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S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 1 8 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

SATURDAY • 12.16.2017 • $2.00

FINAL TAX BILL RELEASED CHANGING

A lower tax rate for top earners

A massive tax cut for corporations to 21 percent

Workingclass families get a bigger Child Tax Credit

You can deduct just $10,000 in state, local and property taxes

PROPONENTS SAY

Individual health insurance mandate goes away in 2019

Sen. Bob Corker

You can inherit up to $22 million tax-free

“Pass through” companies get a 20 percent reduction

No corporate Alternative Minimum Tax

Graduate student tuition waivers stay

Student loan and medical expense deductions remain

GOP appears to have votes to pass overhaul BY STEPHEN OHLEMACHER AND MARCY GORDON Associated Press

‘I realize this is a bet on our country’s enterprising spirit, and that is a bet I am willing to make.’

NOT CHANGING

WASHINGTON • After weeks of quarrels, qualms and then eleventh-hour horse-trading, Republicans revealed late Friday the details of their huge national tax rewrite — along with announcements of support that all but guarantee approval to give President Donald Trump the Christmas legislative triumph he’s been aching for. The legislation would slash tax

rates for big business and lower taxes on the richest Americans in a massive $1.5 trillion bill that the GOP plans to muscle through Congress next week before its year-end break. Benefits for most other taxpayers would be smaller. “This is happening. Tax reform under Republican control of Washington is happening,” House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wisconsin told rank-and-file members in a conference call. “Most critics out there didn’t think it could happen. … And now we’re on the doorstep

of something truly historic.” According to the 1,097-page bill released late Friday, today’s 35 percent rate on corporations would fall to 21 percent, the crown jewel of the measure for many Republicans. Trump and GOP leaders had set 20 percent as their goal, but added a point to free money for other tax cuts that won over wavering lawmakers in final talks. The legislation represents the first major legislative achievement

Retirement accounts such as 401(k) plans stay the same

Religious groups and nonprofits can’t endorse candidates in elections

OPPONENTS SAY

‘It is just the opposite of what America needs, and Republicans will rue the day they pass this.’ Sen. Chuck Schumer

See TAXES • Page A5

State looks to trim degree programs that underperform

‘IT’S NOT THAT I’M AGAINST THE LED TECHNOLOGY. I’M JUST AGAINST THE UGLY FIXTURES.’

BY ASHLEY JOST St. Louis Post-Dispatch

OLD-FASHIONED LIGHT

JEFFERSON CITY • Half of the nearly 1,800 degree programs offered at Missouri’s public colleges and universities are falling short of state standards for graduates and other measures, according to a statewide review. Though that may sound alarming, education leaders say it’s a sign of the changing times in higher education. Zora Mulligan, Missouri’s commissioner for higher education, said she was not concerned about the volume of programs an audit has identified as underperforming. “It indicates student behavior is changing,” she said. “That’s really what this is a map of.” The Missouri Department of Higher

MODERN LED LIGHT

Historic city weighs fight to save streetlights

See DEGREES • Page A4

Alabama has sobering lessons for Republicans in 2018 elections BY CHUCK RAASCH St. Louis Post-Dispatch

WASHINGTON • This week’s election

sissippi, in Brentwood. “The people in town probably think I’m crazy, I think. But they’re very nice about it. They humor me.” Some of them are also taking his calls for preservation to heart — especially in a historic town such as Elsah, where some buildings date to the 1850s and even minor changes can threaten to erode the

result from Alabama provides lessons for Missouri, as the Show-Me state pivots toward one of the most important Senate races in the nation’s recent history. Tuesday’s upset victory for Democrat Doug Jones over Republican Roy Moore for a U.S. Senate seat from Alabama also provides stark consequences for Roy Blunt and his Senate leadership colleagues as they deal with a diminished majority. For now, it means there’s room for just one Republican “no” vote on every major issue still confronting the administration of President Donald Trump. Democrats now have a Senate seat in

See LIGHTS • Page A5

See ALABAMA • Page A4

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

Lexi Norton coats a porch in red paint at the historic home of Deborah and Tim Smith in Elsah on Friday. The historic town is weighing options to preserve the old-fashioned lights as the power company, Ameren, shifts to new LED technology. BY BRYCE GRAY St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ELSAH • Suddenly, one of them was

gone. After years — even decades — of dutiful visits to admire them and stoke his hobby, Barry Williams recently found that his beloved streetlights of Elsah were under siege. A new “cobrahead-style” LED light, like those found along a free-

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way, had replaced one of the village’s historic replica light fixtures. Williams maintains an unabashed obsession with streetlights, traffic signals and anything that lends historic flavor to the streetscape of a community. The oldfashioned “radial wave” streetlights in Elsah have long been among his favorites. “I’ve been very protective of those lights for many years now,” said Williams, who lives on the other side of the Mis-

A White Christmas here?

Hoffman accused of sexual assault

• A6

Forecasters say it could happen

Retailers struggle to get packages out

PAGE A3

Blues seek to end offensive slump Ozuna excited to join the Cardinals

• A8

• B1 • B1

1 M Vol. 139, No. 350 ©2017

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M 1 SATURDAY • 12.16.2017 • A2

JOE’S ST. LOUIS

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM

Find these features and exclusive subscriber content at stltoday.com/extra

Gin Joint patrons get a chance to hear of St. Louis memories JOE HOLLEMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

OF ALL THE GIN JOINTS • ... he had to walk into Nadine’s. Cameron Collins, author of “Lost Treasures of St. Louis,” will be in Soulard neighborhood on Monday to talk about St. Louis history. The author of the blog “Distilled History,” Collins is set to speak at 6:30 p.m. Monday at Nadine’s Gin Joint, 1931 South 12th Street. The event is free and open to the public. Collins also will be selling his book, which features St. Louis memories such as the Club Imperial, Bowling for Dollars at the Arena, Ronnie’s Drive-In, the Crystal Palace in Gaslight Square, Mavrakos Candy and Falstaff Beer. Collins’ book is published by Reedy Press, which lost its stock of 200,000 volumes in a massive warehouse fire on Nov. 15. BIBLE TOUTING • On Sunday, a modern, handcrafted illuminated St. John’s Bible will be placed on permanent display at the Cathedral Basilica of St. Louis. The bible will remain on display after the 2:30 p.m. Festival of Lessons and Carols. Images from the Bible will be projected on the walls of the Cathedral Basilica during the service. According to Post-Dispatch book editor Jane Henderson, the original St. John’s Bible was a 15-year project that involved 23 artists and includes 1,165 pages and 160 illuminations. Newsweek magazine once called it “America’s Book of Kells.” There are 299 “heritage editions,” which are artistic copies of the original.

YEAR’S BIGGEST HEADLINES For St. Louis, 2017 was a year of floods, protests and new faces in government. Review the big news headlines. stltoday.com/news

PICK YOUR FAVORITE ‘EARWORM’

Whether it’s that movie chain jingle, the roofer or the barbecue sauce, some of those earworms are worse than others. Vote for your ‘favorite’ one. stltoday.com/television

PEOPLE CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

Kitty Mandis (right) presents pages of a bound heritage copy of a section of the St. John’s Bible at the Archdiocese of St. Louis headquarters in Shrewsbury in February.

Earlier this year, volumes of one of the copies were put on display at several St. Louis locations. At the time, the archdiocese said it hoped to acquire an edition, which was estimated to cost about $150,000, Henderson reported. Our fair burg’s cathedral will be the only one in the country to have a permanent heritage edition, St. Louis Archbishop Robert J. Carlson said, noting that the Bible was bought “due to the generosity of a Cathedral Basilica parishioner.” ’TIS THE SEASON ... • A recent list from personal finance website WalletHub claimed that St. Louis was more dangerous than even Detroit. But at least, according to the same listmakers, we’re not as needy. Our fair burg was ranked No. 9 on the roster of “2017 Neediest Cities” — ahead of Detroit and seven other cities. The analysis took into account two main factors: economic well-being; and health and safety. The economic well-being category, with St. Louis ranking No. 16, included rates of poverty, unemployment, homelessness, consumer bankruptcy and fore-

closures; high-school dropout rates; and median credit score. We came in more needy, No. 11, in the health/safety category, which looked at: crime and suicide rates; food insecurity; homes without adequate plumbing or cooking capabilities; home overcrowding; and lack of computer and internet service. Cities finishing worse off than St. Louis were: Detroit; Cleveland; Newark, N.J.; Memphis, Tenn.; Jackson, Miss.; Atlanta; Fresno, Calif.; and Los Angeles. When it comes to nearby major cities, Indianapolis was right behind us at No. 10. Other short-drive cities on the list are Cincinnati (29), Kansas City (55), Nashville, Tenn. (56), Chicago (58) Springfield, Mo. (64) and Louisville, Ky. (80). On that note, please know that readers can help by: Going to 100neediestcases. org; call 314-421-6060, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. weekdays; or mail a check or money order to 100 Neediest Cases, P.O. Box 955925, St. Louis, Mo. 63195. Joe Holleman • 314-340-8254 @stlsherpa on Twitter jholleman@post-dispatch.com

100 NEEDIEST CASES: HELPING THOUSANDS

ILL MOTHER FEARS LOSING JOB THREE WAYS TO GIVE

FROM STAFF REPORTS

CASE 89 • Ms. K, a single parent, is strug-

gling with serious health problems while trying to raise her 6-year-old son. Five months ago, Ms. K found out she had systemic lupus and rheumatoid arthritis. She has health insurance, but the deductible is high. At every doctor visit, she must pay the entire bill until the deductible is met. Her medication for lupus is about $200 a month. Ms. K, 37, works at the front desk of a clinic, and her paycheck is almost eaten up by her health care payments. She thinks she could lose her job because of taking so many sick days. She and her son are thankful for any donations this holiday season. They could use a bed and money to help pay utility bills and rent. They could also use clothing, furniture and repairs for her car. She would like her son to have a toy for the holidays.

CASE 90 • When thieves stole Ms. L’s car

this year, she says they stole her sense of hope along with it. Ms. L, 41, has been caring for three children since their parents died in 2006, along with her own three children, four grandchildren and her ailing mother. In all, the children in her care range in age from 1 to 21. Her mother, who suffers from a heart condition, is 58. A new car payment was not part of the plan for this already financially strapped caretaker. Ms. L is hoping for some help this holiday season with an electric washer and dryer, car repairs, utility bills, clothing and a bicycle. Case profiles by Kim Bell and Christine Byers of the PostDispatch.

• Donors can adopt any of the cases — not just the 100 profiled at STLtoday.com/ neediest. The program supplies donors with a list of a family’s needs. All gifts go directly to the family, through a social worker. • New this year, those who want to participate in the campaign can set up a fundraising page and share it through social media. It’s similar to other online crowd sourcing efforts like GoFundMe, but 100 percent of donations go to CAROLINE VANDERVOORT • Brentwood High School. the families in the 100 Neediest Cases campaign and the funds are tax deductible. TO HELP • The program also accepts monetary Or mail a check or money Visit 100neediestcases.org gifts. Every dollar order (no cash) payable to: will go directly to a 100 Neediest Cases Or call 314-421-6060 from needy family, and P.O. Box 955925 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. every family will St. Louis, Mo. 63195 on weekdays. receive something.

HOW IT WORKS For generations, the 100 Neediest Cases campaign has helped thousands of disadvantaged families during the holidays. This year, the program will benefit more than 10,000 needy households — selected by social service agencies that partner with the United Way. The Post-Dispatch is showcasing 100 cases. But all the families will share the cash donations.

Grammy tribute to honor Elton John • Sam Smith, Miley Cyrus and Coldplay’s Chris Martin are set to honor Elton John at a tribute concert next month. The Recording Academy announced Friday that it will tape “Elton John: I’m Still Standing — A GRAMMY Salute” at The Theater at Madison Square Garden in New York on Jan. 30, two days after the 2018 Grammy Awards. The concert will broadcast at a later date on CBS. The Grammys will air live from Madison Square Garden on Jan. 28. Others set to honor John onstage include John Legend, Miranda Lambert, Kesha, Keith Urban, Little Big Town and Maren Morris. John will also perform.

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS

Actress Liv Ullman is 79. Journalist Lesley Stahl is 76. Actor Ben Cross is 70. Actor Sam Robards is 56. Actor Benjamin Bratt is 54. Country singer Jeff Carson is 54. Comedian JB Smoove is 52. Actor Theo James is 33.

From news services

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MISSOURI LOTTERIES

LOTTO Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $6.7 million SHOW ME CASH Friday: 01-06-16-23-29 Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $60,000 PICK-3 Friday Midday: 058 Evening: 008 PICK-4 Friday Midday: 7096 Evening: 5037

ILLINOIS LOTTERIES

LUCKY DAY LOTTO Friday Midday: 17-24-32-38-43 Evening: 04-23-26-33-43 LOTTO Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $16.5 million PICK-3 Friday Midday: 679 FB: 6 Evening: 551 FB: 4 PICK-4 Friday Midday: 2048 FB: 4 Evening: 7326 FB: 2

STLTODAY.COM/LOTTERY Current and past numbers, plus jackpots from state lotteries around the country.

CONTACT US

INSIDE Business ................ A8 Editorial................ A11 Horoscopes...........EV2 Joe Holleman......... A2 Letters to editor ... A11 Obituaries............ A12

Royal wedding or FA Cup final?

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle will marry in St. George’s Chapel at Windsor Castle on May 19 — the same day as one of the biggest English sports events of the year, the FA Cup final. The date was confirmed Friday by the prince’s Kensington Palace office. While most British royal weddings are on weekdays, this one is a Saturday, and the same day as the soccer showdown at London’s Wembley Stadium. Harry’s grandmother Queen Elizabeth II and other royals are expected to attend the wedding, along with Markle’s parents, Thomas Markle and Doria Ragland. The climax of soccer’s oldest cup competition could present a distraction for guests at the royal reception, although the events should at least be at different times. The FA Cup competition, which is open to hundreds of teams all the way from the topranked Premier League down to amateur clubs, began in August and is played every month until two teams meet in the final.

Puzzles ................ EV2 Religion ............... A10 Sports calendar ......B2 Stocks .................... A9 TV listings ............ EV3 Weather............... B10

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Editor: Gilbert Bailon.......................................314-340-8387 Features: Amy Bertrand ..................................314-340-8284 Local news: Marcia Koenig............................... 314-340-8142 Business: Roland Klose.................................... 314-340-8128 Online: Amanda St. Amand.............................. 314-340-8201 Projects: Jean Buchanan .................................. 314-340-8111 Sports: Roger Hensley...................................... 314-340-8301


LOCAL

12.16.2017 • Saturday • M 1

DIGEST AUGUSTA > School overwhelmed by flu • Widespread flu activity shut down an elementary school Friday. Augusta Elementary in the Washington School District will reopen Monday after a thorough cleaning over the weekend. The school had poor attendance this week “due to high incidents of flu and flu like symptoms” according to district administrator Craig Vonder Haar. Around Missouri, there have been 3,558 reported flu cases this season, compared with 606 at this

HOLIDAY DREAMS time last year. There have been 370 deaths in the state linked to pneumonia and influenza since October. Illinois reports less flu activity, with 167 confirmed cases. Six flu outbreaks have been reported in nursing homes, but there have been no other flu-related school closures reported in Missouri. Classes in Litchfield, Ill., were canceled for two days this month when nearly 25 percent of students were out sick. A bad flu season in Australia last summer was a potential warning

of a similar showing in the northern hemisphere, experts said. Most of the flu strains circulating are H3N2, a sub-type known to cause more serious illness while the flu vaccine is less effective against it. Flu is a contagious respiratory illness marked by fever, sore throat, cough, fatigue and muscle aches. Anyone with a fever should stay home from school or work until recording a normal temperature for 24 hours, health officials said. From staff reports

LAW & ORDER

ST. CHARLES COUNTY > Man dies in one-car accident • A man from St. Charles died Thursday after he was injured in an accident on westbound Missouri 364, east of Arena Parkway. The Missouri Highway Patrol says Blake A. Meives, 20, of St. Charles, was driving westbound at 4:20 a.m. Thursday when his car went off the road, through a guardrail and struck an embankment. The vehicle overturned, and Meives was ejected. He was taken to a hospital where he was pronounced dead at 2:35 p.m. ARNOLD > Police officer still recovering after shooting • Arnold Police Officer Ryan O’Connor continues to fight for his life in a St. Louis hospital. The Arnold Police Department posted on its Facebook page Thursday that O’Connor remained in critical condition:

CLAYTON > Man charged with assaulting police • St. Louis County prosecutors charged Jason Cook, 37, on Friday with assaulting two Bellefontaine Neighbors police officers. Cook, who lives in the 10100 block of Bellefontaine Road, is accused of shooting the officers on Thursday morning when they tried to arrest him for firing shots into houses the night before. The officers were shot in the chest but escaped serious injury because they were wearing bulletpoof vests, Mayor Bob Doerr said. Cook is charged with two counts of first-degree assault and two counts of armed criminal action. Bail is set at $150,000, cashonly. Cook was walking along Bellefontaine Road at 7:15 a.m. Thursday when two officers tried to arrest him for firing shots Wednesday night. As the officers confronted him in a yard, he resisted and shot a sergeant and a police officer. Then he ran a block or two to his home, barricading himself inside for hours while tactical officers tried to negotiate with him. The standoff ended about 3 p.m. Thursday. Police say Cook had been shot and was hospitalized with injuries that weren’t considered life-threatening. Police had fired one bullet at Cook just after 11 a.m. after he fired at them from the back of his home, police say. ST. LOUIS COUNTY > High school student with gun charged • A student at Hazelwood West High School has been charged in connection with bringing a loaded gun into the school on Wednesday, the St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office said. Reginald Moorehead, 17, of the 7600 block of Sunset Drive, was arrested at the school. He was charged with unlawful use of a weapon for carrying a loaded weapon into a school, bus and premises, a felony. Moorehead was accused of selling narcotics, and he was brought to the principal’s office, Hazelwood police said. While there, he was searched and a loaded firearm was discovered in a bag around his waist. The firearm was seized and Moorehead was arrested. The gun was a Phoenix Arms .22 caliber semiautomatic pistol, according to court records. He is being held at the St. Louis County Justice Center in lieu of $10,000 bail. He had not posted bail as of Friday. CLAYTON > Ferguson protester sentenced • The second of three men accused of throwing a tire iron and bricks at two police officers in Dellwood during the Ferguson protests in 2014 was sentenced Friday to 120 days of “shock time” in jail, followed by five years

on probation. Authorities say Korey Haulcy, 22, was among three who threw bricks and a tire iron at St. Louis County police officers on Nov. 25, 2014, after the announcement that a grand jury had declined to indict a Ferguson police officer for killing Michael Brown, 18. After the incident at Chambers Road and Floridale Avenue, the men jumped in a car, but police surrounded it before it could get away, police said. The men jumped out and ran, leaving the driver. They were caught when police let the driver go and followed her until she picked up the three men, documents say. All three, who lived in an apartment complex in the 10800 block of Lookaway Drive in north St. Louis County at the time, were charged with attempted assault on a law enforcement officer and resisting arrest. Haulcy pleaded guilty Nov. 20. Haulcy received the same punishment as Cedric James, 23, who was sentenced in October. The case against Andrew L. Brady, 27, is pending.

Hopes for a snowy Christmas could come true this year ST. LOUIS CHRISTMAS WEATHER BY THE NUMBERS

BY ERIN HEFFERNAN St. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. LOUIS • Projected weather patterns

are keeping dreams of a white Christmas in the St. Louis area alive this year. Expected low temperatures and aboveaverage precipitation in Missouri and Illinois mean there is a higher chance of snow on the ground for the holiday, according to National Weather Service meteorologist Jayson Gosselin. But don’t get too excited. “That combination can come in many forms,” Gosselin said. “It could be anything from a cold rain, to sleet or snow.” Still, the very cold air moving across the Midwest mixed with an active storm track expected to hit about Dec. 22 to Dec. 25 significantly increases the chances of snowfall. The National Weather Service suggests checking back for a more detailed Christmas forecast seven days in advance, on

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Average temperature: 32 degrees White Christmases since 1892: 20 percent of the time Record Christmas Day snowfall: 9.2 inches in 1913 Record Christmas morning snow depth: 8 inches in 1915 Last year with a white Christmas: 2010 Average date of first snowfall of at least 1 inch: Dec. 21

Dec. 18. The area’s last white Christmas — defined as at least one inch of snow on the ground by 6 a.m. Christmas Day — was in 2010 when there were about 3 inches of snow on the ground. Since records began in 1892, the city has had a white Christmas about 20 percent of the time.

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BELLEVILLE > Man charged with killing toddler • Police are looking for a Berkeley, Mo., man charged with murder in the death of a 2-year-old boy here in April. Gyasi K. Campbell, 24, was charged Friday with first-degree murder in the death of Campbell Kane Friess, 2, who was pronounced dead April 14 shortly after his mother and boyfriend brought him to an area hospital. Police said Kane died of head trauma but did not release more details about his injuries or Campbell’s motive. Police said Campbell was living with Kane’s mother at a home in the 2600 block of Eastview Drive in Belleville at the time of the boy’s death. Bail was set at $1 million. Authorities ask anyone with information on Campbell’s whereabouts to call 911 or the St. Clair County Sheriff’s Department at 618-2773505.

“He has an amazing team of doctors and nurses working around the clock providing the best health care available, and Ryan has the strength of the Irish in his veins!” O’Connor was shot by Chad Klahs, 29, of Arnold, on Dec. 5 while O’Connor was driving Klahs to police headquarters to be booked on a variety of charges, including a home burglary. Officers seized a 9 mm handgun from Klahs, but he hid a .40-caliber handgun from them and shot O’Connor before fatally shooting himself inside O’Connor’s police SUV, all while handcuffed.

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ARNOLD > Road-rage suspect surrenders to police • Scott F. Heatherly, 50, turned himself in Friday to the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Department — a week after a road rage incident Heatherly in Arnold and four days after he was charged. Police had been in communication with Heatherly’s family this week and were told he was aware of the charges against him. They were told he was going to surrender as early as Wednesday. According to police, a woman was driving south on Interstate 55 near Richardson Road about 5:30 p.m. Dec. 8. She noticed a truck flashing its lights closely behind her vehicle. She exited the highway at Richardson Road and pulled into the parking lot of a Walgreens. The pickup driver, now identified as Heatherly, followed, got out and kicked the back of her car, police say. The woman got out of her car and tried to use her cellphone to take pictures of the man, who then charged her and tackled her to the ground, police say. Heatherly is charged with assault and two counts of property damage. His bail is $50,000.

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NEWS

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATURDAY • 12.16.2017

GOP could court centrist Democrats ALABAMA • FROM A1

a deeply Republican state, tilting the math toward Democrats in what had been, before Tuesday, a longer-shot chance to take over the Senate in 2018. The GOP now has only a 51-49 majority in the Senate, and issues such as infrastructure spending become more thread-the-needle exercises for Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., unless Republicans embark on a new course to attract more centrist members of the Democratic caucus, including Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo. Blunt, who served as a top vote-counter and persuader in the House from 2003 to 2009 before moving to the Senate and its leadership team, told reporters that he believed the narrower majority could actually help GOP leaders shape legislation. “When I was the whip in the House, the easiest whipping we ever had was when we had the smallest majority we ever had because everybody knew what they had to do,” Blunt said. “They had to be part of what was going to get done. So I don’t think it changes anything at all.” But electorally, Jones’ victory certainly does. Republicans now have a greater urgency to defeat Democratic senators running for re-election in 10 states Trump won in 2018, including McCaskill, if they are to hold the Senate. Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley is the most wellknown Republican candidate for that job in a primary field that includes lesser-knowns Austin Petersen, Courtland Sykes and Tony Monetti. Petersen, a former Libertarian who describes himself as a “liberty Republican” who supports both gay marriage and eliminating central banking, said that Alabama showed that “the future direction of the GOP shouldn’t be populism. “The problem is you can win with Trumpism in the primary, but you can’t necessarily win in a general with Trumpism,” Petersen said. “... You have got to be appealing to a general electorate, or you can’t win.” For McCaskill, Jones’ victory in a deep red state was also validation of her strategy to try to diminish Republican margins in

for challengers.” He said that “elections in Virginia and now Alabama indicate that appealing to the base of the Republican Party will not be enough (for Republican candidates) to win elections.” Hawley has already attacked McCaskill as a Democratic partyline foe of Trump’s tax cuts, which the Republican Congress could pass next week and Trump could sign before Christmas. Republicans say it will put money back into the pockets of average Missourians and further help stimulate the economy, and will be positively felt before the election. McCaskill and Democratic colleagues say the GOP plan tilts far too heavily toward the rich and will add dangerously to the government’s debt without commensurate economic stimulus. Robertson said the Alabama election, in which Moore won suburban voters, especially women, suggests difficulty for Illinois Republican incumbents Mike Bost and Rodney Davis in Metro East, and Rep. Ann Wagner, R-Ballwin. And nationally, he said, it could widen cracks between traditional Republicans and a renegade movement forced by exTrump aide Steve Bannon. “Alabama crystallizes the worst fears of Republicans and most unlikely hopes of the Democrats,” Robertson said. “Moore might have been a poor candidate, but he represented a strong element of the Republican Party. Bannon and Trump will continue to fight for this element.” Hawley has so far successfully negotiated that divide in Missouri, Robertson said, but he will also have to deal with fresh Democratic attacks that he’s “Trump’s loyal enabler-to-be.” But that could be a plus in many parts of Missouri. Blunt said recently he believed that, national polls aside, the president was still popular in the Show-Me state. And with Moore’s loss Tuesday, Republican 2018 candidates, including Hawley, won’t have to confront questions about what they thought of Moore’s fitness to serve in the unfolding sexual harassment scandals that have brought down many powerful men.

rural Missouri while energizing urban Democrats and appealing to suburban women. “This was a former prosecutor who wasn’t afraid to be himself, and work hard to earn the votes of the people of his state,” McCaskill said. “Sounds like a plan.” Alabama victor Jones was previously a federal prosecutor; McCaskill was a local prosecutor in Kansas City. McCaskill will have her 50th town hall meeting of 2017 this weekend at St. Louis Community College’s Meramec Campus in Kirkwood on Saturday. A vast majority have been in rural Missouri. Moore had been removed twice from the state’s Supreme Court and faced fresh allegations that, as a man in his 30s, he preyed on and may have sexually assaulted teenage girls as young as 14. “As I said previously, Alabama voters should have had a better choice,” Blunt told the Post-Dispatch. “Candidates matter.” The off-presidential congressional elections of 2018 now come into focus with Trump’s job approval at historic lows for a president at this stage of his presidency. But Republicans believe that could change — and their prospects for holding onto Congress could look much different — if they pass contentious tax cuts before Christmas and if the economy continues to flourish as it has done with bullish job growth and a booming stock market. Democratic candidate recruitment, especially of women, has also been on a bullish pace, and the “resistance” movement that began a day after Trump’s inauguration with a massive women’s rally on the National Mall has manifested in convincing Democratic victories in Virginia and New Jersey gubernatorial races, as well as in Alabama’s Senate special this week. Dave Robertson, department of political science chair at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, said Jones’ win in Alabama hinted of a “wave election in 2018 favoring Democratic candidates. “All Republican incumbents in Congress have to expect stronger Democratic challengers and challenges in 2018,” Robertson said. “That means more money, more support and more workers

Trump calls conduct at the FBI ‘disgraceful;’ praises local police said while at Quantico, “are totally underappreciated, except by me.” Trump made the group a promise. “I want you to know that with me as your president, America’s police will have a true friend and loyal champion in the White House,” Trump said, “more loyal than anyone else can be, I tell you.” Trump appeared on a stage alongside FBI Director Christopher Wray and Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who introduced the president by calling him “our nation’s highest law enforcement official.” That title carries possible implications for the ongoing criminal probe into whether Trump attempted to obstruct justice leading up to the firing of FBI Director James Comey in May. The president’s defenders say that, as the nation’s top law enforcement official, he cannot obstruct justice by firing the head of the FBI. However, in past administrations that phrase has been used to describe the attorney general, not the president. During a news conference at the Justice Department later Friday, Sessions spoke positively about the FBI but suggested the agency might have problems that need fixing. “You can have arrogance sneak into sometimes an institution,” he said. “I don’t share the view that the FBI is not functioning at a high level.” When Trump took the lectern Friday, he did not mention or allude to any of his problems with the bureau, instead focusing on the police and other law enforcement officers present. “We as a country must do a better job showing our police officers our respect and gratitude that you have earned, and we will do that,” the president said. Trump said immigration and crime in Chicago, specifically, were among his greatest concerns when it comes to police work.

WASHINGTON POST

QUANTICO, VA. • President Donald Trump said Friday there is tremendous anger over what he called the FBI’s “disgraceful” behavior, taking aim at the bureau just before he appeared at its training facility to praise the nation’s police officers. “It’s a shame what’s happened with the FBI,” the president told reporters as he prepared to depart the White House for a ceremony at the FBI’s National Academy, where more than 200 law enforcement officers graduated from a program that imparts FBI expertise and standards. “We’re going to rebuild the FBI,” Trump said. “It’ll be bigger and better than ever. But it is very sad when you look at those documents, and how they’ve done that is really, really disgraceful, and you have a lot of very angry people that are seeing it.” The president appeared to be referring to revelations that senior FBI officials exchanged anti-Trump and pro-Hillary Clinton text messages while working on last year’s probe of Clinton’s use of a private email server while she was secretary of state and again during special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into Russian interference in the presidential election, including the possibility of coordination with the Trump campaign. The remarks come at a fraught time in the White House’s relationship with the FBI and the Justice Department. Trump has said the FBI’s reputation is “in tatters” over its handling of politically sensitive cases. His comments also highlighted what has become a recurring theme during his presidency: Trump’s tendency to criticize the FBI, the nation’s premier law enforcement agency, and extol the local police officers who have become central to his law-and-order agenda. Police departments, Trump

Almost 900 degree programs don’t meet productivity standards DEGREES • FROM A1

Education is figuring out which programs, from associate degrees to juris doctors, are hitting their marks over the past three years. The state undertook a similar process in 2011, when colleges voluntarily cut 119 degree programs. This time, with a few weeks to go in the audit, colleges have already agreed to cut or phase out 241 degree programs. Several universities are still negotiating with the state on certain programs. Rusty Monhollon, assistant commissioner for academic affairs at the state higher education department, called it “remarkable” that after six years there were so many programs that didn’t meet graduation standards. The productivity threshold varies by type of degree program. Certificate programs, associate and bachelor’s degree programs all need to have graduated, on average, 10 students in the past three years. For master’s degrees and a series of higher-level certificate programs, the threshold is five students. Doctoral programs need an average of three graduates. The graduate benchmark is the easiest one to quantify, but there are others, such as whether the program meets statewide needs, whether it contributes to the school’s mission, whether it’s worth the money it costs to run the program and whether its graduates get good jobs. An interim report on the audit released this week shows that 66 percent of associate degree programs fall below the threshold, as do 41 percent of bachelor degree programs. The state and the schools are still debating which programs are worth terminating, though technically schools are not required to do anything about the degrees.

ENGINEERING TO EDUCATION

Missouri’s community colleges have voluntarily agreed to cut 123 of the almost 390 certificates and associate programs offered. Schools have convinced the state that 93 additional programs are worth keeping either long term or temporarily so that schools

DEGREE PROGRAMS AT FOUR-YEAR UNIVERSITIES

DEGREE PROGRAMS AT TWO-YEAR COLLEGES IN MISSOURI Missouri's public two-year schools o er more than 500 degree programs. The chart shows how many are underperforming and could be eliminated. Total number of programs

Programs below threshold

57 23 13 104

Metropolitan Community College

75 52

Mineral Area College

43 14

15 30

St. Charles Community College

69

St. Louis Community College

State Technical College of Missouri

42 23

33 59 39 107 62 98 36 60 27 120

University of Central Missouri

43 197 63 122

University of Missouri-Kansas City

21 5 37 27

University of Missouri-St. Louis

54 81 15

SOURCE: Missouri Department of Higher Education

SOURCE: Missouri Department of Higher Education

can work on improving them. An additional 100 programs are still in negotiations. At St. Louis Community College, 28 programs are slated to be phased out, according to the state. One program is still being negotiated, and 13 programs were saved. The college’s Board of Trustees was scheduled to vote on phasing out a host of programs at the Nov. 30 board meeting but decided to hold further discussions. Among the programs the school is considering eliminating is an associate degree in computer science. School leaders say they want to roll out a new associate of science degree in “STEM” — science, technology, engineering and math — that would be a new option for those students who would have been interested in computer science, while broadening the options in other STEM-focused areas. Advocates for the computer science program say the college should keep it and update the curriculum to make it more attractive to students at a time

92

Missouri University of Science and Technology

University of Missouri-Columbia

31

Three Rivers College

42

Truman State University

25

State Fair Community College

139

Missouri State University

Southeast Missouri State University

58

Ozarks Technical Community College

47 27

Northwest Missouri State University

22 22

North Central Missouri College

61 49

Missouri Western State University

19

Moberly Area Community College

11 8

Missouri Southern University

28

Je erson College

Programs below threshold

Lincoln University

31

East Central College

Total number of programs Harris-Stowe State University

64

Crowder College

Missouri's public four-year schools o er about 1,200 degree programs. The chart shows how many are underperforming and could be eliminated.

when technology jobs are supposed to be in high demand. Additional programs at the college that could be cut include associate degrees in mass communication, mechanical engineering, civil engineering and art education. Other schools, particularly four-year universities, aren’t quite ready to share which programs they’re fighting for or considering eliminating. The University of MissouriColumbia, University of Central Missouri, Missouri University of Science and Technology and Southeast Missouri State University were already conducting independent program reviews, and because their approach aligned with the state’s, the department has let them continue that process. The interim report shows that among 15 programs below the threshold, the University of Missouri-St. Louis could be phasing out four or more. There are few details about how the process is going at Harris-Stowe State University,

where eight programs are not meeting the productivity standards. At Mizzou, 63 programs were identified by the state as unproductive. So far, seven have been voluntarily terminated, 20 saved and 36 are still in discussion. Mizzou began its own program review earlier this year and is expected to announce results in the coming months. The goal was to find areas that could be cut so money could be diverted to what leaders call “programs of excellence.”

CHANGING BEHAVIOR

Though the state interim report lists the numbers and not the exact degrees each institution is examining, there are a few identified trends about low-producing program areas. For example, 86 percent of engineering technology programs at community colleges across the state are below the productivity threshold. About 90 percent of construction trade programs, along with 84 percent of computer science

degrees and certificates, are in similar straits across the 12 community colleges. Monhollon highlighted part of the report that shows students are starting programs, gaining the skills they need to get a job and then leaving those programs. At universities, 80 percent of foreign language programs didn’t meet the standards. Neither did 56 percent of the education programs. That metric is complicated, as there are specific tracks an education major can pursue, from special education to early childhood. Mulligan said that the process hadn’t been easy but that it was worthwhile “in the context of the resources that are available,” referring to several years of declining state funding. A final report on the agreements made between the state and each college is expected in January. Ashley Jost • 314-340-8169 @ajost on Twitter ajost@post-dispatch.com


12.16.2017 • Saturday • M 1

NEWS

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • A5

Judge temporarily blocks Trump rules on birth control ASSOCIATED PRESS

PHILADELPHIA • A federal judge in Philadelphia ordered the administration of President Donald Trump on Friday not to enforce new rules that could significantly reduce women’s access to free birth control. Judge Wendy Beetlestone issued the injunction, temporarily stopping the government from enforcing the policy change to former President Barack

Obama’s health care law. The law required most companies to cover birth control at no additional cost, though it included exemptions for religious organizations and some private companies. The new policy would allow more categories of employers, including publicly traded companies, to opt out of providing free contraception to women by claiming religious objections. It would allow any company that is

not publicly traded to deny coverage on moral grounds. Beetlestone, appointed to the bench by Obama, called the Trump administration’s exemptions “sweeping” and said they are the “proverbial exception that swallows the rule.” She was particularly critical of the power to object on moral grounds, saying it “conjured up a world where a government entity is empowered to impose its own version of morality on each one

of us. That cannot be right.” Attorneys for the Trump administration had argued in court documents that the rules are about “protecting a narrow class of sincere religious and moral objectors from being forced to facilitate practices that conflict with their beliefs.” The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services issued the new policy in October. It marked another step in the Trump administration’s rollback of the

Huge tax bill heads for passage

Affordable Care Act, and supporters say it promotes religious freedom. Pennsylvania Attorney General Josh Shapiro, a Democrat, said that Trump broke the law to undermine women’s health and that the ruling would protect women. “This is just the first step, but today is a critical victory for millions of women and families and for the rule of law,” Shapiro said.

HERE’S WHAT IS IN THE FINAL TAX BILL WHAT IS CHANGING: A new tax cut for the rich: The final plan lowers the top tax rate for top earners. Under current law, the highest rate is 39.6 percent for married couples earning more than $470,700. The GOP bill would drop that to 37 percent and raise the threshold at which that top rate kicks in to $500,000 for individuals and $600,000 for married couples. A massive tax cut for corporations to 21 percent: Starting on Jan. 1, 2018, big businesses would see their tax rate fall to just 21 percent from 35 percent, the largest one-time rate cut in U.S. history for America’s largest companies. The new rate amounts to roughly a $1 trillion tax cut for businesses over the next decade. Deduction limits on state, local and property taxes: Under current law, the state and local deduction is unlimited. In the final GOP plan, people can deduct up to $10,000. This includes property, income and sales taxes. The move is widely viewed as a hit to blue states such as New York, Connecticut and California, and there are concerns it could cause property values to fall in high-tax cities and leave less money for public schools and road repairs. Working-class families get a bigger Child Tax Credit: The current Child Tax Credit is $1,000 per child. The final bill provides a $2,000 per child credit (families making up to about $400,000 get the credit) and makes more of the tax credit refundable, meaning families that work but don’t earn enough to actually owe any federal income taxes can get up to $1,400 refunded.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

House Budget Committee Chair Diane Black, R-Tenn., arrives at the House Ways and Means Committee room to work with Chairman Kevin Brady, R-Texas, on the GOP tax bill conferee report Friday. TAXES • FROM A1

for the GOP after nearly a full year in control of Congress and the White House. It’s the widestranging reshaping of the tax code in three decades and is expected to add to the nation’s $20 trillion debt. The tax cuts are projected to add $1.46 trillion over a decade. The bill would repeal an important part of President Barack Obama’s Affordable Care Act — the requirement that all Americans have health insurance or face a penalty — as the GOP looks to unravel a law it failed to repeal and replace this past summer. Only on Friday did Republicans cement the needed support for the overhaul, securing endorsements from wavering senators. Marco Rubio of Florida relented in his high-profile opposition after negotiators expanded the tax credit that parents can claim for their children. He said he would vote for the measure next week. Rubio had been holding out for a bigger child credit for low-income families. After he got it, he tweeted that the change was “a solid step toward broader reforms which are both Pro-Growth and Pro-Worker.” Sen. Bob Corker of Tennessee, the only Republican to vote against the Senate version earlier this month, made the surprise announcement that he would back the legislation. Corker, the chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, has repeatedly warned that the nation’s growing debt is the most serious threat to national security.

“I realize this is a bet on our country’s enterprising spirit, and that is a bet I am willing to make,” Corker said. The White House said Trump “looks forward to fulfilling the promise he made to the American people to give them a tax cut by the end of the year.” The bill embodies a longstanding Republican philosophy that a substantial tax break for businesses will trigger economic growth and job creation for Americans in a trickle-down economy. Skeptical Democrats are likely to oppose the legislation unanimously. “Under this bill, the working class, middle class and upper middle class get skewered while the rich and wealthy corporations make out like bandits,” Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer of New York said. “It is just the opposite of what America needs, and Republicans will rue the day they pass this.” The bill would drop today’s 39.6 percent top rate on individuals to 37 percent. The standard deduction — used by about two-thirds of households — would be nearly doubled, to $24,000 for married couples. The $1,000-per-child tax deduction would grow to $2,000, with up to $1,400 available in IRS refunds for families who owe little or no taxes. Parents would have to provide children’s Social Security numbers to receive the child tax credit, a measure intended to deny the credit to people who are in the U.S. illegally. Those who itemize would lose

some deductions. The deduction that millions use in connection with state and local income, property and sales taxes would be capped at $10,000. That’s especially important to residents of high-tax states such as New York, New Jersey and California. Deductions for medical expenses that lawmakers once considered eliminating would be retained. The bill would allow homeowners to deduct interest only on the first $750,000 of a new mortgage, down from the current limit of $1 million. People who inherit fortunes would get a big break. The bill would double the exemption, meaning the estate tax would apply only to the portion of an estate over $22 million for married couples. Members of a House-Senate conference committee signed the final version of the legislation Friday, sending it to the two chambers for final passage next week. They have been working to blend the different versions passed by the two houses. Republicans hold a slim 52-48 majority in the Senate, including two ailing senators who have missed votes this past week. John McCain of Arizona, who is 81, is at a Washington-area military hospital being treated for the side effects of brain cancer treatment; and Thad Cochran, 80, of Mississippi had a non-melanoma lesion removed from his nose earlier this week. GOP leaders are hopeful they will be available next week.

The individual health insurance mandate goes away in 2019: Beginning in 2019, Americans will no longer be required by law to buy health insurance (or pay a penalty if they refuse to). The individual mandate is part of the Affordable Care Act. The provision is what keeps insurance markets stable while making other, more popular parts of the law work, such as the requirement that insurance companies cover people with pre-existing conditions. You can inherit up to $22 million tax-free: In the end, the estate tax remains part of the U.S. tax code, but far fewer families will pay it. Under current law, Americans can inherit up to $5.5 million tax-free (that threshold is $11 million for married couples). In the final bill, the first $11 million that an individual inherits in property, stocks and other assets won’t be taxed (the figure is $22 million for married couples). “Pass through” companies get a 20 percent reduction: Most American businesses are organized as so-called “pass through” companies where the income from the business is “passed through” to the business owner’s individual tax return. S-Corps, LLCs, partnerships and sole proprietorships are all examples of pass-through businesses. In the final GOP bill, the majority of these companies get to deduct 20 percent of their income tax-free, a large reduction. No corporate “AMT” tax: The final GOP bill gets rid of the corporate Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT), a big relief to business people. CEOs complained that this was a backdoor tax that would make them less likely to build new plants, buy more equipment and invest in more research, because the corporate AMT made the tax credits for those investments essentially null and void. Fewer families will have to pay the individual AMT: The Alternative Minimum Tax for individuals started in 1969 as a way to prevent rich families from using so many credits and loopholes to lower their tax bill to almost nothing. The final GOP tax plan lifts the threshold for requiring the tax.

WHAT IS NOT CHANGING: The bill keeps in place the student loan deduction, medical expense deduction and the graduate student tuition waivers. Retirement accounts such as 401(k) plans stay the same. There are no changes to the tax-free amounts people are allowed to put into 401(k), IRA and Roth IRA retirement accounts. The Johnson Amendment stays. Churches, synagogues, mosques and other nonprofits still can’t get political and endorse candidates in elections. The House bill included a repeal of the Johnson Amendment, but Democrats were able to get the Senate parliamentarian to determine that including the repeal in the bill didn’t comply with the rules of the Senate. Washington Post

Historic Elsah weighs fight to save old-fashioned streetlights LIGHTS • FROM A1

old-time atmosphere central to its identity. Though Williams had initiated contact with town officials more than a year ago to discuss the long-term preservation of the old-fashioned lights, seeing them start to get displaced by new LEDs gave the matter newfound urgency. This week, after town leaders approached Ameren to discuss options for preserving the old style, the utility reinstalled the older design where one of the LED fixtures had already been swapped in during maintenance work. The light fixtures that Williams is trying to preserve aren’t the ornate, regal-looking lampposts one might picture in an old town. The circular, wavy light fixtures protrude from utility poles high above the street, held in place by plain metal attachments. But Williams says they were a dominant style more than a century ago, when electric lights first proliferated along the nation’s streets. “There was a time in this country when those were ubiquitous,” Williams said. “Now they’re almost extinct.” Today about 40 of them remain in Elsah — the last town in

Illinois to have them, Williams said. From the middle of last century until at least the 1980s, the town had older versions of the lights with incandescent bulbs and more decorative trusses in place, according to Williams. He said the lights today were not the same historic relics, but replicas swapped into place since that time. Now retired after a career working various governmentrelated jobs in Washington and St. Louis, Williams continues his decades-long pursuit of streetscape preservation side projects. “It’s not that I’m against the LED technology. I’m just against the ugly fixtures,” said Williams, who wants to avoid a “one-sizefits-all” rollout of the technology throughout Ameren’s service territory. “So much of our habitat in America is so depressingly monotonous,” he said. “I really love finding places like this that really are distinctive and different.” He acknowledged that his fixation with streetscapes might seem quixotic and that changes to streetlights were a subtle detail that not everyone may feel strongly about. But despite the arguably unassuming appearance of Elsah’s lights, he said

they could breed a strong — if often “subliminal” — sentimentality and appreciation. But his enthusiasm for preservation has gained traction with some town residents and officials. Though many of the old light fixtures show their years of wear and tear, finding a way to keep them has resonated with Connie Davis, who runs the Green Tree Inn Bed and Breakfast in Elsah and also serves on the town’s Board of Trustees. “We’re trying really hard to maintain our historic feel,” Davis said. “It’s those little things that make the village special,” she added. “It’s important to maintain the character and charm, because that’s a lot of what draws people here.” Elsah is one of just a small number of places in the country to still have radial lights, said Williams, who has even curated a “reasonably accurate” national database of where they can be found. He said Rockport, Maine, had about 100 of them, with 80 in Harpers Ferry, W.Va., and 60 in Hermann, Mo. — where he engaged in a similar push for preservation. Over the years, Williams has waged streetscape battles across the country, even founding a nonprofit organization called the

American Streetscape Society. His efforts have included work in St. Louis, where he helped advocate for outfitting parts of Forest Park with historic replica streetlights, years ago. In August, Ameren launched an initiative to gradually equip co m pa ny- ow n e d o u td o o r lighting units with LEDs, with 305,000 anticipated replacements by 2027. The utility, which operates in Illinois and Missouri, says that LED lights use 55 to 65 percent less energy than traditional alternatives, generally last three times longer than older bulbs and require less maintenance over their lifetime. Elsah Mayor Mike Pitchford — who happens to be a retired Ameren employee — said the town contacted the company this week to request that it at least temporarily forestall its replacement policy in town while the two parties evaluated potential alternatives. Within days, Ameren responded, agreeing to halt any new installments that may arise from maintenance, while the town decides what it wants. Elsah’s options are to cling to the high-pressure sodium lights compatible with the fixtures for as long as possible; or to eventually achieve a longer-term solution by retrofitting the old fixtures with LED lights, though at

the moment it remains unclear if that can be done. “We’re just giving the village time to figure out how they want to retrofit it,” said Brian Bretsch, a spokesman for Ameren Illinois, noting that parts to maintain the sodium streetlights were becoming unavailable. “That’s something the village will need to do on their end.” Elsah has been in this predicament before. To ensure preservation of its lights in 1982, the town bought the system from the Central Illinois Public Service Company, the regional utility at the time and a predecessor to Ameren. Williams said the move cost $556, according to records. Ownership eventually transferred back to the utility, but this time around, Pitchford is unsure if regaining control of the system is a worthwhile expenditure. It will depend, he said, on what value the village thinks the lights add to its historic ambiance. “We just need to talk it out,” he said. “To own your own system is a big step that I don’t know we’d want to get into.” Bryce Gray • 314-340-8307 @_BryceGray on Twitter bgray@post-dispatch.com


A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NATION

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 12.16.2017

Woman cites Hoffman’s ‘weird’ request

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Actor Dustin Hoffman poses for photographers during a photo call for “The Meyerowitz Stories” at the 70th International Cannes Film Festival in southern France in May.

He exposed himself to her when she was 16, she alleges BY TRISHA THOMAS Associated Press

ROME • A playwright who says Dustin Hoffman exposed himself to her and had her massage his feet in a hotel room when she was 16 said Friday that she spent years in guilty silence and took pains to not dress suggestively in professional contexts because she assumed the incident was her fault. Playwright Cori Thomas was a classmate of Hoffman’s daughter in 1980 when she says she met the actor, who invited her to his New York hotel room to wait for her mother after dinner with the teenagers. After his daughter left, Hoffman went to take a shower, Thomas said in an interview with the Associated Press. “I was just sitting there waiting for my parents. He came out of the bathroom and had a towel around him and that was the first, ‘Hmm, that is kind of weird,’” Thomas, now 53, said. “And then he dropped the towel, and I think I just like . ... I had never seen a naked man. I had never kissed a man.” Entertainment trade outlet Variety first reported Thomas’ account in a story published Thursday that included the allegation by another woman, Melissa Kester, that Hoffman pushed his hand down her pants in a recording studio while working on the 1987 movie “Ishtar.” The publicist and attorney for the 80-year-old Oscar winner did not return email messages seeking comment Thursday. Actress Anna Graham Hunter

also has alleged that Hoffman groped her and made inappropriate comments when she was a 17-year-old intern on the set of the 1985 TV movie “Death of a Salesman.” Hoffman said in an earlier statement that the incident “is not reflective of who I am.”

‘EEWWW, YUCK’

During an interview with the AP in Rome, where she had attended an event for Italian and American playwrights, Thomas described her shock and confusion in the hotel room with “a pretty huge star” who she thought of at the moment “as my friend’s dad.” She said that after dropping his towel, Hoffman put on a robe and asked her to massage his feet. “I didn’t know what to do. I acted my age. I was 16. I thought, ‘Eewww, yuck,’” Thomas said. “I didn’t know what to do really. He made a call to someone and he said, ‘Oh I have the most beautiful girl massaging my feet. How old are you?’ and I said 16, and he said ‘She is 16.’ So he knew my age.” The uncomfortable encounter continued after the call with Hoffman repeatedly asking if she wanted to see him naked again, Thomas said. “I was in a state of shock, not knowing what to do,” she said. “He kept saying, ‘You know I am naked. You know I am naked. If you look, you will see I am naked.’” “I didn’t want to be rude. I was trying to be polite. This was so weird and wrong. ... There was a part of me worried about

Cautious Texas among last states to OK medical marijuana ASSOCIATED PRESS

MANCHACA, TEXAS • When California rings in the new year with the sale of recreational pot for the first time, Texas will be tiptoeing into its own marijuana milestone: a medical cannabis program so restrictive that doubts swirl over who will even use it. Texas is the last big state to allow some form of medical marijuana, albeit an oil extract so low in the psychoactive component, THC, that it couldn’t get a person high. Though it might seem that Texas policymakers have softened their attitude toward the drug, bringing them more in line with the U.S. population as a whole, they have not. A joint could still land you in jail in Texas, and the state’s embrace of medical marijuana comes with a heavy dose of caution. Among the concerns are the license fees to grow marijuana in Texas — which are the highest in the U.S., at nearly $500,000 — and that the program is rolling out with just eight participating doctors in a state of 27 million people. And, like other states, access is limited to a small pool of patients who have been diagnosed with intractable epilepsy and tried at least two other treatments first. “It’s heartbreaking. Being able to say, ‘Yes, you can get it,’ but reading over the whole law there is still some things we have to jump over,” said Cristina Ollervidez, 31, who lives near the Texas-Mexico border and is three hours from the closest participating doctor. Her daughter, Lailah, 7, has a type of epilepsy called Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and is in a wheelchair. Her daughter isn’t listed as having intractable epilepsy but

still has days when she gets several seizures. “Seeing Texas put limitations, I do get that part,” Ollervidez said. “But I don’t think they did their exact research.” Texas is similar to more than a dozen states that restrict access to a low-THC cannabis oil. However, Texas — which is 800 miles wide — licensed just three dispensaries, none of which is in the western half of the state or in fast-growing cities along the border with Mexico. Texas has also placed tighter control on marijuana growers. The licensing fee is 80 times more than originally recommended. Growers are required to have surveillance video of every square foot of their facility and to preserve recordings for two years, which is longer than some police dashcam footage must be retained in Texas. The driver behind the Texas law is Rep. Stephanie Klick, a Republican and Christian conservative who strongly opposes the recreational use of drugs. She said it took her 18 months to round up enough votes in the Legislature and convince skeptics that patients weren’t going to abuse the cannabis oil. “There was one sheriff that thought these kids were going to be juvenile delinquents and end up in his jail. And these are really sick kids,” Klick said. Only four states — Kansas, South Dakota, Nebraska and Idaho — have no form of medical marijuana on the books. Seventeen others, including Texas, allow only low-THC medical cannabis, according to research from the National Conference of State Legislatures.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Playwright Cori Thomas, shown Friday in Rome, is accusing Dustin Hoffman of exposing himself to her when she was 16, in 1980 in a New York hotel room.

what might happen,” she continued. After her mother finally picked her up, Thomas said she did not tell her about what had happened but was quiet enough to make her mother suspicious. “She kept asking, ‘What happened, is everything OK?’ I kept saying ‘I am fine.’ I was afraid of making a fuss. I didn’t want to embarrass my friend. I didn’t want to embarrass myself. I didn’t want to tell her,” Thomas said. “I just kept thinking it was my fault.” Thomas said that it would be years before she would talk about the experience and that she just tried to push it aside. The effect on her lingered, though, she said. “Especially because I thought it was an isolated incident, I took more guilt and blame onto myself. I think I have always behaved in a way not to act suggestive,” Thomas said. “In the professional world, I try to be very refined and not in any way look seductive or seem as if I am trying to be.” Thomas said she decided to come forward publicly to support Hunter and counter attacks on the actress’s credibility. “He is 80 years old. I don’t think anything is going to change with him,” she said. “I do think that he should know that he did something wrong and it is not OK with me that he did something wrong. People also need to know that it is not OK to do these things.”

Sexual assault, harassment accusations rock Kentucky BY ADAM BEAM Associated Press

FRANKFORT, KY. • As sexual assault and harassment allegations sweep through statehouses around the country, no place has been impacted quite like Kentucky: A state forced to confront its past salacious behavior in the midst of a historic transition to Republican rule. Kentucky’s GOP House Speaker resigned his leadership position after acknowledging he secretly settled a sexual harassment claim with a woman in his office. Three other Republican lawmakers lost their committee chairmanships for being part of the same settlement. And a freshman Republican lawmaker who was part of that new political order killed himself Wednesday after facing allegations that he sexually assaulted a teenage girl in his basement. In July, a recording surfaced detailing how Julian Carroll, a Democratic state senator and former governor, had propositioned a young man for sex and, according to the man, groped him. Carroll denied the allegations, and police didn’t file any charges. Three years ago, taxpayers paid $400,000 to settle a sexual harassment lawsuit filed against three Democratic lawmakers. Despite the turmoil, just one lawmaker has resigned: Democrat John Arnold stepped down in 2013 when he was accused of inappropriately touching female employees. Everyone else has

stayed, exposing a rift between Republican Gov. Matt Bevin and GOP leaders. Some, including Bevin, have called for resignations. “We have some of the biggest issues ever facing our state from a financial standpoint and this takes our focus away from the job we’re needing to do,” Republican state Rep. Jim DuPlessis said. DuPlessis used to sit by fellow Republican state Rep. Dan Johnson, the lawmaker who killed himself after accusations that he had assaulted a 17-year-old girl. Other statehouses also have been rocked by scandal. In California, two Democratic lawmakers have resigned and another is facing pressure to amid allegations of repeated misconduct. In Ohio, Republican state Rep. Wesley Goodman resigned after acknowledging “inappropriate behavior” with a person in his office. And on Friday, Alaska state Rep. Dean Westlake, a Democrat, announced that he would resign, after several women accused him of inappropriate behavior. In Kentucky, Republican state Rep. Phil Moffett said the allegations would spur change in the legislature. “There isn’t a single person in the private sector that does not know that they cannot have an inappropriate relationship with a subordinate,” he said. “They know that will be their last day on the job when they do that.”

DIGEST Penn State commits to fraternity accountability Penn State says it is committed to promoting safety and accountability in fraternities as it responds to a grand jury’s report that says that Penn State officials displayed “a shocking apathy” to dangers from excessive drinking and that the school’s inaction allowed criminal acts to occur. The report released Friday by a district attorney in Pennsylvania follows the drinking death in February of a pledge, 19. The report recommends a series of changes that the school should undertake, including regulating drinking itself, rather than hold a fraternity council responsible. Penn State says its efforts are limited by the unwillingness of national fraternities, their associations, undergraduate members and fraternity alumni to challenge behavior that’s been accepted for years and accept the need for major reform. Plane that led Normandy invasion being restored • A plane that led the invasion of Normandy during World War II has been saved from a junkyard and is being carefully restored in Wisconsin. The C-47, called “That’s All, Brother,” carried the first paratroopers who stormed the beaches of Normandy. The aircraft led the more than 800 other C-47s also carrying paratroopers. The plane was lost for 70 years and was accidentally discovered by an Air Force historian at the Basler Turbo Conversions junkyard in Oshkosh, Wis., in 2015, WLUK-TV reported. Arkansas OKs looser weapons rules • Arkansas lawmakers have approved the rules for a new measure expanding where concealed handguns are allowed, rejecting concerns that it would allow students to keep guns in

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Centre County, Pa., District Attorney Stacy Parks Miller (left) announces in May findings an investigation into the death of Penn State University fraternity pledge Tim Piazza, seen in photo at right. Parks released grand jury recommendations Friday.

dorms or could infringe on Second Amendment rights. The Legislative Council approved the rules Friday for carrying out the law, which allows people with concealed handgun licenses to carry at college campuses, government buildings and some bars if they undergo additional training. The council is the Legislature’s main governing body when lawmakers aren’t in session. Some lawmakers said the rules allowing guns in dorm rooms if they’re kept within arm’s reach of the licensee conflict with the law’s intent. Some GOP lawmakers also complained that any limits on gun rights aren’t constitutional. Deadline extended for tornado recovery projects • Federal officials have granted a request from the city of Joplin for a deadline extension on several federally funded tornado recovery projects. Missouri Sens. Claire McCaskill, a Democrat, and Roy Blunt, a Republican, announced the extension from the Federal Emergency Management Agency in news releases Thursday. At issue are repairs to city streets and sidewalks that were pushed back by related federal projects, such as upgrades to the sewer system, which had to be completed first.

That caused the city to miss a deadline. Joplin has been working to rebuild from a massive 2011 tornado that destroyed a large swath of the city and killed 161 residents. Jury favors Arpaio in civil lawsuit • An Arizona jury has refused to award damages against former Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio at a civil trial for bringing a since-dismissed criminal case against one of Sen. Jeff Flake’s sons in the heatexhaustion deaths of 21 dogs. Jurors ruled late Thursday against Austin Flake and his then-wife Logan Brown in their malicious-prosecution lawsuit stemming from Arpaio’s investigation into the heatexhaustion deaths of 21 dogs at a kennel operated by Flake’s in-laws. Flake and Brown, who were in college at the time, were caring for the dogs while the in-laws were out of town. Stephen Montoya, the couple’s attorney, said that his clients disagreed with the verdict but that they were grateful for “the opportunity to force former Sheriff Arpaio and his subordinates at Maricopa County to account for their indisputably reckless conduct.” From news services


WORLD

12.16.2017 • Saturday • M 1

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • A7

North Korea ignores world’s rebukes Speaking at U.N., ambassador blames U.S., never mentions possibility of talks BY EDITH M. LEDERER associated Press

UNITED NATIONS • North Ko-

rea’s friends and enemies joined forces Friday in opposing its determination to be recognized as a nuclear weapons state and calling on leader Kim Jong Un to negotiate the denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula — but the North gave no sign of budging on its nuclear ambitions. In a very rare appearance by a North Korean at the U.N. Security Council, Ambassador Ja Song Nam told a ministerial meeting that the country’s possession of nuclear weapons was “an inevitable self-defensive measure” to defend the country against “the U.S. nuclear threat and blackmail.” Ja never mentioned the possibility of talks. Instead, he called the council meeting “a desperate measure plotted by the U.S. being terrified by the incredible

might of our republic that has successfully achieved the great historic cause of completing the state nuclear force.” He pointed to the Nov. 29 launching of an intercontinental ballistic missile, which experts say could reach the U.S. mainland. South Korea’s Vice Foreign Minister Cho Hyun told the council that North Korea was “in the final stages of nuclear weaponization” and warned that if it could put a nuclear warhead on an intercontinental ballistic missile, “it will fundamentally alter the security landscape in the region and beyond.” He urged the world’s nations to grasp the urgency of the threat this poses and find ways to halt the North’s nuclear program — including by maximizing pressure and uniting in answering “absolutely no” to North Korean attempts to be recognized as a nuclear-weapons state.

U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson declared: “We will never accept a nuclear North Korea.” Tillerson stunned many this week by proposing talks with North Korea without preconditions. But he stepped back Friday, after the White House rebutted the proposal, telling the council, “North Korea must earn its way back to the table.” The U.S. and close allies South Korea and Japan called for increased pressure on the North to get Kim’s government to negotiate the denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula. North Korea’s Ja said his country had been the target of 11 U.N. sanctions resolutions. The United States, the European Union, South Korea, Japan and other countries have imposed additional measures. But all these bans haven’t stopped Kim’s nuclear and missile tests or led to negotiations.

‘DIRE REALITY’ Japan’s Foreign Minister Taro Kono urged the world’s nations to maximize pressure on North Korea “by all means available,” saying there was no other way to get Pyongyang to curb its escalating nuclear and missile programs. He announced that Japan had just ordered the assets of 19 North Korean entities to be frozen. Kono said last week’s visit to Pyongyang by U.N. political chief Jeffrey Feltman “only reconfirmed the dire reality” that North Korea “is nowhere near ready” to abandon its nuclear and missile programs, “nor is it interested in returning to a meaningful dialogue.” U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres warned that “the risk is being multiplied by misplaced overconfidence, dangerous narratives and rhetoric, and the lack of communication channels.” He urged an immediate re-

Voter apathy worries Kremlin Strategists want to show that Putin remains popular BY VLADIMIR ISACHENKOV associated Press

MOSCOW • Russia’s presiden-

tial election campaign formally lasts only three months, and President Vladimir Putin wants to make it as short as possible. With Putin’s approval rating topping 80 percent, there is little doubt about the outcome of the March 18 vote. Instead, voter apathy represents the main challenge for his strategists, who want his showing to be as strong as ever to demonstrate that public support for Putin hasn’t waned 18 years after his first election. In an apparent bid to drum up interest and make a bland race as short as possible to keep voters mobilized, the 65-year-old president waited until last week to declare his intent to run again. It’s not clear yet how Putin will focus his campaign, which was formally opened Friday by the upper house of parliament. Ahead of the 2012 vote, he ran a highly polarizing campaign amid a wave of massive demonstrations in Moscow against his rule. He denounced middle-class protesters as spoiled stooges of the West and relied heavily on support from bluecollar workers and state employees.

‘BROAD BACKING’

Now, in the absence of major protests, Putin can afford to be more benign. The 2014 annexation of Crimea from Ukraine bolstered his support, which has remained high despite a plunge in living standards under a combined blow of a drop in oil prices and Western sanctions. “Even very moderate people never really reconciled themselves after the end of the Soviet Union with Crimea being lost,” said Moscow Carnegie Center director Dmitri Trenin. “They

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Celebrity TV host Ksenia Sobchak, who wants to challenge Russian President Vladimir Putin in the March 18 presidential election, asks a question during Putin’s annual news conference Thursday in Moscow. Russian lawmakers on Friday set the presidential election for March 18.

always thought it was unfair. And Putin had the guts ... to give it back to Russia without spilling a drop of blood.” “Putin has a broad backing across all social groups, which is linked to popular support for his foreign policy achievements,” said Lev Gudkov, the head of the Levada-Center opinion survey agency, a leading independent pollster. “The propaganda has shaped his image as the national leader who has restored Russia’s great power status.” Gudkov said polls show Putin’s popularity is strongest in rural areas and small towns where most people rely on staterun TV for news. His broad support is rooted in a lack of real political competition, he said. Charismatic anti-corruption crusader Alexei Navalny, who challenged Putin with a series of recent protests, is a fresh and widely recognized face that would provide an interesting opponent in the race, but the Kremlin does not want him on the ballot, fearing that would

further expand his clout. Navalny has been barred from running because of an embezzlement conviction, which the 41-year-old opposition leader calls politically motivated.

SOCIALITE’S CHALLENGE

Enter Ksenia Sobchak, a celebrity TV host and socialite famous for her lavish lifestyle, sharp tongue and quick wit. Sobchak, 36, the daughter of the late mayor of St. Petersburg who was Putin’s boss in the 1990s, has positioned herself as a candidate for those voters who detest the president and want change. She denies colluding with the Kremlin, but her involvement provides a crucial element for the campaign: an eloquent Putin critic catering to disenchanted liberal-minded voters. Sobchak denounced Russia’s annexation of Crimea and insisted that the Black Sea peninsula belongs to Ukraine. She also said that Western sanctions against Russia were a legitimate

punishment for Moscow’s actions in Ukraine. Her appearance on the top prime-time talk shows on statecontrolled TV — something that could only happen with approval from the Kremlin — made it clear she has carte blanche to deliver sharp criticism. Sobchak insists her key aim is to encourage public discussion of subjects branded as taboo by the state and give voice to the opposition. But that could be exactly what the Kremlin wants — a dissenter who enlivens the race without posing a real threat to Putin. With her star power, media savviness and energetic presence on social platforms, Sobchak has an appeal to young Russians who form the core of Navalny’s supporters. At the same time, her snobbish, insolent style makes her a strong irritant for blue-collar workers, helping mobilize Putin’s base.

With obesity on rise, Paris reflects on mirrored ‘fat phobia’ BY THOMAS ADAMSON associated Press

PARIS • France gave the world

butter croissants and foie gras, yet it has often been a place where being overweight was seen as almost sinful. Now, after taking a hard look at the contradictions in the mirror, its capital has launched a campaign to counter sizeism, an often disregarded kind of discrimination in the imageconscious city known for luxury fashion brands and tiny waists. Paris anti-discrimination chief Helene Bidard began the initiative after falling victim to weight-related insults and noticing how bias against French people who are overweight went unnoticed, never mind unpunished. “We see fat people as ugly and even stupid, lacking hygiene and in bad health,” Bidard said. As part of its annual week devoted to raising awareness about discrimination, Paris opened on Friday its “Fatphobia, stop! Taking action together” campaign with a plus-size fashion show

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A model presents a creation during a fashion show as part of a day against fat phobia in Paris on Friday.Paris is launching a campaign against sizeism.

and panels featuring bloggers from the “body positive” movement. Fifty thousand leaflets with legal advice and helpline numbers are set to be distributed at sports centers, night clubs, swimming pools and bistros. The effort, which is aimed at countering both casual and institutionalized discrimination, comes amid rising obesity rates in France. The National Institute of Health and Medical Research reported that nearly 16 percent of the adult population was obese last year, compared with 6 percent in 1980. But thinness ideals persist. “There’s this French paradox where you’re supposed to eat foie gras, but you’re not supposed to get fat,” curvy French blogger Daria Marx said. Marx said that although a 2011 French law prohibits job discrimination based on physical appearance, employers often get around it by prioritizing job applications that contain candidates’ photos. Calling it “discrimination,” she cited research that con-

cluded that fat people are 15 times less likely to be called back for interviews if they include their photos. Doctors also can deny in vitro fertilization to women who are deemed overweight. To challenge the images of small-sized beauty propagated by fashion houses such as Parisbased Chanel, Louis Vuitton and Dior, organizers of Friday’s event put on a big-is-beautiful runway show with plus-size clothes specially made by designers such as Ewa Minge. “In France, it’s very difficult (to buy clothes),” Marx said. “I only shop on the internet” or at shops in London, she said. French luxury giants recently woke up to the potential dangers of encouraging excessive thinness. Since Oct 1, French fashion conglomerates LVMH and Kering stopped hiring excessively thin models and now require models to provide medical certificates to prove they are healthy before they can work. The companies said they hoped to set a new global standard for the fashion industry.

establishment and strengthening of government and military communications. Russia’s U.N. Ambassador Vassily Nebenzia said that “military rhetoric accompanied by a test of strength by the participants has led to a situation where around the world people have begun to wonder whether there will be war or not.” He questioned the U.S. commitment to peace on the Korean peninsula, saying 2½ months of quiet from North Korea was answered by Washington and its allies with unscheduled and unprecedented military exercises in their scale, unilateral sanctions and a declaration that the North is a state sponsor of terrorism. “All of these steps force us to wonder about the sincerity of statements that suggest that there is a preference for a peaceful approach to resolving the crisis” by the United States, Nebenzia said.

DIGEST Unions angry over power outages in Puerto Rico Union leaders representing Puerto Rico power company workers slammed local and federal officials on Friday as the U.S. territory missed a deadline to restore 95 percent of power as promised by the island’s governor. Puerto Rico is currently at 64 percent power generation nearly three months after Hurricane Maria hit, and the situation has sparked a growing number of protests organized by some of the hundreds of neighborhoods that remain in the dark. UTIER union president Angel Figueroa said one of the biggest problems was that workers with Puerto Rico’s Electric Power Authority still lacked the equipment or material to meet the governor’s goal. “We’ve been forced to recycle materials,” he said, adding that residents in one mountain town had bought basic supplies so power could be restored there. Polish lawmakers approve court takeover • Poland’s senators have overwhelmingly approved legislation that gives the ruling party control over a top court and a key judicial body despite warnings from European Union leaders that the country could eventually be stripped of its EU voting rights. The overwhelming support the senators gave Friday to changes to regulations for the Supreme Court and the National Council of the Judiciary bring Poland a step closer to an EU procedure that could potentially result in the unprecedented action. Austria’s new government is shift to right • Conservative and nationalist parties in Austria reached a deal on Friday to form a new coalition government that will shift the country to the right and make Sebastian Kurz, 31, Europe’s youngest leader. Kurz, who will be the new chancellor, said the new government would work to reduce Austrians’ tax burden, strengthen the economy and “above all, we want to ensure more security in our country, including by fighting illegal immigration.” Vatican receives sex abuse report • The Vatican says the devastating findings by Australia’s Royal Commission into institutional sex abuse is “thorough” and deserves to be “studied seriously.” The Royal Commission report concluded “that there were catastrophic failures of leadership of Catholic Church authorities over many decades.” It recommended the church lift its demand of clerical celibacy and that priests be prosecuted for failing to report abuse that they learn of in the confessional. Lawmakers move to oust Peru’s president • Lawmakers in Peru launched proceedings Friday to oust President Pedro Pablo Kuczynski, who refuses to resign after being accused of failing to disclose decade-old payments from a Brazilian company embroiled in Latin America’s biggest corruption scandal. Congress voted overwhelmingly in favor of a motion to consider impeaching the former Wall Street banker for “permanent moral incapacity.” The Brazilian construction giant admitted in a 2016 U.S. Justice Department plea agreement to paying nearly $800 million in bribes to obtain lucrative public works contracts. From news services


M 1 Saturday • 12.16.2017 • a8

World’s rich getting still richer amid favorable policies Inequality Report calls for more progressive taxation aSSOCIatEd PrESS

tOKyO • Global income inequality has

worsened over the past four decades, a report finds, with the wealthiest 1 percent of the world’s population capturing twice as much income growth as the bottom half. The world’s middle class, made up mostly of people in North America and Europe, has by some measures fared the worst. Globalization has boosted incomes for hundreds of millions of people in developing countries, particularly China and India. And it has lowered pay for manufacturing workers and other middle-income employees in the developed world. The World Inequality Report 2018 is based on an interactive collection of data compiled by an international team of researchers that includes renowned economists Thomas Piketty and Emmanuel Saez. Their previous research drew attention to widening inequality in the United States by highlighting the disproportionate income gains enjoyed by the richest 1 percent since 1980. The new report argues that countries can reduce inequality through more progressive taxation and by subsidizing education. It points out that the United States and Western Europe had similar levels of inequality in 1980, with the top 1 percent holding about 10 percent of income. But by 2016, the top 1 percent in Europe held a 12 percent income share, compared with 20 percent in the U.S. That divergence occurred partly because the U.S. tax code became less progressive, while European policies provided more support for education, which benefited lower- and middle-income families, the report said. Policy choices can also worsen inequality, says one of the study’s authors, Gabriel Zucman, an economist at the University of California, Berkeley. The tax cut now moving through Congress will mostly benefit wealthier Americans and worsen

the wealth gap, Zucman says. The World Inequality Report shows that income gaps soared after 1980, though they leveled off after 2008 after the financial crisis. The richest 1 percent of the world’s population saw its share of global income slip from about 22 percent in 2008 to just above 20 percent in 2016. At the same time, the share of global income going to the bottom 50 percent rose slightly in the same period, to just under 10 percent, thanks to gains in populous and fastgrowing China and India. The share of income earned by the bottom 50 percent of Americans sank from more than 20 percent in 1980 to 13 percent in 2016, it said. The authors of the report said the data it analyzes were collected from a wide range of government sources over 15 years. One of the goals of the study was to push governments to be more transparent about financial data to ensure that debates over inequality and the policies that affect incomes and wealth are well-informed. “Economic inequality is widespread and to some extent inevitable,” they said in the report’s summary. “It is our belief, however, that if rising inequality is not properly monitored and addressed it can lead to various sorts of political, economic and social catastrophes.” While incomes for the top 10 percent of wealthiest people have soared over the past four decades, the gains have been most dramatic in India, Russia and the United States. In the Middle East, Brazil and sub-Saharan Africa, inequality remained stable at very high levels, forming an “inequality frontier,” the report said. The report said that the transfer of public wealth to the private sector had left governments without the resources needed to invest enough in education, health and other measures to help counter inequality. “While national wealth has substantially increased, public wealth is now negative or close to zero in rich countries,” it said. Following Europe’s example in adopting policies to benefit middle- and low-income earners could help counter the trend toward extreme inequality, it said.

Calendar quirk, Amazon pressure retail delivery

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A UPS employee loads packages onto a truck at a company facility in New York in May. With Christmas on a Monday, most retailers have one fewer day to get packages delivered on time. UPS has said heavy ordering has delayed some package deliveries. aSSOCIatEd PrESS

NEW yOrK • A calendar quirk this year and Amazon’s seven-days-a-week delivery capability are building pressure on retailers to deliver. With Christmas on a Monday, most retailers have one fewer day to get packages delivered on time. Some are pushing up their deadlines for standard delivery or free shipping. And after promoting the convenience of buying online with store pickup, retailers are also trying to satisfy customers coming in to collect their orders. It’s especially important for retailers to hit the mark after some missteps earlier in the season, and because online leader Amazon has the advantage of delivering on Sundays. Research firm StellaService says Dec. 19 is the most popular cutoff date for retailers, two days earlier than last year. Amazon Prime members, meanwhile, get same-day delivery through Dec. 24 in 8,000 cities. Retailers have been trying to speed up delivery as they try to replicate the service offered by Amazon. But UPS said this month that some package deliveries were being delayed because of a surge of orders from online shoppers after

Thanksgiving. And Walmart said about the same time that more online buying created delays in some orders. Amazon has long invested in an infrastructure to do Sunday deliveries, relying on the U.S. Postal Service and its own network of local couriers. For Amazon’s same-day deliveries for Prime members, it uses local couriers, the company said. Alex Vlasto, vice president of marketing at StellaService, said the decision by most retailers not to do Sunday deliveries came down to cost and the limits of their current logistics. Many retailers are making more of their online items available for shoppers interested in picking them up at the store. Walmart said it expected demand for in-store pickup of online orders to double during the final two weeks of the holiday season. Donald Morgan of Pittsgrove, N.J., doesn’t plan to be among those customers. He’s going to a mix of stores and using Amazon after having to wait 15 minutes in line to pick up online orders at Walmart, Target and Best Buy last holiday season. “It’s more aggravation than it’s worth,” Morgan said.

ENTER TO WIN! From left to right: Ida Early (secretary, Women of Achievement), Marian Nunn (vice president, Women of Achievement), Gwendolyn Packnett Ph.D. (president, Women of Achievement), Linda McKay (treasurer, Women of Achievement), and Joni Karandjeff (immediate past president, Women of Achievement).

Nominations are now being accepted The purpose of the Women of Achievement Award is to recognize and honor women of diverse cultures, roles and accomplishments who have demonstrated commitment to the betterment of the St. Louis region through significant voluntary contributions. A committee of community leaders will choose ten honorees to be recognized at the Women of Achievement luncheon on Tuesday, May 15, 2018, at The Ritz-Carlton Hotel in Clayton. Nomination forms are now available. Deadline for nomination is midnight on Wednesday, January 10, 2018. Nominations online preferred. Visit www.woastl.org for criteria and nomination form. Women of Achievement 3418 Charlack Avenue, Ste. 615 St. Louis, MO 63114 (314) 896-4962

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MARKET WATCH

12.16.2017 • Saturday • M 1

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • A9

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM /BUSINESS U.S. stocks jumped Friday as Congressional Republicans put the final touches on a tax overhaul plan. Major indexes reached all-time highs. Small-company stocks, which stand to benefit most from lower corporate tax rates, rose more than the rest of the market.

Oracle

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Close: 24,651.74 Change: 143.08 (0.6%)

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D $186.27

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Mar 18 Jan 18 Mar 18

347.50 967.25 418.25

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NASD 3,052 1,857 2021 872 130 51

5,077 3,204 2028 910 121 30

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HIGH 24688.62 10435.64 756.22 12723.59 6945.82 2679.63 1896.59 27790.07 1538.05

LOW 24584.44 10302.37 751.04 12650.08 6871.46 2659.93 1867.14 27491.25 1507.67

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CLOSE 24651.74 10393.01 753.38 12699.69 6936.58 2675.81 1886.67 27734.32 1530.42

A CHG. +143.08 +65.06 +2.81 +70.62 +80.05 +23.80 +19.53 +231.23 +23.47

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75.92 116.95 27.00

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57.30 1.6548 190.35 2.612

+.26 -.0159 -.64 -.072

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D

Coffee

YTD +24.74% +14.92% +14.22% +14.86% +28.86% +19.52% +13.62% +18.39% +12.77%

Sugar

Gas blend Heating oil Natural gas

TKR

52-WK LO HI

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV NAME

AT&T Inc

T

32.55

43.03 38.24 +.50 +1.3 -10.1

Aegion Corp

AEGN

19.11

28.19 25.56 +.26 +1.0

-3.4 14

+7.8 +2.2 20

TKR

1.96 General Motors

GM

... Home Depot

HD

31.92

6

1.52

133.05 186.31 182.58 +.45 +0.2 +36.2 +36.6 25

3.56

Amdocs

DOX

56.10

67.98 65.58 +1.06 +1.6 +12.6 +8.4 18

AEE

51.35

64.89 60.92 +.09 +0.1 +16.1 +23.5 24 1.83f Lee Ent

American Railcar

ARII

34.29

51.10 39.95 +.32 +0.8 -11.8

ABInBev

BUD

Arch Coal

ARCH

Avadel Pharma

AVDL

7.52

Bank of America

BAC

21.77

29.50 29.04 +.29 +1.0 +31.4 +28.5 17

0.48 Monsanto Co

MON 104.77 122.80 117.34

-.52 -0.4 +11.5 +15.0 22

2.16

Belden Inc

BDC

64.60

86.85 79.22 -1.49 -1.8

0.20 Olin

OLN

25.05

37.52 33.87 +.17 +0.5 +32.3 +35.9 47

0.80

Boeing

BA

BTU

22.58

36.58 35.50

SKIS

4.00

PRFT POST

Build-A-Bear Wkshp BBW

60.13

12.30

8.68 +.28 +3.3 -16.5 -19.2

15.15

1.60 Lowes 3.19e Mallinckrodt plc

88.00 86.86 +1.48 +1.7 +11.3 +9.1 11

154.96 296.75 293.90 +.02 7.25

-7.7 15

+4.9 +11.3 5

+6.0 +5.6 15

1.40 MasterCard ... McDonald’s

... +88.8 +93.9 31 6.84f Peabody Energy

9.15 +.20 +2.2 -33.5 -40.9 19

... Peak Resorts

LEE

5.00

9.24

6.64 +.14 +2.2

1.75

3.30

2.40

...

+0.5 +1.4

7

...

... -17.2 -20.0

5

... 1.64

LOW

70.49

88.55 86.68 +1.10 +1.3 +21.9 +18.4 19

MNK

19.00

55.33 23.36 +.25 +1.1 -53.1 -56.2

...

MA

102.98 154.65 153.34 +1.41 +0.9 +48.5 +48.0 36 1.00f

MCD

118.18 174.44 174.07 +.93 +0.5 +43.0 +44.1 30 4.04f

6.20

-.01

... +28.9

5.20 +.10 +2.0

... -4.8 dd

0.28

16.20

20.22 19.45 +.21 +1.1 +11.2

-0.4 37

...

75.76

89.04 78.08 +.48 +0.6

-2.9 +1.1 cc

...

Caleres Inc.

CAL

22.39

35.72 32.21 +.92 +2.9

-1.9 -12.0 16

Cass Info. Systems

CASS

53.23

68.03 64.01 +1.08 +1.7

-4.3

Centene Corp.

CNC

55.89 103.15 94.85 -4.17 -4.2 +67.8 +76.4 20

Charter

CHTR 275.34 408.83 322.31 -6.37 -1.9 +11.9 +14.0 cc

Citigroup

C

55.23

77.92 74.77 +.85 +1.1 +25.8 +26.0 14

Commerce Banc.

CBSH

49.43

57.91 55.76 +1.42 +2.6

Edgewell

EPC

55.94

82.06 60.99 +1.31 +2.2 -16.4 -21.6 15

Emerson

EMR

55.40

67.83 67.26 +.75 +1.1 +20.6 +21.6 28 1.94f UPS B

Energizer Holdings

ENR

40.64

60.07 47.93 +.40 +0.8

+7.4 +8.9 17 1.16f US Bancorp

USB

49.54

56.61 54.50 +.35 +0.6

+6.1 +6.9 16 1.20f

Enterprise Financial EFSC

36.65

46.25 44.50 +1.15 +2.7

+3.5 +9.6 18

0.44 US Steel

X

18.55

41.83 31.86 +.13 +0.4

-3.5 -10.1 cc

Esco Technologies

ESE

50.30

65.95 60.40 +.15 +0.2

+6.6 +6.6 34

0.32 Verizon

VZ

42.80

54.83 52.65 +.31 +0.6

Express Scripts

ESRX

55.80

73.52 71.55 +2.53 +3.7

+4.0

WMT

65.28 100.13 97.11

WBA WFC

Foresight Energy

FELP

FutureFuel

FF

3.53 12.68

8.33

4.07

... ReinsGrp

RGA

... Reliv

RELV

1.28 Spire Inc

+1.3 +0.6 20 0.90b Stifel Financial

-2.1 12

-.09 -2.2 -37.1 -31.5 dd

16.39 14.27 +.08 +0.6

0.28 Perficient

-3.8 33 0.96f Post Holdings

... Target Corp.

... WalMart 0.13 Walgreen Boots

+2.7 +8.2 17 0.24a Wells Fargo

SR

121.93 165.12 156.54 3.72 62.33

13.77

4.45

-.01

... +24.4 +24.4 14 2.00f

-.07 -1.5

-4.1 +3.9 dd

French firm to buy Centaur Building Services Atalian Global Services of Paris is acquiring Centaur Building Services, a janitorial services company based in the Bevo Hill neighborhood. Led by president Janine JoubertDulay, Centaur has contracts to clean office and manufacturing buildings, sports venues and other facilities in nine states. Founded in 1985, Centaur has 1,800 employees and regional offices in Montgomery, Ala.; Homewood, Ala.; and Nashville, Tenn., and is one of the country’s largest woman-owned commercial cleaning companies, according to its website. Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed. Atalian has more than 100,000 employees worldwide and $2.2 billion in annual revenue. AT&T CEO resigns from Emerson, Boeing boards • Randall Stephenson, the chairman and CEO of AT&T Inc., resigned Friday from the boards of directors of Emerson, the Ferguson-based maker of factory automation equipment, and Boeing, the Chicago-based aerospace giant. In a filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, Emerson and Boeing separately said Stephenson informed the companies that “the coming year will be an extremely busy one for him.” Stephenson is defending his company’s merger deal with Time Warner Inc., which the Justice Department is seeking to block. Both companies said in filings that Stephenson’s resignation was not due to disagreements on any matters related to their operations, policies or practices. Unilever sells spreads business to KKR • Unilever said Friday that it had agreed to sell its margarine and spreads business to U.S. private equity firm KKR for 6.83 billion euros ($8.04 billion) to concentrate on faster-growing products. The brands to be sold include Becel, Flora, Country Crock and Blue Band. Unilever put the business up for sale in April, after a review of its assets prompted by February’s unsolicited $143 billion

takeover attempt by Kraft Heinz. “The announcement today marks a further step in reshaping and sharpening our portfolio for longterm growth,” Chief Executive Paul Polman said. “The consideration recognizes the market leading brands and the improved momentum we have achieved.” Sinclair said to face FCC fine • The Federal Communications Commission plans to fine Sinclair Broadcasting Corp. $13.3 million after it failed to properly disclose that paid programming that aired on local TV stations was sponsored by a cancer institute, Reuters reported Friday, citing three people briefed on the matter. The proposed fine, which covers about 1,700 spots including commercials that looked like news stories that aired during newscasts for the Utah-based Huntsman Cancer Institute over a six-month period in 2016, could bolster critics of Sinclair’s proposed $3.9 billion acquisition of Tribune Media Co. Sinclair Broadcasting and a spokesman for the FCC declined to comment. Sinclair, which has told reporters previously the violations were unintentional, disclosed the investigation in financial filings. Health setback for CEO punishes CSX stock • Shares of CSX slid Friday after the railroad said CEO Hunter Harrison would take a medical leave “due to unexpected complications from a recent illness.” Chief Operating Officer James Foote will serve as acting CEO of the Jacksonville, Fla., company. Harrison, who has engineered turnarounds at three different railroads, was hired in March after activist investors pressured CSX for changes. But questions have emerged about his health. In May The Wall Street Journal reported that Harrison often works from home and occasionally uses oxygen because of an undisclosed health issue. Harrison said that doctors had cleared him to work. Shares of CSX Corp. fell $4.38, or 7.6 percent, to close at $52.93 Friday. Shares hit an all-time high this week and are up 47 percent in the year to date. From staff and wire reports

.0574 .7674 .2999 1.3441 .7843 .1512 1.1792 .0156 .2840 .008914 .052469 .0170 .0741 .000918 1.0129

PreciousMetals NEW YORK

Silver

1.38 1.13 .63

4.50 4.25 3.50

+.50 +.13 +8.20

TREASURIES

LAST

NET CHG

1YR AGO

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 52-wk T-bill 2-year T-note 5-year T-note 7-year T-note 10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

1.31 1.47 1.69 1.85 2.16 2.28 2.35 2.69

+0.01 ... +0.02 +0.03 +0.02 +0.01 ... -0.02

.50 .65 .89 1.28 2.10 2.42 2.60 3.16

NET 1YR LAST CHG AGO

BONDS

PRIME FED RATE FUNDS

CHG

CLOSE

1254.30 15.98 889.40

Gold

Barclays Glob Agg Bd Barclays USAggregate Barclays US High Yield Moodys AAA Corp Idx Barclays US Corp 10-Yr. TIPS

1.61 ... 1.65 2.67 ... 2.70 5.73 +0.01 6.13 3.46 -0.02 4.08 3.21 ... 3.47 .46 ... .69

...

SF

41.93

60.92 59.48 +1.31 +2.3 +19.1 +13.3 19

0.40

48.56

78.00 62.59 +.65 +1.0 -13.3 -16.6 13

2.48

102.12 125.16 118.00 +1.16 +1.0

+2.9 +2.5 20

3.32 0.20

-1.4 +5.9 11

2.36

... +40.5 +39.0 22

2.04

63.82

88.00 71.94 +1.58 +2.2 -13.1 -16.1 15

1.60

49.27

60.56 59.87 +.64 +1.1

-.02

+8.6 +11.1 15 1.56f

Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months.

BUSINESS DIGEST

PREV

.0571 .7648 .3028 1.3321 .7763 .1515 1.1757 .0156 .2845 .008879 .052285 .0170 .0760 .000918 1.0093

82.85 77.05 +.50 +0.7 +19.4 +25.0 21 2.25f

TGT UPS

Argentina Australia Brazil Britain Canada China Euro India Israel Japan Mexico Russia So. Africa So. Korea Switzerland

Bond prices were flat. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note held steady at 2.35 percent.

YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO

$58.35

ExchangeRates

...

-6.3

D

FOREIGN CURRENCY IN DOLLARS CLOSE

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV

46.76 40.95 +.14 +0.3 +17.5 +17.7

O N 52-week range

Platinum

Ameren Corp

102.52 126.50 110.62 +.12 +0.1

0.88 Huttig Building Prod HBP

$35.59

Interestrates Interestrates 52-WK LO HI

S

Vol.: 49.2m (7.5x avg.) PE: 27.3 Mkt. Cap: $47.3 b Yield: 1.5%

Chicago BOT is in cents.

Stocks of Local Interest NAME

45

D

DATE

CSX

Close: $52.93 -4.38 or -7.6% The railroad operator said CEO Hunter Harrison is on leave because of health problems.

Vol.: 7.7m (2.4x avg.) PE: 31.7 Mkt. Cap: $84.22 b Yield: 1.0%

CHICAGO BOT

Close: 2,675.81 Change: 23.80 (0.9%)

S

$150.00

PE: 55.8 Yield: ...

S&P 500

2,640

10 DAYS

S

$101.91

$53.14

2,680

Dow Jones industrials

24,400

CSX

COST

Close: $192.73 6.20 or 3.3% The wholesale club company had a better quarter than analysts expected.

Vol.: 75.1m (4.8x avg.) PE: 21.0 Mkt. Cap: $201.58 b Yield: 1.6%

Charts show stocks that made the news yesterday.

Costco

ADBE

Close: $177.51 2.51 or 1.4% The software company surpassed Wall Street’s forecasts in its latest quarter.

$38.30

24,720

Adobe

ORCL

Close: $48.30 -1.89 or -3.8% Analysts were disappointed with results from the software maker’s cloud business and its forecasts.

GlobalMarkets INDEX S&P 500 Frankfurt DAX London FTSE 100 Hong Kong Hang Seng Paris CAC-40 Mexico City Bolsa Tokyo Nikkei 225 Sao Paolo Bovespa Toronto Zurich

LAST 2675.81 13103.56 7490.57 28848.11 5349.30 48081.55 22553.22 72607.71 16041.98 9394.71

CHG

CHG

YTD

+23.80 +35.48 +42.45 -318.27 -7.84 -140.83 -141.23 +178.77 +25.52 +11.69

+0.90% +0.27% +0.57% -1.09% -0.15% -0.29% -0.62% +0.25% +0.16% +0.12%

+19.52% +14.13% +4.87% +31.12% +10.02% +5.34% +17.99% +20.56% +4.93% +14.29%

Tech firms lead U.S. stocks higher as tax plan advances ASSOCIATED PRESS

N E W YO R K • Wall Street

capped the week with broad gains, propelling the major stock indexes to a new set of milestones Friday. Investors welcomed signs that Congressional Republicans were solidifying support for a major overhaul of the nation’s tax laws ahead of an expected vote next week. Technology stocks led the gains, which more than wiped out the market’s losses from the day before. Health care companies and banks also posted solid gains. Energy stocks were the only laggard. Small-company stocks, which stand to benefit most from lower corporate tax rates, rose more than the rest of the market.

“The tax bill seems to be the driver right now,” said Erik Davidson, chief investment officer at Wells Fargo Private Bank. “The market just thinks it will get done.” The Standard & Poor’s 500 index rose 23.80 points, or 0.9 percent, to 2,675.81. The Dow Jones industrial average gained 143.08 points, or 0.6 percent, to 24,651.74. The Nasdaq added 80.06 points, or 1.2 percent, to 6,936.58. The Dow, S&P 500 and Nasdaq closed at record highs and finished the week with gains. The indexes were headed higher early on as investors watched developments in Washington with the Republican-led tax overhaul bill. GOP leaders moved to placate Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, who had said Thursday that he would vote

Trump reconsiders rules overseeing black lung ASSOCIATED PRESS

CHARLESTON, W.VA. • President Donald Trump’s mining regulators are reconsidering rules meant to protect underground miners from breathing coal and rock dust — the cause of black lung — and diesel exhaust, which can cause cancer. An advocate for coal miners said Friday that this sent a “very bad signal.” The Mine Safety and Health Administration has asked for public comments on whether standards “could be improved or made more effective or less burdensome by accommodating advances in technology, innovative techniques, or less costly methods.” Some “requirements that could be streamlined or re-

placed in frequency” involve coal and rock dust. Others address diesel exhaust, which can have health impacts ranging from headaches and nausea to respiratory disease and cancer. “Because of the carcinogenic health risk to miners from exposure to diesel exhaust, MSHA is requesting information on approaches that would improve control of diesel particulate matter and diesel exhaust,” the agency said. The notices on coal dust and underground diesel exhaust had few details. Both were described as “pre-rule stage.” “I think it’s a very bad signal for coal miners that MSHA is wanting to revisit the issue of coal dust and rock dust as well as diesel exhaust,” said lawyer Tony Oppegard, who represents

against the bill unless the child tax credit was beefed up. By Friday afternoon, Congressional Republicans had finalized the bill, expanding the child tax credit, and winning Rubio’s support. The move provided a major boost for the GOP lawmakers in the Senate who are trying to hold together a razor-thin majority to pass the bill in a vote next week. Technology stocks, which are leading the market this year, notched solid gains. Intel rose $1.30, or 3 percent, to $44.56. “We had seen some rotation out of it the last few weeks,” said Jim Davis, regional investment strategist at U.S. Bank Wealth Management. “We’re starting to see more of a change back to some of the sectors that have done well this year.”

miners in safety cases. “I don’t think the Trump administration has coal miners’ best interests at heart. They’re aligned with coal mine operators as opposed to miners, and the only reasons they would want to reopen these rules or revisit these rules are to weaken them.” The administration of President Barack Obama, through a lengthy rule-making process, lowered the allowable limit for miners’ dust exposure three years ago, Oppegard said. The industry and its mine operators opposed that for years, he said. At the National Mining Association, which represents mine operators, spokesman Luke Popovich said Friday that they believed a review of the dustexposure rule “might shed valuable information on ... ways it might be improved to provide further protection for miners while eliminating unnecessary implementation requirements for operators.”


J O I N T H E C O N V E R S AT I O N

A P L AC E F O R N E W S A N D V I E W S O N FA I T H

W W W . S T L T O D A Y. C O M / R E L I G I O N

M 1 Saturday • 12.16.2017 • a10

‘MERRY CHRISTMAS’

Many unconcerned about use of greeting

FAITH PERSPECTIVES

Social media interactions need a gentler touch GrEG WEEKS Manchester United Methodist Church

FILE PHOTO

By SuSaN HOGaN Washington Post

As a presidential candidate, Donald Trump complained that the greeting “Merry Christmas” had fallen out of vogue. People would be saying it again once he took office, he promised. And you’d hear the greeting more in department stores, too. He has said that repeatedly since occupying the Oval Office. “You’re going to be saying ‘Merry Christmas’ again,” he pledged during a speech to the Heritage Foundation on Oct. 17. But the president’s enthusiasm for the greeting isn’t as widely shared as he may think. “Today, fully half of the U.S. public (52 percent) says a business’ choice of holiday greeting does not matter to them,” according to results of a survey released Tuesday by the Pew Research Center. In other words, “Merry Christmas” is fine, but “Happy holidays” will do. Many surveyed agreed that the religious aspects of Christmas are not as prominent in American culture as in the past, but very few were bothered by this. Nine in 10 adults said they celebrated Christmas in some way. The survey was conducted by telephone a few weeks ago, “among a representative sample” of 1,503 adults nationwide, Pew said. Among other notable find-

President Donald Trump

ings: • Fifty-five percent of American adults said they celebrated Christmas as a religious holiday, down from 59 percent in 2013. • The number of Americans who believe no religious displays, such as nativity scenes, should be permitted on government property, has grown to 26 percent, from 20 percent in 2014. • When it comes to the biblical story of Jesus’ birth, fewer Americans see it as historically accurate, though the number remains significant: Sixty-six percent of Americans believe Jesus was born to a virgin, compared

with 73 percent in 2014. • Sixty-eight percent say wise men, guided by a star, brought gifts for the infant Jesus, compared with 75 percent in 2014. • Seventy-five percent believe baby Jesus was laid in a manger, compared with 81 percent in 2014. • Sixty-seven percent believe an angel announced the birth of Jesus to shepherds, compared with 74 percent in 2014. Three-quarters of Republicans believe in those four parts of the Christmas narrative, the survey said, compared with 47 percent of Democrats. The accounts of Jesus’ birth are found in the Gospels of Matthew and Luke, and they differ. Though an increasing number of Americans doubt some of the historical details, it doesn’t mean they doubt their theological truth. Pew said “nones” — people who identify as atheist, agnostic or “nothing in particular” — recorded the sharpest decline in belief in the nativity narratives. Despite the changes in attitudes, Trump’s push for “Merry Christmas” plays well with his political base. “About half of those who identify with or lean toward the Republican Party express a preference for hearing ‘merry Christmas’ from stores and businesses,” the survey said.

Social media have revolutionized our interactions with others. People are connected more intimately than ever before. Long-lost friends are rediscovered and celebrated. That’s the good side. The bad side is the growing popularity of people expressing their opinions as facts, and mixing in a good dose of anger and outrage. The precipitating factors can be slights from others, failed customer service, news stories (fake or not), rumors. … The list is endless. All it takes is a post or tweet that has catch phrases such as, “Can you believe that?” and “Outrageous!” Others then respond with similar indignation, because they assume that their Facebook friend is telling the whole, unvarnished truth. The piling on continues until emotional catharsis results. The collateral damage is substantial. Tarnished reputations. Broken relationships. Lost customers. In extreme cases, violence and suicide. Such unsocial media expose the dark side of humanity. Posting, uploading or tweeting, all from the convenience of a smart phone or home computer, reveals the rancor that can blemish the human heart. What’s worse, with the divisiveness of our society, and with a president known as the Tweeter in Chief, it seems as if pettiness and vengeance have become virtues. We seem to have lost our sense of shame. Jesus once said that nothing is done in secret that will not be revealed in the light. Actually, though, it seems as if many want their secret thoughts and feelings broadcast. We find comfort in many “likes.” It would probably be best for all involved if people would simply take a moratorium of a day or two before sending out a post that attacks another human being. What would definitely be

best is if we listened to the wisdom of Jesus. In giving a model for how Christians ought to behave with each other, he said this: “If your brother or sister sins against you, go and correct them when you are alone together. If they listen to you, then you’ve won over your brother or sister.” (Matthew 18:15,CEB) Jesus didn’t say that if you have a problem with person A, then go first to person B and talk about how bad person A is. He didn’t say go first on a Facebook rant. He also taught that you need to love your enemies, pray for them and do good to them. Not only do you forgive them, but you should ask their forgiveness if you’ve offended them. This is a far cry from posting Molotov cocktails against their character. Basically, Jesus is saying that if you are a follower of his, then you’re bigger than being petty. Treat another person with the same type of respect you want. Give that individual benefit of the doubt. Initiate the conversation. Be open. Seek reconciliation. At the very least, learn the facts before forming opinions and casting judgments. Make listening a virtue. We’ve made Christianity too easy to claim. It’s too simple to focus on beliefs rather than upon the implications of those beliefs in daily life. In its basic form, being a disciple means obeying Jesus in our dealings with others, and that includes what we send out on social media. Perhaps we should adapt the old acronym “WWJD.” What would Jesus do? More to the point would be “WWJP.” What would Jesus post? That would stop some of the viciousness we see. At least in our little corner of the internet, things would turn more social for a change. Weeks is senior pastor of Manchester United Methodist Church. He is a regular Faith Perspectives contributor to STLtoday. com/religion.

NEWS

Jury pays maid’s fine after convicting her of stealing By tOM JaCKMaN Washington Post

The trial seemed utterly ordinary. A 19-year-old maid swiped a woman’s three rings worth at least $5,000 from a house she was cleaning in Fairfax City, Va., but later returned them after the police questioned her. She was charged with felony grand larceny. What the jury did was extraordinary. They felt bad for the young woman, pregnant with her second child, and agreed that she had made a dumb, youthful mistake. Reluctantly, they convicted her of the felony. But the fine they imposed was her daily pay as a maid, $60. And then they took up a collection and gave her the money to pay the fine.

“The general sentiment was she was a victim, too,” the jury foreman, Jeffery Memmott, said. “Two of the women [jurors] were crying because of how bad they felt. One lady pulled out a $20 bill, and just about everybody chipped in.” Memmott then contacted the public defender in the case, and went to the home of Sandra Mendez Ortega. He gave her the jury’s collection, which totaled $80. “Justice had to be done,” said another juror, Janice Woolridge, explaining why the panel had imposed a felony conviction. “But there’s also got be some compassion somewhere. Young people make bad decisions. We just couldn’t pile on any more.” The two-day trial was held in July, but the sen-

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tencing was Dec. 8 before Fairfax County Circuit Court Judge Robert J. Smith. Mendez Ortega’s attorney, assistant public defender Michael C. Cash, asked the judge to defer the case and not enter a conviction or sentence in light of the defendant’s actions and the jury’s response. Smith declined, entered the conviction and imposed the $60 fine. Numerous veteran criminal lawyers, on both the prosecution and defense sides, said they had never heard of a case in which a jury paid a defendant’s fine. A happy holiday story, right? Well what if you’re the woman whose rings were stolen?

‘JuSt FLaBBErGaStEd’

Although she was not pleased when the jury returned from their deliberations with only a $60 fine for the felony conviction, crime victim Lisa Copeland was appalled when she learned that the jury had also paid the fine. “I just pray that they’re never in my shoes,” Copeland said. She said Mendez Ortega never accepted responsibility for the theft. “If she had accepted accountability, I would be okay with all of this. The fact that she won’t accept accountability makes it wrong.” Copeland said Mendez Ortega had told a series

of lies from the start, and then unfurled a tragic life story that convinced the jury to impose a punishment of a $60 fine. “I was outraged,” Copeland said. “I was just flabbergasted. I didn’t think $60 equated to the crime at all.” She did not know the jury had taken up a collection for Mendez Ortega until she was contacted by a reporter. The case began with Copeland’s discovery in September 2016 that her engagement and wedding rings were missing from the container where they were usually kept. The engagement ring had been her grandmother’s, made in 1943, and the two rings were appraised at $5,000 in 1996, Copeland said. Copeland didn’t realize a third, inexpensive ring had been taken until it was turned in. Fairfax City police investigated and interviewed the three women who had cleaned the home. All three denied taking or seeing the rings, court records show, and no one was charged. But after the interviews, Mendez Ortega reportedly felt bad about the theft, admitted to her boss that she had the rings and turned them over to him. The police were contacted and Mendez Ortega confessed to them as well, saying she returned the rings after learning they were valuable. The police had

her write an apology letter to Copeland, in Spanish, which said in part, “Sorry for grabbing the rings. I don’t know what happened. I want you to forgive me.” Copeland said she has never seen that letter, and that Mendez Ortega has never apologized to her in person. “Never saw it,” Copeland said. “Never heard about it until the trial, during sentencing.” After she was arrested, Mendez Ortega spent eight days in jail until she was released on $1,000 bail. The jury was not told that. The jury also was not told that Mendez Ortega apparently is not in the country legally, as Copeland said she was told by prosecutors, because it was not relevant to whether she stole the rings. “I think it’s relevant to the case,” Copeland said. She said the penalties of a felony conviction, such as not being able to vote or buy a gun, would not be actions available to an immigrant in the country illegally anyway. “It really irritates me that she came here and committed a felony,” said Jeff Copeland, Lisa Copeland’s husband. “People are coming here because there is opportunity here. But when they come here and commit crimes, that’s where you’ve got to draw the line.” At trial, the facts were

not really in dispute. The jury did not hear from Mendez Ortega during the case in chief, but they were already sympathetic to her. “We didn’t feel she should have been tried and convicted,” said Memmott, the foreman. “We tried every way we could to find some way of not convicting her. But the legal standard was very clear.” Two other jurors agreed that the felony conviction was appropriate, given the facts and the law. Lisa Copeland was amazed. “The fact that she confessed,” she said, “and they didn’t want to convict her? I don’t get this. That’s basically saying it’s okay to steal.” Then during the sentencing phase, Mendez Ortega took the stand. She faced a possible sentence of up to 20 years in prison and a fine of up to $2,500. She told the jury she had dropped out of school after sixth grade, that she first became pregnant at 15, that she was pregnant again at 19 and had no job, according to court records. “The whole time she was telling the sob story,” Lisa Copeland said, “I looked at my husband and said, ‘I’ve heard enough of this.’” She noted that after Mendez Ortega took the rings, “she lied to the cops, she lied to her employers. She didn’t turn in the rings, she made somebody else do it.”


J O I N T H E C O N V E R S AT I O N

A P L AC E F O R N E W S A N D V I E W S O N FA I T H

W W W . S T L T O D A Y. C O M / R E L I G I O N

M 2 Saturday • 12.16.2017 • a10

‘MERRY CHRISTMAS’

Many unconcerned about use of greeting

FAITH PERSPECTIVES

Social media interactions need a gentler touch GrEG WEEKS Manchester United Methodist Church

FILE PHOTO

By SuSaN HOGaN Washington Post

As a presidential candidate, Donald Trump complained that the greeting “Merry Christmas” had fallen out of vogue. People would be saying it again once he took office, he promised. And you’d hear the greeting more in department stores, too. He has said that repeatedly since occupying the Oval Office. “You’re going to be saying ‘Merry Christmas’ again,” he pledged during a speech to the Heritage Foundation on Oct. 17. But the president’s enthusiasm for the greeting isn’t as widely shared as he may think. “Today, fully half of the U.S. public (52 percent) says a business’ choice of holiday greeting does not matter to them,” according to results of a survey released Tuesday by the Pew Research Center. In other words, “Merry Christmas” is fine, but “Happy holidays” will do. Many surveyed agreed that the religious aspects of Christmas are not as prominent in American culture as in the past, but very few were bothered by this. Nine in 10 adults said they celebrated Christmas in some way. The survey was conducted by telephone a few weeks ago, “among a representative sample” of 1,503 adults nationwide, Pew said. Among other notable find-

President Donald Trump

ings: • Fifty-five percent of American adults said they celebrated Christmas as a religious holiday, down from 59 percent in 2013. • The number of Americans who believe no religious displays, such as nativity scenes, should be permitted on government property, has grown to 26 percent, from 20 percent in 2014. • When it comes to the biblical story of Jesus’ birth, fewer Americans see it as historically accurate, though the number remains significant: Sixty-six percent of Americans believe Jesus was born to a virgin, compared

with 73 percent in 2014. • Sixty-eight percent say wise men, guided by a star, brought gifts for the infant Jesus, compared with 75 percent in 2014. • Seventy-five percent believe baby Jesus was laid in a manger, compared with 81 percent in 2014. • Sixty-seven percent believe an angel announced the birth of Jesus to shepherds, compared with 74 percent in 2014. Three-quarters of Republicans believe in those four parts of the Christmas narrative, the survey said, compared with 47 percent of Democrats. The accounts of Jesus’ birth are found in the Gospels of Matthew and Luke, and they differ. Though an increasing number of Americans doubt some of the historical details, it doesn’t mean they doubt their theological truth. Pew said “nones” — people who identify as atheist, agnostic or “nothing in particular” — recorded the sharpest decline in belief in the nativity narratives. Despite the changes in attitudes, Trump’s push for “Merry Christmas” plays well with his political base. “About half of those who identify with or lean toward the Republican Party express a preference for hearing ‘merry Christmas’ from stores and businesses,” the survey said.

Social media have revolutionized our interactions with others. People are connected more intimately than ever before. Long-lost friends are rediscovered and celebrated. That’s the good side. The bad side is the growing popularity of people expressing their opinions as facts, and mixing in a good dose of anger and outrage. The precipitating factors can be slights from others, failed customer service, news stories (fake or not), rumors. … The list is endless. All it takes is a post or tweet that has catch phrases such as, “Can you believe that?” and “Outrageous!” Others then respond with similar indignation, because they assume that their Facebook friend is telling the whole, unvarnished truth. The piling on continues until emotional catharsis results. The collateral damage is substantial. Tarnished reputations. Broken relationships. Lost customers. In extreme cases, violence and suicide. Such unsocial media expose the dark side of humanity. Posting, uploading or tweeting, all from the convenience of a smart phone or home computer, reveals the rancor that can blemish the human heart. What’s worse, with the divisiveness of our society, and with a president known as the Tweeter in Chief, it seems as if pettiness and vengeance have become virtues. We seem to have lost our sense of shame. Jesus once said that nothing is done in secret that will not be revealed in the light. Actually, though, it seems as if many want their secret thoughts and feelings broadcast. We find comfort in many “likes.” It would probably be best for all involved if people would simply take a moratorium of a day or two before sending out a post that attacks another human being. What would definitely be

best is if we listened to the wisdom of Jesus. In giving a model for how Christians ought to behave with each other, he said this: “If your brother or sister sins against you, go and correct them when you are alone together. If they listen to you, then you’ve won over your brother or sister.” (Matthew 18:15,CEB) Jesus didn’t say that if you have a problem with person A, then go first to person B and talk about how bad person A is. He didn’t say go first on a Facebook rant. He also taught that you need to love your enemies, pray for them and do good to them. Not only do you forgive them, but you should ask their forgiveness if you’ve offended them. This is a far cry from posting Molotov cocktails against their character. Basically, Jesus is saying that if you are a follower of his, then you’re bigger than being petty. Treat another person with the same type of respect you want. Give that individual benefit of the doubt. Initiate the conversation. Be open. Seek reconciliation. At the very least, learn the facts before forming opinions and casting judgments. Make listening a virtue. We’ve made Christianity too easy to claim. It’s too simple to focus on beliefs rather than upon the implications of those beliefs in daily life. In its basic form, being a disciple means obeying Jesus in our dealings with others, and that includes what we send out on social media. Perhaps we should adapt the old acronym “WWJD.” What would Jesus do? More to the point would be “WWJP.” What would Jesus post? That would stop some of the viciousness we see. At least in our little corner of the internet, things would turn more social for a change. Weeks is senior pastor of Manchester United Methodist Church. He is a regular Faith Perspectives contributor to STLtoday. com/religion.

NEWS

Jury pays fine for thieving maid, 19 By tOM JaCKMaN Washington Post

The trial seemed utterly ordinary. A 19-year-old maid swiped a woman’s three rings worth at least $5,000 from a house she was cleaning in Fairfax City, Va., but later returned them after the police questioned her. She was charged with felony grand larceny. What the jury did was extraordinary. They felt bad for the young woman, pregnant with her second child, and agreed that she had made a dumb, youthful mistake. Reluctantly, they convicted her of the felony. But the fine they imposed was her daily pay as a maid, $60. And then they took up a collection and gave her the money to pay the fine. “The general sentiment was she was a victim, too,” the jury foreman, Jeffery

Memmott, said. “Two of the women [jurors] were crying because of how bad they felt. One lady pulled out a $20 bill, and just about everybody chipped in.” Memmott then contacted the public defender in the case, and went to the home of Sandra Mendez Ortega. He gave her the jury’s collection, which totaled $80. “Justice had to be done,” said another juror, Janice Woolridge, explaining why the panel had imposed a felony conviction. “But there’s also got be some compassion somewhere. Young people make bad decisions.” The two-day trial was held in July, but the sentencing was Dec. 8 before Fairfax County Circuit Court Judge Robert J. Smith. Mendez Ortega’s attorney, assistant public defender Michael C. Cash, asked the judge to defer the case and not enter a con-

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viction or sentence in light of the defendant’s actions and the jury’s response. Smith declined, entered the conviction and imposed the $60 fine. Numerous veteran criminal lawyers, on both the prosecution and defense sides, said they had never heard of a case in which a jury paid a defendant’s fine. A happy holiday story, right? Well what if you’re the woman whose rings were stolen?

‘JuSt FLaBBErGaStEd’

Although she was not pleased when the jury returned from their deliberations with only a $60 fine for the felony conviction, crime victim Lisa Copeland was appalled when she learned that the jury had also paid the fine. “I just pray that they’re never in my shoes,” Copeland said. She said Mendez Ortega never accepted responsibility for the theft. “If she had accepted accountability, I would be okay with all of this. The fact that she won’t accept accountability makes it wrong.” Copeland said Mendez Ortega had told a series of lies from the start, and then unfurled a tragic life story that convinced the jury to impose a punishment of a $60 fine. “I was outraged,” Copeland said. “I was just flabbergasted. I didn’t think $60 equated to the crime at all.” She did not know the jury had taken up a collection for Mendez Ortega until she was contacted by a reporter. After Mendez Ortega was

arrested, she spent eight days in jail until she was released on $1,000 bail. The jury was not told that. The jury also was not told that Mendez Ortega apparently is not in the country legally, as Copeland said she was told by prosecutors, because it was not relevant to whether she stole the rings. “I think it’s relevant to the case,” Copeland said. She said the penalties of a felony conviction, such as not being able to vote or buy a gun, would not be actions available to an immigrant in the country illegally anyway. “It really irritates me that she came here and committed a felony,” said Jeff Copeland, Lisa Copeland’s husband. “People are coming here because there is opportunity here. But when they come here and commit crimes, that’s where you’ve got to draw the line.” Then during the sentencing phase, Mendez Ortega took the stand. She faced a possible sentence of up to 20 years in prison and a fine of up to $2,500. She told the jury she had dropped out of school after sixth grade, that she first became pregnant at 15, that she was pregnant again at 19 and had no job. Lisa Copeland noted that after Mendez Ortega took the rings, “she lied to the cops, she lied to her employers. She didn’t turn in the rings, she made somebody else do it.”

10 injured in crash on northbound I-55 near Edwardsville By dENISE HOLLINSHEd aNd NaSSIM BENCHaaBaNE St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Ten people were taken to hospitals, including three airlifted with life-threatening injuries, after a multivehicle crash about 1:43 p.m. Friday on northbound Interstate 55 near Edwardsville. The crash happened near where a trucker plowed into seven vehicles in November in a fatal crash that claimed the lives of four young women. Both crashes involved semi trucks and occurred on a stretch of Interstate 55 undergoing roadwork. In Friday’s crash, the truck driver, a 53-year-old man from Lewistown, Ill., was traveling northbound on I-55 when he took his eyes off of the road, reached down to pick up a bottle of tea and struck a vehicle, according to Illinois State Police Trooper Calvin Dye Jr. That caused a chain-reaction crash involving a total of 10 vehicles. Police did not have any updates late Friday on the conditions of the people who were airlifted. The semi driver was among seven other people taken to a hospital with injuries that were not considered life-threatening. He admitted to being momentarily distracted when he reached for the beverage, Dye said. All northbound lanes were closed at I-55 and Illinois 143 after the crash. The Illinois Department of Transportation reopened the lanes shortly before 8 p.m. In the fatal November crash, a semi-truck was southbound on I-55 traveling at an estimated 60 mph when it struck the vehicles near the 27.5 milepost in the area south of Hamel in Madison County and about eight miles northeast of Edwardsville. Denise Hollinshed • 314-340-8319 @Hollinshed57 on Twitter dhollinshed@post-dispatch.com


A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , 1 8 7 8

SATURDAy • 12.16.2017 • A11 RAY FARRIS PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER •

GILBERT BAILON EDITOR •

Short takes

TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

POSTCARD FROM MOUND CITy • By DAN MARTIN

Star Wars: Revenge of the nerds

Even before “The Last Jedi,” the latest movie in the Star Wars franchise, hit theaters Friday, legions of the obsessed had begun arguing about “porgs,” this movie’s designated new creature. Were porgs, natives of planet Acht-To, where the aged Luke Skywalker is hanging out, a critical plot element? Or were they just irritating little marketing gimmicks unveiled by the Disney Co. in time for Christmas? Star Wars fans occupy a particularly obsessive corner of the nerd universe, so this argument will rage on social media for years, much like the one that still rages over Ewoks, critters introduced in the third Star Wars film in 1983. You either take these films seriously or you obsess on the merchandise. The two don’t mix well. The plush toys went on sale this weekend, starting at about $25. Some kid you know is going to want one of the “saucer-eyed mewling creatures with plump, puffin-like bodies” (Manohla Dargis in The New York Times) or “infernally moist-eyed little winged critters” (Justin Chang in the Los Angeles Times). Baby porgs are called porglets. Chewbacca would find them tasty.

Costas called Since Bob Costas never called baseball locally, many St. Louisans might not realize that he broadcast the nation’s pastime for decades before anchoring the Olympics for 11 years and winning 28 Emmys for broadcasting excellence in sports, news and entertainment. Among all the accolades, Costas says the highest honor is this year’s Ford C. Frick award, given by the Baseball Hall of Fame in recognition of superiority in broadcasting the sport. This was the first year that Costas, 65, was eligible for the award. Costas got his professional start in St. Louis at KMOX Costas (1120 AM) in 1974 when the station hired him to be the play-by-play announcer for the Spirits of the American Basketball Association. Hall of Fame President Jeff Idelson said, “Bob’s pure affection for baseball … has made him a national treasure.” Costas says he’s something of a historian on the game, which he has followed devotedly since he was a youngster.

The lure of the fatberg Back in September, the world was introduced to the term “fatberg.” It described a congealed mass of fat, wet wipes and disposable diapers 800 feet long and weighing 143 tons blocking a section of London’s aging sewage network. Workers using shovels and high-pressure hoses finally broke it up (and you thought you had a bad job), but the “London Blob” still has its fans. So the Museum of London has announced plans to put a shoebox-sized remnant of the blob on display — mercifully, sealed under glass. Curator Vyki Sparkes said Tuesday that it will be “one of the most fascinating and disgusting objects we have ever had on display.” So if you get an invitation to Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s royal wedding next May, you might want to consider a side trip.

Check the ingredients Apparently, Missouri isn’t tough enough on restaurant workers possessed with a special kind of evil — the kind that causes them to sabotage food, knowing that particular customers will eat it. Rep. Justin Alferman, R-Hermann, wants Missouri’s law to create a special place in hell for food saboteurs. And we’re inclined to agree. It all started a year ago when a local police officer pulled over a Gasconade County man for having a loud muffler, the PostDispatch’s Kurt Erickson reports. It turns out the motorist worked at the same pizza joint where the officer later went to buy some food for his kids. The motorist/preparer, Daniel Robinson, decided to punish the officer by throwing his pizza toppings on the floor, then putting them onto the pizza, then spitting on the pie before putting it in the oven. Robinson got 15 days in jail and five years’ probation. His food-service career is on hiatus. Alferman wants tougher penalties, particularly when the retaliatory sabotage is aimed at officers or judges. Good for him, but he might want to bring his own lunch to work for the upcoming legislative session.

Loud and clear Johns Hopkins University announced it will stop placing the institution’s $3.845 billion investments in stocks of companies that produce thermal coal and divest from companies that contribute to climate change. This marks a persuasive step toward making corporations address the environmental effects of their operations, especially at a time when the Trump administration is averse to using laws for such enforcement. At the same time, more than 200 institutional investors charged with managing a $26 trillion portfolio announced Tuesday they would step up pressure on major corporations to reduce their production of greenhouse gases. The investors said they would press for the 100 biggest polluters to abide by a five-year plan to reduce their climate-changing emissions in conformity with the 2015 Paris climate agreement — an agreement that the Trump administration has withdrawn from. Politicians talk — as Trump so often does — but money talks louder.

Seasoning needed How unqualified does a nominee have to be to get himself disqualified from a lifetime federal judicial appointment? Three years of practicing law and no courtroom experience may be the answer. That description fits Brett Talley, 36, a Justice Department attorney nominated by President Donald Trump to an Alabama federal judgeship. The American Bar Association unanimously declared Talley “not qualified,” and Talley offered to withdraw his nomination. Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, had urged Trump to choose someone else. At long last, the White House on Wednesday withdrew the nomination.

dmartin@post-dispatch.com

yOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS Taking a historical perspective on the Nativity tale

Stop lawsuit abuse in Missouri and Illinois courts

Two letters are eloquent testimony to the power and beauty of the Christmas story (“Nativity scene reflects poorly on Catholic traditions,” Dec. 11, and “Nativity scene doesn’t show Joseph and Mary’s humility,” Dec. 12). It is also a fine tribute to the faith the church has taught that both writers found the modern creche displayed in Belleville to be offensive. Let me suggest, however, that some historical perspective might be in order. It might serve to teach us some of the humility that one writer felt the modern version lacked. Painful as the discovery has been, we now recognize that the accounts of the Nativity are a lovely, earnest but creative product of the church’s earliest thinking. It was a narrative that was not even certified as holy writ until the Council of Nicea — three centuries after the event it purports to describe. It’s true that if we recite something on a regular basis, especially if ordered to do so, those words become second nature; we begin to feel them literally as “the truth.” But it’s my humble (or perhaps merely arrogant and modern) opinion that every generation has an obligation to revisit and reinterpret these various early stories, and the doctrines they try to articulate. Seeing those stories as invented tales may help us be more open to our culture’s (possibly offensive) takes on them. Such humility and intellectual honesty could help us rid ourselves of terms like “holy family,” of the beautiful but impossible notion of an immaculate conception — and of the virgin birth that forced the church to invent it. The writers of those two thoughtful letters are right to feel some pain and take some offense at the Belleville scene. But they should also celebrate the fact that we today are as bright and thoughtful as the bright and thoughtful forebears who crafted the wonderful story. Jamie Spencer • Des Peres

The annual “Judicial Hellholes” report has come out, and once again the St. Louis region is in the spotlight. In Illinois, perennial “hellholes” Madison and Cook counties have again made the list, and St. Louis is ranked the thirdworst in the nation. The report defines a “judicial hellhole” as “a place where judges systematically apply laws and court procedures in an unfair and unbalanced manner.” This is especially true in Illinois, where judges have made Madison and Cook counties favorite destinations for lawsuit tourists. For far too long, Illinois (and now St. Louis) has been a magnet for personal injury lawyers and plaintiffs from all over the country who clog our courts with junk lawsuits all in the hopes of striking it rich playing the lawsuit lottery. Both Illinois and Missouri are competing for the new Amazon headquarters and the 50,000 jobs that come with it. Companies look to locate where the legal system is fair. According to a recent report from Harris Poll, 85 percent of the business leaders surveyed in the report say a state’s lawsuit climate is a “significant factor” in determining where to expand and grow. Both Illinois and Missouri need judges to help create jobs by stopping lawsuit abuse in their courts. If we want to bring jobs and opportunities to the St. Louis region, we need judges who will not allow Madison County and Illinois to remain “judicial hellholes.” Travis Akin • Marion, Ill. Executive director, Illinois Lawsuit Abuse Watch

Media sensationalize sexual harassment allegations We’ve moved into an area of sensationalizing scandalous behavior of men against women and a few rare cases of the opposite, that is, sexual harassment. Most cases appear to involve abuses of power. The fact that victims of such behavior now feel free to express their experiences represents progress. Is there, however, a downside? Not infrequently, what appears to be progress in one area is accompanied by regression in another. The rights that some achieve may become loss of rights for others. As a result, new inequities arise. Historically, our legal ideal was evidenced in the accused considered innocent until proven guilty. Currently, accusations of sexual harassment are taken at face value rather than simply as alleged guilt. They then become sensationalized in the media. We’re so elated with such progress that we fail to consider potential harm hitchhiking a ride on the express train. In this case, a tendency to judge one accused as guilty becomes immediate. We forget some have been falsely smeared or libeled. The consequences are ruined lives and reputations. Two rather infamous cases come to mind where this has happened. One is the Tawana Brawley case where police officers were falsely accused of rape and other horrendous acts. The other case involved the Duke lacrosse team — also false rape allegations. The media could take steps toward simply reporting accusations minus sensationalizing the details, allowing the parties involved to settle guilt or innocence. Such steps would assist in decreasing unnecessary frenzy and protect the innocent. Helen Louise Herndon • Kirkwood

Black voters wield their power in Alabama election Regarding “In Alabama, an unusual alliance yields a Democratic upset” (online Dec. 13): Black people are strong. You could not go through all they’ve gone through and not be strong. Whether it be billy clubs, dog bites, mass incarceration or job discrimination, black people have weathered it all. Yet, one thing has always been missing: power. In a post-Citizens United America, the voting booth is the only place where a rich, white, male billionaire and black single mom raising three kids in a Housing and Urban Development house are exactly equal. However, if you don’t consistently show up at the polls, no politician will ever care about you. And if they don’t care about you, they’ll never do a thing for you. Right now, black people and their vote are the only force that has not yet been brought to bear in our evenly divided, already voting electorate. And that means black people are not only strong but they have power. Sure it’s easy to say,“I don’t see anyone on the ballot worth voting for.” However, I can promise you that none of us go dancing to the polls thinking,“Oh, these are just the people I’ve always dreamed of voting for.” Most of the time, I vote for the lesser of two evils, which means I still end up voting for evil. However, to stay home and do nothing results in exactly that: nothing. In Alabama, the whole country just got a glimpse of the unbelievable power black people, especially black women, can wield. In the end, all the marches, sit-downs, lie-downs, shoutdowns and throw-downs don’t mean squat if you can’t also say,“I’ll see you at the polls,” and then do just that. Get registered. Go vote. Be the power. Madonna Laws-Lowell • Crestwood

Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON Editorial Page Editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382 KEVIN HORRIGAN Deputy Editorial Page Editor • khorrigan@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8135

I know that my retirement will make no difference in its cardinal principles, that it will always fight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always fight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisfied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

STLtoday.com/ThePlatform Find us at facebook/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial E-MAIL MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, letters@post-dispatch.com 900 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days.


NEWS

A12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 12.16.2017

4 Palestinians killed in latest Jerusalem fallout clashes

Pence’s Middle East trip will focus on smoothing things over with Egypt

ASSOCIATED PRESS

BY JENNA JOHNSON Washington Post

GAZA CITY, GAZA STRIP •

Four Palestinians were killed by Israeli fire and dozens more wounded along with an Israeli officer in clashes Friday across the West Bank and near Gaza’s border as the fallout continued over President Donald Trump’s announcement last week recognizing Jerusalem as Israel’s capital. Protests in response to Trump’s announcement, which departed from decades of U.S. policy that the fate of Jerusalem should be decided through negotiations, have yet to relent across various Arab and Muslim countries in the region. Following Friday prayers, Palestinians in the West Bank and along the Gaza border set fire to tires and threw rocks at Israeli troops who responded with tear gas and live fire. Gaza Health Ministry spokesman Ashraf al-Kidra said two Palestinians were killed from gunshots to the head. He identified one of the men as Ibrahim Abu Thraya, 29, a disabled man who had both legs amputated. He had taken part in several border skirmishes recently; images on social media show him carrying a Palestinian flag. An additional 82 Palestinians were injured in clashes in several locations along Gaza’s border with Israel, al-Kidra said. Friday’s deaths put to eight the number of Palestinians killed since Trump’s declaration on Dec. 6. The Israel military said thousands of “Palestinian rioters” rolled burning tires and hurled firebombs and rocks at security forces, who responded with tear gas and also “fired selectively toward main instigators.”

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Israeli soldiers detain a Palestinian boy Friday during clashes at a protest in the West Bank city of Hebron against U.S. President Donald Trump’s decision to recognize Jerusalem as the capital of Israel.

East Jerusalem is home to sensitive Jewish, Muslim and Christian holy sites and the fate of the territory is an emotionally charged issue at the heart of the conflict. The Palestinians seek east Jerusalem, captured by Israel in the 1967 Mideast war from Jordan, as the capital of their hoped-for state. Israel says the entire city, including east Jerusalem, is its eternal capital. Palestinians were infuriated by Trump’s announcement because they saw it as siding with Israel on the most sensitive issue in the conflict. Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas has said Trump’s move disqualified the U.S. from continuing in its role as the traditional mediator of peace talks. Trump said his decision merely recognizes the reality that Jerusalem already serves as Israel’s capital and is not meant to prejudge the final borders of the city.

U.N. HELP SOUGHT Meanwhile, Turkey’s president said Muslim nations would ask the United Nations for an “annulment” of Trump’s decision to recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital. Recep Tayyip Erdogan says the initiative would start at the U.N. Security Council and if it’s “vetoed there, we will work within the U.N. General Assembly for the annulment of this unjust and lawless decision.” Erdogan spoke to a rally in the central province of Konya via teleconference on Friday. His comments followed Wednesday’s summit of Muslim and Arab nations — the 57-member Organization of Islamic Cooperation — which declared east Jerusalem the capital of occupied Palestine and urged the world to recognize the state of Palestine. Turkey has been one of the most vocal critics of Trump’s Dec. 6 decision on recognizing Jerusalem.

With Vice President Mike Pence traveling to the Middle East next week, the administration of President Donald Trump wants to convey one message loud and clear: Egypt continues to be an “incredibly important” partner in the region. In a phone call Friday morning with reporters who will travel with Pence next week, senior administration officials kept adding superlatives as they described the United States’ partnership with Egypt, which has been strained after Trump’s decision this month to recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital and to move the U.S. Embassy there. At the time of the announcement, the Egyptian government said that President Abdel Fatah al-Sissi spoke with Trump and “reiterated Egypt’s unwavering position with regard to maintaining the legal status of Jerusalem within the framework of international references and relevant U.N. resolutions.” Many U.S. allies disagreed with Trump’s decision, as no other country has its embassy in Jerusalem, under a long-standing international consensus that the city’s status should be decided in a peace deal between the Israelis and the Palestinians. Several countries have warned that the move could inflame Muslims and disrupt progress toward a peace deal. On Saturday, Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas announced he would not meet with Pence, and the pope of the Egyptian Coptic church, who leads the largest Christian denomination in the Middle East, also canceled his planned meeting in Cairo with the vice presi-

dent. Pence had originally planned to visit Israel first, but he has rearranged his schedule and will now travel first to Cairo, where he is expected to have a bilateral meeting with Sissi on Wednesday. The change was made, an administration official said on Thursday, because in the wake of the Jerusalem decision, the vice president felt it was important to address the entire Muslim and Arab world — and Egypt was a natural venue. Pence will then continue on to Israel for meetings with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Israeli President Reuven Rivlin, and give formal remarks at the Knesset. On his way home, Pence will visit troops at Ramstein Air Base in Germany.

NO CHRISTIAN MEETINGS

When Pence first announced this trip, he had planned to focus heavily on the persecution of Christians and religious minorities in the Middle East. While the vice president will still bring that up in his public remarks and private conversations, aides said Friday that much of his messaging would be focused on the United States’ relationship with Egypt and their partnership to fight terrorism in the Middle East and elsewhere. The vice president does not plan to meet with any Christian groups during the trip or to visit the West Bank city of Bethlehem to visit the Church of the Nativity. The vice president was originally supposed to leave this weekend, but he delayed the trip by three days to remain in Washington in case he is needed to cast a tiebreaking vote on Republican tax legislation.

ELIZABETH GENTRY SAYAD

Pianist, author and cultural icon in St.Louis dies at 83 BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Elizabeth Gentry Sayad was a founder, co-founder, board member, trustee or driving force for many of the St. Louis region’s cultural, historic and academic institutions. Mrs. Sayad, of St. Louis, died Tuesday (Dec. 12, 2017) of congestive heart failure at Barnes-Jewish Hospital. She was Sayad 83. A concert pianist and author, Mrs. Sayad was involved in the founding of the New Music Circle, New City School, Missouri Arts Council, the Ste. Genevieve-based French colonial preservation group Les Amis, the Shepley Music and Arts Pro-

gram at Christ Church Cathedral and other organizations, and served on the boards of others. She received the Missouri Arts Award in 1991 and the Missouri Humanities Award in 2004; and received an honorary doctorate of Arts and Letters from the University of Missouri-St. Louis. The only child of Elizabeth Estes Gentry and William Richard Gentry, Mrs. Sayad “was one of the great forces of St. Louis,” said her son, Gentry Sayad. “This is a woman who has driven boards of directors all over the area. Just the number of things that she did with the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra, the Laumeier Sculpture Park, Opera Theatre of St. Louis, the Repertory Theatre is amazing.” “Elizabeth was a fantastic person,” St. Louis Art Museum Director Brent R. Benjamin

said. “She has been deeply involved here at the Art Museum for most of her life, but in a formal capacity since 1995; she was a commissioner for nine years, and in 2005 was voted an honorary commissioner. She was a constant presence, and a largerthan-life personality.” Benjamin noted that one of her ancestors, Gen. Richard Gentry, was painted by George Caleb Bingham; a promised gift from Mrs. Sayad and her son, it’s on display at the museum. “She was a great lover and advocate of the arts in general. Her Christmas party was the invitation of the season; she always sat at the piano and played Christmas carols.” Mrs. Sayad was a seventhgeneration Missourian, and wellinformed on the early history of the region, particularly the French settlements of the Mis-

OBITUARIES

Bertel, Joseph A., Sr. - St. Louis Cline, Lois L. - St. Louis

Bertel, Joseph A., Sr.

sissippi Valley. “We have a long history of family in St. Louis,” her son said. Post Road and Long Road were named for Mrs. Sayad’s grandfathers. The family donated what is now Gentry Park and the Payne-Gentry House to the city of Bridgeton. Said Emily Rauh Pulitzer, who worked with Mrs. Sayad often: “She was a force in the founding and early days of the New Music Circle, when there wasn’t much other new music presented in St. Louis. She was very hospitable, outgoing and generous.” Gentry Sayad said that his mother and late father, Homer E. Sayad, were “a team” in many of their endeavors. One of those was the founding of the Shepley Music and Arts Program at Christ Church Cathedral. William “Pat” Partridge, canon precentor at the Cathedral, said,

Celebrations of Life

Cook, Mike - Granite City, IL Rockfield Tunstall, Joan Annette - Maryland Heights

Young, Stewart A.

68, 12/13/17: Vis 12/18, 4-8 pm, Hutchens-Stygar, 5987 Mid Riv- 72, Dec 14, 2017. Services: Visitation Basler Funeral Home in ers Mall Dr., St Chas., Mass 10 am 12/19 St Joseph Catholic Ste. Genevieve, Sun. 12/17 12pm, with service at 2pm. Burial Church 1355 Motherhead Rd, 63304 hutchensfuneralhomes.com Mon., 12/18 at Valle Spring Cemetery at 10:30am

Cline, Lois L.

(nee Petrie), on Monday, 12/11/2017. Funeral from Kutis South Co., 5255 Lemay Ferry, on Monday, 12/18, 9 a.m. for 9:30 Mass at St. Francis of Assisi. Interment J.B. Visitation Sunday, 3-7 pm.

“What we have once enjoyed, we can never lose. All that we love deeply becomes part of us.” HELEN KELLER

“They wanted to open the doors to the Cathedral to welcome and support young talent.” He added, “Elizabeth was a very forward-thinking dynamo of energy; she knew everybody, and everybody knew her. She knew how to lead, always for something good.” In addition to her son, of Shanghai, China, Mrs. Sayad is survived by her daughter, Helene Elizabeth Todd Sayad of St. Louis, and two granddaughters. A funeral will be held at 3 p.m. Mondayat the Church of St. Michael and St. George, 6345 Wydown Boulevard; a reception will follow at the St. Louis Woman’s Club, 4600 Lindell Boulevard. Burial will be private. Sarah Bryan Miller • 314-340-8249 Classical music critic @sbmillermusic on Twitter sbmiller@post-dispatch.com

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Weston, Valentine Kulegian - St. Charles Young, Stewart A. - Valley Park, formerly of Ste. Genevieve

Florists Dierbergs Florist

Order 24 Hours 314-692-2000 or 800-844-6007 Dierbergs.com

Schnucks Florist 65 Metro Locations 314-997-2444; 800-286-9557

Cook, Mike

Wed., Dec. 13, 2017. Services: Visitation Sun., Dec. 17, 4-8 p.m., Unity Baptist Ch., 2500 St Clair Ave., Granite City and Mon. 9 a.m. until Service at 10:30 a.m. Please wear Stl Cardinals red.

Rockfield Tunstall, Joan Annette

56, of Maryland Heights, Dec. 13, 2017. Services: 3950 Baue W. Clay St. Visitation Sun., Dec. 17th 4 - 8 p.m; Service Mon., Dec. 18th 10 a.m. Visit Baue.com

Weston, Valentine Kulegian

88, of St. Charles, MO. December 12, 2017. Alternative Funeral & Cremation Services. 636-498-5300. Alternativefuneralcremation.com

Beautiful Memorials At Schnucks Florist & Gifts, our experienced staff of floral designers is dedicated to the highest level of personal service.

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12.16.2017 • Saturday • M 1

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Honda

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

SATURDAY • 12.16.2017 • B

OZUNA CHECKS IN

New left fielder and Cards’ Fowler have a bond in Bonds BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

If the Cardinals have invigorated the middle of their lineup as they imagine with the addition of Marcell Ozuna and possible relocation of Dexter Fowler, then they will have also turned a home run king into a soothsayer. Barry Bonds said it would happen. Ozuna, the two-time All-Star the Cardinals acquired this week from the Miami Marlins, described Friday how Bonds informed his approach at the plate and ignited his career. The words he used – “patience” and “right pitch to hit” – are the same used by another hitter in the Cardinals clubhouse Bonds has advised. Ozuna called Bonds a mentor. Fowler calls Bonds a mentor. Bonds even whispered the same prediction to the two hitters when working with them. “He said I’d hit in the middle of the order, like him,” Fowler said this past season. “Barry did talk to me about being a middle order-type hitter, a 3-4-5 hitter,” Ozuna said. “Barry Bonds is someone that I really relied on, helping me, and to take that learning to a deeper level.” For the first time since the fiveplayer trade became official Thursday, Ozuna spoke to the St. Louis media Friday during an

In 2016, Miami Marlins hitting coach Barry Bonds celebrates with Marcell Ozuna after an Ozuna home run.

See CARDINALS • Page B2

Carlos Martinez and Marcell Ozuna pose for a picture during Ozuna’s birthday party on Nov. 12. The photo is from Martinez’s Instagram account.

Ozuna and Martinez should make quite a pair BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Marcell Ozuna and Carlos Martinez were dressed impeccably and confidently, appearing as stars of their sport. If their sport was shuffleboard.

Ozuna was draped in this floral, Florida-like buttondown, featuring fuchsia petals and green leaves. Martinez’s shirt looked like wallpaper from a Honolulu living room in 1973. Both men wore white shorts. Ozuna wore a fedora. But these outfits were so out-there, they made for a fun, carefree look

ASSOCIATED PRESS

See HOCHMAN • Page B3

Blues’ struggles on offense don’t seem to have quick fix

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Longhorns hope Herman knows path back to glory

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Blues left winger Alexander Steen tries to score against Tampa Bay Lightning goaltender Andrei Vasilevskiy in Tuesday’s game at Scottrade Center.

Texas coach Tom Herman watches his team before a game against Oklahoma on Oct. 14 in Dallas. The first-year coach has guided the Longhorns to a 6-6 record.

Slump has led to a total of four goals in 3 games

After .500 season, Texas faces Mizzou on Dec. 27

BY TOM TIMMERMANN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The question for Blues forward Alexander Steen was about the problems the team is having scoring lately. “How long have you got?” he replied. “There’s a lot of things to talk about.” That there are. It’s not just one thing that has beset the Blues’ offense right now, as they came within six minutes on Thursday of suffering back-to-back shutouts for the first time in more than

> 6 p.m. Saturday vs. Jets, FSM

three seasons. (The last time they were shut out back-to-back at home was the 2007-08 season.) Sure, they need to get more bodies in front of the net, for rebounds and screens and tips, but they also need to improve a sluggish power play and get better on basic elements such as shooting the puck in the net when presented the opportunity. “When you’re not scoring goals, all of it is a factor,” coach Mike Yeo said. “You look at our rush play right now, I don’t See BLUES • Page B3

BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

When he gathered his new players for their first team meeting, Texas Longhorns football coach Tom Herman took a survey — and got a dose of reality in return. “I said, ‘Raise your hand if you’ve been on a winning Texas football team,’” Herman said months later. Only three hands went up. Herman understood he was in for a

> Texas Bowl: 8p.m., Dec. 27. vs. Texas, ESPN

challenge when he took over the storied program, but those three arms put a visual to the Longhorns’ struggles. Before Herman arrived from the University of Houston, Texas had gone 6-7, 5-7 and 5-7 the three previous seasons under ousted coach Charlie Strong. Texas was 8-5 in 2013, Mack Brown’s final season before Strong became the wrong coach at the wrong time to revive a program some figured was too big to fail. They, too, were wrong. See BOWL • Page B4

SPORTS

1 M


SPORTS

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Saturday 12/16 vs. Jets 6 p.m. FSM

Sunday 12/17 at Jets 5 p.m. FSM

Wednesday 12/20 at Flames 8:30 p.m. FSM

Thursday 12/21 at Oilers 8 p.m. FSM

SLU men’s basketball • slubillikens.com | 314-977-4758 Saturday 12/16 vs. Oregon State (Portland), 9:30 p.m., Pac-12 Net.

Tuesday 12/19 vs. Campbell 7:30 p.m.

Friday 12/22 vs. SEMO 6 p.m. FSM

Saturday 12/30 at La Salle 1 p.m.

Mizzou • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Football

Men’s basketball

Wednesday 12/27 Texas Bowl vs. Texas 8 p.m., ESPN

Saturday 12/16 vs. North Florida 7:30 p.m. SEC Network

Tuesday 12/19 vs. S.F. Austin 8 p.m. ESPNU

Saturday 12/23 vs. Illinois (Scottrade) 7 p.m., ESPN2

Illinois men’s basketball • fightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Saturday 12/16 vs. New Mexico St. (Chicago) 7 p.m., BTN

Saturday 12/23 vs. Missouri (Scottrade) 7 p.m., ESPN2

Saturday 12/30 Wednesday 1/3 vs. Grand Canyon at Minnesota 8 p.m. 3 p.m. BTN

OTHER EVENTS MAJOR ARENA SOCCER • St. Louis Ambush home games Sun. 12/17: vs. Cedar Rapids, 3:05 p.m. Sun. 12/31: vs. Florida, 2:05 p.m. FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

ON THE AIR SATURDAY

BASKETBALL 11 a.m. College: Butler vs. Purdue, KTVI (2) 11 a.m. College: Seton Hall at Rutgers, BTN College: Louisville vs. Memphis, ESPN2 11 a.m. 11 a.m. College: UNC-Greensboro at North Carolina State, FSM 11 a.m. College: Miami at George Washington, CBSSN 11 a.m. College: Detroit vs. Michigan, ESPNU 11:30 a.m. College: Syracuse at Georgetown, KMOV (4) 12 p.m. College: Stephen F. Austin State at LSU, SEC Network 1 p.m. College: Drake vs. Iowa, BTN 1 p.m. College: Virginia Tech at Kentucky, ESPN2 1 p.m. College: Northwestern at DePaul, FS1 1 p.m. College: Oklahoma State vs. Florida State, FS2 1 p.m. College: Loyola (Chicago) at Wisconsin-Milwaukee, FSM Plus 1 p.m. College: East Tennessee State at Xavier, FSM 1:30 p.m. College: Indiana vs. Notre Dame, KTVI (2) 1:30 p.m. College: Michigan State vs. Oakland, ESPNU 2 p.m. College: Georgia at Massachusetts, NBCSN 2 p.m. College women: Northwestern at Missouri St., KMOV (DT-4.3, Charter 181) 2:30 p.m. College: Cincinnati at UCLA, KMOV (4) 2:30 p.m. College: Illinois State at Mississippi, SEC Network 3 p.m. College: Oklahoma vs. Wichita State, ESPN2 3 p.m. College: Loyola-Chicago at Wisconsin-Milwaukee, FSM 3:30 p.m. College: Florida vs. Clemson, FS2 College: Appalachian State at Ohio State, BTN 5 p.m. 5 p.m. College: Middle Tennessee State vs. Auburn, SEC Network 5 p.m. College: Oregon at Fresno State, CBSSN 6:30 p.m. NBA: Thunder at Knicks, NBA College: Illinois vs. New Mexico State in Chicago, BTN, KFNS (590 AM) 7 p.m. 7 p.m. College: Kansas at Nebraska, FS1 7 p.m. College: Arizona at New Mexico, CBSSN 7:30 p.m. College: Missouri vs. North Florida, SEC Network, KTRS (550 AM) 8 p.m. NBA: Celtics at Grizzlies, FSM Plus 9:30 p.m. College: St. Louis U. vs. Oregon St., Pac-12 Networks, WXOS (101.1 FM) 10 p.m. College: Utah at BYU, ESPN2 BOXING 8:40 p.m. Middleweights: David Lemieux vs. Billy Joe Saunders, HBO FOOTBALL Celebration Bowl: North Carolina A&T vs. Grambling State, KDNL (30) 11 a.m. 12 p.m. New Orleans Bowl: Troy vs. North Texas, ESPN 1:30 p.m. Cure Bowl: Western Kentucky vs. Georgia State, CBSSN 2:30 p.m. Las Vegas Bowl: Boise State vs. Oregon, KDNL (30) 3:20 p.m. NFL: Bears at Lions, NFL Network 3:30 p.m. New Mexico Bowl: Marshall vs. Colorado State, ESPN 3:30 p.m. FCS semifinal: South Dakota State at James Madison, ESPNU Division II championship: Texas A&M-Commerce vs. West Florida, ESPN2 5 p.m. 7 p.m. Camellia Bowl: Middle Tennessee State vs. Arkansas State, ESPN 7:25 p.m. NFL: Chargers at Chiefs, NFL Network, KMOX (1120 AM) GOLF 10 a.m. Father/Son Challenge, Day 1, GOLF 9 p.m. Golf Asian Tour: Indonesian Masters, GOLF HOCKEY 2:30 p.m. QMJHL: Acadie-Bathurst at Moncton, NHL Network 6 p.m. Blues vs. Jets, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) 6 p.m. Canadiens vs. Senators, NBCSN MIXED MARTIAL ARTS UFC Fight Night: Lawler vs. Dos Anjos — Prelims, FS1 4 p.m. 7 p.m. UFC Fight Night: Lawler vs. Dos Anjos, KTVI (2) OLYMPICS 1:30 p.m. U.S. Olympic Trials Short Track Speed Skating: Men’s and women’s 500, KSDK (5) 9 p.m. U.S. Olympic Trials Curling: Mixed doubles semifinal, NBCSN RODEO National finals, CBSSN 9 p.m. SOCCER 6:25 a.m. English Premier League: Leicester City vs. Crystal Palace, NBCSN 8:30 a.m. Bundesliga: Stuttgart vs. Bayern Munich, FS1 8:30 a.m. Bundesliga: Eintracht Frankfurt vs. Schalke, FS2 8:55 a.m. English Premier League: Chelsea vs. Southampton, NBCSN 9 a.m. English Premier League: Arsenal vs. Newcastle United, CNBC 11:30 a.m. EnglishPremierLeague: Manchester City vs. Tottenham Hotspur, KSDK (5) VOLLEYBALL 8 p.m. NCAA final: Teams TBA, ESPN2

SUNDAY’S HIGHLIGHTS

BASKETBALL 11 a.m. College women: Eastern Washington at Purdue, BTN 11:30 a.m. College women: Florida State at Texas, FS1 12 p.m. College women: Georgia Tech at Georgia, SEC Network 1:30 p.m. College: Stony Brook at Providence, FS1 2 p.m. College: North Carolina at Tennessee, ESPN 2 p.m. College women: Louisville at Kentucky, SEC Network 3 p.m. College women: Ohio State vs. Cincinnati, ESPN2 FOOTBALL 12 p.m. NFL: Bengals at Vikings, KMOV (4) 12 p.m. NFL: Packers at Panthers, KTVI (2) 3:25 p.m. NFL: Patriots at Steelers, KMOV (4) 7:30 p.m. NFL: Cowboys at Raiders, KSDK (5), KFNS (590 AM), WXOS (101.1 FM) HOCKEY 5 p.m. Blues at Jets, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM)

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M 1 • SATUrDAy • 12.16.2017

Ozuna and Fowler both studied under Bonds CARDINALS • FROM B1

introductory conference call arranged by the Cardinals. Ozuna spoke mostly in Spanish — an effusive answer about borrowing Ichiro Suzuki’s bats came in English — and had his answers translated by Cardinals assistant general manager Moises Rodriguez. At the beginning of the half-hour conversation, Ozuna described how “nervous” he was when he found out about the trade, and how there was “some anxiety” because the deal would mean leaving his family’s home in Miami for half of the year. Midway through he had a new description for the move. “It’s almost like a blessing that I landed here,” Ozuna said. The 27-year-old left fielder has never played for a winning team in five seasons in the majors. The closest he came was the Marlins’ 79-win team in 2016, the year Bonds was the hitting coach. This past year, the Marlins had a fleeting appearance in the wildcard race propelled by the power of Giancarlo Stanton’s 59 homers and Ozuna’s breakout. Ozuna set career highs across the back of his baseball card, from 159 games played to 93 runs scored, .312 average to a .548 slugging percentage, 37 homers to a 5.8 Wins Above Replacement. “From the day I first saw him in the Dominican at 16 years old, I really felt he had the skill set to be successful at the major-league level,” said Michael Hill, the Marlins’ president of baseball operations. “An offensive force. I don’t think you sell him short in any stretch of the imagination. We knew from day one what he was capable of doing, what he was capable of becoming.” The Marlins signed Ozuna as an international amateur for a $49,000 bonus. The Cardinals are unsure how much they scouted him at the time, but another team described him as a player with “special bat speed” and “present raw power.” That meant he had it at the present, as a teen, not projected power. At 22, Ozuna debuted in the majors and hit three homers. He followed with 23 in 2014, but as a regular in 2015 that total sank to 10 and not once in his first three seasons did his on-base percentage tiptoe past .317. When Bonds was hired to be the Marlins’ hitting coach, he arrived at his new locker to find a gift from owner Jeffrey Loria, according to The Sun-Sentinel: A bobblehead of Ozuna. “He was my project when I went there,” Bonds told the paper. “(Loria) said, ‘He’s yours.’ I said, ‘I guarantee you, he won’t get worse.’” Ozuna made the All-Star team

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Marcell Ozuna (right) says he learned a lot from Barry Bonds (left) when Bonds was the hitting coach of the Miami Marlins.

each of the next two seasons, and his on-base percentage scaled from .321 in 2016 to .376 this past season. There were eight players in the National League with at least 35 home runs, but only four had walk rates greater than 9 percent and managed a strikeout rate of 22 percent or less. Three of them — Joey Votto, Charlie Blackmon and Nolan Arenado — finished in the top five for the MVP voting. The fourth was Ozuna. During the conference call Friday, Ozuna described how his offseason work prepped him for the strong 2017, and how that regimen was inspired by what Bonds taught him. Ozuna detailed how “my focus was a little more sharp this year and I attribute (that) to a lot of the work he did leading up to that. That really was critical.” That got him ready for the plate, and at the plate Bonds’ words still echoed in his ear. “Patience. Patience,” Ozuna recalled. “Patience definitely. And how to look for a pitch that he could handle.” That is the same mantra Fowler repeated when asked about Bonds. It is also the same trait that Bonds told Fowler, a career leadoff hitter, would serve him well as he matured into a middle-order hitter, as his power manifested and he would hit third or cleanup. Fowler started working with Bonds before 2014, and since he’s had a .368 onbase percentage and his slugging has risen every year, from .399 in 2014 to .447 as a Cub in 2016 to a

career-best .488 in his first season with the Cardinals. This past summer, moved out of the leadoff spot, Fowler had a .808 OPS in the No. 3 spot. In 18 games at cleanup, Fowler hit .333 with a .450 slugging percentage and a .990 OPS. No hitter in the National League was more productive than Ozuna in the cleanup spot, where he had a .908 OPS and a .536 slugging percentage. The Cardinals will consider some combination of Ozuna, Fowler and Tommy Pham in the middle of the order if Fowler isn’t the leadoff hitter. It could be just as Bonds predicted. Ozuna stressed a few times Friday that he wasn’t preoccupied with where he would hit for his new team. He also wasn’t concerned with what number he might wear. Ozuna had No. 13 for the Marlins, but that’s Matt Carpenter’s in St. Louis, so the new left fielder suggested he might go with No. 23 or some number that represented a child’s birthday. The number he’ll wear is secondary to the numbers he’s expected to produce. When talking about the fans, Ozuna offered one measure he’d go by, adding on in Spanish to an answer he had given. Rodriguez translated: “He’s going to give them a reason to smile.”

Angels get Cozart • After spending his entire career at shortstop in Cincinnati, Zack Cozart was willing to switch positions for the chance to join the Angels’ promising lineup. The All-Star infielder agreed to a $38 million, three-year contract and agreed to play third base in an infield packed with veteran talent. Cozart gets $12,666,000 next season and $12,667,000 in each of the final two years of the deal.

Martin returns from Japan • The Texas Rangers have finalized Chris Martin’s $4 million, two-year contract after the homegrown pitcher spent the past two seasons in Japan. The 31-year-old righthander had the lowest ERA (1.12) and opponents’ batting average (.154) in the Japanese leagues during the 2016-17 seasons. The 6-foot-8 reliever will make $1.75 million next season and $2.25 million in 2019.

Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com

MLB NOTEBOOK Phillies acquire Santana Carlos Santana is bringing his big bat and postseason experience to the Philadelphia Phillies. The 31-year-old first baseman became the first of the offseason’s big-name free agents to find a new home, agreeing Friday to a $60 million, three-year contract with the Phillies, according to two people familiar with the deal. Santana became the first to reach a deal among the nine free agents who last month rejected $17.4 million qualifying offers from their former teams. Philadelphia also traded shortstop Freddy Galvis to San Diego for minor league pitcher Enyel De Los Santos, and finalized two-year deals with relievers Tommy Hunter ($18 million) and Pat Neshek ($16.25 million). Santana hit 23 home runs with 79 RBIs for Cleveland, where he spent all eight of his big league seasons. He started as a catcher in 2010 and shifted to first base in 2015.

Rockies sign pitchers • Colorado finalized $27 million, three-year contracts with righthander Bryan Shaw and lefty Jake McGee in hope of fortifying its bullpen. Shaw, 30, was 4-6 with three saves and a 3.52 ERA last season for Cleveland. McGee was 0-2 with three saves and a 3.61 ERA this year. Shaw gets salaries of $7.5 million next year, $8.5 million in 2019 and $9 million in 2020, and the Rockies have a $9 million option for 2021. McGee receives $7 million next year, $8.5 million in 2019 and $9.5 million in 2020.

Rondon, Rodney sign • Reliever Hector Rondon has agreed to an $8.5 million, two-year contract with the World Series champion Houston Astros. The 29-year-old righthander gets $4 million next year and $4.5 million in 2019. He spent the last five years with the Cubs, posting 77 saves. Also, Minnesota finalized a $4.5 million, one-year contract with righthanded reliever Fernando Rodney. Associated Press

DIGEST Rose leads by one stroke at Indonesian Masters Justin Rose completed the final two holes of his second round early Saturday for a 3-under 69 and a one-stroke lead at the Indonesian Masters in Jakarta. Rose, who had a first-round 62, was among a quarter of the field forced off the Royale Jakarta Golf Club course after weather delays on Friday. The Englishman, who bogeyed his last hole, had a two-round total of 13-under 131. Kiradech Aphibarnrat, who completed his 64 on Friday, was in second place. Brandt Snedeker withdrew with apparent heat exhaustion Friday on the 11th hole of the second round. Ranked 51st in the world, he flew to Jakarta looking to move inside the top 50 by the end of the year and ensure a spot in next year’s Masters. (AP)

Ambush seek first win • The Major Arena Soccer League’s St. Louis Ambush (0-7) will kick off a busy weekend with a 7:05 p.m. Saturday game in Milwaukee against the 7-0 Wave. On Sunday at 3:05 p.m., the Ambush host the Cedar Rapids Rampage at Family Arena. The Rampage (4-3) will host the Kansas City Comets on Saturday night. The Ambush have been more competitive in recent weeks, losing 5-4 on the road against defending league champion Baltimore and falling 4-3 in overtime to visiting Milwaukee. (Joe Lyons) Illini receiver to transfer • Illinois wide receiver Dominic Thieman announced his decision to transfer, becoming the ninth scholarship player to do so since the season ended. Thieman’s departure, which he disclosed on social media, leaves the Illini little experience at the position.

The sophomore, who signed under former coach Bill Cubit, was sixth on the team with 11 catches for 144 yards. Junior Sam Mays announced his intention to transfer two weeks ago (Chicago Tribune) Brazil soccer head suspended • Marco Polo del Nero was suspended as president of Brazil’s soccer confederation, two years after he was indicted in the United States on charges of wire fraud conspiracy and money laundering conspiracy. FIFA said Del Nero was under an ethics investigation and has been banned for 90 days from all soccer activities. Del Nero fled Zurich in May 2015 when other FIFA colleagues were arrested. They included Jose Maria Marin, who was at the time the head of the Brazilian confederation, known as the CBF. Marin and two other South American soccer officials have been on trial in New York. (AP)


SPORTS

12.16.2017 • Saturday • M 1

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • B3

BLUES NOTEBOOK

Bouwmeester ruled out for weekend Pietrangelo could return Sunday, but Gunnarsson’s status is now unclear BY TOM TIMMERMANN St. Louis Post-dispatch

Every day seems to be a new adventure for the Blues. On Friday, there were increasing signs that Alex Pietrangelo would be back on Sunday, confirmation that Jay Bouwmeester would miss the weekend and uncertainty about the status of a third defenseman, Carl Gunnarsson. Just another day at Scottrade Center. The Blues put Bouwmeester on injured reserve Friday morning with an unspecified injury, ruling him out for the weekend games with Winnipeg. They didn’t call up a defenseman to replace him, instead bringing back forward Sammy Blais, who continues to bounce back and forth between St. Louis and San Antonio. Unclear is the status of Gunnarsson, who left

practice early after being drilled in the right leg by a shot by Jordan Schmaltz in a drill. Gunnarsson fell to the ice, got up on his own and went to the bench with little or no pressure on his leg. “We’ll see in the morning,” Blues coach Mike Yeo said. “We’re hopeful he’ll be ready to go, but obviously we don’t know how he’ll feel tomorrow.” With Gunnarsson, the Blues have six healthy defensemen, but if he can’t go, they’ll have to call someone in. The fact that the Blues didn’t call up a defenseman in response to Bouwmeester’s injury, especially with back-to-back games looming, speaks to a confidence that Pietrangelo will be able to play Sunday, the first day he’s able to come off IR. “I think he looks good,” Yeo said. “He felt better

today. Today was a step and we’ll see how he feels tomorrow. Growing more confident, that’s for sure.” The Blues may have called Blais up because of uncertainty with the status of some of their forwards. Dmitrij Jaskin took a hard hit Thursday night, though he finished the game. Jaskin, along with Kyle Brodziak and Robert Bortuzzo, didn’t practice Friday. “They’re a little dinged up,” Yeo said. “We’ll go into the morning and hopeful they’ll be players for us.”

HUTTON’S RETURN

Also back Friday was backup goalie Carter Hutton, who came off injured reserve. Jordan Binnington was sent back to Providence of the AHL. Hutton took a puck to the foot the morning of Dec. 8, and he hasn’t played since he came in

for a few minutes while Jake Allen left the ice for an equipment repair Dec. 5. He hasn’t gotten significant time since Dec. 1. Yeo said Hutton would get one of the two games this weekend with Winnipeg but wouldn’t say which. Hutton’s stats favor his play on the road. Allen has started seven consecutive games, his longest run of the season. “I feel really good actually,” Hutton said. “A few days off, obviously, at the start I couldn’t do much with my foot, then I was able to get some good workouts in. Our strength coach and I found a lot of ways to get extra fitness in that you can’t really do sometimes when you’re playing all the time. I feel like I never missed a beat here.” Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Blues defenseman Jay Bouwmeester (19) appeared close to returning, then had to step back.

BLUES VS. JETS When, where • 6 p.m. Saturday, Scottrade Center TV, radio • Fox Sports Midwest, KMOX (1120 AM) About the Jets • Winnipeg (18-9-5) has cooled off after a torrid start. The Jets are 1-3-1 in their last five outings, most recently a 5-1 loss Thursday to Chicago. They have plenty of firepower with four players in double figures in goals: Nikolaj Ehlers and Patrik Laine have 15 goals apiece, followed by Mark Scheifele (14) and Kyle Connor (10). Ehlers has scored a goal in four consecutive games. The playmaker is forward Blake Wheeler, who is seventh in the NHL in points (38) on eight goals and 30 assists. Defenseman Dustin Byfuglien is out with a lower-body injury. The Jets rank third in power-play efficiency (26.3 percent). Jim Thomas

Blues are trying to solve their offensive problems BLUES • FROM B1

think we’re fast enough, I don’t think we’re direct enough. I look at our offensive zone play, we’ve got guys at the net, we’re not finding ways to create those shot opportunities, those second-chance opportunities. Too many shots are getting blocked and there’s a little too much one and done in the offensive zone, too. I feel like when we’re on top of our game we’ve got more zone time and are more dangerous because of that.” The Blues are not on top of their game right now, though in the pre-Christmas stretch run that starts Saturday, it would be advantageous to them to find it. The Blues start a backto-back, home-and-home series with Winnipeg, one of their top pursuers in the Central Division, on Saturday at Scottrade Center and then in Manitoba on Sunday. “These are going to be two huge games for us,” Steen said. “I’m pretty sure it’s going to look like playoff hockey out there.” What the Blues need most is goals. The defense has been good, though not great, over the past few games, but the offense has been neither. As much as the team has done to create chances, they have one goal total over the past two games and four in the past three, which includes three

in an overtime game against Buffalo, one of the league’s worst defenses. Among the many culprits, one that stands out is the power play. The Blues have gone 0 for 11 over the past four games and they have turned those twominute breaks into a good time to get something at the concession stand because you can be reasonably sure you won’t miss much. “I think the biggest thing right now is special teams for us,” Steen said. “The last two games, if our special teams had been a little bit more crisp, we can walk away with two wins in those two games. I think our penalty kill has been pretty consistent throughout the year; we’ve had a little lull every once in a while in that, too. I think that’s an area we feel like we can start winning games and it’s actually cost us the last two games. “The biggest thing and easiest thing to get from a power play is the momentum. To say you’re going to go out and score two out of four power plays is harder. That’s the ultimate goal, to have a high percentage power play. You at the very least want to create a larger momentum swing than we have been.” That four-game run with no goals on the power play coincides with Jaden Schwartz being out of the lineup, as well as Alex Pietrangelo, whom the team

Martinez, Ozuna together now HOCHMAN • FROM B1

– and their smiles were as bright as their shirts. The photo on Instagram was from Nov. 12 — Ozuna’s 27th birthday — and at the time, the two were just buddies from National League teams. A month later, they’re the smiling faces of a franchise — the best pitcher and the best hitter on the St. Louis Cardinals. It was a fitting snapshot of their personalities and promise. Two proud ballplayers from the Dominican Republic, born 10 months apart, now linked together in this new era of the Car-

dinals. To catch the Cubs, they needed “The Big Bear.” “I’m excited, no doubt about it,” Ozuna said Friday during a teleconference, his Spanish translated by Cards assistant general manager Moises Rodriguez. “I look at what I had in Miami, where I was a big part of the lineup, and Jose Fernandez, who was also a good friend of mine, was one of the more important pitchers on that team. I view that situation as something similar — I’ve got a friend that’s really going to contribute on the pitching side, and I’ll do the same offensively.” In St. Louis, we know all too well how a death can

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Blues forward Vladimir Sobotka can’t get the puck past Anaheim Ducks goalie John Gibson on Thursday night.

hopes to have back Sunday. During this time, Yeo and his staff have thrown together a variety of combinations, none of which has had much success. On Friday, they ran drills designed to emphasize getting to the front of the net and then worked on the power play. One unit consisted of Vladimir Tarasenko, Colton Parayko, Paul Stastny, Brayden Schenn and Steen. The other had Vladimir Sobotka, Jordan Schmaltz, Ivan Barbashev, Patrik Berglund and Vince Dunn. And while both units did work on the ice, the quintets also huddled with Yeo

and associate head coach Craig Berube to discuss strategies. “Sometimes you can put three guys together and the chemistry explodes,” Steen said. “Sometimes it takes a little bit of talking and working at it and then you get it. … It’s been hard because, with injuries and everything else that’s gone on with the team, it’s happened with little practice time. It’s been ‘change it on the go.’ Today was a good day. We actually got out there and got to work on it. Biggest of all was discuss it and start communicating about what we want to accomplish and how we

want our power play to flow. Hopefully we’ll see a big improvement there.” The Blues have been down this road before. In early December, they dropped three in a row and four out of five as they scored two goals or less in each of the four losses. They were able to right that ship briefly, but now with three key players out — Schwartz, Pietrangelo and Jay Bouwmeester — getting back on the right path is a bit trickier. “I felt like the last one, there wasn’t necessarily as much effort and focus on our team game as there’s been in this one,”

detour dreams. Top prospect Oscar Taveras was supposed to be the Cards’ impact hitter — and three years after his death, the Cards traded for an impact hitter, Ozuna, a friend of Oscar’s from the old days. But one wonders how the Marlins’ fate would’ve changed if Fernandez never went on that boat. The young ace died in the fall of 2016. He was 24. Who knows, maybe with Fernandez, the Marlins would’ve been contenders in 2017. And Miami might’ve kept Ozuna and Giancarlo Stanton. But now, Ozuna is a St. Louis Cardinal, coming to town with a résumé sparkling with a Silver Slugger,

Gold Glove, All-Star selection … but no playoff appearances. “The Cardinals are competitors, grinders, all the way to end — they always seem to be in the mix,” said Ozuna, who hit 37 homers last season. “I’m very excited to be able to join that. … It’s almost like a blessing that I landed there because of the winning and the position the Cardinals are always in to compete for a playoff berth.” Carlos and Marcell. They first met in 2010, Ozuna said. Spring training. The Cards and Marlins, of course, share a complex in Florida. Ozuna was suffering from a wrist injury at the time. They hit it off, stayed in touch.

“We respect each other,” Ozuna said. “We try to help each other with professional tips.” Earlier in November, the two hung out in Boston. It was for a Pedro Martinez charity event. The mingled with the likes of Pedro and David Ortiz and Luis Severino, too. Later in the month, Martinez of course attended the big birthday celebration at Ozuna’s home. And the All-Star Game, you may recall, was in Miami this year. As reported in the Post-Dispatch at the time, Martinez’s locker was wasn’t next to teammate Yadier Molina, as is custom for the midsummer classic. Instead, Martinez’s locker was between the locker of two Marlins stars – Ozuna and Fernandez. Yes, the Marlins preserved the late Fernandez’s locker after his death. So there was the Cardinals’ Carlos, nestled into a special area of this clubhouse, hanging out with his friend Marcell, a teammate for a day. Now they’re teammates for the next two seasons. When Martinez posted the pic on Instagram, some folks naturally commented about how they could be future Cardinals teammates. But Ozuna, at first, didn’t believe the trade talk. He’d heard it before and was still a Marlin. So he tuned it out. For a while anyway.

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Yeo said. “I would say this one is more related to the execution. Just making the plays in a timely fashion. Whether it’s shooting the puck into the net or making the timely pass, whether it’s the play that leads to the next play, we’re not making those plays right now. That for me is a matter of bearing down and executing. The effort has been there; the competitiveness of the players to try and defend and try to do the right thing is there and we just have to do them a little bit better.” Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com

Ozuna said he became nervous about being traded from Miami, the franchise and city that defined his young career — but then he remembered a moment in the past. “Carlos and Yadi had joked around with me — ‘We’re going to bring you to the Cardinals!’” Ozuna recalled. “They’d joke around back and forth. So the nervousness went away when I thought of those little exchanges with Carlos and Yadi. If I’m being traded, at least I’m being traded to guys that I know. The anxiety and nervousness went away.” When you think about the best teams in baseball, they have an A-list pitcher and hitter. The Astros with Justin Verlander and Jose Altuve (and George Springer and Carlos Correa). The Dodgers with Clayton Kershaw and Cody Bellinger (and Justin Turner). The Nationals with Max Scherzer (and Stephen Strasburg) and Bryce Harper (and Anthony Rendon). The Yankees with Luis Severino and Aaron Judge (and now Stanton). Cleveland. Arizona. You get the drift. Well, the Cardinals now have Carlos and Marcell, together again. Benjamin Hochman @hochman on Twitter bhochman@post-dispatch.com


COLLEGE FOOTBALL

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 12.16.2017

Ex-Florida assistant is picked to coach Mizzou offensive line His unit with Gators struggled, but Odom cites SEC experience BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

For the second day in a row, Barry Odom has added to his Missouri football staff with a coach who spent the 2017 season in the Southeastern Conference. Brad Davis is the Tigers’ new offensive line coach after spending the year on Florida’s staff in the same role. Davis, 37, has previously worked as a position coach at North Texas, East Carolina, James Madison and Portland State, serving as run game coordinator or co-offensive coordinator at each spot. Before that he was a graduate assistant at North Carolina and Texas A&M. Davis, originally from Baton Rouge, La., played along the offensive line at Oklahoma from 1999-2002, playing for two Big 12 championship teams and in four bowl games. Davis replaces Glen Elarbee, who left Mizzou last week for the same position at Central Florida, where he’ll work under new head coach Josh Heupel, MU’s offensive coordinator the last two seasons. Davis worked under Florida coach Jim McElwain last season and was not retained under new Gators coach Dan Mullen. Mizzou has not released his salary or contract information. Davis made $301,500 at Florida this year, according to USA Today’s annual salary database for college coaches. The Gators made some progress under Davis this season as he inherited a group with 85 career starts, but the offense struggled as the season unraveled. Florida allowed the most sacks in the SEC (37), sixth-most among Power 5 teams, and 6.6 tackles for loss per game, which ranked 12th in the conference. Right guard Martez Ivey earned second-team All-SEC honors. “I’m very pleased to have Brad and his family join our program,” Odom said. “He’s a tremendous teacher and mentor, and he’s been lights out on the recruiting trail with his approach to building true relationships with kids. Brad has experience in the SEC and he has worked hard to earn a great amount of respect among his peers.” “I’m extremely excited to join Coach Odom and his staff at Miz-

zou and help build on the foundation these guys have already laid,” Davis said. “In playing against these guys this year, I saw a team that played hard, played physical and that enjoyed playing together. With Coach Odom, it was an easy sell, because of his passion for the University of Missouri. “Even from afar, that’s something I’ve always admired about him, not only his commitment to the school and to his kids, but really for advancing the program in any way possible.” As of last week, Odom had planned to have offensive analyst Jon Cooper serve as the team’s interim offensive line coach to prepare for the Dec. 27 Texas Bowl against Texas. On Thursday, Odom hired former Arkansas linebackers coach Vernon Hargreaves to coach the Tigers’ inside linebackers. Odom still must hire an offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach and next month will be allowed to hire another assistant thanks to a new NCAA rule that allows expansion to 10 position coaches. Ex-Vols staffer guilty • Former Tennessee director of football operations Chris Spognardi has pleaded guilty to a charge of official misconduct related to the handling of team travel expenses. Spognardi worked at Tennessee the first three seasons of former coach Butch Jones’ tenure, and his responsibilities included managing cash expenditures for team trips. The charge against Spognardi involved the fabrication of receipts. (AP) Arizona State names coordinator • Arizona State coach Herm Edwards promoted Rob Likens to offensive coordinator, hours after Billy Napier left to take the head coaching job at LouisianaLafayette. Likens was the co-offensive coordinator and wide receivers coach this season under fired head coach Todd Graham. Likens’ new official title is offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach. (AP) Napier hired at La.-Lafayette • Louisiana-Lafayette hired Arizona State offensive coordinator Billy Napier as football coach. Napier succeeds Mark Hudspeth, fired after the Ragin’ Cajuns finished 5-7 this season. On Thursday, Hudspeth joined Mississippi State as associate head coach and tight ends coach. (AP)

BOWL SCHEDULE Bowl

Time

TV

Matchup (line in parenthesis)

Site

New Orleans

noon

ESPN

Troy (-6.5) vs. North Texas

Cure

1:30 p.m.

CBSSN

W. Kentucky (-6.5) vs. Georgia St. Orlando, Fla.

Las Vegas

2:30 p.m. KDNL-30 Boise St. vs. Oregon (-7)

New Mexico

3:30 p.m. ESPN

Marshall vs. Colorado St. (-4.5) Albuquerque, N.M.

Camellia

7 p.m.

ESPN

Ark. St. (-3.5) vs. Middle Tenn. Montgomery, Ala.

6 p.m.

ESPN

Fla. Atlantic (-22) vs. Akron

7 p.m.

ESPN

SMU (-5.5) vs. Louisiana Tech

7 p.m.

ESPN

FIU vs. Temple (-7)

SATURDAY

New Orleans Las Vegas

DEC. 19

Boca Raton

Boca Raton, Fla.

DEC. 20

Frisco

Frisco, Texas

DEC. 21

Gasparilla

St. Petersburg, Fla.

DEC. 22

Bahamas

11:30 a.m. ESPN

UAB vs. Ohio (-8)

Idaho Potato

3 p.m.

ESPN

Wyoming (-1) vs. Central Mich.

Nassau, Bahamas

Birmingham

11 a.m.

ESPN

Texas Tech vs. USF (-2.5)

Birmingham, Ala.

Armed Forces

2:30 p.m. ESPN

San Diego St. (-7) vs. Army

Fort Worth, Texas

Boise, Idaho

DEC. 23

Dollar General 6 p.m.

ESPN

Appalachian St. vs. Toledo (-8)

Mobile, Ala.

ESPN

Fresno St. vs. Houston (-2.5)

Honolulu

Heart of Dallas 12:30 p.m. ESPN

Utah (-6.5) vs. West Virginia

Dallas

Quick Lane

4:15 p.m.

ESPN

Duke (-4) vs. Northern Illinois

Cactus

8 p.m.

ESPN

Kansas St. (-2.5) vs. UCLA

DEC. 24

Hawai’i

7:30 p.m.

DEC. 26

Detroit Phoenix

DEC. 27

Independence 12:30 p.m. ESPN

Florida St. (-15.5) vs. So. Miss. Shreveport, La.

Pinstripe

4:15 p.m.

ESPN

Boston College vs. Iowa (-3)

Foster Farms

7:30 p.m.

KTVI-2

Purdue vs. Arizona (-3.5)

Texas

8 p.m.

ESPN

Missouri (-3) vs. Texas

New York Santa Clara, Calif. Houston

DEC. 28

Military

12:30 p.m. ESPN

Virginia (-1) vs. Navy

Annapolis, Md.

Camping World 4:15 p.m.

ESPN

Va. Tech (-5) vs. Oklahoma St.

Alamo

8 p.m.

ESPN

TCU (-2.5) vs. Stanford

Orlando, Fla.

Holiday

8 p.m.

FS1

Michigan St. (-3) vs. Wash. St.

Belk

noon

ESPN

Wake Forest (-3) vs. Texas A&M Charlotte, N.C.

Sun

2 p.m.

KMOV-4 NC State (-6.5) vs. Arizona St.

Music City

3:30 p.m. ESPN

Kentucky vs. Northwestern (-7.5)

Arizona

4:30 p.m. CBSSN

Utah St. (-4) vs. New Mexico St.

Cotton

7:30 p.m.

ESPN

Ohio St. (-7.5) vs. USC

TaxSlayer

11 a.m.

ESPN

Mississippi St. vs. Louisville (-6.5) Jacksonville

Liberty

11:30 a.m. KDNL-30 Iowa St. vs. Memphis (-3)

Fiesta

3 p.m.

ESPN

Penn St. (-2) vs. Washington

Orange

7 p.m.

ESPN

Wisconsin (-6.5) vs. Miami (Fla.) Miami Gardens

Outback

11 a.m.

ESPN2

Peach

11:30 a.m. ESPN

Citrus

noon

Rose (semi.)

4:10 p.m. ESPN

Oklahoma vs. Georgia (-1.5)

Pasadena, Calif.

Sugar (semi.)

7:45 p.m.

ESPN

Clemson vs. Alabama (-2.5)

New Orleans

ESPN

Semifinal winners

San Antonio, Texas San Diego

DEC. 29

El Paso, Texas Nashville Tucson, Ariz.

Arlington, Texas

DEC. 30

Memphis, Tenn. Glendale, Ariz.

JAN. 1

Michigan (-8.5) vs. South Carolina Tampa, Fla. UCF vs. Auburn (-9.5)

KDNL-30 Notre Dame vs. LSU (-3)

Atlanta Orlando, Fla.

JAN. 8

Championship 7 p.m.

Atlanta

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Texas coach Tom Herman walks the sidelines as Texas plays Oklahoma on Oct. 14 in Dallas.

Since start of 2014 season, Texas is just 22-27 BOWL • FROM B1

The Longhorns had dominated for a decade — Texas averaged 11.2 wins a year from 2001 to 2009 — and were it not for Bob Stoops’ Big 12 dynasty at Oklahoma, Brown’s program would have collected more conference and national hardware during his peak years. But Bevo showed signs of spoiled beef with a 5-7 season in 2010, just a year removed from playing for the BCS national championship. In Brown’s final three years, UT was just 25-14 — a fine record for most programs but far short of the standard for the team in burnt orange. Things only got worse under Strong as those three losing seasons unspooled. Since the start of the 2014 season, Texas is just 22-27. Among current Big 12 teams, only Iowa State (15-33) and Kansas (6-42) have fewer wins over the last four years. As the losses accumulated, the mystique was lost on a generation of potential Texas recruits. Current seniors in high school were in fourth grade the last time Texas won double-digit games. Some blue-chip Texas recruits who normally swarmed to Austin instead headed to upstart Big 12 programs at Baylor or Texas Christian or crossed the state border. “The Texas that they know is a lot different than the Texas that people in my generation know,” Herman said earlier this season. “So it’s our job to show them what Texas is capable of, what Texas has been in the past, and what we’re planning on being again in the future.” After another uninspiring regular-season record, Herman’s 6-6 Longhorns can build

toward a brighter future with a Texas Bowl victory against Missouri (7-5) later this month in Houston. Hailed last year as “the hottest young head coach in the country” by Texas president Gregory Fenves, Herman came to Austin after winning 22 of 26 games in two seasons at Houston, including a 6-0 record against nationally ranked teams. Before that, Herman was Urban Meyer’s offensive coordinator at Ohio State, the man behind the controls of the Buckeyes’ 2014 offense, which captured the national championship. Before Ohio State, Herman’s career followed a nondescript path, with assistant coach stops at Sam Houston State, Texas State, Rice and Iowa State. After playing wide receiver at Cal Lutheran and a year coaching at Texas Lutheran, Herman made his first stop in Austin as a Longhorns grad assistant under Brown in 1999 and 2000. Now he’s making $5 million a year to steer Texas back from a rare but extended time in obscurity. A victory over Mizzou on Dec. 27 at NRG Stadium would give Texas its first winning season in four years, but similar to Barry Odom’s Tigers, the road to Houston is every bit as important, especially the extra bowl practices for their young teams. In a regular season that started with a stunning home loss to Maryland and ended with another home loss to Texas Tech, the Longhorns have played 15 freshmen, including starters at quarterback, running back, receiver, tight end and right tackle. “I’m not going to downplay the importance of just winning a game, but I don’t think one number difference on either side is really going to be a

make or break anything in our program,” Herman said after the matchup was announced. “We’re going to stay the course, and we’re going to continue to develop our players and we’re going to try like heck to win the thing and prepare as such.” Two weeks after Texas’ buzzkill loss to Maryland, the Horns played perhaps their best game, taking USC to the brink in Los Angeles, a 27-24 loss. Herman later said hearing Texas fans congratulate him for the performance made his skin crawl, underscoring a mentality he hoped his players would absorb this season. “Losing is awful,” he said during the season. “It’s awful. It’s not just, ‘Oh, well, we’ll get them next week.’ No, this is like the sky-is-falling-type stuff.” The losing continued, albeit in competitive games against the best teams on Texas’ schedule. After beating bowl teams Iowa State and Kansas State, the Longhorns fell to rival Oklahoma by five and Oklahoma State by three, but behind a stingy defense the Horns held two of the country’s most potent offenses to just three touchdowns. Texas went on to clobber Baylor and Kansas around a loss to TCU, but after beating West Virginia to secure bowl eligibility came the flat performance against Texas Tech. It added up to a 6-6 record, far short of the expectations at Texas, but for a team that’s endured a flood of injuries, including multiple setbacks for quarterbacks Shane Buechele and Sam Ehlinger, Herman’s Longhorns can salvage some lost luster in Houston. Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

SATURDAY’S BOWL GAMES CELEBRATION BOWL GRAMBLING (11-1, 7-0 SWAC) VS. NORTH CAROLINA A&T (11-0, 8-0 MEAC) Kickoff • 11 a.m., Mercedes-Benz Stadium, Atlanta (ABC) Top players • Grambling QB DeVante Kincade never lost a game against a SWAC opponent in two years as the starter. He’s thrown for 2,680 yards, with 21 TDs and three picks. ... A&T QB Lamar Raynard has thrown for 2,707 yards, with 26 TDs and five INTs. Top receiver Elijah Bell has caught 11 touchdown passes. Notable • Grambling has won 18 straight vs. conference opponents. It is 4-3 all-time against North Carolina A&T. ... A&T coach Rod Broadway led the Grambling program from 2007 to 2010. Dave Matter’s pick • NC A&T 34, Grambling 31

NEW ORLEANS BOWL

NORTH TEXAS (9-4, 7-1 C-USA) VS. TROY (10-2, 7-1 SUN BELT) Kickoff • Noon, Superdome (ESPN) Top players • North Texas: QB Mason Fine has thrown for 3,749 yards, 28 touchdowns and 13 interceptions. Seven receivers have caught at least 24 passes. ... Troy: LB Tron Folsom has 77 tackles, nine for loss, and an interception. Local line • North Texas: WR Quinetin Jackson (6-3, 208, jr., Granite City) has five catches for 73 yards and a touchdown in 10 games. Notable • North Texas: The Mean Green set several program records including scoring, total offense, passing yards and passing touchdowns. They won eight of their last 10 games. ... Troy: The Trojans beat LSU 24-21 on Sept. 30. ... Troy is 8-2 against North Texas. ... ... Both teams are led by up-and-coming, under-40 coaches who should be in line for Power 5 jobs sooner rather than later: Troy’s Neal Brown and North Texas’ Seth Littrell. Dave Matter’s pick • Troy 34, North Texas 31

CURE BOWL

GEORGIA STATE (6-5, 5-3 SUN BELT) VS. WESTERN KENTUCKY (6-6, 4-4 C-USA) Kickoff • 1:30 p.m., Camping World Stadium, Orlando, Fla. (CBSSN) Top players • Georgia State: Sophomore WR Penny Hart leads the Sun Belt with a school-record 73 receptions for 1,094 yards and eight touchdowns. ... WKU QB Mike White is a Senior Bowl invitee who leads Conference USA in total offense (300.3 yards per game) and is an NFL prospect. Notable • Georgia State RB Glenn Smith is one of three active FBS players with at least 1,000 yards rushing, 1,000 receiving and 1,000 return yards in his career. ... Western Kentucky is one of 11 teams in FBS with five or more receivers who have 25 or more catches. ... The Hilltoppers have won bowl games each of the last three years. GSU has played in only one bowl, losing to San Jose State in the 2015 Cure Bowl. Dave Matter’s pick • Western Kentucky 27, Georgia State 20

LAS VEGAS BOWL

BOISE STATE (10-3, 7-1 MOUNTAIN WEST) VS. OREGON (7-5, 4-5 PAC-12) Kickoff • 2:30 p.m., Sam Boyd Stadium, ABC Top players • Boise State: QB Brett Rypien has 2,515 yards passing, with 14 touchdowns. ... Oregon RB Royce Freeman has 1,475 yards rushing with 16 touchdowns. Local line • Oregon: The career tackles leader at St. Charles West, ILB Blake Rugraff (6-1, 226, so.), has 15 tackles in nine games this season. Notable • This is the only bowl game among the first 10 featuring a Power 5 program. ... Boise State avenged a loss to Fresno State the week before by beating the Bulldogs 17-14 in the Mountain West title game. ... Oregon finished the season by thrashing Arizona and rival Oregon State to reach seven victories in coach Willie Taggart’s first season. He’s now at Florida State, so newly promoted Mario Cristobal will be in charge for the first time. ... Boise State is in a bowl for the 16th consecutive season. ... Oregon is bowling for the 12th time in 13 years. Dave Matter’s pick • Oregon 38, Boise State 28

NEW MEXICO BOWL

COLORADO STATE (7-5, 5-3 MOUNTAIN WEST) VS. MARSHALL (7-5, 4-4 C-USA) Kickoff • 3:30 p.m., Dreamstyle Stadium, Albuquerque (ESPN) Top players • Colorado State QB Nick Stevens has thrown for 3,479 yards, with 27 touchdowns. Michael Gallup is one of the nation’s more prolific receivers, with 94 catches for 1,345 yards. ... Marshall QB Chase Litton has 2,853 yards passing, with 23 TDs. Notable • Colorado State beat San Jose State 42-14 in the regular-season finale to snap a three-game losing streak. ... Marshall dropped four of its last five games after a 6-1 start. Dave Matter’s pick • Colorado State 31, Marshall 28

CAMELLIA BOWL

MIDDLE TENNESSEE (6-6, 4-4 C-USA) VS. ARKANSAS STATE (7-4, 6-2 SUN BELT) Kickoff • 7 p.m., Cramton Bowl, Montgomery, Ala. (ESPN) Top players • Middle Tennessee safety Javonte Moffat leads the team with 95 tackles. ... Arkansas State QB Justice Hansen has broken Ryan Aplin’s school single-season passing record with 3,630 yards. He has a Sun Belt record 34 touchdown passes. Notable • MTSU went 3-1 after QB Brent Stockstill, the school’s career passing leader, returned after missing six games with an injury. ... ASU’s Ja’Von Rolland-Jones needs one sack to break the career FBS record of 44 held by Terrell Suggs and Jonathan Peterson. ... Middle Tennessee is bowl eligible for the sixth straight year but has lost its last four bowls. ... Arkansas State is in a bowl for the seventh consecutive year. Dave Matter’s pick • Arkansas St. 41, Mid. Tenn. 34 Staff and wire reports


12.16.2017 • Saturday • M 1

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • B5

‘Enforcer’ impresses Martin

Billikens are playing a long way from home Oregon State hosts SLU in Portland BY STU DURANDO St. Louis Post-dispatch

Missouri guard Jordan Geist goes up for a shot in front of West Virginia forward Lamont West during a game last month.

Missouri guard Geist has worked hard to add shooting accuracy to defensive grit BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • Before he laid eyes on his new team, Missouri basketball coach Cuonzo Martin received an intriguing text message last spring from the reigning Big Ten player of the year. Caleb Swanigan, like Martin a standout player at Purdue, had a short but sweet scouting report on one of the players Martin was about to inherit from Kim Anderson’s roster. “You’ve got a killer in Geist,” the text read. Geist, as in Jordan Geist, a 6-2 guard who was in and out of Anderson’s starting lineup last year, shot just 28.6 percent from 3-point range and figured to fall behind the fleet of newcomers Martin would bring to Columbia. Geist and Swanigan, now an NBA rookie in Portland, played together in Fort Wayne, Ind., before Swanigan became an All-American at Purdue and Geist surfaced at Mizzou via Ranger Junior College in Texas. “I had just taken the job,” Martin said this week. “I didn’t know who Jordan Geist was. I hadn’t watched the film.” He quickly discovered what Swanigan meant. Last year’s footage would have shown Martin an undersized guard who played with more gumption than obvious offensive skill. Geist didn’t always shoot straight but played with maximum effort on defense, sometimes more than opponents appreciated. Like the time he triggered a bench-clearing wrestling match at Georgia. “He’s a tough dude,” senior

guard Jordan Barnett said. “He doesn’t take nothing from nobody. That’s definitely Coach Martin’s mentality.” This summer, Martin watched Geist embrace his creed for defensive intensity while becoming a self-made shooting threat. Geist discovered a hitch in his jumper and vowed to put up 500 shots each day. By summer’s end the count reached 40,000 shots, he said. “Obviously, when a new staff comes in you have to do as much as you can to show them why you deserve to be here, why you deserve to play,” Geist said. All those shots behind closed doors have paid off since they opened for all to see. Through 10 games, Geist is shooting 48.1 percent from behind the 3-point arc heading into Saturday’s home game against North Florida (5-7). Last Saturday, Geist put together a career game, scoring 28 points against Green Bay in just 23 minutes. He made 11 of 14 shots, including five of eight from deep, and scored on a dunk in transition, prompting a rare outburst from the usually reserved Hoosier as he flexed his biceps in front of the student section. “Something got in me,” he said. “There was a fire lit.” Geist’s 28 points were the most for a Mizzou guard since Namon Wright had the same total against Florida on Feb. 24, 2015. Among Mizzou’s regulars, Geist leads the Tigers in offensive rating (136.8), which measures a player’s points scored per 100 possessions. That figure ranks second among all players in the SEC, as rated by Ken Pomeroy’s advanced metrics.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

MISSOURI VS. NORTH FLORIDA

When • 7:30 p.m. Saturday Where • Mizzou Arena Series • MU leads 1-0; last meeting, MU 96, North Florida 58, Nov. 20, 2010 TV, radio • SEC Network, KTRS (550 AM) Records • MU (8-2), North Florida (5-7) About Mizzou • The Tigers haven’t played since last Saturday’s 100-77 win over Wisconsin-Green Bay, the team’s first 100-point game since 2012. … Graduate guard Kassius Robertson continues to lead the Tigers with 14 points a game, while senior guard Jordan Barnett is close behind at 13.3. … Freshman forward Jontay Porter has become a productive allaround threat, averaging 8.7 points, a team-best 6.8 rebounds, 2 assists and 2.3 blocks, which ranks fifth in the SEC. About North Florida • The Ospreys have played a rigorous lineup of highmajor foes already, with losses to Michigan State, Michigan, Florida and Miami. Coach Matthew Driscoll’s team has won four straight games after starting 0-6. … North Florida is one of the nation’s worst-rated defenses (No. 335 in adjusted defensive efficiency) but shoots 40.3 percent from 3-point range. … Ivan Gandia-Rosa, a 6-1 sophomore guard, leads North Florida with 16 points a game while shooting 44.2 percent from 3-point range, one of six regulars shooting better than 40 percent from deep. Dave Matter

Geist has shifted between the starting lineup and the bench but has become a consistent piece in Martin’s rotation. He likes to call himself “an enforcer” off the bench. Geist made a quick impression on Kassius Robertson when the graduate transfer joined the team this summer. “He always had that toughness, that grit,” Robertson said. “He’s a really fiery kid. He wasn’t going to be pushed around and he was going to get up in you as a defender and annoy the hell out of you. Me and him definitely had some battles in practice way before the season, so I know all about his game, all about his toughness. I’m glad he’s on my team for sure.” Martin, too. Geist has gone scoreless in four of 10 games, mixed two more double-digit outings (16 points against Long Beach State, 11 against St. John’s) and had five games with at least

four assists. But with Martin, defense always comes first, which explains why he wasn’t thrilled with Geist’s four-assist, zeroturnover game against MiamiOhio last week when his usually strong defense fell off at times. Otherwise, he’s lavished heaps of praise on the quiet enforcer with the remade jumper. “He’s kind of quiet, but he’ll bite you now,” Martin said. “He wants to be a good player. When he steps on the floor it doesn’t matter if he’s looking down on you or up at you. It’s competition. And he’s not fazed by your size or your skill level or what you bring to the table. He’s trying to win the game. That’s what separates him from a lot of people.” Credit Swanigan with the assist. Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

Frazier is getting into a zone for Illinois BY MARK TUPPER decatur Herald & review

CHICAGO • Just when Illinois is

hitting a crossroad in its season, freshman guard Trent Frazier is looking like he wants to drive this basketball team through the intersection. Trent Frazier’s play has taken a sharp upturn in the last four games and it comes at a time when Illinois begins playing what coach Brad Underwood termed “big boy games.” Gone are the games like Illinois breezed through Wednesday, when it overpowered Longwood 92-45. Beginning Saturday night against New Mexico State, Illinois plays games in which any opponent can prevail. That’s why Underwood was happy to have two pieces of good news Friday. One, the team’s top two rebounders — Leron Black and Kipper Nichols — were back in practice after sitting out Wednesday’s game. Black was nursing an injured elbow, Nichols a sore foot. Underwood sounded hopeful he’d have both players available but said it would be a game-time decision. Two, Frazier turned in his best practice of the season Friday after scoring 16 points against UNLV last Saturday and 20 against Longwood. “Confidence is a wonderful thing,” Underwood said. “And he’s playing with a lot of it.” Part of Frazier’s surge is a rediscovery of his 3-point stroke. Frazier was two for three against

Stu Durando @studurando on Twitter sdurando@post-dispatch.com

ILLINOIS VS. NEW MEXICO STATE

When • 7 p.m. Saturday Where • United Center, Chicago TV • Big Ten Network Radio • KFNS (590 AM) Records • Illinois 8-4, New Mexico State 8-2 Of note • Game was designed to be a tribute to Lou Henson, who coached each school to the Final Four. Henson will be recognized during the second timeout in the first half.

UNLV and three of eight vs. Longwood. Another part is his work on the defensive end, where he had four steals in each game. But most of the improvement Underwood sees has to do with what he believes is an elevated comfort level 12 games into his college career. “You can tell when a player is starting to feel comfortable,” Underwood said. “They get lost in the game. You have to play to know what a zone like that is. Da’Monte (Williams) has been in it a long time. Mark Smith has been there the last few. “Trent gets a whole different look about him and when he gets there he’s not reacting, he’s anticipating, dialed in. He knows when the opportunities come. He’s getting into that moment and it’s a pretty special place. And with it comes a lot of confidence.” Underwood needs his guards to play at a high level starting Saturday night because in graduate transfer guard Zach Lofton, New

The lineup that Travis Ford has overseen through St. Louis University’s first 10 games has lacked a few pieces that were expected to be on the court when the coaching staff was building a schedule. Ford wanted a better group of nonconference games than his first season at SLU, but not too much better. At this point, while playing with eight scholarship players, he’s fortunate that he didn’t go for something significantly tougher. The Billikens are 5-5 entering Saturday night’s game against Oregon State in Portland, Ore., having posted a couple of solid wins and suffered a couple of hard-toswallow defeats while two players expected to play key roles have yet to appear. Adony Henriquez and Jermaine Bishop made the trip but are not expected to play. “Obviously our roster is a little different than we thought it was going to be,” Ford said. “But this schedule would have been right on target. We’re playing a lot of good teams that will end up with a lot of wins. There’s only one team I think we’ve played that won’t win maybe 17 or 18 games, and that might be Detroit. I think everyone else will be in the 17 to 18,even 25 to 26 (win) range.” The Billikens will play what will be classified as their second road game against the Beavers,although Portland is about a 90-minute drive from the Beavers’ campus. SLU has played enough good opponents and eliminated enough lower-rung teams to have the 45th best schedule in the country with three nonconference games left. What remains before Christmas, including home games against Campbell and Southeast Missouri State, is likely to drop SLU’s strength of schedule. In the previous three seasons, their opponents had a cumulative record that was one game under .500. SLU’s first 10 Division I opponents this season — the Billikens also played D-II Rockhurst — have a combined record of 57-32. “I don’t think we’ll have any opponents in the 300s,” Ford said of the RPI. “What we could control was staying away from the 300s and trying to balance that with top 50s, and we thought we’d have three with Butler, Providence and Virginia Tech.” The results have been a mixed bag as Ford has adjusted to a lack of depth at guard and a shortage of scoring options to break even thus far. The win over Virginia Tech and the quality of the performance against Murray State have been highlights. A home loss to Detroit Mercy and an uncompetitive showing at Butler were disappointing. SLU will never know what might have been if all games had been played with a full complement of players. All Ford can do is wait to find out the ruling that will come out of the university’s Title IX investigation into allegations of sexual assault.

SLU AT OREGON STATE

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Illinois guard Trent Frazier is playing with more confidence, coach Brad Underwood says, and is shooting better from outside.

Mexico State has a player who was honorable mention Associated Press All-American last season and who Underwood believes could be headed to the NBA. Lofton started his career in junior college, transferred to Illinois State where he played in the 201314 season, transferred to Minnesota but was dismissed before he ever played a game, then transferred to Texas Southern before landing at New Mexico State as a fifth-year graduate student. “He’s a guy who can get his own shot at any time,” Underwood said. “He’s very gifted with the basketball. He can score off the catch, from 3, off the bounce, he has a mid-range game and he gets to the rim. And he’s an 88 percent free throw shooter. He’s very difficult to guard.” New Mexico State won 28 games and reached the NCAA

Tournament last season with Paul Weir as the coach. But Weir left for New Mexico and the program is now being run by Chris Jans, who was head coach for one season at Bowling Green before being fired for violating a morals clause in his contract when the university said he acted inappropriately with women in a bar near campus. Saturday night’s game was arranged as a way to honor Lou Henson, who coached each school to the Final Four and who ranks as the coach with the most victories at each school. Henson, who was in the hospital Friday, will be honored during the first half. Many of his former players and assistants have said they will attend the game, including Jimmy Collins, who played for Henson at New Mexico State and who was his longtime assistant coach at Illinois.

When • 9:30 p.m. Where • Moda Center, Portland, Ore. All-time series • SLU leads 2-0. TV, radio: Pac 12 Network; WXOS (101.1 FM) Records • SLU 5-5; Oregon State 7-3 About the Billikens • Javon Bess has attempted 10 free throws in each of the last two games and has shot double-digit FTS five times this season. … Aaron Hines has warmed up the last two games, making four of five 3-pointers, and Davell Roby has made six of 10 over three games. … Hasahn French is leading the Atlantic 10 with 23 blocked shots, which is good enough already for the eighth best total by a SLU freshman. … Moda Center is the second of three NBA arenas where the Billikens will play this season. About the Beavers • Oregon State was picked to finish eighth in the Pac-12 after finishing last in 2016-17. … The Beavers will carry a five-game winning streak into the game. … Leading scorer Tres Tinkle, who averages 17.7 points, is the son of coach Wayne Tinkle. Stephen Thompson Jr. and Ethan Thompson are the sons of assistant coach Stephen Thompson. … Drew Eubanks (6-10, 250) is shooting 70 percent and has made at least half of his shots in all 10 games this season. Stu Durando


SPORTS

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

AREA COLLEGE ATHLETES

SIUC’s Cook is showing the benefits of experience

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 12.16.2017

‘PUNCHING PEOPLE’ BRINGS ENJOYMENT VanZant promotes UFC Fight Night 124, coming to Scottrade in January

Point guard’s scoring up as he leads team in assists BY STEVE EIGHINGER Special to the Post-Dispatch

Aaron Cook, a 6-foot-2 sophomore at Southern Illinois Carbondale who prepped at Westminster, is blossoming as both a playmaker and scorer. He has started all but one of the first nine games for the Salukis (5-4), averaging 10 points while leading SIUC in assists, free-thow percentage and 3-point field goal accuracy. Cook spent his freshman season in Carbondale as the backup point guard, making the most of his apprenticeCook ship at the NCAA Division I level. “Last year really prepared me for this year because I had the experience of being able to play against those top schools,” Cook told siusalukis.com. “This year, I’m definitely feeling more comfortable, so I have a better understanding and (have gotten) the feel of the game down.” Cook poured through 18 points in a 75-69 loss to Southeast Missouri last Saturday, and has registered 12 or more points in five of his last seven outings. Scoring has always come naturally for Cook, who averaged 22.1 points as a high school senior. SIUC hosts Lamar (8-1) in a 3 p.m.Sunday start that will be on ESPN3.

FIRST START IS MEMORABLE

Sophomore point guard Erica Waeltermann (Webster Groves) scored 27 points in her first start for St. Louis Community College, spurring the undefeated Archers (11-0) to a 91-68 win over Southwestern Illinois College last Sunday. Waeltermann also contributed seven rebounds and four assists for STLCC, No. 4 in the junior college Division II rankings. Chrishana Wilson (Gateway) also excelled for the Archers, turning in her sixth straight double-double with 18 points and 10 rebounds.

MILESTONE ALERT

Washington University senior forward Andrew Sanders, a preseason NCAA Division III All-America selection, has moved within 31 points of 1,000 for his career. Sanders, who led Washington U. in scoring in both his junior and sophomore seasons, is at it again. The 6-5 Sanders’ current 19.6 average is a career best. The native of Tampa, Fla., scored a seasonhigh 29 points and had 14 rebounds in an 87-83 victory Dec. 9 over Central (Iowa) College that helped him earn University Athletic Association athlete of the week honors. Sanders also leads the Bears in rebounding at eight a game.

AROUND THE AREA

Central Missouri junior center Jakob Lowrance (Civic Memotrial) is second in scoring (12.9) and leads the Mules in rebounding (6.3). The 6-8 Lowrance has nearly doubled his averages (7.9, 3.0) from his sophomore season. • St. Louis University junior Manuel De Backer finished 36th in the U23 men’s division of the European Cross Country Championships in Samorin, Slovakia. DeBacker, the reigning Atlantic 10 Conference champion, grew up in Belgium but is a native of the Netherlands. He represented the Netherlands in the European Championships. • Missouri Baptist’s men’s basketball keeps rolling. The Spartans have built an 11-2 record that includes a 7-0 mark in the American Midwest Conference. Senior guard Fitzgerald Hopkins (15.4) leads MBU in scoring. • Maryville senior Forrester Sims passed the 1,000-point mark for his career in the Saints’ 134-78 win over Robert MorrisSpringfield. The 134 points are a school record. • Elijah Watson’s performance against a ranked Division II opponent did not go unnoticed. The Missouri-St. Louis senior guard scored 21 points, handed out six assists and grabbed five rebounds in a 77-74 win over No. 20 William Jewell. That outing led Watson to being named Great Lakes Valley Conference player of the week. • Freshman Justin Bateman (Althoff) has the third-best scoring average (14.7) over the last three games for the potent Greenville offense. Greenville is averaging 120.1, four times scoring 130 or more points in a game. • The SIU Edwardsville backcourt tandem of seniors Lauren White (Edwardsville) and Donshel Beck (Ritenour) lead the Cougars (3-5) in scoring. White is averaging 12.3, Beck 11.1. • Junior forward Chase Berger (SLUH) is fourth in goals (five) and points (17) for the No. 15 Penn State men’s hockey team. • Identical twins and Kirkwood High products Megan and Anne Hellwege recently completed impressive volleyball careers, both at the libero position. At Lindenwood, Megan’s 706 digs is the third-most in school history and ranked in the Division II top-five. No. 2 in career digs at LU, she earned Mid-America first-team honors. At Rockhurst, Anne started four years and never missed a set. The school’s career digs leader, she was all-conference for the third consecutive year.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Paige VanZant before fighting Michelle Waterson in a UFC Fight Night mixed martial arts fight in Sacramento, Calif., in 2016. BY JOE LYONS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Paige VanZant started as a dancer. She later worked as a model and even made appearances on a couple of reality shows, placing second on Dancing with the Stars and beating out Olympic gold medal figure skater Dorothy Hamill to win the cooking show Chopped. The 23-year-old from Oregon has written an autobiography, “Rise: Surviving the Fight of My Life,” which will be released in April. But VanZant’s passion is fighting. “I like punching people,’’ she said during a recent trip to St. Louis to promote the UFC Fight Night 124, a 13-bout event scheduled for Jan. 14 at Scottrade Center. “I thought it’d be for fun, but I instantly fell in love with the sport and quickly realized I was pretty good at it. After I won my first amateur fight, I got offered a pro contract and then went out and beat a girl I was supposed to lose to. That helped me make a name for myself in the sport and I’ve been able to build my career from there.” And that career has opened some other doors for the 5-foot-4, 125-pound VanZant. “First and foremost, I’m a fighter and that’s where my focus is,’’ she said. “At the same time, I know careers in this sport can be short-lived, so I’m trying to take advantage of every opportunity I can. I’ve been fortunate to experience a lot and I’ve enjoyed every minute of it. No matter what I’m doing, I try to have fun and do my best.” The Jan. 14 event will mark UFC’s debut in St. Louis. Featured bouts include eighth-ranked Jeremy Stephens against No. 12 Doo Ho Choi at featherweight; No. 11 Uriah Hall versus No. 12 Vitor Belfort at middleweight; and Van-Zant (7-3) against Jessica Rose-Clark (8-4) in the

UFC FIGHT NIGHT 124 When • Jan. 14 Where • Scottrade Center TV • UFC Fight Night will be shown live on FS1, with preliminary bouts beginning at 7 p.m. Gates open at 4 p.m. Tickets • They range from $60 to $150 and are available at www.ticketmaster.com and at the Scottrade Center box office.

newly created women’s flyweight division. “I know she’s from Australia and that we both beat Bec Rawlings — that’s about it,’’ VanZant said when asked about her opponent. “It’s good to know about another fighter’s style, but you don’t want to overthink it. I’d rather focus on my fight and force her to adjust to me. I’m excited about the new weight class; I’m a lot more comfortable at 125 pounds and I think it’ll allow me to showcase more of my athletic ability. I’ve always been more of a brawler, but I consider myself pretty well-rounded fighter. In this sport, you have to be flexible and willing to adjust as the fight progresses.” VanZant, who’s ranked 12th among UFC strawweights, grew up in rural Oregon and is a self-proclaimed tomboy. “I grew up hunting and fishing and riding dirt bikes; I guess that’s why none of this seems out of the ordinary for me,’’ she said. “In dance, you learn to pick up techniques and the same is true of fighting. And because I went straight into MMA without any background in any particular style of fighting, I feel like I’m able to pick up different aspects of the sport quickly.” Mainly because of injuries, VanZant has not fought since Dec. 17, 2016. “It’s not a big deal. I’ve had longer layoffs; I once sat for 18 months because I couldn’t find a fight,’’ she said. “I’m healthy, I’m looking forward to getting

back out there and I’m really excited to be part of the first UFC event in St. Louis.”

MMA VETERAN

James Krause was born in Virginia, grew up in Odessa, Mo., and fights out of his own gym, Glory MMA & Fitness, in Lee’s Summit, Mo. The 31-year-old has been a professional MMA fighter since 2007. “This’ll be my 55th fight. It can be tough — physically, mentally and emotionally — but I think it’s a testament to my love of the sport,” he said. “I’ve formed my life around MMA, so when I’m not preparing for a fight, I’m training and working to prepare other guys for their fights.” Krause (24-7) will face 29-year-old Alex White (12-3), who fights out of Farmington, Mo., in a lightweight bout next month. “We’ve trained together quite a bit; he’s a tough, durable fighter,’’ Krause said. “He’ll bring a fight and that’s what intrigues me. At this point, I don’t just take fights to fight; I want to be in fights that will be entertaining and this is definitely a matchup I think the fans in St. Louis are going to enjoy.” Krause isn’t concerned about fighting so close to White’s home base. “Truthfully, I think I’ll have the bigger crowd, but it doesn’t matter,’’ he said. “In the third round of my last fight, the crowd was chanting my opponent’s name when I told him these people can’t help you and they can’t help me either.” It’s that one-on-one nature of MMA that Krause appreciates. “Growing up, I was never the MVP; I was the guy who got the hustle awards,’’ he said. “And in this sport, if you’re good at everything it can really make you a dangerous fighter, especially against the more one-dimensional fighters.”

NFL NOTEBOOK

NFL STANDINGS

Peterson’s season ends with injury ASSOCIATED PRESS

Adrian Peterson was placed on injured reserve Friday because of a neck injury, ending the running back’s season after only six games with the Arizona Cardinals. Acquired from New Orleans on Oct. 10, Peterson ran for 448 yards — 314 in his first three games — and two touchdowns on 129 carries and had nine catches for 66 yards for the Cardinals. He missed the last two games. In four games for the Saints, he ran for 81 yards on 24 carries. “The good news is my neck injury doesn’t require surgery, but I’m told by Dr. Robert Watkins that the best thing for me is just more rest than the length of the season,” Peterson wrote on Instagram. Carolina owner faces allegations • The Carolina Panthers are investigating workplace misconduct allegations against founder and owner Jerry Richardson. The team said former White House Chief of Staff Erskine Bowles is overseeing the investigation by an L.A.-based firm.

Siemian’s season over • Trevor Siemian’s season is over after the Broncos’ starting quarterback injured his left shoulder in Denver’s win at Indianapolis, coach Vance Joseph said. Joseph also hinted that Paxton Lynch and not Brock Osweiler would start next week. Wright might sit • Seattle appears likely to be without starting linebacker K.J. Wright for Sunday’s matchup with the Rams. Wright has not practiced all week because of a concussion sustained last Sunday. Elsewhere, Minnesota tackle Riley Reiff and tight end Kyle Rudolph are listed as doubtful to face Cincinati; Dallas defensive lineman David Irvin will miss his second straight game; and Oakland receiver Amari Cooper will not play against Dallas. NFL issues fines • Seattle offensive lineman Germain Ifedi was fined $24,309 by the NFL for verbal abuse of a game official. Also for Seattle, Sheldon Richardson and Quinton Jefferson were fined $9,115 for unnecessary roughness penalties.

SATURDAY’S GAMES CHICAGO (4-9) at DETROIT (7-6) Time • 3:30 p.m. Fast facts • Chicago QB Mitchell Trubisky became first Bears rookie with passing and rushing TD in same game last week since Jim McMahon in 1982. ... RB Jordan Howard first in franchise history to run for 1,000-plus yards each of first two seasons. ... Detroit forced five turnovers last week for first time since 2011 and ranks among NFL leaders with 24 takeaways this season. ... QB Matthew Stafford led 32nd career winning drive when tied or trailing in fourth quarter or overtime.

L.A. CHARGERS (7-6) at KANSAS CITY (7-6) Time • 7:25 p.m. Fast facts • Winner has inside track on AFC West title. ... Chargers have won four straight and seven of nine, their best nine-game stretch since 2010. ... Chargers lead NFL with 15 INTs since 0-4 start. ... Chargers QB Philip Rivers is averaging 337 yards passing with eight TDs and no interceptions over past four games. ... Chiefs snapped five-game skid last week against Oakland. ... Kansas City QB Alex Smith is second in NFL with 104.4 rating. Smith is 6-1 in his career against the Chargers. Associated Press

AMERICAN CONFERENCE East New England Buffalo Miami N.Y. Jets South Jacksonville Tennessee Houston Indianapolis North y-Pittsburgh Baltimore Cincinnati Cleveland West Kansas City L.A. Chargers Oakland Denver

W 10 7 6 5 W 9 8 4 3 W 11 7 5 0 W 7 7 6 5

L 3 6 7 8 L 4 5 9 11 L 2 6 8 13 L 6 6 7 9

T 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0

Pct .769 .538 .462 .385 Pct .692 .615 .308 .214 Pct .846 .538 .385 .000 Pct .538 .538 .462 .316

PF 368 240 236 266 PF 329 273 312 225 PF 320 318 226 197 PF 329 298 264 254

PA 250 290 318 311 PA 202 294 335 368 PA 251 246 271 335 PA 289 225 304 328

East W y-Philadelphia 11 Dallas 7 Washington 5 N.Y. Giants 2 South W New Orleans 9 Carolina 9 Atlanta 8 4 Tampa Bay North W Minnesota 10 Detroit 7 7 Green Bay Chicago 4 West W 9 L.A. Rams Seattle 8 Arizona 6 3 San Francisco y-clinched division

L 2 6 8 11 L 4 4 5 9 L 3 6 6 9 L 4 5 7 10

T 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0

Pct .846 .538 .385 .154 Pct .692 .692 .615 .308 Pct .769 .538 .538 .308 Pct .692 .615 .462 .231

PF 404 316 285 199 PF 370 300 294 264 PF 309 338 285 224 PF 396 314 231 228

PA 250 294 344 321 PA 263 262 261 312 PA 235 329 302 274 PA 265 252 317 314

NATIONAL CONFERENCE

Thursday Denver 25, Indianapolis 13 Saturday Chicago at Detroit, 3:30 p.m., (NFL) Chargers at Kansas City, 7:25 (NFL) Sunday Philadelphia at N.Y. Giants, Noon Cincinnati at Minnesota, Noon (KMOV-4) Houston at Jacksonville, Noon Arizona at Washington, Noon N.Y. Jets at New Orleans, Noon Miami at Buffalo, Noon Green Bay at Carolina, Noon (KTVI-2) Baltimore at Cleveland, Noon L.A. Rams at Seattle, 3:05 p.m. New England at Pittsburgh, 3:25 (KTVI-2) Tennessee at San Francisco, 3:25 Dallas at Oakland, 7:30 p.m. (KSDK-5) Monday, Dec. 18 Atlanta at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m. (ESPN)


SPORTS

12.16.2017 • Saturday • M 1

NBA STANDINGS

NHL STANDINGS WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Nashville Blues Winnipeg Minnesota Chicago Dallas Colorado Pacific Los Angeles Vegas San Jose Calgary Anaheim Vancouver Edmonton Arizona

GP 31 33 32 31 32 33 31 GP 33 31 30 32 32 32 32 34

W 20 21 18 17 16 18 15 W 20 20 17 16 14 14 13 7

L 7 10 9 11 11 14 14 L 10 9 10 13 11 14 17 22

OT 4 2 5 3 5 1 2 OT 3 2 3 3 7 4 2 5

Pts 44 44 41 37 37 37 32 Pts 43 42 37 35 35 32 28 19

GF 106 105 108 91 98 98 96 GF 100 107 82 91 86 83 93 76

GA 85 84 92 88 85 97 101 GA 77 95 71 99 92 97 105 118

Home 11-2-2 11-7-0 11-3-1 10-3-2 9-5-2 10-4-0 9-5-1 Home 10-5-2 12-2-1 9-6-2 8-9-0 8-7-3 5-7-3 5-10-0 3-9-1

Away Div 9-5-2 8-1-1 10-3-2 5-1-1 7-6-4 5-2-1 7-8-1 4-5-0 7-6-3 3-5-2 8-10-1 4-8-0 6-9-1 4-5-1 Away Div 10-5-1 3-3-2 8-7-1 9-1-0 8-4-1 5-1-2 8-4-3 5-4-0 6-4-4 3-2-4 9-7-1 3-5-0 8-7-2 4-1-0 4-13-4 1-5-3

L 6 13 10 14 13 15 13 18 L 11 9 12 12 12 14 11 11

OT 2 1 4 4 7 5 7 7 OT 1 5 1 3 3 3 7 7

Pts 48 41 34 32 31 29 27 23 Pts 41 41 41 37 37 35 33 33

GF 117 109 84 87 86 93 82 72 GF 94 100 105 114 105 95 89 88

GA 75 97 82 100 103 110 103 111 GA 84 96 96 111 94 106 89 97

Home 13-2-1 10-5-0 9-5-2 9-7-3 6-6-6 6-6-3 5-5-5 4-9-2 Home 12-6-0 8-5-2 13-5-0 9-2-2 13-5-3 10-5-1 6-6-4 6-4-3

Away 10-4-1 10-8-1 6-5-2 5-7-1 6-7-1 6-9-2 5-8-2 4-9-5 Away 8-5-1 10-4-3 7-7-1 8-10-1 4-7-0 6-9-2 7-5-3 7-7-4

Friday New Jersey 5, Dallas 2 Carolina 5, Buffalo 4, OT NY Rangers 4, Los Angeles 2 Detroit 3, Toronto 1 San Jose at Vancouver, late Thursday Anaheim 3, Blues 1 Philadelphia 2, Buffalo 1 Washington 5, Boston 3 Columbus 6, NY Islanders 4 Montreal 2, New Jersey 1, OT Chicago 5, Winnipeg 1 Minnesota 2, Toronto 0 Colorado 2, Florida 1 Tampa Bay 4, Arizona 1 Nashville 4, Edmonton 0 San Jose 3, Calgary 2 Vegas 2, Pittsburgh 1 Saturday Edmonton at Minnesota, 1 p.m. NY Rangers at Boston, 4 p.m. Los Angeles at NY Islanders, 6 p.m. Winnipeg at Blues, 6 p.m. Montreal at Ottawa, 6 p.m. Columbus at Carolina, 6 p.m. Dallas at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Anaheim at Washington, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh at Arizona, 7 p.m. Tampa Bay at Colorado, 8 p.m. Nashville at Calgary, 9 p.m.

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Tampa Bay Toronto Boston Montreal Detroit Florida Ottawa Buffalo Metropolitan Columbus New Jersey Washington NY Islanders NY Rangers Pittsburgh Philadelphia Carolina

GP 31 34 29 32 32 32 30 33 GP 32 32 33 32 32 33 31 31

W 23 20 15 14 12 12 10 8 W 20 18 20 17 17 16 13 13

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • B7

Div 5-2-0 5-2-1 2-1-2 8-1-1 4-7-2 4-3-1 2-3-1 3-4-2 Div 7-4-0 2-3-0 5-3-0 5-4-1 5-4-2 4-2-0 1-0-3 2-3-2

Sunday Blues at Winnipeg, 5 p.m. Minnesota at Chicago, 6 p.m. Calgary at Vancouver, 7 p.m. Florida at Vegas, 7 p.m. Monday Anaheim at New Jersey, 6 p.m. Columbus at Boston, 6 p.m. Los Angeles at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. San Jose at Edmonton, 8 p.m. Pittsburgh at Colorado, 8 p.m.

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss.

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Houston San Antonio New Orleans Memphis Dallas Northwest Minnesota Denver Portland Oklahoma City Utah Pacific Golden State LA Clippers LA Lakers Sacramento Phoenix

W L 22 4 19 9 15 15 9 20 8 21 W L 17 12 16 13 15 13 14 14 14 15 W L 23 6 11 16 10 17 9 19 9 21

Pct .846 .679 .500 .310 .276 Pct .586 .552 .536 .500 .483 Pct .793 .407 .370 .321 .300

GB — 4 9 14½ 15½ GB — 1 1½ 2½ 3 GB — 11 12 13½ 14½

L10 10-0 8-2 4-6 2-8 4-6 L10 6-4 5-5 5-5 6-4 6-4 L10 9-1 5-5 3-7 4-6 2-8

Str W-11 L-1 L-1 W-1 L-1 Str W-1 W-1 W-2 W-2 W-1 Str W-8 L-1 L-2 L-1 L-5

Home 10-3 13-2 8-7 6-11 6-10 Home 10-5 11-2 7-8 9-4 11-5 Home 10-3 6-7 6-7 5-7 4-12

Away 12-1 6-7 7-8 3-9 2-11 Away 7-7 5-11 8-5 5-10 3-10 Away 13-3 5-9 4-10 4-12 5-9

Conf 12-2 9-5 9-12 8-10 6-14 Conf 14-5 7-8 8-7 7-9 8-7 Conf 11-4 7-9 4-10 7-8 4-11

Str L-1 W-2 W-3 L-1 L-2 Str W-2 W-1 L-4 L-2 L-4 Str W-3 L-2 L-2 W-2 W-5

Home 13-3 10-1 13-5 7-7 6-8 Home 8-5 5-7 6-8 8-7 3-10 Home 12-4 9-5 10-6 8-5 5-8

Away 11-4 9-7 2-8 7-7 5-9 Away 8-8 9-7 5-11 2-11 3-13 Away 9-4 6-7 6-7 8-8 3-12

Conf 15-5 9-4 8-9 6-6 5-9 Conf 7-6 9-7 6-10 5-11 4-17 Conf 16-6 5-8 11-7 9-9 7-8

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Boston Toronto New York Philadelphia Brooklyn Southeast Washington Miami Orlando Charlotte Atlanta Central Cleveland Milwaukee Indiana Detroit Chicago

W 24 19 15 14 11 W 16 14 11 10 6 W 21 15 16 16 8

L 7 8 13 14 17 L 13 14 19 18 23 L 8 12 13 13 20

Pct .774 .704 .536 .500 .393 Pct .552 .500 .367 .357 .207 Pct .724 .556 .552 .552 .286

GB — 3 7½ 8½ 11½ GB — 1½ 5½ 5½ 10 GB — 5 5 5 12½

L10 6-4 8-2 5-5 3-7 5-5 L10 6-4 5-5 3-7 2-8 2-8 L10 9-1 6-4 5-5 3-7 5-5

Friday Detroit 104, Indiana 98 Miami 104, Charlotte 98 Oklahoma City 119, Philadelphia 117, 3OT Portland 95, Orlando 88 Washington 100, Clippers 91 Toronto 120, Brooklyn 87 Utah 107, Boston 95 Chicago 115, Milwaukee 109 Memphis 96, Atlanta 94 Denver 117, New Orleans 111, OT San Antonio at Houston, late Thursday Detroit 105, Atlanta 91 New York 111, Brooklyn 104 Cleveland 121, LA Lakers 112 Minn. 119, Sacramento 96 Golden State 112, Dallas 97 Saturday Portland at Charlotte, 6 p.m. Oklahoma City at New York, 6:30 p.m. Utah at Cleveland, 6:30 p.m. LA Clippers at Miami, 7 p.m. Milwaukee at Houston, 7 Phoenix at Minnesota, 7 Dallas at San Antonio, 7:30 Boston at Memphis, 8 p.m. Sunday Sacramento at Toronto, 2:30 p.m. Orlando at Detroit, 3 p.m. Cleveland at Washington, 5 Indiana at Brooklyn, 5 p.m. Monday Boston at Indiana, 6 p.m. New York at Charlotte, 6 p.m. Miami at Atlanta, 6:30 p.m. Denver at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m. Philadelphia at Chicago, 7 p.m. Portland at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Utah at Houston, 7 p.m. LA Clippers at San Antonio, 7:30 p.m. Phoenix at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Golden State at LA Lakers, 9:30 p.m.

Thunder win thriller in three OTs ASSOCIATED PRESS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Carolina’s Jaccob Slavin (left) and Sebastian Aho celebrate a goal during overtime against the Buffalo Sabres on Friday.

Slavin’s OT goal boosts Carolina over Sabres Buffalo has dropped last six overtime games ASSOCIATED PRESS

Jaccob Slavin scored 2:15 into overtime to give the Carolina Hurricanes a 5-4 victory over the host Buffalo Sabres on Friday night. Jordan Staal, Derek Ryan, Elias Lindstrom, Justin Williams and Slavin each had a goal and an assist to help the Hurricanes win their second in a row to close out a season-long six-game trip. Cam Ward made 37 saves. Jack Eichel had his first career hat trick and assisted on Jake McCabe’s goal for the Sabres. McCabe also had two assists, and Evander Kane had three assists. Chad Johnson stopped 29 shots. Buffalo has lost its last six overtime games. Lindholm set up Slavin in the slot for the winning goal after Ward stopped Kane on a breakaway. Rangers shut down Kings • Rick Nash scored the tiebreaking goal with 3:27 remaining to lead the New York Rangers to a 4-2 victory over the Pacific Divisionleading Los Angeles Kings. Chris Kreider, Kevin Hayes and J.T. Miller also scored to help New York win for the second time in five games (2-2-1). Henrik Lundqvist stopped 33 shots. On the go-ahead goal, Nash stole the puck in the Kings’ zone on the left side near the center line, drove into the left circle and beat Jonathan Quick for his ninth of the season to give the Rangers their third lead of the game. Miller added an empty-netter with 54 seconds remaining, sealing New York’s 11th win in the last 13 at home (11-1-1). Lightning’s Callahan out indefinitely • Tampa Bay Lightning forward Ryan Callahan has an upper-body injury that will sideline him indefinitely. The Lightning said that Callahan will be re-evaluated in three to four weeks. Callahan was injured in the third period of Tampa Bay’s 4-1 victory in Arizona on Thursday night. He tangled with Oliver Ekman-Larsson and the Arizona player fell and landed on Callahan’s right arm. The 32-year-old Callahan has a goal and five assists in 29 games this season. The NHL-leading Lightning will face the Colorado Avalanche on Saturday night.

Russell Westbrook had 27 points, 17 rebounds and 15 assists, and Oklahoma City and the Philadelphia 76ers went basketfor-basket in a three-overtime thriller before the visiting Thunder pulled out a 119-117 victory on Friday night. Andre Roberson scored the winner with 10 seconds left for the Thunder. But one of the early contenders for NBA game of the year belonged to Joel Embiid and Westbrook as they drove, blocked and rebounded their way toward one big play after another. Embiid scored 34 points in 48 minutes with an aching back and rallied the Sixers from a 17-point hole. Embiid grabbed his lower back when he took a hard foul on a drive to the basket in the fourth quarter. Embiid grimaced dur-

NHL SUMMARIES

NBA SUMMARIES

ing timeouts on the bench and trudged into position a few times. Embiid sucked it up and carried the Sixers in the fourth and the first overtime. His feed to a charging Ben Simmons on the baseline for a two-handed dunk tied the score at 94-all with 53 seconds left in the quarter. The Sixers closed the fourth on an 11-0 run.

NOTEBOOK

Hayward could return this season • Celtics guard Gordon Hayward says he is open to playing this season but says it will depend on how fast he is able to heal and show progress as he works his way back from a broken left ankle. Wednesday marked a milestone in Hayward’s recovery process when he was able to shed the walking boot he’s been using since his surgery in October.

Hurricanes 5, Sabres 4, OT

Wizards 100, Clippers 91

Jazz 107, Celtics 95

Carolina 0 1 3 1 — 5 Buffalo 0 1 3 0 — 4 First period: None. Penalties: Okposo, BUF, (hooking), 5:50; Faulk, CAR, (hooking), 11:24; McGinn, CAR, (interference), 16:20; Girgensons, BUF, (hooking), 19:15; Skinner, CAR, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 19:15; Beaulieu, BUF, (slashing), 20:00. Second period: 1, Carolina, Williams 7 (Staal, McGinn), 10:16. 2, Buffalo, Eichel 9 (Kane, McCabe), 10:46. Penalties: None. Third period: 3, Buffalo, McCabe 2 (Kane, Eichel), 1:20. 4, Carolina, Staal 8 (Slavin, Williams), 3:00. 5, Carolina, Ryan 6 (Pesce), 4:03. 6, Carolina, Lindholm 9 (Aho, Ryan), 6:57. 7, Buffalo, Eichel 10 (McCabe, Okposo), 9:24. 8, Buffalo, Eichel 11 (Kane), 9:34. Penalties: None. Overtime: 9, Carolina, Slavin 3 (Aho, Lindholm), 2:15. Penalties: None. Shots: Carolina 7-15-9-3: 34. Buffalo 12-14-13-2: 41. Power-plays: Carolina 0 of 2; Buffalo 0 of 2. Goalies: Carolina, Ward 6-2-1 (41 shots-37 saves). Buffalo, Johnson 1-5-3 (34-29). A: 17,610.

L.A. Clippers: W.Johnson 1-7 1-2 3, Wilson 4-10 1-2 10, Jordan 5-11 2-7 12, L.Williams 5-14 10-10 23, Thornwell 1-3 3-4 5, Dekker 3-7 0-0 6, Reed 0-0 0-2 0, B.Johnson 1-2 0-0 2, Harrell 2-4 1-2 5, Evans 7-18 0-0 15, C.Williams 4-9 0-0 10. Totals 33-85 18-29 91. Washington: Porter Jr. 1-2 0-0 2, Morris 4-9 0-0 8, Gortat 3-6 3-5 9, Wall 5-16 4-7 15, Beal 9-18 0-0 20, Oubre Jr. 2-9 3-3 8, Scott 9-10 2-4 22, McCullough 0-0 0-0 0, Smith 1-5 0-0 2, Mahinmi 1-2 1-2 3, Frazier 0-2 0-0 0, Satoransky 4-6 2-2 11, Meeks 0-3 0-0 0. Totals 39-88 15-23 100. 18 21 91 25 27 — L.A. Clippers Washington 25 23 27 25 — 100 3-point goals: L.A. Clippers 7-24 (L.Williams 3-8, C.Williams 2-3, Evans 1-3, Wilson 1-4, Thornwell 0-1, Dekker 0-2, W.Johnson 0-3), Washington 7-31 (Scott 2-3, Beal 2-6, Satoransky 1-3, Oubre Jr. 1-4, Wall 1-6, Porter Jr. 0-1, Morris 0-1, Smith 0-2, Frazier 0-2, Meeks 0-3). Rebounds: L.A. Clippers 46 (Jordan 16), Washington 49 (Beal 11). Assists: L.A. Clippers 17 (Evans 6), Washington 21 (Wall 5). Total fouls: L.A. Clippers 20, Washington 26. A: 15,442 (20,356).

Utah: Ingles 4-7 0-0 12, Favors 3-6 0-0 6, Gobert 0-1 0-0 0, Rubio 10-15 1-1 22, Mitchell 6-18 3-3 17, Johnson 1-3 1-2 3, Jerebko 6-8 3-3 17, Udoh 2-4 1-1 5, Burks 2-7 4-4 8, Hood 6-14 1-4 17. Totals 40-83 14-18 107. Boston: Tatum 1-6 4-4 7, Horford 9-14 0-0 21, Baynes 1-4 0-0 2, Irving 11-25 9-9 33, Brown 3-8 0-1 6, Nader 0-0 0-0 0, Ojeleye 3-5 0-1 7, Yabusele 1-1 0-0 3, Theis 0-0 0-0 0, Smart 3-13 0-0 6, Rozier 0-4 1-2 1, Larkin 3-6 2-2 9. Totals 35-86 16-19 95. 21 25 33 28 — 107 Utah Boston 26 13 28 28 — 95 3-point goals: Utah 13-25 (Ingles 4-6, Hood 4-7, Jerebko 2-3, Mitchell 2-5, Rubio 1-2, Burks 0-2), Boston 9-31 (Horford 3-5, Irving 2-8, Yabusele 1-1, Larkin 1-3, Tatum 1-3, Ojeleye 1-3, Rozier 0-2, Brown 0-3, Smart 0-3). Fouled out: Rubio. Rebounds: Utah 55 (Udoh 9), Boston 31 (Brown, Horford 6). Assists: Utah 19 (Mitchell 9), Boston 20 (Horford 7). Total fouls: Utah 20, Boston 18. A: 18,624 (18,624).

Pistons 104, Pacers 98

Rangers 4, Kings 2 Los Angeles 0 1 1 — 2 NY Rangers 1 1 2 — 4 First period: 1, NY Rangers, Kreider 11 (Desharnais, Shattenkirk), 10:23 (pp). Penalties: Jokinen, LA, (hooking), 8:58. Second period: 2, Los Angeles, Gaborik 5 (Jokinen), 3:46. 3, NY Rangers, Hayes 7 (Grabner, McDonagh), 14:43. Penalties: Lewis, LA, (tripping), 6:32; Pearson, LA, (holding), 8:41; Fast, NYR, (interference), 11:05. Third period: 4, Los Angeles, Mitchell 2 (Gaborik, Jokinen), 7:59. 5, NY Rangers, Nash 9, 16:33. 6, NY Rangers, Miller 5 (Vesey, Zuccarello), 19:06. Penalties: None. Shots: Los Angeles 10-12-13: 35. NY Rangers 8-12-8: 28. Power-plays: Los Angeles 0 of 1; NY Rangers 1 of 3. Goalies: Los Angeles, Quick 15-10-1 (27 shots-24 saves). NY Rangers, Lundqvist 15-8-2 (35-33). A: 17,756.

Detroit: Bullock 5-8 2-2 15, Harris 2-14 0-1 6, Drummond 9-14 5-8 23, Jackson 3-11 2-2 8, Kennard 4-6 0-0 9, Johnson 4-10 4-4 13, Tolliver 3-6 0-0 9, Moreland 2-3 0-0 4, Smith 3-12 0-0 6, Galloway 4-9 0-0 11. Totals 39-93 13-17 104. Indiana: Bogdanovic 2-11 0-0 4, T.Young 5-9 2-4 12, Turner 8-14 7-8 24, Collison 4-8 0-0 10, Oladipo 8-22 5-5 26, Leaf 1-2 0-0 2, Sabonis 4-6 3-6 11, Joseph 0-5 0-0 0, Stephenson 3-10 2-2 9. Totals 35-87 19-25 98. 27 25 34 18 — 104 Detroit Indiana 19 35 20 24 — 98 3-point goals: Detroit 13-32 (Bullock 3-4, Tolliver 3-6, Galloway 3-7, Harris 2-7, Kennard 1-1, Johnson 1-4, Jackson 0-3), Indiana 9-30 (Oladipo 5-12, Collison 2-4, Turner 1-4, Stephenson 1-4, T.Young 0-1, Sabonis 0-1, Joseph 0-1, Bogdanovic 0-3). Rebounds: Detroit 44 (Drummond 13), Indiana 51 (Turner, T.Young, Oladipo, Stephenson 8). Assists: Detroit 22 (Harris, Smith, Johnson, Kennard 4), Indiana 21 (Stephenson 5). Total fouls: Detroit 22, Indiana 15. Technicals: Johnson. A: 14,687 (18,500).

Chicago: Valentine 1-4 0-0 2, Mirotic 7-16 5-7 22, Lopez 9-14 0-2 18, Dunn 7-12 3-5 17, Holiday 2-10 4-4 8, Zipser 0-2 0-0 0, Markkanen 0-0 0-0 0, Portis 9-16 7-7 27, Grant 2-3 2-7 8, Nwaba 5-9 2-3 13. Totals 42-86 23-35 115. Milwaukee: Middleton 9-19 9-9 29, Antetokounmpo 11-18 6-9 29, Henson 5-6 1-3 11, Bledsoe 5-13 1-2 12, Payton II 1-1 0-0 3, Wilson 0-0 0-0 0, Maker 2-3 2-4 7, Brown 1-1 0-0 3, Liggins 0-0 0-0 0, Vaughn 3-10 1-2 9, Brogdon 3-12 0-0 6. Totals 40-83 20-29 109. 33 26 23 33 — 115 Chicago Milwaukee 30 28 24 27 — 109 3-point goals: Chicago 8-22 (Mirotic 3-7, Grant 2-3, Portis 2-5, Nwaba 1-1, Zipser 0-1, Dunn 0-1, Holiday 0-4), Milwaukee 9-33 (Vaughn 2-8, Middleton 2-9, Brown 1-1, Payton II 1-1, Maker 1-2, Antetokounmpo 1-3, Bledsoe 1-5, Brogdon 0-4). Fouled out: Dunn. Rebounds: Chicago 50 (Portis 12), Milwaukee 43 (Antetokounmpo 16). Assists: Chicago 24 (Dunn, Holiday 7), Milwaukee 24 (Bledsoe 7). Total fouls: Chicago 26, Milwaukee 24. Technicals: Milwaukee coach Bucks (Defensive three second). A: 16,921 (18,717).

Red Wings 3, Maple Leafs 1

Trail Blazers 95, Magic 88

Toronto 1 0 0 — 1 Detroit 0 2 1 — 3 First period: 1, Toronto, Borgman 3 (Martin, Moore), 1:58. Penalties: Daley, DET, (interference), 8:03; van Riemsdyk, TOR, (interference), 13:08. Second period: 2, Detroit, DeKeyser 1 (Zetterberg, Frk), 5:22. 3, Detroit, Daley 1 (Ericsson, Glendening), 11:22 (sh). Penalties: Martin, TOR, (interference), 5:58; Kronwall, DET, (hooking), 10:25. Third period: 4, Detroit, Tatar 10 (Kronwall, Zetterberg), 9:39 (pp). Penalties: Bozak, TOR, (interference), 8:06; DeKeyser, DET, (holding), 14:10; Hainsey, TOR, (hooking), 19:23. Shots: Toronto 12-5-9: 26. Detroit 7-13-9: 29. Power-plays: Toronto 0 of 3; Detroit 1 of 4. Goalies: Toronto, McElhinney 3-3-0 (29 shots-26 saves). Detroit, Howard 10-9-6 (26-25). A: 19,515.

Devils 5, Stars 2 Dallas 1 1 0 — 2 New Jersey 2 1 2 — 5 First period: 1, New Jersey, Santini 2 (Gibbons), 4:28. 2, Dallas, Hanzal 2 (Seguin, Lindell), 6:42 (pp). 3, New Jersey, Coleman 4 (Greene, Gibbons), 19:06. Penalties: Pitlick, DAL, (interference), 0:29; Santini, NJ, (closing hand on the puck), 5:00. Second period: 4, Dallas, Radulov 11 (Lindell, Janmark), 8:09. 5, New Jersey, Boyle 7 (Butcher, Zacha), 16:39 (pp). Penalties: Klingberg, DAL, (cross checking), 10:56; Johns, DAL, major (high sticking), 12:48; Pateryn, DAL, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 16:39; Boyle, NJ, served by Noesen, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 16:39; Boyle, NJ, Misconduct (misconduct), 16:39; Honka, DAL, (slashing), 17:05; Zacha, NJ, (roughing), 20:00. Third period: 6, New Jersey, Lappin 1 (Boyle, Hayes), 12:57. 7, New Jersey, Boyle 8, 18:00. Penalties: Moore, NJ, (high sticking), 1:07; Roussel, DAL, Misconduct (misconduct), 19:52. Shots: Dallas 12-5-13: 30. New Jersey 9-9-8: 26. Power-plays: Dallas 1 of 3; New Jersey 1 of 5. Goalies: Dallas, Lehtonen 5-5-1 (25 shots-21 saves). New Jersey, Schneider 13-6-4 (30-28). A: 13,171.

NHL Scoring Leaders Through Thursday’s games Player, team Nikita Kucherov, TB Steven Stamkos, TB Johnny Gaudreau, CGY Connor McDavid, EDM Anze Kopitar, LA Josh Bailey, NYI Blake Wheeler, WPG Jakub Voracek, PHI John Tavares, NYI Brayden Schenn, STL Phil Kessel, PIT 5 tied with 35 pts.

GP 31 31 32 32 32 32 32 31 32 33 33

G 22 12 13 12 16 8 8 7 18 16 15

A 22 31 26 27 22 30 30 31 19 21 22

PTS 44 43 39 39 38 38 38 38 37 37 37

LATE THURSDAY

Predators 4, Oilers 0 Nashville 0 4 0 — 4 Edmonton 0 0 0 — 0 First period: None. Penalties: Arvidsson, NSH, (slashing), 6:42; Emelin, NSH, (interference), 18:15; Subban, NSH, (cross checking), 20:00; Strome, EDM, (roughing), 20:00. Second period: 1, Nashville, Aberg 2 (Ekholm, Jarnkrok), 2:56. 2, Nashville, Fiala 7 (Ekholm, Turris), 8:16 (pp). 3, Nashville, Turris 7 (Smith), 14:49. 4, Nashville, Josi 7 (Forsberg, Subban), 17:25 (pp). Penalties: Klefbom, EDM, (delay of game), 7:50; Cammalleri, EDM, (slashing), 16:25; McDavid, EDM, (hooking), 17:00. Third period: None. Penalties: Emelin, NSH, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 3:26. Shots: Nashville 4-9-10: 23. Edmonton 22-11-13: 46. Power-plays: Nashville 2 of 3; Edmonton 0 of 3. Goalies: Nashville, Saros 3-3-1 (46 shots-46 saves). Edmonton, Brossoit 3-7-1 (23-19). A: 18,347.

Portland: Turner 3-6 2-2 8, Aminu 6-9 0-0 15, Nurkic 4-11 1-1 9, Lillard 7-16 4-4 21, McCollum 8-20 4-4 20, Davis 1-3 0-0 2, Vonleh 0-1 1-2 1, Collins 2-8 0-0 4, Napier 4-7 0-0 8, Connaughton 2-5 1-2 7. Totals 37-86 13-15 95. Orlando: Hezonja 0-2 4-4 4, Gordon 4-10 3-6 13, Vucevic 12-20 0-0 26, Payton 3-6 0-0 6, Simmons 6-15 2-3 15, Iwundu 1-4 0-0 2, Speights 1-9 0-0 3, Biyombo 1-3 1-2 3, Augustin 4-10 2-2 14, Mack 0-5 2-2 2. Totals 32-84 14-19 88. 24 26 25 20 — Portland 20 23 23 22 — Orlando 3-point goals: Portland 8-18 (Aminu 3-5, Lillard 3-6, Connaughton 2-4, Collins 0-1, McCollum 0-2), Orlando 10-29 (Augustin 4-7, Vucevic 2-5, Gordon 2-5, Simmons 1-3, Speights 1-6, Iwundu 0-1, Mack 0-2). Rebounds: Portland 45 (Nurkic 11), Orlando 45 (Vucevic 14). Assists: Portland 18 (McCollum, Lillard 4), Orlando 15 (Augustin 4). Total fouls: Portland 20, Orlando 18. Technicals: Speights. A: 16,963 (18,846).

95 88

Heat 104, Hornets 98 Miami: Richardson 4-7 2-2 11, J.Johnson 5-10 1-1 11, Olynyk 4-9 2-4 11, Dragic 2-10 4-4 8, Waiters 5-14 2-2 12, Mickey 4-6 0-0 8, Adebayo 5-6 1-1 11, T.Johnson 5-6 2-2 16, Ellington 5-10 1-1 16. Totals 39-78 15-17 104. Charlotte: Kidd-Gilchrist 6-8 1-2 13, Williams 2-6 0-0 5, Howard 4-8 7-12 15, Walker 8-22 5-6 25, Batum 2-7 1-1 5, O’Bryant III 2-6 0-0 4, Kaminsky 3-11 2-2 10, Carter-Williams 1-1 2-2 4, Monk 1-3 0-0 3, Lamb 4-10 2-2 12, Graham 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 34-83 20-27 98. 24 29 26 25 — 104 Miami Charlotte 19 28 24 27 — 98 3-point goals: Miami 11-31 (Ellington 5-10, T.Johnson 4-4, Richardson 1-2, Olynyk 1-4, Mickey 0-1, J.Johnson 0-2, Dragic 0-3, Waiters 0-5), Charlotte 10-27 (Walker 4-10, Lamb 2-4, Kaminsky 2-6, Monk 1-2, Williams 1-4, O’Bryant III 0-1). Rebounds: Miami 40 (Mickey 7), Charlotte 42 (Howard 16). Assists: Miami 25 (Dragic 7), Charlotte 21 (Batum 10). Total fouls: Miami 23, Charlotte 14. Technicals: Williams. A: 15,565 (19,077).

Thunder 119, 76ers 117, 3 OT Oklahoma City: George 8-23 3-4 24, Anthony 11-17 1-1 24, Adams 2-8 1-1 5, Westbrook 10-33 5-12 27, Roberson 2-5 0-0 4, Huestis 3-3 0-1 7, Grant 3-4 0-0 7, Patterson 1-3 0-0 2, Felton 5-10 0-0 14, Abrines 1-6 0-0 3, Ferguson 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 47-113 10-19 119. Philadelphia: Covington 4-21 0-0 11, Saric 7-16 0-0 16, Embiid 11-20 12-13 34, Simmons 6-10 0-2 12, Redick 7-18 1-1 19, Holmes 2-2 0-0 4, Booker 3-4 0-0 6, A.Johnson 0-0 0-0 0, McConnell 0-2 1-1 1, Bayless 4-7 2-3 14. Totals 44-100 16-20 117. Oklahoma City 28 27 26 13 8 9 8 — 119 Philadelphia 23 24 30 17 8 9 6 — 117 3-point goals: Oklahoma City 15-35 (George 5-11, Felton 4-5, Westbrook 2-5, Huestis 1-1, Grant 1-2, Anthony 1-4, Abrines 1-5, Patterson 0-1, Roberson 0-1), Philadelphia 13-46 (Bayless 4-6, Redick 4-13, Covington 3-15, Saric 2-9, Embiid 0-3). Fouled out: Adams. Rebounds: Oklahoma City 60 (Westbrook 18), Philadelphia 50 (Covington 10). Assists: Oklahoma City 28 (Westbrook 15), Philadelphia 35 (Simmons 11). Total fouls: Oklahoma City 21, Philadelphia 20. Technicals: George, Westbrook, Covington. A: 20,612 (21,600).

Raptors 120, Nets 87 Brooklyn: Harris 3-8 0-0 6, Hollis-Jefferson 4-7 1-1 9, Zeller 2-6 0-0 4, Dinwiddie 3-9 1-2 7, LeVert 1-7 0-0 2, Acy 1-4 5-6 7, Mozgov 2-5 3-3 7, Okafor 5-11 0-0 10, Whitehead 5-10 1-2 13, Stauskas 6-9 5-5 22. Totals 32-76 16-19 87. Toronto: Anunoby 1-4 0-0 3, Ibaka 8-15 0-0 18, Valanciunas 7-11 0-0 14, Lowry 4-9 0-0 10, DeRozan 14-19 2-4 31, McKinnie 0-1 0-0 0, Siakam 3-9 0-0 6, Poeltl 5-6 1-3 11, VanVleet 3-5 1-1 7, Wright 3-8 1-1 7, Brown 1-2 0-0 2, Powell 5-8 0-0 11. Totals 54-97 5-9 120. Brooklyn 20 24 — 20 23 87 Toronto 30 28 33 29 — 120 3-point goals: Brooklyn 7-23 (Stauskas 5-7, Whitehead 2-3, Dinwiddie 0-2, Acy 0-2, Okafor 0-2, LeVert 0-3, Harris 0-4), Toronto 7-28 (Ibaka 2-4, Lowry 2-5, Powell 1-1, DeRozan 1-2, Anunoby 1-4, Poeltl 0-1, VanVleet 0-1, Valanciunas 0-1, Brown 0-1, McKinnie 0-1, Wright 0-2, Siakam 0-5). Rebounds: Brooklyn 37 (Stauskas, Acy 7), Toronto 45 (Lowry 10). Assists: Brooklyn 15 (Dinwiddie 5), Toronto 26 (Lowry 12). Total fouls: Brooklyn 14, Toronto 16. A: 19,800 (19,800).

Bulls 115, Bucks 109

Grizzlies 96, Hawks 94 Atlanta: Prince 6-14 0-0 17, Ilyasova 4-8 0-0 9, Plumlee 2-4 0-0 4, Schroder 5-18 7-8 18, Bazemore 8-15 0-0 19, Babbitt 1-3 0-0 2, Bembry 2-2 0-0 4, Collins 1-2 0-0 2, Taylor 0-2 5-6 5, Belinelli 5-9 2-2 14. Totals 34-77 14-16 94. Memphis: Brooks 3-6 2-2 8, Green 3-9 2-4 8, Gasol 3-9 5-5 13, Evans 9-15 0-0 22, Harrison 3-7 1-2 10, Parsons 4-9 1-1 9, Martin 0-3 0-0 0, Davis 2-4 0-0 4, Chalmers 6-10 1-2 16, McLemore 3-6 0-1 6. Totals 36-78 12-17 96. 21 21 26 26 — Atlanta 23 32 Memphis 17 24 — 3-point goals: Atlanta 12-31 (Prince 5-8, Bazemore 3-8, Belinelli 2-6, Ilyasova 1-3, Schroder 1-5, Babbitt 0-1), Memphis 12-25 (Evans 4-5, Harrison 3-3, Chalmers 3-4, Gasol 2-2, Brooks 0-2, Parsons 0-2, McLemore 0-3, Green 0-4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Atlanta 35 (Collins 7), Memphis 43 (Green 12). Assists: Atlanta 27 (Schroder 11), Memphis 21 (Gasol 5). Total fouls: Atlanta 19, Memphis 24. A: 15,803 (18,119).

94 96

LATE THURSDAY

Warriors 112, Mavericks 97 Dallas: Barnes 6-18 3-4 16, Kleber 1-2 2-2 4, Nowitzki 6-13 4-5 18, Ferrell 5-11 0-0 13, Matthews 3-12 0-0 7, Powell 3-4 0-0 6, Motley 1-1 2-4 4, Withey 1-2 0-0 2, Harris 5-8 2-2 13, Barea 6-9 0-0 14, Cleveland 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 37-82 13-17 97. Golden State: Durant 15-23 2-2 36, Casspi 7-9 2-4 17, Bell 4-5 0-0 8, Livingston 4-6 0-0 8, Thompson 10-18 0-0 25, West 4-5 1-1 9, Looney 0-1 0-0 0, McGee 1-2 0-0 2, Cook 1-2 0-0 3, McCaw 0-2 2-2 2, Iguodala 1-5 0-0 2. Totals 47-78 7-9 112. 20 25 24 — 28 Dallas 24 24 32 32 — Golden State 3-point goals: Dallas 10-29 (Ferrell 3-7, Nowitzki 2-3, Barea 2-4, Harris 1-2, Barnes 1-4, Matthews 1-7, Withey 0-1, Kleber 0-1), Golden State 11-22 (Thompson 5-5, Durant 4-8, Cook 1-2, Casspi 1-2, McCaw 0-1, McGee 0-1, Iguodala 0-3). Rebounds: Dallas 31 (Nowitzki 9), Golden State 41 (Casspi, Durant 11). Assists: Dallas 25 (Harris, Barea 6), Golden State 35 (Iguodala 10). Total fouls: Dallas 16, Golden State 22. A: 19,596 (19,596).

97 112

NBA LEADERS Through Thursday’s games G Scoring 26 Harden, HOU Antetokounmpo, MIL 25 29 James, CLE 23 Curry, GOL Lillard, POR 27 Cousins, NOR 29 24 Durant, GOL Porzingis, NYK 24 Davis, NOR 24 Oladipo, IND 27 Booker, PHX 25 Irving, BOS 28 Beal, WAS 28 DeRozan, TOR 26 Embiid, PHL 22 Griffin, LAC 19 Aldridge, SAN 27 Westbrook, OKC 27 Walker, CHA 25 McCollum, POR 26 FG Percentage FG Capela, HOU 151 Jordan, LAC 121 Adams, OKC 144 Kanter, NYK 143 Collins, ATL 110 James, CLE 314 219 Davis, NOR 130 Randle, LAL G Rebounds Drummond, DET 28 Jordan, LAC 26 29 Cousins, NOR 27 Howard, CHA Towns, MIN 29 Embiid, PHL 22 Capela, HOU 26 21 Jokic, DEN

FG 253 275 314 192 224 262 234 218 219 238 213 247 238 216 181 150 235 212 180 207

OFF 140 125 61 98 82 54 82 55

FT 203 186 128 139 184 169 100 128 149 109 120 113 127 169 143 107 126 137 133 73 FGA 222 183 222 238 184 543 384 234 DEF 287 255 302 238 261 191 205 168

PTS 822 748 814 606 709 758 627 611 602 657 608 673 665 617 521 448 612 609 552 553

TOT 427 380 363 336 343 245 287 223

AVG 31.6 29.9 28.1 26.3 26.3 26.1 26.1 25.5 25.1 24.3 24.3 24.0 23.8 23.7 23.7 23.6 22.7 22.6 22.1 21.3 PCT .680 .661 .649 .601 .598 .578 .570 .556 AVG 15.2 14.6 12.5 12.4 11.8 11.1 11.0 10.6


SPORTS

12.16.2017 • Saturday • M 2

NBA STANDINGS

NHL STANDINGS WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Nashville Blues Winnipeg Minnesota Chicago Dallas Colorado Pacific Los Angeles Vegas San Jose Calgary Anaheim Vancouver Edmonton Arizona

GP 31 33 32 31 32 33 31 GP 33 31 31 32 32 33 32 34

W 20 21 18 17 16 18 15 W 20 20 17 16 14 15 13 7

L 7 10 9 11 11 14 14 L 10 9 10 13 11 14 17 22

OT 4 2 5 3 5 1 2 OT 3 2 4 3 7 4 2 5

Pts 44 44 41 37 37 37 32 Pts 43 42 38 35 35 34 28 19

GF 106 105 108 91 98 98 96 GF 100 107 85 91 86 87 93 76

GA Home 85 11-2-2 84 11-7-0 92 11-3-1 88 10-3-2 85 9-5-2 97 10-4-0 101 9-5-1 GA Home 77 10-5-2 95 12-2-1 75 9-6-2 99 8-9-0 92 8-7-3 100 6-7-3 105 5-10-0 118 3-9-1

Away Div 9-5-2 8-1-1 10-3-2 5-1-1 7-6-4 5-2-1 7-8-1 4-5-0 7-6-3 3-5-2 8-10-1 4-8-0 6-9-1 4-5-1 Away Div 10-5-1 3-3-2 8-7-1 9-1-0 8-4-2 5-1-3 8-4-3 5-4-0 6-4-4 3-2-4 9-7-1 4-5-0 8-7-2 4-1-0 4-13-4 1-5-3

L 6 13 10 14 13 15 13 18 L 11 9 12 12 12 14 11 11

OT 2 1 4 4 7 5 7 7 OT 1 5 1 3 3 3 7 7

Pts 48 41 34 32 31 29 27 23 Pts 41 41 41 37 37 35 33 33

GF 117 109 84 87 86 93 82 72 GF 94 100 105 114 105 95 89 88

GA 75 97 82 100 103 110 103 111 GA 84 96 96 111 94 106 89 97

Away 10-4-1 10-8-1 6-5-2 5-7-1 6-7-1 6-9-2 5-8-2 4-9-5 Away 8-5-1 10-4-3 7-7-1 8-10-1 4-7-0 6-9-2 7-5-3 7-7-4

Friday New Jersey 5, Dallas 2 Carolina 5, Buffalo 4, OT NY Rangers 4, Los Angeles 2 Detroit 3, Toronto 1 Vancouver 4, San Jose 3, OT Thursday Anaheim 3, Blues 1 Philadelphia 2, Buffalo 1 Washington 5, Boston 3 Columbus 6, NY Islanders 4 Montreal 2, New Jersey 1, OT Chicago 5, Winnipeg 1 Minnesota 2, Toronto 0 Colorado 2, Florida 1 Tampa Bay 4, Arizona 1 Nashville 4, Edmonton 0 San Jose 3, Calgary 2 Vegas 2, Pittsburgh 1 Saturday Edmonton at Minnesota, 1 p.m. NY Rangers at Boston, 4 p.m. Los Angeles at NY Islanders, 6 p.m. Winnipeg at Blues, 6 p.m. Montreal at Ottawa, 6 p.m. Columbus at Carolina, 6 p.m. Dallas at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Anaheim at Washington, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh at Arizona, 7 p.m. Tampa Bay at Colorado, 8 p.m. Nashville at Calgary, 9 p.m.

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Tampa Bay Toronto Boston Montreal Detroit Florida Ottawa Buffalo Metropolitan Columbus New Jersey Washington NY Islanders NY Rangers Pittsburgh Philadelphia Carolina

GP 31 34 29 32 32 32 30 33 GP 32 32 33 32 32 33 31 31

W 23 20 15 14 12 12 10 8 W 20 18 20 17 17 16 13 13

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • B7

Home 13-2-1 10-5-0 9-5-2 9-7-3 6-6-6 6-6-3 5-5-5 4-9-2 Home 12-6-0 8-5-2 13-5-0 9-2-2 13-5-3 10-5-1 6-6-4 6-4-3

Div 5-2-0 5-2-1 2-1-2 8-1-1 4-7-2 4-3-1 2-3-1 3-4-2 Div 7-4-0 2-3-0 5-3-0 5-4-1 5-4-2 4-2-0 1-0-3 2-3-2

Sunday Blues at Winnipeg, 5 p.m. Minnesota at Chicago, 6 p.m. Calgary at Vancouver, 7 p.m. Florida at Vegas, 7 p.m. Monday Anaheim at New Jersey, 6 p.m. Columbus at Boston, 6 p.m. Los Angeles at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. San Jose at Edmonton, 8 Pittsburgh at Colorado, 8 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss.

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Houston San Antonio New Orleans Memphis Dallas Northwest Minnesota Denver Portland Oklahoma City Utah Pacific Golden State LA Clippers LA Lakers Sacramento Phoenix

W 23 19 15 9 8 W 17 16 15 14 14 W 23 11 10 9 9

L 4 10 15 20 21 L 12 13 13 14 15 L 6 16 17 19 21

Pct GB .852 — .655 5 .500 9½ .310 15 .276 16 Pct GB .586 — .552 1 .536 1½ .500 2½ .483 3 Pct GB .793 — .407 11 .370 12 .321 13½ .300 14½

L10 10-0 7-3 4-6 2-8 4-6 L10 6-4 5-5 5-5 6-4 6-4 L10 9-1 5-5 3-7 4-6 2-8

Str W-12 L-2 L-1 W-1 L-1 Str W-1 W-1 W-2 W-2 W-1 Str W-8 L-1 L-2 L-1 L-5

Home 11-3 13-2 8-7 6-11 6-10 Home 10-5 11-2 7-8 9-4 11-5 Home 10-3 6-7 6-7 5-7 4-12

Away 12-1 6-8 7-8 3-9 2-11 Away 7-7 5-11 8-5 5-10 3-10 Away 13-3 5-9 4-10 4-12 5-9

Conf 13-2 9-6 9-12 8-10 6-14 Conf 14-5 7-8 8-7 7-9 8-7 Conf 11-4 7-9 4-10 7-8 4-11

Str L-1 W-2 W-3 L-1 L-2 Str W-2 W-1 L-4 L-2 L-4 Str W-3 L-2 L-2 W-2 W-5

Home 13-3 10-1 13-5 7-7 6-8 Home 8-5 5-7 6-8 8-7 3-10 Home 12-4 9-5 10-6 8-5 5-8

Away 11-4 9-7 2-8 7-7 5-9 Away 8-8 9-7 5-11 2-11 3-13 Away 9-4 6-7 6-7 8-8 3-12

Conf 15-5 9-4 8-9 6-6 5-9 Conf 7-6 9-7 6-10 5-11 4-17 Conf 16-6 5-8 11-7 9-9 7-8

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Boston Toronto New York Philadelphia Brooklyn Southeast Washington Miami Orlando Charlotte Atlanta Central Cleveland Milwaukee Indiana Detroit Chicago

W 24 19 15 14 11 W 16 14 11 10 6 W 21 15 16 16 8

L 7 8 13 14 17 L 13 14 19 18 23 L 8 12 13 13 20

Pct .774 .704 .536 .500 .393 Pct .552 .500 .367 .357 .207 Pct .724 .556 .552 .552 .286

GB — 3 7½ 8½ 11½ GB — 1½ 5½ 5½ 10 GB — 5 5 5 12½

L10 6-4 8-2 5-5 3-7 5-5 L10 6-4 5-5 3-7 2-8 2-8 L10 9-1 6-4 5-5 3-7 5-5

Friday Detroit 104, Indiana 98 Miami 104, Charlotte 98 Oklahoma City 119, Philadelphia 117, 3OT Portland 95, Orlando 88 Washington 100, LA Clippers 91 Toronto 120, Brooklyn 87 Utah 107, Boston 95 Chicago 115, Milwaukee 109 Memphis 96, Atlanta 94 Denver 117, New Orleans 111, OT Houston 124, San Antonio 109 Thursday Detroit 105, Atlanta 91 New York 111, Brooklyn 104 Cleveland 121, LA Lakers 112 Minnesota 119, Sacramento 96 Golden State 112, Dallas 97 Saturday Portland at Charlotte, 6 p.m. Oklahoma City at New York, 6:30 p.m. Utah at Cleveland, 6:30 p.m. LA Clippers at Miami, 7 p.m. Milwaukee at Houston, 7 p.m. Phoenix at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Dallas at San Antonio, 7:30 p.m. Boston at Memphis, 8 p.m. Sunday Sacramento at Toronto, 2:30 p.m. Orlando at Detroit, 3 p.m. Cleveland at Washington, 5 Indiana at Brooklyn, 5 p.m. Monday Boston at Indiana, 6 p.m. New York at Charlotte, 6. Miami at Atlanta, 6:30 p.m. Denver at Oklahoma City, 7 Philadelphia at Chicago, 7 Portland at Minnesota, 7 Utah at Houston, 7 p.m. LA Clippers at San Antonio, 7:30 p.m. Phoenix at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Golden State at LA Lakers, 9:30 p.m.

Thunder win thriller in three OTs ASSOCIATED PRESS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Carolina’s Jaccob Slavin (left) and Sebastian Aho celebrate a goal during overtime against the Buffalo Sabres on Friday.

Slavin’s OT goal boosts Carolina over Sabres Buffalo has dropped last six overtime games ASSOCIATED PRESS

Jaccob Slavin scored 2:15 into overtime to give the Carolina Hurricanes a 5-4 victory over the host Buffalo Sabres on Friday night. Jordan Staal, Derek Ryan, Elias Lindstrom, Justin Williams and Slavin each had a goal and an assist to help the Hurricanes win their second in a row to close out a season-long six-game trip. Cam Ward made 37 saves. Jack Eichel had his first career hat trick and assisted on Jake McCabe’s goal for the Sabres. McCabe also had two assists, and Evander Kane had three assists. Chad Johnson stopped 29 shots. Buffalo has lost its last six overtime games. Lindholm set up Slavin in the slot for the winning goal after Ward stopped Kane on a breakaway. Rangers shut down Kings • Rick Nash scored the tiebreaking goal with 3:27 remaining to lead the New York Rangers to a 4-2 victory over the Pacific Divisionleading Los Angeles Kings. Chris Kreider, Kevin Hayes and J.T. Miller also scored to help New York win for the second time in five games (2-2-1). Henrik Lundqvist stopped 33 shots. On the go-ahead goal, Nash stole the puck in the Kings’ zone on the left side near the center line, drove into the left circle and beat Jonathan Quick for his ninth of the season to give the Rangers their third lead of the game. Miller added an empty-netter with 54 seconds remaining, sealing New York’s 11th win in the last 13 at home (11-1-1). Lightning’s Callahan out indefinitely • Tampa Bay Lightning forward Ryan Callahan has an upper-body injury that will sideline him indefinitely. The Lightning said that Callahan will be re-evaluated in three to four weeks. Callahan was injured in the third period of Tampa Bay’s 4-1 victory in Arizona on Thursday night. He tangled with Oliver Ekman-Larsson and the Arizona player fell and landed on Callahan’s right arm. The 32-year-old Callahan has a goal and five assists in 29 games this season. The NHL-leading Lightning will face the Colorado Avalanche on Saturday night.

Russell Westbrook had 27 points, 17 rebounds and 15 assists, and Oklahoma City and the Philadelphia 76ers went basketfor-basket in a three-overtime thriller before the visiting Thunder pulled out a 119-117 victory on Friday night. Andre Roberson scored the winner with 10 seconds left for the Thunder. But one of the early contenders for NBA game of the year belonged to Joel Embiid and Westbrook as they drove, blocked and rebounded their way toward one big play after another. Embiid scored 34 points in 48 minutes with an aching back and rallied the Sixers from a 17-point hole. Embiid grabbed his lower back when he took a hard foul on a drive to the basket in the fourth quarter. Embiid grimaced dur-

NHL SUMMARIES

NBA SUMMARIES

ing timeouts on the bench and trudged into position a few times. Embiid sucked it up and carried the Sixers in the fourth and the first overtime. His feed to a charging Ben Simmons on the baseline for a two-handed dunk tied the score at 94-all with 53 seconds left in the quarter. The Sixers closed the fourth on an 11-0 run.

NOTEBOOK

Hayward could return this season • Celtics guard Gordon Hayward says he is open to playing this season but says it will depend on how fast he is able to heal and show progress as he works his way back from a broken left ankle. Wednesday marked a milestone in Hayward’s recovery process when he was able to shed the walking boot he’s been using since his surgery in October.

Hurricanes 5, Sabres 4, OT

Wizards 100, Clippers 91

Jazz 107, Celtics 95

Carolina 0 1 3 1 — 5 Buffalo 0 1 3 0 — 4 First period: None. Penalties: Okposo, BUF, (hooking), 5:50; Faulk, CAR, (hooking), 11:24; McGinn, CAR, (interference), 16:20; Girgensons, BUF, (hooking), 19:15; Skinner, CAR, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 19:15; Beaulieu, BUF, (slashing), 20:00. Second period: 1, Carolina, Williams 7 (Staal, McGinn), 10:16. 2, Buffalo, Eichel 9 (Kane, McCabe), 10:46. Penalties: None. Third period: 3, Buffalo, McCabe 2 (Kane, Eichel), 1:20. 4, Carolina, Staal 8 (Slavin, Williams), 3:00. 5, Carolina, Ryan 6 (Pesce), 4:03. 6, Carolina, Lindholm 9 (Aho, Ryan), 6:57. 7, Buffalo, Eichel 10 (McCabe, Okposo), 9:24. 8, Buffalo, Eichel 11 (Kane), 9:34. Penalties: None. Overtime: 9, Carolina, Slavin 3 (Aho, Lindholm), 2:15. Penalties: None. Shots: Carolina 7-15-9-3: 34. Buffalo 12-14-13-2: 41. Power-plays: Carolina 0 of 2; Buffalo 0 of 2. Goalies: Carolina, Ward 6-2-1 (41 shots-37 saves). Buffalo, Johnson 1-5-3 (34-29). A: 17,610.

L.A. Clippers: W.Johnson 1-7 1-2 3, Wilson 4-10 1-2 10, Jordan 5-11 2-7 12, L.Williams 5-14 10-10 23, Thornwell 1-3 3-4 5, Dekker 3-7 0-0 6, Reed 0-0 0-2 0, B.Johnson 1-2 0-0 2, Harrell 2-4 1-2 5, Evans 7-18 0-0 15, C.Williams 4-9 0-0 10. Totals 33-85 18-29 91. Washington: Porter Jr. 1-2 0-0 2, Morris 4-9 0-0 8, Gortat 3-6 3-5 9, Wall 5-16 4-7 15, Beal 9-18 0-0 20, Oubre Jr. 2-9 3-3 8, Scott 9-10 2-4 22, McCullough 0-0 0-0 0, Smith 1-5 0-0 2, Mahinmi 1-2 1-2 3, Frazier 0-2 0-0 0, Satoransky 4-6 2-2 11, Meeks 0-3 0-0 0. Totals 39-88 15-23 100. 18 21 91 25 27 — L.A. Clippers Washington 25 23 27 25 — 100 3-point goals: L.A. Clippers 7-24 (L.Williams 3-8, C.Williams 2-3, Evans 1-3, Wilson 1-4, Thornwell 0-1, Dekker 0-2, W.Johnson 0-3), Washington 7-31 (Scott 2-3, Beal 2-6, Satoransky 1-3, Oubre Jr. 1-4, Wall 1-6, Porter Jr. 0-1, Morris 0-1, Smith 0-2, Frazier 0-2, Meeks 0-3). Rebounds: L.A. Clippers 46 (Jordan 16), Washington 49 (Beal 11). Assists: L.A. Clippers 17 (Evans 6), Washington 21 (Wall 5). Total fouls: L.A. Clippers 20, Washington 26. A: 15,442 (20,356).

Utah: Ingles 4-7 0-0 12, Favors 3-6 0-0 6, Gobert 0-1 0-0 0, Rubio 10-15 1-1 22, Mitchell 6-18 3-3 17, Johnson 1-3 1-2 3, Jerebko 6-8 3-3 17, Udoh 2-4 1-1 5, Burks 2-7 4-4 8, Hood 6-14 1-4 17. Totals 40-83 14-18 107. Boston: Tatum 1-6 4-4 7, Horford 9-14 0-0 21, Baynes 1-4 0-0 2, Irving 11-25 9-9 33, Brown 3-8 0-1 6, Nader 0-0 0-0 0, Ojeleye 3-5 0-1 7, Yabusele 1-1 0-0 3, Theis 0-0 0-0 0, Smart 3-13 0-0 6, Rozier 0-4 1-2 1, Larkin 3-6 2-2 9. Totals 35-86 16-19 95. 21 33 25 28 — 107 Utah 13 95 Boston 26 28 28 — 3-point goals: Utah 13-25 (Ingles 4-6, Hood 4-7, Jerebko 2-3, Mitchell 2-5, Rubio 1-2, Burks 0-2), Boston 9-31 (Horford 3-5, Irving 2-8, Yabusele 1-1, Larkin 1-3, Tatum 1-3, Ojeleye 1-3, Rozier 0-2, Brown 0-3, Smart 0-3). Fouled out: Rubio. Rebounds: Utah 55 (Udoh 9), Boston 31 (Brown, Horford 6). Assists: Utah 19 (Mitchell 9), Boston 20 (Horford 7). Total fouls: Utah 20, Boston 18. A: 18,624 (18,624).

Rangers 4, Kings 2

Pistons 104, Pacers 98 Detroit: Bullock 5-8 2-2 15, Harris 2-14 0-1 6, Drummond 9-14 5-8 23, Jackson 3-11 2-2 8, Kennard 4-6 0-0 9, Johnson 4-10 4-4 13, Tolliver 3-6 0-0 9, Moreland 2-3 0-0 4, Smith 3-12 0-0 6, Galloway 4-9 0-0 11. Totals 39-93 13-17 104. Indiana: Bogdanovic 2-11 0-0 4, T.Young 5-9 2-4 12, Turner 8-14 7-8 24, Collison 4-8 0-0 10, Oladipo 8-22 5-5 26, Leaf 1-2 0-0 2, Sabonis 4-6 3-6 11, Joseph 0-5 0-0 0, Stephenson 3-10 2-2 9. Totals 35-87 19-25 98. 27 25 34 18 — 104 Detroit Indiana 19 35 20 24 — 98 3-point goals: Detroit 13-32 (Bullock 3-4, Tolliver 3-6, Galloway 3-7, Harris 2-7, Kennard 1-1, Johnson 1-4, Jackson 0-3), Indiana 9-30 (Oladipo 5-12, Collison 2-4, Turner 1-4, Stephenson 1-4, T.Young 0-1, Sabonis 0-1, Joseph 0-1, Bogdanovic 0-3). Rebounds: Detroit 44 (Drummond 13), Indiana 51 (Turner, T.Young, Oladipo, Stephenson 8). Assists: Detroit 22 (Harris, Smith, Johnson, Kennard 4), Indiana 21 (Stephenson 5). Total fouls: Detroit 22, Indiana 15. Technicals: Johnson. A: 14,687 (18,500).

Chicago: Valentine 1-4 0-0 2, Mirotic 7-16 5-7 22, Lopez 9-14 0-2 18, Dunn 7-12 3-5 17, Holiday 2-10 4-4 8, Zipser 0-2 0-0 0, Markkanen 0-0 0-0 0, Portis 9-16 7-7 27, Grant 2-3 2-7 8, Nwaba 5-9 2-3 13. Totals 42-86 23-35 115. Milwaukee: Middleton 9-19 9-9 29, Antetokounmpo 11-18 6-9 29, Henson 5-6 1-3 11, Bledsoe 5-13 1-2 12, Payton II 1-1 0-0 3, Wilson 0-0 0-0 0, Maker 2-3 2-4 7, Brown 1-1 0-0 3, Liggins 0-0 0-0 0, Vaughn 3-10 1-2 9, Brogdon 3-12 0-0 6. Totals 40-83 20-29 109. 33 26 23 33 — 115 Chicago Milwaukee 30 28 24 27 — 109 3-point goals: Chicago 8-22 (Mirotic 3-7, Grant 2-3, Portis 2-5, Nwaba 1-1, Zipser 0-1, Dunn 0-1, Holiday 0-4), Milwaukee 9-33 (Vaughn 2-8, Middleton 2-9, Brown 1-1, Payton II 1-1, Maker 1-2, Antetokounmpo 1-3, Bledsoe 1-5, Brogdon 0-4). Fouled out: Dunn. Rebounds: Chicago 50 (Portis 12), Milwaukee 43 (Antetokounmpo 16). Assists: Chicago 24 (Dunn, Holiday 7), Milwaukee 24 (Bledsoe 7). Total fouls: Chicago 26, Milwaukee 24. Technicals: Milwaukee coach Bucks (Defensive three second). A: 16,921 (18,717).

Los Angeles 0 1 1 — 2 NY Rangers 1 1 2 — 4 First period: 1, NY Rangers, Kreider 11 (Desharnais, Shattenkirk), 10:23 (pp). Penalties: Jokinen, LA, (hooking), 8:58. Second period: 2, Los Angeles, Gaborik 5 (Jokinen), 3:46. 3, NY Rangers, Hayes 7 (Grabner, McDonagh), 14:43. Penalties: Lewis, LA, (tripping), 6:32; Pearson, LA, (holding), 8:41; Fast, NYR, (interference), 11:05. Third period: 4, Los Angeles, Mitchell 2 (Gaborik, Jokinen), 7:59. 5, NY Rangers, Nash 9, 16:33. 6, NY Rangers, Miller 5 (Vesey, Zuccarello), 19:06. Penalties: None. Shots: Los Angeles 10-12-13: 35. NY Rangers 8-12-8: 28. Power-plays: Los Angeles 0 of 1; NY Rangers 1 of 3. Goalies: Los Angeles, Quick 15-10-1 (27 shots-24 saves). NY Rangers, Lundqvist 15-8-2 (35-33). A: 17,756.

Red Wings 3, Maple Leafs 1 Toronto 1 0 0 — 1 Detroit 0 2 1 — 3 First period: 1, Toronto, Borgman 3 (Martin, Moore), 1:58. Penalties: Daley, DET, (interference), 8:03; van Riemsdyk, TOR, (interference), 13:08. Second period: 2, Detroit, DeKeyser 1 (Zetterberg, Frk), 5:22. 3, Detroit, Daley 1 (Ericsson, Glendening), 11:22 (sh). Penalties: Martin, TOR, (interference), 5:58; Kronwall, DET, (hooking), 10:25. Third period: 4, Detroit, Tatar 10 (Kronwall, Zetterberg), 9:39 (pp). Penalties: Bozak, TOR, (interference), 8:06; DeKeyser, DET, (holding), 14:10; Hainsey, TOR, (hooking), 19:23. Shots: Toronto 12-5-9: 26. Detroit 7-13-9: 29. Power-plays: Toronto 0 of 3; Detroit 1 of 4. Goalies: Toronto, McElhinney 3-3-0 (29 shots-26 saves). Detroit, Howard 10-9-6 (26-25). A: 19,515.

Devils 5, Stars 2 Dallas 1 1 0 — 2 New Jersey 2 1 2 — 5 First period: 1, New Jersey, Santini 2 (Gibbons), 4:28. 2, Dallas, Hanzal 2 (Seguin, Lindell), 6:42 (pp). 3, New Jersey, Coleman 4 (Greene, Gibbons), 19:06. Penalties: Pitlick, DAL, (interference), 0:29; Santini, NJ, (closing hand on the puck), 5:00. Second period: 4, Dallas, Radulov 11 (Lindell, Janmark), 8:09. 5, New Jersey, Boyle 7 (Butcher, Zacha), 16:39 (pp). Penalties: Klingberg, DAL, (cross checking), 10:56; Johns, DAL, major (high sticking), 12:48; Pateryn, DAL, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 16:39; Boyle, NJ, served by Noesen, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 16:39; Boyle, NJ, Misconduct (misconduct), 16:39; Honka, DAL, (slashing), 17:05; Zacha, NJ, (roughing), 20:00. Third period: 6, New Jersey, Lappin 1 (Boyle, Hayes), 12:57. 7, New Jersey, Boyle 8, 18:00. Penalties: Moore, NJ, (high sticking), 1:07; Roussel, DAL, Misconduct (misconduct), 19:52. Shots: Dallas 12-5-13: 30. New Jersey 9-9-8: 26. Power-plays: Dallas 1 of 3; New Jersey 1 of 5. Goalies: Dallas, Lehtonen 5-5-1 (25 shots-21 saves). New Jersey, Schneider 13-6-4 (30-28). A: 13,171.

Canucks 4, Sharks 3, OT San Jose 1 1 1 0 — Vancouver 2 1 0 1 — First period: 1, Vancouver, Granlund 5 (H.Sedin, D.Sedin), 0:44 (pp). 2, San Jose, Burns 5 (Couture, Pavelski), 10:45 (pp). 3, Vancouver, Granlund 6 (H.Sedin, D.Sedin), 14:27. Penalties: Dillon, SJ, (cross checking), 0:15; Biega, VAN, (interference), 5:39; Dowd, VAN, (boarding), 10:28; Hansen, SJ, (interference), 12:20; Goldobin, VAN, (tripping), 18:34. Second period: 4, Vancouver, Boeser 17 (H.Sedin, D.Sedin), 11:56 (pp). 5, San Jose, Sorensen 1 (Hansen, Braun), 18:16. Penalties: Braun, SJ, (holding), 11:29. Third period: 6, San Jose, Burns 6 (Ward), 14:11. Penalties: Burmistrov, VAN, (interference), 5:12. Overtime: 7, Vancouver, Gagner 4 (Edler, Markstrom), 4:34. Penalties: None. Shots: San Jose 13-15-8-1: 37. Vancouver 22-10-6-2: 40. Power-plays: San Jose 1 of 4; Vancouver 2 of 3. Goalies: San Jose, Jones 11-7-3 (40 shots-36 saves). Vancouver, Markstrom 9-10-3 (37-34). A: 17,278.

3 4

GP 31 31 32 32 32 32 32 31 32 33 33

G 22 12 13 12 16 8 8 7 18 16 15

A 22 31 26 27 22 30 30 31 19 21 22

Portland: Turner 3-6 2-2 8, Aminu 6-9 0-0 15, Nurkic 4-11 1-1 9, Lillard 7-16 4-4 21, McCollum 8-20 4-4 20, Davis 1-3 0-0 2, Vonleh 0-1 1-2 1, Collins 2-8 0-0 4, Napier 4-7 0-0 8, Connaughton 2-5 1-2 7. Totals 37-86 13-15 95. Orlando: Hezonja 0-2 4-4 4, Gordon 4-10 3-6 13, Vucevic 12-20 0-0 26, Payton 3-6 0-0 6, Simmons 6-15 2-3 15, Iwundu 1-4 0-0 2, Speights 1-9 0-0 3, Biyombo 1-3 1-2 3, Augustin 4-10 2-2 14, Mack 0-5 2-2 2. Totals 32-84 14-19 88. 24 26 25 20 — Portland 20 23 23 22 — Orlando 3-point goals: Portland 8-18 (Aminu 3-5, Lillard 3-6, Connaughton 2-4, Collins 0-1, McCollum 0-2), Orlando 10-29 (Augustin 4-7, Vucevic 2-5, Gordon 2-5, Simmons 1-3, Speights 1-6, Iwundu 0-1, Mack 0-2). Rebounds: Portland 45 (Nurkic 11), Orlando 45 (Vucevic 14). Assists: Portland 18 (McCollum, Lillard 4), Orlando 15 (Augustin 4). Total fouls: Portland 20, Orlando 18. Technicals: Speights. A: 16,963 (18,846).

95 88

Heat 104, Hornets 98 Miami: Richardson 4-7 2-2 11, J.Johnson 5-10 1-1 11, Olynyk 4-9 2-4 11, Dragic 2-10 4-4 8, Waiters 5-14 2-2 12, Mickey 4-6 0-0 8, Adebayo 5-6 1-1 11, T.Johnson 5-6 2-2 16, Ellington 5-10 1-1 16. Totals 39-78 15-17 104. Charlotte: Kidd-Gilchrist 6-8 1-2 13, Williams 2-6 0-0 5, Howard 4-8 7-12 15, Walker 8-22 5-6 25, Batum 2-7 1-1 5, O’Bryant III 2-6 0-0 4, Kaminsky 3-11 2-2 10, Carter-Williams 1-1 2-2 4, Monk 1-3 0-0 3, Lamb 4-10 2-2 12, Graham 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 34-83 20-27 98. 24 29 26 25 — 104 Miami Charlotte 19 28 24 27 — 98 3-point goals: Miami 11-31 (Ellington 5-10, T.Johnson 4-4, Richardson 1-2, Olynyk 1-4, Mickey 0-1, J.Johnson 0-2, Dragic 0-3, Waiters 0-5), Charlotte 10-27 (Walker 4-10, Lamb 2-4, Kaminsky 2-6, Monk 1-2, Williams 1-4, O’Bryant III 0-1). Rebounds: Miami 40 (Mickey 7), Charlotte 42 (Howard 16). Assists: Miami 25 (Dragic 7), Charlotte 21 (Batum 10). Total fouls: Miami 23, Charlotte 14. Technicals: Williams. A: 15,565 (19,077).

Thunder 119, 76ers 117, 3 OT Oklahoma City: George 8-23 3-4 24, Anthony 11-17 1-1 24, Adams 2-8 1-1 5, Westbrook 10-33 5-12 27, Roberson 2-5 0-0 4, Huestis 3-3 0-1 7, Grant 3-4 0-0 7, Patterson 1-3 0-0 2, Felton 5-10 0-0 14, Abrines 1-6 0-0 3, Ferguson 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 47-113 10-19 119. Philadelphia: Covington 4-21 0-0 11, Saric 7-16 0-0 16, Embiid 11-20 12-13 34, Simmons 6-10 0-2 12, Redick 7-18 1-1 19, Holmes 2-2 0-0 4, Booker 3-4 0-0 6, A.Johnson 0-0 0-0 0, McConnell 0-2 1-1 1, Bayless 4-7 2-3 14. Totals 44-100 16-20 117. Oklahoma City 28 27 26 13 8 9 8 — 119 Philadelphia 23 24 30 17 8 9 6 — 117 3-point goals: Oklahoma City 15-35 (George 5-11, Felton 4-5, Westbrook 2-5, Huestis 1-1, Grant 1-2, Anthony 1-4, Abrines 1-5, Patterson 0-1, Roberson 0-1), Philadelphia 13-46 (Bayless 4-6, Redick 4-13, Covington 3-15, Saric 2-9, Embiid 0-3). Fouled out: Adams. Rebounds: Oklahoma City 60 (Westbrook 18), Philadelphia 50 (Covington 10). Assists: Oklahoma City 28 (Westbrook 15), Philadelphia 35 (Simmons 11). Total fouls: Oklahoma City 21, Philadelphia 20. Technicals: George, Westbrook, Covington. A: 20,612 (21,600).

Raptors 120, Nets 87

NHL SCORING LEADERS Through Thursday’s games Player, team Nikita Kucherov, TB Steven Stamkos, TB Johnny Gaudreau, CGY Connor McDavid, EDM Anze Kopitar, LA Josh Bailey, NYI Blake Wheeler, WPG Jakub Voracek, PHI John Tavares, NYI Brayden Schenn, STL Phil Kessel, PIT 5 tied with 35 pts.

Trail Blazers 95, Magic 88

PTS 44 43 39 39 38 38 38 38 37 37 37

Brooklyn: Harris 3-8 0-0 6, Hollis-Jefferson 4-7 1-1 9, Zeller 2-6 0-0 4, Dinwiddie 3-9 1-2 7, LeVert 1-7 0-0 2, Acy 1-4 5-6 7, Mozgov 2-5 3-3 7, Okafor 5-11 0-0 10, Whitehead 5-10 1-2 13, Stauskas 6-9 5-5 22. Totals 32-76 16-19 87. Toronto: Anunoby 1-4 0-0 3, Ibaka 8-15 0-0 18, Valanciunas 7-11 0-0 14, Lowry 4-9 0-0 10, DeRozan 14-19 2-4 31, McKinnie 0-1 0-0 0, Siakam 3-9 0-0 6, Poeltl 5-6 1-3 11, VanVleet 3-5 1-1 7, Wright 3-8 1-1 7, Brown 1-2 0-0 2, Powell 5-8 0-0 11. Totals 54-97 5-9 120. Brooklyn 20 24 — 20 23 87 Toronto 30 28 33 29 — 120 3-point goals: Brooklyn 7-23 (Stauskas 5-7, Whitehead 2-3, Dinwiddie 0-2, Acy 0-2, Okafor 0-2, LeVert 0-3, Harris 0-4), Toronto 7-28 (Ibaka 2-4, Lowry 2-5, Powell 1-1, DeRozan 1-2, Anunoby 1-4, Poeltl 0-1, VanVleet 0-1, Valanciunas 0-1, Brown 0-1, McKinnie 0-1, Wright 0-2, Siakam 0-5). Rebounds: Brooklyn 37 (Stauskas, Acy 7), Toronto 45 (Lowry 10). Assists: Brooklyn 15 (Dinwiddie 5), Toronto 26 (Lowry 12). Total fouls: Brooklyn 14, Toronto 16. A: 19,800 (19,800).

Bulls 115, Bucks 109

Grizzlies 96, Hawks 94 Atlanta: Prince 6-14 0-0 17, Ilyasova 4-8 0-0 9, Plumlee 2-4 0-0 4, Schroder 5-18 7-8 18, Bazemore 8-15 0-0 19, Babbitt 1-3 0-0 2, Bembry 2-2 0-0 4, Collins 1-2 0-0 2, Taylor 0-2 5-6 5, Belinelli 5-9 2-2 14. Totals 34-77 14-16 94. Memphis: Brooks 3-6 2-2 8, Green 3-9 2-4 8, Gasol 3-9 5-5 13, Evans 9-15 0-0 22, Harrison 3-7 1-2 10, Parsons 4-9 1-1 9, Martin 0-3 0-0 0, Davis 2-4 0-0 4, Chalmers 6-10 1-2 16, McLemore 3-6 0-1 6. Totals 36-78 12-17 96. 21 21 26 26 — Atlanta 23 32 Memphis 17 24 — 3-point goals: Atlanta 12-31 (Prince 5-8, Bazemore 3-8, Belinelli 2-6, Ilyasova 1-3, Schroder 1-5, Babbitt 0-1), Memphis 12-25 (Evans 4-5, Harrison 3-3, Chalmers 3-4, Gasol 2-2, Brooks 0-2, Parsons 0-2, McLemore 0-3, Green 0-4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Atlanta 35 (Collins 7), Memphis 43 (Green 12). Assists: Atlanta 27 (Schroder 11), Memphis 21 (Gasol 5). Total fouls: Atlanta 19, Memphis 24. A: 15,803 (18,119).

94 96

Rockets 124, Spurs 109 San Antonio: Leonard 5-9 1-1 12, Aldridge 8-21 0-0 16, Gasol 2-6 0-0 4, Parker 1-4 0-0 2, Green 1-4 0-0 2, Bertans 5-7 0-0 12, Gay 2-6 2-4 7, Lauvergne 7-8 0-0 14, Mills 5-7 0-2 13, Murray 3-8 3-4 9, Forbes 4-9 1-1 11, Ginobili 1-2 0-1 2, B.Paul 2-3 0-0 5. Totals 46-94 7-13 109. Houston: Ariza 4-14 0-0 11, R.Anderson 5-8 0-2 12, Capela 9-11 0-0 18, C.Paul 10-18 3-3 28, Harden 6-18 14-16 28, Tucker 2-6 0-0 5, Black 0-0 0-0 0, Nene 0-2 0-0 0, Qi 0-1 2-2 2, Brown 2-4 0-0 6, Gordon 5-9 1-2 14. Totals 43-91 20-25 124. 16 27 29 37 — 109 San Antonio Houston 31 29 32 32 — 124 3-point goals: San Antonio 10-26 (Mills 3-5, Bertans 2-4, Forbes 2-4, B.Paul 1-1, Gay 1-2, Leonard 1-2, Parker 0-1, Ginobili 0-1, Murray 0-1, Aldridge 0-2, Green 0-3), Houston 18-50 (C.Paul 5-9, Gordon 3-7, Ariza 3-11, R.Anderson 2-3, Brown 2-4, Harden 2-11, Tucker 1-4, Qi 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: San Antonio 39 (Gay 8), Houston 45 (Capela, R.Anderson 10). Assists: San Antonio 22 (Murray 5), Houston 20 (C.Paul 8). Total fouls: San Antonio 17, Houston 16. A: 18,055 (18,055).

Nuggets 117, Pelicans 111 New Orleans: Moore 2-8 0-0 4, Davis 12-22 4-4 28, Cousins 9-17 6-10 29, Rondo 4-5 0-0 9, Holiday 10-21 0-0 25, Cunningham 2-7 0-0 5, Miller 3-7 0-0 8, Nelson 1-4 0-0 3. Totals 43-91 10-14 111. Denver: Craig 2-6 1-2 6, Chandler 3-9 0-0 9, Plumlee 4-8 1-2 9, Murray 5-14 2-2 15, Harris 9-16 1-2 21, Barton 8-14 1-2 19, Lyles 6-12 3-4 19, Faried 1-2 0-0 2, Jokic 6-13 0-0 13, Mudiay 2-4 0-0 4, Beasley 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 46-100 9-14 117. 33 25 28 7 — 18 111 New Orleans 20 26 30 28 13 — 117 Denver 3-point goals: New Orleans 15-34 (Cousins 5-8, Holiday 5-9, Miller 2-5, Rondo 1-2, Nelson 1-3, Cunningham 1-4, Davis 0-1, Moore 0-2), Denver 16-36 (Lyles 4-7, Chandler 3-5, Murray 3-6, Barton 2-4, Harris 2-6, Jokic 1-2, Craig 1-4, Mudiay 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: New Orleans 42 (Davis 12), Denver 48 (Jokic 11). Assists: New Orleans 27 (Nelson 7), Denver 30 (Barton 6). Total fouls: New Orleans 15, Denver 17. A: 17,584 (19,155).

NBA LEADERS Through Thursday’s games Scoring G Harden, HOU 26 Antetokounmpo, MIL 25 James, CLE 29 Curry, GOL 23 Lillard, POR 27 Cousins, NOR 29 Durant, GOL 24 Porzingis, NYK 24 Davis, NOR 24 Oladipo, IND 27 Booker, PHX 25 28 Irving, BOS Beal, WAS 28 DeRozan, TOR 26 Embiid, PHL 22 Griffin, LAC 19 Aldridge, SAN 27 Westbrook, OKC 27 Walker, CHA 25

FG 253 275 314 192 224 262 234 218 219 238 213 247 238 216 181 150 235 212 180

FT 203 186 128 139 184 169 100 128 149 109 120 113 127 169 143 107 126 137 133

PTS 822 748 814 606 709 758 627 611 602 657 608 673 665 617 521 448 612 609 552

AVG 31.6 29.9 28.1 26.3 26.3 26.1 26.1 25.5 25.1 24.3 24.3 24.0 23.8 23.7 23.7 23.6 22.7 22.6 22.1


B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

BOYS BASKETBALL • HAZELWOOD CENTRAL 85, FRANCIS HOWELL 82 (3OT)

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 12.16.2017

FRIDAY’S RESULTS BOYS BASKETBALL

RICK ULREICH • Special to STLhighschoolsports.com

Hazelwood Central senior Telly Wright (right) tries to steal the ball from Francis Howell junior Daylan Dalton during the 8th Annual GAC/Suburban Challenge on Friday at Lindenwood University in St. Charles.

WRIGHT STUFF

Hawks senior comes through to help earn dramatic win over Vikings BY JOE HARRIS Special to STLhighschoolsports.com

ST. CHARLES • All game long Telly

Wright was telling his Hazelwood Central boys basketball teammates that he wanted the ball. He made the most of his chance once they finally found him. Wright followed a 3-pointer with two clutch free throws to lift Central to an 85-82 triple-overtime win over Francis Howell in the 8th Annual GAC/Suburban Challenge at Lindenwood University on Friday night. Wright’s trey with 40 seconds left in the third overtime gave Central (70), No. 4 in the STLhighschoolsports large school basketball rankings, the lead for good. “I have to give myself confidence because no one else will,” Wright said. “At the end of the game I was ready. I’m a senior. I’ve had a lot of experience so I was ready for that shot.” Xavier Ball took a charge to end Howell’s ensuing possession and Shaun Williams and Wright each hit two free throws in the clutch to protect the lead. Howell had one last look, but Daylon Dalton’s 40-foot heave clanged off the rim. “I was nervous because (Dalton) already hit two big shots before that in front of my face,” Wright said. Cameron Williams scored a gamehigh 26 points for Central, while Shaun Williams scored 18 points. Ball had 14 points.

Wright scored five of his eight points in the third extra session. Dalton led Howell (4-2) with 26 points. Matt Schark scored 23 points and Mark Simmons had 19 points. “I’m extraordinarily proud of my kids,” Howell coach Kurt Jacob said. “My kids fight, they work hard and they don’t back down from anybody. They’re extremely good kids and we’ve got some guys who can play a little bit, too. I think some people saw that tonight.” The lead swung back and forth early in the game, before Howell took control midway through the second quarter with a 10-1 run powered by a pair a 3-balls from Schark to give the Vikings a 30-23 lead. Central came back with two free throws from Shaun Williams and a steal by Larrion Heard to cut Howell’s lead to 33-29 at halftime. Ball opened the third quarter with a reverse layup and Maurice Hayes followed with a dunk to get Central’s offense rolling. “We had a lot of adversity all week, but we just keep learning,” Central coach Brandon Gilmore said. “We have a lot of seniors that I trust that we can get through any situation.” Matthew Simmons put down a pair of buckets and Dalton added a steal to give Howell a 41-35 lead. Central went on a 6-0 run, all of which came from the free throw line, to regain the lead before Howell’s Mark Simmons ended the third with a baby hook to cut Central’s lead to 48-47.

Mark Simmons added a three more buckets, the last of which came off a nifty spin move, early in the fourth to help give Howell a 57-51 lead. Cameron Williams got Central back into the game with a spin move of his own, followed by two power dunks off of steals to give the Hawks a 60-58 lead. “It was just the way the game flowed,” Cameron Williams said. “The ball was coming my way. I knew I could get to the rim, so I went to the rim and made some shots.” After two Schark free throws tied the game, Central held for the last shot but came up empty. A whistle blew as time expired and Central originally thought a foul was called on Howell, but it was determined no foul occurred. Cameron Williams completed a traditional 3-point play and added another bucket to give Central a 6562 lead in the first overtime, but Patrick Schulte answered with a trey for Howell to tie it again. “To beat a team like Hazelwood Central you’ve got to play extraordinarily good defense and you have to really to rebound the basketball,” Jacob said. “It’s tough because they’re athletic and they’re big.” Dalton scored six points for Howell in the second overtime, but Cameron Williams ended the period with a pair of buckets to tie it at 73-all. “We stayed to the game plan,” Cameron Williams said. “We didn’t’ execute as well as we should have, but we stayed with it and got the W.”

BOYS BASKETBALL • PARKWAY NORTH 52, WASHINGTON 48

Vikings turn up pressure in fourth, pull out victory against Blue Jays BY JOE HARRIS Special to STLhighschoolsports.com

ST. CHARLES • Parkway North’s Ta-

yari Goodwin and Keashon Petty are known for their offensive skills. The Vikings boys basketball duo showed off their defensive skills Friday. North’s full-court press, led by the guard tandem, created havoc on Washington in a 52-48 win in the Eighth Annual GAC/Suburban Challenge at Lindenwood University. “We had to work hard together,” Goodwin said. “We had to put pressure on them and once we put pressure on them they just turned it over into our hands.” The Vikings forced 20 turnovers, including two 10-second violations in the fourth quarter, to gain the advantage in a back-and-forth game. Meanwhile, North only turned it over six times and just once in the second half. Goodwin led North (4-2) with a game-high 16 points. Brandon Lightfoot scored 12 points, Xavier Drummond had 10 points and Petty added nine points. The press powered a 6-0 run to start the fourth quarter for North. It was punctuated by easy layups off of steals by Drummond and Goodwin as the Vikings extended their lead to 46-39. “We wanted to try to get up and pressure them a little bit,” Parkway North coach Jason Breeland said. “That’s what we’ve been trying to do the last couple of games, try to speed the game up and get some turnovers

with our speed.” A Lightfoot putback and two Drummond free throws safeguarded the North lead down the stretch. Lightfoot scored 10 of his 12 in the second half, after spending the majority of the first half in foul trouble. “I had to come out and show that I cannot foul and play good defense,” Lightfoot said. North jumped out to a 15-4 lead to start the game. The Vikings had a hot hand from the start, hitting on six of their first nine field goal attempts while forcing four early turnovers. Goodwin had a bucket and a trey and Petty had a pair of baskets to lead the North offense. “Petty, to be a freshman, he plays under control, he has a good feel for the game,” Breeland said. “Tayari is a three-year starter for us, starting to finally realize coming into his own that he can score the ball.” Washington (4-3) got back into the game with an 8-0 run late in the first quarter. Cason Suggs had two hoops to help the Blue Jays cut the deficit to 16-12 heading into the second quarter. Washington’s Ty Rinne started the second quarter with a traditional 3-point play to cut the Vikings’ lead to one, but Petty answered with a 3-ball to restore the North lead to 1915. A Tommy Ruether 3-pointer got Washington back to within a possession. Ryan Hoerstkamp followed with a putback and a pair of Alec Brinkmann free throws with 26 seconds left tied the game 23-23 at halftime.

“They were a very athletic team up and down and side to side,” Washington coach Grant Young said. “So that teaches us what we have to do offensively in taking care of the basketball.” Zach Harms gave Washington its first lead with a triple 40 seconds into the third quarter. North answered with a Lightfoot putback and a 3-ball from Goodwin to reclaim a 28-26 lead. “I guess the key really was rebounding and getting 50-50 balls,” Goodwin said. “Coach was on our butts about getting 50-50 balls and saying if we weren’t working then what are we doing?” The Vikings turned up the defensive pressure, forcing four turnovers in the first part of the third quarter. Consecutive layups off of steals by Petty and Goodwin gave North a 3630 lead. A pair of Suggs buckets to end the third cut the North lead to 40-39. “The beginning of the fourth quarter, those first four minutes we turned the ball over four times,” Young said. “Credit them, their guys got into our heads a little bit.” Suggs led Washington with 14 points. Brinkmann scored 11 points and Harms added nine points. Breeland was happy with the patience North showed. “We played through adversity tonight,” Breeland said. “I think the guys are starting to buy in to what we’re trying to do and we just want to try and keep the ball rolling and trust in the process.”

Fox 11 19 16 22 68 Lutheran SC 10 12 15 18 55 F (2-6): Jones 18, Flanigan 15, McQueen 11, Elwood 9, Evans 6, Waters 5, Trayanoff 4. FG 21 (2), FT 24-31. L (0-8): Emily 25, Murdock 13, Ford 7, Hurayt 4, Ritter 4, Erhardt 2. FG 18 (3), FT 16-27. 10 6 1 6 23 Gillespie Greenville 14 25 20 10 69 Gi (1-5): Robbins 12, Kravanya 4, Barrett 2, Stroh 2, Taylor 2, Guevara 1. FG 10 (2), FT 1-3. Gr (3-5): Ephron 15, Nelson 12, Moss 10, Carlson 8, Stearns 7, Harnetiaux 4, Brauns 3, Hamel 3, Zobrist 3, Gray 2, Green 2. FG 27 (11), FT 4-8. 11 20 15 24 70 Luth. South MICDS 21 15 13 14 63 M (2-5): Thompson 19, Smith 14, Cheaney 11, Pronger 6, Pace 4, Scott 4, Hervey 3, Dorsey 2. FG 26 (5), FT 6-8. Marquette 17 10 25 16 68 Summit 13 8 7 13 41 M (4-1): Montgomery 21, Ingram 8, Merz 8, Sieli 8, M. Jennings 6, Mills 6, Schweain 5, J. Jennings 3, Potthoff 2, Matzen 1. FG 27 (5), FT 9-16. 16 16 19 20 71 Miller Career Kirkwood 24 28 16 20 88 M (5-4): Redrick 26, Hutchins 13, Lovett 10, Garrett 7, V. Jackson 5, V. Jackson 3, Tallie 3, Henderson 2, Hill 1, Kelly 1. FG 25 (6), FT 15-31. K: Loyd 29, Clay 15, Lien 15, Phipps 10, Zirges 6, Maclin 4, McDowell 4, Lay 3, Kanzler 2. FG 32 (6), FT 18-24. 15 18 15 23 71 FH Central FH North 15 19 11 17 62 FC (4-2): Coleman 15, Robinson 15, Anderson 14, Estrada 14, Hepler 5, Dent 3, Hayes 3, Lewis 2. FG 24 (4), FT 19-29. Whitfield 18 15 15 22 70 Clayton 11 14 7 12 44 W (6-2): Taylor 22, Watson 17, Ramsey 15, Newlin 9, Stucco 6, McCray 1. FG 22 (6), FT 20-25. C (1-6): C. Heusel 12, Adams 10, E. Heusel 9, Bax 4, Wood 4, Harris 3, Chestnutt-Perry 2. FG 16 (4), FT 8-13. Windsor 11 13 9 8 41 Mehlville 9 21 7 15 52 M (5-2): Waller 18, Hayes 12, D. Adams 11, Reese 5, Valentine 4, Pruitt 2. FG 17 (8), FT 10-13. Rock Bridge 23 17 28 9 77 De Smet 17 6 12 11 46 R: Harris 25, Mosely 20, Patrick 11, Black 6, Boswell 6, Miles 5, Bernskoetter 2, Brown 2, Sanders 2. FG 33 (7), FT 6-8. D (1-6): Goodwin 9, Keita 9, Skoff 8, Walker 8, Barfield 4, Bender 4, Neidenbach 2, Roberson 2. FG 18 (4), FT 6-11. Lift For Life 11 7 10 15 43 Orchard Farm 16 9 7 13 45 L (3-4): Turner 10, Sanford 9, Dabney 8, Love 8, Singleton 4, Anderson 2, Klund 2. FG 17 (6), FT 3-17. O (6-1): Frederick 12, C. Grimes 8, Lindoff 7, Shegog 7, C. Grimes 6, Wolf 3, Cooley 2. FG 18 (1), FT 8-16. Borgia 6 7 9 8 30 St. Mary’s 19 24 19 12 74 S (9-0): Harris 12, Burks 8, Mitchell 7, Austin 6, Collins 6, Houston 6, Jones 6, Parker 6, Y. Rasas 6, S. Rasas 6, Teague 3, Miller 2. FG 30 (9), FT 5-12. 14 10 7 11 42 DuBourg O’F Christian 13 6 16 15 50 O (5-3): Harding 14, Alexander 12, Brenson 11, Niemeyer 6, Taylor 5, Soell 2. FG 20 (2), FT 8-14. Freeburg 5 9 14 11 39 Columbia 13 11 18 11 53 F (3-5): Ervie 19, Muir 11, Diecker 7, C. Smith 2. FG 15 (3), FT 6-8. C (3-4): J. Holmes 22, Peterson 13, Khoury 8, Hubler 6, O’Connor 3, Germain 1. FG 18 (4), FT 13-22. 30 Hermann St. Clair 56 S (1-6): Richardson 11, Decker 10, Henry 10, P. Stark 10, Griffith 5, Bursey 4, Banderman 2, Hoffman 2, T. Stark 2. FG 19 (8), FT 10-13. Waterloo 15 9 4 11 39 Jerseyville 11 8 9 13 41 J (3-5): Wittman 17, Shaw 7, Gibson 5, Hall 4, Goldacker 3, Tuttle 3, Ross 2. FG 14 (3), FT 10-16. Bellvl. East 11 9 13 18 72 O’Fallon 15 12 13 11 68 O (4-3): Hodge 31, Bowman 17, Hayes 6, Anthony 5, Herring 4, Gibson 3, Boone 2. FG 22 (9), FT 15-20. 14 13 15 24 75 Collinsville Alton 13 16 16 21 81 C (4-5): Taylor 31, Lemp 16, Molton 9, Harrison 8, Jones 7, Baker 2, Smith 2. FG 26 (4), FT 19-26. A (6-1): Caldwell 29, M. Smith 21, Clay 17, J. Rivers 14. FG 28 (9), FT 16-23. 6 8 10 25 49 Granite City Edwardsville 19 23 17 13 72 G (2-7): Moore 13, Gordon 11, Watson 8, Mason 6, Wiley 4, Williams 3, Green 2, Grote 2. FG 18 (4), FT 9-14. E (6-1): Marinko 23, Strohmeier 21, Wilson 10, Hairston 8, Stopka 4, Robinson 2, Scarbrough 2, Kinney 1, Tuggle 1. FG 25 (6), FT 16-21. E. St. Louis 12 22 18 12 64 25 20 20 15 80 Bellvl. West E (4-3): Hargrove Jr. 21, Jones 11, Forest 10, Collins 7, Reece 6, Taylor 3, Anderson 2, Seawood 2, I. Williams 2. FG 25 (6), FT 8-12. B (7-1): Liddell 30, Smith 22, Randolph Jr. 17, Brazil III 4, Mosby 4, Woodie 2, Williams 1. FG 27 (4), FT 22-30. Triad 9 10 7 19 45 13 15 8 17 53 Highland H (6-2): Kruse 15, Torre 12, Feldman 7, Schniers 7, LaPorta 5, Etter 3, M. Barth 2, Thornton 2. FG 19 (6), FT 9-13. New Athens 11 4 11 4 30 7 17 9 11 44 Lebanon L (6-2): D. Krumsieg 14, Grob 11, Shaw 8, L. Krumsieg 7, Baker 2, Goetter 2. FG 13 (3), FT 15-24. Civic Mem. 22 21 17 15 75 9 14 12 6 41 Roxana C (6-3): Zupan 19, Adams 17, Clark 14, Denney 6, Buhs 4, Coleman 4, Serafini 4, Hilligoss 2, Lane 2, Reams 2, Loewen 1. FG 34 (1), FT 6-11. Marion 9 17 20 15 61 15 10 13 15 53 Althoff A (2-6): Watts 13, Muhammad 10, Readye 9, Wells 9, Strong 6, Brock 5, Slaughter 1. FG 19 (6), FT 9-16. Steeleville 11 14 8 20 53 10 18 19 16 63 Okawville S (5-5): Gross 25, Conway 9, Wittenborn 8, Mulholland 5, Valleroy 4, Ebers 2. FG 19 (5), FT 10-13. O (7-1): Aubel 13, C. Frederking 12, Hensler 12, Schilling 11, Harre 10, Krohne 5. FG 21 (5), FT 16-25. Nashville 14 13 14 11 52 Sparta 2 4 8 2 16 N (5-2): C. Parker 20, Bultman 10, Haley 6, Bergmann 4, Schnitker 4, D. Anderson 2, M. Anderson 2, Harre 2, C. Parker 2. FG 19 (2), FT 12-18. S (1-5): Keen 4, Lucas 3, Anderson 2, Boston 2, Conners 2, Harris 2, Soderlund 1. FG 6

Friday’s basketball box scores are sponsored by Maryville University. (0), FT 4-9. 11 8 9 13 41 Valley Park Priory 10 19 13 15 57 V (6-2): Shaw 21, Courtney 10, Pickett 6, Burkert 2, Slayton 2. FG 15 (3), FT 8-14. P: Berns 24, Ferrick 9, Kurz 8, Dimitroff 6, Greiner 3, Wagner 2, Wilmsen 2. FG 21 (8), FT 4-11.

GIRLS BASKETBALL

Cuba 18 11 7 14 50 Northwest-CH 11 16 17 13 57 N (1-5): Fortner 24, Lakin 14, Nall 6, Owens 4, Welker 3, Bowen 2, Krebbs 2, Wright 2. FG 20 (2), FT 15-22. Timberland 4 8 6 9 27 Holt 10 6 14 14 44 T (2-5): Raines 8, Auringer 6, Lamb 4, Hartman 3, Fletcher 2, Honore 2, Reiter 2. FG 11 (3), FT 2-9. H (4-2): N. Griesenauer 18, Green 8, Forrest 7, E. Griesenauer 4, A. Meyer 3, Adam 2, Robinson 2. FG 13 (4), FT 14-25. Luth. South 9 11 8 5 33 MICDS 16 17 19 16 68 L (4-2): Brown 17, Heskett 12, Schelp 3, Anderson 1. FG 12 (0), FT 9-17. M (5-1): J. Brooks 20, Hughes 14, J. Brooks 10, Parks 10, Holmes 6, Work 6, Proctor 2. FG 24 (6), FT 14-19. Whitfield 34 16 24 5 79 Clayton 12 10 13 6 41 W (5-1): Blackwell 29, Blakemore 14, Griffin 10, Lawson-Hicks 8, Foster-Walker 7, Daniels 6, Lewis 5. FG 28 (6), FT 17-25. C (1-5): M. Upshaw 10, Conner 9, Litteken 9, Downs 7, Gallegos 4, Nettles 2. FG 15 (3), FT 8-12. Lindbergh 48 Seckman 54 S (5-2): Stuckmeyer 18, Parton 13, Kriese 12, Harris 8, Stamm 3. FG 16 (4), FT 18-29. Orchard Farm 14 11 13 18 56 St. Pius X 7 9 15 5 36 O (5-3): Hopkins 19, Davis 14, Johnston 13, Dill 4, Hedges 4, Frappier 2. FG 21 (4), FT 10-14. Bellvl. East 19 4 18 13 54 O’Fallon 12 13 6 15 46 O (8-1): Thurwalker 14, Best 10, Gordon 8, Schloer 7, Stubblefield 7. FG 17 (4), FT 8-14. DuBourg 4 5 4 23 36 21 11 22 6 60 O’F Christian D (2-6): Behnen 10, Vales 8, Nelson 7, Loehr 5, McCloskey 4, Henson 1, Niethe 1. FG 12 (3), FT 9-17. O (4-3): King 30, Markham 9, Schroer 6, Stugart 4, Herrin 3, Agovino 2, Liddle 2, Stone 2, Pickerill 1, Sardina 1. FG 25 (0), FT 10-21. Hillsboro 15 4 13 13 45 Lesterville 12 8 15 9 44 H (3-3): Boyd 21, Baker 14, Vaughn 10. FG 20 (1), FT 4-6. Oakville 20 8 10 12 50 7 8 5 5 25 North County O (5-3): Boaz 13, Zarr 12, Elguezabal 8, Costello 6, Kuntze 5, Gicante 4, FitzWilliam 2. FG 21 (2), FT 6-6. Webster 16 11 11 19 57 Lafayette 14 28 15 14 71 W (3-3): Rodriguez 22, Daniels 12, Zareh 8, Bailey 4, Moore 4, Reed-Jones 4, Sondag 3. FG 18 (8), FT 13-22. L (5-2): Robbe 30, Devereux 15, Wolf 11, Terry 8, Chester 3, Steins 3, Wilson 1. FG 28 (3), FT 12-14. Festus 16 16 7 15 54 Sikeston 8 4 8 21 41 F (4-6): Oetting 18, Rickermann 18, McMillan 10, Kuykendall 4, Garmon 2, Hebenstriet 2. FG 22 (3), FT 7-15. Mehlville 0 12 10 8 30 Pky. West 9 4 8 7 28 P (1-7): Allgeyer 10, Wolf 7, Meyer 6, Faulkner 2, Swihart 2, Smith 1. FG 9 (4), FT 6-12. Brentwood 11 7 11 7 36 Duchesne 9 15 10 5 39 B (1-5): Gombas 4, Ingersoll 4. FG 4 (0), FT 0-2. D (2-5): Briscoe 18, Varvera 12, McCracken 4, Seiler 4, Weber 1. FG 14 (5), FT 6-15. De Soto 8 10 7 8 33 Principia 10 21 13 17 61 P (8-1): Fredrickson 23, Hinds 20, Rather 8, Bania 7, Boyman 3. FG 20 (7), FT 14-19. New Athens 4 7 4 12 27 Lebanon 23 12 20 3 58 N (5-5): Jansen 8, Ragland 8, McBride 6, Toedte 3, Sullivan 2. FG 10 (3), FT 4-8. L (12-0): K. Bass 22, E. Reinneck 16, Schoenfeld 9, A. Reinneck 5, K. Bass 2, Krumsieg 2, McMullen 2. FG 22 (8), FT 6-12.

GIRLS SWIMMING & DIVING

SUMMIT QUAD Teams: 1. Eureka 733, 2. Cape Girardeau Central 576, 3. Summit 453, 4. Lutheran South 200 100 Backstroke: 1. Lily Harrell, Eureka, 1:01.01; 2. Megan McSalley, Eureka, 1:04.24; 100 Breaststroke: 1. Megan Stempkovski, Cape Girardeau Central, 1:10.88; 2. Ciara Hynes, Eureka, 1:16.25; 100 Butterfly: 1. Madeline Rauh, Lutheran South, 1:04.45; 2. Lauren Jauch, Cape Girardeau Central, 1:05.96; 100 Freestyle: 1. Erika Mock, Eureka, 57.51; 2. Allison McDonald, Cape Girardeau Central, 57.78; 200 Freestyle Relay: 1. Eureka, 1:48.94; 200 Freestyle: 1. Megan Stempkovski, Cape Girardeau Central, 2:07.62; 2. MacKenzie Swope, Eureka, 2:07.62; 200 Individual Medley: 1. Lily Harrell, Eureka, 2:14.5; 2. Allison McDonald, Cape Girardeau Central, 2:28.68; 200 Medley Relay: 1. Cape Girardeau Central, 1:57.76; 2. Eureka, 1:58.22; 400 Freestyle Relay: 1. Eureka, 3:51.66; 2. Cape Girardeau Central, 4:03.77; 50 Freestyle: 1. Lauren Jauch, Cape Girardeau Central, 26.31; 2. Emma Harris, Eureka, 26.57; 500 Freestyle: 1. MacKenzie Swope, Eureka, 5:39.72; 2. Paige Elder, Cape Girardeau Central, 6:31.01; Diving: 1. Ally Weis, Eureka, 259.6; 2. Bailey Walka, Eureka, 189.6

SATURDAY’S SCHEDULE BOYS BASKETBALL

JEFFERSON COUNTY SHOOTOUT At Jefferson College Windsor (2-4) at Crystal City (3-4), 9:30 a.m. De Soto (4-4) vs. Jefferson (2-4), 11 a.m. Festus (4-3) vs. Herculaneum (2-5), 3:30 p.m. St. Pius X (3-2) vs. St. Vincent (3-1), 5 p.m. Perryville vs. Grandview (3-5), 6:30 p.m. St. Louis U. High (2-2) vs. Hillsboro (6-0), 8 p.m. POPLAR BLUFF SHOOTOUT Soldan vs. Jackson, 1 p.m. Vianney (4-3) at Poplar Bluff, 2:30 p.m. MIDWEST SHOWDOWN At Webster Groves Madison (4-3) vs. Harrisburg (Mo.), 1 p.m. Romeoville vs. Parkway Central, 2:30 p.m. Bloomington vs. Cardinal Ritter (8-2), 4 p.m. Chicago Orr vs. Haz. Central (7-0), 5:30 p.m. Fern Creek, Ky., at Webster Groves (3-1), 7 p.m. Chaminade (3-1) vs. Vashon (4-1), 8:30 p.m. COUGAR CLASSIC At Lutheran St. Charles 7th place North Tech at Lutheran St. Charles, 3:30 p.m. Consolation Final Fort Zumwalt East vs. Fox, 5 p.m. 3rd place Lift for Life vs. Valley Park, 6:30 p.m. Championship Orchard Farm vs. Priory, 8 p.m. GAC/SUBURBAN SHOOTOUT At Lindenwood St.CharlesWest(2-3)vs.ParkwayWest(1-5),7p.m. Duchesne (4-1) vs. Jennings (5-1), 8:30 p.m. OTHER GAMES North Callaway (1-5) at Paris, 1:30 p.m. Carbondale (6-2) at Carterville (0-4), 2 p.m. Greenville (2-5) at ME Lutheran (4-4), 6 p.m. Mount Vernon (4-3) at Waterloo (2-6), 6 p.m. Valmeyer (4-4) at Red Bud (6-2), 6:15 p.m. Highland (5-2) at Centralia (7-0), 6:15 p.m. Pana (1-1) at Carlinville (1-4), 7:30 p.m. Althoff (2-5) at Alton Marquette (7-0), 7:30 p.m. Gibault (2-5) at Mater Dei (2-4), 7:30 p.m. Benton at Nashville (4-2), 7:45 p.m. Jerseyville (2-5) at Jacksonville, 8 p.m.

GIRLS BASKETBALL

CANDY CANE CLASSIC At Gibault 7th place Waterloo (1-10) vs. Valmeyer (0-10), 9 a.m. Consolation final Roxana (2-8) vs. Wood River (4-4), 10:30 a.m. 3rd place Red Bud (9-4) vs. Gibault (7-5), noon Championship Columbia(5-5)vs.AltonMarquette(10-1),1:30p.m. FORT ZUMWALT NORTH TOURNAMENT 7th place Fort Zumwalt East (1-5) vs. Hazelwood East (1-4), 11 a.m.

Consolation final Hazelwood West (1-3) vs. McCluer (1-3), 12:30 p.m. 3rd place Nerinx Hall (3-5) at Zumwalt North (2-4), 2 p.m. Championship Pattonville(4-0)vs.Luth.St.Charles(5-3),3:30p.m. CAPITAL CITY SHOOTOUT At Jefferson City Hermann (6-2) vs. California, 4 p.m. Cardinal Ritter (5-0) at Jefferson City, 5:30 p.m. OTHER GAMES Carlinville (6-6) at Staunton (4-2), 10 a.m. FatherMcGivney(5-5)atNorthGreene(2-0),11a.m. North Callaway (4-2) at Paris, 11 a.m. Pana (8-2) at Gillespie (3-4), 11:30 a.m. Mater Dei (5-4) at Highland (8-1), noon Okawville (10-1) at Pinckneyville (2-4), 1 p.m. CivicMemorial(10-0)atSt.Joseph’s(4-2),1:30p.m. ME Lutheran (5-4) at Brussels (0-3), 2:30 p.m. Hillsboro, Ill. (5-6) at Litchfield (1-7), 6 p.m. Marion (5-2) at DuQuoin, 6:15 p.m. Jerseyville (7-3) at Carrollton, 7:30 p.m. Sparta (0-5) at Carterville (4-2), 7:45 p.m.

HOCKEY

At Affton Rink Lindbergh (1-7-1) vs. Vianney (2-6), 6:45 p.m. Whitfield (1-6) vs. St. Mary’s (6-3-1), 8:30 p.m. At Brentwood Ice Priory (6-0) vs. MICDS (8-1), 7:45 p.m. Summit (1-5-1) vs. Westminster (6-2-2), 9:30 p.m. At Webster Rink John Burroughs (1-4-1) vs. Northwest-CH (1-6-1), 8:45 p.m. At Rec Plex South Webster Groves (5-3) vs. Duchesne (7-4), 8:45 p.m. At Kirkwood Rink CBC (6-0-2) vs. Kirkwood (3-4-1), 9:15 p.m. At South County Clayton (2-4-2) vs. Lutheran South (1-5), 9:15 p.m. At Queeny Park Parkway South (4-3-1) vs. Fort Zumwalt East (10-1), 9:45 p.m.

GIRLS SWIMMING & DIVING

Lindbergh Invitational, 9 a.m.

WRESTLING

48th Mascoutah Invitational Fort Zumwalt East Tournament Chaminade Red Devil Invitational Brentwood Invitational Kansas City Stampede Cape Central Tiger Classic Raytown South Holiday Tournament Joe Bee Memorial Tournament Harrisonville Christmas Tournament


STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

BOYS BASKETBALL • HAZELWOOD CENTRAL 85, FRANCIS HOWELL 82 (3OT)

M 2 • SATUrDAy • 12.16.2017

FRIDAY’S RESULTS BOYS BASKETBALL

RICK ULREICH • Special to STLhighschoolsports.com

Hazelwood Central senior Telly Wright (right) tries to steal the ball from Francis Howell junior Daylan Dalton during the 8th Annual GAC/Suburban Challenge on Friday at Lindenwood University in St. Charles.

WRIGHT STUFF

Hawks senior comes through to help earn dramatic win over Vikings BY JOE HARRIS Special to STLhighschoolsports.com

ST. CHARLES • All game long Telly

Wright was telling his Hazelwood Central boys basketball teammates that he wanted the ball. He made the most of his chance once they finally found him. Wright followed a 3-pointer with two clutch free throws to lift Central to an 85-82 triple-overtime win over Francis Howell in the 8th Annual GAC/Suburban Challenge at Lindenwood University on Friday night. Wright’s trey with 40 seconds left in the third overtime gave Central (70), No. 4 in the STLhighschoolsports large school basketball rankings, the lead for good. “I have to give myself confidence because no one else will,” Wright said. “At the end of the game I was ready. I’m a senior. I’ve had a lot of experience so I was ready for that shot.” Xavier Ball took a charge to end Howell’s ensuing possession and Shaun Williams and Wright each hit two free throws in the clutch to protect the lead. Howell had one last look, but Daylon Dalton’s 40-foot heave clanged off the rim. “I was nervous because (Dalton) already hit two big shots before that in front of my face,” Wright said. Cameron Williams scored a gamehigh 26 points for Central, while Shaun Williams scored 18 points. Ball had 14 points.

Wright scored five of his eight points in the third extra session. Dalton led Howell (4-2) with 26 points. Matt Schark scored 23 points and Mark Simmons had 19 points. “I’m extraordinarily proud of my kids,” Howell coach Kurt Jacob said. “My kids fight, they work hard and they don’t back down from anybody. They’re extremely good kids and we’ve got some guys who can play a little bit, too. I think some people saw that tonight.” The lead swung back and forth early in the game, before Howell took control midway through the second quarter with a 10-1 run powered by a pair a 3-balls from Schark to give the Vikings a 30-23 lead. Central came back with two free throws from Shaun Williams and a steal by Larrion Heard to cut Howell’s lead to 33-29 at halftime. Ball opened the third quarter with a reverse layup and Maurice Hayes followed with a dunk to get Central’s offense rolling. “We had a lot of adversity all week, but we just keep learning,” Central coach Brandon Gilmore said. “We have a lot of seniors that I trust that we can get through any situation.” Matthew Simmons put down a pair of buckets and Dalton added a steal to give Howell a 41-35 lead. Central went on a 6-0 run, all of which came from the free throw line, to regain the lead before Howell’s Mark Simmons ended the third with a baby hook to cut Central’s lead to 48-47.

Mark Simmons added a three more buckets, the last of which came off a nifty spin move, early in the fourth to help give Howell a 57-51 lead. Cameron Williams got Central back into the game with a spin move of his own, followed by two power dunks off of steals to give the Hawks a 60-58 lead. “It was just the way the game flowed,” Cameron Williams said. “The ball was coming my way. I knew I could get to the rim, so I went to the rim and made some shots.” After two Schark free throws tied the game, Central held for the last shot but came up empty. A whistle blew as time expired and Central originally thought a foul was called on Howell, but it was determined no foul occurred. Cameron Williams completed a traditional 3-point play and added another bucket to give Central a 6562 lead in the first overtime, but Patrick Schulte answered with a trey for Howell to tie it again. “To beat a team like Hazelwood Central you’ve got to play extraordinarily good defense and you have to really to rebound the basketball,” Jacob said. “It’s tough because they’re athletic and they’re big.” Dalton scored six points for Howell in the second overtime, but Cameron Williams ended the period with a pair of buckets to tie it at 73-all. “We stayed to the game plan,” Cameron Williams said. “We didn’t’ execute as well as we should have, but we stayed with it and got the W.”

GIRLS BASKETBALL • SULLIVAN 46, ROCK BRIDGE 39

Defense lifts Eagles past Bruins for title BY STEVE OVERBEY STLhighschoolsports.com

SULLIVAN • Clare Shetley could hardly breathe. But that wasn’t about to stop the Sullivan High senior forward on Friday night. Shetley, playing with two displaced ribs, poured in eight second-half points to help the Eagles to a 4639 win over Rock Bridge in the championship game of the Sullivan Holiday Invitational. Sullivan captured its own tournament for the first time since 2012. The Eagles improved to 9-0, their best start since the 2005-06 team also won its first nine games. Shetley, who finished with nine points, tallied six points in the final 3 minutes and 27 seconds to hold off Rock Bridge, which had won six in a row after losing its season opener to Class 5 champion Kirkwood. “They don’t hurt right now,” Shetley said of her ribs. “But they will in a few minutes.” Shetley gladly will trade the pain for the championship trophy. “This means a lot to all of us,” said Sulivan junior Katie Creek, who led the winners with 12 points. Mallory Shetley added 11 points. Senior Bria Jones, who recently passed the 1,000-point plateau, added 10 points. Rock Bridge junior Pay-

Fox 11 19 16 22 68 Lutheran SC 10 12 15 18 55 F (2-6): Jones 18, Flanigan 15, McQueen 11, Elwood 9, Evans 6, Waters 5, Trayanoff 4. FG 21 (2), FT 24-31. L (0-8): Emily 25, Murdock 13, Ford 7, Hurayt 4, Ritter 4, Erhardt 2. FG 18 (3), FT 16-27. Howell 15 17 15 13 82 Haz. Central 15 14 19 12 85 Ha (7-0): C. Williams 26, S. Williams 18, Ball 14, Hayes 8, Wright 8, Covington-Berry 7, Cobb 2, Heard 2. FG 29 (3), FT 24-31. Gillespie 10 6 1 6 23 Greenville 14 25 20 10 69 Gi (1-5): Robbins 12, Kravanya 4, Barrett 2, Stroh 2, Taylor 2, Guevara 1. FG 10 (2), FT 1-3. Gr (3-5): Ephron 15, Nelson 12, Moss 10, Carlson 8, Stearns 7, Harnetiaux 4, Brauns 3, Hamel 3, Zobrist 3, Gray 2, Green 2. FG 27 (11), FT 4-8. Dupo 9 21 12 15 57 Valmeyer 20 13 16 20 69 V (5-4): O. Miller 16, Reinhardt 15, Chism 13, Whipple 8, Juelfs 6, McCarthy 6, Rowold 5. FG 24 (8), FT 13-24. Luth. South 11 20 15 24 70 MICDS 21 15 13 14 63 M (2-5): Thompson 19, Smith 14, Cheaney 11, Pronger 6, Pace 4, Scott 4, Hervey 3, Dorsey 2. FG 26 (5), FT 6-8. Marquette 17 10 25 16 68 Summit 13 8 7 13 41 M (4-1): Montgomery 21, Ingram 8, Merz 8, Sieli 8, M. Jennings 6, Mills 6, Schweain 5, J. Jennings 3, Potthoff 2, Matzen 1. FG 27 (5), FT 9-16. Miller Career 16 16 19 20 71 Kirkwood 24 28 16 20 88 M (5-4): Redrick 26, Hutchins 13, Lovett 10, Garrett 7, V. Jackson 5, V. Jackson 3, Tallie 3, Henderson 2, Hill 1, Kelly 1. FG 25 (6), FT 15-31. K: Loyd 29, Clay 15, Lien 15, Phipps 10, Zirges 6, Maclin 4, McDowell 4, Lay 3, Kanzler 2. FG 32 (6), FT 18-24. FH Central 15 18 15 23 71 FH North 15 19 11 17 62 FC (4-2): Coleman 15, Robinson 15, Anderson 14, Estrada 14, Hepler 5, Dent 3, Hayes 3, Lewis 2. FG 24 (4), FT 19-29. Whitfield 18 15 15 22 70 Clayton 11 14 7 12 44 W (6-2): Taylor 22, Watson 17, Ramsey 15, Newlin 9, Stucco 6, McCray 1. FG 22 (6), FT 20-25. C (1-6): C. Heusel 12, Adams 10, E. Heusel 9, Bax 4, Wood 4, Harris 3, Chestnutt-Perry 2. FG 16 (4), FT 8-13. Windsor 11 13 9 8 41 Mehlville 9 21 7 15 52 M (5-2): Waller 18, Hayes 12, D. Adams 11, Reese 5, Valentine 4, Pruitt 2. FG 17 (8), FT 10-13. Rock Bridge 23 17 28 9 77 De Smet 17 6 12 11 46 R: Harris 25, Mosely 20, Patrick 11, Black 6, Boswell 6, Miles 5, Bernskoetter 2, Brown 2, Sanders 2. FG 33 (7), FT 6-8. D (1-6): Goodwin 9, Keita 9, Skoff 8, Walker 8, Barfield 4, Bender 4, Neidenbach 2, Roberson 2. FG 18 (4), FT 6-11. Pky. Central 16 11 19 15 61 Liberty 12 18 18 20 68 P (5-1): Campbell 33, D. Rice 13, Lenoir 8, Silvestri 3, Harris 2, Littlejohn 2. FG 17 (7), FT 20-28. L (3-2): Overall 19, K. Catchings 18, J. Catchings 12, Lawson 8, Sims 5, McKeithen 4, Jorris 2. FG 21 (1), FT 25-35. Lift For Life 11 7 10 15 43 Orchard Farm 16 9 7 13 45 L (3-4): Turner 10, Sanford 9, Dabney 8, Love 8, Singleton 4, Anderson 2, Klund 2. FG 17 (6), FT 3-17. O (6-1): Frederick 12, C. Grimes 8, Lindoff 7, Shegog 7, C. Grimes 6, Wolf 3, Cooley 2. FG 18 (1), FT 8-16. Borgia 6 7 9 8 30 St. Mary’s 19 24 19 12 74 S (9-0): Harris 12, Burks 8, Mitchell 7, Austin 6, Collins 6, Houston 6, Jones 6, Parker 6, Y. Rasas 6, S. Rasas 6, Teague 3, Miller 2. FG 30 (9), FT 5-12. DuBourg 14 10 7 11 42 O’F Christian 13 6 16 15 50 O (5-3): Harding 14, Alexander 12, Brenson 11, Niemeyer 6, Taylor 5, Soell 2. FG 20 (2), FT 8-14. Freeburg 5 9 14 11 39 Columbia 13 11 18 11 53 F (3-5): Ervie 19, Muir 11, Diecker 7, C. Smith 2. FG 15 (3), FT 6-8. C (3-4): J. Holmes 22, Peterson 13, Khoury 8, Hubler 6, O’Connor 3, Germain 1. FG 18 (4), FT 13-22. Hermann 30 St. Clair 56 S (1-6): Richardson 11, Decker 10, Henry 10, P. Stark 10, Griffith 5, Bursey 4, Banderman 2, Hoffman 2, T. Stark 2. FG 19 (8), FT 10-13. Waterloo 15 9 4 11 39 Jerseyville 11 8 9 13 41 W (2-7): Schrader 14, Wahlig 11, Dodd 9, Ivers 3, Smothers 2. FG 12 (6), FT 9-16. J (3-5): Wittman 17, Shaw 7, Gibson 5, Hall 4, Goldacker 3, Tuttle 3, Ross 2. FG 14 (3), FT 10-16. Bellvl. East 11 9 13 18 72 O’Fallon 15 12 13 11 68 O (4-3): Hodge 31, Bowman 17, Hayes 6, Anthony 5, Herring 4, Gibson 3, Boone 2. FG 22 (9), FT 15-20. Collinsville 14 13 15 24 75 Alton 13 16 16 21 81 C (4-5): Taylor 31, Lemp 16, Molton 9, Harrison 8, Jones 7, Baker 2, Smith 2. FG 26 (4), FT 19-26. A (6-1): Caldwell 29, M. Smith 21, Clay 17, J. Rivers 14. FG 28 (9), FT 16-23. Granite City 6 8 10 25 49 Edwardsville 19 23 17 13 72 G (2-7): Moore 13, Gordon 11, Watson 8, Mason 6, Wiley 4, Williams 3, Green 2, Grote 2. FG 18 (4), FT 9-14. E (6-1): Marinko 23, Strohmeier 21, Wilson 10, Hairston 8, Stopka 4, Robinson 2, Scarbrough 2, Kinney 1, Tuggle 1. FG 25 (6), FT 16-21. E. St. Louis 12 22 18 12 64 Bellvl. West 25 20 20 15 80 E (4-3): Hargrove Jr. 21, Jones 11, Forest 10, Collins 7, Reece 6, Taylor 3, Anderson 2, Seawood 2, I. Williams 2. FG 25 (6), FT 8-12. B (7-1): Liddell 30, Smith 22, Randolph Jr. 17, Brazil III 4, Mosby 4, Woodie 2, Williams 1. FG 27 (4), FT 22-30. Triad 9 10 7 19 45 13 15 8 17 53 Highland T (5-4): Barbour 17, K. Cox 17, L. Cox 3, Deatherage 2, Holcomb 2, Nott 2, Winslow 2. FG 17 (6), FT 5-8. H (6-2): Kruse 15, Torre 12, Feldman 7, Schniers 7, LaPorta 5, Etter 3, M. Barth 2, Thornton 2. FG 19 (6), FT 9-13. New Athens 11 4 11 4 30 Lebanon 7 17 9 11 44 L (6-2): D. Krumsieg 14, Grob 11, Shaw 8, L. Krumsieg 7, Baker 2, Goetter 2. FG 13 (3), FT 15-24. Civic Mem. 22 21 17 15 75 Roxana 9 14 12 6 41 C (6-3): Zupan 19, Adams 17, Clark 14, Denney 6, Buhs 4, Coleman 4, Serafini 4, Hilligoss 2, Lane 2, Reams 2, Loewen 1. FG 34 (1), FT 6-11. Marion 9 17 20 15 61 Althoff 15 10 13 15 53 A (2-6): Watts 13, Muhammad 10, Readye 9, Wells 9, Strong 6, Brock 5, Slaughter 1. FG 19 (6), FT 9-16. Steeleville 11 14 8 20 53 Okawville 10 18 19 16 63 S (5-5): Gross 25, Conway 9, Wittenborn 8, Mulholland 5, Valleroy 4, Ebers 2. FG 19 (5), FT 10-13. O (7-1): Aubel 13, C. Frederking 12, Hensler 12, Schilling 11, Harre 10, Krohne 5. FG 21 (5), FT 16-25. Nashville 14 13 14 11 52 2 4 8 2 16 Sparta N (5-2): C. Parker 20, Bultman 10, Haley 6, Bergmann 4, Schnitker 4, D. Anderson 2, M.

Friday’s basketball box scores are sponsored by Maryville University. Anderson 2, Harre 2, C. Parker 2. FG 19 (2), FT 12-18. S (1-5): Keen 4, Lucas 3, Anderson 2, Boston 2, Conners 2, Harris 2, Soderlund 1. FG 6 (0), FT 4-9. 11 8 9 13 41 Valley Park Priory 10 19 13 15 57 V (6-2): Shaw 21, Courtney 10, Pickett 6, Burkert 2, Slayton 2. FG 15 (3), FT 8-14. P: Berns 24, Ferrick 9, Kurz 8, Dimitroff 6, Greiner 3, Wagner 2, Wilmsen 2. FG 21 (8), FT 4-11.

GIRLS BASKETBALL

Cuba 18 11 7 14 50 Northwest-CH 11 16 17 13 57 N (1-5): Fortner 24, Lakin 14, Nall 6, Owens 4, Welker 3, Bowen 2, Krebbs 2, Wright 2. FG 20 (2), FT 15-22. Timberland 4 8 6 9 27 10 6 14 14 44 Holt T (2-5): Raines 8, Auringer 6, Lamb 4, Hartman 3, Fletcher 2, Honore 2, Reiter 2. FG 11 (3), FT 2-9. H (4-2): N. Griesenauer 18, Green 8, Forrest 7, E. Griesenauer 4, A. Meyer 3, Adam 2, Robinson 2. FG 13 (4), FT 14-25. Luth. South 9 11 8 5 33 MICDS 16 17 19 16 68 L (4-2): Brown 17, Heskett 12, Schelp 3, Anderson 1. FG 12 (0), FT 9-17. M (5-1): J. Brooks 20, Hughes 14, J. Brooks 10, Parks 10, Holmes 6, Work 6, Proctor 2. FG 24 (6), FT 14-19. 34 16 24 5 79 Whitfield Clayton 12 10 13 6 41 W (5-1): Blackwell 29, Blakemore 14, Griffin 10, Lawson-Hicks 8, Foster-Walker 7, Daniels 6, Lewis 5. FG 28 (6), FT 17-25. C (1-5): M. Upshaw 10, Conner 9, Litteken 9, Downs 7, Gallegos 4, Nettles 2. FG 15 (3), FT 8-12. Lindbergh 48 Seckman 54 S (5-2): Stuckmeyer 18, Parton 13, Kriese 12, Harris 8, Stamm 3. FG 16 (4), FT 18-29. Orchard Farm 14 11 13 18 56 St. Pius X 7 9 15 5 36 O (5-3): Hopkins 19, Davis 14, Johnston 13, Dill 4, Hedges 4, Frappier 2. FG 21 (4), FT 10-14. Bellvl. East 19 4 18 13 54 O’Fallon 12 13 6 15 46 O (8-1): Thurwalker 14, Best 10, Gordon 8, Schloer 7, Stubblefield 7. FG 17 (4), FT 8-14. DuBourg 4 5 4 23 36 O’F Christian 21 11 22 6 60 D (2-6): Behnen 10, Vales 8, Nelson 7, Loehr 5, McCloskey 4, Henson 1, Niethe 1. FG 12 (3), FT 9-17. O (4-3): King 30, Markham 9, Schroer 6, Stugart 4, Herrin 3, Agovino 2, Liddle 2, Stone 2, Pickerill 1, Sardina 1. FG 25 (0), FT 10-21. 15 4 13 13 45 Hillsboro Lesterville 12 8 15 9 44 H (3-3): Boyd 21, Baker 14, Vaughn 10. FG 20 (1), FT 4-6. L: FG 0 (0), FT 0-0. 22 16 21 11 70 Pky. Central Fox 8 8 10 9 35 P (7-1): O. Stephens 17, Cooke 12, Kelly 11, Hilton 9, M. Stephens 6, Marshall 5, Coleman 4, Perry 4, Moore 2. FG 29 (5), FT 7-13. F (5-4): Chrum 9, Adamec 7, Gierer 5, Dervisevic 4, Drysdale 4, Duff 4, Pisoni 2. FG 13 (1), FT 8-0. St.Chas. West 9 11 15 11 46 18 11 6 9 44 FZ West S (2-5): Wilson 12, Mace 9, Honey 6, Jones 6, Chowning 3, Condos 3, Weinrich 3, Afflick 2, Griffiths 2. FG 16 (7), FT 7-20. Oakville 20 8 10 12 50 North County 7 8 5 5 25 O (5-3): Boaz 13, Zarr 12, Elguezabal 8, Costello 6, Kuntze 5, Gicante 4, FitzWilliam 2. FG 21 (2), FT 6-6. Webster 16 11 11 19 57 14 28 15 14 71 Lafayette W (3-3): Rodriguez 22, Daniels 12, Zareh 8, Bailey 4, Moore 4, Reed-Jones 4, Sondag 3. FG 18 (8), FT 13-22. L (5-2): Robbe 30, Devereux 15, Wolf 11, Terry 8, Chester 3, Steins 3, Wilson 1. FG 28 (3), FT 12-14. Festus 16 16 7 15 54 8 4 8 21 41 Sikeston F (4-6): Oetting 18, Rickermann 18, McMillan 10, Kuykendall 4, Garmon 2, Hebenstriet 2. FG 22 (3), FT 7-15. Mehlville 0 12 10 8 30 Pky. West 9 4 8 7 28 P (1-7): Allgeyer 10, Wolf 7, Meyer 6, Faulkner 2, Swihart 2, Smith 1. FG 9 (4), FT 6-12. Brentwood 11 7 11 7 36 Duchesne 9 15 10 5 39 B (1-5): M. Callihan 14, Franklin 14, Gombas 4, Ingersoll 4. FG 14 (1), FT 7-20. D (2-5): Briscoe 18, Varvera 12, McCracken 4, Seiler 4, Weber 1. FG 14 (5), FT 6-15. De Soto 8 10 7 8 33 Principia 10 21 13 17 61 P (8-1): Fredrickson 23, Hinds 20, Rather 8, Bania 7, Boyman 3. FG 20 (7), FT 14-19. New Athens 4 7 4 12 27 Lebanon 23 12 20 3 58 N (5-5): Jansen 8, Ragland 8, McBride 6, Toedte 3, Sullivan 2. FG 10 (3), FT 4-8. L (12-0): K. Bass 22, E. Reinneck 16, Schoenfeld 9, A. Reinneck 5, K. Bass 2, Krumsieg 2, McMullen 2. FG 22 (8), FT 6-12.

GIRLS SWIMMING & DIVING

SUMMIT QUAD Teams: 1. Eureka 733, 2. Cape Girardeau Central 576, 3. Summit 453, 4. Lutheran South 200 100 Backstroke: 1. Lily Harrell, Eureka, 1:01.01; 2. Megan McSalley, Eureka, 1:04.24 100 Breaststroke: 1. Megan Stempkovski, Cape Central, 1:10.88; 2. Ciara Hynes, Eureka, 1:16.25 100 fly: 1. Madeline Rauh, Lutheran South, 1:04.45; 2. Lauren Jauch, Cape Central, 1:05.96 100 Free: 1. Erika Mock, Eureka, 57.51; 2. Allison McDonald, Cape Central, 57.78; 200 Freestyle Relay: 1. Eureka, 1:48.94; 200 Free: 1. Megan Stempkovski, Cape Central, 2:07.62; 2. MacKenzie Swope, Eureka, 2:07.62; 200 IM: 1. Lily Harrell, Eureka, 2:14.5; 2. Allison McDonald, Cape Central, 2:28.68; 200 Medley Relay: 1. Cape Central, 1:57.76; 2. Eureka, 1:58.22 400 Freestyle Relay: 1. Eureka, 3:51.66; 2. Cape Girardeau Central, 4:03.77; 50 Free: 1. Lauren Jauch, Cape Central, 26.31; 2. Emma Harris, Eureka, 26.57; 500 Free: 1. MacKenzie Swope, Eureka, 5:39.72; 2. Paige Elder, Cape Central, 6:31.01; Diving: 1. Ally Weis, Eureka, 259.6; 2. Bailey Walka, Eureka, 189.6

SATURDAY’S SCHEDULE BOYS BASKETBALL

RANDY KEMP • Special to STLhighschoolsports.com

Sullivan’s Clare Shetley (23) splits two Rock Bridge defenders for a layup during the Peoples Bank Holiday Classic championship girls basketball game Friday in Sullivan, Mo.

ton McCallister led all scorers with 24 points. Creek, who is averaging five points per game, scored 11 in the first half to help the hosts out to a 2213 lead. Rock Bridge, which won four successive state titles from 2011-2014, battled back to within 3837 on a pair of free throws from McCallister midway through the final period. Clare Shetley took over from there with a scintillating drive down the lane for a three-point lead. She hit two foul shots to pump the lead to 43-39 with 23 seconds remaining to seal the victory. Clare Shetley did not start the game after injuring her ribs Wednesday.

She entered the game in the first quarter and immediately picked up a couple fouls. But the halftime breather provided her with a shot of energy. The 6-footer came out in the final period and took control. “Second half, I knew I had to pick up my game,” Clare Shetley said. “I was feeling pretty good.” Clare Shetley said she was able to ignore the pain once she got into the rhythm of the game. “It still hurt, but when you’re going up and down out there, it’s easy to forget about it,” she said. Sullivan used a rockribbed defense to take command early. The Eagles

forced Rock Bridge to miss 22 of 25 shots in the first half. “Defense is always what gets it done for us,” Jones said. Sullivan bolted out to a 28-17 lead early in the third period on a pair of free throws from Sophie Sellers, who started in place of Clare Shetley. Rock Bridge, behind McCallister, battled back late in the period and got to within one on several occasions in the fourth quarter. But the Bruins could never get the lead. “We just pushed together and we executed,” Creek said. “I felt confident and we came out and executed.”

JEFFERSON COUNTY SHOOTOUT At Jefferson College Windsor (2-4) at Crystal City (3-4), 9:30 a.m. De Soto (4-4) vs. Jefferson (2-4), 11 a.m. Festus (4-3) vs. Herculaneum (2-5), 3:30 p.m. St. Pius X (3-2) vs. St. Vincent (3-1), 5 p.m. Perryville vs. Grandview (3-5), 6:30 p.m. St. Louis U. High (2-2) vs. Hillsboro (6-0), 8 p.m. POPLAR BLUFF SHOOTOUT Soldan vs. Jackson, 1 p.m. Vianney (4-3) at Poplar Bluff, 2:30 p.m. MIDWEST SHOWDOWN At Webster Groves Madison (4-3) vs. Harrisburg (Mo.), 1 p.m. Romeoville vs. Parkway Central, 2:30 p.m. Bloomington vs. Cardinal Ritter (8-2), 4 p.m. Chicago Orr vs. Haz. Central (7-0), 5:30 p.m. Fern Creek, Ky., at Webster Groves (3-1), 7 p.m. Chaminade (3-1) vs. Vashon (4-1), 8:30 p.m. COUGAR CLASSIC At Lutheran St. Charles 7th place North Tech at Lutheran St. Charles, 3:30 p.m. Consolation Final Fort Zumwalt East vs. Fox, 5 p.m. 3rd place Lift for Life vs. Valley Park, 6:30 p.m. Championship Orchard Farm vs. Priory, 8 p.m. GAC/SUBURBAN SHOOTOUT At Lindenwood St.CharlesWest(2-3)vs.ParkwayWest(1-5),7p.m. Duchesne (4-1) vs. Jennings (5-1), 8:30 p.m. OTHER GAMES North Callaway (1-5) at Paris, 1:30 p.m. Carbondale (6-2) at Carterville (0-4), 2 p.m. Greenville (2-5) at ME Lutheran (4-4), 6 p.m. Mount Vernon (4-3) at Waterloo (2-6), 6 p.m. Valmeyer (4-4) at Red Bud (6-2), 6:15 p.m. Highland (5-2) at Centralia (7-0), 6:15 p.m. Pana (1-1) at Carlinville (1-4), 7:30 p.m. Althoff (2-5) at Alton Marquette (7-0), 7:30 p.m. Gibault (2-5) at Mater Dei (2-4), 7:30 p.m. Benton at Nashville (4-2), 7:45 p.m. Jerseyville (2-5) at Jacksonville, 8 p.m.

GIRLS BASKETBALL

CANDY CANE CLASSIC At Gibault 7th place Waterloo (1-10) vs. Valmeyer (0-10), 9 a.m. Consolation final Roxana (2-8) vs. Wood River (4-4), 10:30 a.m. 3rd place Red Bud (9-4) vs. Gibault (7-5), noon Championship Columbia(5-5)vs.AltonMarquette(10-1),1:30p.m. FORT ZUMWALT NORTH TOURNAMENT 7th place Fort Zumwalt East (1-5) vs. Hazelwood East (1-4), 11 a.m.

Consolation final Hazelwood West (1-3) vs. McCluer (1-3), 12:30 p.m. 3rd place Nerinx Hall (3-5) at Zumwalt North (2-4), 2 p.m. Championship Pattonville(4-0)vs.Luth.St.Charles(5-3),3:30p.m. CAPITAL CITY SHOOTOUT At Jefferson City Hermann (6-2) vs. California, 4 p.m. Cardinal Ritter (5-0) at Jefferson City, 5:30 p.m. OTHER GAMES Carlinville (6-6) at Staunton (4-2), 10 a.m. FatherMcGivney(5-5)atNorthGreene(2-0),11a.m. North Callaway (4-2) at Paris, 11 a.m. Pana (8-2) at Gillespie (3-4), 11:30 a.m. Mater Dei (5-4) at Highland (8-1), noon Okawville (10-1) at Pinckneyville (2-4), 1 p.m. CivicMemorial(10-0)atSt.Joseph’s(4-2),1:30p.m. ME Lutheran (5-4) at Brussels (0-3), 2:30 p.m. Hillsboro, Ill. (5-6) at Litchfield (1-7), 6 p.m. Marion (5-2) at DuQuoin, 6:15 p.m. Jerseyville (7-3) at Carrollton, 7:30 p.m. Sparta (0-5) at Carterville (4-2), 7:45 p.m.

HOCKEY

At Affton Rink Lindbergh (1-7-1) vs. Vianney (2-6), 6:45 p.m. Whitfield (1-6) vs. St. Mary’s (6-3-1), 8:30 p.m. At Brentwood Ice Priory (6-0) vs. MICDS (8-1), 7:45 p.m. Summit (1-5-1) vs. Westminster (6-2-2), 9:30 p.m. At Webster Rink John Burroughs (1-4-1) vs. Northwest-CH (1-6-1), 8:45 p.m. At Rec Plex South Webster Groves (5-3) vs. Duchesne (7-4), 8:45 p.m. At Kirkwood Rink CBC (6-0-2) vs. Kirkwood (3-4-1), 9:15 p.m. At South County Clayton (2-4-2) vs. Lutheran South (1-5), 9:15 p.m. At Queeny Park Parkway South (4-3-1) vs. Fort Zumwalt East (10-1), 9:45 p.m.

GIRLS SWIMMING & DIVING

Lindbergh Invitational, 9 a.m.

WRESTLING

48th Mascoutah Invitational Fort Zumwalt East Tournament Chaminade Red Devil Invitational Brentwood Invitational Kansas City Stampede Cape Central Tiger Classic Raytown South Holiday Tournament Joe Bee Memorial Tournament Harrisonville Christmas Tournament


FOR THE RECORD

12.16.2017 • Saturday • M 1 NFL INJURY REPORT OUT: definitely will not play; DNP: did not practice; LIMITED: limited participation; FULL: Full participation Saturday CHICAGO BEARS AT DETROIT LIONS — BEAR: LIMITED: S Adrian Amos (hamstring), DT Eddie Goldman (hip), S DeAndre Houston-Carson (ankle), LB Pernell McPhee (shoulder), TE Adam Shaheen (chest), WR Kendall Wright (shoulder). LIONS: DNP: WR T.J. Jones (not injury related), G T.J. Lang (foot), CB Nevin Lawson (illness), C Travis Swanson (concussion), T Rick Wagner (ankle). LIMITED: DE Ezekiel Ansah (ankle), T Taylor Decker (shoulder), T Corey Robinson (foot). FULL: RB Ameer Abdullah (neck), CB Jamal Agnew (knee), T Emmett Cleary (ankle), QB Matthew Stafford (right hand). L.A. CHARGERS AT KANSAS CITY CHIEFS — CHARGERS: DNP: TE Antonio Gates (not injury related). LIMITED: DT Corey Liuget (toe), T Russell Okung (knee). FULL: TE Hunter Henry (calf), LB Denzel Perryman (abdomen), S Adrian Phillips (hamstring), C Spencer Pulley (knee). CHIEFS: DNP: C Mitch Morse (foot). FULL: DE Allen Bailey (knee), DT Bennie Logan (knee), S Eric Murray (ankle), CB Darrelle Revis (shoulder), WR Demarcus Robinson (knee), WR Albert Wilson (hamstring, shoulder). Sunday PHILADELPHIA EAGLES AT N.Y. GIANTS — EAGLES: DNP: TE Brent Celek (not injury related), G Stefen Wisniewski (ankle). LIMITED: S Rodney McLeod (quad). FULL: DE Derek Barnett (groin), TE Zach Ertz (concussion), LB Joe Walker (neck). GIANTS: DNP: S Landon Collins (ankle), DT Damon Harrison (not injury related), WR Roger Lewis (ankle), OL Justin Pugh (back). LIMITED: CB Brandon Dixon (heel/ hamstring), TE Rhett Ellison (finger), LB B.J. Goodson (ankle), DE Jason Pierre-Paul, (finger), WR Travis Rudolph (hamstring). CINCINNATI BENGALS AT MINNESOTA VIKINGS — BENGALS: DNP: LB Vontaze Burfict (concussion), CB Darqueze Dennard (knee), CB Dre Kirkpatrick (concussion), TE Tyler Kroft (hamstring), LB Kevin Minter (hamstring), RB Joe Mixon (concussion), LB Nick Vigil (ankle). LIMITED: RB Giovani Bernard (knee), DE Carlos Dunlap (chest), T Cedric Ogbuehi (shoulder), DT Pat Sims (heel), S Shawn Williams (hamstring). VIKINGS: DNP: CB Mackensie Alexander (ribs), TE Blake Bell (shoulder), LB Emmanuel Lamur (foot), T Riley Reiff (ankle), CB Xavier Rhodes (hip), TE Kyle Rudolph (ankle). LIMITED: C Pat Elflein (shoulder), DT Linval Joseph (knee), RB Jerick McKinnon (shoulder), TE David Morgan (concussion), T Mike Remmers (back), G Jeremiah Sirles (knee), DT Shamar Stephen (shoulder), WR Adam Thielen (knee). HOUSTON TEXANS AT JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS — TEXANS: DNP: G Jeff Allen (groin), LB Jadeveon Clowney (knee, illness), LB Jelani Jenkins (concussion), T Kendall Lamm (concussion), WR Braxton Miller (concussion), QB Tom Savage (concussion). LIMITED: T Julien Davenport (shoulder), RB Andre Ellington (knee), S Andre Hal (knee), DE Joel Heath (knee), RB Lamar Miller (knee), LB Brian Peters (hamstring), G Xavier Su’a-Filo (groin). FULL: RB Alfred Blue (concussion), DT Brandon Dunn (back), G Greg Mancz (knee), RB Jordan Todman (hand), WR DeAndrew White (thigh). JAGUARS: DNP: RB Leonard Fournette (quadricep), WR Allen Hurns (ankle), WR Larry Pinkard (concussion), T Cam Robinson (back). LIMITED: WR Marqise Lee (foot). FULL: QB Blake Bortles (right wrist), LB Telvin Smith (concussion). ARIZONA CARDINALS AT WASHINGTON REDSKINS — CARDINALS: DNP: S Budda Baker (thigh), S Antoine Bethea (knee), LB Karlos Dansby (not injury related), WR Larry Fitzgerald (not injury related), LB Gabe Martin (hamstring), DT Josh Mauro (ankle), RB Adrian Peterson (neck), DT Frostee Rucker (not injury related), G Earl Watford (ankle). LIMITED: G Alex Boone (back), WR John Brown (toe), LB Chandler Jones (hip), DT Corey Peters (ankle). FULL: RB Kerwynn Williams (ribs). REDSKINS: DNP: LB Zach Brown (illness, toe, achilles, hip), T Morgan Moses (ankle), S Montae Nicholson (concussion), CB Josh Norman (knee), T Trent Williams (knee). LIMITED: LB Ryan Anderson (ankle), WR Ryan Grant (ankle), WR Maurice Harris (concussion), DE Terrell McClain (toe), C Chase Roullier (hand). FULL: DE Matt Ioannidis (hand), LB Martrell Spaight (ankle). N.Y. JETS AT NEW ORLEANS SAINTS — JETS: DNP: CB Morris Claiborne (foot), RB Matt Forte (knee), RB Elijah McGuire (ankle), S Rontez Miles (hamstring), CB Rashard Robinson (not injury related), G Brian Winters (abdomen, ankle). LIMITED: LB Bruce Carter (groin), LS Thomas Hennessy (concussion). FULL: WR Robby Anderson (hamstring), G James Carpenter (knee), LB Jordan Jenkins (shoulder), WR Jermaine Kearse (shoulder), S Marcus Maye (finger). SAINTS: DNP: WR Ted Ginn (rib), DE Trey Hendrickson (ankle), LB A.J. Klein (groin). LIMITED: TE Josh Hill (shoulder), G Andrus Peat (groin), S Kenny Vaccaro (groin). FULL: RB Alvin Kamara (concussion), G Senio Kelemete (concussion), WR Michael Thomas (eye). MIAMI DOLPHINS AT BUFFALO BILLS — DOLPHINS: DNP: DE Andre Branch (knee), G Jermon Bushrod (foot), CB Xavien Howard (illness), QB Matt Moore (foot), C Mike Pouncey (hip), DT Ndamukong Suh (knee), CB Cordrea Tankersley (ankle, shoulder), S Michael Thomas (knee), RB Damien Williams (shoulder). LIMITED: DT Jordan Phillips (ankle). FULL: TE MarQueis Gray (shoulder). BILLS: DNP: T Cordy Glenn (illness, foot, ankle), WR Andre Holmes (neck), DT Kyle Williams (groin). LIMITED: WR Kelvin Benjamin (knee), TE Charles Clay (knee), T Seantrel Henderson (back), RB LeSean McCoy (knee), QB Nathan Peterman (concussion). FULL: CB Leonard Johnson (knee), G John Miller (ankle), QB Tyrod Taylor (knee). GREEN BAY PACKERS AT CAROLINA PANTHERS — PACKERS: DNP: CB Davon House (shoulder.back), S Josh Jones (not injury related), LB Jake Ryan (knee). LIMITED: LB Ahmad Brooks (back), DT Quinton Dial (chest/knee), CB Demetri Goodson (hamstring), LB Nick Perry (foot/ shoulder). FULL: G Lucas Patrick (hank). PANTHERS: DNP: S Mike Adams (rest), WR Brenton Bersin (toe), CB Captain Munnerlyn (not injury related), DE Julius Peppers (rest), RB Jonathan Stewart (rest), LB Shaq Thompson (foot), G Trai Turner (concussion). LIMITED: WR Kaelin Clay (shoulder), LB Thomas Davis (back), WR Devin Funchess (shoulder), C Tyler Larsen (foot), QB Cam Newtwon (right shoulder), WR Russell Shepard (shoulder). FULL: C Ryan Kalil (neck), LB Luke Kuechly (shoulder), RB Christian McCaffrey (shoulder), TE Greg Olsen (foot), P Michael Palardy (shoulder), BALTIMORE RAVENS AT CLEVELAND BROWNS — RAVENS: DNP: WR Mike Wallace (ankle). LIMITED: CB Maurice Canady (knee), C Ryan Jensen (ankle), WR Chris Moore (hip), LB Za’Darius Smith (shoulder). FULL: G Jermaine Eluemunor (shoulder). BROWNS: DNP: CB Briean Boddy-Calhoun (knee), CB Jamar Taylor (foot). LIMITED:

T Shon Coleman (shoulder, thumb), TE David Njoku (foot, wrist), S Jabrill Peppers (knee), DT Danny Shelton (chest, ribs), C J.C. Tretter (knee). FULL: LB Josh Keyes (wrist). L.A. RAMS AT SEATTLE SEAHAWKS — RAMS: DNP: LB Mark Barron (not injury related), C John Sullivan (not injury related), T Andrew Whitworth (knee). LIMITED: T Rob Havenstein (knee), WR Robert Woods (shoulder). FULL: LB Connor Barwin (forearm). SEAHAWKS: Practice Not Complete NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS AT PITTSBURGH STEELERS — PATRIOTS: DNP: DL Alan Branch (knee). LIMITED: CB Malcolm Butler (ankle), DL Trey Flowers (rib), CB Stephon Gilmore (ankle), WR Chris Hogan (shoulder), DB Brandon King (hamstring), DL Eric Lee (ankle), WR Matthew Slater (hamstring), LB Kyle Van Noy (calf), OT LaAdrian Waddle (ankle), DL Deatrich Wise Jr., (foot). FULL: QB Tom Brady (achilles), WR Brandin Cooks (hand). STEELERS: DNP: WR Martavis Bryant 9not injury related), TE Vance McDonald (shoulder), CB Coty Sensabaugh (shoulder), DE Stephon Tuitt (illness). LIMITED: CB Joe Haden (fibula), LB Tyler Matakevich (shoulder). TENNESSEE TITANS AT SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS — TITANS: Practice Not Complete. 49ERS: Practice Not Complete. DALLAS COWBOYS AT OAKLAND RAIDERS — COWBOYS: DNP: WR Brice Butler (foot), T La’el Collins (back), TE James Hanna (knee), DE David Irving (concussion), CB Orlando Scandrick (back), T Tyron Smith (back). LIMITED: DT Maliek Collins (foot), LB Justin Durant (concussion), LB Sean Lee (hamstring). RAIDERS: Practice Not Complete.

NFL Playoff Scenarios AFC CLINCHED: Pittsburgh — AFC North title PIT clinches home-field advantage with: Win plus Jacksonville loss or tie Pittsburgh clinches a first-round bye with: Win OR Tie plus Jacksonville loss New England clinches AFC East with: Win or tie OR Buffalo loss or tie New England clinches playoff berth with: Baltimore loss or tie Jacksonville clinches playoff berth with: Win OR Tie plus Buffalo loss or tie OR Tie plus Baltimore loss or tie OR Losses by Buffalo and Baltimore OR Baltimore loss plus Kansas City-Los Aangeles Chargers game does not end in tie

NFC CLINCHED: Philadelphia — NFC East title PHI clinches home-field advantage with: Win plus Minnesota loss PHI clinches a first-round bye with: Win OR Tie plus losses or ties by Los Angeles Raiders, New Orleans and Carolina Minnesota clinches NFC North with: Win or tie OR Losses or ties by Detroit and Green Bay Minnesota clinches a playoff berth with: Seattle loss plus losses by Atlanta and New Orleans OR Seattle loss plus losses by Atlanta and Carolina OR Seattle loss plus Atlanta loss plus Detroit loss or tie OR Seattle loss plus Atlanta tie plus New Orleans loss plus Detroit loss or tie OR Seattle loss plus Atlanta tie plus losses by New Orleans and Carolina LA Rams clinch a playoff berth with: Win plus losses or ties by Detroit and Green Bay plus losses by New Orleans and Atlanta

NFL leaders PASSERS Att Cp Pct Yds TD Rtng 481 324 67.4 3865 27 105.2 Brady, NE Al. Smith, KC 436 293 67.2 3507 23 104.4 Brees, NOR 442 317 71.7 3569 19 104.2 A. Rodgers, GBY 193 128 66.3 1385 13 103.2 De.Watson, HOU 204 126 61.8 1699 19 103 Wentz, PHL 440 265 60.2 3296 33 101.9 418 260 62.2 3383 22 99.2 Goff, LA Stafford, DET 468 307 65.6 3683 23 97.9 Cousins, WAS 440 290 65.9 3440 22 97.7 Rivers, LAC 462 290 62.8 3611 23 97.2 Keenum, MIN 404 270 66.8 2983 18 96.2 Ru. Wilson, SEA 473 293 61.9 3527 29 95.5 McCown, NYJ 397 267 67.3 2926 18 94.5 M. Ryan, ATL 417 275 65.9 3278 17 92.4 Prescott, DAL 399 252 63.2 2752 21 91.6 Roethlis.., PIT 502 318 63.3 3744 24 91.1 Dalton, CIN 389 236 60.7 2747 21 90.4 J. Winston, TAM 329 206 62.6 2475 14 89.7 D. Carr, OAK 420 268 63.8 2942 18 88.8 Ty. Taylor, BUF 326 206 63.2 2090 12 88.6 Bortles, JAC 410 247 60.2 2821 16 85.8 Cutler, MIA 340 218 64.1 2100 18 85.4 C. Palmer, ARI 267 164 61.4 1978 9 84.4 Manning, NYG 441 278 63 2639 15 82.4 Newton, CAR 402 241 60 2720 17 81.9 Brissett, IND 411 245 59.6 2769 11 81.7 Trubisky, CHI 225 131 58.2 1508 6 80 Flacco, BAL 422 272 64.5 2413 13 78 Hundley, GBY 252 161 63.9 1534 8 78 PASS RECEIVERS RECEPTIONS Anto. Brown, PIT De. Hopkins, HOU Landry, MIA Fitzgerald, ARI Mic. Thomas, NOR K. Allen, LAC Thielen, MIN G. Tate, DET L. Bell, PIT Ju. Jones, ATL T. Kelce, KC Dem. Thomas, DEN Doyle, IND D. Adams, GBY C. McCaffrey, CAR YARDS Anto. Brown, PIT De. Hopkins, HOU Thielen, MIN Ju. Jones, ATL K. Allen, LAC Mic. Thomas, NOR Ty. Hill, KC A. Green, CIN T. Kelce, KC Cooks, NE Fitzgerald, ARI Mar. Jones, DET Baldwin, SEA G. Tate, DET T. Hilton, IND

No 99 88 88 87 85 83 80 79 75 73 73 73 71 69 67 Yds 1509 1233 1161 1161 1143 992 986 950 945 924 922 885 860 852 852

RUSHERS L. Bell, PIT K. Hunt, KC Gurley, LA J. Howard, CHI L. McCoy, BUF Ma. Ingram, NOR Fournette, JAC C.. Anderson, DEN M. Gordon, LAC Al. Collins, BAL Gore, IND E. Elliott, DAL C. Hyde, SNF L. Miller, HOU Crowell, CLE

Att Yards 283 1105 218 1046 236 1035 235 1032 239 1007 192 971 231 923 211 858 229 853 162 825 220 793 191 783 188 771 211 764 174 716

Yds 1509 1233 745 922 992 1143 1161 852 579 1161 945 840 611 828 519 No 99 88 80 73 83 85 64 65 73 54 87 51 66 79 48

Avg 15.2 14.0 8.5 10.6 11.7 13.8 14.5 10.8 7.7 15.9 12.9 11.5 8.6 12.0 7.7 Avg 15.2 14.0 14.5 15.9 13.8 11.7 15.4 14.6 12.9 17.1 10.6 17.4 13.0 10.8 17.8

Lng 57 72t 49 37 35 51 65t 45t 42 53 44 40 26 55t 37 Lng 57 72t 65t 53 51 35 79t 77t 44 64t 37 46 54 45t 80t

TD 9 11 8 5 4 5 4 4 2 3 7 4 3 9 4 TD 9 11 4 3 5 4 6 8 7 5 5 8 5 4 4

Avg Long TD 3.9 27 7 4.8 69t 5 4.4 36 10 4.4 53 7 4.2 48t 5 5.1 72 9 4.0 90t 8 4.1 40 2 3.7 87t 6 5.1 50 5 3.6 21 3 4.1 30 7 4.1 61 5 3.6 21 3 4.1 37 2

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • B9

AMERICA’S LINE

TRANSACTIONS

COLLEGES

NFL Favorite Points Underdog ...........................Open Current....................... LIONS ....................6.5 5 ........................Bears Chargers ............... PK PK................... CHIEFS Sunday Eagles.................... 7.5 7.5...................GIANTS PANTHERS ............2.5 3 .................... Packers VIKINGS...............10.5 10.5................ Bengals BILLS .....................3.5 3 ...................Dolphins JAGUARS .................11 11 .....................Texans SAINTS ................ 15.5 15.5.......................Jets WASHINGTON...........4 4 ........................Cards Ravens......................7 7................... BROWNS SEAHAWKS............... 1 2.5......................Rams Patriots .................2.5 3 .................STEELERS 49ERS.......................2 1.5..................... Titans Cowboys................2.5 3 .................. RAIDERS Monday Falcons.....................5 6.5 ..................... BUCS COLLEGE FOOTBALL Odds to win the 2017 College Football Championship Open Current Teams Alabama 3/1 2/1 Clemson 20/1 5/2 Oklahoma 10/1 7/2 Georgia 30/1 7/2 Note: Oklahoma opened as a favorite. NBA Favorite Points Underdog HORNETS 1.5 Blazers CAVALIERS 8.5 Jazz Thunder [2] KNICKS HEAT 6 Clippers T’WOLVES 11.5 Suns ROCKETS 10.5 Bucks SPURS 8.5 Mavericks Celtics 4.5 GRIZZLIES CIRCULAR REPORT: The Knicks — Thunder circle is for New York F Kristaps Porzingis . COLLEGE BASKETBALL Favorite Points Underdog Seton Hall 7.5 RUTGERS Miami-Florida 9 GEORGE WASH FLORIDA INT’L 2.5 James Madison 11.5 Memphis m-Louisville Syracuse 2 GEORGETOWN Northwestern 4.5 DEPAUL KENTUCKY 5 Virginia Tech Loyola-Chicago 3.5 WISCONSIN-MILW TEXAS 10 Louisiana Tech VIRGINIA 12.5 Davidson TOLEDO 4.5 Wright St W KENTUCKY 9.5 Indiana St Georgia 3 MASSACHUSETTS MISSISSIPPI 9.5 Illinois St Cincinnati 1.5 UCLA 6.5 Oklahoma WICHITA ST RHODE ISLAND 11 Charleston CALIFORNIA 7 CS-Fullerton TEMPLE 14.5 Drexel OHIO ST 16 Appalachian St FRESNO ST 1 Oregon 3 Middle Tenn St b-AUBURN WASHINGTON ST 9 Iupui E Michigan 1.5 LONG BEACH ST FLA ATLANTIC 6.5 Arkansas St DAYTON 3.5 Georgia St MARSHALL 2 Ohio U 17 Troy n-ARKANSAS Arizona 15.5 NEW MEXICO ST. MARY’S-CA 17.5 Cal-Irvine TEXAS TECH 28 Rice Kansas 10.5 NEBRASKA 2 CAL-POLY SLO Princeton Unlv 6.5 PACIFIC SAN DIEGO 10.5 N Texas p-OREGON ST 6.5 Saint Louis BYU 4 Utah District of Detroit Classic Michigan 19.5 DETROIT Michigan St 17 Oakland Crossroads Classic Purdue 7.5 BUTLER Notre Dame 6.5 Indiana Orange Bowl Classic Florida St 5 Oklahoma St Florida 5.5 Clemson Hy-Vee Classic Iowa 6 DRAKE Iowa St 1 Northern Iowa Added Games NC STATE 7.5 NC-Greensboro XAVIER 20 E Tennessee St C Michigan 3.5 SOUTHERN UTAH BELMONT 16 Pepperdine E Illinois 1.5 S ALABAMA EVANSVILLE 7.5 Austin Peay TULSA 8.5 Manhattan MURRAY ST 15 Marist MISSISSIPPI ST 16 Tenn-Martin KANSAS ST 18.5 SE Missouri St 27 N Dakota GONZAGA m- Madison Square Garden. b- Birmingham, AL. | p- Portland, OR. n- North Little Rock, AR. NHL Odds Underdog Favorite WILD -$125/+$105 Oilers BRUINS -$145/+$125 Rangers SENATORS -$110/-$110 Canadiens Blue Jackets HURRICANES -$110/-$110 BLUES -$140/+$120 Jets FLYERS -$120/even Stars ISLANDERS -$110/-$110 Kings CAPITALS -$145/+$125 Ducks Penguins -$165/+$145 COYOTES Lightning -$170/+$150 AVALANCHE FLAMES -$110/-$110 Predators Grand Salami: Over/under 64.5 goals. Home team in CAPS © 2017 Benjamin Eckstein

BASEBALL American League HOUSTON ASTROS — Designated OF Preston Tucker for assignment. Agreed to terms with RHP Hector Rondon on a two-year contract. LOS ANGELES ANGELS — Agreed to terms with INF Zack Cozart on a three-year contract. MINNESOTA TWINS — Agreed to terms with RHP Fernando Rodney on a one-year contract and C Wynston Sawyer, 2B Taylor Featherston and OF James Ramsey on minor league contracts. TAMPA BAY RAYS — Agreed to terms with OF Brandon Snyder, LHPs Jonny Venters and Vidal Nuno and RHPs Colton Murray, Cody Hall and Ruben Alaniz on minor league contracts. TEXAS RANGERS — Agreed to terms with RHP Chris Martin on a two-year contract. National League ATLANTA BRAVES — Named Nick Jensen trainer of Gwinnett (IL); Chris Maloney manager, Dennis Lewallyn pitching coach and Carlos Mendez hitting coach of Mississippi (SL); Luis Salazar manager, Mike Maroth pitching coach and Rene Tosoni hitting coach of Florida (FSL); Ralph Wheeler manager and Vic Scarpone trainer of Rome (SAL); Barrett Kleinknecht manager and Drew Garner trainer of Danville (Appalachian); and Nestor Perez manager and Eric Hrycko trainer of the GCL Braves. COLORADO ROCKIES — Agreed to terms with LHP Jake McGee and RHP Bryan Shaw on three-year contracts. MIAMI MARLINS — Designated LHP Hunter Cervenka for assignment. PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES — Traded RHP Nick Burdi to Pittsburgh for future considerations. Agreed to terms with RHPs Pat Neshek and Tommy Hunter on two-year contracts. SAN DIEGO PADRES — Traded RHP Enyel De Los Santos to Philadelphia for INF Freddy Galvis. Designated RHP Jose Ruiz for assignment. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS — Named Alan Zintner assistant director of player development/offense, Matt Buschmann assistant director of player development/run prevention, Dave Hansen minor league hitting coordinator, Julio Rangel minor league pitching coordinator, Justin Lehr minor league rehab pitching coordinator and Dan O’Brien minor league development coach. BASKETBALL | NBA NBA — Named Monty McCutchen vice president/head of referee development and training. FOOTBALL | NFL NFL — Fined New Orleans coach Sean Payton, Jacksonville offensive line coach Pat Flaherty and Jacksonville wide receivers coach Keenan McCardell $10,000 for improperly going on the field during last week’s game. ARIZONA CARDINALS — Placed RB Adrian Peterson on injured reserve. Activated LS Aaron Brewer from injured reserve. Claimed CB C.J. Goodwin off waivers from Atlanta. BUFFALO BILLS — Placed OT Cordy Glenn on injured reserve. CLEVELAND BROWNS — Released OL Andrew Wylie from the practice squad. Signed DL T.Y. McGill to the practice squad. KANSAS CITY CHIEFS — Placed C Mitch Morse on injured reserve. Signed CB Keith Reaser from the practice squad. MINNESOTA VIKINGS — Placed TE Blake Bell on injured reserve. Signed TE Kyle Carter. Signed S Jack Tocho to the practice squad. HOCKEY | NHL NEW YORK ISLANDERS — Loaned F Josh Ho-Sang to Bridgeport (AHL). BLUES — Recalled F Samuel Blais from San Antonio (AHL). OLYMPIC SPORTS USADA — Announced American long jumper Tori Polk accepted a two-year sanction for a non-analytical anti-doping rule violation involving her possession of prohibited substances. SOCCER Major League Soccer COLORADO RAPIDS — Traded M Mike Grella to Columbus for a 2019 second-round draft pick. FC DALLAS — Signed D Maynor Figueroa to a one-year contract. LOS ANGELES FC — Acquired F Diego Rossi by transfer from Penarol (Primera Division-Uruguay). SPORTING KANSAS CITY — Acquired M Yohan Croizet by transfer from Mechelen (Jupiler Pro League-Belgium). National Women’s Soccer League WASHINGTON SPIRIT — Named Tom Torres assistant coach. COLLEGE NCAA — Named Lynn Holzman vice president of women’s basketball. Placed North Colorado’s men’s basketball program on three years’ probation for after finding academic fraud and recruiting violations by ex-coach B.J. Hill and some of his assistants. HOLY CROSS — Named Bob Chesney fb coach. MISSOURI — Named Vernon Hargreaves inside linebackers coach.

Area scores

SOCCER English Premier League GP W D L GF GA Pts 17 16 1 0 52 11 49 Man City Man United 17 12 2 3 37 11 38 Chelsea 17 11 2 4 31 14 35 17 9 4 4 30 14 31 Tottenham Liverpool 17 8 7 2 34 20 31 Burnley 17 9 4 4 16 12 31 17 9 3 5 30 20 30 Arsenal Leicester 17 7 5 5 27 23 26 Watford 17 6 4 7 26 29 22 17 6 4 7 21 29 22 Everton Southampton 17 4 6 7 17 23 18 Huddersfield 17 5 3 9 12 29 18 17 4 5 8 14 23 17 Brighton Bournemouth 17 4 4 9 15 20 16 Stoke 17 4 4 9 19 36 16 17 4 3 10 16 26 15 Newcastle West Brom 17 2 8 7 12 22 14 Crystal Palace 17 3 5 9 12 28 14 17 3 5 9 14 32 14 West Ham Swansea 17 3 3 11 9 22 12 Saturday Leicester vs. Crystal Palace 6:30 a.m. Chelsea vs. Southampton 9 a.m. Watford vs. Huddersfield 9 a.m. Stoke vs. West Ham 9 a.m. Arsenal vs. Newcastle 9 a.m. Brighton vs. Burnley 9 a.m. Man City vs. Tottenham 11:30 a.m.

GOLF Indonesia Masters leaders Friday | Jakarta, Indonesia Purse: $750,000 | Yardage: 7,324; Par: 72 Partial Second Round 68-64 — 132 Kiradech Aphibarnrat, THI Giwhan Kim, SKO 65-68 — 133 Phachara Khongwatmai, THAI 65-69 — 134 Chikkarangappa S., IND 68-67 — 135 Sihwan Kim, USA 68-67 — 135 67-69 — 136 Younghan Song, SKO Choo Tze Huang, SNG 66-71 — 137 Jazz Janewattananond, THAI 69-68 — 137 Steve Lewton, GBR 67-70 — 137 71-67 — 138 Shubhankar Searma, IDN Gaganjeet Bhullar, IND 67-71 — 138 Lu Wei-chih, TWA 66-72 — 138 Suradit Yongcharoenchai, THAI 72-66 — 138 Scott Hend, AUS 69-70 — 139 68-71 — 139 Chan Shih-chang, TWA Daniel Chopra, SWE 68-71 — 139 71-68 — 139 Chinnarat Phadungsil, THAI Ryu Hyunwoo, SKO 68-71 — 139 Terry Pilkadaris, AUS 70-69 — 139 THRU Leaderboard Justin Rose, England -14 16 -12 F Kiradech Aphibarnrat, THAI Giwhan Kim, SKO -11 F Scott Vincent, Zimbabwe -11 14 -10 F Phachara Khongwatmai, THAI Chikkarangappa S., IND -9 F -9 F Sihwan Kim, USA Yusaku Miyazato, Japan -9 16 -9 13 Gunn Charoenkul, THAI Ashley Hall, AUS -9 13 Also -2 F Casey O’Toole, USA Jarin Todd, USA -2 F E 12 Jason Knutzon, USA James Bowen, USA +1 F Jamie Puterbaugh, USA +2 F +2 F Dodge Kemmer, USA John Michael O’Toole, USA +3 F +3 14 Sam Cyr, USA John Catlin, USA +4 16 WD Brandt Snedeker, USA Brett Munson, USA WD

MEN’S TOP 25 SCHEDULE

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Women’s basketball Missouri Valley College 81, Maryville 79 Principia 81, Robert Morris U. (Ill.) 76 Men’s basketball Maryville 86, Harris-Stowe 83

AREA BASKETBALL SCHEDULE

Saturday W: Principia at Westminster, noon W: Harper at St. Louis CC, 1 p.m. W: LU-Belleville at Park, 1 p.m. W: Central Baptist at Missouri Baptist, 1 p.m. W: Webster at Eureka, 1 p.m. W: Greenville at Fontbonne, 1 p.m. W: Washburn at Lindenwood, 1:30 p.m. W: Northwestern at Missouri State, 2 p.m. W: UMSL at Culver Stockton, 2 p.m. M: Principia at Westminster, 2 p.m. W: Illinois Central at Jefferson, 2 p.m. M: Harper at St. Louis CC, 3 p.m. M: LU-Belleville at Park, 3 p.m. M: Central Baptist at Missouri Baptist, 3 p.m. M: Webster at Eureka, 3 p.m. M: Greenville at Fontbonne, 3 p.m. W: Harris-Stowe at Southern INDna, 3 p.m. M: Washburn at Lindenwood, 3:30 p.m. M: Southeast Missouri at Kansas State, 7 p.m. Sunday W: Missouri vs. INDna, in West Palm Beach, Fla., 1:30 p.m. W: NIU at SIU Edwardsville, 2 p.m. W: Lipscomb at SLU, 2 p.m. M: Lamar at SIU Carbondale, 3 p.m. M: Washington at Illinois Wesleyan, 3 p.m.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL HOW THE TOP 25 FARED

1.

2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25.

UConn (8-0) idle Next: vs. Oklahoma, Tuesday. Notre Dame (9-1) idle Next: vs. DePaul, Sunday. Louisville (12-0) idle Next: at Kentucky, Sunday. South Carolina (9-1) idle Next: vs. Savannah State, Sunday. Mississippi State (10-0) idle Next: vs. Maine, Sunday. Baylor (9-1) idle Next: at Nicholls State, Monday. Tennessee (10-0) idle Next: at Long Beach State, Sunday. Texas (8-1) idle Next: vs. No. 12 Florida State, Sunday. Oregon (8-2) idle Next: vs. Mississippi, Sunday. West Virginia (9-0) idle Next: vs. Radford, Saturday. UCLA (7-2) idle Next: at Seton Hall, Sunday. Florida State (10-0) idle Next: at No. 8 Texas, Sunday. Ohio State (10-2) beat Dartmouth 103-70. Next: at Cincinnati, Sunday. Duke (8-2) idle Next: vs. Maine, Tuesday. Maryland (10-2) idle Next: at Coppin State, Wednesday. Missouri (9-1) idle Next: vs. Indiana, Sunday. Oregon State (7-2) idle Next: vs. UC Santa Barbara, Saturday. Stanford (5-4) idle Next: vs. UNLV, Saturday. Texas A&M (8-2) at Southern Cal, late Friday. Next: vs. Hawaii, Wednesday. Villanova (9-0) idle Next: at La Salle, Wednesday. Green Bay (8-1) idle Next: vs. Bradley, Saturday. South Florida (8-2) beat Southern University 108-48. Next: at FIU, Sunday. Michigan (9-2) idle Next: vs. Fort Wayne, Saturday. California (7-2) idle Next: vs. BYU, Saturday. Iowa (10-1) idle Next: at Northern Iowa, Sunday.

MEN’S BASKETBALL FRIDAY’S NATIONAL SCORES

East Mount St. Mary’s 89, Washington (Md.) 67 South E. Kentucky 70, Charleston S. 65 Emory & Henry 104, Berry 86 NC A&T 64, Tennessee St. 54 Samford 98, Thomas (Ga.) 51 Midwest Adrian 85, Great Lakes Christian 61 Creighton 87, Md.-E. Shore 36 Grand View 85, Association Free 50 North Central (Ill.) 73, Alma 52 UIC 76, Dartmouth 60 Wis.-Eau Claire 63, Carleton 56 Southwest Houston Bapt. 100, Barclay 65 Sam Houston 57, UALR 55 Texas A&M-CC 71, St. Mary’s (Texas) 55

8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25.

Villanova (11-0) vs. Hofstra, Dec. 22. Michigan State (9-1) vs. Oakland, Sat. Wichita State (8-1) vs. Oklahoma, Sat. Duke (11-1) vs. Evansville, Wednesday. Arizona State (9-0) vs. Vanderbilt, Sun. Miami (8-0) at George Washington, Sat. North Carolina (9-1) at No. 20 Tennessee, Sunday. Kentucky (8-1) vs. Virginia Tech, Sat. Texas A&M (9-1) vs. Northern Kentucky, Tuesday. Xavier (9-1) vs. ETSU, Saturday. West Virginia (9-1) vs. Coppin State, Wednesday. Gonzaga (8-2) vs. North Dakota, Sat. Kansas (7-2) at Nebraska, Saturday. TCU (10-0) vs. Texas Southern, Monday. Seton Hall (9-1) at Rutgers, Saturday. Virginia (8-1) vs. Davidson, Saturday. Purdue (10-2) vs. Butler, Saturday. Notre Dame (8-2) vs. Indiana, Saturday. Florida State (9-0) vs. Oklahoma State, Saturday. Tennessee (7-1) vs. No. 7 North Carolina, Sunday. Baylor (8-2) vs. Savannah State, Sun. Florida (6-3) vs. Clemson, Saturday. Arizona (7-3) at New Mexico, Saturday. Texas Tech (8-1) vs. Rice, Saturday. Cincinnati (8-2) at UCLA, Saturday.

COLLEGE FOOTBALL NCAA FCS playoffs > Semifinals Friday North Dakota State 55, Sam Houston State 13 Saturday South Dakota State (11-2) at James Madison (13-0), 3:30 p.m. > Championship Jan. 6 | Frisco, Texas North Dakota State (13-1) vs. South Dakota State/James Madison winner, 11 a.m.

Division II playoffs > Championship Saturday | Kansas City, Kan. West Florida (11-3) vs. Texas A&M-Commerce (13-1), 5 p.m.

Division III playoffs > Championship Friday | At Salem, Va. Mount Union 12, Mary Hardin-Baylor 0

NAIA playoffs > Championship Saturday | Daytona Beach, Fla. Saint Francis (Ind.) (13-0) vs. Reinhardt (12-0), 5 p.m.

Missouri Bowl History RECORD: 15-16

2015 Citrus Bowl: Missouri 33, Minnesota 17 2014 Cotton Bowl: Missouri 41, Oklahoma St. 31 2011 Independence Bowl: Missouri 41, North Carolina 24 2010 Insight Bowl: Iowa 27, Missouri 24 2009 Texas Bowl: Navy 35, Missouri 13 2008 Alamo Bowl: Missouri 30, Northwestern 23, OT 2008 Capital One Bowl: Missouri 38, Arkansas 7 2006 Sun Bowl: Oregon St. 39, Missouri 38 2005 Independence Bowl: Missouri 38, South Carolina 31 2003 Independence Bowl: Arkansas 27, Missouri 14 1998 Insight.com Bowl: Missouri 34, West Virginia 31 1997 Holiday Bowl: Colorado St. 35, Missouri 24 1983 Holiday Bowl: Brigham Young 21, Missouri 17 1981 Tangerine Bowl: Missouri 19, Southern Miss 17 1980 Liberty Bowl: Purdue 28, Missouri 25 1979 Hall of Fame Bowl: Missouri 24, South Carolina 14 1978 Liberty Bowl: Missouri 20, LSU 15 1973 Sun Bowl: Missouri 34, Auburn 17 1972 Fiesta Bowl: Arizona St. 49, Missouri 35 1970 Orange Bowl: Penn St. 10, Missouri 3 1968 Gator Bowl: Missouri 35, Alabama 10 1966 Sugar Bowl: Missouri 20, Florida 18 1962 Bluebonnet Bowl: Missouri 14, Georgia Tech 10 1961 Orange Bowl: Missouri 21, Navy 14 1960 Orange Bowl: Georgia 14, Missouri 0 1950 Gator Bowl: Maryland 20, Missouri 7 1949 Gator Bowl: Clemson 24, Missouri 23 1946 Cotton Bowl: Texas 40, Missouri 27 1942 Sugar Bowl: Fordham 2, Missouri 0 1940 Orange Bowl: Georgia Tech 21, Missouri 7 1924 L.A. Christmas Festival: Southern Cal 20, Missouri 7

BLUES STATISTICS Player Brayden Schenn Jaden Schwartz Vladimir Tarasenko Alex Pietrangelo Paul Stastny Vladimir Sobotka Colton Parayko Alexander Steen Joel Edmundson Scottie Upshall Dmitrij Jaskin Kyle Brodziak Vince Dunn Robert Bortuzzo Carl Gunnarsson Patrik Berglund Magnus Paajarvi Sammy Blais Oskar Sundqvist Chris Thorburn Jay Bouwmeester Ivan Barbashev Beau Bennett Wade Megan Nate Prosser Jordan Schmaltz Tage Thompson Goalie GP Jake Allen 28 Carter Hutton 8

GP G 33 16 30 14 33 14 30 7 33 7 33 6 33 3 27 3 33 6 33 5 30 4 33 5 31 2 30 1 28 3 9 3 29 2 9 1 25 0 19 0 10 1 9 0 6 0 1 0 1 0 2 0 4 0 MINS 1607 382

A PTS 21 37 21 35 19 33 16 23 16 23 12 18 14 17 13 16 6 12 7 12 7 11 5 10 4 6 4 5 2 5 1 4 2 4 2 3 3 3 3 3 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 AVG W 2.54 17 1.88 4

+/23 23 16 14 -5 -2 5 -4 4 -2 8 3 5 1 11 -2 -2 1 -2 -2 6 -2 -2 0 0 0 -3 L 8 2

PIM 32 8 9 10 8 26 4 12 18 24 0 12 8 18 8 6 8 4 10 17 0 0 0 0 0 2 4 OT 2 0

PP 3 4 2 2 2 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 GA 68 12

SH 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 SA 763 189

GW PCTG 6 .176 2 .222 2 .097 2 .080 0 .096 2 .091 0 .033 1 .045 0 .098 1 .143 0 .073 1 .128 0 .038 1 .024 1 .136 0 .150 0 .059 0 .125 0 .000 0 .000 0 .091 0 .000 0 .000 0 .000 0 .000 0 .000 0 .000 SV% G .911 0 .937 0

CLASSIFIED

Landscape Laborers

Landscape Laborer (4 ) Temp full time . S t . Louis C o . 2 /2 6 /1 8 1 2 /1 3 /1 8 Emp: Complete Lawn Care. Cleanups, use of ride on mowe rs , ae rators , trimme rs , thatchers, tree & shrub plantings, weeding.. 40 hrs. 8a-4p Mon-Sat, days vary. $13.81/hr. $20.72 OT. Emp. transports to job site locations. 2 months exp nec. Transportation meals/lodging will be reimbursed if worker completes ½ the empl period & return transportation if worker completes contract or is dismissed early by e mp . Tools provided. S end resume to Mark Becker 2891 Wintergreen Dr Florissant MO 63033 or apply at your local MO Job C e nte r re J o # 12066267 at 4040 Seven Hills Dr, Ste 166 Florisant MO 63033

Dogs AKC Reg. Labs, dew claws removd, up to date shots/wrmed, vet chkd. 18 mo. health guar. Avail. 12/15. 618-697-4146.

Dogs

DOODLES & RETRIEVERS: Puppies Ready Now & Thru Christmas!

LABRADOODLES, GOLDENDOODLES, GOLDADORS, GOLDEN RETRIEVERS & LABS All Colors & Sizes, Health Guarantee. Top Rated Breeder

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English Golden Retrievers, Goldendoodles, Wheaten Terriers, Shiba Inu, Lots of Cute Poos!

636-240-3647

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Bernese Mountain Dog - Male dob 11/28/16 house broke, obedience trained, neutered, microchipped U T D on shots, A K C registered. 1200.00 573-631-5190 Dobe rman Pinche r Pups , A K C Black & Rust and Red & Rust, All s hots incl. Rabie s & worme d; Tails, Dew Claws & Ears Done. $650. (573)484-4525.

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Rides Ads Continued from Page A13

Dogs

Firewood/Fuel

GERM AN SHEPHERD PUPS, AKC, Beautiful, show & working line, exc. quality, Reasonable. (314) 605-6216 GOLDENDOODLES 1 male, 1 female. 8 weeks old. Big, beautiful, mellow, intelligent babies for Christmas. chipped. all shots READY NOW! 314-440-4400 GOLDEN RETRIEVER PUPS AKC, OFA, Selectively Bred. Shots, wormed, health guar. See parents. 618.883.2137 www.sieverskennels.com Golden Retrievers AKC Reg., 1st Shots, Dewormed, $500. Call (479)244-9630 I celandic Sheepdog A K C male Christmas puppy. Grand Champion parents $1800 850-803-8888 LAB PUPS - AKC, OFA Yellow, black, chocolate. See Parents, Calm. Shots, Wormed, Health Guar. 618.883.2137 www.sieverskennels.com LAB PUPS, AKC Reg., 1st Shots, Dewormed, Chocolate & Yellow. $500. Call (715)413-1499 Labradoodles F1bb Puppies, 8 wks old, ready for forever home. Very spoiled. Will be very curly! $1000, 573-768-4558 Labrador Retrievers, AKC registered quality. 8 wks old, chocolate, 8 avail. m&f. UTD shots. $500 Call 417-342-4035 POODLES, Toy, 10 wks, AKC, will hold for Xmas, Health Guarantee, Smart, Good w/ family. $600 Call (636)537-3797 Schnoddles, 3 boys, 7 wks, vet checked/shots, family raised, mom & d a d are p e t s , r e a d y for new homes $ 400. 573 789 4073

Seasoned Oak & Hickory delivered/ stacked. Cherry also available for smoking. Over 25 yrs of service 573-513-6510

Merchandise Wanted WANTED: Historian will pay top $$ for German-Japanese WW II relics 314-438-8665

Tools and Hardware Bel/Saw Planer Molder, 5h.p. Completely rebuilt. 618-696-9933

Craft Fairs/Flea Markets

ATTENTION H.O.K. EMPLOYEES

IF YOU WORKED AT H.O.K DURING THE YEARS OF:1971-1974 PLEASE CALL DAN AT 1.618.659.7751 Bids/Proposals

Belleville Flea Market

CITY OF ST. LOUIS BOARD OF PUBLIC SERVICE

Saturday 9am-4pm Sunday 9am-3pm

R E Q U E S T F O R QUALIFICATIONS for DESIGN SERVICES FOR DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING DRIVE LIGHTING AND SIGNAL INTERCONNECT PHASE III, FEDERAL PROJECT STP-9901(643), ST. LOUIS, MO. Statements of Qualifications due by 5:00 PM, CT, January 5, 2018 at Board of Public Service, 1200 Market, Room 301 City Hall, St. Louis, MO 63103. RFQ may be obtained from website w w w .stlbps.org, under On Line Plan Room - Plan Room, or call Board of Public Service at 314-622-3535. 14% D BE participation goal for this project.

December 16, 17, 2017

at the ONLY

BELLE-CLAIR FAIRGROUNDS

Belleville, IL 618-233-0052 www.bcfairgrounds.net

Public Notices This is to notify the unit owner only, Four Stor Storage Inc P.O. Box 186 Wentzville, MO 63385 the misc contents of Unit E-2 Amie Stude will be sold on December 29th 2017

Bids/Proposals Sealed bids for Renovate HVAC & Controls, St . J a me s Veterans Home, St. James, Missouri, Project No. U1503-03 will be received by FM DC, State of MO, UNTIL 1:30 PM, January 18, 2018. For specific project information and ordering plans, go to: http://oa.mo.gov/ facilities

Personals A ADOPTION: A Happily Married, Biracial Couple yearn for baby to Devote our Lives to. Financially S ecure. Expenses Paid. 1-800717-8753 AAAA Josie & Steven AAAA

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FOR THE RECORD

12.16.2017 • Saturday • M 2 NFL INJURY REPORT OUT: definitely will not play; DNP: did not practice; LIMITED: limited participation; FULL: Full participation Saturday CHICAGO BEARS AT DETROIT LIONS — BEAR: LIMITED: S Adrian Amos (hamstring), DT Eddie Goldman (hip), S DeAndre Houston-Carson (ankle), LB Pernell McPhee (shoulder), TE Adam Shaheen (chest), WR Kendall Wright (shoulder). LIONS: DNP: WR T.J. Jones (not injury related), G T.J. Lang (foot), CB Nevin Lawson (illness), C Travis Swanson (concussion), T Rick Wagner (ankle). LIMITED: DE Ezekiel Ansah (ankle), T Taylor Decker (shoulder), T Corey Robinson (foot). FULL: RB Ameer Abdullah (neck), CB Jamal Agnew (knee), T Emmett Cleary (ankle), QB Matthew Stafford (right hand). L.A. CHARGERS AT KANSAS CITY CHIEFS — CHARGERS: DNP: TE Antonio Gates (not injury related). LIMITED: DT Corey Liuget (toe), T Russell Okung (knee). FULL: TE Hunter Henry (calf), LB Denzel Perryman (abdomen), S Adrian Phillips (hamstring), C Spencer Pulley (knee). CHIEFS: DNP: C Mitch Morse (foot). FULL: DE Allen Bailey (knee), DT Bennie Logan (knee), S Eric Murray (ankle), CB Darrelle Revis (shoulder), WR Demarcus Robinson (knee), WR Albert Wilson (hamstring, shoulder). Sunday PHILADELPHIA EAGLES AT N.Y. GIANTS — EAGLES: DNP: TE Brent Celek (not injury related), G Stefen Wisniewski (ankle). LIMITED: S Rodney McLeod (quad). FULL: DE Derek Barnett (groin), TE Zach Ertz (concussion), LB Joe Walker (neck). GIANTS: DNP: S Landon Collins (ankle), DT Damon Harrison (not injury related), WR Roger Lewis (ankle), OL Justin Pugh (back). LIMITED: CB Brandon Dixon (heel/ hamstring), TE Rhett Ellison (finger), LB B.J. Goodson (ankle), DE Jason Pierre-Paul, (finger), WR Travis Rudolph (hamstring). CINCINNATI BENGALS AT MINNESOTA VIKINGS — BENGALS: DNP: LB Vontaze Burfict (concussion), CB Darqueze Dennard (knee), CB Dre Kirkpatrick (concussion), TE Tyler Kroft (hamstring), LB Kevin Minter (hamstring), RB Joe Mixon (concussion), LB Nick Vigil (ankle). LIMITED: RB Giovani Bernard (knee), DE Carlos Dunlap (chest), T Cedric Ogbuehi (shoulder), DT Pat Sims (heel), S Shawn Williams (hamstring). VIKINGS: DNP: CB Mackensie Alexander (ribs), TE Blake Bell (shoulder), LB Emmanuel Lamur (foot), T Riley Reiff (ankle), CB Xavier Rhodes (hip), TE Kyle Rudolph (ankle). LIMITED: C Pat Elflein (shoulder), DT Linval Joseph (knee), RB Jerick McKinnon (shoulder), TE David Morgan (concussion), T Mike Remmers (back), G Jeremiah Sirles (knee), DT Shamar Stephen (shoulder), WR Adam Thielen (knee). HOUSTON TEXANS AT JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS — TEXANS: DNP: G Jeff Allen (groin), LB Jadeveon Clowney (knee, illness), LB Jelani Jenkins (concussion), T Kendall Lamm (concussion), WR Braxton Miller (concussion), QB Tom Savage (concussion). LIMITED: T Julien Davenport (shoulder), RB Andre Ellington (knee), S Andre Hal (knee), DE Joel Heath (knee), RB Lamar Miller (knee), LB Brian Peters (hamstring), G Xavier Su’a-Filo (groin). FULL: RB Alfred Blue (concussion), DT Brandon Dunn (back), G Greg Mancz (knee), RB Jordan Todman (hand), WR DeAndrew White (thigh). JAGUARS: DNP: RB Leonard Fournette (quadricep), WR Allen Hurns (ankle), WR Larry Pinkard (concussion), T Cam Robinson (back). LIMITED: WR Marqise Lee (foot). FULL: QB Blake Bortles (right wrist), LB Telvin Smith (concussion). ARIZONA CARDINALS AT WASHINGTON REDSKINS — CARDINALS: DNP: S Budda Baker (thigh), S Antoine Bethea (knee), LB Karlos Dansby (not injury related), WR Larry Fitzgerald (not injury related), LB Gabe Martin (hamstring), DT Josh Mauro (ankle), RB Adrian Peterson (neck), DT Frostee Rucker (not injury related), G Earl Watford (ankle). LIMITED: G Alex Boone (back), WR John Brown (toe), LB Chandler Jones (hip), DT Corey Peters (ankle). FULL: RB Kerwynn Williams (ribs). REDSKINS: DNP: LB Zach Brown (illness, toe, achilles, hip), T Morgan Moses (ankle), S Montae Nicholson (concussion), CB Josh Norman (knee), T Trent Williams (knee). LIMITED: LB Ryan Anderson (ankle), WR Ryan Grant (ankle), WR Maurice Harris (concussion), DE Terrell McClain (toe), C Chase Roullier (hand). FULL: DE Matt Ioannidis (hand), LB Martrell Spaight (ankle). N.Y. JETS AT NEW ORLEANS SAINTS — JETS: DNP: CB Morris Claiborne (foot), RB Matt Forte (knee), RB Elijah McGuire (ankle), S Rontez Miles (hamstring), CB Rashard Robinson (not injury related), G Brian Winters (abdomen, ankle). LIMITED: LB Bruce Carter (groin), LS Thomas Hennessy (concussion). FULL: WR Robby Anderson (hamstring), G James Carpenter (knee), LB Jordan Jenkins (shoulder), WR Jermaine Kearse (shoulder), S Marcus Maye (finger). SAINTS: DNP: WR Ted Ginn (rib), DE Trey Hendrickson (ankle), LB A.J. Klein (groin). LIMITED: TE Josh Hill (shoulder), G Andrus Peat (groin), S Kenny Vaccaro (groin). FULL: RB Alvin Kamara (concussion), G Senio Kelemete (concussion), WR Michael Thomas (eye). MIAMI DOLPHINS AT BUFFALO BILLS — DOLPHINS: DNP: DE Andre Branch (knee), G Jermon Bushrod (foot), CB Xavien Howard (illness), QB Matt Moore (foot), C Mike Pouncey (hip), DT Ndamukong Suh (knee), CB Cordrea Tankersley (ankle, shoulder), S Michael Thomas (knee), RB Damien Williams (shoulder). LIMITED: DT Jordan Phillips (ankle). FULL: TE MarQueis Gray (shoulder). BILLS: DNP: T Cordy Glenn (illness, foot, ankle), WR Andre Holmes (neck), DT Kyle Williams (groin). LIMITED: WR Kelvin Benjamin (knee), TE Charles Clay (knee), T Seantrel Henderson (back), RB LeSean McCoy (knee), QB Nathan Peterman (concussion). FULL: CB Leonard Johnson (knee), G John Miller (ankle), QB Tyrod Taylor (knee). GREEN BAY PACKERS AT CAROLINA PANTHERS — PACKERS: DNP: CB Davon House (shoulder.back), S Josh Jones (not injury related), LB Jake Ryan (knee). LIMITED: LB Ahmad Brooks (back), DT Quinton Dial (chest/knee), CB Demetri Goodson (hamstring), LB Nick Perry (foot/ shoulder). FULL: G Lucas Patrick (hank). PANTHERS: DNP: S Mike Adams (rest), WR Brenton Bersin (toe), CB Captain Munnerlyn (not injury related), DE Julius Peppers (rest), RB Jonathan Stewart (rest), LB Shaq Thompson (foot), G Trai Turner (concussion). LIMITED: WR Kaelin Clay (shoulder), LB Thomas Davis (back), WR Devin Funchess (shoulder), C Tyler Larsen (foot), QB Cam Newtwon (right shoulder), WR Russell Shepard (shoulder). FULL: C Ryan Kalil (neck), LB Luke Kuechly (shoulder), RB Christian McCaffrey (shoulder), TE Greg Olsen (foot), P Michael Palardy (shoulder), BALTIMORE RAVENS AT CLEVELAND BROWNS — RAVENS: DNP: WR Mike Wallace (ankle). LIMITED: CB Maurice Canady (knee), C Ryan Jensen (ankle), WR Chris Moore (hip), LB Za’Darius Smith (shoulder). FULL: G Jermaine Eluemunor (shoulder). BROWNS: DNP: CB Briean Boddy-Calhoun (knee), CB Jamar Taylor (foot). LIMITED:

T Shon Coleman (shoulder, thumb), TE David Njoku (foot, wrist), S Jabrill Peppers (knee), DT Danny Shelton (chest, ribs), C J.C. Tretter (knee). FULL: LB Josh Keyes (wrist). L.A. RAMS AT SEATTLE SEAHAWKS — RAMS: DNP: LB Mark Barron (not injury related), C John Sullivan (not injury related), T Andrew Whitworth (knee). LIMITED: T Rob Havenstein (knee), WR Robert Woods (shoulder). FULL: LB Connor Barwin (forearm). SEAHAWKS: Practice Not Complete NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS AT PITTSBURGH STEELERS — PATRIOTS: DNP: DL Alan Branch (knee). LIMITED: CB Malcolm Butler (ankle), DL Trey Flowers (rib), CB Stephon Gilmore (ankle), WR Chris Hogan (shoulder), DB Brandon King (hamstring), DL Eric Lee (ankle), WR Matthew Slater (hamstring), LB Kyle Van Noy (calf), OT LaAdrian Waddle (ankle), DL Deatrich Wise Jr., (foot). FULL: QB Tom Brady (achilles), WR Brandin Cooks (hand). STEELERS: DNP: WR Martavis Bryant 9not injury related), TE Vance McDonald (shoulder), CB Coty Sensabaugh (shoulder), DE Stephon Tuitt (illness). LIMITED: CB Joe Haden (fibula), LB Tyler Matakevich (shoulder). TENNESSEE TITANS AT SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS — TITANS: Practice Not Complete. 49ERS: Practice Not Complete. DALLAS COWBOYS AT OAKLAND RAIDERS — COWBOYS: DNP: WR Brice Butler (foot), T La’el Collins (back), TE James Hanna (knee), DE David Irving (concussion), CB Orlando Scandrick (back), T Tyron Smith (back). LIMITED: DT Maliek Collins (foot), LB Justin Durant (concussion), LB Sean Lee (hamstring). RAIDERS: Practice Not Complete.

NFL Playoff Scenarios AFC CLINCHED: Pittsburgh — AFC North title PIT clinches home-field advantage with: Win plus Jacksonville loss or tie Pittsburgh clinches a first-round bye with: Win OR Tie plus Jacksonville loss New England clinches AFC East with: Win or tie OR Buffalo loss or tie New England clinches playoff berth with: Baltimore loss or tie Jacksonville clinches playoff berth with: Win OR Tie plus Buffalo loss or tie OR Tie plus Baltimore loss or tie OR Losses by Buffalo and Baltimore OR Baltimore loss plus Kansas City-Los Aangeles Chargers game does not end in tie

NFC CLINCHED: Philadelphia — NFC East title PHI clinches home-field advantage with: Win plus Minnesota loss PHI clinches a first-round bye with: Win OR Tie plus losses or ties by Los Angeles Raiders, New Orleans and Carolina Minnesota clinches NFC North with: Win or tie OR Losses or ties by Detroit and Green Bay Minnesota clinches a playoff berth with: Seattle loss plus losses by Atlanta and New Orleans OR Seattle loss plus losses by Atlanta and Carolina OR Seattle loss plus Atlanta loss plus Detroit loss or tie OR Seattle loss plus Atlanta tie plus New Orleans loss plus Detroit loss or tie OR Seattle loss plus Atlanta tie plus losses by New Orleans and Carolina LA Rams clinch a playoff berth with: Win plus losses or ties by Detroit and Green Bay plus losses by New Orleans and Atlanta

NFL leaders PASSERS Att Cp Pct Yds TD Rtng 481 324 67.4 3865 27 105.2 Brady, NE Al. Smith, KC 436 293 67.2 3507 23 104.4 Brees, NOR 442 317 71.7 3569 19 104.2 A. Rodgers, GBY 193 128 66.3 1385 13 103.2 De.Watson, HOU 204 126 61.8 1699 19 103 Wentz, PHL 440 265 60.2 3296 33 101.9 418 260 62.2 3383 22 99.2 Goff, LA Stafford, DET 468 307 65.6 3683 23 97.9 Cousins, WAS 440 290 65.9 3440 22 97.7 Rivers, LAC 462 290 62.8 3611 23 97.2 Keenum, MIN 404 270 66.8 2983 18 96.2 Ru. Wilson, SEA 473 293 61.9 3527 29 95.5 McCown, NYJ 397 267 67.3 2926 18 94.5 M. Ryan, ATL 417 275 65.9 3278 17 92.4 Prescott, DAL 399 252 63.2 2752 21 91.6 Roethlis.., PIT 502 318 63.3 3744 24 91.1 Dalton, CIN 389 236 60.7 2747 21 90.4 J. Winston, TAM 329 206 62.6 2475 14 89.7 D. Carr, OAK 420 268 63.8 2942 18 88.8 Ty. Taylor, BUF 326 206 63.2 2090 12 88.6 Bortles, JAC 410 247 60.2 2821 16 85.8 Cutler, MIA 340 218 64.1 2100 18 85.4 C. Palmer, ARI 267 164 61.4 1978 9 84.4 Manning, NYG 441 278 63 2639 15 82.4 Newton, CAR 402 241 60 2720 17 81.9 Brissett, IND 411 245 59.6 2769 11 81.7 Trubisky, CHI 225 131 58.2 1508 6 80 Flacco, BAL 422 272 64.5 2413 13 78 Hundley, GBY 252 161 63.9 1534 8 78 PASS RECEIVERS RECEPTIONS Anto. Brown, PIT De. Hopkins, HOU Landry, MIA Fitzgerald, ARI Mic. Thomas, NOR K. Allen, LAC Thielen, MIN G. Tate, DET L. Bell, PIT Ju. Jones, ATL T. Kelce, KC Dem. Thomas, DEN Doyle, IND D. Adams, GBY C. McCaffrey, CAR YARDS Anto. Brown, PIT De. Hopkins, HOU Thielen, MIN Ju. Jones, ATL K. Allen, LAC Mic. Thomas, NOR Ty. Hill, KC A. Green, CIN T. Kelce, KC Cooks, NE Fitzgerald, ARI Mar. Jones, DET Baldwin, SEA G. Tate, DET T. Hilton, IND

No 99 88 88 87 85 83 80 79 75 73 73 73 71 69 67 Yds 1509 1233 1161 1161 1143 992 986 950 945 924 922 885 860 852 852

RUSHERS L. Bell, PIT K. Hunt, KC Gurley, LA J. Howard, CHI L. McCoy, BUF Ma. Ingram, NOR Fournette, JAC C.. Anderson, DEN M. Gordon, LAC Al. Collins, BAL Gore, IND E. Elliott, DAL C. Hyde, SNF L. Miller, HOU Crowell, CLE

Att Yards 283 1105 218 1046 236 1035 235 1032 239 1007 192 971 231 923 211 858 229 853 162 825 220 793 191 783 188 771 211 764 174 716

Yds 1509 1233 745 922 992 1143 1161 852 579 1161 945 840 611 828 519 No 99 88 80 73 83 85 64 65 73 54 87 51 66 79 48

Avg 15.2 14.0 8.5 10.6 11.7 13.8 14.5 10.8 7.7 15.9 12.9 11.5 8.6 12.0 7.7 Avg 15.2 14.0 14.5 15.9 13.8 11.7 15.4 14.6 12.9 17.1 10.6 17.4 13.0 10.8 17.8

Lng 57 72t 49 37 35 51 65t 45t 42 53 44 40 26 55t 37 Lng 57 72t 65t 53 51 35 79t 77t 44 64t 37 46 54 45t 80t

TD 9 11 8 5 4 5 4 4 2 3 7 4 3 9 4 TD 9 11 4 3 5 4 6 8 7 5 5 8 5 4 4

Avg Long TD 3.9 27 7 4.8 69t 5 4.4 36 10 4.4 53 7 4.2 48t 5 5.1 72 9 4.0 90t 8 4.1 40 2 3.7 87t 6 5.1 50 5 3.6 21 3 4.1 30 7 4.1 61 5 3.6 21 3 4.1 37 2

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • B9

AMERICA’S LINE

TRANSACTIONS

COLLEGES

NFL Favorite Points Underdog ...........................Open Current....................... LIONS ....................6.5 5 ........................Bears Chargers ............... PK PK................... CHIEFS Sunday Eagles.................... 7.5 7.5...................GIANTS PANTHERS ............2.5 3 .................... Packers VIKINGS...............10.5 10.5................ Bengals BILLS .....................3.5 3 ...................Dolphins JAGUARS .................11 11 .....................Texans SAINTS ................ 15.5 15.5.......................Jets WASHINGTON...........4 4 ........................Cards Ravens......................7 7................... BROWNS SEAHAWKS............... 1 2.5......................Rams Patriots .................2.5 3 .................STEELERS 49ERS.......................2 1.5..................... Titans Cowboys................2.5 3 .................. RAIDERS Monday Falcons.....................5 6.5 ..................... BUCS COLLEGE FOOTBALL Odds to win the 2017 College Football Championship Open Current Teams Alabama 3/1 2/1 Clemson 20/1 5/2 Oklahoma 10/1 7/2 Georgia 30/1 7/2 Note: Oklahoma opened as a favorite. NBA Favorite Points Underdog HORNETS 1.5 Blazers CAVALIERS 8.5 Jazz Thunder [2] KNICKS HEAT 6 Clippers T’WOLVES 11.5 Suns ROCKETS 10.5 Bucks SPURS 8.5 Mavericks Celtics 4.5 GRIZZLIES CIRCULAR REPORT: The Knicks — Thunder circle is for New York F Kristaps Porzingis . COLLEGE BASKETBALL Favorite Points Underdog Seton Hall 7.5 RUTGERS Miami-Florida 9 GEORGE WASH FLORIDA INT’L 2.5 James Madison 11.5 Memphis m-Louisville Syracuse 2 GEORGETOWN Northwestern 4.5 DEPAUL KENTUCKY 5 Virginia Tech Loyola-Chicago 3.5 WISCONSIN-MILW TEXAS 10 Louisiana Tech VIRGINIA 12.5 Davidson TOLEDO 4.5 Wright St W KENTUCKY 9.5 Indiana St Georgia 3 MASSACHUSETTS MISSISSIPPI 9.5 Illinois St Cincinnati 1.5 UCLA 6.5 Oklahoma WICHITA ST RHODE ISLAND 11 Charleston CALIFORNIA 7 CS-Fullerton TEMPLE 14.5 Drexel OHIO ST 16 Appalachian St FRESNO ST 1 Oregon 3 Middle Tenn St b-AUBURN WASHINGTON ST 9 Iupui E Michigan 1.5 LONG BEACH ST FLA ATLANTIC 6.5 Arkansas St DAYTON 3.5 Georgia St MARSHALL 2 Ohio U 17 Troy n-ARKANSAS Arizona 15.5 NEW MEXICO ST. MARY’S-CA 17.5 Cal-Irvine TEXAS TECH 28 Rice Kansas 10.5 NEBRASKA 2 CAL-POLY SLO Princeton Unlv 6.5 PACIFIC SAN DIEGO 10.5 N Texas p-OREGON ST 6.5 Saint Louis BYU 4 Utah District of Detroit Classic Michigan 19.5 DETROIT Michigan St 17 Oakland Crossroads Classic Purdue 7.5 BUTLER Notre Dame 6.5 Indiana Orange Bowl Classic Florida St 5 Oklahoma St Florida 5.5 Clemson Hy-Vee Classic Iowa 6 DRAKE Iowa St 1 Northern Iowa Added Games NC STATE 7.5 NC-Greensboro XAVIER 20 E Tennessee St C Michigan 3.5 SOUTHERN UTAH BELMONT 16 Pepperdine E Illinois 1.5 S ALABAMA EVANSVILLE 7.5 Austin Peay TULSA 8.5 Manhattan MURRAY ST 15 Marist MISSISSIPPI ST 16 Tenn-Martin KANSAS ST 18.5 SE Missouri St 27 N Dakota GONZAGA m- Madison Square Garden. b- Birmingham, AL. | p- Portland, OR. n- North Little Rock, AR. NHL Odds Underdog Favorite WILD -$125/+$105 Oilers BRUINS -$145/+$125 Rangers SENATORS -$110/-$110 Canadiens Blue Jackets HURRICANES -$110/-$110 BLUES -$140/+$120 Jets FLYERS -$120/even Stars ISLANDERS -$110/-$110 Kings CAPITALS -$145/+$125 Ducks Penguins -$165/+$145 COYOTES Lightning -$170/+$150 AVALANCHE FLAMES -$110/-$110 Predators Grand Salami: Over/under 64.5 goals. Home team in CAPS © 2017 Benjamin Eckstein

BASEBALL American League HOUSTON ASTROS — Designated OF Preston Tucker for assignment. Agreed to terms with RHP Hector Rondon on a two-year contract. LOS ANGELES ANGELS — Agreed to terms with INF Zack Cozart on a three-year contract. MINNESOTA TWINS — Agreed to terms with RHP Fernando Rodney on a one-year contract and C Wynston Sawyer, 2B Taylor Featherston and OF James Ramsey on minor league contracts. TAMPA BAY RAYS — Agreed to terms with OF Brandon Snyder, LHPs Jonny Venters and Vidal Nuno and RHPs Colton Murray, Cody Hall and Ruben Alaniz on minor league contracts. TEXAS RANGERS — Agreed to terms with RHP Chris Martin on a two-year contract. National League ATLANTA BRAVES — Named Nick Jensen trainer of Gwinnett (IL); Chris Maloney manager, Dennis Lewallyn pitching coach and Carlos Mendez hitting coach of Mississippi (SL); Luis Salazar manager, Mike Maroth pitching coach and Rene Tosoni hitting coach of Florida (FSL); Ralph Wheeler manager and Vic Scarpone trainer of Rome (SAL); Barrett Kleinknecht manager and Drew Garner trainer of Danville (Appalachian); and Nestor Perez manager and Eric Hrycko trainer of the GCL Braves. COLORADO ROCKIES — Agreed to terms with LHP Jake McGee and RHP Bryan Shaw on three-year contracts. MIAMI MARLINS — Designated LHP Hunter Cervenka for assignment. PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES — Traded RHP Nick Burdi to Pittsburgh for future considerations. Agreed to terms with RHPs Pat Neshek and Tommy Hunter on two-year contracts. SAN DIEGO PADRES — Traded RHP Enyel De Los Santos to Philadelphia for INF Freddy Galvis. Designated RHP Jose Ruiz for assignment. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS — Named Alan Zintner assistant director of player development/offense, Matt Buschmann assistant director of player development/run prevention, Dave Hansen minor league hitting coordinator, Julio Rangel minor league pitching coordinator, Justin Lehr minor league rehab pitching coordinator and Dan O’Brien minor league development coach. BASKETBALL | NBA NBA — Named Monty McCutchen vice president/head of referee development and training. FOOTBALL | NFL NFL — Fined New Orleans coach Sean Payton, Jacksonville offensive line coach Pat Flaherty and Jacksonville wide receivers coach Keenan McCardell $10,000 for improperly going on the field during last week’s game. ARIZONA CARDINALS — Placed RB Adrian Peterson on injured reserve. Activated LS Aaron Brewer from injured reserve. Claimed CB C.J. Goodwin off waivers from Atlanta. BUFFALO BILLS — Placed OT Cordy Glenn on injured reserve. CLEVELAND BROWNS — Released OL Andrew Wylie from the practice squad. Signed DL T.Y. McGill to the practice squad. KANSAS CITY CHIEFS — Placed C Mitch Morse on injured reserve. Signed CB Keith Reaser from the practice squad. MINNESOTA VIKINGS — Placed TE Blake Bell on injured reserve. Signed TE Kyle Carter. Signed S Jack Tocho to the practice squad. HOCKEY | NHL NEW YORK ISLANDERS — Loaned F Josh Ho-Sang to Bridgeport (AHL). BLUES — Recalled F Samuel Blais from San Antonio (AHL). OLYMPIC SPORTS USADA — Announced American long jumper Tori Polk accepted a two-year sanction for a non-analytical anti-doping rule violation involving her possession of prohibited substances. SOCCER Major League Soccer COLORADO RAPIDS — Traded M Mike Grella to Columbus for a 2019 second-round draft pick. FC DALLAS — Signed D Maynor Figueroa to a one-year contract. LOS ANGELES FC — Acquired F Diego Rossi by transfer from Penarol (Primera Division-Uruguay). SPORTING KANSAS CITY — Acquired M Yohan Croizet by transfer from Mechelen (Jupiler Pro League-Belgium). National Women’s Soccer League WASHINGTON SPIRIT — Named Tom Torres assistant coach. COLLEGE NCAA — Named Lynn Holzman vice president of women’s basketball. Placed North Colorado’s men’s basketball program on three years’ probation for after finding academic fraud and recruiting violations by ex-coach B.J. Hill and some of his assistants. HOLY CROSS — Named Bob Chesney fb coach. MISSOURI — Named Vernon Hargreaves inside linebackers coach.

Area scores

SOCCER English Premier League GP W D L GF GA Pts 17 16 1 0 52 11 49 Man City Man United 17 12 2 3 37 11 38 Chelsea 17 11 2 4 31 14 35 17 9 4 4 30 14 31 Tottenham Liverpool 17 8 7 2 34 20 31 Burnley 17 9 4 4 16 12 31 17 9 3 5 30 20 30 Arsenal Leicester 17 7 5 5 27 23 26 Watford 17 6 4 7 26 29 22 17 6 4 7 21 29 22 Everton Southampton 17 4 6 7 17 23 18 Huddersfield 17 5 3 9 12 29 18 17 4 5 8 14 23 17 Brighton Bournemouth 17 4 4 9 15 20 16 Stoke 17 4 4 9 19 36 16 17 4 3 10 16 26 15 Newcastle West Brom 17 2 8 7 12 22 14 Crystal Palace 17 3 5 9 12 28 14 17 3 5 9 14 32 14 West Ham Swansea 17 3 3 11 9 22 12 Saturday Leicester vs. Crystal Palace 6:30 a.m. Chelsea vs. Southampton 9 a.m. Watford vs. Huddersfield 9 a.m. Stoke vs. West Ham 9 a.m. Arsenal vs. Newcastle 9 a.m. Brighton vs. Burnley 9 a.m. Man City vs. Tottenham 11:30 a.m.

GOLF Indonesia Masters leaders Friday | Jakarta, Indonesia Purse: $750,000 | Yardage: 7,324; Par: 72 Partial Second Round 68-64 — 132 Kiradech Aphibarnrat, THI Giwhan Kim, SKO 65-68 — 133 Phachara Khongwatmai, THAI 65-69 — 134 Chikkarangappa S., IND 68-67 — 135 Sihwan Kim, USA 68-67 — 135 67-69 — 136 Younghan Song, SKO Choo Tze Huang, SNG 66-71 — 137 Jazz Janewattananond, THAI 69-68 — 137 Steve Lewton, GBR 67-70 — 137 71-67 — 138 Shubhankar Searma, IDN Gaganjeet Bhullar, IND 67-71 — 138 Lu Wei-chih, TWA 66-72 — 138 Suradit Yongcharoenchai, THAI 72-66 — 138 Scott Hend, AUS 69-70 — 139 68-71 — 139 Chan Shih-chang, TWA Daniel Chopra, SWE 68-71 — 139 71-68 — 139 Chinnarat Phadungsil, THAI Ryu Hyunwoo, SKO 68-71 — 139 Terry Pilkadaris, AUS 70-69 — 139 THRU Leaderboard Justin Rose, England -14 16 -12 F Kiradech Aphibarnrat, THAI Giwhan Kim, SKO -11 F Scott Vincent, Zimbabwe -11 14 -10 F Phachara Khongwatmai, THAI Chikkarangappa S., IND -9 F -9 F Sihwan Kim, USA Yusaku Miyazato, Japan -9 16 -9 13 Gunn Charoenkul, THAI Ashley Hall, AUS -9 13 Also -2 F Casey O’Toole, USA Jarin Todd, USA -2 F E 12 Jason Knutzon, USA James Bowen, USA +1 F Jamie Puterbaugh, USA +2 F +2 F Dodge Kemmer, USA John Michael O’Toole, USA +3 F +3 14 Sam Cyr, USA John Catlin, USA +4 16 WD Brandt Snedeker, USA Brett Munson, USA WD

MEN’S TOP 25 SCHEDULE

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Women’s basketball Missouri Valley College 81, Maryville 79 Principia 81, Robert Morris U. (Ill.) 76 Men’s basketball Maryville 86, Harris-Stowe 83

AREA BASKETBALL SCHEDULE

Saturday W: Principia at Westminster, noon W: Harper at St. Louis CC, 1 p.m. W: LU-Belleville at Park, 1 p.m. W: Central Baptist at Missouri Baptist, 1 p.m. W: Webster at Eureka, 1 p.m. W: Greenville at Fontbonne, 1 p.m. W: Washburn at Lindenwood, 1:30 p.m. W: Northwestern at Missouri State, 2 p.m. W: UMSL at Culver Stockton, 2 p.m. M: Principia at Westminster, 2 p.m. W: Illinois Central at Jefferson, 2 p.m. M: Harper at St. Louis CC, 3 p.m. M: LU-Belleville at Park, 3 p.m. M: Central Baptist at Missouri Baptist, 3 p.m. M: Webster at Eureka, 3 p.m. M: Greenville at Fontbonne, 3 p.m. W: Harris-Stowe at Southern INDna, 3 p.m. M: Washburn at Lindenwood, 3:30 p.m. M: Southeast Missouri at Kansas State, 7 p.m. Sunday W: Missouri vs. INDna, in West Palm Beach, Fla., 1:30 p.m. W: NIU at SIU Edwardsville, 2 p.m. W: Lipscomb at SLU, 2 p.m. M: Lamar at SIU Carbondale, 3 p.m. M: Washington at Illinois Wesleyan, 3 p.m.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL HOW THE TOP 25 FARED

1.

2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25.

UConn (8-0) idle Next: vs. Oklahoma, Tuesday. Notre Dame (9-1) idle Next: vs. DePaul, Sunday. Louisville (12-0) idle Next: at Kentucky, Sunday. South Carolina (9-1) idle Next: vs. Savannah State, Sunday. Mississippi State (10-0) idle Next: vs. Maine, Sunday. Baylor (9-1) idle Next: at Nicholls State, Monday. Tennessee (10-0) idle Next: at Long Beach State, Sunday. Texas (8-1) idle Next: vs. No. 12 Florida State, Sunday. Oregon (8-2) idle Next: vs. Mississippi, Sunday. West Virginia (9-0) idle Next: vs. Radford, Saturday. UCLA (7-2) idle Next: at Seton Hall, Sunday. Florida State (10-0) idle Next: at No. 8 Texas, Sunday. Ohio State (10-2) beat Dartmouth 103-70. Next: at Cincinnati, Sunday. Duke (8-2) idle Next: vs. Maine, Tuesday. Maryland (10-2) idle Next: at Coppin State, Wednesday. Missouri (9-1) idle Next: vs. Indiana, Sunday. Oregon State (7-2) idle Next: vs. UC Santa Barbara, Saturday. Stanford (5-4) idle Next: vs. UNLV, Saturday. Texas A&M (8-2) beat Southern Cal 75-74. Next: vs. Hawaii, Wednesday. Villanova (9-0) idle Next: at La Salle, Wednesday. Green Bay (8-1) idle Next: vs. Bradley, Saturday. South Florida (8-2) beat Southern University 108-48. Next: at FIU, Sunday. Michigan (9-2) idle Next: vs. Fort Wayne, Saturday. California (7-2) idle Next: vs. BYU, Saturday. Iowa (10-1) idle Next: at Northern Iowa, Sunday.

MEN’S BASKETBALL FRIDAY’S NATIONAL SCORES

East Mount St. Mary’s 89, Washington (Md.) 67 South E. Kentucky 70, Charleston S. 65 Emory & Henry 104, Berry 86 NC A&T 64, Tennessee St. 54 Samford 98, Thomas (Ga.) 51 Midwest Adrian 85, Great Lakes Christian 61 Creighton 87, Md.-E. Shore 36 Grand View 85, Association Free 50 North Central (Ill.) 73, Alma 52 UIC 76, Dartmouth 60 Wis.-Eau Claire 63, Carleton 56 Southwest Houston Bapt. 100, Barclay 65 Sam Houston 57, UALR 55 Texas A&M-CC 71, St. Mary’s (Texas) 55

8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25.

Villanova (11-0) vs. Hofstra, Dec. 22. Michigan State (9-1) vs. Oakland, Sat. Wichita State (8-1) vs. Oklahoma, Sat. Duke (11-1) vs. Evansville, Wednesday. Arizona State (9-0) vs. Vanderbilt, Sun. Miami (8-0) at George Washington, Sat. North Carolina (9-1) at No. 20 Tennessee, Sunday. Kentucky (8-1) vs. Virginia Tech, Sat. Texas A&M (9-1) vs. Northern Kentucky, Tuesday. Xavier (9-1) vs. ETSU, Saturday. West Virginia (9-1) vs. Coppin State, Wednesday. Gonzaga (8-2) vs. North Dakota, Sat. Kansas (7-2) at Nebraska, Saturday. TCU (10-0) vs. Texas Southern, Monday. Seton Hall (9-1) at Rutgers, Saturday. Virginia (8-1) vs. Davidson, Saturday. Purdue (10-2) vs. Butler, Saturday. Notre Dame (8-2) vs. Indiana, Saturday. Florida State (9-0) vs. Oklahoma State, Saturday. Tennessee (7-1) vs. No. 7 North Carolina, Sunday. Baylor (8-2) vs. Savannah State, Sun. Florida (6-3) vs. Clemson, Saturday. Arizona (7-3) at New Mexico, Saturday. Texas Tech (8-1) vs. Rice, Saturday. Cincinnati (8-2) at UCLA, Saturday.

COLLEGE FOOTBALL NCAA FCS playoffs > Semifinals Friday North Dakota State 55, Sam Houston State 13 Saturday South Dakota State (11-2) at James Madison (13-0), 3:30 p.m. > Championship Jan. 6 | Frisco, Texas North Dakota State (13-1) vs. South Dakota State/James Madison winner, 11 a.m.

Division II playoffs > Championship Saturday | Kansas City, Kan. West Florida (11-3) vs. Texas A&M-Commerce (13-1), 5 p.m.

Division III playoffs > Championship Friday | At Salem, Va. Mount Union 12, Mary Hardin-Baylor 0

NAIA playoffs > Championship Saturday | Daytona Beach, Fla. Saint Francis (Ind.) (13-0) vs. Reinhardt (12-0), 5 p.m.

Missouri Bowl History RECORD: 15-16

2015 Citrus Bowl: Missouri 33, Minnesota 17 2014 Cotton Bowl: Missouri 41, Oklahoma St. 31 2011 Independence Bowl: Missouri 41, North Carolina 24 2010 Insight Bowl: Iowa 27, Missouri 24 2009 Texas Bowl: Navy 35, Missouri 13 2008 Alamo Bowl: Missouri 30, Northwestern 23, OT 2008 Capital One Bowl: Missouri 38, Arkansas 7 2006 Sun Bowl: Oregon St. 39, Missouri 38 2005 Independence Bowl: Missouri 38, South Carolina 31 2003 Independence Bowl: Arkansas 27, Missouri 14 1998 Insight.com Bowl: Missouri 34, West Virginia 31 1997 Holiday Bowl: Colorado St. 35, Missouri 24 1983 Holiday Bowl: Brigham Young 21, Missouri 17 1981 Tangerine Bowl: Missouri 19, Southern Miss 17 1980 Liberty Bowl: Purdue 28, Missouri 25 1979 Hall of Fame Bowl: Missouri 24, South Carolina 14 1978 Liberty Bowl: Missouri 20, LSU 15 1973 Sun Bowl: Missouri 34, Auburn 17 1972 Fiesta Bowl: Arizona St. 49, Missouri 35 1970 Orange Bowl: Penn St. 10, Missouri 3 1968 Gator Bowl: Missouri 35, Alabama 10 1966 Sugar Bowl: Missouri 20, Florida 18 1962 Bluebonnet Bowl: Missouri 14, Georgia Tech 10 1961 Orange Bowl: Missouri 21, Navy 14 1960 Orange Bowl: Georgia 14, Missouri 0 1950 Gator Bowl: Maryland 20, Missouri 7 1949 Gator Bowl: Clemson 24, Missouri 23 1946 Cotton Bowl: Texas 40, Missouri 27 1942 Sugar Bowl: Fordham 2, Missouri 0 1940 Orange Bowl: Georgia Tech 21, Missouri 7 1924 L.A. Christmas Festival: Southern Cal 20, Missouri 7

BLUES STATISTICS Player Brayden Schenn Jaden Schwartz Vladimir Tarasenko Alex Pietrangelo Paul Stastny Vladimir Sobotka Colton Parayko Alexander Steen Joel Edmundson Scottie Upshall Dmitrij Jaskin Kyle Brodziak Vince Dunn Robert Bortuzzo Carl Gunnarsson Patrik Berglund Magnus Paajarvi Sammy Blais Oskar Sundqvist Chris Thorburn Jay Bouwmeester Ivan Barbashev Beau Bennett Wade Megan Nate Prosser Jordan Schmaltz Tage Thompson Goalie GP Jake Allen 28 Carter Hutton 8

GP G 33 16 30 14 33 14 30 7 33 7 33 6 33 3 27 3 33 6 33 5 30 4 33 5 31 2 30 1 28 3 9 3 29 2 9 1 25 0 19 0 10 1 9 0 6 0 1 0 1 0 2 0 4 0 MINS 1607 382

A PTS 21 37 21 35 19 33 16 23 16 23 12 18 14 17 13 16 6 12 7 12 7 11 5 10 4 6 4 5 2 5 1 4 2 4 2 3 3 3 3 3 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 AVG W 2.54 17 1.88 4

+/23 23 16 14 -5 -2 5 -4 4 -2 8 3 5 1 11 -2 -2 1 -2 -2 6 -2 -2 0 0 0 -3 L 8 2

PIM 32 8 9 10 8 26 4 12 18 24 0 12 8 18 8 6 8 4 10 17 0 0 0 0 0 2 4 OT 2 0

PP 3 4 2 2 2 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 GA 68 12

SH 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 SA 763 189

GW PCTG 6 .176 2 .222 2 .097 2 .080 0 .096 2 .091 0 .033 1 .045 0 .098 1 .143 0 .073 1 .128 0 .038 1 .024 1 .136 0 .150 0 .059 0 .125 0 .000 0 .000 0 .091 0 .000 0 .000 0 .000 0 .000 0 .000 0 .000 SV% G .911 0 .937 0

CLASSIFIED

Landscape Laborers

Landscape Laborer (4 ) Temp full time . S t . Louis C o . 2 /2 6 /1 8 1 2 /1 3 /1 8 Emp: Complete Lawn Care. Cleanups, use of ride on mowe rs , ae rators , trimme rs , thatchers, tree & shrub plantings, weeding.. 40 hrs. 8a-4p Mon-Sat, days vary. $13.81/hr. $20.72 OT. Emp. transports to job site locations. 2 months exp nec. Transportation meals/lodging will be reimbursed if worker completes ½ the empl period & return transportation if worker completes contract or is dismissed early by e mp . Tools provided. S end resume to Mark Becker 2891 Wintergreen Dr Florissant MO 63033 or apply at your local MO Job C e nte r re J o # 12066267 at 4040 Seven Hills Dr, Ste 166 Florisant MO 63033

Dogs AKC Reg. Labs, dew claws removd, up to date shots/wrmed, vet chkd. 18 mo. health guar. Avail. 12/15. 618-697-4146.

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GERM AN SHEPHERD PUPS, AKC, Beautiful, show & working line, exc. quality, Reasonable. (314) 605-6216 GOLDENDOODLES 1 male, 1 female. 8 weeks old. Big, beautiful, mellow, intelligent babies for Christmas. chipped. all shots READY NOW! 314-440-4400 GOLDEN RETRIEVER PUPS AKC, OFA, Selectively Bred. Shots, wormed, health guar. See parents. 618.883.2137 www.sieverskennels.com Golden Retrievers AKC Reg., 1st Shots, Dewormed, $500. Call (479)244-9630 I celandic Sheepdog A K C male Christmas puppy. Grand Champion parents $1800 850-803-8888 LAB PUPS - AKC, OFA Yellow, black, chocolate. See Parents, Calm. Shots, Wormed, Health Guar. 618.883.2137 www.sieverskennels.com LAB PUPS, AKC Reg., 1st Shots, Dewormed, Chocolate & Yellow. $500. Call (715)413-1499 Labradoodles F1bb Puppies, 8 wks old, ready for forever home. Very spoiled. Will be very curly! $1000, 573-768-4558 Labrador Retrievers, AKC registered quality. 8 wks old, chocolate, 8 avail. m&f. UTD shots. $500 Call 417-342-4035 POODLES, Toy, 10 wks, AKC, will hold for Xmas, Health Guarantee, Smart, Good w/ family. $600 Call (636)537-3797 Schnoddles, 3 boys, 7 wks, vet checked/shots, family raised, mom & d a d are p e t s , r e a d y for new homes $ 400. 573 789 4073

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Merchandise Wanted WANTED: Historian will pay top $$ for German-Japanese WW II relics 314-438-8665

Tools and Hardware Bel/Saw Planer Molder, 5h.p. Completely rebuilt. 618-696-9933

Craft Fairs/Flea Markets

ATTENTION H.O.K. EMPLOYEES

IF YOU WORKED AT H.O.K DURING THE YEARS OF:1971-1974 PLEASE CALL DAN AT 1.618.659.7751 Bids/Proposals

Belleville Flea Market

CITY OF ST. LOUIS BOARD OF PUBLIC SERVICE

Saturday 9am-4pm Sunday 9am-3pm

R E Q U E S T F O R QUALIFICATIONS for DESIGN SERVICES FOR DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING DRIVE LIGHTING AND SIGNAL INTERCONNECT PHASE III, FEDERAL PROJECT STP-9901(643), ST. LOUIS, MO. Statements of Qualifications due by 5:00 PM, CT, January 5, 2018 at Board of Public Service, 1200 Market, Room 301 City Hall, St. Louis, MO 63103. RFQ may be obtained from website w w w .stlbps.org, under On Line Plan Room - Plan Room, or call Board of Public Service at 314-622-3535. 14% D BE participation goal for this project.

December 16, 17, 2017

at the ONLY

BELLE-CLAIR FAIRGROUNDS

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Public Notices This is to notify the unit owner only, Four Stor Storage Inc P.O. Box 186 Wentzville, MO 63385 the misc contents of Unit E-2 Amie Stude will be sold on December 29th 2017

Bids/Proposals Sealed bids for Renovate HVAC & Controls, St . J a me s Veterans Home, St. James, Missouri, Project No. U1503-03 will be received by FM DC, State of MO, UNTIL 1:30 PM, January 18, 2018. For specific project information and ordering plans, go to: http://oa.mo.gov/ facilities

Personals A ADOPTION: A Happily Married, Biracial Couple yearn for baby to Devote our Lives to. Financially S ecure. Expenses Paid. 1-800717-8753 AAAA Josie & Steven AAAA

STLtoday.com/readerrewards


COLLEGE BASKETBALL

B10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 12.16.2017

NOTEBOOK Tennessee brings Tar Heels to town

their ability to compete with college basketball’s heavyweights. Kentucky (8-1) has begun running away from opponents, a promising trend it hopes to continue against upcoming Power Five conference foes. Saturday’s home game against Virginia Tech (9-1) opens a daunting yearending stretch for the Wildcats that includes next weekend’s matchup against UCLA in New Orleans; their

positive steps in Barnes’ third season. The Vols were picked before the season to finish 13th out of 14 teams in the Southeastern Conference, but they’ve gotten off to a fast start that includes a road win at Georgia Tech and neutral-site victories over No. 17 Purdue and North Carolina State . Their only loss of the season came when they squandered a 12-point halftime lead over No. 1 Villanova in the Battle 4 Atlantis . Sunday’s game will attract the first capacity crowd at the 21,678-seat Thompson-Boling Arena since a February 2015 loss to Kentucky. It’s the first time two ranked men’s teams have faced each other in the building since No. 19 Tennessee defeated No. 2 Kentucky on Feb. 27, 2010.

Tennessee typically isn’t a very hospitable host to defending national champions. A rare sellout crowd will try to make sure that pattern continues Sunday when No. 7 North Carolina faces the 20th-ranked Volunteers in Knoxville for the first time since 1949. Tennessee has won each of the last five times it has hosted a defending national champion, a stretch that includes victories over Kentucky (in February 1999 and February 2013), Florida (February 2007 and February 2008) and Connecticut (January 2012 ). Now that they’re back in the Top 25 for the first time in seven years , the Vols have a chance to make a statement that they’ve returned to national relevance. After making the NCAA Tournament six straight times under Bruce Pearl from 2006-11, Tennessee has been back just once in the six years since. “We want to be a program that’s big on everybody’s schedule,” Tennessee coach Rick Barnes said. “We don’t want to be a program where Tennessee’s coming and (it’s) no big deal. We want people to know, hey, we have a good basketball program. We’re not there yet. We’re working to get there, but we’re not there yet.” Tennessee is making

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Kentucky schedule gets tougher • Kentucky coach John Calipari hasn’t hidden his frustration about the learning curve of his latest group of talented freshmen. And while the No. 8 Wildcats are starting play better, they’re bracing for more challenges ahead. Kentucky has struggled to put away opponents such as Utah Valley, Vermont, Troy and Harvard, efforts that players and Calipari acknowledge have contributed to a perceived lack of national respect. On the other hand, their lone loss — a 65-61 setback to Kansas — showed

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paying for classes prospects needed to become academically eligible and arranging off-campus practice sessions with an academically ineligible student-athlete. In addition to probation, penalties include a one-year postseason ban (already served) for the men’s basketball team; a financial penalty; scholarship and recruiting restrictions; and a vacation of records

N. Colorado on probation • The NCAA placed the University of Northern Colorado men’s basketball program on three years’ probation among other sanctions after finding academic fraud and recruiting violations by ex-coach B.J. Hill and some of his assistants. The violations by Hill and eight members of his staff over a four-year span included completing coursework for prospects,

annual in-state rivalry showdown against Louisville on Dec. 29; and their Southeastern Conference opener against Georgia on New Year’s Eve. Though Calipari still hopes February will reveal Kentucky’s true strengths, he’s eager to see how the Wildcats stack up against the Atlantic Coast Conference Hokies, who lead the nation in scoring at 96.2 points a game and are No. 2 in 3-point shooting at 47 percent.

* Wheels For Wishes is a DBA of Car Donation Foundation.

National Extremes

WEATHER • Low 33, High 61 • Winds SSW 5-15 mph

TODAY ACROSS THE U.S. High: 85° Lake Elsinore, California

Low: -18° Mt. Washington, New Hampshire

Sunny and mild today

110s

Plenty of sunshine along with light to moderate south-southwest winds and warmer temperatures can be expected across the St. Louis area today. Highs will top out in the lower 60s. Sunday will be slightly cooler with some light rain possible. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

24-HOUR FORECAST

MORNING

LUNCH

38°

DRIVE

55°

Sunny

59°

Sunny

Mostly clear

BEDTIME

46°

Increasing clouds

100s 90s 70s

4-DAY FORECAST

62 54 61 59 63 62 60 56 61 61 58 63 58

W

partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy

Illinois Bloomington Carbondale Chicago Decatur Effingham Macomb Mount Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Springfield Urbana

50s 40s 20s

SUNDAY

39°/50°

MONDAY

TUESDAY

H

29 30 29 30 29 29 28 29 32 27 31 28

50 54 44 52 51 53 54 51 58 41 54 49

41°/58° 40°/56° 32°/53°

Chance of rain Partly sunny

Sunny

sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny

Kansas City 36 / 60

Kirksville 31 / 56

Joplin 35 / 62

Springfield 31/ 54

St. Louis 33 / 61 Poplar Bluff 28 / 56

Carbondale 30 / 54

Flood Stage

Current Level

+ 0.10 + 0.12 - 0.04 + 0.06 + 0.12 0.00 0.00 - 1.10 - 0.55 - 0.08

TODAY’S UV INDEX Min.

Very high The higher the UV index number, the greater the need for skin protection.

POLLEN COUNTS Friday, Dec 15th No tree, grass, or weed pollen present Mold - 307 (low) HEATING DEGREE DAYS Yesterday 28 Month (Total) 371 Season 1073 Year Ago 969 Flood Stage

Current Level

ILLINOIS RIVER La Salle 20 11.50 18 12.13 Peoria 14 9.69 Beardstown MERAMEC RIVER 15 3.30 Sullivan 16 - 2.84 Valley Park 24 5.62 Arnold BOURBEUSE RIVER Union 15 1.63 OHIO RIVER Cairo 40 13.15 Maps and weather data provided by:

24-Hr Change

- 0.03 - 0.10 + 0.14 - 0.01 + 0.01 0.00 0.00 - 0.21

SUN & MOON

New Dec 18 Sunrise

First Dec 26

Full Jan 1

7:12 AM Sunset

Last Jan 8 4:41 PM

Moonrise 5:31 AM Moonset 3:58 PM

The average distance to the moon is about 240,000 miles. It took the Apollo missions up to three days to get to the moon. It only took the New Horizons spacecraft about 8 hours and 35 minutes to get there in 2006. SOURCE: McDonnell Planetarium

LAKE LEVELS Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

Current Level

24-Hr Change

354.81 360.32 494.30 656.91 704.88 653.83 912.59 838.64 599.85 404.31 601.91 444.61

+ 0.19 - 0.01 - 0.01 + 0.02 + 0.04 + 0.03 - 0.14 - 0.01 - 0.04 - 0.01 + 0.01 - 0.02

Get more river & lake stage information at 636-441-8467

Lower 48 temps only

Today L H

Albany, N.Y. 18 Albuquerque 24 Anchorage 30 Atlanta 29 Atlantic City 24 Baltimore 21 Billings 31 Biloxi, Ms. 39 Birmingham 30 Bismarck 32 Boise 26 Boston 21 Buffalo 20 Burlington, Vt. 18 Charleston, S.C. 37 Charleston, W.V. 27 Charlotte 29 Cheyenne 31 Chicago 29 Cincinnati 28 Cleveland 24 Colorado Spgs. 29 Concord, N.H. 12 Dallas 39 Daytona Beach 53 Denver 29 Des Moines 30 43 Destin, Fl. 18 Detroit 29 El Paso 30 Evansville 10 Fairbanks 23 Fargo 19 Flagstaff 57 Fort Myers 26 Great Falls 2 Green Bay 18 Hartford 66 Honolulu 42 Houston 27 Indianapolis 29 Jackson, Ms. 37 Juneau 64 Key West 42 Las Vegas 33 Little Rock 50 Los Angeles 31 Louisville

28 46 34 55 42 44 35 56 54 37 35 35 26 26 57 48 52 44 44 48 36 53 29 61 65 48 56 59 30 56 53 21 33 45 78 32 27 34 79 59 47 59 41 77 61 57 71 53

W

Tomorrow L H W

mostly cloudy partly cloudy snow showers sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy rain and snow partly sunny sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy snow showers snow showers sunny sunny sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny snow showers partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny snow cloudy mostly cloudy mostly sunny snow snow partly cloudy thunderstorms showers sunny partly cloudy rain sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny

10 28 25 38 25 29 18 56 39 21 18 18 17 7 38 31 32 18 29 32 26 21 7 45 55 23 30 54 23 42 36 4 21 19 61 20 23 14 66 49 33 46 36 71 43 42 47 35

25 43 29 56 44 46 37 69 53 38 31 27 35 20 66 50 56 33 41 43 40 37 27 68 74 37 43 69 37 55 47 14 33 33 80 37 33 30 81 69 44 65 37 81 56 56 73 45

mostly cloudy mostly cloudy snow showers showers showers mostly cloudy partly cloudy showers showers partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy rain and snow rain showers rain mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy rain and snow rain and snow showers rain and snow showers rain snow partly cloudy snow showers mostly sunny windy cloudy partly cloudy showers mostly cloudy showers showers rain and snow mostly cloudy sunny showers sunny showers

City

Today L H

30 Macon 46 McAllen, Tx. 32 Memphis 62 Miami 26 Milwaukee 23 Minneapolis Missoula, Mt. 26 36 Mobile Montgomery 30 29 Nashville New Orleans 42 New York City 24 Norfolk, Va. 31 Oklahoma City 31 Omaha 27 Orlando 53 Palm Springs 55 Philadelphia 24 Phoenix 44 Pittsburgh 23 Portland, Me. 15 Portland, Or. 30 Providence 19 Raleigh 28 Rapid City 31 Reno 29 Richmond, Va. 26 Sacramento 43 St. Petersburg 58 Salt Lake City 29 San Antonio 42 San Diego 54 San Francisco 49 Santa Fe 18 Savannah 36 Seattle 37 35 Shreveport 25 Sioux Falls 21 Syracuse 41 Tallahassee 56 Tampa 42 Tucson 35 Tulsa 28 Wash D.C. W. Palm Beach 59 29 Wichita Wilmington, De. 22 48 Yuma

57 54 58 80 35 31 32 56 56 55 56 35 49 60 52 71 71 40 68 37 32 44 36 52 38 38 47 60 71 35 52 63 63 45 59 45 59 43 26 63 73 66 62 45 77 60 40 72

W

sunny showers sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy cloudy snow showers mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny windy sunny partly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy rain partly cloudy sunny snow sunny sunny windy sunny snow showers mostly cloudy windy partly cloudy sunny rain mostly cloudy mostly cloudy snow showers partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy

Tomorrow L H W

36 47 42 68 31 22 20 50 40 37 53 26 36 44 27 54 54 28 48 26 13 37 19 31 23 22 29 39 60 25 44 51 50 22 39 40 44 24 11 44 58 47 44 31 66 42 27 48

63 70 57 81 38 32 28 71 61 50 73 37 55 56 41 79 67 43 62 41 28 46 31 56 38 42 52 62 77 33 68 68 63 41 68 47 65 36 27 73 78 58 54 48 80 51 43 65

mostly cloudy partly cloudy rain mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy snow showers showers showers showers mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny showers showers showers sunny rain partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy rain mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy showers mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy showers sunny

TODAY AROUND THE WORLD City Acapulco Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Barbados Beijing Berlin Budapest Buenos Aires Cairo Calgary Cancun Cape Town Dublin Frankfurt

L

H

W

70 32 50 45 75 77 21 32 34 77 55 22 73 57 34 33

86 42 66 71 91 84 32 37 39 90 77 36 80 81 45 39

sunny partly cloudy mostly sunny sunny showers showers mostly sunny cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms mostly sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms mostly sunny partly sunny mostly cloudy

City

L

H

W

Geneva Hong Kong Istanbul Jakarta Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Madrid Mecca Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi

32 59 56 75 48 55 21 32 32 67 45 15 33 72 59 48

38 65 63 90 63 77 44 41 49 88 70 19 40 81 78 66

mostly cloudy partly cloudy cloudy showers sunny partly cloudy sunny mostly sunny mostly sunny sunny partly cloudy snow showers rain and snow partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly sunny

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

+ 0.01 - 0.16 - 1.17 - 0.30 + 0.76

Very unhealthy

Good

Hawaii High: 81°

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

MISSOURI RIVER Kansas City 32 9.37 23 5.96 Jefferson City 21 5.58 Hermann 20 3.57 Washington 25 10.54 St. Charles MISSISSIPPI RIVER Hannibal 16 10.22 Louisiana 15 11.93 Dam 24 25 14.21 Dam 25 26 14.21 Grafton 18 15.71 M.Price, Pool 419 418.80 M.Price, Tail. 21 3.92 St Louis 1.52 30 Chester 27 5.03 Cape Girardeau 32 11.57

24-Hr Change

TODAY’S AIR QUALITY

Jet Stream

-10s

Parts of the Great Lakes, Northeast, north-central Rockies, and Intermountain West will see a little light snow. Showers will develop across south Texas in association with an area of low pressure. Dry conditions will be in place throughout the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast with high pressure in control. City

W

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

RIVER STAGES

0.00” 0.15” 1.45” 35.96” 39.57”

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

PRECIPITATION Last 24 hrs Month (Total) Month (Normal) Year (Total) Year (Normal)

45° 28° 42° 27° 76° -5° 21° 15°

-0s Alaska Low: -8°

Chicago 29 / 44

Wintry Mix

0s

Mostly sunny

ALMANAC Asof7P.M.atLambertField TEMPERATURES High (3:01 p.m.) Low (12:52 a.m.) Average High Average Low Record High (1948) Record Low (1901) High Last Year Low Last Year

10s

WEDNESDAY

Shown are this morning’s lows and today’s highs L

Snow

30s

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

33 28 33 29 32 35 36 31 32 32 32 31 28

H

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

L

T-storms

60s

TODAY IN THE BI-STATE AREA Missouri Branson Cape Girardeau Columbia Farmington Jefferson City Joplin Kansas City Kirksville Rolla Springfield St. Joseph Union West Plains

Rain

80s

City

L

H

W

Oslo Paris Prague Rio De Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Stockholm Sydney Taipei Tokyo Toronto Vancouver Vienna Warsaw

19 37 30 73 43 77 55 22 31 70 61 42 22 38 33 32

24 43 37 87 54 84 87 34 33 84 70 56 24 42 40 35

mostly sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy snow showers partly cloudy showers partly cloudy partly cloudy showers cloudy cloudy


Your Views. Published.

Become a contributor to an ongoing conversation about the best ways to address problems, right wrongs and make our society better. Your input can generate useful ideas that catalyze positive action. Let your view be known and voice be heard in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

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Saturday • 12.16.2017 • EV DUSTIN • By Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker

DILBERT • By Scott Adams

SALLY FORTH • By Francesco Marciuliano and Jim Keefe

BABY BLUES • By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE • By Stephan Pastis GARFIELD • By Jim Davis

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM • By Mike Peters

DEFLOCKED • By Jeff Corriveau

MUTTS • By Patrick McDonnell

PRICKLY CITY • By Scott Stantis

PICKLES • By Brian Crane

HI AND LOIS • By Brian and Greg Walker and Chance Browne

RHYMES WITH ORANGE • By Hilary B. Price

BEETLE BAILEY • By Mort and Greg Walker

BREAKING CAT NEWS • By Georgia Dunn

SUDOKU

THE PAJAMA DIARIES • By Terri Libenson

EVERYDAY


EVERYDAY

EV2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH BRIDGE TIPS • BOB JONES Both vulnerable, North deals NORTH ♠K 6 ♥10 4 ♦A J 10 9 3 ♣K 7 6 2 WEST EAST ♠10 9 ♠J 8 ♥J 8 5 ♥A K Q 9 7 3 2 ♦Q 6 5 4 ♦K ♣Q 10 9 8 ♣A 5 3 SOUTH ♠A Q 7 5 4 3 2 ♥6 ♦8 7 2 ♣J 4 The bidding: NORTH EAST SOUTH WEST 1♦ Dbl 1♠ Pass 2♣ 2♥ 2♠ 3♥ 3♠ Pass 4♠ All pass Opening lead: 10 of ♠ North did a lot of bidding with his modest hand, and South was happy to go on to game when North voluntarily raised his suit. Could he make it? South won the opening spade lead in dummy and led the 10 of hearts. This was an effort to cut the communication between the defenders. East won with the queen of hearts and reverted to spades, South winning the ace. With the trumps now drawn, declarer led the eight of diamonds, running it when West played low. East won with the

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD king and led the ace of hearts, ruffed by South. Declarer led a diamond to dummy’s jack for the good news and the bad news. The good news was that the jack won the trick. The bad news was that East showed out. There was no entry back to the South hand to repeat the diamond finesse, so the best he could do was to cash the ace of diamonds, ruff a diamond, and lead a club toward the king. When that lost to the ace, the contract was down one. South was unlucky to find the diamonds splitting 4-1 and the ace of clubs off side, but he could have done better. Instead of running the eight of diamonds on the first round of the suit, he should have led a low diamond to the jack. He could then run the eight of diamonds on the second round of the suit, holding the lead in his hand to repeat the diamond finesse. (12/16/17)

Across

1 Array in ancient battles 7 Hot beverage 11 Bradford and Bradshaw, for two: abbr. 14 What “It” is 16 New England state sch. 17 Something tested at an auto shop 18 Whose tears create the morning dew, in myth 19 Obliterate 20 Until 21 Multitude 22 Multitude 23 Presidential inits. 25 World’s second most populous landlocked country, after Ethiopia 28 Part of many

a business name 29 Deli counter sign 32 Old union member: abbr. 33 Text alert? 34 Time for remembrance 36 Freaking out, say 38 Scale notes 39 Debugging? 41 Comments like “Yer joshin’!” 44 Things applied to black eyes, traditionally 45 It doesn’t come full circle 46 Group in any circle in a Venn diagram 47 Cool, in slang 48 Twerp 51 Friend, in Firenze 53 Eponymous

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

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CRYPTOQUIP

If Dec. 16 is your birthday • This year you express a unique kind of creativity. If you are single, you could meet many different potential suitors. If you are attached, the two of you happily hop around to different sets of friends with totally diverse interests. A fellow Sagittarius adds more excitement to your life!

WORD GAME December 16 WORD — HANDICAPS (HANDICAPS: HAN-dih-kaps: Disadvantages imposed upon contestants.) Average mark 32 words. Time limit 45 minutes. Can you find 45 or more words in HANDICAPS? The list will be published Monday. YESTERDAY’S WORD — MEDIATED aimed died edit made amid diet emit maid tame dime dame mate team idea date mead tied ideate dead meat teem item deed media tide adit deem meet tied admit deet mete time aide demit mite aided diadem edema RULES OF THE GAME: 1. Words must be of four or more letters. 2. Words that acquire four letters by the addition of “s,” such as “bats” or “dies,” are not allowed. 3. Additional words made by adding a “d” or an “s” may not be used. For example, if “bake” is used, “baked” or “bakes” are not allowed, but “bake” and “baking” are admissible. 4. Proper nouns, slang words, or vulgar or sexually explicit words are not allowed.

weapon designer 54 Plow puller 56 Feature of coastal Louisiana 57 1964 role for Honor Blackman 58 Wedded 59 “If you ask me ...,” for short 60 How many letters are in the longest answers in this puzzle — or how many of these answers there are

Down

1 “Yentl” setting 2 Agatha Christie once described him as a “detestable, bombastic, tiresome little creature” 3 Something to run 4 Symbol of bloodlust 5 Star of TV’s “The Untouchables” 6 Foreign title: abbr. 7 Go hand to hand? 8 60-Across, to 34-Across, e.g. 9 Explains 10 WWII hero 11 Pop icon, to members of her “hive”

HOROSCOPE • JACQUELINE BIGAR Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. The stars show the kind of day you’ll have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult.

CROSSWORD

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 12.16.2017

ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHHH A thought is likely to go from a fantasy to a materialized concept. You will enjoy the surprises you encounter along the way. You get into what is happening, despite any obstacles that get in your way. Tonight: Out and about. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHH Relate on a personal level. Your ability to get your point across to others might not be as powerful as you would like. State the same core message, perhaps in a different way, in order to help convey your message. Tonight: Throw yourself into the moment. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH Communication might be off. Even with the best intentions and a willingness to go over what you are thinking several times, you might not be able to get your message across. Tonight: Out among the crowds. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHH You like being the cook, the baker and the decorator. Though you might want to complain at times, don’t. Know that there are alternatives to your lifestyle and choices. Tonight: Choose a favorite stressbuster. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHHH You’ll want to pull back a bit in order to review an emotional situation. Events seem to occur at a pace that takes your breath away. It might seem as if you are putting out all kinds of fires today. Don’t fight the inevitable; just go with the flow. Tonight: Squeeze in a nap.

Find more free games, or subscribe to get access to more than 50 others, at STLtoday.com/games, where you’ll also find a link to the Puzzle Society.

Puzzle by George Barany and Michael Shteyman

12 Expand 13 One of a pair of fraternal twins, maybe 15 Fail 21 Dances done in 2/4 time 24 The Mediterranean, to ancient Romans 26 1942-43 battle site 27 Cost 30 Pass 31 Chicago’s ___

Center 32 Acting as a partition 34 Relief for xerosis 35 1/1,000 of a yen 36 Computer addresses, for short 37 Luddite’s opposite, of a sort 40 Dilapidated 41 Polymathic Isaac 42 Words of

support 43 Like home, on rare occasions 49 Opposite of dirty 50 Contingency phrase 52 What a marker may mark 53 Subj. of some conspiracy theories 54 Print quality meas. 55 Museum estimate, maybe

Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay. No. 1111

WORD SCRIMMAGE

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH A responsibility calls that could force a change of plans. You might not feel as if you have a choice. You would like to kick back and get into the holiday spirit after a giftwrapping frenzy and perhaps a lengthy nap. Tonight: Hang out under the mistletoe. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH You might want to change your choices. This is a workable plan, as long as you don’t upset the applecart for several loved ones. Choose to stay on course. Tonight: Time to head to a favorite local spot for dinner. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH You will opt to do some last-minute holiday shopping, whether it be for food or for whatever else you might need. Tonight: Remember that you have a budget.

Solutions at bottom of page

WONDERWORD

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHHH Take the lead. You have a lot to do, but you’ll help motivate others to pitch in too. You won’t mind having a few people join you on your various last-minute errands. Tonight: Get into the playfulness of the moment. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH You could be overly worried about shopping, gift wrapping and everything else that is important in making your holiday run smoothly. Tonight: Stop for a favorite dessert on the way home. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHH A friend proves to be a major distraction. You often grumble about this person, but if you are honest with yourself, you enjoy being around him or her. Tonight: Spontaneously bring a group of friends together.

WORDY GURDY

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH You are likely to make important choices for you as well as a loved one. You might prefer to be with just this person and no one else. Reach out to a friend whom you don’t often get to see. Tonight: Now be a duo. STLtoday.com/horoscopes Get expanded horoscope information: star charts, peak times, outlooks and Chinese Zodiac data.

JUMBLE


EVERYDAY

12.16.2017 • Saturday • M 1

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • EV3

DEAR ABBY

WHAT’S THE DIFF? Find six differences between the panels.

Stepson snubbed by family’s habit anyone gifts? — OUTCAST IN MONTANA Dear Outcast • It appears your husband may have a less-thanideal relationship with your mother and your sister. Before taking any action, discuss this with your husband. If he agrees, then you are within your rights to tell them the way they are treating your husband and stepson is hurtful. Say that if it can’t be corrected, you prefer gifts no longer be exchanged because the discrimination is blatant and not what these holidays are supposed to be about. Dear Abby • I’m a 12-year-old girl in seventh grade. I have this crush and we’re friends. I finally got up the courage to tell him I liked him, and he has said nothing about it for the past two days. My best friend, Sara, tried to ask him why twice at lunch, but he left every time she tried to bring it up. I know we’re only in middle school, but I’m ready. Should

Sara and I confront him together or give him time? I can’t do it without Sara because then I would probably run. What should I do? — GIRL WITH A CRUSH Dear Girl With A Crush • Twelveyear-old girls in seventh grade may be ready for crushes, but 12-year-old boys in seventh grade may not be. You have already gotten your message across to him. Forget confronting him and do not involve your friend Sara, or he will run in the opposite direction the minute he sees you coming. Be patient. It may take some time, but he will probably develop an interest in girls eventually. And when he does, you do NOT want him to remember you as the one who embarrassed him in public. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, Calif. 90069.

TV SATURDAY

MISS MANNERS

No polite way to call someone stupid Dear Miss Manners • With the advent of current events being headlined via social media, what is the proper way to inform a participant that their information is false, including verification, without this Southern gentleman’s informing said offender that he/she may be the stupidest creature ever to draw breath? Gentle Reader • Well, not that. No matter how much Southern charm you dress it up in. If one were to go around correcting and berating everyone who spoke an untruth, one would do little else. And the fact that this behavior is being modeled by people we nevertheless elect to office does not excuse it. If you wish to shield yourself from lies and propaganda, Miss Manners suggests that you disengage from offensive social media. Doing so provides a much more pleasant existence and allows

you to maintain friendships that might otherwise be dissolved. If you cannot resist engaging, she would limit you to the occasional response that the offender “might be mistaken,” accompanied by corrected information. Dear Miss Manners • Our family, including three children, are vegetarians. We are not the preachy, whiny kind; we just don’t eat meat. We have a full, fun, colorful, healthy diet of pastas, fruits, veggies, pizzas, bean dishes, etc. A cousin of mine also has children, and claims they have gluten allergies and lactose intolerance. (These are undiagnosed by a doctor. She just “feels” that’s the case.) Regardless, whenever they are at our home at meal times, I ALWAYS provide gluten-free/ lactose-free options. When we go to their home, no such courtesy is extended to us. Family cookouts are basically just

Differences: 1. Line in sidewalk is moved. 2. Dog’s leg is moved. 3. Fence is not as wide. 4. Bush is higher. 5. Shirt is different. 6. Dog’s ear is smaller.

Dear Abby • My husband and I were together for eight years before we married a year ago. He has a kid from a previous marriage who just turned 11. The boy has been a part of my life since he was 3. But it wasn’t until his father and I were married that my parents began sending him Christmas presents. They don’t usually send him birthday gifts. My husband and I had our own child seven months ago. Now they’re sending a ton of Christmas presents for my biological son, but only a few token gifts for my stepson. My sister didn’t bother buying anything for my stepson or my husband. When I pointed it out to her, she ignored me. I don’t think it’s fair that they exclude my stepson. My sister has two girls and I bought gifts for everyone — including her husband — although money was tight. Now I wish I could take everything back. How can I get them to not shortchange my stepson? Or should I just tell them not to bother sending

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meat on the grill. No side dishes, not even any buns. Is it wrong to expect that when you are invited to a gathering that there be something you can eat? Gentle Reader • Miss Manners notes that you began by boasting that you were not the “preachy, whiny kind” of vegetarian. But unfortunately that appears to apply only to situations that could easily accommodate you. Your attention to your cousin’s mere feelings about certain foods is commendable, and it is not unreasonable to assume that your cousin’s family would act in kind. But they have not. So to maintain your low-maintenance status, eat around the choices and, if necessary, fortify before you go. Send questions to Miss Manners, aka Judith Martin, on her website, missmanners.com; to her email, dearmissmanners@gmail.com; or through postal mail to Miss Manners, Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut Street, Kansas City, Mo. 64106.

12/16/17

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FOX UFC Fight Night: Lawler vs. RDA Robbie Lawler Fox 2 News at 9:00pm 2 vs. Rafael Dos Anjos; welterweight bout. From (N) (cc) Winnipeg. (N) S.W.A.T. The SWAT team 48 Hours (cc) CBS NCIS: Los Angeles: 4 767. Callen and Sam go races to find a bomber. under cover. (cc) NBC Will & 5 Grace

Superstore Dateline NBC (cc)

PBS Antiques Roadshow 9 Chinese cinnabar lacquer box. (cc) CW 11

News 11 at 7:00PM (N) (cc)

IND Leverage Hurley is 24 caught up in a drug deal. (cc)

Saturday Night Live (N) (cc)

Death in Paradise The Í FOUR WEDDINGS AND A team works to solve two FUNERAL (’94) HHH murders. Rizzoli & Isles Jane Elementary Sherlock and Maura find a dead tracks an erratic crimiman. (cc) nal. (cc) Mr. Box Of- The First Here’s Help News & Views fice (cc) Family (cc)

ABC I Want a Dog for Christ- Ten Days in the Valley: Ten Days in the Val30 mas, Charlie Brown! Day 5: Back to Ones. (N) ley: Day 6: Down Day. (cc) (N) (cc) MYTV Î A HUSBAND FOR A CHRISTMAS CRUISE (’17) (Vivica A. Fox) A novelist 46 CHRISTMAS (’16) (Vivica finds love on a holiday cruise. A. Fox)

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EVERYDAY

EV4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH THE FAMILY CIRCUS • By Bil Keane

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 12.16.2017

CAROLYN HAX

ZITS • By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

In-laws like to make food judgments Adapted from a recent online discussion.

FUNKY WINKERBEAN • By Tom Batiuk

Hi, Carolyn: I’m going on vacation soon with my inlaws, siblings-in-laws, and their spouses. Over the last few years, I’ve been working on eating fewer unhealthy foods like bread and dairy, and as a result I feel much better. This hasn’t resulted in visible weight loss but has resolved many stomach issues I’ve dealt with. Every time I am with my husband’s family, the mood is “vacation” or “celebration” and the foods they serve are always those I try to avoid, like pasta for dinner and chocolate cake from scratch for dessert. My inlaws keep kosher and my mother-in-law is an avid baker, so suggestions to eat at a restaurant where we can all pick our foods are met with confusion. I get looks and occasional comments about declining those foods, such as how annoying the gluten-free trend is. I’m already anxious about this vacation and having either to join in and suffer the stomachache or decline and get eye rolls about fad diets. Do you have a suggestion for how to handle this? — Lifestyle Choices Burn

SPEED BUMP • By Dave Coverly

BIZARRO • By Dan Piraro

CORNERED • By Mike Baldwin NON SEQUITUR • By Wiley Miller

Answer • Yes, the commentary and eye rolls are annoying and pushy — not to mention the fact that a welcoming family would make at least a minimal effort to provide food everyone can eat. But they’re saying a lot about themselves and virtually nothing about you, because they’re butting into something that just doesn’t affect them. You’re taking personally what isn’t personal. That makes their eyerolling a “so what” waiting to happen. Through trial and error, you learned that you could resolve your stomach issues by not eating bread and dairy. OK then! So you don’t eat them, that’s a good start. Now finish the job by responding just as matter-of-factly to your inlaws: You’re you and they aren’t and so let’s move on: “Yes, thank you, the gluten-free thing is annoying — I’d give anything to eat cake without feeling sick. Oh, and bread ... don’t get me started.” Right? It can annoy you and the family commentariat for completely different reasons, but it’s still true that both parties are annoyed. You can use shorter answers after that — “Eyes say yes, stomach says no”; “[sigh] Aren’t my food reactions old news yet?”; and eventually to, “[blank].” As in, you just do what you do without feeling the need to respond to commentary about it. Cut to the last step right away if you feel game. I do take issue with one remark you make here: When you refer to “unhealthy foods like bread and dairy,” you reveal judginess of your own, no? Bread and dairy are not unhealthy, they’re just fine for ... people for whom they’re just fine.

DUPLEX • By Glenn McCoy MARMADUKE • By Brad Anderson

INTELLIGENT LIFE • By David Reddick

DRABBLE • By Kevin Fagan

MARK TRAIL • By James Allen

LOLA • By Todd Clark ZIGGY • By Tom Wilson

tellme@washpost.com

OTHER COAST • By Adrian Raeside

TAKE IT FROM THE TINKERSONS • By Bill Bettwy

THE ARGYLE SWEATER • By Scott

Hilburn

BLONDIE • By Dean Young and John Marshall

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