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NEW ERA BEGINS AS MIZZOU HIRES ODOM SPORTS • B1

SATURDAY • 12.05.2015 • $1.50

FBI: ‘ACT OF TERRORISM’ WIFE PRAISED ISLAMIC STATE She cheered group in a post while California shooting was underway

LARGER PLOT UNLIKELY Some evidence prompted terrorism investigation, but act seems isolated

PREMEDITATED ATTACK In final days, Farook and Malik tried to erase their electronic footprints

STREETSCAPE WOES Farook

Malik

BY AMANDA LEE MYERS AND TAMI ABDOLLAH Associated Press

SAN BERNARDINO, CALIF. •

The FBI announced Friday that it was investigating the mass shooting at a Southern California oice party as an act of terrorism, but the agency’s director said there was no indication that the slain husband and wife who killed 14 were part of a larger plot or members of a terrorist cell. Though authorities did not cite specific evidence that led them to the terrorism focus, a U.S. law enforcement official revealed that the wife, Tashfeen Malik, had under a Facebook alias pledged allegiance to the Islamic State group and its leader. A Facebook official said Malik praised Islamic State in a post at 11 a.m. Wednesday, when the couple were believed to have stormed a San Bernardino social service center and opened fire.

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

St. Louis spent $17 million to rebuild Washington Avenue but failed to fund maintenance of the street. Original decorative street blocks have cracked and been replaced by asphalt infill. LED lights originally illuminated the center line but haven’t worked for the past year.

See ATTACK • Page A4

City struggles to maintain Washington Avenue’s face-lift BY NICHOLAS J.C. PISTOR St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • Washington Avenue wasn’t supposed to look like this. More than a decade ago, the city pumped about $17 million in state and federal tax dollars into renovating and beautifying the downtown street hugged

by warehouses. The complicated face-lift was a nod to the street’s history as the center of the city’s garment and fashion industry. The new streetscape was special: custom lights, unique trash cans, expanded sidewalks and a zipper-and-stitch-like paving pattern with LED-lit button “runway lights” striped down the center.

Kinder says campaign money was misspent

But the city has struggled since then to maintain the new look. Now, essential design elements are starting to crumble, lights and sidewalks have been altered and the runway lights haven’t worked in more than a year. The unique stitch-like paving pattern is See AVENUE • Page A18

BY SAMANTHA LISS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

AVENUE’S EVOLUTION • AREA IS MAGNET FOR NIGHT LIFE, NEW RESIDENTS

2003

2007

retaliation. Kader’s complaint alleges college administrators punished her and conspired to fire her after she questioned the basis of a poor performance review. Jurors awarded her $1.75 million in punitive damages and $750,000 in

Tens of thousands of dollars of campaign funds raised for Lt. Gov. Peter Kinder’s gubernatorial bid were misspent by former aides, and the U.S. attorney’s office has been notified, Kinder’s campaign said Friday. In a written statement, the campaign said an internal investigation found that for- Kinder mer independent contractors had prepared incorrect reports for the Missouri Ethics Commission “to conceal unauthorized payments and expenditures.” Kinder’s statement did not identify the former contractors.

See COLLEGE • Page A18

See KINDER • Page A18

2012

Harris-Stowe hit with another costly discrimination verdict BY KORAN ADDO St. Louis Post-Dispatch

For the second time this fall, a St. Louis Circuit Court jury has found that Harris-Stowe State University discriminated against an employee based on ethnicity. A jury has awarded Shereen Abdel

TODAY

56°/34°

Paved with good intentions

MOSTLY CLEAR

TOMORROW

51°/37° PARTLY SUNNY

WEATHER A16

Kader, a former professor in HarrisStowe’s College of Education, $2.5 million over complaints that the school didn’t renew her contract because of her national origin. Kader is a Caucasian of Egyptian origin and an Arab Muslim. The jury also dinged Harris-Stowe for

Man charged after missing cabin found LOCAL • A10

POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

Arms makers strain to meet demand Chess grandmaster faces charges ‘No bad news’ in ‘The Wiz Live!’

• A6

• A10

• A17

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Blues lose to Islanders in shootout

• B1

Vol. 137, No. 339 ©2015


M 1 SATURDAY • 12.05.2015 • A2

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM

Find these features and exclusive subscriber content at stltoday.com/extra

SWEET TREATS

MISTLETOE SHOW

ALL-METRO TEAMS

Find out who won the Post-Dispatch’s cookie bakeof Friday at Schnucks cooking school in Des Peres.

See a photo gallery of singer Nate Ruess and the rest of the performers at the Y98 Mistletoe Show Friday night at the Family Arena.

Our fall sports All-Metro teams highlight the area’s best athletes. Softball leads of at STLhighschoolsports.com.

WHAT’S UP

JOE’S ST. LOUIS

THIS DAY IN 1982

Hettiger gets oicial nod for Great Day St. Louis on KMOV

TIMES BEACH FLOOD About a month after residents learned of dangerous dioxin levels in Times Beach, the town along the Meramec River is ravaged by a record-breaking flood. The flood damages or destroys most homes in the town.

EVENTS WAY OF LIGHTS When • Nightly through Dec. 31, 5-9 p.m. Monday-Thursday, 5-10 p.m. Friday-Sunday Where • National Shrine of Our Lady of the Snows, 442 South De Mazenod Drive, Belleville How much • Free; charges for some activities More info • snows.org/events/wayof-lights/ Since 1970, the Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate have invited all to make the Way of Lights a part of their family tradition. Features include Christmas lights, Christmas tree display, community performances, wreath display; camel, donkey and pony rides; petting zoo, carriage rides, LEGO display. HONORING VETERANS When • 5-8 p.m. Sunday Where • Sappington House, 1015 South Sappington Road in Crestwood How much • Free More info • www.GiveandGlow.info Area residents are invited to explore Grant’s Trail in the Gravois Greenway on the eve of the anniversary of Pearl Harbor in the third annual “Nite of Lights — Give and Glow Celebration.” The event features hundreds of luminarias in honor of veterans along Grant’s Trail, between Big Bend Boulevard and Watson Road in Crestwood. All proceeds from the sale of the luminarias benefit the Missouri chapter of USA Cares, a nonprofit helping military families in crisis. Participants can tour the Sappington House, enjoy a bonfire, hot chocolate, spiced cider, cookies and Girl Scout caroling. To list a community event or meeting, submit it online at events.stltoday.com

LOTTERY MULTISTATE GAMES MEGA MILLIONS Friday: 26-42-47-61-73 Mega ball: 06 Megaplier: 5 Estimated jackpot: $47 million POWERBALL Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $127 million

MISSOURI LOTTERIES LOTTO Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $1 million SHOW ME CASH Friday: 01-16-20-30-32 Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $55,000 PICK-3 Friday Midday: 590 Evening: 630 PICK-4 Friday Midday: 8625 Evening: 5561

ILLINOIS LOTTERIES LUCKY DAY LOTTO Friday Midday: 10-12-19-33-40 Evening: 04-1517-25-44 LOTTO Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $16 million PICK-3 Friday Midday: 959 FB: 5 Evening: 021 FB: 3 PICK-4 Friday Midday: 6385 FB: 0 Evening: 7817 FB: 4

STLTODAY.COM/LOTTERY Current and past numbers, plus jackpots from state lotteries around the country.

AMERICA’S FUNNIEST HOME VIDEOS

Texanne McBride (right) and her daughter, Texanne McBride Jr., on “America’s Funniest Home Videos”

JOE HOLLEMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ANCHOR STEAM • She’s had the job for weeks, and now she has the title. After almost two months of fulltime filling in, Laura Hettiger of KMOV (Channel 4) has been oicially named as a permanent 33.3 percent of Great Day St. Louis. Station boss Mike Murphy called Hettiger “a perfect fit” with co-hosts Matt Chambers and Kent Ehrhardt on the one-hour show at 9 a.m. Hettiger replaced Claire Hettiger Kellett on the show in mid-October, when Kellett moved to anchor the afternoon newscasts. Hettiger, who joined KMOV in 2012 as a reporter, will retain her traic-reporting duties on the morning newscast. CRANE EFFECT • St. Louis Symphony vice president Adam Crane is many things, and an “influencer” is one of them. The orchestra’s veep for external affairs, Crane has been named by Musical America as one of the “30 Professionals

of the Year: The Influencers.” Along with citing his radio work and community involvement, the performing arts publication tips its cap to Crane, Crane an avid Cardinals fan, for playing catch with symphony president Marie-Helene Bernard as she prepared to throw out a first pitch at Busch Stadium. PRIMATE TIME • It’s the kind of monkey business that could earn Texanne McBride a cool 10 grand. McBride, an auto finance salesperson from Creve Coeur, will appear in the finals of “America’s Funniest Home Videos.” It airs at 6 p.m. Sunday on KDNL (Channel 30). McBride will appear with her daughter, Texanne McBride Jr., to compete for the $10,000 first prize. The highjinks, recorded in July, involve one of McBride’s two capuchin monkeys, Stitch, and her English bulldog, Mojo. Seems Stitch can voice a few words and as the video will show, gets a bit testy when told to quit shredding the dog’s toys. “It was a lot of fun doing the show, which was in early November,” the elder McBride said. “We had a great time.”

KNOW THEIR/THERE • Confusion over contractions and correct word choices is not just for students anymore. Teachers at Grand Center Arts Academy voted Friday to join the American Federation of Teachers Union Local 420. That morning, the union used Twitter to promote the vote: “Its Election Day for GCAA staf to join @AFTStLouis and have a voice for there profession and students #gcaaunion.” It’s likely they’re wishing they had proofed their Twitter message before posting it there. Joe Holleman • 314-340-8254 @stlsherpa on Twitter jholleman@post-dispatch.com

KIPP charter school administrator resigns BY ELISA CROUCH St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LO U I S • An administrator at KIPP:Victory Academy has resigned. Two students this fall claimed he had physically harmed them, but police said they could not substantiate the allegations. A letter from the principal to parents states that Andrew Sears, assistant school leader, stopped working at the school on Thursday. Tiara Abu, the school leader at the charter elementary school, sent a letter to parents Friday announcing the departure of Sears. According to the school website, Sears was in his second year at KIPP:Victory. The school opened in 2014.

Police and the state Department of Social Services were contacted Oct. 8 and Nov. 10 for alleged physical abuse at the school, 955 Arcade Avenue. Sears was accused of bruising a girl, 7, and a boy, 5. He was put on leave, pending the outcome of investigations by police, the state and KIPP. Tammy Howard said she became alarmed Nov. 10 when she went to the school to pick up her kindergarten son and he had bruises on his face and chest. He told her Sears had grabbed his face with one hand and squeezed hard. She brought it to the attention of school officials, and then she called police. Hope Whitehead, an attorney for the families of both children, said state social services workers first dismissed the

girl’s claims as unsubstantiated, but those concerns were reinvigorated by the second accusation involving the boy. The kindergartner had been disciplined at school the day his mother saw his bruises, the attorney said. Howard said she was glad Sears was no longer at the school. She removed her son from KIPP the week of Nov. 10. He now attends a city district school. Yah Ammi, the father of the girl, said his daughter also went to a different school. “My daughter’s been traumatized,” he said. Elisa Crouch • 314-340-8119 @elisacrouch on Twitter ecrouch@post-dispatch.com

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FLIGHT PATTERN • Until the end of the year, the St. Louis Media History Foundation will feature the work of former Post-Dispatch artist Amadee Wohlschaleger at the Karpeles Manuscript Library Museum. Curated by William Mathis, with an assist from P-D artist Dan Martin, the exhibit focuses on Wohlschaleger’s work for The Sporting News. Several sketches of the Weatherbird also are featured. Admission is free, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday at the museum, at 3524 Russell Boulevard.

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LOCAL

12.05.2015 • Saturday • M 1

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • A3

LAW & ORDER ST. LOUIS > Apartment ire injures seven • Seven people were injured — two seriously — in a ire at the Sunshine Apartments at Hampton Avenue and Sunshine Drive about 12:40 a.m. Friday, Fire Chief Dennis Jenkerson said. The blaze started on the second loor of the 24-unit structure, trapping people above with lames and heavy smoke. Jenkerson praised ireighters who quickly used ladders to reach people hanging out top-loor windows of the three-story structure. “To get everybody out of this building in a very quick time was an impressive feat in itself and also contain the ire,” he said. Four people were taken to hospitals for treatment of smoke inhalation, he said, and three were treated at the scene. Jenkerson said smoke detectors roused most of the residents who occupied 22 of the 24 units. Beth Pike, 59, a tenant who rushed outside without stopping to get a coat, said, “The smoke just got so dark and thick.” She added, “We were in such a rush to get people out.” The ire was believed to be accidental, caused by an electrical malfunction. O’FALLON, MO. > Ex-cop admits stealing drugs • A former O’Fallon police detective, Luke A. Smyka, 36, has pleaded guilty of stealing drugs from the department’s evidence locker. He will be sentenced Feb. 1 by St. Charles County Circuit Judge Jon Cunningham. Smyka, an 11-year veteran of the department, was charged with 19 counts of stealing a controlled substance and two counts of possession of a controlled substance. Prosecutor Tim Lohmar said Smyka pleaded guilty of each charge, which all involved prescription painkillers. The plea was entered on Tuesday. Court records said the thefts were in 2013 and last year. According to court documents, Smyka told investigators he was addicted to pain killers. Lohmar said that because of the charges against Smyka, prosecutors dismissed three unrelated cases against others in which Smyka was involved in the investigation. Lohmar said he couldn’t give details of those cases but none involved drugs or violence. ST. LOUIS > Slain man is identiied • A man fatally shot about 12:50 a.m. Thursday morning on a sidewalk in the 2900 block of North Newstead Avenue has been identiied by police as Terrance Bradley, 32. Bradley, of the 4600 block of St. Ferdinand Avenue, was shot in the chest. He died at a hospital about 2:15 a.m. Thursday. ST. LOUIS COUNTY > Father charged with abuse • Basil Shehadeh, 20, has been charged with child abuse for allegedly putting his 4-yearold son in hot water, causing seconddegree burns on his buttocks. Shehadeh, of the 4800 block of Christoble Shehadeh Drive, was held in lieu of $250,000 bail. Police said Shehadeh put his son in the water Nov. 26, saying the child had soiled himself. BRIDGETON > Missing man is found dead • Remy Anthony Gooldy, 54, the subject of a public alert after walking away from DePaul Health Center on Oct. 28, was found dead in a drainage ditch here Thursday, police said. Capt. Steven James said the cause of death had not been determined but there was no outward sign of foul play. Gooldy The body was in a grassy and wooded area behind the 13800 block of Corporate Woods Trail, police said, and apparently had been there for an “extended amount of time.” Gooldy, who authorities said was homeless, was being treated for worsening dementia and a recent stroke when he left the hospital against medical advice, oicials said.

in July of second-degree burglary in connection with a break-in Aug. 21, 2014, at a convenience store in the 900 block of Lemay Ferry Road in south St. Louis County. A judge ordered him to prison for ive years, but suspended execution of that sentence if he met conditions. WASHINGTON PARK > Fire destroys club • Nobody was reported injured when ire engulfed a strip club here about 4:30 a.m. Friday. Flames destroyed the Main Street Club, at 5103 Bunkum Road.

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

Fog rolls over a water relection of ireighters as they confront a stubborn ire on Friday morning that slowly guts the Main Street Night Club in the 5100 block of Bunkum Road in Washington Park.

stomping him in the head. Johnson sufered severe internal brain hemorrhaging, oicials said.

ST. LOUIS COUNTY > Assault charge follows fatal ight • Ricky Vellmer, 56, has been charged with irst-degree assault in the beating of Michael Johnson, 58, who later died. Charges may be amended after prosecutors review the autopsy. Police said they were called about 7 a.m. Wednesday to a house in the 1900 block of Chambers Road, where Johnson was unresponsive. He died at a hospital about Vellmer 11:20 p.m. Wednesday. Police said the men were “acquaintances” who had fought. Vellmer, of the 10100 block of Imperial Drive in north St. Louis County, was held in lieu of $250,000 bail. Vellmer allegedly threw Johnson on the ground before punching and

ST. LOUIS > Woman gets probation again • Susan Hampe, 66, of St. Louis County, was sentenced Friday to three years of probation for defrauding her sister to pay of money owed from a previous embezzlement case. Hampe pleaded guilty in September to one count of mail fraud. She falsely represented herself as sole trustee for her dead mother’s home in St. Louis County and took the proceeds when it sold, prosecutors said. She used the money to pay $60,000 in restitution owed to a St. Louis County medical practice after an embezzlement, they said. In that 2011 criminal case, she was sentenced to ive years of probation. On Friday, she was ordered to repay $51,000 and ined $1,000 by U.S. District Judge E. Richard Webber.

ST. LOUIS > Bud Weisser busted at brewery • In a struggle between Bud Weisser and Budweiser, the beer company seems to have won. Bud A. Weisser, 19, received summonses from police Thursday accusing him of irst-degree trespassing and resisting arrest after he allegedly entered the AnheuserBusch brewery property at Ninth and Arsenal Streets, where the “King of Beers” is produced. Police said Weisser, of the 200 block of Espenschied Street in St. Louis, abandoned his car after a crash about 6:48 p.m. and hopped the fence into a secure area of the brewery, where he struggled with security oicers. Weisser pleaded guilty

ST. LOUIS > Ex-university worker is sentenced • Catherine Nolde, a former inancial worker at Webster University, was sentenced Friday in federal court here to ive years of probation and ordered to repay $82,571 that she stole through student loan fraud. She had pleaded guilty in August to two counts of embezzlement. Although employees were prohibited from processing their own loan applications, Nolde admitted handling applications for herself and her husband and inlating the “cost of attendance,” her plea says. Nolde used the money, an estimated $82,571 from February 2008 to September 2010, for credit card expenses and home repairs, the plea says. ST. LOUIS > Woman admits selling pain pills • Brandie Archie, 37, of St. Louis, admitted in federal court here Friday that she fraudulently sold pain pills and other drugs. Archie, of the 6000 block of Maple Avenue, said she lied to her doctor about needing prescription drugs for medical problems. She

planned all along to sell the drugs, which were paid for by Medicaid, and did, her plea says. Between October 2014 and January, Archie sold nearly 1,000 doses of Percocet, Adderall and other drugs, court documents say. She pleaded guilty to two counts of health care fraud and four counts of selling a controlled substance. Under federal guidelines, Archie could face about two years in prison when sentenced on March 2. ST. CHARLES > Killer gets life term • Wardell Davison Jr., 22, of Jennings, was sentenced Monday to life in prison after pleading guilty of second-degree murder in the shooting of Charles S. Dishman, 38, in February at an apartment complex in the 200 block of Ameristar Boulevard. Davison also pleaded guilty of armed criminal action and robbery and was sentenced to concurrent terms of 30 years each on those. Police said he was among ive people who went to the Crestview Davison Apartments looking for money and drugs, and that Dishman, who lived in St. Peters, was not the intended target. Melech Yachin Porter, 18, of Bel-Ridge, pleaded guilty previously to the same charges and will be sentenced Dec. 14. A jury trial is set later for Travon Johnson, 22, of Pine Lawn, on those charges. Lamont D. Ware, 22, of St. Louis, and Dennis Lamont Baker, 24, of Northwoods, previously pleaded guilty of robbery and will be sentenced Jan. 4.

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NATION

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 12.05.2015

Abortion clinics brace for attacks Planned Parenthood sites are open but on heightened alert after deadly shooting BY KRISTEN WYATT Associated Press

DENVER • Bulletproof glass and armed

security are nothing new at medical clinics that provide abortions. But in the wake of a deadly shooting last week at a Planned Parenthood clinic in Colorado, clinics nationwide are redoubling security eforts, checking surveillance cameras and reviewing evacuation plans. Police say they’re adding patrols to clinics to guard against those who might be inspired to mimic a shootout that killed three people and injured nine. For the people who work in the nation’s 400-some clinics that provide abortions, it’s a time of resolve and reflection about the dangers they face. “It is an unusual time,” said Vicki Cowart, CEO for Planned Parenthood in the Rocky Mountain Region. “There a vitriol, there’s a hate speech in our country going on right now that could be causing more violence than we might otherwise see.

“Nonetheless, we are good at our security,” she said. “We are open, and we are going to be here for our patients.” But the clinic in Colorado Springs remains closed, heavily damaged during the standoff. Police say Robert Lewis Dear, 57, opened fire at the clinic, which had 45 people inside but no security guard. A receptionist heard gunshots just before noon, Cowart said, and alerted the staf to lock their doors and silence their phones, the recommended procedure when confronting an active shooter. Stafers and patients waited for hours, locked in exam rooms and closets while they awaited an all-clear from police. Hundreds more people in a nearby strip mall and grocery store were locked down, too, as police exchanged fire with the gunman and tried to pinpoint his location. The shootout left three dead, including a police oicer and a man with a pregnant friend who was getting an ultrasound. Hours after the shootout ended, Planned Parenthood stafers were vowing

to return to work as usual Monday morning. But little has been normal since the attack, just the latest incident thought to target clinics that provide abortions. The FBI sent a bulletin in September warning such clinics that “it is likely criminal or suspicious incidents will continue to be directed against reproductive health care providers, their staf and facilities.” There have been 11 murders and more than 220 bombings and arson attacks at abortion facilities in the U.S. since 1977, according to the National Abortion Foundation. National Abortion Federation President Vicki Saporta said her group sent advisories to clinics and hospitals providing abortions to be on heightened alert after the Colorado shooting. The gunbattle reminded them to check security cameras, make sure alarms and locks are in working order and to review with stafers a plan for what to do if they believe they’re being attacked. Police are taking extra notice, too. In

FBI investigating ‘indications of radicalization’ in fatal shooting

Claremont, N.H., a town of 13,000 where a clinic providing abortion was recently vandalized with a hatchet, Police Chief Alexander Scott said officers are taking extra care to keep an eye on the clinic. In Ohio on Friday, Democratic state lawmakers proposed a bill to create “bufer zones” around clinics that perform abortions, a space in which protests are not allowed. Colorado has an 8-foot “floating buffer zone” around people entering clinics that perform abortions. The U.S. Supreme Court has upheld Colorado’s law but last year struck down a 35-foot “bufer zone” law at clinics in Massachusetts. Planned Parenthood’s national president, Cecile Richards, was headed to Denver on Saturday for a “remembrance and unity” rally. Planned Parenthood oicials have bristled at suggestions that security might need a complete rethinking. “This is health care,” Cowart said. “You shouldn’t have to walk through a metal detector to receive health care.”

California shooting doesn’t it gun debate BY KATHLEEN HENNESSEY Associated Press

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Jennifer Caballero places lowers Friday at a makeshift memorial honoring the victims of Wednesday’s shooting rampage in San Bernardino, Calif. The FBI said Friday that it was oicially investigating the deadly shooting in California as an act of terrorism.

ATTACK • FROM A1

Malik and her husband, Syed Farook, died several hours after the massacre in a fierce gunbattle with police. The Islamic State-affiliated news service Aamaq called Malik and Farook “supporters” of their Islamist cause but stopped short of claiming responsibility for the attack. FBI Director James Comey would not discuss whether anyone affiliated with the Islamic State communicated back to Malik, but he said there was no indication yet that the plot had been directed by the Islamic State group or any other foreign terrorist group. He also declined to rule out that possibility based on further investigation. “The investigation so far has developed indications of radicalization by the killers and of potential inspiration by foreign terrorist organizations,” Comey said. He cautioned that the investigation had not yet shown evidence the couple was part of a larger group. Despite mounting signs of the couple’s radicalization, there “is a lot of evidence that doesn’t quite make sense,” Comey said in a nod to the fact that the investigation was just two days old. David Bowdich, assistant director of the FBI’s Los Angeles oice, said that “a number of pieces of evidence” point to terrorism and that the agency was focused on that idea “for good reason.” He would not elaborate. The U.S. oicial who revealed the Facebook post was not authorized to discuss the case publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity. The Facebook official, who also spoke on condition of anonymity, said the company discovered Wednesday’s post on Thursday, removed the profile from public view and reported its contents to law enforcement. Bowdich said he was not aware of the Aamaq report but was not surprised that the Islamic State would attempt to link itself to the attack. He said investigators were looking carefully to determine if there was a connection with the extremist group. Attorneys representing Farook’s family said Friday that none of his family members had any indication that either Farook or his wife held extremist views. Mohammad Abuershaid and David Chesley urged the public and media to wait for specific evidence before jumping to conclusions. When asked to explain potential motivations for the attack, Chesley said at a news conference Friday that co-workers had made fun of Farook for his beard and said he had been isolated with few friends.

The attorneys said the family was shocked by the attack and saw no signs that the couple would be aggressive or had extreme views. Abuershaid and Chesley said Malik had been soft-spoken and talked only with female relatives. She wore a veil that covered her face and didn’t drive. Farook and Malik, who had a 6-monthold daughter, rented a townhome where investigators said they found an arsenal of ammunition and homemade bombs. The attorneys said that Farook’s mother lived with the couple but she stayed upstairs and didn’t notice they had stockpiled 12 pipe bombs and well over 4,500 rounds of ammunition. Abuershaid and Chesley say the couple left their daughter in her care when they carried out Wednesday’s attack. They say the child is with child protective services. Farook’s brother-in-law is beginning the legal process to adopt the girl.

CELLPHONES FOUND Bowdich said FBI analysts were trying to retrieve data from two cellphones found near the couple’s townhome that had been crushed in an apparent attempt to destroy the information inside. “We hope that will take us to their motivation,” he said. Until Friday, federal and local law enforcement oicials said that terrorism was a possibility but that the violence could have stemmed from a workplace grudge or a combination of motives. Farook had no criminal record, and neither he nor his wife was under scrutiny by local or federal law enforcement before the attack, authorities said. Malik, 27, was a Pakistani who grew up in Saudi Arabia and came to the U.S. in 2014 on a fiancée visa. Farook, 28, a restaurant health inspector for the county, was born in Chicago to Pakistani parents and raised in Southern California. Law enforcement officials have long warned that Americans acting in sympathy with Islamic extremists — though not on direct orders — could launch an attack inside the U.S. Using slick propaganda, the Islamic State in particular has urged sympathizers worldwide to commit violence in their countries. Others have done so. In May, just before he attacked a gathering in Texas of people drawing cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad, a man from Phoenix tweeted his hope that Allah would view him as a holy warrior. Two weeks ago, with Americans on edge over the Islamic State attacks in Paris that left 130 people dead, Comey said that U.S. authorities had no specific or credible intelligence pointing to an attack on Ameri-

can soil. Since March 2014, 71 people have been charged in the U.S. in connection with supporting the Islamic State, including 56 this year, according to a recent report from the George Washington University Program on Extremism. Though most are men, “women are taking an increasingly prominent role in the jihadist world,” the report said. It was not immediately clear whether Malik exhibited any support for radical Islamists before she arrived in the U.S. — or, like scores of others arrested by the FBI, became radicalized through online or inperson associations after arriving.

VETTING PROCESS Friends of Farook who knew him from his daily prayers at a mosque in San Bernardino said they saw nothing to make them think he was violent. They said Farook reported meeting his future wife online. To receive her visa, Malik was subjected to a vetting process the U.S. government describes as vigorous. It includes in-person interviews, fingerprints, checks against terrorist watch lists and reviews of her family members, travel history and places where she lived and worked. Foreigners applying from countries that are home to Islamic extremists — such as Pakistan — undergo additional scrutiny before the State Department and Homeland Security approve their applications. Pakistani intelligence oicials said Malik moved as a child with her family to Saudi Arabia 25 years ago. The two oicials, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said that the family was originally from a town in Punjab province and that the father initially moved to Saudi Arabia about three decades ago for work. Another person close to the Saudi government said Malik did not stay in Saudi Arabia, eventually returning to Pakistan and living in the capital Islamabad, though she returned to Saudi Arabia for visits. The person was not authorized to speak publicly and did so on condition of anonymity. Friends in Southern California said they had no idea Farook and Malik were building pipe bombs and stockpiling thousands of rounds of ammunition for their commando-style assault on a gathering of Farook’s colleagues from San Bernardino County’s health department. On Friday morning, the owner of the townhome that Farook and Malik rented opened it to reporters. On a living room table was a copy of the Quran. An upstairs bedroom had a crib, boxes of diapers and a computer.

As investigators search for a motive behind the deadly rampage in San Bernardino, politicians are searching for a way to talk about it. The details of the California massacre at a holiday party — pointing at a potential link to Islamic militants and raising questions about domestic extremism — quickly knocked both Republicans and Democrats of their talking points, upending what has become a grim and predictable ritual in American politics. Democrats who have vowed to use every mass shooting as a moment to call for new gun laws were tempering their rallying cries. Republicans who point to mental health services as the solution had begun to blame extremist views. In an interview Friday morning, Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., said “we have a violence problem in America” but added it’s not exclusive to guns. A U.S. citizen with a clean background but extremist views is perhaps the most significant threat, he said. “That is a very significant, difficult threat to confront,” Rubio said on CBS “This morning.” Hillary Clinton also moved carefully in that direction. “It’s becoming clearer that we are dealing with an act of terrorism,” she said Thursday. “It does raise some serious questions about how we need to be protecting ourselves.” Addressing those questions will become a far more complex debate with fewer clear-cut policy prescriptions than the well-trod conversation over gun control. President Barack Obama has said he worries about the difficulties of preventing a homegrown or “lone-wolf” attacker on U.S. soil — and the limits of security measures to prevent them. But proposing tighter domestic security measures or expanded intelligence gathering is unlikely to win easy support from many in his party. For Republicans, the issue could become quick campaign fodder — although they risk politicizing a national security threat, without ofering a clear alternative. On Thursday, the president walked a fine line in the discussion, mindful of an ongoing investigation and shifting circumstances. He asked for patience, assured Americans they were safe and, notably, toned down his typically fullthroated call for congressional action on gun control. After a briefing from his national security team, Obama asked the American people and “legislatures” to find a way to make “it a little harder” for people to get guns. “And we’re going to have to, I think, search ourselves as a society to make sure that we can take basic steps that would make it harder — not impossible, but harder — for individuals to get access to weapons,” he said. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump was also knocked off his talking point. After initially casting such shootings as “a mental health issue, to a large extent,” in an interview Wednesday night, he offered another explanation Thursday. “Our president doesn’t want to use the term,” he said. “But it turns out it probably was related — radical Islamic terrorism.” Along with Trump, Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, evoked the Paris attacks and said the shooting was a reminder that the U.S. was at war. Cruz told a crowd of Jewish activists that “all of us are deeply concerned that this is yet another manifestation of terrorism, radical Islamic terrorism here at home.”


12.05.2015 • SaturDay • M 1

DIGEST Oicer’s video statement is played at Gray trial Freddie Gray was listless, lethargic and asking for assistance, but instead of calling for an ambulance, Oicer William Porter propped him up so Gray could continue his ride in the back of a police van, the oicer said in a recorded interview shown to jurors Friday. Gray was handcufed and shackled but unrestrained by a seat belt during the ride, and at some point, he broke his neck and died a week later. Prosecutors and attorneys for the oicer disagree on when and exactly how Gray was critically injured. Porter faces manslaughter and other charges in the death of Gray. The nearly hour-long video is central to the state’s case and will probably be used at the trials of ive other oicers charged in Gray’s death April 19. Prosecutors say Porter ignored his training and department policies requiring oicers to call a medic for prisoners who ask for one. “I said, ‘Do you want a medic?’ He said, ‘Yes,’” Porter told the detectives. “He didn’t say, ‘I need a medic.’” Texas drops suit to keep Syrians out • Texas stopped trying Friday to block Syrian refugees from resettling in the state after suing the U.S. government over fears that new arrivals from the wartorn country could pose a security risk. The swift reversal difused a lawsuit the administration of President Barack Obama criticized as unfounded. Since the Paris attacks, at least 29 U.S. governors have vowed to keep new Syrian refugees outside their state borders. One Syrian family, which includes two children ages 3 and 6 and their grandparents, were expected to arrive in Dallas on Monday. Details about the refugees were closely guarded by resettlement organizers over safety concerns. Last month, armed protesters with long guns staged a small demonstration outside a suburban Dallas mosque. University’s holiday party memo draws ire • An online memo advising employees at the University of Tennessee to make sure holiday celebrations aren’t Christmas parties “in disguise” has put school oicials under ire. The memo “Best Practices for Inclusive Holiday Celebrations in the Workplace,” posted on the school’s website by its Oice for Diversity and Inclusion, says parties should celebrate workplace relationships with no emphasis on religion or culture. On Thursday, Rep. John J. Duncan, a Republican, appeared on Fox News and called the post an example of political correctness run amok. Meanwhile, Republican state Sens. Delores Gresham and Mike Bell issued a joint statement calling on Chancellor Jimmy Cheek to resign. The Oice of Diversity and Inclusion said in response that the school was a

diverse campus that was not anti-Christmas but was proinclusion. School may scratch deal in transgender case • School oicials in a suburban Chicago district may back out of a deal with the U.S. Department of Education allowing a transgender student to use a girls locker room. Township High School District 211 Superintendent Daniel Cates criticized on Friday a top federal oicial for how she portrayed his description of the settlement. Cates says the department’s Oice of Civil Rights “acted in bad faith,” so the district will convene an emergency board meeting to discuss actions, “including the potential retraction of the agreement.” Cates and the government are at odds over whether the settlement requires the student to use privacy curtains. The student was born male and identiies as female. Hundreds attend service for slain oicer • Loved ones say a western Pennsylvania police oicer killed while responding to a domestic dispute was someone who never sought credit for the work he did. Friends at his funeral in Johnstown said St. Clair Oicer Lloyd Reed, 54, would help ix a broken-down car or search for a lost dog during his shifts. Hundreds of oicers from around the country turned out Friday to pay tribute at the Cambria County War Memorial, a hockey arena. Ray Shetler Jr. is charged with shooting Reed after police arrived at Shetler’s home in New Florence on Saturday night. Police say Reed was wearing a bulletproof vest but died after being struck in the chest when he exchanged gunire with the suspect. He had worked in law enforcement for about 25 years. Child porn defendant seeks 15-year sentence • The former director of a foundation started by Subway spokesman Jared Fogle asked a federal judge Friday to sentence him to 15 years for providing homemade child pornography to his boss, saying Fogle was psychologically abusive and referred to himself as “daddy.” Russell Taylor, 44, who ran the Jared Foundation, and his attorneys have suggested a sentence range of 15 to nearly 23 years as part of a plea agreement, in which Taylor is scheduled to plead guilty Thursday to child exploitation and child pornography charges. Prosecutors’ sentencing recommendation, suggested Thursday, is 35 years in prison. They said Taylor “repeatedly engaged in criminal activity targeting children.” Taylor has admitted in court documents to using hidden cameras to produce child pornography but said it started by accident when security cameras captured a sexual encounter in his home oice. From news service

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Cities’ policies on police shooting videos inconsistent

ASSOCIATED PRESS

In this Oct. 20, 2014, frame from dashcam video provided by the Chicago Police Department, Laquan McDonald (right) walks down the street just before he was shot. Chicago Oicer Jason Van Dyke has been charged with his murder.

But that may change as videos become more widely used ASSOCIATED PRESS

CHICAGO • There’s often little

commonality when it comes to U.S. cities’ policies on how quickly to release videos of police officers shooting civilians under disputed circumstances, leaving many municipalities to create them on the fly or wait to act until political pressure or court rulings force the issue. As a result, contested videos can emerge within days, months, years — or never. A long wait often only invites accusations that city leaders and police are seeking to hide some wrongdoing or endeavoring to cover something up. “People will fill the void with something if they don’t see the videos — with speculation or rumors,” said Michele Earl-Hubbard, a Seattle-based attorney and advocate of government transparency. “If police want people to understand your side of the story, you gotta get the images out.” There are some indications that message is starting to sink in. This week, Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel announced that he’s setting up a task force to examine, among other things, the city’s video-release policy amid public and political outcry. For more than a year, the city actively delayed releasing police dashcam footage of white Oicer Jason Van Dyke shooting black teenager Laquan McDonald 16 times in 2014 and continuing to fire as McDonald crumpled to the ground. As it is, cities’ policies are all

over the map. Many don’t have any clearly identifiable policy in writing, including Chicago, which has a reputation for dragging its feet. Sometimes, civilian cellphone video plays a role, as in South Carolina earlier this year. And in Seattle, nearly all police video is posted online almost immediately, though special software blurs the images; a video with clear images must be requested. All sides need to figure the best policies “very quickly,” especially because dashcams and body cameras will become more widespread, says Samuel Walker, a retired criminal justice professor at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. The debate over the release of videos typically lines up around the U.S. as such: Police and prosecutors argue they should be withheld until investigations conclude, while transparency advocates, journalists and activists say the public has a right to see the footage immediately. For years, Chicago has consistently fought — hard — in the courts, saying the release of videos would jeopardize active investigations. It used the same argument in the McDonald case before a judge ordered the video’s release; Van Dyke was charged with murder the same day the video was made public. But public pressure in the McDonald case may have forced a change in the city’s approach. Emanuel announced Thursday that a video in the October 2014 police shooting of Ronald Johnson, 25, will be released next week — even as state prosecutors investigate possible criminal charges. Many times, the disagreements land in court. After hearing arguments from city lawyers over the McDonald video, a Cook County judge sided with a

freelance journalist who earlier this year filed a Freedom of Information Act request for the video. The judge rejected the city’s contention, made before Van Dyke was charged, that releasing the video would lead to an unfair trial “in the court of public opinion.” Going back to the 1990s, many departments across the country started extending the time they withheld videos. But Earl-Hubbard said judges have pushed back recently. “Judges are saying, ‘If you can’t prove clearly you can’t investigate if the video’s released, then you can’t keep it secret,’ ” she said. Among the other examples of how cities have dealt with contested videos include: • Hummelstown, Pa.: Video from police Officer Lisa Mearkle’s stun gun was released after she was acquitted last month of third-degree murder, voluntary and involuntary manslaughter after shooting an unarmed man twice in the back as he lay face-down in the snow. Officials declined to publicly release the video until it was shown at trial. • Fairfax, Va.: Records in the March 2013 police shooting death of John Geer — including the oicer’s name — were released 17 months later in response to a judge’s order in a civil lawsuit. The records include police video but not of the actual shooting. • Charleston, S.C.: In April, a bystander’s cellphone video prompted police in North Charleston to release a dashcam video of white Officer Michael Slager shooting Walter Scott, an unarmed black man. Slager has been charged with murder and is awaiting a trial date.

NYC steps up outreach to Muslims after attacks in Paris, California Police there note no uptick in bias crimes against Muslims BY JONATHAN LEMIRE associated Press

NEW YORK • In the aftermath of

last month’s Paris attacks, New York City officials have bolstered security and quietly stepped up outreach to Muslim residents, trying to calm fear of hate-filled retaliation and mend a relationship that has been fraught with mutual suspicion. The city has increased its presence in Muslim neighborhoods, sending staffers to visit mosques and meet with imams and worshippers. Police officials have briefed community leaders on new counterterrorism procedures. Other city oicials have urged Muslims to report any hate crimes, the number of which is sharply lower in New York in 2015 than at this time a year ago. Mayor Bill de Blasio was to speak Friday night at an Islamic community center, reairming that the city’s 800,000 Muslims have the same rights as all New Yorkers while pledging protection from any hate crimes, the mayor’s aides said. De Blasio’s speech at the Jamaica Muslim Center, or Masjid Al-Mamoor, in Queens, is the most highprofile move the administration has made to calm jittery Muslims since the Nov. 13 attacks that killed at least 129 people in Paris and this week’s slaying of 14 people in San Bernardino, Calif. Six days after the Paris attacks, the mayor’s oice organized a meeting among 40 community leaders — the vast majority of them Muslims — and police with aims of building

the trust necessary for Muslims to turn to law enforcement to report crimes. The police department has also increased security at mosques as well as synagogues. Hanane Dannech, 50, a Muslim who immigrated from France, said she had noticed more officers watching her mosque in Brooklyn recently. “We, really, we feel protected,” she said, adding that what she likes about the U.S. is, “it’s the first country on Earth that takes care of other religions.” Dannech said some public officials could do a better job of pointing out that violent extremists are the minority among Muslims rather than the norm. She said that there was always a chance of harassment after “big things happen” and that “each time something happens, it gets worse.” New York Police Department oicials said there had not been an uptick in bias crimes against Muslims since the Paris attacks, though they acknowledge that some hate crimes go unreported. The New York Police Department, which has 900 Muslim oicers, uses its community afairs bureau to foster better relationships by staffing street festivals, providing services to accident victims and trying “to make people who don’t normally talk to cops feel comfortable coming to us,” said the head of the unit, Chief Joanne Jafe. On Monday, Police Commissioner William Bratton will host a conference for clergy members focusing on community involvement and the NYPD’s counterterrorism threat assessment program. “Outreach by the city to the Muslim community is critically important, especially now,” said Donna

Lieberman, executive director of the New York Civil Liberties Union. “But there must be clear distinctions between the outreach and anti-terrorism eforts. Otherwise, it will discourage Muslims from going to law enforcement and just breed further distrust.” After the September 11 attacks, the NYPD used its intelligence division to detect terrorist threats by cultivating informants and conducting surveillance in Muslim communities. The practice became the subject of a series of articles by The Associated Press revealing that the intelligence division had infiltrated dozens of mosques and Muslim student groups and investigated hundreds. Last year, amid complaints of religious and racial profiling, the NYPD disbanded a team of detectives that conducted surveillance, but it has continued its use of informers and undercover investigators to fight terrorism. Meanwhile, a federal pilot program in Boston, Los Angeles and Minneapolis billed as a communitydriven initiative to tackle terrorism and militant recruitment by preventing radicalization from taking root has trigged concern that it’s profiling disguised as prevention. Some Muslims in New York say they have felt harsh stares in recent weeks. “I don’t like the idea that regular everyday Muslims are being lumped together with terrorists,” said Maryam Mohiuddin, a hijabwearing American artist from Bangladesh who was visiting the Al Farooq Mosque in Brooklyn. “I’d like it better if people don’t look at me with suspicion. I’d rather them ask me questions.”


M 1 SATURDAY • 12.05.2015 • A6

KEEPING UP WITH CONFLICT ANADOLU VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS An image from aircraft cockpit video released by Turkey’s state-run agency in July of what it said was Turkish warplanes striking Islamic State group targets in Syria.

U.S. arms makers strain to meet demand as Mideast conlicts rage BY ANDREA SHALAL Reuters

WASHINGTON • Top U.S. arms makers are straining to meet surging demand for precision missiles and other weapons being used in the U.S.-led fight against Islamic State and other conflicts in the Middle East, according to senior U.S. officials and industry executives. Global demand for U.S.-made missiles and so-called smart bombs has grown steadily since their use in the first Gulf War. But the United States and a host of allies are now rushing to ensure a stable supply of such weapons for what is expected to be a long fight against Islamic State, whose rise has fueled conflict in Syria and across a swathe of the Middle East. U.S. officials say arms makers have added shifts and hired workers, but they are bumping up against capacity constraints and may need to expand plants or even open new ones to keep weapons flowing. That could create further logjams at a time when U.S. allies are voicing growing concern that Washington’s processing of arms sales orders is too slow. Islamic State’s deadly attacks in Paris last month have added urgency to the U.S.-led bombing campaign against the group in Iraq and Syria. The campaign had resulted in 8,605 strikes at an estimated cost of about $5.2 bil-

lion as of Dec. 2. Meanwhile, a Saudi-led coalition including Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates and backed by Washington has been is carrying out a nine-month military campaign against Iran-backed rebels in Yemen. Persian Gulf states are also supplying U.S.made arms to rebels fighting Syria’s government in that country’s four-year war. “It’s a huge growth area for us,” said one executive with a U.S. weapons maker, who was not authorized to speak publicly. “Everyone in the region is talking about building up supplies for five to ten years. This is going to be a long fight” against Islamic State. The impact is palpable in Troy, Ala., where Lockheed Martin Corp. builds its 100-pound Hellfire air-to-ground missiles at a 3,863-acre highly secured facility surrounded by woods and horse pastures. Realtors are adding staff in anticipation of new hiring at the plant, and the large grocery chain Publix is opening a store soon. “What’s good for Lockheed is good for Troy,” said Kathleen Sauer, president of the Pike County Chamber of Commerce, adding that the expansion was helping a local economy where unemployment rates are already among the lowest in the state. “Look at our downtown,” she said. “Almost all the stores are open and we have more coming

BOEING

Boeing’s Joint Direct Attack Munition kits converts bombs into “smart” weapons. More than two dozen countries use the weapons.

in.” Lockheed has added a third shift at its plant, which employed 325 workers as of February, and is now at “maximum capacity,” said one executive familiar with the issue. The company announced in February that it would add 240 workers by 2020 and expand the facility, which also produces a 2,000-pound air-to-surface stealthy missile. Frank Kendall, the Pentagon’s chief arms buyer, said this week that there had been particularly strong demand for the Hellfire missiles. At $60,000 to $100,000 apiece they are inexpensive compared with many missiles and can be launched from everything from aircraft and helicopters and ships to destroy armored vehicles or punch into buildings. Kendall and other senior U.S. officials said they were working with Lockheed, Raytheon Co. and Boeing Co. to ramp up production of precision munitions

Ameren hits pause on 1-70 solar farm Utility says start of construction is undergoing a ‘temporary delay’ BY JACOB BARKER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

An Ameren Missouri solar array that would have stretched for more than half a mile along Interstate 70 in Montgomery County has been put on hold. The utility told the Missouri Public Service Commission in October that it no longer needed regulatory approval for the 15-megawatt solar farm it planned to build between High Hill and New Florence, about 70 miles west of St. Louis. In an Oct. 2 filing with the PSC, Ameren said it still intended to build the Montgomery County solar array but that the time frame for construction had changed. When it filed for approval of the project in June, Ameren said it planned to begin construction in October. In a statement Friday, Ameren Missouri President Michael Moehn said the Environmental Protection Agency regulations on

carbon dioxide emissions, known as the Clean Power Plan, played a role in the decision. He said the decision would only “temporarily delay” the start of construction. The final Clean Power Plan, released in August, extended from 2020 to 2022 initial compliance deadlines to cut carbon emissions. Utilities will have to reduce carbon emissions from coal power plants and generate more electricity from natural gas, which emits less carbon than coal, or carbon-free sources such as solar and wind power. The rules also included an incentive program that awards bonus compliance credits to utilities that build renewable energy prior to the 2022 deadline. But to be eligible, those projects have to begin construction after the state submits a final plan for carbon cuts to the EPA, something Missouri probably won’t do until the second half of 2018. The PSC had scheduled hearings on the case for late January,

and several parties may have contested the project. It was unclear whether Ameren changed its construction schedule to ensure it can receive bonus credits under the EPA program or because the case was contested. When asked whether the Clean Energy Incentive Program played a role in the decision, an Ameren spokesman said that there was no timeline for construction and that the company had no further comment. Ameren said it had already acquired the land, performed preliminary engineering work and designed the project. It had projected finishing the solar array late next year and estimated it would provide enough power for nearly 1,600 homes annually. That would be nearly three times as much power as Ameren’s first utility-scale solar array, completed a year ago in O’Fallon, Mo.

Foresight may have to rebuy $600 million in bonds BY JACOB BARKER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Foresight Energy said Friday that it had been notified of an “adverse opinion” in a lawsuit from bondholders who claimed Murray Energy’s purchase of a large stake in Foresight triggered a buyback provision on its debt. In a news release Friday, Foresight said only that it had been notified of the “adverse opinion” and that it was “evaluating its options.” A Murray Energy spokesman said the company had no further comment. St. Louis-based Foresight Energy, which operates some of the country’s most productive coal mines in Southern Illinois, disclosed to investors this year that the trustee for the bondholders of its 2021 senior notes filed suit against it in May. The lawsuit, filed in the Dela-

ware Court of Chancery, alleged that Ohio-based Murray Energy’s April deal to buy a major stake in Foresight’s general partner triggered a “change of control” provision in the bond requirements. As part of the deal, Murray bought a 34 percent stake in Foresight’s general partner and retained an option to purchase another 46 percent. The change in control provision would have required Foresight to make an offer to repurchase the 2021 bonds at 101 percent of the principal amount plus any unpaid interest. The company issued $600 million in bonds at 7.875 percent in 2013. As of Sept. 30, there was $596.5 million outstanding on the debt. The Delaware Court’s opinion was not immediately available. Oral arguments were scheduled to begin in November, Foresight

said in regulatory filings. When Murray initially sought to put together a financing package to take a stake of Foresight, it appeared to tweak the deal in an attempt to avoid triggering the change of control provisions. Murray’s option to buy a larger stake was also conditioned on renegotiating Foresight’s debt to eliminate the “change of control” provision. Foresight’s shares dropped 79 cents, or 22 percent, to close Friday at $2.85. Friday’s news is the second blow to the company this week. Fo re s i g h t re p o r te d l a te Wednesday afternoon that it had to evacuate staf from a mine near Hillsboro, Ill., because of elevated carbon monoxide readings. Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com

and potentially add new capacity. “We are watching that closely. We are looking at the need to increase capacity,” Kendall said.

SALES SURGING Defense shares have performed strongly in recent months on expectations of better results, and many soared after the attacks in Paris. Total U.S. foreign military sales approvals surged 36 percent to $46.6 billion in the year through September 2015 from about $34 billion a year earlier. Approved sales of missiles, smart bombs and other munitions to U.S. allies jumped to an estimated $6 billion in fiscal 2015 from $3.5 billion a year earlier. This year alone, the U.S. government has approved the sale of Hellfires to South Korea, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Lebanon, France, Italy and Britain. In June, the Army said it had asked Lockheed to boost production of the Hellfire to 650 per month by No-

vember from 500 per month. “There are essentially waiting lists for Hellfire. They can’t make them fast enough,” said one State Department official, who asked not to be identified. Lockheed declined to provide any details about how it was meeting increased demand for Hellfires and other munitions. In addition to approved foreign military sales, many munitions sales are overseen by the U.S. Commerce Department and negotiated directly between countries and companies. U.S. weapons makers do not routinely report such sales, and do not break down revenues by specific weapons. Also in high demand, Kendall said, are Boeing’s Joint Direct Attack Munition (JDAM) kits, which turn unguided munitions into smart bombs and have been used consistently to strike Islamic State targets in Iraq and Syria. Last month, the State Department approved a $1.29 billion deal with Saudi Arabia for more than 22,000 JDAMS and other types of precision-guided bombs. Boeing said it boosted the daily production rate of JDAMs at its facility in St. Charles by 80 percent in July to meet demand from the U.S. military and more than 25 other countries. Raytheon, one of the largest U.S. munitions makers, declined to comment on its missile production work. The company has a large missile production facility in Tucson, Ariz., which could potentially boost production, Kendall said.

Congress revives the Export-Import Bank Tea Party conservatives opposed it, saying large corporations beneit BY ERICA WERNER Associated Press

WASHINGTON • In a victory

for the business establishment over Tea Party conservatives, President Barack Obama signed legislation Friday reviving the federal Export-Import Bank five months after Congress allowed it to expire. The bank is a small federal agency that makes and guarantees loans to help foreign customers buy U.S. goods. A measure extending it through 2019 was included in a massive transportation bill that cleared the House and Senate late Thursday and was signed Friday by Obama. The development was cheered by business groups such as the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, which say the ExIm Bank is necessary for U.S. competitiveness since most overseas competitors rely on similar government help. But conservatives pushed by the billionaire GOP Koch Brothers decried the development, arguing that the bank amounts to government interference in the free market and many of its beneficiaries are large corporations that don’t really need the help. “The Export-Import Bank’s revival in this bill is especially offensive to taxpayers who want to end corporate welfare handouts and let the free market finance overseas investments by American companies,” said Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla. Rubio is among the GOP presidential candidates and other leading Republicans who have lined up against the bank, a once-obscure entity that’s become a cause celebre for conservatives. For decades it was renewed by biparti-

san agreement, with little or no debate and often not even a roll-call vote. But after the Koch Brothers and other conservative groups began to seize on the opportunity to kill off a federal agency, leading Republicans such as House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy who once supported the bank, turned against it. Amid that pressure and with Tea Party lawmakers on the ascent on Capitol Hill, Congress failed to act when the bank’s charter was up for renewal June 30, allowing it to expire for the first time in its 81-year history. All along, though, a majority of lawmakers in the House and Senate, including Republicans and Democrats with major manufacturers such as General Electric, Caterpillar or Boeing in their districts, supported the bank. An unusual series of maneuvers and alliances followed, including a rarely used procedure in the House to force a floor vote on the bank over the objections of GOP leaders. The end result was that the measure ended up on the highway bill; and five months after expiring, the Ex-Im Bank is getting back in business. “We brought the Export-Import Bank back to life, so American manufacturers and workers can compete against our foreign competitors on a level playing field,” said GOP Sen. Mark Kirk of Illinois, who is facing a tough re-election fight and took the opportunity to issue a joint statement with leading CEOs. The bank says that last year it authorized $20 billion worth of transactions that supported $27.5 billion of U.S. exports and 164,000 U.S. jobs. Conservatives including the Koch Brothers said they would continue to fight.


MARKET WATCH

12.05.2015 • Saturday • M 1

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • A7

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM /BUSINESS Stocks surged Friday, propelling the market to its biggest gain since September. The Labor Department reported that employers added 211,000 jobs in November. The job gains open the way for the Federal Reserve to begin raising interest rates later this month.

Avon Products

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Close: 17,847.63 Change: 369.96 (2.1%)

$112.22

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NASD 1,852 2,029 1835 960 59 110

4,135 4,197 2041 1068 44 199

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Dec 15 Jan 16 Dec 15

376.25 906 471.25

+6 +8.50 +6.50

Wheat CHICAGO MERC

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Jan 16 Dec 15 Dec 15 Dec 15 Dec 15

159.45 124.27 57.05 14.61 207.40

-.30 -1.43 -1.30 -.06 +1.80

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Dec 15 Dec 15 Jan 16

63.23 124.00 26.00

+1.37 +1.95

NEW YORK

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Jan 16 Jan 16 Jan 16 Jan 16

39.97 1.2702 134.24 2.186

-1.11 -.0261 -1.62 +.005

Hogs Copper

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DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

HIGH 17866.47 7963.91 561.46 10417.76 5147.00 2093.84 1450.31 21699.93 1183.82

LOW 17482.68 7831.52 553.03 10264.96 5043.49 2051.24 1431.95 21298.13 1170.49

CLOSE 17847.63 7954.83 561.20 10408.86 5142.27 2091.69 1449.08 21678.17 1183.39

CHG. +369.96 +69.01 +9.27 +151.48 +104.74 +42.07 +17.34 +380.04 +12.83

%CHG. WK +2.12% s +0.88% t +1.68% t +1.48% t +2.08% s +2.05% s +1.21% t +1.78% t +1.10% t

MO QTR t s t s s s t s t s t s t s t s t s

YTD +0.14% -12.97% -9.20% -3.97% +8.58% +1.59% -0.23% +0.04% -1.77%

Sugar

Gas blend Heating oil Natural gas

NAME

TKR

Aegion

AEGN

15.31

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV NAME

ISLE

7.12

21.43 14.72 +.19 +1.3 +75.9 +89.2 26

...

1.17

-.01 -0.8 -36.4 -27.6 dd

... LMI Aerospace

LMIA

9.20

14.79 10.08

...

AHPI

1.14 45.57

61.46 57.20 +1.04 +1.9 +22.6 +17.5 20 0.78f Laclede Group

Ameren

AEE

37.26

48.14 43.34 +1.09 +2.6

-6.0 +0.1 16 1.70f

American Railcar

ARII

33.02

60.42 53.81

+4.5

Arch Coal Inc

ACI

0.80

Belden Inc

BDC

44.58

1.90

-.48 -0.9

-1.6 10

1.60

-.12 -9.3 -93.4 -93.6 dd

...

95.56 59.72 +.66 +1.1 -24.2 -20.8 81

0.20

22.45

1.17

Lee Ent

LEE

1.36

Mallinckrodt

MNK

52.01 134.26 74.73 +2.53 +3.5 -24.5 -20.9

Monsanto Co

MON

81.22 126.00 97.85 +1.30 +1.3 -18.1 -18.5 21 2.16f

Olin

OLN

15.73

34.34 21.50 +.08 +0.4

-5.6 -13.5 23

0.80

Panera Bread

PNRA 153.00 208.00 185.68 +2.98 +1.6

+6.2 +10.5 32

...

23.00 13.13 +.29 +2.3 -34.7 -35.4 12

Caleres

CAL

26.15

33.83 29.16 +.49 +1.7

-9.3 -12.4 15

CassInfo

CASS

43.00

59.09 52.91 +.47 +0.9

-0.6 +8.7 27 0.88f PeabdyE rs

Centene

CNC

48.16

83.00 58.69 +1.86 +3.3 +13.0 +11.8 21

Commerce Banc.

CBSH

37.65

47.11 45.79 +.97 +2.2 +10.6 +12.5 17 0.90b Perficient

Edgewell

EPC

72.44 107.38 79.06 +.55 +0.7 -17.0 -18.1 16

Emerson

EMR

42.21

65.16 49.17 +.59 +1.2 -20.3 -21.7 12 1.90f

Energizer Holdings

ENR

32.08

44.52 34.20 +1.00 +3.0

Enterprise Financial EFSC

18.80

30.73 29.70 +.38 +1.3 +50.5 +54.4 20 0.32f

Esco Technologies

ESE

33.62

39.98 39.33 +.57 +1.5

+6.6 +9.3 25

0.32

Express Scripts

ESRX

68.06

94.61 86.65 +1.97 +2.3

+2.3 +0.5 27

...

First Clover Leaf

FCLF

8.38

9.89

9.07

Foresight Energy

FELP

3.33

18.73

2.85

FutureFuel

FF

9.11

16.08 14.41 +.26 +1.8 +10.7 +16.5 13

2.81

4.12

...

...

-2.3

...

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-.79 -21.7 -83.1 -71.0

3.68 +.02 +0.5

+9.9 +9.3

0.28

... Peak Resorts

8

0.24

SKIS

1.75

10.29 150.60 10.09 5.76

8.98

...

... -52.4 -52.4

5

...

-.66 -6.1 -91.3 -92.1 dd

7.50 +.01 +0.1

...

-6.3 +1.0

21.57 17.81 +.09 +0.5

-4.4 +1.0 27

...

POST

38.95

71.39 67.58 +1.22 +1.8 +61.3 +59.5 dd

...

Pulaski Financial

PULB

11.50

17.25 16.95

ReinsGrp

RGA

81.82

98.70 92.91 +1.86 +2.0

Reliv

RELV

0.57

Stereotaxis

STXS

Stifel Financial

SF

... WldPntTm

.63

1.40

-.06 -0.4 +37.5 +50.0 15 +6.0 +6.6 11

-.05 -7.1 -46.1 -44.1

0.65

Victims of Martin Sigillito’s massive Ponzi scheme have failed in an effort to recover losses from two banks. U.S. District Judge Linda Reade in Iowa last month tossed out a suit by 56 victims against St. Louis Bank, which is based in Town and Country. In October, she had ruled against 91 victims in a suit against PNC Bank. The judge found no convincing evidence that the banks knew about the fraud being committed in bank accounts controlled by Sigillito, and so couldn’t be held responsible. Sigillito, a Clayton lawyer and investment adviser, was sentenced to 40 years in federal prison and ordered to repay $34 million in restitution in 2012. Sigillito was a bishop of the American Anglican church. He

BUSINESS DIGEST Pericient acquires Enlighten • Pericient Inc., an information technology and management consulting irm based in Town and Country, said Friday that it had acquired Enlighten, a digital marketing agency. Enlighten, based in Ann Arbor, Mich., has $12 million in annual revenue. The companies did not announce the deal’s terms. Pericient said the acquisition added to the company approximately 75 consulting, digital agency, technology, sales and support professionals. Gateway buys Canadian website • Gateway Media, based in Clayton, has acquired Tickld, a Toronto-based website that includes popular viral content. Terms of the deal were not disclosed. Gabe Douek, Gateway’s chief executive, said in a statement that Tickld would expand the reach of his company’s current sites and help it gain a new and growing audience. Tickld’s 14 full-time employees will remain in Toronto. Kasey Grelle, Gateway’s director of corporate development, said Friday that the company had grown to 91 employees from fewer than 20 when

it was formed in January 2013. Gateway was spun of from Answers.com, a University City-based heavyweight in question and answer websites. The split came after Answers was acquired by U.K.-based private equity irm Apax Partners. Gateway operates websites focused on packaging and sharing online content. In June, Gateway acquired Cinemablend.com, an entertainment website for reviews and coverage of the movie, television and gaming industries. Chipotle outbreak spreads • An outbreak of E. coli linked to Chipotle restaurants has sickened seven more people and expanded to three additional states. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said 52 cases had been reported in nine states, including Illinois, Maryland and Pennsylvania. At the end of October, cases had been reported in Oregon and Washington. Additional cases were later reported in California, Minnesota, New York and Ohio. The CDC website didn’t provide details of the Illinois outbreak. However, health oicials with St. Clair County, where the chain’s only

CHG

CLOSE

1084.50 14.51 880.60

Gold Silver

+22.80 +.46 +33.10

3.25 3.25 3.25

40.52

1.01

59.93 45.19 +.89 +2.0 -11.4 -11.2 18

...

SUNE

2.55

33.45

3.64

-.13 -3.4 -81.3 -82.3 dd

...

SEMI

8.13

27.93

8.82

-.14 -1.6 -52.5 -52.7

...

WPT

12.00

lito’s wrongdoing based on a recitation of piecemeal transactions would result in a bank being held liable for virtually any wrongdoing involving accounts held at that bank,” the judge wrote. The case against the banks never went to trial. Instead, the judge issued a summary judgment based on filings submitted by all sides. The case against PNC was brought because of accounts held at Clayton-based Allegiant Bank, which PNC had purchased. Sigillito was controlling individual retirement accounts for his clients at Allegiant, and those accounts held alleged loans for British real estate. Allegiant bankers concluded that such loans shouldn’t be held in IRAs because they would be hard to sell for cash. They told Sigillito to move the accounts out of the bank in 2001. Jim Gallagher • 314-340-8390 jgallagher@post-dispatch.com

Metro East store is situated, say they have no reports of the illness. Of the 52 people infected, the CDC says 47 reported eating at a Chipotle Mexican Grill in the week before the illness started. The agency has not determined the ingredient responsible. Shares dipped 0.7 percent on the news. The shares later tumbled nearly 8 percent in after-hours trading after Chipotle warned that sales at established restaurants could drop 8 to 11 percent for the fourth quarter from a year earlier. Tuna merger of • Chicken of the Sea and Bumble Bee have called of their merger after the administration of President Barack Obama told the companies it would hurt competition in the canned tuna market. The Justice Department announced Friday the deal, announced a year ago between Thailand’s largest seafood company and San Diegobased Bumble Bee Foods, was of. If Thai Union Group, owner of Chicken of the Sea, had bought Bumble Bee, it would have combined the secondand third-largest sellers of tinned tuna in the U.S. From staf and wire reports

1YR AGO

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 52-wk T-bill 2-year T-note 5-year T-note 10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

.21 .47 .57 .97 1.71 2.27 3.01

+0.01 +0.03 +0.03 ... -0.03 -0.05 -0.05

.01 .07 .12 .54 1.57 2.24 2.94

NET 1YR LAST CHG AGO

.13 .13 .13

Barclays LongT-BdIdx

2.83 -0.05 2.78

Bond Buyer Muni Idx

4.28

Barclays USAggregate

2.57 +0.10 2.26

... 4.33

Barclays US High Yield 7.99 +0.06 6.36 Moodys AAA Corp Idx

4.06 +0.17 3.92

Barclays CompT-BdIdx

1.65 -0.03 1.88

Barclays US Corp

3.58 +0.12 3.11

GlobalMarkets

...

-.02 -0.2 -36.0 -27.1 14

NET CHG

1.48

...

21.25 12.87

LAST

BONDS

PRIME FED RATE FUNDS YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO

TREASURIES

0.38

-.03 -2.9 -31.8 -34.2 dd

2.97

Judge tosses suits in banking Ponzi scheme preyed on church members and others in what federal prosecutors called the biggest Ponzi scheme ever in eastern Missouri. His clients thought they were investing in British real estate lending, while Sigillito was spending their money, prosecutors said. He was using money from new investors to pay of old investors — a classic Ponzi operation. According to a lawsuit against St. Louis Bank, investors gave as much as $1 million at a time to Sigillito, who deposited it in the bank, where he had four diferent accounts and a loan. The judge noted that the victims had authorized Sigillito to handle their investments. Under Missouri fiduciary law, a bank isn’t responsible for actions taken by such a representative absent knowledge of a crime. “Concluding that the bank must have known about or was somehow responsible for Sigil-

.1029 .7349 .2659 1.5155 .7497 .1563 1.0975 .0150 .2599 .008176 .059827 .0148 .0697 .000863 1.0121

PreciousMetals

INDEX

0.24 SunEdison Semi

PREV

.1028 .7339 .2664 1.5101 .7474 .1562 1.0871 .0150 .2622 .008115 .060022 .0147 .0697 .000860 1.0031

NEW YORK

The yield on the 10-year Treasury fell to 2.27 percent Friday. Yields affect rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.

0.55

1.20

Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months.

BY JIM GALLAGHER St. Louis Post-dispatch

Argentina Australia Brazil Britain Canada China Euro India Israel Japan Mexico Russia So. Africa So. Korea Switzerland

...

14.90

4 0.68m SunEdison

3

BTU

3.93

+8.5 +14.8 18 1.96f

PRFT

... Post Holdings

1.00

59.38 57.71 +.71 +1.2

49.07

11.76

...

-.01 -0.1 -28.5 -28.9 84

LG

Build-A-Bear Wkshp BBW

$129.19

FOREIGN CURRENCY IN DOLLARS CLOSE

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV

... Isle of Capri

DOX

Huttig Building Prod HBP

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PE: 24.3 Yield: ...

Interestrates Interestrates 52-WK LO HI

-.07 -0.3 +13.6 +15.0 16

Allied Health

$44.45

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22.41 21.14

Amdocs

O 52-week range

Vol.: 9.2m (3.4x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $1.8 b

Chicago BOT is in cents.

LocalStocks 52-WK LO HI

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Soybeans

10 DAYS

1,840

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$29.00

DATE

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StocksRecap NYSE

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40

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CHICAGO BOT

Milk

15,200

O 52-week range

Vol.: 9.5m (6.3x avg.) PE: 454.1 Mkt. Cap: $765.69 m Yield: 6.0%

Live cattle

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Vol.: 5.8m (2.3x avg.) PE: 16.7 Mkt. Cap: $27.49 b Yield: 2.6%

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$10.20

Vol.: 27.0m (2.2x avg.) PE: ... Mkt. Cap: $1.84 b Yield: 5.7%

17,920

S

AMBA

Close: $56.93 -0.95 or -1.6% The video-compression chipmaker gave a forecast for fourth-quarter revenue and earnings that fell short of analysts’ expectations. $80

$20

80 S

Ambarella

BKS

Close: $10.04 -2.01 or -16.7% The book retailer reported a loss for its latest quarter, hurt by weakening sales trends at its stores and online.

4 2

Charts show stocks that made the news yesterday.

Barnes & Noble

NSC

Close: $92.06 -1.05 or -1.1% The railroad operator rejected Canadian Pacific’s proposal to combine the companies in a deal worth more than $28 billion. $100 90

$2.41

17,400

Norfolk Southern

AVP

Close: $4.22 0.23 or 5.8% The beauty products company is talking with Cerberus Capital Management about a potential deal, according to media reports. $5

S&P 500 Frankfurt DAX London FTSE 100 Hong Kong Hang Seng Paris CAC-40 Mexico City Bolsa Tokyo Nikkei 225 Sao Paolo Bovespa Toronto Zurich

LAST 2091.69 10752.10 6238.29 22235.89 4714.79 42994.23 19504.48 45360.70 13358.77 8802.89

CHG

CHG

YTD

+42.07 -37.14 -36.71 -181.12 -15.42 -33.07 -435.42 -1032.56 +34.10 -49.25

+2.05% -0.34% -0.58% -0.81% -0.33% -0.08% -2.18% -2.23% +0.26% -0.56%

+1.59% +9.65% -4.99% -5.80% +10.35% -0.35% +11.77% -9.29% -8.70% -2.01%

Jobs report is a green light for Fed interest rate rise BY LUCIA MUTIKANI reuters

WASHINGTON • U.S. em-

ployment increased at a healthy pace in November, in another sign of the economy’s resilience, and will most likely be followed this month by the first Federal Reserve interest rate rise in a decade. Nonfarm payrolls rose 211,000 last month, the U.S. Labor Department said on Friday. September and October data were revised to show 35,000 more jobs than previously reported. Analysts polled by Reuters were expecting to see a November gain of 200,000 jobs. The unemployment rate held at a 7½-year low of 5.0 percent, as people returned to the labor force in a sign of confidence in the jobs market. The jobless rate is in a range many Fed oicials see as consistent with full employment and has dropped seven-tenths of a percentage point this year. “The employment report should remove the final doubts about a rate hike at the December meeting. The clear message from the labor market to the Fed is: ‘Just do it!’” said Harm Bandholz, chief U.S. economist at UniCredit Research in New York. The Fed will meet Dec. 1516 to decide on whether to raise rates. Stocks rallied on the news Friday, giving the S&P 500 its biggest gain since early September. The Dow Jones industrial average rose 369.96 points, or 2.12 percent, to 17,847.63, the S&P 500 gained 42.07 points, or 2.05 percent, to 2,091.69 and the Nasdaq Composite added 104.74 points, or 2.08 percent, to 5,142.27.

The second month of strong job gains should allay fears the economy has hit a soft patch. A strong U.S. dollar and spending cuts by energy companies have been headwinds to the economy. Though wage increases slowed last month, economists say that was mostly payback for October’s outsized gains, which were driven by a calendar quirk. Anecdotal evidence, as well as data on labor-related costs, suggest that tightening job market conditions are starting to put upward pressure on wages. “Payroll gains were despite continued weakness in manufacturing and energy sectors, suggesting little spillover into the rest of the economy,” said Samuel Coffin, an economist at UBS in Stamford, Conn. Average hourly earnings increased 4.0 cents, or 0.2 percent, from 0.4 percent in October. That lowered the year-on-year reading to 2.3 percent from 2.5 percent in October. The average workweek, however, dipped to 34.5 hours from 34.6. Other labor market measures watched by Fed oicials were mixed. The labor force participation rate, or the share of working-age Americans who are employed or at least looking for a job, rose to 62.5 percent from a near 38year low of 62.4 percent. But a broad measure of joblessness that includes people who want to work but have given up searching and those working part-time because they cannot find fulltime employment rose onetenth of a percentage point to 9.9 percent. That reflected an increase in part-time workers.


WORLD

A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 12.05.2015

U.N. climate talk focus is a matter of degrees But smaller island nations say they’re ‘ighting for lives’ BY SETH BORENSTEIN, ANGELA CHARLTON AND KARL RITTER Associated Press

PARIS • In climate math, the diference

between 1.5 and 2 degrees is much greater than 0.5. Small nations say that for them, that half-degree could mean the diference between life and death. For larger nations, the question is what’s realistic and what’s not when it comes to limiting global warming. The broader issue is how much warming is too much. In 2010, international negotiators formally adopted a goal of limiting warming to 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) over pre-industrial times; Earth has already warmed nearly 1 degree. The warming goal is what experts call a guardrail, and it has the potential to derail the climate talks going on in Paris if negotiators can’t agree on a number. Small island nations — such as the Marshall Islands, Tuvalu and St. Lucia — and some other countries are pushing 1.5 because they see it as an issue of survival. They talk about sea level rise inundating cities, salt water killing of crops and more dangerous storms wiping out cities. “It’s a fight that really should not be focused on numbers, 1.5, 2, 2.5,” said James Fletcher, St. Lucia’s minister for sustainable development, energy, science and technology. “It should be focused on lives. We’re not fighting for numbers, we’re fighting for lives.” Climate scientists say both numbers are a bit arbitrary, but keeping warming to 1.5 degrees could increase the chance of survival for coral reefs, slow the rise in the number of ever-increasing severe weather disasters and help keep the planet from hitting dreaded but so far unseen tipping points of irreversible environmental damage. “There is no such thing as a guardrail where we are free from all the impacts of climate change; we’ve already seen climate change and it’s widespread,” said Chris Field, a Carnegie Institution scientist who headed an international scientific assessment of climate impacts two years ago. For some countries, keeping warming to 1.5 degrees may require steep and pain-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A demonstrator displays a banner Friday in front of a reproduction of the Eifel tower at the United Nations Climate Change Conference in France. Many island nations want a climate accord to keep global warming to 1.5 degrees worldwide over time, instead of 2 degrees.

ful cuts in carbon dioxide emissions from the burning of coal, oil and gas. But United Nations climate chief Christiana Figueres and climate talks president Laurent Fabius, the French foreign minister, were optimistic about compromise. So far, international negotiators trying to broker a deal say it’s a challenge they think they can handle. There are many issues in the talks, which continue through mid-December. Climate negotiators are trying to figure out how much countries must reduce carbon dioxide emissions to keep the planet from heating up to dangerous levels; how to make sure countries do what they promise; and who pays for it all. But how much countries cut and pay could depend in part on the planetary goal. “Whether the text will also take into account a very justifiable request from the most vulnerable countries to improve on those efforts, it remains to be seen how that is going to be handled,” Figueres said in an interview. “It wouldn’t surprise me if there is a recognition of the intense vulnerability of some nations.” Fletcher said that based on reports from his negotiators, there would be pushback from some countries on the 1.5 goal. U.S. chief climate negotiator Todd Stern

said his delegation had talked with the small islands about their position. “We haven’t landed anywhere yet, but we hear the concerns of those countries and we think those concerns are legitimate,” he said. India’s chief climate negotiator, Ashok Lavssa, said India believed that the number should be below 2 degrees, but whether it goes all the way to 1.5 is diicult to say. Fletcher said he could see a compromise by which both goals — 2 and 1.5 — would be listed in whatever pact comes out of the conference and countries would agree to try to hit 1.5 but commit to 2 if they can’t. Then there’s the question of whether either goal is attainable. Andrew Jones, co-director of Climate Interactive, has run the numbers on computer models that simulate how much the world warms based on how much carbon pollution is spewed. He calls achieving a 2-degree goal difficult and a 1.5-degree goal “very diicult.” His numbers show that current pledges by nations would only limit warming to 3.5 degrees, down from the current trajectory of 4.5 degrees if nations continue producing emissions as they have been. For example, to do its part in keeping

warming to 2 degrees, the U.S. must cut emissions by 4.1 percent a year by 2030, but to get to 1.5, it must cut emissions by 6.2 percent a year. Those cuts would need to increase even more between 2030 and 2050. The fastest a country has ever cut carbon emissions was about 4 percent a year during the 1970s oil crisis, when France switched heavily to nuclear power. But Jones and MIT professor John Sterman said people shouldn’t get bogged down in the numbers right now. They said it’s like driving from New York City to San Francisco, arguing about where you are going to park when you get there when you are still only on the East Coast. Field said it wa’s a bit of an academic question, especially because the emissions already spewed stay around for so long the world is nearly already committed to 1.5 degrees of warming. Others, such as James Hansen, a former NASA climate chief turned activist, said 2 degrees was too much warming, calling it “a crazy target to have; you cannot say that’s a safe guardrail.” Hansen, often considered the godfather of global warming science said that “1.5 is certainly less dangerous than 2 degrees; I wouldn’t even want to characterize that as a guardrail.”

DIGEST Cairo club irebombed; 16 die in blaze

Greece is the main point of entry into the EU for people leeing war and poverty at home, with the vast majority of the 700,000 people who have entered the country this year reaching Greek islands from the nearby Turkish coast. Few want to remain in the inancially stricken nation, with nearly all heading on an overland route through the Balkans to the more prosperous European north.

Two men who were denied entry to a nightclub later returned with others and irebombed it early Friday, setting of a blaze that killed all 16 people who were trapped inside by the smoke and lames, authorities said. Terrorism was quickly ruled out as the cause of the attack at the El Sayad restaurant and club in Cairo’s Agouza district. Egypt has been battling a growing Islamic insurgency in recent months. The overnight ire that came on the irst day of the weekend in Egypt also injured three other people. Police were searching for six people suspected in the attack, which took place after two of them were not allowed to enter the club, Interior Ministry spokesman Abu Bakr Abdel-Karim said. Mexico detains two in tourists’ killings • Prosecutors in the Mexican state of Sinaloa say they have detained three suspects in connection with the presumed killing of two Australian tourists who disappeared on Nov. 20. Sinaloa state prosecutor Marco Antonio Higuera said the three were low-level drug dealers who were robbing motorists on a stretch of highway leading south through Navolato, Sinaloa. Higuera said Friday that the three were operating as part of a highway robbery gang along with two other suspects who remain at large. They allegedly killed Adam Coleman and Dean Lucas because Coleman resisted the robbery. The thieves allegedly shot the two Australians to death, then doused their vehicle with gasoline and set it aire. Arrest warrant issued for Pistorius • South African prosecutors issued on Friday an arrest warrant for Oscar Pistorius, after the double-amputee athlete’s conviction in the death of his girlfriend was changed by an appeals court from reckless killing to the more serious charge of murder. A High Court hearing is expected next week to set a date for sentencing. Pistorius may apply for bail at the hearing, pending sentencing. The arrest warrant, reported in local media, means Pistorius may be forced to spend a second Christmas in prison. The Supreme Court of Appeal swept away on Thursday the trial judge’s initial ruling in Pistorius’ case, saying she made legal errors and ignored key evidence in a confusing judgment. The appeals court imposed a murder verdict and sent the case back to High Court for sentencing. Liberia discharges last Ebola patients • Liberia has discharged its last two known Ebola patients from a treatment center, beginning its third countdown to become free from transmission of the deadly virus, health authorities said Friday. Three cases were reported Nov. 20 in Liberia — one of the three West African countries hit hardest by the worst ever Ebola outbreak. One of them, a boy, 15, died Nov. 23. The boy, who lived in the eastern Paynesville district, was Liberia’s irst Ebola patient since it was declared Ebola-free for a second time in September. The boy’s father and brother were released Thursday after recovering from Ebola and have reunited with their families, said Deputy Health Minister Tolbert Nyenswah. He said the 42-day countdown to become free from transmission of the deadly virus started Thursday. The World Health Organization declares that Ebola disease transmission has ended when the country goes through two incubation periods — 21 days each — without a new case emerging. Greek oicial slams EU over migrants • The European Union has provided far less than is needed to help Greece deal with the massive inlux of refugees and other migrants this year, the country’s European afairs minister said Friday.

Nigeria holds boy, 11, as terrorism suspect • Women and even girls have been used by Islamic extremists in Nigeria as suicide bombers. Now, the military says it has detained a boy, 11, who is describing to interrogators how Boko Haram trained him to be a suicide bomber and attack the biggest refugee camp in war-torn northeast Nigeria. The boy is suspect No. 82 on a poster showing photographs of 100 wanted Boko Haram militants, according to army spokesman Col. Sani Kukasheka Usman. “The child said he was sneaked into the camp as a displaced child to get familiarized with the people and wait for the day he would be prompted to carry (out) his own suicide attack,” Usman said in a statement. He said the boy was arrested Tuesday by troops guarding Dalori refugee camp in Maiduguri, the northeastern city that is the birthplace of Nigeria’s homegrown Islamic extremist group. Usman did not respond to an emailed list of questions and press was not immediately able to get access to the child to verify the military’s account.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

An Egyptian forensic member checks the gate of the nightclub that was attacked Friday in Cairo. Terrorism was ruled out in the attack, which killed 16.

Nikos Xydakis gave the example of staf from the European border agency Frontex, saying that Greece needed 750 but initially received only 350, increasing by a further 100 or so in recent days. “Since May Greece has persistently been asking for technical, technological and staing help, and what it has received from Europe is far less than what was asked for,” Xydakis said in an interview.

From news services

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J O I N T H E C O N V E R S AT I O N

A P L AC E F O R N E W S A N D V I E W S O N FA I T H

W W W . S T L T O D A Y. C O M / R E L I G I O N

M 1 Saturday • 12.05.2015 • a9

EVENTS SATURDAY Hanukkah Hullabaloo • The event will feature: Rabbi James Stone Goodman, performing his series of poems, “Eight Nights”; Will Soll and his raucous Klezmer music; DJ Boogieman, ending with a special “STL Jews Who Rock” set. $10. 7 p.m. Covenant Place, 10 Millstone Campus Drive. 314-432-1610 Celebration of Lights • Fort Zumwalt Park features displays from area organizations, churches and businesses through Dec. 30. Admission: $10 for cars; $15 for commercial vans and limousines; $1 per person on tour buses ($25 minimum). 6 p.m. 1000 Jessup Lane, O’Fallon, Mo. Way of Lights • The Shrine of Our Lady of the Snows hosts its Annual Way of Lights Christmas display. 5 p.m. National Shrine of Our Lady of the Snows, 442 South De Mazenod Drive in Belleville. 618-394-6287

Women seek to light Hanukkah candles at Western Wall By MICHELE CHaBIN Religion News Service

JEruSaLEM • Women must be allowed to light Hanukkah candles and say a prayer at the oicial candle-lighting ceremony at the Western Wall when the Jewish festival of Hanukkah begins on Sunday night, Israel’s deputy attorney general said this week. Every year, eight oicial lighting ceremonies — one for each night of Hanukkah — are held in the men’s section of the Western Wall, making it impossible for women to take part. On Monday, Deputy Attorney

General Dina Zilber sent a letter to Western Wall Rabbi Shmuel Rabinowitz informing him that any attempt to ban women from this year’s ceremony would amount to discrimination. Rabinowitz, who administers the Western Wall as a strictly Orthodox synagogue as well as a national heritage site, has long prohibited women from taking an active role in public prayer and has made it impossible for women to access Torah scrolls or light Hanukkah menorahs because they are placed only in the men’s-only prayer section. In her letter, Zilber asked

Rabinowitz to confirm that “steps are being taken to include women in the official candlelighting ceremony. Preventing the participation of women in state ceremonies, such as the ceremony in our case, just because they are women, is unacceptable discrimination.” Underscoring the matter’s urgency, Zilber told Rabinowitz, “the sooner we can get a list of all the participants expected to take part in these ceremonies, as soon as the list is available, it will be a great help.” As part of its campaign “It’s My Right to Light,” the feminist

prayer group Women of the Wall sent letters to Israeli leaders on Nov. 9 asking them to refuse to participate in the oicial Hanukkah ceremony at the Western Wall and calling on female parliamentarians to press for participation. Three female lawmakers took up the challenge and asked Rabinowitz to guarantee women’s participation. Anat Hoffman, chairwoman of Women of the Wall, called it “so symbolic that the Women of the Wall should be the match that lights the flame of the first candle.”

Dinner and concert • Manchester United Methodist Church, 129 Woods Mill Road, hosts a catered dinner and holiday concert with the Coventry Choir and the Vesper Bell choir. $30. 6:30 p.m. 636-394-7506 Return to Bethlehem • Journey through the town of Bethlehem, as it was 2000 years ago. 2 p.m. Lord of Life Lutheran Church, 15750 Baxter Road. 636-5320400 Women’s Cookie Walk • Green Trails Church United Methodist, 14237 Ladue Road, hosts its Annual Cookie Walk, with homemade cookies and treats for $8.50 per pound. 9 a.m. umcgt. org. 314-920-5724 SUNDAY Concert • More than 100 voices combine for a gospel Christmas concert featuring Community Gospel Choir of St. Louis, directed by Suzanne Palmer. 3 p.m., Kirkwood Baptist Church, 211 North Woodlawn, Avenue. Lessons and Carols • Celebrate the holiday season with scripture and song as performed by children and adult choirs, handbell ensembles and instrumentalists. 7 p.m. Zion Lutheran Church, 3866 South Old Highway 94, St. Charles. 636-4417425 Living Nativity • 3 p.m. Gethsemane Lutheran Church, 3600 Hampton Avenue in St. Louis. Intercultural Relections on Art, Beauty and Islam • The program will explore historic and contemporary approaches to Islamic art, from perspectives both within and outside of Islam. 1 p.m., Museum of Contemporary Religious Art, 3700 West Pine Boulevard. 314-977-7170 WEDNESDAY Concert • The Sanctuary Choir and Adult Handbells of the United Methodist Church at Wentzville present a Christmas cantata. 6 p.m. 725 Wall Street in Wentzville. 636-327-6377 FRIDAY Getting in the Christmas Mood • An original, family-friendly production that combines the power of a 90-plus voice choir with the energy of a Big Band. 7 p.m. First Baptist Church O’Fallon, 1111 East US Highway 50, O’Fallon, Ill. 618-632-6223 Submit event listings for free online at events.stltoday.com by registering on the site and following instructions. Only online submissions are accepted.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Rabbis Segal Shmoel (left) and Yehuda Teichtal inspect a giant Hanukkah Menorah at the Pariser Platz in Berlin on Friday.

FAITH PERSPECTIVES

Police cars belong to public, not God By JaMES CrOFt

Before 1956, the United States had no oicial motto. Yet an unofficial motto existed, a perfect expression of solidarity for a nation born of people from many countries and cultures, and composed of many states: “E Pluribus Unum,” “Out of many, one.” Then, in the 1950s, at the height of the Red Scare, and in an attempt to distinguish Godfearing America from “godless Communism,” the 84th Congress established a new, oicial motto: “In God We Trust.” This was a bad move. The United States is a country of people who practice many different religions and none, whose citizens understand the concept of god very diferently. It also has a long, proud history of secularism — the idea that religion should not have undue influence over the government, nor the government undue influence over religion. In this context, introducing an explicitly religious national motto was bound to cause nonreligious people, and religious people who do not believe in God, to feel as if their government in some way fails to represent them. Yet while the motto

remains a platitude on the lips of politicians, or even a statement on the currency, it’s relatively easy to ignore. The same is not true when the motto is displayed prominently on police cars. In August, the Missouri Sheriffs’ Association voted unanimously to plaster “In God We Trust” decals on their patrol vehicles. This is a growing trend in Missouri: The Original Motto Project (which seeks to return the original U.S. motto “E Pluribus Unum”) lists almost 40 police and sherif’s departments in Missouri that now display “In God We Trust” on police vehicles: almost a quarter of all such departments in the U.S. This is a big problem. The police, to do their job well, rely on trusting, positive relationships between oicers and the public they serve. Those relationships are strained when the police decide that it is part of their job to promote belief in God. We all must be able to trust that the police will respond to our needs the same regardless of our religious beliefs, and it’s more diicult to trust that this will happen when the police themselves take a religious position. More concerning still is that police departments that have

taken this step are routinely deleting critical commentary from their social media pages, and blocking those who oppose the decals. Consider, too, the plight of individual police officers and sheriffs who do not believe in God. Such oicers certainly exist: Given the rapidly increasing number of nonreligious Americans, it’s undeniable that some of them serve and protect proudly. When the department for which they work decides to plaster “In God We Trust” on the vehicle they have to drive, they are likely to feel disrespected and marginalized. The officer’s boss is making a statement about their religious beliefs at their place of work. There should be no religious test for law enforcement oicers, and this move threatens to establish one. Deciding who can or cannot be a sherif or police oicer on the basis of their religious beliefs is illegal, intolerant, and unethical. Luckily, opposition to increasing use of these decals has developed into a well-organized movement. Robert Ray, national director of The Original Motto Project (which also has a Missouri chapter) explains his

group’s opposition to the decals: “We feel that the phrase ‘In God We Trust’ does not represent all the citizens. It is a direct promotion of religion over nonreligion by government oicials and leads to the perception that those that do not have a trust in deities are less patriotic or less American. Having this on law enforcement vehicles reinforces this concept with the added authority of one who enforces laws.’ Ray is right. To oppose the use of “In God We Trust” decals on police vehicles is not to insult Christians or to drive God out of the public square. Rather, it is to insist that public services be offered to all citizens in a way that is respectful of their religious beliefs, and that does not threaten to make anyone seeking police and sheriff services feel marginalized. Though private citizens have every right to shout their trust in God from the rooftops, police vehicles are public property, and the police have a responsibility to serve and respect all members of the public — not just those who trust in God. James Croft is the outreach director of the Ethical Society of St. Louis, a Humanist community dedicated to inspiring ethical living.

Megachurch boom rolls on, but big concerns are rising too By CatHy LyNN GrOSSMaN Religion News Service

Change is coming to American megachurches — those behemoths for believers that now dot the religious landscape. There are more participants in megachurch worship than ever. “Last weekend one in 10 adults and children who went to a Protestant church went to a megachurch — about 5 million people,” said Warren Bird, director of research for Leadership Network and co-author of a megachurch study released Wednesday. But individual attendance is down to once or twice a month — or less. “They think ‘regular atten-

dance’ is ‘I get there when I can,’” said the second co-author, sociologist Scott Thumma, director of the Hartford Institute for Religion Research. The study examines megachurches (2,000 people in weekend attendance is the basic qualifier) in comparison with other, smaller congregations. “We found many of these large, successful congregations still have many of the same challenges of smaller congregations. ..,” Thumma said. “Everyone is trying to attract new people and hold on to them and make them disciples. But, today, people are seekers and shoppers looking for a temporary experience of worship, not a long-term commit-

ment.” Megachurches, many launched a quarter century ago by baby boomers, now see slippage in the younger generations. Participation by millennials, ages 18-34, has flattened out at about 19 percent since 2010. But Gen-X attendees, ages 35-49, are drifting out the door — down from 28 percent in 2010 to 23 percent today. Megachurches are still being built. Indeed, the study finds those established since 1990 are growing at more than double the rate of older megachurches. But the study, funded by the Beck Group, which builds megachurches, finds the new churches are constructed very diferently.

Congregations are “getting bigger by getting smaller,” said Bird. They’re building smaller main sanctuaries (median down from 1,500 seats to 1,200 seats) but holding more services on more campuses. The report, based on a survey of “key informants” — senior pastors or executive staf of congregations — also found a shift in how these churches describe their religious self-image. Every year since Thumma and Bird began studying megachurches in 2000, the percentage that describe themselves as “evangelical” has gone up. Now, it’s 71 percent, no matter what their denomination, Bird said. Most pastors said denomina-

tional ties were unimportant or not very important to their congregations. What is increasingly important is service to others outside their own congregations. Thumma said that “for a very long time, the focus of megachurch programming was inward — taking care of our own people. Now there’s a huge shift to outreach: 43 percent said global missions were a specialty of their congregations, and 44 percent said one of their specialties was community service and helping those in need.” Worshippers care most, Bird said, “about finding a church that knows where it’s going and what it’s about. They like clarity of vision in a church.”


LOCAL

A10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

100 NEEDIEST CASES: HELPING THOUSANDS

MOTHER’S ILL HEALTH BURDENS FAMILY

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 12.05.2015

Chess grandmaster allegedly paid young son to drink wine BY JOEL CURRIER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CASE 53 Ms. T knows the hospital almost as well as her own home. She has to seek regular medical attention to deal with the efects of lupus and kidney disease, which also prevent her from working. Ms. T and her son had managed to get by on food stamps and disability, but their strained budget hit the breaking point when she opened her doors to her sister’s two daughters, ages 12 and 13. The girls need the basics: warm coats, socks and shoes. Ms. T has gotten behind on bills, and she needs household items such as towels, dishes, pots and pans.

CASE 54 Mrs. E took in her grandson’s seven children when he checked into a drug rehabilitation program. At 72 years old and living of of Social Security, it’s hard to properly provide for the children — three girls and four boys, ranging in age from 5 to 14. Some of the children have been identified as special needs. The home they live in is in need of repairs and Mrs. E lacks some basic household items and appliances. Mrs. would like clothing and educational and learning items for the children. Proiles by Colleen Schrappen and Koran Addo of the PostDispatch.

KELSEY KAVANAUGH • John F. Kennedy High School

TWO WAYS TO GIVE

TO HELP

• Donors can adopt any of the cases — not just the 100 proiled at STLtoday.com/neediest. The program supplies donors with a list of a family’s needs. All gifts go directly to the family, through a social worker. • The program also accepts monetary gifts. Every dollar will go directly to a needy family, and every family will receive something.

Visit 100neediestcases.org Or call 314-421-6060 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on weekdays. Or mail a check payable to: 100 Neediest Cases P.O. Box 955925 St. Louis, Mo. 63195

HOW IT WORKS • For generations, the 100 Neediest Cases campaign has helped thousands of disadvantaged families during the holidays. This year, the program will beneit 13,127 needy households – selected by social service agencies that work with the United Way. The Post-Dispatch is showcasing 100 cases. But all the families will share the cash donations.

Wentzville man is charged after stolen Wildwood cabin is found FROM STAFF REPORTS

WENTZVILLE • Carl Essen and his relatives were

elated to hear this year that the city of Wildwood was taking steps to preserve a historic log cabin built by their ancestors in the 1870s. But before the city could finalize plans to relocate the cabin, it vanished. “I was blown away,” Essen said of the cabin-napping. Last weekend, word started spreading that someone had disassembled and stolen the cabin. It happened sometime between Nov. 24 and 29, police said. Essen feared that once it got out that police were looking for the cabin-napper, the thief might try to discard the wood. Happily for Essen, the cabin was recovered in pieces outside an apartment house in Wentzville, and a man who lives there was charged Friday with stealing them. Gregory T. Cole, 54, was named in St. Louis County Circuit Court on one count of stealing over $25,000, and held in lieu of $40,000 bail. An anonymous tipster told St. Louis County police that the timbers were behind the apartment building in the 600 block of Scotti Court in Wentzville. That’s where Cole lives. Authorities put the value of the loot at $50,000. Police said Cole admitted the unusual theft, saying he had grown up near the cabin and was familiar with it. He said his mother still lived in that area. He said he had planned to sell the pieces. It appears that Cole is the same man who was charged with felony burglary and misdemeanor harassment after being found sleeping in an unoccupied bedroom in the home of strangers in Wentzville on Oct. 4. In that case, a man in his underwear and a shirt was found about 7:20 a.m., sleeping in a 5-year-old girl’s empty bedroom in a home on Brian Court. The child found him after spending the night in another room. Sgt. Brian Schellman said it appeared that all

SHREWSBURY • One of the world’s elite chess grandmasters, Andre Diamant, has been accused by police of paying his 6-year-old son to drink shots of wine with him here. The child became violently nauseated, according to court documents that say Diamant also had given him beer in the past. Diamant, 25, of the 7400 block of Triwoods Drive in Shrewsbury, was charged Monday with a misdemeanor count of child endangerment. Originally from Brazil, Diamant is a two-time national collegiate chess champion and member of the top-ranked Webster University chess team. He attends Webster on a student visa, majoring in international studies and Spanish, the school said. According to a 2012 article in the Webster University Journal, Diamant has played in chess tournaments around the globe and is Brazil’s youngest grandmaster. There are about 1,500 grandmasters worldwide, as designated by the World Chess Federation. His son told police that in August his father gave him two $20 bills to drink “bad tea” and “good tea” from a shot glass, court records say. The “bad tea” made the boy vomit. The “good tea” did not. The boy identified a bottle of sake, Japanese rice wine, as the “tea” he drank. Shrewsbury Police Lt. Brian Catlett said Dia-

Teachers at Grand Center Arts Academy vote to unionize BY ELISA CROUCH St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • Teachers at Grand

ESSEN FAMILY PHOTO

Alison Essen Jenkins and Mark Essen stand in front of the Essen Log Cabin in Wildwood on Oct. 21. Their ancestors built the cabin in the 1870s.

the parts of the log cabin were recovered. He said a rented box truck was used to haul the 50 logs, each measuring 10 inches by 6 inches by 20 feet. Two sisters who own a 250-acre tract where the cabin sat off Highway 109, just south of Eatherton Road in Wildwood, had planned to donate the building to the city. The cabin has “high historic value,” according to a contractor consulted by the city about moving it. When it disappeared, only the foundation and roof were left behind. Though the city was seeking bids to have the cabin disassembled and relocated, the “free” disassembly could end up costing the city more. Greg Barth, acting chairman of the Wildwood Historic Preservation Commission, said each timber had to be marked in order when taken down so a contractor could easily reassemble the cabin. Now, he said, it’s going to be a little bit more “labor intensive.” As odd as the cabin’s disappearance was, a similar cabin-napping happened earlier this year near Spokane, Wash. That home was later found less than 10 miles from its original location.

mant was celebrating a chess tournament victory and told police that he wanted his son to drink with him Diamant because “alcohol played a part” in his religious and cultural traditions in Brazil. “This guy was in a celebratory mood,” Catlett said. After police were called, Diamant was “very apologetic and upset about it.” Catlett said Diamant fled home to Brazil shortly after he was arrested and released in August. Catlett said police had been unable to reach him since the charges were filed Monday. Diamant’s wife, Mara Kamphorst, 25, who is the child’s mother, sought an order of protection Aug. 13. It says, in part: “Father forced child to drink alcoholic beverages with him. Mother tried to stop him but he told child he would give him $20 for each shot of saki (sic). Child didn’t want to but father persisted and made him. Child got sick and threw up violently. Mother asked friend to call police. Father has a serious drinking problem and has gotten no treatment and is in denial and used poor judgment in endangering our child even when I screamed at him to stop. This has happened in the past but only with sips of beer.” A judge barred Diamant from entering the child’s home or school, or coming within 500 feet of him, and set child support at $850 a month.

Center Arts Academy voted overwhelmingly Friday to join the American Federation of Teachers, putting their school one step closer to having a unionized workforce. The vote was 55 yes and 5 no, according to St. Louis AFT Local 420. Sixty-six teachers and staf were eligible. The secret ballot election was managed by the League of Women Voters. Grand Center Arts Academy is one of more than three dozen charter schools in the city. None of their teachers belong to a union. The move to unionize isn’t finished. Results of the election aren’t final until the school’s governing board votes to certify the results. Grand Center Arts, a performing arts middle and high school, is part of the Confluence Charter Schools network. Grand Center Arts Academy has some independence from the four other schools that make up Confluence, but it is governed by the same board. The board’s next scheduled meeting is Dec. 17. Teachers at the school first moved to unionize in September, when the majority of 64 eligible teachers and staf signed

union authorization cards. Teachers partnered with AFT Local 420, which also represents teachers in St. Louis Public Schools, in hopes of quickly negotiating a contract with the Confluence board. A statement from Confluence says that administrators have worked in cooperation with the union, teachers and the school to ensure that policies and applicable laws are being followed. “Confluence recognizes the rights of staff to organize, or not to organize, and has consistently encouraged staff to become knowledgeable about issues and facts to cast an informed vote,” the statement says. Teachers at the school said this fall there isn’t tension between them and school administration. They said unionizing would allow them more input into decisions that afect them and their students. Some said they want a published pay scale. They also want due process when a teacher is dismissed, which means administrators would have to provide a reason for the firing and provide the teacher with an opportunity to have an independent hearing. Elisa Crouch • 314-340-8119 @elisacrouch on Twitter ecrouch@post-dispatch.com

TO ADVERTISE YOUR CONGREGATION, CONTACT TANYA LEMONS AT 314-340-8549 OR TLEMONS@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Christian Science

Apostolic Apostolic Pentecostal Church All are welcome! 901 Barracksview Rd., St. Louis 63125 (314) 894-8130 apcstl.org Pastor Stephen T. Willeford Sunday Schedule: Sunday School 10 am Worship 11 am & 6:30 pm Spanish Sunday School / Service 2 pm Wednesday Schedule: 7:30 p.m. Adult, Youth, & Children’s Services Home Bible Study Available

Baptist Exciting First Baptist Church of Arnold

Tower Grove Baptist Church 4257 Magnolia Ave, St. Louis, MO 63110-3501 314.865.4673 www.towergrove.org Bible Study for All Ages: 9:00am Sunday Celebration Service: 10:15am Children’s Church (1st – 6th Grade): 10:15am Sunday Nite Live: 6:00pm Wednesdays 6:00 – 7:30pm: Children’s Program (3yrs. – 6th Grade) Youth Program (7th – 12th Grade) Discipleship Classes (Adult) Everyone is Welcome!

Catholic Christian

2012 Missouri State Rd. 636-296-2703 Sun. Bible study: 8 am, 9:30 am & 11 am Sunday Worship: 8 am, 9:30 am, 11 am & 6:30 pm Deaf Interpretation provided at 11 am Wed. AWANAS/Youth Service 6:30 pm Wed. Adult Service 6:30 pm Christian School/Family Life Center Special Ed/Counseling/Day Care Kenny Qualls, Pastor www.fbcarnold.org

First Baptist Church of Wentzville 653 Luetkenhaus Blvd. Wentzville, MO 63385 636-327-8696 www.fbcwentzville.com Ralph Sawyer, Lead Pastor Sunday: 9:30 a.m. and 11:00 a.m. Bible Study/Worship Service Nursery Provided Services interpreted for the deaf at 11:00 a.m.

Shrine of Our Lady of the Snows 15 minutes from downtown St. Louis 618-397-6700 or 314-241-3400 442 S. De Mazenod Drive Belleville, IL 62223 1.5 miles east of I-255 exit 17A Monday-Friday Masses: 7:30 & 11:30 a.m. Saturday: 7:30 a.m. & 5 p.m. Sunday Masses: 9:30 & 11:30 a.m. 2 p.m. Spanish www.snows.org

All are welcome! Sts. Peter and Paul Catholic Church (A faith community of the Ecumenical Catholic Church+USA) Sunday Mass: 2:00 pm at St. Timothy's Church 808 N. Mason Road Creve Coeur, MO 63141 More information at: www.sspp-eccusa.org

First Church of Christ, Scientist Town & Country (SE Corner of 40/64 & Mason Rd.) Sunday 10:00 a.m. Sunday School (up to age 20) 10 a.m. Wed. 7:30 p.m. Testimony Meeting Child Care Provided 314-434-5164 December 6: God the Only Cause and Creator http://christianscience.com/

Lutheran St. Paul's Lutheran Church (LCMS) Invites You to Worship with Us! Saturdays: 5:00 pm Sundays: 8:00, 9:30, 10:45, 11:00 am Sunday School & Bible Study: 9:25 am Special Advent & Christmas Worship Wednesdays (12/2, 9, 16): 11:00 am, 4:00 & 6:30 pm Music Festival: 12/12 at 5:00 pm, 12/13 at 4:00 pm Christmas Eve: 3:00, 4:30, 8:00, 10:30 pm Christmas Day: 10:00 am New Year's Eve: 5:00 pm Visit Us Online at StPaulsDesPeres.org Facebook.com/StPaulsDesPeres Twitter.com/StPaulsDP 12345 Manchester Road Des Peres, MO 63131 314-822-0447

TRINITY LUTHERAN CHURCH Christview Christian Church - Check out our website! www.christviewchristian.net 64 Terrie Lane, St. Charles MO 63301 636-946-5947 Sun Morning Service 10:45 a.m. Sun Bible School 9:30 a.m. Sun Evening Service 6:30 p.m. Come join our church family to worship Christ and honor God in a small, beautiful church full of good ole fashioned hospitality. Teens, join Josh Diel our youth minister on Wed evenings at 6:00 p.m. and be challenged by “The Conquest”!

Eighth and Soulard Streets ï 314-231-4092 “A loving Christ-centered community actively reaching out to all people.” Two miles south of the Arch & Stadium Saturday Evening Service 5:00 p.m. Sunday Morning Services 8:45 and 10:15 a.m. Contemporary Worship at 1004 Locust in Downtown on Sunday at 10:30 a.m. Advent Services: 12:10 and 7:00 p.m. Serving the Homeless Monday through Saturday 9:00-10:30 a.m. Rick Foss, Vacancy Pastor David B. Marth, Pastor Emeritus

Non-Denominational ST. LOUIS FAMILY CHURCH Three Sunday services to choose from! 8:00, 9:30, & 11:15 am You can also connect at our 7:30 Friday night service. Children’s ministry is available for all services. 17458 Chesterfield Airport Road, Chesterfield, MO www.slfc.org / 636.532.3446 Facebook.com/StLouisFamilyChurch

Unity FIRST UNITY CHURCH OF ST. LOUIS 4753 Butler Hill Road (In South County) 314-845-8540 Sunday Service: 10:30 a.m. Rev. Randy Schmelig Sunday, December 6: Sermon Title: Joseph's Story Speaker: Jan Mourning, Minister www.firstunitychurchstlouis.org UNITY CHRIST CHURCH At Skinker & Forsyth • 314-727-6478 Dial A Prayer • 314-727-6478 Ext. 2 9:30 a.m. Contemplative Meditation and Prayer Service 10:30 a.m. Worship Service Wedding Ministry Rev. Sallie Fox, Minister Sunday, December 6: Have You Met 'Grace'? Guest Speaker: Vernetta Holmes, LUT Guest Musicians: Doug Erwin and Katie Kopff

www.unitychristchurchstl.org


SATURDAY

12.05.2015

Honda Pilot’s all-new design makes it more sophisticated, family-friendly Derek Price www.cargazing.com

The Honda Pilot has long been an enigma on wheels, but an all-new version for 2016 could be changing that. As the largest vehicle Honda sells in America, the Pilot RATINGS never seemed to fit in with the rest of Style: 7 the brand’s lineup. It Performance: 8 wore the badge, sure, but its truck-like Price: 9 ride, boxy styling and Handling: 7 plastic-laden interior didn’t match the sleek, Ride: 10 sporty, ultra-solid cars that surrounded it on Comfort: 9 dealer lots. I always Quality: 9 thought it stood out in a mysterious way, Overall: 8 almost like it was built by a totally different car company. After its fresh redesign, though, the Pilot finally feels like a Honda through and through. And that’s a great thing. I spent a week driving the all-new 2016 Pilot and I came away impressed at the huge leap Honda’s designers and engineers managed to make compared with the outgoing model. It’s improved in every way. The interior, in particular, has gone from being some of Honda’s worst work to some of its best work. Soft-touch materials, tight construction, lots of well-integrated technology and ample, smartly placed storage nooks make it one of the most family-friendly vehicles you can get this side of a minivan. While its body has lots of civilized features like a power lift gate and panoramic glass roof, it retains a pinch of truck-like styling that gives it an air of toughness. The overall look is brought up to date with raked-back headlight lenses, LED lighting and muscular character lines and Honda says the changes are about more than appearance. An acoustic windshield All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, as amended which makes it illegal to advertise 'any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.' This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate whichh is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertising in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.

Antique/Classic Special Interest

Buick 4020

WE BUY CARS Cash Paid Today 636-940-9969 fastlanecars.com

Acura

4055

'07 Buick Lucerne CXS: FWD, 4.6L 8 Cyl, One Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Leather Seats, Drive It Home Today $8,990 #36125A

4025

'10 Acura TL 3.7: AWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Nav, Heated Leather Seats, Sunroof, $13,490 #26259A

'03 Buick Century: Custom, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Leather, FWD, Ready To Roll, CALL TODAY, $5,990 #26083B

Courtesy of Honda

The Honda Pilot gets an all-new design for 2016 that is a dramatic improvement over its predecessor. A better cabin, quieter ride and lots of family-friendly features are sure to make it a popular choice. and careful sculpting in the wind tunnel result in better fuel economy and a surprisingly quiet, sophisticated feel on the highway. I thought the steering and brake response were some of the best I’d ever felt in a vehicle this size, with a quick response that belies its heft. I wasn’t quite as impressed with the suspension, which still feels a bit bouncy and trucklike for my taste, although it’s a nice improvement over the last-generation Pilot. To be fair, the rugged suspension feeling could be because Honda is still trying to give the Pilot some actual truck-like capability, not just making it an on-road-only vehicle like most big crossovers have turned into lately. With available all-wheel drive and selectable traction control settings for snow, mud and sand, the new Pilot seems designed to get you out of situations that might

Cadillac

4060 Chevrolet

Bommarito St. Peters Cadillac 1-866-2449085 '12 CTS Luxury AWD, Nav., $23,490 '15 CTS Premium AWD, 100 Miles! $52,990 '13 XTS: Luxury Collection: Sunroof, Nav, 23K Mi, $35,990 '12 CTS Performance AWD, Has It All! $30,790 '12 SRX Performance, White w/Sable, 23K, AWD, $33,480 '12 SRX Performance, 31K Miles, AWD, $33,390

Audi

4040

'14 Audi SQ5 Premium, 36K Miles, Has It All! $45,490

'15 Audi 2.0T: Retired Service Loaner, Heated Leather Seats, AWD, Sunroof, 1 Ownr Clean Carfax, $27,975 #P8279

'15 Audi A3 1.8T: Premium (S Tronic), One Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Lthr Seats, Bluetooth, $27,470 #P8325

'15 Audi A4 2.0T: Premium (Tiptronic), AWD, Heated Leather Seats, Sunroof, Bluetooth, Retired Service Loaner, $31,990#P8297

'06 Buick LaCrosse CXS: 3.6L 6 Cyl, Sunroof, Seated Leather Seats, One Ownr Clean Carfax, New Wiper Blades, $7,990 #36231A

'09 Buick LaCrosse CX: 3.8L V6, FWD, Low Mi, Bluetooth, One Owner Clean Carfax, State Inspected, Black Onyx, $9,990 #36022A

'07 Buick LaCrosse CX: 1 Owner Clean Carfax, 3.8L V6, Premium Sound System, Keyless Entry, FWD, Bucket Seats, $5,990 #38084A

'15 Buick Regal: Premium, Sunroof, 19K Miles, GM Certified, $21,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625

'03 Audi A4 3.0: 4 Door, 5 Passenger Provides Exceptional Value, Leather, Power Front Seats, $7,990 #10510C

'12 CTS Sedan White-Diamond, 33K, 19"Wheels, $29,490 '13 XTS Luxury, Black, 23K Mi., Roof & Nav, $36,990 '12 CTS Lux, AWD, Roof, Opulent Blue, $26,990 '13 Escalade ESV Premium, 30K, AWD, $52,990 '15 Escalade ESV Premium, 6K, AWD, White Diamond, $80,790 '11 CTS-V Coupe, Every Option, 24K, Certi'13 Cadillac ATS: 4 Door, Sunroof, 2.5L, Leather, Black, 26K Miles, One Owner, $20,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '07 Honda Odyssey EX-L: One Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Leather Seats, Sunroof/Moonroof, $8,900 #94641B

4065

'11 Buick Regal CXL: 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Navigation/GPS, Heated Leather Seats, Sunroof/Moonroof, $14,900 #75775A

$32,990 #P8296 2012 Chevy Sonic LT Stk# 42305-1 $8,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'15 Audi A6 3.0T: One Owner Clean Carfax, Sport Pkg, AWD, Low Miles, Nav/GPS, Heated Lthr Seats, $48,950 #P8329

'13 Chevy Spark LT: 5 Dr, 57K Miles, Alloys, One Owner, $9,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '15 Chevy Sonic LT: 5 Door, Alloys, 21K Miles, GM Certified, $13,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '15 Chevy Camaro: V6, Local Trade, Only 1300 Miles, Only $21,099 #F151934A

'12 Audi A6 3.0: Clean Carfax, Audi Certified, Pre-Owned, AWD, Low Miles, Nav/GPS, Heated Leather Seats, $30,990 #25731B

314-621-6666 • stltoday.com/rides

BMW

4050 '12 BMW 750 Stk #T337 $37,990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 '12 BMW 750Li 36K Miles, AWD, DVD, Black, $43,990

'08 X5 3.0si, V6, nav., sunroof, awd, heated seats, stk# 27936A $13,989 ACKERMAN TOYOTA 866-925-9234

'07 Cobalt, Red, Stick, Nice, Stk #Y3038 $5,997

Cadillac

4060

'12 Cadillac CTS: AWD, 3.6L V6, Performance Coupe, Black, 37K Miles, One Owner, $24,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '06 Cadillac CTS: 4 Dr, V6, 5 Spd, Lthr, 76K Mi, Wrnty, $8,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '15 Escalade, 13K miles, stk# T355, $73,990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 314-621-6666 • stltoday.com/jobs

'12 Cruze Eco, Loaded, One Owner, Clean Carfax, $12,874 #38168A

'14 Chevy Cruze: Factory Warranty, 5Yr/100K Mi Wrnty $14,444 #Z1667

'12 Chevy Cruze LTZ: Leather, Fog Lights, Alloy Wheels, $11,986 #B1231

'13 Chevy Cruze LS: One Owner Clean Carfax, FWD, Bucket Seats, OnStar, Prem Sound, Call Today, $9,990 #75882A

'13 CTS Coupe, Premium, AWD, Nav, 18K, $36,490

Chevrolet

'15 Audi A4 2.0T: Premium (Tiptronic), Heated Leather Seats, Sunroof, Audi Certified,

4065 Chevrolet

'12 Cruze LT Pkg., 20xxx miles, stk# C10280P $13,557 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 2012 Chevy Cruze LS Stk #42139-1 $9,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2014 Chevy Cruze LTZ Stk #94029 $14,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'12 Chevy Cruze 2LT: Heated Leather Seats, Sunroof, Bluetooth, Back Up Camera, Sport Package, $13,990 #26083A

'14 Chevy Cruze 2LT: 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Fuel Efficient, Front Heated Leather Seats, Split Folding Rear Seat, $13,990 #P8409

'15 Chevy Cruze 2LT: Leather, 17K Miles, GM Certified, $16,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625

'08 Chevy HHR LT: One Owner, Clean Carfax, 44K Mi., $10,774 #38153A

'10 Chevy HHR LT: 4 Cyl, 83K Miles, Warranty, $7,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '11 Chevy HHR LT: 4 Cyl, 61K Miles, Warranty, $9,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '10 HHR SS 2.0L 4cyl, 93xxx Miles, 19/29 mpg, Stk #T01763 $12,995 Travers Automotive 1-866-704-7909 '14 Chevy Impala Limited, 17K Mi., GM Certified Warranty, Stk# C9955P $15,817 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '10 Impala LT, Sedan, V6, stk# C10195FIU $9,295 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770

'09 Impala LT Sedan, stk# C160590A $8,762 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770

'08 ChevyImpala SS, Leather, Roof, $12,990

'14 Chevy Impala: 5 Yr/100K Powertrain Warranty, Only 21K Miles, $15,199 #Z1641

Perhaps more than anywhere else, the Pilot’s makeover is made obvious in its cabin. cause problems for some of its softer competitors. Thanks to a new 3.5-liter V6 with lots of fuel-saving tricks — it has cylinder deactivation, advanced variable valve timing and direct fuel injection, for example — Honda can claim classleading fuel consumption of 20 mpg in the city and 27 on the highway. 4065 Chevrolet

'09 Chevy Impala: Sharp Car, Auto, Power Options, $8,997 #V150875A

'15 Impala LS: 4 Cyl, 16K Miles, GM Certified, One Owner, $20,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '15 Chevy Impala Lmtd LTZ: Sunroof, Heated Leather, 18K Miles, Black, GM Certified, $19,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '15 Chevy Impala LT: 2.5L, 16K Miles, GM Certified, One Owner, $22,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '12 Malibu LT, 28xxx miles, GM Certified Warranty, stk# C10265P $13,494 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770

'13 Chevy Malibu LTZ Nav, Leather, Roof, $20,990 '15 Chevy Malibu LTZ, 6K, Turbo, 1 Owner, Call!

'13 Malibu LTZ: Pearl White, One Owner, Clean Carfax, GM Cert $17,771 #P5585

2009 Chevy Malibu LT Stk #93853-1 $9,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2008 Malibu LS Stk #42308-1 $8,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'11 Chevy Malibu 2LT: Leather, Chromes, Moonroof, GM Certified $13,997 #360330A

'05 Chevy Malibu: Loaded, Clean Carfax, $4,222 #360497A

'13 Malibu LS Loaded, GM Certified, 20K Mi., $14,442 #31469A

'12 Chevy Malibu LTZ: 57K Miles, 2 Tone Leather, Sunroof, $13,174 #B1188

4110 Ford

CERAME FORD 1-866-311-8350 cerame.com

4110 Honda

'08 Ford Focus SES: Clean Carfax, Leather, FWD, Heated Side Mirrors, Bucket Seats, Call Today, $6,990 #75949A

PRE-OWNED INVENTORY '11 Chevy Malibu 1LT: 4 Cyl, One Owner Clean Carfax, Bluetooth, Power Seat, Sunroof, Remote Engine Start, $8,990 #75425A

'15 Chevy Malibu LT: 23K Miles, GM Certified, $17,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '06 MALIBU MAXX LT 3.5L V6, 7xxx Miles, 22/30 MPG, Stk #C01543 $11,495 Travers Automotive '12 Chevy Volt: Hybrid, Factory Warranty, Local Trade, $12,999 #F151432A

2013 Chevy Spark LS #65860-1 $10,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

Chrysler

'11 Chevy Malibu 2LT, Black, 41K Miles, Auto, Chromes, $15,990

4065 Ford

'05 Chevy Malibu: One Owner Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, Low Miles, FWD, Call Today, $7,990 #35347A

Like the rest of its interior, the Pilot’s technology seems to be designed with families in mind, something I appreciate as a dad with three kids. You can outfit the Pilot with up to five USB ports, four of which have a 2.5-amp output that’s strong enough to charge an iPad — something many cars don’t offer. It also has an auxiliary audio jack for connecting music players, an HDMI port for connecting a game console or other video sources to the entertainment system, two headphone jacks, three 12-volt power outlets and a 115-volt AC outlet. Clearly, it’s designed for today’s connected kids. My test vehicle, a top-of-the-line AWD Elite model, was priced at $47,300 with a full suite of luxuries and high-tech options. You can get the two-wheeldrive base LX model starting at $29,995 and the EX-L with leather for $35,905.

4070

2012 Chrysler 200 Stk #94147-1 $12,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 '14 Chrysler 200 LX: FWD, Folding Rear Seat(s), MP3 Sound System, Remote Keyless Entry, $12,990 #P8474

'14 Chrysler 200 LX: 4 Cyl, 32K Miles, One Owner, $13,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '05 Chrysler 300: Auto, Power Windows & Locks, $6,483 #B1233

'13 Chrysler 300 C: AWD, Sunroof, V8, 34K Miles, One Owner, $24,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '14 Chrysler 300: V6, Leather, 37K Miles, 1 Owner, Only $18,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '07 PT Cruiser Stk# T351 $5,990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 '07 Sebring S e da n Ltd Only 69xxx Mile s , Low Mile s , One Owne r, Va lue P rice $7,699 #H151879A

'09 OUTLOOK XE FWD, Burgandy, 107xxx Miles, Stk #KT9787A $9,9995 '08 G8 4 Dr, Chome, Wheels, Grey, 9xxx Miles, Stk #K2917A $8,988 '12 FOCUS S E 4 Dr, Green, 60xxx Miles, Stk #3572PA $8,988 '12 FORTE EX 4 Dr, Black, 84xxx Miles, Stk #K4568A $9,990 '07 MKZ Moonroof, Leather, Red, 99xxx Miles, Stk #K3384PA $9,994 '11 FUS ION S PORT AWD, Leather, Moonroof, Certified, Black, 55xxx Miles, Stk #8690Y $16,995 '08 CIVIC EX-L Leather, Moon, Nav, Blue, 88xxx Miles, Stk #5208X $10,977 '11 CAMRY LE Grey, 83xxx Miles, Stk #6047X $11,980 '13 S ONIC HB Red, 33xxx Miles, Stk #K5662A $11,985

'14 AVENGER S E Black, 33xxx Miles, Stk #K1942E $12,259

'13 FOCUS SE 2.0L 4cyl, 47xxx Miles, 27/36 MPG, Stk #T01408 $12,995 Travers Automotive 1-866-704-7909

'12 Civic LX: Coupe, Milano Red, Only 25K Miles, Honda Certified Used, Balance of 7 Yr/100K Powertrain Warranty, One Owner, Lease Return, $14,299 #X2682

'14 Ford Mustang: Convertible, Ford Certified, Only 11K Mi, $21,689 #Z1689

'14 Honda Civic: Hybrid, Silver, One Owner, Honda Certified, Only 13K Miles, $18,999 #X2745

2004 Ford Taurus SEL Stk #41920-5 $4,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

2008 Taurus SEL Stk #41919-3 $5,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 314-621-6666 • stltoday.com/homes

Honda

4120

'13 Accord EXL: Blue, Heatd Pwr Sts, Moonroof, Camera, Bluetooth, Loaded, 39K Miles, Honda Certified , $20,299 #H160210A

'12 Honda Civic LX: 22K Mi, One Owner, Lease Return, Honda Certified used Vehicle, Urban Titanium Color, $14,300 #X2739

'13 Ford C-Max: Hybrid, Ford Certified, Special Rates 2.9%/66 Mo, Local Trade, $15,499 #F152273A

'10 Honda Accord EXL: Sedan, V6, Heated Lthr, Moonroof, Alloys, Pwr Seats, Low Miles, Basque Red Pearl, $14,499 #H151462A

'12 Ford Fiesta: Only 71xx Miles!! Ford Certified Special Rates If Qualify, $12,199 #Z1600

'13 Focus, 1500 miles, stk# T303-1, $17,990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 2006 Ford Focus Stk #45133-1 $5,995 St. Charles Nissan /Hyundai (866)672-4020 2012 Ford Focus Titanium #65131-1 $13,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 '12 Ford Focus: 5 Door Hatchback, Local Trade, Factory Warranty, $10,999 #F152048A

2014 Chevy Impala LT Sunroof, Remote Start, Nice! $13,624 #B1151

'12 Chevy Malibu: Satin Black, Auto, $10,000 #V150823A

'07 Chevy Impala LT: Sunroof, $5,796 #15274A

'06 Chevy Malibu Maxx LTZ: Wagon, Power Windows, Cruise, $7,497 #V150700A

'14 Ford Focus: Certified, Only 14K Miles, 7 Yr/100K Mi Powertrain Warranty, $13,999 #F151462C

'14 Chevy Impala LT: Auto, Remote Start, $13,624 #B1196

314-621-6666 stltoday.com/classifieds

'12 Ford Focus SE: Auto, Power Windows & Locks, $8,697 #B1033A

'13 Honda Civic LX: Coupe, Auto, 31K Miles, $13,283 #B1139A

'12 Fusion Sport, low miles, sunroof, stk# 4637A $15,995 AUTO SOLUTIONS 636-379-2300 '07 Ford Fusion SE: V6, One Owner, Great Second Car, $7,777 #Z1627

'13 Fusion SE Tuxedo Black, Only 43K Miles, Will Sell Fast , Stk #H160172M $14,999

'14 Ford Fiesta: 5 Door Hatchback, Only 8K Miles, Ford Certified, Special Rates, $14,199 #Z1682

4120

'08 Civic EX Coupe, One Owner, Clean Carfax, Full Power, #38125A, $8,881

'15 Fit EXL w/Navi Top of the Line! Milano Red, Only 2,870 Miles! Honda Certified Used, One Owner, Clean Carfax, $20,299 #X2728

2010 Honda Accord 3.5 EXL Stk #65433-1 $12,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'14 Honda Accord EXL: 2 Dr Coupe, Nav, 40K Miles, Honda Certified, Balance of 7 Yr/100K Powertain Warranty, $22,999 #X2704

'12 Honda Accord SE'S: Special Edition! Heated Leather, Power Seat, Alloys & More! Selling Fast, Only 4 Remain!! Reduced!! $15,500 #2657

'11 Honda Accord EXL: 4 Dr, V6, Loa de d, Very Cle a n 1 Owne r, Be lize Blue , Timing Be lt Re pla ce d, #X2652A Only $10,499

'12 Accord EX: 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Sunroof/Moonroof, Fuel Efficient, Motor Trend Certified, $12990 #75581A

2011 Accord 3.5 EXL #94023-1 $12,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'14 Honda Civic: Hybrid, Modern Steel, Only 6K Miles, One Owner, Honda Certified, $19,899 #2688

'08 Honda Civic Si: Clean Carfax, Sport Package and Style Package, FWD, Alloy Wheels, Sunroof, $8,990 WIP8403B

'12 Honda Civic EX-L: 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Leather Seats, Sunroof/Moonroof, Navigation/GPS, $12,990 #P8404

'08 Honda Civic Si: FWD, Clean Carfax, Sport Package, Style Package, Stick Shift, Call Today, $8,990 #WIP8403B


A12

Classified

Honda

4120 Ininiti

BOMMARITO HONDA SUPERSTORE 1-888-204-9202 HOLIDAY CERTIFIED SALES EVENT 7 Year/100K Mile Warranty '13 CRV EXL: 39K Miles, Polished Metal Metallic, $23,499 #X2707 '12 Accord LX: Premium, 2 Available, 4 Door, Auto, Polished Metal, Honda Certified, Both $14,999 #X2718 & X2719 '10 Accord EXL: V6, Leather, Moonroof, Power Seat, Basque Red Pearl, $14,499 #H151462A '14 Civic: Hybrid, 4 Dr, Alabaster Silver, Only 4,530 Miles, $19,999 #X2694 '12 Accord LX: Sedan Basque Red Pearl, $14,499 #H160201A '12 CROSSTOUR EX'S & EXL'S Sunroof, Alloys, Full Power, Low Miles, Last 8 Remain! #X2620 Starting at $16,499! Largest Selection of Certified Crosstours in the Midwest!! '14 Accord: Sport, Crystal Black Pearl, 41K Miles, $19,599 #2706 '13 Pilot LX: 4WD, Polished Metal Metallic, Only $21,500 #H152111A '12 CIVIC LX's Sedans & Coupes Available, 10 In Stock Auto, Cruise, Pwr Pkg, Low Miles, Starting at $13,499 #X2714 Largest Selection of Certified Civic's in the Midwest!! '11 Odyssey EXL: 50K Mi, Nav, Leather, Reduced $23,999 #H160314A '12 ACCORD SE'S Heated Lthr, Alloy Wheels, Power Seat, Special Edition, Only 4 Remain . . . Selling Fast!!! Reduced To $15,500 ( X2657) Largest Selection of Certified Accord SE's in the Midwest!! '13 Pilot: Touring, 4WD, Silver, Nav/GPS, Rear DVD, $33,499 #X2702 '12 Civic EX's: 6 To Choose From Starting $ 14,799 Moonroof, Bluetooth, Alloy's, 34MPG, #X2653 2007 Honda FIT Stk #40947-1 $5,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2013 Honda Fit Sport Stk #65493-1 $15,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

Hyundai

4125

2013 Hyundai Veloster Stk #66102-1 $13,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

2012 Hyundai Veloster #94098 $14,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2013 Hyundai Genesis Coupe, Stk #65745-1 $13,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2013 Hyundai Genesis Coupe, Stk #65745-1 $13,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2011 Hyundai Accent GLS Stk #65696-1 $6,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2010 Elantra GLS Stk #66239-1 $6,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2013 Hyundai Elantra GLS #94205 $14,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2013 Hyundai Elantra GLS Stk #66151-1 $13,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2013 Hyundai Elantra GT Stk #93904-1 $13,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'11 Sonata LTD Loaded, Priced to Sell Fast, $9,990

4130 Mazda

'14 Infiniti Q50: 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Infiniti Certified, Low Miles, AWD, Nav/GPS, Heated Lthr Seats, $36,990 #93172A

'14 Infiniti Q50: Infiniti Certified Pre-Owned, AWD, Nav/GPS, Heated Lthr, Seats, Sunroof, Call, $34,990 #93092A

'14 Infiniti Q50: One Owner Clean Carfax, Infiniti Certified, AWD, Low Miles, Nav/GPS, Heated Leather Seats, $34,990 #93142A

'07 Infiniti G35: One Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Leather Seats, RWD, READ TO ROLL! $8,990 #26043A

'06 Infiniti G35: Coupe, FWD, Heated Leather Seats, Navigation System, Sunroof/Moonroof $8,990 #P8378

'04 Infiniti G35 X: 1 Owner Clean Carfax, AWD, Low Miles, Heated Leather Seats, Keyless Entry, $8,590 #75685A

'01 Infiniti I30: Luxury, Loaded, Full Power, $7,777 #29953A

Jaguar

'05 X-Type, Stk# T336 $7,990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 '04 XJ8 Stk #T346 $9990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 Jeep

4145

'12 Jeep Grand Cherokee: Overland, 4X4, Loaded, Leather, Moonroof, $29,842 #36667A

'14 Grand Cherokee Limited: 4WD, Leather, 40K Mi, V6, One Owner, $28,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '14 Jeep Patriot: Sport, FWD, 33K Miles, One Owner, $15,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '14 Wrangler Unlimited 4WD, Local Trade, Sahara Pkg, Loaded, Must See This One! Stk #F143200A $35,999

2013 Hyundai Sonata SE Stk #94102 $15,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

2013 Hyundai Sonata #65832-6 $13,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 '08 S ona ta Auto, P owe r Options , Nice , Stk #V150868A $7,997

'14 Hyundai Sonata: Nav/GPS, Sunroof, Heated Leather Seats, Bluetooth, Backup Camera, Low Miles, $20,990 #25675A

'15 Hyundai Sonata SE: 4 Door, Alloys, 3 to Choose, $16,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 2007 Sonata GLS Stk# 65965-1 $6,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

Call 314-621-6666. Or log on to stltoday.com/classifieds

Ininiti

'13 Wra ngle r Low Mile s , Ne a r Ne w, Stk #V150573A $28,497

'05 Infiniti FX35 78K, Chromes, Roof, AWD, $15,690

'04 Infiniti J35: Luxury EDT, Loaded, Full Power, Clean Carfax, $5,887 #31294A

'07 Mazda Mazda3 s: Leather, Heated Leather Seats, Stick Shift, Power Sunroof, Bose Sound System, $5,495 #94578B

'14 Mazda 6i Touring One Owner, Certified, $20,990

'12 Mazda 6i Touring Certified, Alloys, Auto, $16,290

'14 Mazda 6 I: Touring, Leather, Only 4,500 Miles, $21,812 #Z1812

'11 Mazda CX-7 BLACK FRIDAY SALES PRICING $15,157, P5598

'13 Mazda Miata Hard Top, 4K Mi., Just Arrived, $23,990

Mercedes Benz

Kia

4155

'14 Kia Optima, Silver, Stk# T359 $15,990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 '13 Kia Rio LX: 29 Great MPG, Local Trade, $11,490

'12 Mercedes Benz E350 Stk# T338 $25,990

4165 '05 Lexus GX Stk# T345 $11,990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 '07 Lexus GS350: AWD, 4 Door Sedan, Champaign Beige Metallic, 49K Mi, One Owner, Clean Carfax, $17,488 #H160297A

2011 Lincoln MKZ Stk# 41249-1 $12,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

Mazda

4185

'13 Mazda3 i SV 2.0L 4cyl, 59xxx Miles, Stk #T01470 $13,995 Travers Automotive 1-866-704-7909 2010 Mazda 3i Sport Stk #41777-2 $9,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'08 MAZDA 5 Green, stk #T325 $7,990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 '10 Mazda 3 Hatchback, 18K Miles, Auto, 1 Owner, $14,990

'12 VW CC VW Certified, Auto, Black, $15,990

'11 Nissan Juke SL: AWD, Navigation, Sunroof, $13424 #15947A

2011 Nissan Juke SV #41776-1 $13,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2011 Nissan Juke SV Stk #40707-1 $15,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 '14 Maxima S Local Trade, Factory Warranty, V6, $18,777 #F152118A

'11 Nissan Mulano SL, AWD, Dual Roofs, $22,990

'13 Nissan Maxima SV: 3.5, Moonroof, Nissan Certified, FWD, $17,524 #B1055

'11 Nissan Maxima S: Leather, Sunroof, $11,918 #B1183A

'13 Mazda Speed 3, 24K, 4 New Tires!! $22,490 '07 Honda Civic EX, Auto, 49K, $12,490

'15 Altima S Auto, White, $14,597 #B1197

'04 Ford Thunderbird Two Tops, 10K, Chromes, $27,990

'15 Pathfinder SV 3rd row, 4x4, $26,642 #B1252

'15 Mercedes Benz SLK250 Cabriolet, 3K, Auto, Nav., Call!

'15 Pathfinder SV 3rd row, 4x4, $26,541 #B1253

'02 Ford Thunderbird, Two Top, Yellow, 13K, $22,990

'09 Nissan Altima, '05 ML350 3.7L V6, 111xxx Miles, 15/18 mpg, Stk #F00101 $13,295 Travers Automotive 1-866-704-7909

'15 Mercedes SLK 250 Cabrio, 3K Miles, $42,490

'15 Altima S Auto, Bluetooth, 32k miles, $14,597 #B1200

2009 Pontiac G8 Stk #66234-1 $10,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'08 G6 Sporty, Low Price, Stk #Y2985 $6,997

'09 Pontiac G6: Auto, Sporty, $7,600 #Y2920

'09 Pontiac G6: Fuel Efficient, Satellite Radio, Very Clean and Very Well Priced, FWD, Auto, Call Today, $6,995 #8722A

'09 Pontiac G6: Fuel Efficient, Satellite R a d io , F W D , B u c k et Seats, Keyless Entry, Call Today, $7,995 #8722A

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102

'05 Grand Marquis LS: Ultimate, V8, Leather, Sharp, $7,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625

4207

'09 Mini Cooper John Coope r Works, Hardtop, Stk #V160018A $17,500

'07 Mini Cooper Hard Top, Low Miles, Stk #Y2986A $9,000

'07 MINI Cooper S: FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Leather, Hurry and Take Advantage Now! $9,490 #10357A

4215

2012 Mitz Lancer ES Stk #66010-1 $13,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 '11 Mitsubishi Lancer: Evolution GS, Only 17K Miles, $25,999 #F160039A

4220

2011 Cube 1.8SL Stk# 42190-1 $9,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 '03 Altima, Blue, Stk# T352 $7,990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 '15 Nissan Altima S: Auto, Bluetooth, Backup Camera, $14,977 #B1136

'14 Altima S: Auto, Bluetooth, Back Up Camera, $14,597 #B1206

'15 Altima S: Bluetooth, Back Up Camera, $14,929 #B1222

'06 Altima Auto, Low Mile s , Stk #V150880A $5,900

'01 Nissan Altima SE: White, As-Is, State & Emissions Tested, #H160352A Budget Priced $3,999

2012 Nissan Altima 2.5S #41664-2 $13,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai

2007 Pontiac G6 GT Coupe Stk# 93815-2 $7,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'07 G6 GT 3.9L V6, 78xxx Miles, 17/24 MPG, stk #T01764 $11,495 Travers Automotive 1-866-704-7909

'14 Maxima SV Sport Pkg. Nav, $24,448 #B1236

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102

'14 Rogue S: Auto, AWD, Gold, $18,977 #B1108 '13 Maxima SV Leather, Roof, $17524 #B1055

'01 Saturn SC2 Base: Coupe, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, 5 Speed Manual, CALL TODAY! $4,990 #10456A

4283

'12 Scion xB, fwd, mp3, buckets, keyless entry, prem. sound, 40k mi., stk# 17039, $12,489 ACKERMAN TOYOTA 866-925-9234 '13 Scion FR-S: Local Trade, $15,999 #F151119B

'14 Murano: Platinum, 4x4, 22K Mi, $31,814 #B1235

'14 Maxima S: Grey, Sunroof, 27K Mi, $17,514 #B1245 '15 Altima S: Bluetooth, $15,374 #B1132 '12 Nissan Rogue SL: AWD, Roof, Nav, $19,807 B1169 '13 Altima SL: Sunroof, Leather, $18,483 #B1264 '15 Altima SL: Loaded, 15K Miles, $21,977 #W1574A '14 Maxima SV: Sport Pack, 19: Wheels, Navigation, $24,448 #B1236 '12 Maxima SV: Sunroof, Heated Leather, $19,977 #B1269 '12 Rogue SV: AWD, Sunroof, Nav, $16,777 #B1281

'13 Nissan Sentra: FWD, Low Miles, Motor Trend Certified Vehicle, READY TO ROLL!! $12,990 #8761A

2014 Nissan Sentra SV #41419-1 $13,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2012 Nissan Sentra 2.0 Stk# 41977-1 $13,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

2013 Nissan Sentra SV #41667-1 $13,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2005 Nissan Sentra 1.8S Stk# 93882-1 $4,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

Smart Car

4284

'12 SMART FORTWO Passion, 1.0L 3cyls, 8K Miles, 34/38 MPG, Stk #T01598 $10,995 Travers Automotive 1-866-704-7909

Subaru

4290

2009 Forrester 2.5x #65890-1 $8,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

Suzuki

4295

2003 Suzuki Aerio SX Stk #41995-1 $4,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

Toyota

4300

'12 Prius Hybrid Reliable Stk #Y3163. $12,495

'04 Toyota Prius: One Owner, Clean Carfax, Loaded, $6,778 #31330A

'12 Toyota Prius II: Hatchb/Back, Hybrid, Silver, 29K Mi, One Owner Clean Carfax, 51 MPG City Rating, $15,699 #H152151A

'11 Toyota Camry LE keyless entry, all weather pkg., mp3, 1 owner, 33k mi., stk# 28942A $12,594 ACKERMAN TOYOTA 866-925-9234 '07 Toyota Camry: This Is A Buy! Local Trade $7,999 #F160061A

'08 Toyota Camry: Hybrid, Navigation, Leather, $7,500 #V150501A

'14 Nissan Versa SV, Auto, One Owner, 15K Mi., #360306B, $12,222

'07 Toyota Camry XLE: Gray, 4 Door Sedan, 102K Miles, $9,799 #H151091A

2015 Nissan Versa 1.6 SV Stk #40211 $13,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'11 Toyota Camry: Hybrid, One Owner Clean Carfax, Nav, Backup Camera, Heated Leather Seats, $13,900 #10047A

2015 Nissan Versa 1.6SV Stk #40163 $13,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2015 Nissan Versa 1.6 SV Stk #40260 $13,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2015 Nissan Versa Note SV Stk #94050SL $14,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2015 Nissan Versa Note SV Stk# 94051SL $14,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2015 Nissan Versa 1.6 SV #40199 $13,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2015 Nissan Versa Note S Stk #41830 $13,241 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2015 Nissan Versa 1.6SV #40214 $13,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 314-621-6666 • stltoday.com/homes

'13 VW Be e tle : Ce rtifie d, Auto, P owe r Options , $16,000 #V150774A

'12 VW Beetle 2.0T: Silver/Black, Only 35K Miles, Fun Car! $15,295 #H151940B

2012 VW Beetle 2.5L Stk #93913-1 $13,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'09 VW Jetta TDI BLACK FRIDAY SALES PRICING #29886A, $12,986

'14 VW Jetta: Service Loaner, Certified, Warranty, $15,500 #Y2938

'14 Jetta TDI Le a the r, Roof, Low Mile s , Stk #Y2848 $19,997

'14 VW Jetta 2.0L: FWD, Balance of Manufacturer Wrnty Available, Premium Sound, Bucket Seats, $12,990 #8706A

4280

'05 Ion, manua l, great price, $4,503, stk# B1209

Scion

'12 VW Tiguan: Auto, VW Certified, $19,997 #V150836A

4260

'13 Land Rover, Range Rover, Stk# T322 $77,990

Saturn

'10 VW Sport Wagon: Turbo Diesel, Very Hard To Find, ONLY35K MILES, One Owner, Loaded, $14,999 #F143155A

'12 VW Beetle: Auto, Turbo, Certified, $15,000 #Y2991

'15 Altima S Auto, Bluetooth, Silver, $14,597 #B1206

'15 Altima S: Bluetooth, Auto, $14,977 #B1203

Nissan/Datsun

'05 Buick LaCrosse CX: 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Motor Trend Certified Vehicle, Keyless Entry, $7,590 #75943A

Range Rover/Land Rover

4310

4250

'10 Ma xima , Loa de d Luxury, Stk #Y3147. $12,500

'15 Altima S: Bluetooth, Backup Camera $14,977 #B1136

Mitsubishi

Pontiac

'14 Nissan Maxima SV: Sport Pack, 19" Wheels, Navigation, $24,448 #B1236

CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED VEHICLE INVENTORY

'15 Nissan Altima S: Bluetooth, Back Up Camera, $14,395 #B1226

314-621-6666 stltoday.com/homes

2015 Nissan Versa Note SV Stk #94052SL $14,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

2008 Altima 3.5 SE Stk# 65480-2 $8,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'09 Honda Accord EX-L, Auto, 29K, $16,990

'08 Mazda 3 Touring, Auto, Loaded, 68K Mi., #31462A, $10,544

'13 Mazda 3: Grand Touring, $17,777 #31348A

'13 CC Certified, Warranty, Loaded, Sporty, Stk #Y2969 $19,997

BOMMARITO NISSAN WEST

'15 Nissan Altima S: Auto, Bluetooth, $15,374 #B1132

'13 Mazda 5: Touring, Loaded, Full Power, Mazda Certified, $15,963 #P5575C

'14 Nissan Altima S: 4 Door, 2.5L, 33K Miles, One Owner, $15,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625

2015 Nissan Versa 1.6SV #40138 $13,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

1-866-2449085

'13 Mazda Speed 3 4 New Tires, Certified, 24K Mi.,

'11 Mazda 3 Sport: Loaded, One Owner, Clean Carfax, $10,442 #29946A

2015 Nissan Versa #40245 $13,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

Volkswagen

'00 Celica GTS, M/T, Loaded, Clean Carfax, 19K #29695A, $13,371

'13 Toyota Corolla Auto, M/R, Loaded, 17K Mi., #P5606, $16,444

'00 Corolla Auto, Power Options, Stk #Y3165. $4,500

'14 Toyota Corolla LE: 4 Dr, Black, 37K Miles, One Owner, $14,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 2009 Toyota Corolla LE #93810-2 $8,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai

'13 COROLLA L 1.8L 4cyl, 41xxx Miles, Stk #M00186 $13,574 Travers Automotive 1-866-704-7909 2009 Toyota RAV4 Sport Stk #93911-1 $12,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai

SATURDAY

4300 Volvo

'07 Toyota Camry: Solara, Convertible, Heated Leather Seats, 4 New Tires, FWD, Bucket Seats, Spoiler $8,990 #26216A

2010 Nissan Altima 3.5 SR #65863-1 $12,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

2005 Nissan Murano S Stk #42022-1 $6,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

Mini Cooper

4220 Toyota

2015 Nissan Versa 1.6 SV #40213 $13,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

Bommarito St. Peters NEW ARRIVALS!!

1-866-604-8625 '00 Grand Marquis, white, stk# T366, $5,990

Lexus

4220 Nissan/Datsun

2012 Nissan Altima 2.5 S Stk #41715-1 $12,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102

'13 Kia Soul: Mercury 4195 H/B, Green, Auto, '08 Mercury Grand Loaded, 1 Owner, Marquis GS: V8, 76K Miles, One Owner, Clean Carfax, Warranty, $8,995 $10,966 #290013A Don Brown Chevrolet

'10 SOUL PLUS 2.0L 4 cyl, 72xxx Miles, 24/30 mpg, Stk #M00427 $13,495 Travers Automotive 1-866-704-7909

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

4190

'13 Chevy Suburban LTZ, White Diamond, Roof, Nav, 4WD

4130

'13 Infinity G37X: Navigation, Leather, $24,588 #B1240

'12 Mazda6 i Sport: 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Mazda Certified Pre-Owned, Keyless Entry, Cruise Control, $13490 #8705A

'10 BMW 328i, Convertible, Nav, Auto, 43K, $23,990

Local Trade, $14,199 #F151762A

2012 Hyundai Sonata Stk #94159 $14,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

4185 Nissan/Datsun

'11 Mazda 3 Auto, Loaded, Very Clean,, One Owner, #31439A, $10,613

4140

'12 Hyundai Sonata Lincoln 4170 Hybrid, Awesome '11 Lincoln MKZ: MPG! $15,490 Only 38K Miles, 2013 Hyundai Sonata Stk #65841-1 $13,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

M 1

'13 JETTA SE 2.5L w/PZEV, 2.5L 5cyl, 40xxx Miles, 24/31 mpg, Stk #C01338 $13,995 Travers Automotive '12 Passat Certified, Warranty, One Owner, Stk #Y2962 $14,000

'15 VW Passat: Certified, Loaded, Service Loaner, $20,750 #V150865A

'14 Passat Nice Equipment, Certified Warranty, #Y2934 $17,500

BOMMARITO HAZELWOOD #1 VW CERTIFIED DEALER In St. Louis For 5 Years 2 Yr/24K MI. Warranty PLUS 10 Yr/200K Mi Powertrain Warranty 1-866-936-9044 '13 Passat Auto, Alloys, Bluetooth, $15,643 #Y2681 '14 Passat Wolfsburg Auto, Alloy Wheels, Bluetooth, 10K Mi, $19,977 #Y2680 '14 Jetta SE Bluetooth, 13K Miles, WOW! $19,541 #Y2846 '12 Passat S Auto, 20K Miles, Bluetooth, $14,539, #Y2795 '12 Passat S Alloys, Bluetooth, 12K Miles, $15,777, #Y2853 '14 Jetta SE Bluetooth, 14xxx Miles, Nice, $19,541, #Y2845 '11 Jetta S Auto, Keyless, 41K Mi, $13,873 #Y2868 '14 Jetta Sports Wagon, Auto, Keyless, 32K Mi, $15,777 #Y2871 '11 Jetta TDI Auto, Alloy Wheels, Keyless, $15,777 #V140758A '12 Passat SE Sunroof, Navigation, Bluetooth, $15,777 #Y2874 '12 Passat SE Sunroof, 27K Miles, Bluetooth, $16,977 #Y2844 '14 Passat Wolfsburg 14K Miles, Bluetooth, Auto, $20,452 #Y2847

DECEMBER 5, 2015 4315 Ford Trucks

'13 Volvo XC60 TL: AWD T6 Premium Plus, 46K Mi, Power Sunroof, AWD, $26,842 # W1127A

'15 Volvo XC60: R-Type, Premium Plus, AWD, Gray Metallic, Only 15K Miles, #H152228A Save Thousands $37,499

'04 Volvo S80 2.5T: One Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Leather Seats, Sunroof, Premium Sound , $7,495 #P8179A

Chevrolet Trucks

4330

'09 Avalanche LS, 4x4, brand new wheels and tires, flex fuel, stk# 4327B AUTO SOLUTIONS 636-379-2300

'13 Avalanche LTZ Black Diamond Edition, 4WD Loaded, $42,990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 '05 Colorado: Crew Cab, Loaded, Full Power, $10,644 #31267B

'12 Chvy Colorado: Ext Cab,1 Owner, Clean Carfax, GM Certified, $18,988 #38220A

'05 Chevy Colorado LS: Extended Cab, 4 New Tires, Silver, Only 105K Miles, $8,999 #X2711

'14 Chevy Silverado 1500: Double Cab, Factory Warranty, $20,446 #F142721A

'10 Chevy Silverado 1500: Work Truck, Extended Cab, RWD, 4x2, $13,999 #F151963A

'12 Silverado 1500 Crew Cab, 23k miles, 1 ownr, 5.3L, V8, stk# C151433A, $26,736 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '11 Silverado LT Pkg., crew cab, 4wd, stk# C150272A $21,489 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '09 Silverado 1500 LT, 4x4, brand new rough country lift, new whls, stk# C5059 $28,995 AUTO SOLUTIONS 636-379-2300 '10 Silverado 1500 LT, 4x4, brand new rough country lift, brand new whls, stk# 4860 $24,995 AUTO SOLUTIONS 636-379-2300 '08 Silverado Spray in Bedliner, $19,995, Stk #4982 AUTO SOLUTIONS 636-379-2300 '07 Silverado 1500 Crew Cab, 4x4, brand new rough country lift, brand new wheels and tires, stk# 4918 $24,995 AUTO SOLUTIONS 636-379-2300

'11 Silverado LTZ Crew Cab, 4WD, White Diamond, $34,920

'12 Silverado LT Crew Cab, 4WD, 44K Mi., $30,990

'14 Jetta SE Sunroof, Bluetooth, 15K Miles, $21,177 #Y2850

2005 Dodge Dakota SLT Stk #41341-2 $9,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai

'14 CC Sport Bluetooth, LED's, Keyless Entry, $23,977 #Y2885 '13 CC Sport LED's, Bluetooth, Auto, $20,777 #Y2886 '12 CC Sport Keyless Entry, Auto, Bluetooth, $18,977 #Y2887 '11 GTI 15,000 Miles, Manual, Sunroof, $17,777 #V150703A '13 CC Sport LED's, Bluetooth, $20,777 #Y2888 '14 VW Passat: Certified, Warranty, Stk #Y2933 $18,000

'14 VW Passat: Certified, Service Loaner, $17,000 #Y3047

'13 VW Passat: Certified, Service Loaner, $17,500 #Y2935

'14 VW Passat: Wolfsburg Edition, Black, 34K Miles, One Owner, $15,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625

'13 Ford F150: Crew Cab, 4X4, V8, Ford Certified, Local Trade, $33,999 #F151492A,

2005 Ford F150 Reg Cab, Stk #94000-1 $7,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'06 F250 Super Duty, 6.0L, 4x4, brand new rough country lift, new whls, stk# 4773 $21,995 AUTO SOLUTIONS 636-379-2300

BedLites, Carfax $35,500 Itsaliveauto.com '09 Sierra 1500 SLE, 4x4, brand new rough country lift, new whls, stk# 4846 $28,995 AUTO SOLUTIONS 636-379-2300

'13 Sierra Crew 4WD, Leather, Chromes, Z-71, $30,990

'12 GMC Sierra Crew Cab, White, Chromes, 4WD, $32,990

'09 GMC Sierra Crew Cab SLE 67K Mi., Local Trade, $22,990

'15 Sierra 1500 SLE Z71, V8, 4x4, 6K miles, nav., all weather pkg., all terrain pkg., stk# 28802A $37,949 ACKERMAN TOYOTA 866-925-9234

Hummer

4348

'09 Hummer H-3 M/R, New Tires, Loaded, Must See, Clean Carfax, #36978B, $19,991

Nissan/Datsun Trucks 4380 '14 Nissan Frontier: 4WD, Short Bed, Crew Cab, Backup Camera, Heated Leather Seats, CALL TODAY! $29,990 #75795A

2008 Nissan Frontier SE King Cab Stk #2098015 $12,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai

2012 Nissan Sentra 2.0 Stk #94161 $14,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866) 672-4020 '10 Titan XE 4x4, new wheels and tires, exhaust, stk# 4994, $25,995 AUTO SOLUTIONS 636-379-2300

Toyota Trucks

'14 Dodge 1500 SLT: Quad Cab, 4x4, V8, HEMI, 19K Miles, One Owner, $28,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '14 Ram 2500 SLT, 4x4, low miles, loaded, $38,995 AUTO SOLUTIONS 636-379-2300 '06 Ram 2500 4x4 MegaCab, Diesel, $26,995 #4986 AUTO SOLUTIONS 636-379-2300 '10 Ram 1500, 4x4, only 19k mi, brand new rough country lift and whls, stk# 4934 $31,995 AUTO SOLUTIONS 636-379-2300 '06 Ram 1500, auto, 4x4, brand new rough country lift, brand new wheels and tires, stk# 4964 $23,995 AUTO SOLUTIONS 636-379-2300

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102

Crossovers

$52,990 '13 CAD Escalade Premium, 30K Miles, Silver, $52,290

'15 Encore AWD Convenience Pkg 29K Miles, GM Certified, $22,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '04 Chevy Bla ze r Exce lle nt Condition Stk #Y3146. $6,000

'14 Chevy Captiva Sport LT, fwd, GM Certified Warranty, stk# C150215A $17,444 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '15 Chevy Captiva LT: Sunroof, Leather, 13K Miles, GM Certified, $19,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '12 Chevy Equinox LT, fwd, 38xxx miles, GM Certified Warranty, stk# C10267P $16,785 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '12 Chevy Equinox LT, FWD, 16xxx mi., stk# C10099P $19,311 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '12 Chevy Equinox LS, awd, 30xxx miles, GM Certified Warranty, stk# C10266P $15,285 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770

'12 Chevy Equinox White, Loaded, One Owner, Clean Carfax, #360313A, $15,787

'10 Equinox LS, BLACK FRIDAY SALES PRICING #38199A, $13,644

'10 Chevy Equinox: AWD, Leather, One Owner, $13,850 #F152272A

'13 Chevy Equinox 1LT: FWD, 84K Mi, Camera, Bluetooth, One Owner Clean Carfax, Bal of Fac P/Train Wrnty, $13,799 #H151899A

'13 Equinox LTI FWD, Black Granite, Only 37K Miles, Will Sell Fast At $18,999 #H160172A

'05 Chevy Equinox LS: One Owner Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Keyless Entry, Sharp, $6,990 #36199A

'15 Chevy Equinox LT: 11K Miles, 4 Cyl, 3 To Choose, GM Certified, $22,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '13 Chevy Equinox LT: 4 Cyl, 52K Miles, One Owner, $17,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '15 Chevy Suburban LT, htd lthr seats, prem audio, nav., 4x4, V8, stk# 16994 $48,890 ACKERMAN TOYOTA 866-925-9234

'12 Suburban LTZ 4WD, Chromes, Nav., 52K Mi., $43,480

4385

'13 Tacoma, 4 Cyl., 5 speed, bluetooth, 24k miles, stk# 16807A $16,989 ACKERMAN TOYOTA 866-925-9234 '12 Tundra Crew Cab LTD, 4wd, V8, htd. seats, navi., sunroof, all wthr pkg., 56k mi., stk# 16914 $34,487 ACKERMAN TOYOTA 866-925-9234

'13 Suburban LTZ 4WD, White Diamond, $47,290 '05 Suburban LT, Chromes, Roof, 4WD, $9,990

4387

'09 Honda CR-V EX, '09 Suburban LT 4WD, 62K Mi., Sunroof, Certified, Loaded, One Owner, Clean Carfax, Must $16,790 See! #38232, $18,472

'09 Silverado 1500 LTZ: Crew Cab, 4 WD, Heated Leather Seats, $24,990 #75801B

Dodge Plymouth Trucks 4335

'14 Passat Wolfsburg Bluetooth, Auto, Silver, $19,977 #Y2849

'10 F150 Supercab, 4x4, brand new rough country lift, brand new wheels and tires, stk# 4718 $26,995 AUTO SOLUTIONS 636-379-2300 '12 Ford F150: Super Cab 4x4, Echo Boost, Certified 7yr/600K Mile Powertrain Warranty, $22,999 #F152123A

One Owner Clean Carfax, AWD, Leather, Navigation/GPS, $32,975 #26015C

'13 VW GTI Sedan, Manual, Red, Certified, $23,490

4390

'15 Cadillac Escalade 4x4 Black, Only 13xxx Miles, Stk #T355 $69,990

'13 Cad Escalade Rafferty Auto Premium, 30K, 866-494-4102 ESV Loaded, Certified,

'14 Silverado 2500 4390 LT7, Crew Cab, 4X4, Sport Utilitiy LT7, Diesel, Load'13 Suburban Z71, ed, #360424A, Black, Loaded, $44,474 Captains, Leather, 1 Owner #38264A, $33,333 '09 Silverado: Crew Cab, 4X4, Loaded, Full Power '13 Audi Q7 3.0T: Premium (Tiptronic), $21,751 #38246A

'14 Jetta TDI Autim 15K Miles, Alloy Wheels, $22,977 #Y2848

'11 Jetta SE Auto, 34,000 Low Miles, $12,977 #V150541A

4340 Sport Utilitiy

'11 F150 XLT Super Crew, 4wd, stk# C160693A $23,796 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '01 Ford F-150, 112k mi, Red, $6,990, #T316

'08 Avalanche LT 4345 Z71, Leather, Moon- GMC Trucks roof, Loaded, Clean 2011 Sierra 1500 Denali 37K Mi, Nav, Back-Up Carfax, Camera, Htd/Cool Fr Lthr, Bluetooth, LED #31315A, $20,593

'13 Chevy 1500 LT: V8, 4x4, 53K Miles, GM Certified, New Tires, $23,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '08 Avalanche LTZ: 4x4, Sunroof, Nav, DVD, Sharp, $19,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '05 Colorado, Stk# T335 $5,990

STLTODAY.COM

'13 Buick Encore: FWD, GM Certified, Bluetooth, Backup Camera, ABS Brakes, heated Door Mirrors, $17,990 #7569A

'08 Buick Enclave CX: One Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Leather Seats, Satellite Radio, Keyless Entry, $11,990 #26196A

'10 Cadillac SRX: 3.0L, V6, FWD, Sunroof, Bluetooth, Heated Lthr Seats, Clean Carfax, Keyless Entry, $17,997 #36242A

'11 Chevy Tahoe LTZ: Black, Loaded, Clean Carfax, $29,671 #36030A

'08 Chevy Tahoe LT: 4x4, Lthr, Rear Buckets, One Owner, $19,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '15 Chevy Tahoe LT: 4x4, Black, 36K Miles, GM Certified, $43,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '05 Tra ilbla ze r 2WD Re d, S ta te Sa fe ty & Emis s ions Te s te d, 192K Miles , One Owne r, Clea n Carfax Re port, Va lue P rice d Vehicle at $4,299

'10 Chevy Traverse: AWD, Leather, DVD, Navigation, Only 76K Miles, Balance of Fact Wrnty, Black Granite, $17,488 #H150035A

'15 Chevy Traverse 2LT: AWD, Rear Buckets, 32K Miles, GM Certified, $28,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '12 Chevy Traverse LT: Rear DVD, Captain Chairs, One Owner, $17,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625

2013 CADILLAC ESCALADE 48xxx Miles, Nav, Back-Up Camera, HID Headlites, Heated Leather, Clean Carfax $43,500 ItsAliveAuto.com 1-888-816-2132

'13 Dodge Ram SLT: Crew Cab, 4X4, Big Horn, Loaded, 39K, $28,976 #360116B

'07 Dodge Ram: Reg Cab P/U, Gray, Auto, 70K, $9,988 #360122A

'01 Dodge Ram: Regular Cab, Auto, 91K Miles, $5,443 #B1232

POST-DISPATCH STORE BOOKS RELIVE HISTORY SHOP ONLINE 24/7

Ford Trucks

4340

2012 F150 RAPTOR SVT 38xxx Miles, Super Crew, Sunroof, Bedliner, 5.5 ft. Bed, 6.2L $47,900 ItsAliveAuto.com 1-888-816-2132

www.thepost-dispatchstore.com 1-877-POST-STL (1-877-767-8785) MON. - FRI. 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.


Classified Sport Utilitiy

4390 Sport Utilitiy

'07 Jeep Commander 4WD, 3rd Row, 95K Mi., $12,990

'13 Dodge Durango SXT: AWD, Only 11K Miles, 3rd Row Seating, $26,999 #F151259A

'13 Ford Edge SEL, mp3, bluetooth, keyless entry, all weather pkg., rearview cam., stk# 28789A, $18,998 ACKERMAN TOYOTA 866-925-9234

'12 Ford Edge Pano Roof, Nav, Local Trade, $24,790

'13 Ford Edge SE: FWD, Only 23K Miles, Ford Certified, $20,444 #Z1645

'13 Ford Edge SEL: Certified, 2.9% for 66 Months If You Qualify, $22,998 #Z1660

4390 Sport Utilitiy

'11 GMC Yukon SLT: Heated Leather Seats, Bluetooth, Backup Camera, Trailer Tow, 3rd Row Seating, $25,490 #75863A

'14 GMC Yukon SLT: 4x4, Heated Lthr, 39K Miles, 4 New Tires, GM Certified, $36,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625

'08 Honda Accord BLACK FRIDAY SALES PRICING #360500A $11,811

'15 Honda CRV EX-L $23,473, #C150255A LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770

'14 Honda CRV EXL, Loaded, One Owner, Clean Carfax, 36K, $23,332 #38127A

'11 Honda Pilot EXL: 4WD, 8 Passenger, Leather, Moonroof, Only 73K Miles, Honda Certified, $23,499 #H160327A

'11 Ford Edge SE: FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Parking Sensors, Motor Trend Certified, $15,431 #10095A

'12 Ford Edge SEL: Bluetooth, Backup Camera, Heated Leather Seats, Clean Carfax, CALL TODAY $18,990 #36110A

2007 Ford Edge SEL Stk #41185-1 $9,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'13 Ford Escape 4WD Roof, Auto, $18,990

'06 Ford Escape XLT, Loaded, Full Power, 1 Owner, Clean Carfax, #31466A, $10,276

'08 Ford Escape XLT, 4X4, Loaded, Clean Carfax, #360055A, $10,442

'10 Ford Escape XLT: V6, 4 Door, $11,999 #F151965B

'14 Escape, only 26k mi, Ford Certified, Special rate low as 1.9% if you qualify $17,777 #Z1613

'14 Ford Escape: Ford Certified, 1.9% For 66 Mos. If Qualify. $16,999 #Z1610

'10 Ford Escape: Very Popular Body Style, Save Vehicle For Student, Great Fuel Mileage, Local Trade, Only $14,999 #F142521A

'08 Ford Escape: Gas Saver, Hybrid, $11,500 #V150822B

'08 Escape Gas Saver Hybrid, Stk #V150822B $11,500

'14 Ford Explorer XLT: Certified 7 Yr/100K Powertrain, 2.9 for 66 Months, 1.9% for 36 Months If Qualified, $25,777 #F151289A

'09 GMC Acadia SLT: FWD, Lthr, Moonroof, Gold Mist, 67,709 Miles, 1 Owner Clean Carfax, $17,699 #H150868A

'11 GMC Yukon XL Denali, awd, loaded, stk# C151953A $26,919 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '12 GMC Terrain SLE FWD, 22xxx miles, stk# C10211P $19,421 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770

'14 GMC Terrain Denali: 18K Mi, Chromes, Sunroof, $27,990

314-621-6666 • stltoday.com/classifieds

M 1

'13 Pilot LX, 4WD, Polished Metal Metallic, Honda Certified, Used, CleanCarfax, One Owner, Priced To Sell At $21600 #H152111A

'07 Honda Pilot EXL: 4WD, Leather, Moonroof, Pwr Seat, Only 82K Miles, Timing Belt Changed, Ready To Go, $14,988 #H160294A

2007 Honda Pilot EXL Stk# 65832-1 $9,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'09 Hyundai Santa Fe Limited: White, Leather, $16,920

'09 Hyundai Santa Fe: Limited, V6, Local Trade, $12,999 #F160027A

'14 Hyundai Santa Fe: Sport, AWD, 31K Miles, V6, One Owner, $18,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 2010 Hyundai Santa Fe LTD Stk#65865-1 $14,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2010 Hyundai Santa Fe GLS Stk #40834-1 $12,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'13 Infiniti JX35: Infiniti Certified, Sunroof, Bluetooth, 3rd Row, Heated Leather Seats, Clean Carfax, $2,990 #94386A

'02 Infiniti QX4: Luxury, 4x4, AWD, Leather, Sunroof, Heated Side Mirrors, CALL TODAY! $5,990 #75767A

'12 Jeep Cherokee LTD, 4WD, Roof, Nav., $29,990 '10 Jeep Compass Sport, Katzkin 2 tone leather, aftermarket rims/tires. Must See! Stk# 4455B $12,990 AUTO SOLUTIONS 636-379-2300 '15 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sport Convertible, Auto, AWD/4WD, Oversized Wheels, 6K Mi., Stk# 16768A $31,999 ACKERMAN TOYOTA 866-925-9234 '11 Kia Sorento LX: AWD, Snow Is On It's Way, $15,444 Z1666

'12 Kia Sorento EX: One Owner, Premium Audio, Smart Key, Bluetooth & More! Reduced $14,500 #H160048A

2011 Kia Sorento LX #94062-1 $11,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 '09 Lexus RX350: 4x4, Black, $14,977 #B1040A

314-621-6666 stltoday.com/classifieds

4390 Sport Utilitiy

'04 Lexus RX330 Bamboo Pearl, Heated Leather, Power Liftgate, Tire Pressure Monitor, CD, Cruise $11,700 ItsAliveAuto.com 1-888-816-2132

'06 Lexus RX330, Power Sunroof, FWD, $11,490

'13 Mazda CX-5 Sport, only 25,000 miles, factory warranty, $15,444 #Z1674

'12 Mazda CX-9 Grand Touring, awd, stk# C10268P $22,227 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '05 Mazda Tribute: FWD, Silver, State Safety Emissions Tested & Passed #H152262A Value Car at $5,799

'11 Mitsubishi Outlander Loaded, Full Power, Very Clean, 31K Mi., #38271A, $11,787

'11 Armada 4x4 Platinum, Local Trade $23,988 #F121565A

'11 Nissan Juke: Local Trade, Loaded, Roof, Leather, One Owner, $13,199 #Z1611A

'14 Nissan Murano LE: Platinum, 10K Miles, 2WD, Sunroof, Nav, $28,422 #B1239

'14 Nissan Murano: Platinum, AWD, $31,814 #B1235

'14 Nissan Murano S: V6, Alloys, 36K Miles, One Owner, $18,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '14 Nissan Pathfinder, V6, CVT auto, 3rd row sts, all wthr pkg., stk# 16976 $19,489 ACKERMAN TOYOTA 866-925-9234 '14 Nissan Rogue S: FWD, Only 12K Miles, Factory Warranty, Only $18,444 #Z1544

'14 Nissan Rogue S: AWD, Gold, $18,977 #B1108

2005 Nissan Xterra S Stk #64892-1 $7,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 '02 Oldsmobile Bravada, black, stk# T369, $5,990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 '03 Pontiac Aztek Very Clean, One Owner, Clean Carfax, Great Miles, #38050A, $5,868

4390 Mini vans

'15 Toyota RAV4 XLE: AWD, Sunroof, $22,211 #B1159

'12 Toyota Rav4 LTD: 4WD, Only 62K Miles, Silver, Toyota Quality, Leather, Bluetooth, Reduced to $20,499! #H151066A

'14 Toyota Rav4 LE: AWD, 33K Miles, One Owner, Sharp, $18,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625

4420 Help Wtd (H2B)

2003 Toyota Sequoia SR5 Stk# 42278-1 $8,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'12 Toyota Sienna XLE: 8 Passenger Van, Salsa Red Pearl, Loaded, Only $21,600 #H151901A

Help Wtd (H2B)

4727

Laborers. 10 full-time temporary openings. 02/15/16 - 11/15/16 at Pro-Lawns, Inc. (fax: '04 Toyota Sequoia 636-398-6022) at 3785 Rd St. Charles, SR5, Auto, White, Huster MO. Daily transport to Just Arrived, worksites in St. Louis & St. Charles Cos. MO to $10,990 mow, trim & blow lawns, prune & mulch shrubs, rake leaves & clippings, pull weeds, edge beds & tree rings, '15 Volvo XC60: plant flowers, shrubs & AWD, Bluetooth, Back trees, lift 50 lbs. engage Up Camera, Heated in extensive bending, Leather Seats, One stooping & stretching. Owner Clean Carfax, No min. edu, or e x p . $37,981 #26036A req. Will train & provide all tools, supplies, & equipment required at no charge. Transportation (including meals & if necessary, lodging) Mini vans 4420 to the place of employment will be reim'15 Chrysler Town & bursed if worker comCountry: Touring, 34K pletes 1/2 of employMiles, DVD, Leather, m e n t period. Return One Owner, $21,995 t r a n s p . p r o v i d e d if Don Brown Chevrolet worker completes the 1-866-604-8625 employment period or is dismissed early by '08 Chrysler Town & employer. Daily subsisCntry, blue, 126k mi, tence provided at min loaded, stk# T361 $8,990 $11.86/day for travel to m a x of $46/day w/re ceipts. Employer guarantees to offer work for hrs equal to at least '10 Chrysler ¾ of the workdays in Town &Country: each 12 wk. period of Touring, Silver, the total employment Only 79,555 Miles, period, M-F, 7am-4pm Heated Leather Seats, $13.03/hr. Single workweek is used for com$11,999 #H160345A puting wages due. Pay weekly. Apply at local M O J o b C n t r https://Jobs.mo.gov/ca reer-centers Refer to '14 Grand Caravan Job # 11513239 Near New, Warranty, Stk #Y3034 $18,000

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102

'07 Honda Odyssey EXL: Htd Lthr, S/Roof, 105K Mi, Timing Best Just Replaced, 30 Day Bommarito Wrnty, $12,999

'06 Honda Odyssey EXL: DVD, Leather, Moonroof, 107K Miles, New timing Belt, $10,499 #H160288A

'11 Nissan Quest: Heated Leather Seats, FWD, 3rd Row Seating, Call Today, $16,990 #94711A

Auctions, Estate Sales & Antiques

To place your ad, call 314-621-6666 or 800-365-8020 ext.6666 Antiques Wanted

6290

Historian will pay top $$ for German-Japanese WW II relics 314-438-8665

Bargain Box

Items For $350 or Less

To place a good bargain box or better bargain box ad, visit bargainbox.STLtoday.com

Bargain Box '11 Toyota 4Runner: 4x4, V6, Ltd, 60K Miles, $29,999 #H160430A

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

6340

Computer: Acer, Wireless, Almost Ne w w/pr int er , $295. (314)892-4593

PIANO - Baldwin Studio Upright & Bench, Great Tone & playability, dark 2004 Toyota Highlander finish, Easy Move $300; Prem JB Sound, Leath(314) 352-4196 er, Alloy Wheels, New 60,000 Mile Warranty Tires, $9,700 Itsaliveauto.com 1-888-816-2132 '15 Toyota Highlander LE, V6, mp3, rear camera, awd, stk# 16860 $29,989 ACKERMAN TOYOTA 866-925-9234 '14 Toyota Highlander LE, FWD, mp3, bluetooth, back-up cam, stk# 17011 To place your ad, call $23,989 ACKERMAN TOYOTA 866-925-9234 '14 Toyota RAV4 LE, Dogs 5005 awd, 4dr., mp3, bluetooth, all weather pkg., 39k mi., stk# 16975, $18,489 ACKERMAN TOYOTA 866-925-9234 '07 Toyota Rav4: Very Good Condition, Eng. Amer. Golden Great Student Car For Retrieve., Boxers, Winter Roads, Stand. Poodles, $9877 #Z1576A Wheatens, Shih Tzu, Cavachons, Teddy Bears, PomTesse, & others. 636-240-3647 '12 Toyota Rav4: LoveNCarePets.org 4x4, Sunroof, Great Mi, $17,977 #B1154 E n g lis h Bulldog p u p s , AKC, ve t che cke d. $1800 Ca ll or te xt 618-335-1452 for picture s a nd more de tails. '12 Toyota Rav4: Sport, 4x4, Sunroof, German Shepherd $18,502 #B1155 Puppies: black & tan, large breed. Purebred. $600. Parents on site (314) 220-8282

LANDSCAPE LABORER (23) Temporary full-time openings, 2/15/16 thru 11/15/16. Wells Landscaping & Lawn Care, Inc., Chesterfield, MO. Landscape & maintain properties using tools or equipment. Tasks may include sod laying, mowing, trimming, planting, watering, fertilizing, digging, rake & blow leaves; seeding, mulching, hauling & spreading topsoil, installation of mortarless segmental concrete masonry wall units. Must be able to lift 50 lbs, work in adverse weather conditions & pass a pree m p l o y m e n t drug test paid by employer. No exp. or educ. nec., will train. $13.04/hr, O/T varies at $19.56/hr, 35 hrs, M-F possibly Sat., 7am4pm, hrs may fluctuate due to weather. Shared housing may be available. If used, reasonable deduct ion will be made. Transportation (including meals and to the extent necessary, lodging) to the place of employment will be provided, or its cost to workers reimbursed, if the workers completes half the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker completes the employment per iod or is dismissed early by the employer. All work tools, supplies & equipment provided at no cost. Transportation provided daily from main office to the various work locations wit hin S t . Louis & S t . Charles counties. The employer guarantees to offer work for hours equal to at least ¾'s of the workdays in each 12-week period of the total employment period. Apply directly with the employer. Fax r esume t o Ryan Wells, (636) 537-9302 & also apply at the nearest office of the State Workforce Agency at https://jobs.mo.gov/careercenters and refer to Job Order No. 11513402.

SATURDAY

4727 Help Wtd (H2B)

Landscape Laborer (31) Temporary full-time openings, 2/15/16 thru 11/15/16. Runyon Landscape Management, Inc., Wildwood , M O . Land scape & maintain properties using tools or equipment. Tasks may include sod laying, mowing, pruning, trimming, planting, watering, fertilizing, digging, seeding, mulching, hauling & spreading topsoil, rake & blow leaves; install sprinklers & mortarless segmental masonry walls. Must be able to lift 50 lbs, work in adverse wea t her condit ions & pass a pre-employment drug test paid by employer. No exp. or educ. nec., will train. $13.04/hr, O/T varies at $19.56/hr, 35 hrs, M- F possibly Sat., 7am-4pm, hrs may fluctuate due to weather. Shared housing may be available. If used, reasonable deduction will be made. Transportation (including meals and to the extent necessary, lodging) to the place of employment will be provided, or its cost to workers reimbursed, if the workers completes half the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker completes the employment period or is dismissed early by the employer. All wor k tools, supplies & equipment provided at no cost. Transportation provided daily from main office to the various work locations within St. Charles & St. Louis counties. The employer guarantees to offer work for hours equal to at least 3/4's of the wor kda ys in each 12week period of the total employment period. Apply directly wit h the employer. Fax resume to Larry Runyon, (636) 5327399 and also apply at the nearest office of the State Workforce Agency at https://jobs.mo.gov/career-centers and refer to Job Order No. 11514068.

4727 Legal Notices

Landscape Laborer 24 Openings. Temporary f u l l - t i m e. 2 / 1 5 / 1 6 11/15/16. Conroy Lawn & Landscape, Inc., Pacific, MO. Landscape or maintain properties using tools or equipment. Tasks may include to cut, mow, water, edge lawns, rake & blow leaves; pull, chop weeds, prune, haul topsoil & much. $13.04/hr, O/T varies at $19.56/hr. 35hrs/wk, M-F, possibly Sat., 7am-4pm, hrs may fluctuate due to weather. No exp. or educ. nec. Will train. Must be able to lift 50 lbs, work in adverse weather conditions, pass a post-employment drug test paid by employer. Shared housing may be available. If used, reasonable deduction will be made. Transportation (including meals & to the extent necessary, lodging) to the place of employment will be provided, or its cost to workers reimbursed, if the workers completes half the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker completes the employment period or is dismissed early by the employer. All wor k tools, supplies & equipment provided at no cost. Transportation provided daily from main office to the various work locations within Franklin, St. Louis and St. Charles Counties. The employer guarantees to offer work for hours equal to at least ¾'s of the workdays in each 12-week period of the total employment period. Apply directly with the employer. Fax resume to Mike Conroy at (636) 4516196. Also apply at the nearest MO Workforce Agency at w w w .jobs. mo.gov and refer to Job Order No. 11513379.

Loyet Landscape: 130 Landscape Labor Temporary, full-time jobs 2/15/16 to 11/15/16 St Louis MO-IL area. Mow, trim, plant, fertilize lawns, lay sod; dig holes for plants; pull/chop weeds; rake leaves. Lift & carry <50 lbs. No min educ, exp r e q . $13.03/hr, 35+ hrs/week 7:00AM3 : 0 0 P M M - F . If OT, $19.55/hr. Loyet reimburses Travel to job & MRV Fee end 1st wk & Travel home at end of contract or earlier if Loyet dismisses; tools, supplies for duties; daily transportation fm Loyet's office to job sites; guarantee of ¾ of workdays in ea. 12-wk period. Pay deductions reqd by law. This job ad is in support of a future H2B application. L o y e t contact is M K in g / G M tel 636-2550110. Apply at any MO job svc ofc . Job # 11513369

LANDSCAPE LABORER (2 0 ) Temporary full-time openings, 2 /1 5 /1 6 thru 11/15/16. Cooper Outdoor S e rv i c e s , I n c . , S t . Charles, MO. Landscape & maintain properties using tools or equipment. Tasks may include sod laying, mowing, trimming, planting, watering, fertilizing, digging, raking, installation of sprinkler & mortarless segmental masonry wall units. Must be able to lift 50 lbs, work in adverse weather conditio n s & p a s s a p r e e m p l o y m e n t drug test paid by employer. No exp. or educ. nec., will train. $ 1 3 .0 4 /hr, O/T varies at $ 1 9 .5 6 /hr, 3 5 hrs, M- F possibly Sat., 7am-4pm, hrs may fluctuate due to weather. Shared housing may be available. If used, reasonable deduction will be made. Transportation (including meals and to the e xte nt necessary, lodging) to the place of 6095 employment will be pro- Firewood/Fuel vided, or its cost to worke rs reimbursed, if the workers completes half the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker SEASONED FIREWOOD completes the employDelivered & stacked satisme nt pe riod or is dis faction guar. missed early by the em(573) 768-1780 or ployer. All work tools, (573) 517-1497 supplies & equipment provided at no cost. TransSeasoned Oak portation provided daily and Hickory from main office to the Delivered & Stacked. various work locations 23yrs of Service. within St. Charles & St. 573-513-6510 Louis counties. The employer guarantees to offer 9000 work for hours equal to at Legal Notices least 3 /4 's of the workdays in each 12-week peNOTICE OF riod of the total employPUBLIC HEARING ment period. Apply diBEFORE THE rectly with the employer. FAIRMONT CITY Fax resume to S hawn ZONING BOARD OF Cooper, (6 3 6 ) 9 4 0 -0649 APPEALS and als o apply at the nearest office of the State Workforce Age ncy at RE: 2015-01-SUP is hereby given that https://jobs.mo.gov/career- Notice public hearing will be centers and refer to Job a held before the Zoning Order No. 11514050. Board of Appeals of Fairm o n t City, Illinois, on December 1 4 , 2 0 1 5 at 7 : 0 0 p . m. , a t t h e Fairmont City Community Center, located at 4 0 0 l Cookson Road, Fairmont City, Illinois, at which time and place the Board will consider the proposed variation to the Village Zoning Ordinance as follows:

Pets & Stuff at 314-621-6666 or 800-365-0820, ext. 6666. Dogs

DECEMBER 5, 2015

To consider a request for a Special Use Permit for the following described property: P e rma n e n t P a rc e l Number: 02-09.0-102-084 This is known as 3 8 0 8 Cookson Road Fairmont City, IL 6 2 2 0 1 , Canteen Township, Illinois

5005 Dogs

German Shep puppies.A K C. 1st shot. Ready for Xmas. Great temp e r a m e n t. Raised in home. $700. 314-696-4009 GOLDEN RETRIEVER PUPS AKC, OFA, shots, wormed, health guar. See parents. 618.883.2137 www.sieverskennels.com Jack Russell Terrier Pups, Cute & Registered. Will hold til Christmas. $325; (618)335-6649 LAB PUPS-AKC, OFA Black, Choc. & Yellow, see parents, calm. shots, wormed, health guar. 618.883.2137 www.sieverskennels.com

5005 Said request was made by: Ceres Consulting LLC, to constrict a new single Lab pups, black, yellow family residence next to & chocolate: AKC, their existing business to OFA, blocky, Golden move their employees Retriever Pups, AKC, into for office space. OFA, blocky, Labradoodles & Golden doodles, mini sizes. Shots All persons desiring to appear for or against said wormed, guar., bred petition may appear at for looks, disposition/ said hearing and be heard hunting ability. Ready thereon. now & thru Winter. 618.396.2494 sieversretrievers.com Dated: November 29, 2015 Zoning Board of Labradoodles, F1 & F1B Appeals series. All colors, & all Village of sizes. Shots wormed, Fairmont City, Illinois guar., bred for looks, disBy: Scott E. Penny position/ hunting ability. Ready now & thru winter. Date:Novemeber Secretary 29, 2015 618.396.2494 sieversretrievers.com

Shih -Tza-Poo Males & Females & Toy Poodle Male Puppies, 6 mos Male Yorkie, Cash. (618) 550-0233

314-621-6666 • stltoday.com/classifieds

Search St. Louis area jobs and find the one that’s right for you at STLtoday.com/monster

STLTODAY.COM 9000 Bids/Proposals

Public Meeting/ Open House E a s t - W e s t G a te wa y Council of Governments seeks comment on it's P ro p o s e d T i t l e V I Program. The public comme nt pe riod runs from Monday, December 7th, 2015 until Thursday, January 7 , 2 0 1 6 during which time the document will be posted on www . ewgateway.org and available for viewing at One Me morial Drive , S t e . 1 6 0 0 , S t . Lo u is MO 63102.

A13 9005

The Ladue School District is soliciting proposals from qualified firms to serve as the Construction Management-Agency (CMa) in a cooperative team for the design a nd construction of a capital improvement program. The District intends to retain the services of a C M a to consult and work with the Project Architect/Engineer (A/E) in the design and planning of the project and in the preparation of construction drawings and specifications for the proposed Horton Watkins High School renovation project. The project is a 310,000 sq. ft. com bina tion new construction and renovation that just began the schematic design phase. The District is seeking a firm with proven experience in bringing a complex project such as this in on schedule and within budget.

The public is invited to view the document at an open house style meeting on January 5, 2016 from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at One Memorial Dr., Suite 1 6 0 0 , S t . Louis , MO 6 3 1 0 2 . Comment forms will be available online a n d a t th e me e ting. Persons requiring special accommodations should notify Julie Stone at least 48 hours prior to the open house at 314-421-4220 or 6 1 8 -2 7 4 -2 7 5 0 or email titlevi@ewgateway.org. Please contact Mike Noonan at mnoonan@lAll comme nts on the adueschools.net for the d o c u me n t mu s t b e Request for Proposal received or postmarked (RFP) document with by midnight January 7 , supporting project and 2 0 1 6 , 2 0 1 5 . S end com- s c o p e i n f o r m a t i o n . ments to royce.bauer@- Please email, as phone ewgateway.org or Eastcalls r equ es ting t h e West Gateway Council of R F P w i l l n o t b e r e G o ve rn me n ts , O n e turned. Memorial Drive, S uite 1 6 0 0 , S t . Louis , MO Proposal Award 6 3 1 0 2 . A t t n : Ro yc e Timeline: Bauer. December 8, 2015 (4.00 p.m.) ïProposal submissions due December 2015 / January 2016 ïFirm s may be inter SHDG Chesterfield, LLC viewed is seeking Certificate of January 25, 2016 Need approval from the Missouri Health Facilities ïConstruction Management-Agency recomReview Commit t ee t o mendation is presented build a 67 bed A L F at 16580 Wildhorse Creek t o t h e B o a r d o f t h e Board of Education Road, Chesterfield, MO. Comments should be addr essed t o Richar d D. Watters, 714 Locust S t r e e t , St . L o u i s , M O Personals 63101. 9125

Bids/Proposals

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CITY OF ST. LOUIS BOARD OF PUBLIC SERVICE REQUES T FOR QUALIFICATIONS for TESTING AND INS PECTION OF MATERIALS FOR PROJECTS AT LAMBERT-ST. LOUIS INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT. S ta te me n ts o f Qualifications due by 5:00 PM, CT, December 2 2 , 2 0 1 5 at Board of Public S e rvice , 1 2 0 0 Market, Room 3 0 1 City Hall, St. Louis, MO 63103. RFQ may be obtained from website www .stl-bps.org, under On Line Plan Room - Plan Room, or call Board of Public S ervice at 3 1 4 622-3535. 25% MBE and 5 % W B E participation goals.

LETTING #8599 AIRFIELD MAINTENANCE DEICER TANKS At Lambert-St. Louis International Airport Sealed proposals will be received by the Board of Public Service in Room 208 City Hall, 1200 Market Street, St. Louis, Mo. Unt il 1: 45 PM, CT, on January 12, 2016, then publicly opened and read. Plans and Specifications may be examined on the Board of Public Service website http://www.stlbps.org/planroom.aspx (BPS On Line Plan Room) and may be purchased directly through the BPS website from INDOX Services at cost plus shipping. No refunds will be made. Bidders shall comply with all applicable City, State and Federal laws (including MBE/WBE policies). ). Mandatory pre-bid meeting will be held on Tuesday, December 15, 2015, at 10:00 AM in the Training Room at the Airpor t Office Building, 11495 Navaid Rd., Bridgeton, MO 63044. All bidders must regard Federal Executive Order 11246, "Notice of Requirement for Affirmative Action to Ensure E q u a l Empl oyment Opportunity", the "Equal Opportunity Clause" and the "Standard Federal Equal Employment Specifications" set forth within and referenced at w w w .s t l - b p s .o r g (Announcements).

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A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , 1 8 7 8

SATURDAY • 12.05.2015 • A14

COKE FIZZES OUT

POSTCARD FROM MOUND CITY • BY DAN MARTIN

Short take • Science-for-hire company gets ired. A great scientific dream died this week: The Global Energy Balance Network, funded by the Coca-Cola Co. and founded on the premise that convincing people that all they had to do to drink sugar water was get more exercise, was disbanded. The research group, headed by James Hill of the University of Colorado Medical School, had come under fire from public health experts after the New York Times revealed in August that it was created with $1.5 million from Coca-Cola. The Associated Press this week reported a series of emails detailing the company’s role in setting up the research group. In July 2014, for example,

Rhona Applebaum, then Coke’s chief science officer, emailed Mr. Hill suggesting: “Akin to a political campaign, we will develop, deploy and evolve a powerful and multi-faceted strategy to counter radical organizations and their proponents.” Critics found it more akin to the Tobacco Institute’s famous misdirection campaign. The soda facts weren’t wrong, but the larger fact is that it takes way more physical activity than most people get to burn off the 140 calories in a can of Coke. But “If you want to drink Coke, you have to get off the couch” isn’t much of a sales slogan. dmartin@post-dispatch.com

YOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS Editorial about Mizzou just another example of media divisiveness In reading the editorial “Hostility is antilife” (Nov. 29), it became clear how the bias of the Post-Dispatch editorial board has become part of the divisive media that fuels hatred. As a one-paper town, you should be better, and St. Louisans deserve better. The Post-Dispatch is no different than Fox News or CNN. Instead of doing real journalism, all you do is regurgitate the hype of the national media to fit your own bias. What happened at Mizzou demanded a deeper look at the state’s flagship university from the daily newspaper. The real story should have been what drove the protest because racism likely was not it, but it is the one issue that would draw the attention needed. The faculty and grad students at Mizzou played the media, including the Post-Dispatch, for fools. The cuts in tenure for faculty and insurance for grad students, the Planned Parenthood clinic, and tea party conservatism of the administration were the real reason for the protest, but no one would have cared about that. They wanted regime change and used a poop swastika and redneck in a truck to get it — a brilliant strategy they knew would go unchecked by the media and give them momentum for their real goals. Fox News would portray the ungrateful students as takers, and CNN and the PostDispatch would portray them as heroes standing up against institutional racism. In the end, the media attention would force the regime change they wanted and the people of Missouri would become a little less trustful of people with diferent skin pigment. Thank you, Post-Dispatch, Fox News, CNN, Concerned Student 1950, Sen. Kurt Schaefer, R. Bowen Loftin and all the other actors in this tragic-comedy for making our state worse. The reason newspapers are dying is not because of the Internet or video. It is because they have become lazy. The bottom line is the Post-Dispatch has a responsibility to its readers, its historic past as a once great paper, and journalistic integrity to be better than that divisive editorial and failure to cover the whole story at Mizzou. Tim O’Brien • St. Charles

City Hall gets it all wrong regarding St. Louis’ music scene Regarding “Concert contract canceled” (Nov. 28): I read Nicholas J.C. Pistor’s article about the cancellation of the Summer Rocks contract with a huge sigh of “no kidding.” Last year an out-of-town group, fronted by local developer Steve Stogel, managed to convince representatives at City Hall that, with no track record or connection to St. Louis, they would produce mega-festivals which would be of great financial benefit to the city and region. It didn’t work. The repercussions from the nonfestivals included several major events moving out of the city, a major musical event tied to the National Blues Museum no longer exists, and all of the jobs that came with the events — musicians, production crews, security, vendors — and the money that spills out into the downtown businesses vanished.

Mary Ellen Ponder, chief of staf for Mayor Francis Slay said, “This ambitious endeavor did not come to fruition despite our best eforts.” To be clear, the best efort of the city was to agree to a lopsided contract, with a ridiculous noncompete clause, by an out-of-town group, which displaced already existing events; while in no uncertain terms, the St. Louis community vocally opposed the whole project. Ponder followed up by saying, “We will continue to seek out opportunities that will bring St. Louis the type of world-class music experience that it deserves.” That attitude drives directly at how little city officials seem to understand what is in their own backyard. A city that can claim such acts as Chuck Berry, Ike and Tina Turner, Johnnie Johnson, Fontella Bass and Albert King is a world-class music city. Just imagine what could have come if the time, energy and money that was put into the Summer Rocks concerts would have been put into the world-class music, art and culture which already exists in St Louis. Worst of all, City Hall continues ignore the fact that they are representatives of the people who live here. Musicians, venue owners, producers and folks in the entertainment industry are all voters and taxpayers. I look forward to the time when city officials and business leaders realize what a huge untapped economic commodity St. Louis music is and always has been. Jeremy Segel-Moss • St. Louis President, St. Louis Blues Society

Parents support daughter’s choice to be police oicer Dom Mueller cannot support his son’s career path as a police officer (“Upset at blatant disrespect for men and women in uniform,” Dec. 2). That is his choice. He asks: “As a father, am I wrong?” I answer Mr. Mueller as a father. My wife and I have a daughter. We love her as much as Mr. Mueller loves his son. She is the wife of a wonderful husband and the mother of three beautiful children. Next month, she will have been a member of the St. Louis Police Department for 13 years, most of those spent driving a patrol car in the 3rd District. Is there fear? As a parent, I can say of course there is fear, but our daughter does not have the luxury of taking fear into account. Just as is Mr. Mueller’s son, our daughter is full of life, vim and vigor. Voluntarily putting herself in harm’s way was not something my wife and I were expecting, either. Sure, there are groups that have absolutely no respect for our men and women in uniform, but most folks understand the men and women in uniform are indeed brave souls. Mr. Mueller does not want his son to volunteer for such blatant disrespect. No parent wants that for his or her child. In my experience, however, police oicers do not see themselves as volunteers for blatant disrespect. They see themselves as public servants who protect and serve. They even protect and serve those who have no respect for them. Do my wife and I support our daughter’s career path? You bet we do. Every single day, and we could not be more proud to do so. Our daughter has, on many occasions, run toward danger while others were running away from it. That’s what one does

who protects and serves. Mr. Mueller will not support his son’s career choice “until … respect for the uniform is restored and the respect for the badge is earned.” While he is waiting for that day, men and women like my daughter will be working for that day. I can assure Mr. Mueller our daughter has nothing more to do to earn respect for her uniform and badge. I’m quite certain she’s earned it. Tom Plunkert • Warson Woods

NICUs are absolutely necessary in health care As a NICU nurse, I have dedicated my career to caring for premature and sick newborns. In the United States, one in 10 babies is born premature, which normally requires a NICU admission because they likely have respiratory issues, feeding problems and trouble maintaining their temperature. St. Louis was given an F from the March of Dimes on our prematurity rate in 2015. Missouri and Illinois received C’s from the March of Dimes report card on prematurity for 2015. The article “NICU study questions spike in admissions” (Nov. 29) by Michele Munz completely discredits these cold, hard facts. NICUs are absolutely necessary in health care. The rate of newborns’ morbidity and mortality has drastically decreased due to specialized care for newborns. Ms. Munz barely touched on the fact that most of these normal weight babies are born to mothers who are diabetic. These babies have severe blood sugar issues, which take time and energy to stabilize. There are so many more factors that go into neonatal care that were not even bothered to be researched, such as babies who are breathing too fast could be sufering from a lifethreatening heart defect, who could die at home if undetected. Also, if there are too many NICUs, according to the article, why is it that all of the NICUs in St. Louis are currently busting at the seams with severely ill infants? Jill Barron • Fenton

Sherpa column was entertaining; bring it back Bring back Sherpa! Something in the Post-Dispatch has to be of an entertaining nature, other than your editorials. We miss Joe Holleman’s Sherpa column in the Sunday Everyday section and we really don’t care which of his buddies in the media business are getting awards, moving from TV station to station, etc. now appearing in the weekday editions. Apparently, I’m not alone in this opinion, since his Joe’s St. Louis Spotlight column on Sunday has become boring of late, and readers are not responding to his request for column ideas that provide interesting reading. Paul Friswold • St. Louis County

Elected oicials should be first to host refugees Jesus challenged the leaders in his day because they imposed laws that placed heavy burdens on the shoulders of those they purported to lead. His message seems to be relevant in the current discussion regarding the Syrian refugee issue. For all those in the White House and in both houses of Congress who support ac-

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diference in its cardinal principles, that it will always fight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always fight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisfied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907

Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days. Additional letters are posted online at STLtoday.com/letters.

Important that more homes get tested for radon gas Lung cancer doesn’t play favorites; it can happen despite your sex, age, race, religion, political affiliation, height, weight or skin tone. Lung cancer is the leading cancer killer in both men and women, according to American Lung Association, American Cancer Society, and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. An estimated 158,040 American citizens will die from lung cancer this year — more that colorectal, breast and prostate cancers combined. Very few people are knowledgeable about a leading cause of lung cancer that may be present in their homes: radioactive radon gas. Lung cancer in nonsmokers is the seventh-leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. According to the Environmental Protection Agency and other experts in the field of epidemiology, radon exposure can be the reason 21,000 or more people die each year from lung cancer in our nation. The synergistic efect of smoking and radon gas exposure multiplies the chance of the development of lung cancer. Elevated levels of radon gas have been found in every state in our nation. Radon gas is emitted from the decay products of uranium in the soil and rocks beneath structures like our homes, schools and workplaces. Because the presence of radon cannot be detected by our human senses, the only way to know if it is sharing your environment is to perform a simple test. Test kits can be purchased at hardware stores or free online if you live in Missouri at health.mo.gov/living/environment/ radon/testkit.php. If the radon level is elevated, the radon level can be lowered by a certified professional mitigator. Last month, the National Radon Action Plan was released, which is a combined effort of federal and nongovernment organizations to make radon reduction standard practice to eliminate avoidable radon-induced lung cancer; however, the real difference will be made when laws and regulations are passed to protect our citizens from radioactive radon exposure. Discovering that my home had elevated levels of radon when my husband, Joe, was diagnosed with lung cancer, I educated the Illinois legislators about the danger of radon gas. The Radon Awareness Act was passed and has resulted in a 300 percent increase in the number of homes being tested in Illinois. Gloria Linnertz • Waterloo

GILBERT BAILON EDITOR

PLATFORM • I know that my retirement will make no

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cepting 10,000 refugees, my suggestion is that they themselves shelter the first 1,500 families. Most of these elected oicials are people of means, so they could easily aford to do so. This would show great leadership by example. Furthermore, doing so would reverse the usual practice of enacting laws that place heavy burdens on the backs of the citizens, while at the same time exempting themselves from those same obligations. They would be paying their fair share by supporting refugees with food, clothing and housing and would be witnessing against hypocritical politics. Finally, their actions would concretely demonstrate in the words of President Abraham Lincoln that our government truly is “of the people, by the people, for the people.” Jack Hunthausen • St. Louis

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KEVIN HORRIGAN khorrigan@post-dispatch.com Deputy Editorial Page Editor • 314-340-8135 FRANK REUST freust@post-dispatch.com Letters Editor • 314-340-8356 DEBORAH PETERSON dpeterson@post-dispatch.com Editorial writer • 314-340-8276


WORLD

12.05.2015 • Saturday • M 1

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • A15

Germany OKs military mission to ight against Islamic State Lawmakers approve noncombat support vs. militants ASSOCIATED PRESS

BERLIN • Germany stepped up its contribution to the fight against the Islamic State group on Friday, with lawmakers overwhelmingly voting in favor of sending reconnaissance jets, a tanker plane and a frigate to provide broad noncombat support to the U.S.-led coalition flying airstrikes against the militants. The move answers a call for help from France following last month’s deadly attacks in Paris. Islamic State militants claimed responsibility for the Nov. 13 attacks that killed 130 people and wounded hundreds. On Friday, Belgian and French authorities said they were hunting two new suspects in the Paris carnage. The men used fake identity cards and sent money to a relative of the man who orchestrated the attacks the day before the ringleader died in a shootout with French police, the Belgian prosecutor’s oice said. The German Parliament voted 445 in support of the mission against the extremist group and 146 against, with seven abstentions. The plan received wide support from the ranks of Chancellor Angela Merkel’s governing coalition, a week after the German leader assured French President Francois Hollande that Germany would “act quickly” to help its ally.

“The party that will win is not the party that will have the most powerful, the most modern or the most expensive weaponry or even the bravest fighters,” Henin said. “The side that will win ... is the party that will have the Syrian people on its side. By bombing Syria, we are pushing the Syrians into the hands of IS.” The $145 million-German mission will see two Tornado reconnaissance planes sent to Turkey’s Incirlik base as early as next week. The frigate is already en route to join French aircraft carrier Charles de Gaulle. A maximum contingent of 1,200 soldiers was also approved, serving as support troops in Turkey and elsewhere, including at headquarters operations in Qatar and Kuwait. The German mission is open-ended, but needs annual parliamentary approval. Meanwhile, Hollande visited the Charles de Gaulle, France’s only aircraft carrier, in the eastern Mediterranean where it was dispatched a week before the Paris attacks. The French carrier has been launching raids against Islamic State bases as part of the U.S.-led coalition’s strikes against the group — 110 sorties. It carries 2,000 people on board. British jets flew their first missions as part of the coalition’s anti-Islamic State efforts on Thursday, striking oil fields in eastern Syria that help finance the extremist group.

CRITICS ARE WARY However, German opposition lawmakers questioned the efectiveness of military operations against the extremists. “You won’t fight IS that way. You’ll only strengthen it,” Left Party lawmaker Sahra Wagenknecht told Parliament. Her criticism echoed the concerns voiced by Nicolas Henin, a French journalist who was held hostage by Islamic State militants for 10 months until being freed in April 2014. Henin said that although using military muscle against the group shouldn’t be ruled out, it should be only a small part of a broader strategy.

REBELS TO MEET Saudi Arabia is hosting Syrian opposition groups and many of the main rebel factions next week in an efort to come up with a unified front ahead of peace talks with representatives of the government in Damascus, scheduled to begin early next year. The meeting is the first of its kind in the Sunni kingdom, which is a main backer of the Syrian opposition, underscoring how the internationally backed effort is the most serious yet in attempts to end the nearly five-year civil war. The conflict has killed more than a quarter of a million

people and triggered a refugee crisis of massive proportions. The rebel factions’ participation points to the evolution in the position of many of them that long rejected any negotiations with Damascus so long as long President Bashar Assad was in power. Now they are on board to attempt a process that the United States and its allies say must eventually lead to Assad’s removal — but with no timetable for it. At the three-day gathering that starts next Tuesday in the Saudi capital, Riyadh, the factions will try to form a unified opposition delegation and a platform regarding what is meant to be a transitional period in Syria, oicials who were invited said.

MASS GRAVES REPORTED In Iraq Friday, the U.N. human rights oice said that it has received reports of 16 mass graves discovered near the town of Sinjar after the town was liberated from the Islamic State group last month. The reports were the latest among many instances of mass graves being uncovered in territory wrested from Islamic State militants in Iraq and Syria — thousands of people have been killed in summary and extrajudicial killings by the Sunni militants and the graves have been a dark testimony to the group’s brutality. In June 2014, some 1,700 Iraqi soldiers were captured and then killed by Islamic State militants when they overran Saddam Hussein’s hometown of Tikrit. At the time, the soldiers were trying to flee from Camp Speicher, a nearby army base where they were deployed. Mass graves with hundreds of Iraqi soldiers’ bodies were found after the city was liberated in April. There were no immediate details about how many bodies might be inside the newly found Sinjar graves, according to spokeswoman Cecile Pouilly of the Oice of the High Commissioner for Human Rights.

Death Notice Index

Biondo, Ninfa

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(nee Serra) Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church Wednesday, December 2, 2015. Beloved wife of Giovanni Biondo; dearest mother of Antonino, Maria and Giuseppina Biondo; dear daughter of Onofrio and Lucrezia Serra (nee Ventimiglia); daughter-in-law of Antonio and Giuseppa Biondo; sister of Vincenzo (Giuseppina) Serra, Rosalia (Vito) Randazzo, Teresa (Gianfranco) Pizzo; sister-in-law of Maria (Matteo) Licavoli; our dear niece, aunt, cousin and friend to many. Services: Funeral Monday, December 7, 9:30 a.m. from Collier's Funeral Home, 3400 N. Lindbergh, St. Ann to Holy Spirit Church, 3130 Parkwood Lane, Maryland Heights Mass 10:00 a.m. Entombment Holy Cross Cemetery. Visitation Sunday, 2-9 p.m. www.colliersfuneralhome.com

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To place your loved one’s Funeral Notice, please call the St. Louis Post-Dispatch at 800-365-0820 Ext. 8600 or 314-340-8600 or e-mail us at deathnotices@post-dispatch.com. Please log on to STLtoday.com/obits to share your memories, upload photos and sign the online guest book. As a part of our services, all guest books remain online permanently.

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ASSOCIATED PRESS

German Chancellor Angela Merkel (right) casts her vote Friday to join the alliance against the Islamic State group.

at the age of 93, fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Wednesday, December 2, 2015. Beloved husband of the late Patricia Smith Erker; loving father of Charles A. Erker (Holly), G. Stephen Erker, Barbara Erker Baumstark and Barrett Erker; dear stepfather of Blakeslee E. Noyes (Joanne), Christopher B. Noyes (Anne) and Constance N. Fowler (Ian); dear brother of the late Charles Erker and August Erker; loving grandfather of Candace, Meredith, Lauren, Joseph, Blakeslee, Daniel, Connor, Patricia, Allyson, Elena and Andrew; dear great-grandfather of Tiago and Quinn; uncle, great-uncle, cousin and friend. George (Daderk) was a lifetime resident of St. Louis, graduate of Country Day School and Princeton University. He was a proud veteran of the U.S. Navy, where he served as a pilot during WWII in the Pacific Theater. At the age of 26, George started his career as a stockbroker and remained active in the business the remainder of his life. George loved Pattie, his family, the Northwoods of Wisconsin and Windermere Island, Bahamas. Services: A Memorial Mass will be celebrated at Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic Church, 7148 Forsyth Blvd., at Asbury Avenue, University City on Saturday, December 5, 2015 at 10:00 a.m. Private interment. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to SSM Cardinal Glennon Children's Hospital, 1465 South Grand Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63104 or Girls Inc., 3801 Nelson Dr., St. Louis, MO 63121. The family will receive friends at LUPTON CHAPEL, 7233 Delmar Blvd., University City on Friday, December 4, 2015 from 4:00 to 7:00 p.m. Friends are invited to express condolences at www.luptonchapel.com A SERVICE OF LUPTON CHAPEL

Felman, Leon A. Died on December 3, 2015 at the age of 80. He moved to St. Louis with his family at age 32, rented a small house and opened his first restaurant. Twenty five years later he was considered a prominent, but very private, businessman - investor. He spent the last twenty years of his life doing the things he loved. He generously contributed to dozens of charitable institutions that protected animals, children and veterans. He served on the boards of St. Louis Public Radio, Barnes-Jewish Hospital Foundation, University of Missouri (UMSL) and others. He mentored young entrepreneurs and continued to actively participate in business. Leon's great love for the Cardinals and all things sports was only surpassed by his deep love for his family and friends to whom he was fiercely loyal. He is survived by his wife of 60 years, Harriet; son Seth Felman; daughter and son-in-law Amy and Stephen Levin; his grandchildren Chase, Hannah and Drew Felman and Eli and Samantha Levin; and his brother-in-law, Bernard Lipscher. He will be sorely missed. Services: Memorial service Sunday, December 6, 2:30 p.m. at United Hebrew Congregation, 13788 Conway Road with visitation beginning at 2:00 p.m. until time of service. Interment Private. A RINDSKOPF-ROTH SERVICE

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asleep in Jesus, Wednesday, December 2, 2015. Beloved son of David and Christine Keithley; loving step-son of Kristin Ober loving brother of Charlie, Luke and Delaney Keithley, Emma and Jacob Otto; loving grandson of Gary (Suzanne) Keithley, Ed (Betty) Dirnbeck, Hayward (Ann) Liebling and Ruth McClintock; dear nephew, cousin and friend to many. Services: Funeral service at St. John Church, 15800 Manchester Road, Ellisville, Monday, 11:00 a.m. Interment St. John's Lutheran Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Cornelia de Lange Syndrome Foundation. Visitation at the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory, 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, Sunday 4-8 p.m. and at the church, Monday 10 a.m to time of service. Friends may sign the family's on-line guestbook at Schrader.com.

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NEWS

A16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 12.05.2015

Maine town celebrates earmuf inventor

WEATHER • LOW 31, HIGH 56 > WINDS SE 3-8 MPH Mostly sunny and mild today

BY DAVID SHARP Associated Press

Mostly sunny skies along with light winds and mild temperatures can be expected across the region today as high pressure remains in control. Highs will be in the middle 50s. A weak front will bring more clouds to the area on Sunday. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

24-HOUR FORECAST

MORNING

LUNCH

DRIVE

BEDTIME

35°

50°

53°

45°

Mostly clear

Partly cloudy

Mostly sunny Mostly sunny

F A R M I N G T O N , MAINE • Earmufs come

4-DAY FORECAST

SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

34°/51°

37°/52°

38°/55°

41°/56°

Partly sunny

Partly sunny

Partly cloudy Partly sunny

Shown are this morning’s lows and today’s highs

TODAY IN THE BI-STATE AREA L

H

30 30 31 27 29 31 39 31 31 31 30 30 29

56 54 55 54 55 56 55 51 54 55 53 55 54

Illinois Bloomington Carbondale Chicago Decatur Effingham Macomb Mount Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Springfield Urbana

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Missouri Branson Cape Girardeau Columbia Farmington Jefferson City Joplin Kansas City Kirksville Rolla Springfield St. Joseph Union West Plains

W

sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny

L

H

W

29 28 31 29 28 30 27 30 31 29 30 28

48 53 52 49 47 49 51 48 53 49 50 47

sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy

Chicago 31 / 52

Kirksville 31 / 51 Kansas City 39 / 55

Springfield 30 / 50

St. Louis 31 / 56 Carbondale 28 / 53

Joplin

Poplar Bluff 30 / 54

31 / 56

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

ALMANAC Asof7P.M.atLambertField 54° 30° 46° 30° 74° 8° 41° 34°

0.00” 0.01” 0.42” 49.51” 38.54”

TODAY’S AIR QUALITY Very unhealthy

Good

TODAY’S UV INDEX Min.

Very high The higher the UV index number, the greater the need for skin protection.

POLLEN COUNTS Friday, Dec. 4th No tree, grass, or weed pollen present Mold - 1,689 (low) HEATING DEGREE DAYS 23 Yesterday 92 Month (Total) 654 Season 1076 Year Ago

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

PRECIPITATION Last 24 hrs Month (Total) Month (Normal) Year (Total) Year (Normal)

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

TEMPERATURES High (12:56 p.m.) Low (7:26 a.m.) Average High Average Low Record High (2001) Record Low (1886) High Last Year Low Last Year

SUN & MOON

New Dec 11 Sunrise

First Dec 18

Full Dec 25

Last Jan 1

7:03 AM Sunset

4:40 PM

Moonrise 1:27 AM Moonset 1:33 PM

Looking to the southeast around 6 a.m. in the morning you will see Mars above and to the right of the moon. Looking below and to the left of the moon you will see Venus.

SOURCE: McDonnell Planetarium

RIVER STAGES

Flood Stage

Current Level

MISSOURI RIVER Kansas City 32 13.20 Jefferson City 23 15.93 21 18.76 Hermann 20 15.49 Washington 25 21.72 St. Charles MISSISSIPPI RIVER Hannibal 16 16.13 Louisiana 15 15.57 Dam 24 25 26.11 Dam 25 26 26.30 Grafton 18 19.16 M.Price, Pool 419 416.20 M.Price, Tail. 21 19.87 St Louis 30 25.62 Chester 27 28.09 Cape Girardeau 32 32.85

24-Hr Change

Flood Stage

Current Level

ILLINOIS RIVER La Salle 20 19.02 18 16.58 Peoria 14 14.90 Beardstown MERAMEC RIVER 15 4.30 Sullivan 16 5.68 Valley Park 24 23.08 Arnold BOURBEUSE RIVER Union 15 3.82 OHIO RIVER Cairo 40 40.53

- 1.35 - 1.28 - 0.89 - 0.82 - 0.74 - 0.89 - 0.86 - 0.81 - 0.38 - 0.16 - 0.10 - 0.50 - 0.58 - 0.22 + 0.14

LAKE LEVELS

24-Hr Change

Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

- 0.69 + 0.06 + 0.18 - 0.37 - 0.87 - 0.55 - 0.62

Current Level

24-Hr Change

355.61 372.47 511.15 658.16 713.96 664.60 916.88 845.31 601.03 407.64 609.20 446.34

- 0.08 - 0.02 - 1.39 - 0.17 + 0.06 + 0.18 - 0.30 - 0.22 + 0.09 - 0.02 - 0.32 - 0.16

+ 1.61

Maps and weather data provided by:

Get more river & lake stage information at 636-441-8467

and go when it comes to fashion. But they’re always in style on Chester Greenwood Day. Residents of Farmington, Maine, are set to pay homage to the inventor of the earmuff Saturday by proudly wearing muffs during a parade in honor of the town’s native son. As the story goes, 15-year-old Chester grew weary of the biting cold on his large ears while ice skating and decided to do something about it. He fashioned muffs out of farm wire, and his grandmother sewed fur on them. He improved his creation,

PEOPLE ‘Orange’ star faces assault charges One of the stars of “Orange is the New Black” is facing assault charges after she was accused of punching and scratching a teenage girl. Dascha Polanco was arraigned Thursday in Manhattan Criminal Court. Court papers iled by the district attorney’s oice say the attack on 17-year-old Michelle Cardona happened inside Polanco’s upper Manhattan apartment on July 29. They say Polanco punched the teen several times, pulled her hair and scratched her. Polanco’s attorney, Gerald Lefcourt, says the accusation is an attempt to extort money from the actress. Police ind cocaine in Weiland tour bus • Police in Bloomington, Minn., say they found cocaine in the bedroom of the tour bus where former Stone Temple Pilots frontman Scott Weiland was found dead. Police said they found “a small quantity” of cocaine during a search of the bus Friday after Weiland’s death.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A portrait of Chester Greenwood with his famous invention hangs at the municipal oices in Farmington, Maine.

obtained a patent and manufactured thousands of “Champion Ear Protectors” in Farmington. His legacy seemed to fade away after his death

in 1937. But he and the ear protectors made a comeback 40 years later when the Maine Legislature established Chester Greenwood Day in 1977.

Investigators say they also found a small amount of cocaine elsewhere in the bus and arrested a California man who was traveling with Weiland. The man hasn’t been charged.

Louis, and wrap the tour on March 17 at the Los Angeles Memorial Sports Arena. Tickets go on sale Friday.

Springsteen plans tour in 2016 • Bruce Springsteen will kick of a nine-week U.S. tour next year. On Friday, the music icon, 66, announced The River Tour with the E Street Band, which starts Jan. 16 in Pittsburgh. Springsteen will play 24 dates, including March 6 at the Chaifetz Arena in St.

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS Singer Little Richard is 83. Singer Jim Messina is 68. Country singer Tyler England is 52. Singerguitarist John Rzeznik is 50. Country singer Gary Allan is 48. Comedian Margaret Cho is 47. Actor Frankie Muniz is 30. Actor Ross Bagley is 27. From news services

DONATE YOUR CAR x % Ta 100 tible c u Ded

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Make-A-Wish® Missouri *Free Vehicle Pickup ANYWHERE *We Accept All Vehicles Running or Not *We also accept Trucks, RVs, SUVs & Boats

WheelsForWishes.org

Call: (314) 499-1300

* Wheels For Wishes is a DBA of Car Donation Foundation.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

TODAY ACROSS THE U.S.

National Extremes High: 82° Fort Lauderdale, Florida Low: 5° Big Piney, Wyoming

ORDER BY DEC. 18 TO ENSURE DELIVERY BEFORE 12/25.*

110s 100s 90s

Rain

80s 70s 60s

T-storms

50s 40s 30s

Snow

20s 10s

Wintry Mix

0s -0s Alaska Low: -35°

-10s

Hawaii High: 85°

Jet Stream

Lower 48 temps only

A large ridge of high pressure will keep dry conditions in place throughout the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic, Ohio Valley, Midwest, Great Lakes, and Deep South. Wet weather is expected across parts of south Florida and the Pacific Northwest. The coldest temperatures across the United States will be found in the upper Midwest and north-central Rockies. Today L H

Albany, N.Y. 33 Albuquerque 31 Anchorage 18 Atlanta 36 Atlantic City 32 Baltimore 32 Billings 27 Biloxi, Ms. 44 Birmingham 35 Bismarck 28 Boise 28 Boston 38 Buffalo 37 Burlington, Vt. 32 Charleston, S.C. 43 Charleston, W.V. 26 Charlotte 32 Cheyenne 25 Chicago 31 Cincinnati 29 Cleveland 30 Colorado Spgs. 31 Concord, N.H. 28 Dallas 39 Daytona Beach 64 Denver 30 Des Moines 33 47 Destin, Fl. 30 Detroit 37 El Paso 28 Evansville -5 Fairbanks 30 Fargo 18 Flagstaff 66 Fort Myers 34 Great Falls 28 Green Bay 33 Hartford 73 Honolulu 40 Houston 29 Indianapolis 35 Jackson, Ms. 28 Juneau 71 Key West 42 Las Vegas 33 Little Rock 52 Los Angeles 29 Louisville

49 55 24 57 53 55 43 65 60 46 41 53 51 47 62 55 56 40 52 51 48 47 49 60 75 43 54 66 49 67 52 12 36 49 81 43 47 54 84 64 49 62 36 79 60 57 76 53

W

Tomorrow L H W

sunny sunny cloudy sunny sunny sunny sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny windy showers partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny

29 26 16 39 33 32 26 46 41 19 34 40 34 30 43 27 33 18 32 30 32 18 23 42 67 21 35 49 31 34 31 -7 25 17 66 35 32 30 73 45 30 41 32 73 41 36 53 32

52 50 19 59 55 54 48 65 62 49 42 56 52 51 62 59 59 50 45 51 51 54 54 61 77 56 47 65 46 59 52 4 38 55 83 47 42 57 84 66 48 65 36 81 62 58 79 56

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

City

sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny sunny sunny mostly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy sunny showers sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny mostly cloudy mostly sunny cloudy partly sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy very cold sunny sunny mostly cloudy windy mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy

City

Today L H

35 Macon 54 McAllen, Tx. 34 Memphis 71 Miami 30 Milwaukee 33 Minneapolis Missoula, Mt. 23 39 Mobile Montgomery 35 29 Nashville New Orleans 46 New York City 37 Norfolk, Va. 39 Oklahoma City 35 Omaha 35 Orlando 63 Palm Springs 49 Philadelphia 35 Phoenix 46 Pittsburgh 28 Portland, Me. 29 Portland, Or. 41 Providence 35 Raleigh 32 Rapid City 28 Reno 22 Richmond, Va. 30 Sacramento 38 St. Petersburg 65 Salt Lake City 25 San Antonio 40 San Diego 50 San Francisco 45 Santa Fe 25 Savannah 44 Seattle 42 35 Shreveport 34 Sioux Falls 35 Syracuse 46 Tallahassee 62 Tampa 40 Tucson 33 Tulsa 37 Wash D.C. W. Palm Beach 73 37 Wichita Wilmington, De. 32 49 Yuma

61 74 59 79 49 44 36 64 63 58 63 53 55 55 47 79 76 53 74 49 48 52 53 60 44 47 56 56 76 42 65 75 57 52 62 51 61 39 48 66 79 76 57 57 80 53 53 75

W

Tomorrow L H W

partly cloudy mostly sunny sunny showers partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny sunny sunny sunny sunny sunny sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny sunny sunny sunny sunny cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy rain sunny cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny showers mostly cloudy sunny sunny

37 56 41 73 33 33 22 45 43 35 51 40 46 38 32 66 45 35 46 26 28 44 38 34 20 32 33 44 67 25 45 54 49 18 46 45 41 23 31 49 64 40 39 38 75 36 33 49

62 73 60 80 44 42 37 65 66 55 68 56 57 56 46 80 76 54 77 52 52 52 58 59 46 55 58 59 77 45 67 74 62 47 63 51 63 37 52 70 81 76 56 54 80 52 55 76

partly cloudy partly sunny mostly cloudy showers partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly sunny sunny sunny sunny sunny rain sunny sunny sunny mostly cloudy sunny rain partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy rain partly cloudy partly cloudy rain partly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny showers partly cloudy sunny sunny

ST. LOUIS

HOLIDAY SPIRIT AND STYLE

TODAY AROUND THE WORLD H

W

90 49 69 58 93 86 43 47 49 81 59 42 83 81 54 44

sunny cloudy partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms showers mostly sunny partly cloudy fog partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy cloudy fog

City

L

H

W

Geneva Hong Kong Istanbul Jakarta Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Madrid Mecca Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi

35 60 41 77 38 61 39 50 39 70 47 32 34 76 59 52

46 67 53 91 53 90 65 55 63 90 70 42 39 82 77 79

partly sunny rain sunny thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly sunny cloudy thunderstorms showers sunny

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

L

72 48 50 38 75 79 25 41 39 64 46 25 72 64 50 36

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

City Acapulco Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Barbados Beijing Berlin Budapest Buenos Aires Cairo Calgary Cancun Cape Town Dublin Frankfurt

City

L

H

W

Oslo Paris Prague Rio De Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Stockholm Sydney Taipei Tokyo Toronto Vancouver Vienna Warsaw

35 40 37 70 46 76 54 32 38 57 61 45 34 44 41 41

49 47 45 84 57 84 82 45 52 79 75 61 44 47 51 46

cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly sunny showers partly cloudy partly cloudy cloudy mostly sunny showers mostly sunny partly cloudy rain partly cloudy partly cloudy

* Orders placed after 12/14 will need to choose expedited shipping to ensure delivery.

thepost-dispatchstore.com 1-877-POST-STL (1-877-767-8785) MONDAY - FRIDAY 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Shop 24/7 at your St. Louis store.

Limited quantities available. SHOP EARLY!


ENTERTAINMENT

12.05.2015 • Saturday • M 1

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • A17

TV REVIEW

‘No bad news’ in updated ‘he Wiz Live!’ BY GAIL PENNINGTON St. Louis Post-dispatch

An abundance of commercials and a striking lack of Toto didn’t keep “The Wiz Live!” from being NBC’s best holiday production yet. The musical profited from great casting, with newcomer Shanice Williams (outstanding on all her solos) as Dorothy and a rich supporting ensemble including Stephanie Mills (the original Dorothy on Broadway) as Aunt Em. The 1975 Broadway musical and 1978 movie “The Wiz” adapted the L. Frank Baum book and Judy Garland movie “The Wizard of Oz” with Motown music and an all-black cast. The movie included Diana Ross and Michael Jackson. Tours and revivals have been many, and “The Wiz” remains popular around the world. Looking for a follow-up to 2013’s “The Sound of Music” and last year’s “Peter Pan,” NBC opted for “The Wiz Live!” over “The Music Man,” which the network also optioned. The choice was smart. “The Wiz Live!” (its script updated with humorous touches by Harvey Fierstein) seemed contemporary and relevant, a musical for a time when issues of race and diversity are at the forefront of our culture. Choreographer

NBC

Shanice Williams (left) as Dorothy and Amber Riley as Addaperle, the Good Witch of the North, in “The Wiz Live!”

Fatima Robinson is credited with updating the dance moves. Producers Craig Zadan and Neil Meron eschewed the stunt casting that sank “Peter Pan Live” and almost did in “The Sound of Music.” Williams, making her TV debut as Dorothy, sang exceptionally well and acted well enough. (Only her dancing

seemed a little stif.) The ensemble featured standout after standout, all seeming to have the time of their lives: Amber Riley (“Glee”), resplendent in blue, as Addaperle, the Good Witch of the North; Mary J. Blige as the Wicked Witch of the West; and Uzo Aduba (“Orange Is the New Black”) as Glinda, the

Good Witch of the South. (A highlight of the whole show was Blige’s “Don’t Nobody Bring Me No Bad News.”) Elijah Kelley as the Scarecrow, Ne-Yo as the Tin Woodman and David Alan Grier as the Cowardly Lion joined Dorothy to “Ease on Down the Road.” Common was Oz’s bouncer, and Queen Latifah was the Wiz. For added flash, Cirque du Soleil, which produced “The Wiz Live!” along with Universal, choreographed the opening tornado (a thrilling, unsettling scene), the always scary flying monkeys, and Oz itself with dancers and acrobats. Commercials were many, with advertising blocks lasting about 4½ minutes and arriving all too frequently. Apparently, the production was designed that way to allow for scene changes on a single set, but the interruptions made the show seem choppy and disjointed. Another complaint: Where was Toto? The dog cast in the role was an outsize terrier, possibly a Westie, and he got left behind in Kansas. Maybe this is always the case with “The Wiz,” but Toto fans felt his absence. Gail Pennington • 314-340-8136 TV critic @gailpennington on Twitter gpennington@post-dispatch.com

120515

() ! CC DVS OC DP

Showtimes and movies change daily and are provided by the theaters.

Saturday, December 5, 2015

Central

St. Charles / O’Fallon

St. Charles / O’Fallon

Chase Park Plaza (St. Louis Mid Rivers 14 Cine (Wehrenberg) Cinemas)

O’Fallon Stadium 14 (Regal)

Kingshighway & Lindell ! Chi-Raq (R) DP

40 & Winghaven Blvd.

1220 Mid Rivers Mall Dr. 314-367-0101 www.wehrenberg.com ! Krampus (PG-13) No VIP after 6PM

(11:10 AM 1:50 4:30) 7:10 9:50

10:00 AM 12:25 2:45 5:05 7:25 8:30 9:50

Creed (PG-13) DP

! The Letters (PG) No VIP after 6PM

(10:30 AM 1:10 3:55) 6:40 9:30

10:45 AM 1:30 4:15 7:10 10:00

! Creed (PG-13) No VIP after 6PM

Spectre (PG-13) DP

10:05 AM 11:05 AM 1:10 2:10 4:15 5:15 7:20 8:20 10:25

(2:30) 5:30 8:30

Spotlight (R) DP

! The Good Dinosaur in Disney Digital

(11:00 AM 1:40 4:20) 7:00 9:40

3D (PG) No VIP after 6PM

Brooklyn (PG-13) DP

12:30 3:00 8:00

! The Good Dinosaur (PG) No VIP after 6PM

(10:50 AM 1:30 4:10) 6:50 9:20

Galleria 6 (St. Louis Cinemas) St. Louis Galleria

314-725-0808

Krampus (PG-13) DP (10:30 AM 12:35 2:40 4:55) 7:15 9:30

Creed (PG-13) DP

10:00 AM 11:45 AM 2:15 4:45 5:30 7:15 9:45 10:30

! Victor Frankenstein (PG-13) No VIP after 6PM 9:30 PM

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 2 (PG-13) 10:00 AM 11:00 AM 1:05 2:10 4:10 5:15 7:20 8:30 10:30

The Night Before (R)

(10:15 AM 1:10 4:05) 7:00 9:55

11:00 AM 1:40 4:20 7:05 9:45

The Good Dinosaur (PG) DP (10:00 AM 12:10 2:25 4:45) 7:05 9:20

Victor Frankenstein (PG-13) DP 8:50 PM

Secret in Their Eyes (PG-13) 10:00 AM 12:35 3:15 5:50

Love the Coopers (PG-13) 11:15 AM 2:00 4:45 7:35 10:20

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 2 (PG-13) DP

11:55 AM 3:30 7:00 10:20

The Peanuts Movie (G) DP (10:05 AM 12:05 2:15 4:30) 6:45

Spectre (PG-13) DP (11:00 AM 2:15) 5:30 8:45

Clayton & Skinker Brooklyn (PG-13) DP

11:30 AM 2:00 4:30 7:00 9:25

Spectre (PG-13)

(10:10 AM 1:00 4:00) 6:55 9:45

Hi-Pointe Theatre

The Peanuts Movie (G)

Goosebumps (PG) 10:50 AM 1:35 4:10 6:45

St. Charles Stadium 18 Cine (Wehrenberg) 1830 First Capitol Dr. 314-995-6273 www.wehrenberg.com ! Chi-Raq (R) DVS,CC,No VIP after 6PM

(2:15 5:00) 7:30

11:00 AM 1:45 4:30 7:15 10:00

Christmas in Connecticut (NR) DP (10:30 AM)

! Krampus (PG-13) DVS,CC,No VIP after 6PM

1002 Hi-Pointe Place

! Lincoln Center Series: Balanchine’s The Nutcracker from NYC Ballet (NR) (12:55 PM)

The Letters (PG) CC (11:20 AM 1:20) 4:20 7:20 10:20

Moolah Theatre & Lounge (St. Louis Cinemas) Lindell & Vandeventer

10:15 AM 7:55

314-446-6868 Love the Coopers (PG-13) DVS,CC

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 2 (PG-13) DP (1:30 4:15) 7:00 9:45

11:15 AM 2:00 4:00 6:30

The Peanuts Movie (G) DVS,CC 9:40 AM 11:50 AM 4:30 6:40

Spotlight (R) DVS,CC

Omnimax St. Louis Science Center 5050 Oakland Ave.

1:50 4:55

Secret in Their Eyes (PG-13) DVS,CC

3D (PG) DVS,CC (10:55 AM 1:30) 4:10 6:50 9:30

! The Good Dinosaur (PG) DVS,CC (11:30 AM 2:10) 4:50 7:30 10:05

Victor Frankenstein (PG-13) DVS,CC (1:50) 7:35

(11:50 AM 3:30) 4:30 7:10 7:50 9:50 10:30

The Night Before (R) DVS,CC (2:15) 5:05 7:55 11:00

Love the Coopers (PG-13) DVS,CC (11:10 AM 2:05) 4:55 7:45 10:50

The Peanuts Movie (G) DVS,CC (11:25 AM 2:00) 4:40 7:25 10:55

12:55 PM

! Sankarabharanam 314-289-4400 (Telugu) (NR) DVS,CC,No VIP after 6PM 9:30 PM

Robots (NR)

(11:55 AM 3:20) 6:55 10:15

Bridge of Spies (PG-13) DVS,CC (12:20 3:40) 7:00 10:25

Jerusalem (NR)

The Martian (PG-13) DVS,CC (12:30 3:50) 7:05 10:35

South

12:00 PM

! Krampus (PG-13) DVS,CC,No VIP after 6PM

Journey to Space (NR)

9:40 AM 10:50 AM 1:55 4:20 6:40 7:40 9:00 10:00 11:20

11:00 AM

Tivoli Theatre (Landmark) 6350 Delmar in the Loop ! Trumbo (R)

! Creed (PG-13) DVS,CC,No VIP after 6PM 9:40 AM 12:40 3:40 6:45 8:00 9:45 11:00

314-727-7271 ! The Good

(12:10) 4:25 7:00 9:25

! Suffragette (PG-13) DVS (12:05) 2:20 4:35 7:10 9:35

Dinosaur (PG) DVS,CC,No VIP after 6PM 10:30 AM 11:10 AM 1:00 1:40 4:15 6:35 9:00

! Victor Frankenstein (PG-13) DVS,CC,No VIP after 6P M 4:45 PM

! Room (R) (12:15) 4:30 7:05 9:30

North St. Louis Mills Stadium 18 (Regal)

10:00 AM 10:45 AM 1:10 4:20 4:30 6:45 7:20 8:00 9:50 10:20 11:00

The Night Before (R) DVS,CC 11:50 AM 2:20 4:45 7:45 10:30 11:30

Secret in Their Eyes (PG-13) DVS,CC 1:30 3:30

The Peanuts Movie (G) DVS,CC

5555 St. Louis Mills Blvd. (314)227-5503 10:00 AM 12:20 2:35 ! Lincoln Center Series: Balanchine’s The Spectre (PG-13) DVS,CC Nutcracker from NYC Ballet (NR) 12:55 PM

Krampus (PG-13) DVS,CC

10:30 AM 1:05 4:20 7:15 10:15

Spotlight (R) DVS,CC 10:35 AM 1:45 4:50

(12:00 2:40 5:20) 7:55 10:30

W E H R E N B E RG

Creed (PG-13) DVS,CC (10:45 AM 12:45 1:15 4:00 4:30) 7:15 7:45 10:20 10:50

! The Good Dinosaur in Disney Digital 3D (PG) DVS,CC (11:00 AM 1:35 4:20) 7:05 9:45

7:10 10:15

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 2 (PG-13) DVS,CC 6:05 9:10

! The Good Dinosaur (PG) DVS,CC (11:25 AM 2:10 4:50) 7:35 10:15

Victor Frankenstein (PG-13) DVS,CC (10:55 AM 1:55 4:40) 7:40 10:25

! The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 2 The IMAX Experience (PG-13) DVS,CC 12:30 3:45 7:00 10:10

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 2 (PG-13) DVS,CC (1:00 2:00 4:15 5:05) 7:30 8:10 10:40

The Night Before (R) DVS,CC (12:05 2:45 5:25) 8:00 10:45

Secret in Their Eyes (PG-13) DVS,CC (1:10 3:55) 6:45 9:30

Love the Coopers (PG-13) DVS,CC 6:55 9:35

The Man in 3B (R) (4:35) 7:10 9:35

The Peanuts Movie (G) DVS,CC (12:10 2:35 5:00) 7:20 9:40

Spectre (PG-13) DVS,CC (12:15 3:35) 6:50 10:05

Goosebumps (PG) DVS,CC (11:10 AM 2:00 4:45) 7:25 9:55

The Martian (PG-13) DVS,CC (11:50 AM 3:20) 6:40 10:00

Hotel Transylvania 2 (PG) DVS,CC (11:45 AM 2:20 4:35)

The Perfect Guy (PG-13) DVS,CC (2:15 5:05) 7:50 10:35

! Victor Frankenstein (PG-13) No VIP after 6PM 9:30 PM

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 2 (PG-13)

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 2 The IMAX Experience (PG-13) 10:00 AM 1:25 4:40 7:55 11:15 10:35 AM 1:35 4:35 7:35 9:30 10:35

! Krampus (PG-13) No VIP after 6PM 10:15 AM 12:35 3:00 4:35 5:30 7:00 7:55 9:30 10:20 11:10

10:00 AM 11:00 AM 1:15 2:15 4:30 5:30 7:35 8:30 10:45 11:40

! The Good Dinosaur in Disney Digital 3D (PG) No VIP after 6PM

The Night Before (R)

Secret in Their Eyes (PG-13) 10:15 AM 4:15 7:00 9:45

10:40 AM 1:20 4:10 6:55 9:35

The Peanuts Movie (G)

Spectre (PG-13) 12:15 3:40 7:00 10:20

10:45 AM 1:30 4:15 6:50

1:05 9:45

Gravois Bluffs Stadium 12 (Regal) Hwy 30 @ Gravois Bluff by JC Penny 636-326-2862 ! Lincoln Center Series: Balanchine’s The Nutcracker from NYC Ballet (NR) (12:55 PM)

Krampus (PG-13) DVS,CC (11:20 AM 2:00) 4:50 7:45 10:15

Creed (PG-13) DVS,CC (12:30) 4:00 7:30 10:35

10:10 AM 12:50 3:35 6:05 8:40 ! The Good Dinosaur in Disney Digital ! The Good Dinosaur (PG) No VIP after 6PM 3D (PG) DVS,CC 10:25 AM 10:45 AM 1:05 1:25 3:55 4:15 6:40 7:00 9:10

Frankenstein (PG-13) No VIP after 6PM The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 2 (PG-13) 10:30 AM 11:00 AM 1:45 2:15 5:30 8:35 8:40 11:35

The Night Before (R) 10:45 AM 1:30 4:15 7:00 9:40 11:45

Secret in Their Eyes (PG-13) 10:45 AM 1:30 4:20 7:10 9:55

Love the Coopers (PG-13) 10:45 AM 1:30 4:15 7:00 9:35

The Peanuts Movie (G) 10:45 AM 1:10 3:40 6:05 8:20 10:35

(11:10 AM 1:50) 4:30 7:10 9:45

Victor Frankenstein (PG-13) DVS,CC 4:40 10:20

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 2 (PG-13) DVS,CC (12:15 12:50 3:40) 4:10 6:50 7:20 10:00 10:40

The Night Before (R) DVS,CC (11:55 AM 2:40) 5:15 8:00 10:45

Secret in Their Eyes (PG-13) DVS,CC 7:25 PM

Love the Coopers (PG-13) DVS,CC (11:30 AM 2:30) 5:10 7:50 10:30

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LOCAL

A18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 12.05.2015

Street was part of major downtown success AVENUE • FROM A1

pocked with asphalt infill after recent underground work by Ameren. “It’s a shame to have something so beautiful after so much work end up like this,” said Missy Kelley, chief executive of Downtown STL Inc. The city says it simply doesn’t have the money to keep the street the way it was designed. So, for example, patchwork is often done with asphalt instead of the original materials. Public utilities tear up the street, but they are allowed to reimburse the city for repairs at rates meant for streets with fewer amenities. “It’s a good lesson learned going forward that we factor in a long-term maintenance fund,” Kelley said. The streetscape plan was part of a major success for downtown. It created a pedestrian-friendly stretch filled with new bars and restaurants as well as millions of dollars’ worth of loft developments. In 2011, the American Planning Association named Washington Avenue one of America’s “10 great streets.” Over the last 15 years, downtown has seen its population boom, with

LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

Construction workers rip up Washington Avenue in 2002 to widen and beautify the street as part of more than $350 million in investment going on along the eastern end of Washington in downtown St. Louis.

most residents flocking to the area around Washington Avenue. Downtown STL says it has asked the city to give it an estimated cost to maintain and restore the streetscape. Todd Waelterman, the city’s operations director under Mayor Francis Slay, said his team was working on compiling the detailed cost study. He said exact figures were not yet available. “We have some very expensive amenities down there, from the zipper in the middle to the street

lights to the brick sidewalk,” Waelterman said. “It was built pretty extravagantly.” Waelterman said the city would need outside help to keep the street in the best condition. He said that meant involvement from Downtown STL. Downtown STL already pays for maintenance on several of the street’s amenities, including bulb replacements for the Christmas-style lights that hang over a portion of the street. But many of the street’s problems go beyond maintenance — including the

damage utilities make without paying the full cost of restoration. Waelterman said Ameren had done a lot of work downtown and had paid significant amounts of money to repave several streets. “In a normal average street, we end up with a great product,” Waelterman said. But on Washington Avenue, he said, “it could easily cost 10 times what they’ve been paying on the other streets.” For example, Waelterman said the “stone zippers” running down the

Campaign has notiied U.S. attorney’s oice KINDER • FROM A1

LATER

HOURS

His campaign said it had been tipped off by someone whom it did not identify about “financial discrepancies” dating back several years. The tip came shortly after Kinder announced in July that he was entering the governor’s race, the campaign said. Pam Dixon, who serves as Kinder’s campaign adviser, attorney and spokeswoman, said Friday that the information was shared at the time with the U.S. attorney’s oice for the eastern district of Missouri. U.S. Attorney Richard Callahan would not comment on any potential investigations but confirmed that he had been alerted to problems by Kinder’s campaign. “In July, we received some information from the committee about some possible financial irregularities,” he told the PostDispatch Friday night. “It did not involve the committee.” He declined to comment further. Kinder’s campaign filed numerous amended campaign finance reports Friday, adding expenditures that in some cases occurred several years ago. Some of the additional expenses were to his longtime campaign consultant David Barklage, who had worked for Kinder for more than 20 years. Others were to Logan Thompson, Kinder’s former campaign

manager. Barklage and Kinder severed their relationship this year when Barklage went to work for rival Republican gubernatorial candidate John Brunner. Barklage told the PostDispatch that his consulting firm first noticed discrepancies between Kinder’s campaign finance reports and bank balances, and that it initiated an audit but that it had not been completed when Barklage left Kinder’s campaign last summer. “We did the political work and media (for Kinder), we didn’t do the financial side. It was just something that came up that we saw and had concern on,” Barklage said. Barklage said his parting with Kinder had nothing to do with the finance report discrepancies. Rather, Barklage said, he had already decided to work with Brunner when Kinder decided to run for governor. Barklage’s firm, Barklage and Knowdell, released on Friday night a statement mirroring his comments to the Post-Dispatch: “Our company is the one who first reported potential discrepancies to the Kinder organization last year. Our company also initiated an audit of the books prior to ending our relationship which was taken over by the campaign after we left. Our company did no financial reporting for Lt. Governor Kinder in

either the 2008 or the 2012 campaign, nor any time since 2012. Our firm ended its long-term relationship with the Lt. Governor when the Lt. Governor decided to run for Governor which created a conflict of interest for the firm.” Barklage said he is still working with Brunner. Brunner’s campaign could not be reached for comment Friday night. As Kinder’s general consultant, Barklage told the Associated Press, he had authority to approve expenditures but his own expenses were approved by Thompson. Barklage said his duties did not include hands-on management of the campaign’s finances. Thompson could not be reached Friday evening. In several three-month reporting periods, the changes in reports showed that contributions had initially been under-reported. Coleen Shea, Maverick Consulting LLC, and YPYKYA Inc., all gave more than was previously reported through the three months ending March 31, 2015. It was previously reported that YPYKYA Inc. contributed $500 total to the campaign through March 31, when it actually gave $3,000, according to the amended report filed Friday. In an amended report for the three-month period that ended Dec. 31, 2014, the changes reflect that

Mon-Thurs: 10am- 6:30pm

greater amounts than first reported were given to the campaign by AnheuserBusch, Gary Rust and Missouri Insurance Coalition PAC. In the initial report filed Jan. 16, 2015, AnheuserBusch was listed as having given $1,000 to date. The amended report, filed Dec. 4, shows AnheuserBusch actually contributed $2,000 in aggregate through that reporting period. Also, a $1,000 contribution made by Hallmark Cards Inc. was added that was not previously reported. A large discrepancy in cash on hand also was revealed for this particular reporting period. At the close of the three months that ended Dec. 31, 2014, reports previously showed more than $55,000 was available. That figure was actually closer to $164, according to the amended report. After learning of financial irregularities in his campaign, Kinder closed out his previous campaign committee and opened a new one. He also hired a certified public accountant, who the campaign said was a former Internal Revenue Service agent, to review its financial reports. Alex Stuckey of the Post-Dispatch and the Associated Press contributed to this report. Samantha Liss • 314-340-8017 @samanthann on Twitter sliss@post-dispatch.com

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middle of the street would carry “an extraordinary” replacement cost. So, Waelterman said, the city didn’t ask Ameren to pay for returning the street to how it was. Ken Worland, director of Ameren’s underground division, said Ameren was upgrading its infrastructure downtown, which required tearing up Washington Avenue. He said the company had gotten a cost estimate from the city and agreed to pay for the repaving. When asked if Ameren was informed of the complexity of restoring Washington Avenue, Worland said: “I don’t think that was ever a discussion point.” He said Ameren didn’t get involved in the details of the repaving. “They’ll send us an invoice and we’ll pay the invoice,” Worland said. Worland said he was not sure what could be done now. “We’ve been having a conversation with the city about what to do,” Worland said. “I know the property owners aren’t happy with the paving job.” Brad Waldrop, a downtown developer with property on Washington Avenue, said the city allowed the streetscape to be “destroyed through misman-

agement and fiscal irresponsibility.” “It is good that the city leveraged taxpayer money to create a purposefully customized street to attract private investment,” Waldrop said. “It is bad that the city and Ameren are showing our state and federal governments they are wasting the 1999 funding.” Waldrop said he had spoken with Ameren before the utility did the work. He said Ameren had told him Washington Avenue was “special.” “They said they had taken specific precautions to resurface the street and maintain its customized stone and granite components. They budgeted to do it right and not do a patch job,” Waldrop said. But that’s not what happened. Jared Opsal, who heads the Downtown Neighborhood Association, said he hoped the problems could be fixed. “We would definitely like to see more investment to maintain what we have down there because it definitely adds a sense of place which spurs economic activity,” Opsal said. Nicholas J.C. Pistor • 314-436-2239 @nickpistor on Twitter npistor@post-dispatch.com

Harris-Stowe will appeal, oicial says COLLEGE • FROM A1

compensatory damages for lost wages and emotional distress. On a third count, the jury decided in HarrisStowe’s favor, rejecting a claim that administrators discriminated against Kader based on race. Thursday’s decision follows a decision this fall when a jury awarded another former HarrisStowe College of Education professor $5 million after finding the school discriminated against her because she is white. In that case, jurors agreed with plaintif Beverly Wilkins’ allegation that the College of Education was systematically trying to purge itself of white faculty. On Friday, HarrisStowe spokeswoman Pier Scott said the university “vehemently denies” that Kader was discriminated against in any way. “ H a r r i s - S towe i s committed to creating a nondiscriminatory work environment consistent with its long-standing discrimination policy,” she said. Both lawsuits name LaTisha Smith, the former dean at the College of Education, as a driving force behind the discriminatory behavior. Smith started at the university in 2007. She has since moved on to St. Louis Public Schools, where she is the director of curriculum development and achievement. Smith did not respond to a request for comment. Kader’s lawsuit dates to 2007 when she was pursuing her doctoral degree at Pennsylvania State University. While there, she applied and was accepted for a job at Harris-Stowe. The suit says HarrisStowe agreed to apply for a work visa on Kader’s behalf. Under U.S. immigration law, only an employer can petition or apply for a working visa for a noncitizen employee. Later in 2007, Kader began working at HarrisStowe. Her suit alleges Harris-Stowe administrators “ignored her requests for updates, falsely assured her that the visa application would be submitted and ultimately failed to take the necessary steps to obtain” the visa before it expired. As a temporary measure, Kader obtained an extension through May 2010 on her existing work visa through Penn State.

During the 2008-09 academic year, the lawsuit says, Kader attended an out-of-state conference with Smith during which Smith said Kader “would never progress in the College of Education” because Kader was “not in the group.” Kader also alleges that in the spring of 2010, she received a poor performance review that Smith said stemmed from harsh critiques from students. When Kader asked to see the critiques, it touched of an openly hostile relationship between the two women, the suit alleges. That specific incident led to Smith’s working behind the scenes trying to get Kader fired, attorney Eric Playter said. The allegation jibes with an allegation made in the Wilkins suit that accuses Smith of being hostile to nonblack employees and working to block their career progression at the university. After a culmination of incidents, Kader went to Harris-Stowe’s administration with allegations that Smith was discriminating against her based on her race and national origin, Playter said. Later, Playter said, Harris-Stowe administrators told Kader the documentation needed for a work visa had been lost. In July 2010, U.S. Citizen and Immigration Services denied Kader’s petition for a work visa. “She was denied because Harris-Stowe didn’t respond to repeated requests from the USCIS for documentation,” Playter said. Harris-Stowe officials later used the government’s denial of a work visa as grounds for not renewing Kader’s contract, Playter said. Scott, the university spokeswoman, denied that claim and said Harris-Stowe intended to appeal. Playter said the verdict was an affirmation that anti-Muslim ideology is wrong. “This jury recognized that people who come to this country to be educated and to educate have something to offer,” he said. “They are not hatemongers; they care about this country and they shouldn’t be discriminated against based on where they are from and what they look like.” Koran Addo • 314-340-8305 @KoranAddo on Twitter kaddo@post-dispatch.com


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

SATURDAY • 12.05.2015 • B

ODOM MU’S NO. 1 > Only three Pinkel assistants are expected to return, B5

> Dave Matter discusses Mizzou’s new coach, stltoday.com/mizzou

> Ben Frederickson has three big questions for Odom, stltoday.com

No room for error is costly to Blues Islanders force OT, then win shootout

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Islanders defenseman Calvin de Haan (44) passes the puck away from Blues center Robby Fabbri.

ISLANDERS BLUES

2 1

BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Missouri athletics director Mack Rhoades (right) and new head football coach Barry Odom answer questions at a news conference Friday.

here’s no grace period for Odom as he jumps into hot seat in the rugged SEC

AD Rhoades says he had ive candidates for job, but Odom was the ‘perfect it’

NEW YORK • The Blues have been in lockdown mode all season long in the third period. They were again Friday against New York, but their one slip-up allowed the Islanders back in the game, and Isles used that to pry away a 2-1 shootout win over the Blues at Barclays Center. > 6 p.m. “Just because Saturday they scored doesn’t vs. Toronto, mean we didn’t FSM play well in the third period,” Blues defenseman Alex Pietrangelo said. “I thought we played pretty well. They’re a pretty good offensive team and we only let them score one goal. Things happen. I’m happy with the effort that the guys gave. Disappointed with the loss overall, but we’ve got to find a way to regroup and get ready for See BLUES • Page B7

BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • The final note of “Fight Tiger,” E-flat, hovered like a banner in Mizzou Arena, unofficially signifying the end of Barry Odom’s grace period. The introductory news conference was over. A Missouri

true son, the former linebacker Odom, got the top job. Coach of the Tigers. But the fact that he’s homegrown, or the fact that he’s in his first year as head coach (or, really, first day), does not give Odom an extended grace period. The honeymoon’s over, already. This isn’t Gary Pinkel taking over an intramural team that was the 2001 Missouri Tigers; this is Barry Odom taking over See HOCHMAN • Page B5

BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • Four years ago at the University of Houston, Mack Rhoades promoted an internal candidate to take over as his head football coach. Tony Levine, the team’s special teams coordinator at the time, lasted just three seasons before Rhoades fired him. Faced with a similar choice as Missouri’s athletics director, Rhoades explored “many,

many” candidates this week to succeed coach Gary Pinkel, who announced his resignation last month. But first, Rhoades met with Barry Odom, the team’s defensive coordinator. Before Rhoades would travel the country to meet with other options, he had Odom over to his house for four hours. Why Odom first? “To see how high he set the bar,” Rhoades said. See ODOM • Page B5

11-4 AT BUSCH STADIUM

Righthander will get more than $30 million

See LACKEY • Page B2

BEST ERA (2.77) OF CAREER PROJECTS AS NO. 3 STARTER

John Lackey

The last two games John Lackey pitched for the Cardinals this season were against the Chicago Cubs in the National League division playofs. One was a brilliant, twohit effort over 7 1/3 innings in the first game of the series, won by the Cardinals 4-0 at Busch Stadium. The other was a three-inning, no-decision outing in Game 4 in Chicago in which he allowed four runs while pitching on short rest as he was unable to prolong the Cardinals’ season. The next game Lackey pitches will be for those same Cubs. On Friday, Ken Rosenthal of FoxSports.com reported that the 37-year-old righthander had agreed to a two-year deal with Chicago calling for between $32 million and $34 million, pending a physical. Lackey thus is reunited with lefthander Jon Lester, one of his best friends, who was a Boston teammate of Lackey’s in the Red Sox’s 2013 World Series championship season and the loser to

Lackey and the Cardinals in that Game 1 playoff game this year. More significant, Lackey has been signed for the second time to a multiyear deal via the involvement of Theo Epstein, the Cubs’ president of baseball operations. After the 2009 season, Lackey signed a five-year, $82.5 million deal with the Red Sox, for whom Epstein was general manager. That contract extended to a sixth season, 2015, because one of the provisions of that contract was that Lackey would play for the minimum ($507,500) in 2015 if he had missed any of the previous five seasons because of an injury. Indeed, Lackey missed the 2012 season after having Tommy John elbow surgery, and the Cardinals traded pitcher Joe Kelly and outfielder Allen Craig for him on July 31, 2014, knowing that they would have him for the minimum salary the next year.

Critics still question handling of Keenum BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Cubs and Lackey agree on a two-year contract BY RICK HUMMEL St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Concussion has Rams on defensive

The after-effects of Case Keenum’s concussion against Baltimore on Nov. 22 have lingered to the point where the Rams quarterback will miss his second consecutive start. Meanwhile, the controversy also > Noon lingers over why Sunday vs. Keenum was al- Arizona, lowed to finish out KTVI (Ch. 2) the Rams’ final two offensive plays in that contest after hitting his head on the turf at Baltimore’s M&T Bank Stadium on a sack. Earlier this week, NFL Players Association president Eric Winston told USA Today that he wanted the NFL to reconsider its decision not to issue any fines or discipline for the Rams’ handling of the Keenum concussion. Winston, a nine-year veteran offensive tackle now with Cincinnati, called the Rams’ handling of the situation a “complete failure to adhere to the (concussion) protocol.” Winston continued: “Show me someone that says, ‘No, the Rams did exactly the right thing.’ They didn’t. Everybody knows they didn’t. So there has to be discipline, right? Because when a player doesn’t do something that he’s supposed to do, he gets fined for that when it comes to health See RAMS • Page B6

SPORTS

1 M


SPORTS

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Rams • stlouisrams.com | 314-425-8830 Sunday 12/6 vs. Arizona noon KTVI (2)

Sunday 12/13 vs. Detroit noon KTVI (2)

Thursday 12/17 vs. Tampa Bay 7:25 p.m. KMOV (4)/NFL

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 12.05.2015

Cubs, Lackey agree on contract

Sunday 12/27 at Seattle 3:25 p.m. KTVI (2)

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Saturday 12/5 vs. Toronto 6 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 12/8 vs. Arizona 7 p.m. FSM

Thursday 12/10 vs. Philadelphia 7 p.m. FSM

Saturday 12/12 vs. Dallas 7 p.m. FSM

Mizzou men’s basketball • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Wednesday 12/9 vs. Omaha 7 p.m. SEC Network

Sunday 12/13 at Arizona 7 p.m. Pac 12 Networks

Saturday 12/19 vs. N. Carolina St. 5 p.m. SEC Network

Wednesday 12/23 vs. Illinois (Scottrade Ctr.) 6 p.m., ESPN2

Illini men’s basketball • ightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Saturday 12/5 vs. W. Carolina 2 p.m.

Wednesday 12/9 Saturday 12/12 vs. Ill.-Chicago vs. Yale (in Chicago) 7 p.m. 1 p.m.

Saturday 12/19 vs. South Dakota 2 p.m.

SLU men’s basketball • slubillikens.com | 314-977-4758 Saturday 12/5 vs. Wichita State 8 p.m. ESPNU

Saturday 12/12 Wednesday 12/16 vs. Alabama A&M vs. Tenn.-Martin 7 p.m. 7 p.m. FSM

Saturday 12/19 vs. Indiana State 7 p.m. FSM

OTHER EVENTS MAJOR ARENA SOCCER LEAGUE • ST. LOUIS AMBUSH Sunday 12/6: at Milwaukee, 2:05 p.m. Saturday 12/12: vs. Tacoma, 7:05 p.m. FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

ON THE AIR SATURDAY BASKETBALL 11 a.m. College: Eastern Michigan at Penn State, BTN 11 a.m. College: Seton Hall at Rutgers, ESPNews 11 a.m. College: Binghamton at Michigan State, ESPNU 11 a.m. College: Indiana State at Butler, FS1 11 a.m. College: Bucknell at North Carolina State, FSM 11:30 a.m. College: Temple at Wisconsin, KMOV (4) 12 p.m. College: Syracuse at Georgetown, KTVI (2) 1 p.m. College: Houston Baptist at Michigan, ESPNU 1 p.m. College: Chicago State at DePaul, FS1 1:15 p.m. College: New Mexico at Purdue, BTN 1:30 p.m. College: Maine at Marquette, FSM 2 p.m. College: California at Wyoming, CBSSN 2 p.m. College: Illinois vs. Western Carolina, WQQX (1490 AM) 2 p.m. College: SIU Edwardsville at Northwestern, WSIE (88.7 FM) 2:15 p.m. College: Arizona at Gonzaga, ESPN 2:15 p.m. College: Harvard at Kansas, ESPN2 2:30 p.m. College: Missouri St. at Oklahoma St., FSM Plus 2:30 p.m. College: Kent State at Cleveland State, KDNL (DT-30.2, Charter 182) 3 p.m. College: Mississippi vs. Massachusetts, NBCSN 3 p.m. College: South Florida at South Carolina, SEC Network 3:30 p.m. College: Virginia Military Institute at Ohio State, BTN 4 p.m. College: Georgia Tech at Tulane, CBSSN 4:15 p.m. College women: Notre Dame at Connecticut, ESPN 4:15 p.m. College: Bufalo at Duke, ESPN2 5 p.m. College: SIU Carbondale at North Texas, KATZ (1600 AM) 6 p.m. College: Morehead State at Indiana, BTN 6 p.m. College: Southeast Missouri State at Memphis, CBSSN 6 p.m. College: Providence at Rhode Island, ESPNU 7:30 p.m. College: Western Kentucky at Xavier, FS1 8 p.m. College: St. Louis U. vs. Wichita State, ESPNU, WXOS (101.1 FM) 8 p.m. NBA: Indiana at Utah, FSM Plus 9:30 p.m. College: Texas A&M at Arizona State, ESPN2 BOXING 8 p.m. Daniel Jacobs vs. Peter Quillin, Showtime FOOTBALL • College 11 a.m. Texas at Baylor, ESPN 11 a.m. American championship: Temple at Houston, KDNL (30) 11 a.m. C-USA championship: S. Mississippi at Western Kentucky, ESPN2 3 p.m. SEC championship: Florida vs. Alabama, KMOV (4) 3 p.m. SWAC championship: Alcorn State vs. Grambling State, ESPNU 3:30 p.m. West Virginia at Kansas State, FS1 6:30 p.m. Mountain West championship: Air Force at San Diego State, ESPN2 6:45 p.m. Pac-12 championship: Stanford vs. USC, ESPN 7 p.m. ACC championship: Clemson vs. North Carolina, KDNL (30) 7:15 p.m. Big Ten championship: Iowa vs. Michigan State, KTVI (2) GOLF 11 a.m. PGA: Hero World Challenge, Golf Channel 1:30 p.m. PGA: Hero World Challenge, KSDK (5) 7 p.m. European PGA: Australian PGA Championship, Golf Channel 12 a.m. (Sun.) European LPGA: Kowa Queens Cup, Golf Channel 2 a.m. (Sun.) European PGA: Nedbank Golf Challenge, Golf Channel HOCKEY 5 p.m. College: Massachusetts at Notre Dame, NBCSN 6 p.m. Blues vs. Toronto, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) 6 p.m. Nashville at Detroit, NHL Network 7 p.m. College: Ohio State at Minnesota, ESPNews RODEO 9 p.m. PRCA: National Finals, CBSSN SOCCER 6:40 a.m. English Premier League: Stoke City vs. Manchester City, NBCSN 8:30 a.m. Bundesliga: Borussia Monchengladbach vs. Bayern Munich, FS1 8:30 a.m. Bundesliga: Hertha Berlin vs. Bayer Leverkusen, FS2 8:55 a.m. English Premier League: Manchester United vs. West Ham United, NBCSN 9 a.m. English Premier League: Arsenal vs. Sunderland, USA 11:20 a.m. Bundesliga: VfL Wolfsburg vs. Borussia Dortmund, FS2 11:30 a.m. English Premier League: Chelsea vs. AFC Bournemouth, KSDK (5) WINTER SPORTS 12 p.m. Skiing: Audi Birds of Prey, NBCSN

SUNDAY’S HIGHLIGHTS BASKETBALL 1 p.m. College women: Duke at South Carolina, ESPN2 1 p.m. College: VCU vs. Florida State, ESPNU 1 p.m. College women: Virginia Tech at Tennessee, SEC Network 2 p.m. College women: Penn State at South Florida, CBSSN 2:30 p.m. NBA: Phoenix at Memphis, FSM 3 p.m. College women: Michigan at Princeton, ESPN2 4 p.m. College: San Diego State vs. San Diego at Petco Park, FSM Plus FOOTBALL 11 a.m. College: Final playof rankings, semiinal pairings, ESPN Noon NFL: Arizona at Rams, KTVI (2), WXOS (101.1 FM) 3 p.m. NFL: Kansas City at Oakland, KMOV (4) 3:25 p.m. NFL: Carolina at New Orleans, KTVI (2) 7:30 p.m. NFL: Indianapolis at Pittsburgh, KSDK (5), WXOS (101.1 FM)

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CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

John Lackey reacts to giving up a three-run home run to Chicago’s Javier Baez in the playofs.

LACKEY • FROM B1

The Cardinals rewarded Lackey with innings-pitched incentives that boosted his salary by some $2 million in 2015 and Lackey rewarded them with perhaps the best season of his career. Not only did Lackey compile a 13-10 record, but he posted a personal-best 2.77 earned run average. He gave up three runs or fewer in 30 of his 35 starts, counting the postseason, and he posted a 12th consecutive season of at least 10 wins, excluding 2012 when he didn’t pitch. For the Cardinals, he wound up as their top starter. For the Cubs, he probably will be No. 3 behind Lester and Cy Young Award winner Jake Arrieta, who led the majors with 22 victories. While the Red Sox gave

lefthander David Price $217 million for seven years although Price never has won a postseason start, Lackey has an 8-5 postseason record with the Angels, Boston and the Cardinals and ranks fourth among active pitchers with 165 regular-season victories. Having made Lackey a oneyear, qualifying ofer of $15.8 million and with Lackey declining it, the Cardinals will receive an amateur draft pick after the first round and before the second round next June for the Cubs signing Lackey. The Cubs will lose their firstround choice. Lackey will leave a Busch Stadium home park in which he had an 11-4 regular-season mark and a 2.03 ERA. At Wrigley in two regular-season starts, Lackey is 1-1 with a 1.32 ERA. Throughout the 2015 season,

Lackey had been consistent in saying he wanted to play only two more years. The Cubs have afforded him that opportunity, and Lackey now will have a chance for 200 career wins and perhaps pitching for a third diferent team in the World Series. He started and won the World Series title-clinching games for the 2002 Angels and the 2013 Red Sox. The Cubs fell one round short of the World Series this season when they had no reliable No. 3 or No. 4 starter. There was no immediate comment from the Cardinals nor from Lackey and his representative, Steve Hilliard. Rick Hummel @cmshhummel on Twitter rhummel@post-dispatch.com

DIGEST

BASEBALL NOTEBOOK

Illini form search panel for AD

D’backs, Greinke agree to 6-year deal

An eight-member search committee has been named to help identify qualiied candidates for athletics director at the University of Illinois. Interim Chancellor Barbara Wilson said Friday that she has named Matt Wheeler, a professor in animal sciences and a faculty athletic representative, to head the committee. Wilson said she has not decided whether to hire a search irm to assist in the process. The new AD will be the university’s 14th in the athletics program’s 126 years of competition, overseeing an annual budget of $110 million and a staf of 275 employees. The university has 21 sports with more than 500 athletes. The opening was created when the university dismissed former AD Mike Thomas on Nov. 9, exercising a “without cause” separation clause in Thomas’ contract. The school will pay $2.5 million as part of Thomas’ buyout. Senior associate athletics director Paul Kowalczyk, former AD at Southern Illinois Carbondale, is serving as interim athletics director. (Mark Tupper) Kansas tops Missouri in volleyball • The host Kansas Jayhawks eliminated the Missouri Tigers 3-0 (25-16, 25-13, 27-25) in the second round of the NCAA volleyball tournament Friday night. Mizzou inished its season at 27-6. Spieth in three-way tie for lead • Jordan Spieth feels like he’s on vacation in the Bahamas. On the golf course, he’s all business. Spieth rallied from a rugged start with three straight birdies, and then a surge on the back nine carried him to a 6-under 66 and a share of the lead with Jimmy Walker and Bill Haas going into the weekend at the Hero World Challenge. “The grind is still there,” Spieth said. He had to work hard just to keep pace on a calm, muggy afternoon is the islands, where the wind wasn’t strong enough to blow out a match and it showed in the scoring. Rarely has this holiday event with an 18-man ield featured so many players near the lead. For a brief moment on the back nine, there was a seven-way tie for the lead. Jobe wins Champions tour qualifying meet • Brandt Jobe won the Champions Tour qualifying tournament to earn one of ive fully exempt spots next year, closing with a 2-under 69 for a one-stroke victory. Jobe, a six-time winner on the Japan Golf Tour, had an 18-under 266 total on TPC Scottsdale’s Champions Course. Tom Byrum, Willie Wood and Jose Coceres tied for second, and Mike Grob was another stroke back to take the last fully exempt spot. Byrum shot 63, Wood and Coceres 67, and Grob 69. The next seven players — John Riegger, Gibby Gilbert III, Jean-Francois Remesy, former Mizzou star Stan Utley, 1996 U.S. Open champion Steve Jones, Chien Soon Lu and Miguel Angel Martin — are conditionally exempt. Two FIFA oicials banned from soccer • FIFA vice presidents Juan Angel Napout and Alfredo Hawit have been banned from soccer after being indicted on bribery and racketeering charges. The FIFA ethics committee says judge Joachim Eckert applied the provisional bans, which were requested by ethics prosecutor Cornel Borbely. Napout, the president of the South American confederation CONCACAF, and Hawit, president of North and Central American and Caribbean body CONCACAF, were arrested in predawn raids at a Zurich hotel Thursday. From news services

Zack Greinke will still pitch in the NL West. But surprise — with the Arizona Diamondbacks. The Diamondbacks unexpectedly won the Greinke sweepstakes, beating out the rival Los Angeles Dodgers and San Francisco Giants for the free agent ace Friday night. He reached agreement on a $206.5 million, six-year deal, sources told The Associated Press. The major league ERA leader and runner-up for the NL Cy Young Award boosted the Dodgers to their third straight division title this season. Then the righty, 32, opted out of his contract, leaving $71.5 million on the table — and wound up with the richest deal, by yearly average, in baseball history. Greinke’s new deal contains deferred money. The $34.4 million average will be the sport’s highest, topping David Price’s $31 million with the Boston Red Sox. Earlier, pitcher Johnny Cueto turned down a $120 million ofer from the Diamondbacks. Instead, the Diamondbacks reeled in an even bigger prize. They had money to spend — last February, they signed a TV deal with Fox Sports Arizona for more than $1.5 billion over 20 years. Marlins hire Bonds as hitting coach • If Barry Bonds thinks a full-time return to baseball will help his Hall of Fame chances, he could be disappointed. Maybe he’ll at least help the Miami Marlins. Bonds is joining the staf of new Marlins manager Don Mattingly as hitting coach. The media-shy, steroids-tainted home run king made a rare conference call Friday to discuss his hiring, which raised his proile just as balloting is under way for 2016 Hall of Fame voting. “I’m a Hall of Fame baseball player with no doubt in my mind, no doubt in my heart,” said Bonds, 51. “God knows that. That’s all that matters to me. I’ll leave the voting process up to you guys.” The Marlins need hitting advice. In 2015, when they inished 71-91, they ranked next to last in the majors in runs and home runs, and last in walks — an area where Bonds excelled. Nats, Perez reach deal • Oliver Perez and the Washington Nationals have agreed to a $7 million, twoyear contract, a source said. Perez, 34, a lefthander, was 2-4 with a 4.17 ERA in 70 relief appearances this year from Arizona and Houston. Tigers land Pelfrey • The Detroit Tigers have reached a $16 million, two-year agreement with free-agent righthander Mike Pelfrey, a source said. Pelfrey spent the last three seasons with Minnesota. He went 6-11 with a 4.26 ERA in 2015. Braves-Mariners trade • The Atlanta Braves have added bullpen depth by acquiring hard-throwing righthander Jose Ramirez from the Seattle Mariners for a player to be named and/or cash. Mets GM Alderson has cancer • The New York Mets say general manager Sandy Alderson, 68, has cancer and will begin chemotherapy soon. Chief operating oicer Jef Wilpon said in a statement Friday that doctors are “optimistic about his full recovery.” White Sox OK deals with Navarro, Turner • The Chicago White Sox announced they have agreed to a one-year, $4 million contract with veteran catcher Dioner Navarro. Chicago also agreed on a one-year, $1.5 million contract with righthanded pitcher Jacob Turner. Turner, 24, (Westminster), spent most of last season on the Chicago Cubs’ disabled list (elbow). Associated Press


COLLEGE BASKETBALL

12.05.2015 • Saturday • M 1

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • B3

Gant comes up big in a Mizzou victory Sophomore has impact inside to spark Tigers

MISSOURI 78, N. ILLINOIS 71

BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • There was a

Jakeenan Gant sighting at Mizzou Arena on Friday. His coach and teammates were quite appreciative. Missouri’s 6-8 sophomore forward had struggled in a frontcourt starved for production through the first three weeks of the season. He lost his starting job after the first four games and watched his minutes dwindle. A heralded arrival last year,Gant had done little to live up to his lofty reputation as one of the country’s best prospects. On Friday, he showed some glimmers in MU’s 78-71 win over Northern Illinois. In front of a season-high home crowd of 6,214, Gant came off the bench and sparked the Tigers (4-3) with a season-best 11 points and six rebounds. Playing a season-high 18 minutes, Gant performed like the player his teammates have seen in practice. “He changed the game for us

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Missouri’s Kevin Puryear goes up for a shot between Northern Illinois’ Marin Maric (left) and Levi Bradley in Friday night’s game.

tonight on the boards and being a great energy guy,” freshman forward Kevin Puryear said after scoring a team-high 17 points. “I was really happy I got to see him work tonight.” “We see it every day in practice,” senior forward Ryan Rosburg added. “He’s capable of providing a big spark for us. He can do a lot of things. He’s so athletic and long. Obviously he hasn’t been playing

as good as he thinks he can and we know he can. It was great to see him have success tonight.” He wasn’t alone. Missouri’s top four forwards combined for 41 points and 18 rebounds, including 31 points in the second half. “Credit their bigs,” Huskies coach Mark Montgomery said. “We know they’re good players. They had answers. They ran their ofense eiciently to get them the

VanVleet might return for battered Wichita St. Shockers, Billikens looking to recover from losses BY STU DURANDO St. Louis Post-dispatch

The series of updates on Wichita State guard Fred VanVleet started this week with the senior running and working with trainers outside of practice and a chance he might play against St. Louis University on Saturday. He then increased his activity in practice and told the Wichita Eagle that he would be a game-time decision at Chaifetz Arena. Finally, it was reported by CBS Sports that coach Gregg Marshall said VanVleet would “probably give it a go.” The daily updates wouldn’t have been necessary if not for the Shockers’ recent problems. They enter their third meeting in as many years with the Billikens having sufered three consecutive losses and dropping out of the top 25 for the first time in 43 weeks. Thus, VanVleet’s hamstring injury has been closely watched in Wichita, and SLU coach Jim Crews understands why. “VanVleet is like an older guy playing with a bunch of younger guys,” Crews said. “He’s like 30 and playing with college guys, and he just outsmarts everybody. He’s three steps ahead. He’s a chess player, he’s not checkers.” It’s been a while since the Shockers have stumbled like this. They lost games to USC, Alabama and Iowa last week in Orlando after reaching No. 9 in the rankings. In addition to VanVleet, Wichita State lost Anton Grady to a frightening looking injury in Florida when he suffered a spinal concussion in a collision that left him motionless on the court for several minutes. Guard Landry Shamet is also out with a stress fracture. “We are missing a lot of key guys,” freshman Markis McDuie said. “But I think we definitely could focus more. We had a couple of games we could’ve won last weekend. We just didn’t make shots, had big turnovers near the end of games, fouls, and just other things that didn’t go our way. We’re not going to sit here and say the whole (reason for the losses) was because of injuries.” VanVleet and healthy Ron Baker form what was considered one of best, if not the best, backcourts in the country this season. Fellow guard Tekele Cotton graduated, but the tandem and the supporting cast were considered good enough to produce another huge season. When the teams played two years ago, Baker scored 22 points and VanVleet had six assists in a close Shockers’ win. Last season Baker scored 18 in Wichita State’s 29-point win. “They’re just very smart,” SLU guard

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Wichita State guard Fred VanVleet, talking with coach Gregg Marshall, has had a hamstring injury.

Mike Crawford said. “They know how to play well together and with everybody else. They’re just hard to stop in general. You have to beat them to the things that they’re really good at.” The Billikens hope that a year will make a huge diference. Last season in Wichita, SLU fell behind by 26 in the first half. Crews used five freshmen on the floor together for the first time and the Billikens never made a dent in the deficit. “Last year we didn’t go into the game mentally prepared,” SLU guard Davell Roby said. “We were all hyped for it but were weren’t focused, like little kids in a candy store or something.” That game looked similar to SLU’s outing three days ago against Morehead State as the Billikens never were a threat. Thus, neither team enters Saturday’s game playing the way it was expecting. Crews is preparing his team as if VanVleet is going to play. The guard told the Wichita Eagle on Thursday that he was able to complete 85 percent of practice but that he doesn’t want to do anything that is risky. With or without VanVleet, Marshall said his team has a lot of work to improve. “We’ve got to figure out how to score, figure out how to defend better,” he said. “Once we know who’s going to be out on the floor, we’ve got to come up with an attack that’s going to create easier scoring opportunities than the ones we’re getting. We’ve got to shoot the ball better and execute better. I hope we’re done with additional injuries. It seems like we’ve been going backwards for a while.” Stu Durando @studurando on Twitter sdurando@post-dispatch.com

FG FT Reb N. ILLINOIS Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Baker 32 3-10 3-5 1-4 4 3 11 Iroegbu 10 1-1 0-0 2-2 1 2 2 Armstead 32 3-11 3-5 1-5 0 2 10 Orris 17 0-2 0-0 1-2 0 1 0 Maric 32 5-13 4-4 5-7 0 3 14 Wilson 27 5-12 10-10 1-2 0 3 24 Porter 13 1-2 0-0 0-2 4 3 2 Key 26 2-8 0-0 1-4 2 3 4 Bradley 11 2-4 0-0 1-1 0 2 4 Totals 200 22-63 20-24 17-34 11 22 71 Percentages: FG.349, FT.833. 3-point goals: 7-23, .304. Team rebounds: 5. Blocked shots: 1. Turnovers: 9. Steals: 8. Technical fouls: None. FG FT Reb MISSOURI Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Phillips 35 5-7 2-3 0-1 6 4 13 Wright 26 3-7 2-4 0-5 3 3 10 Clark 20 1-4 3-6 0-7 4 4 6 Puryear 24 6-10 5-5 0-1 0 1 17 Rosburg 21 2-2 0-0 3-7 1 4 4 Isabell 16 1-5 0-1 1-2 1 0 3 Allen 2 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 1 0 Walton 9 1-3 0-0 0-0 0 0 2 Gant 18 4-6 3-3 2-6 0 1 11 Woods 15 4-4 1-2 1-4 1 4 9 VanLeer 14 1-4 0-0 0-0 2 0 3 Totals 200 28-52 16-24 10-38 18 22 78 Percentages: FG.538, FT.667. 3-point goals: 6-15, .400. Team rebounds: 5. Blocked shots: 3. Turnovers: 15. Steals: 6. Technical fouls: None. N. Illinois 26 45 — 71 Missouri 27 51 — 78 A: 6,214. Officials: John Hampton, Mike Roberts, Jamie Luckie.

ball.” The surge started with Gant, who resisted — finally — the urge to hang out on the perimeter and hoist ill-advised 3-pointers. The sophomore came into the game 0 for seven from 3-point range this season and just one for 21 in his career. He’s taken just one shot from behind the arc the last three games, embracing the coaches’ desired role as an impact player at

ST. LOUIS U. VS. WICHITA STATE When • 8 p.m. Where • Chaifetz Arena TV, radio • ESPNU, WXOS (101.1 FM) Records • SLU is 4-2, Wichita State 2-4. All-time series • SLU leads 42-21. About the Billikens • SLU has scored 103 points combined in the last two games against the two top-rated defensive teams in the country. ... Guard Ash Yacoubou has worked on getting more shots around the basket and is shooting 58 percent inside the 3-point arc compared to 44.5 percent last season. ... Guards Mike Crawford and Miles Reynolds are shooting a cumulative 79.7 percent at the free-throw line and the rest of the team is shooting 58.6 percent. About the Shockers • Dec. 5 is the winningest date in Wichita State history, with the Shockers posting a 15-3 mark on this date. ... Ron Baker and Fred VanVleet are included on the Naismith Trophy watch list. The award goes to the national player of the year. ... After scoring ive points in the irst three games, Markis McDuie has averaged 12.3 in the last three. ... The Shockers are under .500 for the irst time since February 2009.

the rim. Gant came into the game with only 15 points and 10 rebounds in MU’s first six games. “We’ve encouraged him to take the ball to the basket more,” MU coach Kim Anderson said. “Sometimes jump shots don’t fall. He’s got a good first step. He’s gotten a lot better around the basket.” “I’m just so happy for him,” Anderson added, “because he’s a guy who never complains and works hard every day.” The Tigers raced out to a 12-0 lead as the Huskies (7-1) didn’t score until 5:05 into the first half. By halftime, though, NIU had climbed within one as the Tigers frittered away possessions with turnovers and early shots. Terrence Phillips, Anderson’s freshman point guard, had a team-high seven points at the break but four turnovers. Missouri eventually settled down in the second half by attacking the paint. NIU tied the game at 41-41 with 13:25 left, but Gant put the Tigers back in front for good with a hook shot. Gant followed with a steal in the backcourt and ran the floor the rest of the way for a three-point play to build a 54-46 lead. Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

No. 2 Maryland bounces back to rip St. Francis FROM WIRE AND NEWS SERVICES

Robert Carter Jr. had 20 points, and No. 2 Maryland routed St. Francis 96-55 on Friday night in College Park, Md. The Terrapins bounced back from their first loss of the season Tuesday against No. 9 North Carolina in the ACC-Big Ten Challenge. Freshman Diamond Stone added 16 points, and Jake Layman scored 11 of his 16 points in the first half. Maryland (7-1) was 31 of 46 from the field (67.4 percent) and has shot at least 50 percent for five consecutive games. Ben Millaud-Meunier led St. Francis (3-4) with 13 points. Ronnie Drinnon added 11 points with 10 rebounds for the Red Flash, who have dropped each of their four road games this season. Layman scored eight points as Maryland opened with a 16-3 run. The Red Flash struggled to get open shots against the Terrapins’ tight man-to-man defense and made just three of their first 16 shots from the field.

AREA SIUC women top SIUE • Rishonda Napier scored 18 points and host Southern Illinois Carbondale beat Southern Illinois Edwardsville. Dyana Pierre added nine points and a game-high 13 rebounds for SIUC (4-3). Shronda Butts led the Cougars (3-5) with 23 points.

NOTEBOOK

CHRIS LEE •P-d

SLU guard Davell Roby takes a fall against SIUE last month.

ILLINOIS VS. W. CAROLINA When • 2 p.m. Saturday Where • State Farm Center, Champaign Radio • WQQX (1490 AM) Records • Illinois is 3-5, Western Carolina 3-4. Of note • Illinois will face one of the smallest teams it will see all season in the Catamounts, who don’t have a starter taller than 6-foot-7; Illinois may counter with a smaller lineup.

Calipari says Wildcats need toughness • Kentucky coach John Calipari cautioned anyone who would listen that all the talent possessed by his latest freshman class would mean nothing if they didn’t also show a little toughness. If he was having trouble getting his team’s attention, he’s not anymore. The top-ranked Wildcats showed none of that needed grit Thursday night in an 87-77 loss at UCLA, a game in which Calipari’s concerns about his team’s resolve painfully unfolded in Kentucky’s first regularseason loss in nearly 21 months. “We got kicked, we got beat, we move on,” Calipari said. “We’ve had a pretty good run, and we’ll see if we can get it going again.” Kentucky (7-1) has until Wednesday against Eastern Kentucky to find some of that missing fortitude. Wisconsin’s Pritzl is out • Wisconsin guard Brevin Pritzl has reinjured his left foot and is out indefinitely. The school said Friday that Pritzl hurt the foot in practice Tuesday. He is coming of a broken foot that required surgery in August but won’t need new surgery, the school said. Pritzl, a 6-3 shooting guard, has played just four minutes this season.

HOW THE TOP 25 FARED 1. Kentucky (7-1) idle. Next: vs. Eastern Kentucky, Wednesday. 2. Maryland (7-1) beat St. Francis (Pa.) 96-55. Next: vs. UConn, Tuesday. 3. Michigan State (8-0) idle. Next: vs. Binghamton, Saturday. 4. Kansas (5-1) idle. Next: vs. Harvard, Saturday. 5. Iowa State (6-0) idle. Next: vs. Buffalo, Monday. 6. Oklahoma (5-0) idle. Next: vs. No. 8 Villanova, Monday.

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7. Duke (7-1) idle. Next: vs. Buffalo, Saturday. 8. Villanova (7-0) idle. Next: vs. No. 6 Oklahoma, Monday. 9. North Carolina (6-1) idle. Next: vs. Davidson, Sunday. 10. Virginia (6-1) idle. Next: vs. William & Mary, Saturday. 11. Purdue (7-0) idle. Next: vs. New Mexico, Saturday. 12. Xavier (7-0) idle. Next: vs. Western Kentucky, Saturday. 13. Gonzaga (5-1) idle. Next: vs. No. 19 Arizona, Saturday. 14. Syracuse (6-1) idle. Next: at Georgetown, Saturday. 15. Oregon (6-0) vs. UNLV, late. Next: vs. Navy, Monday. 16. Vanderbilt (6-1) idle. Next: at No. 25 Baylor, Sunday. 17. Cincinnati (7-1) idle. Next: vs. Morgan State, Sunday. 18. Texas A&M (7-1) idle. Next: at Arizona State, Saturday. 19. Arizona (6-1) idle. Next: at No. 13 Gonzaga, Saturday. 20. West Virginia (6-0) idle. Next: vs. Kennesaw State, Saturday. 21. Miami (6-1) idle. Next: vs. Charlotte, Saturday. 22. SMU (5-0) idle. Next: vs. New Hampshire, Saturday. 23. Providence (7-1) idle. Next: at Rhode Island, Saturday. 24. Louisville (5-1) idle. Next: vs. Grand Canyon, Saturday. 25. Baylor (5-1) idle. Next: vs. No. 16 Vanderbilt, Sunday.


COLLEGE BASKETBALL

12.05.2015 • Saturday • M 2

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • B3

Gant comes up big in a Mizzou victory Sophomore has impact inside to spark Tigers

MISSOURI 78, N. ILLINOIS 71

BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • There was a

Jakeenan Gant sighting at Mizzou Arena on Friday. His coach and teammates were quite appreciative. The 6-8 sophomore forward had struggled in a frontcourt starved for production through the first three weeks of the season. He lost his starting job after the first four games and then watched his minutes dwindle. A heralded arrival last year, Gant had done little to live up to his lofty reputation as one of the country’s best prospects. On Friday, he showed some glimmers in MU’s 78-71 win over Northern Illinois. In front of a season-high crowd of 6,214, Gant came off the bench and sparked the Tigers (4-3) with a seasonbest 11 points and six rebounds. Playing a season-high 18 minutes, Gant performed like the player his teammates have seen in practice. “He changed the game for us

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Missouri’s Kevin Puryear goes up for a shot between Northern Illinois’ Marin Maric (left) and Levi Bradley in Friday night’s game.

tonight on the boards and being a great energy guy,” freshman forward Kevin Puryear said after scoring a team-high 17 points. “I was really happy I got to see him work tonight.” “We see it every day in practice,” senior forward Ryan Rosburg added. “He’s capable of providing a big spark for us. He can do a lot of things. He’s so athletic and long. Obviously he hasn’t been playing

as good as he thinks he can and we know he can. It was great to see him have success tonight.” He wasn’t alone. Missouri’s top four forwards combined for 41 points and 18 rebounds, including 31 points in the second half. Reserve forward Russell Woods added nine points, seven coming in three straight possessions early in the second half. The Tigers’ height and depth issues at the for-

VanVleet might return for battered Wichita St. Shockers, Billikens looking to recover from losses BY STU DURANDO St. Louis Post-dispatch

The series of updates on Wichita State guard Fred VanVleet started this week with the senior running and working with trainers outside of practice and a chance he might play against St. Louis University on Saturday. He then increased his activity in practice and told the Wichita Eagle that he would be a game-time decision at Chaifetz Arena. Finally, it was reported by CBS Sports that coach Gregg Marshall said VanVleet would “probably give it a go.” The daily updates wouldn’t have been necessary if not for the Shockers’ recent problems. They enter their third meeting in as many years with the Billikens having sufered three consecutive losses and dropping out of the top 25 for the first time in 43 weeks. Thus, VanVleet’s hamstring injury has been closely watched in Wichita, and SLU coach Jim Crews understands why. “VanVleet is like an older guy playing with a bunch of younger guys,” Crews said. “He’s like 30 and playing with college guys, and he just outsmarts everybody. He’s three steps ahead. He’s a chess player, he’s not checkers.” It’s been a while since the Shockers have stumbled like this. They lost games to USC, Alabama and Iowa last week in Orlando after reaching No. 9 in the rankings. In addition to VanVleet, Wichita State lost Anton Grady to a frightening looking injury in Florida when he suffered a spinal concussion in a collision that left him motionless on the court for several minutes. Guard Landry Shamet is also out with a stress fracture. “We are missing a lot of key guys,” freshman Markis McDuie said. “But I think we definitely could focus more. We had a couple of games we could’ve won last weekend. We just didn’t make shots, had big turnovers near the end of games, fouls, and just other things that didn’t go our way. We’re not going to sit here and say the whole (reason for the losses) was because of injuries.” VanVleet and healthy Ron Baker form what was considered one of best, if not the best, backcourts in the country this season. Fellow guard Tekele Cotton graduated, but the tandem and the supporting cast were considered good enough to produce another huge season. When the teams played two years ago, Baker scored 22 points and VanVleet had six assists in a close Shockers’ win. Last season Baker scored 18 in Wichita State’s 29-point win. “They’re just very smart,” SLU guard

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Wichita State guard Fred VanVleet, talking with coach Gregg Marshall, has had a hamstring injury.

Mike Crawford said. “They know how to play well together and with everybody else. They’re just hard to stop in general. You have to beat them to the things that they’re really good at.” The Billikens hope that a year will make a huge diference. Last season in Wichita, SLU fell behind by 26 in the first half. Crews used five freshmen on the floor together for the first time and the Billikens never made a dent in the deficit. “Last year we didn’t go into the game mentally prepared,” SLU guard Davell Roby said. “We were all hyped for it but were weren’t focused, like little kids in a candy store or something.” That game looked similar to SLU’s outing three days ago against Morehead State as the Billikens never were a threat. Thus, neither team enters Saturday’s game playing the way it was expecting. Crews is preparing his team as if VanVleet is going to play. The guard told the Wichita Eagle on Thursday that he was able to complete 85 percent of practice but that he doesn’t want to do anything that is risky. With or without VanVleet, Marshall said his team has a lot of work to improve. “We’ve got to figure out how to score, figure out how to defend better,” he said. “Once we know who’s going to be out on the floor, we’ve got to come up with an attack that’s going to create easier scoring opportunities than the ones we’re getting. We’ve got to shoot the ball better and execute better. I hope we’re done with additional injuries. It seems like we’ve been going backwards for a while.” Stu Durando @studurando on Twitter sdurando@post-dispatch.com

FG FT Reb N. ILLINOIS Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Baker 32 3-10 3-5 1-4 4 3 11 Iroegbu 10 1-1 0-0 2-2 1 2 2 Armstead 32 3-11 3-5 1-5 0 2 10 Orris 17 0-2 0-0 1-2 0 1 0 Maric 32 5-13 4-4 5-7 0 3 14 Wilson 27 5-12 10-10 1-2 0 3 24 Porter 13 1-2 0-0 0-2 4 3 2 Key 26 2-8 0-0 1-4 2 3 4 Bradley 11 2-4 0-0 1-1 0 2 4 Totals 200 22-63 20-24 17-34 11 22 71 Percentages: FG.349, FT.833. 3-point goals: 7-23, .304. Team rebounds: 5. Blocked shots: 1. Turnovers: 9. Steals: 8. Technical fouls: None. FG FT Reb MISSOURI Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Phillips 35 5-7 2-3 0-1 6 4 13 Wright 26 3-7 2-4 0-5 3 3 10 Clark 20 1-4 3-6 0-7 4 4 6 Puryear 24 6-10 5-5 0-1 0 1 17 Rosburg 21 2-2 0-0 3-7 1 4 4 Isabell 16 1-5 0-1 1-2 1 0 3 Allen 2 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 1 0 Walton 9 1-3 0-0 0-0 0 0 2 Gant 18 4-6 3-3 2-6 0 1 11 Woods 15 4-4 1-2 1-4 1 4 9 VanLeer 14 1-4 0-0 0-0 2 0 3 Totals 200 28-52 16-24 10-38 18 22 78 Percentages: FG.538, FT.667. 3-point goals: 6-15, .400. Team rebounds: 5. Blocked shots: 3. Turnovers: 15. Steals: 6. Technical fouls: None. N. Illinois 26 45 — 71 Missouri 27 51 — 78 A: 6,214. Officials: John Hampton, Mike Roberts, Jamie Luckie.

ward positions have created problems in some matchups this year, but the Huskies couldn’t answer MU’s inside punch. “Credit their bigs,” Huskies coach Mark Montgomery added. “We know they’re good players. They had answers. They ran their ofense eiciently to get them the ball.” The surge started with Gant, who resisted — finally — the urge

ST. LOUIS U. VS. WICHITA STATE When • 8 p.m. Saturday Where • Chaifetz Arena TV, radio • ESPNU, WXOS (101.1 FM) Records • SLU is 4-2, Wichita State 2-4. All-time series • SLU leads 42-21. About the Billikens • SLU has scored 103 points combined in the last two games against the two top-rated defensive teams in the country. ... Guard Ash Yacoubou has worked on getting more shots around the basket and is shooting 58 percent inside the 3-point arc compared to 44.5 percent last season. ... Guards Mike Crawford and Miles Reynolds are shooting a cumulative 79.7 percent at the free-throw line and the rest of the team is shooting 58.6 percent. About the Shockers • Dec. 5 is the winningest date in Wichita State history, with the Shockers posting a 15-3 mark on this date. ... Ron Baker and Fred VanVleet are included on the Naismith Trophy watch list. The award goes to the national player of the year. ... After scoring ive points in the irst three games, Markis McDuie has averaged 12.3 in the last three. ... The Shockers are under .500 for the irst time since February 2009.

to hang out on the perimeter and hoist ill-advised 3-pointers. The sophomore came into the game 0 for seven from 3-point range this season and just one for 21 in his career. He’s taken just one shot from behind the arc the last three games, embracing his coaches’ desired role as an impact player at the rim. Gant came into the game with only 15 points and 10 rebounds in MU’s first six games. The Tigers raced out to a 12-0 lead as the Huskies (7-1) didn’t score until 5:05 into the first half. By halftime, though, NIU had climbed within one as the Tigers frittered away possessions with turnovers and early shots. Terrence Phillips, Anderson’s freshman point guard, had a team-high seven points at the break but four turnovers. Missouri eventually settled down in the second half by attacking the lane. NIU evened the score at 41-41 with 13:25 left, but Gant put the Tigers back in front for good with a hook shot. Gant followed with a steal in the backcourt and ran the floor the rest of the way for a three-point play to build a 54-46 lead. Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

No. 2 Maryland bounces back to rip St. Francis FROM WIRE AND NEWS SERVICES

Robert Carter Jr. had 20 points, and No. 2 Maryland routed St. Francis 96-55 on Friday night in College Park, Md. The Terrapins bounced back from their first loss of the season Tuesday against No. 9 North Carolina in the ACC-Big Ten Challenge. Freshman Diamond Stone added 16 points, and Jake Layman scored 11 of his 16 points in the first half. Maryland (7-1) was 31 of 46 from the field (67.4 percent) and has shot at least 50 percent for five consecutive games. Ben Millaud-Meunier led St. Francis (3-4) with 13 points. Ronnie Drinnon added 11 points with 10 rebounds for the Red Flash, who have dropped each of their four road games this season. Layman scored eight points as Maryland opened with a 16-3 run. The Red Flash struggled to get open shots against the Terrapins’ tight man-to-man defense and made just three of their first 16 shots from the field.

AREA SIUC women top SIUE • Rishonda Napier scored 18 points and host Southern Illinois Carbondale beat Southern Illinois Edwardsville. Dyana Pierre added nine points and a game-high 13 rebounds for SIUC (4-3). Shronda Butts led the Cougars (3-5) with 23 points.

NOTEBOOK

CHRIS LEE •P-d

SLU guard Davell Roby takes a fall against SIUE last month.

ILLINOIS VS. W. CAROLINA When • 2 p.m. Saturday Where • State Farm Center, Champaign Radio • WQQX (1490 AM) Records • Illinois is 3-5, Western Carolina 3-4. Of note • Illinois will face one of the smallest teams it will see all season in the Catamounts, who don’t have a starter taller than 6-foot-7; Illinois may counter with a smaller lineup.

Calipari says Wildcats need toughness • Kentucky coach John Calipari cautioned anyone who would listen that all the talent possessed by his latest freshman class would mean nothing if they didn’t also show a little toughness. If he was having trouble getting his team’s attention, he’s not anymore. The top-ranked Wildcats showed none of that needed grit Thursday night in an 87-77 loss at UCLA, a game in which Calipari’s concerns about his team’s resolve painfully unfolded in Kentucky’s first regularseason loss in nearly 21 months. “We got kicked, we got beat, we move on,” Calipari said. “We’ve had a pretty good run, and we’ll see if we can get it going again.” Kentucky (7-1) has until Wednesday against Eastern Kentucky to find some of that missing fortitude. Wisconsin’s Pritzl is out • Wisconsin guard Brevin Pritzl has reinjured his left foot and is out indefinitely. The school said Friday that Pritzl hurt the foot in practice Tuesday. He is coming of a broken foot that required surgery in August but won’t need new surgery, the school said. Pritzl, a 6-3 shooting guard, has played just four minutes this season.

HOW THE TOP 25 FARED 1. Kentucky (7-1) idle. Next: vs. Eastern Kentucky, Wednesday. 2. Maryland (7-1) beat St. Francis (Pa.) 96-55. Next: vs. UConn, Tuesday. 3. Michigan State (8-0) idle. Next: vs. Binghamton, Saturday. 4. Kansas (5-1) idle. Next: vs. Harvard, Saturday. 5. Iowa State (6-0) idle. Next: vs. Buffalo, Monday. 6. Oklahoma (5-0) idle. Next: vs. No. 8 Villanova, Monday.

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7. Duke (7-1) idle. Next: vs. Buffalo, Saturday. 8. Villanova (7-0) idle. Next: vs. No. 6 Oklahoma, Monday. 9. North Carolina (6-1) idle. Next: vs. Davidson, Sunday. 10. Virginia (6-1) idle. Next: vs. William & Mary, Saturday. 11. Purdue (7-0) idle. Next: vs. New Mexico, Saturday. 12. Xavier (7-0) idle. Next: vs. Western Kentucky, Saturday. 13. Gonzaga (5-1) idle. Next: vs. No. 19 Arizona, Saturday. 14. Syracuse (6-1) idle. Next: at Georgetown, Saturday. 15. Oregon (6-1) lost to UNLV 80-69. Next: vs. Navy, Monday. 16. Vanderbilt (6-1) idle. Next: at No. 25 Baylor, Sunday. 17. Cincinnati (7-1) idle. Next: vs. Morgan State, Sunday. 18. Texas A&M (7-1) idle. Next: at Arizona State, Saturday. 19. Arizona (6-1) idle. Next: at No. 13 Gonzaga, Saturday. 20. West Virginia (6-0) idle. Next: vs. Kennesaw State, Saturday. 21. Miami (6-1) idle. Next: vs. Charlotte, Saturday. 22. SMU (5-0) idle. Next: vs. New Hampshire, Saturday. 23. Providence (7-1) idle. Next: at Rhode Island, Saturday. 24. Louisville (5-1) idle. Next: vs. Grand Canyon, Saturday. 25. Baylor (5-1) idle. Next: vs. No. 16 Vanderbilt, Sunday.


COLLEGE SPORTS

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 12.05.2015

Alabama is where it usually is Crimson Tide is expected to crush Florida in the SEC title game COLLEGE FOOTBALL NOTEBOOK

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Michigan State favored over unbeaten Iowa

ATLANTA • Alabama has set

the bar high for the rest of the Southeastern Conference. As Alabama heads into another appearance in the SEC championship game, there’s no indication that anyone is close to knocking of Nick Saban’s behemoth from Tuscaloosa. Certainly not Florida, which will face the No. 2 Crimson Tide on Saturday. Despite a resurgent season under new coach Jim McElwain, the ofensively challenged Gators are a massive 18-point underdog against Alabama (11-1, No. 2 CFP), which is one victory away from a second straight trip to the College Football Playof. “Not real excited about playing these creatures,” McElwain joked Friday. In his ninth season as the Tide’s coach, Saban has already won three national titles. Discounting a rebuilding season when he took over a floundering program in 2007, his teams have posted an astonishing record (95-12), earned a spot in five SEC championship games and been a serious player in every national race except one (in 2010, when the Tide “slumped” to 10-3). Not that there seems to be any joy in the ride. Saban was in an especially grumpy mood Friday, barely cracking a smile as he coldly, methodically discussed what it takes to stay on top, year after year after year. “It’s not easy at all,” he said. “You have to have the right psychological disposition to be able to sustain all those ups and downs and look at every one of those challenges as a test, not a sign of what’s going to happen. It’s a test of how you respond to it, how you react to it, and how you try to take advantage of it, good or bad. That’s the only way you have a chance.” Does No. 18 Florida (10-2, No. 18 CFP) have any chance? The Gators’ offensive woes were especially glaring as they struggled to beat Florida Atlantic in overtime and lost 27-2 at home to Florida State, with only a safety preventing Florida’s first shutout loss since 1988. But McElwain isn’t about to shy away from the challenge of

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Alabama running back Derrick Henry had 271 rushing yards against Auburn last Saturday.

going against his former boss, having at least restored some of Florida’s former glory after the Will Muschamp era. McElwain, ofensive coordinator Doug Nussmeier and defensive line coach Chris Rumph are all former assistants on Saban’s staf at Alabama. The Gators are playing in the SEC championship game for the first time since 2009. “It’s been so much fun seeing the development of the program, of our players, of the people around the program,” said McElwain, who spent four years as Saban’s ofensive coordinator. “When you sit back and reflect a little bit, we’ve come a long ways. But how far we’re going to go is probably the most exciting part of it.” Alabama is already there, though Saban has gone to great lengths to make sure no one is looking ahead to the playof. He called this game “a set up,” insisting that Florida is the best team the Tide has faced all season. “We know if we don’t win this game, we can’t do anything else further in the season,” tight end O.J. Howard said, taking his coach at his word. “We’ve got to take it one step at a time, so we’re just focused on this game.”

Mark Dantonio and Kirk Ferentz kept the discussion on point Friday. The Michigan State and Iowa coaches are in Indianapolis to win a Big Ten championship. Nothing more. They’ll let everyone else debate the hot-button issues — the national championship picture, whether two teams from the same conference deserve to make the playofs and which league is the nation’s best. “We’ve been here before,” Dantonio said. “This is still goal No. 1 for us.” The conventional wisdom is that the title game Saturday night is essentially a play-in for one of the four precious spots in the second College Football Playof. Unbeaten Iowa, championship game favorite Michigan State and defending national champion Ohio State were ranked Nos. 4, 5 and 6 this week by The Associated Press and the College Football Playof committee. The Spartans and Buckeyes both inished 11-1 overall and 7-1 in conference play, but East Division champion Michigan State earned its third ticket to Indy in ive years by upsetting Ohio State in Columbus two weeks ago. West Division champ Iowa (120, 8-0) is one of two remaining unbeaten teams (with Clemson) in the Football Bowl Subdivision and, along with Michigan State, was one of ive FBS teams with multiple road wins over ranked foes. ACC title game • Nothing is ever really easy with the ACC’s bowl setup, but the postseason implications for Clemson and North Carolina would be, if Clemson wins Saturday in the ACC championship game. If UNC wins, chaos would ensue in the national title race and in the ACC bowl order. The easiest outlook would be if Clemson wins. No. 1 in the College Football Playof selection committee’s rankings, Clemson would stay in the top spot with a win and play the No. 4 seed, probably the winner of the Big Ten championship game, in the Orange Bowl in Miami on Dec. 31. If UNC beats Clemson, the Tar

Heels would be guaranteed a spot in a New Year’s Day game as the ACC champion. If UNC inished in the top four of the inal CFP rankings, it would make the playof and go to the Orange Bowl to face what would probably be No. 1-seeded Alabama. UNC has to jump No. 7 Stanford and No. 6 Ohio State to get into the top 4. Stanford faces Southern California in the Pac-12 title game Saturday, and UNC probably needs the Cardinal to lose to pass them in the inal rankings. Virginia hires Mendenhall • Virginia has hired Bronco Mendenhall away from Brigham Young to be the Cavaliers’ coach. Virginia made the surprising announcement Friday. There had been numerous reports about various coaches such as Mark Richt and Sonny Dykes being linked to the vacancy, but Mendenhall’s name had never come up. Mendenhall was in his 11th season with the Cougars and 99-42, taking them to a bowl game every season. Virginia inished 4-8 this season and ired Mike London after six seasons during which he had only one winning record. Bowling Green wins MAC • Travis Greene ran for 183 yards and two touchdowns, and Matt Johnson threw two scoring passes to lift Bowling Green over Northern Illinois 34-14 in the MidAmerican Conference title game Friday night in Detroit. The Falcons (10-3) took back the league title in the third straight matchup between the teams. Northern Illinois (8-5) won 51-17 last year, after Bowling Green won in 2013. Pitt RB has cancer • Pittsburgh junior running back James Conner has been diagnosed with cancer and will begin treatment immediately. The 2014 ACC player of the year said Friday he received the diagnosis of stage 2 Hodgkin lymphoma on Thanksgiving and has tumors in his neck and chest. He will begin chemotherapy next week. Treatment will last about six months.

SATURDAY’S GAMES TOP 25 No. 1 Clemson vs. No. 8 North Carolina, in Charlotte, 7 p.m. No. 2 Alabama vs. No. 18 Florida, in Atlanta, 3 p.m. No. 4 Iowa vs. No. 5 Michigan State, in Indianapolis, 7:15 p.m. No. 7 Stanford vs. No. 24 USC, in Santa Clara, Calif., 6:45 p.m. No. 12 Baylor vs. Texas, 11 a.m. No. 17 Houston vs. No. 20 Temple, 11 a.m. NATIONAL SOUTH Southern Miss. (9-3) at W. Kentucky (10-2), 11 a.m. Georgia St. (5-6) at Georgia Southern (8-3), 1 p.m. New Mexico St. (3-8) at La.Monroe (1-11), 2 p.m. Troy (3-8) at LouisianaLafayette (4-7), 4 p.m. Appalachian St. (9-2) at South Alabama (5-6), 6:30 p.m. MIDWEST West Virginia (7-4) at Kansas St. (5-6), 3:30 p.m. SOUTHWEST Texas St. (3-8) at Arkansas St. (8-3), 2 p.m. Grambling St. (9-2) vs. Alcorn St. (8-3), in Houston, 3 p.m. FAR WEST San Diego St. (9-3) at Air Force (8-4), 6:30 p.m. PLAYOFFS Football Championship Subdivision Second Round William & Mary (9-3) at Richmond (8-3), 11 a.m. The Citadel (9-3) at Charleston Southern (9-2), noon Colgate (8-4) at James Madison (9-2), noon Western Illinois (7-5) at Illinois State (9-2), 1 p.m. Chattanooga (9-3) at Jacksonville St. (10-1), 1 p.m. Montana (8-4) at N. Dakota St. (9-2), 2:30 p.m. Sam Houston St. (9-3) at McNeese St. (10-0), 6 p.m. Northern Iowa (8-4) at Portland St. (9-2), 9 p.m.

From news services

AREA COLLEGE ATHLETES NOTEBOOK

Crist has big game in goal as Washington U. advances Bears play Saturday in bid for soccer title BY STEVE EIGHINGER Special to the Post-Dispatch

The Washington University women’s soccer team beat No. 1 Messiah in penalty kicks Friday and will play for the Division III national championship Saturday in Kansas City. Junior goalkeeper Lizzy Crist stopped four penalty kicks and made five saves, extending a stellar run for the defense. Entering Friday’s game, No. 4 Washington U. had allowed just one goal in its last 13 games. Crist made three straight saves in the shootout, including one that sent it to sudden death. The teams had played to a 1-1 tie after 110 minutes. Hannah Rosenberg pushed a shot inside the left corner for a 3-2 lead in the shootout, and when Messiah’s Missy Biener missed high, the Bears’ celebration was on. “It’s a whirlwind of emotion during penalty kicks,” said Crist, who is 18-2-1. “It was an exciting moment, and I took it one PK at a time.” Gillan Myers and Liz Collins made the first two shootout goals for WU (20-2-1), which was in the semifinals for the first time since 2009. That year, Messiah beat Washington U. 1-0 in the championship match. WU trailed 1-0 after Holly Burgard scored in the 41st minute, the first goal the Bears had given up in 790 minutes. The Bears tied it when junior forward Katie Chandler scored from 10 yards on an assist from Megan Renken. Messiah (22-0-3) outshot Washington U. 20-16 and had a 5-0 advantage in corner kicks. The defense-first Falcons had allowed just six shots in their first round playof games. Washington U. will play No. 6 Williams College at 1:30 p.m. Saturday at Swope Soccer Village for the national title.

WASHINGTON U. PHOTO

Lizzy Crist (0) and Katie Chandler celebrate following Washington University’s semiinal victory over Messiah in the NCAA Division III soccer tournament.

RECORD BELONGS TO HILL Sophomore running back Brian Hill (Belleville West) is the new single-season rushing recordholder at Wyoming. Hill, whose fifth 200-yard game of the season catapulted him to the record, finished the year with 1,631 yards. The previous record of 1,455 yards had stood since 1994. Hill ran for 232 yards in Wyoming’s season-ending 35-28 win over UNLV and helped the Cowboys (2-10) avoid what would have been a program record 11th loss. Wyoming coach Craig Bohl compares Hill to former Nebraska standout and three-time Super Bowl champion Roger Craig. Craig played at Nebraska (1980-82) when Bohl was a graduate assistant.

BIG YEAR FOR MUNSON Sophomore linebacker Calvin

Munson (Francis Howell) has been an integral part of a memorable season at San Diego State (9-3). A first-team All-Mountain West Conference selection, Munson leads the Aztecs in tackles, sacks and tackles for loss. “Our goal was to win a conference championship,” Munson told the San Diego Times-Union. “The track we’re on, the goal is to keep winning out ... keep preparing like we have been, keep winning and doing what we’re doing.” San Diego State won the West Division of the Mountain West and plays Mountain Division champ Air Force (8-4) in Saturday’s conference title game. The Aztecs closed the the regular season with an eight-game winning streak, the school’s longest since 1975.

AROUND THE AREA Three local athletes have helped power Central Missouri (6-0) to

a No. 12 position in the Division II men’s basketball rankings. Redshirt sophomore guard Brad Woodson (Vianney) is averaging 8.2 points, 6-8 freshman center Jakob Lowrance (Civic Memorial) contributes 7.3 points and shoots 57 percent from the floor, and senior guard Tony Cochran (Vianney) is averaging 4.8 points for a team that rotates 11 players. • Washington University senior midfielder Olivia Lillegraven and junior forward Katie Chandler are first-team picks on the Division III soccer coaches All-America team. In Division II, Quincy junior midfielder Ashley Burton (Oakville) is on the second team, and Central Missouri senior forward Julie Ireland (Holt) is a third-team pick. • SIU Carbondale freshman wide receiver Jimmy Jones (Hazelwood East) was named to the Missouri Valley Football Confer-

ence all-newcomer team. Also for SIUC, junior LB Chase Allen (Belleville East) and senior TE Adam Fuehne (Mater Dei) are second-team All-MVFC selections. Allen registered 120 tackles, third-most in the conference and the most for a Salukis player since 2002. Allen blocked three kicks, which led the MVFC and ranked fifth nationally. Fuehne had 25 receptions for 351 yards and two TDs. • Southeast Missouri sophomore middle blocker Nzingha Clarke (O’Fallon) is a first-team All-Ohio Valley Conference volleyball selection. Clarke led the OVC in blocks and ranked third in hitting percentage. • Three local players are scoring in double figures for the William Woods basketball team (4-3). Deon Pettigrew (Belleville West), a 6-5 junior center, leads the team at 14.9 points a game. Senior guard Austin Lowery (Francis Howell) is at 13.4, and Bryan DeGeare (Crystal City), a 6-7 junior, is contributing 11.4 points and a team-best 7.7 rebounds. • Samford junior outside hitter Erin Bognar (Westminster) recorded career highs in kills (28) and digs (26) in a 3-2 loss to East Tennessee State in the finals of the Southern Conference volleyball tournament. • Sophomore utility Tommy Stupp (MICDS) is fifth in scoring for the No. 19 Bucknell water polo team. • Both Washington University basketball teams have cracked the top 15 in the D3hoops.com rankings. The No. 11 women are of to a 4-1 start, and the No. 14 men are 5-0 after being unranked in the preseason. • Sophomore outside hitter Lauren Corby (Edwardsville) finished her junior volleyball season at Arkansas-Pine Bluf (12-20) second in kills and third in digs. • Sophomore setter Katie Scholten (Visitation) led the Bowling Green volleyball team (7-22) with 9.42 assists per set.


MIZZOU

12.05.2015 • Saturday • M 1

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • B5

Odom starts to reshape Mizzou’s staf Only three of Pinkel’s assistants are assured of staying with Tigers for next season BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • Missouri’s football staf will have a new look beyond the man at the top. New head coach Barry Odom met with members of former coach Gary Pinkel’s staff Friday, and only three assistants are assured of returning for the 2016 season. Odom, MU’s defensive coordinator and linebackers coach this past season, was announced as the Tigers’ new head coach Thursday, succeeding Pinkel, who announced his resignation last month after 15 years. Odom plans to retain safeties coach Ryan Walters, cornerbacks coach Cornell Ford and quarterbacks coach Andy Hill, multiple sources confirmed Friday. Hill interviewed for the headcoaching job at Montana State on Thursday and was reportedly the frontrunner for the job, but he told the Post-Dispatch he’ll re-

turn for a 21st season on the Mizzou sideline. Hill, like Odom a former Mizzou player, has been a fixture on the MU staf for the last 20 years. It’s unclear if he’ll remain quarterbacks coach under Odom or go back to coaching receivers, a position he held from 1996-2012. Offensive coordinator Josh Henson and ofensive line coach A.J. Ricker both confirmed they won’t be back next season. Henson was promoted to coordinator for the 2013 season and in his debut season calling plays for the ofense, the Tigers set a team record by averaging 490.7 yards per game. The production didn’t last. Mizzou’s ofense slipped to 13th in the SEC in 2014 and this year was the worst in the five power conferences, averaging just 13.6 points a game and 280.9 yards. Missouri’s 16 touchdowns were the fewest for a power conference team since Stanford scored 15 in 2006.

For now, it appears MU will not retain defensive line coach Craig Kuligowski, who has produced nine first-team all-conference players at Mizzou and 12 NFL draft picks, including four firstrounders, or running backs coach Brian Jones and receivers coach Pat Washington, who joined the staf in 2013. Walters came to MU this year from Memphis, where he worked under Odom in 2014. Ford came to Mizzou with Pinkel from Toledo after the 2000 season. He’s been MU’s primary St. Louis recruiter for the last 15 years. Odom didn’t have a timetable for when he’ll begin filling positions on the staff. Athletics director Mack Rhoades stressed that Odom will have autonomy in hiring assistant coaches. “It’s hugely important to find the right fit for us moving forward,” Odom said. Strength and conditioning coach Pat Ivey said he had not

talked with Odom about his role as of Friday. Ivey’s oicial title is associate AD for athletic performance. “That will be Coach Odom’s decision in terms of his strength and conditioning person,” Rhoades said. “That’s obviously a very critical position in today’s world of football.” Odom didn’t discuss specific plans for the ofense he hopes to run, but it’s a topic he discussed extensively with Rhoades during the interview process. “When you coach on the defensive side, you look at ofenses that have presented you problems from a game-planning standpoint and from a personnel standpoint,” Odom said. “Over the course of the last 15 years I’ve got ideas and philosophies for what I want to see in building an ofense going forward. At the end of the day you’ve got to score points and have great play out of your quarterback. It’s all got to fit

together.” One possible candidate for the coordinator position is Utah State’s Josh Heupel, the former Oklahoma quarterback and Sooners coordinator. Heupel’s Utah State ofense ranks No. 60 in scoring offense (29.7 points per game) and No. 93 in total offense (370.8 yards per game). Rhoades had a general template in mind for Mizzou’s offense of the future, saying it will be a blend of schemes with multiple formations. “There’ll be times we play fast tempo and we have four wide receivers,” Rhoades said. “There’ll be times we have two tight ends and the quarterback’s under center. (Odom) will do a great job of taking our strengths in terms of personnel and eventually recruit to where he has a preferred system.” Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Missouri head football coach Barry Odom embraces his sons, James (left) and Garyt, as he is introduced Friday as the new leader of Missouri’s program.

Pinkel calls Odom best man for job HOCHMAN • FROM B1

a formidable SEC roster that, in each of the two years prior, played for the conference championship. Odom must win at least six games, one more than 2015’s five. Pinkel didn’t make a bowl that first year, and that was still OK. They were growing a program then. Mizzou is grown now. And this is SEC football, this is big-boy stuf. And there is a big difference, when you look at the mosaic that is a program, between a lone blip year and two consecutive down years. “Without question, this is a place I expect to win championships,” Odom said Friday, catching my ear with the plural of championship. “I believe in the values of working hard and outworking your opponent. … My vision, without question, will be championships in all walks of life, and I’m not afraid to say that out loud.” He’s 1-0, since he won the news conference, as they say. But I had to ask the coach — you won five games last season with an, um, “young” ofense. If you don’t win six next season, is that a failure of a season? “I’m not in the position to talk number of wins, I’m in position to talk about how we’re going to work really, really hard,” he said. “And if we take care of business and do what we’re supposed to do from now, until we kick the ball of at West Virginia, we’ll be in good position.” I preferred that Mizzou hire a coach who had been a head coach. There’s something about already being in that chair. A lot of first head-coaching jobs are steppingstone jobs; Odom’s already in the SEC, and he probably looks at this as a “pope” job. But one wonders if the lack of head coaching experience will catch up to him? “When I left Don James to work in Toledo, I tried a little bit to be like Don James for the first year or two,” Pinkel said after the band stopped playing. “But I kind of figured it out after that — I got to be Gary Pinkel, and I think that’s the same thing for Barry. And we’ve indirectly talked about that. I could not be more excited than I am right now for the future of Missouri football. “I think we have a pretty good foundation. But this is Barry Odom’s program, this is his now. He’s a process guy, and he’ll put his stamp on every area. There’s not a better guy for that job than Barry Odom.” Now, one reading those quotes might surmise that Pinkel is just saying all the right things. But as the recently retired

coach gushed and gushed, the point that he kept hammering was — the school didn’t hire Odom because he’s a Mizzou guy; the school hired Odom because he was the right guy, and just also happened to be from Mizzou. “He’s kind of got ‘it’ — it’s kind of like a quarterback,” said Pinkel, who retired prematurely because of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. “There’s got to be something inside of him to make him a little diferent. He’s remarkably competitive, he just has all the intangibles it takes. He’s a very good ‘people person.’ He’s tough, he’s competitive, he pays attention to detail, he’s demanding. But he also loves his players, and you can see how they love him, too. ... “Did I ever think he might be (Mizzou’s coach) down the road? To be honest with you, yeah. Because he’s got ‘it.’ I don’t get real close to my assistants, and he’s about as close as we get. … We’ve always had a relationship that’s special.” It was surprising to hear that the popular defensive assistant coach, Craig Kuligowski, won’t return to the Tigers. But that’s Odom, right away, putting his stamp on the program — Odom has certain types of men he wants grooming the young men. Of course, he’s got to recruit the young men to begin with. The more people I talk to, the more understanding I get that Mizzou, even with the Jeremy Maclins and Terry Beckner Jrs., could and should better recruit the St. Louis area. Odom, naturally, emphasized this point Friday, while also talking about a footprint upon Texas and the Southeastern Conference. Odom sold athletics director Mack Rhoades on his vision. Now Odom will have to sell recruits and skeptics that he isn’t the right guy just because perhaps he knows the words to “Fight Tiger.” Next season will be crucial for Mizzou, if only because of how bad the offense was this season. Recruiting the South and Texas is tough to do if your program is rebuilding and not reloading. Yes, their road schedule in 2016 is brutal — at West Virginia, plus LSU, Florida, South Carolina and Tennessee.But Mizzou has 12 games total, with three cupcakes. As we saw this season in the SEC, 6-6 should be good enough for a bowl. But again, this program is no longer about making any bowl. It’s about making a January bowl. And if Mizzou isn’t competing for that during 2017, then it will be fair to be frustrated. Benjamin Hochman @hochman on Twitter bhochman@post-dispatch.com

Rhoades had ive candidates at MU ODOM • FROM B1

The specter of the Levine regime didn’t spook Rhoades into crossing of his internal candidate — especially after the first interview. “After that first meeting my heart was there,” Rhoades said.“Then I needed to get my mind there.” By Wednesday, after Odom had interviewed for the head-coaching job at Memphis, Rhoades pulled the trigger. “He is the right person. This is the right time. This is the perfect fit to lead our program to that next level,” Rhoades said Friday at Odom’s oicial introduction as Missouri’s 32nd head coach. On the same Mizzou Arena court where 18 days earlier Pinkel discussed his plans to retire, Odom stepped onto the floor with his wife, Tia, and three kids and headed straight to Pinkel for a hug. The transition was complete. “At the end of the day, the place you graduate college from is going to have a special place in your heart,” said Odom, a Mizzou linebacker from 1996-99. “Missouri’s an unbelievable, tremendous state. The people of Missouri are the best. I look forward to representing them. ... This is where I wanted to be, without question.” There are some staff questions left to answer. Odom plans to retain only three of Pinkel’s eight other position coaches — Andy Hill, Cornell Ford and Ryan Walters. He’ll have to find an offensive coordinator who can fix this year’s worst offense among the major conferences. Odom will run his defense but needs to find a coordinator to help manage the system. After a week-long search landed Rhoades back to the first candidate he interviewed, one question lingered: Why Odom? Odom’s defense was outstanding this fall during MU’s otherwise forgettable 5-7 season, holding opponents to 16.2 points per game and 302.0 yards, both top-10 averages nationally. But 15 years after Pinkel arrived from Toledo to take over Mizzou’s program, Odom ascends to the top job with fewer career credentials. He’s been a coordinator for four seasons — three at Memphis, one at Mizzou — and has only seven seasons total as a college assistant. His only head-coaching experience was two seasons at Rock Bridge High School more than a decade ago. He’s the ninthyoungest head coach at the FBS level and fourth-youngest in the power conferences. “There’s going to be bumps along the way,” Odom said. “I know that’s going to

happen. I embrace that. I’m ready to lead our football program through those times.” On Wednesday, with his interviews complete, Rhoades hunkered down and made a decision. He had met with Temple’s Matt Rhule and California’s Sonny Dykes. To some degree or another, other head coaches were vetted, including Bowling Green’s Dino Babers and Toledo’s Matt Campbell. Rhoades said he targeted five candidates. It’s unclear if Rhoades had serious discussions with Houston’s Tom Herman, whom he hired at UH last year. Either way, every other candidate linked to the job was a sitting head coach. Only Odom lacked head-coaching experience at the college level. Ultimately, that didn’t matter. “We went into this process openminded and didn’t put any restrictions on any candidate,” Rhoades said. “At the end of the day, it was about who we felt had the best ability to take us to that next level, whether head-coaching experience or not. Over and over and over again, over the many hours of conversations and questions with Coach Odom, I continued to be feel this sense, a gut feeling that he is the man to take this program to the next level.” In the end, other qualities outweighed the one lacking on his résumé, including Odom’s three-year stint as Pinkel’s director of football operations from 2006-08. In the operations position, Odom worked closely alongside Pinkel and managed dayto-day aspects of the program. Odom returned from Memphis on Wednesday without taking the job. By then, he’d already interviewed a second time at Mizzou. Rhoades said it’s “highly important” to promote an assistant from within a coaching staf if he’s part of a great program, but there are no expectations for Odom to become Pinkel 2.0. “I didn’t hire Barry Odom to be Coach Pinkel,” Rhoades said. Pinkel agreed. His first couple of years as a head coach at Toledo he tried too much to imitate his mentor, former Washington coach Don James. He wants his successor to avoid that mistake. He’s confident he will. “He’s got to be Barry Odom,” Pinkel said. “He knows that. He’s on top of that. He’s going to do a tremendous job. I could not be more excited than I am right now for the future of Missouri football.” Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com


NFL

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 12.05.2015

NATIONAL FOOTBALL CONFERENCE WEST Arizona Seattle Rams San Francisco EAST Washington NY Giants Philadelphia Dallas SOUTH Carolina Atlanta Tampa Bay New Orleans NORTH Minnesota Green Bay Chicago Detroit

W 9 6 4 3 W 5 5 4 3 W 11 6 5 4 W 8 8 5 4

L 2 5 7 8 L 6 6 7 8 L 0 5 6 7 L 3 4 6 8

T Pct PF PA Home 0 .818 355 229 4-1 0 .545 267 222 4-2 0 .364 186 230 3-2 0 .273 152 271 3-3 T Pct PF PA Home 0 .455 241 267 5-1 0 .455 287 273 3-2 0 .364 243 274 2-3 0 .273 204 261 1-5 T Pct PF PA Home 0 1.000 332 205 6-0 0 .545 260 234 3-3 0 .455 248 279 2-3 0 .364 261 339 3-2 T Pct PF PA Home 0 .727 231 194 4-1 0 .667 289 238 4-2 0 .455 231 264 1-4 0 .333 253 315 3-4

AMERICAN FOOTBALL CONFERENCE Away 5-1 2-3 1-5 0-5 Away 0-5 2-4 2-4 2-3 Away 5-0 3-2 3-3 1-5 Away 4-2 4-2 4-2 1-4

NFC 6-1 5-4 3-4 2-7 NFC 5-3 4-5 3-6 2-7 NFC 7-0 4-4 4-3 3-5 NFC 5-2 6-3 2-5 3-5

AFC 3-1 1-1 1-3 1-1 AFC 0-3 1-1 1-1 1-1 AFC 4-0 2-1 1-3 1-2 AFC 3-1 2-1 3-1 1-3

Div 3-1 2-2 3-0 0-5 Div 2-1 2-3 2-2 2-2 Div 2-0 0-2 2-1 1-2 Div 3-1 3-2 1-3 2-3

Thursday Green Bay 27, Detroit 23 Sunday Arizona at Rams, noon, KTVI (2) Seattle at Minnesota, noon Jacksonville at Tennessee, noon San Francisco at Chicago, noon NY Jets at NY Giants, noon Atlanta at Tampa Bay, noon Houston at Bufalo, noon Baltimore at Miami, noon Cincinnati at Cleveland, noon Denver at San Diego, 3:05 p.m. Kansas City at Oakland, 3:05 p.m., KMOV (4) Carolina at New Orleans, 3:25 p.m., KTVI (2) Philadelphia at New England, 3:25 p.m. Indianapolis at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m., KSDK (5) Monday Dallas at Washington, 7:30 p.m., ESPN

WEST W L T Pct PF PA Home Denver 9 2 0 .818 252 207 4-1 Kansas City 6 5 0 .545 287 220 3-2 Oakland 5 6 0 .455 264 280 2-3 San Diego 3 8 0 .273 244 307 2-4 EAST W L T Pct PF PA Home New England 10 1 0 .909 347 212 6-0 NY Jets 6 5 0 .545 272 228 4-2 Bufalo 5 6 0 .455 266 257 2-3 Miami 4 7 0 .364 225 287 1-3 SOUTH W L T Pct PF PA Home Indianapolis 6 5 0 .545 249 260 3-3 Houston 6 5 0 .545 232 234 4-2 Jacksonville 4 7 0 .364 236 299 3-3 Tennessee 2 9 0 .182 203 257 0-6 NORTH W L T Pct PF PA Home Cincinnati 9 2 0 .818 297 193 5-1 Pittsburgh 6 5 0 .545 266 230 4-2 Baltimore 4 7 0 .364 259 276 2-3 Cleveland 2 9 0 .182 213 310 1-4

Away 5-1 3-3 3-3 1-4 Away 4-1 2-3 3-3 3-4 Away 3-2 2-3 1-4 2-3 Away 4-1 2-3 2-4 1-5

AFC 5-2 5-2 5-3 2-5 AFC 7-1 5-4 5-5 2-6 AFC 4-3 4-3 4-5 0-7 AFC 7-1 3-4 3-5 2-7

NFC 4-0 1-3 0-3 1-3 NFC 3-0 1-1 0-1 2-1 NFC 2-2 2-2 0-2 2-2 NFC 2-1 3-1 1-2 0-2

RAMS NOTEBOOK

NFL NOTEBOOK

Injuries persist for the Rams

Key Seattle players out

Quinn, Johnson and Zuerlein unlikely to play BY JOE LYONS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

It appears the Rams will again be without defensive end Robert Quinn, cornerback Trumaine Johnson and kicker Greg Zuerlein when they take on the redhot Arizona Cardinals at noon Sunday at the Edward Jones Dome. The team’s Friday injury report listed Quinn (back), Johnson (thigh) and Zuerlein (right hip) as doubtful for the NFC West showdown. In NFL terms, doubtful means there is just a 25 percent chance of playing Sunday. None of the three players practiced this week. Quinn, a two-time Pro Bowl selection, started the season’s first seven games, sat a week and then saw limited action against Chicago. He was inactive for recent games at Baltimore and at Cincinnati. Sixth-year pro Eugene Sims has been filling in for Quinn. Johnson, in the midst of perhaps his best season, was injured on an interception return in Baltimore and did not play in last week’s 31-7 road loss to the Bengals. Marcus Roberson, a second-year pro, stepped in against Baltimore and started in

the Cincinnati game. Zuerlein suffered a strained hip flexor a couple of days before the Cincinnati game. A day before that contest, the team signed free agent kicker Zach Hocker, a University of Arkansas product who began the season with the New Orleans Saints. Zuerlein “did not kick (Friday), so it’ll probably be a gametime decision,’’ Rams coach Jef Fisher said after Friday’s workout at Rams Park. “Zach kicked well, kicked of well (Friday), so we’ll see.’’ Quarterback Case Keenum was limited in practice Friday and still has not cleared the concussion protocol. He’s listed as questionable, which is 50-50. On Thursday, Fisher named Nick Foles as the starter at quarterback. Tackle Rob Havenstein, the team’s second-round draft pick last May, went through another full workout Friday and is listed probable. Havenstein started the first seven games at right tackle but has sat out three of the last four games with a calf injury. Offensive lineman Andrew Donnal (knee) has been ruled out for Sunday. The 9-2 Cardinals, who enter Sunday’s action riding a fivegame winning streak and holding a three-game lead in the NFC West, have ruled out RB Andre Ellington (toe), CB Jerraud Powers (calf) and DT Frostee Rucker (ankle), with DT Cory Redding (ankle) doubtful. WR Michael Floyd (hamstring)

is questionable.

THUMBS-UP FOR ODOM Rams center Tim Barnes, who played at the University of Missouri from 2006-2009, thinks his alma mater made a wise choice in hiring another ex-Tiger, Barry Odom, to take over for Gary Pinkel as the Tigers’ next football coach. “I like it. Not really that surprised since Pinkel helped with the search and likes to promote from within,’’ the fourth-year pro said. “You know that Odom was probably going to be a head coach somewhere this year, so why not Mizzou? I know him personally; he’s a good guy and I’m excited for him.’’ Barnes continued: “You want to keep good people in the program, especially when they have good track records. (Odom) hasn’t been here the whole time. He left and went to Memphis and had success there before coming back. Seems like (Memphis) wanted him back, so I think it’s a good choice by Missouri.’’

GOLDEN SHINES Drafted by the Cardinals in the second round of last spring’s draft, former Affton High and Mizzou standout Marcus Golden had played in all 11 games and made three starts at linebacker for Arizona this season. The 6-foot-3, 260-pound Golden has 24 tackles, including three for loss. He leads the Cardinals with 13 quarterbacks hits, is second with 2½ sacks and is

tied for second with 11 quarterback pressures. He’s also forced a fumble this season. “I love him,’’ Arizona free safety Tyrann Mathieu said earlier in the week. “I love his energy, I love his passion. He’s getting to the quarterback for us; that’s something we definitely need to keep improving on. We need some other guys to step up and get to the quarterback. Marcus is doing a great job. To say he’s a rookie and he has to learn so much, he’s doing a great job just making football plays.’’

The Seahawks will be without running back Marshawn Lynch and receiver Paul Richardson, and will be missing some depth along their defensive line, for Sunday’s game against the Vikings. While Lynch’s absence was expected following abdominal surgery last week, coach Pete Carroll had been optimistic about Richardson’s chances to play. Instead, he was unable to practice all week because of a hamstring problem and was ruled out Friday. The team will also be without defensive end Demarcus Dobbs (concussion) and defensive tackle Jordan Hill (toe) on Sunday. And Vikings defensive tackle Linval Joseph (foot) has been ruled out.

MESSAGE FROM BAILEY On Friday, Rams wide receiver Stedman Bailey issued a message via Twitter: To my entire Rams family, especially my teammates, fans and peers, I thank you so much for your continued prayers and support. My recovery has been nothing short of a miracle (a work of God) and I can only give God the praise, glory and honor for what he is doing in my life at this time. Christmas is a holiday in which Jesus was born as a gift to the world but in all honesty, he has given me and my family a gift which is far greater than what any man can give, a restoration of my life and health. I will continue to get better day by day until I’m able to get back on the field and I ask for your continued prayers. Love, Stedman Bailey. Joe Lyons jlyons@post-dispatch.com

Rams continue to draw criticism over handling of Keenum

Ball works out with Pack • Packers running backs Eddie Lacy and Alonzo Harris missed curfew in Detroit on Wednesday, according to a source, which resulted in a roster shakeup for their game against the Lions. Lacy played just 19 snaps after rushing for at least 100 yards in each of the previous two games, with James Starks getting the bulk of the carries . Harris was released a few hours before kickof and the Packers worked out running back Montee Ball on Friday. Ball, who is from Wentzville, was cut by Denver in the preseason. Green Bay won 27-23 Thursday on Aaron Rodgers’ 61-yard desperation pass to tight end Richard Rodgers on the game’s last play. KC’s Houston sidelined • Chiefs outside linebacker Justin Houston, who has 7½ sacks, won’t play Sunday in Oakland because of his hyperextended left knee, coach Andy Reid said. Center Mitch Morse, receiver De’Anthony Thomas and safety Husain Abdullah also will miss the game, all because of concussions. The Raiders are expected to be without center Rodney Hudson (sprained ankle). QB carousel • The Colts announced that quarterback Andrew Luck, who is recovering from a lacerated kidney and partially torn abdominal muscle and hasn’t played since Nov. 8, won’t play Sunday night in Pittsburgh. He’ll again be replaced by Matt Hasselbeck, who is 4-0 this season. Indy also ruled out three other starters — left tackle Anthony Castonzo (knee), linebacker Jerrell Freeman (hamstring) and right guard Hugh Thornton (elbow). • Peyton Manning (foot) will stay behind in Denver when the Broncos travel to San Diego, giving QB Brock Osweiler his third straight start. Also out for Denver are safety T.J. Ward and nose tackle Sylvester Williams (each has an ankle injury) and linebacker DeMarcus Ware (back). • Eagles quarterback Sam Bradford is expected to return Sunday, against the Patriots, after missing the team’s last two games because of a concussion and left (nonthrowing) shoulder injury. But running back Ryan Mathews (concussion) is out.

RAMS • FROM B1

and safety.” Fisher said he was unaware that Keenum had been diagnosed with concussion symptoms until after the Rams’ 1613 loss to the Ravens. Fisher saw Keenum go down but said he was in game-management mode and didn’t realize the quarterback was slow to get up. On Thursday, Fisher was asked about Winston’s comments and seemed almost eager to reply. “I’ll say this, I have great respect for Eric as a player, and also in the position that he currently holds within the union — the Players Association,” Fisher said. “It’s awfully diicult for an active player, you know, to stay involved — and how should I say this? — understand everything that went on. “I don’t think Eric has all of the facts. The facts were all discussed with the league, with the union. I mean, I can see his position. His position is to protect players. But his position’s no diferent than mine, nor Reggie (Scott)’s, or anybody else associated with the league.” Scott is the Rams’ head athletic trainer. He briefly checked out Keenum after the play, while referee Tony Corrente’s crew was administering a penalty that occurred on the play. But the independent injury spotter at press box level never called for a medical timeout to check out Keenum on the sideline, probably because Scott came out on the field. “It’s very unlikely that anybody is going to be penalized,” Fisher continued. “As I said two weeks ago (after the Keenum incident) ... we’re trying to close the loophole to make sure that that doesn’t happen again.” Although the NFL will consider discipline for future violations of concussion protocol, the league already has let it be known there will be no club discipline in the Keenum matter. A conference call involving athletic trainers and team physi-

Div 2-1 2-1 1-1 0-2 Div 4-0 2-2 3-2 0-5 Div 3-0 2-1 1-2 0-3 Div 3-0 1-2 2-2 1-3

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Rams quarterback Case Keenum drops to his knees after a fumble during the second half against Baltimore on Nov. 22. Keenum hasn’t played since that game.

cians from all 32 teams was held last week to discuss what went wrong with the concussion protocol in the Baltimore game, and what can be done to prevent it from happening again. Medical experts from the league and the players association are continuing to review the issue. More criticism was directed at the Rams, and at Fisher in particular, on the topic this week. Former NFL player and current ESPN analyst Mark Schlereth said in a radio appearance that it was a “bold-faced lie” for Fisher to say he didn’t realize Keenum was injured because he was in game-management mode. Fisher said he spoke with Schlereth on Thursday to clear the air. “He apologized to me,” Fisher said. “Again, Mark didn’t have all of the facts. Those things happen. That’s the world we live

in right now. “When you have the facts and you understand what happened, everything that led up to that incident — and any other incident for that matter — unless you’ve got all the facts, you should probably keep your mouth shut. I think Mark’s one of the best, so we had a really good conversation.” Fisher said he initiated the dialogue with Schlereth when he learned about his remarks. “Would you call somebody if they called you a liar?” Fisher said. “Probably. So I did. I have great respect for Mark and we got it resolved, no problem.” As for Keenum, he has not been made available to reporters while he’s still under the concussion protocol. He has gotten some practice repetitions with the scout team this week, running Arizona plays for the benefit of the Rams’ first-team de-

fense. The Rams play the Cardinals in a noon kickof Sunday at the Edward Jones Dome. But Keenum did not get any reps with the first-team ofense this week while still under the concussion protocol. For that reason, Fisher decided to go with Nick Foles at quarterback against the Big Red. And that won’t change even if Keenum says Saturday that he feels great and clears the protocol. Although unlikely, if that’s the case Saturday, Keenum will be the team’s No. 2 QB and dress for the Arizona game. Otherwise, rookie Sean Mannion will be No. 2 behind Foles for the second week in a row, and Keenum once again will be a gameday inactive. Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com

Elsewhere • The Jets will be without standout cornerback Darrelle Revis (concussion) when they play the Giants on Sunday and his backup, Marcus Williams, is doubtful (sprained knee). That’s a bad sign against standout Giants receiver Odell Beckham Jr. • Patriots linebacker Jamie Collins is expected to be back Sunday, against the Eagles, after missing four games because of illness. But the Pats will be without tight end Rob Gronkowski (knee) and receiver Julian Edelman (foot). Receiver Danny Amendola (knee) is questionable. Other injuries • Bills right guard John Miller (ankle) is out and right tackle Seantrel Henderson (illness) is not expected to play Sunday. Bufalo also will be without linebacker Nigel Bradham (ankle) and running back Karlos Williams (shoulder). ... Falcons receiver Leonard Hankerson (hamstring) is out for the rest of the season. ... Dolphins receiver Rishard Matthews (ribs) is out Sunday, as are Redskins linebacker Perry Riley Jr. (broken foot) and Jaguars receiver Allen Hurns (concussion). From news services


NHL

12.05.2015 • Saturday • M 1

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • B7

BLUES NOTEBOOK

NHL STANDINGS

Parayko comes right back from a ‘scary’ leg injury

EASTERN CONFERENCE

After leaving the ice, he misses only a shift or two BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD St. Louis Post-dispatch

NEW YORK • The rookie season of Blues defenseman Colton Parayko appeared to be in serious jeopardy in the third period of Friday’s game against the New York Islanders. Parayko fell awkwardly on his right leg and had to be escorted to the locker room. But much to the shock of his teammates and coach, the defenseman returned about three minutes later. “It was scary,” Blues defenseman Alex Pietrangelo said. “Obviously something going on in that blood, the kid is a machine. He gets back up, comes back and plays. I was surprised. I was getting ready to play five (defensemen) the rest of the way.” Parayko missed only a shift or two, finishing with 16 minutes, 45 seconds of ice time. Pietrangelo wasn’t the only one surprised to see Parayko return. “I was shocked,” Blues coach Ken Hitchcock said. “It’s good news, but I was shocked.”

FIRST LOOK The game Friday was the Blues’ first at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, the new home of the New York Islanders. Many players were surprised by the unique layout of the building for hockey. “It looks almost like an old college barn,” Blues defenseman Kevin Shattenkirk said. As part of an advertisement, there is a Honda SUV basically parked in the front row at one end of the ice. “It’s very strange,” Shattenkirk said. “Even my mom was talking about that last night, how she was watching the Islanders-Rangers game the other night, and as she was following the play, she just sees a random car sitting in the corner of the rink. That’s a little strange.” The Islanders are in their first season at the Barclays Center after playing previously at the 43-year-old Nassau Coliseum.

NO HALAK The Blues did not see former teammate Jarolslav Halak in net for New York. Halak is 7-4-2 this season with a 1.93 goals-

Blues lose in shootout after Islanders force OT BLUES • FROM B1

tomorrow.” The Blues will turn around and face Toronto on Saturday night at Scottrade Center in the second night of back-to-back games. The club will be looking forward, but the players will still be lamenting that they missed a chance to help Brian Elliott earn his first victory since Oct. 18. Making his first start in 17 days, Elliott turned aside 24 of 25 shots but dropped to 0-3-1 in his last four decisions. “Really wish we could have gotten Brian a win, he really deserves it,” Blues defenseman Kevin Shattenkirk said. “He’s playing fantastic for us, so that’s the only tough part to swallow.” The Blues led 1-0 entering the third period, and they have been one of the best shutdown teams in the NHL this season. They entered Friday’s game having allowed a league-low 12 goals in the final frame and just one in their last six games. But the Islanders are one of the most productive clubs ofensively in the third period, ranking No. 3 with 34 goals coming into Friday. It was the Blues who buckled. New York’s Mikail Grabovski scored his fifth of the season, tying the score 1-1 with 13 minutes, 21 seconds left in regulation. Grabovski gave the puck to linemate Ryan Strome, and when Robert Bortuzzo joined Carl Gunnarsson in pressuring Strome, he made the easy pass to Grabovski for a quick breakaway. Elliott denied the initial shot, but Grabovski put the rebound past him. But at that time, the Blues were more concerned with the right leg of rookie defenseman Colton Parayko buckling a few minutes earlier. Parayko and Strome were behind the Blues’ net when the defenseman fell backward, snapping back his knee and landing awkwardly on his ankle. Parayko grimaced in serious pain and needed assistance from Blues trainer Ray Barile to get to the locker room. How long would he be out? Three weeks? Three months? Try three minutes. He was back before the Islanders tied the score. But with that worry behind them, the Blues now needed a goal. The much-discussed line change of moving Jori Lehtera to the top line with Paul Stastny and Vladimir Tarasenko lasted only last one period Friday. By the start of the second, Alexander Steen had returned to his usual spot with Stastny and Tarasenko and Lehtera had dropped down with David Backes and Troy Brouwer. But the changes didn’t generate any more scoring for the Blues, though they outshot the Islanders 5-3 in OT. “Not very many scoring chances either way,” Steen said. “Unfortunately we had some in the OT and we couldn’t convert them.” The only goal after two periods belonged to Shattenkirk, whose third of the season with just 27 seconds left in the first period cracked open the scoring. Shattenkirk’s eight-game point-streak came to an end in Tuesday’s loss to Florida, but he started another one Friday. Stastny, who was 4-0 on face-ofs in the first period Friday, won the draw and Shattenkirk set up near the point. He exchanged passes with Vladimir Tarasenko, and when the puck came back to him, he sent a slap shot sizzling through the short side of Islanders goalie Thomas Greiss. The goal gave him 11 points (three goals, eight assists) in his last 10 games, and after the final seconds of the period ticked of, it gave the Blues just their sixth lead at the first intermission this season. They had won all five previous games, but there was still a long way to go. The Blues had 10 giveaways in Tuesday’s loss to Florida and they were guilty of five in the second period for a total of 11 through 40 minutes. Kyle Brodziak had one of the errant turnovers that nearly led to a scoring chance. “There was some better stuf than what we played the last two games,” Blues coach Ken Hitchcock said. “But if we can find a way to eliminate some of the easy giveaways in our own zone ...” Jeremy Rutherford @jprutherford on Twitter jrutherford@post-dispatch.com

against average and a .926 save percentage, but with the Islanders playing backto-back games Friday and Saturday, the Isles started Thomas Greiss. Halak was 0-2 against the Blues last season, allowing 11 goals on 72 shots. “We do look at matchups, history of who we’re playing,” Islanders coach Jack Capuano told reporters Friday.

USA HOCKEY ANNOUNCEMENT Oicials from USA Hockey oicially announced Friday that Bufalo will be the site of the 2018 International Ice Hockey Federation World Junior Championships. St. Louis and Pittsburgh finished as runnersup for the 10-nation tournament, which features the top Under-20 players in the world. “It was an extremely difficult decision as all three finalists in contention to host the event were exceptional,” USA Hockey executive director Dave Ogrean said.

Atlantic Montreal Detroit Ottawa Florida Boston Tampa Bay Bufalo Toronto Metropolitan Washington NY Rangers NY Islanders Pittsburgh New Jersey Philadelphia Columbus Carolina

GP 27 26 25 26 23 26 26 26 GP 24 27 27 24 26 26 27 25

W 19 14 13 13 13 12 11 8 W 18 17 15 14 13 11 10 8

L 5 8 7 9 8 11 12 13 L 5 7 8 8 10 10 16 13

OT 3 4 5 4 2 3 3 5 OT 1 3 4 2 3 5 1 4

Pts 41 32 31 30 28 27 25 21 Pts 37 37 34 30 29 27 21 20

GF 92 66 82 67 75 61 63 57 GF 78 76 76 57 65 53 62 51

GA 60 65 75 62 67 59 69 73 GA 53 57 64 55 64 70 80 75

Home 10-3-2 8-5-3 6-4-4 6-5-2 5-6-1 6-5-1 6-8-1 4-5-3 Home 10-3-1 11-4-1 10-4-2 8-4-1 5-6-3 5-4-3 4-7-1 4-6-3

Away 9-2-1 6-3-1 7-3-1 7-4-2 8-2-1 6-6-2 5-4-2 4-8-2 Away 8-2-0 6-3-2 5-4-2 6-4-1 8-4-0 6-6-2 6-9-0 4-7-1

Div 7-0-1 7-3-2 4-2-1 4-2-0 6-3-0 4-5-1 3-6-1 0-4-4 Div 4-2-0 5-1-3 4-0-2 1-2-1 5-4-1 5-3-0 4-4-0 1-4-2

Away 11-2-1 8-4-2 4-4-3 5-5-2 5-6-3 6-8-1 8-8-0 Away 6-3-1 10-3-0 7-8-1 6-5-5 3-8-1 3-9-2 4-10-1

Div 3-1-0 5-2-0 6-3-3 2-2-0 1-3-1 3-7-0 3-1-0 Div 4-4-0 3-2-0 7-1-0 4-1-3 3-3-3 2-4-1 3-4-0

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP Dallas 26 Blues 26 Minnesota 24 Nashville 25 Chicago 26 Winnipeg 26 Colorado 26 Pacific GP Los Angeles 24 San Jose 24 Arizona 26 Vancouver 27 Anaheim 26 Calgary 25 Edmonton 26

W 20 15 13 13 13 12 11 W 15 14 13 9 9 9 9

L 5 7 7 8 9 12 14 L 8 10 12 10 12 14 15

OT 1 4 4 4 4 2 1 OT 1 0 1 8 5 2 2

Pts 41 34 30 30 30 26 23 Pts 31 28 27 26 23 20 20

GF 92 67 66 65 71 73 75 GF 60 67 70 72 52 60 65

GA 68 63 62 64 68 81 77 GA 51 63 80 75 67 90 79

Home 9-3-0 7-3-2 9-3-1 8-3-2 8-3-1 6-4-1 3-6-1 Home 9-5-0 4-7-0 6-4-0 3-5-3 6-4-4 6-5-0 5-5-1

Friday Florida 2, Columbus 1, SO NY Islanders 2, Blues 1, SO Buffalo 5, Arizona 2 Philadelphia 4, New Jersey 3, OT Boston at Calgary, late Dallas at Edmonton, late San Jose at Anaheim, late Thursday Colorado 2, NY Rangers 1 New Jersey 5, Carolina 1 Washington 3, Montreal 2 Ottawa 4, Chicago 3, OT Detroit 5, Arizona 1 Florida 2, Nashville 1 Minnesota 1, Toronto 0 Dallas 4, Vancouver 2 Saturday Washington at Winnipeg, 2 p.m. Pittsburgh at Los Angeles, 3 p.m. NY Islanders at Ottawa, 6 p.m. Nashville at Detroit, 6 p.m. Montreal at Carolina, 6 p.m. Toronto at Blues, 6 p.m. Columbus at Philadelphia, 6:30 p.m. Colorado at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Boston at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Tampa Bay at San Jose, 9:30 p.m. Sunday Arizona at Carolina, 4 p.m. Winnipeg at Chicago, 4 p.m. Florida at New Jersey, 6 p.m. Ottawa at NY Rangers, 6 p.m. Buffalo at Edmonton, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh at Anaheim, 7 p.m. Tampa Bay at Los Angeles, 9 p.m.

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss.

Read leads Flyers to OT win

Jeremy Rutherford @jprutherford on Twitter jrutherford@post-dispatch.com

Islanders 2, Blues 1 Blues

1 0 0 0 — 1

NY Islanders 0 0 1 0 — 2 First period B: Shattenkirk 3 (Tarasenko, Stastny), 19:33. Penalties: Lee, NYI (tripping), 1:07; Backes, StL (interference), 3:22; Hickey, NYI (hooking), 8:04; Gomez, StL (elbowing), 9:21; Cizikas, NYI (cross-checking), 9:21. Second period None. Penalties: Backes, StL (tripping), 14:18. Third period N: Grabovski 5 (Strome, Kulemin), 6:39. Penalties: None. Overtime None. Penalties: None. Shootout Blues 0 (Shattenkirk NG, Tarasenko NG), NY Islanders 2 (Nielsen G, Okposo G). Shots on goal 11 7 9 5 32 Blues NY Islanders 6 9 7 3 25 Power-plays Blues 0 of 2; NY Islanders 0 of 2. Goaltenders Blues, Elliott 4-2-2 (25 shots-24 saves). NY Islanders, Greiss 8-3-2 (32-31). A: 12,873. Referees: Marc Joannette, TJ Luxmore. Linesmen: Lonnie Cameron, Scott Cherrey.

BLUES VS. MAPLE LEAFS When • 6 p.m. Saturday Where • Scottrade Center TV, radio • Fox Sports Midwest, KMOX (1120 AM) Blues • The Blues are back at Scottrade Center for the start of a ive-game homestand. They will face Toronto, Arizona, Philadelphia, Dallas and Colorado during the homestand. ... The Blues have won four straight against Toronto and are 7-0-2 in their last nine games against the Leafs. The Blues’ last regulation loss to the Maple Leafs was a 2-1 defeat on Feb. 6, 2007. ... Jake Allen is expected to get the start. He is 11-5-2 with a 2.13 goalsagainst average and a .926 save percentage this season. Maple Leafs • Toronto comes to town tied for the league-low in victories with just eight this season. The Maple Leafs have lost two straight games, scoring just one goal in back-toback losses to Winnipeg and Minnesota, and they are 1-4-1 in their last six. Meanwhile, Toronto learned Friday that starting goalie James Reimer is day to day with an undisclosed injury. Antoine Bibeau, 21, has been recalled from the American Hockey League and he will join Garret Sparks, 22, in what will be inexperienced duo. Sparks had a 24-save shutout in his NHL debut Monday, beating Edmonton 3-0, but in his second appearance he allowed six goals on 35 shots in a 6-1 loss to Winnipeg. Injuries • Blues — LW Jaden Schwartz (ankle), out. Maple Leafs — G James Reimer (undisclosed), LW Jofrey Lupul (lower-body) and D Stephane Robidas (knee), out. Jeremy Rutherford

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A shot by the Flyers’ Pierre-Edouard Bellemare eludes Devils goalie Cory Schneider.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Matt Read scored on a 2-on-1 break 3:24 into overtime, and the Philadelphia Flyers beat the host New Jersey Devils 4-3 on Friday night for their season-high fourth straight victory. Jakub Voracek set up power-play goals by red-hot Wayne Simmonds and Claude Giroux, and Michal Neuvirth made 15 saves for the Flyers. Pierre-Edouard Bellemare also scored for Philadelphia. Mike Cammalleri, Stefan Matteau and Kyle Palmieri scored for the Devils in a feisty game that featured a couple of scrums and one fight. Read skated with Sean Couturier for his big 2-on-1 in overtime. He faked several shots with defenseman Andy Greene taking away his passing lane, and then fired the puck of goalie Cory Schneider’s shoulder for his fourth goal. Cammalleri tied it with 1:01 left in regulation with a power-play goal on which the Devils had pulled Schneider for an extra skater. It was his 10th goal of the season and ended a streak of 24 straight penalty kills for the Flyers.

The Flyers had taken a 3-2 lead with 10:30 left in the period on a rebound shot by Bellemare.

NOTEBOOK Red Wings lose Miller, Pulkkinen • Detroit lost forwards Drew Miller and Teemu Pulkkinen to injuries that are expected to keep both out for over a month. The team says Miller is expected to miss about six weeks with a broken jaw, and Pulkkinen is expected to miss six to eight weeks with a dislocated right shoulder. Miller, 31, has one goal and one assist in 26 games this season. Pulkkinen, 23, has six goals and five assists in 24 games. Lightning give Cooper extension • Coach Jon Cooper has agreed to a multiyear contract extension with Tampa Bay. Terms were not released. Cooper has a .602 winning percentage since being hired in March 2013. Tampa Bay won a franchise-record 50 games and led the NHL in scoring last season. The Lightning lost the Stanley Cup finals to the Chicago Blackhawks.

NHL SUMMARIES Panthers 2, Blue Jackets 1 (SO)

Flyers 4, Devils 3 (OT)

Sabres 5, Coyotes 2

Florida 0 1 0 0 — 2 Columbus 0 1 0 0 — 1 First period: None. Penalties: Trocheck, Fla (high-sticking), 11:54; Jagr, Fla (high-sticking), 14:09; Murray, Clm (tripping), 19:11. Second period: 1, Florida, Trocheck 8 (B.Campbell, Kampfer), 1:16. 2, Columbus, Chaput 1 (Bodnarchuk, G.Campbell), 12:49. Penalties: None. Third period: None. Penalties: Pirri, Fla (high-sticking), 14:04; Mitchell, Fla (cross-checking), 15:59. Overtime: None. Penalties: Columbus bench (too many men), 2:07. Shootout: Florida 2 (Pirri NG, Trocheck NG, Huberdeau G, Barkov G), Columbus 1 (Johansen NG, Atkinson G, Wennberg NG, Jenner NG). Shots: Florida 15-10-5-2: 32. Columbus 8-8-7-0: 23. Power-plays: Florida 0 of 2; Columbus 0 of 4. Goalies: Florida, Montoya 3-1-1 (23 shots-22 saves). Columbus, Bobrovsky 10-12-1 (32-31). A: 14,062. Referees: Dan O’Rourke, Tim Peel. Linesmen: Jonny Murray, Jay Sharrers.

Philadelphia 1 1 1 1 — 4 New Jersey 1 0 2 0 — 3 First period: 1, New Jersey, Matteau 1, 6:36. 2, Philadelphia, Simmonds 7 (Voracek, Giroux), 9:56 (pp). Penalties: Medvedev, Phi (delay of game), 6:56; Greene, NJ (tripping), 9:43. Second period: 3, Philadelphia, Giroux 9 (Voracek, Gostisbehere), 7:12 (pp). Penalties: McDonald, Phi (interference), 3:07; Palmieri, NJ (hooking), 5:20; Greene, NJ (delay of game), 5:57; Laughton, Phi, major (fighting), 10:22; Farnham, NJ, major (fighting), 10:22; B.Schenn, Phi (elbowing), 19:51. Third period: 4, New Jersey, Palmieri 10 (Elias, Cammalleri), 1:55 (pp). 5, Philadelphia, Bellemare 2 (VandeVelde, Medvedev), 9:30. 6, New Jersey, Cammalleri 10 (Stempniak, Kennedy), 19:00 (pp). Penalties: VandeVelde, Phi (roughing), 2:53; Farnham, NJ (roughing), 2:53; Simmonds, Phi (holding), 13:12; Tootoo, NJ (high-sticking), 13:12; Bellemare, Phi (tripping), 17:39. Overtime: 7, Philadelphia, Read 4 (Del Zotto), 3:24. Penalties: None. Shots: Philadelphia 9-8-6-2: 25. New Jersey 5-7-6-0: 18. Power-plays: Philadelphia 2 of 3; New Jersey 1 of 4. Goalies: Philadelphia, Neuvirth 6-3-1 (18 shots-15 saves). New Jersey, Schneider 11-7-3 (25-21). A: 14,825. Referees: Greg Kimmerly, Brad Meier. Linesmen: Darren Gibbs, Mark Shewchyk.

Arizona 1 0 1 — 2 Buffalo 0 2 3 — 5 First period: 1, Arizona, Domi 9 (Hanzal, Elliott), 14:28. Penalties: Duclair, Ari (tripping), 4:19. Second period: 2, Buffalo, Reinhart 7 (Ristolainen, Gorges), 7:17. 3, Buffalo, McGinn 5 (Eichel, Colaiacovo), 13:33. Penalties: Larsson, Buf (hooking), 9:05; Downie, Ari (roughing), 15:12; Kane, Buf (interference), 17:39. Third period: 4, Buffalo, Kane 5 (Girgensons), 2:40 (sh). 5, Arizona, Domi 10, 6:42. 6, Buffalo, Foligno 2 (Deslauriers, Legwand), 11:44. 7, Buffalo, Kane 6 (Franson, R.O’Reilly), 19:08 (en). Penalties: Foligno, Buf (high-sticking), 2:02. Shots: Arizona 7-7-6: 20. Buffalo 7-10-11: 28. Power-plays: Arizona 0 of 3; Buffalo 0 of 2. Goalies: Arizona, M.Smith 10-8-1 (27 shots-23 saves). Buffalo, Johnson 7-7-1 (20-18). A: 18,204. Referees: Mike Leggo, Dan O’Halloran. Linesmen: Derek Amell, Scott Driscoll.

NHL SCORING LEADERS Player Team Patrick Kane, Chicago Jamie Benn, Dallas Tyler Seguin, Dallas Daniel Sedin, Vancouver Erik Karlsson, Ottawa John Klingberg, Dallas Mike Cammalleri, New Jersey Blake Wheeler, Winnipeg Evgeny Kuznetsov, Washington Artemi Panarin, Chicago Henrik Sedin, Vancouver Mike Hoffman, Ottawa Max Pacioretty, Montreal Evgeni Malkin, Pittsburgh David Krejci, Boston Bobby Ryan, Ottawa Taylor Hall, Edmonton Tomas Plekanec, Montreal Vladimir Tarasenko, St Louis Matt Duchene, Colorado

GP 26 26 26 27 25 26 25 26 24 26 27 21 27 24 23 25 26 27 24 26

Through Thursday’s games G 16 18 14 12 5 5 9 9 8 8 8 13 13 12 9 9 9 7 14 14

A 25 17 21 17 24 22 17 17 18 18 18 12 12 13 16 16 16 18 10 10

PTS 41 35 35 29 29 27 26 26 26 26 26 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 24 24

+/11 10 8 6 6 11 8 114 4 7 8 8 5 4 3 11 10 3 1-

PIM 12 24 6 18 18 14 10 8 12 4 6 4 12 29 8 6 14 8 10 6

PP 9 8 3 5 1 2 1 2 2 0 3 4 4 6 2 2 1 1 4 5

SH 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

GW 4 3 3 2 1 2 0 2 2 1 0 1 3 5 3 0 2 1 2 2

S 94 77 108 100 60 48 67 73 44 65 38 64 108 67 51 63 113 56 92 71

Pct 17.0 23.4 13.0 12.0 8.3 10.4 13.4 12.3 18.2 12.3 21.1 20.3 12.0 17.9 17.6 14.3 8.0 12.5 15.2 19.7


NHL

12.05.2015 • Saturday • M 2

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • B7

BLUES NOTEBOOK

NHL STANDINGS

Parayko comes right back from a ‘scary’ leg injury

EASTERN CONFERENCE

After leaving the ice, he misses only a shift or two BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD St. Louis Post-dispatch

NEW YORK • The rookie season of Blues defenseman Colton Parayko appeared to be in serious jeopardy in the third period of Friday’s game against the New York Islanders. Parayko fell awkwardly on his right leg and had to be escorted to the locker room. But much to the shock of his teammates and coach, the defenseman returned about three minutes later. “It was scary,” Blues defenseman Alex Pietrangelo said. “Obviously something going on in that blood, the kid is a machine. He gets back up, comes back and plays. I was surprised. I was getting ready to play five (defensemen) the rest of the way.” Parayko missed only a shift or two, finishing with 16 minutes, 45 seconds of ice time. Pietrangelo wasn’t the only one surprised to see Parayko return. “I was shocked,” Blues coach Ken Hitchcock said. “It’s good news, but I was shocked.”

FIRST LOOK The game Friday was the Blues’ first at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, the new home of the New York Islanders. Many players were surprised by the unique layout of the building for hockey. “It looks almost like an old college barn,” Blues defenseman Kevin Shattenkirk said. As part of an advertisement, there is a Honda SUV basically parked in the front row at one end of the ice. “It’s very strange,” Shattenkirk said. “Even my mom was talking about that last night, how she was watching the Islanders-Rangers game the other night, and as she was following the play, she just sees a random car sitting in the corner of the rink. That’s a little strange.” The Islanders are in their first season at the Barclays Center after playing previously at the 43-year-old Nassau Coliseum.

NO HALAK The Blues did not see former teammate Jarolslav Halak in net for New York. Halak is 7-4-2 this season with a 1.93 goals-

Blues lose in shootout after Islanders force OT BLUES • FROM B1

tomorrow.” The Blues will turn around and face Toronto on Saturday night at Scottrade Center in the second night of back-to-back games. The club will be looking forward, but the players will still be lamenting that they missed a chance to help Brian Elliott earn his first victory since Oct. 18. Making his first start in 17 days, Elliott turned aside 24 of 25 shots but dropped to 0-2-2 in his last four decisions. “Really wish we could have gotten Brian a win, he really deserves it,” Blues defenseman Kevin Shattenkirk said. “He’s playing fantastic for us, so that’s the only tough part to swallow.” The Blues led 1-0 entering the third period, and they have been one of the best shutdown teams in the NHL this season. They entered Friday’s game having allowed a league-low 12 goals in the final frame and just one in their last six games. But the Islanders are one of the most productive clubs ofensively in the third period, ranking No. 3 with 34 goals coming into Friday. It was the Blues who buckled. New York’s Mikail Grabovski scored his fifth of the season, tying the score 1-1 with 13 minutes, 21 seconds left in regulation. Grabovski gave the puck to linemate Ryan Strome, and when Robert Bortuzzo joined Carl Gunnarsson in pressuring Strome, he made the easy pass to Grabovski for a quick breakaway. Elliott denied the initial shot, but Grabovski put the rebound past him. But at that time, the Blues were more concerned with the right leg of rookie defenseman Colton Parayko buckling a few minutes earlier. Parayko and Strome were behind the Blues’ net when the defenseman fell backward, snapping back his knee and landing awkwardly on his ankle. Parayko grimaced in serious pain and needed assistance from Blues trainer Ray Barile to get to the locker room. How long would he be out? Three weeks? Three months? Try three minutes. He was back before the Islanders tied the score. But with that worry behind them, the Blues now needed a goal. The much-discussed line change of moving Jori Lehtera to the top line with Paul Stastny and Vladimir Tarasenko lasted only last one period Friday. By the start of the second, Alexander Steen had returned to his usual spot with Stastny and Tarasenko and Lehtera had dropped down with David Backes and Troy Brouwer. But the changes didn’t generate any more scoring for the Blues, though they outshot the Islanders 5-3 in OT. “Not very many scoring chances either way,” Steen said. “Unfortunately we had some in the OT and we couldn’t convert them.” The only goal after two periods belonged to Shattenkirk, whose third of the season with just 27 seconds left in the first period cracked open the scoring. Shattenkirk’s eight-game point-streak came to an end in Tuesday’s loss to Florida, but he started another one Friday. Stastny, who was 4-0 on face-ofs in the first period Friday, won the draw and Shattenkirk set up near the point. He exchanged passes with Vladimir Tarasenko, and when the puck came back to him, he sent a slap shot sizzling through the short side of Islanders goalie Thomas Greiss. The goal gave him 11 points (three goals, eight assists) in his last 10 games, and after the final seconds of the period ticked of, it gave the Blues just their sixth lead at the first intermission this season. They had won all five previous games, but there was still a long way to go. The Blues had 10 giveaways in Tuesday’s loss to Florida and they were guilty of five in the second period for a total of 11 through 40 minutes. Kyle Brodziak had one of the errant turnovers that nearly led to a scoring chance. “There was some better stuf than what we played the last two games,” Blues coach Ken Hitchcock said. “But if we can find a way to eliminate some of the easy giveaways in our own zone ...” Jeremy Rutherford @jprutherford on Twitter jrutherford@post-dispatch.com

against average and a .926 save percentage, but with the Islanders playing backto-back games Friday and Saturday, the Isles started Thomas Greiss. Halak was 0-2 against the Blues last season, allowing 11 goals on 72 shots. “We do look at matchups, history of who we’re playing,” Islanders coach Jack Capuano told reporters Friday.

USA HOCKEY ANNOUNCEMENT Oicials from USA Hockey oicially announced Friday that Bufalo will be the site of the 2018 International Ice Hockey Federation World Junior Championships. St. Louis and Pittsburgh finished as runnersup for the 10-nation tournament, which features the top Under-20 players in the world. “It was an extremely difficult decision as all three finalists in contention to host the event were exceptional,” USA Hockey executive director Dave Ogrean said.

Atlantic Montreal Detroit Ottawa Florida Boston Tampa Bay Bufalo Toronto Metropolitan Washington NY Rangers NY Islanders Pittsburgh New Jersey Philadelphia Columbus Carolina

GP 27 26 25 26 24 26 26 26 GP 24 27 27 24 26 26 27 25

W 19 14 13 13 13 12 11 8 W 18 17 15 14 13 11 10 8

L 5 8 7 9 8 11 12 13 L 5 7 8 8 10 10 16 13

OT 3 4 5 4 3 3 3 5 OT 1 3 4 2 3 5 1 4

Pts 41 32 31 30 29 27 25 21 Pts 37 37 34 30 29 27 21 20

GF 92 66 82 67 79 61 63 57 GF 78 76 76 57 65 53 62 51

GA 60 65 75 62 72 59 69 73 GA 53 57 64 55 64 70 80 75

Home 10-3-2 8-5-3 6-4-4 6-5-2 5-6-1 6-5-1 6-8-1 4-5-3 Home 10-3-1 11-4-1 10-4-2 8-4-1 5-6-3 5-4-3 4-7-1 4-6-3

Away 9-2-1 6-3-1 7-3-1 7-4-2 8-2-2 6-6-2 5-4-2 4-8-2 Away 8-2-0 6-3-2 5-4-2 6-4-1 8-4-0 6-6-2 6-9-0 4-7-1

Div 7-0-1 7-3-2 4-2-1 4-2-0 6-3-0 4-5-1 3-6-1 0-4-4 Div 4-2-0 5-1-3 4-0-2 1-2-1 5-4-1 5-3-0 4-4-0 1-4-2

Away 11-2-2 8-4-2 4-4-3 5-5-2 5-6-3 6-8-1 8-8-0 Away 6-3-1 10-4-0 7-8-1 6-5-5 3-8-1 3-9-2 4-10-1

Div 3-1-0 5-2-0 6-3-3 2-2-0 1-3-1 3-7-0 3-1-0 Div 4-4-0 3-3-0 7-1-0 4-1-3 4-3-3 2-4-1 3-4-0

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP Dallas 27 Blues 26 Minnesota 24 Nashville 25 Chicago 26 Winnipeg 26 Colorado 26 Pacific GP Los Angeles 24 San Jose 25 Arizona 26 Vancouver 27 Anaheim 27 Calgary 26 Edmonton 27

W 20 15 13 13 13 12 11 W 15 14 13 9 10 10 10

L 5 7 7 8 9 12 14 L 8 11 12 10 12 14 15

OT 2 4 4 4 4 2 1 OT 1 0 1 8 5 2 2

Pts 42 34 30 30 30 26 23 Pts 31 28 27 26 25 22 22

GF 93 67 66 65 71 73 75 GF 60 67 70 72 53 65 67

GA 70 63 62 64 68 81 77 GA 51 64 80 75 67 94 80

Home 9-3-0 7-3-2 9-3-1 8-3-2 8-3-1 6-4-1 3-6-1 Home 9-5-0 4-7-0 6-4-0 3-5-3 7-4-4 7-5-0 6-5-1

Friday Florida 2, Columbus 1, SO NY Islanders 2, Blues 1, SO Buffalo 5, Arizona 2 Philadelphia 4, New Jersey 3, OT Calgary 5, Boston 4, OT Edmonton 2, Dallas 1, OT Anaheim 1, San Jose 0 Thursday Colorado 2, NY Rangers 1 New Jersey 5, Carolina 1 Washington 3, Montreal 2 Ottawa 4, Chicago 3, OT Detroit 5, Arizona 1 Florida 2, Nashville 1 Minnesota 1, Toronto 0 Dallas 4, Vancouver 2 Saturday Washington at Winnipeg, 2 p.m. Pittsburgh at Los Angeles, 3 p.m. NY Islanders at Ottawa, 6 p.m. Nashville at Detroit, 6 p.m. Montreal at Carolina, 6 p.m. Toronto at Blues, 6 p.m. Columbus at Philadelphia, 6:30 p.m. Colorado at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Boston at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Tampa Bay at San Jose, 9:30 p.m. Sunday Arizona at Carolina, 4 p.m. Winnipeg at Chicago, 4 p.m. Florida at New Jersey, 6 p.m. Ottawa at NY Rangers, 6 p.m. Buffalo at Edmonton, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh at Anaheim, 7 p.m. Tampa Bay at Los Angeles, 9 p.m.

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss.

Read leads Flyers to OT win

Jeremy Rutherford @jprutherford on Twitter jrutherford@post-dispatch.com

Islanders 2, Blues 1 Blues

1 0 0 0 — 1

NY Islanders 0 0 1 0 — 2 First period B: Shattenkirk 3 (Tarasenko, Stastny), 19:33. Penalties: Lee, NYI (tripping), 1:07; Backes, StL (interference), 3:22; Hickey, NYI (hooking), 8:04; Gomez, StL (elbowing), 9:21; Cizikas, NYI (cross-checking), 9:21. Second period None. Penalties: Backes, StL (tripping), 14:18. Third period N: Grabovski 5 (Strome, Kulemin), 6:39. Penalties: None. Overtime None. Penalties: None. Shootout Blues 0 (Shattenkirk NG, Tarasenko NG), NY Islanders 2 (Nielsen G, Okposo G). Shots on goal 11 7 9 5 32 Blues NY Islanders 6 9 7 3 25 Power-plays Blues 0 of 2; NY Islanders 0 of 2. Goaltenders Blues, Elliott 4-2-2 (25 shots-24 saves). NY Islanders, Greiss 8-3-2 (32-31). A: 12,873. Referees: Marc Joannette, TJ Luxmore. Linesmen: Lonnie Cameron, Scott Cherrey.

BLUES VS. MAPLE LEAFS When • 6 p.m. Saturday Where • Scottrade Center TV, radio • Fox Sports Midwest, KMOX (1120 AM) Blues • The Blues are back at Scottrade Center for the start of a ive-game homestand. They will face Toronto, Arizona, Philadelphia, Dallas and Colorado during the homestand. ... The Blues have won four straight against Toronto and are 7-0-2 in their last nine games against the Leafs. The Blues’ last regulation loss to the Maple Leafs was a 2-1 defeat on Feb. 6, 2007. ... Jake Allen is expected to get the start. He is 11-5-2 with a 2.13 goalsagainst average and a .926 save percentage this season. Maple Leafs • Toronto comes to town tied for the league-low in victories with just eight this season. The Maple Leafs have lost two straight games, scoring just one goal in back-toback losses to Winnipeg and Minnesota, and they are 1-4-1 in their last six. Meanwhile, Toronto learned Friday that starting goalie James Reimer is day to day with an undisclosed injury. Antoine Bibeau, 21, has been recalled from the American Hockey League and he will join Garret Sparks, 22, in what will be inexperienced duo. Sparks had a 24-save shutout in his NHL debut Monday, beating Edmonton 3-0, but in his second appearance he allowed six goals on 35 shots in a 6-1 loss to Winnipeg. Injuries • Blues — LW Jaden Schwartz (ankle), out. Maple Leafs — G James Reimer (undisclosed), LW Jofrey Lupul (lower-body) and D Stephane Robidas (knee), out. Jeremy Rutherford

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A shot by the Flyers’ Pierre-Edouard Bellemare eludes Devils goalie Cory Schneider.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Matt Read scored on a 2-on-1 break 3:24 into overtime, and the Philadelphia Flyers beat the host New Jersey Devils 4-3 on Friday night for their season-high fourth straight victory. Jakub Voracek set up power-play goals by red-hot Wayne Simmonds and Claude Giroux, and Michal Neuvirth made 15 saves for the Flyers. Pierre-Edouard Bellemare also scored for Philadelphia. Mike Cammalleri, Stefan Matteau and Kyle Palmieri scored for the Devils in a feisty game that featured a couple of scrums and one fight. Read skated with Sean Couturier for his big 2-on-1 in overtime. He faked several shots with defenseman Andy Greene taking away his passing lane, and then fired the puck of goalie Cory Schneider’s shoulder for his fourth goal. Cammalleri tied it with 1:01 left in regulation with a power-play goal on which the Devils had pulled Schneider for an extra skater. It was his 10th goal of the season and ended a streak of 24 straight penalty kills for the Flyers.

The Flyers had taken a 3-2 lead with 10:30 left in the period on a rebound shot by Bellemare.

NOTEBOOK Red Wings lose Miller, Pulkkinen • Detroit lost forwards Drew Miller and Teemu Pulkkinen to injuries that are expected to keep both out for over a month. The team says Miller is expected to miss about six weeks with a broken jaw, and Pulkkinen is expected to miss six to eight weeks with a dislocated right shoulder. Miller, 31, has one goal and one assist in 26 games this season. Pulkkinen, 23, has six goals and five assists in 24 games. Lightning give Cooper extension • Coach Jon Cooper has agreed to a multiyear contract extension with Tampa Bay. Terms were not released. Cooper has a .602 winning percentage since being hired in March 2013. Tampa Bay won a franchise-record 50 games and led the NHL in scoring last season. The Lightning lost the Stanley Cup finals to the Chicago Blackhawks.

NHL SUMMARIES Panthers 2, Blue Jackets 1 (SO)

Sabres 5, Coyotes 2

Flames 5, Bruins 4 (OT)

Florida 0 1 0 0 — 2 Columbus 0 1 0 0 — 1 First period: None. Penalties: Trocheck, Fla (high-sticking), 11:54; Jagr, Fla (high-sticking), 14:09; Murray, Clm (tripping), 19:11. Second period: 1, Florida, Trocheck 8 (B.Campbell, Kampfer), 1:16. 2, Columbus, Chaput 1 (Bodnarchuk, G.Campbell), 12:49. Penalties: None. Third period: None. Penalties: Pirri, Fla (high-sticking), 14:04; Mitchell, Fla (cross-checking), 15:59. Overtime: None. Penalties: Columbus bench (too many men), 2:07. Shootout: Florida 2 (Pirri NG, Trocheck NG, Huberdeau G, Barkov G), Columbus 1 (Johansen NG, Atkinson G, Wennberg NG, Jenner NG). Shots: Florida 15-10-5-2: 32. Columbus 8-8-7-0: 23. Power-plays: Florida 0 of 2; Columbus 0 of 4. Goalies: Florida, Montoya 3-1-1 (23 shots-22 saves). Columbus, Bobrovsky 10-12-1 (32-31). A: 14,062. Referees: Dan O’Rourke, Tim Peel. Linesmen: Jonny Murray, Jay Sharrers.

Arizona 1 0 1 — 2 Buffalo 0 2 3 — 5 First period: 1, Arizona, Domi 9 (Hanzal, Elliott), 14:28. Penalties: Duclair, Ari (tripping), 4:19. Second period: 2, Buffalo, Reinhart 7 (Ristolainen, Gorges), 7:17. 3, Buffalo, McGinn 5 (Eichel, Colaiacovo), 13:33. Penalties: Larsson, Buf (hooking), 9:05; Downie, Ari (roughing), 15:12; Kane, Buf (interference), 17:39. Third period: 4, Buffalo, Kane 5 (Girgensons), 2:40 (sh). 5, Arizona, Domi 10, 6:42. 6, Buffalo, Foligno 2 (Deslauriers, Legwand), 11:44. 7, Buffalo, Kane 6 (Franson, R.O’Reilly), 19:08 (en). Penalties: Foligno, Buf (high-sticking), 2:02. Shots: Arizona 7-7-6: 20. Buffalo 7-10-11: 28. Power-plays: Arizona 0 of 3; Buffalo 0 of 2. Goalies: Arizona, M.Smith 10-8-1 (27 shots-23 saves). Buffalo, Johnson 7-7-1 (20-18). A: 18,204. Referees: Mike Leggo, Dan O’Halloran. Linesmen: Derek Amell, Scott Driscoll.

Boston 1 2 1 0 — 4 Calgary 2 1 1 1 — 5 First period: 1, Calgary, Gaudreau 7 (Jones), :33. 2, Calgary, Giordano 6 (Brodie, Gaudreau), 15:55. 3, Boston, Beleskey 3 (Chara, Eriksson), 17:19. Penalties: Trotman, Bos (tripping), 8:41; C.Miller, Bos (roughing), 13:32; Marchand, Bos (slashing), 18:42; Gaudreau, Cal (slashing), 18:42. Second period: 4, Boston, Marchand 11 (Connolly, Trotman), 1:36. 5, Calgary, Gaudreau 8 (Hudler, Wideman), 1:56. 6, Boston, Chara 5 (Beleskey, Eriksson), 2:22. Penalties: Krejci, Bos (tripping), 3:02; Granlund, Cal (holding), 11:50. Third period: 7, Boston, Marchand 12 (penalty shot), 18:54 (sh). 8, Calgary, Hudler 5 (Monahan, Colborne), 19:58. Penalties: Chara, Bos (delay of game), 17:43. Overtime: 9, Calgary, Gaudreau 9 (D.Hamilton, Brodie), 3:20. Penalties: None. Shots: Boston 15-7-11-5: 38. Calgary 9-12-13-2: 36. Power-plays: Boston 0 of 1; Calgary 0 of 4. Goalies: Boston, Gustavsson (11 shots-8 saves), Rask 8-7-3 (1:56 second, 25-23). Calgary, Ramo 8-8-1 (38-34). A: 19,289. Referees: Dave Lewis, Kelly Sutherland. Linesmen: Trent Knorr, Andy McElman.

Flyers 4, Devils 3 (OT) Philadelphia 1 1 1 1 — 4 New Jersey 1 0 2 0 — 3 First period: 1, New Jersey, Matteau 1, 6:36. 2, Philadelphia, Simmonds 7 (Voracek, Giroux), 9:56 (pp). Penalties: Medvedev, Phi (delay of game), 6:56; Greene, NJ (tripping), 9:43. Second period: 3, Philadelphia, Giroux 9 (Voracek, Gostisbehere), 7:12 (pp). Penalties: McDonald, Phi (interference), 3:07; Palmieri, NJ (hooking), 5:20; Greene, NJ (delay of game), 5:57; Laughton, Phi, major (fighting), 10:22; Farnham, NJ, major (fighting), 10:22; B.Schenn, Phi (elbowing), 19:51. Third period: 4, New Jersey, Palmieri 10 (Elias, Cammalleri), 1:55 (pp). 5, Philadelphia, Bellemare 2 (VandeVelde, Medvedev), 9:30. 6, New Jersey, Cammalleri 10 (Stempniak, Kennedy), 19:00 (pp). Penalties: VandeVelde, Phi (roughing), 2:53; Farnham, NJ (roughing), 2:53; Simmonds, Phi (holding), 13:12; Tootoo, NJ (high-sticking), 13:12; Bellemare, Phi (tripping), 17:39. Overtime: 7, Philadelphia, Read 4 (Del Zotto), 3:24. Penalties: None. Shots: Philadelphia 9-8-6-2: 25. New Jersey 5-7-6-0: 18. Power-plays: Philadelphia 2 of 3; New Jersey 1 of 4. Goalies: Philadelphia, Neuvirth 6-3-1 (18 shots-15 saves). New Jersey, Schneider 11-7-3 (25-21). A: 14,825. Referees: Greg Kimmerly, Brad Meier. Linesmen: Darren Gibbs, Mark Shewchyk.

Ducks 1, Sharks 0 San Jose 0 0 0 — 0 Anaheim 0 0 1 — 1 First period: None. Penalties: Marleau, SJ (tripping), 3:02; Bieksa, Ana (tripping), 5:07; Haley, SJ, major (fighting), 9:40; Stewart, Ana, major (fighting), 9:40; Donskoi, SJ (hooking), 12:49; Lindholm, Ana (holding), 17:56; Horcoff, Ana (high-sticking), 20:00. Second period: None. Penalties: Anaheim bench, served by Ritchie (too many men), 11:21. Third period: 1, Anaheim, Santorelli 4 (Thompson, Stewart), 2:49. Penalties: Karlsson, SJ (hooking), 4:39; Pavelski, SJ (hooking), 16:37. Shots: San Jose 10-11-2: 23. Anaheim 10-6-10: 26. Power-plays: San Jose 0 of 4; Anaheim 0 of 4. Goalies: San Jose, Jones 12-8-0 (26 shots-25 saves). Anaheim, Gibson 3-2-1 (23-23). A: 15,701. Referees: Steve Kozari, Frederick L’Ecuyer. Linesmen: Tony Sericolo, Devin Berg.

Oilers 2, Stars 1 (OT) Dallas 0 1 0 0 — 1 Edmonton 1 0 0 1 — 2 First period: 1, Edmonton, Hall 10, 14:49. Penalties: Nurse, Edm (hooking), 6:50; Moen, Dal (hooking), 9:42; Janmark, Dal (high-sticking), 12:19. Second period: 2, Dallas, Janmark 5 (Oleksiak, Fiddler), 18:23. Penalties: Nemeth, Dal (holding), 11:13; Hendricks, Edm (hooking), 16:12. Third period: None. Penalties: Nurse, Edm (interference), 8:56; Fayne, Edm (holding), 11:48. Overtime: 3, Edmonton, Eberle 4 (Draisaitl), :45. Penalties: None. Shots: Dallas 14-13-15-1: 43. Edmonton 8-10-4-2: 24. Power-plays: Dallas 0 of 4; Edmonton 0 of 3. Goalies: Dallas, Niemi 10-4-2 (24 shots-22 saves). Edmonton, Nilsson 7-7-1 (43-42). A: 16,839. Referees: Tom Kowal, Brian Pochmara. Linesmen: Ryan Gibbons, Michel Cormier.


SPORTS

B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

AMERICA’S LINE

NBA STANDINGS EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Toronto Boston New York Brooklyn Philadelphia Southeast Miami Atlanta Orlando Charlotte Washington Central Cleveland Chicago Indiana Detroit Milwaukee

W 12 11 10 5 1 W 11 13 11 10 8 W 13 11 12 11 7

L 8 8 10 14 19 L 6 9 8 8 9 L 5 5 6 9 13

Pct .600 .579 .500 .263 .050 Pct .647 .591 .579 .556 .471 Pct .722 .688 .667 .550 .350

GB — ½ 2 6½ 11 GB — ½ 1 1½ 3 GB — 1 1 3 7

L10 5-5 6-4 6-4 4-6 1-9 L10 7-3 5-5 7-3 6-4 5-5 L10 6-4 7-3 8-2 6-4 2-8

Str L-1 W-2 W-2 L-1 L-1 Str W-1 W-1 W-5 L-1 W-1 Str L-1 W-2 L-1 W-3 L-2

Home 4-3 6-4 5-6 4-3 1-7 Home 9-3 8-4 7-3 8-3 4-5 Home 9-1 7-1 6-2 7-2 5-4

Away 8-5 5-4 5-4 1-11 0-12 Away 2-3 5-5 4-5 2-5 4-4 Away 4-4 4-4 6-4 4-7 2-9

Conf 7-3 8-6 6-8 3-8 0-12 Conf 5-5 7-5 5-5 6-6 6-7 Conf 11-5 6-3 9-3 5-4 6-10

L10 Str 8-2 W-2 7-3 L-1 5-5 L-1 5-5 W-2 3-7 L-4 L10 Str 5-5 L-2 4-6 L-2 4-6 L-2 4-6 W-1 2-8 W-1 L10 Str 10-0 W-20 5-5 L-1 2-8 L-3 4-6 L-1 2-8 L-1

Home 10-0 6-4 5-3 5-7 3-5 Home 8-3 3-4 2-7 5-5 3-6 Home 10-0 8-5 5-5 5-7 1-6

Away 6-4 5-5 6-6 4-4 1-10 Away 3-5 5-5 6-3 3-7 4-7 Away 10-0 2-4 3-7 2-6 2-10

Conf 9-2 8-7 9-7 6-6 4-10 Conf 6-2 4-4 3-4 7-9 5-11 Conf 15-0 9-7 7-7 2-9 0-9

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest San Antonio Memphis Dallas Houston New Orleans Northwest Oklahoma City Utah Minnesota Portland Denver Paciic Golden State LA Clippers Phoenix Sacramento LA Lakers

W 16 11 11 9 4 W 11 8 8 8 7 W 20 10 8 7 3

L 4 9 9 11 15 L 8 9 10 12 13 L 0 9 12 13 16

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 12.05.2015

Pct GB .800 — .550 5 .550 5 .450 7 .211 11½ Pct GB .579 — .471 2 .444 2½ .400 3½ .350 4½ Pct GB 1.000 — .526 9½ .400 12 .350 13 .158 16½

Friday Washington 109, Phoenix 106 New York 108, Brooklyn 91 Detroit 102, Milwaukee 95 Atlanta 100, LA Lakers 87 Houston 100, Dallas 96 Cleveland at New Orleans, late Thursday Miami 97, Oklahoma City 95 Denver 106, Toronto 105 Orlando 103, Utah 94 San Antonio 103, Memphis 83 Portland 123, Indiana 111 Boston 114, Sacramento 97 Saturday Denver at Philadelphia, noon Golden State at Toronto, 4 p.m. Charlotte at Chicago, 7 p.m. Portland at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Sacramento at Houston, 7 p.m. Cleveland at Miami, 7 p.m. Boston at San Antonio, 7:30 p.m. New York at Milwaukee, 7:30 p.m. Indiana at Utah, 8 p.m. Orlando at LA Clippers, 9:30 p.m. Sunday Phoenix at Memphis, 2:30 p.m. Golden State at Brooklyn, 5 p.m. LA Lakers at Detroit, 5 p.m. Dallas at Washington, 5 p.m. Sacramento at Oklahoma City, 6 p.m.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Brooklyn’s Joe Johnson guards New York’s Carmelo Anthony, who scored 28 points.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

had eight points and four rebounds.

Carmelo Anthony scored 28 points, Kristaps Porzingis had 19 and the host New York Knicks beat the Brooklyn Nets 10891 on Friday night to get back to .500. Arron Afflalo added 18 points for the Knicks (10-10), who dominated lowly Philadelphia and Brooklyn in their last two games after a four-game losing streak. They reclaimed city bragging rights with ease, leading by as much as 31 points. Brook Lopez scored 21 points, and Thaddeus Young had 18 points and 11 rebounds for the Nets. They had won two in a row and have a lot to fix before they host the Golden State Warriors on Sunday. Lopez beat twin brother Robin to take the opening tip, and it was soon clear that was all the Nets would be winning. The Knicks blitzed them with a season-best 42 points in the first quarter, led 65-42 at halftime and opened their first lead of 30 or more since the 2013-14 season in the third period. The Nets had allowed 91 points or fewer in three straight games, but the Knicks already surpassed that with a 9267 cushion heading to the fourth quarter. Brooklyn fell to 1-11 on the road. Former St. Louis University star Willie Reed made his debut with the Nets. He

Beal lifts Wizards • Former Chaminade star Bradley Beal scored 34 points, Ramon Sessions added 18 and the host Washington Wizards rallied to beat the Phoenix Suns 109-106 in a turnover-filled game. Otto Porter Jr. the former Georgetown star from Scott County (Mo. ) Central, added 13 points. Before the game, the Wizards said center Marcin Gortat traveled home to Poland because of a family emergency and will miss at least one other game. Clippers have key injuries • Inflamed rib cartilage will prevent perennial All-Star point guard Chris Paul from playing when the Los Angeles Clippers host the Orlando Magic on Saturday night, Clippers coach Doc Rivers said. Rivers added the Clippers probably also will be without starting shooting guard J.J. Redick, who sprained his right ankle Wednesday night.“We’re going to have to do it a little bit without two key guys, but everyone goes through injuries,” Rivers said before the Clippers’ practice Friday. “We’re not the only team. The key for us, what we haven’t done well this year, is we haven’t won games when guys have been out. I think we may have won one.

NBA SUMMARIES Hawks 100, Lakers 87

Wizards 109, Suns 106

Rockets 100, Mavericks 96

L.A. Lakers: Bryant 4-19 4-5 14, Randle 3-12 2-2 8, Hibbert 2-5 1-2 5, Russell 6-16 0-0 16, Clarkson 5-8 0-0 13, Nance Jr. 3-5 0-0 6, Williams 6-13 3-4 18, Bass 2-5 0-0 4, World Peace 1-3 0-0 3. Totals 32-86 10-13 87. Atlanta: Sefolosha 3-7 0-0 8, Millsap 6-12 3-3 15, Horford 6-11 3-4 16, Teague 5-9 2-2 13, Korver 3-8 0-0 7, Muscala 2-4 1-1 6, Schroder 2-4 1-2 6, Bazemore 5-10 3-4 15, Patterson 0-0 0-0 0, Scott 5-9 3-4 14. Totals 37-74 16-20 100. L.A. Lakers 19 17 30 21 — 87 Atlanta 23 29 20 28 — 100 3-point goals: L.A. Lakers 13-27 (Russell 4-7, Clarkson 3-3, Williams 3-6, Bryant 2-10, World Peace 1-1), Atlanta 10-26 (Bazemore 2-3, Sefolosha 2-4, Muscala 1-1, Scott 1-2, Schroder 1-3, Teague 1-3, Horford 1-4, Korver 1-5, Millsap 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: L.A. Lakers 50 (Russell 10), Atlanta 48 (Horford 9). Assists: L.A. Lakers 19 (Bryant 5), Atlanta 24 (Horford, Teague 5). Total fouls: L.A. Lakers 14, Atlanta 11. A: 19,051 (18,729).

Phoenix: Tucker 3-6 2-3 9, Leuer 6-7 0-1 13, Len 3-5 0-0 6, Bledsoe 9-18 3-4 22, Knight 7-16 1-3 19, Booker 4-6 0-0 8, Morris 4-10 2-2 10, Price 2-5 0-0 6, Teletovic 0-2 2-3 2, Warren 5-9 0-0 11. Totals 43-84 10-16 106. Washington: Porter 6-12 1-1 13, Dudley 0-7 3-4 3, Hollins 1-1 0-0 2, Wall 5-13 5-6 17, Beal 12-23 5-6 34, Blair 2-2 0-2 4, Temple 2-6 1-2 6, Neal 4-6 2-2 12, Sessions 8-12 2-2 18, Oubre Jr. 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 40-82 19-25 109. Phoenix 31 29 25 21 — 106 Washington 22 29 27 31 — 109 3-point goals: Phoenix 10-23 (Knight 4-7, Price 2-4, Tucker 1-1, Warren 1-1, Leuer 1-2, Bledsoe 1-5, Len 0-1, Teletovic 0-1, Morris 0-1), Washington 10-25 (Beal 5-8, Neal 2-2, Wall 2-4, Temple 1-4, Porter 0-1, Dudley 0-3, Sessions 0-3). Fouled out: Tucker. Rebounds: Phoenix 44 (Tucker 13), Washington 51 (Beal 9). Assists: Phoenix 21 (Bledsoe 7), Washington 19 (Wall 9). Total fouls: Phoenix 23, Washington 21. Technicals: Phoenix delay of game. A: 17,255 (20,308).

Houston: Ariza 7-10 0-4 18, Jones 7-12 3-3 17, Capela 0-5 2-4 2, Beverley 5-7 0-0 14, Harden 10-23 4-5 25, Harrell 0-4 0-0 0, Lawson 3-8 1-2 8, Brewer 3-8 0-0 7, Terry 3-5 0-0 7, Thornton 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 39-84 10-18 100. Dallas: Matthews 1-9 2-4 5, Nowitzki 6-15 4-4 16, Pachulia 3-7 1-2 7, Williams 8-16 2-2 22, Felton 4-8 0-0 9, Powell 4-5 3-5 11, Parsons 4-12 0-0 9, Villanueva 1-1 0-0 2, Harris 6-7 2-3 15, McGee 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 37-81 14-20 96. Houston 26 31 21 22 — 100 Dallas 28 25 25 18 — 96 3-point goals: Houston 12-26 (Beverley 4-4, Ariza 4-7, Terry 1-1, Lawson 1-3, Brewer 1-5, Harden 1-6), Dallas 8-29 (Williams 4-10, Harris 1-1, Felton 1-3, Parsons 1-4, Matthews 1-8, Nowitzki 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Houston 53 (Capela 10), Dallas 50 (Pachulia 11). Assists: Houston 20 (Harden 9), Dallas 23 (Williams 6). Total fouls: Houston 22, Dallas 17. Technicals: Jones, Felton. Flagrant fouls: Jones. A: 20,339 (19,200).

Knicks 108, Nets 91

Most Consecutive Wins To Start of Season

Milwaukee: Middleton 6-15 6-6 21, Antetokounmpo 5-11 2-2 12, Monroe 7-15 0-0 14, Bayless 4-9 0-1 9, Mayo 5-13 3-3 13, Parker 4-8 2-2 10, Carter-Williams 3-8 0-0 6, Vaughn 0-2 0-0 0, O’Bryant 1-1 0-0 2, Henson 4-5 0-0 8. Totals 39-87 13-14 95. Detroit: Morris 7-14 8-9 23, Ilyasova 4-10 4-5 13, Drummond 7-18 3-10 17, Jackson 8-14 6-7 23, Caldwell-Pope 1-6 6-6 8, Johnson 4-10 0-0 10, Tolliver 3-5 0-2 8, Blake 0-3 0-0 0, Baynes 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 34-82 27-39 102. Milwaukee 16 24 19 36 — 95 Detroit 17 34 16 35 — 102 3-point goals: Milwaukee 4-18 (Middleton 3-7, Bayless 1-5, Carter-Williams 0-2, Mayo 0-4), Detroit 7-23 (Tolliver 2-3, Johnson 2-4, Morris 1-2, Jackson 1-4, Ilyasova 1-5, Blake 0-2, Caldwell-Pope 0-3). Fouled out: Mayo. Rebounds: Milwaukee 53 (Monroe 13), Detroit 56 (Drummond 23). Assists: Milwaukee 21 (Bayless, Carter-Williams 5), Detroit 18 (Jackson 5). Total fouls: Milwaukee 33, Detroit 11. Technicals: Morris, Detroit defensive three second. A: 16,963 (22,076).

Brooklyn: Johnson 3-9 2-2 9, Young 9-19 0-0 18, B.Lopez 8-20 5-5 21, Jack 2-6 0-0 5, Hollis-Jefferson 1-4 0-0 2, Bogdanovic 3-4 0-0 7, Robinson 5-6 0-2 10, Larkin 3-8 0-0 6, Ellington 2-8 1-2 5, Brown 0-1 0-0 0, Reed 3-4 2-4 8, Karasev 0-2 0-0 0, Sloan 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 39-91 10-15 91. New York: Anthony 9-18 5-7 28, Porzingis 7-13 2-2 19, R.Lopez 3-6 1-1 7, Calderon 0-2 1-2 1, Afflalo 7-11 3-3 18, Galloway 3-9 0-0 8, Williams 3-7 2-2 8, Thomas 3-9 2-2 9, Seraphin 1-4 2-2 4, Grant 2-4 0-0 4, Amundson 1-4 0-0 2. Totals 39-87 18-21 108. Brooklyn 21 21 25 24 — 91 New York 42 23 27 16 — 108 3-point goals: Brooklyn 3-11 (Bogdanovic 1-1, Johnson 1-2, Jack 1-2, Karasev 0-1, Brown 0-1, Larkin 0-1, Ellington 0-3), New York 12-27 (Anthony 5-8, Porzingis 3-4, Galloway 2-5, Afflalo 1-2, Thomas 1-4, Calderon 0-1, Williams 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Brooklyn 55 (Young 11), New York 53 (Porzingis 10). Assists: Brooklyn 15 (Johnson 4), New York 25 (Calderon 10). Total fouls: Brooklyn 13, New York 14. Flagrant fouls: Johnson. Ejected: Johnson. A: 19,812 (19,763).

NBA teams that have won 12 or more straight games at the start of the season (final record in parentheses): 20 — Golden State Warriors, 2015. 15 — Washington Capitols, 1948 (38-22). 15 — Houston Rockets, 1993 (58-24). 14 — Boston Celtics, 1957 (49-23). 14 — Dallas Mavericks, 2002 (60-22). 12 — Seattle SuperSonics, 1982 (48-34). 12 — Chicago Bulls, 1996 (69-13).

Scoring leaders Through Thursday’s games SCORING G FG Curry, GOL 20 211 Harden, HOU 19 158 Westbrook, OKC 19 179 George, IND 18 154 James, CLE 18 172 Griffin, LAC 19 186 Lillard, POR 20 168 Davis, NOR 16 135 Bledsoe, PHX 18 138 Wiggins, MIN 17 130

FT 116 195 135 113 95 93 94 101 90 101

PTS 640 560 522 477 460 469 489 381 399 375

AVG 32.0 29.5 27.5 26.5 25.6 24.7 24.5 23.8 22.2 22.1

Underdog 49ers BROWNS Jaguars Texans Ravens SAINTS VIKINGS RAMS Falcons GIANTS CHARGERS RAIDERS Eagles Colts Cowboys

COLLEGE FOOTBALL Favorite Open/Current Underdog BAYLOR 20.5 21 Texas GA SOUTHERN 22 20.5 Georgia St ARKANSAS ST 23 25.5 Texas St New Mex St NL 2 UL-MONROE W Virginia 5.5 6 KANSAS ST App’chian St 17 18 S ALABAMA UL-LAFAYETTE 1.5 1.5 Troy C-USA Championship, Bowling Green, KY W KENTUCKY 8.5 7.5 So Miss American Championship, Houston HOUSTON 5.5 6 Temple PAC 12 Championship, Santa Clara, CA Stanford 4 4.5 Usc SEC Championship, Atlanta Alabama 17 17.5 Florida Mountain West Championship, San Diego SAN DIEGO ST 6 6.5 Air Force ACC Championship, Charlotte Clemson 6 5 N Carolina Big Ten Championship, Indianapolis Michigan St 3 3 Iowa Odds to win the 2015 College Football Championship Team Open Alabama 8/1 Oklahoma 25/1 Clemson 25/1 Michigan State 20/1 Iowa 75/1 Ohio State 4/1 North Carolina 75/1

Current 6/5 5/2 5/1 8/1 12/1 18/1 20/1

Odds to win the Heisman Trophy Player School Derrick Henry Alabama Deshaun Watson Clemson Baker Mayfield Oklahoma Christian McCaffrey Stanford NBA Favorite Nuggets Warriors HEAT T’WOLVES ROCKETS BULLS BUCKS SPURS Pacers CLIPPERS

Anthony, Knicks top Nets

Pistons 102, Bucks 95

NFL Favorite Open/Current Sunday BEARS 7 7 Bengals NL 9.5 TITANS 2 2.5 BILLS 3.5 3 DOLPHINS 4 4 Panthers 6.5 7 Seahawks PK 1 Cards 6 5.5 BUCS 2 1 Jets PK 2 Broncos 4.5 4 Chiefs 3 3 PATRIOTS NL 9.5 STEELERS NL 7 Monday WASHINGTON 3.5 4

Points 3 7 2 1.5 2.5 6 1.5 8.5 1.5 2.5

Odds 1/2 7/2 12/1 15/1

Underdog 76ERS RAPTORS Cavaliers Blazers Kings Hornets Knicks Celtics JAZZ Magic

COLLEGE BASKETBALL Favorite Points Underdog Seton Hall 4.5 RUTGERS BUTLER 16 Indiana St PENN ST 3 E Michigan WISCONSIN 8 Temple GEORGETOWN 5 Syracuse LASALLE 8 Drexel Creighton 3 LOYOLA-CHICAGO PURDUE 14 New Mexico Northeastern 5 DETROIT California 6 WYOMING KANSAS 22 Harvard GONZAGA 6.5 Arizona OKLAHOMA ST 13 Missouri St MIDDLE TENN ST 11 S Alabama s-UMASS 1 Mississippi GEORGE MASON 7 Penn MIAMI-FLORIDA 27.5 Charlotte ST. BONA 6 Ohio U OREGON ST 10.5 Nevada BOWLING GREEN 1.5 Drake Georgia Tech 6.5 TULANE DUKE 23.5 Buffalo RHODE ISLAND 2 Providence S CAROLINA 19 S Florida VIRGINIA 14 William & Mary RICHMOND 2.5 Northern Iowa Kent St 3 CLEVELAND ST C FLORIDA 14 Illinois-Chi ILLINOIS ST 3 Uab So Illinois 6.5 N TEXAS XAVIER 18 W Kentucky Wichita St 5.5 SAINT LOUIS UTEP 1 UT-Arlington Pepperdine 8 CS-NORTHRIDGE CAL-POLY SLO 1.5 Fresno St Boise St 5.5 PORTLAND SANTA CLARA 10 San Jose St Texas A&M 2.5 ARIZONA ST Charleston 9 CITADEL IUPUI 1 Miami-Ohio UTAH 17.5 Ipfw sl-Byu 4.5 Weber St NORTHWESTERN 20 SIU-Edw’ville TROY 5 Austin Peay TULSA 11.5 Oral Roberts DENVER 4.5 Air Force OHIO ST 16 Vmi INDIANA 13 Morehead St MEMPHIS 23 SE Missouri St Ark-L Rock 5.5 IDAHO ILLINOIS 11 W Carolina BRADLEY 2 N Dakota MINNESOTA 11.5 S Dakota Evansville 3 MURRAY ST s — Springfield, MA. sl- Salt Lake City, UT. NHL Favorite Odds Underdog Capitals -$125/+$105 JETS KINGS -$145/+$125 Penguins BLUES -$200/+$170 Maple Leafs SENATORS -$120/even Islanders Canadiens -$135/+$115 HURRICANES RED WINGS -$125/+$105 Predators FLYERS -$135/+$115 Blue Jackets WILD -$160/+$140 Avalanche CANUCKS -$110/-$110 Bruins SHARKS -$110/-$110 Lightning Grand Salami: Over/under 53.5 goals. MMA • UFC 194, Las Vegas C. McGregor -$140 vs. J. Aldo C. Weidman -$150 vs. L. Rockhold R. Souza -$155 vs. Y. Romero D. Maia -$135 vs. G. Nelson M. Holloway -$500 vs. J. Stephens Home team in CAPS © 2015 Benjamin Eckstein

+$120 +$130 +$135 +$115 +$400

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL American League BOSTON RED SOX — Agreed to terms with LHP David Price on a seven-year contract. Designated INF/ OF Garin Cecchini for assignment. CHICAGO WHITE SOX — Agreed to terms with C Dioner Navarro and RHP Jacob Turner on one-year contracts. SEATTLE MARINERS — Traded RHP Jose Ramirez to Atlanta for a player to be named or cash. Named Scott Brosius coach for Tacoma (PCL), Ethan Katz pitching coach for Bakersfield (Cal), Mitch Canham manager for Clinton (MWL), Moises Hernandez pitching coach for Everett (NWL), and Zac Livingston manager and Yoel Monzon pitching coach for Peoria (Arizona). Named Mike Micucci field coordinator, David Macias coordinatorinternational player programs, Rick Waits pitching coordinator, Carlos Chantres low-level pitching coordinator, Pete Harnisch special assistant-player development and John Hester special assistant-player development/scouting. TAMPA BAY RAYS — Designated OF Joey Butler for assignment. TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Agreed to terms with C Josh Thole on a one-year contract. National League ATLANTA BRAVES — Agreed to terms with INF Gordon Beckham on a one-year contract. CHICAGO CUBS — Claimed LHP Edgar Olmos off waivers from Seattle. LOS ANGELES DODGERS — Assigned RHP Brooks Brown outright to Oklahoma City (PCL). MIAMI MARLINS — Named Barry Bonds hitting coach, Tim Wallach bench coach and Juan Nieves pitching coach. Reassigned hitting coach Frank Menechino to assistant hitting coach. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association HOUSTON ROCKETS — Assigned G/F K.J. McDaniels to Rio Grande Valley (NBADL). LOS ANGELES CLIPPERS — Assigned F Branden Dawson to Grand Rapids (NBADL). MEMPHIS GRIZZLIES — Assigned F James Ennis to Iowa (NBADL). PHILADELPHIA 76ERS — Waived G Phil Pressey. Recalled Gs Tony Wroten and Kendall Marshall from Delaware (NBADL). FOOTBALL National Football League NFL — Fined San Francisco DE Quinton Dial $17,363 and Denver LB Von Miller $8,681 for their actions during last week’s games. ATLANTA FALCONS — Placed WR Leonard Hankerson on injured reserve. Activated WR Devin Hester from injured reserve. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS — Released WR Douglas McNeil from the practice squad. Signed C Drew Nowak to the practice squad. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS — Released CB Leonard Johnson. HOCKEY National Hockey League CAROLINA HURRICANES — Reassigned D Ryan Murphy to Charlotte (AHL). Recalled D Jaccob Slavin and Fs Brock McGinn and Phil Di Giuseppe from Charlotte. DALLAS STARS — Assigned G Maxime Lagace and Fs Gemel Smith and Cole Ully from Texas (AHL) to Idaho (ECHL). LOS ANGELES KINGS — Assigned F Joel Lowry from Ontario (AHL) to Manchester (ECHL). NASHVILLE PREDATORS — Reassigned F Cody Bass to Milwaukee (AHL). NEW JERSEY DEVILS — Reassigned G Scott Wedgewood from Albany

(AHL) to Adirondack (ECHL) and G Ken Appleby from Adirondack to Albany. TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING — Agreed to terms with coach Jon Cooper on a multiyear contract extension. SOCCER Major League Soccer NEW YORK CITY FC — Declined the 2016 contract options on D Kwame Watson-Siriboe, D Jeb Brovsky, MF Ned Grabavoy and MF Pablo Alvarez. COLLEGE EAST CAROLINA — Fired football coach Ruffin McNeill. MEMPHIS — Named Mike Norvell football coach. MIAMI — Named Mark Richt football coach. MONTANA STATE — Named Jeff Choate football coach. VIRGINIA — Named Bronco Mendenhall football coach.

GOLF Hero World Challenge Friday at Albany Golf Club, Nassau, Bahamas Purse: $3.5 million; Yards: 7,267; Par: 72 Second Round Jordan Spieth 67-66 — 133 Bill Haas 67-66 — 133 Jimmy Walker 66-67 — 133 Chris Kirk 69-65 — 134 Patrick Reed 69-65 — 134 Bubba Watson 67-67 — 134 Matt Kuchar 70-66 — 136 Paul Casey 66-70 — 136 Zach Johnson 66-70 — 136 Dustin Johnson 68-69 — 137 Brooks Koepka 67-70 — 137 Adam Scott 67-70 — 137 Rickie Fowler 70-68 — 138 J.B. Holmes 71-68 — 139 Anirban Lahiri 69-70 — 139 Billy Horschel 71-70 — 141 Justin Rose 71-72 — 143 Hideki Matsuyama 75-73 — 148

Nedbank Challenge Friday at Gary Player Country Club, Sun City, South Africa Purse: $6.5 million; Yards: 7,831; Par: 72 Second Round Henrik Stenson, Sweden 66-67 — 133 Jaco van Zyl, South Africa 66-68 — 134 Robert Streb, United States 69-66 — 135 Marc Leishman, Australia 68-68 — 136 Kiradech Aphibarnrat, Thailand 70-68 — 138 Ross Fisher, England 69-71 — 140 Emiliano Grillo, Argentina 72-69 — 141 Scott Piercy, United States 73-68 — 141 Keegan Bradley, United States 72-69 — 141 Chris Wood, England 70-71 — 141 Bernd Wiesberger, Austria 70-71 — 141 Thomas Aiken, South Africa 73-69 — 142 Byeong-Hun An, South Korea 72-70 — 142 Andy Sullivan, England 71-71 — 142 Louis Oosthuizen, South Africa 70-72 — 142 Thongchai Jaidee, Thailand 70-72 — 142 Miguel Angel Jimenez, Spain 70-72 — 142 Branden Grace, South Africa 68-74 — 142 Danny Willett, England 67-75 — 142 Tommy Fleetwood, England 71-72 — 143 Victor Dubuisson, France 71-73 — 144 Shane Lowry, England 74-71 — 145 Charl Schwartzel, South Africa 71-74 — 145 Russell Knox, Scotland 69-76 — 145 Martin Kaymer, Germany 75-71 — 146 Matthew Fitzpatrick, England 69-77 — 146 Webb Simpson, United States 75-72 — 147 Lee Westwood, England 72-81 — 153 Steven Bowditch, Australia 77-78 — 155 Soren Kjeldsen, Denmark 74-81 — 155

Australian PGA Friday at RACV Royal Pines Resort, Gold Coast, Australia Purse: $1.27 million; Yards: 7,364; Par: 72 Second Round David Lingmerth, Sweden 73-68 — 141 Mark Foster, England 69-73 — 142 Zander Lombard, South Africa 67-75 — 142 Peter Uihlein, U.S. 75-67 — 142 Matthew Millar, Australia 72-70 — 142 Pablo Martin Benavides, Spain 75-67 — 142 Dylan Frittelli, South Africa 70-72 — 142 Rhein Gibson, Australia 79-64 — 143 Todd Sinnott, Australia 71-72 — 143 Jason Scrivener, Australia 72-71 — 143 Ashley Hall, Australia 70-73 — 143 Tom Lewis, England 72-71 — 143 Ryan Fox, New Zealand 74-70 — 144 Anthony Brown, Australia 73-71 — 144 Nathan Holman, Australia 77-68 — 145 Aaron Pike, Australia 72-73 — 145 Deyen Lawson, Australia 75-70 — 145 Jordan Zunic, Australia 73-72 — 145 Also Harold Varner III, U.S. 74-73 — 147 Missed cut Ryan Carter, U.S. 80-72 — 152 Brandt Snedeker, U.S. 84-75 — 159

COLLEGES SATURDAY BASKETBALL SCHEDULE W: McKendree at Bellarmine, noon W: Missouri S&T at UMSL, 1 p.m. W: Drury at Maryville, 1 p.m. W: Lincoln at Lindenwood, 1 p.m. W: Webster at Principia, 1 p.m. W: Fontbonne at Iowa Wesleyan, 1 p.m. W: Southwestern Illinois at Kaskaskia, 1 p.m. M: SIUE at Northwestern, 2 p.m. W: Missouri Baptist at LU-Belleville, 2 p.m. M: St. Louis CC at Lincoln Land, 2 p.m. W: William Woods at Harris-Stowe, 2 p.m. M: McKendree at Bellarmine, 2:15 p.m. M: Missouri State at Oklahoma State, 2:30 p.m. M: Missouri S&T at UMSL, 3 p.m. M: Drury at Maryville, 3 p.m. M: Lincoln at Lindenwood, 3 p.m. M: Webster at Principia, 3 p.m. M: Fontbonne at Iowa Wesleyan, 3 p.m. M: Southwestern Illinois at Kaskaskia, 3 p.m. W: Jefferson vs. Missouri Baptist JV, in Poplar Bluff, 3 p.m. M: Missouri Baptist at LU-Belleville, 4 p.m. M: William Woods at Harris-Stowe, 4 p.m. M: SIUC at North Texas, 5 p.m. M: Washington at Illinois Wesleyan, 7 p.m. W: Washington vs. Simpson, 7 p.m. SUNDAY BASKETBALL SCHEDULE M: SWIC vs. Three Rivers, at St. Louis CC, 2 p.m. M: Danville Area at St. Louis CC, 4 p.m. M: Lewis & Clark vs. Mineral Area, at St. Louis CC, 6 p.m.

Friday’s national college basketball scores East Canisius 96, Monmouth (NJ) 86 Fairfield 74, Rider 70 Iona 101, Marist 66 Niagara 76, Quinnipiac 72 Pittsburgh 96, Duquesne 75 Saint Joseph’s 80, Columbia 78 Siena 89, Manhattan 54 South Akron 75, Marshall 65 Alabama 58, Southern Miss. 55 East Carolina 82, SC-Upstate 71 Elon 77, FIU 71 Kansas St. 68, Georgia 66 Louisiana Tech 95, Jackson St. 88, 2OT Maryland 96, St. Francis (Pa.) 55 Old Dominion 82, Delaware St. 38 Southern U. 73, SE Louisiana 69 Wake Forest 88, Arkansas 85 Midwest American U. 60, Youngstown St. 56 Georgia St. 59, Wright St. 46 Missouri 78, N. Illinois 71 Southwest N. Dakota St. 74, Arkansas St. 73

NFL LATE THURSDAY

Packers 27, Lions 23 Green Bay 0 0 14 13 — 27 Detroit 17 0 3 3 — 23 First Quarter Det: FG Prater 51, 8:48. Det: Ebron 3 pass from Stafford (Prater kick), 1:50. Det: C.Johnson 17 pass from Stafford (Prater kick), 1:02. Third Quarter Det: FG Prater 34, 8:54. GB: Cobb fumble recovery in end zone (Crosby kick), 5:44. GB: Adams 8 pass from A.Rodgers (Crosby kick), 4:06. Fourth Quarter Det: FG Prater 42, 7:06. GB: A.Rodgers 17 run (Crosby kick), 3:04. GB: R.Rodgers 61 pass from A.Rodgers (run failed), :00. A: 63,207. GB Det First downs 19 17 Total Net Yards 313 306 Rushes-yards 24-67 25-101 Passing 246 205 Punt Returns 0-0 1-0 Kickoff Returns 3-61 2-51 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 1-24 Comp-Att-Int 24-36-1 23-35-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 3-27 3-15 Punts 6-47.7 6-45.7 Fumbles-Lost 3-0 1-1 Penalties-Yards 7-55 9-108 Time of Possession 26:56 33:04 Rushing: Green Bay, A.Rodgers 4-27, Crockett 5-22, Starks 9-15, Lacy 5-4, Cobb 1-(minus 1). Detroit, Abdullah 13-67, Stafford 2-22, Bell 8-5, Riddick 1-4, Tate 1-3. Passing: Green Bay, A.Rodgers 24-361-273. Detroit, Stafford 23-35-0-220. Receiving: Green Bay, R.Rodgers 8-146, Starks 5-45, Cobb 4-29, Adams 4-21, J.Jones 1-19, Abbrederis 1-16, Lacy 1-(minus 3). Detroit, Tate 8-63, Riddick 5-27, C.Johnson 3-44, T.Jones 2-37, Bell 2-25, Ebron 2-9, Fuller 1-15. Missed Field Goals: Green Bay, Crosby 41 (WL).

NFL superlatives WEEK 13 POINTS Most 52, New Orleans vs. N.Y. Giants 11/1 51, New England vs. Jacksonville 9/27 49, N.Y. Giants at New Orleans 11/1 48, Arizona at Chicago 9/20 48, Atlanta vs. Houston 10/4 Fewest 0, Chicago at Seattle 9/27 3, Minnesota at San Francisco 9/14 3, San Francisco vs. Green Bay 10/4 3, San Francisco vs. Seattle 10/22 3, San Diego vs. Kansas City 11/22 TOTAL YARDS Most 608, New Orleans vs. N.Y. Giants 11/1 597, Pittsburgh vs. Oakland 11/8 548, San Diego at Green Bay 10/18 546, Detroit vs. Chicago 10/18 (OT) 538, Pittsburgh at Seattle 11/29 Fewest 140, Green Bay at Denver 11/1 142, San Francisco vs. Seattle 10/22 146, Chicago at Seattle 9/27 156, San Francisco at Arizona 9/27 173, Baltimore at Denver 9/13 RUSHING YARDS Most 283, Tampa Bay at Philadelphia 11/22 266, Buffalo vs. Miami 11/8 263, Minnesota at Oakland 11/15 255, Seattle vs. San Francisco 11/22 248, Miami vs. Houston 10/25 Fewest 7, Philadelphia vs. Dallas 9/20 12, Miami at N.Y. Jets 11/29 14, Washington at Carolina 11/22 15, Miami at New England 10/29 15, Cleveland at Pittsburgh 11/15 NET PASSING YARDS Most 505, New Orleans vs. N.Y. Giants 11/1 488, San Diego at Green Bay 10/18 480, Pittsburgh at Seattle 11/29 451, New England at Buffalo 9/20 441, N.Y. Giants vs. San Francisco 10/11 Fewest 48, Chicago at Seattle 9/27 50, Green Bay at Denver 11/1 53, San Francisco at Arizona 9/27 81, San Francisco vs. Seattle 10/22 82, Buffalo at Tennessee 10/11 TIMES SACKED BY OPPONENT Most 8, Buffalo vs. New England 9/20 PASSES HAD INTERCEPTED Most 5, Denver vs. Kansas City 11/15 FUMBLES LOST Most 4, Cleveland at N.Y. Jets 9/13 4, Cleveland at Rams 10/25 4, Washington at Carolina 11/22 4, Rams at Baltimore 11/22 TURNOVERS TIMES LOSING BALL ON FUMBLES LOST OR INTERCEPTIONS Most 6, Detroit vs. Arizona 10/11 (2 fumbles; 4 interceptions) FIRST DOWNS Most 35, New England vs. Jacksonville 9/27 35, New Orleans vs. N.Y. Giants 11/1 Fewest 7, Chicago at Seattle 9/27 FIRST DOWNS RUSHING Most 14, San Francisco vs. Minnesota 9/14 14, Dallas at N.Y. Giants 10/25 14, Seattle vs. San Francisco 11/22 Fewest 0, Miami at Jacksonville 9/20 0, Miami at N.Y. Jets 11/29 FIRST DOWNS PASSING Most 26, San Diego at Green Bay 10/18 Fewest 2, Chicago at Seattle 9/27 FIRST DOWNS BY PENALTY Most 7, N.Y. Giants at Buffalo 10/4 7, Washington vs. Tampa Bay 10/25 7, N.Y. Giants at New Orleans 11/1 7, Miami at Buffalo 11/8 7, Indianapolis vs. Denver 11/8 7, New Orleans vs. Tennessee 11/8 (OT) 7, Arizona at San Francisco 11/29 TIME OF POSSESSION Most 41:08, Washington vs. Philadelphia 10/4

BOXING Fight Schedule Saturday At Hamburg, Germany, Jack Culcay vs. Dennis Hogan, 12, for the interim WBA World super welterweight title. At Barclays Center, Brooklyn, N.Y. (SHO), Daniel Jacobs vs. Peter Quillin, 12, for Jacobs’ WBA World middleweight title; Jesus Cuellar vs. Jonathan Oquendo, 12, for Cuellar’s WBA World featherweight title; Chris Algieri vs. Erick Bone, 10, welterweights; Will Rosinsky vs. Joe Smith Jr., 10, light heavyweights. Monday At Hua Hin, Thailand, Amnat Ruenroeng vs. Myung Ho Hee, 12, for Ruenroeng’s IBF World Flyweight title. Thursday At Chiang Mai, Thailand, Stamp Kiatniwat vs. Gregorio Lebron, 12, for the interim WBA World flyweight title. Dec. 11 At San Juan, Puerto Rico (truTV), Nonito Donaire vs. Cesar Juarez, 12, junior featherweights. At Bayou City Event Center, Houston (SHO), Regis Prograis vs. Abel Ramos, 10, super lightweights. Dec. 12 At O2 Arena, London, Kevin Mitchell vs. Ismael Barroso, 12, for the interim WBA World lightweight title. At AT&T Center, San Antonio (NBC), Omar Figueroa Jr. vs. Antonio DeMarco, 12, super lightweights; Dominic Breazeale vs. Charles Martin, 10, heavyweights; Chris Arreola vs. Travis Kauffman, 10, heavyweights.

MU BASKETBALL STATISTICS Player Puryear Wright Phillips Clark Walton Isabell VanLeer Rosburg Woods Gant Allen Barton Total Opponents

GP GS Min/G FG% 3PT% FT% Reb/G Ast/G Stl. Blk Pts/G 6 6 28.0 .526 .125 .739 4.8 0.5 2 1 13.0 6 5 26.5 .381 .333 .818 4.7 1.0 3 3 9.7 6 6 24.3 .514 .412 .889 3.8 3.0 7 1 8.8 6 6 28.8 .264 .316 .875 2.8 3.5 6 0 8.0 6 1 15.0 .323 .000 .750 2.0 1.3 2 1 6.3 6 0 11.8 .538 .600 1.000 1.7 1.0 4 0 6.0 6 0 15.2 .433 .417 .000 1.5 0.7 3 0 6.0 6 2 17.2 .500 .000 .385 3.2 0.2 1 2 4.2 6 0 13.0 .714 .000 .222 2.2 0.2 0 2 3.7 6 4 10.7 .294 .000 .714 1.7 0.3 1 6 2.5 5 0 11.0 .400 .000 .250 2.4 0.2 3 1 1.0 2 0 1.0 .000 .000 .000 0.0 0.0 0 0 0.0 6 .431 .327 .699 33.5 11.8 32 17 69.0 6 200.0 .400 .363 .706 36.0 12.2 36 16 69.7

SLU BASKETBALL STATISTICS Player Yacoubou Crawford Reynolds Yarbrough Agbeko Roby Gillmann Bartley Bishop Jolly Neufeld Eagleton Hines TEAM Total Opponents

GP GS Min/G FG% 3PT% FT% Reb/G Ast/G Stl Blk Pts/G 6 6 31.2 .477 .250 .500 6.3 2.0 5 2 13.0 6 6 28.3 .523 .429 .880 3.0 1.3 3 0 12.8 6 6 26.5 .541 .500 .735 1.5 3.0 10 1 11.2 6 0 22.7 .438 .333 .583 6.5 1.8 2 0 9.7 6 6 18.5 .480 .000 .588 5.2 0.3 2 2 5.7 6 0 18.2 .313 .286 .667 2.0 2.2 1 0 3.7 6 6 20.5 .444 .333 .667 2.2 1.0 2 5 3.7 6 0 12.5 .375 .273 1.000 0.5 1.3 1 1 3.2 4 0 5.3 .286 .400 1.000 0.3 0.5 1 0 2.0 5 0 6.6 .600 .000 .500 1.0 0.2 0 2 1.8 6 0 12.3 .357 .000 .000 0.8 0.2 2 2 1.7 1 0 1.0 .000 .000 .000 0.0 0.0 0 0 0.0 2 0 0.5 .000 .000 .000 0.0 0.0 0 0 0.0 6 0 0.0 .000 .000 .000 3.2 0.0 0 0 0.0 6 .461 .325 .665 32.2 13.7 29 15 67.3 6 .404 .307 .712 34.0 12.0 34 23 63.7


SPORTS

B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

AMERICA’S LINE

NBA STANDINGS EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Toronto Boston New York Brooklyn Philadelphia Southeast Miami Atlanta Orlando Charlotte Washington Central Chicago Cleveland Indiana Detroit Milwaukee

W 12 11 10 5 1 W 11 13 11 10 8 W 11 13 12 11 7

L 8 8 10 14 19 L 6 9 8 8 9 L 5 6 6 9 13

Pct .600 .579 .500 .263 .050 Pct .647 .591 .579 .556 .471 Pct .688 .684 .667 .550 .350

GB — ½ 2 6½ 11 GB — ½ 1 1½ 3 GB ½ — ½ 2½ 6½

L10 5-5 6-4 6-4 4-6 1-9 L10 7-3 5-5 7-3 6-4 5-5 L10 7-3 5-5 8-2 6-4 2-8

Str L-1 W-2 W-2 L-1 L-1 Str W-1 W-1 W-5 L-1 W-1 Str W-2 L-2 L-1 W-3 L-2

Home 4-3 6-4 5-6 4-3 1-7 Home 9-3 8-4 7-3 8-3 4-5 Home 7-1 9-1 6-2 7-2 5-4

Away 8-5 5-4 5-4 1-11 0-12 Away 2-3 5-5 4-5 2-5 4-4 Away 4-4 4-5 6-4 4-7 2-9

Conf 7-3 8-6 6-8 3-8 0-12 Conf 5-5 7-5 5-5 6-6 6-7 Conf 6-3 11-5 9-3 5-4 6-10

L10 Str 8-2 W-2 7-3 L-1 5-5 L-1 5-5 W-2 4-6 W-1 L10 Str 5-5 L-2 4-6 L-2 4-6 L-2 4-6 W-1 2-8 W-1 L10 Str 10-0 W-20 5-5 L-1 2-8 L-3 4-6 L-1 2-8 L-1

Home 10-0 6-4 5-3 5-7 4-5 Home 8-3 3-4 2-7 5-5 3-6 Home 10-0 8-5 5-5 5-7 1-6

Away 6-4 5-5 6-6 4-4 1-10 Away 3-5 5-5 6-3 3-7 4-7 Away 10-0 2-4 3-7 2-6 2-10

Conf 9-2 8-7 9-7 6-6 4-10 Conf 6-2 4-4 3-4 7-9 5-11 Conf 15-0 9-7 7-7 2-9 0-9

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest San Antonio Memphis Dallas Houston New Orleans Northwest Oklahoma City Utah Minnesota Portland Denver Paciic Golden State LA Clippers Phoenix Sacramento LA Lakers

W 16 11 11 9 5 W 11 8 8 8 7 W 20 10 8 7 3

L 4 9 9 11 15 L 8 9 10 12 13 L 0 9 12 13 16

M 2 • SATUrDAy • 12.05.2015

Pct GB .800 — .550 5 .550 5 .450 7 .250 11 Pct GB .579 — .471 2 .444 2½ .400 3½ .350 4½ Pct GB 1.000 — .526 9½ .400 12 .350 13 .158 16½

Friday Washington 109, Phoenix 106 New York 108, Brooklyn 91 Detroit 102, Milwaukee 95 Atlanta 100, LA Lakers 87 Houston 100, Dallas 96 New Orleans 114, Cleveland 108, OT Thursday Miami 97, Oklahoma City 95 Denver 106, Toronto 105 Orlando 103, Utah 94 San Antonio 103, Memphis 83 Portland 123, Indiana 111 Boston 114, Sacramento 97 Saturday Denver at Philadelphia, noon Golden State at Toronto, 4 p.m. Charlotte at Chicago, 7 p.m. Portland at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Sacramento at Houston, 7 p.m. Cleveland at Miami, 7 p.m. Boston at San Antonio, 7:30 p.m. New York at Milwaukee, 7:30 p.m. Indiana at Utah, 8 p.m. Orlando at LA Clippers, 9:30 p.m. Sunday Phoenix at Memphis, 2:30 p.m. Golden State at Brooklyn, 5 p.m. LA Lakers at Detroit, 5 p.m. Dallas at Washington, 5 p.m. Sacramento at Oklahoma City, 6 p.m.

Anthony, Knicks top Nets

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Brooklyn’s Joe Johnson guards New York’s Carmelo Anthony, who scored 28 points.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

had eight points and four rebounds.

Carmelo Anthony scored 28 points, Kristaps Porzingis had 19 and the host New York Knicks beat the Brooklyn Nets 10891 on Friday night to get back to .500. Arron Afflalo added 18 points for the Knicks (10-10), who dominated lowly Philadelphia and Brooklyn in their last two games after a four-game losing streak. They reclaimed city bragging rights with ease, leading by as much as 31 points. Brook Lopez scored 21 points, and Thaddeus Young had 18 points and 11 rebounds for the Nets. They had won two in a row and have a lot to fix before they host the Golden State Warriors on Sunday. Lopez beat twin brother Robin to take the opening tip, and it was soon clear that was all the Nets would be winning. The Knicks blitzed them with a season-best 42 points in the first quarter, led 65-42 at halftime and opened their first lead of 30 or more since the 2013-14 season in the third period. The Nets had allowed 91 points or fewer in three straight games, but the Knicks already surpassed that with a 9267 cushion heading to the fourth quarter. Brooklyn fell to 1-11 on the road. Former St. Louis University star Willie Reed made his debut with the Nets. He

Beal lifts Wizards • Former Chaminade star Bradley Beal scored 34 points, Ramon Sessions added 18 and the host Washington Wizards rallied to beat the Phoenix Suns 109-106 in a turnover-filled game. Otto Porter Jr. the former Georgetown star from Scott County (Mo. ) Central, added 13 points. Before the game, the Wizards said center Marcin Gortat traveled home to Poland because of a family emergency and will miss at least one other game. Clippers have key injuries • Inflamed rib cartilage will prevent perennial All-Star point guard Chris Paul from playing when the Los Angeles Clippers host the Orlando Magic on Saturday night, Clippers coach Doc Rivers said. Rivers added the Clippers probably also will be without starting shooting guard J.J. Redick, who sprained his right ankle Wednesday night.“We’re going to have to do it a little bit without two key guys, but everyone goes through injuries,” Rivers said before the Clippers’ practice Friday. “We’re not the only team. The key for us, what we haven’t done well this year, is we haven’t won games when guys have been out. I think we may have won one.

NBA SUMMARIES Hawks 100, Lakers 87

Wizards 109, Suns 106

Rockets 100, Mavericks 96

L.A. Lakers: Bryant 4-19 4-5 14, Randle 3-12 2-2 8, Hibbert 2-5 1-2 5, Russell 6-16 0-0 16, Clarkson 5-8 0-0 13, Nance Jr. 3-5 0-0 6, Williams 6-13 3-4 18, Bass 2-5 0-0 4, World Peace 1-3 0-0 3. Totals 32-86 10-13 87. Atlanta: Sefolosha 3-7 0-0 8, Millsap 6-12 3-3 15, Horford 6-11 3-4 16, Teague 5-9 2-2 13, Korver 3-8 0-0 7, Muscala 2-4 1-1 6, Schroder 2-4 1-2 6, Bazemore 5-10 3-4 15, Patterson 0-0 0-0 0, Scott 5-9 3-4 14. Totals 37-74 16-20 100. L.A. Lakers 19 17 30 21 — 87 Atlanta 23 29 20 28 — 100 3-point goals: L.A. Lakers 13-27 (Russell 4-7, Clarkson 3-3, Williams 3-6, Bryant 2-10, World Peace 1-1), Atlanta 10-26 (Bazemore 2-3, Sefolosha 2-4, Muscala 1-1, Scott 1-2, Schroder 1-3, Teague 1-3, Horford 1-4, Korver 1-5, Millsap 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: L.A. Lakers 50 (Russell 10), Atlanta 48 (Horford 9). Assists: L.A. Lakers 19 (Bryant 5), Atlanta 24 (Horford, Teague 5). Total fouls: L.A. Lakers 14, Atlanta 11. A: 19,051 (18,729).

Phoenix: Tucker 3-6 2-3 9, Leuer 6-7 0-1 13, Len 3-5 0-0 6, Bledsoe 9-18 3-4 22, Knight 7-16 1-3 19, Booker 4-6 0-0 8, Morris 4-10 2-2 10, Price 2-5 0-0 6, Teletovic 0-2 2-3 2, Warren 5-9 0-0 11. Totals 43-84 10-16 106. Washington: Porter 6-12 1-1 13, Dudley 0-7 3-4 3, Hollins 1-1 0-0 2, Wall 5-13 5-6 17, Beal 12-23 5-6 34, Blair 2-2 0-2 4, Temple 2-6 1-2 6, Neal 4-6 2-2 12, Sessions 8-12 2-2 18, Oubre Jr. 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 40-82 19-25 109. Phoenix 31 29 25 21 — 106 Washington 22 29 27 31 — 109 3-point goals: Phoenix 10-23 (Knight 4-7, Price 2-4, Tucker 1-1, Warren 1-1, Leuer 1-2, Bledsoe 1-5, Len 0-1, Teletovic 0-1, Morris 0-1), Washington 10-25 (Beal 5-8, Neal 2-2, Wall 2-4, Temple 1-4, Porter 0-1, Dudley 0-3, Sessions 0-3). Fouled out: Tucker. Rebounds: Phoenix 44 (Tucker 13), Washington 51 (Beal 9). Assists: Phoenix 21 (Bledsoe 7), Washington 19 (Wall 9). Total fouls: Phoenix 23, Washington 21. Technicals: Phoenix delay of game. A: 17,255 (20,308).

Houston: Ariza 7-10 0-4 18, Jones 7-12 3-3 17, Capela 0-5 2-4 2, Beverley 5-7 0-0 14, Harden 10-23 4-5 25, Harrell 0-4 0-0 0, Lawson 3-8 1-2 8, Brewer 3-8 0-0 7, Terry 3-5 0-0 7, Thornton 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 39-84 10-18 100. Dallas: Matthews 1-9 2-4 5, Nowitzki 6-15 4-4 16, Pachulia 3-7 1-2 7, Williams 8-16 2-2 22, Felton 4-8 0-0 9, Powell 4-5 3-5 11, Parsons 4-12 0-0 9, Villanueva 1-1 0-0 2, Harris 6-7 2-3 15, McGee 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 37-81 14-20 96. Houston 26 31 21 22 — 100 Dallas 28 25 25 18 — 96 3-point goals: Houston 12-26 (Beverley 4-4, Ariza 4-7, Terry 1-1, Lawson 1-3, Brewer 1-5, Harden 1-6), Dallas 8-29 (Williams 4-10, Harris 1-1, Felton 1-3, Parsons 1-4, Matthews 1-8, Nowitzki 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Houston 53 (Capela 10), Dallas 50 (Pachulia 11). Assists: Houston 20 (Harden 9), Dallas 23 (Williams 6). Total fouls: Houston 22, Dallas 17. Technicals: Jones, Felton. Flagrant fouls: Jones. A: 20,339 (19,200).

Pistons 102, Bucks 95 Milwaukee: Middleton 6-15 6-6 21, Antetokounmpo 5-11 2-2 12, Monroe 7-15 0-0 14, Bayless 4-9 0-1 9, Mayo 5-13 3-3 13, Parker 4-8 2-2 10, Carter-Williams 3-8 0-0 6, Vaughn 0-2 0-0 0, O’Bryant 1-1 0-0 2, Henson 4-5 0-0 8. Totals 39-87 13-14 95. Detroit: Morris 7-14 8-9 23, Ilyasova 4-10 4-5 13, Drummond 7-18 3-10 17, Jackson 8-14 6-7 23, Caldwell-Pope 1-6 6-6 8, Johnson 4-10 0-0 10, Tolliver 3-5 0-2 8, Blake 0-3 0-0 0, Baynes 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 34-82 27-39 102. Milwaukee 16 24 19 36 — 95 Detroit 17 34 16 35 — 102 3-point goals: Milwaukee 4-18 (Middleton 3-7, Bayless 1-5, Carter-Williams 0-2, Mayo 0-4), Detroit 7-23 (Tolliver 2-3, Johnson 2-4, Morris 1-2, Jackson 1-4, Ilyasova 1-5, Blake 0-2, Caldwell-Pope 0-3). Fouled out: Mayo. Rebounds: Milwaukee 53 (Monroe 13), Detroit 56 (Drummond 23). Assists: Milwaukee 21 (Bayless, Carter-Williams 5), Detroit 18 (Jackson 5). Total fouls: Milwaukee 33, Detroit 11. Technicals: Morris, Detroit defensive three second. A: 16,963 (22,076).

Knicks 108, Nets 91

Pelicans 114, Cavs 108 (OT)

Brooklyn: Johnson 3-9 2-2 9, Young 9-19 0-0 18, B.Lopez 8-20 5-5 21, Jack 2-6 0-0 5, Hollis-Jefferson 1-4 0-0 2, Bogdanovic 3-4 0-0 7, Robinson 5-6 0-2 10, Larkin 3-8 0-0 6, Ellington 2-8 1-2 5, Brown 0-1 0-0 0, Reed 3-4 2-4 8, Karasev 0-2 0-0 0, Sloan 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 39-91 10-15 91. New York: Anthony 9-18 5-7 28, Porzingis 7-13 2-2 19, R.Lopez 3-6 1-1 7, Calderon 0-2 1-2 1, Afflalo 7-11 3-3 18, Galloway 3-9 0-0 8, Williams 3-7 2-2 8, Thomas 3-9 2-2 9, Seraphin 1-4 2-2 4, Grant 2-4 0-0 4, Amundson 1-4 0-0 2. Totals 39-87 18-21 108. Brooklyn 21 21 25 24 — 91 New York 42 23 27 16 — 108 3-point goals: Brooklyn 3-11 (Bogdanovic 1-1, Johnson 1-2, Jack 1-2, Karasev 0-1, Brown 0-1, Larkin 0-1, Ellington 0-3), New York 12-27 (Anthony 5-8, Porzingis 3-4, Galloway 2-5, Afflalo 1-2, Thomas 1-4, Calderon 0-1, Williams 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Brooklyn 55 (Young 11), New York 53 (Porzingis 10). Assists: Brooklyn 15 (Johnson 4), New York 25 (Calderon 10). Total fouls: Brooklyn 13, New York 14. Flagrant fouls: Johnson. Ejected: Johnson. A: 19,812 (19,763).

Cleveland: James 13-29 10-11 37, Love 6-16 3-5 15, Mozgov 4-5 0-0 8, Dellavedova 3-5 0-0 8, J.Smith 6-14 0-0 18, Thompson 2-4 1-2 5, Jones 1-5 4-4 7, Williams 4-10 0-0 8, Jefferson 0-1 0-0 0, Varejao 0-0 2-2 2. Totals 39-89 20-24 108. New Orleans: Gee 1-3 1-2 3, Davis 13-22 3-6 31, Asik 1-2 4-6 6, Evans 5-13 4-5 14, Gordon 7-9 1-2 19, Anderson 5-12 6-7 18, Holiday 5-10 2-3 13, D.Cunningham 3-5 0-0 6, Cole 2-7 0-0 4, Babbitt 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 42-85 21-31 114. Cleveland 27 26 24 28 3 — 108 New Orleans 21 31 32 21 9 — 114 3-point goals: Cleveland 10-33 (J.Smith 6-13, Dellavedova 2-3, Jones 1-5, James 1-5, Williams 0-2, Love 0-5), New Orleans 9-25 (Gordon 4-5, Davis 2-4, Anderson 2-6, Holiday 1-2, Gee 0-1, Cole 0-1, Babbitt 0-2, Evans 0-2, D.Cunningham 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Cleveland 48 (Love, Thompson 10), New Orleans 59 (Davis 12). Assists: Cleveland 18 (James 8), New Orleans 25 (Evans 10). Total fouls: Cleveland 26, New Orleans 25. Technicals: James. A: 17,906 (16,867).

NFL Favorite Open/Current Sunday BEARS 7 7 Bengals NL 9.5 TITANS 2 2.5 BILLS 3.5 3 DOLPHINS 4 4 Panthers 6.5 7 Seahawks PK 1 Cards 6 5.5 BUCS 2 1 Jets PK 2 Broncos 4.5 4 Chiefs 3 3 PATRIOTS NL 9.5 STEELERS NL 7 Monday WASHINGTON 3.5 4

Underdog 49ers BROWNS Jaguars Texans Ravens SAINTS VIKINGS RAMS Falcons GIANTS CHARGERS RAIDERS Eagles Colts Cowboys

COLLEGE FOOTBALL Favorite Open/Current Underdog BAYLOR 20.5 21 Texas GA SOUTHERN 22 20.5 Georgia St ARKANSAS ST 23 25.5 Texas St New Mex St NL 2 UL-MONROE W Virginia 5.5 6 KANSAS ST App’chian St 17 18 S ALABAMA UL-LAFAYETTE 1.5 1.5 Troy C-USA Championship, Bowling Green, KY W KENTUCKY 8.5 7.5 So Miss American Championship, Houston HOUSTON 5.5 6 Temple PAC 12 Championship, Santa Clara, CA Stanford 4 4.5 Usc SEC Championship, Atlanta Alabama 17 17.5 Florida Mountain West Championship, San Diego SAN DIEGO ST 6 6.5 Air Force ACC Championship, Charlotte Clemson 6 5 N Carolina Big Ten Championship, Indianapolis Michigan St 3 3 Iowa Odds to win the 2015 College Football Championship Team Open Alabama 8/1 Oklahoma 25/1 Clemson 25/1 Michigan State 20/1 Iowa 75/1 Ohio State 4/1 North Carolina 75/1

Current 6/5 5/2 5/1 8/1 12/1 18/1 20/1

Odds to win the Heisman Trophy Player School Derrick Henry Alabama Deshaun Watson Clemson Baker Mayfield Oklahoma Christian McCaffrey Stanford NBA Favorite Nuggets Warriors HEAT T’WOLVES ROCKETS BULLS BUCKS SPURS Pacers CLIPPERS

Points 3 7 2 1.5 2.5 6 1.5 8.5 1.5 2.5

Odds 1/2 7/2 12/1 15/1

Underdog 76ERS RAPTORS Cavaliers Blazers Kings Hornets Knicks Celtics JAZZ Magic

COLLEGE BASKETBALL Favorite Points Underdog Seton Hall 4.5 RUTGERS BUTLER 16 Indiana St PENN ST 3 E Michigan WISCONSIN 8 Temple GEORGETOWN 5 Syracuse LASALLE 8 Drexel Creighton 3 LOYOLA-CHICAGO PURDUE 14 New Mexico Northeastern 5 DETROIT California 6 WYOMING KANSAS 22 Harvard GONZAGA 6.5 Arizona OKLAHOMA ST 13 Missouri St MIDDLE TENN ST 11 S Alabama s-UMASS 1 Mississippi GEORGE MASON 7 Penn MIAMI-FLORIDA 27.5 Charlotte ST. BONA 6 Ohio U OREGON ST 10.5 Nevada BOWLING GREEN 1.5 Drake Georgia Tech 6.5 TULANE DUKE 23.5 Buffalo RHODE ISLAND 2 Providence S CAROLINA 19 S Florida VIRGINIA 14 William & Mary RICHMOND 2.5 Northern Iowa Kent St 3 CLEVELAND ST C FLORIDA 14 Illinois-Chi ILLINOIS ST 3 Uab So Illinois 6.5 N TEXAS XAVIER 18 W Kentucky Wichita St 5.5 SAINT LOUIS UTEP 1 UT-Arlington Pepperdine 8 CS-NORTHRIDGE CAL-POLY SLO 1.5 Fresno St Boise St 5.5 PORTLAND SANTA CLARA 10 San Jose St Texas A&M 2.5 ARIZONA ST Charleston 9 CITADEL IUPUI 1 Miami-Ohio UTAH 17.5 Ipfw sl-Byu 4.5 Weber St NORTHWESTERN 20 SIU-Edw’ville TROY 5 Austin Peay TULSA 11.5 Oral Roberts DENVER 4.5 Air Force OHIO ST 16 Vmi INDIANA 13 Morehead St MEMPHIS 23 SE Missouri St Ark-L Rock 5.5 IDAHO ILLINOIS 11 W Carolina BRADLEY 2 N Dakota MINNESOTA 11.5 S Dakota Evansville 3 MURRAY ST s — Springfield, MA. sl- Salt Lake City, UT. NHL Favorite Odds Underdog Capitals -$125/+$105 JETS KINGS -$145/+$125 Penguins BLUES -$200/+$170 Maple Leafs SENATORS -$120/even Islanders Canadiens -$135/+$115 HURRICANES RED WINGS -$125/+$105 Predators FLYERS -$135/+$115 Blue Jackets WILD -$160/+$140 Avalanche CANUCKS -$110/-$110 Bruins SHARKS -$110/-$110 Lightning Grand Salami: Over/under 53.5 goals. MMA • UFC 194, Las Vegas C. McGregor -$140 vs. J. Aldo C. Weidman -$150 vs. L. Rockhold R. Souza -$155 vs. Y. Romero D. Maia -$135 vs. G. Nelson M. Holloway -$500 vs. J. Stephens Home team in CAPS © 2015 Benjamin Eckstein

+$120 +$130 +$135 +$115 +$400

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL American League BOSTON RED SOX — Agreed to terms with LHP David Price on a seven-year contract. Designated INF/ OF Garin Cecchini for assignment. CHICAGO WHITE SOX — Agreed to terms with C Dioner Navarro and RHP Jacob Turner on one-year contracts. SEATTLE MARINERS — Traded RHP Jose Ramirez to Atlanta for a player to be named or cash. Named Scott Brosius coach for Tacoma (PCL), Ethan Katz pitching coach for Bakersfield (Cal), Mitch Canham manager for Clinton (MWL), Moises Hernandez pitching coach for Everett (NWL), and Zac Livingston manager and Yoel Monzon pitching coach for Peoria (Arizona). Named Mike Micucci field coordinator, David Macias coordinatorinternational player programs, Rick Waits pitching coordinator, Carlos Chantres low-level pitching coordinator, Pete Harnisch special assistant-player development and John Hester special assistant-player development/scouting. TAMPA BAY RAYS — Designated OF Joey Butler for assignment. TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Agreed to terms with C Josh Thole on a one-year contract. National League ATLANTA BRAVES — Agreed to terms with INF Gordon Beckham on a one-year contract. CHICAGO CUBS — Claimed LHP Edgar Olmos off waivers from Seattle. LOS ANGELES DODGERS — Assigned RHP Brooks Brown outright to Oklahoma City (PCL). MIAMI MARLINS — Named Barry Bonds hitting coach, Tim Wallach bench coach and Juan Nieves pitching coach. Reassigned hitting coach Frank Menechino to assistant hitting coach. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association HOUSTON ROCKETS — Assigned G/F K.J. McDaniels to Rio Grande Valley (NBADL). LOS ANGELES CLIPPERS — Assigned F Branden Dawson to Grand Rapids (NBADL). MEMPHIS GRIZZLIES — Assigned F James Ennis to Iowa (NBADL). PHILADELPHIA 76ERS — Waived G Phil Pressey. Recalled Gs Tony Wroten and Kendall Marshall from Delaware (NBADL). FOOTBALL National Football League NFL — Fined San Francisco DE Quinton Dial $17,363 and Denver LB Von Miller $8,681 for their actions during last week’s games. ATLANTA FALCONS — Placed WR Leonard Hankerson on injured reserve. Activated WR Devin Hester from injured reserve. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS — Released WR Douglas McNeil from the practice squad. Signed C Drew Nowak to the practice squad. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS — Released CB Leonard Johnson. HOCKEY National Hockey League CAROLINA HURRICANES — Reassigned D Ryan Murphy to Charlotte (AHL). Recalled D Jaccob Slavin and Fs Brock McGinn and Phil Di Giuseppe from Charlotte. DALLAS STARS — Assigned G Maxime Lagace and Fs Gemel Smith and Cole Ully from Texas (AHL) to Idaho (ECHL). LOS ANGELES KINGS — Assigned F Joel Lowry from Ontario (AHL) to Manchester (ECHL). NASHVILLE PREDATORS — Reassigned F Cody Bass to Milwaukee (AHL). NEW JERSEY DEVILS — Reassigned G Scott Wedgewood from Albany

(AHL) to Adirondack (ECHL) and G Ken Appleby from Adirondack to Albany. TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING — Agreed to terms with coach Jon Cooper on a multiyear contract extension. SOCCER Major League Soccer NEW YORK CITY FC — Declined the 2016 contract options on D Kwame Watson-Siriboe, D Jeb Brovsky, MF Ned Grabavoy and MF Pablo Alvarez. COLLEGE EAST CAROLINA — Fired football coach Ruffin McNeill. MEMPHIS — Named Mike Norvell football coach. MIAMI — Named Mark Richt football coach. MONTANA STATE — Named Jeff Choate football coach. VIRGINIA — Named Bronco Mendenhall football coach.

GOLF Hero World Challenge Friday at Albany Golf Club, Nassau, Bahamas Purse: $3.5 million; Yards: 7,267; Par: 72 Second Round Jordan Spieth 67-66 — 133 Bill Haas 67-66 — 133 Jimmy Walker 66-67 — 133 Chris Kirk 69-65 — 134 Patrick Reed 69-65 — 134 Bubba Watson 67-67 — 134 Matt Kuchar 70-66 — 136 Paul Casey 66-70 — 136 Zach Johnson 66-70 — 136 Dustin Johnson 68-69 — 137 Brooks Koepka 67-70 — 137 Adam Scott 67-70 — 137 Rickie Fowler 70-68 — 138 J.B. Holmes 71-68 — 139 Anirban Lahiri 69-70 — 139 Billy Horschel 71-70 — 141 Justin Rose 71-72 — 143 Hideki Matsuyama 75-73 — 148

Nedbank Challenge Friday at Gary Player Country Club, Sun City, South Africa Purse: $6.5 million; Yards: 7,831; Par: 72 Second Round Henrik Stenson, Sweden 66-67 — 133 Jaco van Zyl, South Africa 66-68 — 134 Robert Streb, United States 69-66 — 135 Marc Leishman, Australia 68-68 — 136 Kiradech Aphibarnrat, Thailand 70-68 — 138 Ross Fisher, England 69-71 — 140 Emiliano Grillo, Argentina 72-69 — 141 Scott Piercy, United States 73-68 — 141 Keegan Bradley, United States 72-69 — 141 Chris Wood, England 70-71 — 141 Bernd Wiesberger, Austria 70-71 — 141 Thomas Aiken, South Africa 73-69 — 142 Byeong-Hun An, South Korea 72-70 — 142 Andy Sullivan, England 71-71 — 142 Louis Oosthuizen, South Africa 70-72 — 142 Thongchai Jaidee, Thailand 70-72 — 142 Miguel Angel Jimenez, Spain 70-72 — 142 Branden Grace, South Africa 68-74 — 142 Danny Willett, England 67-75 — 142 Tommy Fleetwood, England 71-72 — 143 Victor Dubuisson, France 71-73 — 144 Shane Lowry, England 74-71 — 145 Charl Schwartzel, South Africa 71-74 — 145 Russell Knox, Scotland 69-76 — 145 Martin Kaymer, Germany 75-71 — 146 Matthew Fitzpatrick, England 69-77 — 146 Webb Simpson, United States 75-72 — 147 Lee Westwood, England 72-81 — 153 Steven Bowditch, Australia 77-78 — 155 Soren Kjeldsen, Denmark 74-81 — 155

Australian PGA Friday at RACV Royal Pines Resort, Gold Coast, Australia Purse: $1.27 million; Yards: 7,364; Par: 72 Second Round David Lingmerth, Sweden 73-68 — 141 Mark Foster, England 69-73 — 142 Zander Lombard, South Africa 67-75 — 142 Peter Uihlein, U.S. 75-67 — 142 Matthew Millar, Australia 72-70 — 142 Pablo Martin Benavides, Spain 75-67 — 142 Dylan Frittelli, South Africa 70-72 — 142 Rhein Gibson, Australia 79-64 — 143 Todd Sinnott, Australia 71-72 — 143 Jason Scrivener, Australia 72-71 — 143 Ashley Hall, Australia 70-73 — 143 Tom Lewis, England 72-71 — 143 Ryan Fox, New Zealand 74-70 — 144 Anthony Brown, Australia 73-71 — 144 Nathan Holman, Australia 77-68 — 145 Aaron Pike, Australia 72-73 — 145 Deyen Lawson, Australia 75-70 — 145 Jordan Zunic, Australia 73-72 — 145 Also Harold Varner III, U.S. 74-73 — 147 Missed cut Ryan Carter, U.S. 80-72 — 152 Brandt Snedeker, U.S. 84-75 — 159

COLLEGES SATURDAY BASKETBALL SCHEDULE W: McKendree at Bellarmine, noon W: Missouri S&T at UMSL, 1 p.m. W: Drury at Maryville, 1 p.m. W: Lincoln at Lindenwood, 1 p.m. W: Webster at Principia, 1 p.m. W: Fontbonne at Iowa Wesleyan, 1 p.m. W: Southwestern Illinois at Kaskaskia, 1 p.m. M: SIUE at Northwestern, 2 p.m. W: Missouri Baptist at LU-Belleville, 2 p.m. M: St. Louis CC at Lincoln Land, 2 p.m. W: William Woods at Harris-Stowe, 2 p.m. M: McKendree at Bellarmine, 2:15 p.m. M: Missouri State at Oklahoma State, 2:30 p.m. M: Missouri S&T at UMSL, 3 p.m. M: Drury at Maryville, 3 p.m. M: Lincoln at Lindenwood, 3 p.m. M: Webster at Principia, 3 p.m. M: Fontbonne at Iowa Wesleyan, 3 p.m. M: Southwestern Illinois at Kaskaskia, 3 p.m. W: Jefferson vs. Missouri Baptist JV, in Poplar Bluff, 3 p.m. M: Missouri Baptist at LU-Belleville, 4 p.m. M: William Woods at Harris-Stowe, 4 p.m. M: SIUC at North Texas, 5 p.m. M: Washington at Illinois Wesleyan, 7 p.m. W: Washington vs. Simpson, 7 p.m. SUNDAY BASKETBALL SCHEDULE M: SWIC vs. Three Rivers, at St. Louis CC, 2 p.m. M: Danville Area at St. Louis CC, 4 p.m. M: Lewis & Clark vs. Mineral Area, at St. Louis CC, 6 p.m.

Friday’s national college basketball scores East Canisius 96, Monmouth (NJ) 86 Fairfield 74, Rider 70 Iona 101, Marist 66 Niagara 76, Quinnipiac 72 Pittsburgh 96, Duquesne 75 Saint Joseph’s 80, Columbia 78 Siena 89, Manhattan 54 South Akron 75, Marshall 65 Alabama 58, Southern Miss. 55 East Carolina 82, SC-Upstate 71 Elon 77, FIU 71 Kansas St. 68, Georgia 66 Louisiana Tech 95, Jackson St. 88, 2OT Maryland 96, St. Francis (Pa.) 55 Old Dominion 82, Delaware St. 38 Southern U. 73, SE Louisiana 69 Wake Forest 88, Arkansas 85 Midwest American U. 60, Youngstown St. 56 Georgia St. 59, Wright St. 46 Missouri 78, N. Illinois 71 Southwest N. Dakota St. 74, Arkansas St. 73 Texas 59, Samford 49 Far West Cal St.-Fullerton 70, Seattle 61 Montana 82, San Francisco 50 Saint Mary’s (Cal) 81, UC Davis 67 UC Irvine 70, Pacific 67

NFL LATE THURSDAY

Packers 27, Lions 23 Green Bay 0 0 14 13 — 27 Detroit 17 0 3 3 — 23 First Quarter Det: FG Prater 51, 8:48. Det: Ebron 3 pass from Stafford (Prater kick), 1:50. Det: C.Johnson 17 pass from Stafford (Prater kick), 1:02. Third Quarter Det: FG Prater 34, 8:54. GB: Cobb fumble recovery in end zone (Crosby kick), 5:44. GB: Adams 8 pass from A.Rodgers (Crosby kick), 4:06. Fourth Quarter Det: FG Prater 42, 7:06. GB: A.Rodgers 17 run (Crosby kick), 3:04. GB: R.Rodgers 61 pass from A.Rodgers (run failed), :00. A: 63,207. GB Det First downs 19 17 Total Net Yards 313 306 Rushes-yards 24-67 25-101 Passing 246 205 Punt Returns 0-0 1-0 Kickoff Returns 3-61 2-51 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 1-24 Comp-Att-Int 24-36-1 23-35-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 3-27 3-15 Punts 6-47.7 6-45.7 Fumbles-Lost 3-0 1-1 Penalties-Yards 7-55 9-108 Time of Possession 26:56 33:04 Rushing: Green Bay, A.Rodgers 4-27, Crockett 5-22, Starks 9-15, Lacy 5-4, Cobb 1-(minus 1). Detroit, Abdullah 13-67, Stafford 2-22, Bell 8-5, Riddick 1-4, Tate 1-3. Passing: Green Bay, A.Rodgers 24-361-273. Detroit, Stafford 23-35-0-220. Receiving: Green Bay, R.Rodgers 8-146, Starks 5-45, Cobb 4-29, Adams 4-21, J.Jones 1-19, Abbrederis 1-16, Lacy 1-(minus 3). Detroit, Tate 8-63, Riddick 5-27, C.Johnson 3-44, T.Jones 2-37, Bell 2-25, Ebron 2-9, Fuller 1-15. Missed Field Goals: Green Bay, Crosby 41 (WL).

NFL superlatives WEEK 13 POINTS Most 52, New Orleans vs. N.Y. Giants 11/1 51, New England vs. Jacksonville 9/27 49, N.Y. Giants at New Orleans 11/1 48, Arizona at Chicago 9/20 48, Atlanta vs. Houston 10/4 Fewest 0, Chicago at Seattle 9/27 3, Minnesota at San Francisco 9/14 3, San Francisco vs. Green Bay 10/4 3, San Francisco vs. Seattle 10/22 3, San Diego vs. Kansas City 11/22 TOTAL YARDS Most 608, New Orleans vs. N.Y. Giants 11/1 597, Pittsburgh vs. Oakland 11/8 548, San Diego at Green Bay 10/18 546, Detroit vs. Chicago 10/18 (OT) 538, Pittsburgh at Seattle 11/29 Fewest 140, Green Bay at Denver 11/1 142, San Francisco vs. Seattle 10/22 146, Chicago at Seattle 9/27 156, San Francisco at Arizona 9/27 173, Baltimore at Denver 9/13 RUSHING YARDS Most 283, Tampa Bay at Philadelphia 11/22 266, Buffalo vs. Miami 11/8 263, Minnesota at Oakland 11/15 255, Seattle vs. San Francisco 11/22 248, Miami vs. Houston 10/25 Fewest 7, Philadelphia vs. Dallas 9/20 12, Miami at N.Y. Jets 11/29 14, Washington at Carolina 11/22 15, Miami at New England 10/29 15, Cleveland at Pittsburgh 11/15 NET PASSING YARDS Most 505, New Orleans vs. N.Y. Giants 11/1 488, San Diego at Green Bay 10/18 480, Pittsburgh at Seattle 11/29 451, New England at Buffalo 9/20 441, N.Y. Giants vs. San Francisco 10/11 Fewest 48, Chicago at Seattle 9/27 50, Green Bay at Denver 11/1 53, San Francisco at Arizona 9/27 81, San Francisco vs. Seattle 10/22 82, Buffalo at Tennessee 10/11 TIMES SACKED BY OPPONENT Most 8, Buffalo vs. New England 9/20 PASSES HAD INTERCEPTED Most 5, Denver vs. Kansas City 11/15 FUMBLES LOST Most 4, Cleveland at N.Y. Jets 9/13 4, Cleveland at Rams 10/25 4, Washington at Carolina 11/22 4, Rams at Baltimore 11/22 TURNOVERS TIMES LOSING BALL ON FUMBLES LOST OR INTERCEPTIONS Most 6, Detroit vs. Arizona 10/11 (2 fumbles; 4 interceptions) FIRST DOWNS Most 35, New England vs. Jacksonville 9/27 35, New Orleans vs. N.Y. Giants 11/1 Fewest 7, Chicago at Seattle 9/27 FIRST DOWNS RUSHING Most 14, San Francisco vs. Minnesota 9/14 14, Dallas at N.Y. Giants 10/25 14, Seattle vs. San Francisco 11/22 Fewest 0, Miami at Jacksonville 9/20 0, Miami at N.Y. Jets 11/29 FIRST DOWNS PASSING Most 26, San Diego at Green Bay 10/18 Fewest 2, Chicago at Seattle 9/27 FIRST DOWNS BY PENALTY Most 7, N.Y. Giants at Buffalo 10/4 7, Washington vs. Tampa Bay 10/25 7, N.Y. Giants at New Orleans 11/1 7, Miami at Buffalo 11/8 7, Indianapolis vs. Denver 11/8 7, New Orleans vs. Tennessee 11/8 (OT) 7, Arizona at San Francisco 11/29 TIME OF POSSESSION Most 41:08, Washington vs. Philadelphia 10/4

BOXING Fight Schedule Saturday At Hamburg, Germany, Jack Culcay vs. Dennis Hogan, 12, for the interim WBA World super welterweight title. At Barclays Center, Brooklyn, N.Y. (SHO), Daniel Jacobs vs. Peter Quillin, 12, for Jacobs’ WBA World middleweight title; Jesus Cuellar vs. Jonathan Oquendo, 12, for Cuellar’s WBA World featherweight title; Chris Algieri vs. Erick Bone, 10, welterweights; Will Rosinsky vs. Joe Smith Jr., 10, light heavyweights. Monday At Hua Hin, Thailand, Amnat Ruenroeng vs. Myung Ho Hee, 12, for Ruenroeng’s IBF World Flyweight title. Thursday At Chiang Mai, Thailand, Stamp Kiatniwat vs. Gregorio Lebron, 12, for the interim WBA World flyweight title. Dec. 11 At San Juan, Puerto Rico (truTV), Nonito Donaire vs. Cesar Juarez, 12, junior featherweights. At Bayou City Event Center, Houston (SHO), Regis Prograis vs. Abel Ramos, 10, super lightweights. Dec. 12 At O2 Arena, London, Kevin Mitchell vs. Ismael Barroso, 12, for the interim WBA World lightweight title. At AT&T Center, San Antonio (NBC), Omar Figueroa Jr. vs. Antonio DeMarco, 12, super lightweights; Dominic Breazeale vs. Charles Martin, 10, heavyweights; Chris Arreola vs. Travis Kauffman, 10, heavyweights.

MU BASKETBALL STATISTICS Player Puryear Wright Phillips Clark Walton Isabell VanLeer Rosburg Woods Gant Allen Barton Total Opponents

GP GS Min/G FG% 3PT% FT% Reb/G Ast/G Stl. Blk Pts/G 6 6 28.0 .526 .125 .739 4.8 0.5 2 1 13.0 6 5 26.5 .381 .333 .818 4.7 1.0 3 3 9.7 6 6 24.3 .514 .412 .889 3.8 3.0 7 1 8.8 6 6 28.8 .264 .316 .875 2.8 3.5 6 0 8.0 6 1 15.0 .323 .000 .750 2.0 1.3 2 1 6.3 6 0 11.8 .538 .600 1.000 1.7 1.0 4 0 6.0 6 0 15.2 .433 .417 .000 1.5 0.7 3 0 6.0 6 2 17.2 .500 .000 .385 3.2 0.2 1 2 4.2 6 0 13.0 .714 .000 .222 2.2 0.2 0 2 3.7 6 4 10.7 .294 .000 .714 1.7 0.3 1 6 2.5 5 0 11.0 .400 .000 .250 2.4 0.2 3 1 1.0 2 0 1.0 .000 .000 .000 0.0 0.0 0 0 0.0 6 .431 .327 .699 33.5 11.8 32 17 69.0 6 200.0 .400 .363 .706 36.0 12.2 36 16 69.7

SLU BASKETBALL STATISTICS Player Yacoubou Crawford Reynolds Yarbrough Agbeko Roby Gillmann Bartley Bishop Jolly Neufeld Eagleton Hines TEAM Total Opponents

GP GS Min/G FG% 3PT% FT% Reb/G Ast/G Stl Blk Pts/G 6 6 31.2 .477 .250 .500 6.3 2.0 5 2 13.0 6 6 28.3 .523 .429 .880 3.0 1.3 3 0 12.8 6 6 26.5 .541 .500 .735 1.5 3.0 10 1 11.2 6 0 22.7 .438 .333 .583 6.5 1.8 2 0 9.7 6 6 18.5 .480 .000 .588 5.2 0.3 2 2 5.7 6 0 18.2 .313 .286 .667 2.0 2.2 1 0 3.7 6 6 20.5 .444 .333 .667 2.2 1.0 2 5 3.7 6 0 12.5 .375 .273 1.000 0.5 1.3 1 1 3.2 4 0 5.3 .286 .400 1.000 0.3 0.5 1 0 2.0 5 0 6.6 .600 .000 .500 1.0 0.2 0 2 1.8 6 0 12.3 .357 .000 .000 0.8 0.2 2 2 1.7 1 0 1.0 .000 .000 .000 0.0 0.0 0 0 0.0 2 0 0.5 .000 .000 .000 0.0 0.0 0 0 0.0 6 0 0.0 .000 .000 .000 3.2 0.0 0 0 0.0 6 .461 .325 .665 32.2 13.7 29 15 67.3 6 .404 .307 .712 34.0 12.0 34 23 63.7


STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

12.05.2015 • Saturday • M 1

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • B9

BOYS BASKETBALL

FRIDAY’S RESULTS

Alton’s second-half surge dooms East St. Louis

BOYS BASKETBALL Maplewood-RH 15 20 15 16 U. City 14 23 24 22 U: Bledsoe 22, Moore 16, R. Gentry 14, Crockett 11. FG 33 (6), FT 11-15.

66 83

Seckman 22 16 14 20 72 De Soto 12 9 16 22 59 S: Hurley 17, Kramer 15, Barger 10. FG 28 (1), FT 15-29.

BY ADAM ZUVANICH StLhighschoolsports.com

Brussels 8 13 9 14 Valmeyer 4 11 6 9 V (1-6): V. Larsen 15. FG 9 (5), FT 7-15.

44 30

EAST ST. LOUIS • Ev-

Conluence 10 25 2 Metro 8 5 13 M: Phillips 17. FG 12 (2), FT 10-19.

21 11

58 37

JohnBurroughs 8 18 19 11 Mehlville 7 13 5 17 J: Smith 15, Mill 12. FG 20 (1), FT 15-20.

56 42

erything was going East St. Louis’ way halfway through Friday’s Southwe s te r n C o n fe re n c e opener against Alton. The Flyers held a 10-point lead and had a senior guard who could hardly miss, and they also had the support of a large crowd in their home gym. The only problem was that the Redbirds weren’t discouraged or defeated. They were just getting warmed up. Alton altered its defense and held Kenny Roberson, who drained five 3-point goals in the second quarter for East St. Louis, to one field goal in the second half. The Redbirds’ outside shooters heated up down the stretch, and they rallied back, started to pull away and then held on for a 6562 win. “We really wanted this game. We want to win the conference,” Alton senior Marcus Latham said. “We just hit a couple shots and turned it up on defense.” Alton (3-1), which finished second to East St. Louis (1-3) in last year’s conference race, snapped a three-game losing streak against the Flyers. East St. Louis lost its third game in a row and dropped a conference game for the first time in two seasons. The Flyers led throughout most of the first three quarters, building a 14-point lead late in the second quarter. The senior Roberson led the charge, hitting a career-high five treys in the second quarter and scoring 19 points in the opening half. But he managed only two points in the final two periods as the Redbirds played man-to-man defense against Roberson and

Whitield 15 10 13 15 53 St. Mary’s 15 10 14 2 41 W: Rucker 12, Berry 11, Watson 11. FG 19 (3), FT 12-17. S: Rasas 9. FG 15 (1), FT 10-22. Herculaneum 8 16 8 18 57 Jeferson 17 20 2 11 67 J: Reed 24, Hammock 18, Null 16. FG 20 (7), FT 20-24. Fox 12 9 7 14 Summit 3 8 16 16 S: Jennings 15. FG 13 (7), FT 10-16.

42 43

Principia 11 12 11 10 44 Brentwood 10 14 14 16 54 P: P. Sellers 11, C. Sellers 10. FG 17 (4), FT 6-9. B: Jones 18, Butters Jones 17. FG 19 (2), FT 14-16. Vianney 18 19 10 19 66 Bellvl. West 14 14 17 8 53 V: Krus 18, Thomas 15, Gordon 13. FG 23 (4), FT 16-22. B: Liddell 22, Behrmann 10. FG 22 (2), FT 7-17.

PAUL KOPSKY • StLhighschoolsports.com

Kenny Roberson (left) of East St. Louis drives baseline for a shot as Maurice Edwards of Alton defends during a game on Friday at East St. Louis High School.

a zone against the rest of the Flyers, who lost their 10-point halftime lead by the end of the third quarter and trailed by as many as 10 in the fourth. “In the second half we just stopped playing,” Roberson said. “We just gave up.” East St. Louis senior Antonio Johnson, who added 14 points to Roberson’s game-high 21, tried to lead a late comeback with two 3-pointers in the final 90 seconds. But Alton already had made enough shots of its own by that point. Junior Maurice Edwards scored a team-high 19 points for the Redbirds, throwing down two breakaway dunks in the first half and tying the game with a 3 at the end of the third quarter. Sophomore guard Kevin Caldwell kick started the third-period surge with two 3-pointers of his own,

finishing with 16 points, and Latham sank two long 3s in the fourth quarter en route to 14 points. Alton took its first lead since early in the second quarter on a layup by Tre Smith on the opening possession of the fourth, and he converted a three-point play on the next trip down the floor. That started a 12-2 run by the Redbirds, who made their first six field-goal attempts in the final period to take East St. Louis’ crowd out of the game and send many of its fans to the exits well before the final buzzer. “This environment,” Edwards said of what sparked the second-half comeback. “This is my favorite place to play besides my home gym.” Edwards and the rest of the Redbirds made themselves at home on the Flyers’ floor, and now the conference race might go through Alton.

Granite City 20 6 6 17 O’Fallon 9 2 8 11 G (4-1): Berry 18, R. Allen 11. FG 14 (5), FT 15-19. O (1-4): Fulton 10. FG 10 (1), FT 9-17.

49 30

Bismarck 15 18 24 Grandview 21 20 17 G: Klaus 33. FG 28 (3), FT 10-12.

76 71

19 13

Priory 11 14 17 15 57 Trinity 14 9 9 14 46 P: Kurz 17, Rund 12. FG 20 (1), FT 16-27. T: Matthews 17. FG 19 (3), FT 5-10.

RICHARD ULREICH • Special for StLhighschoolsports.com

Hazelwood Central Shaun Williams (22) is defended by Vashon Korray Gilbert (1) during the championship game of the Vianney Invitational Tournament on Friday. Alton 6 16 21 22 65 E. St. Louis 8 24 11 19 62 E: Roberson 21, A. Johnson 14. FG 25 (11), FT 1-9.

Jennings 11 15 6 15 47 Luth. South 11 25 17 20 73 L: Member-Meneh 22, Lawson 15, Anderson 10. FG 25 (2), FT 21-41.

Collinsville 7 2 12 16 37 Edwardsville 17 8 20 16 61 C: Webb 10. FG 15 (5), FT 2-6. E (3-2): Epenesa 14, Smith 14, Stephen 14, Green 12. FG 21 (8), FT 11-15.

Lafayette 11 4 18 15 48 Paciic 9 13 12 16 50 P: Flemming 27, Rogers 10. FG 19 (2), FT 10-23.

Gillespie 5 9 8 4 26 Mater Dei 26 16 29 19 90 G (3-2): N. Price 14. FG 9 (4), FT 4-4. M: Pollman 16, Kampwerth 13, G. Boeckmann 11. FG 34 (10), FT 12-25.

Pky. North 21 21 8 12 62 Pky. West 4 6 8 2 20 PN (5-0): Johnson 16, May 13, Sutton 12. FG 28 (3), FT 3-11. PW: Loaney 8, Poppen 8. FG 6 (2), FT 6-13.

Althof 23 20 11 20 74 Carbondale 14 12 19 13 58 A (4-1): Ferguson 19, J. Goodwin 19, Young 10. FG 28 (9), FT 9-11.

Oakville 16 7 11 11 45 Seckman 6 10 10 9 35 O: Ball 11, Costello 11, Walters 10. FG 16 (1), FT 12-36. S: Jeske 19. FG 11 (2), FT 11-24.

Madison 7 6 18 15 46 Gibault 15 16 17 17 65 G (5-1): J. Rueter 24, Deterding 17, Davis 13. FG 22 (7), FT 14-20.

Union 3 12 6 11 Washington 11 14 14 18 W: Brinker 17, Carpenter 16. FG 21 (12), FT 3-8.

GIRLS BASKETBALL

Staunton 2 4 4 8 18 Litchield 25 14 14 15 68 S: Welch 4. FG 7 (1), FT 3-5. L: Thomack 14, Frerichs 13, Brockmeyer 12, Furlong 10. FG 33 (0), FT 2-8.

32 57

McCluer 16 17 20 23 76 MICDS 14 20 16 25 75 MI: Spence 29, Mitchell 21, Buchanan 15. FG 28 (5), FT 14-24.

Orchard Farm 2 8 5 3 18 Granite City 14 12 11 10 47 O: Dahl 4, N. Heitmann 4, Johnston 4. FG 6 (0), FT 6-22. G: Moore 17, Garrett 10. FG 17 (1), FT 12-24.

Jennings 15 13 21 20 69 Luth. South 4 19 26 15 64 J: Welch 16, Rice 12. FG 24 (3), FT 18-32. L: Meneh 20, C. Fournie 10. FG 24 (4), FT 12-25.

Mehlville 8 8 9 12 Windsor 9 6 12 15 W: H. Holloway 15. FG 13 (3), FT 13-24.

37 42

Nerinx Hall 20 10 22 Rosati-Kain 5 6 8 N: McArthur 19. FG 27 (0), FT 6-8. R: Theobald 12. FG 9 (3), FT 2-8.

60 23

Ritenour 8 8 4 Pattonville 8 16 23 R: Frost 13. FG 10 (1), FT 4-17. P: M. Brown 11. FG 5 (0), FT 8-18.

5 11

25 58

FZ West 13 12 13 14 52 Marquette 13 14 15 18 60 M: Lomantini 16, Drumm 14, Winkler 14. FG 20 (0), FT 20-32.

Valley Park 8 7 2 Kennedy 14 12 5 V: Schmidt 11. FG 9 (2), FT 7-18.

10 7

27 38

Trinity 7 10 Lift For Life 6 10 T: Fite 19. FG 17 (2), FT 6-25.

13 7

42 36

Pky. North 6 10 9 13 38 Pky. West 15 15 17 21 68 PN: Goodwin 9, Thompson 9. FG 14 (1), FT 9-16. PW: Yess 19, Lathrop 13, Socha 10. FG 27 (3), FT 11-15. Pky. South 7 3 6 18 34 Pky. Central 5 4 13 17 39 PS: Mullen 8. FG 15 (2), FT 2-6. PC: Green 17, Campbell 12. FG 14 (1), FT 10-26. Westminster 10 11 23 14 58 Haz. East 17 15 14 27 73 H: McKelvin 19, Shepherd 19, Manley 11, McBride 10. FG 27 (4), FT 15-21. Kennedy 7 12 13 10 42 Valley Park 10 11 19 9 49 V: Courtney 13, Shaw 13. FG 17 (4), FT 11-21. West County 13 19 12 14 Hillsboro 15 22 22 17 H: Schwartz 30, Pinkley 14, Besand 12, Brewer 12. FG 25 (11), FT 15-20.

58 76

8 4

Grandview 17 30 6 2 55 Maplewood-RH 3 3 6 6 18 G: Sparks 10, Thomlison 10. FG 22 (4), FT 7-17. Elsberry 3 4 2 12 21 Winield 10 12 6 13 41 W: P. Ward 17, Hoelting 12, O. Ward 11. FG 12 (4), FT 13-19. Brentwood 3 4 3 7 17 FZ North 14 11 9 14 48 F: Nesslage 13, Pudlowski 12. FG 19 (6), FT 4-10.

Metro 22 25 13 8 68 Vashon 5 2 0 1 8 M (2-4): Flowers 28, Burt 16. FG 32 (2), FT 2-6.

12 13

Visitation 10 5 3 19 37 St.Chas. West 4 8 7 11 30 V: Long 16, Torrey 12. FG 12 (2), FT 11-29. S: Poindexter 13. FG 10 (3), FT 7-8. Barat 6 2 4 0 Principia 15 20 17 8 P (3-2): Bania 29, Hinds 14. FG 20 (11), FT 9-12.

12 60

Pky. South 6 14 5 12 37 Pky. Central 12 14 22 16 64 PS: Steins 20. FG 14 (1), FT 8-14. PC: G. Stephens 29, Horn 12, O. Stephens 11. FG 21 (3), FT 19-24.

GIRLS BASKETBALL • WEBSTER GROVES 52, HOWELL 43

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MICHAEL GULLEDGE • Special to StLhighschoolsports.com

Francis Howell forward Rachel Fick (14) looks to move the ball under pressure from Webster Groves guard Jaidah Stewart (21) during the Marquette Basketball Tournament at Marquette High School in Chesterield, Mo.

SATURDAY’S SCHEDULE BOYS BASKETBALL -KASKASKIAN CLASSIC at Carlyle Seventh place: 3 p.m. Fifth place: 4:30 p.m. Third place: 6 p.m. Championship: 7:30 p.m. -LEBANON/WESCLIN TOURNAMENT Wesclin vs Lebanon, Illinois, 6:30 p.m. Nashville vs Columbia at Lebanon, Ill., 8 p.m. -TRICO PIONEER INVITATIONAL Shawnee vs Sparta, 4:30 p.m. Steeleville vs Red Bud, 6 p.m. Chester vs Trico, 7:30 p.m. -LUTHERAN SOUTH ROUND ROBIN Liberty (Wentzville) vs Jennings, 12:30 p.m. Lutheran South vs Cape Girardeau Central, 3:30 p.m. -DE SOTO FOUNTAIN CITY CLASSIC Consolation championship Summit vs TBA, 11:30 a.m. Third place 2:30 p.m. Championship 5:30 p.m. -WINFIELD CLASSIC Seventh place Winield vs North County Christian, 2 p.m. Consolation inal FZ East vs Warrenton, 3:30 p.m. Third place Blue Knights vs O’Fallon Christian, 5 p.m. Championship St. Dominic vs Timberland, 6:30 p.m.

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-MONTGOMERY COUNTY INVITATIONAL Third place Clopton vs Montgomery County, 4:30 p.m. Championship Fulton vs Bowling Green, 7:30 p.m. -CHICAGO ELITE CLASSIC at UIC Pavilion Larkin vs Marian Catholic, 1 p.m. Riverside Brookield vs Gonzaga, 2:30 p.m. East St. Louis vs Evanston, 5:30 p.m. Chaminade vs Miller Grove, 7 p.m. DeMatha vs St. Vincent-St. Mary (Ohio), 4 p.m. Chicago Simeon vs Whitney Young, 8:30 p.m. -NORM STEWART CLASSIC at Columbia College South Callaway vs Salisbury, 11 a.m. Harrisburg, Missouri vs California , 2 p.m. CBC vs Tolton, 5 p.m. O’Hara vs Hickman, 8 p.m.

Moberly vs Fatima, 12:30 p.m. Sunday. Liberty North vs Rock Bridge, 5 p.m. Sunday. Mexico vs Battle, 8 p.m. Sunday. OTHER AREA GAMES: Meridian vs. ME Luth., at Edwardsville, 2 p.m. Soldan vs. Carnahan, at Vashon, 2 p.m. Sullivan, ILL at Jerseyville, 4:30 p.m. Belleville East at Marion, 6 p.m. Centralia, Illinoi at O’Fallon, 6:15 p.m. Mater Dei at Althof, 7:30 p.m.

GIRLS BASKETBALL -NORTHWEST-CEDAR HILL TOURNAMENT Consolation inal Villa Duchesne vs Ladue, 9 a.m. Saturday. Third place Festus vs Ursuline, 11:30 a.m. Saturday. Championship Northwest Cedar Hill vs Hazelwood Central, 1:30 p.m. Saturday. -LUTHERAN SOUTH ROUND ROBIN Lindbergh vs Jennings, 11 a.m. Saturday. Lutheran South vs Gateway Science Academy, 2 p.m. Saturday. -MONTGOMERY COUNTY INVITATIONAL Third place Clopton vs New Haven, 3 p.m. Saturday. Championship Hermann vs Fulton, 6 p.m. Saturday. -28TH TROY INVITATIONAL Seventh place Westminster vs Troy Buchanan, 10 a.m. Saturday. Consolation inal Fort Zumwalt South vs St. Dominic, 11:30 a.m. Saturday. Third place Eureka vs St. Charles, 1 p.m. Saturday. Championship Hickman vs Holt, 2:30 p.m. Saturday. OTHER AREA GAMES: Althof at Carbondale, 12:30 p.m. Gillespie at Bunker Hill, 1 p.m. ME Lutheran at Brussels, 1 p.m. Piasa Southwestern at Vandalia, 1 p.m. Borgia at Cor Jesu, 4:30 p.m. Soldan vs. Carnahan, at Vashon, 6 p.m. Gibault at Marissa, 6:15 p.m. Osage vs. St. James, at Eugene, 7 p.m.

WRESTLING Afton Invitational Starting time: 9:15 a.m. Teams: Chaminade, Cleveland, Gateway STEM, Herculaneum, MS-Berkeley, Miller

Career, Normandy, Parkway Central, Parkway North, Windsor. 37th Civic Memorial Tournament Starting time: 9 a.m. Teams: Benton, Carlyle, Centralia, Civic Memorial, East St. Louis, Herrin, Highland, Jacksonville, Jerseville, MaplewoodRichmond Heights, Mater Dei, Mattoon, Vandalia, Waterloo, Wood River. John Burroughs Round Robin Starting time: 9 a.m. Teams: Brentwood, Clayton, John Burroughs, Ladue, Lutheran St. Charles, Priory, Sullivan, Sumner Ron Sauer Duals at Fox Starting times: 9 a.m. Pool A: Belleville East, Holt, Quincy, Nortwest-Cedar Hill. Pool B: Eureka, Fort Zumwalt West, Lockport, Whitield. Pool C: Edwardsville, Fox, Francis Howell Central, Rolla. Pool D: Helias, Oak Forest-River Park, Seckman, Staley. Westminster Tournament Starting times: 9 a.m. Format: Three rounds of pools, followed by 8-man bracket Teams: De Smet, Marquette, MICDS, Moberly, Paciic, Ste. Genevieve, St. Charles West, Summit, Timberland, Washington, Westminster. Parkway South Patriot Classic Starting times: 9 a.m. Teams: Francis Howell, Francis Howell North, Hickman, Jackson, Kirkwood, Lafayette, Lindbergh, McCluer North, Parkway South, Rock Bridge, SLUH, Vianney.

HOCKEY Westminster vs. Oakville, at Afton Rink, 6:30 p.m. St. Mary’s vs. Duchesne, at Rec Plex Sout, 6:45 p.m. Northwest-CH vs. Ladue, at Brentwood Ice, 7:45 p.m. Clayton vs. MICDS, at Afton Rink, 8:15 p.m. St. Louis U. High vs. Fort Zumwalt West, at Rec Plex Sout, 8:30 p.m. Eureka vs. Seckman, at Webster Rink, 8:45 p.m. Lutheran South vs. Whitield, at FSI Shark Tan, 9:10 p.m. Kirkwood vs. Vianney, at Kirkwood Rink, 9:15 p.m. Parkway West vs. John Burroughs, at Brentwood Ice, 9:30 p.m. Summit vs. Chaminade, at Queeny Park, 9:30 p.m.


STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

12.05.2015 • Saturday • M 2

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • B9

BOYS BASKETBALL

FRIDAY’S RESULTS

Alton’s second-half surge dooms East St. Louis

BOYS BASKETBALL 66 83

Seckman 22 16 14 20 72 De Soto 12 9 16 22 59 S: Hurley 17, Kramer 15, Barger 10. FG 28 (1), FT 15-29. Holt 11 28 19 12 70 Hannibal 12 15 15 23 65 Ho: T. Jones 30. FG 21 (6), FT 22-32. Ha: E. Jones 18, Deal 15, D. Jones 13. FG 21 (6), FT 17-29.

BY ADAM ZUVANICH StLhighschoolsports.com

EAST ST. LOUIS • Ev-

erything was going East St. Louis’ way halfway through Friday’s Southwe s te r n C o n fe re n c e opener against Alton. The Flyers held a 10-point lead and had a senior guard who could hardly miss, and they also had the support of a large crowd in their home gym. The only problem was that the Redbirds weren’t discouraged or defeated. They were just getting warmed up. Alton altered its defense and held Kenny Roberson, who drained five 3-point goals in the second quarter for East St. Louis, to one field goal in the second half. The Redbirds’ outside shooters heated up down the stretch, and they rallied back, started to pull away and then held on for a 6562 win. “We really wanted this game. We want to win the conference,” Alton senior Marcus Latham said. “We just hit a couple shots and turned it up on defense.” Alton (3-1), which finished second to East St. Louis (1-3) in last year’s conference race, snapped a three-game losing streak against the Flyers. East St. Louis lost its third game in a row and dropped a conference game for the first time in two seasons. The Flyers led throughout most of the first three quarters, building a 14-point lead late in the second quarter. The senior Roberson led the charge, hitting a career-high five treys in the second quarter and scoring 19 points in the opening half. But he managed only two points in the final two periods as the Redbirds played man-to-man defense against Roberson and

Maplewood-RH 15 20 15 16 U. City 14 23 24 22 U: Bledsoe 22, Moore 16, R. Gentry 14, Crockett 11. FG 33 (6), FT 11-15.

Brussels 8 13 9 14 Valmeyer 4 11 6 9 V (1-6): V. Larsen 15. FG 9 (5), FT 7-15.

44 30

Conluence 10 25 2 Metro 8 5 13 M: Phillips 17. FG 12 (2), FT 10-19.

21 11

58 37

Kennedy 7 12 13 10 42 Valley Park 10 11 19 9 49 V: Courtney 13, Shaw 13. FG 17 (4), FT 11-21.

JohnBurroughs 8 18 19 11 Mehlville 7 13 5 17 J: Smith 15, Mill 12. FG 20 (1), FT 15-20.

56 42

finishing with 16 points, and Latham sank two long 3s in the fourth quarter en route to 14 points. Alton took its first lead since early in the second quarter on a layup by Tre Smith on the opening possession of the fourth, and he converted a three-point play on the next trip down the floor. That started a 12-2 run by the Redbirds, who made their first six field-goal attempts in the final period to take East St. Louis’ crowd out of the game and send many of its fans to the exits well before the final buzzer. “This environment,” Edwards said of what sparked the second-half comeback. “This is my favorite place to play besides my home gym.” Edwards and the rest of the Redbirds made themselves at home on the Flyers’ floor, and now the conference race might go through Alton.

Herculaneum 8 16 8 18 57 Jeferson 17 20 2 11 67 J: Reed 24, Hammock 18, Null 16. FG 20 (7), FT 20-24.

Collinsville 7 2 12 16 37 Edwardsville 17 8 20 16 61 C: Webb 10. FG 15 (5), FT 2-6. E (3-2): Epenesa 14, Smith 14, Stephen 14, Green 12. FG 21 (8), FT 11-15.

42 43

Vianney 18 19 10 19 66 Bellvl. West 14 14 17 8 53 V: Krus 18, Thomas 15, Gordon 13. FG 23 (4), FT 16-22. B: Liddell 22, Behrmann 10. FG 22 (2), FT 7-17. Lutheran SC 15 14 19 17 65 University Ci 8 12 13 5 38 L: Meyer 16, Legrand 10. FG 28 (4), FT 5-10. Granite City 20 6 6 17 49 O’Fallon 9 2 8 11 30 G (4-1): Berry 18, R. Allen 11. FG 14 (5), FT 15-19. O (1-4): Fulton 10. FG 10 (1), FT 9-17. North Clay 9 14 4 6 33 Carlyle 27 23 19 9 78 N: Walker 7. FG 8 (4), FT 13-18. C: Taylor 16, Toennies 14, Nettles 12. FG 33 (8), FT 4-9. Staunton 3 10 7 12 32 Litchield 22 23 25 13 83 S (1-4): Scroggins 8. FG 10 (2), FT 10-16. L (3-2): Scharf 22, Franke 16, Meyer 10, Simmons 10. FG 31 (6), FT 15-21. Bismarck 15 18 24 Grandview 21 20 17 G: Klaus 33. FG 28 (3), FT 10-12.

19 13

76 71

Teutopolis 6 11 14 11 42 Breese C. 10 9 9 10 38 T: M. Hardiek 13, B. Mette 10. FG 14 (6), FT 8-13. B: Schneider 16. FG 15 (5), FT 3-7. Priory 11 14 17 15 57 Trinity 14 9 9 14 46 P: Kurz 17, Rund 12. FG 20 (1), FT 16-27. T: Matthews 17. FG 19 (3), FT 5-10. McCluer 16 17 20 23 76 MICDS 14 20 16 25 75 MI: Spence 29, Mitchell 21, Buchanan 15. FG 28 (5), FT 14-24. Jennings 15 13 21 20 69 Luth. South 4 19 26 15 64 J: Welch 16, Rice 12. FG 24 (3), FT 18-32. L: Meneh 20, C. Fournie 10. FG 24 (4), FT 12-25.

-KASKASKIAN CLASSIC at Carlyle Seventh place: 3 p.m. Fifth place: 4:30 p.m. Third place: 6 p.m. Championship: 7:30 p.m.

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Gillespie 5 9 8 4 26 Mater Dei 26 16 29 19 90 G (3-2): N. Price 14. FG 9 (4), FT 4-4. M: Pollman 16, Kampwerth 13, G. Boeckmann 11. FG 34 (10), FT 12-25. Waterloo 6 11 6 15 38 Jerseyville 10 13 9 9 41 W (0-5): Huels 10, Lenhardt 10. FG 12 (0), FT 4-7. J (2-3): Z. Ridenhour 13, Kanallakan 11. FG 15 (3), FT 8-13. Althof 23 20 11 20 74 Carbondale 14 12 19 13 58 A (4-1): Ferguson 19, J. Goodwin 19, Young 10. FG 28 (9), FT 9-11. Madison 7 6 18 15 46 Gibault 15 16 17 17 65 G (5-1): J. Rueter 24, Deterding 17, Davis 13. FG 22 (7), FT 14-20. Windsor 12 13 17 12 54 Afton 16 19 11 9 55 A: Ford 19, Gordon 14, Williams 12. FG 22 (6), FT 5-12. SLUH 20 15 18 11 64 Pattonville 7 10 15 10 42 S: Nester 16, McKissic 13, D. Jackson 10. FG 22 (4), FT 16-26. P: Williams 11. FG 14 (2), FT 12-19. FZ South 11 18 7 16 52 Howell 17 9 22 20 68 F: Thomas 18, Bellinger 16. FG 19 (3), FT 11-22. H: Reader 20, Bush 13, Elifritz 13, Ambrose 11. FG 27 (2), FT 12-20.

GIRLS BASKETBALL Wright City 10 8 7 11 36 Conluence 4 15 7 9 35 W: J. Hunter 13. FG 16 (0), FT 4-12. C: Shaw 20, Young 13. FG 14 (2), FT 5-7. Orchard Farm 2 8 5 3 18 Granite City 14 12 11 10 47 O: Dahl 4, N. Heitmann 4, Johnston 4. FG 6 (0), FT 6-22. G: Moore 17, Garrett 10. FG 17 (1), FT 12-24. Mehlville 8 8 9 12 Windsor 9 6 12 15 W: H. Holloway 15. FG 13 (3), FT 13-24.

37 42

Nerinx Hall 20 10 22 Rosati-Kain 5 6 8 N: McArthur 19. FG 27 (0), FT 6-8. R: Theobald 12. FG 9 (3), FT 2-8.

60 23

8 4

FZ West 13 12 13 14 52 Marquette 13 14 15 18 60 M: Lomantini 16, Drumm 14, Winkler 14. FG 20 (0), FT 20-32.

Grandview 17 30 6 2 Maplewood-RH 3 3 6 6 G: Sparks 10, Thomlison 10. FG 22 (4), FT 7-17.

55 18

Elsberry 3 4 2 12 21 Winield 10 12 6 13 41 W: P. Ward 17, Hoelting 12, O. Ward 11. FG 12 (4), FT 13-19. North Tech 3 7 18 15 43 O’F Christian 12 17 17 4 50 N: Stith 20, Tate 10. FG 15 (8), FT 5-9. O: Parker 19, Markham 12. FG 21 (4), FT 4-13. Brentwood 3 4 3 7 17 FZ North 14 11 9 14 48 F: Nesslage 13, Pudlowski 12. FG 19 (6), FT 4-10. Pky. South 6 14 5 12 37 Pky. Central 12 14 22 16 64 PS: Steins 20. FG 14 (1), FT 8-14. PC: G. Stephens 29, Horn 12, O. Stephens 11. FG 21 (3), FT 19-24. Jennings 11 15 6 15 47 Luth. South 11 25 17 20 73 L: Member-Meneh 22, Lawson 15, Anderson 10. FG 25 (2), FT 21-41. Lafayette 11 4 18 15 48 Paciic 9 13 12 16 50 P: Flemming 27, Rogers 10. FG 19 (2), FT 10-23. Pky. North 21 21 8 12 62 Pky. West 4 6 8 2 20 PN (5-0): Johnson 16, May 13, Sutton 12. FG 28 (3), FT 3-11. PW: Loaney 8, Poppen 8. FG 6 (2), FT 6-13. Oakville 16 7 11 11 45 Seckman 6 10 10 9 35 O: Ball 11, Costello 11, Walters 10. FG 16 (1), FT 12-36. S: Jeske 19. FG 11 (2), FT 11-24. Union 3 12 6 11 Washington 11 14 14 18 W: Brinker 17, Carpenter 16. FG 21 (12), FT 3-8.

32 57

Staunton 2 4 4 8 18 Litchield 25 14 14 15 68 S: Welch 4. FG 7 (1), FT 3-5. L: Thomack 14, Frerichs 13, Brockmeyer 12, Furlong 10. FG 33 (0), FT 2-8. Metro 22 25 13 8 68 Vashon 5 2 0 1 8 M (2-4): Flowers 28, Burt 16. FG 32 (2), FT 2-6. Ritenour 8 8 4 5 25 Pattonville 8 16 23 11 58 R: Frost 13. FG 10 (1), FT 4-17. P: Danfort 15, M. Brown 11. FG 21 (3), FT 13-26. Valley Park 8 7 2 10 27 Kennedy 14 12 5 7 38 V: Schmidt 11. FG 9 (2), FT 7-18. K: Holmes 8, Schueppert 8. FG 12 (2), FT 12-29. Trinity 7 10 Lift For Life 6 10 T: Fite 19. FG 17 (2), FT 6-25.

12 13

13 7

42 36

Visitation 10 5 3 19 37 St.Chas. West 4 8 7 11 30 V: Long 16, Torrey 12. FG 12 (2), FT 11-29. S: Poindexter 13. FG 10 (3), FT 7-8. Barat 6 2 4 0 12 Principia 15 20 17 8 60 P (3-2): Bania 29, Hinds 14. FG 20 (11), FT 9-12. Webster 9 19 6 Howell 4 17 6 H: Wilborn 19. FG 13 (6), FT 11-15.

18 16

52 43

Luth. North 11 16 7 10 44 Duchesne 17 8 11 12 48 L: Dickson 24, White 10. FG 17 (6), FT 4-4. FH Central 10 8 13 11 Lutheran SC 6 18 14 14 F: Raup 14, Ebert 11. FG 17 (4), FT 4-8. L: Kluesner 34. FG 18 (0), FT 16-26.

42 52

HOCKEY CBC 6, De Smet 0

SATURDAY’S SCHEDULE BOYS BASKETBALL

EASTERN MO FIREFIGHTERS AGAINST DISTRACTED DRIVING present

58 76

Alton 6 16 21 22 65 E. St. Louis 8 24 11 19 62 E: Roberson 21, A. Johnson 14. FG 25 (11), FT 1-9.

Principia 11 12 11 10 44 Brentwood 10 14 14 16 54 P: P. Sellers 11, C. Sellers 10. FG 17 (4), FT 6-9. B: Jones 18, Butters Jones 17. FG 19 (2), FT 14-16.

a zone against the rest of the Flyers, who lost their 10-point halftime lead by the end of the third quarter and trailed by as many as 10 in the fourth. “In the second half we just stopped playing,” Roberson said. “We just gave up.” East St. Louis senior Antonio Johnson, who added 14 points to Roberson’s game-high 21, tried to lead a late comeback with two 3-pointers in the final 90 seconds. But Alton already had made enough shots of its own by that point. Junior Maurice Edwards scored a team-high 19 points for the Redbirds, throwing down two breakaway dunks in the first half and tying the game with a 3 at the end of the third quarter. Sophomore guard Kevin Caldwell kick started the third-period surge with two 3-pointers of his own,

West County 13 19 12 14 Hillsboro 15 22 22 17 H: Schwartz 30, Pinkley 14, Besand 12, Brewer 12. FG 25 (11), FT 15-20.

Whitield 15 10 13 15 53 St. Mary’s 15 10 14 2 41 W: Rucker 12, Berry 11, Watson 11. FG 19 (3), FT 12-17. S: Rasas 9. FG 15 (1), FT 10-22.

Hickman 11 12 10 11 44 Troy 14 3 4 18 39 H: Sutton 15, Hubbard 10, Thomas 10. FG 18 (0), FT 6-18. T: Bassham 15. FG 13 (5), FT 8-14.

Kenny Roberson (left) of East St. Louis drives the baseline for a shot as Maurice Edwards of Alton defends during a game on Friday at East St. Louis High School.

Pky. South 7 3 6 18 34 Pky. Central 5 4 13 17 39 PS: Mullen 8. FG 15 (2), FT 2-6. PC: Green 17, Campbell 12. FG 14 (1), FT 10-26. Westminster 10 11 23 14 58 Haz. East 17 15 14 27 73 W: Cook 22. FG 22 (7), FT 7-12. H: McKelvin 19, Shepherd 19, Manley 11, McBride 10. FG 27 (4), FT 15-21.

Fox 12 9 7 14 Summit 3 8 16 16 S: Jennings 15. FG 13 (7), FT 10-16.

PAUL KOPSKY • StLhighschoolsports.com

Pky. North 6 10 9 13 38 Pky. West 15 15 17 21 68 PN: Goodwin 9, Thompson 9. FG 14 (1), FT 9-16. PW: Yess 19, Lathrop 13, Socha 10. FG 27 (3), FT 11-15.

-LEBANON/WESCLIN TOURNAMENT Wesclin vs Lebanon, Illinois, 6:30 p.m. Nashville vs Columbia at Lebanon, Ill., 8 p.m. -TRICO PIONEER INVITATIONAL Shawnee vs Sparta, 4:30 p.m. Steeleville vs Red Bud, 6 p.m. Chester vs Trico, 7:30 p.m. -LUTHERAN SOUTH ROUND ROBIN Liberty (Wentzville) vs Jennings, 12:30 p.m. Lutheran South vs Cape Girardeau Central, 3:30 p.m. -DE SOTO FOUNTAIN CITY CLASSIC Consolation championship Summit vs TBA, 11:30 a.m. Third place 2:30 p.m. Championship 5:30 p.m. -WINFIELD CLASSIC Seventh place Winield vs North County Christian, 2 p.m. Consolation inal FZ East vs Warrenton, 3:30 p.m. Third place Blue Knights vs O’Fallon Christian, 5 p.m. Championship St. Dominic vs Timberland, 6:30 p.m. -MONTGOMERY COUNTY INVITATIONAL Third place Clopton vs Montgomery County, 4:30 p.m. Championship Fulton vs Bowling Green, 7:30 p.m. -CHICAGO ELITE CLASSIC at UIC Pavilion Larkin vs Marian Catholic, 1 p.m. Riverside Brookield vs Gonzaga, 2:30 p.m. East St. Louis vs Evanston, 5:30 p.m. Chaminade vs Miller Grove, 7 p.m. DeMatha vs St. Vincent-St. Mary (Ohio), 4 p.m. Chicago Simeon vs Whitney Young, 8:30 p.m. -NORM STEWART CLASSIC at Columbia College South Callaway vs Salisbury, 11 a.m. Harrisburg, Missouri vs California , 2 p.m. CBC vs Tolton, 5 p.m. O’Hara vs Hickman, 8 p.m.

Moberly vs Fatima, 12:30 p.m. Sunday. Liberty North vs Rock Bridge, 5 p.m. Sunday. Mexico vs Battle, 8 p.m. Sunday. OTHER AREA GAMES: Meridian vs. ME Luth., at Edwardsville, 2 p.m. Soldan vs. Carnahan, at Vashon, 2 p.m. Sullivan, ILL at Jerseyville, 4:30 p.m. Belleville East at Marion, 6 p.m. Centralia, Illinoi at O’Fallon, 6:15 p.m. Mater Dei at Althof, 7:30 p.m.

GIRLS BASKETBALL -NORTHWEST-CEDAR HILL TOURNAMENT Consolation inal Villa Duchesne vs Ladue, 9 a.m. Saturday. Third place Festus vs Ursuline, 11:30 a.m. Saturday. Championship Northwest Cedar Hill vs Hazelwood Central, 1:30 p.m. Saturday. -LUTHERAN SOUTH ROUND ROBIN Lindbergh vs Jennings, 11 a.m. Saturday. Lutheran South vs Gateway Science Academy, 2 p.m. Saturday. -MONTGOMERY COUNTY INVITATIONAL Third place Clopton vs New Haven, 3 p.m. Saturday. Championship Hermann vs Fulton, 6 p.m. Saturday. -28TH TROY INVITATIONAL Seventh place Westminster vs Troy Buchanan, 10 a.m. Saturday. Consolation inal Fort Zumwalt South vs St. Dominic, 11:30 a.m. Saturday. Third place Eureka vs St. Charles, 1 p.m. Saturday. Championship Hickman vs Holt, 2:30 p.m. Saturday. OTHER AREA GAMES: Althof at Carbondale, 12:30 p.m. Gillespie at Bunker Hill, 1 p.m. ME Lutheran at Brussels, 1 p.m. Piasa Southwestern at Vandalia, 1 p.m. Borgia at Cor Jesu, 4:30 p.m. Soldan vs. Carnahan, at Vashon, 6 p.m. Gibault at Marissa, 6:15 p.m. Osage vs. St. James, at Eugene, 7 p.m.

WRESTLING Afton Invitational Starting time: 9:15 a.m. Teams: Chaminade, Cleveland, Gateway STEM, Herculaneum, MS-Berkeley, Miller

Career, Normandy, Parkway Central, Parkway North, Windsor. 37th Civic Memorial Tournament Starting time: 9 a.m. Teams: Benton, Carlyle, Centralia, Civic Memorial, East St. Louis, Herrin, Highland, Jacksonville, Jerseville, MaplewoodRichmond Heights, Mater Dei, Mattoon, Vandalia, Waterloo, Wood River. John Burroughs Round Robin Starting time: 9 a.m. Teams: Brentwood, Clayton, John Burroughs, Ladue, Lutheran St. Charles, Priory, Sullivan, Sumner Ron Sauer Duals at Fox Starting times: 9 a.m. Pool A: Belleville East, Holt, Quincy, Nortwest-Cedar Hill. Pool B: Eureka, Fort Zumwalt West, Lockport, Whitield. Pool C: Edwardsville, Fox, Francis Howell Central, Rolla. Pool D: Helias, Oak Forest-River Park, Seckman, Staley. Westminster Tournament Starting times: 9 a.m. Format: Three rounds of pools, followed by 8-man bracket Teams: De Smet, Marquette, MICDS, Moberly, Paciic, Ste. Genevieve, St. Charles West, Summit, Timberland, Washington, Westminster. Parkway South Patriot Classic Starting times: 9 a.m. Teams: Francis Howell, Francis Howell North, Hickman, Jackson, Kirkwood, Lafayette, Lindbergh, McCluer North, Parkway South, Rock Bridge, SLUH, Vianney.

HOCKEY Westminster vs. Oakville, at Afton Rink, 6:30 p.m. St. Mary’s vs. Duchesne, at Rec Plex Sout, 6:45 p.m. Northwest-CH vs. Ladue, at Brentwood Ice, 7:45 p.m. Clayton vs. MICDS, at Afton Rink, 8:15 p.m. St. Louis U. High vs. Fort Zumwalt West, at Rec Plex Sout, 8:30 p.m. Eureka vs. Seckman, at Webster Rink, 8:45 p.m. Lutheran South vs. Whitield, at FSI Shark Tan, 9:10 p.m. Kirkwood vs. Vianney, at Kirkwood Rink, 9:15 p.m. Parkway West vs. John Burroughs, at Brentwood Ice, 9:30 p.m. Summit vs. Chaminade, at Queeny Park, 9:30 p.m.

GIRLS BASKETBALL • WEBSTER GROVES 52, HOWELL 43

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MICHAEL GULLEDGE • Special to StLhighschoolsports.com

Francis Howell forward Rachel Fick (14) looks to move the ball under pressure from Webster Groves guard Jaidah Stewart (21) during the Marquette Basketball Tournament at Marquette High School in Chesterield, Mo.


STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

B10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 12.05.2015

ALL-METRO FALL SOFTBALL FIRST TEAM

PLAYER OF THE YEAR • JENNY JANSEN, WARRENTON

MOTIVATED

Taylor Nordwald, pitcher, Warrenton, senior A key behind the Warriors’ run to the Class 3 state title. Amassed a record of 18-1 with a 0.88 earned-run average in 119 2/3 innings. She pitched her way out of an early jam in the Class 3 state championship as Warrenton defeated Cape Notre Dame. Also helped with her bat, hitting .442 with two home runs and 29 RBI. Amanda Cabrera, pitcher, Kennedy, senior Tennessee State signee had a 0.53 earnedrun average and 202 strikeouts and went 18-5 in 144 2/3 innings. She struck out a school-record 26 hitters in a 10-inning sectional loss to Bowling Green. Cabrera inished as Kennedy’s school record holder in wins, strikeouts and innings pitched. Kelsey Lenox, catcher, Marquette, sophomore Lenox was as solid at the plate as she was behind it. Lenox hit .405 with 13 doubles, a triple, three home runs and 34 RBI for Class 4 state runner-up Marquette. Additionally, she had just one passed ball and a .957 ielding percentage to go along with 111 putouts. Ashley Ellis, inielder, Fox, senior A key behind this year’s Class 4 third-place inisher and building the Fox program altogether. Ellis, who signed to play for SEMO, mashed the ball to the tune of a .453 batting average with 16 home runs and 56 RBI. Ellis also led Fox with 17 walks and ive sacriices. Karli Allen, inielder, Fox, senior Signed to play for Northwest Missouri State, Allen hit .410 with six doubles, eight home runs and 39 RBI for a Warriors team that placed third in the state in Class 4. Allen amassed 22 putouts and ive assists without committing an error. Austine Pauley, inielder, Francis Howell North, senior Pauley helped lead Howell North to the Class 4 quarterinals by hitting .580 with 11 doubles, ive triples, seven home runs, 25 RBI and 89 total bases. Pauley also had 23 stolen bases. Howell North coach Bob Dunahue said Pauley set the Missouri state record for career total bases this season. Katie Laceield, inielder, Incarnate Word, senior Also a basketball standout, Laceield signed to play softball at Indiana after hitting.678 to go along with area-leading 18 doubles, ive home runs, 36 RBI and 22 stolen bases for the Class 3 quarterinalist Red Knights. Did not strike out in 73 plate appearances. Abby George, outielder, Lutheran South, junior Sparked the Lancers’ ofense by hitting.578 with 11 doubles, three triples and 17 RBI. George also led the Lancers in stolen bases and had a .920 ielding percentage with 28 putouts and 41 assists. Did not strike out in 103 plate appearances. Megan Clince, outielder, Marquette, senior Hit .485 with 10 doubles, ive home runs and 39 RBI for the Class 4 state runner-up Mustangs with 16 multi-hit games and 16 stolen bases. In the outield, Clince compiled a .952 ielding percentage while accounting for 56 putouts and three assists. Established program records for career hits and RBIs. Meredith Adam, utility, Holt, senior Adam hit for a .443 average with 14 doubles, two triples, one home run and 43 RBI. In the ield, Adam had just one error to go along with 99 putouts and 15 assists. She also did her part for a deep Holt pitching staf with a 5-0 record and 1.14 earned-run average. Kimie Fozzard, utility, Fort Zumwalt West, senior McNeese State signee had a .556 batting average to go along with 13 doubles, two triples, 11 home runs and 43 RBI. Additionally, Fozzard carried her share of the pitching load as she owned a 12-2 record with a 2.23 earned-run average and 98 strikeouts in 94 innings.

SECOND TEAM CeCe Peine, pitcher, Holt, junior Kaylee Wurdack, pitcher, Parkway South, senior Sam Dockweiler, catcher, Holt, senior Jade Gates, inielder, Incarnate Word, junior Destinee Frost, inielder, Warrenton, sophomore Darby Joerling, inielder, Francis Howell, senior Emily Frankenreiter, inielder, Lutheran South, senior Claudia Gallo, outielder, Fox, senior Kelli Gorman, outielder, Orchard Farm, junior Amanda Kraus, utility, Valley Park, junior Kaitlyn Nottlemann, utility, Summit, senior

THIRD TEAM Kaitlynn Williams, pitcher, Troy, junior Sarah Handrahan, pitcher, Jeferson, junior Kirsten Preston, catcher, Fox, senior Katy Kruse, inielder, St. Dominic, junior Madison LeClaire, inielder, Paciic, senior Maddie Michalski, inielder, Oakville, sophomore Madison Harris, inielder, Windsor, senior Sadie Wise, inielder, Kirkwood, senior Taylor Rumping, inielder, Marquette, senior Carly Robinson, utility, Summit, junior Peyton Pfeifer, utility, Pattonville, sophomore

PAUL KOPSKY • STLhighschoolsports.com

Warrenton softball player Jenny Jansen (right) poses with her sister, Jessica, and the Class 3 championship trophy.

Jansen sisters play key role in Warrenton’s softball title run BY JIM FAASEN STLhighschoolsports.com

J

enny Jansen couldn’t help but follow the advice of her older sister, Jessica. Neither could the rest of the Warrenton High softball team. Jenny, a junior shortstop, hit a team-high .581 with 14 doubles, three home runs and 42 RBI for the Class 3 state champion Warriors, who beat Cape Girardeau Central 12-2 in the title contest. But it was the pre-game speeches and inspiration providedbyJessicaJansen,avivacious 19-year-old with Down syndrome, that triggered the run to the school’s first-ever softballchampionship. Jessica helped fuel a dominant late-season blitz by speaking to the squad right before each game. “She comes in and screams at the top of her lungs, ‘Are you ready?’ ” Jenny recalled. “She’s like, ‘Make some noise,’ and we all scream and she says, ‘I

can’t hear you.’ “It gets us so fired up and ready to play.” With older sister watching ever move, Jansen went out and turned in the season of a lifetime to earn her Post-Dispatch player of the Year honors for the 2015 campaign. Jenny Jansen also compiled an 8-1 record in the pitching circle with a 1.18 earned-run average. In addition, she stole 14 bases for the Warriors, who won 28 of 30 games. “She’s everything you want in a player,” Warrenton coach Trevor Hibbs said. “On the field, of the field, she just does everything that you wish every single player would do.” Jenny Jansen closed out the season on a 14-game hitting streak as her team won its last nine games by a 104-11 margin. While Hibbs prepared the squad from a strategical standpoint, Jessica took care of the emotional side. The contests simply could not officially start until Jessica completed her fire-

up speech. “She started doing them formysummerteamandever since they started, we just keptwinning,” Jennysaid. Jessica enjoyed the magic carpet ride to the state title, as much, if not more, than the players. “I wanted to help my sister,” Jessica said. “They have a great team and I wanted to help out. I said to them that I wanted them to go out and play the championship game and make me proud.” Hibbs said the partnership between Jessica and the team was great to see, especially since Jessica’s words of wisdom always seemed to hit home. “It got the girls fired up and it got us going every time,” Hibbs said. “The girls just loved it.” Jessica and Jenny’s mom, Laurie Jansen, was overjoyed that both of her daughters could play such an integral part in a championship season. “It’s hard to put into words because to say I’m

proud is an understatement,” Laurie Jansen said. “I think I’m most proud of the dedication and the hard work they both put into everything that they do versus just the accomplishment itself. As a team, I’m just extremely proud of the way they welcomed Jessica and embraced her.” Warrenton had winning streaks of 18 and nine games during the season and, at the forefront of it all, was Jenny Jansen and her multi-purpose skills. “Jenny leads by example in practice,” Hibbs said. “She’s an awesome base runner, just her softball IQ is incredible.” Jenny Jansen says the reality of being a state champion hasn’t completely sunk in just yet. “I still don’t even have the words right now,” Jenny Jansen said. “I have so much pride in this community. I have more pride in being a part of this team than I have ever had. This has just been something so special.”

PITCHER OF THE YEAR • ABBY DEANE, EUREKA

BACK TO BACK South Dakota State-bound Deane led Wildcats to another deep playof run BY JIM FAASEN STLhighschoolsports

A

bby Deane knew she had her work cut out this season. Trying to replicate last year would be a chore for the hard-throwing Eureka High righthander. Yet Deane did not flinch, turning in a campaign that almost bettered her junior year, in which she led the Wildcats to a third-place finish at the state tournament. For the second successive season, Deane has been selected as the PostDispatch pitcher of the year. Deane might have been even more impressive her final time around amassing a 19-1 record with a 0.76 earned-run average. She recorded a 246 strikeouts in 129 innings, breaking the school record of 222 she set in 2014. “I feel really good about myself this year because the numbers were better than even last year,” Deane said. “That means I’m improving. That’s what I want to keep doing.” Deane was 16-11 with a 1.60 ERA in 2014. The Wildcats fell short

BEN LOEWNAU • STLhighschoolsports.com

Eureka pitcher Abby Deane was 19-1 with 246 strikeouts and a 0.76 ERA in 2015.

of a state trip this season, losing to Fox in the quarterfinal round. Deane, who is headed to South Dakota State University in Brookings, carried an 18-0 mark and a 0.55 ERA into the final contest of the season against Fox. Up until that point, she had been almost perfect surrendering just six earned runs in 19 outings. The Wildcats did not have as strong of an offensive lineup this season, which forced Deane to bear down even more. “Our ofense was something we really had to work

at this season because we knew it was not what it had been in the past,” Deane said. “There were a lot of pitchers’ duels and some of those games were so close, I almost had heart attacks.” Eureka coach Mark Mosley said that without Deane and her spotless regular season, which included 11 shutouts, the Wildcats likely would not have reached the elite eight. The Wildcats (20-4) scored just 133 runs in 24 games — but only gave up 41. “We’ve had really good pitchers come through

this program and she’s definitely been one of the best,” said Mosley, who also coached 2013 Post Dispatch player of the year and pitcher Maddie Krumrey. “She had a lot of young players around her and we relied a lot more on her than we’ve had to rely on pitchers in the past. Abby was able to dominate and perform.” Deane, who was also the Suburban West Conference player of the year and a first-team all state selection, said that she owes a lot of the success she’s enjoyed over the past two seasons to teammates, and especially to Krumrey. “She was very helpful and I actually learned a lot from her,” Deane said of Krumrey. “Just being at all the games my sophomore year and being able to come up after her and being able to finish what she started, it was really nice having her come before me. I learned a lot from her.” Deane will now get the chance to use that knowledge as she heads off to college. “I’m very confident and I think I’m going to go up there and do very well,” Deane said. “I’m excited.”

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STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

B10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SATUrDAy • 12.05.2015

ALL-METRO FALL SOFTBALL FIRST TEAM

PLAYER OF THE YEAR • JENNY JANSEN, WARRENTON

MOTIVATED

Taylor Nordwald, pitcher, Warrenton, senior A key behind the Warriors’ run to the Class 3 state title. Amassed a record of 18-1 with a 0.88 earned-run average in 119 2/3 innings. She pitched her way out of an early jam in the Class 3 state championship as Warrenton defeated Cape Notre Dame. Also helped with her bat, hitting .442 with two home runs and 29 RBI. Amanda Cabrera, pitcher, Kennedy, senior Tennessee State signee had a 0.53 earnedrun average and 202 strikeouts and went 18-5 in 144 2/3 innings. She struck out a school-record 26 hitters in a 10-inning sectional loss to Bowling Green. Cabrera inished as Kennedy’s school record holder in wins, strikeouts and innings pitched. Kelsey Lenox, catcher, Marquette, sophomore Lenox was as solid at the plate as she was behind it. Lenox hit .405 with 13 doubles, a triple, three home runs and 34 RBI for Class 4 state runner-up Marquette. Additionally, she had just one passed ball and a .957 ielding percentage to go along with 111 putouts. Ashley Ellis, inielder, Fox, senior A key behind this year’s Class 4 third-place inisher and building the Fox program altogether. Ellis, who signed to play for SEMO, mashed the ball to the tune of a .453 batting average with 16 home runs and 56 RBI. Ellis also led Fox with 17 walks and ive sacriices. Karli Allen, inielder, Fox, senior Signed to play for Northwest Missouri State, Allen hit .410 with six doubles, eight home runs and 39 RBI for a Warriors team that placed third in the state in Class 4. Allen amassed 22 putouts and ive assists without committing an error. Austine Pauley, inielder, Francis Howell North, senior Pauley helped lead Howell North to the Class 4 quarterinals by hitting .580 with 11 doubles, ive triples, seven home runs, 25 RBI and 89 total bases. Pauley also had 23 stolen bases. Howell North coach Bob Dunahue said Pauley set the Missouri state record for career total bases this season. Katie Laceield, inielder, Incarnate Word, senior Also a basketball standout, Laceield signed to play softball at Indiana after hitting.678 to go along with area-leading 18 doubles, ive home runs, 36 RBI and 22 stolen bases for the Class 3 quarterinalist Red Knights. Did not strike out in 73 plate appearances. Abby George, outielder, Lutheran South, junior Sparked the Lancers’ ofense by hitting.578 with 11 doubles, three triples and 17 RBI. George also led the Lancers in stolen bases and had a .920 ielding percentage with 28 putouts and 41 assists. Did not strike out in 103 plate appearances. Megan Clince, outielder, Marquette, senior Hit .485 with 10 doubles, ive home runs and 39 RBI for the Class 4 state runner-up Mustangs with 16 multi-hit games and 16 stolen bases. In the outield, Clince compiled a .952 ielding percentage while accounting for 56 putouts and three assists. Established program records for career hits and RBIs. Meredith Adam, utility, Holt, senior Adam hit for a .443 average with 14 doubles, two triples, one home run and 43 RBI. In the ield, Adam had just one error to go along with 99 putouts and 15 assists. She also did her part for a deep Holt pitching staf with a 5-0 record and 1.14 earned-run average. Kimie Fozzard, utility, Fort Zumwalt West, senior McNeese State signee had a .556 batting average to go along with 13 doubles, two triples, 11 home runs and 43 RBI. Additionally, Fozzard carried her share of the pitching load as she owned a 12-2 record with a 2.23 earned-run average and 98 strikeouts in 94 innings.

SECOND TEAM CeCe Peine, pitcher, Holt, junior Kaylee Wurdack, pitcher, Parkway South, senior Sam Dockweiler, catcher, Holt, senior Jade Gates, inielder, Incarnate Word, junior Destinee Frost, inielder, Warrenton, sophomore Darby Joerling, inielder, Francis Howell, senior Emily Frankenreiter, inielder, Lutheran South, senior Claudia Gallo, outielder, Fox, senior Kelli Gorman, outielder, Orchard Farm, junior Amanda Kraus, utility, Valley Park, junior Kaitlyn Nottlemann, utility, Summit, senior

THIRD TEAM Kaitlynn Williams, pitcher, Troy, junior Sarah Handrahan, pitcher, Jeferson, junior Kirsten Preston, catcher, Fox, senior Katy Kruse, inielder, St. Dominic, junior Madison LeClaire, inielder, Paciic, senior Maddie Michalski, inielder, Oakville, sophomore Madison Harris, inielder, Windsor, senior Sadie Wise, inielder, Kirkwood, senior Taylor Rumping, inielder, Marquette, senior Carly Robinson, utility, Summit, junior Peyton Pfeifer, utility, Pattonville, sophomore

PAUL KOPSKY • STLhighschoolsports.com

Warrenton softball player Jenny Jansen (right) poses with her sister, Jessica, and the Class 3 championship trophy.

Jansen sisters play key role in Warrenton’s softball title run BY JIM FAASEN STLhighschoolsports.com

J

enny Jansen couldn’t help but follow the advice of her older sister, Jessica. Neither could the rest of the Warrenton High softball team. Jenny, a junior shortstop, hit a team-high .581 with 14 doubles, three home runs and 42 RBI for the Class 3 state champion Warriors, who beat Cape Girardeau Central 12-2 in the title contest. But it was the pre-game speeches and inspiration providedbyJessicaJansen,avivacious 19-year-old with Down syndrome, that triggered the run to the school’s first-ever softballchampionship. Jessica helped fuel a dominant late-season blitz by speaking to the squad right before each game. “She comes in and screams at the top of her lungs, ‘Are you ready?’ ” Jenny recalled. “She’s like, ‘Make some noise,’ and we all scream and she says, ‘I

can’t hear you.’ “It gets us so fired up and ready to play.” With older sister watching ever move, Jansen went out and turned in the season of a lifetime to earn her Post-Dispatch player of the Year honors for the 2015 campaign. Jenny Jansen also compiled an 8-1 record in the pitching circle with a 1.18 earned-run average. In addition, she stole 14 bases for the Warriors, who won 28 of 30 games. “She’s everything you want in a player,” Warrenton coach Trevor Hibbs said. “On the field, of the field, she just does everything that you wish every single player would do.” Jenny Jansen closed out the season on a 14-game hitting streak as her team won its last nine games by a 104-11 margin. While Hibbs prepared the squad from a strategical standpoint, Jessica took care of the emotional side. The contests simply could not officially start until Jessica completed her fire-

up speech. “She started doing them formysummerteamandever since they started, we just keptwinning,” Jennysaid. Jessica enjoyed the magic carpet ride to the state title, as much, if not more, than the players. “I wanted to help my sister,” Jessica said. “They have a great team and I wanted to help out. I said to them that I wanted them to go out and play the championship game and make me proud.” Hibbs said the partnership between Jessica and the team was great to see, especially since Jessica’s words of wisdom always seemed to hit home. “It got the girls fired up and it got us going every time,” Hibbs said. “The girls just loved it.” Jessica and Jenny’s mom, Laurie Jansen, was overjoyed that both of her daughters could play such an integral part in a championship season. “It’s hard to put into words because to say I’m

proud is an understatement,” Laurie Jansen said. “I think I’m most proud of the dedication and the hard work they both put into everything that they do versus just the accomplishment itself. As a team, I’m just extremely proud of the way they welcomed Jessica and embraced her.” Warrenton had winning streaks of 18 and nine games during the season and, at the forefront of it all, was Jenny Jansen and her multi-purpose skills. “Jenny leads by example in practice,” Hibbs said. “She’s an awesome base runner, just her softball IQ is incredible.” Jenny Jansen says the reality of being a state champion hasn’t completely sunk in just yet. “I still don’t even have the words right now,” Jenny Jansen said. “I have so much pride in this community. I have more pride in being a part of this team than I have ever had. This has just been something so special.”

PITCHER OF THE YEAR • ABBY DEANE, EUREKA

BACK TO BACK South Dakota State-bound Deane led Wildcats to another deep playof run BY JIM FAASEN STLhighschoolsports

A

bby Deane knew she had her work cut out this season. Trying to replicate last year would be a chore for the hard-throwing Eureka High righthander. Yet Deane did not flinch, turning in a campaign that almost bettered her junior year, in which she led the Wildcats to a third-place finish at the state tournament. For the second successive season, Deane has been selected as the PostDispatch pitcher of the year. Deane might have been even more impressive her final time around amassing a 19-1 record with a 0.76 earned-run average. She recorded a 246 strikeouts in 129 innings, breaking the school record of 222 she set in 2014. “I feel really good about myself this year because the numbers were better than even last year,” Deane said. “That means I’m improving. That’s what I want to keep doing.” Deane was 16-11 with a 1.60 ERA in 2014. The Wildcats fell short

BEN LOEWNAU • STLhighschoolsports.com

Eureka pitcher Abby Deane was 19-1 with 246 strikeouts and a 0.76 ERA in 2015.

of a state trip this season, losing to Fox in the quarterfinal round. Deane, who is headed to South Dakota State University in Brookings, carried an 18-0 mark and a 0.55 ERA into the final contest of the season against Fox. Up until that point, she had been almost perfect surrendering just six earned runs in 19 outings. The Wildcats did not have as strong of an offensive lineup this season, which forced Deane to bear down even more. “Our ofense was something we really had to work

at this season because we knew it was not what it had been in the past,” Deane said. “There were a lot of pitchers’ duels and some of those games were so close, I almost had heart attacks.” Eureka coach Mark Mosley said that without Deane and her spotless regular season, which included 11 shutouts, the Wildcats likely would not have reached the elite eight. The Wildcats (20-4) scored just 133 runs in 24 games — but only gave up 41. “We’ve had really good pitchers come through

this program and she’s definitely been one of the best,” said Mosley, who also coached 2013 Post Dispatch player of the year and pitcher Maddie Krumrey. “She had a lot of young players around her and we relied a lot more on her than we’ve had to rely on pitchers in the past. Abby was able to dominate and perform.” Deane, who was also the Suburban West Conference player of the year and a first-team all state selection, said that she owes a lot of the success she’s enjoyed over the past two seasons to teammates, and especially to Krumrey. “She was very helpful and I actually learned a lot from her,” Deane said of Krumrey. “Just being at all the games my sophomore year and being able to come up after her and being able to finish what she started, it was really nice having her come before me. I learned a lot from her.” Deane will now get the chance to use that knowledge as she heads off to college. “I’m very confident and I think I’m going to go up there and do very well,” Deane said. “I’m excited.”

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Saturday • 12.05.2015 • EV DUSTIN • By Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker

DILBERT • By Scott Adams

SALLY FORTH • By Francesco Marciuliano and Jim Keefe

BABY BLUES • By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE • By Stephan Pastis GARFIELD • By Jim Davis

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SUDOKU

THE PAJAMA DIARIES • By Terri Libenson

EVERYDAY


EVERYDAY

EV2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH BRIDGE TIPS • BOB JONES East-West vulnerable. North deals. NORTH ♠A 10 4 ♥J 6 5 ♦A K 6 5 ♣J 7 6 WEST EAST ♠J 8 6 3 ♠Void ♥8 7 4 3 ♥Q 10 9 ♦9 3 2 ♦Q J 10 7 ♣9 4 ♣A K Q 10 8 2 SOUTH ♠K Q 9 7 5 2 ♥A K 2 ♦8 4 ♣5 3 The bidding: NORTH EAST SOUTH WEST 1♦ 2♣ 2♠ Pass 3♠ Pass 4♠ All pass Opening lead: Nine of ♣ The usual gang was fighting the battle of the boards at the club’s Saturday night duplicate. When Hard Luck Louie was South, the auction went as shown. East won the opening club lead and continued with high clubs. Louie had to decide what to do on the third round of clubs. He reasoned that West, who was short in clubs, was likely to be long in spades. Inspired, Louie rufed the third club with the king of spades and cashed the queen of spades, prepared to finesse against West’s jack of spades on the next trick. Louie was crushed when East showed

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD out on the first trump. Even with a finesse, he couldn’t pick up West’s trumps and drifted down one when the queen of hearts failed to fall under the ace and king. “How do you like that!” said Louie. “4-0 trumps and no luck in hearts. If it wasn’t for bad luck, I’d have no luck at all.” Lucky Larry declared the same contract later in the evening, facing the same problem on the third round of clubs. Larry decided that the chance of avoiding a heart loser was remote. Rather than ruffing the third club, Larry discarded his low heart. East shifted to a diamond, won in dummy with the ace. Larry led a low spade to his king, noting East’s void, and led a low spade to dummy’s 10. He cashed the ace of spades, crossed back to his hand in hearts, and drew the last trump. Making four! (12/05/15)

Across 1 Soft top 6 Diner stack 15 Eating at the bar, perhaps 16 Simple, simple, simple 17 Blueprint notation 18 Overrun 19 Invited over for coffee, say 20 Aural measure 21 Charlie Brown, e.g. 22 Accident figures, for short 23 Coldwell Banker competitor 24 “Radiolab” producer 25 Light fountain selections 27 1946 Goethe Prize winner

28 Progressive business: Abbr. 29 Word that can be common 30 Considerably 31 Bid for a balanced hand 33 What clones share 37 Planks work them 38 Dope, say 39 “What’s that?” 40 Gangsta rap characters 43 One to one, e.g. 45 Site of an arrangement 46 Dance floor abilities 47 Attentiongrabbing riff, perhaps 48 Former Baath Party stronghold 49 White matter component

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

tcaeditors@tribune.com

CRYPTOQUIP

If Dec. 5 is your birthday • This year you become more sensitive to your family and their needs. At the same time, you become more tuned into yourself. Your serious dedication to work or to whatever you are doing points to success. Libra might be gentle and appealing, but he or she might not always follow through.

WORD GAME December 5 WORD — NONFERROUS (NONFERROUS: non-FER-us: Not composed of or containing iron.) Average mark 32 words. Time limit 45 minutes. Can you find 47 or more words in NONFERROUS? The list will be published Monday. YESTERDAY’S WORD — ADENOIDS send noise dead adios side nose dean aeon sine odds dido aide snide onside died aided soda idea dine anise sodden ides diode anode sonde sadden does aside sone said done dado sand dose dais sane node dandies sedan noes danio RULES OF THE GAME: 1. Words must be of four or more letters. 2. Words that acquire four letters by the addition of “s,” such as “bats” or “dies,” are not allowed. 3. Additional words made by adding a “d” or an “s” may not be used. For example, if “bake” is used, “baked” or “bakes” are not allowed, but “bake” and “baking” are admissible. 4. Proper nouns, slang words, or vulgar or sexually explicit words are not allowed.

50 Gaynor with the one-woman show “Razzle Dazzle!” 51 Look to do some character assassination 53 Johnny who used to cry “Come on down!” 54 Deferential respect 55 Short, sharp, metallic sound 56 Like the explorer Henry Hudson 57 ___ Park

Down 1 Knocked down 2 1960s-’80s Chevrolet coupe utility vehicle 3 Car and Driver assignment 4 Secure, as help 5 Many a Snapchat user 6 Came clean 7 Classic 1971 album that closes with “Riders on the Storm” 8 Ways of sitting in yoga 9 Test tube material 10 Get stuck 11 In a manner of speaking 12 Some printers 13 Former chain store for kids 14 Decorative fixture 23 Shares quarters (with)

HOROSCOPE • JACQUELINE BIGAR Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. The stars show the kind of day you’ll have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Diicult.

CROSSWORD

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 12.05.2015

ARIES (March 21-April 19) ★★★★ There could be an innate awkwardness between you and someone else in the morning. Fortunately this gawkiness fades quickly. Tonight: Listen to what others have to say. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) ★★★ Pace yourself and get certain errands completed. You are likely to be involved with matters involving the holiday season. You could see a friend become unusually aggressive. Tonight: Make it easy. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) ★★★★ Your naughtiness could mark the next few days. You can’t help but get into the kidlike attitude associated with the holiday season. You are likely to be singing carols by the end of the day. Tonight: Add a touch of romance. CANCER (June 21-July 22) ★★★ You might need some downtime at home because that is where you can relax. No matter what, you are likely to get into some form of holiday preparation anyway. Tonight: Go along with someone’s idea. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) ★★★★ Your friendship is more important to someone than you realize. What starts of as a light encounter could evolve into a heavy but important chat. Tonight. Be willing to change plans. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) ★★★ You might decide that today is the day to do your holiday shopping. You could make yourself crazy with this project, but you will be happier

Find more free games, or subscribe to get access to more than 50 others, at STLtoday.com/games, where you’ll also find a link to the Puzzle Society.

Puzzle by Peter Wentz

26 Academy omissions 27 Socializes (with) 30 Rows that run deep 32 Suddenly and angrily stop playing a game, in modern lingo 33 Healthful beverage high in antioxidants

34 Puts up a jumper, say 35 Western union locale? 36 British Invasion group 38 Possible consequence of cheating 40 Soap dish, possibly? 41 Candy company that

42 43

44 46 50 52

makes gummy bears Linguists study them Targets of a so-called “juice cleanse” Mellows out Hardly pleased with Sulk “It Can Wait” spot, e.g.

Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/puzzleforum. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords. No. 1031

WORD SCRIMMAGE

in the long run. Tonight: Make sure you check your bank account. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) ★★★★ You might be energized and want to cut down your own Christmas tree or go ice skating. Whatever type of indulgence you choose, you will have a great time. Tonight: Add some spice to the moment. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) ★★★★ You might not care to be on top of what needs to happen; instead, opt for some personal time and perhaps take a lazy day. You won’t have another opportunity like this for a while. Tonight: Not to be found. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) ★★★★★ Put greater emphasis on a certain friendship. Yes, you might have other plans, but what is going on here could be unusual and quite special. Listen to your sixth sense regarding a money matter. Tonight: Where the action is.

Solutions at bottom of page

WONDERWORD

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) ★★★★ Be willing to take a stand, yet be gentler than you normally are. Use the art of persuasion and tap into your sensitivities to achieve the results you want. An older relative could become extremely demanding at a bad moment. Just go with the low. Tonight: In the limelight. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) ★★★★ Take an overview of what is happening. You understand others’ needs, but you need to know whether you can fulill them. At times, you tend to withdraw. Tonight: Go to a concert, or put on some holiday music.

WORDY GURDY

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) ★★★★★ You easily could get drawn into a one-on-one conversation during the day. In fact, your day could be a series of these types of conversations with diferent people. Do not lose sight of your long-term goals and plans. Tonight: With a favorite person at a favorite place. STLtoday.com/horoscopes Get expanded horoscope information: star charts, peak times, outlooks and Chinese Zodiac data.

JUMBLE


EVERYDAY

12.05.2015 • Saturday • M 1

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • EV3

DEAR ABBY

WHAT’S THE DIFF? Find six diferences between the panels.

Teen barred from old friend’s wedding

Dear Invited • At 18, the brideto-be is an adult, and while marriage at such a young age isn’t advisable for many reasons, there’s nothing immoral about it. I’m sorry you didn’t mention what might have happened in your friend’s life in the last two years, because it may be the reason your mother is worried about your associating with her. Your mom may want to protect you, but she’s going about it in the wrong way. You could learn a

lot about life by simply observing what happens to your friend after she has reached the altar. Dear Abby • My brother, my only sibling, hasn’t contacted me in 14 years. I have tried to figure out why. I wasn’t mean to him, and we didn’t fight. My cousin told me it’s because I called him incessantly years ago. I don’t recall having done such a thing. I really miss and care about him. I live in a group home and wonder if he’s ashamed of me. He has accomplished more job-wise than I have. I want to move on with my life, but I continue to fixate on why he seems to hate me. — HIS SISTER IN MARYLAND Dear Sister • What a sad situation. Not knowing your brother, I can’t guess his reason for distancing himself. That’s why I’m advising you to write him a letter. Tell him how you feel, that you miss and care about him and would like to know why he hasn’t contacted you during all this time.

He may or may not respond. But if he doesn’t, please understand that his silence has less to do with you or your living situation than it does about him and his inability to empathize. Dear Abby • My husband demands we give our first child the name “Junior” as his legal first name, supposedly to honor the baby’s paternal grandpa, who is also called Junior. I am vehemently opposed to it because Junior is a title, not a name, and also because Grandpa is a notorious drunk, criminal and adulterer. Who should win out? — DUE SOON IN SYRACUSE Dear Due Soon • You should! Naming a child after someone is, indeed, supposed to be an honor, and from your description, your father-in-law isn’t someone who deserves one. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, Calif. 90069.

Diferences: 1. Man in background is moved. 2. Golf club grip is shorter. 3. Tree branch is missing. 4. Sign is smaller. 5. Shoes are diferent. 6. Sleeve is shorter.

Dear Abby • I am 16 and my old friend from grammar school is getting married next month. I just received a wedding invitation in the mail. However, my mother does not approve of her getting married at such a young age (she’s 18) and has forbidden me to go or even talk to her. I haven’t seen this friend in more than two years because she moved away and has only recently returned. I want to attend her wedding. How can I go about convincing my mom to let me go? — INVITED IN LAS VEGAS

MISS MANNERS

TV SATURDAY

Encourage gratitude from stepniece

For complete channels and 24-hour program information, customize your own TV listings at STLtoday.com/tv.

Dear Miss Manners • I have a stepniece who never writes thankyou notes. This is normally a mere annoyance because it makes it impossible for me to know for sure if a birthday card or gift arrived safely, but I’ve come to expect the lack of acknowledgment for the normal gift-giving instances. I sent this niece a graduation card with a monetary gift enclosed. I shouldn’t have been surprised that a thank-you never arrived although I’d hoped that the special occasion might have inspired a sudden burst of politeness. No such luck. However, in this case, I’m finding it much harder to get over my annoyance. It’s especially diicult to be gracious when my brother asks me to mentor this girl (his stepdaughter) as she begins her studies at my college alma mater. Gentle Reader • As your brother

has invited you to mentor this girl, your first act of advice could be about encouraging kindness and generosity by showing gratitude. Not only will this ease the unpleasantness for you, but it will also be extremely useful to her in future business and social relationships. While Miss Manners does not generally condone chastising people for their etiquette transgressions (that, after all, is her lot in life), in this particular case, you have been invited to help the poor girl out. If worded properly and kindly (“Now that you are in college, you are going to want to be sure to express thanks for any acts of kindness, if for no other reason than to show that you are grateful and make them want to continue”), correcting her behavior would help everyone out. Dear Miss Manners • On a sunny morning, I put on my running

shoes and took the same tour I always do. Unfortunately, this time, a funeral just started at the church I always pass. The funeral car was still on the way to the church and the family of the departed were walking behind the car. I was running on the sidewalk, in the opposite direction. It was so weird, that group of people were mourning, and I was running happily. Should I have stopped running until they passed? Gentle Reader • Unless you are physically in their way, Miss Manners does not — nor would anyone — expect you to cease all activity. An alternative to stopping your run would be going across the street so as to maintain a respectful distance as a courtesy. Send questions to Miss Manners, aka Judith Martin, on her website, missmanners.com; to her email, dearmissmanners@gmail.com; or through postal mail to Miss Manners, Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut Street, Kansas City, Mo. 64106.

12/5/15

7:00

7:30

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30

FOX ÍCollege Football: Big Ten Championship: Teams TBA. (N) 2

CBS NCIS The team uncov- To Be Announced 4 ers a fraudulent charity. (cc)

48 Hours (N) (cc)

NBC IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE (’46) HHHH (James Stewart) A guardian angel 5 strengthens a man ruined by a miser. (cc) PBS The Carpenters: Close to You (My 9 Music Presents) The pair’s career. (cc) CW 11

ÍFavorites

News 11 at 7:00PM/The Rizzoli & Isles A comPulse (N) (cc) munity activist is gunned down. (cc)

Elementary Sherlock reels when Irene reappears. (cc)

IND Leverage The team tries Republic of Doyle Jake Larry Rice News & 24 Views to stop a terrorist. (cc) investigates an unusual robbery. ABC ÍCollege Football: Teams TBA. (N) (cc) 30

MYTV Î A CHRISTMAS KISS II MERRY KISSMAS (’15) (Karissa Staples) 46 (’14) (Elisabeth Harnois)

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EVERYDAY

EV4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH THE FAMILY CIRCUS • By Bil Keane

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 12.05.2015

ZITS • By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

CAROLYN HAX

FUNKY WINKERBEAN • By Tom Batiuk

Dealing with man of her dreams’ family Adapted from a recent online discussion. Dear Carolyn • I am in a great relationship with the man of my dreams. We have plans to live together, and we each make a comfortable living. The problem is his family. None of them is very financially stable, and all of them depend on his help. I love that he is so generous but am bothered that they take advantage of him. It just seems terribly unfair that they are all a financial drain on him because they feel entitled to a lifestyle that they haven’t earned. If we are going to be sharing our lives and our finances I want to suggest that he set limits with them but am unsure how to do this without seeming like a horrible Grinch. — Anonymous

SPEED BUMP • By Dave Coverly

BIZARRO • By Dan Piraro

CORNERED • By Mike Baldwin NON SEQUITUR • By Wiley Miller

Answer • You basically just said you want to jump in and tell him how to deal with his family, and that’s not a great way to start of this next phase of your relationship. For one thing, you do not, DO NOT want to move in with him unless and until this is resolved in a way you both can embrace fully. Not tolerate, not bear — embrace. And, you’re not going to get there by throwing out suggestions without understanding the situation fully. You need to understand why his family is this way. Why is Man o’ Dreams OK with this, assuming he is; what is his limit when it comes to sacrificing his (or your) comfort for theirs; when would he be willing to revisit this arrangement; who would be a higher priority to him than these family members, if there ever came a time when he couldn’t support everyone? Would he ever help you out, as live-in partner? Would he only help in the context of marriage? If he ever has a child, will the child come first? Fairness is your biggest concern now because you have the luxury of no other problems. If and when those start to crop up, his feeling a primary obligation to his family of origin could spell misery for any family he creates. So get right at this: Say you’re struggling to understand the arrangement with his family. Ask him to explain more thoroughly. If you expect both of you to have some say in how the other deals with family, then you need to get that out there now. Then you need to take whatever he says and give it time to prove true. People may want to behave a certain way around family, and promise they will, but nothing’s real until it survives the reality test. And lose the “horrible Grinch” equivocating. Couples sharing a home are to some degree financial partners, too, so protect yourself by thinking like one and by not apologizing for it.

DUPLEX • By Glenn McCoy

MARMADUKE • By Brad Anderson

TINA’S GROOVE • By Rina Piccolo

DRABBLE • By Kevin Fagan

MARK TRAIL • By James Allen

LOLA • By Todd Clark ZIGGY • By Tom Wilson

tellme@washpost.com

OTHER COAST • By Adrian Raeside

TAKE IT FROM THE TINKERSONS • By Bill Bettwy

THE ARGYLE SWEATER • By Scott Hilburn

BLONDIE • By Dean Young and John Marshall

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