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S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 1 8 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

THURSDAY • 12.01.2016 • $1.50

OVERTIME LAW IN LIMBO Court order to delay implementation has St. Louis employers scrambling THE LAW

THE DELAY

EXAMPLES: DEALING WITH FALLOUT

Under the new law originally scheduled to go into efect Thursday, salaried employees making less than $47,476 a year would be paid overtime.

A federal judge in Texas blocked implementation of the rule while the regulation’s legality is examined in more detail by the court.

Wal-Mart handed out raises to entry-level managers, raising their pay to $48,500 from $45,000, keeping them exempt from overtime. Those raises apparently will stick.

Glik’s clothing stores at first decided on an hourly rate for eligible workers in which they work the same 45 hours as currently while receiving about the same total pay. For now, that decision is being reversed.

BY JIM GALLAGHER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

If things had gone President Barack Obama’s way, 4.6 million salaried workers in the U.S. would be waking up this morning newly eligible for overtime pay. But a federal judge in Texas issued week a temporary injunction last week that halts enforcement of the new overtime rule, which was to take efect today. See OVERTIME • Page A8

South is battered by ire, wind and rain

he Christmas crush

BY JAY REEVES Associated Press

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. •

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Nathan Ambus, an employee of Ted Koplar, crawls out from under the holiday tree that he and several other workers were decorating on Wednesday on Maryland Avenue in the Central West End. Ambus had crawled inside the tree to work on the lights. The tree is on top of the fountain near the Chase Park Plaza Hotel.

Planned Parenthood challenges state’s abortion restrictions

EAST ST. LOUIS

ST. LOUIS • Planned Parenthood affiliates in

See ABORTION • Page A8

TODAY

Pay check

47°/33° PARTLY CLOUDY

TOMORROW

46°/32° PARTLY CLOUDY

WEATHER A18

On July 2, 1917, the tenuous relationship between blacks and whites in East St. Louis gave way to violence. Before it ended, at least 39 blacks were killed along with at least nine whites, although some reports put the number of black deaths closer to 100. Rioters burned more than 300 black homes and businesses.

Kranzberg will take over, renovate Grandel Theatre PAGE A3

Kingshighway bridge opening delayed

Ballpark Village tax incentives advance Charges filed in MetroLink shootings

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844.484.9669 ShenYun.com/STL

See RIOTS • Page A8

• A2 • A3

• A5

1 M

Charlotte, N.C., oicer cleared in killing

• A6

POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

PERFECT HOLIDAY GIFT

his beleaguered river town was once rich with blue-collar jobs and middle-class homes as World War I bolstered industry and created economic opportunities. But one fateful night, July 2, 1917, the tenuous relationship between blacks and whites over those new jobs gave way to violence. Black neighborhoods were burned, residents trapped inside their homes. Other blacks were stoned and lynched, leaving scars on a city that never fully healed from its racial divide. In the end, at least 39 blacks were killed along with at least nine whites, although various reports put the number of black deaths closer to 100. Rioters burned more than 300 black homes and businesses. T h a t’s why co m m u nity leaders say a centennial

T

BY CELESTE BOTT AND SAMANTHA LISS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Missouri filed a federal lawsuit Wednesday morning challenging state laws that require abortion clinics to meet standards for surgical centers and for their doctors to have hospital privileges. The move comes after similar restrictions in Texas were struck down by the U.S. Supreme Court in July, a landmark decision that determined the laws were medically unnecessary and unconstitutional. The ruling didn’t invalidate similar restrictions elsewhere, however, leaving states such as Missouri to pursue their own fights in court. Planned Parenthood ailiates in Alaska and North Carolina filed similar challenges Wednesday.

See SOUTH • Page A6

BY DOUG MOORE St. Louis Post-Dispatch

THE DEADLY RACE RIOTS OF 1917

Supreme Court struck down Texas rules in landmark case

Tornadoes that dropped out of the night sky killed five people in two states and injured at least a dozen more early Wednesday, adding to a seemingly biblical onslaught of drought, flood and fire plaguing the South. The storms tore through just as firefighters began to get control of wildfires that killed seven and damaged or wiped out hundreds of homes and businesses around the resort town of Gatlinburg, Tenn. In Alabama, the weather system dumped more than 2 inches of rain in areas that had been parched by months of choking drought. At least 13 confirmed twisters damaged homes, splintered barns and toppled trees in parts of Alabama,

Vol. 138, No. 336 ©2016

A Performance

Like No Other —You Must See! “I’ve reviewed about 4,000 shows, none can compare to what I saw tonight!” — Richard Connema, renowned Broadway critic

ALL-NEW 2017 SHOW WITH LIVE ORCHESTRA

Feb 25–26, Peabody Opera House


M 1 THURSDAY • 12.01.2016 • A2

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM

Find these features and exclusive subscriber content at stltoday.com/extra

DECADES ON VIDEO

BOUNCING BLUES?

MIZZOU CHAT

Watch 30 years of growth in the area in a Google Timelapse of satellite images.

The two Bens discuss the Blues’ bounce-back since Columbus.

Bring your questions and comments about Mizzou sports, and beat writer Dave Matter will tackle them during an 11 a.m. live chat.

JOE’S ST. LOUIS

WHAT’S UP

St. Louis’ news media elite honored at Press Club gala

FAIR CLOSES A crowd estimated at 100,000 attends the closing ceremonies of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, better known as the World’s Fair. A band plays “Auld Lang Syne” as fireworks light the night sky.

late Co. and come in gold embossed reproductions of the box used in the early 1900s. Proceeds support Campbell House preservation. Boxes are available at the museum ($9.95 per box); by phone at 314-421-0325; or at campbellhousemuseum.org.

JOE HOLLEMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

HOUSE CALL • The Post-Dispatch’s own Bill McClellan was given the St. Louis Press Club’s lifetime achievement award at a soirée Wednesday night at the Edward Jones headquarters in Des Peres. “It’s odd getting a longevity award for something that’s really been fun,” said McClellan, who started at the Post in 1980 and became a columnist in 1983. He gave the credit for his noteworthy career to his wife, Mary. “When her parents met me, they were filled with a sense of foreboding. “When my parents met her, they said, ‘You need to marry that girl, right away.’” Also from the Post-Dispatch, artist Dan Martin was honored as a Media Person of the Year. Martin started at the newspaper in 1980. In 1986, he began drawing the famous Weatherbird, the longest-running daily cartoon in U.S. history. Others lauded at the dinner were anchorman Tom O’Neal, sportscaster Jay Randolph, reporter Sharon Stevens and social media innovators Jack Dorsey and Jim McKelvey. KMOX Radio was honored as the media institution of the year. Local celebs sighted among the nearly 400 guests included former anchorman Dick Ford, Jewish Light editor Ellen Futterman, KMOXers Debbie Monterrey and Steve Moore, SLU journalism professor emeritus Avis Meyer, and McClellan’s “Donnybrook” companions Charlie Brennan, Ray Hartmann, Alvin Reid and Wendy Wiese. Brennan also doubled as emcee for the bash. CAMPBELL SCOOP • Busy Bee Chocolate, a long-ago St. Louis candy company, is making a comeback — at least for this holiday season — to raise money for the historic Campbell House Museum. Seems Hugh Campbell was a big giftgiver during Christmas, and one of his go-to presents was a box of Busy Bee’s confections, museum executive director Andrew Hahn said. Hugh Campbell was the son of Robert

DAVID CARSON • P-D

Bill McClellan in the St. Louis PostDispatch newsroom.

Martin

O’Neal

Stevens

Campbell, who in 1854 moved into the mansion on Lucas Place, the city’s elite neighborhood. The house, which was built in 1851, sits at 1508 Locust Street. He also was one of Busy Bee’s best customers, spending more than $1,500 each year on boxes of chocolates, Hahn said. Hahn said the original company was founded in 1881 by — “No joke,” Hahn said — Walter, Gilbert and William Candy; the Candy Brothers. They sold the business in 1935 and it closed for good in 1959. This year’s edition of the edibles are made by Chocolate, Chocolate, Choco-

STANDARD FARE • As part of the 15th anniversary observance of 9/11 in September, 7,000 flags flew on Art Hill in Forest Park. Now, about 3,500 of those flags are available for a $60 donation that will go to military and veterans groups. Each flag has a photo of the fallen service person whom the flag represented and his or her dog tags. The flags are available at 1114 South Brentwood Boulevard, across from the Galleria. Hours are 1-7 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays; and 1-5 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. For information, go to flagsofvalorusa.com “Donors can have the flag taken off the pole and folded with the dog tag and photo on it; or we can cut the pole in two, with a connector to put it back together, for easy transport,” said Rick Randall of Pace Properties Inc., which led the 9/11 remembrance. The charities include: Semper Fi Fund; Missouri Military Memorial Foundation; Greater St. Louis Honor Flight; and the St. Louis Military Oicer Support Foundation. AIR SPACE • Scott Sloyer of Ballwin had a holiday wish he wanted filled some day: Being a balloon handler in the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City. Last weekend, that wish came true for Sloyer, sales director for the ticketing service Etix. “You have to be invited by a New York City Macy’s employee, so I just started networking until I found someone who would help me,” said Sloyer, who took his wife, Rachel, and son, Tyler, to help celebrate the holiday. “It was,” he said, “a blast.” Joe Holleman • 314-340-8254 @stlsherpa on Twitter jholleman@post-dispatch.com

The Kingshighway bridge between Shaw Boulevard and Vandeventer/Southwest avenues won’t be open, as hoped, by the end of the year. The St. Louis Streets Department said in March that four lanes would be open by the end of December. Now, that date has been pushed to April. The section of road closed July 6, 2015 so crews could demolish the 78-year-old viaduct and build a new bridge. The delay is attributed to encountering utility lines not shown in city records, the extra time needed to install some construction materials and the closeness of buildings to the bridge, said Rich Bradley, president of the city’s board of public service.

“It’s a very diicult job in a very tight area,” he said. The utility lines that popped up affected plans for a drainage system. Also, the approaches to the bridge are being filled with a lightweight material that takes much longer to install than other materials such as cement. It’s sensitive to any changes in weather such as moisture and temperature — so on some days, that part of the project is halted, Bradley said. Because some buildings are so close to the viaduct, it means special consideration must be given to avoid structural damage to them. And construction has to work around the schedule of the Union Pacific Railroad, which is paying for 20 percent of the new $21 million bridge above its tracks. The Federal Highway Administration is covering 80 percent of the costs. The

budget remains the same, despite the delay, Bradley said. Traffic estimates for that portion of Kingshighway, which connects south St. Louis to Interstate 44 and Highway 40 (Interstate 64), have ranged from 40,000 to 55,000 cars per day. It had long been in disrepair — it was saturated with salt, with deteriorating concrete and chunks breaking of the columns — before being knocked down piece by piece. The new bridge will be 90 feet wide with three lanes in each direction. The current bridge is 66 feet wide. It also will have 6-foot sidewalks on both sides with 8-inch-high curbs. Leah Thorsen • 314-340-8320 @leahthorsen on Twitter lthorsen@post-dispatch.com

CHRISTMAS TREE WALK When • 6 p.m. Friday Where • 7305 Manchester Road, Maplewood How much • Free More info • maplewood-chamber.com/ ctw2016/ Carriage rides and hot chocolate are featured in historic Maplewood. Merchants will ofer holiday shopping specials. Live entertainment will be ofered at some restaurants or cofee shops. NORTH POLE DASH When • 8:30 a.m. Saturday Where • Frontier Park, 500 S. Riverside Drive, St. Charles How much • $20-$40 More info • www. historicstcharles.com/includes/events/ Santa-s-North-Pole-Dash/961/ The Greater St. Charles County Chamber of Commerce holds its sixth annual Santa’s North Pole Dash & Children’s Snowman Shule. Participants will receive a medal, themed shirt, hat, beard and gloves. The event has sold out the last two years. Santa’s North Pole Dash is a 5K run and 1-mile walk for all ages. Children 11 and under can participate in the Snowman Shule, a race near Frontier Park. To list a community event or meeting, submit it online at events.stltoday.com.

LOTTERY MULTISTATE GAMES POWERBALL Wednesday: 03-14-18-25-45 Powerball: 07 Power play: 2 Estimated jackpot: $40 million MEGA MILLIONS Tuesday: 22-33-49-51-59 Mega ball: 08 Megaplier: 4 Friday’s estimated jackpot: $30 million

MISSOURI LOTTERIES LOTTO Wednesday: 02-05-06-18-30-34 Estimated jackpot: $1.5 million SHOW ME CASH Wednesday: 09-11-16-30-38 Thursday’s estimated jackpot: $361,000 PICK-3 Wednesday Midday: 366 Evening: 538 PICK-4 Wednesday Midday: 6599 Evening: 2114 LUCKY DAY LOTTO Wednesday Midday: 27-32-42-44-45 Evening: 09-18-20-23-44 LOTTO Thursday’s estimated jackpot: $3.25 million PICK-3 Wednesday Midday: 322 FB: 5 Evening: 331 FB: 0 PICK-4 Wednesday Midday: 4858 FB: 0 Evening: 0005 FB: 3

STLTODAY.COM/LOTTERY Current and past numbers, plus jackpots from state lotteries around the country.

CORRECTIONS • Memorial contributions made in honor

of Missouri Supreme Court Judge Richard B. Teitelman may be sent to Legal Services of Eastern Missouri, 4232 Forest Park Avenue. A front-page story Tuesday provided the wrong address.

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INSIDE 100 Neediest ......... A4 Business .............. A10 Chuck Raasch ........ A7 Editorial .............. A14 Horoscopes ......... EV2 Letters to editor .. A14

EVENTS

ILLINOIS LOTTERIES

Kingshighway bridge opening delayed until April BY LEAH THORSEN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

THIS DAY IN 1904

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LOCAL

12.01.2016 • Thursday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • A3

Ballpark Village progress is advanced BY KORAN ADDO st. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. LOUIS • A Board of

Aldermen committee advanced on Wednesday a bill that would grant the St. Louis Cardinals and their development partner, Cordish Cos, a public incentives package worth up to $16 million as part of the planned second phase of Ballpark Village. Included in the package is a 1 percent sales tax on purchases within Ballpark Village. The $16 million is in addition to the $49 million in tax incentives the Cardinals were granted four

years ago as part of Ballpark Village’s first phase. If approved by the full board, the Cardinals would have access to a combined $65 million in public tax incentives over the next two decades. Cardinals President Bill DeWitt III said on Wednesday the tax incentives are necessary for Ballpark Village’s $220 million second phase to become a reality. The team is planning an oice building, retail center and 29-story apartment tower across Clark Avenue from Busch Stadium’s center field. Work on the projects could be com-

pleted by early 2019. “We’re trying to do something that really nobody’s done downtown in a long, long, time,” DeWitt said, adding that combining residential development, with office and entertainment space poses unique challenges. “There are a ton of infrastructure requirements and the rents you can get from those uses in the current markets do not justify the investment to the developer in this current environment,” he said. “So some incentive is required to get the return to an acceptable level to make the project a go.”

Jack Coatar, the city’s 7th Ward Alderman, sponsored the bill. He estimated that the city will net $5 million in new revenues over 10 years. The school district stands to gain more than $3 million during the same time frame. Otis Williams, executive director of the St. Louis Development Corp, the city agency that determines which projects are worthy of receiving taxpayer help, repeated Coatar’s numbers. “We believe, fully, this is a viable project,” he said. “It’s worthwhile.” The committee also approved two amendments

Capital T, rhymes with P, stands for Pool hall of Fame all-star player Jeanette Lee plays against Team usa in an exhibition pool match at Ballpark Village on Wednesday. Team usa will travel to London to play in the Mosconi Cup against Team Europe next week.

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Q&A: MLS president talks expansion to St. Louis BY MIKE FAULK • st. Louis Post-dispatch

Major League Soccer President and Deputy Commissioner Mark Abbott says St. Louis is well-positioned for an expansion team, but whether it will happen is yet to be seen. ¶ Politics could decide things as voters will be asked to fund up to 40 percent of the $200 million stadium. The specifics of that proposal, which would include the city taking ownership of the 22,000-seat stadium, are still being negotiated, but it’s expected to appear in the April 4 municipal elections. ¶ In a 20-minute telephone interview Tuesday from the league oice in New York, Abbott explained why MLS is so interested in St. Louis and why the league has confidence in a proposal put forth by SC STL, which includes investors with ties to the Cardinals, Blues and St. Louis FC. Q: What are the odds for St. Louis to secure a team and why is there such faith in the ownership group SC STL? A: “We’ve been working almost for a year now with public oicials and business leaders in St. Louis, including the governor and the mayor. Through that process we have been able to understand really the depth of their passionate commitment, capacity and the speciicity of their plan. It has all the elements you really need. They’ve got sports experience, business experience, inancial capacity and a strong working relationship with the public oicials that have allowed them to propose this partnership. They themselves are also making a sizable inancial commitment.” Q: So you’ve seen SC STL’s inances? A: “Absolutely, we’ve seen what they have. As we do with all potential ownership groups we do a very thorough vetting. We have great conidence in their commitment and the capacity they have to fulill their obligations under what’s required by the league and any public-private partnership in St. Louis. It’s really a dream team ownership group.” Q: There’s a $200 million stadium proposal for downtown, but SC STL wants up to 40 percent of that funded by public money. Why do you support that idea? A: “We’ve been working collaboratively with public oicials for over a year and it was their judgment it was appropriate to bring the public-private partnership to a vote. We believe the type of partnership being proposed here is of great value to the

Ortiz: Time for St. Louis to make $80 million decision • B1 community. We have seen the success of these partnerships in markets throughout the country. It’s diicult to build stadiums today without them. The cost of stadiums obviously have escalated signiicantly in the last 20 years. The stadiums bring beneit to the communities beyond just the beneit of a team in the community. Stadiums themselves have multiple uses. That’s why we see communities embracing partnerships of this type.”

as Chicago and Kansas City. Rivalries are what has been driving interest in this league. You look at the Seattle Sounders and Portland Timbers in the Paciic Northwest, that has generated a lot of interest. St. Louis has the opportunity for a rivalry in the league and that helps grow overall interest in the league. It’s also a strong media market and that’s something that we look to also as we think about expansion.”

Q: Why does the MLS think St. Louis would be a strong market for professional soccer? A: “There are four factors we look at when we evaluate a market: the strength of the ownership group, the facility plan, dynamics in the market and the contribution of that market in helping the league achieve its overall goals. Based on our own research into St. Louis, we know there is a strong fan interest. But that will only lead to success if we have the right ownership group and stadium plan. I think what’s really attractive about St. Louis is it is in many ways the historical home of the sport in the U.S. What also struck me the irst time I went was the number of people in inluence and authority who had played the game their entire lives. You just feel the sport when you’re there.”

Q: The league wants to

Q: How would having a team in St. Louis boost the league’s “overall goals,” as you say? A: “Given its location in the middle of the country, St. Louis presents the opportunity for strong rivalries with places such

TWEET WITH THE WEATHERBIRD Got a question? Ask the Weatherbird. twitter.com/Weatherbird

expand to 28 teams. It will soon have 23, and a 24th in Miami is almost a lock. SC STL vice chairman Jim Kavanaugh said they want to have a team playing in 2020 or 2021. What is the time frame for ielding four more teams? A: “We haven’t yet announced a timetable for the launch of expansion clubs. I’m not sure when that might happen.” (MLS Commissioner Don Garber previously said expansion in St. Louis would not happen prior to 2020.) Mike Faulk 314-340-8656 @mike_faulk on Twitter mfaulk@post-dispatch.com

to the bill, including one pushed by city Comptroller Darlene Green urging the city to pursue so-called federal New Markets tax credits to replace some of the tax incentives the bill currently calls on the city to provide. The New Markets Tax Credit program was created to springboard new development in low-income communities. It’s unclear whether Ballpark Village would qualify. An additional amendment ofered by 21st Ward Alderman Antonio French, a candidate for mayor, would divert $250,000 annually from the tax revenue

generated by Ballpark Village into a fund that would provide grants and lowinterest loans to help new small businesses open in low-income areas. French said city leaders had a long track record of providing financial assistance to projects downtown and in the central corridor at the expense of poorer areas of the city. “I think it’s time we provide some benefits to the neighborhoods that are struggling,” he said. Koran Addo • 314-340-8305 @KoranAddo on Twitter kaddo@post-dispatch.com

Kranzberg will take over, renovate Grandel heatre A rendering of the renovated Grandel Theatre.

BY GAIL PENNINGTON st. Louis Post-dispatch

The Kranzberg Arts Foundation is taking over the long-dormant Grandel Theatre in Grand Center and will renovate it for use by organizations including Dance St. Louis and Metro Theater Company, the foundation announced Wednesday. The Grandel, at 3610 Grandel Square, was last used by the Black Rep, which was based there until 2013. (Since then the troupe has performed at Harris-Stowe State University and Washington University.) It also had been home to St. Louis Shakespeare and to the Repertory Theatre of St. Louis’ Off-Ramp Series, which ended in 2009. The acquisition of the Grandel adds to the Kranzberg Arts Foundation’s growing interests in Grand Center. The foundation, established by arts patrons Ken and Nancy Kranzberg, took over the historic Cadillac Building (3224 Locust Street) in April. Renamed .ZACK, it’s Grand Center’s first performing-arts incubator. In addition, the foundation operates the Kranzberg Arts Center (501 North Grand Boulevard) and the Marcelle Theater (3310 Samuel Shepherd Drive). SPACE Architecture + Design will renovate the Grandel for theater, dance and concert programming.

Kranzberg Arts Foundation resident organizations Dance St. Louis, Ashleyliane Dance Company, Karlovsky & Company Dance and Metro Theater Company will use the Grandel for mainstage productions. Heal Center for the Arts will be incubated at the Grandel, and the Dark Room Wine Bar & Photo Gallery will relocate there from its nearby home on Grand Avenue. The re-imagined Grandel will also play host to visual arts exhibits, dance classes, educational programs and live jazz, according to the announcement. “The Kranzberg Arts Foundation is working closely with our district and community partners to ensure the Grandel Theatre is a true example of diversity in audience, programming and organizational use,” executive director Chris Hansen said in the announcement. “The opportunity to bring this historic venue back online for the community is thrilling and humbling for our organization.” Mainstage shows in the renovated Grandel are expected by late spring or early summer. The Romanesque Revival structure was built in 1884 for use as a First Congregational Church. Gail Pennington • 314-340-8136 TV critic @gailpennington on Twitter gpennington@post-dispatch.com

An Unforgettable Adventure To a Lost Civilization Shen Yun isn’t your average production. It sends you home with a strong message of hope. Every performance overflows with uplifting energy and is packed with action, courage, beauty, and humor. Experience the all-new 2017 program—it embodies the wisdom of ancient China and the values we all treasure. It’s so profound, so inspiring, it touches your soul. Come see Shen Yun with your family and friends!

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LOCAL

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 12.01.2016

Reward grows in mysterious shooting Friends hope record amount will help ind killer of Maggie O’Brien’s popular owner BY KIM BELL St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • Patrick McVey’s

gym locker at the handball club in Arnold is just the way he left it. Except for a wooden heart in black bunting attached to the front, and the message: “We’ll miss you.” McVey, 57, was on his way there to play handball McVey Nov. 9 when he was gunned down in his SUV on southbound Interstate 55 near Loughborough Avenue. Police have reported no major breaks in

their investigation, but a growing reward fund could change that. The mystery has sparked the largest-ever cash reward in the history of St. Louis Regional CrimeStoppers — $82,440 as of Wednesday morning — said St. Louis police Oicer Lisa Pisciotta, its executive director. The latest contribution, $8,100, came from The St. Louis Hinder Club, a group of fellow handball enthusiasts. McVey was an avid player, said his friend Ron Gronemeyer, who retired in 1999 as chief investigator for the St. Louis Fire Department. Gronemeyer and his wife visited with McVey while eating lunch Nov. 9 at Maggie O’Brien’s

Restaurant and Irish Pub, a popular downtown bar McVey coowned, about an hour before the shooting. McVey was found slumped behind the steering wheel of his dark gray Ford Explorer just before 6 p.m. but was believed to have been killed by a bullet that hit his moving vehicle about 2:30 p.m. His friends are stumped about a motive. Gronemeyer said he first wondered if there was a link to a 2009 botched robbery at the business in which a bartender and one of the robbers were killed. The surviving robber, a lookout and a bar employee who helped plot the

crime were sentenced to prison. Some considered road rage, but Gronemeyer said McVey was so low-key it would be hard to imagine. “It could even be a mistaken identity,” he speculated. “We don’t know.” He said Hinder Club members contributed to the reward to “at least feel like we’re doing something.” Pisciotta said the large reward is due in part to McVey’s popularity. “He had a big family, a big social group. He was a very nice man by all accounts,” she said. CrimeStoppers automatically ofers a $5,000 reward in homicide cases, but money from others can increase it. Some dona-

100 NEEDIEST CASES: HELPING THOUSANDS

CAR ACCIDENT UPENDS MAN’S LIFE

tions to the McVey total were anonymous; more than $11,000 came from the St. Louis Building and Construction Trades Council. Each tipster is given a number and told to check back periodically to see if the information led to charges. Once there is a warrant issued and the suspect is arrested, the reward is available,” Pisciotta said. CrimeStoppers does not wait for a conviction. CrimeStoppers’ tip line is 866-371-8477. Callers can remain anonymous. Kim Bell • 314-340-8115 @kbellpd on Twitter kbell@post-dispatch.com

County police will use technology to track gunire BY DENISE HOLLINSHED St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS COUNTY • Mi-

ADIA FRAZER • Edwardsville High School

CASE 47 • P, 44, became a paraplegic after a car ac-

cident in 2002. He was hospitalized and homeless during his recovery. He has moved to a low-income apartment but is on a limited income and struggles to pay bills. He sufers from bedsores and needs medical supplies and household items, especially a shower chair because he can’t sit in a tub. He’s grateful for any help, and hopes to return to school soon. A computer would help him become more independent. CASE 48 • Grandma is overwhelmed. One of her daughters lost custody of her children. Another daughter is in prison. So the grandmother is raising five grandchildren. She struggles to pay the household bills while also providing basic necessities for her grandchildren. Grandma would consider it a blessing

to receive clothing, shoes or Christmas toys for her grandchildren. CASE 49 • K is the single mother of a 10-year-old

daughter; she’s also the legal guardian of her troubled ex-sister-in-law’s twin 10-year-old boys. K was managing until last November, when she was diagnosed with Stage 3 lymphoma, the same cancer that killed her mother three years ago. K is in treatment, getting chemotherapy and radiation while trying to care for the children. Cancer is a costly disease, and K can work only part time. She’s behind on bills and feeling overwhelmed. This is a family in need of help this Christmas. Case proiles by Valerie Schremp Hahn, Koran Addo and Sarah Bryan Miller of the Post-Dispatch.

crophones that alert police to the sound of gunfire will be added to the Castle Point area of St. Louis County, as the technology moves beyond the city of St. Louis. The St. Louis County Council voted Tuesday to authorize County Executive Steve Stenger to accept a Justice Department grant of up to $400,636 that would, in part, acquire a Shotspotter system. It will be used in the area near Halls Ferry and Chambers roads, with a range of two or three miles, according to Officer Benjamin Granda, spokesperson for county police. The plan is to start operation in the spring. He called it an “additional resource to help us keep the community as well as officers safe,” adding, “It’s been proven successfully throughout the country.” He said the area was chosen to provide “the best crime reduction and community engagement” for the investment. He noted, “It is one of the areas our department focuses on with hotspot policing initiatives.” According to Granda, at

TO HELP

• Donors can adopt any of the cases — not just the 100 proiled at STLtoday.com/ neediest. The program supplies donors with a list of a family’s needs. All gifts go directly to the family, through a social worker. • The program also accepts monetary gifts. Every dollar will go directly to a needy family, and every family will receive something.

Visit 100neediestcases.org Or call 314-421-6060 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on weekdays. Or mail a check or money

HOW IT WORKS For generations, the 100 Neediest Cases campaign has helped thousands of disadvantaged families during the holidays. This year, the program will beneit more than 10,000 needy households — selected by social service agencies that partner with the United Way. The Post-Dispatch is showcasing 100 cases. But all the families will share the cash donations.

order (no cash) payable to: 100 Neediest Cases P.O. Box 955925 St. Louis, Mo. 63195

Man guilty of manslaughter in killing at 7-Eleven BY JOEL CURRIER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • Dominique Whitfield

said he shot Carlos Fowler fearing that gunfire would follow Fowler’s sucker-punch to the face Nov. 16, 2014, outside a 7-Eleven store in the Downtown West neighborhood. Whitfield pulled a handgun from his waistband and shot Fowler in the chest, shoulder and buttocks. Fowler, 27, of Woodson Terrace, collapsed on the sidewalk and died a short while later. After considering Whitfield’s self-defense claim, a St. Louis jury found him guilty Wednesday of voluntary manslaughter, instead of first-degree murder, and armed criminal action. Jurors recommended 15 years in prison for manslaughter and four years for armed criminal action. Circuit Judge Robert H. Dierker, who will sentence Whitfield on Jan. 6, cannot exceed that. The shooting, about 6 p.m. at 201 North 17th Street, was recorded by three store surveillance

cameras. The videos show Whitfield approach Fowler just outside the front door and a brief argument before Fowler punches Whitield Whitfield in the face. The two back apart before Whitfield pulls a gun and fires. Fowler was unarmed. “There is no selfFowler defense here,” Assistant Circuit Attorney Dwight Warren told jurors. “Carlos was not right in hitting [Whitfield], but he doesn’t deserve to die.” Whitfield drove from the scene with his girlfriend. Police later recovered a .40-caliber handgun hidden behind a water heater at Whitfield’s apartment that matched slugs and shell casings from the crime scene. Whitfield, now 23, testified that he and Fowler had bad blood and both sold guns and drugs downtown. Whitfield’s girlfriend told

the court Fowler had a reputation for starting fights and often showed of his guns. It was unclear why Fowler punched Whitfield, who said it was unprovoked. Whitfield and his attorney, Megan Beesley, told jurors Whitfield had shot Fowler believing Fowler might have been reaching for a gun. “He thought he was about to get shot,” Beesley told jurors. Whitfield pleaded guilty in July 2015 to a federal charge of brandishing a sawed-of shotgun at the same 7-Eleven in February 2014, court records say. Fowler’s mother, Elizabeth Fowler, of St. Louis, has said her son grew up in St. Louis and played football at Hazelwood Central High School. She said he was the oldest of six siblings and left behind a 7-year-old son who lives with his mother in Philadelphia. She said Fowler was a nephew of Syracuse, N.Y., Police Chief Frank Fowler. Joel Currier • 314-340-8256 @joelcurrier on Twitter jcurrier@post-dispatch.com

Denise Hollinshed • 314-340-8319 @Hollinshed57 on Twitter dhollinshed@post-dispatch.com

Washington U. boosts anti-sex assault eforts BY ASHLEY JOST St. Louis Post-Dispatch

TWO WAYS TO GIVE

least $300,000 of the grant will be used for the technology, and at least $100,000 for community counseling and violence de-escalation in areas most afected by gunfire. Shotspotter, common in major cities, uses multiple microphones, tuned to the sound of gunfire, to fix a point where a shot is fired and notify police immediately. It can mean faster help for victims, an increased chance of arrest, better preservation of evidence and an opportunity to intervene while a crime is still taking place. Granda said the grant would get the system up and running, and he anticipates the county will seek additional funding to keep it going in the future. St. Louis police have used Shotspotter in some of its violence-plagued neighborhoods since 2008. The city’s system was in some recent controversy after a revelation that it was shut off for about three months this year in a bureaucratic tangle between City Hall and Police Headquarters over how the bill would be paid.

ST. LOUIS • Washington

University administrators estimate they spend $1 million annually to address sexual violence on campus. This week, they announced even more money and resources toward the cause. “We are, and have been, committed to doing everything we can to make sure we have an environment conducive to learning and developing that’s free from relationship violence and sexual assault and harassment,” Washington U. Provost Holden Thorp told the Post-Dispatch Wednesday. He said current prevention efforts included everything from staffing to education events. Among the new initiatives: • Two new staf members for the Title IX oice, as well as dedicated oice space. • Permanent funding for the student-run, anonymous helpline, S.A.R.A.H. • A new staf member to field sexual misconduct at the medical school campus. • A dedicated staff member for lesbian, gay, transgender and bisexual students at the Relationship and Sexual Violence Prevention Center. These initiatives came from findings of the American Association of Universities Campus Climate Survey released in 2015. The findings showed that 22.6 percent of undergraduate women and 7.5 percent of undergraduate men on Washington U.’s campus reported experiencing non-consensual sexual contact that included incapacitation or physical force.

Those numbers are on par with the average among the almost 30 AAU schools that participated in the survey, including the University of Missouri-Columbia. But Thorp said being on par with peer institutions in the prestigious AAU wasn’t good enough. He wants to show improvement when the AAU conducts another climate survey, years from now. The campus announced education for faculty and staf, fraternity members and athletes as well as bolstered programming about stalking, relationship violence and sexual harassment. One of the most important announcements is a new research initiative to investigate different approaches to prevention of sexual violence. The Campus Sexual Assault and Relationship Violence Assessment Initiative will be housed in Washington U.’s Institute of Public Health. In a news release, school administrators said the goal was to pilot solutions among different student populations — for example, students who identify as LGBTQ — and develop practices that could be shared with other universities. Thorp said he was excited about the research initiative “because ultimately, while it’s important to provide adjudication and support, in the long run what we want to do is reduce the incidents of relationship violence and sexual misconduct.” Ashley Jost • 314-340-8169 @ajost on Twitter ajost@post-dispatch.com


LOCAL

12.01.2016 • Thursday • M 1

LAW & ORDER ST. LOUIS > Man fatally stabbed • Robert Collins, 44, died after being stabbed multiple times in the upper body about 1:50 p.m. Tuesday at his home near the Halls Ferry Circle, police said. He lived in the 1100 block of Howell Street and was found lying outside. He died at a hospital. Police said Collins had argued with another man who stabbed him and ran of. WENTZVILLE > Threats left on GM plant walls • General Motors has beefed up security at its Wentzville plant after threats of violence against minorities were found scrawled on restroom walls, oicials said. The company arranged to hire ofduty Wentzville police to supplement its own guards inside. Paul West, the assistant police chief, said the department was investigating two reports of messages “indicating that around the irst of December there’s going to be a violent act at GM.” He said minorities were threatened, but he did not provide details. GM spokesman Darin Copeland said messages were discovered over the past two months, most recently in midNovember. “We have to take these threats seriously,” he said. The plant employs about 4,600 people and operates 24 hours a day, including many Saturdays. JEFFERSON COUNTY > Judge charged with DWI, assault • Nathan B. Stewart, 51, a Jeferson County circuit judge, was charged with misdemeanor driving while intoxicated and felony second-degree assault after a traic crash in which a passenger was injured, oicials said Wednesday. The Missouri Highway Patrol said a 2004 Cadillac Escalade driven by Stewart, of Hillsboro, Mo., ran of southbound Highway BB, south of Cedar Rock Road, struck a utility pole and overturned about 9:21 p.m. Tuesday. The patrol said that Stewart declined treatment for minor injuries and that his passenger, John F. Dietrich, 50, of Hillsboro, sufered moderate injuries and was taken to St. Anthony’s Medical Center. Stewart, a Democrat, was elected to the court in 2010 and defeated in a bid for re-election Nov. 8 but has not yet reached the end of his term. His clerk said he was not available for comment Wednesday. CAPE GIRARDEAU, MO. > No charges for woman who killed husband with car • A southeastern Missouri investigator says his department won’t recommend charges against a woman who killed her husband by running him down with a car after he threatened her and a child. Cape Girardeau County Sherif’s Department Capt. David James said the investigation so far indicated that Lonnie Masters’ wife acted in self-defense when she struck him with a vehicle on Saturday, according to the Southeast Missourian. Authorities have said that earlier that day, Masters, 45, had abducted his wife and their 4-year-old child, and he threatened to kill them and himself. Investigators say that after driving around with them, Masters returned to a residence where the wife was able to escape and get into another vehicle. Masters had been charged in October with domestic assault, unlawful use of a weapon and child endangerment.

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • A5

Arrests, charges in MetroLink shootings BY NASSIM BENCHAABANE st. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. CLAIR COUNTY • In-

vestigators have charged two men in connection with recent MetroLink station shootings and say they have two others in custody. Shaquille R. Turner, 22, and DeAngelo L. Franklin, 22, both of East St. Louis, were each charged Wednesday with aggravated battery with a firearm and armed robbery. Both men were being held at the St. Clair County Jail with bail set at $1 million each.

Authorities said Franklin and Turner attempted to rob a man and then shot him in the face at the Swansea MetroLink station Monday night. The victim was taken to a St. Louis hospital in critical condition. He remained at the hospital Wednesday night. Authorities also took two men into custody Wednesday evening in connection with the Nov. 22 shooting at the East Riverfront Metro Link Station in East St. Louis. Police expect charges will be filed against the men this

tion him, but he was caught after a short foot chase, Toth said. A handgun was found on him. McHughes was arresting Franklin when Turner approached, Toth said. The deputy suspected Turner and Franklin were at the station together and began to question him as other law enforcement officers arrived on the scene. Police then received a call about a disoriented man on the train at the MetroLink Swansea station. There they found a man who had been shot in the face.

week. Scott Toth, an investigator with the St. Clair County sheriff’s office, said Franklin and Turner were caught by Sgt. Kenny McHughes shortly after the shooting. McHughes had just pulled into the parking lot of the Swansea MetroLink station Monday night for a routine patrol when he saw a man with a bandana over his face running across the lot. The man turned out to be Franklin, Toth said. Franklin ran away when the deputy tried to ques-

The shooting was caught on surveillance video, Toth said. Video showed the man was shot on the platform but then got up from the ground and walked onto the train, he said. “Video surveillance was key in this investigation,” Toth said. Toth said the two MetroLink station shootings were similar, but he did not provide more details pending the ongoing investigation. Nassim Benchaabane • 314-340-8167 @NassimBnchabane on Twitter nbenchaabane@post-dispatch.com

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LOCAL

12.01.2016 • Thursday • M 2

LAW & ORDER ST. LOUIS > Man fatally stabbed • Robert Collins, 44, died after being stabbed multiple times in the upper body about 1:50 p.m. Tuesday at his home near the Halls Ferry Circle, police said. He lived in the 1100 block of Howell Street and was found outside. He died at a hospital. Police said Collins had argued with a man who stabbed him and ran of. WENTZVILLE > Threats left on GM plant walls • General Motors has beefed up security at its Wentzville plant after threats of violence against minorities were found scrawled on restroom walls, oicials said. The company arranged to hire of-duty Wentzville police to supplement its guards. Paul West, the assistant police chief, said the department was investigating two reports of messages “indicating that around the irst of December there’s going to be a violent act at GM.” He said minorities were threatened, but he did not provide details. GM spokesman Darin Copeland said messages were discovered over the past two months, most recently in midNovember. “We have to take these threats seriously,” he said. The plant employs about 4,600 and operates 24 hours a day, including many Saturdays. JEFFERSON COUNTY > Judge charged with DWI, assault • Nathan B. Stewart, 51, a Jeferson County circuit judge, was charged with misdemeanor driving while intoxicated and felony second-degree assault after a traic crash in which a passenger was injured, oicials said Wednesday. The Missouri Highway Patrol said a 2004 Cadillac Escalade driven by Stewart, of Hillsboro, Mo., ran of southbound Highway BB, south of Cedar Rock Road, struck a utility pole and overturned about 9:21 p.m. Tuesday. The patrol said Stewart declined treatment for minor injuries, and his passenger, John F. Dietrich, 50, of Hillsboro, had moderate injuries and was taken to St. Anthony’s Medical Center. Stewart, a Democrat, was elected to the court in 2010 and defeated in a bid for re-election Nov. 8 but has not yet reached the end of his term. His clerk said he was not available for comment Wednesday. ST. LOUIS > Man convicted of killing ex-girlfriend’s new boyfriend • A man from St. Louis was convicted Wednesday of murdering his ex-girlfriend’s new boyfriend during a ight outside a Carondelet neighborhood apartment last year. Arthur Bolton, 24, of the 3900 block of South Compton Avenue, was found guilty of irst-degree murder and armed criminal action in the fatal shooting on Jan. 15, 2015, of Kenny Burgett, 19, who lived in the same block. Prosecutors said Bolton went to the home of his ex-girlfriend in the 7800 block of Tennessee Place and challenged Burgett to a ist ight. Police said that when the two went outside, Bolton fatally shot Burgett. Bolton’s attorney, Aurora Fluhr, said Bolton’s ex-girlfriend and three other neighbors had misidentiied Bolton. She said Bolton was “1,000 percent innocent” and planned to appeal. Sentencing is Jan. 27. Life imprisonment without parole is the mandatory sentence. Bolton’s brother, Michael Edwards, 22, of the 3900 block of South Compton, has a pending charge of witness tampering for allegedly making threatening calls to a witness in the case.

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • A5

Arrests, charges in MetroLink shootings BY NASSIM BENCHAABANE st. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. CLAIR COUNTY • In-

vestigators have charged two men in connection with recent MetroLink station shootings and say they have two others in custody. Shaquille R. Turner, 22, and DeAngelo L. Franklin, 22, both of East St. Louis, were each charged Wednesday with aggravated battery with a firearm and armed robbery. Both men were being held at the St. Clair County Jail with bail set at $1 million each.

Authorities said Franklin and Turner attempted to rob a man and then shot him in the face at the Swansea MetroLink station Monday night. The victim was taken to a St. Louis hospital in critical condition. He remained at the hospital Wednesday night. Authorities also took two men into custody Wednesday evening in connection with the Nov. 22 shooting at the East Riverfront Metro Link Station in East St. Louis. Police expect charges will be filed against the men this

tion him, but he was caught after a short foot chase, Toth said. A handgun was found on him. McHughes was arresting Franklin when Turner approached, Toth said. The deputy suspected Turner and Franklin were at the station together and began to question him as other law enforcement officers arrived on the scene. Police then received a call about a disoriented man on the train at the MetroLink Swansea station. There they found a man who had been shot in the face.

week. Scott Toth, an investigator with the St. Clair County sheriff’s office, said Franklin and Turner were caught by Sgt. Kenny McHughes shortly after the shooting. McHughes had just pulled into the parking lot of the Swansea MetroLink station Monday night for a routine patrol when he saw a man with a bandana over his face running across the lot. The man turned out to be Franklin, Toth said. Franklin ran away when the deputy tried to ques-

The shooting was caught on surveillance video, Toth said. Video showed the man was shot on the platform but then got up from the ground and walked onto the train, he said. “Video surveillance was key in this investigation,” Toth said. Toth said the two MetroLink station shootings were similar, but he did not provide more details pending the ongoing investigation. Nassim Benchaabane • 314-340-8167 @NassimBnchabane on Twitter nbenchaabane@post-dispatch.com

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A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NATION

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 12.01.2016

Prosecutor clears oicer in killing Shooting is ruled justiied; evidence rebuts assertions that slain man was unarmed ASSOCIATED PRESS

• A prosecutor cleared on Wednesday a Charlotte police oicer in the killing of a black man whose death touched of civil unrest, and he presented detailed evidence to rebut assertions that the slain man was unarmed. Officer Brentley Vinson was justified in opening fire on Keith Scott on Sept. 20 and won’t face charges, said CharlotteMecklenburg District Attorney Andrew Murray. Meanwhile, in Charleston, S.C., a jury began deliberations Wednesday in the murder trial of Michael Slager, a fired white police officer who was videotaped killing a black motorist after a traic stop. The jury of 11 whites and one black man got the case after a monthlong trial in which 55 witnesses testified. The jury deliberated an hour before retiring. In a 40-minute news presentation in Charlotte to news reporters, Murray produced evidence that Scott had been armed with a handgun and that Vinson, who is black, had feared Scott would shoot. The announcement “profoundly disappointed” Scott’s family, but they haven’t

CHARLOTTE, N.C.

CHARLOTTE OBSERVER VIA AP Rakeyia Scott, widow of Keith Lamont Scott, reacts at a news conference Wednesday in Charlotte, N.C. The police shooting of Scott was ruled justiied.

decided whether to file a lawsuit, their attorney said. Scott, 43, was killed in the parking lot of an apartment complex. Much of Murray’s presentation centered on the gun and on debunking witnesses who said Scott hadn’t been armed. Murray displayed a store’s surveillance video taken shortly before the incident, showing the outline of what appeared to be a holstered gun on Scott’s ankle. He said Scott’s DNA was found on a Colt .380-caliber semi-automatic handgun recovered at the scene. Murray released his report online and asked the public to review his findings before protesting again. Two nights of protests after the shooting resulted in looted stores near the scene and in downtown Charlotte, millions of dollars of damage, a fatal shooting and more than two dozen injuries to police oicers and others. “The community should read the report. Digest the report. Please do not act viscerally on news snippets,” Murray said. A group of several dozen people gathered at Charlotte police headquarters in the rain Wednesday night, saying they didn’t believe Scott had a gun. They said

Southern plagues: Drought, lood, ire and now killer storms ravage region

that a white oicer had actually shot Scott and that Murray and state investigators were using Vinson as a scapegoat despite body and dashboard camera footage showing only Vinson firing his weapon. The protests remained calm.

SLAGER CASE In the South Carolina shooting, Slager, the oicer, was charged with murder, but the judge said Wednesday that the jury could also consider manslaughter in the death of Walter Scott, 50, who died after five of the eight bullets Slager fired hit him in the back as he tried to run away. Slager was fired from the North Charleston Police Department and charged with murder shortly after the Scott family’s attorney made the bystander’s video public. The jurors repeatedly watched the images during the trial, even stopping to analyze them frame by frame. Scott ran from his car into a vacant lot after Slager pulled him over for a broken taillight. Slager testified that he had chased him down but that Scott had refused to be subdued and tried to run away again.

After new regulations, Oklahoma’s shakes calm BY SETH BORENSTEIN Associated Press

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Serenity Brooks, 5, holds a doll as she digs for her belongings after a storm ripped through the town of Rosalie, Ala., Wednesday.

SOUTH • FROM A1

Louisiana, Mississippi and Tennessee, the National Weather Service said. Tombstones were knocked over in the cemetery behind the badly damaged Rosalie Baptist Church, near where three people died in northeastern Alabama. “It looks like the rapture happened up there,” said church member Steve Hall, referring to the end-times belief of many Christians. “Are we thinking the Lord is trying to get our attention?” said the pastor, Roger Little. The National Weather Service was assessing damage from multiple possible tornadoes across the region. At least five hit Alabama, three more struck southern Tennessee, and one was confirmed in Louisiana and at least 4 in Mississippi, forecasters said. A potential tornado was spotted on the ground Wednesday a few miles from Atlanta, and flights were briefly delayed at the city’s main airport, but no major damage occurred. Three people were killed and one person critically injured in a mobile home after an apparent twister hit tiny Rosalie, about 115 miles northeast of Birmingham, said Jackson County Chief Deputy Rocky Harnen. A suspected tornado was responsible for the death of a husband and wife in southern Tennessee’s Polk County, while an unknown number of others were injured, said Tennessee Emergency Management Agency spokesman Dean Flener. No details were immediately available. The Daily Post-Athenian in Athens, Tenn., reported the Meigs County sherif’s oice said lightning was suspected as the cause of two deaths in a mobile home fire overnight. Shirley Knight, whose family owns a small propane business in Rosalie, said the storm crashed in on them in the middle of the night. Daybreak revealed mangled sheets of metal, insulation and a ladder hanging in trees. “We had a plaza, a service station and several buildings connected together, and it’s all gone,” said Knight, adding that the storm also destroyed a church and damaged buildings at a nearby Christmas tree farm. The same storm apparently hit a closed day care center in Ider, injuring seven

people, including three children who had left their mobile home to seek shelter, said Anthony Clifton, DeKalb County emergency management director. Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley issued a state of emergency because of the storms. Meanwhile, thousands of people were without power, including up to 45,000 homes at one point in Alabama. Many schools dismissed early in Alabama and Georgia to avoid having students on the roads in buses as storms continued to roll across the region Wednesday. Teams from the National Weather Service confirmed that at least two weak tornadoes struck western Alabama, and meteorologist Kurt Weber from Huntsville said they were assessing damage tracks from at least four other potential tornadoes. Tornadoes and hail also were reported Tuesday in Louisiana and Mississippi. The National Weather Service in Jackson, Miss., counted six confirmed tornadoes in areas of the state it monitors. Despite dozens of tornado warnings, authorities said no one was injured in Mississippi, but six homes were reported destroyed in one southeastern county. Mississippi Public Service Commissioner Brandon Presley said he came upon a UPS truck that was blown onto its side and struck a pickup truck. “I’ve never driven through something like this in my life,” Presley said. Torrential rain filled waterways and ponds that were drying up just days ago. Police in the northwestern Alabama city of Florence put out barriers to block roads that flooded with as much as 2 feet of water when fallen leaves clogged drainage systems during torrential downpours. Streams were cresting in western Alabama after as much as 4 inches of rain. All that water will only help snuf out wildfires that have burned thousands of acres across the region in recent weeks. Rain provided some relief for the Gatlinburg area on Wednesday. All the wildfires in the city are now out, but some are still smoldering, according to the Tennessee Emergency Management Agency. Firefighters are still checking for hotspots, said Gatlinburg Fire Chief Greg Miller. Some people had to deal with more than one problem. A six-person crew that spent all Tuesday night fighting fires in Gatlinburg left

the fire scene only to help respond to a tornado in McMinn County, Tenn., said Fire Chief Bill Roach of Englewood, Tenn. “They’re wore out,” Roach said. “They’ve had very little sleep, and I know I’ve had two hours since Monday morning. We’re to our limits.”

FIRES ‘HUMAN-CAUSED’ At least 53 people were treated for injuries at hospitals after the fires, though their conditions were not known. Massive walls of flames spread down the mountains into Gatlinburg and Pigeon Forge on Monday with shocking speed, said those who fled with little more than the clothes on their backs. The fires are estimated to have damaged or destroyed more than 700 homes and businesses — nearly half of them in the city of Gatlinburg. Park Superintendent Cassius Cash said late Wednesday afternoon that the fire was “likely to be human-caused.” There were numerous new blazes overnight, according to officials — most of them brush fires. First responders were also struggling with small mudslides and rock slides as the lush foliage that once held the ground in place has burned away. Park officials estimated that about 16,000 acres had burned by Wednesday afternoon. Search-and-rescue eforts were ongoing Wednesday in the charred, smokechoked mountains, but some areas throughout Sevier County remained unreachable, authorities said. The Red Cross launched a service to try to reunite those who were separated; the number of those missing is not clear. “We’re going to be OK,” Gatlinburg Mayor Mike Werner reassured residents repeatedly throughout a news conference Wednesday morning. The mayor said authorities were still working to identify the dead and did not release any details about how they were killed. State law enforcement set up a hotline for people to report missing friends and family. Gatlinburg Police Chief Randall Brackins said they had searched about 30 percent or less of the city so far. The Washington Post contributed to this report.

WASHINGTON • The rate of earthquakes in Oklahoma has dropped dramatically since late May, when the state limited wastewater injections into energy wells, an Associated Press statistical analysis shows. And a new scientific study says the state is on its way back to calmer times that prevailed before a huge jump in manmade quakes. For quake-prone parts of Oklahoma, the state ordered what is essentially a 40 percent reduction in injection of the saltwater that scientists generally blame for the massive increase in earthquakes. This year, before the new rules went into effect on May 28, Oklahoma averaged 2.3 quakes a day. Since then the average dropped to 1.3 a day, based on the AP’s analysis of U.S. Geological Survey data of earthquakes of magnitude 3.0 or larger. But some of those fewer post-regulatory quakes have been large and damaging. “Definitely the rate of quakes have gone down,” said USGS geophysicist Robert Williams. “At the same time we had more magnitude 5s this year than ever before historically in Oklahoma. It’s good news on one hand. It’s heading in the right direction but troubling to see these large damaging quakes in Pawnee and Cushing.” Over the last couple years, scientists have linked a dramatic increase in earthquakes in Oklahoma, Kansas and Texas to the practice of injecting wastewater from hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, back underground after drilling for oil and gas. Higher volumes of wastewater injected are connected to more quakes with the fluids adding more pressure to tiny faults. After Kansas regulated wastewater volume in March 2015, a January AP analysis showed that Kansas felt fewer quakes, while less-regulated Oklahoma got more. In response, Oklahoma announced new regulations. This November, Oklahoma had an average of less than a quake per day, though a 5.0 magnitude quake shook the vulnerable Cushing area where massive oil reserves are stored. “The trend is obvious,” Stanford University professor William Ellsworth said. He said the AP numbers were similar but not identical to a trend he calculated using a diferent database and diferent size earthquakes. He said the new regulations were partly responsible for the fallof in earthquakes, but he noted there also had been less drilling because of a crash in oil prices. Williams of USGS said it was important to put even the reduced one-a-day quakes in context. Before 2009, Oklahoma averaged one magnitude 3.0 earthquake a year; now it is good news that the rate is down to one a day, he said. In 2015, Oklahoma averaged 2.3 quakes of magnitude 3.0 or larger a day. In 2014, it was 1.6 per day. A study published Wednesday in the journal Science Advances by a different Stanford seismologist, Mark Zoback, saw the reduction in Oklahoma quakes and used intricate computer simulations to show that the rate of earthquakes will continue to go down and eventually return to near pre-2009 levels. Williams and Ellsworth, who weren’t part of the study, said Zoback’s work made sense. “We’re not out of the woods yet. There is still a possibility for potentially damaging earthquakes,” Zoback said. “It’s going to take a few years for the situation to return to normal.” Oklahoma has had three quakes magnitude 5.0 or larger since 2014, and two of them occurred after the May regulations took efect: the September 5.8 in Pawnee and the November quake in Cushing.


NEWS

12.01.2016 • THURSDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A7

LETTER FROM WASHINGTON

Trump’s tweets undermine any meaningful messages Unproven claims, personal attacks add up

ASSOCIATED PRESS

President-elect Donald Trump, shown Nov. 10 at the White House, continues to fire back at critics via Twitter.

FOR GOODNESS SAKE! CHUCK RAASCH St. Louis Post-Dispatch

WASHINGTON • President-elect Donald

Trump struck the right chord with American critics of the late Fidel Castro, tweeting “Fidel Castro is dead!” and calling the Cuban leader “a brutal dictator who oppressed his own people for nearly six decades.” It was in stark contrast with President Barack Obama, whose tepid response — “history will record and judge the enormous impact of this singular figure on the people and the world around him” — could have been said about anyone from Mahatma Gandhi to Hitler. The divergent reactions were a vivid display of how differently foreign policy will be conducted in the Trump administration. It was an extension of the inyour-face style and the call-evil-whatit-is doctrine he broadly espoused on the campaign trail. There are critics of this break-the-china diplomacy in a world of complex dangers, but Americans do know where Trump stands when it comes to the late Castro. With Obama, who more than any president opened up relations with modern Cuba, not so much. Obama’s reaction to Castro’s death added to the final chapter of a president who often drew lines in foreign sand — from Syria to Guantanamo Bay — only to see them obliterated by inaction or the hot wind of real conflict. After almost six decades in power, in which the American right vilified Castro as an oppressor and killer, and the American left legitimized him as a revolutionary who eschewed free enterprise for free health care, Americans were looking for clues of how this president recorded and judged the dead revolutionary. Instead they were served stale milquetoast. Trump looked more decisive, in relief. And then he stepped on his own message. Even after his Castro reaction earned praise from liberal columnist Richard Cohen, Trump showed the flip side as he so often did as a candidate. Even as he has held more than two dozen meetings with prospective cabinet and administration hires in the three weeks since the election, he has returned to the reactive Twitter postings that drew so many followers and detractors during the campaign. Trump tweeted unproven claims that widespread election fraud took place Nov. 8, and he then re-tweeted critiques of CNN reporter Jeff Zeleny for accurately reporting that the claims were, as far as anyone had been able to prove, baseless. It was a stunning attack on the integrity of the process that has made him president. Coming from the prospective chief executive, its impact on undermining the confidence in a foundation of the republic — free and fair elections — cannot and

should not be underestimated. The two studies that Trump spokesman Jason Miller cited to support Trump’s claims, in fact, do not. As Politico reported, an author of one Miller citation said there were “zero findings” of the fraud that Trump alleged happened on Election Day; the other report cited was questioned and debunked through peer review. ProPublica.org, the independent, investigative site that did as much as any news group to monitor the 2016 elections, declared that they “went of without serious incident.” Yet Trump attacked Zeleny — a native Nebraskan, grounded in print at local newspapers, with a reputation as a tireless fact-checker and a courteous manner of everyone’s favorite son — as a “bad reporter” for doing what the First Amendment requires of a journalist. One of Trump’s re-tweets attacking Zeleny came from an account of someone identified as a 16-year-old with a follower base that might have been smaller than his high school class. Trump is in a position now where such declarations are far beyond the entertaining, out-loud musings of a brash New Yorker. Will he continue them as president? His handling of questions about how he’ll divorce the presidency from his business dealings seem to say yes. He’s answered most through cryptic social media posts, if at all, although he tweeted Wednesday he’ll hold a news conference Dec. 15 to talk about it, his first news conference in almost five months. The presidency has often been described as too big for any one person. The best fill it expansively with broad strokes and big pictures, not through a thousand nettling claims against individual Americans, or midnight tweets of unproven claims. Americans rallied to FDR’s “only thing we have to fear is fear itself” to confront the Great Depression, sensing he had seen something over the horizon to believe in. Americans celebrated Ronald Reagan’s “Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall” as proof that freedom was the sunshine that ended the darkness of the Cold War. Both of these late presidents had their critics and still do. Neither, over long years in oice, displayed the thin skin that Trump has in the three weeks since he was elected. They stayed in the big picture. It’s impossible to imagine either squandering the time — or narrowing the vision — to engage in the kind of personal attacks that Trump joined on a single reporter. In jumping back in the Twitter weeds and making unproven allegations and personal attacks, Trump is in danger of undercutting the bully pulpit he had so deftly used to say out loud what many Americans thought of Castro. Retributions based on falsehoods against the press was Castro’s thing. Chuck Raasch • 202-298-6880 @craasch on Twitter craasch@post-dispatch.com

DIGEST TOWN AND COUNTY > Thomas Jeferson statue approved for display • The Board of Aldermen has agreed to an ofer to place a life-size bronze statue of Thomas Jeferson in a prominent place in the city. The board authorized an agreement Monday night for the ofer by resident Donald Koch’s charitable foundation to provide the statue, known as “Declaration of Independence.” The city’s public art commission and ultimately the aldermen will have the final say in selection of the site and other details such as insurance. The statue, by nationally known sculptor George Lundeen, is valued at about $90,000 and may cost $900 a year to insure. The city already has the “Discovery” by sculptor Harry Weber, with central figures of a horse and dog. Aldermen also gave first reading of the city’s 2017 budget, with a slight spending increase over 2016 and an average 2.75 percent increase in employee salaries. The number of employees will remain at 50 fulltime workers. They also began the process of approving a deer-control contract for the eighth consecutive season. The White Bufalo firm of Connecticut would be paid $74,000 to cull up to 220 deer. Deer remain a problem in the city, causing car accidents and property damage, oicials said. (Special to the Post-Dispatch)

URBANA, ILL. > University of Illinois to study ‘sanctuary’ status for immigrants • A University of Illinois working group will study legal ramifications of making the campus a sanctuary for students living in the U.S. without legal permission. SPRINGFIELD, ILL. > Lawmakers ask Illinois governor to resume contract talks • Nearly three dozen Illinois legislators of both political stripes are asking Gov. Bruce Rauner to resume contract negotiations with the state’s largest public-employee union. The lawmakers said Wednesday that the issue was crucial to the struggling state. Decatur Democratic Rep. Sue Scherer says “nothing happens if you’re not at the table.” Rauner, a Republican, ended talks last winter with the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees state council. A state labor board sided with Rauner this month that talks were at “impasse.” That means the governor can impose his terms. He did that a second time Wednesday in announcing an employee drug and alcohol testing plan. AFSCME says in a statement it will talk. Rauner spokeswoman Catherine Kelly says the two sides should cooperate on implementing the governor’s provisions. (Associated Press)

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A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

LOCAL

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 12.01.2016

East St. Louis to commemorate the deadly race riots of 1917

Employers adjust as overtime rule hovers in limbo OVERTIME • FROM A1

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY EDWARDSVILLE, BOWEN ARCHIVES

A victim of rioting by whites in East St. Louis on July 2, 1917. Few photographs of the savage rampage exist, partly because rioters attacked news photographers and smashed their cameras. City police oicers also harassed journalists who were covering the riot.

RIOTS • FROM A1

commemoration next year is necessary to mark a crucial part of the city and the country’s history. “We can’t own our future without owning our past,” said East St. Louis Mayor Emeka Jackson-Hicks. “It was a dark time that holds a lot of pain.” A series of events begins in January alongside Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. observances, continues through Black History Month and culminates with a festival in July. A monument also is to be erected to serve as a permanent reminder of one of the most deadly riots in the U.S. Details were announced Wednesday in a ceremony at the East St. Louis campus of Southern Illinois University Edwardsviille. “We are standing on bloody ground,” said the Rev. Joseph Brown, chairman of the commemoration commission, referring to the land where the campus is now situated, just of East Broadway. For Brown, 72, and others his age, they remember stories by their parents and grandparents of the deadly riots. Of massive fires, bloody streets and residents fleeing the city by the thousands. And media accounts gave grisly details

of the night. “For an hour and a half last evening I saw the massacre of helpless negroes at Broadway and Fourth Street, in downtown East St. Louis, where a black skin was a death warrant,” wrote Post-Dispatch reporter Carlos F. Hurd in a story published a day after the violence. The eyewitness account by Hurd, who had gained fame five years earlier with interviews of Titanic survivors, would serve as one of the most chilling of the time. “The sheds in the rear of negroes’ houses on Fourth Street had been ignited to drive out the negro occupants of the houses,” Hurd wrote. “And the slayers were waiting for them to come out. It was stay in and be roasted, or come out and be slaughtered.” Hurd’s detailed account is often referenced by historians. Speakers on Wednesday said history must stay in the forefront as other events such as the Ferguson unrest take place so that there is perspective. So that we can know how far we have come and how much work still needs to be done, said Michael McMillan, president and CEO of the Urban League of Metropolitan St. Louis. “We were created as a result of the race riots,” McMillan said of the local Ur-

ban League chapter, the fourth oldest in the country. He said there were plans to open a satellite oice in East St. Louis as the Urban League takes a more regional approach. Brown got emotional at the ceremony, as did Jackson-Hicks. The commemoration will be painful. But it will be healing, Brown said. It’s been 100 years, but for many African-Americans, violence is still a very real part of their life, with a rash of police shootings of black men. For East St. Louisans, news accounts from 1917 don’t feel distant at all. In his account, Hurd wrote of a lyncher calling for others to join in and “pull for East St. Louis.” “The rope was long, but not too long for the number of hands that grasped it, and this time the negro was lifted to a height of about seven feet from the ground. The body was left hanging there.” For more on the commemorative events scheduled, go to www.estl1917ccci.org. Doug Moore • 314-340-8125 @dougwmoore on Twitter dmoore@post-dispatch.com

Planned Parenthood iles federal lawsuit challenging Missouri’s abortion restrictions ABORTION • FROM A1

Missouri was the first state in the nation to adopt both laws, which abortion rights advocates have long argued do little to protect women’s health. Instead, they say, the laws block women’s rights to have abortions by making requirements so stringent that few providers can meet them. Mary Kogut, president and CEO of Planned Parenthood of the St. Louis Region and Southwest Missouri, said lifting these restrictions would allow Planned Parenthood health centers in Joplin, Springfield, Columbia and Kansas City to ofer abortion services. Kogut said the restrictions “have created a situation where for 1.2 million women in Missouri who could be impacted with a pregnancy, where they might make a decision about an abortion, there is only one facility for them to go to,” Kogut said. The Planned Parenthood affiliate serving the Kansas City area and Kansas and Oklahoma is listed as another plaintif in the suit, filed in federal court in Jeferson City, along with Dr. Ronald N. Yeomans, who provides abortions in Kansas for Planned Parenthood and wants to provide the services in Missouri. Defendants named in the lawsuit include the director of Missouri’s Department of Health and Senior Services Peter Lyskowski; Attorney General Chris Koster; and the prosecuting attorneys in Boone, Jackson, Jasper and Greene counties. Susan Klein, legislative liaison for Missouri Right to Life, said it was “absurd” for Planned Parenthood to challenge requirements to ensure that physicians who perform abortions have hospital privileges and that clinics are clean and medically up to date. “Women have not been harmed, they’ve been helped. They’re getting better care than they would without the restrictions,” Klein said. But abortion rights advocates insist the laws were intended to limit access. Right now, Planned Parenthood in St. Louis is the only facility that meets the legal requirements to provide abortions, down from 29 clinics statewide in 1982. In a press call with reporters Wednesday, Kogut and Laura McQuade, CEO of the Planned Parenthood affiliate for mid-Missouri and Kansas, said that the organization had providers lined up in Kansas City, Columbia, Springfield and Joplin to begin performing abortions if they win in court.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

In this September 2015 photo, demonstrators show support for Planned Parenthood as an anti-abortion demonstrator stands amongst them at the Country Club Plaza in Kansas City. Planned Parenthood and its allies iled lawsuits Wednesday in North Carolina, Missouri and Alaska, challenging abortion restrictions.

Columbia’s Planned Parenthood Clinic was the most recent location to stop providing abortions, after the University of Missouri revoked the hospital privileges of Dr. Colleen McNicholas in December 2015. A federal judge later blocked the state health department from pulling the clinic’s abortion license, ruling that the staf had been intimidated by state legislators who had formed a panel to investigate Planned Parenthood’s practices. But when the clinic’s abortion license expired in June, it couldn’t be immediately renewed because a doctor with hospital privileges was unavailable. Planned Parenthood has since vowed to renew performing medication-induced abortions at its Columbia location if the federal lawsuit proves successful. And that’s what supporters are hoping for. “It’s always scary to have your constitutionally protected rights decided in a court of law,” said Alison Dreith, executive director of NARAL Pro-Choice Missouri. “But I’m excited and optimistic.” Calling the requirements “an undue burden,” Dreith said it was unreasonable for a state to have only one abortion provider for millions of Missouri women scattered across the state.

Coupled with a law in Missouri that requires women to wait 72 hours before an abortion, it forces them to take on added travel costs, Dreith said. “They have to take time of work, find child care, lose out on that pay and often have to travel miles and miles to get there,” she said. Beyond the courtroom, several St. Louis area lawmakers have said they plan to file bills challenging the same restrictions, citing the Supreme Court’s ruling on the Texas laws as momentum to push the legislation, despite GOP supermajorities in both chambers of the state Legislature. Some Republican lawmakers, meanwhile, are considering more restrictions. Sen. Bob Onder, R-Lake Saint Louis, told the Associated Press that he was drafting legislation requiring abortion providers to track fetal tissue from surgery to its disposal. He’s also looking into potential protections for abortion clinic employees to act as whistleblowers. Bill filing begins Dec. 1. Celeste Bott • 573-556-6186 @celestebott on Twitter cbott@post-dispatch.com

Now, the rule is in limbo. Workers and their bosses can wonder if President-elect Donald Trump may try to cancel or change it after taking oice in January. He indicated he might. Many St. Louis employers had already prepared for the new rule by changing the way they pay employees. Some junior managers got nice raises, pushing their pay above $47,476 a year, the new rule’s cutof for overtime eligibility. Other salaried managers were told that they were now hourly employees eligible for overtime. “For many big St. Louis companies, it’s a huge undertaking,” said R. Michael Lowenbaum, a Clayton labor lawyer who advises companies. “They had to look at everybody’s job.” With the rule now suspended, workers and their bosses wonder what to do next. Should they put pay back the way it was, or wait and see what happens? Federal law requires that most employees be paid time-and-a-half for work over 40 hours per week. But it makes an exception for salaried workers whose duties are executive, administrative or professional. Under the old rule, those workers needn’t be paid overtime if they earned more than $23,600 per year, a figure that hadn’t changed since 2004. Doubling the cutoff means millions of lower-level managers and administrators would be eligible for overtime pay. States sued to block the rule, and U.S. District Judge Amos Mazzant, an Obama appointee, delayed it last week until the case can come to trial. The judge noted that the Fair Labor Standards Act requires the government to look at what workers do and how they are paid in deciding on overtime. But the big increase in the pay cutof is “essentially a de facto salary-only test,” he wrote in his 20-page ruling. The U.S. Department of Labor said in a statement that the injunction denies “a fair day’s pay for a long day’s work for millions of hardworking Americans,” adding that it was confident the rule is legal. But the judge’s order shifts the question to the incoming Trump administration, which could stop defending the suit or begin the lengthy process of changing the rule. Trump has said little on the issue. In an August interview with Circa, a news site, he cited the rule as an example of over-regulation. “We would love to see a delay or a carve-out of sorts for our small business owners,” Trump said in the interview. Actually, businesses with less than $500,000 in annual revenue are already exempt. Reversing the overtime rule might pose some political risk for Trump, who drew much support from blue-collar voters. Democrats could denounce him for denying overtime to people on the bottom of the middle class. Only 7 percent of full-time salaried employees are currently eligible for overtime pay, down from 62 percent in 1975, according to the Labor Department. But the efect of the rule would vary widely among businesses. Schnuck Markets Inc., the Maryland Heights-based supermarket chain, said most of its employees were paid hourly, leaving only about 1 percent of its 14,000-person workforce affected by the overtime rule. The company dealt with those on a case-by-case basis, a spokesman said. But Wal-Mart Stores Inc., one of the biggest employers in the St. Louis area, handed out raises to all its entry-level managers, raising their pay to $48,500 from $45,000, keeping them exempt from overtime. Those raises will apparently stick. “We are still reviewing the court’s ruling, but we don’t anticipate making any changes to what we’ve already shared with our associates,” a Wal-Mart spokesman said in an email. By contrast, the Glik’s chain of more than 60 clothing stores plans to reverse a decision to switch about 10 employees to hourly pay from salary. Dealing with the rule “was incredibly upsetting,” said Jef Glik, CEO of the Granite City company founded by his family in 1897. It mainly afected young people just out of college and starting careers. Glik recalled when he began as a young assistant buyer for a retailer in Houston. “My buyer said to me, ‘You’re my assistant and you’re here when I’m here. I start at 7 a.m. and I work until 6 p.m.’ ” The overtime rule would make it hard for new people to learn the way he did, Glik said. “I want them to have the same opportunity I had. Go for it. Climb the ladder.” He and his managers spent about 20 hours and “thousands of dollars” on legal advice deciding how to deal with the rule. His initial solution was to switch the young grads to an hourly rate so that they work the same 45-hour week while receiving about the same total pay. Now, he’s reversing that. Glick said his young salaried workers didn’t like the idea of being hourly employees. “It was upsetting for them as well because they didn’t graduate fromcollege for that,” he said. Lowenbaum, the labor lawyer, is advising clients that have made changes not to reverse them — especially if they gave raises — but to wait to see what happens. “It’s probably bad for employee morale, and there is no reason to backtrack,” he said. Even if the rule is reinstated, employers won’t have to grant back pay to workers who exceed 40 hours, said the lawyer, and he doesn’t expect the rule to survive Trump. “It’s probably dead, I would think,” Lowenbaum said. Jim Gallagher • 314-340-8390 jgallagher@post-dispatch.com @JimGallagher14 on Twitter


NATION

12.01.2016 • Thursday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • A9

Trump announces he will leave business ‘in total’ Plan leaves open how he will avoid conlicts of interest BY DREW HARWELL Washington Post

President-elect Donald J. Trump tweeted Wednesday morning that he would soon leave his “great business in total” to focus on the presidency, a response to growing worries over his global conflicts of interest. The tweets followed Trump’s morning announcement, which appeared to echo his long insistence that he would cede the company’s management to his children as a way of putting distance between his private interests and public power. But it remained unclear whether the new arrangement would include a full sale of Trump’s stake or, as he has offered before, a ceding of company management to his children, which ethics advisers have said would not resolve worries that the business could still influence his decisions in the Oval Oice. “I will be holding a major news conference in New York City with my children on December

ASSOCIATED PRESS

President-elect Donald Trump gives the thumbs-up as he arrives at a Trump golf club recently in Bedminster, N.J.

15 to discuss the fact that I will be leaving my great business in total in order to fully focus on running the country in order to MAKE AMERICA GREAT AGAIN!” Trump tweeted. “While I am not mandated to do this under the law, I feel it is visually important, as President, to in no way have a conflict of interest with my various businesses. Hence, legal documents are being crafted which take me

completely out of business operations. The Presidency is a far more important task!” Presidents are not bound by the strict conflict-of-interest laws governing most U.S. elected oicials. But most modern presidents have agreed to sell or sequester their assets in a “blind trust,” led by an independent manager with supreme control, in order to keep past business deals, investments and rela-

tionships from influencing their White House term. Giving company management to his children — Donald Jr., Eric and Ivanka — would still leave open the potential for Trump to make presidential decisions for their benefit. The children have already played a key part in Trump’s governing preparations, serving on the transition team now selecting key appointees and sitting in on meetings with foreign heads of state. Trump spokespeople did not immediately return requests for more details on the move. But Richard Painter, chief White House ethics lawyer under President George W. Bush, said the move did not appear to ofer enough of a division to keep entanglement worries at bay. “That’s business operations, not ownership. The problem is, we need to resolve the conflicts of interest that arise from his ownership. And we’re hearing nothing about how that’s getting resolved,” Painter said. “Even if he does not operate the businesses, you’re going to have lots of people working for the business running around the world trying to cut deals,” Painter added. “And it’s critical that none of those people discuss U.S. business in a way that could be

interpreted, or misinterpreted, of ofering quid pro quo … or soliciting a bribe on the part of the president.” The weeks since Trump’s electoral victory have been marked by a series of entanglements between his private ventures and public ambitions. Trump welcomed a group of Indian business executives to meet with him and his family at Trump Tower, where talk turned to the potential for new real-estate deals. Trump and his daughter, Ivanka, who is likely to play a key part in running the company, met with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe during Trump’s first meeting as president-elect with a foreign government leader. His company, the Trump Organization, has over the years sealed lucrative real-estate and branding deals for business in at least 18 countries and territories across the world, including in places where the U.S. has sensitive diplomatic ties, such as Turkey, Azerbaijan and India. Trump’s company is also pitching foreign diplomats on his new luxury hotel in Washington as a place to book rooms and hold meetings.

Treasury, Commerce picks say growth will balance tax plan Analysts put 10-year cost at $6 trillion BY YLAN Q. MUI AND JIM TANKERSLE Washington Post

President-elect Donald Trump’s nominee to lead the Treasury Department called on Wednesday reforming the nation’s tax code his top priority, promising tax breaks for the middle class but no overall tax cut for highincome households. Steven Mnuchin, a former Goldman Sachs banker and Hollywood financier, confirmed in an interview Wednesday on CNBC’s Squawk Box that Trump had asked him to serve in the administration. Billionaire industrial-

ist Wilbur Ross also confirmed that he is the nominee for Commerce Secretary. Also Wednesday, Trump announced that he had tapped Todd Ricketts, from the billionaire family that owns the Chicago Cubs, to be deputy commerce secretary. In the joint interview, Mnuchin and Ross professed confidence in the new administration’s ability to boost economic growth as high as 4 percent a year. The projection includes Trump’s proposed overhaul of the tax code, including streamlining individual tax rates into three brackets and reducing the corporate tax rate to 15 percent. Independent research groups have estimated the plan could cost as much as $6 trillion over the next decade.

Mnuchin said Wednesday that he believed the tax cuts would generate more jobs, helping to ofset the cost. Mnuchin also said that a reduced tax rate for the highest earners would be ofset by the elimination or curtailing of many deductions that favor the wealthy. Mnuchin also pushed back against analysis by the nonpartisan Tax Policy Center that found the bulk of the benefits under Trump’s plan would go to wealthy households, while some single-parent households would end up paying higher taxes. He highlighted plans for a child-care tax credit and rebates for lowerincome families. The comments highlight two potential sources of tension for the Trump administration as it

pushes its tax plan — one with congressional Republicans, the other with the federal budget deficit. They also fly in the face of every independent analysis of Trump’s plan, including one analysis Trump has frequently cited favorably. Mnuchin reiterated Trump’s commitment to cutting taxes for the middle class, a key diference between the president-elect’s campaign plan and the tax blueprint put forth by GOP leaders on Capitol Hill. The congressional plan, like Trump’s, would cut taxes for the wealthy and for corporations, but it would not do nearly as much as Trump would to cut taxes for lower- and middle-income Americans. Mnuchin also said two things about Trump’s tax plan that in-

dependent analyses do not support: that the wealthy will receive no net tax benefits from the plan and the plan will not add to the deficit. Even the friendliest analysis toward Trump, work by the independent Tax Foundation that the Trump campaign frequently cited to bolster his proposals, finds Trump’s plan would add at least $2.6 trillion to the federal debt over a decade, and as much as $3.9 trillion, after accounting for increased economic growth. The Tax Foundation also finds Trump’s plan would boost incomes for the top 1 percent of U.S. earners by 10 to 16 percent, an amount that dwarfs the benefits lower- and middle-income earners would see from the plan.

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M 1 Thursday • 12.01.2016 • a10

OPEC’s ‘historic’ moment: oil output will be reduced

Obama moves to lock in vehicle eiciency rules EPA wants to act before Trump takes oice By daVId shEPardsON Reuters

WashINGTON • The Environ-

mental Protection Agency said Wednesday that it wouldl push to lock in fuel efficiency standards central to outgoing President Barack Obama’s climate policy before Donald Trump’s administration takes over in January. Automakers had appealed to the president-elect, who has been critical of Obama’s climate policies, to review the rules requiring them to nearly double fleet-wide fuel efficiency by 2025, saying they impose significant costs and are out of step with consumer preferences. The EPA under law had to decide by April 2018 whether to modify the 2022-2025 model year vehicle emission rules requiring average fleet-wide efficiency of more than 50 miles per gallon. Instead, the agency said it would end the public comment period by Dec. 30, and could move to lock in the rules after then and before Obama leaves oice Jan. 20. The EPA in a statement said it concluded after a lengthy review that automakers could meet the 2025 standards. Janet McCabe, EPA acting assistant administrator, told reporters that the technical record could “arguably support strengthening the 2022 through 2025 standards” but that the EPA believed it “is not the time to introduce uncertainty by changing the standard.” She denied that the impending administration change prompted the decision, but the EPA website previously showed a timeline that suggested a decision on midterm review was not expected until mid-2017. The Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers, a trade group representing General Motors, Ford, Toyota, Volkswagen and others, blasted the decision,

ASSOCIATED PRESS

OPEC oil ministers meeting Wednesday in Vienna, Austria, where they agreed to decrease oil production.

By GEOrGE JahN aNd KIyOKO METZLEr Associated Press

VIENNa • Breaking with years

of inaction, OPEC agreed Wednesday to cut its oil output for the first time since 2008. The move in efect scraps its strategy of squeezing U.S. competition through high supply that had backfired by lowering prices and draining the cartel’s own economies. The reduction of 1.2 million barrels a day is significant, leaving OPEC’s daily output at 32.5 million barrels. And OPEC President Mohammed Bin Saleh Al-Sada said non-OPEC nations were expected to pare an additional 600,000 barrels a day. The combined cut will result, at least in the short term, in somewhat more pricey oil — and, by extension, car fuel, heating and electricity. The international benchmark for crude jumped 8.3 percent, or $3.86, to $50.24 on Wednesday. In the longer term, however, analysts say it’s highly unlikely that oil will return to the highs

of around $100 a barrel last seen two years ago. That’s partly due to the fact that President-elect Donald Trump has promised to free up more oil drilling in the U.S., which would increase global supply. Demand is also not recovering as the world economy sags. Playing tribute to “a historic moment,” Al-Sada said that Wednesday’s move “will definitely balance the market and help (in) reducing the stock overhang.” Al-Sada said the OPEC cutback would take effect Jan. 1, with consultations planned on the exact timing of the nonOPEC reductions. Russia alone is committed to taking 300,000 barrels a day of the market. With the production cut, OPEC will not only benefit from gaining more dollars per barrel. It can also lay claim once again to playing a part in influencing world prices. And its tentative alliance with Russia and other non-OPEC nations may give it — and them — additional clout in future competition for market share with

U.S. producers, which are sure to return in increasing numbers if crude prices move upward. Wednesday’s decision was a departure from years of infighting among members refusing to give up their market share and a resulting series of inconclusive meetings. In another reflection of new-found discipline within the cartel, Al-Sada said Indonesia’s membership had been suspended after it refused to accept its share of proposed output cuts, reducing the number of OPEC countries to 13. Part of the focus after Wednesday’s decision is how well it holds. OPEC gave up assigning quotas in part because members have ignored them in their quest for petrodollars. But officials were displaying new confidence. In comments addressed to nay-sayers about his organization’s relevance, AlSada said its decision “means the weight of OPEC and the resiliency of OPEC is still there and it will continue to be there.” “Today’s unity is a very explicit sign about the position of OPEC,” he added.

saying, “This extraordinary and premature rush to judgment circumvents the serious analysis necessary to make sure the [vehicle] standards appropriately balance fuel efficiency, carbon reduction, afordability and employment.” The group said that it looked forward to working with the Trump administration on revisions and that “the evidence is abundantly clear that with low gas prices, consumers are not choosing the cars necessary to comply with increasingly unrealistic standards.” It had previously asked Trump to review the automotive greenhouse gas rules and other Obama administration actions that enable California and certain other states to mandate sales of electric vehicles. Environmental groups applauded the administration move and said they expected the EPA to finalize the rules by Jan. 20. “What’s not to like about a plan, agreed to by the automakers, that cuts oil use, saves money at the pump and reduces pollution?” said Daniel Becker, director of the Safe Climate Campaign, a Washington-based group that supports strong climate action. The Republican-led Congress or the Trump administration could seek to reverse or modify the rules. However, if the current EPA rules are locked in, it could make doing so more difficult and time consuming. Auto lobbyists said the next administration will have a variety of ways of reversing the EPA action, including reopening the technical assessment report. They also said the Obama administration’s move could backfire by bringing more attention to the issue early in the Trump administration. Trump’s transition team did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

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MARKET WATCH

12.01.2016 • Thursday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • A11

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM /BUSINESS Stocks closed mostly lower Wednesday amid heavy selling of utilities and other steady dividend payers. Yields on bonds rose sharply, and that sent bond substitutes in the stock market lower. Eight of the 11 sectors of the Standard and Poor’s 500 index fell.

Hess

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Dec 16 Jan 17 Dec 16

336.75 1032.25 380.50

-10.25 -3.50

Wheat CHICAGO MERC

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Feeder cattle

Jan 17 Dec 16 Dec 16 Dec 16 Dec 16

128.42 110.75 51.02 16.94 262.15

+1.45 +1.83 +.67 +.02 +2.65

ICE

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Cotton

Dec 16 Dec 16 Jan 17

72.46 147.50 28.52

+.08 -2.40 -.14

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Crude oil

Jan 17 Dec 16 Dec 16 Jan 17

49.44 1.4908 157.09 3.352

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2,100

Hogs Milk Copper

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A

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DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

NASD 1,910 1,713 994 1807 221 55

5,302 3,620 1188 1813 208 52

1,950

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Coffee

StocksRecap NYSE

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HIGH 19225.29 9042.65 647.63 10890.04 5393.15 2214.10 1639.36 23154.19 1337.33

LOW 19123.38 8906.36 632.67 10838.45 5323.68 2198.81 1627.49 22991.07 1320.95

CLOSE 19123.58 8981.65 632.67 10838.48 5323.68 2198.81 1627.52 22991.07 1322.34

CHG. +1.98 +38.07 -21.87 +20.78 -56.24 -5.85 -3.59 -55.92 -5.88

%CHG. WK +0.01% s +0.43% t -3.34% s +0.19% s -1.05% t -0.27% t -0.22% t -0.24% t -0.44% t

MO QTR s s s s t t s s s s s s s s s s s s

YTD +9.75% +19.62% +9.49% +6.85% +6.32% +7.58% +16.37% +8.61% +16.41%

Sugar

Gas blend Heating oil Natural gas

TKR

AT&T Inc Aegion Corp Allied Health Amdocs Ameren Corp American Railcar ABInBev Arch Coal Bank of America Belden Inc Boeing Build-A-Bear Wkshp Caleres Inc. Cass Info. Systems Centene Corp. Charter Citigroup Commerce Banc. Edgewell Emerson Energizer Holdings Enterprise Financial Esco Technologies Express Scripts Foresight Energy FutureFuel General Motors Home Depot Huttig Building Prod Isle of Capri LMI Aerospace

T AEGN AHPI DOX AEE ARII BUD ARCH BAC BDC BA BBW CAL CASS CNC CHTR C CBSH EPC EMR ENR EFSC ESE ESRX FELP FF GM HD HBP ISLE LMIA

52-WK LO HI 33.09 16.00 0.50 50.06 41.33 35.43 101.00 59.05 10.99 36.51 102.10 10.01 21.27 45.05 47.36 214.06 34.52 35.66 67.94 41.25 28.86 25.01 31.50 64.46 1.07 9.77 26.69 109.62 3.01 10.62 7.01

43.89 25.63 1.91 61.33 54.08 57.57 136.08 86.47 20.88 75.91 152.11 14.98 33.70 72.45 75.57 281.43 56.83 55.44 88.00 56.82 53.41 39.45 57.20 89.00 7.80 14.80 36.52 139.00 7.00 23.32 10.55

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV NAME 38.63 24.19 1.16 58.97 49.12 44.89 103.27 78.03 21.12 73.90 150.56 14.35 32.74 70.00 57.63 275.31 56.39 54.81 79.14 56.44 44.87 38.40 55.90 75.88 6.57 13.73 34.53 129.40 6.12 22.42 9.06

-.85 -.31 -.08 ... -1.81 +.87 -1.54 +2.20 +.91 -.40 -1.08 -.10 +.19 -.65 +.03 -5.18 +.87 +.05 -1.15 +2.04 +.86 -.20 +.20 -.98 +.36 +.02 -.04 -.22 +.09 +.20 +.10

-2.2 -1.3 -6.5 ... -3.6 +2.0 -1.5 +2.9 +4.5 -0.5 -0.7 -0.7 +0.6 -0.9 +0.1 -1.8 +1.6 +0.1 -1.4 +3.8 +2.0 -0.5 +0.4 -1.3 +5.8 +0.1 -0.1 -0.2 +1.5 +0.9 +1.1

+12.3 +23.3 15 +25.3 +12.8 30 +3.8 +7.0 dd +8.1 +4.6 17 +13.6 +21.5 18 -3.0 -19.1 10 -17.4 -15.7 +23.9+6731.5 +25.5 +17.4 17 +55.0 +17.6 16 +4.1 +6.2 20 +17.2 +7.0 21 +22.1 +11.4 17 +36.0 +34.1 33 -12.4 -1.9 14 +21.1 +35.5 +9.0 +3.2 15 +35.3 +26.9 21 +1.0 -2.5 30 +18.0 +12.0 21 +31.7 +31.2 20 +35.4 +32.0 18 +54.7 +41.5 28 -13.2 -10.3 16 +86.1 +39.6 dd +1.7 -4.0 9 +1.5 -0.8 6 -2.2 -1.3 21 +61.1 +63.4 5 +60.9 +17.9 17 -10.0 -15.2 dd

1.96f ... ... 0.78 1.70 1.60 3.94e ... 0.30f 0.20 4.36 ... 0.28 0.92f ... ... 0.64 0.90b ... 1.92f 1.10f 0.44 0.32 ... 0.68m 0.24 1.52 2.76 ... ... ...

TKR

Argentina Australia Brazil Britain Canada China Euro India Israel Japan Mexico Russia So. Africa So. Korea Switzerland

52-WK LO HI

The number of Americans who signed contracts to purchase homes edged up slightly in October, a sign that the housing market remains on sure footing after solid price and sales gains this year. The National Association of Realtors said Wednesday that its seasonally adjusted pending home sales index rose 0.1 percent to 110. Pending sales improved in the Northeast, Midwest and West, while falling in the South. Many of the contracts were signed when 30-year mortgage rates were averaging less than 3.5 percent, close to a historic low. In the weeks since the presidential election, average rates have jumped above 4 percent, making it costlier to buy a home. Pending sales contracts are a barometer of future purchases. A sale is typically completed a month or two after a contract is signed.

LEE

1.15

LOW

62.62

83.65 70.55

Mallinckrodt plc

MNK

50.90

85.83 52.70 +.28 +0.5 -29.4 -20.9

MasterCard

MA

78.52 108.93 102.20 -1.62 -1.6

3.92

3.05

-.20 -6.2 +81.5 +87.9 -.16 -0.2

McDonald’s

MCD

110.33 131.96 119.27 -1.41 -1.2

Monsanto Co

MON

83.73 114.26 102.71 +.32 +0.3

Olin

OLN

12.29

Panera Bread

PNRA 178.99 224.15 212.11 +.27 +0.1

Peak Resorts

SKIS

2.60

Perficient

PRFT

14.15

-7.2

6

...

-6.9 19

1.40 ...

+5.0 +6.0 30

0.76

+1.0 +8.8 23 3.76f +4.3 +9.6 23

2.16

26.46 26.00 +.68 +2.7 +50.6 +19.4 37

0.80

7.70

+8.9 +16.3 35

...

4.80 +.15 +3.2 -20.1 -34.5 dd

0.55

22.66 18.00

-.06 -0.3

+5.1 +3.3 22

U.S. consumer spending, incomes rose in October • U.S. consumers boosted their spending again in October, while their incomes increased at the fastest clip in six months. A key gauge of inlation watched by the Federal Reserve posted the fastest 12-month gain in two years. The Commerce Department said Wednesday that consumer spending increased 0.3 percent in October after a revised 0.7 percent jump in September. Incomes increased 0.6 percent, the best showing since April. An inlation gauge closely followed by the Federal Reserve increased 1.4 percent compared to a year ago. That was the fastest 12-month advance since 2014. The rise was still below the Fed’s 2 percent target. But with inlation irming, the Fed is expected to boost a key interest rate next month.

POST

50.93

ReinsGrp

RGA

76.96 122.97 122.05 +.13 +0.1 +42.7 +33.8 13 1.64f

Reliv

RELV

Spire Inc

SR

55.24

71.21 64.54 -1.71 -2.6

Stifel Financial

SF

25.00

50.92 49.85 +.69 +1.4 +17.7 +7.5 20

...

SunEdison Semi

SEMI

11.98 11.96

...

Supervalu Inc.

SVU

3.94

Target Corp.

TGT

65.50

3.84

3.24

89.00 76.33 -1.56 -2.0 +23.7 +9.7 69 55.37

7.17

4.13

4.64

-.25 -5.7 -85.5

...

UPS B

UPS

87.30 116.48 115.92

USB

37.07

US Steel

X

6.15

Verizon

VZ

43.79

-9.2

-.10 -2.1 -31.6 -32.6

Netlix to allow downloads • Netlix Inc. will now allow users to download shows and movies to their smartphones and tablets to watch when they’re oline, the company said Wednesday. The video streaming irm said the download function was available for both iOS and Android

From news services

-17.10 -.25 -11.40

7

YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO

.38 .38 .13

3.50 3.50 3.25

TREASURIES

LAST

NET CHG

1YR AGO

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 52-wk T-bill 2-year T-note 5-year T-note 10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

.48 .60 .78 1.12 1.84 2.38 3.02

+0.01 +0.04 +0.02 +0.03 +0.06 +0.09 +0.07

.19 .41 .47 .92 1.59 2.15 2.90

NET 1YR LAST CHG AGO

BONDS

PRIME FED RATE FUNDS

...

AP Muni Bond Idx

2.73 +0.05

...

Barclays Glob Agg Bd

1.57 -0.01

...

Barclays USAggregate

2.53 -0.02 2.48

Barclays US High Yield 6.61 +0.02 8.02 Moodys AAA Corp Idx

3.95 -0.03 3.99

Barclays US Corp

3.33 -0.03 3.50

10-Yr. TIPS

.43 +0.02

.56

...

+6.4 +9.9 13 2.40f

-.36 -0.3 +20.5 +14.6 20

33.78 32.34 +1.18 +3.8 +305.3+288.1 dd

0.20

+8.0 +17.7 14 2.31f

WalMart

WMT

58.67

75.19 70.43

-.94 -1.3 +14.9 +22.5 15 2.00f

Walgreen Boots

WBA

71.50

87.05 84.73

-.80 -0.9

Wells Fargo

WFC

43.55

56.24 52.92 +1.06 +2.0

World Point Term.

WPT

11.79

17.65 16.82

-0.5 +3.3 19 -2.6

GlobalMarkets

3.12

49.57 49.62 +.52 +1.1 +16.3 +14.2 15 1.12f 56.95 49.90 -1.06 -2.1

The yield on the 10-year Treasury rose to 2.38 percent on Wednesday. Yields affect rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.

...

+8.6 +16.3 19 2.10f

... +52.6 +25.9

84.14 77.24 -1.17 -1.5

US Bancorp

Wells Fargo’s top lawyer postpones retirement • James Strother, Wells Fargo & Co.’s general counsel, who had originally planned to retire at the end of 2016, will stay on indeinitely in the position to deal with fallout from the bank’s sales scandal, according to a bank spokesman. “In light of recent events the decision was made to have Jim Strother remain with the company and continue to serve as our general counsel,” said Peter Gilchrist, a Wells Fargo spokesman. The decision was made by the bank’s board of directors, and a search is under way for Strother’s replacement, Gilchrist said. The scandal pertains to Wells Fargo’s opening as many as 2 million accounts in customers’ names without their permission.

Silver

...

Post Holdings

Minivan gets 84 mpg equivalent in electric mode • Fiat Chrysler says its new gas-electric hybrid minivan will get the equivalent of 84 miles per gallon in electric mode and 32 mpg in city-highway mileage when in hybrid mode. The redesigned Chrysler Paciica minivan went on sale earlier this year, and the hybrid version is due in showrooms in December. The company says the Paciica is the irst hybrid minivan in the U.S. and the most eicient minivan on the market. It says the numbers have been conirmed by the Environmental Protection Agency. The hybrid can go 33 miles on battery power. After that it switches to the hybrid mode. The hybrid Paciica costs $41,995 before a $7,500 federal income tax credit. The price excludes shipping.

CHG

CLOSE

1170.80 16.41 909.90

Gold

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV

Lee Ent

operating systems, for a mix of original and licensed content. Netlix said many popular movies and series are already available for download, including its original shows “Orange is the New Black” and “The Crown.” Users have long clamored for a download option that would allow them to watch Netlix content in areas with poor or costly connectivity — aboard an airplane in light, for instance.

.0637 .7490 .2948 1.2504 .7453 .1447 1.0647 .0146 .2609 .008903 .048501 .0154 .0720 .000857 .9888

PreciousMetals NEW YORK

Platinum

1.50

-3.6 13

1.52

-.15 -0.9 +25.5 +40.2 16

1.20

Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months.

October pending home sales nudged upward

CHG

+4.21 +.1137 +10.82 +.037

PREV

.0630 .7390 .2953 1.2512 .7451 .1451 1.0599 .0146 .2608 .008755 .048716 .0156 .0708 .000849 .9840

Interestrates Interestrates

Lowes

BUSINESS DIGEST

PE: ... Yield: ...

FOREIGN CURRENCY IN DOLLARS CLOSE

Chicago BOT is in cents.

Stocks of Local Interest NAME

$78.58

Vol.: 8.4m (4.2x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $16.11 b

2,000 J

N

ExchangeRates

CHICAGO BOT

Soybeans

S O 52-week range

$41.60

Vol.: 5.6m (1.8x avg.) PE: 18.6 Mkt. Cap: $50.82 b Yield: 4.6%

Futures

2,050

17,500

Vol. (in mil.) Pvs. Volume Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows

$220.77

Close: 2,198.81 Change: -5.85 (-0.3%)

2,160

70

70

S&P 500

2,200

19,500

17,000

75

N

Vol.: 6.5m (2.0x avg.) PE: 17.5 Mkt. Cap: $87.2 b Yield: 1.2%

2,240

Close: 19,123.58 Change: 1.98 (flat)

S O 52-week range

$138.20

Vol.: 13.8m (3.0x avg.) PE: ... Mkt. Cap: $17.72 b Yield: 1.8%

Dow Jones industrials

18,800

$80

80 75

150

ADSK

Close: $72.61 -2.65 or -3.5% The design software company projected weaker-than-expected sales for the current quarter.

$85

200 S O 52-week range

Autodesk

DUK

Close: $73.77 -2.60 or -3.4% Bond yields rose and companies that pay large dividends similar to bonds, such as REITs, traded lower.

50

Charts show stocks that made the news yesterday.

19,020

Duke Energy

GS

Close: $219.29 7.54 or 3.6% The bank’s stock climbed after former Goldman Sachs executive Steve Mnuchin was named the next U.S. Treasury secretary. $250

$60

$32.41

19,240

Goldman Sachs

HES

Close: $55.96 6.91 or 14.1% The price of oil jumped as OPEC countries agreed to trim production for the first time in eight years.

INDEX S&P 500 Frankfurt DAX London FTSE 100 Hong Kong Hang Seng Paris CAC-40 Mexico City Bolsa Tokyo Nikkei 225 Sao Paolo Bovespa Toronto Zurich

LAST 2198.81 10640.30 6783.79 22789.77 4578.34 45315.97 18308.48 61906.37 15082.85 7875.19

CHG

CHG

YTD

-5.85 +19.81 +11.79 +52.70 +26.88 -56.23 +1.44 +919.84 +83.04 +30.18

-0.27% +0.19% +0.17% +0.23% +0.59% -0.12% +0.01% +1.51% +0.55% +0.38%

+7.58% -0.96% +8.67% +3.99% -2.11% +5.44% -3.81% +42.81% +15.93% -10.69%

St. Louis jobless rate fell to 4.7 percent in October Fed reports ‘modest’ improvement in area economy BY JIM GALLAGHER st. Louis Post-dispatch

The metro St. Louis unemployment rate dropped to 4.7 in October from 5 percent in September as the region added jobs and the number of jobless fell, the government reported Wednesday. The local rate beat the seasonally adjusted national unemployment rate of 4.9 percent for October. The region gained 3,500 jobs over the month, bringing the 12-month gain to 35,000 jobs. The bistate metro area has 1.389 million nonfarm jobs, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. Over the past year, the region has seen its biggest job growth in leisure and hospitality, followed by professional and business services, and those trends continued in October. Leisure

and hospitality gained 12,400 jobs over the month. Professional and business services, a catch-all category that includes law and accounting firms as well as garbage collection, gained 8,100 jobs. Manufacturing weakened slightly, losing 2,100 jobs. Information, a category including broadcasters, newspapers and publishers, lost 700 jobs. The number of unemployed people dropped by 7,000 in the month to 64,500. The count of unemployed is taken from a survey of households, and includes only people actively looking for work. Monthly changes are sometimes hard to reconcile with the official count of jobs, which is taken from a survey of employers. Separately, the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis reported “modest” improvement in the economy of its region, which in-

cludes eastern Missouri, southern Illinois, Arkansas and parts of Indiana, Kentucky, Tennessee and Mississippi. The Fed found “tight labor market conditions, moderate hiring, and moderate wage pressures.” The Fed found that 60 percent of its business contacts had raised wages to keep or attract workers. The results were in line with most Federal Reserve districts. Including St. Louis, seven of the bank’s 12 districts reported “modest” to “moderate” growth this fall. Another three districts — Philadelphia, Cleveland and Kansas City — saw a “slight” pace of growth. Richmond viewed activity as “mixed,” and New York said activity had been “flat.” Jim Gallagher • 314-340-8390 jgallagher@post-dispatch.com @JimGallagher14 on Twitter

Loft apartments planned in Southampton BY TIM BRYANT st. Louis Post-dispatch

A developer plans to begin work early next year to put 15 loft-style apartments in a former credit union building in St. Louis’ Southampton neighborhood. Salviccio Properties bought the two-story building at 4650 Hampton Avenue this month for $620,000. American Eagle Credit Union occupied the building until it moved about two years ago, said the development firm’s owner, Matt Salviccio. He said the $1.5 million redevelopment would produce onebedroom lofts of 650 to 800 square feet with high-eiciency

appliances and windows. An outdoor kitchen and fire pits are planned for a rooftop deck. Projected monthly rents at SOHA Lofts are $750 to $950. Parking is included. Construction is expected to take about 15 months. Salviccio said Wednesday that he believes the lofts will appeal to people who prefer “walk first and drive second” living. The building is blocks from Francis Park, Hampton Village shopping center and restaurants on Macklind Avenue. Hilliker Corp. represented Salviccio’s SOHA Lofts LLC in buying the building from Anheuser-Busch Employee Credit Union, represented by NAI Desco.

Salviccio said he completed the purchase Nov. 2, the same day the city’s Planning Commission approved rezoning the property for residential use. He said he isn’t seeking tax incentives for the project. Renderings show purple balconies on the front of the building. Those are mere renderings, said Salviccio, adding that he believed purple on a building “is a little too aggressive” for that part of the city. Instead, the brick building will be painted “deco” white and outfitted with black-framed casement windows, he said. Tim Bryant • 314-340-8206 tbryant@post-dispatch.com @tbry51 on Twitter


NATION

A12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 12.01.2016

Pelosi retains Democratic leadership She vows party’s crash and burn won’t happen again BY PAUL KANE AND ED O’KEEFE Washington Post

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi won on Wednesday the race to lead the Democratic caucus for an eighth term, prevailing in a contest that became a vote of confidence in her continued stewardship and an early proxy battle over the future of the Democratic Party. The Californian easily toppled Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, a seventerm lawmaker who launched an upstart bid to lead House Democrats two weeks ago in response to the party’s disappointing November election results. But Pelosi’s margin of victory, 134 votes to 63 for Ryan, signaled a large degree of discontent with her continued leadership after 14 years atop the caucus and, more broadly, with the Democratic policy agenda that many lawmakers feel has grown stale. While she cleared her self-declared margin of victory, a twothirds majority, many Democrats were stunned that almost a third of the caucus was willing to vote for a back-bench lawmaker with no major policy or political experience. Many were left wondering whether a more seasoned Democrat could have actually toppled Pelosi, with several privately suggesting this would have to be Pelosi’s last term as leader. Ry-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of Calif. speaks shortly after regaining leadership of House Democrats.

an’s 63 votes marked the largest number of opposition votes Pelosi has faced in any leadership race since winning a deputy leadership position 15 years ago that set her on a course to become the first female House speaker.

economic agenda, at times ignored by their presidential nominee, Hillary Clinton, and other Democrats, would move to the front and center to appeal across the country alongside the cultural issues that dominated the campaign. “We’re going to win as Democrats if we have an economic message that resonates in every part of the country,” Ryan told reporters after his defeat. “We are disappointed because I like to win. … But the party is better of,” he added. An hour later, Pelosi appeared

PARTY ‘BETTER OFF’ Though they came up well short, Ryan and his band of supporters declared a symbolic victory in prompting Pelosi to make a series of proposals to elevate junior lawmakers and lead a more inclusive leadership table. They also declared that the party’s

and publicly congratulated Ryan on running a good race. But, she said, “I think we’re at a time that is well beyond politics. It’s about the character of America. After gaining just six seats in the November elections — after Pelosi publicly and privately suggested a gain of more than 20 — there will be 194 members of the House Democratic caucus. Four nonvoting delegates, including Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-D.C., were allowed to vote in Wednesday’s caucus elections. Pelosi tried to placate junior lawmakers by offering new or

modified positions, including the new position of “vice-ranking member” on the more than 20 standing House committees and reserving it for lawmakers who have served four terms or less. A policy leadership position would be divided into three co-chairmen and reserved for those who have served five terms or less. Rep. Beto O’Rourke, D-Tex., 44, credited Ryan’s challenge with forcing those proposals. “That’s partly a response to the competition in the caucus for votes, and that’s a healthy thing,” O’Rourke, first elected in 2012, said. At 76, Pelosi is one of three septuagenarians leading the caucus, followed by Rep. Steny H. Hoyer, D-Md., 77, the minority whip; and Rep. James E. Clyburn, D-S.C., 76, the assistant to the leader. Hoyer and Clyburn were unchallenged Wednesday for their re-election, and the caucus elevated Rep. Joseph Crowley, DN.Y., to the No. 4 post of caucus chairman, and Rep. Linda T. Sánchez D-Calif., became the first Latina in leadership as caucus vice-chairman. Republicans, after years of vilifying Pelosi’s West Coast liberalism, were gleeful at the stasis among Democratic leaders. The National Republican Congressional Committee immediately hung a “Congrats Nancy!” poster atop a “Hire Pelosi” banner that had been affixed to Republican National Committee headquarters this week.

DIGEST Protest spurs state to borrow $7 million North Dakota leaders will borrow an additional $7 million to cover the cost of law enforcement related to the ongoing protest of the four-state Dakota Access oil pipeline. The state’s Emergency Commission voted Wednesday to borrow the funds from the state-owned Bank of North Dakota. The commission is headed by Gov. Jack Dalrymple. The group earlier approved $10 million in emergency spending. Oicials say the new loan should cover the state’s cost of policing protests over the $3.8 billion pipeline through December. Trump alma mater adopts sanctuary policy • President-elect Donald Trump’s alma mater has renewed its pledge to block federal agents without a warrant from removing students in the country illegally.

University of Pennsylvania President Amy Gutmann released a letter Wednesday that echoes sanctuary policies in place at a growing number of U.S. universities. During his campaign, Trump pledged to launch a “deportation force” and end the practice of granting temporary status to students in the U.S. illegally. Trump and three of his children are Penn graduates. Stein requests recount of Michigan vote • Green Party presidential nominee Jill Stein on Wednesday requested a full hand recount of Michigan’s presidential vote, making it the third state narrowly won by Republican Donald Trump where she’s asked for another look at the results. Stein previously requested recounts of the presidential votes in Pennsylvania and Wisconsin. President-elect Trump defeated Democrat Hillary Clinton by 10,704 votes out of nearly 4.8 million ballots

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cast in Michigan, but Stein alleges that irregularities and the possibility that vote scanning devices could have been hacked call the results into question. Terrorists may have inspired Ohio State attacker • A Somali-born student who carried out a car-and-knife attack at Ohio State University may have been inspired by the Islamic State and a former al-Qaida leader, investigators said Wednesday. Law enforcement oicials said it was too soon to say that the rampage that hurt 11 people on Monday was terrorism. They said they were not aware of any direct contact between the Islamic State and the attacker. “We only believe he may have been inspired” by the group and Anwar al-Awlaki, an American-born cleric who took a leadership role in al-Qaida before being killed in 2011, said Angela Byers, an FBI agent leading the investigation.

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Women’s march could include entertainers • Organizers of a planned women’s march on Washington say they expect high-proile speakers and big-name entertainers to be part of the program on the day after Donald Trump’s inauguration. Linda Sarsour, a march organizer, said the march would send a message that black, Hispanic and Muslim women will stand up to the Trump administration.

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No line left to cross in Aleppo, U.N. says Fighters lout Geneva Convention as civilians are trapped without medical aid, food BY MICHAEL ASTOR associated Press

UNITED NATIONS • Parties to the Syrian conflict have systematically disregarded the laws of war, showing time and again that they are willing to do anything to gain military advantage, the U.N. humanitarian chief said Wednesday. Speaking via video-link from London, Stephen O’Brien told an emergency meeting of the Security Council that was nowhere more apparent than in the besieged city of eastern Aleppo with nearly a quarter of million people trapped inside. “There are no limits or red lines left to cross. The rules of war — sacrosanct notions borne out of generations of costly and painful lessons and set more than 150 year ago in the First Geneva Convention — have been systematically disregarded in Syria,” O’Brien said. O’Brien said some 25,000 people, most of them women and children, have been displaced from their homes since Saturday and that it is likely thousands more will flee in the coming days as Syrian forces step up the attack. He said there was no longer any properly functioning hospital in eastern Aleppo, which has been under siege for nearly 150 days and that most of the people trapped inside don’t have the means to survive much longer. He called on the Syrian government to allow the U.N. and its humanitarian partners unrestricted access to deliver food and medical aid. In Syria Wednesday, a series of artillery rounds lobbed on eastern Aleppo killed 26 civilians, including seven children, as they fled a government ground ofensive in the besieged enclave.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Civil Defense workers carry a victim on a stretcher after artillery ire struck the Jub al-Quba district in Aleppo, Syria, on Wednesday.

It was the second time the Jub al-Quba neighborhood, in the historic district of the rebel-held eastern side of the city, was struck in as many days. An airstrike Tuesday blamed by activists on the government killed 25 civilians in the same area. They were also believed to be newly displaced from the government onslaught on the northern parts of eastern Aleppo. Meanwhile, eight civilians, including two children, were killed in shelling on the government-held western side of the city, according to state media. The government blamed rebels for the attack. The embattled opposition fighters clashed heavily on the southern edge of the enclave with government-allied

troops, who made new gains in the government offensive that has cleaved the rebel-held part of the city. The Syrian government pushed its way into the 17-square-mile rebel-held enclave over the weekend, making its first territorial gain in the area seized by the opposition fighters since 2012. Government officials say they want to “liberate” the area, calling the opposition fighters “terrorists,” and accusing them of holding civilians there hostage. Despite opening a number of passageways to allow civilians to leave before the ofensive, none of the residents took advantage of it, citing fears of being arrested or forcibly conscripted. The passageways were not U.N.-supervised.

In New York on Wednesday, Syria’s U.N. Ambassador Bashar Ja’afari accused the rebels of opening fire on the civilians as they tried to flee eastern Aleppo. The bodies of the victims of the Jub alQuba attack Wednesday lined the streets, as their bags and few belongings lay close by their sides, photos showed. Jawad al-Rifai, who took the pictures for the Aleppo Media Center, said they were civilians — most of them women and children — fleeing shelling and air strikes on other parts of the city. “They were fleeing on foot. They were coming to our side,” said Ibrahim Al-Haj, a member of the Syrian Civil Defense teams, explaining that the displaced were heading to what they thought was safer ground. “There were children, baby bottles and bags all over.” The neighborhood and others around it in Aleppo’s centrally located old city have absorbed thousands of residents displaced by the advance of government troops in the east. Abdulkafi Alhamdo, a teacher living in the Zabadieh neighborhood in eastern Aleppo, said refugees were filling up his building, most of its flats abandoned because of the war. They have close to nothing, he said, and have asked for the simplest things, including salt. “They knock on my door all the time. They ask for a plate, or some sheets,” Alhamdo said. The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, which monitors the war in Syria through a network of local contacts, said tens more were wounded in Jub al-Quba.

Children of war-torn Aleppo lose beloved clown A missile strike killed man who entertained traumatized children BY PHILIP ISSA associated Press

BEIRUT • When war is constant,

it can be easy to lose sight of how much a single death can matter. But the passing of one committed social worker will be especially devastating to his community in Aleppo. Anas al-Basha, 24, was a center director at Space for Hope, one of many unheralded local initiatives operating against the odds to provide civil society services to Syria’s war-torn opposition areas. He was also a joker who dressed as a clown to cheer up the Aleppo’s traumatized children. He was killed Tuesday in a presumed Russian or government missile strike on the Mashhad neighborhood in the be-

The siege has been immensely trying for the men and woman who shouldered the burden of looking after Aleppo’s traumatized children. “All of us in this field [of child care] are exhausted, and we have to find strength to provide psychological support and continue with our work,” Hijazi said. Space for Hope has suspended its operations in Aleppo for the time being. A renewed government assault has brought shelling and bombardment at an unprecedented rate, displacing tens of thousands of civilians in the span of four days and killing dozens of civilians daily. Anas is survived by his wife, who remains trapped in Aleppo. They married two months ago.

sieged, eastern side of the city. Space for Hope supports 12 schools and four psycho-social support centers in eastern Aleppo, providing counseling and financial support for 365 children who have lost one or both parents. Many of the staf of 34 learned social work on the job as the country’s fiveyear civil war unfolded. Anas’s supervisor, Samar Hijazi, said she would remember him as a friend who loved to work with children. “He would act out skits for the children to break the walls between them,” she said. Anas’s parents left the city before the government sealed its siege of the rebel-held eastern districts last summer. He chose to stay on and had his salary sent to them in the countryside.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

This undated photo shows Syrian social worker Anas al-Basha, 24, as a clown, distributing toys to children in Aleppo, Syria.

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A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , 1 8 7 8

THURSDAy • 12.01.2016 • A14 RAY FARRIS PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER •

GILBERT BAILON EDITOR •

TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

Protecting abortion rights Planned Parenthood iles a gutsy lawsuit to turn back restrictions.

P

lanned Parenthood made a gutsy move in the current political environment by stepping forward Wednesday with a court challenge seeking to overturn two highly restrictive Missouri laws on abortion. The organization is standing up for women’s constitutional right to choose, despite the Nov. 8 election results that suggest the state’s Legislature and governor have a strengthened hand to further restrict access to abortion services. Leaders of Planned Parenthood affiliates in Missouri are basing their challenge on the similarity between state laws here and those in Texas, which were struck down by the U.S. Supreme Court in July. In the court’s most sweeping statement on abortion rights since 1992, justices said in Whole Woman’s Health v. Hellerstedt that the Texas restrictions were medically unnecessary and unconstitutional. The regulations required doctors who perform abortions to have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital and abortion clinics to meet safety standards so stringent and costly that few providers could comply. Missouri was the first state in the nation to adopt both laws. Supporters say they are intended to protect women’s health, but critics contend they are thinly veiled attempts to block women’s access to abortions. In Texas, the regulations would have shut down three-quarters of the abortionproviding clinics and justices said “these effects would be harmful to, not supportive of, women’s health.” Planned Parenthood in St. Louis is currently the only

facility that meets requirements to provide abortions in Missouri. Mary Kogut, president and CEO of Planned Parenthood of the St. Louis Region and Southwest Missouri, said lifting the restrictions would allow clinics in Joplin, Springfield, Columbia and Kansas City to offer abortion services. The law, paired with another state law that requires women to wait 72 hours before receiving an abortion, pose an undue financial and emotional burden on women. The restrictions force women to take time off work, lose pay, travel hundreds of miles and pay for accommodations. We have no doubt that Missouri legislators and social conservatives will continue to try ruses to restrict or block women’s access to legal abortions. But the claim that they are doing it to protect women’s health is bogus and should not be taken seriously. Their intent is to make it difficult for women to exercise their rights and access a procedure that recognized medical authorities say is among the safest available. The availability of better and more effective contraception has helped push the abortion rate down in Missouri from a peak of 19,482 in 1985, when there were about two dozen clinics that performed the procedure, to 5,060 in 2014, the most recent year for which figures are available. We want to see unplanned pregnancies and associated abortion rates go down. More reproductive education and available contraception will continue to move it that way without endangering women’s health.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Planned Parenthood supporters rally at the Country Club Plaza in Kansas City last year. An anti-abortion demonstrator stands among them.

Pulling the rug out Trump and the GOP Congress have a nasty surprise for Trump’s base.

B

y all reckonings, the demographic group most responsible for Donald Trump’s presidential victory was working class white voters with no college degrees. They make up 42 percent of the population; 70 percent of them turned out to vote and Trump won 67 percent of their votes. From one day to the next, it’s hard to know what Trump’s policies really are. This is not a man with a long and consistent policy record, nor a fealty to fact. But much of what Trump wants will have to be done in cooperation with Congress, a body dominated by Republicans whose intentions do not bode well for Trump’s working-class supporters. Consider the Affordable Care Act, which Trump has vowed to repeal and replace with “something terrific.” He told the Wall Street Journal he’s rethinking his position, but congressional Republicans aren’t. And on Monday, Trump rewaffled, naming two key health policy appointees who want to make drastic changes in programs that benefit Trump’s base. Trump named Rep. Tom Price, R-Ga., to head the Department of Health and Human Services, which oversees all government health care programs. To head the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services, he named Seema Verma. She is a consultant who advised several Republican governors,including Indiana’s Mike Pence, now the vice president-elect, on modifying Obamacare to make it more palatable to conservatives. Only 70 percent of working-class

whites with no college degrees are actually employed, but not all of them have access to health insurance through their jobs. Census Bureau data show that among families with household income of $49,000 or less, the number of uninsured Americans dropped by 8.6 percent in the past two years. Price, the HHS secretary-designate, is the author of the 242-page “Empowering Patients Act,” one of several GOP proposals that would gut the Affordable Care Act. It’s an insurance-company friendly measure that would make it cheaper to insure young and healthy Americans and less affordable for the older Americans who are more likely to get sick. In both cases, policies would be less comprehensive. And then there’s Medicaid, the health care program for the poor and disabled. In states that adopted Medicaid expansion plans — like Pence’s Indiana — about 15 million more Americans gained coverage through Medicaid. Under most GOP “repeal and replace” plans, most of them would lose it. House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., advocates turning Medicaid funding over to state governments. The feds would send states a block grant, possibly for Medicaid (including nursing homes), food stamps, supplemental Social Security for the disabled and Pell Grants as well. States could divvy it up how they want. All of that, plus changes to Obamacare, could mean a lot of Trump’s voters are in for an unpleasant surprise. They can’t say they weren’t warned.

yOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS Agency and its board failed the taxpayers, disabled people

Paper’s coverage doesn’t call Castro a dictator

Dick Goldbaum said that the financial situation at the St. Louis Office of Developmental Disabilities Resources involved no misappropriation of funds but is rather a result of “bad decisions” (“Agency serving disabled is mired in financial mess,” Nov. 27). While he may be correct legally speaking, those involved harmed a vulnerable population and should be held accountable. Was no one asking questions when $11 million in grants were going out against tax revenues averaging $6 million a year? When the decision was made that the reserve needed to be spent down, did anyone consider what would happen to the newly created programs in following years? Is it possible that an entity with “just” $6 million in tax revenue and a $17 million reserve didn’t warrant the mayor’s attention while Bill Siedhof, a past member of the mayor’s Cabinet, held a board seat? And where was the city comptroller? Did the auditor not ask any questions? An appointment to the Developmental Disabilities Resources board is a public trust, an obligation to the taxpayers and to many disabled individuals who depend on that funding to function — and maybe thrive — in daily life. They failed all stakeholders. Their names should be made public and they should answer for their lack of diligence. If it was skills that they lacked, that lies with the mayor. The nonprofit community and funders have come to see a reserve as a sign of sustainability. The agency’s situation is a reflection of the board’s — and maybe the mayor’s — ignorance of proper fund management. Correction is certainly needed, but to expect Goldbaum to present a balanced budget in just one year, requiring over $4 million in cuts, creates more damage to an already stressed system. The bright spot is that the good people who work and volunteer in the agencies affected will dig deeper, be more creative and do more. They have no choice. Peggy Slater • Brentwood

The Post-Dispatch’s left-leaning double standard has been on display again in its coverage of Fidel Castro’s death. The Associated Press articles correctly describe Fulgencio Batista, the Cuban president who was overthrown by Castro in 1959 after a seven-year despotic rule, as a “dictator” and a “thuggish strongman.” However Castro, whose iron-fisted and brutally intolerant autocracy lasted half a century, oppressed far more people, and did far more harm inside and outside Cuba than Batista ever did. Castro is never called a “dictator” or any other pejorative epithet in the articles, which always respectfully refer to the late Communist tyrant as the Cuban “leader.” Rev. Brian W. Harrison • St. Louis

Schaaf’s proposal is not true campaign inance reform Just finished reading state Sen. Rob Schaaf’s piece “Introducing the representation credit” (Nov. 27). Why should I, a taxpayer and a voter, have to surrender $100 of my tax dollars to buy influence in my own state? Influence should not be for sale. This is money that could be better spent on schools, infrastructure and social programs. Get to work and draft true campaign finance reform. David Auer • Oakville

Castro’s detractors and their families tell a diferent story It’s absolutely amazing how there is such a massive difference in the postmortem views on the legacy of former Cuban dictator Fidel Castro (“Castro shaped everyday life in Cuba,” Nov. 29). Growing up in the ’50s and ’60s, I can still recollect the horrific stories reported on the fates of his detractors. Yet today, we read a heartwarming story of the benevolent father figure exemplary of Cuban life. I wonder how many of the surviving family members of the thousands he slaughtered would agree. To be fair, it would seem only appropriate for the next story to be titled how Castro “shaped everyday death in Cuba.” Dave Boeckmann • St. Louis

AFP Fidel Castro in 2007.

Looks like Trump really didn’t mean what he said Now I understand how Donald Trump got elected. The Republicans knew all along that he was only kidding with all his promises to do so many great things. They actually knew that he really did not mean any of the things he said. Here, all along I believed him serious with his wild and impossible promises. I thought he really truly meant what he said. And that is why I voted against him. The Republicans were right; he really did not mean any of the things he said. But I am really confused. Can I believe anything that he says now? Robert Schutzius • Florissant

Divided about the candidates, but not about the nation Are we really a deeply divided nation on the issues, as cable media love to tell us? Or were we only divided about the candidates? Now that we are past the personalities and campaign rhetoric, politicians from both parties are talking about infrastructure improvements, middle-class job creation, entitlement funding and ways to make health care more affordable for everyone. The solutions from both parties have nearly converged. In fact, we have no major question, such as slavery of the mid-1800s. We just need Congress to stop letting their petty political scorecards hold up obvious solutions. On that, America is united. Gary Kreie • Des Peres Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON Editorial Page Editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382 KEVIN HORRIGAN Deputy Editorial Page Editor • khorrigan@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8135

I know that my retirement will make no diference in its cardinal principles, that it will always ight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always ight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

STLtoday.com/ThePlatform Find us at facebook/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial E-MAIL MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, letters@post-dispatch.com 900 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days.


OTHER VIEWS

12.01.2016 • THURSDAY • M 1

100 YEARS AGO TODAY ON THE EDITORIAL PAGE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A15

THE LEWIS BOYS’ CONVICTION • When the Missouri law was changed to fix upon the jury responsibility for infliction of the death penalty in murder

cases, the belief was widespread that it meant the end of capital punishment in the state. Since then juries almost invariably impose sentences of imprisonment for life upon convicted murderers. In rare instances only has the extreme penalty been exacted. Access the full item at stltoday.com/news/opinion

Judge Rick works the room Teitelman made ighting for the poor and oppressed fashionable. BY MIKE WOLFF

Most mornings before a Missouri Supreme Court session was to begin, Judge Richard B.“Rick” Teitelman, a large disheveled man with big thick glasses and a smile to match, would appear in the courtroom and go around shaking hands making everyone feel welcome. Unusual for a supreme court judge, but it was perfectly in character for one of the most remarkable men I have ever known. The judge was legally blind, but he often saw so much more than the rest of us. I thought his forays “working the room” before court were his way of connecting with the people who were there because he could not see them from the bench, which the other judges could. Judge Rick also needed to see them, to feel their presence, their angst, their hopes. When he graduated from law school in 1973, Rick had to fight to get a reader so he could take the bar exam. He passed the bar but

could not find a job. So he hung his shingle outside his one-room apartment and volunteered as a lawyer for 200 United Farm Workers charged with picketing at local supermarkets selling lettuce, grapes and wines. His efforts drew the attention of Legal Services of Eastern Missouri, which gave him a staff attorney job in 1975. Five years later he was named its executive director and general counsel. Rick made Legal Services a cause in the legal community and in the larger community as well. He joined every organization that might conceivably help legal aid or which might have been an adversary. The ACLU or the Federalists, African-American lawyers, women lawyers — wherever two or more might gather to discuss legal aid, Rick was there. He rose to be vice president of The Missouri Bar. The lawyer’s oath pledges help for the “defenseless” and “oppressed.” To Judge Rick the oath was a solemn

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Missouri Supreme Court Judge Richard B. Teitelman asks a question of attorneys as they present their case in the Missouri Supreme Court in 2008.

duty, joyfully assumed. He made fighting for the poor and oppressed fashionable. A thousand or more of the legal community gather each year for the “Justice for All” Ball that Rick and some of his friends started years ago to raise money for legal services. It is our legal community’s prom. Rick knew that Legal Services could not succeed on federal aid alone. He got a filing fee on court cases

to support legal aid; he got state money through Social Services, and he greatly enhanced funding from private sources. Gov. Mel Carnahan told me when he appointed Rick to the court of appeals in 1998: “I will never make a more liberal appointment … or a better one.” The liberal part was unimportant; the “better” was important. There was none better. People will forget what

you said and what you did, the poet and St. Louis native Maya Angelou has said,“but people will never forget how you made them feel.” When Judge Rick knew from working the room before a court session that a lawyer’s father, mother or child was in the audience, he would praise the lawyer’s performance. When my son Ben got a job with the Bronx Defenders some years ago, Rick sent him a note saying how pleased he was. Working for legal aid was the high point of my career, the supreme court judge said. Many such kindnesses will be remembered this week because scarcely a day in Rick’s adult life would go by without several people receiving notes of praise or phone calls lauding some accomplishment however small or large. He was always concerned with the young, especially those with disabilities. He will be remembered for his terse, carefully written opinions. Joe Amrine, who spent 17 years on death row, will remember that he

is free because Judge Rick wrote the majority opinion rejecting the state’s position that it is acceptable to execute an innocent man if he got a “fair” trial. Others will remember his dissent from a decision denying death benefits to the samesex partner of a highway patrolman killed on duty. He was an able servant of the law who believed, as he exhorted my students last week: “Look for the justice in the case.” Judge Rick’s kindness masked a determination and a strategic sense that often was underappreciated. One does not ascend to the Supreme Court on the power of mensch alone. He was tough-minded, brilliant, with an innate sense of fairness and respect even for those who disagreed with him. There was none better.

Mike Wolf is dean of St. Louis University Law School and a former judge and chief justice of the Supreme Court of Missouri.

Don’t undermine integrity of election Recount three weeks after the fact cannot avoid the appearance of dirty tricks. LEONARD PITTS Miami Herald

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

Eric Greitens gives his victory speech after defeating Democrat Chris Koster for Missouri governor on Nov. 8. Greitens was at his election watch party at the DoubleTree Hotel in Chesterfield.

And the loser is ... Elections aren’t horse races. Don’t treat ballots as bets on who’ll win. TOD ROBBERSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Enough time has passed since the Nov. 8 elections for me to reflect on the mission of our editorial pages in the electoral process. An awful lot of readers have the mistaken impression that we are in the business of picking winners and losers. Thus, many readers have declared in phone calls and emails, the editorial board lost badly because we supported candidates who lost. The recommendations offered by this newspaper have never served as predictions or prognostications. They quite simply serve as a guide, reflecting our informed assessment of the candidates and issues at hand. Candidates don’t have the time to visit all voters and answer the important questions on their minds. We serve as their shortcut to reach the greater public. The major candidates typically come sit with us for about an hour, knowing full well that we will grill them intensively. Candidates participate because, if they can persuade us, they might be able to persuade a wider audience of voters with their message. We have to presume that readers pay attention because they want to have deeper insights. Some candidates don’t handle the editorial board interaction very well. GOP gubernatorial candidate Eric Greitens, who is now the governorelect, lost his cool when we asked him to be more specific about his support of urban police stop-and-frisk policies. Our questions made his head hurt, he complained. Greitens’ Democratic opponent, Chris Koster, stumbled badly when pressed to take an impromptu civics test. The question was how many of the governor’s Cabinet positions the two candidates could name. Koster struggled mightily. A few days later,

Greitens nailed it. Koster later claimed it was a “gotcha” question. The only problem was, Koster was the one who first proposed we ask the question … of Greitens, that is. In the end, the ability to name Cabinet positions was not among the issues we or voters really cared about in this election. We did care about issues such as abortion rights, guns and crime, transportation, infrastructure and jobs. We wanted specifics about policies and solutions, and we pressed both candidates relentlessly. Greitens answered well on a superficial level, but Koster had deeper, pithier, more well-considered answers. It was not an easy choice, but our recommendation went to Koster. That didn’t mean we were predicting a Koster victory. We were simply saying to readers: We’ve talked to both at length and immersed ourselves in their platforms, and Koster is the more qualified person for the job. Not all Missouri voters agreed. Greitens won. We interviewed the major candidates for U.S. Senate from Missouri and Illinois. We talked to top contenders for Missouri’s lieutenant governor, attorney general, secretary of state and treasurer. Candidates from Illinois’ U.S. House 12th District came to our office to state their best case. We heard pro and con arguments regarding the various amendments and propositions on the ballot. Space considerations limited how much we could convey to readers about these conversations. Very often, we resorted to shorthand phrases such as,“This is a tough choice …” as a way of signaling that we really liked, or were really ambivalent about, both candidates and that they were nearly equally qualified. The Democratic Party put up a higher-caliber roster, even though those candidates wound up taking a drubbing. We would have loved to recommend more Republican candidates, but in the end, our decision had to be consistent with our previous editorial stances on key issues. We are

guided by the ideals set forth in Joseph Pulitzer’s Platform, printed daily on the Editorial Page. We take into account the record, experience level and maturity of the people seeking office. We devoted lots of ink to the presidential contest. Our conviction throughout the primary and general election campaign was that Donald Trump is unqualified for the presidency, and of all candidates running from either major party, Hillary Clinton was by far the most qualified. Nothing has happened since the election to change that view. Our recommendations, just like votes cast at the polls, are statements of preferences. American democracy would be sorely devalued, and of severely limited durability, if voters’ only goal at the polls was to pick winners as if betting on a horse race or boxing match. The only proper choice to make is an informed choice. Clinton got 2.3 million more voters than Trump, but he will win where it counts: the Electoral College. Regardless of our position, we believe that the country needs to get behind its new leader. If he fails, our country fails. Greitens won and he deserves congratulations and support. As we’ve stated editorially, he’s a smart man with Oxford graduate credentials under his belt. We have no doubt that he’s qualified for this job. From the beginning, our big request was that he allow his intellectual side to shine through. He and other winners can be bitter that we asked tough questions or prodded for specifics. They can freeze us out. Or they can accept that this is how the process works, and work with this newspaper and others to achieve the goals that best serve Missourians’ needs. Either way, our goal remains to inform readers, call out politicians when they get it wrong, and praise them when they’re on target. trobberson@post-dispatch.com Twitter: @trobberson 314-340-8382

I oppose the recount. There are, to my mind, only two reasons to re-examine ballots in a presidential campaign, as Green Party candidate Jill Stein has raised money to do. The first is in the event of error or fraud, but there is no evidence thereof in the 2016 election, as Stein herself has admitted. The second is in the event the margin of victory is especially slim. And yes, in the three states where Stein is pushing for a recount — Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania — the margins are indeed thin, particularly in Michigan, which Hillary Clinton lost by just 11,612 votes. But in a case like that, the recount must begin immediately — and preferably automatically — to be seen as credible. A recount three weeks after the fact cannot avoid the appearance of dirty tricks. Indeed, if the results in any of the states in question were overturned at this late date, Donald Trump’s supporters would suspect malfeasance — and be justified in doing so. Don’t misunderstand: I remain unalterably convinced that the new president is an awful person and that America made a generations-defining mistake in choosing him. But that does not give us license to casually undermine the integrity of the election. Besides, Trump is doing a fine job of that without Stein’s help. You’d think, what with recruiting the political equivalents of Darth Vader and Victor Von Doom for his Cabinet and presumably ordering a new Oval Office rug with a giant golden “T” in the center, he’d be too busy for such things, but you’d be wrong. On Monday, Trump tweeted,“I won the popular vote if you deduct the millions of people who voted illegally.” It was hardly the first time he didn’t know what the hell he was talking about. Not only is there zero evidence this supposedly massive fraud happened, but simple logic says that it could not. To be here illegally is to live off the grid, to be paid in cash, avoid interactions with police, steer clear of City Hall. Why would one such person — let alone millions — jeopardize the security of anonymity to cast a fraudulent vote? It’s an idiotic idea. News organizations dutifully dubbed it “baseless,” too polite to say that his claim contained enough steer manure to fertilize Central Park. And at this point, anyone who ever believed in an ideal called America should be unnerved. A democracy is, in many ways, a fragile thing. As Thomas Jefferson wrote, it depends for its very existence upon the “consent of the governed” — meaning not our support of every action a government takes, but rather, our willingness to believe in its integrity. It is from this that democratic government derives its power. Democracy, then, is an act of mutual agreement. In a nation of 320 million people who share no one ancestry, culture or faith, it is also connective tissue. The idea that my vote matters no more — or less — than yours is the tie that binds an Inuit in Bethel, Alaska, to a Haitian refugee in Miami to an Irish Catholic in Boston to a Mexican-American in San Diego to a Muslim in Kansas City. It is the thing that makes us Americans. And it’s the thing Trump burned down in his scorched earth appeal to bigotry and resentment. Now, here comes Stein in a desperate bid to deny the electorate its appalling choice. Avatars of a demoralized left and a hateful right, they are alike in at least one respect: their apparent willingness to damage what they purport to love. So we find ourselves at a no-win crossroads. Trump’s victory is a terrible thing. Stealing it would be even worse.

Leonard Pitts Jr. lpitts@miamiherald.com Copyright The Miami Herald Distributed by Tribune Content Agency


A16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 12.01.2016

OBITUARIES To place or share an obituary for your loved one, visit us at: www.stltoday.com/obits For more information you can contact us by phone at 800-365-0820 ext 5, or 314-340-8600 or by email at deathnotices@post-dispatch.com Arthur, Robert Milton "Bob" - Wildwood Bander, Rose A. - St. Louis Blair, Dorothy E. - St. Louis Brockschmidt, Donald John Fred - St. Louis Bruemmer - see McCann Cooper, James C. - St. Louis Fine - see Blair Fitzgerald, Keith G. - St. Louis Fuller, Audrey J. - St. Louis

McCann, Cheryl Katheryn "Sherry" - St. Louis McFarland, Dr. Gerald L. "Jerry" - St. Louis McGuckin - see Brockschmidt Missey, Steven Thomas - Troy, MO O'Donnell - see Tonnies Polk - see Langenberg Regan, Frank J. Jr. - St. Louis Schulz - see Tonnies

Teitelman, The Honorable Richard B. - St. Louis Tonnies, Edna M. - St. Louis Varrone, Nicholas J. Sr. - St. Louis

Gaffney, Shirley - Cottleville Gruber, Carol A. - St. Louis Gushleff, Gerald K. - St. Louis Kapp, Robert W., III "Bob" - St. Louis

White, Wilbur Dean - St. Louis Wilt, Virginia Lucille - St. Louis Winkle, Sr. Billy G. - St. Charles Wolfinger, Linda Ann - St. Louis Zuellig Sr., Rudolph O. - St. Louis

Langenberg, Mary Booth - St. Louis Lesyna, Lorraine C. - St. Louis

Mackey, Eugene J. III - Ladue Manning - see Tonnies

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Brockschmidt, Donald John Fred

found peace and passed into the loving arms of his parents, Jim and Else Arthur, on Saturday, November 26, 2016. He will forever be fondly remembered for the love, guidance and unwavering support that he gave to his family, Sharon K. Arthur, Robert Andersen Arthur and Lisa Marie Arthur (Lewis), his dog, Punky, and the countless pets, family m embers and friends that he touched. Services: Memorial visitation at the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory, 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, Sunday, December 4, 2016, 4-8 p.m. In lieu of flowers, the family asks that donations be made, in Bob's name, to the Wildlife Center of the North Coast, P.O. Box 1232, Astoria, OR, 97103 (www.coastwildlife.org). Friends may sign the family's on-line guestbook at Schrader.com.

Bander, Rose A. Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church Thursday, November 24, 2016. Beloved daughter of the late Namer and Edna Bander; dear sister of the late Thomas, Badeeh, Charles, Clarence, Lorraine Bander and Lulu Quallen; loving and cherished aunt, great-aunt and great-great-aunt; dear sister-in-law, cousin and friend to many. Rose volunteered at the Old Cathedral USO Canteen during WWII. After a 30 year exemplary career with the General Services Administration at the National Personnel Records Center, she enjoyed a long and fulfilling retirement. Rose was a member of Our Lady of Sorrows Parish for almost 70 years. She was a devout person, extremely generous and a wonderful cook who loved celebrating everything with her family. Services: Visitation Saturday, December 3, from 9:00 a.m. until 10:00 a.m. Funeral Mass at Nazareth Living Center Chapel, 2 Nazareth Lane, St. Louis, MO 63129. Interment Sts. Peter and Paul Cemetery. Memorials to Nazareth Living Center Foundation (www.nazarethlivingcenter.com/giving-instructions) or to St. Jude Children's Hospital (donors@stjude.org). A service of KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY CHAPEL, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd.

Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church. Tuesday, November 29, 2016. Dear mother of Martha "Marty" Roedder, Judith K. Wise, the late William G. Fine, mother-in-law, grandmother, great-grandmother, great great-grandmother, great great great-grandmother and friend. Services: Funeral from HUTCHENS Mortuary,675 Graham Road, Florissant, 9:30 am Saturday, December 3, to St. Rose Philippine Duchesne Church, 2650 Parker Road, Florissant, 63033, for 10:00 am Mass. Private Interment Sacred Heart Cemetery. In lieu of flowers Memorials to Circle of Concern, P. O. Box 444, 112 St. Louis Avenue, Valley Park, MO 63088-0444. VISITATION 8:30 A.M.-9:30 A.M. SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3. Online guestbook at www.hutchensmortuary.com

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Mackey, Eugene J. III

on 11/30/16 of Cottleville, MO Wife of Gene Gaffney. Vis. Fri. 11-1pm, Ser. 1pm Oltmann F.H., Union, MO 103 N. Church St. Union, MO 63084

Mary Booth Langenberg died peacefully on Sunday, November 20, 2016 at home surrounded by her family. Beloved mother of William Lee Polk, Jr. (Carolyn) and dearest grandmother of Olivia Lee Polk, William Jackson Polk and Samuel Finnegan Polk; dearest stepmother of Peter Morton Langenberg (Marilyn) and Alice Langenberg Abrams (Walter); grandmother of Stewert M. Langenberg and Karen P. Langenberg, Sonya J. Abrams (Michael) and Benjamin O. Abrams (Sarah); stepmother of Charles M. Polk II; grandmother of Caroline G. Polk (Forrest), Charles M. Polk III (Kelly), and Jennifer P. Ellis (Brian). She is also survived by her nine great-grandchildren. Mary was preceded in death by her parents Andrew Franklin and Mary Finnegan Booth and her siblings Irene, Forrest, Thomas, Samuel, Newell, and James. Mary was a gracious, wise, and beautiful woman who was devoted to her family, her friends, and the St. Louis community. Born in Springfield, Illinois in 1926, she moved to St. Louis in 1942 to attend Washington University. In 1954 she married William Lee Polk and they shared a wonderful life together until his death in 1964. She later married Oliver Morton Langenberg, and over the course of nearly fifty very happy years they together built lifelong friendships, travelled the globe, and helped others. Mary was active in many St. Louis organizations. In addition to founding ExecuTours, a successful executive relocation firm, she served on the boards of the St. Louis Grand Jury Association, The St. Michael School, the Vestry of The Church of St. Michael and St. George, The Woman's Exchange and the Chatillon-DeMenil Mansion, among others. Mary's creativity found its expression in her passion for crafts, for all things culinary, and for the varied arts of living, in particular entertaining. She loved beauty, valued preparedness, candor and humor and presided over many a lively table. Mary treasured her summers spent at the Chautauqua Institution in upstate New York. Services: A memorial service will take place at The Church of St. Michael and St. George, Wydown at Ellenwood, Clayton, on Saturday, December 3 at 1:00 PM. The family will receive friends in the Great Hall following the service. Private interment will take place at Bellefontaine Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Chautauqua Institution (P.O. Box 28, Chautauqua, N.Y., 14722) or the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center.

Gruber, Carol A.

Lesyna, Lorraine C.

Eugene J. Mackey, III went to be with the Lord on Sunday, November 27, 2016. Beloved husband of Ann Meyer Mackey; loving father of Elizabeth A. "Libby" Mackey Perrin, Augustine M. "Tina" Mackey Shodeen (Mark), Eugene J. "Gene" Mackey, IV and Philip J. Mackey (Mary); dear grandfather of William, Jennifer and Andrew, Claire, Grace and E.J., Madison, P.J. and Cadence; dear step-father of Barbie Mattie, Clint Whittemore and Katie McAllister; dear step-grandfather of Nora, Emma and Sterling; dear brother of Ellen Mackey and the late John E. Mackey; dear brother-in-law of Jan Shapleigh Mackey and Jim Meyer; dear uncle of Alex, John and Janie. He was preceded in death by his parents Eugene J. Mackey, Jr. and Mary Mackey Layton, and his brother John E. Mackey. Gene graduated from Ladue Horton Watkins High School in 1956, and received his Bachelor's Degree from Washington University in 1962. He received his Master's in Architecture from Harvard University in 1963. He founded Eugene J. Mackey, III Architects in 1968, which later became Mackey Mitchell Architects. Gene's work left an indelible mark on St. Louis, exemplified by projects such as the renovation of the Old Cathedral, which followed his father's renovation of that historic landmark in 1960. Other notable projects include Chaifetz Arena, the Alberici Headquarters, a LEED Platinum building, Central Institute for the Deaf, Jones Visitor Center in Forest Park, CBC High School, the design of the fountain at the Missouri History Museum, and the current renovation of Soldiers Memorial and Court of Honor, originally designed by his father more than 60 years ago. Gene also expanded his family's legacy at the Missouri Botanical Garden, where his father designed the Climatron, with multiple projects including design of the Japanese Garden, renovation of Spink Pavilion and design of the Shapleigh Fountain, a project he considered to be one of his favorites. Gene's accomplishments garnered widespread professional recognition, including serving two terms as President of the St. Louis Chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA), and being named a Fellow of the AIA, the highest membership level offered by the Institute. He was presented with the Leslie N. Boney Spirit of Fellowship Award by the College of Fellows and received the Distinguished Service Award from AIA Missouri. Gene also received the Gold Honor Award from the St. Louis AIA Chapter, the highest individual award an architect can receive. He was one of only 15 members to have ever received this honor. Gene built his firm into a national practice focused on student life projects, including a 40-year relationship with Washington University which included the complete transformation of the South 40 residential campus that resulted in the University being named #1 on The Princeton Review list of "Best College Dorms." Other Mackey Mitchell university projects were completed at St. Louis University, University of Missouri, University of Notre Dame, Westminister College, Texas Tech University, University of Rhode Island, University of Pittsburgh, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Northwestern University, Miami (Ohio) University, SIUE, Pennsylvania State University, University of Colorado-Boulder, Ohio Wesleyan University, University of Alabama, University of Minnesota, University of Nebraska, Indiana University, Truman State University, Webster University, and many more. Gene was a giant as a civic leader and tireless advocate for the City of St. Louis and the region throughout his life. He was a trusted advisor and mentor to many friends and business leaders in the community for over 50 years. His impact on the St. Louis community and beyond is profound, deep and wide ranging, and will be felt for generations to come. Gene's passion and enthusiasm for architecture and the advancement of the St. Louis community was only surpassed by his love for his family. He was a devoted husband and always cherished the time he spent with his children and grandchildren. Whether the time was spent drawing, apple picking, golfing, on family trips or just talking about life, Gene was the consummate patriarch and a true family man. Gene was a man of deep faith and an eternal optimist, who sincerely believed each day was a gift from God to be celebrated. He demonstrated that belief each and every day in the way he impacted others and lived his life. He would frequently give the advice that we should "always remain curious" in life, and was a dedicated scholar and historian. Gene was an unwavering and true "gentleman" as anyone who had the privilege of meeting him will attest. We will all miss his calm counsel, guidance and inspiration, but his legacy will live on. Services: The family will receive friends at a visitation to be held at THE LUPTON CHAPEL, 7233 Delmar Blvd., University City on Sunday, December 4, from 12:00 Noon until 5:00 p.m. The Funeral and Interment will be private. A SERVICE OF THE LUPTON CHAPEL

age 87, passed away peacefully at home November 29, 2016. He was born on April 19, 1929 to Mayme Hedley and Elmer J. Brockschmidt in St. Louis, MO. He grew up in University City and graduated from University City High School. Don and his 2 brothers were active in scouting and all three made Eagle Scout. In 1952 he graduated from Washington University with a degree in Industrial Engineering. He served in the U.S. Navy reserves from 1948 to 1957 as YNT2. He married Rosemary Jones (St. Charles, MO) in Jefferson City, MO, Aug. 21,1954, after meeting at McDonnell Aircraft Corporation. They spent 62 years together in St. Louis, MO. In 1952 he began his career as Corporate Production Manager at Nooter Corporation, St. Louis, MO retiring after 42 years in 1994. Donald was an avid sports fan and loved to play golf. He was a lifelong member of Cherry Hills and St. Albans Country Club until his health prevented him from playing golf. He is predeceased by his sister Betty (Bill) Griffin, brothers John Elmer and Kenneth Hedley (Jean) Brockschmidt, brother-in-laws David A. Jones and Donald Jones. He is survived by his wife Rosemary, daughters Rhonda, Linda (Charles) Love, Donna (Tom) McGuckin; grandchildren Lauren Christine Love, Charles Ian Love, Christina Jayne McGuckin; brother-in-law Paul (Jackie) Jones, Roger (Janet) Jones, sister-in-law Barbara Wilkins Brockschmidt, Dianna Jones, niece and nephew, Ann and Paul Brockschmidt, Lynn Jones and Allen (Angela) Jones, and many lifelong friends. Services: Visitation at Bopp Chapel Saturday, December 3, 10-12, with funeral service at 12:00 pm. Immediately followed by burial at Bellerive Garden Cemetery. www.boppchapel.com

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72, November 30, 2016. Loving husband of Darlene Cooper of 48 years; father of Sherri (Earle) Simpson, Chris (Wendy) Cooper and Loren (Ronnie) Reid; grandpa of Adam, Rachel, Beth, Maddie, Keegan, Audrey, and Kenny; brother of Joe (Pat) Bryant and John (Sis) Cooper; Brother-in-law of Ron (Myrt) Klein. He is an uncle, cousin, and a friend to many. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois Road. Monday December 5, at 10:30 am. Interment at Sunset Cemetery. Visitation Sunday From 4-8 pm In lieu of flowers, donations appreciated to either the American Heart Association or the National Kidney Association.

Fitzgerald, Keith G. Baptized into the Hope of Christ's Resurrection, Sun., Nov. 27, 2016. Beloved husband of Jan Fitzgerald, dear father of Kyle and Eric (Alissa Kleinman) Fitzgerald, dear brother of Suzanne (Michael) Wallis, James and Scott (Kerri) Fitzgerald, and dear uncle, brother-in-law and friend. Keith practiced architecture for more than 30 years and designed commercial and residential buildings. He was a Board Member of the St. Louis Track Club and an avid community volunteer. Services: Funeral Mass will be held Sat., Dec. 3 at St. Joseph Catholic Church, 106 N. Meramec Ave. at 10 a.m. In lieu of flowers, contributions to The Association for Frontaltemporal Degeneration www.theaftd.org is appreciated. KRIEGSHAUSER BROTHERS www.k-brothers.com

Fuller, Audrey J.

Blair, (Fine), Dorothy E.

Arthur, Robert Milton "Bob"

Langenberg, Mary Booth

Cooper, James C.

To Our Readers

(nee Weyer) Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Monday November 28, 2016. Loving wife of the late Fred Fuller for 58 years; dear mother of Alan (Margaret) Fuller, Robert (Sheri) Fuller and Diane (Louie) Accurso; dear sister of Jean Zgraggen and Sister Jean Ann Weyer SSND. She was preceded in death by her parents, a brother and sister; Beloved grandmother of 9, and great grandmother of 14; cherished aunt and friend. Audrey attended La Clare College in Belleville, Ill. After raising her 3 children she enjoyed her job at SLCC at Forest Park for over 20 years. She was a long time member of St. Anthony Padua Catholic Church. Services: Funeral from the Hoffmeister South County Chapel, 1515 Lemay Ferry Rd. Saturday December 3, 9:30 am then to St. Anthony Padua Catholic Church 3140 Meramec, St. Louis, MO. For funeral mass to celebrated at 10:00 am. Entombment Calvary Mausoleum. Visitation Friday December 2, 4-8 pm at the Hoffmeister South County Chapel. Masses preferred. Share your condolences at www.hoffmeistersouthcounty.com.

Gaffney, Shirley

(nee Doddek) passed away November 29, 2016 surrounded by her devoted husband of 54 years, Bob, and family members. Carol was an RN at Barnes Hospital for 42 years, as well as the nurse in the first aid station at the old Busch Stadium for St. Louis Cardinals home games. She was preceded in death by her beloved daughter Cheryl. If desired, expressions of sympathy may be made to either BJC Hospice (bjchospice.org) or Susan G. Komen for the Cure (komen.org) in support of breast cancer patients. Services: Funeral service at Peace Lutheran Church, 737 Barracksview Rd., St. Louis, MO 63125 at 10:00am Saturday, December 3, 2016 with interment to follow at St. Trinity Cemetery. Visitation on Friday, December 2 from 4pm - 8pm at Hoffmeister South County Chapel, 1515 Lemay Ferry Rd., St. Louis, MO 63125 www.hoffmeistersouthcounty.com

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Gushleff, Gerald K. Sr. 83, passed away Nov. 26, 2016. Visitation Friday, December 2 from 11 am-1 pm, service 1 pm at Irwin Chapel, Granite City, IL

Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church Sunday, November 27, 2016. Beloved wife of the late Robert J. Lesyna; loving mother of William (Trish England) Lesyna, Mary (Mark) Robben, Kalyna Katherine Lesyna, Linda (Sally Cheek) Lesyna and Donna (Jeff) Reitz; cherished grandmother of Catherine, Mark, Eric, Alex, Anna and the late Allyson Robben Dowell and great-grandmother of 9. Services: Visitation at Nazareth Living Center, 2 Nazareth Lane, Friday, December 2, 9:30 a.m. until time of Mass at 10:30 a.m. Interment Sts. Peter and Paul Cemetery. In Lieu of flowers contributions To Notre Dame High School appreciated. A KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY SERVICE.

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Kapp, Robert W., III "Bob"

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Born Oct 16, 1954 and passed away peacefully November 28, 2016, surrounded by family. Preceded in death by parents Robert W Kapp, Jr. (Dorothy) and Dolores Pogorzelski (Walter). Survived by his loving wife Janet M. Kapp (nee Mueller) and son, Devin R. Kapp (Leigh Kreft); sisters and brothers-in-Law Roberta (Bret) DeRousse, Karen Kapp-Gregory (Tom), Cathy Clark (Richard); sisterin-law Marcy LeGrand (Roy) who helped in his last days with love and care, brother-in-law Michael Mueller (Lauran); loving uncle to Tama (Hayden), Christopher, David (Karen), Stephanie (Tim), Marnie (Mark), D'Larin (Tim) and Mark, and great-uncle. Bob lived his life to the fullest with wonderful family, being with the love of his life for 35 years and friends too many to count. Bob knew someone wherever he went and never lost his sense of humor. He fought with a determination and strength that was enviable. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Friday 12:00 p.m. Interment Resurrection Cemetery. Visitation Thursday 4-8 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations to Toys for Tots or other charity of your choice that brings joy to children during the up-coming holiday season.

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NEWS

12.01.2016 • Thursday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • A17

Giving Tuesday has record-setting day 5-year-old efort to boost online charitable donations nets $168 million worldwide BY DAVID CRARY associated Press

NEW YORK • Giving Tuesday, a 5-year-

old phenomenon aimed at encouraging online charitable giving, produced recordshattering donations this week, according to two organizations that tracked the flow of gifts. The 92nd Street Y in New York City, credited for launching the event in 2012, said Wednesday that contributions reported by organizations in the U.S. and abroad for a 24-hour period total $168 million — up from about $117 million in 2015. It said there were roughly 1.6 million donations, coming from people in nearly 100 countries. Blackbaud, a software company that

serves many nonprofits, reported that it processed $47.7 million in online donations Tuesday for more than 6,700 organizations — a 20 percent increase in giving over last year. It said 22 percent of the donations were made via a mobile device. In its first year in 2012, under the aegis of the 92nd Street Y, Giving Tuesday generated about $10 million in donations after being pitched as a way to promote charity on the heels of Thanksgiving weekend’s big shopping days. In subsequent years, it has mushroomed into a decentralized global movement, with nonprofits of all types soliciting donations, promoting volunteerism and encouraging acts of kindness. The 92nd Street Y received detailed re-

ports from many of the participating organizations. Among them: • A Baltimore nonprofit called Thread organized a “Love Notes to Baltimore” campaign where residents wrote uplifting messages in chalk on streets. • Volunteers in Bethel, Alaska, stood in below-zero weather to accept donations for area nonprofits. • The Humane Society of the United States exceeded its target of $200,000, with a total of $350,000 raised. • The University of Michigan’s campaign raised $5.5 million in 24 hours, compared with $4.3 million last year. Numerous progressive organizations, in their Giving Tuesday appeals, made reference to the recent election victories of

DOUGLAS F. BOSCHERT

DEATHS ELSEWHERE

Ex-St. Charles mayor, honored sports volunteer dies at 95

Grant Tinker • The NBC boss and producer, who brought new polish to the TV world and beloved shows including “Hill Street Blues” to the audience, has died. He was 90. Mr. Tinker died Monday (Nov. 28, 2016) at his home in Los Angeles, according to his son, producer Mark Tinker. Though he had three tours of duty with NBC, the last as its chairman, Mr. Tinker was perhaps best-known as the nurturing hand at MTM Enterprises, the production company he founded in 1970 and ran for a decade. Nothing less than a creative salon, MTM scored with some of TV’s most respected and best-loved programs, including “Lou Grant,” “Rhoda,” “The Bob Newhart Show” and, of course, the series that starred his business partner and then-wife, Mary Tyler Moore. “I am deeply saddened to learn that my former husband and professional Tinker mentor Grant Tinker has passed away,” Moore said in a statement. “Grant was a brilliant, driven executive who uniquely understood that the secret to great TV content was freedom for its creators and performing artists. This was manifest in his ‘irst be best and then be irst’ approach.” Mr. Tinker, who had come to NBC as a management trainee in 1949 with legendary founder David Sarnof still in charge, left the company for the last time at the end of an era, as NBC, along with its parent RCA, was about to be swallowed by General Electric. In 2005, he won a prestigious Peabody Award honoring his career. In receiving his medallion, he called himself “a guy of no distinct or speciic skills [who] always needed a lot of help.” He also had received the Governors Award from the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. “Grant Tinker was a great man who made an indelible mark on NBC and the history of television that continues to this day,” said Steve Burke, CEO of NBCUniversal, sole owner of the network since 2013. “He loved creative people and protected them, while still expertly managing the business. Very few people have been able to achieve such a balance.” “His level of class set him apart from everyone else in our business,” said Bob Greenblatt, Chairman of NBC Entertainment, “and all of us at this company owe him a debt of gratitude. In fact, TV watchers everywhere do.”

BY MARK SCHLINKMANN st. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. CHARLES • Douglas F. Boschert, whose long govern-

mental career included stints as St. Charles mayor, state representative and top county oicial, died Sunday (November 27, 2016) at St. Joseph Hospital of a stroke. He was 95. Mr. Boschert, a lifelong resident of St. Charles, was mayor from 1979 to 1983, losing his bid for reelection to Melvin Wetter. Mr. Boschert, a Republican, got his start in elective oice in 1970 when voters picked him as presiding judge of the old St. Charles County administrative court. At the time, it was the top elected position in county government. After serving four years, he was defeated Boschert for a second term. But he mounted a successful political comeback in 1976, winning a seat in the Missouri House. He served there until he was elected mayor in 1979. After leaving the mayor’s oice, he was in the House again from 1985 through 1988. In 1988, he gave up the seat to run unsuccessfully for the county commission, the county’s governing body at the time. He also served as emergency preparedness director. Mr. Boschert’s nephew, Don Boschert Jr., recalled Wednesday that Mr. Boschert was proud of his part in pushing for construction of a second Interstate 70 bridge over the Missouri River at St. Charles in 1979. He also was active in eforts to build other bridges. Mr. Boschert was an Army Air Corps veteran of World War II and for many years was a co-owner of the BK grocery in St. Charles. In 1990, he was inducted into the St. Charles County Amateur Sports Hall of Fame for his 45 years of involvement in amateur baseball and softball. He was a softball catcher and then an adult volunteer. He also was a member of the commission that devised St. Charles County’s charter. He was a member of the Kiwanis Club and American Legion. Visitation will be from 4 to 8 p.m. Thursday at Baue Funeral Home, 620 Jefferson Street, St. Charles. A funeral Mass will be celebrated at 10 a.m. Friday at St. Charles Borromeo Catholic Church, 601 North Fourth Street, St. Charles, with burial at St. Charles Memorial Gardens, 3950 West Clay Street. Among the survivors are his wife, Leaetta Boschert; a brother, the Rev. Hubert Boschert of Omaha, Neb.; and two sisters, Joan Schaefer of St. Charles and Jean Boschert of Surprise, Ariz. Memorial contributions may be made to the church or American Legion Post 312. Mark Schlinkmann • 314-340-8265 @mschlinkmann on Twitter mschlinkmann@post-dispatch.com

Michael James ‘Jim’ Delligatti • The McDonald’s franchisee who created the Big Mac nearly 50 years ago and saw it become perhaps the best-known fast-food sandwich in the world, died Monday (Nov. 28, 2016) at home in Pittsburgh. Mr. Delligatti, who according to his son ate at least one 540-calorie Big Mac a week for decades, was 98. Mr. Delligatti’s franchise was based in Uniontown, not far from Pittsburgh, when he invented the chain’s signature burger in 1967 after deciding customers wanted a bigger sandwich. Demand exploded as Mr. Delligatti’s sandwich spread to the rest of his 47 stores in Pennsylvania and was added to the chain’s national menu in 1968. “He was often asked why he named it the Big Mac, and he said because Big Mc sounded too funny,” his son Michael Delligatti said. Mr. Delligatti told the Associated Press in 2006 that

Donald Trump and congressional Republicans. “When I look around today, I see how far we’ve come — and how far we have left to go now that Donald Trump has been elected,” said an appeal from Barbara Miller, who serves on the board of the National Organization for Women. On the right flank, the conservative Media Research Center appealed for donations to help it counter “the liberal media.” Henry Timms, executive director of the 92nd Street Y and co-founder of Giving Tuesday, said the event’s success was due to “the work of ordinary people all over the country.” “For all those things that may divide us, we all share a proud tradition of giving,” he said.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The late Big Mac creator Michael “Jim” Delligatti sits behind a Big Mac birthday cake at his 90th birthday party in August 2008 in Canonsburg, Pa.

McDonald’s resisted the idea at irst because its simple lineup of hamburgers, cheeseburgers, fries and shakes was selling well. “They igured, why go to something else if [the original menu] was working so well?” Delligatti said then. McDonald’s has sold billions of Big Macs since then, in more than 100 countries. Associated Press

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OBITUARIES McCann, Cheryl Kathryn "Sherry"

(nee: Bruemmer), 72, died peacefully on November 27, 2016 at her home surrounded by family after a courageous 1 year battle with cancer. Sherry was born and raised in La Crosse, WI and eventually settled in the St. Louis area. She was the beloved wife of Thomas McCann for 52 years. Loving mother of Gina (Michael) Cleveland and Kristy (Sean) Campion. Treasured grandmother to Brennan Cleveland, Aaron Cleveland, Bremmer Campion and Haley Campion. Dear sister to Rick (Sue) Bruemmer and Phyllis (Jim) Blank. Loving aunt to her many nieces and nephews. Services: A memorial visitation for Sherry will be held Saturday, December 3, 11am at BUCHHOLZ Valley of Flowers Mortuary, 619 Rue St. Francois with service to follow at 2pm. In lieu of flowers, donations to the American Cancer Society would be greatly appreciated.

Honor ...your loved one with a condolence message in our online guest book. Visit Us At: /obituaries the #1 St. Louis website

McFarland, Dr. Gerald L. "Jerry"

on Tuesday Nov. 29, 2016. Beloved husband of 57 years to Mary Ann McFarland (nee Mabry); dear brother, uncle, cousin, and friend to many. Dr. McFarland proudly served as a Medic in the Navy during the Korean War, was a Teacher of Science, School Principal at Northeast Middle and Central Middle in the Parkway School District, and was a devoted member of Salem Methodist Church. Services: Funeral Service Saturday December 3rd, 11 am at Salem in Ladue United Methodist Church. Interment Bellerive Cemetery. If desired Memorial contributions may be made to Epworth Children and Family Services, Salem in Ladue United Methodist Church, or St. Andrews Charitable Foundation. Visitation Friday December 2nd, 5-8pm at Bopp Chapel, and Saturday 10-11am at Salem in Ladue United Methodist Church. www.boppchapel.com

Missey, Steven Thomas 68, Nov. 29, 2016 Vis. 12/3 from 9a.m. until time of MASS at 10 a.m. Immaculate Conception Old Monroe Service of Carter-Ricks F.H. Winfield

Regan, Frank J. Jr. Sun., Nov. 27, 2016. Memorial visitation Dec. 2, 9:30 a.m. until Mass 10:30 a.m. at Assumption Church (O'Fallon). colliersfuneralhome.com

Teitelman, The Honorable Richard B. Justice of the Supreme Court of Missouri died November 29, 2016. Dear son of the late Nathan and the late May Teitelman; dear brother and brother-in-law of Gilbert E. (Elyce) and the late Louis Teitelman. Our dear friend. Services: Funeral service Thursday, December 1st, 2:00 PM at Graham Memorial Chapel, Washington University in St. Louis. Parking in Danforth Garage at Forsyth Blvd and Wallace Drive. Memorial contributions preferred to Legal Services of Eastern Missouri, 4232 Forest Park, 63108. Lindell Blvd, 63108. Please visit bergermemorialchapel.com for more information. BERGER MEMORIAL SERVICE

Tonnies, Edna M.

Varrone, Nicholas J. Sr.

Winkle, Sr. Billy G.

92, Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church Saturday, November 26, 2016. Beloved husband of Ann M. Varrone (nee Steger); dear father of Nicholas Jr. (Ellie) and Timothy (Marilyn) Varrone and Denise (Steve) Bihr; our dear grandfather, greatgrandfather, brother-in-law, uncle, great-uncle and friend. Nicholas was a Knight of the 4th Degree. Services: Funeral from KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY CHAPEL, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Friday, December 2, 9:30 a.m. to St. Margaret Mary Alacoque Church for 10:00 a.m. Mass. Interment JB National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions to the charity of your choice appreciated. Visitation Thursday, 5-8 p.m.

age 82, of Saint Charles, MO, died on Tuesday, November 29, 2016. Contact (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com

White, Wilbur Dean St Louis MO-Wilbur White, 88 died Sun Nov 20, 2016. Husband of Betty Marie White (Aslinger), father of Kevin White (Laura), Kerry White (Anna) & grandfather. From Springdale AR, son of Bascom Thomas and Nancy Irene White. Memorial Service: 11am Sat Dec 3, Bellefontaine United Methodist Church, 10600 Bellefontaine Rd. Bellefontaine Neighbors, MO

Wilt, Virginia Lucille (nee Vollmer), 98, baptized into the hope of Christ's Resurrection Monday, November 28, 2016. Dear wife of the late Fred Tonnies, Sr. for many years; loving mother of Fred (Kathleen) Tonnies, Judy (Bill) O'Donnell Schulz, and Audrey (the late Pat) Manning; cherished grandmother of Joe Tonnies, Sarah (Trey) Pope, the late Dennis O'Donnell, Dan O'Donnell, Patrick Manning, Tim Manning, Margaret Manning, Bill (DeAnn) Schulz, Julie (Bill) Johnston, Bob Schulz; dear great-grandmother of Kyle, Ava, Liam, Olivia and Shelby Rae. Services: Visitation Sunday, December 4, 12 pm - 2 pm at BUCHHOLZ Mortuary West, 2211 Clarkson Road (at Wilson Road), Chesterfield, MO. Interment Private at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. Online guestbook at buchholzmortuary.com. In lieu of flowers donations may made be made to the charity of your choice.

(nee Hovis) On Monday, November 28, 2016. Beloved wife of the late Howard O. Wilt; loving mother of Linda (Russell) March and Rhonda (the late Herman "Fred" Reimler); cherished grandmother of Bradley (Lennie) Reimler, Jason Northcutt, Timothy (Kristina) Reimler, and Ryan (Katy) March; great-grandmother of Christian, Zachary, Lucas, and Levi; loving sister of Arthur (the late LaRita), Dwain (Yolanda) Hovis, and the late Leona (Jim) Reynolds, Hazel (Glen) Spencer, Cyde (Audrey), Floyd (survived by Melba) and Richard Hovis; dear sister-in-law of Earl (Mollie) Wilt; caring aunt, greataunt, and friend to many. Services: A Memorial Gathering, Friday, December 2 from 4 p.m. until the time of service 6 p.m. at Grace Freewill Baptist Church, 2258 Tenbrook Rd, Arnold 63010. Contributions can be made to the American Lung Association. KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY CHAPEL SERVICE

Wolfinger, Linda Ann

(nee Verseman), passed away, Wednesday, November 23, 2016 at Missouri Baptist Hospital with her family surrounding her. Linda was born on November 24, 1946 at home in Farrar, MO, to the late Edwin and Ruth Verseman (nee Kassel). She was married to William D. Wolfinger in Cape Girardeau, MO on May 22, 1976. She is survived by her husband; her daughter, Anne (Jason) Knollmann; newly born grandsons, Isaac and Ben; her sister, Helen (Robert) Heeszel; nieces, Sara (Adam) Wedel, Susan (Doug) Fiehler, Danielle (John) Rinaldi, Angela Cevallos, and Momi Howard; and nephew, John (Amy) Verseman. Services: Funeral service at Concordia Lutheran Church, 505 S. Kirkwood Road, Kirkwood, Friday, December 2, 2016, 11:00 a.m. Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to American Diabetes Association or American Lung Association. Visitation at the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory, 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, Thursday 5-8 p.m. and at the church, Friday, 10 a.m. until time of service. Friends may sign the family's on-line guestbook at Schrader.com.

Zuellig Sr., Rudolph O. Baptized into the hope of Christ's Resurrection Sunday, November 27, 2016. Beloved husband for 63 years of Ann M. Zuellig (nee Katzenberger); loving father of Rudolph Zuellig Jr. and Robert (LeaAnn) Zuellig; cherished grandfather of Rudolph (Amy) III, Curtis (Tamara), Jonathan (Nicole) Zuellig and Ella and Maddie Zuellig; great-grandfather of Rudolph IV, Grace, Aden, Aleyna, Cole, Cameron and Dalylah on the way; dear brother of Tillie Plouder; our dear uncle, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral from KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Monday, December 5, 9:30 a.m. to Assumption Catholic Church for 10 a.m. Mass. Interment Mount Olive Cemetery. Visitation Sunday, 4-8 p.m.

LOCAL 1 I.B.E.W. Please be advised of the death of Bro. Martin L. Sanzottera Communication Member 40 Years November 23, 2016 Services Were Held Frank D. Jacobs, B.M. James C. Douglas, F.S.

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NEWS

A18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 12.01.2016

WEATHER • LOW 35, HIGH 47 • WINDS W 5-15 MPH

PEOPLE

Dry and seasonable today

Dylan is no-show at White House

Mostly sunny to partly cloudy skies along with light westerly winds and near seasonable temperatures can be expected across the St. Louis area today. Highs will be in the mid-to-upper 40s. Friday and Saturday will also feature dry conditions. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

24-HOUR FORECAST

MORNING

LUNCH

DRIVE

37°

44°

45°

BEDTIME

38°

Mostly sunny Partly cloudy Partly cloudy

Partly cloudy

4-DAY FORECAST

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

33°/46°

32°/45°

36°/48° 36°/52°

Partly cloudy

Increasing clouds

Slight chance of rain

H

31 31 29 33 30 29 30 28 29 28 28 31 29

53 48 44 47 45 52 44 41 44 50 42 45 50

W

sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny

Illinois Bloomington Carbondale Chicago Decatur Effingham Macomb Mount Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Springfield Urbana

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L

MONDAY

PM rain possible

Shown are this morning’s lows and today’s highs

TODAY IN THE BI-STATE AREA Missouri Branson Cape Girardeau Columbia Farmington Jefferson City Joplin Kansas City Kirksville Rolla Springfield St. Joseph Union West Plains

SUNDAY

L

H

W

33 33 35 32 32 30 31 33 30 35 32 33

41 47 40 41 41 40 44 41 42 40 42 41

mostly cloudy sunny cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy

Chicago 35 / 40

Kirksville 28 / 41 Kansas City 30 / 44

Springfield 32 / 42

St. Louis 35 / 47 Carbondale 33 / 47

Joplin 29 / 52

Poplar Bluff 31 / 51

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ALMANAC Asof7P.M.atLambertField 46° 34° 48° 32° 72° 1° 48° 40°

0.00” 3.73” 3.91” 40.31” 38.12”

TODAY’S AIR QUALITY Very unhealthy

Good

TODAY’S UV INDEX Min.

Very high The higher the UV index number, the greater the need for skin protection.

POLLEN COUNTS Wednesday, Nov. 30th No tree, grass, or weed pollen present Mold - 7,344 (moderate) HEATING DEGREE DAYS Yesterday 25 Month (Total) 400 Season 491 Year Ago 562

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PRECIPITATION Last 24 hrs Month (Total) Month (Normal) Year (Total) Year (Normal)

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

TEMPERATURES High (11:55 a.m.) Low (4:37 a.m.) Average High Average Low Record High (2014) Record Low (1964) High Last Year Low Last Year

SUN & MOON

First Dec 7 Sunrise

Full Dec 13

Last Dec 20

7:00 AM Sunset

New Dec 29 4:40 PM

Moonrise 8:34 AM Moonset 6:46 PM

Looking to the southeast around 6 a.m. in the morning you will see the star Spica below Jupiter. This star is a blue-white star, which means it is hotter than our sun.

SOURCE: McDonnell Planetarium

RIVER STAGES

Flood Stage

Current Level

MISSOURI RIVER Kansas City 32 9.82 23 6.49 Jefferson City 21 Hermann 6.11 20 3.65 Washington 25 10.15 St. Charles MISSISSIPPI RIVER Hannibal 16 11.64 Louisiana 15 11.66 Dam 24 25 17.96 Dam 25 26 17.57 Grafton 18 15.70 M.Price, Pool 419 418.60 M.Price, Tail. 21 7.07 St Louis 30 7.90 Chester 27 10.83 Cape Girardeau 32 16.37

24-Hr Change

Flood Stage

Current Level

ILLINOIS RIVER La Salle 20 17.82 18 12.30 Peoria 14 10.19 Beardstown MERAMEC RIVER 15 2.95 Sullivan 16 - 2.27 Valley Park 24 6.06 Arnold BOURBEUSE RIVER Union 15 2.07 OHIO RIVER Cairo 40 15.90

- 0.12 - 0.30 - 0.16 - 0.04 - 0.11 - 0.14 - 0.21 - 0.87 + 0.47 + 0.08 0.00 + 0.34 + 0.31 - 0.36 - 0.10

LAKE LEVELS

24-Hr Change

Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

+ 1.11 + 0.01 - 0.29 + 0.01 - 0.04 - 0.05 - 0.02

Current Level

24-Hr Change

354.92 360.25 494.95 658.28 706.02 652.05 909.60 840.32 600.68 406.36 602.34 445.80

+ 0.16 + 0.08 - 0.05 + 0.02 + 0.06 - 0.08 0.00 0.00 + 0.28 + 0.19 0.00 + 0.51

+ 1.47

Maps and weather data provided by:

Get more river & lake stage information at 636-441-8467

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS

Bob Dylan is not only skipping the ceremony in Stockholm awarding him the Nobel Prize in Literature, he also skipped meeting with Dylan the president on Wednesday. President Barack Obama met with several American winners of the Nobel Prize before they oicially accept their award. But White House spokesman Josh Earnest said that “unfortunately, for those of you wondering, Bob Dylan will not be at the White House today, so everybody can relax.” Earnest says Dylan didn’t give a reason. ‘Today’ will have Lauer for another two years • Matt Lauer has quietly signed on for two more years as co-anchor on NBC’s “Today.” Citing unnamed sources, the New York Post said late Tuesday that Lauer agreed to extend his commitment through 2018 and will earn $20 million a year. An NBC News representative is not commenting on the report, but a person familiar with the deal said the contract signing is not recent. Lauer, 58, has been at the helm of “Today” since 1997. Lauer was subjected to harsh criticism from pundits and political partisans earlier this year for his performance as moderator in NBC’s presidential candidate forum after he failed to press Presidentelect Donald Trump on his insistence that he had been opposed to the Iraq war. Lauer also received blowback for interrupting Hillary Clinton, who attempted to provide longer and more detailed answers during her portion. But the controversy over Lauer’s performance never afected his standing with morning TV viewers as “Today” ratings remained steady in the aftermath.

Actor-director Woody Allen is 81. Actress-singer Bette Midler is 71. Singer Gilbert O’Sullivan is 70. Actor Treat Williams is 65. Country singer Kim Richey is 60. Actress Charlene Tilton

is 58. Model-actress Carol Alt is 56. Comedian Sarah Silverman is 46. Actor David Hornsby is 41. Singer Janelle Monae is 31. Actress Ashley Monique Clark is 28. Actress Zoe Kravitz is 28. Singer Nico Sereba is 26. From news services

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TODAY ACROSS THE U.S.

National Extremes High: 86° Marathon, Florida

Low: -5° Alamosa, Colorado

Rain

40s

30s

20s

40s 30s

30s

T-storms

50s

20s

40s

50s 40s 40s

30s

Snow

40s

60s

50s

60s

50s

50s 60s

Wintry Mix

70s 80s

70s

Jet Stream

Alaska Low: -43°

Hawaii High: 83°

Scattered rain and snow showers are expected throughout parts of the Great Lakes and upper Midwest in association with a low pressure area and an upper-level trough. Another frontal boundary will bring snow showers to parts of the north-central Rockies. Cooler air will settle into the northern Plains and north-central Rockies. Today L H

Albany, N.Y. 43 Albuquerque 22 Anchorage 13 Atlanta 42 Atlantic City 51 Baltimore 48 Billings 26 Biloxi, Ms. 46 Birmingham 38 Bismarck 22 Boise 28 Boston 47 Buffalo 41 Burlington, Vt. 47 Charleston, S.C. 62 Charleston, W.V. 39 Charlotte 48 Cheyenne 14 Chicago 35 Cincinnati 35 Cleveland 38 Colorado Spgs. 13 Concord, N.H. 41 Dallas 40 Daytona Beach 66 Denver 16 Des Moines 32 52 Destin, Fl. 36 Detroit 29 El Paso 34 Evansville -23 Fairbanks 31 Fargo 8 Flagstaff 67 Fort Myers 28 Great Falls 33 Green Bay 46 Hartford 73 Honolulu 42 Houston 33 Indianapolis 35 Jackson, Ms. 37 Juneau 76 Key West 38 Las Vegas 34 Little Rock 49 Los Angeles 36 Louisville

50 43 24 56 59 54 40 63 57 29 39 56 44 48 71 47 62 35 40 44 43 37 53 65 80 39 39 67 43 59 45 -4 33 39 82 36 40 55 83 67 42 60 38 82 56 59 65 47

W

Tomorrow L H W

mostly cloudy partly cloudy snow sunny sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny sunny cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy showers cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy cloudy mostly cloudy cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy cloudy sunny cloudy sunny sunny snow cloudy sunny partly sunny mostly cloudy cloudy mostly cloudy showers sunny mostly cloudy sunny rain partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy

37 29 9 38 34 36 24 45 34 19 25 38 37 38 42 34 36 14 32 32 35 18 35 47 54 20 30 47 34 38 30 -7 24 13 66 24 29 34 72 47 31 33 36 73 41 36 48 31

46 44 14 58 51 50 37 64 60 26 39 49 42 44 64 45 59 30 38 45 41 31 45 65 69 33 39 67 42 63 46 -5 30 34 81 37 38 49 82 69 41 64 38 81 54 59 66 47

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

City

mostly cloudy mostly cloudy cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy cloudy cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny snow mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny rain and snow partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy

City

Today L H

46 Macon 56 McAllen, Tx. 36 Memphis 73 Miami 35 Milwaukee Minneapolis 34 Missoula, Mt. 26 42 Mobile Montgomery 41 36 Nashville New Orleans 46 New York City 50 Norfolk, Va. 59 Oklahoma City 30 Omaha 29 Orlando 66 Palm Springs 48 Philadelphia 53 Phoenix 41 Pittsburgh 37 Portland, Me. 41 Portland, Or. 42 Providence 47 Raleigh 55 Rapid City 16 Reno 27 Richmond, Va. 55 Sacramento 39 St. Petersburg 69 Salt Lake City 28 San Antonio 39 San Diego 51 San Francisco 45 Santa Fe 14 Savannah 61 Seattle 40 36 Shreveport 29 Sioux Falls 42 Syracuse 55 Tallahassee 70 Tampa 30 Tucson 31 Tulsa 50 Wash D.C. W. Palm Beach 73 25 Wichita Wilmington, De. 50 43 Yuma

62 78 56 83 41 36 37 64 61 53 62 53 66 59 38 83 66 56 64 42 51 49 57 64 36 40 63 57 78 35 68 64 58 39 69 46 64 33 43 70 79 65 59 56 83 51 56 67

W

Tomorrow L H W

sunny mostly sunny sunny showers cloudy cloudy cloudy sunny sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy cloudy sunny cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy

36 66 37 71 31 28 23 39 35 34 49 38 42 34 26 60 47 37 44 32 37 42 37 37 20 23 37 37 63 23 53 50 44 21 40 43 38 27 39 40 62 35 35 37 70 28 35 47

63 81 59 82 37 32 36 66 64 56 65 50 54 56 39 72 61 50 63 41 48 47 50 56 35 43 55 58 74 33 65 65 60 39 66 49 63 32 43 69 75 62 58 51 81 51 50 64

sunny thunderstorms sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy rain partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy showers sunny sunny mostly cloudy sunny rain sunny cloudy cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy windy

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NAME ______________________________________________________________________________________________________

ADDRESS _______________________________________________________________________ APT. ____________________

CITY ____________________________________________________________ STATE _________ ZIP ____________________

PHONE ( _______________ ) _____________________________________________________________

TODAY AROUND THE WORLD 73 43 40 54 70 80 32 37 32 69 56 27 72 64 33 31

H

85 49 52 72 88 86 48 46 42 82 63 36 85 77 42 41

W

sunny cloudy sunny partly cloudy mostly sunny mostly cloudy mostly sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny showers mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy cloudy

City Geneva Hong Kong Istanbul Jakarta Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Madrid Mecca Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi

L

33 61 38 77 49 65 31 30 44 73 52 41 11 74 57 52

H

50 72 44 86 61 86 58 43 54 91 77 45 24 82 76 84

W

sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy rain partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy cloudy sunny mostly sunny cloudy snow showers partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy

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Acapulco Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Barbados Beijing Berlin Budapest Buenos Aires Cairo Calgary Cancun Cape Town Dublin Frankfurt

L

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

City

City Oslo Paris Prague Rio De Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Stockholm Sydney Taipei Tokyo Toronto Vancouver Vienna Warsaw

EMAIL ________________________________________________________________________________ L

29 27 32 69 33 75 59 37 27 63 67 43 41 39 36 32

H

34 42 39 78 57 87 87 43 32 90 70 57 44 45 42 39

W

partly cloudy partly cloudy cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy showers showers showers cloudy rain

TOTAL (enclosed)

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WORLD

12.01.2016 • ThursDay • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-DIsPaTCh • A19

Haiti’s new leader eager to begin

DIGEST

Moise’s priorities are agriculture, education, energy, foreign investment BY DAVID McFADDEN associated Press

PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI • The political newcomer chosen to lead deeply divided Haiti for the next five years says he’s eager to improve the lives of desperately poor families in the long-neglected countryside and bring steady economic advances to one of the least developed nations in the world. Jovenel Moise, an upbeat entrepreneur, said reviving the economically blighted countryside where almost 80 percent of households farm was one of his major goals. He described the rural poor as the backbone of his homeland’s fragile economy. “It’s really important to change the lifestyle of these people,” Moise told the Associated Press in his first interview with an international news agency since oicials issued preliminary results showing he won the Nov. 20 election in a landslide. If the preliminary results withstand challenges by three of his closest rivals in coming weeks, Moise will have earned the presidency with 55 percent of the votes in a field of 27 candidates. The result is supposed to be certified on Dec. 29 after an electoral tribunal resolves the challenges. In the interview at a Petionville campaign oice, Moise said his priorities were agriculture, education, energy reform and foreign investment. He said he was looking forward to the challenge of building consensus and helping fix a political culture perpetually at war with itself. “I am working hard to be close with the Parliament because there’s no way a president can work without deputies, without senators,” he said.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Jovenel Moise, Haiti’s president-elect, is helped by a team member before an interview in his oice in Petion-Ville, Haiti, on Tuesday.

Robert Fatton, a Haitian-born politics professor at the University of Virginia, said that Moise would find governing diicult “if he is unwilling or unable to draw some key adversaries into his regime.” “The next few weeks and months will be bumpy and will test Jovenel Moise’s statecraft and capacity to move the country in a new and hopeful trajectory,” he said. The still-preliminary November victory came more than a year after Moise topped an initial presidential vote that was eventually thrown out for alleged fraud, leading to a lengthy period of political limbo. A businessman from northern Haiti, Moise had never run for office until he was hand-picked by outgoing President Michel Martelly to be the Tet Kale party candidate. Some critics continue to view Moise’s ascent with suspicion, suggesting Martelly is using the candidate as a proxy. Moise laughed of the criticism, saying it

was mostly about the snobbery of political elites in the capital. “In Haiti, when you come from the countryside, the people here in Port-au-Prince, they think they know everything. But it’s not true ,and I’m the example. In the countryside you have good people also — with knowledge, with vision, with capacity,” Moise said. Moise, 48, a father of three, said that Martelly would be an adviser when he becomes president and that he wanted to study his predecessor’s successes and mistakes. Other previous presidents also will serve as advisers, he said. Moise said he was disappointed that voter turnout was a paltry 21 percent. There’s long been a deep sense of voter disenchantment in Haiti ,and Moise said he believed more Haitians would vote in the next electoral cycle if politicians simply kept their promises and stopped feuding.

Plane that crashed was out of fuel The pilot of the chartered plane carrying a Brazilian soccer team told air traic controllers he had run out of fuel and desperately pleaded for permission to land before crashing into the Andes, killing 71 people, according to a leaked recording of the inal minutes of the doomed light. In the sometimes chaotic exchange with the air traic tower, the pilot of the British-built jet could be heard repeatedly requesting authorization to land because of “fuel problems.” A female controller explained another plane had been diverted with mechanical problems and had priority, instructing the pilot to wait seven minutes. As the plane circled in a holding pattern, the pilot grew more desperate. “Complete electrical failure, without fuel,” he said in the tense inal moments before the plane set of on a four-minute death spiral that ended with it slamming into a mountainside Monday night. World chess champion wins third title • Two-time world chess champion Magnus Carlsen won his third title on Wednesday, defeating Russian challenger Sergey Karjakin after three weeks of grueling play in the World Chess Championship. Fans greeted the Norwegian with a “happy birthday” chorus and huge cheers after his victory. He turned 26 on the same day he beat the Russian, winning two of four tie-breaking “rapid games.” The grandmasters started Wednesday’s chessboard battle with a 6-6 tie after 12

games. They will share a prize of $1.1 million, the winner getting 60 percent. Gambian leader warns against protests • Gambia’s president of more than two decades is warning that even peaceful protests will not be permitted after Thursday’s election, a move that comes as people are for the irst time speaking out more freely against President Yahya Jammeh’s rule. Jammeh, 51, who took control of this small West African country in 1994, raised his hands in the air before thousands of singing and dancing supporters at his inal campaign rally late Tuesday. Jammeh has said his victory is all but assured with divine intervention, and warned the opposition against protesting. Castro’s ashes start 500mile journey • Surrounded by white roses and drawn by a green military jeep, Fidel Castro’s ashes began a more than 500-mile journey on Wednesday across the country he ruled for nearly 50 years. Just after 7 a.m, an honor guard placed a small, lagdraped cedar coin under a glass dome on a trailer behind the Russian jeep. Thousands of soldiers and state security agents saluted the 90-yearold leader’s remains as they rolled slowly out of Havana’s Plaza of the Revolution. Tens of thousands of Cubans lined the path of the funeral procession, which retraced the path of Castro’s triumphant march into Havana nearly six decades ago. Castro died Friday. From news services

120116

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A20 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

THURSDAY • 12.01.2016 • B

We are all Chapecoense fans Soccer team’s calamity is a painful reminder of how sports unite, complete us GRIEVING HEADLINES

>> “Haunting video shows Brazilian players aboard doomed light.” >> “Chapecoense goalkeeper made heartbreaking inal call to wife after plane crash, moments before he died.” >> “Chapecoense player found out he was to be father a week before crash death.”

BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Why do we love strangers? Are we weird? Why do sports fans devote a part of their hearts to athletes they’ve never met? Our favorite athletes represent what makes us “us” — a passion and dedication to the team and, oh we so hope, to our city, too. There are few things cooler than when athletes proclaim they care about the same city that you care about, the same city that made you and defines you. Stan and Ozzie and Hullie and Yadi may

be from somewhere else, sure, but they are St. Louis’ — and they are St. Louis. We admire athletes simultaneously because they’re human and superhuman. They’re larger-than-life with uncommon talents, but they make mistakes and have families and emote like all of us do. We’re all in on our teams, on our players. So this week, I think of those devoted to Chapecoense. Their beloved team has perished. This week, we’re all devoted to Chapecoense, the Brazilian soccer club aboard the airplane that crashed Monday. Seventy-one people died. We mourn these strangers and, for a brief moment, allow ourselves to try to See HOCHMAN • Page B3

Perron is paying of Blues forward is one of league’s top producers BY TOM TIMMERMANN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

NO PAY, NO MLS, IT SEEMS Voters will be deciding future of stadium plan

When the NHL’s free agency gates sprung open July 1, it didn’t take long for the big names to land big contracts. Kyle Okposo got $42 million over seven years from the Sabres. Milan Lucic signed a similar deal with Edmonton. Andrew Ladd got $38.5 million over seven years from the Islanders. For forwards with a history of scoring goals, it’s the best day of the year, maybe their lives. The Blues saw David Backes leave for his own big deal, earning $30 million over five seasons. Troy Brouwer snagged a fouryear, $18 million contract from the Flames. That left a sizable hole in the Blues’ forward corps, but to replace them, the Blues didn’t jump into the free agent frenzy. Instead, they went to an old standby, signing David Perron, who had been one of their own before being traded away in 2013, to a two-year deal for $7 million. While the final accounting on the free agent class won’t be done for years, the early returns say the Blues are getting a pretty good return on their investment. Perron is, by at least one measure, the hottest player in the league right now, with seven goals and nine assists and an eight-game point streak, the longest active streak in the league and the third longest so far this season. His run started amid the wreckage of the Blues’ 8-4 loss to Columbus on Nov. 12 with three assists in that game, and since then he has scored three

JOSE de JESUS ORTIZ St. Louis Post-Dispatch

See BLUES • Page B6

> 7 p.m. Thursday vs. Lightning, FSM > Blues continue to have confidence in Yakupov. B6

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A fan of Brazil’s soccer team Chapecoense mourns during a gathering inside Arena Conda stadium in Chapeco, Brazil on Tuesday.

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Blues left winger David Perron reacts after scoring against the Dallas Stars on Monday at Scottrade Center.

It appears that local citizens and sports fans will have to answer the $80 million question while SC St. Louis proceeds as the only expansion efort Major League Soccer considers for the Gateway to the West. As SC St. Louis makes its pitch for partial public financing for a soccerspecific stadium, team officials will claim that they expect to lose money during the franchise’s first few years. SC St. Louis Chairman Paul Edgerley said Tuesday that MLS expansion here might not be possible if voters don’t approve the estimated $80 million needed in public financing to build a $200 million stadium. “My belief is that without public funding it would be hard to get an MLS franchise in St. Louis, whether it’s us or someone else,” Edgerley said. “It’s the honest truth. I think that where the league is in development, I think economically there needs to be a partnership between the community and whatever ownership group would come in.” According to Forbes, MLS franchises are worth an average of $185 million, with a high of $285 million for the Seattle Sounders. Forbes estimated that only seven MLS teams were See ORTIZ • Page B2

“So there is a chance that we would do something outside of that, but I would say that is remote. The plan that we have today has us set up to invest a significant amount of money, not only just in the stadium but in the franchise fees and the miscellaneous things that go into the operation, and that’s even before you’re operating the team longterm.” — Jim Kavanaugh, SC St. Louis vice-chairman > MLS answers questions about the St. Louis efort. A3

MU volleyball well aware of early tourney pitfalls Tigers hosting irst two rounds of NCAA play BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • Three years ago Wayne Kreklow’s Missouri volleyball team marched into the postseason with its record spotless. The Tigers had captured the Southeastern Conference championship and were rewarded with first- and second-round home games in the 64-team national bracket. They didn’t know the taste of de-

feat until it’s all they had to swallow. Purdue ambushed the 35-0 Tigers in the second round of the tournament on Mizzou’s home floor at the Hearnes Center. A team that hadn’t lost all season didn’t know how to respond when momentum wasn’t on its side. That year, the Tigers were so good they swept 27 of their 36 matches. No opponent took them to five sets. MIZZOU PHOTO

See VOLLEYBALL • Page B4

Missouri volleyball coach Wayne Kreklow lifts the SEC championship trophy after Saturday’s win.

SPORTS

1 M


SPORTS

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Thursday 12/1 vs. Tampa Bay 7 p.m. FSM

Saturday 12/3 vs. Winnipeg 6 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 12/6 vs. Montreal 7 p.m. FSM

Thursday 12/8 at NY Islanders 6 p.m. FSM

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 12.01.2016

MLS EASTERN CONFRENCE FINALS • MONTREAL AT TORONTO

Toronto outlasts Montreal

Mizzou men’s basketball • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Saturday 12/3 vs. Western Kentucky 2 p.m.

Tuesday 12/6 vs. Miami (Ohio) 7 p.m.

Saturday 12/10 vs. Arizona 11 a.m. ESPN2

Saturday 12/17 vs. Eastern Ill. 2:30 p.m. SEC Network

SLU men’s basketball • slubillikens.com | 314-977-4758 Saturday 12/3 vs. Kansas State 7 p.m. FSM Plus

Tuesday 12/6 at Wichita State 7 p.m. FSM Plus

Sunday 12/11 vs. Chicago State 2 p.m.

Wednesday 12/14 at SIU C-dale 7 p.m.

Illinois men’s basketball • ightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Saturday 12/3 vs. VCU (in Miami) 2 p.m., CBSSN

Tuesday 12/6 vs. IUPUI 7 p.m.

Saturday 12/10 vs. Central Michigan 2 p.m.

Saturday 12/17 vs. BYU (Chicago) 8:30 p.m. BTN

OTHER EVENTS MAJOR ARENA SOCCER LEAGUE • St. Louis Ambush home games Fri. 12/9: vs. Florida, 7:35 p.m. Sun. 12/18: vs. Cedar Rapids, 3:05 p.m. FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

TICKET INFORMATION Cardinals Blues SLU Raiders Fairmount

314-345-9000 Rascals 636-240-2287 Grizzlies 618-337-3000 314-622-2583 Illinois 217-333-3470 Mizzou 800-228-7297 314-977-4758 SIUE 855-748-3849 Ambush 636-477-6363 636-294-9662 STL FC 636-680-0997 314-436-1516 • 618-345-4300 CANADIAN PRESS

Toronto FC defender Nick Hagglund (center) celebrates his goal against the Montreal Impact with teammates Michael Bradley (right) and Steven Beitashour during the second half Wednesday in Toronto.

ON THE AIR BASKETBALL 6 p.m. College: Columbia at Seton Hall, FS1 6 p.m. College women: Oklahoma at Kentucky, SEC Network 7 p.m. NBA: Clippers at Cavaliers, TNT 7 p.m. NBA: Magic at Grizzlies, FSM Plus 8 p.m. College: Cincinnati at Iowa State, ESPN 8 p.m. College: Oregon St. at Mississippi State, ESPNU 8 p.m. College: Stephen F. Austin at Arkansas, SEC Network 8 p.m. High school: Hamilton Heights (Tenn.) at Memphis East (Tenn.), ESPN2 9:30 p.m. NBA: Houston at Golden State, TNT FOOTBALL 7:25 p.m. NFL: Cowboys at Vikings, KSDK (5) NFL Network GOLF 6:30 a.m. European PGA: Alfred Dunhill Championship, irst round, GOLF 12:30 p.m. PGA: Hero World Challenge, irst round, GOLF 7 p.m. European PGA: Australian PGA Championship, second round, GOLF 2:30 a.m. European PGA: Alfred Dunhill Championship, second round, GOLF HOCKEY 5:30 p.m. College: Michigan at Penn State, ESPNU 7 p.m. NHL: Blues vs. Lightning, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM)

Winners to face Seattle for MLS championship ASSOCIATED PRESS

TORONTO • Benoit Cheyrou and

Tosaint Ricketts scored 2 minutes apart in extra time and Toronto FC advanced to the MLS Cup final, outlasting the Montreal Impact 5-2 in the rain Wednesday night for a 7-5 aggregate victory. It took extra time and 12 goals to decide the two-leg Eastern Conference final. Toronto will host the Seattle Sounders on Dec. 10 in the MLS championship game, becoming the first Canadian team to play for the title. Toronto trailed 3-2 after Game 1 in Montreal and fell further behind after the Impact scored first

before a BMO Field-record crowd of 36,000. Only once before in MLS playof history had a club trailed by as many as three goals in a two-leg aggregate series and come back to win. The San Jose Earthquakes were down 4-0 in 2003 before rallying to beat the Los Angeles Galaxy 5-4. With the teams tied 5-5 on aggregate, Cheyrou scored on a header in the 98th minute — just a minute after entering the game — when he knocked in Steven Beitashour’s cross. Then, Jozy Altidore outmuscled a couple of defenders to send in a cross that Ricketts, beating two more defenders to the ball, swept in. Dominic Oduro opened the scoring in the 24th minute for Montreal, a goal that meant To-

ronto had to score twice. Armando Cooper and Altidore did just that before the first half was over, tying the aggregate score at 4-4, with an away goals edge to Toronto. But the Impact’s Ignacio Piatti made it 2-2 — and 5-4 on aggregate — in the 53rd minute after substitute Johan Venegas found him behind the defense. The ball bounced off either Piatti or defender Nick Hagglund, leaving Toronto fans to watch in pain as it trickled slowly into the net. Hagglund restored order with a superb header in the 68th minute to make it 3-2 on the night and 5-5 on aggregate. It came of a short corner with Justin Morrow delivering the cross.

DIGEST Texas defensive back lips pledge to Mizzou Terry Petry irst gave the University of Houston an oral commitment in November 2015, but after taking an oicial recruiting visit to Missouri earlier this fall, the defensive back from Missouri City, Texas, oicially changed his plans Wednesday. Petry lipped his pledge from Houston to Mizzou, he announced on Twitter. Petry, rated a four-star prospect by Rivals.com, also holds ofers from Kansas and Iowa State. Houston coach Tom Herman recently left the program to become the head coach at Texas. Petry becomes the 14th known player to commit to Mizzou’s 2017 class. Listed as 5-11, 160 pounds, Petry played at Ridge Point High School. Petry took an oicial visit to Missouri on Sept. 17, the weekend of MU’s game against Georgia. He’s rated the No. 29 cornerback prospect in the country and the No. 36 player in Texas by Rivals.com. (Dave Matter) LPGA Tour is growing • The LPGA Tour will have four new tournaments next year, with an increase of $4.35 million in total prize money. Commissioner Mike Whan announced the 2017 schedule Wednesday. It features 34 oicial tournaments, 21 of them in North America and 16 with prize money of $2 million or more. Whan said the U.S. Women’s Open would have a $5 million purse, the largest ever in women’s golf. “While we receive credit for being a global tour, we’re just as proud that we’ve added more events in North America since 2011 than we have abroad,” Whan said. “It’s an exciting time for our organization and we cannot wait to start another great season in January.” Some of the events previously were announced. The surprise was the Lorena Ochoa Invitational in Mexico moving from November to May and switching to match play. The ield was particularly weak this year because it was between the end of the fall Asia swing and CME Group Tour Championship in Florida. (AP) German Grand Prix dropped • The 2017 Formula One championship will be run over 20 races, without the German Grand Prix, depriving new champion Nico Rosberg of his home race. Motorsport’s governing body, the FIA, approved the calendar at a meeting Wednesday in Vienna. The dropping of the German race for inancial reasons was expected: German media had reported that teams were told of the decision in advance so it does not disrupt their travel planning for next season. The Hungarian Grand Prix, on July 30, will now be the last race before F1’s summer break. The season will then resume with the Belgian Grand Prix on Aug. 27. Rosberg will begin the defense of his driver’s world title at the opening race in Melbourne, Australia, on March 26. (AP) Two races left for California Chrome • California Chrome is scheduled to make the next-to-last start of his career on Dec. 17 at Los Alamitos, the Orange County track where the world’s richest thoroughbred has been based for nearly three years. The track says California Chrome will run in the $100,000 Winter Challenge at 1 1/16 miles. It will serve as the 5-year-old horse’s prep for the $12 million Pegasus World Cup on Jan. 28 at Gulfstream Park in Florida. California Chrome has never raced at his home track. The World Cup is set to be California Chrome’s last career race before he retires to stud in Kentucky. Trained by Art Sherman, California Chrome has won 15 of 25 career races and earned a record $14,452,650. He won Horse of the Year honors in 2014 and is a contender again this year. (AP)

HOW TO SUBMIT A LETTER FAX 314-340-3070 E-MAIL soundof@post-dispatch.com HOLE IN ONE Golf courses submit results to postsports@post-dispatch.com

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CANADIAN PRESS

Montreal Impact forward Dominic Oduro (center) scores past Toronto FC defender Nick Hagglund during the irst half Wednesday in Toronto.

Group to seek public money ORTIZ • FROM B1

valued over $200 million. Sporting Kansas City, which is a close model to what would be expected in St. Louis, was valued at $195 million as the eighth highest MLS team on Forbes’ list. By comparison, Forbes estimated that the average Major League Baseball team is worth $1.3 billion, with a high of $3.4 billion for the Yankees. Forbes estimates the Cardinals’ value at $1.6 billion. MLS has not publicly stated what the expansion fee would be for a St. Louis franchise, but some have estimated it as high as $200 million. That figure seems a tad high considering that Forbes values 13 of the established teams in the 21-year-old league under $200 million. Nonetheless, Edgerley’s ownership group clearly understands what it would cost to pay the expansion fee, build a stadium, fund a roster of players and develop a club infrastructure. We cannot blame them for asking for public funds. Most billionaire and millionaire owners want

the public to pick up their tabs. Few people love handouts quite like professional sports teams and leagues, whether through tax breaks or public financing for stadiums. The Houston Dynamo spent half a decade trying to get taxpayers to fund their beautiful downtown stadium, which was MLS’ first downtown stadium in a major U.S. city. The city and Harris County ultimately settled on paying the $35 million price for the land and infrastructure necessary, while the Dynamo added $60 million to build the $95 million stadium, which opened in May 2012. Just last year, the San Jose Earthquakes opened their $100 million stadium. We must wait to see what SC St. Louis hopes to get in public financing, but it’s clear that early on they want to claim that MLS expansion won’t be possible in St. Louis without public funding for a stadium. “Based on the plan that we have in place today we would need public funding,” SC St. Louis Vice Chairman Jim Kavanaugh

said. “So there is a chance that we would do something outside of that, but I would say that is remote. The plan that we have today has us set up to invest a significant amount of money, not only just in the stadium but in the franchise fees and the miscellaneous things that go into the operation, and that’s even before you’re operating the team long-term.” Major League Soccer officials will visit St. Louis in January to try to help SC St. Louis make its case to local leaders and the public. Considering the MLS stadiums that have been built recently for under $100 million, it might make more sense to ask SC St. Louis to build a more modest stadium. It’s also important to wonder if St. Louis citizens really want an ownership group that would let $80 million stand in the way of bringing MLS to town. If SC St. Louis cannot aford the $80 million needed to help build its own stadium, will they actually have the resources to build a champion? Jose de Jesus Ortiz @OrtizKicks on Twitter jortiz@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Thursday 12/1 vs. Tampa Bay 7 p.m. FSM

Saturday 12/3 vs. Winnipeg 6 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 12/6 vs. Montreal 7 p.m. FSM

Thursday 12/8 at NY Islanders 6 p.m. FSM

M 2 • THUrSDAy • 12.01.2016

MLS EASTERN CONFRENCE FINALS • MONTREAL AT TORONTO

Toronto outlasts Montreal

Mizzou men’s basketball • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Saturday 12/3 vs. Western Kentucky 2 p.m.

Tuesday 12/6 vs. Miami (Ohio) 7 p.m.

Saturday 12/10 vs. Arizona 11 a.m. ESPN2

Saturday 12/17 vs. Eastern Ill. 2:30 p.m. SEC Network

SLU men’s basketball • slubillikens.com | 314-977-4758 Saturday 12/3 vs. Kansas State 7 p.m. FSM Plus

Tuesday 12/6 at Wichita State 7 p.m. FSM Plus

Sunday 12/11 vs. Chicago State 2 p.m.

Wednesday 12/14 at SIU C-dale 7 p.m.

Illinois men’s basketball • ightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Saturday 12/3 vs. VCU (in Miami) 2 p.m., CBSSN

Tuesday 12/6 vs. IUPUI 7 p.m.

Saturday 12/10 vs. Central Michigan 2 p.m.

Saturday 12/17 vs. BYU (Chicago) 8:30 p.m. BTN

OTHER EVENTS MAJOR ARENA SOCCER LEAGUE • St. Louis Ambush home games Fri. 12/9: vs. Florida, 7:35 p.m. Sun. 12/18: vs. Cedar Rapids, 3:05 p.m. FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

TICKET INFORMATION Cardinals Blues SLU Raiders Fairmount

314-345-9000 Rascals 636-240-2287 Grizzlies 618-337-3000 314-622-2583 Illinois 217-333-3470 Mizzou 800-228-7297 314-977-4758 SIUE 855-748-3849 Ambush 636-477-6363 636-294-9662 STL FC 636-680-0997 314-436-1516 • 618-345-4300

ON THE AIR

CANADIAN PRESS

Toronto FC defender Nick Hagglund (center) celebrates his goal against the Montreal Impact with teammates Michael Bradley (right) and Steven Beitashour during the second half Wednesday in Toronto.

BASKETBALL 6 p.m.

College: Columbia at Seton Hall, FS1

6 p.m.

College women: Oklahoma at Kentucky, SEC Network

7 p.m.

NBA: Clippers at Cavaliers, TNT

7 p.m.

NBA: Magic at Grizzlies, FSM Plus

8 p.m.

College: Cincinnati at Iowa State, ESPN

8 p.m.

College: Oregon St. at Mississippi State, ESPNU

8 p.m.

College: Stephen F. Austin at Arkansas, SEC Network

8 p.m. ESPN2

High school: Hamilton Heights (Tenn.) at Memphis East (Tenn.),

ASSOCIATED PRESS

9:30 p.m. NBA: Houston at Golden State, TNT FOOTBALL 7:25 p.m. NFL: Cowboys at Vikings, KSDK (5) NFL Network GOLF 6:30 a.m. European PGA: Alfred Dunhill Championship, irst round, GOLF 12:30 p.m. PGA: Hero World Challenge, irst round, GOLF 7 p.m. GOLF

European PGA: Australian PGA Championship, second round,

2:30 a.m. European PGA: Alfred Dunhill Championship, second round, GOLF HOCKEY 5:30 p.m. College: Michigan at Penn State, ESPNU 7 p.m.

Winners to face Seattle for MLS championship

NHL: Blues vs. Lightning, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM)

DIGEST Texas defensive back lips pledge to Mizzou Terry Petry irst gave the University of Houston an oral commitment in November 2015, but after taking an oicial recruiting visit to Missouri earlier this fall, the defensive back from Missouri City, Texas, oicially changed his plans Wednesday. Petry lipped his pledge from Houston to Mizzou, he announced on Twitter. Petry, rated a four-star prospect by Rivals.com, also holds ofers from Kansas and Iowa State. Houston coach Tom Herman recently left the program to become the head coach at Texas. Petry becomes the 14th known player to commit to Mizzou’s 2017 class. Listed as 5-11, 160 pounds, Petry played at Ridge Point High School. Petry took an oicial visit to Missouri on Sept. 17, the weekend of MU’s game against Georgia. He’s rated the No. 29 cornerback prospect in the country and the No. 36 player in Texas by Rivals.com. (Dave Matter)

TORONTO • Benoit Cheyrou and

Tosaint Ricketts scored 2 minutes apart in extra time and Toronto FC advanced to the MLS Cup final, outlasting the Montreal Impact 5-2 in the rain Wednesday night for a 7-5 aggregate victory. It took extra time and 12 goals to decide the two-leg Eastern Conference final. Toronto will host the Seattle Sounders on Dec. 10 in the MLS championship game, becoming the first Canadian team to play for the title. “Tonight was a special night,” captain Michael Bradley said. “Ten days from now we want to do one better.” Toronto trailed 3-2 after Game 1 in Montreal and fell further behind after the Impact scored first before a BMO Field-record crowd of 36,000. Only once before in MLS playof history had a club trailed by as many as three goals in a two-leg aggregate series and come back to

wine. The San Jose Earthquakes were down 4-0 in 2003 before rallying to beat the Los Angeles Galaxy 5-4. “One of our messages was there was no way, no chance, no how we were going to be outcompeted tonight in front of our fans in our stadium,” Toronto coach Greg Vanney said. “And we were going to run hard and we were going to run through everything that we had to make sure that those margins turned in our favor.” With the teams tied 5-5 on aggregate, Cheyrou scored on a header in the 98th minute — just a minute after entering the game — when he knocked in Steven Beitashour’s cross. Then, Jozy Altidore outmuscled a couple of defenders to send in a cross that Ricketts, beating two more defenders to the ball, swept in. “For me, the most exciting playoff event that I’ve ever been a part of,” Vanney said. “And for sure that I’ve ever seen.” Dominic Oduro opened the scoring in the 24th minute for Montreal, a goal that meant Toronto had to score twice. Armando Cooper and Altidore did

just that before the first half was over, tying the aggregate score at 4-4, with an away goals edge to Toronto. But the Impact’s Ignacio Piatti made it 2-2 — and 5-4 on aggregate — in the 53rd minute after substitute Johan Venegas found him behind the defense. The ball bounced off either Piatti or defender Nick Hagglund, leaving Toronto fans to watch in pain as it trickled slowly into the net. Hagglund restored order with a superb header in the 68th minute to make it 3-2 on the night and 5-5 on aggregate. It came of a short corner with Justin Morrow delivering the cross. “Guys are down in the dressing room. It’s grueling out there,” Impact coach Mauro Biello said. “Today was a tough game, a lot of emotions in playofs, it’s a long season, and in the end the players gave everything, all the way to the end. It’s a tough moment, for sure, for everyone, when you’re so close and falling short. But we’ll be back, and we’ll be even stronger.”

LPGA Tour is growing • The LPGA Tour will have four new tournaments next year, with an increase of $4.35 million in total prize money. Commissioner Mike Whan announced the 2017 schedule Wednesday. It features 34 oicial tournaments, 21 of them in North America and 16 with prize money of $2 million or more. Whan said the U.S. Women’s Open would have a $5 million purse, the largest ever in women’s golf. “While we receive credit for being a global tour, we’re just as proud that we’ve added more events in North America since 2011 than we have abroad,” Whan said. “It’s an exciting time for our organization and we cannot wait to start another great season in January.” Some of the events previously were announced. The surprise was the Lorena Ochoa Invitational in Mexico moving from November to May and switching to match play. The ield was particularly weak this year because it was between the end of the fall Asia swing and CME Group Tour Championship in Florida. (AP) German Grand Prix dropped • The 2017 Formula One championship will be run over 20 races, without the German Grand Prix, depriving new champion Nico Rosberg of his home race. Motorsport’s governing body, the FIA, approved the calendar at a meeting Wednesday in Vienna. The dropping of the German race for inancial reasons was expected: German media had reported that teams were told of the decision in advance so it does not disrupt their travel planning for next season. The Hungarian Grand Prix, on July 30, will now be the last race before F1’s summer break. The season will then resume with the Belgian Grand Prix on Aug. 27. Rosberg will begin the defense of his driver’s world title at the opening race in Melbourne, Australia, on March 26. (AP) Two races left for California Chrome • California Chrome is scheduled to make the next-to-last start of his career on Dec. 17 at Los Alamitos, the Orange County track where the world’s richest thoroughbred has been based for nearly three years. The track says California Chrome will run in the $100,000 Winter Challenge at 1 1/16 miles. It will serve as the 5-year-old horse’s prep for the $12 million Pegasus World Cup on Jan. 28 at Gulfstream Park in Florida. California Chrome has never raced at his home track. The World Cup is set to be California Chrome’s last career race before he retires to stud in Kentucky. Trained by Art Sherman, California Chrome has won 15 of 25 career races and earned a record $14,452,650. He won Horse of the Year honors in 2014 and is a contender again this year. (AP)

HOW TO SUBMIT A LETTER FAX 314-340-3070 E-MAIL soundof@post-dispatch.com HOLE IN ONE Golf courses submit results to postsports@post-dispatch.com

Must include name, address for veriication. Letters may be edited for length and clarity.

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Roger Hensley Cameron Hollway Don Reed Mike Smith Mike Reilly Chris Gove

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314-340-8301 314-340-8392 314-340-8313 314-340-8137 314-340-8178 314-744-5725

CANADIAN PRESS

Montreal Impact forward Dominic Oduro (center) scores past Toronto FC defender Nick Hagglund during the irst half Wednesday in Toronto.

Group to seek public money ORTIZ • FROM B1

valued over $200 million. Sporting Kansas City, which is a close model to what would be expected in St. Louis, was valued at $195 million as the eighth highest MLS team on Forbes’ list. By comparison, Forbes estimated that the average Major League Baseball team is worth $1.3 billion, with a high of $3.4 billion for the Yankees. Forbes estimates the Cardinals’ value at $1.6 billion. MLS has not publicly stated what the expansion fee would be for a St. Louis franchise, but some have estimated it as high as $200 million. That figure seems a tad high considering that Forbes values 13 of the established teams in the 21-year-old league under $200 million. Nonetheless, Edgerley’s ownership group clearly understands what it would cost to pay the expansion fee, build a stadium, fund a roster of players and develop a club infrastructure. We cannot blame them for asking for public funds. Most billionaire and millionaire owners want

the public to pick up their tabs. Few people love handouts quite like professional sports teams and leagues, whether through tax breaks or public financing for stadiums. The Houston Dynamo spent half a decade trying to get taxpayers to fund their beautiful downtown stadium, which was MLS’ first downtown stadium in a major U.S. city. The city and Harris County ultimately settled on paying the $35 million price for the land and infrastructure necessary, while the Dynamo added $60 million to build the $95 million stadium, which opened in May 2012. Just last year, the San Jose Earthquakes opened their $100 million stadium. We must wait to see what SC St. Louis hopes to get in public financing, but it’s clear that early on they want to claim that MLS expansion won’t be possible in St. Louis without public funding for a stadium. “Based on the plan that we have in place today we would need public funding,” SC St. Louis Vice Chairman Jim Kavanaugh

said. “So there is a chance that we would do something outside of that, but I would say that is remote. The plan that we have today has us set up to invest a significant amount of money, not only just in the stadium but in the franchise fees and the miscellaneous things that go into the operation, and that’s even before you’re operating the team long-term.” Major League Soccer officials will visit St. Louis in January to try to help SC St. Louis make its case to local leaders and the public. Considering the MLS stadiums that have been built recently for under $100 million, it might make more sense to ask SC St. Louis to build a more modest stadium. It’s also important to wonder if St. Louis citizens really want an ownership group that would let $80 million stand in the way of bringing MLS to town. If SC St. Louis cannot aford the $80 million needed to help build its own stadium, will they actually have the resources to build a champion? Jose de Jesus Ortiz @OrtizKicks on Twitter jortiz@post-dispatch.com


SOCCER

12.01.2016 • Thursday • M 1

Loss of soccer team is heartbreaking

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • B3

Tocco prizes year-to-year successes

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Supporters of the Chapecoense soccer team gather inside Arena Condado stadium in Chapeco, Brazil on Wednesday. HOCHMAN • FROM B1

comprehend the incomprehensible: What if something like this happened to our team? We quickly move on from the thought. We don’t allow ourselves to daydream a nightmare. But even the brief moment reasserts how much we care — and how much our players matter to us. In death, we learn about life and about how we love. Now, before we get too deep into this column, let’s not get out of proportion. There are many Chapecoense fans mourning, but even the most-emotional fan — one who has the team emblem tattooed or who named a pet after a player — didn’t love the players like the players’ loved ones did. But as we think about our fellow fans in Brazil, we acknowledge how athletes transfix us, how our sports overtake us, and how losing a sports team would also mean the loss of something in you, because sports do something to us that most things can’t. Just like sports showcase the super-human side of some humans, they also make humans look inhuman — sports fans who allow strangers to alter their actions. There is surely some psychology to explain why we’re so devoted to strangers — why sports fans can adore an athlete with a similar love they have for their friends.

Perhaps it’s possible that a sports fan could force himself or herself to stop caring. Feet to the fire, maybe you could proclaim: “I’ve never met a Cardinal (or Blue or Tiger or Billiken) and it’s kind of weird that I devote this much energy and time into caring about this guy just because he plays sports well, and I will now reallocate my energy toward people actually in my life.” But we wouldn’t dare think this way. Having a team, having a favorite player, completes us. OK, maybe not “completes,” but it rounds us out. It’s part of our makeup, our identity; a team or player allows us to lose ourselves in both fantasy and reality. It nourishes us. It makes us part of a club. It allows us to feel warmth and a connection, even if it is with strangers (both the players and the other fans you’ve never met). And, of course, being a fan creates a bond, shared with families and friends, forever. So I think about Chapecoense. On Sunday, the fans were intoxicated by the excitement of their team’s upcoming match, over in Colombia, where Chapecoense would play the first leg of the South American Cup finals. On Monday, the fans’ team didn’t exist. Even the headlines were heartbreaking: “Haunting video shows Brazilian players aboard doomed flight.” “Chapecoense goalkeeper made

heartbreaking final call to wife after plane crash, moments before he died.” “Chapecoense player found out he was to be father a week before crash death.” This team was a dream: One of the worst in Brazil just a decade ago, the team’s rise through the ranks was something for a soccer storybook. “It was South America’s Cinderella,” Argentine journalist Martin Mazur told CNN. “Nobody could have predicted this macabre ending.” Chapecoense captured imaginations. The team represented why we like sports in the first place. Man, of all teams to go, this one? The ride their fans had been on. To end like this? It makes you want to hold your loved ones. And perhaps it makes you want to daydream about the sports dreams that have come true — your own team winning a big game, as if the players did it just for you. And that feeling, how you felt like you’re part of a team — strike that, feel like you’re part of a team — because your support and heart are part of what makes a team belong to a city. And belong to its fans. Benjamin Hochman @hochman on Twitter bhochman@post-dispatch.com

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Rockhurst’s Tony Tocco is the second winningest coach in college soccer history. BY JOE LYONS st. Louis Post-dispatch

Tony Tocco’s negotiations for a teaching position at Rockhurst University had reached an impasse. “We were about $500 apart when Father Bob Weiss asked me if I’d be interested in helping out as an assistant coach for the soccer team,” said Tocco, a St. Louis University grad who played goalie on the Billikens’ undefeated national championship squad in 1964.“I didn’t know really anyone in Kansas City at the time, so I knew I’d have the time. At that point, coaching really wasn’t something I’d given any thought. I wanted WINNINGEST to teach and honestly figured I’d ALL-TIME spend three or four years here and INTERCOLLEGIATE COACHES then move back to St. Louis.” But 46 years later, Tocco is (BY VICTORIES) still in Kansas City, where he is a 1. Jay Martin (Ohio full-time professor and head of Wesleyan) 683-134-66 the accounting department as 2. Tony Tocco well as head coach of one of the (Rockhurst) 680-185-70 top NCAA Division II soccer pro- 3. Joe Bean (Quinnipiac, grams in America. Bridgeport, Wheaton) “In the classroom and on the 607-185-61 soccer field, my job is to teach,” 4. C. Cliford McCrath the 72-year-old said. “This isn’t (Wheaton, Gordon, the way I expected my life would Spring Arbor, Seattle go, but God has truly blessed me.” Paciic) 597-233-95 Tocco and his sixth-ranked 5. Ron Butcher (Keene Hawks (18-2-3) will travel about State, N.H.) 596-263-72 4 miles Thursday to Swope Soc- Source: Rockhurst University cer Village to take on No. 4 Uni- sports information versity of Charleston (18-2-2) of West Virginia in a Division II semifinal at 2 p.m., with No. 2 Wingate (17-1) and No. 10 University of California-San Diego (19-2-2) to meet in the other semifinal at 11 a.m. As an NAIA power from 1973-1997, Rockhurst played in 17 national tournaments, advanced to the Final Four 10 times and finished as national runners-up in 1973, 1976, 1979 and 1997. Since the move to DII in 1998, the Hawks have earned a spot in the NCAAs nine times and reached the semifinals in 2013, 2015 and this year. Tocco will enter Thursday’s action with 680 career coaching victories — with 683, only Jay Martin of Division III Ohio Wesleyan has won more games in the history of college soccer — but Tocco’s career, as successful as it has been, is lacking one thing: a national championship. “I’m reminded of that all the time — by players, friends, even my wife,” Tocco joked. “I sometimes wonder how things would’ve been diferent if we’d won (a championship) because over the years, I’ve seen a lot of teams win that title and then never get back to that level again. But this is our 13th trip to the national semifinals which, I think, says a lot about what we’ve managed to build here. I guess it’s all in the way you look at it, but which would you rather have: that one national championship or the consistent year-to-year success?” A key ingredient in Tocco’s soccer dynasty at Rockhurst has been his recruiting ties to St. Louis. He relied almost exclusively on players from his hometown from 1970 through 1984 and has gradually expanded from there. “For years, the coaches here complained to me, but I had to go with what I knew would work for me,” he said. “The athletes here and in St. Louis are very similar, but the guys in St. Louis, especially early in my coaching career, were playing a lot more soccer and they were playing at a higher level. That has leveled of a lot in the last few years and we’re recruiting a lot more in Kansas City now.” Tocco and associate head coach Giorgio Antongirolami frequently use the St. Louis-Kansas City rivalry to spice up practice sessions. “We’ll split up into teams of guys from St. Louis, Kansas City and elsewhere and the intensity is phenomenal,” Tocco said. “We figure that nobody we’ll ever face in a real game will push these guys any harder than they push themselves in those practices.” Some of the St. Louis-area players making major contributions to this year’s squad are goalkeeper Logan Feldmann (St. Dominic); defender Sal Caruso (CBC); midfielders Adam Michel (Vianney), Sean Michel (Vianney) and Connor Mullen (De Smet); and forwards Brian O’Neal (Lindbergh), Andrew Patke (SLUH) and Kaleb Jackson (De Smet). Jackson, the Hawks’ scoring leader with 12 goals and five assists, had the early second-half goal that helped Rockhurst get by Fort Hays State 1-0 for the return trip to the semifinals with Feldmann, a 2015 All-American, posting his 11th shutout of the season. “The St. Louis guys have been huge for us all season,” Tocco said. “Logan’s been outstanding in goal; the only reason he might not be All-American again is that we don’t give up a ton of shots. Sal stepped up when our All-American back got hurt and we haven’t lost a thing. Connor’s been tremendous at center mid. Adam and Kaleb have come up big when we’ve needed them, even though they’ve been playing hurt. And Sean, he’s stepped in as a freshman on a team that returned 21 of 24 top guys from last year and he’s been outstanding no matter where we’ve used him.” The Hawks face a similarly battle-tested squad in Charleston, which lost 3-1 to Lynn in the 2014 title match and fell 2-1 in last year’s semifinals to Pfeifer. “They’re very good — everybody is at this point, right?” said Tocco, who was inducted into the St. Louis Soccer Hall of Fame in 2010. “I don’t know how much of a home-field advantage there’ll be since we’ve never played at Swope, but hopefully we can get a decent crowd out to support these guys. They’ve worked extremely hard and overcome a lot to get to this point. To win it would mean everything to the program, the players and the alumni.” Joe Lyons jlyons@post-dispatch.com


B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

SPORTS

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 12.01.2016

COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP

COLLEGE FOOTBALL NOTEBOOK

COMMENTARY

No. 14 Louisville outlasts No. 15 Purdue

MU receiver arrested for assault

Rams fumble their LA homecoming on the ield and of

Ray Spalding and Mangok Mathiang each scored 11 points and Donovan Mitchell contributed seven critical points down the stretch to help No. 14 Louisville hold of No. 15 Purdue 71-64 on Wednesday night in the ACC/Big Ten Challenge in Louisville. Seeking a rebound from their second-half collapse against Baylor in the Battle 4 Atlantis championship when they lost a 22-point lead, the Cardinals held Purdue to a season-low 36 percent shooting but needed key baskets as the Boilermakers cut a 51-33 deicit to four with 14.4 seconds left. Ryan McMahon’s 3-pointer with 4 minutes remaining helped along with Mathiang’s layup with 2:30 left, but Mitchell’s late scoring including a 3 and then two free throws with 2 second left helped the Cardinals (6-1) escape with their irst win over Purdue since 1996. Louisville had a 32-18 advantage in the paint with Anas Mahmoud adding nine. Caleb Swanigan had 14 points and 11 rebounds and P.J. Thompson had 13 points, but the Boilermakers (5-2) had their fourgame winning streak stopped along with a conference-record seven-game winning streak in the Challenge. No. 5 Duke still rolling • This isn’t the Duke team that was picked No. 1 in the preseason. That’s no slight to these current Blue Devils, who in their present composition have been plenty strong enough to win seven of eight, take down Michigan State and earn a No. 5 ranking. But how much better will this team be once three injured freshman big men — Harry Giles, Marques Bolden and Jayson Tatum (Chaminade) — are inally healthy enough to play? Coach Mike Krzyzewski says it’s still not quite time to ind out. “We’re getting there, but it’ll be a while,” Krzyzewski said after the 78-69 victory over the Spartans on Tuesday night. “... We just have to run our race the way we’re running it, and

HOW THE TOP 25 FARED 1. Kentucky (7-0) idle. Next: vs. No. 11 UCLA, Saturday. 2. Villanova (7-0) idle. Next: vs. Saint Joseph’s, Saturday. 3. North Carolina (7-1) lost to No. 13 Indiana 76-67. Next: vs. Radford, Sunday. 4. Kansas (6-1) idle. Next: vs. Stanford, Saturday. 5. Duke (7-1) idle. Next: vs. Maine, Saturday. 6. Virginia (7-0) beat Ohio State 63-61. Next: vs. No. 25 West Virginia, Saturday. 7. Xavier (7-0) idle. Next: vs. No. 9 Baylor, Saturday. 8. Gonzaga (6-0) idle. Next: vs. MVSU, Thursday. 9. Baylor (7-0) beat Sam Houston State 79-45. Next: at No. 7 Xavier, Saturday. 10. Creighton (7-0) idle. Next: vs. Akron, Saturday. 11. UCLA (7-0) vs. UC Riverside, late. Next: at No. 1 Kentucky, Saturday. 12. Saint Mary’s (Cal) (5-0) at Stanford, late. Next: vs. UT Arlington, Thursday, Dec. 8. 13. Indiana (5-1) beat No. 3 North Carolina 76-67. Next: vs. SIU Edwardsville, Friday. 14. Louisville (6-1) beat No. 15 Purdue 71-64. Next: at Grand Canyon, Saturday. 15. Purdue (5-2) lost to No. 14 Louisville 71-64. Next: vs. Morehead State, Saturday. 16. Arizona (6-1) beat Texas Southern 85-63. Next: vs. No. 8 Gonzaga, Saturday. 17. Wisconsin (6-2) idle. Next: vs. Oklahoma, Saturday. 18. Butler (7-0) idle. Next: vs. Central Arkansas, Saturday. 19. Iowa State (5-1) idle. Next: vs. Cincinnati, Thursday. 20. South Carolina (6-0) idle. Next: vs. Vermont, Thursday. 21. Rhode Island (5-2) idle. Next: at Providence, Saturday. 22. Syracuse (4-2) idle. Next: vs. North Florida, Saturday. 23. Oregon (5-2) vs. Western Oregon, late. Next: vs. Savannah State, Saturday. 24. Florida (6-1) idle. Next: at North Florida, Thursday. 25. West Virginia (5-1) idle. Next: at No. 6 Virginia, Saturday.

eventually, hopefully, we’ll get all those guys.” Those guys were three reasons why Duke (7-1) was the favorite to win the Atlantic Coast Conference and topped the preseason polls. In the past week, the three ivestar freshmen have taken part in pregame warmups. Bolden and Giles have gone through drills at closer to full speed than Tatum. — Associated Press

MU hosting volleyball VOLLEYBALL • FROM B1

“We never had to battle through anything,” said outside hitter Carly Kan, one of three current seniors who played on the 2013 team as a freshman. “We expected to win every single match and every single set. It was hard to find what we needed to do in practice to make us better.” “We were unstoppable,” added senior middle blocker Emily Thater. “We were an incredible team. We had senior leadership, but honestly, not to knock any of our seniors, I think they got a little rattled. It was a really good Purdue team and wasn’t afraid. They scouted us hard and executed.” Mizzou again won the SEC regular-season title this season and will host NCAA Tournament games at the Hearnes Center this week. Unlike last time, though, this team has built up scar tissue from a more challenging regular season. The Tigers (25-5), ranked No. 18 in the latest coaches poll and No. 9 in the RPI, had to lose a few matches this fall before learning to adjust. “(Losing) makes you stronger because you have to compete and it’s not easy,” said Kreklow, who guides MU into its 13th NCAA Tournament appearance in his 17 years as coach. “That really hurt that (2013) group because you have to be put in those situations to know how to respond and go, ‘OK, we’re down 0-2 here. It’s no big deal. We’ve been here before. We can still do it.’ That’s where this group has taken a few lumps and lost some, which I think helps.” Purdue (18-13) and Iowa State (18-10) meet in Thursday’s opening first-round match at 4:30 p.m., followed by Missouri, the No. 15 overall seed in the tournament, against Northern Illinois (25-5) at 6:30 p.m. The winners of those matches meet at 6 p.m. Friday. In 2013, Mizzou cruised past Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis in the NCAA first round, then lost to Purdue in four sets. Should both the Tigers and Boilermakers win Thursday, they’ll get a rematch three years in the making. “It’s a little tempting to look (at Purdue) and think, ‘Hmmm, I remember you guys. You humiliated us a little bit,’” Thater said. “There may be a little fuel

to that fire, but Iowa State is a really good group and all we’re focused on is Northern Illinois.” To refocus his team this week, Kreklow put the Tigers through a grueling practice Monday with a focus on defensive drills. Mizzou opens tournament play on a four-match winning streak but won’t waltz into the postseason expecting to cruise past this week’s opponents. “The big thing is you have to avoid putting pressure on yourself as a player because you are hosting and technically you’re the higher seed,” Kreklow said. “You have to get out of this mindset that we’re supposed to win. That’s not the case anymore because everybody’s good and anybody can beat anybody if the ball is bouncing the right way.” The ball rarely bounced the Tigers’ way the first few weeks of the season when they lost three matches in a nine-day span to Utah, Miami-Ohio and Brigham Young, three teams that all appear in the 64-team NCAA bracket. But something wasn’t right with Mizzou’s style of play, Kreklow thought. He scrapped a 6-2 system that uses two setters in favor of the 5-1 scheme the Tigers used in 2013. In the 5-1, MU uses one primary setter, junior Courtney Eckenrode, and plays with an extra defensive player along the back line. Mizzou is 19-2 since making the change. “It allowed us to play at a faster pace,” Kreklow said. “That was helpful. One of the things that helped us over the course of the season was we were probably the best passing team in the league.” But that was the regular season. The Tigers know better than to expect regular-season results to naturally carry over into the postseason. Northern Illinois, winner of 20 of 21 matches and the Mid-American Conference champion, is first in line. “They’re just a good solid mid-major team that’s capable of any given night of beating a lot of different people,” Kreklow said. “Our goal is to not be the one that gets upset in the first round, because I guarantee somebody will.” Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

Dilosa suspended indeinitely

Any hopes for season, Fisher’s job rest squarely on ofense BY BILL PLASCHKE Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES • On a cloudless, endlessly blue

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Missouri wide receiver Keyon Dilosa was arrested early Wednesday morning on suspicion of thirddegree domestic assault, a misdemeanor.

STAFF AND WIRE REPORTS

Missouri wide receiver Keyon Dilosa was arrested on suspicion of third-degree domestic assault early Wednesday morning after allegedly punching a woman in the face in downtown Columbia, Mo. Police were called to 10th Street outside Harpo’s Bar & Grill for a physical disturbance involving Dilosa, 21, and a 20-year-old woman, according to the police report. A witness told police that Dilosa and the alleged victim were in a verbal argument and Dilosa struck the victim one time in the face with a closed fist. The witness said bystanders assisted in restraining Dilosa until oicers arrived. The alleged victim and Dilosa had a relationship, according to police. Dilosa was arrested at 12:48 a.m. and processed at Boone County Jail at 3:19 a.m. on suspicion of third-degree domestic assault, a misdemeanor. Dilosa posted $1,000 bond and was released. No charges were immediately filed. Mizzou suspended Dilosa indefinitely, team spokesman Chad Moller confirmed. Dilosa caught two passes for 7 yards this season and 11 passes for 86 yards in 2015. The redshirt sophomore from Round Rock, Texas, was positioned for more playing time this year but fell behind on the depth chart once preseason camp began. By the end of the season he was not traveling with the team on road trips. Dilosa is the second Missouri player arrested in recent weeks. Freshman running back Damarea Crockett was arrested Nov. 20 by campus police on suspicion of marijuana possession. The team’s leading rusher was suspended for the Tigers’ final game of the season. (Dave Matter) Walter Camp inalists • Quarterbacks Lamar Jackson from Louisville, Deshaun Watson from Clemson and Jake Browning from Washington, along with two defensive stars Jonathan Allen of Alabama and Jabrill Peppers of Michigan, are the finalists for the Walter Camp player of the year award. Jackson is the front-runner for the Heisman Trophy and has accounted for 51 touchdowns. The Walter Camp winner will be announced Dec. 8. (AP) Oregon’s next steps • It has been 40 years since Oregon fired a head coach, and now Oregon is in the market following the dismissal of coach Mark Helfrich. Athletics director Rob Mullens told players that he would be moving quickly to make a hire. “We’re going to look far and wide. We’re going to have a broad, diverse pool of candidates,” Mullens said. “We want somebody who embraces the student experience, who understands the high expectations at the University of Oregon, who understands our community, you know, really, really wants to be here.” Helfrich spent four years as head coach of Oregon, promoted to the job after serving under previous coach Chip Kelly. Kelly was previously the offensive coordinator under head coach Mike Bellotti, who was the offensive coordinator under coach Rich Brooks. Brooks, who coached the Ducks from 1977-94, was hired when the Ducks dismissed Don Read in 1976. Among the possible candidates being mentioned for the Oregon job are Western Michigan’s P.J. Fleck and Boise State’s Bryan Harsin, as well as Penn State’s James Franklin and Florida’s Jim McElwain, though McElwain said on Wednesday he’s not interested. Helfrich was fired Tuesday evening following a meeting with Mullens, three days after the Ducks ended the season with the 34-24 loss to the rival Oregon State Beavers in the annual Civil War game. Oregon finished 4-8 overall and won just two games in conference play to finish in the basement of the Pac-12 North. It was a dramatic fall for a team that two seasons earlier had gone to the College Football Playof title game. (AP) Elsewhere • Texas running back D’Onta Foreman says he will leave the Longhorns to enter the NFL draft after rushing for 2,028 yards this season as a junior. Foreman’s rushing total in 11 games was the second-best in school history, behind only Ricky Williams in 1998 when Williams won the Heisman Trophy. Forman also scored 15 touchdowns and is a finalist for the Doak Walker Award given to college football’s top running back. ... Georgia Tech’s leading rusher Marcus Marshall says he will transfer rather than return for his final two seasons. Marshall rushed for 624 yards as a sophomore. (AP)

Saturday afternoon in July, the unlimited future of the Rams could be described in one word. Watching the team take the field at UC Irvine for its first oicial training camp practice, mingling with the thousands of beaming fans who showed up simply to cheer calisthenics, former Rams quarterback Jim Everett gushed about the scene. “Amazing,” Everett said at the time. Four months later, the same word applies to the same team, but in not quite the same way. Amazing, how the Rams could have squandered so much goodwill so fast. Amazing, how they could have so quickly bored their fans, alienated one of their former stars, and sank deeply into coaching and quarterback controversies. Amazing, how they could have walked into their new city as homecoming heroes and yet somehow forgotten where they were. After 11 games, the biggest problem with this four-win team is one of identity. They may have changed addresses, but, on the field, they haven’t changed cultures. These aren’t the Los Angeles Rams. These are still the St. Louis Rams. Same losing habit, same boring style, same numbed spectators, same empty hope. What was supposed to be a season-long welcoming party has long since petered out, broken up, and has now officially ended with the guests of honor being run out into the street amid groans and catcalls. First, there was the Jared Gof issue, the Rams insistent on keeping their No. 1 overall draft pick quarterback on the bench for nine long games while starter Case Keenum agonizingly tread water. Then there was the Todd Gurley issue, a star running back who was supposedly this town’s new Kobe Bryant playing instead like the new Dwight Howard. It’s never a good thing when your most famous player becomes your most disappointing player, right? Then, there was news from Nielsen that fewer fans were watching televised Rams games than the other games shown in the Los Angeles market. The homecoming seemingly reached a low point Sunday in New Orleans when the vaunted Rams defense allowed an NFL season-high 49 points to the swaggering Saints. But then on Monday, their image took an even bigger hit with the news that Coach Jef Fisher had initially refused sideline passes to one of the greatest Rams ever, running back Eric Dickerson, after Dickerson had continually ripped them on a radio show. In a town built on stars, the fight with Dickerson is one the Rams can’t win. They have every right to deny special privileges to a former player who publicly criticizes them, but do they really want to go there with a Hall of Famer? Be bigger than that. Check out the Lakers, who absorbed several years of rips from Magic Johnson while quietly shrugging and continuing to embrace him. The Rams have a lot to learn about surviving in the Los Angeles sports market, and they admit it. “This is a city that expects its teams to be champions, and to be in the playofs, and to win consistently,” said Kevin Demof, the Rams’ chief operating oicer. “That needs to be our standard, and if we fall short of that, we have to own up to it and go fix it.” Amid a pristine backdrop of browns and greens at the Rams practice field in Thousand Oaks on Tuesday, Demof directly addressed the perception that his team is a mess, credibly facing the criticism. “This was not going to be a ‘snap your fingers and have a change overnight,’” he said. “There’s a lot of work to be done to grow this fan base.” No, Demof didn’t fire Fisher on the spot like many fans would have hoped, but he pointedly acknowledged the final five games could determine the direction of the organization. “Jef has done a tremendous job handling the distractions of this offseason … but at the end of the day, we all need more wins,” Demof said. “How this team responds to adversity, how we get better, the progress Jared shows, the form the defense shows … that’s what these last five weeks are all about. That will tell us a lot about whether we have the right pieces to move forward in 2017.” Considering those five games include contests with three current division leaders, Fisher’s chances don’t look good, especially since Demof kept mentioning the “hope” that has been so absent. “We can’t change the first 11 games, but we still have the last five games, and most important is that we can show that hope for next year,” Demof said. In a separate interview Tuesday, Fisher also stood up to the questions, with answers that indicate he is impervious to the heat. Worried about your job? “No, I’ve never been worried about my job, I’ve never been concerned about it,” he said. Think your future depends on the last five games? “No, no, I don’t,” he said. “I have confidence in the organization. (Owner) Stan (Kroenke) and I are in a really good place, we know the direction we’re headed; he also appreciates and understands how diicult it had been from a moving standpoint, he understands that.” Fisher acknowledged that change is needed in the ofensive approach, which has led to the early handcufs on Gof and the bevy of boring games. “We need to open the offense up, no doubt about it, our ofense needs to get better,” he said. An open ofense is probably the only thing that can legitimately save Fisher’s job and salvage a bit of this season. Let Gof wing it. Hope Gurley can spring it. Find a way to entertain even as you’re battling Patriots and Falcons and Seahawks. Act like you love LA. Play like you live in LA. And goodness, no matter how much Eric Dickerson pops of, can you just give the man his tickets?


B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

SPORTS

M 2 • THUrSDAy • 12.01.2016

COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP

COLLEGE FOOTBALL NOTEBOOK

COMMENTARY

No. 13 Hoosiers upset No. 3 North Carolina

MU receiver arrested for assault

Rams fumble their LA homecoming on the ield and of

OG Anunoby scored 16 points, James Blackmon Jr. had 14 and Robert Johnson added 11 Wednesday night, leading No. 13 Indiana past No. 3 North Carolina 76-67 in the ACC-Big Ten Challenge in Bloomington, Ind. The Hoosiers (5-1) have won two straight since last week’s stunning loss to little-known IPFW. Indiana started fast and fended of the Tar Heels’ second-half charges to close it out. Anunoby was injured at the end of the game and needed help to get to the locker room. North Carolina (7-1) never led and spent most of the game trailing by double digits. Indiana never allowed the Tar Heels to get closer than 61-57 with 4:52 to play. The Tar Heels were led by Justin Jackson with 21 points and Kennedy Meeks with 10. No. 14 Louisville 71, No. 15 Purdue 64 • Ray Spalding and Mangok Mathiang each scored 11 points and Donovan Mitchell contributed seven critical points down the stretch to help Louisville hold of Purdue in the ACC-Big Ten Challenge in Louisville. Mitchell’s late scoring, including a 3 and two free throws with 2 seconds left, helped the Cardinals (6-1) escape with their irst win over Purdue since 1996. Caleb Swanigan had 14 points and 11 rebounds for Purdue (5-2). No. 5 Duke still rolling • This isn’t the Duke team that was picked No. 1 in the preseason. That’s no slight to these current Blue Devils, who in their present composition have been plenty strong enough to win seven of eight, take down Michigan State and earn a No. 5 ranking. But how much better will this team be once three injured freshman big men — Harry Giles, Marques Bolden and Jayson Tatum (Chaminade) — are inally healthy enough to play? Coach Mike Krzyzewski says it’s still not quite time to ind out. “We’re getting there, but it’ll

HOW THE TOP 25 FARED 1. Kentucky (7-0) idle. Next: vs. No. 11 UCLA, Saturday. 2. Villanova (7-0) idle. Next: vs. Saint Joseph’s, Saturday. 3. North Carolina (7-1) lost to No. 13 Indiana 76-67. Next: vs. Radford, Sun. 4. Kansas (6-1) idle. Next: vs. Stanford, Saturday. 5. Duke (7-1) idle. Next: vs. Maine, Saturday. 6. Virginia (7-0) beat Ohio State 63-61. Next: vs. No. 25 West Virginia, Sat. 7. Xavier (7-0) idle. Next: vs. No. 9 Baylor, Saturday. 8. Gonzaga (6-0) idle. Next: vs. MVSU, Thursday. 9. Baylor (7-0) beat Sam Houston State 79-45. Next: at No. 7 Xavier, Saturday. 10. Creighton (7-0) idle. Next: vs. Akron, Saturday. 11. UCLA (8-0) beat UC Riverside 97-57. Next: at No. 1 Kentucky, Saturday. 12. Saint Mary’s (6-0) beat Stanford 66-51. Next: vs. UT Arlington, Dec. 8. 13. Indiana (5-1) beat No. 3 N. Carolina 76-67. Next: vs. SIUE, Friday. 14. Louisville (6-1) beat No. 15 Purdue 71-64. Next: at Grand Canyon, Sat. 15. Purdue (5-2) lost to No. 14 Louisville 71-64. Next: vs. Morehead State, Sat. 16. Arizona (6-1) beat Texas Southern 85-63. Next: vs. No. 8 Gonzaga, Sat. 17. Wisconsin (6-2) idle. Next: vs. Oklahoma, Saturday. 18. Butler (7-0) idle. Next: vs. Central Arkansas, Saturday. 19. Iowa State (5-1) idle. Next: vs. Cincinnati, Thursday. 20. South Carolina (6-0) idle. Next: vs. Vermont, Thursday. 21. Rhode Island (5-2) idle. Next: at Providence, Saturday. 22. Syracuse (4-2) idle. Next: vs. North Florida, Saturday. 23. Oregon (6-2) beat Western Oregon 93-54. Next: vs. Savannah State, Sat. 24. Florida (6-1) idle. Next: at North Florida, Thursday. 25. West Virginia (5-1) idle. Next: at No. 6 Virginia, Saturday.

Associated Press

“We never had to battle through anything,” said outside hitter Carly Kan, one of three current seniors who played on the 2013 team as a freshman. “We expected to win every single match and every single set. It was hard to find what we needed to do in practice to make us better.” “We were unstoppable,” added senior middle blocker Emily Thater. “We were an incredible team. We had senior leadership, but honestly, not to knock any of our seniors, I think they got a little rattled. It was a really good Purdue team and wasn’t afraid. They scouted us hard and executed.” Mizzou again won the SEC regular-season title this season and will host NCAA Tournament games at the Hearnes Center this week. Unlike last time, though, this team has built up scar tissue from a more challenging regular season. The Tigers (25-5), ranked No. 18 in the latest coaches poll and No. 9 in the RPI, had to lose a few matches this fall before learning to adjust. “(Losing) makes you stronger because you have to compete and it’s not easy,” said Kreklow, who guides MU into its 13th NCAA Tournament appearance in his 17 years as coach. “That really hurt that (2013) group because you have to be put in those situations to know how to respond and go, ‘OK, we’re down 0-2 here. It’s no big deal. We’ve been here before. We can still do it.’ That’s where this group has taken a few lumps and lost some, which I think helps.” Purdue (18-13) and Iowa State (18-10) meet in Thursday’s opening first-round match at 4:30 p.m., followed by Missouri, the No. 15 overall seed in the tournament, against Northern Illinois (25-5) at 6:30 p.m. The winners of those matches meet at 6 p.m. Friday. In 2013, Mizzou cruised past Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis in the NCAA first round, then lost to Purdue in four sets. Should both the Tigers and Boilermakers win Thursday, they’ll get a rematch three years in the making. “It’s a little tempting to look (at Purdue) and think, ‘Hmmm, I remember you guys. You humiliated us a little bit,’” Thater

said. “There may be a little fuel to that fire, but Iowa State is a really good group and all we’re focused on is Northern Illinois.” To refocus his team this week, Kreklow put the Tigers through a grueling practice Monday with a focus on defensive drills. Mizzou opens tournament play on a four-match winning streak but won’t waltz into the postseason expecting to cruise past this week’s opponents. “The big thing is you have to avoid putting pressure on yourself as a player because you are hosting and technically you’re the higher seed,” Kreklow said. “You have to get out of this mindset that we’re supposed to win. That’s not the case anymore because everybody’s good and anybody can beat anybody if the ball is bouncing the right way.” The ball rarely bounced the Tigers’ way the first few weeks of the season when they lost three matches in a nine-day span to Utah, Miami-Ohio and Brigham Young, three teams that all appear in the 64-team NCAA bracket. But something wasn’t right with Mizzou’s style of play, Kreklow thought. He scrapped a 6-2 system that uses two setters in favor of the 5-1 scheme the Tigers used in 2013. In the 5-1, MU uses one primary setter, junior Courtney Eckenrode, and plays with an extra defensive player along the back line. Mizzou is 19-2 since making the change. “It allowed us to play at a faster pace,” Kreklow said. “That was helpful. One of the things that helped us over the course of the season was we were probably the best passing team in the league.” But that was the regular season. The Tigers know better than to expect regular-season results to naturally carry over into the postseason. Northern Illinois, winner of 20 of 21 matches and the Mid-American Conference champion, is first in line. “They’re just a good solid mid-major team that’s capable of any given night of beating a lot of different people,” Kreklow said. “Our goal is to not be the one that gets upset in the first round, because I guarantee somebody will.” Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

BY BILL PLASCHKE Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES • On a cloudless, endlessly blue

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Missouri wide receiver Keyon Dilosa was arrested early Wednesday morning on suspicion of thirddegree domestic assault, a misdemeanor.

STAFF AND WIRE REPORTS

be a while,” Krzyzewski said after the 78-69 victory over the Spartans on Tuesday night. “... We just have to run our race the way we’re running it, and eventually, hopefully, we’ll get all those guys.” Those guys were three reasons Duke (7-1) was the favorite to win the Atlantic Coast Conference and topped the preseason polls. In the past week, the three ivestar freshmen have taken part in pregame warmups. Bolden and Giles have gone through drills at closer to full speed than Tatum.

MU hosting volleyball VOLLEYBALL • FROM B1

Dilosa suspended indeinitely

Any hopes for season, Fisher’s job rest squarely on ofense

Missouri wide receiver Keyon Dilosa was arrested on suspicion of third-degree domestic assault early Wednesday morning after allegedly punching a woman in the face in downtown Columbia, Mo. Police were called to 10th Street outside Harpo’s Bar & Grill for a physical disturbance involving Dilosa, 21, and a 20-year-old woman, according to the police report. A witness told police that Dilosa and the alleged victim were in a verbal argument and Dilosa struck the victim one time in the face with a closed fist. The witness said bystanders assisted in restraining Dilosa until oicers arrived. The alleged victim and Dilosa had a relationship, according to police. Dilosa was arrested at 12:48 a.m. and processed at Boone County Jail at 3:19 a.m. on suspicion of third-degree domestic assault, a misdemeanor. Dilosa posted $1,000 bond and was released. No charges were immediately filed. Mizzou suspended Dilosa indefinitely, team spokesman Chad Moller confirmed. Dilosa caught two passes for 7 yards this season and 11 passes for 86 yards in 2015. The redshirt sophomore from Round Rock, Texas, was positioned for more playing time this year but fell behind on the depth chart once preseason camp began. By the end of the season he was not traveling with the team on road trips. Dilosa is the second Missouri player arrested in recent weeks. Freshman running back Damarea Crockett was arrested Nov. 20 by campus police on suspicion of marijuana possession. The team’s leading rusher was suspended for the Tigers’ final game of the season. (Dave Matter) Walter Camp inalists • Quarterbacks Lamar Jackson from Louisville, Deshaun Watson from Clemson and Jake Browning from Washington, along with two defensive stars Jonathan Allen of Alabama and Jabrill Peppers of Michigan, are the finalists for the Walter Camp player of the year award. Jackson is the front-runner for the Heisman Trophy and has accounted for 51 touchdowns. The Walter Camp winner will be announced Dec. 8. (AP) Oregon’s next steps • It has been 40 years since Oregon fired a head coach, and now Oregon is in the market following the dismissal of coach Mark Helfrich. Athletics director Rob Mullens told players that he would be moving quickly to make a hire. “We’re going to look far and wide. We’re going to have a broad, diverse pool of candidates,” Mullens said. “We want somebody who embraces the student experience, who understands the high expectations at the University of Oregon, who understands our community, you know, really, really wants to be here.” Helfrich spent four years as head coach of Oregon, promoted to the job after serving under previous coach Chip Kelly. Kelly was previously the offensive coordinator under head coach Mike Bellotti, who was the offensive coordinator under coach Rich Brooks. Brooks, who coached the Ducks from 1977-94, was hired when the Ducks dismissed Don Read in 1976. Among the possible candidates being mentioned for the Oregon job are Western Michigan’s P.J. Fleck and Boise State’s Bryan Harsin, as well as Penn State’s James Franklin and Florida’s Jim McElwain, though McElwain said on Wednesday he’s not interested. Helfrich was fired Tuesday evening following a meeting with Mullens, three days after the Ducks ended the season with the 34-24 loss to the rival Oregon State Beavers in the annual Civil War game. Oregon finished 4-8 overall and won just two games in conference play to finish in the basement of the Pac-12 North. It was a dramatic fall for a team that two seasons earlier had gone to the College Football Playof title game. (AP) Elsewhere • Texas running back D’Onta Foreman says he will leave the Longhorns to enter the NFL draft after rushing for 2,028 yards this season as a junior. Foreman’s rushing total in 11 games was the second-best in school history, behind only Ricky Williams in 1998 when Williams won the Heisman Trophy. Forman also scored 15 touchdowns and is a finalist for the Doak Walker Award given to college football’s top running back. ... Georgia Tech’s leading rusher Marcus Marshall says he will transfer rather than return for his final two seasons. Marshall rushed for 624 yards as a sophomore. (AP)

Saturday afternoon in July, the unlimited future of the Rams could be described in one word. Watching the team take the field at UC Irvine for its first oicial training camp practice, mingling with the thousands of beaming fans who showed up simply to cheer calisthenics, former Rams quarterback Jim Everett gushed about the scene. “Amazing,” Everett said at the time. Four months later, the same word applies to the same team, but in not quite the same way. Amazing, how the Rams could have squandered so much goodwill so fast. Amazing, how they could have so quickly bored their fans, alienated one of their former stars, and sank deeply into coaching and quarterback controversies. Amazing, how they could have walked into their new city as homecoming heroes and yet somehow forgotten where they were. After 11 games, the biggest problem with this four-win team is one of identity. They may have changed addresses, but, on the field, they haven’t changed cultures. These aren’t the Los Angeles Rams. These are still the St. Louis Rams. Same losing habit, same boring style, same numbed spectators, same empty hope. What was supposed to be a season-long welcoming party has long since petered out, broken up, and has now officially ended with the guests of honor being run out into the street amid groans and catcalls. First, there was the Jared Gof issue, the Rams insistent on keeping their No. 1 overall draft pick quarterback on the bench for nine long games while starter Case Keenum agonizingly tread water. Then there was the Todd Gurley issue, a star running back who was supposedly this town’s new Kobe Bryant playing instead like the new Dwight Howard. It’s never a good thing when your most famous player becomes your most disappointing player, right? Then, there was news from Nielsen that fewer fans were watching televised Rams games than the other games shown in the Los Angeles market. The homecoming seemingly reached a low point Sunday in New Orleans when the vaunted Rams defense allowed an NFL season-high 49 points to the swaggering Saints. But then on Monday, their image took an even bigger hit with the news that Coach Jef Fisher had initially refused sideline passes to one of the greatest Rams ever, running back Eric Dickerson, after Dickerson had continually ripped them on a radio show. In a town built on stars, the fight with Dickerson is one the Rams can’t win. They have every right to deny special privileges to a former player who publicly criticizes them, but do they really want to go there with a Hall of Famer? Be bigger than that. Check out the Lakers, who absorbed several years of rips from Magic Johnson while quietly shrugging and continuing to embrace him. The Rams have a lot to learn about surviving in the Los Angeles sports market, and they admit it. “This is a city that expects its teams to be champions, and to be in the playofs, and to win consistently,” said Kevin Demof, the Rams’ chief operating oicer. “That needs to be our standard, and if we fall short of that, we have to own up to it and go fix it.” Amid a pristine backdrop of browns and greens at the Rams practice field in Thousand Oaks on Tuesday, Demof directly addressed the perception that his team is a mess, credibly facing the criticism. “This was not going to be a ‘snap your fingers and have a change overnight,’” he said. “There’s a lot of work to be done to grow this fan base.” No, Demof didn’t fire Fisher on the spot like many fans would have hoped, but he pointedly acknowledged the final five games could determine the direction of the organization. “Jef has done a tremendous job handling the distractions of this offseason … but at the end of the day, we all need more wins,” Demof said. “How this team responds to adversity, how we get better, the progress Jared shows, the form the defense shows … that’s what these last five weeks are all about. That will tell us a lot about whether we have the right pieces to move forward in 2017.” Considering those five games include contests with three current division leaders, Fisher’s chances don’t look good, especially since Demof kept mentioning the “hope” that has been so absent. “We can’t change the first 11 games, but we still have the last five games, and most important is that we can show that hope for next year,” Demof said. In a separate interview Tuesday, Fisher also stood up to the questions, with answers that indicate he is impervious to the heat. Worried about your job? “No, I’ve never been worried about my job, I’ve never been concerned about it,” he said. Think your future depends on the last five games? “No, no, I don’t,” he said. “I have confidence in the organization. (Owner) Stan (Kroenke) and I are in a really good place, we know the direction we’re headed; he also appreciates and understands how diicult it had been from a moving standpoint, he understands that.” Fisher acknowledged that change is needed in the ofensive approach, which has led to the early handcufs on Gof and the bevy of boring games. “We need to open the offense up, no doubt about it, our ofense needs to get better,” he said. An open ofense is probably the only thing that can legitimately save Fisher’s job and salvage a bit of this season. Let Gof wing it. Hope Gurley can spring it. Find a way to entertain even as you’re battling Patriots and Falcons and Seahawks. Act like you love LA. Play like you live in LA. And goodness, no matter how much Eric Dickerson pops of, can you just give the man his tickets?


NFL

12.01.2016 • THURSDAY • M 1 NATIONAL FOOTBALL CONFERENCE Pct

PF

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • B5 JIM THOMAS’

AMERICAN FOOTBALL CONFERENCE

EAST

W

L T

Div

EAST

W

L T

Pct

Dallas

10

1 0 .909 316

213

5-1

5-0

6-1

4-0

3-1

New England

9

2 0

.818 293

197

3-2

6-0

7-1

2-1

3-1

5-3

3-0

2-1

Miami

7

4 0 .636 249 240

5-1

2-3

5-3

2-1

2-1

4-3 2-1-1

2-2

Bufalo

6

5 0 .545

281 236

3-2

3-3

3-4

3-1

1-3

3-6

2-0

0-3

NY Jets

3

8 0

.273 196 266

1-4

2-4

3-5

0-3

1-2

NFC AFC

Pct

.727 231

PA Home Away

NY Giants

8

3 0

213

5-1

3-2

Washington

6

4 1 .591 280 264

4-2

2-2-1

Philadelphia

5

6 0 .455 254

213

4-1

1-5

L T

PA Home Away

Pct

PF

NFC AFC

PF

SOUTH

W

Div

SOUTH

W

L T

7

4 0 .636 358 302

3-2

4-2

5-3

2-1

3-1

Houston

6

5 0 .545 194 236

5-1

1-4

4-4

2-1

Tampa Bay

6

5 0 .545 249 264

2-4

4-1

5-3

1-2

2-1

Tennessee

6

6 0 .500 308 296

3-3

3-3

3-5

3-1

1-3

New Orleans

5

6 0 .455 334 307

3-3

2-3

4-3

1-3

1-2

Indianapolis

5

6 0

.455 270 301

3-3

2-3

3-5

2-1

2-2

3-3

1-4

4-4

0-3

1-3

2

9 0

.182 214 293

1-4

1-5

1-7

1-2

1-2

NFC AFC

Div

W

L T

Pct

Carolina

4

7 0 .364 276 281

W

L T

Pct

PF

PA Home Away

Jacksonville NORTH

PF

PA Home Away AFC

NFC Div

Atlanta

NORTH

PF

PA Home Away AFC

PA Home Away AFC

NFC Div 3-0

7

4 0 .636 247 238

5-1

2-3

5-2

2-2

2-2

Baltimore

6

5 0 .545 218 201

4-2

2-3

6-2

0-3 4-0

Minnesota

6

5 0 .545 218 192

4-1

2-4

4-5

2-0

1-3

Pittsburgh

6

5 0 .545 266 222

3-2

3-3

5-3

1-2

2-1

Green Bay

5

6 0 .455 274 289

3-2

2-4

4-4

1-2

2-1

Cincinnati

3

7 1

1-2

2

9 0 .182 178 264

2-3

0-6

2-5

0-4

2-1

NFC AFC

Div

Chicago

W

L T

Pct

PF

PA Home Away

.318

213 245

2-2-1

1-5

3-5 0-2-1

0-6

0-6

0-8

0-4 0-4

PA Home Away AFC

NFC Div

Cleveland

0 12 0 .000

197 352

WEST

W

PF

L T

Pct

Seattle

7

3 1 .682 224 187

5-0

2-3-1 3-3-1

4-0 1-1-1

Oakland

9

2 0

.818 307 275

4-2

5-0

6-1

3-1

2-1

Arizona

4

6 1 .409 245 228

3-2-1

1-4 3-4-1

1-2 2-1-1

Kansas City

8

3 0

.727 252 214

4-1

4-2

6-2

2-1

3-0

Los Angeles

4

7 0 .364 170 236

1-4

3-3

3-5

1-2

2-1

Denver

7

4 0 .636 266

219

4-2

3-2

4-3

3-1

1-3

San Francisco

1 10 0 .091 228 344

1-5

0-5

1-7

0-3

1-3

San Diego

5

6 0

313 291

3-2

2-4

4-5

1-1

1-3

Thursday Dallas at Minnesota, 7:25 p.m., KSDK-5, NFL Net. Sunday Los Angeles at New England, noon, KTVI-2 Kansas City at Atlanta, noon, KMOV-4 Houston at Green Bay, noon

Philadelphia at Cincinnati, noon Miami at Baltimore, noon Denver at Jacksonville, noon Detroit at New Orleans, noon San Francisco at Chicago, noon Bufalo at Oakland, 3:05 p.m.

.455

Washington at Arizona, 3:25 p.m. Tampa Bay at San Diego, 3:25 p.m. NY Giants at Pittsburgh, 3:25 p.m., KTVI-2 Carolina at Seattle, 7:30 p.m., KSDK-5 Monday Indianapolis at NY Jets, 7:30 p.m., ESPN

Seahawks hope to get starters back The Seattle Seahawks are hopeful starters Earl Thomas and DeShawn Shead will return for Sunday’s game against Carolina. Coach Pete Carroll said Wednesday that Thomas and Shead were expected to practice. Both players sufered hamstring injuries two weeks ago in a win over Philadelphia and missed last Sunday’s loss to Tampa Bay. Seattle could have a number of injured players back against the Panthers, including defensive end Michael Bennett following minor knee surgery and starting center Justin Britt, who missed last week’s game with an ankle injury. Britt’s absence left the Seahawks with three rookies starting on the ofensive line and Seattle struggled, managing just three ofensive points in the 14-5 loss. The Seahawks will be making a change on the ofensive line, with Bradley Sowell stepping in at right tackle as the starter in place of Garry Gilliam.

Falcons lose defensive end • Atlanta said defensive end Adrian Clayborn, second on the team with 4½ sacks, will miss at least two weeks after having surgery on his left knee. Clayborn sufered the injury in Sunday’s win over Arizona . Dolphins cut lineman after arrest • Miami reserve defensive tackle Leon Orr was cut during practice when the team learned of his arrest on marijuana charges near Naples, Fla. Orr was charged Tuesday afternoon with misdemeanor marijuana possession and felony possession of a controlled substance. He was released on $7,000 bail. Meanwhile, left tackle Branden Albert has returned to practice after missing the past two games because of a dislocated left wrist. Left guard Laremy Tunsil, sidelined last week by a shoulder injury, also practiced on a limited basis. Center Mike Pouncey remained sidelined by a hip injury. Carr expects no problems • Oakland Raiders quarterback Derek Carr says he will have no limitations this week because of the injured little finger on his throwing hand that forced him to miss a series last week. Carr deflected all questions about the finger, repeatedly saying it’s “doing great.” No practice for Siemian • Denver Broncos quarterback Trevor Siemian was placed in a walking boot and held out of practice after spraining his left foot in Denver’s overtime loss to Kansas City on Sunday night. Coach Gary Kubiak indicated the injury wasn’t too serious, terming his quarterback day to day. Watkins is held out • Bufalo Bills receiver Sammy Watkins was a late scratch from practice after complaining about soreness in his surgically repaired left foot. Watt helps family • Texans lineman J.J. Watt has donated $10,000 to a Houston-area high school football player who is in a coma after sufering a brain injury in a playof game last week. Grant Milton, a senior at The Woodlands high school, was injured Saturday during a game in Waco and was rushed to a hospital, where he remains in a coma. Associated Press

THURSDAY NIGHT PREVIEW DALLAS (10-1) AT MINNESOTA (6-5) Time/TV • 7:25 p.m., KSDK (Ch. 5), NFL Network P-D rankings • Cowboys 1, Vikings 13 Fast facts • Cowboys closing in on playof berth; they’re in with a win over Vikings, plus either a Tampa Bay or Washington loss Sunday. ... Meanwhile, Vikings’ playof hopes flickering with five losses in last six games. ... Cowboys’ dynamic rookie duo of QB Dak Prescott and RB Ezekiel Elliott (John Burroughs) seem to set one milestone or another on a weekly basis. With two TD passes Thursday, Prescott joins Charlie Connerly (New York Giants, 1948) as only rookies in league history with 20 or more TD passes in first 12 games of season. ... Vikings continue to struggle scoring points; they’ve put up only three points in the fourth quarter over their last three games. ... But TE Kyle Rudolph continues to be a bright spot; he matched career high with nine catches last week. Jim Thomas

1. DALLAS COWBOYS (1) Who’s gonna beat these guys? Ten in a row and streaking toward the No. 1 playof seed in the NFC. 2. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS (2) As Chris Long closes in on his first playof berth, he faces his old team, the Rams. 3. OAKLAND RAIDERS (4) The Raiders are assured of first winning season since 2002. 4. KANSAS CITY CHIEFS (5) After another dramatic win, team motto should be: “We’ll find a way.” 5. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS (3) This team is beat up and got beaten up by Tampa Bay. Can they “find a way” to get past Carolina at home? 6. DENVER BRONCOS (6) Decision to try 62-yard field goal in OT vs. Chiefs could haunt coach Gary Kubiak. 7. NEW YORK GIANTS (7) The NFL’s hottest team east of Dallas puts its winning streak on the line in Pittsburgh. 8. ATLANTA FALCONS (10) Dirty Birds lead the league in scoring, but having trouble shaking Tampa Bay in the NFC South.

NOTEBOOK

Vikings coach ailing • Minnesota coach Mike Zimmer had emergency eye surgery Wednesday, about a month after he had an initial procedure to repair a torn retina. Vikings general manager Rick Spielman said Zimmer was uncertain to recover in time for the team’s game against Dallas on Thursday night. Earlier, Minnesota ruled out center Joe Berger and punt returner Marcus Sherels for the game.

(Last week’s ranking in parentheses.)

NFC Div

Detroit

WEST

POWER RANKINGS

9. DETROIT LIONS (11) The fun doesn’t start until the fourth quarter with these guys. How long can this high-wire act continue? 10. MIAMI DOLPHINS (12) Don’t look now, but Dolphins are in the thick of the wild-card hunt. 11. WASHINGTON REDSKINS (8) Kirk Cousins & Co. must kick Cardinals while they’re down Sunday to keep wildcard push going. 12. HOUSTON TEXANS (9) Did the Texans swing and miss again at the quarterback position? Brock Osweiler just can’t get going. ASSOCIATED PRESS

Denver Broncos quarterback Paxton Lynch is hit by Atlanta Falcons defensive end Dwight Freeney in a game Oct. 9 that involved two playof contenders.

Playof races hitting homestretch in NFL Dallas in command, but other spots wide open BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

In the NFL, the playof races really don’t begin until Thanksgiving. At least, that’s the saying. Well, the turkey has been carved up, even the leftovers have disappeared, and December football is here. “I think the later you get in the season, every game — the importance increases because you’re getting down to the end and everybody’s fighting to win their next game,” Dolphins coach Adam Gase told reporters in Miami. “The stakes go up. Everything starts feeling ... it feels diferent in December.” Sure, there are still a lot of “onegame-at-a-time” chants and variations thereof being thrown around the NFL. Take Denver coach Gary Kubiak, for example. After a 3027 overtime loss to Kansas City on Sunday night, in what may have been the game of the year to date in the NFL, the defending Super Bowl champs suddenly are on the outside looking in. At 7-4, they would be out if the playoffs started tomorrow, having been passed on tiebreaker criteria by Gase’s streaking Dolphins (7-4). “I’m not worried about the stretch run,” Kubiak told Denver reporters. “I’m worried about Jacksonville. We have to focus on playing better this week.” Naturally. There’s a lot of season left, right? Well, actually, there isn’t that much season left. The finish line is coming into view, and for many playof hopefuls, the margin for error is rapidly shrinking. “All of our hard work up until this point has set the table for us to be playing meaningful football in December, which is what everyone in the league shoots for,” New York Giants rookie coach Ben McAdoo said. With a six-game winning streak and an 8-3 record, McAdoo’s Giants are primed for their first playof appearance since 2011, but there’s some work to do, starting with Sunday’s game at Pittsburgh. The upand-down Steelers currently have the same record, 6-5, as rival Baltimore atop the AFC North. But the Ravens currently own the tiebreaker edge by virtue of a 21-14 victory over the Steelers on Nov. 6. The West is loaded with contenders in the AFC. And in the East, Miami has won six in a row. So a wild-card berth probably is out of the question for the Steelers. Most likely, it’s division title or bust. The opposite is true for the Giants, who are two games down to mighty Dallas (10-1) in the NFC East and have a brutal closing schedule that includes division leaders Pittsburgh, Dallas and Detroit over the

next three Sundays. The playof picture starts with the Cowboys, who this weekend can become the first team to clinch a berth. The Cowboys qualify for the Roger Goodell Invitational with a victory at Minnesota on Thursday night, and either a Tampa Bay loss or tie (Sunday at San Diego) or a Washington loss (Sunday at Arizona). At the moment, the Giants and Washington (6-4-1) are the favorites for the two wild-card spots in the NFC because no one else in the conference has fewer than five losses besides division leaders Dallas and Seattle (7-3-1). In the AFC, Kansas City (8-3) is in the driver’s seat for the top wildcard spot and could still run down Oakland (9-2) for the AFC West title. But it’s a hazardous road. After playing a grueling five quarters in Denver against an archrival, the Chiefs are on the road again this week against Atlanta (7-4), the high-scoring division leaders in the NFC South. After expending all that energy to get past the Broncos, a letdown certainly is possible in the Georgia Dome. “There’s times when a big win can be more dangerous than a tough loss to rebound of of,” quarterback Alex Smith told Chiefs reporters Wednesday. “Especially a big game in the division on national TV with everyone talking about it. “Can we be mentally tough enough to handle the success, and can we ‘focus-down’ and do all the little things this week? We got back late Monday morning (from Denver). Can we handle that with going on the road again? It’s a big challenge, and we’ll find out.” Four days after the Atlanta game, the Chiefs take on Oakland in a Thursday night contest at Arrowhead Stadium that could decide the AFC West. But first things first. The Raiders game won’t be as crucial if the Chiefs aren’t focused against the Falcons. “I think this time of the year, the players — you can see the light at the end of the tunnel,” Chiefs coach Andy Reid said Wednesday in Kansas City. “And if you’re in position to strike, I don’t think you can aford to take games of. Not that I believe in that anyway, but surely at this time — that can’t even be an issue. Every game is so important right now. It doesn’t matter if it’s NFC, AFC — it doesn’t matter.” It really doesn’t matter if you’re San Francisco (1-10) or Cleveland (0-12). They’ve already been eliminated from playof contention. Maybe next year. Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com

13. MINNESOTA VIKINGS (13) Getting swept by Lions makes Thursday night vs. Dallas a now-or-never proposition. 14. BUFFALO BILLS (14) It will take an upset of the Raiders for Rex Ryan to keep the Bills relevant. 15. PITTSBURGH STEELERS (17) Nice job against Luck-less Colts on Thanksgiving night. But which Steelers team shows up this week? 16. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS (19) Maybe that win in KC two Sundays ago wasn’t a fluke after all. Just ask Seattle. 17. GREEN BAY PACKERS (24) That’s more like it. Classic Aaron Rodgers with the short-passing game, and defense came to play in Philly. 18. BALTIMORE RAVENS (20) Still hold tiebreaker edge over Pittsburgh in AFC North, but now red-hot Miami comes to town. 19. SAN DIEGO CHARGERS (25) They pretty much have nothing to play for but continue to be a tough out. 20. NEW ORLEANS (23) Maybe Sean Payton needs to visualize Gregg Williams on the opposing sideline every Sunday. 21. TENNESSEE TITANS (21) Mike Mularkey got way too conservative down the stretch in Chicago, and it almost cost the Titans. 22. PHILADELPHIA EAGLES (15) Carson Wentz provides hope for the future. As for this season, Eagles are sinking fast. 23. ARIZONA CARDINALS (16) Attention Super Bowl shoppers, the window on the Lombardi Trophy is about to close in Phoenix. 24. INDIANAPOLIS COLTS (18) If Colts are serious about running down Houston in AFC South, now’s the time to quit running in place. 25. CAROLINA PANTHERS (22) Any chance of sneaking back into NFC South race probably ended with that nearmiss in Oakland. 26. LOS ANGELES RAMS (26) It’s one thing to upset Eric Dickerson, but now Jef Fisher has drawn the wrath of Snoop Dogg! 27. CINCINNATI BENGALS (27) December is here, and the Bengals have only one victory since September. 28. NEW YORK JETS (28) Andrew Luck in town. Monday Night Football. Ryan Fitzpatrick still at QB. Does it get any better? 29. CHICAGO BEARS (29) For those scoring at home, Bears are 21-38 since Lovie Smith was shown the door. 30. JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS (30) The Atlantic sturgeon and coach Gus Bradley (14-45) are both on Florida’s list of endangered species. 31. SAN FRANCISCO 49ers (31) These guys are now 6-21 since parting ways with Jim Harbaugh. 32. CLEVELAND BROWNS (32) The Browns absolutely, positively won’t lose a football game this week.


HOCKEY

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 12.01.2016

BLUES NOTEBOOK

NHL STANDINGS

Blues continue to have conidence in Yakupov

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W Montreal 23 16 Ottawa 23 14 Tampa Bay 24 13 Boston 23 12 Florida 23 11 Detroit 23 11 Toronto 23 10 Bufalo 22 8 Metropolitan GP W NY Rangers 24 16 Pittsburgh 23 13 Washington 21 13 Columbus 21 12 New Jersey 22 10 Philadelphia 24 11 Carolina 22 9 NY Islanders 22 8

Armstrong stands by trade for forward, who has been healthy scratch BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Blues general manager Doug Armstrong took a chance on Nail Yakupov, and although the former No. 1 pick can’t crack the lineup lately, the GM says he still has confidence. In October, the Blues acquired Yakupov for forward prospect Zach Pochiro and a conditional thirdround pick, hoping that a change of scenery would help the 23-yearold, who floundered during four seasons in Edmonton. Yakupov had a decent start with the Blues, with four points in his first six games, but soon his ice time diminished and he was dropped to the fourth line before becoming a healthy scratch for the first time Nov. 5. He’s sat out seven of the Blues’ past 12 games and isn’t expected to be in the lineup when they host Tampa Bay on Thursday at Scottrade Center. But apparently that doesn’t have the club secondguessing the deal. “We felt it was a worthwhile gamble,” Armstrong said. “We gave up a third-round draft pick and he’s come in, and quite honestly, someone like Dmitrij Jaskin is really playing great hockey right now and he’s taken away his ice time. That’s just the nature of competition. You’ve got to push and prod and find your way in, and other guys are trying to do it. “I have a lot of confidence in Yak that he’s going to keep his nose to the grindstone and when he gets his opportunity, he’s just got to make the most of it. We look at it from how our team is doing, not how each individual player is doing, and our team is doing well. He’s part of our team.” The Blues are 13-7-3 for 29 points, which places them second in the Western Conference standings and tied for fourth in the league standings heading into their matchup with the Lightning. Jaskin has played in all but two of the Blues’ 23 games this season, sitting out as a healthy scratch Oct. 13 and 15. With Alexander Steen sidelined by an upper-body injury the past six games, Ty Rattie has been playing in Yakupov’s place, and in Rattie’s last three games he hasn’t logged more than 12 shifts or eight minutes of ice time in any of them. Still, the Blues are electing to suit up Rattie over Yakupov, who in his past five games has one assist, one shot on goal, two penalties and a minus-3 rating. His last ap-

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT Chicago 24 15 6 3 Blues 23 13 7 3 Nashville 22 11 8 3 Minnesota 22 11 8 3 Dallas 24 9 9 6 Winnipeg 25 11 12 2 Colorado 21 9 11 1 Paciic GP W L OT San Jose 23 13 9 1 Anaheim 23 11 8 4 Edmonton 24 12 10 2 Los Angeles22 12 9 1 Calgary 26 11 13 2 Vancouver 23 10 11 2 Arizona 21 8 10 3

goals and had six more assists. That doesn’t include the shootout goal he scored Saturday to give the Blues a win over Minnesota. “Wow, that’s pretty cool,” Perron said when told of his status this week. “(Sidney) Crosby doesn’t have like a 44-game (streak)?” (No, Crosby’s streak is currently at six.) Perron is also keeping up, and in most cases, surpassing his highdollar free agent Class of 2016 comrades. Only Lucic, with seven goals and 10 assists, has more points. None of them has more goals. Perron’s Corsi number of 39 puts him up with Jason Demers of Florida (50), Lucic (49) and Loui Eriksson of Vancouver (47) and ahead of the rest. The Blues are getting that for far less than what those other players are making. “We had a plan on what we were going to do in free agency,” general manager Doug Armstrong said, “and we felt very comfortable creating more space for some of our own players and then using lesser dollar players to fill in some of the still-important roles, but diferent roles.” And Perron was part of that plan. With seven goals and nine assists, Perron has almost matched the numbers he had in 28 games with Anaheim last season after being traded by Pittsburgh. Barring injury, he seems likely to surpass his totals for last season, when he had a combined 12 goals and 24 assists with the Penguins and Ducks. “We knew the player, we knew the person,” Armstrong said. “We felt that he was more Anaheim than Pittsburgh in the quality of player and how he was going to play. Also, the coach was very comfortable bringing him back in. He felt that he would fit into how we want to play and what we want to do. And he’s younger than those other guys (in the free agent pool) and it just

Pts 33 29 25 25 24 24 19 Pts 27 26 26 25 24 22 19

GF 68 62 65 62 61 66 47 GF 54 59 70 57 60 54 51

GA 60 63 57 47 79 72 63 GA 49 55 63 54 77 70 65

Home 9-1-2 10-1-2 8-1-1 7-3-0 6-3-2 8-4-0 4-6-1 Home 8-3-0 7-4-1 5-6-0 9-2-0 4-7-0 7-4-1 5-4-0

Away Div 6-5-1 5-3-0 3-6-1 6-2-1 3-7-2 6-4-0 4-5-3 3-3-2 3-6-4 5-6-2 3-8-2 5-4-1 5-5-0 4-6-0 Away Div 5-6-1 3-3-1 4-4-3 6-1-1 7-4-2 3-3-1 3-7-1 4-2-0 7-6-2 2-4-1 3-7-1 3-2-1 3-6-3 4-2-3

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss.

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Blues right winger Nail Yakupov skates around Kings goaltender Peter Budaj in an early-season game Oct. 29 at Scottrade Center.

pearance was in Washington a week ago, when he had no shots and was a minus-1 in 6:29 of ice time. That outing was followed by backto-back healthy scratches against Minnesota and Dallas. “I think I played good, but ... I don’t really want to say how I played,” Yakupov said. “We have coaches, we have a staf who watch how you play and they’re going to tell you how you played, they’re going to tell you, the media, how guys played. Everything I got, I just try to leave on the ice and try to skate hard and try to stick to the system, play the right way and be smart. That’s what I do.” Vladimir Tarasenko, Yakupov’s closest friend on the Blues, said the fellow Russian has kept a positive attitude during the stretch. “He’s a hardworking guy and he loves hockey,” Tarasenko said. “Of course it’s a little bit weird when you don’t play every night, but he keeps working hard.” As the Blues’ leading scorer was speaking, Yakupov walked into the locker room after being one of last players to leave the ice following practice. After losing a playful side bet with teammates during practice that day, Yakupov came into the room with his hands full of equipment.

“Look at him — you see this? — carrying our helmets,” Tarasenko pointed out to a reporter. “He tries to work hard in practice and he helps other guys. When people don’t play, they give really good boost to us when they don’t react selfishly and they support us all the time. He’s a really good player, and same as I believe in our team success, I believe in his success.” Yakupov appreciated Tarasenko’s support and joked that he doesn’t have to lug his teammates’ gear around to earn it. “I’m trying to be the good teammate, but I’m not trying to create something and be like a clown in the locker room,” Yakupov said. “I’m obviously working hard, just waiting for my chance, that’s all I can do. I’m not trying to do something crazy and show coaches how good I am. They already know who I am as a person, who I am as a player. “I’m just trying to work hard like everybody else does on the ice. Obviously it’s more exciting to play a game than practice, but nothing I can do. I’m not a coach or a GM. I’m working hard, like I usually do, so we’ll see what happens.” Jeremy Rutherford @jprutherford on Twitter jrutherford@post-dispatch.com

Perron has eight-game point streak BLUES • FROM B1

L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 5 2 34 68 50 12-1-1 4-4-1 8-1-2 8 1 29 55 56 8-5-1 6-3-0 5-5-0 10 1 27 71 65 6-3-1 7-7-0 6-3-1 10 1 25 55 53 5-5-0 7-5-1 5-4-0 10 2 24 58 60 7-4-0 4-6-2 5-4-1 10 2 24 57 59 6-6-1 5-4-1 2-6-1 9 4 24 70 74 8-3-0 2-6-4 4-3-1 9 5 21 44 57 3-4-3 5-5-2 3-4-2 L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 7 1 33 88 59 9-4-1 7-3-0 5-3-0 7 3 29 69 70 8-2-1 5-5-2 6-3-0 6 2 28 57 48 8-3-0 5-3-2 2-3-2 5 4 28 67 48 8-3-1 4-2-3 3-0-0 7 5 25 55 58 7-0-2 3-7-3 2-0-1 10 3 25 77 80 7-5-2 4-5-1 3-2-0 9 4 22 54 59 6-3-0 3-6-4 2-4-1 10 4 20 56 67 7-4-3 1-6-1 1-3-2

LIGHTNING AT BLUES When • Thursday at 7 p.m. Where • Scottrade Center TV, radio • Fox Sports Midwest, KMOX (1120 AM) Blues • The Blues swept the season series with Tampa Bay last season, including a 2-0 win at Scottrade Center, where they haven’t lost to the Lightning since the 2009-10 season. … The Blues have won ive straight at home, their longest streak since winning ive straight from Dec. 19, 2013 to Jan. 14, 2014. The franchise record for a home win streak is nine, in 1990-91. Lightning • Tampa Bay has lost three in a row and been outscored 14-5 in that stretch, though the team is seventh in the league in scoring. … Nikita Kucherov is tied for second in the NHL in points with 26 (11 goals, 15 assists). Steven Stamkos has nine goals and 11 assists in 17 games but is out indeinitely with a knee injury. The team has gone 3-4 since he got hurt. Injuries • Blues — F Alexander Steen (upper body) is doubtful; D Joel Edmundson (upper body) is questionable. Lightning — F Ryan Callahan (lower body) and F Steven Stamkos (knee) are out. D Anton Stralman (upper body) is day-to-day. Tom Timmermann

felt like he was a really solid option for us.” “I don’t know what to say” about outplaying other free agents at the start of the season, Perron said. “It’s nice for sure. Coming back here, I knew I would have some good opportunities, just knowing Hitch, knowing the staf, how much he pushed to get me back. I could feel that from the start of the free agency there, when we started talking. It was natural for me to come back.” There is a case to be made that while Perron has put up good num-

bers, he didn’t do much before his recent run. In the first 15 games of the season, he had four goals and one assist, with three of the goals and the one assist all coming in one game, at Calgary on Oct. 22. Perron feels his game has been there even when he wasn’t scoring yet and he’s been contributing on both sides of the puck. Hitchcock is even using him regularly on the penalty-killing unit. “I really do,” Perron said. “I had a good game in Calgary pointswise, but I felt like my game was there before. I feel one of my best games was playing with (Alexander Steen and Vladimir Tarasenko) in Vancouver (four days earlier). I’m trying to build and keep building and make sure even when the legs sometimes aren’t 100 percent there, the puck-making decisions, everything is there and I’m playing the right way.” Hitchcock agrees. “He doesn’t cheat to score,” the coach said. “He plays the game the right way, he’s on the right side of the puck, he has a base where he understands that part of the game now. He’s not fishing for pucks, he’s not hoping pucks pop free to create ofense, he’s not looking to cheat the game, he plays the game real honest right now and I think it makes him a way better player. We use the term loosely, but man, he’s a 200-foot player and he’s made himself a 200-foot player. “He’s grown up. He’s 28 years old, but he’s been 10 years in the league, his game has maturity in his play, he’s really competitive on the puck, I like that. I trust him, I trust him offensively, and I really trust him defensively.” And whatever price you can put on trust, the Blues are getting their money’s worth. Jeremy Rutherford of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report. Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com

Wednesday NY Islanders 5, Pittsburgh 3 Calgary 3, Toronto 0 San Jose at Los Angeles, late Tuesday NY Rangers 3, Carolina 2 Columbus 5, Tampa Bay 1 Detroit 3, Dallas 1 Philadelphia 3, Boston 2, SO Buffalo 5, Ottawa 4 Winnipeg 3, New Jersey 2 Chicago 2, Florida 1, SO Toronto 4, Edmonton 2 Nashville 5, Colorado 3 San Jose 2, Arizona 1, OT

Anaheim 2, Montreal 1 Vancouver 5, Minnesota 4 Thursday Carolina at Boston, 6 p.m. NY Rangers at Buffalo, 6 p.m. Dallas at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. NY Islanders at Washington, 6 p.m. Florida at Detroit, 6:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Ottawa, 6:30 p.m. Tampa Bay at Blues, 7 p.m. Edmonton at Winnipeg, 7 p.m. New Jersey at Chicago, 7:30 p.m. Columbus at Colorado, 8 p.m. Los Angeles at Arizona, 8 p.m. Anaheim at Vancouver, 9 p.m.

Lee boosts Islanders in inal seconds ASSOCIATED PRESS

Anders Lee scored the tiebreaking goal with 27 seconds remaining to lift the New York Islanders to a 5-3 victory over the defending champion Pittsburgh Penguins on Wednesday night. Thomas Hickey fired a slap shot from the point that deflected of Lee’s stick and past goalie Matt Murray to help the Islanders recover after giving up a three-goal lead in the third period. With Murray pulled on the ensuing faceoff, Nikolay Kulemin scored into the empty net 3 seconds later. Johnny Boychuk, Jason Chimera and Casey Cizikas also scored for the Islanders, and Thomas Greiss made 31 saves. Conor Sheary, Justin Schultz and Evgeni Malkin scored in the first 13:08 of the third period for the Penguins. Murray finished with 25 saves, starting for the third time in four games. The Islanders had not scored more than two goals in their last eight games — including a 3-2, 14-round shootout win at Anaheim on Nov. 22. Schultz pulled the Penguins within one when he skated in across the left faceof circle and fired a shot top shelf with 9:20 remaining. Malkin then tied it with a wrister past Greiss 2:28 later with his ninth of the season. Patric Hornqvist returned for the Penguins after missing six games due to a concussion.

NOTEBOOK Anderson leaves Senators to care for wife • Ottawa Senators goaltender Craig Anderson has taken a leave of absence from the team as his wife battles a rare form of throat cancer. Nicholle Anderson has been diagnosed with nasopharyngeal carcinoma, a cancer that starts in the upper part of the throat behind the nose and near the base of skull. She is undergoing treatment in New York. Mike Condon and the recently recalled Andrew Hammond will take on the goaltending duties in Anderson’s absence. Anderson is 12-5-1 with a 2.20 goals-against average this season. Elsewhere • Colorado placed captain Gabriel Landeskog on injured reserve with a lower-body injury retroactive to Nov. 15. Landeskog has four goals and four assists in 15 games this season. ... Nashville signed defenseman Adam Pardy to a one-year deal after putting defenseman Anthony Bitetto on IR and assigning forward Miikka Salomaki to the AHL. Pardy, 32, has 52 points in 338 NHL games.

NHL SUMMARIES Islanders 5, Penguins 3 Pittsburgh 0 0 3 — 3 NY Islanders 1 2 2 — 5 First period: 1, NY Islanders, Boychuk 3 (Bailey, Nelson), 19:47. Penalties: Sheary, PIT, (high sticking), 9:39; Hickey, NYI, (interference), 12:13; Nelson, NYI, (tripping), 17:34. Second period: 2, NY Islanders, Chimera 2 (Mayfield, Beauvillier), 2:10. 3, NY Islanders, Cizikas 3 (Ladd, Mayfield), 17:21. Penalties: Pittsburgh bench, served by Guentzel (too many men on the ice), 7:58; Cullen, PIT, (delay of game), 7:58; Cole, PIT, (delay of game), 10:28; Lee, NYI, (hooking), 14:26. Third period: 4, Pittsburgh, Sheary 5 (Hornqvist, Crosby), 0:32. 5, Pittsburgh, Schultz 1 (Cole), 10:40. 6, Pittsburgh, Malkin 9 (Dumoulin, Crosby), 13:08. 7, NY Islanders, Lee 5 (Boychuk, Hickey), 19:33. 8, NY Islanders, Kulemin 2 (Cizikas), 19:36. Penalties: Cizikas, NYI, (roughing), 11:08; Letang, PIT, (roughing), 11:08. Shots: Pittsburgh 9-13-12: 34. NY Islanders 7-13-10: 30. Power-plays: Pittsburgh 0 of 3; NY Islanders 0 of 4. Goalies: Pittsburgh, Murray 7-2-0 (29 shots25 saves). NY Islanders, Greiss 5-4-0 (34-31). A: 12,149. Referees: Tim Peel, Kyle Rehman. Linesmen: Michel Cormier, Jonny Murray.

Flames 3, Maple Leafs 0 Toronto 0 0 0 — 0 Calgary 3 0 0 — 3 First period: 1, Calgary, Hamilton 1 (Engelland, Ferland), 0:19. 2, Calgary, Versteeg 3 (Brouwer, Monahan), 0:49. 3, Calgary, Stajan 2 (Frolik, Chiasson), 15:49. Penalties: Carrick, TOR, (roughing), 13:37; Hamilton, CGY, (holding), 16:23. Second period: None. Penalties: Zaitsev, TOR, (hooking), 13:23; Versteeg, CGY, (holding), 17:56. Third period: None. Penalties: None. Shots: Toronto 12-13-14: 39. Calgary 10-13-6: 29. Power-plays: Toronto 0 of 2; Calgary 0 of 2. Goalies: Toronto, Enroth 0-3-1 (29 shots-26 saves). Calgary, Johnson 8-4-1 (39-39). A: 19,289. Referees: Wes McCauley, Ian Walsh. Linesmen: Shane Heyer, Mark Wheler.

TUESDAY BOX SCORES

Ducks 2, Canadiens 1 Montreal 0 0 1 — 1 Anaheim 1 1 0 — 2 First period: 1, Anaheim, Rakell 9 (Kesler, Vatanen), 16:50 (pp). Penalties: Ritchie, ANA, (interference), 4:36; Perry, ANA, (high sticking), 9:39; Perry, ANA, Major (fighting), 14:57; Shaw, MTL, Major (fighting), 14:57; Weber, MTL, (roughing), 16:04. Second period: 2, Anaheim, Fowler 7 (Kesler, Silfverberg), 11:56. Penalties: Carr, MTL, (tripping), 18:21; Emelin, MTL, (hooking), 19:57. Third period: 3, Montreal, Shaw 5 (Gallagher, Pacioretty), 18:00. Penalties: Cogliano, ANA, (hooking), 13:43; Shaw, MTL, Misconduct (misconduct), 19:32; Shaw, MTL, (hooking), 19:32; Vermette, ANA, (high sticking), 19:38. Shots: Montreal 17-13-10: 40. Anaheim 10-21-7: 38. Power-plays: Montreal 0 of 3; Anaheim 1 of 4. Goalies: Montreal, Price 13-2-1 (38 shots-36 saves). Anaheim, Gibson 7-7-3 (40-39). A: 14,830. Referees: Gord Dwyer, Brad Watson. Linesmen: Bevan Mills, Brian Murphy.

Sharks 2, Coyotes 1 Arizona 0 1 0 0 — 1 San Jose 0 1 0 1 — 2 First period: None. Penalties: Ward, SJ, (hooking), 7:53. Second period: 1, Arizona, Domi 4 (Vrbata, Schenn), 7:19. 2, San Jose, Tierney 2 (Boedker, Braun), 15:29. Penalties: None. Third period: None. Penalties: Murphy, ARI, (hooking), 0:28; Labanc, SJ, (roughing), 8:44; Mcginn, ARI, (roughing), 8:44; White, ARI, Misconduct (misconduct), 12:31; Dillon, SJ, (interference), 12:31; Hanzal, ARI, (high sticking), 19:59. Overtime: 3, San Jose, Burns 9 (Couture, Pavelski), 0:19 (pp). Penalties: None. Shots: Arizona 5-5-9: 19. San Jose 13-16-12-1: 42. Power-plays: Arizona 0 of 2; San Jose 1 of 2. Goalies: Arizona, Smith 4-1-2 (42 shots-40 saves). San Jose, Jones 11-8-1 (19-18). A: 17,377. Referees: Jean Hebert, Chris Schlenker. Linesmen: Kiel Murchison, Kory Nagy.


HOCKEY

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • THUrSDAy • 12.01.2016

BLUES NOTEBOOK

NHL STANDINGS

Blues continue to have conidence in Yakupov

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div Chicago 24 15 6 3 33 68 60 9-1-2 6-5-1 5-3-0 Blues 23 13 7 3 29 62 63 10-1-2 3-6-1 6-2-1 Nashville 22 11 8 3 25 65 57 8-1-1 3-7-2 6-4-0 Minnesota 22 11 8 3 25 62 47 7-3-0 4-5-3 3-3-2 Dallas 24 9 9 6 24 61 79 6-3-2 3-6-4 5-6-2 Winnipeg 25 11 12 2 24 66 72 8-4-0 3-8-2 5-4-1 Colorado 21 9 11 1 19 47 63 4-6-1 5-5-0 4-6-0 Paciic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div San Jose 24 14 9 1 29 58 50 8-3-0 6-6-1 4-3-1 Anaheim 23 11 8 4 26 59 55 7-4-1 4-4-3 6-1-1 Edmonton 24 12 10 2 26 70 63 5-6-0 7-4-2 3-3-1 Los Angeles 23 12 10 1 25 58 58 9-3-0 3-7-1 4-3-0 Calgary 26 11 13 2 24 60 77 4-7-0 7-6-2 2-4-1 Vancouver 23 10 11 2 22 54 70 7-4-1 3-7-1 3-2-1 Arizona 21 8 10 3 19 51 65 5-4-0 3-6-3 4-2-3

Armstrong stands by trade for forward, who has been healthy scratch BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Blues general manager Doug Armstrong took a chance on Nail Yakupov, and although the former No. 1 pick can’t crack the lineup lately, the GM says he still has confidence. In October, the Blues acquired Yakupov for forward prospect Zach Pochiro and a conditional thirdround pick, hoping that a change of scenery would help the 23-yearold, who floundered during four seasons in Edmonton. Yakupov had a decent start with the Blues, with four points in his first six games, but soon his ice time diminished and he was dropped to the fourth line before becoming a healthy scratch for the first time Nov. 5. He’s sat out seven of the Blues’ past 12 games and isn’t expected to be in the lineup when they host Tampa Bay on Thursday at Scottrade Center. But apparently that doesn’t have the club secondguessing the deal. “We felt it was a worthwhile gamble,” Armstrong said. “We gave up a third-round draft pick and he’s come in, and quite honestly, someone like Dmitrij Jaskin is really playing great hockey right now and he’s taken away his ice time. That’s just the nature of competition. You’ve got to push and prod and find your way in, and other guys are trying to do it. “I have a lot of confidence in Yak that he’s going to keep his nose to the grindstone and when he gets his opportunity, he’s just got to make the most of it. We look at it from how our team is doing, not how each individual player is doing, and our team is doing well. He’s part of our team.” The Blues are 13-7-3 for 29 points, which places them second in the Western Conference standings and tied for fourth in the league standings heading into their matchup with the Lightning. Jaskin has played in all but two of the Blues’ 23 games this season, sitting out as a healthy scratch Oct. 13 and 15. With Alexander Steen sidelined by an upper-body injury the past six games, Ty Rattie has been playing in Yakupov’s place, and in Rattie’s last three games he hasn’t logged more than 12 shifts or eight minutes of ice time in any of them. Still, the Blues are electing to suit up Rattie over Yakupov, who in his past five games has one assist, one shot on goal, two penalties and a minus-3 rating. His last ap-

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W Montreal 23 16 Ottawa 23 14 Tampa Bay 24 13 Boston 23 12 Florida 23 11 Detroit 23 11 Toronto 23 10 Bufalo 22 8 Metropolitan GP W NY Rangers 24 16 Pittsburgh 23 13 Washington 21 13 Columbus 21 12 New Jersey 22 10 Philadelphia 24 11 Carolina 22 9 NY Islanders 22 8

L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 5 2 34 68 50 12-1-1 4-4-1 8-1-2 8 1 29 55 56 8-5-1 6-3-0 5-5-0 10 1 27 71 65 6-3-1 7-7-0 6-3-1 10 1 25 55 53 5-5-0 7-5-1 5-4-0 10 2 24 58 60 7-4-0 4-6-2 5-4-1 10 2 24 57 59 6-6-1 5-4-1 2-6-1 9 4 24 70 74 8-3-0 2-6-4 4-3-1 9 5 21 44 57 3-4-3 5-5-2 3-4-2 L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 7 1 33 88 59 9-4-1 7-3-0 5-3-0 7 3 29 69 70 8-2-1 5-5-2 6-3-0 6 2 28 57 48 8-3-0 5-3-2 2-3-2 5 4 28 67 48 8-3-1 4-2-3 3-0-0 7 5 25 55 58 7-0-2 3-7-3 2-0-1 10 3 25 77 80 7-5-2 4-5-1 3-2-0 9 4 22 54 59 6-3-0 3-6-4 2-4-1 10 4 20 56 67 7-4-3 1-6-1 1-3-2

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss.

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Blues right winger Nail Yakupov skates around Kings goaltender Peter Budaj in an early-season game Oct. 29 at Scottrade Center.

pearance was in Washington a week ago, when he had no shots and was a minus-1 in 6:29 of ice time. That outing was followed by backto-back healthy scratches against Minnesota and Dallas. “I think I played good, but ... I don’t really want to say how I played,” Yakupov said. “We have coaches, we have a staf who watch how you play and they’re going to tell you how you played, they’re going to tell you, the media, how guys played. Everything I got, I just try to leave on the ice and try to skate hard and try to stick to the system, play the right way and be smart. That’s what I do.” Vladimir Tarasenko, Yakupov’s closest friend on the Blues, said the fellow Russian has kept a positive attitude during the stretch. “He’s a hardworking guy and he loves hockey,” Tarasenko said. “Of course it’s a little bit weird when you don’t play every night, but he keeps working hard.” As the Blues’ leading scorer was speaking, Yakupov walked into the locker room after being one of last players to leave the ice following practice. After losing a playful side bet with teammates during practice that day, Yakupov came into the room with his hands full of equipment.

“Look at him — you see this? — carrying our helmets,” Tarasenko pointed out to a reporter. “He tries to work hard in practice and he helps other guys. When people don’t play, they give really good boost to us when they don’t react selfishly and they support us all the time. He’s a really good player, and same as I believe in our team success, I believe in his success.” Yakupov appreciated Tarasenko’s support and joked that he doesn’t have to lug his teammates’ gear around to earn it. “I’m trying to be the good teammate, but I’m not trying to create something and be like a clown in the locker room,” Yakupov said. “I’m obviously working hard, just waiting for my chance, that’s all I can do. I’m not trying to do something crazy and show coaches how good I am. They already know who I am as a person, who I am as a player. “I’m just trying to work hard like everybody else does on the ice. Obviously it’s more exciting to play a game than practice, but nothing I can do. I’m not a coach or a GM. I’m working hard, like I usually do, so we’ll see what happens.” Jeremy Rutherford @jprutherford on Twitter jrutherford@post-dispatch.com

Wednesday NY Islanders 5, Pittsburgh 3 Calgary 3, Toronto 0 San Jose 4, Los Angeles 1 Tuesday NY Rangers 3, Carolina 2 Columbus 5, Tampa Bay 1 Detroit 3, Dallas 1 Philadelphia 3, Boston 2, SO Buffalo 5, Ottawa 4 Winnipeg 3, New Jersey 2 Chicago 2, Florida 1, SO Toronto 4, Edmonton 2 Nashville 5, Colorado 3 San Jose 2, Arizona 1, OT

Anaheim 2, Montreal 1 Vancouver 5, Minnesota 4 Thursday Carolina at Boston, 6 p.m. NY Rangers at Buffalo, 6 p.m. Dallas at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. NY Islanders at Washington, 6 p.m. Florida at Detroit, 6:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Ottawa, 6:30 p.m. Tampa Bay at Blues, 7 p.m. Edmonton at Winnipeg, 7 p.m. New Jersey at Chicago, 7:30 p.m. Columbus at Colorado, 8 p.m. Los Angeles at Arizona, 8 p.m. Anaheim at Vancouver, 9 p.m.

Lee boosts Islanders in inal seconds ASSOCIATED PRESS

Anders Lee scored the tiebreaking goal with 27 seconds remaining to lift the New York Islanders to a 5-3 victory over the defending champion Pittsburgh Penguins on Wednesday night. Thomas Hickey fired a slap shot from the point that deflected of Lee’s stick and past goalie Matt Murray to help the Islanders recover after giving up a three-goal lead in the third period. With Murray pulled on the ensuing faceoff, Nikolay Kulemin scored into the empty net 3 seconds later. Johnny Boychuk, Jason Chimera and Casey Cizikas also scored for the Islanders, and Thomas Greiss made 31 saves. Conor Sheary, Justin Schultz and Evgeni Malkin scored in the first 13:08 of the third period for the Penguins. Murray finished with 25 saves, starting for the third time in four games. The Islanders had not scored more than two goals in their last eight games — including a 3-2, 14-round shootout win at Anaheim on Nov. 22. Schultz pulled the Penguins within one when he skated in across the left faceof circle and fired a shot top shelf with 9:20 remaining. Malkin then tied it with a wrister past Greiss 2:28 later with his ninth of the season. Patric Hornqvist returned for the Penguins after missing six games due to a concussion.

NOTEBOOK

Perron has eight-game point streak BLUES • FROM B1

goals and had six more assists. That doesn’t include the shootout goal he scored Saturday to give the Blues a win over Minnesota. “Wow, that’s pretty cool,” Perron said when told of his status this week. “(Sidney) Crosby doesn’t have like a 44-game (streak)?” (No, Crosby’s streak is currently at six.) Perron is also keeping up, and in most cases, surpassing his highdollar free agent Class of 2016 comrades. Only Lucic, with seven goals and 10 assists, has more points. None of them has more goals. Perron’s Corsi number of 39 puts him up with Jason Demers of Florida (50), Lucic (49) and Loui Eriksson of Vancouver (47) and ahead of the rest. The Blues are getting that for far less than what those other players are making. “We had a plan on what we were going to do in free agency,” general manager Doug Armstrong said, “and we felt very comfortable creating more space for some of our own players and then using lesser dollar players to fill in some of the still-important roles, but diferent roles.” And Perron was part of that plan. With seven goals and nine assists, Perron has almost matched the numbers he had in 28 games with Anaheim last season after being traded by Pittsburgh. Barring injury, he seems likely to surpass his totals for last season, when he had a combined 12 goals and 24 assists with the Penguins and Ducks. “We knew the player, we knew the person,” Armstrong said. “We felt that he was more Anaheim than Pittsburgh in the quality of player and how he was going to play. Also, the coach was very comfortable bringing him back in. He felt that he would fit into how we want to play and what we want to do. And he’s younger than those other guys (in the free agent pool) and it just

LIGHTNING AT BLUES When • Thursday at 7 p.m. Where • Scottrade Center TV, radio • Fox Sports Midwest, KMOX (1120 AM) Blues • The Blues swept the season series with Tampa Bay last season, including a 2-0 win at Scottrade Center, where they haven’t lost to the Lightning since the 2009-10 season. … The Blues have won ive straight at home, their longest streak since winning ive straight from Dec. 19, 2013 to Jan. 14, 2014. The franchise record for a home win streak is nine, in 1990-91. Lightning • Tampa Bay has lost three in a row and been outscored 14-5 in that stretch, though the team is seventh in the league in scoring. … Nikita Kucherov is tied for second in the NHL in points with 26 (11 goals, 15 assists). Steven Stamkos has nine goals and 11 assists in 17 games but is out indeinitely with a knee injury. The team has gone 3-4 since he got hurt. Injuries • Blues — F Alexander Steen (upper body) is doubtful; D Joel Edmundson (upper body) is questionable. Lightning — F Ryan Callahan (lower body) and F Steven Stamkos (knee) are out. D Anton Stralman (upper body) is day-to-day. Tom Timmermann

felt like he was a really solid option for us.” “I don’t know what to say” about outplaying other free agents at the start of the season, Perron said. “It’s nice for sure. Coming back here, I knew I would have some good opportunities, just knowing Hitch, knowing the staf, how much he pushed to get me back. I could feel that from the start of the free agency there, when we started talking. It was natural for me to come back.” There is a case to be made that while Perron has put up good num-

bers, he didn’t do much before his recent run. In the first 15 games of the season, he had four goals and one assist, with three of the goals and the one assist all coming in one game, at Calgary on Oct. 22. Perron feels his game has been there even when he wasn’t scoring yet and he’s been contributing on both sides of the puck. Hitchcock is even using him regularly on the penalty-killing unit. “I really do,” Perron said. “I had a good game in Calgary pointswise, but I felt like my game was there before. I feel one of my best games was playing with (Alexander Steen and Vladimir Tarasenko) in Vancouver (four days earlier). I’m trying to build and keep building and make sure even when the legs sometimes aren’t 100 percent there, the puck-making decisions, everything is there and I’m playing the right way.” Hitchcock agrees. “He doesn’t cheat to score,” the coach said. “He plays the game the right way, he’s on the right side of the puck, he has a base where he understands that part of the game now. He’s not fishing for pucks, he’s not hoping pucks pop free to create ofense, he’s not looking to cheat the game, he plays the game real honest right now and I think it makes him a way better player. We use the term loosely, but man, he’s a 200-foot player and he’s made himself a 200-foot player. “He’s grown up. He’s 28 years old, but he’s been 10 years in the league, his game has maturity in his play, he’s really competitive on the puck, I like that. I trust him, I trust him offensively, and I really trust him defensively.” And whatever price you can put on trust, the Blues are getting their money’s worth. Jeremy Rutherford of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report. Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com

Anderson leaves Senators to care for wife • Ottawa Senators goaltender Craig Anderson has taken a leave of absence from the team as his wife battles a rare form of throat cancer. Nicholle Anderson has been diagnosed with nasopharyngeal carcinoma, a cancer that starts in the upper part of the throat behind the nose and near the base of skull. She is undergoing treatment in New York. Mike Condon and the recently recalled Andrew Hammond will take on the goaltending duties in Anderson’s absence. Anderson is 12-5-1 with a 2.20 goals-against average this season. Elsewhere • Colorado placed captain Gabriel Landeskog on injured reserve with a lower-body injury retroactive to Nov. 15. Landeskog has four goals and four assists in 15 games this season. ... Nashville signed defenseman Adam Pardy to a one-year deal after putting defenseman Anthony Bitetto on IR and assigning forward Miikka Salomaki to the AHL. Pardy, 32, has 52 points in 338 NHL games.

NHL SUMMARIES Islanders 5, Penguins 3

Leaders

Pittsburgh 0 0 3 — 3 NY Islanders 1 2 2 — 5 First period: 1, NY Islanders, Boychuk 3 (Bailey, Nelson), 19:47. Penalties: Sheary, PIT, (high sticking), 9:39; Hickey, NYI, (interference), 12:13; Nelson, NYI, (tripping), 17:34. Second period: 2, NY Islanders, Chimera 2 (Mayfield, Beauvillier), 2:10. 3, NY Islanders, Cizikas 3 (Ladd, Mayfield), 17:21. Penalties: Pittsburgh bench, served by Guentzel (too many men on the ice), 7:58; Cullen, PIT, (delay of game), 7:58; Cole, PIT, (delay of game), 10:28; Lee, NYI, (hooking), 14:26. Third period: 4, Pittsburgh, Sheary 5 (Hornqvist, Crosby), 0:32. 5, Pittsburgh, Schultz 1 (Cole), 10:40. 6, Pittsburgh, Malkin 9 (Dumoulin, Crosby), 13:08. 7, NY Islanders, Lee 5 (Boychuk, Hickey), 19:33. 8, NY Islanders, Kulemin 2 (Cizikas), 19:36. Penalties: Cizikas, NYI, (roughing), 11:08; Letang, PIT, (roughing), 11:08. Shots: Pittsburgh 9-13-12: 34. NY Islanders 7-13-10: 30. Power-plays: Pittsburgh 0 of 3; NY Islanders 0 of 4. Goalies: Pittsburgh, Murray 7-2-0 (29 shots25 saves). NY Islanders, Greiss 5-4-0 (34-31). A: 12,149. Referees: Tim Peel, Kyle Rehman. Linesmen: Michel Cormier, Jonny Murray.

GOAL SCORING Sidney Crosby, Pittsburgh Patrik Laine, Winnipeg David Pastrnak, Boston Mark Scheifele, Winnipeg Michael Grabner, NY Rangers Alex Ovechkin, Washington Marian Hossa, Chicago Nikita Kucherov, Tampa Bay Connor McDavid, Edmonton Wayne Simmonds, Philadelphia Jeff Carter, Los Angeles Kevin Hayes, NY Rangers Nazem Kadri, Toronto Jonathan Marchessault, Florida Auston Matthews, Toronto Rick Nash, NY Rangers James Neal, Nashville Vladimir Tarasenko, Blues Kyle Turris, Ottawa James van Riemsdyk, Toronto

Flames 3, Maple Leafs 0 Toronto 0 0 0 — 0 Calgary 3 0 0 — 3 First period: 1, Calgary, Hamilton 1 (Engelland, Ferland), 0:19. 2, Calgary, Versteeg 3 (Brouwer, Monahan), 0:49. 3, Calgary, Stajan 2 (Frolik, Chiasson), 15:49. Penalties: Carrick, TOR, (roughing), 13:37; Hamilton, CGY, (holding), 16:23. Second period: None. Penalties: Zaitsev, TOR, (hooking), 13:23; Versteeg, CGY, (holding), 17:56. Third period: None. Penalties: None. Shots: Toronto 12-13-14: 39. Calgary 10-13-6: 29. Power-plays: Toronto 0 of 2; Calgary 0 of 2. Goalies: Toronto, Enroth 0-3-1 (29 shots-26 saves). Calgary, Johnson 8-4-1 (39-39). A: 19,289. Referees: Wes McCauley, Ian Walsh. Linesmen: Shane Heyer, Mark Wheler.

Through Tuesday’s games GP 16 25 18 25 24 21 23 23 24 24 22 24 22 23 22 24 20 23 23 22

G 15 13 13 13 12 12 11 11 11 11 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10

GOALS AGAINST AVG GPI MIN GA AVG Juuse Saros NAS 2 117 2 1.02 Tuukka Rask BOS 17 1024 28 1.64 Devan Dubnyk MIN 17 1015 28 1.66 Carey Price MON 16 961 27 1.68 Matt Murray PIT 8 444 13 1.75 Mike Condon PIT 4 204 6 1.76 Philipp Grubauer WAS 5 300 9 1.8 Jimmy Howard DET 12 626 19 1.82 Andrei Vasilevskiy TB 9 540 17 1.89 Aaron Dell SJ 4 217 7 1.93 Michael Leighton CAR 1 60 2 2.0 Jonathan Bernier ANA 9 415 14 2.02 Pekka Rinne NAS 18 1061 36 2.03 Peter Budaj LA 20 1118 38 2.04 Jonas Gustavsson EDM 4 147 5 2.04 Sergei Bobrovsky CBJ 19 1092 38 2.09 Martin Jones SJ 20 1148 40 2.09 Curtis McElhinney CBJ 3 171 6 2.09 Roberto Luongo FLA 15 910 32 2.11 Braden Holtby WAS 16 963 35 2.18


SPORTS

12.01.2016 • ThurSday • M 1 NBA STANDINGS

Wednesday Sacramento at Philadelphia, ppd. Detroit 121, Boston 114 Toronto 120, Memphis 105 LA Lakers 96, Chicago 90 New York 106, Minnesota 104 Oklahoma City 126, Washington 115, OT San Antonio 94, Dallas 87 Miami at Denver, 8 p.m. Phoenix 109, Atlanta 107 Indiana at Portland, late

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Toronto Boston New York Brooklyn Philadelphia Southeast Charlotte Atlanta Orlando Washington Miami Central Cleveland Chicago Milwaukee Detroit Indiana

W 12 10 9 5 4 W 10 10 7 6 5 W 13 10 8 10 9

L 6 8 9 12 14 L 8 9 11 11 12 L 3 7 8 10 9

Pct .667 .556 .500 .294 .222 Pct .556 .526 .389 .353 .294 Pct .813 .588 .500 .500 .500

GB — 2 3 6½ 8 GB — ½ 3 3½ 4½ GB — 3½ 5 5 5

L10 6-4 6-4 6-4 2-8 3-7 L10 4-6 3-7 4-6 4-6 3-7 L10 7-3 6-4 4-6 5-5 5-5

Str W-4 L-1 W-1 W-1 L-4 Str L-1 L-4 W-1 L-1 L-2 Str L-1 L-1 W-2 W-2 W-2

Home 6-3 4-4 7-3 4-5 4-8 Home 5-5 6-2 4-6 5-5 2-7 Home 9-1 4-2 6-4 7-2 8-4

Away 6-3 6-4 2-6 1-7 0-6 Away 5-3 4-7 3-5 1-6 3-5 Away 4-2 6-5 2-4 3-8 1-5

Conf 7-2 8-4 5-6 2-7 3-9 Conf 7-5 8-3 2-8 4-7 3-7 Conf 10-3 7-4 5-5 6-5 5-7

Tuesday Detroit 112, Charlotte 89 Brooklyn 127, LA Clippers 122, 2OT Milwaukee 118, Cleveland 101 New Orleans 105, LA Lakers 88 Orlando 95, San Antonio 83 Utah 120, Houston 101 Thursday Dallas at Charlotte, 6 p.m. Milwaukee at Brooklyn, 6:30 p.m. LA Clippers at Cleveland, 7 p.m. Orlando at Memphis, 7 p.m. Miami at Utah, 8 p.m. Houston at Golden State, 9:30 p.m.

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest San Antonio Houston Memphis New Orleans Dallas Northwest Oklahoma City Utah Portland Denver Minnesota Paciic Golden State LA Clippers LA Lakers Sacramento Phoenix

W 15 11 11 7 3 W 12 11 9 7 5 W 16 14 10 7 6

L 4 7 8 12 14 L 8 8 10 10 13 L 2 5 10 11 13

Pct .789 .611 .579 .368 .176 Pct .600 .579 .474 .412 .278 Pct .889 .737 .500 .389 .316

GB — 3½ 4 8 11 GB — ½ 2½ 3½ 6 GB — 2½ 7 9 10½

L10 9-1 6-4 7-3 6-4 1-9 L10 6-4 6-4 4-6 4-6 3-7 L10 10-0 6-4 4-6 4-6 3-7

Str W-1 L-1 L-2 W-1 L-1 Str W-4 W-4 L-1 W-1 L-3 Str W-12 L-3 W-1 L-1 W-1

Home 4-4 4-2 5-4 5-5 2-5 Home 8-4 5-3 5-4 3-5 3-6 Home 7-1 7-2 6-4 4-5 3-5

Away 11-0 7-5 6-4 2-7 1-9 Away 4-4 6-5 4-6 4-5 2-7 Away 9-1 7-3 4-6 3-6 3-8

Conf 9-3 7-4 7-3 3-10 2-9 Conf 6-4 6-6 8-7 5-6 3-9 Conf 11-2 10-2 6-8 4-6 2-10

Friday Orlando at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. LA Lakers at Toronto, 6:30 p.m. Minnesota at New York, 6:30 p.m. Sacramento at Boston, 6:30 p.m. Cleveland at Chicago, 7 p.m. Detroit at Atlanta, 7 p.m. LA Clippers at New Orleans, 7 p.m. Washington at San Antonio, 7:30 p.m. Houston at Denver, 9:30 p.m.

hunder dispell Wizards in overtime ASSOCIATED PRESS

Russell Westbrook scored 14 of his 35 points in overtime and posted his fourth consecutive triple-double to help the Thunder defeat the Wizards 126-115 on Wednesday night in Oklahoma City. Westbrook added 14 rebounds and 11 assists for his ninth triple-double this season and the 46th of his career. The Thunder have won all four games during his triple-double streak, and he heads into December averaging a triple-double on the season. Former Thunder coach Scott Brooks returned as Washington’s coach, and the crowd greeted him warmly. Brooks coached the Thunder for seven years and led them to the Western Conference Finals three times and the NBA Finals once. Bradley Beal (Chaminade) scored 31 points, John Wall had 15 points and 15 assists, and Marcin Gortat added 12 points and 11 rebounds for the Wizards.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Thunder’s Victor Oladipo (left) and Washington’s Bradley Beal battle for the ball on Wednesday in Oklahoma City.

Lakers lose Young • Los Angeles Lakers guard Nick

Young is expected to miss two to four weeks with a strained right calf muscle. Young got hurt in the first quarter of Tuesday night’s 105-88 loss at New Orleans. He had an MRI on Wednesday that revealed the injury.

Center on Tuesday, and the ice surface remained under the basketball court. Wednesday was an unseasonably warm day, and it likely afected the surface.

NBA SUMMARIES Pistons 121, Celtics 114

Lakers 96, Bulls 90

LEADERS

Detroit: Morris 8-13 2-2 20, Harris 9-20 0-0 21, Drummond 8-13 4-7 20, Smith 9-12 1-2 19, Caldwell-Pope 10-17 3-4 25, Hilliard 0-3 0-0 0, Leuer 4-5 2-2 12, Baynes 0-1 4-4 4, Udrih 0-3 0-0 0. Totals 48-87 16-21 121. Boston: Crowder 5-15 2-2 14, A.Johnson 4-7 3-3 11, Horford 3-5 2-2 9, Thomas 10-20 4-4 27, Bradley 4-12 2-2 14, Brown 0-2 0-0 0, Jerebko 2-2 0-0 4, Zeller 0-0 1-2 1, Olynyk 7-9 2-2 19, Smart 4-14 2-2 12, Rozier 1-5 1-1 3. Totals 40-91 19-20 114. Detroit 31 28 33 29 — 121 Boston 28 25 31 30 — 114 3-point goals: Detroit 9-20 (Harris 3-6, Leuer 2-3, Caldwell-Pope 2-4, Morris 2-5, Hilliard 0-1, Smith 0-1), Boston 15-42 (Bradley 4-8, Olynyk 3-4, Thomas 3-7, Smart 2-8, Crowder 2-10, Horford 1-2, A.Johnson 0-1, Rozier 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Detroit 52 (Drummond 17), Boston 33 (Bradley 6). Assists: Detroit 28 (Smith 8), Boston 26 (Rozier 6). Total fouls: Detroit 19, Boston 17. Technicals: Detroit defensive three second, Detroit team. A: 17,338 (18,624).

L.A. Lakers: Deng 3-9 3-6 10, Ingram 1-9 6-8 8, Randle 4-13 5-8 13, Mozgov 1-4 0-0 2, Calderon 3-4 1-1 7, Nance 5-8 2-3 12, Robinson 1-2 0-0 2, Black 2-2 2-4 6, Williams 4-12 9-11 18, Clarkson 9-18 0-0 18. Totals 33-81 28-41 96. Chicago: Gibson 4-9 3-6 11, Lopez 4-12 2-2 10, Rondo 6-12 0-0 14, Wade 7-15 3-4 17, Butler 4-18 13-15 22, Mirotic 3-9 0-0 6, Portis 1-2 1-2 3, Canaan 2-9 0-0 5, Grant 1-3 0-0 2, Valentine 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 32-91 22-29 90. L.A. Lakers 17 30 23 26 — 96 Chicago 28 19 26 17 — 90 3-point goals: L.A. Lakers 2-8 (Deng 1-2, Williams 1-3, Clarkson 0-1, Ingram 0-2), Chicago 4-21 (Rondo 2-3, Canaan 1-5, Butler 1-6, Grant 0-1, Wade 0-1, Valentine 0-1, Mirotic 0-4). Fouled out: Gibson. Rebounds: L.A. Lakers 60 (Randle 20), Chicago 46 (Gibson 10). Assists: L.A. Lakers 17 (Williams 5), Chicago 22 (Rondo, Wade 6). Total fouls: L.A. Lakers 24, Chicago 26. A: 21,773 (20,917).

Scoring Davis, NOR Westbrook, OKC DeRozan, TOR Cousins, SAC Harden, HOU Lillard, POR Durant, GOL Curry, GOL Thomas, BOS Butler, CHI Leonard, SAN Irving, CLE Walker, CHA James, CLE Wall, WAS Wiggins, MIN Antetokounmpo, MIL Anthony, NYK McCollum, POR Love, CLE

G 18 19 17 18 18 19 18 18 17 16 18 16 18 15 14 17 16 17 19 16

Raptors 120, Grizzlies 105

San Antonio: Leonard 5-16 9-12 21, Aldridge 2-9 1-2 5, Dedmon 2-5 2-2 6, Laprovittola 3-6 0-0 7, Green 4-8 1-2 11, K.Anderson 2-2 0-0 4, Bertans 2-2 2-2 7, Lee 3-6 1-2 7, Mills 9-12 0-0 23, Simmons 1-5 1-2 3. Totals 33-71 17-24 94. Dallas: Barnes 8-15 0-0 17, Finney-Smith 0-3 0-0 0, Bogut 2-2 0-2 4, Williams 4-12 0-0 9, Matthews 8-19 5-6 26, Brussino 0-0 0-0 0, Powell 4-6 2-2 10, Mejri 0-0 0-0 0, Curry 5-11 2-2 14, Harris 0-3 0-0 0, Gibson 1-2 0-0 3, J.Anderson 1-4 2-2 4. Totals 33-77 11-14 87. San Antonio 21 22 18 33 — 94 Dallas 17 23 26 21 — 87 3PT: San Antonio 11-19 (Mills 5-6, Green 2-4, Leonard 2-5, Bertans 1-1, Laprovittola 1-3), Dallas 10-30 (Matthews 5-11, Curry 2-5, Barnes 1-2, Gibson 1-2, Williams 1-3, Finney-Smith 0-2, Harris 0-2, J.Anderson 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: San Antonio 42 (Dedmon 10), Dallas 37 (Bogut 12). Assists: San Antonio 16 (Mills 4), Dallas 17 (Bogut, Williams 5). Total fouls: San Antonio 11, Dallas 18. Technicals: San Antonio defensive three second 2, San Antonio team 2, Dallas defensive three second, Dallas team. A: 19,245 (19,200).

FG Percentage Gobert, UTA Jordan, LAC Capela, HOU Howard, ATL Gortat, WAS Durant, GOL Kanter, OKC Valanciunas, TOR Plumlee, POR Whiteside, MIA

FG 71 84 100 96 76 174 98 84 78 122

Memphis: Williams 4-10 2-3 10, Green 5-11 6-7 16, Gasol 7-14 2-2 18, Harrison 7-12 3-4 21, Allen 4-8 4-5 12, Martin 1-5 2-2 5, Davis 1-3 0-0 2, Daniels 6-12 3-3 19, Baldwin 1-6 0-0 2. Totals 36-81 22-26 105. Toronto: Carroll 6-11 2-4 17, Siakam 2-2 0-0 4, Valanciunas 3-6 0-0 6, Lowry 8-13 9-10 29, DeRozan 6-9 10-11 24, Ross 1-6 0-0 3, Patterson 5-10 0-0 14, Nogueira 2-3 0-0 4, VanVleet 0-0 0-0 0, Joseph 4-8 7-8 16, Powell 1-1 0-0 3. Totals 38-69 28-33 120. Memphis 28 29 25 23 — 105 Toronto 25 30 34 31 — 120 3-point goals: Memphis 11-27 (Harrison 4-5, Daniels 4-8, Gasol 2-4, Martin 1-2, Allen 0-1, Baldwin 0-1, Green 0-2, Williams 0-4), Toronto 16-32 (Patterson 4-6, Lowry 4-7, Carroll 3-7, DeRozan 2-3, Powell 1-1, Joseph 1-3, Ross 1-5). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Memphis 30 (Gasol 8), Toronto 42 (Patterson 13). Assists: Memphis 16 (Harrison 4), Toronto 23 (Lowry 8). Total fouls: Memphis 25, Toronto 25. A: 19,800 (19,800).

Spurs 94, Mavericks 87

Knicks 106, T’Wolves 104

Thunder 126, Wizards 115 OT

New York: Anthony 5-16 3-4 14, Porzingis 11-20 4-5 29, O’Quinn 1-2 0-1 2, Rose 5-12 0-0 11, Lee 3-3 0-0 7, Kuzminskas 5-9 0-0 14, N’dour 0-0 0-0 0, Hernangomez 2-2 2-2 6, Plumlee 1-1 2-3 4, Jennings 5-14 0-0 12, Vujacic 2-4 0-0 5, Baker 0-0 0-0 0, Holiday 1-8 0-0 2. Totals 41-91 11-15 106. Minnesota: Wiggins 8-20 0-1 19, Towns 15-22 17-20 47, Dieng 2-6 4-6 8, Rubio 2-5 4-4 8, LaVine 5-13 6-6 17, Muhammad 1-4 1-2 3, Bjelica 0-5 0-0 0, Aldrich 1-1 0-0 2, Jones 0-0 0-0 0, Dunn 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 34-77 32-39 104. New York 28 30 23 25 — 106 Minnesota 31 18 25 30 — 104 3-point goals: New York 13-32 (Kuzminskas 4-5, Porzingis 3-7, Jennings 2-5, Lee 1-1, Vujacic 1-2, Rose 1-3, Anthony 1-6, Holiday 0-3), Minnesota 4-19 (Wiggins 3-4, LaVine 1-5, Dunn 0-1, Rubio 0-2, Towns 0-3, Bjelica 0-4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: New York 39 (Porzingis, O’Quinn 8), Minnesota 40 (Towns 18). Assists: New York 24 (Jennings 7), Minnesota 17 (Rubio 6). Total fouls: New York 26, Minnesota 17. A: 13,987 (19,356).

Washington: Porter 5-9 0-0 11, Morris 7-16 5-8 19, Gortat 6-12 0-2 12, Wall 6-20 1-2 15, Beal 10-21 7-10 31, Oubre 4-6 2-2 12, Smith 1-4 0-0 2, Thornton 4-7 2-2 11, Satoransky 1-3 0-0 2. Totals 44-98 17-26 115. Oklahoma City: Sabonis 5-5 0-0 10, Adams 3-6 6-10 12, Westbrook 12-35 10-10 35, Oladipo 10-16 0-0 25, Roberson 4-6 0-0 10, Grant 1-3 4-8 7, Kanter 6-10 2-3 14, Lauvergne 2-3 0-0 5, Christon 1-2 0-0 2, Morrow 2-9 0-0 6. Totals 46-95 22-31 126. Washington 19 34 31 21 10 — 115 Oklahoma City 32 28 24 21 21 — 126 3-point goals: Washington 10-28 (Beal 4-10, Oubre 2-3, Wall 2-7, Porter 1-2, Thornton 1-3, Satoransky 0-1, Morris 0-2), Oklahoma City 12-30 (Oladipo 5-9, Roberson 2-3, Morrow 2-7, Lauvergne 1-1, Grant 1-3, Westbrook 1-6, Christon 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Washington 48 (Gortat 11), Oklahoma City 47 (Westbrook 14). Assists: Washington 25 (Wall 15), Oklahoma City 28 (Westbrook 11). Total fouls: Washington 25, Oklahoma City 22. Technicals: Morris, Westbrook.

Rebounds Whiteside, MIA Drummond, DET Howard, ATL Jordan, LAC Gortat, WAS Vucevic, ORL Davis, NOR Gobert, UTA Love, CLE Bogut, DAL

Through Tuesday’s games FG 203 195 180 177 154 170 174 158 134 128 144 149 151 128 115 132 138 142 157 107

FT 160 163 129 133 154 147 101 88 136 134 119 50 81 72 77 99 81 69 61 95 FGA 112 134 160 158 127 305 173 149 141 221

PTS 578 588 497 517 517 536 487 479 442 413 442 392 436 353 324 389 364 386 424 348

AVG 32.1 30.9 29.2 28.7 28.7 28.2 27.1 26.6 26.0 25.8 24.6 24.5 24.2 23.5 23.1 22.9 22.8 22.7 22.3 21.8 PCT .634 .627 .625 .608 .598 .570 .566 .564 .553 .552

G OFF DEF TOT AVG 17 79 177 256 15.1 18 60 174 234 13.0 17 77 141 218 12.8 19 57 183 240 12.6 16 49 140 189 11.8 18 53 155 208 11.6 18 33 169 202 11.2 19 59 152 211 11.1 16 45 129 174 10.9 13 37 99 136 10.5

Assists Harden, HOU Westbrook, OKC James, CLE Wall, WAS Paul, LAC Frazier, NOR Rondo, CHI Lowry, TOR Green, GOL Rodriguez, PHL

G 18 19 15 14 19 19 14 17 17 18

AST 215 214 140 124 168 143 103 124 118 122

AMERICA’S LINE

BASEBALL

COLLEGE

NFL Favorite

Free Agents Signings

Area colleges

The 18 free agents who have signed, with name, position, former club if different, and contract. The contract information was obtained by The AP from player and management sources. For players with minor league contracts, letter agreements for major league contracts are in parentheses:

WEDNESDAY’S SCORES

Points Open Current 3.5 3

Underdog

Cowboys VIKINGS Sunday Broncos 5 4.5 JAGUARS FALCONS 3.5 3.5 Chiefs PACKERS 6 6.5 Texans Eagles 1.5 1 BENGALS SAINTS 5 6 Lions BEARS 2.5 1.5 49ers PATRIOTS 13.5 13.5 Rams RAVENS 3.5 3.5 Dolphins RAIDERS 3.5 3 Bills CHARGERS 4 4 Bucs CARDS 2.5 2.5 Washington STEELERS 5.5 6 Giants SEAHAWKS 6.5 6.5 Panthers Monday Colts 1 1.5 JETS Bye week: Browns, Titans. COLLEGE FOOTBALL Favorite Points Underdog Open Current Friday MAC Championship Game | Detroit, MI W Michigan 18.5 18.5 Ohio U Friday PAC 12 Championship | Santa Clara, CA Washington 7 7.5 Colorado Saturday W VIRGINIA 16 17 Baylor TCU 4 4 Kansas St S ALABAMA 11.5 11.5 New Mexico St Troy 8.5 7.5 GA SOUTHERN UL-Lafayette 7 7 UL-MONROE OKLAHOMA 13 12 Oklahoma St Arkansas St 23 23.5 TEXAS ST IDAHO 7 6.5 Georgia St Saturday Conf. USA Championship | Bowling Green W KENTUCKY 7.5 9.5 La Tech Saturday AAC Championship Game | Annapolis, MD NAVY 3 3 Temple Saturday SEC Championship Game | Atlanta, GA Alabama 23 24 Florida Saturday Mountain West Championship | Laramie, WY San Diego St 6 7 WYOMING Saturday ACC Championship Game Charlotte, NC Clemson 9 10 Va Tech Saturday BIG 10 Championship Game Indianapolis, IN Wisconsin 3 2.5 Penn St NBA Favorite Points Underdog HORNETS 10.5 Mavericks Bucks 4 NETS CAVALIERS 4.5 Clippers Magic 1 GRIZZLIES JAZZ 9 Heat WARRIORS 10 Rockets COLLEGE BASKETBALL Favorite Points Underdog SETON HALL 16 Columbia TROY 3.5 S Florida MISSISSIPPI ST 8.5 Oregon St IOWA ST 5 Cincinnati CAL-POLY SLO 7.5 Utsa Added Games OAKLAND 14 Oral Roberts RIDER 2 Fairfield UTAH 14.5 Montana St PACIFIC 10 Sacramento St NHL Favorite Odds Underdog CAPITALS -$220/+$180 Islanders PENGUINS -$200/+$170 Stars BRUINS -$155/+$135 Hurricanes Rangers -$150/+$130 SABRES SENATORS -$120/even Flyers RED WINGS -$110/-$110 Panthers BLUES -$145/+$125 Lightning JETS -$110/-$110 Oilers BLACKHAWKS -$165/+$145 Devils Kings -$135/+$115 COYOTES Blue Jackets -$125/+$105 AVALANCHE Ducks -$135/+$115 CANUCKS Grand Salami: Over/under 63.5 goals. SOCCER ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE Saturday TOTTENHAM -$290 Swansea City +$850 Draw +$430 Over/under goal total 3.0 goals Southampton +$125 CRYSTAL PALACE +$240 Draw +$230 Over/under goal total 2.5 goals STOKE CITY -$155 Burnley +$480 Draw +$290 Over/under goal total 2.5 goals Leicester City +$120 SUNDERLAND +$245 Draw +$235 Over/under goal total 2.5 goals Arsenal -$135 WEST HAM UNITED +$380 Draw +$290 Over/under goal total 3.0 goals WEST BROMWICH ALBION +$120 Watford +$250 Draw +$230 Over/under goal total 2.5 goals MANCHESTER CITY +$110 Chelsea +$265 Draw +$250 Over/under goal total 2.5 goals Home team in CAPS © 2016 Benjamin Eckstein

TRANSACTIONS

NOTEBOOK NBA postpones Kings76ers game • The NBA postponed Wednesday’s game between the Sacramento Kings and Philadelphia 76ers because of condensation on the court. The Flyers hosted an NHL game at the Wells Fargo

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCh • B7

AVG 11.9 11.3 9.3 8.9 8.8 7.5 7.4 7.3 6.9 6.8

NBA calendar Dec. 15 • Deadline for NBA or players’ union to notify the other if it will opt out of the collective bargaining agreement after the season. Jan. 5 • 10-day contracts can be signed. Jan. 10 • All contracts guaranteed for the remainder of the season. Feb. 17-19 • All-Star weekend, New Orleans. Feb. 23 • Trade deadline, 2 p.m. CST. March 1 • Playoff eligibility waiver deadline. April 12-15 • Portsmouth Invitational Tournament, Portsmouth, Va. April 12 • Regular season ends. April 14 • Rosters set for playoffs April 15 • Playoffs begin. April 23 • Early entry eligibility deadline May 1 • Conference semifinals begin. May 9-14 • Draft combine, Chicago. May 16 • Draft lottery.

BASEBALL American League MINNESOTA TWINS — Agreed to terms with C Jason Castro on a three-year contract. OAKLAND ATHLETICS — Agreed to terms with OF Matt Joyce on a two-year contract. Designated INF Rangel Ravelo for assignment. National League ATLANTA BRAVES — Agreed to terms with INF-OF Sean Rodriguez on a two-year contract. COLORADO ROCKIES — Agreed to terms with RHP Jordan Lyles on a one-year contract. NEW YORK METS — Agreed to terms with OF Yoenis Cespedes on a four-year contract. Traded RHP Logan Verrett to Baltimore for cash. PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES — Named Terry Ryan special assignment scout. PITTSBURGH PIRATES — Agreed to terms with LHP Dan Runzler and RHP Jason Stoffel on minor league contracts. CARDINALS — Named Richard Clapp manager at Memphis (PCL), Dan Bilardello manager at Palm Beach (FSL), Joe Kruzel manager at State College (NYP), and Roberto Espinoza manager at Johnson City (Appalachian). BASKETBALL • NBA PHILADELPHIA 76ERS — Assigned F-C Nerlens Noel to Delaware (NBADL). Recalled G-F Timothe Luwawu-Cabarrot from Delaware. FOOTBALL • NFL ATLANTA FALCONS — Placed CB Desmond Trufant on injured reserve. Waived P Matt Wile. Signed C Trevor Robinson and CB Blidi Wreh-Wilson. Signed OL Kevin Graf to the practice squad. BUFFALO BILLS — Signed TE Logan Thomas. Signed G Isame Faciane to the practice squad. DETROIT LIONS — Signed LB Brandon Chubb to the practice squad. MIAMI DOLPHINS — Waived DT Leon Orr. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS — Signed RB D.J. Foster to the practice squad. Released FB Glenn Gronkowski from the practice squad. NEW YORK GIANTS — Designated RB Shane Vereen for return from injured reserve. Signed S Christian Bryant to the practice squad. NEW YORK JETS — Signed OT Donald Hawkins to the practice squad. Released OT Zach Sterup from the practice squad. WASHINGTON REDSKINS — Signed DL Trevon Coley to the practice squad. HOCKEY • NHL COLORADO AVALANCHE — Recalled Fs Gabriel Bourque and Sam Henley from San Antonio (AHL). NASHVILLE PREDATORS — Signed D Adam Pardy to a one-year contract. Placed D Anthony Bitetto on injured reserve. Sent F Miikka Salomaki to Milwaukee (AHL). NEW JERSEY DEVILS — Placed F Beau Bennett on injured reserve, retroactive to Nov. 28. Recalled F John Quenneville from Albany (AHL). OTTAWA SENATORS — Announced G Craig Anderson has taken a leave of absence. TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING — Recalled Fs Joel Vermin and Michael Bournival from Syracuse (AHL). WASHINGTON CAPITALS — Recalled Fs Paul Carey and Jakub Vrana from Hershey (AHL). Reassigned F Zach Sanford to Hershey. MOTORSPORTS NASCAR and INTERNATIONAL SPEEDWAY CORPORATION — Named Christopher Davis managing director and chief security officer. COLLEGE GEORGIA TECH — Announced sophomore RB Marcus Marshall will transfer. MISSOURI — Suspended sophomore WR Keyon Dilosa indefinitely after he was arrested and accused by a witness of punching a woman in the face. NOTRE DAME — Announced QB Malik Zaire was granted his release and will transfer. TEXAS — Announced RB D’Onta Foreman will enter the NFL draft.

MLS PLAYOFFS Eastern Conference Montreal 3, Toronto FC 2 Wednesday: Toronto FC 5, Montreal 2, Toronto advances 7-5 on aggregate Western Conference Seattle 2, Colorado 1, Seattle 1, Colorado 0 Seattle advances 3-1 on aggregate MLS Cup Dec. 10: Seattle vs. Toronto FC

AMERICAN LEAGUE HOUSTON (2) — Signed Charlie Morton, rhp, Philadelphia, rhp, to $14 million, two-year contract; signed Josh Reddick, of, Los Angeles Dodgers, to a $52 million, four-year contract. KANSAS CITY (1) — Re-signed Drew Butera, c, to a $3.8 million, two-year contract. LOS ANGELES (2) — Re-signed Andrew Bailey, rhp, to a $1 million, one-year contract; signed Jesse Chavez, rhp, Los Angeles Dodgers, to a $5.75 million, one-year contract. MINNESOTA (1) — Signed Jason Castro, c, Houston, to a $24.5 million, three-year contract. OAKLAND (1) — Signed Matt Joyce, of, Pittsburgh, to an $11 million, two-year contract. TEXAS (1) — Signed Andrew Cashner, rhp, Miami, to a $10 million, one-year contract. TORONTO (1) — Signed Kendrys Morales, dh, Kansas City, to a $33 million, three-year contract.

NATIONAL LEAGUE ATLANTA (3) — Signed R.A. Dickey, rhp, Toronto, to an $8 million, one-year contract; signed Bartolo Colon, rhp, New York Mets, to a $12.5 million, one-year contract; signed Sean Rodriguez, inf, Pittsburgh, to an $11.5 million, two-year contract. CHICAGO (1) — Signed Jon Jay, of, San Diego, to an $8 million, one-year contract. NEW YORK (2) — Neil Walker, 2b, accepted $17.2 million qualifying offer; re-signed Yoenis Cespedes, of, to a $110 million, four-year contract. PHILADELPHIA (1) — Jeremy Hellickson, rhp, accepted $17.2 million qualifying offer. ST. LOUIS (1) — Signed Brett Cecil, lhp, Toronto, to a $30.5 million, four-year contract. WASHINGTON (1) — Re-signed Chris Heisey, of, to a $1.4 million, one-year contract.

Remaining Cardinals free agents

Women’s volleyball Missouri Baptist 3, Union College (Ky.) 0 Women’s basketball Webster University 80, Greenville College 69 Men’s basketball Illinois State 77, Ind.-Purdue Indianapolis 63 Lindenwood 97, Robert Morris-Springfield 61 THURSDAY BASKETBALL SCHEDULE W: Southern Indiana at McKendree, 5:30 p.m. W: Mo. Baptist at William Woods, 5:30 p.m. W: LU-Belleville at STL Pharmacy, 5:30 p.m. W: Maryville at Missouri S&T, 5:30 p.m. W: Harris-Stowe at Columbia College, 5:30 W: UMSL at Drury, 5:45 p.m. M: Southern Indiana at McKendree, 7:30 p.m. M: Mo. Baptist at William Woods, 7:30 p.m. M: LU-Belleville at STL Pharmacy, 7:30 p.m. M: Maryville at Missouri S&T, 7:30 p.m. M: Harris-Stowe at Columbia College, 7:30 M: Lewis & Clark at Wabash, 7:30 p.m. M: UMSL at Drury, 7:45 p.m.

Women’s basketball top 25 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

ST. LOUIS (4) — Matt Holliday, of; Brandon Moss, 1b-of; Jordan Walden, rhp; Jerome Williams, rhp.

13.

GOLF

15.

Hole in one

16.

14.

Incline Village • Roger Creibaum, hole No. 5, 108 yards, wedge, Nov. 26. 17.

World Golf Ranking Through Nov. 27 1. Jason Day 2. Rory McIlroy 3. Dustin Johnson 4. Henrik Stenson 5. Jordan Spieth 6. Hideki Matsuyama 7. Adam Scott 8. Patrick Reed 9. Alex Noren 10. Bubba Watson 11. Danny Willett 12. Rickie Fowler 13. Paul Casey 14. Sergio Garcia 15. Justin Rose 16. Branden Grace 17. Brooks Koepka 18. Phil Mickelson 19. Russell Knox 20. Jimmy Walker 21. Justin Thomas 22. Matt Kuchar 23. Tyrrell Hatton 24. Charl Schwartzel 25. Emiliano Grillo

AUS NIR USA SWE USA JPN AUS USA SWE USA ENG USA ENG ESP ENG SAF USA USA SCO USA USA USA ENG SAF ARG

18. 11.54 10.55 10.09 8.67 8.66 6.91 6.75 5.64 5.58 5.36 5.22 5.12 5.01 4.96 4.94 4.62 4.53 4.40 4.32 4.23 4.17 4.09 3.81 3.79 3.74

NFL LEADERS SCORING NONKICKERS David Johnson, ARI Blount, NE E. Elliott, DAL Gordon, SD D. Murray, TEN Mi. Evans, TAM L. McCoy, BUF Anto. Brown, PIT L. Murray, OAK Jo. Nelson, GBY KICKERS Du. Hopkins, WAS Santos, KC Sturgis, PHL Tucker, BAL Lambo, SD D. Bailey, DAL McManus, DEN Janikowski, OAK Crosby, GBY Lutz, NOR Novak, HOU PASSERS Brady, NE M. Ryan, ATL Brees, NOR Prescott, DAL Mariota, TEN Cousins, WAS D. Carr, OAK Roethlisb..., PIT M. Stafford, DET Bradford, MIN Hoyer, CHI Rodgers, GBY Tannehill, MIA Luck, IND Rivers, SD Ru. Wilson, SEA Kessler, CLE Manning, NYG Dalton, CIN Al. Smith, KC J. Winston, TAM

TDRusRecRetX2Pts 13 10 3 0 0 78 12 12 0 0 0 72 12 11 1 0 0 72 11 9 2 0 0 66 11 8 3 0 0 66 10 0 10 0 1 62 10 9 1 0 1 62 10 0 10 0 0 60 9 9 0 0 0 54 9 0 9 0 0 54 PAT FG Lg Pts 25/27 25/31 50 100 21/22 25/28 54 96 21/22 25/29 55 96 15/15 27/27 57 96 32/35 21/24 47 95 34/34 20/22 56 94 25/26 23/27 55 94 29/29 20/26 56 89 26/28 20/23 46 86 38/39 16/22 57 86 17/18 23/28 53 86

Att Cmp Pct Yds TD Int 256 175 68.4 2201 18 1 380 262 68.9 3516 26 6 456 326 71.5 3587 30 8 340 231 67.9 2835 18 2 378 243 64.3 2998 25 8 437 299 68.4 3540 20 7 423 281 66.4 3115 22 5 373 242 64.9 2745 23 7 391 261 66.8 2883 19 5 348 248 71.3 2415 12 3 200 134 67 1445 6 0 449 289 64.4 3074 27 7 329 217 66 2574 15 8 375 236 62.9 2827 19 8 399 251 62.9 3128 23 12 368 238 64.7 2865 11 4 192 126 65.6 1369 6 2 413 261 63.2 2902 20 10 408 259 63.5 3043 12 6 346 229 66.2 2297 10 4 406 249 61.3 2900 22 11

RECEIVERS RECEPTIONS No Yds Avg Long TD Anto. Brown, PIT 82 998 12.2 51 10 Fitzgerald, ARI 78 802 10.3 32 5 Mi. Evans, TAM 73 1020 14.0 45t 10 S. Diggs, MIN 67 747 11.1 46 2 A. Green, CIN 66 964 14.6 54t 4 A. Cooper, OAK 66 922 14.0 64t 3 Ju. Jones, ATL 65 1140 17.5 75t 5 Beckham, NYG 65 915 14.1 75t 8 Michael Thomas, NOR 65 789 12.1 35 7 Landry, MIA 64 733 11.5 42t 2 Edelman, NE 64 617 9.6 33 2 T. Pryor, CLE 62 855 13.8 54 4 Sanders, DEN 61 830 13.6 64 4 Baldwin, SEA 61 767 12.6 59 5 Jo. Nelson, GBY 61 754 12.4 58 9 YARDS Yds No Avg Long TD Ju. Jones, ATL 1140 65 17.5 75t 5 Mi. Evans, TAM 1020 73 14.0 45t 10 Anto. Brown, PIT 998 82 12.2 51 10 A. Green, CIN 964 66 14.6 54t 4 Hilton, IND 942 60 15.7 63t 5 A. Cooper, OAK 922 66 14.0 64t 3 Beckham, NYG 915 65 14.1 75t 8 T. Pryor, CLE 855 62 13.8 54 4 Sanders, DEN 830 61 13.6 64 4 Fitzgerald, ARI 802 78 10.3 32 5 M. Wallace, BAL 792 51 15.5 95t 4 Olsen, CAR 790 58 13.6 78t 3 Ty. Williams, SD 790 51 15.5 51t 5 Michael Thomas, NOR 789 65 12.1 35 7 K. Britt, LA 788 54 14.6 47 4 RUSHERS E. Elliott, DAL D. Murray, TEN David Johnson, ARI Gordon, SD L. Miller, HOU Blount, NE Ajayi, MIA L. McCoy, BUF Jo. Howard, CHI Forte, NYJ D. Freeman, ATL Ma. Ingram, NOR S. Ware, KC L. Bell, PIT Gore, IND Je. Hill, CIN Gurley, LA Crowell, CLE T. West, BAL C. Hyde, SNF TOTAL YARDS David Johnson, ARI E. Elliott, DAL D. Murray, TEN Gordon, SD Ju. Jones, ATL L. Bell, PIT S. Ware, KC L. Miller, HOU Mi. Evans, TAM Jo. Howard, CHI Anto. Brown, PIT D. Freeman, ATL L. McCoy, BUF Ma. Ingram, NOR A. Green, CIN KICK RETURNERS Patterson, MIN Erickson, CIN Cunningham, LA Dw. Harris, NYG Hester, BAL Lockett, SEA B. Tate, BUF J. Grant, MIA Weems, ATL INTERCEPTIONS Hayward, SD Lan. Collins, NYG M. Peters, KC Rhodes, MIN Gilmore, BUF R. Sherman, SEA

Att 243 229 210 234 211 212 161 157 149 202 161 136 149 151 178 147 200 145 153 154

YdsAvg 1199 4.9 1043 4.6 921 4.4 908 3.9 881 4.2 869 4.1 847 5.3 819 5.2 766 5.1 759 3.8 729 4.5 721 5.3 705 4.7 699 4.6 670 3.8 644 4.4 641 3.2 605 4.2 600 3.9 594 3.9

LngTD 60t 11 75t 8 58t 10 48 9 45 3 44 12 62t 7 75t 9 69 2 32 7 48 5 75t 3 46 2 44 3 22 4 74t 6 24t 4 85t 5 35 4 34 6

Total Rush 1534 921 1502 1199 1352 1043 1273 908 1140 0 1136 699 1077 705 1032 881 1020 0 1008 766 1007 9 998 729 994 819 969 721 964 0

Rec 613 303 309 365 1140 437 372 151 1020 242 998 269 175 248 964

No Yards 16 500 15 451 18 507 16 410 16 409 14 348 15 367 14 341 16 374 Int 6 5 5 4 4 4

Avg Long TD 31.2 104t 1 30.1 84 0 28.2 61 0 25.6 46 0 25.6 60 0 24.9 43 0 24.5 45 0 24.4 45 0 23.4 42 0 Yds Long TD 100 31 1 72 44t 1 47 28 0 129 100t 1 104 49 0 37 31 0

SACKS • V. Miller, DEN, 12.5; L. Alexander, BUF, 10.0; Avril, SEA, 10.0; Ford, KC, 10.0; V. Beasley, ATL, 9.5; Kerrigan, WAS, 9.0; K. Mack, OAK, 9.0; Orakpo, TEN, 9.0; Wake, MIA, 8.5.

19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25.

Notre Dame (7-0) beat Iowa 73-58. Next: vs. Valparaiso, Sunday. UConn (5-0) idle. Next: vs. No. 15 DePaul, Thursday. South Carolina (5-0) idle. Next: at No. 14 Texas, Thursday. Baylor (7-1) idle. Next: vs. Abilene Christian, Thursday. Maryland (6-0) idle. Next: at No. 7 Louisville, Thursday. Mississippi State (7-0) idle. Next: at Iowa State, Saturday. Louisville (6-1) idle. Next: vs. No. 5 Maryland, Thursday. Florida State (7-1) beat Minnesota 75-61. Next: vs. W. Carolina, Sunday. Ohio State (5-2) idle. Next: vs. No. 18 Miami, Thursday. UCLA (5-1) idle. Next: vs. Hawaii, Sunday. Stanford (6-1) idle. Next: at Cal State Bakersfield, Thursday. Oklahoma (5-0) idle. Next: at No. 17 Kentucky, Thursday. Washington (6-1) idle. Next: at Grand Canyon, Thursday. Texas (2-2) idle. Next: vs. No. 3 South Carolina, Thursday. DePaul (5-1) idle. Next: at No. 2 UConn, Thursday. West Virginia (8-0) beat Morehead State 94-53. Next: vs. Mississippi, Sunday. Kentucky (5-1) idle. Next: vs. No. 12 Oklahoma, Thursday. Miami (5-1) idle. Next: at No. 9 Ohio State, Thursday. Florida (5-1) beat Wofford 74-51. Next: vs. Long Beach State, Saturday. Syracuse (5-3) beat Michigan State 75-64. Next: vs. CCSU, Sunday. Colorado (7-0) beat SE Louisiana 112-54. Next: vs. Idaho State, Saturday. Tennessee (4-2) beat Tennessee State 86-36. Next: vs. No. 4 Baylor, Sunday. Auburn (6-1) idle. Next: at Kansas State, Thursday. Oregon State (3-1) idle. Next: vs. Idaho, Friday. Texas A&M (5-1) lost to Southern Cal 66-62. Next: at SMU, Monday.

Men’s basketball scores East Army 97, Fair. Dickinson 78 Binghamton 91, Mansfield 71 Brown 81, St. Francis Brooklyn 71 Bryant 79, Yale 70 Bucknell 73, Richmond 68 CCSU 82, Maine 61 Cornell 80, Northeastern 77 Drexel 73, Lafayette 70 Georgetown 96, Coppin St. 44 Holy Cross 55, Albany (NY) 49 LIU Brooklyn 75, Hartford 68 La Salle 89, Lehigh 81 Loyola (Md.) 71, Stony Brook 70 NJIT 83, St. Francis (Pa.) 70 Providence 76, New Hampshire 62 Sacred Heart 71, Fordham 70 St. Bon. 81, Siena 74 Temple 78, Saint Joseph’s 72 Towson 99, Goucher 37 UConn 51, Boston U. 49 UMBC 81, Duquesne 72 UMass 62, Wagner 55 Youngstown St. 75, Robert Morris 74 South Charlotte 65, J. Madison 56 Coast. Carolina 88, Methodist University 59 E. Kentucky 78, W. Kentucky 59 Elon 84, FIU 81 Georgia 86, Morehouse 72 Georgia St. 81, Wright St. 74 IPFW 103, Austin Peay 99 Kennesaw St. 76, Florida A&M 74 Louisville 71, Purdue 64 Marshall 98, Ohio 88 Miami 73, Rutgers 61 Mid. Tennessee 77, Mississippi 62 N. Kentucky 84, Morehead St. 79 Old Dominion 59, Dartmouth 47 Radford 74, VMI 67 SC State 90, Voorhees 85 SE Louisiana 85, Md.-E. Shore 75 South Alabama 78, Southern Miss. 55 UCF 81, Stetson 45 Winthrop 58, Furman 57 Midwest Akron 95, Adrian 41 DePaul 77, Drake 75 E. Michigan 87, Detroit 61 Evansville 83, Wabash College 39 George Mason 54, N. Iowa 50 Ill.-Chicago 74, Chicago St. 58 Illinois St. 77, IUPUI 63 Indiana St. 63, N. Illinois 52 Kansas St. 80, Green Bay 61 Loyola (Chi.) 75, Norfolk St. 62 Marquette 90, W. Carolina 44 Miami (Ohio) 78, Grambling St. 76 Milwaukee 72, Jacksonville 67 S. Dakota St. 90, Minnesota Crookston 58 UMKC 84, South Dakota 82 UNC-Wilmington 97, W. Michigan 92 Virginia Tech 73, Michigan 70 Southwest Arkansas St. 78, Cleveland St. 51 Baylor 79, Sam Houston 45 North Texas 73, Texas College 45 Oklahoma St. 101, Rogers State 85 Rice 90, Houston Bapt. 77 TCU 86, Washington 71 Texas Tech 69, Incarnate Word 48 Far West Arizona 85, Texas South. 63 Fresno St. 80, Menlo 67 New Mexico 64, Abilene Christian 55 Wyoming 82, Denver 70

Football TOP 25 SCHEDULE Friday No. 4 Washington vs. No. 9 Colorado, Pac-12 championship at Santa Clara, Calif., 8 p.m. No. 13 Western Michigan vs. Ohio, MAC championship at Detroit, 6 p.m. Saturday No. 1 Alabama vs. No. 15 Florida, SEC championship at Atlanta, 3 p.m. No. 3 Clemson vs. No. 19 Virginia Tech, ACC championship at Orlando, Fla., 7 p.m. No. 6 Wisconsin vs. No. 8 Penn State, Big Ten championship at Indianapolis, 7:17 p.m. No. 7 Oklahoma vs. No. 11 Oklahoma State, 11:20 a.m. No. 14 West Virginia vs. Baylor, 2:30 p.m. No. 20 Navy vs. Temple, AAC championship, 11 a.m.

CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIPS FRIDAY Mid-American: Ohio vs. Western Michigan at Detroit, 6 p.m., ESPN2 Pac-12: Washington vs. Colorado at Santa Clara, Calif. , 8 p.m., KTVI (2) SATURDAY American Athletic: Temple at Navy, 11 a.m., KDNL (30) Conference USA: Louisiana Tech at Western Kentucky, 11 a.m., ESPN Southeastern: Alabama vs. Florida at Atlanta, 3 p.m., KMOV (4) Southwestern Athletic: Alcorn State vs. Grambling State, 3 p.m., ESPNU Mountain West: San Diego State at Wyoming, 6:45 p.m., ESPN Atlantic Coast: Clemson vs. Virginia Tech at Orlando, Fla., 7 p.m., KDNL (30) Big Ten: Wisconsin vs. Penn State at Indianapolis, 7:15 p.m., KTVI (2)

FCS PLAYOFFS Second Round | Saturday New Hampshire (8-4) at James Madison (10-1), 1 p.m. Youngstown St. (9-3) at Jacksonville St. (10-1), 1 p.m. Villanova (9-3) at S. Dakota St. (8-3), 2 p.m. Chattanooga (9-3) at Sam Houston St. (11-0), 2 p.m. San Diego (10-1) at North Dakota St. (10-1), 2:30 p.m. Central Arkansas (10-2) at Eastern Washington (10-1), 3 p.m. Wofford (9-3) at The Citadel (10-1), 5 p.m. Richmond (9-3) at North Dakota (9-2), 5 p.m.

DIVISION II PLAYOFFS Quarterfinals | Saturday Shepherd (12-0) at California (Pa.) (11-0), Noon Ferris St. (11-2) at Grand Valley St. (12-0), Noon Harding (13-0) at NW Missouri St. (12-0), 1 p.m. N. Greenville (9-4) at N. Alabama (9-1), 1 p.m.

DIVISION III PLAYOFFS Quarterfinals | Saturday Mount Union (11-1) at Alfred (12-0), 11 a.m. Wisconsin-Whitewater (13-0) at John Carroll (11-1), 11 a.m. Wheaton (11-1) at Mary Hardin-Baylor (12-0), Noon Wisconsin-Oshkosh (11-1) at St. Thomas (Minn.) (12-0), Noon


SPORTS

12.01.2016 • ThurSday • M 2 NBA STANDINGS EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Toronto Boston New York Brooklyn Philadelphia Southeast Charlotte Atlanta Orlando Washington Miami Central Cleveland Chicago Milwaukee Detroit Indiana

W 12 10 9 5 4 W 10 10 7 6 6 W 13 10 8 10 9

L 6 8 9 12 14 L 8 9 11 11 12 L 3 7 8 10 10

Pct .667 .556 .500 .294 .222 Pct .556 .526 .389 .353 .333 Pct .813 .588 .500 .500 .474

GB — 2 3 6½ 8 GB — ½ 3 3½ 4 GB — 3½ 5 5 5½

L10 6-4 6-4 6-4 2-8 3-7 L10 4-6 3-7 4-6 4-6 4-6 L10 7-3 6-4 4-6 5-5 5-5

Str W-4 L-1 W-1 W-1 L-4 Str L-1 L-4 W-1 L-1 W-1 Str L-1 L-1 W-2 W-2 L-1

Home 6-3 4-4 7-3 4-5 4-8 Home 5-5 6-2 4-6 5-5 2-7 Home 9-1 4-2 6-4 7-2 8-4

Away 6-3 6-4 2-6 1-7 0-6 Away 5-3 4-7 3-5 1-6 4-5 Away 4-2 6-5 2-4 3-8 1-6

Conf 7-2 8-4 5-6 2-7 3-9 Conf 7-5 8-3 2-8 4-7 3-7 Conf 10-3 7-4 5-5 6-5 5-7

Home 4-4 4-2 5-4 5-5 2-5 Home 8-4 5-3 6-4 3-6 3-6 Home 7-1 7-2 6-4 4-5 3-5

Away 11-0 7-5 6-4 2-7 1-9 Away 4-4 6-5 4-6 4-5 2-7 Away 9-1 7-3 4-6 3-6 3-8

Conf 9-3 7-4 7-3 3-10 2-9 Conf 6-4 6-6 8-7 5-6 3-9 Conf 11-2 10-2 6-8 4-6 2-10

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest San Antonio Houston Memphis New Orleans Dallas Northwest Oklahoma City Utah Portland Denver Minnesota Paciic Golden State LA Clippers LA Lakers Sacramento Phoenix

W 15 11 11 7 3 W 12 11 10 7 5 W 16 14 10 7 6

L 4 7 8 12 14 L 8 8 10 11 13 L 2 5 10 11 13

Pct .789 .611 .579 .368 .176 Pct .600 .579 .500 .389 .278 Pct .889 .737 .500 .389 .316

GB — 3½ 4 8 11 GB — ½ 2 4 6 GB — 2½ 7 9 10½

L10 9-1 6-4 7-3 6-4 1-9 L10 6-4 6-4 4-6 4-6 3-7 L10 10-0 6-4 4-6 4-6 3-7

Str W-1 L-1 L-2 W-1 L-1 Str W-4 W-4 W-1 L-1 L-3 Str W-12 L-3 W-1 L-1 W-1

Wednesday Sacramento at Philadelphia, ppd. Detroit 121, Boston 114 Toronto 120, Memphis 105 LA Lakers 96, Chicago 90 New York 106, Minnesota 104 Oklahoma City 126, Washington 115, OT San Antonio 94, Dallas 87 Miami 106, Denver 98 Phoenix 109, Atlanta 107 Portland 131, Indiana 109 Tuesday Detroit 112, Charlotte 89 Brooklyn 127, LA Clippers 122, 2OT Milwaukee 118, Cleveland 101 New Orleans 105, LA Lakers 88 Orlando 95, San Antonio 83 Utah 120, Houston 101 Thursday Dallas at Charlotte, 6 p.m. Milwaukee at Brooklyn, 6:30 p.m. LA Clippers at Cleveland, 7 p.m. Orlando at Memphis, 7 p.m. Miami at Utah, 8 p.m. Houston at Golden State, 9:30 p.m. Friday Orlando at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. LA Lakers at Toronto, 6:30 p.m. Minnesota at New York, 6:30 p.m. Sacramento at Boston, 6:30 p.m. Cleveland at Chicago, 7 p.m. Detroit at Atlanta, 7 p.m. LA Clippers at New Orleans, 7 p.m. Washington at San Antonio, 7:30 p.m. Houston at Denver, 9:30 p.m.

hunder dispel Wizards in overtime ASSOCIATED PRESS

Russell Westbrook scored 14 of his 35 points in overtime and posted his fourth consecutive triple-double to help the Thunder defeat the Wizards 126-115 on Wednesday night in Oklahoma City. Westbrook added 14 rebounds and 11 assists for his ninth triple-double this season and the 46th of his career. The Thunder have won all four games during his triple-double streak, and he heads into December averaging a triple-double on the season. Former Thunder coach Scott Brooks returned as Washington’s coach, and the crowd greeted him warmly. Brooks coached the Thunder for seven years and led them to the Western Conference Finals three times and the NBA Finals once. Bradley Beal (Chaminade) scored 31 points, John Wall had 15 points and 15 assists, and Marcin Gortat added 12 points and 11 rebounds for the Wizards.

NOTEBOOK NBA postpones Kings76ers game • The NBA postponed Wednesday’s game between the Sacramento Kings and Philadelphia 76ers because of condensation on the court. The Flyers hosted an NHL

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Thunder’s Victor Oladipo (left) and Washington’s Bradley Beal battle for the ball on Wednesday in Oklahoma City.

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCh • B7

AMERICA’S LINE

BASEBALL

COLLEGE

NFL Favorite

Free Agents Signings

Area colleges

The 18 free agents who have signed, with name, position, former club if different, and contract. The contract information was obtained by The AP from player and management sources. For players with minor league contracts, letter agreements for major league contracts are in parentheses:

WEDNESDAY’S SCORES Women’s volleyball Missouri Baptist 3, Union College (Ky.) 0 Women’s basketball Webster University 80, Greenville College 69 Men’s basketball Illinois State 77, Ind.-Purdue Indianapolis 63 Lindenwood 97, Robert Morris-Springfield 61

Points Open Current 3.5 3

Underdog

Cowboys VIKINGS Sunday Broncos 5 4.5 JAGUARS FALCONS 3.5 3.5 Chiefs PACKERS 6 6.5 Texans Eagles 1.5 1 BENGALS SAINTS 5 6 Lions BEARS 2.5 1.5 49ers PATRIOTS 13.5 13.5 Rams RAVENS 3.5 3.5 Dolphins RAIDERS 3.5 3 Bills CHARGERS 4 4 Bucs CARDS 2.5 2.5 Washington STEELERS 5.5 6 Giants SEAHAWKS 6.5 6.5 Panthers Monday Colts 1 1.5 JETS Bye week: Browns, Titans. COLLEGE FOOTBALL Favorite Points Underdog Open Current Friday MAC Championship Game | Detroit, MI W Michigan 18.5 18.5 Ohio U Friday PAC 12 Championship | Santa Clara, CA Washington 7 7.5 Colorado Saturday W VIRGINIA 16 17 Baylor TCU 4 4 Kansas St S ALABAMA 11.5 11.5 New Mexico St Troy 8.5 7.5 GA SOUTHERN UL-Lafayette 7 7 UL-MONROE OKLAHOMA 13 12 Oklahoma St Arkansas St 23 23.5 TEXAS ST IDAHO 7 6.5 Georgia St Saturday Conf. USA Championship | Bowling Green W KENTUCKY 7.5 9.5 La Tech Saturday AAC Championship Game | Annapolis, MD NAVY 3 3 Temple Saturday SEC Championship Game | Atlanta, GA Alabama 23 24 Florida Saturday Mountain West Championship | Laramie, WY San Diego St 6 7 WYOMING Saturday ACC Championship Game Charlotte, NC Clemson 9 10 Va Tech Saturday BIG 10 Championship Game Indianapolis, IN Wisconsin 3 2.5 Penn St NBA Favorite Points Underdog HORNETS 10.5 Mavericks Bucks 4 NETS CAVALIERS 4.5 Clippers Magic 1 GRIZZLIES JAZZ 9 Heat WARRIORS 10 Rockets COLLEGE BASKETBALL Favorite Points Underdog SETON HALL 16 Columbia TROY 3.5 S Florida MISSISSIPPI ST 8.5 Oregon St IOWA ST 5 Cincinnati CAL-POLY SLO 7.5 Utsa Added Games OAKLAND 14 Oral Roberts RIDER 2 Fairfield UTAH 14.5 Montana St PACIFIC 10 Sacramento St NHL Favorite Odds Underdog CAPITALS -$220/+$180 Islanders PENGUINS -$200/+$170 Stars BRUINS -$155/+$135 Hurricanes Rangers -$150/+$130 SABRES SENATORS -$120/even Flyers RED WINGS -$110/-$110 Panthers BLUES -$145/+$125 Lightning JETS -$110/-$110 Oilers BLACKHAWKS -$165/+$145 Devils Kings -$135/+$115 COYOTES Blue Jackets -$125/+$105 AVALANCHE Ducks -$135/+$115 CANUCKS Grand Salami: Over/under 63.5 goals. SOCCER ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE Saturday TOTTENHAM -$290 Swansea City +$850 Draw +$430 Over/under goal total 3.0 goals Southampton +$125 CRYSTAL PALACE +$240 Draw +$230 Over/under goal total 2.5 goals STOKE CITY -$155 Burnley +$480 Draw +$290 Over/under goal total 2.5 goals Leicester City +$120 SUNDERLAND +$245 Draw +$235 Over/under goal total 2.5 goals Arsenal -$135 WEST HAM UNITED +$380 Draw +$290 Over/under goal total 3.0 goals WEST BROMWICH ALBION +$120 Watford +$250 Draw +$230 Over/under goal total 2.5 goals MANCHESTER CITY +$110 Chelsea +$265 Draw +$250 Over/under goal total 2.5 goals Home team in CAPS © 2016 Benjamin Eckstein

TRANSACTIONS game at the Wells Fargo Center on Tuesday, and the ice surface remained under the basketball court. Wednesday was an unseasonably warm day, and it likely afected the surface. Lakers lose Young • Los Angeles Lakers guard Nick

Young is expected to miss two to four weeks with a strained right calf muscle. Young got hurt in the first quarter of Tuesday night’s 105-88 loss at New Orleans. He had an MRI on Wednesday that revealed the injury.

NBA SUMMARIES Pistons 121, Celtics 114

Lakers 96, Bulls 90

Suns 109, Hawks 107

Detroit: Morris 8-13 2-2 20, Harris 9-20 0-0 21, Drummond 8-13 4-7 20, Smith 9-12 1-2 19, Caldwell-Pope 10-17 3-4 25, Hilliard 0-3 0-0 0, Leuer 4-5 2-2 12, Baynes 0-1 4-4 4, Udrih 0-3 0-0 0. Totals 48-87 16-21 121. Boston: Crowder 5-15 2-2 14, A.Johnson 4-7 3-3 11, Horford 3-5 2-2 9, Thomas 10-20 4-4 27, Bradley 4-12 2-2 14, Brown 0-2 0-0 0, Jerebko 2-2 0-0 4, Zeller 0-0 1-2 1, Olynyk 7-9 2-2 19, Smart 4-14 2-2 12, Rozier 1-5 1-1 3. Totals 40-91 19-20 114. Detroit 31 28 33 29 — 121 Boston 28 25 31 30 — 114 3-point goals: Detroit 9-20 (Harris 3-6, Leuer 2-3, Caldwell-Pope 2-4, Morris 2-5, Hilliard 0-1, Smith 0-1), Boston 15-42 (Bradley 4-8, Olynyk 3-4, Thomas 3-7, Smart 2-8, Crowder 2-10, Horford 1-2, A.Johnson 0-1, Rozier 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Detroit 52 (Drummond 17), Boston 33 (Bradley 6). Assists: Detroit 28 (Smith 8), Boston 26 (Rozier 6). Total fouls: Detroit 19, Boston 17. Technicals: Detroit defensive three second, Detroit team. A: 17,338 (18,624).

L.A. Lakers: Deng 3-9 3-6 10, Ingram 1-9 6-8 8, Randle 4-13 5-8 13, Mozgov 1-4 0-0 2, Calderon 3-4 1-1 7, Nance 5-8 2-3 12, Robinson 1-2 0-0 2, Black 2-2 2-4 6, Williams 4-12 9-11 18, Clarkson 9-18 0-0 18. Totals 33-81 28-41 96. Chicago: Gibson 4-9 3-6 11, Lopez 4-12 2-2 10, Rondo 6-12 0-0 14, Wade 7-15 3-4 17, Butler 4-18 13-15 22, Mirotic 3-9 0-0 6, Portis 1-2 1-2 3, Canaan 2-9 0-0 5, Grant 1-3 0-0 2, Valentine 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 32-91 22-29 90. L.A. Lakers 17 30 23 26 — 96 Chicago 28 19 26 17 — 90 3-point goals: L.A. Lakers 2-8 (Deng 1-2, Williams 1-3, Clarkson 0-1, Ingram 0-2), Chicago 4-21 (Rondo 2-3, Canaan 1-5, Butler 1-6, Grant 0-1, Wade 0-1, Valentine 0-1, Mirotic 0-4). Fouled out: Gibson. Rebounds: L.A. Lakers 60 (Randle 20), Chicago 46 (Gibson 10). Assists: L.A. Lakers 17 (Williams 5), Chicago 22 (Rondo, Wade 6). Total fouls: L.A. Lakers 24, Chicago 26. A: 21,773 (20,917).

Atlanta: Bazemore 8-17 2-2 22, Muscala 0-5 0-0 0, Howard 8-10 1-1 17, Schroder 13-23 3-3 31, Korver 1-2 0-0 3, Sefolosha 3-6 0-0 6, Humphries 2-4 1-2 5, Scott 0-1 0-0 0, Delaney 1-4 0-0 2, Hardaway Jr. 9-17 1-2 21. Totals 45-89 8-10 107. Phoenix: Tucker 6-9 3-3 17, Chriss 2-4 2-2 7, Chandler 3-5 0-0 6, Bledsoe 5-17 2-2 12, Booker 5-13 2-6 13, Dudley 6-9 2-3 17, Bender 0-2 0-0 0, Len 3-4 0-0 6, Knight 6-18 8-9 23, Barbosa 4-8 0-0 8. Totals 40-89 19-25 109. Atlanta 27 21 27 32 — 107 Phoenix 36 14 27 32 — 109 3PT: Atlanta 9-25 (Bazemore 4-8, Schroder 2-6, Hardaway Jr. 2-7, Korver 1-1, Delaney 0-1, Humphries 0-1, Scott 0-1), Phoenix 10-21 (Knight 3-3, Dudley 3-5, Tucker 2-3, Booker 1-2, Chriss 1-3, Bender 0-2, Bledsoe 0-3). FO: None. RB: Atlanta 40 (Howard 14), Phoenix 41 (Chandler, Len 9). AST: Atlanta 20 (Schroder 9), Phoenix 15 (Booker, Bledsoe 4). TF: Atlanta 22, Phoenix 17. A: 15,909 (18,422).

Spurs 94, Mavericks 87

Heat 106, Nuggets 98

Raptors 120, Grizzlies 105 Memphis: Williams 4-10 2-3 10, Green 5-11 6-7 16, Gasol 7-14 2-2 18, Harrison 7-12 3-4 21, Allen 4-8 4-5 12, Martin 1-5 2-2 5, Davis 1-3 0-0 2, Daniels 6-12 3-3 19, Baldwin 1-6 0-0 2. Totals 36-81 22-26 105. Toronto: Carroll 6-11 2-4 17, Siakam 2-2 0-0 4, Valanciunas 3-6 0-0 6, Lowry 8-13 9-10 29, DeRozan 6-9 10-11 24, Ross 1-6 0-0 3, Patterson 5-10 0-0 14, Nogueira 2-3 0-0 4, VanVleet 0-0 0-0 0, Joseph 4-8 7-8 16, Powell 1-1 0-0 3. Totals 38-69 28-33 120. Memphis 28 29 25 23 — 105 Toronto 25 30 34 31 — 120 3-point goals: Memphis 11-27 (Harrison 4-5, Daniels 4-8, Gasol 2-4, Martin 1-2, Allen 0-1, Baldwin 0-1, Green 0-2, Williams 0-4), Toronto 16-32 (Patterson 4-6, Lowry 4-7, Carroll 3-7, DeRozan 2-3, Powell 1-1, Joseph 1-3, Ross 1-5). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Memphis 30 (Gasol 8), Toronto 42 (Patterson 13). Assists: Memphis 16 (Harrison 4), Toronto 23 (Lowry 8). Total fouls: Memphis 25, Toronto 25. A: 19,800 (19,800).

San Antonio: Leonard 5-16 9-12 21, Aldridge 2-9 1-2 5, Dedmon 2-5 2-2 6, Laprovittola 3-6 0-0 7, Green 4-8 1-2 11, K.Anderson 2-2 0-0 4, Bertans 2-2 2-2 7, Lee 3-6 1-2 7, Mills 9-12 0-0 23, Simmons 1-5 1-2 3. Totals 33-71 17-24 94. Dallas: Barnes 8-15 0-0 17, Finney-Smith 0-3 0-0 0, Bogut 2-2 0-2 4, Williams 4-12 0-0 9, Matthews 8-19 5-6 26, Brussino 0-0 0-0 0, Powell 4-6 2-2 10, Mejri 0-0 0-0 0, Curry 5-11 2-2 14, Harris 0-3 0-0 0, Gibson 1-2 0-0 3, J.Anderson 1-4 2-2 4. Totals 33-77 11-14 87. San Antonio 21 22 18 33 — 94 Dallas 17 23 26 21 — 87 3PT: San Antonio 11-19 (Mills 5-6, Green 2-4, Leonard 2-5, Bertans 1-1, Laprovittola 1-3), Dallas 10-30 (Matthews 5-11, Curry 2-5, Barnes 1-2, Gibson 1-2, Williams 1-3, Finney-Smith 0-2, Harris 0-2, J.Anderson 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: San Antonio 42 (Dedmon 10), Dallas 37 (Bogut 12). Assists: San Antonio 16 (Mills 4), Dallas 17 (Bogut, Williams 5). Total fouls: San Antonio 11, Dallas 18. Technicals: San Antonio defensive three second 2, San Antonio team 2, Dallas defensive three second, Dallas team. A: 19,245 (19,200).

Miami: Babbitt 4-9 0-0 11, McRoberts 0-4 1-2 1, Whiteside 11-18 3-5 25, Dragic 6-17 4-6 16, McGruder 1-5 0-0 3, J.Johnson 4-12 2-3 10, Reed 0-1 0-2 0, Ellington 8-14 1-2 22, T.Johnson 7-13 4-6 18. Totals 41-93 15-26 106. Denver: Gallinari 6-16 4-6 17, Faried 4-8 2-4 10, Nurkic 2-3 0-0 4, Nelson 5-14 4-6 17, Mudiay 3-11 1-3 7, Hernangomez 0-1 0-0 0, Chandler 8-17 0-0 17, Gee 0-0 0-0 0, Jokic 7-11 3-4 17, Murray 3-10 1-1 9. Totals 38-91 15-24 98. Miami 28 24 23 31 — 106 Denver 30 17 33 18 — 98 3PT: Miami 9-24 (Ellington 5-9, Babbitt 3-6, McGruder 1-2, Dragic 0-3, J.Johnson 0-4), Denver 7-22 (Nelson 3-5, Murray 2-6, Chandler 1-4, Gallinari 1-5, Mudiay 0-2). FO: None. RB: Miami 48 (Whiteside 16), Denver 55 (Jokic 13). AST: Miami 26 (Dragic, T.Johnson 7), Denver 28 (Nelson 8). TF: Miami 25, Denver 21. TEC: Miami defensive three second 2, Dragic, Miami team 2, Whiteside, Denver defensive three second, Nurkic, Denver team. A: 11,471 (19,155).

Knicks 106, T’Wolves 104

Thunder 126, Wizards 115 OT

New York: Anthony 5-16 3-4 14, Porzingis 11-20 4-5 29, O’Quinn 1-2 0-1 2, Rose 5-12 0-0 11, Lee 3-3 0-0 7, Kuzminskas 5-9 0-0 14, N’dour 0-0 0-0 0, Hernangomez 2-2 2-2 6, Plumlee 1-1 2-3 4, Jennings 5-14 0-0 12, Vujacic 2-4 0-0 5, Baker 0-0 0-0 0, Holiday 1-8 0-0 2. Totals 41-91 11-15 106. Minnesota: Wiggins 8-20 0-1 19, Towns 15-22 17-20 47, Dieng 2-6 4-6 8, Rubio 2-5 4-4 8, LaVine 5-13 6-6 17, Muhammad 1-4 1-2 3, Bjelica 0-5 0-0 0, Aldrich 1-1 0-0 2, Jones 0-0 0-0 0, Dunn 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 34-77 32-39 104. New York 28 30 23 25 — 106 Minnesota 31 18 25 30 — 104 3-point goals: New York 13-32 (Kuzminskas 4-5, Porzingis 3-7, Jennings 2-5, Lee 1-1, Vujacic 1-2, Rose 1-3, Anthony 1-6, Holiday 0-3), Minnesota 4-19 (Wiggins 3-4, LaVine 1-5, Dunn 0-1, Rubio 0-2, Towns 0-3, Bjelica 0-4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: New York 39 (Porzingis, O’Quinn 8), Minnesota 40 (Towns 18). Assists: New York 24 (Jennings 7), Minnesota 17 (Rubio 6). Total fouls: New York 26, Minnesota 17. A: 13,987 (19,356).

Washington: Porter 5-9 0-0 11, Morris 7-16 5-8 19, Gortat 6-12 0-2 12, Wall 6-20 1-2 15, Beal 10-21 7-10 31, Oubre 4-6 2-2 12, Smith 1-4 0-0 2, Thornton 4-7 2-2 11, Satoransky 1-3 0-0 2. Totals 44-98 17-26 115. Oklahoma City: Sabonis 5-5 0-0 10, Adams 3-6 6-10 12, Westbrook 12-35 10-10 35, Oladipo 10-16 0-0 25, Roberson 4-6 0-0 10, Grant 1-3 4-8 7, Kanter 6-10 2-3 14, Lauvergne 2-3 0-0 5, Christon 1-2 0-0 2, Morrow 2-9 0-0 6. Totals 46-95 22-31 126. Washington 19 34 31 21 10 — 115 Oklahoma City 32 28 24 21 21 — 126 3-point goals: Washington 10-28 (Beal 4-10, Oubre 2-3, Wall 2-7, Porter 1-2, Thornton 1-3, Satoransky 0-1, Morris 0-2), Oklahoma City 12-30 (Oladipo 5-9, Roberson 2-3, Morrow 2-7, Lauvergne 1-1, Grant 1-3, Westbrook 1-6, Christon 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Washington 48 (Gortat 11), Oklahoma City 47 (Westbrook 14). Assists: Washington 25 (Wall 15), Oklahoma City 28 (Westbrook 11). Total fouls: Washington 25, Oklahoma City 22. Technicals: Morris, Westbrook.

Trail Blazers 131, Pacers 109 Indiana: Robinson 6-10 1-1 15, M.Turner 7-12 5-5 19, T.Young 2-6 0-0 4, Teague 7-13 10-12 25, Ellis 1-5 2-2 4, Allen 0-1 2-2 2, Christmas 0-0 0-0 0, Niang 0-0 0-0 0, Jefferson 5-8 3-4 13, Brooks 6-10 1-1 16, J.Young 0-1 2-2 2, Stuckey 2-6 5-6 9. Totals 36-72 31-35 109. Portland: Harkless 9-14 2-2 23, Plumlee 8-14 0-0 16, Davis 1-3 0-0 2, Lillard 11-18 5-7 28, McCollum 7-18 3-3 19, Layman 0-0 0-0 0, Vonleh 1-1 0-0 2, Leonard 3-9 0-0 8, Napier 0-0 0-0 0, Quarterman 2-2 0-0 5, E.Turner 5-6 2-2 13, Connaughton 0-0 0-0 0, Crabbe 4-8 5-5 15. Totals 51-93 17-19 131. Indiana 23 35 25 26 — 109 Portland 31 42 36 22 — 131 3-point goals: Indiana 6-14 (Brooks 3-5, Robinson 2-4, Teague 1-2, J.Young 0-1, Stuckey 0-1, Ellis 0-1), Portland 12-33 (Harkless 3-7, Crabbe 2-4, McCollum 2-6, Leonard 2-7, Quarterman 1-1, E.Turner 1-1, Lillard 1-6, Plumlee 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Indiana 32 (M.Turner 10), Portland 39 (Davis 9). Assists: Indiana 19 (Teague 8), Portland 29 (Lillard 10). Total fouls: Indiana 14, Portland 23. A: 19,107 (19,980).

BASEBALL American League MINNESOTA TWINS — Agreed to terms with C Jason Castro on a three-year contract. OAKLAND ATHLETICS — Agreed to terms with OF Matt Joyce on a two-year contract. Designated INF Rangel Ravelo for assignment. National League ATLANTA BRAVES — Agreed to terms with INF-OF Sean Rodriguez on a two-year contract. COLORADO ROCKIES — Agreed to terms with RHP Jordan Lyles on a one-year contract. NEW YORK METS — Agreed to terms with OF Yoenis Cespedes on a four-year contract. Traded RHP Logan Verrett to Baltimore for cash. PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES — Named Terry Ryan special assignment scout. PITTSBURGH PIRATES — Agreed to terms with LHP Dan Runzler and RHP Jason Stoffel on minor league contracts. CARDINALS — Named Richard Clapp manager at Memphis (PCL), Dan Bilardello manager at Palm Beach (FSL), Joe Kruzel manager at State College (NYP), and Roberto Espinoza manager at Johnson City (Appalachian). BASKETBALL • NBA PHILADELPHIA 76ERS — Assigned F-C Nerlens Noel to Delaware (NBADL). Recalled G-F Timothe Luwawu-Cabarrot from Delaware. FOOTBALL • NFL ATLANTA FALCONS — Placed CB Desmond Trufant on injured reserve. Waived P Matt Wile. Signed C Trevor Robinson and CB Blidi Wreh-Wilson. Signed OL Kevin Graf to the practice squad. BUFFALO BILLS — Signed TE Logan Thomas. Signed G Isame Faciane to the practice squad. DETROIT LIONS — Signed LB Brandon Chubb to the practice squad. MIAMI DOLPHINS — Waived DT Leon Orr. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS — Signed RB D.J. Foster to the practice squad. Released FB Glenn Gronkowski from the practice squad. NEW YORK GIANTS — Designated RB Shane Vereen for return from injured reserve. Signed S Christian Bryant to the practice squad. NEW YORK JETS — Signed OT Donald Hawkins to the practice squad. Released OT Zach Sterup from the practice squad. WASHINGTON REDSKINS — Signed DL Trevon Coley to the practice squad. HOCKEY • NHL COLORADO AVALANCHE — Recalled Fs Gabriel Bourque and Sam Henley from San Antonio (AHL). NASHVILLE PREDATORS — Signed D Adam Pardy to a one-year contract. Placed D Anthony Bitetto on injured reserve. Sent F Miikka Salomaki to Milwaukee (AHL). NEW JERSEY DEVILS — Placed F Beau Bennett on injured reserve, retroactive to Nov. 28. Recalled F John Quenneville from Albany (AHL). OTTAWA SENATORS — Announced G Craig Anderson has taken a leave of absence. TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING — Recalled Fs Joel Vermin and Michael Bournival from Syracuse (AHL). WASHINGTON CAPITALS — Recalled Fs Paul Carey and Jakub Vrana from Hershey (AHL). Reassigned F Zach Sanford to Hershey. MOTORSPORTS NASCAR and INTERNATIONAL SPEEDWAY CORPORATION — Named Christopher Davis managing director and chief security officer. COLLEGE GEORGIA TECH — Announced sophomore RB Marcus Marshall will transfer. MISSOURI — Suspended sophomore WR Keyon Dilosa indefinitely after he was arrested and accused by a witness of punching a woman in the face. NOTRE DAME — Announced QB Malik Zaire was granted his release and will transfer. TEXAS — Announced RB D’Onta Foreman will enter the NFL draft.

MLS PLAYOFFS Eastern Conference Montreal 3, Toronto FC 2 Wednesday: Toronto FC 5, Montreal 2, Toronto advances 7-5 on aggregate Western Conference Seattle 2, Colorado 1, Seattle 1, Colorado 0 Seattle advances 3-1 on aggregate MLS Cup Dec. 10: Seattle vs. Toronto FC

AMERICAN LEAGUE HOUSTON (2) — Signed Charlie Morton, rhp, Philadelphia, rhp, to $14 million, two-year contract; signed Josh Reddick, of, Los Angeles Dodgers, to a $52 million, four-year contract. KANSAS CITY (1) — Re-signed Drew Butera, c, to a $3.8 million, two-year contract. LOS ANGELES (2) — Re-signed Andrew Bailey, rhp, to a $1 million, one-year contract; signed Jesse Chavez, rhp, Los Angeles Dodgers, to a $5.75 million, one-year contract. MINNESOTA (1) — Signed Jason Castro, c, Houston, to a $24.5 million, three-year contract. OAKLAND (1) — Signed Matt Joyce, of, Pittsburgh, to an $11 million, two-year contract. TEXAS (1) — Signed Andrew Cashner, rhp, Miami, to a $10 million, one-year contract. TORONTO (1) — Signed Kendrys Morales, dh, Kansas City, to a $33 million, three-year contract.

NATIONAL LEAGUE ATLANTA (3) — Signed R.A. Dickey, rhp, Toronto, to an $8 million, one-year contract; signed Bartolo Colon, rhp, New York Mets, to a $12.5 million, one-year contract; signed Sean Rodriguez, inf, Pittsburgh, to an $11.5 million, two-year contract. CHICAGO (1) — Signed Jon Jay, of, San Diego, to an $8 million, one-year contract. NEW YORK (2) — Neil Walker, 2b, accepted $17.2 million qualifying offer; re-signed Yoenis Cespedes, of, to a $110 million, four-year contract. PHILADELPHIA (1) — Jeremy Hellickson, rhp, accepted $17.2 million qualifying offer. ST. LOUIS (1) — Signed Brett Cecil, lhp, Toronto, to a $30.5 million, four-year contract. WASHINGTON (1) — Re-signed Chris Heisey, of, to a $1.4 million, one-year contract.

THURSDAY BASKETBALL SCHEDULE W: Southern Indiana at McKendree, 5:30 p.m. W: Mo. Baptist at William Woods, 5:30 p.m. W: LU-Belleville at STL Pharmacy, 5:30 p.m. W: Maryville at Missouri S&T, 5:30 p.m. W: Harris-Stowe at Columbia College, 5:30 W: UMSL at Drury, 5:45 p.m. M: Southern Indiana at McKendree, 7:30 p.m. M: Mo. Baptist at William Woods, 7:30 p.m. M: LU-Belleville at STL Pharmacy, 7:30 p.m. M: Maryville at Missouri S&T, 7:30 p.m. M: Harris-Stowe at Columbia College, 7:30 M: Lewis & Clark at Wabash, 7:30 p.m. M: UMSL at Drury, 7:45 p.m.

Women’s basketball top 25 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13.

Remaining Cardinals free agents ST. LOUIS (4) — Matt Holliday, of; Brandon Moss, 1b-of; Jordan Walden, rhp; Jerome Williams, rhp.

15.

GOLF

16.

14.

Hole in one

17.

Incline Village • Roger Creibaum, hole No. 5, 108 yards, wedge, Nov. 26.

18. 19.

World Golf Ranking

20.

Through Nov. 27 1. Jason Day 2. Rory McIlroy 3. Dustin Johnson 4. Henrik Stenson 5. Jordan Spieth 6. Hideki Matsuyama 7. Adam Scott 8. Patrick Reed 9. Alex Noren 10. Bubba Watson 11. Danny Willett 12. Rickie Fowler 13. Paul Casey 14. Sergio Garcia 15. Justin Rose 16. Branden Grace 17. Brooks Koepka 18. Phil Mickelson 19. Russell Knox 20. Jimmy Walker 21. Justin Thomas 22. Matt Kuchar 23. Tyrrell Hatton 24. Charl Schwartzel 25. Emiliano Grillo

AUS NIR USA SWE USA JPN AUS USA SWE USA ENG USA ENG ESP ENG SAF USA USA SCO USA USA USA ENG SAF ARG

11.54 10.55 10.09 8.67 8.66 6.91 6.75 5.64 5.58 5.36 5.22 5.12 5.01 4.96 4.94 4.62 4.53 4.40 4.32 4.23 4.17 4.09 3.81 3.79 3.74

NFL LEADERS SCORING NONKICKERS David Johnson, ARI Blount, NE E. Elliott, DAL Gordon, SD D. Murray, TEN Mi. Evans, TAM L. McCoy, BUF Anto. Brown, PIT L. Murray, OAK Jo. Nelson, GBY KICKERS Du. Hopkins, WAS Santos, KC Sturgis, PHL Tucker, BAL Lambo, SD D. Bailey, DAL McManus, DEN Janikowski, OAK Crosby, GBY Lutz, NOR Novak, HOU PASSERS Brady, NE M. Ryan, ATL Brees, NOR Prescott, DAL Mariota, TEN Cousins, WAS D. Carr, OAK Roethlisb..., PIT M. Stafford, DET Bradford, MIN Hoyer, CHI Rodgers, GBY Tannehill, MIA Luck, IND Rivers, SD Ru. Wilson, SEA Kessler, CLE Manning, NYG Dalton, CIN Al. Smith, KC J. Winston, TAM

TDRusRecRetX2Pts 13 10 3 0 0 78 12 12 0 0 0 72 12 11 1 0 0 72 11 9 2 0 0 66 11 8 3 0 0 66 10 0 10 0 1 62 10 9 1 0 1 62 10 0 10 0 0 60 9 9 0 0 0 54 9 0 9 0 0 54 PAT FG Lg Pts 25/27 25/31 50 100 21/22 25/28 54 96 21/22 25/29 55 96 15/15 27/27 57 96 32/35 21/24 47 95 34/34 20/22 56 94 25/26 23/27 55 94 29/29 20/26 56 89 26/28 20/23 46 86 38/39 16/22 57 86 17/18 23/28 53 86

Att Cmp Pct Yds TD Int 256 175 68.4 2201 18 1 380 262 68.9 3516 26 6 456 326 71.5 3587 30 8 340 231 67.9 2835 18 2 378 243 64.3 2998 25 8 437 299 68.4 3540 20 7 423 281 66.4 3115 22 5 373 242 64.9 2745 23 7 391 261 66.8 2883 19 5 348 248 71.3 2415 12 3 200 134 67 1445 6 0 449 289 64.4 3074 27 7 329 217 66 2574 15 8 375 236 62.9 2827 19 8 399 251 62.9 3128 23 12 368 238 64.7 2865 11 4 192 126 65.6 1369 6 2 413 261 63.2 2902 20 10 408 259 63.5 3043 12 6 346 229 66.2 2297 10 4 406 249 61.3 2900 22 11

RECEIVERS RECEPTIONS No Yds Avg Long TD Anto. Brown, PIT 82 998 12.2 51 10 Fitzgerald, ARI 78 802 10.3 32 5 Mi. Evans, TAM 73 1020 14.0 45t 10 S. Diggs, MIN 67 747 11.1 46 2 A. Green, CIN 66 964 14.6 54t 4 A. Cooper, OAK 66 922 14.0 64t 3 Ju. Jones, ATL 65 1140 17.5 75t 5 Beckham, NYG 65 915 14.1 75t 8 Michael Thomas, NOR 65 789 12.1 35 7 Landry, MIA 64 733 11.5 42t 2 Edelman, NE 64 617 9.6 33 2 T. Pryor, CLE 62 855 13.8 54 4 Sanders, DEN 61 830 13.6 64 4 Baldwin, SEA 61 767 12.6 59 5 Jo. Nelson, GBY 61 754 12.4 58 9 YARDS Yds No Avg Long TD Ju. Jones, ATL 1140 65 17.5 75t 5 Mi. Evans, TAM 1020 73 14.0 45t 10 Anto. Brown, PIT 998 82 12.2 51 10 A. Green, CIN 964 66 14.6 54t 4 Hilton, IND 942 60 15.7 63t 5 A. Cooper, OAK 922 66 14.0 64t 3 Beckham, NYG 915 65 14.1 75t 8 T. Pryor, CLE 855 62 13.8 54 4 Sanders, DEN 830 61 13.6 64 4 Fitzgerald, ARI 802 78 10.3 32 5 M. Wallace, BAL 792 51 15.5 95t 4 Olsen, CAR 790 58 13.6 78t 3 Ty. Williams, SD 790 51 15.5 51t 5 Michael Thomas, NOR 789 65 12.1 35 7 K. Britt, LA 788 54 14.6 47 4 RUSHERS E. Elliott, DAL D. Murray, TEN David Johnson, ARI Gordon, SD L. Miller, HOU Blount, NE Ajayi, MIA L. McCoy, BUF Jo. Howard, CHI Forte, NYJ D. Freeman, ATL Ma. Ingram, NOR S. Ware, KC L. Bell, PIT Gore, IND Je. Hill, CIN Gurley, LA Crowell, CLE T. West, BAL C. Hyde, SNF TOTAL YARDS David Johnson, ARI E. Elliott, DAL D. Murray, TEN Gordon, SD Ju. Jones, ATL L. Bell, PIT S. Ware, KC L. Miller, HOU Mi. Evans, TAM Jo. Howard, CHI Anto. Brown, PIT D. Freeman, ATL L. McCoy, BUF Ma. Ingram, NOR A. Green, CIN KICK RETURNERS Patterson, MIN Erickson, CIN Cunningham, LA Dw. Harris, NYG Hester, BAL Lockett, SEA B. Tate, BUF J. Grant, MIA Weems, ATL INTERCEPTIONS Hayward, SD Lan. Collins, NYG M. Peters, KC Rhodes, MIN Gilmore, BUF R. Sherman, SEA

Att 243 229 210 234 211 212 161 157 149 202 161 136 149 151 178 147 200 145 153 154

YdsAvg 1199 4.9 1043 4.6 921 4.4 908 3.9 881 4.2 869 4.1 847 5.3 819 5.2 766 5.1 759 3.8 729 4.5 721 5.3 705 4.7 699 4.6 670 3.8 644 4.4 641 3.2 605 4.2 600 3.9 594 3.9

LngTD 60t 11 75t 8 58t 10 48 9 45 3 44 12 62t 7 75t 9 69 2 32 7 48 5 75t 3 46 2 44 3 22 4 74t 6 24t 4 85t 5 35 4 34 6

Total Rush 1534 921 1502 1199 1352 1043 1273 908 1140 0 1136 699 1077 705 1032 881 1020 0 1008 766 1007 9 998 729 994 819 969 721 964 0

Rec 613 303 309 365 1140 437 372 151 1020 242 998 269 175 248 964

No Yards 16 500 15 451 18 507 16 410 16 409 14 348 15 367 14 341 16 374 Int 6 5 5 4 4 4

Avg Long TD 31.2 104t 1 30.1 84 0 28.2 61 0 25.6 46 0 25.6 60 0 24.9 43 0 24.5 45 0 24.4 45 0 23.4 42 0 Yds Long TD 100 31 1 72 44t 1 47 28 0 129 100t 1 104 49 0 37 31 0

SACKS • V. Miller, DEN, 12.5; L. Alexander, BUF, 10.0; Avril, SEA, 10.0; Ford, KC, 10.0; V. Beasley, ATL, 9.5; Kerrigan, WAS, 9.0; K. Mack, OAK, 9.0; Orakpo, TEN, 9.0; Wake, MIA, 8.5.

21. 22. 23. 24. 25.

Notre Dame (7-0) beat Iowa 73-58. Next: vs. Valparaiso, Sunday. UConn (5-0) idle. Next: vs. No. 15 DePaul, Thursday. South Carolina (5-0) idle. Next: at No. 14 Texas, Thursday. Baylor (7-1) idle. Next: vs. Abilene Christian, Thursday. Maryland (6-0) idle. Next: at No. 7 Louisville, Thursday. Mississippi State (7-0) idle. Next: at Iowa State, Saturday. Louisville (6-1) idle. Next: vs. No. 5 Maryland, Thursday. Florida State (7-1) beat Minnesota 75-61. Next: vs. W. Carolina, Sunday. Ohio State (5-2) idle. Next: vs. No. 18 Miami, Thursday. UCLA (5-1) idle. Next: vs. Hawaii, Sun. Stanford (6-1) idle. Next: at Cal State Bakersfield, Thursday. Oklahoma (5-0) idle. Next: at No. 17 Kentucky, Thursday. Washington (6-1) idle. Next: at Grand Canyon, Thursday. Texas (2-2) idle. Next: vs. No. 3 South Carolina, Thursday. DePaul (5-1) idle. Next: at No. 2 UConn, Thursday. West Virginia (8-0) beat Morehead St. 94-53. Next: vs. Mississippi, Sunday. Kentucky (5-1) idle. Next: vs. No. 12 Oklahoma, Thursday. Miami (5-1) idle. Next: at No. 9 Ohio State, Thursday. Florida (5-1) beat Wofford 74-51. Next: vs. Long Beach State, Saturday. Syracuse (5-3) beat Michigan State 75-64. Next: vs. CCSU, Sunday. Colorado (7-0) beat SE Louisiana 112-54. Next: vs. Idaho State, Saturday. Tennessee (4-2) beat Tennessee State 86-36. Next: vs. No. 4 Baylor, Sunday. Auburn (6-1) idle. Next: at Kansas State, Thursday. Oregon St. (3-1) idle. Next: vs. Idaho, Fri. Texas A&M (5-1) lost to Southern Cal 66-62. Next: at SMU, Monday.

Men’s basketball scores East Army 97, Fair. Dickinson 78 Brown 81, St. Francis Brooklyn 71 Bryant 79, Yale 70 Bucknell 73, Richmond 68 CCSU 82, Maine 61 Cornell 80, Northeastern 77 Drexel 74, Lafayette 70 Georgetown 96, Coppin St. 44 Holy Cross 55, Albany (NY) 49 LIU Brooklyn 75, Hartford 68 La Salle 89, Lehigh 81 Loyola (Md.) 71, Stony Brook 70 NJIT 83, St. Francis (Pa.) 70 Providence 76, New Hampshire 62 Sacred Heart 71, Fordham 70 St. Bon. 81, Siena 74 Temple 78, Saint Joseph’s 72 UConn 51, Boston U. 49 UMBC 81, Duquesne 72 UMass 62, Wagner 55 Youngstown St. 75, Robert Morris 74 South Charlotte 65, J. Madison 56 Clemson 60, Nebraska 58 E. Kentucky 78, W. Kentucky 59 Elon 84, FIU 81 Georgia 86, Morehouse 72 Georgia St. 81, Wright St. 74 IPFW 103, Austin Peay 99 Louisville 71, Purdue 64 Marshall 98, Ohio 88 Memphis 84, Jackson St. 69 Miami 73, Rutgers 61 Mid. Tennessee 77, Mississippi 62 N. Kentucky 84, Morehead St. 79 Old Dominion 59, Dartmouth 47 South Alabama 78, Southern Miss. 55 UCF 81, Stetson 45 Virginia 63, Ohio St. 61 Winthrop 58, Furman 57 Midwest Akron 95, Adrian 41 DePaul 77, Drake 75 E. Michigan 87, Detroit 61 Evansville 83, Wabash College 39 George Mason 54, N. Iowa 50 Ill.-Chicago 74, Chicago St. 58 Illinois St. 77, IUPUI 63 Indiana 76, North Carolina 67 Indiana St. 63, N. Illinois 52 Kansas St. 80, Green Bay 61 Loyola (Chi.) 75, Norfolk St. 62 Marquette 90, W. Carolina 44 Miami (Ohio) 78, Grambling St. 76 Milwaukee 72, Jacksonville 67 S. Dakota St. 90, Minnesota Crookston 58 UMKC 84, South Dakota 82 UNC-Wilmington 97, W. Michigan 92 Virginia Tech 73, Michigan 70 Southwest Arkansas St. 78, Cleveland St. 51 Baylor 79, Sam Houston 45 North Texas 73, Texas College 45 Oklahoma St. 101, Rogers State 85 Rice 90, Houston Bapt. 77 TCU 86, Washington 71 Texas Tech 69, Incarnate Word 48 Far West Arizona 85, Texas South. 63 BYU 77, Utah St. 63 Boise St. 71, SMU 62 California 68, Louisiana Tech 59 Colorado St. 72, Colorado 58 Fresno St. 80, Menlo 67 New Mexico 64, Abilene Christian 55 Oregon 93, Western Oregon 54 San Francisco 78, Alcorn St. 65 Southern Cal 76, San Diego 55 UC Irvine 58, Santa Clara 55 UNLV 89, S. Utah 81 Wyoming 82, Denver 70

Football TOP 25 SCHEDULE Friday No. 4 Washington vs. No. 9 Colorado, Pac-12 championship at Santa Clara, Calif., 8 p.m. No. 13 Western Michigan vs. Ohio, MAC championship at Detroit, 6 p.m. Saturday No. 1 Alabama vs. No. 15 Florida, SEC championship at Atlanta, 3 p.m. No. 3 Clemson vs. No. 19 Virginia Tech, ACC championship at Orlando, Fla., 7 p.m. No. 6 Wisconsin vs. No. 8 Penn State, Big Ten championship at Indianapolis, 7:17 p.m. No. 7 Oklahoma vs. No. 11 Oklahoma State, 11:20 a.m. No. 14 West Virginia vs. Baylor, 2:30 p.m. No. 20 Navy vs. Temple, AAC championship, 11 a.m.

CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIPS FRIDAY Mid-American: Ohio vs. Western Michigan at Detroit, 6 p.m., ESPN2 Pac-12: Washington vs. Colorado at Santa Clara, Calif. , 8 p.m., KTVI (2) SATURDAY American Athletic: Temple at Navy, 11 a.m., KDNL (30) Conference USA: Louisiana Tech at Western Kentucky, 11 a.m., ESPN Southeastern: Alabama vs. Florida at Atlanta, 3 p.m., KMOV (4) Southwestern Athletic: Alcorn State vs. Grambling State, 3 p.m., ESPNU Mountain West: San Diego State at Wyoming, 6:45 p.m., ESPN Atlantic Coast: Clemson vs. Virginia Tech at Orlando, Fla., 7 p.m., KDNL (30) Big Ten: Wisconsin vs. Penn State at Indianapolis, 7:15 p.m., KTVI (2)

FCS PLAYOFFS Second Round | Saturday New Hampshire (8-4) at James Madison (10-1), 1 p.m. Youngstown St. (9-3) at Jacksonville St. (10-1), 1 p.m. Villanova (9-3) at S. Dakota St. (8-3), 2 p.m. Chattanooga (9-3) at Sam Houston St. (11-0), 2 p.m. San Diego (10-1) at North Dakota St. (10-1), 2:30 p.m. Central Arkansas (10-2) at Eastern Washington (10-1), 3 p.m. Wofford (9-3) at The Citadel (10-1), 5 p.m. Richmond (9-3) at North Dakota (9-2), 5 p.m.

DIVISION II PLAYOFFS Quarterfinals | Saturday Shepherd (12-0) at California (Pa.) (11-0), Noon Ferris St. (11-2) at Grand Valley St. (12-0), Noon Harding (13-0) at NW Missouri St. (12-0), 1 p.m. N. Greenville (9-4) at N. Alabama (9-1), 1 p.m.

DIVISION III PLAYOFFS Quarterfinals | Saturday Mount Union (11-1) at Alfred (12-0), 11 a.m. Wisconsin-Whitewater (13-0) at John Carroll (11-1), 11 a.m. Wheaton (11-1) at Mary Hardin-Baylor (12-0), Noon Wisconsin-Oshkosh (11-1) at St. Thomas (Minn.) (12-0), Noon


B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

ATHLETES OF THE WEEK Reyondous Estes East St. Louis football A 6-foot-1, 173-pound senior quarterback, Estes led the Flyers to a 26-13 win over Plainield North in the Class 7A title game, He threw three touchdown passes to lift the Flyers to a 20-0 lead by the third quarter. He engineered a drive on the Flyers’ second possession of the game, capping of the march with a 7-yard pass to James Knight on fourth down. Estes then hit Jef Thomas on a 43-yard strike just 1 minute and 42 seconds after the initial score. Estes connected with Thomas again on a 61-yard TD toss in the third quarter. A Mizzou commit, Estes threw for 2,464 yards and 26 TDs this season. Brooke Flowers Metro basketball A versatile 6-foot-4 junior forward/center, Flowers starred at the Springield Southeast Tournament, leading all players in scoring, rebounding and blocked shots. She put up big numbers against Springield Southeast (23 points, 17 rebounds, 13 blocks), East St. Louis (16 points, 15 rebounds, 10 blocks), Decatur MacArthur (33 points, 23 rebounds, ive blocks) and Peoria Central (six points, 15 rebounds). Flowers had opened the season with a 17-point, 17-rebound performance in a win over Gateway STEM. Flowers averaged 16.8 points, 13.2 rebounds and 7.5 blocks last season. Kelly McLaughlin St. Joseph’s basketball A 6-foot-2 senior center, McLaughlin got of to a hot start in two games in the St. Joseph’s Turkey Shootout. In the season opener, she scored 28 points and pulled down 13 rebounds as the Angels pounded Dexter 61-36. She was 10 of 17 from the ield and hit eight of nine free throws. McLaughlin followed by scoring a team-high 16 points and grabbing nine rebounds in a 57-51 loss to Rock Bridge. Last season, she earned all-Metro Women’s Athletic Association honors after averaging 13.2 points and 12.5 rebounds. McLaughlin has committed to Miami of Ohio. Jared Phillips Cardinal Ritter basketball A 5-foot-11 junior point guard, Phillips was named the MVP of the Borgia Turkey Tournament after leading the Lions to the championship. In irst round, he inished with 16 points, six rebounds, seven assists and three steals in a 76-65 win over North Tech. Phillips followed with a 17-point, three-steal performance in a semiinal game against Borgia, which the Lions won 63-51. Phillips saved his best game for last, putting up 22 points and four assists in a 67-62 win over McCluer North in the championship game. Mark Smith Edwardsville basketball A 6-foot-5 senior guard, Smith led the Tigers to the championship of the Battling Bulldogs Thanksgiving Tournament at Highland. In the title game, Smith went on a scoring frenzy, pouring in 37 points along with pulling down 10 rebounds and dishing out nine as the Tigers knocked of defending Class 3A champion Althof 81-78. Smith helped the Tigers advance to the title game with big performances in wins over Waterloo (22 points, eight rebounds, 13 assists), Carbondale (31 points, nine rebounds, nine assists) and Highland (14 points, eight rebounds, 12 assists). Allie Troeckler Civic Memorial basketball A 5-foot-10 senior guard/ forward, Troeckler was named the MVP of the Salem Wildcat Thanksgiving Tournament after leading the Eagles to the championship. In ive tournament games, she averaged 19.6 points, 8.8 rebounds, 3.4 assists, 3.8 steals and 3.6 blocks. An all-Missisippi Valley Conference selection the past three seasons, a two-time all-state pick and a second-team All-Metro honoree last season, Troeckler signed with SIU Edwardsville in November. She is less than 100 points from becoming CM’s career leading scorer and is on pace to become the school’s career leader in steals and blocks. Kyren Williams Vianney football A 5-foot-10, 175-pound sophomore receiver, running back, safety and kick returner, Williams amassed 221 total yards and scored four touchdowns in the Griins’ 49-14 win over Fort Zumwalt North in the Class 5 championship game. He carried the ball 15 times for 131 yards with a 48-yard TD run and a pair of 1-yard scores. He also caught ive passes for 90 yards, including a 46-yard TD reception. Williams inished the season among the area leaders in touchdowns (28) and points (172). He rushed for 748 yards and caught 48 passes for 591 yards. Compiled by Paul Kopsky. Send nominations to pkopsky@stltoday.com.

PLEASE REPORT YOUR GAMES Coaches are reminded to report results throughout the year and have a variety of options. The preferred method is with the username and password issued for datacenter.statsonline.com. We also can be reached by phone (314-830-5400), fax (314-830-5454) or email (stats@stltoday.com).

STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 12.01.2016

BOYS BASKETBALL • PREVIEW SPOTLIGHT

READY TO ROAR Edwardsville has pieces in place to make long postseason run BY DAVID KVIDAHL STLhighschoolsports.com

EDWARDSVILLE • Now that Jayson Ta-

tum’s four-year reign as the focal point of all things basketball in the area has come to a close, what is left to fill the void? In a word — plenty. The basketball talent is deep and plentiful in these parts. It is spread across every river and through each conference. Some have more than others. But none has more than the Southwestern Conference. The top-ranked recruit in Illinois is East St. Louis center and Illinois recruit Jeremiah Tilmon. Not far behind is Belleville East’s standout guard and Illinois signee Javon Pickett. Belleville West is where you’ll find rising sophomore star EJ Liddell and senior post Tyler Dancy. “This is as good as the league has been since I’ve been coaching,” Edwardsville coach Mike Waldo said. “It’ll be hard to win games.” Edwardsville, though, is where you’ll find the deepest, most-experienced roster in the league. The Tigers went 25-5 last season and ran the table to finish 14-0 and win their league outright. It’s one of the reasons Edwardsville is the No. 1 team in the STLhighschoolsports.com largeschools preseason rankings. Four starters return from that team, and not a one of them is a high-major basketball talent. At least not yet. Senior point guard Mark Smith verbally committed to pitch at Missouri before opening up his options this summer to consider basketball instead of baseball. A sensational junior season that saw him average 14 points, 7 rebounds, 8 assists and 2 steals might have had something to do with it. The 6-foot-4 Smith enters his third-year as a starter and the extension of Waldo on the court. A year older and a year stronger, Smith can make his case this winter he’s a top-tier basketball prospect. “It’s something I’ve worked for,” Smith said. “Coach Waldo is a great coach. I’ve matured a lot since sophomore year. “I think you go out there and play how he tells us to play and execute his game plan. Right now I’m just trying to focus on my grades. It’s good options to have. I’m just trying to take it all in right now and win. I’m just trying to win games.”

BEN LOEWNAU • STLhighschoolsports.com

Oliver Stephen (31) is one of the key returning pieces for the Edwardsville boys basketball team, which is No. 1 in the STLhighschoolsports.com preseason large-school rankings.

If there is one thing players do for Waldo, it’s win. In his 34 seasons as a coach, the last 29 at Edwardsville, Waldo is 683-255. At Edwardsville he has 602 victories, nine Southwestern Conference titles and 20 regional championships. Already a member of the Illinois Basketball Coaches Association Hall of Fame, Waldo brushes of the plaudits for his success. “It makes me think about all of the great kids and people I’ve worked with,” Waldo said. This version of the Tigers is as close as it can be without actually being family. Smith, senior shooting guard Oliver Stephen and senior post AJ Epenesa have played together since they were in fourth grade. They’ve grown up on the varsity together. This is the last time they’ll get to share the bond of basketball together before life takes them along their own paths. “We’ve all played together forever. We just have a good feel for each other,” Epensa said. “We have a good connection as a group. We make each other better on the court.” Stephen opened the season out with a bang. He hit 10 3-pointers in an 80-52 season-opening win against Waterloo at

the Highland Tournament. It’s the second time he’s done that in the past two seasons. Epenesa (6-5) is verbally committed to play football at Iowa. So this is his last hurrah not only with his teammates but with a game he has loved much of his life. He averaged 17 points, 13 rebounds and three assists as a junior. If he has one hope for his senior year, it’s to do something he’s never experienced — go on a playof run. Last year the Tigers went unbeaten in conference but league rival Alton knocked them out in the sectional semifinal. It was the second year the Redbirds beat the Tigers when the season was on the line. That has only fueled Edwardsville in the ofseason. “Last two years I’ve started on varsity, Alton has knocked us out of the playofs. We have a chip on our shoulder for Alton specifically but playofs in general. We can get to a super-sectional and move on because we have that capability as a team,” Epenesa said. “I feel like we’re straight up talented enough and we work too hard to not get to that point. If we don’t get to that point we should be disappointed in ourselves.”

BOYS BASKETBALL • PLAYERS TO WATCH Daniel Farris, guard, Vashon, senior The brains and heart of the Class 4 champion, Farris has a penchant for delivering in the clutch, particularly at the free-throw line. Averaged 15 points per game as a junior and routinely did most of his scoring in the second half. The 5-foot-11 loor general takes a backseat to no point guard in the area. Jordan Goodwin, guard, Althof, senior The leading contender for Mr. Illinois Basketball this season, the 6-foot-4 Goodwin is a unique talent. Undersized but blessed with a big motor, the St. Louis University signee is never outworked or outhustled. Averaged 19 points, 9 rebounds and 3 assists as a junior as he led Althof to the Class 3A state championship. Carte’Are Gordon, junior, Webster Groves, forward The highest-rated prospect in the state in his class, the 6-foot-9 Gordon verbally committed to St. Louis U. in the fall. Transferred to Webster Groves at semester break last season after playing at Vianney freshman and part of sophomore season. Will be eligible the third week of January. Averaged 20 points, 12 rebounds, 2 assists, 1 steal and 3 blocks at Vianney. Brandon McKissic, guard, SLUH, senior Combo guard will have the chance to show of his ability to distribute the ball this season for the Jr. Billikens. The 6-foot-2 McKissic averaged 15 points, 4 rebounds, 4 assists and 1 steal as a junior. A University of Missouri–Kansas City signee, surpassed 1,000 career points in season opener this week. Javon Pickett, guard, Belleville East, senior One of the two local jewels in the Illinois 2017 recruiting class, Pickett can ill it up in a hurry. The 6-foot-4 combo guard averaged 24 points and 6 rebounds last season.

Courtney Ramey, guard, Webster Groves, junior One of the most dynamic players in the area, the 6-foot-4 Ramey is a loor general who can score, rebound, defend and ind open teammates. A varsity stalwart since he was a freshman, averaged 18 points, 9 rebounds, 5 assists and 3 steals as a sophomore. Mark Smith, guard, Edwardsville, senior A sensational all-around athlete, the 6-foot-4 Smith verbally committed to pitch for Missouri but now is considering his options, including basketball. Averaged 14 points, 7 rebounds, 8 assists and 3 steals as a junior. Jeremiah Tilmon, center, East St. Louis senior After a year away at La Lumiere School, Tilmon returned to inish his high school career where it began. The 6-foot-11 true center is the consensus top-rated recruit in Illinois. Became the highestrated recruit to pledge to Illinois coach John Groce when he signed in November. Averaged 11 points, 7 rebounds and 4 blocks as a sophomore at East St. Louis. Torrence Watson, guard, Whitield, junior An explosive ofensive presence, the 6-foot-4 Watson averaged 19 points last season as he helped Whitield to the Class 3 state semiinals. His Rivals.com proile lists 10 ofers including Missouri, St. Louis U., Creighton, Marquette and Texas A&M. Should have plenty of opportunities to showcase all-around game with a young team around him. Wyatt Yess, forward, Parkway West, senior Big enough to play inside, skilled enough to play on the perimeter, Yess is a matchup nightmare. The 6-foot-8 Yess averaged 15 points, 9 rebounds, 2 assists, 1 steal and 2 blocks per game as a junior. Committed to Yale.

WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS BOYS BASKETBALL Mehlville 20 15 26 5 66 Bayless 20 15 26 5 17 M: Adams III 14, Hughes 12, Adams 10. FG 28 (7), FT 3-9. Westminster 17 12 14 20 72 FZ South 16 8 19 22 78 W: DeGroot 18, Webb 15, Stewart 12, Cusumano 11. FG 25 (7), FT 15-16. F: Bellinger 32, Thomas 23, Jordan 21. FG 31 (2), FT 14-21. SLUH 15 15 10 18 58 Vianney 15 12 11 25 63 S: McKissic 24, Sanders 15, Leritz 12. FG 23 (3), FT 9-13. V: Krus 27, Braun 15, Cochran 13. FG 17 (6), FT 23-28. Windsor 10 12 8 15 45 DuBourg 13 9 17 19 58 W: Haight 19. FG 16 (1), FT 12-19. D: Noah 25, Retting 14. FG 22 (3), FT 10-14. Trinity 14 23 19 17 73 Haz. East 16 14 17 17 64 H: Fultz 18, Walls 16, Wilson 16. FG 26 (3), FT 9-23. Luth. South 13 31 14 21 79 Lutheran SC 7 11 20 9 47 L.: Yaeger 29, Daube 12, Waller 11, Fournie 10. FG 28 (2), FT 21-26. Le: Jones 16, Mecker 11, Wright 10. FG 17 (1), FT 10-18. Lift For Life 19 7 22 8 56 Miller Career 19 17 31 19 86 L: Love 16, Davis 12, Brown 10. FG 23 (1), FT 9-19. M (4-1): Perkins 14, Hayes 13, Bonner 11, Hutchins 11. FG 38 (7), FT 3-9. Okawville 14 17 18 15 64 Hillsboro, Il 12 7 6 20 45 O: N. Frederking 25, Ganz 12, C. Frederking 10. FG

21 (5), FT 17-21. H: Fenske 22, White 11. FG 18 (5), FT 4-9. Lebanon 19 30 16 12 77 Fath.McGivney 10 9 14 19 52 L: Guthrie 20, D. Krumsieg 18. FG 32 (9), FT 4-7. F: Shumate 23, Jones 13. FG 17 (4), FT 15-22. Haz. Central 16 12 16 15 59 Bellvl. West 23 17 17 22 79 H: S. Williams 15, C. Williams 11, Wright 11. FG 21 (8), FT 9-13. B: Dancy 19, Liddell 18, Fox 13, Randolph 13, Matthews 10. FG 31 (3), FT 14-23. Crossroads 6 7 5 3 21 Kennedy 12 11 17 10 50 K (3-3): McAleenan 21. FG 20 (7), FT 3-0. Cahokia 19 17 15 11 62 Haz. West 6 10 10 15 41 H: Thornton 14. FG 17 (2), FT 5-15. Troy 11 6 20 14 51 Rock Bridge 24 17 17 23 81 T: Bassham 17, Nett 17. FG 18 (8), FT 7-11. Pky. West 15 10 14 16 55 Pky. Central 21 8 16 7 52 PW: Yess 20, Swiney 12. FG 18 (4), FT 15-22. PC: Campbell 23. FG 19 (3), FT 11-18. Pky. North 8 11 17 10 46 Pky. South 14 18 10 21 63 PN: Goodwin 8. FG 18 (5), FT 5-9. PS: Weiss 15, A. Sommer 14, McArthy 12, Unger 11, Welin 11. FG 20 (4), FT 19-21. Columbia 7 12 13 13 52 Wesclin 8 12 16 9 60 C: Holmes 26. FG 22 (4), FT 4-8. W: Ottensmeier 31, Stephens 10. FG 21 (7), FT 11-17. Red Bud 11 11 15 7 44 Chester 6 17 24 8 55 R: Grohmann 14, Ziebold 11. FG 13 (2), FT 16-24. C: Martin 13, Golding 10, Smith 10. FG 21 (6), FT 7-14. Pinckneyville 7 8 18 18 51

Carlyle 6 12 14 12 44 P: Rulevish 14, Jausel 10. FG 17 (5), FT 12-17. C: Cox 14. FG 15 (2), FT 12-17. Hancock 18 11 15 16 60 JohnBurroughs 8 16 22 25 71 J: Goldfarb 32, D. Miller 14, Nicolais 12. FG 22 (10), FT 17-24. GIRLS BASKETBALL FZ West 5 16 13 7 41 Nerinx Hall 11 15 15 14 55 N: Lanter 16, McArthur 13, Graf 11. FG 17 (1), FT 20-23. Grandview 8 2 11 11 32 Principia 8 16 15 3 42 P: Demaree 12, Hinds 12. FG 13 (8), FT 8-11. FH Central 12 14 10 6 42 MICDS 18 14 12 7 51 F: Ebert 12, Curry 10. FG 17 (5), FT 3-6. M: L. Hughes 14, Parks 10. FG 16 (6), FT 13-22. Pky. West 8 7 6 9 30 Pky. Central 24 9 8 17 58 PW: Martenet 7. FG 11 (0), FT 8-16. PC: G. Stephens 17. FG 21 (5), FT 11-21. Pky. North 18 8 14 17 57 Pky. South 6 10 10 10 36 PN: Stovall 14, Pimentel 12, Belcher 10. FG 22 (3), FT 10-17. PS: Steins 9. FG 13 (2), FT 8-18. Marquette 11 17 10 14 52 Summit 2 11 11 6 30 M: Drumm 20, Lomantini 13. FG 20 (4), FT 8-14. CSOMB 2 4 4 2 12 Soldan 22 17 16 13 68 S: Huggans 23, Thomas 17, Jackson 10. FG 26 (5), FT 11-22. JohnBurroughs 14 9 13 12 48 Metro 9 12 10 7 38 J: Gill 19. FG 18 (3), FT 9-16.

M (3-3): Goldman 10. FG 16 (2), FT 4-8. Bellvl. West 9 11 9 12 41 Mater Dei 10 7 15 8 40 B (5-0): Darough 16. FG 15 (5), FT 6-11. M: Winkeler 11, Beckmann 10. FG 13 (3), FT 11-20. Cleveland 0 0 0 0 22 Roosevelt 7 12 11 14 44 R: Washington 21, Jones 12. FG 17 (6), FT 4-8. Ritenour 10 6 8 13 37 Clayton 16 14 15 16 61 R: Ramey 14. FG 15 (0), FT 7-16. C: Jones 15, Conner 11, Sams 11, Crittenden 10. FG 25 (0), FT 11-29. Liberty 15 18 19 11 63 Herculaneum 19 12 26 16 73 L: Kruse 26, Ingle 17, Shaefer 10. FG 25 (3), FT 10-15. Trinity 2 2 16 10 30 Lift For Life 8 14 11 6 39 T: Fite 12. FG 11 (2), FT 6-15. L: McKinney 16, Shabazz 10. FG 10 (4), FT 15-27. Lafayette 10 12 18 15 55 Webster 12 16 10 9 47 L: Harris 15, Terry 10. FG 20 (2), FT 13-19. W: Stewart 17. FG 16 (4), FT 11-20. Bowling Green 9 7 16 13 45 Hermann 16 17 19 12 64 H: Stiers 32, Schannuth 15. FG 17 (6), FT 24-34. WRESTLING Brentwood 60, St. Mary’s 18 Lafayette 53, Timberland 18 Afton 36, University City 33 University City 39, Clayton 36 Gateway STEM 48, Cleveland 24 Gateway STEM 60, Vashon 12 University City 36, O’Fallon Christian 15

THURSDAY’S SCHEDULE BOYS BASKETBALL SpringfieldCentral vs. Lafayette at Parkview, 4 p.m. Windsor vs. Bayless at Affton, 5 p.m. St. Louis Knights at Winfield, 5 p.m. Union vs. Bolivar, at Branson, 5:30 p.m. Brentwood vs. Orchard Farm at Valley Park, 5:30 p.m. McKinley at Northwest Academy, 6 p.m. Gateway STEM vs. Sumner at Miller Career, 6 p.m. O’Fallon Christian vs. Timberland at Winfield, 6:30 p.m. ME Lutheran at Lutheran North, 7 p.m. Lafayette vs. SpringfieldCentral at Parkview, 7 p.m. Valley Park vs. Principia at Valley Park, 7 p.m. De Smet at Parkview, 7 p.m. St. Paul Lutheran vs. St. Louis Patriots at Crystal City, 7 p.m. Fulton vs. Hermann at Montgomery Co, 7 p.m. New Athens at Freeburg, 7:15 p.m. DuBourg vs. Mehlville at Affton, 8 p.m. Warrenton vs. Fort Zumwalt East at Winfield, 8 p.m. St. James at Sullivan, 8 p.m.

GIRLS BASKETBALL Bayless vs. Hancock at Affton, 3:30 p.m. Bolivar vs. Union at Branson, 4 p.m. Holt at Troy, 4 p.m. Orchard Farm vs. Northwest Academy at Kennedy, 5 p.m. Jennings at Lutheran South, 5:30 p.m. Visitation vs. O’Fallon Christian at Lutheran SC, 5:30 p.m. St. Dominic vs. Westminster at Troy, 5:30 p.m. FH North vs. Haz. Central at Northwest-CH, 5:30 p.m. Gillespie at Vandalia, 6 p.m. Nokomis at Mount Olive, 6 p.m. Alton Marquette at Brussels, 6 p.m. Bunker Hill at Roxana, 6 p.m. Crystal City vs. St. Vincent at Valle, 6 p.m. Rosati-Kain at Pattonville, 6 p.m. McCluer S-Berkeley at Clayton, 6 p.m. Marissa at Dupo, 6:15 p.m. Okawville at Greenville, 6:15 p.m. Fort Zumwalt North at Warrenton, 6:30 p.m.

Valley Park vs. Kennedy at Kennedy, 6:30 p.m. ME Lutheran at Madison, 6:30 p.m. DuBourg vs. Affton, at Affton, 6:30 p.m. St. Louis Patriots at Cleveland, 6:30 p.m. Borgia vs. Gateway STEM at Luth. South, 7 p.m. Timberland vs. St. Charles West, at Lutheran SC, 7 p.m. Fort Zumwalt South vs. Hickman, at Troy, 7 p.m. Ladue vs. Festus, at Northwest-CH, 7 p.m. Jerseyville at Mascoutah, 7:15 p.m. Collinsville at Edwardsville, 7:30 p.m. Waterloo at Civic Memorial, 7:30 p.m. Valmeyer at Lebanon, 7:30 p.m. Cahokia at Althoff, 7:30 p.m. East St. Louis at Alton, 7:30 p.m. Triad at Highland, 7:30 p.m. Carlinville at Hillsboro (Ill.), 7:30 p.m. Gibault at New Athens, 7:30 p.m. Ste. Genevieve at Valle Catholic, 7:30 p.m. Red Bud at Carlyle, 7:45 p.m. Columbia at Wesclin, 7:45 p.m. Eureka vs. St. Charles at Troy, 8:30 p.m.

HOCKEY John Burroughs vs. Clayton at Queeny Park, 6:30 p.m. Summit vs. Lindbergh at South County , 7 p.m. St. Mary’s vs. Parkway West at Queeny Park, 8:15 p.m. Oakville vs. CBC at Affton Rink, 9 p.m. WRESTLING Herculaneum at Festus, 5 p.m. Hancock at Festus, 5 p.m. Herculaneum vs. Hancock at Festus, 5 p.m. St. Clair at De Soto, 5 p.m. Lutheran South at De Soto, 5 p.m. St. Clair vs. Lutheran South at De Soto, 5 p.m. St. Louis U. High at Windsor, 6 p.m. Alton at East St. Louis, 6 p.m. Edwardsville at Collinsville, 6 p.m. O’Fallon at Granite City, 6 p.m. GIRLS SWIMMING McCluer North, Nerinx Hall at Westminster, 4 p.m. Washington at Eureka, 4:30 p.m. Lutheran South at Ursuline at Principia, 6:30 p.m.


B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

BOYS BASKETBALL • PREVIEW SPOTLIGHT

ATHLETES OF THE WEEK Reyondous Estes East St. Louis football A 6-foot-1, 173-pound senior quarterback, Estes led the Flyers to a 26-13 win over Plainield North in the Class 7A title game, He threw three touchdown passes to lift the Flyers to a 20-0 lead by the third quarter. He engineered a drive on the Flyers’ second possession of the game, capping of the march with a 7-yard pass to James Knight on fourth down. Estes then hit Jef Thomas on a 43-yard strike just 1 minute and 42 seconds after the initial score. Estes connected with Thomas again on a 61-yard TD toss in the third quarter. A Mizzou commit, Estes threw for 2,464 yards and 26 TDs this season. Brooke Flowers Metro basketball A versatile 6-foot-4 junior forward/center, Flowers starred at the Springield Southeast Tournament, leading all players in scoring, rebounding and blocked shots. She put up big numbers against Springield Southeast (23 points, 17 rebounds, 13 blocks), East St. Louis (16 points, 15 rebounds, 10 blocks), Decatur MacArthur (33 points, 23 rebounds, ive blocks) and Peoria Central (six points, 15 rebounds). Flowers had opened the season with a 17-point, 17-rebound performance in a win over Gateway STEM. Flowers averaged 16.8 points, 13.2 rebounds and 7.5 blocks last season. Kelly McLaughlin St. Joseph’s basketball A 6-foot-2 senior center, McLaughlin got of to a hot start in two games in the St. Joseph’s Turkey Shootout. In the season opener, she scored 28 points and pulled down 13 rebounds as the Angels pounded Dexter 61-36. She was 10 of 17 from the ield and hit eight of nine free throws. McLaughlin followed by scoring a team-high 16 points and grabbing nine rebounds in a 57-51 loss to Rock Bridge. Last season, she earned all-Metro Women’s Athletic Association honors after averaging 13.2 points and 12.5 rebounds. McLaughlin has committed to Miami of Ohio. Jared Phillips Cardinal Ritter basketball A 5-foot-11 junior point guard, Phillips was named the MVP of the Borgia Turkey Tournament after leading the Lions to the championship. In irst round, he inished with 16 points, six rebounds, seven assists and three steals in a 76-65 win over North Tech. Phillips followed with a 17-point, three-steal performance in a semiinal game against Borgia, which the Lions won 63-51. Phillips saved his best game for last, putting up 22 points and four assists in a 67-62 win over McCluer North in the championship game. Mark Smith Edwardsville basketball A 6-foot-5 senior guard, Smith led the Tigers to the championship of the Battling Bulldogs Thanksgiving Tournament at Highland. In the title game, Smith went on a scoring frenzy, pouring in 37 points along with pulling down 10 rebounds and dishing out nine as the Tigers knocked of defending Class 3A champion Althof 81-78. Smith helped the Tigers advance to the title game with big performances in wins over Waterloo (22 points, eight rebounds, 13 assists), Carbondale (31 points, nine rebounds, nine assists) and Highland (14 points, eight rebounds, 12 assists). Allie Troeckler Civic Memorial basketball A 5-foot-10 senior guard/ forward, Troeckler was named the MVP of the Salem Wildcat Thanksgiving Tournament after leading the Eagles to the championship. In ive tournament games, she averaged 19.6 points, 8.8 rebounds, 3.4 assists, 3.8 steals and 3.6 blocks. An all-Missisippi Valley Conference selection the past three seasons, a two-time all-state pick and a second-team All-Metro honoree last season, Troeckler signed with SIU Edwardsville in November. She is less than 100 points from becoming CM’s career leading scorer and is on pace to become the school’s career leader in steals and blocks. Kyren Williams Vianney football A 5-foot-10, 175-pound sophomore receiver, running back, safety and kick returner, Williams amassed 221 total yards and scored four touchdowns in the Griins’ 49-14 win over Fort Zumwalt North in the Class 5 championship game. He carried the ball 15 times for 131 yards with a 48-yard TD run and a pair of 1-yard scores. He also caught ive passes for 90 yards, including a 46-yard TD reception. Williams inished the season among the area leaders in touchdowns (28) and points (172). He rushed for 748 yards and caught 48 passes for 591 yards. Compiled by Paul Kopsky. Send nominations to pkopsky@stltoday.com.

READY TO ROAR Edwardsville has pieces in place to make long postseason run BY DAVID KVIDAHL STLhighschoolsports.com

EDWARDSVILLE • Now that Jayson Ta-

tum’s four-year reign as the focal point of all things basketball in the area has come to a close, what is left to fill the void? In a word — plenty. The basketball talent is deep and plentiful in these parts. It is spread across every river and through each conference. Some have more than others. But none has more than the Southwestern Conference. The top-ranked recruit in Illinois is East St. Louis center and Illinois recruit Jeremiah Tilmon. Not far behind is Belleville East’s standout guard and Illinois signee Javon Pickett. Belleville West is where you’ll find rising sophomore star EJ Liddell and senior post Tyler Dancy. “This is as good as the league has been since I’ve been coaching,” Edwardsville coach Mike Waldo said. “It’ll be hard to win games.” Edwardsville, though, is where you’ll find the deepest, most-experienced roster in the league. The Tigers went 25-5 last season and ran the table to finish 14-0 and win their league outright. It’s one of the reasons Edwardsville is the No. 1 team in the STLhighschoolsports.com largeschools preseason rankings. Four starters return from that team, and not a one of them is a high-major basketball talent. At least not yet. Senior point guard Mark Smith verbally committed to pitch at Missouri before opening up his options this summer to consider basketball instead of baseball. A sensational junior season that saw him average 14 points, 7 rebounds, 8 assists and 2 steals might have had something to do with it. The 6-foot-4 Smith enters his third-year as a starter and the extension of Waldo on the court. A year older and a year stronger, Smith can make his case this winter he’s a top-tier basketball prospect. “It’s something I’ve worked for,” Smith said. “Coach Waldo is a great coach. I’ve matured a lot since sophomore year. “I think you go out there and play how he tells us to play and execute his game plan. Right now I’m just trying to focus on my grades. It’s good options to have. I’m just trying to take it all in right now and win. I’m just trying to win games.”

BEN LOEWNAU • STLhighschoolsports.com

Oliver Stephen (31) is one of the key returning pieces for the Edwardsville boys basketball team, which is No. 1 in the STLhighschoolsports.com preseason large-school rankings.

If there is one thing players do for Waldo, it’s win. In his 34 seasons as a coach, the last 29 at Edwardsville, Waldo is 683-255. At Edwardsville he has 602 victories, nine Southwestern Conference titles and 20 regional championships. Already a member of the Illinois Basketball Coaches Association Hall of Fame, Waldo brushes of the plaudits for his success. “It makes me think about all of the great kids and people I’ve worked with,” Waldo said. This version of the Tigers is as close as it can be without actually being family. Smith, senior shooting guard Oliver Stephen and senior post AJ Epenesa have played together since they were in fourth grade. They’ve grown up on the varsity together. This is the last time they’ll get to share the bond of basketball together before life takes them along their own paths. “We’ve all played together forever. We just have a good feel for each other,” Epensa said. “We have a good connection as a group. We make each other better on the court.” Stephen opened the season out with a bang. He hit 10 3-pointers in an 80-52 season-opening win against Waterloo at

the Highland Tournament. It’s the second time he’s done that in the past two seasons. Epenesa (6-5) is verbally committed to play football at Iowa. So this is his last hurrah not only with his teammates but with a game he has loved much of his life. He averaged 17 points, 13 rebounds and three assists as a junior. If he has one hope for his senior year, it’s to do something he’s never experienced — go on a playof run. Last year the Tigers went unbeaten in conference but league rival Alton knocked them out in the sectional semifinal. It was the second year the Redbirds beat the Tigers when the season was on the line. That has only fueled Edwardsville in the ofseason. “Last two years I’ve started on varsity, Alton has knocked us out of the playofs. We have a chip on our shoulder for Alton specifically but playofs in general. We can get to a super-sectional and move on because we have that capability as a team,” Epenesa said. “I feel like we’re straight up talented enough and we work too hard to not get to that point. If we don’t get to that point we should be disappointed in ourselves.”

BOYS BASKETBALL • PLAYERS TO WATCH Daniel Farris, guard, Vashon, senior The brains and heart of the Class 4 champion, Farris has a penchant for delivering in the clutch, particularly at the free-throw line. Averaged 15 points per game as a junior and routinely did most of his scoring in the second half. The 5-foot-11 loor general takes a backseat to no point guard in the area.

Brandon McKissic, guard, SLUH, senior Combo guard will have the chance to show of his ability to distribute the ball this season for the Jr. Billikens. The 6-foot-2 McKissic averaged 15 points, 4 rebounds, 4 assists and 1 steal as a junior. A University of Missouri– Kansas City signee, surpassed 1,000 career points in season opener this week.

Jordan Goodwin, guard, Althof, senior The leading contender for Mr. Illinois Basketball this season, the 6-foot-4 Goodwin is a unique talent. Undersized but blessed with a big motor, the St. Louis University signee is never outworked or outhustled. Averaged 19 points, 9 rebounds and 3 assists as a junior as he led Althof to the Class 3A state championship.

Javon Pickett, guard, Belleville East, senior One of the two local jewels in the Illinois 2017 recruiting class, Pickett can ill it up in a hurry. The 6-foot-4 combo guard averaged 24 points and 6 rebounds last season. Courtney Ramey, guard, Webster Groves, junior One of the most dynamic players in the area, the 6-foot-4 Ramey is a loor general who can score, rebound, defend and ind open teammates. A varsity stalwart since he was a freshman, averaged 18 points, 9 rebounds, 5 assists and 3 steals as a sophomore.

Carte’Are Gordon, junior, Webster Groves, forward The highest-rated prospect in the state in his class, the 6-foot-9 Gordon verbally committed to St. Louis U. in the fall. Transferred to Webster Groves at semester break last season after playing at Vianney freshman and part of sophomore season. Will be eligible the third week of January. Averaged 20 points, 12 rebounds, 2 assists, 1 steal and 3 blocks at Vianney.

Mark Smith, guard, Edwardsville, senior A sensational all-around athlete, the 6-foot-4 Smith verbally committed to pitch for Missouri but now is considering his options, including basketball. Averaged 14 points, 7 rebounds, 8 assists and 3 steals as a junior.

Jeremiah Tilmon, center, East St. Louis senior After a year away at La Lumiere School, Tilmon returned to inish his high school career where it began. The 6-foot-11 true center is the consensus top-rated recruit in Illinois. Became the highest-rated recruit to pledge to Illinois coach John Groce when he signed in November. Averaged 11 points, 7 rebounds and 4 blocks as a sophomore at East St. Louis. Torrence Watson, guard, Whitield, junior An explosive ofensive presence, the 6-foot-4 Watson averaged 19 points last season as he helped Whitield to the Class 3 state semiinals. His Rivals.com proile lists 10 ofers including Missouri, St. Louis U., Creighton, Marquette and Texas A&M. Should have plenty of opportunities to showcase allaround game with a young team around him. Wyatt Yess, forward, Parkway West, senior Big enough to play inside, skilled enough to play on the perimeter, Yess is a matchup nightmare. The 6-foot-8 Yess averaged 15 points, 9 rebounds, 2 assists, 1 steal and 2 blocks per game as a junior. Committed to Yale.

WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS BOYS BASKETBALL Mehlville 20 15 26 5 66 Bayless 20 15 26 5 17 M: Adams III 14, Hughes 12, Adams 10. FG 28 (7), FT 3-9. Westminster 17 12 14 20 72 FZ South 16 8 19 22 78 W: DeGroot 18, Webb 15, Stewart 12, Cusumano 11. FG 25 (7), FT 15-16. F: Bellinger 32, Thomas 23, Jordan 21. FG 31 (2), FT 14-21. SLUH 15 15 10 18 58 Vianney 15 12 11 25 63 S: McKissic 24, Sanders 15, Leritz 12. FG 23 (3), FT 9-13. V: Krus 27, Braun 15, Cochran 13. FG 17 (6), FT 23-28. Windsor 10 12 8 15 45 DuBourg 13 9 17 19 58 W: Haight 19. FG 16 (1), FT 12-19. D: Noah 25, Retting 14. FG 22 (3), FT 10-14. Trinity 14 23 19 17 73 Haz. East 16 14 17 17 64 H: Fultz 18, Walls 16, Wilson 16. FG 26 (3), FT 9-23. Holt 15 18 15 16 64 Hannibal 14 21 8 12 55 Ho: Jones 15, Forrest 14. FG 25 (3), FT 11-21. Ha: D. Jones 30. FG 22 (5), FT 6-15. Luth. South 13 31 14 21 79 Lutheran SC 7 11 20 9 47 L.: Yaeger 29, Daube 12, Waller 11, Fournie 10. FG 28 (2), FT 21-26. Le: Jones 16, Mecker 11, Wright 10. FG 17 (1), FT 10-18. Lift For Life 19 7 22 8 56 Miller Career 19 17 31 19 86 L: Love 16, Davis 12, Brown 10. FG 23 (1), FT 9-19. M (4-1): Perkins 14, Hayes 13, Bonner 11, Hutchins 11. FG 38 (7), FT 3-9. Lebanon 19 30 16 12 77 Fath.McGivney 10 9 14 19 52 L: Guthrie 20, D. Krumsieg 18. FG 32 (9), FT 4-7. F: Shumate 22, Jones 13. FG 17 (4), FT 14-22. Okawville 14 17 18 15 64 Hillsboro, Il 12 7 6 20 45 O: N. Frederking 25, Ganz 12, C. Frederking 10.

THURSDAY’S SCHEDULE BOYS BASKETBALL SpringfieldCentral vs. Lafayette at Parkview, 4 p.m. Windsor vs. Bayless at Affton, 5 p.m. St. Louis Knights at Winfield, 5 p.m. Union vs. Bolivar, at Branson, 5:30 p.m. Brentwood vs. Orchard Farm at Valley Park, 5:30 p.m. McKinley at Northwest Academy, 6 p.m. Gateway STEM vs. Sumner at Miller Career, 6 p.m. O’Fallon Christian vs. Timberland at Winfield, 6:30 p.m. ME Lutheran at Lutheran North, 7 p.m. Lafayette vs. SpringfieldCentral at Parkview, 7 p.m. Valley Park vs. Principia at Valley Park, 7 p.m. De Smet at Parkview, 7 p.m. Fulton vs. Hermann at Montgomery Co, 7 p.m.

M 2 • THUrSDAy • 12.01.2016

New Athens at Freeburg, 7:15 p.m. DuBourg vs. Mehlville at Affton, 8 p.m. Warrenton vs. Fort Zumwalt East at Winfield, 8 p.m. St. James at Sullivan, 8 p.m. GIRLS BASKETBALL Bayless vs. Hancock at Affton, 3:30 p.m. Bolivar vs. Union at Branson, 4 p.m. Holt at Troy, 4 p.m. Orchard Farm vs. Northwest Academy at Kennedy, 5 p.m. Jennings at Lutheran South, 5:30 p.m. Visitation vs. O’Fallon Christian at Lutheran SC, 5:30 p.m. St. Dominic vs. Westminster at Troy, 5:30 p.m.

FG 21 (5), FT 17-21. H: Fenske 22, White 11. FG 18 (5), FT 4-9. Haz. Central 16 12 16 15 59 Bellvl. West 23 17 17 22 79 H: S. Williams 15, C. Williams 11, Wright 11. FG 21 (8), FT 9-13. B: Dancy 19, Liddell 18, Fox 13, Randolph 13, Matthews 10. FG 31 (3), FT 14-23. Afton 3 16 20 20 59 Lindbergh 15 16 15 22 68 A: Williams 18, Gordon 17. FG 20 (8), FT 11-14. L: Davis 20, Lahm 14, Levi 12, Laceield 10. FG 27 (1), FT 13-21. Crossroads 6 7 5 3 21 Kennedy 12 11 17 10 50 C: Chester 11, Lutjens 10. FG 8 (4), FT 1-2. K (3-3): McAleenan 21. FG 20 (7), FT 3-0. Clayton 8 3 16 11 38 St. Charles 16 9 19 12 56 C: Watkins 10. FG 12 (5), FT 9-26. S: Hughes 16, Teson 15, Whitlock 13. FG 18 (5), FT 15-17. Cahokia 19 17 15 11 62 Haz. West 6 10 10 15 41 H: Thornton 14. FG 17 (2), FT 5-15. Troy 11 6 20 14 51 Rock Bridge 24 17 17 23 81 T: Bassham 17, Nett 17. FG 18 (8), FT 7-11. R: Mosely 31. FG 29 (12), FT 11-13. Pky. West 15 10 14 16 55 Pky. Central 21 8 16 7 52 PW: Yess 20, Swiney 12. FG 18 (4), FT 15-22. PC: Campbell 23. FG 19 (3), FT 11-18. Pky. North 8 11 17 10 46 Pky. South 14 18 10 21 63 PN: Goodwin 8. FG 18 (5), FT 5-9. PS: Weiss 15, A. Sommer 14, McArthy 12, Unger 11, Welin 11. FG 20 (4), FT 19-21. Red Bud 11 11 15 7 44 Chester 6 17 24 8 55 R: Grohmann 14, Ziebold 11. FG 13 (2), FT 16-24. C: Martin 13, Golding 10, Smith 10. FG 21 (6), FT 7-14. Pinckneyville 7 8 18 18 51 Carlyle 6 12 14 12 44 P: Rulevish 14, Jausel 10. FG 17 (5), FT 12-17. C: Cox 14. FG 15 (2), FT 12-17.

FH North vs. Haz. Central at Northwest-CH, 5:30 p.m. Gillespie at Vandalia, 6 p.m. Nokomis at Mount Olive, 6 p.m. Alton Marquette at Brussels, 6 p.m. Bunker Hill at Roxana, 6 p.m. Crystal City vs. St. Vincent at Valle, 6 p.m. Rosati-Kain at Pattonville, 6 p.m. McCluer S-Berkeley at Clayton, 6 p.m. Marissa at Dupo, 6:15 p.m. Okawville at Greenville, 6:15 p.m. Fort Zumwalt North at Warrenton, 6:30 p.m. Valley Park vs. Kennedy at Kennedy, 6:30 p.m. ME Lutheran at Madison, 6:30 p.m. DuBourg vs. Affton, at Affton, 6:30 p.m. St. Louis Patriots at Cleveland, 6:30 p.m. Borgia vs. Gateway STEM at Luth. South, 7 p.m. Timberland vs. St. Charles West, at Lutheran SC, 7 p.m. Fort Zumwalt South vs. Hickman, at Troy, 7 p.m.

Columbia 7 12 13 13 52 Wesclin 8 12 16 9 60 C: Holmes 26. FG 22 (4), FT 4-8. W: Ottensmeier 31, Stephens 10. FG 21 (7), FT 11-17. St. Vincent 19 19 20 10 68 Crystal City 12 11 7 2 32 C (1-4): DeGeare 15, Blanks 14. FG 12 (1), FT 7-10. Hancock 18 11 15 16 60 JohnBurroughs 8 16 22 25 71 J: Goldfarb 32, D. Miller 14, Nicolais 12. FG 22 (10), FT 17-24. Maplewood-RH 17 15 12 5 49 Whitield 10 19 16 13 58 M: Womak 26, Becton 12. FG 21 (5), FT 2-7. W: Watson 32. FG 20 (5), FT 13-17. Hickman 15 9 9 13 46 Howell 15 16 19 16 66 Hi: Thomas 17. FG 13 (3), FT 17-25. Ho: Brohm 20, Schark 10. FG 26 (4), FT 10-14. GIRLS BASKETBALL FZ West 5 16 13 7 41 Nerinx Hall 11 15 15 14 55 N: Lanter 16, McArthur 13, Graf 11. FG 17 (1), FT 20-23. Grandview 8 2 11 11 32 Principia 8 16 15 3 42 P: Demaree 12, Hinds 12. FG 13 (8), FT 8-11. FH Central 12 14 10 6 42 MICDS 18 14 12 7 51 F: Ebert 12, Curry 10. FG 17 (5), FT 3-6. M: L. Hughes 14, Parks 10. FG 16 (6), FT 13-22. Pky. West 8 7 6 9 30 Pky. Central 24 9 8 17 58 PW: Martenet 7. FG 11 (0), FT 8-16. PC: G. Stephens 17. FG 21 (5), FT 11-21. Pky. North 18 8 14 17 57 Pky. South 6 10 10 10 36 PN: Stovall 14, Pimentel 12, Belcher 10. FG 22 (3), FT 10-17. PS: Steins 9. FG 13 (2), FT 8-18. Ritenour 10 6 8 13 37 Clayton 16 14 15 16 61 R: Ramey 14. FG 15 (0), FT 7-16. C: Jones 15, Conner 11, Sams 11, Crittenden 10. FG 25 (0), FT 11-29.

Ladue vs. Festus, at Northwest-CH, 7 p.m. Jerseyville at Mascoutah, 7:15 p.m. Collinsville at Edwardsville, 7:30 p.m. Waterloo at Civic Memorial, 7:30 p.m. Valmeyer at Lebanon, 7:30 p.m. Cahokia at Althoff, 7:30 p.m. East St. Louis at Alton, 7:30 p.m. Triad at Highland, 7:30 p.m. Carlinville at Hillsboro (Ill.), 7:30 p.m. Gibault at New Athens, 7:30 p.m. Ste. Genevieve at Valle Catholic, 7:30 p.m. Red Bud at Carlyle, 7:45 p.m. Columbia at Wesclin, 7:45 p.m. Eureka vs. St. Charles at Troy, 8:30 p.m. HOCKEY John Burroughs vs. Clayton at Queeny Park, 6:30 p.m. Summit vs. Lindbergh at South County , 7 p.m. St. Mary’s vs. Parkway West at Queeny Park, 8:15 p.m.

CSOMB 2 4 4 2 12 Soldan 22 17 16 13 68 S: Huggans 23, Thomas 17, Jackson 10. FG 26 (5), FT 11-22. JohnBurroughs 14 9 13 12 48 Metro 9 12 10 7 38 J: Gill 19. FG 18 (3), FT 9-16. M (3-3): Goldman 10. FG 16 (2), FT 4-8. Bellvl. West 9 11 9 12 41 Mater Dei 10 7 15 8 40 B (5-0): Darough 16. FG 15 (5), FT 6-11. M: Winkeler 11, Beckmann 10. FG 13 (3), FT 11-20. Cleveland 22 Roosevelt 7 12 11 14 44 R: Washington 21, Jones 12. FG 17 (6), FT 4-8. Liberty 15 18 19 11 63 Herculaneum 19 12 26 16 73 L: Kruse 26, Ingle 17, Shaefer 10. FG 25 (3), FT 10-15. Trinity 2 2 16 10 30 Lift For Life 8 14 11 6 39 T: Fite 12. FG 11 (2), FT 6-15. L: McKinney 16, Shabazz 10. FG 10 (4), FT 15-27. Lafayette 10 12 18 15 55 Webster 12 16 10 9 47 L: Harris 15, Terry 10. FG 20 (2), FT 13-19. W: Stewart 17. FG 16 (4), FT 11-20. Bowling Green 9 7 16 13 45 Hermann 16 17 19 12 64 H: Stiers 32, Schannuth 15. FG 17 (6), FT 24-34. Marquette 11 17 10 14 52 Summit 2 11 11 6 30 M: Drumm 20, Lomantini 13. FG 20 (4), FT 8-14. WRESTLING Brentwood 60, St. Mary’s 18 Lafayette 53, Timberland 18 Afton 36, University City 33 University City 39, Clayton 36 Gateway STEM 48, Cleveland 24 Gateway STEM 60, Vashon 12 University City 36, O’Fallon Christian 15

Oakville vs. CBC at Affton Rink, 9 p.m. WRESTLING Herculaneum at Festus, 5 p.m. Hancock at Festus, 5 p.m. Herculaneum vs. Hancock at Festus, 5 p.m. St. Clair at De Soto, 5 p.m. Lutheran South at De Soto, 5 p.m. St. Louis U. High at Windsor, 6 p.m. Alton at East St. Louis, 6 p.m. Edwardsville at Collinsville, 6 p.m. O’Fallon at Granite City, 6 p.m. GIRLS SWIMMING McCluer North, Nerinx Hall at Westminster, 4 p.m. Washington at Eureka, 4:30 p.m. Lutheran South at Ursuline at Principia, 6:30 p.m.


NEWS

12.01.2016 • ThurSday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCh • B9

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T H E E A S I E S T WAY T O F I N D A V E H I C L E

Acura

4025 Chevrolet

'07 Acura RDX: Technology Package, One Owner, Clean Carfax, Navigation, Sunroof/Moonroof, $9,990 #8949A

'10 Acura TL 3.7: Clean Carfax, Backup Camera, Navigation, Bluetooth $14,490 #94533D

4065 Ford

'15 Chevy Sonic: Hatchback, Silver, Only 8K Miles, Nice Price $11,499 #SC1415

'15 Chevy Sonic LT: 4 Dr, Alloys, 2K Miles, GMCertified, $14,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

4110 Honda

'13 Ford Fusion SE: Sterling Gray, Only 6K Miles, Call Today, $15,799 #H161997A

'14 Acura MDX, Tech pkg, Black, Local Trade. $36,490 #C7998B

'12 Acura TL: AWD, White, 58K Miles, Sharp! #V17146A, $21,980

Audi

4040

'11 Audi Q7 Prestige Quattro, 55K Mi, Has It All! #B7926, $34,990

BMW

4050

'12 BMW 650xi Convertible, Spt Pkg, 41K, Black, #B7997, $41,400

'07 BMW 328xi : AWD, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats, Moonroof $11,990 #27061A

'10 BMW 535i xDrive : Heated Front Seats, Navigation, Bluetooth, Heated Door Mirrors, Seat Memory $10,990 #26693B

'11 BMW 328i xDrive: Clean CARFAX, AWD, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof/Moonroof, $13,490 #10772A

'10 BMW 535i xDrive: AWD, Clean CARFAX, Sunroof/Moonroof, Bluetooth, Heated Front Seats $13,990 #P8723A

Buick

4055

'15 Buick LaCrosse: Black, Leather, 2.4L, 14K Miles, GM Certified, $19,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '11 LaCrosse CXL: 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Sunroof, Remote Start, Bluetooth $12,990 #39026A

'13 Camaro ZL1 10K Mi., Loaded, Fresh Tires, Local Trade, #B7838A Honda $41,400

'03 Chevy Cavalier: 66K Mi, Automatic, White, $5,990 #C17087B

'14 Corvette Triple Black, 3LT, 6K Mi., Auto, #B8212 $52,980

'12 Chevy Cruze LTZ: White, 91K Miles, Htd Power Lthr, Bluetooth, Fog Lights, $9,999 #SC1446A

'11 Chevy Cruze LT: Turbo, 53K Miles, Alloys, $10,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '12 Chevy Cruze LT: Turbo, 33K Miles, One Owner, $11,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '12 Chevy Cruze LTZ: Leather, 93K Miles, Only $8,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '10 Chevy HHR LS: 4 Cyl, 80K Miles, Local Trade, $7,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '16 Chevy Impala LTZ: V6, 16K Miles, GM Certified, $25,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '12 Chevy Impala LT: V6, 60K Miles, One Owner, Sharp, $10,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '15 Chevy Impala LS: 4 Cyl, 14K Miles, GM Certified, $18,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '13 Chevy Malibu LS: Black, 26K Miles, Balance of Factory Warranty,

4060

'09 Cadillac SRX V6: Leather and Theater Packages, AWD, Clean Carfax, Sunroof $9,990 #8870B

'14 Cadillac ATS: 4Dr. Turbo, AWD, Navi/Luxury Edition, Silver, Only 15K Miles Now $23,499 #AT1640

'08 Cadillac CTS: 4 Dr, Sunroof, Navigation, Black, Sharp, $11,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

Chevrolet

4065

'10 Chevy Cobalt LS: 4 Cyl, FWD, Bluetooth, Priced Below Average, Motor Trend Certified Call Today, $7,490 #10898A

'14 Chevy Cruze ECO: 4 Cyl, FED, One Owner Clean Carfax, GM Certified $10,990 #35252A

'14 Chevy Cruze: ECO 4 Cyl, FWD, Clean CARFAX, GM Certified, Bluetooth, Manual Transmission $10,990 #35252A

'11 Chevy Malibu 1LT: Bluetooth, Flex Fuel, Satellite Radio, Keyless Entry, Call Today, $7,990 #38111D

'12 Chevy Malibu 1LS: FWD, One Owner, Clean Carfax, Keyless Entry, Premium Sound, $7,990 #95418A

'13 Honda Civic EX: Motor Trend Certified, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Bluetooth $13,976 #P8703A

'12 Honda Civic Si: Clean Carfax, 6 Speed Sunroof/Moonroof, Navigation, Bluetooth Premium Sound $13,990 #10835B

'14 Honda Civic LX: FWD, One Owner Clean CARFAX, Motor Trend Certified, Low Miles, $12,990 #26544A

'13 Honda Fit: 5 Dr, Hatchback, Honda Certified, H160695A, Crystal Black, Only 24K Miles $13,499 #H160695A

'15 Honda CRZ: 2 Dr, Hybrid, Black, Only 1,xxx Miles, Like New, Honda Certified $13,499 #X3010

'14 Accord EX-L Coupe, 17K miles, Black/Black #C7793B $20,490

'13 Honda Accord LX: 4 Dr, Silver Metallic, 41K Miles, Bluetooth, Alloys, B/U Camera, Auto Climate Control, $15,999 #X3035

'08 Honda Accord EX: 4 Cyl, Black, Power Seat, Moonroof, 90K Miles, $9,899 #DL1325

SPECIAL APR 1.9% ON CERTIFIED HONDAS Now thru December 12th 7 Year/100K Mile Warranty '14 Ridgeline RTL: 4WD, Silver Metallic, 22K Miles, Reduced $30,999 #H170174A '13 Fit Hatchback: (3) to choose from Now Starting at $13,499 Crystal Black, Only 24K Miles! #H160695A '13 Civic LX: 4 DR's, 7 To Choose, Polished Metal, B/U Camera, Bluetooth, 37K Miles, Largest Inventory in Midwest Now Starting at $13,499 #X3010 '13 CRV EX: AWD, Urban Titanium, 36K Miles, Alloys, Moonroof, Bluetooth, Back Up Camera, $19,699 #X3003 '13 Accord Sport (s): (4) to Choose From, 18" Alloys, Fog Lights, White, $17,999 #H170190A '14 CRV LX: AWD, Pearl White, 34K Miles, Bluetooth, Backup Camera, $18,699 #H161558C '13 Accord LX: 4 Door, Silver Metallic, Bluetooth, Alloys, Backup Camera, Auto Climate, 41K Mi, Priced To Sell Fast, $15,999 #X3035 '14 Odyssey EXL: With Rear DVD, Smoky Topaz, Loaded! $28,499 #H162304A '13 Civic EX: Coupe, Polished Metal Metallic, Moonroof, Alloy Wheels, Bluetooth, Camera, 38K Miles, Reduced $13,799 #X2980 '12 Pilot EXL: 4WD, Polished Metal, Power Moonroof, Only 48K Miles, Heated Leather, $25,999! #H162133B

Hyundai

'14 Chevy Malibu LTZ, A lot of car for little money, #B7653B, $15,990

'13 Chevy Spark LS: 5 Dr, Alloys, 26K Miles, GMCertified, $9,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

Chrysler

'14 Honda Civic LX: White, 41K Miles, Honda Certified, Pre-Owned, Bluetooth, Camera, $13,299 #H162135A

4070

14 Chrysler 300S, AWD, Black/Black, Sharp, Only 17K Miles $22,290 #SC1400

'13 Chrysler 200: Limited, V6, Sunroof, 21K Miles, 1 Owner, $14,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

Dodge

$10,999 #H162147B

'10 Honda Civic EX: 4 Dr, Polished Metal, Alloys, Moonroof, 127K Miles, Value Priced, $8,995 #DL1321

'13 Honda Civic LX: 5 To Choose, Polished Metal, 37K Miles, Largest Selection in Midwest, Starting At $13,499 #X3010

'08 Dodge Avenger SE: 2.4L, 4 Cyl, Auto, FWD, Power Windows & Locks, Remote Keyless Entry, Call Today, $5,490 #P8346B

'14 Charger R/T: Chromes, 4 New Tires $24,480 #M15337A

Ford

4110

'13 Hyundai Veloster: Hatchback, 4 Cyl, FWD, Clean Carfax, Bluetooth, Nav/GPS, Backup Camera, $12,990 #27057B

'16 Hyundai Genesis: AWD, 4K Sunroof, Navi #C8268A, $42,490

'12 Elantra LTD: Only 48K Miles, Beige Metallic, Will Go Fast! #H161936A $10,299

'16 Hyundai Elantra SE: 4 Door, 27K Miles, One Owner, $12,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

Ininiti

4085

Find it. Sell it. Buy it. Post it.

4125

'12 Hyundai Sonata: Leather Heated Front Seats, Bluetooth, Sunroof/Moonroof $11,490 #10773A

'11 Honda Civic LX: White, Only 71K Miles, High Quality,

'13 Ford Focus: Lthr, Roof, Nav, 33K Mi, #B8267 $12,990

'13 Ford Fusion Hybrid SE, #V15493B, $14,990

'14 Kia Sorento LX: Gray, Only 21K Miles, Bluetooth, 17" Alloys, Nice Price, Call Now! #SC1362 $14,995

'15 Kia Soul: 2 To Choose From, White, Low payment, Starting at $12,699 #H161715A

Lexus

4165

'07 Lexus IS 250: One Owner, Clean Carfax, AWD, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats $14,990 #39052A

'07 Lexus RX 350: Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, AWD, Sunroof Call Today! $11,990 #96060A

'06 Infiniti M35x: AWD, Low Miles, Sunroof, Heated Front Seats, Bose System $10,490 #27172A

'09 Infiniti G37x Base: AWD, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats, Bluetooth, Sunnroof Call Today, $13,990 #26670A

'06 Infiniti G35 X: Clean Carfax, AWD, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, Premium Package $10,490 #95163B

Repeat as necessary.

Jeep

'08 Lexus ES 350 Base: Clean CARFAX, Low Miles, Leather, Sunroof/Moonroof Call Today, $13,990 #P8673A

Mazda

314-621-6666

'13 Mazda Mazda3 i: Sport, 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Mazda Certifed $14,490 #38264A

'12 Mazda Mazda 3i: Touring, One Owner, Clean Carfax, Mazda Certified Pre-Owned $11,490 #10827A

'15 Mazda Mazda3 i: Sport, One Owner Clean CARFAX, Madza Certified, Includes Balance of Warrenty $14,990 #8894A

'12 Mazda Mazda CX-7i: 1 Owner, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Keyless Entry, Cruise Control, $10,990 #10779A

'12 Mazda Mazda2: Touring, Hatchback, Clean Carfax, Red, Cruise Control $8,990 #10881A

'12 Mazda Mazdaspeed 3: 59K Miles, Red, Local Trade, $17,990 #V17193A

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Mercedes Benz

4190

'08 Mercedes Benz E Class Base: Clean CARFAX, Low Miles, Leather Trimmed Seats, $11,990 #26680A

'12 CHEVY CRUZE LT

2010 CHEVY HHR LS

DISCOUNT CORNER 1-866-2449085 '12 Toyota Avalon: Limited, Leather, Sunroof, Auto $18,490

'13 Lexus GX460: 36K Miles, Loaded, Black w/Tan, $39,490

'13 Chevy Traverse LTZ: AWD, 44K Mi, Loaded, $28,450

'13 Volvo XC60: Leather, Sunroof, Black on Black, $29,990

'13 Ford Fusion: Hybrid, Awesome MPG, $14,990

'13 Chevy Camero ZT1: 10K Miles, Local Trade, $40,400

'12 BWM 650: Convertible, x-Drive, Navigation, Auto, Black, $41,490

'11 Audi Q7 S-Line: Quattro, Black, 55K Mi, $34,900 '14 Honda Accord EX-L: Coupe, 17K Miles, Black, $20,400

'12 Toyota Rav 4: Sport, 43K Miles, 4WD, Black, $16,900

'13 Mercedes Benz C300: 4MATIC, Black, Navigation, Sport Package,

'12 BMW 650xi: Convertible 41K Miles, Auto, Like New, $41,400

'14 Subaru Legacy: 3.6L, Auto, Full Pwr $20,400

Mitsubishi

'14 GMC Sierra: 16K Mi, Local Trade, $19,400

4215

'07 Mitsubishi Eclipse Spyder GS Convertible: Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Premium Sound System $7,990 #27116B

4387 Sport Utilitiy

Nissan/Datsun

'04 Mini Cooper S: Local Trade, White Hatchback #C8248A $7,490

'11 Mini Cooper S: Contryman, Clean Carfax, Sunroof, Turbocharged Call Today, $14,990 #26717B

Take a test drive on

4220

'11 Nissan Altima 2.5 S: 4 Cyl, FWD, Clean CARFAX, Motor Trend Certified, Low Miles, Call Today, $10,490 #26063B

'13 Nissan Altima 2.5: Clean Carfax, Leather Trimmed Seats, Heated Front Seats, Bluetooth, Sunroof/Moonroof, $14,490 #P8725A

'12 GMC Terrain SLE-1: Clean Carfax, Backup Camera, Bluetooth, Satellite Radio Call Today! $12,990 #95156B

'09 Buick Enclave CXL: Navigation, Heated Front Seats, DVD, Bluetooth, Sunroof $13,990 #27097B

'10 GMC Yukon XL 1500: One Owner, Clean CARFAX, 4WD, Navigation, Backup Camera, $14,990 #27205A

'12 Chevy Equinox LS: 4 Cyl, FWD, Clean CARFAX, Remote Keyless Entry, Satellite Radio, $6,990 77269A

'13 Chevy Equinox 1LT: 1 Owner Clean Carfax, AWD, Low Miles, Backup Camera, Bluetooth $19,990 #78140A

'10 Chevy Equinox LT: One Owner, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Bluetooth, Sunroof $12,990 #95248A

'05 Chevy Avalanche 1500: Low Miles, 4WD, Sunroof, Alloy Wheels, Flex Fuel Bose System $11,990 #27114B

'14 Honda Ridgeline SE: Lthr, Navigation, $30,490 '09 VW EOS: Auto, 75K Miles, $11,490 '12 GMC Acadia: SLT1: 66K Miles, , Leather, Quad Seats, $21,490

'10 Chevy Equinox LT: 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Sunroof, Bluetooth, Back Up Camera, $11,990 #10857A

'14 Nissan Altima 2.5S: Silver, 4 Door, Only 18K Miles, Priced To Sell, $15,999 #SC1444

'13 Nissan Maxima SV: Only 15K Miles, Silver Metallic, Htd Power Leather, Moonroof, 3.5 V6, Nice! $19,699 #SC1343

Pontiac

4250

'09 Pontiac G6 Coupe: 59K Miles, Automatic, Warranty $7,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

4290

'13 Subaru XV Crosstrek: Premium AWD Crossover, Pearl White, Only 24K Miles, Call Today #SC1327 $18,499

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'08 Chevy Suburban 1500T: New Tires, Clean Carfax, 4WD, Heated Front Seats, Premium Package, $15,490 #77162A

'09 VW EOS Luxury, Auto, Black, V8114 $11,400

'17 Cadillac XT5: Luxury, Black C17027R $45,740

4330

'05 Chevy Silverado 1500: AWD, Security System, Priced Below Average $7,990 #77552B

'14 Chevy 2500: HD, Reg Cab, 4x4 WT, V8, One Owner, $22,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '15 Chevy 1500 LT: Double Cab, 4x4, V6, GM Certified, 12K Mi, $27,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

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'15 Tahoe LTZ 20xxx Miles, Every Option, White!! Stk #C16349A $56,490

Dodge Plymouth Trucks 4335

'12 Ram 2500: Laramie, 4WD, #M16648A $42,470

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'06 Chevy Trailblazer, DVD, 3rd Row V16388B $6,490 '13 Chevy Traverse LTZ: AWD, Loaded, $28,400 #B8065

4300

'13 Toyota Corolla LE: 4 Cyl, FWD, Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified $13,490 #38249A

'12 Toyota Prius: Hatchback, 1 Owner, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Navigation $11,990 #P8751

Ford Trucks

'14 Ford F-150 STX: Extended Cab, 4x4, V6, Black, 12K Miles, One Owner, $26,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

GMC Trucks

4345

'14 GMC Sierra A Must Sell, Very Cheap, #V16121A, $19,400

Honda Trucks '12 Toyota Corolla: Clean CARFAX, Fuel Efficient, Bluetooth, Sunroof/Moonroof, $9,990 #P8670D

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'13 GMC Acadia SLT: AWD, Roof, Quad Seats, $28,900 #B8066

'07 Honda CRV EX: 1 Owner Clean Carfax, AWD, Sunroof, Multi-Disc changer. Perfect Color Combination $9,490 #10819A

4347

'10 Honda Ridgeline RT 4WD, Silver, 127K Miles, Timing Service Completed, 1 Owner, Clean Carfax #H170086A $14,999

Misc Trucks

4370

'02 Lincoln Blackwood, 59K, Leather, Sunroof, C17184A $17,490

Crossovers

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Mini vans 4340

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4390

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Toyota 4207

4155

'13 Kia Optima LX: 19K Miles, Gray, $13,499 SC1377 2 others to choose from

Bommarito ST. PETERS

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Subaru

4145

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4310 Crossovers

4185

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Kia

4210 Volkswagen

'05 Porsche 911:

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'15 CHEVY 1500 LT

4155 Misc. Autos

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4130 Mini Cooper

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$28,499 #H170127A

'14 BUICK ENCORE 1.4

HONDA CERTIFIED CLEARANCE EVENT

$13,299 #H170207A

'14 300S, AWD, Sunroof, Nav, 24K Miles, One Owner, $22,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

Cadillac

4120

4120 Kia

BOMMARITO HONDA SUPERSTORE 1-888-204-9202

'14 Ford Taurus Loaded, 38K, #C15246RA, $27,990

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'13 Infiniti EX-37 Journey: Loaded, #B8167, $27,990 '10 Ford Edge Lmtd: One Owner, Clean CARFAX, Heated Front Seats, Bluetooth, Sunroof/Moonroof $11,990 #95424A

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'12 Expedition EL, 4WD, Leather, White, B8230 $20,980

4387

'14 Toyota Corolla: 2 To Choose From, Magnetic Gray, 19K Miles, Starting at $12,999 #SC1401

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'15 CHEVY TAHOE LT

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4X4, SNRF, DVD, 25K, GM CERT., #P05769

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'13 CHEVY VOLT PREM

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'15 CHEVY TRAVERSE 2LT

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'16 JEEP PATRIOT

'16 RAM 1500 QUAD CAB SLT

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LTHR., 31K, GM CERT., 1 OWNR, STK# P05871

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5DR., 16K, 1 OWNR, GM CERT., STK# P05794

AWD, 22K, SNRF, DVD, GM CERT., #P05793

SXT, V6, 3RD ROW, 1 OWNR, STK# P05721

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'08 CADILLAC CTS V6 4DR

'13 CHEVY IMPALA LTZ

'12 CHEVY IMPALA LS

'15 CHEVY IMPALA LS

'14 FORD F-150 EXT CAB SXT

'16 JEEP CHEROKEE

'15 VW BEETLE BUG

AWD, 3.6 V6, NAV., BLACK, STK# 170175A

SNRF, HTD LTHR., 78K MI., STK# P05733A

V6, ALLOYS, STK# P05745A

'15 CHEVY SUBURBAN LT

4X4, SNRF, DUAL DVD, 23K, GM CERT., #P05770

4 CYL., 17K, GM CERT., 1 OWNR, STK# P05832

4X4, V6, 12K MI., 1 OWNR, STK# 160721A

NAV., LAT, 25K MI., 1 OWNR, STK# P05758

TURBO, 36K MI., 1 OWNR, STK# P05822

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4420

'16 Chrysler Town & Country: Touring, (2) To Choose, DVD, Loaded, Black, 25K Miles, Just Reduced! $20,999 AT1661

'16 Chrysler Town & Country: Touring, Rear DVD, Leather, 4 TO CHOOSE! $21,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '09 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT: 3.8L V6, FWD, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, 3rd Row Seating, $8,990 #95428B

'16 Dodge Journey SXT: Gray, 25K Miles, Hurry In! $17,399 #AT1704

'10 VW Routan SE: Cocoa Bean, Only 38K Miles, Hurry In, #H162226A $14,999

Vans

4430

'16 2500 Express Van LT: 12 Passenger, 24K Miles, $23,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

'15 Ford Transit: Passenger Van, Local Trade, $24,490 #C8183B


BASEBALL

B10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 12.01.2016

NOTEBOOK Clapp named new Memphis manager Endearing because of his scrappy style of play and nickname, Richard “Stubby” Clapp, a reserve inielder in 2001, always will have a place in Cardinals lore. Now he is in their employ again. Native Canadian Clapp, who had been working as the Class AAA hitting coach in the Toronto system, has been named manager of the Cardinals’ Class AAA ailiate in Memphis, where he was hugely popular as a player for four seasons from 1999-2002. Clapp batted .200 on ive-for-25 hitting for the Cardinals. He played four seasons at Memphis from 1999-2002 and was the irst Redbirds player to have his number retired. Clapp, who replaces Mike Shildt, promoted to “quality control” coach at the major-league level, also has coached and managed in the Houston organization besides his work with

Toronto. General manager John Mozeliak said he had had a list of a dozen candidates for the Memphis job. “He stuck out,” said Mozeliak. Pitching coach Bryan Eversgerd and hitting coach Mark Budaska will return to those roles at Memphis. Johnny Rodriguez will move to Class AA Springield from short-season State College. Chris Swauger, who managed the Cardinals rookie-league Johnson City team the past two seasons, has been promoted to Class A Peoria. Dann Bilardello, who had managed Springield, will guide Class A Palm Beach next season. Joe Krugel will manage at State College, Roberto Espinoza will be at Johnson City, Steve Turco at Gulf Coast and Frey Peniche for the Cardinals’ Dominican Republic summer league team. (Rick Hummel) MLB players, owners reach tentative deal • Baseball players and owners reached

a tentative agreement on a ive-year labor contract Wednesday night, a deal that extends the sport’s industrial peace to 26 years since the ruinous ights in the irst two decades of free agency. After days of near roundthe-clock talks, negotiators reached a verbal agreement about 3½ hours before the expiration of the current pact. Then they worked to draft a memorandum of understanding, which must be ratiied by both sides. The deal extends the sport’s labor peace to 26 years since 1995. As part of the deal, the luxury tax threshold rises from $189 million to $195 million next year, $197 million in 2018, $206 million in 2019, $209 million in 2020 and $210 million in 2021, the person said. Tax rates increase to 20 percent for irst ofenders, 30 percent for second ofenders and 50 percent for third ofenders. There also is a new surtax of 12 percent

MISSOURI VS ILLINOIS

40 big-league games overall. OF Joyce reaches deal with A’s • The Oakland Athletics have found their potential new right ielder, agreeing to terms with Matt Joyce on an $11 million, two-year contract. The 32-year-old has played 140 games in three of the last four seasons, batting .242 with 13 home runs and 42 RBIS this year for Pittsburgh.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Minnesota has signed former Houston catcher Jason Castro to a three-year contract worth $24.5 million.

for teams $20 million to $40 million above the threshold, 40 percent for irst ofenders more than $40 million above the threshold and 42.5 percent for second or subsequent ofenders more than $40 million above. There will be a new penalty for signing certain free agents that could afect a team’s draft order. There is no change to limits on active rosters, which remain at 25 for most of the season and 40 from Sept. 1 on. Management failed to obtain an international draft of amateurs residing outside the U.S., Puerto Rico and Canada but did get a hard cap on each team’s annual bonus pool for those players. Negotiators met through most of Tuesday night in an efort to increase momentum in the negotiations, which began during spring training. This is the third straight time the sides reached a new agreement before expiration, but in 2006 and 2011 a deal was struck weeks in advance. Talks took place at a hotel outside Dallas where the players’ association held its annual executive board meeting.

Cespedes, Mets inalize contract • Yoenis Cespedes and the New York Mets have inalized a $110 million, fouryear contract. A two-time All-Star, Cespedes gets $22.5 million in 2017, $29 million in each of the following two seasons and $29.5 million in 2020. The 31-year-old receives a full no-trade provision as part of the agreement, the largest for a free agent thus far this ofseason. The deal’s $27.5 million average annual value ties former Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez for the secondhighest among position players, trailing only Miguel Cabrera’s $29.2 million with Detroit. Lyles, Rockies agree to deal • Facing the possibility of getting cut by the Colorado Rockies later this week, righthander Jordan Lyles agreed to a one-year contract worth $3,175,000 — a $200,000 raise. Lyles was mostly used out of the bullpen by the Rockies last season. He made the irst of his 35 relief appearances on June 22 after being recalled from Triple-A Albuquerque and went 4-5 with a 5.83 ERA in

Twins sign Castro • The Minnesota Twins have signed former Houston Astros catcher Jason Castro to a three-year contract worth $24.5 million. The deal was agreed to last week and inalized Wednesday. Castro will make $8.5 million in 2017, $8 million in 2018 and $8 million in 2019. He became a free agent after six seasons with the Astros, hitting .232 with 114 doubles, 62 home runs, 212 RBIs and 215 walks in 617 career games. Phillies hire former Twins GM as scout • The Phillies have hired former Minnesota Twins general manager Terry Ryan as a special assignment scout. Philadelphia announced the appointment Wednesday, about 4½ months after Ryan was ired in the middle of his 19th season as GM of the Twins. Ryan spent 31 years with the organization, starting in 1986 as the scouting director. Braves inalize agreement with Rodriguez • The Atlanta Braves have inalized an $11.5 million, two-year contract with utility player Sean Rodriguez. The 31-year-old provides depth with major league starts at every position except catcher. He hit .270 with 18 homers and 56 RBI — all career highs — for Pittsburgh in 2016. Staf and wire reports

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MON. - SAT. 10-7 • SUN. 12-5

E ! E E S ID S IN

J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / C O M I C S

Thursday • 12.01.2016 • EV DUSTIN • By Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker

DILBERT • By Scott Adams

SALLY FORTH • By Francesco Marciuliano and Jim Keefe

BABY BLUES • By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE • By Stephan Pastis GARFIELD • By Jim Davis

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM • By Mike Peters MUTTS • By Patrick McDonnell

DEFLOCKED • By Jeff Corriveau PRICKLY CITY • By Scott Stantis

PICKLES • By Brian Crane

HI AND LOIS • By Brian and Greg Walker and Chance Browne

RHYMES WITH ORANGE • By Hilary B. Price

BEETLE BAILEY • By Mort and Greg Walker

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE • By Lynn Johnston

SUDOKU

THE PAJAMA DIARIES • By Terri Libenson

EVERYDAY


EVERYDAY

EV2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

BRIDGE TIPS • BOB JONES Neither vulnerable, South deals. NORTH ♠7 5 ♥A Q 8 7 3 ♦K Q 6 4 3 ♣A WEST EAST ♠10 4 ♠A 9 2 ♥J 10 9 4 ♥K 5 2 ♦A J 10 7 ♦8 2 ♣K J 10 ♣Q 8 7 3 2 SOUTH ♠K Q J 8 6 3 ♥6 ♦9 5 ♣9 6 5 4 The bidding: SOUTH WEST NORTH EAST 3♠ Pass 4♠ All pass Opening lead: Jack of ♥ If you asked a group of 100 bridge experts to list the top 10 players of all time, Bob Hamman, from Texas, would be on every list and at the top of many. Hamman was South in today’s deal. Hamman won the opening heart lead with dummy’s ace, cashed the ace of clubs, and quickly cross-ruffed four tricks, felling the king of hearts in the process. This was the position: NORTH ♠Void ♥Q 8 ♦K Q 6 4 3 ♣Void

WEST ♠10 4 ♥10 ♦A J 10 7 ♣Void SOUTH ♠K Q J 8 ♥Void ♦9 5 ♣9

EAST ♠A 9 2 ♥Void ♦8 2 ♣Q 8

Hamman led dummy’s queen of hearts. Had East rufed, there would have been an easy road to 10 tricks, so East shed a diamond, preparing for his own ruf, as Hamman shed his last club. The king of diamonds now would have been fatal — ace of diamonds, diamond ruff, club, forcing a high ruf from Hamman. The king of spades to the ace and another club would have promoted the 10 of spades into the setting trick. Hamman led a heart instead, discarding a diamond as West ruffed. West cashed the ace of diamonds and led another one. East rufed with the nine of spades and Hamman over-rufed with the jack. Now the king of spades pinned the 10 and Hamman had his contract. (12/01/16)

Across 1 Blu-ray ancestor 4 European History and Physics C: Mechanics, for two 11 One may be open at the bar 14 Fair-hiring inits. 15 Midriff-showing garment 16 “Kinda sorta” 17 Area ___ 18 Tile in a mosaic 19 The “World’s Most Dangerous Group” 20 Like fish and chips 22 Like many celebrity memoirs 24 Some gold rush remnants 25 Sister publication of 16 Magazine 26 What’s done in Haiti? 27 Suffix with drunk 28 Column on an airport screen: abbr.

29 #1 hit for Bill Withers (1972) and Club Nouveau (1987) 32 ___ es Salaam 34 Address not found on a GPS 35 Full of ghosts … like four answers in this puzzle? 37 “Now I ain’t sayin’ ___ a gold digger” (Kanye West lyric) 40 ___ Pérignon (brand of bubbly) 41 Milton Berle hosted the world’s first one 43 Berry said to have anti-aging qualities 46 Crew leader, for short 47 Advice between “buy” and “sell” 48 Zapper 51 Campfire entertainment

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

tcaeditors@tribune.com

CRYPTOQUIP

If Dec. 1 is your birthday • This year you have a way of looking at personal matters that will allow you to see the best way of handling them. If you are single, you could meet someone of signiicance this year. If you are attached, the two of you can be found playfully swapping jokes and laughing. Capricorn might be full of him- or herself.

WORD GAME December 1 WORD — NOVELLA (NOVELLA: no-VEL-uh: A short prose tale or novel.) Average mark 18 words. Time limit 35 minutes. Can you find 26 or more words in NOVELLA? The list will be published tomorrow. YESTERDAY’S WORD — QUARTZITE tier azure quart tire azurite quartet titer rate quartz trait ratite quiet treat raze quire trite rite quirt true tare quit tzar tart quite zeta taut quitter irate tauter quiz etui tear urea teat utter tetra attire RULES OF THE GAME: 1. Words must be of four or more letters. 2. Words that acquire four letters by the addition of “s,” such as “bats” or “dies,” are not allowed. 3. Additional words made by adding a “d” or an “s” may not be used. For example, if “bake” is used, “baked” or “bakes” are not allowed, but “bake” and “baking” are admissible. 4. Proper nouns, slang words, or vulgar or sexually explicit words are not allowed.

53 Monster film hit of 1984 54 How the fashionable dress 56 Grp. that brought Colbert to Baghdad 57 “That was over the line” 59 Like on Twitter, informally 60 Bleu expanse 61 School assignment specification 62 Word before “Happy New Year!” 63 It went boom, for short 64 Repeat offenses, metaphorically 65 GPS lines: abbr.

Down 1 Sink or swim, e.g. 2 Package delivery person 3 Fit for a queen 4 It follows a curtain-raising 5 Inauguration VIP: abbr. 6 Comedian Daniel 7 Brief records, in brief 8 Knight’s ride 9 Shredded 10 4,200 feet, for the Golden Gate Bridge 11 One involved with underground rock bands? 12 “This ___!” (fighting words) 13 Tête-à-têtes 21 Element #50

HOROSCOPE • JACQUELINE BIGAR Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. The stars show the kind of day you’ll have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Diicult.

CROSSWORD

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 12.01.2016

ARIES (March 21-April 19) ★★★★ Your sense of direction and your dedication point you toward making signiicant changes. You might have to answer to a demanding boss or relative. Tonight: On top of the world. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) ★★★★★ You could see a situation in a very diferent light if you speak to someone you care about who has insight into your true personality. Your high energy will help you avoid a problem at the last minute. Tonight: Happiest surrounded by friends. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) ★★★ One-on-one relating takes you down a new path. Your imagination helps you see how creative you can be when dealing with others. You might ind that you’ll gain a lot if you can detach and see a situation from a new perspective. Tonight: All smiles. CANCER (June 21-July 22) ★★★★ You will feel much more in touch with what is happening within a special relationship if you open up. You might ind that you can break through any barriers as a result. Tonight: “Yes” is the only answer. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) ★★★★ You could be in a position where you want to take your time and make a key decision. How you handle a personal matter could change as the day goes on. Plan on some downtime for yourself. It is possible to be too much of a people person sometimes. Tonight: As you like it.

Find more free games, or subscribe to get access to more than 50 others, at STLtoday.com/games, where you’ll also find a link to the Puzzle Society.

Puzzle by Milo Beckman

23 Ingot, e.g. 25 Home of the Thunder, the Double-A affiliate of the Yankees 26 Certain bug 27 ___ Darya 30 “Now you’re talking!” 31 “Smokey, this is not ___. This is bowling. There are rules” (“The Big Lebowski” quote)

32 Joe Biden’s home: abbr. 33 Suffix with hater 36 Ted Cruz’s home: abbr. 37 Aimed at 38 Suriname colonizer 39 Last song recorded by all four Beatles, with “the” 40 German article 42 By way of: abbr. 43 Reunion attendees

44 Welfare worker’s workload 45 Of ___ (so to speak) 46 More adorable 49 Boxing segments: abbr. 50 Joint ailment 51 Bit of dust 52 Tap options 54 Take a long bath 55 Fashion’s ___ Saint Laurent 58 Early fifth-century year

Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/puzzleforum. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords. No. 1027

WORD SCRIMMAGE

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) ★★★★ You could be in one of your most creative moments. You know what you want, and you know how to get there. You might mix some exciting moments into your plans. You are unusually attractive right now. Tonight: In the moment. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) ★★★★ You know that there is much more to do, and you will enjoy doing it. Deal with a confusing personal matter, even if it is driving you a little crazy. Tonight: Have a serious discussion with a friend. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) ★★★★ You are full of pizazz and fun, but others might ind it diicult to relate to you in an open manner. You seem to be more comfortable being less serious, but what have you been missing out on as a result? Tonight: Indulge yourself a little.

Solutions at bottom of page

WONDERWORD

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) ★★★★ You might be more prepared than others for what is coming down the pike. A quick exchange of words could be more signiicant than you realize. Take no one for granted. Tonight: Say “yes” to an ofer. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) ★★★★ You are full of life and quite capable of convincing anyone of anything. You will maintain your distance when there is a problem. Create a perfect day to relax and unwind. Tonight: Ask and you shall receive. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) ★★★ You are generally a calm yet outspoken thinker. Right now, however, you seem to have transformed into an almost too assertive personality who is determined to get whatever he or she wants. Tonight: Play it low-key.

WORDY GURDY

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) ★★★★ You might want to reach out to someone at a distance whom you care a lot about. Understand where each of you is coming from. Tonight: Be where the action is. STLtoday.com/horoscopes Get expanded horoscope information: star charts, peak times, outlooks and Chinese Zodiac data.

JUMBLE


EVERYDAY

12.01.2016 • ThurSday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCh • EV3

DEAR ABBY

WHAT’S THE DIFF? Find six diferences between the panels.

Wife’s job at the gym worries husband My wife has no interest in marriage counseling but tells me I should seek professional help for my issues. — THREATENED IN TEXAS Dear Threatened • Part of your wife’s job is to be friendly to the members of that gym. It doesn’t mean that she’s involved with any of them outside of work. The problem with jealousy and insecurity is that unless they are managed, they tend to feed on each other and grow. While I can’t banish the suspicions from your mind, some sessions with a licensed mental health professional might help you to put them into perspective. It may save your marriage. Dear Abby • I take a maintenance pain pill for arthritis. I count them every other day to make sure that I’m not taking too many. My daughter has been coming to my house a lot lately, and — not every time, but off and on — I’ll count my pills after she

leaves, and my count doesn’t match the one from the day before. Sometimes I’m missing almost all of them, but when I talk to my daughter and ask if she took them, she always says she didn’t. If I ask nicely, “Are you sure?” she accuses me of calling her a liar. I know she’s taking them, but I don’t know what to do about her lying to me about it. I really need the pills for myself. What should I do? — IN PAIN IN KANSAS Dear In Pain • Your daughter may have become addicted to your pain medication or be selling them to people who are. It’s time to start keeping your pills under lock and key. Once you do, your daughter may be forced to come clean about the lying — or you may find you’re seeing a lot less of her than you currently do. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, Calif. 90069.

Diferences: 1. Ball is moved. 2. Leg is moved. 3. Foot is moved. 4. Stripe is missing from helmet. 5. Arm is shorter. 6. Cap is reversed.

Dear Abby • My wife and I have been married for almost 11 years and have three children. About four years ago my wife cheated on me and left. After a six-week split, we decided we wanted to work things out. Everything was great — until recently, when she got a job working at a busy gym. Several of the guys from the gym have added her on Facebook and send her messages. They like all her posts and pictures. I work out there and when I go in, I see her laughing and joking with them. This has all started to bring me flashbacks to when she cheated. I tried talking to her about how I feel, but she just says they are my insecurity issues and I need to deal with them. At this point, I’m contemplating divorce so I won’t go through the same pain I went through last time. I check her Facebook page constantly to see if she has added any new guys and see what comments they are leaving. I know it’s not healthy, and it makes me constantly depressed.

DR. FOX

TV THURSDAY

Inhumanity of catching, releasing cats

For complete channels and 24-hour program information, customize your own TV listings at STLtoday.com/tv.

Dear Dr. Fox • You recently ran a letter about National Feral Cat Day, which is an insult to the domestic cat, our most popular beloved pet. Forcing unadoptable cats to live and die outdoors through the misguided practice of trapneuter-release (or abandon) rather than receive a quick, humane death is cruel and irrational. As the director of a cat shelter, I have witnessed too many who sufer miserably with prolonged deaths from parasite infestations or systemic infections from injuries or diseases transmitted by fleas and other animals. After one trip to the clinic for sterilization, these cats will never receive any palliative care for the many afflictions they may eventually acquire. Cats do not belong on farms, where they can contaminate farm animals and vegetable crops with toxoplasmosis gon-

dii oocysts — spread via feces — which they catch while hunting native wildlife, not just pest species. Animal shelters were created to prevent cruelty to animals, not for people to do what makes them feel good. The true heroes are open-admission shelter stafs who make diicult but compassionate decisions for the sake of the animals while cleaning up the problems that irresponsible people leave behind. Love your cats by keeping them safe on your own property and away from wildlife. I spent three months this past summer fighting the crazy “nokill” people at town board meetings because they didn’t approve of euthanizing feral cats instead of applying TNR to them. They basically spread lies about me stalking cats in backyards and taking people’s cats! It was quite frightening. I came through with

the help of my supporters and from three veterinarians. — Gail Mihocko, Project Cat director, Accord, N.Y. Dear G.M. • I agree with you; communities endorsing TNR without question are undoubtedly betraying what I consider a sacred duty to care for cats and all creatures great and small. In most communities, releasing cats to live permanently outdoors is an abdication of responsibility for wildlife protection, public health and cats’ welfare. Visit Dr. Fox’s website at DrFoxVet.net. Send mail to animaldocfox@gmail.com or to Dr. Michael Fox in care of Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut Street, Kansas City, Mo. 64106.

12/1/16

7:00

7:30

8:00

8:30

FOX Rosewood Rosewood Pitch: Scratched. Ru2 and Villa go to Cuba. (N) mors put Mike in the spotlight. (7:59) (N) CBS The Big 4 Bang Theory

9:00

9:30

Fox 2 News at 9:00pm (N) (cc)

The Great Mom (8:01) Life in Pure Genius A radical Indoors (N) (cc) Pieces (N) remote surgery is at(7:31) (N) (cc) tempted. (N) (cc)

NBC ÎFootball ÍNFL Football: Dallas Cowboys at Minnesota Vikings. The 5 Night first-place Cowboys visit the Vikings in Week 13 action. (7:20) (N) (cc) PBS Donnybrook 9

CW 11

News 11 at 7:00PM (N) (cc)

IND Judge 24 Hatchett (cc)

Ric Edelman’s The Truth About Retirement Planning for a secure retirement. (cc)

ÍHamilton’s America

DC’s Legends of Tomor- Supernatural Vince row: Invasion! (N) (cc) Vincente plans to kill his fans. (N) (cc)

Justice for Daniel Boone All

Here’s Help The Lucy Show (cc)

ABC A Charlie Brown Christ- The Great American Baking Show: Cake Week; 30 mas (cc) Cookie Week. Bundt cakes inspired by winter flavors. (N) (cc) Blue Bloods A car from Blue Bloods An elusive MYTV Blue Bloods Jamie’s 46 behavior is questioned. a classic film is stolen. serial killer taunts (cc) (cc) Danny.

CleanSweep ! E L A S D N E R YEA

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AMERICAN MADE


EVERYDAY

EV4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

THE FAMILY CIRCUS • By Bil Keane

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 12.01.2016

DR. KEITH ROACH

ZITS • By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

Efective treatment for voices in head Dear Dr. Roach • Years ago, I went to a doctor for sinus problems. He needed to put a drainage hole in my ear. For a while, everything was fine. But now I hear people talking to me. They say they are hooked up to my head. They talk through my head day and night, and I can’t get any peaceful sleep or rest. Sometimes they talk very ugly and vulgar. They know everything I think, say or write, and they tell me about it. I seem to be losing my memory as well. Do you know what this is? I’m 78 years old, and I need my life back. — I.A.

FUNKY WINKERBEAN • By Tom Batiuk

SPEED BUMP • By Dave Coverly

BIZARRO • By Dan Piraro

Answer • The voices are not real. They are called auditory hallucinations, and they are the hallmark of a general class of mental illnesses called psychoses. Schizophrenia is a common cause of auditory hallucination, but it is unusual to see someone at 78 years old with the first episode. In older adults, psychosis can be the result of a large number of medical conditions. The best thing for you to do is see both a psychiatrist and a medical doctor (that is, a doctor specializing in a field like internal medicine or family practice) so you can be evaluated. It’s very important that you go right away, as there is very efective treatment to stop the voices and get your life back.

CORNERED • By Mike Baldwin NON SEQUITUR • By Wiley Miller

DUPLEX • By Glenn McCoy

Dear Dr. Roach • I have been reading about former President Ronald Reagan and the way he was treated for cancer. The reports say he was treated in Germany with oxygen therapy and was cured. Why aren’t more doctors using this treatment if it was so successful? Is it a money thing? — M.F.L.

MARMADUKE • By Brad Anderson

TINA’S GROOVE • By Rina Piccolo

Answer • The historical record shows that President Reagan was treated in 1985 for a cancerous polyp at Bethesda Naval Medical Center. His cancer was found during a routine colonoscopy. It was successfully treated with surgery, requiring removal of a section of colon. He underwent another colonoscopy in 1987, and four polyps were removed, none of which was cancerous. Oxygen therapy is not an appropriate or effective treatment for colon (or other) cancer, which usually is curable if found early enough. This is why I agree with the recommendations for colon cancer screening, most commonly done via colonoscopy. I found on the internet two separate versions of the story that President Reagan was treated in Germany. There is no evidence to support either of them. I agree that the story here is about money — but it’s about unscrupulous people preying on fears of cancer to promote an expensive and useless treatment.

DRABBLE • By Kevin Fagan

MARK TRAIL • By James Allen

LOLA • By Todd Clark ZIGGY • By Tom Wilson

Dr. Roach regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but will incorporate them in the column whenever possible. Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med.cornell.edu or request an order form of available health newsletters at 628 Virginia Drive, Orlando, Fla. 32803.

OTHER COAST • By Adrian Raeside

TAKE IT FROM THE TINKERSONS • By Bill Bettwy

THE ARGYLE SWEATER • By Scott Hilburn

BLONDIE • By Dean Young and John Marshall

See more comics and play interactive games at STLtoday.com/comics


12.1.16