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TUESDAY • 12.03.2019 • $2.50

A PARTISAN DIVIDE CONGRESS PUSHES AHEAD ON TRUMP IMPEACHMENT WITH NATION SPLIT The impeachment report, to be released Tuesday, is expected to forcefully make the Democrats’ case that Trump engaged in impeachable “wrongdoing and misconduct.”

BY LISA MASCARO AND MARY CLARE JALONICK

Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The House is plunging into a landmark impeachment week, with Democrats who once hoped to sway Republicans now facing the prospect of an ever-hardening partisan split over the historic question of removing President Donald Trump from office. Lawmakers were getting their first look Monday night — behind closed doors — at the impeachment report from the House Intelli-

A GOP report counters: “They are trying to impeach President Trump because some unelected bureaucrats chafed at an elected President’s ‘outside the beltway’ approach to diplomacy.”

gence Committee. The report, to be released Tuesday, is expected to forcefully make the Democrats’ case that Trump engaged in what Chairman Adam Schiff calls impeachable “wrongdoing and misconduct” in pressuring Ukraine to investigate Democrats and Joe Biden while he was withholding military aid. House Democrats also are debating whether to expand articles of impeachment to include charges beyond abuse of power in Please see TRUMP, Page A5

City seeks tax credits for soccer stadium

50 YEARS LATER

PROM KILLINGS STILL ECHO

With construction looming, St. Louis is asking for up to $30M BY KURT ERICKSON

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

years to piece together what happened in 1969. An Illinois prosecutor dropped charges against the presumed killer so there never was a trial where facts and accusations could flow in open court. Morrison this year self-published his findings in a book, “Bad Moon Rising.” “I think it’s helped heal the town of Mascoutah,” he said. Morrison, 67, now lives in Harrisonburg, Virginia, but returned to Mascoutah in October to speak with students at a high school assembly about the crime and its aftermath. Webb, Jung and Moll welcome Morrison’s visits to town and his curiosity that unearthed answers about the double murder. Morrison and a few friends visit the cemetery yearly to toast the couple who never made it home from prom. This was, after all, the crime that marred their childhoods — and the town — a half century ago. “We used to have our windows open and doors open at night,” Webb said. “Not after that.”

JEFFERSON CITY — A state board is poised to debate the first round of state aid that will help pay for St. Louis’ Major League Soccer stadium. In an application submitted to the Missouri Development Finance Board, the city is asking for $15 million in tax credits that will help pay to prepare the sprawling downtown site. “(T)he project will enable the St. Louis region to reclaim its regional and national reputation as a three-sport, ‘first-class’ city,” the application notes. The board will meet in a special session Tuesday and could vote on the tax credits at its regular meeting on Dec. 17. A second application for another $15 million is expected to be submitted next month. Construction could begin as soon as January, the application notes. Plans calls for construction of a 22,500-seat stadium north of Market Street in place of highway ramps, parking lots and private businesses along Olive Street. Practice fields and other team facilities would be wedged south of Market between 21st and 22nd streets, replacing empty land and highway on- and off-ramps. St. Louis’ MLS ownership group, led by the Taylor family of Clayton-based rental car giant Enterprise Holdings, wants to get the stadium built in time for the first game in March 2022. The total price tag for the development is listed at $461 million. MLS officially awarded the group the 28th team of the growing men’s soccer league in August. In the application, the city’s redevelopment agency notes

Please see PROM, Page A4

Please see SOCCER, Page A4

CRISTINA M. FLETES, CFLETES@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Ed Morrison, right, offers a toast to the memory of Mike Morrison and Debbie Means, who were killed 50 years ago after prom. Joining Morrison in early October at the Holy Childhood church cemetery in Mascoutah are, from left, his wife Mindy Morrison and longtime friends Mary Kay Webb and Bob Moll. To watch a video of Ed Morrison as he talks about his book on the killings, go to stltoday.com/multimedia

‘IT WASN’T THE NICE PEACEFUL SMALL TOWN ANYMORE’ BY KIM BELL

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

MASCOUTAH — Three conversations were going at once at David Jung’s kitchen table, where old friends gathered this fall to catch up. They laughed about years-old Easter candy left in a freezer. They mused about the rituals of the homecoming parade. The chatter ceased and all eyes turned to Ed Morrison when the topic turned, inevitably, to murder. Morrison has ties with everyone at the table over the murders 50 years ago of his older brother, Mike, and his brother’s prom date, Debbie Means. There’s Mary Kay Webb, his childhood neighbor and good friend who helped Ed find the couple’s abandoned car the day after prom. There’s Jung, the traffic cop first to reach the bodies and who dressed as a woman to try to snare a killer. And Robert Moll, classmate and funeralhome director’s son who, at the age of 16, accompanied his father to the crime scene Mike Morrison, 18, and Debbie Means, 15, attended the Mascoutah Community High and kept grisly details to himself. Morrison worked diligently over the School prom on May 3, 1969.

Freeholders could propose just about anything — or nothing

Railway Exchange owner says petition jeopardizes tax credits

BY MARK SCHLINKMANN

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS — The developers behind a $300 million plan to redo the 1.2 million-squarefoot Railway Exchange building downtown have another hurdle to clear in the daunting project: stay out of bankruptcy court. Four contractors who say they’re collectively owed about $115,000 in services sued last month to force the building

BY JACOB BARKER

ST. LOUIS — For more than a month, St. Louisans have watched — some with exasperation, some with amusement — as aldermen and the mayor squabbled over the makeup of the city’s delegation to the new regional Board of Freeholders. But while the impasse continues and names are proposed, floated, CHRISTIAN GOODEN, CGOODEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM Please see FREEHOLDERS, Page A5

TODAY

A pedestrian walks by the Railway Exchange building in 2013.

Coming soon

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owner, HH St. Louis Railway LP, into involuntary bankruptcy. That action, in St. Louis bankruptcy court, comes as the Railway Exchange owner has spent much of this year in litigation with larger, secured creditors in St. Louis Circuit Court. Hudson Holdings of Florida acquired the massive structure at 615 Olive Street and an Please see RAILWAY, Page A5

Missourians OK’d for pot top forecasts • A3 Builders: Area lacks growth mentality • A7 Mizzou coaching search gets tougher • B1 Albert O. is headed to the NFL draft • B1

1 M Vol. 141, No. 337 ©2019


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WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM GIFTS THAT SAY STL

RIVERFRONT MEMORIES

From home decor to jewelry and more, we have gift ideas that scream St. Louis. stltoday.com/thelist

Whether you remember it cruising the river or starring as a casino, the Admiral was a St. Louis landmark. See how much you remember. stltoday.com/entertainment

UPCOMING CHATS Tuesday Sports columnist Ben Frederickson, 11 a.m. Wednesday Ask the Road Crew, 1 p.m. Jim Thomas talks Blues, 1 p.m. Thursday MU sports with Dave Matter, 11 a.m. Friday Talk STL sports with Jeff Gordon, 1 p.m.

JOE’S ST. LOUIS

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CONTACT US For news tips only, phone: 314-340-8222 Submit news tips: metro@post-dispatch.com Submit calendar events: events.stltoday.com Main number: 314-340-8000 Editor: Gilbert Bailon 314-340-8387 Features: Amy Bertrand 314-340-8284 Local news: Marcia Koenig 314-340-8142 Online: Amanda St. Amand 314-340-8201 Sports: Roger Hensley 314-340-8301

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FULL ACCESS SUBSCRIPTIONS The Post-Dispatch is a Lee Enterprises Newspaper and is published daily. USPS: 476-580. Postmaster send address changes to St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 901 N 10th Street St. Louis MO 63101-1250. Periodical postage paid at St. Louis. Suggested average weekly retail prices for home delivery with full digital access are: Monday-Sunday $14.25, Sunday-Friday $14.25, Monday-Friday $11.75, Thursday-Sunday $11.75, Sat-Mon $10.50, Fri-Sun $10.50, Sun-Mon $8.00, Sat-Sun Only $8.00, Sunday Only $5.50.The subscription price includes all applicable sales tax and a charge for the convenience of having the paper delivered. To avoid delivery charges, call 1-314-340-8888 to arrange pickup of your paper at a local distribution center. Rates are based on the annual charges for premium days and/or plus sections delivered on 12/23/18, 12/25/18, 1/13/19, 1/27/19, 2/17/19, 2/24/19, 3/10/19, 3/17/19, 3/31/19, 4/14/19, 4/21/19, 5/19/19, 5/26/19, 6/16/19, 6/23/19, 6/30/19, 7/14/19, 7/21/19, 8/11/19, 8/18/19, 8/25/19, 9/01/19, 9/8/19, 9/15/19, 9/22/19, 9/29/19, 10/27/19, 11/17/19, 11/28/19, 12/08/19, 12/22/19, 12/29/19, and timing of these charges may affect the length of the subscription. A nonrefundable account setup fee will be charged to qualifying new starts. All Full Access Subscriptions include unlimited digital access. To access these benefits, you must first provide your email address, register with STLtoday.com and activate your account online. To activate your digital account, visit STLtoday. com/activate. For assistance setting up your account, visit STLtoday.com/ subscriberservices or call 1-314-340-8888.

LOTTERY Multistate games POWERBALL Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $120 million MEGA MILLIONS Tuesday’s estimated jackpot: $266 million LUCKY FOR LIFE Monday: 10-31-43-44-46 Lucky ball: 13

Missouri lotteries LOTTO Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $1.3 million SHOW ME CASH Monday: 2-3-5-28-39 Tuesday’s estimated jackpot: $62,000 PICK-3 Midday: 051 Evening: 633 PICK-4 Midday: 9416 Evening: 6992

Illinois lotteries LUCKY DAY LOTTO Monday Midday: 9-12-23-30-37 Evening: 1-20-25-27-31 LOTTO Monday: 7-28-32-36-39-45 Extra shot: 5 Estimated jackpot: $13.2 million PICK-3 Monday Midday: 792 FB: 1 Evening: 663 FB: 4 PICK-4 Monday Midday: 7502 FB: 8 Evening: 9298 FB: 0

Hamm is getting good grades for support roles in two major films JOE HOLLEMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

HAMM TIME: As the Oscar-touted movie season hits full bloom on U.S. screens, now is a good time to check how a pair of films featuring Jon Hamm are doing with the critics. Already out is “The Report,” a factbased political drama starring Annette Bening and Adam Driver that deals with an investigation into the CIA’s use of torture. The movie has garnered solid, if not always spectacular, reviews from top critics. Overall, Rotten Tomatoes reports that 33 critics have given the film an average rating of 6.27 out of a possible 10. Of those 33 critics, 24 gave the film a “rotten” tomato and nine gave it a “fresh.” Hamm did get some good ink from New York Times critic Jeannette Catsoulis, who praised STL’s No. 1 celeb for a “spicy performance” as Denis McDonough, President Barack Obama’s chief of staff. The second film, Clint Eastwood’s “Richard Jewell,” opens nationwide on Dec. 13. In that film, Hamm plays an FBI agent investigating the pipe bombing at the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta. The title character, played by Paul Walter Houser, was a security guard at the Olympics who was wrongly accused of the crime. The film also stars Sam Rockwell, Kathy Bates and Olivia Wilde. According to Rotten Tomatoes, the film has been given an average rating of 7.0 out of 10 from four top critics. From them, the movie got three “fresh” and

ATSUSHI NISHIJIMA, AMAZON STUDIOS

Jon Hamm stars in “The Report,” a factbased political drama also featuring Annette Bening and Adam Driver that deals with an investigation into the CIA’s use of torture. one “rotten” tomato. Todd McCarthy of the Hollywood Reporter said Hamm comes “on very strong” in his role as the hard-charging lead FBI agent on the investigation. Variety’s Peter Debruege gives a cap-tip to Hamm for “playing that handsome-on-the-outside, sordidunderneath dynamic that suited him so well in ‘Mad Men.’” WAVELENGTHS: After 42 years of selling radio ads, Greg Kornfeld will lay down his rate card at the end of the year. Kornfeld has been selling radio time for KTRS since 1996. He began his career back in 1977 with KMOX (1120 AM). “I know it sounds trite, but I’ll miss the people — both the people in the office and the clients,” Kornfeld said, adding that he had no immediate retirement plans. “I’m sure I’ll be doing more traveling, but right now I just will have things to do around the house,” he said. Station boss Mark Dorsey said Kornfeld is “one of the true great people in our profession,” adding that he’s “a legend in radio sales.”

SAFE SPACE: For the last few years, the safeness of St. Louis, or lack of it, has hurt our rankings in a multitude of areas. So there’s little surprise that a list whose core subject is “safety” would have us close to the bottom of the pile. In the area of “home and community safety,” our fair burg came in at No. 179 out of the 182 largest cities in the U.S., according to a list from personal finance website WalletHub. The only cities deemed less safe were Detroit; San Bernardino, California; and Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Specifically, only three cities had higher rates (per capita) of assaults than St. Louis — Birmingham, Alabama; Memphis, Tennessee; and Detroit — and only three had worse traffic-fatality rates — Bakersfield, California; Huntington, West Virginia; and Casper, Wyoming. Other factors used to compile the rankings included forcible rapes, thefts, hate crimes, number of sex offenders, drug-poisoning deaths, pedestrian fatalities, and road quality. And all this is happening while St. Louis is tied for first, with four other cities, for having the most law enforcement officers per capita. That means that all eight of our major neighbors finished better when it came to home and community safety, though none cracked the top 100: Nashville, Tennessee (114); Chicago (122); Louisville, Kentucky (129); Indianapolis (133); Cincinnati (144); Springfield, Missouri (145); Kansas City (163); and Memphis (172). For the record, St. Louis police report there have been 183 homicides so far this year, up from the 167 at this time in 2018. Joe Holleman • 314-340-8254 @stlsherpa on Twitter jholleman@post-dispatch.com

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS Director Jean-Luc Godard is 89. Singer Jaye P. Morgan (“The Gong Show”) is 88. Actor Nicolas Coster (“The Misadventures of Sheriff Lobo”) is 86. Actress Mary Alice is 78. Singer Ozzy Osbourne is 71. Singer Mickey Thomas of Jefferson Starship is 70. Bassist Paul Gregg of Restless Heart is 65. Actor Steven Culp (“Desperate Housewives”) is 64. Actress Daryl Hannah is 59. Actress Julianne Moore is 59. Actor

Brendan Fraser is 51. Singer Montell Jordan is 51. Actor-comedian Royale Watkins is 50. Actor Bruno Campos (“Nip/Tuck,” “Jesse”) is 46. Actress Holly Marie Combs (“Charmed”) is 46. Actress Lauren Roman (“Bold and the Beautiful”) is 44. Musician Daniel Bedingfield is 40. Actress Tiffany Haddish (“Girls Trip”) is 40. Actress Anna Chlumsky is 39. Actress Jenna Dewan (“The Resident,” “Supergirl”) is 39. Actor Brian

Bonsall (“Family Ties”) is 38. Actress Dascha Polanco (“Orange is the New Black”) is 37. Singer-songwriter Andy Grammer is 36. Drummer Michael Calabrese of Lake Street Dive is 35. Actress Amanda Seyfried (“Mamma Mia”) is 34. Actor Jake T. Austin (“The Fosters,” “Wizards of Waverly Place”) is 25. — Associated Press

100 NEEDIEST CASES: HELPING THOUSANDS

MOTHER DAMAGED BY ABUSE HOW IT STARTED The tradition of 100 Neediest Cases campaign dates to 1922, when civic leaders formed the Christmas Bureau. The PostDispatch has partnered with the program for more than five decades, renaming it 100 Neediest Cases in 1954.

CASE 45: Ms. P was left for dead when the father of her children beat her so severely that she had to be hospitalized. The whites of Ms. P’s eyes were bloodred for six months. That ordeal, and the horror of discovering that her abuser had also sexually assaulted her 12-year-old daughter, left her mentally damaged. She was pregnant with twins at the time of the violence; they were born at 25 weeks, and spent four months in intensive care. While recovering from her injuries and sitting by her babies’ bedsides, Ms. P fell behind on her utility bills. She is hoping for a blessing for her children, ages 12, 10, 3 and 1; they’re her reason for living. They need clothing, a bed and other household items, toys and books. CASE 46: Ms. A, 39, lives with her three daughters, ages, 11, 17 and 23. The eldest has a developmental disability. The family recently moved to a new home in St. Louis but couldn’t bring their furniture with them. They need about $2,000 to repair their only vehicle and could use winter clothes, household supplies and furniture. The family hopes they’ll have enough to celebrate the holidays this year with a family meal. Case profiles by Erin Heffernan and Sarah Bryan Miller of the Post-Dispatch.

ANNA STETZEL, LINDBERGH HIGH SCHOOL

TO HELP Call 314-4216060 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on weekdays, visit 100neediestcases.org, or mail a check payable to “100 Neediest Cases” (no cash) to P.O. Box 955925, St. Louis, Mo. 63195.

WAYS TO GIVE ADOPT A CASE • For highest-need cases, the program supplies donors with a list of a family’s needs. Donors are asked to meet at least one of the stated needs and provide at least one present for each individual in the family. Everything goes directly to the family, through a social worker. DONATE • Monetary gifts to the 100 Neediest Cases general fund are used to help the more than 4,000 cases, and go directly to the families. FUNDRAISE • Encourage friends, family and others to join you in helping. Set up a fundraising page for your adopted family or the program overall, and have an even bigger impact.

HOW IT WORKS Social service agencies, working through the United Way, identify thousands of needy families. Volunteers then select 100 cases to be profiled in the newspaper to raise awareness

SEEKING AND SERVING ALL IN NEED. Give at www.svdpstlouis.org


LOCAL

12.03.2019 • TUESDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A3

Doctor rejects plea deal relating to marriage to teen BY ROBERT PATRICK

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS — A former St. Louis University Hospital doctor who impregnated and married the teenage daughter of a former patient rejected a plea deal Monday that would have resulted in five years in prison on child pornography charges. Dr. Ashu Joshi of Sunset Hills was indicted in 2018 on charges of production and receipt of child pornography and transportation of a minor across state lines for sex. He has pleaded not guilty to the charges, which carry penalties ranging from at least five years in prison to life. Joshi, now 47, was suspended from his job after the charges became public and also had his medical license suspended. Joshi met the Kentucky teen through her mother, a patient, before Joshi took a job in Missouri

and moved here, according to federal authorities. The girl originally wanted to talk to Joshi about becoming a doctor, then became his babysitter before they began having sex, investigator Donya Jackson with the U.S. attorney’s office said in a hearing last year. The teen’s mother knew they were “dating” but did not want them having sex, Jackson said. Facebook notified the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children in October 2018 that Joshi was sending and receiving what appeared to be child porn via Facebook Messenger, prosecutors have said in court filings. Joshi took nude pictures of the two of them and requested pictures of the teen’s genitals, the filings allege. The teen, now 17, was present Monday in U.S. District Court in St. Louis at a hearing called to discuss plea negotiations, ac-

companied by her lawyer and the couple’s baby boy. Joshi’s bid for time with his son in the courthouse after the hearing was re- Joshi jected by U.S. District Judge John Ross, who said Joshi’s lawyers would have to file a separate request for that. The teen has asked for leniency for Joshi, suggesting probation as the appropriate punishment and requesting a meeting with prosecutors to plead Joshi’s case, court filings said. A Kentucky family court judge, Stephen M. Jones, last month declared the couple to be married after motions from both Joshi and the teen and a paternity test. Assistant U.S. Attorney Colleen Lang on Monday filed a motion suggesting the marriage was fraudulent. Lang said Joshi and

the teen both failed to tell the judge that Joshi is facing federal felony charges in which she is the alleged victim. Nor did they mention that she is 17 or that they are barred by Joshi’s bond conditions from any contact, Lang’s filing said. They also never told anyone before last month that they were married, according to the filing. Lang is also seeking to have Joshi jailed until his trial for having either direct or “indirect” contact with the teen. Joshi’s lawyer, Daniel Juengel, told the Post-Dispatch on Monday that defense lawyers disputed a number of those claims. He insisted that the teen’s mother gave permission for the marriage, and that the couple described each other as husband and wife in Facebook conversations. He also said it was likely that the judge knew about the charges against Joshi, as the case was “all over the

news” both here and in Kentucky. Juengel said prosecutors are disputing the marriage because it “could be a big problem for their prosecution,” adding that the case raises constitutional issues over how private conversations between a married couple were being monitored by Facebook without their consent. He also said that a Facebook employee was essentially acting on behalf of the government at the time. Juengel said that people in states across the country can be married at 16 or 17 years of age, but child pornography laws don’t have a marriage exception and are therefore “unconstitutional on their face.” A trial date for Joshi has not been set while the legal issues are pending. Robert Patrick • 314-621-5154 @rxpatrick on Twitter RPatrick@post-dispatch.com

Missourians OK’d for medical pot top forecasts

DIGEST CLAYTON — County rebuked for Wildhaber stance: Two civil rights groups blasted St. Louis County on Monday for taking a “hypocritical” and “shameful” legal stance in a discrimination case despite comments from the county executive that denounced the strategy. The county’s legal team is asking a judge to amend a nearly $20 million jury verdict in favor of Sgt. Keith Wildhaber, or order a new trial. In a 63-page motion, the lawyers used the same legal argument that had upset County Executive Sam Page and County Counselor Beth Orwick: that it is legal to discriminate against gay people in Missouri. In a joint statement, the civil rights groups wrote that “the Missouri Human Rights Act already prohibits discrimination based on sex. As our state Supreme Court recognized earlier this year, discrimination based on sex may manifest itself by discriminating against a man because he is gay. Pretending that Missouri law excuses this discrimination, suggesting that the jury was too confused to render a legitimate verdict, and continuing to claim that there were other, good reasons to discriminate against Wildhaber is part and parcel of the same package: a failure to insist that St. Louis

County respect the dignity and equality of members of the LGBTQ community.” Page’s chief of staff, Winston Calvert, responded in a statement: “We agree with PROMO and the ACLU that discrimination based sexual orientation and gender identity must be outlawed. And PROMO and the ACLU seem to agree with the County that it isn’t. The County does not want to be in the position of protecting its solvency and its insurance coverage by having to appeal a $20 million award relying on a deficiency of state law. But we have to be. And, though the appeal is ours, the actions that resulted in the award predate the current administration.” AFFTON — Monday classes canceled: The Affton School District called off classes Monday after bus drivers found a downed power line on some of the empty buses. Erica Chandler, a district spokeswoman, said no one was hurt. The power line fell on buses parked near the administration building at Weber and MacKenzie roads. Bus drivers arriving to work about 6 a.m. saw the line down. The district made the decision to call off school and notified parents around 6:30 a.m.

BY NASSIM BENCHAABANE

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Missouri has approved thousands more people to use marijuana as medicine within the first six months of the process than researchers in a state-commissioned study predicted the state would see by the end of 2020, and that number could continue to outpace predictions through 2022, advocates say. Since July 4, 21,879 Missourians have received state cards allowing them to legally possess and use marijuana as medicine after physicians confirmed they have a qualifying medical condition, according to the Department of Health and Senior Services, the agency tasked with regulating medical marijuana. Researchers with the University of Missouri’s Economic and Policy Analysis Research Center predicted in April that Missouri would have 19,000 medical marijuana patients in 2020 after DHSS asked them to estimate the number of qualified marijuana patients and how much marijuana would be needed to serve them. The researchers estimated Missouri would have about 22,500 patients in 2021, growing to 26,000 in 2022. Marijuana advocates said in April that the study — which

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used data from 2015 culled from 19 states — underestimated the number of patients Missouri would see because it used old data from states with widely varying medical marijuana programs. “We have always predicted that the numbers would be far larger than the MU Economics study predicted,” said Dan Viets, chairman of the Missouri Cannabis Industry Association, in a written statement released last week by the Missouri chapter of the Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws. “They made the mistake of assuming that all medical marijuana programs are equal.” Missouri could have at least 122,000 medical marijuana patients by the end of 2022, said Missouri Medical Cannabis Trade Association spokesman Jack Cardetti. The number is based on a trend in states like Colorado that saw 2% to 3% of the population licensed as marijuana patients after approving medical use, he said. In the university study, researchers averaged numbers from 19 states that have legalized medical marijuana, looking chiefly at Washington, Arizona, Massachusetts and Colorado, which they said offered the most complete data available. The 46-page study projected the supply of marijuana

would outpace demand and that the market would not support the number of businesses the state planned to license. But because of the differences in state programs and how thoroughly they kept track of data, the study was only able to make projections “with 66% confidence” of how much marijuana patients would need. At the most, Missouri could have 69,272 qualified medical marijuana patients by 2022, according to the study. But even that number of patients, the study said, wouldn’t generate enough demand for the first three years for 60 commercial marijuana growers. DHSS says it is bound by the constitutional amendment voters approved in 2018 that legalized medical marijuana to license at least 60 commercial marijuana growers, 192 dispensaries and 86 facilities that manufacture marijuana-infused products. The state expects to begin awarding licenses by January. The law provided for so many marijuana businesses because it ensured greater access for patients and would generate competition in the market, Cardetti said. “We think that’s good for patients and we think that’s good for the industry,” he said.


A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

LOCAL

M 1 • TUESDAY • 12.03.2019

Tisaby: Deposition that led to perjury case is invalid BY JOEL CURRIER

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS — William Don Tisaby, who is facing perjury and evidence tampering charges stemming from a 2018 investigation of former Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens, asserted in court Monday that the deposition that led to Tisaby’s indictment should be thrown out because he never certified his responses with a signature. Tisaby, 67, a former FBI agent from Alabama, is charged with six counts of perjury and one count of

evidence tampering. He’s accused of lying during a deposition last year as part of the investigation of Greitens. During a hearing Monday, Daniel Dailey, one of Tisaby’s two lawyers, said the case should be dismissed because the unsigned deposition renders Tisaby’s testimony incomplete, and that Tisaby has never had the chance to review or clarify his responses. Special prosecutor Gerard “Jerry” Carmody rejected the argument, saying Tisaby should not be allowed to lie under oath, then

claim the deposition is invalid because he failed to sign a deposition transcript he received 20 months ago. Carmody also said Tisaby’s signature certifying his testimony is unnecessary because the entire March 2018 deposition was videotaped. Circuit Judge Bryan Hettenbach did not immediately rule on Tisaby’s motion to suppress the deposition. Keeping the deposition out of evidence effectively would sink the case against Tisaby. Tisaby’s trial is set for March. Tisaby’s lawyer has said he is

“absolutely 100 percent innocent” and is the target of a racially motivated grand jury investigation. Tisaby was indicted in June for allegedly lying during a deposition last year before Greitens’ trial date. Tisaby was hired by Circuit Attorney Kimberly M. Gardner in January 2018 to investigate Greitens after news broke that Greitens had had an affair with his hairdresser as he was preparing to run for office in 2015. The woman’s ex-husband claimed Greitens threatened to release a

photo of her partly undressed if she exposed their affair. Greitens denied that. In a statement Monday, Gardner called Tisaby a “well-respected career investigator” who was “refused the right to review the transcript of his testimony.” “Allowing this case to proceed without providing Mr. Tisaby the ability to review his deposition testimony sets a dangerous precedent in Missouri,” Gardner said. Joel Currier • 314-340-8132 @joelcurrier on Twitter jcurrier@post-dispatch.com

Prom From A1

Prom night murders Mascoutah was a town of barely 5,000 people in 1969. Mascoutah Community High School hosted prom on a Saturday night, May 3, 1969. Mike Morrison, 18, a senior and honor student, invited Means, who was his girlfriend and a 15-year-old sophomore. Her family lived at Scott Air Force Base. After prom, they went to dinner, then to a friend’s home. Later, they met classmates for a party at an abandoned strip coal mining operation. They left after about 2 a.m. Sunday and never made it home. Their bodies were found the next day at the edge of the mining operation, six miles southwest of Mascoutah. According to a Post-Dispatch account, “Young Morrison had been shot in the head at least twice. He was wearing tuxedo trousers and white shirt. His feet were lying in a small stream.” At the bottom of an incline was Means’ body, nude and bruised. Her hands and feet were bound with clothesline that was tied tightly around her neck, the PostDispatch reported. She’d been strangled. Part of her undergarments were used to gag her. A few days later, an itinerant mechanic who repaired mobile homes in St. Clair County stopped coming to work at Scott Mobile Home Sales. His boss grew suspicious. Police found blood in his Shiloh trailer, according to a newspaper account, and the mechanic became the prime suspect. By the end of May, police nabbed that suspect, 39-year-old Marshall Wayne Stauffer (who used an alias of William Raymond Nickerson), in Sacramento, California. Police said he had undeveloped camera film linking him to other crimes. Extradited to Illinois, Stauffer pleaded guilty in Clinton County of robbing a Belleville boy and girl and also raping the girl near Breese on the night of April 25, days before the Mascoutah prom. He was sentenced to two terms of 50 to 52 years in prison. As part of a plea deal in the Clinton County case, St. Clair County state’s attorney Robert Rice dismissed the Mascoutah murder case. Rice said one reason he dropped the charges was that Means’ family had been transferred by the Air Force to Germany; returning them to St. Clair County for trial would have involved considerable difficulty, according to a Sept. 10, 1969, Post-Dispatch story. Morrison is still furious, not only with Rice’s decision but also that Rice didn’t inform the Morrison family. His parents found out from a television newscast, he said. After an uproar in the community, Rice agreed to meet with Mascoutah residents to explain his decision. Before more than 300 people in the school gymnasium, Rice said there was insufficient evidence. Morrison watched from the back of the gym. He saw that people were angry, pointing fingers, yelling at Rice. “Our kids are not safe,” someone shouted. Jung was among the troopers guarding Rice. “The people started heading for the stage,” Jung said.

Soccer From A1

that the project will employ an estimated 2,179 workers during the 25-month construction period and provide 636 permanent jobs once the stadium begins operating. The application notes that the project “will be an amenity to help attract businesses and employees to the city and state.” “Simply put, MLS fans are the people St. Louis will need to recruit and retain to populate St. Louis’ booming start-up sector, the new, expanded National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency and St. Louis’ growing bio tech industry (to name just a few,)” the application says. “Finally, one of the most important policy objectives achieved by the project is that it will help

CRISTINA M. FLETES PHOTOS, CFLETES@POST-DISPATCH.COM

David Jung, in a picture taken in October at his home in Mascoutah, was a trooper with the state police in 1969. He was the first to discover the bodies of Mike Morrison and Debbie Means, high-school students who were killed on their prom night.

Mike Morrison and Debbie Means were buried in adjacent graves in the Holy Childhood church cemetery in Mascoutah. “They wanted a piece of him. We grabbed him by the arm and we got him out the side door.” Stauffer served 21 years for the Clinton County crimes. He was later arrested for kidnapping and raping girls in Idaho, Oregon and Nevada, and given a life sentence. Stauffer died in 2002 in an Idaho prison at the age of 71, according to the Idaho Department of Correction. Morrison, who was 17 when his brother died, distanced himself from Mascoutah after the murders. “My parents would walk into a restaurant in Mascoutah for a casual dinner, there’d be a hush, fingers point at them. Not to be rude. But they were always, ‘The parents of the boy.’ They would never get away from that,” Morrison said. His family — including Morrison’s other siblings, a 10-year-old brother and a college-aged sister — moved in 1971 to Bowie, Maryland. Morrison graduated from Southern Illinois University in Carbondale and worked at a bank in Du Quoin, Illinois. He moved to Germany and Virginia, where he worked as a financial planner.

Morrison returned to Mascoutah periodically, including for his 30th class reunion, where he waited in the drink line behind Moll. The former classmates hadn’t spoken in a decade. Out of the blue, Morrison turned to Moll. “Weren’t you and your dad there when they retrieved the bodies?” Morrison asked. Moll said he was, and Morrison asked if he’d mind describing what he saw. “Eddie,” Moll replied, “I’ve been waiting for 30 years to tell you.” Moll knew that, as a funeral director, a trade he learned from his father, certain topics weren’t discussed. But Moll reasoned, “It’s his brother and he wants to know.” So Moll divulged specifics he’d long kept from his friend. One detail he shared was the image of Mike’s hands gripping the grass, even in death. “When my dad and I turned Mike over, his hands were down and he had grass in his hands, and the roots came out. His hands were still clenched like this,” Moll said. “Something vivid. I never forgot.” Morrison was taken by surprise, realizing that perhaps his brother hadn’t died instantly as he’d thought. As Moll and Mor-

downtown St. Louis avoid a serious vacant property issue,” the application says. “It will help activate the recently renovated Union Station and the new Ferris wheel and aquarium within.” Compared to other cities with soccer teams, the St. Louis project will be funded primarily with private dollars. Nearly 90% of the MLS facility in Kansas City, for example, was financed with public money, compared to an estimated 22% for the St. Louis stadium. Construction also is waiting on a final agreement between the Missouri Department of Transportation and the city. MoDOT owns the highway ramps that will be removed to make room for the massive project; the city plans to acquire the land and sell it to the ownership group. The application notes that the final three of nine parcels needed to build the facility are close to be-

ing acquired. Though the Taylor-led group would own the stadium, it plans to ask for 25 years of property tax abatement on the value of the stadium development. The MoDOT land is tax-exempt now, but the ownership group plans to pay property taxes on the value of the undeveloped land based on what MoDOT agrees to sell it for. It also would continue paying existing property taxes based on the current value of several private properties it intends to acquire along Olive Street. In an attempt to keep the area active beyond the 17 regular-season MLS home games, the owners plan to build the stadium so restaurants and commercial spaces can serve game-day patrons and weekday pedestrians, even when games aren’t going on. A public plaza with a small soccer field on the eastern end of the

The drink line

rison spoke in a corner at the reunion, Morrison summoned his wife Mindy to hear Moll’s account. Others at the reunion gathered around. “They wanted to hear that, too,” he said. It was the first time people outside Morrison’s group of friends talked openly with him about the murders. Morrison wrote a 12-page story about the crimes, for family posterity. As more information poured in, his focus ballooned into a book, which he co-wrote with Mindy, a retired teacher. In research, he telephoned friends to tap recollections. He read newspaper clippings and tracked down investigators. He lodged a request for Illinois State Police files. He followed a paper trail to document Stauffer’s other crimes and, finally, his death in prison — facts neither Morrison nor many in town knew.

Decoy in a blonde wig A key investigator Morrison turned to for background was Jung. In 1969, when Jung was 25 years old, his duties with the state police were mainly as a traffic cop. The day after prom, when the couple hadn’t come home, Jung heard a deputy quip: “Don’t worry about it, they’re out shacked up someplace.” Once the couple’s abandoned car turned up, “the town was terrified,” Jung said. The police chief asked Jung and Jung’s patrol partner, Trooper Charlie Graul, to search every farmhouse, ditch and culvert near the strip mine. Two days after prom, an airman in a plane spotted Mike’s white shirt. Jung and Graul were the first officers on the ground to reach the bodies. On the theory that the killer confronted the couple in a car, Jung and Graul acted as decoys. Jung wore a blonde wig from the city clerk. The police chief was

a clown in the Shriners, so Jung borrowed his bra and the “rubber bazoombas,” as Jung jokingly called them. He tucked his gun into a purse. The “couple” parked at night for a week. They were spooked a few times when cars pulled up, but no one ever approached. It turns out, the killer had left town and put a letter in the mail addressed to Means’ mother, containing the contents of Mike’s wallet. Jung’s next task: Find where the letter had been mailed. Only a single “k” in the postmark was clear. Jung consulted a road map and drove to towns with K in the name. That didn’t materialize either. In all, Jung logged 331.5 hours over 23 days working on the case. “After this was all over with,” Jung said, “we were back on the road doing traffic.” Morrison always believed his brother was killed first, but decided it is more likely that Means was the first to die. He wishes the state’s attorney were still alive so he could get an explanation for the plea deal. He wrote to the prosecutor’s son but never heard back. Ed and Mindy Morrison have two sons. As a parent, “Ed’s nerves were on edge” whenever a prom rolled around, Mindy said. Researching and telling the story has been cathartic for her husband, Mindy added. “Ed was still stuck in the moment as a 17-year-old kid trying to make sense of what happened,” she said. After the murders, Jung added something to his patrol routine. He made it a point to stop and talk with couples parked on a lover’s lane, asking the girls if they were alright and urging them to stay safe. Mascoutah, Jung said, was forever changed. “It wasn’t the nice peaceful small town anymore,” Jung said, “where nothing bad ever happened.”

A view of the planned MLS stadium looking north at Market Street, according to renderings. The facility is being designed by HOK of St. Louis and Minneapolis-based Julie Snow. stadium offers a more intentional end to the Gateway Mall. The mall now trails off at 21st Street before falling into the highway-ramp hole beneath Market. “(T)he project will also serve

as the anchor for revitalizing an underutilized area of the city, helping to attract new economic activity in an area adjacent to the area occupied by the project,” the application says.


NEWS

12.03.2019 • TUESDAY • M 1

Freeholders From A1

withdrawn and substituted, the fact remains that such citycounty boards — set up under the Missouri Constitution — rarely get anything accomplished. The freeholders process has been used only six times since the constitution was changed in 1924 to give the city and county a way to reunite or otherwise modify their relationship following their separation in 1876. And only once has such a board successfully altered government here: in 1954, when city and county voters approved forming the Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District. Nevertheless, the new board — which may call itself the Board of Electors as the last panel did 30 years ago — is given wide-ranging, open-ended authority to craft a proposal in its yearlong lifespan assigned by the constitution. “It could be anything,” St. Louis Alderman Annie Rice said. “It could be nothing.” While the makeup of the nineperson St. Louis delegation is still being hashed out, the nine St. Louis County appointees and sole state appointee are set. The panel could push for anything from outright consolidation of the city and county to a much more incremental change, such as the last board’s unsuccessful plan to put all of Forest Park under joint city-county ownership and funding. To take effect, whatever the board proposes has to be approved by separate majorities of voters in the city and county. That’s the major difference between the freeholders process and the now-discarded merger plan proposed earlier this year by the Better Together organization. That plan — to merge the city, county and all county municipalities into one entity — would have been decided at a statewide election as a proposed constitutional amendment. As an alternative to the Better Together proposal, municipal officials in the county led a petition effort as outlined in the constitution to trigger the creation of the freeholders board. Mayor Lyda Krewson, who had been a strong supporter of Better Together, said, “I do understand that the folks who collected the signatures here don’t want anything to change” in the county. Still, she concedes “it is possible something good will come out of this.” Krewson made her comment to reporters as she left the Nov. 12 opening meeting of the board, which was held without any city representation but had no substantive discussions. Further meetings aren’t expected until after the city members are approved by the Board of Aldermen. Pat Kelly, executive director of the Municipal League of Metro St. Louis, disputed Krewson’s assertion that the league is opposed to all change. The league initiated the petition process, he insisted, “because we thought there needed to be a public forum” on city-county issues instead of letting the private Better Together organization set the terms of the debate. “We’re hoping that something positive will come out of this process regardless of what it is,” said Kelly, a former Brentwood mayor. “Realistically it’s got to be something they build a consensus for (among voters). It has to be something the general public feels can be beneficial.” Kelly has suggested that the new board consider allowing St. Louis to reenter St. Louis County as one of its municipalities. But he says the league itself hasn’t taken a position. “Once the process starts, we want to be a participant,” he said. Board members and prospective members so far have said little about what the board might consider, other than to say they want to get input from the public. Meanwhile, Krewson and County Executive Sam Page, who appointed the county members, haven’t made any proposals or listed subject areas for the board to consider. Nor has Gov. Mike Parson. That concerns James Shrews-

Railway From A1

adjacent parking garage in January 2017 about four years after Macy’s closed its downtown department store. Bordered by Sixth, Seventh, Olive and Locust streets, the Railway Exchange once housed Famous-Barr’s flagship department store and the offices of its parent company, May Department Stores, which was acquired by Macy’s parent in 2005. Hudson has spent the last three years trying to piece together financing for the historic rehab with some success. It has secured rights to $50 million in Missouri

bury, a former St. Louis aldermanic president who now heads the regional Convention and Sports Complex Authority, which oversees the domed stadium downtown. “If anything’s going to happen with the board, the mayor, the governor and the county executive have to be on the same page and they have to work diligently toward that goal,” he said. “If they don’t, this is just a waste of time.”Meanwhile, Terry Jones, a professor emeritus of political science at the University of Missouri at St. Louis, said the board will have to decide “whether to go big, I mean sweeping, or go small” in terms of its plan’s impact. “I would define a sweeping change under the current climate as being city reentry,” Jones said. Ken Warren, a political science professor at St. Louis University, doubts that the new board will produce anything significant that can get voter approval — in part because of the “bad feelings” left from the Better Together proposal. “There’s a whole cloud over this,” Warren said. The last freeholder petition drive was in 1987, when thenCounty Executive Gene McNary initiated one to advance his goal of drastically reducing the number of county municipalities. Amid die-hard opposition from municipal officials, the board spent a year hammering out a plan calling for the remapping of the county into 37 expanded or new municipalities, four fire districts and no unincorporated areas and various other features. But an election slated for 1989 was never held. Opponents challenged the plan all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, which declared invalid the state constitution’s requirement that only property owners could serve on freeholder boards. Backers then got the state Supreme Court to order appointment of a second board, with no property ownership requirement. The court didn’t give it a name but said it should be made up of electors, a term that generally means registered voters. So the new board informally called itself the Board of Electors. Because of that, Joe Blanner, a Jefferson County lawyer and Parson’s appointee to the current board, says the electors name should be used by the panel that is forming now. The 1990-91 electors board’s Forest Park plan, which also would have increased business utility taxes to pay for a fund to help attract new businesses to the region, lost in both the city and the county. Also failing at the polls were freeholder-generated proposals in 1926 for a city-county merger under city government, in 1955 for a metropolitan transit district, and in 1959 for a new metropolitan district to handle items such as police, sanitation, roads, transit and economic development. For years, freeholder boards were limited to considering an outright city-county merger, city reentry, annexation by the city of part of the county and new metro districts for specified services. But in 1966, Missouri voters approved a constitutional amendment adding a so-called fifth avenue — “any other plan for the partial or complete government of all or any part of the city and the county.” However, it’s legally unclear if a freeholders/electors proposal can tinker with school districts, said Jordan Cherrick, the lead lawyer in the successful effort to get the state Supreme Court in 1990 to keep the process intact. The state constitution addresses schools and education in an entirely different section than local government, he pointed out. Whether a freeholders plan could even address schools has never been ruled on by the courts, he said. However, there is at least some historical precedent for dealing with schools. The 1926 citycounty merger plan rejected by voters also would have put county schools under the city school system. Mark Schlinkmann • 314-340-8265 @markschlinkmann on Twitter mschlinkmann@post-dispatch.com

Historic Tax Credits, federal historic tax credits likely worth another $50 million and another $50 million in tax-exempt bonds, according to a filing on Monday seeking the dismissal of the involuntary bankruptcy petition. “However, many of these tax credit programs would be placed in jeopardy if an order for relief under the Bankruptcy Code is granted,” the response filed by David Sosne of Summers Compton Wells said. A change in ownership would jeopardize the federal credits, and to retain the right to claim the state credits, the developers must spend at least $20.3 million on the project by July. Changes

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A5

LAW AND ORDER SWANSEA — Man accused of sexually assaulting child: A Fairview Heights man was charged Nov. 20 with sexually assaulting a 7-year-old child, police said Monday. Robert Kassing, 57, was helping a family with child care when the alleged incident occurred. He was charged in St. Clair County with predatory criminal sexual assault and aggravated criminal sexual abuse. The father of the 7-year-old called police Nov. 17 after the child told a grandmother that Kassing had gotten into the shower with the child while at the family’s house in Swansea. Family members then looked Kassing up online and discovered he was a registered sex offender. Police interviewed the child, who told investigators that Kassing committed an assault in the shower. Kassing has a record of child pornography and the sexual assault of a 16-year-old victim, according to Illinois’ sex offender registry. “It is an important reminder to always check the sex offender registry and know who is near your children,” Swansea Police Chief Steve Johnson said in a statement Monday. “The father did not know.” Kassing is being held on $1,750,000 bail. Police are encouraging anyone with more information about Kassing to call Detective Gary Reuter at 618-233-8114. ST. LOUIS — Woman admits fatal stabbing: A 60-year-old woman admitted in court Monday to fatally stabbing her boyfriend at their St. Louis home last year. Kimberly Brown pleaded

Trump From A1

the Ukraine controversy, according to the Washington Post. Members of the House Judiciary Committee and other more liberal-minded lawmakers and congressional aides have been privately discussing the possibility of drafting articles that include obstruction of justice or other “high crimes” they believe are clearly outlined in special counsel Robert Mueller’s report — or allegations that Trump has used his office to benefit his bottom line. The idea, however, is running into resistance from some moderate Democrats wary of impeachment blowback in their GOP-leaning districts, as well as Democratic leaders who sought to keep impeachment narrowly focused, according to officials who spoke on the condition of anonymity to talk freely. For Republicans, the proceedings are simply a “hoax,” with Trump insisting he did nothing wrong and his GOP allies in line behind him. Late Monday, he tweeted his daily complaints about it all and then added a suggestive question: “Can we go to Supreme Court to stop?” He didn’t elaborate. It’s all boiling down to a historic test of political judgment in a case that is dividing Congress and the country. Departing Monday for a NATO meeting in London, Trump criticized the House for pushing forward with proceedings while he was heading overseas, a breach of political decorum that traditionally leaves partisan differences at the water’s edge. He predicted Republicans would actually benefit from the entire impeachment effort against him, though “it’s a disgrace for our country.” For the Democrats, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi faces a critical test of her leadership as she steers the process ahead after resisting the impeachment inquiry through the summer, warning it was too divisive for the country and required bipartisan support. Speaking to reporters at the international climate conference in Madrid, Pelosi declined

to the state program would make obtaining that many credits in the future more difficult. Gamma Real Estate Capital LLC financed the building purchase and holds an $18.6 million secured claim. Another $2.5 million in mechanics liens from contractors are also pending and part of the litigation in state court, led by architecture firm Cannon Design, which claims it is owed over $1.7 million. The unsecured creditors who filed the bankruptcy petition, which include St. Louis consulting firms Development Strategies and Lafser & Associates and security firm Hudson Services, are “a small fraction of the overall debt

guilty to a reduced count of involuntary manslaughter and armed criminal action in the April 2018 stabbing death of her boyfriend, Charles Patrick, 55. Brown’s trial on charges of first-degree murder and armed criminal action had been scheduled for this week. Both lived in the 3300 block of Clara Avenue in the WellsGoodfellow neighborhood, where police were called early on a Saturday morning. Officers found Patrick dead in a pool of blood with a stab wound to his torso, charges said. Police later found a bloody knife in the kitchen sink. Brown told police she stabbed her boyfriend in the chest, according to court documents. Prosecutors recommended a 10-year sentence for the manslaughter charge and a concurrent three-year term for armed criminal action. Sentencing is scheduled for Jan. 27 before Circuit Judge Michael Mullen. ST. LOUIS — City reaches 183 homicides: A man fatally injured over the weekend was St. Louis’ 183rd homicide victim of the year. Last year at this time, St. Louis had 167 homicides. Police have not released the name of the latest victim. At about 6:30 a.m. Saturday, St. Louis police were called about a shooting in the 5200 block of Emerson Avenue. The unidentified man was found on the front porch of a home there. He was suffering from what police called a puncture wound and died later at a hospital. On Monday, police spokeswoman Evita Caldwell said whether the man was shot is “part of the investigation.” Caldwell said she had nothing

else to add. That block of Emerson Avenue is the border for the Walnut Park East and the Mark Twain neighborhoods, which both are seeing spikes in crime. Homicide detectives are handling the investigation. Police have no suspects. Anyone with information is asked to call police at 314-444-5371 or CrimeStoppers at 866-3718477. In all of 2018, St. Louis had 186 homicides. In 2017, there were 205 homicides; in 2016, 188 homicides; and in 2015, 188 homicides. CHESTERFIELD — Man sought in connection with theft, fire: Police said Monday they’re searching for a man who they believe stole jewelry from a Macy’s store and who’s also a person of interest in a suspicious fire that was set at a nearby Target. The man seen on security footage is suspected of stealing about $45,000 to $50,000 in jewelry Saturday from the Macy’s in Chesterfield Mall located off Interstate 64 and Clarkson Road. Earlier that same afternoon, a suspicious fire triggered an emergency evacuation of a Target at 40 THF Blvd., two miles west of the mall. Firefighters arrived about 5:30 p.m. to find that Target employees had used fire extinguishers to quell the blaze, which started in the bedding section of the store, fire officials said. No one was injured. “The store remains temporarily closed as we assess and clean up the damage caused to our building and products, and will likely remain closed until midDecember,” a Target representative said in an email.

to engage with impeachment questions. “When we travel abroad, we don’t talk about the president in a negative way,” she said. “We save that for home.” The next step in the impeachment process comes Wednesday, when the Judiciary Committee gavels its own hearings open ahead of a possible impeachment vote by the full House by Christmas. That would presumably send the issue to the Senate for a trial in January. The Democratic majority on the Intelligence Committee says its report, compiled after weeks of testimony from current and former diplomats and administration officials, will speak for itself in laying out the president’s actions toward Ukraine. Ahead of the report’s public release, Republicans preempted with their own 123-page rebuttal. In it, they claim there’s no evidence Trump pressured Zelenskiy. Instead, they say Democrats just want to undo the 2016 election. Republicans dismiss witness testimony of a shadow diplomacy being run by Trump lawyer Rudy Giuliani, and they rely on the president’s insistence that he was merely concerned about “corruption” in Ukraine — though the White House transcript of Trump’s phone call with Zelenskiy never mentions the word. “They are trying to impeach President Trump because some unelected bureaucrats chafed at an elected President’s ‘outside the beltway’ approach to diplomacy,” according to the report from Republicans Devin Nunes of California, Jim Jordan of Ohio and Michael McCaul of Texas. Trump on Monday pointed to Zelenskiy’s recent comments as proof he did nothing wrong. The Ukrainian president said in an interview he never talked to Trump “from the position of a quid pro quo,” but he didn’t say Trump did nothing wrong. In fact, he had strong criticism for Trump’s actions in the Time magazine interview. With Ukraine at war with Russia, he said, its partners “can’t go blocking anything for us.” The finished Intelligence Committee report sets up the week’s cascading actions. The

panel is expected to vote to send the findings to the Judiciary Committee, which will take the lead on considering articles of impeachment. As the process intensifies, Judiciary on Wednesday will convene legal experts whose testimony, alongside the report will begin to lay the groundwork for possible charges. Democrats could begin drafting articles of impeachment against the president in a matter of days, with voting in the Judiciary Committee next week. Republicans on the committee, led by Rep. Doug Collins of Georgia, plan to rely on procedural moves to stall the process and portray the inquiry as a sham. The White House declined an invitation to participate, with Counsel Pat Cipollone denouncing the proceedings as a “baseless and highly partisan inquiry” in a letter to Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler, DN.Y. Trump had previously suggested that he might be willing to offer written testimony under certain conditions, though aides suggested they did not anticipate Democrats would ever agree to them. Cipollone’s letter of nonparticipation applied only to the Wednesday hearing, and he demanded more information from Democrats on how they intended to conduct further hearings before Trump would decide whether to participate. Nadler said Monday if the president really thought his call with Ukraine was “perfect,” as he repeatedly says, he would “provide exculpatory information that refutes the overwhelming evidence of his abuse of power.” House rules provide the president and his attorneys the right to cross-examine witnesses and review evidence before the committee, but little ability to bring forward witnesses of their own. Asked why not have his lawyers participate, Trump said Monday: “Because the whole thing is a hoax. Everybody knows it.”

that likely exceeds” $22 million, the filing says. It accuses the unsecured firms of using bankruptcy court as a collection device. The best chance for the unsecured creditors to be paid is if the project is successful, Sosne argued in the filing, because there is no income being generated by the building and parking garage. Meanwhile, it costs some $75,000 a month just to pay taxes, insurance and other property costs, and the parking garage needs to be demolished, the filing claims. Recently, the Railway Exchange owners said they responded to a request for 143,000-square-feet of downtown office space from the federal General Services Ad-

ministration and that they are “actively attempting to sell, market and develop the project.” Shortly after Hudson Holdings acquired the building, a 2017 water main break did millions of dollars worth of damage to the Railway Exchange. The Railway Exchange owners last year sued Ameren, accusing the electric utility through a subcontractor of causing the break. The Railway Exchange, completed in 1914, is the city’s second-largest building by area, just behind the AT&T Center, which is also vacant.

The Washington Post contributed to this report.

Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com


LOCAL

A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • TUESDAY • 12.03.2019

LAW AND ORDER ST. CHARLES COUNTY — One dead in house fire: One person was killed Monday afternoon in a house fire, officials say. A neighbor called in the fire at 4:08 p.m., telling police of concern that someone was trapped inside a burning home in the 300 block of Blanche Drive, according to Kelly Hunsel of the St. Charles Fire Department. Hunsel reported the fire under control at 4:41 p.m. and out at 4:55 p.m. and said the state fire marshal will investigate the cause of the fire. When firefighters arrived at the home they found smoke billowing from the roof and a person who was already deceased inside. Officials have not released the identity of the victim. There were no other known injuries, according to the St. Charles County Ambulance District. ST. LOUIS — Suit against legislator dropped: A woman who accused state Rep. Steven Roberts Jr. of sexually assaulting her in a downtown bar in 2015 dismissed her lawsuit against the legislator last week, according to court documents. The woman, Amy Harms, filed the suit in 2017 alleging she was assaulted by Roberts in April 2015 at the now-closed Side Bar on Washington Avenue. Harms claimed Roberts, then an assistant city prosecutor, penned her in a corner of the bar with his chair and fondled her under a table. The suit was dismissed Nov. 26. Attorneys for both Harms and Roberts did not respond to requests for comment this week. Roberts, who now represents a district in St. Louis, was arrested a few days after the incident but was never charged. Harms came forward after another woman, former state Rep. Cora Faith Walker, publicly alleged that Roberts raped her after

a night out. Roberts denied the claims and filed a defamation suit against Walker in October 2016. Walker then countersued Roberts in 2017. Both dismissed their lawsuits last May. ST. LOUIS — Sentencing in double homicide: A St. Louis man was sentenced Monday in a 2018 double homicide stemming from an alleged robbery and drug deal. A jury found Corliss F. Mack Jr., 38, of the 2800 block of Howard Street, guilty in September of two counts of second-degree murder and two counts of armed criminal action, while finding him not guilty of robbery and kidnapping. The jury acquitted a co-defendant of all counts. Judge Michael Noble sentenced Mack to 20 years in prison. Mack and the co-defendant stood trial in September in the May 2018 deaths of Ira Johnson and Sylvester Caston in the city’s Penrose neighborhood. Johnson, 55, and Caston, 61, were found shot to death May 19 in the 4400 block of Sexauer Avenue. Authorities said Mack fatally shot the men during a holdup of a heroin dealer. ST. LOUIS — One of two defendants has murder case dismissed: The circuit attorney’s office dismissed a murder case Monday against one of two defendants in a 2017 shooting death. Five felony counts, including first-degree murder and first-degree assault, were dropped against Brandon Cross, 30, in the shooting death of Gentrail Wafford. Wafford, 35, was found shot to death June 8, 2017, in the 1400 block of De Soto Avenue. Cross’ trial was scheduled to begin this week. Circuit Attorney Kimberly M. Gardner said in a statement that the case was dismissed “due to witness intimidation, which led to

ROBERT COHEN, RCOHEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Investigators from the state fire marshal’s office photograph the area around a burned home after one person was killed in a house fire in the 300 block of Blanche Drive in St. Charles on Monday. witnesses not being available at this time.” Her statement also said, “It is extremely important to protect witnesses to bring those who need to be held accountable to justice.” Cross’ lawyer, T.J. Matthes, said, “We were confident that whether they had their witnesses or not, a jury would find him not guilty.” Murder and other charges are still pending against co-defendant Terrance D. Williams in Wafford’s death. Williams, 30, also faces witness tampering charges along with two others in connection with another homicide in 2018. MADISON COUNTY — Crash closes I-70 ramp: A multivehicle crash early Monday closed the westbound ramp of Interstate 70 leading to southbound Interstate 55 near Troy, Illinois. The Illinois State Police said the overpasses were icy at the time of the 5 a.m. crash. At least one person was seriously injured in the crash. Two tractor-trailers overturned. One passenger car also crashed there.

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12.03.2019 • TUESDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A7 M 1 TUESDAY • 12.03.2019 • A7

BUSINESS DIGEST Stocks retreat on economy, trade jitters: Wall Street stepped back from last week’s record highs on Monday, with weak manufacturing data and fresh trade worries keeping buyers on the sidelines. All three major U.S. stock averages began the last month of the year in the red as investors returned from the long holiday weekend. A report from the Institute for Supply Management (ISM) showed U.S. manufacturing activity contracted in November for the fourth consecutive month, stoking concerns that the longest period of economic expansion in U.S. history could be losing steam. President Donald Trump also on Monday tweeted that he would restore tariffs on steel imported from Brazil and Argentina, providing yet another sign that the multifront trade between the United States and its global trading partners will continue to dominate markets and hinder global economic growth. The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 267.35 points, or 0.95%, to 27,784.06, the S&P 500 lost 27 points, or 0.86%, to 3,113.98 and the Nasdaq Composite dropped 97.48 points, or 1.12%, to 8,567.99. Centene to sell IlliniCare to CVS: Centene Corp. said on Monday it had entered an agreement to sell its Illinois unit to CVS Health Corp. The sale moves the Claytonbased health insurer a step closer to completing its $15.27 billion deal to buy smaller rival WellCare Health Plans Inc. When Centene announced the WellCare deal, Wall Street analysts said divestitures in some states likely would be required to address antitrust concerns. IlliniCare Health Plan serves about 1.5 million Medicaid enrollees, which also includes older adults who are dually eligible for coverage under Medicaid and Medicare. Financial terms of the IlliniCare deal were not disclosed. Ex-Honeywell CEO in bid talks for Vertiv: A company led by former Honeywell International CEO David Cote and backed by Goldman Sachs Group is in talks to acquire U.S. backup power equipment firm Vertiv for more than $5 billion, including debt, Reuters reported

Monday, citing sources. Based in Columbus, Ohio, Vertiv manufactures systems and provides maintenance for backup power and other safety systems to data centers, communication networks, and commercial and industrial environments. Vertiv is the former network power business of Ferguson-based Emerson, which private equity firm Platinum Equity acquired three years ago for about $4 billion, in one of the largest deals the Los Angelesbased buyout firm had ever completed. Emerson kept a minority interest in the company, according to a statement at the time. Vertiv declined to comment. Representatives for Platinum Equity and Goldman Sachs did not immediately respond to requests for comment. Cote could not be immediately reached for comment. Facebook to allow transfer of photos, videos: Facebook Inc. said on Monday it has introduced an option to transfer photos and videos from the social media network directly to other services, starting with Google Photos. The option will be available to users in Ireland, with a worldwide rollout planned for the first half of 2020. All data transfers will be encrypted and users will be asked for a password before the transfer is initiated, the company said in a blog post. Facebook said in September it supports data portability and is planning to build new tools around it. Wells Fargo names new No. 2: Wells Fargo & Co. on Monday named Scott Powell chief operating officer, effective Dec. 9. Powell most recently was chief executive officer of Santander Holdings USA Inc. as well as of Santander Consumer USA Holdings Inc. The COO position has been vacant at the bank since October 2016, when Tim Sloan was promoted as CEO. Powell will report directly to CEO Charles Scharf, who took over the top job in October. Wells Fargo is the parent of St. Louis-based Wells Fargo Advisors. From staff and wire reports

St. Louis lacks a growth mentality, construction executives complain they want to tell. “Our community and civic leaders and our political leaders are not on the same page,” he said. “There’s too much disagreement about what progress really looks like.” He cited the NorthSide Regeneration project area, where city officials have tried to cancel Paul McKee’s development rights, as an example of a project where “everybody needs to put their swords down and get the toxicity out of the conversation.” Clayco affiliates sold some property to McKee for the development in 2011 and 2012. Clark moved from St. Louis to Chicago in 2010 and placed Clayco’s headquarters there three years later, partly to take advantage of business opportunities in the Windy City. Chicago, he said, has 62 tower cranes operating right now, despite high tax rates and pension costs that are sometimes cited as barriers to doing business. “Their economic development people are in such lockstep,” Clark said, adding that he wouldn’t say the same about St. Louis. St. Louis’ crane count is usually in the single digits. It’s not a perfect economic indicator, but it does show where development dollars are flowing. If we want to know why the big cranes are rare here, we need to listen to the people responsible for putting them up.

its work outside St. Louis. “Part of the problem in St. Louis is there has been no growth here for 30 years,” said Bob Clark, founder and chairman of Clayco. “Increased density creates an increase in value across industrial, office and retail, and that’s what St. Louis has produced more attracts capital.” than its share of multibillionSt. Louis also doesn’t have a dollar construction firms, but most of their growth is happening particularly compelling image. “Recruiting talent to here is exin other cities. tremely difficult in our business,” Those companies, the Consaid Greg Hesser, president of struction Forum St. Louis figured, have a pretty good idea why Alberici Constructors. The executives agreed that St. some markets are booming and Louis has made progress toward others are not. On Monday, the a more diverse construction group asked top executives of workforce. Clark said he was Alberici, Arco, Clayco and Mc“horrified” at the industry’s lack Carthy to compare and contrast their hometown with other places of diversity in Chicago, where Clayco is headquartered, and said where they do business. St. Louis firms have done more to St. Louis, they concurred, has recruit African American workers a strong construction workforce and help minority-owned suband experienced set of subconcontractors. tracting firms. It falls short in The construction industry areas that are beyond the indusleaders said successful cities have try’s control, including populamore coordinated and effective tion growth that drives demand political and civic leadership than for new apartments, offices and they see in St. Louis. shopping centers. Jeff Cook, president and chief John Buescher, president of McCarthy’s central division, said executive of Arco Construction, said places like Dallas, Denver most of his firm’s business is in and Nashville succeeded because the “sunshine smile” stretching “they got out and told their story. from California to Texas to the The cities that are pro-business, southeastern seaboard. “That’s they will communicate and let where people are moving and you know that.” where a lot of the capital is,” he In St. Louis, Clark added, key said. McCarthy, with more than $4 billion in revenue, does 95% of groups can’t agree on what story DAVID NICKLAUS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Cyber Monday sales are on track to hit record BY JOSEPH PISANI

Associated Press

NEW YORK — Cyber Monday is still holding up as the biggest online shopping day of the year, even though many of the same deals have been available online for weeks and the name harks back to the days of dial-up modems. Shoppers are expected to spend a record $9.4 billion on purchases made on their phones and com-

puters Monday, up about 19% from last year’s Cyber Monday, according to Adobe Analytics, which tracks transactions at 80 of the top 100 U.S. online stores. Cyber Monday was created by retailers in 2005 to get people to shop online at a time when highspeed internet was rare and the iPhone didn’t exist. The idea was to encourage people to shop at work, where faster connections

made it easier to browse, when they returned from the Thanksgiving break. “It’s somewhat antiquated,” said Rob Graf, vice president of strategy and insights at cloud computing company Salesforce, which tracks shopping behavior of the online stores that use its platform. “But retailers are still using it as a big milestone and driving heavy discounts.”

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM /BUSINESS Technology companies led a broad slide for stocks Monday, handing the market a downbeat start to the month. Trade tensions flared with China’s diplomatic retaliation for U.S. support of protesters in Hong Kong, putting investors in a selling mood.

United States Steel

10

S O 52-week range

$24.74

28,200

Dow Jones industrials

27,920

Close: 27,783.04 Change: -268.37 (-1.0%)

$42 40

12

38 S O 52-week range

$11.06

$18.93

30 S O 52-week range

$29.77

3,120

Close: 3,113.87 Change: -27.11 (-0.9%)

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Corn

Dec 19 Jan 20 Dec 19

373.50 870.50 543.25

+2.25 -6.25 -4.25

Wheat

3,200

CHICAGO MERC

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

28,000

3,100

Feeder cattle

27,000

3,000

Live cattle

26,000

2,900

Jan 20 Dec 19 Dec 19 Nov 19 Dec 19

142.15 120.75 60.35 20.40 263.25

-.12 -.45 -1.67 +.04 -.95

ICE

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Cotton

Dec 19 Dec 19 Jan 20

63.85 121.50 26.02

-.55 +2.95 -.29

NEW YORK

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Crude oil

Jan 20 Jan 20 Jan 20 Jan 20

55.96 1.5733 188.60 2.329

+.79 -.0177 +.75 +.048

Hogs

24,000

Milk Copper

2,800 J

J

A

O

2,700

N

J

J

A

S

O

N

Coffee

StocksRecap NYSE

NASD

3,153 1,662 725 1970 57 44

2,158 1,053 825 2138 80 44

Vol. (in mil.) Pvs. Volume Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows

S

DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

HIGH 28109.84 10937.14 849.64 13554.29 8672.84 3144.31 2012.87 32055.32 1627.34

LOW 27782.35 10729.58 844.09 13443.10 8540.16 3110.78 1995.45 31705.27 1606.63

CLOSE 27783.04 10734.85 845.88 13448.26 8567.99 3113.87 1995.86 31735.42 1607.58

CHG. -268.37 -122.72 -5.84 -96.95 -97.48 -27.11 -14.29 -290.44 -16.92

%CHG. WK -0.96% t -1.13% t -0.69% t -0.72% t -1.13% t -0.86% t -0.71% t -0.91% t -1.04% t

MO QTR s s t s t s s s s s s s s s s s s s

YTD +19.10% +17.06% +18.65% +18.23% +29.13% +24.21% +20.01% +23.25% +19.21%

Sugar

Gas blend Heating oil Natural gas

52-WK LO HI

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV NAME

52-WK LO HI

T

26.80

39.70 37.32

-.06 -0.2 +30.8 +31.7

FF

10.17

19.31 11.02

-.20 -1.8 -30.5 -34.4 13 0.24a

Aegion Corp

AEGN

14.12

22.87 21.25

-.41 -1.9 +30.2

... 28

... General Motors

GM

31.46

41.90 35.88

-.12 -0.3

Allied Hlthcre Prod

AHPI

0.92

1.01 +.01 +1.0 -44.7

... dd

... Home Depot

HD

Amdocs

DOX

52.60

69.85 69.29

-.01

Ameren Corp

AEE

62.51

80.85 73.68

-.65 -0.9 +13.0 +12.1 26

ABInBev

BUD

64.55 102.70 79.28

Arch Coal

ARCH

68.63 101.92 72.81 -1.30 -1.8 -12.3

Avadel Pharma

AVDL

1.03

Bank of America

BAC

Belden Inc BellRing Brands Boeing

BA

... +18.3

... 19

1.14 Huttig Building Prod HBP 1.98 Lee Enterprises

-.07 -0.1 +20.5 +6.3 20 3.19e Lowes -2.1

4

1.80 Mallinckrodt plc

... dd

... MasterCard

22.66

33.60 33.43 +.11 +0.3 +35.7 +23.3 12

0.72 McDonald’s

BDC

37.79

64.33 53.47

0.20 Olin

BRBR

15.15

20.90 20.23 +.20 +1.0

Build-A-Bear Wkshp BBW

6.47

6.14

-.21 -3.3 +138.0

-.27 -0.5 +28.0 +2.3 14 ...

...

292.47 446.01 355.18 -11.00 -3.0 +10.1 +20.7 33 2.31

6.50

2.93

-.07 -2.3 -25.8 -61.5 dd

8.22 Perficient

LOW MNK

27.33

3.77

... dd

...

-.20 -1.1 -13.9 -13.7 -.61 -6.3 -70.2 -60.3

2.00 Reinsurance Gp

RGA

0.28 Reliv

RELV SR

Centene Corp.

CNC

41.63

68.44 60.18

-.29 -0.5

Charter

CHTR 272.91 485.99 470.33 +.32 +0.1 +65.0

Cigna

CI

Citigroup

C

48.42

76.28 74.52

-.60 -0.8 +43.1 +21.4 10 2.04f UPS B

Commerce Banc.

CBSH

50.86

64.61 x63.55

-.03

2.20 ... 1.32

+9.9 +8.0 30 5.00f

9.07

43.28 41.76

... ...

... -76.1 -85.7

27.32 17.32 37.37

83.88 113.73 104.96

1.08 Spire Inc

-.52 -1.2 +87.6

4

0.80

... 52

...

-.64 -0.6 +17.8 +13.2 11

...

129.17 169.26 164.15 -1.31 -0.8 +17.1 +13.7 15

2.40

3.45 70.53

5.89

4.14 +.15 +3.7

88.00 77.29

... dd

...

+4.3 +0.8 17

-2.3

2.37

STXS SF

38.39

TGT

60.15 127.97 123.98 -1.03 -0.8 +87.6 +87.0 21

2.64

UPS

89.89 125.31 118.22 -1.51 -1.3 +21.2 +13.0 20

3.84

USB

43.14

... 17 1.04b US Bancorp ... US Steel

EPC

26.36

46.55 30.48

-.68 -2.2 -18.4 -27.3 16

Emerson

EMR

55.39

75.54 73.36

-.50 -0.7 +22.8 +14.7 20 2.00f Verizon

Energizer Holdings

2.99

X

9.93

VZ

52.28

4.75

4.19

-.13 -0.2

... Stereotaxis, Inc. 0.04 Target Corp.

63.23 61.63

60.51 59.76

-.08 -1.9 +25.4+172.4

-.27 -0.4 +30.8 +13.5 14 1.68f

24.74 13.67 +.55 +4.2 -25.1 -44.5

8

61.34 59.96

8 2.46f

-.28 -0.5

+6.7 +5.3

0.20

WMT

85.78 125.38 119.28 +.19 +0.2 +28.1 +27.5 69 2.12f

WBA

49.03

86.31 59.27

-.33 -0.6 -13.3

... 11

1.83

WFC

43.02

54.75 53.62

-.84 -1.5 +16.4 +5.4 12

2.04

51.28 49.91 +.02 47.03 44.85

Esco Technologies

62.72

89.12 86.63 -1.44 -1.6 +31.5 +27.0 24

... +10.5 +9.7 33

0.32 Wells Fargo

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note rose to 1.83% on Monday. Yields affect rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.

4.75 5.50 5.25

LAST

NET CHG

1YR AGO

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 52-wk T-bill 2-year T-note 5-year T-note 7-year T-note 10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

1.57 1.59 1.59 1.60 1.65 1.77 1.83 2.28

-0.01 -0.02 ... +0.02 +0.04 +0.04 +0.06 +0.08

2.36 2.53 2.69 2.79 2.87 2.92 3.01 3.30

NET 1YR LAST CHG AGO

BONDS

PRIME FED RATE FUNDS YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO

TREASURIES

1.63 2.38 2.13

Barclays Glob Agg Bd Barclays USAggregate Barclays US High Yield Moodys AAA Corp Idx Barclays US Corp 10-Yr. TIPS

1.41 2.30 5.84 2.94 2.87 .18

+0.01 ... -0.01 -0.01 ... +0.02

2.19 3.55 7.23 4.21 4.36 1.03

0.60

1.20 WalMart

32.54 36.09

Silver

-3.30 -.13 -.70

...

-.89 -1.4 +48.8 +26.9 19

... 13 0.68f Walgreen Boots

ENR

Enterprise Financial EFSC

CHG

CLOSE

1462.30 16.84 899.70

Gold

0.58

... Stifel Financial

Edgewell

ESE

1.43

20.92

-.46 -0.8

-.35 -0.8 +19.2

-.06 -3.1 -10.9 -20.0

POST

-.27 -1.2 -22.3 -22.3 10

... +18.4

1.88

PRFT

32.28 21.62

-7.3 19

3.69

... Post Holdings

60.97 x55.74

+9.5

1.76

+0.6

85.90 121.22 116.00 -1.31 -1.1 +25.6 +34.2 26

8.65

14.30

141.95 213.71 196.94 -2.98 -1.5

-.01 -0.5

15.38

44.35

... 94

1.81

OLN

CASS

... -13.3 17

3.69

BTU

CAL

... 17

5.44

1.57

169.04 221.93 195.18 +.70 +0.4

Cass Info. Systems

+5.3

1.52

MCD

Caleres Inc.

-5.5 23

+7.3

171.89 293.69 286.47 -5.76 -2.0 +51.9 +51.5 66

BG

+0.2

-0.6 dd

158.09 239.31 217.62 -2.89 -1.3 +26.7 +33.0 22

MA

Bunge Ltd

47.26

62.92 53.54 +.16 +0.3

... Peabody Energy

LEE

.0167 .6765 .2359 1.2935 .7534 .1422 1.1017 .0139 .2881 .009134 .051106 .0156 .0683 .000846 .9999

PreciousMetals NEW YORK

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV

AT&T Inc

2.17

PREV

.0167 .6821 .2373 1.2944 .7520 .1421 1.1078 .0140 .2876 .009176 .051113 .0156 .0687 .000843 1.0085

Interestrates Interestrates

TKR

2.04 FutureFuel

Argentina Australia Brazil Britain Canada China Euro India Israel Japan Mexico Russia So. Africa So. Korea Switzerland

Platinum

NAME

7

TKR

$33.75

PE: 12.3 Vol.: 47.1m (0.9x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $300.7 b Yield: 2.2%

FOREIGN CURRENCY IN DOLLARS CLOSE

Chicago BOT is in cents.

Stocks of Local Interest

N

ExchangeRates

CHICAGO BOT

Soybeans

10 DAYS

S O 52-week range

$22.66

$41.23

Vol.: 6.6m (1.1x avg.) PE: 13.9 Mkt. Cap: $31.8 b Yield: 1.4%

29,000

25,000

25

N

Futures

S&P 500

BAC

Close: $33.43 0.11 or 0.3% Banks got a lift from rising bond yields, which they rely on to charge more lucrative interest on loans. $35

36

N

PE: 11.0 Vol.: 12.6m (1.0x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $9.6 b Yield: 1.7%

3,160

3,080

10 DAYS

-

14 10

Bank of America

NEM

Close: $38.74 0.34 or 0.9% The gold mining company announced a $1 billion stock buyback plan.

$16

N

Vol.: 12.5m (0.8x avg.) PE: 3.9 Mkt. Cap: $2.3 b Yield: 1.5%

Charts show stocks that made the news yesterday.

Newmont Goldcorp

MRO

Close: $11.96 0.31 or 2.7% Rising crude oil prices helped lift energy and oilfield services companies.

12

$9.93

27,640

Marathon Oil

X

Close: $13.67 0.55 or 4.2% President Donald Trump said the U.S. would impose tariffs on steel and aluminum imports from Argentina and Brazil. $14

Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months. Other: x - ex-dividend.

GlobalMarkets INDEX S&P 500 Frankfurt DAX London FTSE 100 Hong Kong Hang Seng Paris CAC-40 Mexico City Bolsa Tokyo Nikkei 225 Sao Paolo Bovespa Toronto Zurich

LAST 3113.87 12964.68 7285.94 26444.72 5786.74 42544.14 23529.50 108927.80 16981.47 10348.44

CHG

CHG

YTD

-27.11 -271.70 -60.59 +98.23 -118.42 -276.04 +235.59 +688.50 -58.73 -144.80

-0.86% -2.05% -0.82% +0.37% -2.01% -0.64% +1.01% +0.64% -0.34% -1.38%

+24.21% +22.78% +8.29% +2.43% +22.32% +2.17% +17.56% +23.94% +18.56% +22.77%


A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S P A P E R • F O U N D E D B Y J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2M , 1 18 7• 8TUESDAY • 12.03.2019 A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

TUESDAY • 12.03.2019 • A8 RAY FARRIS PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER

GILBERT BAILON EDITOR •

TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

Tobacco’s lesson Parson should lead the campaign for a Missouri vaping tax, not rule it out.

M

issouri already imposes the lowest cigarette tax in America, which deprives the state of needed revenue to counter tobacco’s health care costs and misses an opportunity to nudge potential new smokers away from starting. Now Gov. Mike Parson says he has no interest in learning from the state’s mistake, nor following the lead of other states that are confronting growing health concerns about vaping by boosting the taxes on it. So-called “sin taxes” are an effective way to contain potentially harmful markets that can’t realistically be outlawed (tobacco, alcohol, gambling) and to recoup some of the fiscal and societal costs they inflict. Why close off that option at the start of a new and growing health crisis? Vaping — smoking electronic cigarettes, initially thought to be a safe alternative to tobacco — is being blamed for dozens of deaths nationally, including at least two in Missouri. Though the lung illness still isn’t fully understood, there’s enough evidence to conclude it’s in the public interest to discourage young people from taking up this habit. Yet, as the Post-Dispatch’s Kurt Erickson reported Monday, Parson, the elected official in the best position to start building support for a significant Missouri vaping tax, is dismissing the idea at the outset. Even as Parson recently outlined an educational campaign to crack down on underage vaping, he opined: “I don’t know if pricing it out of someone’s reach is always the right answer.” What could be wrong with pricing a potentially deadly product out of reach of teens who are being lured to it with candy flavors? The knee-jerk, anti-tax instincts of Jefferson City’s ruling Republicans,

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A woman using an electronic cigarette exhales a puff of smoke. whom Parson leads, probably are motivating the governor’s reaction. Reluctance to tax is a legitimate political philosophy, but one that can be taken to counterproductive extremes. One example is Missouri’s lowestin-the-nation cigarette tax of 17 cents per pack. Even Parson acknowledges that Missouri is saddled with unusually high tobacco-related health costs — some $3 billion annually, against a relatively meager $105 million in tobacco tax revenue. Why would the state open another expensive, destructive path like that to another product by leaving vaping undertaxed? Add to that the significant campaign contributions that Parson and other Republicans get from the vaping industry (which is intertwined with the tobacco industry), and it’s difficult not to feel like the fix is in. Missouri law requires a statewide vote to impose major new taxes, and the voters have declined before to raise the cigarette tax. But taxing e-cigarettes — which are newer and less entrenched than tobacco — could be an easier sell. Now is the time to sell such a tax, but it would require Parson and other top Republicans to get fully on board. Unless, of course, they’d rather wait until vaping is as big a public health nuisance as tobacco.

If the shoe fits ... Mexico’s drug cartels have more than earned Trump’s ‘terrorist’ label.

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he “terrorist” label is a dangerous one because it very often serves to de-legitimize groups that have justifiable reasons for fighting back against their oppressors. But very often, the word so appropriately fits the perpetrator that no one disputes it. Even Osama bin Laden embraced his terrorist label after the 9/11 attacks. Now President Donald Trump says he wants to attach this powerful designation to Mexico’s violent drug cartels. It’s about time. For too long, American presidents have danced around this diplomatically sensitive issue. If Trump is serious, he should proceed with extreme caution, and he must never confuse this label as creating any sort of authority for the United States to violate Mexico’s sovereignty in pursuit of drugcartel terrorists. But calling them what they are would make clear to all who support the drug trade in this country exactly what they are funding — murder, kidnappings, torture, enslavement and massive bloodshed. Among thousands of examples are last month’s bloody attack in northwestern Mexico, in which three women and six children with dual Mexican-U.S. citizenship died, and Sunday’s nearly hour-long attack near the Texas border that left at least 21 people dead. U.S. government agencies have differing definitions of terrorism. The Foreign Relations Authorization Act identifies it as “premeditated, politically motivated violence perpetrated against noncombatant targets by subnational groups or clandestine agents.” The FBI distinguishes terrorist violence as being motivated by a desire to advance ideological goals. Defenders of Mexico have long argued that drug-cartel violence doesn’t constitute terrorism since all they’re trying to do is control territory and smuggling routes for financial gain. Mexico’s Foreign Ministry labels the cartels international crime organizations, not terrorist groups. Any Mexican can testify, though, that cartel violence induces terror on a mass scale. When cartels kidnap children, murder journalists or hang opposing cartel members from overpasses,

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Children shovel dirt into the grave that contains the remains of Christina Langford Johnson, a victim of a cartel ambush, during a burial service in Colonia LeBaron, Mexico. In the attack on Nov. 4, Langford Johnson jumped out of her vehicle and waved her hands to show she was no threat to the attackers and was shot twice in the heart, community members said. they are sending a message that their authority must not be questioned. When they bribe senior police or government officials, their goal is political control to advance their smuggling operations. Academics disagree on whether there is an ideological motivation behind what the cartels do. Some, such as notorious convicted drug lord Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman, embraced a “Robin Hood” ideology to justify their violence. For others, the ideology was anarchy for the sake of personal enrichment. These groups unquestionably have left behind them a trail of terror, including tens of thousands of deaths, rivaling the worst acts committed by, say, Hezbollah or the Islamic State. Trump has a well-known penchant for blurting out ill-considered policy decisions. If he’s serious about this designation, it should be made only after methodical study backed by sound legal justifications. But U.S. consumers of illicit drugs deserve to have their eyes opened to the real terror that makes their recreational pastime possible.

YOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS

Avoid future lawsuits; use aerial surveillance now Regarding “Well-regulated aerial surveillance program could help solve violent crime” (Nov. 11): St. Louis County has something to teach the city of St. Louis. The county had the opportunity to settle police Sgt. Keith Wildhaber’s discrimination case for $850,000 dollars. They chose to go to court and lost $20 million. How might St. Louis city lose big? Recently, the Post-Dispatch has said the city should give a well-regulated aerial surveillance technology a chance to reduce gun violence. What if next summer some children die by gun violence, and the parents discover that St. Louis officials turned down the opportunity to install aerial motion imagery, at no cost to the city for three years? How much would that lawsuit be worth? Frank Moeller • Lake Saint Louis

Disabled Missourians need more habilitation access Regarding “In Missouri, people who can’t speak and see wait in line for help” (Nov. 24): This article highlights the great need for a full continuum of care for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities. It is very disheartening to me to see families suffering because of lack of services. Some of these families could find extensive services at Missouri habilitation centers, which are intermediate-care facilities for individuals with intellectual disabilities. These facilities must have very high standards of care and oversight in order to maintain Medicaid funding. However, there currently is a no-newadmissions policy for all of these Missouri centers. Families or hospitals asking about admissions are told habilitation centers are not a choice, which is in violation of federal law. Our neighboring states of Illinois and Arkansas have open admissions to their centers, and families are frequently choosing them to receive services. Missouri habilitation centers are residential campuses for persons with severe intellectual disabilities who many times also have severe behavior challenges and high medical needs. A full array of services is available on campus including medical, speech and occupational therapy, behavior management, daily programming, work opportunities, and transportation. Residents enjoy many off-campus activities such as shopping, dining, and trips to libraries, parks and entertainment events. Staffers at habilitation centers are well trained, so that residents can live their lives to the fullest, despite their disabilities. Families looking for comprehensive services should have the option of choosing a habilitation center as required by federal law. Mary Vitale • Florissant President, Bellefontaine Habilitation Center Parents Association

Editorial Board hypocritical about death penalty Regarding the editorial, “Machinery of death needs mothballing as Americans sour on executions” (Nov. 25): Does the level of hypocrisy displayed by the Post-Dispatch Editorial Board know no bounds? You have consistently applauded, defended and supported the 1973 Supreme Court decision Roe v. Wade, which has resulted in more than 60 million abortions. Then, in the above mentioned editorial, in which you argue against the resumption of capital punishment by the federal government, you write: “Rather, it’s about the axiom that civilized so-

cieties don’t kill their own citizens. Period.” Can we conclude that board members consider our society uncivilized, are hypocrites or that their sense of ethics and morality have descended into a slimy morass? Joe Glass • St. John

Trump has been unfairly tormented over his taxes Regarding the editorial, “It’s time for the Supreme Court to stop Trump’s financial hide-and-seek” (Nov. 25): If I were running for office, and you wanted my tax returns, I would have to say, “Come get them.” President Donald Trump has been the most tormented president we’ve had in quite a long time. He has brought some of it on himself, but mostly it has been brought by those who want him to fail. If he fails, then the country fails also. My only hope is that when Trump leaves office, we get another president with the same fighting stamina to withstand the onslaught of ignorance and hate that has been generated toward him and his family. Where are you going to find a candidate who will not accept a salary, like Trump, and still fight for Americans’ individual rights? Dave Watson • St. Peters

Trump’s ‘human scum’ tweet is really despicable Lost in the endless barrage of presidential tweets, there is one that is so outrageous and offensive that we cannot and must not overlook it. Angered by the Democrat-led House Intelligence Committee impeachment inquiry, President Donald Trump recently tweeted that Rep. Adam Schiff is a liar and then admonished Republicans to “Keep fighting tough, Republicans, you are dealing with human scum.” Is this what we have come to now, that we accept words like this from our president? That politicians from the opposing party are human scum? Our fellow Americans? His fellow Americans? Why haven’t Republicans objected to these despicable words? Is this the “new normal” condition we are told we are living under? I fervently hope not, and I urge everyone to contact their senators and representative and let them know President Trump’s tweets are unacceptable. Ruth C. Bauer • Kirkwood

Party of Lincoln deserves better than Donald Trump There is sufficient evidence to impeach President Donald Trump for seeking personal favor from Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy in exchange for releasing military aid authorized by Congress. Republicans continue to stand with Trump, who claimed he could shoot someone on Fifth Avenue and not lose any support. You can expect loud celebrations when impeachment fails in the Senate, similar to the acquittal of O.J. Simpson. Abraham Lincoln’s party has mutated, trampling age-old human norms, dividing families when obvious facts are disputed. Civility is compromised by repetitive lies. Evil wins when good people refuse to resist. We handed the country to a man with no record of service, who dodged paying his taxes, and profited from fraudulent education and charity setups. He is easily the most successful con man rising to the highest position under our watch. We deserve better. Mohinder Partap • Ladue Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON Editorial Page Editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382

STLtoday.com/opinion Find us at facebook/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial I know that my retirement will make no difference in its cardinal principles, that it will always fight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always fight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisfied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907

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MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, E-MAIL 901 N 10th Street St. Louis MO 63101-1250 letters@post-dispatch.com Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days.


OTHER VIEWS

12.03.2019 • TUESDAY • M 1

50 YEARS AGO TODAY ON THE EDITORIAL PAGE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A9

PROGRESS IN BLACK STUDIES • When the black studies movement began, its proponents were conspicuous for their impatience with the slow pace of

academic change. Mostly their impatience found rhetorical expression; occasionally it turned into militant action. The most pressing problem is finding enough persons qualified to teach what amounts to virtually an entirely new field of learning. Access the full item at stltoday.com/opinion

Susan Rice’s memoir prompts nostalgia for Obama years literally, to foreign policy mandarin Richard Holbrooke, in a roomful of diplomats. In 2008, campaigning as a surrogate for Good memoirs always have a Obama, she threw roundhouse rhetorical punches at his rival, quality the Germans define as a bildungsroman, a novel of the Sen. John McCain (creating a principal character’s education feud about which she repeatedly expresses regret). in the world. That’s true with But she learned from these Rice’s tale: She was an African mistakes, partly after she began American who triumphed in the elite world of prep schools, taking some heavy punches Ivy League colleges and Rhodes herself. She quotes (approvingly) the withering critique Scholarships. She embodied the intellect and ambition these offered then by her Clinton institutions aspired to produce, administration colleague, Ambassador Howard Wolpe: even as she masked a shat“You are overly directive and tered family where her parents intimidate others so much that “fought ugly and often,” she you quell dissent and stifle writes, and her home life was contrary advice.” “like a civil war battlefield.” People who’ve worked with David Brooks, the New York Times columnist, describes the Rice in recent years would say she had to keep re-learning distinction between “résumé that lesson of humility, and virtues,” the tokens of meritocratic success, and “eulogy vir- she’s still one of the few senior foreign-policy officials who tues” that truly define someregularly drops the “F-bomb.” one’s character. Rice’s story and, indeed, Obama’s combine Obama advises her at one both in a compelling but some- point in the White House that her problem is that she lacks times unstable mix. For all her privilege, Rice was a poker face. That’s a telling famously pugnacious. In 1999, criticism from Obama, who could be Mr. Cool to a fault. as a young assistant secretary Rice was battered during of State in Bill Clinton’s adminwhat should have been the istration, she gave the finger,

Current president’s personal qualities are a reverse image of his predecessor. DAVID IGNATIUS Washington Post

Reading Susan Rice’s new memoir, “Tough Love,” is a reminder of two things: what a remarkably gifted, subtle but maddeningly distant man President Obama was; and how people like Rice who served him endured ceaseless public attacks in a country that was already on the ragged edge, though we didn’t yet know it. Washington memoirs are most valuable for the parts that aren’t about what the author did at the office. That’s especially true of this account by the former national security adviser. The riveting passages are where Rice tells the private story that was hidden: her parents’ brutal divorce, her mother’s death, her children’s struggles with their mother’s public vilification.

zenith of her career because of the Benghazi “scandal,” which, as she re-tells it, seems an even more bizarre piece of Republican character assassination than it did at the time. She went on five network Sunday shows to explain the tragedy that had happened there, using “talking points” that had been prepared by the CIA, and was so intensely demonized that her mother and daughter both were badly traumatized. The Benghazi fallout changed Rice’s life, probably for the better. She withdrew from consideration as secretary of state in Obama’s second term and instead became national security adviser. And she learned to subordinate her own public persona. She describes her role overseeing the National Security Council staff as playing “point guard,” a player who “is rarely the showboat or the high scorer ... but is essential to the cohesion and efficacy of the team.” Rice acknowledges that the Obama administration’s foreign policy record was “mixed.” The flaws were perhaps most evident in the inability to find a policy that would avert

the slaughter in Syria. “My heart and my conscience will forever ache over Syria,” she writes. The larger problem, she explains, is that “we suffered from a mismatch between our stated objectives and the means we were prepared to employ to achieve them — in Libya, Syria, Ukraine and, arguably, Afghanistan.” She has that right. Behind Rice is the extraordinary figure of Obama, whom she acknowledges was “consistently the smartest guy in the room” whenever the NSC met. It’s impossible not to feel nostalgic for his intelligence and personal reticence these days, as the country is buffeted by a president whose personal qualities are a reverse image of his predecessor. Obama, lean, austere, almost professorial in his demeanor, was a man who despised flattery and liked to pass the time playing cards, watching sports on television, and thinking about how best to make a difference in the world. How far away that moment seems now. David Ignatius @IgnatiusPost Copyright The Washington Post

‘Deep state’ contagion flourishes under Trump It’s become a partisan talking point in defense of almost everything the president does.

DANIEL ACKER, BLOOMBERG

An aerial photograph taken above Princeton, Ill., on Oct. 9, 2017, shows corn being harvested.

More ethanol? Two wrongs don’t make good policy Trade war hurt corn growers. Trump wants the rest of us to pay for it — again. BY STANFORD L. LEVIN

Farmers continue to be greatly harmed by the president’s ill-conceived trade war with China. To offset some of this damage, the administration first implemented direct subsidy payments to farmers. Following that, the administration has recently proposed boosting ethanol production from corn, which would boost corn prices and, presumably, aid corn farmers, but at the same time would increase gasoline prices. This recent ethanol proposal would increase the amount of ethanol that refiners must blend into gasoline. Earlier this year the ban on E15 fuel use during the summer was lifted in spite of the adverse public health consequences of burning ethanol in sunny weather, the reason for the initial ban. The new ethanol target is 15 billion gallons for 2020. This is bad policy, and it needs to be reversed. The administration has made these proposals to try to offset some of the harm that has come to corn farmers as a result of President Donald Trump’s trade war with China. The link between the trade dispute, and particularly the drop in Chinese purchases of U.S. corn and soybeans, and the boost in ethanol production is clear. What has not been made clear is that the rest of us would pay for this mandate through higher gasoline prices and higher prices for other goods and services in order to provide money to those farmers hurt by the trade war. We have already paid for the previous subsidy through our taxes. This new ethanol policy would raise prices and would also be costly. While mandating an increase in ethanol production may channel more money to corn farmers through higher corn prices, ethanol is more expensive than oil for gasoline, and it imposes costs on refiners who must blend the ethanol into gasoline. Evidence of the higher cost is the number of waivers that have been granted to small refiners for which blending ethanol is prohibitively expensive. As a result, everyone who uses gasoline would pay more, and this increased cost would ripple through the economy, particularly in

industries for which gasoline is a major cost. Many goods and services are delivered by truck, for example, and higher gasoline prices would increase transportation costs and, in the end, the prices for the goods and services that are delivered. While some farmers may benefit, increased ethanol production would be partially or fully offset by declines in other parts of the economy due to higher prices and reduced purchases. Boosting the amount of ethanol in gasoline is also bad for the environment. Corn production is energy intensive, and ethanol must be transported by truck. Ethanol contains less energy per gallon than does oil, so more fuel is used, resulting in higher emissions. When burned, ethanol — more so than oil — reacts with sunlight to produce smog that endangers the health of everyone, especially people with lung ailments and asthma. The combination of these effects would most likely leave the environment in worse shape than would burning oil. Ironically, the extra greenhouse gases from burning ethanol would contribute to global warming, and, as a result, it is farmers themselves who would suffer from unstable weather, flooding and droughts. Furthermore, ethanol production drives up U.S. corn prices, and those increases spread to other countries. In the past, higher corn prices have been problematic for Mexico and Central American countries where corn is a major component of the diet. More ethanol production would simply cause more problems for our southern neighbors and may contribute to worsening international relations. Attempting to use an ethanol mandate to fix the consequences of the trade war on farmers is counterproductive and bad policy. It would simply harm the environment, raise costs and leave us all worse off. Two bad policies do not result in a good policy but only double the harm. Stanford L. Levin is emeritus professor of economics at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville. He has published and consulted widely on energy issues.

it’s no surprise when partisan rhetoric gets heated. JONAH GOLDBERG Democrats called the effort to The Dispatch impeach Bill Clinton a coup. And they were wrong, too. The problem is that this deep state contagion has spread far outside of impeachment. The deep state is the right’s “Just this week, I stuck up for new bogeyman. three great warriors against the I’d wager that until fairly Deep State,” Trump declared recently, few people had ever last week at a rally in Florida. heard the phrase. I’d also bet The crowd loved it, of course. that roughly 99% of those who But think about what Trump fling the term around have no is saying. The three waridea that it’s borrowed from riors Trump was referring to Turkish politics. were three men charged with The idea of a deep state, or committing war crimes. He “state within a state,” is that pardoned all three. One hadn’t there are undemocratic forces within the permanent bureau- even received a trial yet. Many great warriors put their careers cracy, the military and the intelligence services who pur- in peril to testify against the two other men. sue their own interests rather Reasonable people can than those of the people or the disagree on the specifics of agenda that voters desire. Depending on the country in the acts, but military law experts are uniformly aghast question, deep states are not at Trump’s decision. Accordonly real, they are sometimes ing to Military.com, Trump’s as devious as people fear. At move has “blown a hole in the various times in the history of military justice system and will the Soviet Union, the secret police ran the government and make it harder to prosecute future war crimes, military law the Communist Party for its experts say.” own benefit. Whatever you think of that, In the democratic West, the idea that the military the civil service and other bureaucratic institutions often justice system is part of the accumulate enough power and deep state because it sought to enforce prohibitions against arrogance that they see themselves as immune to the desires war crimes is grotesque. Military leadership wasn’t behavof voters or politicians. Prior to a few years ago, some people ing like a bunch of Turkish would call this sort of thing the generals conspiring against the “deep state,” and depending on elected government for their own selfish ends. the context, that was fine. If anything, the selfishness But now it’s become a parruns the other way. The presitisan talking point in defense of almost everything President dent now wants to campaign Donald Trump does. It’s a war- with the “three warriors” for political advantage. rant for widespread paranoia Indeed, the impeachment and hysteria. People talk as if witnesses defamed as deep we live in a Jason Bourne or James Bond movie, with secret state operatives by Trump and his defenders testified that deep state organizations plotthe president was orchestratting to overthrow the governing an effort in Ukraine for ment or something. his own self-interest, not the Impeachment, we’re told national interest. These people almost every day, is a “deep weren’t secretly shouting “Hail state coup.” When the Turkish military launched a “deep state Hydra!”; they were doing what they thought the law and patricoup,” it launched an actual, you know, “coup” — which the otic duty required. Deep staters are now those dictionary still defines as an extralegal violent overthrow of who follow the rules in ways inconvenient to Trump’s a government. personal desires or political The sort of coup that some ambitions. It would be too on the right are talking about confusing to say that Trump — which, if successful, would is the real deep state operaresult in the vice president tive here since he was lawfully lawfully becoming president elected. But he does seem to and Trump’s Cabinet staying adhere to a view of the state in place — isn’t a coup. It’s not particularly deep state-ish most famously articulated by Louis XIV: L’état, c’est moi (I either, given that the people am the state). And any obstacle leading it are democratically elected legislators publicly fol- to his unfettered rule is now the deep state and by extension lowing not just the rules but illegitimate. also the wishes of the people who elected them. (You can be Jonah Goldberg is editor-in-chief of The sure that if Democratic voters Dispatch and the host of The Remnant weren’t behind the effort, peo- podcast. Follow him on Twitter at @ JonahDispatch. ple such as Rep. Adam Schiff wouldn’t be pushing impeachment.) In fairness, impeachment arouses partisan excess, and


A10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

WORLD

M 1 • TUESDAY • 12.03.2019

NATO under friendly fire as leaders prep for summit BY LORNE COOK

Associated Press

BRUSSELS — NATO leaders will gather in London on Tuesday as the world’s biggest military alliance, marking its 70th birthday, battles with one of the most confounding of adversaries: Itself. As thousands of troops stand ready along Europe’s eastern flank to deter Russia — the reason the trans-Atlantic alliance was founded in 1949 — or help keep the peace in places like Afghanistan and Kosovo, the leaders of countries with NATO’s largest armies are wildly taking pot shots at each other. Before the two-day summit, to include receptions at Buckingham Palace and Downing Street plus a working session at a golf resort in outer London, Karen Donfried, president of the German Marshall Fund think tank, said the 29 NATO allies are approaching this meeting “with a sense of foreboding.” “Few anticipate a gathering that will both unify and stop the growing cracks in cohesion. Alliance leaders carry the responsibility

to articulate NATO’s common purpose and ongoing relevance. If they do not, Vladimir Putin will be raising a glass in Moscow to the fraught state of the alliance at 70,” she said, in reference to Russia’s president. In recent months, U.S. President Donald Trump has declared that peace is nigh in Afghanistan — NATO’s longest and most costly operation in terms of lives and cash — only to call off talks with the Taliban. Now, it seems, they are on again. All the while, U.S. troop numbers are declining. Other allies are unsure what to make of it. Last month, he precipitously pulled troops out of northern Syria. Turkey took that as a green light to launch an invasion that has alarmed its European NATO partners, many already struggling with the political fallout sparked by the arrival of tens of thousands of Syrian refugees via Turkey in 2015. French President Emmanuel Macron, complaining of a U.S. leadership vacuum and sensing

an opportunity for France to fill it and boost Europe’s security credentials, has lamented the “brain death” of NATO and says the allies need “a wake-up call.” Macron wants strategic talks about where NATO is going, who its adversaries really are, how to tackle terrorism, what to do about an unpredictable ally like Turkey, and how to improve relations with Russia, rather than a spend a third summit in self-flagellation about Trump’s favorite topic: military spending. In the latest act of political friendly-fire, Turkey accused Macron of supporting terrorism for agreeing to hold talks with a Syrian Kurd politician whom Ankara considers to be part of an extremist group. “You should get checked whether you’re brain-dead,” Erdogan said Friday, in remarks directed at Macron. “Kicking Turkey out of NATO or not, how is that up to you? Do you have the authority to make such a decision?” Meanwhile, Erdogan plans to test a new air defense system,

purchased from Russia, that its partners refuse to allow near any NATO military equipment. German Chancellor Angela Merkel, in the final period of her reign, has played the go-between, trying to keep the NATO leadership train on the rails. From the outside, and quite possibly from the Kremlin, it looks like a great act of self-harm. NATO has no real wars to fight but its power, and Europe’s security, lies in the abilities of the allies to deter adversaries like Russia and potential ones such as China. That deterrence depends on a balanced mix of military posturing and shows of political resolve by speaking with one voice. Since Russia annexed Ukraine’s Crimean Peninsula in 2014, NATO has deployed more than 4,000 troops to Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Poland to discourage further military adventurism by Putin. The allies also ended their post-Cold War budget cuts and stepped up defense spending. But it is the very public infighting among alliance heavyweights

that undermines NATO’s security efforts. “The leaders have a responsibility for not undermining deterrence,” said Tomas Valasek, senior fellow at the Carnegie Europe think-tank. “Deterrence is not just about having bombs, bullets, missiles, airplanes or these days cyber geeks you can deploy against the adversary. Deterrence is also about communicating that we mean it when we say we’re an alliance of 29 and we are ready to respond as 29 when something bad happens,” Valasek said. “Our adversaries are constantly looking for chinks in our armor. For cracks or signs of division. God knows there have been plenty of those,” he added. On its 70th birthday, NATO’s summit declaration — should it survive the hail of friendly fire — will focus on the future; issues like new disarmament talks, the alliance’s role in space, and its policy toward China. Its main challenge today could be surviving its go-italone leaders.

Defense budgets set to dominate NATO summit BY LORNE COOK

Associated Press

BEN GARVER, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Keith Standring clears snow for The Alternative Living Center on Monday in Pittsfield, Mass., following an overnight snowstorm Monday.

East Coast braces for ‘long, difficult storm’ BY MARY ESCH

Associated Press

ALBANY, N.Y. — A final wallop of a seemingly endless winter storm that impacted most of the country over the long holiday weekend is bearing down on the East, dumping heavy snow, shuttering schools and stymieing travel in the region Monday. The storm dropped one round of snow on parts of the region late Sunday and could bring 10 to 20 inches total by Tuesday morning from Pennsylvania to Maine, forecasters said. Heavy snow was also expected in the Appalachian Mountains down to Tennessee and North Carolina. “It’s moving very slowly, so the snow is just going to continue through the day,” National Weather Service meteorologist Jennifer Vogt said Monday. Since Sunday, the storm has dropped 20 inches of snow in East Glenville, New York, 15 miles northwest of Albany — the highest snow total in the Northeast so far. The same storm has pummeled the U.S. for days as it moved cross country, dumping heavy snow from California to the Midwest and inundating other areas with rain. Gov. Andrew Cuomo declared

a state of emergency Monday for seven counties in eastern New York and assigned 300 National Guard members to assist with snow removal. State police had responded to more than 740 storm-related crashes statewide since the snow started falling. “We’re tough, we’ve seen it all, we can handle it all,” Cuomo said at a storm briefing before urging people to stay off the roads. He told nonessential state employees to stay home. But some workers had no choice but to trudge through knee-high snow and brush off their cars before heading out on the slushy roads. “I just hate driving in snow,” Kaia Jansson said as she raked snow off her car in Albany. “It’s always a mess and it’s cold and not fun.” In Nashua, New Hampshire, Alana Kirkpatrick didn’t enjoy her 5 a.m. “workout,” which consisted of removing heaps of snow from her car. “Why do I still live in New England?” she said. Hundreds of schools were already closed throughout the region, with more snow on the way. “It’s going to be a long, difficult storm,” Gov. Chris Sununu said.

In areas not already bludgeoned by the first wave, schools closed preemptively as rain was expected to turn into snow in the region’s first significant storm of the season, a nor’easter so named because the winds typically come from the northeast. At least four counties closed schools Monday in West Virginia, where 2 inches to a foot of snow was forecast. Closer to the heavily populated, coastal Interstate 95 corridor, a wintry mix was more likely. In New Jersey, Gov. Phil Murphy said Monday at a news conference that the worst was still ahead. He closed state government for nonessential workers at noon. Only 3 inches of snow was forecast for New York City, where schools were expected to remain open, and 5 inches for Philadelphia. Up to 9 inches, though, was possible in Boston by Tuesday night. More than 450 flights into or out of the U.S. were canceled Monday morning, with more than 2,300 delays, according to the flight tracking site FlightAware. Airports in the New York and Boston areas accounted for many of them. There were 950 cancellations and 8,800 delays

on Sunday. The storm also caused major traffic disruptions. Tractor-trailers were banned or lower speed limits put in place on stretches of highway in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. New York also posted lower speed limits on some highways. Many buses from New York City to Pennsylvania and upstate destinations such as Ithaca and Binghamton were canceled. Dozens of school districts in upstate New York were closed Monday, along with several State University of New York campuses and other colleges. Many schools in southern Maine were also closed. A commuter ferry on its way to Boston, where it was rainy and windy Monday morning, hit a wave and listed heavily, sending some passengers to the floor. No injuries were reported. The trouble began in the East on Sunday as the storm moved out of the Midwest after days of pummeling parts of the U.S. Duluth, Minnesota, is still cleaning up more than 21 inches of snow that dropped over the weekend. Major highways reopened in Wyoming and Colorado after blizzard conditions and drifting snow blocked them.

Officer shoots armed student in Wisconsin BY GRETCHEN EHLKE AND IVAN MORENO ASSOCIATED PRESS

MILWAUKEE — An officer shot an armed male student Monday morning in a classroom at a suburban Milwaukee high school after the suspect pointed a gun at officers, a police chief said. A Waukesha South High School student informed a school resource officer that a classmate had a handgun around 10:17 a.m., Waukesha Police Chief Russell Jack said. He said the resource officer went to the classroom to confront the 17-year-old suspect and move other students in the room to safety. Waukesha police and sheriff’s deputies soon arrived at the school and tried to de-escalate the situation to no avail. “The suspect would not remove his hands from his pocket and continued to ignore officers’ commands,” Jack said. “The suspect removed his handgun from

his waistband and pointed it at the officers. An officer was forced to discharge his firearm, striking the suspect.” No officers or other students were injured, Jack said. He said officers performed life-saving measures on the suspect, who is in custody and in stable condition. The officer who shot the student is an 11-year-veteran of the police department, Jack said. Terry Schuster, the public relations director for the Waukesha School District, said she understood it was the school resource officer who shot the student. Police said the shooting was an isolated incident and that they are not seeking other suspects. Students who streamed out of the school about 11:15 a.m. said a drill was announced and they took cover under desks and teachers barricaded doors. They told reporters outside the school

RICK WOOD, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Waukesha South High School students find their waiting parents and friends after leaving the building following shots fired Monday inside the school. that they knew it wasn’t a drill when they heard two or three gunshots. Parents gathered outside and

hugged students as they streamed out of the school in Waukesha, about 18 miles west of Milwaukee.

BRUSSELS — Despite pleas to set aside bickering over military spending so the issue doesn’t dominate a third NATO summit in a row, the United States is almost certain to demand again this week that its 28 NATO partners respect their pledges to boost defense budgets. NATO countries slashed spending as tensions eased after the Cold War. But Russia’s 2014 annexation of Ukraine’s Crimean Peninsula was a wake-up call. The allies agreed then to halt cuts, boost budgets and move toward spending 2% of gross domestic product on defense by 2024. The 2% figure is perhaps too simplistic in that its value fluctuates depending on how economies perform. Moreover, countries calculate their defense budgets differently; some want veterans pensions included, for example. Correct spending levels don’t guarantee that adequate forces can be deployed into battle in a timely way and sustained by efficient supply lines. Nor do they have a relationship to any real security threat assessment. Importantly, this is about national military budgets, not NATO funding. No one owes the United States money, even though Washington spends more on defense than all the other allies combined. That said, European allies and Canada rely heavily on U.S. equipment like large military transport planes and air-to-air refueling, and NATO’s deterrent effect is more credible backed by the United States. Nine countries are projected to meet the 2% benchmark this year — the U.S. with about 3.4%, Greece, Britain, Bulgaria, Estonia, Poland, Latvia, Lithuania and Romania — up from three nations in 2014. Germany will spend 1.35%, ranking it 17th, but it aims to hit 1.5% by the deadline. Spain, Belgium and Luxembourg spend less than 1%. While budgets have risen since 2014, NATO headquarters chooses to use 2016 — the year Donald Trump was elected U.S. president— as its reference point for spending increases. Officials concede privately that this is to mollify Trump. According to new numbers released on Friday, European Allies and Canada will add $130 billion to their defense budgets by the end of 2020. Germany will account for around 20% of that increase. A total of some $400 billion more is expected to be added by 2024. Germany, the main victim of Trump’s ire, says its current spending meets NATO planning requirements, and plans to spend 2% by around 2031. Aside from national budgets, NATO also has a smaller in-house budget worth around $2 billion to run the organization’s headquarters in Brussels and provide some common funding to military operations around the world. NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg said Thursday that the United States will in future pay less into that pot, with Germany helping to fill the gap. He said Washington and Berlin will pay “roughly 16%” each of the total budget going forward. The U.S. was previously the biggest contributor, paying about 22%. Other European allies will also pay more, apart from France, which has refused.


12.03.2019 • TUESDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A11

NATION&WORLD SUPREME COURT

DIGEST

Bullock gives up on presidential bid HELENA, Mont. — Montana Gov. Steve Bullock ended his Democratic presidential campaign Monday, becoming the third Western governor boasting executive experience and a Washington-outsider appeal to flame out in the contest. The campaigns of Bullock, Washington Gov. Jay Inslee and former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper failed to gain momentum in a D.C.centric race in which former Vice President Joe Biden and Sens. Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren dominated the polls for most of the past few months. Bullock, a 53-year-old twoterm governor and former attorney general, touted acrossthe-aisle appeal, arguing he was the best bet to defeat President Donald Trump because he was the only Democratic candidate to win in a state that Trump won in 2016.

Justices debate gun case Second Amendment backers seek ruling on now-defunct NYC law BY MARK SHERMAN

Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Chief Justice John Roberts appeared Monday to be the key vote in whether the Supreme Court considers expanding gun rights or sidesteps its first case on the issue in nearly 10 years. The court’s dismissal of the case would be a disappointment to gun-rights advocates and a huge relief to gun-control groups. Both sides thought a conservative Supreme Court majority fortified by two appointees of President Donald Trump, Justices Neil Gorsuch

and Brett Kavanaugh, might use the case to expand on landmark decisions from a decade ago that established a right to keep a gun at home for self-defense. The arguments dealt with a dispute over New York City restrictions on taking licensed, locked and unloaded guns outside the city limits. New York has dropped its transport ban, but only after the high court decided in January to hear the case. The justices spent most of the hour trying to determine whether anything is left of the case brought by the National Rifle Association’s New York affiliate and three city residents, after the change in New York law. Roberts sought assurances in a handful of questions to the city’s lawyer that New York po-

lice would not refuse to issue gun licenses to people who have might have violated the old law. “Would the fact of a violation of the prior law be used against them?” Roberts asked Richard Dearing, the lawyer representing the city. “It will not. It absolutely will not,” Dearing replied, as part of his argument urging the justices to get rid of the case. The four liberal justices made clear they are likely to vote for dismissal. “So what’s left of this case? Petitioners have gotten all the relief they sought,” said Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, on the bench for the first time since a recent two-night hospital stay. Paul Clement, representing the gun owners, said his clients are entitled to an order from a federal

court, not just the representations of the city’s lawyer. The lawsuit in New York began as a challenge to the city’s prohibition on carrying a licensed, locked and unloaded handgun outside the city limits, either to a shooting range or a second home. Lower courts upheld the regulation, but the Supreme Court’s decision to review the case caused officials at both the city and state level to scramble to find a way to remove the case from the justices’ grasp. Not only did the city change its regulation to allow licensed gun owners to transport their weapons to locations outside New York’s five boroughs, but the state enacted a law barring cities from imposing the challenged restrictions. A decision is expected by late June.

US aid to Lebanon gets quiet release WASHINGTON — The Trump administration has quietly released more than $100 million in military assistance to Lebanon after months of unexplained delay that led some lawmakers to compare it to the aid for Ukraine at the center of the impeachment inquiry. The $105 million in Foreign Military Financing funds for the Lebanese Armed Forces was released just before the Thanksgiving holiday and lawmakers were notified of the step on Monday, according to two congressional staffers and an administration official. All three spoke on condition of anonymity. The money had languished in limbo at the Office of Management and Budget since September though it already won congressional approval and had overwhelming support from the Pentagon, State Department and National Security Council. The White House has yet to offer any explanation for the delay despite repeated queries from Congress. BRIEFLY SYRIA: A suspected Syrian government airstrike on a market in a northwestern rebel-held town killed 13 civilians on Monday while Turkish artillery shells landed near a school in a Kurdish-held town, killing at least nine, including eight children, activists said. JIMMY CARTER: Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter was admitted to a south Georgia hospital over the weekend for treatment of a urinary tract infection and “looks forward to returning home soon,” a spokeswoman said Monday.

JOE GIDDENS, PA VIA AP

LONDON HONORS VICTIMS OF BRIDGE STABBING Leanne O’Brien, center, the girlfriend of Jack Merritt, is comforted by family members during a vigil at The Guildhall to honor him and Saskia Jones, who were both killed in Friday’s attack on London Bridge in Cambridge, England. London Bridge reopened to cars and pedestrians Monday, three days after a man previously convicted of terrorism offenses stabbed two people to death and injured three others before being shot dead by police. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson and main opposition Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn paused Monday to honor the victims of the attack, then went back to trading blame for the security failings that allowed the man to go on a violent rampage in the heart of London.

UN chief: Keep fighting for Earth World leaders gather for meeting tackling global warming BY ARITZ PARRA AND FRANK JORDANS

BLOOMBERG: President Donald Trump’s campaign said Monday it will no longer give credentials to Bloomberg News reporters to cover campaign events because of coverage “biases,” an accusation that the news organization rejects. The news service’s founder, billionaire Michael Bloomberg, announced last week he was seeking the Democratic nomination for president. IRAN PROTESTS: At least 208 people in Iran have been killed amid protests over sharply rising gasoline prices and a subsequent crackdown by security forces, Amnesty International said Monday, as one government official acknowledged telling police to shoot demonstrators. SPACE STATION: Spacewalking astronauts installed new pumps on a cosmic ray detector outside the International Space Station on Monday in a bid to extend its scientific life. It was the third spacewalk in nearly three weeks for Italy’s Luca Parmitano and NASA’s Andrew Morgan. One more spacewalk remains before NASA can declare the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer successfully repaired. NEW ORLEANS: Some type of personal feud is believed to have sparked the weekend shooting that left 10 people injured at the edge of New Orleans’ historic French Quarter, police chief Shaun Ferguson said Monday. “This is not a domestic terrorism act,” Ferguson told reporters. — Associated Press

Associated Press

MADRID — U.N. SecretaryGeneral António Guterres urged countries Monday not to lose hope in the fight against climate change, as representatives from nearly 200 countries gathered in Madrid for a two-week meeting on tackling global warming. In his opening speech to delegates, Guterres cited recent scientific data showing that levels of heat-trapping gases have hit a record high, reaching levels not

seen for at least 3 million years when sea levels were 33-66 feet higher than today. Unless emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases are sharply cut, temperatures could rise to twice the threshold set in the 2015 Paris accord by the end of the century, he warned. “Do we really want to be remembered as the generation that buried its head in the sand, that fiddled while the planet burned?” Guterres asked. His appeal came after Chile’s environment minister, Carolina Schmidt, said the Dec. 2-13 meeting needs to lay the groundwork for moving toward carbon-neutral economies while being sensitive to the poorest and those most

vulnerable to rising temperatures — something that policymakers have termed “just transition.” “Those who don’t want to see it will be on the wrong side of history,” said Schmidt, who is chairing the meeting. She called on governments to make more ambitious pledges to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases ahead of a deadline to do so next year. The summit, which moved to the Spanish capital after Chile had to pull out amid anti-government protests, aims to put the finishing touches to the rules governing the 2015 Paris accord. That involves creating a functioning international emissionstrading system and compensat-

ing poor countries for losses they suffer from rising sea levels and other consequences of climate change. Countries agreed in Paris four years ago to limit global warming to well below 3.6 Fahrenheit, ideally 2.7F by the end of the century compared with pre-industrial times. Already, average temperatures increased by about 1C, leaving little room for the more ambitious target to be met. Guterres called out big greenhouse gas emitters that are still building coal-fired power plants. He noted that had countries started cutting their emissions drastically a decade ago, reaching the Paris goal would have been much easier.

China hits US over Border town begins new Hong Kong law cleanup after gunbattle Government suspends Navy visits, sanctions pro-democracy groups BY KEN MORITSUGU

Associated Press

HONG KONG — China said Monday it will suspend U.S. military ship and aircraft visits to Hong Kong and sanction several American pro-democracy and human rights groups in retaliation for the signing into law of legislation supporting anti-government protests in the semi-autonomous territory. While the nature of the sanctions remained unclear, the move followed Chinese warnings that the U.S. would bear the costs if the Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act was approved. The steps are “in response to America’s unreasonable behavior,”

foreign ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying said in Beijing, adding that the legislation interfered in China’s internal affairs. The law, signed last Wednesday by President Donald Trump, mandates sanctions on Chinese and Hong Kong officials who carry out human rights abuses and requires an annual review of the favorable trade status that Washington grants Hong Kong. The legislation was backed by U.S. lawmakers who are sympathetic to the protesters and criticized Hong Kong police for cracking down on the pro-democracy movement. Police say their use of tear gas, rubber bullets and other force is a necessary response to escalating violence by the protesters, who have blocked major roads and thrown gasoline bombs back at officers in riot gear.

22 people were killed in firefight between cartel, security forces BY MARIA VERZA

Associated Press

VILLA UNION, Mexico — A small town near the U.S.-Mexico border began cleaning up Monday, gripped by fear after the killing of 22 people in a ferocious weekend gunbattle between drug cartel members and security forces. A 72-year-old woman living near Villa Union’s city hall recounted how she huddled with two of her grandchildren inside an armoire during the shooting. The street in front of her home was littered with shell casings, and her walls and door were pocked with bullet holes. “I’m still trembling,” she said,

speaking on condition of anonymity out of fear for her safety. “We’ve never seen anything like this. It was as if they just wanted to sow terror.” Around midday Saturday, armed men in a convoy of dozens of vehicles arrived in Villa Union and began shooting up city hall. Many of the vehicles were emblazoned with the cartel’s initials — CDN, for Cartel del Noreste, or Northeast Cartel — as were the attackers’ bulletproof vests. Coahuila Gov. Miguel Riquelme said state security forces arrived within an hour and surrounded the town, about 35 miles southwest of Eagle Pass, Texas. Sixteen gunmen were killed, along with four state police officers and two civilians, he said. On Monday morning, the town was strewn with burned-out vehicles, and the city hall’s facade was riddled with bullet holes.


NATION

A12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • TUESDAY • 12.03.2019

Trump threatens tariffs against Brazil BY MAURICIO SAVARESE AND DARLENE SUPERVILLE

Associated Press

SAO PAULO — Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro’s U.S.-focused foreign policy efforts suffered a severe setback on Monday when his American counterpart Donald Trump pledged to impose tariffs on steel and aluminum on the South American nation. Trump initially leveled the threat by Twitter while accusing Brazil and neighboring Argentina, governed by U.S. allies Bolsonaro and Mauricio Macri, of manipulating their currencies and hurting American farmers. Brazil’s vice president denied

the accusation, but Bolsonaro, who openly admires Trump, was reticent; the far-right politician said he could call Trump “if needed.” Argentina’s production and labor minister, Dante Sica, said Trump’s announcement caught policymakers by surprise. Meanwhile, the Trump administration also proposed tariffs on up to $2.4 billion worth of French imports — from Roquefort cheese to handbags — in retaliation for France’s tax on American tech giants like Google, Amazon and Facebook. The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative said Monday that France’s new digital services tax

discriminates against U.S. companies and says that the tariffs could reach 100%. The agency will accept public comment on the plan through Jan. 6 and hold a hearing Jan. 7. The French tax is designed to prevent tech companies from dodging taxes by putting headquarters in low-tax European countries. Both South American nations were among a group of U.S. allies that Trump exempted from steel and aluminum tariffs in March 2018. The American president’s threat to reverse that decision and impose the metals tariffs on Argentina and Brazil is another example of his mercurial ap-

OBITUARIES

proach to trade policy. He also called on America’s central bank to act to prevent other countries from devaluing their currencies. “Brazil has really discounted. If you take a look at what’s happened with their currency, they’ve devalued their currency very substantially by 10 percent. Argentina also,” Trump said shortly before departing for a NATO conference in London. He did not provide specifics on the tariffs. The stakes are high for Bolsonaro, who has made his relationship with Trump a cornerstone of his diplomacy and is called by both friends and foes “the Trump

of the tropics.” While feuding publicly with other Western leaders, including the presidents of Germany and France, Bolsonaro made several concessions to Trump in the expectation of reaping benefits. He exempted American tourists from visas to visit Brazil, allowed the U.S. to launch satellites from Brazil and made it easier for Brazilians to buy American wheat and ethanol. In exchange, he received tepid U.S. support for Brazil’s bid to enter the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, while Argentina received full endorsement for membership.

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Celebrations of Life

Briggs, Lorraine Hood - St. Louis

Jansen, William M. - St. Louis

Parker, Anna Marie - St. Louis

Buhrman, Bonnie Jean - St. Louis

Kuhn, Joanne - St. Louis

Paul, Raymond - St. Peters, MO

Conboy, Thomas M. - St. Louis

Lehman, Ralph S. - Newton, KS

Pratt, Doris D. - St. Louis

Hay, William G. - St. Louis

Migneco, Angelo P. - St. Louis

Shipman, Betty Jane - St. Louis

Helm, John Louis - St. Charles

Otto, Freda E. - St. Louis

Weinhold, Jo Anne - St. Louis

Briggs, Lorraine Hood

Lorraine Hood Briggs, of Chesterfield, Missouri, passed from this life on November 27, 2019. Born August 22, 1923, in Justin, Texas, Lorraine, daughter of Marguerite Spencer Hood and Lee Hood, was the eldest of three daughters. Lorraine was an art therapist, active member of Union Avenue Christian Church, and mother of four. She grew up in Texas, Missouri, and Oklahoma, graduating with an art degree from Phillips University, Enid, Oklahoma. She later earned a Master's Degree in Art Therapy from Lindenwood College and was the art therapist at Edgewood Children's Center. While attending Enid High School, she met her husband of 70 years, William Briggs. Bill enlisted in the Navy in 1942, and on leave, they were married June 6, 1944. Lorraine and Bill lived in several cities, including Atlanta, Cleveland, Dallas, Seattle, Washington D.C., and St. Louis, as he pursued his career as an aeronautical engineer. Lorraine's artistic skills and her innate sense of style shone through in all her endeavors, including her love of drawing, gourmet cooking, designing and sewing beautiful clothing for her family, teaching piano lessons, and cultivating African violets and roses. Lorraine and Bill raised their children in Disciples of Christ Churches, and in 1964 became faithful members of Union Avenue Christian Church in St. Louis, assuming numerous leadership roles, including as teachers of the young adult Century Class. She was proud of the music and arts programs at Union Avenue, supporting many displays of paintings and photographs there. She was also an early advocate for and supporter of the Union Avenue Opera Company. Lorraine and Bill traveled extensively in retirement. A devoted wife, mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother, she dearly loved her family. She is survived by her sisters, Janice Hood Newman of Alexandria, VA, and Annadale Hood Bouchez of Westlake Village, CA; her children, son Eugene Stephen Briggs II and daughter-in-law Sandra Searcy Briggs of Ft. Worth, Texas; daughter Cynthia Anne Briggs and son-in-law Thomas O'Brien of St. Louis, Missouri; daughter Julia Louise Briggs Doverspike of Bella Vista, Arkansas; and son Spencer Gentry Briggs and daughter-in-law Ann White Briggs of Clearwater, Florida. Her grandchildren and spouses are grandson Andrew Gentry Briggs and wife, Rachelle Norman Briggs of Ft. Worth, Texas; granddaughter Jessica Marie Doverspike Roder and husband John Roder of Anchorage, Alaska; grandson Daniel Leon Doverspike and wife Kim Stephenson Doverspike of Sandy, Utah; granddaughter Joy Lorraine Davis and husband Shane Zachary Davis of Bozeman, Montana; grandson Keith William Doverspike of Youngstown, Ohio; granddaughter Julia Maureen O?Brien of St. Louis, Missouri; grandson William Thomas O?Brien of Washington, D.C.; grandson Eric Stephen Briggs of Clearwater, Florida; and granddaughter Gemma Elizabeth Briggs of Clearwater, Florida. Her great grandchildren are Kallie Lynn Doverspike and Brooklyn Ruth Doverspike of Sandy, Utah; Indigo Joy Roder, Matteo Caleb Roder, and Leon Calder Roder of Anchorage, Alaska; Shane Marie Davis, Paul William Davis, and Kurtis Cole Davis of Bozeman, Montana; and Lila Lorraine Briggs of Fort Worth, TX. Memorial Services will be held on December 27, 2019, at Union Avenue Christian Church of St. Louis. Memorial gifts may be made to Union Avenue Opera. Services: 11:00 am, Friday, December 27, 2019, Union Avenue Christian Church, St. Louis, MO.

Beautiful Memorials At Schnucks Florist & Gifts, our experienced staff of floral designers is dedicated to the highest level of personal service.

Order 24 Hours schnucksfloral.com (314) 997-2444 or (800) 286-9557

Buhrman, Bonnie Jean

Otto, Freda E.

Jansen, William M.

Paul, Raymond

Sun., Dec. 1, 2019. Visit 9am with Funeral Mass to follow 10am (nee Williams) on Sun., Dec. 1, 2019. Beloved wife of James A. Otto Wed. Dec. 4 at Our Lady of the Presentation Catholic Church, 8860 for 57 years; dear sister of Betty Mormino and Kathryn Bogle; our Tudor. Kriegshauser Brothers. www.k-brothers.com for more info. dear aunt and friend. Services: Funeral at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel 5255 Lemay Ferry on Wed., Dec. 4 at 9:30 a.m. Interment Conboy, Thomas M. National Cemetery. Memorials to Calvary Presbyterian Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Sun., Dec. 1, Church appreciated. Visitation Tue., 4-8 p.m. 2019. Beloved husband of Connie Sue Conboy (nee Weaver) for over 62 years; loving father of Terry Truex, Sherry Conboy, Rev. Parker, Anna Marie Tom (Joyce) Conboy and Linda Conboy; adoring grandfather of 97, Sun., Dec. 1, 2019. Beloved wife Jason (Denise) Newborn, Jessica (Mike) Johnson, Chip Truex, of the late Eugene W. Parker; dear Melisa (Chris) Gibson, Matt (Angela) Newborn, Victoria and mother of Dianne Parker, Sue Alexandra Truex; cherished great-grandfather of 5. Our dearest (Tom) O'Meara, Gene (Irene) brother, brother-in-law, uncle, great-uncle, cousin and friend to Parker, Gary (Sue) Parker; dear many. grandmother of Terri (Steve) Tom was a member of the Knights of Columbus Chapter #8588. Sieckhaus, Todd (Lori) Services: Funeral from Kutis Affton Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Thurs., Gummersbach; Meghan (Jake) Dec.5, at 9:15 a.m. to St. Anthony of Padua (High Ridge) for 10 a.m. Winegrad, Thomas (Emily) Mass. Int. Resurrection Cemetery. Contributions to the O'Meara, Jr.; Chris and Nick Parker; Alzheimer's Association appreciated. Visitation Wed. 3-8 Brittany (Tim) Lenze, Jacque (Nick) p.m. Whisler, Krista Parker; dear great-grandmother of Annie and Hay, William G. John; Matthew and Erin; Kiefer and 84, passed Sat., Nov. 30 2019. Services: Parker; and Sophia. Hoffmeister South County Chapel. Visitation Dec. 5 Gram used every minute of her 97 years to bring faith, light, love from 4-8 p.m. Funeral Dec. 6 at 10 a.m. and laughter into the lives of everyone around her. The best way www.hoffmeistersouthcounty.com we can honor her is to pick up where she left off, welcoming each day with gratitude, choosing love over fear, and unselfishly sharing our own unique and beautiful gifts with the world. Helm, John Louis Services: Memorial Mass Wed., Dec. 4, 11 a.m. at Sacred Heart December 1, 2019, age 95. Visitation Wednesday, December Church, Valley Park. Private burial at Jefferson Barracks. 4, Baue Cave Springs, 11:30 am to 1:30 pm. Service to Memorials to Catholic Charities, or Family Center, 9450 follow 1:30 pm. Contact (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com Manchester Rd., Suite 204, 63119. 76, of St. Peters, on Nov. 29, 2019. Vis. Tues., Dec. 3, 99 years young, passed away peacefully on Dec. 1, 2019. 4:00-8:00 pm, Baue Cave Springs 3950 W. Clay St. Father of William D. Jansen. He is now with his much Funeral Wed., Dec. 4, 11:30 am, same location. Visit loved and adored wife Vera, along with deceased brothers Clem, Clyde, Bob, and Don Jansen and sister Baue.com Marcella Mosbacher. He spent 30 years with the City of St. Pratt, Doris D. Louis Fire Dept. operating H&L 11. William "Willie" was very asleep in Jesus at the age of 91 on dedicated to his wife, son, and all the people he encountered. He Saturday, November 30, 2019. will be greatly missed. A great guy. In lieu of flowers, memorials to Dear daughter of the late Robert I. Mercy South Hospice (Degreef House) are appreciated. Pratt and Marie "Mamie" (nee Services: Visit Thurs. 12/5, from 11 a.m. until time of Mass Wotli) Pratt; dear cousin and friend at 12 p.m., both at St. Raphael the Archangel. Interment to many. Jefferson Barracks Nat’l Cemetery. Doris worked for over 20 years with the City of St. Louis as an Kuhn, Joanne account clerk. (nee Waite) asleep in Jesus on Sat., Nov. 30, 2019. Beloved wife of A special thanks to the staff of the late Robert L. Kuhn; loving mother of Patti (Joseph) Benedick Laclede Groves for their kind and and James (Mary) Kuhn. Services: Funeral at KUTIS SOUTH loving care, and support to Doris COUNTY Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., on Fri., Dec. 6, 10 a.m. Int. and her family. Park Lawn. Vis. Thurs., 4-8 p.m. In lieu of flowers, contributions to Services: Visitation at Laclede the American Parkinson Disease Assoc., 1415 Elbridge Payne Rd., Groves Chapel (723 So. Laclede Station Rd.) on Thursday, Suite 150, (63017), appreciated. kutisfuneralhomes.com December 5, 10 a.m. until funeral service at 11 a.m. Interment Our Redeemer Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions to the charity of your choice. KUTIS AFFTON Lehman, Ralph S. passed away peacefully on November 21, 2019, at age 97. He was SERVICE. the longtime CEO of Edgewood Children's Center in Webster Shipman, Betty Jane Groves, MO. A celebration of life will be held Saturday, January 11, 2020, at 11:00 am at the Bethel College Mennonite Church, North November 29, 2019. Visitation Wed. Dec 4, from 11 am-12:30, with funeral ceremony at 12:30 at Valhalla Newton, Kansas. www.petersenfamilyfuneralhome.com Chapel. www.valhallafunerals.net

Migneco, Angelo P.

Weinhold, Jo Anne Baptized into the hope of Christ's Resurrection, December 2, 2019. Beloved husband of the late Madelyn Migneco; dear father of Mark Sat., Nov. 30, 2019. Visit. Thurs., Dec. 5, 4-8 pm, BOPP CHAPEL, (Pam) Migneco, Kimberly Piatchek and Michael Migneco; 10610 Manchester Rd., Kirkwood. Funeral Fri., 10 am, visitation at cherished grandfather of Christopher, Lisa, Shelby, Michael, Gage, 9 am, at Concordia Lutheran, Kirkwood. Boppchapel.com Gemma, Gualliana and Gisella, and great-grandfather of Emiley, Florist Miranda, Collette, Levi and Blake; dear brother of Mary Jones and 7 late brothers and sisters. Services: Visitation at St. Margaret Mary Alacoque Church on Dierbergs Florist Order 24 Hours Thurs., Dec. 5, 9:30 a.m. until time of Mass at 11 a.m. Interment 314-692-2000 or 800-844-6007 Resurrection Cemetery. A KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY SERVICE. Dierbergs.com “The best and most beautiful things in the world cannot be seen, nor touched, but are felt in the heart.” HELEN KELLER

Schnucks Florist 65 Metro Locations 314-997-2444; 800-286-9557


12.03.2019 • TUESDAY • M 1

NATION

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A13

Democrats take aim at Trump’s cash advantage

Lawsuit: Ex-Cardinal McCarrick abused boy in Newark in 1990s

BY BRIAN SLODYSKO

Associated Press

Associated Press

NEWARK, N.J. — Former Roman Catholic Cardinal Theodore McCarrick abused a teenage boy in the 1990s when he was leader of the Archdiocese of Newark, according to a lawsuit filed under a newly enacted New Jersey law that gives accusers more time to make legal claims. Another lawsuit filed by two of six sisters alleges that a now-deceased priest who previously worked for the archdiocese abused them and their siblings for almost 10 years after he was transferred to Pennsylvania. “This is a momentous day for our family because we can finally move forward in our search for justice,” one of the sisters, Patty Fortney-Julius, said at a news conference Monday. A law that was passed by New Jersey in the spring and went into effect Sunday allows child sex abuse victims to sue until they turn 55, or within seven years of their first realization the abuse caused

WASHINGTON — Democrats are narrowing President Donald Trump’s early spending advantage, with two billionaire White House hopefuls joining established party groups to target the president in key battleground states that are likely to determine the outcome of next year’s election. Priorities USA and American Bridge, two of the leading Democratic outside groups, are ramping up operations. The organization ACRONYM recently pledged to spend $75 million. And former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg has pledged to spend $100 million on ads targeting Trump, while California billionaire Tom Steyer promised $50 million. The billionaires have come under fire from some Democratic rivals for trying to buy the presidency. But the influx of cash is soothing anxiety in some corners of the party that Trump, who has repeatedly broken fundraising records, was off to an unprecedented early start in the 2020 advertising wars. Some had argued that the Democrats’ overwhelming focus on the sprawling presidential primary field allowed the president to burnish a reelection narrative unchallenged ahead of what is expected to be an exceptionally close election. “It’s safe to say the gap is closing,” said David Brock, who leads several Democratic groups, including American Bridge. “People can breathe a little bit of a sigh of relief that there is a major Democratic response now and that Trump’s spending will be met.” The money has put Democrats on firmer footing in states such as Florida, Wisconsin, Michigan, Pennsylvania, North Carolina and Arizona, which will be key to victory in 2020. But it’s unclear how long it will last. Trump has built a massive money-raising machine that has fused a traditional network of big-dollar Republican donors with a sophisticated digital operation that has raked in small contributions from rank-andfile supporters. Sitting presidents have long used their office to draw a spotlight and rake in money while the party out of power fights its way through a primary. Trump, however, never really ceased campaigning and has been running for reelection essentially since taking office, giving him a far earlier head start. For months, his campaign has spent comparatively little on digital advertising in battlegrounds, while dumping money in population-dense states like New York, California and Texas, which are rich in potential donors but won’t decide the outcome of the election. Yet the money he is raising there will enable him to flood important states with advertising early next year. Over the summer, the lack of spending fueled worries — and some snipping — that not enough was being done counter Trump. “We welcome other efforts. But we also need to remember that Trump has yet to start spending money big in swing states,” said Patrick McHugh, the executive director of Priorities USA, which spent roughly $200 million during the 2016 election. “Matching dollar for dollar now would come at the detriment of matching his spending online and on television once he begins spending in earnest in states that matter.” While the economy overall has performed well during Trump’s presidency, Priorities is driving a message that aims to move beyond the toplines and connect peoples’ frustration with their own financial well-being directly to the president. The group has yet to say how much it will spend on the 2020 contest, but it has outspent Trump $6.5 million to $2.2 million since July on Facebook and Google in Florida, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania and Michigan. American Bridge, which has traditionally focused on conducting opposition research, has launched a $50 million radio, TV and digital advertising campaign in the same states that is geared toward rural and exurban voters in about 80 counties that Barack Obama carried but later switched to Trump. “It’s a margins game that we’re playing, but we think that we can get enough people to defect,” Brock said.

BY DAVID PORTER

them harm. The previous limit was two years. Victims who were previously barred from suing because they didn’t act during the allotted time period now have a two-year window to file claims. Both lawsuits announced Monday seek unspecified punitive damages. Fortney-Julius and her sisters allege the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Newark knew that Augustine Giella abused children well before their abuse began in the early 1980s, after his transfer to the Harrisburg diocese. Her sister, Lara Fortney-McKeever, recalled through tears Monday how Giella came to her fifth grade classroom seeking volunteers for jobs around the rectory. “I quickly raised my hand,” she said. “That is the day I have regretted for over three decades, and it will haunt me for the rest of my life. I introduced this monster to my entire family, and it shattered us.” In an emailed statement, the Newark archdiocese said it “will

continue to cooperate and work with victims, their legal representatives and law enforcement authorities in an ongoing effort to resolve allegations made and bring closure to victims.” The Diocese of Harrisburg said in an emailed statement that it hadn’t received the complaint yet and deferred comment. “The Fortney family, as well as all survivors of child abuse, have access to professional therapy and counseling services, at no cost to them, through the Diocese,” the statement said. “The Diocese of Harrisburg will continue to do all we can to support survivors of child sexual abuse and to ensure all youth in our care are safe.” The sisters’ accounts were among hundreds in last year’s investigation on clergy sexual abuse conducted by a Pennsylvania grand jury that provided impetus for New Jersey legislators to act this year. About two dozen states changed their laws on statutes of limitations this year, and several others have created so-called lookback win-

dows for lawsuits, as New Jersey has. The Fortney sisters sued in New Jersey because Pennsylvania lawmakers declined to pass a lookback provision this month. McCarrick, who also served as archbishop of Washington, D.C., and was one of the highest-ranking, most visible Catholic Church officials in the United States, was defrocked in February at age 89 after a church investigation determined he sexually abused minors, as well as adult seminarians. In a lawsuit filed Monday, John Bellocchio alleges McCarrick sexually assaulted him when he was 14 and McCarrick was visiting Bellocchio’s parish in Hackensack, New Jersey. Bellocchio’s attorney, Jeff Anderson, said his client’s lawsuit is the first to name McCarrick as a defendant. It also names the Newark archdiocese as a defendant, but not Vatican officials. It does, however, allege Vatican officials were aware of McCarrick’s behavior yet continued to promote him to ever higher positions.

ALEX BRANDON, ASSOCIATED PRESS

During a 2019 Christmas preview Monday at the White House. a gingerbread replica features landmarks from around the country.

Patriotism is White House Christmas theme BY DARLENE SUPERVILLE

Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Melania Trump is celebrating American patriotism at the White House this Christmas, incorporating red and blue into the traditional holiday green, adding a timeline of American design, innovation and architecture and studding a Christmas tree with her family’s annual ornament, the American flag. The traditional gingerbread White House shares its stage with American landmarks including the Statue of Liberty and Golden Gate Bridge. “It is with great joy that our family welcomes you to the White House this holiday season as we celebrate the Spirit of America,” President Donald Trump, the first lady and their son, Barron, say in the signed introduction to a souvenir book visitors will receive as

a holiday keepsake. “We hope you enjoy our tribute to the traditions, customs and history that make our nation great.” The White House previewed the decorations for journalists on Monday before Trump and the first lady departed for London. Journalists were also admitted to the grounds of the Naval Observatory, the official residence for Vice President Mike Pence and his wife, Karen, to see the Christmas decorations there. The East Colonnade of the White House is lined with double rows of see-through panels etched with more than 60 examples of American design, innovation and architecture, ranging from the Woolworth Building in New York City to the Space Needle in Seattle. A tree dedicated to Gold Star families that lost an immediate relative during military service

stands at the beginning of the hallway while a tree decorated with the Trump family ornament — an American flag this year — glistens at the end of the colonnade. East Room decorations are inspired by the U.S. flag and feature gilded eagle Christmas tree toppers, mirrored stars and red and blue ribbons. In the State Dining Room, at the opposite end of the hallway, the decor continues to showcase American design. The gingerbread White House, built from 200 pounds of gingerbread and slathered in 25 poundsof royal icing and 35 pounds of chocolate, showcases the South Portico, including a staircase made using angel hair, fettucine and spaghetti. The popular display also features models of some of the nation’s most famous landmarks, including Mount Rushmore, St. Louis’ Gateway Arch, the Alamo,

the Liberty Bell and the Statue of Liberty, along with the Golden Gate Bridge and the Space Needle. The Blue Room is again commanded by a towering tree, a 18 ½-foot Douglas fir from a Pennsylvania farm, decorated with flowers representing every state and territory. The Red Room is decorated with games, including trees made of White House playing cards bearing the president and first lady’s signatures. It’s meant to highlight her “Be Best” youth initiative and serve as a reminder of the kindness, respect and teamwork needed to play together. Mrs. Trump continued her tradition of hanging wreaths on the mansion’s exterior windows — 106 in all. More than 225 volunteers flew in from around the country to help decorate the White House during Thanksgiving weekend.

Rock tragedy: Music superstars, small suburb forever linked BY DAN SEWELL

Associated Press

FINNEYTOWN, Ohio — The concrete bench in a small northern Cincinnati suburb depicts a guitar, with the message “My Generation” just below it. In the background are plaques with the faces of three teenagers, Jackie Eckerle, Karen Morrison and Stephan Preston, frozen in time 40 years ago. Bricks in the plaza around the bench carry eight other names. All 11 were killed in a frantic stampede of people trying to get into the British rock band The Who’s concert on Dec. 3, 1979, at Cincinnati’s Riverfront Coliseum. The city of Finneytown suffered disproportionately, and its three losses included the two youngest victims, 15-year-olds Eckerle and Morrison. Their schoolmates say well over 100 other people from Finneytown were there. “Everyone’s connected to it, everywhere you go around here,” said Fred Wittenbaum, who was a freshman at Finneytown High

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Concertgoers and a policeman stand near a pile of shoes and clothing left after a crowd surged toward the doors of Cincinnati’s Riverfront Coliseum to get into a rock concert by British rock band The Who on Dec. 3, 1979. School then but did not attend the concert. “Either they went to the concert, or they had a friend or a family member who was there.” Since then, the community of around 12,000 people, many

living in ranch-style homes built years before the concert, has been inextricably linked with The Who, which was already well on the way to the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame with such hits as “Won’t Get

Fooled Again,” “Can’t Explain,” and “My Generation,” an anthem of rebellious youth. Most of the blame afterward focused on the first-come, firstserved arrangement for seating that saw thousands of fans line up for hours ready to charge toward the coveted floor spots, and on confusion over and lack of preparation for when the doors were opening. Besides those trampled in the stampede, some two dozen other fans were injured. Frontman Roger Daltrey and guitarist Pete Townshend, the last survivors of the original band, say they have struggled emotionally over the years with the concert carnage, which they didn’t know about until their show was ending. “Because there’s always a certain amount, ‘If I hadn’t been doing this, it wouldn’t have happened,’ you know,” Daltrey said during an unpublicized visit last year to the Finneytown memorial site. “That’s just human nature. That’s what we carry with us.”


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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

TUESDAY • 12.03.2019 • B

Albert O. headed to the NFL draft Junior tight end is coming off a disappointing season with a career-low 26 receptions

MICHAEL WOODS, AP PHOTO

> Mizzou basketball inside: Tigers look to get back on track vs. Charleston Southern. B3

BLUES BLANK HAWKS

BY DAVE MATTER

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

COLUMBIA, Mo. — For the second time in two days, the Missouri football team lost a junior to the NFL draft. This one was expected: Tight end Albert Okwuegbunam won’t return for his senior season and will make himself available for the 2020 draft. He announced his plans on Twitter. He tweeted the following on Monday: “I’m beyond thankful for my experiences at this outstanding University. I’ve learned so much about the game of football and life over these past 4 years. Through trial and triumph these experiences undoubtedly molded me into the player/man I am today. I am extremely thankful for all my coaches throughout my career so far and their everlasting impact on and off the field. But most importantly I am thankful for my brothers and the extremely tight bonds I’ve formed over these years. Through the ups and downs we’ve always stayed solid and supported each other when at times it felt no one Please see MU, Page B2

Sterk’s search for a coach gets tougher

TONY AVELAR, AP PHOTO

CHARLES REX ARBOGAST, AP PHOTO

It’s hard to think of a better potential hire than Boise State’s Bryan Harsin.

Jake Allen makes one of his 38 saves Monday as Jay Bouwmeester (19), Tyler Bozak (21) and Chicago’s Dominik Kubalik watch. BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Allen has 38 saves in win at Chicago BY JIM THOMAS

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CHICAGO — It has been a long time, hasn’t it? Too long really, since the Blues met their old friends from Chicago in the sport of ice hockey. Last season, the teams had met three times by Oct. 27, and four times in the Blues’ first 16 > Up next: games. It took until Monday 7 p.m. Wednes- night — Game 29 for the Blues day at Penand in the month of December, guins, NBCSN no less — for the 2019-20 edition of the rivalry to get underway. > Notebook: “Obviously Blues fans and Bortuzzo: “It’s a game I have to Blackhawks fans don’t like play . . . on that each other much,” Blues center Brayden Schenn said. “It kinda edge.” B5 goes in both sports, baseball and hockey.” Sure does.

Blues 4, Hawks 0

Monday’s game was the latest the teams have met to start a season series since the 2009-10 campaign, when a Blues roster that included David Perron, Alexander Pietrangelo and Alexander Steen lost 3-0 in Chicago on Dec. 16. The Blues had better luck Monday at United Center, toppling the Blackhawks 4-0. It was the fourth victory in a row for St. Louis (18-5-6), and extended their road point streak to 10 games (8-0-2), the secondlongest streak in franchise history. The franchise road record of 11 games with at least a point (10-0-1) was achieved during the 1999-2000 season.

Illini can’t quite overcome early deficit following lackluster start BY JOEY WAGNER

Decatur (Ill.) Herald & Review

Miami 81, Illinois 79 > Up next: 4 p.m. Saturday at Maryland, ESPN2

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Chris Lykes was a one-man, 5-foot-7 ball of terror for the Illinois men’s basketball team to try to find a way to contain on Monday night. The Miami guard knifed through defenders for easy layups and hit contested, hand-inhis-face 3-pointers on his way to 28 points, but one defensive play saved the game and prevented the Illini from overcoming what was once a 27-point first-half

ARMANDO L. SANCHEZ, CHICAGO TRIBUNE

Blues defenseman Colton Parayko crashes into Please see BLUES, Page B5 Blackhawks center Ryan Carpenter.

Just when you become convinced the college football coaching carousel has reached its capacity for chaos, stuff like this happens. Poor Matt Luke reportedly found out Ole Miss fired him while he was in a recruit’s home. Then a Twitter joker convinced half the world that the Rebels had hired Washington State’s Mike Leach. That was news to Leach. And Ole Miss. Sports Illustrated reported Clay Helton was out at Southern Cal, but that was either false or premature, so Sports Illustrated debunked the Sports Illustrated Please see FREDERICKSON, Page B2

SLOW STARTS PLAGUE TIGERS Mizzou has been playing from behind early in its recent losses. B3

deficit at the State Farm Center. Illinois (6-2) found its rhythm after a glacial start to the game to trim the deficit to one point with 16 seconds to go. Sophomore guard Ayo Dosunmu dribbled up and attacked the basket only to find Lykes waiting for him to draw a charge with two seconds left to seal an 81-79 Miami win in the ACC/Big Ten Challenge, earning head coach Jim Larranaga his 650th career win. “We would have loved to get CHARLIE RIEDEL, AP PHOTO Please see ILLINOIS, Page B3

Cuonzo Martin and the Tigers return to action Tuesday against Charleston Southern.

SPORTS

© 2019 St. Louis Children’s Hospital. All Rights Reserved. © 2019 St. Louis Blues Hockey Club and the National Hockey League. All Rights Reserved.

1 M


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

TUESDAY • 12.03.2019 • B

Albert O. headed to the NFL draft Junior tight end is coming off a disappointing season with a career-low 26 receptions

MICHAEL WOODS, AP PHOTO

> Mizzou basketball inside: Tigers look to get back on track vs. Charleston Southern. B3

BLUES BLANK HAWKS

BY DAVE MATTER

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

COLUMBIA, Mo. — For the second time in two days, the Missouri football team lost a junior to the NFL draft. This one was expected: Tight end Albert Okwuegbunam won’t return for his senior season and will make himself available for the 2020 draft. He announced his plans on Twitter. He tweeted the following on Monday: “I’m beyond thankful for my experiences at this outstanding University. I’ve learned so much about the game of football and life over these past 4 years. Through trial and triumph these experiences undoubtedly molded me into the player/man I am today. I am extremely thankful for all my coaches throughout my career so far and their everlasting impact on and off the field. But most importantly I am thankful for my brothers and the extremely tight bonds I’ve formed over these years. Through the ups and downs we’ve always stayed solid and supported each other when at times it felt no one Please see MU, Page B2

Sterk’s search for a coach gets tougher

TONY AVELAR, AP PHOTO

CHARLES REX ARBOGAST, AP PHOTO

It’s hard to think of a better potential hire than Boise State’s Bryan Harsin.

Jake Allen makes one of his 38 saves Monday as Jay Bouwmeester (19), Tyler Bozak (21) and Chicago’s Dominik Kubalik watch. BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Allen has 38 saves in win at Chicago BY JIM THOMAS

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Blues 4, Hawks 0 > Up next: 7 p.m. Wednesday at Penguins, NBCSN > Notebook: Bortuzzo: “It’s a game I have to play . . . on that edge.” B5

CHICAGO — It has been a long time, hasn’t it, since the Blues met their old friends from Chicago. Last season, the teams had met three times by Oct. 27, and four times in the Blues’ first 16 games. It took until Monday night — Game 29 for the Blues this season and in the month of December, no less — for the 2019-20 edition of the Midwest rivalry to get underway. For Blues fans this one was worth the wait. Behind a 38save performance by goalie Jake Allen, and goals by Mackenzie MacEachern, Jaden Schwartz, Brayden Schenn and Tyler Bozak, St. Louis blanked the Blackhawks

4-0 before 21,204 at United Center. “Never an easy building to come into, so it’s good to obviously get a win here,” Schwartz said. “It would be nice to finish off in Pittsburgh for a good little road trip. It was a good solid team win for us. I thought the second period wasn’t our best, but we found a way to get it done.” It was the fourth victory in a row for the Blues (18-5-6), and extended their road point streak to 10 games (8-0-2), the secondlongest streak in franchise history. They can tie the franchise road record of 11 games with at least a point, achieved during the 1999-2000 season, on

Illini can’t quite overcome early deficit following lackluster start BY JOEY WAGNER

Decatur (Ill.) Herald & Review

Miami 81, Illinois 79 > Up next: 4 p.m. Saturday at Maryland, ESPN2

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Chris Lykes was a one-man, 5-foot-7 ball of terror for the Illinois men’s basketball team to try to find a way to contain on Monday night. The Miami guard knifed through defenders for easy layups and hit contested, hand-inhis-face 3-pointers on his way to 28 points, but one defensive play saved the game and prevented the Illini from overcoming what was once a 27-point first-half

ARMANDO L. SANCHEZ, CHICAGO TRIBUNE

Blues defenseman Colton Parayko crashes into Please see BLUES, Page B5 Blackhawks center Ryan Carpenter.

Just when you become convinced the college football coaching carousel has reached its capacity for chaos, stuff like this happens. Poor Matt Luke reportedly found out Ole Miss fired him while he was in a recruit’s home. Then a Twitter joker convinced half the world that the Rebels had hired Washington State’s Mike Leach. That was news to Leach. And Ole Miss. Sports Illustrated reported Clay Helton was out at Southern Cal, but that was either false or premature, so Sports Illustrated debunked the Sports Illustrated Please see FREDERICKSON, Page B2

SLOW STARTS PLAGUE TIGERS Mizzou has been playing from behind early in its recent losses. B3

deficit at the State Farm Center. Illinois (6-2) found its rhythm after a glacial start to the game to trim the deficit to one point with 16 seconds to go. Sophomore guard Ayo Dosunmu dribbled up and attacked the basket only to find Lykes waiting for him to draw a charge with two seconds left to seal an 81-79 Miami win in the ACC/Big Ten Challenge, earning head coach Jim Larranaga his 650th career win. “We would have loved to get CHARLIE RIEDEL, AP PHOTO Please see ILLINOIS, Page B3

Cuonzo Martin and the Tigers return to action Tuesday against Charleston Southern.

SPORTS

© 2019 St. Louis Children’s Hospital. All Rights Reserved. © 2019 St. Louis Blues Hockey Club and the National Hockey League. All Rights Reserved.

2 M


SPORTS

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

M 1 • TUESDAY • 12.03.2019

ROAD

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Wednesday 12/4 at Penguins 7 p.m. NBCSN

Saturday 12/7 vs. Maple Leafs 6 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 12/10 at Sabres 6:30 p.m. FSM

Thursday 12/12 vs. Golden Knights 7 p.m., FSM

St. Louis U. • slubillikens.com | 314-977-4758 Men’s basketball Sunday 12/8 vs. Tulane (in Phoenix) 12:30 p.m.

Women’s basketball Saturday 12/14 at Auburn (in Birmingham) 3 p.m., ESPN2

Tuesday 12/3 vs. Southeast Missouri State 7 p.m.

Thursday 12/5 at Missouri 7 p.m.

Mizzou • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Men’s basketball Tuesday 12/3 vs. Charleston Southern 7 p.m.

Women’s basketball Saturday 12/7 at Temple 6:30 p.m. ESPNU

Thursday 12/5 vs. St. Louis U. 7 p.m.

Sunday 12/8 at Kansas City 2 p.m.

SIUE • siuecougars.com | 855-748-3849 Men’s basketball

Women’s basketball

Wednesday 12/4 Sunday 12/15 vs. Chicago State at Northwestern 3 p.m. 7:30 p.m. ESPNU

Sunday 12/8 vs. Loyola 2 p.m.

Monday 12/16 at Illinois State 11 a.m.

Illinois • fightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Football

Men’s basketball

TBA Bowl game TBA

Saturday 12/7 at Maryland 4 p.m. ESPN2

Wednesday 12/11 vs. Michigan 8 p.m. BTN

Saturday 12/14 vs. Old Dominion 5 p.m. BTN MICHAEL WOODS, AP PHOTO

Missouri quarterback Connor Bazelak recovers a fumble on the snap against Arkansas on Friday.

OTHER EVENTS MAJOR ARENA SOCCER • St. Louis Ambush home games Sun. 12/8: vs. Milwaukee, 5:05 p.m. Sun. 12/15: vs. Kansas City, 3:05 p.m. FAIRMOUNT PARK • Simulcasting: 11 a.m-11:30 p.m. daily.

MU From B1

TICKET INFORMATION Cardinals 314-345-9000 Grizzlies 618-337-3000 Ambush 636-477-6363 Blues 314-622-2583 Illinois 217-333-3470 Mizzou 800-228-7297 SLU 314-977-4758 SIUE 855-748-3849 STLFC 636-680-0997 Fairmount 314-436-1516 • 618-345-4300

ON THE AIR BASKETBALL 5:30 p.m. College: St. Peter’s at St. John’s, FS1 6 p.m. College: Iowa at Syracuse, ESPN2 6 p.m. College: Northwestern at Boston College, ESPNU 6 p.m. College: Butler at Mississippi, SEC Network 6 p.m. College: Vermont at Cincinnati, CBSSN 6 p.m. College: Northwestern at Boston College, ESPNU 6:30 p.m. College: Michigan at Louisville, ESPN 6:30 p.m. NBA: Mavericks at Pelicans, TNT 7 p.m. College: Missouri St. vs. Murray St., KXFN (1380 AM), KYRO (1280 AM) 7 p.m. College: Missouri vs. Charleston Southern, KTRS (550 AM) 7:30 p.m. College: Oral Roberts at Creighton, FS1 8 p.m. College: Florida State at Indiana, ESPN2 8 p.m. College: Illinois State at TCU, FSM 8 p.m. College: New Orleans at LSU, SEC Network 8 p.m. College: Bradley at Memphis, CBSSN 8 p.m. College: Rutgers at Pittsburgh, ESPNU 8:30 p.m. College: Duke at Michigan State, ESPN 9 p.m. NBA: Trail Blazers at Clippers, TNT 10 p.m. College: Arizona State at San Francisco, CBSSN FOOTBALL 6 p.m. College playoff rankings announcement, ESPN HOCKEY 7 p.m. Lightning at Predators, NBCSN SOCCER 1:30 p.m. English Premier League: Burnley FC vs. Manchester City, NBCSN

DIGEST Cardinals offer contract to pitcher John Gant The Cardinals presented a contract to pitcher John Gant ahead of Monday evening’s non-tender deadline, a date every winter that spurs some trades and lets loose a trickle of new free agents into the marketplace. Gant, 27, is the only player the Cardinals have on the roster who is eligible for arbitration, and if the two sides cannot agree on a salary for 2020 ahead of January’s formal exchange of salary figures an arbiter will pick. The Cardinals also formally presented contracts to all of the players on the 40-man roster with less than three years of service time, including pitchers Jordan Hicks and Jack Flaherty, center fielder Harrison Bader, and prospects Andrew Knizner, Randy Arozarena, and Lane Thomas. Their salaries for 2020 will be set in spring training, but after Monday all of them have contracts for 2020. The Cardinals pruned their roster ahead of the non-tender deadline by passing reliever Dominic Leone through waivers and setting him free before Monday. Gant went 11-1 with a 3.66 ERA in 64 appearances, all in relief, in 2019. (Derrick Goold) Messi, Rapinoe win awards: Lionel Messi won a record sixth Ballon d’Or while World Cup winner Megan Rapinoe earned the women’s prize on Monday. A day after scoring his 614th career goal for Barcelona, Messi reclaimed the trophy he last won in 2015. Liverpool defender Virgil van Dijk was second in the polling, followed by Cristiano Ronaldo, who shared the record of five Ballon d’Ors with Messi until Monday. Rapinoe won the women’s Ballon d’Or for leading the United States to World Cup glory in July. She scored six goals in the championship, earning her the Golden Boot as the top scorer and the Golden Ball as the top player. (AP) Washington’s Petersen steps down: Washington coach Chris Petersen says he is stepping down after six seasons at the school, with defensive coordinator Jimmy Lake promoted to over the program. Petersen’s decision was shocking coming off a season where the Huskies went 7-5 in the regular season and are bound for a sixth straight bowl game. The school said Petersen, 55, will transition into a “leadership advisory role” within the athletic department. (AP) Other college football: Injured South Carolina quarterback Jake Bentley says he’s leaving the Gamecocks to play a final college football season elsewhere. Bentley will graduate on Dec. 16, meaning he could play immediately at his new school. ... The Southeastern Conference has fined Auburn $250,000 after fans stormed the field celebrating an Iron Bowl victory. It’s the school’s fourth violation of the league’s policy prohibiting fan access to the field or court. The SEC announced the fine Monday, two days after fans almost completely covered the field at Jordan-Hare Stadium following the 11th-ranked Tigers’ 48-45 win over No. 9 Alabama. (AP)

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else was and I can’t thoroughly express the gratitude I’ll always have for that. “Ever since the first time I put on a helmet and shoulder pads playing in the NFL has been my dream. God-willing I’ve been blessed with this opportunity and I have decided to embark on that journey now. I will forgo my last year of eligibility and declare for the 2020 NFL Draft. I’m excited for what the future holds but will always be thankful to Missouri.” Okwuegbunam has not yet received a draft grade from the NFL draft advisory committee, a source confirmed Monday. Okwuegbunam had a disappointing 2019 season, finishing with a career-low 26 catches for 306 yards and six touchdowns. He missed the home finale against Tennessee with a shoulder injury. In seven games against Southeastern Conference teams, he caught only 17 passes for 145 yards and two touchdowns. He led the team with eight drops and had several costly penalties, including a flag for unsportsmanlike conduct that negated a crucial first down in MU’s loss to Florida. In 33 career games, he caught 23 touchdowns, second all-time at Mizzou behind only former All-America tight end Chase Coffman’s 30 touchdown catches from 2005-08. He finishes his three-year career with 98 catches for 1,187 yards. Okwuegbunam first committed to Mizzou’s 2016 recruiting

Frederickson From B1

report. What? Fans are tracking airplanes like the FAA. Rumors of Bob Stoops and Urban Meyer keep taking flight. Crazy season is now boarding for takeoff. Mizzou fans are riding the highs and lows. Jim Sterk’s emphasis on privacy during his hunt for Barry Odom’s replacement should make more sense now. If an athletics director took a moment to dismiss each wave of wackiness, there would be no time for interviews. One of the few things we have learned for certain between the news of Odom’s firing on Saturday and now is that Sterk’s task has become more complicated. That’s what happens when Ole Miss surprises everyone by crowding in alongside Arkansas, Florida State and Mizzou. Some thoughts on Sterk’s search as it begins to spin: • It’s hard to think of a better hire, on paper, than Boise State’s Bryan Harsin. The Broncos are preparing to play in yet another Mountain West Conference championship game. They are 63-16 during Harsin’s six seasons there. That .797 winning percentage is the sixth-best in college football during that span. Only two coaches — Alabama’s Nick Saban and Clemson’s Dabo Swinney — have a higher winning percentage with one program during those same years. Harsin’s program churns out NFL players. His background is on offense, where he learned under Chris Petersen and Mack Brown. His buyout is a very reasonable $350,000, and his current contract pays him about $10.25 million through 2024. Would he jump on a five-year deal that came close to doubling that haul? Some doubt Harsin is willing to leave his alma mater after relocating there from a one-season stint as Arkansas State head coach in 2013. Some believe he is holding out for a Pac-12 gig. But the 43-year-old has shown inter-

class before Gary Pinkel announced his retirement then stuck with the Tigers when Barry Odom was promoted to head coach. After a redshirt season in 2016, the Springfield, Ill., native became an instant hit in Mizzou’s offense and led the SEC with 11 touchdown catches, the most by any tight end in the country. After his Freshman All-America season, Okwuegbunam boosted his receptions from 29 to 43 as a sophomore, even though he missed the season’s final four games with a broken scapula. He still became a finalist for the John Mackey Award, given to the nation’s best tight end. His first two years prompted preseason All-America buzz heading into this season, but he rarely established a prominent role in the offense. His targets slipped from 58 in nine games last year to 46 in 11 games this year. On Sunday, junior defensive tackle Jordan Elliott announced plans to leave MU a year early for the NFL draft.

BAZELAK SUFFERS TORN ACL Freshman quarterback Connor Bazelak suffered a torn anterior cruciate ligament in his right knee on the play that knocked him out of Friday’s 24-20 win at Arkansas, team spokesman Chad Moller confirmed Monday. Bazelak, who made his first career start in Little Rock, Ark., will undergo surgery next week. It’s unclear what his status will be for the start of spring practices under the team’s next coaching staff.

est in other jobs lately, including Oregon and Tennessee. If he is convinced he has reached his Mountain West ceiling, the SEC could be appealing, especially a job in the less-threatening SEC East. • Here’s hoping Sterk’s Mountain West connection stops in Boise. The former San Diego State AD has a lot of respect for Air Force coach Troy Calhoun. But Calhoun’s off-putting personality and his triple-option system would be hard sells at Mizzou. The Tigers are known for producing quarterbacks and defensive linemen. What QB wants to run the triple-option? What defensive lineman want to get chop-blocked every day in practice? • I wonder if Sterk would have any reservations about shopping for a coach on super agent Jimmy Sexton’s list. I wonder if Sexton would be standoffish toward dealing with Sterk. Odom was a Sexton client. Odom and Sexton pushed for an extension and raise last season, campaigning for a bump that Mizzou would have provided on its own schedule. Odom got his money. It came with some tension. Then came the Derek Dooley disaster. The offensive coordinator who cost Odom his job was a Sexton guy. The arranged marriage flopped. Swimming in Sexton’s waters might not be Sterk’s first choice, if he can avoid it. Sexton might not be Sterk’s biggest fan at the moment. It should be mentioned that Sexton represents both Florida Atlantic’s Lane Kiffin and Memphis’ Mike Norvell. • Don’t rush to dismiss the idea of Charlotte’s Will Healy as a potential candidate. The 34-yearold, baby-faced ball of positive energy is a relentless recruiter who has been labeled College Football’s Next Big Thing. The former Richmond quarterback made the transition from coaching quarterbacks and receivers and leading recruitment at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga to becoming the head coach at Austin Peay entering the 2016 season. Healy was

The freshman from Dayton, Ohio, was making his third appearance of the season and put together a few promising drives, completing 7 of 9 passes for 80 yards. He was attempting to scramble for a first down on third-and-long early in the second quarter when he landed awkwardly along the sideline and suffered the knee injury. Taylor Powell played the rest of the game and led the Tigers back from a third-quarter deficit for the win. Under the NCAA’s redshirt rule, Bazelak will preserve his year of eligibility because he played in less than four games, leaving him four full seasons to see the field. In three games this year he completed 15 of 21 passes for 144 yards. If he’s not recovered in time for the start of the 2020 season, the Tigers will be down to two returning scholarship quarterbacks to compete for the job, Powell and Shawn Robinson, who transferred to MU from Texas Christian University earlier this year. Robinson was required to sit out this season by NCAA transfer rules, but the former Big 12 starter will have a strong shot to win the job next fall. The Tigers also are expected to add Chaminade’s Brady Cook, one of the area’s top passers this season with 3,194 yards and 33 touchdowns. Cook confirmed over the weekend that he still plans to sign with Mizzou after the team’s coaching change. Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

only 30 then. Austin Peay was the worst Division I program in America, with a record of 8-60 in its previous six seasons. Healy went 0-11 in year one before going 8-4 in 2017, a turnaround that won him the Eddie Robinson Award for top Football Championship Subdivision coach. Before Healy jumped to Charlotte after his third season at Austin Peay, he had landed four top-five FCS recruiting classes in his past five seasons between UT-Chattanooga and Austin Peay. In its first season without him, his former Austin Peay team is 10-3 and still alive in the FCS playoffs. Meanwhile his first Charlotte team is 7-5 and riding a program-best five-game winning streak into Charlotte’s first bowl appearance. His group of Charlotte commitments for the 2020 season, according to 247Sports, ranks third in Conference USA. Healy sells fun, and follows through. He joins his players in locker room dance parties after wins. He announced the team’s trip to the Bahamas Bowl by dressing up in scuba gear. It’s corny unless you believe in it, and he believes in it. A growing list of impressive coaches believe in Healy, including Clemson’s Swinney and Georgia’s Kirby Smart. Sterk mentioned “energy” a lot when describing the hire he hopes to make. Healy would check that box, big time. He might need some guidance when it comes to jumping into the SEC. If only there was a longtime, successful coach still around Mizzou who could serve as a non-threatening mentor. Oh, yes. That’s right. Gary Pinkel exists. Don’t write off Healy. I asked a source close to the search if I’m crazy for continuing to bring him up. The answer was no. One more thing. Healy’s agent is, of course, Sexton. Buckle up, Mizzou fans. Coaching search season and all of its craziness is only just beginning to bloom. Ben Frederickson @Ben_Fred on Twitter bfrederickson@post-dispatch.com


COLLEGE BASKETBALL

12.03.2019 • TUESDAY • M 1

Michigan makes huge jump to No. 4 in poll JOHN MARSHALL

Associated Press

Louisville is the latest No. 1 following an unexpected loss by Duke. Michigan has matched a record by debuting at No. 4. A season of parity is taking a toll in the AP Top 25. Louisville became the fourth team in five weeks to claim the top spot, receiving 48 of 65 first-place votes from a media panel in The Associated Press men’s basketball poll released Monday. No. 2 Kansas, coming off the Maui Invitational title, had three first-place votes and No. 5 Virginia received five. Maryland rose to No. 3 in a week when every spot in the poll changed from last week. Michigan (7-0) knocked off Iowa State, No. 7 North Carolina and No. 9 Gonzaga to win the Battle 4 Atlantis title in the Bahamas. The Wolverines were rewarded with nine first-place votes and matched Kansas in 1989 for the biggest jump from being unranked in the history of the poll that dates to 1949. Not a bad first season under former Michigan star Juwan Howard. “I’m sure we’re on the map now,” Howard said. “A lot of teams are looking and seeing Michigan as a name that’s out there. When you beat teams like Creighton and Iowa State as well as North Carolina and Gonzaga, you’re no longer under the radar.” Louisville wasn’t exactly under the radar after opening the preseason poll at No. 5. The Cardinals (7-0) made a steady climb to No. 2 and moved to the top spot when previous No. 1 Duke lost at home to Stephen F. Austin. Duke dropped to No. 10 after its 150-game home winning streak against nonconference opponents ended in Durham. Louisville has its first No. 1 ranking in six years after beating Akron and Western Kentucky last week. “There’s no team that’s arrived. No team’s arrived,” Cardinals coach Chris Mack said. “A lot of people are saying that we haven’t played anybody. A lot of people are saying we’re not there. Maybe we aren’t deserving. I don’t care.” The record for most teams at No. 1 is seven, set in 1983, so this season already is more than halfway there. Another jumble could come next Monday because of a slate of huge games this week, including Michigan at Louisville on Tuesday.

Jayhawks rise Kansas was No. 3 in the preseason poll and dropped to fifth after a season-opening loss to Duke. The Jayhawks (6-1) have been on a roll since then, culminating last week with their third Maui Invitational title. Kansas used its size up front to beat up on Chaminade, Brigham Young and Dayton to add to the Maui titles it won in 1996 and 2015. “I’m not sure the win will have a ton to do with what we do going forward,” Jayhawks coach Bill Self said. “It’s still November and I would like to think that that automatically puts us in a very good or favorable position, but if you don’t play well against Colorado, a top20 team, next Saturday then this probably didn’t mean as much.”

Rising Michigan had the biggest jump after receiving 12 overall votes last week. No. 6 Ohio State and No. 14 Auburn were next, both moving up four spots.

Falling No. 25 Utah State had the biggest drop, falling 10 places after losing to Saint Mary’s on Friday. No. 11 Michigan State tumbled eight spots after going 2-1 in the Maui Invitational. No. 21 Tennessee dropped four places after losing to Florida State and beating Virginia Commonwealth at the Emerald Coast Classic. The AP Top Twenty Five Record Pts Prv 1. Louisville (48) 7-0 1599 2 2. Kansas (3) 6-1 1497 4 3. Maryland 8-0 1446 5 4. Michigan (9) 7-0 1429 5. Virginia (5) 7-0 1424 7 6. Ohio St. 7-0 1244 10 7. North Carolina 6-1 1162 6 8. Kentucky 6-1 1096 9 9. Gonzaga 8-1 1095 8 10. Duke 7-1 1083 1 11. Michigan St. 5-2 964 3 12. Arizona 9-0 875 14 13. Oregon 6-2 785 11 14. Auburn 7-0 698 18 15. Memphis 6-1 652 16 16. Seton Hall 6-2 629 13 17. Florida St. 7-1 562 18. Baylor 5-1 466 19 19. Dayton 5-1 386 20. Colorado 6-0 371 21 21. Tennessee 6-1 331 17 22. Washington 5-1 222 23 23. Villanova 5-2 192 22 24. Butler 7-0 165 25. Utah St. 7-1 112 15 Others receiving votes: Florida 111, Xavier 91, San Diego St. 89, Saint Mary’s (Cal) 86, Oklahoma St. 85, Texas Tech 43, West Virginia 28, Purdue 24, DePaul 18, Arkansas 17, Indiana 13, Penn St. 9, Stephen F Austin 7, Oklahoma 6, Liberty 5, Notre Dame 2, Richmond 2, VCU 2, SMU 1, Delaware 1.

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • B3

Sluggish starts hurt Mizzou BY DAVE MATTER

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

COLUMBIA, Mo. — Maybe it’s the pregame meal. Or the pregame shootaround. Whatever that’s tripped up the Missouri basketball team in the opening minutes of its three losses, Cuonzo Martin is running out of time to identify the problem and fix it. After going 0 for 2 in Kansas City last week against Butler and Oklahoma at the Hall of Fame Classic, the Tigers (4-3) are back home Tuesday against Charleston Southern (2-5), one of just three remaining home games against a mid-major opponent until Southeastern Conference play begins in a month. In their losses to Xavier, Butler and Oklahoma, the Tigers were soundly outplayed in the early stretches. Through the first eight minutes of all three games, those three opponents outscored Martin’s team 62-28. What’s the problem? “Just a little bit of everything,” Martin said after the 77-66 loss to Oklahoma. “Stagnant offense, getting Jeremiah (Tilmon) going in situations, defensive breakdowns. We don’t have a real physical presence defensively.” Consider these dismal numbers from those three losses. In the first eight minutes … • The Tigers shot 37 percent from the field (10 of 27), compared to 63.2 percent by their three opponents. • Xavier, Butler and Oklahoma combined to make 11 of 19 3-pointers (57.9 percent) • The Tigers shot a respectable 40 percent from behind the arc, but just 4 of 10 — fewer attempts from 3 than the opponents made from 3. • Mizzou had 13 turnovers in those opening eight minutes, compared to five by the opponents. • Mizzou had nine fouls, compared to three by the opponents. As poorly as the Tigers played on the offensive end early in those games — like last year, the turnovers are troubling — Martin was especially frustrated with his team’s man-to-man defense, which is supposed to be the program’s strength under his watch. “We really got to communicate better defensively,” guard Mark Smith said. “We can make some adjustments like we talked about in the locker room, but we’ve really got to find a way to come out the first seven minutes a lot better.” The struggles were so bad in the early stretches last week that Martin left Kansas City considering playing zone defense, something his teams have rarely done. After Tuesday’s game against Charleston Southern (rated No. 312 by KenPom.com), the Tigers are short on chances to gobble up wins against overmatched foes. Mizzou faces a road test Saturday at Temple (6-1), fol-

CHARLIE RIEDEL, AP PHOTO

Oklahoma’s De’Vion Harmon shoots over Missouri’s Mitchell Smith (5) during last week’s game in Kansas City, Mo. lowed by home games against Southern Illinois Carbondale (3-5) and Chicago State (3-6) sandwiched around the Braggin’ Rights Game against Illinois (61) on Dec. 21. On the offensive end, the Tigers have been among the worst 3-point shooting teams in Division I, shooting just 27.1 percent. That ranks No. 317 nationally as of Monday. Only Arkansas, Pittsburgh, Virginia and Texas A&M were shooting a worse percentage among highmajor conference teams. One issue Martin noted in Kansas City was shot selection — not so much the shots the Tigers attempted but who was taking them. “You still have to be aggressive and confident on the floor, but the right guys have to be in position to make plays,” he said. Then there’s the Tilmon factor. The junior center was invisible through the first three halves in Kansas City before scoring 11 points in the second half against Oklahoma, which coincided with MU’s brief comeback against the Sooners. “He’s so physical, a talented player around the rim,” Martin said. “You take what they give you. Just make the 1-on-1 play. If not, hit the open guy. I think it’s really simple for him because he’s so physical, so strong. I think he was a little more demanding of the ball (against Oklahoma). It was probably the best I’ve seen him all season.” Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

CHARLIE RIEDEL, AP PHOTO

Jeremiah Tilmon puts up a shot against Oklahoma last week. He accomplished little during the first three halves of Mizzou’s games in Kansas City.

MIZZOU vs. CHARLESTON SOUTHERN When: 7 p.m. Where: Mizzou Arena Series: First meeting

About Charleston Southern: The Buccaneers from the Big South Conference are off to a rough start under longtime coach Barclay TV, radio: SEC Network-Plus Radebaugh. Their only wins have (streaming only), KTRS (550 AM) come against Columbia International and Delaware State, while About Missouri: The Tigers lost they’ve dropped games to No. 19 both games at last week’s Hall of Dayton, No. 11 Michigan State, Fame Classic in Kansas City, falling by 11 points to both Butler and Southern Utah and Furman by an average margin of 39 points. … Oklahoma. … Junior guard Mark Dontrell Shuler, a 6-2 sophomore, Smith snapped out of a shooting slump against Oklahoma and leads leads the team with 18.8 points per MU with 12.9 points per game with game, while Phlandrous Fleming, a 6-4 junior, averages 9.9 points and his 3-point percentage up to 39.7. … Junior guard Dru Smith is off to 7.3 rebounds. a solid start, averaging 12.3 points

Records: Mizzou (4-3), Charleston Southern (2-5)

Illinois From B1

it on the rim, but yeah, you put the ball in one of your best players’ hands and try to get to the rim and or make a play,” Illinois head coach Brad Underwood said. “Again, Lykes, as he was on the offensive end, made the defensive play. Give the young man credit.” Larranaga and the Hurricanes (5-3) came to Champaign “so worried that they were going to crush us on the board that we wouldn’t nearly have a chance.” Their plan was simple: Don’t give Illinois rebounding opportunities or loosely translated to, “Don’t miss.” The Hurricanes executed that game plan and hardly missed. They shot 59.3 percent in the game and were 10-of-18 on 3-pointers (55.6 percent). The first half, though, is where the Hurricanes buried Illinois. They shot 66.7 percent from the field and 50 percent on 3-pointers to build a 27-point lead. The hot shooting combined with 10 of Illinois’ 13 turnovers was enough to build an insurmountable gap, even if Illinois eventually outrebounded Miami 32-23. “We started really slow on the defensive side and they were hitting shots,” Illinois senior guard Andres Feliz said. “We were fighting to contain them. Our defense was really low. That’s not usually us. We’re a tough team. We guard and sit down. That wasn’t there for us. We’ve got to get better at that part.” Underwood burned all of his timeouts in an effort to find any way to spark a team that had “the worst shootaround” in Underwood’s tenure, the third-year coach said. There were mental lapses that extended back to the

RICK SCUTERI, AP PHOTO

Illinois center Kofi Cockburn maneuvers against Arizona earlier this month. previous two days of practice. When the coaching staff pressed the players on what to do in ballscreen defenses, they came up blank. It was a precursor to a slow start. “We didn’t come ready as we should into shootaround or practice, not as focused as we should have been, not as dialed in,” Illinois sophomore Giorgi Bezhanishvili said, while Feliz slowly, and matter-of-factly nodded his head to Bezhanishvili’s left. “We didn’t go as hard as we can. You can always go harder and harder and we didn’t go as hard as we could. That’s on our part. That’s the players’ part is to come ready every day.” Some sort of flip switched at halftime. Illinois forced seven Miami turnovers in the second half and the offense finally came to life behind freshman Kofi

and 4.7 assists while shooting an SEC-best 92.6-percent from the foul line.

Cockburn’s 23 points to go with 14 points from Trent Frazier, 12 from Dosunmu and 11 from Feliz. The Illini went on a 7-0 run early in the second half, a 16-2 run midway through the second half and an 8-0 run before Dosunmu was called for the charge on what would have been an attempt for the gamewinning shot. “I think we should have started with that energy from the beginning like we always do,” Feliz said. “We’ve got to come together and keep fighting because we’re a great team on the defensive side. That’s what leads us to a good offense.” Underwood shouldered the blame for Monday’s loss and for the first-half effort that dug Illinois in too far a hole to eventually overcome. At halftime, he reminded his team of a home game against Maryland where

MIAMI 81, ILLINOIS 79 FG FT Reb MIAMI Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Waardenburg 31 4-7 2-2 1-8 1 2 12 Miller 18 1-2 0-0 1-2 2 3 2 Lykes 27 11-17 5-9 0-0 2 4 28 McGusty 34 6-13 0-2 1-3 3 1 13 Vasiljevic 33 7-11 0-0 0-3 0 2 20 Walker 23 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Wong 16 1-2 0-0 0-2 0 3 2 Stone 14 1-1 0-0 1-3 1 3 2 Beverly 4 1-1 0-0 0-0 0 3 2 Herenton — 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Totals 200 32-54 7-13 4-21 9 21 81 Percentages: FG .593, FT .538. 3-Point Goals: 10-18, .556 (Vasiljevic 6-9, Waardenburg 2-4, McGusty 1-2, Lykes 1-3). Team Rebounds: 3. Team Turnovers: 10 (23 PTS). Blocked Shots: 2 (Miller, Wong). Turnovers: 10 (Beverly 3, McGusty 3, Wong 2, Vasiljevic, Waardenburg). Steals: 8 (Lykes 4, Herenton, Stone, Waardenburg, Walker). Technical Fouls: Lykes, 00:34 first. FG FT Reb ILLINOIS Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Bezhanishvili 32 3-5 0-2 4-8 5 3 6 Cockburn 23 8-8 7-8 2-4 0 3 23 Dosunmu 36 5-14 2-2 0-0 4 3 12 Feliz 25 4-8 3-5 0-6 3 1 11 Frazier 34 4-7 2-2 0-2 2 2 14 Williams 27 2-6 1-2 1-7 2 1 5 Griffin 15 2-4 2-2 1-3 0 3 8 Bosmans-Verdonk 4 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Nichols 4 0-1 0-0 0-0 0 1 0 Totals 200 28-53 17-23 8-30 16 17 79 Percentages: FG .528, FT .739. 3-Point Goals: 6-17, .353 (Frazier 4-5, Griffin 2-4, Feliz 0-1, Nichols 0-1, Williams 0-2, Dosunmu 0-4). Team Rebounds: 4. Team Turnovers: 13 (15 PTS). Blocked Shots: 4 (Bezhanishvili 2, Griffin 2). Turnovers: 13 (Cockburn 3, Feliz 3, Dosunmu 2, Frazier 2, Bezhanishvili, Griffin, Nichols). Steals: 4 (Dosunmu 2, Williams 2). Technical Fouls: Griffin, 00:34 first. Miami 50 31 — 81 Illinois 31 48 — 79 A—11,819 (15,500).

the Illini trailed by 19 points at halftime before eventually losing by one point in overtime. At some point, Underwood attests, the competitive spirit of his team would carry the weight of making a comeback. The first half was just one bad possession, or any of Illinois’ five missed free throws, to overcome. “Our effort was more of an issue than anything we could do Xs and Os wise,” Underwood said. “We addressed that and it was great to see that we’ve got a locker room full of guys with pride. They fought. You can’t ask for anything more. Had we been able to finish off that last play, you’re talking about the biggest comeback in school history. But we’re not, and Miami deserves the credit for that.”


SPORTS

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NHL ROUNDUP

STANDINGS & SCHEDULE Atlantic GP Boston 27 Florida 26 Buffalo 28 Toronto 28 Montreal 27 Tampa Bay 24 Ottawa 27 Detroit 30 Metropolitan GP Washington 28 N.Y. Islanders 25 Philadelphia 27 Carolina 27 Pittsburgh 27 N.Y. Rangers 26 Columbus 26 New Jersey 26

EASTERN CONFERENCE W L OT Pts GF GA Home 19 3 5 43 99 65 11-0-4 13 8 5 31 94 93 7-3-2 13 10 5 31 85 83 8-3-3 13 11 4 30 93 92 7-3-4 11 10 6 28 89 96 6-6-3 12 9 3 27 88 79 6-4-1 11 15 1 23 69 84 7-5-0 7 20 3 17 63 119 4-10-1 W L OT Pts GF GA Home 19 4 5 43 104 83 8-2-4 18 5 2 38 75 59 11-2-1 15 7 5 35 85 78 8-1-4 16 10 1 33 88 76 8-5-0 14 9 4 32 93 78 10-3-2 13 10 3 29 84 87 8-5-2 11 11 4 26 66 80 8-6-1 9 13 4 22 66 97 4-6-4

Away 8-3-1 6-5-3 5-7-2 6-8-0 5-4-3 6-5-2 4-10-1 3-10-2 Away 11-2-1 7-3-1 7-6-1 8-5-1 4-6-2 5-5-1 3-5-3 5-7-0

Div 7-2-3 3-2-1 6-4-1 5-5-1 3-4-2 7-2-0 4-4-0 2-6-0 Div 3-1-1 6-2-1 6-2-2 2-6-1 4-2-3 5-2-0 3-4-1 3-3-1

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div St. Louis 29 18 5 6 42 90 75 8-3-3 10-2-3 6-1-1 Colorado 26 16 8 2 34 97 75 8-3-1 8-5-1 5-4-0 Winnipeg 27 16 10 1 33 77 76 6-5-1 10-5-0 4-2-0 Dallas 28 15 10 3 33 75 68 9-4-1 6-6-2 5-3-2 Nashville 26 12 10 4 28 87 85 7-5-3 5-5-1 5-3-0 Minnesota 27 12 11 4 28 79 86 7-1-2 5-10-2 2-6-1 Chicago 27 10 12 5 25 74 85 7-7-2 3-5-3 2-4-2 Pacific GP W L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div Edmonton 29 17 9 3 37 91 84 7-3-2 10-6-1 7-3-1 Arizona 28 15 9 4 34 78 67 7-6-1 8-3-3 6-2-3 Vegas 29 14 11 4 32 87 82 7-5-3 7-6-1 7-3-1 San Jose 28 15 12 1 31 82 91 9-6-0 6-6-1 7-5-0 Vancouver 28 13 11 4 30 92 84 5-3-3 8-8-1 4-3-1 Calgary 29 13 12 4 30 73 86 7-3-2 6-9-2 3-5-1 Anaheim 27 11 12 4 26 71 82 7-5-2 4-7-2 3-4-1 Los Angeles 27 11 14 2 24 70 89 9-5-1 2-9-1 4-7-1 Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Top three teams in each division and two wild cards per conference advance to playoffs.

Sunday’s results

Minnesota 3, Dallas 2, SO Boston 3, Montreal 1 Edmonton 3, Vancouver 2 Monday’s results

Vegas 4, N.Y. Rangers 1 Buffalo 7, New Jersey 1 N.Y. Islanders 4, Detroit 1 St. Louis 4, Chicago 0 Los Angeles at Anaheim, (n)

Arizona at Columbus, 6 p.m. Vegas at New Jersey, 6 p.m. Toronto at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Tampa Bay at Nashville, 7 p.m. Dallas at Winnipeg, 7 p.m. Ottawa at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Washington at San Jose, 9:30 p.m. Wednesday’s games

Colorado at Toronto, 6 p.m. St. Louis at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m. Tuesday’s games N.Y. Islanders at Montreal, 6 p.m. Ottawa at Edmonton, 8:30 p.m. Washington at Los Angeles, 9 Carolina at Boston, 6 p.m. p.m. Minnesota at Florida, 6 p.m.

STAT OF THE DAY

15

Avalanche forward Gabriel Landeskog could play for Colorado on Wednesday against Toronto. Landeskog, who has seven points in 11 games this season, has missed the past 15 games with a lower-body injury. — NHL.com

STANDINGS & SCHEDULE EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Toronto 15 4 Boston 14 5 Philadelphia15 6 Brooklyn 10 10 New York 4 17 Southeast W L Miami 14 5 Orlando 8 11 Charlotte 8 14 Washington 6 12 Atlanta 5 16 Central W L Milwaukee 18 3 Indiana 13 7 Detroit 7 13 Chicago 6 14 Cleveland 5 14

Pct. GB L10 Str .789 — 8-2 W-7 .737 1 6-4 W-1 .714 1 8-2 W-4 .500 5½ 6-4 L-1 .190 12 2-8 L-7 Pct GB L10 Str .737 — 8-2 W-2 .421 6 5-5 W-1 .364 7½ 3-7 L-2 .333 7½ 4-6 L-2 .238 10 1-9 W-1 Pct GB L10 Str .857 — 10-0 W-12 .650 4½ 7-3 W-1 .35010½ 3-7 W-1 .30011½ 3-7 L-3 .263 12 1-9 L-3

Home Away Conf 9-0 6-4 9-2 7-0 7-5 9-2 10-0 5-6 10-2 6-4 4-6 6-5 3-8 1-9 2-14 Home Away Conf 8-0 6-5 9-1 7-4 1-7 5-8 4-6 4-8 6-8 3-4 3-8 2-4 3-7 2-9 2-9 Home Away Conf 9-1 9-2 12-2 9-2 4-5 9-6 6-4 1-9 6-12 3-7 3-7 5-9 3-7 2-7 4-12

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Dallas 13 6 Houston 13 6 San Antonio 7 14 Memphis 6 14 New Orleans 6 14 Northwest W L Denver 13 4 Utah 12 9 Minnesota 10 9 Okla. City 8 11 Portland 8 12 Pacific W L L.A. Lakers 17 3 L.A. Clippers15 6 Phoenix 9 10 Sacramento 8 10 Golden State 4 18

Pct GB .684 — .684 — .333 7 .300 7½ .300 7½ Pct GB .765 — .571 3 .526 4 .421 6 .400 6½ Pct GB .850 — .714 2½ .474 7½ .444 8 .182 14

Sunday’s results Miami 109, Brooklyn 106 Boston 113, New York 104 Memphis 115, Minnesota 107 Dallas 114, L.A. Lakers 100 Okla. City 107, New Orleans 104 Detroit 132, San Antonio 98 Orlando 100, Golden State 96 Toronto 130, Utah 110 L.A. Clippers 150, Washington 125 Monday’s results Phoenix 109, Charlotte 104 Philadelphia 103, Utah 94

STAT OF THE DAY

9

Pascal Siakam and defending champion Toronto have a perfect 9-0 record at home this season and will be put to the test this week against Miami (12-3 with Jimmy Butler) on Tuesday and Houston on Thursday. — NBA.com

L10 7-3 7-3 2-8 3-7 4-6 L10 8-2 4-6 5-5 4-6 4-6 L10 9-1 8-2 3-7 6-4 2-8

Str W-2 W-2 L-1 L-1 L-5 Str L-1 L-2 L-1 W-2 W-3 Str L-1 W-1 W-1 W-1 L-3

Home 6-4 8-2 5-6 3-10 4-6 Home 8-2 8-1 3-7 6-4 3-4 Home 9-2 12-1 5-7 5-3 2-7

M 1 • TUESDAY • 12.03.2019

Away 7-2 5-4 2-8 3-4 2-8 Away 5-2 4-8 7-2 2-7 5-8 Away 8-1 3-5 4-3 3-7 2-11

Conf 8-3 8-3 4-8 4-9 5-10 Conf 7-3 9-5 4-6 6-8 5-7 Conf 12-2 10-5 5-7 4-5 3-13

Atlanta 104, Golden State 79 Indiana 117, Memphis 104 Milwaukee 132, New York 88 Chicago at Sacramento, (n) Tuesday’s Games Detroit at Cleveland, 6 p.m. Orlando at Washington, 6 p.m. Dallas at New Orleans, 6:30 p.m. Miami at Toronto, 6:30 p.m. Houston at San Antonio, 7:30 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Denver, 8 p.m. Portland at L.A. Clippers, 9 p.m.

Five-goal 1st period lifts Sabres ASSOCIATED PRESS

BUFFALO, N.Y. — Jack Eichel had a goal and two assists, and the Buffalo Sabres used a five-goal first period to beat the New Jersey Devils 7-1 Monday night. Eichel scored 2:46 into the game, and Conor Sheary scored twice during the first 20 minutes. Jeff Skinner and Rasmus Asplund also connected in the first, and Victor Olofsson and Henri Jokiharju scored in the second. Linus Ullmark made 44 saves for the Sabres. Louis Domingue was pulled after allowing five goals on 15 shots. He was replaced by Mackenzie Blackwood, who made 15 saves. The Sabres blew out New Jersey while celebrating the 50th anniversary of the birth of the franchise. Buffalo was awarded an expansion team on Dec. 2, 1969. GOLDEN KNIGHTS 4, RANGERS 1: Alex Tuch scored twice in the first four minutes and Vegas beat host New York. Reilly Smith and Max Pacioretty also scored to help Vegas get its first three-game winning streak of the season. Malcolm Subban stopped 29 shots as the Golden Knights improved

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Sabres forward Jack Eichel, right, and Devils defenseman Matt Tennyson collide during the first period Monday in Buffalo, N.Y. ISLANDERS 4, RED WINGS 1: Jordan Eberle scored two goals and Semyon Varlamov made 30 saves to lift New York over host Detroit, extending the Red Wings’ winless streak to 10 games.

Anders Lee and Anthony Beauvillier also scored for the Islanders, who were outshot 31-25 but never trailed in the game. Dylan Larkin had the only goal for Detroit.

Goaltender Robin Lehner The 68-year-old Lafleur had was ill. heart surgery Sept. 26. Lafleur helped the Canadiens win the Stanley Cup five times. In 1,126 career NHL games from 1971 to 1991, the Hockey Hall of MONTREAL — Montreal Famer had 1,353 points (560 Canadiens great Guy Lafleur goals and 793 assists) and had additional surgery, just became the first player in two months removed from history to score at least 50 quadruple bypass heart sur- goals and 100 points in six gery in late September. consecutive seasons. The team disclosed the BRIEFLY Nov. 28 procedure at the request of Lafleur’s family FREE AGENTS: Edmonton’s and said it removed a lobe Jesse Puljujarvi and Dallas’ on one of his lungs, as well Julius Honka are ineligible lymph nodes. The statement to play this season after failsaid the operation was suc- ing to sign a contract by the cessful and Lafleur would Sunday deadline set by the return home in coming days collective bargaining agreeto continue his recovery. ment.

PENGUINS: Pittsburgh signed former New Jersey and Anaheim forward Stefan Noesen to a two-way contract.

to 5-2-1 after a season-high five-game skid (0-4-1). Brendan Lemieux scored and Henrik Lundqvist finished with 28 saves for the Rangers, who were 4-0-1 in their previous five games.

AROUND THE LEAGUE

Blackhawks play one man short CHICAGO — The struggling Chicago Blackhawks played a man short against the St. Louis Blues because of injuries and the salary cap. Forward Andrew Shaw missed Monday’s game against the Stanley Cup champions with an unspecified injury. Colliton said Chicago would go with 11 forwards and six defensemen because of the cap. Forwards Dylan Strome and Drake Caggiula were out with concussions, and defenseman Duncan Keith missed his second straight game with a groin injury.

Montreal’s Lafleur has 2nd surgery

BLACKHAWKS: Chicago assistant Marc Crawford will be away from the team while it reviews his conduct with another organization. The Blackhawks didn’t provide any details Monday about what they are examining, but former NHL forward Sean Avery recently told the New York Post that Crawford kicked him after he was whistled for a too-manymen-on-the-ice penalty when he played under Crawfor for the Los Angeles Kings during the 2006-07 season. — Wire reports

NBA ROUNDUP

AROUND THE NBA

Oubre’s late 3-pointers lifts Suns past Hornets

Smart suffers abdominal injury

ASSOCIATED PRESS

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Kelly Oubre Jr. scored 23 points, including two clutch 3-pointers in the final minute that lifted the Phoenix Suns to a 109-104 victory over the Charlotte Hornets on Monday night. Devin Booker added 23 points and Dario Saric had 16 points and 10 rebounds for the Suns, who snapped a three-game skid. Marvin Williams led the Hornets with a season-high 22 points, and Devonte’ Graham had 15 points and 12 assists. The Suns led by 20 at the break, but squandered that lead and trailed by five in the final minute. That’s when Oubre knocked down back-to-back 3-pointers to put the Suns ahead with 19.8 seconds left. The Hornets were setting up for the potential winning shot when P.J. Washington’s handoff went off Graham’s leg. Ricky Rubio added two free thows to push the lead to 107-104. Graham had a chance to tie the game but airballed a shot from the top of the key with 9 seconds remaining. Before the late-game collapse, it appeared the Hornets were going to overcome a horrible first half in which they committed 15 turnovers and scored just 39 points while going 4-for-16 from 3-point range. Like they’ve done several times this season, the Hornets battled back. They went ahead by five with 8½ minutes to go on a putback by Dwayne Bacon and a 3-point play by Williams. 76ERS 103, JAZZ 94: James Ennis III hit a 3-pointer and dropped for three pushups, and Tobias Harris scored 26 points to lead host Phil-

BOSTON — Boston Celtics guard Marcus Smart has another injury to concern him with, it seems, after suffering one in Sunday’s 113-104 road win against the New York Knicks. He was ruled out in the third quarter after taking what the Celtics termed a “a direct blow to the abdomen” in trying to take a charge from the Knicks’ Kevin Knox. “No, just in my oblique,” he said, per the Boston Herald. “Right in the same spot that I tore last season. It wasn’t as bad as the tear, but it’s still sore and pretty tender. We’re just going to take it slow and day by day re-evaluate it (Monday), and see what we have to do.” Smart missed the first round of the 2019 playoffs and three games of the second round before playing in Game 4 against Milwaukee.

Kings guard Fox out 2-3 weeks

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Suns forward Kelly Oubre Jr. dunks against Hornets forward Miles Bridges in the first half Monday in Charlotte, N.C. Hunter added 18 and host Atlanta snapped a 10-game losing streak with a win over Golden State in a matchup of teams with the worst records in the NBA. The Warriors finished with a season BUCKS 132, KNICKS 88: low in points. It was the Giannis Antetokounmpo lowest point total allowed needed only 14 minutes by the Hawks. on the court to record another double-double, fin- PACERS 117, GRIZZLIES 104: ishing with 29 points and Malcolm Brogdon scored 15 rebounds in 21 minutes 19 points, Domantas Sabas host Milwaukee won its onis added 18 and Indiana 12th straight game in a rout beat host Memphis. Jaren of New York. Jackson Jr. led the Grizzlies with a season-high 31 HAWKS 104, WARRIORS points. Solomon Hill moved 79: Trae Young scored 24 into the starting lineup and points, rookie De’Andre added 22, also a season best. adelphia to a victory over Utah. Al Horford scored 17 points to help the Sixers win for the eighth time in nine games and improve to 10-0 at home.

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Guard De’Aaron Fox returned to on-court, non-contact basketball activities in a recovery from a left ankle sprain he suffered on Nov. 11, the Sacramento Kings said in a release Monday. Fox will not travel for the upcoming four-game road trip and will continue to work with the team’s health and performance staff in Sacramento. Fox will be re-evaluated again in approximately 2-3 weeks and his status will be updated as appropriate. The team also said forward Marvin Bagley III (right thumb fracture) continued to make progress toward full recovery and will have his six-week evaluation by the team’s medical staff at the end of the week. There is no immediate timetable for his return. — Wire reports


SPORTS

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NHL ROUNDUP

STANDINGS & SCHEDULE Atlantic GP Boston 27 Florida 26 Buffalo 28 Toronto 28 Montreal 27 Tampa Bay 24 Ottawa 27 Detroit 30 Metropolitan GP Washington 28 N.Y. Islanders 25 Philadelphia 27 Carolina 27 Pittsburgh 27 N.Y. Rangers 26 Columbus 26 New Jersey 26

EASTERN CONFERENCE W L OT Pts GF GA Home 19 3 5 43 99 65 11-0-4 13 8 5 31 94 93 7-3-2 13 10 5 31 85 83 8-3-3 13 11 4 30 93 92 7-3-4 11 10 6 28 89 96 6-6-3 12 9 3 27 88 79 6-4-1 11 15 1 23 69 84 7-5-0 7 20 3 17 63 119 4-10-1 W L OT Pts GF GA Home 19 4 5 43 104 83 8-2-4 18 5 2 38 75 59 11-2-1 15 7 5 35 85 78 8-1-4 16 10 1 33 88 76 8-5-0 14 9 4 32 93 78 10-3-2 13 10 3 29 84 87 8-5-2 11 11 4 26 66 80 8-6-1 9 13 4 22 66 97 4-6-4

Away 8-3-1 6-5-3 5-7-2 6-8-0 5-4-3 6-5-2 4-10-1 3-10-2 Away 11-2-1 7-3-1 7-6-1 8-5-1 4-6-2 5-5-1 3-5-3 5-7-0

Div 7-2-3 3-2-1 6-4-1 5-5-1 3-4-2 7-2-0 4-4-0 2-6-0 Div 3-1-1 6-2-1 6-2-2 2-6-1 4-2-3 5-2-0 3-4-1 3-3-1

Central St. Louis Colorado Winnipeg Dallas Nashville Minnesota Chicago Pacific Edmonton Arizona Vegas San Jose Vancouver Calgary Anaheim Los Angeles

WESTERN CONFERENCE W L OT Pts GF GA Home 18 5 6 42 90 75 8-3-3 16 8 2 34 97 75 8-3-1 16 10 1 33 77 76 6-5-1 15 10 3 33 75 68 9-4-1 12 10 4 28 87 85 7-5-3 12 11 4 28 79 86 7-1-2 10 12 5 25 74 85 7-7-2 W L OT Pts GF GA Home 17 9 3 37 91 84 7-3-2 15 9 4 34 78 67 7-6-1 14 11 4 32 87 82 7-5-3 15 12 1 31 82 91 9-6-0 13 11 4 30 92 84 5-3-3 13 12 4 30 73 86 7-3-2 12 12 4 28 75 84 8-5-2 11 15 2 24 72 93 9-5-1

Away 10-2-3 8-5-1 10-5-0 6-6-2 5-5-1 5-10-2 3-5-3 Away 10-6-1 8-3-3 7-6-1 6-6-1 8-8-1 6-9-2 4-7-2 2-10-1

Div 6-1-1 5-4-0 4-2-0 5-3-2 5-3-0 2-6-1 2-4-2 Div 7-3-1 6-2-3 7-3-1 7-5-0 4-3-1 3-5-1 4-4-1 4-8-1

GP 29 26 27 28 26 27 27 GP 29 28 29 28 28 29 28 28

Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Top three teams in each division and two wild cards per conference advance to playoffs. Sunday’s results

Minnesota 3, Dallas 2, SO Boston 3, Montreal 1 Edmonton 3, Vancouver 2 Monday’s results

Vegas 4, N.Y. Rangers 1 Buffalo 7, New Jersey 1 N.Y. Islanders 4, Detroit 1 St. Louis 4, Chicago 0 Anaheim 4, Los Angeles 2

Arizona at Columbus, 6 p.m. Vegas at New Jersey, 6 p.m. Toronto at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Tampa Bay at Nashville, 7 p.m. Dallas at Winnipeg, 7 p.m. Ottawa at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Washington at San Jose, 9:30 p.m. Wednesday’s games

Colorado at Toronto, 6 p.m. St. Louis at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m. Tuesday’s games N.Y. Islanders at Montreal, 6 p.m. Ottawa at Edmonton, 8:30 p.m. Washington at Los Angeles, 9 Carolina at Boston, 6 p.m. Minnesota at Florida, 6 p.m. p.m.

STAT OF THE DAY

15

Avalanche forward Gabriel Landeskog could play for Colorado on Wednesday against Toronto. Landeskog, who has seven points in 11 games this season, has missed the past 15 games with a lower-body injury. — NHL.com

STANDINGS & SCHEDULE EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Toronto 15 4 Boston 14 5 Philadelphia15 6 Brooklyn 10 10 New York 4 17 Southeast W L Miami 14 5 Orlando 8 11 Charlotte 8 14 Washington 6 12 Atlanta 5 16 Central W L Milwaukee 18 3 Indiana 13 7 Detroit 7 13 Chicago 7 14 Cleveland 5 14

Pct. GB L10 Str .789 — 8-2 W-7 .737 1 6-4 W-1 .714 1 8-2 W-4 .500 5½ 6-4 L-1 .190 12 2-8 L-7 Pct GB L10 Str .737 — 8-2 W-2 .421 6 5-5 W-1 .364 7½ 3-7 L-2 .333 7½ 4-6 L-2 .238 10 1-9 W-1 Pct GB L10 Str .857 — 10-0 W-12 .650 4½ 7-3 W-1 .35010½ 3-7 W-1 .333 11 3-7 W-1 .263 12 1-9 L-3

Home Away Conf 9-0 6-4 9-2 7-0 7-5 9-2 10-0 5-6 10-2 6-4 4-6 6-5 3-8 1-9 2-14 Home Away Conf 8-0 6-5 9-1 7-4 1-7 5-8 4-6 4-8 6-8 3-4 3-8 2-4 3-7 2-9 2-9 Home Away Conf 9-1 9-2 12-2 9-2 4-5 9-6 6-4 1-9 6-12 3-7 4-7 5-9 3-7 2-7 4-12

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Dallas 13 6 Houston 13 6 San Antonio 7 14 Memphis 6 14 New Orleans 6 14 Northwest W L Denver 13 4 Utah 12 9 Minnesota 10 9 Okla. City 8 11 Portland 8 12 Pacific W L L.A. Lakers 17 3 L.A. Clippers15 6 Phoenix 9 10 Sacramento 8 11 Golden State 4 18

Pct GB .684 — .684 — .333 7 .300 7½ .300 7½ Pct GB .765 — .571 3 .526 4 .421 6 .400 6½ Pct GB .850 — .714 2½ .474 7½ .421 8½ .182 14

Sunday’s results Miami 109, Brooklyn 106 Boston 113, New York 104 Memphis 115, Minnesota 107 Dallas 114, L.A. Lakers 100 Okla. City 107, New Orleans 104 Detroit 132, San Antonio 98 Orlando 100, Golden State 96 Toronto 130, Utah 110 L.A. Clippers 150, Washington 125 Monday’s results Phoenix 109, Charlotte 104 Philadelphia 103, Utah 94

STAT OF THE DAY

9

Pascal Siakam and defending champion Toronto has a perfect 9-0 record at home this season and will be put to the test this week against Miami (12-3 with Jimmy Butler) on Tuesday and Houston on Thursday. — NBA.com

L10 7-3 7-3 2-8 3-7 4-6 L10 8-2 4-6 5-5 4-6 4-6 L10 9-1 8-2 3-7 5-5 2-8

Str W-2 W-2 L-1 L-1 L-5 Str L-1 L-2 L-1 W-2 W-3 Str L-1 W-1 W-1 L-1 L-3

Home 6-4 8-2 5-6 3-10 4-6 Home 8-2 8-1 3-7 6-4 3-4 Home 9-2 12-1 5-7 5-4 2-7

M 2 • TUESDAY • 12.03.2019

Away 7-2 5-4 2-8 3-4 2-8 Away 5-2 4-8 7-2 2-7 5-8 Away 8-1 3-5 4-3 3-7 2-11

Conf 8-3 8-3 4-8 4-9 5-10 Conf 7-3 9-5 4-6 6-8 5-7 Conf 12-2 10-5 5-7 4-5 3-13

Atlanta 104, Golden State 79 Indiana 117, Memphis 104 Milwaukee 132, New York 88 Chicago 113, Sacramento 106 Tuesday’s Games Detroit at Cleveland, 6 p.m. Orlando at Washington, 6 p.m. Dallas at New Orleans, 6:30 p.m. Miami at Toronto, 6:30 p.m. Houston at San Antonio, 7:30 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Denver, 8 p.m. Portland at L.A. Clippers, 9 p.m.

Five-goal 1st period lifts Sabres ASSOCIATED PRESS

BUFFALO, N.Y. — Jack Eichel had a goal and two assists, and the Buffalo Sabres used a five-goal first period to beat the New Jersey Devils 7-1 Monday night. Eichel scored 2:46 into the game, and Conor Sheary scored twice during the first 20 minutes. Jeff Skinner and Rasmus Asplund also connected in the first, and Victor Olofsson and Henri Jokiharju scored in the second. Linus Ullmark made 44 saves for the Sabres. Louis Domingue was pulled after allowing five goals on 15 shots. He was replaced by Mackenzie Blackwood, who made 15 saves. The Sabres blew out New Jersey while celebrating the 50th anniversary of the birth of the franchise. Buffalo was awarded an expansion team on Dec. 2, 1969. ISLANDERS 4, RED WINGS 1: Jordan Eberle scored two goals and Semyon Varlamov ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS made 30 saves to lift New Sabres forward Jack Eichel, right, and Devils defenseman Matt Tennyson collide during the first York over host Detroit, ex- period Monday in Buffalo, N.Y. tending the Red Wings’ winless streak to 10 games. host Anaheim defeated Los saves for the Ducks, who held in the first four minutes and Angeles. Kurtis MacDermid the Kings scoreless in the Vegas beat host New York. DUCKS 4, KINGS 2: Derek and Nikolai Prokhorkin each first and third periods. Reilly Smith and Max PaGrant scored twice, and scored for the Kings, who fell cioretty also scored to help Jakob Silfverberg and Carter to 2-10-1 in road games this GOLDEN KNIGHTS 4, RANG- Vegas get its first three-game Rowney each added goals as season. Ryan Miller made 34 ERS 1: Alex Tuch scored twice winning streak of the season.

AROUND THE LEAGUE

Blackhawks play one man short CHICAGO — The struggling Chicago Blackhawks played a man short against the St. Louis Blues because of injuries and the salary cap. Forward Andrew Shaw missed Monday’s game against the Stanley Cup champions with an unspecified injury. Colliton said Chicago would go with 11 forwards and six defensemen because of the cap. Forwards Dylan Strome and Drake Caggiula were out with concussions, and defenseman Duncan Keith missed his second straight game with a groin injury.

Goaltender Robin Lehner The 68-year-old Lafleur had was ill. heart surgery Sept. 26. Lafleur helped the Canadiens win the Stanley Cup five times. In 1,126 career NHL games from 1971 to 1991, the Hockey Hall of MONTREAL — Montreal Famer had 1,353 points (560 Canadiens great Guy Lafleur goals and 793 assists) and had additional surgery, just became the first player in two months removed from history to score at least 50 quadruple bypass heart sur- goals and 100 points in six gery in late September. consecutive seasons. The team disclosed the BRIEFLY Nov. 28 procedure at the request of Lafleur’s family FREE AGENTS: Edmonton’s and said it removed a lobe Jesse Puljujarvi and Dallas’ on one of his lungs, as well Julius Honka are ineligible lymph nodes. The statement to play this season after failsaid the operation was suc- ing to sign a contract by the cessful and Lafleur would Sunday deadline set by the return home in coming days collective bargaining agreeto continue his recovery. ment.

Montreal’s Lafleur has 2nd surgery

PENGUINS: Pittsburgh signed former New Jersey and Anaheim forward Stefan Noesen to a two-way contract. BLACKHAWKS: Chicago assistant Marc Crawford will be away from the team while it reviews his conduct with another organization. The Blackhawks didn’t provide any details Monday about what they are examining, but former NHL forward Sean Avery recently told the New York Post that Crawford kicked him after he was whistled for a too-manymen-on-the-ice penalty when he played under Crawfor for the Los Angeles Kings during the 2006-07 season. — Wire reports

NBA ROUNDUP

AROUND THE NBA

Oubre’s late 3-pointers lift Suns past Hornets

Smart suffers abdominal injury

ASSOCIATED PRESS

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Kelly Oubre Jr. scored 23 points, including two clutch 3-pointers in the final minute that lifted the Phoenix Suns to a 109-104 victory over the Charlotte Hornets on Monday night. Devin Booker added 23 points and Dario Saric had 16 points and 10 rebounds for the Suns, who snapped a three-game skid. Marvin Williams led the Hornets with a season-high 22 points, and Devonte’ Graham had 15 points and 12 assists. The Suns led by 20 at the break, but squandered that lead and trailed by five in the final minute. That’s when Oubre knocked down back-to-back 3-pointers to put the Suns ahead with 19.8 seconds left. The Hornets were setting up for the potential winning shot when P.J. Washington’s handoff went off Graham’s leg. Ricky Rubio added two free thows to push the lead to 107-104. Graham had a chance to tie the game but airballed a shot from the top of the key with 9 seconds remaining. Before the late-game collapse, it appeared the Hornets were going to overcome a horrible first half in which they committed 15 turnovers and scored just 39 points while going 4-for-16 from 3-point range. HAWKS 104, WARRIORS 79: Trae Young scored 24 points, rookie De’Andre Hunter added 18 and host Atlanta snapped a 10-game losing streak with a win over Golden State in a matchup of teams with the worst records in the NBA. PACERS 117, GRIZZLIES 104: Malcolm Brogdon scored

BOSTON — Boston Celtics guard Marcus Smart has another injury to concern him with, it seems, after suffering one in Sunday’s 113-104 road win against the New York Knicks. He was ruled out in the third quarter after taking what the Celtics termed a “a direct blow to the abdomen” in trying to take a charge from the Knicks’ Kevin Knox. “No, just in my oblique,” he said, per the Boston Herald. “Right in the same spot that I tore last season. It wasn’t as bad as the tear, but it’s still sore and pretty tender. We’re just going to take it slow and day by day re-evaluate it (Monday), and see what we have to do.” Smart missed the first round of the 2019 playoffs and three games of the second round before playing in Game 4 against Milwaukee.

Kings guard Fox out 2-3 weeks

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Suns forward Kelly Oubre Jr. dunks against Hornets forward Miles Bridges in the first half Monday in Charlotte, N.C. Ennis III hit a 3-pointer and dropped for three pushups, and Tobias Harris scored 26 points to lead host Philadelphia to a victory over Utah. Al Horford scored 17 points to help the Sixers win for the eighth time in nine games and improve to 10-0 BUCKS 132, KNICKS 88: at home. Giannis Antetokounmpo needed only 14 minutes BULLS 113, KINGS 106: Zach on the court to record an- LaVine scored 28 points, and other double-double, fin- Lauri Markkanen added 20 ishing with 29 points and points and seven rebounds as 15 rebounds in 21 minutes Chicago defeated host Sacas host Milwaukee won its ramento. Buddy Hield paced 12th straight game in a rout the Kings with 26 points, of New York. while Richaun Holmes chipped in 20 ppoints and 76ERS 103, JAZZ 94: James nine rebounds.

19 points, Domantas Sabonis added 18 and Indiana beat host Memphis. Jaren Jackson Jr. led the Grizzlies with a season-high 31 points. Solomon Hill moved into the starting lineup and added 22, also a season best.

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Guard De’Aaron Fox returned to on-court, non-contact basketball activities in a recovery from a left ankle sprain he suffered on Nov. 11, the Sacramento Kings said in a release Monday. Fox will not travel for the upcoming four-game road trip and will continue to work with the team’s health and performance staff in Sacramento. Fox will be re-evaluated again in approximately 2-3 weeks and his status will be updated as appropriate. The team also said forward Marvin Bagley III (right thumb fracture) continued to make progress toward full recovery and will have his six-week evaluation by the team’s medical staff at the end of the week. There is no immediate timetable for his return. — Wire reports


12.03.2019 • TUESDAY • M 1

SPORTS

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • B5

MLB NOTEBOOK

BLUES NOTEBOOK

Moustakas, Reds agree to four-year contract

Bortuzzo returns to lineup

ASSOCIATED PRESS

CINCINNATI — All-Star infielder Mike Moustakas and the Cincinnati Reds have agreed to a four-year, $64 million contract, a person familiar with the negotiations told The Associated Press, the team’s first move to upgrade a lineup that struggled to score. The person spoke on condition of anonymity Monday because the agreement had not been announced. For the second straight offseason, the Reds are making a splurge in free agency as they try to shake themselves out of a rut of six straight losing seasons. Their first move involved getting a player from the NL Central-rival Milwaukee Brewers. The 31-year-old could fill the Reds’ hole at second base that opened when Scooter Gennett got hurt and then was traded last season. Cincinnati scored the fourth-fewest runs in the NL last season despite one of the league’s most hitter-friendly ballparks. Bulking up on offense, stabilizing the outfield and overhauling the bullpen are the Reds’ priorities in the offseason. Moustakas is a first step toward fixing the offense. He hit .254 with 35 homers and 87 RBIs last year, making his third AllStar team. He began the season at second base and moved to third with Travis Shaw in a slump. Cincinnati has Eugenio Suarez at third base.

and lost a lot of fluids, so it takes a little bit to get back but I feel great now though.”

BY JIM THOMAS

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CHICAGO — Four games later, and $67,073 poorer, Blues defenseman Robert Bortuzzo returned to action Monday against the Chicago Blackhawks. For someone who was rotating in and out of the lineup with Carl Gunnarsson anyway, jockeying between No. 6 and No. 7 defenseman status, the wait had to be especially frustrating. “Any time you’re sitting out, you’re just champing at the bit to get back in there,” Bortuzzo said. “The team’s playing some great hockey. We’ve been able to put guys in and out. Just excited to be around the game and teammates and playing.” When he spoke to the PostDispatch last week, Bortuzzo didn’t have a lot to say about his suspension and fine, a result of a cross-check to the lower back of Nashville’s Viktor Arvidsson in a Nov. 23 game against the Predators in St. Louis. Bortuzzo was more forthcoming to a group of reporters Monday at the United Center following the Blues’ morning skate. “Maybe the cross-check was a little excessive,” Bortuzzo said. “Again, my intention’s never to injure anyone. I accepted the ruling and looking to moving forward.” Arvidsson suffered the injury on the cross-check that according the Predators will sideline him four-to-six weeks. Bortuzzo said he has not reached out to Arvidsson since then. His reputation may be tarnished

Sundqvist improving Oskar Sundqvist has accompanied the Blues on this trip. He didn’t skate Monday, but did some work on the stationary bike. He no longer is using crutches and wasn’t in a walking boot.

Shorter odds

SCOTT KANE, AP PHOTO

Robert Bortuzzo and Jordan Binnington combine to stop a shot by Anaheim’s Sam Steel last month. to a degree by the latest suspension. He was suspended three games last season — two games in the preseason and one to start the regular season — for elbowing Washington’s Michal Kempny in a preseason game. But it doesn’t sound like Bortuzzo is going to change his physical style of play — one that is on the edge of fair and foul. “I’m gonna play the game hard,” Bortuzzo said. “I feel like I do a good job of walking the line. I’m not gonna go through all my instances (of past fines or suspension). I’m sure it’s easy to dissect things for other people. “But the temperature of the game is high at times. Again, I’m not a malicious player. I’m not out here trying to injure people. I stand by that. It’s a game I have to play, is on that edge. I’m proud of

the way I play hard without being malicious. That’s not my intent with it.” For his part, Blues coach Craig Berube thinks Bortuzzo will learn from the latest suspension. “He knows if you cross-check somebody like that, there’s gonna be some repercussions,” Berube said. “That was a (knee)-jerk reaction. He plays a hard game, but he’s normally not doing stuff like that. He’ll play his game. I think he’ll be fine.”

Gunnarsson’s healthy After missing two games because of an illness, Gunnarsson returned to practice Monday, but was a healthy scratch for Chicago. Whatever bug or virus Gunnarsson had, he said, “Luckily enough it seemed to be a quick one. I didn’t eat the whole time

After losing Vladimir Tarasenko for five months following shoulder surgery in late October, oddsmakers had the Blues at 20/1 to win the Stanley Cup at the start of November. Eleven teams had shorter odds that the Blues. But after going 10-2-3 in November, the Blues are 14/1 to repeat as Cup champions according to BetOnline. Only Boston (7/1), Washington (9/1) and Colorado (12/1) have shorter odds than St. Louis at the start of December.

Prospect watch Blues prospect Joel Hofer, a fourth-round draft pick in 2018, has been selected to participate in Canada’s National Junior Team selection camp Dec. 9-12 in Oakville, Ontario. The Team Canada roster for the 2020 World Junior championship will be selected at that camp. A goalie for the Portland (Ore.) Winterhawks, Hofer leads the Western Hockey League with 16 wins and a 1.92 goals-against average. His save percentage is .935. Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com

Padres acquire Profar from A’s Switch-hitting second baseman Jurickson Profar was acquired by the San Diego Padres from the Oakland Athletics on Monday for catcher Austin Allen and a player to be named. In his lone season with the A’s, Profar matched his career high with 20 home runs and batted .218 with 67 RBIs over 139 games. He will provide versatility to play other infield positions as well as the outfield. Profar was acquired from AL West rival Texas last year. The 26-year-old is eligible for arbitration and is expected to earn about $5.5 million.

Cubs cut Russell after domestic violence ban The Chicago Cubs failed to offer a 2020 contract to shortstop Addison Russell on Monday, making the 2016 All-Star a free agent one year after he was suspended for violating Major League Baseball’s domestic violence policy. Russell was banned for 40 games last season after a series of allegations made by ex-wife Melisa Reidy. The 25-year-old returned to the Cubs in May and batted a career-low .237 with nine homers, 23 RBIs and a .699 OPS. Russell earned $4 million in 2019 and was likely to gain a raise in arbitration. “We decided to non-tender Addison Russell today simply because the role we expected him to play for the 2020 Cubs was inconsistent with how he would have been treated in the salary arbitration process,” Cubs executive Theo Epstein said in a statement.

McCann, White Sox ink one-year deal All-Star catcher James McCann agreed to a one-year, $5.4 million contract with the Chicago White Sox on Monday, more than doubling his salary. The 29-year-old McCann was eligible for arbitration.

Indians acquire León from Red Sox The Indians acquired veteran catcher Sandy León in a trade from the Red Sox. Cleveland sent minor league right-hander Adenys Bautista to Boston on Monday for the 30-year-old León.

Marlins acquire Villar, Aguilar Infielder Jonathan Villar was acquired Monday by the Miami Marlins from the Baltimore Orioles for minor league lefthanded pitcher Easton Lucas. The Marlins also claimed first baseman Jesús Aguilar off waivers after he was designated for assignment last week by the Tampa Bay Rays.

ARMANDO L. SANCHEZ, CHICAGO TRIBUNE

Blackhawks right wing Patrick Kane passes the puck near Blues goalie Jake Allen during the first period Monday in Chicago.

Blues

Blues 4, Blackhawks 0 St. Louis 2 0 2 — 4 Chicago 0 0 0 — 0 First Period—1, St. Louis, MacEachern 4 (Dunn), 2:34. 2, St. Louis, Schwartz 8 (Perron, Pietrangelo), 14:22 (pp). Penalties—Schenn, STL, (tripping), 3:53; Kane, CHI, (tripping), 14:08. Second Period—None. Penalties—Walker, STL, (slashing), 0:21; Toews, CHI, (slashing), 13:52. Third Period—3, St. Louis, Schenn 14 (Schwartz, Walker), 8:56. 4, St. Louis, Bozak 3, 18:11. Penalties—None. Shots on Goal—St. Louis 10-9-11—30. Chicago 10-11-17—38. Power-play opportunities—St. Louis 1 of 2; Chicago 0 of 2. Goalies—St. Louis, Allen 5-1-2 (38 shots-38 saves). Chicago, Crawford 5-7-2 (30-26). A—21,204 (19,717). T—2:17. Referees—Ghislain Hebert, Jon Mclsaac. Linesmen— Tyson Baker, James Tobias.

From B1

The Blackhawks, last in the Central Division at 10-12-5, were injury-depleted Monday. So injury-depleted (and salary-cap depleted) that they could afford to dress only 11 forwards along with the usual six defensemen and remain cap compliant. Not that the Blues are feeling any sympathy, fielding a lineup minus Vladimir Tarasenko, Alexander Steen, Oskar Sundqvist and Sammy Blais. On Friday, Jake Allen took a shutout into the final 3:11 of play in Dallas, when Roope Hintz scored for the Stars in a 3-1 Blues victory. This time he got his shutout, his first in 20 career games against the Blackhawks and the 20th of his career, stopping 38 shots. After a stretch in mid-to-late November in which the opposing team scored first in six of seven games, the Blues have reversed that trend. When Mackenzie MacEachern scored at the 2:34 mark of the first period, it made three games in a row that the Blues had scored first. And when Jaden Schwartz tippedin a Pietrangelo power-play shot from just inside the blueline, the Blues had a 2-0 lead at the 14:22 mark. They took a 2-0 lead into the second period for only the second time all season, and the first time since Oct. 27 in Detroit — a game the Blues eventually won 5-4 in overtime. The Blues got a lucky bounce on the first goal. Vince Dunn’s shot off the end boards bounced back towards the slot and skipped over goalie Corey Crawford’s stick to MacEachern who swooped in for the puck and sent it past Craw-

CHARLES REX ARBOGAST, AP PHOTO

Chicago’s Jonathan Toews checks the Blues’ Jaden Schwartz against the boards during the first period. ford, glove side. It gave MacEachern goals in back-to-back games for the first time in his young career; he has seven career NHL goals and four this season. Just before his goal, Schwartz may have gotten away with tripping when he got his skate under Patrick Kane’s skate. Kane didn’t like it, and swatted at Schwartz’s legs in retaliation. This one was too obvious for officials to miss and Kane was sent off for tripping. After Ryan O’Reilly won the faceoff at the start of the power play, it took only 14 seconds to score. Schwartz’s goal was his eighth of the season and his fourth in his last eight games. It took him until March 19 (against Edmonton) last season to notch his eighth goal. The Blues were sloppy and sluggish for much of a scoreless second period. Nathan Walker was penalized for slashing just 21 seconds into the period, and that allowed Chicago to gain

early momentum. They kept it for much of the period, outshooting the Blues 8-2 over the first eight minutes. The Blues were bogged down trying to get out of the neutral zone and spent very little time on offense. They went more than six minutes without a shot on goal over the middle of the period. After a Jonathan Toews slashing penalty O’Reilly had a point-blank chance in the near left faceoff circle off a Schwartz feed, but to no avail. That was all the Blues could muster on that power play, although they did perk up in the closing minutes of the second period with five shots over the final 2:16. Still, it was Chicago that got the best chance as the period wound down when Alex DeBrincat hit the post far side on a one-timer with 1:26 left. DeBrincat has been a Blues killer in his young NHL career, with 10 points (six goals, four assists) in nine career games against St. Louis entering Mon-

day’s contest. The third period started much like the second for the Blues. They couldn’t get much offensive zone time against a Blackhawks squad that continued to be very tough in the neutral zone. At the 4:40 mark, Brandon Saad weaved through two Blues defenders down the slot, but Allen made the save. With just under 12 minutes left, Anton Wedin and Connor Murphy had good looks in back-to-back fashion but Allen was equal to the task. So as the third period wound down, the crowd of 21,204 at United remained largely quiet. But were the Blues letting the Blackhawks hang around? Just one quick shot by the Blackhawks or unlucky bounce against the Blues could make it a 2-1 game and get the crowd and home team back into it. But with 11:04 to play the game’s next goal belonged to Brayden Schenn, who took a backhand pass from Walker and had time to tee up the puck and rifle it past Crawford for his 14th goal of the season and a 3-0 lead. Tyler Bozak capped the night with his third goal of the season with 1:49 to play. Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com


12.03.2019 • TUESDAY • M 2

SPORTS

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • B5

MLB NOTEBOOK

BLUES NOTEBOOK

Moustakas, Reds agree to four-year contract

Bortuzzo returns to lineup

ASSOCIATED PRESS

CINCINNATI — All-Star infielder Mike Moustakas and the Cincinnati Reds have agreed to a four-year, $64 million contract, a person familiar with the negotiations told The Associated Press, the team’s first move to upgrade a lineup that struggled to score. The person spoke on condition of anonymity Monday because the agreement had not been announced. For the second straight offseason, the Reds are making a splurge in free agency as they try to shake themselves out of a rut of six straight losing seasons. Their first move involved getting a player from the NL Central-rival Milwaukee Brewers. The 31-year-old could fill the Reds’ hole at second base that opened when Scooter Gennett got hurt and then was traded last season. Cincinnati scored the fourth-fewest runs in the NL last season despite one of the league’s most hitter-friendly ballparks. Bulking up on offense, stabilizing the outfield and overhauling the bullpen are the Reds’ priorities in the offseason. Moustakas is a first step toward fixing the offense. He hit .254 with 35 homers and 87 RBIs last year, making his third AllStar team. He began the season at second base and moved to third with Travis Shaw in a slump. Cincinnati has Eugenio Suarez at third base.

and lost a lot of fluids, so it takes a little bit to get back but I feel great now though.”

BY JIM THOMAS

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CHICAGO — Four games later, and $67,073 poorer, Blues defenseman Robert Bortuzzo returned to action Monday against the Chicago Blackhawks. For someone who was rotating in and out of the lineup with Carl Gunnarsson anyway, jockeying between No. 6 and No. 7 defenseman status, the wait had to be especially frustrating. “Any time you’re sitting out, you’re just champing at the bit to get back in there,” Bortuzzo said. “The team’s playing some great hockey. We’ve been able to put guys in and out. Just excited to be around the game and teammates and playing.” When he spoke to the PostDispatch last week, Bortuzzo didn’t have a lot to say about his suspension and fine, a result of a cross-check to the lower back of Nashville’s Viktor Arvidsson in a Nov. 23 game against the Predators in St. Louis. Bortuzzo was more forthcoming to a group of reporters Monday at the United Center following the Blues’ morning skate. “Maybe the cross-check was a little excessive,” Bortuzzo said. “Again, my intention’s never to injure anyone. I accepted the ruling and looking to moving forward.” Arvidsson suffered the injury on the cross-check that according the Predators will sideline him four-to-six weeks. Bortuzzo said he has not reached out to Arvidsson since then. His reputation may be tarnished

Sundqvist improving Oskar Sundqvist has accompanied the Blues on this trip. He didn’t skate Monday, but did some work on the stationary bike. He no longer is using crutches and wasn’t in a walking boot.

Shorter odds

SCOTT KANE, AP PHOTO

Robert Bortuzzo and Jordan Binnington combine to stop a shot by Anaheim’s Sam Steel last month. to a degree by the latest suspension. He was suspended three games last season — two games in the preseason and one to start the regular season — for elbowing Washington’s Michal Kempny in a preseason game. But it doesn’t sound like Bortuzzo is going to change his physical style of play — one that is on the edge of fair and foul. “I’m gonna play the game hard,” Bortuzzo said. “I feel like I do a good job of walking the line. I’m not gonna go through all my instances (of past fines or suspension). I’m sure it’s easy to dissect things for other people. “But the temperature of the game is high at times. Again, I’m not a malicious player. I’m not out here trying to injure people. I stand by that. It’s a game I have to play, is on that edge. I’m proud of

the way I play hard without being malicious. That’s not my intent with it.” For his part, Blues coach Craig Berube thinks Bortuzzo will learn from the latest suspension. “He knows if you cross-check somebody like that, there’s gonna be some repercussions,” Berube said. “That was a (knee)-jerk reaction. He plays a hard game, but he’s normally not doing stuff like that. He’ll play his game. I think he’ll be fine.”

Gunnarsson’s healthy After missing two games because of an illness, Gunnarsson returned to practice Monday, but was a healthy scratch for Chicago. Whatever bug or virus Gunnarsson had, he said, “Luckily enough it seemed to be a quick one. I didn’t eat the whole time

After losing Vladimir Tarasenko for five months following shoulder surgery in late October, oddsmakers had the Blues at 20/1 to win the Stanley Cup at the start of November. Eleven teams had shorter odds that the Blues. But after going 10-2-3 in November, the Blues are 14/1 to repeat as Cup champions according to BetOnline. Only Boston (7/1), Washington (9/1) and Colorado (12/1) have shorter odds than St. Louis at the start of December.

Prospect watch Blues prospect Joel Hofer, a fourth-round draft pick in 2018, has been selected to participate in Canada’s National Junior Team selection camp Dec. 9-12 in Oakville, Ontario. The Team Canada roster for the 2020 World Junior championship will be selected at that camp. A goalie for the Portland (Ore.) Winterhawks, Hofer leads the Western Hockey League with 16 wins and a 1.92 goals-against average. His save percentage is .935. Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com

Padres acquire Profar from A’s Switch-hitting second baseman Jurickson Profar was acquired by the San Diego Padres from the Oakland Athletics on Monday for catcher Austin Allen and a player to be named. In his lone season with the A’s, Profar matched his career high with 20 home runs and batted .218 with 67 RBIs over 139 games. He will provide versatility to play other infield positions as well as the outfield. Profar was acquired from AL West rival Texas last year. The 26-year-old is eligible for arbitration and is expected to earn about $5.5 million.

Cubs cut Russell after domestic violence ban The Chicago Cubs failed to offer a 2020 contract to shortstop Addison Russell on Monday, making the 2016 All-Star a free agent one year after he was suspended for violating Major League Baseball’s domestic violence policy. Russell was banned for 40 games last season after a series of allegations made by ex-wife Melisa Reidy. The 25-year-old returned to the Cubs in May and batted a career-low .237 with nine homers, 23 RBIs and a .699 OPS. Russell earned $4 million in 2019 and was likely to gain a raise in arbitration. “We decided to non-tender Addison Russell today simply because the role we expected him to play for the 2020 Cubs was inconsistent with how he would have been treated in the salary arbitration process,” Cubs executive Theo Epstein said in a statement.

McCann, White Sox ink one-year deal All-Star catcher James McCann agreed to a one-year, $5.4 million contract with the Chicago White Sox on Monday, more than doubling his salary. The 29-year-old McCann was eligible for arbitration.

Indians acquire León from Red Sox The Indians acquired veteran catcher Sandy León in a trade from the Red Sox. Cleveland sent minor league right-hander Adenys Bautista to Boston on Monday for the 30-year-old León.

Marlins acquire Villar, Aguilar Infielder Jonathan Villar was acquired Monday by the Miami Marlins from the Baltimore Orioles for minor league lefthanded pitcher Easton Lucas. The Marlins also claimed first baseman Jesús Aguilar off waivers after he was designated for assignment last week by the Tampa Bay Rays.

ARMANDO L. SANCHEZ, CHICAGO TRIBUNE

Blackhawks right wing Patrick Kane passes the puck near Blues goalie Jake Allen during the first period Monday in Chicago.

Blues

Blues 4, Blackhawks 0 St. Louis 2 0 2 — 4 Chicago 0 0 0 — 0 First Period—1, St. Louis, MacEachern 4 (Dunn), 2:34. 2, St. Louis, Schwartz 8 (Perron, Pietrangelo), 14:22 (pp). Penalties—Schenn, STL, (tripping), 3:53; Kane, CHI, (tripping), 14:08. Second Period—None. Penalties—Walker, STL, (slashing), 0:21; Toews, CHI, (slashing), 13:52. Third Period—3, St. Louis, Schenn 14 (Schwartz, Walker), 8:56. 4, St. Louis, Bozak 3, 18:11. Penalties—None. Shots on Goal—St. Louis 10-9-11—30. Chicago 10-11-17—38. Power-play opportunities—St. Louis 1 of 2; Chicago 0 of 2. Goalies—St. Louis, Allen 5-1-2 (38 shots-38 saves). Chicago, Crawford 5-7-2 (30-26). A—21,204 (19,717). T—2:17. Referees—Ghislain Hebert, Jon Mclsaac. Linesmen— Tyson Baker, James Tobias.

From B1

Wednesday in Pittsburgh. And don’t look now, but the Blues have two red-hot goalies. After Allen’s first career shutout in 20 games against Chicago and his 20th shutout overall, he’s 4-0-2 over his past six games with a 1.78 goals-against average and a save percentage of .946. Allen is now tied for second in career shutouts with Jaroslav Halak on the Blues’ franchise list. Brian Elliott has the franchise record with 25. “He’s dialed in,” said Schwartz, whose tip-in of an Alex Pietrangelo shot gave the Blues a 2-0 lead in the first period. “He’s in the zone, making huge saves — timely saves — for us. We know how good of a goalie he is. “Every player, every goalie has a rough few months or an off year in their career. He’s a guy that just continues to work. Even when he’s not playing, he comes to the rink and he’s working and he’s getting better. You can see how good of a goalie he is and you can tell that he’s confident right now.” For the last couple of games in particular, there has been a calmness to Allen’s game. Call it locked in, call it whatever, but he doesn’t seem to be moving around as much in the crease, perhaps because he’s been so positionally sound — seeing the puck and being in the right place at the right time. “My goal after the first couple games of the year, I sat down and said, let’s just try to get better every single time,” Allen said. “The starts at that point were a little few and far between.

CHARLES REX ARBOGAST, AP PHOTO

Chicago’s Jonathan Toews checks the Blues’ Jaden Schwartz against the boards during the first period. Getting some games, obviously closer to consecutive games, gets you a little bit more in the groove.” When MacEachern scored at the 2:34 mark of the first period, it made it three games in a row that the Blues had scored first. Prior to that, the opposing team had scored first in six of the prior seven games. “I think coming into this building, everybody knows it’s pretty hostile,” MacEachern said. “So I think scoring early kind of eases the nerves and kind of lets us play our game.” The Blues got a lucky bounce on his goal. Vince Dunn’s shot off the end boards bounced back towards the slot and skipped over Chicago goalie Corey Crawford’s stick to MacEachern, who swooped in for the puck and sent it past Crawford, glove side. “Fortunate maybe, but he’s doing the right thing by skating and driving (to the net), and he got a good bounce,” coach Craig

Berube said. “We’re a good team when we’ve got the lead.” It gave MacEachern goals in back-to-back games for the first time in his young career; he has seven career NHL goals and four this season. Then came Schwartz’s goal late in the first — his eighth of the season. He didn’t get his eighth last season until March 19 (against Edmonton). This one allowed the Blues to take a 2-0 lead into the second period for only the second time all season, and the first time since Oct. 27 in Detroit — a game the Blues had to huff and puff their way to win 5-4 in overtime. There was no huffing and puffing Monday, although the Blues did hit a lull in the second period. “In the second period our puck play wasn’t very good,” Berube said. “And then they had the puck way too much. We didn’t have it very much until maybe the last six minutes of that pe-

riod we got some shots.” The Blues were sloppy and sluggish for much of a scoreless second period. Nathan Walker was penalized for slashing just 21 seconds into the period, and that allowed Chicago to gain early momentum. They kept it for much of the period, outshooting the Blues 8-2 over the first eight minutes. “When you have a two-goal lead or any sort of a lead, to get the next goal is huge,” Berube said. “I don’t want to sit back. I don’t want to play that way. We want to be an aggressive team no matter the score, and I thought that our guys did that in that they went out and got that next goal. That’s what we talked about in between periods: let’s go get that next goal.” With 11:04 to play in the third, that next goal belonged to Schenn, who took a backhand pass from Walker and had time to tee up the puck and rifle it past Crawford for his 14th goal of the season. Bozak capped the night with his third goal of the season with 1:49 to play. Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

GOLF

COLLEGES

Area hole in one

Tapawingo: John Cosgrove, hole No. 3, 120 yards, 9-iron.

FOOTBALL NFL AFC East L T Pct PF 2 0 .833 322 3 0 .750 257 8 0 .333 204 9 0 .250 200 South W L T Pct PF Houston 8 4 0 .667 293 Tennessee 7 5 0 .583 276 Indianapolis 6 6 0 .500 261 Jacksonville 4 8 0 .333 220 North W L T Pct PF Baltimore 10 2 0 .833 406 Pittsburgh 7 5 0 .583 236 Cleveland 5 7 0 .417 246 Cincinnati 1 11 0 .083 179 West W L T Pct PF Kansas City 8 4 0 .667 348 Oakland 6 6 0 .500 237 Denver 4 8 0 .333 198 L.A. Chargers 4 8 0 .333 244 NFC East W L T Pct PF Dallas 6 6 0 .500 310 Philadelphia 5 7 0 .417 274 Washington 3 9 0 .250 173 N.Y. Giants 2 10 0 .167 230 South W L T Pct PF y-New Orleans 10 2 0 .833 298 Tampa Bay 5 7 0 .417 340 Carolina 5 7 0 .417 280 Atlanta 3 9 0 .250 260 North W L T Pct PF Green Bay 9 3 0 .750 289 Minnesota 8 4 0 .667 319 Chicago 6 6 0 .500 212 Detroit 3 8 1 .292 280 West W L T Pct PF Seattle 10 2 0 .833 329 San Francisco 10 2 0 .833 349 L.A. Rams 7 5 0 .583 283 Arizona 3 8 1 .292 255 y-clinched division Thursday’s results Chicago 24, Detroit 20 Buffalo 26, Dallas 15 New Orleans 26, Atlanta 18 Sunday’s results Baltimore 20, San Francisco 17 Green Bay 31, N.Y. Giants 13 Tennessee 31, Indianapolis 17 Pittsburgh 20, Cleveland 13 Cincinnati 22, N.Y. Jets 6 Tampa Bay 28, Jacksonville 11 Miami 37, Philadelphia 31 Washington 29, Carolina 21 L.A. Rams 34, Arizona 7 Kansas City 40, Oakland 9 Denver 23, L.A. Chargers 20 Houston 28, New England 22 Monday’s result Seattle 37, Minnesota 30 Thursday, Dec. 5 Dallas at Chicago, 7:20 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 8 Washington at Green Bay, noon Indianapolis at Tampa Bay, noon San Francisco at New Orleans, noon Carolina at Atlanta, noon Detroit at Minnesota, noon Denver at Houston, noon Baltimore at Buffalo, noon Miami at N.Y. Jets, noon Cincinnati at Cleveland, noon L.A. Chargers at Jacksonville, 3:05 p.m. Pittsburgh at Arizona, 3:25 p.m. Tennessee at Oakland, 3:25 p.m. Kansas City at New England, 3:25 p.m. Seattle at L.A. Rams, 7:20 p.m. Monday, Dec. 9 N.Y. Giants at Philadelphia, 7:15 p.m. W New England 10 Buffalo 9 N.Y. Jets 4 Miami 3

PA 145 188 280 377 PA 271 234 257 292 PA 219 225 272 298 PA 265 324 237 241

PA 236 284 290 339 PA 248 346 320 323 PA 255 242 208 315 PA 293 183 250 351

HOCKEY NHL GOLDEN KNIGHTS 4, RANGERS 1 Vegas 2 2 0 — 4 N.Y. Rangers 0 1 0 — 1 First Period—1, Vegas, Tuch 3 (McNabb, Marchessault), 1:34. 2, Vegas, Tuch 4 (Schmidt, Karlsson), 3:50 (pp). Penalties— Skjei, NYR, (holding stick), 1:52; Roy, VGK, (hooking), 11:56; Hague, VGK, (delay of game), 19:13. Second Period—3, Vegas, R.Smith 12, 4:44. 4, Vegas, Pacioretty 10 (Stone, Glass), 6:20 (pp). 5, N.Y. Rangers, Lemieux 4 (Zibanejad, Trouba), 15:15. Penalties—Kakko, NYR, (high sticking), 5:59. Third Period—None. Penalties—Theodore, VGK, (hooking), 1:33; Pacioretty, VGK, (tripping), 4:59; Pacioretty, VGK, (hooking), 17:46; Strome, NYR, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 18:48; Stastny, VGK, (holding), 19:15. Shots on Goal—Vegas 17-11-4—32. N.Y. Rangers 12-7-11—30. Power-play opportunities—Vegas 2 of 2; N.Y. Rangers 0 of 6. Goalies—Vegas, Subban 3-4-2 (30 shots-29 saves). N.Y. Rangers, Lundqvist 7-6-2 (32-28). A—16,325 (18,006). T—2:18. Referees—Peter MacDougall, Dan O’Rourke. Linesmen—Shandor Alphonso, Bryan Pancich. SABRES 7, DEVILS 1 New Jersey 0 1 0 — 1 Buffalo 5 2 0 — 7 First Period—1, Buffalo, Eichel 17 (Ristolainen), 2:46. 2, Buffalo, Skinner 11 (Larsson), 4:59. 3, Buffalo, Sheary 4 (Larsson, Skinner), 6:57. 4, Buffalo, Sheary 5 (McCabe, Larsson), 16:41. 5, Buffalo, Asplund 1 (Mittelstadt), 19:02. Penalties—Coleman, NJ, (tripping), 0:44; Girgensons, BUF, (slashing), 12:02. Second Period—6, Buffalo, Olofsson 11 (Eichel, Montour), 4:40. 7, New Jersey, Hischier 4 (Vatanen, Gusev), 8:10 (pp). 8, Buffalo, Jokiharju 3 (Eichel, Olofsson), 12:08 (pp). Penalties—Miller, BUF, (roughing), 3:22; Subban, NJ, (roughing), 3:22; Girgensons, BUF, (tripping), 6:31; Palmieri, NJ, (tripping), 11:06. Third Period—None. Penalties—Montour, BUF, (tripping), 6:14; Jokiharju, BUF, (hooking), 17:01. Shots on Goal—New Jersey 6-21-18—45. Buffalo 15-8-9—32. Power-play opportunities—New Jersey 1 of 4; Buffalo 1 of 2. Goalies—New Jersey, Blackwood 8-7-3 (17 shots-15 saves), Domingue 1-2-0 (15-10). Buffalo, Ullmark 7-5-2 (45-44). A—15,422 (19,070). T—2:25. Referees—Brian Pochmara, Kelly Sutherland. Linesmen—Julien Fournier, Libor Suchanek. ISLANDERS 4, RED WINGS 1 N.Y. Islanders 2 1 1 — 4 Detroit 0 1 0 — 1 First Period—1, N.Y. Islanders, Lee 7 (Pulock, Barzal), 8:46. 2, N.Y. Islanders, Beauvillier 9 (Bailey, Pulock), 13:17. Penalties—Helm, DET, (delay of game), 3:12; Beauvillier, NYI, (hooking), 11:08; Boychuk, NYI, (hooking), 16:31. Second Period—3, Detroit, Larkin 7 (Zadina, Bertuzzi), 10:36 (pp). 4, N.Y. Islanders, Eberle 1 (Lee, Leddy), 16:34 (pp). Penalties—Lee, NYI, (high sticking), 5:00; Toews, NYI, (delay of game), 7:43; Leddy, NYI, (holding), 10:26; Nielsen, DET, (interference), 14:26; Nemeth, DET, (interference), 14:58. Third Period—5, N.Y. Islanders, Eberle 2 (Komarov, Pulock), 13:24. Penalties— Koivula, NYI, (tripping), 2:37; Glendening, DET, (boarding), 16:43; Filppula, DET, (high sticking), 18:46. Shots on Goal—N.Y. Islanders 9-6-10—25. Detroit 11-13-7—31. Power-play opportunities—N.Y. Islanders 1 of 5; Detroit 1 of 6. Goalies—N.Y. Islanders, Varlamov 8-3-2 (31 shots-30 saves). Detroit, Bernier 5-8-2 (25-21). A—17,510 (20,000). T—2:22. Referees—Tim Peel, Corey Syvret. Linesmen—Brad Kovachik, Mark Shewchyk.

SOCCER English Premier League GP W D L GF GA Pts 14 13 1 0 32 12 40 14 10 2 2 33 9 32 14 9 2 3 39 16 29 14 8 2 4 28 20 26 14 5 5 4 24 21 20 14 4 8 2 19 17 20 14 4 7 3 17 13 19 14 4 7 3 20 21 19 14 4 6 4 21 17 18 14 5 3 6 20 20 18 14 5 3 6 13 18 18 14 4 4 6 18 20 16 14 4 4 6 17 23 16 14 4 4 6 13 22 16 14 4 3 7 21 22 15 14 4 3 7 16 21 15 14 4 2 8 14 22 14 14 3 3 8 15 32 12 14 3 2 9 15 30 11 14 1 5 8 9 28 8 Tuesday Crystal Palace vs. Bournemouth , 1:30 p.m. Burnley vs. Man City , 2:15 p.m. Wednesday Leicester vs. Watford , 1:30 p.m. Wolverhampton vs. West Ham , 1:30 p.m. Man United vs. Tottenham , 1:30 p.m. Chelsea vs. Aston Villa , 1:30 p.m. Southampton vs. Norwich , 1:30 p.m. Liverpool vs. Everton , 2:15 p.m. Thursday Sheffield United vs. Newcastle , 1:30 p.m. Arsenal vs. Brighton , 2:15 p.m.

Liverpool Leicester Man City Chelsea Tottenham Wolverhampton Sheffield United Arsenal Man United Burnley Crystal Palace Bournemouth West Ham Newcastle Aston Villa Brighton Everton Southampton Norwich Watford

Area colleges schedule

Men’s basketball

BASKETBALL Tuesday, Dec. 3 W: Maryville at Missouri S&T, 5:30 p.m. W: Lindenwood at UMSL, 5:30 p.m. W: Southern Indiana at McKendree, 5:30 p.m. W: Columbia College at Missouri Baptist, 5:30 p.m. W: Harris-Stowe at William Woods, 5:30 p.m. W: Park at LU-Belleville, 5:30 p.m. W: Tennessee Martin at SIU Carbondale, 6 p.m. W: Southeast Missouri at St. Louis U., 7 p.m. W: STL Pharmacy at Stephens, 7 p.m. M: Lindenwood at UMSL, 7:30 p.m. M: Southern Indiana at McKendree, 7:30 p.m. M: Maryville at Missouri S&T, 7:30 p.m. M: Columbia College at Missouri Baptist, 7:30 p.m. M: Harris-Stowe at William Woods, 7:30 p.m. M: Park at LU-Belleville, 7:30 p.m.

MONDAY’S SCORES EAST Bates 82, Johnson & Wales (RI) 74 Bryant 60, Navy 45 Cobleskill at Delhi, ppd. DeSales at Montclair St., ppd. Delaware 84, Columbia 76 Gwynedd-Mercy 72, Goucher 51 Mansfield at Mercy, ppd. Mass.-Dartmouth 94, Bridgewater (Mass.) 84 New England 95, Maine Maritime 79 St. Lawrence 83, Oswego St. 82 Stony Brook 65, Manhattan 47 Wilson at Centenary (NJ), ppd. SOUTH Benedict 87, LeMoyne-Owen 74 Columbus St. 86, West Georgia 81 Delta St. 87, Blue Mountain 83 Elon 70, Kennesaw St. 46 Emmanuel (Ga.) 88, Georgia College 77 Ga. Southwestern 89, Fort Valley St. 62 Hofstra 64, Canisius 57 Holy Cross 81, Mercer 67 Morehouse 98, Spring Hill 88 North Florida 93, High Point 70 South Florida 65, Furman 55 Tennessee Tech 86, Reinhardt 47 UIC 89, San Diego 83 Wofford 77, NC Central 59 Young Harris 91, Pfeiffer 82 MIDWEST Black Hills St. 91, Dakota St. 53 Kansas St. 76, Florida A&M 58 Miami 81, Illinois 79 Minn. Duluth 95, St. Cloud St. 74 SOUTHWEST North Texas 77, Texas-Arlington 66 Northeastern St. 100, SW Christian 74 Stephen F. Austin 114, Arlington Baptist 49

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES — Agreed to terms with LHP Richard Bleier, INF Hanser Alberto, RHP Dylan Bundy, RHP Miguel Castro, RHP Mychal Givers and INF/OF Trey Mancini on one-year contracts. Acquired LHP Easton Lucas from Miami Marlins for INF Jonathan Villar. BOSTON RED SOX — Traded C Sandy León to Cleveland for RHP Adenys Bautista. Declined to tender 2020 contracts to INF Marco Hernandez and LHP Josh Osich. CHICAGO WHITE SOX — Agreed to terms with C James McCannon on a one-year contract. Declined to tender 2020 contracts to RHP Ryan Burr, LHP Caleb Frare and INF Yolmer Sánchez. Released RHP Thyago Vieira. CLEVELAND INDIANS — Agreed to terms with C Sandy Leon and UTL Andrew Velazques on a one-year contract. Declined to tender 2020 contracts to RHP James Hoyt and C Kevin Plawecki. HOUSTON ASTROS — Agreed to terms with RHP Joe Biagini on a one-year contract. Declined to tender 2020 contract to RHP Aaron Sanchez. KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Agreed to terms with LHP Mike Montgomery on a one-year contract. Declined to tender 2020 contracts to SS Humberto Arteaga, 3B Cheslor Cuthbert, SS Erick Mejia and RHP Jesse Hahn. LOS ANGELES ANGELS — Declined to tender a 2020 contracts to C Kevan Smith. MINNESOTA TWINS — Agreed to terms with INF Ehire Adrianza on a one-year contract. Declined to tender 2020 contracts to 1B C.J. Cron and RHP Trevor Hildenberger. OAKLAND ATHLETICS — Acquired C Austin Allen and a player to be named from San Diego for 2B Jurickson Profar. Agreed to terms with LHP T.J. McFarland on a one-year contract. Declined to tender 2020 contracts to LHP Ryan Buchter, RHP Blake Treinen and C Josh Phegley. SEATTLE MARINERS — Declined to tender 2020 contracts to INF Tim Beckham and OF Domingo Santana. TEXAS RANGERS — Announced RHP Nick Goody accepted his assignment to the club and was placed on the major league roster. Claimed RHP Jimmy Herget off waivers from Cincinnati. Designated LHP Jeffrey Springs for assignment. Declined to tender 2020 contracts to RHP Ian Gibaul and RHP WeiChieh Huang. TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Agreed to terms with 2B Andy Burns, OF Patrick Kivlehan and RHPs Phillippe Aumont, A.J. Cole and Justin Miller on minor league contracts. Declined to tender 2020 contracts to C Luke Maile, RHP Derek Law and RHP Jason Adam. National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS — Declined to tender 2020 contracts to OF Steven Souza Jr., RHP Taijuan Walker and C Caleb Joesph. ATLANTA BRAVES—Declined to tender 2020 contracts to INF/OF Charlie Culberson, C John Ryan Murphy and OF Rafael Ortega. CHICAGO CUBS — Agreed to terms with RHP Jharel Cotton on a one-year contract. Declined to tender 2020 contracts to INF Addison Russell and LHP Danny Hultzen. CINCINNATI REDS — Agreed to terms with OF Travis Jankowski, RHP Trevor Bauer, RHP Matt Bowman, RHP Anthony DeSciafani, RHP/ OF Michael Lorenzen and C Curt Casali on one-year contracts. Declined to tender 2020 contracts to RHP Kevin Gausman, IF/OF Jose Peraza and RHP Jimmy Herget. COLORADO ROCKIES — Declined to tender 2020 contract to RHP Wes Parsons. LOS ANGELES DODGERS — Agreed to terms with C Austin Barnes to a one-year contract. Declined to tender 2020 contract to RHP Yimi Garcia. MIAMI MARLINS — Claimed 1B Jesus Aguilar off waivers from Tampa Bay. Designated RHP Tayron Guerrero and INF J.T. Riddle for assignment, then declined to tender 2020 contract to INF J.T. Riddle. MILWAUKEE BREWERS — Agreed to terms with OF Ben Gamel and SS Orlando Arcia on one-year contracts. Declined to tender 2020 contracts to LHP Alex Claudio, RHP Junior Guerra, RHP Jimmy Nelson, INF Tyler Saladino and 3b Travis Shaw. PITTSBURGH PIRATES — Declined to tender 2020 contract to C Elias Diaz. Agreed to terms with SS Erik Gonzalez on a one-year contract. PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES — Claimed RHP Trevor Kelley off waivers from Boston. SAN DIEGO PADRES — Agreed to terms with 2B Jurickson Profar on a one-year contract. Declined to tender 2020 contracts to RHP Pedro Avila and RHP Miguel Diaz. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS — Agreed to terms with OF Alex Dickerson, LHP Wandy Peralta and IF Donovan Solano on one-year contracts. Declined to tender 2020 contracts to LHP Tyler Anderson, RHP Rico Garcia, OF Kevin Pillrd and OF Joey Rickard. WASHINGTON NATIONALS — Agreed to terms with INF Wilmer Difo and RHP Hunter Strickland on one-year contracts. Agreed to terms with LHP Roenis Elias, SS Trea Turner, RHP Joe Ross and OF Michael A. Taylor on one-year contracts. Declined to tender 2020 contracts to RHP Javy Guerra and RHP Koda Glover. Frontier League FLORENCE FREEDOM — Exercised the 2020 contract options on LHPs Scott Sebald, Mike Castellani, George Faue, Karl Craigie and Hayden Wheeler; RHPs Zak Spivy, Jamal Wilson, Jackson Owens, Sean Hughes and Ryan Mordecai; UTs Connor Crane, Kenny Meimerstorf and Trevor Craport; OFs Andre Mercurio, Isaac Benard, Brandon Pugh and Ricky Ramirez Jr.; INFs Caleb Lopes, Luis Pintor, Kevin Whatley and Taylor Bryant; Cs Jackson Pritchard, Ryan Rinsky and Michael Gulino. Declined the options on RHPs Chris Amend and Sean Watkins; and LHP Patrick McGrath. SOUTHERN ILLINOIS MINERS — Signed INF Yeltsin Gudino and INF Gianfranco Wawoe to contract extensions. WINDY CITY THUNDERBOLTS — Signed INF/ OF Michael Mateja to a contract extension. FOOTBALL National Football League ARIZONA CARDINALS — Released CB Tramaine Brock Sr. and RB Zach Zenner. ATLANTA FALCONS — Signed OL John Wetzel. Activated Matt Bosher from IR. Assigned OL Chris Lindstrom to the practice squad. DETROIT LIONS — Placed TE T.J. Hockenson on IR. GREEN BAY PACKERS — Released CB Tremon Smith. MIAMI DOLPHINS — Signed CB Eric Rowe to a contract extension through the 2022 season. MINNESOTA VIKINGS — Placed LB Ben Gedeon on IR. Signed WR Alexander Hollins from the practice squad. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS — Claimed DL Albert Huggins off waivers from Philadelphia. Released K Kai Forbath. OAKLAND RAIDERS — Activated LB Marquel Lee. Waived WR Trevor Davis. HOCKEY National Hockey League ANAHEIM DUCKS — Recalled G Anthony Stolarz from San Diego (AHL). DETROIT RED WINGS — Reassigned G Filip Larsson from Grand Rapids (AHL) to Toledo (ECHL). PITTSBURGH PENGUINS — Signed F Stefan Noesen to a two-way contract. American Hockey League AHL — Suspended Belleville D Jonathan Aspirot for two games for a cross-checking incident during a Nov. 29 game at Binghamton. GRAND RAPIDS GRIFFINS — Assigned F Troy Loggins to Toledo (ECHL). Recalled F Tyler Spezia from Toledo. SOCCER Major League Soccer ATLANTA UNITED — Acquired D Brooks Lennon from Real Salt Lake in exchange for $150,000 in General Allocation Money and $150,000 in Targeted Allocation Money. FC DALLAS — Traded F Dominique Badji to Nashville SC for $150,000 in 2020 General Allocation Money and $175,000 in 2020 Targeted Allocation Money. COLLEGE SOUTHEASTERN CONFERENCE — Fined Auburn $250,000 after fans stormed the football field celebrating a 48-45 win over Alabama on Nov. 30. BUCKNELL — Named Michelle Manning senior associate director of athletics for administration. NORTH TEXAS — Fired defensive coordinator Troy Reffett and offensive coordinator Bodie Reeder. OLD DOMINION — Announced the resignation of football coach Bobby Wilder. SOUTH CAROLINA — Announced senior QB Jake Bentley is leaving the program and will transfer. UNLV — Named Lauren Jordan assistant swimming coach. WASHINGTON — Announced the resignation of football coach Chris Petersen. Promoted defensive coordinator Jimmy Lake to head football coach.

Women’s basketball THE AP TOP TWENTY FIVE Record Pts Prv 1. Stanford (23) 8-0 740 3 2. Louisville (5) 8-0 708 8 3. Oregon 6-1 662 1 4. UConn (2) 6-0 657 4 5. Oregon St. 7-0 623 7 6. South Carolina 8-1 609 5 7. Baylor 7-1 597 2 8. Florida St. 7-0 517 12 9. Maryland 7-1 507 9 10. Mississippi St. 8-1 472 10 11. UCLA 7-0 430 11 12. Texas A&M 5-1 429 6 13. N.C. State 8-0 397 12 14. Indiana 6-1 368 17 15. Kentucky 7-0 367 14 16. DePaul 6-1 291 16 17. Tennessee 7-0 230 20 18. Gonzaga 6-1 218 22 19. Michigan St. 6-1 184 15 20. Arizona 7-0 182 24 21. Miami 5-2 144 19 22. Missouri St. 7-1 101 — 23. Arkansas 7-1 94 25 24. Michigan 6-1 42 — 25. LSU 7-1 41 — Others receiving votes: Syracuse 29, Florida Gulf Coast 28, South Dakota 27, West Virginia 24, Minnesota 10, North Carolina 5, Notre Dame 5, Northwestern 3, Rutgers 3, Purdue 2, Colorado 1, Creighton 1, Drake 1, TCU 1. HOW THE AP TOP 25 FARED Monday 20. Arizona (8-0) beat Monmouth 86-34. Next: at UTEP, Saturday.

Football FCS PLAYOFFS Second Round Saturday, Dec. 7 Monmouth (NJ) (11-2) at James Madison (11-1), noon Northern Iowa (9-4) at South Dakota State (8-4), 1 p.m. Kennesaw State (11-2) at Weber State (9-3), 2 p.m. Albany (NY) (9-4) at Montana State (9-3), 2 p.m. Southeastern Louisiana (8-4) at Montana (9-3), 2 p.m. Illinois State (9-4) at Central Arkansas (9-3), 2 p.m. Nicholls (9-4) at North Dakota State (12-0), 2:30 p.m. Austin Peay (10-3) at Sacramento State (9-3), 8 p.m. DIVISION II PLAYOFFS Quarterfinals Saturday, Dec. 7 Notre Dame (Ohio) (12-1) at Slippery Rock (12-0), noon West Florida (10-2) at Lenoir-Rhyne (13-0), noon Northwest Missouri State (12-1) at Ferris State (11-0), noon Texas A&M-Commerce (11-2) at Minnesota State (12-0), noon DIVISION III PLAYOFFS Quarterfinals Saturday, Dec. 7 Muhlenberg (12-0) at Salisbury (11-0), 11 a.m. North Central (Ill.) (11-1) at Delaware Valley (11-1), Noon Wisconsin-Whitewater (11-1) at Mary HardinBaylor (12-0), Noon Saint John’s (Minn.) (11-1) at Wheaton (Ill.) (12-0), Noon

M 1 • TUESDAY • 12.03.2019

Seattle holds off Vikings, takes 1st ASSOCIATED PRESS

SEATTLE — Rashaad Penny scored one touchdown rushing and one receiving, Russell Wilson hit David Moore for a 60-yard TD pass, and the Seattle Seahawks built a big second-half lead before holding off the Minnesota Vikings for a 37-30 win Monday night. Seattle (10-2) moved into a tie with San Francisco atop of the NFC West but holds the tiebreaker. The Seahawks have the inside track to the division title with four games left. Minnesota (8-4) fell a game behind Green Bay in the NFC North and is only one game ahead of the Los Angeles Rams in the wildcard race. They may have lost star running back Dalvin Cook to a shoulder injury when he fumbled midway through the third quarter in what became a major turning point. Wilson wasn’t great, but he came up with key plays as Seattle won its fifth straight. He had a forgettable first-half moment trying to bat down a deflected pass only to watch Anthony Harris intercept the ball and return it for a touchdown. Wilson was 21 of 31 for 240 yards. The key was the running of Penny and Chris Carson. Seattle rushed for 218 yards, the most allowed by Minnesota this season. Carson had 102, including a 1-yard TD. Penny added 74. The Vikings were giving up just 94 yards per game rushing. Minnesota quarterback Kirk Cousins was 22 of 38 for 276 yards but couldn’t connect with Irv Smith Jr. on fourth-and-3 at the Vikings 42 with 2:31 left. Jason Myers’ 36-yard field goal with 21 seconds left provided the final margin for Seattle. It was a wild second half featuring 40 combined points and four key turnovers — three by Minnesota.

JOHN FROSCHAUER, AP PHOTO

Seattle’s Rashaad Penny high-steps into the end zone for a touchdown against the Vikings on Monday in Seattle. SEAHAWKS 37, VIKINGS 30 Minnesota 7 10 0 13 — 30 Seattle 7 3 17 10 — 37 First Quarter Min—Cook 2 run (Bailey kick), 8:12. Sea—Carson 1 run (Myers kick), :11. Second Quarter Min—Harris 20 interception return (Bailey kick), 5:09. Sea—FG Myers 29, :58. Min—FG Bailey 47, :00. Third Quarter Sea—Penny 1 run (Myers kick), 9:02. Sea—FG Myers 29, 5:46. Sea—Moore 60 pass from R.Wilson (Myers kick), :05. Fourth Quarter Sea—Penny 13 pass from R.Wilson (Myers kick), 13:30. Min—Treadwell 58 pass from Cousins (Bailey kick), 12:49. Min—Rudolph 3 pass from Cousins (kick failed), 7:14. Sea—FG Myers 36, :21. A—69,080. Min Sea First downs 17 24 Total Net Yards 354 444 Rushes-yards 14-78 43-218 Passing 276 226 Punt Returns 0-0 1-9 Kickoff Returns 3-57 2-51 Interceptions Ret. 1-20 1-0 Comp-Att-Int 22-38-1 21-31-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 0-0 2-14 Punts 4-42.5 3-42.0 Fumbles-Lost 3-2 1-1 Penalties-Yards 3-30 1-30 Time of Possession 20:15 39:45 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Minnesota, Cook 9-29, S.Diggs 1-27, Mattison 4-22. Seattle, Carson 23-102, Penny 15-74, Homer 1-29, R.Wilson 4-13. PASSING—Minnesota, Cousins 22-38-1276. Seattle, R.Wilson 21-31-1-240. RECEIVING—Minnesota, Mattison 4-51, Rudolph 4-50, S.Diggs 4-25, Cook 3-35, Ham 2-42, Conklin 2-8, Treadwell 1-58, I.Smith 1-6, O.Johnson 1-1. Seattle, Metcalf 6-75, Hollister 6-44, Penny 4-33, Moore 2-65, Gordon 1-10, Carson 1-7, J.Brown 1-6. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Seattle pulled even at 17 on Penny’s 1-yard TD run. On Minnesota’s first play of the next possession, Cook was stripped by Rasheem Green, and Bradley McDougald recovered. It was the first of two critical turnovers that led to 10 points for Seattle. The Seahawks were held to a field goal following Cook’s fumble but took a 27-17 lead on their next

possession when Moore ran free through the Vikings secondary and Wilson hit him in stride. Minnesota cornerback Xavier Rhodes appeared to think he had safety help over the top, but no one was there as Moore sprinted for his second TD catch of the season on the next-to-last play of the third quarter. The first play of the fourth quarter was forgettable for the Vikings as well. Cousins’ pass for Stefan Diggs was intercepted by Tre Flowers, who may have gotten away with pass interference, but deflected the pass and made a juggling interception at the Minnesota 25. Three plays later, Wilson hit Penny on a screen pass and Seattle had a 17-point lead. Minnesota’s rally started with Seattle’s own blown coverage as Cousins hit Laquon Treadwell for a 58-yard TD from Cousins. Seattle seemed poised to add on, helped by a fake punt that Travis Homer took for 29 yards, but DK Metcalf fumbled and the Vikings recovered at their 28 with 9:34 left. It took barely 2 minutes for Minnesota to pull within 34-30 as Cousins hit Kyle Rudolph for a 3-yard touchdown and another brilliant onehanded catch by the Vikings’ tight end. But that was as close as Minnesota would get.

AMERICA’S LINE NFL Points Underdog Open Current Thursday Cowboys .............. 3......... 3 ................ BEARS Sunday Ravens ................5.5 ....5.5 ..................BILLS PACKERS ............. 14 ..13.5 .............Redskins TEXANS ...............9.5 ....9.5 ..............Broncos SAINTS ................3.5 ....... 3 ................. 49ers BROWNS .............. 8......8.5 .............. Bengals FALCONS .............. 2......2.5 ............ Panthers VIKINGS .............. NL......NL .................. Lions JETS ....................6.5 ....5.5 .............Dolphins BUCS .................... 3......... 3 ...................Colts Chargers .............. 3......... 3 ............ JAGUARS PATRIOTS ............. 3......... 3 ................. Chiefs Steelers ..............1.5 ....2.5 ................ CARDS Titans ................... 3......... 3 .............RAIDERS Seahawks............ NL......NL ................. RAMS Monday EAGLES ...............8.5 ....8.5 .................Giants COLLEGE FOOTBALL Favorite Points Underdog Open Current Friday PAC 12 Championship Game Santa Clara, CA Utah ....................6.5 ....6.5 ............... Oregon Saturday MAC Championship Game Detroit, MI C Michigan ..........6.5 ....6.5 ........ Miami-Ohio Sun Belt Championship Game Boone, NC APP’CHIAN ST ...... 6......... 6 ....... Ul-Lafayette Big 12 Championship Game Arlington, TX Oklahoma ...........9.5 ....8.5 ................ Baylor Conference USA Championship Game Boca Raton, FL FLA ATLANTIC .....7.5 ....7.5 .................... Uab American Conference Championship Game Memphis, TN MEMPHIS ............ 10 ....9.5 ...........Cincinnati Mountain West Championship Game Boise, ID BOISE ST ............. 15 ..13.5 ................ Hawaii SEC Championship Game Atlanta, GA Lsu ......................6.5 ....... 7 .............. Georgia BIG 10 Championship Game Indianapolis, IN Ohio St ...............16.5 .16.5 ...........Wisconsin ACC Championship Game Charlotte, NC Clemson .............28.5 .28.5 .............. Virginia NBA Favorite Points Underdog Pistons ....................2.5 ............... CAVALIERS WIZARDS.................1.5 ....................... Magic Mavericks ...............3.5 ................. PELICANS RAPTORS ................ NL ......................... Heat Rockets .................... 4........................ SPURS NUGGETS ................. 2........................ Lakers CLIPPERS ................. 9....................... Blazers COLLEGE BASKETBALL Favorite Points Underdog INDIANA ST .............. 6................N Dakota St ST. JOHN’S..............20.5 ............... St. Peter’s LOUISVILLE .............6.5 .................. Michigan BALL ST.................... 2.......... Loyola-Chicago MIAMI-OHIO............1.5 .............No Kentucky MISSISSIPPI ............1.5 .......................Butler E MICHIGAN ............. 4..................Valparaiso GEORGE MASON ...... 9................ Jack’ville St GEORGIA ST ............. 7................. Dartmouth KENT ST .................13.5 .....................Detroit BOSTON COLLEGE ...1.5 ...........Northwestern SYRACUSE ................ 4........................... Iowa W MICHIGAN ........... PK ....................Oakland WILLIAM & MARY..... 3.............Old Dominion WRIGHT ST ..............1.5 .............. W Kentucky W CAROLINA ...........5.5 ............ Chattanooga Nebraska-Omaha..... 3............ ARKANSAS ST VANDERBILT ............ 2....................... Buffalo ARKANSAS .............. 17 ..............Austin Peay MISSOURI ST ............ 5................... Murray St DRAKE ...................10.5 ....... Wisconsin-Milw TCU ........................13.5 .................Illinois St TEXAS ..................... 13 .......................... Uab CREIGHTON ............. 12 ............ Oral Roberts MEMPHIS ................ 12 .................... Bradley NEW MEXICO ST ......4.5 ......................... Utep PITTSBURGH ............ 4...................... Rutgers INDIANA..................2.5 ................. Florida St MICHIGAN ST ........... 5...........................Duke Cal-Santa Barb......... 2....... CS-BAKERSFIELD Arizona St ...............1.5 .......SAN FRANCISCO NHL Favorite Odds Underdog BLUE JACKETS .-$120/even ............. Coyotes PANTHERS ..... -$145/+$125 .................Wild Vegas ............. -$150/+$130 ............ DEVILS FLYERS ........... -$110/-$110......Maple Leafs CANADIENS......-$120/even ........... Islanders BRUINS .......... -$150/+$130 ...... Hurricanes PREDATORS ... -$110/-$110..........Lightning Stars .............. -$110/-$110..................JETS CANUCKS ....... -$165/+$145 ..........Senators Capitals............-$120/even .............SHARKS Favorite

NFL NOTEBOOK

Jaguars switch back to Minshew amid 4-game skid ASSOCIATED PRESS

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — The Mississippi Mustache is back in Jacksonville’s starting lineup. Rookie sensation Gardner Minshew will start Sunday as the reeling Jaguars host the Los Angeles Chargers. He replaces ineffective and highly paid quarterback Nick Foles following the team’s fourth consecutive lopsided loss. Coach Doug Marrone made the announcement Monday, one day after a 2811 home loss to Tampa Bay in which the Jaguars (4-8) managed 242 yards, turned the ball over four times and were flagged a season-high 16 times for 125 yards. It was Jacksonville’s 18th loss in its past 24 games. “We feel with Gardner’s mobility and elusiveness, it gives us a better chance of winning with the way we’re playing right now because we’re all not doing a good enough job,” Marrone said. Asked whether the job would be Minshew’s for the remainder of the season, Marrone said, “We’re planning on him playing.” It was the obvious move following Sunday’s debacle against Tampa Bay. Foles ended Jacksonville’s first three drives with turnovers that each turned into Buccaneers touchdowns. Marrone benched Foles at halftime, trailing 25-0. Marrone said Foles handled the demotion like a pro. “It’s brutal; it’s tough,” Marrone said. “He’s a competitor. He worked his (butt) off to come back. He’s a great pro, so he’s going to do everything he can to help us win. And at the same time, he’s got to be ready in case there’s an injury. I think the world

of him. I think he’s a really good quarterback. He obviously can win in this league. But we have to have some help around him.”

“A lot of mixed emotions right now,” Adams said Sunday. “I’m more upset at the fact that I feel like I let the team down.”

Mayfield OK after injuring hand

Lions place TE Hockenson on IR

Browns quarterback Baker Mayfield is not expected to miss any time after injuring his right hand in Sunday’s 20-13 loss to Pittsburgh. Mayfield played the second half with a glove helping protect and support his hand after it struck the facemask of Steelers linebacker Bud Dupree while throwing a deep incompletion just before halftime. Browns coach Freddie Kitchens said Monday that he was prepared to play backup Garrett Gilbert in the second half, but X-rays taken on Mayfield at halftime were negative. Kitchens said Mayfield “should be fine” and able to start this week when the Browns (5-7) host the Cincinnati Bengals (1-11).

The Detroit Lions have placed rookie tight end T.J. Hockenson on injured reserve with an ankle injury. Coach Matt Patricia announced the move Monday. The Lions took Hockenson in the first round of this year’s draft. He has caught 32 passes for 367 yards and two touchdowns. The loss of Hockenson is another blow to an offense that has been without quarterback Matthew Stafford and recently put backup quarterback Jeff Driskel on IR. Hockenson caught six passes for 131 yards and a touchdown in Detroit’s season opener against Arizona. That was his only 100-yard game.

Jets’ Adams suffers ankle sprain New York Jets star safety Jamal Adams has a sprained left ankle that could sideline him for at least the team’s game Sunday against Miami. “I think it’s a legit weekto-week (injury),” coach Adam Gase said Monday. Adams still was expected to have an MRI exam to further evaluate the injury which happened early in the Jets’ 22-6 loss at Cincinnati. After the game, Adams fought back tears while discussing the loss and the injury, which had him in a walking boot.

Cardinals release Brock, Zenner The Arizona Cardinals released veteran cornerback Tramaine Brock Sr. and running back Zach Zenner on Monday, one day after a 34-7 loss to the Los Angeles Rams. The 31-year-old Brock was part of a secondary that’s given up the most passing yards in the league this season. The 10-year veteran had played in 10 games and was sixth on the team with 37 tackles. Zenner was signed midseason after injuries to David Johnson and Chase Edmonds hurt the team’s depth at running back. The five-year veteran appeared in three games.


SPORTS

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

GOLF

COLLEGES

Area hole in one

Tapawingo: John Cosgrove, hole No. 3, 120 yards, 9-iron.

FOOTBALL NFL AFC East L T Pct PF 2 0 .833 322 3 0 .750 257 8 0 .333 204 9 0 .250 200 South W L T Pct PF Houston 8 4 0 .667 293 Tennessee 7 5 0 .583 276 Indianapolis 6 6 0 .500 261 Jacksonville 4 8 0 .333 220 North W L T Pct PF Baltimore 10 2 0 .833 406 Pittsburgh 7 5 0 .583 236 Cleveland 5 7 0 .417 246 Cincinnati 1 11 0 .083 179 West W L T Pct PF Kansas City 8 4 0 .667 348 Oakland 6 6 0 .500 237 Denver 4 8 0 .333 198 L.A. Chargers 4 8 0 .333 244 NFC East W L T Pct PF Dallas 6 6 0 .500 310 Philadelphia 5 7 0 .417 274 Washington 3 9 0 .250 173 N.Y. Giants 2 10 0 .167 230 South W L T Pct PF y-New Orleans 10 2 0 .833 298 Tampa Bay 5 7 0 .417 340 Carolina 5 7 0 .417 280 Atlanta 3 9 0 .250 260 North W L T Pct PF Green Bay 9 3 0 .750 289 Minnesota 8 4 0 .667 319 Chicago 6 6 0 .500 212 Detroit 3 8 1 .292 280 West W L T Pct PF Seattle 10 2 0 .833 329 San Francisco 10 2 0 .833 349 L.A. Rams 7 5 0 .583 283 Arizona 3 8 1 .292 255 y-clinched division Thursday’s results Chicago 24, Detroit 20 Buffalo 26, Dallas 15 New Orleans 26, Atlanta 18 Sunday’s results Baltimore 20, San Francisco 17 Green Bay 31, N.Y. Giants 13 Tennessee 31, Indianapolis 17 Pittsburgh 20, Cleveland 13 Cincinnati 22, N.Y. Jets 6 Tampa Bay 28, Jacksonville 11 Miami 37, Philadelphia 31 Washington 29, Carolina 21 L.A. Rams 34, Arizona 7 Kansas City 40, Oakland 9 Denver 23, L.A. Chargers 20 Houston 28, New England 22 Monday’s result Seattle 37, Minnesota 30 Thursday, Dec. 5 Dallas at Chicago, 7:20 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 8 Washington at Green Bay, noon Indianapolis at Tampa Bay, noon San Francisco at New Orleans, noon Carolina at Atlanta, noon Detroit at Minnesota, noon Denver at Houston, noon Baltimore at Buffalo, noon Miami at N.Y. Jets, noon Cincinnati at Cleveland, noon L.A. Chargers at Jacksonville, 3:05 p.m. Pittsburgh at Arizona, 3:25 p.m. Tennessee at Oakland, 3:25 p.m. Kansas City at New England, 3:25 p.m. Seattle at L.A. Rams, 7:20 p.m. Monday, Dec. 9 N.Y. Giants at Philadelphia, 7:15 p.m. W New England 10 Buffalo 9 N.Y. Jets 4 Miami 3

PA 145 188 280 377 PA 271 234 257 292 PA 219 225 272 298 PA 265 324 237 241

PA 236 284 290 339 PA 248 346 320 323 PA 255 242 208 315 PA 293 183 250 351

HOCKEY NHL GOLDEN KNIGHTS 4, RANGERS 1 Vegas 2 2 0 — 4 N.Y. Rangers 0 1 0 — 1 First Period—1, Vegas, Tuch 3 (McNabb, Marchessault), 1:34. 2, Vegas, Tuch 4 (Schmidt, Karlsson), 3:50 (pp). Penalties— Skjei, NYR, (holding stick), 1:52; Roy, VGK, (hooking), 11:56; Hague, VGK, (delay of game), 19:13. Second Period—3, Vegas, R.Smith 12, 4:44. 4, Vegas, Pacioretty 10 (Stone, Glass), 6:20 (pp). 5, N.Y. Rangers, Lemieux 4 (Zibanejad, Trouba), 15:15. Penalties—Kakko, NYR, (high sticking), 5:59. Third Period—None. Penalties—Theodore, VGK, (hooking), 1:33; Pacioretty, VGK, (tripping), 4:59; Pacioretty, VGK, (hooking), 17:46; Strome, NYR, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 18:48; Stastny, VGK, (holding), 19:15. Shots on Goal—Vegas 17-11-4—32. N.Y. Rangers 12-7-11—30. Power-play opportunities—Vegas 2 of 2; N.Y. Rangers 0 of 6. Goalies—Vegas, Subban 3-4-2 (30 shots-29 saves). N.Y. Rangers, Lundqvist 7-6-2 (32-28). A—16,325 (18,006). T—2:18. Referees—Peter MacDougall, Dan O’Rourke. Linesmen—Shandor Alphonso, Bryan Pancich. SABRES 7, DEVILS 1 New Jersey 0 1 0 — 1 Buffalo 5 2 0 — 7 First Period—1, Buffalo, Eichel 17 (Ristolainen), 2:46. 2, Buffalo, Skinner 11 (Larsson), 4:59. 3, Buffalo, Sheary 4 (Larsson, Skinner), 6:57. 4, Buffalo, Sheary 5 (McCabe, Larsson), 16:41. 5, Buffalo, Asplund 1 (Mittelstadt), 19:02. Penalties—Coleman, NJ, (tripping), 0:44; Girgensons, BUF, (slashing), 12:02. Second Period—6, Buffalo, Olofsson 11 (Eichel, Montour), 4:40. 7, New Jersey, Hischier 4 (Vatanen, Gusev), 8:10 (pp). 8, Buffalo, Jokiharju 3 (Eichel, Olofsson), 12:08 (pp). Penalties—Miller, BUF, (roughing), 3:22; Subban, NJ, (roughing), 3:22; Girgensons, BUF, (tripping), 6:31; Palmieri, NJ, (tripping), 11:06. Third Period—None. Penalties—Montour, BUF, (tripping), 6:14; Jokiharju, BUF, (hooking), 17:01. Shots on Goal—New Jersey 6-21-18—45. Buffalo 15-8-9—32. Power-play opportunities—New Jersey 1 of 4; Buffalo 1 of 2. Goalies—New Jersey, Blackwood 8-7-3 (17 shots-15 saves), Domingue 1-2-0 (15-10). Buffalo, Ullmark 7-5-2 (45-44). A—15,422 (19,070). T—2:25. Referees—Brian Pochmara, Kelly Sutherland. Linesmen—Julien Fournier, Libor Suchanek. ISLANDERS 4, RED WINGS 1 N.Y. Islanders 2 1 1 — 4 Detroit 0 1 0 — 1 First Period—1, N.Y. Islanders, Lee 7 (Pulock, Barzal), 8:46. 2, N.Y. Islanders, Beauvillier 9 (Bailey, Pulock), 13:17. Penalties—Helm, DET, (delay of game), 3:12; Beauvillier, NYI, (hooking), 11:08; Boychuk, NYI, (hooking), 16:31. Second Period—3, Detroit, Larkin 7 (Zadina, Bertuzzi), 10:36 (pp). 4, N.Y. Islanders, Eberle 1 (Lee, Leddy), 16:34 (pp). Penalties—Lee, NYI, (high sticking), 5:00; Toews, NYI, (delay of game), 7:43; Leddy, NYI, (holding), 10:26; Nielsen, DET, (interference), 14:26; Nemeth, DET, (interference), 14:58. Third Period—5, N.Y. Islanders, Eberle 2 (Komarov, Pulock), 13:24. Penalties— Koivula, NYI, (tripping), 2:37; Glendening, DET, (boarding), 16:43; Filppula, DET, (high sticking), 18:46. Shots on Goal—N.Y. Islanders 9-6-10—25. Detroit 11-13-7—31. Power-play opportunities—N.Y. Islanders 1 of 5; Detroit 1 of 6. Goalies—N.Y. Islanders, Varlamov 8-3-2 (31 shots-30 saves). Detroit, Bernier 5-8-2 (25-21). A—17,510 (20,000). T—2:22. Referees—Tim Peel, Corey Syvret. Linesmen—Brad Kovachik, Mark Shewchyk. DUCKS 4, KINGS 2 Los Angeles 0 2 0 — 2 Anaheim 2 1 1 — 4 First Period—1, Anaheim, Grant 7 (Rowney, Deslauriers), 5:14. 2, Anaheim, Silfverberg 10 (Lindholm, Rakell), 9:47 (pp). Penalties— Toffoli, LA, (slashing), 8:01. Second Period—3, Los Angeles, MacDermid 2 (Lewis, Amadio), 6:01. 4, Anaheim, Rowney 5 (Del Zotto, Lindholm), 6:57. 5, Los Angeles, Prokhorkin 4 (Toffoli, Walker), 11:42. Penalties—Lindholm, ANA, (interference), 7:53; Gudbranson, ANA, (delay of game), 9:33. Third Period—6, Anaheim, Grant 8 (Getzlaf, Lindholm), 19:22. Penalties—None. Shots on Goal—Los Angeles 7-19-10—36. Anaheim 7-6-7—20. Power-play opportunities—Los Angeles 0 of 2; Anaheim 1 of 1. Goalies—Los Angeles, Campbell 4-5-1 (19 shots-16 saves). Anaheim, Miller 4-1-2 (36-34). A—15,434 (17,174). T—2:28. Referees—Marc Joannette, TJ Luxmore. Linesmen—David Brisebois, Brandon Gawryletz.

SOCCER English Premier League Tuesday Crystal Palace vs. Bournemouth , 1:30 p.m. Burnley vs. Man City , 2:15 p.m. Wednesday Leicester vs. Watford , 1:30 p.m. Wolverhampton vs. West Ham , 1:30 p.m. Man United vs. Tottenham , 1:30 p.m. Chelsea vs. Aston Villa , 1:30 p.m. Southampton vs. Norwich , 1:30 p.m. Liverpool vs. Everton , 2:15 p.m.

Area colleges schedule

Men’s basketball

BASKETBALL Tuesday, Dec. 3 W: Maryville at Missouri S&T, 5:30 p.m. W: Lindenwood at UMSL, 5:30 p.m. W: Southern Indiana at McKendree, 5:30 p.m. W: Columbia College at Missouri Baptist, 5:30 p.m. W: Harris-Stowe at William Woods, 5:30 p.m. W: Park at LU-Belleville, 5:30 p.m. W: Tennessee Martin at SIU Carbondale, 6 p.m. W: Southeast Missouri at St. Louis U., 7 p.m. W: STL Pharmacy at Stephens, 7 p.m. M: Lindenwood at UMSL, 7:30 p.m. M: Southern Indiana at McKendree, 7:30 p.m. M: Maryville at Missouri S&T, 7:30 p.m. M: Columbia College at Missouri Baptist, 7:30 p.m. M: Harris-Stowe at William Woods, 7:30 p.m. M: Park at LU-Belleville, 7:30 p.m.

MONDAY’S SCORES EAST Baruch at Worcester St., ppd. Bates 82, Johnson & Wales (RI) 74 Bloomsburg 96, Cheyney 50 Bryant 60, Navy 45 Cobleskill at Delhi, ppd. DeSales at Montclair St., ppd. Delaware 84, Columbia 76 Geneseo St. at SUNY-Canton, ppd. Gwynedd-Mercy 72, Goucher 51 Mansfield at Mercy, ppd. Mass.-Dartmouth 94, Bridgewater (Mass.) 84 Mount St. Mary (NY) at Hartwick, ppd. New England 95, Maine Maritime 79 Queens (NY) at East Stroudsburg, ppd. St. Lawrence 83, Oswego St. 82 Stony Brook 65, Manhattan 47 Virginia Union 71, Bluefield St. 67 Wilson at Centenary (NJ), ppd. SOUTH Ala.-Huntsville 80, Trevecca Nazarene 60 Benedict 87, LeMoyne-Owen 74 Claflin 60, Winston-Salem 53 Clark Atlanta 74, Lane 71 Columbus St. 86, West Georgia 81 Delta St. 87, Blue Mountain 83 Elon 70, Kennesaw St. 46 Emmanuel (Ga.) 88, Georgia College 77 Ga. Southwestern 89, Fort Valley St. 62 Hofstra 64, Canisius 57 Holy Cross 81, Mercer 67 Liberty 87, Trinity Baptist 28 Marymount 67, Catholic 44 Miles 70, Paine 62 Morehouse 98, Spring Hill 88 Nicholls 120, Campbellsville 69 North Florida 93, High Point 70 South Florida 65, Furman 55 St. Bonaventure 71, FAU 64 Tennessee Tech 86, Reinhardt 47 Tuskegee 68, Albany (Ga.) 53 UIC 89, San Diego 83 Virginia St. 113, Shaw 82 Wofford 77, NC Central 59 Young Harris 91, Pfeiffer 82 MIDWEST Black Hills St. 91, Dakota St. 53 Kansas St. 76, Florida A&M 58 Martin Luther at Concordia (Moor.), ppd. Miami 81, Illinois 79 Minn. Duluth 95, St. Cloud St. 74 Minnesota 78, Clemson 60 N. Iowa 110, Luther 51 SOUTHWEST NW Oklahoma St. 81, Randall 76 North Texas 77, Texas-Arlington 66 Northeastern St. 100, SW Christian 74 Stephen F. Austin 114, Arlington Baptist 49

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES — Acquired LHP Easton Lucas from Miami Marlins for INF Jonathan Villar. BOSTON RED SOX — Traded C Sandy León to Cleveland for RHP Adenys Bautista. Declined to tender 2020 contracts to INF Marco Hernandez and LHP Josh Osich. CHICAGO WHITE SOX — Agreed to terms with C James McCann on a one-year contract. Declined to tender 2020 contracts to RHP Ryan Burr, LHP Caleb Frare and INF Yolmer Sánchez. Released RHP Thyago Vieira. CLEVELAND INDIANS — Agreed to terms with C Sandy Leon and UTL Andrew Velazques on a one-year contract. Declined to tender 2020 contracts to RHP James Hoyt and C Kevin Plawecki. HOUSTON ASTROS — Agreed to terms with RHP Joe Biagini on a one-year contract. Declined to tender 2020 contract to RHP Aaron Sanchez. KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Agreed to terms with LHP Mike Montgomery on a one-year contract. Declined to tender 2020 contracts to SS Humberto Arteaga, 3B Cheslor Cuthbert, SS Erick Mejia and RHP Jesse Hahn. LOS ANGELES ANGELS — Declined to tender a 2020 contracts to C Kevan Smith. MINNESOTA TWINS — Agreed to terms with INF Ehire Adrianza and RHP Matt Wisler on one-year contracts. Declined to tender 2020 contracts to 1B C.J. Cron and RHP Trevor Hildenberger. OAKLAND ATHLETICS — Acquired C Austin Allen and a player to be named from San Diego for 2B Jurickson Profar. Agreed to terms with LHP T.J. McFarland on a one-year contract. Declined to tender 2020 contracts to LHP Ryan Buchter, RHP Blake Treinen and C Josh Phegley. SEATTLE MARINERS — Declined to tender 2020 contracts to INF Tim Beckham and OF Domingo Santana. TEXAS RANGERS — Announced RHP Nick Goody accepted his assignment to the club and was placed on the major league roster. Claimed RHP Jimmy Herget off waivers from Cincinnati. Designated LHP Jeffrey Springs for assignment. Declined to tender 2020 contracts to RHP Ian Gibaul and RHP WeiChieh Huang. TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Agreed to terms with RHP Anthony Bass on a one-year contract. Agreed to terms with 2B Andy Burns, OF Patrick Kivlehan and RHPs Phillippe Aumont, A.J. Cole and Justin Miller on minor league contracts. Declined to tender 2020 contracts to C Luke Maile, RHP Derek Law and RHP Jason Adam. National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS — Declined to tender 2020 contracts to OF Steven Souza Jr., RHP Taijuan Walker and C Caleb Joesph. ATLANTA BRAVES—Declined to tender 2020 contracts to INF/OF Charlie Culberson, C John Ryan Murphy and OF Rafael Ortega. CHICAGO CUBS — Agreed to terms with RHP Jharel Cotton on a one-year contract. Declined to tender 2020 contracts to INF Addison Russell and LHP Danny Hultzen. CINCINNATI REDS — Agreed to terms with OF Travis Jankowski on a one-year contract. Declined to tender 2020 contracts to RHP Kevin Gausman, IF/OF Jose Peraza and RHP Jimmy Herget. COLORADO ROCKIES — Declined to tender 2020 contract to RHP Wes Parsons. LOS ANGELES DODGERS — Agreed to terms with C Austin Barnes and LHP Scott Alexander on one-year contracts. Declined to tender 2020 contract to RHP Yimi Garcia. MIAMI MARLINS — Claimed 1B Jesus Aguilar off waivers from Tampa Bay. Designated RHP Tayron Guerrero and INF J.T. Riddle for assignment, then declined to tender 2020 contract to INF J.T. Riddle. MILWAUKEE BREWERS — Agreed to terms with OF Ben Gamel and SS Orlando Arcia on one-year contracts. Declined to tender 2020 contracts to LHP Alex Claudio, RHP Junior Guerra, RHP Jimmy Nelson, INF Tyler Saladino and 3b Travis Shaw. PITTSBURGH PIRATES — Declined to tender 2020 contract to C Elias Diaz. Agreed to terms with SS Erik Gonzalez on a one-year contract. PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES — Claimed RHP Trevor Kelley off waivers from Boston. Agreed to terms with C Andrew Knapp on a one-year contract. Declined to tender 2020 contracts to 2B Cesar Hernandez and 3B Maikel Franco. SAN DIEGO PADRES — Agreed to terms with 2B Jurickson Profar and INF Greg Garcia on one-year contracts. Declined to tender 2020 contracts to RHP Pedro Avila and RHP Miguel Diaz. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS — Agreed to terms with OF Alex Dickerson, LHP Wandy Peralta and IF Donovan Solano on one-year contracts. Declined to tender 2020 contracts to LHP Tyler Anderson, RHP Rico Garcia, OF Kevin Pillrd and OF Joey Rickard. WASHINGTON NATIONALS — Agreed to terms with INF Wilmer Difo and RHP Hunter Strickland on one-year contracts. Agreed to terms with LHP Roenis Elias, SS Trea Turner, RHP Joe Ross and OF Michael A. Taylor on one-year contracts. Declined to tender 2020 contracts to RHP Javy Guerra and RHP Koda Glover. Frontier League FLORENCE FREEDOM — Exercised the 2020 contract options on LHPs Scott Sebald, Mike Castellani, George Faue, Karl Craigie and Hayden Wheeler; RHPs Zak Spivy, Jamal Wilson, Jackson Owens, Sean Hughes and Ryan Mordecai; UTs Connor Crane, Kenny Meimerstorf and Trevor Craport; OFs Andre Mercurio, Isaac Benard, Brandon Pugh and Ricky Ramirez Jr.; INFs Caleb Lopes, Luis Pintor, Kevin Whatley and Taylor Bryant; Cs Jackson Pritchard, Ryan Rinsky and Michael Gulino. Declined the options on RHPs Chris Amend and Sean Watkins; and LHP Patrick McGrath. SOUTHERN ILLINOIS MINERS — Signed INF Yeltsin Gudino and INF Gianfranco Wawoe to contract extensions. WINDY CITY THUNDERBOLTS — Signed INF/ OF Michael Mateja to a contract extension. FOOTBALL National Football League ARIZONA CARDINALS — Released CB Tramaine Brock Sr. and RB Zach Zenner. ATLANTA FALCONS — Signed OL John Wetzel. Activated Matt Bosher from IR. Assigned OL Chris Lindstrom to the practice squad. DETROIT LIONS — Placed TE T.J. Hockenson on IR. GREEN BAY PACKERS — Released CB Tremon Smith. MIAMI DOLPHINS — Signed CB Eric Rowe to a contract extension through the 2022 season. MINNESOTA VIKINGS — Placed LB Ben Gedeon on IR. Signed WR Alexander Hollins from the practice squad. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS — Claimed DL Albert Huggins off waivers from Philadelphia. Released K Kai Forbath. OAKLAND RAIDERS — Activated LB Marquel Lee. Waived WR Trevor Davis. HOCKEY National Hockey League ANAHEIM DUCKS — Recalled G Anthony Stolarz from San Diego (AHL). DETROIT RED WINGS — Reassigned G Filip Larsson from Grand Rapids (AHL) to Toledo (ECHL). PITTSBURGH PENGUINS — Signed F Stefan Noesen to a two-way contract. American Hockey League AHL — Suspended Belleville D Jonathan Aspirot for two games for a cross-checking incident during a Nov. 29 game at Binghamton. GRAND RAPIDS GRIFFINS — Assigned F Troy Loggins to Toledo (ECHL). Recalled F Tyler Spezia from Toledo. SOCCER Major League Soccer ATLANTA UNITED — Acquired D Brooks Lennon from Real Salt Lake in exchange for $150,000 in General Allocation Money and $150,000 in Targeted Allocation Money. FC DALLAS — Traded F Dominique Badji to Nashville SC for $150,000 in 2020 General Allocation Money and $175,000 in 2020 Targeted Allocation Money. COLLEGE SOUTHEASTERN CONFERENCE — Fined Auburn $250,000 after fans stormed the football field celebrating a 48-45 win over Alabama on Nov. 30. BUCKNELL — Named Michelle Manning senior associate director of athletics for administration. NORTH TEXAS — Fired defensive coordinator Troy Reffett and offensive coordinator Bodie Reeder. OLD DOMINION — Announced the resignation of football coach Bobby Wilder. SOUTH CAROLINA — Announced senior QB Jake Bentley is leaving the program and will transfer. UNLV — Named Lauren Jordan assistant swimming coach. WASHINGTON — Announced the resignation of football coach Chris Petersen. Promoted defensive coordinator Jimmy Lake to head football coach.

Women’s basketball THE AP TOP TWENTY FIVE Record Pts Prv 1. Stanford (23) 8-0 740 3 2. Louisville (5) 8-0 708 8 3. Oregon 6-1 662 1 4. UConn (2) 6-0 657 4 5. Oregon St. 7-0 623 7 6. South Carolina 8-1 609 5 7. Baylor 7-1 597 2 8. Florida St. 7-0 517 12 9. Maryland 7-1 507 9 10. Mississippi St. 8-1 472 10 11. UCLA 7-0 430 11 12. Texas A&M 5-1 429 6 13. N.C. State 8-0 397 12 14. Indiana 6-1 368 17 15. Kentucky 7-0 367 14 16. DePaul 6-1 291 16 17. Tennessee 7-0 230 20 18. Gonzaga 6-1 218 22 19. Michigan St. 6-1 184 15 20. Arizona 7-0 182 24 21. Miami 5-2 144 19 22. Missouri St. 7-1 101 — 23. Arkansas 7-1 94 25 24. Michigan 6-1 42 — 25. LSU 7-1 41 — Others receiving votes: Syracuse 29, Florida Gulf Coast 28, South Dakota 27, West Virginia 24, Minnesota 10, North Carolina 5, Notre Dame 5, Northwestern 3, Rutgers 3, Purdue 2, Colorado 1, Creighton 1, Drake 1, TCU 1. HOW THE AP TOP 25 FARED Monday 20. Arizona (8-0) beat Monmouth 86-34. Next: at UTEP, Saturday.

Football FCS PLAYOFFS Second Round | Saturday, Dec. 7 Monmouth (NJ) (11-2) at J. Madison (11-1), noon N. Iowa (9-4) at South Dakota State (8-4), 1 p.m. Kennesaw St. (11-2) at Weber State (9-3), 2 p.m. Albany (NY) (9-4) at Montana State (9-3), 2 p.m. Southeastern La. (8-4) at Montana (9-3), 2 p.m. Illinois St. (9-4) at Central Arkansas (9-3), 2 p.m. Nicholls (9-4) at N. Dakota St. (12-0), 2:30 p.m. Austin Peay (10-3) at Sac. State (9-3), 8 p.m. DIVISION II PLAYOFFS Quarterfinals | Saturday, Dec. 7 Notre Dame (Ohio) (12-1) at Slippery Rock (12-0), noon West Florida (10-2) at Lenoir-Rhyne (13-0), noon Northwest Missouri State (12-1) at Ferris State (11-0), noon Texas A&M-Commerce (11-2) at Minn. State (12-0), noon DIVISION III PLAYOFFS Quarterfinals | Saturday, Dec. 7 Muhlenberg (12-0) at Salisbury (11-0), 11 a.m. North Central (Ill.) (11-1) at Delaware Valley (11-1), Noon Wisconsin-Whitewater (11-1) at Mary HardinBaylor (12-0), Noon Saint John’s (Minn.) (11-1) at Wheaton (Ill.) (12-0), Noon

AMERICA’S LINE NFL Points Underdog Open Current Thursday Cowboys .............. 3......... 3 ................ BEARS Sunday Ravens ................5.5 ....5.5 ..................BILLS PACKERS ............. 14 ..13.5 .............Redskins TEXANS ...............9.5 ....9.5 ..............Broncos SAINTS ................3.5 ....... 3 ................. 49ers BROWNS .............. 8......8.5 .............. Bengals FALCONS .............. 2......2.5 ............ Panthers VIKINGS .............. NL......NL .................. Lions JETS ....................6.5 ....5.5 .............Dolphins BUCS .................... 3......... 3 ...................Colts Chargers .............. 3......... 3 ............ JAGUARS PATRIOTS ............. 3......... 3 ................. Chiefs Steelers ..............1.5 ....2.5 ................ CARDS Titans ................... 3......... 3 .............RAIDERS Seahawks............ NL......NL ................. RAMS Monday EAGLES ...............8.5 ....8.5 .................Giants COLLEGE FOOTBALL Favorite Points Underdog Open Current Friday PAC 12 Championship Game | Santa Clara, CA Utah ....................6.5 ....6.5 ............... Oregon Saturday MAC Championship Game | Detroit, MI C Michigan ..........6.5 ....6.5 ........ Miami-Ohio Sun Belt Championship Game | Boone, NC APP’CHIAN ST ...... 6......... 6 ....... Ul-Lafayette Big 12 Championship Game | Arlington, TX Oklahoma ...........9.5 ....8.5 ................ Baylor Conf. USA Championship | Boca Raton, FL FLA ATLANTIC .....7.5 ....7.5 .................... Uab American Conf. Championship | Memphis, TN MEMPHIS ............ 10 ....9.5 ...........Cincinnati Mountain West Championship | Boise, ID BOISE ST ............. 15 ..13.5 ................ Hawaii SEC Championship Game | Atlanta, GA Lsu ......................6.5 ....... 7 .............. Georgia BIG 10 Championship | Indianapolis, IN Ohio St ...............16.5 .16.5 ...........Wisconsin ACC Championship Game | Charlotte, NC Clemson .............28.5 .28.5 .............. Virginia NBA Favorite Points Underdog Pistons ....................2.5 ............... CAVALIERS WIZARDS.................1.5 ....................... Magic Mavericks ...............3.5 ................. PELICANS RAPTORS ................ NL ......................... Heat Rockets .................... 4........................ SPURS NUGGETS ................. 2........................ Lakers CLIPPERS ................. 9....................... Blazers COLLEGE BASKETBALL Favorite Points Underdog INDIANA ST .............. 6................N Dakota St ST. JOHN’S..............20.5 ............... St. Peter’s LOUISVILLE .............6.5 .................. Michigan BALL ST.................... 2.......... Loyola-Chicago MIAMI-OHIO............1.5 .............No Kentucky MISSISSIPPI ............1.5 .......................Butler E MICHIGAN ............. 4..................Valparaiso GEORGE MASON ...... 9................ Jack’ville St GEORGIA ST ............. 7................. Dartmouth KENT ST .................13.5 .....................Detroit BOSTON COLLEGE ...1.5 ...........Northwestern SYRACUSE ................ 4........................... Iowa W MICHIGAN ........... PK ....................Oakland WILLIAM & MARY..... 3.............Old Dominion WRIGHT ST ..............1.5 .............. W Kentucky W CAROLINA ...........5.5 ............ Chattanooga Nebraska-Omaha..... 3............ ARKANSAS ST VANDERBILT ............ 2....................... Buffalo ARKANSAS .............. 17 ..............Austin Peay MISSOURI ST ............ 5................... Murray St DRAKE ...................10.5 ....... Wisconsin-Milw TCU ........................13.5 .................Illinois St TEXAS ..................... 13 .......................... Uab CREIGHTON ............. 12 ............ Oral Roberts MEMPHIS ................ 12 .................... Bradley NEW MEXICO ST ......4.5 ......................... Utep PITTSBURGH ............ 4...................... Rutgers INDIANA..................2.5 ................. Florida St MICHIGAN ST ........... 5...........................Duke Cal-Santa Barb......... 2....... CS-BAKERSFIELD Arizona St ...............1.5 .......SAN FRANCISCO NHL Favorite Odds Underdog BLUE JACKETS .-$120/even ............. Coyotes PANTHERS ..... -$145/+$125 .................Wild Vegas ............. -$150/+$130 ............ DEVILS FLYERS ........... -$110/-$110......Maple Leafs CANADIENS......-$120/even ........... Islanders BRUINS .......... -$150/+$130 ...... Hurricanes PREDATORS ... -$110/-$110..........Lightning Stars .............. -$110/-$110..................JETS CANUCKS ....... -$165/+$145 ..........Senators Capitals............-$120/even .............SHARKS

M 2 • TUESDAY • 12.03.2019

Seattle holds off Vikings, takes 1st TIM BOOTH

Associated Press

SEATTLE — Rashaad Penny scored one rushing touchdown and one receiving, Russell Wilson hit David Moore for a 60-yard scoring pass and the Seattle Seahawks built a big second-half lead before holding off the Minnesota Vikings for a 37-30 win Monday night. Seattle (10-2) moved into a tie with San Francisco atop of the NFC West but holds the tiebreaker. The Seahawks have the inside track to the division title with four games remaining. “Just couldn’t be more excited to have that kind of win and put us at 10 wins, that’s a nice spot for this time,” Seattle coach Pete Carroll said. “We kick it into the fourth quarter, and now it’s finish time.” Minnesota (8-4) fell a game behind Green Bay in the NFC North and is only one game ahead of the Los Angeles Rams in the wildcard race. It may have lost star running back Dalvin Cook to a shoulder injury when he fumbled midway through the third quarter in what became a major turning point. Wilson wasn’t great, but he came up with key plays as Seattle won its fifth straight. He had a forgettable firsthalf moment trying to bat down a deflected pass only to watch Anthony Harris intercept the ball and return it for a touchdown. Wilson was 21 of 31 for 240 yards. The key was the running of Penny and Chris Carson. Seattle rushed for 218 yards, the most allowed by Minnesota this season. Carson had 102, including a 1-yard touchdown. Penny added 74. The Vikings were giving up just 94 rushing yards per contest entering the game. “Our running game has been a staple of our offense. That’s our foundation, and both of those guys are amazing backs. They’re really coming on,” Seattle offensive lineman Duane Brown said. Minnesota quarterback Kirk Cousins was 22 of 38 for 276 yards but couldn’t connect with Irv Smith Jr. on fourth-and-3 at the Vikings’ 42 with 2:31 left. Jason Myers’ 36-yard field goal with 21 seconds left provided the final margin

JOHN FROSCHAUER, AP PHOTO

Seattle’s Rashaad Penny high-steps into the end zone for a touchdown against the Vikings on Monday in Seattle. SEAHAWKS 37, VIKINGS 30 Minnesota 7 10 0 13 — 30 Seattle 7 3 17 10 — 37 First Quarter Min—Cook 2 run (Bailey kick), 8:12. Sea—Carson 1 run (Myers kick), :11. Second Quarter Min—Harris 20 interception return (Bailey kick), 5:09. Sea—FG Myers 29, :58. Min—FG Bailey 47, :00. Third Quarter Sea—Penny 1 run (Myers kick), 9:02. Sea—FG Myers 29, 5:46. Sea—Moore 60 pass from R.Wilson (Myers kick), :05. Fourth Quarter Sea—Penny 13 pass from R.Wilson (Myers kick), 13:30. Min—Treadwell 58 pass from Cousins (Bailey kick), 12:49. Min—Rudolph 3 pass from Cousins (kick failed), 7:14. Sea—FG Myers 36, :21. A—69,080. Min Sea First downs 17 24 Total Net Yards 354 444 Rushes-yards 14-78 43-218 Passing 276 226 Punt Returns 0-0 1-9 Kickoff Returns 3-57 2-51 Interceptions Ret. 1-20 1-0 Comp-Att-Int 22-38-1 21-31-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 0-0 2-14 Punts 4-42.5 3-42.0 Fumbles-Lost 3-2 1-1 Penalties-Yards 3-30 1-30 Time of Possession 20:15 39:45 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Minnesota, Cook 9-29, S.Diggs 1-27, Mattison 4-22. Seattle, Carson 23-102, Penny 15-74, Homer 1-29, R.Wilson 4-13. PASSING—Minnesota, Cousins 22-38-1276. Seattle, R.Wilson 21-31-1-240. RECEIVING—Minnesota, Mattison 4-51, Rudolph 4-50, S.Diggs 4-25, Cook 3-35, Ham 2-42, Conklin 2-8, Treadwell 1-58, I.Smith 1-6, O.Johnson 1-1. Seattle, Metcalf 6-75, Hollister 6-44, Penny 4-33, Moore 2-65, Gordon 1-10, Carson 1-7, J.Brown 1-6. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

for Seattle. “I think we have a football team that can go on the road in a tough environment and get a win. I think this is an opportunity we missed. It’s disappointing,” Cousins said. It was a wild second half featuring 40 combined points and four key turnovers — three by Minnesota. Seattle pulled even at 17 on Penny’s 1-yard touchdown run. On Minnesota’s first play of the next possession, Cook was stripped by Rasheem Green, and Bradley McDougald recovered. It was the first of two critical turnovers that led to 10 points for Seattle. The Seahawks were held

to a field goal following Cook’s fumble but took a 27-17 lead on their next possession when Moore ran free through the Vikings secondary, and Wilson hit him in stride. Minnesota cornerback Xavier Rhodes appeared to think he had safety help over the top, but no one was there as Moore sprinted for his second touchdown catch of the season on the next-to-last play of the third quarter. The first play of the fourth quarter was forgettable for the Vikings as well. Cousins’ pass for Stefan Diggs was intercepted by Tre Flowers, who deflected the pass and made a juggling interception at the Minnesota 25. Three plays later, Wilson hit Penny on a screen pass, and Seattle had a 17-point lead. Minnesota’s rally started with Seattle’s own blown coverage as Cousins hit Laquon Treadwell for a 58-yard touchdown. Seattle seemed poised to add on, helped by a fake punt that Travis Homer took for 29 yards, but DK Metcalf fumbled, and the Vikings recovered at their 28 with 9:34 left. It took barely 2 minutes for Minnesota to pull within 34-30 as Cousins hit Kyle Rudolph for a 3-yard touchdown and another brilliant one-handed catch by the Vikings’ tight end. But that was as close as Minnesota would get.

Injuries Vikings left tackle Riley Reiff suffered a concussion early in the second half and was ruled out. Cook immediately went to the locker room after his fumble with a shoulder injury and did not return.

Favorite

NFL NOTEBOOK

Jaguars switch back to Minshew amid 4-game skid ASSOCIATED PRESS

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — The Mississippi Mustache is back in Jacksonville’s starting lineup. Rookie sensation Gardner Minshew will start Sunday as the reeling Jaguars host the Los Angeles Chargers. He replaces ineffective and highly paid quarterback Nick Foles following the team’s fourth consecutive lopsided loss. Coach Doug Marrone made the announcement Monday, one day after a 2811 home loss to Tampa Bay in which the Jaguars (4-8) managed 242 yards, turned the ball over four times and were flagged a season-high 16 times for 125 yards. It was Jacksonville’s 18th loss in its past 24 games. “We feel with Gardner’s mobility and elusiveness, it gives us a better chance of winning with the way we’re playing right now because we’re all not doing a good enough job,” Marrone said. Asked whether the job would be Minshew’s for the remainder of the season, Marrone said, “We’re planning on him playing.” It was the obvious move following Sunday’s debacle against Tampa Bay. Foles ended Jacksonville’s first three drives with turnovers that each turned into Buccaneers touchdowns. Marrone benched Foles at halftime, trailing 25-0. Marrone said Foles handled the demotion like a pro. “It’s brutal; it’s tough,” Marrone said. “He’s a

competitor. He worked his (butt) off to come back. He’s a great pro, so he’s going to do everything he can to help us win. And at the same time, he’s got to be ready in case there’s an injury. I think the world of him. I think he’s a really good quarterback. He obviously can win in this league. But we have to have some help around him.”

Mayfield OK after injuring hand Browns quarterback Baker Mayfield is not expected to miss any time after injuring his right hand in Sunday’s 20-13 loss to Pittsburgh. Mayfield played the second half with a glove helping protect and support his hand after it struck the facemask of Steelers linebacker Bud Dupree while throwing a deep incompletion just before halftime. Browns coach Freddie Kitchens said Monday that he was prepared to play backup Garrett Gilbert in the second half, but X-rays taken on Mayfield at halftime were negative. Kitchens said Mayfield “should be fine” and able to start this week when the Browns (5-7) host the Cincinnati Bengals (1-11).

line him for at least the team’s game Sunday against Miami. “I think it’s a legit weekto-week (injury),” coach Adam Gase said Monday. Adams still was expected to have an MRI exam to further evaluate the injury which happened early in the Jets’ 22-6 loss at Cincinnati. After the game, Adams fought back tears while discussing the loss and the injury, which had him in a walking boot. “A lot of mixed emotions right now,” Adams said Sunday. “I’m more upset at the fact that I feel like I let the team down.”

Lions place TE Hockenson on IR

The Detroit Lions have placed rookie tight end T.J. Hockenson on injured reserve with an ankle injury. Coach Matt Patricia announced the move Monday. The Lions took Hockenson in the first round of this year’s draft. He has caught 32 passes for 367 yards and two touchdowns. The loss of Hockenson is another blow to an offense that has been without quarterback Matthew Stafford and recently put backup quarterback Jeff Driskel on IR. Jets’ Adams suffers Hockenson caught six passes for 131 yards and ankle sprain a touchdown in Detroit’s New York Jets star safety season opener against ArJamal Adams has a sprained izona. That was his only left ankle that could side- 100-yard game.


DECEMBER.3.2019 • TUESDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • B7

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STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • TUESDAY • 12.03.2019

GIRLS BASKETBALL | SEASON PREVIEW

SHARING THE SPOTLIGHT

PLAYERS TO WATCH F • Anna Hall, senior,

Civic Memorial The 5-foot-11 Missouri Southern signee is one of the toughest post players in the area. One season removed from averaging 17.4 points and 9.4 rebounds per game for a 29win team that reached a Class 3A sectional final, she is at it again. In five games this season, Hall is averaging 18.8 points and seven rebounds. G/F • Sydney Harris, sophomore, Edwardsville Versatile 6-footer was among team leaders as a freshman, averaging 12.9 points and 4.7 rebounds per game as the Tigers reached a Class 4A sectional final. She also made 53 percent of her 3-pointers and 75 percent of her free throws. Harris is averaging 19.7 points and 4.3 rebounds in five games this season. G • Jordan Peete, senior, Ladue Peete has proven to have one of the more versatile games in the area as she can score both by slashing her way to the basket or taking an outside shot. After leading the Rams with a 15.6 points per game average as a junior, she already owns a scoring average of 21.7 points in three games. F • Vanessa Polk, sophomore, John Burroughs Quickly growing into one of the best post players in the area. The 6-foot-2 Polk averaged a double-double last season for the Bombers with 10.3 points and 12.9 rebounds per game. She also was among area leaders in blocked shots with an average of 2.96. G • Adrenna Snipes, sophomore, Alton Marquette The 5-foot-5 spark plug helped the Explorers win the Columbia Tipoff Classic on their way to a 5-0 start. She is averaging 22.8 points and five rebounds a game. As a freshman, she averaged 17.9 points and five rebounds to help Marquette to 21 victories and a Prairie State Conference title.

PAUL BAILLARGEON PHOTOS, SPECIAL TO STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

Vashon freshman Raychel Jones goes in for a layup during a practice last week. The Wolverines are seeking their first winning season since the 2005-06 season.

PRESEASON RANKINGS

Vashon seeks first winning season in more than a decade BY JIM FAASEN

STLhighschoolsports.com

John Albert III said he knows as the Vashon girls basketball team continues to grow it still sits under a long shadow cast at the school. The third-year Vashon girls coach is proud of the program’s effort to become respectable in its own right and not merely an afterthought. That is a unique challenge at a school like Vashon, a longtime boys basketball juggernaut which has won three state championships the last four seasons and 11 overall. “It’s related. I tell my kids the truth because I try to be open and honest,” said Albert, who formerly was an assistant with Vashon’s boys team. “I tell them that a lot of times you play teams that want to beat us because they can’t beat our boys. Whether we want to admit it or not, it actually goes hand in hand.” Vashon posted a 10-10 record a year ago, which was a big step forward for a team that hasn’t had a winning season since going 11-8 in 2005-06. The Wolverines only had 15 victories between 2010-18. Nestled in that stretch of futility was Vashon’s 30-28 loss to Normandy on Feb. 8, 2018. That snapped Normandy’s 109-game losing streak. “I really think this team is moving in the right direction,” said senior guard Jaliya Smith, who transferred to Vashon from Pattonville. “This year, everybody is really committed and is working so hard. I am so happy to be a part of this because this team and this program are helping me to grow as both a player and a leader.” Albert said he likes what he sees from leaders like Smith and other upperclassmen. But Vashon’s building blocks also include

Vashon girls basketball coach John Albert III leads a practice last week. a five-player freshman class. Vashon beat Metro 47-41 in its season opener Nov. 25 and a trio of freshmen — Raychel Jones (16 points), Karina Barnett (nine points) and Rayvin Jones (seven points) — led the way offensively. “Our freshmen are good, that’s a fact,” Albert said. “Raychel has put in a lot of work this summer in the gym and she has the chance to be really special. These girls have all spent a lot of time working on their games.” Smith added 12 points in the landmark victory for the Wolverines. Vashon’s last victory against Metro, a Public High League power, came by a 41-31 score on Dec. 14, 2001. Metro has averaged nearly 20 in its last five seasons. “Coach told us we hadn’t beaten them in a long time,” Raychel Jones said. “It feels special to start so well. We keep competing with each other in practice on the court. We’re going to keep working hard because we want to compete for a district championship and a chance (to play in the postseason).” Vashon’s hopes of taking another step forward are reflected in a schedule that includes an appearance at the Norm Stewart Classic at

LARGE SCHOOLS Rank, team 1. Parkway Central 2. Edwardsville 3. Hazelwood Central 4. O’Fallon 5. Eureka 6. Collinsville 7. Kirkwood 8. Fort Zumwalt North 9. Oakville 10. Parkway North

Record 1-0 5-0 2-2 4-0 0-0 4-0 1-1 0-0 2-0 1-0

SMALL SCHOOLS Rank, team 1. Incarnate Word 2. Civic Memorial 3. Whitfield 4. Cardinal Ritter 5. Lutheran St. Charles 6. Highland 7. Alton Marquette 8. Father McGivney 9. Festus 10. Vashon

Record 0-0 5-0 1-1 1-1 0-0 3-1 5-0 4-0 0-0 1-0

Mizzou Arena. The Wolverines face Battle at 8 a.m. Sunday. At 4 p.m. Dec. 14, Vashon faces Chicago Butler at Whitney Young in one of several Girl PowHer Classic events contested in different cities. Vashon also faces tough nonconference tests closer to home, including: 7:30 p.m. Dec. 9 at Whitfield; at 6 p.m. Feb 6 at Lutheran North; and 6 p.m. Feb. 11 at East St. Louis. “They all knew by our schedule that it was going to be tough,” Albert said. “We just talk about competing and being competitive every day, even in practice. If we go hard against each other every day, playing opponents will be much easier.”

NOTEBOOK

Breden finds new ways to score; Mathews continues offensive tear BY JIM FAASEN

STLhighschoolsports.com

As a junior, Clare Breden has had to change the way she goes about things. And so far, it’s paying dividends. After averaging 17.7 points last season as a guard for Jerseyville, Breden’s perimeter shooting percentage has dropped by more than 10 percent for the Panthers (3-1). But she’s still finding ways to score. The junior’s average has gone up to 18.3 points per game four contests into the season. “This feels great actually with all the pressure and stuff like that,” Breden said. “It’s tough not making as many threes, but I just have to forget about it and keep playing the game. You just can’t let that affect you.” Breden, who eclipsed the 1,000-point plateau last season, has found a few sweet spots from inside the arc and at the free throw line. She’s made 24 of 27 from the charity stripe for an 88.9 free-throw percentage. No one inside the Jerseyville program is surprised Breden has adapted her game so quickly. “I think she’s had to

PAUL KOPSKY, STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

After averaging 17.7 points last season for Jerseyville, junior Clare Breden is still finding ways to score while adapting her shooting game to best suit the Panthers. work to get her points,” Jerseyville coach Kevin Strebel said. “In some cases, she’s been defended really well. At this point with her longrange shot, it’s not like she’s been shooting quite as well as she has previously, and she knows that. That’s why she’s really had to work to get her points.” Breden is one of 10 returning players for Jerseyville, which finished 22-9 following a 56-53 loss to Sacred Heart-Griffin in a regional final a season ago. Breden will be a key figure in helping the Panthers make another run at a re-

gional crown. “I’m real happy because we have 10 players that have experience,” Strebel said. “The girls are working hard every day. The experience means something because whenever we try to run anything, they’ve got a good mind for it. They’re playing hard, they’re thinking well and they’re getting results because of that.” Her numbers have been nice over the years, but Breden is only concerned about one thing — wins. How Jerseyville gets them is of little importance. “We want to win more

tournaments, get a better It only took one game for record and have a really Matthews to eclipse her good time,” Breden said. previous career-high of 41, which she scored against MATHEWS Cahokia last season. West coach Kelly Russell said she CONTINUES expects plenty more from OFFENSIVE TEAR her senior guard. Despite missing more “Mykel is one of the than a month last season, hardest working individuMykel Mathews held the als I’ve ever had the privitop scoring average in the lege of working with,” RusSt. Louis metro area. sell said. “She puts countThe then junior for Ha- less hours in at the gym zelwood West averaged on her own time. She just 24.8 points per game. shows how much that level Mathews, who scored of dedication can pay off.” 25 points or more in nine games last season, is TOWERS TAKES OVER showing off her impressive AT FZ WEST offensive prowess once again, averaging a robust After 10 years patrolling 36.5 points per game after the sideline for the boys, a pair of season-opening Chad Towers has taken the victories. reigns of the Fort Zumwalt The 5-foot-6 Mathews West girls basketball team. Towers went 118-146 in a poured in a career-high 42 points in a win over Nor- decade at the helm with the mandy Nov. 25 and fol- boys. Former girls coach Manlowed it up with a 31-point performance in a win over dee Weiskopf left become an assistant principal at McCluer the next night. Mathews’ road map to the O’Fallon, Mo.-based success has been simple. school, while Jeremy Rapp, “I really just love the who also coached the girls game and live by ‘GBE’ — squad, will lead the boys ‘Get better every day,’” this season. Mathews said. “My main “Change is always good goal is to help my team be because there is always successful. Without my something you can learn teammates, I wouldn’t be from it,” senior post player where I am.” Brooklyn Palmer said. “The

chance to do things different ways is good. I loved our last coach, but I think both are amazing in their own ways.” West (1-0) started the Towers era off with a bang, overcoming a 13-point deficit in the fourth quarter to beat rival Fort Zumwalt South on Nov. 26 at Lindenwood University. “It’s been wonderful. I came over for two reasons. One, my daughters are in the program, but I also know all the girls that are in the program,” Towers said. “They are unbelievable young women and it has been really refreshing. My coaching staff that’s with me, we’ve enjoyed it from day one.” The Jaguars have two missions as they set a course to win a district title for the second time in three seasons — adjust to a new style of play and improve upon their 11-16 mark from last season. “I think it’s a little of both,” Towers said. “I haven’t had this much height in a while, so we’re going to work with what we have. We’re learning how to include that. We’re trying to coach to the girls but then also have them play our style.”


STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

12.03.2019 • TUESDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • B9

MONDAY’S RESULTS BOYS BASKETBALL Affton 7 10 9 9 35 Hancock 28 21 20 7 76 A: Hercules 19, C. Recht 7, Wilson 4, LaRose 3, T. Johnston 2. FG 14 (6), FT 1-2. H: Richardson 31, Williams 22, Livingston 10, Hunter 4, Jackson 4, Armstrong 2, Pound 2, Anderson 1. FG 33 (3), FT 7-9. Lift For Life 19 24 8 14 65 St.Chas. West 8 17 17 8 50 L (5-0): R. Singleton 12, Jackson 11, Gray 9, Sanford 9, Wiley 8, McDaniels 5, Johnson 3, Robinson 3, Turner 3, Bond 2. FG 27 (5), FT 6-14. S: Wilson 25, Newell 10, Wampler-Foust 7, Smith 5, Lemons 3. FG 19 (4), FT 8-15. Haz. West 2 22 15 7 46 Howell 18 20 20 19 77 Ho: Schark 33, Engelhard 10, Thompson 9, Williams 9, Fortner 7, Lohmar 4, Maddox 4, Boehm 1. FG 29 (10), FT 9-15. Vianney 12 18 12 18 60 Haz. Central 19 13 19 19 70 V: Schueler 27, Braun 9, Lattimore 9, Ducey 7, Wilson 6, Sausele 2. FG 19 (6), FT 16-21. H: Nicholson 19, Jones 12, Scarbrough 10, Farrell 8, Garrett Jr 7, Dunn 6, Roberts 4, Gowins 2, Graham 2. FG 27 (4), FT 12-20. Windsor 10 7 10 24 51 Oakville 14 9 6 11 40 W: P. Hartmann 12, Alford 11, Siegel 9, Amabile 8, Martin 6, Tanner 5. FG 17 (7), FT 10-15. O: Whitman 14, Elza 6, Beardsley 5, Hastings 5, Leeker 4, Kiser 2, Otto 2, Ware 2. FG 15 (5), FT 5-9. MS-Berkeley 8 8 0 7 23 Maplewood-RH 19 18 17 4 58 MS: Moody 8, Jenkins 6, Maxedon 5, Beal 2, Silas 2. FG 9 (0), FT 5-7. Ma: Stewart 32, Grawer 10, Posley 7, Miller 5, Hern 2, Works 2. FG 23 (3), FT 9-15. Hickman 13 14 11 22 60 Troy 21 19 19 28 87 T: St. Pierre 23, Ryan 14, Thomas 13, C. Nett 12, Ludwig 8, Rasco 7, B. Nett 6, Bruns 4. FG 36 (5), FT 10-15.

Lovejoy 10 11 14 4 39 Chester 21 4 9 17 51 L (3-2): Kent 14, Gaither 12, Batee 4, Hayden 3, Holliday 2, Loston 2, Wiley-Jackson 2. FG 19 (0), FT 1-5. C: Reith 15, Martin 14, Korando 8, Landeros 6, J. Hughes 4, Andrews 3, Jany 1. FG 17 (1), FT 16-26. Red Bud 10 3 18 7 38 Massac County 18 21 24 2 65 R: Wiegard 13, Birkner 5, Kueker 5, Malott 4, Simpson 4, Diewald 3, Amman 2, Cowell 2. FG 14 (5), FT 5-9. Staunton 17 16 22 16 71 Lebanon 10 2 16 11 39 S: E. Booth 23, Kinder 15, Devries 9, Ray 8, A. Booth 4, Futrell 4, Goss 4, McCalla 4. FG 31 (2), FT 7-14. L (0-5): Schulte 18, Gross 6, Burger 4, Cunningham 4, Fairlie 3, McGee 2, Washington 2. FG 15 (4), FT 5-6. Wesclin 10 9 14 11 44 Waterloo 11 6 8 17 42 Wa: Lenhardt 15, Balabas 9, Hergenroeder 6, Schrader 6, Wade 6. FG 19 (4), FT 0-2. St. Mary’s 11 11 38 16 76 U. City 12 30 19 21 82 U: Abbey 24, Hampton 20, Robinson 15, Ming 13, Jackson 10. FG 31 (1), FT 19-32. Bayless 6 8 11 8 33 Mehlville 29 25 26 12 92 B: Gunter 16, Shaver 6, Grant 5, Muratovic 5, Moore 1. FG 11 (5), FT 6-8. M: D. Branson 25, Brown 20, Waller 18, Bradford 11, Daughtery 11, Sights 4, C. Branson 3. FG 42 (5), FT 3-8. Saxony Luther 8 14 13 22 57 Crystal City 18 17 12 8 55 C: Denby 13, Short 12, Richardson 10, Anderson 8, Bassin 7, Eisenbeis 5. FG 21 (6), FT 7-22. Gtwy Snce Ac. 4 6 13 8 31 Orchard Farm 17 23 22 8 70 G: A. Jackson 12, Davis 9, Drago 4, Ferris 4, Clark 2. FG 12 (4), FT 3-9. O: Wolfe 20, Schroeder 9, Spaeth 7, Botts 6, Calmese 6, Reeves 6, Wolf 5, Bledsoe 3, Frederick 3, Heitmann 3, Westerfield 2. FG

30 (4), FT 6-14. Metro 7 8 10 7 32 MICDS 20 24 18 5 67 Me: Isom 17, Foluke 5, Ndacaisaba 4, Blank 2, Hodzic 2, McDaniel 2. FG 12 (5), FT 3-6. MI: Roper 17, Mitchell-Day 13, Hendricks 10, Pronger 9, Hall 6, Pace 4, Wienstroer 3, Brooks 2, Jones 2, Andrew 1. FG 28 (4), FT 7-8. North Tech 4 14 16 15 49 Murphysboro 19 12 9 15 55 N: Jackson 18, Fraction 14, Francis 8, Thomas 3, Buchanan 2, Crawford 2, Seay 2. FG 17 (7), FT 8-11. M: Clemons 15, Clark 8, Abell 6, Jackson 6, McZeke 6, Davis 5, Myers 5, Frazier 2, Hale 2. FG 23 (4), FT 5-10. Columbia 9 15 14 15 53 Mascoutah 10 6 7 21 44 C: Holmes 26, O’Connor 12, S. Horner 9, James 5, N. Horner 1. FG 23 (2), FT 5-8. M: Bibb 13, J. Seibert 9, King 8, Bryant 5, Rudolphi 5, LaJoye 2, Manuel 2. FG 19 (5), FT 1-2. Sparta 15 6 13 14 48 Steeleville 11 12 15 9 47 Sp: Harris 12, Williams 10, Keen 9, Parks 6, Ethington 5, Cometto 3, Merideth 3. FG 16 (6), FT 10-15. St: Hagel 14, Gerlach 9, Gross 6, Wilson 6, Newby 4, Lazenby 3, Mevert 3, Wasson 2. FG 18 (4), FT 7-10. Clayton 10 10 11 11 49 Lindbergh 13 8 15 6 47 C: Walker 15, Akannam 11, Weston 10, Chesnutt-Perry 7, Tripathy 4, Hill 2. FG 23 (1), FT 2-8. L: Abeln 19, Bonzchowski 6, Knuckles 6, Kopp 6, Ludwig 5, Kearney 3, Scott 2. FG 20 (1), FT 6-14. OTHER AREA SCORES Cape Girardeau Central 66, Fox 35 St. Vincent 75, Grandview 45 Westminster 48, St. Dominic 45 Duchesne 42, North County 32 St. James 70, Potosi 35 Jackson 72, Carnahan 58 Wright City 77, Blue Knights 73

McCluer North 49, Hannibal 35 Waynesville 67, Steelville, Mo. 56 Du Quoin 68, Carmi-White County 60 FHCentral 55, Riverview Gardens 45 Rock Bridge 72, Holt 56 GIRLS BASKETBALL Bayless 3 5 1 0 9 Oakville 25 23 11 7 66 O: Dickneite 17, Minor 16, Elguezabal 12, FitzWilliam 8, Halamicek 5, Gicante 4, Kohm 4. FG 29 (0), FT 8-14. First Baptist 7 7 7 7 28 Gibault 12 12 15 5 44 G (5-2): Wightman 18, Davis 14, Bernal 5, Grither 2, Hooten 2, Ramey 2, Steibel 1. FG 19 (0), FT 6-14. Nerinx Hall 13 14 11 14 52 Marquette 7 7 15 17 46 N: Heckel 17, Duff 13, Klutho 10, Solverud 8, Carosello 4. FG 13 (3), FT 23-31. M: Watkins 12, Dorhauer 7, E. Morrow 7, Fitzgerald 5, Williams 5, Bievins 4, M. Morrow 4, Baumgartner 2. FG 15 (1), FT 15-32. Hancock 7 10 10 14 41 Fox 12 12 18 14 56 H: Hoffmann-Collins 19, Dought 10, D. Haynes-McGinnist 4, Stewart 4, Fujarte 2, Moultrie 2. FG 18 (4), FT 1-7. F: A. Chapman 20, Reisner 12, Dervisevic 9, O. Chapman 6, M. Chapman 5, Krieger 2, Wheeler 2. FG 22 (6), FT 6-9. Washington 1 6 12 10 29 Liberty 12 12 4 14 42 L: Patterson 10, Orf 7, VanPamel 7, Giljum 6, Kruse 5, Gordley 4, Watson 3. FG 14 (2), FT 12-21. Timberland 7 5 2 0 14 Lutheran SC 13 14 16 8 51 L: M. Lindesmith 17, Grzeskowiak 10, Aulbert 8, Coleman 4, J. Lindesmith 4, Preusser 3, Vangilder 3, Johnson 2. FG 17 (6), FT 11-14. A. Marquette 9 5 12 5 31 Mater Dei 12 13 17 11 53 A (5-1): Snipes 10, Fandrey 6, A. Williams 6, Kirchner 4, Porter 3, Meyer 2. FG 13 (3), FT 2-3. M: Lampe 18, Strieker 13, C. Toennies 10,

FOOTBALL UPDATE

Myers 1. FG 21 (4), FT 13-23. Cahokia 15 15 12 15 57 Mt Vernon 27 17 17 12 73 C: Tucker 18, Wells 13, Brownlee 6, Snider 6, Lacy 5, J. Brown 4, J. Jennings 3, Woolens 2. FG 24 (6), FT 3-9. Windsor 6 9 6 9 30 Lindbergh 22 16 4 12 54 L: Bommarito 16, Headrick 13, Wymer 8, Strubhart 6, Jones 4, Glaser 3, Forbes 2, Neaf 2. FG 21 (6), FT 6-10. OTHER AREA SCORES Hannibal 42, Trinity 30 North County 66, Villa Duchesne 17 St. Clair 67, Owensville 44 University City 61, De Soto 40 Piasa Southwestern 56, Wood River 37 Wesclin 48, Carlyle 40 Roxana 39, Metro-East Lutheran 29 St. Pius X 34, Oak Ridge 25 Gillespie 80, Alton 68 Breese Central 46, Salem, Ill. 30 Hermann 67, Wellsville 10 Okawville 46, Christ Our Rock 37 Marion 48, Althoff 16 Sullivan 53, Fort Zumwalt West 28 Mehlville 54, Affton 47 Seckman 63, Hillsboro 16 Triad 45, Mascoutah 22 New Haven 48, Bowling Green 36 Fulton 57, Clopton 49 Elsberry 48, North Tech 26 Lindbergh 54, Windsor 30 Farmington 46, Northwest Cedar Hill 24 Greenville 56, Nokomis 28 Union 81, St. Louis Patriots 20 Clayton 40, McCluer South-Berkeley 8 Lift for Life 64, Winfield 12 Hermann 67, Wellsville 10 New Haven 48, Bowling Green 36 Montgomery County 66, Siles 15 Fulton 59, Clopton 47

Gebke 4, Innes 2, Kramer 2, Schildroth 2, Wieter 2. FG 20 (2), FT 11-12. Mehlville 12 14 14 14 54 Affton 12 8 10 17 47 M: Moore 17, Canady 11, Silies 8, Rapp 6, Tremusini 6, Angeles 3, O’Shea 3. FG 17 (4), FT 16-33. A: M. Blackmon 4. FG 1 (0), FT 2-6. St.Chas. West 4 14 5 9 32 MICDS 4 11 22 21 58 S: Nicastro 14, Block 6, Jackson 5, Weinrich 3, Coffey 2, Hudson 2. FG 9 (3), FT 11-12. M: Brooks 20, Harrell 16, Fall 9, Nwamu 7, Gira 6. FG 23 (4), FT 8-12. Columbia 5 7 10 8 30 Freeburg 15 13 16 12 56 C (2-3): Holten 13, Jany 8, Becker 4, Barthel 2, Wagner 2, Litteken 1. FG 12 (0), FT 6-12. F: Schwemmer 14, Gebke 10, Eichenlaub 7, Borja 5, Peterson 5, A. Holcomb 4, Kimes 4, Kisgen 4, Mueller 3. FG 21 (7), FT 7-14. Civic Mem. 14 22 21 6 63 Collinsville 16 8 11 7 42 Ci (6-0): Hall 24, Buhs 12, Tyus 9, Standefer 6, Zupan 6, C. Christeson 4, Niemeier 2. FG 25 (4), FT 9-9. Co (4-1): Knutson 14, Mitchell 10, Liljegren 8, Bush 4, Doyle 3, Gary 3. FG 15 (1), FT 11-18. Carrollton 8 6 12 12 38 Carlinville 8 7 6 10 31 Cr: Meuth 17, Uhles 12, McAdams 5, Bennett 2, Hinderhan 2. FG 13 (2), FT 10-19. Cl (4-1): DeNeve 7, Seal 7, Stewart 5, G. Reels 4, Stayton 4, Baker 2, Wills 2. FG 12 (1), FT 6-11. New Athens 18 12 7 12 49 Dupo 4 7 11 18 40 N: White 17, Stewart 14, Drake 8, Poirot 6, Hager 2, Sullivan 2. FG 19 (3), FT 8-19. D (1-4): Esmon 16, Heidelberg 8, Curtis 7, Gill 5, Francis 3, Armstrong 1. FG 16 (4), FT 4-12. Waterloo 6 11 7 8 32 Jerseyville 15 12 13 19 59 W: Hubbard 9, Dawson 6, N. Gum 5, N. Gum 4, Lindhorst 4, Baum 2, Bockhorn 2. FG 12 (3), FT 5-9. J (4-1): Manns 17, Breden 16, White 8, Brown 6, Jones 4, Talley 4, Metzler 2, Hudson 1,

HOCKEY Duchesne 9, Webster Groves 0 D: Kevin Burke 3, Austin Meers 2, Jack Johnsen, Derek Cagle, Thomas Dulle, Chase Unnerstall; shutout by Jack Boschert

TUESDAY’S SCHEDULE

MISSOURI

ILLINOIS

BOYS BASKETBALL

CLASS 6 Championship At Faurot Field, Columbia De Smet 35, Joplin 20 CLASS 5 Semifinals Jackson 20, Staley 7 Carthage 20, Fort Zumwalt North 17 Championship, Saturday At Faurot Field, Columbia Carthage (11-2) vs. Jackson (13-0), 7 p.m. CLASS 4 Semifinals Platte County 15, St. Mary’s 14 Webb City 35, Ladue 0 Championship, Friday At Faurot Field, Columbia Webb City (13-1) vs. Platte County (11-3), 7 p.m. CLASS 3 Semifinals Odessa 31, Kennett 14 Cassville 13, Trinity 0 Championship, Saturday At Faurot Field, Columbia Cassville (12-2) vs. Odessa (14-0), 11 a.m. CLASS 2 Semifinals Lutheran North 38, Lathrop 24 Ava 20, Clark County 14 (OT) Championship, Friday At Faurot Field, Columbia Ava (14-0) vs. Lutheran North (13-0), 3 p.m. CLASS 1 Semifinals Valle Catholic 37, Mid-Buchanan 14 Lincoln 46, Marceline 20 Championship, Saturday At Faurot Field, Columbia Lincoln (14-0) vs. Valle Catholic (13-1), 3 p.m.

CLASS 8A Championship At Huskie Stadium, DeKalb Lincoln-Way East 12, Gurnee Warren 0 CLASS 7A Championship At Huskie Stadium, DeKalb Chicago Mount Carmel 37, Nazareth Academy 13 CLASS 6A Championship At Huskie Stadium, DeKalb East St. Louis 43, Crystal Lake Prairie Ridge 21 CLASS 5A Championship At Huskie Stadium, DeKalb Rochester 42, Chicago St. Rita 28 CLASS 4A Championship At Huskie Stadium, DeKalb Richmond-Burton 50, Murphysboro 14 CLASS 3A Championship At Huskie Stadium, DeKalb Williamsville 46, Byron 42 CLASS 2A Championship At Huskie Stadium, DeKalb Newman Central Catholic 35, Nashville 14 CLASS 1A Championship At Huskie Stadium, DeKalb Lena-Winslow 58, Central A&M 20 8-MAN Championship Polo 50, Milford Cissna Park 26

GERALD LINNEMAN MEMORIAL TIPOFF CLASSIC Parkway Central (1-0) at Parkway North (0-1), 7 p.m. Parkway West (0-1) at Parkway South (1-0), 7 p.m. KASKASKIAN CLASSIC At Carlyle Pool A Pinckneyville vs. Flora, 6 p.m. Pool B Woodlawn (1-0) vs. Hillsboro, Ill. (0-2), 7:30 p.m. 45TH VALLEY PARK INVITATIONAL First round Crossroads (0-1) vs. St. Pius X (0-1), 5 p.m. Principia vs Valley Park, 6:30 p.m. 53RD VIANNEY INVITATIONAL First round Whitfield (0-1) vs. Trinity, 4:30 p.m. Pattonville vs. Hazelwood East, 6 p.m. SULLIVAN CHAMPIONSHIP First round Salem vs. Farmington, 5:30 p.m. St. Clair (1-0) at Sullivan, 7 p.m. DUKE HERBERT TOURNAMENT At Crystal City St. Louis Patriots (1-0) vs. Jefferson, 5 p.m. Herculaneum vs. Scott City, 6:30 p.m. MONTGOMERY COUNTY INVITATIONAL First round Silex vs Fulton at 6 p.m. Clopton vs. Bowling Green, 7:30 p.m. Wellsville vs. Hermann (0-1), 6 p.m. New Haven (1-0) at Montgomery County (1-0), 7:30 p.m.

WINFIELD TIPOFF First round Elsberry (0-2) vs. O’Fallon Christian, 5 p.m. Luth. St. Charles at Winfield (1-1), 3:30 p.m. Blue Knights (0-1) vs. Timberland (0-1), 6:30 p.m. Warrenton (2-0) vs. Fort Zumwalt East, 8 p.m. NON-TOURNAMENT GAMES Alton Marquette (3-1) at Highland (1-3), 6 p.m. Mount Olive (2-2) at Litchfield (1-3), 6 p.m. Cape Notre Dame vs. Carnahan (1-2), at Gateway STEM, 6 p.m. Carrollton at Piasa Southwestern (1-3), 6 p.m. Gateway Legacy (2-0) at Sumner (0-1), 6:15 p.m. McCluer (2-0) at St. Louis U. High, 6:30 p.m. Roxana (3-1) at Wood River (2-2), 7 p.m. Pacific (1-2) at Festus, 7 p.m. Union (0-3) at Washington (3-0), 7 p.m. Father McGivney (1-3) at New Athens (1-2), 7:30 p.m. Granite City (4-0) at O’Fallon (3-0), 7:30 p.m. Jerseyville (2-2) vs. Jacksonville (1-2), at Jacksonville, 7:30 p.m. Centralia (Mo.) at North Callaway, 7:30 p.m. Newton at Salem (1-1), 7:30 p.m. Belleville East (3-1) at Cahokia (0-4), 7:45 p.m.

SOUTHSIDE CLASSIC At Affton Consolation semifinals: 3:30 & 5 p.m. Championship semifinals: 6:30 & 8 p.m. MARQUETTE INVITATIONAL Pool A Nerinx Hall vs. Lafayette (0-1), 6:30 p.m. Pool B Francis Howell (0-1) vs. Sullivan (0-1), 5 p.m. LUTHERAN ST. CHARLES TOURNAMENT First round Notre Dame vs. Lutheran North, 5:30 p.m. Visitation (1-1) vs. FH Central, 7 p.m. PRINCIPIA TOURNAMENT First round KIPP St. Louis (1-0) vs. Summit (1-0), 6 p.m. Orchard Farm vs. Jennings (0-1), 7:30 p.m. St. Louis Patriots (0-1) at Principia (2-0), 6 p.m. Soldan vs. Valley Park (0-1), 7:30 p.m. 32ND TROY INVITATIONAL Pool play St. Dominic (0-1) at Troy (1-0), 7 p.m. First round Fort Zumwalt South (0-1) vs. Eureka, 4 p.m. St. Charles (0-1) vs. Westminster, 5:30 p.m. VALLEY CALEDONIA TOURNAMENT Jefferson (1-0) vs. West County, 5:30 p.m. NON-TOURNAMENT GAMES Wright City at Maplewood-RH (0-1), noon Incarnate Word at Cor Jesu (1-1), 5:30 p.m. Riverview Gardens (0-1) at John Burroughs, 5:30 p.m. Union at Washington (0-1), 5:30 p.m. Dupo (1-3) at Father McGivney (4-0), 6 p.m. Alton Marquette (5-0) at Hardin Calhoun (0-3), 6 p.m. McKinley (0-2) at Vashon (1-0), 6 p.m. Alton (1-4) at Belleville East (0-4), 6 p.m.

GIRLS BASKETBALL GERALD LINNEMAN MEMORIAL TIPOFF CLASSIC Parkway Central (1-0) at Parkway North (1-0), 5:30 p.m. Parkway West (0-1) at Parkway South (0-1), 5:30 p.m.

ST. LOUIS FIVE-DAY FORECAST TONIGHT

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

Sunny and milder

Clear

Plenty of sunshine WIND W 7-14 mph

Times of clouds and sun WIND S 4-8 mph

Partly sunny and cooler WIND N 7-14 mph

Sunshine

HOCKEY Highland (1-6) vs. Triad (2-5), at E. Alton Rink, 7:15 p.m. Belleville Twsp. (6-1) vs. Collinsville (4-3-1), at McKendree Rec, 7:30 p.m. Duchesne (4-1) vs. Fort Zumwalt West (1-3), at Wentzville, 8:30 p.m. O’Fallon (2-6) vs. Alton (2-4-1), at E. Alton Rink, 8:45 p.m. Wood River (0-8) vs. Columbia (6-1), at McKendree Rec, 9 p.m. BOYS WRESTLING MASCOUTAH QUAD At Mascoutah, 5:30 p.m. Teams: Cahokia, Mascoutah, Mount Vernon, Illinois, O’Fallon DUALS SLUH at Hazelwood West, 5 p.m. Clayton at Brentwood, 5 p.m. GIRLS SWIMMING Kirkwood vs. Webster Groves at Webster University, 4 p.m. Cor Jesu vs. Oakville at Mehlville, 4:30 p.m.

NATIONAL OUTLOOK

.com

TODAY

Waterloo (1-2) at Red Bud (3-2), 6 p.m. Marion (0-5) at Mounds Meridian, 6 p.m. Litchfield (5-1) at Williamsville (2-4), 6 p.m. Centralia (Mo.) at North Callaway, 6 p.m. Gibault (4-2) at Chester (5-0), 6:15 p.m. Centralia (Ill.) (1-3) at Carbondale (0-3), 6:15 p.m. Fort Zumwalt North at FH North, 6:30 p.m. Roosevelt (0-2) at Normandy (0-1), 6:30 p.m. Gateway STEM (0-1) at East St. Louis (1-1), 6:30 p.m. Steelville at Grandview (1-1), 7 p.m. O’Fallon (4-0) at Whitfield (1-1), 7:30 p.m. Vandalia (1-3) at Ramsey, 7:30 p.m.

A major snowstorm will blast eastern New England for a time today. Aside from snow showers over the Appalachians and Rockies, most areas from the mid-Atlantic and Southeast to the Pacific coast can expect dry weather. Meanwhile, the latest storm from the Pacific will approach the California coast with rain late in the day. Shown are noon positions of precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

WIND WSW 7-14 mph

WIND W 7-14 mph

50°

34°

80

Peoria 55 74 Macomb 44/30 45/31 Bloomington Urbana 42/29 41/29

Kirksville 49/31

Quincy 47/31

Decatur 43/29 Springfield 57 45/30 Effingham 70 55 45/31

35

Columbia 70 50/32 St. Louis Mount Jefferson Vernon 50/34 City 48/30 52/32 Union 55 52/33 57 44 Rolla Carbondale 52/33 49/32 Farmington 52/33 Cape Girardeau 49/32 Springfield 53/30 Poplar Bluff West Plains 51/34 55 53/33

44

RIVER AND LAKE LEVELS Flood Stage 24 hour Stage (ft.) Mon. Change

Location

Missouri River Kansas City Jefferson City Hermann Washington St. Charles Mississippi River Hannibal Louisiana Dam 24 Dam 25 Grafton M.Price, Pool M.Price, Tail. St. Louis Chester Cape Girardeau Illinois River La Salle Peoria Beardstown

32 23 21 20 25

Flood Stage 24 hour Stage (ft.) Mon. Change

Location

Meramec River Sullivan Valley Park Arnold Bourbeuse River Union Ohio River Cairo Lake Levels Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

21.47 -0.42 19.70 +0.70 19.80 +0.24 16.13 -0.47 22.84 +0.96

16 14.23 -0.33 15 13.17 -0.01 25 23.06 +0.10 26 23.18 +0.78 18 16.47 +0.07 419 413.96 -1.72 21 17.71 +1.73 30 23.80 +2.27 27 25.22 +1.65 32 30.14 +1.68 20 18 14

15.28 +0.80 12.19 +0.08 11.89 +0.21

15 16 24

7.08 +2.08 7.60 +1.19 21.10 +2.15

15

7.42 +3.42

40

36.92 +2.84 355.41 366.52 505.80 659.05 710.27 672.45 918.13 839.59 601.02 408.16 607.87 446.14

-0.09 +3.08 +7.13 +0.87 +0.24 +0.26 +0.24 none +0.47 +0.69 +1.00 +0.78

TEMPERATURE TRENDS Daily Temperature

Billings 43/29

Forecast Temperature

Average High

Average Low

San Francisco 61/51

Statistics through 5 p.m. Monday Temperature High/low 40°/34° Normal high/low 47°/31° Last year high/low 56°/39° Record high 75° (2012) Record low 4° (1886) Precipitation 24 hrs through 5 p.m. Mon. Trace Month to date (normal) 0.01” (0.21”) Year to date (normal) 52.14” (38.33”) Record for this date 1.73” (1967)

70

62

60

55

50 40 30

37

39 32

30

48

42 36

50

52

52 45

40 41 34

34

34

32

W

T

F

S

S

M

T

W

39

37

54

T

F

S

49

43

29

20

T

50

S

23 M

Denver 48/25

Los Angeles 69/56

New York 39/31

Detroit 38/32

Washington 48/35

Kansas City 52/31

Atlanta 51/37

El Paso 64/42 Houston 70/46 Chihuahua 71/46

Cold front

Warm front

Miami 70/54

Monterrey 76/52

Stationary front

Showers

T-storms

Rain

Flurries

Snow

Ice

Pollen Yesterday Trees Weeds Grass Mold

Absent Absent Absent Low Source: St. Louis County

Heating Degree Days Degree days are an indicator of energy needs. The more the total degree days, the more energy is necessary to heat.

Monday Month to date Normal month to date Since July 1 Normal since July 1

28 52 52 1019 874

RealFeel Temperature® Today An exclusive index of effective temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure and elevation on the human body.

28° 8 a.m.

42° noon

42° 4 p.m.

35° 8 p.m.

UV Index Today Shown is the highest value of the day.

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11+

City

Today Wednesday Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

City

Today Wednesday Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

Albany, N.Y. Albuquerque Anchorage Atlanta Austin Baltimore Birmingham Boise Boston Charleston, S.C. Charleston, W.Va. Charlotte Chicago Cincinnati Cleveland Dallas Daytona Beach Denver Des Moines Destin, Fla. Detroit Hartford Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock

36/23/pc 52/34/s 22/11/s 51/37/s 74/43/s 48/32/s 52/34/s 41/31/pc 37/28/sn 55/36/s 40/32/c 52/33/pc 41/30/s 40/31/pc 38/32/c 66/39/s 60/39/s 48/25/s 45/30/s 56/45/s 38/32/c 39/25/pc 84/72/pc 70/46/s 40/31/pc 52/31/s 61/48/pc 58/35/s

Los Angeles Louisville Memphis Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Montgomery Nashville New Orleans New York City Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, Maine Portland, Ore. Sacramento Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Seattle Tampa Tucson Washington, D.C. Wichita

69/56/pc 45/34/pc 54/35/s 70/54/s 41/30/s 35/28/pc 56/33/s 50/34/pc 62/45/s 39/31/s 60/33/s 48/30/s 63/46/s 43/33/s 72/57/pc 37/30/c 33/19/sn 49/42/pc 61/48/c 40/28/pc 73/46/s 67/58/pc 61/51/c 52/47/pc 63/53/pc 72/53/pc 48/35/s 59/32/s

38/31/c 49/35/c 15/6/pc 59/39/s 71/46/pc 48/33/pc 60/35/s 43/29/c 41/33/pc 61/38/s 46/30/pc 58/34/s 42/27/pc 45/29/pc 40/32/sf 65/47/pc 66/43/s 45/27/c 46/28/s 65/46/s 39/29/c 41/29/pc 84/73/sh 72/52/pc 44/27/s 54/32/s 55/45/r 63/39/s

The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.

National Extremes Monday in the 48 contiguous states

Today’s Air Quality

High: 86 Hollywood, Fla.

airnow.gov

Good Moderate Unhealthy Unhealthy Very Hazardous (sensitive) Unhealthy

Skywatch Rise

Sun Moon

Set

7:02 a.m. 12:33 p.m.

4:40 p.m. 11:29 p.m.

First Quarter

Full Moon

Last Quarter

New Moon

Dec 4

Dec 11

Dec 18

Dec 25

©2019; forecasts and graphics, except for the KTVI forecasts, provided by

61/53/r 50/32/s 59/39/s 75/56/s 39/27/pc 36/23/s 65/36/s 56/33/s 68/48/s 41/33/pc 61/42/pc 48/29/s 68/44/s 45/34/c 70/52/r 39/29/sf 38/25/pc 50/41/c 56/47/c 39/31/r 73/49/pc 65/54/r 58/49/sh 51/42/r 69/50/s 68/50/c 51/36/pc 59/37/s

Low: -22 Cotton, Minn.

WORLD FORECAST

Forecast index based on presence of manmade particulates affecting aspects of human health.

80

60

Toronto 36/31

Minneapolis 35/28 Chicago 41/30

ALMANAC

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

A quiet weather pattern will dominate the middle U.S., which means more sunshine and dry time for us. Highs will be a little better this week with temperatures near or above normal right into next weekend.

Joplin 54/32

Montreal 32/22

52° 32° 52° 37° 45° 29° 50° 39°

REGIONAL OUTLOOK

Kansas City 52/31

Chief Meteorologist Glenn Zimmerman

WIND SSE 7-14 mph

Winnipeg 30/22

Seattle 52/47

City

Today Wednesday Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

City

Today Wednesday Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Beijing Berlin Buenos Aires Cairo Cancun Dublin Hong Kong Jerusalem Johannesburg London Madrid Mecca

47/36/c 65/54/pc 66/49/c 86/66/s 45/23/pc 40/37/c 77/61/t 71/55/s 81/61/s 46/38/pc 68/56/pc 60/45/s 91/57/s 44/34/pc 51/38/pc 89/67/s

Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi Paris Rio de Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Sydney Tokyo Toronto Vancouver

75/48/pc 32/22/s 30/23/pc 74/60/s 75/59/c 74/48/s 44/29/pc 77/69/pc 64/42/pc 88/77/t 85/55/s 42/24/pc 81/62/s 59/45/pc 36/31/pc 48/43/r

42/34/pc 57/48/r 65/46/pc 84/63/pc 46/22/pc 42/30/s 78/55/pc 73/57/s 81/65/s 48/38/r 70/57/c 61/50/s 63/51/t 45/35/pc 54/41/s 88/68/s

74/47/pc 34/28/sn 31/29/c 74/63/c 76/62/pc 73/49/pc 41/30/s 84/72/pc 59/44/pc 88/77/t 87/56/s 41/23/s 84/61/s 56/43/s 37/28/c 47/35/r

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, i-ice, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow


B10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • TUESDAY • 12.03.2019

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / C O M I C S

Tuesday • 12.03.2019 • eV DUSTIN • By Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker

DILBERT • By Scott Adams

SALLY FORTH • By Francesco Marciuliano and Jim Keefe

BABY BLUES • By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE • By Stephan Pastis GARFIELD • By Jim Davis

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM • By Mike Peters MUTTS • By Patrick McDonnell

DEFLOCKED • By Jeff Corriveau PRICKLY CITY • By Scott Stantis

PICKLES • By Brian Crane

HI AND LOIS • By Brian and Greg Walker and Chance Browne

RHYMES WITH ORANGE • By Hilary B. Price

BEETLE BAILEY • By Mort and Greg Walker

BREAKING CAT NEWS • By Georgia Dunn

THE PAJAMA DIARIES • By Terri Libenson

SUDOKU

E ! E E S ID S IN


EVERYDAY

EV2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CRYPTOQUIP

WORD GAMES

CROSSWORD

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

HOROSCOPE • JACQUELINE BIGAR Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. For best results, readers should refer to the dates following each sign. HAPPY BIRTHDAY FOR TUESDAY, DEC. 3, 2019: This year, you will want to be more visible and go out more often. You will enjoy relating to people. If single, you might meet many admirers and several wannabe sweeties. Your innate charisma will draw many people toward you. Choose who you want to relate to with care. You can be very sensitive and easily wounded. If attached, the two of you will experience the purchase of a major object or a change in lifestyle. Enjoy yourself but recognize that this trend will not last forever. PISCES sometimes drowns you with their emotions. ARIES (MARCH 21-APRIL 19) HHH You might be sluggish or in your daydreams right now. You have a lot on your mind and it might be relaxing to escape. Nevertheless, you come up with a wonderful idea that you might decide to pursue. Tonight: Go invisible. TAURUS (APRIL 20-MAY 20) HHHHH Remain focused on your objectives if you want to emerge on top of your game. Consider jotting down some of your better ideas, though do try them out on a friend. Tonight: Notice how friendly someone is being. GEMINI (MAY 21-JUNE 20) HHHH Others let you know how they feel about what you are doing, especially around work and community activities. Do not be surprised if someone sneaks in ideas around his or her own agenda. Tonight: Out and about. CANCER (JUNE 21-JULY 22) HHHH You might have been envisioning a trip, getting together with a friend or maybe getting tickets to an event. Whatever lurks in your mind, you might want to play it out. Participating in this type of happening feeds your energy. Tonight: Start making plans. LEO (JULY 23-AUG. 22) HHHHH One-on-one relating remains, as always, a naturally strong area for you. At present, you become luckier and capable of closing an important money deal or making wonderful plans that will delight you and others. Tonight: Be a duo.

VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEPT. 22) HHHH The smart move will be to defer to others. Often, people tell you what they think they want, but if you allow them to choose and take control, plans or events could be considerably different. Tonight: Say yes to what pops up. LIBRA (SEPT. 23-OCT. 22) HHHH Defer to a friend or someone you see with frequency. He or she has come up with an intriguing suggestion that appeals to you. The other party will be delighted by your strong response. Tonight: Off having a good time. SCORPIO (OCT. 23-NOV. 21) HHHHH You know better than most what strange events and places you can visit with your imagination. You might decide to choose one of these options and see what is revealed. Don’t get distracted when dealing with a loved one or child. Tonight: The party goes on. SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22-DEC. 21) HHH You might feel inordinately pushed by a domestic issue or someone you live with. Push does not need to come to shove, as a discussion at the right time could prove positive. Tonight: Order a favorite dinner. CAPRICORN (DEC. 22-JAN. 19) HHHH You speak your mind and others listen. Sometimes you might be vague, and you could be surprised by others and what might feel like demanding questions. Just answer. Tonight: Make plans with a neighbor or sibling. AQUARIUS (JAN. 20-FEB. 18) HHH Curb a tendency to be possessive or jealous. Ask yourself what really might be going on there. You might consider signing up for a class or going off to the gym in order to build yourself up in your mind. Tonight: Curb any wild spending. PISCES (FEB. 19-MARCH 20) HHHHH The Moon in your sign makes you undefeatable and adds to an innate magnetism. You draw others toward you. You are unlikely to cause problems, except for having too many admirers. Use your imagination more. Tonight: Whatever puts a smile on your face.

SOLUTION AT BOTTOM

BORN TODAY Singer Ozzy Osbourne (1948), actress Daryl Hannah (1960), rapper Trina (1974)

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME By David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

.com

Get the free JUST JUMBLE app • Follow us on Twitter @PlayJumble

BRIDGE TIPS • BOB JONES

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 12.03.2019

GYROL

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PIENT LTEERN DRROBE ©2019 Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved.

“ Yesterday’s

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

” (Answers tomorrow) Jumbles: FRAME SHRUG BRUNCH COMPLY Answer: When both dogs went after the ball at the same time, the ball was — UP FOR GRABS


12.03.2019 • TueSday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • EV3

EVERYDAY

DEAR ABBY

WHAT’S THE DIFF?

Full-time trucker overstays her welcome Dear Abby • My widowed mother-in-law, “Minnie,” works full time as a trucker, traveling around the U.S. She doesn’t have a home of her own since she lives on the road. My husband and I live in a small one-bedroom apartment. When she’s here for holidays or family functions, she always sleeps on our couch. At first I didn’t mind once or twice for holidays, but since my niece was born, Minnie wants to be home more to visit with her. My husband’s brother has a large home and plenty of space, but Minnie never stays there because she doesn’t like my sisterin-law. I have had many conversations and some blowout fights with my husband over this issue. He’s the older brother and feels guilty about asking her to stay at a hotel. My sister-in-law doesn’t help the situation. She sabotages holidays and events to ensure Minnie won’t feel comfortable staying there. — Dreading it in the East

Dear Dreading • Blowout fights with your husband are detrimental to your marriage. Because he appears to be unable to summon the backbone to have an honest conversation with his mother, I guess it’s up to you. Explain to Minnie that the current arrangement isn’t working. Tell her twice-a-year visits for holidays and family functions were manageable, but in the future, if she’s unwilling to stay in her younger son’s home, she should arrange to stay at a hotel or motel for those “extra” visits. Dear Abby • Some of my extended family members have become vegan. When they come to my home, I make sure to have appropriate food for them, in addition to nonvegan food for others. When I am invited to their homes for a celebration, they offer only vegan selections. No one is allowed to bring nonvegan or meat-based dishes to their home. It has reached the point that I

no longer want to go there when a meal is involved. Is it common for vegans to prohibit guests from ever taking other food into their home? — Meat Lover in Houston Dear Meat Lover • People become vegans for a variety of reasons. Some do because they feel it is unethical to kill animals for food. Others do it because they feel raising animals for slaughter is harmful to the planet. People also become vegans for health reasons. Individuals who adopt this way of life often feel as your relatives do, and that’s their privilege. If it impinges on your freedom or limits your enjoyment of these celebrations, forgo them and either participate in get-togethers that don’t include food or go to an accommodating restaurant. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

MISS MANNERS

TV TUESDAY

In defense of e-cards for Christmas Dear Miss Manners • I am writing in defense of e-cards for the Christmas holiday. People say they are impersonal, but I disagree. I write everyone’s name on their email, and I write a short message to everyone. While I will never complain about what form of communication my friends choose to use, I find most holiday cards have nothing written on them, let alone a personal greeting, and most have printed labels. I enjoy writing an email to accompany my e-card, and thinking of that person and my memories of them. Because e-cards are less expensive, and there is no postage, I am able to keep my list as large as I want it, without having to cut anyone when finances are tight. My greeting can be printed if the recipient wishes, or just read, enjoyed and deleted, which is perfect, too. Gentle Reader • You are in for

a disappointment if you expect Miss Manners to argue that the form is more important than the content in regard to something as informal as Christmas greetings. The paper Christmas card can be charming, but not if it lacks the point, which is to show people whom you rarely see that you still think of them. Cards that contain only a signature or, Miss Manners will argue, a family photograph, without reference to the recipient, are not charming. And there are those who persist in addressing them to people they barely remember. So your method of writing something personal is fine — provided your e-cards are not the animated sort that take up time and space on the computer, annoying grouches like Miss Manners. Dear Miss Manners • I have guests coming for the Christmas holidays: two adults and

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one child. We have a guest room, which they have used before, but this time my husband thinks we should give up the master bedroom for them, since the child is a little older. Both rooms have their own bathrooms and plenty of closet space. The only difference is that one has a queen-sized bed and the other a king. Gentle Reader • Don’t you want to invest in a futon for the guest room? Miss Manners only asks because while it might be difficult to cram two adults and a large child into either the smaller or the larger bed, it might also be difficult for you and your husband not to grow resentful when you are kept out of your room.

12/3/19

7:00

7:30

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30

FOX 2 News at 9:00pm FOX The Resident The doc- Empire Lucious and 2 tors perform brain sur- Cookie revisit their past. (N) (cc) gery. (N) (N) (cc) CBS NCIS: Silent Service. 4 Vance gets news from the Pentagon.

FBI OA must protect a NCIS: New Orleans: In leader from Egypt. (cc) the Blood. (cc)

NBC Dr. Seuss’ Train5 Grinch Dragon

The Voice The top 8 artists are revealed. (N) (cc)

Making It Wall installations and mailboxes. (9:01) (N)

PBS Rick Steves Fascism in Europe The John Fogerty: My 50 Year Trip A 9 rise and fall of fascism in Europe. musical journey with John Fogerty. (cc) (cc) CW 11

News 11 at 7:00PM (N) (cc)

METV The Andy 24 Griffith Show

The Andy Griffith Show

ABC Brad Paisley Thinks 30 He’s Special (N) (cc)

Send your questions to Miss Manners at her website, missmanners.com; to her email, dearmissmanners@gmail.com; or through postal mail to Miss Manners, Andrews McMeel Syndication, 1130 Walnut St., Kansas City, MO 64106.

ION 46

The Flash Iris and Cisco Arrow: Purgatory. Olimust help Barry. (N) (cc) ver looks for help from a friend. (N) Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C.

Green Acres (cc)

Hogan’s Hogan’s Heroes (cc) Heroes (cc)

CMA Country Christmas A holiday celebration. (N) (cc)

Criminal Minds Perpe- Criminal Minds: Legacy. Criminal Minds The trators hunt the victims. Homeless people in BAU must profile Gide(cc) Kansas City. on. (cc)

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EVERYDAY

EV4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH THE FAMILY CIRCUS • By Bil Keane

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 12.03.2019

ZITS • By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

DR. KEITH ROACH

Restricting water is key to treating salt levels Dear Dr. Roach • A few years ago, while skiing in Utah, I became violently ill and could barely walk. I called 911 and was taken to the hospital, where I was diagnosed with hyponatremia. It took a week in the hospital to recover. My internist eventually prescribed 1 gram of salt/ sodium a day and to not drink too much water. Even though I take the gram of salt a day and salt my food, the salt level in my body continues to remain low at 130-135. Sometimes my legs get shaky, which is my body telling me when the salt level is too low, so I take another gram of salt. Neither my doctor nor any other has ever been able to tell me what causes this problem. I am 87 years old, 5 feet, 7 inches tall and weigh 130 pounds; my blood pressure is normal, with 20 mg Lisinopril, and I am in relatively good health. — P.M. Answer • I think the most likely diagnosis is that you have the syndrome of inappropriate anti-diuretic hormone secretion. SIADH can happen in people with any kind of brain injury, with some cancers, lung diseases and due to drugs. However, in older people, it frequently comes on with no clear reason. The diagnosis of SIADH is made by a thorough evaluation. A kidney specialist would be most expert in diagnosing this condition. Very low sodium levels are extremely dangerous. The body needs to precisely regulate sodium, and very low levels can cause severe and permanent damage, even death. Although the salt (sodium) level is low in the blood, salt is not the primary problem for the vast majority of people with this disorder: Water is. Your internist’s advice to not drink too much water was absolutely correct, as water restriction is the primary treatment for this condition. Dear Dr. Roach • My son is very overweight (325 pounds) and has poorly controlled diabetes, with an A1C of 9.7%. His doctor says the most recent research shows that bariatric surgery can send Type 2 diabetes into a long-term remission. How can this be? — G.R. Answer • Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for weight loss in people who are severely overweight. Many studies have shown that bariatric surgery is very effective, and lowers the A1C level by 2% to 3.5%. Nearly 80% of people with diabetes achieve remission with surgery (meaning an A1C level below 6% to 6.5% without medications). The complication rate of diabetes is dramatically reduced after achieving near-normal blood sugar levels. Bariatric surgery isn’t for everyone, but for younger people who have poorly controlled diabetes or other significant obesityrelated conditions, it is a very reasonable option.

FUNKY WINKERBEAN • By Tom Batiuk

SPEED BUMP • By Dave Coverly

BIZARRO • By Wayno and Piraro

CORNERED • By Mike Baldwin NON SEQUITUR • By Wiley Miller

DUPLEX • By Glenn McCoy

MARMADUKE • By Brad Anderson

NANCY • By Olivia Jaimes

DRABBLE • By Kevin Fagan

MARK TRAIL • By James Allen

LOLA • By Todd Clark ZIGGY • By Tom Wilson

Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med.cornell. edu or send mail to 628 Virginia Dr., Orlando, FL 32803.

OTHER COAST • By Adrian Raeside

TAKE IT FROM THE TINKERSONS • By Bill Bettwy

THE ARGYLE SWEATER • By Scott Hilburn

BLONDIE • By Dean Young and John Marshall

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