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This content was produced by Brand Ave. Studios. The news and editorial departments of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch had no role in its creation or display. For more information about Brand Ave. Studios, contact tgriffin@stltoday.com.

COLLEGE CONNECTION

SALES MANAGER

CONTENTS

Charles Mems cmems@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8033

How to find and list 3 Exhibitor 10 apply for scholarships Help to find everything at the fair

CONTENT PRODUCTION MANAGER

Sarah Gerrein sgerrein@stltoday.com 314-340-8014

Six tips for winning scholarships

to prepare 5 How for a professional Financial aid 14 award career letters A college senior gives advice on the next stage of life

CONTENT PRODUCTION

Natalie Macias nmacias@stltoday.com 314-657-3310

What to do when the financial aid letter arrives

VICE PRESIDENT BRAND AVE. STUDIOS

Teresa Griffin tgriffin@stltoday.com 314-340-8909

Real experience elevates Lindenwood graduates above the pack. Outstanding academics, hands-on learning, and internships in every discipline provide our students unique opportunities for educational, personal, and career success.

Call 636.949.4949 | www.lindenwood.edu In Illinois, call 618.239.6000 or visit www.lindenwood.edu/belleville

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April 12, 2019


MOACAC ST. LOUIS SPRING COLLEGE FAIR Content provided by MOACAC

Colleges attending the Missouri Association for College Admission Counseling Spring College Fair, from 1-3 p.m. April 28, include: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

American University Arizona State University Arkansas State University Avila University Ball State University Bates College Bellarmine University Belmont University Benedictine College Bradley University Brescia University Butler University Central Methodist University Chamberlain College of Nursing Columbia College

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Columbia College Chicago Cornell College Creighton University Culver-Stockton College Dominican University (Chicago) Drake University Drury University Eastern Illinois University Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University Evangel University Florida Southern College Fontbonne University Franklin College Goldfarb School of Nursing Grand Canyon University Harris-Stowe State University Illinois College

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Illinois State University Illinois Wesleyan Indiana State University Indiana University Bloomington Iowa State University Iowa Wesleyan University Kansas State University Knox College Lake Forest College Lewis University Lindenwood University Lindenwood University Belleville Loyola University Chicago Lyon College MacMurray College Marian University Maryville University McKendree University Michigan State University Millikin University Missouri Southern State University

• Missouri State University • Missouri University of Science & Technology • Missouri Western State University • Monmouth College • Murray State University • Northwest Missouri State University • Ohio University • Ohio Wesleyan University • Park University • Peru State College • Pittsburg State University • Purdue University • Quincy University • Ranken Technical College • Roanoke College • Rockhurst University • Sacred Heart University • Saint Louis University • Seton Hall University

• Southern Illinois University Edwardsville • Southeast Missouri State University • Southern Illinois University Carbondale • Southern Methodist University • St. Charles Community College • St. Louis College of Pharmacy • St. Louis Community College • St. Mary’s University — TX • Stephens College • The University of Alabama • The University of Mississippi (Ole Miss) • The University of Tampa • The University of Tulsa • Truman State University • University of Arkansas • University of Central Missouri • University of Dayton • University of Evansville

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

University of Indianapolis University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Kentucky University of Missouri University of Missouri-Kansas City University of Missouri-St. Louis University of Nebraska-Lincoln University of Oklahoma University of Oregon University of Southern California University of Wyoming Wabash College Webster University Western Illinois University Westminster College Wichita State University William Jewell College William Woods University Xavier University

Report: College is worth the cost, but planning is key Content provided by Statepoint Media

Despite rising college costs, a clear majority of families believe higher education is well-worth the investment, and most students and parents are willing to stretch themselves financially to make it happen, according to a new study. The national study from Sallie Mae and Ipsos, “How America Values College 2018,” found that 66 percent of college-going families believe they are getting a good value for the price they’re paying for college, and 20 percent say college is worth every penny. Even those willing to stretch financially are taking deliberate, resourceful and concrete steps to make college more affordable. Forty-five percent of college students are working year-round to earn money for school, and 37 percent of students live at home with parents or relatives to save on housing costs. “Families resoundingly shared that college is worth the cost, and their resourcefulness made it more affordable,” says Raymond J. Quinlan, chairman and CEO, Sallie Mae. Other ways students are saving on

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college costs? Sixty-seven percent of students are cutting back their spending, and 24 percent are taking classes over a shorter period of time in order to graduate sooner and reduce costs. While many families are making such significant strides to prepare for college costs and save money, Quinlan points out that there’s still work to do when it comes to equipping more families with tools and information needed to create a plan to pay for college. Planning, and ultimately paying for college also involves terms and jargon that may leave many scratching their heads. Indeed, when asked a series of true or false questions about certain paying-for-college terminology, lingering misconceptions persisted: 42 percent of families mistakenly believe work-study funds are automatic, more than 20 percent believe “free tuition” means college is free and 19 percent believe the sticker price is what college will cost them. For many families, attending college is a vital aspect of fulfilling the American Dream. Ensure your family is prepared for the expense by researching and understanding all your options.

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PHOTO: STATEPOINT MEDIA

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Planning for success at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville Sponsored content by Kiara Laack SENIOR, MASS COMMUNICATIONS MAJOR AT SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY EDWARDSVILLE

College is quickly approaching, and I know what you might be thinking ... “How am I supposed to be ready when: • I don’t know my major.” • I don’t know what classes to take.” • I don’t know how to organize my schedule.” Don’t worry. SIUE is here to help! When you arrive at SIUE for new student orientation, you’ll meet with your academic advisor to schedule your classes. Trust me when I say your advisor is not only there to help make sure your schedule meets your academic goals. They’re also there to help if you haven’t figured out what direction you want to go. Initially, I was considering pharmacy school. My advisor was the one who helped me get on track to where I was meant to be,

and I’m excited to be graduating soon with a degree in mass communications. I owe a lot to my advisor, and I have all kinds of tricks and tips when it comes to being prepared for your initial advising appointment. • Be honest with your advisor. If something doesn’t feel right about your academic path, tell them. They’re there to help you. • Be sure to schedule your classes with enough time to eat. Nothing is worse than being hangry in the middle of class! • Some people love online and night classes, and some people hate them. It doesn’t hurt to try them at least once. • Don’t be afraid to try fun electives! Not every class you take has to be related to your major. And for my last bit of advice ... don’t be afraid to ask questions! SIUE wants you to succeed.

CDC Career Development Center staff student meetings. Photo: SIUE

We Will Shape the World to Come Missouri students know SIUE will prepare them for a successful career and a life of purpose. Our Missouri student enrollment has nearly doubled in recent years thanks to our in-state tuition, beautiful campus and top-ranked programs.

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April 12, 2019


From me to you:

How to prepare for a

PROFESSIONAL while still

CAREER a student Grace Moore, Brand Ave. Studios Contributing Writer

for a professional career while still in college.

I graduate from the University of Iowa in less than two months. I have to type that sentence to believe it myself. As I sit here writing this, I realize I am wearing the same jean jacket I wore to my first day of freshman year. How could it have gone by this quickly? When I was in high school, my mom always used to tell me that college is not scary. She would say, “The scary part happens when school ends: the real world.” And now that I am on the verge of joining the “real world” on a career trajectory, I realize how right she was. The good news is that there is a way to prepare

1. Make a running list (The irony is that I am showing just how effective I find list-making in the very structure of this article.) Lists are an easy and efficient way to stay organized. College students have access to a variety of resources, connections and possible career opportunities over four years. When I found a company or position that sparked my interest, I would include it on a composite list. When the time came to apply for internships and post-grad positions, I targeted those companies and positions I previously researched.

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2. Use your resources Nearly every university provides a Career Service Center for its students. In Career Services, advisors and fellow students alike help with resume building. It’s a free and constructive service that assists you with the search for your dream job. This department also develops relationships with businesses that interview and ultimately hire students. Do not be afraid to visit this office frequently. While a student, it is in your best interest to take advantage of the resources provided to you. 3. Expand your horizons Whether you enter college with a declared major and a definitive career path or as an open major with no idea what you want to do, it is important to give all of your classes equal attention. Don’t discount non-major classes as they may open the door to brand new disciplines or interests that can supplement or even alter your career goals. Giving each one of your classes its due will also show future employers your versatility. 4. Summers are for success Spending a summer break focused on filling your resume with relatable work experience is one of the most rewarding experiences for a college student. Not only do internships help decide what positions interest you professionally, they also diversify a resume and garnish

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important letters of recommendation. Many times, internships can even lead to a full-time offer after graduation. Using LinkedIn, searching the careers section of a company’s website or using personal connections are all great ways to find a summer internship. 5. Widen your net When it comes to landing a job after graduation, widening your net of connections is instrumental. Before I arrived the University of Iowa, I was told time and time again to make connections with my professors, with non-for-profits in Iowa City and with small business owners. I admit this was daunting at first. However, by simply visiting my professor during office hours and sending inquiries about freelance work or open positions to organizations in the area, I quickly built a community of professionals and adults whom I trusted. As a senior, these same connections wrote my letters of recommendation, advised my senior thesis project and provided much needed mentorship in times of confusion or uncertainty. Widening your net and seeking experienced advice as a young and curious pre-professional is crucial if you intend to fiercely enter the job market. There is a certain, beautiful freedom about having the world at your fingertips. Finding small ways to prepare for and manage that overwhelming, exciting fact is the key to postgraduation success.

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UCM leads degree completion in state of Missouri Sponsored content by The University of Central Missouri

UCM graduates earn better jobs For the past 150 years, UCM has been graduating students who get employed. In fact, 97 percent of UCM students launch their career or begin graduate school within six months of graduation! From professional pilots and cyber security hacking experts to award-winning teachers and internationally recognized artists and musicians, starting salaries from UCM’s undergraduate programs are as high as $75,000! UCM students also benefit from the generosity of more than 100,000 living alumni – 9,000 of What UCM is doing differently whom are living in St. Louis – who than other schools UCM is able to achieve such high offer more networking and postcompletion rates because of aggres- graduate support than other schools. sive, student-centric initiatives put in place to support student retention A top destination for firstand graduation. UCM students ben- generation students efit from the following advantages to Sixty-four percent of UCM stukeep them on track: dents are either first-generation, • A brand-new Success Advising Pell-eligible or from an underrepCenter resented group. UCM is a dedicated • Aca d e m i c s u p p o r t o f fe re d partner in each student’s journey 24/7 through in-person and online and delivers the right resources at resources the right time to help them graduate • Commitment to affordability on time with less debt. That’s why 97 • State-of-the-art learning envi- percent of UCM graduates say they ronments including an airport and believe their academic program prenursing suite pared them for the workforce. The University of Central Missouri graduates more students than any other institution in Missouri, according to data provided by MDHE in 2019. This accomplishment is not a surprise to the UCM faculty and staff who dedicate their time to ensuring every student is successful, whether they study at the flagship Warrensburg campus or at UCM — Lee’s Summit, located at the state-of-theart Missouri Innovation Campus in the Kansas City metro area.

UCM students. Photo: The University of Central Missouri

INTERNSHIP CONSIDERATIONS Content provided by Green Shoot Media

© ADOBE STOCK

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Does it require you to move? invaluable experience both in Does it require you to put other the short and long term. After graduating from high plans on hold? If you are on the school or college, you might find losing end, it may not be the What comes next? yourself looking for or having ideal opportunity for you. If you accept this internship, been offered an internship posiwhere could it lead you? This is tion. While this is an exciting What will I learn? an important question because time, it is important to underWhile you should be learn- it will help you decide whether stand whether it is actually an ing something from every expe- or not an internship aligns with opportunity worth pursuing. rience, what you learn from your professional goals. After all, not everything an internship should help you You should always have offered to us is necessarily in our advance your career in some a plan. And you should also best interest. Before you sign way. Keep in mind that intern- understand and be comfortable your name on the dotted line ships are often about you doing with that plan changing. for an internship, ask yourself a lot of grunt work. For example, an internship the following three questions. Stay focused on giving your could end up leading to a posibest, which means putting all tion you never thought possible. your effort into the task at hand. Is it what you thought would What will it cost me? Many internships are unpaid. Perhaps you find that what you happen? Perhaps not. Others offer a range of compen- learn is less skills-based and Don’t be so rigid in your fivesation, from course credit to a more beneficial in the network- year plan that you forget that small stipend. ing it provides. This can be plans grow and change as we do.

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April 12, 2019


JOIN 1,500 FELLOW ST. LOUIS STUDENTS AT UCM Did you know that UCM has more than 9,000 alumni living in St. Louis and more than 1,500 St. Louis students currently enrolled in classes? Join them on campus and see for yourself! “I chose UCM because it’s not that far from home … I had a lot of people from my high school in St. Louis telling me about UCM, and I just loved everything about it. So I thought, ‘I have to go to this school!’”

•Affordable, high-quality education •150+ programs including nursing and aviation •200+ student organizations •Dedicated faculty and staff committed to student success

– Armonya Harris, nursing McCluer North High School

Schedule your visit today at ucmo.edu/visit.

/UCentralMO

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April 12, 2019


Maryville’s active learning approach sets the national standard Sponsored content by Maryville University

In typical classrooms, students sit in rows of desks, listening to a professor deliver a lecture. At Maryville University, we’re doing things differently. Our approach is revolutionizing higher education by putting students at the center of learning. As part of our Digital World program, all on-campus traditional undergraduate students receive a free iPad with 150+ apps, the delivery system for this new way of learning. Using the latest technology and collaborating with fellow students in innovative learning spaces, you will be the center of your education. Our life coaches use learning diagnostics to develop a personalized learning profile for every student, enabling our faculty to create customized learning experiences. Whether it’s the latest learning apps on the iPad, class projects spread out across campus and the St. Louis area, Cyber Security students working with clients in our state-of-the-art Cyber Fusion Center, virtual reality and augmented reality, flying drones, 3D printers, and learning spaces utilizing the latest technology — Maryville’s active learning approach prepares students for a globally connected workforce. With our revolutionary approach, it’s no surprise 97 percent of Maryville graduates obtain a job in their chosen field within six months of graduation.

PHOTO: JAY FRAM FOR MARYVILLE UNIVERSITY

97%

90+ ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

CAREER PLACEMENT RATE

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3,000

of our full-time students RECEIVE AID

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Sport management majors go pro Sponsored content by Grant Riggs, senior public relations major and sport management minor, McKendree University

Lauren (Putbrese) Carro ’16, senior manager of guest services and event operations for the St. Louis Blues. Photo: McKendree University

Recent graduates of McKendree University’s sport management program now represent the NBA, MLB, NFL, NHL and athletic departments within the NCAA Power Five, Mid-Major and Division II collegiate conferences. In less than a decade, sport management has grown to become one of McKendree’s most popular and successful programs, with nearly 90 students and classes that incorporate hands-on experience. In order to ensure that students are obtaining the right knowledge, Dr. Elisabeth “Lis” Erickson, assistant professor of sport management, utilizes her connections within the field. “I am in regular communication with people who work in the sport field and I adjust the information I share with students, in and out of class, to reflect what current professionals say is happening in both professional and collegiate sport,” she said. “Our curriculum has

adjusted to ensure that students have both the theoretical knowledge and the practical experiences employers tell us they want their entry-level employees to have.” Using their education, experiences and internships, several recent McKendree graduates have made an immediate impact in their careers, including Lauren (Putbrese) Carro ’16, senior manager of guest services and event operations for the St. Louis Blues; Kendall Butler ’16 , premium sales consultant for Las Vegas Stadium; Erica Schuelke ’17, fan experience representative for the Kansas City Chiefs and Trevor Brumleve ’17, operations manager at NRG Park. As Lis looks upon the program she has built in just five years, the progress is evident. In-class experiences, hands-on projects and internships are allowing McKendree graduates to make immediate impacts. “Employers — both at the internship and full-time, ‘real’ job level — have repeatedly told me that our students’ and alumni’s abilities to speak to these experiences put those folks head and shoulders above other candidates for the same position,” she said.

Continue Your Story At McKendree University, we make you a priority by offering top-notch, award-winning degree programs on-campus or online. You will learn from respected faculty in a supportive environment. Our classes balance theory with real-world application that is so valuable in the workplace today. Start your next chapter today!

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April 12, 2019


EXPLORE ROCKHURST UNIVERSITY

PHOTO: STATEPOINT MEDIA

How to find and apply for scholarships Content provided by StatePoint Media

Savvy students and families know that scholarships can play an integral role in meeting college costs. To help students and families find and apply for scholarships, Sallie Mae, the nation’s saving, planning, and paying for college company, is offering six tips: Get an early start. Apply for scholarships your junior year of high school and every year in college. Approximately 50 percent of available scholarships are for students already enrolled in college. There are also many scholarships available for graduate school. Don’t miss out. To qualify for $150 billion in financial aid, including scholarships, complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Schools use the FAFSA to put together financial aid packages, states use it to determine eligibility for state aid, and it’s required for many scholarship applications. Some aid is awarded on a first-come, first-served basis, or from programs with limited funds, so the earlier families fill out the FAFSA, the better. Remember, not everything is a deal. Never pay for scholarships and be wary of “guaranteed” money. Don’t be lured in by sites or organizations that charge a fee to access scholarship applications. School counselors and school financial aid offices can recommend reputable options.

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Even small savings count. Many scholarships may just be for a few hundred dollars, but these can add up and can be used for a variety of college expenses. Apply for as many as possible — you’ll be surprised how much you can earn. Take advantage of doorbusters. Some scholarship awards are as easy as showing up and registering. Sallie Mae, for example, offers a $1,000 monthly sweepstakes for those who sign up for its free college planning tools. Keep an eye out for unique gifts. Scholarships are not limited to athletics and academics. There is free money for college for just about any interest, including awards for lefthanded students, skateboarders and bakers. To find additional tips and to register for Sallie Mae’s Scholarship Search, home to 5 million scholarships collectively worth more than $24 billion, or the recently launched Graduate School Scholarship Search, home to 850,000 graduate school scholarships worth more than $1 billion, visit www.salliemae. com. After filling out a brief profile, students are matched with relevant scholarships, their award amounts, application requirements, and deadlines. The tool automatically sends updates when it identifies new matches. “Scholarships are one of the most prevalent funding sources families use to help pay for college,” said Martha Holler, senior vice president, Sallie Mae. “The key is knowing where to find them, and how to apply.”

Located in Kansas City, Missouri, RU offers a quality, Jesuit education with a distinct focus on lifelong learning, leadership and service. What’s the best way to find out if RU is the place for you? Schedule your campus visit.

rockhurst.edu/visit Rockhurst University admits students of any race, color and national or ethnic origin.

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Save time, register online before going to college fairs Content provided by MOACAC

CHOOSE UMSL for endless possibilities ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪

Top ranked academic programs Named “Most Affordable” by Business Insider Over 100 student organizations for you to join Named one of “America’s Best Colleges” by Forbes Internship and Networking opportunities

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At University of Missouri–St. Louis, we transform lives. Visit us and see for yourself.

The information form — a staple of college fairs across the country — has gone digital in St. Louis. Instead of students filling out a card for every college representative they talk to, students can visit www.StriveFair. com whenever they have time before a college fair. At this site, students register one time, then are texted and emailed a bar code for college representatives to scan. The registration allows students to create a user name to edit their profile if their information changes. The website allows students to let colleges know their academic information and interests. The day after the fair, students will receive an email report with the contact information of every college that scanned the bar code. The form is a virtual mirror of the

cards found at college fairs. Instead of spending their time at a college fair filling out several similar interest cards at the college tables they visit, students can spend their time actually talking to college representatives. The program streamlines the process for those representatives as well. The online program is free for the student and the school district. Many school counselors use the website to see if students are signing up for local college fairs. The Missouri Association of College Admission Counseling, a non-profit organization of admissions professionals, high school counselors and educational institutions, is using the system for its Sunday, April 28 Spring College Fair.

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8 warning signs you won’t finish college RYAN LANE of NerdWallet

Forty percent of students who enroll in a four-year college don’t graduate within six years, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. These students miss the benefits of a degree, but they may still pay dearly for their education: According to the office of Federal Student Aid, students who don’t complete college are three times more likely to have loans default than those who earn degrees. To avoid this negative outcome and stay on track, colleges and researchers say to watch for these eight warning signs that can derail your education. 1. NOT ACCEPTING HELP Some colleges offer programs that spot students who need help. Georgia State University monitors 800 factors to identify atrisk students. “We brand our system ‘GPS Advising,’” says Timothy Renick, the university’s senior vice president for student success. “Students are notified the moment that they make a wrong turn, and we can advise them about what they need to do to get back on path again.” But it’s up to students to take advantage of assistance at Georgia State and elsewhere. Don’t be embarrassed to use tutoring services, writing centers and other on-campus resources; they’re there to help you. 2. TAKING TOO FEW CREDITS The Community College Research Center found that students at four-year colleges who take 15 credits their first semester are 11 percent more likely to earn a degree than those who take 12 credits. That’s partly due to basic math. Many colleges consider 12 credits a full course load. But taking 12 credits each semester will leave you 24 credits shy of graduating after four years. To help you graduate on time, take at least 15 credits each semester or catch up with summer classes. 3. CHOOSING UNNECESSARY COURSES The 15 credits you take to stay on track shouldn’t be for just any courses. You want classes that count toward your major, says Bruce Vandal, senior vice president of the national nonprofit Complete College America. “The more credits you take in your major the first year, the better off you are,” says Vandal. He recommends nine as a goal. Balance the types of classes, too. Renick says Georgia State University identified “toxic

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combinations” of courses. For example, they courses, Vandal says to advocate for yourself. found students struggle when taking calculus Tell your adviser you deserve to take regular courses and be responsible for getting the and physics in the same semester. support you need. 4. STRUGGLING IN YOUR MAJOR Pay attention to your grades in courses 6. RUNNING OUT OF MONEY related to your major. They predict your If you’re facing a financial shortfall, talk to the financial aid office about options like chances for success. “If you barely pass that first course, talk to completion scholarships and emergency a faculty member or adviser about how you loans. For example, Georgia State University can strengthen your skills before attempting provides micro grants to help students comupper-level and more difficult coursework in plete their studies. the field,” Renick says. Make sure you complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, as well. The FAFSA makes you eligible for gov5. BEING PLACED IN REMEDIAL ernment grants, loans and other financial CLASSES Remedial classes are supposed to prepare aid. Only 60.9 percent of high school seniors students for college-level work. But they can submitted a FAFSA in 2018, according to the make students feel like they don’t belong in National College Access Network. college. If you need remedial classes, you’re not 7. SKIPPING CLASS alone. Approximately 1 in 4 freshmen end up Students who don’t attend class struggle in remedial classes, according to the national academically. “This view is not just what facthink tank Education Reform Now. ulty members claim to get you to show up,” If you feel comfortable taking traditional Renick says. “The data supports the claim.”

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If you’re not putting in the necessary effort, ask yourself why. Regularly skipping class is likely symptomatic of a bigger issue. Figure out the root problem and address it before your grades suffer too much. 8. DEALING WITH ADVERSITY Unforeseen life events, such as illness or the death of a loved one can force students to drop out. Long-term issues involving food insecurity and housing can prove overwhelming as well. Before withdrawing, see what emergency services your school offers, like grief counseling, food vouchers or short-term housing. “There is likely somebody on that campus who can help you navigate (your) challenges,” says Vandal. “It’s not something you have to bear alone.” This article was provided to The Associated Press by the personal finance website NerdWallet. Ryan Lane is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: rlane@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @ ryanhlane.

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things to know about college financial aid award letters

Content provided by Brandpoint Media

High school students across the country will soon be eagerly awaiting financial aid award letters from colleges. For many aspiring college students and their parents, this is when things can start to get complicated. College is a big expense and it’s important to have a clear understanding of the financing options to ensure students and their parents make wise decisions. According to a recent survey from College Ave Students Loans by Barnes & Noble College Insights, more than twice as many parents (69 percent) found this time — figuring out how to pay for college — more stressful than the college selection process (30 percent). Joe DePaulo, CEO and Co-Founder of College Ave Student Loans, is here to help by decoding one of the most important documents on the road to college: the financial aid award letter.

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1. Financial aid award letters can be confusing Financial aid letters vary from school to school. There is no uniform format they must follow, so each letter can vary in how they use symbols (such as L or LN for loans) and even how they calculate the cost of college. Make sure to compare how items such as scholarships, loans and work-study are applied to the bottom line. 2. Know the ‘net price’ of college Your letter may include the cost of attendance (COA), which is an estimate of what you can expect to pay for one year of school. Typically the COA includes tuition, fees, and room and board. To find the ‘net price’ at the college, subtract the ‘free aid,’ or scholarships and grants, from the COA. This net price — which sometimes can be significantly lower than the ‘sticker’ price of a college — is the amount the family is expected to pay.

3. Expect to pay more Though financial aid award letters typically call out the “expected family contribution” (EFC), expect to pay more over the course of the year. According to the College Ave survey, 59 percent of parents said college was more expensive than they had anticipated. Parking, transportation home, club and organization fees, even dining out can add to the bottom line. 4. You can petition your award letter If you felt the financial aid award letter did not accurately represent your family’s needs, you can ask the school to re-evaluate your financial aid offer (especially if your circumstances have changed). Contact the financial aid office and request they review your cost of attendance to ensure it includes other expenses (such as childcare) or changes in your ability to pay (job loss or medical costs), which may help

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you secure more money in grants, work-study or loans. 5. Keep applying for scholarships While some scholarship applications have many applicants, others have little competition. Be sure to apply for specialty scholarships unique to your area of educational study or even local area. Every amount helps and reduces the amount your family has to pay. One easy scholarship to apply for is the College Ave $1,000 Scholarship Monthly Sweepstakes. If you find you still fall short after scholarships and grants and federal loans in the student’s name, one option to consider is a private student loan. Look for a private loan with good interest rates and flexible terms that meet your family’s unique needs. Check out the College Ave Student Loans calculator to find out how different repayment plans save you money over the total cost of the loan.

April 12, 2019


COMING THURSDAY MAY 9 2019 St. Louis Post-Dispatch Scholar Athletes

Fifty-three years ago, Hall of Fame baseball writer Bob Broeg introduced the idea of honoring senior students whose excellence on the playing field and in the classroom set them apart from the rest.

Don’t miss the 2019 Scholar Athlete Section AND MORE delivered straight to you:

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St. Louis Post-Dispatch Scholar Athletes have: • Lettered in at least one varsity sport • Are in the top 25% of their graduating class • Are in good standing at their respective high schools.

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TAKE YOUR EXPERIENCE FROM CLASSROOM TO CAREER: you’ll do that here.

Southeast is a place for PEOPLE DRIVEN TO DO. And, there’s no limit to what you’ll do. You will have ONCE-IN-A-LIFETIME OPPORTUNITIES to see your education in action—and IMPRESS FUTURE EMPLOYERS, too! / Only University in the nation to participate in week-long Center for Strategic and International Studies program / 70+ study abroad locations / Competitions from Belgium to Guam / Spending the week in corporate offices of fashion industry giants / Countless internships from animal assisted therapy to NASA

573.651.2590 admissions@semo.edu @semissouristate

See what you’ll do at Southeast. SEMO.EDU/COLLEGECONNECTION

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