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S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 1 8 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

WEDNESDAY • 12.05.2018 • $2.00

‘A SMOKING SAW’

SEN. LINDSEY GRAHAM, R-S.C.

‘The crown prince is a wrecking ball. I think he’s complicit in the murder of Mr. Khashoggi to the highest level possible.’ SEN. BOB CORKER, R-TENN.

‘If the crown prince went in front of a jury, he would be convicted in 30 minutes.’

SENATORS SAY SAUDI CROWN PRINCE ‘COMPLICIT’ IN JOURNALIST’S KILLING

BY SHANE HARRIS AND KAROUN DEMIRJIAN Washington Post

WASHINGTON • Senators emerged from an unusual closed-door Mohammed briefing with the CIA director on Tuesday and accused the Saudi crown prince of complicity in the murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi. Lawmakers said evidence presented by the U.S. spy agency overwhelmingly pointed to Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman’s involvement in the assassination. “There’s not a smoking gun, there’s a smoking saw,” said Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., referring to the bone saw that investigators believe was used to dismember Khashoggi after he was killed Oct. 2 by a team of

Saudi agents inside the country’s consulate in Istanbul. Armed with classified details provided by President Donald Trump’s handpicked Khashoggi CIA director, Gina Haspel, senators shredded the arguments put forward by senior administration officials who had earlier insisted that the evidence of Mohammed’s role is inconclusive. The gulf that has emerged between Republican lawmakers and the president over how to respond to the journalist’s murder appeared to widen after Tuesday’s briefing, with Graham, one of Trump’s closest Senate allies, announcing he was no longer willing to work with the crown prince, whom

PRESIDENT TRUMP, LAST MONTH

‘It could very well be that the Crown Prince had knowledge of this tragic event — maybe he did and maybe he didn’t!’

See SAUDI • Page A7

REP. CHRIS STEWART, R-UTAH

‘We have to have a relationship with some players we don’t agree with. Journalists disappear all over the country.’

FINDING A COMMUNITY

Flynn gave ‘substantial’ help to Mueller Special counsel seeks no jail time for former Trump adviser BY CAROL D. LEONNIG, ROSALIND S. HELDERMAN AND DEVLIN BARRET Washington Post

Getting on disability meant Wartts was also eligible for Section 8 housing. Section 8 participants pay up to 40 percent of their income for housing costs, including rent and utilities, with the rest subsidized by the federal government. “That was just a huge blessing and an opportunity to embrace a standard of adulthood that you just can’t find when you’re still living at home,” Wartts said. She lives in a downtown

WASHINGTON • Special counsel Robert Mueller recommended that former national security adviser Michael Flynn serve no prison time, citing his “substantial assistance” with several ongoing investigations, according to a court filing Tuesday. Flynn was forced out of his post as national security adviser in February 2017 after the White House said he misled administration officials, including Vice President Mike Pence, about his contacts with Sergey Kislyak, Russia’s ambassador to the United States at the time. Since then, Flynn has been cooperating with Mueller’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 campaign, and his full account of events has been one of the best-kept secrets in Washington. He is one of five Donald Trump aides who have pleaded guilty in Mueller’s probe. The special counsel’s new filing is the first time prosecutors have described Flynn’s assistance since his guilty plea in December 2017. In it, prosecutors said Flynn has assisted with several ongoing inves-

See TENANTS • Page A4

See FLYNN • Page A10

CRISTINA M. FLETES • cfletes@post-dispatch.com.

“I’m going to miss this view,” said Naima Wartts, 42, as she looks out the window while packing up her apartment last month in downtown St. Louis. Wartts receives housing assistance and wishes to move closer to her family in University City.

Housing program helps Section 8 tenants move into better neighborhoods

BY JANELLE O’DEA St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Before she got help with paying rent, Naima Wartts wasn’t sure she’d ever be able to live independently. Wartts, 42, was diagnosed with bipolar disorder in 1999. The illness left her unable to maintain steady employment. For the next decade, she lived with her mother until she was able to secure disability benefits from the federal government.

Messenger: 2008 plea haunts woman • A2

Bush’s trademark ‘thousand points of light’ appeal was made at WU

Killings down 42 pct. in East St. Louis • A6

Crowds turn out to honor Bush for his long service, from war to the White House • A8

Bodies in car were missing couple • A6 Cookies summon the holiday spirit • LET’S EAT

Mizzou lands Clemson QB transfer SPORTS

Raasch: In Bush, a gentle man is remembered differently than he was received in his time • A9

BY CHUCK RAASCH St. Louis Post-Dispatch

TODAY

44°/34° NOT AS COLD

TOMORROW

38°/21°

A BIT OF SNOW, RAIN

WASHINGTON • President George Bush’s

WEATHER B12

See BUSH • Page A9

1 M

initial public push for his “thousand points of light” volunteerism initiative came on a Washington University campus that he would become quite familiar with during his years in public life. Less than a month after his inauguration in 1989, the late president told an audience on the Danforth Campus that service and

One sweet season

POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

Vol. 140, No. 339 ©2018

Bommarito INFINITI .com

EN7 P O 4/ 2


M 1 WEDNESDAY • 12.05.2018 • A2

TONY’S TAKE

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM

Camden County still bedevils woman after 2008 guilty plea

12 DAYS OF GIVEAWAYS

TONY MESSENGER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Alicyn Rapp was dropped off in the shadow of the big red barn in Camdenton, the one that houses a souvenir and T-shirt shop at the intersection of Missouri Highways 5 and 54. “I had no money, no car and no phone,” Rapp remembers. “I had no way to get back home to St. Louis. I was stranded.” A stranger bought her a hot dog at Sonic and let Rapp her use her phone. Her dad would be able to come get her in a couple of days. She found a cheap motel and the good Samaritan paid for her room. That was in July. Rapp, 36, had just been let out of Camden County Jail. She had been picked up on a warrant from a case for which she long ago served her time. Her troubles stemmed from a bad breakup. In 2006. Rapp believes she might have the oldest ongoing case in Camden County. She met a guy that summer at Lake of the Ozarks. Things moved fast. She moved in with him in the loft above his windowtinting business. They drank a lot. They fought. Then he cheated on her. That’s what the police report says. It also says she hit him and trashed his loft. Rapp says he hit her first. Police charged her with domestic violence and property damage, both misdemeanors. A warrant was issued for her arrest, but Rapp had already moved back to St. Louis, where she grew up. She’s a south city Catholic girl. There

was St. Gabriel’s for elementary and middle school, followed by Bishop DuBourg for high school. By the age of 14, she was fighting addiction, mostly alcohol and meth. In 2004, she caught her first drug possession case and went to prison. Since then, she’s done three stints in prison — all for drug possession — and has found herself in nine different county jails. Only one case remains on her record. Camden County. She was arrested in 2007, went through a couple of attorneys and by 2008 pleaded guilty. Her sentence was one year in jail, but it was suspended. She received two years of probation and a bill for the nine days she spent in jail. Altogether, her court costs came to about $1,200. By 2009, Rapp was behind in her payments and the court revoked her probation. She did a couple of days in jail and her cash bond of $400 was applied to her costs. Then again in 2010. Revocation. Jail. Another bill for jail time. And 2012. This is the pattern that creates de facto debtors prisons in rural Missouri. Poor people who can’t afford to pay their costs — even after doing their time on misdemeanor charges — end up with even larger bills by spending more time in jail on probation revocation or contempt of court for missing hearings. Camden County collects more in so-called “board bills” than any county in the state except for neighboring Laclede County. The practice has earned the lake area jail there a motto often repeated by its inmates. “It’s legendary,” says Rapp. “Come on vacation, leave on probation, come back on revocation.” Since 2006, this has been Rapp’s life. In 2013, she tried to put an end to the cycle. She was in the Chillicothe Correctional Center, doing 120 days for possession of meth, and she was trying to turn

her life around. Her record has been clean since then, though she knows her battle with addiction will last a life time. “I am writing you requesting time served in lieu of fines and/or jail time to run concurrent with my current sentence …” Rapp wrote the Camden County Circuit Court. “I am trying to change my life and I would like a clean slate to start over.” The prosecutor in Camden County was willing to grant the request. The judge said no, not unless Rapp also paid the $1,639.70 in outstanding bills. So when Rapp walked out of prison, she was picked up by Camden County deputies, who drove her back to the county jail, and then added a bill for mileage to her ever increasing jail costs. In 2015, still behind in payments, she got picked up again. “I sat in Camden County Jail for 18 days, waiting to go to court just for them to release me with a new payment schedule,” she says. “It’s ridiculous.” On Monday, she had a court date again to discuss her payments with the judge, the fifth one to handle her case since it began in 2006. She didn’t go. She is living with her husband in Woodson Terrace these days. Her car doesn’t work. Next week she starts training for a job with Jack in the Box. The idea of scraping together the money to find a way to make it to Camden County just to tell the judge she can’t afford a payment makes no sense to her. “It’s been 12 years, for God’s sake,” Rapp says. “I’ve lost jobs, my house, cars, my children. I’ve done enough time. I’ve paid them enough money. With this hanging over my head, I’m never going to get a clean start. When is it going to stop?” Tony Messenger • 314-340-8518 @tonymess on Twitter tmessenger@post-dispatch.com

100 NEEDIEST CASES: HELPING THOUSANDS

ATTACK ON GIRL SCARS FAMILY WAYS TO GIVE

FROM STAFF REPORTS

CASE 47 • Ms. S’s daughter was kidnapped when she was just 12 years old. Her throat was slashed and she was left for dead. The girl survived, and her attacker has been jailed. Now, the family is struggling to make ends meet as they cope with her recovery. Ms. S recently returned to work after taking time off to care for her daughter. She’s behind on bills, has outstanding parking tickets, the gas has been disconnected and the electricity could be next. She has a son, 16, and two other daughters, ages 10 and 3. Any donations would be welcome.

ADOPT A CASE • For highestneed cases, the program supplies donors with a list of a family’s needs. Donors are asked to meet at least one of the stated needs and provide at least one present for each individual in the family. Everything goes directly to the family, through a social worker.

CASE 48 • After losing everything in a fire in July, Ms. J and her family could use help to get back on their feet. Ms. J works to provide for her three children, one of whom is pregnant, and her mother, who also lives with them. But it’s been a financial and emotional struggle trying to rebuild. Immediate needs include clothing, household items, cleaning supplies, toiletry items and food. Ms. J, 46, also asks for help fixing her home. The wiring and appliances all need repair. Any assistance would be appreciated.

DONATE • Monetary gifts to the 100 Neediest Cases general fund are used to help the more than 4,000 cases, and go directly to the families.

CASE 49 • Ms. A has faced challenges her whole

life. Now 25, and the mother of three, she has struggled with depression since childhood. She has also had chronic fatigue, headaches and other problems. She finally has a diagnosis: Chiari malformation, a condition in which brain tissue pushes into the spinal canal. Her third child, a 3-year-old girl, weighed 1 pound at birth and spent her first five months in intensive care. The girl is diagnosed with cerebral palsy, needs a ventilator to breathe and is fed through a tube. Ms. A struggles to pay her bills and put food on the table. Donations could help this family with rent, food and clothing.

Case profiles by Christine Byers, Celeste Bott and Jeremy Kohler of the Post-Dispatch.

JULIA HUDDLESTON • De Soto High School

TO HELP Visit 100neediestcases.org Or call 314-421-6060 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on weekdays.

SEEKING AND SERVING ALL IN NEED. Donate at www.svdpstlouis.org

Or mail a check or money order (no cash) payable to: 100 Neediest Cases P.O. Box 955925 St. Louis, Mo. 63195

FUNDRAISE • Encourage friends, family and others to join you in helping. Set up a fundraising page for your adopted family or the program overall, and have an even bigger impact.

HOW IT WORKS

HOW IT STARTED

Social service agencies, working through the United Way, identify thousands of needy families. Volunteers then select 100 cases to be profiled in the newspaper to raise awareness.

The tradition dates to 1922, when civic leaders formed the Christmas Bureau. The Post-Dispatch has partnered with the program for more than five decades, renaming it 100 Neediest Cases in 1954.

Enter Go! Magazine’s 12 Days of Giveaways through Dec. 18. You’ll have the chance to take home a great prize from some of your favorite shops, venues and more. stltoday.com/contests

IPARTY: SPORTS ON TAP

Post-Dispatch sports writers met readers and fans at another great Sports on Tap event Monday at Kirkwood Station Brewing Company. Check out the photos. stltoday.com/multimedia

UPCOMING CHATS

Wednesday Ask the Road Crew, 1 p.m. Jim Thomas (Blues), 1 p.m. Thursday Dave Matter (Mizzou), 11 a.m. Friday Jeff Gordon (sports), 1 p.m.

PEOPLE ‘Negan’ shows his soft heart

A North Carolina animal rescue group says that thanks to “The Walking Dead” actor Jeffrey Dean Morgan, a donkey and an emu who have bonded can stay together. The Charlotte Observer reported that Morgan is adopting them, and they will roam free on his Hudson Valley, N.Y., farm. Morgan, who plays the villainous Negan on the TV zombie thriller, was the best choice for the pair because of his farm and resources, said Jennifer Gordon, founder of Carolina Waterfowl Rescue. Kanye is chided for phone use during ‘Cher Show’ • Kanye West really, really liked opening night of “The Cher Show” on Broadway. But at least one performer couldn’t tell, because West was messing with his phone as he watched with his wife, Kim Kardashian. “Hey @kanyewest so cool that you’re here at @TheCherShow!,” cast member Jarrod Spector tweeted Monday at the rapper. “If you look up from your cellphone you’ll see we’re doing a show up here. It’s opening night. Kind of a big deal for us. Thanks so much.” A few hours later, West wrote: “The dynamics of Cher and Sonny’s relationship made Kim and I grab each other’s hand and sing ‘I got you babe,’” he wrote. Golden Globe announcers named • There are four Hollywood stars who are guaranteed to be awake bright and early for this year’s Golden Globe Awards announcement. Terry Crews, Danai Gurira, Leslie Mann and Christian Slater have been tasked with presenting the Golden Globe nominees at Thursday’s news conference, the Hollywood Foreign Press Association announced Tuesday. The announcement will be at 5:30 a.m. California time at the Beverly Hilton hotel in Beverly Hills.

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS

Singer Little Richard is 86. Opera singer Jose Carreras is 72. Singer Jim Messina is 71. Comedian Margaret Cho is 50. Actress Amy Acker is 42. Actor Frankie Muniz is 33. From news services

LOTTERY MULTISTATE GAMES MEGA MILLIONS Tuesday: 28-31-41-42-50 Mega ball: 04 Megaplier: 3 Estimated jackpot: $208 million POWERBALL Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $200 million

MISSOURI LOTTERIES

LOTTO Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $2.3 million SHOW ME CASH Tuesday: 06-09-16-24-34 Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $88,000 PICK-3 Tuesday Midday: 684 Evening: 632 PICK-4 Tuesday Midday: 4365 Evening: 8675

ILLINOIS LOTTERIES

LUCKY DAY LOTTO Tuesday Midday: 18-20-34-37-43 Evening: 05-17-31-40-41 LOTTO Monday: 01-02-20-22-41-51 Extra shot: 17 Thursday’s estimated jackpot: $2.25 million PICK-3 Tuesday Midday: 136 FB: 7 Evening: 121 FB: 4 PICK-4 Tuesday Midday: 5006 FB: 2 Evening: 1950 FB: 7

STLTODAY.COM/LOTTERY Current and past numbers, plus jackpots from state lotteries around the country.

GOT A STORY TIP? We want to hear from you. Submit news tips online. They are confidential, and you can choose to remain anonymous >>> stltoday.com/newstips CONTACT US

INSIDE Business .............. A12 Editorial .............. A14 Horoscopes ......... EV2 Letters to editor .. A14 Obituaries ........... A16 People ................... A2

Puzzles ................ EV2 Sports calendar .... B2 Stocks ................. A13 Tony Messenger .... A2 TV listings ........... EV3 Weather ............... B12

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Editor: Gilbert Bailon.......................................314-340-8387 Features: Amy Bertrand ..................................314-340-8284 Local news: Marcia Koenig............................... 314-340-8142 Business: Lisa Brown ....................................... 314-340-8127 Online: Amanda St. Amand.............................. 314-340-8201 Projects: Jean Buchanan .................................. 314-340-8111 Sports: Roger Hensley...................................... 314-340-8301


LOCAL

12.05.2018 • Wednesday • M 1

Case is dropped against minister who gave out sandwiches without a permit BY JESSE BOGAN st. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. LOUIS • As families prepared

to go trick-or-treating Oct. 31, the Rev. Ray Redlich, of New Life Evangelistic Center, was downtown as usual, trying to make connections with people who are homeless. He said he handed out bologna sandwiches from a cooler that early evening, including at 1211 Locust Street, near Christ Church Cathedral. “In our ministry, we go where the people are,” he said. But police approached at the popular feeding location this time. Redlich said one of the officers told him that he should know better than to hand out food. The officer wrote Redlich a ticket for allegedly “operating” prepared food without a permit and set the court date for Dec. 4, according to a copy of the citation. Redlich said he agreed he’d been

handing out food. Still, he planned to fight it. But when Redlich showed up in court Tuesday, the case wasn’t on the docket. Redlich said he was told that the city counselor’s office decided not to pursue the case. “Our focus is on violent crime,” Public Safety Director Jimmie Edwards said in a prepared statement. “Issuing citations for this type of offense is not a priority for the city of St. Louis. However, it is within the discretion of individual officers to issue citations within the scope of the law.” That said, Edwards added the city has guidelines governing food preparation and distribution designed to protect the public. “I understand that folks want to help and we appreciate that,” he said. “It is the job of the city of St. Louis to ensure that our residents experiencing homelessness are receiving food prepared and trans-

ported according to the required sanitary guidelines.” Even though the citation was dropped, Redlich and his team at New Life Evangelistic Center, which has a long history of tangling with city officials, are still upset about the ticket. They’d like to hear from any others who have been ticketed and perhaps join forces in a federal lawsuit arguing violations of religious freedoms. Redlich said he understood that soup kitchens, or other venues that people go to for hot food, should be inspected. But what if, say, somebody wants to bring food to a neighbor in need, or as a kind gesture? “Does that mean they have to be regulated by the city?” Redlich said. “There has to be some reasonable limits on that.” Jesse Bogan • 314-340-8255 @jessebogan on Twitter jbogan@post-dispatch.com

OUT IN THE COLD

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Jazmin Herbst, 22, begs for money as drivers exit Mcdonald’s at Tucker Boulevard and Carr street on Tuesday. Herbst said she has been living on the streets for the past two years, sleeping behind the old Greyhound Bus station.

DIGEST

The agreement involves a special taxing district, or TDD, to help pay for a parking lot, road extension and other infrastructure work at the facility. City Administrator Mike Geisel said residents in the TDD area last year approved extending a 0.38-cent sales tax on purchases in the area until up to 2046 to fund about $7 million in bonds for the project. The taxing district had been collecting the tax for years but voters had needed to approve its extension to service debt taken on for projects for the sports complex. The TDD originally extended to only 2031. The association has teamed with the Staenberg Group and Mia Rose Holdings to develop the $22.5 million, 78,000-squarefoot complex on 12 acres at 18385 Chesterfield Airport Road. The organization has said the rink is needed since the closure last year of the Hardee’s IcePlex in the valley. The project is set to be completed in October, Geisel said. The new easement agreement states that, once the district no longer exists, it will be the responsibility of the hockey association to maintain the parking lot, Geisel said. The road extension of Old Olive Boulevard, near Chesterfield Airport Road, eventually will be part of the St. Louis County road system, Geisel said.

MANCHESTER > New law allows for heftier fines on two streets • Manchester aldermen on Monday night passed an ordinance designating two residential streets as “increased safety areas,” which allow for the doubling of traffic fines to up to $300. Traffic on the streets has worsened despite police presence and the use of radar, officials say. The streets — Connie Lane and Joyce Ann Drive — are being used as connectors between Hanna and Sulphur Springs roads. There are violations for speeding, following too close and other incidents. Signs advising of the new fines are ready for installation, officials said. Other streets may be added, the city attorney said. State highways have used the designation in some locations for years to cover enforcement in state courts. CHESTERFIELD > Council approves pact with hockey group • The Chesterfield City Council on Monday approved an agreement that ensures the Chesterfield Hockey Association is responsible for maintaining transportation-related infrastructure being funded by the Chesterfield Valley Transportation Development District for a new hockey complex.

THE VALUE OF HEARING WELL. Comfort, Quality For The Budget Minded

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A3

Prosecutor given wide latitude in shootings by police BY JOEL CURRIER st. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. LOUIS • The circuit attorney’s office has the authority to prosecute those charged in nonfatal police shootings as well as investigate the officers who use deadly force in those cases, the Missouri Supreme Court ruled Tuesday. The court said Circuit Judge Timothy Boyer overstepped his authority by excluding Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner’s office in January from pursuing assault and other charges against Wendell Davis and recommending she appoint a special prosecutor to avoid what Boyer called “an appearance of impropriety.” As the elected St. Louis circuit attorney, Gardner “holds one of the most powerful positions in our legal system, and (Boyer) cannot control the way (Gardner) chooses to exercise the broad, almost unfettered, discretion conferred upon her by statute,” wrote Missouri Supreme Court Judge Paul C. Wilson in the 7-0 decision. Boyer declined to comment on the ruling, but said he would not recuse himself from the Davis case. Gardner, in a press release, said she appreciated that the Supreme Court “believed it was significant enough to take a unanimous stand against this unprecedented decision by the Circuit Court.” The ruling allows Gardner’s prosecution of Davis, 28, to resume in St. Louis Circuit Court. Davis was charged after St. Louis police Officer Amon Figgs shot him during an arrest attempt Aug. 31,2017, in the Jeff-VanderLou neighborhood. Davis was partially paralyzed and was released from jail on bail

in February. An appeals court this year upheld Boyer’s decision to disqualify Gardner. Gardner challenged the decision to the Supreme Court, arguing that Boyer’s ruling usurped her authority. As the city’s elected prosecutor, she has discretion and duty “to ensure public confidence in the administration of justice” by using attorneys independent of those prosecuting defendants in the use of force reviews, she wrote. Davis’ case was on hold until prosecutors assured Figgs he would not be charged in the incident. The case was an example of tension between police and Gardner’s office over officerinvolved shooting cases. In January, Brian Millikan, the lawyer for Figgs, sought to have the circuit attorney’s office removed from the case. Figgs and other officers have resisted testifying in police shooting cases without immunity from being prosecuted, their attorney has claimed, because of a backlog caused by prosecutors’ failure to finish their investigations. Millikan said Tuesday that “while we certainly disagree with the substance of the opinion, we respect the court’s authority to issue it.” Davis’ co-defendant, Joshua Polk, 30, was sentenced in August to two years in prison after pleading guilty to resisting arrest. Polk and Davis jumped out of an SUV in the 3800 block of Maffitt Avenue, police said, and two officers chased them on foot. Police said when Figgs drew his gun and ordered Davis to get down, Davis raised a handgun toward the officer, and Figgs opened fire. Joel Currier • 314-340-8132 @joelcurrier on Twitter jcurrier@post-dispatch.com

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LOCAL

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 12.05.2018

Housing program helps Section 8 tenants move into better neighborhoods

County police want to question officers involved in 2014 protest BY CHRISTINE BYERS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS COUNTY • Two St. Louis

CRISTINA M. FLETES • cfletes@post-dispatch.com

Naima Wartts has paired with Mobility Connection, a program which gives housing voucher recipients greater flexibility in choosing where they live. Wartts said finding landlords in the area she wants to live that accept Section 8 housing aid has proved difficult. TENANTS • FROM A1

St. Louis apartment, where she has lived for almost 10 years since receiving a housing voucher. With the help of a local housing program, Mobility Connection, Wartts hopes to move to University City or Clayton, which would bring her closer to her grocery, library, part-time job, family and church. “My center of gravity never really changed from U. City and Clayton,” Wartts said. Mobility Connection, a joint program of city and county housing authorities, began in March 2017. It falls under the umbrella nonprofit AscendSTL, which was previously the St. Louis Housing Authority Development Corp. Ascend offers social services and affordable housing partnerships in the region. Mobility Connection moves people with housing vouchers to “high-opportunity areas,” or places where 10 percent or less of households live in poverty and 10 percent or less of housing units are subsidized. These areas often have better schools, less crime and more community amenities. “We want to create true housing choice,” said Janie Oliphant, program director at Mobility Connection. In the first year and a half, the program moved about three dozen clients.

THE OPPORTUNITY GAP

The program didn’t start just out of the desire to create more choice for Section 8 tenants. In the late ’90s and early 2000s, researchers did an experiment. In five cities, some families with vouchers were allowed to move anywhere in the city, and some were required to move to low-poverty neighborhoods. The results of that research were mixed until Raj Chetty, a professor of economics at Harvard University, used federal income tax data and the housing research to look at long-term outcomes for children. “We find that moving to a lower poverty neighborhood significantly improves college attendance rates and earnings for children who were young (below age 13) when their families moved. These children also live in better neighborhoods themselves as adults and are less likely to become

single parents,” according to Chetty’s research. Similar research, dubbed the Opportunity Atlas, was released this year by the Census Bureau showing outcomes for children who live in different parts of the country. In the St. Louis area, children who were raised in some parts of the city of St. Louis, north St. Louis County and East St. Louis have lower household incomes as adults compared to children who grew up in other parts of the metro area. Oliphant compared Mobility Connection’s high-opportunity areas map with the Census research and found that the areas her program deemed high-opportunity align with better outcomes. Chris Krehmeyer, president and CEO of Beyond Housing, a housing-assistance nonprofit group, said programs such as Mobility Connection help address part of the opportunity-gap issue, but he also sees a need for a regional attitude shift. “We’re not going to be attractive to companies that we think may want to come here because we haven’t invested in our families and neighborhoods important to St. Louis,” Krehmeyer said. “Either we wake up and say, ‘Let’s invest in places’ or allow them to decay — that’s not a solution.” Michael Brown’s death in Ferguson and the protests that followed spurred conversations about how to improve St. Louis communities. “Housing authority leadership and leadership at HUD came together and said, ‘What can we do to try and mitigate some of the problems that were identified during this period?’” Oliphant said.

HIGH DEMAND

There are 13,000 voucherholders in St. Louis and St. Louis County. Only 7 percent of them live in low-poverty areas, Oliphant said. Mobility Connection has 400 families on its waiting list. There are even longer wait lists for vouchers. Oliphant and the other Mobility Connection employee, Peter Grein, would like to help as many families as possible. With a limited budget, the program provides pre- and post-move support, housing search assistance and workshops on property ownership, conducting a housing search, being a good tenant and fi-

LAW & ORDER ST. LOUIS > Escapee apprehended at motel • The U.S. Marshals Service says a man convicted of murder who escaped from a county jail in Oklahoma has been apprehended in St. Louis. Patrick M. Walker, 34, was taken into custody about 11:15 a.m. Tuesday at an extended-stay motel in the St. Louis area, Deputy U.S. Marshal Callen Stephens said. Walker Authorities say Walker escaped from the Payne County Jail on Thursday after he assumed the identity of a cellmate who was being released on bail. Walker, also known as “Notty G,” was serving a life sentence for first-degree murder out of Oklahoma County and was housed temporarily at the Payne County Jail for a court appearance. Federal marshals say Walker made his way to the St. Louis area with the help of a female accomplice.

nancial fitness. Mobility Connection began with a one-time $250,000 grant from the Department of Housing and Urban Development. The housing authorities have continued to support the program, and Mobility Connection also is seeking philanthropic support. In addition to a lack of affordable housing, getting landlords to accept vouchers is a substantial challenge. About a third of housing units contacted by Mobility Connection do not accept vouchers, according to the program’s 2017 annual report. Except for the city, which has an income discrimination law, landlords in the St. Louis area can say “no thank you” to tenants with Section 8 vouchers. Landlords may have prejudices about Section 8 tenants or don’t want to deal with bureaucracy, such as extra paperwork or additional inspections, Oliphant said. Fees and security deposits are also hurdles. Some landlords aren’t flexible with security deposits or application fees, which puts those properties out of reach for some tenants. “Lots of low-income families are also trying to pay off bad debts while they’re saving for security deposits,” Oliphant said. This year, property sales presented another challenge for Mobility Connection. Early in the summer, property management company FirstKey Homes bought houses where Mobility Connection clients lived. Some of the tenants received notice that the new owners would no longer accept vouchers, according to Oliphant. FirstKey Homes is a subsidiary of Cerberus Capital Management, a firm that specializes in “alternative investing.” Cerberus is the largest residential property owner in St. Louis County, second only to the city of St. Louis, according to county assessor records. (The city owns residential property in St. Louis Lambert International Airport’s flight path.) Oliphant and Grein scrambled to find new housing for the families, who were told they had to be out of their properties by the end of July. One of the program’s clients, Tara Kennard, had been in her home in Florissant for just a year when she got the notice

Details about the woman weren’t released. ST. LOUIS COUNTY > Passenger dies after crash • Two cars collided head-on while traveling on North Lindbergh Boulevard near St. Louis Lambert International Airport on Monday afternoon, leaving a female passenger with fatal injuries, according to the Missouri Highway Patrol. Police said a Hummer traveling southbound on Lindbergh veered into the northbound lanes just north of Missouri Bottom road and collided head-on with a northbound Audi about 2:35 p.m. Cheryl Burris, 48, of St. Louis, a passenger in the Audi, was injured and died early Tuesday at a hospital, the patrol said. She was not wearing a seat belt, according to the crash report. The drivers of both cars suffered serious injuries. Both were wearing seat belts. ST. LOUIS > Pedestrian killed on I-70 is identified • A man found dead after apparently being hit by a vehicle on Interstate 70 in St. Louis early Monday has

she had to move. “I was kind of stunned because I wasn’t given enough notice, and I didn’t have that many options at the time when I received that letter,” Kennard, 40. a single mother of five, said. “It was a very rushed situation.” Three of Kennard’s children, ages 18, 8 and 6, live with her. Oliphant and Grein were able to find another home for Kennard and her children in Florissant, but Kennard had to pay for moving and temporary housing while they were in between houses. During that time, her children stayed with their dad, who was able to get them to and from school. “For them, everything worked out, but for me it was frustrating because I don’t like being separated from my kids,” Kennard said. After the moves were completed, Oliphant received notice that FirstKey Homes decided to accept vouchers. FirstKey said in an email through a New York-based public relations firm that in the time residents were displaced, the company was “assessing the properties and the policies associated with those properties.” The company then decided to accept the vouchers. By then, one client had given up her housing voucher, and a majority of clients affected already had moved back into their old neighborhoods or areas with higher rates of poverty. One person who had to move is still in the process of finding housing, which will likely not be in a better area than where she’s moving from, Oliphant said. She is now living in her car and her children are staying with other family members. All of the families in the Mobility Connection program have stayed in the housing they moved to, Oliphant said, except for those affected by the FirstKey decision. Oliphant said feedback from families and clients about the program has been mostly positive, and most clients have one piece of advice for future participants. “It’s mostly about trusting the process and not losing faith,” she said. “Even with our assistance, it’s really hard.” Janelle O’Dea • 314-340-8349 @jayohday on Twitter jodea@post-dispatch.com

been identified, but police still don’t know who might have hit him or why he was in the road. Officers found the body in the eastbound fast lane at St. Louis Avenue near Old North St. Louis about 12:18 a.m., police said. They found no witnesses and don’t know who hit the victim. They identified the victim Tuesday as Jerome Riley, 47. Police gave an address for Riley in the 1400 block of Locust Street. The only structures on the block are the former New Life Evangelistic Center homeless shelter and a charter school. An accident reconstruction unit is investigating Riley’s death. Authorities asked anyone with information to contact CrimeStoppers at 1-866-371-8477. ST. LOUIS > Ex-Washington U. official admits theft • The former business director of Washington University’s Division of Medical Education on Tuesday admitted embezzling about $300,000 and using the money for international travel and personal purchases, federal prosecutors said.

County officers were notified Monday that the department wanted to question them about their conduct during a 2014 protest. The notification comes just days after Missouri Rep. Bruce Franks Jr. released video of his arrest at the protest, saying the video supports a lawsuit he filed two years ago claiming officers used excessive force. The protest followed the fatal police shooting of a man at a gas station in Berkeley. St. Louis Police Association business manager Matt Crecelius said the video released by Franks triggered the new investigation, but that the officers now under investigation are not those named in Franks’ suit. Police said last week that at least one officer had already been disciplined in connection with the protest, but that discipline was not directly related to Franks’ claims. Instead, the discipline was related to misconduct discovered during an investigation prompted by his complaint. St. Louis County police Sgt. Shawn McGuire refused to elaborate, citing personnel protections, so it’s unclear what the discipline was for, how many officers were disciplined and what kind of discipline the officer or officers faced. It’s also not clear when it was handed down, though McGuire said it came after Franks’ complaint, which was made several months after the protest. Franks disputed the department’s statement, saying he received a letter from internal affairs stating that no officers were disciplined as a result of his complaint. Franks’ video is about two minutes long and is edited. Some of it contains clips from police body cameras in which an officer can be heard talking about “getting a couple good licks in on somebody.” One complains about all the lights on the gas station lot where protesters gathered, and that protesters are filming their actions. Crecelius complained that the video had been edited. The department has refused to release unedited versions of the video to the Post-Dispatch. Lawyers for Franks also declined to release the full videos. “Anybody watching that can see that it’s a production, it’s a compilation of the best of Bruce Franks,” Crecelius said. “These officers are being questioned based off a video that doesn’t show the full incident.” The release of Franks’ video came the same week that four St. Louis police officers were indicted by federal authorities for assaulting an undercover officer who was posing as a protester during a 2016 protest.

DIGEST ST. CHARLES COUNTY > Ex-Nixon aide hired by county • John Watson, a longtime top aide to former Gov. Jay Nixon, will soon become St. Charles County government’s chief attorney. County Executive Steve Ehlmann has chosen Watson to be county counselor, succeeding Keith Hazelwood, who is retiring after about two years in the job. Watson’s appointment, which takes effect in January, was approved Monday night by the County Council. Watson, 58, worked 17 years as Nixon’s chief of staff, both in the governor’s office and when Nixon was Missouri attorney general. He also held various other posts under Nixon and was tapped by Nixon to fill in briefly as state auditor after Tom Schweich died in 2015. Nixon eventually named Nicole Galloway to succeed Schweich. Watson later was executive director of the Missouri State Employees Retirement System from September 2015 until last January when he was replaced. Since then he has been in private law practice in Jefferson City. Ehlmann, a Republican, and Nixon, a Democrat, are longtime friends. The two both served in the Legislature in the early 1990s and late 1980s.

Barbara “Basia” Skudrzyk, 38, of Rock Hill, pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court to three counts of mail fraud, and admitted embezzling the money over more than eight years, ending July 31, prosecutors said. She created false invoices and false W-9 forms to get the department to pay for a moving company, a home cleaning service, divorce lawyers, painters and construction companies, prosecutors said. She also used the money at a jewelry boutique and for travel across the globe, including to Poland, Germany, Thailand, Canada, Florida, New York City and Texas, they said. She also bought Visa gift cards at the Washington University bookstore by forging another employee’s signature, prosecutors said. Skudrzyk, also known as Barbara “Basia” Najarro, is scheduled to be sentenced in March. Defense lawyer Nicholas Williams wrote in a text message that Skudrzyk’s plea was “a step toward an acceptance of responsibility and a rehabilitated life.”


LOCAL

12.05.2018 • Wednesday • M 1

Enterprise chairman Taylor wins St. Louis Award for philanthropy BY DAVID HUNN st. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. LOUIS • Andrew

C. Taylor, executive chairman of Enterprise Holdings, was honored on Tuesday with the St. Louis Award for his work on the renovations of the Gateway Arch National Park and Soldiers Memorial Military Museum, two of the most high-profile public restorations in the region. Taylor and his famJ.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com ily paid for much of the Andrew C. Taylor, executive chairman of Enterprise Holdings $30 million renovation Inc., claps along Tuesday after he received the 2018 St. Louis of Soldiers Memo- Award during a ceremony at the Visitors Center in Forest Park. rial, which reopened in November. The family also donated according to Enterprise. The St. Louis Award, established in 1931 $25 million to the foundation that led the $380 million rebuild of the Gateway Arch by philanthropist and shoemaker David P. Wohl, honors “the resident of St. Louis grounds and museum. In 2015, Taylor succeeded attorney Wal- who has contributed the most outstanding ter Metcalfe as chairman of CityArchRiver service for its development ... or shall have — later renamed Gateway Arch Park Foun- performed such services as to bring greatdation — leading the organization as work est honor to the community.” Past recipients include Anna Crosslin, was completed on the city’s most promipresident of the International Institute of nent landmark. “His leadership, patience and determi- St. Louis, Dr. William Danforth, former nation guided the transformation of the chancellor of Washington University, PeArch and grounds,” said David W. Kem- ter Raven, former director of the Missouri per, executive chairman of Commerce Botanical Garden, and the Rev. Starsky Bancshares and president of the St. Louis Wilson and Richard McClure, co-chairmen of the Ferguson Commission. Award committee. Taylor and his family have given tens Kemper praised Taylor’s engagement, ethics, generosity and ability to work with of millions to area institutions in recent years, including at least $30 million to Forothers. “If you’re going to get some big things est Park Forever, $35 million to the Dandone, you have to do it as a team,” Taylor forth Plant Science Center, $36 million to the St. Louis Art Museum, $40 million to responded. “This is a team sport.” Taylor joined Enterprise Rent-A-Car rescue the St. Louis Symphony and $70 at 16, washing cars at one of the original million to Washington University. The Taylors are also pitching a $400 St. Louis offices. After college at the University of Denver and a stint with a Ford million plan to build a Major League SocMotor Co. affiliate in San Francisco, he cer stadium downtown and start a team in returned to Enterprise in 1973, when the St. Louis. On Tuesday, Taylor spoke of the city’s company operated about 5,000 cars. He became general manager of regional op- potential. “This place is worth the investment,” erations in 1976, company president in 1980, chief executive in 1991 and chair- Taylor said. “I think we’re on the edge of a renaissance here.” man in 2001. The company and its affiliates now have David Hunn • 314-340-8121 nearly 2 million vehicles worldwide and @davidhunn on Twitter account for $24 billion in revenue in 2018, dhunn@post-dispatch.com

Two are charged in 2004 Lincoln County killing BY ERIN HEFFERNAN st. Louis Post-dispatch

LINCOLN COUNTY • Byron Owens was

found dead with five gunshot wounds at a remote Lincoln County farm the day after his 34th birthday in April 2004, and, for more than 14 years, his case went unsolved. But on Tuesday authorities arrested two men they believe were behind the crime. Daniel Russell, 57, who had been in a Tipton, Mo., prison, and Joseph Harrell, 36, of Warrenton, were Russell charged Tuesday with firstdegree murder. Russell, a member of the Hells Lovers Outlaw Motorcycle Gang, wanted his friend Owens dead because he believed Owens told authorities about a theft they Harrell did together, police said in court documents. Harrell accompanied Russell the night of the death and was connected to the murder weapon, which was found in a creek near Owens’ body, police said. The night before his death, Owens, a landscape worker from Warrenton, was out celebrating his birthday with a group of friends, said Lincoln County Sheriff John Cottle. The next morning his body was found when a farmer checking his cattle noticed an unfamiliar pickup next to a creek on his land. There, in far western Lincoln County near Truxton, police found Owens’ body. He had been shot five times. The case was first investigated by the Major Case Squad of Greater St. Louis and was then turned over to the Lincoln County sheriff’s office. Soon the trail went cold. Still, the sheriff’s office didn’t forget the death. “We felt for some time that this was a solvable case,” said Lincoln County sheriff’s Lt. Andy Binder. “But we knew we needed to pound the bushes to get it done.” About 18 months ago, Sheriff Cottle hired a full-time cold case detective solely for the Owens case. The investigation uncovered new witness statements and pieced together a series of events that police outlined in court documents. According to the police account: Owens and Russell were friends, and were involved in a theft together. After the crime, police searched Russell’s home, found the stolen property and arrested him in March 2004. Russell blamed Owens.

Russell had suspected his friend of being a snitch, and told several people he was going to kill him. Shortly before Owens’ death, Russell’s close friend, Harrell, bought a Owens new vehicle. He said he wanted it for “something special.” On the night of the murder — April 12, 2004 — Harrell picked up Russell, who said he was leaving to find and kill Owens. Later that night, Russell returned home, burned his clothes in a barrel and took a bath. He was spotted with what looked like blood splattered on his face. The next morning, the farmer found Owens’ body. Close by, police found a gun about three feet deep in a creek, and a lab later confirmed it was the murder weapon. The gun had last been seen in Harrell’s possession, and a search warrant in 2004 found spent cartridges that had been fired from same weapon in Harrell’s home. The vehicle Harrell had bought was never found.

CRIMINAL PAST

Russell and Harrell went 14 years without being charged in Owens’ death, but both had other run-ins with the law over the years. Russell was arrested the day Owens’ body was found on a drug possession charge. He pleaded guilty in October 2004 to possession of a controlled substance and the receiving stolen property charge police say he blamed Owens for. He was sentenced to three years in prison. In 2012, Russell was again arrested on felony burglary and theft charges. He pleaded guilty in September 2013 and was in prison from July 2013 to March 2016. Almost two years after his release, Russell was arrested again, this time for possession of a controlled substance. He pleaded guilty and was in prison from March until Tuesday, when he was arrested and accused of Owens’ murder. Harrell already had convictions for felony assault, burglary, receiving stolen property and weapons charges before Owens’ death. He then pleaded guilty in 2007 to a second-degree burglary charge and was sentenced to five years in prison. Harrell was arrested Tuesday at his Warrenton home. Cottle congratulated investigators on the case at a news conference Tuesday, but added: “I regret Byron’s mother was unable to have closure prior to her death almost three years ago.” Erin Heffernan • 314-340-8145 @erinheff on Twitter eheffernan@post-dispatch.com

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A5

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LOCAL

A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Olivette couple identified as pair found dead in car in North County

Killings down 42 pct. in E. St. Louis, officials say BY ROBERT PATRICK St. Louis Post-Dispatch

EAST ST. LOUIS • Homi-

cides are down in this troubled Metro East city by 42 percent this year, officials said Tuesday, crediting a partnership between law enforcement and the community. From Dec. 4, 2016, to Dec. 4, 2017, there were 36 homicides, U.S. Attorney Steven D. Weinhoeft said in a news conference, compared to 21 in the 12 months just ended. Tuesday also marked the one-year anniversary of the implementation of Project Safe Neighborhood in the city, which Weinhoeft and other officials credited for the drop. The project, which is a centerpiece of the federal strategy to address violent crime, brings together federal, state and local law enforcement with the community, Weinhoeft said, and allows each area to determine the best strategy to address the problem. The project began by targeting crime in East St. Louis, he said, saying violent crime statistics were “staggering.” Weinhoeft said before this effort East St. Louis had a murder rate 20 times the national average and five times that of Chicago on a per capita basis. Weinhoeft said that a year ago, he met with police in East St. Louis and asked them to bring their “best cases or worst people” to the project. “That was an eye-opening meeting,” he said. Investigators described people, by name, and the num-

ber of murders with which they believed them to be involved. The project focused on the “priority violent offenders,” and sought to prosecute them for “any offense we can prove” to get them out of the community and “interrupt the cycle of violence,” he said. Officials declined to name any of those targeted or describe their crimes, but Weinhoeft said that 16 “violent offenders” had been charged. Weinhoeft and St. Clair County State’s Attorney Brendan Kelly praised the work of Illinois State Police crime scene investigators, who respond to every shooting in the city. Weinhoeft also credited the East St. Louis police, state and federal prosecutors, the Illinois State Police and various federal law enforcement agencies, including the local office of the U.S. Marshals Service, who, he said, are second in the nation in the number of firearms seized. East St. Louis Police Chief Jerry C. Simon said the project had exceeded his expectations. In an example of one of the project’s positive effects, Simon said he was approached recently at a high school basketball game by someone who said that a man had been openly carrying and firing an assault rifle and “terrorizing” their neighborhood of mostly elderly residents, who were afraid to talk to police. The man’s recent arrest allowed residents to come out of their houses and socialize once again, Simon said.

Autopsies reveal they each died from at least one gunshot BY RACHEL RICE St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS COUNTY • Autopsies

have confirmed the bodies found Monday in a car in north St. Louis County are a missing Olivette couple, police said Tuesday. Igor Zhukov, 47, and Michele Laws, 43, both of the 9800 block of Greenery Lane, were found about 2:30 p.m. Monday in their Nissan Sentra, which was at the bottom of a ravine in the 300 block of Bluff Drive, near Riverview and the St. Louis city border. The autopsies Tuesday found that Laws and Zhukov each died of at least one gunshot. Police are investigating their deaths as a double homicide. The car and the bodies were discovered less than two miles from where the couple were believed to be on Thursday afternoon in the area of Interstate 270 and Lilac Avenue. Police said Zhukov’s cellphone was last detected in that area at 3 p.m. that day. “At this time, it is unknown how long Laws and Zhukov were deceased prior to being discovered,”

BY DAVID A. LIEB Associated Press

JEFFERSON CITY • Three Missouri state lawmakers have resigned just ahead of the date a new constitutional amendment takes effect requiring legislators to wait two years before they can become lobbyists. State Sen. Jake Hummel, D-St. Louis, confirmed Tuesday that he had resigned Friday in order to preserve his right to register as a lobby-

Neighbors couple were killed by the man’s son, who was visiting from Chicago when he shot them and stole their car, police say. Tyjuan D. CannonScarelli, 18, was charged with two counts of firstdegree murder, two counts of armed criminal action and stealing a motor vehicle. He was not in custody and police were seeking to arrest him in the Chicago area. He is charged in the shooting deaths of Iesha Emery, 33, and Jerry Cannon, 40. Cannon-Scarelli is Cannon’s son, police said. Emery and Cannon were found dead in the home they shared on Oran Drive on Sunday, a week after court documents say they were killed. Prosecutors said in charging documents that Cannon-Scarelli was a “recent occupant” of the home at Oran Drive and Newby

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St. Louis County police said in a statement. The couple did not return home that day; their family called police on Friday and said it was not like the couple to leave without a word. The couple had two daughters, ages 14 and 9, who were safe with relatives when their parents disappeared. Michele Laws’ sister-in-law, Kelly Laws, said the family was “devastated” following confirmation that the bodies were the missing couple. “Michele and Igor were doing

ist sooner rather than later. Rep. Kevin Corlew, R-Kansas City, submitted his resignation Tuesday, to take effect Wednesday, a day before the requirement kicks in. Rep. Kirk Mathews, R-Pacific, resigned effective Nov. 27. Neither stated a reason in his resignation letter nor immediately responded to phone messages Tuesday seeking comment. Missouri voters approved Constitutional Amendment 1 with 62 per-

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Nassim Benchaabane of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report. Rachel Rice • 314-340-8344 @RachelDRice on Twitter rrice@post-dispatch.com

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Street, and had been visiting from Chicago. A 9 mm pistol and 2008 Buick Lucerne were missing from the home when the couple were found, charges said. Home surveillance video shows the couple entering the home with CannonScarelli between 3:09 p.m. and 3:12 p.m. on Nov. 25, with Cannon-Scarelli leaving at 3:41 p.m. with two duffel bags and what appears to be a firearm. The home surveillance system shows no one entering or leaving the home until Sunday morning, the day a relative of the couple found the bodies, charges say. They were found about 8:30 a.m. The stolen Buick was found in the Chicago area, and recent social media postings show CannonScarelli holding what appears to be the stolen gun. Cannon-Scarelli was ordered held without bail. The Major Case Squad investigated the case. A photo of Cannon-Scarelli was not immediately available.

Igor Zhukov and Michele Laws were last seen about 2 p.m. on Thursday. Their bodies were discovered Monday in their car in a ravine.

their best to support their kids,” Laws said. “Michele was by far the most thoughtful person I’ve ever known, toward everyone. Her kids, thank goodness they have their grandma. She takes good care of them, (and) they’re definitely going to be in need of support ... We’re devastated, absolutely devastated. And we hope to God (the police) find the responsible parties.” On Monday, Laws’ mother, Ruth Laws, said she’d last seen her daughter about 2 p.m. Thursday when her daughter brought her groceries. Now, Ruth Laws said, she has to move on and try to take care of the couple’s daughters. “We’ll have to change chapters in our book and forget how wonderful she was,” Ruth Laws said of her daughter. “Or we’ll just cry every day ... It’s just senseless that (someone) would do this. If only (their murderer) would know they were taking the girls’ parents away.” Police ask anyone with information about the incident to contact the St. Louis County Police Department at 636-529-8210 or, to remain anonymous, contact CrimeStoppers at 1-866-371-8477 if they have any information regarding the incident.

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NATION

12.05.2018 • Wednesday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A7

Senators accuse Saudi prince of complicity in murder SAUDI • FROM A1

the White House regards as one its most important allies in the Middle East. In recent days, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Defense Secretary Jim Mattis have said that no single piece of evidence irrefutably links Mohammed to the killing. But the senators, in effect, said that doesn’t matter, because the evidence they heard convinced them beyond the shadow of a doubt. “If the crown prince went in front of a jury, he would be convicted in 30 minutes,” said Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., the chairman of the Committee on Foreign Relations. Haspel, who had declined to appear alongside Mattis and Pompeo at a briefing on U.S.-Saudi policy for the full Senate last week, was joined by agency personnel and gave what lawmakers described as a compelling and decisive presentation of the evidence that the CIA has analyzed since Khashoggi, a Washington Post contributing columnist, was killed. “We heard the clearest testimony I’ve heard from intelligence this morning,” Corker said later during a confirmation hearing for Trump administration nominees. “I’ve been here 12 years; I’ve never heard, ever, a presentation like was made today,” he said. Graham declined to say what the CIA officials had said, but in a brief interview he noted, “you can be assured it was thorough and the evidence is overwhelming.” Graham leveled sharp criticism at Pompeo and Mattis, saying he thought they were “following the lead of the president.” He called them “good soldiers.” But, Graham added, one would “have to be willfully blind not to come to the conclusion” that Mohammed was “intricately involved in the de-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

CIA Director Gina Haspel addresses an audience in Louisville, Ky., in September. On Tuesday, she briefed Senate leaders on the slaying of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi as senators weigh their next steps in possibly punishing the United States’ longtime Middle East ally over the killing.

mise of Mr. Khashoggi.” “It is zero chance, zero, that this happened in such an organized fashion without the crown prince,” Graham said. “It would defy logic to think” someone other than Mohammed was responsible, said Sen. Richard Shelby, R-Ala., noting that members of the prince’s own royal guard are believed to have been part of the team that killed Khashoggi. Congressional Republicans and Democrats have hammered Trump for his apparent ambivalence toward the CIA’s findings — “maybe he did and maybe he didn’t!” Trump said in a statement last month. The president has said that the

value of Saudi weapons purchases and the country’s role as a strategic check on Iran are too important to jeopardize. Haspel has tried to avoid getting in the middle of a policy debate. But her presentation heightened the tension between Trump and members of his own party. “The reason they don’t draw the conclusion that (Mohammed is) complicit is because the administration doesn’t want to go down that road — not because there’s not evidence to suggest it,” Graham said. Senators declined to detail the particulars of Haspel’s presentation, but the CIA had previously

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“Saudi Arabia’s a strategic ally, and the relationship is worth saving — but not at all costs,” Graham said. Sen. Richard Durbin, D-Ill., said that senators had asked Haspel to return later and provide the same briefing to all members of the chamber. House members are supposed to receive a briefing on Yemen and Saudi Arabia similar to the one that the Senate received last week, with Pompeo and Mattis. Thus far, Haspel has not committed to attending. Last week, the Senate took the historic step of voting to take up a resolution, spearheaded by Sens. Bernie Sanders,

told congressional and administration officials that its assessment is based on multiple communications intercepts, an audio recording from inside the Saudi consulate, and the agency’s belief that Mohammed, who exercises complete control of his government, would have to know about a plan to murder a prominent critic. Graham made clear that the crown prince’s culpability had caused a breach in the U.S.-Saudi relationship, and said the United States should come down on the government in Riyadh like “a ton of bricks.” He said he could no longer support arms sales to the Saudis as long as Mohammed was in charge.

I-Vt., and Mike Lee, RUtah, to end U.S. support for the Saudi-led coalition fighting Houthi rebels in Yemen. For some of the 14 Republicans who supported the procedural step, the vote was intended as a warning shot to Trump, to inspire him to start openly condemning Mohammed or withholding military support from the Saudis. Haspel’s briefing may have been designed to placate some of those senators, such as Graham, who last week said he would not support “any key vote” until the CIA director spoke to senators about the agency’s findings. Graham said Tuesday that he was satisfied with Haspel’s briefing and would not be backing the Yemen resolution to its conclusion. In place of that, he announced that he would be introducing a “sense of the Senate” resolution to specifically condemn Mohammed as responsible for Khashoggi’s murder, and that he would not support any future arms sale to Saudi Arabia as long as Mohammed remains in power. But between the Senate Democrats and the handful of Republicans who believe that U.S. participation in the Saudi-led coalition in Yemen is morally objectionable or unconstitutional, supporters of the Yemen resolution have enough support to advance the measure to the stage where lawmakers may propose amendments to it. Graham and Sen. Robert Menendez, D-N.J., the co-authors of a bill to sanction Saudi Arabia and curtail almost all weapons transfers to the kingdom, may propose their package of punitive measures as an amendment to the Yemen resolution, as it appears that talks to attach it to a must-pass spending bill have not gained enough momentum.

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NATION

A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 12.05.2018

Crowds honor Bush for long service

He is celebrated for rights for the disabled, military career — but mainly as a ‘sincere’ guy ing. On Tuesday, Dole was helped out of his wheelchair by an aide, slowly steadied himself and saluted Bush with his left hand, his chin quivering. Dignitaries had come forward on Monday, too, to honor the Texan whose service to his country extended three quarters of a century, from World War II through his final years as an advocate for volunteerism and relief for people displaced by natural disaster. Bush, 94, died Friday. Trump’s relationship with the Bush family has been tense. The current president has mocked the elder Bush for his “thousand points of light” call to volunteerism, challenged his son’s legacy as president and trounced “low-energy” Jeb Bush in the Republican presidential primaries en route to office. The late President Bush called Trump a “blowhard.” Those insults have been set aside, but the list of funeral service speakers marked the first time since Lyndon Johnson’s death in 1973 that a sitting president was not tapped to eulogize a late president. (Bill Clinton did so for Richard Nixon, and George W. Bush eulogized Ronald Reagan and Gerald Ford.) After services in Washington, Bush’s remains will be returned to Houston to lie in repose at St. Martin’s Episcopal Church before burial Thursday at his family plot on the presidential library grounds at Texas A&M University in College Station. His final resting place will be alongside Barbara Bush, his wife of 73 years , and Robin Bush, the daughter they lost to leukemia in 1953 at age 3. Trump has ordered the federal government closed Wednesday for a national day of mourning. Major U.S. stock markets will be closed; there will be no mail delivery. Flags on public buildings are flying at half-staff for 30 days.

BY CALVIN WOODWARD, LAURIE KELLMAN AND ASHRAF KHALIL Associated Press

WASHINGTON • Soldiers, citi-

zens in wheelchairs and long lines of others on foot wound through the hushed Capitol Rotunda on Tuesday to view George Bush’s casket and remember a president whose legacy included World War II military service and a landmark law affirming the rights of the disabled. Bob Dole, a compatriot in war, peace and political struggle, steadied himself out of his wheelchair and saluted his old friend and onetime rival. As at notable moments in his life, Bush brought together Republicans and Democrats in his death, and not only the VIPs. Members of the public who never voted for the man waited in the same long lines as the rest, attesting that Bush possessed the dignity and grace that deserved to be remembered by their presence on a cold overcast day in the capital. “I’m just here to pay my respects,” said Jane Hernandez, a retired physician in the heavily Democratic city and suburbs. “I wasn’t the biggest fan of his presidency, but all in all he was a good, sincere guy doing a really hard job as best he could.” Bush’s service dog, Sully, was brought to the viewing, too — his main service these last months since Barbara Bush’s death in April being to rest his head on her husband’s lap. Service dogs are trained to do that. The CIA also honored Bush, the only spy chief to become president, as three agency directors past and present joined the public in the viewing. In the midst of the period of mourning, first lady Melania Trump gave Laura Bush, one of her predecessors, a tour of holiday decorations at the White House, a “sweet visit during this

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Former Sen. Bob Dole, 95, salutes the flag-draped casket of George Bush as the former president lies in state Tuesday at the U.S. Capitol in Washington. Dole and Bush were friends and onetime rivals for the presidency.

somber week,” according to a post on Laura Bush’s Instagram account. And the Trumps visited members of the Bush family at the presidential guesthouse, where they are staying. Former President George W. Bush and his wife greeted the Trumps outside before everyone went in for the private, 20-minute visit. Although President Donald Trump will attend Bush’s national funeral service Wednesday, he is not among the eulogists announced by the Bush family, a list that includes George W. Bush. The others are Alan Simpson, the former senator and acerbic wit from Wyoming; Brian Mulroney, the former Canadian prime minister who also gave a eulogy for Ronald Reagan; and presidential historian Jon Meacham. People lined up before dawn to pay respects to the 41st presi-

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NATION

12.05.2018 • WEDNESDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A9

LETTER FROM WASHINGTON

Time has left a gentle memory of a gentleman CHUCK RAASCH St. Louis Post-Dispatch

WASHINGTON • Now, there are 999

points of light. The mourning for former President George Bush has unleashed benevolent memories of a president whose decency stood apart from the crudity and mistrust of this era, and his era. But it’s a selective memory of a man who aspired to kinder and gentler, yet was caricatured and attacked as stilted and disconnected. That says more about us than George Herbert Walker Bush. The political harmony we aspire to in repose is rarely what we reward in real time. Less than a month removed from a bitter midterm election, that point hit home with Bush’s peaceful passing, his last words reportedly, “I love you.” The precise things this late president is being honored for — a willingness to compromise, a modesty and humility and yearning for civility and a thousand points of light on a darkened political landscape — were mocked when he was in the political arena. His broken “no new taxes” promise to get a deficit-cutting budget agreement

Bush was first sitting president to visit WU BUSH • FROM A1

volunteerism “can enrich America,” and that he had a simple goal: “More Americans helping others by effectively serving their communities, and the nation.” It signaled the outside-Washington, D.C., launch of his “thousand points of light” initiative that drew so much commentary — and some ridicule — at the time. Almost four years after the “points of light” speech, Washington University was host for the first 1992 presidential campaign debate between Bush, independent

with Democrats helped cost Bush a second term in 1992. Anti-tax hawks attacked him as spineless and worse, and some still refer to him with a sneer. Democrats, who proudly held up the Kennedy dynasty, attacked him as a clueless patrician. Gov. Ann Richards of Texas famously described him at the 1988 Democratic National Convention as being “born with a silver foot in his mouth.” Bush, the most self-deprecating of modern presidents, sent her a tiny silverfoot pendant as a “peace offering” a month after the election. This reporter was in the press pack following Bush when, in New Hampshire campaigning for his 1992 re-election, he mangled the rock group “Nitty Gritty Dirt Band” as the “Nitty Ditty Nitty Gritty Great Bird.” He was mercilessly ridiculed for being culturally disconnected. Today, that moment looks more like that from a politician who always acknowledged his inability to get down and personal like Bill Clinton, or to pronounce in aspirational grandiloquence about mountaintops like Ronald Reagan. The malapropism watch was a thing throughout Bush 41’s public life. “I stand for anti-bigotry, anti-Semitism, and anti-racism,” he said in Columbus, Ohio, weeks before the 1988 election. He got hammered in the press for that too, and his backers fought back by past-

ing bumper stickers that said, “Annoy the Media — Re-Elect Bush.” But he never held a grudge. “We need an independent media to hold people like me accountable,” Bush told the British newspaper, The Guardian, last year. Some commentators say the gentle memories today can’t excuse the racially charged Willie Horton ads run on his behalf in 1988, or the fact that he inflicted the scorched-earth tactics of the late Lee Atwater on the body politic. But the Bush Orbit had an influence there, too; Atwater asked for forgiveness before dying of a brain tumor in 1991. In history, Bush will be remembered as the steady bridge between two of the most charismatic presidents of our lifetimes. His personality fit the times. Subsequent presidents — Barack Obama most recently — have remarked on how Bush’s understated, calm, measured reaction to the collapse of the Soviet Union avoided the “spike the ball” celebrations that might have been the impulse of other presidents — Donald Trump, especially. State parades and “we won the war” celebrations here would have made life much tougher for then-Russian President Mikhail Gorbachev against the hardline never-enders in the collapsing Soviet state. That period when the Berlin Wall was torn asunder was the old CIA director Bush at his best. Sometimes what a politician

doesn’t say rings louder than any words. That memory of quieter leadership is a large part of today’s benevolent mourning for this war hero, family man, and president. Imagine a day without a presidential tweet attacking someone, or meddling in an ongoing investigation, or threatening this or that. So a whole lot of historical rewriting is going on. As a 31-year-old combatant in Bill Clinton’s political “war room” in 1992, George Stephanopoulos was a relentless attack dog against Bush. In a seminal moment days before that election, Stephanopoulos called in to CNN host Larry King, as King was interviewing Bush. On live TV, Stephanopoulos accused Bush of lying about the Reagan administration’s Iran-Contra arms-for-hostages deal. Bush called him a “very able young man,” but he lost the exchange and, days later, the election. On Sunday, in his “This Week” show on ABC, Stephanopoulos remembered a George Herbert Walker Bush “redeemed by grace in defeat and wisdom revealed by history. “The 20-year-old fighter pilot shot down in World War II, executed a soft landing of the Cold War as president, a singular achievement of a remarkable man,” Stephanopoulos said, 26 years later.

Ross Perot and the eventual winner, Democrat Bill Clinton. In 1999, Bush 41 returned to deliver the keynote at Washington University’s Founders Day. As Susan Killenberg McGinn points out in Washington University’s “The Source,” the 1989 Bush visit was the first time a sitting president had appeared on that campus. Not even native son Harry Truman had done that when he was president. Bush was mindful of the history and the moment on that day, Feb. 17, 1989. He quoted Missouri native Mark Twain in his speech at what he called “this university of excellence.” He cited other famous Missourians, including World War II General Omar Bradley, Truman, and “that master linguist, Yogi Berra.” “Oh, I love to quote Yogi,” said Bush, who was known to mangle the language himself from time to time. “Remem-

ber when he said, ‘Let’s pair them off in threes’?” But another Bush joke floated without reaction over a silent Washington University audience. He joked that some columnists had dubbed his “thousand points of light” volunteer initiative the product of a “thousand pints of lite.” When no one laughed, Bush remarked that he was surprised that no one got the joke in beermaking St. Louis, of all places. The Washington University presidential debate in 1992 made all sorts of history. It featured three candidates, rather than two, for starters. Perot, the bantam billionaire who disrupted the political order with warnings about the debt and promises to “get under the hood” to fix the government, had only re-entered the race nine days earlier. He’d led in some polls in the summer, but then dropped his challenge while citing worries over vague threats to his family. The university, which has hosted more presidential debates (five) than any other site, had to scramble to put together that first one. The commission on presidential debates gave the university a week to get ready. Anheuser-Busch donated

$500,000 to help cover costs. The general consensus was that Perot did well by showing up and not appearing overmatched. When Bush accused Perot of lacking governing experience, Perot shot back that “I don’t have any experience in running up a $4 trillion debt.” When Bush, who enlisted in the Navy on his 18th birthday during World War II, highlighted Clinton’s avoidance of the draft during the Vietnam War and said Clinton had failed the test of patriotism, Clinton accused Bush of employing the tactics of the late Wisconsin Sen. Joe McCarthy. In a Senate floor speech Tuesday reminiscing about Bush’s many visits to Missouri, Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., talked about Bush’s familial connections to the ShowMe state, starting with his mother, Dorothy Walker Bush, who was born in Maine, Mo., in 1901. “Certainly, in Missouri we claim part of the Bush family,” Blunt said. “His mother grew up in Missouri. The Walkers were from Missouri, and he treated Missouri like it was one of the states he was connected to.” He said one of Bush’s greatest legacies was extolling the idea “that there was great value in serving others.”

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A10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 12.05.2018

Confusion and fear intensify Former Trump adviser called on status of U.S.-China deal a ‘substantial’ help to Mueller Dow Jones slides 800 points as doubts raised about trade negotiations BY CHRISTOPHER RUGABER Associated Press

WASHINGTON • The administration of

President Donald Trump raised doubts Tuesday about the substance of a U.S.China trade accord, contributing to a broad stock market plunge and intensifying fears of a global economic slowdown. Investors had initially welcomed the truce that the administration said was reached over the weekend in Buenos Aires between Trump and Chinese President Xi Jingping — and sent stocks up Monday. But on Tuesday, after a series of confusing and conflicting words from Trump and some senior officials, stocks tumbled, with the Dow Jones shedding about 800 points, or 3.1 percent. White House aides have struggled to explain the details of what the two countries actually agreed on. And China has not confirmed that it made most of the concessions that the Trump administration has claimed. “The sense is that there’s less and less agreement between the two sides about what actually took place,” said Willie Delwiche, an investment strategist at Baird. “There was a rally in the expectation that something had happened. The problem is that something turned out to be nothing.” Other concerns contributed to the stock sell-off, including falling long-term bond yields. Those lower rates suggested that investors expect the U.S. economy to slow, along with global growth, and possibly fall into recession in the coming year or two. John Williams, president of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, also unnerved investors by telling reporters Tuesday that he supports further Fed rate hikes. His remarks renewed fears that the Fed may miscalculate and raise rates so high or so fast as to depress growth. The disarray surrounding the China deal coincides with a global economy that faces other challenges: Britain is struggling to negotiate its exit from the European Union. Italy’s government is seeking to spend and borrow more, which could elevate interest rates and stifle growth. And in the United States, home sales have fallen sharply in the past year as mortgage rates have jumped. Trump and White House aides have promoted the apparent U.S.-China agreement in Buenos Aires as a historic

breakthrough that would ease trade tensions and potentially reduce tariffs. They announced that China had agreed to buy many more American products and to negotiate over the administration’s assertions that Beijing steals American technology. But by Tuesday morning, Trump was renewing his tariff threats in a series of tweets. “President Xi and I want this deal to happen, and it probably will,” Trump tweeted. “But if not remember, I am a Tariff Man. When people or countries come in to raid the great wealth of our Nation, I want them to pay for the privilege of doing so.” Trump added that a 90-day timetable for negotiators to reach a deeper agreement had begun and that his aides would see “whether or not a REAL deal with China is actually possible.” The president’s words had the effect of making the weekend agreement, already a vague and uncertain one, seem even less likely to produce a long-lasting trade accord. “We expect the relationship between the world’s two largest economies to remain contentious,” Moody’s Investors Service said in a report. “Narrow agreements and modest concessions in their ongoing trade dispute will not bridge the wide gulf in their respective economic, political and strategic interests.” Among the conflicting assertions that White House officials made was over whether China had actually agreed to drop its 40 percent tariffs on U.S. autos. In addition, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said Tuesday on the Fox Business Network that China agreed to buy $1.2 trillion of U.S. products. But Mnuchin added, “if that’s real” — thereby raising some doubt — it would close the U.S. trade deficit with China, and “we have to have a negotiated agreement and have this on paper.” Many economists have expressed skepticism that very much could be achieved to bridge the vast disagreements between the two countries in just 90 days. “The actual amount of concrete progress made at this meeting appears to have been quite limited,” Alec Phillips and other economists at Goldman Sachs wrote in a research note. During the talks in Buenos Aires, Trump agreed to delay a scheduled escalation in U.S. tariffs on many Chinese goods, from 10 percent to 25 percent, that had been set to take effect Jan. 1. Instead, the two sides are to negotiate over U.S. complaints about China’s trade practices, notably that it has used predatory tactics to try to achieve supremacy in technology.

FLYNN • FROM A1

tigations — participating in 19 interviews with federal prosecutors. Tuesday’s filing is heavily redacted, continuing to shroud the details of what Flynn told Mueller’s team. But the document noted Flynn has assisted the special counsel with its “investigation concerning links or coordination between the Russian government and individuals associated with the Trump campaign.” Flynn pleaded guilty to one felony count of making a false statement, despite a longer list of charges he could have faced. Prosecutors said last year they would likely seek a prison sentence between zero and six months. The generous terms indicate Flynn’s cooperation is viewed as highly useful to Mueller’s investigation, legal experts said. As part of his investigation, Mueller has been working to determine whether any of the president’s allies coordinated with Russia or sought help for his campaign. Prosecutors have sought to learn whether Trump urged Flynn’s outreach to the Russian ambassador to signal that the new White House team would go easy on the Russian government. During the presidential transition, Flynn had several contacts with Kislyak. In December 2016, he attended a meeting at Trump Tower in New York, during which Trump’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner, proposed to the Russian ambassador setting up a secret communications channel with the Kremlin, according to people briefed on intelligence reports. Later in the month, Flynn spoke with Kislyak about U.S. sanctions on Russia and other topics, Flynn admitted in his plea last year. Flynn also told prosecutors that he was in touch with senior Trump transition officials before and after his communications with the ambassador. In his plea agreement, Flynn said he contacted the Russian ambassador on Dec. 22, 2016, about the incoming administration’s opposition to a U.N. resolution condemning Israeli settlements as illegal and requested that Russia vote against or delay it. Kislyak called back a day later to say Russia would not vote against the resolution, court records show. In another conversation, on Dec. 29, Flynn called Kislyak to suggest the in-

coming president was not a fan of sanctions imposed by the Obama administration and asked Russia not to escalate the ongoing feud, according to filings. Russian President Vladimir Putin issued a statement Dec. 30 saying Russia would not retaliate against the U.S. sanctions at that time. The following day, the ambassador called Flynn to inform him of Russia’s decision to honor Flynn’s request, according to the records. Flynn admitted he had lied to FBI agents about his interactions with the ambassador when they interviewed him just four days after the inauguration, but he also asserted that others in Trump’s transition team knew about his talks with Kislyak, according to court filings. Flynn told prosecutors that a “very senior member of the Presidential Transition Team” had directed him to contact officials from foreign governments, including Russia, about the U.N. resolution on Israel. That official is not named, but people familiar with the matter have said it refers to Kushner. According to one transition team official, Trump’s son-in-law told Flynn that blocking the U.N. resolution was a top priority of the president-elect. Flynn said that before speaking with the ambassador on Dec. 29, he called a transition official at Mar-a-Lago resort, where Trump was staying, “to discuss what, if anything, to communicate to the Russian ambassador about the U.S. Sanctions.” Flynn learned transition members did not want Russia to escalate the situation, according to court papers. The official is not identified in records, but people familiar with the matter identified her as K.T. McFarland. McFarland, who initially denied to FBI agents talking to Flynn about sanctions in the call, later told investigators they may have discussed sanctions. Two major questions were left unanswered by Flynn’s 2017 guilty plea: whether Trump instructed Flynn to call the ambassador and why Flynn lied about the contacts in the first place. When Flynn pleaded guilty, thenWhite House lawyer Ty Cobb said the national security adviser’s lies had nothing to do with the president. “Nothing about the guilty plea or the charge implicates anyone other than Mr. Flynn,” Cobb said.

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NATION

12.05.2018 • Wednesday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A11

Subpoenas issued to Trump entities in D.C. hotel case BY JONATHAN O’CONNELL, ANN E. MARIMOW AND DAVID A. FAHRENTHOLD Washington Post

The attorneys general for Maryland and the District of Columbia issued subpoenas for financial records and other documents from as many as 13 of President Donald Trump’s private entities Tuesday as part of an ongoing lawsuit alleging that his business violates the Constitution’s ban on gifts or payments from foreign governments. The subpoenas seek details on some of the most closely held secrets of Trump’s presidency: Which foreign governments have paid the Trump Organization money? How much? And for what? All of the documents — among them marketing materials targeted to foreign embassies, credit card receipts and restaurant reservation logs — relate to Trump’s D.C. hotel, which is at the center of the case because of events foreign governments have held there and the federal lease that allows the business to operate. The lawsuit is based on the little-used emoluments clauses in the Constitution, which bar presidents from taking improper payments from foreign governments or individual states. Trump has argued that he is not in violation, saying the Constitution intended to ban bribes, not regular business transactions. The Trump Organization also donates profits from foreign governments to the U.S. Treasury. The Justice Department, which is defending Trump in the case, declined to comment. Maryland’s Brian Frosh and the District’s Karl Racine, both Democrats, are seeking documents related to the president’s company, including the trust that holds his personal assets. They also are trying to view documents from a slew of competing Washington hotels and restaurants. Their goal is to show that Trump’s property is unfairly siphoning business from competitors, the offices of

ASSOCIATED PRESS

This 2016 photo shows the Trump International Hotel in Washington. A lawsuit accuses President Donald Trump of profiting from his office.

the two attorneys general announced Tuesday. Also receiving subpoenas are federal agencies that may have some information about Trump’s hotel, which operates in the federally owned Old Post Office Pavilion on Pennsylvania Avenue downtown. At the top of the list is the General Services Administration, which leases the property to Trump’s company. In its subpoena to the agency, the attorneys general ask for documents related to the hotel’s lease as well as financial records. Other agencies receiving subpoenas are the Commerce Department, the Defense Department and the Agriculture Department, all of which have reportedly spent money at the hotel, and the Treasury Department, to which the Trump Organization donated profits from foreign governments this year. Specifically, the attorneys general ask for credit card and billing receipts for any spending by the federal agencies at the hotel and the hotel’s steakhouse, BLT Prime. The state of Maine is also receiving a subpoena because of a visit Republican Gov. Paul LePage made to the hotel in early 2017. The agencies and entities have until Jan. 3 to respond to the subpoenas. Frosh said in an interview

that he expects the subpoenas will yield more detailed information about payments the president’s businesses have received from foreign governments, such as India, China and Saudi Arabia. “ T h i s i s t h e i n fo r m a tion we believe will prove our case,” Frosh said Tuesday after the subpoenas were issued. “There’s not much doubt that Donald J. Trump has been receiving emoluments prohibited by the Constitution.” But Frosh said he expects the Justice Department to resist the subpoenas to try to stop the attorneys general from getting the information. The Trump Organization reiterated the contributions it makes to the Treasury. “On February 22, 2018, The Trump Organization voluntarily donated to the U.S. Treasury all profits identified as being from foreign government patronage at our hotels and similar businesses. We intend to make a similar contribution in 2019,” the statement said. Since Trump won the 2016 election, his hotel in Washington has hosted events put on by the embassies of Kuwait, Bahrain and the Philippines — all U.S. allies. The Saudi government spent at least $270,000 to reserve hotel rooms and banquet rooms at the D.C. hotel, according to foreign lobbying records.

DIGEST Costa Rican held in death of Florida woman Costa Rican authorities have detained a security guard named Bismark Espinosa Martinez in connection with the death of American Carla Stefaniak, said Walter Espinoza, director general of Costa Rica’s Judicial Investigation Department. Officials zeroed in on Martinez late Monday after noting several contradictions in his story about Stefaniak’s disappearance, Espinoza said. Martinez lived in the same Airbnb where Stefaniak, of Hallandale Beach, Fla., had gone to celebrate her 36th birthday. Espinoza shared no details on what police uncovered about Martinez, but revealed Stefaniak appeared to have had many injuries, including a blow to the head. Sentencing bill gains support • Supporters of a criminal justice bill say they have met the threshold set by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell for getting a vote. Senate Judiciary Chairman Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, said he has support for the legislation from more than half of the Republicans in the chamber. Democratic leaders said support on their side is “overwhelming.” If true, their projections mean at least two-thirds of the Senate would vote for the bill. Yet it remains unclear whether the legislation will receive a vote on the floor, with only a few weeks to go before a new Congress is sworn in. The criminal justice bill would reduce mandatory sentences for certain drug crimes and give judges more discretion to make the punishment fit the crime. GOP email hacked during midterms • Thousands of emails were stolen from aides to the National Republican Congressional Committee during the 2018 midterm campaign, a major breach exposing vulnerabilities that have kept cybersecurity experts on edge since the 2016 presidential race. The email accounts were compromised during a series of intrusions that had been spread over several months and discovered in April, a person familiar with the matter told The Associated Press. At least four different party aides had their emails seen by hackers, said the person, who was not authorized

to discuss the details publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity. The committee said an “unknown entity” was behind the hack. A cybersecurity firm and the FBI have been investigating the matter, the committee said. The FBI declined to comment. Wisconsin GOP supports Walker • The Wisconsin Senate voted Tuesday to approve 82 appointees of outgoing Republican Gov. Scott Walker during a lame-duck legislative session. The appointees were approved by a party-line vote, with Republicans in support and Democrats against. The GOP lawmakers are moving to limit the powers of the incoming Democratic governor and attorney general. More beef recalled for salmonella • An Arizona company is expanding the scope of its recall of raw beef that could be contaminated with salmonella, federal officials said Tuesday. The U.S. Department of Agriculture said in a news release that a unit of Brazil’s JBS is now recalling more than 12 million pounds of raw beef that was shipped around the U.S. Health officials say all the products up for recall have the USDA inspection number “EST. 267.” The products were packaged between late July and September. The USDA says all the potentially tainted products have been removed from retailer stores. But the agency says people still may have products in their freezers that should be thrown away. There were 246 illnesses reported from 25 states as of midNovember, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. No deaths have been reported. Four charged in Panama Papers case • Federal authorities in New York announced a raft of conspiracy and tax fraud charges Tuesday against four men in the first U.S. prosecution related to the so-called Panama Papers. The 11-count indictment unsealed in Manhattan stems from what prosecutors described as an “intercontinental money laundering scheme” involving a global law firm based in Panama. Two Germans, one American and one Panamanian were charged with conspiracy and other counts. From news services

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M 1 Wednesday • 12.05.2018 • a12

Treasury panel suggests review of postal rates By RaCHeL sIeGeL Washington Post

A task force commissioned by President Donald Trump to evaluate the Postal Service’s business model is recommending a slew of options to stabilize its long-term finances. But it did not go so far as to say the financially strapped Postal Service is losing money to Amazon.com, a company which contracts services from the Postal Service and that has consistently drawn Trump’s ire. Even though the report does not specifically cite Amazon, it does recommend a re-evaluation of the pricing for e-commerce packages and other nonessential mail shipped by companies such as Amazon. This year, Trump pushed Postmaster General Megan Brennan to double the rate the Postal Service charges Amazon and other firms to deliver packages. Trump also signed an executive order in April mandating a government review of the Postal Service. On Tuesday, that task force suggested steps the Postal Service can take to respond to the rise of e-commerce and boost profitability, but senior administration officials said the findings don’t apply to any particular Postal Service customer. Specifically, the report recommends a sharpened definition of the Postal Service’s “Universal Service Obligation.” The public policy that establishes the minimal level of service the government postal service must provide to citizens and businesses. The rise of e-commerce has challenged long-held ideas about that standard — as businesses rely on the postal service to deliver not just letters but products of all sorts. Pharmaceuticals, for example, are considered essential mail. But, say, a T-shirt or a vacuum cleaner would not be. For essential items, the

government can step in and offer a subsidy to help cover added cost of delivery. The Postal Service has been losing money for more than a decade. According to the report, it is slated to lose tens of billions of dollars more over the next decade. As of the end of fiscal year 2018, the Postal Service balance sheet reflects $89 billion in liabilities against $27 billion in assets — a net deficiency of $62 billion. Those losses have been compounded by a decline in mail volume and caps on mail pricing. And while e-commerce has boosted package volumes, that revenue is not enough to offset the decline in mail revenue, the report said. The report also recommends modernizing the Postal Services methods for cost standards and allocation so that it can make better-informed management decisions, government policies and regulatory reporting. The Postal Service should also address its rising labor and operating costs, which are expected to grow as the country’s population expands. When Trump pressured Brennan to double the rate the Postal Service charges for Amazon.com and other firms to ship packages, she told the White House that the Postal Service is bound by contracts and that arrangements would have to be reviewed by a regulatory commission. Brennan told Trump that the Postal Service benefits from its contract with Amazon, and noted for him a wide range of other companies that it partners with for deliveries. Mark Dimondstein, president of the American Postal Workers Union, said in a statement that the report’s recommendations would slow down service and reduce delivery days, and that the Postal Service is already equipped to meet e-commerce shipping needs.

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Save-A-Lot’s headquarters settles into St. Ann center By JaCOB BaRKeR St. Louis Post-Dispatch

sT. ann • A former de-

partment store in what was once touted as the world’s largest shopping mall has been transformed into a sleek, modern office space to house more than 500 corporate employees of national grocery chain Save-A-Lot. By next week, SaveA-Lot officials say the company should be finished moving from its old corporate headquarters in Earth City to its leased space in the former Northwest Plaza mall, now known as the Crossings at Northwest. What had been a dead mall four years ago now boasts a third major office employer, with Save-ALot joining Charter Communications and St. Louis County government and election board offices in the space behind a Menard’s hardware store that opened in 2015. Taxpayers helped the $106 million redevelopment with $7.4 million in Missouri brownfield cleanup tax credits, $33 million in taxincrement financing from St. Ann and nearly $30 million worth of federal New Markets tax credits. S ave -A- L o t’s n ew 162,000-square-foot space will house a test kitchen, blind taste-testing booths and a miniature mock-up of a SaveA-Lot store to create marketing materials and test new equipment and product layout concepts. The $20 million buildout — $8 million from the company and $12 million from the building’s owner — began in April, when Save-A-Lot signed the lease. The new space is larger than the 130,000-squarefoot Earth City headquarters it has occupied since the ’90s, but the ability to build out both employee amenities, such as a gym and lounge, along with the test spaces was “one of the main reasons we were moving,” Save-A-Lot Chief Investment Officer Kevin Proctor said. “We didn’t have a test store; we didn’t have a test kitchen,” he said of the company’s Earth City building. “It lacks all these facilities that we need.”

PHOTOS BY JOHANNA HUCKEBA • jhuckeba@post-dispatch.com

A former department store has been transformed into SaveA-Lot’s new headquarters at the Crossings at Northwest in St. Ann. Employees are scheduled to start in the new space next week.

Save-A-Lot, which traces its start to Cahokia 40 years ago, has grown into a large, national grocer with more than 1,300 stores in 36 states, including 37 stores in the St. Louis region. In 2016, Save-A-Lot was sold by its former parent company, Minneapolis-based Supervalu to Canadian private equity firm Onex Corp. for $1.37 billion. It anticipates moving roughly 500 workers from its Earth City building, which it plans to sell, and adding some 60 jobs as part of the move. Average salaries are in the $80,000 to $85,000 range, company officials said during a tour of the offices Tuesday. The Missouri Department of Economic Development is offering $3 million through the Missouri Works program and $85,000 through Skilled Workforce Missouri to help support the move. The local incentive package, though, ran into political heat amid the

St. Louis County Council’s disputes with St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger. The council has criticized a longterm lease Stenger’s office pushed to move the elections board and other county offices to Northwest Plaza. The redevelopers of the mall, Robert and David Glarner, gave at least $365,000 to Stenger’s successful reelection effort. Council members questioned how Northwest Plaza was chosen by the St. Louis Economic Development Partnership, which members have accused of becoming a political tool for Stenger. In September, the city of St. Ann had to take over and pass the local incentive package, which provides 50 percent abatement of SaveA-Lot’s personal property taxes for 15 years, amounting to $268,000. With a one-time abatement of sales tax on new equipment, such as furniture, the combined

subsidy would be about $577,000. Proctor said the political tussle did “not at all” affect the company’s timetable for moving, and he called the Partnership “very good partners” in helping Save-A-Lot secure new space. Proctor said the company “looked at all options” when it began searching for new space, including outside the St. Louis region. T h e C ro s s i n gs a t Northwest is close to much of Save-A-Lot’s workforce and St. Louis Lambert International Airport, he said. That will come in handy because of the managers and other employees it frequently brings in for training and company meetings at its headquarters. ”It was very convenient for our people,” Proctor said. “We felt it was the right place to run our business.” Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com

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MARKET WATCH

12.05.2018 • Wednesday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A13

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM /BUSINESS Stocks slumped on Wall Street Tuesday as traders worried that the U.S. and China made less progress than originally thought on defusing their trade dispute. The wave of selling erased the market’s day-earlier gains.

Bank of America

28

80 O 52-week range

Close: 25,027.07 Change: -799.36 (-3.1%)

24,240

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Close: 2,700.06 Change: -90.31 (-3.2%)

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StocksRecap NYSE Vol. (in mil.) Pvs. Volume Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows

NASD 2,551 2,537 407 2536 40 243

4,399 4,117 449 2413 71 335

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2,560

N HIGH 25773.12 10774.32 757.90 12568.64 7421.11 2785.93 1892.98 28768.57 1548.11

LOW 25008.11 10285.21 748.05 12212.52 7150.11 2697.18 1825.45 27771.08 1479.91

J CLOSE 25027.07 10374.07 749.84 12221.98 7158.43 2700.06 1826.62 27796.93 1480.75

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MO QTR t t t t s s t t t t t t t t t t t t

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52-WK LO HI

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV NAME -.98 -3.1 -21.0

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28.85

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Amdocs

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60.50

71.72 63.80 -1.78 -2.7

Ameren Corp

AEE

51.89

70.68 70.04 +.24 +0.3 +18.7 +12.4 25 1.90f Huttig Building Prod HBP 70.50 69.97

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2.00 FutureFuel ... General Motors 1.00 Home Depot

374.25 911.75 519.25

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CLOSE

CHG

Crude oil

Jan 19 Jan 19 Jan 19 Jan 19

53.25 1.4434 190.09 4.457

Sugar

Gas blend Heating oil Natural gas

11.32

18.97 16.35

30.56

45.52 36.52 -1.93 -5.0 -10.9

American Railcar

ARII

34.76

ABInBev

BUD

72.88 117.06 74.27 -1.61 -2.1 -33.4 -31.4 18 3.19e Lowes

LOW

75.09 102.61 84.75

MNK

Arch Coal

ARCH

Avadel Pharma

AVDL

2.80

11.93

2.88

-.06 -0.1 +68.0 +77.5 -.19 -0.2

-9.0 +2.7

6

-.12 -4.0 -64.9 -66.1 dd

Bank of America

BAC

25.88

33.05 26.99 -1.55 -5.4

Belden Inc

BDC

50.71

87.15 50.45 -5.43 -9.7 -34.6 -33.3

Boeing

BA

Build-A-Bear Wkshp BBW

9

-8.6 +3.0 13 9

274.01 394.28 342.50 -17.46 -4.9 +16.1 +35.2 32 5.81

10.45

5.56

-.32 -5.4 -39.6 -28.7 17 -1.1 14

1.60 Lee Enterprises 1.60 Mallinckrodt plc ... MasterCard

1.95

3.30

2.19

-.01 -0.5

5

...

81.16 117.70 90.33 -3.96 -4.2

-2.8 +14.1 20

1.92

11.65

+2.6 +10.7

36.65 23.14 -1.02 -4.2

-6.8

-8.3

...

38.84 20.45 -1.34 -6.1 -42.5 -35.4

6.84 Peabody Energy

BTU

29.66

47.84 32.71

... Peak Resorts

SKIS

4.45

Centene Corp.

CNC

94.69 148.24 142.18 -4.65 -3.2 +40.9 +45.2 20 -2.9 64

-.13 -4.8 -60.9 -59.6 dd

18.49

62.08 54.36 -1.03 -1.9 +12.1 +7.9 16 1.04b Post Holdings -4.2

2.60

146.84 190.88 185.04

41.09 29.46 -1.37 -4.4 -12.0

+7.3 +7.9 21

...

7.59

MCD

45.31

163.02 227.13 217.84 -7.00 -3.1

4.12

2.61

OLN

27.10

CHTR 250.10 396.64 321.84 -4.86 -1.5

1.52

0.60 McDonald’s

CASS

CI

-6.6 dd

-7.5 +3.0 19

0.20 Olin

CAL

Charter

167.00 215.43 175.30 -6.44 -3.5

0.28 Perficient

5.08

+7.5 +9.0 28 4.64f 5

0.80

-5.9 +5.7 dd

0.28

-.18 -0.5 -16.9 -.03 -0.6

-1.6

PRFT

18.23

31.09 24.13 -1.32 -5.2 +26.5 +32.6 44

...

70.66 101.43 93.34 -1.67 -1.8 +17.8 +19.5 24

...

RGA

... Reliv

RELV SR

127.84 164.86 144.16 -6.10 -4.1 3.72 60.09

6.24

4.94 +.04 +0.8

82.85 77.36 -1.78 -2.2

-7.5

-5.1 13 2.40f

+3.6 +8.4 dd +2.9

C

61.72

80.70 62.26 -2.90 -4.5 -16.3 -11.7 11 1.80f Stifel Financial

SF

42.51

68.76 45.94 -1.97 -4.1 -22.9 -16.8 14 0.48f

CBSH

54.24

72.55 60.61 -2.26 -3.6

TGT

60.45

90.39 69.31 -3.03 -4.2

Edgewell

EPC

39.50

62.67 42.51 +.51 +1.2 -28.4 -27.8 22

Emerson

EMR

64.55

79.70 65.65 -3.21 -4.7

-5.8 +9.5 21

Energizer Holdings

ENR

44.57

65.57 45.07

-6.1 +2.1 30 1.20f US Steel

Enterprise Financial EFSC

40.47

58.15 41.86 -2.33 -5.3

Esco Technologies

ESE

54.35

71.47 66.46 -3.61 -5.2 +10.3 +8.6 18

Express Scripts

ESRX

65.31 101.73 98.87 -1.77 -1.8 +32.5 +56.3 13

Foresight Energy

FELP

3.28

4.62

-.66 -1.4

-7.3

3.75 +.06 +1.6 -14.2

UPS

1.94 US Bancorp

-0.5 12 0.52f Verizon

-7.5 dd

0.32 WalMart ... Walgreen Boots 0.13 Wells Fargo

+6.2 +24.7 12

101.45 135.53 106.77 -8.50 -7.4 -10.4

3.64

48.49

58.50 52.60 -1.80 -3.3

-1.8 +1.4 14

1.20

X

21.96

47.64 22.57 -1.19 -5.0 -35.9 -18.2 13

0.20

VZ

46.09

61.58 58.09

WMT

81.78 109.98 95.81 -2.94 -3.0

+9.7 +18.1

7 2.41f

-3.0 +3.6 55 2.08f

WBA

59.07

85.83 82.82 -2.87 -3.3 +14.0 +22.3 15

WFC

50.02

66.31 51.78 -2.46 -4.5 -14.7

1.76

-0.6 13 1.72f

Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months. Other: x - ex-dividend.

BUSINESS DIGEST Quora discloses data breach • Quora, a widely used questionand-answer website, said a “malicious third party” had compromised the account information of 100 million users. Names, email addresses and encrypted passwords were among the compromised information, Quora chief executive Adam D’Angelo said in a blog post about the incident, as well as personal activity on the website and “data imported from linked networks” such as Facebook and Twitter. Quora did not disclose any information about who the intruders might be, or how they gained access to its system. The company said it discovered the data breach on Friday, but Quora did not say when the attackers first broke into its system or how long they had access to the user information. The company said it is investigating the cause of the breach, adding that it has hired a security firm to investigate the hack and has notified law enforcement. Centene executive Cynthia Brinkley retiring • Cynthia Brinkley, chief administrative and markets officer for Clayton-based managed care company Centene, is retiring from the company Feb. 1. Until her retirement, Brinkley will continue to focus on Centene Forward, in initiative launched this year to standardize administrative processes, the company said. Brinkley joined Centene in 2014 and was named president and chief operating officer in 2017. This year, she was named chief administrative and markets officer. Prior to joining Centene, Brinkley was an executive at General Motors and AT&T/SBC Communications. Brent Layton, executive vice president and chief development officer, who currently leads domestic and international business development, will take over international operations. “Cynthia committed to provide her leadership and expertise for a minimum of three years to help build and solidify the company as a diversified, multinational

health care enterprise,” Michael Neidorff, chairman and CEO of Centene, said in a statement. “We appreciate Cynthia’s invaluable contributions to the organization over her tenure.” Thomson Reuters to cut 3,200 jobs in next two years • Thomson Reuters Corp. said on Tuesday that it will cut its workforce by 12 percent in the next two years, axing 3,200 jobs, as part of a plan to streamline the business and reduce costs. The news and information provider, which completed the sale of a 55 percent stake in its Financial & Risk unit to private equity firm Blackstone Group LP, announced the cuts during an investor day in Toronto, in which it outlined its future strategy and growth plans. The company, which is focusing on its legal and tax businesses following the Blackstone deal, declined to say where the job cuts were being made. However, Co-Chief Operating Officer Neil Masterson told investors that staff had already been informed about 90 percent of the planned cuts. The company aims to grow annual sales by 3.5 percent to 4.5 percent by 2020, excluding the impact of any acquisitions. Chief Executive Officer Jim Smith said it plans to cross-sell more products to existing customers and to attract new customers. The company will also cut the number of products it sells, he said. Volkswagen may use U.S. Ford plants • Volkswagen’s chief executive said on Tuesday after a meeting at the White House that the German automaker was building an alliance with Ford Motor Co. and that it might use the U.S. automaker’s plants to build cars. VW CEO Herbert Diess said the company was also “considering building a second car plant,” adding, “We are in quite advanced negotiations and dialog with Ford Corp. to really build up a global automotive alliance, which also would strengthen the American automotive industry.” From news services

NET CHG

1YR AGO

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 52-wk T-bill 2-year T-note 5-year T-note 7-year T-note 10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

2.42 2.56 2.72 2.79 2.82 2.85 2.92 3.16

+0.09 ... ... -0.03 -0.04 -0.05 -0.07 -0.11

1.29 1.48 1.64 1.82 2.14 2.29 2.37 2.76

NET 1YR LAST CHG AGO

2.13 1.63 1.13

Barclays Glob Agg Bd Barclays USAggregate Barclays US High Yield Moodys AAA Corp Idx Barclays US Corp 10-Yr. TIPS

2.19 3.54 7.13 4.17 4.35 .98

... ... -0.09 -0.05 -0.02 -0.04

1.61 2.68 5.69 3.61 3.24 .49

GlobalMarkets

2.56

-1.2 18

USB

-.07 -0.1

5.25 4.75 4.25

LAST

...

Citigroup

... UPS B

YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO

TREASURIES

BONDS

PRIME FED RATE FUNDS

+7.20 +.14 -6.50

-0.4 17 2.37f

Commerce Banc.

+8.5 +18.2 16 0.94b Target Corp.

Silver

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell to 2.92 percent Tuesday. Yields affect interest rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.

CHG

CLOSE

1241.10 14.52 804.20

Gold

0.52

POST

... Reinsurance Gp 0.04 Spire Inc

5.78

-.33 -0.2

.0274 .7349 .2601 1.2728 .7569 .1453 1.1342 .0142 .2686 .008796 .049066 .0150 .0729 .000900 1.0011

PreciousMetals NEW YORK

-.65 -3.8 +16.0 +17.9 20 0.24a

140.61 225.35 200.49 -9.37 -4.5 +32.5 +40.9 47 1.32f

Cass Info. Systems

+.30 +.0120 +1.34 +.118

PREV

.0268 .7338 .2598 1.2716 .7549 .1463 1.1342 .0142 .2679 .008864 .048772 .0150 .0722 .000900 1.0025

Platinum

MA

Caleres Inc.

Cigna

LEE

Argentina Australia Brazil Britain Canada China Euro India Israel Japan Mexico Russia So. Africa So. Korea Switzerland

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV

FF

$894.37 PE: 18.0 Yield: ...

ExchangeRates

Interestrates Interestrates 52-WK LO HI

N

FOREIGN CURRENCY IN DOLLARS CLOSE

Chicago BOT is in cents.

GM HD

Vol.: 931.4k (2.7x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $22.5 b

Dec 18 Jan 19 Dec 18

Stocks of Local Interest NAME

$590.76

Corn

Coffee

O 52-week range

PE: ... Yield: ...

CHG

Copper

S

$15.30

CLOSE

Milk

2,640 J

Futures

700

N

DATE

Hogs

2,720

O 52-week range

CHICAGO BOT

Live cattle

2,800

25,600

$3.20

Wheat

2,880

S

Vol.: 25.8m (1.5x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $1.9 b

Soybeans

2,960

26,400

$900 800

5

N

S&P 500

2,720

27,200

24,000

$71.96

O 52-week range

Vol.: 5.6m (1.3x avg.) PE: 21.9 Mkt. Cap: $64.2 b Yield: 4.1%

10 DAYS

2,840

Dow Jones industrials

25,120

$33.05

S

AZO

Close: $880.07 55.61 or 6.8% The Memphis, Tennessee-based auto parts retailer reported earnings that beat Wall Street’s forecasts.

10

70

N

Vol.: 103.1m (1.6x avg.) PE: 12.7 Mkt. Cap: $264.9 b Yield: 2.2%

Charts show stocks that made the news yesterday.

10 DAYS

S

AutoZone

CRON

Close: $10.74 0.57 or 5.6% The marijuana producer confirmed it’s in talks about a potential investment by the U.S. tobacco company Altria Group. $15

$100 90

26

Cronos

DUK

Close: $90.05 0.43 or 0.5% High-dividend stocks like utilities held up relatively well as traders sought out lower-risk investments.

30

$25.88

26,000

Duke Energy

BAC

Close: $26.99 -1.55 or -5.4% Banks fell more than the rest of the market as bond yields dropped sharply, which makes it harder to make money from lending. $32

INDEX S&P 500 Frankfurt DAX London FTSE 100 Hong Kong Hang Seng Paris CAC-40 Mexico City Bolsa Tokyo Nikkei 225 Sao Paolo Bovespa Toronto Zurich

LAST 2700.06 11335.32 7022.76 27260.44 5012.66 41865.07 22036.05 88624.44 15063.59 9085.00

CHG

CHG

YTD

-90.31 -130.14 -39.65 +78.40 -41.32 -216.71 -538.71 -1195.69 -211.39 -21.56

-3.24% -1.14% -0.56% +0.29% -0.82% -0.52% -2.39% -1.33% -1.38% -0.24%

+0.99% -12.25% -8.65% -8.89% -5.65% -15.17% -3.20% +16.00% -7.07% -3.16%

Apple resorts to promotions, trade-ins to boost iPhone sales BY MARK GURMAN Bloomberg

Apple Inc. is experimenting with iPhone marketing strategies it rarely uses — such as discount promotions via generous device buyback terms — to help goose sales of its flagship product. Company executives moved some marketing staff from other projects to work on bolstering sales of the latest handsets in October, about a month after the iPhone XS went on sale and in the days around the launch of the iPhone XR, according to a person familiar with the situation. This person described it as a “fire drill,” and a possible admission that the devices may have been selling below some expectations. The person asked not to be identified discussing private strategy changes. Since then, Apple has embarked on a series of aggressive trade-in offers that have temporarily reduced the cost of some of its latest iPhones, a rare step for a company that’s been raising device prices in recent years to lift revenue and profit. Apple spokeswoman Trudy Muller declined to comment. On Sunday evening, Apple kicked these efforts into high gear, adding a new banner to the top of its website advertising the iPhone XR for $449, $300 less than its official sticker price. The deal, noted with an asterisk and described at the bottom of the page, requires customers to trade in an iPhone 7 Plus, a high-end handset from two years ago. Apple has lost about a fifth of its market value since the start of October on signs of waning iPhone demand. On Monday, iPhone supplier Cirrus Logic Inc. cut its holiday quarter sales forecast 16 percent due to “recent weakness in the smartphone market.” Apple has also stopped reporting iPhone unit sales, sparking concern its most-important product is no longer growing. The new marketing push may

BLOOMBERG

A customer holds an Apple iPhone XS Max box recently in Chicago.

give holiday sales a bump and help the company with a broader goal of increasing the number of Apple devices in use. However, the approach may undermine a key bullish argument from analysts: That higher prices will make up for lackluster unit sales. Last week, the company started offering a limited-time promotion that boosts the tradein value of older iPhones by between an additional $25 to $100. Apple retail employees have also been told in recent weeks to mention the program more often to consumers in stores, according to another person familiar with the situation. Some Japanese wireless carriers also cut iPhone XR pricing last week by way of subsidies. Last year, there were similar concerns about sales of the iPhone X, and the handset ended up selling well. And Apple has used similar marketing tactics before. In 2007, it cut the price of the iPhone by $200, less than three months after the device launched. When the iPhone 3G debuted in 2008, Apple worked with carriers to subsidize the cost. It has also quietly increased trade-in values for older iPhone models in the past. Apple is working on several new products and services, including an augmented-reality

headset, driverless car technology, and digital offerings like original video. Analysts also expect a new business model centered on subscriptions. Those options are riskier than the iPhone, which for a decade enticed millions of consumers to hand over hundreds of dollars for a new handset every two years like clockwork. The public hasn’t flocked to AR technology in the same way yet, while Netflix Inc. has a huge head start in digital video, Alphabet Inc.’s Waymo leads in autonomous vehicles, and Amazon.com Inc.’s Prime service has nailed subscriptions online. “The question yet again is, ‘What’s the next phase of innovation?’” Michael Olson, an analyst at Piper Jaffray, said. Apple spent $35 billion on research and development from 2016 to 2018. The technology that emerges from this huge investment “needs to become a new engine of growth,” he added. Finding another hit like the iPhone will be almost impossible. Since Apple launched the device in 2007, it’s become one of the most successful products on Earth. The gadget generated $167 billion in revenue during Apple’s latest fiscal year, about the same as Alphabet Inc. and Walt Disney Co. combined.


A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , 1 8 7 8

WEDNESDAy • 12.05.2018 • A14 RAY FARRIS PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER

• GILBERT BAILON EDITOR • TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

Don’t give up

L

Amid graffiti and decay, signs of St. Louis’ progress deserve recognition.

transform abandoned warehouses and ast week’s finalization of the industrial buildings into what became the land transfer between St. Louis Cortex technology corridor. and the National GeospatialBut because of its success, the ripple Intelligence Agency caps a effects are now being seen in investment multiyear effort to keep the agency, its efforts to develop the long-abandoned 3,100 jobs and $1.7 billion construction City Foundry area near Ikea. And across project in the city’s central core. By any Highway 40 (Interstate 64) from the definition, that’s an enormous accomfoundry, construction crews are working plishment, especially considering the to revive the old Armory building. These multiple political challenges and legal constitute an $83 million investment to pitfalls that constantly endangered the transform eyesore buildings that have long project. stood as dilapidated, graffiti-covered billThe fact that the 97-acre land transboards advertising the city’s steady decay. fer occurred the same week a proposed These symbols matter. When outsiders Major League Soccer stadium received overwhelming support from the Board of Aldermen means that two long-dormant areas west of downtown should soon see a boom in construction activity. Rarely do projects like these occur in a vacuum without the development ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com of ancillary, Excavators and earth-moving equipment move along the site of the job-generating new location of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency in north businesses St. Louis in February. nearby — restaurants, encounter massive signs of urban decay convenience stores and even residential as they approach downtown from the properties. interstates, the message they get is that St. This is how economic activity gerLouis is a dying city, a place to be avoided. minates, then ripples outward. This Images of construction cranes and slow point can’t be stressed enough because but steady transformation send the opporesidents, particularly in north St. Louis, site message. justifiably need assurance. During Board Collins-Muhammad is right to ask of Aldermen debate last week over the about a plan for the north side. It’s a quesstadium, 21st Ward Alderman John tion this newspaper has been asking since Collins-Muhammad raised an important at least 1950. St. Louisans have had their point: “My only fear is we’re not planning hopes dashed too many times by politifor long-term growth in poverty-stricken cians and developers who spoke as if they communities. When will we plan for could wave a magic wand to bring megagrowth on the north side?” projects and massive transformation. The sad truth is that city planners can In reality, we’re in for an almost imperonly do so much to encourage investment ceptible, agonizingly slow slog. But the in abandoned or blighted neighborhoods. signs of progress are there. If a plan is what Even with low land prices and strong tax incentives, investors typically are reluctant Collins-Muhammad wants, perhaps he should offer up some ideas and see if he to gamble on areas that don’t already have can start a few ripples of his own. a promising track record. It took years to

Mea culpa

A

A police chief’s apology to rape victims is a good first step toward reform.

legislation passed this year, police in the shocking CNN report last state are now required to submit rape kits week charted how, even now, to labs within 14 days of collection and well into the 21st century, cannot destroy the kits for at least 30 years. many law enforcement proBut CNN found other issues in fessionals across America still aren’t Springfield, including an outlandish taking the crime of sexual assault seridepartmental policy of telling alleged ously. Among the most disturbing practices has been the premature destruction rape victims, by mail, that they have just 10 days to engage with an investigator. of “rape kits” — the packages of DNA The department would material and other medautomatically close the ical data collected from cases of those they didn’t victims after alleged hear from, labeling the sexual assaults. On that victims “uncooperative.” and other issues, the The department also gave police department in waivers to alleged vicSpringfield, Mo., was tims — sometimes on the among the worst ofvery day of the crime — fenders, the network pressing them to decide found. immediately whether Now, in a refreshto pursue charges. Both ing departure from the policies blithely ignored circle-the-wagons the psychological trauma mentality that such inherent in sexual assault. revelations often elicit, In a video response Springfield’s police chief Police Chief Paul Williams posted Friday, Springfield has issued an apology to the victims and a vow to reform his office’s Police Chief Paul Williams said his department “takes full responsibility for what we practices. Candid contrition is an example now know were mistakes in the handling that law enforcement leaders everywhere of past sexual assault cases.” should follow. “To the victims of sexual assault and The CNN report examined the records their families … we sincerely apologize,” of 207 of the nation’s roughly 17,000 law he said, adding that all rape kits are now enforcement agencies. It found that just within that small sample, 25 of those agen- tested and kept “indefinitely,” and that the department will work these cases “at a cies had destroyed 400 rape kits related pace comfortable for victims.” to cases for which statutes of limitations “When you know better, you do better,” hadn’t passed. he said. It found that between 2010 and 2015, Victim advocates rightly point out that police in Springfield alone have discarded the video message lacks some specificity 108 rape kits while prosecution was still on what changes the department is makviable — some within a year of the alleged ing. But give credit where it’s due: This is crime. Most of the kits were never even exactly the kind of acknowledgment of tested for DNA. mistakes and vows to “do better” that have Thankfully, a recent change in Missouri to come before real change can happen. law addresses part of the problem. Under

See editorial cartoons from around the country online at stltoday.com/opinion

yOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS St. Louis police face enormous amount of pressure on the job In his Dec. 2 column, Post-Dispatch columnist Tony Messenger writes that “the text messages from police aren’t all that surprising. They’re racist. They’re damning.” I fail to see the racist part in the aforementioned messages. Damning? Without a doubt. When will these young people realize that trusting social media is a critical mistake? I have a more pressing question, though. Is there going to come a time in your journalism career that you consider both sides of the story? I am aware that our uniformed police are subject to scrutiny and held to higher standards. But when persons of supposed civil responsibility, like columnists, seek to fan the fla mes of racial discord it hurts the community. I am not defending these police officers, I am merely pointing to the fact that before the Jason Stockley verdict, the consensus from the Post-Dispatch was that there would be an unjust verdict and predictable protests would follow. The Post-Dispatch and its writers were priming the pump for some civil disobedience and the accompanying discourse on police action. Well, you got it. I am sure these four officers and many more faced the impending dilemma of conflict on a daily basis, until the fateful night in question. But, instead of examining the emotional pressure cooker facing the officers, you choose to promote a falsehood of prevailing evil within the ranks of the St. Louis police department. I have two suggestions: Look in the mirror; Tony Messenger is not a hero, not for civil rights nor the community. And try to put yourself in the shoes of any policeman, fireman or soldier if you can and realize that they are people. People make mistakes, they get tired, frustrated, angry and they get hurt. Gerald Jorden • High Ridge

Here’s a bright idea: Make the switch to LED lightbulbs My bet is that we have up to 500 million table and floor lamps in the U.S. with three-way incandescent 50-100-150watt bulbs. The Department of Energy hasn’t banned manufacture or import of the old-style bulbs because suitable LED replacements have just recently become readily and economically available online and in some stores. The cost is about $13 each, less with mail-in rebates. And yes, if you want a 150-watt equivalent dimmable or single-wattage bulb, they’re on the shelf now, too. What does the buyer get? A lamp with 25 times the life, one-sixth of the electrical cost, and far less heat output to ruin lampshades and overwork your air conditioning system. Is this good for our environment? Lighting has been thought to account for 20 percent of our power usage, and therefore a significant contributor to global warming. Add that overworked air conditioning load and we have a compelling reason to buy LED bulbs. Reap the benefits and tell your friends. Bob Hutton • Chesterfield

Pitts, Post-Dispatch are way off on views on Trump, reporting Regarding Leonard Pitts’ Nov. 30 column “The day we used tear gas against the children”: It’s pretty obvious that op-ed columnist Leonard Pitts gets his news from the same place as the Post-Dispatch. He is outraged and appalled that President Donald Trump’s administration would use tear gas on the migrants at

the border, yet was totally oblivious that President Barack Obama had done it for years. Don’t take my word for it, just check a non-left-wing news source. The Post-Dispatch spent more than a month hammering Judge Brett Kavanaugh for unreliable 35-year-old allegations, but I have yet to read one line of print on recent abuse allegations against Minnesota Democrat Keith Ellison. I am an independent voter; I try to find unbiased news to make good voting choices. The main reason your subscriptions are down is not because of digital news, but the Post-Dispatch doesn’t understand that you constantly offend half of the metro area with your biased reporting. Dave Groeblinghoff • O’Fallon, Mo.

Trump’s decision on journalist’s killing is a blood money choice President Donald Trump says we shouldn’t punish Saudi Arabia’s crown prince for ordering the murder of Jamal Khashoggi because the crown prince could cancel a big military spending package in retaliation. In other words, Trump is saying that if we punish the Saudi leader for the murder it might cost our country a lot of money. Thus, he is letting the crown prince get off in exchange for what amounts to blood money, a payoff in order to avoid punishment. Besides the fact that Trump is saying that the money is worth more to him than the man’s life, letting a murderer off for a bribe goes against all ideas of justice. Even the Romans wouldn’t do that. On top of that, it sets a bad precedent. Just who will Trump sell out next, I wonder? What other journalist — or critic — will die for a billion or two? Robert Wanager • Hillsboro

Give first-generation students the tools they need to succeed Imagine being invited to join a game of Monopoly. Little do you know, you are joining several hours after the game has begun. The impossible task of catching up is exactly what first-generation students experience when preparing for college. Without generational knowledge and financial benefactors to assist them with this process, students who are the first in their families to pursue a college degree must depend on themselves to find the starting line. Where do I search for schools? What do I look for in a school? What is a major? How do I pay for tuition? What is a FAFSA? How do I take the ACT? These are only some of the questions firstgeneration students may ask. Compared to those whose family members have attended college, firstgeneration college students are over 50 percent more likely to leave college in their first year. This is why funding for post-secondary support programs for first-generation students, low-income students and those with disabilities, also known as TRiO programs, must be increased more than what they have been for 2019. A more significant increase in TRiO funding can help provide much-needed emotional, academic and financial support to many more students throughout their four years of college. If we want our future generations to lead this country, we must give them a fighting chance to do so. Angela Serwin • St. Louis Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON Editorial Page Editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382

STLtoday.com/opinion Find us at facebook/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial I know that my retirement will make no difference in its cardinal principles, that it will always fight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always fight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisfied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

E-MAIL MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, letters@post-dispatch.com 900 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days.


OTHER VIEWS

12.05.2018 • WEDNESDAY • M 1 25 YEARS AGO TODAY ON THE EDITORIAL PAGE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A15

THE STADIUM: STILL A GOOD DEAL • Disappointing as it is that St. Louis did not get a National Football League franchise, people here know that there is

life without football. Bill Bidwill packed up his Cardinals team after the 1987 season. What makes this failure hurt so much is that St. Louis seemed so certain of being selected. Access the full item at stltoday.com/opinion

‘Whatever’ system of planning isn’t working in St. Louis More thought, public input needed. BY GREG MICHAUD

St. Louis was once a great city. After 60 years of steady decline there should be vigorous discussions on how to rebuild St. Louis. Instead, by 2020 over a billion dollars of public money will be given to developers and corporations as if tax giveaways are the only solution. What if that billion dollars was invested in public infrastructure instead? Isn’t creating a desirable city that people want to live and work in a better strategy than bribing the already wealthy to locate in a damaged city? A key problem is that the city of St. Louis has what can be best called the “whatever” system of planning. It is a reactive system: The city reacts to development proposals instead of guiding development in a creative and prosperous

manner for the benefit of its citizens. This reactive system of planning is a major factor in the way the automobile has been allowed to devour the human and pedestrian environment. The new Ikea should have been built alongside the street. This means an equal status for pedestrians, transit and the automobile. In fact, great cities around the world use this simple planning technique to reserve streets for people. The experience of the driver is similar no matter what side of the building the parking is located. Cities like London carry urban planning a step further designating areas as pedestrian priority zones, connecting them throughout the city. Central to the decline of St. Louis is the absence of

meaningful public participation. Fox Associates has recently built a new parking garage in Grand Center on Washington Avenue, turning a prime commercial and pedestrian site into an autoonly,featureless streetscape. This happened in spite of a city sponsored “Grand Center Great Streets Master Plan” completed several years earlier. Design professionals, along with inclusive public participation, recommended that parking be in the center of the block, echoing the classical planning technique of reserving streets for human activity. Ignoring those recommendations, the permits and tax abatements for the Fox Associates garage were rammed through city hall quickly without public discussion. Public participation was blown out of the planning process. Unless the public interest is served it is impossible to

develop projects like the classical planning method of using transit route transfer centers for constructing highly visible public spaces. These public spaces are often in the form of squares and plazas that house vendors and markets. Transit centers that are surrounded with walkable environments and population density will, along with strategically placed commercial shops, fill public spaces with daily economic and social activity. This approach makes a city more attractive even as transit becomes a tool for economic development. In contrast, when St. Louis builds squares, plazas and public spaces it does so on leftover land that is vacant except for special events. One example is the Public Media Commons in Grand Center. Transit and pedestrians are not considered. Vendors are banned in most of the city, effectively

killing off small-scale economic opportunities and triggering a city void in human interest and hustle and bustle. Cities like London, with more than 30 street markets, or Singapore, with its hawker centers, turn the built environment into economic opportunities for vendors and create major tourist attractions, even as local markets are supported. A pedestrian-oriented city and an efficient transit system are the building blocks of an artful and human-scaled city. It is also significant that a walkingoriented urban environment is the foundation of a sustainable, carbon-neutral city. Current planning in St. Louis fails on all counts. The evidence is the city itself. London has a Statement of Community Involvement that codifies public participation,“empowering local people to shape their

surroundings”. It mandates government responses and includes a proactive planning process where residents participate in the planning of their city before anything is built. New policy findings are added yearly with a major public review occurring every five years. In London the 2015 Local Plan fully integrates all aspects of infrastructure. In St. Louis there isn’t an understanding of the big picture.The result is a fragmented style of governing and building. There is a vast difference in a city built for the economic and social success of everyone, which describes early St. Louis and fueled its growth, versus a city built to satisfy the financial needs of a few, which defines St. Louis today. Greg Michaud, of St. Louis, consults and writes about urban and environmental issues.

Of course it’s George Soros’ fault; it’s always George Soros’ fault In ordinary times, such an extraordinary manipulation of events would never happen. by the alt-right who regularly use it as a euphemism for Jews,” AntiDefamation League chief executive Jonathan Greenblatt said at the group’s annual summit Monday. “During this past election,there were television ads run by mainstream Where does George Soros find the political candidates and parties that time? shamefully portrayed the Jewish To hear the loon-o-sphere tell it, philanthropist George Soros, casting the Hungarian-born liberal Jewish him as a grotesque caricature pulled billionaire, at the ripe old age of 88, right from the pages of the Protocols has been exceedingly industrious. of Zion responsible for all the world’s He dismantled the Soviet Union, ills.” launched coups in four Eastern Last week, The Washington European countries and a revolution Post’s Felicia Sonmez reported that in a fifth, while also destroying the the director of the U.S. Agency for Malaysian economy and financing Global Media apologized to Soros Halliburton. last month for a taxpayer-financed He caused the 2008 global finanprogram the agency aired describing cial crisis, bought the presidency Soros as a “nonpracticing Jew of flexfor Barack Obama, wrote the 2009 stimulus and served as “puppetmas- ible morals.” The program claimed he was involved in “clandestine operater” for Hillary Clinton. tions that led to the dismantling of He organized the protests in Ferthe Soviet Union” and described him guson, the 2016 post-election protests, the Women’s March, the March as “the architect of the financial collapse of 2008.” for Science, the Parkland, Fla., gunOn Monday, even as the ADL was control protests, the anti-Kavanaugh decrying the Protocols-of-Zionprotests, the NFL national anthem style attacks on Soros, the Trump protests, the migrant caravan — and administration was enabling such also, paradoxically, the neo-Nazi attacks. march in Charlottesville, Va. As the Post’s Griff Witte reported, He controls the State Department, Hungary’s autocratic leader Viktor the Democratic Party and the union movement and is financing a “Purple Orban — who has engaged in an ugly anti-Semitic campaign against Revolution” to overthrow President Soros — succeeded in forcing the Donald Trump, as well as efforts Soros-founded Central European to break up the euro zone, depose University, a top institution, to leave the Turkish president and destroy the country. Facebook. Incredibly, U.S. Ambassador David In ordinary times, all but the most B. Cornstein, a jeweler and longtime deranged Alex Jones listener would Trump pal, admitted he tried neither recognize the above as wackadoodle, incentives nor threats to sway his tied together by a common libel used “friend” Orban. Cornstein instead against Jews for centuries: the clan“blamed the university’s founder” — destine manipulation of events. Soros — for the school’s “departure But these are not ordinary times, and refused to criticize and Trump and his Orban,” Witte reported. advisers are not only As part of Orban’s endorsing the conpersecution of Soros spiracy theories but also — whose Open Sociassigning a whole new ety Foundations has portfolio of world-domchampioned democratic ination responsibilities institutions in Eastern to Soros — as if he didn’t Europe — the Hungaralready have enough on ian government put his plate. up billboards last year Trump, in his closing (many soon covered ad of the 2016 campaign, in anti-Semitic graffeatured Soros and two Soros fiti) that evoked Nazi other American Jews as propaganda. The government, falsely part of a “global power structure” claiming Soros wanted to flood acting in cahoots with Clinton Hungary with illegal immigrants, against America. More recently, he pushed a “Stop Soros” law targeting suggested that the Brett Kavanaugh non-governmental organizations protesters were “paid for by Soros,” and passed legislation targeting what and said he “wouldn’t be surprised” it called “the Soros university.” if Soros were behind the caravan.“A The university has bipartisan suplot of people say yes.” port in Washington, and Cornstein Donald Trump Jr. has echoed (who said during his confirmation the Nazi-collaborator slander and that he was a “proud American Jew” the Ferguson allegation, and Rudy concerned about Hungary’s antiGiuliani circulated an “anti-Christ” Semitism) promised to protect it. idea. But Trump’s man did no such A consequence: Soros was one of thing. Instead, he said he saw no the attempted targets of a Trump problems with human rights in fan in Florida who sent pipe bombs Hungary and claimed evicting the to the president’s critics, and the university “doesn’t have anything suspect in the Pittsburgh synagogue to do with academic freedom.” The massacre had posted online about fault, Trump’s man said, is Soros’. Soros controlling the caravan, as Isn’t it always? Trump had suggested. “There are those — including the president of the United States — who Dana Milbank Twitter: @Milbank rail against ‘globalists’ that are ruinCopyright The Washington Post ing the country, a term popularized DANA MILBANK Washington Post

MELINA MARA • Washington Post

Crowds gather during the public viewing as former President George H.W. Bush lies in state at the U.S. Capitol rotunda in Washington on Monday.

Bush’s life proves that sometimes things go gloriously right Those who saw weakness in the former president’s manner know nothing about true strength. MICHAEL GERSON Washington Post

All the talk about the attributes of this or that generation is usually overblown. But there is an exception when a cohort of young Americans shares a massive, overwhelming experience of depression or war. A certain view of their country is often formed and fixed. This can be said of John F. Kennedy, the commanding officer of PT-109. And Lt. Cmdr. Richard Nixon, who ran the South Pacific Combat Air Transport Command. And Navy aviator George H.W. Bush. Serving in the Pacific theater of World War II, these young men had few traits of temperament or character in common. But the war shaped their conception of America’s global role, and their view of the necessity and capability of government in general. People who fought in World War II were marinated in the ideas that evil is real and that American power is an essential, irreplaceable force for good. They intuitively understood the moral narrative of Munich, Buchenwald, D-Day, Hiroshima, NATO and the twilight struggle. And they generally shared the notion that America could do anything that power, wealth, will and courage could accomplish. This presented the temptation of overreach, as in Vietnam. JFK’s inaugural pledge to “pay any price, bear any burden” should be taken seriously, but not literally. But the children of World War II really did believe that a torch was passing from Dwight Eisenhower’s generation

— the generation of their commanding officers — to a group of Americans who had rescued the world and fully intended to lead it. Given the other paths America might have taken, they did an extraordinary job. They twice saved humanity from well-armed, aggressive, totalitarian ideologies — first as soldiers, sailors and airmen, then as statesmen. America and the world owe them a great deal. Being one of the youngest Navy pilots in World War II, and blessed with longevity, George H.W. Bush was among the last of his cohort to leave us. As intelligence chief, diplomat and president, he brought to his calling a set of values that might be called patrician. He was less New Frontier and more old school. He rose up in government on the impulse of service. He lived by high standards of decency, fair play, humility, love of family and love of country. He was relentlessly moderate in temperament and political instinct. This type of “establishment” code is easier to lampoon than replace. So much that what a graceless age dismisses as repression is actually politeness, compassion and dignity. And Bush’s moral sensibilities turned out to be exactly what was needed at a decisive historical moment. As the Soviet Union collapsed under the weight of its economic and moral failure, what was needed from America was patience, wisdom, steady purpose and the generosity of true power. In presiding over the breaking of nations, an excess of vision or ambition might have been dangerously disruptive. Crowing would have led to bitterness and unpredictable anger. And Bush was incapable of crowing.

On closer exposure to Bush, there was something more at work than a moral code. I generally saw the elder Bush through the eyes of his son, George W. Bush, for whom I worked. And he could hardly mention his father’s name without welling up in tears of affection. During George W’s first Republican National Convention speech, we had to cut short the section praising his father, because the son could not get through the words without breaking down. There was a sweetness to their relationship that is a tribute to both men. George H.W. Bush loved deeply, and was deeply loved. He was sentimental without being fragile. And those who saw weakness in his manner know nothing about true strength — the victory over ego, over impulse, over hatred. Dying can be cruel and unfair. But there was a profound and encouraging sense of rightness, of fittingness, at Bush’s death. He left few things unaccomplished, and none that mattered. He was only briefly parted from the love of his life. His strength failed before his spirit. Bush died as well as a man could manage — full of years, full of honors, surrounded by affection, confident in his faith, knowing that his work on earth was done. Bush’s life provides assurance that sometimes things go gloriously right. Sometimes Americans vote for a decent and honest leader. Sometimes a president finds his calling and his moment. Sometimes a good man meets a good end. And still. It is a sad and solemn task to dig the graves of giants. Michael Gerson michaelgerson@washpost.com Copyright The Washington Post


A16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 12.05.2018

OBITUARIES

Barrett, Michael T. - St. Louis Buchholz, Jane F. - St. Louis Chapman, Shelba "Jean" - St. Louis Compton, Clark - Ellisville Fluchel, Jack R. - St. Louis French, Richard E. - St. Louis Groene, Shirley Jean - Chesterfield Hagnauer - see Klein

Celebrations of Life

Jackson, Claude V. Jr. - St. Louis Kern, Gary - Manchester Klein, Louis Edward "Ned" - Kirkwood Linhoff, Norma Riney - St. Charles Moll - see Klein Mudd, Thomas J. - St. Charles Nickles, Walter C. - St. Louis O'Connor, Thomas E. - St. Louis

French, Richard E.

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Patterson, Johanna T. - St. Louis Paul, Michael E. - Barnhart Roberts, Christine - St. Louis Street, Helen L. - St. Louis Strunk, George "Bud" - St. Louis Suarez, Charlotte "Schottzie" - St. Louis Votaw, Leroy Dave - St. Louis

O'Connor, Thomas E.

70, of St. Louis, MO died on November 30, 2018. Richard was 69, passed away on 11/28. Visitation 9-10 a.m. on Thurs. 12/6 at married to Jeannie (nee Kellogg) and is also survived by his sons St. Robert Bellarmine with a 10 a.m. Funeral Mass immediately David (Tejal) and Eric, and grandchildren Henry and following. Hutchensfuneralhomes.com Ruthie. Services are private.

Groene, Shirley Jean

(nee Bell) 83, passed Saturday morning, December. 1, 2018, at home surrounded by her loving family. For more info see Schrader.com

Jackson, Claude V. Jr.

94, of St Ann, MO. Visitation Thurs, 12/6/18 from 4-7 p.m. Alexander White Mullen Funeral Home. Private Interment Fee Fee Cemetery. www.alexanderstlouis.com

Barrett, Michael T.

fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, on Sunday, December 2, 2018. Son of the late Thomas J. and Margaret A. Barrett; loving father of Bridget (Drew Schenck), Erin, Cristin, and Meghan Barrett; beloved grandfather of Logan, Aidan, and Liam Barrett; cherished brother of Mary Jo Barrett and the late Pegg y W a l d o n ; d ea r cou s in a n d friend. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Thursday, December 6, 9:30 a.m. to St. Mark Catholic Church for 10 a.m. Mass. Interment Assumption Church Cemetery (O'Fallon, MO). Visitation Wednesday, 4-8 p.m.

Kern, Gary

80, November 30, 2018. Funeral service at Lord of Life Lutheran Church, Chesterfield, Thurs., 11 a.m. Visit at church Thurs., 9-11 a.m. For more info see Schrader.com

Klein, Louis Edward "Ned"

died December 1, 2018 at the age of 98. He is survived by his wife, Carol Bick Klein, and his children, the Reverend Susan W. Klein, William E. Klein, Ph.D. (Jane Tylus), and Jane C. Klein (Reuben Rigel). He is the beloved grandfather of William Moll (Caroline), Sarah Spano (Phil Kropoth), Alex Klein and Nathan Klein, and greatgrandfather of Jackson and Justin Moll. Ned is the step-father to Carol's children Robert (Kathy) H a g n a u e r , a n d Ka rl ( C h e r i ) Buchholz, Jane F. Hagnauer, and loved by their children Emily (Chris Desloge), (nee: Buhr) Baptized into the hope of Christ's Resurrection on Aimee, Karl, and Tyler, and great-granddaughter, Charlotte Monday, December 3, 2018. Jane gifted her body to St. Louis University Medical School. Cherished wife of the late Charles J. Desloge. Ned was a former husband of Crockett Leslie. Ned was Buchholz, Sr. Loving mother of Charles J. (Carolyn Olson) born in Richard City, Tennessee, one of five sons. He is survived Buchholz, Barbara J. (Frank) Momeno, Karen M. Tucker and the by a brother, Richard. He received his B.S. from Lehigh University, and entered the late Becky A. Buchholz. Dear sister of Maryann (the late Navy in 1943. He left the Navy in 1946 as Lt. (jg) and received Richard) Greene, Rev. Donald Buhr, Pat (the late Jack), Carol (the late Bob), Sharon (the late Tom), Mary and the late Paul his M.S. from the California Institute of Technology in 1947. He Buhr. Dear sister-in-law of Fred (Sharyn) Buchholz, Casilda began working for Monsanto Company in St. Louis, and (Jack) Struckhoff, and the late Donald (Joan) Buchholz, Marie remained there until his retirement in 1983. While at Monsanto, (Bill) Lamburth and Vince Buchholz. Dear grandmother of he received two patents from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Alexander Ritchie, Maria and Dominic Momeno, and Melissa, Office. His last position was as the Director of the New Amanda, Joseph and Daniel Tucker. Dear great-grandmother of Enterprises group, which specialized in the emerging field of biotechnology. Tavion and Katana. Upon retirement, he founded his own venture capital group. Jane was a 48 year member of St. Angela Merici Parish. Services: A Memorial Mass will be held on Thursday, December From 1985-1993, he gave an annual lecture at the Wharton 6, at 6 p.m. with a Memorial Gathering following the Mass at St. School of Business on monitoring the success of new ventures. Angela Merici Parish, 3860 N. Hwy 67, Florissant, MO. In lieu of He was a Senior Partner of Baring Private Equity Partners from 1984-1999, and on the board of venture capital groups in fl ow ers , M a s s es p referred . O n l in e g u e s t b o o k at Munich, Germany and Leuven, Belgium. He was a member of buchholzmortuary.com. the American Chemical Society, and the American Advancement A BUCHHOLZ Valley of Flowers Mortuary service. of Sciences. In addition to his business activities, Ned was a pianist and Chapman, Shelba "Jean" lover of classical music. He served on the Clayton Public School December 3, 2018. Beloved wife Board, the Vestry of St. Michael's Episcopal Church, and the of the late Elwyn L. "Chip" Human Subjects Committee at Washington University Medical Chapman; dear daughter of Iva School. Kathleen Chapman; loving Ned will be remembered for his innovative mind, adventurous mother of Daniel "Dan" (Eileen) spirit, sense of humor, and his love of music. Ned also loved Chapman of Chesterfield, MO and skiing, scuba diving, fine wine, lobster, and dry martinis at Club Diana "Di" Chapman of Brent- Ned. wood, MO; cherished grandSpecial thanks to the staff at Bethesda Hawthorne Place, and mother of Kate Chapman and for the loving care provided by his friend, Angela Lewis. M ich a el (J a imee) C h a p ma n ; Services: A funeral service followed by interment will be great-grandmother of Norah conducted at St. Peter's Episcopal Church, 110 N. Warson Rd. at Chapman. Ladue Rd., Ladue, Saturday, December 8, 2018 at 2:30 p.m. In Services: Visitation 4-8 p.m., lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to St. Thursday, December 6, 2018 at P et er' s E p is cop a l Ch u rch , or the Hope Center for JAY B. SMITH Funeral Home Maplewood, 7456 Manchester. Fu- Neurological Disorders at Washington University. No neral 10 a.m. Friday at Jay B. Smith with burial to follow at St. visitation. Condolences online www.luptonchapel.com. Paul Churchyard in Affton, MO. Donations may be made to A SERVICE Little Bit Foundation, 516 Hanley Ind. Court, Brentwood, OF Mo. 63144 or Backstoppers, Inc. 203, 10411 Clayton Rd. LUPTON CHAPEL 63131. Tributes at www.jaybsmith.com

Compton, Clark

86, December 3, 2018. Memorial Visitation at Schrader Funeral Home, Ballwin, Sunday, 2-6 pm. For more info see Schrader.com

Fluchel, Jack R.

Linhoff, Norma Riney

December 1, 2018, age 91. Services: Vis. Thu., Dec. 6, St. Cletus Catholic Church, 12-1pm, Funeral Mass to follow at 1pm. (636) 940-1000 or visit baue.com

Mudd, Thomas J.

December 1, 2018, age 61. Gathering & Reception, Fri. Dec. 7, Baue Cave Springs, 2-4 p.m., Celebration of Life to follow at 4 p.m. Visit baue.com

Monday, December 3, 2018. Beloved husband of Linda Fluchel (nee Reynolds); dear father of Jason (Kim Schmitt) Nickles, Walter C. Fluchel and Jamie Fluchel; dear son of the late Edward and Violet Monday, December 3, 2018. Service at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Fluchel; dear son-in-law of Adele Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Friday, December 7, 11:30 a.m. (the late Robert) Reynolds; our Interment Mt. Hope Cemetery. Visitation Thursday, 4-9 p.m. dear brother, brother-in-law, uncle, great-uncle, great-greatuncle, nephew, cousin and dear “It is not length of life, but depth of life.” friend to many. RALPH WALDO EMERSON Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois, Saturday, December 8, 9:00 a.m. Entombment Sunset MauSIGN THE ONLINE GUEST BOOK AND soleum. Visitation Friday, 3-9 p.m.

SEND YOUR CONDOLENCES

“To live in the hearts we leave behind is not to die.” THOMAS CAMPBELL

STLtoday.com/obits

Patterson, Johanna T.

(nee Berra), Fortified with the Sa cra men t s of H ol y Mother Church, on Monday, December 3, 2018. The beloved wife of the late Joseph Patterson; loving mother of Dennis "Vada" (Katie) Patterson, Diane (Glen) Hausler, Susan (Joe Torrisi) Bianchi, Ken Patterson, Steve (Rose) P a t t ers on and Patrick (Tina Locke) Patterson; dear sister of Henrietta Berra and Theresa Schuler; cherished grandmother, great-grandmother, great-great grandmother; dear aunt, cousin and friend. Services: Visitation Thursday, December 6, 2018, 4:00 p.m. 8:00 p.m., Calcaterra Funeral Home, 5140 Daggett Ave., St. Louis, MO 63110. Mass of Christian burial Friday, December 7, 2018, 10:00 a.m., St Ambrose Catholic Church, 5130 Wilson Ave., St. Louis, MO. Interment to follow in Resurrection Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorials appreciated to the Sick and Elderly Program of the Hill. Condolences may be offered at www.calcaterrafuneral.com

Paul, Michael E.

on December 1, 2018. Visitation Thurs., 12/6, 4-8 p.m. Funeral Fri., 12/7, 10:30 a.m. Kutis South County. Burial Sunset Memorial Park. www.kutisfuneralhomes.com

Roberts, Christine

December 1, 2018. Funeral service at Schrader Funeral Home, Ballwin, Friday at 11:30 a.m. Visitation from 10 a.m. till 11:30 a.m. For more info see Schrader.com

Street, Helen L.

(nee Wolk) Monday, December 3, 2018. Beloved wife of the late Paul Street; dear mother of Barbara (Jim) Sullivan, Cheryl (Joseph) Schwaiger, William (Charlene), Steven (Sandra) and Raymond (Loretta) Street; our dear grandmother, great-grandmother, sister-in-law, aunt, great-aunt and friend. Services: KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY CHAPEL, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Thursday, December 6, 10:00 a.m. Interment Bunker Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Alzheimer's Association or Humane Society. Visitation Wednesday, 4-8 p.m.

Strunk, George "Bud"

age 82. Visitation will be Thursday, 12/6/18 from 4-8 p.m. Newcomer Cremations, Funerals - Receptions, St Peters, MO. M a s s w ill be Frid a y, 12/7/18 a t 10 a.m. in Immaculate Conception Catholic Church, Old Monroe, MO

Suarez, Charlotte "Schottzie"

Passed away November 30, 2018. Beloved mom of Rick (Deb), Sharon, Theresa (Larry) Peterson and David Suarez; loving grandma of Rick, Jr., Michelle and Spencer; great-grandma of 5; our aunt, great-aunt, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral 9:30 a.m. Friday from JOHN L. ZIEGENHEIN & SONS Funeral Homes - South County (4830 Lemay Ferry) to St. Margaret Mary Alacoque Catholic Church for 10:00 a.m. Mass. Interment St. Paul Churchyard. VISITATION THURSDAY 3 p.m. - 8 p.m. If desired, donations to St. Jude Children's Research Hospital.

Votaw, Leroy Dave

11-30-2018. Was preceded in death by his loving wife Daisy I. Votaw (nee Street) and he is survived by two daughters Sandi Gl a t s t ein a n d J a n et (B ria n ) Newton; his grandchildren Connie (Gary) Smith, Jennifer (Jarad) Newell, Briana (Stephen) Motter, Marisa Newton, Grace Newton, Rhett (Daynnah) Newton; great-grandchildren Cassandra, Thomas, Abigail, Emmett, Alice, Adeline. Siblings Barbara Bryant, Shirley Moore. Preceded in death by Melba Cassidy, Walter Votaw, Steven Votaw. Leroy was a dedicated employee and union member of the St. Louis Post Dispatch for over 30 years. He enjoyed his retirement by spending time near Lake Wapapello and making frequent trips to visit his family. Services: In lieu of flowers contributions to Stray Rescue of St. Louis. Memorial Service Thursday, Dec. 6th at 11:00 a.m. at Valhalla Cemetery and Chapel. 7600 St. Charles Rock Road.

Fraternal Notices

LOCAL 1 - I.B.E.W.

Please be advised of the death of Bro. Mark A. Buschmann Journeyman Wireman/Retired Member 24 Years November 19, 2018 Services have already taken place. Frank D. Jacobs, B.M.

David A. Roth, F.S.

LOCAL 1 - I.B.E.W.

Beautiful Memorials At Schnucks Florist & Gifts, our experienced staff of floral designers is dedicated to the highest level of personal service.

Order 24 Hours schnucksfloral.com (314) 997-2444 or (800) 286-9557

Please be advised of the death of Bro. Douglas Taylor Production Worker - Retired Member 57 Years December 1, 2018 Visitation Thursday, December 6, 2018, 1-7 p.m. Funeral Thursday, December 6, 2018, 7 p.m. McCoy-Blossom Funeral Home 1304 Boone St., Troy, MO 63379 Frank D. Jacobs, B.M. David A. Roth, F.S.

InMemorials Memoriam

Wilbert John Filges

December 5, 1918 - October 28, 1969 Happy 100th birthday Dad, from your sons Ron and Keith

Florists Dierbergs Florist

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Schnucks Florist 65 Metro Locations 314-997-2444; 800-286-9557


12.05.2018 • Wednesday • M 1

WORLD

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A17

Macron relents on energy tax; move is too late, protesters say

DIGEST Parliament rebukes May

Britain’s Parliament dealt Prime Minister Theresa May’s government a bruising defeat Tuesday, and that was before lawmakers began an epic debate that will decide the fate of May’s European Union divorce deal. Opening five days of debate on the Brexit agreement, May said it was the “duty of this Parliament to deliver on the result” of the referendum. But the government appeared to be on a collision course with Parliament. Minutes before May rose to speak, lawmakers delivered a historic rebuke, finding her Conservative government in contempt of Parliament for refusing to publish the advice it had received from the country’s top law officer about the Brexit deal. The reprimand, while largely symbolic, marks the first time a British government has been found in contempt of Parliament. The 311293 vote demonstrated the fragility of May’s government. Ukrainians block cyberattack • Ukrainian authorities say they’ve thwarted a huge cyberattack and are blaming Russia for the alleged digital assault as tension between the two countries has flared. The Security Service of Ukraine said in a statement that hackers used malicious accounting documents to target the information technology systems of the country’s judiciary. The SBU described the alleged hacking as “massive” but produced little detail about the extent, timing, nature or severity of the hacks.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Demonstrators stand in front of a makeshift barricade to block the entrance of a fuel depot Tuesday in Le Mans, western France. French Prime Minister Edouard Philippe announced a suspension of planned fuel tax hikes Tuesday. BY THOMAS ADAMSON associated Press

PARIS • The French govern-

ment caved in after Paris’ worst rioting in decades and delayed an increase in energy taxes Tuesday — but it was seen as “too little, too late” by many protesters whose anger seems increasingly focused on embattled President Emmanuel Macron. Demonstrators were back in the streets wearing their signature yellow vests. They blocked several fuel depots and, on a highway near the southern city of Aubagne, commandeered a toll booth to let motorists pass for free near a sign reading “Macron dictator.” The protests began Nov. 17 with motorists upset over the fuel tax increase, but have grown

Holocaust survivors gather for global Hanukkah ceremonies BY DAVID RISING associated Press

BERLIN • Hundreds of Ho-

locaust survivors around the world marked the third night of Hanukkah on Tuesday, with menorah-lighting ceremonies paying tribute to them and the 6 million other Jews who were killed by the Nazis. Initiated last year by the New York-based organization that handles claims on behalf of Jews persecuted by the Nazis, International Holocaust Survivors Night was expanded this year to include Moscow, a nod to the large number of survivors who live in Russia and other former Soviet countries. “The sense of Hanukkah is in our dear veterans who are present here today,” Russia’s Chief Rabbi Berel Lazar said at the ceremony in the Jewish Community Center and Synagogue in Moscow. “These people have seen war, but never gave up.” Other ceremonies were held in Berlin and Jerusalem. At a gathering of more than 100 survivors at Oheb Shalom Congregation in South Orange, N.J., outside New York City, Hanna Keselman recalled being separated from her parents in Germany by the Nazis. Her mother survived but her father died. “We are what is left of a people who were not able to celebrate the Jewish religion because another government decided that we were not worthy of existing, much less openly practicing our faith,” Keselman, 87, said. “It is a miracle, after the horrors we faced, that we are celebrating Hanukkah today.”

to encompass a range of complaints — the stagnant economy, social injustice and France’s tax system, one of the highest in Europe — and some now call for the government to resign. President Donald Trump said Macron’s decision to delay the tax hike justifies his own decision to withdraw from an international climate accord. Trump said the decision means Macron has reached the same conclusion as Trump, that the global agreement reached by nearly 200 nations in Paris in 2015 is “fatally flawed because it raises the price of energy for responsible countries while whitewashing some of the worst polluters in the world.” Last weekend, more than 130 people were injured and 412 arrested in rioting in the French capital. Shops were looted and

cars torched in plush neighborhoods around the famed Champs-Elysees Avenue. The Arc de Triomphe was sprayed with graffiti and vandalized. Four people have been killed, officials said, and more protests are planned for this weekend. One unifying complaint among the leaderless protesters, who come from across the political and social spectrum, has been the anger at Macron and the perceived elitism of France’s aloof ruling class. Since returning from the G-20 summit in Argentina, Macron has either remained in his palace residence or else shied away from speaking publicly about the protests that have created his biggest political crisis since taking office last May. It was Prime Minister Edouard Philippe who announced

a six-month delay in the fuel tax increase that was to have begun in January. Just three weeks ago, Philippe had insisted the government would be steadfast in the tax plans aimed at weaning French consumers off fossil fuels. He also announced a freeze in electricity and natural gas prices until May. “No tax is worth putting the nation’s unity in danger,” Philippe said in a live televised address. Macron, for his part, visited a regional government headquarters that was torched by protesters, but he did not speak to reporters. The government U-turn appeared to appease few of the protesters, who wear the yellow vests that France requires motorists to have in their vehicles in case of roadside emergencies.

U.S. says it will leave arms treaty if Russia doesn’t comply in 60 days BY MICHAEL BIRNBAUM AND JOHN HUDSON Washington Post

BRUSSELS • Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said Tuesday that Russia is violating a Cold Warera arms control agreement and that the United States would begin the process of leaving the accord in 60 days if Moscow doesn’t come into compliance. The ultimatum, issued at a meeting at NATO headquarters in Brussels, amounts to a softening of the administration’s position after President Donald Trump abruptly announced in October that he had decided to “terminate the agreement.” But neither Pompeo nor other NATO officials held out much hope that Russia would destroy the missiles and launchers that the alliance said violate the landmark accord. “It makes no sense for the United States to remain in a treaty that constrains our ability to respond to Russia’s violations,” Pompeo said after a meeting of NATO foreign ministers. “We hope that they’ll change course, but there’s been absolutely no indication that they’ll do so.” The Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty, signed by the United States and the Soviet Union in 1987, banned nuclear and nonnuclear missiles with ranges from 500 to 5,500 kilometers, or about 310 to 3,400 miles. It has been a pillar of Europe’s security architecture for more than three decades, but the Trump administration has said it puts the United States at a military disadvantage against China, which is not bound by the treaty. For much of the West, the INF Treaty was a watershed moment in Cold War arms control, eliminating more than 2,600 missiles and ending a yearslong standoff with nuclear missiles in Europe between East and West. Trump’s announcement that

ASSOCIATED PRESS

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo (left) shakes hands Tuesday with NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg before a meeting at NATO headquarters in Brussels.

the United States would exit the treaty raised fears of a return to Cold War tension when nuclear-tipped missiles across the continent threatened to strike targets within minutes. Pompeo did not detail U.S. plans for the future, but he suggested the Pentagon would quickly start to build its capability. The termination plan was set to go into effect Tuesday, but German Chancellor Angela Merkel and other European leaders persuaded the president to delay the move to allow for additional consultations with allies and to try to pressure the Kremlin one last time to comply with the treaty, according to diplomats and officials familiar with the discussions. European leaders fear that their voters could be sympathetic to a Kremlin argument that the United States is tearing up one international agreement after another, following Trump’s decision to leave the Paris climate agreement and

the Iran nuclear deal. Their anger may have been fueled by Pompeo’s decision to deliver a blistering foreign policy address in Brussels just before the NATO meeting, using a city that serves as a capital for the European Union to lash out at multinational organizations and “bureaucrats.” Trump critics “claim America is acting unilaterally instead of multilaterally, as if every kind of multilateral action is by definition desirable,” Pompeo said. “Our mission is to reassert our sovereignty, reform the liberal international order, and we want our friends to help us and to exert their sovereignty as well,” he said to stony silence from the European audience, as he excoriated the United Nations, the International Criminal Court, the European Union, the World Trade Organization, the World Bank, the Organization of American States, the African Union, the Iran deal and the Paris climate agreement.

Baby’s birth a first from cadaver uterus • Brazilian doctors are reporting the world’s first baby born to a woman with a uterus transplanted from a deceased donor. Eleven previous births have used a transplanted womb but from a living donor, usually a relative or friend. Experts said using uteruses from women who have died could make more transplants possible. Ten previous attempts using deceased donors in the Czech Republic, Turkey and the U.S. have failed. The baby girl was delivered last December by a woman born without a uterus. She became pregnant through in vitro fertilization seven months after the transplant. The donor was a 45-year-old woman who had three children and died of a stroke. Israel destroys tunnels dug under border • Israel launched an operation Tuesday to destroy tunnels it said Hezbollah had dug under its northern border. The military said it had exposed one of the Lebanese militant group’s tunnels into Israeli territory. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said Tuesday night that the tunnels were built by Hezbollah but funded by Iran. The dramatic announcement — which involved the unearthing of a tunnel that appears to have been monitored by Israel for several years — triggered concern that domestic politics were at play. Meanwhile, the prime minister was also criticized Tuesday by protests against the government’s response to violence against women. Thousands of redcapped demonstrators called for Netanyahu to “wake up” and carried signs reading “Women’s blood is not cheap” and “We are killed and the government is silent.” Cuban cellphones to get internet access • Cuba says its citizens will be offered full internet access on mobile phones beginning Thursday, becoming one of the last nations to do so. Mayra Arevich, president of the Cuban state telecom monopoly, announced on national television Tuesday that Cubans can begin contracting 3G service for the first time Thursday. Until now, Cubans have had access only to state-run email accounts on their phones. The communist-governed island has one of the world’s lowest rates of internet use but that has been expanding rapidly since Presidents Barack Obama and Raul Castro declared détente in 2014. Expansion has not slowed with President Donald Trump’s rollback of relations. Anthrax kills hippos in Malawi • Twenty-two hippopotamuses have died from anthrax disease at Liwonde National Park in Malawi over the past two months, a wildlife official said on Tuesday. Laboratory tests conducted by the Health Ministry showed that the animals had been infected with the highly infectious, sporeforming bacterial disease, Brighton Kumchedwa, director of the Department of National Parks and Wildlife, said. A few weeks ago, wildlife officials had assumed that the deaths were caused by climate change after they found the hippos floating in the Shire River in September and October. The river had unusually low water levels. From news services


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M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 12.05.2018

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WEDNESDAY • 12.05.2018 • B

BRYANT CHOOSES MIZZOU

> Quarterback won 16 of his 18 starts playing for Clemson

> Top Arkansas receiver Nance also decides to go to Missouri

BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • In a mostly

empty Mizzou Arena before Tuesday’s men’s basketball game, the roar rippled through the student section at approximately 6:07 p.m. Missouri had its quarterback for next year — and The Antlers were already partying like it’s 2019. Kelly Bryant, college football’s most prized free agent, will use

his final season of eligibility at Missouri next year after winning 16 of his 18 starts at Clemson. Bryant made his decision public Tuesday night with a video he posted on Twitter shortly after 6 p.m. Without a clear successor to senior quarterback Drew Lock, Missouri was among the first reported teams to contact Bryant when he announced in late September he planned to transfer. He

See TRANSFER • Page B4

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Quarterback Kelly Bryant will have one season of eligibility at Mizzou.

Learning experience Young SLU team falls to Collier and top-ranked Connecticut

Freshmen stand out in MU win Watson snaps slump, scores career-best 12 BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • After a few

choppy weeks to open the season, the Missouri men’s basketball team has found smoother waters lately. With Tuesday’s 65-45 victory over the University of Texas-Arlington, the Tigers have two wins in three days and now face a man- MISSOURI 65 ageable course the rest of the UTA 45 month. 6 p.m. Friday vs. Mizzou’s final >Oral Roberts, SEC Net. four nonconference opponents are just 13-21 collectively, and while that foursome includes two high-profile opponents in Xavier and Illinois, Cuonzo Martin’s Tigers (5-3) are starting to resemble a functional team. Mizzou exploited its size advantage against the smaller Mavericks of the Sun Belt Conference and kept up the hot shooting from the perimeter and the foul line.

See MIZZOU • Page B3

DeWitts recall late president’s graciousness In baseball, families found a connection

PHOTOS BY CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

UConn’s Napheesa Collier goes up for a shot over St. Louis University’s Evan Zars in the first half of Tuesday night’s game at Chaifetz Arena. Collier, a graduate of Incarnate Word, had 22 points and 11 rebounds to lead the Huskies. BY STU DURANDO St. Louis Post-Dispatch

SLU coach Lisa Stone urges on her team in the first half against undefeated UConn.

Lisa Stone had done it before against the likes of Tulsa and other opponents in the opening month of the season. But to play five freshmen simultaneously against No. 1 Connecticut required a bit of courage. But Tuesday night’s meeting at Chaifetz Arena was mostly about the future for the Billikens, so their coach didn’t hesitate to give it a long hard look in UConn’s 98-42 win. Napheesa Collier stole the show in her St. Louis home-

UCONN 98 SLU

42

> 5 p.m. Saturday vs. Missouri

coming by scoring 22 points and grabbing 11 rebounds in front of about 300 friends and relatives among the crowd of 7,105. The senior forward did nothing to alter Stone’s opinion that Collier is the best player in the country. Yet, it was Stone’s freshmen whom she heaped with the most praise. And it was a sentiment that UConn coach Geno Auriemma repeated after Myia Clark scored a career-

high 18 points and Ciaja Harbison had 12. “I’m excited for our freshmen. No one was afraid,” Stone said. “They played with great energy. Because we played that game, it’s going to help us win an A-10 championship at some point. UConn sets the bar for how to play. “You saw five freshmen on the court for a large portion of the second half. I am excited for the trajectory of this program. Myia played her tail off against the No. 1 team in the See SLU • Page B2

Another comeback for Hitchcock JEFF GORDON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Edmonton Oilers have gone 4-2-1 since Ken Hitchcock, 66, was hired as coach.

Ken Hitchcock was in his element Tuesday afternoon. The former Blues coach was back at ice level at Enterprise Center. He drew up drills for his fifth NHL team, the Edmonton Oil-

ers. As his players flew up and down the ice, he barked commands over the shooshing of skates and the clacking of sticks. Hitchcock, 66, lives for this. He is an elite taskmaster known for engineering quick turnarounds. Coaching opportunities arise regularly given the league’s crazy competitive balance, so the calls keep coming.

Hitchcock’s latest comeback with his hometown Oilers did not stun the industry. Nor did his early success (4-2-1) with that long-frustrated franchise, which plays the Blues on Wednesday night. Blues interim coach Craig Berube noted the difference in their play. “For sure, they seem like they are a heavier team, See GORDON • Page B5

UP NEXT: 7 p.m. Wednesday vs. Oilers, NBCSN | INSIDE: Tarasenko has started scoring again. B5

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Former President George Bush and his wife, Barbara, attend a Houston Astros game in 2009. The Bushes were longtime Astros fans. BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

It was early in the morning after one of those playoff games that went late into the night when Cardinals Chairman Bill DeWitt Jr. heard his phone buzz to life and opted to ignore it. It had to be 2005, or maybe 2004, and the Cardinals were in Houston to face the Astros in the National League Championship Series. The middle games of those best-ofseven series for the pennant were all at Houston’s Minute Maid Park, and there would be another game there that night, so DeWitt let the phone ring. He checked the message eventually — and immediately returned the call. It was from former President George Bush. Of course he’d come to lunch. “That was an invitation that couldn’t be turned down,” DeWitt recalled Tuesday. “For a couple of hours, we went to their house, and See CARDINALS • Page B8

SPORTS

1 M


SPORTS

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Wednesday 12/5 vs. Oilers 7 p.m. NBCSN

Friday 12/7 at Jets 7 p.m. FSM

Sunday 12/9 vs. Canucks 2 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 12/11 vs. Panthers 7 p.m. FSM

St. Louis U. • slubillikens.com | 314-977-4758 Men’s basketball Wednesday 12/5 at SIU Carbondale 7 p.m.

Women’s basketball Sunday 12/9 vs. Oregon State 2:30 p.m. ESPNU

Sunday 12/9 vs. Missouri 5 p.m.

Thursday 12/20 at Illinois State 11 a.m.

Mizzou • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Football

M. basketball

Monday 12/31 Liberty Bowl vs. Oklahoma St. 2:45 p.m., ESPN

Friday 12/7 vs. Oral Roberts 6 p.m. SEC Network

W. basketball Tuesday 12/18 vs. Xavier 6 p.m. ESPNU

Thursday 12/6 vs. UMKC 7 p.m.

Illinois men’s basketball • fightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Wednesday 12/5 vs. Ohio State (in Chicago) 6 p.m., BTN

Saturday 12/8 vs. UNLV 1 p.m. BTN

Saturday 12/15 vs. East Tennessee State 1 p.m.

Saturday 12/22 vs. Missouri (Enterprise Ctr.) 7 p.m., BTN

SIUE • siuecougars.com | 855-748-3849 Men’s basketball Saturday 12/8 vs. Harris-Stowe 2 p.m.

Women’s basketball Monday 12/17 at Drake 7 p.m.

Thursday 12/6 at Loyola 7 p.m.

Saturday 12/8 at Chicago State 2 p.m.

OTHER EVENTS INDOOR SOCCER • St. Louis Ambush home games Sun. 12/16: vs. Kansas City, 3:05 p.m. Sat. 12/29: vs. Kansas City, 7:05 p.m.

ON THE AIR BASKETBALL 10 a.m. G League: Iowa at Raptors 905, ESPNU 5 p.m. College: Lafayette at Connecticut, ESPNU 5:30 p.m. College: Ohio at Xavier, FS1 5:30 p.m. College: Mount St. Mary’s at St. John’s, FS2 6 p.m. College: Illinois vs. Ohio State in Chicago, BTN, KFNS (590 AM) 6 p.m. College: Hartford at Duke, ESPN2 College: Brown at Butler, FSM 6 p.m. 6:30 p.m. College: Middle Tennessee State at Vanderbilt, SEC Network 7 p.m. College: St. Louis U. at SIU Carbondale, WXOS (101.1 FM), KATZ (1600 AM) 7 p.m. College: Oklahoma State at Tulsa, CBSSN 7 p.m. College: VCU at Texas, ESPNU College: Missouri State vs. Western Kentucky, KXFN (1380 AM, 7 p.m. 106.5 FM), KYRO (1280 AM) NBA: 76ers at Raptors, ESPN 7 p.m. 7 p.m. NBA: Clippers at Grizzlies, FSM Plus 7:30 p.m. College: Temple at Villanova, FS1 College: Nebraska at Minnesota, BTN 8 p.m. College: UNC-Wilmington at North Carolina, ESPN2 8 p.m. 9 p.m. College: Arkansas at Colorado State, CBSSN 9 p.m. College: TCU at SMU, ESPNU 9:30 p.m. NBA: Spurs at Lakers, ESPN College: Washington at Gonzaga, ESPN2 10 p.m. GOLF (Thu.) European PGA: South African Open, first round, GOLF 4 a.m. HOCKEY Blues vs. Oilers, NBCSN, KMOX (1120 AM) 7 p.m. 9:30 p.m. Blackhawks at Ducks, NBCSN SOCCER 1:55 p.m. English Premier League: Manchester United vs. Arsenal, NBCSN

DIGEST Major golf championships returning to Texas

The PGA of America is leaving Florida for a $520 million development in the Dallas area that will include a 500-room hotel, a massive conference center and two golf courses that will bring major championships back to Texas. The decision followed approval of an incentives package by the Frisco City Council and other government entities. The move is not expected until the summer of 2022, about the time the two golf courses, plus a 9-hole short course and practice areas are finished. The first tournament will be the Senior PGA Championship in 2023. As part of the agreement, the PGA Championship will be held at one of the two courses in 2027 and 2034. It will be the first time the PGA Championship is held in the Dallas area since Jack Nicklaus won his first Wanamaker Trophy in 1963 at Dallas Athletic Club. The PGA of America also said it would consider its new headquarters for a Ryder Cup. The last major in Texas was in 1969, when Orville Moody won the U.S. Open at Champions Golf Club in Houston. Texas was seen as too hot for the PGA Championship, a problem that no longer exists with the major moving from August to May starting next year. Kurt Busch to Ganassi Racing • Kurt Busch and sponsor Monster Energy will move to Chip Ganassi Racing next season for Busch’s 20th season in NASCAR. The partnership announced Tuesday is a one-year contract for Busch to drive the No. 1 Chevrolet with primary sponsorship from Monster. It is believed the one season as teammate to Kyle Larson will be Busch’s final year of fulltime NASCAR competition. Busch won NASCAR’s Cup title in 2004 and counts the Daytona 500 and Coca-Cola 600 among his 30 career victories. He spent the last five seasons with Stewart-Haas Racing. Champion Wilder calls for rematch • WBC heavyweight champion Deontay Wilder says he wants a rematch with Tyson Fury “ASAP.” Wilder said in a conference call that he’s “ready and willing to give Tyson Fury the opportunity ASAP.” The two heavyweights fought to a split-decision draw Saturday night in Los Angeles in one of the bigger heavyweight bouts in America in years. Afterward, the British challenger said the two would “100 percent” meet again in the ring. Wilder says he doesn’t want to fight anybody else before a rematch. He says, “Everyone is talking about this fight. It’s only right for us to go back in and do it again.” Wilder (40-0-1) knocked Fury (27-0-1) down twice late in the fight, but was outboxed much of the way at Staples Center. SEMO men win on the road • Junior Skyler Hogan scored a gamehigh 25 points and teammates Isaiah Gable and Gabe McGlothan added 11 points apiece, helping Southeast Missouri (5-4) to a 77-57 victory at Mississippi Valley State (2-8). Hogan, a 6-5 transfer from Division II Embry-Riddle in Florida, hit 10 of 16 shots, including 5 of 8 from 3-point range. Associated Press

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M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 12.05.2018

Experience pays off for Salukis’ Fletcher BY STU DURANDO St. Louis Post-Dispatch

When Armon Fletcher returned home from a much-anticipated season opener at Kentucky, the Southern Illinois Carbondale guard was hobbled but hopeful. However, a knee injury suffered against the Wildcats brought bad news with a six- to eight-week recovery period expected. Adrenaline had allowed him to keep playing that night. The diagnosis caught him off guard. “It messed with my head a little for a while,” the Edwardsville High alum said. “But I have a great support system and great people in my circle who helped keep me together mentally.” Surprisingly, the 6-foot-5 senior was able to play less than three weeks later. He’ll enter Wednesday night’s game against St. Louis University in Carbondale as the Salukis’ leading scorer and rebounder as well as being the only remaining member of his recruiting class in the program. Sticking with coach Barry Hinson has paid off for Fletcher, who is in his fifth year at SIUC, having redshirted as a freshman. He was voted to the Missouri Valley Conference’s preseason all-conference team after making the second team as a junior. He recently surpassed 1,000 points for his career. But scoring isn’t necessarily the emphasis for Fletcher. “I think he’s got more areas he can continue to get better,” Hinson said after his team’s win at SIU Edwardsville. “He knows how I feel about him shooting. He’s a scorer. He’s one of the best 3-point shooters I’ve ever coached. If we did a shooting video, we’d literally talk about how compact he is. ... He knows he’s got the green light any time behind the arc. But he knows to get to the next level, rebounding and defense are going to be what get him there, not shooting. He’s already got that part.” Fletcher is averaging 13.6 points and 6.2 rebounds, both of which lead SIUC. He’s shooting 61 percent and has made 55.6 percent of his 3-pointers. Having him back in the lineup has been crucial for a team that was picked to finish third in the MVC. The Salukis have won five of six since losing to Kentucky and Buffalo to open the season. Fletcher said he developed his shot as a young player because he was afraid of contact. Tall and skinny, he shied away from the

lane in favor of open jumpers. He said he has gone through a variety of shooting forms along the way, emulating various NBA players. “Growing up I was so skinny,” he said. “I couldn’t jump. I wasn’t strong and I wasn’t fast. The only thing I could do was shoot. I finally found something that made me feel comfortable. I had to fix some things with my elbow being out. I started watching Brad Beal highlights because he keeps his elbow in.” Fletcher’s persistence to stay at SIUC went against the grain. Three other members of his class departed with Jordan Caroline heading to Nevada, where he is a star on a top-10 team, Deion Lavender to Valparaiso and Chaz Glotta (Fort Zumwalt North) to Maryville. Fletcher became an oddity: a fifth-year player with his original school. “You see what takes place with guys in one place for five years,” Hinson said. “The guys before him left because we weren’t winning. ... We haven’t had a losing season with Armon playing.” It wasn’t that he didn’t think about leaving. But simply following his former teammates took wasn’t enough and eventually he decided, “I didn’t have a reason to leave.” “Personally, it has helped me become a better man,” he said of putting in five years. “Being able to make a tough decision and my parents allowing me to grow up on my own here — it’s just benefited me well. I learned a lot basketballwise sitting out my freshman year.” He hopes to help get the Salukis to the NCAA Tournament for the first time since 2007. Two of the team’s losses thus far have been understandable. The Salukis hung around with ninth-ranked Kentucky until the final 10 minutes. They then lost to No. 17 Buffalo at home without Fletcher. A lopsided loss to Massachusetts was a lot more concerning. But the Salukis have played better since, and have won their last two games on the road. “We’ve seen how good we can be and how bad we can be,” Fletcher said. “We’ve taken a few losses we feel we could have won. We feel we’re not at our best right now, even though it looks like we’re playing well.” Stu Durando @studurando on Twitter sdurando@post-dispatch.com

SLU AT SIUC

When • 7 p.m. Wednesday Where • SIU Arena All-time series • SLU leads 31-26 TV/radio • ESPN+; WXOS (101.1 FM) Records • SLU 6-1, SIUC 5-3 About the Billikens • Dion Wiley (thigh) and Javon Bess (ankle) did not practice Monday or Tuesday. Wiley will not play and Bess will be a game-time decision. ... Bess has taken over the team scoring lead with a 14.6 average. ... The Billikens rank 13th in the country in field goal percentage defense, holding opponents to 36.8 percent. ... SLU is outrebounding teams by an average of seven per game and has been led by Hasahn French with 7.5 per game. About the Salukis • In their one game against an Atlantic 10 team, SIUC lost to Massachusetts 84-62 during a tournament in Las Vegas. ... Former Billiken Marcus Bartley is starting and averaging 7.5 points and 3.9 assists. He has made 48.6 percent of his 3-pointers. ... During their three-game win streak, the Salukis are shooting 58 percent. ... Armon Fletcher (Edwardsville) has averaged 22 points and 8.5 rebounds in the last two games.

HOW THE TOP 25 FARED 1. Gonzaga (8-0) idle. Next: vs. Washington, Wednesday. 2. Kansas (7-0) beat Wofford 72-47. Next: vs. New Mexico State, Sat. 3. Duke (7-1) idle. Next: vs. Hartford, Wednesday. 4. Virginia (8-0) idle. Next: vs. VCU, Sunday. 5. Michigan (9-0) beat Northwestern 62-60. Next: vs. South Carolina, Sat. 6. Nevada (8-0) idle. Next: vs. No. 20 Arizona St., Friday. 7. Tennessee (6-1) idle. Next: vs. No. 1 Gonzaga, Sunday. 8. Auburn (7-1) beat UNC Asheville 67-41. Next: vs. Dayton, Saturday. 9. Kentucky (7-1) idle. Next: vs. Seton Hall, Saturday. 10. Michigan State (7-2) idle. Next: at Florida, Saturday. 11. Florida State (7-1) idle. Next: vs. UConn, Saturday. 12. Wisconsin (8-1) idle. Next: at Marquette, Saturday. 13. Texas Tech (7-0) idle. Next: vs. Arkansas-Pine Bluff, Wednesday. 14. North Carolina (6-2) idle. Next: vs. UNC Wilmington, Wednesday. 15. Virginia Tech (6-1) idle. Next: vs. VMI, Wednesday. 16. Kansas State (6-1) idle. Next: at Tulsa, Saturday. 17. Buffalo (7-0) idle. Next: vs. Le Moyne, Wednesday. 18. Iowa (6-2) idle. Next: vs. Iowa State, Thursday. 19. Ohio State (7-1) idle. Next: vs. Illinois, Wednesday. 20. Arizona State (7-0) idle. Next: vs. No. 6 Nevada, Friday. 21. Villanova (6-2) idle. Next: vs. Temple, Wednesday. 22. Miss. State (6-1) beat McNeese 90-77. Next: vs. Clemson, Sat. 23. Maryland (7-1) idle. Next: at Purdue, Thursday. 24. Nebraska (7-1) idle. Next: at Minnesota, Wednesday. 25. Furman (9-0) beat Elon 98-74. Next: at S.C. Upstate, Saturday.

SLU freshmen schooled by UConn SLU • FROM B1

country. Caija was fearless.” And Connecticut was dominant. The Huskies never trailed and put together scoring runs of 13-0, 11-0, 12-0 and 11-0 again. They allowed SLU to score consecutive field goals only once in the game. Collier scored the game’s first points and eight in the first quarter, when UConn (8-0) jumped to a 15-2 lead. Meanwhile, all of SLU’s 20 first-half points were scored by freshmen. The five on the roster accounted for 37 of the team’s total and made 14 of 41 shots while the rest of the team made two of 21. “I was really impressed, and I talked to the team about it, how hard they compete as young players,” Auriemma said. “They’re not ready to win a game like this, obviously. But their big kid going against our big kid didn’t back down. To me it’s a great sign when you have young players willing to compete like that. That’s a good sign when you compete, knowing you’re going to lose anyway.” UConn’s individual talent was on display from the start. Twotime All-American Katie Lou Samuelson made five 3-pointers and scored 20 points. Kyla Irwin and Olivia Nelson-Odoba had 10 rebounds each as the Huskies battered the Billikens on the boards 56-31. Crystal Dangerfield had 10 assists without a turnover. The Huskies disrupted everything SLU attempted to do offensively with long arms that wreaked havoc with passes and shots. They blocked nine shots and turned the Billikens’ 14 turnovers into 27 points for a nearly perfect efficiency. And they did it all 48 hours after going into Notre Dame and beating the Irish to take over the No. 1 spot in the country. “You see, experience and feel what a championship team looks like,” Stone said. But it was Collier’s night on the court after she had her jersey re-

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

St. Louis University guard Ciaja Harbison drives toward the basket between UConn’s Christyn Williams (left) and Crystal Dangerfield in the second half Tuesday night at Chaifetz Arena. NO. 1 UCONN 98, SLU 42 FG FT Reb Min M-A M-A O-T UCONN 29 10-17 2-6 5-11 Collier Irwin 25 1-4 0-0 2-10 30 7-11 1-1 0-3 Dangerfield Samuelson 27 7-13 1-2 3-6 Williams 31 7-13 0-0 1-4 Nelson-Ododa 24 5-12 2-5 5-10 Bent 12 2-2 0-0 0-2 Coombs 22 0-3 2-2 0-2 200 39-75 8-16 19-56 Totals Percentages: FG , FT. 3-point goals: 12-24, Blocked shots: 9 Turnovers: 8 Steals: 9 Technical fouls: None. FG FT Reb ST. LOUIS U. Min M-A M-A O-T Wilken 8 0-2 0-0 2-3 32 6-13 2-2 0-4 Clark Frantz 29 1-10 1-2 0-2 Harbison 34 5-13 2-2 0-4 McMahan 20 0-3 0-0 0-0 Flowers 21 1-5 0-2 1-4 Zars 25 1-5 0-0 0-4 Lindfors 8 1-6 0-0 3-3 Hughes 4 0-0 0-0 0-1 Rice 19 1-5 0-0 0-0 Totals 200 16-62 5-8 10-31 Percentages: FG , FT. 3-point goals: 5-22, Blocked shots: 3 Turnovers: 14 Steals: 4 Technical fouls: None. UConn 25 21 25 27 St. Louis U. 10 10 7 15 A: 7,105. Officials: Karen Preato, Pualani Spurlock, John Capolino.

A PF PTS 2 1 22 2 2 2 10 0 18 8 0 20 4 2 17 2 0 12 0 2 5 2 1 2 30 8 98

A PF PTS 0 2 0 18 1 4 1 2 3 5 2 12 0 1 0 0 3 2 1 2 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 0 0 8 16 42

— —

98 42

tired at Incarnate Word on Monday with her teammates along to watch. In the crowd were many relatives from Jefferson City. “It was awesome,” she said. “I haven’t played in front of them

live before. To have so many people show up was humbling for me.” True to her understated style, Collier said she didn’t play well, despite making 10 of 17 shots and completing her sixth doubledouble in eight games. “The thing about Napheesa is she’s just a solid performer,” Stone said. “They’re good everywhere, but I do think she’s a player of the year candidate. She’s a tough matchup inside and out.” UConn outscored SLU in every quarter, tallying 25, 21, 25 and 27 points. The Huskies shot 52 percent and made 12 of 24 3-pointers. They registered 30 assists on 39 baskets and committed eight turnovers. “Everything I expected was what it was,” Harbison said. “They’re a very good team. I think we learned a lot from playing them. It was a good opportunity to play against someone like them to get better. We know what we have to work on.” Stu Durando @studurando on Twitter sdurando@post-dispatch.com


COLLEGE BASKETBALL

12.05.2018 • Wednesday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B3

Underwood needs Illinois to play tougher ILLINI VS. OHIO STATE

Illini’s next test: No. 19 Buckeyes at United Center BY JOEY WAGNER decatur Herald & Review

C H A M PA I G N , I L L . •

There’s a laundry list of things that Brad Underwood wasn’t happy with after Sunday’s loss at Nebraska. The Illini turned the ball over too often — 15 times — fouled too frequently — Nebraska shot 30 free throws — and left Underwood, Illinois men’s basketball coach, as frustrated as he’s been with the offense. If the Illini (2-6) want to snap a two-game losing streak — they’ve lost six of their last seven — they will have to be tougher in a “home game” at 6 p.m. Wednesday against No. 19 Ohio State at the United Center in Chicago. “We’re going to have to be on our best offensively,” Underwood said. “We have to execute. We have to cut hard. We’ve been talking ad nauseam with our guys about toughness. We’re not tough enough. We are not tough enough. It’s a toughness to be disciplined enough to execute. We didn’t do that at Nebraska. “We’ve got to understand how to be tough and disciplined enough that when we have to get a basket, that we can execute. We’ve had a good couple of days.”

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Illinois’ Giorgi Bezhanishvili (15) and Da’Monte Williams defend against Nebraska’s James Palmer Jr. in the second half of the Cornhuskers’ 75-60 victory Sunday in Lincoln, Neb.

Underwood says Ohio State (7-1) is the most physical team that Illinois will have seen to date, spearheaded by big man Kaleb Wesson in the post and a veteran point guard in C.J. Jackson. “They’re a tough team,” senior Aaron Jordan said. “They execute on offense and defense. We’ve got to play our best game and match their toughness.” Though there is some frustration — not discouragement — at times among the Illini, there’s not a lack of confidence with a Top 25 team immediately ahead in the schedule. “They’re physical,” freshman guard Ayo Dosunmu said. “They’re a good team. At the end of the day we can compete

with anybody. We’ve got to come out and play hard and play our game and not look for excuses.” There were lessons learned against Nebraska in the Big Ten opener. Wednesday’s game against Ohio State is the second of two early-season Big Ten games before the Illini resume their non-conference schedule. Big Ten play for Illinois resumes on Jan. 3 at Indiana. “I feel like we were playing good defensively, but we’ve got to play a little bit tougher and turn it up a notch,” Dosunmu said of what the team learned. “Big Ten play is a different animal than regular games. Teams are more physical, there are more scouts out and more information out.

We have to get stronger and we have to get bigger and we have to get tough.” Foul troubles plagued Illinois against Nebraska, and have hurt the Illini all season. Nebraska was in the bonus early and often and finished shooting 25 of 30 from the free-throw line, compared to 8 of 13 for the Illini. On the season, opponents have shot 153 of 214 from the charity stripe this season, compared to 79 of 117 for Illinois. “We’re working on it in practice, trying to move our feet more and keep our hands up because we know that’s one of our deficiencies as a team right now,” Dosunmu said. “We have to move our feet, keep our hands up and not foul as

Tigers are back on track, post fifth win of season MIZZOU • FROM B1

Tuesday was an especially productive night for Martin’s freshmen. Torrence Watson broke out of a scoring slump and eclipsed his season-high scoring total early in the

When • Wednesday, 6 p.m. Where • United Center, Chicago TV/radio • Big Ten Network, KFNS (590 AM) Records • Illinois 2-6, Ohio State 7-1 Of note • Wednesday marks the 53rd game the Illini will play at the United Center, dating back to the 1994-95 season. Illinois owns an all-time record of 37-15 (.712) there. Illinois will look to snap an 11-game losing streak against Top 25 teams. The last win against a ranked opponent was in the 2016 Big Ten Tournament against Iowa.

second half. Watson, the St. Louis’ area’s leading scorer last year as a senior at Whitfield School, played just two minutes in Sunday’s win over Central Florida and hadn’t scored more than three points in the last five games. He got

going Tuesday with a pair of corner 3-pointers in the first half and finished with a team-high 12 points. Watson came out of Sunday’s game with a leg injury but was clearly feeling better 48 hours later. His teammates doused him

with water when he came into the locker room after the win. “I don’t really like the water because my whole body was wet, but it was fun to go in there and see the guys happy for me,” he said after playing a season-

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much.” Illinois ranks 335th in the nation with 22.9 fouls per game. Conversely, Michigan is tops in the country, only fouling 13 times per contest. “That’s really staying disciplined and playing hard,” Jordan said. “The harder you play, the more you won’t foul. Fouling is a mistake. When you react, if you’re in reacting mode all the time, you’re going to foul.” Underwood wants his teams to play tough defense but also not make mistakes that send teams to the free-throw line. “There’s an average of eight missed layups in every high major basketball game,” the coach pointed out. “We want teams to

high 29 minutes. “I was just glad they kept giving me the ball.” Watson had just three field goals in Mizzou’s last five games. He shook off the shooting blues by making four of nine attempts in Tuesday’s win. “It was good for him,” Martin said. “But he’s also been putting extra time in. That helps, because it gives you confidence to see the ball go in. It goes in during individual workouts, in practices and now it goes in in the games. That’s great to see. I always felt like he played with energy. … It’s not like you have to teach him how to play hard. But he can shoot the ball.” Freshman guard Javon Pickett, coming off a career-best 13 points Sunday, started the scoring Tuesday with two early 3s from the corner and ended the night with 10 points. Xavier Pinson wasn’t left out. The freshman point guard twice beat the shot clock with pull-up jumpers and finished with seven points and a couple of assists. Mizzou came into the game leading the Southeastern Conference in 3-point shooting percentage and had another prolific night from the arc, finishing nine of 25. UT-Arlington (3-6), one of the shortest teams in the country at No. 353 in Ken Pomeroy’s average height metric, had no answer for 6-10 center Jeremiah Tilmon when he was on the floor. Fouls ultimately put him on the bench midway through the second half, but Tilmon had his way with the Mavericks inside, finishing with 10 points and 12 rebounds. Tilmon had to wrestle 7-6 center Tacko Fall in Sunday’s win over Central Florida but finished that overtime win with just a single rebound in 29 minutes. Martin made one thing clear Tuesday: That’s not acceptable. “We need him to rebound,” Martin said. “The game has changed, so there’s not as many shots around the rim with lowpost scores and there’s long rebounds because guys are shooting 3s. But he’s better than one rebound a night.” Tilmon has also proven to be better at the foul line. He shot six of six from the stripe Tuesday to push his season average to 81 percent. He shot 52.6 percent last year as a freshman. Tuesday’s game featured the debut of sophomore forward K.J. Santos — in his uniform. The 6-8 transfer from Illinois-

drive the ball and make them finish. We think it’s OK to try to get a steal and try to slap. We don’t teach that. We do quite the contrary. It’s discipline. We’re not there yet.” The Illini rank near the bottom in the country in allowing players to play with two fouls, according to KenPom.com rankings. Underwood allows his players to play 6.7 percent of available minutes in the first half after picking up their second foul. The national average is 22.3 percent. “That’s trust and it’s been a long time since I’ve trusted a guy, probably since Thomas Walkup (at Stephen F. Austin), to play with two,” Underwood said. “If you get a third one, you’re really hamstrung for the second half.” It’s a trust factor, but even after freshman big man Giorgi Bezhanishvili went to the bench in the first half with his second foul against Nebraska, Underwood thought his team played well, and has seen a different version of graduate big man Adonis De La Rosa, who seems to be a natural fit against Ohio State’s Wesson. “We’ve seen another Adonis this week,” Underwood added. “He’s a guy who can match with Wesson and they can slam bodies together. It was a tough matchup in Lincoln. They play a little smaller and a little more finesse. AD has been a lot better.”

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Missouri’s Kevin Puryear dribbles past TexasArlington’s Patrick Mwamba during the first half Tuesday night. MISSOURI 65, TEXAS-ARLINGTON 45

FG FT Reb TEXAS-ARL. Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Ibarguen 26 4-7 1-3 2-6 1 1 9 26 1-4 1-4 4-9 1 2 3 Mwamba Azore 19 0-4 0-0 0-1 1 2 0 Davis 27 2-3 2-2 1-5 1 1 6 27 3-14 0-0 0-0 4 1 8 Warren Castro 24 3-6 0-0 0-3 1 2 8 14 2-3 0-0 0-1 0 2 4 Narcis Jackson-Young 14 2-3 0-0 0-0 0 1 5 Bryant 13 1-1 0-0 0-0 2 1 2 10 0-1 0-2 0-0 0 0 0 Nouhi Totals 200 18-46 4-11 7-25 11 13 45 Percentages: FG.391, FT.364. 3-point goals: 5-18, .278. Team rebounds: 3. Team Turnovers: 21. Blocked shots: 2. Turnovers: 21. Steals: 6. Technical fouls: None. FG FT Reb MISSOURI Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Puryear 20 3-5 0-0 1-1 1 3 7 Tilmon 21 2-4 6-6 3-12 1 5 10 29 4-10 0-0 0-2 3 0 9 Geist Pickett 26 4-9 0-0 2-5 2 0 10 18 2-4 0-0 0-2 1 3 5 Ma.Smith Watson 29 4-9 1-2 1-1 0 1 12 26 1-5 0-0 0-6 0 0 3 Mi.Smith Pinson 18 3-5 1-4 0-1 2 0 7 Nikko 13 0-1 2-4 2-3 0 1 2 Totals 200 23-52 10-16 9-33 10 13 65 Percentages: FG.442, FT.625. 3-point goals: 9-24, .375. Team rebounds: 2. Team Turnovers: 14. Blocked shots: 3. Turnovers: 14. Steals: 8. Technical fouls: None. Texas-Arlington 21 24 — 45 Missouri 37 28 — 65

Chicago had been in street clothes for the first seven games while recovering from a foot injury. For the first time this year, he took part in the pregame shootaround, but he never got off the bench. Martin said Santos is medically cleared to play, but Martin wants him to get more practice time before seeing the floor in a game. Martin said Santos will probably play Friday when the Tigers host Oral Roberts. Defensively, the Tigers held the Mavericks to 39.1 percent shooting and turned 21 turnovers into 17 points. Point guard Jordan Geist struggled shooting from the perimeter, making just one of seven 3-pointers, but gave the Tigers nine points with three assists and one turnover. After a four-turnover game in MU’s loss to Temple last week, Geist has given the ball away just once in 69 minutes the last two games combined. Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com


B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

MU picks up top QB, receiver TRANSFER • FROM B1

also visited Arkansas, North Carolina, Auburn and Mississippi State. Down the stretch, Auburn seemed to become the most serious competition for Barry Odom and his staff. Bryant, 22, visited Auburn last weekend and hosted Auburn coach Gus Malzhan for an in-home visit Tuesday, 247Sports.com reported. The late sales pitch didn’t work. Mizzou’s good news didn’t end there. Former Arkansas wide receiver Jonathan Nance, another graduate transfer, also announced on Twitter a commitment to Mizzou. Nance was Arkansas’ leading receiver in 2017, catching 37 passes for 539 yards and five touchdowns. He visited Mizzou the same weekend as Bryant in late October when the Tigers hosted Kentucky. Bryant heard from more than 20 teams early in the process, said Ramon Robinson, who has trained Bryant since his high school years and helped mentor him during his second turn through the recruiting process. Bryant was unavailable to comment, but earlier in the day Robinson said the Tigers had a strong chance to land the quarterback. For the past couple of months, Robinson spent late nights studying the offenses of the teams recruiting Bryant, including Missouri. He was impressed with the Tigers’ system under first-year coordinator Derek Dooley. “I like their combination of running multiple offensive sets,” Robinson said. “They run a little pro style. They run a little spread with an RPO (run-pass option) system. The biggest thing with him is whatever program he goes to, he wants to develop more outside of his offseason training and develop in the classroom with more advancement.” “He’s hard working, determined,” Robinson added. “He’s that diamond in the rough. He’s under the radar in terms of all the things he can do as a quarterback. I don’t see any limitations in his game and his skills. Wherever he chooses to go, he’s going to be a guy who throws the ball down the field on a consistent basis. He can run it, of course, when he needs to. “He’s going to be a great leader on and off the field where kids are going to fall in love with him. He’s that guy when he walks in the room, people just light up. He’s the one who brings a smile to everyone’s face.” Arkansas was seen as an early favorite because of Bryant’s ties

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 12.05.2018

NFL NOTEBOOK

Washington ‘discussed’ Kaepernick as QB option ASSOCIATED PRESS

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Kelly Bryant will give the Tigers a dual-threat quarterback. He had 16 passing and 16 rushing touchdowns at Clemson.

Jonathan Nance was the leading receiver for Arkansas in 2017 by catching 37 passes for 539 yards and five touchdowns.

to Razorbacks coach Chad Morris, who first recruited the quarterback to Clemson. Bryant, from Calhoun Falls, S.C., announced plans to transfer shortly after Clemson named freshman Trevor Lawrence its starting quarterback for the fifth game of the season. Bryant had started the first four games and split time with the five-star recruit. The NCAA’s new redshirt rule allowed Bryant to preserve his year of eligibility because he only played in four games this season. Had he appeared in one more game for Clemson, Bryant would have exhausted his final year of eligibility. In a small four-game sample size against Furman, Texas A&M, Georgia Southern and

Georgia Tech, Bryant completed 66.7 percent of his passes this season and posted a passer rating of 146.9. Last season, he led Clemson to 12 wins, earned MVP honors in the ACC championship game and guided the Tigers back to the College Football Playoff, where they lost to Alabama in the Sugar Bowl. For his career, Bryant doesn’t have close to Lock’s four-year body of work — Lock has completed 860 of 1,515 passes with 96 touchdowns — but has been more accurate at 66 percent compared to Lock’s 56.8 and nearly as efficient with a 132.8 passer rating compared to Lock’s 138.1. Robinson, who’s trained Bryant and more than 20 other college quarterbacks at Elite Position Training Football Academy in South Carolina, believes he’ll become an instant leader in the locker room. “It’s a matter of getting around the guys on a daily basis and being able to lead them and show them he’s a leader,” Robinson said. “They already know he can play. Now it’s a matter of getting on the same page, just balling and having fun. To me, the main thing with Kelly is he has to get back to having fun. That’s what I’ve always told him. ‘You’ve got to have that smile that everybody loves to see.’ He has to get back to being himself.” Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

Washington Redskins coach Jay Gruden says the team “talked about and discussed” bringing in quarterback Colin Kaepernick for a tryout “but we will probably go in a different direction.” Gruden said there might have been “a greater possibility” of considering Kaepernick if the Redskins were in need of a QB in Week 1 rather than at this stage of the season now. Washington lost Colt McCoy to a broken right leg in a Monday night loss at Philadelphia that left the Redskins at 6-6. McCoy had replaced Alex Smith as the starting quarterback after Smith broke his right leg last month. Gruden said McCoy had surgery Tuesday but would not go on injured reserve immediately because there is a chance he might be able to return before the season ends. For now the Redskins will turn to Mark Sanchez at QB. Kaepernick hasn’t played since the 2016 season, when he began kneeling during the national anthem as a way to protest police brutality and social and racial injustice. He filed a grievance against the NFL last year, saying team owners colluded to keep him off rosters. Game official on leave • The NFL has placed game official Roy Ellison on administrative leave while it investigates an accusation that he called Bills defensive end Jerry Hughes a vulgar name during Buffalo’s game at Miami on Sunday. The league confirmed Ellison’s status and the investigation Tuesday but provided no further details. Hughes confronted Ellison in the tunnel following Buffalo’s loss, and video of the incident shows him accusing the umpire of using a derogatory term. Ellison was suspended in 2013 for making a derogatory statement to Washington tackle Trent Williams during a game. Steelers’ Conner out • Pittsburgh will head to Oakland without running back James Conner. Coach Mike Tomlin said Conner is dealing with a sprained left ankle and will not play when the AFC North leaders take on the Raiders. Conner, who is second in the

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Colin Kaepernick has not played in an NFL game since losing 25-23 to visiting Seattle in the 2016 regular-season finale.

NFL in rushing touchdowns (12) and fifth in rushig yards (909), suffered the injury Sunday. The team initially believed Conner was dealing with a leg contusion, but said the injury turned out to be more serious than originally thought. Veteran Stevan Ridley and rookie Jaylen Samuels are Pittsburgh’s other backs. Buffalo releases Benjamin • The Bills cut Kelvin Benjamin Tuesday, an indication of how poorly the receiver underperformed during his 13 months with the team. Benjamin, who was not expected to be re-signed, had just 23 catches on 62 targets for 354 yards and one touchdown. Niners’ long snapper suspended • San Francisco long snapper Kyle Nelson has been suspended 10 games for violating the league’s policy on performance-enhancing substances. Nelson will miss the final four games of this season and the first six in 2019 under the suspension handed out Tuesday. Nelson says he believes the positive test came from a legal supplement. Broncos add cornerback • Denver has signed veteran cornerback Jamar Taylor to add depth to its secondary with star cornerback Chris Harris Jr. out with chip fracture in his lower right leg. Taylor, a sixth-year pro, played in 74 games and made 41 starts with Arizona (2018), Cleveland (2016-17) and Miami (2013-15).

COLLEGE FOOTBALL NOTEBOOK

NFL STANDINGS

Ohio State’s Meyer will step down

NATIONAL FOOTBALL CONFERENCE

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Ohio State coach Urban Meyer abruptly announced his retirement Tuesday, citing health concerns and a difficult year that included a three-game suspension over his handling of domestic violence allegations against a nowfired assistant coach. He will step down after the Rose Bowl on Jan. 1. Meyer is leaving at the top of his profession after three national championships in a career spanning three decades, the last seven years at OSU, where he has an 82-9 record. The 54-yearold Meyer has an arachnoid cyst in his brain that causes severe headaches. But Meyer, who had previous coaching stops at Bowling Green, Utah and Florida, didn’t blame only his health for stepping away. “The style of coaching I’ve done for 33 years is very intense, very demanding. I tried to delegate more and CEO more and the product started to feel ...,” he said, not finishing his thought. “I didn’t feel I was doing right by our players and by Gene (Smith, the athletics director).” Meyer said leaving would have been more difficult if the program wasn’t healthy. The Buckeyes are 12-1 after winning the Big Ten championship and Meyer said he felt good about his replacement: Assistant coach Ryan Day will take over as the 25th coach of the storied program where Meyer won a national title in 2014 after two at Florida (2006, 2008). “You want to hand it off to someone who could make it stronger,” Meyer said. It was Day who led the Buckeyes when Meyer was suspended before the season opener over his role in the handling of nowfired assistant Zach Smith, who was accused by his ex-wife of domestic abuse. Meyer said he knew about the allegations but wasn’t sure they were true and kept Smith on staff because no

ASSOCIATED PRESS

After 33 years of coaching college football, including the last 17 as a head coach, Ohio State’s Urban Meyer will retire after the Rose Bowl.

criminal charges were filed. A report issued by an investigative committee showed Meyer tolerated bad behavior for years from Smith, including domesticviolence accusations, drug addiction, lies and other acts that directly clash with the values Meyer touts publicly. Asked if the suspension will affect his legacy, Meyer said, “I’m sure it will. “I can lie to you and say it is not important to me.” Locksley is Maryland’s new coach • Maryland hired Alabama offensive coordinator Mike Locksley as its football coach Tuesday night, bringing home a familiar presence after the most tumultuous year in the program’s recent history. Locksley, who won the Broyles Award Tuesday as the nation’s top assistant, was Maryland’s running backs coach from 1997-2002 and returned as the program’s offensive coordinator from 2012-15. Louisville hires Satterfield • Louisville has officially hired Scott Satterfield as its head coach. The University of Louisville Athletic Association unanimously approved the hiring of the former Appalachian State coach on Tuesday. Satterfield,

who received a six-year contract with a base annual salary of $1.625 million and another $1.625 million for media obligations, was introduced at a news conference later Tuesday at Cardinal Stadium. The 45-year-old Satterfield guided the Mountaineers to a 5124 record with three bowl wins in six seasons. Ole Miss WR headed to NFL • A.J. Brown, the all-time leading receiver at Mississippi, has announced he will skip his senior season and enter this spring’s NFL draft. The 6-foot-1, 230-pound Brown had a stellar three-year career for the Rebels, and was recently named All-SEC after catching 85 passes for 1,320 yards and six touchdowns. Charges against Illini player dismissed • A prosecutor has dismissed domestic battery charges against Illinois redshirt freshman defensive tackle Lere Oladipo. Assistant Champaign County State’s Attorney Brooke Hinman said she dismissed three misdemeanor counts against the 20-year-old after both the alleged victim and a witness changed their stories. The case was set to go to trial on Tuesday.

EAST Dallas Philadelphia Washington NY Giants SOUTH New Orleans Carolina Tampa Bay Atlanta NORTH Chicago Minnesota Green Bay Detroit WEST y-LA Rams Seattle Arizona San Francisco

W L 7 5 6 6 6 6 4 8 W L 10 2 6 6 5 7 4 8 W L 8 4 6 5 4 7 4 8 W L 11 1 7 5 3 9 2 10

T Pct PF PA 0 .583 247 223 0 .500 258 266 0 .500 233 257 0 .333 267 315 T Pct PF PA 0 .833 419 269 0 .500 304 306 0 .417 318 355 0 .333 296 333 T Pct PF PA 0 .667 344 241 1 .542 275 270 1 .375 281 287 0 .333 254 316 T Pct PF PA 0 .917 419 298 0 .583 319 259 0 .250 175 310 0 .167 255 336

Home 5-1 4-3 3-3 2-4 Home 5-1 5-1 4-2 3-4 Home 5-1 4-2 4-1-1 3-4 Home 6-0 3-2 1-5 2-3

Away 2-4 2-3 3-3 2-4 Away 5-1 1-5 1-5 1-4 Away 3-3 2-3-1 0-6 1-4 Away 5-1 4-3 2-4 0-7

NFC 6-3 4-5 6-4 3-7 NFC 7-2 4-5 4-5 4-4 NFC 6-2 5-3-1 2-6-1 2-7 NFC 7-1 6-3 3-5 1-8

AFC Div 1-2 3-1 2-1 3-1 0-2 2-2 1-1 0-4 AFC Div 3-0 2-1 2-1 1-2 1-2 2-2 0-4 2-2 AFC Div 2-2 3-1 1-2 2-1-1 2-1 1-2-1 2-1 1-3 AFC Div 4-0 4-0 1-2 2-2 0-4 2-2 1-2 0-4

y-clinched division

AMERICAN FOOTBALL CONFERENCE EAST New England Miami Buffalo NY Jets SOUTH Houston Indianapolis Tennessee Jacksonville NORTH Pittsburgh Baltimore Cincinnati Cleveland WEST Kansas City LA Chargers Denver Oakland

W L 9 3 6 6 4 8 3 9 W L 9 3 6 6 6 6 4 8 W L 7 4 7 5 5 7 4 7 W L 10 2 9 3 6 6 2 10

T 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0 T 1 0 0 1 T 0 0 0 0

Pct .750 .500 .333 .250 Pct .750 .500 .500 .333 Pct .625 .583 .417 .375 Pct .833 .750 .500 .167

PF 331 244 178 243 PF 302 325 221 203 PF 346 297 286 266 PF 444 340 276 220

PA 259 300 293 307 PA 235 279 245 243 PA 282 214 371 312 PA 327 249 262 367

Home 6-0 5-1 2-3 2-4 Home 5-1 4-2 4-1 3-4 Home 3-3 4-2 3-4 3-2-1 Home 5-0 4-2 3-3 1-5

Away AFC NFC Div 3-3 6-2 3-1 3-0 1-5 5-4 1-2 3-1 2-5 3-6 1-2 1-2 1-5 2-7 1-2 0-4 Away AFC NFC Div 4-2 7-2 2-1 3-1 2-4 5-5 1-1 2-2 2-5 4-6 2-0 2-2 1-4 3-6 1-2 1-3 Away AFC NFC Div 4-1-1 4-4-1 3-0 3-1-1 3-3 6-3 1-2 2-3 2-3 3-5 2-2 1-3 1-5 3-5-1 1-2 2-1-1 Away AFC NFC Div 5-2 8-1 2-1 4-0 5-1 6-2 3-1 2-2 3-3 4-5 2-1 2-2 1-5 1-7 1-3 0-4

y-clinched division

Monday Philadelphia 28, Washington 13 Thursday Jacksonville at Tennessee, 7:20 p.m., KTVI-2, NFL Network Sunday Atlanta at Green Bay, noon, KTVI-2 Baltimore at Kansas City, noon, KMOV-4 New Orleans at Tampa Bay, noon NY Giants at Washington, noon Indianapolis at Houston, noon

NY Jets at Buffalo, noon Carolina at Cleveland, noon New England at Miami, noon Cincinnati at LA Chargers, 3:05 p.m. Denver at San Francisco, 3:05 p.m. Philadelphia at Dallas, 3:25 p.m., KTVI-2 Detroit at Arizona, 3:25 p.m. Pittsburgh at Oakland, 3:25 p.m. LA Rams at Chicago, 7:20 p.m., KSDK-5 Monday, Dec. 10 Minnesota at Seattle, 7:15 p.m., ESPN


HOCKEY

12.05.2018 • Wednesday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B5

Tarasenko may be heating up

BLUES NOTEBOOK

His recent goals are among few bright spots for the Blues

Butler can relate to fans’ frustration

BY TOM TIMMERMANN st. Louis Post-dispatch

BY TOM TIMMERMANN st. Louis Post-dispatch

There was not much to get excited about out of the Blues’ just-completed three-game trip, which saw them come back with one win, three injured players and more unanswered questions about how a team can look as good as it did against Colorado and look as bad as it did against Detroit and Arizona. If there was any encouraging sign, it was that the team got two goals from Vladimir Tarasenko on the trip, which joined with his goal against Winnipeg before the trip gave him goals in three games in a row. (The streak ended in Arizona.) Before that run, Tarasenko had gone 10 games without a goal, his longest drought since his rookie season. Since Tarasenko goals tend to come in bunches — before he hit his scoring hiatus, four goals of his other five goals this season came in a run of three games — there’s the chance that this could be the start of a reawakening. “I believe, like I always say, if you work hard, it’s coming back,” Tarasenko said Tuesday. “There were some problems with scoring, but I hope it’s gone. I have to play my best now because there are a lot of injured guys, so we need to step up and do our job out there. … We need to learn a little again how to have fun in the games and enjoy hockey through the hard work and get some goals and get some chances and be positive and enjoy the moment.” The latest chance for the Blues to get something going starts Wednesday against Edmonton and Ken Hitchcock in what Tarasenko termed “a really big game for us.” “From the start of the year, we don’t have a winning streak, so that’s what we need here and we need to figure out how to play back to backs,” Tarasenko said. “Not how to play, but how not to lose the second game. (The Blues are 0-4 in the second game of back-to-backs this season.) A good winning streak would be nice for us. There were a lot of positive moments for us in the games. Like I said, we had a lot of injuries, but it’s not supposed to be easy. It’s hockey. It happens. We need to play for those guys too, not ourselves. We’re working on it here a lot. We’re working on progress a lot too. That’s hoping to make a winning streak to keep our team going. I don’t think the season is done yet.” In the continuing effort to find effective line combinations, as well as work around the team’s growing injury list, interim coach Craig Berube gave his lines one of their biggest shakes of the season Tuesday. Tarasenko was moved to a line centered by Tyler Bozak, with Pat Maroon on the other wing. It’s the first time this season Bozak and Tarasenko have been on the same line. Ryan O’Reilly will center youngsters Zach Sanford and Robert Thomas, and Brayden Schenn will center David Perron and San Antonio call-up Jordan Kyrou. “Sanford and O’Reilly have played together before and had good success,” Berube said. “They’ve got a good playmaker with them there, Robbie Thomas. Schenn and Perron, they’ve been playing together quite a bit, we put some speed there with

Defenseman Chris Butler, like everyone at the Blues’ AHL farm team in San Antonio, pays attention to what goes on with the parent team, but his perspective on the big team’s struggles is formed in a different mold. As someone born and raised in St. Louis, he knows what the team’s poor start means not just for the Blues, but for the city as well. “I think there’s definitely frustration,” Butler said. “Having grown up here, having seen this team for a long period of time, I think this is the first year the expectations have been taken to another level. This was always a storied playoff franchise for such a long time, such a long run, that people seem to be OK with being a playoff team. “Obviously the acquisitions you make this summer kind of catapult you into the category of legitimate contender for the Stanley Cup and this is obviously what the city has been craving for a long time. To come out of the games a little slow, I think there’s a lot of frustration. Fan base, players, everybody involved. I don’t think this was the start anybody was anticipating, but there is a lot of hockey to be played. I know statistically the data shows they’re not in a great spot right now, but it starts with one game and one win. Yeah, there’s a lot of injuries, but it’s a lot of opportunities for other guys, too.” Butler skated in practice with Jay Bouwmeester on Tuesday, and the two look to be the team’s third pairing Wednesday against Edmonton. Butler got in the first two games of the season with the Blues, even scoring a goal, before being sent down to San Antonio as players got healthy. At San Antonio, Butler served as the team’s captain. After starting the season 3-12, San Antonio has gone 6-2-1, so Butler knows something about turning a bad season around, though the Rampage are still in last in the AHL’s Central Division. “Obviously both teams have kind of had some tough stretches as of late,” Butler said. “We were kind of struggling in San Antonio and kind of got things turned around there. The guys who are here from the forward side of things have been playing real well for us. They are a big part of turning things around.”

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Blues right winger Vladimir Tarasenko picks up the puck with Colorado Avalanche left winger Gabriel Landeskog in pursuit during their game Friday.

BLUES VS. OILERS When/Where • 7 p.m. Wednesday, Enterprise Center TV/Radio • NBCSN, KMOX (1120 AM) About the Oilers • Look who’s back. Former Blues coach Ken Hitchcock returns to St. Louis, this time as head coach for Edmonton. The Oilers, 13-12-2 overall, are 4-2-1 since “Hitch” replaced Todd McLellan on Nov. 20. Connor McDavid (14 goals) Leon Draisaitl (13) and Alex Chiasson (11) have combined to score 53 percent of Edmonton’s goals. McDavid missed Monday’s 4-1 loss in Dallas with flu-like symptoms but is expected to play against St. Louis. Despite having one of the game’s biggest stars in McDavid, the Oilers rank 27th in scoring, averaging 2.63 goals per game. Forward Kyle Brodziak, who spent the past three seasons with the Blues before signing with Edmonton in free agency in July, has two goals and one assist in 25 games. Jim Thomas

Kyrou. Bozak’s a good rush player, (we can) get some shots off the rush for Vladi. And then big Patty Maroon going to the net and being around the net.” “Obviously when things aren’t going well, things get changed,” Bozak said. “Me personally, I’ve got to produce more offensively and maybe he’s trying to spark that, being with a guy like Vladi. Hopefully that does that. You have to find chemistry with guys. The games we’ve been losing, I don’t think the chemistry has been there with some lines, so we’re changing it up and I hope it works out.” While Tarasenko has just nine goals this season, he has taken 101 shots, the 10th most in the league coming into Tuesday’s play, so the lack of goals hasn’t been for a lack of opportunities. He’s had four or more shots on goal in 16 of the team’s 25 games so far. Still, there has been criticism that he has passed too much and not taken enough shots. Tarasenko said he has

Oilers hope Hitchcock can turn team around GORDON • FROM B1

more physical,” Berube said. Hitch is just doing what Hitch does — and what Hitch will always want to do in one form or another. He is an iconic figure in the industry, a role model for other coaches. “Being around Hitch, playing for him in junior and pro and then coaching with him, alongside him, around him, he’s a very successful coach, obviously,” Berube said last month. “Hitch is a demanding coach. I think that I try to follow in the same lines. I’m demanding, but I’m fair. But my door is always open so players can come in and communicate. I communicate well with players. That’s the kind of stuff that I learned from Hitch.” Hitchcock didn’t win a Stanley Cup in St. Louis, but he led to the Blues to their first Western Conference finals since

been thinking about his all-around game, and sometimes that means not shooting. “I can’t judge my game, but I’m trying to help the team as much as I can,” he said. “Obviously I need to score, but some games it doesn’t go in, so you need to play a good all-around game like, if your partner is open, I always will make a play. (Then) play good in the D-zone and, like I said, help the team. “Our line (has had) a lot of chances. You can score possibly every game, but the puck doesn’t go in. You just need to find a way to put it through. Maybe play more simple, put more shots in, and they will go in.” Bozak has been impressed with Tarasenko as a playmaker and said he’s seen this before, with elite scorers who choose to pass. He played with Phil Kessel in Toronto and saw many of the same things. But on this line, he wants to be the passer. “I’ll be telling him to be shooting it as much as he can,” Bozak said. “That was the same thing with Kessel. He always wanted to pass the puck. I always say, ‘If I had a shot like theirs I’d be shooting it every time I had the chance.’ He’s a very unselfish player who wants to pass it whenever he can. But I’m going to try to keep saying to him ‘Shoot, shoot, shoot,’ and get it in his head to shoot it every time.” And, Berube said, do it quickly. “I think he’s on the right track, he’s getting good looks,” Berube said. “He’s got to keep getting those good looks and keep shooting. The worst thing that can happen is he starts aiming the puck and not getting it off quick. The key is to get the shot off quick. Don’t aim it, just shoot it and it will go in.” If Tarasenko is about to start a hot streak again, that’s fine with Bozak. “The puck is starting to go in for him now, so it’s a pretty nice time to get put with him,” he said. Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com

2001 and just their second NHL Final Four since 1986. “We had a great relationship with the people, the town, the fans, the players, it was a hell of a six-year run,” Hitchcock said after his Tuesday practice. “When you’re in the playoffs six years in a row, you’re in the conference finals ... I mean, we were in a conference and a division that were strong. We’re sitting there with Nashville and Chicago and then you’ve got LA on a roll and we’re right in the mix with those teams. “In this league, when you make the playoffs that many years in a row, you’ve done a lot of good things.” After that 20-game playoff run in ’16, the Blues lost captain David Backes and key veteran Troy Brouwer to free agency. The strain of the playoff push wore on Hitchcock, too, and he pondered retirement. Ultimately he returned, but Blues general manager Doug Armstrong hired Mike Yeo to assist him for 2016-17 and serve as the coach-in-waiting. “The concept I thought was valid,” Armstrong said last month. “The coach-in-waiting was done because we had a coach who told me he wanted to coach one more year. We were coming off a successful season, we went to the semifinals. I was looking for a continuation coach, that

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NEW START

While Butler and Jordan Kyrou were in St. Louis at the start of the season, this will be the first time for the third call-up, veteran forward Jordan Nolan. This will mark his eighth season in the NHL. Interim coach Craig Berube has him playing on the fourth line with Ivan Barbashev and Oskar Sundqvist. Nolan leads San Antonio in scoring with seven goals and eight assists, though those numbers are uncharacteristic of his NHL career, where he has never had more than six goals. “I was playing a lot of minutes and my goal was to get back up here, so my main focus was how I was playing,” he said. “But I know where this team is. It doesn’t take much to turn a season around. You have to commit and find some new energy, and hopefully the three of us can bring that. “If I come in here and work hard and play the way I know I can, I should bring a little spark, and that can get the boys going.”

BLUENOTES

The team’s three day-to-day players, Alexander Steen, Jaden Schwartz and Carl Gunnarsson, didn’t practice with the team. … Rockford defenseman Dennis Gilbert got a three-game suspension for an illegal check on San Antonio’s Mackenzie MacEachern on Sunday. MacEachern left the game and did not return. Klim Kostin then fought Gilbert and was ejected from the game. … Josh Pauls, who attends Lindenwood and plays for the Blues’ sled hockey team, has been named captain of the 201819 U.S. sled hockey team, which is playing in the Para Hockey Cup in Canada this week. Also on the team is longtime U.S. goalie Steve Cash of Overland. Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com

could continue what that group had built, 100-point seasons, a good playoff run.” But with Yeo waiting in the wings, the players tuned out Hitchcock and ultimately forced his dismissal. “That group didn’t get it done,” Armstrong said. “We had the coach that wanted to coach one more year ended up coaching a half a year here. We had to make that change. Mike came in, did a hell of a job, pushed us on. It made me feel that was the right decision because he was able to get a group that I believed in at that time to go on a long run, to win a playoff round ... to have a successful 25 games at the start of his next (season).” During the 2016-17 season Hitchcock dropped hints that he was willing to coach beyond that season. He recharged his battery after Armstrong fired him and returned to Dallas to coach the Stars — the franchise he led to the 1999 Stanley Cup. This time around he replaced coach Lindy Ruff and prodded the Stars to a 13-point improvement last season. They just missed the playoffs, though, and Hitchcock slid into an advisory role with the Stars. “I think I’ve had enough,” he later told the Dallas Morning News. “I think the coaching part ... is over.” Ah, but it wasn’t. Hitchcock shed 80 pounds and got back into good coaching shape. The Oilers hired him Nov. 20 after firing Todd McLellan. “Ken and I do talk quite a bit,” Armstrong said after that news broke. “I’m not surprised to hear that information. I wish him nothing but the best. He’s a hell of a coach.” The Oilers don’t have much offensive talent beyond superstar Connor McDavid and forwards Leon Draisaitl and Ryan Nugent-Hopkins. So Hitchcock is convincing the group that it must grind out victories. “I know what is wrong, but it’s not going to get fixed overnight,” he told reporters after getting hired. “If we expect to win hockey games we’re not going to do it on talent, we have to develop an atmosphere where we’re 100 percent locked in playing for each other and not with each other. There’s a big difference in those two words. “I went through this in St. Louis, we turned it around in eight or nine days, and we started to really play for each other. I think I can help this group turn that around.” And so his adventure continues. He will coach his 1,544th regular-season NHL game Wednesday night and enjoy still another reunion with familiar faces. “It seems like every arena I go to I’ve coached in,” Hitchcock quipped Tuesday. “Are there any more left? Am I doing an outdoor rink tour?” Jeff Gordon • 314-340-8175 @gordoszone on Twitter jgordon@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 12.05.2018

Seattle gets an NHL team starting in 2021 ASSOCIATED PRESS

SEA ISLAND, GA. • Seattle is getting a National Hockey League team. It will just have to wait a little bit longer to drop the puck. The NHL Board of Governors unanimously approved adding Seattle as the league’s 32nd franchise on Tuesday, with play set to begin in 2021 instead of 2020 to allow enough time for arena renovations. The as-yet unnamed franchise will be the Emerald City’s first major winter sports team since the NBA’s SuperSonics left town in 2008. “Today is a day for celebration in a great city that adores and avidly supports its sports teams and for our 101-year-old sports league,” Commissioner Gary Bettman said.

The announcement came a few moments after Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan let the news slip at a watch party in Seattle, prompting cheers: “I got a call from a mole in the room and it was a unanimous vote. We’re getting hockey.” The decision was widely expected after the Seattle Hockey Partners group impressed the board’s executive committee in October with a plan that had all the ingredients the NHL was looking for. Strong ownership led by billionaire David Bonderman and producer Jerry Bruckheimer, a downtown arena in a sports-crazed city and a season-ticket drive that drummed up 10,000 orders in 12 minutes all cleared the way for the NHL to add another team

NHL STANDINGS GP 28 28 27 28 26 28 25 GP 28 29 28 28 27 25 29 27

W 19 16 17 15 14 9 9 W 17 14 13 14 13 12 11 10

less than three years after approving a franchise in Las Vegas. Seattle Hockey President and CEO Tod Leiweke joked that he’d have to throw out some Seattle 2020 business cards be-

cause of the pushed-back timing. But all sides agreed 2021 was the best time to start. “They’ve always felt that we should have a little more time to build the arena right,” Bruckheimer

the Central Division. Flames 9, Blue Jackets 6 • Johnny Gaudreau had two goals and two assists, and the Calgary Flames scored five goals in the second period to rally past the host Columbus Blue Jackets on Tuesday night. Sean Monahan also had two goals and two assists for Calgary, which scored five straight goals for a 6-4 lead during the second period. Monahan opened that barrage 1:55 into the second, and Elias Lindholm, Matthew Tkachuk, Noah Hanifin and TJ Brodie followed with goals. Tkachuk, Hanifin and Brodie scored in a span of 1:53. Cam Atkinson netted a hat trick for Columbus to extend his point streak to 11 games, but the Blue Jackets lost their second straight.

NHL SUMMARIES

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Nashville Colorado Winnipeg Dallas Minnesota Chicago Blues Pacific Calgary Anaheim San Jose Vegas Edmonton Arizona Vancouver Los Angeles

ASSOCIATED PRESS

NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman (left) shakes hands with Seattle Hockey Partners majority owner David Bonderman at Tuesday’s announcement.

said. “We wanted to bring it to 2020-21 because we want to get going right away, but it’s not fair to the fans or to the players to not have a 100 percent finished arena when we start.” The owners will pay a $650 million expansion fee, up from the $500 million the Vegas Golden Knights paid to join the league just two years ago. Leiweke said arena renovations will cost $800 million and the addition of a stateof-the-art practice facility makes it a total investment of over $1.5 billion. The NHL will also realign its two divisions in the West for the 2021-22 season: Seattle will play the Pacific, home to its closest geographic rivals like Vancouver, Calgary and San Jose, and the Arizona Coyotes will move to

L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 8 1 39 90 67 11-5-0 8-3-1 6-2-0 7 5 37 102 79 6-2-3 10-5-2 3-3-1 8 2 36 94 78 9-3-2 8-5-0 5-3-0 10 3 33 78 72 9-3-1 6-7-2 1-2-1 10 2 30 83 76 8-4-2 6-6-0 6-3-0 14 5 23 77 104 5-5-3 4-9-2 4-3-1 13 3 21 74 85 6-7-1 3-6-2 3-6-3 L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 9 2 36 100 82 8-3-2 9-6-0 6-4-0 10 5 33 70 83 7-3-5 7-7-0 5-3-2 10 5 31 85 89 8-3-2 5-7-3 4-2-1 13 1 29 82 78 7-3-1 7-10-0 7-2-1 12 2 28 71 83 7-4-1 6-8-1 3-3-1 11 2 26 66 66 6-6-1 6-5-1 2-2-1 15 3 25 82 102 5-6-1 6-9-2 3-5-1 16 1 21 58 82 6-8-1 4-8-0 3-4-1

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div Tampa Bay 29 21 7 1 43 114 85 11-4-0 10-3-1 8-2-0 Toronto 28 20 8 0 40 102 73 9-5-0 11-3-0 4-2-0 Buffalo 29 17 8 4 38 89 82 9-2-2 8-6-2 6-3-2 Boston 27 14 9 4 32 71 69 9-3-0 5-6-4 6-4-1 Montreal 28 13 10 5 31 88 90 8-6-2 5-4-3 3-3-4 Detroit 28 12 12 4 28 81 93 7-6-3 5-6-1 3-5-2 Florida 26 11 10 5 27 87 91 6-4-3 5-6-2 4-1-3 Ottawa 28 12 13 3 27 100 114 9-4-2 3-9-1 5-6-1 Metropolitan GP W L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div Washington 26 15 8 3 33 95 83 8-4-2 7-4-1 5-2-1 Columbus 27 15 10 2 32 96 92 7-5-1 8-5-1 3-3-1 NY Islanders 26 13 10 3 29 77 75 7-4-2 6-6-1 10-2-0 NY Rangers 28 13 12 3 29 80 88 10-4-1 3-8-2 2-4-1 Carolina 26 12 10 4 28 66 71 7-4-3 5-6-1 3-3-1 Pittsburgh 26 11 10 5 27 89 87 6-6-2 5-4-3 2-5-1 Philadelphia 25 11 12 2 24 76 88 5-7-1 6-5-1 3-3-0 New Jersey 26 9 12 5 23 75 91 7-2-4 2-10-1 4-4-1

NHL LEADERS Through Monday’s games Goal Scoring Name Team Patrik Laine Winnipeg Brayden Point Tampa Bay Jeff Skinner Buffalo Nathan MacKinnon Colorado Alex Ovechkin Washington David Pastrnak Boston Joe Pavelski San Jose John Tavares Toronto Cam Atkinson Columbus Gabriel Landeskog Colorado Mark Scheifele Winnipeg Sean Monahan Calgary Sidney Crosby Pittsburgh Filip Forsberg Nashville Chris Kreider NY Rangers Connor McDavid Edmonton Pierre-Luc Dubois Columbus Patrick Kane Chicago Auston Matthews Toronto Elias Pettersson Vancouver Assists Name Team Mikko Rantanen Colorado Mitchell Marner Toronto Nikita Kucherov Tampa Bay Blake Wheeler Winnipeg Jack Eichel Buffalo Brent Burns San Jose John Carlson Washington Thomas Chabot Ottawa Nathan MacKinnon Colorado Nicklas Backstrom Washington Jonathan Huberdeau Florida Matt Duchene Ottawa Johnny Gaudreau Calgary Mark Giordano Calgary Claude Giroux Philadelphia Evgeni Malkin Pittsburgh Connor McDavid Edmonton Artemi Panarin Columbus Morgan Rielly Toronto Taylor Hall New Jersey Plus/Minus Name Team Gabriel Landeskog Colorado T.J. Brodie Calgary Ryan McDonagh Tampa Bay Ron Hainsey Toronto Mikko Rantanen Colorado Jeff Skinner Buffalo John Carlson Washington Michal Kempny Washington Colton Sissons Nashville Mattias Ekholm Nashville Mark Giordano Calgary Tyson Barrie Colorado Nathan MacKinnon Colorado Mikael Backlund Calgary Nick Bonino Nashville Kasperi Kapanen Toronto Ryan Murray Columbus Morgan Rielly Toronto

Flames 9, Blue Jackets 6 Calgary 1 5 3 — Columbus 3 2 1 — First period: 1, Calgary, Gaudreau 11 (Monahan, Hamonic), 6:24. 2, Columbus, Werenski 5 (Bjorkstrand, Wennberg), 9:47. 3, Columbus, Anderson 12, 15:43 (pp). 4, Columbus, Atkinson 17 (Panarin, Jones), 19:42. Penalties: Calgary bench, served by Tkachuk (too many men on the ice), 0:44; Giordano, CGY, (hooking), 13:45. Second period: 5, Columbus, Atkinson 18 (Panarin, Jones), 0:49. 6, Calgary, Monahan 16 (Giordano), 1:55 (pp). 7, Calgary, Lindholm 13 (Monahan, Hamonic), 2:46. 8, Calgary, Tkachuk 13 (Gaudreau, Lindholm), 12:39 (pp). 9, Calgary, Hanifin 3 (Tkachuk, Jankowski), 13:29. 10, Calgary, Brodie 3 (Gaudreau), 14:32. 11, Columbus, Foligno 7 (Murray), 15:00. Penalties: Dubinsky, CBJ, (hooking), 1:50; Werenski, CBJ, (tripping), 11:28; Murray, CBJ, (holding), 17:02; Brodie, CGY, (hooking), 19:42. Third period: 12, Calgary, Monahan 17 (Tkachuk, Giordano), 2:15 (pp). 13, Calgary, Gaudreau 12 (Giordano, Smith), 6:29. 14, Columbus, Atkinson 19 (Murray, Nutivaara), 8:13. 15, Calgary, Czarnik 2 (Backlund), 13:11. Penalties: Anderson, CBJ, (tripping), 1:25. Shots: Calgary 8-14-6: 28. Columbus 14-9-7: 30. Power-plays: Calgary 3 of 4; Columbus 1 of 3. Goalies: Calgary, Smith 9-7-1 (16 shots-13 saves), Rittich 8-2-1 (14-11). Columbus, Bobrovsky 10-9-0 (26-18), Korpisalo 5-1-2 (2-1). A: 14,885.

Ottawa 0 1 1 — Montreal 1 3 1 — First period: 1, Montreal, Drouin 10 (Peca, Domi), 14:30. Penalties: Domi, MTL, (roughing), 5:49; Batherson, OTT, (roughing), 5:49; Domi, MTL, served by Kotkaniemi, (roughing), 5:49; Stone, OTT, (kneeing), 10:17; Chaput, MTL, (holding), 19:29; Tkachuk, OTT, (slashing), 19:29; Gallagher, MTL, (holding), 19:56. Second period: 2, Ottawa, DeMelo 3 (Boedker, Tierney), 8:49. 3, Montreal, Domi 12 (Drouin), 14:38. 4, Montreal, Domi 13 (Byron, Drouin), 17:29. 5, Montreal, Lehkonen 5 (Kotkaniemi, Shaw), 18:17. Penalties: Tierney, OTT, (tripping), 3:55. Third period: 6, Montreal, Gallagher 12 (Tatar), 4:21. 7, Ottawa, Stone 13 (Duchene), 12:29. Penalties: Kotkaniemi, MTL, (hooking), 4:43; Kulak, MTL, Major (fighting), 10:50; Dzingel, OTT, Major (fighting), 10:50. Shots: Ottawa 10-13-7: 30. Montreal 17-12-12: 41. Power-plays: Ottawa 0 of 3; Montreal 0 of 2. Goalies: Ottawa, Anderson 11-10-3 (41 shots-36 saves). Montreal, Price 9-8-4 (30-28). A: 20,705.

Thursday Detroit at Toronto, 6 p.m. NY Islanders at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. Colorado at Florida, 6 p.m. Columbus at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Montreal at Ottawa, 6:30 p.m. Boston at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m. Washington at Arizona, 8 p.m. Minnesota at Calgary, 8 p.m. Nashville at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Chicago at Vegas, 9 p.m. New Jersey at Los Angeles, 9:30 p.m. Friday Blues at Winnipeg, 7 p.m. San Jose at Dallas, 7 p.m. Minnesota at Edmonton, 8 p.m. Carolina at Anaheim, 9 p.m.

9 6

EASTERN CONFERENCE Str Home Away L-1 10-3 10-2 W-4 13-1 4-7 W-3 6-3 7-7 L-7 3-9 5-8 L-1 4-7 4-10 Str Home Away W-2 6-6 6-6 L-2 8-5 3-7 W-2 7-5 3-9 L-1 5-9 4-5 L-3 3-8 2-11 Str Home Away L-1 11-2 4-5 L-1 9-4 4-4 W-1 7-4 7-6 W-1 3-8 2-10 L-7 3-9 2-11

Conf 12-3 12-7 9-5 6-7 5-13 Conf 8-6 11-8 6-6 5-12 4-11 Conf 8-3 10-6 9-3 4-12 4-11

L10 8-2 8-2 6-4 2-8 4-6 L10 6-4 4-6 5-5 4-6 2-8 L10 6-4 7-3 6-4 3-7 1-9

Southwest W L Pct GB L10 Str Home Away 13 9 .591 — 6-4 L-1 7-3 6-6 Memphis 12 10 .545 1 8-2 W-2 10-2 2-8 Dallas 9-3 3-10 New Orleans 12 13 .480 2½ 4-6 L-1 11 12 .478 2½ 5-5 L-1 5-5 6-7 Houston 3 4-6 L-1 7-4 4-9 San Antonio 11 13 .458 W L Pct GB L10 Str Home Away Northwest 16 7 .696 — 7-3 W-6 9-3 7-4 Denver 9-3 6-4 Oklahoma City 15 7 .682 ½ 8-2 W-3 13 11 .542 3½ 3-7 L-3 8-4 5-7 Portland 12 12 .500 4½ 7-3 W-1 10-4 2-8 Minnesota Utah 12 13 .480 5 5-5 W-1 3-6 9-7 Pacific W L Pct GB L10 Str Home Away LA Clippers 16 7 .696 — 8-2 W-1 9-1 7-6 1 4-6 W-1 11-2 5-7 Golden State 16 9 .640 14 9 .609 2 7-3 W-3 9-4 5-5 LA Lakers Sacramento 12 11 .522 4 5-5 W-2 6-5 6-6 4 20 .167 12½ 1-9 L-6 3-9 1-11 Phoenix

Conf 8-5 7-7 6-8 5-9 9-9 Conf 10-4 7-6 6-8 6-9 8-8 Conf 11-5 8-6 10-6 7-9 3-12

WESTERN CONFERENCE

Boston 0 0 0 — 0 Florida 0 — 4 1 5 First period: None. Penalties: Nordstrom, BOS, (holding), 15:34; Pysyk, FLA, (interference), 17:41. Second period: 1, Florida, Hoffman 13 (Sceviour, Huberdeau), 4:21. 2, Florida, Matheson 2, 13:13. 3, Florida, Huberdeau 7 (Barkov, Yandle), 15:14. 4, Florida, Hoffman 14 (Yandle, Barkov), 19:55 (pp). Penalties: McCann, FLA, (hooking), 5:30; Haley, FLA, (high sticking), 14:04; Pastrnak, BOS, (holding), 14:20; Hunt, FLA, (interference), 17:51; Pastrnak, BOS, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 17:51; DeBrusk, BOS, (slashing), 19:00. Third period: 5, Florida, Dadonov 13 (Huberdeau, Barkov), 14:26 (pp). Penalties: Bjugstad, FLA, (holding), 5:20; Moore, BOS, (hooking), 9:10; Wagner, BOS, (tripping), 10:49; Carlo, BOS, (cross checking), 13:02. Shots: Boston 7-16-10: 33. Florida 13-20-11: 44. Power-plays: Boston 0 of 4; Florida 2 of 6. Goalies: Boston, Halak 8-4-2 (44 shots-39 saves). Florida, Luongo 5-3-0 (33-33). A: 12,058.

Penguins 6, Avalanche 3

2 5

BY ASSOCIATED PRESS

Myles Turner matched his season high with 18 points and added 11 rebounds and five blocked shots as the host Indiana Pacers defeated Chicago 96-90 on Tuesday night and spoiled the debut of new Bulls coach Jim Boylen. Darren Collison had 23 points and eight rebounds, Bojan Bogdanovic scored 14 points and Tyreke Evans finished with 10 for Indiana. Domantis Sabonis added nine points and 11 rebounds off the bench for the Pacers. Lauri Markkanen led the Bulls with 21 points and 10 rebounds. Jus-

Colorado 0 3 0 — 3 3 3 Pittsburgh 0 — 6 First period: 1, Pittsburgh, Guentzel 12 (Letang, Dumoulin), 2:46. 2, Pittsburgh, Malkin 10 (Pearson, Hornqvist), 6:52. 3, Pittsburgh, Brassard 3 (Maatta, Aston-Reese), 7:27. Penalties: Simon, PIT, (hooking), 12:47. Second period: 4, Colorado, Barrie 4 (Landeskog, Rantanen), 8:16 (pp). 5, Colorado, Soderberg 9 (Cole, Calvert), 9:32. 6, Colorado, Nieto 3 (Bourque), 13:17 (sh). Penalties: Letang, PIT, (interference), 6:42; Crosby, PIT, (tripping), 10:59; Rantanen, COL, (interference), 11:44. Third period: 7, Pittsburgh, Hornqvist 10 (Letang, Kessel), 6:11 (pp). 8, Pittsburgh, Hornqvist 11 (Malkin), 7:32. 9, Pittsburgh, Hornqvist 12, 8:58. Penalties: Nemeth, COL, (slashing), 5:47; Compher, COL, (roughing), 14:48; J.Johnson, PIT, (roughing), 14:48; MacKinnon, COL, (tripping), 17:01. Shots: Colorado 18-12-15: 45. Pittsburgh 10-11-11: 32. Power-plays: Colorado 1 of 3; Pittsburgh 1 of 3. Goalies: Colorado, Varlamov 10-6-3 (32 shots-26 saves). Pittsburgh, DeSmith 7-4-3 (45-42). A: 18,415.

Jets 3, Islanders 1 Winnipeg 0 0 3 — 3 NY Islanders 0 0 1 — 1 First period: None. Penalties: Laine, WPG, (cross checking), 1:08; Mayfield, NYI, (tripping), 10:43. Second period: None. Penalties: None. Third period: 1, NY Islanders, Lee 10 (Boychuk, Nelson), 1:33. 2, Winnipeg, Trouba 3 (Connor, Wheeler), 3:39 (pp). 3, Winnipeg, Lowry 5 (Perreault, Tanev), 4:01. 4, Winnipeg, Ehlers 9, 19:57. Penalties: Barzal, NYI, (holding stick), 1:58; Tanev, WPG, (tripping), 8:57; Lee, NYI, (tripping), 9:32. Shots: Winnipeg 3-15-6: 24. NY Islanders 8-12-8: 28. Power-plays: Winnipeg 1 of 3; NY Islanders 0 of 2. Goalies: Winnipeg, Hellebuyck 12-7-1 (28 shots-27 saves). NY Islanders, Greiss 9-5-1 (23-21). A: 9,125.

GP 27 27 28 26 28 28 25 27 27 26 25 27 27 27 25 25 26 25 27 26 GP 27 27 28 27 27 28 25 23 28 28 27 23 27 27 27 27 26 27

G 21 20 20 19 19 19 17 17 16 16 16 15 14 14 14 14 13 13 13 13 A 34 32 30 30 27 25 24 24 24 23 22 21 21 21 21 21 21 20 20 19 +/19 18 18 16 16 16 15 15 15 14 14 13 13 12 12 12 12 12

Detroit at Milwaukee, 7 p.m. LA Clippers at Memphis, 7 p.m. Philadelphia at Toronto, 7 p.m. San Antonio at LA Lakers, 9:30 p.m. Thursday New York at Boston, 7 p.m. Phoenix at Portland, 9 p.m. Houston at Utah, 9:30 p.m. Friday Denver at Charlotte, 6 p.m. Indiana at Orlando, 6 p.m. Philadelphia at Detroit, 6 p.m. Sacramento at Cleveland, 6:30 p.m. Toronto at Brooklyn, 6:30 p.m. Memphis at New Orleans, 7 p.m. Oklahoma City at Chicago, 7 p.m. LA Lakers at San Antonio, 7:30 p.m. Miami at Phoenix, 8 p.m. Golden State at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.

tin Holiday, facing off against his brother, Indiana rookie Aaron Holiday, finished with 15 points. Chicago has lost seven straight games. Boylan was named Bulls coach on Monday, taking over for the fired Fred Hoiberg, who was let go following a 5-19 start this season.

NOTEBOOK

Fultz sees specialists • Philadelphia 76ers guard Markelle Fultz is out indefinitely with thoracic outlet syndrome. Fultz visited with several specialists to figure out what’s ailing him. The Sixers said the specialists have identified a compression or irrita-

tion in the area between the lower neck and upper chest. Physical therapy was recommended for Fultz before returning to play. Other news • Memphis general manager Chris Wallace announced that the team has signed 6-foot-11 Joakim Noah for the remainder of the season. ... Los Angeles Clippers guard Patrick Beverley has been fined $25,000 by the NBA for throwing a basketball at a fan during a game Sunday in Dallas. ... Atlanta will be without Taurean Prince for at least three weeks after the small forward suffered a left ankle injury Monday.

NBA SUMMARIES Magic 105, Heat 90

Kings 122, Suns 105

Orlando: Simmons 1-6 0-0 3, Gordon 7-16 3-4 20, Vucevic 8-16 1-2 19, Augustin 3-11 3-3 11, Fournier 5-10 0-0 13, Isaac 4-5 4-4 12, Bamba 2-4 0-2 4, Grant 1-5 1-2 4, Ross 7-13 3-3 19. Totals 38-86 15-20 105. Miami: McGruder 3-8 0-0 7, J.Johnson 5-8 0-0 11, Whiteside 6-7 0-2 12, Richardson 2-14 1-1 6, Ellington 2-7 0-0 6, Winslow 6-13 0-0 14, Olynyk 4-11 1-2 13, Adebayo 3-7 0-0 6, T.Johnson 2-3 0-0 4, Wade 5-13 0-0 11. Totals 38-91 2-5 90. Orlando 27 30 29 — 105 19 Miami 25 25 12 28 — 90 3-point goals: Orlando 14-28 (Gordon 3-3, Fournier 3-4, Ross 2-3, Vucevic 2-5, Augustin 2-6, Simmons 1-2, Grant 1-4, Isaac 0-1), Miami 12-35 (Olynyk 4-10, Winslow 2-4, Ellington 2-6, McGruder 1-1, J.Johnson 1-3, Wade 1-4, Richardson 1-7). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Orlando 43 (Gordon 13), Miami 47 (Whiteside 9). Assists: Orlando 22 (Augustin, Gordon 5), Miami 19 (Richardson 5). Total fouls: Orlando 13, Miami 19. Technicals: Orlando coach Steve Clifford. A: 19,600 (19,600).

Sacramento: Shumpert 2-5 3-4 7, Bjelica 1-3 0-0 2, CauleyStein 3-5 0-0 6, Fox 5-11 5-8 16, Hield 7-13 3-4 20, Ju.Jackson 4-5 0-0 10, Giles III 4-5 5-9 13, Koufos 5-7 1-2 11, Mason 3-7 2-3 9, Ferrell 0-2 0-0 0, Bogdanovic 5-9 2-2 14, Williams 5-6 0-0 11, McLemore 1-6 0-0 3. Totals 45-84 21-32 122. Phoenix: Jo.Jackson 4-11 4-6 14, Ariza 5-13 1-2 14, Ayton 5-8 0-0 10, Okobo 3-8 0-0 6, Bridges 3-12 1-1 7, Anderson 0-0 0-0 0, Bender 0-1 4-4 4, Holmes 4-7 2-2 10, Melton 9-12 0-0 21, Crawford 1-6 4-5 6, Daniels 4-9 1-1 13. Totals 38-87 17-21 105. 36 32 31 23 — 122 Sacramento Phoenix 9 31 27 38 — 105 3-point goals: Sacramento 11-24 (Hield 3-5, Ju.Jackson 2-2, Bogdanovic 2-5, Fox 1-1, Mason 1-1, Williams 1-2, McLemore 1-4, Bjelica 0-1, Shumpert 0-3), Phoenix 12-43 (Daniels 4-9, Melton 3-4, Ariza 3-8, Jo.Jackson 2-6, Bender 0-1, Okobo 0-4, Crawford 0-4, Bridges 0-7). Fouled out: Holmes. Rebounds: Sacramento 42 (Bjelica 7), Phoenix 43 (Holmes 10). Assists: Sacramento 27 (Fox 7), Phoenix 27 (Crawford, Melton 5). Total fouls: Sacramento 22, Phoenix 27. Technicals: Sacramento coach Kings (Defensive three second), Giles III. A: 12,977 (18,422).

Pacers 96, Bulls 90 Tuesday Indiana 96, Chicago 90 Orlando 105, Miami 90 Dallas 111, Portland 102 Sacramento 122, Phoenix 105 Utah 139, San Antonio 105 Monday Oklahoma City 110, Detroit 83 Cleveland 99, Brooklyn 97 Denver 106, Toronto 103 Golden State 128, Atlanta 111 Washington 110, New York 107 LA Clippers 129, New Orleans 126 Minnesota 103, Houston 91 Wednesday Denver at Orlando, 6 p.m. Golden State at Cleveland, 6 p.m. Oklahoma City at Brooklyn, 6:30 p.m. Washington at Atlanta, 6:30 p.m. Charlotte at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Dallas at New Orleans, 7 p.m.

Panthers 5, Bruins 0

GP 26 28 28 27 26 26 28 27 25 27 26 27 22 26 28 26 26 27 13 23

Pacers beat Bulls, new coach Boylen

NBA STANDINGS Atlantic W L Pct GB Toronto 20 5 .800 — Philadelphia 17 8 .680 3 Boston 13 10 .565 6 Brooklyn 8 17 .320 12 New York 8 17 .320 12 Southeast W L Pct GB Orlando 12 12 .500 — Charlotte 11 12 .478 ½ 2 Washington 10 14 .417 9 14 .391 2½ Miami 5 19 .208 7 Atlanta W L Pct GB Central 15 7 .682 — Milwaukee Detroit 13 8 .619 1½ Indiana 14 10 .583 2 Cleveland 5 18 .217 10½ 5 20 .200 11½ Chicago

Maple Leafs 4, Sabres 3, OT Toronto 0 2 1 1 — 4 Buffalo 2 — 0 1 0 3 First period: None. Penalties: None. Second period: 1, Toronto, Matthews 14 (Hainsey), 8:33. 2, Buffalo, Reinhart 8 (Ristolainen, Beaulieu), 14:01. 3, Toronto, Gardiner 2 (Tavares, Marner), 19:50. Penalties: Brown, TOR, (interference), 11:19; Thompson, BUF, (hooking), 11:39. Third period: 4, Buffalo, Eichel 6 (Skinner, Ristolainen), 2:39. 5, Buffalo, Eichel 7 (Reinhart), 12:57. 6, Toronto, Marleau 7 (Rielly, Matthews), 14:47. Penalties: Thompson, BUF, (hooking), 7:16; Marleau, TOR, (interference), 8:44. Overtime: 7, Toronto, Matthews 15 (Kapanen, Gardiner), 4:57. Penalties: None. Shots: Toronto 7-10-11-2: 30. Buffalo 14-12-11-4: 41. Power-plays: Toronto 0 of 2; Buffalo 0 of 2. Goalies: Toronto, Andersen 16-7-0 (41 shots-38 saves). Buffalo, Ullmark 5-0-3 (30-26). A: 19,070.

Canadiens 5, Senators 2

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss.

Tuesday Winnipeg 3, NY Islanders 1 Florida 5, Boston 0 Calgary 9, Columbus 6 Pittsburgh 6, Colorado 3 Montreal 5, Ottawa 2 Tampa Bay 6, Detroit 5, SO Toronto 4, Buffalo 3, OT Washington at Vegas, late Minnesota at Vancouver, late Arizona at Los Angeles, late Monday Tampa Bay 5, New Jersey 1 Nashville 2, Buffalo 1 Dallas 4, Edmonton 1 Wednesday Edmonton at Blues, 7 p.m. Chicago at Anaheim, 9:30 p.m. Carolina at San Jose, 9:30 p.m.

Lightning 6, Red Wings 5, SO Tampa Bay 0 3 2 0 — 6 Detroit 2 2 1 0 — 5 Tampa Bay won shootout 2-1. First period: 1, Detroit, Nyquist 5 (Larkin), 16:54. 2, Detroit, Nielsen 2 (Athanasiou), 17:15. Penalties: None. Second period: 3, Tampa Bay, Joseph 7 (Callahan), 5:10. 4, Tampa Bay, Joseph 8 (Gourde), 11:37. 5, Detroit, Nielsen 3 (Witkowski), 13:33. 6, Tampa Bay, Stamkos 10 (Callahan), 14:27. 7, Detroit, Nielsen 4 (Athanasiou), 16:26. Penalties: Green, DET, (interference), 19:42. Third period: 8, Detroit, Nyquist 6 (Larkin, Abdelkader), 4:06. 9, Tampa Bay, Miller 6 (Sergachev), 9:50. 10, Tampa Bay, Paquette 7 (Joseph), 14:58 (sh). Penalties: Killorn, TB, (hooking), 6:45; Athanasiou, DET, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 6:45; Callahan, TB, (interference), 14:02; Johnson, TB, (tripping), 18:50. Overtime: None. Penalties: Larkin, DET, (hooking), 4:29. Shootout: Tampa Bay 2 (Hedman G, Point NG, Kucherov G), Detroit 1 (Nielsen NG, Vanek NG, Nyquist G). Shots: Tampa Bay 5-18-11-1: 35. Detroit 12-7-4-1: 24. Power-plays: Tampa Bay 0 of 2; Detroit 0 of 2. Goalies: Tampa Bay, Pasquale 1-0-0 (24 shots-19 saves). Detroit, Howard 9-6-4 (35-30). A: 18,477.

Chicago: J.Holiday 5-11 2-2 15, Markkanen 8-24 0-0 21, Carter Jr. 5-11 2-2 12, Arcidiacono 0-5 0-0 0, LaVine 6-15 0-0 13, Parker 6-12 0-0 12, Hutchison 1-4 0-0 3, Payne 4-7 1-1 10, Harrison 2-5 0-0 4. Totals 37-94 5-5 90. Indiana: Bogdanovic 5-10 3-4 14, Young 3-8 0-0 6, Turner 8-17 2-4 18, Collison 6-7 8-8 23, Evans 3-9 4-4 10, McDermott 1-5 0-0 2, Sabonis 4-8 1-2 9, Joseph 3-6 2-2 9, A.Holiday 2-6 0-0 5. Totals 35-76 20-24 96. 21 24 22 23 — 90 Chicago Indiana 23 20 27 26 — 96 3-point goals: Chicago 11-31 (Markkanen 5-13, J.Holiday 3-6, Hutchison 1-1, Payne 1-2, LaVine 1-3, Harrison 0-1, Parker 0-2, Arcidiacono 0-3), Indiana 6-22 (Collison 3-4, Joseph 1-3, A.Holiday 1-3, Bogdanovic 1-4, Young 0-1, Turner 0-1, Evans 0-3, McDermott 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Chicago 44 (Carter Jr. 13), Indiana 45 (Turner, Sabonis 11). Assists: Chicago 26 (LaVine 9), Indiana 22 (Turner, Joseph, Collison, A.Holiday 3). Total fouls: Chicago 23, Indiana 13. A: 16,446 (20,000).

Jazz 139, Spurs 105 San Antonio: Gay 0-3 0-0 0, Bertans 3-6 0-0 8, Aldridge 7-10 2-2 16, Forbes 4-10 0-0 9, DeRozan 7-13 2-3 16, Pondexter 0-1 0-0 0, Cunningham 1-4 0-0 3, Metu 4-8 2-2 10, Poeltl 9-11 2-2 20, Mills 3-8 0-0 8, White 5-11 0-0 10, Belinelli 1-5 2-2 5. Totals 44-90 10-11 105. Utah: Ingles 5-9 0-0 13, Favors 5-7 4-4 14, Gobert 5-7 8-10 18, Rubio 5-10 0-0 12, Mitchell 7-13 2-2 20, O’Neale 4-9 1-1 11, Sefolosha 3-4 0-0 7, Crowder 3-4 0-0 8, Niang 2-3 0-0 5, Udoh 1-1 0-0 2, Neto 3-5 0-0 7, Exum 3-4 0-0 7, Korver 5-8 2-3 15. Totals 51-84 17-20 139. San Antonio 20 27 31 27 — 105 29 41 — Utah 34 35 139 3-point goals: San Antonio 7-22 (Bertans 2-4, Mills 2-5, Cunningham 1-3, Belinelli 1-4, Forbes 1-5, White 0-1), Utah 20-33 (Mitchell 4-6, Korver 3-4, Ingles 3-6, Rubio 2-3, Crowder 2-3, O’Neale 2-4, Exum 1-1, Niang 1-2, Neto 1-2, Sefolosha 1-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: San Antonio 32 (Poeltl 7), Utah 42 (Gobert 10). Assists: San Antonio 25 (DeRozan 7), Utah 38 (Ingles, Rubio 7). Total fouls: San Antonio 19, Utah 20. A: 18,306 (18,306).

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Bulls head coach Jim Boylen questions a call on Tuesday against the Pacers in Indianapolis. Mavericks 111, Trail Blazers 102

Portland: Harkless 2-5 0-0 5, Aminu 5-6 1-2 12, Nurkic 4-9 1-2 9, Lillard 10-23 11-12 33, McCollum 7-19 2-2 18, Leonard 0-0 1-1 1, Collins 1-2 0-0 2, Curry 1-3 0-0 3, Turner 5-10 3-4 13, Stauskas 3-7 0-0 6. Totals 38-84 19-23 102. Dallas: Barnes 4-12 3-5 11, Doncic 6-14 7-9 21, Jordan 4-8 4-5 12, Smith Jr. 4-9 3-5 12, Matthews 6-12 2-3 17, Finney-Smith 2-3 0-0 5, Kleber 4-7 0-0 8, Powell 2-5 1-2 7, Barea 3-11 3-4 9, Harris 3-6 1-2 9. Totals 38-87 24-35 111. 20 28 — 102 25 29 Portland Dallas 26 24 — 34 27 111 3-point goals: Portland 7-24 (McCollum 2-7, Lillard 2-8, Aminu 1-2, Curry 1-2, Harkless 1-2, Stauskas 0-3), Dallas 11-30 (Matthews 3-6, Powell 2-3, Doncic 2-4, Harris 2-5, Finney-Smith 1-1, Smith Jr. 1-4, Kleber 0-2, Barea 0-2, Barnes 0-3). Fouled out: Nurkic. Rebounds: Portland 48 (Aminu 13), Dallas 51 (Jordan 17). Assists: Portland 20 (Lillard 8), Dallas 25 (Smith Jr. 9). Total fouls: Portland 29, Dallas 19. Technicals: Aminu, Harkless, Matthews. A: 19,341 (19,200).


SPORTS

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • WeDneSDAy • 12.05.2018

Seattle gets an NHL team starting in 2021 ASSOCIATED PRESS

SEA ISLAND, GA. • Seattle is getting a National Hockey League team. It will just have to wait a little bit longer to drop the puck. The NHL Board of Governors unanimously approved adding Seattle as the league’s 32nd franchise on Tuesday, with play set to begin in 2021 instead of 2020 to allow enough time for arena renovations. The as-yet unnamed franchise will be the Emerald City’s first major winter sports team since the NBA’s SuperSonics left town in 2008. “Today is a day for celebration in a great city that adores and avidly supports its sports teams and for our 101-year-old sports league,” Commissioner Gary Bettman said.

The announcement came a few moments after Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan let the news slip at a watch party in Seattle, prompting cheers: “I got a call from a mole in the room and it was a unanimous vote. We’re getting hockey.” The decision was widely expected after the Seattle Hockey Partners group impressed the board’s executive committee in October with a plan that had all the ingredients the NHL was looking for. Strong ownership led by billionaire David Bonderman and producer Jerry Bruckheimer, a downtown arena in a sports-crazed city and a season-ticket drive that drummed up 10,000 orders in 12 minutes all cleared the way for the NHL to add another team

NHL STANDINGS GP 28 28 27 28 27 28 25 GP 28 29 28 29 27 26 30 28

W 19 16 17 15 15 9 9 W 17 14 13 15 13 13 11 10

less than three years after approving a franchise in Las Vegas. Seattle Hockey President and CEO Tod Leiweke joked that he’d have to throw out some Seattle 2020 business cards be-

cause of the pushed-back timing. But all sides agreed 2021 was the best time to start. “They’ve always felt that we should have a little more time to build the arena right,” Bruckheimer

the Central Division. Flames 9, Blue Jackets 6 • Johnny Gaudreau had two goals and two assists, and the Calgary Flames scored five goals in the second period to rally past the host Columbus Blue Jackets on Tuesday night. Sean Monahan also had two goals and two assists for Calgary, which scored five straight goals for a 6-4 lead during the second period. Monahan opened that barrage 1:55 into the second, and Elias Lindholm, Matthew Tkachuk, Noah Hanifin and TJ Brodie followed with goals. Tkachuk, Hanifin and Brodie scored in a span of 1:53. Cam Atkinson netted a hat trick for Columbus to extend his point streak to 11 games, but the Blue Jackets lost their second straight.

NHL SUMMARIES

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Nashville Colorado Winnipeg Dallas Minnesota Chicago Blues Pacific Calgary Anaheim San Jose Vegas Edmonton Arizona Vancouver Los Angeles

ASSOCIATED PRESS

NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman (left) shakes hands with Seattle Hockey Partners majority owner David Bonderman at Tuesday’s announcement.

said. “We wanted to bring it to 2020-21 because we want to get going right away, but it’s not fair to the fans or to the players to not have a 100 percent finished arena when we start.” The owners will pay a $650 million expansion fee, up from the $500 million the Vegas Golden Knights paid to join the league just two years ago. Leiweke said arena renovations will cost $800 million and the addition of a stateof-the-art practice facility makes it a total investment of over $1.5 billion. The NHL will also realign its two divisions in the West for the 2021-22 season: Seattle will play the Pacific, home to its closest geographic rivals like Vancouver, Calgary and San Jose, and the Arizona Coyotes will move to

L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 8 1 39 90 67 11-5-0 8-3-1 6-2-0 7 5 37 102 79 6-2-3 10-5-2 3-3-1 8 2 36 94 78 9-3-2 8-5-0 5-3-0 10 3 33 78 72 9-3-1 6-7-2 1-2-1 10 2 32 86 78 8-4-2 7-6-0 6-3-0 14 5 23 77 104 5-5-3 4-9-2 4-3-1 13 3 21 74 85 6-7-1 3-6-2 3-6-3 L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 9 2 36 100 82 8-3-2 9-6-0 6-4-0 10 5 33 70 83 7-3-5 7-7-0 5-3-2 10 5 31 85 89 8-3-2 5-7-3 4-2-1 13 1 31 87 81 8-3-1 7-10-0 7-2-1 12 2 28 71 83 7-4-1 6-8-1 3-3-1 11 2 28 68 67 6-6-1 7-5-1 3-2-1 16 3 25 84 105 5-7-1 6-9-2 3-5-1 17 1 21 59 84 6-9-1 4-8-0 3-5-1

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div Tampa Bay 29 21 7 1 43 114 85 11-4-0 10-3-1 8-2-0 Toronto 28 20 8 0 40 102 73 9-5-0 11-3-0 4-2-0 Buffalo 29 17 8 4 38 89 82 9-2-2 8-6-2 6-3-2 Boston 27 14 9 4 32 71 69 9-3-0 5-6-4 6-4-1 Montreal 28 13 10 5 31 88 90 8-6-2 5-4-3 3-3-4 Detroit 28 12 12 4 28 81 93 7-6-3 5-6-1 3-5-2 Florida 26 11 10 5 27 87 91 6-4-3 5-6-2 4-1-3 Ottawa 28 12 13 3 27 100 114 9-4-2 3-9-1 5-6-1 Metropolitan GP W L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div Washington 27 15 9 3 33 98 88 8-4-2 7-5-1 5-2-1 Columbus 27 15 10 2 32 96 92 7-5-1 8-5-1 3-3-1 NY Islanders 26 13 10 3 29 77 75 7-4-2 6-6-1 10-2-0 NY Rangers 28 13 12 3 29 80 88 10-4-1 3-8-2 2-4-1 Carolina 26 12 10 4 28 66 71 7-4-3 5-6-1 3-3-1 Pittsburgh 26 11 10 5 27 89 87 6-6-2 5-4-3 2-5-1 25 11 12 2 24 76 88 5-7-1 6-5-1 3-3-0 Philadelphia 26 9 12 5 23 75 91 7-2-4 2-10-1 4-4-1 New Jersey NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Tuesday Winnipeg 3, NY Islanders 1 Florida 5, Boston 0 Calgary 9, Columbus 6 Pittsburgh 6, Colorado 3 Montreal 5, Ottawa 2 Tampa Bay 6, Detroit 5, SO Toronto 4, Buffalo 3, OT Vegas 5, Washington 3 Minnesota 3, Vancouver 2 Arizona 2, Los Angeles 1 Monday Tampa Bay 5, New Jersey 1 Nashville 2, Buffalo 1 Dallas 4, Edmonton 1 Wednesday Edmonton at Blues, 7 p.m. Chicago at Anaheim, 9:30 p.m. Carolina at San Jose, 9:30 p.m.

Friday Blues at Winnipeg, 7 p.m. San Jose at Dallas, 7 p.m. Minnesota at Edmonton, 8 p.m. Carolina at Anaheim, 9 p.m.

Str Home Away L-1 10-3 10-2 W-4 13-1 4-7 W-3 6-3 7-7 L-7 3-9 5-8 L-1 4-7 4-10 Str Home Away W-2 6-6 6-6 L-2 8-5 3-7 W-2 7-5 3-9 L-1 5-9 4-5 L-3 3-8 2-11 Str Home Away L-1 11-2 4-5 L-1 9-4 4-4 W-1 7-4 7-6 W-1 3-8 2-10 L-7 3-9 2-11

Conf 12-3 12-7 9-5 6-7 5-13 Conf 8-6 11-8 6-6 5-12 4-11 Conf 8-3 10-6 9-3 4-12 4-11

L10 8-2 8-2 6-4 2-8 4-6 L10 6-4 4-6 5-5 4-6 2-8 L10 6-4 7-3 6-4 3-7 1-9

Southwest W L Pct GB L10 Str Home Away 13 9 .591 — 6-4 L-1 7-3 6-6 Memphis 12 10 .545 1 8-2 W-2 10-2 2-8 Dallas 9-3 3-10 New Orleans 12 13 .480 2½ 4-6 L-1 11 12 .478 2½ 5-5 L-1 5-5 6-7 Houston 3 4-6 L-1 7-4 4-9 San Antonio 11 13 .458 W L Pct GB L10 Str Home Away Northwest 16 7 .696 — 7-3 W-6 9-3 7-4 Denver 9-3 6-4 Oklahoma City 15 7 .682 ½ 8-2 W-3 13 11 .542 3½ 3-7 L-3 8-4 5-7 Portland 12 12 .500 4½ 7-3 W-1 10-4 2-8 Minnesota Utah 12 13 .480 5 5-5 W-1 3-6 9-7 Pacific W L Pct GB L10 Str Home Away LA Clippers 16 7 .696 — 8-2 W-1 9-1 7-6 1 4-6 W-1 11-2 5-7 Golden State 16 9 .640 14 9 .609 2 7-3 W-3 9-4 5-5 LA Lakers Sacramento 12 11 .522 4 5-5 W-2 6-5 6-6 4 20 .167 12½ 1-9 L-6 3-9 1-11 Phoenix

Conf 8-5 7-7 6-8 5-9 9-9 Conf 10-4 7-6 6-8 6-9 8-8 Conf 11-5 8-6 10-6 7-9 3-12

WESTERN CONFERENCE

Monday Oklahoma City 110, Detroit 83 Cleveland 99, Brooklyn 97 Denver 106, Toronto 103 Golden State 128, Atlanta 111 Washington 110, New York 107 LA Clippers 129, New Orleans 126 Minnesota 103, Houston 91 Wednesday Denver at Orlando, 6 p.m. Golden State at Cleveland, 6 p.m. Oklahoma City at Brooklyn, 6:30 p.m. Washington at Atlanta, 6:30 p.m. Charlotte at Minnesota, 7 p.m.

Wild 3, Canucks 2 Minnesota 1 2 0 — 3 Vancouver 1 1 0 — 2 First period: 1, Vancouver, Leivo 5 (Boeser, Pettersson), 7:02. 2, Minnesota, Parise 13 (Spurgeon, Dumba), 12:17 (pp). Penalties: Del Zotto, VAN, (tripping), 12:02. Second period: 3, Vancouver, Motte 4 (Schaller, Stecher), 9:56. 4, Minnesota, Zucker 9 (Mi.Granlund, Suter), 15:36 (pp). 5, Minnesota, Zucker 10 (Mi.Granlund, Staal), 16:31 (pp). Penalties: Dumba, MIN, (holding), 10:48; Edler, VAN, served by Virtanen, (interference), 14:29; Del Zotto, VAN, (cross checking), 15:29; Pateryn, MIN, (boarding), 19:26. Third period: None. Penalties: Zucker, MIN, (tripping), 11:35. Shots: Minnesota 7-16-5: 28. Vancouver 6-11-14: 31. Power-plays: Minnesota 3 of 3; Vancouver 0 of 3. Goalies: Minnesota, Dubnyk 10-8-2 (31 shots-29 saves). Vancouver, Nilsson 3-6-0 (28-25). A: 17,122.

Flames 9, Blue Jackets 6 Calgary 1 5 3 — Columbus 3 2 1 — First period: 1, Calgary, Gaudreau 11 (Monahan, Hamonic), 6:24. 2, Columbus, Werenski 5 (Bjorkstrand, Wennberg), 9:47. 3, Columbus, Anderson 12, 15:43 (pp). 4, Columbus, Atkinson 17 (Panarin, Jones), 19:42. Penalties: Calgary bench, served by Tkachuk (too many men on the ice), 0:44; Giordano, CGY, (hooking), 13:45. Second period: 5, Columbus, Atkinson 18 (Panarin, Jones), 0:49. 6, Calgary, Monahan 16 (Giordano), 1:55 (pp). 7, Calgary, Lindholm 13 (Monahan, Hamonic), 2:46. 8, Calgary, Tkachuk 13 (Gaudreau, Lindholm), 12:39 (pp). 9, Calgary, Hanifin 3 (Tkachuk, Jankowski), 13:29. 10, Calgary, Brodie 3 (Gaudreau), 14:32. 11, Columbus, Foligno 7 (Murray), 15:00. Penalties: Dubinsky, CBJ, (hooking), 1:50; Werenski, CBJ, (tripping), 11:28; Murray, CBJ, (holding), 17:02; Brodie, CGY, (hooking), 19:42. Third period: 12, Calgary, Monahan 17 (Tkachuk, Giordano), 2:15 (pp). 13, Calgary, Gaudreau 12 (Giordano, Smith), 6:29. 14, Columbus, Atkinson 19 (Murray, Nutivaara), 8:13. 15, Calgary, Czarnik 2 (Backlund), 13:11. Penalties: Anderson, CBJ, (tripping), 1:25. Shots: Calgary 8-14-6: 28. Columbus 14-9-7: 30. Power-plays: Calgary 3 of 4; Columbus 1 of 3. Goalies: Calgary, Smith 9-7-1 (16 shots-13 saves), Rittich 8-2-1 (14-11). Columbus, Bobrovsky 10-9-0 (26-18), Korpisalo 5-1-2 (2-1). A: 14,885.

9 6

Panthers 5, Bruins 0 Boston 0 0 0 — 0 Florida 0 — 4 1 5 First period: None. Penalties: Nordstrom, BOS, (holding), 15:34; Pysyk, FLA, (interference), 17:41. Second period: 1, Florida, Hoffman 13 (Sceviour, Huberdeau), 4:21. 2, Florida, Matheson 2, 13:13. 3, Florida, Huberdeau 7 (Barkov, Yandle), 15:14. 4, Florida, Hoffman 14 (Yandle, Barkov), 19:55 (pp). Penalties: McCann, FLA, (hooking), 5:30; Haley, FLA, (high sticking), 14:04; Pastrnak, BOS, (holding), 14:20; Hunt, FLA, (interference), 17:51; Pastrnak, BOS, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 17:51; DeBrusk, BOS, (slashing), 19:00. Third period: 5, Florida, Dadonov 13 (Huberdeau, Barkov), 14:26 (pp). Penalties: Bjugstad, FLA, (holding), 5:20; Moore, BOS, (hooking), 9:10; Wagner, BOS, (tripping), 10:49; Carlo, BOS, (cross checking), 13:02. Shots: Boston 7-16-10: 33. Florida 13-20-11: 44. Power-plays: Boston 0 of 4; Florida 2 of 6. Goalies: Boston, Halak 8-4-2 (44 shots-39 saves). Florida, Luongo 5-3-0 (33-33). A: 12,058.

Penguins 6, Avalanche 3

Canadiens 5, Senators 2 2 5

Colorado 0 3 0 — 3 3 3 Pittsburgh 0 — 6 First period: 1, Pittsburgh, Guentzel 12 (Letang, Dumoulin), 2:46. 2, Pittsburgh, Malkin 10 (Pearson, Hornqvist), 6:52. 3, Pittsburgh, Brassard 3 (Maatta, Aston-Reese), 7:27. Penalties: Simon, PIT, (hooking), 12:47. Second period: 4, Colorado, Barrie 4 (Landeskog, Rantanen), 8:16 (pp). 5, Colorado, Soderberg 9 (Cole, Calvert), 9:32. 6, Colorado, Nieto 3 (Bourque), 13:17 (sh). Penalties: Letang, PIT, (interference), 6:42; Crosby, PIT, (tripping), 10:59; Rantanen, COL, (interference), 11:44. Third period: 7, Pittsburgh, Hornqvist 10 (Letang, Kessel), 6:11 (pp). 8, Pittsburgh, Hornqvist 11 (Malkin), 7:32. 9, Pittsburgh, Hornqvist 12, 8:58. Penalties: Nemeth, COL, (slashing), 5:47; Compher, COL, (roughing), 14:48; J.Johnson, PIT, (roughing), 14:48; MacKinnon, COL, (tripping), 17:01. Shots: Colorado 18-12-15: 45. Pittsburgh 10-11-11: 32. Power-plays: Colorado 1 of 3; Pittsburgh 1 of 3. Goalies: Colorado, Varlamov 10-6-3 (32 shots-26 saves). Pittsburgh, DeSmith 7-4-3 (45-42). A: 18,415.

Jets 3, Islanders 1 Winnipeg 0 0 3 — 3 NY Islanders 0 0 1 — 1 First period: None. Penalties: Laine, WPG, (cross checking), 1:08; Mayfield, NYI, (tripping), 10:43. Second period: None. Penalties: None. Third period: 1, NY Islanders, Lee 10 (Boychuk, Nelson), 1:33. 2, Winnipeg, Trouba 3 (Connor, Wheeler), 3:39 (pp). 3, Winnipeg, Lowry 5 (Perreault, Tanev), 4:01. 4, Winnipeg, Ehlers 9, 19:57. Penalties: Barzal, NYI, (holding stick), 1:58; Tanev, WPG, (tripping), 8:57; Lee, NYI, (tripping), 9:32. Shots: Winnipeg 3-15-6: 24. NY Islanders 8-12-8: 28. Power-plays: Winnipeg 1 of 3; NY Islanders 0 of 2. Goalies: Winnipeg, Hellebuyck 12-7-1 (28 shots-27 saves). NY Islanders, Greiss 9-5-1 (23-21). A: 9,125.

Knights 5, Capitals 3 Washington 1 1 1 — 3 Vegas 1 0 4 — 5 First period: 1, Vegas, Reaves 6 (Lindberg, Eakin), 2:30 (pp). 2, Washington, Vrana 7 (Connolly), 15:33. Penalties: Connolly, WSH, (interference), 1:03; Bowey, WSH, (holding), 8:05; Vegas bench, served by Carr (too many men on the ice), 9:43; Dowd, WSH, (tripping), 19:44. Second period: 3, Washington, Ovechkin 20 (Bowey, Connolly), 11:42. Penalties: Kuznetsov, WSH, (illegal equipment), 8:35; Reaves, VGK, served by Carr, Major (interference), 15:42; Reaves, VGK, Misconduct (misconduct), 15:42. Third period: 4, Vegas, Bellemare 4 (Schmidt, McNabb), 2:33. 5, Vegas, Eakin 11 (Lindberg, Engelland), 2:49. 6, Washington, Vrana 8 (Kuznetsov, Niskanen), 11:40. 7, Vegas, Schmidt 1 (Theodore), 18:35 (pp). 8, Vegas, Schmidt 2, 19:53. Penalties: Miller, VGK, (high sticking), 3:53; Marchessault, VGK, (slashing), 7:14; Dowd, WSH, major (high sticking), 14:46. Shots: Washington 9-9-8: 26. Vegas 7-10-11: 28. Power-plays: Washington 0 of 4; Vegas 2 of 6. Goalies: Washington, Holtby 10-6-2 (27 shots-23 saves). Vegas, Fleury 14-9-1 (26-23). A: 18,275.

NHL LEADERS Through Monday’s games Goal Scoring Name Team Patrik Laine Winnipeg Brayden Point Tampa Bay Jeff Skinner Buffalo Nathan MacKinnon Colorado Alex Ovechkin Washington David Pastrnak Boston Joe Pavelski San Jose John Tavares Toronto Cam Atkinson Columbus Gabriel Landeskog Colorado Mark Scheifele Winnipeg Assists Name Team Mikko Rantanen Colorado Mitchell Marner Toronto Nikita Kucherov Tampa Bay Blake Wheeler Winnipeg Jack Eichel Buffalo Brent Burns San Jose John Carlson Washington Thomas Chabot Ottawa Nathan MacKinnon Colorado Nicklas Backstrom Washington Plus/Minus Name Team Gabriel Landeskog Colorado T.J. Brodie Calgary Ryan McDonagh Tampa Bay Ron Hainsey Toronto Mikko Rantanen Colorado Jeff Skinner Buffalo John Carlson Washington Michal Kempny Washington Colton Sissons Nashville

GP 26 28 28 27 26 26 28 27 25 27 26 GP 27 27 28 26 28 28 25 27 27 26 GP 27 27 28 27 27 28 25 23 28

G 21 20 20 19 19 19 17 17 16 16 16 A 34 32 30 30 27 25 24 24 24 23 +/19 18 18 16 16 16 15 15 15

Pacers beat Bulls, new coach Boylen

EASTERN CONFERENCE

Tuesday Indiana 96, Chicago 90 Orlando 105, Miami 90 Dallas 111, Portland 102 Sacramento 122, Phoenix 105 Utah 139, San Antonio 105

Maple Leafs 4, Sabres 3, OT Toronto 0 2 1 1 — 4 Buffalo 2 — 0 1 0 3 First period: None. Penalties: None. Second period: 1, Toronto, Matthews 14 (Hainsey), 8:33. 2, Buffalo, Reinhart 8 (Ristolainen, Beaulieu), 14:01. 3, Toronto, Gardiner 2 (Tavares, Marner), 19:50. Penalties: Brown, TOR, (interference), 11:19; Thompson, BUF, (hooking), 11:39. Third period: 4, Buffalo, Eichel 6 (Skinner, Ristolainen), 2:39. 5, Buffalo, Eichel 7 (Reinhart), 12:57. 6, Toronto, Marleau 7 (Rielly, Matthews), 14:47. Penalties: Thompson, BUF, (hooking), 7:16; Marleau, TOR, (interference), 8:44. Overtime: 7, Toronto, Matthews 15 (Kapanen, Gardiner), 4:57. Penalties: None. Shots: Toronto 7-10-11-2: 30. Buffalo 14-12-11-4: 41. Power-plays: Toronto 0 of 2; Buffalo 0 of 2. Goalies: Toronto, Andersen 16-7-0 (41 shots-38 saves). Buffalo, Ullmark 5-0-3 (30-26). A: 19,070.

Ottawa 0 1 1 — Montreal 1 3 1 — First period: 1, Montreal, Drouin 10 (Peca, Domi), 14:30. Penalties: Domi, MTL, (roughing), 5:49; Batherson, OTT, (roughing), 5:49; Domi, MTL, served by Kotkaniemi, (roughing), 5:49; Stone, OTT, (kneeing), 10:17; Chaput, MTL, (holding), 19:29; Tkachuk, OTT, (slashing), 19:29; Gallagher, MTL, (holding), 19:56. Second period: 2, Ottawa, DeMelo 3 (Boedker, Tierney), 8:49. 3, Montreal, Domi 12 (Drouin), 14:38. 4, Montreal, Domi 13 (Byron, Drouin), 17:29. 5, Montreal, Lehkonen 5 (Kotkaniemi, Shaw), 18:17. Penalties: Tierney, OTT, (tripping), 3:55. Third period: 6, Montreal, Gallagher 12 (Tatar), 4:21. 7, Ottawa, Stone 13 (Duchene), 12:29. Penalties: Kotkaniemi, MTL, (hooking), 4:43; Kulak, MTL, Major (fighting), 10:50; Dzingel, OTT, Major (fighting), 10:50. Shots: Ottawa 10-13-7: 30. Montreal 17-12-12: 41. Power-plays: Ottawa 0 of 3; Montreal 0 of 2. Goalies: Ottawa, Anderson 11-10-3 (41 shots-36 saves). Montreal, Price 9-8-4 (30-28). A: 20,705.

Thursday Detroit at Toronto, 6 p.m. NY Islanders at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. Colorado at Florida, 6 p.m. Columbus at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Montreal at Ottawa, 6:30 p.m. Boston at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m. Washington at Arizona, 8 p.m. Minnesota at Calgary, 8 p.m. Nashville at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Chicago at Vegas, 9 p.m. New Jersey at Los Angeles, 9:30 p.m.

NBA STANDINGS Atlantic W L Pct GB Toronto 20 5 .800 — Philadelphia 17 8 .680 3 Boston 13 10 .565 6 Brooklyn 8 17 .320 12 New York 8 17 .320 12 Southeast W L Pct GB Orlando 12 12 .500 — Charlotte 11 12 .478 ½ 2 Washington 10 14 .417 9 14 .391 2½ Miami 5 19 .208 7 Atlanta W L Pct GB Central 15 7 .682 — Milwaukee Detroit 13 8 .619 1½ Indiana 14 10 .583 2 Cleveland 5 18 .217 10½ 5 20 .200 11½ Chicago

Lightning 6, Red Wings 5, SO Tampa Bay 0 3 2 0 — 6 Detroit 2 2 1 0 — 5 Tampa Bay won shootout 2-1. First period: 1, Detroit, Nyquist 5 (Larkin), 16:54. 2, Detroit, Nielsen 2 (Athanasiou), 17:15. Penalties: None. Second period: 3, Tampa Bay, Joseph 7 (Callahan), 5:10. 4, Tampa Bay, Joseph 8 (Gourde), 11:37. 5, Detroit, Nielsen 3 (Witkowski), 13:33. 6, Tampa Bay, Stamkos 10 (Callahan), 14:27. 7, Detroit, Nielsen 4 (Athanasiou), 16:26. Penalties: Green, DET, (interference), 19:42. Third period: 8, Detroit, Nyquist 6 (Larkin, Abdelkader), 4:06. 9, Tampa Bay, Miller 6 (Sergachev), 9:50. 10, Tampa Bay, Paquette 7 (Joseph), 14:58 (sh). Penalties: Killorn, TB, (hooking), 6:45; Athanasiou, DET, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 6:45; Callahan, TB, (interference), 14:02; Johnson, TB, (tripping), 18:50. Overtime: None. Penalties: Larkin, DET, (hooking), 4:29. Shootout: Tampa Bay 2 (Hedman G, Point NG, Kucherov G), Detroit 1 (Nielsen NG, Vanek NG, Nyquist G). Shots: Tampa Bay 5-18-11-1: 35. Detroit 12-7-4-1: 24. Power-plays: Tampa Bay 0 of 2; Detroit 0 of 2. Goalies: Tampa Bay, Pasquale 1-0-0 (24 shots-19 saves). Detroit, Howard 9-6-4 (35-30). A: 18,477.

Dallas at New Orleans, 7 p.m. Detroit at Milwaukee, 7 p.m. LA Clippers at Memphis, 7 p.m. Philadelphia at Toronto, 7 p.m. San Antonio at LA Lakers, 9:30 p.m. Thursday New York at Boston, 7 p.m. Phoenix at Portland, 9 p.m. Houston at Utah, 9:30 p.m. Friday Denver at Charlotte, 6 p.m. Indiana at Orlando, 6 p.m. Philadelphia at Detroit, 6 p.m. Sacramento at Cleveland, 6:30 p.m. Toronto at Brooklyn, 6:30 p.m. Memphis at New Orleans, 7 p.m. Oklahoma City at Chicago, 7 p.m. LA Lakers at San Antonio, 7:30 p.m. Miami at Phoenix, 8 p.m. Golden State at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.

BY ASSOCIATED PRESS

Myles Turner matched his season high with 18 points and added 11 rebounds and five blocked shots as the host Indiana Pacers defeated Chicago 96-90 on Tuesday night and spoiled the debut of new Bulls coach Jim Boylen. Darren Collison had 23 points and eight rebounds, Bojan Bogdanovic scored 14 points and Tyreke Evans finished with 10 for Indiana. Domantis Sabonis added nine points and 11 rebounds off the bench for the Pacers. Lauri Markkanen led the Bulls with 21 points and 10 rebounds. Jus-

tin Holiday, facing off against his brother, Indiana rookie Aaron Holiday, finished with 15 points. Chicago has lost seven straight games. Boylan was named Bulls coach on Monday, taking over for the fired Fred Hoiberg, who was let go following a 5-19 start this season.

NOTEBOOK

Fultz sees specialists • Philadelphia 76ers guard Markelle Fultz is out indefinitely with thoracic outlet syndrome. Fultz visited with several specialists to figure out what’s ailing him. The Sixers said the specialists have identified a compression or irrita-

NBA SUMMARIES

Pacers 96, Bulls 90 Chicago: J.Holiday 5-11 2-2 15, Markkanen 8-24 0-0 21, Carter Jr. 5-11 2-2 12, Arcidiacono 0-5 0-0 0, LaVine 6-15 0-0 13, Parker 6-12 0-0 12, Hutchison 1-4 0-0 3, Payne 4-7 1-1 10, Harrison 2-5 0-0 4. Totals 37-94 5-5 90. Indiana: Bogdanovic 5-10 3-4 14, Young 3-8 0-0 6, Turner 8-17 2-4 18, Collison 6-7 8-8 23, Evans 3-9 4-4 10, McDermott 1-5 0-0 2, Sabonis 4-8 1-2 9, Joseph 3-6 2-2 9, A.Holiday 2-6 0-0 5. Totals 35-76 20-24 96. — 90 21 24 22 23 Chicago Indiana 20 27 26 — 23 96 3-point goals: Chicago 11-31 (Markkanen 5-13, J.Holiday 3-6, Hutchison 1-1, Payne 1-2, LaVine 1-3, Harrison 0-1, Parker 0-2, Arcidiacono 0-3), Indiana 6-22 (Collison 3-4, Joseph 1-3, A.Holiday 1-3, Bogdanovic 1-4, Young 0-1, Turner 0-1, Evans 0-3, McDermott 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Chicago 44 (Carter Jr. 13), Indiana 45 (Turner, Sabonis 11). Assists: Chicago 26 (LaVine 9), Indiana 22 (Turner, Joseph, Collison, A.Holiday 3). Total fouls: Chicago 23, Indiana 13. A: 16,446 (20,000).

Other news • Memphis general manager Chris Wallace announced that the team has signed 6-foot-11 Joakim Noah for the remainder of the season. ... Los Angeles Clippers guard Patrick Beverley has been fined $25,000 by the NBA for throwing a basketball at a fan during a game Sunday in Dallas. ... Atlanta will be without Taurean Prince for at least three weeks after the small forward suffered a left ankle injury Monday. Jazz 139, Spurs 105

Magic 105, Heat 90 Orlando: Simmons 1-6 0-0 3, Gordon 7-16 3-4 20, Vucevic 8-16 1-2 19, Augustin 3-11 3-3 11, Fournier 5-10 0-0 13, Isaac 4-5 4-4 12, Bamba 2-4 0-2 4, Grant 1-5 1-2 4, Ross 7-13 3-3 19. Totals 38-86 15-20 105. Miami: McGruder 3-8 0-0 7, J.Johnson 5-8 0-0 11, Whiteside 6-7 0-2 12, Richardson 2-14 1-1 6, Ellington 2-7 0-0 6, Winslow 6-13 0-0 14, Olynyk 4-11 1-2 13, Adebayo 3-7 0-0 6, T.Johnson 2-3 0-0 4, Wade 5-13 0-0 11. Totals 38-91 2-5 90. Orlando 27 19 30 29 — 105 Miami 25 25 12 28 — 90 3-point goals: Orlando 14-28 (Gordon 3-3, Fournier 3-4, Ross 2-3, Vucevic 2-5, Augustin 2-6, Simmons 1-2, Grant 1-4, Isaac 0-1), Miami 12-35 (Olynyk 4-10, Winslow 2-4, Ellington 2-6, McGruder 1-1, J.Johnson 1-3, Wade 1-4, Richardson 1-7). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Orlando 43 (Gordon 13), Miami 47 (Whiteside 9). Assists: Orlando 22 (Augustin, Gordon 5), Miami 19 (Richardson 5). Total fouls: Orlando 13, Miami 19. Technicals: Orlando coach Steve Clifford. A: 19,600 (19,600).

tion in the area between the lower neck and upper chest. Physical therapy was recommended for Fultz before returning to play.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Bulls head coach Jim Boylen questions a call on Tuesday against the Pacers in Indianapolis. Mavericks 111, Trail Blazers 102

Portland: Harkless 2-5 0-0 5, Aminu 5-6 1-2 12, Nurkic 4-9 1-2 9, Lillard 10-23 11-12 33, McCollum 7-19 2-2 18, Leonard 0-0 1-1 1, Collins 1-2 0-0 2, Curry 1-3 0-0 3, Turner 5-10 3-4 13, Stauskas 3-7 0-0 6. Totals 38-84 19-23 102. Dallas: Barnes 4-12 3-5 11, Doncic 6-14 7-9 21, Jordan 4-8 4-5 12, Smith Jr. 4-9 3-5 12, Matthews 6-12 2-3 17, Finney-Smith 2-3 0-0 5, Kleber 4-7 0-0 8, Powell 2-5 1-2 7, Barea 3-11 3-4 9, Harris 3-6 1-2 9. Totals 38-87 24-35 111. Portland 20 25 28 29 — 102 Dallas 34 26 27 24 — 111 3-point goals: Portland 7-24 (McCollum 2-7, Lillard 2-8, Aminu 1-2, Curry 1-2, Harkless 1-2, Stauskas 0-3), Dallas 11-30 (Matthews 3-6, Powell 2-3, Doncic 2-4, Harris 2-5, Finney-Smith 1-1, Smith Jr. 1-4, Kleber 0-2, Barea 0-2, Barnes 0-3). Fouled out: Nurkic. Rebounds: Portland 48 (Aminu 13), Dallas 51 (Jordan 17). Assists: Portland 20 (Lillard 8), Dallas 25 (Smith Jr. 9). Total fouls: Portland 29, Dallas 19. Technicals: Aminu, Harkless, Matthews. A: 19,341 (19,200).

San Antonio: Gay 0-3 0-0 0, Bertans 3-6 0-0 8, Aldridge 7-10 2-2 16, Forbes 4-10 0-0 9, DeRozan 7-13 2-3 16, Pondexter 0-1 0-0 0, Cunningham 1-4 0-0 3, Metu 4-8 2-2 10, Poeltl 9-11 2-2 20, Mills 3-8 0-0 8, White 5-11 0-0 10, Belinelli 1-5 2-2 5. Totals 44-90 10-11 105. Utah: Ingles 5-9 0-0 13, Favors 5-7 4-4 14, Gobert 5-7 8-10 18, Rubio 5-10 0-0 12, Mitchell 7-13 2-2 20, O’Neale 4-9 1-1 11, Sefolosha 3-4 0-0 7, Crowder 3-4 0-0 8, Niang 2-3 0-0 5, Udoh 1-1 0-0 2, Neto 3-5 0-0 7, Exum 3-4 0-0 7, Korver 5-8 2-3 15. Totals 51-84 17-20 139. San Antonio 27 31 20 27 — 105 34 35 139 Utah 29 41 — 3-point goals: San Antonio 7-22 (Bertans 2-4, Mills 2-5, Cunningham 1-3, Belinelli 1-4, Forbes 1-5, White 0-1), Utah 20-33 (Mitchell 4-6, Korver 3-4, Ingles 3-6, Rubio 2-3, Crowder 2-3, O’Neale 2-4, Exum 1-1, Niang 1-2, Neto 1-2, Sefolosha 1-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: San Antonio 32 (Poeltl 7), Utah 42 (Gobert 10). Assists: San Antonio 25 (DeRozan 7), Utah 38 (Ingles, Rubio 7). Total fouls: San Antonio 19, Utah 20. A: 18,306 (18,306).

Kings 122, Suns 105 Sacramento: Shumpert 2-5 3-4 7, Bjelica 1-3 0-0 2, CauleyStein 3-5 0-0 6, Fox 5-11 5-8 16, Hield 7-13 3-4 20, Ju.Jackson 4-5 0-0 10, Giles III 4-5 5-9 13, Koufos 5-7 1-2 11, Mason 3-7 2-3 9, Ferrell 0-2 0-0 0, Bogdanovic 5-9 2-2 14, Williams 5-6 0-0 11, McLemore 1-6 0-0 3. Totals 45-84 21-32 122. Phoenix: Jo.Jackson 4-11 4-6 14, Ariza 5-13 1-2 14, Ayton 5-8 0-0 10, Okobo 3-8 0-0 6, Bridges 3-12 1-1 7, Anderson 0-0 0-0 0, Bender 0-1 4-4 4, Holmes 4-7 2-2 10, Melton 9-12 0-0 21, Crawford 1-6 4-5 6, Daniels 4-9 1-1 13. Totals 38-87 17-21 105. Sacramento 36 32 — 31 23 122 Phoenix 27 38 — 105 9 31 3-point goals: Sacramento 11-24 (Hield 3-5, Ju.Jackson 2-2, Bogdanovic 2-5, Fox 1-1, Mason 1-1, Williams 1-2, McLemore 1-4, Bjelica 0-1, Shumpert 0-3), Phoenix 12-43 (Daniels 4-9, Melton 3-4, Ariza 3-8, Jo.Jackson 2-6, Bender 0-1, Okobo 0-4, Crawford 0-4, Bridges 0-7). Fouled out: Holmes. Rebounds: Sacramento 42 (Bjelica 7), Phoenix 43 (Holmes 10). Assists: Sacramento 27 (Fox 7), Phoenix 27 (Crawford, Melton 5). Total fouls: Sacramento 22, Phoenix 27. Technicals: Sacramento coach Kings (Defensive three second), Giles III. A: 12,977 (18,422).


12.05.2018 • WedneSday • M 1

STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

ALL-METRO GIRLS GOLF

RAIN OR SHINE

PLAYER OF THE YEAR • BROOKE BIERMANN, LAFAYETTE

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • B7

TUESDAY’S RESULTS GIRLS WRESTLING

Brentwood 36, Normandy 18 126: Shamya Walker, Normandy, pin Lexi Shackelford, Brentwood, 2:29 143: Anna Wagner, Brentwood, pin Celicity Wright, Normandy, 3:05 152: Christa’nae Wright, Normandy, pin Isabella Lancaster, 1:08 187: Shekinah Reed, Brentwood, pin Genesis Gregory, Normandy, 1:03 235: Takeira Steen, Normandy, pin Samantha Morton, Brentwood, 2:00 Won by forfeit Brentwood: Skylar Schoenberg (103), Zoe Arrindell (110), Murphy Jones (116), Penelope Herrera (131) Double forfeits: 121, 136, 167

BOYS WRESTLING

Brentwood 66, Borgia 18 113: Joseph Lause, Borgia, pin Owen Brotherton, Brentwood, 2:52 138: Xavier Lane, Brentwood, pin Grant Straatmann, Borgia, 3:33 145: Josiyah Reed, Brentwood, pin Garrett Posinski, Borgia, 5:01 152: Cody Hughes, Brentwood, pin Nathan Boone, Brogia, 1:52 170: Thomas Suntrup, Brentwood pin Brynner Frankenberg, Borgia, 2:29 182: Braedyn Frankenberg, Borgia, pin Robert Watson, Brentwood, 2:59 195: Thaddeus Isgrigg, Borgia, pin Konrad Bradt, Brentwood, 5:15 Won by forfeit Brentwood: Corvon Johnson (106), Ian Lawrence 120), Connor Lawrence (126), Aleksander Muradov (132), Nathan Butler (160), Tristan Jones (220), Charles Capps (285)

GIRLS BASKETBALL

PAUL KOPSKY • STLhighschoolsports.com

Lafayette sophomore Brooke Biermann is the Post-Dispatch All-Metro girls golf player of the year. Biermann finished second in the Class 2 state tournament in October after rolling to district and sectional titles. BY BRIAN WEBSTER STLhighschoolsports.com

WILDWOOD • Katrina Clark got a text message recently. Somebody felt the Lafayette High girls golf coach should know one of her players was out in the cold a month after the season ended, hitting balls in a swirling, biting wind in near freezing conditions. Clark knew exactly who it was that was facing off against the elements. In fact, Clark had heard from several folks, each with the same news about the same player. Brooke Biermann was the guilty party. “Me, I’m not surprised that she’s out there constantly working,” Clark said. “Even in 30-degree weather.” It’s not that Biermann, a sophomore, has gone crazy or anything. She’s not burning off frustration, nor stubbornly refusing to accept the reality of another St. Louis winter. She’s just being herself, putting in the work, because she knows the girls she’ll want to beat someday are doing the same thing. “As long as there’s no snow on the ground, I’ll be out there practicing,” Biermann said. “All the girls in the warm states are getting better. I have to keep up with them.” Biermann has beaten almost all of the girls in Missouri. After finishing fourth at state as a freshman last year, she returned this fall and took second, four strokes short of twotime state champion Megan Propeck of Notre Dame de Sion. “Brooke has battled with (Propeck) in summer events and has beaten her,” Clark said. “But she just hasn’t been able to get her at state yet.” The two played even for 32 holes (18 on the first day, then 14 on the crucial second day) at Swope Memorial Golf Course in Kansas City, but then Propeck birdied No. 15 as Biermann took a bogey. Biermann then lost two more strokes trying to make up ground on the final hole. “Coming off the course that day, I was really, really happy with how I played,” Biermann said. Biermann, the Post-Dispatch All-Metro girls golfer of the year, is coming off an incredible campaign. She went 8-0 in dual matches, and won the Suburban Conference Yellow Pool and Summit Tournament. Biermann crushed the field in district play, finishing six strokes ahead of her nearest competitor. She then tamed a steady breeze to claim her second sectional crown in as

Tireless work ethic helps Lancers sophomore reach elite level many years — by a whopping eight strokes. The freshman standout was even more dominant as a sophomore. “The thing that impressed me the most about Brooke this year is her ball-striking,” Clark said. “She’s hitting a lot more distance, and with accuracy, even better than a year ago.” Biermann said she worked over the past offseason to improve her ball striking. Of course, she got a little taller, a little stronger in her 15th year of life. But it’s the work, always the grind of staying fit and focused, that Biermann credits with keeping her game consistent. “I do work very hard,” Biermann said. “I feel like sometimes people think I was just born with the ability to play golf. It takes hours and hours of practice.” To Biermann, talent is beside the point. It’s a fickle thing. Sometimes it’s there, sometimes it’s not. Biermann keeps her natural skills at the ready through practice, like the best do. PGA superstar Jordan Spieth is one golfer Biermann tries to emulate. “Jordan Spieth has said, ‘The more you practice, the smaller your misses are,’ and I like to go by that,” Biermann said. It’s true, Biermann comes from a golf-loving household, with parents who happily support her development as a player. And yes, she’s grown up around lush, rolling courses, with easy access to equipment and private coaching. But none of it would matter if it weren’t for Biermann’s amazing work ethic. Biermann’s relationship with golf began when she was little more than a toddler. Her father brought her with him whenever he found time to hit the links. She loved riding in the golf cart with him. That turned into steering the cart, which soon grew into her dad letting her drive the cart. One day, she naturally wanted to try hitting and putting herself. Now, here she is, not just winning at golf, but devoting more time to improving her game than most other kids spend on social media.

On school days, Biermann works out for an hour, then tries to spend at least another hour each afternoon hitting. On weekends, she has morning practices with her swing coach, then plays a round or two with her dad. “It’s just normal for us to go out and play golf as a family,” Biermann said. “It’s been a normal, comfortable part of my life.” During the summer, Biermann spends five sweltering hours a day fine-tuning every swing in her arsenal, from driving and hitting to chipping and putting. That’s when she’s not already playing in a tournament or traveling to play in one. Last summer alone, Biermann played at events in Kentucky, Minnesota, Iowa, Indiana, Louisiana, Arizona and California. In July, she won first place at the American Junior Golfers Association Championship tournament, played in Eureka. It was a touchstone for Biermann in more ways than one. At the time, she called her six-stroke AJGA win the greatest of her career, a confidence booster affirming her growth as a player. But also, it came on a course — The Legends — where Biermann had struggled before. “I used to hate that course,” Biermann said. “I had some terrible runs there, but I decided, well, there’s a lot of big tournaments there, and I’m just going to have to learn how to play it.” Now, she appreciates The Legends for forcing her to get better. “I love the course now,” Biermann said. “I feel like it really punishes you for bad shots, so the best player there usually wins. If you’re not on your game there, you won’t be able to compete.” This mental approach is one of the key reasons for Biermann’s success. “Brooke’s physical game is sharp,” Clark said. “But the most impressive thing is how mature her golf brain is. If she has a setback or a bad hole, you know she’s going to bounce back with a few birdies. She’s tough as nails.” Clark has seen plenty of girls and young women with Biermann’s talent. What makes Biermann special is the pure desire she has for the game. “She’s one of the easiest kids you’ll ever have to coach,” Clark said. “She loves golf. It’s her passion. It’s what she wants to do. I would not be surprised if she ends up playing golf for a living.”

BOYS BASKETBALL

Bayless 7 14 10 14 45 17 7 13 12 49 Bourbon Ba: Gunter 17, Herndon 9, Johnson 9, Woodard 6, J. Grant 2, Patton 2. FG 19 (0), FT 7-11. Bo: Farris 27, Delong 2. FG 10 (3), FT 6-9. Haz. East 24 13 13 19 69 McCluer North 20 26 25 16 87 H: Simms 25, Gilmore 12, Fultz 7, Shepherd 6, Brown 5, Lane 5, Lowe 5, Rose 2, Terry 2. FG 29 (9), FT 2-5. M (5-0): Butler 25, Evans 17, Lee 16, MosleyMull 10, Daniels 9, Ray 8, Hall 2. FG 33 (7),

WEDNESDAY’S SCHEDULE

FIRST TEAM Grace Aromando, junior, St. Joseph’s Helped Angels to third successive state title with a team-leading fourth-place finish in Kansas City, including a team-best 75 at Swope Memorial. Also earned medalist honors in Angel Classic with a 2-under 70, the team’s best round of the season.

Nicole Rallo, sophomore, St. Joseph’s Rolled to the medalist title in the IllinoisMissouri River Challenge with an even-par 71, one of her six rounds of 77 or better. Finished third in district and sectional play. She was second on her team at state with a sixth-place effort.

Zoee Harrington, senior, Liberty Tied for top spot in district play on the way to seventh-place finishes in both sectional and state tournaments. Bound for Quincy University, Harrington won the GAC Central individual championship.

Claire Solovic, junior, Seckman Fired a 4-under-par 68 in winning Lindbergh Invitational in early September, the lowest 18-hole score on the Missouri side this season. Came in third at the state tournament thanks to a second-day score of 71, five shots better than her opening round. All-Metro player of the year both as freshman and sophomore.

Momo Kikuchi, junior, Pattonville Finished in a tie for medalist honors in district play and placed third in the sectional, just one stroke behind the co-leaders. Placed ninth in Class 2 state tournament after tying for 11th as both a freshman and sophomore.

Troy 21 14 10 8 53 Howell 13 9 9 6 37 T (5-0): K. Mennemeyer 20, DeClue 12, Wenzel 9, Caldwell 5, Illig 4, Bova 3. FG 21 (4), FT 7-10. H (3-2): Thompson 14, Russell 8, M. Huwe 7, Wilkenson 4, Brewster 2, Machado 2. FG 15 (2), FT 5-9. Kirkwood 23 12 6 15 56 McCluer 0 5 5 4 14 K: Bruns 20, Musson 8, Behnam 6, Ludbrook 6, Hupp 5, Mills 3, Mulvaney 3, Poger 3, Jozwiakowski 2. FG 22 (6), FT 6-9. M: Johnson 11, Green 3. FG 3 (1), FT 7-8. McCluer North 13 13 13 10 49 Haz. East 6 4 4 7 21 H: Harris 9, Bufford 3, Hancock 3, Anderson 2, Hicks 2, Williams 2. FG 6 (0), FT 9-29. St.Chas. West 8 7 8 12 35 Ursuline 6 14 12 9 41 S (3-2): Nicastro 9, Wilson 8, Pokorny 6, Weinrich 6, Block 2, Chowning 2, Jackson 2. FG 16 (2), FT 1-4. U: Effer 11, Adrian 10, LaMartina 7, Gunn 6, Hodge 3, Cavato 2, Noonan 2. FG 13 (3), FT 12-25. Clayton 14 4 11 10 39 Pattonville 22 14 15 17 68 P: Battle 15, Jenkins 15, Danfort 14, Benedict 7, Nelson 5, Dixon 4, Richardson 4, Heiligenstein 2. FG 27 (5), FT 7-14. Granite City 4 3 8 4 19 Bellvl. West 12 7 17 15 51 G (0-5): Powell 5, Moore 3, Reeves 3, Rush 3, Harris 2, Hurst 2, Fusselman 1. FG 6 (0), FT 7-22. B (4-3): Nunn 15, Gray 11, Chapman 8, Goodwin 6, McGee 4, A. Bennett 3, Sams 3, R. Bennett 1. FG 17 (5), FT 12-21. FZ North 11 5 9 12 37 Pky. West 9 6 11 10 36 F: Robinson 14, Stahl 8, J. Grimes 7, Clausner 4, K. Grimes 2, Moody 2. FG 17 (2), FT 1-6. P: T. Allgeyer 17, Swihart 7, Lyons 5, Vietmeier 3, Selm 2, Thompson 2. FG 13 (6), FT 4-11. Mehlville 2 9 4 2 17 Cor Jesu 23 5 21 8 57 M (1-4): VanDover 8, Rapp 4, Seiler 4, Hill 1. FG 8 (0), FT 1-2. C: Ronshausen 23, Hummel 11, Solon 9, Boyet 2, Collier 2, Fraser 2, Hite 2, Klaesner 2, Korpecki 2, Erusha 1, Slinkard 1. FG 17 (7), FT 16-26. 15 18 10 16 59 Soldan Carnahan 14 5 2 5 26 S (3-4): Jackson 14, Palmer 12, Davis 11, M. Mohamad 9, Wellington 9, Wingate 4. FG 22 (6), FT 9-16. C: Johnson 16, Kimple 7, Sykes 3. FG 9 (3), FT 5-10. Miller Career 23 31 17 3 74 Vashon 6 5 2 2 15 M: A. Garrett 19, R. Tally 15, A. Garrett 12, Harris 10, Grayson 8, R. Tally 4, Degrate 2, C. White 2, E. White 2. FG 33 (7), FT 1-6. V (3-2): FG 0 (0), FT 0-0. Winfield 18 Liberty 58 L: VanPamel 18, Patterson 10, Riggins 8, Watson 8, Lathon 5, Giljum 4, Kruse 3, Ahmed 2. FG 20 (7), FT 11-14. Trinity 8 4 10 16 38 Valley Park 3 5 13 8 29 V (1-4): Ballard 6, Redden 6, Kientzy 5, Rogers 5, McCloud 4, Nelson 3. FG 12 (1), FT 4-15. Seckman 10 7 21 12 50 Lindbergh 14 6 10 13 43 S: Parton 24, Townsend 11, Mercer 6, Harris 3, Wyman 3, Hake 2, Critchlow 1. FG 19 (1), FT 11-26. L: J. Baudendistel 20, M. Baudendistel 8, Bommarito 5, Fleming 4, T. Headrick 3, Miller 2, Jones 1. FG 15 (2), FT 11-15. Haz. West 7 10 13 0 30 Ladue 31 15 23 16 85 H: Burrus 16, Blackson 10, Brooks 3, Brown 1. FG 10 (3), FT 7-13. L: Peete 25, Collins 21, Minkler 16, Douglas 10, Hamilton 6, Hay 3, Rogers 2, Smith 2. FG 34 (8), FT 9-16. Pky. North 11 15 16 22 64 Eureka 11 6 9 24 50 P: Davis 25, Rhodes 17, Stacker 11, Williams 8, A. Jordan 3. FG 26 (7), FT 5-10. E: Hillyer 16, Thurman 11, Herbert 10, DeMoulin 4, Rust 3, Oligschlaeger 2, Peterson 2, Archambault 1, Pogue 1. FG 15 (5), FT 15-22. 5 6 5 6 22 Affton Orchard Farm 21 18 20 11 70 O: Doza 21, Hopkins 21, Dorsey 8, Dahl 6, Williams 6, Runion 4, Montani 2, Schroer 2. FG 31 (1), FT 7-14. Union 15 22 12 15 64 Northwest-CH 13 10 12 9 44 N (1-4): Fortner 27, S. Roth 7, J. Roth 4, Owens 3, Krebbs 2, Petry 1. FG 16 (3), FT 9-13. Luth. South 10 23 13 15 61 Notre Dame 8 18 16 11 53 L (5-0): Pawlitz 21, Heskett 13, Akerson 11, Schelp 10, Schmidt 4, Nichols 2. FG 20 (2), FT 19-31. E. St. Louis 11 14 20 13 58 Collinsville 12 17 14 23 66 E (2-4): Hicks 9, Darough 4, Glanton 4, Milton 4, Jeffries 2, Taylor 2. FG 9 (3), FT 4-5. C (4-2): Mitchell 29, Knutson 9, Liljegren 6, Ludgate 6, Bauer 4, Doyle 4, Fenton 3, King 3, Marsala 2. FG 19 (4), FT 24-36.

FT 14-20. Gtwy Snce Ac. 10 6 16 10 42 Principia 9 11 11 13 44 G (1-4): Jackson 9, Ferris 8, Clark 7, A. Jones 7, Davis 6, C. Jones 3, Pearcy 2. FG 16 (3), FT 7-18. P (2-3): Coyne 11, James 9, Hoffman 7, Ellis 6, Jordan 6, N. Omondi 3, Legard 2. FG 15 (7), FT 7-12. Linn 7 15 10 12 44 Hermann 12 14 7 19 52 L: K. Peters 11, L. Peters 9, D. Voss 7, Grellner 6, Patterson 6, A. Peters 3, Maassen 2. FG 17 (5), FT 5-6. H: Moeckli 19, Scheidegger 12, Anderson 9, McKague 8, Schannuth 4. FG 18 (5), FT 11-22. Althoff 13 10 10 10 43 Mater Dei 8 8 13 15 44 A (2-4): Burgner 17, Wells 7, Bruening 6, Brown 4, Readye 4, Ache 3, Wilson 2. FG 16 (5), FT 6-13. M (4-2): Boeckmann 11, Schuchman 9, Dant 8, Goebel 7, Schadegg 6, Foppe 2, Haake 1. FG 15 (4), FT 10-14. Lebanon 10 9 13 15 47 Valmeyer 12 8 11 19 50 L (0-6): Krumsieg 17, White 14, Clark 8, Shaw 5, Martin 2, Glasper 1. FG 14 (2), FT 17-23. V (3-4): Reinhardt 17, Greer 14, McCarthy 6, Rowald 6, Fausz 5, Weber 2. FG 15 (7), FT 13-21. Steeleville 26 24 12 9 71 Red Bud 4 12 9 7 32 S (6-1): Wilson 16, Hagel 15, B. Mevert 13, Stearns 7, Sutton 5, Mulholland 4, Gross 3, Z. Mevert 3, Conway 2, Hill 2, Newby 1. FG 27 (9), FT 8-12. R (0-6): Birkner 8, Wiegard 8, Dwyer 5, Koester 4, Van Dorn 3, Amman 2, Barriger 2. FG 13 (3), FT 3-5. Marissa 4 17 13 22 56 Dupo 11 10 5 17 43 M (6-1): Ivory-Greer 27, Jones 13, Bowlby 8, Steinwagner 8. FG 19 (6), FT 12-17. D (3-3): Swims 23, Kyle 6, Touchette 6, Calhoun 4, Mantz 4. FG 15 (4), FT 9-13. Northwest Ac. 22 15 17 13 67 CSOMB 11 16 13 12 52 N (1-5): Geist 19, Collins 17, Bailey 15, Aldridge 7, Scott 4, Edwards 3, Curry 2. FG 28 (4), FT 7-9. C: Quinn 25, Smith 14, Wright 7, King-Lee 4, Bunting 2. FG 22 (1), FT 7-15. Pky. South 18 14 12 15 59 Oakville 9 8 16 18 51 P: Sommer 31, Rollins 10, Esker 8, Ellebrecht 4, Stone 4, Gong 2. FG 16 (6), FT 21-30. Jefferson 10 13 15 20 58 Hancock 25 15 22 18 80 J: Null 16, Weik 15, Eisenbeis 12, Wagner 6, McWhorter 4, Holdinghausen 3, Gosnell 2. FG 20 (10), FT 8-15. H: Richardson 34, Evans 13, Sutton 12, Moultrie 8, Williams 6, Hunter 4, Wilson 3. FG 35 (4), FT 6-11. Borgia 9 12 9 4 34 De Smet 6 8 19 19 52 D (5-1): Asleson 18, Gassamma 12, Redmond 8, Walker 6, Neidenbach 5, Skoff 2, Goodwin 1. FG 21 (8), FT 2-4. Vianney 9 13 14 7 43 Chaminade 22 18 30 9 79 C: Batchman 20, Case 18, Kasubke 13, Dunn 12, Vickers 7, Handy 6, Winfield 2, Greer 1. FG 31 (7), FT 10-19. DuBourg 3 2 8 7 22 Pacific 4 6 2 8 25 P (4-1): Fleming 13, Harris 4, Cowsert 3, Evans 3, Bukowsky 2. FG 10 (2), FT 3-4. Pky. Central 9 9 21 16 55 Lafayette 15 13 17 20 65 P: D. Harris 18, Ball 14, Roberts 13, Littlejohn 10. FG 21 (4), FT 9-16. L: Schmitt 21, W. Tulloch 15, Campbell 12, Griffey 7, Stovall 5, Hewlett 3, Diaby 2. FG 23 (7), FT 12-16. Pky. North 14 11 18 16 59 Zumwalt East 13 12 21 26 72 Z: Bonney 24, Johnson 13, Thurman 13, Collins 6, Allen 5, Woodard 5, York 4, Highfill 2. FG 27 (3), FT 15-23. St. Pius X 15 31 16 21 83 Affton 12 12 25 22 71 A: Olliges 33, C. Recht 14, Hercules 7, K. Recht 6, Rolwes 6, Westbrook 5. FG 24 (8), FT 15-22. Timberland 6 16 12 7 41 Howell 23 16 18 17 74 H: Schark 20, Dalton 13, Thompson 10, Boehm 6, Fortner 6, Schulte 6, Engelhard 5, Maddox 3, Olwig 3, Williams 2. FG 31 (8), FT 4-4. 28 9 16 9 62 Liberty Washington 9 7 7 7 30 L: Catchings 24, McCrary 9, Lawson 8, McKeithen 8, Hilgartner 3, Ball 2, Betton 2, Edney 2, Hauk 2, Jacboi 2. FG 27 (6), FT 2-11. Crystal City 20 9 7 8 44 St. Louis Pat 15 15 10 11 51 C: Richardson 16, Wilkerson 10, Denby 6, Lowe 6, Bassin 4, Tullock 2. FG 15 (8), FT 6-9. S (2-3): Dease 17, Duchene 9, Arens 6, Keating 6, Witaschek 6, Kilchrist 5, Puruis 2. FG 19 (5), FT 8-13. Sullivan 13 9 12 11 45 Duchesne 6 5 15 9 35 D: Suellentrop 11, O’Brien 10, M. DeGuentz 7, Fischer 5, Schwendemann 2. FG 13 (3), FT 6-10. Columbia 13 17 21 12 63 Roxana 6 8 8 4 26 C (3-2): J. Holmes 16, S. Horner 14, James 12, Khoury 6, Peterson 6, N. Horner 5, B. Holmes 2, O’Connor 2. FG 24 (12), FT 3-5. R (4-3): Huffman 9, Golenor 6, Beckman 5, Homer 2, Lara 2, White 2. FG 10 (5), FT 1-5. Collinsville 11 28 12 13 64 E. St. Louis 22 8 18 19 67 C (7-1): Taylor 27, Harrison 14, Molton 8, Dzelandini 7, Smith 6, Jones 2. FG 18 (5), FT 23-31. E (4-1): Hargrove Jr. 37, Leflore 12, T. Jones 5, Williams 4, Anderson 3, Rice 3, Johnson 2, King 1. FG 23 (6), FT 15-28. Gibault 17 15 17 18 67 New Athens 15 12 8 21 56 N (2-3): Range 20, Schneider 12, Lintker 9, Boone 6, Shevlin 4, Page 3, Whitworth 2. FG 20 (1), FT 15-18. Alton 21 9 22 19 71 O’Fallon 2 12 15 13 42 O (2-3): Dismukes 12, Riley II 9, Tebbe 5, Wills 5, Watson 4, Lowery 3, Burton 2, Harris 2. FG 12 (4), FT 14-15. Civic Mem. 11 11 12 11 45 Highland 20 14 13 13 60 C (0-5): Zupan 19, Coleman 10, Hilligoss 5, Lane 4, N. Turbyfill 4, Thornton 3. FG 16 (4), FT 9-11. Waterloo 8 5 4 6 23 Freeburg 13 16 21 9 59 W (1-4): Wahlig 9, McAlister 4, Wade 4, Balabas 2, Hergenroeder 2, Lenhardt 2. FG 7 (2), FT 7-8. North Callawa 12 13 19 12 56 Boonville 17 21 17 16 71 N: Kellerman 17, G. Cash 13, C. Cash 11, Locastro 11, Jeffries 4. FG 23 (9), FT 1-3. Sesser-Valier 12 7 5 15 39 Okawville 13 15 12 15 55 S: Woodland 21, Boles 6, Bates 5, E. Gunter 5, G. Gunter 2. FG 15 (4), FT 5-9. O (3-2): Schilling 14, Aubel 13, Heckert 9, Krohne 9, Frederking 8, Harre 2. FG 22 (4), FT 7-9. Christopher 12 16 8 28 64 21 13 16 22 72 Sparta C: Saeger 19, Pratt 13, Garver 12, Hawkins 9, Motsinger 8, Goins 3. FG 24 (1), FT 15-21. S (4-2): Keen 21, Williams 18, Anderson 11, Cometto 8, Clark 5, Stefani 5, Algee 4. FG 26 (4), FT 16-29. New Haven 13 11 7 8 39 6 9 4 5 24 Silex N (3-2): Groner 10, D. Lewis 10, Kormeier 6, Eichelberger 5, Rethemeyer 4, Gerlemann 2, Madden 2. FG 16 (4), FT 3-4.

SECOND TEAM

THIRD TEAM

Lucy Bloomstran, senior, John Burroughs Emma Buell, junior, Villa Duchesne Claire Pan, junior, John Burroughs Parker Perry, junior, MICDS Mia Rallo, freshman, St. Joseph’s

Chloe Davidson, sophomore, O’Fallon Sofia Gamayo, sophomore, Lindbergh Mikaela Kossina, junior, Columbia Riley Lewis, freshman, Edwardsville Siiri Pehkonen, senior, Fox

WRESTLING

MS-Berkeley at Hazelwood East, 9 a.m. Gate.STEM, Soldan at Miller Career, 4:30 p.m. Gateway Science at Sumner, 4:30 p.m. Lindbergh at McCluer North, 5 p.m. Parkway Central at Oakville, 5 p.m. Ladue, Marquette at Kirkwood, 5 p.m. Web.Groves, Summit at Pattonville, 5 p.m. SLUH at Hillsboro, 5 p.m. De Soto at St. Charles, 5 p.m. John Burroughs, Lutheran North, Brentwood at MICDS, 5 p.m. St. James at Francis Howell, 5 p.m. Clayton at Parkway West, 5 p.m. Lafayette at Eureka, 5:30 p.m. Althoff, Belleville West at Belleville East, 6 p.m. Timberland at Fort Zumwalt North, 6 p.m. Mehlville at Seckman, 6 p.m. FZ South at Francis Howell Central, 6 p.m. Parkway South at Northwest-CH, 6 p.m.

BOYS BASKETBALL

— North Greene Spartan Classic At White Hall North Greene Pleasant Plains vs. North Greene, 5 p.m. Brown County vs. Griggsville-Perry, 6:30 p.m. Brussels (4-2) vs. Greenfield, 8 p.m. — St. Charles West Warrior Classic Ritenour vs. Lutheran North, 5 p.m. FZ West (1-1) vs. FZ South (2-0), 6:30 p.m. Marquette (2-0) vs. St. Dominic (1-1), 8 p.m. — 63rd Gene Steighorst Tournament At Hillsboro Festus (1-2) vs. Northwest-CH (0-2), 5:30 p.m. De Soto (3-3) vs. Seckman (1-3), 7 p.m. — Non-tournament Whitfield (1-2) at Mater Dei (3-2), 6 p.m. Gateway STEM (3-0) at Clayton (1-2), 6 p.m. McKinley (3-0) vs. Roosevelt (2-3) at Gateway STEM, 6:15 p.m. Miller Career (2-3) at Lift For Life (2-1), 6:15 p.m.

Luth. SC (0-4) at Valley Park (2-2), 6:30 p.m. Med.andBio (0-2) at Wood River (2-4), 6:30 p.m. Park.Central (3-0) at Lindbergh (3-1), 7 p.m. Westminster (3-1) at MICDS (1-2), 7 p.m. Grandview (1-3) at Dupo (3-2), 7 p.m. College Prep (5-1) at Cleveland (0-5), 7 p.m.

GIRLS BASKETBALL

— 21st Herculaneum Classic STL Patriots (1-4) vs. NW Academy (1-3), 4 p.m. St. Paul Luth. (0-1) vs. Crossroads (0-1), 5:30 p.m. Grandview (1-3) vs. Crystal City (1-1), 7 p.m. Soldan (2-4) at Herculaneum (4-2), 8:30 p.m. — Whitfield Round Robin Pacific (1-2) vs. John Burroughs (3-0), 6 p.m. Gate.STEM (1-3) at Whitfield (2-0), 7:30 p.m. — Stephanie Phillips Classic Jefferson City at Kickapoo, 6 p.m. — Centralia (Mo.) Tournament Hallsville vs. North Callaway (0-3), 9 p.m. — Non-tournament Jackson at Visitation (2-4), 5:30 p.m. Riv.Gardens (0-2) at N.Tech (1-4), 5:30 p.m. Westminster (2-1) at MICDS (1-2), 5:30 p.m. OF Christian (1-3) at Luth. SC (3-1), 5:30 p.m. Jennings (2-1) at Ritenour (0-3), 5:45 p.m. Luth.North (3-0) at Inc.Word (2-0), 6 p.m. Brentwood at Villa Duchesne (2-3), 6 p.m. Roxana (2-3) at Staunton (6-2), 6 p.m. Duchesne (0-2) at Rosati-Kain (0-1), 6 p.m. Oakville (2-2) at Parkway South (1-2), 6 p.m. Lebanon (6-3) at Steeleville (3-6), 6:15 p.m. Sparta (2-3) at Okawville (2-3), 6:15 p.m. Gibault (4-5) at Red Bud (3-6), 6:15 p.m. Hancock (1-2) at Silex (0-3), 6:30 p.m. Ladue (0-1) at Lafayette (1-2), 7 p.m.

GIRLS SWIMMING & DIVING

Duchesne at Rosati-Kain, 3:30 p.m. Haz. East, Haz. Central at McCluer, 3:30 p.m. Affton, Ritenour at University City, 4 p.m.

GO ONLINE FOR MORE Girls basketball • Troy rolls past Francis Howell Boys basketball • Alton tops O’Fallon in first game since brawl


SPORTS

B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH AMERICA’S LINE NFL Favorite Points Underdog ...........................Open Current....................... > Thursday TITANS...................4.5 4.5 .................Jaguars > Sunday CHIEFS......................7 6.5 ..................Ravens TEXANS .................4.5 4.5 ......................Colts Panthers .................. 1 1.5................BROWNS PACKERS ..................6 5.5.................. Falcons Saints ....................8.5 8 ........................BUCS BILLS .....................3.5 3.5........................ Jets Patriots .................8.5 7.5............. DOLPHINS Rams ........................4 3 ......................BEARS Giants....................3.5 3.5........WASHINGTON Broncos....................6 5.5....................49ERS CHARGERS .............14 14...................Bengals Lions...................... 1.5 2.5................... CARDS COWBOYS..............3.5 3.5....................Eagles Steelers................11.5 11 .................RAIDERS > Monday SEAHAWKS...............3 3.5...................Vikings COLLEGE FOOTBALL Favorite Points Underdog Open Current > Saturday at Philadelphia p-Army .....................7 7..........................Navy > DEC. 15 Celebration Bowl No Caro A&T.......... 7.5 7.5................Alcorn St New Mexico Bowl Utah St ...................10 10 .................. N Texas Cure Bowl Tulane ...................3.5 3.5..........UL-Lafayette Las Vegas Bowl Fresno St..................4 4 ................Arizona St Camellia Bowl E Michigan ............ PK PK.......... Ga Southern New Orleans Bowl App’chian St.............7 7.............. Mid Tenn St > DEC. 18 Boca Raton Bowl Uab........................ 1.5 1.5............. No. Illinois > DEC. 19 Frisco Bowl Ohio U ......................3 3 ............San Diego St > DEC. 20 Gasparilla Bowl Marshall................2.5 2.5............. S FLORIDA > DEC. 21 Bahamas Bowl Toledo ......................6 6 ..............Florida Int’l Potato Bowl Byu ......................... 12 12.............W Michigan > DEC. 22 Birmingham Bowl Memphis ...............3.5 4 ............ Wake Forest Armed Forces Bowl Army ..................... NL NL.................Houston Dollar General Bowl Buffalo .....................3 3 ..........................Troy Hawaii Bowl HAWAII ..................2.5 2.5.................. La Tech > DEC. 26 First Responder Bowl Boise St ....................3 3 .............. Boston Coll Quick Lane Bowl Georgia Tech............4 4 ............... Minnesota Cheez-It Bowl California .............. PK PK......................... Tcu > DEC. 27 Independence Bowl Temple ..................3.5 3.5...................... Duke Pinstripe Bowl Miami-Fla..............3.5 3.5.............. Wisconsin Texas Bowl Vanderbilt.............4.5 4.5 ...................Baylor

> DEC. 28 Music City Bowl Auburn..................4.5 4.5 ..................Purdue Camping World Bowl W Virginia ................7 7...................Syracuse Alamo Bowl Wash St ....................4 4 .....................Iowa St > Dec. 29 • CFP: Orange Bowl Alabama.................14 14...............Oklahoma • CFP: Cotton Bowl Clemson ..................11 11 ............Notre Dame > DEC. 29 Arizona Bowl Nevada.................. PK PK........... Arkansas St Peach Bowl Michigan ...............6.5 7......................Florida Belk Bowl S Carolina..............4.5 4.5 .................Virginia > DEC. 31 Military Bowl Cincinnati.................6 6 ........... Virginia Tech Sun Bowl Stanford................6.5 6.5 ............ Pittsburgh San Francisco Bowl Oregon ..................2.5 2.5........... Michigan St Liberty Bowl Missouri ................8.5 8.5 ........ Oklahoma St Holiday Bowl Utah.......................6.5 6.5 .......Northwestern Gator Bowl Texas A&M ............4.5 4.5 ................NC State > Jan. 1 Outback Bowl Miss St...................6.5 6.5 ......................Iowa Citrus Bowl Penn St.....................7 5.5............... Kentucky Fiesta Bowl Lsu............................8 7.5................C Florida Rose Bowl Ohio St .....................5 6 ............. Washington Sugar Bowl Georgia....................11 11 .......................Texas NBA Favorite Points Underdog Warriors 11 CAVALIERS Nuggets 5 MAGIC Wizards 5.5 HAWKS Thunder 7.5 NETS T’WOLVES 5 Hornets RAPTORS 6 76ers BUCKS 7.5 Pistons PELICANS 5 Mavericks GRIZZLIES PK Clippers LAKERS 8 Spurs COLLEGE BASKETBALL Favorite Points Underdog XAVIER 11.5 Ohio U BUTLER 17 Brown Marshall 1 DUQUESNE GEORGE WASH 6 Towson c-Ohio St 5.5 Illinois INDIANA ST 2 N Texas N CAROLINA 26 NC-Wilmington OLD DOMINION 9.5 William & Mary St. Joseph’s 3 PRINCETON TOLEDO 14 Detroit WRIGHT ST 5.5 Miami-Ohio Bowling Green 1.5 CLEVELAND ST VANDERBILT 13 Middle Tenn St ILLINOIS-CHI PK Illinois St LOYOLA-CHICAGO 4.5 Ball St W Kentucky 5 MISSOURI ST NO ILLINOIS 8 Cal-Davis SO ILLINOIS 3 Saint Louis TEXAS 8.5 Virginia Comm Oklahoma St 1 TULSA VILLANOVA 10 Temple BYU 1 Utah St Nebraska 2.5 MINNESOTA

DeWitts have fond memories of George Bush CARDINALS • FROM B1

they showed us all around, showed us some of the memorabilia they had, and talked baseball. That was the kind of person he was. He was engaging to everyone, acted like it was fun to be with you. It was terrific, just terrific. And top of it all, a great baseball fan.” The 41st president of the United States will be memorialized during a state funeral Wednesday at the Washington National Cathedral, and since his death Friday his fondness for baseball and roots in the game have been mapped and illuminated. Many stretch all the way to the Cardinals and St. Louis. Bill DeWitt III, president of the team, served in the EPA during Bush’s administration, and one of the team’s current owners, Craig Stapleton, was an ambassador during President George W. Bush’s administration. Stapleton’s wife, Debbie Walker Stapleton, is the first President Bush’s first cousin through a branch of the family tree that sprouted from St. Louis. On Tuesday, three-time MVP and former Cardinals first baseman Albert Pujols joined former Cardinals manager Tony La Russa to pay their respects to the president in the Capitol rotunda, where he was lying in state. President Bush and his late wife, Barbara, were fixtures at significant Houston games during the peak of the CardinalsAstros rivalry, and they always had seats behind home plate waiting for them. They both stood up, the former president in a brick-red Astros jacket and clapping, as Pujols came to the plate in Game 5 of the 2005 NLCS. The Bushes shared in the shock as Pujols sent the series back to St. Louis with a mammoth home run. La Russa got to know the family far earlier, after visiting the White House with the Oakland A’s and later attending a state dinner. Their relation-

S Carolina 5 WYOMING San Francisco 6 CALIFORNIA Arkansas 6.5 COLORADO ST CS-FULLERTON 3 Loyola-M’mount SAN DIEGO ST 6.5 San Diego Tcu 1 SMU GONZAGA 15 Washington Added Games NC STATE 26 W Carolina VIRGINIA TECH 32 Vmi HOFSTRA 14.5 Monmouth Akron 3 IPFW DARTMOUTH 3.5 Quinnipiac ST. BONA 6 Siena FLA ATLANTIC 1 Mercer TULANE 7.5 Tenn-Martin AIR FORCE 5.5 Denver WASHINGTON ST 7.5 Idaho PORTLAND ST 5 Portland FRESNO ST 7.5 Weber St LONG BEACH ST 4 Southern Utah c- Chicago, IL. NHL Favorite Odds Underdog BLUES -$120/even Oilers SHARKS -$160/+$140 Hurricanes DUCKS -$150/+$130 Blackhawks Grand Salami: Over/under 17.5 goals. Home team in CAPS © 2018 B. Eckstein

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL American League DETROIT — Agreed to terms with LHP Matt Moore on a one-year contract. TAMPA BAY — Promoted Paul Hoover to field coordinator. Named Jonathan Erlichman process and analytics coach and Justin Su’a mental skills coach. TEXAS — Named Oscar Marin bullpen coach, Callix Crabbe assistant hitting coach and Regan Wong physical therapist. Promoted Jacob Newburn to assistant trainer. BASKETBALL | NBA NBA — Fined L.A. Clippers G Patrick Beverley $25,000 for throwing the game ball at a spectator and Utah C Rudy Gobert $15,000 for public criticism of officiating. CHICAGO — Announced resignation of ast. coach Randy Brown. Promoted director of player development Shawn Respert to ast. coach. Named Dean Cooper ast. coach. MEMPHIS — Signed F Joakim Noah for the remainder of the season. FOOTBALL | NFL ARIZONA — Placed OL Mike Iupati, WR Christian Kirk and DT Olsen Pierre on injured reserve. Signed DE Vontarrius Dora and WR Jalen Tolliver from the practice squad. BUFFALO — Released WRs Kelvin Benjamin and Andre Holmes. Placed C Russell Bodine on injured reserve. Signed DE Mike Love and CB Denzel Rice from the practice squad. DENVER — Signed CB Jamar Taylor. Waived T Cyrus Kouandjio. GREEN BAY — Placed S Ibraheim Campbell on injured reserve. Signed LB Kendall Donnerson from the practice squad and Ss Tray Matthews and Jason Thompson to the practice squad. MIAMI — Placed TE A.J. Derby on injured reserve. Claimed DB Dee Delaney off waivers. OAKLAND — Waived DE Fadol Borwn. Signed DE Damontre’ Moore. PITTSBURGH — Placed WR Justin Hunter on injured reserve.

ship was further nurtured by Jean Becker, the 41st president’s chief of staff, a Missouri native and Cardinals fan. Bush was a standout athlete in prep school, and after serving in World War II enrolled at Yale and became the captain of the baseball team, which twice played in the College World Series championship. It was at Yale that he played against Vin Scully’s Fordham team and where Bush was photographed with Babe Ruth shortly before the Sultan of Swat’s death. Bush threw with his left hand, batted righthanded and was often described in later stories as a good glove. He kept his first baseman’s glove in a desk drawer in the Oval Office and reportedly would sometimes put it on and pop it with his left hand as he thought. In 1994, several Red Sox players visited the Bushes in Kennebunkport, Maine, and the former president paired with Roger Clemens to beat St. Louis native Scott Cooper in horseshoes. The president wrote Cooper, an All-Star third baseman for Boston that summer, a letter he treasures and shared Tuesday. In it Bush boasts how “Roger and I are undefeated.” “True you had some ugly shoes thrown — I think particularly of two tosses — one that almost wiped our dog, Millie — and the one that had five elements,” Bush wrote. “(H)itting the grass, then the wood, then ricocheting dangerously off the iron stake, only to brush the clay, before ending up at rest against the stone wall. ‘Wild Thing’ they now call it up here. Nice throw, Scott.” Cooper recalled in a text message, “What a gentleman.” Bill DeWitt Jr. first met the first President Bush in the early 1980s, when Bush was Ronald Reagan’s vice president and a business partner’s father. DeWitt joined George W. Bush in the oil and gas business, and while that was a short venture, the two became friends, bound by business, politics and baseball, a deep fondness for baseball. Later that decade DeWitt’s connections in baseball helped forge a group around the younger Bush that purchased the Texas Rangers. DeWitt was part of the ownership before leading the group that would buy the

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 12.05.2018

HOCKEY | NHL NHL — Approved the addition of a franchise in Seattle to begin play in 2021. DETROIT RED WINGS — Recalled C Wade Megan from Grand Rapids (AHL). Reassigned F Dylan Sadowy from Grand Rapids to Toledo (ECHL). LOS ANGELES KINGS — Assigned F Sheldon Rempal to Ontario (AHL). NEW YORK ISLANDERS — Returned F Stephen Gionta to Bridgeport (AHL). Recalled G Christopher Gibson from Bridgeport. NEW YORK RANGERS — Assigned F Ryan Grop from Hartford (AHL) to Maine (ECHL). OLYMPIC SPORTS U.S. ANTI-DOPING AGENCY — Named Adam Woullard director of communications. SOCCER Major League Soccer NEW YORK CITY FC — Named Brad Sims CEO. NEW YORK RED BULLS — Exercised options on Gs Evan Louro and Ryan Meara; D Kyle Duncan, Aaron Long and Michael Amir Murillo; Ms Vincent Bezecourt, Derrick Etienne Jr., Alex Muyl and Florian Valot; and Fs Anatole Abang and Brian White. Declined options on F Carlos Rivas and Ds Aurelian Collin, Ethan Kutler, Kevin Politz, D Fidel Escobar and M Marc Rzatkowski. National Women’s Soccer League WASHINGTON — Re-signed F Estefania Banini. COLLEGE ARKANSAS — QB Cole Kelley will transfer. BROWN — Named James Perry football coach. LOUISVILLE — Named Scott Satterfield football coach. MISSISSIPPI — WR A.J. Brown will enter the NFL draft. OHIO STATE — Football coach Urban Meyer will retire. Promoted QBs coach Ryan Day to head coach, effective end of the season.

NFL LEADERS Week 13 PASSERS Att-Cp Pct Yds TD Rtng Brees, NOR 384-290 75.5 3262 30 123.2 Mahomes, KC 429-287 66.9 3923 41 118.1 P. Rivers, LAC 380-265 69.7 3418 28 115.7 Ru. Wilson, SEA 326-217 66.6 2716 29 115.5 Goff, LA 414-275 66.4 3754 27 109.9 M. Ryan, ATL 460-326 70.9 3814 25 109.3 D.Watson, HOU 364-242 66.5 3031 21 101.1 369-257 69.6 2846 18 100.6 Wentz, PHL Fitzpatrick,RB 246-164 66.7 2366 17 100.4 Newton, CAR 400-278 69.5 2999 24 99.8 REC. YARDS Yds No Avg Long TD Jul. Jones, ATL 1323 86 15.4 58 3 Thielen, MIN 1166 98 11.9 68 9 M. Evans, TAM 1121 66 17.0 72t 5 Michael Thomas, NOR 1120 91 12.3 72t 8 Ty. Hill, KC 1119 66 17.0 75t 11 D. Adams, GBY 1115 85 13.1 57 11 De. Hopkins, HOU 1115 80 13.9 49t 8 Smith-Schuster, PIT 1104 83 13.3 97t 4 T. Kelce, KC 1082 79 13.7 43 9 Beckham, NYG 1052 77 13.7 51 6 RUSHERS Att Yards Avg Long TD Gurley, LA 233 1175 5.0 36 15 E. Elliott, DAL 240 1150 4.8 41 6 S. Barkley, NYG 195 954 4.9 68t 8 Lindsay, DEN 154 937 6.1 65t 8 Conner, PIT 201 909 4.5 30 12 L. Miller, HOU 176 876 5.0 97t 3 McCaffrey, CAR 163 863 5.3 59 5 A. Peterson, WAS 192 856 4.5 90t 7 Kareem Hunt, KC 181 824 4.6 45 7 M. Gordon, LAC 153 802 5.2 34t 9

SOCCER MLS Cup championship Saturday • Portland at Atlanta, 7 p.m.

English Premier League Tuesday Brighton 3, Crystal Palace 1 West Ham 3, Cardiff 1 Bournemouth 2, Huddersfield 1 Watford 1, Man City 2 Wednesday Wolverhampton vs. Chelsea, 1:45 p.m. Fulham vs. Leicester, 1:45 p.m. Everton vs. Newcastle, 1:45 p.m. Burnley vs. Liverpool, 1:45 p.m. Man United vs. Arsenal, 2 p.m. Tottenham vs. Southampton, 2 p.m.

COLLEGES Area results Women’s basketball SE Missouri St. 82, Illinois-Springfield 46 South Dakota 85, Missouri State 74 Southern Indiana 75, LU-Belleville 42 Spalding 70, Principia 31 Men’s basketball UMSL 90, LU-Belleville 47 Missouri Southern 106, Truman State 77 SE Missouri State 77, Mississippi Valley 57 Eastern Illinois 90, Fontbonne 37 Missouri Baptist 85, Webster U. 64

Area basketball schedule Wednesday W: Missouri Baptist at McKendree, 5:30 p.m. W: John Wood at Jefferson, 5:30 p.m. W: MacMurray at Webster, 6 p.m. M: W. Kentucky at Missouri State, 7 p.m. W: Indiana State at Illinois, 7 p.m. M: Blackburn at McKendree, 7 p.m. M: LU-Belleville JV at SW Illinois, 7 p.m. W: SW Illinois at LU-Belleville JV, 7:30 p.m. M: State Fair at St. Louis CC, 7:30 p.m.

Women’s Top 25 Fared Tuesday 1. UConn (8-0) beat St. Louis U. 98-42. Next: vs. Seton Hall, Saturday. 2. Notre Dame (7-1) idle. Next: at Toledo, Saturday. 3. Oregon (7-0) idle. Next: at Michigan State, Sunday. 4. Baylor (7-0) idle. Next: vs. Morehead State, Dec. 12. 5. Louisville (9-0) beat UT Martin 102-62. Next: vs. No. 19 Kentucky, Sunday. 6. Mississippi State (8-0) idle. Next: vs. No. 18 Marquette, Thursday. 7. Maryland (8-0) idle. Next: vs. James Madison, Saturday. 8. Oregon State (6-1) idle. Next: vs. Santa Clara, Sunday. 9. Tennessee (6-0) idle. Next: vs. Stetson, Wednesday. 10. N.C. State (8-0) idle. Next: vs. Hampton, Wednesday. 11. Stanford (6-1) idle. Next: vs. No. 4 Baylor, Saturday, Dec. 15.

Cardinals before the 1996 season. In March 2005, the DeWitts hosted the 41st president for a spring training game at Roger Dean Stadium between Bush’s beloved Astros and the Cardinals. They spoke throughout the game and mostly about the game because, as DeWitt said, “He certainly knew all the players and loved talking baseball.” DeWitt and his wife, Kathy, served as co-chairs for both of George W. Bush’s inaugurals, and they were frequent guests at the White House during his two terms. It was at the White House in 2011 that the DeWitts and Bushes met again, with baseball ever present. The same afternoon President Obama presented Cardinals great Stan Musial with a Medal of Freedom, he looped the same honor around the 41st president’s neck. NBA legend

12. Texas (7-1) idle. Next: vs. No. 9 Tennessee, Sunday. 13. California (7-0) idle. Next: at Saint Mary’s, Saturday. 14. Minnesota (7-0) idle. Next: vs. Incarnate Word, Wednesday. 15. Syracuse (7-2) idle. Next: vs. Maryland-Eastern Shore, Wed. 16. Iowa (6-2) idle. Next: vs. Iowa State, Wednesday. 17. Arizona State (5-2) idle. Next: vs. Southern University, Friday. 18. Marquette (6-1) idle. Next: at No. 6 Mississippi State, Thursday. 19. Kentucky (8-0) idle. Next: vs. Rhode Island, Thursday. 20. DePaul (5-3) idle. Next: vs. Northwestern, Wednesday. 21. Drake (8-1) beat Clarke 91-43. Next: at South Dakota State, Saturday. 22. South Carolina (4-4) idle. Next: vs. Appalachian State, Wednesday. 23. Missouri (6-2) idle. Next: vs. UMKC, Thursday. 24. Gonzaga (8-1) idle. Next: vs. Washington State, Sunday. 25. Miami (7-2) idle. Next: vs. New Orleans, Sunday.

MEN’S BASKETBALL Major scores Tuesday East American U. 95, St. Francis (Pa.) 82 Boston U. 79, Mass.-Lowell 60 Bucknell 92, La Salle 79 Holy Cross 82, UMass 78 Indiana 64, Penn St. 62 Maine 75, Fordham 68, 2OT NJIT 77, Army 72 Penn 89, Miami 75 Providence 100, Boston College 95, OT Seton Hall 77, New Hampshire 57 Syracuse 72, Northeastern 49 South Appalachian St. 100, Howard 86 Auburn 67, UNC-Asheville 41 Clemson 65, St. Peter’s 60 Davidson 99, Winthrop 81 Furman 98, Elon 77 Jacksonville 94, Presbyterian 88 J. Madison 73, Radford 66 Louisiana Tech 82, Prairie View 68 Mississippi St. 90, McNeese St. 77 SE Missouri 77, MVSU 57 UAB 73, North Alabama 67 Midwest Cent. Michigan 100, Youngstown St. 94, 3OT Cincinnati 78, N. Kentucky 65 Dayton 98, Detroit 59 E. Illinois 90, Fontbonne 37 Kansas 72, Wofford 47 Missouri 65, Texas-Arlington 45 Oklahoma 85, Notre Dame 80 Southwest Abilene Christian 83, Campbell 68 Bradley 68, UALR 62 Incarnate Word 82, Trinity (TX) 57

Bill Russell was honored in the same ceremony, and President Bush remarked to The New York Times about being beside two Hall of Fame athletes, “I don’t know if I’m their league.” During a reception that day, Bill DeWitt Jr. got to spend some time with the former president, not too far from where people gathered to talk to Musial. The conversation bent where DeWitt expected — to baseball. “He was what you’d expect,” DeWitt said Tuesday. “Very gracious, engaging. It was always, ‘How are you doing? How is the team doing?’ An incredible person in every way. It’s pretty universal the admiration and respect that he received.” Derrick Goold • @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com

WEDDING ING GO GOWNS & ACCESSORIES  GUEST ACCOMMODATIONS  HONEYMOONS & DESTINAT TION N WE W INGS  INVITATIONS, CALLIGRAPHY AND STATIONERY  LIVE MUSIC  OFFICIANTS  PHOTO OGR RAPHY ST. LOUIS’ BEST BRIDAL HOTO O BO OOTHS  WEDDING RECEPTION SITES  REHEARSAL DINNERS  REGISTRIES  VIDEOG GRA APHER AND SWEE ETS  TRANSPORTATION  TUXEDOS & FORMAL WEAR  BEAUTY & HEALTH SPAS  WEDD DING ING C CAK ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH  CAT TERER ERS DISC JOCKEYS  EVENT DECOR  FLORISTS  WEDDING GOWNS & ACCESSORIESS  GUE GUES E CCOM COM MMODATIONS HY A AND VOTTHE HONEYMOONS & DESTINATION WEDDINGS  INVITATIONS, CALLIGRAAPHY R STATIO ONERY  LIVE MUSIC  OFFICIANTS  PHOTOGRAPHY  PHOTO BOOTHS  WEDDING RE ECEP EPTION O F SITES  REHEARSAL R DINNERS  REGISTRIES  VIDEOGRAPHERY  SWEETS  TRANSPORTATION ION  TUX OSS & FOR RMAL WEAR  BEAUTY & HEALTH SPAS  WEDDING CAKES  CATERERS DISC JOCKEYS EYS  EVE DECOR R  FLORISTS  WEDDING GOWNS & ACCESSORIES  GUEST ACCOMMODATIONS  HONEYM NEYMOON NEYM OFFI FFICIAN DESTINA INA INATION WEDDINGS  INVITATIONS, CALLIGRAPHY AND STATIONERY  LIVE MUSIC  O PHOT TOG GRAPHY  PHOTO BOOTHS  WEDDING RECEPTION SITES  REHEARSAL DINNERS  REGI R GISTRIE  VIDEO VIDEOGRAPHERY  SWEETS  TRANSPORTATION  TUXEDOS & FORMAL WEAR  BEAUTY Y & HE HEALTH SPAS  W WEDDING CAKES  CATERERS DISC JOCKEYS  EVENT DECOR  FLORISTS  WEDDING ING GO GOWN INVITA & ACCE ESSSORIES  GUEST ACCOMMODATIONS  HONEYMOONS & DESTINATION WEDDINGS  INVI ONS,, C CAL LLIGRAPHY AND STATIONERY  LIVE MUSIC  OFFICIANTS  PHOTOGRAPHY  PHOTO O BO OOTHS EDDING ING R RECEPTION SITES  REHEARSAL DINNERS  REGISTRIES  VIDEOGRAPHERY  SWEETSS  TRAN RTAT ATION  TUXEDOS & FORMAL WEAR  BEAUTY & HEALTH SPAS  WEDDING CAKES  CATER ERER ERS DI JOCKEYS EYS  EVENT DECOR  FLORISTS  WEDDING GOWNS & ACCESSORIES  GUEST ACCOMMO ODA ATION  HO ONEYM NEYMOONS & DESTINATION WEDDINGS  INVITATIONS, CALLIGRAPHY AND STATIONERY  LIVE MUSIC C  OFFICIANTS  PHOTOGRAPHY  PHOTO BOOTHS  WEDDING RECEPTION SITES  REHE EHEARSA EHE INNERS  REGISTRIES  VIDEOGRAPHERY  SWEETS  TRANSPORTATION  TUXEDOS & FORM MAL L WEA W BEAU UTY & HEALTH HE SPAS  WEDDING CAKES  CATERERS DISC JOCKEYS  EVENT DECOR  FL FLORISTS WEDDING ING GO GOWNS & ACCESSORIES  GUEST ACCOMMODATIONS  HONEYMOONS & DESTINAT TION N WE W INGS  INVITATIONS, CALLIGRAPHY AND STATIONERY  LIVE MUSIC  OFFICIANTS  PHOTO OGR RAPHY GRA APHER HOTO O BO OOTHS  WEDDING RECEPTION SITES  REHEARSAL DINNERS  REGISTRIES  VIDEOG SWEE ETS  TRANSPORTATION  TUXEDOS & FORMAL WEAR  BEAUTY & HEALTH SPAS  WEDD DING ING C CAK  CAT TERER ERS DISC JOCKEYS  EVENT DECOR  FLORISTS  WEDDING GOWNS & ACCESSORIESS  GUE GUES CCOM MMODATIONS  HONEYMOONS & DESTINATION WEDDINGS  INVITATIONS, CALLIGRA APHY HY A AND STATIO ONERY  LIVE MUSIC  OFFICIANTS  PHOTOGRAPHY  PHOTO BOOTHS  WEDDING RE ECEP EPTION GIFT CA ION  TUX SITES  REHEARSAL R DINNERS  REGISTRIES  VIDEOGRAPHERY  SWEETS  TRANSPORTATION RD OSS & FOR RMAL WEAR  BEAUTY & HEALTH SPAS  WEDDING CAKES  CATERERS DISC JOCKEYS EYS  EVE DECOR R  FLORISTS  WEDDING GOWNS & ACCESSORIES  GUEST ACCOMMODATIONS  HONEYM NEYMOON NEYM DESTINA INA INATION WEDDINGS  INVITATIONS, CALLIGRAPHY AND STATIONERY  LIVE MUSIC  O OFFI FFICIAN PHOT TOG GRAPHY  PHOTO BOOTHS  WEDDING RECEPTION SITES  REHEARSAL DINNERS  REGI R GISTRIE  VIDEO VIDEOGRAPHERY  SWEETS  TRANSPORTATION  TUXEDOS & FORMAL WEAR  BEAUTY Y & HE HEALTH VOTE AT STLTODAY.COM/CONTESTS SPAS  W WED DDING CAKES  CATERERS DISC JOCKEYS  EVENT DECOR  FLORISTS  WEDDING ING GO GOWN & ACCE ESSSOR RIES  GUEST ACCOMMODATIONS  HONEYMOONS & DESTINATION WEDDINGS  INVI INVITA SPO NSORS ONS,, C CAL LLIIGRAPHY AND STATIONERY  LIVE MUSIC  OFFICIANTS  PHOTOGRAPHY  PHOT TO O BO OOTHS EDDING ING R RE ECEPTION SITES  REHEARSAL DINNERS  REGISTRIES  VIDEOGRAPHERY  SWEE ETSS  TRAN RTAT ATION  TUXEDOS & FORMAL WEAR  BEAUTY & HEALTH SPAS  WEDDING CAKES  CATER ERER ERS DI JOCKEYS EYS  EVENT DECOR  FLORISTS  WEDDING GOWNS & ACCESSORIES  GUEST ACCOMM MMO ODA ATION  HO ONEYM NEYM NEYMOONS & DESTINATION WEDDINGS  INVITATIONS, CALLIGRAPHY AND STATIONE NERY  LIVE MUSIC C  OFFICIANTS  PHOTOGRAPHY  PHOTO BOOTHS  WEDDING RECEPTION SITES  R REHE EHEARSA EHE INNERS  REGISTRIES  VIDEOGRAPHERY  SWEETS  TRANSPORTATION  TUXEDOS & FORM MAL L WEA W BEAU UTY Y & HEALTH HE SPAS  WEDDING CAKES  CATERERS DISC JOCKEYS  EVENT DECOR  FL FLORISTS WEDDING ING GOWNS GO & ACCESSORIES  GUEST ACCOMMODATIONS  HONEYMOONS & DESTINA INAT TION N WE W INGS  INVITATIONS, INVI CALLIGRAPHY AND STATIONERY  LIVE MUSIC  OFFICIANTS  PHOT TO OGR RAPHY EOG GRA APHER HOTO O BO OO OTHS  WEDDING RECEPTION SITES  REHEARSAL DINNERS  REGISTRIES  VIDEO SWEE ETS  TRANSPORTATION  TUXEDOS & FORMAL WEAR  BEAUTY & HEALTH SPAS  WED DD DING ING C CAK  CAT TERER ER DISC JOCKEYS  EVENT DECOR  FLORISTS  WEDDING GOWNS & ACCESSORIE ERS IESS  GUE GUES CCOM MMOD DATIONS  HONEYMOONS & DESTINATION WEDDINGS  INVITATIONS, CALLIG GRA APHY HY A AND RE ECEP EPTION STATIO ONER RY  LIVE MUSIC  OFFICIANTS  PHOTOGRAPHY  PHOTO BOOTHS  WEDDING R SITES  REHE REHEARSAL DINNERS  REGISTRIES  VIDEOGRAPHERY  SWEETS  TRANSPORTATION ION  TUX OSS & FOR RM MAL WEAR  BEAUTY & HEALTH SPAS  WEDDING CAKES  CATERERS DISC JOCK CKEYS EYS  EVE DECOR R  FL FLORISTS  WEDDING GOWNS & ACCESSORIES  GUEST ACCOMMODATIONS  HO ONEYM NEYMOON NEYM DESTINA INA ION WEDDINGS  INVITATIONS, CALLIGRAPHY AND STATIONERY  LIVE MUSIC  O INATI OFFI FFICIAN PHOT TOG GR RAPHY  PHOTO BOOTHS  WEDDING RECEPTION SITES  REHEARSAL DINNERS  REGI R GISTRIE  VIDEO VIDEOGRAPHERY  SWEETS  TRANSPORTATION  TUXEDOS & FORMAL WEAR  BEAUTY Y & HE HEALTH SPAS  W WED DDING CAKES  CATERERS DISC JOCKEYS  EVENT DECORTwisted  FLORISTS  WEDDING ING GO GOWN Lilies WEDDINGS  INVI & ACCE ESSSOR RIES  GUEST ACCOMMODATIONS  HONEYMOONS & DESTINATION INVITA ONS,, C CAL LLIIGRAPHY AND STATIONERY  LIVE MUSIC  OFFICIANTS  PHOTOGRAPHY  PHOT TO O BO OOTHS EDDING ING R RE ECEPTION SITES  REHEARSAL DINNERS  REGISTRIES  VIDEOGRAPHERY  SWEE ETSS  TRAN RTAT ATION  TUXEDOS & FORMAL WEAR & HEALTH SPAS  WEDDING CAKES  CATER ERER ERS DI a live  musicBEAUTY joint JOCKEYS EYS  EVENT DECOR  FLORISTS  WEDDING GOWNS & ACCESSORIES  GUEST ACCOMM MMO ODA ATION  HO ONEYM NEYM NEYMOONS & DESTINATION WEDDINGS  INVITATIONS, CALLIGRAPHY AND STATIONE NERY  LIVE MUSIC C  OFFICIANTS FFICIANTS  PHOTOGRAPHY  PHOTO BOOTHS  WEDDING RECEPTION SITES  R REHE EHEARSA EHE MAL L WEA W INNERS  REGISTRIES  VIDEOGRAPHERY  SWEETS  TRANSPORTATION  TUXEDOS & FORM BEAU UTY & HEALTH HE SPAS  WEDDING CAKES  CATERERS DISC JOCKEYS  EVENT DECOR  FL FLORISTS TION N WE W WEDDING ING GO GOWNS & ACCESSORIES  GUEST ACCOMMODATIONS  HONEYMOONS & DESTINAT INGS  INVITATIONS, CALLIGRAPHY AND STATIONERY  LIVE MUSIC  OFFICIANTS  PHOTO OGR RAPHY GRA APHER HOTO O BO OOTHS  WEDDING RECEPTION SITES  REHEARSAL DINNERS  REGISTRIES  VIDEOG FOR MORE INFORMATION 314-475-1201 SWEE ETS  TRANSPORTATION  TUXEDOS & FORMAL WEAR  BEAUTY & HEALTH SPAS  WEDD DING ING C CAK *OFFICIAL RULES CAN BE ATGOWNS & ACCESSORIES  CAT TERER ERS DISC JOCKEYS  EVENT DECOR  FLORISTS  FOUND WEDDING S  GUE GUES WWW.STLTODAY.COM/CONTESTS CCOM MMODATIONS  HONEYMOONS & DESTINATION WEDDINGS  INVITATIONS, 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B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH AMERICA’S LINE NFL Favorite Points Underdog ...........................Open Current....................... > Thursday TITANS...................4.5 4.5 .................Jaguars > Sunday CHIEFS......................7 6.5 ..................Ravens TEXANS .................4.5 4.5 ......................Colts Panthers .................. 1 1.5................BROWNS PACKERS ..................6 5.5.................. Falcons Saints ....................8.5 8 ........................BUCS BILLS .....................3.5 3.5........................ Jets Patriots .................8.5 7.5............. DOLPHINS Rams ........................4 3 ......................BEARS Giants....................3.5 3.5........WASHINGTON Broncos....................6 5.5....................49ERS CHARGERS .............14 14...................Bengals Lions...................... 1.5 2.5................... CARDS COWBOYS..............3.5 3.5....................Eagles Steelers................11.5 11 .................RAIDERS > Monday SEAHAWKS...............3 3.5...................Vikings COLLEGE FOOTBALL Favorite Points Underdog Open Current > Saturday at Philadelphia p-Army .....................7 7..........................Navy > DEC. 15 Celebration Bowl No Caro A&T.......... 7.5 7.5................Alcorn St New Mexico Bowl Utah St ...................10 10 .................. N Texas Cure Bowl Tulane ...................3.5 3.5..........UL-Lafayette Las Vegas Bowl Fresno St..................4 4 ................Arizona St Camellia Bowl E Michigan ............ PK PK.......... Ga Southern New Orleans Bowl App’chian St.............7 7.............. Mid Tenn St > DEC. 18 Boca Raton Bowl Uab........................ 1.5 1.5............. No. Illinois > DEC. 19 Frisco Bowl Ohio U ......................3 3 ............San Diego St > DEC. 20 Gasparilla Bowl Marshall................2.5 2.5............. S FLORIDA > DEC. 21 Bahamas Bowl Toledo ......................6 6 ..............Florida Int’l Potato Bowl Byu ......................... 12 12.............W Michigan > DEC. 22 Birmingham Bowl Memphis ...............3.5 4 ............ Wake Forest Armed Forces Bowl Army ..................... NL NL.................Houston Dollar General Bowl Buffalo .....................3 3 ..........................Troy Hawaii Bowl HAWAII ..................2.5 2.5.................. La Tech > DEC. 26 First Responder Bowl Boise St ....................3 3 .............. Boston Coll Quick Lane Bowl Georgia Tech............4 4 ............... Minnesota Cheez-It Bowl California .............. PK PK......................... Tcu > DEC. 27 Independence Bowl Temple ..................3.5 3.5...................... Duke Pinstripe Bowl Miami-Fla..............3.5 3.5.............. Wisconsin Texas Bowl Vanderbilt.............4.5 4.5 ...................Baylor

> DEC. 28 Music City Bowl Auburn..................4.5 4.5 ..................Purdue Camping World Bowl W Virginia ................7 7...................Syracuse Alamo Bowl Wash St ....................4 4 .....................Iowa St > Dec. 29 • CFP: Orange Bowl Alabama.................14 14...............Oklahoma • CFP: Cotton Bowl Clemson ..................11 11 ............Notre Dame > DEC. 29 Arizona Bowl Nevada.................. PK PK........... Arkansas St Peach Bowl Michigan ...............6.5 7......................Florida Belk Bowl S Carolina..............4.5 4.5 .................Virginia > DEC. 31 Military Bowl Cincinnati.................6 6 ........... Virginia Tech Sun Bowl Stanford................6.5 6.5 ............ Pittsburgh San Francisco Bowl Oregon ..................2.5 2.5........... Michigan St Liberty Bowl Missouri ................8.5 8.5 ........ Oklahoma St Holiday Bowl Utah.......................6.5 6.5 .......Northwestern Gator Bowl Texas A&M ............4.5 4.5 ................NC State > Jan. 1 Outback Bowl Miss St...................6.5 6.5 ......................Iowa Citrus Bowl Penn St.....................7 5.5............... Kentucky Fiesta Bowl Lsu............................8 7.5................C Florida Rose Bowl Ohio St .....................5 6 ............. Washington Sugar Bowl Georgia....................11 11 .......................Texas NBA Favorite Points Underdog Warriors 11 CAVALIERS Nuggets 5 MAGIC Wizards 5.5 HAWKS Thunder 7.5 NETS T’WOLVES 5 Hornets RAPTORS 6 76ers BUCKS 7.5 Pistons PELICANS 5 Mavericks GRIZZLIES PK Clippers LAKERS 8 Spurs COLLEGE BASKETBALL Favorite Points Underdog XAVIER 11.5 Ohio U BUTLER 17 Brown Marshall 1 DUQUESNE GEORGE WASH 6 Towson c-Ohio St 5.5 Illinois INDIANA ST 2 N Texas N CAROLINA 26 NC-Wilmington OLD DOMINION 9.5 William & Mary St. Joseph’s 3 PRINCETON TOLEDO 14 Detroit WRIGHT ST 5.5 Miami-Ohio Bowling Green 1.5 CLEVELAND ST VANDERBILT 13 Middle Tenn St ILLINOIS-CHI PK Illinois St LOYOLA-CHICAGO 4.5 Ball St W Kentucky 5 MISSOURI ST NO ILLINOIS 8 Cal-Davis SO ILLINOIS 3 Saint Louis TEXAS 8.5 Virginia Comm Oklahoma St 1 TULSA VILLANOVA 10 Temple BYU 1 Utah St Nebraska 2.5 MINNESOTA

DeWitts have fond memories of George Bush CARDINALS • FROM B1

they showed us all around, showed us some of the memorabilia they had, and talked baseball. That was the kind of person he was. He was engaging to everyone, acted like it was fun to be with you. It was terrific, just terrific. And top of it all, a great baseball fan.” The 41st president of the United States will be memorialized during a state funeral Wednesday at the Washington National Cathedral, and since his death Friday his fondness for baseball and roots in the game have been mapped and illuminated. Many stretch all the way to the Cardinals and St. Louis. Bill DeWitt III, president of the team, served in the EPA during Bush’s administration, and one of the team’s current owners, Craig Stapleton, was an ambassador during President George W. Bush’s administration. Stapleton’s wife, Debbie Walker Stapleton, is the first President Bush’s first cousin through a branch of the family tree that sprouted from St. Louis. On Tuesday, three-time MVP and former Cardinals first baseman Albert Pujols joined former Cardinals manager Tony La Russa to pay their respects to the president in the Capitol rotunda, where he was lying in state. President Bush and his late wife, Barbara, were fixtures at significant Houston games during the peak of the CardinalsAstros rivalry, and they always had seats behind home plate waiting for them. They both stood up, the former president in a brick-red Astros jacket and clapping, as Pujols came to the plate in Game 5 of the 2005 NLCS. The Bushes shared in the shock as Pujols sent the series back to St. Louis with a mammoth home run. La Russa got to know the family far earlier, after visiting the White House with the Oakland A’s and later attending a state dinner. Their relation-

S Carolina 5 WYOMING San Francisco 6 CALIFORNIA Arkansas 6.5 COLORADO ST CS-FULLERTON 3 Loyola-M’mount SAN DIEGO ST 6.5 San Diego Tcu 1 SMU GONZAGA 15 Washington Added Games NC STATE 26 W Carolina VIRGINIA TECH 32 Vmi HOFSTRA 14.5 Monmouth Akron 3 IPFW DARTMOUTH 3.5 Quinnipiac ST. BONA 6 Siena FLA ATLANTIC 1 Mercer TULANE 7.5 Tenn-Martin AIR FORCE 5.5 Denver WASHINGTON ST 7.5 Idaho PORTLAND ST 5 Portland FRESNO ST 7.5 Weber St LONG BEACH ST 4 Southern Utah c- Chicago, IL. NHL Favorite Odds Underdog BLUES -$120/even Oilers SHARKS -$160/+$140 Hurricanes DUCKS -$150/+$130 Blackhawks Grand Salami: Over/under 17.5 goals. Home team in CAPS © 2018 B. Eckstein

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL American League DETROIT — Agreed to terms with LHP Matt Moore on a one-year contract. TAMPA BAY — Promoted Paul Hoover to field coordinator. Named Jonathan Erlichman process and analytics coach and Justin Su’a mental skills coach. TEXAS — Named Oscar Marin bullpen coach, Callix Crabbe assistant hitting coach and Regan Wong physical therapist. Promoted Jacob Newburn to assistant trainer. BASKETBALL | NBA NBA — Fined L.A. Clippers G Patrick Beverley $25,000 for throwing the game ball at a spectator and Utah C Rudy Gobert $15,000 for public criticism of officiating. CHICAGO — Announced resignation of ast. coach Randy Brown. Promoted director of player development Shawn Respert to ast. coach. Named Dean Cooper ast. coach. MEMPHIS — Signed F Joakim Noah for the remainder of the season. FOOTBALL | NFL ARIZONA — Placed OL Mike Iupati, WR Christian Kirk and DT Olsen Pierre on injured reserve. Signed DE Vontarrius Dora and WR Jalen Tolliver from the practice squad. BUFFALO — Released WRs Kelvin Benjamin and Andre Holmes. Placed C Russell Bodine on injured reserve. Signed DE Mike Love and CB Denzel Rice from the practice squad. DENVER — Signed CB Jamar Taylor. Waived T Cyrus Kouandjio. GREEN BAY — Placed S Ibraheim Campbell on injured reserve. Signed LB Kendall Donnerson from the practice squad and Ss Tray Matthews and Jason Thompson to the practice squad. MIAMI — Placed TE A.J. Derby on injured reserve. Claimed DB Dee Delaney off waivers. OAKLAND — Waived DE Fadol Borwn. Signed DE Damontre’ Moore. PITTSBURGH — Placed WR Justin Hunter on injured reserve.

ship was further nurtured by Jean Becker, the 41st president’s chief of staff, a Missouri native and Cardinals fan. Bush was a standout athlete in prep school, and after serving in World War II enrolled at Yale and became the captain of the baseball team, which twice played in the College World Series championship. It was at Yale that he played against Vin Scully’s Fordham team and where Bush was photographed with Babe Ruth shortly before the Sultan of Swat’s death. Bush threw with his left hand, batted righthanded and was often described in later stories as a good glove. He kept his first baseman’s glove in a desk drawer in the Oval Office and reportedly would sometimes put it on and pop it with his left hand as he thought. In 1994, several Red Sox players visited the Bushes in Kennebunkport, Maine, and the former president paired with Roger Clemens to beat St. Louis native Scott Cooper in horseshoes. The president wrote Cooper, an All-Star third baseman for Boston that summer, a letter he treasures and shared Tuesday. In it Bush boasts how “Roger and I are undefeated.” “True you had some ugly shoes thrown — I think particularly of two tosses — one that almost wiped our dog, Millie — and the one that had five elements,” Bush wrote. “(H)itting the grass, then the wood, then ricocheting dangerously off the iron stake, only to brush the clay, before ending up at rest against the stone wall. ‘Wild Thing’ they now call it up here. Nice throw, Scott.” Cooper recalled in a text message, “What a gentleman.” Bill DeWitt Jr. first met the first President Bush in the early 1980s, when Bush was Ronald Reagan’s vice president and a business partner’s father. DeWitt joined George W. Bush in the oil and gas business, and while that was a short venture, the two became friends, bound by business, politics and baseball, a deep fondness for baseball. Later that decade DeWitt’s connections in baseball helped forge a group around the younger Bush that purchased the Texas Rangers. DeWitt was part of the ownership before leading the group that would buy the

M 2 • WeDneSDAy • 12.05.2018

HOCKEY | NHL NHL — Approved the addition of a franchise in Seattle to begin play in 2021. DETROIT RED WINGS — Recalled C Wade Megan from Grand Rapids (AHL). Reassigned F Dylan Sadowy from Grand Rapids to Toledo (ECHL). LOS ANGELES KINGS — Assigned F Sheldon Rempal to Ontario (AHL). NEW YORK ISLANDERS — Returned F Stephen Gionta to Bridgeport (AHL). Recalled G Christopher Gibson from Bridgeport. NEW YORK RANGERS — Assigned F Ryan Grop from Hartford (AHL) to Maine (ECHL). OLYMPIC SPORTS U.S. ANTI-DOPING AGENCY — Named Adam Woullard director of communications. SOCCER Major League Soccer NEW YORK CITY FC — Named Brad Sims CEO. NEW YORK RED BULLS — Exercised options on Gs Evan Louro and Ryan Meara; D Kyle Duncan, Aaron Long and Michael Amir Murillo; Ms Vincent Bezecourt, Derrick Etienne Jr., Alex Muyl and Florian Valot; and Fs Anatole Abang and Brian White. Declined options on F Carlos Rivas and Ds Aurelian Collin, Ethan Kutler, Kevin Politz, D Fidel Escobar and M Marc Rzatkowski. National Women’s Soccer League WASHINGTON — Re-signed F Estefania Banini. COLLEGE ARKANSAS — QB Cole Kelley will transfer. BROWN — Named James Perry football coach. LOUISVILLE — Named Scott Satterfield football coach. MISSISSIPPI — WR A.J. Brown will enter the NFL draft. OHIO STATE — Football coach Urban Meyer will retire. Promoted QBs coach Ryan Day to head coach, effective end of the season.

NFL LEADERS Week 13 PASSERS Att-Cp Pct Yds TD Rtng Brees, NOR 384-290 75.5 3262 30 123.2 Mahomes, KC 429-287 66.9 3923 41 118.1 P. Rivers, LAC 380-265 69.7 3418 28 115.7 Ru. Wilson, SEA 326-217 66.6 2716 29 115.5 Goff, LA 414-275 66.4 3754 27 109.9 M. Ryan, ATL 460-326 70.9 3814 25 109.3 D.Watson, HOU 364-242 66.5 3031 21 101.1 369-257 69.6 2846 18 100.6 Wentz, PHL Fitzpatrick,RB 246-164 66.7 2366 17 100.4 Newton, CAR 400-278 69.5 2999 24 99.8 REC. YARDS Yds No Avg Long TD Jul. Jones, ATL 1323 86 15.4 58 3 Thielen, MIN 1166 98 11.9 68 9 M. Evans, TAM 1121 66 17.0 72t 5 Michael Thomas, NOR 1120 91 12.3 72t 8 Ty. Hill, KC 1119 66 17.0 75t 11 D. Adams, GBY 1115 85 13.1 57 11 De. Hopkins, HOU 1115 80 13.9 49t 8 Smith-Schuster, PIT 1104 83 13.3 97t 4 T. Kelce, KC 1082 79 13.7 43 9 Beckham, NYG 1052 77 13.7 51 6 RUSHERS Att Yards Avg Long TD Gurley, LA 233 1175 5.0 36 15 E. Elliott, DAL 240 1150 4.8 41 6 S. Barkley, NYG 195 954 4.9 68t 8 Lindsay, DEN 154 937 6.1 65t 8 Conner, PIT 201 909 4.5 30 12 L. Miller, HOU 176 876 5.0 97t 3 McCaffrey, CAR 163 863 5.3 59 5 A. Peterson, WAS 192 856 4.5 90t 7 Kareem Hunt, KC 181 824 4.6 45 7 M. Gordon, LAC 153 802 5.2 34t 9

SOCCER MLS Cup championship Saturday • Portland at Atlanta, 7 p.m.

English Premier League Tuesday Brighton 3, Crystal Palace 1 West Ham 3, Cardiff 1 Bournemouth 2, Huddersfield 1 Watford 1, Man City 2 Wednesday Wolverhampton vs. Chelsea, 1:45 p.m. Fulham vs. Leicester, 1:45 p.m. Everton vs. Newcastle, 1:45 p.m. Burnley vs. Liverpool, 1:45 p.m. Man United vs. Arsenal, 2 p.m. Tottenham vs. Southampton, 2 p.m.

COLLEGES Area results Women’s basketball SE Missouri St. 82, Illinois-Springfield 46 South Dakota 85, Missouri State 74 Southern Indiana 75, LU-Belleville 42 Spalding 70, Principia 31 Men’s basketball UMSL 90, LU-Belleville 47 Missouri Southern 106, Truman State 77 SE Missouri State 77, Mississippi Valley 57 Eastern Illinois 90, Fontbonne 37 Missouri Baptist 85, Webster U. 64

Area basketball schedule Wednesday W: Missouri Baptist at McKendree, 5:30 p.m. W: John Wood at Jefferson, 5:30 p.m. W: MacMurray at Webster, 6 p.m. M: W. Kentucky at Missouri State, 7 p.m. W: Indiana State at Illinois, 7 p.m. M: Blackburn at McKendree, 7 p.m. M: LU-Belleville JV at SW Illinois, 7 p.m. W: SW Illinois at LU-Belleville JV, 7:30 p.m. M: State Fair at St. Louis CC, 7:30 p.m.

Women’s Top 25 Fared Tuesday 1. UConn (8-0) beat St. Louis U. 98-42. Next: vs. Seton Hall, Saturday. 2. Notre Dame (7-1) idle. Next: at Toledo, Sat. 3. Oregon (7-0) idle. Next: at Michigan State, Sunday. 4. Baylor (7-0) idle. Next: vs. Morehead State, Dec. 12. 5. Louisville (9-0) beat UT Martin 102-62. Next: vs. No. 19 Kentucky, Sunday. 6. Mississippi State (8-0) idle. Next: vs. No. 18 Marquette, Thursday. 7. Maryland (8-0) idle. Next: vs. James Madison, Saturday. 8. Oregon State (6-1) idle. Next: vs. Santa Clara, Sunday. 9. Tennessee (6-0) idle. Next: vs. Stetson, Wednesday. 10. N.C. State (8-0) idle. Next: vs. Hampton, Wednesday. 11. Stanford (6-1) idle. Next: vs. No. 4 Baylor, Saturday, Dec. 15. 12. Texas (7-1) idle. Next: vs. No. 9 Tennessee, Sunday. 13. California (7-0) idle. Next: at Saint Mary’s, Saturday. 14. Minnesota (7-0) idle. Next: vs.

Cardinals before the 1996 season. In March 2005, the DeWitts hosted the 41st president for a spring training game at Roger Dean Stadium between Bush’s beloved Astros and the Cardinals. They spoke throughout the game and mostly about the game because, as DeWitt said, “He certainly knew all the players and loved talking baseball.” DeWitt and his wife, Kathy, served as co-chairs for both of George W. Bush’s inaugurals, and they were frequent guests at the White House during his two terms. It was at the White House in 2011 that the DeWitts and Bushes met again, with baseball ever present. The same afternoon President Obama presented Cardinals great Stan Musial with a Medal of Freedom, he looped the same honor around the 41st president’s neck. NBA legend

Incarnate Word, Wednesday. 15. Syracuse (7-2) idle. Next: vs. Maryland-Eastern Shore, Wednesday. 16. Iowa (6-2) idle. Next: vs. Iowa State, Wed. 17. Arizona State (5-2) idle. Next: vs. Southern University, Friday. 18. Marquette (6-1) idle. Next: at No. 6 Mississippi State, Thursday. 19. Kentucky (8-0) idle. Next: vs. Rhode Island, Thursday. 20. DePaul (5-3) idle. Next: vs. Northwestern, Wednesday. 21. Drake (8-1) beat Clarke 91-43. Next: at South Dakota State, Saturday. 22. South Carolina (4-4) idle. Next: vs. Appalachian State, Wednesday. 23. Missouri (6-2) idle. Next: vs. UMKC, Thursday. 24. Gonzaga (8-1) idle. Next: vs. Washington State, Sunday. 25. Miami (7-2) idle. Next: vs. New Orleans, Sunday.

MEN’S BASKETBALL Major scores Tuesday East American U. 95, St. Francis (Pa.) 82 Boston U. 79, Mass.-Lowell 60 Bucknell 92, La Salle 79 Holy Cross 82, UMass 78 Indiana 64, Penn St. 62 Maine 75, Fordham 68, 2OT NJIT 77, Army 72 Penn 89, Miami 75 Providence 100, Boston College 95, OT Seton Hall 77, New Hampshire 57 Syracuse 72, Northeastern 49 South Appalachian St. 100, Howard 86 Auburn 67, UNC-Asheville 41 Belmont 76, Lipscomb 74 Clemson 65, St. Peter’s 60 Davidson 99, Winthrop 81 Florida 66, West Virginia 56 Furman 98, Elon 77 Georgia St. 83, Alabama 80 Grambling St. 81, Centenary College of Louisiana 57 Jacksonville 94, Presbyterian 88 J. Madison 73, Radford 66 Louisiana Tech 82, Prairie View 68 Memphis 88, S. Dakota St. 80 Mississippi St. 90, McNeese St. 77 SE Missouri 77, MVSU 57 UAB 73, North Alabama 67 Midwest Cent. Michigan 100, Youngstown St. 94, 3OT Cincinnati 78, N. Kentucky 65 Dayton 98, Detroit 59 E. Illinois 90, Fontbonne 37 High Point 55, Valparaiso 53 Kansas 72, Wofford 47 Marquette 76, UTEP 69 Michigan 62, Northwestern 60 Missouri 65, Texas-Arlington 45 Oklahoma 85, Notre Dame 80 Southwest Abilene Christian 83, Campbell 68 Arkansas St. 87, Evansville 77 Bradley 68, UALR 62 Houston 79, Lamar 56 Incarnate Word 82, Trinity (TX) 57 Far West CS Bakersfield 67, UC Merced 53 Colorado 82, South Dakota 58 New Mexico St. 100, New Mexico 65

Bill Russell was honored in the same ceremony, and President Bush remarked to The New York Times about being beside two Hall of Fame athletes, “I don’t know if I’m their league.” During a reception that day, Bill DeWitt Jr. got to spend some time with the former president, not too far from where people gathered to talk to Musial. The conversation bent where DeWitt expected — to baseball. “He was what you’d expect,” DeWitt said Tuesday. “Very gracious, engaging. It was always, ‘How are you doing? How is the team doing?’ An incredible person in every way. It’s pretty universal the admiration and respect that he received.” Derrick Goold • @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com

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Sources say Nats will sign Corbin

BASEBALL NOTEBOOK

class and became the first player among them to sign a big money, multiyear deal this offseason. Still on the market is right fielder Bryce Harper, the 2012 NL rookie of the year and 2015 NL MVP for the Nationals. Washington made a lateseason offer to Harper in a bid to keep him, but that was not accepted. Corbin recently made the rounds of free-agent suitors, including meeting with Nationals owner Mark Lerner and general manager Mike Rizzo. The signing of Corbin — who had drawn interest from the New York Yankees and Philadelphia Phillies, among other clubs, and was expected to draw offers of at least $20 million a year — could be a signal that the Nationals are moving on from Harper. After going 82-80 and failing to make the playoffs after two NL East titles in a row, Washington has been busy this offseason. In addition to the agreement with Corbin, the Nationals already have added two catchers — Yan Gomes via trade, Kurt Suzuki in free agency — and two back-end-of-the-bullpen relievers — Kyle Barraclough via trade, Trevor Rosenthal in free agency. Because Corbin declined a $17.9 million qualifying offer by Arizona, Washington would forfeit its firstround pick in next June’s amateur draft, No. 17 overall, and Arizona would gain an extra pick after the first round as compensation. (AP)

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Patrick Corbin pitches for the Arizona Diamondbacks in September. He was 11-7 last season with a 3.15 ERA, his best season in the majors. ilable

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Add Patrick Corbin to the All-Star starting staff the Washington Nationals have assembled. A person familiar with the deal said the lefthanded Corbin has agreed to a six-year contract with the Nationals, pending a physical exam. Another person familiar with the terms said the contract is for $140 million. The people confirmed the details of the agreement to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity Tuesday because nothing had been announced by the team. Corbin’s contract would include $10 million in deferred money, one of the people said. Corbin, who has played his entire major league career for the Arizona Diamondbacks, joins a rotation in Washington that already includes three-time Cy Young Award winner Max Scherzer and Stephen Strasburg. Corbin was an NL All-Star selection in 2013 and this year; Scherzer has been picked for each of the past six Midsummer Classics; Strasburg has made it three times. The 29-year-old Corbin is coming off his best season in the majors, going 11-7 with a 3.15 ERA while pitching 200 innings for the second time in his career. He finished fifth in voting for NL Cy Young honors; Scherzer was second as he came up just shy of a third consecutive prize. Corbin was considered the top starter available in an elite free-agent

Tigers get pitcher Moore • Lefthander Matt Moore and the rebuilding De-

troit Tigers finalized a $2.5 million, one-year contract that allows him to earn an additional $1 million in performance bonuses. “Matt is a veteran lefthanded starting pitcher with a solid threepitch mix that we see competing for a spot in our rotation next season,” Tigers general manager Al Avila said. “He has the ability to effectively use the whole strike zone with his arsenal, and we’re excited for him to join our organization.” The 29-year-old was 3-8 with a 6.79 ERA for Texas in 12 starts and 27 relief appearances last season. He is 54-56 with a 4.56 ERA over eight seasons with Tampa Bay, San Francisco and Texas. (AP) Chirinos reportedly to Astros • Robinson Chirinos, cast aside by the Texas Rangers last month, reportedly is on the verge of joining the Rangers’ No. 1 rival. Ken Rosenthal reported that the catcher and the Houston Astros are well down the path on a contract, and that all that stands between Chirinos and joining the Astros is a physical. The Rangers declined to pick up the option on Chirinos’ contract for 2019. Because of incentives, the value of the contract had neared $4 million, and the Rangers decided they would rather spend that on a defensive upgrade. And they did, signing veteran Jeff Mathis to a two-year deal for $6.25 million. (Fort Worth Star-Telegram)

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'13 Chevy Corvette: 3LT, Conv, Only 13K Miles, New Tires, Clean Carfax $42,990 #P6646

'02 Chevy Impala Only 76K miles. Very clean $5,990 #44192A

'15 Chevy Camaro ZLT: Loaded, Very Clean $20,990 #420204A

'16 Audi S5 Premium Plus: 18K Miles, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, Certified, Low Miles $42,999 #28074A

'17 Chevy Spark: LS, 21K Miles, Hatchback, FWD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner $11,990 #420082A

'16 Audi A6 3.0T: Prestige, 30K Miles, Quattro, AWD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner $37,200 #P9664

'15 Chevy Trax: LS, Carfax One Owner, Certified $14,469 #P6663

'18 Audi A5 Coupe: Premium Plus, 4K Miles, Clean Carfax 1 Owner AWD, $41,200 #P9604

18 Audi Q7: Prestige, Quattro, Sportback, AWD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, $64,700 #P9657

'15 Chevy Sonic: 47K Miles, Auto, Certified $8,990 #V19124A

'12 Chevy Impala: LT Fleet, Auto, $6,490 #M18107C

BMW

Buick '12 Buick Regal: Leather, Auto, Just Arrived $7,490 #B9322

'15 Buick Regal: Loaded, Black, GM Certified! $15,469 #420131B

'12 Buick Regal: FWD, Clean Carfax, One Owner $9,990 #C18107RA

'09 Buick LaCrosse: CXL, White Opal, FWD, $7,990 #C9353A

'15 Buick Encore: Gray, FWD, Auto, Back-up Camera $14,220 #M17390RA

'13 Buick Encore: Convenience, FWD, Clean Carfax $9,990 #M18516A

Cadillac '13 Cadillac CTS-V: 28K miles, coupe, auto, rec seats, roof. $42,990 #C9528I

'17 Cadillac XT5 Platinum: AWD, 30K Miles, Clean Carfax 1 Owner $38,700 #80091A

'13 Cadillac CTS-V: Coupe, AWD, Clean Carfax One Owner, 19K Miles $37,987 #P9507

'15 Nissan Rogue: 37K Miles, $18,680 #P4324 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

Chevrolet '10 Chevrolet Camaro Coupe, 1 LT, $13,346 Stock #P06852 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '18 Chevrolet Impala: $19,995 Stock #P06999 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

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'17 Honda Accord: Sport, Black, Auto, $22,490 #C9412A

Hyundai

'15 Hyundai Sonata: Limited, 31K, Red w/ Tan Leather $14,990 #V17800A

'12 Hyundai Veloster: Automatic, Local Trade, Just Arrived $8,490 #V18419B

'13 Hyundai Elantra: GLS, $11,490 #M18383B

Infiniti '17 Infiniti Q50: 3.0t Premium, Certified, 12K Miles, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $36,200 #96195L

'17 Infiniti Q50: 3.0t Premium, AWD, Certified, One Owner $33,888 #96360L

Misc. Autos

Volvo

BOMMARITO ST. PETERS

'11 Volvo C70: CVT, 52K Miles, $16,880 #114651 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

CADILLAC CERTIFIED 6yr/100K 1-866-244-9085 '14 CTS: Luxury, AWD, $24,490 '14 CTS-V: Sedan, White, Auto, Loaded $43,490 '16 XTS: Luxury Collection, Pano Roof, AWD, 12K Miles Call Today! '16 ATS: Coupe, Luxury, AWD, 5K, Black $32,490 '18 XTS: White, Certified, Just Arrived $34,490 '18 XT5: FWD, 4K, Bronze $34,990 '15 SRX: Luxury Collection, Pano Roof, Navy Blue, 36K Call Today! '15 XTS: Luxury, White Diamond, 26K Miles $28,490 '14 Escalade: Black, 55K, Quad Seats $36,490 '16 SRX: Luxury Collection, Crystal White, AWD, Certified,

BOMMARITO ST. PETERS 1-866-244-9085 VOLKSWAGEN'S '16 Jetta: Auto, Certified, 39K, $12,990 '15 Jetta: SE, 44K, Auto, Gas, Certified $13,490

'11 Jetta Wagon: TDI, Auto, Red, 57K Miles $11,990 '18 Infiniti Q70L: 3.7Luxe, 5K Miles, AWD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $41,700 #97172L

'18 Infiniti QX60: AWD, 6 Cyl, 3.5L, 20K Miles, Stk # P9637, $34,700

'17 Nissan 370Z: 8K Miles, Keyless Start, Brilliant Silver $22,208 #C11798Q LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770

Chrysler '05 Chrysler 300: Auto, Leather w/ Heat, Power Roof $8,490 #V9458A

Jeep '15 Jeep Wrangler: Unlimited, 4WD, Freedom Edition, $28,432 Stock #180861A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '13 Jeep G/CHK: SRT-8 4WD, white, NAV, Pan roof. $34,490 #C9434A

'18 Passat: 2.0 Turbo, 10K, Auto, Blue $17,490 '18 Beetle: 6K, Auto, Black $18,490 '18 Tiguan: S, FWD, Blue Metallic, 7K $19,990 '12 Jetta Sedan: TDI, Auto, Blue, 51K Miles $11,990

Nissan/Datsun '17 Nissan Altima Stock #P07025 $14,367 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Nissan Altima Auto, 7K Miles, White. $16,990 #V9201A

'17 Dodge Challenger: SXT, Plus Coupe, $23,357 Stock #P07018 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '11 Dodge Charger: SE, Redline, 5-Speed Auto, RWD $12,990 #B9332A

'16 Dodge Challenger: Hellcat!! 19K Miles, Red and Ready!$52,990 #B9463

'13 Dodge Challenger: SXT, Black, Automatic, 59K Miles $16,990 #M18600A

'10 Dodge Challenger: R/T Plus, Roof & Nav, Auto $17,990 #C9433A

'03 Ram 2500 4X4 Diesel Quad Cab, 227k highway miles, Sharp ph. 618-541-0605

Fiat '17 Fiat Abarth: 13K, Celeste Blue, Auto, Local Trade $17,490 #V18667A

Ford '12 Ford Focus: Backup Camera, Fuel Efficient, $6,999 #C11817Q LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '13 Ford Fusion: SE, FWD, Carfax One Owner $8,220 #V18579A

'14 Ford Mustang: GT, Loaded, Clean Carfax, Auto, $35,537 #35520A

'07 Ford Mustang: GT, Red, M/T, Loaded, Very Clean $11,990 #P6648

'17 Ford Mustang: Ecoboost, 6-Speed, RWD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $21,990 #C9077A

'18 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 Crew Cab, Short Box, 4WD, $35,494 Stock #181014A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '14 Chevrolet Silverado: 1500 Reg Cab, Std. Box, 2WD $16,917 Stock #181140A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Chevrolet Silverado: 1500, LT, Certified, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, 32K Miles, $31,569 #P6662

'17 Chevrolet Silverado: 2500HD High Country, 8K Miles, 4WD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner $58,800 #79723A

'16 Chevy Colorado: 4x4 $28,800 #192382 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '17 Chevy Silverado 1500 Certified, Crew Cab, Short Box, 4WD, $43,640 Stock #190124A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Chevy Suburban LTZ: Black, loaded, NAV, DVD $45,990 #M19023A

'17 Chevy Colorado: 4x4, "Black Out" Edition, Loaded $27,550 #35244A

'13 Chevy Silverado: 1500, LT, AWD, Ext Cab 6.5" Widespread $19,990 #420209A

'17 Chevy Silverado: Crew Cab, High Country, One Owner, Only 14K Miles $42,990 #P6541A

'14 Chevy Silverado: 3500HD, LTZ, Crew Cab, 4WD, Clean Carfax $39,200 #79281A

'15 Chevy Silverado 2500: HD, LTZ, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, 4WD $47,556 #79680A

Ford Trucks '12 Ford F-120: 4WD, ABS Brakes, Turbocharged $22,402 #C11823P LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus: Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD, 8K Miles, Certified $40,987 #28175L

'18 Audi Q7: Premium, 11K Miles, Clean Carfax, One Owner, AWD $53,888 #28207L

'18 Audi Q3 Quattro: 7K Miles, Utopia Blue Metallic, AWD, $33,987 #28209L

'18 Audi Q5: 2.0T Quattro, Ibis White, AWD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $40,987 #28326L

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus: Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, 9K Miles, AWD $41,556 #28392L

'18 Audi Q7: Premium Plus, 11K Miles, AWD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $55,200 #28602L

'18 Audi Q5: Premium Plus, Quattro, AWD, 6K Miles $42,800 #28649L

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus: Certified, Clean Carfax, One Owner, AWD $42,800 #28658L

'18 Audi Q5: PremiumPlus, Quattro, 24K Miles, $41,490 #C18154B1

'18 Audi Q5 Premium: Clean Carfax, One Owner, Certified, 6K Miles $38,800 #28659L

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus: 7K Miles, Certified, Clean Carfax, One Owner $42,800 #28660L

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus: Certified, AWD, Clean Carfax, One Owner, $39,800 #28757L

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus: AWD, Clean Carfax, One Owner, 8K Miles $40,900 #28758L

18 Audi Q7 Prestige: Quattro Sport, 6 Cyl, 3.0L, AWD, Auto, 9K Miles, $61,500 #28763L

'17 Audi Q7: Premium Plus, AWD, 33K Miles, Carfax 1 Owner $47,800 #29026A

'13 Ford F-150: Raptor, Crew Cab, 4WD, White, Local Trade $38,990 #M18349B

Kia '14 Kia Forte: New Front Brakes, Backup Camera $8,581 #C190638A LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '13 Kia Optima: 32K Miles, Certified, Auto, Gray $12,990 #M18388B

'17 Nissan Sentra SV, CVT, $13,566 Stock #P07029 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '14 Nissan Maxima: 34K Miles, Black, Sunroof, Auto $19,990 #C18235C

Pontiac Dodge

Chevrolet Trucks

'17 Jetta: SE, 15K, Auto, Certified $15,890

'09 Jetta: SEL, Auto, White $5,990

'10 Chevy Corvette: Grand Sport, Convertible, Local Trade!$30,490 #M18448A1

'14 BMW I3: Range, 19K Miles $17,800 #196541 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '13 BMW 328: xDrive, 64K, Auto, Local Trade $17,490 #V17707B

Honda '16 Honda Civic Coupe LX, Stock #190113A Call Us! DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '18 Honda Accord: Sport, One Owner, Only 3K Miles $27,469 #37022A

Lexus '15 Lexus IS350: New Front Brakes, Heated Front Seats, Backup Camera $25,300 #C11879P LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '17 Lexus RC: Black w/Red Leather, 21K Miles $35,490 #B9509

'17 Lexus ES350: FWD, Clean Carfax, One Owner, 12K Miles $33,987 #P9498

'16 Lexus GS 350: 4 Door Sedan, 34K Miles, Clean Carfax $35,888 #P9588

'16 Lexus RC 300: 2 Dr Coupe, 6 Cyl, 3.5L, AWD, Leather, 16K Miles, #P9644, $33,800

Mazda '09 Mazda Mazda3: Grand Touring, Stock #190132A Call Us DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '14 Mazda 6 Grand Touring: 57K miles, automatic. Certified $15,990 #M18564A

'16 Mazda CX-5: Grand Touring, AWD, White, Certified, $24,990, Stk #M9531

'15 Mazda 6: iSport, Auto, Local Trade $13,490 #M18236A

Mercedes Benz '09 Mercedes-Benz AMG: 6.0L V12, 81K Miles, RWD, Clean Carfax $35,200 #79807A

'17 Mercedes-Benz E 300: Luxury, Carfax 1 Owner, RWD, Sedan, $39,700 #P9651

'09 G6 Coupe, Very Good cond., 65K mi., White, Perfect on the inside, $5800. 636-441-9770

Porsche '12 Porsche 911: Black Edition, Convertible RWD, Clean Carfax $54,987 #P9511

Range Rover/Land Rover '15 Land Rover LR4: 4WD, gray, local trade. Just arrived. $37,990 #C18198B

Subaru '14 Subaru Forester Touring: Leather, NAV, Black, auto. $14,490 #V18519A

Toyota '15 Toyota Prius Two: 5 Door Hatchback, Backup Camera $12,7 #C11813ICO LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '13 Toyota Yaris: LE, Automatic, 30+ MPG $7,290 #B9108A

'16 Toyota Corolla: Auto, Loaded, Clean Carfax $14,469 #44172A

Volkswagen '12 Volkswagen Passat: SE Stock #190026A Call Us! DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '08 Volkswagen GTI: 2 Door, Carfax 1 Owner #35262B Call Today!

'14 Volkswagen Passat: Wolfsburg Edition, 65K Miles, FWD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $10,972 #42917B

'12 Volkswagen Jetta: TDI, 6-Speed Auto DSG, FWD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, $10,990 #V9458

'11 Ford F150 Lariat: Crew Cab, 4x4, Loaded. $29,990 #44028B

'10 Ford F-150: Lariat, Crew Cab, 4WD, V8 $18,990 #M19021A

'18 Ford F-150: 4WD, Platinum Super Crew, 5K Miles, Clean Carfax $50,987 #79725A

'15 Ford F-150 Lariat: Super Crew Cab Styleside, 67K Miles, Clean Carfax $32,987 #P9460

GMC Trucks '16 GMC Sierra 1500: SLT, 4WD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $33,888 #79838A

Honda Trucks '18 Honda Ridgeline: RTL-T, Crew Cab, 13K Miles, AWD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner $33,800 #79460A

Misc Trucks '15 Ram 1500: Big Horn, Backup Camera, Low Miles, $25,999 #C11818P LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '14 Ram 2500: 6.7 Diesel, Crew Cab Laramie, 4 New Tires, $44,990 #B9170

'17 Ram 1500: Laramie Longhorn Edition, 7K Miles, 4WD $40,990 #C18259A

Nissan/Datsun Trucks '15 Nissan Titan: Pro, Crew Cab, 4WD, 1 Owner $28,990 #B9063

'17 Nissan Frontier: SV, V6, 6K Miles, Crew Cab, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $23,750 #400069A

'18 Audi Q5 Premium: Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, Well Maintained $35,200 #P9607

'18 Audi Q7: Premium Plus, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD, $48,800 #P9619

'18 Audi Q5 Premium: Certified, Clean Carfax, One Owner, AWD $34,800 #P9625

'16 BMW X5 50i: xDrive, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD, 41K Miles $44,800 #P9665

15 BMW X5 35d: AWD, 30K Miles, Carfax 1 Owner, $37,888 #P9574

'18 Buick Encore: Preferred, 1K Miles, Just Arrived $20,990 #C18022B

'18 Buick Envision: Premium II, Galaxy Silver, AWD, $37,987 #P9356

'15 Cadillac Escalade: ESV Premium, Dark Granite, Local Trade $47,990 #C19050A

'14 Cadillac Escalade: Premium, AWD, Certified, Black $37,290 #C9319A

'14 Cadillac Escalade: Black/Black, AWD, 56K Miles, Nav, Roof $36,490 #C9404

'15 Cadillac Escalade: Luxury, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, 4WD $45,888 #98139A

'18 Cadillac Escalade: Luxury Package, 4WD, 20K Miles $59,987 #P9311

'13 Chevrolet Equinox: FWD 1LT, $11,896 Stock #180656A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '14 Chevrolet Equinox: LS, FWD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, $12,976 #P6427B

'07 Nissan Frontier: 81K, V6, Extended Cab $10,990 #M9532A

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12.05.2018 • Wednesday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B11

Sport Utility

Sport Utility

'14 Chevrolet Traverse: LT. FWD, Clean Carfax, One Owner, $14,770 #44093A

'18 Infiniti QX60: AWD, Carfax 1 Owner, 20K Miles $34,556 #P9551

'15 Chevrolet Tahoe: LTZ, 43K Miles, Clean Carfax, 4WD, $44,200 #12416A

'15 Jeep Cherokee: Limited, New Front Brakes, Carfax 1 Owner, $21,235 #C11819P LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770

'14 Chevy Traverse: LT, Backup Camera, Heated Front Seats, $12,385 #C181676W LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '17 Chevy Equinox: LT, Backup Camera, Blind Spot Detector, $13,830 #C11843DTP LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '08 Chevy Equinox: LT $8,875 #197281 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '17 Chevy Traverse: FWD, LS, $22,410 Stock #P06928A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '18 Chevy Tahoe 4 WD LT $44,954 Stock #P07028 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '18 Chevy Equinox: Certified, AWD, LT, $22,929 Stock #P06955 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '10 Chevy Equinox: LTZ, Loaded, Clean Carfax, Full Power $11,569 #44167A

'18 Chevy Tahoe: LT, One Owner, Clean Carfax, GM Certified $42,990 #P6600

'13 Chevy Equinox: Loaded, Very Clean. $11,469 #420054B

'05 Chevy Suburban Z71: Black, Loaded, Very Clean. $8,990 #P6637A

'13 Chevy Equinox: LT, Clean Carfax, One Owner $10,969 #35477A

'13 Chevy Equinox: Loaded, Very Clean. $11,469 #420054B

'15 Ford Explorer: XLT, 3rd Row Seating, Parking Assist, $17,202 #C190621A LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '07 Ford Edge: SEL $9,855 #197731 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '11 Ford Escape: Limited, 4WD, Carfax 1 Owner $10,490 #M18078A1

'07 GMC Envoy $6,925 #L15151 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '08 GMC Envoy: 2WD, SLE1, $17,995 Stock #P06854A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '18 GMC Terrain: 1K Miles, White, Just Arrived! $26,490 #B9076B

'15 GMC Yukon: Denali, White, GM Certified, Loaded $42,750 #420141B

'12 GMC Acadia: SLE, Loaded, Very Clean, Full Power $14,769 #P6555A

'13 GMC Acadia Denali: Loaded, One Owner, Clean Carfax, $19,469 #44155A

'17 GMC Yukon: SLT, Onxy Black, 20K Miles, 4x4, $45,987 #P9277

'16 GMC Acadia Denali: AWD, Ebony Twilight, 24K Miles, Clean Carfax $33,987 #P9478

'16 GMC Yukon Denali: 4WD, Quicksilver Metallic $49,200 P9606

'08 Yukon SLT 4WD, Chrome Pkg., 1 owner, 200K+ mi., $7900. Call (314)606-1480 '16 Honda Pilot: EX-L, Backup Camera, Heated Front Seats, $30,400 #C180787B LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '14 Honda CR-V: EX, AWD, 17K Miles, $19,490 #C18230A2

'17 Hyundai Santa FE: SE, $18,550 Stock #P06966 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '10 Hyundai Santa Fe GLS: Loaded, Full Power $8,990 #420175B

'13 Hyundai Tucson: LTD, Loaded, Black $12,469 #42511A

'18 Infiniti QX60: AWD, Certified, Clean Carfax 1 Owner $38,200 #97029L

'18 Infiniti QX60: Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, 22K Miles, AWD, $34,987 #P9500

'18 Infiniti QX60: AWD, Certified, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $34,789 #P9543

'17 Infiniti QX80: AWD, Clean Carfax, One Owner, 48K Miles $42,789 #P9546

'11 Jeep Liberty: Limited, 4WD, Clean Carfax, 74K Miles $13,469 #P6627

'16 Jeep Cherokee: Trailhawk, 4WD, Leather, Roof, 8K Miles $29,490 #V18665B

'07 Lexus RX350: AWD, $10,850 #195821 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '08 Lexus RX350: AWD, $12,550 #193931 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '16 LR Range Rover: Sport V6 HSE, AWD, Clean Carfax $41,888 #79760A

'18 Mazda CX-9: Grand Touring, Certified, Clean Carfax, 5K Miles, Certified, $34,200 #12064L

'18 Mazda CX-9: Grand Touring, 2K Miles, AWD, Clean Carfax, $35,200 #12068L

'18 Mazda CX-9: Signature, Clean Carfax, 2K Miles, AWD, $40,200 #12129L

'18 Mazda CX-9: Signature, AWD, Clean Carfax, 3K Miles, $40,700 #12248L

'13 Mazda CX-5: Nav, Sky Active Motor, Sunroof, $12,990 #V18631A

'17 Mazda CX-5: Touring, 4K, Certified, Like New FWD, $23,990 #M17390R

'18 Mazda CX-9: Grand Touring, AWD, Clean Carfax, Sonic Silver $32,987 #P9497

'15 Nissan Pathfinder: Platinum $26,850 #P4328 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '15 Nissan Pathfinder: Platinum $25,922 #P4325 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '16 Nissan Pathfinder: 4WD, Platinum, $18,557 Stock #P06899 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '14 Nissan Pathfinder: Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, Auto, Heated Seats, $19,992 #44111A

'08 Saturn VUE: AWD, Stock #190142A Call Us! DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '02 Toyota Rav4: Stock #190033A Call us! DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '17 Toyota Sequoia: Platinum, 41K Miles, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $45,888 #97375A

'17 Toyota Highlander: Hybrid Limited, AWD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner $40,400 #98123A

'16 Volkswagen Touareg: VR6 FSI, 8-Speed Auto with Tipt, AWD, 31K Miles, $31,990 #V18546A

'12 Volvo XC70: $11,590 #P42542 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '13 Volvo XC90: AWD Stock #180402A Call Us! DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Volvo XC60: T5, Premier, White, Sunroof & Nav, $27,990 #M18556A

'17 Volvo XC60: R-Design, AWD, Clean Carfax, One Owner, 12K Miles $34,556 #P9549

Public Notices UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT WESTERN DISTRICT OF MISSOURI

636-240-3647

CIVIL ACTION NO: 18-cv-03339-MDH

Houska, Inc. needs 14 temp/fulltime Landscape Laborers. $14.52 hr and $21.78 hr OT. M-F 7:00 am to 4:00 p m from 2/11/19 to 11/30/19. No exp. req. and min. OTJ training provided. Using hand tools perform landscaping, including seeding & sodding; watering; digging holes using hand tools with a max width of 24 in. and a depth of 18 in., holes are to plant; planting, hauling top soil & mulch. Involves bending, stooping, lifting and stretching on a frequent basis. Must be able to lift 100 lbs often, work in extreme weather conditions. Must have OSHA 10 cert., requirement per our commercial and school related projects. Job location in Foristell, MO. No drop ins please. Possibility of performance based raise. Must pass employ er paid post hire drug test. Post hire employ er paid background check. Transportation provided to jobsite from central location. Please inquire about the job opportunity or send applications, indications of availability, and/or resumes directly to: St. Charles Job Center, 212 Turner Blvd., St. Peters, MO 63376 or P.O. Box 93, Foristell, MO 63348-Refer to job order #MO12556705. Transportation (incl. meals and to the extent nec.-lodging) to the place of employment will be provided, at its cost to workers reimbursed, if the worker completes half the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker completes the employment period or is dismissed early by employer. Employer provided tools, supplies and equip. req. to perform the job at no charge.

Mid-West Gunite, LP seeks 6 temp F T C o n c r e t e Finishers from 2/1/19-11/30/19. Duties: be able to form concrete & check proper construction, work with tools such as level, shovel, & trowel, able to read & follow blue print, signal drivers & other employees, check concrete to make sure properly aligned & at proper depth, clean equip & work areas. Employer will provide worker all tools, supplies, & equip. 1 mo. exp. req. Be able to lift up to 50 lbs and work outdoors. Worksite 40 Mid Rivers Trade Ct, St. Peters, MO 63376 & other sites in multiple counties in MO & IL. $29.05/hr Mon-Fri, some Sat; 40 hrs/wk. Shifts 7am-4pm. OT may be avail. @ $43.58/hr. Hrs = to @ least 3/4ths of the workday s in each 12-wk period. Paid weekly; single workweek used as standard for computing wages. All deductions from pay req. by law. If worker completes 50% of contract, employer will reimburse worker for transp. & subsistence from place of recruit to place of work. Upon completion of contract or where worker is dismissed earlier, employer will provide or pay for worker's reasonable costs of return transp. & subsistence back home, except where worker will not return due to subsequent employment w/ another employer. The amount of transp. pay or reimbursement will be = to the most economical & reasonable common carrier for the distance involved. Daily subsistence will be provided @ a rate of $12.26/ day to a max of $51.00/ day w/ receipts. Applicants seeking to inquire about job or send apps, indications of avail &/or resumes contact nearest MO Job Center @ 212 Turner Blvd, St. Peters, M O 63376, (636) 2556060 or fax resumes to Nancy Yanez 636-397-0017 using Job Order #12560606.

Business Opportunities Grocery Store in Marquand, MO. Good Equipment, Good Customer Base, $15,000+ Sales per week, Must see to appreciate. Call Jim 1573-783-6482 or 573-783-2906 evenings.

Boston Terriers, Golden Retrievers, Goldendoodles (Mini & Standard), Cockalierpoos, Cockashihs, Mini Schnauzer, Doxipoos, Cavapoos, Peekapoos, Havapoos and Other Poos.

IN ADMIRALTY

CHECK OUR WEBSITE FOR OTHERS.

lovencarepets.org GOLDEN RETRIEVER PUPS AKC, OFA, Microchipped. Shots, wormed, health guar. See parents. 618.883.2137 www.sieverskennels.com Lab Pups, AKC, Yellow, shots, etc. C h . lin e s , f a m . r a i s e d , g u a r . povertyhilllabradors.com $500. 314-795-9041 Poodles, toy, 12 wks, AKC, Health Guar., wormed, will hold for Xmas, smart. Males $650, females, $850. 636-537-3797 Schnauzer Puppies - small. Mom/dad AKC. 1st shots, wormed. Male - $350; female - $400. Call 636-225-4185 Sheepadoodle: ICA Registered Up to date on worming and shots. Non shedding hypoallergenic. Sweet pups looking for their loving homes. Bland MO $800.00 573-437-2850 Standard Poodle Puppies, AKC, Cream, White & Apricot 4-Males & 2-Females. Health wrnty. $500-750. 573-619-3357 Yorkies - Teeny Tiny Teacups. Males & females, shots & wormed finished. Call 636-597-3311 or 636-290-1330.

Firewood/Fuel

Dogs

Seasoned Oak & Hickory Delivered & Stacked. Over 25 yrs of service 573-513-6510

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Public Notices Mehlville Fire Protection District CANDIDATE FILING FOR DIRECTOR FIRE DISTRICT ELECTION There will be a General Municipal Election on Tuesday , April 2, 2019. One (1) Director for the Mehlville Fire Protection District will be elected for a six (6) year term. An individual wishing to be a candidate for election should file a Declaration of Candidacy between December 11, 2018, at 8:00 a.m. and January 15, 2019, at 5:00 p.m. Candidates w ill file at District H e a d q u a r t e r s , 11020 M ueller Road, St. Louis, Missouri between 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. on weekdays. Filing will be open until 5:00 p.m. on January 15, 2019. Candidates will be listed on the ballot in the order in which they file. There will be a sign-in sheet between 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. on weekdays. Candidates will file according to the order on the sign-in sheet and the sign-in sheet will roll over from day to day. Filing w ill begin at 8:00 a.m. Candidates shall use the outer lobby entrance of District Headquarters when filing. Candidate filing will be closed on December 24, 25, 31 and January 1, 2019. A candidate shall be a resident and voter of the Mehlville Fire Protection District for at least one (1) year prior to the election and be over the age of twenty-four years. A candidate cannot be delinquent in payment of taxes, no exceptions. A candidate must make a statement under oath that they possess the required qualifications. The filing fee is $10.00 and identification will be required. The District Headquarters is the sole filing place for this candidacy.

NOTICE OF ELECTION FILING CITY OF DELLWOOD Please take notice that the City of Dellwood, Missouri will conduct a municipal e le ction on April 2 , 2 0 1 9 , for the offices of one Alderman from e ach of the four (4 ) Wards for a term of two (2) years each, and Mayor for a term of two (2 ) years. Persons desiring to file as a candidate for the election to office to be elected at said election may file a declaration of candidacy at the office of the City Clerk at 1 0 2 6 6 West Florissant Ave, Dellw ood, Mis s ouri. The opening date is Tuesday, December 1 1 , 2 0 1 8 at 8 :0 0 a.m. and the close date is Tuesday January 15, 2019 at 5:00 p.m.

Sealed bids for New Fulton State Hospital, Furniture, Fixtures, and Equipment, Fulton, Missouri , Project No. M1411-11 will be received by FM DC, State of MO, UNTIL 1:30 PM, 12/27/2018. For specific project information and ordering plans, go to: http:// oa.mo.gov/facilities

The City of Hazelwood, Missouri is accepting sealed bids for the 2019 H A Z E L WO O D CITY HALL FLOORI NG REPLACEM ENT PROJECT. Instructions to Bidders, Specifications, and Bid Forms will be available on the City's website at www. hazelwoodmo.org. Sealed bids will be accepted until 1:30 p.m., Wednesday , January 23, 2019.

In the Matter of The Complaint of Branson Duck Vehicles, LLC, as Owner; and Ripley Entertainment, Inc., as Owner pro hac vice of the STRETCH DUCK 07 for Exoneration from or Limitation of Liability N O TI C E TO CLAI M ANTS OF C O M P L A I N T F O R EXONERATION FROM OR LIMITATION OF LIABILITY Notice is given that the a b o v e named Plaintiffs have filed a Complaint pursuant to Title 46 United States Code ss. 30501 et. seq., for exoneration from or limitation of liability for all claims for any loss, damage, injury, death, or destruction arising out of or occurring on July 19, 2018 on a voyage of the Stretch Duck 07 on Table Rock Lake, that resulted in the sinking of the boat, 17 deaths, and additional injuries to others, as more fully described in the Complaint. All persons having such claims must file their respective claims, as provided in Rule F of the Supplemental Rules for Certain Admiralty and Maritime Claims of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, with the Clerk of this Court at the United States Courthouse for the Western District of Missouri, 222 N. John Q. H a m m o n s Pkw y , Springfield, Missouri 65806, and must serve a copy thereof on attorneys for Plaintiffs on or before January 18, 2019 or be defaulted. If any Claimant desires to contest either the right to exoneration from or the right to limitation of liability, that Claimant shall file and serve on the attorney s for the Plaintiffs an Answer to the Complaint on or before the aforesaid date, as required by Supplemental Rule F (5) of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, unless his or her claim has included an answer, so designated, or be defaulted. /s/ Douglas Harpool Douglas Harpool United States Disctrict Judge Dated: Novemeber 30, 2018 Attorneys for Plaintiffs: LASHLY & BAER, P.C. Terrance J. Good 714 Locust Street St. Louis, MO 63101 (314) 621-2939 (314) 621-6844/Fax TJgood@lashlybaer.com K&L GATES LLP Jeffrey S. King State Street Financial Center One Lincoln Street Boston, MA 02111-2950 (617) 261-3100 (617) 261-3175/Fax Jeffrey.king@klgates.com PATTON & RYAN, LLC John W. Patton, Jr 330 N. Wabash Ave., Ste. 3800 Chicago, IL 60611 (312) 261-5160 (312) 261-5161/Fax Jpatton@pattonryan.com

"Vantage Pointe at A d w o r t h D r p la n s to es tablis h a 7 1 - b e d assisted living facility at 1025 & 1031 Adworth Drive, Mehlville, MO 63385 pending certificate of need approval of their $14,335,000 application from the Missouri Health Facilities Review Committee. This application (Proj. No. 5666 RS) will be filed on or before December 21, 2018."

Bids/Proposals Advertisement for Bids Sealed bids will be received by Developmental Disabilities Resource Bo a r d o f S t . C h a r l e s C o u n t y (DDRB) until 2:00 PM CST Tuesday, January 8, 2019, for the Interior Renovation and Remodeling work of a building located at 1025 Country Club Road, St. Charles, MO 63303. Bids will be opened publicly at that time. Drawings and specifications for this project are on file at the office of the Architect, Hoener Associates, Inc., 6707 Plainview Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63109, (314) 781-9855, FAX (314) 781-0163. Information as to bidding instructions and requirements for procuring bidding documents may be obtained from the Architect. Not less than the prevailing hourly wage rates, as determined by the State of Missouri, Division of Labor Standards shall be paid all workers employed on this project. The Board of Directors reserves the right to waive technicalities, to select any contractor filing a proposal, and to reject any or all bids. A pre-bid meeting is scheduled for Tuesday, December 19, 2018 at 9:00 AM CST at the DDRB office. Immediately following the prebid meeting, a walk-through of the site will be conducted.

STLtoday.com/readerrewards STLtoday.com/jobs

Bids/Proposals Kearney R-I School District Request for Qualification to Provide Construction Manager as Adviser Services for Bulldog Stadium Renovation Project Closing Date: December 14, 2018 Closing Time: 2:00 pm local time The Board of Education of Kearney R-I S chool District seeks S tateme nts of Qualifications from construction managers interested in providing construction manager as adviser services. Copy of the Request for Qualifications can be obtained through the Kearney R-1 School District website or by contacting Jeff Morrison via email at morrisonj@ksdr1.net. Interested parties should submit in writing one (1) hard copy and one (1) electronic version in PDF format of its S tatement of Qualifications in sealed envelopes or other suitable packaging. Clearly mark the outside of the envelope or package with the words ìS tatement of Qualifications to Provide Construction Manager as Adviser Services.î Statements of Qualifications must be received on or before the Closing Time on the Closing Date set forth above at the offices of Kearney R-I School District at the following address: Jeff Morrison Assistant Superintendent of Human Resources and Student Services Kearney R-I School District 150 West State Route 92 Kearney, MO 64060 The Board reserves the right to reject any or all Statements of Qualific a tio n s , to wa ive a n y i n f o rma l i t i e s a n d mi n o r irregularities, and may, in its sole discretion, disqualify any qualifications submitted by a party that the Board determines lacks the minimal qualifications to perform the proposed work.

LETTING NO. 8681 CONCRETE & BRICK REMOVAL/REPLACEMENT AND COMPLETE SIDEWALK INSTALLATION SP-109 Sealed proposals will be received by the Board of Public Service in Room 208 City Hall, 1200 Market Street, St. Louis, M o . Until 1:45 PM, CT, on January 15, 2019, then publicly opened and read. Plans and Specifications may be examined on the Board of Public Service website http://www.stlbps.org/ planroom.aspx (BPS On Line Plan Room) and may be purchased directly through the BPS website from INDOX Services at cost plus shipping. No refunds will be made. A pre-bid conference for all contractors bidding on this project will be held on December 11, 2018 at 10:00 A.M. in Room 305, City Hall, 1200 Market Street, St. Louis MO 63103. Bidders shall comply with all applicable City, State and Federal laws (including MBE/WBE policies). All bidders must regard Federal Executive Order 11246, "Notice of Requirement for Affirmative Action to Ensure Equal Employ ment Opportunity", the "Equal Opportunity Clause" and the "Standard Federal Equal Employment Specifications" set forth within and referenced at w w w .stl-bps.org (Announcements).

NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS OWNER: The Board of Governors for the Missouri State University Sealed bids for the RENOVATION OF ROOM 114, M E Y E R LIBRARY will be received at the Office of Planning, Design & Construction, Missouri State University , 901 S. National, Springfield, MO 65897, until 2:00 p.m. on DECEMBER 18, 2018 and then publicly opened and read aloud. With each proposal, a certified check or bid bond properly executed by the bidder in the amount of five percent (5%) of the bid shall be submitted. Plans and specifications can be obtained from the Office of Planning, Design & Construction upon receipt of a $25.00 refundable deposit for documents returned within thirty days from date of bid. All sets of specifications required other than in person will be mailed at bidder's expense. Electronic sets of plans and specifications are also available at https://plans.missouristate.edu/. Attention of bidders is particularly called to the requirements as to the conditions of employment to be observed. Bidders must agree to comply with the prevailing wage rate provisions and other statutory regulations as referred to in the specifications MSU is an AA/EO institution.

The City of Wentzville is seeking s ta te m e n ts o f qualifications for Construction Management Services-Owner's Agent for a Multigenerational Facility Design and Construction. Details are available a t th e C ity 's Bid Opportunities w e b s it e at h ttp ://w w w . wentzvillemo.org/departments/proc urement/current_bidding_opportuni ties.php

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Heritage Lawn & Landscape, LLC, St. Peters, MO. Daily transportation will be provided from a central location to and from worksites in the following counties: St Charles, St Louis, St Louis City, Lincoln, Warren, Jefferson. 35 TEMP, FT Landscape Laborer positions. 02/20/2019 - 11/15/2019, 7:00a4:00p, 40 hrs/wk, overtime varies, Monday-Friday, some Saturdays required, schedule varies. $14.52$15.00/hr, $21.78-$22.50/hr OT, raise at employer's discretion. Cut, trim, edge, water lawns & flower b e d s ; c l e a n u p , w e e d , p la n t , spread mulch, rake, blow leaves, aerate & overseed lawns. Pre-hire background check required. Able to lift 50lbs. N o ex perience r e quired, will train. Employer may make payroll deductions at employee's request. Employer provides w orkers at no charge all tools, supplies, equip req’d to perform job. Initial transp (including me a ls &, t o e x t e n t necessary, lodging) to place of employment provided, or its cost to workers reimbursed, if worker completes half the employ ment period. Return transp provided if w orker completes employ ment period or is dismissed early by employer. Inquire about job opportunity or send applications, indications of availability , &/or resumes directly to Email: christine@heritagell.com, Phone: (314) 420-6447 or the nearest MO SWA, St. Charles Job Center, 212 Turner Blvd, St Peters, MO 63376, (636) 255-6060. Refer to JO#12566208.

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WEATHER

B12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 12.05.2018

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ST. LOUIS FIVE-DAY FORECAST TODAY

TONIGHT

Not as cold

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

Becoming cloudy A bit of snow and Cold with clouds rain and sun WIND WIND WIND SSW 6-12 mph W 7-14 mph N 4-8 mph

WIND WSW 6-12 mph

44°

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

Mostly cloudy and chilly WIND ENE 7-14 mph

Sunny and chilly

REGIONAL OUTLOOK

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

After a couple of days of light snow, dry weather is back. Highs today will be a little higher with top temperatures in the 40s. Another little system will roll by tomorrow. A rain/snow mix is possible.

80

Peoria 55 74 Macomb 38/27 39/26 Bloomington Urbana 36/28 36/29

Kirksville 42/26

Quincy 42/29

Decatur 37/30

Springfield 57 39/30 Effingham 70 55 38/29

35

Joplin 50/35

Columbia 45/33 St. Louis Mount Jefferson 44/34 Vernon City 40/27 46/31 Union 55 45/29 57 44 Rolla Carbondale 45/31 42/29 Farmington 45/30 Cape Girardeau 44/28 Springfield 48/30 Poplar Bluff West Plains 46/27 55 47/29 70

44

RIVER AND LAKE LEVELS

Flood Stage 24 hour Stage (ft.) Tue. Change

Location

Missouri River Kansas City Jefferson City Hermann Washington St. Charles Mississippi River Hannibal Louisiana Dam 24 Dam 25 Grafton M.Price, Pool M.Price, Tail. St. Louis Chester Cape Girardeau Illinois River La Salle Peoria Beardstown

32 23 21 20 25

20.55 +1.52 14.25 +1.18 13.70 +0.67

55

50

10

4.12 -0.24 2.67 +3.06 18.53 +3.00

15

5.50 +2.68

40

37.13 +0.95 354.68 361.23 495.59 658.87 706.81 655.24 912.06 840.92 600.89 407.29 610.91 446.21

Forecast Temperature

Average High

-0.14 +0.36 +0.59 -0.11 +0.16 -0.14 +0.16 +0.06 +0.21 +0.07 +0.70 +0.28

Average Low

67

70 60

20

15 16 24

TEMPERATURE TRENDS

80

30

Meramec River Sullivan Valley Park Arnold Bourbeuse River Union Ohio River Cairo Lake Levels Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

16 15.30 +0.80 15 14.33 +1.12 25 24.29 +0.60 26 23.68 +0.89 18 16.60 +0.16 419 413.58 -1.50 21 16.25 +1.42 30 21.49 +2.45 27 22.34 +2.53 32 26.49 +1.24

Daily Temperature

40

Flood Stage 24 hour Stage (ft.) Tue. Change

Location

23.26 +0.92 18.51 +1.92 17.81 +0.96 14.94 +1.12 20.33 +0.85

20 18 14

33 18 W

56

52 38

48

39

26 T

F

S

S

Flurries and locally heavier snow showers will extend from Montana to northern Minnesota and southeastward to West Virginia and Virginia today. A storm will bring heavy rain and mountain snow to a large part of California with snow showers across the upper part of the Great Basin. Much of the rest of the nation can expect a dry day. Shown are noon positions of precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Seattle 45/28

Chief Meteorologist Glenn Zimmerman

WIND NNE 7-14 mph

Toronto 35/27

39 33 M

36 30 T

44

38

34 W

33

34

37

39

21

23

25

22

24

T

F

S

S

M

45 29 T

Minneapolis 27/11

ALMANAC

Temperature High/low 36°/30° Normal high/low 46°/30° Last year high/low 70°/47° Record high 74° (2001) Record low 8° (1886) Precipitation 24 hrs through 5 p.m. Tue. 0.13” Month to date (normal) 0.91” (0.42”) Year to date (normal) 39.53” (38.54”) Record for this date 0.94” (1923)

Pollen Yesterday

Absent Absent Absent Low - 2149

Source: St. Louis County

Heating Degree Days Degree days are an indicator of energy needs. The more the total degree days, the more energy is necessary to heat.

Tuesday Month to date Normal month to date Since July 1 Normal since July 1

32 85 105 1147 927

RealFeel Temperature® Today An exclusive index of effective temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure and elevation on the human body.

22° 8 a.m.

36° noon

38° 4 p.m.

29° 8 p.m.

UV Index Today Shown is the highest value of the day.

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11+

The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.

Today’s Air Quality

airnow.gov

Denver 42/13 Los Angeles 59/54

Chihuahua 70/50

-10s -0s Cold front

0s

Albany, N.Y. Albuquerque Anchorage Atlanta Austin Baltimore Birmingham Boise Boston Charleston, S.C. Charleston, W.Va. Charlotte Chicago Cincinnati Cleveland Dallas Daytona Beach Denver Des Moines Destin, Fla. Detroit Hartford Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock

Good Moderate Unhealthy Unhealthy Very Hazardous (sensitive) Unhealthy

Skywatch Rise

Set

7:04 a.m. 5:11 a.m.

4:40 p.m. 3:56 p.m.

New Moon

First Quarter

Full Moon

Last Quarter

Dec 7

Dec 15

Dec 22

Dec 29

©2018; forecasts and graphics, except for the KTVI forecasts, provided by

Atlanta 46/28

34/23/pc 49/31/pc 34/29/c 46/28/s 58/46/pc 39/27/c 47/25/s 31/13/pc 35/27/s 55/31/pc 36/24/sn 48/24/pc 34/26/pc 34/25/c 34/27/sf 56/46/pc 61/42/s 42/13/pc 36/18/s 55/38/s 36/29/sf 35/20/s 82/70/s 61/45/pc 33/26/pc 46/27/s 52/42/c 52/32/s

High: 88 Marathon, Fla.

Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Beijing Berlin Buenos Aires Cairo Cancun Dublin Hong Kong Jerusalem Johannesburg London Madrid Mecca

Houston 61/45

Miami 74/57

Monterrey 60/53

Stationary front

Today Hi/Lo/W

National Extremes

City

Washington 41/31

10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

Warm front

City

New York 37/29

Detroit 36/29

Kansas City 46/27

El Paso 62/46

Forecast index based on presence of manmade particulates affecting aspects of human health.

Sun Moon

Chicago 34/26

San Francisco 57/46

Statistics through 5 p.m. Tuesday

Trees Weeds Grass Mold

Montreal 30/25

Winnipeg 17/-10

Billings 31/9

38° 21° 33° 23° 34° 25° 37° 22°

34°

Kansas City 46/27

NATIONAL OUTLOOK

.com

Thursday Hi/Lo/W

39/25/pc 51/36/pc 35/31/c 50/35/pc 64/57/sh 42/29/pc 52/35/pc 31/15/pc 40/30/pc 54/34/s 42/27/c 50/30/pc 30/14/c 41/21/c 36/25/sn 54/45/c 66/51/s 33/19/pc 24/8/pc 55/43/s 36/22/sf 39/27/pc 82/71/s 66/58/c 37/19/sn 31/17/c 52/43/sh 45/35/c

Showers

T-storms

City

Rain

Los Angeles Louisville Memphis Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Montgomery Nashville New Orleans New York City Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, Maine Portland, Ore. Sacramento Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Seattle Tampa Tucson Washington, D.C. Wichita

Flurries

Today Hi/Lo/W

59/54/r 36/28/pc 48/32/s 74/57/s 33/23/c 27/11/pc 52/26/s 41/26/s 57/44/s 37/29/pc 54/38/pc 32/18/s 63/40/s 38/28/pc 73/51/pc 32/26/sf 31/18/pc 45/30/s 56/39/r 35/25/c 57/50/pc 65/57/r 57/46/r 45/28/s 63/41/s 75/48/pc 41/31/sf 52/31/pc

Snow

Ice

Thursday Hi/Lo/W

62/49/r 45/26/c 48/38/c 74/64/s 28/14/c 18/2/pc 54/31/s 49/36/c 64/52/pc 40/31/pc 44/29/c 22/5/pc 69/50/s 41/30/pc 65/54/sh 35/22/sn 36/26/pc 44/29/s 58/35/s 35/26/c 65/60/sh 66/55/r 59/45/s 44/28/s 68/50/s 66/49/sh 44/32/pc 35/22/c

Tuesday in the 48 contiguous states Low: -20 Daniel, Wyo.

WORLD FORECAST

Today Hi/Lo/W

49/47/r 60/47/pc 67/55/sh 95/79/pc 35/23/c 42/34/pc 77/54/pc 69/59/pc 83/72/t 54/49/r 78/72/pc 58/46/pc 91/64/s 56/50/r 60/38/pc 84/67/t

Thursday Hi/Lo/W

54/52/c 53/44/pc 65/53/r 95/79/pc 31/11/s 47/46/sh 71/49/pc 68/58/pc 80/73/pc 56/44/sh 80/65/pc 53/47/c 85/62/pc 56/54/r 60/36/s 83/60/pc

City

Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi Paris Rio de Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Sydney Tokyo Toronto Vancouver

Today Hi/Lo/W

69/48/s 30/25/pc 34/27/sf 82/64/pc 79/58/c 78/52/pc 53/50/c 92/74/t 63/51/pc 84/72/sh 80/51/pc 39/28/pc 73/66/pc 66/51/pc 35/27/c 43/24/s

Thursday Hi/Lo/W

69/47/pc 34/18/sf 31/21/c 78/67/s 80/60/pc 78/51/pc 57/50/c 85/71/t 61/46/t 85/75/pc 84/54/s 44/14/pc 76/64/pc 54/49/r 37/20/c 41/26/c

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, i-ice, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow


WEDNESDAY • 12.05.2018 • L

PHOTOS BY HILLARY LEVIN • hlevin@post-dispatch.com

MERRY MORSELS

There’s no better way to summon the holiday spirit than with a cookie or two (or six) 6 RECIPES

BY DANIEL NEMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

• Sherpa Chocolate Chip Cookies • Spritz Cookies • Chocolate Haystacks • Thin, Crisp Gingerbread Cookies • Chocolate Candy Cane Kiss Cookies (left) • The Essential Chewy Sugar Cookie

It’s the best week of the year for food writers. Every holiday season, we run a Let’s Eat section devoted (almost) entirely to cookies. We hope the readers look forward to it, because we certainly do. It’s cookies, right? Cookies. Life does not get better. The only question is: Which cookies should we make? This year, we decided to take a scientific approach to the cookie conundrum. We asked a bunch of our colleagues what kind of cookies speak of the holidays to them. What cookie do they absolutely have to have for it to truly be Christmas? In our world, this counts as a scientific poll. Not surprisingly, the results were

PAGE L4-L5

CONTEST WINNERS

Chocolate Turtle Cookies and Mocha Hazelnut Sandwich Cookies. PAGE L6

BAKING TIPS

Some tips for making a better batch of cookies. PAGE L7

See COOKIES • Page L4

An ode to Oreos, a psalm to psnickerdoodles DANIEL NEMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

I have a friend who doesn’t like cookies. Let me rephrase that: I know someone who would be a friend if she liked cookies, but she doesn’t, so she can’t be a viable

candidate for friendship. I’m not entirely certain she’s human. Cookies are the Platonic ideal of dessert. They’re portable, they’re small and you can eat several of them before you start to feel guilty about it. For some unknown good thing that our ancestors must have done, the gods of baking looked kindly upon humans and decided to bestow upon us a

great gift, the ability to combine flour, sugar and butter in such a way that raises us above other animals and brings meaning to our existence. It helps if you add a little vanilla, too. This is an ode to Oreos, a paean to powdered sugar, a hymn to Hydrox, an anthem to almond cookies, a song to sugar, a psalm to, um, psnickerdoodles. Sing, Muse! Not all cookies are created

TWO BIG, BRASH ZINFANDELS THAT ARE PERFECT FOR WINTER. PAGE L2

equal. The aforementioned Hydrox are obviously a cheap knockoff of Oreos, but I just now learned that they were actually invented four years before Oreos (1908, compared to 1912). And windmill cookies are just a poor man’s version of speculaas cookies from Holland. But here’s the thing: I will eat windmill cookies, and with gusto. I like windmill cookies. I will even eat Hydrox, especially

now that I know they were the progenitor of the chocolate sandwich cookie. Oreos — Oreo come latelies — are as great as cookies get. They are one of the food items that absolutely, positively cannot be improved upon. And yet, the folks at Nabisco — probably very nice people who are kind to puppies — keep attempting See NEMAN • Page L6

USE CHICKEN THIGHS TO MAKE BROTH IN CLASSIC CHICKEN NOODLE SOUP. PAGE L2 LET’S EAT

1 M


L2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

ON OUR RADAR

LET’S EAT

Robust zinfandel for winter BY GAIL APPLESON • Special to the Post-Dispatch

One way to chase away the chill of a cold December evening is to open a bottle of a big, brash zinfandel from California. Powerful and intensely fruity, these red wines often taste of concentrated berries, black pepper and spices. Old vine zins, made from vines that are typically more than 50 years old, are particularly known for their intensity and flavor. These robust wines are a great choice for hearty, winter foods, but be aware that some are high in alcohol.

CONSENTINO 2016 CIGAR OLD VINE ZINFANDEL, LODI, CALIFORNIA

Bought • Aldi, 7369 Watson Road, in November for $9.99 Description • This zinfandel, which received a best buy rating from Beverage Testing Institute, is an example of some of the very good private label wines sold by Aldi. The grapes for this delicious, flavorful wine come from the Dry Creek Valley appellation, which is famous for its dense concentration of old vine zinfandel. Bursting with rich raspberry and blackberry fruit, Crimson Roots has hints of bakery spice and black pepper. It has an alcohol level of 14.5 percent.

AMY BERTRAND Let’s Eat and features editor • abertrand@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8284 DANIEL NEMAN food writer • dneman@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8133 DONNA BISCHOFF vice president of advertising • dbischoff@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8529

BEST BITES: MAPLE CHEERIOS

WINE FINDS

CRIMSON ROOTS 2016 OLD VINE ZINFANDEL, DRY CREEK VALLEY, SONOMA COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 12.05.2018

Maple syrup goes well with breakfast. Cheerios are breakfast. Therefore, maple-flavored Cheerios should be just the thing, right? They’re actually not so great dry — they’re a bit too sweet — but they open up and temper their flavor in milk. They may not be as sublime as original Cheerios, but nothing is. Size • 10.8 ounces Price • $3.99 Available • Grocery stores, including Dierbergs — Daniel Neman

Bought • World Market, 24 Brentwood Promenade Court, in November for $12.99 (with free membership, promotions) Description • Grapes for this bold zinfandel come from Lodi, another famous zinfandel region in California. The Cigar Old Vine Zinfandel, which earned 91 points from Wine Enthusiast for the 2015 vintage, is a peppery and smoky red that tastes of black cherries and blackberries. Aged in oak for eight months, it has hints of cedar and herbs. Drier than the Crimson Roots, this savory zin also has a higher alcohol level of 15.5 percent.

Follow Gail on Twitter @GailAppleson.

PREP SCHOOL

Making a French 75 In the world of cocktails, it doesn’t get much classier than a French 75, a shimmering concoction of gin, lemon juice and champagne. In a new Prep School video, Daniel Neman demonstrates the art of making one.

stltoday.com/food

For classic rendition Peas and carrots get their due of chicken soup, go in spicy pasta with tahini for the thighs DINNER IN MINUTES

BY BONNIE S. BENWICK The Washington Post

Peas and carrots have a reputation for being good companions on the plate, but because I was raised on the frozen mix, I never endorsed the notion. The wan cubes of orange and wrinkly orbs of green were about the same in size but not of the same

texture, so a typical turn in a saucepan failed them both. What a difference a little knife work makes! In this dish, the carrots are cut into thin, short matchsticks. Each vegetable is given its due, thanks to the right timing in the pan. (Read: The peas plump and the carrots retain some crunch.) They pick up notes from sauteed sweet

onion, garlic and crushed red pepper flakes, then are combined with a quickly blended lemony tahini sauce. Some pasta dishes just feel like fall, and this is one of them. It is earthy and savory, and can be served warm or at room temperature. To make this a vegan meal, use a nondairy milk and a sharp vegan cheese.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

BY AMERICA’S TEST KITCHEN

This classic rendition of chicken soup starts the old- fashioned way, by making a from-scratch broth. But instead of using a whole chicken we turned to meaty chicken thighs, which kept things easier; they also added intense, meaty flavor to the broth. To cut down on greasiness, we removed the skin after browning and before letting the thighs simmer along with the chopped and sauteed onion and bay leaves. Since most people prefer white meat in their chicken soup, we simply poached two boneless, skinless chicken breasts in the simmering broth, removing

them when tender to add to the soup at the end. With the broth and the meat taken care of, we turned our attention to the soup with an eye toward keeping things simple and traditional. Onion, carrot, and celery and some fresh thyme fit the bill. As for the noodles, cooking them right in the broth intensified their flavor. Note that the thighs are used to flavor the broth, but once the broth is strained, the meat can be shredded and used for chicken salad or a pot pie. If you prefer dark meat in your soup, you can omit the chicken breasts and add the shredded thigh meat to the soup instead.

CLASSIC CHICKEN NOODLE SOUP Yield: 8 to 10 servings For the broth 4 pounds bone-in, skin-on chicken thighs, trimmed Salt and pepper 1 tablespoon vegetable oil 1 onion, chopped 12 cups water 2 bay leaves 1 pound boneless, skinless chicken breasts, trimmed

For the soup 1 tablespoon vegetable oil 1 onion, chopped fine 1 carrot, peeled and sliced thin 1 celery rib, halved lengthwise and sliced thin 2 teaspoons minced fresh thyme 6 ounces wide egg noodles ¼ cup minced fresh parsley Salt and pepper

1. For the broth: Pat thighs dry with paper towels and season with salt and pepper. Heat oil in Dutch oven over medium-high heat until smoking. Cook half of thighs skin side down until deep golden brown, about 6 minutes. Turn thighs and lightly brown second side, about 2 minutes. Transfer to strainer set in large bowl. Repeat with remaining thighs and transfer to strainer; discard fat in bowl. Pour off fat from pot, add onion, and cook over medium heat until just softened, about 3 minutes. Meanwhile, remove and discard skin from thighs. Add thighs, water, bay leaves and 1 tablespoon salt to the pot. Cover and simmer for 30 minutes. Add chicken breasts and continue simmering until broth is rich and flavorful, about 15 minutes. 2. Strain broth into a large container, let stand for at least 10 minutes, then remove fat from surface. Meanwhile, transfer chicken to a cutting board to cool. Once cooled, remove thigh meat from bones, shred and reserve for another use (can refrigerate for up to 2 days or freeze for up to 1 month). Shred breast meat and reserve for soup. 3. For the soup: Heat oil in now-empty Dutch oven over medium-high heat until shimmering. Add onion, carrot and celery and cook until onion has softened, 3 to 4 minutes. Stir in thyme and broth and simmer until vegetables are tender, about 15 minutes. Add noodles and shredded breast meat and simmer until noodles are just tender, about 5 minutes. Off heat, stir in parsley and season with salt and pepper. Serve. Per serving (based on 10): 170 calories; 8g fat; 29mg cholesterol; 234mg sodium; 18g carbohydrate; 1g fiber; 2g sugar; 6g protein. America’s Test Kitchen provided this article to the Associated Press

STACY ZARIN GOLDBERG • The Washington Post

SPICY TAHINI PASTA Yield: 2 servings Kosher salt 6 ounces dried, thick spaghetti, preferably wholegrain or soba noodles 2 cloves garlic 1 medium carrot 1 small onion ½ lemon ½ cup tahini

½ cup low-fat milk (may substitute nondairy milk) ½ to 1 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes 4 ounces frozen peas ¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper Water (optional) ½-ounce piece Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese Sturdy salad greens, for serving

1. Bring a pot of water to a boil over medium-high heat. Add a generous pinch of salt and the pasta; cook according to the package directions. Drain. 2. Meanwhile, cut the garlic into very thin slices. Scrub the carrot well, then cut into matchsticks. Cut the onion in half, then into ½-inch wide half moons. Blend the juice of the lemon half, the tahini and milk in a blender, until smooth. 3. Grease a medium nonstick skillet or saute pan with cooking oil spray and place it over medium heat. Add the garlic and cook for 2 minutes, stirring, then add the onion and crushed red pepper flakes (to taste). Cook for about 5 minutes, until softened. 4. Pour in the puree, add the peas and stir to incorporate. Cook for about 8 minutes or until the peas have warmed through, then add the drained noodles, carrot matchsticks and black pepper. If the sauce seems too thick, add up to ¼ cup of water. Toss to incorporate, then remove from the heat. Taste for spiciness; add some or all the remaining crushed red pepper flakes. 5. Use a Microplane zester to grate the cheese over the pasta. Divide between bowls; top each portion with a handful of salad greens. Based on recipe from HealthyLittleVittles.com.


12.05.2018 • Wednesday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • L3

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L4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

LET’S EAT: COOKIE EDITION

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 12.05.2018

PHOTOS BY HILLARY LEVIN • hlevin@post-dispatch.com

Season’s eatings: It’s all about the cookies COOKIES • FROM L1

pretty much what you would expect. Our scientifically selected respondents turn out to crave some of the most popular cookies of the season. We’re talking gingerbread men, sugar cookies, those cookies with a Hershey’s Kiss in the middle (but an especially good version). All the classics: haystacks, spritz cookies (it’s a German thing) and chocolate chip. You could argue that chocolate chip cookies aren’t particularly related to the holidays. It’s not a bad argument, but I have a riposte: They’re chocolate chip cookies. Q.E.D. As it happens, columnist Joe Holleman — he’s the one who suggested them — has an excellent recipe for chocolate chip cookies that he worked on and tweaked until he got it to have a crisp outside but a soft center, and also so it does not spread out too much on the tray while baking. It’s just the way he likes it. Now that I’ve made them, it’s just the way I like it, too. I believe he began with the Toll House recipe, which is in itself perfection. But then he gilded the perfection with a handful of extra steps. So I guess the recipe is perfecter than perfect.

Chocolate chip cookies are crisp on the outside but have a soft center.

He begins by toasting walnuts or pecans and then grinding them to a near-powder, which he adds to the dough. He also triples the called-for amount of vanilla, melts the butter, stirs the liquid ingredients three times and chills the dough before cooking it. He tried one and said it was even better than the ones he makes. I was pleased, but then he explained it was better because he didn’t have to make it. If the chocolate chip cookies take a lot of time and effort, the haystacks were the fastest and easiest. Melt chocolate. Add chow mein noodles, nuts and salt. Let them dry, and serve. They’re crispy, chocolatey, salty and

nutty. Basically everything you want in a sweet snack. Gingerbread cookies can be made two ways: thick and chewy or thin and crispy. I prefer thin and crispy, because I like their bite, their crunch, their satisfying snap. When I bite the head off a gingerbread man, I want him to know it. The difference in making the two is fairly small. I just rolled the dough thinner, to one-eighth of an inch, and baked them a bit longer in a slightly cooler oven. I also added a touch more ginger than the recipe originally called for, because I like ginger. The thin and crispy gingerbread men can also be used as

Christmas-tree ornaments to delightful effect. Sugar cookies can also be made two ways, thick and chewy or just as thick and crisp. I prefer thick and chewy because they’re so nice and soft and welcoming. The ones I made are also spectacular (some of our ravenous taste testers liked them the most of all). The recipe comes from “The King Arthur Flour Cookie Companion,” and those people know something about making cookies. Or at least sugar cookies. What makes them so good? I can’t quite tell for sure. Maybe it’s the use of baking powder and baking soda, to give them just enough rise. Maybe it is the combination of granulated and brown sugars, with extra sweetening from corn syrup. Maybe it is the hint of nutmeg, or just the right amount of vanilla. Perhaps it is the proportion of all the ingredients mixed together that makes them so flavorful. But if I had to guess, I’d say it’s the butter. These cookies use a lot of butter. Butter is pretty much the answer to every culinary question. Cookies with a Hershey’s Kiss in the middle are a standard, but the Chocolate Candy Cane Kiss Cookies I made are a real standout. The cookies themselves are

THIN, CRISP GINGERBREAD COOKIES Yield: About 34 cookies 3 cups all-purpose flour ¾ cup dark brown sugar, packed ¾ teaspoon baking soda 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon 1 tablespoon ground ginger, see note ½ teaspoon ground cloves

½ teaspoon salt 1½ sticks (12 tablespoons) unsalted butter, softened but still cool, cut into 12 pieces ¾ cup molasses 2 tablespoons milk Royal icing, for decorating

chocolate, which is an improvement on most of the other versions I have had, and they are softer and chewier, too. I suspect the addition of a small amount of Greek yogurt is the secret to that texture. And then there is the Kiss itself, which in this case is a peppermint-flavored candy-cane Kiss. The peppermint of the Kiss, combined with the chocolate of the cookie, is a mouth-pleasing mixture that is sheer indulgence. A colleague with Czech heritage requested that I make spritz cookies, and I’m glad she did. They are nicely buttery (I’ve heard that butter is the answer to every culinary question, but don’t quote me on that) with more than a hint of almond. Best of all, they come in fanciful holiday shapes. These treats require a cookie press, which is basically the same idea as a caulk gun, but with almond-flavored dough. You tighten the press, which forces the dough through disks of varying shape. I made Christmas trees, clusters of stars and pinwheels. These cookies taste as good as they look. And they look marvelous. Daniel Neman • 314-340-8133 Food writer @dnemanfood on Twitter dneman@post-dispatch.com

ROYAL ICING

Yield: 3 cups

¼ cup meringue powder, see note ¼ teaspoon salt

3 to 4 cups powdered sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla extract Food coloring, optional

Note: Meringue powder can be found in the baking aisle of many large grocery stores. 1. In a medium mixing bowl, whisk together the meringue powder, salt and powdered sugar. Add the vanilla and ¾ cup cool water and stir or beat on slow speed. The mixture will seem hard and lumpy, but the sugar will dissolve after 4 or 5 minutes and everything will smooth out. 2. Once the mixture is smooth, gradually increase the mixer speed to high, taking several minutes for the transition. Beat at high speed until the icing is fluffy. Add food coloring, if desired. Keep the icing covered with plastic wrap or a damp cloth to prevent it from drying out, if you won’t be using it right away or if you’re tackling extra-long projects. Per (¼ cup) serving: 108 calories; no fat; no saturated fat; no cholesterol; 1g protein; 27g carbohydrate; 25g sugar; no fiber; 62mg sodium; 20mg calcium

1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Lightly grease (or line with parchment) 2 baking sheets. 2. In a large mixing bowl, beat together the butter, granulated sugar, brown sugar, corn syrup, vanilla, nutmeg, baking powder, baking soda, salt and egg. Stir in the flour. 3. Place the coarse sugar in a shallow dish. Drop the dough by the tablespoonful into the sugar, rolling the balls to coat them. Place them on the prepared baking sheets. 4. Bake for 10 minutes, until the edges are just barely beginning to brown. Remove from oven and cool on the baking sheets for 5 minutes before transferring to a wire rack to cool completely. Per cookie: 104 calories; 4g fat; 2g saturated fat; 15mg cholesterol; 1g protein; 16g carbohydrate; 9g sugar; no fiber; 54mg sodium; 14mg calcium

Note: If you want a sharper flavor, use 1 heaping tablespoon of ground ginger. 1. In a food processor, process the flour, brown sugar, baking soda, cinnamon, ginger, cloves and salt until combined, about 10 seconds. Scatter the butter pieces over the flour mixture and process until the mixture is sandy and resembles very fine meal, about 15 seconds. With the machine running, gradually add the molasses and milk; process until the dough is evenly moistened and forms a soft mass, about 10 seconds. 2. Scrape the dough onto a work surface; divide it in quarters. Working with one portion at a time, roll the dough 1/8 inch thick between 2 large sheets of parchment paper. Leaving the dough sandwiched between the parchment layers, stack on a baking sheet and freeze until firm, 15 to 20 minutes. 3. Adjust the oven racks to the upper- and lower-middle positions and heat the oven to 325 degrees. Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper or spray them with nonstick cooking spray. 4. Remove 1 dough sheet from the freezer, place on the work surface. Peel off the top parchment sheet and gently lay it back in place. Flip the dough over; peel off and discard second parchment layer. Cut the dough into gingerbread people, transferring shapes to prepared baking sheets with a wide metal spatula, spacing them ¾ inch apart; set the scraps aside. Repeat with the remaining dough until the baking sheets are full. 5. Bake until the cookies are set in the center and the dough barely retains an imprint when touched very gently with a fingertip, 11 to 15 minutes, rotating the baking sheets front to back and switching positions top to bottom halfway through the baking time. Do not overbake. 6. Cool the cookies on the sheets 2 minutes, then remove with a wide metal spatula to a wire rack; cool to room temperature. Gather the scraps, repeat rolling, cutting and baking in steps 2, 4 and 5. Decorate with royal icing. Per cookie: 111 calories; 4g fat; 3g saturated fat; 11mg cholesterol; 1g protein; 18g carbohydrate; 8g sugar; 1g fiber; 67mg sodium; 24mg calcium

1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. 2. Beat the butter, brown sugar and granulated sugar until creamy. Add the egg and yogurt, and beat again. In another bowl, stir together the cocoa powder, baking soda and flour. Slowly beat the butter mixture into the flour mixture. 3. Roll the dough into 36 balls and roll them in the red, green and white sugars. The cookie dough will be very sticky. Place on a baking sheet. Bake for 8 minutes. Cool on baking sheet for 1 to 2 minutes. Remove to a sheet of waxed paper on the counter. 4. Press a Kiss into the top of each cookie. Do not move the cookies until they are completely cool and the kiss has set back up. Store in a sealed container. Per cookie: 90 calories; 4g fat; 2g saturated fat; 10mg cholesterol; 2g protein; 14g carbohydrate; 9g sugar; 1g fiber; 43mg sodium; 19mg calcium

Recipe from “The King Arthur Flour Cookie Companion”

Recipe from “Baking Illustrated”

Recipe by insidebrucrewlife.com

THE ESSENTIAL CHEWY SUGAR COOKIE Yield: 36 cookies 1½ sticks (12 tablespoons) unsalted butter ¾ cup granulated sugar ½ cup brown sugar ¼ cup light corn syrup 2 teaspoons vanilla extract ¼ teaspoon nutmeg

1½ teaspoons baking powder ½ teaspoon baking soda ½ teaspoon salt 1 large egg 2½ cups all-purpose flour ¼ cup coarse or granulated sugar, for coating

Recipe from “The King Arthur Flour Cookie Companion”

CHOCOLATE CANDY CANE KISS COOKIES Yield: 36 cookies cup (about 5 tablespoons) butter, softened ½ cup brown sugar ¾ cup granulated sugar 1 egg 1/3 cup plain Greek yogurt 1/3

2/3 cup dark cocoa powder 1 teaspoon baking soda 1½ cups all-purpose flour Coarse red, green and white sanding sugars 36 Candy Cane Kisses, unwrapped


LET’S EAT: COOKIE EDITION

12.05.2018 • Wednesday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • L5

PHOTOS BY HILLARY LEVIN • hlevin@post-dispatch.com

CHOCOLATE HAYSTACKS

Yield: 48 pieces

24 ounces chocolate chips (milk, semisweet or dark) 2 cups chow mein noodles

1 cup toasted nuts; choose from almonds, peanuts, cashews or pistachios Salt, optional

SPRITZ COOKIES

1. Prepare 2 sheet pans with parchment paper. Set aside. 2. Melt chocolate chips according to package’s instructions. Add chow mein noodles and nuts to the melted chocolate and carefully combine until noodles and nuts are well-coated with the chocolate. 3. Heap tablespoons full of mixture onto parchment paper and allow to cool. Sprinkle with salt, if desired. Serve or store in an airtight container. Per serving: 121 calories; 6g fat; 3g saturated fat; no cholesterol; 2g protein; 15g carbohydrate; 9g sugar; 2g fiber; 144mg sodium; 7mg calcium

SHERPA CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIES

Yield: About 66 cookies

1 large egg 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 teaspoon almond extract Candy décors, optional

2¼ cups all-purpose flour ½ teaspoon baking powder ½ teaspoon salt 2 sticks butter, softened ½ cup granulated sugar

Yield: About 50 cookies

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Place 2 large cookie sheets in freezer. 2. On waxed paper, combine flour, baking powder and salt. In large bowl, with mixer on medium speed, beat butter and sugar until pale and creamy. Beat in egg, then beat in both extracts. With mixer on low speed, gradually add flour mixture. Beat just until blended. 3. Spoon one-third of dough into cookie press or large decorating bag fitted with large star tip. Onto chilled cookie sheets, press or pipe dough as desired, spacing 2 inches apart. Sprinkle with décors, if using. 4. Bake until lightly browned around edges, 10 to 12 We Specialize in Area Rugs! minutes, rotating cookie sheets between upper and lower More Selection at Sale Prices! oven racks halfway through. Place cookie sheets on wire racks to cool 2 minutes. Using a wide metal spatula, transfer cookies to racks to cool completely. Rechill cookie sheets and repeat with remaining dough. Store cookies in airtight container up to 1 week, or freeze up to 1 month. Suggested retail Per cookie: 50 calories, 1g protein, 5g carbohydrate, 3g Rug Gallery total fat, 2g saturated fat, no fiber, 10mg cholesterol, 10mg St. Louis’ Best Kept Secret sodium 8994 Manchester (2 blocks West of Brentwood)

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2 cups walnut or pecan halves or pieces ½ cup (1 stick) plus 7 tablespoons unsalted butter, divided 1 cup packed dark brown sugar ½ cup granulated sugar 2 eggs 1 tablespoon vanilla 2 cups all-purpose flour 1 teaspoon kosher salt 1 teaspoon baking soda 2 cups semisweet chocolate chips 1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spread nuts on a baking sheet. Toast until fragrant, about 7 to 10 minutes. Remove nuts; turn off the oven. 2. Measure 1 cup of nuts into a small bowl. Stir in 1 tablespoon butter. When butter melts, coarsely chop the nuts. Let cool, then cover and set aside. 3. When the remaining 1 cup of nuts have cooled completely, transfer to a food processor. Grind until fine, almost powdery. Dump onto a paper towel and let sit until dry, preferably overnight. 4. Melt the remaining ½ cup plus 6 tablespoons butter in a saucepan or in the microwave. Let cool slightly. 5. Combine brown and granulated sugars, eggs, vanilla and melted butter in a mixing bowl. Stir with a whisk or a fork until smooth. Let sit for several minutes, then stir again. Let sit again, then stir for a third time. (This process results in a mixture that has an icinglike texture and produces cookies with chewier centers.) 6. Place ground nuts, flour, salt and baking soda in a large mixing bowl; combine with a fork until nuts are well-distributed. Make sure nuts do not clump. 7. Stirring with a fork, slowly add the wet ingredients to the flour mixture just until blended. Do not overmix. Mix in chocolate chips, then chopped nuts. 8. Cover the bowl and refrigerate at least 1 hour or as long as overnight. (Chilling makes the dough easier to manage and reduces spreading.) 9. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Line two or three cookie sheets with nonstick aluminum foil. Using a 1½-inch cookie scoop, drop dough onto cookie sheets, placing them about 2 inches apart. 10. Bake one cookie sheet at a time for 11 to 14 minutes or until cookies are lightly brown at the edges. Let cookies cool on the sheet for 1 minute, then transfer to a wire cooling rack. Note: To minimize spreading, let the cookie sheets cool completely between batches. Per cookie: 147 calories; 9g fat; 3.5g saturated fat; 18mg cholesterol; 1.5g protein; 15g carbohydrate; 10g sugar; 1g fiber; 70mg sodium; 12mg calcium; 60mg potassium. Recipe by Joe Holleman

WHAT ARE YOU DOING THIS HOLIDAY SEASON?

Still 360

Small Batches Whiskey, Bourbon, Rum & Gin

• See the winners in the PostDispatch Toy Test. • Find gifts for everyone on your list. • 10 new children’s books to savor the season. • Holiday arts: Theater, light displays, family events and more. stltoday.com/holidays


L6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

LET’S EAT: COOKIE EDITION

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 12.05.2018

The best of the best: Our winning cookie recipes CHOCOLATE TURTLE COOKIES

BY DANIEL NEMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

It seems like there is no limit to the kinds of cookies you can make for the holidays. When we asked our readers to submit recipes for the Post-Dispatch’s annual Holiday Cookie Contest, we were absolutely inundated with submissions — almost buried, as it were, by an avalanche of flour and sugar and butter, plus lots of bits of yummy things. Picking a winner from all of the responses was not easy, at least not for our crack team of experts who endeavored to do just that. And we doubt that it was any easier for our readers who voted for the recipes they thought were best. Somehow, the voting readers and our team of judges managed to come up with picks for the best of the best, the top readersubmitted cookie recipes of 2018. And the winners are: Gabbie Eyler of Ellisville, for her Chocolate Turtle Cookies, which were picked by the readers; and Shiane Wilcoxen of O’Fallon, Ill., for her Mocha Hazelnut Sandwich Cookies, which were picked by our judges. For Eyler, it’s not the first time she has been featured in these pages. The PostDispatch ran a picture of her and her mother, Amy Eyler, in 2006 for the cherry meringue cookies that they made together. Eyler was 8 at the time. Now she is 21 and back with her award-winning Chocolate Turtle Cookies. She developed the recipe about a year ago. “Everybody seems to like the Turtle candies, so I decided to try it in cookie form, and all my friends liked it,” she said. “I do a lot of baking. I’m a senior at Wash U and baking is my way to destress. I don’t have a sweet tooth, so I just give it to neighbors and friends.” You read that right: She loves to bake, but she doesn’t eat much of her own baking. That means the biggest beneficiaries of her baking prowess are “mainly my guy friends; they’ll eat anything I bake,” she said. She also works at a yoga studio and brings baked goods in for the teachers. Eyler, who is studying psychology and anthropology, learned to bake with her mother, who is also her biggest baking fan. “She was probably more excited than I was (to win this contest). She is very

Yield: 27 cookies

Shiane Wilcoxen, the judges’ pick for the PostDispatch Cookie Contest

Gabbie Eyler, the People’s Choice winner in the PostDispatch Cookie Contest

POST-DISPATCH

Gabbie Eyler, 8, with her mom, Amy, in 2006.

Gabbie Eyler’s Chocolate Turtle Cookies

encouraging of my baking,” Eyler said. The winner of the judged contest, Shiane Wilcoxen, was surprised to hear that she had won the first cooking contest she ever entered. But then,

everything about her baking has been a surprise. Wilcoxen, 40, went straight to work in Chicago after high school. But she had a baby when she was 25, and with the new baby came new expenses.

“I saw a commercial on TV that Robert Morris (University) was opening up a culinary school 10 minutes from my work, and it was at night,” she said. She applied and became part of the inaugural culinary school class. On the first day, her son, Quinn, was just 2 weeks old. Wilcoxen worked in billing for insurance companies during the day and went to culinary school at night, but she still needed extra money. So on top of her other duties, she took a cake-decorating master class at a cake-decorating school. She received her certificate in cake decorating while she was still in culinary school. “When I graduated, I realized that cake was what I wanted to do,” she said. She began baking and decorating cakes from home, later moving her operation to the kitchen in a church across the street. Her first big break came from the husband of a high school friend, who worked at a furniture store. “They needed a huge, six-tier cake. I needed a new bed for my son. So I bartered a $1,000 cake for a bedroom suite,” she said. That cake got her noticed and brought her more business. For eight years she baked and decorated cakes and worked as a private chef before moving to the St. Louis area. She no longer bakes professionally and is back to working in accounts receivable for medical billing. But she looks back fondly on the time she ran a baking company called Q-Tea-Pie (it sounds like “cutie pie” when you say it aloud). She came up with the name with and for her son, Quinn. “I wanted something to honor him, because I would not have gone to culinary school if he had not been born,” she said. Daniel Neman • 314-340-8133 Food writer @dnemanfood on Twitter dneman@post-dispatch.com

Chewy, chocolatey or crumbly: Cookies are the best NEMAN • FROM L1

to improve them by coming up with new flavors. Swedish Fish Oreos, Fruit Punch Oreos, Candy Corn Oreos. It’s as if they knew their efforts were doomed, so they just stopped trying. Toll House cookies are also the ultimate expression of cookiedom and cannot be improved upon. Other chocolate chip recipes come and go, and some will even be (very nearly) as good as the Toll House recipe. But the Toll House cookie was the very first chocolate chip cookie

— Ruth Graves Wakefield invented it in 1936 at her Toll House restaurant in Whitman, Mass. — and it is still the best. How many other foods can you say this about? How many others recipes can claim indisputable perfection? Steak is great, but there is always another way to make it better. Ketchup can be tweaked and improved. Even Tater Tots can be given an upgrade. But Oreos and Toll House cookies are the Everest of the cookie world. Even the humblest

cookies are, in their own way, great. Those crumbly, nutty crescent cookies that get powdered sugar all over your sweater are wonderful. Ginger snaps are amazing. Coconut macaroons are chewy marvels. According to one poll that admittedly looks to be extravagantly unscientific, 44 percent of people polled responded that their least favorite cookie is oatmealraisin. That only shows what too many cutbacks in education funding will get you, or perhaps that too few people have had my oatmeal-raisin cookies.

Those things are amazing. There is a reason that cookies are served at the most joyous time of the year. But perhaps we are looking at this the wrong way, maybe we have the chain of causation wrong. We don’t serve cookies now because the holidays are so festive. The holidays are festive because that’s when we serve so many cookies.

20 tablespoons (2½ sticks) unsalted butter, room temperature 2 cups granulated sugar 2 eggs 2 teaspoons vanilla 2 cups plus 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour ¾ cup cocoa powder ½ teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon baking soda 2½ cups roasted and salted pecans, finely chopped ½ cup caramel bits ¼ cup plus 2 to 3 tablespoons heavy cream, divided ½ cup semisweet chocolate chips 1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. 2. Beat butter and sugar together until light and fluffy. Add eggs and vanilla. 3. In a separate bowl, combine flour, cocoa, salt and baking soda. Slowly stir or beat flour mixture into egg mixture. 4. Using a standard cookie scoop, roll dough into balls and roll in finely chopped pecans. 5. Arrange 9 cookies per baking sheet and bake for 13 minutes. Allow to cool on the sheet for at least 5 minutes. 6. Once the cookies are cooled, melt caramel and 2 to 3 tablespoons heavy cream together. Drizzle over cookies. Then melt chocolate with remaining ¼ cup heavy cream, and drizzle over cookies. Per cookie: 256 calories; 18g fat; 8g saturated fat; 39mg cholesterol; 2g protein; 24g carbohydrate; 21g sugar; 2g fiber; 118mg sodium; 19mg calcium Recipe by Gabbie Eyler of Ellisville.

MOCHA HAZELNUT SANDWICH COOKIES Yield: 24 cookies 1 cup (2 sticks) butter, softened 1¼ cups granulated sugar 1 egg 1 egg yolk 4 teaspoons instant espresso 2 teaspoons vanilla 2½ cups all-purpose flour ½ teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon baking powder 1 cup finely ground hazelnuts 1 cup heavy cream 11/3 cups plus ¼ cups semisweet chocolate chips, divided 8 tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter 1. In a large bowl, beat 1 cup softened butter and sugar until pale and fluffy. Beat in the egg, egg yolk, espresso and vanilla. In a separate bowl, stir together flour, salt and baking powder. Gradually add flour mixture to creamed mixture, blending well. Stir in the hazelnuts. Divide the dough into thirds; flatten each portion into a circle. Wrap each circle in plastic wrap; refrigerate for 1 hour. 2. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. On a lightly floured surface, roll out one disk of the dough 1/8 inch thick. Cut with a floured 1½-inch cookie cutter; place pieces ½ inch apart on ungreased baking sheet. Repeat with remaining disks of dough. Bake for 6 to 8 minutes. Remove to wire racks to cool. 3. In a small saucepan, bring heavy cream to boil. Remove from heat; stir in 11/3 cups of the chocolatechips until melted. Cut the 8 tablespoons butter into chunks, add and stir until glossy. Transfer to a bowl and refrigerate for 1½ hours or until filling reaches spreading consistency, stirring occasionally. 4. Spread filling over the bottom of half of the cookies; top with remaining cookies. Melt remaining ¼ cup chocolate chips; drizzle over cookies. Let stand until set. Per cookie: 315 calories; 20g fat; 11g saturated fat; 52mg cholesterol; 4g protein; 31g carbohydrate; 20g sugar; 2g fiber; 58mg sodium; 20mg calcium Nutrition analysis calculated for 24 cookies. Recipe by Shiane Wilcoxen

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12.05.2018 • Wednesday • M 1

LET’S EAT: COOKIE EDITION

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • L7

PHOTOS BY TOM MCCORKLE • The Washington Post

Making holiday cookies can bring joy and happiness — unless it doesn’t.

How to bake a better batch of cookies every time BY BONNIE S. BENWICK • THE WASHINGTON POST

Making holiday cookies can bring joy and happiness — unless it doesn’t. If you bake only a few times a year or think you’re missing “the baking gene,” consult these alphabetically ordered tips. BUTTER

Good grocery store packaged brands (in sticks) typically have a fat content of at least 80 percent. Premium, European-style butter brands have a higher fat content, up to 86 percent. Cookbook author Lisa Yockelson likes to use premium butter for bar cookies and dense cookie doughs, like shortbread, and the national packaged stick brands for rolled cookies. When the recipe calls for melting butter, think about infusing it with a bay leaf as the butter cools. This will add a nice flavor.

BAKING POWDER VS. BAKING SODA (FOR COOKIES)

Baking powder (sodium bicarbonate plus tartaric acid) helps cookies expand or puff up. Baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) helps tenderize the dough and also provides a bit of leavening. Sifting or sprinkling these ingredients into the mix will help ensure an even interior crumb, says Joy the Baker. If either has been in your pantry for a while, buy fresh.

DISHER (NO. 40)

This cookie scoop is popular with bakers because it yields consistent, 1 ½ tablespoonssize mounds of dough. You can find the tool in kitchen stores and online for less than $10.

EGGS

When you need to separate whites from yolks, do so when the eggs are cold. It will reduce the chances of yolk breakage. • Eggs for beating into cookie doughs will incorporate more readily when they are at room temperature. Yolks = fat and richness; whites lighten the texture.

• Crack an egg open on the counter, not the edge of the bowl you’re working in; this will help prevent any tiny bits of shell or broken yolk from getting into the mix. • Most U.S. recipes rely on large eggs for baking, says Joy the Baker, even if they don’t specify the size. A large egg translates to about 3 ¼ tablespoons; if you were to use extra-large or jumbo eggs instead of large, you would be adding substantially more liquid to the dough. (Yes, we know the Barefoot Contessa likes using extra-large eggs.)

GLUTEN-FREE

Two of the biggest concerns with gluten-free baking are cross-contamination and the use of ingredients with hidden gluten. If you are using a stand mixer that has had gluten flours or potentially contaminated ingredients in it, be sure to first properly wash and sanitize the machine’s entire exterior. The same goes for measuring cups, baking pans and cooling racks. If your utensils are wooden or plastic and are well worn, consider buying new ones to use specifically for gluten-free baking. Gluten-free cookies should be packaged and plated separately from cookies containing gluten.

MISTAKES

Failed cookies are almost always edible. Reduce them to crumbles and freeze for topping ice cream, sundaes and for creating parfait layers.

MIXING

A mixture of butter and sugar that is overbeaten can result in cookie dough that spreads, says cookbook author and Paris food blogger David

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Crinkle cookies look pretty but can they taste better? BY AMERICA’S TEST KITCHEN

Rolled in powdered sugar before baking, chocolate crinkle cookies (often called earthquakes) feature chocolaty fissures that break through the bright white surface during baking. While striking in

appearance, these cookies often fall short on taste. Using a combination of cocoa powder and unsweetened bar chocolate rather than bittersweet chocolate (which contains sugar) certainly upped the intensity, and swapping brown sugar for the granulated created a

Lebovitz. Even when a recipe says to beat until fluffy or “cream the butter and sugar together,” mix those two ingredients only until thoroughly blended.

NUTS

Toasted/roasted nuts have more flavor than raw ones. When you bring home fresh ones from the store, toss them on a baking sheet, roast, cool and stash in a container in the freezer until ready to use. This will save you time when you are baking in multiple batches. Bonus flavor: Drizzle them with melted butter before toasting; be sure to freeze or refrigerate once they have cooled.

OVENS

Make sure your oven temperature is accurate. Oven thermometers are inexpensive and helpful for monitoring. Consider getting the oven professionally calibrated before a big baking session if you are not able to adjust it yourself (check the manual). Hot spots and uneven heating are common in many home ovens, especially as the appliances age. That’s why rotating baking sheets full of cookies halfway through the baking time is generally a good idea even when you are baking them one sheet at a time. A telltale sign: Cookies on one part of the sheet are browning faster than the rest. For convection, the rule of thumb is to set a convection oven 25 degrees lower than for a conventional oven.

SHEET PANS (BAKING SHEETS)

Use heavy, light-colored ones when you can, or stack two lightweight pans on top of each other.

complex sweetness. At this point, the cookies had deep, rich flavor, but the exterior cracks were too few and too wide, and the cookies weren’t spreading enough. Using a combination of baking soda and baking powder helped—the bubbles produced by the leaveners rose to the surface and burst, leaving fissures— but the cracks gapped. We had been refrigerating this fluid dough overnight before portioning and baking the cookies, but the cold dough didn’t begin to spread very much until after that dried exterior had formed, forcing the cracks to open wide. The solution was to bake the cookies after letting the dough sit at room temperature for 10 minutes, which was just enough time for the dough to firm up to a scoopable consistency.

SILICONE LINERS These are a washable, reusable alternative to parchment paper (read below) and are now available in some supermarkets as well as kitchen stores.

SALTED OATMEAL COOKIES

STORAGE

Put a slice of fresh bread into the container with your cookies. That’s the best way to keep them nice and moist, says Milk Bar’s Christina Tosi. It will breathe new life into your cookies for three or four days. When you are defrosting baked/frozen cookies, open the lid, bag or wrapping slightly so condensation does not form.

UNBLEACHED OR BLEACHED FLOUR

Unbleached all-purpose flour has more protein and weighs slightly more than bleached flour. So if you are able to use bleached flour for cookies, which will help make them more tender and may make colored doughs brighter, do so. To measure amounts of flour accurately (without a kitchen scale), fill the drymeasure cup, then level it off.

WAX PAPER VS. PARCHMENT PAPER

Both are nonstick, but they are not interchangeable. Wax paper should not be exposed to direct heat, such as using it to line pans on which you are baking cookies. Use it for rolling out and wrapping doughs, as a protective surface when you are decorating cookies, and to separate layers of cookies stored in containers. Use parchment paper for baking or a silicone liner (see earlier entry).

Yield: 18 cookies 12 tablespoons (1 ½ sticks) unsalted butter, at room temperature 1 cup light brown sugar ½ cup granulated sugar 1 teaspoon baking powder ¼ teaspoon baking soda

¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon 2 large eggs 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 ¾ cups all-purpose flour 2 cups rolled oats (not quick-cooking) Sea salt, for sprinkling

1. In the large bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat the butter for a few minutes on mediumhigh speed until light and fluffy. Scrape down the sides of the bowl and add the sugars, baking powder, baking soda and cinnamon, beating until the mixture is well blended. Reduce the speed to medium and add the eggs and vanilla extract, mixing until well incorporated. Reduce the speed to low and add the flour and oats, scraping down the sides of the bowl as necessary and mixing just until they are incorporated. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and chill the dough for at least an hour before baking. 2. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper. 3. Form the dough into golf ball-size balls and place about 2 inches apart on the baking sheet. Sprinkle sea salt generously on top of each ball of dough, as you would sugar. Bake 1 sheet at a time for 15 minutes or until the cookies are puffed and beginning to turn golden, being careful not to overbake. (The cookies should have a tender interior.) Transfer the cookies, still on the parchment paper, to a wire rack to cool completely. Per cookie: 207 calories; 8g fat; 5g saturated fat; 41mg cholesterol; 2g protein; 29g carbohydrate; 13g sugar; 1g fiber; 29mg sodium; 31mg calcium Adapted from a 2005 DCist recipe, the Washington Post.

CHOCOLATE CRINKLE COOKIES

Yield: 22 servings

1 cup (5 ounces) all-purpose flour ½ cup (1 ½ ounces) unsweetened cocoa powder 1 teaspoon baking powder ¼ teaspoon baking soda ½ teaspoon salt 1 ½ cups packed (10 ½ ounces) brown sugar

3 large eggs 4 teaspoons instant espresso powder (optional) 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 4 ounces unsweetened chocolate, chopped 4 tablespoons unsalted butter ½ cup granulated sugar ½ cup powdered sugar

1. Adjust oven rack to middle position and heat oven to 325 degrees. Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper. Whisk flour, cocoa, baking powder, baking soda and salt together in a bowl. 2. Whisk brown sugar, eggs, espresso powder (if using) and vanilla together in a large bowl. Microwave chocolate and butter in a bowl at 50 percent power, stirring occasionally, until melted, 2 to 3 minutes. 3. Whisk chocolate mixture into egg mixture until combined. Fold in flour mixture until no dry streaks remain. Let dough sit at room temperature for 10 minutes. 4. Spread granulated sugar in shallow dish. Spread powdered sugar in a second shallow dish. Working in batches, drop 2-tablespoon mounds of dough (or use No. 30 scoop) directly into granulated sugar and roll to coat. Transfer dough balls to powdered sugar and roll to coat; space dough balls evenly on prepared sheets, 11 per sheet. 4. Bake cookies, 1 sheet at a time, until they are puffed and cracked and edges have begun to set but centers are still soft (cookies will look raw between cracks and seem underdone), about 12 minutes, rotating sheet halfway through baking. Let cookies cool on sheet for 5 minutes, then transfer to wire rack. Let cookies cool completely before serving. Per cookie: 165 calories; 6g fat; 35mg cholesterol; 103mg sodium; 29g carbohydrate; 2g fiber; 22g sugar; 3g protein. America’s Test Kitchen provided this article to the Associated Press.


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EV2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH BRIDGE TIPS • BOB JONES North-South vulnerable, North deals NORTH ♠Void ♥A K Q 7 5 3 2 ♦A 10 5 3 ♣K 7 WEST EAST ♠J 9 6 4 ♠K Q 8 3 2 ♥J 9 4 ♥8 ♦9 8 7 6 4 ♦K 2 ♣4 ♣8 6 5 3 2 SOUTH ♠A 10 7 5 ♥10 6 ♦Q J ♣A Q J 10 9 The bidding: NORTH EAST SOUTH WEST 1♥ 1♠ 2♣ 3♠ 4♦ Pass 4♥ Pass 4♠ Pass 6♣ Pass 7♥ Pass 7NT All pass Pre-emptive Opening lead: Four of ♠ In a time when artificial gadgetry seems to dominate most expert auctions, it’s a pleasure to see an auction based purely on bridge logic. North in today’s deal was the late Sydney Lazard, a Hall of Famer, playing with his regular partner, Bart Bramley. Many non-expert players would open the North hand with a bid of two clubs. It’s a way to “start the party” and inform partner that good times are about to roll. Experts will not open distributional hands with a two-club bid un-

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD less the high-card strength is overwhelming. Describing a distributional hand is even more difficult when you start with an artificial bid at the two level. Lazard might have bid four hearts at his second turn, but he thought he was too strong for that bid after Bramley’s two-level response. Slam chances were significant. The delicate four-diamond bid brought a somewhat timid preference from Bramley, but Bramley couldn’t know that his side had an eightcard fit, much less nine. The four-heart bid gave Lazard confidence that his heart suit was solid, and he tried a fourspade cue bid. Bramley wanted to accept the slam try, but he didn’t know which suit to play in. He jumped to six clubs to emphasize his club strength. Lazard recognized that his king of clubs was golden, so he jumped to the grand slam in hearts. Bramley was certain that his partner held long, solid hearts, plus a minor suit king, so he converted to seven no trump and the top spot was reached. A well-bid hand!

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Across

1 ___ rug 5 Audibly horrified 10 Quarrel 14 Stephen King title about a dog 15 Cabaret show 16 A transcontinental traveler might go by this 17 Saint who lent his name to a Minnesota college 18 Justice Kagan 19 It’s not a good look 20 Listings in the Internal Revenue Code 22 CIA infiltrator during the Cold War 24 Part of IPA 25 Sound at a séance 26 Savings for a rainy day

WORD GAME December 5 WORD — HIJACKER (HIJACKER: HI-jak-er: One who seizes control of a vehicle in transit.) Average mark 28 words. Time limit 40 minutes. Can you find 37 or more words in HIJACKER? The list will be published tomorrow. YESTERDAY’S WORD — TELETHON teen lent teeth lone tenet loth tent heel tenth helot thee hole then hone thole hotel tole nettle tone noel tote note leno RULES OF THE GAME: 1. Words must be of four or more letters. 2. Words that acquire four letters by the addition of “s,” such as “bats” or “dies,” are not allowed. 3. Additional words made by adding a “d” or an “s” may not be used. For example, if “bake” is used, “baked” or “bakes” are not allowed, but “bake” and “baking” are admissible. 4. Proper nouns, slang words, or vulgar or sexually explicit words are not allowed.

30 Not self-parked 34 Afore 35 A.A. Milne character 36 Drips in the O.R. 37 Biblical judge 38 Nabokov title 39 ___ turkey 40 Goddess: Lat. 41 Toward the most common part of a boat to fish from 42 Prize on “The Bachelor” 44 Wooden rod 46 Story of a lifetime, for short? 47 Public ruckus 49 P, for Plato 50 Like the ocean 51 Groups that typically meet weekly for lunch 54 Drug also called angel dust

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

56 Language spoken by Jesus 57 Lincoln or Ford 60 Visa alternative 62 Discovering the word at 67-Across, for this puzzle 63 Place underground 64 Pay (up) 65 Baltic capital 66 Animated film of 1998 67 Resting place hinted at by 28-, 5-, 45-, 9- and 31-Down, in that order 68 Oodles

Down

1 Macbeth, e.g. 2 Dance with percussion accompaniment 3 Battler of Hector in the “Iliad” 4 Lose carbonation 5 “Do you still l ike me?” 6 Comes together 7 NYC’s Park or Fifth 8 Destroyed, as an armada 9 Walkway option in lieu of paving 10 ___ l’oeil (illusion) 11 Rival of Cassio, in Shakespeare 12 Truckload at a garbage dump 13 Get out of Dodge 21 Tip off

HOROSCOPE • JACQUELINE BIGAR Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. The stars show the kind of day you’ll have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult.

CROSSWORD

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 12.05.2018

If Dec. 5 is your birthday • This year is exciting and encourages communication to flourish. Although some of the people in your life might seem controlling, the majority appear to be easygoing and fun. Sagittarius often costs you more than you might like to spend. ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Look at an issue that could have created fireworks. Others appreciate your passion, as long as it is not directed at them. A reversal could shake up the status quo. Remember, for every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction. Tonight: A long-overdue chat. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHH You might be taken aback by everything going on around you. Experience your feelings rather than act on them; otherwise, you might just be adding fuel to the fire. Once you reach a realization, a conversation becomes far more plausible. Tonight: Not to be found. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH Honor a change involving a friend. You can’t take back words you’ve said. Though you could have a strong reaction, try discussing your feelings without inflaming a situation. Working as a group proves more effective. Tonight: Where you want to be. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHH Take a stand, move forward and handle a problem. Your sensitivity mixes well with your practical nature. Together, these assets will help you wade through muddy waters and come out sparkling clean. Know that you have what it takes. Tonight: In the limelight. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHHH Read between the lines as you walk into a situation where people have strong opinions. Understand the underlying issue. Help others see what they have in common, as opposed to what is different. Communication allows greater give-and-take. Tonight: Return calls, then decide. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH A partner could be somewhat difficult. You might

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have a strong reaction as a result. Resist going off on a spending spree while in this mood. A discussion is necessary. You understand the importance of timing; just wait. Tonight: Spend time with your best friend. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH Defer to others. You could have a difficult time maintaining your authority. Walk in the other direction, and refuse to be a part of this situation. The other parties might be floored, but they will look at their actions. Tonight: Entertain suggestions, but do what you want. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH Listen to what is being offered, even if you don’t like what you hear at first. Pace yourself and accomplish what you must before following someone’s chosen path. You have the drive to get a lot done. Stay focused. Tonight: You deserve to take it easy. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHHH Your playfulness might not be in tune with others’ moods. Someone you care about could be on the warpath. This person’s words might surprise you. Be a good listener, and look for solutions. Your willingness to help will come through. Tonight: Time for fun. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHH Stay centered, and know where you are coming from. Avoid testing out ideas on others. An unexpected insight forces you to regroup. You can’t avoid a matter and/or an issue involving real estate. Tonight: Have an important discussion. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH You are coming from a good place, but suddenly you might find yourself feeling angry. Focus on how you can change the outcome of the situation. Have an important discussion when you feel more settled. Tonight: Hang out at a favorite haunt. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH Be aware of your spending. No matter what you do, you seem to make choices that could cause a problem. Perhaps you need more information, as you have yet to see a clear path. You will be given time and openness. Tonight: Pay your bills first.

Puzzle by Bruce Haight

23 Material for Thor Heyerdahl’s Kon-Tiki 26 Becomes imminent 27 Worker in a trauma ward, for short 28 Image on an ancient mariner’s map 29 Symbol of depravity 30 Security device, informally

31 Serving at a 4:00 social 32 Pixielike 33 Jingle, e.g. 43 “Music for Airports” musician 45 “What did I do to deserve this?” 46 Image on the king of clubs 48 When one is expected, for short 50 Tampa Bay pro, informally

52 It is “either plagiarism or revolution,” per Paul Gauguin 53 Be horizontal 54 ___ John 55 “You’re pulling my leg!” 58 Hit 2012 movie whose plot involves a plan to make a movie 59 House leader after Boehner 61 ___ Affair 63 Playtex product

Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay. No. 1031

WORD SCRIMMAGE

Solutions at bottom of page

WONDERWORD

WORDY GURDY

STLtoday.com/horoscopes Get expanded horoscope information: star charts, peak times, outlooks and Chinese Zodiac data.

JUMBLE


EVERYDAY

12.05.2018 • Wednesday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • EV3

DEAR ABBY

WHAT’S THE DIFF? Find six differences between the panels.

Normal life eludes survivor of abuse

Dear Lost • My heart goes out to you. You have experienced an atrocity. The groups you have been attending may not have been the right ones for you. One-on-one sessions with a licensed mental health professional, someone who specializes in working with victims of sexual abuse and/or PTSD, might be more appropriate.

A good place to start finding the help you’re looking for would be the Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network (RAINN). It’s the nation’s largest anti-sexual violence network. You can find it online at rainn.org or by calling 800-656-4673. I wish you healing and success. Please let me hear from you again and tell me how you are doing. Dear Abby • I’m a 29-year-old woman living on my own an hour away from my family. My parents were bitterly divorced 10 years ago, and a year ago I lost my father to cancer. At the time, my mother voiced her disapproval of my going to be with him on his deathbed. The day he passed, she told me not to be too sad because “he was thinking about suicide anyway.” I have so much anger toward her for these and other things her emotional immaturity has led her to do or say. On the one-year anniversary of Daddy’s death, she tried to pick a fight with me for “obviously not wanting to talk” to her.

It prompted me to do exactly that, and I calmly discontinued speaking with her. The past two weeks without my mother’s voice in my life have been the longest stretch of peace and confidence I have experienced in a long time, but her birthday is coming up, and I worry that I am being a bad daughter by continuing not to talk to her. What’s more important — healing the breach, or my own mental health? — Conflicted Daughter Dear Daughter • For both your sakes, do both if you can manage it. Try this: Explain to your mother the reason for your sudden silence. Set some firm boundaries. If she cooperates, you will still be able to have a relationship with her. If she doesn’t, at least you will know you tried. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, Calif. 90069.

Differences: 1. Arm is not showing. 2. Window panes are different. 3. House is not as wide. 4. Collar is different. 5. Sweater is not as long. 6. Board under sign is lower.

Dear Abby • I am a 53-year-old woman who is a sexual abuse survivor. This has consumed every aspect of my life. It started when I was around 2, I believe, and was a daily occurrence until I was 14. My abuser was my paternal grandfather, now deceased. I’ve sought counseling and therapy groups over the years, to no avail. I have dealt with flashbacks, nightmares, failed marriages, etc. I just want to feel normal, and I don’t know how. Am I searching for something that does not exist? I don’t know if you can help me, but if you have any advice at all, I would be grateful. — Lost in the South

TV WEDNESDAY

CAROLYN HAX

Holidays on hold in organic showdown Dear Carolyn • I am in an OOD (Obsessive Organic Disagreement) with my daughter-inlaw and her husband — my son. Three families are coming to my house for the holiday. The OOD couple decided not to join us if everyone didn’t contribute dishes made from foods labeled “organic.” The OOD couple have three preschool children. They buy only organic foods and dine at cafes of all-organic grocery stores. Otherwise, they bring organic food and beverages for the children. Letting them bring their own organic-labeled foods for holidays hasn’t worked well. My daughter-in-law brought so many vegetables for a cookout that she monopolized the entire grill cooking them. They proceeded to eat dinner as we had just gained access to the grill. I was brought up that if someone invited you for dinner, you

ate what you liked of what was served. You didn’t order the hostess to prepare foods specific to your family nor did you bring your own dinner to the “dinner.” Would it poison the OOD family to eat one holiday meal that was “regular” food? — OOD Grandmother Answer • Being right doesn’t do you much good if you’re answering the wrong questions. Of course these kids could safely eat one “regular” meal, no hotline confirmation required, oh my goodness. And yes, etiquette tilts heavily toward gracious acceptance of whatever hosts choose to serve, although allergies and other intolerances can politely factor in. And, organic? Sure. Their prerogative, though it’s an imprecise business at best. But this isn’t about food or manners. It’s about fanaticism.

For complete channels and 24-hour program information, customize your own TV listings at STLtoday.com/tv.

Who’s

7:30

8:00

FOX Empire Kai uncovers 2 some dirty activity. (N) (cc)

8:30

9:00

9:30

Star: Zion. Star ends up FOX 2 News at 9:00pm in a legal bind. (N) (cc) (N) (cc)

SEAL Team The team CBS Survivor: So Smart 4 They’re Dumb. (N) (cc) suspects a leak. (8:01) (N) (cc)

Criminal Minds Former rehab patients die of overdoses. (N)

NBC Chicago Med Halstead’s Chicago Fire A loved 5 wedding day is thrown one becomes an accioff. (N) dent victim. (N)

Chicago P.D.: Descent. Antonio crosses a line. (N)

PBS Brain Secrets With Dr. Michael 9 Merzenich Maintaining cognitive fitness. (cc) CW 11

News 11 at 7:00PM (N) (cc)

METV The Andy 24 Griffith Show

Í CONCERT FOR GEORGE (’03) HHH (Tom Hanks)

Riverdale Archie meets All American FriendLaurie Lake. (N) (cc) ships are put to the test. (N) (cc)

The Andy Griffith Show

Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C.

Hogan’s WKRP in Hogan’s Cincinnati: Heroes (cc) Heroes (cc) Pilot.

Single Par- A Million Little Things: ABC The Gold- American Modern 30 bergs (N) Housewife Family (N) ents (8:31) perspective. (N) (cc) (N) (N) Blue Bloods An activist Blue Bloods Frank ION Blue Bloods A stray 46 bullet strikes an elderly is in danger of deporta- deals with a whistlewoman. tion. blower. (cc)

tellme@washpost.com

THE 2018 ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

7:00

12/5/18

Your daughter-in-law — she’s the driver here, I gather, while your son is the passenger? — is an extremist. Extremism is psychological, not dietary. This is also more of a hostage situation than a menu challenge. Your access to your son and grandchildren lies behind that “OOD” gate, which your daughter-in-law controls, and your son buys into (again, I gather). So, sure, you can fulminate about your daughter-in-law’s food sanctimony, but your son and grandkids won’t be there. And that’s the thing you want, isn’t it? Not winning, but companionship? If you want your son and grandkids there, then you need to stop trying to reason with — or, perhaps more aptly, triumph over — the fanatic. You just need to meet her terms.

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EVERYDAY

EV4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH THE FAMILY CIRCUS • By Bil Keane

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 12.05.2018

DR. KEITH ROACH

ZITS • By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

What exactly is H. pylori and how is it treated?

FUNKY WINKERBEAN • By Tom Batiuk

Dear Dr. Roach • My 82-year-old husband was diagnosed with H. pylori and was treated with two antibiotics and omeprazole. Would you expand on what H. pylori is? — T.R.

SPEED BUMP • By Dave Coverly

Answer • Helicobacter pylori is a bacteria species that is able to live in the stomach. It was identified in a paper from 1984 and is recognized as a major contributor to gastrointestinal ulcers and inflammation. It plays a role in the development of certain types of stomach cancers. H. pylori is the underlying cause of most stomach and duodenal ulcers, and people who have these ulcers are tested for H. pylori and treated if the bacteria is present. Treatment helps speed recovery and prevent recurrence of disease. H. pylori is hard to kill. A common regimen is clarithromycin, amoxicillin and omeprazole. Diagnosis can be made with biopsy specimens from an upper endoscopy, or by breath test or stool test. In people with stomach symptoms but who do not require endoscopy, many clinicians choose to look for H. pylori by stool or breath testing, and treat if present. Unfortunately, treating the infection is effective at curing symptoms only a minority of the time. H. pylori increases the risk of stomach cancer and is the cause of most cases of a cancer called a MALToma. People with this unusual cancer often are cured with successful treatment of H. pylori, making it the first known cancer to be cured with antibiotics.

BIZARRO • By Wayno and Piraro

CORNERED • By Mike Baldwin NON SEQUITUR • By Wiley Miller

DUPLEX • By Glenn McCoy MARMADUKE • By Brad Anderson

Dear Dr. Roach • My doctor heard a heart murmur and sent me for an echocardiogram. This showed that I have heart thickening due to high blood pressure, but that my valves are OK. He said the murmur came from “aggressive heart muscle contractions.” I’m 68, and my blood pressure is around 140/76. What can I expect my heart health to be? I exercise 150 minutes per week. — B.G.

INTELLIGENT LIFE • By David Reddick

DRABBLE • By Kevin Fagan

Answer • I looked at your echocardiogram report, and it showed your ejection fraction (the percent of blood the heart squeezes out every beat) was 75 percent (on the border of too high), and the report noted abnormal relaxation of the thickened wall of the left ventricle. These findings are consistent with hypertensive heart disease. Fortunately, this is treatable. Meticulous blood pressure control is the best treatment for your condition. Regular exercise is still indicated, but I don’t recommend overexerting yourself until you speak with your cardiologist.

MARK TRAIL • By James Allen

LOLA • By Todd Clark ZIGGY • By Tom Wilson

Dr. Roach regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but will incorporate them in the column whenever possible. Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med.cornell. edu or send mail to 628 Virginia Dr., Orlando, FL 32803.

OTHER COAST • By Adrian Raeside

TAKE IT FROM THE TINKERSONS • By Bill Bettwy

THE ARGYLE SWEATER • By Scott

Hilburn

BLONDIE • By Dean Young and John Marshall

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12.5.18  

12.5.18 St. Louis Post-Dispatch

12.5.18  

12.5.18 St. Louis Post-Dispatch