________________________ has fulfilled the requirements of the Probationary

Week of ______________________________________ at Drexler Middle School.

Date _______________________________________

Academic Coach ________________________________

Certificate of Study Session Completion __________________________________ has fulfilled the requirements of the Probationary

Week of ______________________________________ at Drexler Middle School.

Date _______________________________________

Academic Coach ______________________________


42

P.B.S. Bobcat Buck Brain Booster 8-10 questions correct earns a Bobcat Buck. 0-7 correct requires a reteaching of all lessons plus retesting.

Student Name ___________________________________________________________

1. While waiting in the bus line, you should stand behind the _________________________ line. 2. When using the restroom, think ___________ minutes, __________ towels. 3. The most appropriate time to get a drink of water is _______________________________ classes. 4. When walking in the hallway, you should walk on the ________________________ side. 5. When lining up in the bus line, students should be arranged ________________ to ___________________. 6. While eating, chew with your _________________________ closed. 7. School supplies need to be kept _______________________________ your locker. 8. Lunch money needs to be paid ____________________________ the school day begins. 9. Treat others as _________________________ want to be treated. 10. What does R.O.A.R. stand for?

R________________, O____ ___________ _____________, A_________________, R________________


42

P.B.S. Bobcat Buck Brain Booster Key 8-10 questions correct earns a Bobcat Buck. 0-7 correct requires a reteaching of all lessons plus retesting.

Student Name ______________________MASTER_____________________________

1. While waiting in the bus line, you should stand behind the _____WHITE____________________ line. 2. When using the restroom, think ______2_____ minutes, ______2____ towels. 3. The most appropriate time to get a drink of water is __BETWEEN, BEFORE, AFTER_________ classes. 4. When walking in the hallway, you should walk on the _____RIGHT______ side. 5. When lining up in the bus line, students should be arranged _OLDEST, 8TH GRADE__ to _YOUNGEST, PRESCHOOL____. 6. While eating, chew with your__MOUTH____ closed. 7. School supplies need to be kept __INSIDE, IN__________ your locker. 8. Lunch money needs to be paid ___BEFORE________ the school day begins. 9. Treat others as ___YOU, I_________ want to be treated. 10. What does R.O.A.R. stand for? R_ESPECTFUL_, O_N___ _YOUR__ _HONOR_, A_CCEPTING__, R_ESPONSIBLE__

(Teachers – derivatives of the above are acceptable)


44

Reflection Sheet Name of Student _____________________________________________Date ________________________ (Please feel free to use the back of this sheet if you need more room) What I chose to do?

Why I chose to do it?

Which R.O.A.R. trait(s) did I choose not to follow? ___Respectful ___ On Your Honor ___ Accepting ___ Responsible

What were my other choices?

What effect did my behavior have on my learning and on other’s learning?

What will I choose to do next time?

Student Signature ____________________________________________ ( a photocopy of this Reflection Paper will be sent to the student’s residence)


P.B.S. Kick-Off – 2009 (Year 2) 1. August 20th and August 21st. 2. Two hour early dismissal schedule for school district. 3. Posters in hallway. 4. Each grade level determines its schedule from 8:20-Lunch. The first two days of school should be spent covering the P.B.S. behavior expectations along with classroom expectations, procedures, school supplies, orientation, ground rules, etc.. Academic instruction will begin on Monday, August 24th. 5. A test will be given (Bobcat Brain Booster) on Friday. 6. August 20th, 2009: a. Cover all expectations. Each grade level determines schedule (keep in mind Expo classes). 7. August 21st, 2009: a. Cover remaining expectations in a.m. b. Assembly – All grades 1. 10:00 a.m.-11:15. – all grades. Report to Homerooms then to gym. Dismiss to homerooms after assembly. 8th grade to homeroom THEN to lunch 2. All teachers give Bobcat Bucks to students sitting and waiting 3. Video introducing the P.B.S. standards 4. R.O.A.R. posters 5. Hawaii theme 6. Hoola-Hoop contest. Correct answers to 10 Bobcat questions. 1st falls = 1 Buck, 2nd falls = 2 Bucks, etc. 7. Limbo. Draw 10 names from each grade level to compete. 1 Buck for each pass under. 8. Social in gym a. Music provided by ______ b. Ice cream social c. Committee plans. One of the first Fridays in August or September. d. Bobcat Buck for ice cream and toppings.


P.B.S. Handbook 2009-2010  

P.B.S. handbook for the 2009-2010 school year.

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