Page 1

S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 1 8 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

WEDNESDAY • 12.20.2017 • $2.00

SWEEPING TAX BILL ALL BUT LAW

County Council passes trimmed budget

LAST-MINUTE CHANGES WILL FORCE HOUSE TO REVOTE

Stenger did not stay for vote; his plan was cut by $31 million

Trump is expected to sign the bill before Christmas ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON • Jubilant Republicans

pushed on Tuesday to the verge of the most sweeping rewrite of the nation’s tax laws in more than three decades, a deeply unpopular bill they insist Americans will learn to love when they see their paychecks in the new year. President Donald Trump cheered the lawmakers on, eager to claim his first major legislative accomplishment. There was one last hiccup. Speaker Paul Ryan, who has worked years toward the goal of revamping the tax code, gleefully pounded the gavel on the final House vote, but then it turned out it

BUSINESS CUTS ARE PERMANENT, NOT SO FOR INDIVIDUALS

STATE AND LOCAL TAX DEDUCTIONS WILL BE CAPPED FOR SOME

RESTORES TAX BENEFITS STRIPPED FROM EARLIER VERSIONS

Permanently slashes tax rate for corporations to 21 percent from 35 percent. Tax cuts for individuals and families expire in 2026.

Imposes $10,000 cap on federal deduction used in connection with state and local income, property and sales taxes.

Restores some tax benefits, benefits, including deductions for medical expenses and interest paid on student loans.

DEFICIT WILL GROW

CHILD TAX CREDIT RISES

OBAMACARE PROVISION

Projected to add $1.46 trillion to the nation’s $20 trillion debt over a decade. If cuts don’t expire, deficits would rise more.

See TAX • Page A6

$1,000-per-child tax credit doubles to $2,000, with up to $1,400 available in IRS refunds for families who owe little or no taxes.

BY JEREMY KOHLER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CLAYTON • The St. Louis County Council gave final approval on Tuesday to a budget that will cut $31 million in spending next year from the $696 million that County Executive Steve Stenger had sought. The council voted 6-1 for final approval, with 5th District Councilman Pat Dolan in dissent. The cuts were part of legislation filed last week in a surprise move by Council Chairman Sam Page that was more about the council taking control of spending than cutting programs. In its final meeting of the year, the council finalized a veto-proof move

Repeals the part of the health care law that requires all Americans to carry health insurance or face a tax penalty.

NICKLAUS: Tax-cut bill falls short of GOP promises > A16 • ANALYSIS: GOP’s Tea Party promises are dashed > A6

See COUNTY • Page A4

‘CHARLES IS OUR GUY’

Tax credits for low-income housing lose state funding BY KURT ERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • A panel led by Gov. Eric Greitens put the brakes on issuing low-income housing tax credits Tuesday, dealing a blow to supporters who say the move will drive away jobs and reduce housing opportunities for poor people. In a decision telegraphed during a meeting last month, the Missouri Housing Development Commission voted 8-2 against using state money to match $140 million in federal low-income housing tax credits. Greitens, a Republican newcomer, has said the action will save tens of See CREDITS • Page A5

St. Charles County cuts health services as nurses exit

DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

Notre Dame High School freshman girls basketball team members Grace Corzine (left) and Mackenzie Thompson help Charles Tabor up the stairs to take his seat in the gym at the school on Dec. 5. He has been a regular at school events since 1998.

Notre Dame’s No. 1 booster attended a holiday show 19 years ago; he’s now its most beloved, ardent fan

BY DOUG MOORE St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The basketball team at Notre Dame High School ran through its drills on the highgloss court. Music — the loud stuff that teens like but older adults such as Charles Tabor don’t appreciate — boomed, pumping adrenaline for layups and three-point attempts. Tabor, 77, sat on the first row of the gymnasium bleachers, waiting for the home team to take on Ursuline Academy. He has been a regular at this courtside seat since 1998. With the help of his retractable white cane, Tabor can make his way from the curb, where he is dropped off by a CallA-Ride van, into the school. But as soon as

Tabor is spotted, at least one student from this Catholic all-girls school runs out to say hello and escorts him inside. Tabor first showed up at the small south St. Louis County school around this time

TASTY TRADITIONS FOR NEW YEAR’S EVE

19 years ago, after hearing on the radio about a Christmas program at Notre Dame. He doesn’t recall much about the holiday performance, but he does remember former athletic director Thom Champion greeting him and asking his name. “I’m Charles Tabor,” he said. “Welcome to Notre Dame, Charles,” Champion said. “When he said that, I knew where I wanted to be,” Tabor said. A warm voice. A kind word. That was all Tabor needed to become the most loyal fan, the one everyone knows. The elderly man in the Notre Dame cap and matching letter jacket who pulls out a kazoo to

BY BLYTHE BERNHARD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

See TABOR • Page A4

See VACCINES • Page A5

The St. Charles County Department of Public Health canceled vaccine clinics, education programs and CPR training this fall after more than half of its nurses and a health educator resigned. “Kids aren’t getting immunizations. They’re not being educated on everything from tobacco to STDs to hand-washing practices,” said Brittany McNamara, a former health educator with the department who resigned in August over concerns

Historic building’s fate up to aldermen

• A8

Katy Trail boosters fight development

• A11

MOSTLY CLOUDY

Cards are still assessing their options

• B1

WEATHER B10

Petro hoping to get the Blues on track

TODAY

50°/35°

No shot in the arm

MOSTLY CLEAR

TOMORROW

52°/42°

LET’S EAT

POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

2017 s60 DynAMIc Lease for 36 months,

329

$ west county VolVo 636-200-2822 • www.wcvolvo.com

14410 MANCHESTER ROAD MANCHESTER, MO 63011

Lease for 36 months,

529

$

per

mo*

$329 due at signing

2018 VolVo Xc90 t5 AwD

stk#18558

• B1

1 M Vol. 139, No. 354 ©2017

2017 Xc60

per

mo*

$529 due at signing

sAVe up to $10,000 on remaining inventory

*Total due includes $0 cap cost reduction. Customer to pay first payment, tax, title, license and dealer administrative fee. Lease at 7,500 miles per year (additional miles are available). S60 MSRP $41,410. No security deposit with approved credit. Financing through VCFS. Expires 1/2/2018. ALL TRADE-IN ACCEPTED


S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 1 8 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

WEDNESDAY • 12.20.2017 • $2.00

SENATE PASSES SWEEPING TAX BILL

County Council passes trimmed budget

LAST-MINUTE CHANGES WILL FORCE HOUSE TO REVOTE

Stenger did not stay for vote; his plan was cut by $31 million

Trump is expected to sign the bill before Christmas ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON • Jubilant Republicans

pushed on Tuesday to the verge of the most sweeping rewrite of the nation’s tax laws in more than three decades, a deeply unpopular bill they insist Americans will learn to love when they see their paychecks in the new year. President Donald Trump cheered the lawmakers on, eager to claim his first major legislative accomplishment. House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., who has worked years toward the goal of revamping the tax code, gleefully pounded the gavel on the final House vote, but then it turned out it wasn’t

BUSINESS CUTS ARE PERMANENT, NOT SO FOR INDIVIDUALS

STATE AND LOCAL TAX DEDUCTIONS WILL BE CAPPED FOR SOME

RESTORES TAX BENEFITS STRIPPED FROM EARLIER VERSIONS

Permanently slashes tax rate for corporations to 21 percent from 35 percent. Tax cuts for individuals and families expire in 2026.

Imposes $10,000 cap on federal deduction used in connection with state and local income, property and sales taxes.

Restores some tax benefits, benefits, including deductions for medical expenses and interest paid on student loans.

DEFICIT WILL GROW

CHILD TAX CREDIT RISES

OBAMACARE PROVISION

Projected to add $1.46 trillion to the nation’s $20 trillion debt over a decade. If cuts don’t expire, deficits would rise more.

See TAX • Page A6

$1,000-per-child tax credit doubles to $2,000, with up to $1,400 available in IRS refunds for families who owe little or no taxes.

BY JEREMY KOHLER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CLAYTON • The St. Louis County Council gave final approval on Tuesday to a budget that will cut $31 million in spending next year from the $696 million that County Executive Steve Stenger had sought. The council voted 6-1 for final approval, with 5th District Councilman Pat Dolan in dissent. The cuts were part of legislation filed last week in a surprise move by Council Chairman Sam Page that was more about the council taking control of spending than cutting programs. In its final meeting of the year, the council finalized a veto-proof move

Repeals the part of the health care law that requires all Americans to carry health insurance or face a tax penalty.

NICKLAUS: Tax-cut bill falls short of GOP promises > A16 • ANALYSIS: GOP’s Tea Party promises are dashed > A6

See COUNTY • Page A4

‘CHARLES IS OUR GUY’

Tax credits for low-income housing lose state funding BY KURT ERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • A panel led by Gov. Eric Greitens put the brakes on issuing low-income housing tax credits Tuesday, dealing a blow to supporters who say the move will drive away jobs and reduce housing opportunities for poor people. In a decision telegraphed during a meeting last month, the Missouri Housing Development Commission voted 8-2 against using state money to match $140 million in federal low-income housing tax credits. Greitens, a Republican newcomer, has said the action will save tens of See CREDITS • Page A5

St. Charles County cuts health services as nurses exit

DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

Notre Dame High School freshman girls basketball team members Grace Corzine (left) and Mackenzie Thompson help Charles Tabor up the stairs to take his seat in the gym at the school on Dec. 5. He has been a regular at school events since 1998.

Notre Dame’s No. 1 booster attended a holiday show 19 years ago; he’s now its most beloved, ardent fan

BY DOUG MOORE St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The basketball team at Notre Dame High School ran through its drills on the highgloss court. Music — the loud stuff that teens like but older adults such as Charles Tabor don’t appreciate — boomed, pumping adrenaline for layups and three-point attempts. Tabor, 77, sat on the first row of the gymnasium bleachers, waiting for the home team to take on Ursuline Academy. He has been a regular at this courtside seat since 1998. With the help of his retractable white cane, Tabor can make his way from the curb, where he is dropped off by a CallA-Ride van, into the school. But as soon as

Tabor is spotted, at least one student from this Catholic all-girls school runs out to say hello and escorts him inside. Tabor first showed up at the small south St. Louis County school around this time

TASTY TRADITIONS FOR NEW YEAR’S EVE

19 years ago, after hearing on the radio about a Christmas program at Notre Dame. He doesn’t recall much about the holiday performance, but he does remember former athletic director Thom Champion greeting him and asking his name. “I’m Charles Tabor,” he said. “Welcome to Notre Dame, Charles,” Champion said. “When he said that, I knew where I wanted to be,” Tabor said. A warm voice. A kind word. That was all Tabor needed to become the most loyal fan, the one everyone knows. The elderly man in the Notre Dame cap and matching letter jacket who pulls out a kazoo to

BY BLYTHE BERNHARD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

See TABOR • Page A4

See VACCINES • Page A5

The St. Charles County Department of Public Health canceled vaccine clinics, education programs and CPR training this fall after more than half of its nurses and a health educator resigned. “Kids aren’t getting immunizations. They’re not being educated on everything from tobacco to STDs to hand-washing practices,” said Brittany McNamara, a former health educator with the department who resigned in August over concerns

Historic building’s fate up to aldermen

• A8

Katy Trail boosters fight development

• A11

MOSTLY CLOUDY

Cards are still assessing their options

• B1

WEATHER B10

Petro hoping to get the Blues on track

TODAY

50°/35°

No shot in the arm

MOSTLY CLEAR

TOMORROW

52°/42°

LET’S EAT

POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

2017 s60 DynAMIc Lease for 36 months,

329

$ west county VolVo 636-200-2822 • www.wcvolvo.com

14410 MANCHESTER ROAD MANCHESTER, MO 63011

Lease for 36 months,

529

$

per

mo*

$329 due at signing

2018 VolVo Xc90 t5 AwD

stk#18558

• B1

2 M Vol. 139, No. 354 ©2017

2017 Xc60

per

mo*

$529 due at signing

sAVe up to $10,000 on remaining inventory

*Total due includes $0 cap cost reduction. Customer to pay first payment, tax, title, license and dealer administrative fee. Lease at 7,500 miles per year (additional miles are available). S60 MSRP $41,410. No security deposit with approved credit. Financing through VCFS. Expires 1/2/2018. ALL TRADE-IN ACCEPTED


M 1 WEDNESDAY • 12.20.2017 • A2

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM

Find these features and exclusive subscriber content at stltoday.com/extra

THE BEST TV OF 2017?

CARDS, BLUES, MIZZOU AND MORE

Not a single commercial network show made the cut, but shows such as “Ozark” and “Big Little Lies” did. See if your favorites are on the list. stltoday.com/ entertainment

The hot stove is just lukewarm as we await what the Cards might do next. The Blues are fighting the injury bug. Cuonzo’s boys could use a big win. Have questions on your STL favorites? Ask Jose de Jesus Ortiz in a live chat at 1 p.m. Wednesday. stltoday.com/sports

Pet funeral marks a somber trip around the circle of life TONY MESSENGER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

After more than 30 years of parenting, I presided over my first family pet funeral last weekend. Ruby was a red-eared slider. My daughter, Bethany, found her on a country road in Ozark County a couple of years ago. The turtle was barely the size of a quarter. We had found other turtles on visits to the family farm where my wife grew up, but they never made their way back to the city with us. Usually, we’d put them on the back patio at my mother-in-law’s house for a couple of days in a plastic pool with some grass and strawberries. We’d send them back into the wild before our trip back home. But Ruby was a keeper. Her first home was a cake pan. Shocked that we didn’t kill her three weeks or so after bringing her home, we bought an aquarium. She outgrew that one and we bought an even bigger one. She seemed happy enough. Until that day around Thanksgiving when she was floating upside down. It reminded me of the first time I lost a goldfish. There were two of them, actually: Rocky and Jaws.

It was the ’70s, obviously, and I was 10 or so, about the same age my daughter is now. We had a red-brick wall in the corner of our yard that was the entrance to our subdivision. I dug a hole, buried my fish, and marked the grave. The story I remember is that my sister gave them too much food. Maybe that’s how Ruby died, though it’s more likely it was my turn to clean out the aquarium and I waited too long. Maybe the water was too cold, or the heat lamp too hot. Everything I knew about turtle care, I learned on Google. These are the moments in life we remember: our first brushes with the pain of loss. I turned to Twitter for help before Ruby’s funeral service. I wanted to read a bit of Scripture that would properly memorialize the occasion. I settled on Luke 12:6: “Are not five sparrows sold for two pennies? Yet not one of them is forgotten by God.” The verse reminded me of another holiday trip to the farm. My brother-in-law was teaching one of my sons to shoot. After some safety lessons and target practice, they wandered around a couple of barns looking for sparrows in the rafters. Andrew shot a few. Now he carries a rifle for a living, as a U.S. Marine. Death is a way of life on the farm. Sparrows, cows, goats, deer. There are no funerals. It’s a circle of life

thing. But Ruby died in the city. We brought her back where we found her to memorialize her life and death. Bethany painted a headstone. Her cousins and brother scouted out a proper burial spot and dug a hole. I prepared to say a few words. How does one eulogize a turtle? The whole thing reminded me a bit of a Sunday this summer when we were down on the farm and we decided to have our own church service rather than go to the church my mother-in-law attends. The kids designed the entire thing. They read Bible verses and sang songs. My son gave a brief sermon. Something about integrity, I think. It was all going well until one of the cousins burped loudly while passing out communion. We laughed uncontrollably. The postservice potluck was fabulous. As a young altar boy, this was always my greatest fear, that I’d spill the holy water, or burp, or ring the bell at the wrong time, or trip while lighting a candle and light the whole church on fire. There were no candles at Ruby’s funeral. Just a few words, a moment of silence and the sounds of farm life in the background. It rained later, which always brings the turtles out on the farm, crossing the dirt road, in search of something. Life marches on. Slow and steady she goes. Tony Messenger • 314-340-8518 @tonymess on Twitter tmessenger@post-dispatch.com

100 NEEDIEST CASES: HELPING THOUSANDS

HOME LOST TO WATER DAMAGE CASE 99 • Recently, this single mother

with two preteen children learned her home was infested with bedbugs. They left home and lost all of their furniture. Things returned to normal until she arrived home one day and her home was flooded. The family is living with her brother. Meanwhile, she has fallen behind on utilities and other necessities. She needs money to help with bills, gift cards to purchase basics for her children, school supplies and necessities such as towels, household supplies and clothing.

Case profiles by Harry Jackson Jr. and Sarah Bryan Miller of the Post-Dispatch.

Harvey Weinstein’s alleged predatory behavior could end up costing him more than just his reputation. The disgraced movie exec’s wife, Georgina Chapman, stands to walk away from their 10-year marriage with nearly $12 million, thanks to a prenuptial agreement, TMZ reports. Chapman, 41, announced shortly after sexual misconduct allegations against Weinstein, 65, broke in October that she was leaving him. Vegas will be home for Lady Gaga • Lady Gaga will join the list of superstars with regularly scheduled shows in Las Vegas in 2018, when she kicks off a two-year residency in December. Gaga said Tuesday that performing in Vegas had been her “lifelong dream.” She says she is humbled to be joining a historical lineup of performers that include Tony Bennett, Frank Sinatra and Elvis Presley. Legend of Nazareth • John Legend will play Jesus of Nazareth in “Jesus Christ Superstar Live in Concert,” coming on Easter 2018 from NBC. “Just woke up to Andrew LLoyd Webber tweeting about me. It’s a good day,” Legend, the “All of Me” singer, said Tuesday on social media. Lamar will sing at halftime but not in stadium • Seven-time Grammy Award winner Kendrick Lamar, 30, will perform during halftime at the College Football Playoff national championship game in Atlanta on Jan. 8. Lamar will perform at Atlanta’s Centennial Olympic Park. Inside Mercedes-Benz Stadium, where the game will be played, the school bands will perform at halftime. Lamar’s performance will be part of ESPN’s halftime coverage. Ex-‘Property Wars’ star heading for prison • A former star on the “Property Wars” reality TV show has been sentenced to 17 years in federal prison in Arizona for bank fraud, money laundering and aggravated identity theft. Scott Menaged, 40, also was ordered Tuesday to pay more than $33 million in restitution to banks and more than 200 investors. He pleaded guilty in October.

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS

From news services

LOTTERY MULTISTATE GAMES MEGA MILLIONS Tuesday: 28-37-39-42-58 Mega ball: 02 Megaplier: 3 Estimated jackpot: $223 million POWERBALL Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $269 million

MISSOURI LOTTERIES

LACEY CALL • St. Louis Community College at Meramec

THREE WAYS TO GIVE

TO HELP

• Donors can adopt any of the cases — not just the 100 profiled at STLtoday.com/neediest. The program supplies donors with a list of a family’s needs. All gifts go directly to the family, through a social worker. • New this year, those who want to participate in the campaign can set up a fundraising page and share it through social media. It’s similar to other online crowd sourcing efforts like GoFundMe, but 100 percent of donations go to the families in the 100 Neediest Cases campaign and the funds are tax deductible. • The program also accepts monetary gifts. Every dollar will go directly to a needy family, and every family will receive something.

Visit 100neediestcases.org Or call 314-421-6060 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on weekdays. Or mail a check or money order (no cash) payable to: 100 Neediest Cases P.O. Box 955925 St. Louis, Mo. 63195-5925

HOW IT WORKS For generations, the 100 Neediest Cases campaign has helped thousands of disadvantaged families during the holidays. This year, the program will benefit more than 10,000 needy households — selected by social service agencies that partner with the United Way. The Post-Dispatch is showcasing 100 cases. But all the families will share the cash donations.

LOTTO Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $6.9 million SHOW ME CASH Tuesday: 03-12-28-35-36 Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $83,000 PICK-3 Tuesday Midday: 870 Evening: 217 PICK-4 Tuesday Midday: 7500 Evening: 4506

ILLINOIS LOTTERIES

LUCKY DAY LOTTO Tuesday Midday: 02-07-20-35-37 Evening: 04-17-19-30-36 LOTTO Monday: 08-13-17-22-30-49 Extra shot: 03 Thursday’s estimated jackpot: $17 million PICK-3 Tuesday Midday: 306 FB: 8 Evening: 184 FB: 3 PICK-4 Tuesday Midday: 2045 FB: 7 Evening: 5942 FB: 6

STLTODAY.COM/LOTTERY Current and past numbers, plus jackpots from state lotteries around the country.

CONTACT US

INSIDE Business .............. A16 Editorial .............. A18 Horoscopes ......... EV2 Letters to editor .. A18 Obituaries ........... A20 Puzzles ................ EV2

Weinstein is losing his wife, $12 million as well as reputation

Musician Alan Parsons is 69. Actress Jenny Agutter is 65. Actress Blanche Baker is 61. Singer Billy Bragg is 60. Country singer Kris Tyler is 53. Singer David Cook is 35. Actor Jonah Hill is 34. Singer JoJo is 27.

FROM STAFF REPORTS

CASE 100 • T is the single mother of three children, 14, 6 and 1. She was diagnosed with cancer as a teenager and has struggled with her medications for years; they make her feel worse, and that makes it difficult to take care of her children. The past year has been particularly tough. The family lost everything in a house fire and had to start over. T works, but she had to go to part time when she found that her baby was being mistreated at his day care center. Now she’s lucky to get 20 hours a week, for $10 an hour, and her food stamps were cut by half because of her job. She was in an accident that caused serious dental injuries; complications from that led to a minor heart attack. T took a class in budgeting and money management, and stretches her meager income as far as it will go. This year, stretching doesn’t extend to Christmas. They all need clothes, and T wants to give her children toys and books as well as necessities.

PEOPLE

Reviews ............... A10 Sports calendar .... B2 Stocks .................. A17 Tony Messenger .... A2 TV listings ........... EV3 Weather .............. B10

The Post-Dispatch is a Lee Enterprises Newspaper and is published daily. USPS: 476-580. Postmaster send address changes to St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 900 N. Tucker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63101-1099. Periodical postage paid at St. Louis. Suggested average weekly retail prices for home delivery with full digital access are: Monday-Sunday $8.92, Sunday-Friday $9.10, Monday-Friday $6.88, Thursday-Sunday $7.09, Sat-Mon $6.16, Fri-Sun $6.16, Sun-Mon $5.62, Sat-Sun Only $5.62, Sunday Only $4.09. The subscription price includes all applicable sales tax and a charge for the convenience of having the paper delivered. To avoid delivery charges, call 314-340-8888 to arrange pick up of your paper at one of our local distribution centers. Rates are based on the annual charges for premium days and/or plus sections delivered on 7/16/17, 8/27/17, 9/17/17, 9/24/17, 10/15/17, 11/23/17, 12/3/17, 12/17/17, 12/24/17, 1/14/18, 2/18/18, 3/18/18, 4/15/18, 5/20/18, 6/24/18, 7/15/18, 8/26/18, 9/09/18, 9/23/18, 10/14/18, 11/22/18 and timing of these charges may affect the length of the subscription. A nonrefundable account set up fee will be charged to qualifying new starts.

MISSING YOUR PAPER? 314-340-8888

For news tips only, phone ................................ 314-340-8222 Submit news tips ..........................metro@post-dispatch.com

homedelivery@post-dispatch.com

Submit events for our calendar ............ events.stltoday.com

To get your paper redelivered, call or email us before 9 a.m. Monday-Friday, 10 a.m. Saturday-Sunday and 9 a.m. on holidays, where redelivery is available.

Main number....................................................314-340-8000

SUBSCRIBE

STLtoday.com/subscriberservices 888-785-3201

PLACE DEATH NOTICES

STLtoday.com

800-365-0820 ext. 8600

PLACE CLASSIFIED OR OTHER ADVERTISING

STLtoday.com

314-621-6666

FAX AD INFORMATION BUY REPRINTS

314-340-8664 STLtoday.mycapture.com

Editor: Gilbert Bailon.......................................314-340-8387 Features: Amy Bertrand ..................................314-340-8284 Local news: Marcia Koenig............................... 314-340-8142 Business: Roland Klose.................................... 314-340-8128 Online: Amanda St. Amand.............................. 314-340-8201 Projects: Jean Buchanan .................................. 314-340-8111 Sports: Roger Hensley...................................... 314-340-8301


LOCAL

12.20.2017 • Wednesday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A3

Doctor charged with sexually abusing patients BY KIM BELL st. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. LOUIS COUNTY • A doctor was charged Monday with sexual abuse and sodomy for allegedly groping two women who were his patients at pain clinics in St. Louis County. The doctor, Abhishek Jain, 38, of the 12300 block of Tributary Drive in Maryland Heights, was charged in St. Louis County with two counts of second-degree sexual abuse and two counts of seconddegree sodomy. He is being held in lieu of $500,000 bail. Jain’s medical license was on probation in Missouri, and he already was in trouble in Maine, Kansas and California, state records show. Jain works at Interventional Pain Management Services, which has offices at 5000 Cedar Plaza Parkway in unincorporated St. Louis County and at 261 Dunn Road in Florissant. The manager and owner

could not be reached for comment. Charges say both incidents of abuse happened in October. One of the alleged victims, a 60-year-old woman, was at Jain’s office Jain on Cedar Plaza to be treated for chronic pain. Police say that during an exam Oct. 17, the doctor groped her breasts and genitals with his hands. Another woman, 61, told police the doctor groped her breasts and genitals during an appointment on Oct. 23. She was at the Dunn Road pain clinic to be treated for hip and back pain. The woman told police she stopped the exam once he abused her. Each sodomy charge is a felony punishable by up to four years in prison and a $5,000 fine. Each sex abuse charge is a misdemeanor punishable by up to a year in jail and a $1,000 fine. Court records in St. Louis County, as of Tuesday morning, showed no attorney

Appeals court backs ordinance on interfering with an officer BY CELESTE BOTT st. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. LOUIS • The Missouri Eastern District appeals court ruled on Tuesday that St. Louis County’s ordinance barring interference with a police officer is constitutional. A lawsuit filed by two Ferguson protesters in 2015 alleged the ordinance was vague, giving police officers too much discretion and threatening First Amendment rights. In February, a circuit court judge disagreed. Tuesday’s ruling upholds that dismissal. Melissa V. Bennett and Rebecca “KB” L. Frazier, both of University City, were arrested on Oct. 22, 2014, near the Ferguson police station, during a demonstration for a National Day of Protest to Stop Police Brutality. The office of County Counselor Peter Krane charged them nine months later, accusing them of having “unlawfully interfered in any manner with a police officer or other employee of the county in the performance of his official duties or to obstruct him in any manner whatsoever while performing any duty.” The cases against them were later dropped by the county, but Bennett and Frazier sued anyway on the grounds that they were subject to that same ordinance in other protests. Their attorneys argued to the court that the law is so broad it limited their right to protest. Lawyers for St. Louis County contended that the ordinance strikes a balance between protecting free

speech while still allowing police officers to do their jobs. In its opinion, the appeals court found that there was no danger of arbitrary or discriminatory application because the ordinance “uses commonly understood language that properly informs police officers of when enforcement is proper.” Words in the ordinance such as “interfere” and “obstruct” are commonly understood to mean physical action, the court found, interpreting the law as applying only to physical interferences and obstructions and not limiting protesters’ speech. “Therefore, police officers have guidance from the Ordinance that only physical conduct is prohibited, and the Ordinance does not contain an impermissible delegation to police officers for resolution based on a subjective basis,” wrote Judge Kurt S. Odenwald. Maggie Ellinger-Locke, attorney for the plaintiffs, said the court’s determination that the ordinance applies only to physical conduct is a partial victory for Bennett and Frazier, as well as for the First Amendment. “This flies in the face of ongoing police practices, where the ordinance is routinely applied to purely verbal conduct,” she said in a statement. “Thus the ruling represents a promising change in the law. We hope County police will take notice, amending their operating practices accordingly.” They are still weighing the next steps, Ellinger-Locke said, including a potential appeal to the Missouri Supreme Court.

CAPE GIRARDEAU, MO. > Man who killed wife sentenced in related case • A Cape Girardeau, Mo., would-be author who murdered his wife in 2011 and then helped write a tell-all book while behind bars was sentenced Tuesday to 35 years in prison. James Clay Waller, 45, pleaded guilty in October in federal court in St. Louis to a charge of interstate domestic violence. In addition to the prison Waller term, Waller is barred from profiting from the book or anything else involving his story. Waller admitted in his plea that he dug a grave for his estranged wife, Jacque Sue Waller, northeast of Cape Girardeau on May 31, 2011. The next day, he beat and strangled her at his home in Jackson, Mo. after a meeting at a divorce lawyer’s office, his plea says. The disappearance of the mother of 5-year-old triplets attracted national attention. Waller pleaded guilty in Cape Girardeau County Circuit Court in 2013 to seconddegree murder and led investigators to his wife’s body as part of a deal for 20 years in prison. But local officials and Jacque Waller’s relatives were dissatisfied with that sentence and asked federal officials to take another look at the case. Investigators found inmates to whom he had confessed

TRAIL OF TROUBLE

The Missouri Division of Professional Registration confirmed to the Post-Dispatch that Jain is a licensed medical doctor but is on probation in Missouri due to past concerns, documented in state records. Jain was put on probation in 2008 by the Maine Medical Center “due to continued issues regarding professionalism,” according to the records. Maine Medical Center eventually fired him from a residency program, records say. The next year, the Kansas Board of Healing Arts denied his application for a license based on his troubles in Maine. He also lied about it on his Kansas

application, officials say. In February 2013, the California Medical Board issued him a physician and surgeon’s license, subject to probation based on the Kansas denial. The board found he had not disclosed the Kansas denial on his application in California. In July 2016, he applied for a physician and surgeon’s license in Missouri. Jain told the Missouri board that a former coworker alleged that Jain assaulted her in a hospital supply room in May 2015, preventing her from leaving. Jain denied assaulting her, records say. She filed suit but eventually dropped the case in an out-of-court settlement, he told investigators. After examining his background, the Missouri board decided to issue him a license — but put him on three years’ probation. Kim Bell • 314-340-8115 @kbellpd on Twitter kbell@post-dispatch.com

Family of man and infant daughter killed in crash settles suit for $2.2 million Driver got three years in prison; he and Grove bar were sued after ’16 deaths Wolf

BY JOEL CURRIER st. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. LOUIS • Relatives of a St. Louis man

and infant killed last year in a DWI crash have settled a lawsuit against the drunken driver and the Grove bar where he drank before getting behind the wheel. The $2.2 million settlement approved Tuesday by St. Louis Circuit Judge Jason Sengheiser says insurance policies for Atomic Cowboy and Eric Wolf will pay relatives of Antwon Jones, 40, and his 2-month-old daughter, Scarlett Rose Jones. Both were killed in March 2016 when Wolf rear-ended them at Vandeventer and McRee avenues. Wolf was speeding at least 70 mph when he hit Jones’ Subaru. Wolf, who turned 31 on Tuesday, was sentenced in September to three years in prison after pleading guilty to two counts of involuntary manslaughter. Wolf, who lived in the 200 block of Bellerive Boulevard in St. Louis, also received five years’ probation. The lawsuit claimed Atomic Cowboy, at 4140 Manchester Avenue, served Wolf alcohol despite him being “visibly intoxicated.” Wolf then drove his car while in-

Jones

Scarlett Rose

toxicated and crashed. When police arrested Wolf, he declined an officer’s request for a blood sample, so police obtained a search warrant to get one. Court documents said Wolf’s bloodalcohol content was 0.12 percent — 50 percent over the legal limit — “several hours after the accident.” The $2.2 million settlement is being split evenly between Antwon Jones’ fiancée, Terherrah Givens, who is the mother of Scarlett Rose, and five biological relatives of Jones. Atomic Cowboy’s insurance policy will pay $2 million; Wolf’s policy will pay $200,000. Lawyers for Givens will receive about $372,000 of Givens’ payout; lawyers for Jones’ relatives will get about $434,000 of their sum. Sengheiser asked relatives in court Tuesday if they thought the settlement was fair, and they said they did. At the end of the hearing, Sengheiser approved the settlement, pronounced it “fair and reasonable,” and offered his condolences. Joel Currier • 314-340-8256 @joelcurrier on Twitter jcurrier@post-dispatch.com

O P E N T O D A Y, 9 a . m . - 1 0 p . m .

LAW & ORDER CLAYTON > Killer gets life sentence • A St. Louis man who murdered an Illinois college student who was trying to sell his sports car through Craigslist was sentenced Tuesday to life in prison without parole. Michael Gordon, 27, was convicted in October of first-degree murder and armed criminal action in the May 2015 shooting death of 19-year-old Taylor Clark, a sophomore at Southern Illinois University Gordon Edwardsville. Gordon’s convoluted scheme, prosecutors argued at trial, was to replace his repossessed red Nissan 350Z by killing Clark and taking the car Clark was selling, which was the same model. Prosecutors said Gordon lured Clark to an area behind the MTC Truck Driver training school at 12000 Missouri Bottom Road in Hazelwood where Gordon worked, shot him once in the face with a .40-caliber pistol, dumped his body and tried to cover it up. The automatic sentence for the firstdegree murder conviction was life without parole because the state did not seek the death penalty.

on file to represent Jain. No one could be reached Tuesday on his behalf. A woman who answered the phone at Interventional Pain Management Services said the owner declined to comment. Investigators are asking any other patients who think they have been victimized to contact police at 314-615-5400.

and found the book manuscript in March 2016. He was indicted two months later. MADISON COUNTY > Victim dies days after I-55 pileup • One of the motorists involved in a massive crash on Interstate 55 near Edwardsville last Friday has died of her injuries. The Illinois State Police identified the victim as Pauline McKinney, 62, of Livingston, Ill. Trooper Calvin Dye Jr. said McKinney died at St. Louis University Hospital on Monday evening. She was among three people airlifted to hospitals after Friday’s crash. Dye said two other people remained hospitalized Tuesday in serious condition. Police say the multi-vehicle crash happened just before 1:45 p.m. Friday on northbound I-55 near Edwardsville. A truck driver, a 53-year-old man from Lewistown, Ill., was heading north on I-55 when he took his eyes off of the road, reached down to pick up a bottle of tea and struck a vehicle, Dye said. That caused a chain-reaction crash involving 10 vehicles. JEFFERSON CITY > State’s high court rules in favor of drugmaker • The Missouri Supreme Court sided with pharmaceutical giant Bayer AG on Tuesday, ruling that women suing the company over a birth control device had yet to illustrate why Missouri courts had jurisdiction in the case. Ninety-two women sued the company in St. Louis Circuit Court in 2016, alleging damaging effects from the contraceptive device, which is implanted into a woman’s fallopian tubes. Bayer has argued that because 85 of the women don’t live in Missouri, and that because the company is not based here, Missouri courts do not have jurisdiction. According to the ruling, attorneys for the women intend to file an amended petition boosting their side’s assertion that Missouri courts can take on the case. The St. Louis Circuit Court overruled Bayer’s motion to dismiss last year, and an appeals court sided with the circuit court. But in a unanimous decision Tuesday, the Supreme Court ruled Missouri courts do not have jurisdiction in the case and ordered the circuit court to vacate its prior decision. The judges said the lower court can weigh whether to consider the amended petition from the plaintiffs. Bayer is in the midst of a $63.5 billion takeover of Creve Coeur-based Monsanto. The company has faced increasing controversy over Essure, and stopped selling the device in all countries besides the United States in September.

GUARANTEED SIZE EVENT If your size is on this chart and not in stock in Levi’s® Men’s 505™ Regular Fit Jeans, 550™ Relaxed Fit Jeans or 559™ Relaxed Straight Fit Jeans, we will send you a free pair. Limit one free pair per customer. No phone orders accepted. See associate for details.

39

99

MEN’S

505TM JEANS 550TM JEANS 559TM JEANS

FIVE DAYS ONLY! Offer valid Dec. 20 through Dec. 24, 2017.


LOCAL

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 12.20.2017

School backers named gym after No. 1 fan

PHOTOS BY DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

Charles Tabor (seated center) attends the Notre Dame High School junior varsity basketball game against Ursuline Academy as he sits in the bleachers at Notre Dame on Dec. 5. Tabor, 77, who is blind, began attending events at the school 19 years ago and is now a regular fixture at most Notre Dame athletic events. TABOR • FROM A1

engage a quiet crowd. “We’re something in his life, and that’s important to him, and to us,” said Mark Bayens, athletic director since 2011. “This feels like family to him.” If there is an activity at Notre Dame, Tabor is there. Softball and basketball games. Plays. Christmas and spring concerts. The Fall Festival. “I believe in being active. If I wasn’t active, I wouldn’t be here talking to you.” A nod to mortality. An opportunity to tout his good health. Last year, Notre Dame added to the list of items for its annual auction the naming rights for the gymnasium. Dr. James and Beth Lundy, parents of a current Notre Dame student and a recent graduate, were the top bidders. They named the gym after Tabor. “When he starts to cheer, it’s so sweet and genuine,” said Beth Lundy, of O’Fallon, Ill. “There’s no pretension to it. It’s not about attention. He’s just excited to be there. You can just tell. I like to honor that kind of thing.” The Lundys, top bidders again this year, chose to keep Tabor’s name on the gym. Below the scoreboard hangs a sign: “The Charles Tabor Gymnasium In honor of Notre Dame High School’s #1 Fan”

THE SIXTH MAN

Tabor has been blind since he was 3, following unsuccessful cataract surgeries. “Am I bitter about it?” Tabor said without being asked. Not at all. Medical technology in the 1940s was not what it is today, he said. “What they couldn’t do for me they are able to do today,” Tabor said. “Those who have it rough are those who lose their sight when they are older.” For Tabor, it’s more about what he has than what might have been. He lives alone in a small apartment across from Tower Grove Park and next to a grocery store. The senior living high-rise on South Grand Boulevard sits on the city’s busiest bus line. At

Kathy Donovan talks with Charles Tabor during halftime at the Notre Dame High School junior varsity basketball game on Dec. 5.

Tower Grove Manor, he drinks his coffee black, steers clear of salt and looks forward to Mondays — better known as biscuits and gravy day at the retirement center. He plays bingo on Wednesday nights and attends Mass on Sunday. He wasn’t raised Catholic, growing up in Church of Christ and Baptist congregations. But Mass is a social event. A priest comes in so residents don’t have to go out. His relationship with Notre Dame High School may have held some sway. On the front door of his apartment, Tabor has mounted his “6th Man Award,” a plaque he received from the Notre Dame basketball program in 2012 during the annual sports banquet. “We wanted to recognize him for all the times he has come to support us,” Bayens said. “We came up with a special award.” Tabor attended Missouri School for the Blind, getting as far as eighth grade. At age 7, a scalp infection kept him out of class for a year “and I never caught up.” But he eventually earned a GED. In 1970, when his dad and stepmom retired and headed to Florida, Tabor moved with them. “I had no other choice in where to live,” said Tabor, who said homes for young disabled people were all but nonexistent at that time. In 1998, he moved back to St. Louis, after the deaths of his parents. He never really warmed up to Florida. The Midwest was

“Coming here, it’s like home to me,” said Charles Tabor as he waits for a Notre Dame High School freshman basketball game to start.

more to his liking, in temperature and temperament. His sister and her family still live in Florida. “My stepmom used to ask me: ‘What are you going to do when I die?’ I told her I was going to keep going like I always have.” He began looking for ways to connect with the city that he grew up in. That’s when he heard the public service announcement about a holiday program at Notre Dame. His income comes from the state’s Missouri Blind Pension program and Social Security. He reads books on American history and listens to college football and St. Louis Cardinals games. With the help of a talented announcer, Tabor says, he can see the action on the field, from a play action pass to a second base steal. Music is transcending. It takes him back, and holds him in the moment. “Music, you can picture it in your mind,” Tabor said. Although his teen years corresponded with the beginnings of rock ’n’ roll, he never veered far from big band and Sinatra. His favorite song is “My Way.” During an interview at his apartment, Tabor popped a CD into a portable player. An instrumental version of the song by Dutch conductor André Rieu and his orchestra filled the tiny dining room. For five minutes, Tabor said nothing, listening intently and moving his fingers over the braille dots on his bingo card.

The lyrics of the song he has listened to hundreds of times ran through his head. “Regrets, I’ve had a few But then again, too few to mention I did what I had to do And saw it through without exemption.” Silence filled the air several seconds after the song ended. He clicked the off button. “It symbolizes the life you might have lived,” Tabor finally said. “I’ve been through good times and other moments. It’s something you identify with.”

‘IT’S SO COOL AND UNIQUE’

Tabor is often among a small crowd at Notre Dame sporting events. Afternoon softball games are played when most parents are at work. That’s why it’s important that Tabor be there to show support, he said. From his cheers of “Let’s Go Rebels!” to leading the crowd in a rendition of “Take Me Out to the Ballgame,” Tabor makes his presence known. He says he even gives an occasional verbal jab to those who make questionable calls. “Where is your eyesight, ref?” Tabor chuckles when he tells that story — possibly more of a tall tale. Tabor arrives at basketball games early, cheering on the freshman squad and their growing pains, the scrappy JV battle and the prime-time varsity fa-

ceoff. The sounds of sneakers on hardwood. The swish of the ball in the net. The shouts of coaches. The cheers from parents. They all help Tabor gauge the action of the game. Still, he occasionally asks someone sitting nearby the score. For the students at Notre Dame, Tabor enhances the school experience. “No other school has a Charles,” said junior Amelia Shaw, 17. “He can’t see the games but he knows what is going on. He feels it. It’s so cool and unique. Charles is our guy.” Sophomore Kelly Oge, 15, first saw Tabor last year while walking through the gym to field hockey practice. A basketball game was going on. Tabor, as usual, was cheering and playing his kazoo. “I was so touched by him and his spirit that I actually started crying,” Kelly said. “He just made my heart full of happiness.” School president Meghan Bohac said Tabor fits nicely into the mission of Notre Dame: educating young women to become confident, compassionate Christian leaders. “He embodies that for our girls,” Bohac said. Conversations with Tabor are more like reflections, not surprising for someone his age. He often borrows from his favorite tune, stressing he has no regrets. But he does have a wish. In 1949, at 9, Tabor began listening to University of Notre Dame football games on the radio. It would be the year the Fighting Irish became national champions for the third time in four years. The team became his team. Sitting among the more than 75,000 fans in South Bend, Ind., would be incredible, he said. “I don’t know if it will ever happen. Getting tickets is probably impossible.” In the meantime, he’s got his local Notre Dame, a school of 230 students overlooking the Mississippi River. A school that embraced him two decades ago and never let go. Doug Moore • 314-340-8125 @dougwmoore on Twitter dmoore@post-dispatch.com

St. Louis County keeps spending at 2017 levels in new budget COUNTY • FROM A1

to wrest spending power from Stenger and individual department heads, who have enjoyed discretion to overbudget for programs and roll over unspent money year to year. Now county departments will have to hold spending at 2017 levels and come before the council to ask for any more money. Hazel Erby, the 1st District councilwoman, said she hoped the council could use some of the money saved to give raises to county employees who were “cut out” of money generated by a public safety tax that county voters approved in April. The bulk of that windfall was used to give an average 30 percent raise to po-

lice officers, and other county employees have appeared before the council for weeks to point out the unfairness. “I think most of us agree that something went wrong with allocating the funds and leaving out so many employees who deserved raises,” Erby said. “It almost brings tears to your eyes that so many support personnel were left out of the equation.” Stenger, who said last week that he would have something to say about the council’s move on his budget after final approval, left the meeting before the vote and did not respond to a reporter’s call and text seeking comment. There were fireworks — but they sizzled before the meeting in a chain of emails, and never materialized into their usual

public spectacle. Page said after the meeting that the county’s top lawyer had objected to the form of the budget ordinances, and had been refusing earlier in the day to prepare them. Page shared an email chain that started about two hours before the meeting in which he emailed County Counselor Peter Krane and asked for a written explanation for refusing to prepare the final budget bills for council approval. Krane responded that he had never been asked to prepare the bills. He said he had asked the council’s administrative director, Genevieve Frank, if the council wanted him to review the bills or put them in final form, and was told no. “Please let me know if you would like

my office to provide a legal opinion” about the bills, he wrote. But Krane apparently backed down before the meeting and wouldn’t talk about it afterward. Page told a reporter in an email that Krane’s claim that Frank had told him not to put the bills in final form for final passage was untrue. “This is exactly why the county council needs our own attorney who does not report to the county executive, and can be fired by the county executive at any moment,” he wrote. “It’s legal malpractice for your own lawyer to try to trap you in a game of gotcha.” Jeremy Kohler • 314-340-8337 @jeremykohler on Twitter jkohler@post-dispatch.com


LOCAL

12.20.2017 • Wednesday • M 1

Funding cut for housing credits likely to be felt in St. Louis, backers warn CREDITS • FROM A1

millions of dollars in state funds and lead to reforms of the controversial tax credit programs. The change was spearheaded by commission member Jason Crowell, who fought for years to rein in state tax credits as a Republican state senator from southeast Missouri. His plan would accept the federal low-income allocation but keep the state from matching it with its own tax credits. Crowell said he hopes the move will force the Legislature to address the longsimmering issue. “We are here today to demand reform from the General Assembly,” Crowell said. In a statement, Greitens said the move was a win for taxpayers at the expense of developers. “We’re not playing their games anymore. Politics as usual is over,” Greitens said. Lt. Gov. Mike Parson, a Republican who sits on the 10-member housing panel, urged members to instead adopt a plan to further study the issue before cutting off the state money. He said more facts were needed before the board took action. “I believe it will hurt rural Missouri,” Parson said. “None of us know the impact of what this is going to do to the people of the state of Missouri.” Crowell said, “I know the consequences.” The vote came less than two hours after Greitens announced he had appointed two new members to open seats on the panel, carrying on a practice of filling boards and commissions with allies who will carry out his policy wishes. He earlier stacked the state Board of Education and the Missouri Veterans Commission in order to replace the leaders of those agencies. The new members — Craig Porter of Kearney and John Scariot of St. Louis — joined Greitens, Crowell and other Greitens’ allies in scrapping the state portion of the tax credits. Porter is a developer in the Kansas City area and a former Clay County commissioner. Scariot is chief financial officer for BluePenguin Payments and a former financial officer at MasterCard. Parson was joined by a representative of Republican Treasurer Eric Schmitt in supporting further study of the issue. Jonathan Hensley, general counsel for Schmitt, said the treasurer believes time is needed to study the effects of federal tax reform that is before Congress this week. “We don’t know what it’s going to do,”

Hensley said. The state tax credit has drawn fire for being inefficient. Developers sell them to finance projects but typically receive just 42 cents on the dollar, far lower than the price paid for the federal credits. In June, state Auditor Nicole Galloway, a Democrat, found about $150 million in low-income state credits are redeemed a year. Long term, about $1.3 billion are outstanding and obligated to developers, meaning they will be redeemed in future years. Uncertainty over how much is redeemed each year makes budgeting in the state more difficult. Greitens said the program started with good intentions, but he highlighted the low price the credits fetch and its cost to the state. And he referenced past efforts to change the program that have failed in the Legislature because “a lot of politicians fear the insiders in this industry.” Supporters of the program say the lack of money will mean less investment in some of the poorest areas of St. Louis, where developers use the credits for housing projects. Parson said public hearings held last month found few opponents of the program. For example, at a public hearing on the new plan in St. Louis on Nov. 30, close to 100 people showed up and almost unanimously opposed the commission’s preliminary action to eliminate the state funding. There are more than 23,000 families on the housing voucher list in the city, said Cheryl Lovell, executive director of the St. Louis Housing Authority. Housing operated by the authority is already 99 percent to 100 percent occupied. “We have families contacting us every day looking for housing assistance,” she said. Withholding the state match of low-income housing tax credits “will only exacerbate the dire shortage” of affordable units. Sen. Scott Sifton, D-St. Louis County, said the commission’s plan is “throwing the baby out with the bathwater.” “I am ready, willing and able to talk about reform,” he said. “What the commission voted for (last month) is not reform. It’s decapitation.” Nicole McKoy, who works as a housing administrator for the local offices of the Salvation Army, said the organization has used the credits to develop housing for its clients. “We know the good it does for our clients,” she said. “The evidence is there.” Jacob Barker of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report. Kurt Erickson • 573-556-6181 @KurtEricksonPD on Twitter kerickson@post-dispatch.com

Cuts to vaccines, health education as nurses exit in St. Charles County VACCINES • FROM A1

about management. “This administration’s failure to rectify personnel issues has crippled their capacity to provide needed public health services.” Four out of seven public health nurses resigned from the department in the first half of 2017, leading to the cancellation of four back-to-school vaccine clinics and about 2,400 fewer immunizations last summer. The department administered 4,133 vaccines to children in July and August 2016 through a federally funded program that provides free vaccines for lowincome families. This year, it gave 1,754 vaccines in July and August. The nursing shortage also delayed the department’s CPR training classes for day care employees until 2018, health officials said. Two positions have remained open since the summer. Hope Woodson, the department’s director, said that between a “huge outpouring” of job applications and a remodeling of the offices on Boone’s Lick Road, she hasn’t had much time to do interviews. “We’ve had a staffing issue but we are filling those roles as quickly as possible,” she said. “Public health nurses turn over quickly.” After a spate of staff departures over the summer, the county’s human resources department conducted a satisfaction survey of health department employees. The majority of employees said they were satisfied in their jobs, according to the human resources report on the survey, while “some employees expressed a lack of trust in leadership and/or a feeling of lack of honesty from management.” The staffing shortage coincided with the department’s plans to revamp its services in an effort to increase revenue. The department’s health services division has projected revenue of $1.4 million and expenses of $2.1 million in 2018, according to the county budget. The health department shut down its sexually transmitted disease clinic this month and terminated the position of nurse practitioner. Residents will no longer be able to get STD exams or treatment through the department. There were more than 2,000 STD clinic visits in 2017 and all testing and treatment

supplies were provided by the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services. Woodson said the demand for STD treatment was outweighed by requests from residents for new services including travel vaccines and cholesterol, blood pressure and glucose screenings. “We’ve been tracking concerns for years,” she said. “Now was a good time to provide those services.” Between 2016 and Oct. 31 of this year, the health department’s immunization clinic received 158 requests for typhoid vaccines, 53 requests for yellow fever vaccines and 41 requests for malaria vaccines (which are unavailable in the U.S.). A spokesman for the department said there are no records on community requests for blood pressure and cholesterol screenings. In an exit interview from July obtained by the Post-Dispatch, a former nurse said the health department “has future plans that do not take into account the community needs and wants … the immunization and education program has significantly decreased their services, when the needs have tremendously increased.” While St. Charles County has some of the lowest poverty rates in the region, more than 8 percent of children, or about 7,700 kids in the county, live at or below the poverty level, according to 2016 U.S. Census Bureau estimates. That’s up from 6 percent in 2009. Last year, the department hosted 531 health education presentations on topics that included eating disorders, drug and alcohol use, hygiene and STDs to schools, day cares, prisons and community groups. There were 268 such presentations in 2017 with the health educator position vacant from July to November. “The cutbacks at the county health department have affected our students and families,” said Mary LaPak, spokeswoman for the Wentzville School District. “We used to be able to refer our students to the county for required immunizations, but they have not been the resource they were in the past due to lack of supply and personnel.” Blythe Bernhard • 314-340-8129 @blythebernhard on Twitter bbernhard@post-dispatch.com

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A5

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

PAIDADVERTISEMENT

Why Haven’t Senior Homeowners Been Told These Facts? Keep reading if you own a home in the U.S. and were born before 1955. It’s a well-known fact that for many senior citizens in the U.S. their home is their single biggest asset, often accounting for more than 50% of their total net worth. Yet, according to new statistics from the mortgage industry, senior homeowners in the U.S. are now sitting on more than 6.1 trillion dollars of unused home equity.1 With people now living longer than ever before and home prices back up again, ignoring this “hidden wealth” may prove to be short sighted. All things considered, it’s not surprising that more than a million homeowners have already used a governmentinsured Home Equity Conversion Mortgage or “HECM” loan to turn their home equity into extra cash for retirement. However, today, there are still millions of eligible homeowners who could benefit from this FHA-insured loan but may simply not be aware of this “retirement secret.” Some homeowners think HECM loans sound “too good to be true.” After all, you get the cash you need out of your home but you have no more monthly mortgage payments.

FACT: In 1988, President Reagan signed an FHA bill that put HECM loans into law.

loan don’t even bother to get more information because of rumors they’ve heard. That’s a shame because HECM loans are helping many senior homeowners live a better life. In fact, a recent survey by American Advisors Group (AAG), the nation’s number one HECM lender, found that over 90% of their clients are satisfied with their loans. While these special loans are not for everyone, they can be a real lifesaver for senior homeowners like Betty Carter, who recently took out a HECM loan with AAG so that she could finally get the extra cash she needed to fix up her house. “With the help of AAG, I have been able to repair my home’s foundation that I had been putting NO MONTHLY MORTGAGE off for several years, ref inish the PAYMENTS?2 EXTRA CASH? hardwood floors, paint the interior and will have the exterior painted within a few days. My house is It’s a fact: no monthly starting to look like my home again mortgage payments are required and it feels good,” says Carter. with a government-insured The cash from a HECM loan HECM loan;2 however the homeowners are still responsible can be used for any purpose. Many people use the money for paying for the maintenance to save on interest charges by of their home, property taxes, paying off credit cards or other homeowner’s insurance and, if high-interest loans. Other required, their HOA fees. common uses include making Another fact many are not home improvements, paying off aware of is that HECM reverse medical bills or helping other mortgages first took hold when family members. Some people President Reagan signed the simply need the extra cash for FHA Reverse Mortgage Bill everyday expenses while others into law 29 years ago in order are now using it as a “safety net” to help senior citizens remain in for financial emergencies. their homes. If you’re a homeowner age 62 Today, HECM loans are or older, you owe it to yourself simply an effective way for homeowners 62 and older to get to learn more so that you can the extra cash they need to enjoy make an informed decision. Homeowners who are interested retirement. in learning more can request a free Although today’s HECM 2017 HECM loan Information loans have been improved to Kit and free Educational DVD by provide even greater financial calling American Advisors Group protection for homeowners, toll-free at 1-800-661-5913. there are still many At no cost or obligation, the misconceptions. professionals at AAG can help For example, a lot of people you find out if you qualify and mistakenly believe the home also answer common questions must be paid off in full in such as: order to qualify for a HECM 1. What’s the government’s loan, which is not the case. In role? fact, one key advantage of a 2. How much money might I HECM is that the proceeds get? will first be used to pay off any 3. Who owns the home after I existing liens on the property, take out a HECM loan? which frees up cash flow, a huge You may be pleasantly blessing for seniors living on surprised by what you discover a fixed income. Unfortunately, when you call AAG for more many senior homeowners who information today. might be better off with HECM 1 Source: http://reversemortgagedaily.com/2016/06/21/seniors-home-equity-grows-to-6-trillion-reverse-mortgage-opportunity. 2If you qualify and your loan is approved, a Home Equity Conversion Mortgage (HECM) must pay off any existing mortgage(s). With a HECM loan, no monthly mortgage payment is required. A HECM increases the principal mortgage loan amount and decreases home equity (it is a negative amortization loan). AAG works with other lenders and financial institutions that offer HECMs. To process your request for a loan, AAG may forward your contact information to such lenders for your consideration of HECM programs that they offer. Borrowers are responsible for paying property taxes and homeowner’s insurance (which may be substantial). We do not establish an escrow account for disbursements of these payments. A set-aside account can be set up to pay taxes and insurance and may be required in some cases. Borrowers must occupy home as their primary residence and pay for ongoing maintenance; otherwise the loan becomes due and payable. The loan also becomes due and payable when the last borrower, or eligible non-borrowing surviving spouse, dies, sells the home, permanently moves out, defaults on taxes or insurance payments, or does not otherwise comply with the loan terms. American Advisors Group (AAG) is headquartered at 3800 W. Chapman Ave., 3rd & 7th Floors, Orange CA, 92868. (4824 NW Gateway Ave, Suite 201, Riverside, MO 64168). V2017.08.23_OR

These materials are not from HUD or FHA and were not approved by HUD or a government agency.


NATION

A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 12.20.2017

Massive tax package moving ahead TAX • FROM A1

wasn’t final after all. Senate Republicans appeared to have the votes needed to pass the measure, after holdout Republican Sens. Marco Rubio of Florida and Bob Corker of Tennessee said last week that they would support it. The Senate was expected to pass the legislation Tuesday night and send it on to Trump for his signature. But the Democrats noted that three provisions violated Senate rules. So the massive bill will be hauled back across the Capitol for the House to revote on Wednesday. GOP House members roared and applauded as their chamber passed the $1.5 trillion package largely along party lines, 227-203. Ryan declared, “This was a promise made. This is a promise kept,” as he and other GOP leaders convened a victory news conference moments later. The Senate was still on track to approve the package that will touch every American taxpayer and every corner of the U.S. economy, providing steep tax cuts for businesses and the wealthy, and more modest help for middle- and low-income families. After the delay for a second House vote, the measure then heads to Trump, who is aching for a win after 11 months of legislative failures and nonstarters. The president tweeted his congratulations to GOP leaders and “all great House Republicans who voted in favor of cutting your taxes!” The St. Louis-area members of the House, as expected, divided along party lines, with Reps. Ann Wagner, R-Ballwin; Jason Smith, R-Salem; Blaine Luetkemeyer, R-St. Elizabeth; Mike Bost, R-Murphysboro; Rodney Davis, R-Taylorville; and John Shimkus, R-Collinsville, all voting yes. Rep. William Lacy Clay, D-St. Louis, voted no. Wagner called it “pro-family tax reform.” But Clay said it was “one of the worst pieces of legislation that I have ever seen,” and predicted that it would force spending cuts in Missouri in programs such as Medicare. Congressional Republicans, who faltered badly in trying to dismantle Barack Obama’s Affordable Care Act, see passage of the tax bill as crucial to proving to Americans they can govern — and imperative for holding onto House and Senate majorities in next year’s midterm elections. They have repeatedly argued that the bill will spur economic growth

as corporations, flush with cash, increase wages and hire more workers. But they acknowledge they have work to do in convincing everyday Americans. Many voters in surveys see the legislation as a boost to the wealthy, such as Trump and his family, and a minor gain at best for the middle class. “I don’t think we’ve done a good job messaging,” said Rep. Greg Walden, R-Ore. “Results are what’s going to make this popular.” Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., said that “people are going to begin to see immediately that this is a different place than where they were” on the taxes they pay. “We are going to spend a lot of time talking about that and the reason that we want to be internationally competitive,” Blunt said. “And particularly where we live, in the middle of the country, the more the economy moves toward rewarding people who make things and grow things, the better we do.” Because of the lower corporate rates, he said, “the United States will be the best place for foreign investment over the next decade of anywhere in the world.” Democrats called the bill a giveaway to corporations and the wealthy, with no likelihood that business owners will use their gains to hire more workers or raise wages. Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., said she was “frustrated and angry” at the bill’s passage, and she called it a “missed opportunity to get permanent tax reform that would have focused on families in Missouri that are trying to figure out if they can ever afford to retire or send their kids to college.” “It could have been permanent, but because they wanted to do so much for the folks at the top they knew they could ram it through on a party-line vote,” she said. “And so they never really wanted to work with us, to find that sweet spot where we could have given real relief to the middle class and still done a more competitive corporate rate, and cleaned out some of the loopholes that they walked away from.” And Democrats mocked the contention that the bill will make taxes so simple that millions can file their returns “on a postcard” — an idea repeated often by the president. “We’re going to have to carry around a billboard for tax simplification,” declared Rep. Richard Neal of Massachusetts, the top Democrat on the Ways and Means Committee. Tax cuts for corporations would be

permanent while the cuts for individuals would expire in 2026 in order to comply with Senate budget rules. The tax cuts would take effect in January, and workers would start to see the tax changes in their paychecks in February. For now, Democrats are planning to use the bill in their campaigns next year. Senate Democrats posted poll numbers on the bill on a video screen at their Tuesday luncheon. “This bill will come back to haunt them, as Frankenstein did,” House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, DCalif., said. The bill would slash the corporate income tax rate to 21 percent from 35 percent. The top tax rate for individuals would be lowered to 37 percent from 39.6 percent. The legislation repeals an important part of the 2010 health care law — the requirement that all Americans carry health insurance or face a penalty — as the GOP looks to unravel the law it failed to repeal and replace. It also allows oil drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. The $1,000-per-child tax credit doubles to $2,000, with up to $1,400 available in IRS refunds for families who owe little or no taxes. Parents would have to provide children’s Social Security numbers to receive the child credit, a measure intended to deny the credit to people who are in the U.S. illegally. Disgruntled Republican lawmakers from high-tax New York, New Jersey and California receded into the background as the tax train rolled. They oppose a new $10,000 limit on the deduction for state and local taxes. Rep. Rodney Frelinghuysen, RN.J., was among those who voted against the bill. Frelinghuysen chairs the powerful House Appropriations Committee, and it is rare for committee chairmen to oppose major legislation. The bill is projected to add $1.46 trillion to the nation’s debt over a decade. GOP lawmakers say they expect a future Congress to continue the tax cuts so they won’t expire. That would drive up deficits even further. The bill would initially provide tax cuts for Americans of all incomes. But if the cuts for individuals expire, most Americans — those making less than $75,000 — would see tax increases in 2027, according to congressional estimates. Chuck Raasch of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report.

ion

J

A Comprehensive Approach to Wound Healing

ANALYSIS

GOP’s Tea Party promises are dashed in tax cut embrace BY ANDREW TAYLOR Associated Press

WASHINGTON • The Tea Party class of 2010 vowed to usher in a new era for the Republican Party, one in which conservatives clamoring for fiscal discipline would roll back government spending to rein in trillion-plus budget deficits. Not anymore. Republicans are returning to their Ronald Reagan-era roots — tax cuts first, followed by vague promises of cutting spending down the road. Concerns about growing budget deficits have been shelved as Republicans controlling Washington focus instead on delivering tax breaks along with spending increases for the military. GOP leaders insist they haven’t abandoned their desire to confront trillion-dollar deficits. Looking toward 2018, House Speaker Paul Ryan has raised the prospect of tackling runaway benefit programs — with the spike in the deficit caused by the tax overhaul already being used to justify a potential round of austerity next year. That would require political courage that’s rare in an election year in which Republicans face the prospect of daunting losses. If history repeats, the spending cuts won’t be realized. Reagan’s assault on the bureaucracy sputtered. Republicans in Congress haven’t made a serious run at cutting spending since a failed 2011 budget deal delivered automatic cuts known as sequestration to Washington. Those too have unraveled. And whether President Donald Trump’s tax cuts prove to be durable remains to be seen. Reagan’s 1981 tax cut was pared back several times. Three of the following four presidents — George Bush, Bill Clinton and Barack Obama — signed tax increases into law. For now, the clear winners are the individuals soon to pocket tax cuts, along with corporations and businesses who stand to reap a windfall. The potential losers are the people who rely on the social safety net. But if Republicans fail, again, in their promises to wrestle the budget under control, the joke will be on the Tea Party base that thought it was voting for fiscal conservatism. The budget deficit, which registered $666 billion in the 2017 budget year, is set to soar even higher, fueled by the tax cuts, a disaster relief total set to breach $130 billion, and long-promised, record budget increases for the military. Trillion-dollar deficits loom before the end of Trump’s term, which has Republicans already planning a pivot to long-promised curbs on government benefit programs such as food stamps, Medicaid and Medicare. “There is no way out,” Rep. Mark Sanford, R-S.C., a member of the party’s deficit hawk wing, said Tuesday. “The tax bill is in essence the nail in the coffin on driving the absolute mathematical necessity of reform to entitlement programs. You can’t have both.” Ryan said in an interview Tuesday that “even if we get the kind of growth we hope to get (from tax cuts), you still have to reform entitlements if you’re going to get this debt under control. You cannot grow your way out of the entitlement problem we have coming.”

r o f us

Cardinals

Spring Training! $ 00 1645 March 19th through March 24th 2018

per person

At SSM Health Wound Care and Hyperbarics Center, we treat all wounds. Our approach to wound care is aggressive and comprehensive, coordinating traditional and advanced therapies that aid and accelerate the healing process. Our center is staffed by a multi-disciplinary team of physicians and nurses with advanced training in wound care.

We treat all chronic wounds associated with, but not limited to: • Slow-to-heal or non-healing wounds

• Internal injuries or open wounds from radiation therapy

• Diabetic foot ulcers

• Bone infection (called osteomyelitis)

• Lower leg or foot wounds • Surgical wounds that have opened

• Acute traumatic and crush injuries

• Non-healing skin grafts or surgical flaps

For more information about our services, please call 636-949-7158 or visit ssmhealth.com.

Wound Care and Hyperbarics Medical Office Building 1 330 First Capitol Drive, Suite 120 St. Charles, MO 63301 ©2017 SSM Health. All rights reserved. SJSC-STL-16-170741 12/17

(based on double occupancy -single rate is available)

Trip includes:

• Round Trip Airfare to Ft. Lauderdale (2 bags included) • Five Nights at the LaQuinta Inn and Suites in Jupiter FL • Continental Breakfast Daily • All Hotel Taxes • Reserved Seats on March 20th (vs Mets) 21th (vs Marlins) 22nd (vs Braves) • One Day Bullpen Club with Lunch Buffet • Transportation To and From the Ball Park and the Airport • Free Day on Friday, March 23rd to Explore the Area (Rental Cars Offered)

Don't Miss Out! Only 24 Spaces are Available.

This Trip Typically Fills Up Quickly.

Contact Karen Furlow at

800-899-1046

karen@4ambassadortravel.com to reserve your space today!


NATION

A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • WeDneSDAy • 12.20.2017

Massive tax package moving ahead TAX • FROM A1

final after all, as Democrats noted that three provisions violated Senate rules. So the massive bill must be hauled back across the Capitol for the House to revote on Wednesday. The Senate vote was 51-48 early Wednesday, with all Republicans in favor and all Democrats opposed. Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., was absent because of his illness. But the votes needed to pass the measure were reeled inn after holdout Republican Sens. Marco Rubio of Florida and Bob Corker of Tennessee said last week that they would support it. GOP House members roared and applauded as their chamber passed the $1.5 trillion package largely along party lines, 227-203. Ryan declared, “This was a promise made. This is a promise kept,” as he and other GOP leaders convened a victory news conference moments later. The bill will touch every American taxpayer and every corner of the U.S. economy, providing steep tax cuts for businesses and the wealthy, and more modest help for middle- and low-income families. After the delay for a second House vote, the measure then heads to Trump, who is aching for a win after 11 months of legislative failures and nonstarters. The president tweeted his congratulations to GOP leaders and “all great House Republicans who voted in favor of cutting your taxes!” The St. Louis-area members of the House, as expected, divided along party lines, with Reps. Ann Wagner, R-Ballwin; Jason Smith, R-Salem; Blaine Luetkemeyer, R-St. Elizabeth; Mike Bost, R-Murphysboro; Rodney Davis, R-Taylorville; and John Shimkus, R-Collinsville, all voting yes. Rep. William Lacy Clay, D-St. Louis, voted no. Wagner called it “pro-family tax reform.” But Clay said it was “one of the worst pieces of legislation that I have ever seen,” and predicted that it would force spending cuts in Missouri in programs such as Medicare. Congressional Republicans, who faltered badly in trying to dismantle Barack Obama’s Affordable Care Act, see passage of the tax bill as crucial to proving to Americans they can govern — and imperative for holding onto House and Senate majorities in next year’s midterm elections. They have repeatedly argued that the bill will spur economic growth as corporations, flush with cash, in-

crease wages and hire more workers. But they acknowledge they have work to do in convincing everyday Americans. Many voters in surveys see the legislation as a boost to the wealthy, such as Trump and his family, and a minor gain at best for the middle class. “I don’t think we’ve done a good job messaging,” said Rep. Greg Walden, R-Ore. “Results are what’s going to make this popular.” Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., said that “people are going to begin to see immediately that this is a different place than where they were” on the taxes they pay. “We are going to spend a lot of time talking about that and the reason that we want to be internationally competitive,” Blunt said. “And particularly where we live, in the middle of the country, the more the economy moves toward rewarding people who make things and grow things, the better we do.” Because of the lower corporate rates, he said, “the United States will be the best place for foreign investment over the next decade of anywhere in the world.” Democrats called the bill a giveaway to corporations and the wealthy, with no likelihood that business owners will use their gains to hire more workers or raise wages. Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., said she was “frustrated and angry” at the bill’s passage, and she called it a “missed opportunity to get permanent tax reform that would have focused on families in Missouri that are trying to figure out if they can ever afford to retire or send their kids to college.” “It could have been permanent, but because they wanted to do so much for the folks at the top they knew they could ram it through on a party-line vote,” she said. “And so they never really wanted to work with us, to find that sweet spot where we could have given real relief to the middle class and still done a more competitive corporate rate, and cleaned out some of the loopholes that they walked away from.” And Democrats mocked the contention that the bill will make taxes so simple that millions can file their returns “on a postcard” — an idea repeated often by the president. “We’re going to have to carry around a billboard for tax simplification,” declared Rep. Richard Neal of Massachusetts, the top Democrat on the Ways and Means Committee. Tax cuts for corporations would be

permanent while the cuts for individuals would expire in 2026 in order to comply with Senate budget rules. The tax cuts would take effect in January, and workers would start to see the tax changes in their paychecks in February. For now, Democrats are planning to use the bill in their campaigns next year. Senate Democrats posted poll numbers on the bill on a video screen at their Tuesday luncheon. “This bill will come back to haunt them, as Frankenstein did,” House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, DCalif., said. The bill would slash the corporate income tax rate to 21 percent from 35 percent. The top tax rate for individuals would be lowered to 37 percent from 39.6 percent. The legislation repeals an important part of the 2010 health care law — the requirement that all Americans carry health insurance or face a penalty — as the GOP looks to unravel the law it failed to repeal and replace. It also allows oil drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. The $1,000-per-child tax credit doubles to $2,000, with up to $1,400 available in IRS refunds for families who owe little or no taxes. Parents would have to provide children’s Social Security numbers to receive the child credit, a measure intended to deny the credit to people who are in the U.S. illegally. Disgruntled Republican lawmakers from high-tax New York, New Jersey and California receded into the background as the tax train rolled. They oppose a new $10,000 limit on the deduction for state and local taxes. Rep. Rodney Frelinghuysen, RN.J., was among those who voted against the bill. Frelinghuysen chairs the powerful House Appropriations Committee, and it is rare for committee chairmen to oppose major legislation. The bill is projected to add $1.46 trillion to the nation’s debt over a decade. GOP lawmakers say they expect a future Congress to continue the tax cuts so they won’t expire. That would drive up deficits even further. The bill would initially provide tax cuts for Americans of all incomes. But if the cuts for individuals expire, most Americans — those making less than $75,000 — would see tax increases in 2027, according to congressional estimates. Chuck Raasch of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report.

ion

J

A Comprehensive Approach to Wound Healing

ANALYSIS

GOP’s Tea Party promises are dashed in tax cut embrace BY ANDREW TAYLOR Associated Press

WASHINGTON • The Tea Party class of 2010 vowed to usher in a new era for the Republican Party, one in which conservatives clamoring for fiscal discipline would roll back government spending to rein in trillion-plus budget deficits. Not anymore. Republicans are returning to their Ronald Reagan-era roots — tax cuts first, followed by vague promises of cutting spending down the road. Concerns about growing budget deficits have been shelved as Republicans controlling Washington focus instead on delivering tax breaks along with spending increases for the military. GOP leaders insist they haven’t abandoned their desire to confront trillion-dollar deficits. Looking toward 2018, House Speaker Paul Ryan has raised the prospect of tackling runaway benefit programs — with the spike in the deficit caused by the tax overhaul already being used to justify a potential round of austerity next year. That would require political courage that’s rare in an election year in which Republicans face the prospect of daunting losses. If history repeats, the spending cuts won’t be realized. Reagan’s assault on the bureaucracy sputtered. Republicans in Congress haven’t made a serious run at cutting spending since a failed 2011 budget deal delivered automatic cuts known as sequestration to Washington. Those too have unraveled. And whether President Donald Trump’s tax cuts prove to be durable remains to be seen. Reagan’s 1981 tax cut was pared back several times. Three of the following four presidents — George Bush, Bill Clinton and Barack Obama — signed tax increases into law. For now, the clear winners are the individuals soon to pocket tax cuts, along with corporations and businesses who stand to reap a windfall. The potential losers are the people who rely on the social safety net. But if Republicans fail, again, in their promises to wrestle the budget under control, the joke will be on the Tea Party base that thought it was voting for fiscal conservatism. The budget deficit, which registered $666 billion in the 2017 budget year, is set to soar even higher, fueled by the tax cuts, a disaster relief total set to breach $130 billion, and long-promised, record budget increases for the military. Trillion-dollar deficits loom before the end of Trump’s term, which has Republicans already planning a pivot to long-promised curbs on government benefit programs such as food stamps, Medicaid and Medicare. “There is no way out,” Rep. Mark Sanford, R-S.C., a member of the party’s deficit hawk wing, said Tuesday. “The tax bill is in essence the nail in the coffin on driving the absolute mathematical necessity of reform to entitlement programs. You can’t have both.” Ryan said in an interview Tuesday that “even if we get the kind of growth we hope to get (from tax cuts), you still have to reform entitlements if you’re going to get this debt under control. You cannot grow your way out of the entitlement problem we have coming.”

r o f us

Cardinals

Spring Training! $ 00 1645 March 19th through March 24th 2018

per person

At SSM Health Wound Care and Hyperbarics Center, we treat all wounds. Our approach to wound care is aggressive and comprehensive, coordinating traditional and advanced therapies that aid and accelerate the healing process. Our center is staffed by a multi-disciplinary team of physicians and nurses with advanced training in wound care.

We treat all chronic wounds associated with, but not limited to: • Slow-to-heal or non-healing wounds

• Internal injuries or open wounds from radiation therapy

• Diabetic foot ulcers

• Bone infection (called osteomyelitis)

• Lower leg or foot wounds • Surgical wounds that have opened

• Acute traumatic and crush injuries

• Non-healing skin grafts or surgical flaps

For more information about our services, please call 636-949-7158 or visit ssmhealth.com.

Wound Care and Hyperbarics Medical Office Building 1 330 First Capitol Drive, Suite 120 St. Charles, MO 63301 ©2017 SSM Health. All rights reserved. SJSC-STL-16-170741 12/17

(based on double occupancy -single rate is available)

Trip includes:

• Round Trip Airfare to Ft. Lauderdale (2 bags included) • Five Nights at the LaQuinta Inn and Suites in Jupiter FL • Continental Breakfast Daily • All Hotel Taxes • Reserved Seats on March 20th (vs Mets) 21th (vs Marlins) 22nd (vs Braves) • One Day Bullpen Club with Lunch Buffet • Transportation To and From the Ball Park and the Airport • Free Day on Friday, March 23rd to Explore the Area (Rental Cars Offered)

Don't Miss Out! Only 24 Spaces are Available.

This Trip Typically Fills Up Quickly.

Contact Karen Furlow at

800-899-1046

karen@4ambassadortravel.com to reserve your space today!


12.20.2017 • Wednesday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A7

Special Holiday Class THIS WEDNESDAY & SATURDAY

AT THE

SUPERSTORE ON OLIVE!

Learn the best lighting, setting and posing tips for getting those magical portraits in front of your beautiful Christmas tree!

1 Hour Lecture

SIGN UP ONLINE OR IN STORES!

for only $10

LAST MINUTE

GIFT IDEAS

shop now!

FREE LENS & SAVE $200!

10%

OFF

GX85 W/12-32 MM LENS WITH FREE 45-150 MM LENS

X-DROP WRINKLERESISTANT BACKDROP

• 16 MP Live MOS Sensor, 3.0” Tiltable Touch LCD • 4K Video, 4K Photo, ISO 200 - 25,600, Wi-Fi • 5-Axis Image Stabilization, Dual IS, • 9 programmable function buttons

599.99

$

After Instant Rebate. Was $799.99

Flash Modifiers

$

25U0E

$

VAL

139.99

PERFEC T FOR FULL LENGTH PORTRA ITS

SPEEDLIGHTS The ProMaster speedlight works with your camera to add light where you want it. It automatically adjusts its exposure and light beam to match your camera and lens settings.

STARTING AT

149.99

$

TORCH

RING LIGHT WITH

Organizers

Studio lighting in your pocket. Offering photographers and videographers best-in-class LED technology. 5700 KELVIN • 800 LUMEN

FREE

PHOTO VIDEO DRONE STUDIO

STAND

$20 VALUE

149.99 $79.99

$

STARTING ARTING AT $19.99

NEW W PRODUCT PHOTO EDITING CONSOLE LE FOR AD ADOBE LIGHTROOM.

SAVE TIME & GET MORE M CREATIVE! EXCLUSIVELY AT CREVE COEUR CAMERA!

SAVE $15

60 VALUE

$

BLUETOOTH SPEAKERS FOR THE PAIR

9.99

$

REG. $29.99

PERFECT STOCKING STUFFER!

AVAILABLE IN BLUE, RED & BLACK

Flash Modifiers

9-in-1 Collapsible Reflector Kit (40”)

STARTING AT

$

114.99

$

Color Checker Passport Photo Color Control and Creativity for Photography

19.99 $84.99 REG. $99.99

ALL LOCATIONS!

MON-SAT 10AM-9PM • SUN 12- 6PM SAT, DEC. 23 10AM-8PM • SUN, DEC. 24 10AM-4PM $ $ $ $

SAVE 200 SAVE 100 SAVE 150 SAVE 100 I N S TA N T L Y

G7

ART LENSES

w/14-42 Lens

• 16 MP Live-MOS Sensor, 3.0” Tilt touch LCD screen • 5-Axis Image Stabilization, Touch AF, Wi-Fi built-in • Shoot up to 8.6 fps, 4K Ultra HD Video, 121 point AF

• 24.2 MP CMOS Sensor with 3” LCD • Shoot up to 5 fps, ISO 100-25600 • 11 - Point AF System, Full HD Video

• 16 MP Live MOS Sensor, 3.0” Swivel Touch screen LCD • 4K UHD Video, 4K Photo, ISO 200 - 25,600, Wi-Fi • Continuous shooting up to 8 fps, DFD AF Technology

599.99

$

$

After Instant Rebate. Was $799.99

OM-D EM-10 MARK III

w/AF-P 18-55VR

399.99

SAVE 100 SAVE 150 $

$

150-600MM Di VC USD G2

FZ300

• 12.1 MP MOS Sensor, 24x Optical zoom f/2.8 Constant • 3.0” Free Angle Touch LCD, 5-Axis Hybrid O.I.S. • Shoot up to 12 fps, 4k Photo Mode, 4k Video

GREAT IDEA FOR A STOCKING STUFFER

699.99

$

After Instant Rebate. Was $549.99

1299.99

$

After Instant Rebate. Was $1399.99

$

449.99

After Instant Rebate. Was $799.99

WITH ANY NEW CAMERA OR LENS PURCHASE, YOU GET

INSTANT

REWARDS YOU CAN USE THEM TOWARDS: Classes, Warranties, Filters, Personal or Business Printing and other photo lab services. See store for details.

After Instant Rebate. Was $599.99

Same Price, Better Advice www.cccamera.com CREVE COEUR SUPERSTORE 12747 Olive Blvd 314-567-3456

SALE PRICES VALID THRU DECEMBER 24, 2017

CRESTWOOD 9560 Watson Rd 314-842-0404

ST. CHARLES 1987 Zumbehl Rd 636-947-3456

COLUMBIA, MO 21 Conley Rd 573-443-0503

O’FALLON, IL 2020 W Hwy 50 618-622-3456

SEE STORE FOR DETAILS. ALL OFFERS VALID IN STORES ONLY. NOT VALID WITH ANY OTHER OFFER, DISCOUNT, OR PROMOTION. NOT VALID ON PREVIOUS PURCHASES. WHILE SUPPLIES LAST ON IN STOCK ITEMS. SALE PRICES VALID AT TIME OF PRINTING.

SPRINGFIELD, IL 2955 Lindbergh Blvd 217-546-4005


LOCAL

A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 12.20.2017

Developers may have a path around Preservation Board

DIGEST LADUE > City expands ‘peeping Toms’ ordinance to cover drones • To avoid conflict with Federal Aviation Administration laws that prevent cities from regulating air space, the Ladue City Council on Monday unanimously approved amending an existing law prohibiting “peeping Toms” to include drones. City Attorney Erin Seele said that, though the city hasn’t experienced problems with the small unmanned aircraft, officials want to be proactive. “A city can’t ban drones, because the FAA controls air space, but we can regulate what a drone does, such as spying or peeping in windows,” Mayor Nancy Spewak said. “We want an enforceable ordinance for police to prevent drones flying around on private property without the permission of property owners.” The original law prohibited people from peering into windows of others’ buildings without a visible, lawful purpose. The change says it will be unlawful for anyone to “peek or peer in the door or window of any inhabited building, whether personally or by means of devices within that person’s control” without permission of the owners. Seele said the law would send any violation to municipal court. “This will not interfere with, for example, the ability of a real estate agent to use a drone to take photos of a property for sale,” she said. Other cities also have taken action in recent months to limit the use of drones.

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

A 33-story apartment tower is proposed to replace the building at 300 South Broadway. The Preservation Board voted to require that part of the brick facade be preserved. BY JACOB BARKER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Though the St. Louis Preservation Board has asked developers to save part of the 120-year-old brick building at 300 South Broadway before demolishing the rest, the fate of the old structure likely will be decided by the Board of Aldermen. Action by the aldermen is expected because developers have asked for city incentives for the proposed 33-story, 265-unit apartment tower near Busch Stadium. On Tuesday, the Land Clearance for Redevelopment Authority approved a redevelopment plan that provides a property tax abatement of 90 percent of the project’s value for the first 10 years, 85 percent for the next five years and 80 percent for the final five years. In addition to the 20-year property tax break, developers also are seeking a sales tax exemption on construction materials. If approved by aldermen, the redevelopment plan could trump the Preservation Board’s 4-3 decision on Monday to direct the developers to retain a corner

KANSAS CITY > State ranks high for maternal deaths • Missouri’s maternal mortality rate is ranked as one of the worst in the country. Last year’s Health of Women and Children Report by the United Health Foundation put the national average at nearly 20 deaths per 100,000 live births. The report put Missouri’s maternal mortality rate at more than 28 deaths per 100,000 live births, ranking the state in the bottom 10. “It’s not acceptable,” said Randall Williams, director of the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services. He said most maternal deaths are preventable, but there’s room for improvement. The leading causes of maternal death in Missouri are cardiac-related. The state’s high smoking and obesity rates during pregnancy also put women at more risk, the Kansas City Star reported. State figures show that about 15 percent of Missouri women smoked during pregnancy in 2015. Nationally the rate is less than 8.5 percent. The United Health Foundation report says the U.S. has the highest maternal mortality rate among developed countries, with more than 1,300 pregnancy-related deaths between 2011 and 2012. From correspondent and wire reports

HDA ARCHITECTS

A rendering of the proposed 300 South Broadway apartment tower downtown by Jack Holleran of HDA Architects and Chicago firms White Oak Realty Partners and CA Ventures.

of the existing building’s brick facade. That’s because the ordinance governing demolition review says the Preservation Board “shall” approve demolition requests in compliance with redevelopment plans. “If it comes back to the Preservation Board, I think the only question will be denial or approval of demolition, and I think with a redevelopment plan in hand, it will be rubber-stamped,” said Andrew Weil, executive director of the Landmarks Association of St. Louis. A development team made up of Jack Holleran of local firm HDA Architects and two Chicago firms, White Oak Realty Partners and CA Ventures, wants to build an apartment tower similar to one they recently finished on Meramec Avenue in downtown Clayton. They plan to buy the existing building from St. Louis Community College, which is in the midst of budget cuts, for $5.8 million. The developers can appeal the Preservation Board’s decision to the Planning Commission. But the Planning Commission follows the same criteria, which says that demolitions that comply with redevelopment plans passed

END of YEAR SALE! DONATE YOUR CAR Painter/Carpenter Stan Ray Apparel Made in USA

Double Knee Pant Reg $2399 to $2599

DES PERES 12017 Manchester Rd. 314-821-1616

wned

19

$

Sale Ends 12/30/17

-O Family

Sizes from 28"-50" Lengths up to 36"

“A FAMILY TRADITION SINCE 1865!”

per pair

Wheels For Wishes

Choose a buyer like T. Brian Hill who has over 30 years experience buying and selling. Then call for a free verbal estimate.

(314) 313-5804

Benefiting

BRENTWOOD 8121 Manchester Rd. 314-645-2020

*Free Vehicle Pickup ANYWHERE *We Accept All Vehicles Running or Not *We also accept Trucks, RVs, SUVs & Boats

WheelsForWishes.org

Call: (314) 499-1300

Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com

How to sell your valuable jewelry with confidence:

Make-A-Wish® Missouri

99

www.reinekedecorating.com

x % Ta 100 tible c u Ded

into ordinances “shall be approved except in unusual circumstances.” The fact that the demolition request came to Preservation Board on Monday, before its redevelopment plan was passed, is unusual, Weil said. It isn’t a foregone conclusion that the redevelopment plan will be approved. Recently, aldermen have been more willing to question development incentives. “You do have to get it through the Board of Aldermen,” Weil said. And he’s not sure how a requirement that the developers spare the brick walls, parts of which were designed by prolific St. Louis architect Isaac Taylor and date to the 1890s, can be enforced. “These other conditions they put forward, it’s questionable in my mind whether those are enforceable by the Preservation Board itself,” he said. The developers haven’t yet said whether they’ll appeal the Preservation Board decision. “We are going to evaluate that,” Holleran said of the board’s request.

USED JEWELRY BUYER T. Brian Hill

Sell these valuables today —

* Wheels For Wishes is a DBA of Car Donation Foundation.

WWW.USEDJEWELRYBUYER.COM

122 N. Main in Historic Saint Charles

• Certified diamonds & fine jewelry • Antique & estate jewelry • High grade wrist and pocket watches • Old gold & sterling silver • U.S. gold & silver coins • Private jewelry & coin collections

PROVEN LOW PRICE AND HIGH QUALITY* We Service All Brands

0% APR for 72 Months on Qualifying Systems**

$3100 in Utility & Manufacturer Instant Rebates on Qualifying HVAC System

Hurry! Offers expire soon!

29Service Fee

$

With repair purchase

Additional diagnostic charges may apply To be performed during normal business hours. May not be combined with other offers. One coupon per customer. Expires 1/6/18.

& 99 Furnace AC Tune-up

$

Furnace AND AC Tune-Up Together Tune up includes both furnace and A/C. To be performed during normal business hours. May not be combined with other offers. One coupon per customer. Expires 1/6/18.

CALL 314-236-9887 & 618-215-7388 All offers limited to supply and could expire at any time. ** The special terms APR will continue to apply until all qualifying purchases are paid in full. The monthly payment for this purchase will be the amount that will pay for the purchase in full in equal payments during the promotional (special terms) period. Expires 1/6/18.

Installed starting at:

++ 1499 Furnace

$

++Offer is for Trane Furnace TUE1A040A924. Price shown is to connect to existing fuel lines, electrical, ducting, and piping. Other sizes and configurations can be purchased at the discounted rate shown plus an additional discounted upgrade fee. Picture may not represent final equipment selection.

*According to a recent study comparing the price of furnace and air conditioning installation between Dunn Heating and Cooling, LLC and 22 other major, reputable companies holding a HVAC license in the St. Louis County area.

GET IT DUNN RIGHT OR YOUR MONEY BACK Now Hiring Experienced Technicians

Free Consultation

recYcLing gooDs and recLaiming Lives .87 of every dollar spent goes directly into the services that the adult rehabilitation center provides. the money collected in the st. louis stores stays right here in the local community.

items We neeD Appliances Automobiles Children’s Clothing Furniture Household Goods Men’s Clothing

Miscellaneous Women’s Clothing Computer Systems Books Sofas Suits

Whose Life WiLL Your Donation transform?

Schedule A Pick-Up • 314-535-0057 • www.satruck.org


12.20.2017 • Wednesday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A9

MORE OF WHAT YOUR

BUSINESS

NEEDS

&

LESS THAN YOU THOUGHT

YOU’D SPEND

AT&T INTERNET FOR BUSINESS

40

$

100 MBPS / MONTH WHEN BUNDLED

Why trust anyone else? Switch to AT&T Internet for Business, now at a lower price. Go to att.com/smallbusinessinternet or call 1-855-288-5565.

That’s the Power of &.

AT&T Internet for Business Promotion: Offer expires 12/31/2017. 24-month promotional rate is $40/month for 100x20Mbps Dynamic IP service, based on designated market area. After 24 months, the then-current published rates will apply and prices will be subject to change. Customer must have or purchase a qualifying AT&T voice service. Up to a $99 equipment installation charge is extra. Prices do not include applicable taxes, surcharges and fees. Acceptance of AT&T Internet Terms of Service at www.att.com/internetterms is required. Geographic and service restrictions apply. Internet speed claims represent maximum network Service Capability speeds; actual customer speeds are not guaranteed and may vary based on factors including site traffic, content provider server capacity, internal network management, device capabilities and use of other services. © 2017 AT&T Intellectual Property. All rights reserved. All marks used herein are the property of their respective owners.


LOCAL

A10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 12.20.2017

MOVIE REVIEW

Jackman shines in ‘The Greatest Showman’ BY CALVIN WILSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Phineas Taylor Barnum (Hugh Jackman) has a lot of imagination, and he’s determined to make a buck off it in the hustle and bustle of the 19th century. But he’s not just thinking of himself. Barnum feels obligated to his wife, Charity (Michelle Williams), who turned her back on a life of fabulous wealth to stand beside a penniless dreamer. Her sacrifice lies at the heart of his ambition. Barnum has a setback when the New York masses fail to patronize his museum of oddities. It’s only when he takes it a step further — presenting a pageant of unusual people — that he enjoys the success that has so long eluded him. The singing, dancing “freaks” prove to be hugely popular. At first, Barnum is only slightly annoyed that the critics dismiss him as a charlatan. But before long, money isn’t enough. Barnum also yearns to be recognized by high society. And he sees Swedish opera singer Jenny Lind (Rebecca Ferguson), who has a huge following in Europe, as his ticket to respectability. Bankrolling an American tour for Lind is a financial risk. But Barnum can’t quite control his rampaging ego. “The Greatest Showman” is highly enjoyable while you’re watching it, but it’s not particularly memorable. Still, it must be said that director Michael Gracey has a flair for the spectacular and a feel for the sheer exuberance of musical theater.

Hugh Jackman stars as circus co-founder P.T. Barnum in “The Greatest Showman.”

Working from a screenplay by Jenny Bicks (“Rio 2”) and Bill Condon (“Dreamgirls”), Gracey channels the spirit of classic movie musicals while hedging his bets with wildly anachronistic pop songs by “La La Land” Oscar winners Benj Pasek and Justin Paul. The film is best appreciated as a showcase for Jackman, who makes a dazzling

Barnum and holds on to our sympathies even as the character proves to be something of a heel. Jackman’s performance is what showbiz is all about. He may not be “The Greatest Showman,” but he’s definitely a contender. Calvin Wilson • 314-340-8346 @calvinwilsonstl on Twitter calvinwilson@post-dispatch.com

‘THE GREATEST SHOWMAN’

★★★ out of four Run time • 1:45 Rating • PG Content • Thematic elements including a brawl Coming Sunday • Multiple Oscar nominee Michelle Williams talks about her career and “All the Money in the World,” which opens Christmas Day. In A&E

MOVIE REVIEW

CONCERT REVIEW

‘Jumanji’ gets an upgrade in ‘Welcome to the Jungle’

Big Sean, Metro Boomin represent for the Midwest

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Karen Gillan (left), Dwayne Johnson and Jack Black star in a “Jumanji” update. BY JODY MITORI Special to the Post-Dispatch

More than 20 years have passed since the original “Jumanji” opened. The so-so family comedy starring Robin Williams was loosely based on a children’s book of the same name about a magical board game that overlaps into the real world. In “Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle,” that board game has become a video game. Four teens — a jock, a nerd, a beauty and a brain — are stuck in detention together and stumble on Jumanji. They each select a game personality, and soon the familiar drumbeat of the original film starts, signaling the beginning of play. The high schoolers find themselves transported to the game’s jungle in the adult bodies of their avatars. Nerdy Spencer is now a bulked-up fighter (Dwayne Johnson), football player Fridge is a foot shorter and about a hundred pounds lighter (Kevin Hart), smart, sarcastic Martha is a knockout martial-arts master (Karen Gillan) and beautiful Bethany is a middle-age male cartographer (Jack Black). The foursome learn that they have to retrieve a magic jewel from the sinister Van Pelt (Bobby Cannavale) and return it to its rightful place to lift a curse on the island of Jumanji. Spencer, an avid gamer, realizes that like other video games, Jumanji requires the players to complete

‘JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE’ ★★★ out of four Run time • 1:59 Rating • PG-13 Content • Adventure action, suggestive content and some language

different levels to win. The challenges the players face are only mildly intriguing, but they showcase each of the players’ different strengths and how they have to work together as a team. The real fun of “Jumanji” lies in the casting. The towering Johnson and scrappy Hart play especially well off each other, and Black receives easy laughs when Bethany sees her new body but also adds surprising sensitivity to his character when she meets another game player. Gillan proves she has the grit to fight alongside Johnson, so the film takes a disappointing detour when the team sends her to distract two enemy guards by flirting with them. Also, Cannavale, who is set up to be the main villain, is less threatening than the rhinos, hippos and snakes in the jungle. Those animals look much more realistic in the new “Jumanji” than they did in the old, but the effects are not the only improvement. With its smart casting and lively action sequences, this version of the game is an overall upgrade.

PHOTO BY JON GITCHOFF

Big Sean (right) and Metro Boomin perform Monday at the Pageant in St. Louis. The surprise concert was in support of their “Double or Nothing” album. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Big Sean and Metro Boomin, two hip-hop heavyweights who just released the joint album “Double or Nothing,” dropped in Monday night for a free pop-up show at the Pageant. The show turned out to be one of the year’s top hip-hop events. Big Sean, a popular rapper from Detroit, and Metro Boomin, hip-hop’s biggest producer and a St. Louis native who made his name in Atlanta, had worked together on Big Sean’s hit “Bounce Back.” The show is visiting only two cities: St. Louis and Detroit. About 1,700 fans showed up at the Pageant. “The Midwest is a place people skip over, overlook, diss,” Big Sean said. “Most of the talented people come from the Midwest. He took an opportunity with unstoppable Midwest energy and did it like it was nothing.” As the 313 and 314 area codes were projected onto the stage, Big Sean and Metro Boomin immediately drew the crowd into “Double or Nothing” with songs such as “Who’s Stopping Me,” “Pull Up N Wreck” and “Savage Time.” It was Leland Wayne’s first hometown performance as Metro Boomin. Big Sean carried the lead vocal role with his distinct voice and cadence, rap-

ping over Metro Boomin’s high-profile, minimalist street beats and ad libs. After performing about half of “Double or Nothing,” Metro Boomin played DJ and give the crowd a lengthy refresher on the many hits he has produced: “Father Stretch My Hands Part 1” (Kanye West), “Bad and Boujee” (Migos), “Jumpman” (Drake & Future), “X” (21 Savage), “Both” (Gucci Mane and Drake), “Bank Account” (21 Savage), “Mask Off” (Future), “Tunnel Vision” (Kodak Black) and more. It was a reminder of how crucial Metro Boomin has been to hip-hop the last few years. Big Sean returned for songs in his repertoire such as “Mercy,” “Sacrifices,” “Moves,” “Blessings,” “Clique” and “IDFWU.” Metro Boomin rejoined him to finish off “Double or Nothing” with “So Good,” “Reason” and “In Tune” before “Bounce Back.” “We did everything tonight,” Big Sean said. “Go Legend,” the opening track to “Double or Nothing,” brought the concert to a close. Before the show, DJ Mo Beatz sent the crowd into a frenzy with hits from Future, Playboi Carti, Yo Gotti and Cardi B. Kevin C. Johnson • 314-340-8191 Pop music critic @kevincjohnson on Twitter kjohnson@post-dispatch.com

THEATER REVIEW

Max & Louie comedy takes audience behind scenes with a tone-deaf diva BY JUDITH NEWMARK St. Louis Post-Dispatch

When he first took his job as Florence Foster Jenkins’ accompanist, Cosme McMoon explains in Stephen Temperley’s “Souvenir,” he did it for the money. The pay was good, the vacations were long and his generous employer urged him to keep writing songs of his own. It was a hard job, though. He had to listen to her sing. Though she fancied herself a contralto, Jenkins’ singing was beyond belief. What’s even harder to believe? Temperley’s twocharacter comedy — sailing to laugh-outloud heights under director Sydnie Grosberg Ronga at Max & Louie Productions — is based on a true story. A wealthy socialite, Jenkins (Debby Lennon) made a name for herself in the 1930s and ’40s. She started by giving concerts for friends, but as demand

grew, there were larger audiences, then records, then her Carnegie Hall debut. Her voice was so hideous that people came to laugh. But in Temperley’s telling, Jenkins never realized that — in part because McMoon (Paul Cereghino) became not only her accompanist but her protector. “I found myself admiring her certainty,” reports McMoon, who tells the story in flashback. Later, he wonders if she actually invented a new art form. Only once, frustrated and overwhelmed, does he suggest that her voice is not the glorious instrument she imagines. She’s hurt, of course. But, confident that what really counts is “the music you hear in your head,” she accepts his backtracking apology with queenly grace. Convinced of her gift, Jenkins stands beyond criticism; few artists are so blessed. Cereghino gives a poised, wry perfor-

‘SOUVENIR’ When • Through Dec. 31 Where • Marcelle Theater, 3310 Samuel Shepard Drive, St. Louis How much • $20-$45 More info • 314-534-1111; metrotix.com

mance throughout, well-calibrated to this intimate theater. It’s as if he were telling stories to friends. So why, in such a space, is he wearing a microphone? And if it is really needed, couldn’t it have been colored to match his dark hair? His performance is too smooth for this lapse. Lennon is a marvel. Of course, she is really a wonderful singer — you probably have to be to play this role, which demands strict vocal control. She’s quite a comedian, too. Her portrayal of Jenkins offstage, rich in ladylike manners and cooing self-praise, is

subtle and period-perfect. When she sings opera, complete with exaggerated facial expressions and florid gestures, she’s hilarious. Teresa Doggett designed her fabulously over-the-top costumes, and Dunsi Dai designed the arching, elegant set. “Souvenir” submits readily to a socioeconomic interpretation. If Jenkins had been an ordinary woman, she simply would have been the thorn in some choir director’s side, tolerated for her dedication. Her considerable privilege enabled her to find a unique career. But as McMoon reminds us, she truly loved the music; to her, it was all that counted. Who’s to say that she wasn’t true to what she heard in her head? That must have been a privilege indeed. Judith Newmark • 314-340-8243 Theater critic @judithnewmark on Twitter jnewmark@post-dispatch.com


LOCAL

12.20.2017 • Wednesday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A11

Clayton clears way for apartment tower BY JACOB BARKER st. Louis Post-dispatch

A 22-story apartment tower in downtown Clayton is moving forward after the city’s Board of Aldermen approved a contract to sell a city-owned parking lot to the developers Tuesday night. The move brings closer to conclusion a years-long process to find a developer for the site. That developer, Indianapolis-based Flaherty & Collins, in February announced plans for what is now a 228unit apartment high-rise at the corner of Brentwood and Forsyth boulevards. Neighbors worried the building in a downtown where hundreds of new apartments have recently been added would further strain parking, especially because many of the 132 spaces on the existing city-owned lot are available for public use. The adjacent property owner, KP Development, urged the city to delay a vote on the sale of the lot. They pointed to the city’s 2015 request for proposals for the lot, which called for “coordination of development with adjoining property owners.” KP has its own plan for a nine-story “boutique” office building on the remainder of the city block, surrounded by the parking lot. The company worries there isn’t enough parking in the garage attached to the proposed building to accommodate its plans. If Flaherty & Collins moves ahead with its plans as they are, “it certainly makes it much more difficult” for KP to develop the office building, said Gary Feder, an attorney representing the firm. Still, on Monday, Clayton’s Plan Commission and Architectural Review Board endorsed a rezoning and development plan for the Flaherty & Collins project. Objections were lobbed at the “shared parking” plan included in the proposal, which posits residents will often leave during the day, freeing up space for shoppers and office workers.

Board members cited a parking study that said the 324 spaces included in the apartment’s garage would be enough to accommodate residents and the public. A parking agreement approved Tuesday requires 132 spaces to be available to the public, 29 hourly and 103 available for lease. City Manager Craig Owens cited a city-commissioned study that found its downtown parking is only 66 percent utilized. “You don’t want to build twice when you can share spaces,” he said. Feder said that might work — if there were enough spaces included in the garage. He also took issue with the $1.1 million sales price of a property that St. Louis County real estate records value at $3.1 million. Owens agreed the city could have gotten more money for the land, but it wanted to make sure it wasn’t sold to a speculator who just sat on the property. “Our approach was to ask for great development proposals, not the best bid,” he said. Joanne Boulton, aldermanic representative to the commission/board, said Monday that KP “keeps wanting not to let Flaherty & Collins build unless they do it with you, which seems a little unfair.” “This is the best and most profitable plan that’s been presented to us — I don’t see a need to wait, other than for (KP) to jam this plan up,” she said. Jeff Rainford, a KP consultant, said his client has tried to work with Flaherty & Collins. “They’ve begged for meetings,” he said. Clayton aldermen still have to give final approval to the rezoning, which could come as early as next month. KP, though, isn’t giving up. “It’s not over,” Feder said. Post-Dispatch correspondent Mary Shapiro contributed to this report. Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com

This rendering shows the planned 22-story Shaw Park Tower luxury apartments at Forsyth and Brentwood boulevards in Clayton.

Katy Trail boosters fight proposed development BY MARK SCHLINKMANN st. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. CHARLES COUNTY •

Some boosters of the Katy Trail are opposing a plan to build more than 400 homes into forested Missouri River bluffs across from Chesterfield. Officials with Trailnet, the areawide trail advocacy organization, and the Katy Land Trust contend that the plan by NT Home Builders would mar the landscape and detract from the experience of bicyclists and walkers using the nearby Katy Trail. “We’ve developed an entire economy based on serenity and alternative mobility,” Trailnet CEO Ralph Pfremmer said Tuesday of the less populated part of the county southwest of Highway 40 (Interstate 64). “It’s going to congest that area.” Pfremmer, who said development should stay on the other side of “the 64 corridor,” sent emails urging trail supporters to attend a county Planning and Zoning Commission hearing Wednesday night on the plan. Another critic is Hilda “Pat” Jones of Williamsburg, Mo., who with her

late husband, Edward T. “Ted” Jones Jr., donated over $2 million to buy the right-of-way space from railroads that got the trail started. In letters to the PostDispatch and the county Planning and Zoning Commission, she contended that the subdivision would degrade the area’s natural beauty. But developer Greg Whittaker, who heads NT, insisted that the look and feel of the area wouldn’t be adversely affected and that major efforts would be taken to preserve the forested, hilly terrain at the site. He said the whole point of the project, the Bluffs, is to blend into the surroundings and create a resort-type feel. Elevation changes would be preserved, along with 185 acres of trees. Moreover, he said, streets would be narrower than usual. Plans call for 315 singlefamily homes on about 200 acres, plus 120 attached housing units. He said the development would occur gradually and take as long as 12 to 15 years to complete. He added that the homes would be atop 140-foot-

high bluffs and set back by a buffer of 150 to 700 feet. “You’re not going to ever see it from the Katy Trail” on the flat land below, Whittaker said. The county’s planning staff has recommended that the county approve rezoning needed. In a report last week, the staff said the project generally doesn’t comply with the county master plan

Missouri Bluffs Golf Club, which is on universityowned property. A university spokesman declined to comment Tuesday. Greg Kelly, who lives in the nearby village of Weldon Spring Heights, also is opposed and worries about increased traffic. Mark Schlinkmann • 314-340-8265 @mschlinkmann on Twitter mschlinkmann@post-dispatch.com

Now we must fight for them! This fight involves getting 1411 Locust reopened for our homeless veterans and other homeless people. New Life Evangelistic Center is helping hundreds throughout Mid America at the Veterans Coming Home Centers.

have room for one more homeless veteran?

Left: upper denture Right: upper implant denture

Starting at $17,500 Start eating the food you love and living the life you deserve.

1

• Consultation and X-Rays • Second Opinion

Call Now Dr. Barry Brace & Associates Kirkwood Office

(314) 200-2599 O’Fallon Missouri Office

(636) 200-2664

Implant dentistry is a non-specialty interest area not recognized by the ADA that requires no specific educational training to advertise this service.

sity of Missouri, which owns the tract, for agreeing to sell to a private developer and complained that the university’s plan wasn’t made public until recently. The site is near corporate offices and labs in the Missouri Research Park, which was developed by the university, near Highways 40 and 94. The homes would be on the periphery of the

They fought for us—

Had it with dentures? Dental implants are more affordable than ever.

$

because the area was envisioned as remaining undeveloped due to the rolling terrain. “However, due to the proposed density, connectivity and minimal impact of development, staff does believe it would meet the general intent of the master plan,” the report said. Pfremmer, with Trailnet, also criticized the Univer-

this year— tists eers again p is h y Top Den b Voted agazine’s M is u o L one of St.

If you believe Americans should have the right to not only preach about helping the poor and homeless, but should have the right to practice these teachings by providing direct services to the homeless and hurting, please give now by texting NLEC to 555-888 or send your tax deductible gift to:

NLEC, PO Box 473, St. Louis, MO 63166.


LOCAL

12.20.2017 • Wednesday • M 2

Katy Trail boosters battle proposal for homes on bluff

Clayton clears way for apartment tower

BY MARK SCHLINKMANN st. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. CHARLES COUNTY •

BY JACOB BARKER st. Louis Post-dispatch

A 22-story apartment tower in downtown Clayton is moving forward after the city’s Board of Aldermen approved a contract to sell a city-owned parking lot to the developers Tuesday night. The move brings closer to conclusion a years-long process to find a developer for the site. That developer, Indianapolis-based Flaherty & Collins, in February announced plans for what is now a 228-unit apartment high-rise at the corner of Brentwood and Forsyth boulevards. Neighbors worried the building in a downtown where hundreds of new apartments have recently been added would further strain parking, especially because many of the 132 spaces on the existing city-owned lot are available for public use. The adjacent property owner, KP Development, urged the city to delay a vote on the sale of the lot. They pointed to the city’s 2015 request for proposals for the lot, which called for “coordination of development with adjoining property owners.” KP has its own plan for a nine-story “boutique” office building on the remainder of the city block, surrounded by the parking lot. The company worries there isn’t enough parking in the garage attached to the proposed building to accommodate its plans. If Flaherty & Collins moves ahead with its plans as they are, “it certainly makes it much more difficult” for KP to develop the office building, said Gary Feder, an attorney representing the firm. Still, on Monday, Clayton’s Plan Commission and Architectural Review Board endorsed a rezoning and development plan for the Flaherty & Collins project. Objections were lobbed at the “shared parking” plan included in the proposal, which posits residents will often leave during the day, freeing up space for shoppers and office workers. Board members cited a parking study that said the 324 spaces included in the apartment’s garage would be enough to accommodate residents and the public.

Three shot in separate incidents Tuesday night BY NASSIM BENCHAABANE st. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. LOUIS • A man who

was shot in or near a downtown loft building and a 17-year-old were among three people wounded in separate shootings within a fourhour span Tuesday night, St. Louis police said. The first shooting was shortly before 6 p.m. at Tucker Boulevard and Cass Avenue, just north of downtown, police said. The 27-year-old man who was injured showed up at a hospital with multiple wounds and was listed in critical condition. The second shooting was about 9:46 p.m. in the 1000 block of St. Charles Street downtown. The location is behind the Merchandise Mart, a several-

story building that has retail on the ground floor and loft apartments above. Police said a 26-yearold man was shot in the lower back. He was breathing and conscious when officers reached him. A resident of the building said he heard several gunshots. Detectives had placed several evidence markers in the street. The third shooting happened about two minutes later in the 5900 block of Plymouth Avenue in the West End neighborhood. A 17-year-old boy was shot in the abdomen, police said. He, too, was breathing and conscious when police reached him. No other details were released on the shootings. Nassim Benchaabane • 314-340-8167 @NassimBnchabane on Twitter nbenchaabane@post-dispatch.com

This rendering shows the planned 22-story Shaw Park Tower luxury apartments at Forsyth and Brentwood boulevards in Clayton.

A parking agreement approved Tuesday requires 132 spaces to be available to the public, 29 hourly and 103 available for lease. City Manager Craig Owens cited a city-commissioned study that found its downtown parking is only 66 percent utilized. “You don’t want to build twice when you can share spaces,” he said. Feder said that might work — if there were enough spaces included in the garage. He also took issue with the $1.1 million sales price of a property that St. Louis County real estate records value at $3.1 million. Owens agreed the city could have gotten more money for the land, but it wanted to make sure it wasn’t sold to a speculator who just sat on the property. “Our approach was to ask for great development proposals, not the best bid,” he said. Joanne Boulton, aldermanic representative to the commission/board, said Monday that KP “keeps wanting not to let Flaherty & Collins build unless they do it with you, which seems a little unfair.” “This is the best and most profitable plan that’s been presented to us — I don’t see a need to wait, other than for (KP) to jam this plan up,” she said. Jeff Rainford, a KP consultant, said his client has tried to work with Flaherty & Collins. “They’ve begged for meetings,” he said. Clayton aldermen still have to give final approval to the rezoning, which could come as early as next month. KP, though, isn’t giving up. “It’s not over,” Feder said. Post-Dispatch correspondent Mary Shapiro contributed to this report. Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com

JOIN STLTODAY ON FACEBOOK

Become a fan of STLtoday on Facebook and get the early word on news scoops. facebook.com/STLPD

Mark Schlinkmann • 314-340-8265 @mschlinkmann on Twitter mschlinkmann@post-dispatch.com

Now we must fight for them! This fight involves getting 1411 Locust reopened for our homeless veterans and other homeless people. New Life Evangelistic Center is helping hundreds throughout Mid America at the Veterans Coming Home Centers.

have room for one more homeless veteran?

Left: upper denture Right: upper implant denture

Starting at $17,500 Start eating the food you love and living the life you deserve.

1

• Consultation and X-Rays • Second Opinion

Call Now Dr. Barry Brace & Associates Kirkwood Office

(314) 200-2599 O’Fallon Missouri Office

(636) 200-2664

Implant dentistry is a non-specialty interest area not recognized by the ADA that requires no specific educational training to advertise this service.

Some boosters of the Katy Trail are opposing a plan to build more than 400 homes into forested Missouri River bluffs across from Chesterfield. Officials with Trailnet, the areawide trail advocacy organization, and the Katy Land Trust contend that the plan by NT Home Builders would mar the landscape and detract from the experience of bicyclists and walkers using the nearby Katy Trail. “We’ve developed an entire economy based on serenity and alternative mobility,” Trailnet CEO Ralph Pfremmer said Tuesday of the less populated part of the county southwest of Highway 40 (Interstate 64). “It’s going to congest that area.” Pfremmer, who said development should stay on the other side of “the 64 corridor,” sent emails urging trail supporters to attend a county Planning and Zoning Commission hearing Wednesday night on the plan. Another critic is Hilda “Pat” Jones of Williamsburg, Mo., who with her late husband, Edward T. “Ted” Jones Jr., donated over $2 million to buy the right-of-way space from railroads that got the trail started. In letters to the PostDispatch and the county Planning and Zoning Commission, she contended that the subdivision would degrade the area’s natural beauty. But developer Greg Whittaker, who heads NT, insisted that the look and feel of the area wouldn’t be adversely affected and that major efforts would be taken to preserve the forested, hilly terrain at the site. He said the whole point of the project, the Bluffs, is to blend into the surroundings and create a resort-type feel. Elevation changes would be pre-

served, along with 185 acres of trees. Moreover, he said, streets would be narrower than usual. Plans call for 315 singlefamily homes on about 200 acres, plus 120 attached housing units. He said the development would occur gradually and take as long as 12 to 15 years to complete. He added that the homes would be atop 140-foothigh bluffs and set back by a buffer of 150 to 700 feet. “You’re not going to ever see it from the Katy Trail” on the flat land below, Whittaker said. The county’s planning staff has recommended that the county approve rezoning needed. In a report last week, the staff said the project generally doesn’t comply with the county master plan because the area was envisioned as remaining undeveloped due to the rolling terrain. “However, due to the proposed density, connectivity and minimal impact of development, staff does believe it would meet the general intent of the master plan,” the report said. Pfremmer, with Trailnet, also criticized the University of Missouri, which owns the tract, for agreeing to sell to a private developer and complained that the university’s plan wasn’t made public until recently. The site is near corporate offices and labs in the Missouri Research Park, which was developed by the university, near Highways 40 and 94. The homes would be on the periphery of the Missouri Bluffs Golf Club, which is on universityowned property. A university spokesman declined to comment Tuesday. Greg Kelly, who lives in the nearby village of Weldon Spring Heights, also is opposed and worries about increased traffic.

They fought for us—

Had it with dentures? Dental implants are more affordable than ever.

$

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A11

this year— tists eers again p is h y Top Den b Voted agazine’s M is u o L one of St.

If you believe Americans should have the right to not only preach about helping the poor and homeless, but should have the right to practice these teachings by providing direct services to the homeless and hurting, please give now by texting NLEC to 555-888 or send your tax deductible gift to:

NLEC, PO Box 473, St. Louis, MO 63166.


NATION

A12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Distraction could be factor in fatal Amtrak derailment BY MICHAEL BALSAMO AND HAVEN DALEY Associated Press

DUPONT, WASH. • Inves-

tigators are looking into whether the Amtrak engineer whose speeding train plunged off an overpass, killing at least three people, was distracted by the presence of an employeein-training next to him in the locomotive, a federal official said Tuesday. The official, who was not authorized to discuss the matter publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity, said investigators want to know whether the engineer lost “situational awareness” because of the second person in the cab. Preliminary information indicated that the emergency brake on the Amtrak train that derailed in Washington state went off automatically and was not manually activated by the engineer, National Transportation Safety Board member Bella DinhZarr said. The train was hurtling at 80 mph in a 30 mph zone Monday morning when it ran off the rails along a curve south of Seattle, sending some of its cars plummeting onto an interstate highway below, Dinh-Zarr said, citing data from the locomotive’s event recorder. Dinh-Zarr said it is not yet known what caused the train to derail and that it was too early in the investigation to conclude why it was going so fast. Investigators will talk to the engineer and other crew members and review the event data record from the lead locomotive as well as an identical device from the rear engine, which has already been studied. Investigators are also trying to get images from two on-board cameras that were damaged in the

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 12.20.2017

Hear Better. lIve Better. Guaranteed.

FREE

cALL FOR YOUR HOLIDAY TRIAL “Heartland Hearing helped maximize my hearing, where others could not.” Jerry Retired Veteran

INVISI EAR HHc 36

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Two damaged train cars sit on flatbed trailers Tuesday after being taken from the scene of an Amtrak train crash Monday onto Interstate 5 in DuPont, Wash. The train was traveling 50 mph over the speed limit when it derailed.

crash, she said. There were two people in the cab of the train at the time of the crash, the engineer and an in-training conductor who was familiarizing himself with the route, Dinh-Zarr said. A second conductor was in the passenger cabin at the time of the crash, which is also part of the job responsibility, she said. In previous wrecks, investigators looked at whether the engineer was distracted or incapacitated. It is standard procedure in a crash investigation to test the engineer for alcohol or drugs and check to determine whether he or she was using a cellphone, something that is prohibited while the train is running. The engineer, whose name was not released, was bleeding from the head after the crash and his eyes were swollen shut, according to radio transmissions from a crew member. The transmissions mentioned a second person in the front of the train who was also hurt. The train, with 85 passengers and crew members, was making the inaugural run along a fast new bypass route that was created by refurbishing

freight tracks alongside Interstate 5. The 15-mile, $180.7 million project was aimed at speeding up service by bypassing a route with a number of curves, single-track tunnels and freight traffic. Investigators were also looking into what training was required of the engineer and other crew members to operate on the new route, said Ted Turpin, the lead NTSB investigator of the crash. At least some of the crew had been doing runs on the route for two weeks prior to the crash, including a Friday ride-along for local dignitaries, DinhZarr added. The bypass underwent testing by Sound Transit and Amtrak beginning in January and at least until July, according to documents on the Washington Department of Transportation website. Positive train control — technology that can automatically slow or stop a speeding train — was not in use on that stretch of track. Track sensors and other PTC components have been installed, but the system is not expected to be completed until the spring, transit officials said.

BE ONE OF THE FIRST 60 cALLERS and receive Your

holidaY trial aBsolutelY free You and Your familY don’t have to suffer the effects of hearing loss this Year! appointments fill up fast, call for Yours now!

FREE HEARING TEST FREE VIDEO OTOScOpE EXAM

0

Exam Value $400 - FREE!

$ % interest AvAilAble

0

down paYment AvAilAble

8 convenient Locations south countY 314-325-8222 swansea 618-857-3299 farmington 573-837-4722 columBia 573-705-9900

Jefferson citY 573-818-3318 alton 618-857-3323 chesterfield 636-203-7056 creve coeur 314-202-4822

royce r. lamarr, Bc-HIS

A ST. LOUIS THING

THE POST-DISPATCH

TRIVIA NIGHT

.... in in a ass llittle ittle a ass o one ne d day! ay! GIVE YOUR

OLD

BATHROOM

A FRESH

NEW

Test your knowledge of all things St. Louis at this one-of-a-kind St. Louis trivia night to help support 100 Neediest Cases.

LOOK!

BEFORE

AFTER

Bath Fitter has the Perfect Bathtub or Shower Solution

(For as long as you own your home†)

• Over ONE MILLION installations and 30 years in the business. • LESS EXPENSIVE than most bathroom renovations. • Special financing available • CUSTOM MADE to ensure a perfect fit • SEAMLESS one-piece acrylic wall system • Both Fitter specializes in Tub-to-Shower Conversions. • No Subcontractors used-only factory trained experts

PRESENT THIS COUPON AND SAVE

900

*

48 MONTHS* NO INTEREST

OR

20% OFF $ UP TO SP-SPAD1028101220

“See store for details. One coupon per customer. May not be combined with any other offer. Coupon must be presented at the time of estimate. Discount applies to same day purchases only. Previous orders and estimates excluded. Offer good only at this location. The BATH FITTER “Lifetime Warranty” warrants that each BATH FITTER bathtub, bathtub liner, shower base, bath wall, shower wall and ceiling will be free of manufacturing defects for as long as the original purchaser owns the home. Complete details of the BATH FITTER warranty can be seen at our store prior to sale. “No interest option based on an approved credit application.

Call today TODAY for your Free in - YOUR home consultation CALL FOR FREE Upper Level of White Oaks Mall IN Wabash HOMEAve., CONSULTATION 2501 Springfield, IL 62704 bathfitter.com/location/SpringfieldIL REINVENTING THE REMODEL

314-898-0170 (888) 680-0024 636-203-7049

FEB. 8TH, 2018

DOORS OPEN – 6 PM TRIVIA STARTS – 7 PM

@ PALLADIUM ST. LOUIS

READER EXCLUSIVE: Be the FIRST to reserve your table of 8! $400/TABLE OF 8. TICKETS INCLUDE: • Meet & greet with • St. Louis Post-Dispatch Writers • Catered food • Complimentary beer all night • VIP Gift Bag • Valet Parking • Raffle • Silent auction • Surprises throughout the night

SPACE IS LIMITED

Visit: STLToday.com/ourevents


12.20.2017 • Wednesday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A13

Helping the families of those who MADE THE ULTIMATE SACRIFICE

or suffered a catastrophic injury for our safety.

In Memoriam

Captain John Kemper St. Louis City Fire Department EOW* July 12, 2017

In Honor

Officer Gary Glasby

St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department

Officer Ryan O’Connor Arnold Police Department

Thank You BackStoppers Supporters Since 1959, The BackStoppers has assisted more than 160 families of police officers, firefighters and publicly-funded paramedics/EMTs in the region who made the ultimate sacrifice or suffered a catastrophic injury in the line of duty. In 2016, The BackStoppers provided $3 million in assistance to nearly 80 families with more than 65 dependent children. Ninety cents of every dollar donated to The BackStoppers goes to assisting families. We are sincerely grateful for your dedication to our mission that made this assistance possible. Thank you for your generous support. *End of Watch

Make a Difference–Become A BackStopper The BackStoppers is a membership organization open to anyone interested in supporting the families of those who lost their lives in the line of duty.

Please join at www.backstoppers.org @BackStoppers Donations are tax deductible. Send your check, payable to The BackStoppers to: The BackStoppers P.O. Box 795168, St. Louis, MO 63179-0700 OR Visit our website: www.backstoppers.org for more information and to make an online donation.

The BackStoppers, 10411 Clayton Road, Suite A5, St. Louis, MO 63131 866-539-0521 toll free / 314-692-0200 phone 314-692-0204 fax www.backstoppers.org

Serving the following counties: In Missouri Franklin, Jefferson, Lincoln, Perry, Pike, St. Charles, St. Francois, St. Louis City, St. Louis County, Ste. Genevieve, Warren, Washington and Cape Girardeau In Illinois Bond, Clinton, Madison, Monroe and St. Clair


NATION

A14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 12.20.2017

$20 million to upgrade plant that spewed black water Aging sewage treatment plant near Niagara Falls is blamed for filthy spill that fouled tourist dock

ASSOCIATED PRESS

NIAGARA FALLS, N.Y. • The aging sew-

age treatment plant responsible for a stinky black discharge at Niagara Falls over the summer is in line for an overhaul. New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo pro-

posed on Tuesday spending $20 million to begin improvements at the Niagara Falls Wastewater Treatment Facility. The state fined the Niagara Falls Water Board $50,000 after discolored water spewed into the Niagara River and enveloped the Maid of the Mist tour boat dock in view of tourists July 29. “What happened in Niagara Falls was a big wake-up call for a lot of people,” said Elizabeth Moran, water and natural resources director for Environmental Advocates of New York. The group has called for $800 million in grant funding in this

year’s budget to begin to meet infrastructure needs statewide. “I think before Niagara Falls hit national news, a lot of people didn’t realize that sewage overflow events are actually something that plague not just Niagara Falls but all of New York and many areas throughout the country,” Moran said. The Niagara Falls Water Board has said the July discharge happened when workers at the treatment plant let a pump run for too long while emptying a basin that contained residue from the cleaning of carbon filters.

“So, after doing my homework, I decided to choose Hans Wiemann with its exclusive ARTAS Robotic Hair Transplant procedure” Cam Janssen - Former Blues Hockey player

ARTAS Robotic System

fr

gr

ab

ba

rw

ee

ith

s

e af

-h

om

e

l so

ut

io

Hans Wiemann is the ONLY company that has a state‑of‑the‑art ARTAS robot within a 750 mile radius. Current special offer: Receive $500 off the ARTAS and PRP procedure only at Hans Wiemann.

n

Complete Safe Home Solution veteran owned

Call for a free hair and scalp analysis consultation.

618-215-7398 | 314-236-9884

specializing in Creating safe,accessible homes

Breakthrough Erectile Dysfunction Treatment Now Available in St. Louis!

Call today and reCeive a free in home quote

314-758-0774 • 618-744-1745

Ask The experTs Dr. Barry Brace, DMD

Dr. Tim Grayem, DDS

Implant and Cosmetic Dentistry O'Fallon, MO 636-206-4376 myofallondds.com

&

Kirkwood, MO 314-474-7401 mystldds.com

Q: I’m 75 and I hate my embarrassing,

wobbly dentures. I was told years ago that I didn’t have enough bone for implants with out multiple surgeries. I couldn’t afford $60,000, so I did nothing. Please help me! Isn’t there anything new that I can afford? Now I’m 75 and my problem is only getting worse. Is there any hope for me?

The St. Louis Men’s Clinic is proud to introduce the newest and most effective technologies available to treat Erectile Dysfunction. ED WAVE THERAPY Revolutionary Erectile Dysfunction (ED) Treatment Without Medication St. Louis Men’s Clinic is now offering a cutting edge new treatment procedure known as WAVE Therapy. Wave Therapy is the most advanced and highly effective non-invasive treatment for ED. Call us today at 314-282-8080 to see if you are a candidate for this in office procedure that can significantly improve the quality of your life. Our ED patients now have a revolutionary treatment option available to them that provides long-term results and spontaneity without the use of drugs, surgery, injections or apparatus. 88% of our patients who have tried WAVE Therapy would recommend it to others. This proprietary technology treats the cause and not the symptoms of ED by breaking up plaque and blockages, and increasing blood flow by creating new blood vessels, utilizing the body’s natural healing agents. The beneficial effects of WAVE Therapy are often experienced after only a few treatments at The St. Louis Men’s Clinic.

Many patients report a noticeable improvement of their ability to achieve an erection within a few weeks.

Effective Wave Treatment Without Medication During treatment, high frequency acoustical waves are applied to different areas of the penis. This stimulates the creation of new blood vessels in the cavernous bodies and improves blood flow in the penis (and the ability to achieve an erection).

A:

90% of the people who have been told they are not candidates for conventional dental implants without multiple surgeries, bone grafts and sinus lifts are actually perfect candidates for our advanced implant procedures. In almost every case, there is a dental implant solution that can help; a cost effective solution to fit nearly every budget. Dental implants actually stop the progress of bone loss and facial changes caused by denture wear. Your age is not a factor. As long as you don’t have uncontrolled systemic disease such as diabetes, severe heart, lung or brain disease and are not a heavy tobacco user, then you are probably a candidate for dental implants regardless of your age. Our oldest implant patient was 93 at the time and he told us after getting his new implant teeth that it was the best decision of his life. You’ll Never Have To Remove Your Teeth Again Tooth loss, gum disease and bone disease affect millions of people world wide, on every continent, across every age group. More than 40 million people in the US are estimated to have no teeth at all; a much more widespread problem than most realize. Major barriers to solving the problem are the perceived complexity of treatments, stagnant technology and the high cost of treatments. Our innovative advanced solutions have eliminated most of those barriers. There is a solution, a cost effective, proven solution. Legal Notice: Our success is built on long term relationships with our patients through genuine caring and unrivaled excellence in value, comfort, and service and the relentless quest for improvement. However, nothing stated herein should be construed as a claim of secret, superior or exclusive techniques, ability or equipment. All are well documented in the literature and training is widely available to any dentist who cares to pursue these goals. Our doctors are General Dentists. Cosmetic and Implant Dentistry are non-specialty interest areas not recognized by the ADA that require no specific educational training to advertise these services.

Unlike conventional ED treatment, such as PDE5 inhibitors, EDWT does not involve the use of any pharmaceuticals. Morover, the Wave Treatment causes no side-effects or systemic load on other organs and healthy tissues.

This breakthrough, therapeutic treatment, brings long lasting improvement for erectile function and sexual health to millions of men – without pain or medication. Benefits of Non-Invasive WAVE Therapy for Erectile Dysfunction • Long Term Results and Spontaneity • No Drugs • Non-Surgical • No Side Effects • Treats root cause of problem • Fast, Safe, & Effective

In clinical tests, EDWT has shown significant long-term effectiveness. These results are confirmed by a double-blind placebo controlled study of a large group of patients.

$99 OFFICE VISIT Limited Time Offer

Please call The St. Louis Men’s Clinic today at 314-282-8080 to see if you are a candidate for this in office procedure that can significantly improve the quality of your life. To learn more about WAVE Therapy, visit our website: www.stlmensclinic.com

777 S. New Ballas Road, Suite 119W, St. Louis, MO 63141

www.stlmensclinic.com 314-282-8080


12.20.2017 • Wednesday • M 1

WORLD

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A15

Mexico looks to Europe, beyond for free trade As NAFTA falters, other alliances form BY MICHAEL BIRNBAUM Washington Post

BRUSSELS • Mexicans want

European customers for their cheese and orange juice. Europe’s manufacturers hope to sell toothbrushes and marble to Mexico’s growing middle class. And if Mexican revelers need some fizz to ring in the New Year, France wants it to be French Champagne. So much for NAFTA. With President Donald Trump threatening to tear up North America’s 23-year-old freetrade agreement, Mexican officials are in Brussels this week trying to upgrade a deal with Europe to soften the hit. Mexico is not the only U.S. ally forced to look for new friends. Since Washington shrugged off its role as globalization’s biggest cheerleader, Japan also has worked out an agreement with the European Union that is awaiting a final green light. And after U.S. trade officials blasted the World Trade Organization at a ministers’ meeting in Buenos Aires, Argentina, last week, other nations seem to be doubling down on a defiant response: The globalized model the Americans once championed will survive without them. “We hope that over the next few days that we will be able to have a positive outcome on Mexico,” said the top EU agriculture official, Phil Hogan, who is to meet with Mexican Economy Minister Ildefonso Guajardo on Wednesday. Apart from the European Union, Mexico is bargaining with Argentina, Brazil and Asia. Meanwhile, Europe is flirting with Latin America, Australia and New Zealand. The efforts were turbocharged by Trump’s free-trade skepticism after he abandoned the Trans-Pacific Partnership, a pan-Asian deal that was a pet project of President Barack Obama’s administration and included the EU, Japan and Mexico. Officials involved in the negotiations say they have been happy to try to salvage the rubble

from Trump’s torpedo. “The EU is left as practically the only big player in the global arena without the U.S., so it’s a necessity to conclude agreements,” said Alessia Mosca, the EU lawmaker overseeing the Mexico deal for the European Parliament. “For this reason there has been a speedup to the talks.” Mexico and the European Union already have a free-trade agreement that went into effect in 2000, but that was at the start of the internet era, and officials say it is out of date. The new talks seek to expand and modernize the agreement, adding previously excluded items such as grains, meat and dairy. Mexico’s quest for new trading partners represents an insurance policy against economic harm if the Trump administration decides to end NAFTA, because about 80 percent of Mexican exports go north to the United States. And if new tariffs suddenly boosted the cost of imported corn and car parts, Mexico could turn to South America or Europe. “The strategy is to have alternative suppliers if the U.S. leaves NAFTA, which is not what we want or hope,” said Luis de la Calle, an economist and one of the original NAFTA negotiators. De la Calle said Mexico hoped to sell juice, fruits and vegetables to Europe. “Mexico has already made the decision to independently diversify trade,” he said. “There is an appetite for trade agreements, and Mexico is taking advantage of that appetite.” “We have for the past 10 years been in this strange and difficult situation for many countries that for 50 years broadly followed the leadership of America in global trade policy,” said Fredrik Erixon, director of the European Center for International Political Economy, a Brussels-based think tank. “Now America isn’t there,” he said. “And many countries, including those in the EU, have difficulties to figure out what to do now.”

ASSOCIATED PRESS

U.S. Marines from III-Marine Expeditionary Force from Okinawa, Japan, run on the snow to attend a joint military winter exercise Tuesday with South Korean marines in Pyeongchang, South Korea. More than 400 marines from the two countries are participating in the winter exercise through Friday.

DIGEST China’s carbon trading fights climate change China launched a nationwide carbon-trading scheme Tuesday, solidifying the country’s role as an emerging leader in the fight against climate change. The market will initially cover about 1,700 of the country’s coal- and natural-gas-based power-generating companies, accounting for about 3 billion tons of carbon dioxide emissions per year — more than a third of the country’s total, China’s powerful National Development and Reform Commission announced. U.N. approves 2018 humanitarian aid in Syria • The U.N. Security Council has approved the delivery of humanitarian aid across borders and conflict lines in Syria for another year, with Russia urging a gradual end to the program that has helped millions of people in rebel-held areas. The council voted 12-0 on Tuesday to extend the mandate of the crossborder convoys, with Russia, China and Bolivia abstaining. Bus crashes on trip to Mayan ruins, killing at least 12 • At least 12 people died when a bus carrying cruise ship passengers to Mayan ruins in eastern Mexico flipped over on a highway early Tuesday, officials said. Seven Americans and two Swedes were

among the injured, Quintana Roo state Civil Defense spokesman Vicente Martin said. He said authorities hadn’t yet established the nationalities of the dead. Last-ditch push ahead of Catalonia vote • Catalan party leaders and politicians made last-ditch appeals to undecided voters in Spain’s Catalonia region Tuesday ahead of an election that polls indicate could be a close race between supporters of secession and political rivals who want to remain part of the country. With opinion polls suggesting that more than 20 percent of the region’s 5.5 million-strong electorate were undecided about who to support in Thursday’s election, the final campaign rallies set out clear battle lines. Coalition intercepts missile over Saudi Arabia’s capital • The Saudi-led coalition fighting Yemen’s Shiite rebels said it intercepted a missile fired over southern Riyadh on Tuesday, which the rebels said was targeting a “top leadership” meeting at the royal palace in the kingdom’s capital. It was the second time in as many months that a rebel projectile had reached as far inside the kingdom as Riyadh. Guam gives tips on surviving nuclear missile attack • Guam security officials have released two videos to help residents

prepare for emergencies, including a nuclear missile attack, which North Korea has threatened to carry out. The first tells residents to stockpile emergency supplies and to make an evacuation plan. The second explains what to do if officials sound the attack tone siren, which would warn of a nuclear attack. The U.S. territory is advising residents hearing the attack tone siren to shelter in the closest concrete structure and wait until the all-clear is given. Violence rising in Ukraine • International observers are raising the alarm about intensified fighting in eastern Ukraine. Ertugrul Apakan, chief monitor of the special monitoring mission for eastern Ukraine at the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, said Tuesday that the number of cease-fire violations increased by 35 percent in the past week compared with a week earlier. Leaders to meet in Canada, stand against N. Korea • The United States and Canada say nations from around the world will convene on Jan. 16 in Vancouver to show solidarity against North Korea’s nuclear program. U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson is meeting in the Canadian capital, Ottawa, with Canadian Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland. From news services

#)%%

!"&+ *"+$ /'0.$,-(


M 1 WEDNESDAY • 12.20.2017 • A16

Final tax-cut bill falls short of GOP promises Taxes won’t be much simpler, and bulk of the cuts benefit businesses, the wealthy DAVID NICKLAUS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The tax bill that appears to be headed for the president’s desk this week isn’t exactly what we were promised during last year’s campaign. The Tax Policy Center estimates that the bill will save the average middle-income American about $900 next year. That’s far from the dramatic middle-class tax cut that President Donald Trump and other Republicans talked about; the largest goodies are reserved for corporations and the wealthy. Moreover, the biggest middle-class tax breaks are scheduled to expire in 2025. After that, on average, people earning less than $75,000 a year would owe Uncle Sam more than they do now. Another Republican theme relied on one of House Speaker Paul Ryan’s favorite symbolic images, a postcard-size tax return. This bill falls short of that. It will decrease the number of people who itemize deductions and increase the number who can use the 14-line 1040EZ form,

ASSOCIATED PRESS

House Speaker Paul Ryan, shown Tuesday on Capitol Hill in Washington, has touted the benefits of the Republican tax plan. The sweeping rewrite of the nation’s tax laws appears headed to the president’s desk.

but it also adds new layers of complexity for people who are self-employed or own pass-through businesses. The tax-preparation industry won’t be closing up shop anytime soon. Republicans did keep their pledge to corporate America: They vowed to bring

business taxation in line with the rest of the world, and lowering the corporate rate to 21 percent from 35 percent does that. At the same time, the bill allows corporations to immediately deduct the full cost of certain capital investments, and adopts a territorial system that taxes businesses only on their activities within the United States. The promise to the rest of us was that this combination of policies would encourage business investment, making U.S. companies more competitive and encouraging them to bring home cash that is squirreled away in overseas subsidiaries. The bill should do all of those things, according to Eric Toder, co-director of the Tax Policy Center. The question is, how much will it help the economy? In one estimate, a top Trump administration economist predicted that corporations would invest so much that the average American worker’s salary would rise by $4,000. That’s wildly inflated, Toder says. He thinks the extra spending power for individuals and businesses could add 0.6 percent or 0.7 percent to next year’s gross domestic product — a big boost, considering that the economy has been growing a little over 2 percent a year.

The increase in demand, however, amounts to sort of a sugar high. “It will evaporate, because we are very close to full employment,” Toder said. “You’ll get some incentive-to-work effect from lower tax rates, but the higher debt load will mean higher interest rates down the road. In the long run, we see this as having a small positive effect.” That brings us to one more promise that some Republicans are still sticking to: that the tax cuts will pay for themselves. That one is highly unlikely to be kept. Congress could have closed some individual and corporate loopholes to pay for lower tax rates, but the biggest tax preferences were tweaked only slightly. Republicans gave up on revenue-neutral tax reform and opted for a bill that’s allowed to add $1.5 trillion to the deficit over a decade. Even after allowing for economic growth, the Joint Committee on Taxation says the deficit will swell by about $1 trillion. It’s no wonder that, in one poll, 41 percent of Americans say the tax bill is a bad idea, against 25 percent who like it. We simply didn’t get what we were promised. David Nicklaus • 314-340-8213 @dnickbiz on Twitter dnicklaus@post-dispatch.com

Rapid rise in Crypto stock that minted billionaires spurs SEC action markets in 2017. Despite losing more than $2.7 million this year and posting just a few hundred thousand dollars of revenue, the company’s market capitalization exceeds $11 billion. Its lofty valuation has made a billionaire out of President James Gilbert, who held a stake worth nearly $4.2 billion based on Monday’s closing price. Crypto trades over-the-counter, a market that typically has less stringent oversight than regulated exchanges. Its share jump has attracted the attention of market operator OTC Markets Group, which added a skull-and-crossbones icon next to the company’s stock symbol this month to urge investors to be extra cautious before buying the shares. The company invests in digital assets, and is developing source code for managing them, according to regulatory filings.

BY MATT ROBINSON Bloomberg

U.S. regulators temporarily suspended trading in an obscure digital currency company due to concerns that its stock is being manipulated after the shares surged more than 17,000 percent in less than three months, making paper billionaires out of top executives. In a Tuesday order halting buying and selling of the Crypto Co., the Securities and Exchange Commission said it was worried investors aren’t getting accurate disclosures or enough information about the company. Questions have also arisen about “potentially manipulative transactions” involving the Malibu, Calif.-based company’s shares, the SEC said. Crypto appears to be a beneficiary of the digital-currency fever that has gripped

399

$

99 SAVE

250

$

At the end of September, it held crytocurrencies worth $900,110, filings show. Bitcoin, the biggest digital currency, was trading for about $4,171 at the time, but has since surged to more than $18,220. The SEC said its concerns about Crypto include the compensation paid for the promotion of the company and statements made in regulatory filings about plans for insiders to sell their shares. The company didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment. The temporary suspension will last through Jan. 3, according to the SEC order. Wall Street’s main regulator has been cracking down on offerings tied to cryptocurrencies due to concerns that some companies aren’t complying with securities rules and that investors could get fleeced. Earlier this month, the SEC froze the as-

sets of an initial coin offering that promised a 13-fold profit in less than a month. The agency alleged that the offering violated federal securities laws since it was not registered with the government. Crypto disclosed last week that it was selling shares privately for $7, a steep discount to the $223 investors were paying for its stock in public markets at the time. Chief Executive Officer Michael Poutre said the $7 price had been communicated to potential buyers weeks ago — before the stock’s dramatic surge. The stock peaked at $642 on Dec. 11 before closing at $575 Monday. Crypto also disclosed last week that it plans to split its shares 10-for-1, citing the recent jump in the stock price and the recent “rise of the entire digital-currency market.” The company is the product of a reverse merger with a sports bra company.

Special

HOLIDAY

PURCHASE One of Our Most Popular Vacuums

NOW ON SALE LW1500RS Regularly $649.99 No substitutions.

Sale price good until 12/31/17, not to be combined with any other offer.

3828 S. linDBergH 63127 • 314-821-5066

LADUE

8853 lADUe rOAD 63124 • 314-726-5505

C H E S T E R F I E L D VA L L E Y

On lindbergh Blvd. 2 Blocks South of Watson road near O’leary’s

ladue road & i-170 near Maggie Moo’s

Chesterfield Commons near lowe’s

SUNSET HILLS

Special Holiday hours in effect call stores for details.

270 THf BlvD. 63005 • 636-519-8400

Closed Christmas Day


MARKET WATCH

12.20.2017 • Wednesday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A17

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM /BUSINESS Indexes fell Tuesday as technology stocks and smaller companies gave up some of their recent gains. Stocks closed at record highs over the past two days as the Republican tax bill made its way through Congress. The market started higher, then drifted lower.

CCL

McDermott International MDR

Tenet Healthcare

Close: $68.13 1.53 or 2.3% The cruise line had a strong fourth quarter, thanks in part to higher ticket prices.

Close: $6.69 -0.90 or -11.9% The offshore drilling platform agreed to buy Chicago Bridge & Iron in an all-stock deal valued at $6 billion.

Close: $15.03 0.29 or 2.0% The hospital chain Tenet Healthcare said it plans to sell its Conifer business and cut more costs.

Carnival

$8

$70 65

7

60

6

S

51.38

Close: 24,754.75 Change: -37.45 (-0.2%)

24,080

69.89

O N 52-week range

$130

16

120

12

8.33

110 S

O N 52-week range

12.25

S&P 500

Vol.: 3.6m (1.1x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $1.52 b

Corn Soybeans

10 DAYS

Wheat

22.72

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Mar 18 Jan 18 Mar 18

347.50 956 419.50

+.50 -5.50 -1

2,720

CHICAGO MERC

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

24,000

2,640

Feeder cattle

23,000

2,560

Hogs

22,000

2,480

Copper

Jan 18 Dec 17 Feb 18 Dec 17 Dec 17

145.20 120.00 66.90 15.44 312.75

-2.45 +.03 -.50 -.06 +.55

Milk

21,000

J

J

A

S

StocksRecap NYSE Vol. (in mil.) Pvs. Volume Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows

NASD 1,957 2,015 1033 1860 154 52

3,231 3,479 1027 1882 164 34

O

N

DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

2,400

D

HIGH 24850.11 10550.68 747.62 12807.13 6995.88 2694.44 1909.26 27964.24 1552.21

LOW 24715.60 10479.41 733.71 12747.26 6951.49 2680.74 1896.15 27813.88 1535.90

ICE

J

J

CLOSE 24754.75 10535.91 733.84 12747.55 6963.85 2681.47 1897.03 27821.94 1536.75

A CHG. -37.45 +13.65 -12.00 -38.28 -30.91 -8.69 -8.27 -49.87 -12.17

S

O

%CHG. WK -0.15% s +0.13% s -1.61% t -0.30% s -0.44% s -0.32% s -0.43% s -0.18% s -0.79% s

N MO QTR s s s s t t s s s s s s s s s s s s

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Mar 18 Mar 18 Mar 18

75.03 121.75 26.93

-.17 -.15

NEW YORK

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Crude oil

Jan 18 Jan 18 Jan 18 Jan 18

57.46 1.6966 193.99 2.692

Cotton

D

Coffee

YTD +25.26% +16.50% +11.25% +15.29% +29.36% +19.77% +14.24% +18.77% +13.23%

Sugar

Gas blend Heating oil Natural gas

52-WK LO HI

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV NAME

TKR

AT&T Inc

T

32.55

43.03 38.05

-.41 -1.1 -10.5

Aegion Corp

AEGN

19.11

28.19 25.46

-.80 -3.0

-3.0 14 2.00f General Motors

+7.4 +3.3 20

Amdocs

DOX

56.10

67.98 66.05 +.52 +0.8 +13.4 +11.5 18

Ameren Corp

AEE

51.35

64.89 59.49

American Railcar

ARII

34.29

51.10 41.22 +.37 +0.9

ABInBev

BUD

Arch Coal

ARCH

Avadel Pharma

AVDL

7.52

Bank of America

BAC

21.77

29.50 29.45

Belden Inc

BDC

64.60

86.85 81.39 +.32 +0.4

Boeing

BA

Build-A-Bear Wkshp BBW

-9.0

-6.5 15

8.31

-.20 -2.4 -20.0 -16.7

5

-.03 -0.1 +33.3 +31.8 17 +8.9 +5.7 15

0.88 Huttig Building Prod HBP LEE

1.60 Lowes 1.40 MasterCard ... McDonald’s

14.65

9.30

...

... -32.4 -37.6 20

31.92

46.76 42.49 +.34 +0.8 +22.0 +20.1

6

1.52 3.56

5.00

9.24

6.90 +.13 +1.9

+4.4 +6.1

7

...

1.75

3.30

2.40 +.05 +2.1 -17.2 -21.7

5

... 1.64

LOW

70.49

88.55 88.86 +1.42 +1.6 +24.9 +21.9 20

MNK

19.00

55.33 23.11

-.59 -2.5 -53.6 -55.8

...

MA

102.98 154.65 151.68 -1.44 -0.9 +46.9 +48.9 35 1.00f

MCD

118.18 175.78 173.39

-.81 -0.5 +42.4 +44.5 30 4.04f

MON 104.77 122.80 116.00 -1.57 -1.3 +10.3 +13.5 21

2.16

0.20 Olin

OLN

25.43

37.52 34.03

0.80

36.58 36.40 +.08 +0.2 +32.1

... Peak Resorts

-.20 -0.6 +32.9 +37.8 47

BTU

22.58

SKIS

4.00

PRFT

16.20

20.22 19.40

POST

75.76

89.04 77.85 -1.43 -1.8

6.20

5.25 +.05 +1.0

-5.4

...

0.28

-.18 -0.9 +10.9 +4.1 37

...

Caleres Inc.

CAL

22.39

34.10 32.58

-.39 -1.2

-0.7

-3.8 16

CASS

53.23

68.03 62.44 -2.55 -3.9

-6.6

-0.7 32 0.96f Post Holdings

Centene Corp.

CNC

55.89 103.15 100.94 +3.01 +3.1 +78.6 +73.3 22

Charter

CHTR 282.54 408.83 316.97 -6.26 -1.9 +10.1 +12.1 cc

Citigroup

C

55.23

77.92 74.70

-.97 -1.3 +25.7 +28.3 14

Commerce Banc.

CBSH

49.43

57.91 56.48

-.02

Edgewell

EPC

55.94

82.06 60.64

-.30 -0.5 -16.9 -18.7 15

Emerson

EMR

55.40

68.88 68.54 +.18 +0.3 +22.9 +26.1 29 1.94f UPS B

UPS

Energizer Holdings

ENR

40.64

60.07 47.98

-.40 -0.8

+7.6 +15.0 17 1.16f US Bancorp

USB

49.54

56.61 54.56

Enterprise Financial EFSC

36.65

46.25 44.70

-.65 -1.4

+4.0 +13.2 18

0.44 US Steel

X

18.55

41.83 33.84 +.41 +1.2

+2.5

Esco Technologies

ESE

50.30

65.95 60.55

-.60 -1.0

+6.9 +7.7 34

0.32 Verizon

VZ

42.80

54.83 52.83

-1.0 +6.3 11

2.36

Express Scripts

ESRX

55.80

73.46 73.66 +.28 +0.4

+7.1 +4.9 12

WMT

65.28 100.13 98.80 +.90 +0.9 +42.9 +40.8 22

2.04

WBA

63.82

88.00 72.19

-.36 -0.5 -12.8 -13.9 15

1.60

WFC

49.27

61.12 60.36

-.58 -1.0

Foresight Energy

FELP

FutureFuel

FF

3.53 12.68

8.33

3.99

16.39 14.40

RGA RELV

1.28 Spire Inc

SR

+2.6 +5.1 20 0.90b Stifel Financial

-.07 -1.8 -38.3 -37.8 dd -.09 -0.6

... ReinsGrp ... Reliv

... Target Corp.

... WalMart 0.13 Walgreen Boots

+3.6 +4.3 18 0.24a Wells Fargo

-3.2 +2.0 cc

...

121.93 165.12 154.89 -1.27 -0.8 +23.1 +25.4 14 2.00f 3.72 62.33

13.77

Tenet puts Conifer unit up for sale • Tenet Healthcare Corp. on Tuesday said it is putting its Conifer unit up for sale and plans to cut $100 million more in costs, as interim CEO Ronald Rittenmeyer works to slash its heavy debt load. The Dallas-based company said it hired investment bank Goldman Sachs to advise on the sale process for Conifer, which provides financial and debt collection services as well as technology to hospitals and health care companies. Tenet, which owns Des Peres Hospital as well as more than a dozen surgery centers in the St. Louis area, has a market capitalization of about $1.5 billion and nearly $15 billion of debt. UPS orders 125 Tesla semitrucks • United Parcel Service Inc. has ordered 125 Tesla all-electric semitrucks, the package delivery company said Tuesday. The Tesla trucks will cost around $200,000 each for a total order of about $25 million. Tesla has received orders for the trucks from such major companies as Walmart, J.B. Hunt Transport Services, Sysco Corp. and Anheuser-Busch. Prior to UPS, the largest single order came from PepsiCo Inc., for 100 trucks. Jack in the Box to sell Qdoba • Restaurant chain operator Jack in the Box Inc. said Tuesday it will sell its Qdoba Restaurant Corp. unit to funds affiliated with Apollo Global Management LLC for about $305 million cash. Qdoba Restaurant operates and franchises more than 700 Qdoba Mexican Eats restaurants. The deal is expected to close by April 2018, San Diego-based Jack in the Box said. Export-Import Bank nominee snubbed • The U.S. Senate Banking Committee rejected President Donald Trump’s nominee to head the U.S. ExportImport Bank but approved four other board nominees, enough to restore the trade bank’s full lending powers upon their confirmation by the full Senate.

The committee voted 13-10 against Scott Garrett as the bank’s president. Garrett is a former Republican congressman from New Jersey who helped lead an effort by conservatives in Congress to shut down the bank in 2015 but who had pledged to keep the bank “fully open” during his tenure as its leader. Housing starts rose in November • Construction of new homes increased 3.3 percent in November — with the gain largely coming from single-family houses being built at the strongest pace in more than a decade. The Commerce Department said Tuesday that builders broke ground on homes last month at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 1.3 million units. The increase marks a key moment in the recovery from the Great Recession: Builders started work on single-family houses at the fastest pace since September 2007, which was just a few months before the start of that economic downturn. Building permits, an indicator of future construction, slipped 1.4 percent in October to 1.3 million. But the number of permits authorized so far this year has increased 5.8 percent. Weihai to open first U.S. tire plant • A Chinese tiremaker is moving more aggressively into the U.S. market, announcing plans Tuesday for a North Carolina factory that is to eventually employ 800 and produce 6 million tires a year. The $580 million plant, which will be located in rural Edgecombe County, is the first in the United States for Weihai, a China-based maker of tires for passenger vehicles, trucks and buses and heavy equipment. Triangle Tire, Weihai’s U.S. subsidiary, could get up to $152 million in state and local tax breaks, worker training and other incentives if it meets hiring targets. The jobs are projected to pay an average wage of $56,450 a year, well above a county average of $32,642. From staff and wire reports

Silver

4.85 +.27 +5.8

+4.5 +12.3 dd

PRIME FED RATE FUNDS 1.38 1.13 .63

CHG

CLOSE

1260.70 16.07 914.10

Gold

-1.50 -.05 +.90

TREASURIES

LAST

NET CHG

1YR AGO

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 52-wk T-bill 2-year T-note 5-year T-note 7-year T-note 10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

1.35 1.49 1.70 1.87 2.22 2.37 2.46 2.82

+0.01 ... +0.01 +0.02 +0.05 +0.07 +0.07 +0.08

.50 .64 .88 1.23 2.02 2.35 2.54 3.12

NET 1YR LAST CHG AGO

BONDS

4.50 4.25 3.50

.0569 .7667 .3040 1.3382 .7770 .1510 1.1784 .0156 .2853 .008884 .052394 .0171 .0784 .000920 1.0144

PreciousMetals NEW YORK

The yield on the 10-year Treasury rose to 2.46 percent Tuesday. Yields affect rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.

YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO

PREV

.0568 .7665 .3039 1.3380 .7765 .1514 1.1845 .0156 .2854 .008854 .052070 .0170 .0787 .000921 1.0146

Barclays Glob Agg Bd Barclays USAggregate Barclays US High Yield Moodys AAA Corp Idx Barclays US Corp 10-Yr. TIPS

1.61 2.70 5.75 3.48 3.24 .50

... +0.02 +0.01 +0.05 +0.02 +0.04

1.72 2.77 6.25 4.11 3.52 .67

...

82.85 75.05 -1.50 -2.0 +16.3 +22.6 21 2.25f

SF

41.93

61.42 60.31

-.45 -0.7 +20.7 +21.2 19

0.40

TGT

48.56

74.24 64.06

-.02

2.48

... -11.3 -13.3 13

102.12 125.16 119.00 +.19 +0.2 -.22 -0.4 -.42 -0.8

+3.8 +5.5 20

3.32

+6.2 +8.1 16 1.20f -3.1 cc

0.20

+9.5 +12.9 15 1.56f

Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months.

BUSINESS DIGEST

+.30 +.0241 +1.47 -.053

...

-1.3 dd

Cass Info. Systems

...

0.28 Perficient

Argentina Australia Brazil Britain Canada China Euro India Israel Japan Mexico Russia So. Africa So. Korea Switzerland

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV

133.05 186.31 185.98 +1.25 +0.7 +38.7 +39.4 26

133.49

ExchangeRates

Interestrates Interestrates 52-WK LO HI

D

FOREIGN CURRENCY IN DOLLARS CLOSE

Platinum

0.48 Monsanto Co

154.96 297.37 297.25 +1.11 +0.4 +90.9 +95.4 31 6.84f Peabody Energy 7.25

GM HD

3.19e Mallinckrodt plc

+6.0 +12.1

88.44 88.06 +.07 +0.1 +12.8 +12.7 12 12.30

... Home Depot

-.92 -1.5 +13.4 +20.5 23 1.83f Lee Ent

103.40 126.50 111.78 +.35 +0.3 60.13

TKR

O N 52-week range

Vol.: 4.4m (3.1x avg.) PE: 416.3 Mkt. Cap: $24.58 b Yield: 0.7%

Chicago BOT is in cents.

Stocks of Local Interest NAME

S

100.87

PE: -11.9 Yield: ...

25,000

Live cattle

100

D

Futures

CHICAGO BOT

Close: 2,681.47 Change: -8.69 (-0.3%)

2,600

$18

D

Vol.: 24.4m (11.3x avg.) PE: -163.3 Mkt. Cap: $1.9 b Yield: ...

2,660

10 DAYS

S

ZBH

Close: $121.38 6.95 or 6.1% The medical device company named former Medtronic executive Bryan Hanson as its new CEO.

14

5.56

2,720

Dow Jones industrials

24,480

D

Vol.: 6.8m (2.1x avg.) PE: 19.2 Mkt. Cap: $36.36 b Yield: 3.9%

Charts show stocks that made the news yesterday.

24,880

O N 52-week range

Zimmer Biomet

THC

GlobalMarkets INDEX S&P 500 Frankfurt DAX London FTSE 100 Hong Kong Hang Seng Paris CAC-40 Mexico City Bolsa Tokyo Nikkei 225 Sao Paolo Bovespa Toronto Zurich

LAST 2681.47 13215.79 7544.09 29253.66 5382.91 48403.03 22868.00 72680.37 16133.35 9399.17

CHG

CHG

YTD

-8.69 -96.51 +7.08 +203.25 -37.67 -231.51 -33.77 -435.08 +1.71 -53.15

-0.32% -0.72% +0.09% +0.70% -0.69% -0.48% -0.15% -0.60% +0.01% -0.56%

+19.77% +15.11% +5.62% +32.97% +10.71% +6.05% +19.64% +20.68% +5.53% +14.35%

Humana eyes patient care as it joins 2 equity firms in deal for Kindred

Green groups sue Trump administration over delay of methane rule

FROM STAFF AND WIRE REPORTS

BY TIMOTHY GARDNER Reuters

Humana Inc. and two private equity firms said Tuesday they agreed to buy home health care and long-term care operator Kindred Healthcare Inc. for about $810 million, the latest expansion by a U.S. health insurer into patient care. Humana, TPG Capital and Welsh, Carson, Anderson & Stowe will pay $9 per share in cash. Including debt and other costs, the deal is worth about $4 billion. The buyers plan to split Kindred into two separate companies: a larger one that focuses on home health care and the other focused on long-term acute care and rehabilitation. Humana, the fourth largest U.S. health insurer, will pay $800 million in cash for Kindred shares and to cover other costs. That will give it a 40 percent stake in Kindred at Home, which will employ the 40,000 Kindred caregivers who serve about 130,000 patients daily. It will not have a stake in the second Kindred unit. Humana’s insurance business is focused on individuals in the U.S. government’s Medicare program for the elderly and disabled. The acquisition builds on Humana’s focus on using health providers in members’ homes to improve health outcomes and save costs. The company has the right to purchase the 60 percent stake in Kindred at Home owned by the private equity firms at the end of the third year. The deal is expected to close in the summer of 2018. The deal comes after competitors Aetna Inc. and UnitedHealth Group Inc. announced deals that will expand the reach of those insurers into health care services in locations and sites that charge less than hospitals. Soaring health care costs have been a national issue, and the federal government has been restricting its spending for health, putting pressure on insurers. Wall Street analysts said the Kindred deal would not end speculation that Humana itself could be a takeover target in the current health care consolidation wave. In the St. Louis area, Kindred operates Kindred Hospital, a 60-bed transitional care facility at 4930 Lindell Boulevard, as well as hospice and home health care services.

WASHINGTON • A coalition of nearly 20 envi-

ronmental and Native American tribal groups sued President Donald Trump’s administration on Tuesday, challenging its delay of a rule limiting emissions of the powerful greenhouse gas methane from oil and gas drilling operations on federal lands. This month, the Bureau of Land Management, part of the Department of the Interior, suspended implementation of the rule for a year, until Jan. 17, 2019, saying it wanted to avoid compliance costs for energy companies as it revises the regulation. The delay “is yet another action taken by the Trump administration to benefit the oil and gas industry at the expense of the American public, particularly the millions of Westerners” who use public lands for ranching, hunting, hiking and other purposes, Darin Schroeder, a lawyer with the Clean Air Task Force, said in a statement. His organization represented the National Wildlife Federation, one of the groups that filed the lawsuit against Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke and his department. Energy companies say the rule, finalized at the end of President Barack Obama’s administration in 2016, could cost them tens of thousands of dollars per well. The Trump administration is expected to announce a draft rule in coming weeks, in line with its policy of maximizing output of oil, gas and coal and dismantling rules it says prevent job growth. The rule targets accidental leaks and intentional venting of methane from drilling operations on public lands, where about 9 percent of the country’s natural gas and 5 percent of its oil were produced last fiscal year. Some of its 2017 provisions have already been phased in. The lawsuit, also filed by the Sierra Club, the Environmental Defense Council, and the Diné Citizens Against Ruining Our Environment, a Navajo group, seeks to stop the delay and force the Interior Department to implement the rule in January. It was filed in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California in San Francisco. The Interior Department did not respond to a request for comment on the lawsuit.


A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , 1 8 7 8

WEDNESDAy • 12.20.2017 • A18 RAY FARRIS PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER

GILBERT BAILON EDITOR •

TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

Clemons folds

More victims of Reggie Clemons: defendants who might actually be innocent.

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

Supporters of Reginald Clemons’ innocence wear their “Justice for Reggie” T-shirts at a rally at Kiener Plaza in September 2012.

A

fter 26 years of protesting his innocence in a case that tainted nearly everyone who touched it, Reginald Clemons on Monday copped a plea. The big top has finally come down on what a family member of his victims once called “the Reggie Clemons circus.” Clemons, 46, pleaded guilty to two counts of second-degree murder in the April 4, 1991, killings of Julie and Robin Kerry, sisters who were raped and thrown into the Mississippi River from the deck below the old Chain of Rocks Bridge in one of the most notorious crimes in the city’s history. The body of Julie Kerry, 20, was found weeks later 307 miles downriver near Caruthersville. The body of 19-year-old Robin Kerry was never found. Of the four suspects in the killings, Clemons, who was 19 at the time, and Marlin Gray, who was 24, were adults. Antonio Richardson, who was 16, and Daniel Winfrey, 15, were tried as adults. Gray, Clemons and Richardson were given the death penalty. Gray was executed in 2005. Richardson later had his sentence commuted to life without parole because of his age. Winfrey testified against the other three in exchange for a 30-year sentence and has since been paroled. On Monday, Clemons also pleaded guilty to two counts of rape and one count of first-degree robbery. In all, he’ll serve five consecutive 30-year terms. Over the years, he repeatedly denied

any role in the killings and rapes. Handsome and eloquent, he attracted an international group of supporters, including the ACLU and Amnesty International, which sold green “Justice for Reggie” T-shirts. Clemons attracted sympathy after he claimed — and a judge later confirmed — that St. Louis police had beaten a confession out of him. The late Nels Moss, the assistant circuit attorney who prosecuted him in 1993, withheld evidence of the beating and was repeatedly allowed to inflame the jury. Clemons’ lawyers, a husband-and-wife team who were going through a divorce, weren’t fully invested in his defense. Two decades later, a special master appointed by the Missouri Supreme Court found trial errors, and the high court ordered a new trial, which was set to begin Jan. 8. The Missouri attorney general was seeking the death penalty (the circuit attorney’s office said it couldn’t afford a death penalty case) but instead settled for the plea deal. With five 30-year sentences running consecutively, Clemons is unlikely ever to be paroled. He could have gotten life without parole 24 years ago. The death sentence accomplished nothing. By playing the victim for a quarter of a century, Clemons strung out the grief for the Kerry family and cast doubt on defendants in other cases who might truly be falsely accused. His sideshow antics helped detour the course of justice, but at least justice is finally served.

yOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS Narrative of the Nativity is not to be dismissed Dismissing the Nativity as a piece of fiction creates skepticism at a time when Christians celebrate Christmas with sincerity (“Taking a historical perspective on the Nativity tale,” Dec. 16). Asserting that the birth of Jesus Christ is the late construct of a deluded church is both uninformed and illogical. The church owes its existence to the truth that Jesus was born of the blessed Virgin Mary, and not the other way, as if reports of his birth in the New Testament were a story concocted by wishful ecclesiastics in order to validate the church’s existence and doctrine. Further, the narrative of the Nativity is certified, not initially at Nicea (325 A.D.), but in the first century as the report documented by St. Luke, a historian who was as careful and integral as scholars today. He reports the birth of Jesus at the time of a Roman emperor with a legate governor in first-century Syria (Luke 2:1-8). History attests that the church’s belief in the birth of Jesus Christ is not mistaken, much less fraudulent. At Christmas, all may have confidence that the report of his birth is more than a Nativity tale. He was born and he is real. Richard H. Warneck • Webster Groves

Buying silence

S

Taxpayer funds have no place in settling lawmakers’ harassment claims.

seek re-election in 2018. But he waited omething is truly amiss in so long to decide, he missed the deadline American democracy if elected to remove his name from the Texas GOP officials and political appointees ballot. Now the state Republican Party think they have the right to dishas had to sue, arguing that it shouldn’t pense taxpayer dollars as hush-money be forced “to be represented on the pripayments to sexual harassment victims. mary election ballot by a candidate with Not only is this an egregious abuse of public money, it helps abusers think they whom it does not wish to associate.” If a member of Congress fails, say, to can avoid getting caught. fix a rumpled office carpet that causes an Rep. John Conyers, D-Mich., resigned aide to trip and fall, then it seems after reports surfaced last month justifiable to use government that he had sexually harassed a funds to avert a negligence lawCapitol Hill staffer, then used suit. Or if there’s a fender-bender office funds — taxpayer dolinvolving the member’s car while lars — to buy the victim’s silence. he or she is conducting public The congressional Office of business, then it’s appropriate to Compliance has paid more than use taxpayer funds to resolve a $17 million for 264 settlements claim. and awards since 1997 to federal Farenthold But sexual abuse or harassment employees who leveled accusais not public business. It’s personal, and tions, including sexual harassment, at responsibility for it rests 100 percent on work, The Washington Post reported. There’s no telling what the toll is at the the shoulders of the offending legislator. The same would hold true if the legislastate and local level. We do know that the Missouri Department of Corrections tor was fined for shoplifting or smacking someone over the head with a pool cue. used public funds to settle harassment The Republican Party used to be big claims as part of $7.6 million in out-ofon personal responsibility. Farenthold’s court payments. actions, his attempt to make taxpayers Some legislators have simply opted to pay for his mistakes, and his ongoing resign rather than attempt out-of-court efforts to stay on the government payroll settlements or other remedies. Sen. Al should appall his colleagues. Franken, D-Minn., is among them. But Democrats were open and blunt in Rep. Blake Farenthold, R-Texas, doesn’t demanding Franken’s resignation, even seem to understand the problem. He though his offenses were less severe. wants to stay in office and finish out his Republicans, whose platform is based term rather than resign over allegations on morality and personal responsibility, that he sexually harassed staffers and should at least hold their politicians to bought their silence with $84,000 in tax the same standards. dollars. Farenthold has announced he will not

The veterans’ long-term care facilities need improved checks and balances, along with closer supervision and monitoring of quality. As a retired nurse, I have survived numerous accreditation visits by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations. I don’t recall any hospital, regardless of its pristine reputation, being considered “perfect” when reviewed by this group. I am in disbelief that the investigation by the Department of Public Safety of the veterans home found no problems. Let’s uncover the cover-up. Certainly our veterans health care facilities should be expected to meet or exceed the same high standards as our public health care organizations. We owe our veterans the best care. Karen Fishman • Chesterfield

Idea of a list of banned words is subversive Remember comedian George Carlin’s bit about the seven dirty words not allowed to be spoken on TV? They were of the four-letter variety. Well now the Trump administration in its wisdom has issued from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention a list of words and phrases to be banished from government knowledge and usage (“Forbidden words? Dec. 17). The words are: diversity, entitlement, fetus, evidence-based, science-based, transgender and vulnerable. What could have provoked this “newspeak” list? Who do you think is the special interest group of President Donald Trump’s base that is being paid off here? We know Trump didn’t compose this list. It was obviously handed to him or his deputy by a large donor or supporter. Could it maybe be from a prominent evangelical? It doesn’t matter from whom; the very idea of a list of banned words is subversive. So now we have the rightwing thought police invading our First Amendment and official government agency business as well. Andrew Wolff • Ballwin

Tax cut is a tax increase in disguise for middle class

TONY MESSENGER • P-D

Former state Rep. Rick Stream, R-Kirkwood, speaks at a news conference in October about the care of the veterans at the St. Louis Veterans Home.

Stream, Messenger push for better care for veterans Thanks to Rick Stream and Tony Messenger for keeping the flame ignited under the investigation of the leadership and care at the St. Louis Veterans Home (“ ‘Massive cover-up’ at veterans home spurs call for hearings,” Dec. 17). Providing care in a skilled-nursing facility, whether as a registered nurse, nurse tech or aide, is one of the most difficult and demanding health care jobs. Many patients require frequent attention to incontinence, activities of daily living and meals. Lifting, turning, repositioning, feeding and cleaning these patients is both physically and emotionally demanding. Nursing homes, including those for veterans and the public, are notoriously understaffed to fulfill the recurrent needs of the patients. Add to this that many of these patients are heavy to lift, turn and move, and the result is an exhausted and overworked staff who often feel unappreciated.

I calculated our family taxes under the current and proposed tax rates for younger son (single, apartment), older son (single, own home w/mortgage) and parents (married, own home, no mortgage) — respectively lower, middle and upper-middle incomes. All of us will pay higher effective tax rates, from 2 percent to 5 percent higher. The middle-class tax cut is a middle class tax increase in disguise. The next election can’t get here soon enough. Richard Kutta • Creve Coeur

No help for the common folk in Washington The president has bullied Republican senators and representatives into quickly passing a “tax reform” bill that will add significantly to our nation’s debt. Merry Christmas to some. Not so much for those who depend on Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid or affordable health care. They would be wise to save any extra money in their paychecks. Logically, the next thing we will hear from Washington is that there is not enough money in the Treasury for such entitlements — their word for help for the common folk. Republicans will have their tax reform — and the rich will get richer. Lynn Meehan • Edwardsville Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON Editorial Page Editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382 KEVIN HORRIGAN Deputy Editorial Page Editor • khorrigan@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8135

I know that my retirement will make no difference in its cardinal principles, that it will always fight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always fight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisfied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

STLtoday.com/ThePlatform Find us at facebook/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial E-MAIL MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, letters@post-dispatch.com 900 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days.


OTHER VIEWS

12.20.2017 • WEDNESDAY • M 1 100 YEARS AGO TODAY ON THE EDITORIAL PAGE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A19

THE VATICAN AND THE PORTE • The announcement that the Vatican will condemn any efforts on the part of Christian nations to assist the Moslem to recapture Jerusalem is of much greater importance than appears on the surface and may lead to serious trouble between Germany and Turkey. Jerusalem itself, while of minor military importance, blocks the way to the Suez Canal and Egypt. Access the full item at stltoday.com/opinion

Why we work together every Christmas Muslim and Jewish communities create a circle of friendship. BY SOPHIE MALIK AND JERRY HOCHSZTEIN

For seven years, the Jewish and Muslim communities in St. Louis have united to serve the greater community through the Jewish and Muslim Day of Community Service. After a whopping 1,350 volunteers turned out for the 2016 event on Christmas Day, we decided to take a closer look at the evolution of the program and relish in the progress that has brought us closer together and strengthened our St. Louis region. The Day of Service started in 2010 with a small group of Muslim and Jewish friends who decided that they wanted to make a difference. Instead of going to

the movies on Christmas Eve — a common tradition for those outside the Christian faith — they came together to deliver gifts for a charitable organization. It was a simple idea with a simple execution, but what grew out of it has been anything but simple. Others heard about the event and decided that they wanted to join as well. Volunteers relished the opportunity to do volunteer work and help others in the region, but even more so, they loved that they could do it while learning more about people of other faiths, building relationships, and combating the stereotypes that had plagued both communities.

Since that time, the program has grown in volunteer and project size each year. At 21 sites in the St. Louis area this year, volunteers will be spending a few hours of their day off delivering meals to the homebound through Five Star Senior Center, creating toiletry kits for organizations like Volunteers in Medicine, making snack packs to be added to backpacks for the homeless created by Back@You, playing games and doing art projects with teens at the St. Louis Juvenile Detention Center, decorating cards and making no-sew blankets for hospitalized children, along with many other activities benefiting local organizations. In particular, the seventh annual Jewish and Muslim Day of Community

Service comes at the end of a tumultuous year. 2017 has witnessed a rise in hate crimes against both Jewish and Muslim communities and a fearful increase in white nationalist rhetoric. Yet, these two communities have only grown closer. Following the desecration of the Jewish cemetery in University City this year, the Muslim community nationally rallied together to raise nearly $200,000 to help defray the cost of repairs. In the spring, the Jewish community organized an Iftar dinner to celebrate the break-fast during the month of Ramadan, hosting a dinner for nearly 300 Jews and Muslims. Over the years of this program, the Muslim and Jewish communities have worked together to do good in the community, but it has turned into so much

more. Our communities don’t just have a working relationship, we have friendships. We stand by each other during difficult times. And perhaps even more inspiring, each year we see a growing number of volunteers from other faith communities join us as well, some choosing to celebrate part of their Christmas with fellowship and charity, and expanding the circle of friendship. The Islamic Foundation of Greater St. Louis and the Jewish Community Relations Council of St. Louis through its Milford and Lee Bohm Social Justice Center are excited to invite you to participate in our Seventh Annual Christmas Day program this year. Please join us at the welcome breakfast at Shaare Emeth Synagogue at 11645 Ladue Road in St. Louis

County and get to know your neighbors of the Muslim, Jewish and other faiths. The doors open at 8:30 a.m., and the program begins at 9 a.m. We welcome all, regardless of race or religion, to give of your time volunteering while showing unity, fellowship and good will toward others. There are many opportunities to get involved. If you wish to volunteer at a site after the breakfast or donate to support the event this year, please visit the website jewishmuslimdayofservicestl.org to learn more. For those impacted, charity is anything but simple. Sophie Malik and Jerry Hochsztein are the co-chairs for the 2017 Jewish and Muslim Day of Community Service. For more information, please contact Alyssa Banford at abanford@ jcrcstl.org or 314-442-3894.

Welcome to The Trump Family Swamp President is using White House like a marketing agency for family brand. EUGENE ROBINSON Washington Post

ASSOCIATED PRESS

President Donald Trump speaks on national security Monday in Washington. Trump says his new national security strategy puts “America First.”

Anarchy that sustains Trump ruins institutions Other presidents would be restrained by the prospect of social division and political chaos. Not Trump. MICHAEL GERSON Washington Post

A president with no concern for veracity or consistency has assured us he is not considering the firing of Special Counsel Robert Mueller. This does not make the prospect even marginally less remote. And it has done little to inhibit the attempt by some conservatives to discredit the investigation. On a move against Mueller and his office, the wind is thick with straws. Rep. Bob Goodlatte, chair of the House Judiciary Committee, warns: “We do not know the magnitude of insider bias on Mr. Mueller’s team.” Sen. John Cornyn urges Mueller “to clean house of partisans” and wonders if the special counsel’s final report will be legitimate. The Murdoch press — led in silly shrillness by Fox News personalities — continues to trash the reputations of Mueller and his associates. At one level, this is “whataboutism” run amok. What about Bill and Hillary Clinton? Didn’t they ruthlessly discredit Ken Starr and his investigation? Why should Republicans hobble themselves with scruples? But here is a difference. Clinton and his defenders were accusing an investigator of being a power-mad prig. Some of Trump’s defenders are claiming, in effect, that the FBI is engaged in a “coup d’etat” (the words of Florida Republican Rep. Matt Gaetz) — a politically motivated attempt to reverse the results of the 2016 election. Their evidence? That some senior investigators donated to Democrats, supported Hillary Clinton and

called Trump an “idiot.” If that last charge were considered a disqualification, we would have the political equivalent of the Rapture (including, apparently, some of the Cabinet). But the larger point is this: Trump Republicans are willing to smear a man of genuine integrity, and undermine confidence in federal law enforcement, for reasons they must know are thin to the point of transparency. This is beyond cynicism. It is institutional arson. This is the profoundly anti-conservative strategy of Trump supporters against any institution (the courts, the media, law enforcement) that exposes the administration’s deception and corruption: Burn, baby, burn. Because Mueller is inexorable, the desperation in Trump world is palpable. We know that senior officials in the Trump campaign wanted to collude with the Russians in order to influence the election. (Donald Trump Jr. has admitted meeting with a Russian lawyer in June 2016 to get damaging information on Hillary Clinton.) We know that Russian intelligence had the means to influence the election, hacked from a variety of sources. We know that Trump officials tried to conceal their contacts with the Russians, while seeking policy changes favorable to Russian interests. We know (on the credible testimony of a former FBI director) that President Trump tried to shut down the investigation of these matters. And it is a good bet that Mueller knows far more about all of this than we do. As the investigation seems to be closing in on members of the Trump family, the president has a variety of options, all with serious risks. He might be able (it is debated among legal scholars) to fire Mueller directly. But unless he

also abolishes the special counsel’s office, FBI officials would continue to investigate any crimes they have discovered. Other precedent would require Trump first to fire Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein (to whom Mueller reports), then (probably after a cascade of Justice Department resignations) find a stooge willing to fire Mueller. This would be a direct assault on the autonomy and integrity of the FBI, which still has defenders on Capitol Hill. Or Trump could do a preemptive pardon of individuals being investigated. This would look deeply corrupt — like an admission of guilt written in neon — and there are serious legal issues surrounding a presidential self-pardon. This option would put the tolerance of Hill Republicans for executive lawlessness to the test. Is there any limit to their capacity for servility? The frog is in the pot, and it nears a boil. If Trump takes any of these aggressive actions, it will define his presidency, exaggerate social division and throw America public life into chaos. At that point, he will deserve impeachment, whether he is impeached or not. (That will be determined, not by the degree of the offenses, but by which party controls the House of Representatives.) Behind all this is a nagging fear. Other presidents would be restrained by the prospect of social division and political chaos. For Trump, these may be incentives. He seems to thrive in bedlam. But the anarchy that sustains him damages the institutions around him — a cost for which he cares nothing. Michael Gerson michaelgerson@washpost.com Copyright The Washington Post

The presidency was never meant to be a profit center for a nepotistic, moneygrubbing family. But that was before the Trumps moved in. This scandal is lying in plain sight, overlooked because of the constant stream of missteps, outrages and distractions that come and go at an exhausting pace. While everyone watches his Twitter feed, President Donald Trump is using the White House like a marketing agency for his family brand. This is not normal or acceptable — and it surely isn’t what laid-off factory workers and coal miners had in mind when they jumped on the “populist” Trump train. Last week, Ivanka Trump opened a retail store inside Trump Tower, her father’s New York skyscraper, to sell her eponymous foreignmade handbags and other items. We can now finally dispense with the notion that she is an “unpaid” adviser to the president. It’s not a very big store — more of a glorified kiosk, really — but the conflict of interest is obvious. She and her husband, Jared Kushner, are in positions where they can influence U.S. policy toward the countries where her products are made, such as China, Indonesia, Vietnam, India and Bangladesh. The store is located where it can siphon money from Trump-supporting tourists who make pilgrimages to Trump Tower while visiting the sights of Manhattan. This is just the latest example of how the Trump family is seeking to monetize the presidency. We haven’t seen anything like it since 1977, when Jimmy Carter’s brother started hawking Billy Beer. (President Carter, at least, had the decency to be embarrassed.) As is the case with other family members, including the president, Ivanka Trump has refused to divest herself of her business interests. Instead, the Trumps and Kushner have put them into trusts — but in a way that provides not even a fig leaf of probity. That’s because the businesses — including the Trump Organization, the president’s umbrella enterprise — are still operating and are being run by family members whose aims are pecuniary, not patriotic. Do you believe for a moment that Trump pays no attention to how his sons, Donald Jr. and Eric, are handling his company? Or that Ivanka Trump and Kushner are unaware of what his siblings are doing with the troubled Kushner family real estate empire and Ivanka’s fashion line? I don’t.

Consider this sequence of events: Trump is elected president in November 2016. The membership initiation fee at his Palm Beach club, Mar-a-Lago, doubles to $200,000 in January 2017. Following his inauguration, Trump spends 34 days thus far — fully one-tenth of his presidency — at Mara-Lago, mixing freely with members in a setting hidden from the prying eyes of the news media. If you had a corporate or private cause to plead with the president of the United States, and you had ample resources, might you consider a $200,000 Mar-aLago membership a promising investment? I think you might. The Trump International Hotel in Washington, just down Pennsylvania Avenue from the White House, has become what The Washington Post called “a kind of political clubhouse” for Trump associates and organizations, such as political action committees, that support the Trump agenda. Last month, for example, the Trump 2020 campaign held a “VIP reception” there that cost $30,000, according to the Post, and featured deviled eggs and lobster BLTs. There are plenty of other nearby hotels that could have hosted such an event — the W, the Willard, the J.W. Marriott. The campaign just happened to choose one whose profits accrue to Trump’s bottom line. Likewise, for some reason, the Trump International has become a popular place for foreign delegations to stay while visiting Washington. Many legal scholars believe this line of business violates the Emoluments Clause of the Constitution prohibiting federal officials from receiving gifts or profits from foreign governments. At least three lawsuits have been filed seeking clarification from the courts. It is true that Trump and his family have lost some business. Many if not most of the charities that once used Mar-a-Lago for their annual galas have decided to go elsewhere this year. Ivanka Trump’s product line was dropped by Nordstrom and Nieman Marcus because of low sales. Skittish investors have backed away from deals that could rescue Kushner from his potentially ruinous $1.8 billion purchase of a white-elephant Fifth Avenue office building. But the presidency isn’t supposed to be a matter of pluses and minuses on a balance sheet. The president campaigned on a pledge to clean up Washington. Instead, he has created a huge new federally protected wetland — the Trump Family Swamp Inc. Eugene Robinson eugenerobinson@washpost.com Copyright The Washington Post


A20 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 12.20.2017

OBITUARIES

Ahearn - see Good Braden - see Garnatz Bressler, Sandra L. - St. Louis Busch, Ruth Virginia - St. Louis Carrigan, Harry - O'Fallon, MO Dowd - see Good Edwards, Kathaleen - St. Louis Frederickson, Florence N. - St. Louis Garnatz, Joel A. - St. Louis Gibbons - see Good

Bressler, Sandra L.

(nee Hart), Sunday, December 17, 2017. Preceded in death by her husband Gerald Bressler; daughter of Howard and Margaret L. Hart; survived by her brothers Gerald H, Dale B, and Leon W. Hart. Gathering of family and friends on a date to be determined. Hutchens Mortuary Service.

Busch, Ruth Virginia

(nee Venn), passed away on Monday, December 18, 2017. Ruth was born on January 14, 19 19 , t h e you n ges t child of Charles and Martha Venn. She joined the family with her older sisters, Jeanette (William) Bouchein and Grace (Raymond) Kuehn. She was the beloved wife of the late Herbert H. Busch and the dear mother of the late Herbert C. Busch and Christine A. (William) Linnenbringer. Ruth was the proud grandmother of Mark C. Busch, Ted W. (Danielle), Keith M. (Erin), the late Greg M. and Scott C. Linnenbringer; dear great-grandmother of Madelyn and Devin Busch and Claire, Otto, Nate and Greta Linnenbringer. Although she loved all her grandsons and greatgrandchildren, she had a special place in her heart for her dear Greg, her "Angel" as she always called him. She was a dear aunt, great-aunt and friend. Services: Memorial service at KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois, on Saturday, December 23 at 10:30 a.m. Interment was held in private at Laurel Hill Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions to a charity of your choice appreciated.

Celebrations of Life

Good, Julanne M. - St. Louis Gounis - see Good Grant, Tracy Michelle - St. Louis Hayes, Lynda M. - St. Louis Hunter, Frederick Warren - St. Louis Kuny, Kenneth Carl - Omaha, NE, formerly of St. Louis Levine, Edward - St. Louis Mackler, Dr. Leona - St. Louis McFarland, Lawrence D. - St. Louis Oelze, Murleen N. - Maryland Heights

Hunter, Frederick Warren

Entered into rest Sunday, December 17, 2017. Son of the late Harold Ward Hunter and Helen Marie Hunter (nee Saeger). Dear brother of Harold Randal Hunter (Judy) and Gloria Jean Klohr (nee Hunter). Uncle of Tim, Wes, Penny Klohr. Cousin and friend. Warren to his family and Fred to his friends. He moved lightly on the earth. Tears are shed for the might-havebeens but not for his life. He lived his life the way he wanted. Services: Services pending. ST LOUIS CREMETORY

Kuny, Kenneth Carl

Ken passed from death to eternal life on Thursday, December 14th, he was surrounded by his family. Ken was born February 26, 1931 in St. Louis to Theodore and Alice Kuny. After finishing High School he went to work as a Machinist for a year and then joined the Air Force. During his four year enlistment he was an Instructor and commissioned to Japan as an electronics repairman. Upon completing his service he returned to St. Louis and entered Washington University's School of Engineering. Graduating as an Electronics Engineer, he started his 34 year career at McDonnell Douglas.

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Osseck, Robert - St. Louis Piant, Marian - St. Charles Piskos, Frank F. - Ellisville Reese - see Garnatz Roesler, Rose Marie - St. Louis Russell, Kenneth W. - Overland Slaughter, Ray Evan Lee - Wentzville Strahl Sr., George A. - St. Louis Struebing, Dorothy E. - St. Louis, formerly of Bel Nor Tayon, Mary Ellen - St. Louis

Russell, Kenneth W.

Mon., Dec. 18, 2017. Svc. Fri., Dec. 22, 12 noon at Collier's Funeral Home, 3400 N. Lindbergh Blvd. (St. Ann). Vis. Thurs., 4-8 pm. colliersfuneralhome.com

Slaughter, Ray Evan Lee

84, Dec. 18, 2017. Services: Vis. Fri., Dec. 22, 3-7 P.M. Pitman F.H., Wentzville and Sat., Dec. 23, 11 A.M. until Service, 1 P.M. Delaney F.H., Marceline, MO. www.pitmanfuneralhome.com

Strahl Sr., George A.

passed away on Sunday, December 17, 2017. Beloved husband of the late Jeanne Renner and Sally Bond; loving father of George (Deanna) Strahl Jr. and Annie Nottelmann; dearest grandfather of Cory and Ben Nottelmann; dear friend to many. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Friday, December 22 at 1 0 a . m . I n t er ment at Sunset Cemetery. Visitation Thursday, 4-8 p.m.

Struebing, Dorothy E.

(nee Daniels), 85, formerly of Bel Nor, Asleep in Jesus, Monday, Dec. 18, 2017. Beloved wife for 62 years of the late Irwin William Struebing Jr.; loving mother of Dennis (Mary) Struebing, Kurt (Laurene) Struebing and Sandy Favazza (the late Robert "Bob" Favazza and current companion, Greg Monachella); cherished grandmother of David (Anita) Favazza, Desiree (Jason) Franken, Kelly (Matt) Foskett, Jamie (Ty) Powell, Ehren Struebing and John (Chrissy) Struebing; dear great-grandmother of Tyler, Meghan, Katie, Jesse, Sam, Abe, Eli, Riley, Abby and Curtis; our dear sister-in-law, aunt, cousin and friend. Services: Visitation at SHEPARD FUNERAL CHAPEL, 9255 Natural Bridge Rd. at I-170 (314-426-6000), Thurs., Dec. 21, 3 p.m. until the Funeral Service at 7 p.m. Burial is private at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. Family requests memorials to The BackStoppers, Inc. P.O. Box 795168, St. Louis, MO 63179. www.ShepardFuneralChapel.com

He was a husband to the late Pat Kuny (Ehrlacher) for the 62 years they were married and she was a dedicated wife and mother to their two children, Beth Pyle (Kuny) and K. Martin Kuny. Ken is survived by his son K. Martin Kuny and daughter Carrigan, Harry Beth Pyle (Kuny). He is also survived by 5 grandchildren 78, passed away on Monday, Patrick Kuny, Sarah Kuny, Amanda Pyle, Spencer Pyle, and December 18, 2017 at Missouri Peyton Pyle. Ken's siblings are Carole Lener and the late B a p t i s t M ed ica l Cen t er. H e Elinor Elstermeyer. Ken will be dearly missed and made a Tayon, Mary Ellen owned and operated Accounting profound impact on many lives that he touched. (nee Diederich), Associates in Bridgeton, MO. Services: A Celebration of life will be held on December 28th at Fortified with the He is survived by his wife Brookstone Meadows in Omaha, Nebraska. Sacraments of Holy Norma; son, Randy Carrigan; two ARBOR SOCIETY Mother Church on Sunday, daughters: J oD ee Black and December 17, 2017. Beloved wife Cindy Carrigan-Nelson and three and best friend of the late Andrew Levine, Edward grandchildren: McKenzie Nelson, A.J. Carrigan and Grace Carrigan. December 18, 2017. Beloved husband of Carole Levine; dear J. Tayon Sr.; loving mother of Services: Vis. 8:30 a.m. until father and father-in-law of Lance (Erin) Levine; dearest Andrew (Jane) Tayon Jr., Thomas Mass at 9:30 a.m. Dec. 22, at grandfather of Hayden and Zoe Levine; dear brother of the late Philip Tayon and Annette (Mark) Reinhardt; dear grandmother of Immaculate Conception Catholic Phillip and late Morris Levine. Church, Dardenne Prairie, MO. Interment Cemetery of Our Lady Mr. Levine was a longtime business owner of Levine Hat Andrew III, Katie, Maggie and Michael; dear daughter of the late with full military honors. Memorials to the American Heart Company in downtown St. Louis. Association or St. Vincent de Paul, appreciated. Arrangements Services: Funeral service Thursday, December 21, at 12:30 Thomas and Marguerite Diederich by HOUSER-MILLARD, (573) 636-3838. Condolences may be left p.m., at Congregation Shaare Emeth, 11645 Ladue Rd. No (nee Metzger); dear sister of Tom online for the family at www.millardfamilychapels.com visitation before the service. Interment at New Mt. Sinai (Jane) Diederich and the late Peggy (Joe) Torti and Cemetery, 8430 Gravois Rd. Memorial contributions preferred Catherine (Chris) Dedert; our dear aunt, Godmother and friend. Mrs. Tayon was one of the first WAVES (Women Accepted for to a charity of your choice. Please visit Edwards, Kathaleen Voluntary Emergency Services) and served in the U.S. Navy bergermemorialchapel.com for more information. (nee Reinkowski), Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother during WWII. She was a charter member of Service Women's BERGER MEMORIAL SERVICE Church, Friday, December 15, 2017. Beloved mother of Tara Auxiliary Post #404 and a proud 71 year member of The AmeriSims, Jessica Brown and Anthony Brown (Nictaska Green); can Legion. Mackler, Dr. Leona loving grandmother of Jaylin, Justyce, Judi, Corey, Michael, Services: Visitation at St. Mark Catholic Church, Thursday, Rashued, James, Jermey, Justice and Jayden; our beloved sister, "Happiness is not a goal…it's a December 21, 9:00 a.m. until funeral Mass at 10:00 a.m. cousin and friend of many. by-product of a life well lived." Interment JB National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contribuServices: Funeral from KUTIS CITY Chapel, 2906 Gravois, - Eleanor Roosevelt tions to St. Mark Catholic School (for scholarships), 4200 Thursday, December 21, 7 p.m. Interment private. December 18, 2017 - A lifetime Ripa Ave., 63125 appreciated. A KUTIS AFFTON SERVICE. VISITATION THURSDAY, 3-9 P.M. resident of St. Louis, Dr. Leona (Lee) Mackler has devoted her Fraternal Notices life to educating thousands of Frederickson, Florence N. young minds in our (nee Johnson), Asleep in Jesus on Dec. 17, 2017. Beloved wife of community. She attended LOCAL 1 - I.B.E.W. the late Herbert E. Frederickson; dear mother of Stina (Edward) Washington University, Roach, Diane Null and the late Dale Frederickson; dearest earning a B.A./M.Ed. in Please be advised of the death of grandmother of Scott (Lisa) Null, Jamie (Dave Forsythe) Null, Elementary and Secondary Bro. Richard W. Dieterle Kristyna Gebhart and Nathaniel Roach; loving great-grandmothAdministration. She began her Journeyman Wireman/Retired er of Nathan and Evan Null, Bishop and Samuel Gebhart and career in the St. Louis Public School District, serving as a Member 51 Years Merritt Roach; dear aunt, cousin and friend of many. teacher before entering administration as a director of schools, December 18, 2017 Services: Visitation will be Thursday, Dec. 21, 2017 from 10 a.m. director of district reading, and ultimately assistant deputy Visitation, Thurs., Dec. 21, 2017, until the time of the funeral service beginning at 1 1a.m. at superintendent of the district. Dr. Mackler received her Ph.D. in 4-8 p.m. Quernheim Funeral Home, Gethsemane Lutheran Church, 3600 Hampton Ave. The inter- Organizational Analysis & Corporate Culture from Stanford Waterloo, IL 62298. Funeral, Fri. Dec. 22, 2017 8-9:30 a.m. ment will follow in Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. In lieu University. She co-authored Reading Diagnosis, a text widely Funeral Mass following at 10 a.m. at of flowers, donations to Gethsemane Lutheran Church are ap- used in schools across the country to help teachers become St. Peter and Paul Catholic Church, Waterloo, IL 62298. preciated. Please share memories and condolences at better instructors in reading. She has spoken nationally on the Frank D. Jacobs, B.M. James C. Douglas, F.S. www.hoffmeistercolonial.com. subject of education, and has consulted with numerous corporations to help improve their corporate culture. In 1982, Florists Dr. Mackler founded Mackler & Associates, returning to her first Garnatz, Joel A. great love, working directly with students with a wide array of Monday, December 18, 2017. Dierbergs Florist B el oved husband of Sandra educational goals and learning challenges. Order 24 Hours Lee is survived by her dearest, lifelong friend Henrietta Ga rn a t z (nee Nol d e) ; loving 314-692-2000 or 800-844-6007 father of Stacy (David) Reese, Barken, cousin Barbara L. Wasserman (Snider) and her Dierbergs.com Amy (Tim) B ra d en and Todd daughter Rachelle, cousin Ben Kresteel, cousin Rosalie Dulitz (Jenn Morgan) Garnatz; awesome (Kresteel), her husband Harris and their children Felicia, Harold, Schnucks Florist grandpa of Ryan, Emily, Katie, Lewis and Karen and their families. 65 Metro Locations Hannah, Kelli and Matt; our dear Services: Graveside Service Wednesday, December 20th, 10:30 314-997-2444; 800-286-9557 brother-in-law, uncle, cousin and a.m. at Chevra Kadisha Cemetery, 1601 North and South Rd., St. Louis, MO 63130. Memorial contributions may be made to The friend of many. American Heart Association or American Diabetes Association. Please visit bergermemorialchapel.com for more information. BERGER MEMORIAL SERVICE Services: Funeral from KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY CHAPEL, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Saturday, December 23, 9:30 a.m. to St. Margaret Mary Alacoque Church for 10 a.m. Mass. Interment Resurrection Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions to the Backstoppers, appreciated. Visitation, Friday, 4-9 p.m.

Good, Julanne M.

December 18, 2017. Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church. Dearest daughter of the late Alfred and Julia (nee Gibbons) Good. Predeceased by her siblings Mary (Frank) Ahearn, Al (Rosemary) Good, Bernice (Ed) Gou n is , Al ice Good, William (Mary) Good, Patricia (James) Dowd and Donna Good. Our dear aunt, great-aunt, great-great aunt, cousin and friend to many. Services: Mass will be celebrated 10:00 a.m., Friday, December 22, 2017 at Ascension Catholic Church, 230 Santa Maria Dr. Chesterfield, MO 63005. Visitation Thursday 4 to 8 p.m. at OrtmannStipanovich Funeral Home, 12444 Olive Blvd., Creve Coeur, MO 63141. In lieu of flowers, donations to Alzheimer's Association preferred. Interment Resurrection Cemetery. Arrangements by Kevin and Ellen O'Sullivan. Ortmann Stipanovich Funeral Home osfuneralhomes.com

Grant, Tracy Michelle

McFarland, Lawrence D.

Monday, December 18, 2017. Beloved husband for 60 years of Jean McFarland (nee McClintic); loving father, grandfather, great-grandfather, brother, uncle and friend. Services: Visitation at KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Friday, December 22, 11:30 a.m. until service at 12:30 p.m. Private Interment J.B. National Cemetery. Memorials to Lutheran Senior Services or Alzheimer's Assoc. appreciated.

Oelze, Murleen N.

90, of Maryland Heights, Dec. 17, 2017. Services: Baue W. Clay St. Vis. Thur., Dec 21st, 4 - 7 p.m. Svc. Fri., Dec. 22 11:30 a.m. Visit Baue.com

Osseck, Robert

75, St. John, MO. Funeral Mass at Our Lady of the Presentation Fri., Dec. 22, 2017 at 10 a.m. Visitation at the Ortmann Funeral Home on Thursday from 4-8 p.m. www.osfuneralhomes.com

Piant, Marian

Dec. 17, 2017 Services: Vis. Baue Cave Springs, Wed., Dec. 20, 4-8 p.m. Svc. Baue Cave Springs, Thu., Dec. 21, 10 a.m. Contact (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com

Piskos, Frank F.

93, Dec. 18, 2017. Services: Funeral service at the Family Center at Schrader Funeral Home, Ballwin, Fri., 11 am. Visitation, Thurs. 4-8 pm. For more info see Schrader.com.

Roesler, Rose Marie

(nee Cremer) Tuesday, December 19, 2017. Beloved wife of the late Theodore Roesler; loving mother of Denise (David) Cunningham, Cheryl (Dennis) a n d Edward Roesler; dear grandmother of Hayes, Lynda M. Megan, D.J. and Ian Cunningham, (nee Diestelkamp), went to be with the Lord Monday, December Aaron (Cheryl) and Zach (Rachel) 18, 2017. Beloved daughter of Sharon and the late Edward Barr; dear sister-in-law, aunt, Diestelkamp; loving mother of Michelle (Charlie) Blume, Kevin cousin and friend. Hayes, Emily (Mike) Nothum and Matthew Hayes; dearest grandServices: Funeral at KUTIS mother of Tommy and Jack; dear sister, sister-in-law, aunt, AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois cousin and friend to many. Rd., Saturday, Dec. 23, 11:30 a.m. Services: Visitation at KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois Rd., Interment Mt. Hope Cemetery. Saturday December 23, from 11:30 am until the funeral service Memorials to Missouri Botanical Garden, appreciated. at 1:30 PM. Private inurnment. In lieu of flowers, contribuVisitation Friday, 4-8 p.m. tions may be made to the American Diabetes Association.

Dec. 18, 2017. Dear daughter of Shirley Grant and mother of Andrew and Joclyn. Services: Memorial Visitation, KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois Rd., Fri., Dec. 22, 4-8 p.m.

Beautiful Memorials At Schnucks Florist & Gifts, our experienced staff of floral designers is dedicated to the highest level of personal service.

Order 24 Hours schnucksfloral.com (314) 997-2444 or (800) 286-9557


12.20.2017 • Wednesday • M 1

NATION

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A21

House surveillance renewal bill Senate’s Russia will be moved on own, GOP says inquiry adds BY KAROUN DEMIRJIAN Washington Post

WASHINGTON • The House will try to reauthorize and limit a controversial surveillance program, which lets the government collect foreign intelligence on U.S. soil, without relying on the budget or other must-pass legislation to get it through Congress, according to Republicans apprised of the plan. House leaders intend to release one reauthorization proposal that combines bills endorsed by the House Intelligence, House Judiciary and Senate Intelligence committees, senior GOP members of the House Intelligence Committee said Tuesday. Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., told House Republicans at a conference Tuesday morning that the combination measure would not be attached to the continuing resolution being debated this week, Rep. Michael Conaway, R-Texas, said. “We’ve got to get it done before we leave this week,” Conaway added. But it is not yet clear how the new bill will combine current proposals, or that the Senate is on board with the House’s plan to advance the bill through Congress on its own. Absent congressional action, the

National Security Agency’s authority to collect emails and other communications of overseas foreign targets from U.S. companies — an authority known as Section 702 — will expire at the end of the year. Intelligence professionals rank a reauthorization of this surveillance power as their top legislative priority for 2017. Lawmakers have resisted intelligence experts’ calls to renew the surveillance authority without imposing certain restrictions on it first, based on concerns that the program has few safeguards to protect the privacy of Americans who may have been in touch with foreign targets. The Federal Bureau of Investigation can presently search the database of surveillance records collected under Section 702 for information about Americans without first obtaining a warrant. The House Judiciary Committee’s proposal is the most restrictive of the three proposals being incorporated into the forthcoming, stand-alone Section 702 bill. It requires the FBI, in criminal cases, to obtain a warrant before being able to view anything resulting from a query for information about Americans in the database. That requirement would not apply to counterterrorism or counterintelligence cases.

The House Intelligence Committee would require a court order to view the substance of similar queries, while the Senate Intelligence Committee’s proposal creates a procedural hurdle for the FBI, requiring it to submit a formal request to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court to rule on the legality of any queries that turn up information about “a known United States person.” The secret court considers any request for foreign intelligence or law enforcement purposes to be legal. It was not immediately clear how Republican leaders planned to resolve those competing proposals. “I don’t know what it’s going to look like,” Rep. Thomas Rooney, RFla., who chairs the House Intelligence panel’s subcommittee on the NSA and cybersecurity, said. He also suggested that separating out Section 702 legislation was politically necessary to preserve a coalition. Noting that “members of the Freedom Caucus and other libertarian types ... have a problem with 702,” Rooney said he was glad that the bill reauthorizing it was being separated from must-pass legislation. “They really shouldn’t be included with each other,” he said. “This needs to be debated by itself.”

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Diver George Bell, dressed as Santa Claus, swims in the Philippine coral reef tank on Tuesday during a presentation on fish and corals as part of the ’Tis the Season for Science exhibit at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco.

DIGEST NYC beefs up security

There will more police activity near New York City bus stations, airports, subways and bridges this holiday season. Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced on Tuesday the deployment of additional personnel from the State Police and the National Guard at key transportation points throughout the holidays. In addition, officials say radiation detectors and bomb-sniffing dogs will be used. Cuomo, a Democrat, says the stepped-up security presence isn’t based on any credible threats or information suggesting imminent danger. He says the preparations are simply being done out of an abundance of caution. EPA cancels media contract with GOP firm • The Environmental Protection Agency is canceling a $120,000 “media tracking” contract it recently signed with a Republican public affairs and opposition-research firm, amid questions about the firm’s political work and outrage from lawmakers on Capitol Hill. The EPA had defended the contract with Definers Public Affairs, saying it

had hired the firm merely to act as a news clipping service. But an agency spokesperson confirmed Tuesday that the EPA and the company had agreed to terminate the contract. Virginia House recount gives seat to Democrat • In the Virginia legislature, a Republican seat flipped Democratic in a wild recount Tuesday — with the Democrat winning by a single vote — creating a rare 50-50 tie between the parties in the House of Delegates and refashioning the political landscape in Richmond, Va. Democrat Shelly Simonds emerged from the recount as the winner in the 94th District of the House of Delegates, seizing the seat from Republican incumbent David Yancey. A three-judge panel still must certify the results, an event scheduled for Wednesday. Ex-Kentucky judge rebuked for antigay adoption stance • A Kentucky judge retired after his objections to handling adoption cases involving same-sex couples met with criticism, but that didn’t shield him from a parting rebuke from a disciplinary commission, which reprimanded him Tuesday. Former Judge W. Mitchell Nance, who raised moral objections

to hearing adoption cases involving gay and lesbian adults, was publicly reprimanded by the Kentucky Judicial Conduct Commission. That was the only public sanction available, the commission said, due to Nance’s previously announced retirement, which took effect last Saturday. Coal-fired power plant in New Mexico is being closed • The first of two units to be shut down at a coal-fired power plant that has been serving customers throughout the American Southwest for decades is no longer in operation, officials with New Mexico’s largest utility said Tuesday. Unit 3 at the San Juan Generating Station was turned off just after midnight and another unit at the four-unit plant will be turned off this weekend as Public Service Co. of New Mexico works to meet a federally mandated deadline for the closure. The partial shutdown is part of an agreement with state and federal regulators and other stakeholders to reduce haze-causing pollution in the Four Corners region, where New Mexico, Arizona, Colorado and Utah meet. From news services

new focus: Green Party’s Stein

BY MARY CLARE JALONICK associated Press

WASHINGTON • The Senate intelligence committee

has asked for documents from Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein as part of its probe into Russian interference in the 2016 election, adding another new thread to the panel’s investigation as it heads into next year. Stein said Tuesday that she was cooperating with the probe and providing documents to the committee. She has captured the interest of investigators partly because she attended a 2015 dinner in Moscow sponsored by Russian television network RT with Russian President Vladimir Putin. The Senate Intelligence Committee chairman, Richard Burr, R-N.C., appeared to confirm the investigation’s new focus on Stein on Monday. Asked what the committee wanted to know about from Stein’s campaign, Burr responded: “Collusion with the Russians.” The request to Stein is more evidence that the Senate panel will still have much work to do in 2018. While the investigation has largely focused on both the Russian interference and whether it was in any way connected to President Donald Trump’s Republican campaign, investigators are following multiple leads. Burr was coy about other campaigns the panel may be looking into. On Monday, he told reporters that the committee had “two other campaigns that we’re just starting on,” one of which he indicated was Stein’s. He would not answer questions from reporters Tuesday about what the other campaign is but hinted that it was Democrat Hillary Clinton’s by ruling out other candidates. The panel has already interviewed several Clinton campaign officials and has been investigating a dossier of allegations about Trump’s ties to Russia. Clinton’s presidential campaign and the Democratic National Committee helped fund that political research. It’s unclear if Burr was referring to a new phase of the investigation or work they have already done. The top Democrat on the panel, Virginia’s Sen. Mark Warner, would not say whom the panel is investigating but noted on Tuesday that Stein was at the “infamous dinner” with Putin. Michael Flynn, who later became Trump’s national security adviser, also attended the 2015 dinner. Flynn is cooperating with special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into the Russian meddling and has pleaded guilty to a count of making false statements to FBI agents. Warner also said Stein had said complimentary things about WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, who Warner said “clearly was being used by the Russians to take some of the hacked information and release it into our political system.” WikiLeaks released stolen emails from several Democratic officials during the campaign. Assange denies receiving the material from Russia.

Democrats unlikely to force DACA vote this week, they say BY ED O’KEEFE Washington Post

WASHINGTON • Democrats are backing away from

a pledge to force a vote this month over the fate of thousands of undocumented immigrants brought to this country as children, angering activists but probably averting the threat of a government shutdown at a critical moment in spending negotiations with Republicans and President Donald Trump. With a deadline of midnight Friday to pass spending legislation, dozens of Democrats had vowed to withhold support if Republicans refused allow a vote on a measure known as the Dream Act that would allow roughly 1.2 million immigrants to stay legally in the United States. But a group of vulnerable Democratic senators facing re-election in conservative states next year aren’t willing to go that far — meaning the party is unlikely to muster the votes to block the spending bill. “We’ve got to get it done, but I’m not drawing a line in the sand that it has to be this week versus two weeks from now,” said Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., who faces re-election next year in a state that Trump won by more than 18 points. Other Democrats facing similar headwinds echoed that sentiment, including Sens. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., and Joe Donnelly, DInd. Trump won those states by 42 and 19 percentage points, respectively. Their reluctance to enact legislation protecting “Dreamers” has exposed a rift among Democrats, with immigration advocates staging protests this week and accusing some Democrats of taking the party’s Latino supporters for granted. The current push for immigration legislation erupted in September, after Trump vowed to end a program known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, instituted by then-President Barack Obama via executive action and allowing some immigrants brought into the country as children to stay legally. At the time, Trump declared the program unconstitutional — and he challenged Congress by setting a March 5 deadline to pass legislation offering parallel protections to those provided under DACA. Schumer responded to that challenge by promising that “Democrats will do everything we can to prevent President Trump’s terribly wrong order from becoming reality.” House Minority Leader Pelosi, D-Calif., said in October: “We have to do it before Christmas. That’s just the way it is.” But in the weeks since, both leaders have amended their wish list and are now also pushing to use the looming spending showdown to reauthorize the State Children’s Health Insurance Program and devote more federal funding to cash-strapped pensions and opioid abuse programs. DACA recipients remain a top concern for House Democrats and a handful of Democratic senators, including Illinois’ Richard Durbin, the second-ranking Democrat, as well as senators mulling 2020 presidential campaigns. “This can’t come down to an issue of what is politically popular. It’s just morally right,” said Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., a potential 2020 contender.


A22 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 12.20.2017

Bommarito Pre-Owned Centers 9 Convenient Locations

MISSOURI'S #1 AUTOMOTIVE GROUP

1000's

OF VEHICLES, EVERY MODEL, ALL PRICE RANGES,

EVERY MANUFACTURER

Bommarito Is The Only St. Louis Dealer Awarded Motor Trend’s Pre-Owned Vehicle Certification. WE HAVE

Scan with your smartphone to learn more.

Bommarito

Pre-Owned Centers

AND FACTORY CERTIFIED

Bommarito

WILL BUY YOUR CAR

OUTRIGHT...Even if you don't buy a car from us! • We'll buy every car we appraise regardless of year, make, model or condition.

• The sale of your vehicle can take as little as 20 minutes, just sign the paperwork and walk away with payment in hand. • We will handle your loan payoff if needed - It's easy - No private party issues - Hassle Free.

• $500 MORE FOR YOUR TRADE GUARANTEE • 72 HOUR EXCHANGE POLICY See dealer for details.

Visit Any Of Our 9 Bommarito Certified Pre-Owned Center Locations;

West County, South County, St. Peters & Hazelwood OR SHOP US ONLINE AT:

.com


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

WEDNESDAY • 12.20.2017 • B

PETRO WAS ‘BORN TO PLAY’

Blues captain returned to lineup Sunday, now he’s eager to get team back to its game BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CALGARY, ALBERTA • Two Saturdays ago in Detroit, Alex Pietrangelo took a painful shot to the foot during the first period and basically shrugged it off. He left the ice briefly, but still logged heavy ice time in the Blues’ 6-1 victory Dec. 7 over the Red Wings. His 25 minutes 5 seconds was just off his season average of 25:37 per game. “I didn’t even know until I took my skate off,” Pietrangelo said. “I mean I get pucks off the feet all the time.” Apparently he was running on adrenaline the rest of the afternoon at Little

> Alex Pietrangelo leads the Blues’ skaters in average time on ice (25:37), and even after missing four games, he still has earned the fourt-most points (23).

Caesars Arena. Even in the visitors dressing room just a couple of minutes after the game, he joked as reporters gathered around the soft-spoken — some would say media-shy — Jay Bouwmeester, who had scored his first goal of the season. “Get in there close,” he said, a tease directed more at Bouwmeester than the media. Then Pietrangelo took his skates off and ... ouch! “All of a sudden it hits you,” he said. He had an X-ray taken before the team flew back to St. Louis, and the next day the foot was very swollen. See BLUES • Page B6

> Brodziak reaches milestone with 800 NHL games. B3 > 8:30 p.m. Wednesday at Flames, FSM

Focused on the finish

Mizzou wins despite test against SFA Tigers turn ball over 21 times against the Lumberjacks BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • Missouri

PHOTOS BY DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

St. Louis University guard Jordan Goodwin (0) celebrates after St. Louis beat Campbell at Chaifetz Arena on Tuesday night.

With family backing, SLU’s Goodwin settles in JOSE de JESUS ORTIZ St. Louis Post-Dispatch

As he does before each St. Louis University basketball game, Tim Goodwin sent his son Jordan an inspirational text message Tuesday. The freshman point guard received the text seven hours before he and the Billikens tipped off against Campbell University at Chaifetz Arena. Tim Goodwin, a pastor at Mount Vernon’s Pilgrim Rest Baptist Church, included a Bible verse, Matthew 20:16, in his

text: “So the last shall be first, and the first last: for many be called, but few chosen.” Tim Goodwin actually picks a different verse for his son every day, whether the Billikens have a game or not, to remind him to keep God first. Tuesday’s text was meant to let Jordan know that he’ll continue to grow as he overcomes the growing pains most freshmen go through early in their careers. “It’s not about the start, but the finish,” Tim Goodwin reminded his son in the text. “You start slow but you will finish strong.” Tim Goodwin was focused on the big picture, but the second part of his text perfectly described the run that put the See ORTIZ • Page B3

> SLU picks up defense in 2nd half to top Campbell. B3

ST. LOUIS U. CAMPBELL

74 66

> UP NEXT: 6 p.m. Friday vs. SEMO, FSM

coach Cuonzo Martin warned anyone willing to listen that Tuesday’s visit from Stephen F. Austin “won’t be a cakewalk.” His point guards will agree after a grueling 82-81 victory at Mizzou Arena. The visitors’ swarming defense was every bit as lethal as advertised — except, on occasion, along the 3-point arc. MIZZOU 82 In M izzou’s p e n u l t i m a te SF AUSTIN 81 game of the 7 p.m. Saturday vs. calendar year, >Illinois (at Scottrade before Satur- Center), ESPN2 day’s Braggin’ Rights Game with Illinois, Martin rifled through his guards trying to find someone who could keep the ball out of the Lumberjacks’ hands. Mizzou’s 21 turnovers marked a season-high. Fortunately for the Tigers, when they weren’t giving possessions away they were dropping them through the net. Mizzou (10-2) made 10 of its first 11 shots, including its first six 3-pointers, a shooting spree potent enough to offset the issues in the backcourt. For the game, the Tigers shot 11 of 22 from long range. Kassius Robertson led the Tigers with 23 points, while Jordan Barnett continued his blistering December with 22. The senior guard came into Tuesday’s game averaging 18.2 points in MU’s last six contests — and scored his 20th point on the second possession of the second half. The duo combined to shoot 13 of 24 from behind the arc.

See MIZZOU • Page B4

Any deal for Donaldson is risky Getting just one year from third baseman not ideal for Cardinals BY RICK HUMMEL St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Toronto Blue Jays’ Josh Donaldson rounds first base after hitting a solo home run against the Boston Red Sox Sept. 26.

As the Cardinals continue their search for bullpen help, perhaps another hitter and maybe a starter, word in Toronto is that the Blue Jays haven’t really made any attempt to lock down star third baseman Josh Donaldson to a long-term deal and may be agreeable to moving him. Donaldson, finishing off a two-

year, $28.6 million contract, is arbitration-eligible and could command close to $25 million for next season. It is after the season that is the question. Donaldson could be a free agent and the Cardinals have said they are loath to give up years of control over potential prospects they might trade for perhaps just one year with Donaldson or Baltimore’s Manny Machado, who seems very likely to file for free agency

after next season if he is traded or not. Donaldson, who is 32, may not be as eager to file for free agency then and often has voiced a desire to stay in Toronto. As the Blue Jays begin selling season tickets for next year, it might behoove management to make it clear that Donaldson either will be with the club or not. See CARDINALS • Page B2

> FSM to give ‘inside’ look at Cards’ winter meeting moves. B2 > Former Dodger Gonzalez now a free agent. B2

SPORTS

1 M


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

WEDNESDAY • 12.20.2017 • B

PETRO WAS ‘BORN TO PLAY’

Blues captain returned to lineup Sunday, now he’s eager to get team back to its game BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CALGARY, ALBERTA • Two Saturdays ago in Detroit, Alex Pietrangelo took a painful shot to the foot during the first period and basically shrugged it off. He left the ice briefly, but still logged heavy ice time in the Blues’ 6-1 victory Dec. 7 over the Red Wings. His 25 minutes 5 seconds was just off his season average of 25:37 per game. “I didn’t even know until I took my skate off,” Pietrangelo said. “I mean I get pucks off the feet all the time.” Apparently he was running on adrenaline the rest of the afternoon at Little

> Alex Pietrangelo leads the Blues’ skaters in average time on ice (25:37), and even after missing four games, he still has earned the fourt-most points (23).

Caesars Arena. Even in the visitors dressing room just a couple of minutes after the game, he joked as reporters gathered around the soft-spoken — some would say media-shy — Jay Bouwmeester, who had scored his first goal of the season. “Get in there close,” he said, a tease directed more at Bouwmeester than the media. Then Pietrangelo took his skates off and ... ouch! “All of a sudden it hits you,” he said. He had an X-ray taken before the team flew back to St. Louis, and the next day the foot was very swollen. See BLUES • Page B6

> Brodziak reaches milestone with 800 NHL games. B3 > 8:30 p.m. Wednesday at Flames, FSM

Focused on the finish

Mizzou wins despite test against SFA Robertson steal in final seconds helps avoid late collapse BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • Missouri

PHOTOS BY DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

St. Louis University guard Jordan Goodwin (0) celebrates after St. Louis beat Campbell at Chaifetz Arena on Tuesday night.

With family backing, SLU’s Goodwin settles in JOSE de JESUS ORTIZ St. Louis Post-Dispatch

As he does before each St. Louis University basketball game, Tim Goodwin sent his son Jordan an inspirational text message Tuesday. The freshman point guard received the text seven hours before he and the Billikens tipped off against Campbell University at Chaifetz Arena. Tim Goodwin, a pastor at Mount Vernon’s Pilgrim Rest Baptist Church, included a Bible verse, Matthew 20:16, in his

text: “So the last shall be first, and the first last: for many be called, but few chosen.” Tim Goodwin actually picks a different verse for his son every day, whether the Billikens have a game or not, to remind him to keep God first. Tuesday’s text was meant to let Jordan know that he’ll continue to grow as he overcomes the growing pains most freshmen go through early in their careers. “It’s not about the start, but the finish,” Tim Goodwin reminded his son in the text. “You start slow but you will finish strong.” Tim Goodwin was focused on the big picture, but the second part of his text perfectly described the run that put the See ORTIZ • Page B3

> SLU picks up defense in 2nd half to top Campbell. B3

ST. LOUIS U. CAMPBELL

74 66

> UP NEXT: 6 p.m. Friday vs. SEMO, FSM

guard Kassius Robertson didn’t have a choice. After missing two free throws that would have given the Tigers a three-point lead in the final seconds against Stephen F. Austin, the senior guard had only one option. “I had to do something,” he later said. The Tigers’ graduate transfer, the sharp-shooting Canadian who joined the program this MIZZOU 82 summer so he could finally SF AUSTIN 81 play in the 7 p.m. Saturday vs. NCAA Tour- >Illinois (at Scottrade nament, did Center), ESPN2 the only thing that could preserve the win. He got the ball With 13 seconds left, his team up one, Robertson fought through a screen, tipped a pass to SFA’s T.J. Holyfield and corralled it long enough to call a timeout with 2.7 seconds left. “It saved me,” he said, “from locking myself in my room for a good week.” From there, the Tigers cleanly inbounded the ball and Jordan Geist dribbled the final seconds off the clock to preserve a grueling 82-81 win, Mizzou’s fifth straight victory. “I was so shocked that I missed those free throws,” said Robertson, who didn’t miss much else and finished with a game-high 23 points. “I had to forget about that to be honest and make sure we didn’t lose the game because that would have been a lot worse.” “Not a good win in my opinion,” Missouri coach Cuonzo Martin. “A great win.”

See MIZZOU • Page B4

Any deal for Donaldson is risky Getting just one year from third baseman not ideal for Cardinals BY RICK HUMMEL St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Toronto Blue Jays’ Josh Donaldson rounds first base after hitting a solo home run against the Boston Red Sox Sept. 26.

As the Cardinals continue their search for bullpen help, perhaps another hitter and maybe a starter, word in Toronto is that the Blue Jays haven’t really made any attempt to lock down star third baseman Josh Donaldson to a long-term deal and may be agreeable to moving him. Donaldson, finishing off a two-

year, $28.6 million contract, is arbitration-eligible and could command close to $25 million for next season. It is after the season that is the question. Donaldson could be a free agent and the Cardinals have said they are loath to give up years of control over potential prospects they might trade for perhaps just one year with Donaldson or Baltimore’s Manny Machado, who seems very likely to file for free agency

after next season if he is traded or not. Donaldson, who is 32, may not be as eager to file for free agency then and often has voiced a desire to stay in Toronto. As the Blue Jays begin selling season tickets for next year, it might behoove management to make it clear that Donaldson either will be with the club or not. See CARDINALS • Page B2

> FSM to give ‘inside’ look at Cards’ winter meeting moves. B2 > Former Dodger Gonzalez now a free agent. B2

SPORTS

2 M


SPORTS

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 12.20.2017

ROAD

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Wednesday 12/20 at Flames 8:30 p.m. FSM

Thursday 12/21 at Oilers 8 p.m. FSM

Saturday 12/23 at Canucks 9 p.m. FSM

Wednesday 12/27 vs. Predators 7 p.m. FSM

SLU men’s basketball • slubillikens.com | 314-977-4758 Friday 12/22 vs. SEMO 6 p.m. FSM

Saturday 12/30 at La Salle 1 p.m.

Wednesday 1/3 at Davidson 6 p.m.

Saturday 1/6 vs. Richmond 7 p.m. FSM

Mizzou • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Football

Men’s basketball

Wednesday 12/27 Texas Bowl vs. Texas 8 p.m., ESPN

Saturday 12/23 vs. Illinois (Scottrade) 7 p.m., ESPN2

Wednesday 1/3 at South Carolina 8 p.m. ESPN2

Saturday 1/6 vs. Florida 12 p.m. KMOV

Illinois men’s basketball • fightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Saturday 12/23 vs. Missouri (Scottrade) 7 p.m., ESPN2

Saturday 12/30 Wednesday 1/3 vs. Grand Canyon at Minnesota 8 p.m. 3 p.m. BTN

Saturday 1/6 at Michigan 11a.m. BTN

OTHER EVENTS MAJOR ARENA SOCCER • St. Louis Ambush home games Sun. 12/31: vs. Florida, 2:05 p.m. Sat. 1/6: vs. Kansas City, 7:05 p.m. FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

ON THE AIR BASKETBALL 3:30 p.m. College: St. Joseph’s vs. St. John’s, ESPNU 6 p.m.

College: Houston vs. Providence, ESPNU

6 p.m.

College: Evansville at Duke, ESPN2

6 p.m.

College: Wagner at Seton Hall, FS1

6 p.m.

College: North Texas at Georgetown, FS2

6 p.m.

College: James Madison at Florida, SEC Network

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Toronto Blue Jays’ Josh Donaldson, shown Sept. 26, has often voiced a desire to stay in Toronto.

Rays’ Longoria is still an option

6:30 p.m. NBA: Pacers at Hawks, FSM Plus 7 p.m.

College: Texas-San Antonio at Nebraska, BTN

CARDINALS • FROM B1

7 p.m.

NBA: Lakers at Rockets, NBA

8 p.m.

College: Wofford at North Carolina, ESPN2

8 p.m.

College: South Carolina Upstate at Creighton, FS1

8 p.m.

College: Furman at Tennessee, SEC Network

8 p.m.

College: Albany (N.Y.) at Louisville, ESPNU

9:30 p.m. NBA: Grizzlies at Warriors, NBA 10 p.m.

College: Kansas State vs. Washington State, ESPN2

FOOTBALL 7 p.m.

Frisco Bowl: Louisiana Tech vs. Southern Methodist, ESPN

HOCKEY 7 p.m.

Red Wings at Flyers, NBCSN

8:30 p.m. Blues at Flames, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) SOCCER 1:30 p.m. Deutsche Pokal: Bayern Munich vs. Borussia Dortmund, ESPN2

DIGEST SEC men’s basketball tourney tickets go on sale

All-session tickets for the Southeastern Conference men’s basketball tournament, scheduled for March 7-11 at Scottrade Center, go on sale Wednesday at 10 a.m. through Ticketmaster. The postseason tournament is making its first appearance in St. Louis. The ticket books are $360 and provide admission to all 13 games and seven sessions. All available tickets are in the mezzanine level. Tickets may be purchased online at ticketmaster.com, by phone at 800-745-3000 or at the Scottrade Center box office. “We are absolutely thrilled to welcome the SEC to St. Louis,” said Frank Viverito, president of the St. Louis Sports Commission, which partnered with Scottrade Center to host the event. There will be two first-round games played on March 7, four second-round games on March 8, four quarterfinal games on March 9, two semifinal games on March 10 and the championship game at noon on Sunday, March 11. For more information on the 2018 SEC Men’s Basketball Tournament, visit SECSports.com. (From news services) American wins giant slalom • Mikaela Shiffrin won a World Cup giant slalom Tuesday in Courchevel, France. It was her third victory of the season. The 23-year-old from Vail, Colo., was fastest in the first run and had a big enough margin to beat France’s Tessa Worley by .99 seconds in mild and sunny conditions. Italian veteran Manuela Moelgg was third, 1.01 behind Shiffrin. Shiffrin has won 34 World Cup races, but this was only her fifth in giant slalom. Worley, eighth after the first run, was fast on the bottom section of the Stade Emile-Allais course. But it was not enough to erase the 1.42 seconds she conceded to Shiffrin in the morning run. Shiffrin is the defending overall World Cup champion and leads again this season. Her other wins this season were in downhill and slalom. (AP) Nashville to get MLS expansion team • A person with direct knowledge tells The Associated Press that Major League Soccer plans to announce Wednesday that Nashville will be awarded an expansion team. The person spoke on condition of anonymity Tuesday because a public announcement was not authorized. The league called a news conference for Wednesday for an announcement on the “future of soccer in Nashville” and said MLS Commissioner Don Garber will attend along with Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam, Nashville Mayor Megan Barry and John R. Ingram, head of the group bidding for a Nashville team. Nashville and Sacramento, Calif., were viewed as the favorites for the league’s 25th and 26th teams, with Cincinnati and Detroit the other finalists. A decision on the second area picked is expected within a few weeks. (AP) U.S. sprinter Gatlin fires coach • World 100-meter champion Justin Gatlin says he has fired coach Dennis Mitchell following an undercover investigation that appeared to show people linked to the sprinter offering to supply performance-enhancing drugs. Gatlin, who also won the 100 meters at the 2004 Athens Olympics, said on Instagram he was “shocked and surprised to learn that my coach would have anything to do with even the appearance of these current accusations. I fired him as soon as I found out about this.” The Athletics Integrity Unit says it is investigating the allegations published in Tuesday’s edition of British newspaper The Daily Telegraph. IAAF President Sebastian Coe says “these allegations are extremely serious.” The Telegraph reported that Mitchell and track agent Robert Wagner offered to supply and administer testosterone and human growth hormone for an actor training for a film for a fee of $250,000. (AP)

HOW TO SUBMIT A LETTER FAX 314-340-3070 E-MAIL soundoff@post-dispatch.com HOLE IN ONE Golf courses submit results to postsports@post-dispatch.com

Must include name, address for verification. Letters may be edited for length and clarity.

MAIL Sports Sound Off St. Louis Post-Dispatch 900 North Tucker Boulevard St. Louis, MO 63101

CONTACT US

To e-mail editors, use first initial AND last name@post-dispatch.com For general information call 314-340-8222

Roger Hensley Cameron Hollway Don Reed Mike Smith Mike Reilly Chris Gove

Assistant Managing Editor | Sports Deputy Sports Editor Deputy Sports Editor | Nights Assistant Sports Editor | Online Assistant Sports Editor | Nights High School Sports

314-340-8301 314-340-8392 314-340-8313 314-340-8137 314-340-8178 314-744-5725

So, the issue is what would they want if they trade him? A Major League Baseball source familiar with the Jays said Toronto probably would want two major leaguers — such as a third baseman and a starting pitcher — and a prospect. The Cardinals have two starting third basemen in Matt Carpenter and Jedd Gyorko. They also have a spare outfielder in power hitter Randal Grichuk. The Cardinals also have young starting pitching, but would they risk it for the possibility of only one year of Donaldson, who had 33 homers last season while missing nearly 50 games because of injury? Two or more prospects would seem to be something the Cardinals would not do with Toronto.

TALKING WITH TAMPA BAY Talks are believed to be ongoing between the Cardinals and the Rays about closer Alex Colome, possibly third baseman Evan Longoria and maybe even starter Chris Archer, although that last possibility seems less likely. The Rays would want young pitching, of course, but might be amenable to a first baseman under control in Jose Martinez as they are losing both Lucas Duda and Logan Morrison to free agency. Tampa Bay has more urgency than probably ever before to discuss trading the 32-year-old Longoria, who early next season can become a 5-10 man with veto power over all trades. As the Cardinals survey his possibilities, the San Francisco Giants, looking for a third baseman, too, have inquired about Longoria, who is guaranteed $86

million into 2023. They might try to make the Rays take on the $18.5 million owed outfielder Hunter Pence for next year or the $9 million due outfielder Denard Span. Colome, a first-year arbitration player for the Rays, had 47 saves last season. His price tag would be relatively modest in dollars but maybe not so in players.

REED ON THE RADAR?

The Cardinals still are thought to be in the running for free agent righthander Addison Reed, who has had closer’s experience but has been mostly a setup man in his career. Reed was believed to be close to a deal with Philadelphia but that didn’t materialize, and the Phillies signed Pat Neshek and Tommy Hudson. Rick Hummel @cmshhummel on Twitter rhummel@post-dispatch.com

FSM to give ‘inside’ look at Cards’ winter meetings DAN CAESAR St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Fox Sports Midwest had cameras following Cardinals executives at last week’s winter meetings and presents an “inside” look at the inner workings of the team’s moves in a series four 30-minute shows, the first of which is to air at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. They are hosted by Jim Hayes, who was at the meetings. Given all the high-profile activity the team recently has had, including the spurning of the club by Giancarlo Stanton and its subsequent acquisition of Marcell Ozuna, it could be an interesting series. “The show includes a realtime look at how the Ozuna deal went down, and how the Cardinals went about regrouping after

FOX SPORTS MIDWEST

A Fox Sports Midwest camera was rolling at the recent winter meetings when pitcher Miles Mikolas (right) signed as John Mozeliak watched.

Stanton declined to waive his notrade” clause, Hayes said. “Our cameras go inside the Cardinals’ suite, as (team president of baseball operations John) Mozeliak discussed the situation in front of

his full staff.” The second episode is at 5 p.m. Thursday (repeated at 11 p.m.). The series concludes with installments at 5:30 p.m. on Dec. 22 and at 12:30 p.m. on Christmas Day.

BASEBALL NOTEBOOK

Former Dodger Gonzalez now a free agent at almost $3.7 million and Washington — which is paying tax for the first time — at just under $1.45 million.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Adrian Gonzalez has been released by the Atlanta Braves and is a free agent. Atlanta acquired the 35-yearold as part of Saturday’s fiveplayer trade that sent outfielder Matt Kemp to the Los Angeles Dodgers and immediately designated him for assignment and placed him on waivers. Gonzalez waived his no-trade clause after the Braves agreed to cut him from their roster, and he was formally released Monday. Atlanta is set at first base with Freddie Freeman. Los Angeles also sent starting pitchers Scott Kazmir and Brandon McCarthy and infielder Charlie Culberson to Atlanta along with $4.5 million due May 1. NL Rookie of the Year Cody Bellinger took over at first base for the Dodgers when Gonzalez went on the disabled list with a herniated disk in his back last season. Gonzalez, acquired from the Red Sox in August 2012, was an AllStar in 2015 and led the NL in RBIs in 2014. He gets $21.5 million in the final year of his contract, and a team signing him to a big league contract would owe just the minimum $545,000, with Atlanta paying the remainder. Dodgers top luxury tax list • The Los Angeles Dodgers will pay baseball’s highest luxury tax for

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Hundley has deal with Giants • Catcher Nick Hundley has agreed to a $2.5 million, one-year contract to remain with the San Francisco Giants. The 34-year-old hit .249 with nine homers and 35 RBIs in 303 plate appearances last season and threw out 13 of 49 runners attempting to steal. He has a .249 career average with 81 homers and 340 RBIs. Hundley became a free agent after the season.

the fourth straight year and the New York Yankees owe a penalty for a 15th consecutive season, streaks that could end as the sport’s biggest spenders slash payroll for 2018. The Dodgers owe $36.2 million, according to final figures compiled by the commissioner’s office and obtained by The Associated Press. That raises their five-year tax total to nearly $150 million. New York was second at $15.7 million, its lowest amount since 2011 but a figure that increased its total since the tax began to $341 million. San Francisco was next at $4.1 million, followed by Detroit

Rangers’ Perez injured • Texas Rangers lefthander Martin Perez broke his non-pitching elbow in a mishap with a bull and is likely to miss the start of the season. Perez had surgery Monday in Dallas and is expected to start throwing in about a month. The Rangers said Tuesday the 26-year-old is expected to be sidelined from games until midApril, putting him on track for a possible return to the major leagues by May 1. The injury occurred on Perez’s ranch in his native Venezuela. General manager Jon Daniels said Perez told him he was startled by a bull and fell on the elbow. Perez was 13-12 with a 4.82 ERA in a team-high 32 starts.

Atlanta released Adrian Gonzalez after getting him in a trade with the Dodgers on Saturday.


COLLEGE BASKETBALL

12.20.2017 • Wednesday • M 1

Bills rally to beat Campbell

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B3

SLU coach values ‘passion’ Goodwin brings to game

Hines scores 18 as SLU picks up its defensive play in second half

ORTIZ • FROM B1

BY STU DURANDO st. Louis Post-dispatch

One of the prerequisites for St. Louis University to remain in games during nonconference play has been to keep opposing offenses under wraps, even frustrated if possible. The Billikens have been pretty consistent in that quest, holding eight of their first 10 Division I opponents under their season scoring averages. In fact, an average of 12 points under. But as usual, SLU coach Travis Ford was concerned as his team had one day to prepare for Campbell. “This is as big a challenge as we’ve had on one-day preparation that I can remember in a long time,” Ford said the day before. “It seems we’ve been running up against a lot of great offensive teams.” The defensive feat didn’t seem possible at halftime Tuesday night but SLU tightened up in the second half by holding Campbell to 28 points and the Billikens rallied for a 74-66 win at Chaifetz Arena. The Camels entered the game averaging 84.8 points and had 38 at halftime. But SLU raced out of the intermission to gain control and held Campbell to 33 percent shooting in the second half. Aaron Hines came off the bench to score a team-high 18 points for SLU (6-6), making 11 of 13 free throws. Jalen Johnson had 17 points and Hasahn French registered 11 points to go along with 12 rebounds. The Billikens made more than enough free throws this time, largely because of their 42 opportunities, which resulted in 29 points. SLU started with a secondhalf run that was similar to their burst against Murray State in the previous home-court victory. The Billikens went on an 18-3 run to erase an eight-point halftime deficit as Jordan Goodwin got things rolling and Johnson started to warm up. Johnson, who had made just two of 18 3-pointers in the previous three games, nailed a pair of 3s as the run grew, scored on a layup and hit two free throws to give the Billikens a 54-45 lead with 10 minutes 38 seconds left. The lead grew as big as 59-48 with the help of a string of free throws. But in typical SLU style, the Billikens went into a scoring drought that saw them miss five consecutive shots in an eightminute stretch. That allowed Campbell to cut the SLU lead to 60-56 until Goodwin scored with 3:07 remaining. SLU’s big lead didn’t seem enough due to the presence of Campbell guards Chris Clemons and Marcus Burk. They comprised possibly the best backcourt tandem SLU has faced in nonconference play this sea-

DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com Billikens guard Javon Bess (3) drives to the basket between Campbell forward Shane Whitfield (32) and center Andrew Eudy (25) in the first half of St. Louis University’s 74-66 win Tuesday at Chaifetz Arena.

son with a combined average of 42 points with an abundance of 3-pointers. Campbell entered the game having made 42 percent of its 3-pointers and with no fear of launching them “from 35 feet in,” Ford had warned his team. Burk got things rolling in the opening minute, setting the tone for a first half that saw the Camels make seven of 11 field goals from beyond the arc with Burk and Clemons making three apiece. The hot shooting allowed Campbell to slowly extend its lead until the Camels found themselves on top 29-19 with 5:32 left in the first half. The Billikens then got boost from Hines, who came off the bench to score 10 points in the half, including eight in a row to pull the Billikens within two points. But Campbell ended the half with three 3-pointers in the last three minutes to take a 38-30 lead to the break.

FG FT Reb CAMPBELL Min M-A M-A O-T A S.Whitfield 39 2-4 2-4 0-3 2 Eudy 18 2-3 0-0 0-2 3 37 7-14 2-3 0-5 1 Burk Clemons 39 7-20 10-10 0-3 0 Gensler 20 3-6 0-0 0-4 2 Oliver 21 0-3 0-0 1-3 1 20 0-3 0-0 1-5 1 Lado Nelson 6 0-0 1-2 0-0 0 Totals 200 21-53 15-19 2-25 10 Percentages: FG.396, FT.789. 3-point goals: 9-22, .409. Team rebounds: 3. Team Turnovers: 11. Blocked shots: 3. Turnovers: 11. Steals: 8. Technical fouls: None. FG FT Reb ST. LOUIS U. Min M-A M-A O-T A French 37 5-8 1-6 5-12 3 39 4-6 6-6 0-3 2 Johnson Goodwin 36 5-11 5-7 3-8 2 Roby 20 2-7 0-0 0-1 0 Bess 37 1-6 6-10 0-6 2 28 3-8 11-13 0-6 1 Hines Foreman 2 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 Anthony 1 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 Totals 200 20-46 29-42 8-36 10 Percentages: FG.435, FT.690. 3-point goals: 5-13, .385. Team rebounds: 4. Team Turnovers: 13. Blocked shots: 4. Turnovers: 13. Steals: 5. Technical fouls: None. 38 28 — Campbell St. Louis U. 30 44 — A: 5,017.

Stu Durando @studurando on Twitter sdurando@post-dispatch.com

> UP NEXT: 6 p.m. Friday vs. SEMO, FSM

ST. LOUIS U. 74, CAMPBELL 66 PF PTS 4 6 5 4 2 20 3 28 4 7 3 0 4 0 1 1 26 66

PF PTS 3 11 2 17 2 16 1 4 2 8 2 18 0 0 2 0 14 74

66 74

Billikens ahead in the second half. The Billikens trailed 38-30 at the half. Then they opened the second half with an 18-3 run to take a 48-41 lead. With his parents, Tim and Antoinette, cheering from the stands, Goodwin scored five of his 16 points during that 18-3 run. “I do think about that. It’s not how you start. It’s about how you finish,” Jordan said. “If you give 100 percent at both ends of the court you’ll find yourself in good positions at the end of the day.” Jordan Goodwin is definitely starting to settle in at SLU. The Althoff Catholic High graduate scored 16 points in his first game since he scored a careerhigh 22 points Saturday in a 6360 loss at Oregon State. “I think I’m comfortable now,” he said. “As far as just knowing my role, knowing my position, knowing what I’m supposed to do, when to take my shots, I feel like I’m starting to fit in. I still got a lot of growing to do. “There’s still a lot I got to learn. There’s still a lot I have to learn to play the point guard position, but I feel like I’m getting a lot better.” After the Camels cut the Billikens’ lead to four points, Goodwin drove hard to the basket and scored while drawing the foul with 3:07 to play. He nailed his free throw to put SLU ahead 63-56. Antoinette shot up from her seat in Section 101 to clap for Jordan as the crowd roared after that crucial basket. Even Tim, who maintained a calm demeanor for most of the game, popped up to cheer after his son helped stall Campbell’s momentum. It is clear that the Goodwins are enjoying the opportunity to cheer for their son at SLU. It only took them 10 minutes to get to Chaifetz Arena from their home. “I’m really grateful because it means that he’ll have the home support of his family here at the games,” Antoinette said. “On home games he’ll have us here in the stands rooting for him, and that means a lot for him and to us.” Tim and Antoinette have attended every SLU home game and even a few road games this season. The Centreville native appreciates and values their active presence at his games. “It’s awesome,” he said. “It’s a blessing. My mom and dad have been a part of my family since I was born. Where I’m from, that’s kind of not how it is. I’m fortunate to have both of them. “They’ve been with me through my ups and downs

throughout all my struggles. I know they both love me. I go with them. They’re going to be there through thick and thin. I thank God for them and I love them.” Goodwin is the first top local recruit that Travis Ford signed at SLU, and his coach has noticed improvement recently. “I think he continues to improve,” Ford said of Goodwin. “That’s the thing I’ve been most proud with Jordan is how far he’s come from practice to the beginning of the year to where he’s at now. He’s very coachable, plays with an incredible amount of passion. The thing we’ve been talking about and I think he’s overcome a little bit and continues the thing we try to get him to do is not worry about mistakes as much. “Don’t worry about when I get on you. Don’t let that affect you. Keep playing. He’s done that now, for about two to three weeks he’s really just not worried about a missed shot, not worried about a turnover, not worried about if I get on him, and he just continues to compete.” And like every good point guard, Goodwin is willing to share on and off the court. A few Billikens are also benefiting from having a hometown guy on the roster. The Goodwins invited senior guard Davell Roby and freshman forward Hasahn French over to their home for Thanksgiving dinner. Unfortunately for Jordan, his mom cannot cook him his favorite dish — Chicken Alfredo — because he has to maintain his weight. That’s probably the only hometown benefit the 6-3, 215-pound point guard cannot capitalize on these days. He’ll have plenty of opportunities to eat Chicken Alfredo at home after the season. For now, he’ll focus on becoming the best point guard he can be. He’ll work on his game while his parents rejoice in having him close. “The biggest highlight is me being able to come to every game and support him with my husband,” Antoinette said. “Our family coming to support him that means a lot to us because we’ve been supporting him since Day 1. “I don’t think we’ve missed a game that he’s had from high school or junior high with me or his dad there. So being here is really good for us.” Jose de Jesus Ortiz @OrtizKicks on Twitter jortiz@post-dispatch.com

COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP

HOW THE TOP 25 FARED

Missouri State cruises past Wright State

2. Michigan State (11-1) idle. Next: vs. Long Beach State, Thursday.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Obediah Church scored 13 points to go along with eight rebounds, three assists and three blocked shots and Alize Johnson

added 12 points with 14 rebounds for his seventh double-double of the season as host Missouri State held off a second-half Wright State run to win 66-50 Tuesday night.

Mike Shannon’s MIKE SHANNON’S CHOICE: Choice:

2,895

$

10 Year Parts Warranty!

R-410A

Installed

- 70,000 BTU Furnace - 2-1/2 Ton Air Conditioner - 2-1/2 Ton Coil Present equipment and flue type may vary price.

Take Advantage of

$1000 Lennox Rebates* Plus more rebates from your utility company *On select qualifying systems

SIUE wins battle of Cougars • Christian Ellis and Jalen Henry scored 19 points apiece and SIU Edwardsville pulled away for an 88-76 win over visiting Chicago State Tuesday. Jaylen McCoy added 17 points, on 5-of-6 shooting with four 3-pointers, and Daniel Kinchen added 15 for SIUE (4-6), which picked up its third straight win. Glen Burns had 18 points for Chicago State (2-13), which has lost nine straight and has yet to beat a Division I team. Blowout win for SIUC • Armon Fletcher (Edwardsville High) scored 20 and Sean Lloyd Jr. added 16 as host SIU Carbondale (7-4) blasted visiting North Carolina A&T 102-64. The Salukis made 61.3 of their shots, including 14 of 25 from 3-point range, and led 58-37 at the half. Femi Olujobi scored 20 for the Aggies (6-6)

WOMEN

Expires Expires 5/15/15 12/31/17

WE SERVICE ALL MAKES AND MODELS

GALMICHE & SONS WWW.GALMICHEANDSONS.COM

314-993-1110

Down 18 at the half, the Raiders (75) closed to 53-48 with 7:51 to play. But Church scored four straight to spark a 13-2 run and the Bears won going away. Jarrid Rhodes scored 12 points with three 3s for Missouri State (10-3), which has won eight of nine. Justin Mitchell scored 18 for Wright State, which saw its three-game win streak ended.

SINCE 1950

Milestone wins for Auriemma, Hatchell • North Carolina’s Sylvia Hatchell and Geno Auriemma of Connecticut became the third and fourth women’s Division I coaches to post their 1,000th career victory on Tuesday. Hatchell’s Tar Heels beat Grambling State 79-63 in an afternoon game while UConn blew by Oklahoma 88-64 Tuesday evening with Napheesa Collier (Incarnate Word) leading the way with 21 points and

1. Villanova (11-0) idle. Next: vs. Hofstra, Friday.

3. Arizona State (11-0) beat Longwood 95-61. Next: vs. Pacific, Friday. 4. Duke (11-1) idle. Next: vs. Evansville, Wednesday. 5. North Carolina (10-1) idle. Next: vs. Wofford, Wed. 6. Miami (9-0) idle. Next: at Hawaii, Friday. 7. Kentucky (9-1) idle. Next: vs. UCLA, Saturday. 8. Texas A&M (10-1) beat Northern Kentucky 64-58. Next: vs. Buffalo, Thursday. 9. Xavier (11-1) beat Marshall 81-77. Next: at Northern Iowa, Friday. 10.West Virginia (9-1) idle. Next: vs. Coppin State, Wed. 11. Wichita State (9-2) beat Arkansas State 89-80. Next: vs. Florida Gulf Coast, Friday. 12. Gonzaga (10-2) idle. Next: at San Diego State, Thurs. 13. Virginia (10-1) beat Savannah State 78-47. Next: vs. Hampton, Friday. 14.Kansas (9-2) idle. Next: vs. Stanford, Thursday. 15. TCU (11-0) idle. Next: vs. William & Mary, Friday. 16.Purdue (11-2) idle. Next: vs. Tennessee State, Thurs. 17. Oklahoma (9-1) beat Northwestern State 105-68. Next: at Northwestern, Friday. 18. Arizona (9-3) idle. Next: vs. UConn, Thursday. 18. Baylor (9-2) idle. Next: vs. Southern University, Wed. 20.Cincinnati (10-2) beat Arkansas-Pine Bluff 77-49. Next: vs. Cleveland State, Thursday. 21. Tennessee (7-2) idle. Next: vs. Furman, Wednesday. 21. Texas Tech (10-1) beat FAU 90-54. Next: vs. Abilene Christian, Friday. 23.Seton Hall (9-2) idle. Next: vs. Wagner, Wednesday. 24.Florida St. (10-1) idle. Next: vs. Southern Miss., Thurs. 25.Creighton (9-2) idle. Next: vs. SC Upstate, Wednesday.

nine rebounds. Hatchell and Auriemma join Tennessee’s Pat Summitt (1,098) and Stanford’s Tara VanDerveer (1,018) in women’s basketball’s 1,000-win club. SLU beats Tulsa • The host Billikens (6-7) raced to a 21-10 lead after a quarter and went on to a 77-66 win over Tulsa Tuesday. One of five starters in double figures, Jackie Kemph led the Billikens with 16 points. Jenny Vliet scored 13 and pulled down 12 rebounds. Shug Dickson scored a game-high 33 for the Golden Hurricane (5-8).


COLLEGE BASKETBALL

12.20.2017 • Wednesday • M 2

Bills rally to beat Campbell

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B3

SLU coach values ‘passion’ Goodwin brings to game

Hines scores 18 as SLU picks up its defensive play in second half

ORTIZ • FROM B1

BY STU DURANDO st. Louis Post-dispatch

One of the prerequisites for St. Louis University to remain in games during nonconference play has been to keep opposing offenses under wraps, even frustrated if possible. The Billikens have been pretty consistent in that quest, holding nine of their first 11 Division I opponents under their season scoring averages. In fact, an average of 12 points under. It didn’t appear they would succeed in that pursuit at halftime Tuesday night, but SLU held Campbell to 28 points and 33 percent shooting after the break, allowing the Billikens to rally for a 74-66 win at Chaifetz Arena. The Camels entered the game averaging 84.8 points and seemed to be on the way to that number until SLU clamped down on the 3-point shooters and overcame an eight-point halftime deficit. “I wasn’t too happy at halftime,” coach Travis Ford said. “It was probably the first time in a long time I got upset (at halftime) because we just were not following the scouting report, giving up 3s we knew we couldn’t give up. The 3s and their transition points set us back. We changed some things but more than anything it was our effort and intent to make plays — deflections, steals, rebounds above the rim.” Campbell made two 3-pointers in the second half after hitting seven in the first, and SLU (6-6) used an 18-3 run to start the second half to wipe out the deficit and gain control. A team in need of a boost at the free-throw line got it from Aaron Hines, who made 11 of 13 on his way to scoring a teamhigh 18 points. SLU generated 42 attempts and scored 29 points from the line, a day after Ford instituted running penalties in practice for not making enough free throws. “I work on them like my jump shot,” Hines said. “I knew it was going to be a key against their zone early, getting in the paint. My first focus was trying to find teammates to get open looks but being aggressive worked out for me.” Campbell’s high-scoring offense is due to guards Chris Clemons and Marcus Burk, possibly the best backcourt tandem SLU has faced in nonconference play. Clemons finished with 28 points and Burk with 20, improving on their average of a combined 42 points. But they made seven of 19 shots in the second half as SLU focused its zone more heavily on eliminating 3s. SLU started with a secondhalf run that was similar to their burst against Murray State in the previous home game as Jordan Goodwin got things rolling and Jalen Johnson started to warm up. The Billikens scored the first

DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

Billikens guard Javon Bess (3) drives to the basket between Campbell forward Shane Whitfield (32) and center Andrew Eudy (25) in the first half of St. Louis University’s 74-66 win Tuesday at Chaifetz Arena.

eight points to tie the game. After a 3-pointer by Clemons, SLU responded by scoring the next 10 points. Johnson, who had made two of 18 3-pointers in the previous three games, nailed a pair of 3s as the run grew, scored on a layup and hit two free throws, giving the Billikens a 54-45 lead with 10 minutes 38 seconds remaining. “We got to a point in the game where if you don’t give up any 3s and have a lead of a certain amount, they’re going to have a tough time coming back,” Ford said. “All we were trying to do was not give up 3s and we told Hasahn (French) to protect the rim. He did that several times.” French blocked three shots to go with his 11 points and 12 rebounds. He avoided foul trouble and was able to play 37 minutes. Johnson added 17 points and Goodwin had 16 and eight rebounds. The game followed a growing trend that has seen the Billikens start slowly and fall behind by double digits the last three games. In each case they were able to recover to get the lead, although they did eventually lose at Oregon State. “We’ve been focused on trying to start better lately,” French said. “We’ve been trying to follow that, but we have to be better in the first half.” Burk got things rolling in the

ST. LOUIS U. 74, CAMPBELL 66 FG FT Reb CAMPBELL Min M-A M-A O-T A S.Whitfield 39 2-4 2-4 0-3 2 Eudy 18 2-3 0-0 0-2 3 37 7-14 2-3 0-5 1 Burk Clemons 39 7-20 10-10 0-3 0 Gensler 20 3-6 0-0 0-4 2 21 0-3 0-0 1-3 1 Oliver Lado 20 0-3 0-0 1-5 1 6 0-0 1-2 0-0 0 Nelson Totals 200 21-53 15-19 2-25 10 Percentages: FG.396, FT.789. 3-point goals: 9-22, .409. Team rebounds: 3. Team Turnovers: 11. Blocked shots: 3. Turnovers: 11. Steals: 8. Technical fouls: None. FG FT Reb ST. LOUIS U. Min M-A M-A O-T A French 37 5-8 1-6 5-12 3 39 4-6 6-6 0-3 2 Johnson Goodwin 36 5-11 5-7 3-8 2 20 2-7 0-0 0-1 0 Roby Bess 37 1-6 6-10 0-6 2 Hines 28 3-8 11-13 0-6 1 2 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 Foreman Anthony 1 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 200 20-46 29-42 8-36 10 Totals Percentages: FG.435, FT.690. 3-point goals: 5-13, .385. Team rebounds: 4. Team Turnovers: 13. Blocked shots: 4. Turnovers: 13. Steals: 5. Technical fouls: None. 38 28 — Campbell St. Louis U. 30 44 — A: 5,017.

PF PTS 4 6 5 4 2 20 3 28 4 7 3 0 4 0 1 1 26 66

PF PTS 3 11 2 17 2 16 1 4 2 8 2 18 0 0 2 0 14 74

66 74

opening minute, setting the tone for a first half that saw the Camels make seven of their 11 field goals from beyond the arc with Burk and Clemons making three apiece. The hot shooting allowed Campbell to slowly extend its lead until the Camels were up 29-19 with 5:32 left in the first half. The Billikens then got boost from Hines, who came off the bench to score 10 points in the half, including eight in a row to pull the Billikens within two. But Campbell ended the half with three 3s in the last three minutes to take a 38-30 lead into the break.

Billikens ahead in the second half. The Billikens trailed 38-30 at the half. Then they opened the second half with an 18-3 run to take a 48-41 lead. With his parents, Tim and Antoinette, cheering from the stands, Goodwin scored five of his 16 points during that 18-3 run. “I do think about that. It’s not how you start. It’s about how you finish,” Jordan said. “If you give 100 percent at both ends of the court you’ll find yourself in good positions at the end of the day.” Jordan Goodwin is definitely starting to settle in at SLU. The Althoff Catholic High graduate scored 16 points in his first game since he scored a career-high 22 points Saturday in a 63-60 loss at Oregon State. “I think I’m comfortable now,” he said. “As far as just knowing my role, knowing my position, knowing what I’m supposed to do, when to take my shots, I feel like I’m starting to fit in. I still got a lot of growing to do. “There’s still a lot I got to learn. There’s still a lot I have to learn to play the point guard position, but I feel like I’m getting a lot better.” After the Camels cut the Billikens’ lead to four points, Goodwin drove hard to the basket and scored while drawing the foul with 3:07 to play. He nailed his free throw to put SLU ahead 63-56. Antoinette shot up from her seat in Section 101 to clap for Jordan as the crowd roared after that crucial basket. Even Tim, who maintained a calm demeanor for most of the game, popped up to cheer after his son helped stall Campbell’s momentum. It is clear that the Goodwins are enjoying the opportunity to cheer for their son at SLU. It only took them 10 minutes to get to Chaifetz Arena from their home. “I’m really grateful because it means that he’ll have the home support of his family here at the games,” Antoinette said. “On home games he’ll have us here in the stands rooting for him, and that means a lot for him and to us.” Tim and Antoinette have attended every SLU home game and even a few road games this season. The Centreville native appreciates and values their active presence at his games. “It’s awesome,” he said. “It’s a blessing. My mom and dad have been a part of my family since I was born. Where I’m from, that’s kind of not how it is. I’m fortunate to have both of them. “They’ve been with me through my ups and downs

throughout all my struggles. I know they both love me. I go with them. They’re going to be there through thick and thin. I thank God for them and I love them.” Goodwin is the first top local recruit that Travis Ford signed at SLU, and his coach has noticed improvement recently. “I think he continues to improve,” Ford said of Goodwin. “That’s the thing I’ve been most proud with Jordan is how far he’s come from practice to the beginning of the year to where he’s at now. He’s very coachable, plays with an incredible amount of passion. The thing we’ve been talking about and I think he’s overcome a little bit and continues the thing we try to get him to do is not worry about mistakes as much. “Don’t worry about when I get on you. Don’t let that affect you. Keep playing. He’s done that now, for about two to three weeks he’s really just not worried about a missed shot, not worried about a turnover, not worried about if I get on him, and he just continues to compete.” And like every good point guard, Goodwin is willing to share on and off the court. A few Billikens are also benefiting from having a hometown guy on the roster. The Goodwins invited senior guard Davell Roby and freshman forward Hasahn French over to their home for Thanksgiving dinner. Unfortunately for Jordan, his mom cannot cook him his favorite dish — Chicken Alfredo — because he has to maintain his weight. That’s probably the only hometown benefit the 6-3, 215-pound point guard cannot capitalize on these days. He’ll have plenty of opportunities to eat Chicken Alfredo at home after the season. For now, he’ll focus on becoming the best point guard he can be. He’ll work on his game while his parents rejoice in having him close. “The biggest highlight is me being able to come to every game and support him with my husband,” Antoinette said. “Our family coming to support him that means a lot to us because we’ve been supporting him since Day 1. “I don’t think we’ve missed a game that he’s had from high school or junior high with me or his dad there. So being here is really good for us.” Jose de Jesus Ortiz @OrtizKicks on Twitter jortiz@post-dispatch.com

COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP

HOW THE TOP 25 FARED

Missouri State cruises past Wright State

2. Michigan State (11-1) idle. Next: vs. Long Beach State, Thursday.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Obediah Church scored 13 points to go along with eight rebounds, three assists and three blocked shots and Alize Johnson

added 12 points with 14 rebounds for his seventh double-double of the season as host Missouri State held off a second-half Wright State run to win 66-50 Tuesday night.

Mike Shannon’s MIKE SHANNON’S CHOICE: Choice:

2,895

$

10 Year Parts Warranty!

R-410A

Installed

- 70,000 BTU Furnace - 2-1/2 Ton Air Conditioner - 2-1/2 Ton Coil Present equipment and flue type may vary price.

Take Advantage of

$1000 Lennox Rebates* Plus more rebates from your utility company *On select qualifying systems

SIUE wins battle of Cougars • Christian Ellis and Jalen Henry scored 19 points apiece and SIU Edwardsville pulled away for an 88-76 win over visiting Chicago State Tuesday. Jaylen McCoy added 17 points, on 5-of-6 shooting with four 3-pointers, and Daniel Kinchen added 15 for SIUE (4-6), which picked up its third straight win. Glen Burns had 18 points for Chicago State (2-13), which has lost nine straight and has yet to beat a Division I team. Blowout win for SIUC • Armon Fletcher (Edwardsville High) scored 20 and Sean Lloyd Jr. added 16 as host SIU Carbondale (7-4) blasted visiting North Carolina A&T 102-64. The Salukis made 61.3 of their shots, including 14 of 25 from 3-point range, and led 58-37 at the half. Femi Olujobi scored 20 for the Aggies (6-6)

WOMEN

Expires Expires 5/15/15 12/31/17

WE SERVICE ALL MAKES AND MODELS

GALMICHE & SONS WWW.GALMICHEANDSONS.COM

314-993-1110

Down 18 at the half, the Raiders (75) closed to 53-48 with 7:51 to play. But Church scored four straight to spark a 13-2 run and the Bears won going away. Jarrid Rhodes scored 12 points with three 3s for Missouri State (10-3), which has won eight of nine. Justin Mitchell scored 18 for Wright State, which saw its three-game win streak ended.

SINCE 1950

Milestone wins for Auriemma, Hatchell • North Carolina’s Sylvia Hatchell and Geno Auriemma of Connecticut became the third and fourth women’s Division I coaches to post their 1,000th career victory on Tuesday. Hatchell’s Tar Heels beat Grambling State 79-63 in an afternoon game while UConn blew by Oklahoma 88-64 Tuesday evening with Napheesa Collier (Incarnate Word) leading the way with 21 points and

1. Villanova (11-0) idle. Next: vs. Hofstra, Friday.

3. Arizona State (11-0) beat Longwood 95-61. Next: vs. Pacific, Friday. 4. Duke (11-1) idle. Next: vs. Evansville, Wednesday. 5. North Carolina (10-1) idle. Next: vs. Wofford, Wed. 6. Miami (9-0) idle. Next: at Hawaii, Friday. 7. Kentucky (9-1) idle. Next: vs. UCLA, Saturday. 8. Texas A&M (10-1) beat Northern Kentucky 64-58. Next: vs. Buffalo, Thursday. 9. Xavier (11-1) beat Marshall 81-77. Next: at Northern Iowa, Friday. 10.West Virginia (9-1) idle. Next: vs. Coppin State, Wed. 11. Wichita State (9-2) beat Arkansas State 89-80. Next: vs. Florida Gulf Coast, Friday. 12. Gonzaga (10-2) idle. Next: at San Diego State, Thurs. 13. Virginia (10-1) beat Savannah State 78-47. Next: vs. Hampton, Friday. 14.Kansas (9-2) idle. Next: vs. Stanford, Thursday. 15. TCU (11-0) idle. Next: vs. William & Mary, Friday. 16.Purdue (11-2) idle. Next: vs. Tennessee State, Thurs. 17. Oklahoma (9-1) beat Northwestern State 105-68. Next: at Northwestern, Friday. 18. Arizona (9-3) idle. Next: vs. UConn, Thursday. 18. Baylor (9-2) idle. Next: vs. Southern University, Wed. 20.Cincinnati (10-2) beat Arkansas-Pine Bluff 77-49. Next: vs. Cleveland State, Thursday. 21. Tennessee (7-2) idle. Next: vs. Furman, Wednesday. 21. Texas Tech (10-1) beat FAU 90-54. Next: vs. Abilene Christian, Friday. 23.Seton Hall (9-2) idle. Next: vs. Wagner, Wednesday. 24.Florida St. (10-1) idle. Next: vs. Southern Miss., Thurs. 25.Creighton (9-2) idle. Next: vs. SC Upstate, Wednesday.

nine rebounds. Hatchell and Auriemma join Tennessee’s Pat Summitt (1,098) and Stanford’s Tara VanDerveer (1,018) in women’s basketball’s 1,000-win club. SLU beats Tulsa • The host Billikens (6-7) raced to a 21-10 lead after a quarter and went on to a 77-66 win over Tulsa Tuesday. One of five starters in double figures, Jackie Kemph led the Billikens with 16 points. Jenny Vliet scored 13 and pulled down 12 rebounds. Shug Dickson scored a game-high 33 for the Golden Hurricane (5-8).


SPORTS

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 12.20.2017

MIZZOU FOOTBALL NOTEBOOK

Hectic times for Tigers, prospects New signing period could result in 20 or so recruits added by Friday BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • In between prepar-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Missouri’s Terrence Phillips (right) steals the ball from Stephen F. Austin’s Ty Charles during the first half of Tuesday night’s game in Columbia, Mo.

Robertson, Barnett lead Tigers scoring in close home win MIZZOU • FROM B1

The Lumberjacks (10-2) never took the lead in the second half but never backed down. With 18 seconds left, Kevon Harris’s 3-pointer got SFA within a point, 82-81, and on MU’s next possession Robertson missed a pair of free throws. But the Tigers gave SFA a taste of its own poison as Robertson forced a turnover, giving Mizzou the ball with 2.7 seconds left. Jordan Geist dribbled the final seconds off the clock to preserve the win. Martin played point guard roulette in the first half, going through four different ballhandlers as the Lumberjacks continued to trap and pressure the Tigers deep into the backcourt. MU headed into the locker room with a 48-40 lead after committing 11 turnovers. From the opening tip, the Tigers put an emphasis on feeding center Jeremiah Tilmon in the post, and the freshman came through with baskets on all three of his shot attempts. But Tilmon took a seat 6:32 into the game after picking up his second foul, staying there for the rest of the half. Luckily, the Tigers had Barnett and Robertson to shoot them out of the turnover ditch. The two seniors shot a combined 6 of 9 from behind the 3-point arc and scored 30 of the Tigers’ 48 points at the break. The Lumberjacks, coached by Kyle Keller, a longtime assistant at Oklahoma State, Kansas and Texas A&M, stuck with the approach that got them to a 10-1 start, namely their relentless pressure on ball-handlers. On Saturday, the Southland Conference power from Nacogdoches, Texas, won for the first time on the home floor of an Southeastern Conference opponent when they beat Louisiana State on a last-second basket. In their second stop on a two-game SEC swing, the Lumberjacks gave Mizzou its best challenge since last month’s Advocare Invitational, when West Virginia’s suffocating press gave the Tigers similar problems in a championship game defeat. SFA came into the game leading the nation in turnover percentage on defense, forcing a turnover on 29.3 percent of defensive possessions, and No. 2 in steal percentage, swiping the ball 15.7 percent of the time. They lived up to their reputation early as Martin’s primary ball-handler committed 10 of MU’s first 11 turnovers, a team-high four by Geist. SFA kept it close by pounding the ball inside on post moves or penetration and scored 28 of its 40 first-half points in the lane. Midway through the second half, SFA used a 12-2 run to get within three points of the Tigers. Junior guard Terrence Phillips gave the Tigers some cushion, squeezing in a baseline floater to beat the shot clock, good for a 66-59 lead. But Mizzou’s turnover problems wouldn’t go away. SFA evened the score at 70-70 with 4:46 after a botched handoff in the Mizzou backcourt, but the Tigers came right back with Kevin Puryear’s putback, then a couple Geist free throws. Mizzou seemingly put SFA away with a Robertson 3-pointer, a Jontay Porter block against the glass, followed by a Robertson floater in the lane, but the Lumberjacks had a couple punches left, just not the knockout blow they needed for another road upset. Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

MISSOURI 82, STEPHEN F. AUSTIN 81 FG FT Reb STEPHEN F. AUSTIN Min M-A M-A O-T A PF Gilmore 28 4-7 3-4 0-3 1 4 Holyfield 35 7-11 4-4 4-8 3 1 Augustin 16 1-4 0-0 0-0 1 5 Canete 29 3-11 0-0 3-4 2 2 K.Harris 29 6-12 3-5 1-2 2 0 Comeaux 19 3-4 3-4 2-2 1 1 Bogues 0 17 6-10 0-0 1-1 1 15 0-2 0-0 1-1 2 4 Charles Nieminen 9 0-1 0-0 0-0 0 4 Bain 3 1-1 0-0 0-0 0 1 Grujic -0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 Totals 200 31-63 13-17 12-21 12 23 Percentages: FG.492, FT.765. 3-point goals: 6-16, .375. Team rebounds: 5. Team Turnovers: 12. Blocked shots: 1. Turnovers: 12. Steals: 11. Technical fouls: None. FG FT Reb MISSOURI Min M-A M-A O-T A PF Barnett 34 6-12 6-6 2-6 2 2 Puryear 26 1-4 4-5 1-4 1 2 1 Tilmon 21 5-5 0-0 1-4 4 B.Harris 13 2-4 2-2 0-1 5 1 Robertson 38 7-12 4-6 0-0 3 1 1 J.Porter 28 1-3 1-2 1-5 2 3 Geist 19 0-0 4-4 2-4 2 11 2-3 2-2 0-1 1 4 Phillips 0-0 Nikko 5 0-0 0-0 0 1 0-0 VanLeer 5 0-0 0-0 0 1 Totals 200 24-43 23-27 7-25 17 20 Percentages: FG.558, FT.852. 3-point goals: 11-21, .524. Team rebounds: 3. Team Turnovers: 21. Blocked shots: 6. Turnovers: 21. Steals: 10. Technical fouls: None. Stephen F. Austin 40 41 — 48 Missouri 34 —

PTS 11 18 3 7 19 9 12 0 0 2 0 81

PTS 22 6 10 6 23 4 4 7 0 0 82

81 82

ing for a bowl game and rebuilding his coaching staff, Missouri’s Barry Odom has found time to put the finishing touches on the first portion of his 2018 recruiting class, a group that starts to become official Wednesday, the first day of college football’s new early signing period. High school seniors are now allowed to sign national letters of intent with college programs during a 72-hour period through Friday. Recruits who don’t sign this week can sign during the traditional national signing day, set for Feb. 7. Missouri expects to sign the bulk of the players who have verbally committed to play for the Tigers, perhaps as many as 20 of the 21 targets. “For us it looks really favorable for Wednesday, but I’d like a few more hours in each day because you run out of them,” Odom said. “The thing that our recruiting department has done and our assistant coaches really worked to develop close, true relationships. We feel really solid with the number that we’re going to get.” Like some of his more vocal peers around the country, Odom has mixed feelings about the early signing date. For one, he’s concerned about the recruits who are still playing high school football games late into the fall while college teams are trying to bring them to campus for official visits. Simi Bakare, a running back from Round Rock, Texas, played in a state playoff game Saturday, then rushed to Columbia for his official visit. Bakare,

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Missouri head coach Barry Odom is anxious to see how college football’s new early signing period works out.

once committed to Tulane, gave the Tigers a verbal pledge during his visit. Odom, once a head high school coach in Columbia, doesn’t like the condensed schedule for recruits. “We’ll sit down again at the AFCA meetings with the NCAA and hopefully through one cycle through this have a better feel for how everyone feels — everybody,” Odom said. “At the end of the day you want to do what’s best for the kids, your students, your prospects. But also you have to take into consideration the high school coach and how that affects your current team. When I’m not here and out recruiting, I’m away from my guys. That’s a whole other way to look at it.” Bakare, a three-star running back, rushed for 1,759 yards and 29 touchdowns at Cedar Ridge High School.

He’s MU’s seventh target to announce his commitment since the start of the month. Jatorian Hansford, an outside linebacker from Forsyth, Ga., confirmed Tuesday that Mizzou projects him as a defensive end, though he hadn’t decided if he’ll sign this week or in February. Vincent Gray, a defensive back from Rochester, Mich., who committed to MU in July, announced on Monday that he’s received an offer from Michigan, his home-state school. As of Tuesday it was uncertain if Gray will still sign with the Tigers. He didn’t return a message to confirm his status. Unlike past seasons under the old model, college coaches will have fewer targets to chase down in January. Instead, Mizzou assistant Andy Hill said he expects college coaches to devote more time to evaluating sophomores and juniors in January. As for the unsigned senior prospects they could get bombarded by college coaches scrambling to finish their classes. “I’ll be curious to see what happens with the guys who are left over,” Hill said. “It’ll be like sharks in the water.”

TIGERS ARE SET TO ADD FOUR IN-STATE TARGETS

Among the 20 or so players Missouri expects to sign this week, four are in-state products, two each from the St. Louis and Kansas City areas. Both St. Louis recruits signed with the Tigers in previous years but needed a junior college detour: wide receiver Harry Ballard III from McCluer North and defensive tackle Antar Thompson from Maplewood-Richmond Heights. From the west side of the state, the Tigers expect to sign defensive end Daniel Parker Jr. from Blue Springs and receiver Dominic Gicinto from Raytown. Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

Lock gets new perspective on QB spot All-SEC quarterback has been working with would-be successors BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • Whether they get

their chance to compete for a starting job next year or in 2019, Missouri’s backup quarterbacks are under the watch of the player they hope to one day succeed. While Barry Odom waits to hire an offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach, he’s put his recordbreaking passer in charge of the position group as the Tigers prepare for the Dec. 27 Texas Bowl. That has given junior Drew Lock a new perspective on the three players in line to have his job. Lock plans to announce some time after the bowl game whether he’ll enter the 2018 NFL draft or come back to Mizzou for his senior season. Either way, the Tigers will need a plan of succession, sooner or later. The All-Southeastern Conference quarterback has been impressed the last couple of weeks with his peers-turned-pupils: redshirt sophomore Jack Lowary, redshirt freshman Micah Wilson and freshman Taylor Powell. Wilson saw the most playing time during the regular season, appearing in five games, mostly to hand the ball off in the closing minutes of lopsided games. Wilson completed five of 10 passes for 48 yards and an interception in those cameos and was more effective as a runner, picking up 89 yards on 15 carries, including a 22-yard touchdown at Connecticut. “He knew he could throw deep. He knew he was an athlete. But he needed to focus more on the mental side,” Lock said. “I’ve said it a couple times that he reminds me a lot of myself, not necessarily now but when I was learning things.” Bowl practices are a luxury for teams this time of year, especially at positions that will experience some roster turnover in the offseason. Whether Lock comes back to Mizzou or turns pro, Odom wanted to see the backups get more action against Mizzou’s top defensive unit. “Anytime you get live reps against the defense it’s good because during the season you get in a stretch where there’s not enough time and you’ve got to cram in Drew getting all the reps,” Wilson said. “It’s really nice for me to get some experience and sling it around a little bit.” Wilson, a 6-foot-3, 215-pounder from Tulsa, Okla., is a Mizzou legacy: His dad, Curtis, played on the Tigers’ offensive line during the Woody Widenhofer years — along with Andy Lock, Drew’s father — and served as team captain in 1988. Wilson rarely got to showcase his arm in games this season but has since impressed teammates the last few weeks. “You can just see him in practice getting a lot more confident with his throws,” right tackle Paul Adams said. “Throws that he probably wouldn’t have made in camp he’s making now.” Lowary, whom Lock called, “100 percent the smartest dude on the field,” attempted just one pass in his two ap-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Redshirt freshman Micah Wilson and the other Mizzou quarterbacks are taking advantage of the added practice time leading up to the Texas Bowl.

pearances off the bench this fall. Powell used this season as his redshirt year and practiced on the scout team after turning some heads during preseason camp. “Taylor doesn’t get a bunch of the offensive reps, but watching him go against our defense his arm strength has progressed throughout the year drastically,” Lock said. “That was one of the things he really wanted to work on. He knew he was one of the smarter guys on the field. He knew his footwork was nice, but he needed to put some extra yards on his throws. He’s done that.” There’s a chance Missouri’s next quarterback might not be on the current roster. The new 72-hour early signing period begins Wednesday, and the Tigers don’t have a quarterback among their 21 verbal commitments. Adding a quarterback this week seems unlikely considering the staff doesn’t have a fulltime coordinator or quarterback coach. Odom expects to fill that role after the bowl game, giving the staff a little more than a month to secure a quarterback recruit before the traditional February signing date. Mizzou could find Lock’s heir apparent in the junior college ranks. Lindsey Scott Jr., a redshirt freshman at East Mississippi Community College, recently received a scholarship offer from Odom’s staff, NOLA.com reported Tuesday. Scott began his career at Loui-

siana State, redshirted his freshman year in 2016, then decided to transfer in August. The 5-11 quarterback was named the Gatorade Louisiana Football Player of the Year in 2015 after leading Zachary High School to the 5A state title. He held offers from service academy schools Air Force, Army and Navy along with Power 5 schools Maryland, Rutgers, Syracuse and Wake Forest. This fall, he helped lead East Mississippi to the national junior college championship, the school featured in the Netflix documentary series “Last Chance U.” He threw for 3,481 yards and 29 touchdowns and ran for 729 yards and six scores. He’d have three seasons of eligibility at his next school. Should Lock return for his senior year, the Tigers could still add Scott and give him a chance to compete for the job in 2019. For now, the waiting game continues as the backups take advantage of the extra work. “Obviously either way Drew’s got to do what’s best for him,” Wilson said. “I don’t know what he’s thinking, but I’m just trying to learn everything I can behind him and learn a lot of lessons through him and get a lot of experienced these weeks.” Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • WeDneSDAy • 12.20.2017

MIZZOU FOOTBALL NOTEBOOK

Hectic times for Tigers, prospects New signing period could result in 20 or so recruits added by Friday BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • In between prepar-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Missouri’s Terrence Phillips (right) steals the ball from Stephen F. Austin’s Ty Charles during the first half of Tuesday night’s game in Columbia, Mo.

Lumberjacks force season-high 21 turnovers for MU MIZZOU • FROM B1

Martin warned anyone willing to listen that Tuesday’s visit from the Lumberjacks “won’t be a cakewalk.” His point guards can safely agree. SFA’s swarming defense was every bit as lethal as advertised — except, on occasion, along the 3-point arc. In Mizzou’s penultimate game of the calendar year, before Saturday’s Braggin’ Rights Game with Illinois, Martin rifled through his guards trying to find someone who could keep the ball out of the Lumberjacks’ hands. Mizzou’s 21 turnovers marked a season-high. Fortunately for the Tigers, when they weren’t giving possessions away they were dropping them through the net. Mizzou (10-2) made 10 of its first 11 shots, including its first six 3-pointers, a shooting spree potent enough to offset the issues in the backcourt. For the game, the Tigers shot 11 of 22 from long range. Jordan Barnett continued his blistering December with 22 points. The senior guard came into Tuesday’s game averaging 18.2 points in MU’s last six contests — and led all scorers with 17 at halftime on just six shots. “My guys don’t get their feelings hurt very often, but it wasn’t pleasant in our locker room (at halftime),” SFA coach Kyle Keller said. “I broke my cuff link talking to them about Barnett. My wife said, ‘What happened to your shirt?’ I said, ‘Ahhh, Barnett.’ She said, ‘Oh, I understand.’” The Lumberjacks (10-2) never took the lead in the second half but never backed down. With 18 seconds left, Kevon Harris’s 3-pointer got SFA within a point, 82-81, and on MU’s next possession Robertson missed his free throws. Long before that, Martin played point guard roulette in the first half, going through four different ball-handlers as the Lumberjacks continued to trap the Tigers near midcourt and blitz their ball screens at will. MU headed into the locker room with a 48-40 lead after committing 11 turnovers. Luckily, the Tigers had Barnett and Robertson to shoot them out of the turnover ditch. The two seniors shot a combined 6 of 9 from behind the 3-point arc and scored 30 of the Tigers’ 48 points at the break. The Lumberjacks stuck with the approach that got them to a 10-1 start, namely their relentless pressure on ball-handlers. SFA came into the game leading the nation in turnover percentage on defense, forcing a turnover on 29.3 percent of defensive possessions, and No. 2 in steal percentage, swiping the ball 15.7 percent of the time. They lived up to their reputation early as Martin’s primary ball-handlers committed 10 of MU’s first 11 turnovers, a team-high four by Geist. SFA kept it close by pounding the ball inside on post moves or penetration and scored 28 of its 40 first-half points in the lane. Midway through the second half, SFA used a 12-2 run to get within three points of the Tigers. Junior guard Terrence Phillips gave the Tigers some cushion, squeezing in a baseline floater to beat the shot clock, good for a 66-59 lead. But Mizzou’s turnover problems wouldn’t go away. SFA evened the score at 70-70 with 4:46 after a botched handoff in the Mizzou backcourt, but the Tigers came right back with Kevin Puryear’s putback, then a couple Geist free throws. Mizzou seemingly put SFA away with a Robertson 3-pointer, a Jontay Porter block against the glass, followed by a Robertson floater in the lane, but the Lumberjacks had a couple punches left, just not the knockout blow they needed for another road upset.

MISSOURI 82, STEPHEN F. AUSTIN 81 FG FT Reb STEPHEN F. AUSTIN Min M-A M-A O-T A PF Gilmore 28 4-7 3-4 0-3 1 4 Holyfield 35 7-11 4-4 4-8 3 1 Augustin 16 1-4 0-0 0-0 1 5 Canete 29 3-11 0-0 3-4 2 2 2 K.Harris 29 6-12 3-5 1-2 0 Comeaux 1 19 3-4 3-4 2-2 1 0 17 6-10 0-0 1-1 1 Bogues 2 Charles 15 0-2 0-0 1-1 4 0 9 0-1 0-0 0-0 4 Nieminen 0 Bain 3 1-1 0-0 0-0 1 0 -0-0 0-0 0-0 0 Grujic Totals 200 31-63 13-17 12-21 12 23 Percentages: FG.492, FT.765. 3-point goals: 6-16, .375. Team rebounds: 5. Team Turnovers: 12. Blocked shots: 1. Turnovers: 12. Steals: 11. Technical fouls: None. FG FT Reb PF MISSOURI Min M-A M-A O-T A Barnett 2 34 6-12 6-6 2-6 2 1 Puryear 26 1-4 4-5 1-4 2 1 Tilmon 21 5-5 0-0 1-4 4 5 13 2-4 2-2 0-1 1 B.Harris 0-0 Robertson 38 7-12 4-6 3 1 J.Porter 1 28 1-3 1-2 1-5 2 3 Geist 19 0-0 4-4 2-4 2 1 Phillips 11 2-3 2-2 0-1 4 0-0 Nikko 5 0-0 0-0 0 1 0-0 VanLeer 5 0-0 0-0 0 1 24-43 7-25 17 Totals 200 23-27 20 Percentages: FG.558, FT.852. 3-point goals: 11-21, .524. Team rebounds: 3. Team Turnovers: 21. Blocked shots: 6. Turnovers: 21. Steals: 10. Technical fouls: None. Stephen F. Austin 40 41 — 48 34 — Missouri

PTS 11 18 3 7 19 9 12 0 0 2 0 81

PTS 22 6 10 6 23 4 4 7 0 0 82

81 82

ing for a bowl game and rebuilding his coaching staff, Missouri’s Barry Odom has found time to put the finishing touches on the first portion of his 2018 recruiting class, a group that starts to become official Wednesday, the first day of college football’s new early signing period. High school seniors are now allowed to sign national letters of intent with college programs during a 72-hour period through Friday. Recruits who don’t sign this week can sign during the traditional national signing day, set for Feb. 7. Missouri expects to sign the bulk of the players who have verbally committed to play for the Tigers, perhaps as many as 20 of the 21 targets. “For us it looks really favorable for Wednesday, but I’d like a few more hours in each day because you run out of them,” Odom said. “The thing that our recruiting department has done and our assistant coaches really worked to develop close, true relationships. We feel really solid with the number that we’re going to get.” Like some of his more vocal peers around the country, Odom has mixed feelings about the early signing date. For one, he’s concerned about the recruits who are still playing high school football games late into the fall while college teams are trying to bring them to campus for official visits. Simi Bakare, a running back from Round Rock, Texas, played in a state playoff game Saturday, then rushed to Columbia for his official visit. Bakare,

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Missouri head coach Barry Odom is anxious to see how college football’s new early signing period works out.

once committed to Tulane, gave the Tigers a verbal pledge during his visit. Odom, once a head high school coach in Columbia, doesn’t like the condensed schedule for recruits. “We’ll sit down again at the AFCA meetings with the NCAA and hopefully through one cycle through this have a better feel for how everyone feels — everybody,” Odom said. “At the end of the day you want to do what’s best for the kids, your students, your prospects. But also you have to take into consideration the high school coach and how that affects your current team. When I’m not here and out recruiting, I’m away from my guys. That’s a whole other way to look at it.” Bakare, a three-star running back, rushed for 1,759 yards and 29 touchdowns at Cedar Ridge High School.

He’s MU’s seventh target to announce his commitment since the start of the month. Jatorian Hansford, an outside linebacker from Forsyth, Ga., confirmed Tuesday that Mizzou projects him as a defensive end, though he hadn’t decided if he’ll sign this week or in February. Vincent Gray, a defensive back from Rochester, Mich., who committed to MU in July, announced on Monday that he’s received an offer from Michigan, his home-state school. As of Tuesday it was uncertain if Gray will still sign with the Tigers. He didn’t return a message to confirm his status. Unlike past seasons under the old model, college coaches will have fewer targets to chase down in January. Instead, Mizzou assistant Andy Hill said he expects college coaches to devote more time to evaluating sophomores and juniors in January. As for the unsigned senior prospects they could get bombarded by college coaches scrambling to finish their classes. “I’ll be curious to see what happens with the guys who are left over,” Hill said. “It’ll be like sharks in the water.”

TIGERS ARE SET TO ADD FOUR IN-STATE TARGETS

Among the 20 or so players Missouri expects to sign this week, four are in-state products, two each from the St. Louis and Kansas City areas. Both St. Louis recruits signed with the Tigers in previous years but needed a junior college detour: wide receiver Harry Ballard III from McCluer North and defensive tackle Antar Thompson from Maplewood-Richmond Heights. From the west side of the state, the Tigers expect to sign defensive end Daniel Parker Jr. from Blue Springs and receiver Dominic Gicinto from Raytown. Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

Lock gets new perspective on QB spot All-SEC quarterback has been working with would-be successors BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • Whether they get

their chance to compete for a starting job next year or in 2019, Missouri’s backup quarterbacks are under the watch of the player they hope to one day succeed. While Barry Odom waits to hire an offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach, he’s put his recordbreaking passer in charge of the position group as the Tigers prepare for the Dec. 27 Texas Bowl. That has given junior Drew Lock a new perspective on the three players in line to have his job. Lock plans to announce some time after the bowl game whether he’ll enter the 2018 NFL draft or come back to Mizzou for his senior season. Either way, the Tigers will need a plan of succession, sooner or later. The All-Southeastern Conference quarterback has been impressed the last couple of weeks with his peers-turned-pupils: redshirt sophomore Jack Lowary, redshirt freshman Micah Wilson and freshman Taylor Powell. Wilson saw the most playing time during the regular season, appearing in five games, mostly to hand the ball off in the closing minutes of lopsided games. Wilson completed five of 10 passes for 48 yards and an interception in those cameos and was more effective as a runner, picking up 89 yards on 15 carries, including a 22-yard touchdown at Connecticut. “He knew he could throw deep. He knew he was an athlete. But he needed to focus more on the mental side,” Lock said. “I’ve said it a couple times that he reminds me a lot of myself, not necessarily now but when I was learning things.” Bowl practices are a luxury for teams this time of year, especially at positions that will experience some roster turnover in the offseason. Whether Lock comes back to Mizzou or turns pro, Odom wanted to see the backups get more action against Mizzou’s top defensive unit. “Anytime you get live reps against the defense it’s good because during the season you get in a stretch where there’s not enough time and you’ve got to cram in Drew getting all the reps,” Wilson said. “It’s really nice for me to get some experience and sling it around a little bit.” Wilson, a 6-foot-3, 215-pounder from Tulsa, Okla., is a Mizzou legacy: His dad, Curtis, played on the Tigers’ offensive line during the Woody Widenhofer years — along with Andy Lock, Drew’s father — and served as team captain in 1988. Wilson rarely got to showcase his arm in games this season but has since impressed teammates the last few weeks. “You can just see him in practice getting a lot more confident with his throws,” right tackle Paul Adams said. “Throws that he probably wouldn’t have made in camp he’s making now.” Lowary, whom Lock called, “100 percent the smartest dude on the field,” attempted just one pass in his two ap-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Redshirt freshman Micah Wilson and the other Mizzou quarterbacks are taking advantage of the added practice time leading up to the Texas Bowl.

pearances off the bench this fall. Powell used this season as his redshirt year and practiced on the scout team after turning some heads during preseason camp. “Taylor doesn’t get a bunch of the offensive reps, but watching him go against our defense his arm strength has progressed throughout the year drastically,” Lock said. “That was one of the things he really wanted to work on. He knew he was one of the smarter guys on the field. He knew his footwork was nice, but he needed to put some extra yards on his throws. He’s done that.” There’s a chance Missouri’s next quarterback might not be on the current roster. The new 72-hour early signing period begins Wednesday, and the Tigers don’t have a quarterback among their 21 verbal commitments. Adding a quarterback this week seems unlikely considering the staff doesn’t have a fulltime coordinator or quarterback coach. Odom expects to fill that role after the bowl game, giving the staff a little more than a month to secure a quarterback recruit before the traditional February signing date. Mizzou could find Lock’s heir apparent in the junior college ranks. Lindsey Scott Jr., a redshirt freshman at East Mississippi Community College, recently received a scholarship offer from Odom’s staff, NOLA.com reported Tuesday. Scott began his career at Loui-

siana State, redshirted his freshman year in 2016, then decided to transfer in August. The 5-11 quarterback was named the Gatorade Louisiana Football Player of the Year in 2015 after leading Zachary High School to the 5A state title. He held offers from service academy schools Air Force, Army and Navy along with Power 5 schools Maryland, Rutgers, Syracuse and Wake Forest. This fall, he helped lead East Mississippi to the national junior college championship, the school featured in the Netflix documentary series “Last Chance U.” He threw for 3,481 yards and 29 touchdowns and ran for 729 yards and six scores. He’d have three seasons of eligibility at his next school. Should Lock return for his senior year, the Tigers could still add Scott and give him a chance to compete for the job in 2019. For now, the waiting game continues as the backups take advantage of the extra work. “Obviously either way Drew’s got to do what’s best for him,” Wilson said. “I don’t know what he’s thinking, but I’m just trying to learn everything I can behind him and learn a lot of lessons through him and get a lot of experienced these weeks.” Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com


FOOTBALL

12.20.2017 • Wednesday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B5

Longtime coach Kill is retiring

NFL NOTEBOOK

Green Bay shuts down QB Rodgers

He was on staff at Rutgers this year, also a former SIUC coach

Steelers’ Brown will not play vs. Texans

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Carolina’s Julius Peppers (90) pats Green Bay Packers’ Aaron Rodgers (12) after a sack Sunday in the Panthers’ 31-24 win.

Rutgers offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach Jerry Kill watches his team work out during practice this year. ASSOCIATED PRESS

PISCATAWAY, N.J. • Jerry Kill, a longtime

coach who spent last season as the offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach at Rutgers, has retired for health reasons, the school announced Tuesday. Kill, 56, stepped down as Minnesota’s coach in 2015 because of epilepsy. Kill suffered a seizure and was hospitalized on Sept. 10 this year, one day after getting knocked to the ground on the sidelines during a game against Eastern Michigan. After he was hit, Kill said he was lightheaded and “really discombobulated.” He had the seizure the next day. Kill managed to make it through the sea-

son. The Scarlet Knights finished 4-8. “I hope that through my 34 years of coaching that I was able to be a positive influence on young people because that is truly why I coach. I want to thank all the players for what they have done for me,” Kill said in a statement. “I don’t have any regrets and I’ve had a blessed career. I love this game and all the coaches that I’ve worked with. They have all made Jerry Kill a better man. I know that I did it the right way and I did it my way. I gave everything I had to the game, I just ran out of juice.” A native of Cheyney, Kan., Kill played football at Southwestern College in Winfield, Kan. His head coaching career spanned 22

COLLEGE FOOTBALL NOTEBOOK

ASSOCIATED PRESS

years at five schools: Saginaw Valley State (1994-98), Emporia State (1999-2000), Southern Illinois Carbondale (2001-07), Northern Illinois (2008-10) and Minnesota (2011-15). He took Northern Illinois and Minnesota to three bowl games each and posted a 152-99 career record. He had kidney cancer in 2005, and his epilepsy started to affect him during his first season at Minnesota. He spent 2016 in an administrative role at Kansas State before joining coach Chris Ash’s staff at Rutgers. His departure means that next season, Rutgers will have its ninth offensive coordinator in nine years.

COLLEGE FOOTBALL BOWL SCHEDULE, RESULTS Bowl

Time

TV

Matchup (line in parenthesis)

Site

Tuesday Boca Raton

Florida Atlantic 50, Akron 3

Boca Raton, Fla.

Wednesday Frisco

7 p.m.

ESPN

SMU (-4.5) vs. Louisiana Tech

7 p.m.

ESPN

Florida Int. vs. Temple (-7)

Frisco, Texas

Thursday Gasparilla

St. Petersburg, Fla.

Friday Bahamas

11:30 a.m. ESPN

Ala.-Birmingham vs. Ohio (-7.5)

Idaho Potato

3 p.m.

ESPN

Wyoming (-2.5) vs. Central Mich.

Nassau, Bahamas

Birmingham

11 a.m.

ESPN

Texas Tech vs. USF (-2.5)

Birmingham, Ala.

Armed Forces

2:30 p.m. ESPN

San Diego St. (-6.5) vs. Army

Fort Worth, Texas

Boise, Idaho

Saturday

Dollar General 6 p.m.

ESPN

Appalachian St. vs. Toledo (-8)

Mobile, Ala.

Dec. 24 Hawai’i

7:30 p.m. ESPN

Fresno St. vs. Houston (-2.5)

Honolulu

Dec. 26 Heart of Dallas 12:30 p.m. ESPN

Utah (-6.5) vs. West Virginia

Quick Lane

4:15 p.m. ESPN

Duke (-5) vs. Northern Illinois

Cactus

8 p.m.

Kansas St. (-2.5) vs. UCLA

ESPN

Dallas Detroit Phoenix

Dec. 27

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Florida Atlantic wide receiver Kamrin Solomon (15) celebrates a big gain against Akron in the first half of Tuesday night’s 50-3 victory.

Kiffin gets big extension, then blowout win in bowl ASSOCIATED PRESS

Lane Kiffin ended his first Florida Atlantic season with a flourish, with Devin Singletary running for 124 yards and three touchdowns as the Owls rolled past Akron 50-3 in the Boca Raton (Fla.) Bowl on Tuesday night. Singletary finished with 32 touchdowns this season for the Owls (11-3), who ended the year on a 10-game winning streak and matched the school record for wins in a season — set during the team’s run to the Division I-AA semifinals in 2003. Jeff Driskel threw for 270 yards and two touchdowns, plus ran for two more scores for FAU. The Owls had a massive turnaround in Kiffin’s first year and may have an even brighter future. Earlier Tuesday, a person with knowledge of the negotiations told The Associated Press that FAU and Kiffin have agreed to extend his contract six more years through 2027. Kato Nelson threw for 80 yards for Akron (7-7). The game was a perfect microcosm of FAU’s season: Once the Owls got rolling, they never stopped. And Kiffin held nothing back. FAU got three touchdowns on fourth-down tries, unsuccessfully tried an onside kick in the first quarter, went for a 2-point conversion in the third quarter to make it 36-3 and even tried a halfback pass in the fourth quarter with a 47-point lead. The Owls didn’t punt on their first nine possessions, getting seven

Independence 12:30 p.m. ESPN

Florida St. (-15.5) vs. So. Miss.

Pinstripe

4:15 p.m. ESPN

Boston College vs. Iowa (-3)

Foster Farms

7:30 p.m. KTVI-2

Purdue vs. Arizona (-4)

Texas

8 p.m.

Missouri (-3) vs. Texas

ESPN

Shreveport, La. New York Santa Clara, Calif. Houston

Dec. 28 Military

12:30 p.m. ESPN

Virginia vs. Navy (-1)

Annapolis, Md.

Camping World 4:15 p.m. ESPN

Virginia Tech vs. Oklahoma St. (-4.5)

Alamo

8 p.m.

ESPN

TCU (-2.5) vs. Stanford

Orlando, Fla.

Holiday

8 p.m.

FS1

Michigan State vs. Wash. State (-2.5) Wake Forest (-3) vs. Texas A&M

San Antonio, Texas San Diego

Dec. 29 Belk

noon

ESPN

Sun

2 p.m.

KMOV-4 NC State (-6.5) vs. Arizona State

Charlotte, N.C.

Music City

3:30 p.m. ESPN

Kentucky vs. Northwestern (-7.5)

Arizona

4:30 p.m. CBSSN

Utah State (-4) vs. New Mexico State

Cotton

7:30 p.m. ESPN

Ohio State (-7.5) vs. USC Mississippi St. vs. Louisville (-6.5)

El Paso, Texas

touchdowns and two missed field goals out of those. Even on the last play of the game, FAU threw a pass — a 10-yard gain, one that gave the Owls a 582-146 edge in total yards.

TaxSlayer

11 a.m.

Liberty

11:30 a.m. KDNL-30 Iowa St. vs. Memphis (-3)

NOTEBOOK

Fiesta

3 p.m.

ESPN

Penn St. (-2.5) vs. Washington

Glendale, Ariz.

Orange

7 p.m.

ESPN

Wisconsin (-6.5) vs. Miami (Fla.)

Miami Gardens

Outback

11 a.m.

ESPN2

Michigan (-8) vs. South Carolina

Tampa, Fla.

Peach

11:30 a.m. ESPN

Citrus

noon

Northwestern QB returning • Northwestern quarterback Clayton Thorson plans to return for his senior season. Thorson announced Tuesday he will be back next year and hopes to win a Big Ten championship. Thorson is Northwestern’s career leader with 26 victories as a starter and ranks second in yards passing, completions and total offense. The Wildcats will play Kentucky in the Music City Bowl on Dec. 29. Other news • Alabama coach Nick Saban said Tuesday that freshman inside linebacker Dylan Moses is out indefinitely after sustaining a foot injury in Monday’s practice. ... Bernard Clark, associate head coach and defensive coordinator for the University at Albany, has been hired as head coach at Robert Morris. ... A person familiar with the decision says Kent State is hiring Syracuse offensive assistant Sean Lewis as its new coach. ... Maryland receiver DJ Moore will skip his senior season to enter the NFL draft. Moore was selected first-team All-Big Ten after setting a school record with 80 catches for 1,033 yards. He also scored eight touchdowns. ... Florida junior Eddy Pineiro, the most accurate kicker in program history, is leaving school early for the NFL.

Nashville Tucson

Arlington, Texas

Dec. 30 ESPN

Jacksonville Memphis, Tenn.

Jan. 1 Central Florida vs. Auburn (-9.5)

KDNL-30 Notre Dame vs. LSU (-3)

Rose (semi.)

4:10 p.m. ESPN

Oklahoma vs. Georgia (-1.5)

Sugar (semi.)

7:45 p.m. ESPN

Clemson vs. Alabama (-3)

Atlanta Orlando, Fla. Pasadena, Calif. New Orleans

Jan. 8 Championship 7 p.m.

ESPN

Semifinal winners

Atlanta

EARLIER RESULTS SATURDAY, Dec. 16 New Orleans: Tory 50, North Texas 30

Cure: Georgia St. 27, W. Kentucky 17

Las Vegas: Boise State 38, Oregon 28

New Mexico: Marshall 31, Colorado St. 28

Camellia: Middle Tenn. 35, Ark. St. 30

WEDNESDAY’S BOWL GAME FRISCO BOWL SMU (7-5, American Athletic) vs. Louisiana Tech (6-6, CUSA) Kickoff • 7 p.m., Toyota Stadium, Frisco, Texas (ESPN) Top players • SMU’s Courtland Sutton and Trey Quinn are the only FBS teammates who each have 1,000 yards receiving and 10 touchdowns. QB Ben Hicks has 3,442 yards passing and 32 TDs. ... Tech QB J’Mar Smith is a dual threat with 2,758 yards passing and 356 rushing. Notable • Sonny Dykes will coach SMU less than two weeks after being hired. That’s an unconventional move, even for a lower-tier bowl, especially considering Dykes wasn’t an on-field coach this year. The former Cal head coach was an offensive consultant at TCU. Adding another story line: Dykes was Louisiana Tech’s head coach from 2010-12. ... SMU’s highoctane passing offense matches up against a Tech defense that allowed on 16 TD passes this season. Dave Matter’s pick • SMU 38, Louisiana Tech 31 — STAFF AND WIRE REPORTS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Aaron Rodgers is done for the season. The Green Bay Packers put their star quarterback on injured reserve Tuesday, a day after they were eliminated from playoff contention. Rodgers missed seven games after breaking his right collarbone Oct. 15 against Minnesota. He returned on Sunday, throwing three touchdowns and three interceptions in a 31-24 loss at Carolina. Atlanta’s win against Tampa Bay on Monday night ended Green Bay’s eightyear run of consecutive postseason berths. Pittsburgh’s Brown ruled out • Steelers coach Mike Tomlin says star receiver Antonio Brown will miss Pittsburgh’s Christmas Day visit to Houston with a contusion on his left calf. The NFL’s leading receiver left in the second quarter against the Patriots after getting tangled up while trying to catch a pass in the end zone. Tomlin declined to get into the specifics of Brown’s injury and didn’t put a timetable on a possible return. “I just know he’s out next week,” Tomlin said. Steelers have 8 Pro Bowlers • Pittsburgh leads the NFL in one category this season: most Pro Bowl players. Antonio Brown, Le’Veon Bell and Ben Roethlisberger are among eight Steelers selected for the all-star game. They will be joined on Jan. 28 in Orlando, Fla., by tackle Alejandro Villanueva, guard David DeCastro, center Maurkice Pouncey, kicker Chris Boswell and linebacker Ryan Shazier, who is injured. Brown, also injured but expected back for the playoffs, was voted a starter, as were Bell and the three offensive linemen. The Philadelphia Eagles and New Orleans Saints each placed six players in the game in balloting announced Tuesday. LA Rams named included RB Todd Gurley, DT Aaron Donald, P Johnny Hekker, K Greg Zuerlein and return specialist Pharoh Cooper. Season ends for Broncos’ Ray • Shane Ray’s season is over in Denver, where the third-year outside linebacker from the University of Missouri played in just eight games after breaking his left wrist in July and undergoing surgery. Ray had the screws removed Friday, a day after the Broncos beat the Indianapolis Colts. Ray missed the first six games of the season and when he returned he wasn’t his usual self because he was unable to lift weights and he dropped from 242 to 225 pounds. He collected 15 tackles and one sack a year after posting 48 tackles and eight sacks. Carolina’s Davis has suspension reduced • The NFL has reduced linebacker Thomas Davis’ suspension from two games to one following his appeal. Davis was suspended Monday following his helmet-to-helmet hit on Green Bay Packers wide receiver Davante Adams in the third quarter Sunday. Hearing officer James Thrash, appointed jointly by the NFL and the players’ union, heard the appeal. Adams left the 31-24 loss to he Panthers with a concussion after being blindsided by Davis following a Carolina interception. Davis was penalized 15 yards, but not ejected. Davis, the 2015 NFL Walter Payton Man of the Year, was visibly upset on the sideline after the play. He tweeted an apology to Adams on Monday.


HOCKEY

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 12.20.2017

Defenseman helps drive offense

BLUES NOTEBOOK

Brodziak milestone with 800 NHL games

BLUES • FROM B1

In a sense, Pietrangelo was luckier than teammate Jaden Schwartz, who will be sidelined until late January at the earliest after taking a shot off the foot just a minute or so after Pietrangelo did in Detroit. But it still meant that the player known as “Petro” — the team captain and rock of the defense — would be sidelined for a week. That shelved him for four games. Granted, not a ton of missed time but still four games too many for Pietrangelo, who has averaged 79 regular-season games a year in his previous six (non-lockout) seasons with the Blues. “It’s frustrating to sit out,” he said. “Nobody wants to sit there. We’re born to play, right? We’re not born to sit and watch. “So whether you’re out of the lineup, you’re injured, whatever, it’s frustrating. But it’s nice to be back. Nice to be around the group. Nice to be in the routine again. Good timing, too, coming up to Christmas, just to get back before that. It’s a good feeling, yeah.” During his week out of the lineup, Pietrangelo spent a couple of days off the ice, then slowly worked his way back into the routine. That meant lots of time in the training room for treatment, and plenty of gym time to maintain conditioning. “It’s a balance of trying to make sure you’re ready to play and still in game shape, and trying to rehab,” he said. “Even when you’re in the gym, you’re trying to stay in as good a shape as possible, but you’re trying not to overdo it because it could be an opportunity to get a little extra rest.” Because this far into the season, every hockey player has some kind of bump or bruise, particularly in a December Blues schedule packed with games. Pietrangelo returned to action Sunday in Winnipeg, a fact that was mere afterthought in the wake of the team’s most lopsided loss of the season. (The Blues have lost five times this season by three goals, but never by as many as four until the 4-0 loss to the Jets.) The Blues went 2-2 during a fourgame homestand while Pietrangelo was sidelined, which coincided with the start of Schwartz’s missed time. Pietrangelo saw some of the same symptoms in those games that were trouble areas in the 4-0 drubbing. “We’re spending too much time in our end,” Pietrangelo said. “That’s why we’re not scoring five-on-five

BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CALGARY, ALBERTA •

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Anaheim Ducks’ Logan Shaw (48) and the Blues’ Alex Pietrangelo (27) chase the puck during the first period of the Nov. 29 game in St. Louis.

BLUES AT FLAMES When/Where • 8:30 p.m., Wednesday, Scotiabank Saddledome, Calgary, Alberta TV/Radio • Fox Sports Midwest, KMOX (1120 AM) About the Flames • Calgary is 17-14-3 overall, but is one of only five teams in the NHL with a losing record at home (8-10). The Flames have some firepower. Johnny Gaudreau, aka Johnny Hockey, is among the league’s scoring leaders with 40 points (13 goals, 27 assists). Sean Monahan has 17 goals, seven of which have come on the power play. St. Louisan Matthew Tkachuk is third on the team in points, with 20 on seven goals and 13 assists. But the Flames aren’t the stingiest team on defense — their 102 goals allowed were the fifth-most in the Western Conference entering Tuesday’s play. Jim Thomas

goals. We won 2-0 (Saturday against Winnipeg), but they were power play goals. “We gotta find a way to balance it out and score some goals five-onfive, because you can’t always win games with power play goals. It’s tough to score when you’re playing a lot in your end. So the quicker we can get out of our end now, the more energy and opportunities will happen.” Five-on-five play had been the strength of the Blues’ game most of the season. But since Schwartz — and Pietrangelo — were sidelined, the Blues have scored only three five-on-five goals. Then again, they’ve scored only six goals total in those five games. “You don’t win faceoffs, you spend more time in your zone — D-

zone — and you turn pucks over, that creates energy, creates opportunities for them,” Pietrangelo said. “When you think about it, that’s really what we do to a lot of teams is we’ll win the draws in the O-zone, and we’ll create turnovers, and we’ll spend more time in their end than we’ll spend in ours.” So speaking specifically of Sunday’s game against the Jets, Pietrangelo said, “They kinda played our game right back at us. We talked about that (Tuesday).” Having Pietrangelo back won’t replace Schwartz’s 14 goals, but having one of the game’s best defensemen in your lineup is never a bad thing. “It’s huge,” said center Kyle Brodziak. “Obviously he’s the captain of our team. Big voice in the locker room. But what he does on the ice — he logs the big minutes and controls the game very well.” Pietrangelo hasn’t scored a goal since Nov. 9 against Arizona, but even with the four missed games he’s still tied for eighth among all NHL defensemen with 23 points. And even without the goals, he was contributing on offense, with seven assists in the 11 games preceding the time lost to injury. He even had two assists in Detroit after taking the puck off the foot. “He’s a leader for us, especially on the back end,” coach Mike Yeo said. “We need his execution. We need his defensive game. He has the ability to help us get to our game.” A game that has gone AWOL to a large degree over the past week or so. Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com

Maple Leafs 8, Hurricanes 1

Bruins 3, Sabres 0 Boston 0 1 2 — 3 Buffalo 0 0 0 — 0 First period: None. Penalties: Bogosian, BUF, Major (fighting), 4:48; Miller, BOS, Major (fighting), 4:48; Bergeron, BOS, (slashing), 8:30. Second period: 1, Boston, DeBrusk 8 (McAvoy, Spooner), 10:14. Penalties: Rodrigues, BUF, (high sticking), 3:33. Third period: 2, Boston, Schaller 4, 18:09. 3, Boston, Backes 4 (Heinen, Nash), 19:29. Penalties: Kane, BUF, (slashing), 4:32. Shots: BOS 10-14-9: 33. Buffalo 17-9-10: 36. Power-plays: Boston 0 of 2; Buffalo 0 of 1. Goalies: Boston, Khudobin 8-2-2 (36 shots36 saves). Buffalo, Lehner 7-14-4 (31-30). A: 17,811.

Red Wings 6, Islanders 3 Detroit 2 1 3 — 6 NY Islanders 1 2 0 — 3 First period: 1, NY Islanders, Lee 21 (Bailey, Tavares), 6:32. 2, Detroit, Frk 7 (Larkin, Ericsson), 9:33. 3, Detroit, Nyquist 9 (Tatar, Zetterberg), 16:49 (pp). Penalties: Pelech, NYI, (holding), 15:52; Abdelkader, DET, (slashing), 19:17. Second period: 4, NY Islanders, Pulock 2 (Eberle), 2:03 (pp). 5, NY Islanders, Bailey 10 (Barzal, Tavares), 12:59 (pp). 6, Detroit, Mantha 13 (Zetterberg), 15:15. Penalties: Larkin, DET, (high sticking), 1:30; Larkin, DET, (tripping), 11:59. Third period: 7, Detroit, Daley 2 (Zetterberg, Larkin), 10:03. 8, Detroit, Green 3 (Larkin, Athanasiou), 14:12. 9, Detroit, Glendening 7 (Nielsen, DeKeyser), 19:31. Penalties: None. Shots: DET 6-4-12: 22. NYI 9-23-5: 37. Power-plays: DET 1 of 1; NYI 2 of 3. Goalies: DET, Mrazek 3-4-1 (37 shots-34 saves). NYI, Greiss 9-5-2 (21-16). A: 10,511.

Wild 6, Senators 4 Minnesota 1 2 3 — 6 Ottawa 1 2 1 — 4 First period: 1, Ottawa, Karlsson 2 (Dzingel, Brassard), 2:08. 2, Minnesota, Staal 13 (Coyle, Suter), 11:11. Penalties: None. Second period: 3, Ottawa, Karlsson 3 (Hoffman, Stone), 1:08 (pp). 4, Ottawa, Pageau 5 (Pyatt, Thompson), 5:44. 5, Minnesota, Stewart 8 (Prosser, Eriksson Ek), 10:19. 6, Minnesota, Koivu 5 (Dumba, Suter), 19:05. Penalties: Zucker, MIN, (tripping), 0:14; Spurgeon, MIN, (tripping), 3:13; Ceci, OTT, (hooking), 10:43; Granlund, MIN, (tripping), 11:37; Ceci, OTT, (interference), 17:04. Third period: 7, Minnesota, Prosser 1, 1:48. 8, Minnesota, Brodin 3 (Staal), 4:57. 9, Minnesota, Staal 14 (Niederreiter, Coyle), 16:39 (pp). 10, Ottawa, Brassard 8 (Stone, Hoffman), 18:34 (pp). Penalties: Brassard, OTT, (high sticking), 5:22; Ottawa bench, served by Dzingel (too many men on the ice), 14:48; Brodin, MIN, (slashing), 17:45. Shots: MIN 10-17-13: 40. Ottawa 9-13-10: 32. Power-plays: MIN 1 of 4; Ottawa 2 of 4. Goalies: Minnesota, Stalock 6-5-1 (32 shots28 saves). Ottawa, Anderson 9-11-3 (40-34). A: 13,804.

NO EXCUSES

It goes without saying that the Blues miss Jaden Schwartz and everything he brings to the rink. “But we’re still a better hockey team than what we’ve shown the last couple games,” Yeo said after Tuesday’s practice. “And so, if we want to make excuses, we can point to guys that are out of the lineup. “I do feel that part of it was we went through a difficult stretch. A lot of games. Fatigue can set in. But that’s not an excuse any more. We had the day off (Monday), we had a practice opportunity today, so we should be sharp (Wednesday).”

THOMPSON’S ROLE

It looks like forward Tage Thompson, recalled Monday from San Antonio, will be thrown right into the thick of things. He was put in a top 6 role during Tuesday’s practice, on a line with veterans Alexander Steen and Paul Statsny. “Obviously, it’s an amazing opportunity playing with two of the best players in the league,” Thompson said. “So I’m just going to try and play my game. Probably a little nervous. But just play my game, and I think I’ll get some chances and have some fun with ‘em.”

Maple Leafs score 8 goals in romp over Hurricanes

NHL SUMMARIES

Carolina 1 0 0 — 1 Toronto 4 0 4 — 8 First period: 1, Toronto, Komarov 4 (Hyman, Hainsey), 2:52 (sh). 2, Toronto, Marner 3 (J.van Riemsdyk, Rielly), 5:33 (pp). 3, Carolina, Skinner 12 (Teravainen, Fleury), 9:07. 4, Toronto, J.van Riemsdyk 16 (Bozak, Marner), 10:34 (pp). 5, Toronto, Bozak 7 (Marner), 13:28. Penalties: Martin, TOR, (holding), 2:43; Polak, TOR, (roughing), 4:58; Jooris, CAR, served by Williams, (roughing), 4:58; Jooris, CAR, (roughing), 4:58; Williams, CAR, Major (fighting), 8:17; Komarov, TOR, Major (fighting), 8:17; Pesce, CAR, (slashing), 9:28; J.van Riemsdyk, TOR, (slashing), 15:59; Kadri, TOR, (high sticking), 18:44. Second period: None. Penalties: None. Third period: 6, Toronto, Marleau 12 (Marner, Bozak), 9:25. 7, Toronto, Kapanen 2, 9:31. 8, Toronto, Nylander 6 (Hyman), 14:05. 9, Toronto, Carrick 2 (J.van Riemsdyk, Bozak), 18:33 (pp). Penalties: J.van Riemsdyk, TOR, (cross checking), 5:02; Aho, CAR, (holding), 17:18. Shots: Carolina 13-12-8: 33. Toronto 14-10-12: 36. Power-plays: Carolina 0 of 4; Toronto 3 of 3. Goalies: Carolina, Darling 8-10-6 (36 shots-28 saves). Toronto, Andersen 18-10-1 (33-32). A: 19,288.

From a Blues’ perspective, the 4-0 loss Sunday in Winnipeg was pretty much a game without any redeeming value. Even so, it was a meaningful night for center Kyle Brodziak — his 800th regular-season game in the National Hockey League. “It’s a good little milestone, that once you finish your career you can look back and be proud of,” he said. “It’s a lot of hockey games over the years, but I feel pretty privileged to do that.” Brodziak, 33, is in his third season with St. Louis, so he has played only 179 of those contests wearing a Bluenote. Mike Yeo hasn’t been around the Blues even that long, but he coached Brodziak for four seasons in Minnesota so he knows him well. “He’s got great insight to the game,” Yeo said. “He’s a leader in the sense that he goes out and he does his job night after night. Regardless of what’s going on, with our team or with their team, he finds a way to go out and do his thing. He’s quietly had a very, very good year for us.” He’s a member of the Blues’ “Century Line,” so dubbed because the combined ages of its usual members — Brodziak, Scottie Upshall and Chris Thorburn — is over 100 years (101 to be exact). In 34 games this season, Brodziak has five goals and five assists and is plus-3. Pretty good numbers for a fourth-line center. He also logs regular time on the team’s penalty kill unit. “When I came into the league until now the game has changed quite a bit,” Brodziak said. “I think for the older guys that are still around today it’s every-

body’s ability to adapt to the changes. The speed of the game has gotten a lot faster. Defense is a big priority for pretty much every team in the league now, and that wasn’t always the case I don’t think when I was coming into the league.” Brodziak’s 800th game was delayed one night because he sat out Saturday’s 2-0 Blues win over Winnipeg with an unspecified minor injury. “Luckily it was just one game, and hopefully I can just look back on it now,” he said.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Mitch Marner and Tyler Bozak each had a goal and three assists, and the host Toronto Maple Leafs stopped a three-game slide by routing the Carolina Hurricanes 8-1 on Tuesday. Toronto scored four in the first and four more in the third on a special anniversary for the NHL. The first NHL games were played on Dec. 19, 1917, including ASSOCIATED PRESS

Toronto Maple Leafs center Mitchell Marner (left) celebrates his first-period goal Tuesday against the Carolina Hurricanes with teammate James van Riemsdyk. Rangers 4, Ducks 1

Capitals 4, Stars 3, OT

Avalanche 4, Penguins 2

Anaheim 0 0 1 — 1 NY Rangers 1 — 4 1 2 First period: 1, NY Rangers, Carey 3 (Holden, Desharnais), 19:14. Penalties: Cogliano, ANA, (slashing), 14:25; Zuccarello, NYR, (roughing), 15:25. Second period: 2, NY Rangers, Hayes 8 (Zuccarello, Holden), 0:38. 3, NY Rangers, Carey 4 (Desharnais, Vesey), 13:00. Penalties: Lindholm, ANA, (hooking), 14:15. Third period: 4, Anaheim, Kase 7 (Getzlaf, Manson), 14:43. 5, NY Rangers, Grabner 17 (Fast), 16:37. Penalties: Nash, NYR, (hooking), 3:59. Shots: ANA 16-15-9: 40. NYR 10-12-10: 32. Power-plays: ANA 0 of 2; NYR 0 of 2. Goalies: Anaheim, Gibson 10-11-4 (32 shots-28 saves). NY Rangers, Lundqvist 17-8-2 (40-39). A: 18,006.

Washington 1 1 1 1 — 4 Dallas 1 1 1 0 — 3 First period: 1, Washington, Burakovsky 2 (Eller, Connolly), 10:35. 2, Dallas, Benn 14 (Radulov, Klingberg), 15:14 (pp). Penalties: Roussel, DAL, (roughing), 4:31; Vrana, WSH, (roughing), 4:31; Roussel, DAL, served by Radulov, (roughing), 4:31; Roussel, DAL, (roughing), 15:06; Wilson, WSH, (roughing), 15:06; Wilson, WSH, served by Connolly, (roughing), 15:06; Dallas bench, served by Radulov (too many men on the ice), 18:49. Second period: 3, Dallas, Smith 4 (Hamhuis, Spezza), 11:09. 4, Washington, Orlov 4 (Backstrom), 13:12. Penalties: Washington bench, served by Connolly (too many men on the ice), 1:11; Wilson, WSH, (roughing), 1:57; Benn, DAL, (roughing), 1:57; Carlson, WSH, (holding), 14:23; Radulov, DAL, (interference), 19:05. Third period: 5, Dallas, Radulov 12 (Pateryn), 15:53. 6, Washington, Connolly 7 (Eller, Burakovsky), 16:34. Penalties: Wilson, WSH, (slashing), 7:02. Overtime: 7, Washington, Burakovsky 3 (Carlson), 1:51. Penalties: None. Shots: Washington 9-5-12-2: 28. Dallas 11-14-10-1: 36. Power-plays: Washington 0 of 3; Dallas 1 of 4. Goalies: Washington, Holtby 20-7-0 (38 shots-35 saves). Dallas, Bishop 13-9-2 (28-25). A: 18,112.

Pittsburgh 1 0 1 — 2 Colorado 1 2 1 — 4 First period: 1, Colorado, Barrie 3 (Nieto), 5:04. 2, Pittsburgh, Ruhwedel 1 (Rowney), 10:39. Penalties: Zadorov, COL, (high sticking), 10:52. Second period: 3, Colorado, Barrie 4 (Andrighetto, Rantanen), 5:56 (pp). 4, Colorado, Compher 5 (Andrighetto), 18:20. Penalties: Cole, PIT, (cross checking), 4:54; Zadorov, COL, (interference), 10:26; Letang, PIT, (tripping), 11:00; Cole, PIT, (holding), 13:53; Maatta, PIT, (tripping), 19:02; Rantanen, COL, (holding), 19:23. Third period: 5, Pittsburgh, Malkin 11 (Cole, Ruhwedel), 1:25. 6, Colorado, Rantanen 10 (Landeskog, MacKinnon), 18:27. Penalties: None. Shots: Pittsburgh 18-6-8: 32. Colorado 13-15-9: 37. Power-plays: Pittsburgh 0 of 3; Colorado 1 of 4. Goalies: Pittsburgh, Murray 12-9-1 (36 shots-33 saves). Colorado, Varlamov 11-8-1 (32-30). A: 15,824.

Jets 6, Predators 4 Winnipeg 1 3 2 — 6 Nashville 2 1 1 — 4 First period: 1, Winnipeg, Lowry 6 (Myers, Tanev), 8:05. 2, Nashville, Jarnkrok 8, 19:19. 3, Nashville, Fiala 9 (Smith), 19:40. Penalties: Smith, NSH, (tripping), 0:26; Copp, WPG, (interference), 16:42. Second period: 4, Winnipeg, Laine 17 (Kulikov, Little), 6:54. 5, Nashville, Subban 7 (Johansen, Forsberg), 7:55 (pp). 6, Winnipeg, Ehlers 16 (Wheeler, Scheifele), 8:25. 7, Winnipeg, Ehlers 17 (Myers, Armia), 16:00 (pp). Penalties: Irwin, NSH, (tripping), 0:27; Laine, WPG, (slashing), 1:28; Tanev, WPG, (interference), 7:18; Weber, NSH, (boarding), 14:20; Weber, NSH, (tripping), 16:20. Third period: 8, NSH, Weber 1 (Fiala), 0:30. 9, Winnipeg, Tanev 3 (Morrissey, Lowry), 18:34. 10, Winnipeg, Wheeler 9 (Myers), 19:58. Penalties: Watson, NSH, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 9:33; Little, WPG, (slashing), 9:33; Emelin, NSH, (hooking), 11:12. Shots: WPG 13-13-10: 36. NSH 11-9-14: 34. Power-plays: WPG 1 of 5; Nashville 1 of 3. Goalies: Winnipeg, Hellebuyck 18-4-4 (34 shots-30 saves). Nashville, Rinne 18-5-3 (35-30). A: 17,432.

Scoring leaders Through Monday’s games Skater, team GP Nikita Kucherov, TB 32 Steven Stamkos, TB 32 Jakub Voracek, PHI 33 John Tavares, NYI 33 Johnny Gaudreau, CGY 34 34 Connor McDavid, EDM 33 Josh Bailey, NYI Anze Kopitar, LA 35 Nathan MacKinnon, COL 33 Blake Wheeler, WPG 34 Brayden Schenn, STL 35 Phil Kessel, PIT 35 Alex Ovechkin, WAS 34 3 tied with 36 pts.

G 23 12 8 19 13 12 9 17 15 8 16 15 23

A PTS 23 46 31 43 33 41 21 40 27 40 28 40 31 40 22 39 24 39 31 39 22 38 23 38 14 37

LATE MONDAY

Oilers 5, Sharks 3 San Jose 1 1 1 — 3 Edmonton 2 1 2 — 5 First period: 1, San Jose, Pavelski 7 (Labanc, Burns), 6:15 (pp). 2, Edmonton, Letestu 8 (Draisaitl, Klefbom), 14:42. 3, Edmonton, Strome 5 (Khaira, Draisaitl), 18:51. Penalties: Labanc, SJ, (high sticking), 2:43; Walker, EDM, (holding), 5:24; Hertl, SJ, (delay of game), 12:40. Second period: 4, Edmonton, NugentHopkins 14 (Maroon, Caggiula), 6:36. 5, San Jose, Hertl 8 (Burns, Labanc), 8:32. Penalties: Russell, EDM, (holding), 12:37; Pavelski, SJ, (tripping), 13:15; Strome, EDM, (tripping), 13:46. Third period: 6, Edmonton, Maroon 9 (Nugent-Hopkins), 8:23. 7, San Jose, Sorensen 2 (Karlsson, Braun), 11:58. 8, Edmonton, Strome 6 (Benning), 19:52. Penalties: None. Shots: San Jose 6-7-8: 21. Edmonton 8-10-11: 29. Power-plays: San Jose 1 of 3; Edmonton 0 of 2. Goalies: San Jose, Jones 11-8-3 (28 shots-24 saves). Edmonton, Talbot 12-10-1 (21-18). A: 18,347.

Goaltending leaders WINS Goalie, team Andrei Vasilevskiy, TBL Braden Holtby, WSH Pekka Rinne, NSH Jake Allen, STL Frederik Andersen, TOR Sergei Bobrovsky, CBJ Connor Hellebuyck, WPG Corey Crawford, CHI Henrik Lundqvist, NYR Jonathan Quick, LAK

GP 26 26 25 29 28 28 27 26 28 27

SHUTOUTS Name Team Sergei Bobrovsky CBJ F. Andersen, TOR Devan Dubnyk, MIN Pekka Rinne, NSH A. Vasilevskiy, TBL

MIN SO W-L-OT 1674 4 17-10-1 1686 3 17-10-1 1315 3 12-8-2 1519 3 18-4-3 1564 3 21-4-1

GP 28 28 23 25 26

MINS 1564 1485 1519 1667 1686 1674 1545 1510 1586 1579

W-L-OT 21-4-1 19-7-0 18-4-3 17-9-2 17-10-1 17-10-1 17-4-4 16-7-2 16-8-2 16-10-1

NHL calendar Jan. 1 — Winter Classic: Buffalo at New York Rangers, at Citi Field. Jan. 27-28 — All-Star weekend, Tampa, Fla. Feb. 26 — Trade deadline. March 3 — Stadium Series: Toronto at Washington, at U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, Md. April 7 — Last day regular season. April 11 — Playoffs begin. June 22-23 — NHL draft, Dallas.

a 10-9 win by the Montreal Wanderers over Toronto. James van Riemsdyk had a goal and two assists for the Maple Leafs, and Leo Komarov, Patrick Marleau, Kasperi Kapanen, William Nylander and Connor Carrick also scored. Frederik Andersen made 32 saves. Jeff Skinner scored for Carolina, and Scott Darling stopped 27 shots. The Hurricanes had won three in a row.

NHL STANDINGS WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div Nashville 33 21 8 4 46 112 91 11-3-2 10-5-2 8-2-1 Blues 35 22 11 2 46 107 88 12-7-0 10-4-2 6-2-1 Winnipeg 35 20 10 5 45 118 98 12-3-1 8-7-4 7-3-1 33 17 11 5 39 102 86 10-5-2 7-6-3 4-5-2 Chicago Minnesota 34 18 13 3 39 100 99 10-4-2 8-9-1 4-6-0 Dallas 35 18 14 3 39 102 103 10-4-1 8-10-2 4-8-0 Colorado 33 16 15 2 34 105 109 10-6-1 6-9-1 4-5-1 Pacific GP W L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 35 21 10 4 46 107 82 10-5-2 11-5-2 3-3-2 Los Angeles Vegas 32 21 9 2 44 112 97 13-2-1 8-7-1 9-1-0 San Jose 32 17 11 4 38 88 80 9-6-2 8-5-2 5-2-3 Calgary 34 17 14 3 37 97 102 8-10-0 9-4-3 6-4-0 Anaheim 35 14 13 8 36 92 104 8-7-3 6-6-5 3-2-4 Vancouver 34 15 15 4 34 88 106 6-8-3 9-7-1 4-6-0 Edmonton 34 15 17 2 32 101 110 6-10-0 9-7-2 5-1-0 35 7 23 5 19 78 122 3-10-1 4-13-4 1-5-3 Arizona EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Home Tampa Bay 32 24 6 2 50 123 80 13-2-1 Toronto 35 21 13 1 43 117 98 11-5-0 Boston 32 17 10 5 39 96 87 10-5-3 Detroit 33 13 13 7 33 92 106 6-6-6 33 14 15 4 32 87 103 9-7-3 Montreal Ottawa 32 11 14 7 29 89 109 6-6-5 Florida 33 12 16 5 29 95 115 6-6-3 Buffalo 34 8 19 7 23 72 114 4-10-2 Metropolitan GP W L OT Pts GF GA Home 35 22 12 1 45 112 101 14-5-0 Washington New Jersey 33 19 9 5 43 105 99 9-5-2 Columbus 34 20 13 1 41 97 93 12-6-0 NY Rangers 34 19 12 3 41 112 97 14-5-3 34 18 13 3 39 121 120 10-3-2 NY Islanders 35 17 15 3 37 101 112 10-5-1 Pittsburgh 33 14 12 7 35 92 94 7-7-4 Philadelphia Carolina 33 14 12 7 35 91 106 7-4-3

Away 11-4-1 10-8-1 7-5-2 7-7-1 5-8-1 5-8-2 6-10-2 4-9-5 Away 8-7-1 10-4-3 8-7-1 5-7-0 8-10-1 7-10-2 7-5-3 7-8-4

Div 5-2-0 5-2-1 3-1-2 4-7-2 8-2-1 3-3-1 4-3-1 3-5-2 Div 5-3-0 2-3-0 7-5-0 5-4-2 5-4-1 4-2-0 1-0-3 3-3-2

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Tuesday Toronto 8, Carolina 1 Minnesota 6, Ottawa 4 Detroit 6, NY Islanders 3 NY Rangers 4, Anaheim 1 Boston 3, Buffalo 0 Winnipeg 6, Nashville 4 Washington 4, Dallas 3, OT Florida at Arizona, late Tampa Bay at Vegas, late Montreal at Vancouver, late Monday New Jersey 5, Anaheim 3 Boston 7, Columbus 2 Los Angeles 4, Philadelphia 1

Edmonton 5, San Jose 3 Colorado 4, Pittsburgh 2 Wednesday Toronto at Columbus, 6:30 p.m. Detroit at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Blues at Calgary, 8:30 p.m. Thursday Columbus at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. NY Rangers at New Jersey, 6 p.m. Anaheim at NY Islanders, 6 p.m. Winnipeg at Boston, 6 p.m.

Ottawa at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m. Carolina at Nashville, 7 p.m. Chicago at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Blues at Edmonton, 8 p.m. Colorado at Los Angeles, 9:30 p.m. Vancouver at San Jose, 9:30 p.m. Friday Philadelphia at Buffalo, 6 p.m. Minnesota at Florida, 6:30 Montreal at Calgary, 8 p.m. Washington at Arizona, 8 p.m.


HOCKEY

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • WeDneSDAy • 12.20.2017

Defenseman helps drive offense

BLUES NOTEBOOK

Brodziak milestone with 800 NHL games

BLUES • FROM B1

In a sense, Pietrangelo was luckier than teammate Jaden Schwartz, who will be sidelined until late January at the earliest after taking a shot off the foot just a minute or so after Pietrangelo did in Detroit. But it still meant that the player known as “Petro” — the team captain and rock of the defense — would be sidelined for a week. That shelved him for four games. Granted, not a ton of missed time but still four games too many for Pietrangelo, who has averaged 79 regular-season games a year in his previous six (non-lockout) seasons with the Blues. “It’s frustrating to sit out,” he said. “Nobody wants to sit there. We’re born to play, right? We’re not born to sit and watch. “So whether you’re out of the lineup, you’re injured, whatever, it’s frustrating. But it’s nice to be back. Nice to be around the group. Nice to be in the routine again. Good timing, too, coming up to Christmas, just to get back before that. It’s a good feeling, yeah.” During his week out of the lineup, Pietrangelo spent a couple of days off the ice, then slowly worked his way back into the routine. That meant lots of time in the training room for treatment, and plenty of gym time to maintain conditioning. “It’s a balance of trying to make sure you’re ready to play and still in game shape, and trying to rehab,” he said. “Even when you’re in the gym, you’re trying to stay in as good a shape as possible, but you’re trying not to overdo it because it could be an opportunity to get a little extra rest.” Because this far into the season, every hockey player has some kind of bump or bruise, particularly in a December Blues schedule packed with games. Pietrangelo returned to action Sunday in Winnipeg, a fact that was mere afterthought in the wake of the team’s most lopsided loss of the season. (The Blues have lost five times this season by three goals, but never by as many as four until the 4-0 loss to the Jets.) The Blues went 2-2 during a fourgame homestand while Pietrangelo was sidelined, which coincided with the start of Schwartz’s missed time. Pietrangelo saw some of the same symptoms in those games that were trouble areas in the 4-0 drubbing. “We’re spending too much time in our end,” Pietrangelo said. “That’s why we’re not scoring five-on-five

BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CALGARY, ALBERTA •

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Anaheim Ducks’ Logan Shaw (48) and the Blues’ Alex Pietrangelo (27) chase the puck during the first period of the Nov. 29 game in St. Louis.

BLUES AT FLAMES

zone — and you turn pucks over, that creates energy, creates opportunities for them,” Pietrangelo said. “When you think about it, that’s really what we do to a lot of teams is we’ll win the draws in the O-zone, and we’ll create turnovers, and we’ll spend more time in their end than we’ll spend in ours.” So speaking specifically of Sunday’s game against the Jets, Pietrangelo said, “They kinda played our game right back at us. We talked about that (Tuesday).” Having Pietrangelo back won’t replace Schwartz’s 14 goals, but having one of the game’s best defensemen in your lineup is never a bad thing. “It’s huge,” said center Kyle Brodziak. “Obviously he’s the captain of our team. Big voice in the locker room. But what he does on the ice — he logs the big minutes and controls the game very well.” Pietrangelo hasn’t scored a goal since Nov. 9 against Arizona, but even with the four missed games he’s still tied for eighth among all NHL defensemen with 23 points. And even without the goals, he was contributing on offense, with seven assists in the 11 games preceding the time lost to injury. He even had two assists in Detroit after taking the puck off the foot. “He’s a leader for us, especially on the back end,” coach Mike Yeo said. “We need his execution. We need his defensive game. He has the ability to help us get to our game.” A game that has gone AWOL to a large degree over the past week or so.

When/Where • 8:30 p.m., Wednesday, Scotiabank Saddledome, Calgary, Alberta TV/Radio • Fox Sports Midwest, KMOX (1120 AM) About the Flames • Calgary is 17-14-3 overall, but is one of only five teams in the NHL with a losing record at home (8-10). The Flames have some firepower. Johnny Gaudreau, aka Johnny Hockey, is among the league’s scoring leaders with 40 points (13 goals, 27 assists). Sean Monahan has 17 goals, seven of which have come on the power play. St. Louisan Matthew Tkachuk is third on the team in points, with 20 on seven goals and 13 assists. But the Flames aren’t the stingiest team on defense — their 102 goals allowed were the fifth-most in the Western Conference entering Tuesday’s play. Jim Thomas

goals. We won 2-0 (Saturday against Winnipeg), but they were power play goals. “We gotta find a way to balance it out and score some goals five-onfive, because you can’t always win games with power play goals. It’s tough to score when you’re playing a lot in your end. So the quicker we can get out of our end now, the more energy and opportunities will happen.” Five-on-five play had been the strength of the Blues’ game most of the season. But since Schwartz — and Pietrangelo — were sidelined, the Blues have scored only three five-on-five goals. Then again, they’ve scored only six goals total in those five games. “You don’t win faceoffs, you spend more time in your zone — D-

Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com

Maple Leafs 8, Hurricanes 1

Bruins 3, Sabres 0 Boston 0 1 2 — 3 Buffalo 0 0 0 — 0 First period: None. Penalties: Bogosian, BUF, Major (fighting), 4:48; Miller, BOS, Major (fighting), 4:48; Bergeron, BOS, (slashing), 8:30. Second period: 1, Boston, DeBrusk 8 (McAvoy, Spooner), 10:14. Penalties: Rodrigues, BUF, (high sticking), 3:33. Third period: 2, Boston, Schaller 4, 18:09. 3, Boston, Backes 4 (Heinen, Nash), 19:29. Penalties: Kane, BUF, (slashing), 4:32. Shots: BOS 10-14-9: 33. Buffalo 17-9-10: 36. Power-plays: Boston 0 of 2; Buffalo 0 of 1. Goalies: Boston, Khudobin 8-2-2 (36 shots36 saves). Buffalo, Lehner 7-14-4 (31-30). A: 17,811.

Red Wings 6, Islanders 3 Detroit 2 1 3 — 6 NY Islanders 1 2 0 — 3 First period: 1, NY Islanders, Lee 21 (Bailey, Tavares), 6:32. 2, Detroit, Frk 7 (Larkin, Ericsson), 9:33. 3, Detroit, Nyquist 9 (Tatar, Zetterberg), 16:49 (pp). Penalties: Pelech, NYI, (holding), 15:52; Abdelkader, DET, (slashing), 19:17. Second period: 4, NY Islanders, Pulock 2 (Eberle), 2:03 (pp). 5, NY Islanders, Bailey 10 (Barzal, Tavares), 12:59 (pp). 6, Detroit, Mantha 13 (Zetterberg), 15:15. Penalties: Larkin, DET, (high sticking), 1:30; Larkin, DET, (tripping), 11:59. Third period: 7, Detroit, Daley 2 (Zetterberg, Larkin), 10:03. 8, Detroit, Green 3 (Larkin, Athanasiou), 14:12. 9, Detroit, Glendening 7 (Nielsen, DeKeyser), 19:31. Penalties: None. Shots: DET 6-4-12: 22. NYI 9-23-5: 37. Power-plays: DET 1 of 1; NYI 2 of 3. Goalies: DET, Mrazek 3-4-1 (37 shots-34 saves). NYI, Greiss 9-5-2 (21-16). A: 10,511.

Wild 6, Senators 4 Minnesota 1 2 3 — 6 Ottawa 1 2 1 — 4 First period: 1, Ottawa, Karlsson 2 (Dzingel, Brassard), 2:08. 2, Minnesota, Staal 13 (Coyle, Suter), 11:11. Penalties: None. Second period: 3, Ottawa, Karlsson 3 (Hoffman, Stone), 1:08 (pp). 4, Ottawa, Pageau 5 (Pyatt, Thompson), 5:44. 5, Minnesota, Stewart 8 (Prosser, Eriksson Ek), 10:19. 6, Minnesota, Koivu 5 (Dumba, Suter), 19:05. Penalties: Zucker, MIN, (tripping), 0:14; Spurgeon, MIN, (tripping), 3:13; Ceci, OTT, (hooking), 10:43; Granlund, MIN, (tripping), 11:37; Ceci, OTT, (interference), 17:04. Third period: 7, Minnesota, Prosser 1, 1:48. 8, Minnesota, Brodin 3 (Staal), 4:57. 9, Minnesota, Staal 14 (Niederreiter, Coyle), 16:39 (pp). 10, Ottawa, Brassard 8 (Stone, Hoffman), 18:34 (pp). Penalties: Brassard, OTT, (high sticking), 5:22; Ottawa bench, served by Dzingel (too many men on the ice), 14:48; Brodin, MIN, (slashing), 17:45. Shots: MIN 10-17-13: 40. Ottawa 9-13-10: 32. Power-plays: MIN 1 of 4; Ottawa 2 of 4. Goalies: Minnesota, Stalock 6-5-1 (32 shots28 saves). Ottawa, Anderson 9-11-3 (40-34). A: 13,804.

NO EXCUSES

It goes without saying that the Blues miss Jaden Schwartz and everything he brings to the rink. “But we’re still a better hockey team than what we’ve shown the last couple games,” Yeo said after Tuesday’s practice. “And so, if we want to make excuses, we can point to guys that are out of the lineup. “I do feel that part of it was we went through a difficult stretch. A lot of games. Fatigue can set in. But that’s not an excuse any more. We had the day off (Monday), we had a practice opportunity today, so we should be sharp (Wednesday).”

THOMPSON’S ROLE

It looks like forward Tage Thompson, recalled Monday from San Antonio, will be thrown right into the thick of things. He was put in a top 6 role during Tuesday’s practice, on a line with veterans Alexander Steen and Paul Statsny. “Obviously, it’s an amazing opportunity playing with two of the best players in the league,” Thompson said. “So I’m just going to try and play my game. Probably a little nervous. But just play my game, and I think I’ll get some chances and have some fun with ‘em.”

Maple Leafs score 8 goals in romp over Hurricanes

NHL SUMMARIES

Carolina 1 0 0 — 1 Toronto 4 0 4 — 8 First period: 1, Toronto, Komarov 4 (Hyman, Hainsey), 2:52 (sh). 2, Toronto, Marner 3 (J.van Riemsdyk, Rielly), 5:33 (pp). 3, Carolina, Skinner 12 (Teravainen, Fleury), 9:07. 4, Toronto, J.van Riemsdyk 16 (Bozak, Marner), 10:34 (pp). 5, Toronto, Bozak 7 (Marner), 13:28. Penalties: Martin, TOR, (holding), 2:43; Polak, TOR, (roughing), 4:58; Jooris, CAR, served by Williams, (roughing), 4:58; Jooris, CAR, (roughing), 4:58; Williams, CAR, Major (fighting), 8:17; Komarov, TOR, Major (fighting), 8:17; Pesce, CAR, (slashing), 9:28; J.van Riemsdyk, TOR, (slashing), 15:59; Kadri, TOR, (high sticking), 18:44. Second period: None. Penalties: None. Third period: 6, Toronto, Marleau 12 (Marner, Bozak), 9:25. 7, Toronto, Kapanen 2, 9:31. 8, Toronto, Nylander 6 (Hyman), 14:05. 9, Toronto, Carrick 2 (J.van Riemsdyk, Bozak), 18:33 (pp). Penalties: J.van Riemsdyk, TOR, (cross checking), 5:02; Aho, CAR, (holding), 17:18. Shots: Carolina 13-12-8: 33. Toronto 14-10-12: 36. Power-plays: Carolina 0 of 4; Toronto 3 of 3. Goalies: Carolina, Darling 8-10-6 (36 shots-28 saves). Toronto, Andersen 18-10-1 (33-32). A: 19,288.

From a Blues’ perspective, the 4-0 loss Sunday in Winnipeg was pretty much a game without any redeeming value. Even so, it was a meaningful night for center Kyle Brodziak — his 800th regular-season game in the National Hockey League. “It’s a good little milestone, that once you finish your career you can look back and be proud of,” he said. “It’s a lot of hockey games over the years, but I feel pretty privileged to do that.” Brodziak, 33, is in his third season with St. Louis, so he has played only 179 of those contests wearing a Bluenote. Mike Yeo hasn’t been around the Blues even that long, but he coached Brodziak for four seasons in Minnesota so he knows him well. “He’s got great insight to the game,” Yeo said. “He’s a leader in the sense that he goes out and he does his job night after night. Regardless of what’s going on, with our team or with their team, he finds a way to go out and do his thing. He’s quietly had a very, very good year for us.” He’s a member of the Blues’ “Century Line,” so dubbed because the combined ages of its usual members — Brodziak, Scottie Upshall and Chris Thorburn — is over 100 years (101 to be exact). In 34 games this season, Brodziak has five goals and five assists and is plus-3. Pretty good numbers for a fourth-line center. He also logs regular time on the team’s penalty kill unit. “When I came into the league until now the game has changed quite a bit,” Brodziak said. “I think for the older guys that are still around today it’s everybody’s ability to adapt to

the changes. The speed of the game has gotten a lot faster. Defense is a big priority for pretty much every team in the league now, and that wasn’t always the case I don’t think when I was coming into the league.” Brodziak’s 800th game was delayed one night because he sat out Saturday’s 2-0 Blues win over Winnipeg with an unspecified minor injury. “Luckily it was just one game, and hopefully I can just look back on it now,” he said.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Toronto Maple Leafs center Mitchell Marner (left) celebrates his first-period goal Tuesday against the Carolina Hurricanes with teammate James van Riemsdyk.

NHL STANDINGS

Rangers 4, Ducks 1

Capitals 4, Stars 3, OT

Canadliens 7, Canucks 5

Anaheim 0 0 1 — 1 NY Rangers 1 2 1 — 4 First period: 1, NY Rangers, Carey 3 (Holden, Desharnais), 19:14. Penalties: Cogliano, ANA, (slashing), 14:25; Zuccarello, NYR, (roughing), 15:25. Second period: 2, NY Rangers, Hayes 8 (Zuccarello, Holden), 0:38. 3, NY Rangers, Carey 4 (Desharnais, Vesey), 13:00. Penalties: Lindholm, ANA, (hooking), 14:15. Third period: 4, Anaheim, Kase 7 (Getzlaf, Manson), 14:43. 5, NY Rangers, Grabner 17 (Fast), 16:37. Penalties: Nash, NYR, (hooking), 3:59. Shots: ANA 16-15-9: 40. NYR 10-12-10: 32. Power-plays: ANA 0 of 2; NYR 0 of 2. Goalies: Anaheim, Gibson 10-11-4 (32 shots-28 saves). NY Rangers, Lundqvist 17-8-2 (40-39). A: 18,006.

Washington 1 1 1 1 — 4 Dallas 1 1 1 0 — 3 First period: 1, Washington, Burakovsky 2 (Eller, Connolly), 10:35. 2, Dallas, Benn 14 (Radulov, Klingberg), 15:14 (pp). Penalties: Roussel, DAL, (roughing), 4:31; Vrana, WSH, (roughing), 4:31; Roussel, DAL, served by Radulov, (roughing), 4:31; Roussel, DAL, (roughing), 15:06; Wilson, WSH, (roughing), 15:06; Wilson, WSH, served by Connolly, (roughing), 15:06; Dallas bench, served by Radulov (too many men on the ice), 18:49. Second period: 3, Dallas, Smith 4 (Hamhuis, Spezza), 11:09. 4, Washington, Orlov 4 (Backstrom), 13:12. Penalties: Washington bench, served by Connolly (too many men on the ice), 1:11; Wilson, WSH, (roughing), 1:57; Benn, DAL, (roughing), 1:57; Carlson, WSH, (holding), 14:23; Radulov, DAL, (interference), 19:05. Third period: 5, Dallas, Radulov 12 (Pateryn), 15:53. 6, Washington, Connolly 7 (Eller, Burakovsky), 16:34. Penalties: Wilson, WSH, (slashing), 7:02. Overtime: 7, Washington, Burakovsky 3 (Carlson), 1:51. Penalties: None. Shots: WSH 9-5-12-2: 28. DAL 11-14-10-1: 36. Power-plays: WSH 0 of 3; Dallas 1 of 4. Goalies: WSH, Holtby 20-7-0 (38 shots-35 saves). DAL, Bishop 13-9-2 (28-25). A: 18,112.

Montreal 1 3 3 — 7 5 Vancouver 1 2 2 — First period: 1, Vancouver, Vanek 8 (Gagner, Pouliot), 11:37 (pp). 2, Montreal, Carr 3 (Hudon, Schlemko), 16:39 (pp). Penalties: Jerabek, MTL, (holding), 6:18; Morrow, MTL, (high sticking), 9:39; Vanek, VAN, (tripping), 14:45. Second period: 3, Montreal, Deslauriers 2 (Petry, Froese), 7:18. 4, Vancouver, Vanek 9 (Eriksson, Biega), 14:00. 5, Montreal, Deslauriers 3 (Carr, Alzner), 17:05. 6, Vancouver, D.Sedin 7 (Gudbranson, Vanek), 17:39. 7, Montreal, Petry 4 (Shaw), 19:13 (pp). Penalties: Biega, VAN, (cross checking), 19:09. Third period: 8, Montreal, Byron 10 (Drouin, Pacioretty), 1:37. 9, Vancouver, Boeser 18 (D.Sedin, H.Sedin), 13:29 (pp). 10, Montreal, Galchenyuk 8 (Danault), 17:27. 11, Vancouver, Vanek 10 (Boeser, H.Sedin), 18:59. 12, Montreal, Danault 7 (Plekanec, Pacioretty), 19:49. Penalties: Biega, VAN, (interference), 9:45; Froese, MTL, (interference), 12:37. Shots: MTL 9-14-9: 32. VAN 16-9-14: 39. Power-plays: MTL 2 of 3; Vancouver 2 of 3. Goalies: Montreal, Price 10-10-2 (39 shots34 saves). Vancouver, Nilsson 6-5-1 (31-25). A: 18,865.

Jets 6, Predators 4 Winnipeg 1 3 2 — 6 Nashville 2 1 1 — 4 First period: 1, Winnipeg, Lowry 6 (Myers, Tanev), 8:05. 2, Nashville, Jarnkrok 8, 19:19. 3, Nashville, Fiala 9 (Smith), 19:40. Penalties: Smith, NSH, (tripping), 0:26; Copp, WPG, (interference), 16:42. Second period: 4, Winnipeg, Laine 17 (Kulikov, Little), 6:54. 5, Nashville, Subban 7 (Johansen, Forsberg), 7:55 (pp). 6, Winnipeg, Ehlers 16 (Wheeler, Scheifele), 8:25. 7, Winnipeg, Ehlers 17 (Myers, Armia), 16:00 (pp). Penalties: Irwin, NSH, (tripping), 0:27; Laine, WPG, (slashing), 1:28; Tanev, WPG, (interference), 7:18; Weber, NSH, (boarding), 14:20; Weber, NSH, (tripping), 16:20. Third period: 8, NSH, Weber 1 (Fiala), 0:30. 9, Winnipeg, Tanev 3 (Morrissey, Lowry), 18:34. 10, Winnipeg, Wheeler 9 (Myers), 19:58. Penalties: Watson, NSH, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 9:33; Little, WPG, (slashing), 9:33; Emelin, NSH, (hooking), 11:12. Shots: WPG 13-13-10: 36. NSH 11-9-14: 34. Power-plays: WPG 1 of 5; Nashville 1 of 3. Goalies: Winnipeg, Hellebuyck 18-4-4 (34 shots-30 saves). Nashville, Rinne 18-5-3 (35-30). A: 17,432.

Panthers 3, Coyotes 2 Florida 0 1 2 — 3 Arizona 1 1 0 — 2 First period: 1, Arizona, Fischer 8 (Keller, Ekman-Larsson), 15:51. Penalties: MacKenzie, FLA, (delay of game), 2:13; Yandle, FLA, (holding), 13:47; Domi, ARI, (tripping), 14:05; Ekblad, FLA, (tripping), 14:15. Second period: 2, Arizona, Stepan 6 (Goligoski, Perlini), 18:14. 3, Florida, Bjugstad 9 (MacKenzie), 19:50. Penalties: Yandle, FLA, (roughing), 1:05. Third period: 4, Florida, Malgin 5 (Trocheck, Dadonov), 3:37. 5, Florida, Matheson 3 (Dadonov), 5:41. Penalties: Merkley, ARI, (high sticking), 4:58; McCoshen, FLA, (interference), 4:58. Shots: Florida 7-7-12: 26. Arizona 23-9-9: 41. Power-plays: Florida 0 of 0; Arizona 0 of 4. Goalies: FLA, Reimer 6-9-4 (41 shots-39 saves). ARI, Raanta 4-8-2 (26-23). T: 2:39.

LATE MONDAY

Knights 4, Lightning 3 Tampa Bay 2 0 1 — 3 Vegas 0 2 2 — 4 First period: 1, Tampa Bay, Stamkos 13 (Hedman, Kucherov), 7:43 (pp). 2, Tampa Bay, Namestnikov 14 (Kucherov, Hedman), 19:13 (pp). Penalties: McNabb, VGK, (delay of game), 6:35; Koekkoek, TB, (hooking), 15:58; Neal, VGK, (slashing), 18:13. Second period: 3, Vegas, Neal 17 (Perron, Theodore), 10:07 (pp). 4, Vegas, Marchessault 12 (Perron, Theodore), 18:21 (pp). Penalties: Coburn, TB, (delay of game), 9:20; Kunitz, TB, (slashing), 17:36. Third period: 5, Vegas, Haula 13 (Perron, Theodore), 4:42 (pp). 6, Tampa Bay, Hedman 4 (Stamkos), 16:08. 7, Vegas, Theodore 2 (Haula, Marchessault), 19:57 (pp). Penalties: Sergachev, TB, (high sticking), 4:33; Lindberg, VGK, (slashing), 7:26; Engelland, VGK, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 16:52; Coburn, TB, (holding stick), 19:36. Shots: TBL 12-10-16: 38. Vegas 10-18-8: 36. Power-plays: TBL 2 of 4; Vegas 4 of 5. Goalies: TBL, Vasilevskiy 21-5-1 (36 shots-32 saves). VGK, Fleury 5-1-1 (38-35). A: 17,813.

Goaltending leaders WINS Goalie, team Andrei Vasilevskiy, TBL Braden Holtby, WSH Pekka Rinne, NSH Jake Allen, STL Frederik Andersen, TOR Sergei Bobrovsky, CBJ Connor Hellebuyck, WPG Corey Crawford, CHI Henrik Lundqvist, NYR Jonathan Quick, LAK

GP 26 26 25 29 28 28 27 26 28 27

MINS 1564 1485 1519 1667 1686 1674 1545 1510 1586 1579

Oilers 5, Sharks 3 San Jose 1 1 1 — 3 Edmonton 2 1 2 — 5 First period: 1, San Jose, Pavelski 7 (Labanc, Burns), 6:15 (pp). 2, Edmonton, Letestu 8 (Draisaitl, Klefbom), 14:42. 3, Edmonton, Strome 5 (Khaira, Draisaitl), 18:51. Penalties: Labanc, SJ, (high sticking), 2:43; Walker, EDM, (holding), 5:24; Hertl, SJ, (delay of game), 12:40. Second period: 4, Edmonton, NugentHopkins 14 (Maroon, Caggiula), 6:36. 5, San Jose, Hertl 8 (Burns, Labanc), 8:32. Penalties: Russell, EDM, (holding), 12:37; Pavelski, SJ, (tripping), 13:15; Strome, EDM, (tripping), 13:46. Third period: 6, Edmonton, Maroon 9 (Nugent-Hopkins), 8:23. 7, San Jose, Sorensen 2 (Karlsson, Braun), 11:58. 8, Edmonton, Strome 6 (Benning), 19:52. Penalties: None. Shots: SJS 6-7-8: 21. Edmonton 8-10-11: 29. Power-plays: SJS 1 of 3; Edmonton 0 of 2. Goalies: San Jose, Jones 11-8-3 (28 shots-24 saves). Edmonton, Talbot 12-10-1 (21-18). A: 18,347.

Scoring leaders W-L-OT 21-4-1 19-7-0 18-4-3 17-9-2 17-10-1 17-10-1 17-4-4 16-7-2 16-8-2 16-10-1

Through Monday’s games GP Skater, team Nikita Kucherov, TB 32 32 Steven Stamkos, TB 33 Jakub Voracek, PHI 33 John Tavares, NYI Johnny Gaudreau, CGY 34 Connor McDavid, EDM 34 Josh Bailey, NYI 33 Anze Kopitar, LA 35 Nathan MacKinnon, COL 33 34 Blake Wheeler, WPG

G 23 12 8 19 13 12 9 17 15 8

Mitch Marner and Tyler Bozak each had a goal and three assists, and the host Toronto Maple Leafs stopped a three-game slide by routing the Carolina Hurricanes 8-1 on Tuesday. Toronto scored four in the first and four more in the third on a special anniversary for the NHL. The first NHL games were played on Dec. 19, 1917, including

a 10-9 win by the Montreal Wanderers over Toronto. James van Riemsdyk had a goal and two assists for the Maple Leafs, and Leo Komarov, Patrick Marleau, Kasperi Kapanen, William Nylander and Connor Carrick also scored. Frederik Andersen made 32 saves. Jeff Skinner scored for Carolina, and Scott Darling stopped 27 shots. The Hurricanes had won three in a row.

A PTS 23 46 31 43 33 41 21 40 27 40 28 40 31 40 22 39 24 39 31 39

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div Nashville 33 21 8 4 46 112 91 11-3-2 10-5-2 8-2-1 Blues 35 22 11 2 46 107 88 12-7-0 10-4-2 6-2-1 Winnipeg 35 20 10 5 45 118 98 12-3-1 8-7-4 7-3-1 33 17 11 5 39 102 86 10-5-2 7-6-3 4-5-2 Chicago Minnesota 34 18 13 3 39 100 99 10-4-2 8-9-1 4-6-0 Dallas 35 18 14 3 39 102 103 10-4-1 8-10-2 4-8-0 Colorado 33 16 15 2 34 105 109 10-6-1 6-9-1 4-5-1 Pacific GP W L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 33 22 9 2 46 116 100 14-2-1 8-7-1 9-1-0 Vegas Los Angeles 35 21 10 4 46 107 82 10-5-2 11-5-2 3-3-2 San Jose 32 17 11 4 38 88 80 9-6-2 8-5-2 5-2-3 Calgary 34 17 14 3 37 97 102 8-10-0 9-4-3 6-4-0 Anaheim 35 14 13 8 36 92 104 8-7-3 6-6-5 3-2-4 Vancouver 35 15 16 4 34 93 113 6-9-3 9-7-1 4-6-0 Edmonton 34 15 17 2 32 101 110 6-10-0 9-7-2 5-1-0 36 7 24 5 19 80 125 3-11-1 4-13-4 1-5-3 Arizona EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Home Tampa Bay 33 24 7 2 50 126 84 13-2-1 Toronto 35 21 13 1 43 117 98 11-5-0 Boston 32 17 10 5 39 96 87 10-5-3 Montreal 34 15 15 4 34 94 108 9-7-3 33 13 13 7 33 92 106 6-6-6 Detroit Florida 34 13 16 5 31 98 117 6-6-3 Ottawa 32 11 14 7 29 89 109 6-6-5 Buffalo 34 8 19 7 23 72 114 4-10-2 Metropolitan GP W L OT Pts GF GA Home 35 22 12 1 45 112 101 14-5-0 Washington New Jersey 33 19 9 5 43 105 99 9-5-2 Columbus 34 20 13 1 41 97 93 12-6-0 NY Rangers 34 19 12 3 41 112 97 14-5-3 34 18 13 3 39 121 120 10-3-2 NY Islanders 35 17 15 3 37 101 112 10-5-1 Pittsburgh 33 14 12 7 35 92 94 7-7-4 Philadelphia Carolina 33 14 12 7 35 91 106 7-4-3

Away 11-5-1 10-8-1 7-5-2 6-8-1 7-7-1 7-10-2 5-8-2 4-9-5 Away 8-7-1 10-4-3 8-7-1 5-7-0 8-10-1 7-10-2 7-5-3 7-8-4

Div 5-2-0 5-2-1 3-1-2 8-2-1 4-7-2 4-3-1 3-3-1 3-5-2 Div 5-3-0 2-3-0 7-5-0 5-4-2 5-4-1 4-2-0 1-0-3 3-3-2

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Tuesday Toronto 8, Carolina 1 Minnesota 6, Ottawa 4 Detroit 6, NY Islanders 3 NY Rangers 4, Anaheim 1 Boston 3, Buffalo 0 Winnipeg 6, Nashville 4 Washington 4, Dallas 3, OT Florida 3, Arizona 2 Vegas 4, Tampa Bay 3 Montreal 7, Vancouver 5 Monday New Jersey 5, Anaheim 3 Boston 7, Columbus 2 Los Angeles 4, Philadelphia 1

Edmonton 5, San Jose 3 Colorado 4, Pittsburgh 2 Wednesday Toronto at Columbus, 6:30 p.m. Detroit at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Blues at Calgary, 8:30 p.m. Thursday Columbus at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. NY Rangers at New Jersey, 6 p.m. Anaheim at NY Islanders, 6 p.m. Winnipeg at Boston, 6 p.m.

Ottawa at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m. Carolina at Nashville, 7 p.m. Chicago at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Blues at Edmonton, 8 p.m. Colorado at Los Angeles, 9:30 p.m. Vancouver at San Jose, 9:30 p.m. Friday Philadelphia at Buffalo, 6 p.m. Minnesota at Florida, 6:30 Montreal at Calgary, 8 p.m. Washington at Arizona, 8


SPORTS

12.20.2017 • Wednesday • M 1 AMERICA’S LINE

NBA STANDINGS EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB L10 Str Boston 26 7 .788 — 7-3 W-2 Toronto 20 8 .714 3½ 9-1 W-3 New York 16 14 .533 8½ 6-4 L-1 Philadelphia 14 16 .467 10½ 2-8 L-3 Brooklyn 11 18 .379 13 4-6 L-3 Southeast W L Pct GB L10 Str Washington 17 14 .548 — 6-4 W-1 Miami 15 15 .500 1½ 5-5 L-1 Charlotte 11 19 .367 5½ 3-7 W-1 Orlando 11 20 .355 6 3-7 L-5 Atlanta 7 23 .233 9½ 3-7 W-1 W L Pct GB L10 Str Central Cleveland 23 9 .719 — 8-2 L-1 17 13 .567 5 3-7 W-3 Detroit Milwaukee 16 13 .552 5½ 6-4 W-1 Indiana 17 14 .548 5½ 5-5 L-1 Chicago 9 20 .310 12½ 6-4 W-6 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB L10 Str Houston 25 4 .862 — 10-0 W-14 San Antonio 21 10 .677 5 7-3 W-2 New Orleans 15 16 .484 11 4-6 L-2 Memphis 9 21 .300 16½ 2-8 L-1 Dallas 8 23 .258 18 3-7 L-3 Northwest W L Pct GB L10 Str Minnesota 18 13 .581 — 6-4 W-1 Portland 16 14 .533 1½ 4-6 L-1 Denver 16 14 .533 1½ 5-5 L-1 Oklahoma City15 15 .500 2½ 7-3 W-1 Utah 14 17 .452 4 4-6 L-2 Pacific W L Pct GB L10 Str Golden State 24 6 .800 — 9-1 W-9 LA Clippers 11 18 .379 12½ 3-7 L-3 LA Lakers 10 18 .357 13 2-8 L-3 Phoenix 11 21 .344 14 3-7 W-2 Sacramento 10 20 .333 14 4-6 W-1 Tuesday Sacramento 101, Philadelphia 95 Washington 116, New Orleans 106 Milwaukee 119, Cleveland 116 Monday Boston 112, Indiana 111 Charlotte 109, New York 91 Atlanta 110, Miami 104 Chicago 117, Philadelphia 115 Houston 120, Utah 99 Minnesota 108, Portland 107 Oklahoma City 95, Denver 94 Phoenix 97, Dallas 91 San Antonio 109, LA Clippers 91 Golden State 116, LA Lakers 114, OT

Home Away Conf 13-3 13-4 16-5 11-1 9-7 9-4 14-5 2-9 8-10 7-8 7-8 6-7 6-9 5-9 5-10 Home Away Conf 9-6 8-8 7-7 6-7 9-8 9-8 9-8 2-11 6-11 6-8 5-12 6-11 4-10 3-13 5-17 Home Away Conf 13-4 10-5 17-7 9-5 8-8 10-9 10-5 6-8 6-8 10-7 7-7 12-8 6-8 3-12 8-8 Home Away Conf 13-3 12-1 14-2 15-2 6-8 11-6 8-7 7-9 9-12 6-12 3-9 8-10 6-11 2-12 6-16 Home Away Conf 11-6 7-7 15-6 7-8 9-6 8-8 11-2 5-12 7-9 10-4 5-11 8-9 11-5 3-12 8-8 Home Away Conf 10-3 14-3 12-4 6-7 5-11 7-10 6-8 4-10 4-11 4-12 7-9 6-11 5-7 5-13 7-8

Wednesday Toronto at Charlotte, 6 p.m. Indiana at Atlanta, 6:30 p.m. Miami at Boston, 6:30 p.m. Sacramento at Brooklyn, 6:30 p.m. LA Lakers at Houston, 7 p.m. Orlando at Chicago, 7 p.m. Utah at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m. Detroit at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Minnesota at Denver, 8 p.m. San Antonio at Portland, 9 p.m. Memphis at Golden State, 9:30 p.m. Phoenix at LA Clippers, 9:30 p.m.

Cavaliers’ streak ends despite rally vs. Bucks

NFL Favorite Points Underdog ...........................Open Current....................... Saturday RAVENS.................. 13 13.5..................... Colts Vikings .....................9 9 ..................PACKERS Sunday Lions.........................4 5 ..................BENGALS Chargers ..................7 7...........................JETS Rams .....................6.5 6.5 .................. TITANS BEARS ...................6.5 6.5 ..................Browns PANTHERS .............10 10 ....................... Bucs SAINTS ..................5.5 5 .....................Falcons WASHINGTON...........4 3.5..................Broncos CHIEFS....................10 10.5...............Dolphins PATRIOTS ............ 12.5 12......................... Bills Jaguars.....................5 4.5 ................... 49ERS CARDS ...................4.5 4 .......................Giants COWBOYS..............4.5 5 .................Seahawks Monday Steelers..................10 9.5..................TEXANS EAGLES.....................9 9 .....................Raiders COLLEGE FOOTBALL Odds to win the 2017 College Football Championship Open Current Teams 3/1 2/1 Alabama Clemson 20/1 5/2 10/1 7/2 Oklahoma Georgia 30/1 7/2 Note: Oklahoma and Virginia opened as favorites. NBA Points Underdog Favorite Raptors 1 HORNETS 5.5 Kings NETS Pacers 4.5 HAWKS CELTICS 8 Heat 5.5 Jazz THUNDER ROCKETS 14 Lakers 5 Magic BULLS MAVERICKS 2 Pistons 2.5 NUGGETS T’Wolves Spurs 1.5 BLAZERS WARRIORS 10 Grizzlies 6.5 Suns CLIPPERS COLLEGE BASKETBALL Points Underdog Favorite MASSACHUSETTS 4 Georgia St ST. BONA 8.5 Northeastern 24 James Madison FLORIDA DUKE 25 Evansville 2.5 Towson OAKLAND GEORGETOWN 11 N Texas MISSISSIPPI ST 20 Ark-L Rock NEBRASKA 11 Utsa UTAH ST 17 Youngstown St 8 CAL-RIVERSIDE Valparaiso s-Kansas St 8.5 WASHINGTON ST Birthday of Basketball Classic 6.5 St. Joseph’s St. John’s Providence Houston 3 Added Games Bradley 5 SE MISSOURI ST 7 Manhattan HOFSTRA MEMPHIS 11 Siena 15 TENNESSEE Furman N CAROLINA 25 Wofford s- Spokane, WA. NHL Odds Underdog Favorite Maple Leafs BLUE JACKETS -$145/+$125 -$190/+$170 Red Wings FLYERS FLAMES -$120/even Blues Grand Salami: Over/under 16.5 goals. Home team in CAPS © 2017 Benjamin Eckstein

SOCCER English Premier League GP W D L GF GA 18 17 1 0 56 12 Man City Man United 18 13 2 3 39 12 18 12 2 4 32 14 Chelsea Liverpool 18 9 7 2 38 20 Arsenal 18 10 3 5 31 20 18 9 5 4 16 12 Burnley Tottenham 18 9 4 5 31 18 Leicester 18 7 5 6 27 26 Everton 18 7 4 7 24 30 Watford 18 6 4 8 27 33 Huddersfield 18 6 3 9 16 30 Southampton 18 4 6 8 17 24 Brighton 18 4 6 8 14 23 Crystal Palace 18 4 5 9 15 28 West Ham 18 4 5 9 17 32 Bournemouth 18 4 4 10 15 24 Stoke 18 4 4 10 19 39 Newcastle 18 4 3 11 16 27 West Brom 18 2 8 8 13 24 Swansea 18 3 3 12 10 25 Monday Everton 3, Swansea 1 Friday Arsenal vs. Liverpool 1:45 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 23 Everton vs. Chelsea 6:30 a.m. Man City vs. Bournemouth 9 a.m. West Ham vs. Newcastle 9 a.m. Southampton vs. Huddersfield 9 a.m. Stoke vs. West Brom 9 a.m. Swansea vs. Crystal Palace 9 a.m. Brighton vs. Watford 9 a.m. Burnley vs. Tottenham 11:30 a.m. Leicester vs. Man United 1:45 p.m.

Pts 52 41 38 34 33 32 31 26 25 22 21 18 18 17 17 16 16 15 14 12

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B7

COLLEGES

MEN’S BASKETBALL

AREA SCORES

TUESDAY’S NATIONAL SCORES

Women’s basketball SLU 77, Tulsa 66 Maryville 76, Fort Wayne 70 UMSL 96, Oakland City 54 St. Louis CC 82, Lincoln Land 68 Lyon (Ark.) 70, Missouri Baptist 53 Men’s basketball SLU 74, Campbell 66 Lindenwood 112, Robert Morris-Springfield 56 Maryville 79, Okla. Christian 62 UMSL 75, Purdue NW 63 Illinois State 71, Illinois-Chicago 70 Missouri State 66, Wright State 50 St. Louis CC 58, Lincoln Land 48 SIUE 88, Chicago State 76 SIUC 102, NC A&T 64 Eastern Illinois 78, Western Illinois 77

WEDNESDAY’S BASKETBALL SCHEDULE

W: SIU Carbondale vs. Kennesaw State, in San Juan, P.R., 1 p.m. M: Bradley at Southeast Missouri, 1 p.m. W: SIU Edwardsville vs. Akron, in Fort Myers, Fla., 3:30 p.m. W: LU-Belleville at Westmont, 5 p.m.

COLLEGE FOOTBALL AP Coach of the Year voting Voting for the 2017 AP Coach of the year, with first-, second- and third-place votes and total points (voting on 3-2-1 basis): Coach 1st 2nd 3rd Total Scott Frost, UCF 21 15 7 100 Kirby Smart, Georgia 7 12 10 55 Dabo Swinney, Clemson 7 6 5 38 Lincoln Riley, Oklahoma 4 8 8 36 Mark Richt, Miami 5 4 5 28 Bill Clark, UAB 6 3 2 26 Paul Chryst, Wisconsin 3 2 5 18 Matt Campbell, Iowa State 2 2 6 16 Jeff Tedford, Fresno State 1 2 4 11 Gus Malzahn, Auburn 1 1 1 6 Lane Kiffin, FAU - 2 2 Jeff Monken, Army - 1 1 Gary Patterson, TCU - 1 1

East Canisius 67, Elon 51 Duquesne 65, Lamar 64 Holy Family 100, Chestnut Hill 76 Iona 82, Holy Cross 68 Jefferson 84, Wilmington (Del.) 81, OT Niagara 79, Cleveland St. 77 Penn St. 80, Binghamton 65 Pittsburgh 74, Delaware St. 68 Syracuse 81, Buffalo 74 South Barton 100, Tusculum 97 Bucknell 86, Richmond 78 Carson-Newman 84, Limestone 72 Clemson 64, South Carolina 48 Coll. Charles. 80, SC State 64 FIU 91, Florida G.C. 88 Flagler 76, Young Harris 74 Freed-Hardeman 98, Crowley’s Ridge 66 Ga. Southern 78, Kennesaw St. 69 High Point 72, W. Carolina 61 Kentucky Wesleyan 95, Lake Erie 79 King (Tenn.) 80, Lenoir-Rhyne 49 Mississippi 85, Texas A&M-CC 63 NC State 81, Robert Morris 69 Queens (NC) 83, Johnson C. Smith 77 UCF 74, Stetson 55 UNC Asheville 67, UNC Greensboro 60 VCU 69, Winthrop 55 Virginia 78, Savannah St. 47 Virginia Tech 63, Presbyterian 55 Midwest Ball St. 79, North Florida 65 Cincinnati 77, Ark.-Pine Bluff 49 ETSU 81, Detroit 73 Grand View 95, Yellowstone Christian 68 Hillsdale 78, Davis & Elkins 59 Minn. Duluth 87, N. Michigan 82 Minn. St.-Mankato 69, Waldorf 59 Northwood (Mich.) 81, Wis.-Parkside 68 Notre Dame 97, Dartmouth 87 Ohio St. 94, The Citadel 65 Rochester (Mich.) 72, Saginaw Valley St. 51 Roosevelt 72, Siena Heights 66 Upper Iowa 94, Bethany Lutheran 89 Xavier 81, Marshall 77 Southwest Oklahoma 105, Northwestern St. 68

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL HOW THE TOP 25 FARED 1. UConn (9-0) beat Oklahoma 88-64. Next: vs. Duquesne, Friday. 2. Notre Dame (10-1) idle. Next: vs. Marquette, Wednesday. 3. Louisville (13-0) idle. Next: at Air Force, Wednesday. 4. South Carolina (10-1) idle. Next: at Temple, Thursday. 5. Mississippi State (11-0) idle. Next: at UNLV, Wednesday. 6. Baylor (10-1) idle. Next: at Kansas State, Thursday, Dec. 28. 7. Tennessee (11-0) idle. Next: at No. 18 Stanford, Thursday. 8. Texas (9-1) idle. Next: at Oklahoma, Thursday, Dec. 28. 9. West Virginia (11-0) idle. Next: vs. Morehead State, Thursday. 10. Oregon (9-2) idle. Next: vs. No. 19 Texas A&M, Thursday. 11. UCLA (8-2) idle. Next: at Fordham, Wednesday. 12. Ohio State (11-2) idle. Next: at Nebraska, Thursday, Dec. 28. 13. Florida State (10-1) idle. Next: at Creighton, Thursday. 14. Duke (8-2) vs. Maine. Next: vs. Wyoming, Thursday. 15. Maryland (10-2) idle. Next: at Coppin State, Wednesday. 16. Missouri (11-1) idle. Next: vs. Illinois, Friday. 17. Oregon State (8-2) idle. Next: vs. UC Davis, Wednesday. 18. Stanford (6-5) idle. Next: vs. No. 7 Tennessee, Thursday. 19. Texas A&M (9-2) idle. Next: vs. Hawaii, Wednesday. 20. Villanova (9-0) idle. Next: at La Salle, Wednesday. 21. Green Bay (10-1) beat Northwestern 63-57. Next: at Wright State, Dec. 28. 22. South Florida (9-2) idle. Next: vs. Dayton, Wednesday. 23. Michigan (10-2) idle. Next: vs. Delaware State, Thursday. 24. California (8-2) idle. Next: at Kentucky, Thursday. 25. Iowa (11-1) idle. Next: vs. Drake, Thursday.t

2017 FINAL MLB PAYROLLS Final 2017 payrolls for the 30 major league teams, according to information received by clubs from the commissioner’s office. Figures are for 40-man rosters and include salaries and prorated shares of signing bonuses, earned incentive bonuses, non-cash compensation, buyouts of unexercised options and cash transactions. In some cases, parts of salaries that are deferred are discounted to reflect present-day values.

L.A. Dodgers.......... $243,687,497

Toronto.......................165,179,831

Philadelphia..............114,539,020

N.Y. Yankees.............208,376,830

Seattle.......................157,588,836

Minnesota................. 111,209,586

Detroit.......................190,815,585

Cardinals.............. 155,235,772

Arizona......................105,941,702

Boston.......................189,218,620

Kansas City ............... 153,634,135

Cincinnati....................99,951,375 Pittsburgh...................95,865,735

San Francisco...........186,568,459

N.Y. Mets.................. 148,604,654

Chicago Cubs ........... 186,222,249

Colorado.................. 142,686,009

Washington.............. 178,944,530

Cleveland ................. 136,096,914

Texas ......................... 174,726,776

Houston ....................134,076,102

San Diego.....................71,292,313

L.A. Angels................173,924,908

Atlanta ..................... 122,493,908

Milwaukee..................68,190,606

Baltimore.................. 167,413,907

Miami ........................116,975,560

Total.................4,244,958,541

Chicago White Sox.....87,809,300 Tampa Bay .................81,346,870 Oakland...................... 76,340,952

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES — Sent RHP Jake Bray to Oakland to complete an earlier trade. TAMPA BAY RAYS — Sent C Jonah Heim to Oakland to complete an earlier trade. OAKLAND ATHLETICS — TEXAS RANGERS — Agreed to terms with RHPs Austin Bibens-Dirkx and Erik Goeddel on minor league contracts. National League ATLANTA BRAVES — Released 1B Adrian Gonzalez. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS — Agreed to terms with C Nick Hundley on a one-year contract. BASKETBALL | NBA ATLANTA HAWKS — Assigned F/C Mike Muscala and G Tyler Dorsey to Erie (NBAGL). CHICAGO BULLS — Waived G Kay Felder. DALLAS MAVERICKS — Waived G/F Antonius Cleveland and C Jeff Withey. Signed G Kyles Collinsworth to a two-way contract. FOOTBALL | NFL ARIZONA CARDINALS — Placed WR Brittan Golden on injured reserve. Released LB Kevin Snyder from the practice squad. Re-signed

RB Bronson Hill. Signed LB Vontarrius Dora and WR Rashad Ross to the practice squad. CLEVELAND BROWNS — Placed DB Derrick Kindred on injured reserve. Signed DB B.W.Webb. Signed DB Trevon Hartfield to the practice squad. DENVER BRONCOS — Placed LB Shane Ray on injured reserve. Signed CB Michael Hunter from the practice squad. DETROIT LIONS — Placed WR TJ Jones on injured reserve. Signed WR Andy Jones from the practice squad and CB Adairius Barnes to the practice squad. GREEN BAY PACKERS — Placed QB Aaron Rodgers on injured reserve. Released FB Joe Kerridge. Released QB Jerod Evans from the practice squad. Signed QB Joe Callahan. INDIANAPOLIS COLTS — Released DT Jeremy Liggins from the practice squad. NEW YORK GIANTS — Waived LB Jeremy Cash. Activated DE Romeo Okwara from injured reserve. Signed WR Amba Etta-Tawo to the practice squad. TENNESSEE TITANS — Released TE Jerome Cunningham from the practice squad. Signed DE Johnny Maxey to the practice squad. WASHINGTON REDSKINS — Placed S Montae Nicholson on injured reserve. Signed S Fish

Smithson from the practice squad and DL Tavaris Barnes to the practice squad. HOCKEY | NHL ARIZONA COYOTES — Traded G Michael Leighton to Pittsburgh for F Josh Archibald and G Sean Maguire. Assigned C Dylan Strome to Tucson (AHL). DALLAS STARS — Traded D Jamie Oleksiak to Pittsburgh for a conditional 2019 fourth-round draft pick. EDMONTON OILERS — Recalled LW Anton Slepyshev from Bakersfield (AHL). SOCCER | MLS LA GALAXY — Acquired D Rolf Feltscher on a free transfer. COLLEGE EMORY — Named Cory Greiner men’s soccer coach. MARYLAND — WR DJ Moore will enter the NFL draft. MICHIGAN — Announced QB Shea Patterson will transfer from Mississippi. RUTGERS — Announced the retirement of offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach Jerry Kill.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Cavaliers’ LeBron James reacts after making a shot in front of the Bucks’ Giannis Antetokounmpo (34) and John Henson (31) during the first half Tuesday night. ASSOCIATED PRESS

Giannis Antetokounmpo scored 27 points, Eric Bledsoe had 26 and the host Milwaukee Bucks held off the Cleveland Cavaliers 119-116 on Tuesday night. Milwaukee ended a five-game losing streak to Cleveland. Khris Middleton had 18 points and 10 assists, and Malcolm Brogdon scored 16 points. LeBron James scored 39 points for Cleveland, which had won five in a row and lost for just the second time in its last 20 games. James had seven assists but just one rebound. Kevin Love finished with 21 points. Milwaukee led 103-83 when Cleveland launched a furious comeback.

Back-to-back 3-pointers by Dwyane Wade put the Cavaliers up 107-105, capping a 24-3 run.

NOTEBOOK

Lakers’ Lopez sidelined • Los Angeles Lakers center Brook Lopez has a moderate right ankle sprain and will be reevaluated in three weeks. Lopez is averaging 12.8 points and 4.3 rebounds per game. Other news • Philadelphia center Joel Embiid remained out Tuesday with a back injury. ... Chicago waived backup guard Kay Felder. ... Dallas signed guard Kyle Collinsworth to a two-way contract and requested waivers on guard-forward Antonius Cleveland and center Jeff Withey.

NBA SUMMARIES Kings 101, 76ers 95

Bucks 119, Cavaliers 116

Sacramento: Bogdanovic 1-6 2-2 4, Randolph 12-19 2-4 27, Cauley-Stein 3-10 3-7 9, Fox 1-4 0-2 2, Temple 4-9 1-4 9, Jackson 1-4 0-0 3, Koufos 1-2 0-0 2, Labissiere 1-2 0-0 2, Mason 7-9 0-0 16, Richardson 1-4 1-1 3, Hield 9-19 3-3 24, Carter 0-3 0-0 0. Totals 41-91 12-23 101. Philadelphia: Covington 5-19 5-5 17, Saric 3-10 4-4 11, Johnson 3-5 1-2 7, Simmons 5-6 3-5 13, Redick 3-10 0-0 8, Booker 2-4 2-4 6, Holmes 2-4 0-0 4, Bayless 5-12 1-2 15, McConnell 5-6 1-2 11, Luwawu-Cabarrot 1-5 0-0 3. Totals 34-81 17-24 95. Sacramento 30 18 23 30 — 101 Philadelphia 27 30 21 17 — 95 3-point goals: Sacramento 7-27 (Hield 3-9, Mason 2-2, Randolph 1-3, Jackson 1-3, Richardson 0-1, Temple 0-2, Carter 0-3, Bogdanovic 0-4), Philadelphia 10-35 (Bayless 4-8, Redick 2-5, Covington 2-13, Luwawu-Cabarrot 1-3, Saric 1-5, Holmes 0-1). Rebounds: Sacramento 39 (Temple 8), Philadelphia 53 (Simmons 12). Assists: Sacramento 21 (Temple 4), Philadelphia 21 (Simmons 9). Total fouls: Sacramento 20, Philadelphia 19. Technicals: McConnell. A: 20,558 (21,600).

Cleveland: James 14-22 5-5 39, Crowder 4-10 2-2 10, Love 8-15 0-0 21, Calderon 1-3 3-3 6, Smith 1-3 0-0 2, Osman 0-1 0-0 0, Green 3-5 7-9 13, Thompson 3-4 3-5 9, Wade 5-10 0-0 14, Korver 1-7 0-0 2. Totals 40-80 20-24 116. Milwaukee: Middleton 7-15 3-4 18, Antetokounmpo 8-14 11-12 27, Henson 7-11 1-2 15, Bledsoe 10-16 4-5 26, Dellavedova 2-4 0-0 6, Snell 3-7 0-0 8, Maker 0-0 1-2 1, Liggins 0-2 0-0 0, Brown 1-3 0-0 2, Brogdon 5-10 2-2 16. Totals 43-82 22-27 119. Cleveland 34 24 25 33 — 116 Milwaukee 30 39 29 21 — 119 3-point goals: Cleveland 16-41 (James 6-11, Love 5-11, Wade 4-6, Calderon 1-2, Smith 0-2, Korver 0-4, Crowder 0-5), Milwaukee 11-29 (Brogdon 4-7, Dellavedova 2-3, Bledsoe 2-5, Snell 2-6, Middleton 1-5, Brown 0-1, Liggins 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Cleveland 37 (Love 10), Milwaukee 40 (Antetokounmpo 13). Assists: Cleveland 26 (James 7), Milwaukee 27 (Middleton 10). Total fouls: Cleveland 20, Milwaukee 18. Technicals: Cleveland coach Cavaliers (Defensive three second). A: 18,717 (18,717).

Wizards 116, Pelicans 106

LATE MONDAY

New Orleans: Moore 6-12 0-0 12, Davis 11-21 14-15 37, Cousins 8-17 9-11 26, Rondo 0-3 0-0 0, Holiday 4-11 4-4 13, Cunningham 1-2 0-0 2, Miller 1-5 0-0 2, Diallo 1-2 0-1 2, Asik 0-1 2-2 2, Nelson 1-1 1-2 4, Cooke 1-1 1-2 4, Clark 0-4 2-3 2. Totals 34-80 33-40 106. Washington: Oubre Jr. 3-8 3-4 10, Morris 5-6 2-2 13, Gortat 5-7 0-0 10, Wall 6-18 2-4 18, Beal 9-19 3-4 26, McCullough 0-3 0-0 0, Smith 0-3 0-0 0, Scott 11-15 0-0 24, Mahinmi 2-2 0-0 4, Frazier 1-3 0-0 2, Satoransky 3-4 0-0 6, Meeks 1-4 0-0 3. Totals 46-92 10-14 116. New Orleans 19 36 15 36 — 106 Washington 36 25 32 23 — 116 3-point goals: New Orleans 5-20 (Cooke 1-1, Nelson 1-1, Holiday 1-2, Davis 1-3, Cousins 1-5, Rondo 0-1, Miller 0-1, Clark 0-2, Moore 0-4), Washington 14-35 (Beal 5-11, Wall 4-8, Scott 2-5, Morris 1-1, Meeks 1-3, Oubre Jr. 1-3, Frazier 0-2, Smith 0-2). Rebounds: New Orleans 42 (Cousins 13), Washington 44 (Gortat 14). Assists: New Orleans 20 (Holiday 5), Washington 29 (Wall 10). Total fouls: New Orleans 16, Washington 31. Technicals: New Orleans coach Alvin Gentry, Oubre Jr.. A: 16,529 (20,356).

Golden State: Durant 10-29 12-13 36, Bell 2-5 2-2 6, McGee 4-4 0-0 8, McCaw 1-5 0-0 2, Thompson 6-24 1-2 17, Young 4-8 0-0 10, Casspi 5-9 4-4 14, West 3-9 0-0 6, Looney 4-6 0-0 8, Cook 0-1 0-0 0, Iguodala 4-7 0-0 9. Totals 43-107 19-21 116. L.A. Lakers: Ingram 6-12 7-12 19, Nance Jr. 2-4 4-6 8, Lopez 3-5 0-2 6, Ball 6-12 1-2 16, Caldwell-Pope 4-17 4-4 14, Brewer 0-3 0-0 0, Kuzma 10-16 1-1 25, Randle 5-11 5-8 15, Clarkson 2-7 0-0 4, Hart 3-5 0-0 7. Totals 41-92 22-35 114. Golden State 32 25 26 19 14 — 116 L.A. Lakers 24 29 29 20 12 — 114 3-point goals: Golden State 11-34 (Durant 4-11, Thompson 4-13, Young 2-5, Iguodala 1-2, West 0-1, McCaw 0-2), L.A. Lakers 10-25 (Kuzma 4-6, Ball 3-6, Caldwell-Pope 2-8, Hart 1-1, Brewer 0-1, Clarkson 0-1, Lopez 0-2). Fouled out: Bell. Rebounds: Golden State 61 (Durant 11), L.A. Lakers 45 (Randle 11). Assists: Golden State 25 (Durant 8), L.A. Lakers 23 (Ball 6). Total fouls: Golden State 26, L.A. Lakers 26. Technicals: Durant. A: 18,997 (19,060).

Warriors 116, Lakers 114

NFL STANDINGS

NFL PRO BOWL SELECTIONS

AMERICAN CONFERENCE W L T Pct PF East y-New England 11 3 0 .786 395 8 6 0 .571 264 Buffalo 6 8 0 .429 252 Miami N.Y. Jets 5 9 0 .357 285 W L T Pct PF South x-Jacksonville 10 4 0 .714 374 8 6 0 .571 296 Tennessee 4 10 0 .286 319 Houston Indianapolis 3 11 0 .214 225 W L T Pct PF North y-Pittsburgh 11 3 0 .786 344 8 6 0 .571 345 Baltimore Cincinnati 5 9 0 .357 233 0 14 0 .000 207 Cleveland W L T Pct PF West Kansas City 8 6 0 .571 359 7 7 0 .500 311 L.A. Chargers Oakland 6 8 0 .429 281 5 9 0 .357 254 Denver NATIONAL CONFERENCE W L T Pct PF East y-Philadelphia 12 2 0 .857 438 Dallas 8 6 0 .571 336 6 8 0 .429 305 Washington 2 12 0 .143 228 N.Y. Giants W L T Pct PF South 10 4 0 .714 401 New Orleans Carolina 10 4 0 .714 331 9 5 0 .643 318 Atlanta Tampa Bay 4 10 0 .286 285 W L T Pct PF North y-Minnesota 11 3 0 .786 343 8 6 0 .571 358 Detroit 7 7 0 .500 309 Green Bay Chicago 4 10 0 .286 234 W L T Pct PF West L.A. Rams 10 4 0 .714 438 8 6 0 .571 321 Seattle 6 8 0 .429 246 Arizona San Francisco 4 10 0 .286 253 x-clinched playoff spot | y-won division

Jan. 28 | Orlando, Fla. (Subject to Change)

PA 274 306 342 342 PA 209 319 380 368 PA 278 256 305 362 PA 302 255 324 328 PA 279 311 359 355 PA 282 286 282 336 PA 242 339 333 294 PA 272 294 337 337

Monday • Atlanta 24, Tampa Bay 21 Saturday Indianapolis at Baltimore, 3:30 p.m. Minnesota at Green Bay, 7:30 p.m. Sunday Cleveland at Chicago, Noon Atlanta at New Orleans, Noon Denver at Washington, Noon Tampa Bay at Carolina, Noon Miami at Kansas City, Noon L.A. Rams at Tennessee, Noon L.A. Chargers at N.Y. Jets, Noon Detroit at Cincinnati, Noon Buffalo at New England, Noon Jacksonville at San Francisco, 3:05 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Arizona, 3:25 p.m. Seattle at Dallas, 3:25 p.m. Monday, Dec. 25 Pittsburgh at Houston, 3:30 p.m. Oakland at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m. LATE MONDAY

Falcons 24, Buccs 21 Atlanta 7 10 0 7 — 24 Tampa Bay 7 0 7 7 — 21 First Quarter Atl: Hardy 6 pass from Ryan (Bryant kick), 6:54. TB: Howard 30 pass from Winston (Murray kick), 1:52. Second Quarter Atl: Toilolo 0 fumble recovery (Bryant kick), 12:56. Atl: FG Bryant 57, 3:12. Third Quarter TB: M.Evans 42 pass from Winston (Murray kick), 8:31. Fourth Quarter Atl: Freeman 32 run (Bryant kick), 7:58. TB: Humphries 16 pass from Winston (Murray kick), 4:07. A: 62,382. Atl TB First downs 24 22 Total Net Yards 410 373 Rushes-yards 35-201 18-84 Passing 289 209 Punt Returns 2-17 2-30 Kickoff Returns 4-108 2-62 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 0-0 27-35-0 Comp-Att-Int 17-31-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 1-3 2-10 Punts 4-47.8 4-40.3 Fumbles-Lost 2-1 2-0 Penalties-Yards 6-60 7-53 Time of Possession 33:15 26:45 Rushing: Atlanta, Freeman 22-126, Te.Ward 8-40, Ryan 3-29, Gabriel 1-3, Sanu 1-3. Tampa Bay, Barber 13-53, Winston 3-18, Jackson 1-7, Humphries 1-6. Passing: Atlanta, Ryan 17-31-0-212. Tampa Bay, Winston 27-35-0-299. Receiving: Atlanta, Freeman 5-68, J.Jones 3-54, Hardy 2-33, Sanu 2-23, Gabriel 2-16, Hooper 2-12, Te.Ward 1-6. Tampa Bay, M.Evans 5-79, Humphries 5-43, Brate 4-49, Sims 4-6, Barber 3-15, Howard 1-30, Cross 1-23, Godwin 1-18, Auclair 1-14, Martino 1-11, Jackson 1-11. Missed Field Goals: Tampa Bay, Murray 54.

NFL PLAYOFF SCENARIOS WEEK 16

AFC

NFC

OFFENSE (21) QUARTERBACKS (3) — Tom Brady, New England; Ben Roethlisberger, Pittsburgh; Philip Rivers, Los Angeles Chargers WIDE RECEIVERS (4) — Keenan Allen, Los Angeles Chargers; Antonio Brown, Pittsburgh; A.J. Green, Cincinnati; DeAndre Hopkins, Houston RUNNING BACKS (3) — Le’Veon Bell, Pittsburgh; Kareem Hunt, Kansas City; LeSean McCoy, Buffalo FULLBACK (1) — James Develin, New England TIGHT ENDS (2) — Rob Gronkowski, New England; Travis Kelce, Kansas City TACKLES (3) — Taylor Lewan, Tennessee; Donald Penn, Oakland; Alejandro Villanueva, Pittsburgh GUARDS (3) — David DeCastro, Pittsburgh; Richie Incognito, Buffalo; Kelechi Osemele, Oakland CENTERS (2) — Rodney Hudson, Oakland; Maurkice Pouncey, Pittsburgh DEFENSE (18) DEFENSIVE ENDS (3) — Joey Bosa, Los Angeles Chargers; Calais Campbell, Jacksonville; Khalil Mack, Oakland INTERIOR LINEMEN (3) — Geno Atkins, Cincinnati; Jurrell Casey, Tennessee; Malik Jackson, Jacksonville OUTSIDE LINEBACKERS (3) — Jadeveon Clowney, Houston; Von Miller, Denver; Terrell Suggs, Baltimore INSIDE/MIDDLE LINEBACKERS (2) — C.J. Mosley, Baltimore; Ryan Shazier, Pittsburgh CORNERBACKS (4) — A.J. Bouye, Jacksonville; Casey Hayward, Los Angeles Chargers; Jalen Ramsey, Jacksonville; Aqib Talib, Denver FREE SAFETY (1) — Eric Weddle, Baltimore STRONG SAFETIES (2) — Micah Hyde, Buffalo; Reshad Jones, Miami SPECIALISTS (4) PUNTER (1) — Brett Kern, Tennessee PLACEKICKER (1) — Chris Boswell, Pittsburgh RETURN SPECIALIST (1) — Tyreek Hill, Kansas City SPECIAL TEAMER (1) — Matthew Slater, New England

OFFENSE (21) QUARTERBACKS (3) — Drew Brees, New Orleans; Carson Wentz, Philadelphia; Russell Wilson, Seattle WIDE RECEIVERS (4) — Larry Fitzgerald, Arizona; Julio Jones, Atlanta; Adam Thielen, Minnesota; Michael Thomas, New Orleans RUNNING BACKS (3) — Todd Gurley, Los Angeles Rams; Mark Ingram, New Orleans; Alvin Kamara, New Orleans FULLBACK (1) — Kyle Juszczyk, San Francisco TIGHT ENDS (2) — Zach Ertz, Philadelphia; Jimmy Graham, Seattle TACKLES (3) — Lane Johnson, Philadelphia; Tyron Smith, Dallas; Trent Williams, Washington GUARDS (3) — Brandon Brooks, Philadelphia; Zack Martin, Dallas; Brandon Scherff, Washington CENTERS (2) — Travis Frederick, Dallas; Alex Mack, Atlanta DEFENSE (18) DEFENSIVE ENDS (3) — Everson Griffen, Minnesota; Cameron Jordan, New Orleans; Demarcus Lawrence, Dallas INTERIOR LINEMEN (3) — Fletcher Cox, Philadelphia; Aaron Donald, Los Angeles Rams; Gerald McCoy, Tampa Bay OUTSIDE LINEBACKERS (3) — Anthony Barr, Minnesota; Chandler Jones, Arizona; Ryan Kerrigan, Washington INSIDE/MIDDLE LINEBACKERS (2) — Luke Kuechly, Carolina; Bobby Wagner, Seattle CORNERBACKS (4) — Marshon Lattimore, New Orleans; Patrick Peterson, Arizona; Xavier Rhodes, Minnesota; Darius Slay, Detroit FREE SAFETY (1) — Earl Thomas, Seattle STRONG SAFETIES (2) — Landon Collins, New York Giants; Malcolm Jenkins, Philadelphia SPECIALISTS (4) PUNTER (1) — Johnny Hekker, Los Angeles Rams PLACEKICKER (1) — Greg Zuerlein, Los Angeles Rams RETURN SPECIALIST (1) — Pharoh Cooper, Los Angeles Rams SPECIAL TEAMER (1) — Budda Baker, Arizona

NFL LEADERS Week 15 PASSERS Att Cp pct Yds TD Int Rtng Al. Smith, KC 466 316 67.8 3738 25 5 105.4 Brady, NE 516 346 67.1 4163 28 7 104 Brees, NOR 478 343 71.8 3850 21 7 104 Des. Watson, HOU 204 126 61.8 1699 19 8 103 Wentz, PHL 440 265 60.2 3296 33 7 101.9 Stafford, DET 501 332 66.3 3920 25 9 99.1 Goff, LA 439 274 62.4 3503 24 7 98.9 Keenum, MIN 427 290 67.9 3219 20 7 98.9 Cousins, WAS 466 308 66.1 3636 24 9 98.8 A. Rodgers, GBY 238 154 64.7 1675 16 6 97.2 McCown, NYJ 397 267 67.3 2926 18 9 94.5 Ru. Wilson, SEA 503 307 61 3669 30 11 94.1 Rivers, LAC 498 310 62.2 3838 24 10 93.8 J. Winston, TAM 364 233 64 2774 17 8 93.6 Roethlisberger, PIT 532 340 63.9 4025 26 14 92.2 M. Ryan, ATL 448 292 65.2 3490 18 11 92 Bortles, JAC 439 268 61 3147 19 8 89.7 Prescott, DAL 426 270 63.4 2964 21 11 89.6 Ty. Taylor, BUF 355 223 62.8 2314 13 4 89.1 D. Carr, OAK 458 289 63.1 3113 20 10 88.4 Dalton, CIN 411 247 60.1 2860 21 11 87 Newton, CAR 433 261 60.3 2962 21 12 85.4 C. Palmer, ARI 267 164 61.4 1978 9 7 84.4 Manning, NYG 498 315 63.3 3073 18 10 84.2 Brissett, IND 411 245 59.6 2769 11 7 81.7 Cutler, MIA 389 246 63.2 2374 18 14 80.6 Mariota, TEN 393 247 62.8 2823 12 14 79.7 Flacco, BAL 464 298 64.2 2701 14 12 79.1 252 161 63.9 1534 8 8 78 Hundley, GBY 271 162 59.8 1822 7 7 77.8 Trubisky, CHI Brian Hoyer, SNF 205 119 58 1245 4 4 74.1 349 206 59 2285 12 14 73.3 Siemian, DEN PASS RECEIVERS No Yds Avg Long TD RECEPTIONS Anto. Brown, PIT 101 1533 15.2 57 9 Landry, MIA 98 844 8.6 49 8 Michael Thomas, NOR 94 1085 11.5 35 5 De. Hopkins, HOU 92 1313 14.3 72t 12 Fitzgerald, ARI 92 982 10.7 37 5 K. Allen, LAC 88 1197 13.6 51 5 Thielen, MIN 83 1191 14.3 65t 4 G. Tate, DET 82 885 10.8 45t 4 L. Bell, PIT 80 627 7.8 42 2 T. Kelce, KC 79 991 12.5 44 7 Ju. Jones, ATL 76 1215 16.0 53 3 D. Adams, GBY 74 885 12.0 55t 10 Dem. Thomas, DEN 73 840 11.5 40 4 C. McCaffrey, CAR 73 592 8.1 37 5 Doyle, IND 71 611 8.6 26 3 Ty. Hill, KC 69 1074 15.6 79t 7 Del. Walker, TEN 68 755 11.1 42 3 Kamara, NOR 68 684 10.1 38 5 A. Green, CIN 67 980 14.6 77t 8 Baldwin, SEA 67 866 12.9 54 5 Gronkowski, NE 64 1017 15.9 53t 7 D. Bryant, DAL 63 771 12.2 50t 6 Ertz, PHL 63 719 11.4 53 8 Engram, NYG 63 710 11.3 35 6 Du. Johnson, CLE 61 537 8.8 41t 3

REC. YARDS Yds No Anto. Brown, PIT 1533 101 De. Hopkins, HOU 1313 92 Ju. Jones, ATL 1215 76 K. Allen, LAC 1197 88 Thielen, MIN 1191 83 Michael Thomas, NOR 1085 94 Ty. Hill, KC 1074 69 Gronkowski, NE 1017 64 T. Kelce, KC 991 79 Cooks, NE 984 58 Fitzgerald, ARI 982 92 A. Green, CIN 980 67 Mar. Jones, DET 970 54 M. Goodwin, SNF 897 51 Ro. Anderson, NYJ 888 57 G. Tate, DET 885 82 D. Adams, GBY 885 74 Baldwin, SEA 866 67 T. Hilton, IND 852 48 Landry, MIA 844 98 Dem. Thomas, DEN 840 73 Mi. Evans, TAM 839 60 Kupp, LA 804 58 Funchess, CAR 781 58 Jeffery, PHL 781 56 RUSHERS Att Yards L. Bell, PIT 307 1222 K. Hunt, KC 242 1201 Gurley, LA 257 1187 J. Howard, CHI 245 1069 L. McCoy, BUF 259 1057 Ma. Ingram, NOR 204 1045 M. Gordon, LAC 248 931 Fournette, JAC 231 923 C.. Anderson, DEN 211 858 Al. Collins, BAL 174 844 D. Freeman, ATL 174 806 C. Hyde, SNF 204 796 L. Miller, HOU 220 796 Gore, IND 220 793 Crowell, CLE 179 788 E. Elliott, DAL 191 783 Blount, PHL 159 717 M. Lynch, OAK 163 695 D. Lewis, NE 130 674 D. Henry, TEN 140 668 L. Murray, MIN 175 662 J. Stewart, CAR 191 661 Kamara, NOR 99 652 Newton, CAR 114 643 D. Murray, TEN 169 611 T. Coleman, ATL 139 593 Darkwa, NYG 145 587 B. Powell, NYJ 146 581 Perine, WAS 156 547 A. Morris, DAL 113 546 Ru. Wilson, SEA 81 521 Mixon, CIN 157 518 Ja. Allen, BAL 140 517 Abdullah, DET 151 513

Avg Long TD 15.2 57 9 14.3 72t 12 16.0 53 3 13.6 51 5 14.3 65t 4 11.5 35 5 15.6 79t 7 15.9 53t 7 12.5 44 7 17.0 64t 6 10.7 37 5 14.6 77t 8 18.0 58 8 17.6 83t 1 15.6 69t 7 10.8 45t 4 12.0 55t 10 12.9 54 5 17.8 80t 4 8.6 49 8 11.5 40 4 14.0 42t 5 13.9 64 4 13.5 35 7 13.9 53t 9 Avg Long TD 4.0 27 8 5.0 69t 6 4.6 57t 13 4.4 53 7 4.1 48t 6 5.1 72 11 3.8 87t 7 4.0 90t 8 4.1 40 2 4.9 50 5 4.6 44 7 3.9 61 5 3.6 21 3 3.6 21 3 4.4 59 2 4.1 30 7 4.5 68 2 4.3 51t 7 5.2 44 4 4.8 75t 5 3.8 46 6 3.5 60t 6 6.6 74t 7 5.6 69 5 3.6 75t 5 4.3 52 5 4.0 47 4 4.0 75t 4 3.5 30 1 4.8 70 1 6.4 29 3 3.3 25 4 3.7 37 4 3.4 34 3

AFC CLINCHED: New England — AFC East, Pittsburgh — AFC North, Jacksonville — playoff berth. NEW ENGLAND (11-3) vs. Buffalo (8-6), Sunday Clinches home-field advantage throughout AFC playoffs with: — Win and Pittsburgh loss and Jacksonville loss or tie Clinches first-round bye with: — Win and Pittsburgh loss, or — Win and Jacksonville loss or tie, or — Tie and Jacksonville loss PITTSBURGH (11-3) at Houston (4-10), Monday Clinches first-round bye with: — Win and Jacksonville loss or tie, or — Tie and Jacksonville loss JACKSONVILLE (10-4) at San Francisco (4-10), Sunday Clinches AFC South title with: — Win or tie, or — Tennessee loss or tie KANSAS CITY (8-6) vs. Miami (6-8), Sunday Clinches AFC West title with: — Win, or — L.A. Chargers loss, or — Tie and L.A.Chargers tie TENNESSEE (8-6) vs. L.A. Rams (10-4), Sunday Clinches playoff berth with: — Win and Baltimore loss and Buffalo loss

NFC CLINCHED: Philadelphia — NFC East title and first-round bye, Minnesota — NFC North title. PHILADELPHIA (12-2) vs. Oakland (6-8), Monday Clinches home-field advantage throughout NFC playoffs with: — Win, or — Minnesota loss, or — Tie and Minnesota tie MINNESOTA VIKINGS (11-3) at Green Bay (7-7), Saturday Clinches first-round bye with: — Win and Carolina loss or tie, or — Tie and Carolina loss and New Orleans loss or tie and L.A. Rams loss or tie LOS ANGELES RAMS (10-4) at Tennessee (8-6), Sunday Clinches NFC West title with: — Win or tie, or — Seattle loss or tie Clinches playoff berth with: — Detroit loss or tie and Carolina loss and Atlanta loss NEW ORLEANS (10-4) vs. Atlanta (9-5), Sunday Clinches NFC South title with: — Win and Carolina loss Clinches playoff berth with: — Win or tie, or — Dallas-Seattle tie CAROLINA (10-4) vs. Tampa Bay (4-10), Sunday Clinches playoff berth with: — Win or tie, or — Dallas-Seattle tie ATLANTA (9-5) at New Orleans (10-4), Sunday Clinches playoff berth with: — Win, or — Tie and Dallas-Seattle tie and Detroit loss or tie


SPORTS

12.20.2017 • Wednesday • M 2

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB L10 Str Boston 26 7 .788 — 7-3 W-2 Toronto 20 8 .714 3½ 9-1 W-3 New York 16 14 .533 8½ 6-4 L-1 Philadelphia 14 16 .467 10½ 2-8 L-3 Brooklyn 11 18 .379 13 4-6 L-3 Southeast W L Pct GB L10 Str Washington 17 14 .548 — 6-4 W-1 Miami 15 15 .500 1½ 5-5 L-1 Charlotte 11 19 .367 5½ 3-7 W-1 Orlando 11 20 .355 6 3-7 L-5 Atlanta 7 23 .233 9½ 3-7 W-1 W L Pct GB L10 Str Central Cleveland 23 9 .719 — 8-2 L-1 17 13 .567 5 3-7 W-3 Detroit Milwaukee 16 13 .552 5½ 6-4 W-1 Indiana 17 14 .548 5½ 5-5 L-1 Chicago 9 20 .310 12½ 6-4 W-6 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB L10 Str Houston 25 4 .862 — 10-0 W-14 San Antonio 21 10 .677 5 7-3 W-2 New Orleans 15 16 .484 11 4-6 L-2 Memphis 9 21 .300 16½ 2-8 L-1 Dallas 8 23 .258 18 3-7 L-3 Northwest W L Pct GB L10 Str Minnesota 18 13 .581 — 6-4 W-1 Portland 16 14 .533 1½ 4-6 L-1 Denver 16 14 .533 1½ 5-5 L-1 Oklahoma City15 15 .500 2½ 7-3 W-1 Utah 14 17 .452 4 4-6 L-2 Pacific W L Pct GB L10 Str Golden State 24 6 .800 — 9-1 W-9 LA Clippers 11 18 .379 12½ 3-7 L-3 LA Lakers 10 18 .357 13 2-8 L-3 Phoenix 11 21 .344 14 3-7 W-2 Sacramento 10 20 .333 14 4-6 W-1 Tuesday Sacramento 101, Philadelphia 95 Washington 116, New Orleans 106 Milwaukee 119, Cleveland 116 Monday Boston 112, Indiana 111 Charlotte 109, New York 91 Atlanta 110, Miami 104 Chicago 117, Philadelphia 115 Houston 120, Utah 99 Minnesota 108, Portland 107 Oklahoma City 95, Denver 94 Phoenix 97, Dallas 91 San Antonio 109, LA Clippers 91 Golden State 116, LA Lakers 114, OT

COLLEGES

AMERICA’S LINE

NBA STANDINGS Home Away Conf 13-3 13-4 16-5 11-1 9-7 9-4 14-5 2-9 8-10 7-8 7-8 6-7 6-9 5-9 5-10 Home Away Conf 9-6 8-8 7-7 6-7 9-8 9-8 9-8 2-11 6-11 6-8 5-12 6-11 4-10 3-13 5-17 Home Away Conf 13-4 10-5 17-7 9-5 8-8 10-9 10-5 6-8 6-8 10-7 7-7 12-8 6-8 3-12 8-8 Home Away Conf 13-3 12-1 14-2 15-2 6-8 11-6 8-7 7-9 9-12 6-12 3-9 8-10 6-11 2-12 6-16 Home Away Conf 11-6 7-7 15-6 7-8 9-6 8-8 11-2 5-12 7-9 10-4 5-11 8-9 11-5 3-12 8-8 Home Away Conf 10-3 14-3 12-4 6-7 5-11 7-10 6-8 4-10 4-11 4-12 7-9 6-11 5-7 5-13 7-8

Wednesday Toronto at Charlotte, 6 p.m. Indiana at Atlanta, 6:30 p.m. Miami at Boston, 6:30 p.m. Sacramento at Brooklyn, 6:30 p.m. LA Lakers at Houston, 7 p.m. Orlando at Chicago, 7 p.m. Utah at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m. Detroit at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Minnesota at Denver, 8 p.m. San Antonio at Portland, 9 p.m. Memphis at Golden State, 9:30 p.m. Phoenix at LA Clippers, 9:30 p.m.

Cavaliers’ streak ends despite rally vs. Bucks

NFL Favorite Points Underdog ...........................Open Current....................... Saturday RAVENS.................. 13 13.5..................... Colts Vikings .....................9 9 ..................PACKERS Sunday Lions.........................4 5 ..................BENGALS Chargers ..................7 7...........................JETS Rams .....................6.5 6.5 .................. TITANS BEARS ...................6.5 6.5 ..................Browns PANTHERS .............10 10 ....................... Bucs SAINTS ..................5.5 5 .....................Falcons WASHINGTON...........4 3.5..................Broncos CHIEFS....................10 10.5...............Dolphins PATRIOTS ............ 12.5 12......................... Bills Jaguars.....................5 4.5 ................... 49ERS CARDS ...................4.5 4 .......................Giants COWBOYS..............4.5 5 .................Seahawks Monday Steelers..................10 9.5..................TEXANS EAGLES.....................9 9 .....................Raiders COLLEGE FOOTBALL Odds to win the 2017 College Football Championship Open Current Teams 3/1 2/1 Alabama Clemson 20/1 5/2 10/1 7/2 Oklahoma Georgia 30/1 7/2 Note: Oklahoma and Virginia opened as favorites. NBA Points Underdog Favorite Raptors 1 HORNETS 5.5 Kings NETS Pacers 4.5 HAWKS CELTICS 8 Heat 5.5 Jazz THUNDER ROCKETS 14 Lakers 5 Magic BULLS MAVERICKS 2 Pistons 2.5 NUGGETS T’Wolves Spurs 1.5 BLAZERS WARRIORS 10 Grizzlies 6.5 Suns CLIPPERS COLLEGE BASKETBALL Points Underdog Favorite MASSACHUSETTS 4 Georgia St ST. BONA 8.5 Northeastern 24 James Madison FLORIDA DUKE 25 Evansville 2.5 Towson OAKLAND GEORGETOWN 11 N Texas MISSISSIPPI ST 20 Ark-L Rock NEBRASKA 11 Utsa UTAH ST 17 Youngstown St 8 CAL-RIVERSIDE Valparaiso s-Kansas St 8.5 WASHINGTON ST Birthday of Basketball Classic 6.5 St. Joseph’s St. John’s Providence Houston 3 Added Games Bradley 5 SE MISSOURI ST 7 Manhattan HOFSTRA MEMPHIS 11 Siena 15 TENNESSEE Furman N CAROLINA 25 Wofford s- Spokane, WA. NHL Odds Underdog Favorite Maple Leafs BLUE JACKETS -$145/+$125 -$190/+$170 Red Wings FLYERS FLAMES -$120/even Blues Grand Salami: Over/under 16.5 goals. Home team in CAPS © 2017 Benjamin Eckstein

SOCCER English Premier League GP W D L GF GA 18 17 1 0 56 12 Man City Man United 18 13 2 3 39 12 18 12 2 4 32 14 Chelsea Liverpool 18 9 7 2 38 20 Arsenal 18 10 3 5 31 20 18 9 5 4 16 12 Burnley Tottenham 18 9 4 5 31 18 Leicester 18 7 5 6 27 26 Everton 18 7 4 7 24 30 Watford 18 6 4 8 27 33 Huddersfield 18 6 3 9 16 30 Southampton 18 4 6 8 17 24 Brighton 18 4 6 8 14 23 Crystal Palace 18 4 5 9 15 28 West Ham 18 4 5 9 17 32 Bournemouth 18 4 4 10 15 24 Stoke 18 4 4 10 19 39 Newcastle 18 4 3 11 16 27 West Brom 18 2 8 8 13 24 Swansea 18 3 3 12 10 25 Monday Everton 3, Swansea 1 Friday Arsenal vs. Liverpool 1:45 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 23 Everton vs. Chelsea 6:30 a.m. Man City vs. Bournemouth 9 a.m. West Ham vs. Newcastle 9 a.m. Southampton vs. Huddersfield 9 a.m. Stoke vs. West Brom 9 a.m. Swansea vs. Crystal Palace 9 a.m. Brighton vs. Watford 9 a.m. Burnley vs. Tottenham 11:30 a.m. Leicester vs. Man United 1:45 p.m.

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B7

Pts 52 41 38 34 33 32 31 26 25 22 21 18 18 17 17 16 16 15 14 12

AREA SCORES Women’s basketball SLU 77, Tulsa 66 Maryville 76, Fort Wayne 70 UMSL 96, Oakland City 54 St. Louis CC 82, Lincoln Land 68 Lyon (Ark.) 70, Missouri Baptist 53 Men’s basketball SLU 74, Campbell 66 Lindenwood 112, Robert Morris-Springfield 56 Maryville 79, Okla. Christian 62 UMSL 75, Purdue NW 63 Illinois State 71, Illinois-Chicago 70 Missouri State 66, Wright State 50 St. Louis CC 58, Lincoln Land 48 SIUE 88, Chicago State 76 SIUC 102, NC A&T 64 Eastern Illinois 78, Western Illinois 77

WEDNESDAY’S BASKETBALL SCHEDULE

W: SIU Carbondale vs. Kennesaw State, in San Juan, P.R., 1 p.m. M: Bradley at Southeast Missouri, 1 p.m. W: SIU Edwardsville vs. Akron, in Fort Myers, Fla., 3:30 p.m. W: LU-Belleville at Westmont, 5 p.m.

MEN’S BASKETBALL TUESDAY’S NATIONAL SCORES

East Canisius 67, Elon 51 Duquesne 65, Lamar 64 Holy Family 100, Chestnut Hill 76 Iona 82, Holy Cross 68 Jefferson 84, Wilmington (Del.) 81, OT Niagara 79, Cleveland St. 77 Penn St. 80, Binghamton 65 Pittsburgh 74, Delaware St. 68 Syracuse 81, Buffalo 74 South Alabama 80, Mercer 79 Auburn 81, Murray St. 77 Austin Peay 75, Troy 73 Barton 100, Tusculum 97 Belmont 75, W. Kentucky 72 Bucknell 86, Richmond 78 Carson-Newman 84, Limestone 72 Clemson 64, South Carolina 48 Coll. Charles. 80, SC State 64 Covenant 120, Rhodes 110 FIU 91, Florida G.C. 88 Flagler 76, Young Harris 74 Freed-Hardeman 98, Crowley’s Ridge 66 Georgia 80, Georgia Tech 59 Ga. Southern 78, Kennesaw St. 69 High Point 72, W. Carolina 61 Kentucky Wesleyan 95, Lake Erie 79 King (Tenn.) 80, Lenoir-Rhyne 49 LSU 80, Sam Houston 58

Louisiana-Laf. 82, SE Louisiana 74 McNeese St. 84, Texas College 68 Mississippi 85, Texas A&M-CC 63 NC State 81, Robert Morris 69 Queens (NC) 83, Johnson C. Smith 77 Thomas More 83, Franklin 70 UCF 74, Stetson 55 UNC Asheville 67, UNC Greensboro 60 VCU 69, Winthrop 55 Virginia 78, Savannah St. 47 Virginia Tech 63, Presbyterian 55 Midwest Augustana (SD) 84, Wayne (Neb.) 59 Ball St. 79, North Florida 65 Butler 85, Morehead St. 69 Carroll (Wis.) 82, Milwaukee Engineering 51 Cincinnati 77, Ark.-Pine Bluff 49 ETSU 81, Detroit 73 Grand View 95, Yellowstone Christian 68 Hillsdale 78, Davis & Elkins 59 Illinois St. 71, UIC 70 Iowa 92, S. Utah 64 Minn. Duluth 87, N. Michigan 82 Minn. St.-Mankato 69, Waldorf 59 Minot St. 77, Mary 65 Missouri 82, Steph. F. Austin 81 Missouri St. 66, Wright St. 50 Northern St. (SD) 89, Minn. St.-Moorhead 70 Northland 78, Lakeland 77 Northwestern 85, Lewis 48 Northwood (Mich.) 81, Wis.-Parkside 68 Notre Dame 97, Dartmouth 87 Ohio St. 94, The Citadel 65 Rochester (Mich.) 72, Saginaw Valley St. 51 Roosevelt 72, Siena Heights 66 S. Dakota St. 87, Drake 74 S. Illinois 102, NC A&T 64 SIU-Edwardsville 88, Chicago St. 76 Saint Louis 74, Campbell 66 Sioux Falls at Midland, ppd. St. Cloud St. 111, Iowa Wesleyan 68 St. Norbert 75, North Central (Minn.) 62 Upper Iowa 94, Bethany Lutheran 89 Wichita St. 89, Arkansas St. 80 Winona St. 98, Michigan Tech 66 Xavier 81, Marshall 77 Southwest Abilene Christian 109, Arlington Baptist 60 Arkansas 104, Oral Roberts 69 Oklahoma 105, Northwestern St. 68 Oklahoma St. 71, Tulsa 59 SMU 84, Cal Poly 64 Texas A&M 64, N. Kentucky 58 Texas St. 85, Ecclesia 43 Texas Tech 90, FAU 54 UTEP 72, Incarnate Word 66 Far West Arizona St. 95, Longwood 61 Colorado St. 87, Ark.-Fort Smith 73 Montana 86, UC Irvine 68 N. Colorado 91, Wyoming 84 UCLA 85, South Dakota 82 Weber St. 72, Pepperdine 67

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL HOW THE TOP 25 FARED 1. UConn (9-0) beat Oklahoma 88-64. Next: vs. Duquesne, Friday. 2. Notre Dame (10-1) idle. Next: vs. Marquette, Wednesday. 3. Louisville (13-0) idle. Next: at Air Force, Wednesday. 4. South Carolina (10-1) idle. Next: at Temple, Thursday. 5. Mississippi State (11-0) idle. Next: at UNLV, Wednesday. 6. Baylor (10-1) idle. Next: at Kansas State, Thursday, Dec. 28. 7. Tennessee (11-0) idle. Next: at No. 18 Stanford, Thursday. 8. Texas (9-1) idle. Next: at Oklahoma, Thursday, Dec. 28. 9. West Virginia (11-0) idle. Next: vs. Morehead State, Thursday. 10. Oregon (9-2) idle. Next: vs. No. 19 Texas A&M, Thursday. 11. UCLA (8-2) idle. Next: at Fordham, Wednesday. 12. Ohio State (11-2) idle. Next: at Nebraska, Thursday, Dec. 28. 13. Florida State (10-1) idle. Next: at Creighton, Thursday. 14. Duke (8-2) vs. Maine. Next: vs. Wyoming, Thursday. 15. Maryland (10-2) idle. Next: at Coppin State, Wednesday. 16. Missouri (11-1) idle. Next: vs. Illinois, Friday. 17. Oregon State (8-2) idle. Next: vs. UC Davis, Wednesday. 18. Stanford (6-5) idle. Next: vs. No. 7 Tennessee, Thursday. 19. Texas A&M (9-2) idle. Next: vs. Hawaii, Wednesday. 20. Villanova (9-0) idle. Next: at La Salle, Wednesday. 21. Green Bay (10-1) beat Northwestern 63-57. Next: at Wright State, Dec. 28. 22. South Florida (9-2) idle. Next: vs. Dayton, Wednesday. 23. Michigan (10-2) idle. Next: vs. Delaware State, Thursday. 24. California (8-2) idle. Next: at Kentucky, Thursday. 25. Iowa (11-1) idle. Next: vs. Drake, Thursday.

2017 FINAL MLB PAYROLLS Final 2017 payrolls for the 30 major league teams, according to information received by clubs from the commissioner’s office. Figures are for 40-man rosters and include salaries and prorated shares of signing bonuses, earned incentive bonuses, non-cash compensation, buyouts of unexercised options and cash transactions. In some cases, parts of salaries that are deferred are discounted to reflect present-day values.

L.A. Dodgers.......... $243,687,497

Toronto.......................165,179,831

Philadelphia..............114,539,020

N.Y. Yankees.............208,376,830

Seattle.......................157,588,836

Minnesota................. 111,209,586

Detroit.......................190,815,585

Cardinals.............. 155,235,772

Arizona......................105,941,702

Boston.......................189,218,620

Kansas City ............... 153,634,135

Cincinnati....................99,951,375 Pittsburgh...................95,865,735

San Francisco...........186,568,459

N.Y. Mets.................. 148,604,654

Chicago Cubs ........... 186,222,249

Colorado.................. 142,686,009

Washington.............. 178,944,530

Cleveland ................. 136,096,914

Texas ......................... 174,726,776

Houston ....................134,076,102

San Diego.....................71,292,313

L.A. Angels................173,924,908

Atlanta ..................... 122,493,908

Milwaukee..................68,190,606

Baltimore.................. 167,413,907

Miami ........................116,975,560

Total.................4,244,958,541

Chicago White Sox.....87,809,300 Tampa Bay .................81,346,870 Oakland...................... 76,340,952

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES — Sent RHP Jake Bray to Oakland to complete an earlier trade. TAMPA BAY RAYS — Sent C Jonah Heim to Oakland to complete an earlier trade. OAKLAND ATHLETICS — TEXAS RANGERS — Agreed to terms with RHPs Austin Bibens-Dirkx and Erik Goeddel on minor league contracts. National League ATLANTA BRAVES — Released 1B Adrian Gonzalez. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS — Agreed to terms with C Nick Hundley on a one-year contract. BASKETBALL | NBA ATLANTA HAWKS — Assigned F/C Mike Muscala and G Tyler Dorsey to Erie (NBAGL). CHICAGO BULLS — Waived G Kay Felder. DALLAS MAVERICKS — Waived G/F Antonius Cleveland and C Jeff Withey. Signed G Kyles Collinsworth to a two-way contract. FOOTBALL | NFL ARIZONA CARDINALS — Placed WR Brittan Golden on injured reserve. Released LB Kevin Snyder from the practice squad. Re-signed

RB Bronson Hill. Signed LB Vontarrius Dora and WR Rashad Ross to the practice squad. CLEVELAND BROWNS — Placed DB Derrick Kindred on injured reserve. Signed DB B.W.Webb. Signed DB Trevon Hartfield to the practice squad. DENVER BRONCOS — Placed LB Shane Ray on injured reserve. Signed CB Michael Hunter from the practice squad. DETROIT LIONS — Placed WR TJ Jones on injured reserve. Signed WR Andy Jones from the practice squad and CB Adairius Barnes to the practice squad. GREEN BAY PACKERS — Placed QB Aaron Rodgers on injured reserve. Released FB Joe Kerridge. Released QB Jerod Evans from the practice squad. Signed QB Joe Callahan. INDIANAPOLIS COLTS — Released DT Jeremy Liggins from the practice squad. NEW YORK GIANTS — Waived LB Jeremy Cash. Activated DE Romeo Okwara from injured reserve. Signed WR Amba Etta-Tawo to the practice squad. TENNESSEE TITANS — Released TE Jerome Cunningham from the practice squad. Signed DE Johnny Maxey to the practice squad. WASHINGTON REDSKINS — Placed S Montae Nicholson on injured reserve. Signed S Fish

Smithson from the practice squad and DL Tavaris Barnes to the practice squad. HOCKEY | NHL ARIZONA COYOTES — Traded G Michael Leighton to Pittsburgh for F Josh Archibald and G Sean Maguire. Assigned C Dylan Strome to Tucson (AHL). DALLAS STARS — Traded D Jamie Oleksiak to Pittsburgh for a conditional 2019 fourth-round draft pick. EDMONTON OILERS — Recalled LW Anton Slepyshev from Bakersfield (AHL). SOCCER | MLS LA GALAXY — Acquired D Rolf Feltscher on a free transfer. COLLEGE EMORY — Named Cory Greiner men’s soccer coach. MARYLAND — WR DJ Moore will enter the NFL draft. MICHIGAN — Announced QB Shea Patterson will transfer from Mississippi. RUTGERS — Announced the retirement of offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach Jerry Kill.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Cavaliers’ LeBron James reacts after making a shot in front of the Bucks’ Giannis Antetokounmpo (34) and John Henson (31) during the first half Tuesday night. ASSOCIATED PRESS

Giannis Antetokounmpo scored 27 points, Eric Bledsoe had 26 and the host Milwaukee Bucks held off the Cleveland Cavaliers 119-116 on Tuesday night. Milwaukee ended a five-game losing streak to Cleveland. Khris Middleton had 18 points and 10 assists, and Malcolm Brogdon scored 16 points. LeBron James scored 39 points for Cleveland, which had won five in a row and lost for just the second time in its last 20 games. James had seven assists but just one rebound. Kevin Love finished with 21 points. Milwaukee led 103-83 when Cleveland launched a furious comeback.

Back-to-back 3-pointers by Dwyane Wade put the Cavaliers up 107-105, capping a 24-3 run.

NOTEBOOK

Lakers’ Lopez sidelined • Los Angeles Lakers center Brook Lopez has a moderate right ankle sprain and will be reevaluated in three weeks. Lopez is averaging 12.8 points and 4.3 rebounds per game. Other news • Philadelphia center Joel Embiid remained out Tuesday with a back injury. ... Chicago waived backup guard Kay Felder. ... Dallas signed guard Kyle Collinsworth to a two-way contract and requested waivers on guard-forward Antonius Cleveland and center Jeff Withey.

NBA SUMMARIES Kings 101, 76ers 95

Bucks 119, Cavaliers 116

Sacramento: Bogdanovic 1-6 2-2 4, Randolph 12-19 2-4 27, Cauley-Stein 3-10 3-7 9, Fox 1-4 0-2 2, Temple 4-9 1-4 9, Jackson 1-4 0-0 3, Koufos 1-2 0-0 2, Labissiere 1-2 0-0 2, Mason 7-9 0-0 16, Richardson 1-4 1-1 3, Hield 9-19 3-3 24, Carter 0-3 0-0 0. Totals 41-91 12-23 101. Philadelphia: Covington 5-19 5-5 17, Saric 3-10 4-4 11, Johnson 3-5 1-2 7, Simmons 5-6 3-5 13, Redick 3-10 0-0 8, Booker 2-4 2-4 6, Holmes 2-4 0-0 4, Bayless 5-12 1-2 15, McConnell 5-6 1-2 11, Luwawu-Cabarrot 1-5 0-0 3. Totals 34-81 17-24 95. Sacramento 30 18 23 30 — 101 Philadelphia 27 30 21 17 — 95 3-point goals: Sacramento 7-27 (Hield 3-9, Mason 2-2, Randolph 1-3, Jackson 1-3, Richardson 0-1, Temple 0-2, Carter 0-3, Bogdanovic 0-4), Philadelphia 10-35 (Bayless 4-8, Redick 2-5, Covington 2-13, Luwawu-Cabarrot 1-3, Saric 1-5, Holmes 0-1). Rebounds: Sacramento 39 (Temple 8), Philadelphia 53 (Simmons 12). Assists: Sacramento 21 (Temple 4), Philadelphia 21 (Simmons 9). Total fouls: Sacramento 20, Philadelphia 19. Technicals: McConnell. A: 20,558 (21,600).

Cleveland: James 14-22 5-5 39, Crowder 4-10 2-2 10, Love 8-15 0-0 21, Calderon 1-3 3-3 6, Smith 1-3 0-0 2, Osman 0-1 0-0 0, Green 3-5 7-9 13, Thompson 3-4 3-5 9, Wade 5-10 0-0 14, Korver 1-7 0-0 2. Totals 40-80 20-24 116. Milwaukee: Middleton 7-15 3-4 18, Antetokounmpo 8-14 11-12 27, Henson 7-11 1-2 15, Bledsoe 10-16 4-5 26, Dellavedova 2-4 0-0 6, Snell 3-7 0-0 8, Maker 0-0 1-2 1, Liggins 0-2 0-0 0, Brown 1-3 0-0 2, Brogdon 5-10 2-2 16. Totals 43-82 22-27 119. Cleveland 34 24 25 33 — 116 Milwaukee 30 39 29 21 — 119 3-point goals: Cleveland 16-41 (James 6-11, Love 5-11, Wade 4-6, Calderon 1-2, Smith 0-2, Korver 0-4, Crowder 0-5), Milwaukee 11-29 (Brogdon 4-7, Dellavedova 2-3, Bledsoe 2-5, Snell 2-6, Middleton 1-5, Brown 0-1, Liggins 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Cleveland 37 (Love 10), Milwaukee 40 (Antetokounmpo 13). Assists: Cleveland 26 (James 7), Milwaukee 27 (Middleton 10). Total fouls: Cleveland 20, Milwaukee 18. Technicals: Cleveland coach Cavaliers (Defensive three second). A: 18,717 (18,717).

Wizards 116, Pelicans 106

LATE MONDAY

New Orleans: Moore 6-12 0-0 12, Davis 11-21 14-15 37, Cousins 8-17 9-11 26, Rondo 0-3 0-0 0, Holiday 4-11 4-4 13, Cunningham 1-2 0-0 2, Miller 1-5 0-0 2, Diallo 1-2 0-1 2, Asik 0-1 2-2 2, Nelson 1-1 1-2 4, Cooke 1-1 1-2 4, Clark 0-4 2-3 2. Totals 34-80 33-40 106. Washington: Oubre Jr. 3-8 3-4 10, Morris 5-6 2-2 13, Gortat 5-7 0-0 10, Wall 6-18 2-4 18, Beal 9-19 3-4 26, McCullough 0-3 0-0 0, Smith 0-3 0-0 0, Scott 11-15 0-0 24, Mahinmi 2-2 0-0 4, Frazier 1-3 0-0 2, Satoransky 3-4 0-0 6, Meeks 1-4 0-0 3. Totals 46-92 10-14 116. New Orleans 19 36 15 36 — 106 Washington 36 25 32 23 — 116 3-point goals: New Orleans 5-20 (Cooke 1-1, Nelson 1-1, Holiday 1-2, Davis 1-3, Cousins 1-5, Rondo 0-1, Miller 0-1, Clark 0-2, Moore 0-4), Washington 14-35 (Beal 5-11, Wall 4-8, Scott 2-5, Morris 1-1, Meeks 1-3, Oubre Jr. 1-3, Frazier 0-2, Smith 0-2). Rebounds: New Orleans 42 (Cousins 13), Washington 44 (Gortat 14). Assists: New Orleans 20 (Holiday 5), Washington 29 (Wall 10). Total fouls: New Orleans 16, Washington 31. Technicals: New Orleans coach Alvin Gentry, Oubre Jr.. A: 16,529 (20,356).

Golden State: Durant 10-29 12-13 36, Bell 2-5 2-2 6, McGee 4-4 0-0 8, McCaw 1-5 0-0 2, Thompson 6-24 1-2 17, Young 4-8 0-0 10, Casspi 5-9 4-4 14, West 3-9 0-0 6, Looney 4-6 0-0 8, Cook 0-1 0-0 0, Iguodala 4-7 0-0 9. Totals 43-107 19-21 116. L.A. Lakers: Ingram 6-12 7-12 19, Nance Jr. 2-4 4-6 8, Lopez 3-5 0-2 6, Ball 6-12 1-2 16, Caldwell-Pope 4-17 4-4 14, Brewer 0-3 0-0 0, Kuzma 10-16 1-1 25, Randle 5-11 5-8 15, Clarkson 2-7 0-0 4, Hart 3-5 0-0 7. Totals 41-92 22-35 114. Golden State 32 25 26 19 14 — 116 L.A. Lakers 24 29 29 20 12 — 114 3-point goals: Golden State 11-34 (Durant 4-11, Thompson 4-13, Young 2-5, Iguodala 1-2, West 0-1, McCaw 0-2), L.A. Lakers 10-25 (Kuzma 4-6, Ball 3-6, Caldwell-Pope 2-8, Hart 1-1, Brewer 0-1, Clarkson 0-1, Lopez 0-2). Fouled out: Bell. Rebounds: Golden State 61 (Durant 11), L.A. Lakers 45 (Randle 11). Assists: Golden State 25 (Durant 8), L.A. Lakers 23 (Ball 6). Total fouls: Golden State 26, L.A. Lakers 26. Technicals: Durant. A: 18,997 (19,060).

Warriors 116, Lakers 114

NFL STANDINGS

NFL PRO BOWL SELECTIONS

AMERICAN CONFERENCE W L T Pct PF East y-New England 11 3 0 .786 395 8 6 0 .571 264 Buffalo 6 8 0 .429 252 Miami N.Y. Jets 5 9 0 .357 285 W L T Pct PF South x-Jacksonville 10 4 0 .714 374 8 6 0 .571 296 Tennessee 4 10 0 .286 319 Houston Indianapolis 3 11 0 .214 225 W L T Pct PF North y-Pittsburgh 11 3 0 .786 344 8 6 0 .571 345 Baltimore Cincinnati 5 9 0 .357 233 0 14 0 .000 207 Cleveland W L T Pct PF West Kansas City 8 6 0 .571 359 7 7 0 .500 311 L.A. Chargers Oakland 6 8 0 .429 281 5 9 0 .357 254 Denver NATIONAL CONFERENCE W L T Pct PF East y-Philadelphia 12 2 0 .857 438 Dallas 8 6 0 .571 336 6 8 0 .429 305 Washington 2 12 0 .143 228 N.Y. Giants W L T Pct PF South 10 4 0 .714 401 New Orleans Carolina 10 4 0 .714 331 9 5 0 .643 318 Atlanta Tampa Bay 4 10 0 .286 285 W L T Pct PF North y-Minnesota 11 3 0 .786 343 8 6 0 .571 358 Detroit 7 7 0 .500 309 Green Bay Chicago 4 10 0 .286 234 W L T Pct PF West L.A. Rams 10 4 0 .714 438 8 6 0 .571 321 Seattle 6 8 0 .429 246 Arizona San Francisco 4 10 0 .286 253 x-clinched playoff spot | y-won division

Jan. 28 | Orlando, Fla. (Subject to Change)

PA 274 306 342 342 PA 209 319 380 368 PA 278 256 305 362 PA 302 255 324 328 PA 279 311 359 355 PA 282 286 282 336 PA 242 339 333 294 PA 272 294 337 337

Monday • Atlanta 24, Tampa Bay 21 Saturday Indianapolis at Baltimore, 3:30 p.m. Minnesota at Green Bay, 7:30 p.m. Sunday Cleveland at Chicago, Noon Atlanta at New Orleans, Noon Denver at Washington, Noon Tampa Bay at Carolina, Noon Miami at Kansas City, Noon L.A. Rams at Tennessee, Noon L.A. Chargers at N.Y. Jets, Noon Detroit at Cincinnati, Noon Buffalo at New England, Noon Jacksonville at San Francisco, 3:05 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Arizona, 3:25 p.m. Seattle at Dallas, 3:25 p.m. Monday, Dec. 25 Pittsburgh at Houston, 3:30 p.m. Oakland at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m. LATE MONDAY

Falcons 24, Buccs 21 Atlanta 7 10 0 7 — 24 Tampa Bay 7 0 7 7 — 21 First Quarter Atl: Hardy 6 pass from Ryan (Bryant kick), 6:54. TB: Howard 30 pass from Winston (Murray kick), 1:52. Second Quarter Atl: Toilolo 0 fumble recovery (Bryant kick), 12:56. Atl: FG Bryant 57, 3:12. Third Quarter TB: M.Evans 42 pass from Winston (Murray kick), 8:31. Fourth Quarter Atl: Freeman 32 run (Bryant kick), 7:58. TB: Humphries 16 pass from Winston (Murray kick), 4:07. A: 62,382. Atl TB First downs 24 22 Total Net Yards 410 373 Rushes-yards 35-201 18-84 Passing 289 209 Punt Returns 2-17 2-30 Kickoff Returns 4-108 2-62 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 0-0 27-35-0 Comp-Att-Int 17-31-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 1-3 2-10 Punts 4-47.8 4-40.3 Fumbles-Lost 2-1 2-0 Penalties-Yards 6-60 7-53 Time of Possession 33:15 26:45 Rushing: Atlanta, Freeman 22-126, Te.Ward 8-40, Ryan 3-29, Gabriel 1-3, Sanu 1-3. Tampa Bay, Barber 13-53, Winston 3-18, Jackson 1-7, Humphries 1-6. Passing: Atlanta, Ryan 17-31-0-212. Tampa Bay, Winston 27-35-0-299. Receiving: Atlanta, Freeman 5-68, J.Jones 3-54, Hardy 2-33, Sanu 2-23, Gabriel 2-16, Hooper 2-12, Te.Ward 1-6. Tampa Bay, M.Evans 5-79, Humphries 5-43, Brate 4-49, Sims 4-6, Barber 3-15, Howard 1-30, Cross 1-23, Godwin 1-18, Auclair 1-14, Martino 1-11, Jackson 1-11. Missed Field Goals: Tampa Bay, Murray 54.

NFL PLAYOFF SCENARIOS WEEK 16

AFC

NFC

OFFENSE (21) QUARTERBACKS (3) — Tom Brady, New England; Ben Roethlisberger, Pittsburgh; Philip Rivers, Los Angeles Chargers WIDE RECEIVERS (4) — Keenan Allen, Los Angeles Chargers; Antonio Brown, Pittsburgh; A.J. Green, Cincinnati; DeAndre Hopkins, Houston RUNNING BACKS (3) — Le’Veon Bell, Pittsburgh; Kareem Hunt, Kansas City; LeSean McCoy, Buffalo FULLBACK (1) — James Develin, New England TIGHT ENDS (2) — Rob Gronkowski, New England; Travis Kelce, Kansas City TACKLES (3) — Taylor Lewan, Tennessee; Donald Penn, Oakland; Alejandro Villanueva, Pittsburgh GUARDS (3) — David DeCastro, Pittsburgh; Richie Incognito, Buffalo; Kelechi Osemele, Oakland CENTERS (2) — Rodney Hudson, Oakland; Maurkice Pouncey, Pittsburgh DEFENSE (18) DEFENSIVE ENDS (3) — Joey Bosa, Los Angeles Chargers; Calais Campbell, Jacksonville; Khalil Mack, Oakland INTERIOR LINEMEN (3) — Geno Atkins, Cincinnati; Jurrell Casey, Tennessee; Malik Jackson, Jacksonville OUTSIDE LINEBACKERS (3) — Jadeveon Clowney, Houston; Von Miller, Denver; Terrell Suggs, Baltimore INSIDE/MIDDLE LINEBACKERS (2) — C.J. Mosley, Baltimore; Ryan Shazier, Pittsburgh CORNERBACKS (4) — A.J. Bouye, Jacksonville; Casey Hayward, Los Angeles Chargers; Jalen Ramsey, Jacksonville; Aqib Talib, Denver FREE SAFETY (1) — Eric Weddle, Baltimore STRONG SAFETIES (2) — Micah Hyde, Buffalo; Reshad Jones, Miami SPECIALISTS (4) PUNTER (1) — Brett Kern, Tennessee PLACEKICKER (1) — Chris Boswell, Pittsburgh RETURN SPECIALIST (1) — Tyreek Hill, Kansas City SPECIAL TEAMER (1) — Matthew Slater, New England

OFFENSE (21) QUARTERBACKS (3) — Drew Brees, New Orleans; Carson Wentz, Philadelphia; Russell Wilson, Seattle WIDE RECEIVERS (4) — Larry Fitzgerald, Arizona; Julio Jones, Atlanta; Adam Thielen, Minnesota; Michael Thomas, New Orleans RUNNING BACKS (3) — Todd Gurley, Los Angeles Rams; Mark Ingram, New Orleans; Alvin Kamara, New Orleans FULLBACK (1) — Kyle Juszczyk, San Francisco TIGHT ENDS (2) — Zach Ertz, Philadelphia; Jimmy Graham, Seattle TACKLES (3) — Lane Johnson, Philadelphia; Tyron Smith, Dallas; Trent Williams, Washington GUARDS (3) — Brandon Brooks, Philadelphia; Zack Martin, Dallas; Brandon Scherff, Washington CENTERS (2) — Travis Frederick, Dallas; Alex Mack, Atlanta DEFENSE (18) DEFENSIVE ENDS (3) — Everson Griffen, Minnesota; Cameron Jordan, New Orleans; Demarcus Lawrence, Dallas INTERIOR LINEMEN (3) — Fletcher Cox, Philadelphia; Aaron Donald, Los Angeles Rams; Gerald McCoy, Tampa Bay OUTSIDE LINEBACKERS (3) — Anthony Barr, Minnesota; Chandler Jones, Arizona; Ryan Kerrigan, Washington INSIDE/MIDDLE LINEBACKERS (2) — Luke Kuechly, Carolina; Bobby Wagner, Seattle CORNERBACKS (4) — Marshon Lattimore, New Orleans; Patrick Peterson, Arizona; Xavier Rhodes, Minnesota; Darius Slay, Detroit FREE SAFETY (1) — Earl Thomas, Seattle STRONG SAFETIES (2) — Landon Collins, New York Giants; Malcolm Jenkins, Philadelphia SPECIALISTS (4) PUNTER (1) — Johnny Hekker, Los Angeles Rams PLACEKICKER (1) — Greg Zuerlein, Los Angeles Rams RETURN SPECIALIST (1) — Pharoh Cooper, Los Angeles Rams SPECIAL TEAMER (1) — Budda Baker, Arizona

NFL LEADERS Week 15 PASSERS Att Cp pct Yds TD Int Rtng Al. Smith, KC 466 316 67.8 3738 25 5 105.4 Brady, NE 516 346 67.1 4163 28 7 104 Brees, NOR 478 343 71.8 3850 21 7 104 Des. Watson, HOU 204 126 61.8 1699 19 8 103 Wentz, PHL 440 265 60.2 3296 33 7 101.9 Stafford, DET 501 332 66.3 3920 25 9 99.1 Goff, LA 439 274 62.4 3503 24 7 98.9 Keenum, MIN 427 290 67.9 3219 20 7 98.9 Cousins, WAS 466 308 66.1 3636 24 9 98.8 A. Rodgers, GBY 238 154 64.7 1675 16 6 97.2 McCown, NYJ 397 267 67.3 2926 18 9 94.5 Ru. Wilson, SEA 503 307 61 3669 30 11 94.1 Rivers, LAC 498 310 62.2 3838 24 10 93.8 J. Winston, TAM 364 233 64 2774 17 8 93.6 Roethlisberger, PIT 532 340 63.9 4025 26 14 92.2 M. Ryan, ATL 448 292 65.2 3490 18 11 92 Bortles, JAC 439 268 61 3147 19 8 89.7 Prescott, DAL 426 270 63.4 2964 21 11 89.6 Ty. Taylor, BUF 355 223 62.8 2314 13 4 89.1 D. Carr, OAK 458 289 63.1 3113 20 10 88.4 Dalton, CIN 411 247 60.1 2860 21 11 87 Newton, CAR 433 261 60.3 2962 21 12 85.4 C. Palmer, ARI 267 164 61.4 1978 9 7 84.4 Manning, NYG 498 315 63.3 3073 18 10 84.2 Brissett, IND 411 245 59.6 2769 11 7 81.7 Cutler, MIA 389 246 63.2 2374 18 14 80.6 Mariota, TEN 393 247 62.8 2823 12 14 79.7 Flacco, BAL 464 298 64.2 2701 14 12 79.1 252 161 63.9 1534 8 8 78 Hundley, GBY 271 162 59.8 1822 7 7 77.8 Trubisky, CHI Brian Hoyer, SNF 205 119 58 1245 4 4 74.1 349 206 59 2285 12 14 73.3 Siemian, DEN PASS RECEIVERS No Yds Avg Long TD RECEPTIONS Anto. Brown, PIT 101 1533 15.2 57 9 Landry, MIA 98 844 8.6 49 8 Michael Thomas, NOR 94 1085 11.5 35 5 De. Hopkins, HOU 92 1313 14.3 72t 12 Fitzgerald, ARI 92 982 10.7 37 5 K. Allen, LAC 88 1197 13.6 51 5 Thielen, MIN 83 1191 14.3 65t 4 G. Tate, DET 82 885 10.8 45t 4 L. Bell, PIT 80 627 7.8 42 2 T. Kelce, KC 79 991 12.5 44 7 Ju. Jones, ATL 76 1215 16.0 53 3 D. Adams, GBY 74 885 12.0 55t 10 Dem. Thomas, DEN 73 840 11.5 40 4 C. McCaffrey, CAR 73 592 8.1 37 5 Doyle, IND 71 611 8.6 26 3 Ty. Hill, KC 69 1074 15.6 79t 7 Del. Walker, TEN 68 755 11.1 42 3 Kamara, NOR 68 684 10.1 38 5 A. Green, CIN 67 980 14.6 77t 8 Baldwin, SEA 67 866 12.9 54 5 Gronkowski, NE 64 1017 15.9 53t 7 D. Bryant, DAL 63 771 12.2 50t 6 Ertz, PHL 63 719 11.4 53 8 Engram, NYG 63 710 11.3 35 6 Du. Johnson, CLE 61 537 8.8 41t 3

REC. YARDS Yds No Anto. Brown, PIT 1533 101 De. Hopkins, HOU 1313 92 Ju. Jones, ATL 1215 76 K. Allen, LAC 1197 88 Thielen, MIN 1191 83 Michael Thomas, NOR 1085 94 Ty. Hill, KC 1074 69 Gronkowski, NE 1017 64 T. Kelce, KC 991 79 Cooks, NE 984 58 Fitzgerald, ARI 982 92 A. Green, CIN 980 67 Mar. Jones, DET 970 54 M. Goodwin, SNF 897 51 Ro. Anderson, NYJ 888 57 G. Tate, DET 885 82 D. Adams, GBY 885 74 Baldwin, SEA 866 67 T. Hilton, IND 852 48 Landry, MIA 844 98 Dem. Thomas, DEN 840 73 Mi. Evans, TAM 839 60 Kupp, LA 804 58 Funchess, CAR 781 58 Jeffery, PHL 781 56 RUSHERS Att Yards L. Bell, PIT 307 1222 K. Hunt, KC 242 1201 Gurley, LA 257 1187 J. Howard, CHI 245 1069 L. McCoy, BUF 259 1057 Ma. Ingram, NOR 204 1045 M. Gordon, LAC 248 931 Fournette, JAC 231 923 C.. Anderson, DEN 211 858 Al. Collins, BAL 174 844 D. Freeman, ATL 174 806 C. Hyde, SNF 204 796 L. Miller, HOU 220 796 Gore, IND 220 793 Crowell, CLE 179 788 E. Elliott, DAL 191 783 Blount, PHL 159 717 M. Lynch, OAK 163 695 D. Lewis, NE 130 674 D. Henry, TEN 140 668 L. Murray, MIN 175 662 J. Stewart, CAR 191 661 Kamara, NOR 99 652 Newton, CAR 114 643 D. Murray, TEN 169 611 T. Coleman, ATL 139 593 Darkwa, NYG 145 587 B. Powell, NYJ 146 581 Perine, WAS 156 547 A. Morris, DAL 113 546 Ru. Wilson, SEA 81 521 Mixon, CIN 157 518 Ja. Allen, BAL 140 517 Abdullah, DET 151 513

Avg Long TD 15.2 57 9 14.3 72t 12 16.0 53 3 13.6 51 5 14.3 65t 4 11.5 35 5 15.6 79t 7 15.9 53t 7 12.5 44 7 17.0 64t 6 10.7 37 5 14.6 77t 8 18.0 58 8 17.6 83t 1 15.6 69t 7 10.8 45t 4 12.0 55t 10 12.9 54 5 17.8 80t 4 8.6 49 8 11.5 40 4 14.0 42t 5 13.9 64 4 13.5 35 7 13.9 53t 9 Avg Long TD 4.0 27 8 5.0 69t 6 4.6 57t 13 4.4 53 7 4.1 48t 6 5.1 72 11 3.8 87t 7 4.0 90t 8 4.1 40 2 4.9 50 5 4.6 44 7 3.9 61 5 3.6 21 3 3.6 21 3 4.4 59 2 4.1 30 7 4.5 68 2 4.3 51t 7 5.2 44 4 4.8 75t 5 3.8 46 6 3.5 60t 6 6.6 74t 7 5.6 69 5 3.6 75t 5 4.3 52 5 4.0 47 4 4.0 75t 4 3.5 30 1 4.8 70 1 6.4 29 3 3.3 25 4 3.7 37 4 3.4 34 3

AFC CLINCHED: New England — AFC East, Pittsburgh — AFC North, Jacksonville — playoff berth. NEW ENGLAND (11-3) vs. Buffalo (8-6), Sunday Clinches home-field advantage throughout AFC playoffs with: — Win and Pittsburgh loss and Jacksonville loss or tie Clinches first-round bye with: — Win and Pittsburgh loss, or — Win and Jacksonville loss or tie, or — Tie and Jacksonville loss PITTSBURGH (11-3) at Houston (4-10), Monday Clinches first-round bye with: — Win and Jacksonville loss or tie, or — Tie and Jacksonville loss JACKSONVILLE (10-4) at San Francisco (4-10), Sunday Clinches AFC South title with: — Win or tie, or — Tennessee loss or tie KANSAS CITY (8-6) vs. Miami (6-8), Sunday Clinches AFC West title with: — Win, or — L.A. Chargers loss, or — Tie and L.A.Chargers tie TENNESSEE (8-6) vs. L.A. Rams (10-4), Sunday Clinches playoff berth with: — Win and Baltimore loss and Buffalo loss

NFC CLINCHED: Philadelphia — NFC East title and first-round bye, Minnesota — NFC North title. PHILADELPHIA (12-2) vs. Oakland (6-8), Monday Clinches home-field advantage throughout NFC playoffs with: — Win, or — Minnesota loss, or — Tie and Minnesota tie MINNESOTA VIKINGS (11-3) at Green Bay (7-7), Saturday Clinches first-round bye with: — Win and Carolina loss or tie, or — Tie and Carolina loss and New Orleans loss or tie and L.A. Rams loss or tie LOS ANGELES RAMS (10-4) at Tennessee (8-6), Sunday Clinches NFC West title with: — Win or tie, or — Seattle loss or tie Clinches playoff berth with: — Detroit loss or tie and Carolina loss and Atlanta loss NEW ORLEANS (10-4) vs. Atlanta (9-5), Sunday Clinches NFC South title with: — Win and Carolina loss Clinches playoff berth with: — Win or tie, or — Dallas-Seattle tie CAROLINA (10-4) vs. Tampa Bay (4-10), Sunday Clinches playoff berth with: — Win or tie, or — Dallas-Seattle tie ATLANTA (9-5) at New Orleans (10-4), Sunday Clinches playoff berth with: — Win, or — Tie and Dallas-Seattle tie and Detroit loss or tie


STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

BOYS BASKETBALL • VASHON 78, CARDINAL RITTER 71

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 12.20.2017

FOOTBALL • MISSOURI MEDIA FINAL RANKINGS Statewide high school football rankings, as compiled by a 15-member panel of sportswriters and broadcasters. First-place votes in parenthesis. Panel is made up of Dion Clisso, PrepsKC; Sam McDowell, The Kansas City Star; David Kvidahl, STLHighschoolsports.com; Jim Powers, High School Sports Caravan; Cameron Teague, The Columbia Tribune; Tom Rackers, Jefferson City News-Tribune; Mike Scott, Ozone Sports; Harrison Keegan, The Springfield News-Leader; Tim Leible, The Rolla Daily News; Thomas Huitt-Johnson, The St. Joseph News-Press; J.B. Connoley, KRES radio; Chris Pobst, Sikeston Standard-Democrat; Matt King, The Daily Journal; Jason Peake, The Joplin Globe; Josh Mlot, Southeast Missourian.

CLASS 6

Rank, team Record Pts. 1. CBC (15) 13-1 150 2. Blue Springs 11-3 133 3. Eureka 12-1 111 4. Park Hill 10-3 104 5. Rockhurst 8-4 64 6. Hazelwood Central 10-2 59 7. Lindbergh 10-2 55 8. Kirkwood 9-2 49 9. Lee’s Summit West 8-3 45 10. Blue Springs South 5-7 27 Dropped out: No. 6 Rock Bridge Also receiving votes: Rock Bridge (9-2), 21; Ft. Zumwalt West (8-3), 3; Lafayette (7-4), 3; Joplin (8-2), 1

CLASS 5

PAUL BAILLARGEON • Special to STLhighschoolsports.com

Caleb Wilkerson of Cardinal Ritter finds an opening and goes around Phillip Russell of Vashon in a boys basketball game Tuesday at Vashon.

Wolverines hold off Lions, opt for some extra practice BY DAVID KVIDAHL STLhighschoolsports.com

Immediately after the Vashon and Cardinal Ritter boys basketball teams shook hands Tony Irons, ran practice. The Vashon coach, Irons did not like the birthday present his Wolverines gave him. The No. 2 small school in the STLhighschoolsports.com rankings, Vashon (5-2) scored a 78-71 win over Ritter but not before it gave up a 15-point halftime lead with a subpar third quarter. When Irons, 34, saw the lack of execution and effort to start the second half he needed something to grab his team’s attention. The Wolverines had a similar start to their matchup on Saturday with Chaminade. On that night a four-point lead evaporated the Red Devils went on to win. Hence practice on his birthday. “You can’t have a 15-point lead and come out the same way we did against Chaminade in the second half and lay an egg,” Irons said. “It’s the same stuff. We’re not playing hard for an entire game. That’s what it is. It’s youth. It’s a lot of things we have to correct, small stuff. We have to become a better team and we’re not there yet.” Vashon took a 40-25 lead into halftime on the strength of its rebounding. The Wolverines muscled

the smaller Lions off the glass for rebounds and putbacks. Seven players scored in the first half as Vashon got contributions from all over. The No. 8 small school, Ritter (94) was hamstrung as it had to play the first half with senior guard Jared Phillips and junior Resean Pate, who were in foul trouble. Senior 6-foot-6 post Breon Mosby did not play either as he’s out until after the new year with a hand injury. Despite its shortcomings Ritter battled. Behind junior guard Malek Davis and freshman Marion Fleming, the Lions turned it up in the third quarter and went on a 16-5 run to cut the Wolverines’ lead to 45-41 with 2 minutes and 27 seconds to go. Vashon sophomore guard Phil Russell hit a pair of 3-pointers to push the Wolverines ahead 56-48 at the end of the third. But Ritter had lopped off enough of the lead to keep it in the game until the last minute. “I thought the young kids fought. We came in here, in this territory, most teams get 30-balled, running clock on a night like that,” said Ritter coach Randy Reed, who picked up career win 400 on Monday. “With the athletes they’ve got, the talent they’ve got, I patted my guys on the back. There’s no such thing as moral victories, but I can’t get too down on my team after that performance.”

Davis had 21 points and five assists. Flemming stuffed the stat sheet with 20 points, four rebounds, two steals and four blocks. Senior guard Ronald Welch had 13 points, nine rebounds, two steals and a block. Pate finished with 10 points and six rebounds. Ritter was as close as four when Welch hit one of two free throws to make it 66-62 with 1:58 to play. But Vashon junior guard Mario McKinney scored 10 of his game-high 24 points over the remainder of the game to keep the Wolverines in front. McKinney had four rebounds, five steals and a block. Sophomore Cam’Ron Fletcher had six points, nine rebounds and four blocks. Junior guard Cyrus Alexander had 14 points and four rebounds. Sophomore Kobe Clark scored eight points and 11 rebounds. The two-time defending Class 4 champions, Vashon has been on some hard roads in the past but this year will be the roughest yet. St. Mary’s and Sikeston are potential road blocks just to get to the state semifinals. If located in different corners of the bracket, all three teams would be capable of meeting in Springfield. “Until they can put a whole game together we’ll have to figure out ways to motivate them,” Irons said. “Right now we’re not tough and we have to get a whole lot better, quickly.”

WEDNESDAY’S SCHEDULE BOYS BASKETBALL

Sumner (3-4) vs. St. Louis College (5-2) at Miller Career, 5 p.m. Poplar Bluff vs. Haz. Central (7-1) at Waynesville, 5:30 p.m. Orchard Farm (7-1) at Northwest Academy (5-4), 6 p.m. Carbondale (8-2) at Murphysboro (5-0), 6:15 p.m. Crystal City (3-7) at St. Pius X (3-4), 7 p.m. St. Dominic (4-4) at Winfield (5-6), 7 p.m. Edwardsville (6-1) at East St. Louis (4-3), 7:30 p.m. Carnahan (2-6) at Waynesville (2-1), 7:30 p.m.

Chaminade (4-1) at St. Louis U. High (3-3), 7:30 p.m. Nashville (6-2) at Carterville (0-5), 7:45 p.m.

Brussels (0-3) at Orchard Farm (5-3), 6:30 p.m. West County (3-1) at Jefferson (4-4), 7 p.m. Fox (5-4) at Windsor (1-7), 7 p.m. Farmington (3-2) at Sullivan (9-0), 7 p.m. Borgia (4-2) at Notre Dame (5-2), 7:15 p.m. East St. Louis (6-1) at Edwardsville (9-0), 7:30 p.m.

GIRLS BASKETBALL

Litchfield (1-8) at Roxana (3-8), 4 p.m. Union (4-4) at Waynesville (0-1), 4 p.m. Civic Memorial (10-1) at Highland (8-2), 5 p.m. McCluer North (2-5) at Jennings (2-3), 5:30 p.m. New Athens (6-5) at Red Bud (10-4), 6:15 p.m.

GIRLS SWIMMING & DIVING

Holt vs. Fort Zumwalt South at Rec-Plex, 3:30 p.m.

Rank, team Record Pts. 1. Staley (15) 14-0 150 2. Pattonville 9-4 135 3. Fort Zumwalt North 12-1 108 4. Vianney 10-2 103 5. Fort Osage 9-3 92 6. Carthage 9-4 82 7. Liberty-KC 8-3 47 8. Battle 8-4 44 9. Lebanon 8-4 21 10. Jackson 8-3 20 Dropped out: No. 7 Poplar Bluff, No. 9 Sedalia Smith-Cotton Also receiving votes: Poplar Bluff (9-1), 11; William Chrisman (7-4), 5; Sedalia Smith-Cotton (9-1), 3; Ozark (7-5), 2 Webster Groves (5-5), 1

CLASS 4

Rank, team 1. Webb City (15) 2. Ladue 3. Platte County 4. Parkway Central 5. Carl Junction 6. Moberly 7. Harrisonville 8. Hillsboro

Record 15-0 12-3 11-3 12-2 10-2 10-3 9-4 9-4

Pts. 150 131 120 98 88 52 47 39

LW 1 3 2 5 10 9 8 4 7 —

LW 1 5 3 2 4 10 6 8 — —

LW 1 5 3 4 2 — — —

9. Rolla 7-6 27 — 10. Borgia 11-1 19 7 Dropped out: t-No. 4 Kearney, No. 8 Smithville, No. 9 MICDS, No. 10 Camdenton Also receiving votes: Kearney (8-3), 17; St. Joseph Lafayette (9-3), 13; Smithville (9-2), 10; MICDS (9-3), 9; Grain Valley (9-3), 2; Camdenton (8-3), 1; Jefferson City Helias (6-6), 1; West Plains (8-3), 1

CLASS 3

Rank, team Record Pts. LW 1. Maryville (15) 13-2 54 7 T2. Blair Oaks 13-1 120 2 T2. Mt. Vernon 10-5 120 — 4. Center 8-3 90 8 5. Lutheran South 9-4 75 — 6. McCluer South-Berkeley 10-1 73 1 7. Chillicothe 10-2 66 4 8. Park Hills Central 12-1 58 3 9. Eldon 11-2 47 6 10. Reeds Spring 9-3 13 — Dropped out: No. 5 Seneca, No. 9 Hogan Prep Academy, No. 10 Mexico Also receiving votes: Mexico (8-4), 6; Seneca (9-2), 3; Owensville (8-4), 2; Pleasant Hill (5-7), 1; Hogan Prep Academy (10-1), 1

CLASS 2

Rank, team Record Pts. LW 1. Lamar (15) 14-0 150 1 2. Lutheran North 12-1 126 3 3. Lafayette County 14-1 122 6 4. Trinity 9-1 95 2 5. Ava 12-1 90 4 6. Clark County 9-5 84 — 7. North Callaway 11-2 42 7 8. Cardinal Ritter 9-2 31 5 9. Caruthersville 9-3 25 — 10. Palmyra 9-3 18 9 Dropped out: No. 8 Lexington, No. 10 South Callaway Also receiving votes: Holden (5-7), 13; Lathrop (9-3), 13; Malden (10-2), 6; South Callaway (10-2), 5; Mtn. Grove (7-5), 2

CLASS 1

Rank, team Record Pts. LW 1. Monroe City (15) 15-0 150 1 2. Valle 12-2 135 3 3. East Buchanan 11-3 113 — 4. Lockwood 11-3 98 — 5. Lincoln 11-1 65 5 6. Westran 10-3 60 — T7. Princeton 12-1 55 8 T7. Thayer 9-4 55 — 9. Marceline 11-1 38 2 10. Hamilton 10-2 26 4 Dropped out: No. 6 Pierce City, No. 7 Fayette, No. 9 Hayti, No. 10 Sarcoxie Also receiving votes: Hayti (9-3), 12; Pierce City (11-1), 10; South Shelby (6-6), 4; Plattsburg (7-5), 2; Sarcoxie (9-2), 2; Adrian (10-2), 1; Crest Ridge (10-2), 1

BASKETBALL • TUESDAY’S BOX SCORES BOYS

Lebanon, Ill. 5 7 12 4 28 Staunton 7 13 10 18 48 L (6-3): D. Krumsieg 15, Grob 6, L. Krumsieg 4, Goetter 3. FG 9 (3), FT 7-15. S (3-3): No statistics reported. 14 21 10 32 77 Trinity McCluer North 17 17 17 21 72 T (5-2): No statistics reported. M (3-4): Ray 18, Butler 17, Daniels 15, Evans 11, Lee 4, Sharp 4, Mosley-Mull 3. FG 22 (3), FT 25-35. 7 13 14 8 42 Fath.McGivney Civic Mem. 10 13 18 10 51 F (4-8): Shumate 18, Weir 12, Loeffler 8, Jones 4. FG 17 (2), FT 6-11. C (7-3): Adams 18, Zupan 11, Clark 8, Withers 6, Denney 4, Buhs 2, Coleman 2. FG 22 (2), FT 5-11.

Tuesday’s basketball box scores are sponsored by Maryville University.

13 14 10 13 50 O’Fallon Bellvl. West 24 24 17 7 72 O (4-4): Hodge 19, Bowman 12, Hayes 8, Herring 3, Anthony 2, Gibson 2, Ritchie 2, Shieppe 2. FG 19 (8), FT 4-10. B (8-1): Liddell 26, Smith 10, Romious 9, Randolph Jr. 8, Brazil III 7, Mosby 5, Williams 5, Woodie 2. FG 28 (6), FT 10-13.

Collinsville 15 14 15 21 65 Granite City 7 6 16 16 45 C (5-5): Taylor 22, Jones 15, Lemp 13, Harrison 9, Baker 3, McGovern 3. FG 21 (6), FT 17-23. G (2-8): Gordon 13, Mason 9, Watson 8, Moore 6, Wiley 5, Green 3, Grote 1. FG 17 (3), FT 8-20.

11 10 15 19 55 Hancock Valley Park 18 6 9 11 44 H (7-2): Warren 16, Richardson 15, Moultrie 10, Turner 7, Davis 5, Burton 2. FG 19 (6), FT 11-16. V (6-4): No statistics reported.

12 4 15 4 35 Bellvl. East Alton 11 15 12 20 58 B (5-5): Lacey 10, Adams 8, Yates 6, May 3, Barnes 2, Hughes 2, K. Waller 2, Williams 2. FG 10 (3), FT 12-16. A (7-1): M. Smith 14, Caldwell 12, Clay 11, Miller 5, J. Rivers 4, D. Smith 4, J. Jones 2, K. Rivers 2, Sanders 2, Woods 2. FG 19 (5), FT 15-21.

10 8 8 18 44 Windsor Fox 14 13 9 13 49 W (3-6): Schmidt 12, E. Worley 8, C. Hartmann 7, Alford 4, Van Etten 4, E. Worley 4, Harrison 3, P. Hartmann 2. FG 18 (2), FT 6-10. F (3-7): No statistics reported. 10 10 9 12 41 Gtwy Snce Ac. Bayless 18 11 8 7 44 G (3-6): No statistics reported. B (2-5): Johnson 21, Bates 7, Dorsey 6, Gunther 5, Herndon 5. FG 18 (3), FT 5-13. Columbia 14 11 14 8 47 Carlyle 8 7 16 13 44 Co (4-4): Peterson 15, J. Holmes 10, Hubler 7, O’Connor 6, Khoury 4, Worley 3, Germain 2. FG 18 (3), FT 8-12. Ca (3-6): Boatright 14, Siever 14, N. Becker 8, Darr 4, Reinacher 4. FG 17 (3), FT 7-15. 14 20 13 17 64 Mascoutah Jerseyville 14 18 9 15 56 M (5-4): No statistics reported. J (4-6): Hall 22, Wittman 17, Tuttle 5, Goldacker 4, Gibson 2, Jackson 2, Ross 2, Shaw 2. FG 20 (10), FT 6-13.

GIRLS

Hancock 14 8 11 16 49 Valley Park 14 17 24 5 60 H (5-4): Turner 18, Stewart 8, Stroup 8, Warren 8, Mitchell 4, Moultrie 3. FG 18 (3), FT 10-29. V (3-4): No statistics reported. Gateway STEM 10 0 8 14 32 Riverview 8 7 5 9 29 G (9-3): No statistics reported. R (2-7): Dickens 14, Dukes 8, Johnson 7. FG 12 (3), FT 2-5. O’Fallon 16 17 17 7 57 Bellvl. West 5 2 5 18 30 O (9-1): Thurwalker 18, Bell 10, Best 7, Schloer 6, Bullock 5, Gordon 5, Chamberlain 4, C. Keller 2. FG 21 (1), FT 14-27. B (1-10): Nunn 12, Quarles 11, Brown 3, Coughlin 2, Jones 2. FG 12 (3), FT 3-6. S. Boone 7 10 9 13 39 Hermann 17 20 22 6 65 H (8-2): Godat 19, B. Grosse 17, Stiers 10, Brune 6, Schneider 5, H. Grosse 3, Winkelmann 3, Williman 2. FG 24 (5), FT 12-19.

FOOTBALL • MISSOURI MEDIA ALL-STATE TEAMS (Selected by a panel of statewide media, including David Kvidahl of STLhighschoolsports.com)

CLASS 6

Coach of the year: Scott Pingel, CBC FIRST-TEAM OFFENSE QB Brett Gabbert, junior, 6-0, 190, CBC ATH Mann McGruder, senior, 6-1, 195, Ritenour RB Hassan Haskins, senior, 6-2, 210, Eureka RB Phillip Brooks, senior, 5-9, 175, Lee’s Summit West RB Bryan Bradford, junior, 6-0, 210, CBC R/E Ronnie Bell, senior, 6-0, 170, Park Hill R/E Cameron Brown, senior, 6-1, 175, CBC R/E David Grenia, senior, 6-3, 173, Lindbergh OL Conrad Rowley, junior, 6-4, 270, Blue Springs OL TJ Kennedy, senior, 6-6, 320, Lee’s Summit OL Kobe Brandt, senior, 6-6, 300, Rock Bridge OL Brendan Schlittler, senior, 6-5, 300, Eureka OL Ben Stater, junior, 6-4, 310, CBC K Nathan Rockwell, senior, 5-9, 160, Blue Springs South FIRST-TEAM DEFENSE DL Daniel Parker, senior, 6-3, 250, Blue Springs DL Khristian Boyd, senior, 6-4, 340, Blue Springs DL Jacob Sykes, senior, 6-4, 262, Rockhurst DL Logan Wells, senior, 6-4, 230, Lindbergh LB Theo Price, senior, 5-11, 190, Lindbergh LB Brighton Ramirez, senior, 6-2, 230, Park Hill LB Caleb Marquez, senior, 6-3, 240, Blue Springs LB Jaden Brown, junior, 6-0, 205, CBC DB Malik Billingsley, junior 5-8, 160, CBC DB Lonnell Boyd, senior, 5-8, 170, CBC DB Mario Goodrich, senior, 6-2, 185, Lee’s Summit West DB Devin Haney, senior, 6-3, 175, Park Hill DB Dallas Craddieth, senior, 6-0, 190, Hazelwood Central P Jack Zgiet, senior, 6-0, 175, Ritenour SECOND-TEAM OFFENSE QB Billy Maples, senior, 6-3, 220, Park Hill ATH Jake Verschoore, senior, 5-10, 202, Fort Zumwalt West RB Dorian Clayton, senior, 5-10, 215, Park Hill RB Nate Peat, junior, 5-9, 180, Rock Bridge RB Brady McCanles, senior, 6-0, 191, Rockhurst R/E Tre Wheaton, senior, 6-1, 175, Blue Springs R/E Marquis Majors, senior, 6-0, 175, Fort Zumwalt West R/E Rico Payton, senior, 6-1, 175, Lindbergh OL Joe Glazer, senior, 6-2, 240, Rockhurst OL Brady Feeny, sophomore, 6-5, 280, CBC OL Blake Rogenhofer, senior, 6-4, 285, Ritenour OL Zach Starforth, senior, 6-6, 305, Raymore-Peculiar OL Robert Greco, senior, 6-2, 260, Hazelwood Central K Tom Burke, senior, 6-2, 180, Eureka SECOND-TEAM DEFENSE DL Brendan Carter, senior, 5-10, 215, Eureka DL Faze Thomas, junior, 6-6, 300, CBC DL Arvell Ferguson, junior, 6-4, 215, Kirkwood DL Don Hammers, senior, 5-11, 235, Rock Bridge LB Austin Stuller, junior, 6-1, 225, Blue Springs LB Tyriek Lewis, senior, 5-11, 205, Kirkwood LB Ben Hunnius, senior, 6-1, 210, Eureka LB Bryson Clayton, senior, 6-4, 215, Rock Bridge DB Azaiah Bello, senior, 6-2, 215, Blue Springs DB Cole Elwood, junior, 6-0, 175, Fox DB Jake Malven, senior, 6-0, 185, Lafayette DB Michael Muelberger, senior, 6-1, 185, Blue Springs South P Josh Dodge, senior, 6-0, 175, Blue Springs

CLASS 5

Coach of the year: Phil Lite, Staley FIRST-TEAM OFFENSE QB Kaleb Eleby, senior, 6-1, 205, Pattonville ATH John Raybourn, senior, 6-2, 187, Staley RB Robert Rawie, senior, 6-0, 185, Liberty RB Clyde Price, junior 6-0, 210, North Kansas City RB Kyren Williams, junior, 5-10, 190, Vianney R/E Dominic Gicinto, senior, 5-10, 180, Raytown R/E J.D. Benbow, senior, 6-3, 225, Staley R/E Charles Shelton IV, senior, 5-10, 155, Pattonville

OL Ben Becker, senior, 6-5, 285, Park Hill South OL Caron Coleman, senior, 6-2, 290, Pattonville OL Marcus Greer, senior, 6-3, 305, Chaminade OL Trevor Blankenship, senior, 6-1, 240, Staley OL Jackson Pfender, junior, 6-3, 291, Staley K Brady Pohl, junior, 6-1, 190, Liberty North FIRST-TEAM DEFENSE DL Zach Elam, senior, 6-4, 227, Staley DL Tyler Miller, senior, 6-4, 248, Staley DL Daniel Carson, senior, 6-5, 270, William Chrisman DL Qadry Taalib, senior 5-9, 220, Vianney LB Mason Middleton, senior, 5-9, 165, Fort Osage LB Dakari Streeter, senior, 6-2, 230, Pattonville LB Tre Morris, senior, 5-10, 195, Battle LB Donovan Prott, junior, 5-8, 205, Pattonville DB David Ellison, senior, 5-10, 185, Pattonville DB Adrian Kenney, senior, 5-11, 165, Battle DB Antionne Nunn, junior, 5-10, 175, Belton DB Joe Barnes, senior, 5-8, 175, Liberty P Thomas Henrichs, senior, 6-5, 205, Liberty SECOND-TEAM OFFENSE QB Alex Huston, senior, 6-1, 185, Glendale ATH Cooper Callis, senior, 6-2, 195, Jackson RB Cole Mueller, senior, 6-1, 182, Holt RB John Berry, senior, 5-11, 210, Lebanon RB Blake Delacruz, junior 5-7, 165, Parkview R/E Drey Tyler, senior, 5-8, 165, Battle R/E Arkell Smith, senior, 6-2, 180, Carthage R/E Jordan Kent, junior, 5-11, 165, Jackson OL Trevor Olson, senior, 6-1, 285, Fort Zumwalt North OL Jan Salmon, senior, 6-3, 340, Fort Osage OL Owen Leible, senior, 6-2, 285, Jackson OL Brad Papez, senior, 6-6, 265, Timberland OL Bobby Lawrence, senior, 6-7, 300, St. Joseph Central K Brayden Swearingin, senior, 6-2, 175, Willard SECOND-TEAM DEFENSE DL Brayden Swope, senior, 6-4, 270, Liberty DL Ikenna Enechukwu, senior, 6-4, 240, Ruskin DL Otto Ulberg, senior, 6-3, 275, Fort Osage DL Kader Ndiaye, senior, 6-2, 295, Fort Zumwalt North LB Jordan Guilfoy, senior, 6-1, 200, Vianney LB Jaylin Vaughn, junior, 6-0, 240, Fort Zumwalt North LB Robby Blanchard, senior, 6-2, 227, Staley LB Colton Winder, junior, 6-2, 205, Carthage DB Blake Murphy, junior, 5-9, 166, Fort Osage DB Kelvyn Mason, junior, 6-1, 165, William Chrisman DB Dijion Walls, senior, 6-1, 185, Hazelwood East DB Ty Glendenning, junior, 6-1, 180, Lebanon P Jake Wilson, junior, 6-0, 190, Staley

CLASS 4

Coach of the year: Mike Tarpey, Ladue FIRST-TEAM OFFENSE QB Tanner Clarkson, senior, 6-2, 195, Platte County ATH Jordan Jackson, senior, 5-9, 155, Ladue RB Aaron Harris, senior, 6-0, 215, Cape Central RB Durand Henderson, junior, 6-1, 180, Webb City RB Rayquion Weston, junior, 5-11, 190, Carl Junction R/E Jonathon Watts, senior, 6-5, 195, Platte County R/E Devin Richardson, senior, 5-10, 175, Platte County R/E Blaize Klossner, junior, 5-10, 160, Rolla OL Landon Bebee, senior, 6-3, 290, Webb City OL Alex Updike, senior, 6-5, 260, Kearney OL Johnathan Chapman, senior, 6-0, 230, Moberly OL Michael Thompson, senior, 6-4, 315, Parkway North OL Taylor Howard, senior, 6-1, 245, Carl Junction K Parker Lacina, senior, 6-0, 190, Platte County FIRST-TEAM DEFENSE DL Michael Smith, senior, 6-0, 235, Platte County DL Jaylen Sykes, senior, 6-6, 345, Ladue DL Elijah Robinson, senior, 6-2, 190, Webb City DL Zeke Wall, senior, 6-0, 275, Carl Junction LB Ben Heimann, senior, 5-9, 185, Moberly LB BJ Buchanan, senior, 6-0, 200, Ladue LB Dakota Schmidt, senior, 6-0, 195, Platte County

LB Jordon Rogers, senior, 5-11, 190, Webb City DB Diego Bernard, senior, 6-0, 170, St. Joseph Lafayette DB Alex Gaskill, junior, 6-1, 175, Webb City DB DeAndre Campbell, senior, 6-1, 205, Parkway Central DB Jalani Williams, junior, 6-2, 170, Parkway North P Nick Gelina, senior, 6-0, 180, Moberly SECOND-TEAM OFFENSE QB Josh Pritchett, senior, 6-4, 175, Rolla ATH Ben Watson, junior, 5-11, 180, Fort Zumwalt East RB Brayden Lidgard, sophomore, 5-8, 160, West Plains RB Michael Keller, senior, 5-9, 160, Hillsboro RB Andrew Hunt, junior, 5-11, 180, Ladue R/E Dale Chesson, junior, 6-0, 180, Ladue R/E Gunnar Carpenter, senior 6-1, 165, Kearney R/E Arther Green, senior, 6-3, 190, Parkway Central OL Tyren Clark, senior, 6-6, 300, Raytown South OL Zach Bodway, senior, 5-10, 190, Hillsboro OL Brenden McClure, senior, 6-6, 250, North County OL Grant Fowler, senior, 6-1, 240, Webb City OL Nick Wortham, senior, 6-1, 305, Fort Zumwalt East K PJ Hensley, senior, 5-10, 195, Ladue SECOND-TEAM DEFENSE DL Cam Meeks, senior, 6-3, 225, Ladue DL Nick Kruse, senior, 6-0, 228, Harrisonville DL Cartez Crook-Jones, senior, 6-5, 240, Grandview-KC DL Julian McBride, sophomore 6-2, 245, Cape Central LB Kobe Cummings, senior, 6-0, 195, Platte County LB Javis Berlin, senior, 6-0, 205, Webb City LB Jacob Perez, senior, 6-1, 220, Smithville LB Matthew Sinnot, senior, 5-11, 185, Borgia DB Chris Broeder, senior, 6-0, 175, Borgia DB Nate Moore, senior, 5-10, 150, Parkway Central DB Lane Jett, junior, 5-10, 170, West Plains DB JP Post, senior, 5-9, 145, Platte County P Brady Monks, senior, 6-2, 165, Kearney

CLASS 3

Coach of the year: Matt Webb, Maryville FIRST-TEAM OFFENSE QB Nolan Hair, junior, 5-10, 180, Blair Oaks ATH Amaun Ryan, senior, 6-1, 175, KC Center RB Jeremiah Wilson, senior, 6-2, 205, KC Center RB Cody Schrader, senior, 5-10, 215, Lutheran South RB Eli Dowis, junior, 6-3, 175, Maryville R/E Will Hopkins, junior, 6-0, 170, Park Hills Central R/E RJ Benkelman, senior, 6-2, 190, Lutheran South R/E Ben Thomas, junior, 5-8, 165, Blair Oaks OL Sidney Gates, senior, 6-2, 280, KC Center OL Jalen Sundell, senior, 6-6, 260, Maryville OL Jacob Search, senior, 6-0, 220, Maryville OL Walker Graves, senior, 6-2, 305, Chillicothe OL Riley Pope, senior, 6-3, 265, Eldon K Parker Boyce, junior, 5-11, 170, Southern Boone FIRST-TEAM DEFENSE DL Terrese Aaron, senior, 6-0, 270, Mexico DL Tyler Curd, junior, 5-10, 236, Oak Grove DL Averyon West, senior, 6-5, 315, McCluer South-Berkeley DL Cayden Heisner, senior, 6-1, 200, Mount Vernon LB Mac Bowers, senior, 6-0, 217, Richmond LB Brady Atwell, senior, 6-2, 175, Maryville LB Will Boswell, junior, 6-0, 210, Mount Vernon LB John Lillig, senior, 6-2, 225, St. Pius X-KC DB Brett Shaffer, senior, 6-1, 175, Chillicothe DB Trevon Alexander, senior, 6-2, 190, Richmond DB Braydan Pritchett, junior, 5-11, 175, Blair Oaks DB Sam Stichnote, junior, 6-2, 175, Southern Boone P Zach Haynes, junior, 6-1, 170, Potosi SECOND-TEAM OFFENSE QB Vito Orlando, junior, 6-2, 190, Lutheran South ATH Jace Bland, senior, 6-2, 220, Park Hills Central RB Josh Kille, senior, 5-8, 211, Chillicothe RB Isaiah Merida, senior, 6-0, 180, Eldon RB Kelly Newton, senior, 5-10, 176, Reeds Spring R/E Daveon Trust, senior, 6-3, 190,

McCluer South-Berkeley R/E Grant Conway, junior, 6-1, 165, St. James R/E Eliyh D’Obron, sophomore, 6-2, 170, Odessa OL Tanner Friend, junior, 5-11, 215, Park Hills Central OL JT Taylor, sophomore, 6-3, 290, Lutheran South OL Justin Cobb, senior, 6-2, 210, Blair Oaks OL Coy Butterworth, senior, 6-3, 240, Monett OL Jordan Jenkins, senior, 5-11, 305, McCluer South-Berkeley K Jayden Buttram, senior, 5-11, 170, Mount Vernon SECOND-TEAM DEFENSE DL Isaac Boyd, junior, 5-8, 244, Ste. Genevieve DL Julian Rangel, sophomore, 6-1, 295, KC Center DL Lorenzo Phillips, senior, 5-11, 165, McCluer South-Berkeley DL Nick Wilson, senior, 6-3, 185, St. James LB Tyler Houchin, junior, 6-0, 210, Maryville LB Darrell Bailey, senior, 6-0, 215, Hogan Prep LB Isaiah Henders, junior, 6-2, 185, KC Center LB Keshon Spraggins, senior, 6-3, 240, Lutheran South DB Tate Oglesby, sophomore 6-1, 175, Maryville DB Tyson Riley, junior, 6-2, 200, Springfield Catholic DB Cameron Holman, senior, 6-0, 175, Mexico DB Andrew Montemayor, senior, 5-11, 165, Mount Vernon P Jack Willard, senior, 6-0, 165, Chillicothe

CLASS 2

Coach of the year: Scott Bailey, Lamar FIRST-TEAM OFFENSE QB Isaiah Williams, junior, 5-10, 160, Trinity ATH Kinser Madison, senior, 6-1, 205, Lafayette County RB Adam Reno, senior, 6-0, 215, North Callaway RB Tray Stevenson, senior, 5-10, 205, Malden RB Canaan Brooks, senior, 5-11, 205, Lutheran North R/E Chase Looney, senior, 6-2, 245, Lafayette County R/E Jameson Williams, junior, 6-2, 175, Cardinal Ritter R/E Marcus Washington, junior, 6-2, 170, Trinity OL Cliff Mason, senior, 5-8, 275, Lafayette County OL Ira Henry, sophomore, 6-5, 320, Trinity OL Jack Buford, junior, 6-5, 305, Lutheran North OL Seth Fullerton, senior, 6-2, 220, Lamar OL Caleb Gouge, junior, 6-5, 305, Lamar K Noah Mencer, senior, 5-11, 165, Palmyra FIRST-TEAM DEFENSE DL Cooper Lucas, senior, 5-10, 215, Lamar DL TW Ayers, senior, 6-2, 240, Lamar DL Ronnie Perkins, senior, 6-4, 260, Lutheran North DL J.J. McCoy, senior, 6-3, 235, Lafayette County LB Elijah Thirkield, senior, 5-11, 205, Lafayette County LB Shammond Cooper, junior, 6-2, 190, Trinity LB Devin Ruffin, senior, 6-0, 225, Lutheran North LB Travis Bailey, junior, 6-2, 210, Lamar DB Kaiden Davenport, senior, 5-8, 176, Centralia DB Jared Phillips, senior, 5-10, 175, Cardinal Ritter DB Trenton Rankin, senior, 5-9, 165, Lafayette County DB Nathaniel Bentrup, senior, 6-1, 173, St. Joseph LeBlond P Zack Rarick, senior, 5-9, 165, Jefferson SECOND-TEAM OFFENSE QB Robert Hunter, junior, 6-5, 190, Tolton ATH Koel Orchard, senior, 6-0, 170, Mtn. View-Liberty RB Kevin Edwards, junior, 5-6, 160, Macon RB Q’nairies Anderson, junior, 5-11, 180, Charleston RB Donovan Marshall, senior, 6-0, 190, Lutheran North R/E Nick Beckett, senior, 6-0, 180, Tolton R/E Isaac Mauldin, senior, 5-10, 175, Fair Grove R/E Bryce Strawn, senior, 6-2, 195, Caruthersville OL Payton Wallace, junior 6-1, 255, Lexington OL Ryan Wilson, senior, 6-3, 275, University Academy OL Shane Levett, senior 6-1, 200, Macon OL Kyle Golbricht, junior 6-2, 275, Clark County OL Jackson Wilson, senior, 6-1, 237, Malden K Tim Branneky, senior, 6-0, 180, Lutheran North SECOND-TEAM DEFENSE DL Mason Owen, senior, 6-0, 225, Trenton DL D’Vion Harris, junior, 6-2, 215, Lutheran North

DL Jack Hunziker, senior, 6-2, 250, Clark County DL Jeffrey Smoot, senior, 6-1, 251, Macon LB Mason Gash, sophomore, 6-0, 190, Lafayette County LB Jordan Delashmutt, junior, 5-11, 204, North Callaway LB Jeremy Tucker, senior, 6-3, 215, Charleston LB Peyton Plunkett, senior, 6-2, 205, Palmyra DB Carter Otwell, senior, 6-2, 185, Mountain Grove DB Braxden Neil, senior, 6-3, 185, Palmyra DB Zeb Riney, senior, 5-10, 155, Clark County DB Isaac Trice, junior, 5-9, 155, Trinity P Cade Hicks, senior, 6-4, 160, Macon

CLASS 1

Coach of the year: David Kirby, Monroe City FIRST-TEAM OFFENSE QB Andrew Smith, senior, 6-2, 180, Princeton ATH LaTroy Harper, senior, 6-2, 185, Hamilton RB Matthew Graham, senior, 5-9, 170, Plattsburg RB Rylan Chrisman, senior, 5-9, 170, Marceline RB Zach Osborn, junior, 5-9, 146, Monroe City R/E Seth Kenagy, senior, 6-2, 155, East Buchanan R/E Tyler Blum, junior, 6-4, 186, Valle R/E Blaine Millburn, senior, 6-2, 190, Princeton OL Tyler Trosper, junior, 5-10, 245, Hamilton OL Alex Wilson, senior, 6-0, 243, Monroe City OL Ben Miller, junior 6-3, 250, Westran OL Nathan Sayre, junior, 6-1, 230, Marceline OL Dalton Kertz, senior 6-2, 240, Valle K Raul Reyes, senior 5-8, 225, Sarcoxie FIRST-TEAM DEFENSE DL Ivory Winters, junior, 6-1, 205, Hayti DL Max Hays, sophomore, 6-2, 200, Monroe City DL Jonathon Saxbury, junior 6-1, 288, Monroe City DL Drew Dailey, senior 6-1, 330, Princeton LB Brendan Meyer, senior, 6-1, 245, Valle LB Cole Pennewell, senior, 6-0, 200, Monroe City LB Isaiah Estes, junior, 5-11, 205, Fayette LB Kenney Pully, senior, 5-11, 225, Hamilton DB Dawson Shively, senior, 6-2, 170, Monroe City DB Ryan Grein, junior, 6-2, 160, Valle DB Ethan Kilgore, sophomore, 6-5, 190, East Buchanan DB Clayton Sweeten, senior, 5-10, 145, Princeton P Gavin Davis, junior, 5-9, 160, West Platte SECOND-TEAM OFFENSE QB Tyler Schottel, junior, 5-9, 135, East Buchanan ATH Brock Wood, junior, 6-0, 165, South Shelby RB Carter Roth, junior 5-9, 170, Valle RB Garrett Young, senior 5-9, 165, Thayer RB Derek Stephens, senior, 6-3, 205, Lincoln R/E Levi Terrell, senior, 6-2, 155, Marceline R/E Chris Evans, senior, 6-3, 210, Westran R/E Conner Karl, senior, 5-11, 170, East Buchanan OL Garrett MacMillan, senior, 6-1, 259, Valle OL Anson Johnson, junior 6-0, 260, Adrian OL Dawson Russell, senior, 6-1, 215, Thayer OL Michael Ryan, senior, 6-5, 200, Monroe City OL Boog Chandler, senior, 6-1, 240, Cass-Midway K Cullen Bruner, sophomore, 5-10, 150, Marceline SECOND-TEAM DEFENSE DL Jake Boatwright, senior, 6-4, 250, East Buchanan DL Trevor Ganaway, senior, 6-4, 370, Marceline DL Owen Schweigert, senior 6-3, 196, Valle DL Garrett Trosper, senior, 5-10, 255, Hamilton LB Dillon Brisbin, senior, 5-11, 170, Wellington-Napoleon LB Breck Hancock, senior, 6-1, 220, Paris LB Alex Young, junior, 5-11, 185, Westran LB Cory Moubry, senior, 5-10, 210, Knox County DB Tanner Coffman, senior, 5-9, 155, Princeton DB Chris Comerford, senior, 5-9, 165, Sarcoxie DB Trey Shannon, junior, 6-1, 170, Wellington-Napoleon DB Jay Moore, senior, 5-9, 155, Hayti P Jayme McGowan, junior, 5-11, 160, Windsor-Sedalia


STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

BOYS BASKETBALL • VASHON 78, CARDINAL RITTER 71

M 2 • WeDneSDAy • 12.20.2017

FOOTBALL • MISSOURI MEDIA FINAL RANKINGS Statewide high school football rankings, as compiled by a 15-member panel of sportswriters and broadcasters. First-place votes in parenthesis. Panel is made up of Dion Clisso, PrepsKC; Sam McDowell, The Kansas City Star; David Kvidahl, STLHighschoolsports.com; Jim Powers, High School Sports Caravan; Cameron Teague, The Columbia Tribune; Tom Rackers, Jefferson City News-Tribune; Mike Scott, Ozone Sports; Harrison Keegan, The Springfield News-Leader; Tim Leible, The Rolla Daily News; Thomas Huitt-Johnson, The St. Joseph News-Press; J.B. Connoley, KRES radio; Chris Pobst, Sikeston Standard-Democrat; Matt King, The Daily Journal; Jason Peake, The Joplin Globe; Josh Mlot, Southeast Missourian.

CLASS 6

Rank, team Record Pts. 1. CBC (15) 13-1 150 2. Blue Springs 11-3 133 3. Eureka 12-1 111 4. Park Hill 10-3 104 5. Rockhurst 8-4 64 6. Hazelwood Central 10-2 59 7. Lindbergh 10-2 55 8. Kirkwood 9-2 49 9. Lee’s Summit West 8-3 45 10. Blue Springs South 5-7 27 Dropped out: No. 6 Rock Bridge Also receiving votes: Rock Bridge (9-2), 21; Ft. Zumwalt West (8-3), 3; Lafayette (7-4), 3; Joplin (8-2), 1

CLASS 5

PAUL BAILLARGEON • Special to STLhighschoolsports.com

Caleb Wilkerson of Cardinal Ritter finds an opening and goes around Phillip Russell of Vashon in a boys basketball game Tuesday at Vashon.

Wolverines hold off Lions, opt for some extra practice BY DAVID KVIDAHL STLhighschoolsports.com

Immediately after the Vashon and Cardinal Ritter boys basketball teams shook hands, Tony Irons ran practice. The Vashon coach, Irons did not like the birthday present his Wolverines gave him. The No. 2 small school in the STLhighschoolsports.com rankings, Vashon (5-2) scored a 78-71 win over Ritter but not before it gave up a 15-point halftime lead with a subpar third quarter. When Irons, 34, saw the lack of execution and effort to start the second half he needed something to grab his team’s attention. The Wolverines had a similar start to their matchup on Saturday with Chaminade. On that night a four-point lead evaporated the Red Devils went on to win. Hence practice on his birthday. “You can’t have a 15-point lead and come out the same way we did against Chaminade in the second half and lay an egg,” Irons said. “It’s the same stuff. We’re not playing hard for an entire game. That’s what it is. It’s youth. It’s a lot of things we have to correct, small stuff. We have to become a better team and we’re not there yet.” Vashon took a 40-25 lead into halftime on the strength of its rebounding. The Wolverines muscled

the smaller Lions off the glass for rebounds and putbacks. Seven players scored in the first half as Vashon got contributions from all over. The No. 8 small school, Ritter (94) was hamstrung as it had to play the first half with senior guard Jared Phillips and junior Resean Pate, who were in foul trouble. Senior 6-foot-6 post Breon Mosby did not play either as he’s out until after the new year with a hand injury. Despite its shortcomings Ritter battled. Behind junior guard Malek Davis and freshman Marion Fleming, the Lions turned it up in the third quarter and went on a 16-5 run to cut the Wolverines’ lead to 45-41 with 2 minutes and 27 seconds to go. Vashon sophomore guard Phil Russell hit a pair of 3-pointers to push the Wolverines ahead 56-48 at the end of the third. But Ritter had lopped off enough of the lead to keep it in the game until the last minute. “I thought the young kids fought. We came in here, in this territory, most teams get 30-balled, running clock on a night like that,” said Ritter coach Randy Reed, who picked up career win 400 on Monday. “With the athletes they’ve got, the talent they’ve got, I patted my guys on the back. There’s no such thing as moral victories, but I can’t get too down on my team after that performance.”

Davis had 21 points and five assists. Flemming stuffed the stat sheet with 20 points, four rebounds, two steals and four blocks. Senior guard Ronald Welch had 13 points, nine rebounds, two steals and a block. Pate finished with 10 points and six rebounds. Ritter was as close as four when Welch hit one of two free throws to make it 66-62 with 1:58 to play. But Vashon junior guard Mario McKinney scored 10 of his game-high 24 points over the remainder of the game to keep the Wolverines in front. McKinney had four rebounds, five steals and a block. Sophomore Cam’Ron Fletcher had six points, nine rebounds and four blocks. Junior guard Cyrus Alexander had 14 points and four rebounds. Sophomore Kobe Clark scored eight points and 11 rebounds. The two-time defending Class 4 champions, Vashon has been on some hard roads in the past but this year will be the roughest yet. St. Mary’s and Sikeston are potential road blocks just to get to the state semifinals. If located in different corners of the bracket, all three teams would be capable of meeting in Springfield. “Until they can put a whole game together we’ll have to figure out ways to motivate them,” Irons said. “Right now we’re not tough and we have to get a whole lot better, quickly.”

WEDNESDAY’S SCHEDULE BOYS BASKETBALL

Sumner (3-4) vs. St. Louis College (5-2) at Miller Career, 5 p.m. Poplar Bluff vs. Haz. Central (7-1) at Waynesville, 5:30 p.m. Orchard Farm (7-1) at Northwest Academy (5-4), 6 p.m. Carbondale (8-2) at Murphysboro (5-0), 6:15 p.m. Crystal City (3-7) at St. Pius X (3-4), 7 p.m. St. Dominic (4-4) at Winfield (5-6), 7 p.m. Edwardsville (6-1) at East St. Louis (4-3), 7:30 p.m. Carnahan (2-6) at Waynesville (2-1), 7:30 p.m.

Chaminade (4-1) at St. Louis U. High (3-3), 7:30 p.m. Nashville (6-2) at Carterville (0-5), 7:45 p.m.

Brussels (0-3) at Orchard Farm (5-3), 6:30 p.m. West County (3-1) at Jefferson (4-4), 7 p.m. Fox (5-4) at Windsor (1-7), 7 p.m. Farmington (3-2) at Sullivan (9-0), 7 p.m. Borgia (4-2) at Notre Dame (5-2), 7:15 p.m. East St. Louis (6-1) at Edwardsville (9-0), 7:30 p.m.

GIRLS BASKETBALL

Litchfield (1-8) at Roxana (3-8), 4 p.m. Union (4-4) at Waynesville (0-1), 4 p.m. Civic Memorial (10-1) at Highland (8-2), 5 p.m. McCluer North (2-5) at Jennings (2-3), 5:30 p.m. New Athens (6-5) at Red Bud (10-4), 6:15 p.m.

GIRLS SWIMMING & DIVING

Holt vs. Fort Zumwalt South at Rec-Plex, 3:30 p.m.

Rank, team Record Pts. 1. Staley (15) 14-0 150 2. Pattonville 9-4 135 3. Fort Zumwalt North 12-1 108 4. Vianney 10-2 103 5. Fort Osage 9-3 92 6. Carthage 9-4 82 7. Liberty-KC 8-3 47 8. Battle 8-4 44 9. Lebanon 8-4 21 10. Jackson 8-3 20 Dropped out: No. 7 Poplar Bluff, No. 9 Sedalia Smith-Cotton Also receiving votes: Poplar Bluff (9-1), 11; William Chrisman (7-4), 5; Sedalia Smith-Cotton (9-1), 3; Ozark (7-5), 2 Webster Groves (5-5), 1

CLASS 4

Rank, team 1. Webb City (15) 2. Ladue 3. Platte County 4. Parkway Central 5. Carl Junction 6. Moberly 7. Harrisonville 8. Hillsboro

Record 15-0 12-3 11-3 12-2 10-2 10-3 9-4 9-4

Pts. 150 131 120 98 88 52 47 39

LW 1 3 2 5 10 9 8 4 7 —

LW 1 5 3 2 4 10 6 8 — —

LW 1 5 3 4 2 — — —

9. Rolla 7-6 27 — 10. Borgia 11-1 19 7 Dropped out: t-No. 4 Kearney, No. 8 Smithville, No. 9 MICDS, No. 10 Camdenton Also receiving votes: Kearney (8-3), 17; St. Joseph Lafayette (9-3), 13; Smithville (9-2), 10; MICDS (9-3), 9; Grain Valley (9-3), 2; Camdenton (8-3), 1; Jefferson City Helias (6-6), 1; West Plains (8-3), 1

CLASS 3

Rank, team Record Pts. LW 1. Maryville (15) 13-2 54 7 T2. Blair Oaks 13-1 120 2 T2. Mt. Vernon 10-5 120 — 4. Center 8-3 90 8 5. Lutheran South 9-4 75 — 6. McCluer South-Berkeley 10-1 73 1 7. Chillicothe 10-2 66 4 8. Park Hills Central 12-1 58 3 9. Eldon 11-2 47 6 10. Reeds Spring 9-3 13 — Dropped out: No. 5 Seneca, No. 9 Hogan Prep Academy, No. 10 Mexico Also receiving votes: Mexico (8-4), 6; Seneca (9-2), 3; Owensville (8-4), 2; Pleasant Hill (5-7), 1; Hogan Prep Academy (10-1), 1

CLASS 2

Rank, team Record Pts. LW 1. Lamar (15) 14-0 150 1 2. Lutheran North 12-1 126 3 3. Lafayette County 14-1 122 6 4. Trinity 9-1 95 2 5. Ava 12-1 90 4 6. Clark County 9-5 84 — 7. North Callaway 11-2 42 7 8. Cardinal Ritter 9-2 31 5 9. Caruthersville 9-3 25 — 10. Palmyra 9-3 18 9 Dropped out: No. 8 Lexington, No. 10 South Callaway Also receiving votes: Holden (5-7), 13; Lathrop (9-3), 13; Malden (10-2), 6; South Callaway (10-2), 5; Mtn. Grove (7-5), 2

CLASS 1

Rank, team Record Pts. LW 1. Monroe City (15) 15-0 150 1 2. Valle 12-2 135 3 3. East Buchanan 11-3 113 — 4. Lockwood 11-3 98 — 5. Lincoln 11-1 65 5 6. Westran 10-3 60 — T7. Princeton 12-1 55 8 T7. Thayer 9-4 55 — 9. Marceline 11-1 38 2 10. Hamilton 10-2 26 4 Dropped out: No. 6 Pierce City, No. 7 Fayette, No. 9 Hayti, No. 10 Sarcoxie Also receiving votes: Hayti (9-3), 12; Pierce City (11-1), 10; South Shelby (6-6), 4; Plattsburg (7-5), 2; Sarcoxie (9-2), 2; Adrian (10-2), 1; Crest Ridge (10-2), 1

BASKETBALL • TUESDAY’S BOX SCORES BOYS

Lebanon, Ill. 5 7 12 4 28 Staunton 7 13 10 18 48 L (6-3): D. Krumsieg 15, Grob 6, L. Krumsieg 4, Goetter 3. FG 9 (3), FT 7-15. S (3-3): No statistics reported. Trinity 14 21 10 32 77 McCluer North 17 17 17 21 72 T (5-2): No statistics reported. M (3-4): Ray 18, Butler 17, Daniels 15, Evans 11, Lee 4, Sharp 4, Mosley-Mull 3. FG 22 (3), FT 25-35. Fath.McGivney 7 13 14 8 42 10 13 18 10 51 Civic Mem. F (4-8): Shumate 18, Weir 12, Loeffler 8, Jones 4. FG 17 (2), FT 6-11. C (7-3): Adams 18, Zupan 11, Clark 8, Withers 6, Denney 4, Buhs 2, Coleman 2. FG 22 (2), FT 5-11. 13 14 10 13 50 O’Fallon Bellvl. West 24 24 17 7 72 O (4-4): Hodge 19, Bowman 12, Hayes 8, Herring 3, Anthony 2, Gibson 2, Ritchie 2, Shieppe 2. FG 19 (8), FT 4-10. B (8-1): Liddell 26, Smith 10, Romious 9, Randolph Jr. 8, Brazil III 7, Mosby 5, Williams 5, Woodie 2. FG 28 (6), FT 10-13. 11 10 15 19 55 Hancock Valley Park 18 6 9 11 44 H (7-2): Warren 16, Richardson 15, Moultrie 10, Turner 7, Davis 5, Burton 2. FG 19 (6), FT 11-16. V (6-4): No statistics reported. 10 8 8 18 44 Windsor Fox 14 13 9 13 49 W (3-6): Schmidt 12, E. Worley 8, C. Hartmann 7, Alford 4, Van Etten 4, E. Worley 4, Harrison 3, P. Hartmann 2. FG 18 (2), FT 6-10. F (3-7): No statistics reported. 10 10 9 12 41 Gtwy Snce Ac. Bayless 18 11 8 7 44 G (3-6): No statistics reported. B (2-5): Johnson 21, Bates 7, Dorsey 6, Gunther 5, Herndon 5. FG 18 (3), FT 5-13. 14 11 14 8 47 Columbia Carlyle 8 7 16 13 44 Co (4-4): Peterson 15, J. Holmes 10, Hubler 7, O’Connor 6, Khoury 4, Worley 3, Germain 2. FG 18 (3), FT 8-12. Ca (3-6): Boatright 14, Siever 14, N. Becker 8, Darr 4, Reinacher 4. FG 17 (3), FT 7-15. Mascoutah 14 20 13 17 64 Jerseyville 14 18 9 15 56 M (5-4): No statistics reported. J (4-6): Hall 22, Wittman 17, Tuttle 5, Goldacker 4, Gibson 2, Jackson 2, Ross 2, Shaw 2. FG 20 (10), FT 6-13.

Tuesday’s basketball box scores are sponsored by Maryville University. Collinsville 15 14 15 21 65 7 6 16 16 45 Granite City C (5-5): Taylor 22, Jones 15, Lemp 13, Harrison 9, Baker 3, McGovern 3. FG 21 (6), FT 17-23. G (2-8): Gordon 13, Mason 9, Watson 8, Moore 6, Wiley 5, Green 3, Grote 1. FG 17 (3), FT 8-20. 12 4 15 4 35 Bellvl. East Alton 11 15 12 20 58 B (5-5): Lacey 10, Adams 8, Yates 6, May 3, Barnes 2, Hughes 2, K. Waller 2, Williams 2. FG 10 (3), FT 12-16. A (7-1): M. Smith 14, Caldwell 12, Clay 11, Miller 5, J. Rivers 4, D. Smith 4, J. Jones 2, K. Rivers 2, Sanders 2, Woods 2. FG 19 (5), FT 15-21.

GIRLS

Hancock 14 8 11 16 49 Valley Park 14 17 24 5 60 H (5-4): Turner 18, Stewart 8, Stroup 8, Warren 8, Mitchell 4, Moultrie 3. FG 18 (3), FT 10-29. V (3-4): No statistics reported. 8 14 32 Gateway STEM 10 0 Riverview 8 7 5 9 29 G (9-3): No statistics reported. R (2-7): Dickens 14, Dukes 8, Johnson 7. FG 12 (3), FT 2-5. 16 17 17 7 57 O’Fallon Bellvl. West 5 2 5 18 30 O (9-1): Thurwalker 18, Bell 10, Best 7, Schloer 6, Bullock 5, Gordon 5, Chamberlain 4, C. Keller 2. FG 21 (1), FT 14-27. B (1-10): Nunn 12, Quarles 11, Brown 3, Coughlin 2, Jones 2. FG 12 (3), FT 3-6. 7 10 9 13 39 S. Boone Hermann 17 20 22 6 65 H (8-2): Godat 19, B. Grosse 17, Stiers 10, Brune 6, Schneider 5, H. Grosse 3, Winkelmann 3, Williman 2. FG 24 (5), FT 12-19.

FOOTBALL • MISSOURI MEDIA ALL-STATE TEAMS Selected by a panel of statewide media, including David Kvidahl of STLhighschoolsports.com CLASS 6

Coach of the year: Scott Pingel, CBC FIRST-TEAM OFFENSE QB Brett Gabbert, junior, 6-0, 190, CBC ATH Mann McGruder, senior, 6-1, 195, Ritenour RB Hassan Haskins, senior, 6-2, 210, Eureka RB Phillip Brooks, senior, 5-9, 175, Lee’s Summit West RB Bryan Bradford, junior, 6-0, 210, CBC R/E Ronnie Bell, senior, 6-0, 170, Park Hill R/E Cameron Brown, senior, 6-1, 175, CBC R/E David Grenia, senior, 6-3, 173, Lindbergh OL Conrad Rowley, junior, 6-4, 270, Blue Springs OL TJ Kennedy, senior, 6-6, 320, Lee’s Summit OL Kobe Brandt, senior, 6-6, 300, Rock Bridge OL Brendan Schlittler, senior, 6-5, 300, Eureka OL Ben Stater, junior, 6-4, 310, CBC K Nathan Rockwell, senior, 5-9, 160, Blue Springs South FIRST-TEAM DEFENSE DL Daniel Parker, senior, 6-3, 250, Blue Springs DL Khristian Boyd, senior, 6-4, 340, Blue Springs DL Jacob Sykes, senior, 6-4, 262, Rockhurst DL Logan Wells, senior, 6-4, 230, Lindbergh LB Theo Price, senior, 5-11, 190, Lindbergh LB Brighton Ramirez, senior, 6-2, 230, Park Hill LB Caleb Marquez, senior, 6-3, 240, Blue Springs LB Jaden Brown, junior, 6-0, 205, CBC DB Malik Billingsley, junior 5-8, 160, CBC DB Lonnell Boyd, senior, 5-8, 170, CBC DB Mario Goodrich, senior, 6-2, 185, Lee’s Summit West DB Devin Haney, senior, 6-3, 175, Park Hill DB Dallas Craddieth, senior, 6-0, 190, Hazelwood Central P Jack Zgiet, senior, 6-0, 175, Ritenour SECOND-TEAM OFFENSE QB Billy Maples, senior, 6-3, 220, Park Hill ATH Jake Verschoore, senior, 5-10, 202, Fort Zumwalt West RB Dorian Clayton, senior, 5-10, 215, Park Hill RB Nate Peat, junior, 5-9, 180, Rock Bridge RB Brady McCanles, senior, 6-0, 191, Rockhurst R/E Tre Wheaton, senior, 6-1, 175, Blue Springs R/E Marquis Majors, senior, 6-0, 175, Fort Zumwalt West R/E Rico Payton, senior, 6-1, 175, Lindbergh OL Joe Glazer, senior, 6-2, 240, Rockhurst OL Brady Feeny, sophomore, 6-5, 280, CBC OL Blake Rogenhofer, senior, 6-4, 285, Ritenour OL Zach Starforth, senior, 6-6, 305, Raymore-Peculiar OL Robert Greco, senior, 6-2, 260, Hazelwood Central K Tom Burke, senior, 6-2, 180, Eureka SECOND-TEAM DEFENSE DL Brendan Carter, senior, 5-10, 215, Eureka DL Faze Thomas, junior, 6-6, 300, CBC DL Arvell Ferguson, junior, 6-4, 215, Kirkwood DL Don Hammers, senior, 5-11, 235, Rock Bridge LB Austin Stuller, junior, 6-1, 225, Blue Springs LB Tyriek Lewis, senior, 5-11, 205, Kirkwood LB Ben Hunnius, senior, 6-1, 210, Eureka LB Bryson Clayton, senior, 6-4, 215, Rock Bridge DB Azaiah Bello, senior, 6-2, 215, Blue Springs DB Cole Elwood, junior, 6-0, 175, Fox DB Jake Malven, senior, 6-0, 185, Lafayette DB Michael Muelberger, senior, 6-1, 185, Blue Springs South P Josh Dodge, senior, 6-0, 175, Blue Springs

CLASS 5

Coach of the year: Phil Lite, Staley FIRST-TEAM OFFENSE QB Kaleb Eleby, senior, 6-1, 205, Pattonville ATH John Raybourn, senior, 6-2, 187, Staley RB Robert Rawie, senior, 6-0, 185, Liberty RB Clyde Price, junior 6-0, 210, North Kansas City RB Kyren Williams, junior, 5-10, 190, Vianney R/E Dominic Gicinto, senior, 5-10, 180, Raytown R/E J.D. Benbow, senior, 6-3, 225, Staley R/E Charles Shelton IV, senior, 5-10, 155, Pattonville

OL Ben Becker, senior, 6-5, 285, Park Hill South OL Caron Coleman, senior, 6-2, 290, Pattonville OL Marcus Greer, senior, 6-3, 305, Chaminade OL Trevor Blankenship, senior, 6-1, 240, Staley OL Jackson Pfender, junior, 6-3, 291, Staley K Brady Pohl, junior, 6-1, 190, Liberty North FIRST-TEAM DEFENSE DL Zach Elam, senior, 6-4, 227, Staley DL Tyler Miller, senior, 6-4, 248, Staley DL Daniel Carson, senior, 6-5, 270, William Chrisman DL Qadry Taalib, senior 5-9, 220, Vianney LB Mason Middleton, senior, 5-9, 165, Fort Osage LB Dakari Streeter, senior, 6-2, 230, Pattonville LB Tre Morris, senior, 5-10, 195, Battle LB Donovan Prott, junior, 5-8, 205, Pattonville DB David Ellison, senior, 5-10, 185, Pattonville DB Adrian Kenney, senior, 5-11, 165, Battle DB Antionne Nunn, junior, 5-10, 175, Belton DB Joe Barnes, senior, 5-8, 175, Liberty P Thomas Henrichs, senior, 6-5, 205, Liberty SECOND-TEAM OFFENSE QB Alex Huston, senior, 6-1, 185, Glendale ATH Cooper Callis, senior, 6-2, 195, Jackson RB Cole Mueller, senior, 6-1, 182, Holt RB John Berry, senior, 5-11, 210, Lebanon RB Blake Delacruz, junior 5-7, 165, Parkview R/E Drey Tyler, senior, 5-8, 165, Battle R/E Arkell Smith, senior, 6-2, 180, Carthage R/E Jordan Kent, junior, 5-11, 165, Jackson OL Trevor Olson, senior, 6-1, 285, Fort Zumwalt North OL Jan Salmon, senior, 6-3, 340, Fort Osage OL Owen Leible, senior, 6-2, 285, Jackson OL Brad Papez, senior, 6-6, 265, Timberland OL Bobby Lawrence, senior, 6-7, 300, St. Joseph Central K Brayden Swearingin, senior, 6-2, 175, Willard SECOND-TEAM DEFENSE DL Brayden Swope, senior, 6-4, 270, Liberty DL Ikenna Enechukwu, senior, 6-4, 240, Ruskin DL Otto Ulberg, senior, 6-3, 275, Fort Osage DL Kader Ndiaye, senior, 6-2, 295, Fort Zumwalt North LB Jordan Guilfoy, senior, 6-1, 200, Vianney LB Jaylin Vaughn, junior, 6-0, 240, Fort Zumwalt North LB Robby Blanchard, senior, 6-2, 227, Staley LB Colton Winder, junior, 6-2, 205, Carthage DB Blake Murphy, junior, 5-9, 166, Fort Osage DB Kelvyn Mason, junior, 6-1, 165, William Chrisman DB Dijion Walls, senior, 6-1, 185, Hazelwood East DB Ty Glendenning, junior, 6-1, 180, Lebanon P Jake Wilson, junior, 6-0, 190, Staley

CLASS 4

Coach of the year: Mike Tarpey, Ladue FIRST-TEAM OFFENSE QB Tanner Clarkson, senior, 6-2, 195, Platte County ATH Jordan Jackson, senior, 5-9, 155, Ladue RB Aaron Harris, senior, 6-0, 215, Cape Central RB Durand Henderson, junior, 6-1, 180, Webb City RB Rayquion Weston, junior, 5-11, 190, Carl Junction R/E Jonathon Watts, senior, 6-5, 195, Platte County R/E Devin Richardson, senior, 5-10, 175, Platte County R/E Blaize Klossner, junior, 5-10, 160, Rolla OL Landon Bebee, senior, 6-3, 290, Webb City OL Alex Updike, senior, 6-5, 260, Kearney OL Johnathan Chapman, senior, 6-0, 230, Moberly OL Michael Thompson, senior, 6-4, 315, Parkway North OL Taylor Howard, senior, 6-1, 245, Carl Junction K Parker Lacina, senior, 6-0, 190, Platte County FIRST-TEAM DEFENSE DL Michael Smith, senior, 6-0, 235, Platte County DL Jaylen Sykes, senior, 6-6, 345, Ladue DL Elijah Robinson, senior, 6-2, 190, Webb City DL Zeke Wall, senior, 6-0, 275, Carl Junction LB Ben Heimann, senior, 5-9, 185, Moberly LB BJ Buchanan, senior, 6-0, 200, Ladue LB Dakota Schmidt, senior, 6-0, 195, Platte County

LB Jordon Rogers, senior, 5-11, 190, Webb City DB Diego Bernard, senior, 6-0, 170, St. Joseph Lafayette DB Alex Gaskill, junior, 6-1, 175, Webb City DB DeAndre Campbell, senior, 6-1, 205, Parkway Central DB Jalani Williams, junior, 6-2, 170, Parkway North P Nick Gelina, senior, 6-0, 180, Moberly SECOND-TEAM OFFENSE QB Josh Pritchett, senior, 6-4, 175, Rolla ATH Ben Watson, junior, 5-11, 180, Fort Zumwalt East RB Brayden Lidgard, sophomore, 5-8, 160, West Plains RB Michael Keller, senior, 5-9, 160, Hillsboro RB Andrew Hunt, junior, 5-11, 180, Ladue R/E Dale Chesson, junior, 6-0, 180, Ladue R/E Gunnar Carpenter, senior 6-1, 165, Kearney R/E Arther Green, senior, 6-3, 190, Parkway Central OL Tyren Clark, senior, 6-6, 300, Raytown South OL Zach Bodway, senior, 5-10, 190, Hillsboro OL Brenden McClure, senior, 6-6, 250, North County OL Grant Fowler, senior, 6-1, 240, Webb City OL Nick Wortham, senior, 6-1, 305, Fort Zumwalt East K PJ Hensley, senior, 5-10, 195, Ladue SECOND-TEAM DEFENSE DL Cam Meeks, senior, 6-3, 225, Ladue DL Nick Kruse, senior, 6-0, 228, Harrisonville DL Cartez Crook-Jones, senior, 6-5, 240, Grandview-KC DL Julian McBride, sophomore 6-2, 245, Cape Central LB Kobe Cummings, senior, 6-0, 195, Platte County LB Javis Berlin, senior, 6-0, 205, Webb City LB Jacob Perez, senior, 6-1, 220, Smithville LB Matthew Sinnot, senior, 5-11, 185, Borgia DB Chris Broeder, senior, 6-0, 175, Borgia DB Nate Moore, senior, 5-10, 150, Parkway Central DB Lane Jett, junior, 5-10, 170, West Plains DB JP Post, senior, 5-9, 145, Platte County P Brady Monks, senior, 6-2, 165, Kearney

CLASS 3

Coach of the year: Matt Webb, Maryville FIRST-TEAM OFFENSE QB Nolan Hair, junior, 5-10, 180, Blair Oaks ATH Amaun Ryan, senior, 6-1, 175, KC Center RB Jeremiah Wilson, senior, 6-2, 205, KC Center RB Cody Schrader, senior, 5-10, 215, Lutheran South RB Eli Dowis, junior, 6-3, 175, Maryville R/E Will Hopkins, junior, 6-0, 170, Park Hills Central R/E RJ Benkelman, senior, 6-2, 190, Lutheran South R/E Ben Thomas, junior, 5-8, 165, Blair Oaks OL Sidney Gates, senior, 6-2, 280, KC Center OL Jalen Sundell, senior, 6-6, 260, Maryville OL Jacob Search, senior, 6-0, 220, Maryville OL Walker Graves, senior, 6-2, 305, Chillicothe OL Riley Pope, senior, 6-3, 265, Eldon K Parker Boyce, junior, 5-11, 170, Southern Boone FIRST-TEAM DEFENSE DL Terrese Aaron, senior, 6-0, 270, Mexico DL Tyler Curd, junior, 5-10, 236, Oak Grove DL Averyon West, senior, 6-5, 315, McCluer South-Berkeley DL Cayden Heisner, senior, 6-1, 200, Mount Vernon LB Mac Bowers, senior, 6-0, 217, Richmond LB Brady Atwell, senior, 6-2, 175, Maryville LB Will Boswell, junior, 6-0, 210, Mount Vernon LB John Lillig, senior, 6-2, 225, St. Pius X-KC DB Brett Shaffer, senior, 6-1, 175, Chillicothe DB Trevon Alexander, senior, 6-2, 190, Richmond DB Braydan Pritchett, junior, 5-11, 175, Blair Oaks DB Sam Stichnote, junior, 6-2, 175, Southern Boone P Zach Haynes, junior, 6-1, 170, Potosi SECOND-TEAM OFFENSE QB Vito Orlando, junior, 6-2, 190, Lutheran South ATH Jace Bland, senior, 6-2, 220, Park Hills Central RB Josh Kille, senior, 5-8, 211, Chillicothe RB Isaiah Merida, senior, 6-0, 180, Eldon RB Kelly Newton, senior, 5-10, 176, Reeds Spring R/E Daveon Trust, senior, 6-3, 190,

McCluer South-Berkeley R/E Grant Conway, junior, 6-1, 165, St. James R/E Eliyh D’Obron, sophomore, 6-2, 170, Odessa OL Tanner Friend, junior, 5-11, 215, Park Hills Central OL JT Taylor, sophomore, 6-3, 290, Lutheran South OL Justin Cobb, senior, 6-2, 210, Blair Oaks OL Coy Butterworth, senior, 6-3, 240, Monett OL Jordan Jenkins, senior, 5-11, 305, McCluer South-Berkeley K Jayden Buttram, senior, 5-11, 170, Mount Vernon SECOND-TEAM DEFENSE DL Isaac Boyd, junior, 5-8, 244, Ste. Genevieve DL Julian Rangel, sophomore, 6-1, 295, KC Center DL Lorenzo Phillips, senior, 5-11, 165, McCluer South-Berkeley DL Nick Wilson, senior, 6-3, 185, St. James LB Tyler Houchin, junior, 6-0, 210, Maryville LB Darrell Bailey, senior, 6-0, 215, Hogan Prep LB Isaiah Henders, junior, 6-2, 185, KC Center LB Keshon Spraggins, senior, 6-3, 240, Lutheran South DB Tate Oglesby, sophomore 6-1, 175, Maryville DB Tyson Riley, junior, 6-2, 200, Springfield Catholic DB Cameron Holman, senior, 6-0, 175, Mexico DB Andrew Montemayor, senior, 5-11, 165, Mount Vernon P Jack Willard, senior, 6-0, 165, Chillicothe

CLASS 2

Coach of the year: Scott Bailey, Lamar FIRST-TEAM OFFENSE QB Isaiah Williams, junior, 5-10, 160, Trinity ATH Kinser Madison, senior, 6-1, 205, Lafayette County RB Adam Reno, senior, 6-0, 215, North Callaway RB Tray Stevenson, senior, 5-10, 205, Malden RB Canaan Brooks, senior, 5-11, 205, Lutheran North R/E Chase Looney, senior, 6-2, 245, Lafayette County R/E Jameson Williams, junior, 6-2, 175, Cardinal Ritter R/E Marcus Washington, junior, 6-2, 170, Trinity OL Cliff Mason, senior, 5-8, 275, Lafayette County OL Ira Henry, sophomore, 6-5, 320, Trinity OL Jack Buford, junior, 6-5, 305, Lutheran North OL Seth Fullerton, senior, 6-2, 220, Lamar OL Caleb Gouge, junior, 6-5, 305, Lamar K Noah Mencer, senior, 5-11, 165, Palmyra FIRST-TEAM DEFENSE DL Cooper Lucas, senior, 5-10, 215, Lamar DL TW Ayers, senior, 6-2, 240, Lamar DL Ronnie Perkins, senior, 6-4, 260, Lutheran North DL J.J. McCoy, senior, 6-3, 235, Lafayette County LB Elijah Thirkield, senior, 5-11, 205, Lafayette County LB Shammond Cooper, junior, 6-2, 190, Trinity LB Devin Ruffin, senior, 6-0, 225, Lutheran North LB Travis Bailey, junior, 6-2, 210, Lamar DB Kaiden Davenport, senior, 5-8, 176, Centralia DB Jared Phillips, senior, 5-10, 175, Cardinal Ritter DB Trenton Rankin, senior, 5-9, 165, Lafayette County DB Nathaniel Bentrup, senior, 6-1, 173, St. Joseph LeBlond P Zack Rarick, senior, 5-9, 165, Jefferson SECOND-TEAM OFFENSE QB Robert Hunter, junior, 6-5, 190, Tolton ATH Koel Orchard, senior, 6-0, 170, Mtn. View-Liberty RB Kevin Edwards, junior, 5-6, 160, Macon RB Q’nairies Anderson, junior, 5-11, 180, Charleston RB Donovan Marshall, senior, 6-0, 190, Lutheran North R/E Nick Beckett, senior, 6-0, 180, Tolton R/E Isaac Mauldin, senior, 5-10, 175, Fair Grove R/E Bryce Strawn, senior, 6-2, 195, Caruthersville OL Payton Wallace, junior 6-1, 255, Lexington OL Ryan Wilson, senior, 6-3, 275, University Academy OL Shane Levett, senior 6-1, 200, Macon OL Kyle Golbricht, junior 6-2, 275, Clark County OL Jackson Wilson, senior, 6-1, 237, Malden K Tim Branneky, senior, 6-0, 180, Lutheran North SECOND-TEAM DEFENSE DL Mason Owen, senior, 6-0, 225, Trenton DL D’Vion Harris, junior, 6-2, 215, Lutheran North

DL Jack Hunziker, senior, 6-2, 250, Clark County DL Jeffrey Smoot, senior, 6-1, 251, Macon LB Mason Gash, sophomore, 6-0, 190, Lafayette County LB Jordan Delashmutt, junior, 5-11, 204, North Callaway LB Jeremy Tucker, senior, 6-3, 215, Charleston LB Peyton Plunkett, senior, 6-2, 205, Palmyra DB Carter Otwell, senior, 6-2, 185, Mountain Grove DB Braxden Neil, senior, 6-3, 185, Palmyra DB Zeb Riney, senior, 5-10, 155, Clark County DB Isaac Trice, junior, 5-9, 155, Trinity P Cade Hicks, senior, 6-4, 160, Macon

CLASS 1

Coach of the year: David Kirby, Monroe City FIRST-TEAM OFFENSE QB Andrew Smith, senior, 6-2, 180, Princeton ATH LaTroy Harper, senior, 6-2, 185, Hamilton RB Matthew Graham, senior, 5-9, 170, Plattsburg RB Rylan Chrisman, senior, 5-9, 170, Marceline RB Zach Osborn, junior, 5-9, 146, Monroe City R/E Seth Kenagy, senior, 6-2, 155, East Buchanan R/E Tyler Blum, junior, 6-4, 186, Valle R/E Blaine Millburn, senior, 6-2, 190, Princeton OL Tyler Trosper, junior, 5-10, 245, Hamilton OL Alex Wilson, senior, 6-0, 243, Monroe City OL Ben Miller, junior 6-3, 250, Westran OL Nathan Sayre, junior, 6-1, 230, Marceline OL Dalton Kertz, senior 6-2, 240, Valle K Raul Reyes, senior 5-8, 225, Sarcoxie FIRST-TEAM DEFENSE DL Ivory Winters, junior, 6-1, 205, Hayti DL Max Hays, sophomore, 6-2, 200, Monroe City DL Jonathon Saxbury, junior 6-1, 288, Monroe City DL Drew Dailey, senior 6-1, 330, Princeton LB Brendan Meyer, senior, 6-1, 245, Valle LB Cole Pennewell, senior, 6-0, 200, Monroe City LB Isaiah Estes, junior, 5-11, 205, Fayette LB Kenney Pully, senior, 5-11, 225, Hamilton DB Dawson Shively, senior, 6-2, 170, Monroe City DB Ryan Grein, junior, 6-2, 160, Valle DB Ethan Kilgore, sophomore, 6-5, 190, East Buchanan DB Clayton Sweeten, senior, 5-10, 145, Princeton P Gavin Davis, junior, 5-9, 160, West Platte SECOND-TEAM OFFENSE QB Tyler Schottel, junior, 5-9, 135, East Buchanan ATH Brock Wood, junior, 6-0, 165, South Shelby RB Carter Roth, junior 5-9, 170, Valle RB Garrett Young, senior 5-9, 165, Thayer RB Derek Stephens, senior, 6-3, 205, Lincoln R/E Levi Terrell, senior, 6-2, 155, Marceline R/E Chris Evans, senior, 6-3, 210, Westran R/E Conner Karl, senior, 5-11, 170, East Buchanan OL Garrett MacMillan, senior, 6-1, 259, Valle OL Anson Johnson, junior 6-0, 260, Adrian OL Dawson Russell, senior, 6-1, 215, Thayer OL Michael Ryan, senior, 6-5, 200, Monroe City OL Boog Chandler, senior, 6-1, 240, Cass-Midway K Cullen Bruner, sophomore, 5-10, 150, Marceline SECOND-TEAM DEFENSE DL Jake Boatwright, senior, 6-4, 250, East Buchanan DL Trevor Ganaway, senior, 6-4, 370, Marceline DL Owen Schweigert, senior 6-3, 196, Valle DL Garrett Trosper, senior, 5-10, 255, Hamilton LB Dillon Brisbin, senior, 5-11, 170, Wellington-Napoleon LB Breck Hancock, senior, 6-1, 220, Paris LB Alex Young, junior, 5-11, 185, Westran LB Cory Moubry, senior, 5-10, 210, Knox County DB Tanner Coffman, senior, 5-9, 155, Princeton DB Chris Comerford, senior, 5-9, 165, Sarcoxie DB Trey Shannon, junior, 6-1, 170, Wellington-Napoleon DB Jay Moore, senior, 5-9, 155, Hayti P Jayme McGowan, junior, 5-11, 160, Windsor-Sedalia


12.20.2017 • Wednesday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B9

Tuesday - Friday 8:00am - 8:00pm Saturday 8:00am - 6:00pm Christmas Hours Sun Dec. 17: 10am-6pm Mon. Dec. 18: 8am-8pm Christmas Eve Dec. 24: 10am-3pm Christmas Day: CLOSED

#1 Gravois, Fenton, MO 636-343-9447 www.dennydennis.com PPS M2

LCP II

CCP

PPQ NAVY

PK380

9MM

$369.99

STAINLESS AINLESS #5080301

Save $100

380 Acp

9MM LUGER

$299.99

$299.99

#5050308

#2805961

$549.99

#2796086

380 Acp

$339.99

$239.99

BLACK #5080300

#03750

SD9VE4

442 38 SPEC

638

642

CuSTOM II

PRO II

uLTRA II

$319.99

$389.99

$389.99

$389.99

$699.99

$699.99

$699.99

#150544

#223900

#163870

ROuGh RIDER

#163810

huNTER

TWO TONE

TWO TONE

M&P 15 SPORT

TWO TONE

590 ShOCKwAVE

SAvE $100

RR22MB4

Save $100

RR22B6

.243 WiN 6.5 cREEdMOOR 30-06

$119.99

5.56/223 REM.

$549.99

$699.99

#10202

12ga or 20ga

#50657 / #50659

$349.99

M3000 #31838

MAX-5 ONLY 28” BBL.

Buy an M3000

(Item #31838 ONLY-MAX-5,28”)

And Get a 75 Rebate!

On-Site identification kiosk class iii compliant cut your wait time by 1/3.

$

$399.99

For your Suppressor and SBR tax stamp

CCI MINI-MAG 300 ROuND

BROwNING 22LR 400 RD PACKAGE

LOCK-N-LOAD® CLASSIC™ KIT $

SALE

SALE

$19.99

REG $24.99

CALDwELL MAG ChARGER

Save $10

$18.99

9MM LUGER

$9.99

10% OFF

SALE

$269.99 #0850

REG $339.99

wheeler heeler Delta Series AR-15 Combo Tool

ADVENTuRE SERIES VACuuM

20 OZ. QUENchER STAiNLESS OR BLAck

REG $14.99 SALE

REG $24.99 SALE

$19.99 3-9x40 MATTE NP

4-12 VX-1

$259.99 #09286

40 OZ. QUENchER STAiNLESS OR BLAck • 50 hRS. icEd, 11 hRS. cOLd, 7 hRS. hOT

$61.99 #383774

Save $90

• iNcLUdES 1,500-GRAiN diGiTAL pOckET ScALE, NOSLER 7Th EdiTiON RELOAdiNG MANUAL ANd hANd pRiMiNG TOOL • OFFERS UNivERSAL cASE LOAdiNG BLOck, dEBUR TOOL, pOWdER FUNNEL ANd cASE SLick LUBE

REG $339.99 SALE

REG $69.99 SALE

$29.99 #110002

TARGET & RANGE

• EvERYThiNG iN ONE pAckAGE EXcEpT diES • FEATURES SiNGLE-STAGE pRESS • iNcLUdES LATEST RELOAdiNG hANdBOOk

CALDwELL ThE ROCK ShOOTING REST

REG $39.99 SALE

#UTR9115

RELOADER SPECIAL-5 EXPLORER SINGLE STAGE PRESS KIT

70 OFF

Troy Lundry Special Edition

REG $25.99

$474.99 -REBATE $75.00

REG $24.99 SALE

$9.99

$16.99

#10-02662-001, 002

#10-02664-001, 002

3-9x40 MATTE BDR

REG

$299.99 $209.99

ALL USEd hANdGUNS excluding consignments

Find Denny Dennis on-line at www.dennydennis.com

REG $199.99

SALE

$139.99 #BRA40103

20% OFF

REG $179.99

SALE

$139.99 #BRA40104

ALL kNivES

ALL PRICES GOOD

and many more

12/17-12/24/2017

Limited to store stock. All Firearms are sold in strict compliance with all state and federal laws. Not Responsible for misprints. No trade ins for sale firearms


WEATHER

B10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 12.20.2017

We

BLACK FRIDAY

Bu

yC

ar

s

SAVINGS

7800 N. LiNdBergh BLvd, hazeLWood, Mo 63042

stlouisautostop.com

ALL MONTH LONG!

(314) 227-0440

1000+

250 Vehicles Under $15,000 Shop 24/7 at stlouisautostop.com

CArS & TruCkS IN INVeNTOry!

CHEVY • FORD • DODGE • LEXUS • MERCEDES BENZ • BMW • CHRYSLER • NISSAN

New VehICLeS ArrIVINg DAILy! 2014 Jaguar XJL POrTFOLiO

2015 Chevy Traverse LT

NAV, AWD, Dual Sunroofs, Massaging Heated Leather Seats, Alloys, Only 28,xxx miles. Super Clean!! Rates as low as 1.9% Call Today!

2016 mazda 3 sPOrT

2017 gmC aCadia sLe

AWD, 3rd Row, Quad Seating, Backup Cam, Backup Cam & Alloys, 1 Owner, Clean Carfax, Alloys, One Owner, Clean Carfax! Financing for Good Credit, Bad Credit... Doesn’t Matter! Everyone! Only $22,995 Financing for Everyone. Low Miles. Only $14,995

2010 Chevy CamarO 2LT

2015 LinCOLn mkC

2014 dOdge Charger sXT

Leather Seats, Upgraded Wheels. Low Miles. Only $13,995. Financing for Everyone!

One Owner, Clean Carfax, AWD, Heated Leather Seats, Backup Cam & Alloys. Only 3,xxx Miles. Factory Warranty. WONT LAST CALL NOW!

Clean Carfax, LOW MILES! Sunroof & Alloys. Financing for Everyone! Payments as low as $349/mth.

2001 POrsChe Carrera

1 Owner, Clean Carfax. Only 17,xxx Miles. Full Factory Warranty. 3rd Row Luggage Rack. Backup Cam & Alloys. Try $349/mth.

2017 TOyOTa rav4 XLe

1 Owner. Clean Carfax. Very Rare Luxury Sports Car. 1 Owner, Clean Carfax. Only 17,xxx Miles. AWD, Sunroof, Luggage Rack, Backup Cam. Just Only 9,xxx Miles. New Tires, Come w/Original window Reduced. Financing for Everyone! $25,995 sticker book, and 2 sets of keys. Flawless. Call Today!

2017 buiCk LaCrOsse essenCe

2015 audi q5 Premium

2014 bmW 750Li Xdrive 1 Owner, Clean Carfax. LOADED! NAV, Twin Turbo, M Package, Roof, Backup Cam, Drive Assist Package. Only 61,xxx Miles. Huge Discount, Only $35,495. Won’t Last, Call Now!

1 Owner, Clean Carfax, Pano Roof, Heated Leather Plus Package, Clean Carfax, NAV, AWD, Heated Seats, Backup Cam & Alloys. Only 13,xxx Miles. Full Leather Seats, Roof, Bluetooth, Alloy. Only 28,xxx Factory Warranty & Rates as low as 1.9% Call Today! Miles. Local Trade. Super Clean. Call for Price

7800 N. LiNdBergh BLvd, hazeLWood, Mo 63042

2783 duNN road, st. Louis, Mo 63136

stlouisautostop.com • (314) 227-0440

18155 us highWay 66, eureKa, Mo. 63025

stlmotorcity.com • (314) 786-3921

traversautoplex.com • (636) 549-4498

5 LOCATIONS

WatCh our shoW oN KPLr 11 tv this saturday at 12 PM.

22 YEARS IN BUSINESS LOCALLY OWNED

*Payments are with 72 months at 2.9% APR (estimated financing rate) with a 20% down payment.

1080 W. terra LaNe, o’FaLLoN, Mo 63366

225 North hWy 67, FLorissaNt, Mo 63031

gmtautowest.com • (636) 542-4962

gmtautosales.com • (314) 266-6577

f i n a n c i n g f o r e v e ryo n e WEATHER • Low 36, High 50 • Winds ENE 5-10 mph

National Extremes

TODAY ACROSS THE U.S. High: 87° Harlingen, Texas

Low: 2° Gunnison, Colorado

Still mild for December

110s

Some morning clouds are expected to gradually decrease this afternoon into this evening. Highs will top out around 50. Mild temperatures will persist through Friday when a front will bring some rain to the area. Colder air will settle into the region this weekend. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

24-HOUR FORECAST

MORNING

LUNCH

38°

DRIVE

45°

Mostly cloudy

48°

Decreasing clouds

Mostly clear

BEDTIME

41°

Partly cloudy

100s 90s 80s 70s

4-DAY FORECAST

56 50 50 50 51 58 49 45 51 55 47 50 52

W

mostly cloudy rain partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy rain

Illinois Bloomington Carbondale Chicago Decatur Effingham Macomb Mount Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Springfield Urbana

50s 40s 20s

THURSDAY

35°/52°

Mostly cloudy

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

42°/50°

29°/35°

PM rain possible

H

29 43 26 30 31 27 40 28 31 23 30 29

44 48 36 45 45 42 47 43 45 36 47 44

22°/31°

Partly sunny and colder

partly cloudy rain mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy

Kansas City 36 / 49

Kirksville 29 / 45

Joplin 46 / 58

Springfield 30 / 47

St. Louis 36 / 50 Poplar Bluff 45 / 50

Carbondale 43 / 48

Flood Stage

Current Level

+ 0.39 + 0.03 + 0.45 + 0.60 + 0.29 0.00 + 0.33 + 0.16 - 0.31 - 0.32

TODAY’S UV INDEX Min.

Very high The higher the UV index number, the greater the need for skin protection.

POLLEN COUNTS Tuesday, Dec 19th No tree, grass, or weed pollen present Mold - 2,201 (low) HEATING DEGREE DAYS 23 Yesterday 441 Month (Total) 1143 Season 1149 Year Ago Flood Stage

Current Level

ILLINOIS RIVER La Salle 20 11.72 18 12.42 Peoria 14 9.53 Beardstown MERAMEC RIVER 15 3.22 Sullivan 16 - 2.84 Valley Park 24 5.60 Arnold BOURBEUSE RIVER Union 15 1.64 OHIO RIVER Cairo 40 12.92 Maps and weather data provided by:

24-Hr Change

- 0.04 + 0.29 - 0.17 - 0.06 0.00 - 0.06 + 0.01 + 0.71

SUN & MOON

First Dec 26 Sunrise

Full Jan 1

Last Jan 8

7:15 AM Sunset

New Jan 16 4:43 PM

Moonrise 8:53 AM Moonset 7:02 PM

The moon is just starting to wax again after the new moon on December 18th. It is currently in the waxing crescent phase.

SOURCE: McDonnell Planetarium

LAKE LEVELS Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

Current Level

24-Hr Change

354.27 359.53 494.36 656.72 705.03 654.13 911.93 838.61 599.87 404.30 601.90 444.27

- 0.28 - 0.27 + 0.02 - 0.02 + 0.04 0.00 - 0.22 - 0.01 + 0.02 + 0.01 - 0.01 - 0.07

Get more river & lake stage information at 636-441-8467

Lower 48 temps only

Albany, N.Y. 32 Albuquerque 28 Anchorage 26 Atlanta 56 Atlantic City 36 Baltimore 39 Billings 28 Biloxi, Ms. 63 Birmingham 60 Bismarck 19 Boise 31 Boston 35 Buffalo 29 Burlington, Vt. 29 Charleston, S.C. 56 Charleston, W.V. 40 Charlotte 52 Cheyenne 28 Chicago 26 Cincinnati 34 Cleveland 30 Colorado Spgs. 26 Concord, N.H. 30 Dallas 51 Daytona Beach 61 Denver 29 Des Moines 26 66 Destin, Fl. 26 Detroit 36 El Paso 42 Evansville 14 Fairbanks 8 Fargo 17 Flagstaff 62 Fort Myers 21 Great Falls 14 Green Bay 33 Hartford 64 Honolulu 60 Houston 31 Indianapolis 65 Jackson, Ms. 25 Juneau 72 Key West 43 Las Vegas 54 Little Rock 48 Los Angeles 38 Louisville

34 54 31 67 48 47 35 71 70 25 36 41 31 31 73 48 55 55 36 42 34 58 36 66 82 62 42 73 31 64 47 24 22 47 81 25 23 40 77 78 42 76 37 79 65 60 63 47

W

Tomorrow L H W

partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy showers partly cloudy mostly cloudy snow showers showers snow snow showers sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy showers rain showers partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy showers partly cloudy sunny rain snow snow partly cloudy sunny snow mostly cloudy sunny showers sunny partly cloudy showers rain and snow partly cloudy sunny showers partly cloudy showers

18 31 18 50 24 28 10 52 48 4 23 21 21 10 51 29 40 10 27 27 23 24 12 49 64 21 31 59 24 40 31 5 5 19 65 2 18 18 63 52 27 47 27 71 42 43 43 30

27 50 23 57 41 42 27 69 66 15 33 29 29 20 56 53 50 12 39 47 40 28 24 73 77 24 38 72 36 65 52 16 10 29 80 25 32 32 81 76 47 75 34 80 52 66 66 53

partly cloudy partly cloudy fog mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy flurries drizzle sunny mostly cloudy snow sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy snow drizzle mostly sunny mostly cloudy windy partly cloudy sunny very cold partly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy snow sunny partly cloudy showers partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny sunny mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy

City

Today L H

56 Macon 64 McAllen, Tx. 53 Memphis 67 Miami 22 Milwaukee 16 Minneapolis Missoula, Mt. 28 64 Mobile Montgomery 62 48 Nashville New Orleans 67 New York City 39 Norfolk, Va. 48 Oklahoma City 48 Omaha 25 Orlando 62 Palm Springs 49 Philadelphia 39 Phoenix 45 Pittsburgh 32 Portland, Me. 31 Portland, Or. 38 Providence 36 Raleigh 49 Rapid City 21 Reno 32 Richmond, Va. 44 Sacramento 43 St. Petersburg 65 Salt Lake City 35 San Antonio 51 San Diego 52 San Francisco 46 Santa Fe 25 Savannah 57 Seattle 35 57 Shreveport 22 Sioux Falls 32 Syracuse 59 Tallahassee 64 Tampa 38 Tucson 48 Tulsa 44 Wash D.C. W. Palm Beach 65 39 Wichita Wilmington, De. 36 47 Yuma

70 78 59 80 29 24 31 73 74 55 77 42 53 58 44 82 66 47 70 38 39 45 41 52 49 38 51 54 76 45 76 62 57 51 77 39 70 39 33 79 79 68 56 48 80 53 47 73

W

showers mostly sunny showers partly cloudy mostly cloudy cloudy snow showers showers showers showers partly cloudy rain partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny showers sunny showers mostly cloudy snow showers rain partly cloudy partly cloudy snow sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny showers partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy snow showers rain partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny

Tomorrow L H W

52 64 44 65 26 19 18 53 50 39 53 25 35 45 33 64 51 29 44 24 13 27 19 36 14 17 32 34 66 25 51 50 41 28 55 28 49 24 16 57 66 42 48 32 63 42 28 48

63 83 63 80 36 25 26 72 71 60 74 38 48 61 38 81 57 41 58 43 25 39 32 49 21 34 47 54 77 32 72 63 57 46 62 39 74 26 26 79 79 55 66 44 81 53 41 60

mostly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy rain and snow cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny drizzle mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny fog sunny partly cloudy windy sunny sunny sunny mostly cloudy snow showers mostly cloudy sunny sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy snow mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny

TODAY AROUND THE WORLD City Acapulco Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Barbados Beijing Berlin Budapest Buenos Aires Cairo Calgary Cancun Cape Town Dublin Frankfurt

L

H

W

73 41 44 55 61 76 25 32 22 68 63 10 72 64 50 36

87 48 54 77 81 84 43 38 34 80 81 13 83 77 55 39

sunny cloudy mostly cloudy partly sunny partly cloudy partly sunny partly cloudy cloudy mostly sunny sunny partly cloudy snow showers partly cloudy mostly sunny showers cloudy

City

L

H

W

Geneva Hong Kong Istanbul Jakarta Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Madrid Mecca Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi

32 52 41 77 54 59 29 42 29 65 48 27 32 71 57 54

40 67 46 82 72 77 49 52 55 90 77 29 34 81 75 75

partly cloudy mostly sunny mostly cloudy showers mostly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy cloudy mostly sunny sunny mostly sunny partly cloudy snow partly cloudy mostly sunny mostly sunny

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

+ 0.02 - 0.04 - 0.26 - 0.22 - 0.02

Very unhealthy

Good

Today L H

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

MISSOURI RIVER Kansas City 32 9.49 23 5.82 Jefferson City 21 4.89 Hermann 20 2.67 Washington 25 9.27 St. Charles MISSISSIPPI RIVER Hannibal 16 10.67 Louisiana 15 12.01 Dam 24 25 14.64 Dam 25 26 14.45 Grafton 18 15.79 M.Price, Pool 419 418.80 M.Price, Tail. 21 3.73 St Louis 30 0.75 Chester 27 3.45 Cape Girardeau 32 9.80

24-Hr Change

TODAY’S AIR QUALITY

Jet Stream

-10s

Hawaii High: 81°

A low pressure system will move eastward and bring wet weather to portions of the Tennessee Valley, Deep South, and Southeast. Another storm system will bring snow to parts of the northern Plains, northern Rockies, and Intermountain West. High pressure will be in control throughout the Great Lakes, Mid-Atlantic, and Northeast. City

W

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

RIVER STAGES

0.00” 0.15” 1.78” 35.96” 39.90”

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

PRECIPITATION Last 24 hrs Month (Total) Month (Normal) Year (Total) Year (Normal)

53° 35° 41° 26° 68° -7° 25° 3°

-0s Alaska Low: -13°

Chicago 26 / 36

Wintry Mix

0s

Partly sunny and cold

ALMANAC Asof7P.M.atLambertField TEMPERATURES High (2:39 p.m.) Low (2:49 a.m.) Average High Average Low Record High (1976) Record Low (1983) High Last Year Low Last Year

10s

SUNDAY

Shown are this morning’s lows and today’s highs L

Snow

30s

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

46 45 36 40 38 46 36 29 38 45 32 36 45

H

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

L

T-storms

60s

TODAY IN THE BI-STATE AREA Missouri Branson Cape Girardeau Columbia Farmington Jefferson City Joplin Kansas City Kirksville Rolla Springfield St. Joseph Union West Plains

Rain

City

L

H

W

Oslo Paris Prague Rio De Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Stockholm Sydney Taipei Tokyo Toronto Vancouver Vienna Warsaw

28 37 29 74 30 76 54 18 24 67 59 34 29 32 29 26

35 48 36 88 48 84 88 36 39 75 65 48 32 38 36 35

freezing rain cloudy partly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy cloudy showers mostly sunny mostly sunny mostly cloudy sunny cloudy snow


Classified

M 1 ●

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

WEDNESDAY

DECEMBER 20, 2017

STLTODAY.COM

C1

2018 Jeep Wrangler A roughneck with 21st-century perks DRIVING WITH DAN By DAN WIESE

Contributing Automotive Writer drivingwithdan@gmail.com

MARANA, Arizona -- With every new model, the Jeep brand finds itself between a rock and a soft place: required off-road capability, requested on-road civility -- two easily selfexclusive attributes. More than any of its Jeep brethren, it is Wrangler, say the keepers of the Jeep f lame that will never compromise the former to attain the latter. “First and foremost is off-road capability,” said Brian Leyes, Wrangler’s chief engineer. “We will never compromise that. Anyone who suggested that was immediately chased out of the room and doesn’t work at Jeep anymore.” Of course, that legendary capability has to be wrapped in styling that ref lects the heritage look of the iconic open-top Jeep. Getting that styling right on this “JL”-generation Wrangler fell to design chief Mark Allen and his team, who took cues from classic open-top Jeeps -- headlight-pinched seven-slot grille from the 1955-’86 CJ, raised hood panel from the 1997-’06 TJ -- and blended them with new ideas -- lower beltline, larger windows, available LED lighting -- to create a modern look instantly traceable to Jeep’s iconic appearance. Again offered in two- and fourdoor variants, JL’s trims include the base Sport, the muscular Rubicon, with its standard 33-inch tires, and the tony Sahara, that last one offered only

The all-new Wrangler’s wheelbase is 2 inches longer, but its turning circle is notably tighter and its forgiving break-over angle is retained. The red Jeep is a two-door Rubicon, the silver Jeep a four-door Sahara.

as a four-door. At launch, every Wrangler is powered by a 3.6-liter V-6, but a torquey, 2.0-liter, turbo four with mild hybrid electric assist will arrive within months. (A V-6 diesel with 260 hp and 442 lb.-ft. of torque is coming in 2019, a plug-in hybrid in 2020.) Wrangler’s 285-hp six mates to either a six-speed manual or eight-speed automatic. The 270-hp turbo four, whose 295 lb.-ft. of torque betters the six’s 260, mates only to the automatic,

as will the diesel. Of course, 4WD is standard, and Wrangler retains its lever-operated two-speed transfer case. However, in a first for Wrangler, Sahara’s T-case, in addition to 2hi, 4hi and 4lo, adds an allwheel drive “Auto” mode. continued inside

F L O L R A D H O . R S COOM D R . C M A A M

M

EXCLUSIVE HOLIDAY OFFERS STARTING AT

0 APR FOR 72 MONTHS %

PLUS $1,000 FORD CREDIT BONUS CASH1

2017 Ford F150 Supercrew 4x4 XLT Offers available on 2017 model year vehicles only. $1,000 Ford Credit Bonus Cash requires Ford Credit financing. Not all buyers will qualify for Ford Credit financing. 0% APR financing for 72 months at $13.89 per month per $1,000 financed regardless of down payment. Not available on Focus RS, Fiesta, Mustang Shelby GT350/GT350R, Ford GT, Super Duty and F-150 Raptor. For all offers, take new retail delivery from dealer stock by 1/2/18. See dealer for qualifications and complete details.

1

636-978-FORD (3673)

1075 WEST TERRA LANE, HWY 70 & BRYAN RD. (NORTH SERVICE RD.) O’FALLON, MO SERVICE & PARTS HOURS: M-F 7am-6pm • SAT 7am-5pm BODY SHOP HOURS: M-F 8am-5pm

Marshall Ford 70 Hwy. K

636-272-FORD (3673)

Certified Pre-Owned

Bryan Rd.

www.marshall-ford.com

40/61


C2

Classified

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, as amended which makes it illegal to advertise ‘any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.’ This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertising in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.

R E Auctions Commercial Real Estate Auction

Thur., Dec 28 at 12PM 8523 Watson Rd, St. Louis MO Viewing Thur., Dec 21, 12-1PM Comm bldg offers a turn-key opportunity. Private offices, recept. area, 4 bays, asphalt parking lot. Highly visible location! More info on our website.

www.adamsauctions.com ADAM'S AUCTIONS 618-234-8751

M 1

'04 Acura TSX: Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof $6,990 #P9004A

Hyundai

'07 Buick Lucerne CXL: V6, One Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, $6,990 #39013A

'14 Chevy Captiva: Sport, Leather, Sunroof, $13,990 #P3761-1 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '15 Chevy Trax: LT, $14,901 #P3706 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '11 Chevy Impala: $5,995 #68961-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '15 Chevy Cruze: 2LT $12,397 #48794-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '15 Chevy Impala: LTZ $19,697 #49015-2 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '11 Chevy Cruze: $5,995 #69004-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '14 Chevy Malibu LT: $10,697 #68380-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '17 Chevy Spark LS: Hatchback $10,676 #170937 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '17 Chevy Sonic: $12,632 #171071 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '17 Chevy Malibu: 1LT $17,500 #P06437 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '14 Chevy Spark LS: $7,828 Stk# 180126A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Chevy Cruze 2LT: $12,599 Stk #P06473 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '17 Chevy Cruze LT: $16,479 #P06453 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '09 Chevy Impala: LT, $9,990 #171023A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Chevy Malibu LTZ: 38K Miles, Black, Sunroof, Navigation, $16,990 #V17695A

'14 Chevy Cruze: Clean Carfax, Low Miles, GM Certified Pre-owned $12,490 #11403B

'15 Ford Mustang: GT, Competition Orange!! A Must See $27,990 #V17747A

'13 Hyundai Elantra GLS: Motor Trend Certified, Bluetooth, FWD $10,990 #40082A

Chrysler

'14 Ford Mustang GT: 5.0L 8 Cyl, Manual, 34K Miles, A Must See, $23,490 #B8630

'11 Hyundai Sonata: Clean Carfax, FWD, Low Miles, Bluetooth $8,490 #78835B

'14 Ford Mustang: Convertible, Premium, Triple Black $14,990 #B8768

'12 Hyundai Sonata: Sparkling Ruby Mica, Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified $10,990 #28268A

Cadillac '12 Cadillac CTS: Navigation, Sunroof, 50K Miles, White Diamond, $18,900 #48933-1 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '12 Cadillac CTS: Only 20K Miles #P4247 $18,750 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

'16 Cadillac ATS: Coupe, Performance Collection $34,490 #C8796

'11 Cadillac CTS: AWD, White, 44K Miles, Call Today!

'17 Cadillac XTS: 5K miles, FWD, Save Thousands! #C17401R Call Today!

'12 Cadillac SRX: Premium, AWD, Heated Front Seats Navigation $14,990 #78463B

Chevrolet

'09 Audi A4 2.0T: Premium, Tiptronic, AWD, Sunroof, Heated Front Seats $9,990 #P9040A

BMW '14 BMW X5: 37K, White, AWD, Nav, Roof $37,490 #B8866

Buick '07 Buick LaCrosse: $4,995 #49357-5 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020

'12 Buick LaCrosse: Premium, One Owner Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified $14,490 #79256A

STLTODAY.COM

Ford

Audi

'11 Audi Q5 2.0T Premium: Tiptronic, AWD, Panoramic Sunroof, Backup Camera $14,990 #28320B

DECEMBER 20, 2017

Chevrolet

'17 Cadillac XTS: FWD, Certified, Navigation, Silver, $34,990 #C8665

'08 Audi A4 2.0T: Special Edition, AWD, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof $8,990 #27259M

WEDNESDAY

Chevrolet

'10 Acura TL 3.5: w/ Technology Package, Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified $14,490 #11611A

'15 Audi Allroad Wagon: Premium, Panoroof, $28,990 #B8777

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Buick

Acura '08 Acura MDX: $8,597 #49063-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020

'14 Chevy Cruze LS: 1.8L, Automatic Transmission, $9,130 #C17023A LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '14 Chevy Cruze LS: Automatic, $9,242 #C172090A LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '14 Chevy Cruze: LS, One Owner $8,767 #C11454P LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '15 Chevy Spark: LT, 18K Miles $9,412 #C11455P LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770

'14 Chevy Captiva: Sport, 2LS, FWD $10,959 #C172016M LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '12 Chevy Cruze LT: Automatic Transmission $8,782 #C171198M LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '13 Chevy Cruze LS, 31K Miles, Automatic $10,982 #C180844A LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '10 Chevy Impala LT: V6, #C180518A $10,519 LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '14 Chevy Cruze: LT $11,449 #P3737 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '13 Chevy Sonic: LT $7,900 #24369-5 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426

'16 Chevy Camaro: SS Convertible, 3K Miles, Just Arrived #C17287B Call Today!

'15 Chevy Impala LS: Clean Carfax, Bluetooth $13,990 #P8945

'12 Chevy Malibu 1LT: Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, Low Miles $10,990 #95536A

'13 Chrysler 300 C: Sunroof, Leather, 45K Miles $18,900 #48844-2 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '11 Chrysler 200:Limited, Convertible, One Owner Clean Carfax $12,990 #P9042A

'13 Chrysler 200 Limited: Convertible, Clean Carfax, Backup Camera $12,990 #28156A

Dodge '12 Dodge Charger SE: Flex Fuel $10,990 #78008A

Ford '11 Ford Fiesta: $5,995 #48357-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '14 Ford Focus: Wagon $11,980 #P41762 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '05 Ford Focus: $3,197 #68031-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020

'13 Ford Focus Titanium: Hatchback, Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, Bluetooth, $11,990 #78490A

'12 Ford Focus SE: Low Miles, Clean Carfax, Flex Fuel, $8,490 #27398B

'14 Ford Focus: One Owner, Motor Trend Certified, Low Miles, Bluetooth $10,490 #12021A

'17 Ford Fusion: SE, $15,499 #P3725 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '12 Ford Fusion SE: $6,997 #49002-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '14 Ford Fusion S: Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified FWD,$11,990 #28481A

'06 Chevy HHR LT: Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, Remote Start, $6,490 #78414C

'13 Chevy Impala LTZ: Heated Leather Front Seats, Bluetooth, Remote Start, Flex Fuel, $8,990 #78105A

'17 Ford Fusion SE: One Owner Clean Carfax $13,490 #P8946

'15 Ford Mustang: GT, Loaded, Only 18K Miles $29,900 #48684-5 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426

'04 Convertible Mustang GT-40th Anniv, 8 Cyl Auto, Excellent, 78k, $8,000 314-402-0374

Honda '04 Honda Accord: $4,995 #68693-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '12 Honda Civic: $11,397 #49491-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '13 Honda Civic: Si, 22K Miles, Gray, #V17468B Call Today!

'13 Honda Accord: Sport, 49K, Automatic, Local Trade $15,990 #C17410A

'14 Honda Accord: One Owner Clean Carfax, Bluetooth $12,990 #27766A

'08 Honda Civic LX: One Owner Clean Carfax, Nighthawk Black Pearl, FWD $6,990 #39307A

'11 Hyundai Elantra: Limited, FWD, Low Miles, Sunroof, Bluetooth, Backup Camera $9,490 #P8996A

Infiniti '07 Infiniti G35X: AWD, Automatic $9,919 #C172178A LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '02 Infiniti I35: $4,995 #47182-2 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '17 Infiniti QX60: 13K, AWD, Gray, Just Arrived #B8891 Call Today!

'07 Infiniti M35x: Clean Carfax, AWD, Backup Camera, Navigation $9,990 #P9056A

'07 Infiniti QX56: Tuscan Pearl, Low Miles, Clean Carfax, 3rd Row Seating $12,490 #P9005A

Hyundai '13 Hyundai Sonata: Hybrid $10,995 #47440-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '17 Hyundai Elantra: Limited $16,997 #68666-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '15 Hyundai Genesis 5.0 $29,995 #68932-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '12 Hyundai Tuscon: $14,997 #69030-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '13 Hyundai Elantra: $8,697 #68470-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '11 Hyundai Elantra: $7,397 #68900-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '15 Hyundai Sonata: Sport $12,997 #68596-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '13 Hyundai Veloster: $12,570 Stk# 171022A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Hyundai Sonata: Limited, 30K Miles, Roof, Black $18,490 #M17233A

Jeep '16 Jeep Renegade: LTD Stk $21,200 #P06420 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '14 Jeep Wrangler: Unlimited $31,000 #171235M DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Jeep Cherokee Sport: 6K Miles, White, Auto, 4WD, $21,990 #C8689A

'14 Jeep Wrangler Sahara: Unlimited, Hart Top, Auto, A Must See, $31,990 #B8588

'16 Jeep Compass Sport SUV 4 door. Very Good Condition. 48,xxx mi. $12,000. 636-253-8114.

Kia '11 Kia Sorento EX, FWD, Automatic $10,822 #C180793B LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '14 Kia Soul + 27K Miles, One Owner, $13,900 #24289-1 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426

SUNDAY COUPONS THEY JUST MAKE CENTS Whether you use a couple or couple dozen every week, you end up with more groceries in your cart and change in your pocket. And that Sunday newspaper you just bought? It has paid for itself. Now that is what we call savvy shopping. SUBSCRIBE TODAY at STLtoday.com/subscribe


Classified

M 1 ●

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

2018 Jeep Wrangler

A roughneck with 21st-century perks

er-sliding top, which acts like a huge sun roof.

DRIVING WITH DAN continued from the front

THREE TOPS ARE OFFERED:

• The easier-folding convertible top jettisons zippers and Velcro for tongueand-groove attachments that make installing and removing windows less stressful. • An all-new “Sky One-Touch” pow-

• A three-piece hard top, which is pretty much unchanged, although the panels are lighter and easier to handle. Oh, and -- yes! -- the windshield still folds. Why? “Because it always has,” Allen said. “We fought for that one.” Now, however, it folds from a fixed windshield

WEDNESDAY

DECEMBER 20, 2017

frame in less than five minutes with the removal of four bolts. Compare that to the 28 bolts and over-an-hour it took to fold the windshield on the outgoing JK Wrangler. Despite no-compromise capability -we drove a Rubicon on an Arizona moonscape and, believe me, this thing will climb a rope -- all the modern safety and convenience features are here: keyless enter and go, reconfigurable gauge dis-

STLTODAY.COM

C3

play, 5.0-, 7.0- or 8.4-inch Uconnect touch screen, USB ports, 115v household-style outlet, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto compatibility, power windows, locks, mirrors, and more than 75 active and passive safety features, including blind-spot monitor, Rear Cross Path detection and electronic stability control with roll mitigation. Look for the new Wrangler early in the first quarter of 2018.

2018 Jeep Wrangler DRIVE FORMAT: Four-

HORSEPOWER: V-6: 285;

auto (opt. w/ V-6, standard

wheel drive

I-4: 270

w/ I-4)

BASE PRICE: 2-dr.: $28,190

TORQUE: V-6: 260 lb.-ft.;

EPA MPG: V-6 manual: 17

(Rubicon: $38,190); 4-dr.:

I-4: 295 lb.-ft.

city/23 hwy/19 combined;

$31,690 (Sahara: $38,540; Rubicon: $41,690)

V-6 auto: 18/23/20; I-4: N/A RECOMMENDED FUEL: V-6: regular; I-4: premium

TOWING MAX.: 3,500 lbs.

ENGINES: 3.6L V-6; 2.0L

recommended, regular ac-

(four-door)

turbocharged I-4 with

ceptable

“eTorque” electric power assist

WHERE BUILT: Toledo, TRANSMISSION: 6-speed

Ohio

manual (V-6 only); 8-speed

Kia

Mazda

Misc. Autos

Pontiac

Volkswagen

Ford Trucks

'12 Kia Sorento: $9,697 #48959-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '07 Kia Sedona: $4,995 #49328-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '15 Kia Optima LX: $12,900 Stk# P06451 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Kia Soul: 5 Door Wagon $15,341 #P06466 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '09 Kia Rio LX: Sunset Orange, Low Miles $5,490 #40036A

'06 Mazda MX-5: Convertible, Clean Carfax, Low Miles $7,490 #8876A

BOMMARITO ST. PETERS

'10 Pontiac Vibe GT: Auto, Blue, Just Arrived! #M18044A Call Today!

'13 Volkswagen Golf: Hatchback, Conv & Sunroof PZEV $12,628 #P06448 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '13 Volkswagen Passat: SEL $16,333 #P06449 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '13 Volkswagen Passat $8,990 Stk# P06316A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'01 Ford F-150: $4,995 #49110-3 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '01 Ford F-150: Super Cab $4,995 #49110-3 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '14 Ford F-150: FX4, Crew Cab, 4WD, 50K, $29,490 #C17399A

Lexus '11 Lexus CT: 53K, Roof & Nav, Leather, #B8854 Call Today!

'14 Lexus IS 250: AWD, 39K, Loaded #C17358B Call Today!

'15 Lexus RX 350: Black./Black, AWD, Nav, Loaded #B8879 Call Today!

'16 Lexus RC350: F-sport, AWD, 2K, Save Cash!! $40,490 #B8776

1-866-244-9085 '15 Mazda Mazda3i: Touring, One Owner, Clean Carfax, Mazda Certified Pre-owned $13,990 #P9058

'12 Mazda MX-5 Miata: Grand Touring, Hard Top Convertible, $14,990 #11539A

'16 Mazda Miata: Grand Touring, 2K, Miles, Automatic, $24,990 #M16524R

'14 Mazda 3i Hatchback: One Owner Carfax, Mazda Certified Pre-Owned $14,990 #P9010

'12 Passat: Black, V6, Auto, Local Trade $9,490 '14 CC 2.0T R-Line: Auto, Red, Local Trade $12,490

'10 Mazda Mazda6 i: 2.5L 4 Cyl, FWD, Clean Carfax, 6 Speed, Stick Shift, Call Today, $7,490 #11446A

Mercedes Benz '11 Mercedes Benz C300: AWD, Auto, 45K, Jest Arrived $17,990 #V8322A

'05 Mercedes-Benz C: C-Class $6,397 #69042-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020

Mini Cooper '13 Mini Cooper: Pano Roof, Auto, Sport Package #B8849 Call Today!

Misc. Autos BOMMARITO ST. PETERS CADILLAC SUPERSTORE 1-866-244-9085 '16 SRX Performance: 12K, Red, AWD, Certified Call Today! '17 XT5 Luxury: 4K, AWD, Time to Save, Call Today!

'16 Mazda CX-5: Grand Touring, 15K, AWD $27,990 #M8856

'13 Passat SE: 30K, Black, Auto, Roof, Call Today! '13 Passat SE: 40K, White, Auto, Roof, Nav, Call Today!

Mazda '13 Mazda 3 isport: Automatic, 36K Miles $10,978 #C172079M LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '90 Mazda RX-7: Convertible $5,995 #95164-3 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '15 Mazda 6: Auto, Touring $15,000 #P06412 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Mazda Mazda6 i: Touring, 28K Miles, Auto, Certified, $18,990 #M8673

VOLKSWAGEN'S

'15 Escalade: Luxury, 33K, White, Loaded, Certified, Call Today! '16 Escalade: Premium, 22K, AWD, Loaded, White, Call Today! '11 DTS: Luxury, 43K, White Diamond, Chromes Call Today! '16 ATS Coupe: Performance, 25K Miles, Certified, White, AWD, Call Today! '16 SRX: Luxury, 28K Miles, Black, AWD, Certified $28,990

'13 Routan SE: Black, 74K, Just Arrived $13,490

Nissan/Datsun '11 Nissan Sentra 2.0: Automatic, $6,600 #C180913A LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '10 Nissan Altima: $7,995 #49069-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '16 Nissan Versa: 1.6S $9,997 #49201-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '14 Nissan Sentra SR: $12,397 #49195-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '14 Nissan Sentra SE: $12,397 #68677-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '16 Nissan Altima: 3.5 SR $18,597 #94739SL St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '12 Nissan Altima: Automatic, Sunroof, 53K Miles $10,990 #C8702A

'15 Nissan Sentra: SL, 36K Miles, Automatic, Local Trade $14,690 #C8495A

'09 Nissan Maxima 3.5 One Owner Clean Carfax, Low MIles, GPS, Bluetooth $10,990 #95440M

'10 Nissan Maxima 3.5: Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, Bluetooth $13,990 #95497B

Saab '08 Saab 9-3: $7,995 #69000-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020

Scion '09 Scion tC: One Owner, Sunroof/Moonroof, Flint Mica $5,490 #79013A

'10 Nissan Altima 2.5S Coupe, FWD, CVT with Xtronic, Clean Carfax $7,990 #11247M

Subaru '10 Subaru Forest 2.5X: Motor Trend Certified, AWD $13,490 #28216A

Pontiac

'18 XT5: Premium, Red, 4K, FWD $52,990

'09 Pontiac G6 GXP: 3.6L V6, 6 Speed Automatic $7,213 #C171957B LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770

'12 Toyota Tundra: Crew Cab, 4WD, Blacked Out and Lifted Call Today!#B8907 '14 VW Beetle: R-Line, 55K Miles, One Owner Deep Black, $13,990 #V17298A

Sport Utility '15 BMW X3: Red $26,870 #191131 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '15 Buick Enclave: Premium, AWD, White Diamond, 28K, $33,990 #B8823

'11 Chevy HHR LT, 56K Miles, $7,763 #C180652A LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '06 Chevy HHR LT: 2.4L, Automatic, Leather, $4,741 #C172018A LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '11 Chevy Equinox: LS, FWD, 74K Miles, One Owner $10,730 #C180676A LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '17 Chevy Traverse: LT, AWD $25,994 #P3764 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '11 Chevy Traverse: #190331 $10,800 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '09 Chevy Traverse: $6,997 #49174-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '12 Chevy Tahoe LT: $23,990 #P06119A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Chevy Equinox LT: 8K Miles, Auto, Local Trade, $20,490 #C17287A

Toyota '10 Toyota Camry: LE $8,850 #185092 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '10 Toyota Camry: XLE, 69K Miles, $10,990 #L12712 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '07 Toyota Camry: $6,995 #49211-2 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '07 Toyota Camry SE: $6,597 #49108-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '09 Toyota Corolla: XRS $5,997 #48449-2 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '09 Toyota Avalon: $11,397 #68956-2 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '16 Toyota Corolla LE: $13,008 Stk #P06465 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Toyota Avalon: XLE $20,990 Stk# P06442 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'07 Toyota Corolla CE: One Owner Clean Carfax, FWD, 5Speed Manual $4,990 #11630A

'07 Camry Original owner 144K miles MO Inspection $3900. 636333-2814

Volkswagen '11 Volkswagen Jetta: $6,995 #95199-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020

EXPLORE OUR EXPANDED OBITUARY FEATURES ON

search

Toyota Trucks

'15 VW Jetta 1.8T SE: 1.8L 4 Cyl, FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Turbo, $11,490 #P8949

'09 Nissan Altima: 2.5S $7,490 #11036B

'14 ATS: Luxury, 12K, White Diamond, Certified, $20,990

'13 Volkswagen Tiguan S: One Owner Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, AWD $10,990 #28142B

'17 VW Jetta GLI: 7K Miles, Just Arrived, Save, $21,990 #V8550A

'08 Toyota Camry Hybrid Clean Carfax Low Miles, FWD $9,990 #28340A

'15 SRX: Luxury, 33K Mocha, Certified, $28,490 '08 Mazda MX-5: Convertible, Grand Touring, Clean Carfax, Low Miles $12,990 #11388B

'85 Pontiac Fiero GT: Red, Manual, One For The Ages, $5,990 #M17439A

Volvo '15 Volvo S60 T5: AWD, Platinum Certified, 0/9% Financing, $24,628 #L1340 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '16 Volvo V60 T5: $22,922 #P4175 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '14 Volvo XC60 T5: Volvo Certified, 0.9% Financing, $24,833 #L1311 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '14 Volvo XC60: AWD, Black on Black, Loaded, Just Arrived! #B8851 Call Today!

Chevrolet Trucks '11 Chevy Silverado1500: Extended Cab $15,000 #P06443 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '17 Chevy Colorado: Extended Cab, $22,000 #P06423 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'12 Chevy Silverado: 34K Miles, 4WD, White, 5.3L V8, $27,490 #B8631

'13 Chevy Equinox: LS, One Owner Clean Carfax, Bluetooth $11,490 #P9002A

Ford Trucks '15 Ford F350 Lariot: Diesel, 4x4, Crew, Loaded $48,785 #P3757 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '03 Ford F150: SVT Lightning $12,875 #L13663 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '14 Ford F150: Supercab, STX $22,890 #P41671 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

STLtoday.com/obits

connect

Find the most up-to-date and complete obituary information locally and nationwide

remember

Sign Guest Books, “Light a Candle” and receive grief support

Send flowers, gifts and create a memorial website

For info on submitting an obit/memorial email deathnotices@post-dispatch.com or call 314-340-8600

'15 Ford Edge: Titanium, Leather, Heated Seats $23,899 #P3724 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '17 Ford Escape: SE $16,989 #P3720 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '17 Ford Explorer LTD, Black on Black $35,790 #P4245 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '07 Ford Edge SEL, Plus $13,995 #68849-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020


C4

Classified

M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

WEDNESDAY

Sales Champ Overhauled

DECEMBER 20, 2017

STLTODAY.COM

Toyota completely redesigns top-selling Camry to be more engaging CARGAZING

By DEREK PRICE

Contributing Automotive Writer

When Toyota started its topto-bottom redesign of America’s most popular car, the Camry, the goal could be summed up with one word: emotion. That’s a dramatic change for a vehicle long known for being automotive vanilla. Its decades-long reputation is built on reliability and practicality more than style and feel, so the decision to inject some excitement into the Camry — even a little bit — is a big deal. And if Toyota wants people to see this new-generation Camry as a break from the past, it’s working. I just spent a week driving the all-new 2018 model, and people’s reaction was almost universally the same everywhere I took it. “That’s a Camry?” folks would ask. It certainly doesn’t look like your father’s Toyota. An aggressive front end with a gaping grille, sweeping character lines on the sides and an optional two-tone paint job with a blacked-out roof combine to

make it look futuristic and even a bit, yes, sporty. Granted, my tester was the most out-there looking version, the Camry XSE, which was intentionally designed to appear different from the regular Camry from as far as 200 yards away. Toyota’s stylists wanted the sport trim levels — perhaps the Camry’s biggest opportunity for sales growth — to be obviously, blatantly special. Its new driving feel is similarly sporty, although no one will confuse it for a BMW. The version I tested felt tauter than any Camry I’ve driven before, with less body roll and a noticeably lower center of gravity that helps it hug the road. The vast majority of buyers, though, will be looking for what this car is known for: a smooth, silent, solid-feeling ride. Toyota borrowed ideas from its luxury models to help make the new Camry quieter, including more sound insulation under the hood and in the fenders, a thicker insulating mat in front of the firewall, more noise-proofing material in the

ceiling and a new design for an all-around solid product, as sion is rated for 51 mpg in city driving and 53 on the highway, the rain gutters to cut down on usual for a Camry. Just as before, three engine a huge jump over the previous wind noise. While its roof height is an choices are available: four cyl- generation car. Finally, there’s my favorite inch lower than before, some- inders, six cylinders or a hything that helps its aerody- brid drivetrain. The 2.5-liter thing of all about the new Camnamics and contributes to that four-cylinder engine makes 206 ry and what I think will move more of them on the sporty new look, the showroom floor than interior feels just as anything else. It comes spacious as ever. The standard — even the hip points in both the cheapest base model front and back seats, — with radar cruise hood height and glass control, lane departure area all dropped alert with steering asdown about an inch, sist, blind spot monitoo, to keep visibility tors, rear cross traffic and roominess simialert and sensors delar to the previous signed to prevent colgeneration. lisions, including sensThis car’s Achiling pedestrians who les heel remains its The Toyota Camry’s new look marks a dramatic departure from the infotainment system. past, especially on the XSE sport trim with a black roof and aggres- walk in front of the car. The system is called Most new 2018 ve- sive lines. hicles are offering today’s two horsepower and is rated for 41 Toyota Safety Sense-P, and best smartphone connection mpg on the highway, a strong Toyota deserves major kudos technologies that come from combination that will make for making this a no-charge feaactual tech companies, not car most drivers happy. A 3.5-liter ture set on every model instead manufacturers — Apple Car- V6 is better for people who want of an extra-cost upsell like most Play and Android Auto — but more performance, and I loved of its competitors. Pricing starts at $23,495 for Toyota stubbornly continues to how it felt and sounded in my do its own thing and not offer tester. It makes 301 horsepower the base L trim and ranges up the Apple or Google systems. and earns a still-respectable 32- to $34,950 for the sporty and Aside from that, it’s hard to find mpg highway rating from the luxurious XSE with a V6 enmany complaints in this car. It’s government. The hybrid ver- gine.

3795 West State Route 15 Belleville, IL

618-233-8140

2017 RAM

2017 JEEP CHEROKEE

YEAR END SALES EVENT! JUST ANNOUNCED!

EVEN BIGGER REBATES! Inquire Within.

YEAR END SALES EVENT!!

Up to 35% off MSRP

Up to 30% off MSRP

PRE-OWNED

2017 PACIFICA

Now America’s Best Selling Mini Van

$6,198 Discount & 0% Financing For 60 Months

If you currently own a FCAV additional loyalty rebates may apply.

2008 Dodge Avenger #33093.............................. $5,997 2008 Pontiac G6 #60481.............................. $5,997 2012 Chevy Cruze #43730.............................. $7,997 2008 Mazda Mazda6, #33018A. .......................... $7,997 2013 Chevy Cruze #43705.............................. $8,995

2008 Chrysler 300 Hemi, #60499....................................$8,995 2008 Chrysler Crossfire #5525....................................$11,488 2013 Kia Soul + #38022..................................$10,675 2015 Kia Soul #33022..................................$10,977

WHAT

O IT IS T

3795 West State Route 15, Belleville, IL • www.olivercjoseph.net Tax title, license, doc extra, some vehicles may have aftermarket options at extra cost.

Sport Utility

Sport Utility

Sport Utility

Sport Utility

Sport Utility

Sport Utility

'09 Ford Escape: XLT $7,995 #68585-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '06 Ford Explorer: $7,065 #52A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '13 Ford Escape SE: One Owner, Ruby Red Tinted, Turbocharged VCT $10,990 #39226A

'13 GMC Yukon Denali: DVD, Sunroof, Black $32,900 #48966-1 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '12 GMC Terrain: SLE-2 $17,700 #P06432 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 GMC Yukon XL: 4WD, Loaded, 33K Miles, Black $54,990 #C17389A

'09 Honda Pilot: $10,397 #67076-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '11 Honda CR-V: SE, AWD, Gray, Roof, #14,990 #B8833

'12 Kia Sorento EX: One Owner Clean Carfax, AWD, $11,490 #11456A

'15 Mazda CX-9: Grand Touring, AWD, Navigation $30,490 #M8790

'12 Nissan Murano: Motor Trend Certified, AWD, Low Miles $13,990 #11195A

'11 Land Rover LR4: Must See!$17,900 #48607-1 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426

'16 Mazda CX-5: Touring, AWD, 15K, Certified $24,490 #M8791

'12 Porsche Cayenne: $26,890 #191261 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '15 Scion XP: $11,697 #48830-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '17 Toyota Rav4: XLE $22,900 #P3788 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426

'07 Ford Edge SEL: Clean Carfax, AWD, Leather Trimmed Seats, Low Miles, $9,990 #11455A

'12 Ford Edge SE: Clean Carfax, AWD, Bluetooth, Heated Front Seats $9,490 #11215A

'10 Ford Edge: Limited, Panorama Sunroof, Heated Front Seats $9,990 #96737A

STLtoday.com/classifieds

'17 GMC Acadia SLT-1: FWD, 3K Miles, Local Trade, $31,990 #C8502A

'15 GMC Terrain: Roof, Navigation, Chromes, Navy Blue $21,990 #B8801

'10 GMC Acadia SLT-1: One Owner, AWD, Heated Front Seats, Remote Start, Backup Camera, Bluetooth $12,490 #79055A

'07 Honda CRV EX-L, $7,995 #49357-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020

'16 Honda Fit: EX, Auto, Yellow!! Yellow!! $17,490 #B8847

'15 Hyundai Tuscon: $15,997 #67279-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '11 Hyundai Santa Fe: GLS $9,995 #49468-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '13 Hyundai Santa Fe $14,995 #68142-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020

'15 Hyundai Santa Fe: Limited, Has It All!! Nav, Roof, Call Now! #V18142A

STLtoday.com/homes

'11 Land Rover LR4: Black on Black, Rear DVD, AWD, #B8855 Call Today!

'13 Lexus RX450H: $24,855 #187831 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

'16 Lexus NX 200t: 7K Miles, AWD, Local Trade, $35,490 #C17318A

'08 Lexus LX 470: 4.7L V8, Clean Carfax, 4WD, Sunroof, 3rd Row Seating $8,490 #96616A

'11 Mazda CX-7: $6,997 #68648-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020

'13 Mazda CX-9: Sport, 55K Miles, Certified, Gray #M17128A Call Today!

'16 Nissan Rogue: L, Loaded, 9K Miles, $23,800 #189311 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

'08 Toyota 4Runner: SR5, V8, Clean Carfax, AWD, Low Miles $14,990 #27595M

'14 Nissan Maxima: 3.5 $16,997 #48557-5 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020

'14 Nissan Murano: LE Pano Roof, Navigation, Gray $22,490 #B8835

'13 Nissan Murano: Motor Trend Certified, $13,490 #78437A

@stltoday ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH


Property Manager Condominium Association looking for full-time Property Manager. Duties will include: management of Association, coordination of subcontractors, approval of invoices, minor maintenance, yard work (i.e., mowing, trimming, etc.), leaf pick-up in the fall, snow removal and sidewalk clearing in the winter, and other duties associated with the upkeep of condominium units. Housing is included. Please send full resume to: PO Box 411991, Creve Coeur, Missouri 63141.

Sport Utility

Public Notices

'03 Toyota Rav4: AWD, Low Miles, Rainforest Pearl $6,990 #8897M

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF ST. LOUIS COUNTY, MISSOURI

'07 Volvo XC70: AWD $8,773 #P42112 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

Mini vans '12 Chrysler Town & Country: $10,995 #49078-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '15 Dodge Journey: SXT $15,400 #P06426 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '14 Dodge Grand Caravan Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, 3rd Row Seating $13,990 #78114A

'14 Honda Odyssey: EX-L, Just Arrived, 40K Miles, Well Cared For $24,490 #B8762

'07 Toyota Sienna: $6,995 #68280-1 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai 866-672-4020 '11 Toyota Sienna: Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, Low Miles $14,490 #78731C

Boats 1977 AeroGlass Fish & Ski, 135 HP Mercury Eng. - just overhauled, Exc. Cond., 314-313-5534

Help Wanted Drivers: CDL-A! Jingle all the way to the bank!

Paid Benefits, Mileage, 401K & Incentives! Recruiting.DriveTransLand .com/Join

800-234-5710

Dogs AKC Reg. Labs, dew claws removd, up to date shots/wrmed, vet chkd. 18 mo. health guar. Avail. 12/15. 618-697-4146. Bernese Mountain Dog - Male dob 11/28/16 house broke, obedience trained, neutered, microchipped U T D on shots, A K C registered. 1200.00 573-631-5190 Dobe rman Pinche r Pups , A K C Black & Rust and Red & Rust, All s hots incl. Rabie s & worme d; Tails, Dew Claws & Ears Done. $650. (573)484-4525.

DOODLES & RETRIEVERS: Puppies Ready Now & Thru Christmas!

LABRADOODLES, GOLDENDOODLES, GOLDADORS, GOLDEN RETRIEVERS & LABS All Colors & Sizes, Health Guarantee. Top Rated Breeder

618.396.2494 sieversretrievers.com English Golden Retrievers, Goldendoodles, Wheaten Terriers, Shiba Inu, Lots of Cute Poos!

636-240-3647

lovencarepets.org

Frenchton Puppies Available . 2F 3 /4 French-1/4 BT; 3 M/ 2 F 1 /4 French-3/4 BT. $800-$1200 Call 417-247-5531 GERM AN SHEPHERD PUPS, AKC, Beautiful, show & working line, exc. quality, Reasonable. (314) 605-6216 GOLDENDOODLES 1 male, 1 female. 8 weeks old. Big, beautiful, mellow, intelligent babies for Christmas. chipped. all shots READY NOW! 314-440-4400 GOLDEN DOODLES ICA, cremes and apricots 6-Male & 4-females. $700-$800 ggkpups.com 573-619-3357 GOLDEN RETRIEVER PUPS AKC, OFA, Selectively Bred. Shots, wormed, health guar. See parents. 618.883.2137 www.sieverskennels.com Golden Retrievers AKC Reg., 1st Shots, Dewormed, $500. Call (479)244-9630 LAB PUPS - AKC, OFA Yellow, black, chocolate. See Parents, Calm. Shots, Wormed, Health Guar. 618.883.2137 www.sieverskennels.com LAB PUPS, AKC Reg., 1st Shots, Dewormed, Chocolate & Yellow. $500. Call (715)413-1499 MINIATURE SCHNAUZERS AKC, Black & Silver, 2 females. Ready 12/21. $800-$1000 ggkpups.com 573-619-3357 Retriever Poodle Mix, 7 male, 2 female. 10 wks. $500/ ea. All shots, dewormed, dew claws removed. Call 636-432-3435

Firewood/Fuel Seasoned Oak & Hickory delivered/ stacked. Cherry also available for smoking. Over 25 yrs of service 573-513-6510

Merchandise Wanted WANTED: Historian will pay top $$ for German-Japanese WW II relics 314-438-8665

Sporting Goods

GUN SHOW

DEC. 22-23 FRI 9-5 & SAT 9-5 FARMINGTON CIVIC CENTER (2 Black Knight Dr) INFO: (563) 927-8176 www.rkshows.com

STLtoday.com/jobs

In re LAURA ELLEN LOPER Filed Nov. 27, 2017 Joan M. Gilmer Circuit Clerk, St. Louis County Case No. 17SL-DR05019 Division No. 40 Parties: Appearances Petitioner(s) appears in person The court finds that the change of name (s) would be prope r and would not be detrimental to the interests of any other person. The name(s) of Petitioner(s) is/are changed as follows: From LAURA ELLEN LOPER To LAURA ELLEN SAMPSON Birth Date 2/8/1959 Notice : Notice of the change of name(s) shall be published at least once each week for three consecutive weeks in the following newspaper of general circulation: ST. LOUIS COUNTIAN Court Costs: Court costs are to be paid from the court cost deposit(s) previously posted. /s/ D Smith Judge Dennis N. Smith 11-27-17 Date

NOTICE OF FILING OF A DECLARATION OF CANDIDACY FOR DIRECTORS OF PUBLIC WATER SUPPLY DISTRICT NO. 2 OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY Notice is hereby given that all persons interested in filing a Declaration of Candidacy for Director of Public Water Supply District No. 2 of St. Charles County, Missouri from Sub-District #3 and SubDistrict #4 may do so at the offices of the said District, located at 100 Water Drive, O'Fallon, Missouri 63368 between the hours of 8:00 am and 4:30 p m . Monday through Friday, on and between the dates listed herein. In addition, the office will be open for Filing on January 16th, 2018 until 5:00 pm. Filing of a Declaration of Candidacy begins at 8:00 am December 12, 2017 and closes at 5:00 pm January 16th, 2018. Done by the order of the Board of Directors, Public Water Supply District No. 2 of St. Charles County, Missouri.

NOTICE OF FILING OF INTERAGENCY BANK MERGER ACT APPLICATION This notice is to inform the public that pursuant to Section 18(c) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act, The Peoples State Bank of Newton ("Newton") and First Bank have filed an Interagency Bank Merger Act Application with the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation ("FDIC") for its prior written approval of the purchase and assumption by Newton of certain assets and liabilities associated with First Bank's branches located at 1310 West Main Street, Salem, Illinois 62881, 200 Mattes Avenue, Vandalia, Illinois 62471 and 200 West Main Street, Greenville, Illinois 62246. The branches will continue to be operated by Newton under the name of "The Peoples State Bank of Newton" following completion of the transaction. Any person wishing to comment on this application may file his or her comments in writing with the regional director of the FDIC at the appropriate FDIC regional office located at 300 S. Riverside Plaza, Suite 1700, Chicago, Illinois 60606 not later than January 7, 2017. The non-confidential portions of the application are on file at the appropriate FDIC office and are available for public inspection during regular business hours. Photocopies of the non-confidential portion of the application file will be made available upon request.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CITY OF CHESTERFIELD PLANNING COMMISSION NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Planning Commission of the City of Chesterfield will hold a Public Hearing on Monday, January 08, 2018 at 7:00 pm, in the Council Chambers at the City Hall, 690 Chesterfield Parkway We s t , C h e s t e r f i e l d , M i s s o u ri 63017. Said Hearing will be as follows: P.Z. 21-2017 Clock Tower Plaza ( K o m m e r z L C ) : A request t o amend Ordinance 2,442 to revise development restrictions in a "PC" Planned Commercial district for 2.61 acres located north of Edison Avenue and northeast of the intersection of Chesterfield Commons East Road and Edison Avenue. (17T240243). Any one interested in the proceedings will be given an opportunity to be heard. Copies of the request are available for review in the Department of Planning a n d Development Services a t Chesterfield City Hall, 690 Chesterfield Parkway West during weekdays between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. If you should need additional information about this project, please contact Mr. Joseph Knight, Project Planner, by telephone at 636-537-4736 or by e m a i l a t jknight@chesterfield.mo.us CITY OF CHESTERFIELD Merrell Hansen, Chair Chesterfield Planning Commission PROPERTY DESCRIPTION A TRACT OF LAND BEING PART OF LOT 2 OF SI LVER MAPLE F AR M , ACCORDI NG TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 274, PAGE 96 OF ST. LOUIS COUNTY RECORDS TOWNSHIP 45 NORTH, RANGE 4 EAST OF THE FIFTH PRINCIPAL M ERI DI AN, ST. LOUIS COUNTY, MISSOURI.

M 1 ●

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

WEDNESDAY

ATTENTION H.O.K. EMPLOYEES

IF YOU WORKED AT H.O.K DURING THE YEARS OF:1971-1974 PLEASE CALL DAN AT 1.618.659.7751

PUBLIC NOTICE AUCTION If payment is not received, PS OrangeCo, Inc. will sell the entire contents of rental spaces at the following locations to the highest bidder on: December 29, 2017, starting at 8:00 a.m. The undersigned will sell personal property including furniture, clothing, tools, and/or other household items. (Auctions will start at 8691 Olive Blvd, St. Louis, MO 63132 and run in order as listed.) 8691 Olive Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63132 1020 McMiller, 1301 Williams, 1303 Johnson, 1304 Allen, 2016 Pearson, 2033 Moseley, 225 Chatman, 2303 Grant, 342 Falls, 344 Moore, 408 Carter, 512 Crawford, 744 Taylor, 926 White, B3035 Young. 4653 World Pkwy, St. Louis, MO 63134 1019 Patrick, 3013 Sutton, 3028 Clark Jr., 3049 Fisher, 4044 Ponder, 4060 Anderson, 4123 Chappell, 5010 Blountt, 5051 Hardin, 6011 Hamilton, 6063 Woods, 6078 Smith. 9291W Florissant, St. Louis, MO 63136 111 Kelsey, 246 Garner, 257 Baker, 259 Sanford, 308 Poole, 322 Rogers, 353 Myer, 403 Blanchard, 412 Raybon, 423 Gann, 505 Harwell, 510 Dugger, 534 Williams, 609 Henderson, 629 Jackson, 638 Moore, 651 Lewis, 658 Dixon, 671 Hill, 675 Simmons, 735 Pyse, 740 Griffith, 753 Foster III, 770 Hurd, 784 Blount. 11575 New Halls Ferry, Florissant, MO 63033 1007 Bates, 1012 Richardson, 102 Robinson, 1070 Mady, 1073 Smith, 1125 Johnson, 1211 Malik, 1235 Washington, 206 Welch, 336 Williams, 356 Schneider, 407 Foster, 417 Gorden, 461 Anderson, 468 Williams, 502 Crayton, 514 Franklin, 521 Wotawa, 528 Nash, 558 Owens, 560 Smith, 631 Shank, 632 Mcclendon, 739 Barnes, 742 Cunningham, 751 Bell, 859 Burgess, 867 Rothberg, 910 Oladapo, 918 West, 920 Hendley. 11837 Benham Road, St. Louis, MO 63138 B011 Stevenson, B019 Hall, B048 Jenkins, B054 Mosier, B056 Keys, B062 Payne, C033 Whitley, C039 Scott, C065 Wishom, C077 Morrow, C109 Scales, C130 Winham, C141 Flemming, D009 Smith, D010 Moore, D047 Lee, E043 Hunter, E044 Marshall, E121 Cole, F033 McCombs, F038 Jordan, F063 Ford, G035 Chapman, G036 Brim Jr. 14249 New Halls Ferry, St. Louis, MO 63033 1015 Johnson, 1049 Caston, 1063 Brown, 1070 Betts, 1076 Whitley, 1115 Wright, 2037 Jenkins, 3026 Anderson, 3059 Clark, 3074 Williams, 3098 Morris, 3153 Jenkins, 3189 Wright, 3210 Costello, 3225 Forston. 1795 N Hwy 67, Florissant, MO 63033 101 Blanks, 117 Hatton, 134 Criddle, 167 Amann, 190 Muhammad, 305 Boyd, 407 Williams, 624 Tolias, 701 Mckee, 718 Pryor, 739 Childress, 812 Wright, 839 Walker, 841 Robbins, 915 Hatton. 6030 N. Lindbergh Blvd, Hazlewood, MO 63042 B005 McCallum, B015 Shiadek, B026 Levy, B030 Reed, C018 Rogers, C040 Forrester Jr., C042 Heinle, D005 Rogers, D015 Bass, D022 Thomas, D074 Gregory, D076 Moore, E003 Defrance, E026 Grace, E032 Robinson, E042 Wallace, E043 Hampton, F055 Cobbs, F101 Starks, G011 Banks. 3760 Pennridge Dr. Bridgeton, MO 63044 B006 Hamilton, C001 Whitesell, D031 Revelle, D043 Anderson, E022 Mccain, E062 Purnell, F042 Harris, F046 Walton, G015 Perry Jr., G020 Harvey. 1539 Old Highway 94 S, St. Charles, MO 63303 B003 Williams, B019 Patton, C033 Smith, D069 Adams, D092 Counts, D096 Kemple, E011 Macias, E054 Carapella, E098 Smelser, H063 Nelson 3777 Veterans Memorial Pkwy, St. Charles, MO 63303 10-226 Heitman, 11-259 Chambers, 11-260 Reid, 13-340 Hayden, 6-146 Weber

PUBLIC NOTICE AUCTION If payment is not received, PS OrangeCo, Inc. will sell the entire contents of rental spaces at the following locations to the highest bidder on: December 28, 2017, starting at 8:00 a.m. The undersigned will sell personal property including furniture, clothing, tools, and/or other household items. (Auctions will start at 1250 S Third Street, St. Louis, MO 63104 and run in order as listed.) 1250 S. Third Street, St. Louis, MO 63104 902 Meneh, 925 Meneh, C108 Gaines, E8 Down, G156 Porter, G25 Russell, G51 Bumpus 11 North Vandeventer Ave St Louis MO 63108 141 Hampton, 156 Tory, 171 Nunley, 175 Alexander, 230 Clark, 233 Triplett, 242 Hayes, 297 Wiggley, 311 Richardson, 350 Primm, 434 Rusan, 454 Hill, 487 Shannon, 490 Wallace, 492 Graham, 493 Mays, 503 Lindquist, 658 Palozola Jr. 5801 Wilson Rd St Louis MO 63110 1112 Carpenter, 1213 Warner, 2110 Vine, 2280 Graumenz, 2355 Bass, 2369 Meeks, 3135 Hopkins, B010 Cryer, B023 Jay Carpenter 3rd, B091 McClenahan

DECEMBER 20, 2017 Public Notices

Bids/Proposals

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

CITY OF ST. LOUIS BOARD OF PUBLIC SERVICE

Notice is hereby given that the Planning and Zoning C o m m i s s i o n of the City of Ellisville w ill continue a public hearing at the Ellisville City Hall, #1 Weis Avenue, on Wednesday, January 10, 2018, at 7:00 P.M. to consider a City-initiated petition for Text Amendments to Title IV, Land Use, pertaining to the following: (1) fences, and (2) building lines/setbacks. Notice is hereby given that the Council of the City of Ellisville will hold a public hearing at the Ellisville City Hall, #1 Weis Avenue, on Wednesday, January 17, 2018, at 7:00 P.M. to consider a City-initiated petition for Text Amendm e n t s t o T i t l e I V, L a n d U s e , pertaining to the following: (1) fences, and (2) building lines/setbacks. These public hearings are in compliance with Title IV, Land Use, of the Municipal Code of the City of Ellisville.

P U B L I C N O T I C E: C e l l c o Partnership and its controlled affiliates doing business as Verizon Wireless (Verizon Wireless) are proposing to construct a 98.5-foot side-mounted telecommunications tower located at 1430 Olive Street, in St. Louis, Clayton County, Missouri (3 8 3 7 ' 49.0'' North and 90 1 2 ' 0 4 . 0 0 '' West). Public comments regarding potential effects on historic properties may be submitted within 3 0 days from the date of this publication to: Patrick Moakley, Terracon 135 Ambassador Drive, Naperville, IL 6 0 5 4 0 ; (6 3 0 ) 4 4 5 - 0 1 9 7 ; patrick.moakley@ terracon.com.

R E Q U E S T F O R QUALIFICATIONS for Professional Engineering and Field Survey Services for Louisiana Calm Streets, St. Louis, M O, Federal Project TAP9901(649). Statements of Qualifications due by 5:00 PM, CT, January 10, 2018 at Board of Public Service, 1200 Market, Room 301 City Hall, St. Louis, MO 63103. RFQ may be obtained from website w w w .stl-bps.org, under On Line Plan Room - Plan Room, or call Board of Public Service at 314-622-3535. 14% D B E participation goal for this project.

CITY OF ST. LOUIS BOARD OF PUBLIC SERVICE R E Q U E S T F O R QUALIFICATIONS for DESIGN SERVICES FOR CLIMATE CONTROL PROJECTS, PACKAGES 2 AND 3, ST. LOUIS LAMBERT INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT. Statements of Qualifications due by 5:00 P.M ., CT, January 11, 2018 at Board of Public Service, 1200 Market, Room 301 City Hall, St. Louis, MO 63103. RFQ may be obtained from website www.stlbps.org, under the On Line Plan Room - Plan Room, or call the City of St. Louis, Board of Public Service, at 314-622-3535. 25% MBE and 5% WBE participation goals.

MEHLVILLE SCHOOL DISTRICT ACCEPTING BIDS/PROPOSALS Notice to Contractors, Mehlville School District is accepting sealed bids/proposals for HVAC Updates. For more details, please visit our website at w w w.mehlvilleschool district.com

STATE OF INDIANA COUNTY OF LAKE ss. IN THE LAKE SUPERIOR COURT CROWN POINT, INDIANA IN THE MATTER OF: JT - DOB 10/9/2008 MT - DOB 5/22/2014 CHILDREN ALLEGED TO BE CHILDREN IN NEED OF SERVICES AND JA SMINE A SR EA L SA YLES, MOTHER NICHOLAS TAYLOR, FATHER A ND A NY UNKNOWN A L LEGED FATHERS (Parents) CAUSE NUMBER: 45D06-1705-JC-000565 45D06-1705-JC-000566 SUMMONS FOR SERVICE BY PUBLICATION & NOTICE OF CHILDREN IN NEED OF SERVICES HEARING TO: Nicholas Taylor and Any Unknown Alleged Fathers; NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to the above noted parent whose whereabouts are unknown, as well as Any Unknown Alleged Fathers, whose whereabouts are also unknown, that the Indiana Department of Child Services has filed its Verified Petition Alleging the children to be in Need of Services, in accordance with I.C. 3134-9-3, and that an adjudication hearing has been scheduled with the Court. Y O U A R E H E R E B Y COMMANDED to appear before the Judge of the Lake Superior C o u r t , 3 0 0 0 W. 93rd Avenue, Crown Point, IN 46307, 219-6606900 for a CHINS Publication Service Return Hearing on 2/14/2018 at 8:30 AM . At said hearing, the Court will consider the Petition and evidence thereon and w ill r e n d e r it s decision a s t o whether the above named minor children are children in need of services and shall enter adjudication accordingly. Your failure to appear after lawful notice will be deemed as your default and waiver to be present at said hearing. UPON ENTRY OF SAID ADJUDICA TION, A D I SPO SI T I O N A L HEARING will be held in which the Court will consider (1) Alternatives for the care, treatment, or rehabilitation for the children; (2) The necessity, nature, and extent of your participation in the program of care, treatment, or rehabilitation f o r t h e children; a n d (3) Your financial responsibility for any services provided for the parent, guardian or custodian of the children including child support.

MISSOURI DEPARTMENT OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Posted: December 15, 2017 Hearing: Monday, January 8, 2018, 2:00 – 5:00 p.m. Notice is hereby given that the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) w ill conduct a public hearing relating to the hiring of a new commissioner of education, from 2:00 . 5:00 p.m. on Monday, January 8, 2018, in the State Board Room, 1st floor, Jefferson Building, 205 Jefferson St. Jefferson City, MO 65101. The tentative agenda will be as follows: • 2:00-2:15 . Opening comments by State Board of Education President Charlie Shields • 2 : 1 5 - 5 : 0 0 . Pu b lic c o mme n t period* (*Verbal comments will be limited to three minutes each. Longer comments may be submitted in writing at the hearing; absentee comments may be emailed to sbe@ dese.mo.gov or sent to State Board of Education, P.O. B o x 4 8 0 , J e f f e r s o n C it y , M O 65102.) Anyone attending this public hearing who requires auxiliary aids or services should request such services by contacting the executive assistant to the State Board of Education for the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, 573-751-3563, or Relay Missouri, 800-735-2966, no later than 72 hours before the meeting. The news media may obtain copies of this notice by contacting Sarah Potter, Communications Coordinator PO Box 480 Jefferson City, MO 65102 573 -751 -3469 communications@dese.mo.gov

Exclusive St. Louis books, apparel, gifts and more!

Y O U M U S T R E S P O N D by appearing in person or by an attorney within thirty (30) days after the last publication of this notice, and in the event you fail to do so, an adjudication on said petition and a dispositional decree may be entered against you without further notice. Dated this 4th day of December, 2017 Michael A. Brown Juvenile Court Clerk Justin R Paris, 31076-64 Attorney, Indiana Department of Child Services, 661 Broadway, Gary, IN 46402 Work: 219-881-6944

3850 Forder Road, St. Louis, MO 63129 F018 Haake, H033 Pastrana, J013 Mitchell, M003 Enloe, M020 Wiethop 3940 Reavis Barracks, St. Louis, MO 63125 A097 Rodriguez, D401 Hopkins, D433 Sears 9722 Gravois, Affton, MO 63123 B022 Newman, B048 Fernow, B050 Leftridge, B061 Valdivia, D223 Sample, D238 Binford, G057 Boyer 9030 Watson Rd. Crestwood, MO 63126 F064 Burns, F275 Buckingham, G003 Hefner 1550 N Lindbergh, St. Louis 63132 030 Fitzpatrick, 415 Harris, 609 Chandler, 610 Spencer, 646 Nevils, 684 Collins, 757 Caldwell, 801 Feldmann, 954 Adewole 2956 N. Lindbergh Blvd., Saint Ann, MO 63074 093 Radwan, 116 Keys, 123 Jones, 144 Johnson, 177 Kozieja, 181 Mcpherson, 185 Powell, 186 Wilkes, 221 Carr, 272 Irizarry, 296 Johnson, 309 Banks, 347 Market. 11580 Page Service Road, St. Louis, MO 63146 D061 Pack, D100 Randolph, D110 Thorpe, D141 RZ Financial Group LLC, D154 RZ Financial Group LLC, D160 Washington, D172 Stevenson, D194 Motley

C5

STLTODAY.COM

thepost-dispatchstore.com

Classified

STLtoday.com/readerrewards

GET A GREAT DEAL! The Ultimatee Guide To What’s On TV V

81%OFF

*

FOR POST-DISPATCH SUBSCRIBERS ONLY

Localized TV and cable listings tings for your area

*off the cover price

Daily best bets & sports section

13 issues for just

2211 Barrett Station Rd, Ballwin, MO 63021 B027 Ries, B047 Gold, B229 Baldridge

A-Z movie guide & network news

831 Meramec Station Rd, Valley Park, MO 63088 B002 Grothaus, B008 West, B010 Keener, B041 Dennings, B066 O’Meara, B128 Dick, B226 Boulais, C001Lenau, D050 Pleimann, E001 Marberry

Puzzles, games, trivia, soaps and horoscopes

16230 Truman Rd Ellisville, MO 63011 1049 Davis, 2028 Armstrong, B009 Poertner

Q & A with your favorite celebrities

ordering is easy!

$9.75

1-877-580-4159

iwantmytvmagazine.com


Classified

M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

WEDNESDAY

DECEMBER 20, 2017

STLTODAY.COM

cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com

($2,750 Consumer Cash + $500 Chrysler Capital Bonus Cash + $2,000 Bonus Cash + $1,000 Hemi V8 Bonus Cash + $1,250 Bonus Cash (Bighorn/Laramie) + $3,105 Avg. Dealer Discount + $3,000 Big Horn Package Discount) Only available on select models and trims. Residency restrictions apply. Must finance through Chrysler Capital. Not all customers will qualify. Tax, title and license fees may apply. See dealer for complete details. Expires 1/2/18

Only available on select models and trims. Residency restrictions apply. May need to finance through specific financial institution. Not all customers will qualify. Tax, title and license fees may apply. See dealer for complete details. Expires 1/2/18

Only available on select models and trims. Residency restrictions apply. May need to finance through specific financial institution. Not all customers will qualify. Tax, title and license fees may apply. See dealer for complete details. Expires 1/2/18

2018 JEEP COMPASS

®

•LATITUDE FWD• WELL-QUALIFIED LESSEES CAN GET A LOW-MILEAGE LEASE FOR:

179/MO.

$

39

3,299

DUE AT /MO. SIGNING TAX, TITLE AND LICENSE EXTRA. NO SECURITY DEPOSIT REQUIRED FOR

$

$

($.20 CHARGE FOR EACH MILE OVER 32,500 MILES)

OFFER FOR WELL-QUALIFIED LESSEES THROUGH ALLY FINANCIAL BASED ON MSRP EXAMPLE WITH A 28J PACKAGE AFTER $2,750 IN TOTAL CASH ALLOWANCE, PLUS $0 ACQUISITION FEE. TOTAL DUE AT SIGNING INCLUDES A DOWN PAYMENT OF $3,120 AND FIRST MONTH’S PAYMENT. TOTAL MONTHLY PAYMENTS EQUALS $6,981. TAX, TITLE AND LICENSE AND DEALER DOCUMENTATION FEES ARE EXTRA. OFFER REQUIRES A DEALER CONTRIBUTION WHICH MAY AFFECT FINAL COST. LESSEE IS RESPONSIBLE FOR EXCESS WEAR AND TEAR AND MILEAGE CHARGE IF VEHICLE IS RETURNED AT END OF TERM. OPTION TO PURCHASE AT LEASE END AT A RESIDUAL PRICE. EACH PARTICIPATING DEALER’S ACTUAL TERMS MAY VARY. NOT ALL LESSEES WILL QUALIFY. RESIDENCY RESTRICTIONS APPLY. MUST TAKE RETAIL DELIVERY BY 1/2/18. JEEP IS REGISTERED TRADEMARK OF FCA US LLC.

*Vehicles based on inventory. Price includes rebates and discounts. Everyone qualifies for Cassens price, customers may qualify for additional rebates. See dealer for details. Tax,title license & doc fees extra. Expires 1/2/18.

YOUR AUTOMOTIVE SUPERSTORE 2 Miles North of I-270 on Hwy. 159

cassenscan.com 618-656-6070

CASSENS

4

cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com

cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com

cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com cassenscan.com

C6


STLTODAY.COM/FOOD WEDNESDAY • 12.20.2017 • L

PHOTOS BY CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

RING IN THE NEW YEAR WITH THESE

TASTY TRADITIONS BY DANIEL NEMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The first time my parents left my brother and me alone overnight, it was New Year’s Eve. Being the wild-eyed, raucous partiers that we were, we celebrated our freedom by watching one of those countdown shows on television, popping a batch of popcorn and drinking Dr Pepper. And thus was a tradition born. For the next several years, we observed New Year’s Eve, separately or together, with popcorn and Dr Pepper.

The point is that New Year’s Eve traditions are easy to make. But around the world, they seem to share a couple of themes. Many cultures look to New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day as a time to hope for prosperity. That is why many cultures celebrate with a pot of beans or lentils, which, because there are so many of them in a serving, represent abundance. Other cultures focus on the end-of-year, beginning-ofyear theme of continuity, by See TRADITIONS • Page L4

RECIPES • Vasilopita (top), Toshikoshi Soba (above), Polenta With Lentils in Tomato Sauce and Hoppin’ John. PAGE L4

Nutty as a — well, you know DANIEL NEMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The thing is, I like fruitcake. And yes, I’ve heard all the jokes. “Fruitcakes make ideal gifts because the Postal Service has been unable to find a way to damage them.” — Dave Barry There is just something about a dense, lightly spiced cake studded with nuts and pieces of dried fruit that appeals to

Best wines of 2017

my sense of the holidays. Perhaps it’s Pavlovian — I have been conditioned to associate fruitcake with sparkling lights, happy music, Santa Claus, cookies and presents. Fruitcake makes me joyous, if not outright merry. It doesn’t have to be great, expensive, high-quality fruitcake, either. I am perfectly happy with a slice or six from a relatively cheap loaf, as long as it meets the right conditions. It cannot be too dry. It cannot be too

This is definitely a good time to be a consumer who wants a good quality wine priced at $15 and below. We are the beneficiaries of a number of forces in our favor, including better production methods, the availability of wines from all over the world and stiff competition for shelf space. In addition, local retailers continue to offer discounts for multiple-bottle purchases and other promotions. Although I found many fine affordable wines during 2017, here are some of my favorites:

See NEMAN • Page L4

See WINES • Page L5

BY GAIL APPLESON Special to the Post-Dispatch

LET’S EAT

1 M


L2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

ON OUR RADAR

LET’S EAT

AMY BERTRAND Let’s Eat and features editor • abertrand@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8284 DANIEL NEMAN food writer • dneman@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8133 DONNA BISCHOFF vice president of advertising • dbischoff@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8529

WINE FINDS

Pinot meunier makes a unique gift BY GAIL APPLESON • Special to the Post-Dispatch

One fun way to surprise your holiday hosts is to present them with a very unusual, but good quality, wine that they are unlikely to have or perhaps even tasted. One such example is a single varietal wine made from the dark-skinned pinot meunier grape. Pinot meunier is best known as the third grape in true Champagne sparkling wine in which it’s usually blended with chardonnay and pinot noir. The grape is extensively grown in the Marne Valley area of the Champagne region. Pinot meunier is also grown in California where it’s also mostly used in sparkling wines. However, there are a few wineries that do bottle it as a single varietal. I found one called Fable at Parker’s Table, the wine and gourmet food market located in a former post office on Oakland Avenue. Fable is owned by Sonoma County’s Brack Mountain Wine Company, which specializes in artisan wines.

FABLE 2016 PINOT MEUNIER, DOMMEN VINEYARD, RUSSIAN RIVER VALLEY, SONOMA COUNTY

BEST BITES: GHIRARDELLI CHOCOLATE SQUARES HOLIDAY LIMITED EDITION ASSORTMENT Surely, everybody knows Ghirardelli Chocolate Squares, those delectably delicious chocolate treats. For the holidays, they put out an assortment of special festive flavors: eggnog, peppermint bark and milk chocolate pumpkin spice caramel. I brought a bag to the office, and the eggnog went first — which is understandable, because they credibly taste like a white-chocolate version of eggnog. My favorite was the peppermint bark, mixing chocolate with the flavor of candy canes. The pumpkin spice caramel square is the closest to a misfire: pumpkin spice is great, caramel is great, but the combination is just a little off. Size • 8.25 ounces Price • $5.99 (on sale) Available • Schnucks and other grocery stores — Daniel Neman

PREP SCHOOL

Mediterranean spread

Bought • Parker’s Table, 7118 Oakland Avenue, in December for $22.99 Description • This is an intriguing wine that has lots of character and is quite aromatic. Distinctively floral and fruity, it tastes like the juicy black plums you find in the summer along with some bakery spice. Fable is a very soft wine that’s somewhat similar to a pinot noir, but it’s a bit bigger in body and more rustic. This is a very flavorful wine that is best sipped with food rather than on its own. It calls for flavorful fare like veal osso buco or Mediterranean style eggplant dishes. Follow Gail on Twitter @GailAppleson.

M 1 • WEDNESDAY • 12.20.2017

A recipe this great is worth repeating: Daniel Neman shows how simple it is to whip up a marvelous, intensely flavored spread in this favorite Prep School video. It takes little more than olives, feta cheese and an hour to marinate.

stltoday.com/food

Chocolate Peppermint Cookies are a treat CHOCOLATE PEPPERMINT COOKIES Yield: About 3 dozen cookies 1 pound bittersweet chocolate 4 ounces unsweetened chocolate 8 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into tablespoons 4 large eggs, at room temperature

ASSOCIATED PRESS

BY SARA MOULTON Associated Press

If, like me, you’re a fan of dark chocolate peppermint bark at Christmastime, you’re going to love these cookies. Your friends and family will, too. But you’ll have to plan ahead because the batter is so soft it needs to chill overnight before scooping. The main ingredient here is 1 ½ pounds of chocolate, which guarantees an intensely chocolate flavor. The cookie’s base is made of a combination of unsweetened and bittersweet chocolate. Afterward, additional chunks of the bittersweet chocolate — along with the crushed mint candy — are folded in. The key to this recipe’s success is good quality bittersweet chocolate — that is, a brand that contains at least 60 percent cacao. The higher the percentage of cacao in a chocolate bar,

the darker and more intense the flavor. That’s why we’re adding chunks of chocolate instead of chocolate chips — bittersweet bar chocolate contains much more cacao than most chips. Chopping the chocolate will take a little time. I recommend using a serrated knife for the job. As for crushing the peppermint candies, the best way is to put them in a resealable plastic bag and then gently whack away at the bag with a rolling pin. I suggest baking a single tray of cookies at a time because the cookies don’t cook evenly when there’s more than one tray. As you might imagine, these cookies are delicious year-round. If you decide to make them during a season when peppermint candies are scarce, just leave them out and add 1 ½ tablespoons of powdered espresso. You will end up with outstanding mocha cookies.

1 ½ cups granulated sugar 2 teaspoons vanilla extract 60 grams (about ½ cup) all-purpose flour ½ teaspoon baking powder ¼ teaspoon table salt 1 cup (about 5 ounces) hard red-and-white peppermint candies

1. Coarsely chop one-half of the bittersweet chocolate and all of the unsweetened chocolate. In a medium metal bowl combine the coarsely chopped chocolates and the butter; set the bowl over a saucepan of barely simmering water, making sure the bottom of the bowl is not touching the water, and melt the mixture, stirring often. Remove from the heat as soon as all of the chocolate is just melted. 2. Meanwhile, in a medium bowl with electric beaters (or in a stand mixer), beat the eggs and sugar on medium speed until the mixture is very thick and pale, about 10 minutes. Beat in the vanilla. In a small bowl sift together the flour, baking powder and salt. Chop the remaining bittersweet chocolate into chocolate-chip size pieces. Chop or crush the peppermint candies into ¼- to 1/3-inch pieces. 3. Fold the melted chocolate mixture into the egg mixture using a large rubber spatula. Add the flour mixture and fold it in until it is just incorporated. Add the chip-size bittersweet chocolate and the peppermint pieces and stir gently, just until incorporated. Cover and chill the mixture overnight. 4. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Line 3 large baking sheets with parchment paper, scoop out the batter into balls about 1 ½-inches wide (the size of a walnut shell) and arrange them on the baking sheets, leaving an inch of space between them. Working with one sheet pan at a time, bake the cookies on the middle shelf of the oven for 9 to 11 minutes, until they are shiny on top and set around the edges but still soft to the touch on top. Let them sit on the sheet pans for 5 minutes and then transfer them to a rack to cool completely. Per serving: 164 calories; 10g fat; 31mg cholesterol; 32mg sodium; 20g carbohydrate; 2g fiber; 14g sugar; 3g protein.

Plenty of almonds makes satisfying, healthy snack BY THE CULINARY INSTITUTE OF AMERICA

ALMOND AND FLAX CRACKERS WITH SMOKED ALMOND SPREAD

For many of us, the new year is a time to make a fresh start. We’re wiping the slate clean with a renewed sense of optimism for the year ahead, and we’re trying to eat healthier foods, which means you won’t find a macaroni and cheese recipe at the end of this article. When it comes to reformulating our eating habits, it’s a little bit easier to menu-plan breakfast, lunch and dinner. The real struggle, both in preparation and willpower, comes when we start thinking about that mid-afternoon snack. No matter the time, the reason, or the season, the best kind of snack to fill you up (and keep you that way) is one that is filled with protein. Nuts are especially handy as a snack food, because they are protein-rich, portable, and give us a daily dose of hearthealthy unsaturated fatty acids. If you’re fed up with your 3 p.m. handful of almonds and find yourself eyeballing the office’s snack machine, this Almond and Flax Crackers with Smoked Almond Spread recipe from the Culinary Institute of America is very much what you need. We made it a little fancy (more on that later), but at its core, this is “cheese” and crackers. The crackers only have five ingredients, and they are vegan and gluten-free. They’re spread on a baking sheet and dehydrated in your oven (so, low and slow baking), which means no fussy rolling and cutting. You’ll love the bold flavor from a

Yield: 12 servings 1 cup almonds 1 cup smoked almonds ½ cup golden flax seeds 2 tablespoons coriander seeds 2 tablespoons tamari or soy sauce

ASSOCIATED PRESS

heavy dose of coriander seed, but you can mix and match any of your favorite seasonings, like fennel seed, curry blends or even Korean-style chili paste. The same is true for the almond spread we’ve made for a topper. This version relies on the flavor of smoked almonds, and substituting plain almonds would make it pretty bland. That is, of course, unless you add roasted garlic, fresh herbs, citrus zest or horseradish. You can even add a sprinkle of nutritional yeast, which is a deactivated yeast product that has a cheesy flavor. Of course, you can spread these crackers with virtually anything. They’re perfect for your favorite hummus and butters, or alongside leftover roasted chicken and fresh fruits and veggies.

1 tablespoon agave nectar 1 ¼ cup water, or as needed, divided use Kosher salt, as needed Micro herbs and edible flowers, as needed for garnish

Note: If your oven won’t go to 170 degrees, set it to the lowest possible temperature, and check the crackers frequently, since they will cook faster. 1. In two containers, cover the almonds with water, cover and soak overnight. Drain and reserve separately. 2. Preheat the oven to 170 degrees. In a blender or food processor, combine about half of the flax seeds and the coriander, and pulse to grind finely. Add the drained plain almonds, remaining flax seeds, tamari, agave nectar and 1 cup of the water, and blend until a smooth paste forms. 3. Line a baking sheet with a silicone baking mat. Spread the almond mixture into an even layer, all the way to the edge of the pan. Use the back of a knife to score the paste into your desired shape. 4. Place in the oven to dehydrate until dry and crisp, about 7 hours. (Time will depend on the size of your pan. An 18-by-13inch pan will take about 7 hours.) 5. Meanwhile, in a clean blender combine the smoked almonds with the remaining ¼ cup water, and blend until smooth. Season with salt, to taste. 6. Spread or pipe the almond spread on each cracker and top with micro herbs and edible flowers before serving. Per serving: 167 calories; 14g fat; no cholesterol; 249mg sodium; 8g carbohydrate; 4g fiber; 2g sugar; 6g protein.

DINNER IN MINUTES

You won’t notice the cauliflower rice in this frittata BY BONNIE S. BENWICK The Washington Post

Do I like cauliflower as much as the next guy? Well, no. It’s one of the cruciferous vegetables whose cooked aroma sends me running for the exit. But the oh-sotrendy riced variety, stirred into this frittata mix, works for me. Here’s why: Used raw, it adds a bit of healthful yet stealthful heft to the eggs, and it takes a back seat to the better-smelling trio of quickly sauteed onion, garlic and mushrooms. I didn’t catch a single cauli-whiff during the frittata’s 25 minutes of oven time. A scattering of crumbled feta on top browns and melts just enough to seal the deal. Was that a bit of cheese I just scooped up, or was it softened cauliflower rice? I couldn’t quite tell — and that’s the point.

MUSHROOM AND CAULIFLOWER FRITTATA Yield: 3 to 4 servings 1 small onion 2 cloves garlic 8 ounces button mushrooms Leaves from 2 stems fresh thyme or tarragon Leaves from 4 stems flat-leaf parsley 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil 4 large eggs ¼ cup whole or low-fat milk Sea salt or kosher salt Freshly ground black pepper 6 ounces cauliflower rice 2 ounces feta cheese, crumbled 1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. 2. Finely chop the onion. Crush the garlic cloves, then chop. Stem the mushrooms and clean them, as needed, then cut into thin slices. Coarsely chop the thyme or tarragon and parsley leaves. 3. Heat the oil in a medium (9- or 10-inch) ovenproof skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in the onion, garlic and mushrooms, and cook for 3 minutes, or until lightly golden. Remove from the heat. 4. Meanwhile, whisk together the eggs, milk, thyme or tarragon and the parsley in a mixing bowl. Season lightly with salt and pepper. Add the cauliflower rice, stirring to incorporate, then pour the mixture into the pan. Sprinkle with the feta. Roast (top rack) for about 25 minutes, or until just set and lightly browned on top. 5. Serve hot. Per serving (based on 4, using low-fat milk and sea salt): 180 calories; 12g protein; 8g carbohydrates; 12g fat; 5g saturated fat; 200mg cholesterol, 290mg sodium; 2g fiber; 4g sugar Adapted from a recipe at DonnaHay.com.


LET’S EAT

12.20.2017 • Wednesday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • L3

SPECIAL REQUEST

Sweet Potato Pie Cheesecake at 360 is a winter favorite

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

BY PAT EBY special to the Post-dispatch

Q • I recently had the amazing sweet potato cheesecake at 360 rooftop at the Hilton. I would love to get the recipe to make this for my family for the holidays. — Annie Custer, Maplewood

A • Cheesecake lovers especially enjoy dessert at 360, the rooftop restaurant and bar atop the Hilton at the Ballpark in downtown St. Louis with spectacular views of the city, the river and the Gateway arch. “We always have a cheesecake on the menu,” chef Rex Hale says. “We use locally grown seasonal fresh fruits and berries all throughout the year. The

360, THE ROOFTOP AT THE HILTON HOTEL AT THE BALLPARK 1 South Broadway 314-241-8439; 360-stl.com

cheesecake recipe we share today, which is based on the classic flavors of sweet potato pie, is a winter favorite, as is our roasted pear and apple cheesecake.” Hale recommends pairing his sweet potato cheesecake with the Four Leaf Clover, a 360 house cocktail featuring Tullamore Dew Irish whiskey, Big O Ginger liqueur and lemon bolstered with Urban Chestnut’s Bushelhead cider and cinnamon. “The ginger and the cider complement the flavors in

the cheesecake,” Hale says. 360 isn’t just about dessert, however, although the house-made Kit Kat-style bars and beignets certainly have their advocates. This restaurant and bar high above the city is about shared and small plates, satisfying sandwiches, dinner entrees and drinks served in a bright, modern space with wide windows and views to the north, south, east and west of town. Hale brings his special imprint to 360, sourcing seasonal produce and quality proteins from farms and producers nearby. “Rex Hale is a rock star when it comes to sourcing farm to table,” chef Rob Connoley of Squatter’s Cafe says. Hale

has long championed local farmers and farms, often taking his staff on field trips to see where the food in his kitchens originates. The cheesecake sparkles with the bright pop of goat cheese from Baetje Farms of Bloomsdale, Mo., and the smooth taste of the sweet potatoes pureed with honey. The garnish of a not-too-sweet graham cracker with a light dusting of cinnamon and sugar works well with the tart-sweet flavor of the cheesecake. A trip to 360 is always a pleasure, but guests enjoy a special treat over the holidays when city lights shine a little brighter and the fires that circle this rooftop restaurant seem a little warmer.

TO REQUEST A RECIPE

PICK UP the newissue of

Visit feastmagazine.com to see when Feast TV airs on your local PBS station.

Would you like to request a recipe from a restaurant that is still open in the St. Louis area? Send your request along with your full name and the city you live in to reciperequest@ postdispatch.com.

Find cookie recipes, holiday party appetizer recipes and more at stltoday.com/ holidays

360 ROASTED SWEET POTATO SWEET AND SAVORY CHEESECAKE Yield: 10 to 12 cheesecakes For the sweet potato puree: ¾ cup roasted sweet potato flesh (may be roasted ahead of time) ¼ cup local honey ¼ cup plus 2 tablespoons water ½ teaspoon pure vanilla extract ¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon Pinch of kosher salt For the homemade graham crackers: 2 ½ cups plus 2 tablespoons unbleached pastry flour or unbleached all-purpose flour 1 cup dark brown sugar, lightly packed 1 teaspoon baking soda ¾ teaspoon kosher salt 7 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into 1-inch cubes and frozen

cup mildly flavored honey, such as clover 5 tablespoons whole milk 2 tablespoons real vanilla extract 3 tablespoons granulated sugar 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon For the cheesecakes: 1 pound full-fat cream cheese, softened 8 ounces pound Baetje Farms goat cheese, softened ¼ plus 2 tablespoons cup granulated sugar ¼ cup sweet potato puree 1 ½ teapoons real vanilla extract 1 teaspoons ground cinnamon ¼ cup full fat sour cream 1 whole large eggs 2 egg yolks 1/3

Notes: • This recipe takes time, but it is easy to make. The sweet potatoes must be roasted and cooled. The cakes and graham crackers each have chill and resting times. The sweet potato puree and graham crackers may be made a day or two ahead of time. • The 3-ounce silicone bombe molds are available online. The cheesecakes easily pop out of these molds. Small custard cups and silicone muffin tins (regular muffin size, not jumbo) also worked for this recipe. 1. Make the sweet potato puree: Place sweet potatoes, honey, water, vanilla, cinnamon and salt in a food processor or blender and pulse to a smooth puree. Place in a covered container and refrigerate until ready to use. Makes 1 cup. Remove about 15 minutes ahead of plating final cakes. 2. To make the graham crackers, place flour, brown sugar, baking soda and salt in the bowl of a food processor fitted with a steel blade or a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment and pulse or mix on low until just incorporated. 3. Add frozen butter pieces and pulse on and off or mix on low until the dough is the consistency of coarse meal. 4. In a small bowl, whisk honey, milk and vanilla together. Add to the dry ingredients and pulse or mix on low until just incorporated. The dough will be sticky and soft. 5. Turn dough out onto a well-floured surface and pat into a rectangle shape 1-inch thick. Cover and refrigerate until firm, 2 hours or overnight. 6. At baking time, remove dough and divide in half. Return one half to the refrigerator. Sift flour over the counter surface and roll out the dough, flouring as needed, to 1/8-inch thickness. Cut into rounds with a 2 ½-inch biscuit cutter, dipping cutter in flour as needed. Remove rounds to parchment-lined baking sheets using a thin offset spatula. 7. Mix granulated sugar and cinnamon together. Evenly dust the tops of each round with mixture. 8. Place baking sheets in the refrigerator to chill for 30 to 45 minutes. 9. Repeat steps 5 through 8 with remaining half of dough. 10. Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Bake for 18 to 20 minutes, turning the sheets halfway through baking. Remove finished crackers to a cooling rack. When completely cooled, store in a tightly covered container. 11. Make the cheesecakes. Place softened cream cheese and goat cheese in a large bowl. Use a stand mixer with a paddle attachment, mix the cheeses together, scraping down the sides as needed, until thoroughly combined and light. 12. Add granulated sugar and mix to combine well. Add sweet potato puree, vanilla, cinnamon and sour cream and mix until just combined. 13. Add the eggs and egg yolks one at a time until they are just combined into the cheese. Don’t overmix as the eggs will cause the cake batter to rise. 14. Chill for 1 hour. 15. Preheat oven to 250 degrees. Place a kettle filled with water on stove and heat until near boiling. 16. Lightly coat 3-ounce silicone bombe molds with cooking spray. Spoon batter into molds, filling just to the top. 17. Place molds in a baking dish or roasting pan. Pour hot water from kettle to a depth of half the mold or cups. Don’t cover. 18. Place in preheated oven and bake for approximately 30 minutes. The cakes should be appear lightly firm when done. They don’t brown. Don’t overbake. 19. Turn off the oven and crack open the door. Wait 5 to 10 minutes and then remove pan carefully from oven. 20. Carefully remove molds or cups from the water bath to a cooling rack. Keep away from drafts and allow the cakes to cool thoroughly. Carefully pop out cakes to a waiting sheet. Cover lightly and refrigerate until serving time. 21. To serve, remove the remaining refrigerated sweet potato puree from refrigerator about 10 to 15 minutes ahead of plating. Stir to blend. 22. Spoon a dollop of sweet potato puree on each plate. Top with a cheesecake. An offset spatula works well to place the cheesecake. Garnish with a graham cracker. Per serving (based on 12): 557 calories; 28g fat; 16g saturated fat; 123mg cholesterol; 11g protein; 66g carbohydrate; 44g sugar; 1g fiber; 347mg sodium; 167mg calcium

Lock Problems? We’re Your App for That! Give us a call...

We’ll take good care of you! LOCAL SINCE 1974

Where can you find Feast? Use the issue locator on our website.

feastmagazine.com

314-961-2444 • FixMyLock.com

8619 Manchester Rd. • Brentwood Store Hours M-F 9am-4pm • Service on Wheels M-F 8am-6pm


L4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

LET’S EAT

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 12.20.2017

Vasilopita recipe is truly stunning TRADITIONS • FROM L1

specifically serving foods that are round. And some cultures combine these two ideas by placing a prize — often a coin — inside a round cake or bread. Whoever gets the piece with the prize or coin is said to be assured of wealth and good luck in the coming year. That’s the case with the Greek tradition of serving Vasilopita. Vasilopita is named for St. Basil, whose feast day is Jan. 1 for the Eastern church and Jan. 2 for the Western. Practically every family in Greece has its own recipe for Vasilopita, but the one I baked from “Food from Many Greek Kitchens” is truly stunning. This elegant cake is dense and not too sweet. It is flavored with the zest of orange and lemons, scented with vanilla and brandy, and graced with a hint of almonds. It can also be beautiful; it is traditionally decorated with sliced almonds in a pretty pattern or with powdered sugar sifted over a doily. I chose to decorate mine in another traditional method for the New Year, cutting out the numbers of the year 2018 to use as a stencil, with powdered sugar flurried over the cake. When I removed the numbers, their crisp image was clear in the sugar, reminding all of the reason for the celebration. For my next New Year’s inspiration, I looked to the American South, where I can attest that Hoppin’ John is indeed a staple of the holiday. Hoppin’ John is nothing less than black-eyed peas cooked with a ham hock, and yet it is also, somehow, so much more. Perhaps it is the fact that this simple dish of ham-and-beans is made with 16 ingredients, proof of the extra care that is taken for the New Year’s celebrations. Even so, it is just beans cooked with ham and mirepoix (onion, carrot and celery), spiced with a hot pepper and flavored with a bay leaf and thyme, served on basmati rice. Typically, Hoppin’ John is served on plain white rice, but the recipe I used gets great mileage out of the basmati substitution. Even better is this brilliant idea: It uses the flavored water that the beans were cooked in to also cook the rice. These simple tricks elevate an everyday dish to a comforting treat worthy of the new year. In Italy, the holiday is also often celebrated with a plate of beans, only in this case it is sometimes lentils. The lentils are frequently cooked with sausage, but because that is too close in concept to Hoppin’ John, I decided instead to go the vegetarian route with Polenta with Lentils in Tomato Sauce. What could be more Italian than that? It’s a straightforward dish, lentils plus garlic plus mirepoix

PHOTOS BY CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

Polenta with Lentils in Tomato Sauce, an Italian tradition to celebrate the New Year.

plus tomatoes on polenta, but I made my own version of it fancier by pan-frying the polenta. All it takes is the forethought to make the polenta the night before. By morning, it can be cut into wedges and then fried until it is crisp and golden on the outside, and creamy on the inside. It’s almost too good for lentils, but not quite. Finally, I turned to Japan for a tradition that is said to assure a long life. Every New Year’s Eve, many Japanese eat Toshikoshi Soba, a noodle soup. The idea is that the noodles represent longevity, especially when they are slurped up without breaking them. As with so many Japanese dishes, the base is dashi, a broth you can make yourself from bonito flakes, but I just used boiling water and a powder I bought at an international market. To this I added kaeshi, a blend of soy sauce, mirin and a little sugar that I did make myself. Combined, the two have a marvelous umami taste that is the perfect backdrop for soba noodles, which are made from buckwheat. If you want, you could just serve the dish as is, but much of the fun of Toshikoshi Soba is deciding which ingredients to add into it. Chopped green onions are almost required, but I also added spinach leaves, a very popular seven-ingredient red pepper spice called shichimi togarashi and thin, dried seaweed called nori. In Japan, it is often served with fishcakes called kamaboko, which I once saw described as a Japanese version of gefilte fish. And I know one Japanese native who adds a raw egg, allowing the heat of the broth to cook it. That’s not necessarily typical, but she does it because she likes it. Isn’t that how traditions begin? Daniel Neman • 314-340-8133 Food writer @dnemanfood on Twitter dneman@post-dispatch.com

VASILOPITA Yield: 12 servings 1 coin, such as a quarter 3 cups all-purpose flour 1 heaping tablespoon baking powder Pinch of salt 14 tablespoons (1¾ sticks) butter, room temperature 1½ cups granulated sugar 4 eggs 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 tablespoon grated orange zest (1 large orange) 1 tablespoon grated lemon zest (2 lemons) ¼ cup brandy ¾ cup milk 1/3 cup blanched almonds, finely chopped Powdered sugar, for dusting

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter and flour an 11¾-inch springform cake pan. Thoroughly wash the coin with soap and water until it is impeccably clean. Sift the flour, baking powder and salt together into a bowl. 2. Whip the butter and sugar together with handheld beaters in a large bowl until creamy. Add the eggs one at a time, whisking well after each one. Beat in the vanilla and the orange and lemon zests. In turn, fold in one-third of the dry ingredients, the brandy, another third of the dry ingredients, the milk and the remaining dry ingredients. Fold in the almonds. Scrape into the springform pan. Drop in the coin, trying to keep it upright, not flat. 3. Bake 50 to 60 minutes or until a skewer inserted into the center comes out clean. Cool in the pan for 5 minutes before turning out onto a wire cake rack to cool completely. 4. Put a doily on top of the cake and dust with powdered sugar before removing it to reveal a lacy pattern. You can also cut a stencil of the numbers of the new year and dust that. Per serving: 402 calories; 18g fat; 9g saturated fat; 99mg cholesterol; 7g protein; 52g carbohydrate; 27g sugar; 1g fiber; 168mg sodium; 115mg calcium Recipe from “Food from Many Greek Kitchens,” by Tessa Kiros

HOPPIN’ JOHN Yield: 6 to 8 servings 1 cup dried black-eyed peas, soaked overnight or boiled 2 minutes and kept in the hot water for 1 hour 7 cups water 1 medium onion, cut into quarters 1 carrot, peeled and cut into quarters 1 celery rib, cut into quarters 1 smoked ham hock or ¼ pound slab bacon 1 dried hot chile

1 bay leaf 1 thyme sprig Large pinch of kosher salt 2 cups basmati rice 3 scallions, chopped 2 tomatoes, halved, seeded and chopped Several basil leaves, chopped or torn Extra-virgin olive oil ¼ cup tomato chutney or your favorite hot sauce

1. Wash and pick over the peas, removing any misshapen ones or pebbles. Place the peas in a large saucepan, add the water and bring to a simmer. Add the onion, carrot, celery, ham hock, chile pepper, bay leaf, thyme sprig and salt, and simmer until the vegetables are tender, about 25 minutes. 2. Drain the peas reserving the broth. Remove bay leaf, onion, carrot, thyme, pepper and celery. Remove meat from ham hock and chop into bite-sized pieces. Return peas and chopped meat to the pan, along with a little broth to keep them moist. 3. Transfer 3½ cups of the reserved broth to a medium saucepan and bring to a simmer. Add the rice and cook until it is fluffy and tender and has absorbed almost all of the liquid, 16 to 18 minutes. Remove from the heat and let the rice continue to steam, covered, for 5 to 10 minutes while you reheat the peas. Add the remaining broth to the peas and reheat gently. Taste and season with salt and pepper. 4. Transfer the rice to a serving bowl and spoon the warm peas and broth on top. Scatter the chopped scallions, tomatoes and basil over the peas. Drizzle everything with a little extra virgin olive oil and finish with a large dollop of the chutney. Per serving (based on 6): 342 calories; 10g fat; 2g saturated fat; no cholesterol; 13g protein; 49g carbohydrate; 5g sugar; 6g fiber; 541mg sodium; 43mg calcium Adapted from “Frank Stitt’s Southern Table,” by Frank Stitt

Fruitcakes should be treated with respect — really crumbly. And to tell the truth, it’s probably best if it does not contain too much citron. It is my considered belief that the genesis for so many people’s dislike of fruitcake is that the first one they had was too dry or too crumbly, or had too much citron. For them it was one and done — they never wanted to try another fruitcake ever again. Unfortunately, the national aversion to fruitcake was codified when it fell into the hands of comedians. Johnny Carson made a joke about it, and suddenly everyone felt it was their duty to proclaim their hatred for this most innocent holiday pastry. “The worst gift is a fruitcake. There is only one fruitcake in the entire world, and people keep sending it to each other.” — Johnny Carson That opened the floodgates. People piled on, targeting fruitcakes with the kind of vituperation they now reserve for journalists.

Yield: 4 to 6 servings 2 cups medium-grind cornmeal 2/3 cup brown lentils 1 bay leaf 1 medium garlic clove 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1 small onion, minced 1 medium carrot, peeled and diced small 1 celery rib, diced small 1 (14.5-ounce) can chopped tomatoes, drained 2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley leaves 2 tablespoons unsalted butter Freshly grated ParmigianoReggiano cheese

Hoppin’ John is a New Year’s Eve tradition in the South.

NEMAN • FROM L1

POLENTA WITH LENTILS IN TOMATO SAUCE

Even journalists joined in. In the seminal and hilarious “A Short History of Fruitcake,” food writer Robert Sietsema referred to “the fruitcake plague.” One type of fruitcake is “brickshaped, making them easy to throw,” he wrote. Another comes in “the standard hemorrhoidcushion configuration.” Though I am ashamed to admit it now, I caved to peer pressure. I joined in. Like the characters in “The Lottery,” I threw metaphorical rocks at the thing I loved. “What is the difference between a fruitcake and a rubber door stop? If absolutely necessary, you can eat a door stop.” — Me As a child, I was accustomed to eating the fruitcake that I had to sell door-to-door for some organization or other, the kind of fruitcake that absolutely no one likes, even fruitcake lovers. It was dry and crumbly, and it had too much citron. The only part I liked was the cherries, because red was my favorite flavor.

It wasn’t until my brother made fruitcake for the first (and as far as I know, only) time that I learned what was missing from the versions I had eaten before then: alcohol. My mother took us to the liquor store and bought a bottle of cheap bourbon to use to soak the fruitcake. It was probably the first bottle of bourbon I had ever seen. I still remember the brand — Old Mr. Boston. The brand name is still on a popular book of cocktail recipes, but the bourbon itself died out years ago. It was probably best used only in fruitcake. “Reality is like a fruitcake; pretty enough to look at but with all sorts of nasty things lurking just beneath the surface.” — A. Lee Martinez I’m not saying that fruitcake should have a boozy taste, like my brother’s did, incidentally. A faint hint of alcohol is all that is needed, unlike a certain rum cake that I know. It keeps the cake moist and helps preserve it. People who don’t want alcohol can certainly find — or better

still, make — plenty of fruitcakes that are just as good. They just need to be moist. Obviously, I believe fruitcakes should be treated with respect, but I can’t help but admire the town of Manitou Springs, Colo., which every year holds a Great Fruitcake Toss. People come together to throw their fruitcakes, hit them with golf clubs, sling them from slingshots and launch them from a trebuchet (it’s an earlier version of a catapult), all trying to get the farthest distance. A couple of years ago, the record was set by a group of Boeing engineers who put together a giant air gun powered by a vintage exercise bicycle and a 1955 compressor pump, which pressurized an air tank to 60 psi. The air gun, which almost looked like a piece of artillery, shot a 1-pound fruitcake at about 200 mph out of the barrel. It traveled 1,116 feet. No word on whether the fruitcake was damaged.

1. Place 8 cups water in a large pot, and bring to a boil over high heat. Add 2 teaspoons salt and lower the heat to medium. Whisk in the cornmeal in a slow, steady stream; this should take almost 2 minutes. Make sure to whisk the cornmeal continuously to prevent lumps from forming. Continue whisking as the cornmeal comes back to a boil. Simmer, whisking constantly, until the polenta starts to thicken, 1 to 2 minutes. 2. Reduce the heat until the polenta is at the barest simmer. Cover and cook very slowly, stirring with a wooden spoon every 10 minutes until the cornmeal loses its raw flavor, 35 to 40 minutes. 3. While the polenta is cooking, bring 8 cups of water to a boil in a medium saucepan. Add the lentils, bay leaf and garlic, and simmer over medium heat until the lentils are tender but still a bit firm, about 25 minutes. Drain, discard the bay leaf and garlic, and set aside. 4. While the lentils are cooking, heat the oil in a large saucepan. Add the onion, carrot and celery, and sauté over medium heat until the vegetables have softened, about 10 minutes. 5. Add the tomatoes. Simmer until the sauce thickens somewhat, about 10 minutes. Add the lentils and cook for 1 to 2 minutes to heat through. Stir in the parsley and season with salt and pepper to taste. 6. When the polenta has finished cooking, stir in the butter and add more salt if needed. Divide the polenta among large individual bowls. Spoon some of the lentils and sauce over each portion. Serve immediately with grated cheese passed separately at the table. 7. For extra elegance, make the polenta the night before and refrigerate it in a couple of skillets, making sure the polenta is no more than an inch or so thick. The day you are serving the dish, slice the polenta into wedges and pan fry a few wedges at a time in plenty of butter over medium-high heat. Cook on one side until golden brown and lightly crispy, then flip and cook until the other side is the same. Per serving (based on 6): 345 calories; 13g fat; 4g saturated fat; 11mg cholesterol; 11g protein; 50g carbohydrate; 4g sugar; 10g fiber; 121mg sodium; 58mg calcium Adapted from “The Complete Italian Vegetarian Cookbook,” by Jack Bishop.

TOSHIKOSHI SOBA (YEAR-END NOODLE SOUP) Yield: 6 servings 6 ounces dried soba noodles 5 cups basic dashi stock (homemade, or buy the powdered form) ¾ cup soy sauce 3 ounces (6 tablespoons) mirin 1 tablespoon granulated sugar Spinach, optional Kamaboko (fish cakes), optional Shichimi togarashi (seveningredient red-pepper spice), optional Nori seaweed, optional Wasabi, optional Eggs, optional 1 green onion, finely chopped 1. Bring a large pot of water to boil. Add soba noodles and lower the heat to a simmer; do not cook in a rolling boil. Cook until the noodles are cooked through but still chewy, about 3 minutes. Drain the noodles immediately and rinse in a bowl of cold water. Change the water several times to remove all starch from the surface of the noodles. Place in a colander and set aside. 2. Make the dashi stock in a large pot and add the soy sauce, mirin and sugar. Heat, and when the stock is hot, add the soba noodles; simmer gently until they are heated through. 3. Place noodles into serving bowls and add soup. Add any of the optional toppings you desire; if using eggs, make sure the soup is very hot before cracking the egg into the bowl — the heat of the soup will somewhat cook the egg. Garnish with the chopped green onions. Per serving (without optional ingredients): 143 calories; no fat; no saturated fat; no cholesterol; 7g protein; 25g carbohydrate; 2g sugar; 1g fiber; 2,089mg sodium; 33mg calcium Adapted from justhungry.com


LET’S EAT

12.20.2017 • WEDNESDAY • M 1

Recognizing favorite wines of 2017 REDS Domaine J. Boulon 2015 Morgon (France) Bought • Wine Merchant, 7817 Forsyth Boulevard, in October for $12.99 Description • This delicious and reasonably priced wine comes from Morgon, considered one of the best of the Beaujolais crus, The Boulon is a fine example from this village, which is known for producing some of the bigger-bodied and more concentrated wines in Beaujolais. This is a soft, fragrant red that tastes of black cherries and plums with some spice. It has lots of finesse and is very easy to drink. Clos de la Niverdière 2014 Chinon (France) Bought • Grapevine Wines, 309 South Kirkwood Road, in April for $12.99 Description • This is an absolutely lovely wine that’s a true gem. Light- to medium-bodied, this is an elegant, lively wine that has the distinctive raspberry flavor of Chinon’s reds along with fresh leafy aromatics. It’s incredibly well-balanced, with a silky texture and a refreshing acidity that makes you want to take another sip. An easy-to-drink, versatile red, it can be enjoyed as an aperitif wine or with a wide range of dishes. Oregon Trails Wine Co. 2015 Pinot Noir, Willamette Valley (Oregon) Bought • Straub’s, 211 Lockwood Avenue, in June for $14.99 Description • This is a fine example of a very good pinot noir in the under $15 category. It comes from Wine Trees, a wine brand developer that focuses on small-lot producers. The wine’s back label is signed by Douglas Danielak, a well-known Napa winemaker. A very easy-to-drink fruity, light- to medium-bodied red, this silky wine tastes of fresh raspberries and cherries with some earthiness and spice.

VIN GRIS/ROSÉ

Vistamar 2015 Sepia Reserva Pinot Noir, Casablanca Valley (Chile) Bought • Total Wine, 90 Brentwood Promenade Court, in August for $9.99 Description • Usually I shy away from pinot noir in the under-$10 range, but this one is a real winner. It comes from Casablanca Valley, which is best known for its crisp chardonnay and sauvignon blanc. Very true to the pinot noir varietal, this wine is lightbodied but very flavorful with a mouthwatering acidity. This is an earthy and elegant red that tastes of raspberries and cherries. It would go well with grilled salmon and tuna.

WINES • FROM L5 Cellers Baronia del Montsant 2010 Cims, Montsant (Spain) Bought • Schnucks Lindbergh, 10275 Clayton Road, in August for $14.99 Description • This delicious, medium- to full-bodied red received 90 points from Robert Parker’s Wine Advocate. A blend of 63 percent garnacha and 37 percent cariñena, it was aged in oak for five months. Far easier to sip than the Xibrana and ready to drink now, this dry red is well-balanced with soft tannins and good acidity. It has complex layers of fruit, tasting of cranberries, strawberries and some plum with a touch of earthiness. It would go well with paella Valenciana.

Yannick Paquet, Crémant de Bourgogne (France) Bought • Wine Merchant, 7817 Forsyth Boulevard in November for $14.99 Description • This French sparkling wine is a great option if Champagne is too expensive. Absolutely delicious, it has that yeasty, toasty nose often associated with sparkling wines from Champagne. It comes from the family who owns Domaine des Granges, which is known for its Burgundian white wines. Made from chardonnay, this sparkler is fresh, crisp and complex with exuberant, pinpoint bubbles.

River Road Family Vineyards and Winery 2015 Pinot Gris (California) Bought • Total Wine, 90 Brentwood Promenade Court, in April for $13.99 Description • This delightful pinot gris invokes the spring with its inviting floral aroma. Based in the Green Valley of the Russian River Valley, Sonoma County, River Road is owned by St. Louisan Ron Rubin. Lively and wellbalanced, this is a very easyto-drink pinot gris that tastes of fresh, juicy peaches and apricots. It’s a lovely aperitif wine sipped with appetizers or a fine match with lighter entrees.

KINDNESS Yield: 1 servings ¾ ounce (1 ½ tablespoon) Drambuie ½ ounce (1 tablespoon) gin ½ ounce (1 tablespoon) lemon juice ¼ ounce (1 ½ teaspoon) Honey Simple Syrup (recipe below) 4 ounces (½ cup) sparkling wine In a mixing glass filled with ice, combine the Drambuie, gin, lemon juice, and simple syrup, and stir to combine. Strain into a wine glass and top with sparkling wine just before serving.

HONEY SIMPLE SYRUP

Makes about ¾ cups (enough for 24 cocktails) ½ cup honey ½ cup water Combine the honey and water in a small saucepan and bring to a simmer over medium heat, stirring constantly until the honey dissolves. Cool completely before use.

The grapes for this delicious unoaked wine were actually grown in Pouilly-Fuissé but could not be classified as such due to the altitude of the vineyards. This is a lush and vibrant chardonnay that has complex fruit flavors including fresh juicy green apples. It ends with a long, clean finish. It would go well with fish, chicken and rich cream sauces. Nicolas Potel 2015 MâconVillages (France) Bought • Wine Merchant, 7817 Forsyth Boulevard, in August for $14.99 Description • This is a delicious pure chardonnay, and the previous vintage received 90 points from Wine & Spirits. A zesty, complex wine, it’s crisp, tart and refreshing with a stony minerality and mouthwatering acidity. It tastes of green apples, lemon and other citrus fruits along with a hint of almonds. It can be enjoyed with appetizers but would go particularly well with shellfish and other seafood. Domaine de la Vauvise 2016 Les Trois Terroirs, Sancerre (France) Bought • Trader Joe’s, 48 Brentwood Promenade Court, in July for $14.99 Description • Although most Sancerre wines cost more than $20, this is an example of a good entry-level label that has been available at Trader Joe’s for several years. An aromatic white, it’s well-balanced and crisp with flavors of grapefruit and stone fruit along with some grassiness and herbs.

Store Hours:

Mon.-Sat. 9am-8pm Sun. 9am-5:30pm

VINCENT’S MARKET VINCENT’S MARKET

• Full Line of Groceries • Chauvin Whole Bean Coffee • Butcher Shop • Fine Wine…200 + Varieties

We Reserve the Right to Limit

.

PRICES GOOD 12/24/17

• Fresh Baked Fazio's Breads • Produce & Health Food Sections • Meat Custom Cut to Your Order • Beer - Imports & MicroBrews

Select

7

www.vincentsmarket.biz

Fully Cooked Boneless

12

8 2 1

We Accept Food Stamps

2400 S. 12th Street • 314-772-4710

$

lb. lb.)

Vincent’s 12TH Street Market

A real neighborhood store In Historic Soulard... Since 1912

Loin Chops

$ 99

(Choice $999

• Liquor • Draft Beer • Propane Refilled

Fresh Lamb

Miller Hams

3

$ 29

99

lb. (Whole 10-12 lb. avg.)

lb.

1 4 3

$ 99 Frozen Whole $ 19 Ribeye Steak ................... Jennie-O Turkeys ............. Lean Boneless $ 99 $ 89 Hickory Smoked Slab Bacon ....................... Pork Loin Roast ............... Smoked $ 89 Purnell’s $ 19 Ham Shanks .................... Country Sausage Roll.......... Boneless Select

Choice $10.99 lb.

lb.

During the chorus of “Auld Lang Syne,” New Year’s revelers in-theknow sing, “and we’ll take a cup of kindness yet, for auld lang syne.” This recipe for the Kindness sparkling wine cocktail mixes botanical gin, lightly spiced Drambuie, and the complex sweetness of honey, all topped off with New Year’s Eve bubbles. If you’re hosting a party, you can make the cocktail in a pitcher ahead of time — just leave out the sparkling wine. Guests can add that to their glass at 11:55.

Domaine des Granges 2016 Mâcon-Fuissé (France) Bought • Wine Merchant, 7817 Forsyth Boulevard, in August for $14.99 Description • Mâcon-Fuissé and the famous PouillyFuissé, home of quite pricey, topquality chardonnay, are related geographically but are two separate appellations.

Christmas Eve 9-5 Closed Christmas Day

lb.

BY THE CULINARY INSTITUTE OF AMERICA

TYDY 2016 Sauvignon Blanc, Val de Loire (France) Bought • Starrs, 1135 South Big Bend Boulevard, in July for $11.99 Description • This zesty white is a fine example of an extremely tasty sauvignon blanc in the IGP category. TYDY stands for Thierry Delaunay, the fifth-generation owner of Domaine Joël Delaunay, located in the Touraine area in the middle of the Loire Valley wine region. This refreshing sauvignon blanc has a lovely floral nose and tastes of citrus with some tropical fruit and a hint of herbs.

WHITES

Standing Rib Roast

A cup of ‘kindness’ for New Year’s

Babich 2016 Pinot Gris, Marlborough (New Zealand) Bought • Schnucks, 8800 Manchester Road, in September for $13.99 Description • This rich pinot gris comes from the family-owned Babich Wines that was founded in 1916 by Croatian immigrant Josip Babich. This is a well-balanced, medium-bodied white that tastes of pears and peaches with a touch of lemon. Partially barrel fermented, it has some ginger and bakery spice flavors. Soft and easy to drink, it would go well with fish and white meats.

Famille Lafage 2016 Miraflors, Côtes du Roussillon (France) Bought • Wine and Cheese Place, 7435 Forsyth Boulevard, in June for $14.99 Description • This elegant, barely pink vin gris earned a well-deserved 91 points from Wine Enthusiast. Its sleek and graceful frosted bottle reflects the beautifully balanced, elegant wine that it holds. A blend of 60 percent grenache gris, 30 percent mourvèdre and 10 percent carignan, this is a silky, smooth and very clean wine that delivers delicious layers of red berries with floral aromatics. This is an easy-todrink, hard-to-resist wine that even won over a friend who claimed to dislike rosés. The Miraflors makes for a lovely aperitif or a pair with light foods.

SPARKLING

Bodegas Abanico Hazaña Viñas Viejas 2014 Rioja Cosecha (Spain) Bought • Wine & Cheese Place, 7435 Forsyth Boulevard, in May for $11.99 Description • This deeply flavored red received 92 points from Robert Parker’s Wine Advocate, which called the wine “simply one of the greatest values in Rioja that money can buy.” A blend of 85 percent tempranillo and 15 percent graciano, this is an intense medium- to full-bodied red that tastes of dark fruit, tobacco and vanilla from oak aging. The wine’s spiciness increases as it opens. It would go well with grilled beef.

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • L5

lb.

DELI DEPT.

6 $ 49 Chopped Ham .................. 4 $ 59 Cotto Salami.................... 4 $ 29 American Cheese............. 5 $ 19 Swiss ............................... 6 Turkey Breast..................

$ 99

lb.

lb.

16 oz. pkg.

GROCERIES/HEALTH FOOD

BEER St. Louis

1 $ 99 Brooklyn Brewery ........... . 7 Illinois $ 99 Main Street................... 15 Jeff City $ 99 Bur Oak.......................... 7

4 pak can/btl $ OFF Urban Chestnut................

l b. l b.

New York

6 pak btl

l b.

BUY ONE

Campbell’s

3 5 PRODUCE HY•TOP Cranberries .................... $129 Mostaccioli ................... 5/$500 WINES Vincent’s Market Celery ............................ 99¢ Stove Top 4/$ 00 5 Cabernet Sauvignon ......... $799 $ 59 Stuffing Mix ................ Russet Potatoes .............. 1 Del Monte Stemmari $ 89 Vegetables .................. 4/$300 $ 99 1 Pineapples ..................... Pinot Noir ...................... 8 Nabisco 2/$ 00 Villa Wolf FROZEN FOODS Snack Crackers ............... 5 $ 99 Green Giant Riesling ......................... 9 Dole 5/$ Vegetables.................... 5 Pineapple ...................... 2/$300 Adami Kraft $ 99 ¢ Cool Whip ..................... 99 Vlasic Chips 2/$ 00 Prosecco...................... 12 Stacker or Spears .............. 5 SODA DAIRY Domino Prairie Farms $ 19 $ 99 Sugar ............................. 2 Butter ............................ 3 7-UP/ Tide Laundry Kraft Cream Cheese $ 99 ¢ 2/$ 3 Detergent Pods .............. 5 Dr Pepper .................... 99 Philadelphia .................. FRESH MEAT ORDERS Stock-Up & Save!! Vincent's Market Is Proud To Carry l b. l b.

Fresh Crisp

Green Giant Golden

GET ONE 4/$ 00 Gravy ........................... FREE Campbell’s Cream of 5/$ 00 10.5 oz. can Mushroom or Chicken Soup .............. 10 oz. varieties

12 oz. bag

12 pak. var

6 pak. can

16 oz. box

slk.

750 ml.

6 oz. varieties

5 lb. bag

ea.

13-15 oz. varieties

750 ml.

6-13 oz. box

8-10 oz. boxes

750 ml.

20 oz. can

750 ml.

8 oz. bowl

16-24 oz. jar

1 lb. qts.

8 oz. bar

4 lb. bag

2 lt. btl.

16 ct. pkg.

MEAT ORDER #6

2 lbs. Pork Steaks 2 lbs. Pork Chops 3 lbs. Rib Tips 2 lbs. Ground Beef

2 lbs. Chicken Wings 3 lbs. Leg Quarters 2 lbs. Slab Bacon 1 lb. Cooked Salami

49.99

MEAT ORDER #9

3 lbs. Pork Chops 5 lbs. Ground Beef 3 lbs. Pork Steaks 2 lbs. Slab Bacon 3 lbs. Chicken Wings 2 lbs. Hot Dogs 5 lbs. Leg Quarters

64.99

$

MEAT ORDER #23 5 lbs. Ground Beef 2 lbs. Bologna 4 lbs. Pork Steaks 4 lbs. Pork Chops 2 lbs. American Cheese

3 lbs. Pork Sausage 3 lbs. Beef Roast 9 lbs. Leg Quarters 3 lbs. Pork Roast 4 lbs. Chicken Wings

112.99

$

MEAT ORDER #34 ALL PORK

Thomas Coffee

3 lbs. Pork Roast 2 lbs. Bacon 6 lbs. Spare Ribs 3 lbs. Pork Steaks 3 lbs. Boneless Pork Chops 2 lbs. Pork Sausage

52.99

$

$

MEAT ORDER #24 5 lbs. Ground Beef 5 lbs. Slab Bacon 5 lbs. Pork Sausage 5 lbs. Beef Roast 4 lbs. Pork Roast

9 lbs. Leg Quarters 5 lbs. Pork Steaks 2 lbs. Bologna 6 lbs. Chicken

128.99

$

MEAT ORDER #35 PICNIC SPECIAL

2 lbs. Bologna 2 lbs. Cooked Salami 2 lbs. Turkey Breast 1 lbs. American

1 lb. Swiss Cheese 2 lbs. Hot Dogs 2 lbs. Bratwurst 3 lbs. Ground Beef

61.99

$

MEAT ORDER #10 ALL BEEF!!!

2 lbs. Round Steak 2 lbs. Chuck Roast 3 lbs. Ground Beef

2 lbs. Sirloin Steak 2 lbs. Stew Meat

51.99

$

MEAT ORDER #25

MEAT ORDER #11

3 lbs. Ground beef 5 lbs. Pork Sausage 3 lbs. Rib Tips 5 lbs. Pork Steaks 10 lbs. Chicken Wings 9 lbs. Chicken

79.99

$

MEAT ORDER #27

3 lbs. Pork Steaks 2 lbs. Ground Beef 3 lbs. Cube Steak 3 lbs. Ground Chuck 4 lbs. Country Spareribs 2 lbs. Italian Sausage 3 lbs. Sirloin Steak 3 lbs. T-Bone 3 lbs. Pork Steaks 3 lbs. Center Cut 3 lbs. Cut-Up Chicken 2 lbs. Bratwurst 3 lbs. Porterhouse Steak Pork Chops

62.99

$

MEAT ORDER #37 2 lbs. Hot Dogs 2 lbs. Bacon 2 lbs. Pork Chops 2 lbs. Ground Beef

23.99

$

119.99

$

MEAT ORDER #36 ALL CHICKEN!!!

3 lbs. Cut Up 2 lbs. Wings 2 lbs. Drum Sticks

2 lbs. Thighs 3 lbs. Boneless Breast

25.99

$


L6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 12.20.2017

top 10

Sparkling Wines written by Jordan Baranowski

From elegant Champagnes to fun sparklers, these are the best bubblies to give your gatherings a little pop.

2

1

MONTAUDON BRUT Wine Spectator – 90 Our top sparkling of the year, this elegant brut can start a party right or ring in the new year with class.

3

France, 750 mL, $34.99

4

MAILLY BRUT RESERVE GRAND CRU

LA VOSTRA PROSECCO

Wine Spectator – 91 Save this traditional Champagne for a special evening in 2018.

Prosecco is a great way to kick off a celebratory evening, and La Vostra is great solo or with a few hors d'oeuvres.

France, 750 mL, $18.99

France, 750 mL, $39.99

Italy, 750 mL, $9.99

5

6

7

LOUIS BOUILLOT BRUT

Subtle apple and pear flavors make this an ideal bubbly to drink with a complex meal or as an endcap to one with dessert.

ARMANI SPARKLING ROSÉ

SANTI NELLO PROSECCO VALDOBBIADENE

JACQUELINE LEONNE BRUT

Crisp and bursting with berry flavors, this Italian bubbly is perfect for seafood dishes.

A welcome pairing for a traditional holiday spread, this versatile Prosecco is crisp and refreshing.

Zippy citrus flavor and plenty of berry goodness help show just how good a New Mexico sparkling wine can be.

Italy, 750 mL, $15.99

Italy, 750 mL, $14.99

New Mexico, 750 mL, $14.99

8

9

10

RONDEL BRUT CAVA

TESORO DELLA REGINA PROSECCO

RIVATA CASA ROSSA

Wine & Spirits – 90 This peachy, flowery Spanish brut is a spritzy kickoff for a weekend brunch.

Wine & Spirits – 90 This versatile Prosecco will liven up a quiet evening in or cocktail hour.

Red bubbles go with heartier meals; slight sweetness and more body allow it to stand up to big flavors.

Spain, 750 mL, $8.99

Italy, 750 mL, $16.99

Italy, 750 mL, $9.99

Accessories

If you’re giving the gift of wine this holiday season, don’t forget the glasses and stylish wrapping job! Pick up a few of these as stocking stuffers or office holiday party arty gifts.

RIEDEL VINUM CUVEE PRESTIGE GLASSES, 2-pack, $49.99

BORMIOLI CRESCENDO CHAMPAGNE GLASSES, 4-pack, $34.99 HOLIDAY GIFT BOX FOR ONE BOTTLE, $3.49 Shop Missouri's largest selection of wine, spirits, beer and more online and pick up your order in store! Start filling your cart at TotalWine.com. The Promenade at Brentwood 90 Brentwood Promenade Court Brentwood, MO 63144 314.963.3265

Manchester Meadows 13887 Manchester Road Ballwin, MO 63011 636.527.0482

Clarkson Square 1781 Clarkson Road Chesterfield, MO 63017 636.536.9869

Prices valid from 12/20/2017 through 12/27/2017 in Missouri stores only. Total Wine & More is not responsible for typographical errors, human error or supplier price increases. Same Price Cash or Credit. Products while supplies last. Total Wine & More reserves the right to limit quantities. Total Wine & More is a registered trademark of Retail Services & Systems, Inc. ©2017 Retail Services & Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Please drink responsibly. Use a designated driver.


• 700 Fabrics & Leathers • Custom Order < 3 Weeks • American Made 11182-B South Towne Square St. Louis, MO 63123 314-894-9922 Behind Denny's In South County

Up To 70% Off!

Clean Sweep Sale

• Best Selection • Best Price • Best Service

World's Largest Chair Manufacturer

55 Years Building The "Best" Chair 11 Years Selling To St. Louis Direct To The Public

MON. - SAT. 10-7 • SUN. 12-5

E ! E E S ID S IN

J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / C O M I C S

Wednesday • 12.20.2017 • eV DUSTIN • By Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker

DILBERT • By Scott Adams

SALLY FORTH • By Francesco Marciuliano and Jim Keefe

BABY BLUES • By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE • By Stephan Pastis GARFIELD • By Jim Davis

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM • By Mike Peters

DEFLOCKED • By Jeff Corriveau

MUTTS • By Patrick McDonnell

PRICKLY CITY • By Scott Stantis

PICKLES • By Brian Crane

HI AND LOIS • By Brian and Greg Walker and Chance Browne

RHYMES WITH ORANGE • By Hilary B. Price

BEETLE BAILEY • By Mort and Greg Walker

BREAKING CAT NEWS • By Georgia Dunn

SUDOKU

THE PAJAMA DIARIES • By Terri Libenson

EVERYDAY


EVERYDAY

EV2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH BRIDGE TIPS • BOB JONES Both vulnerable, North deals NORTH ♠A 10 9 2 ♥5 2 ♦K 9 5 2 ♣A Q 6 WEST EAST ♠8 7 6 ♠K 4 3 ♥J 4 ♥A Q 10 9 8 ♦J 10 8 4 ♦7 6 ♣10 8 4 2 ♣7 5 3 SOUTH ♠Q J 5 ♥K 7 6 3 ♦A Q 3 ♣K J 9 The bidding: NORTH EAST SOUTH WEST 1♦ 1♥ 3NT All pass Opening lead: Jack of ♥ East overtook the jack of hearts lead with the queen as South ducked. East continued with the ace of hearts and the 10 of hearts to declarer’s king as dummy discarded a club. Despite a combined 29 highcard points, there was no sure route to nine tricks. There were chances, however. South started by cashing the ace, queen, and king of diamonds. He was hoping for a 3-3 split, or a possible “restricted choice” finesse should East play the 10 or jack on the second round. East didn’t oblige and then discarded a low spade on the third diamond. South cashed the ace

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD of clubs, overtook the queen of clubs with the king, and cashed the jack of clubs, East following to all three rounds. South had a decision to make. He had to assume that the king of spades was off side from the auction. Had East started with 3-5-2-3 distribution, as seemed likely for his discard of a spade on the third diamond? Or perhaps East had started with 2-5-2-4 distribution and discarded his low spade early, leaving himself with a singleton king. That would have been a clever play on his part, and would foil an attempt by South to end play him. Declarer decided that if East had been that clever, he would pay off to him. South went with the percentages and exited with his remaining heart. East could cash another heart trick, but then had to lead away from his king of spades. Well played! (12/20/17)

Across

1 Man’s name that means “king” 4 Taxpayers’ IDs 8 Verbal digs 13 Palindromic farm animal 14 St. Patrick, for the Irish 15 Is a first-stringer 17 *Monthly charge for a London apartment? 19 Garb 20 Targets 22 Follower of the first intermission 23 Mineral in bath powder 26 *French fries on a London card table? 28 Mushroom used in sukiyaki 30 Arrives on

time for 31 90° from ENE 32 Like a doctor’s penmanship, stereotypically 36 Sign of spring 39 First X, say 40 *Catalog from a London raincoat designer? 42 Spot in la mer 43 Herd unit 45 Learjet competitor 46 Cardinal ___ 47 What like-pole magnets do 49 Johnny Appleseed, e.g. 51 *Part of a London police officer’s uniform? 56 Furtive “Hey, you!” 57 Home of the Ewoks 58 Perfectly 60 Add, per a recipe

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

tcaeditors@tribune.com

CRYPTOQUIP

If Dec. 20 is your birthday • This year you often listen to your sixth sense, especially when it comes to your personal life. If you are single, your love life could experience many twists and turns. If you are attached, your relationship takes on a very exciting tone. Capricorn always has strong opinions.

WORD GAME December 20 WORD — TRACHEA (TRACHEA: TRAY-kee-uh: A tube which carries air between the larynx and the lungs.) Average mark 28 words. Time limit 40 minutes. Can you find 37 or more words in TRACHEA? The list will be published tomorrow. YESTERDAY’S WORD — LOBATE able bleat late aloe bloat lobe alto blot oblate table boat bale tale boatel bate teal bola beat tole bole belt bolt beta abet blat RULES OF THE GAME: 1. Words must be of four or more letters. 2. Words that acquire four letters by the addition of “s,” such as “bats” or “dies,” are not allowed. 3. Additional words made by adding a “d” or an “s” may not be used. For example, if “bake” is used, “baked” or “bakes” are not allowed, but “bake” and “baking” are admissible. 4. Proper nouns, slang words, or vulgar or sexually explicit words are not allowed.

62 *Conveyance in a multilevel London store? 66 Place for a sword 67 Dagwood’s bratty neighbor 68 Message on an offstage card 69 Lucy’s sitcom pal 70 Beat people? 71 What curtains may signify

Down

1 TKO caller 2 Harry Potter’s Hedwig, e.g. 3 Roll-call call 4 Familiar voice since 2011 5 Rascal 6 “I beg to differ” 7 Weaselly sort 8 Characterbuilding youth org. 9 What follows a cry of “Char-r-rge!” 10 Mechanism in a unidirectional wrench 11 Words found in the answers to this puzzle’s starred clues 12 Remove with a sandblaster, say 16 Dos y cuatro 18 Bulletin board item 21 Conductors set them 23 Final frame in bowling

HOROSCOPE • JACQUELINE BIGAR Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. The stars show the kind of day you’ll have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult.

CROSSWORD

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 12.20.2017

ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH You make quite an impression on others, especially in situations where you are in command. You have the capability to shake up the status quo. Tonight: Make calls. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH Detach and take in the big picture. As a result, you’ll gain some insight and be able to circumvent a hassle. Your perspective grows as you express more compassion toward others. Tonight: Treat yourself to a movie. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH You might see the beginning of a power play developing between you and someone else in your life. Rise above this person’s issues by not getting pulled in. Tonight: Express your caring attitude. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH You might start visualizing your universe quite differently from how you have up till now. A loved one seems to be in the midst of a major transformation. Tonight: Accept an offer. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHH Get into a project and respond to that creative voice within. Count on your natural ingenuity and playful imagination to emerge whenever you stop to chat with others. You find answers when others can’t. Tonight: Know when to call it a night. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Don’t allow someone else to intimidate you. Try to imagine what it must be like to

Find more free games, or subscribe to get access to more than 50 others, at STLtoday.com/games, where you’ll also find a link to the Puzzle Society.

Puzzle by Steven E. Atwood

24 Lennox of Eurythmics 25 Atkins plan, e.g. 27 Synthetic alternative to silk 29 Suffix with sex 33 Gets ready to play basketball, say, with “up” 34 Cat once prized for its fur 35 Airer of Ken Burns documentaries 37 Many a rapper’s name

38 George who played Norm on “Cheers” 41 Ike’s home state: abbr. 44 ___ Harry, vocalist for the band Blondie 48 Fool’s gold 50 German automaker 51 First lady after Eleanor 52 Words before double or take 53 Sine’s recipro-

cal, briefly 54 Frida who was portrayed in film by Salma Hayek 55 Crush, in a way, with “on” 59 Some narrative writing 61 Org. with the Original Six teams 63 What 61-Down teams play on 64 Amusement 65 Sen. Cruz

Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay. No. 1115

WORD SCRIMMAGE

be this person; detach and try to walk in his or her shoes. As a result, you’ll gain a unique perspective of what he or she has to deal with. Tonight: All smiles. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHH You might be more uptight than you realize; a matter involving your home could be involved. Recognize where you do and do not have influence. Be willing to take a leap of faith. Tonight: You can adjust to each curve ball. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH You finally communicate your bottom line so that the other party can hear you loud and clear. This person could have a strong reaction, which might be upsetting. Tonight: Let go, but still remain authentic.

Solutions at bottom of page

WONDERWORD

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHH Be aware of the costs of proceeding as you have been. You might not be as contained as you would like to believe you are. Your sixth sense will dispute some of the information you are hearing. Tonight: Finish your holiday shopping. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHHH You seem more willing to experience life from other perspectives. Your thinking seems limited to you, and only you can broaden your mental outlook to get past your mental filters. Tonight: Till the wee hours. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH You’ll choose not to reveal everything that is on your mind; perhaps you don’t feel that the timing is right. Your perceptions are right, but convincing others might be difficult. Tonight: Play it low-key.

WORDY GURDY

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH Meetings and gettogethers fill your day. If you use the right words and tone, you can get everyone to listen to your ideas. One person might feel challenged by your perspective. Use care when dealing with this person. Tonight: Where your friends are. STLtoday.com/horoscopes Get expanded horoscope information: star charts, peak times, outlooks and Chinese Zodiac data.

JUMBLE


EVERYDAY

12.20.2017 • Wednesday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • EV3

DEAR ABBY

WHAT’S THE DIFF? Find six differences between the panels.

She cheats on man who’s cheating

Dear Losing Yourself • Has your brother-in-law MARRIED Velma? If not, I see no reason why you should be forced to clear any-

thing with her. If the two of them have tied the knot, then I can see a benefit for you in having a discussion. Of course, that discussion should be in the office of a professional mediator, and you should first make a list of all the questions you would like her to answer. At the top of the list would be why she was sleeping with your husband and his brother at the same time. Close to that one would be why she thinks you would ever want to have a relationship with her. Dear Abby • I am a Korean lady whose husband spends a lot of time on Facebook. He says it’s to promote his books. (He loves to write.) I think he does it to get recognition from his Facebook “friends.” Well, that may be great for him. But my problem with him — and Facebook — is that sometimes he provides too much information about ME. None of it is positive. We had a fight two weeks ago, and the next thing I knew, I was

reading about it on Facebook, all from his point of view. Before that, he complained he only got a bowl of cereal for breakfast when he would have liked a hot meal. I feel hurt after reading what he’s posting and ashamed for not being a “good enough” spouse. Am I overly sensitive or should I confront him about this? — EMBARRASSED IN KOREA Dear Embarrassed • By all means talk to your husband about what he’s been doing, because if he has complaints, they should be directed to you rather than his Facebook buddies. If you feel compelled to defend yourself, you can always reply to his posts to set the record straight. If he continues to publicly discuss what should be a private matter, you might be less embarrassed if you read his posts less often or unfriend him altogether. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, Calif. 90069.

TV WEDNESDAY

CAROLYN HAX

When to tell a friend about boyfriend Hello, Carolyn • One of my best girlfriends (we’re in our 40s and 50s) has started dating a former lover of mine. Because I’m a private person, my friends possibly knew of him — I’m single — but didn’t press for details. They all know him independently through a group affiliation we share. He became “former” earlier this year because he constantly let me down, from canceling a date as I’m literally on my way, to taking a phone call while I’m talking with him about facing my oncologist about my cancer progress — the whole range of disrespectful. No biggie, I respected him enough to accept how he wanted to be and we just transitioned back to friendship. A few weeks into their dating experience, however, he’s already doing the same to her — last minute cancellations, etc. Her desire for marriage may blind her to how disrespectful his behavior

can be. So, two questions: Do I have to crack my own shell of privacy and tell my friend I had a thing with a guy she’s now dating? He’s obviously not mentioned it. If I wait to see if it becomes serious, then it’s an even harder conversation. I feel really uncomfortable about each of the say/don’t-say options. And do I share with her some of the thoughtless and disrespectful things he’s done? Not least of which, I think, is dating one of my best friends without a heads-up to me. Maybe I should talk to him? I don’t like being in this position! — Say/Not Say? Answer • These lose-lose decisions always feel the hardest, obviously, because you don’t see any courses of action you like but inaction leaves you stuck in the limbo of facing an unwanted

Differences: 1. Top of step stool is larger. 2. Towel is longer. 3. Faucet is not showing. 4. Thumb is moved. 5. Ear is different. 6. Mouth is open.

Dear Abby • A year ago, my husband confessed that he was having an affair at work. Before it started, he tried setting “Velma” up with his twin brother, but she said she wasn’t interested. Their affair lasted for months, until the guilt “ate him up.” When he told me, I was devastated. We agreed to get counseling and work on our marriage. Well, it turns out Velma was also seeing his brother while she was with my husband. Oh! And she had a baby, and we’re not sure who the father is. My brother-in-law claims he loves Velma and she loves him. I have been asked if I am willing to sit with her, my husband and brother-in-law to “clear the air.” I don’t think I can do it. Although I want my brother-in-law to be happy, at the same time, I don’t want to ever be near this woman. Please help. — LOSING MYSELF

For complete channels and 24-hour program information, customize your own TV listings at STLtoday.com/tv.

choice. It’s lose-lose-lose, in a way. But there’s usually a good decision — or a merely less-bad one — to be found by breaking a situation down to its most basic facts. Here, you have two certainties at the foundation of everything: Your privacy is yours, and your friend’s relationship is hers. So your best choice is going to be the one that comes closest to honoring these two facts. Which means you say as little as possible, and you disrupt the relationship as little as possible. You rightly point out that choosing to say nothing will loom larger and get weirder as their relationship progresses. That means speaking up might feel like butting into their business but is actually more respectful of their relationship — and your privacy — than silence. tellme@washpost.com

7:00

12/20/17

7:30

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30

FOX Empire: Full Circle. Lu- Star: Insecure. The new Fox 2 News at 9:00pm 2 cious looks to a friend label head wants to (N) (cc) for answers. rebrand. CBS 4

Survivor (N) (cc)

Survivor: Reunion Special. (N) (cc)

NBC Making a PITCH PERFECT (’12) HHH (Anna Kendrick) College students 5 Difference enter an a cappella competition. (cc) PBS Nature Cats in Asia and NOVA: Bird Brain. 9 Africa. (Part 1 of 2) (cc) Scientists test avian aptitude. (N) CW 11

News 11 at 7:00PM (N) (cc)

IND Judge 24 Hatchett (cc)

SuperNature -- Wild Flyers The extremes of true flight. (cc)

Grandma Got Run Over The Top 12 Greatest Christmas Movies of All by a Reindeer (cc) Time (cc)

Justice for Daniel Boone All

Here’s Help The Lucy Show

American Match Game Amy SeABC The Gold- Speechless Modern 30 bergs Housewife daris; Chris D’Elia. (cc) Family: (cc) Lake Life. MYTV Law & Order: Talking 46 Points. Someone in a crowd fires a gun.

Law & Order: Church. Pastor accused of murder.

Law & Order: Special Victims Unit A prostitution ring.

n a e l C Sweep

! E L A S D N YEAR E

UP TO!

*While They Last!

D CopperS Swivel Glider OL Pin Cushion Ottoman Petite Accent Chair Paisley Mid Century Leg D Gray LChair SO 6pc Blue Power Tilt Headrest Reclining Sectional - BIG Double Size Power Tilt Recliner Wingback Chair 16 colors Power Petite Recliner SOLD Lemon Yellow Power Chaise Rocker/Recliner Shrimp Red Urethane Rocker Recliner Red Paisley Power Recliner LD SO Blue Floral Chaise Recliner-Power Wall Saver Recliner 16 colors GenuineS Leather free POWer D OLRecliner Power Lift Recliner 16 colors free leatHer Power Lift Recliner

WOW

F F O % 70

WAS

NOW

$4999

$1974

$1299 $599

$447 $247

$949

$299

$899 $849 $1399

$330 $317 $472

reCLiner

$1399 $699 $899 $1299 $2199

$473 $249 $375 $599 $999

$ 999

$899 $599 $849 $799

$299 $199 $325 $275

Genuine Leather

WOW!

While They Last!

$

Was

Wall Saver

Now

399

Genuine Leather Upgrade Saves $800!

YEAR END SALE! PICTURES ARE REPRESENTATIONS ONLY

World’s Largest Chair Manufacturer! South County 55 and Lindbergh Behind Denny’s.

314-894-9922 10-7 Mon-Sat, Sun 12-5 www.besthfstl.com

AmericAn mAde

all lift reclinerS

50% Off


EVERYDAY

EV4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH THE FAMILY CIRCUS • By Bil Keane

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 12.20.2017

DR. KEITH ROACH

ZITS • By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

Escalating drug costs create a treatment hardship FUNKY WINKERBEAN • By Tom Batiuk

Dear Dr. Roach • After a three-year battle with multiple myeloma, my husband passed away in July. During those three years, he had almost every kind of chemotherapy known. As time progressed, the drugs got more expensive. Last summer, they wanted to try a drug called Revlimid. When we investigated what the cost to us would be with our Medicare Part D, it was $25 per pill, and they wanted him to be on the medicine for three weeks, then off for a week. I tried several “patient assistance programs” and was told by each that we wouldn’t qualify because we were covered by a government insurance. Why would they help younger patients and not those of us who are over 65? Luckily, my husband served in the Navy and he was able to get his Revlimid through the Veterans Affairs system, but what are seniors who didn’t serve in the military supposed to do? Are there any options for us? Someone is making a bunch of money at our expense. — S.F.

SPEED BUMP • By Dave Coverly

BIZARRO • By Dan Piraro

CORNERED • By Mike Baldwin NON SEQUITUR • By Wiley Miller

Answer • Lenalidomide (Revlimid) is a relative of thalidomide, and may be of benefit to several types of “liquid” cancers, those of the bone marrow. Without insurance, the pills are over $600 each. Your insurance did help (a lot), but I understand that $500 for three weeks of medications can still be a real hardship for many. However, you would be horrified, as I have been, to hear what some people pay out of pocket for medication. Lenalidomide is moderately effective: It improves disease-free survival by about six months, and people on lenalidomide for multiple myeloma achieved a complete response (no evidence of tumor by blood testing) 16 percent of the time, compared with 3 percent for the group without lenalidomide. That makes the drug worth more than its alternatives. Many oncology medications are very expensive, and this is one. On the other hand, it is a significant advance in helping people live longer. I don’t have the answer to runaway pharmaceutical costs in the U.S. It’s very different in other countries.

DUPLEX • By Glenn McCoy MARMADUKE • By Brad Anderson

INTELLIGENT LIFE • By David Reddick

DRABBLE • By Kevin Fagan

MARK TRAIL • By James Allen

Readers • The booklet on COPD explains both emphysema and chronic bronchitis, the two elements of COPD, in detail. Readers can obtain a copy by writing: Dr. Roach Book No. 601 628 Virginia Dr. Orlando, FL 32803 Enclose a check or money order (no cash) for $4.75 U.S./$6 Can. with the recipient’s printed name and address. Please allow 4-6 weeks for delivery.

LOLA • By Todd Clark ZIGGY • By Tom Wilson

Dr. Roach regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but will incorporate them in the column whenever possible. Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med. cornell.edu.

OTHER COAST • By Adrian Raeside

TAKE IT FROM THE TINKERSONS • By Bill Bettwy

THE ARGYLE SWEATER • By Scott

Hilburn

BLONDIE • By Dean Young and John Marshall

See more comics and play interactive games at STLtoday.com/comics