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S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 1 8 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

WEDNESDAY • 11.30.2016 • $1.50

‘WALKING THROUGH HELL’ A wildfire rages in this photo provided to CNN by the National Park Service. Fanned by strong winds and the Southeast’s worst drought in nearly a decade, at least 14 fires burned in and around Gatlinburg, Tenn., forcing evacuations from the popular tourist getaway and nearby communities — including Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

hree dead in Tennessee ires housands lee as winds whip up furious blazes in Smoky Mountain resort area BY STEVE MEGARGEE AND JONATHAN MATTISE Associated Press

GATLINBURG, TENN. • With flames

dripping from tree branches like lava and the air filled with embers, thousands of people raced through a hell-like landscape as they fled from wildfires that killed three people and destroyed hundreds of homes and a resort in the Great Smoky Mountains. Fanned by hurricane-force winds, the flames reached the doorstep of Dollywood, the theme park named after country music legend and local hero Dolly Parton. But the attraction was spared any significant damage. The fires spread quickly on Monday night, when winds topping 87 mph

whipped up the flames, catching residents and tourists in the Gatlinburg area by surprise. Police banged on front doors and told people to get out immediately. Some trekked 20 minutes to catch lifesaving rides on trolleys usually reserved for tours and wedding parties. “There was fire everywhere. It was like we were in hell,” said Linda Monholland, who was working at Park View Inn in Gatlinburg when she and five other people fled on foot. “Walking through hell, that’s what it was. I can’t believe it. I never want to see something like that again in my life, ever.” “Hell opened up,” her co-worker Sissy Stinnett said. In all, more than 14,000 residents and See FIRES • Page A6

High court judge Teitelman dies at 69

THE TENNESSEAN VIA AP

Smoke rises around the charred remains of two vehicles Tuesday in Gatlinburg, Tenn. Wildfires spread quickly Monday night, forcing thousands of tourists and residents to flee.

Trump taps Washington, Wall Street for Cabinet

MLS: Just one group in contention here

BY KURT ERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BY MIKE FAULK St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • Richard B. Teitelman, Missouri’s first legally blind Supreme Court judge, has died. Judge Teitelman, known as “Rick,” began his service on the state’s high court in March 2002 and served as its chief justice from July 2011 through June 2013. He was 69. Details of his death were not immediately Teitelman available, but his longtime colleague and friend, former Supreme Court Justice Michael Wolff, said Teitelman had been ailing for several years.

On Tuesday, Trump also chose Rep. Tom Price of Georgia to oversee the nation’s health care system, picking the fierce Obamacare critic who has championed efforts to privatize Medicare. And he selected another veteran Republican, Elaine Chao, to lead the Department of Transportation.

If a Major League Soccer team comes to St. Louis, the league has already decided who would own it, MLS President Mark Abbott said by phone Tuesday. Abbott said SC STL, an ownership group led by investors tied to other sports teams including the Cardinals, Blues and the minor league soccer club St. Louis FC, is the “only contender” for team ownership. His comments come less than a day after SC STL’s competitor, Foundry St. Louis, announced a bid to pay $80 million of SC STL’s $200 million downtown stadium proposal. Some see the offer as an attempt to stoke voter opposition to public funding for the

See TRUMP • Page A6

See MLS • Page A5

See JUDGE • Page A5

Tom Price

Steven Mnuchin

BY STEVE PEOPLES, JULIE PACE AND RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR Associated Press

WASHINGTON • President-

elect Donald Trump is tapping a trio of nominees with deep ties to Washington and Wall Street to fill out his Cabinet, including former Goldman Sachs executive Steven Mnuchin as Treasury secretary.

Elaine Chao

Scary scene

TODAY

Messenger: Mike Shannon takes on the Cards in battle to sell his building

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Minimum wage rallies spark arrests as protesters block Hampton • A4

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M 1 WEDNESDAY • 11.30.2016 • A2

Shannon vs. Cards over building sale TONY MESSENGER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Mike Shannon has given his life to the St. Louis Cardinals. Now, he’d like the organization that has been his employer for most of his adult life to get out of his way. Shannon owns the building at 620 Market Street that used to house his restaurant, once one of the most popular hangouts before and after Cardinals baseball games at Busch Stadium, which sits just to the south. In January, Shannon closed his restaurant. Unlike some other restaurant owners in town who had experienced similarly timed closings, he didn’t blame Ballpark Village, the heavily subsidized entertainment and retail establishment adjacent to Busch that is owned by the Cardinals and the Baltimore-based Cordish Cos. “Everybody wants to blame this or that,” he said at the time. “There is no blame.” But Shannon, through his attorney, is singing a diferent tune after struggling to sell his building in a prime location. The building’s marketing is limited by a height restriction in the deed that restricts development on the site to nothing higher than

35 feet. To get rid of the restriction and give the land a fair value, Shannon needs the Cardinals, Cordish and the city’s Land Clearance for Redevelopment Authority to waive the restriction. “He just wants to sell his property and get a reasonable price for it,” said Lathrop and Gage attorney David Sweeney, who represents JBS LLC, Shannon’s limited liability company that owns the building. “Mike just wants an even playing field.” That’s a reference to the Cardinals’ recently announced plans for a second phase of Ballpark Village, in which they are seeking up to $65 million in tax incentives to build a 310-foot apartment tower as well as an oice building and retail center. The new complex is estimated to cost about $220 million. On Wednesday, the proposal for tax incentives goes before a committee of the Board of Aldermen, the first step toward the Cardinals and Cordish obtaining the incentives. Shannon, a former Cardinals right fielder and third baseman and its radio announcer for 45 years, is frustrated, his attorney says, that the Cardinals are seeking public subsidies while standing in the way of the sale of his building for what it’s truly worth. “You’ve got Ballpark Village trying to get tax credits, and meanwhile, they won’t

do right by a guy who is a longtime employee and a lifetime St. Louisan,” Sweeney says. Sweeney says the height restriction dates to 1997, and was related to the old Busch Stadium, not the current one. But Cardinals President Bill DeWitt III says the restriction has actually been connected to the property for more than 50 years. He says the Cardinals and Cordish are willing to waive the deed restriction, if they have some refusal rights over what goes on the land that used to house Shannon’s building. “I’ve been working on this for a couple of years trying to create some options for Mike,” DeWitt said. “We’ve proposed a number of solutions.” At one point, the Cardinals offered to buy the property, though DeWitt said the complicated deal likely didn’t get Shannon the price he was looking for. This summer, the Cardinals agreed to waive the height restriction when Shannon had an offer from a company that wanted to build a giant Ferris wheel on the site. But that proposal got caught up in city politics. The proposal was opposed by Bob O’Laughlin, chairman and chief executive of Lodging Hospitality Management, the company that redeveloped Union Station. O’Laughlin told the city the Ferris wheel would be too close to a similar project his company plans at Union Station.

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM

Morning commuters Tuesday navigated around a homeless man overdosing on K2, facedown in the middle of the road.

MULTISTATE GAMES MEGA MILLIONS Tuesday: 22-33-49-51-59 Mega ball: 08 Megaplier: 4 Estimated jackpot: $25 million POWERBALL Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $40 million

MISSOURI LOTTERIES LOTTO Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $1.4 million SHOW ME CASH Tuesday: 07-22-31-34-35 Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $323,000 PICK-3 Tuesday Midday: 015 Evening: 402 PICK-4 Tuesday Midday: 7927 Evening: 4695

ILLINOIS LOTTERIES LUCKY DAY LOTTO Tuesday Midday: 01-03-19-25-30 Evening: 20-23-33-42-45 LOTTO Monday: 04-09-10-15-23-36 Extra shot: 12 Thursday’s estimated jackpot: $3.25 million PICK-3 Tuesday Midday: 279 FB: 9 Evening: 460 FB: 9 PICK-4 Tuesday Midday: 7986 FB: 3 Evening: 2418 FB: 9

STLTODAY.COM/LOTTERY Current and past numbers, plus jackpots from state lotteries around the country.

CORRECTIONS • A memo last month about “signature authority” for personnel documents for airport employees was sent by Deborah Gibbs in the city of St. Louis human resources office to Sharon Stone, human resources manager at Lambert-St. Louis International Airport. The sender and recipient were reversed in a front-page story Tuesday.

DID MIKE SHANNON REALLY SAY THAT?

MO’S 5 BEST & WORST FREE-AGENT SIGNINGS

Some snicker at his convolutions of the language. We embrace them. Test your knowledge of these Shannonisms, based on broadcasting lore.

In the wake of Brayan Pena’s unconditional release, Rick Hummel takes a look at the Cardinals’ five worst and five best free-agent signings in the John Mozeliak era.

WHAT’S UP

$1 million grant aims to house 150 homeless BY DOUG MOORE St. Louis Post-Dispatch

St. Louis has received a $1 million federal grant city leaders say will help move up to 150 people into stable housing and out of shelters. “It’s simply not enough to warehouse people for the night,” said St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay. “This is a more dignified approach.” Slay made his remarks Tuesday morning at Biddle House, a 24-hour shelter the city opened in August. The grant is the latest effort by the city to tackle the complex issue of homelessness, following a cease-anddesist notice issued earlier this month to New Life Evangelistic Center. The city says the shelter is operating illegally and must close. Its occupancy permit expired in May 2015. The Rev. Larry Rice, who has run the shelter at 14th and Locust streets for 40 years, says he will appeal and has no plans to go anywhere. The city has come under increasing pressure from downtown residents and businesses because of the recent surge in overdoses near Rice’s shelter. Emergency crews have reported over the past three weeks that nearly 300 people have been hospitalized following overdoses on a synthetic cannabis, commonly referred to as K2. Laurie Phillips, CEO of St. Patrick Center, one of two agencies that operates Biddle House, said there are about 1,300 homeless people in St. Louis. Of those, about 55 percent would qualify for the “rapid rehousing” program covered by the $1 million grant issued by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. About 20 percent of the city’s homeless are defined as “chronic” and harder to move of the streets and onto a path to permanent housing. They of-

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ten have substance abuse and mental health issues and are reluctant to accept help. The remaining 25 percent are people who are at risk of becoming homeless. Eddie Roth, the city’s Health Services director, said with the new funding — along with the 2,500 beds provided nightly for temporary shelter throughout the city — shutting down New Life will not leave a gap in current homeless services. Slay, in his remarks, did not name Rice specifically but said the overwhelming majority of those providing homeless services do so without controversy “and are not the ones you see in the news.” Rice and City Hall have had an acrimonious relationship for decades. Rice is not a member of the city’s Continuum of Care, a group of 60 organizations that provide various services to the homeless and receive HUD funding. Slay said the $1 million is new money on top of the $11.5 million HUD provides annually that is divvied up among the Continuum of Care partners. With the new funds, the city will work with ArchCity Defenders, a nonprofit civil rights law firm, to help remove any legal impediments that prevent someone from moving into permanent housing. “This is a fantastic step forward,” said Thomas Harvey, co-founder and CEO of ArchCity. The city plans to seek the $1 million as an ongoing annual boost to homeless efforts, Slay said. With 15,000 evictions every year in St. Louis and St. Louis County, there will continue to be an influx of people needing help, Harvey said.

TIMES BEACH TESTING EPA technicians clad in protective gear begin taking soil samples at Times Beach to test for dioxin as residents of the city go about their daily routines. Waste oil sprayed on the streets 10 years earlier to control dust contained dioxin.

HEADS UP LETTERS FROM SANTA Here are the steps for your child to get a letter back with a North Pole postmark: • Have your child write a letter to Santa and place it in an envelope addressed to: Santa Claus, North Pole. • Later, when alone, open the envelope and write a personalized response. • Insert the response letter into an envelope and address it to the child. Add the return address: SANTA, NORTH POLE, to the envelope along with a first-class stamp. • Place the complete envelope into a larger envelope with appropriate postage and address it to: North Pole Postmark, Postmaster, 4141 Postmark Drive, Anchorage, Alaska 99530-9998 Letters must be received in Anchorage by Dec. 15. Santa’s helpers at the Postal Service will take care of the rest. To submit items, email them to headsup@post-dispatch. com or fax them to 314-340-3050.

EVENTS WINTER WONDERLAND ON ICE When • 7 p.m. Dec. 9 and 5 p.m. Dec. 10 Where • St. Peters Rec-Plex, 5200 Mexico Road How much • $9.50 for adults; $7.50 for children and seniors ($1 less for Rec-Plex pass holders) More info • 636-939-2386 Skaters from the Rec-Plex’s ice skating program are preparing original performances set to holiday music. Enjoy solo acts, synchronized skating and formation teams, advanced skaters, up-andcomers, and special appearances from Santa and Frosty. To list a community event or meeting, submit it online at events.stltoday.com.

Doug Moore • 314-340-8125 @dougwmoore on Twitter dmoore@post-dispatch.com

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Tony Messenger • 314-340-8518 @tonymess on Twitter tmessenger@post-dispatch.com

Find these features and exclusive subscriber content at stltoday.com/extra

WATCH: ST. LOUIS COMMUTERS NAVIGATE AROUND MAN OVERDOSING ON K2

LOTTERY

The LCRA board tabled the proposal. Now O’Laughlin, coincidentally, is part of the ownership group planning to seek yet another pile of tax subsidies to bring a Major League Soccer team to St. Louis and build a city-owned stadium next to Union Station. Lost in all the subsidy madness is a 77-year-old who grew up on the city’s south side, still lives in the city, and in 2014 was inducted into the St. Louis Cardinals Hall of Fame. Starting last season, Shannon cut back his workload to call only home games. His year-to-year contract, worth about $860,000 a year, according to Cardinals sources, has been ofered to be renewed for next season. “We’re talking about Mike Shannon,” Sweeney says. “What (the Cardinals) are trying to do is control the competition. Mike just wants to sell this and let the market decide.” DeWitt says the Cardinals remain willing to waive the height restriction, “as long as we can protect our investment.” “We’re trying to solve the problem,” DeWitt says. “I’ve always said we’ve got Mike’s best interests in mind.” The best fans in baseball might beg to difer.

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LOCAL

11.30.2016 • WEdnEsday • M 1

Man killed by of-duty oicer had history of leeing police BY CHRISTINE BYERS AND DAVID CARSON st. Louis Post-dispatch

CAHOKIA • Police said Tuesday that an off-duty Washington Park officer shot and killed a man who drove at him while trying to avoid arrest outside a Walmart store here. The dead man, Jason Stringer, 35, of East St. Louis, was wanted on warrants and had a history of eluding police in the past, officials said. The officer, 53, whose name was not released, called police about 4:50 p.m. Stringer Monday to report seeing a wanted man with a woman outside the store. Two Cahokia officers tried to take the suspect into custody but he fled after a struggle, according to statement from the Illinois State Police. Cahokia Police Chief Dave Landmann said the man got into a vehicle and drove toward the off-duty oicer, who fired. He said Cahokia oicers did not shoot. A statement from Cahokia police says two Cahokia oicers were injured, but the state police release said no oicers were hurt. Washington Park Police Chief Tony Tomlinson said the oicer who fired has been with his department for about two weeks and passed all of the necessary background checks. “My initial information on the scene is that all the oicers were following the letter of the law,” Tomlinson said. “I would ask that everyone wait for the results of the investigation.” He declined to comment further about the circumstances until completion of an outside investigation by the state police. “It’s a tragedy all the way around,” Tomlinson said. “Yes, he’s a criminal. I want him to go to jail. I want him to face charges and not lose his life.” St. Clair County State’s Attorney Brendan Kelly said his oice will review results of the state police investigation. Rita Stringer, 56, of Belleville, said the St. Clair County coroner’s oice notified her about her son’s death. She said Tuesday morning she was upset that police had not briefed her

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A3

100 NEEDIEST CASES: HELPING THOUSANDS

SHE LEFT ABUSE, WANTS NEW START

ART BY ANNA BLOMSTROM • Brentwood High school CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

Police said Jason Stringer, while trying to escape, drove into a police vehicle and a brick pillar in front of Walmart in Cahokia, nearly striking pedestrians.

on what happened. Cahokia police said that while trying to escape, the suspect struck a police vehicle and a brick pillar in front of the Walmart, which caused “extensive damage to the building” and “nearly struck several pedestrians.” It says the Washington Park officer fired “multiple shots at the suspect” hitting him at least once. Autopsy results were pending. Police from multiple agencies pursued Stringer east for about a mile on Camp Jackson Road as he struck other vehicles. Ultimately, he hit a median divider, which disabled his vehicle. He was arrested and taken to a hospital, where he died. Tomlinson said he did not know whether the suspect had been armed. He said the man had fled from police multiple times, and was wanted for firing shots on two occasions in October at his ex-girlfriend’s new boyfriend. Tomlinson said the man put a gun to the new boyfriend’s head at a gas station on Nov. 23. Kashondra Murphy, 37, who described herself as Jason Stringer’s former girlfriend and mother of their 12-year-old child, said he was fun and lovable, “but he had his faults. I think he got wrapped up in the streets.” She cried while talking about how Stringer had fired shots at her new boyfriend. Murphy of Belleville said they had been together for more than 10 years and apart for about six months.

“I just wish he went to jail instead of being dead,” she said. The suspect was wanted on warrants from East St. Louis for being a convicted felon with a gun and four counts of fleeing and eluding. His bail for those charges was $112,000, Tomlinson said. Earlier Monday, he had fled from an East St. Louis oicer, but police did not pursue, given the rainy conditions, Tomlinson noted. The Illinois State Police said the off-duty oicer recognized Stringer’s vehicle at the Walmart from the pursuit that occurred earlier Monday. On Oct. 29, Stringer rammed an East St. Louis police captain’s vehicle during a pursuit that led into Washington Park, Tomlinson said. Tomlinson said Stringer also was involved in a pursuit that ended in a crash earlier this year in downtown St. Louis, and was taken to a hospital for his injuries. The chief said he escaped because police in Illinois thought St. Louis city police were watching him. But St. Louis Police Chief Sam Dotson said Tuesday that city oicers do not guard prisoners in hospitals unless they have been charged. State police asked that anyone with information about Monday’s shooting call Detective Bryant Johnson at 618-571-4125. Kim Bell of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report. Christine Byers • 314-340-8087 @christinedbyers on Twitter cbyers@post-dispatch.com

CASE 45 • The most important thing to Ms. F is the safety of her five children. That’s what brought her to St. Louis this year — she was on the run from an abusive relationship. But the family had to leave all their belongings behind and, once here, they had trouble finding permanent housing. Ms. F is looking forward to a home opening up for them soon, but she is in need of furniture and household items. And after all the children (ages 9 to 13) have been through, a few gifts — clothes, games and music downloads – would be appreciated. CASE 46 • Two years ago, Ms. M took in her cousin’s children, now ages 8 and 12. The boys have flourished since being in a stable and loving home. But tragedy has struck. Ms. M’s husband suddenly died this year, and she lost her son. Ms. M, who is 73 and has multiple sclerosis, is struggling. Her income has dropped dramatically. She’s in dire need of beds, a hot water heater, roof repairs and clothing. Case proiles by Colleen Schrappen and Michelle Munz of the Post-Dispatch.

TWO WAYS TO GIVE

HOW IT WORKS

• Donors can adopt any of the cases — not just the 100 proiled at STLtoday. com/neediest. The program supplies donors with a list of a family’s needs. All gifts go directly to the family, through a social worker. • The program also accepts monetary gifts. Every dollar will go directly to a needy family, and every family will receive something.

For generations, the 100 Neediest Cases campaign has helped thousands of disadvantaged families during the holidays. This year, the program will beneit more than 10,000 needy households — selected by social service agencies that partner with the United Way. The PostDispatch is showcasing 100 cases. But all the families will share the cash donations.

TO HELP Visit 100neediestcases.org Or call 314-421-6060 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on weekdays. Or mail a check or money order (no cash) payable to: 100 Neediest Cases P.O. Box 955925 St. Louis, Mo. 63195

Baby boy in Wentzville child abuse case dies BY MARK SCHLINKMANN st. Louis Post-dispatch

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WENTZVILLE • The baby boy victimized in a high-profile child abuse case here has died, spurring prosecutors to elevate the felony charge already filed against his father. Assistant Police Chief Paul West said his department was notified early Tuesday that the 9-weekold boy had died at Cardinal Glennon Children’s Hospital in St. Louis. Burnette The father, Robert James Burnette, 19, has been in the St. Charles County Jail for several weeks on a charge of felony abuse or neglect of a child, causing serious physical injury. On Tuesday, Prosecutor Tim Lohmar amended the charge to abuse of a child resulting in a death, the maximum allowed in child abuse cases. His office said it’s now treating the case as a homicide. Police say the baby sufered from bleeding on the brain and broken bones, among other injuries. Court documents stated that the father shoved his fingers down the infant’s throat, trying to find the boy’s voice box to stop him from crying. The baby also was thrown onto a bed and shaken violently, authorities said. The baby’s mother, Megan L. Hendricks, 20, witnessed the abuse and didn’t call for help, authorities say. She still faces the lesser child abuse charge filed initially against Burnette. The boy has been identified only as J.B. in court documents, but social media posts identify him as Jaxon Burnette. The abuse is alleged to have happened between Oct. 18 and Nov. 7 at the couple’s

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St. Louis Crisis Nursery urges anyone who needs help to call the agency’s 24-hour, free and conidential help line at 314-768-3201 in the St. Louis area and 636-947-0600 in St. Charles County. “People can drop their kids of to us if they are feeling overwhelming stress, if they feel like they might hurt the child,” said Venus Martz, communications director. The group helps children from birth to 12 years old. It operates ive nurseries and eight outreach centers with social workers in the metro area. Parents can stop by to pick up diapers and clothes, or talk with someone. “Sometimes they just need a couple hours, sometimes a couple of days, depending on the gravity of the situation,” Martz said. The agency helped more than 7,200 children in 2016.

home in the 100 block of St. Charles Street in Wentzville. Lohmar’s office said that if convicted under the amended charge, Burnette could be sentenced to up to life in prison. That’s the equivalent to second-degree murder. West, the police official, said a family court judge on Monday ordered life support equipment turned of after a hospital ethics committee decided it was in the child’s best interest. He said a guardian appointed by the court had made the same recommendation, and that the boy’s parents did not appeal the decision. West said the judge had appointed lawyers to represent the parents. Mark Schlinkmann • 314-340-8265 @mschlinkmann on Twitter mschlinkmann@post-dispatch.com

Police ponder connection between MetroLink shootings BY KIM BELL st. Louis Post-dispatch

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SWANSEA • Police were checking sur-

veillance video Tuesday to see if a shooting last week at one Illinois MetroLink station is connected with another here Monday night Both victims were critically wounded, and both attacks occurred about 8 p.m. On Monday, a man was shot in the face on the train platform Swansea. He was in critical but stable condition Tuesday at a hospital, said St. Clair County sherif’s Sgt. Dan Stockett. Stockett said a deputy on patrol was

in the parking lot and saw one man run. Police soon arrested two men in connection with the assault. Officials said they planned to seek charges against the men Wednesday. Police continue to investigate a shooting Nov. 22 at the East Riverfront MetroLink station in East St. Louis, near the Casino Queen, Stockett said. He said no one was arrested in that case. “We’re not sure if they are connected,” he said. He said the East Riverfront shooting was a suspected robbery. Nassim Benchaabane of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report.


LOCAL

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 11.30.2016

Protesters demand minimum wage hike Demonstrators seek $15 per hour; police arrest many for blocking Hampton traic BY KIM BELL St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • St. Louis police arrested nearly 30 people Tuesday evening outside the McDonald’s restaurant on Hampton Avenue near Interstate 44 as part of a national day of protests for a $15 minimum wage. Police Chief Sam Dotson had warned protesters they would be arrested for blocking the street. At 5:30 p.m. about 200 protesters began marching around the McDonald’s before people willing to be arrested broke of to sit in the street. “Folks are trying to survive on $7.65 an hour; that’s just simply not enough,” said a clergyman who joined those who were arrested. Dotson said earlier in the day that the city supports a wage increase and there are laws already in place to address the issue. “Our city is one of the most progressive cities in the state,” Dotson said. “We already passed laws to increase the minimum wage, so why are you impacting families trying to get home to get their kids to sporting events in a community that’s already heard and agrees with your message? “My job is to make sure those groups have the opportunity to their have message heard … but this will require resources to open traffic on Hampton Avenue, and those resources are better spent in neighborhoods, not dealing with protests for something our community has already said ‘Yes’ to.” But Betty Douglas, 59, said the $7.90 she makes at the McDonald’s on Hampton is not enough to care for her family, which includes a 16-year-old son with autism. “They just can’t walk over us,” Douglas told the crowd. Douglas said she has worked nearly every position at the McDonald’s over the last nine years and has gotten a raise of only 65 cents an hour in that time. She said her boss at McDonald’s doesn’t like that she participated in the march. “They’re angry with me,” she said. “I’m angry too.” Earlier Tuesday, protesters shut down the McDonald’s in downtown St. Louis during morning rush hour. Police stood by as the 100 or so protesters marched, chanted

PHOTOS BY CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

About 200 people blocked rush hour traic Tuesday in the 1400 block of Hampton Avenue to call for a higher minimum wage.

Frances Holmes is led away by police as several dozen protesters are arrested during a minimum wage demonstration in the 1400 block of Hampton Avenue in St. Louis.

and held signs outside the restaurant at 1119 North Tucker Boulevard. Managers had closed the dining area, and protesters blocked the drivethrough for about a halfhour starting at 7 a.m. No one was arrested. T h ey swa r m e d t h e window, chanting at the workers inside: “Come on out, we’ve got your back.” The “Fight for $15” rally marks four years since a group of workers walked out of their fast-food jobs in New York City, sparking a movement. The federal minimum hourly wage is

$7.25, although there are higher minimums in some states. Missouri, for example, is now at $7.65 an hour minimum wage but will increase it to $7.70 next year. There were similar protests planned for 340 cities Tuesday morning, including in New York where more than two dozen protesters were arrested after they linked arms and blocked morning rush-hour traic, according to news reports. Frances Holmes, 53, of St. Louis, said Tuesday’s effort was her fifth

Jahbari Morris, a Taco Bell employee, repeats a chant during a minimum wage demonstration in the parking lot of a McDonald’s in the 1400 block of Hampton Avenue in St. Louis on Tuesday.

strike in recent years. She said she works at a Webster Groves fast-food restaurant, making $9 an hour. She was one of three people on her morning shift who skipped work to protest. Holmes took glee in seeing the protesters block the drive-through lanes and force the restaurant to close its dining room. “That let them feel what we feel, no money coming in,” she said. Holmes, who used to work at the restaurant on Tucker, estimated the store would lose $1,000

an hour during the shutdown. Javen Goode, 18, was among the protesters. Goode lives in Florissant with his mother. He makes $8 an hour at Subway. “(Fifteen dollars) an hour would give me a chance to move out,” said Goode, who dreams of moving to California and designing computer games. In a statement, McDonald’s spokesperson Terri Hickey said, “We take seriously our role in helping strengthen communities

as we and our franchisees separately employ hundreds of thousands of people, providing many with their very first job.” Hickey added that the company ofers its workers the opportunity to develop skills they can use to build careers beyond fast food. The company invests in Archways to Opportunity, programs that provide tuition assistance. Christine Byers and Ashley Lisenby of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report. Kim Bell • 314-340-8115 @kbellpd on Twitter kbell@post-dispatch.com

LAW & ORDER FESTUS > Primate center accused of unsafe conditions • People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals announced Tuesday its intent to sue the Missouri Primate Foundation here on claims that at least 16 chimpanzees and other primates are housed in unsafe and unsanitary conditions. The animal rights group said it is providing the 60-day advance notice required to sue under the Endangered Species Act. The foundation’s owner, Connie Braun Casey, could not be reached for comment. Years ago, she and her thenhusband ran the foundation, at 12338 Highway CC, as well as Chimparty, a now-closed business that provided

chimpanzees for parties, television ads and movies. Brittany Peet, a PETA lawyer, said the group hopes to persuade Casey to give up her animals, at no cost to her, for transfer to an accredited chimpanzee sanctuary. Peet said a former foundation volunteer notiied PETA after visiting the Festus facility last month. ST. CHARLES > Ex-student gets probation for false report • A judge has ordered probation for Joanna L. Newberry, a former Lindenwood University student whose false report of a campus assault in 2014 generated an alert to 12,000 students and staf.

Court records say she pleaded no contest to a misdemeanor charge of making a false report. Associate Circuit Judge Elizabeth Swann issued a suspended imposition of sentence on Nov. 14, ordering two years of supervised probation, continued counseling and that she stay of the Lindenwood campus. Newberry was 21 when she claimed she was attacked by a man in the basement bathroom of Butler Library. She said she kicked him away and he led. She later admitted making up the story and was dismissed from the school.

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11.30.2016 • WEdnEsday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A5

Incoming system chief visits UMSL Choi shares vision for campuses, commits to listening; those who met him left impressed Zahn, UMSL’s director of community outreach and engagement. She said that connecting with the community can often get overlooked at schools with large research missions, but “UMSL was created to serve this community and he recognizes that.”

BY ASHLEY JOST st. Louis Post-dispatch

BELLERIVE ACRES • Kicking of an almost weeklong tour of all four University of Missouri System schools, incoming president Mun Choi visited the St. Louis campus for the first time Tuesday. Choi, currently the provost at the University of Connecticut, was officially named as the incoming university system president last month. He arrives at the system oice in Columbia March 1. During his University of Missouri-St. Louis visit, Choi spoke briefly to a room of more than 100 faculty, staf, students, alumni and community members. He shared a similar vision that he did when he was introduced at a press conference in Jefferson City, recommitting himself to wanting to listen to all of the stakeholders. A few dozen people lined up to glad-hand with the incoming president. Those who did said they were impressed. “He seems plugged into something we’ve been looking at on this campus, which is how students can succeed when they get here,” Betsy Sampson, a project coordinator with UMSL’s Office of Academic Affairs, said. UMSL’s push is part of a systemwide retention effort, she said,

PLANNING AHEAD

CRISTINA M. FLETES • cfletes@post-dispatch.com

Incoming University of Missouri System President Mun Choi talks with Turquoise Bailey, a senior in public policy with a minor in Spanish, as Choi met with students, staf, faculty and alumni Tuesday in the Millennium Student Center at the University of Missouri-St. Louis.

but it’s good to have someone at the helm who understands that’s important. After the reception, Choi spent much of the day meeting with campus leaders. Monday night, he met with business

leaders including Tom Minogue of Thompson Coburn LLP, and UMSL donors Terry and Stan Freeks, a spokesman said. Civic engagement was among the priorities Choi outlined during his remarks Tuesday.

Judge Teitelman is recalled fondly for his connection with people JUDGE • FROM A1

“He’s had some serious health problems,” said Wolf, who is dean of the St. Louis University Law School. In honor of Teitelman, the court canceled oral arguments scheduled for Tuesday, but will hear arguments as scheduled on Wednesday. “It is with great sadness that the Supreme Court of Missouri acknowledges the passing of its beloved colleague,” the court said in a statement issued Tuesday morning. Teitelman — the first Jewish judge to serve on the state’s high court — was born in Philadelphia. At a Missouri Bar Association event earlier this year, Teitelman said his mother had wanted him to become a doctor. At age 13, however, he was declared legally blind. He graduated from University of Pennsylvania in 1969 with a degree in math and moved to Missouri where he attended law school at Washington University. He worked at Legal Services of Eastern Missouri in St. Louis for nearly a quarter-century before being appointed to the Missouri Court of Appeals in 1998. He was elevated to the state Supreme Court by former Gov. Bob Holden, a Democrat, in 2002. On Tuesday, Dana Tippin Cutler, president of the Missouri Bar, ofered condolences to Teitelman’s family and friends. “We join with the Court in recognizing his 18 years of service to the people of Missouri as an appellate judge and his career-long dedication to making sure all Missourians, regardless of their income, have equal access to justice in Missouri,” Tippin Cutler noted in a statement. House Minority Leader Gail McCann Beatty said the court benefited from Teitelman’s dedication to equal justice for all. “During his decades representing poor clients as a legal aid attorney and later as a jurist, Judge Richard Teitelman’s commitment to protecting the less fortunate from injustice was unwavering,” McCann Beatty said. Thomas G. Glick, president of the board of directors of Legal Services of Eastern Missouri ofered praise for Teitelman. “He gave voice to those without representation and was tireless in his work to protect the vulnerable,” Glick said.

SELECTION PROCESS Teitelman’s death sets up a process that likely will give Gov.-elect Eric Greitens, a Republican, the opportunity to select a replacement for the seven-member high court. The selection of Supreme Court judges is governed by Missouri’s nonpartisan court plan. Under that process, a committee headed by Supreme Court Chief Justice Patricia Breckenridge will set out a schedule for attorneys to apply for the position. That panel interviews the applicants and submits three names to the governor, who has 60 days to choose a finalist. Typically, however, the application, interview and selection process takes longer than the 41 days left in Democratic Gov. Jay Nixon’s term. The selection committee comprises the chief justice, three attorneys chosen by their fellow lawyers and three Missouri residents appointed by the

governor. Of the citizen members, the term of Cheryl Darrough of Columbia ends Dec. 31, giving Nixon the ability to keep his fingerprints on the panel before he leaves on Jan. 9. In a statement, Nixon said, “Judge Teitelman will be remembered not only for his breaking new ground as the first legally blind judge to sit on Missouri’s highest court, but also for his legal skills and his passion for justice. He truly listened to, and never forgot, those who needed justice the most.” During the recent election, Greitens signaled that he wants to alter the state’s court plan, which is viewed as a national model for removing partisanship from the judiciary. “Eric is opposed to our current system of judicial selection that gives trial lawyers too much control over the appointment of the very judges they argue their cases in front of,” Greitens policy director Will Scharf said in October.

‘PASSIONATE PUBLIC SERVICE’ In a statement issued Tuesday, Greitens said Teitelman’s “life serves as a reminder to every Missourian that nothing should stand in the way of passionate public service.” Teitelman was known for his humor and kindness. After a speech to the Legislature in 2012, the Missouri Bar served members of the House and Senate a lunch featuring knishes — a meat or potatofilled dumpling that is a staple of Jewish cooking. Teitelman said his vision problem stemmed from a congenital anomaly of the optic nerve. He could read large type, but he did not drive. He never described himself as handicapped or disabled. Rather, he said in 2007, “It’s a challenge. These challenges are things that are character building.” He used a magnifying glass to read and relied on his law clerks for other reading duties. Longtime friend Stuart Berkowitz, former regional advisory board chairman for the Missouri-Southern Illinois oice of the Anti-Defamation League, called Teitelman “one-of-akind.” “His uniqueness as an individual, an attorney, an advocate and as a judge was unmatched,” Berkowitz said. On days when the court was hearing arguments, Teitelman would often walk through the courtroom before proceedings began to shake hands and chat with people in the audience. “It was just so disarming. In part, he really made human connections extraordinarily well,” Wolf said. “He was one of the most extraordinary people I’ve ever known.” A funeral service will be held at 2 p.m. Thursday at Graham Memorial Chapel on the campus of Washington University. Among the survivors is his brother, Gilbert E. Teitelman of Philadelphia. He was preceded in death by his parents, Nathan and May, and his brother Louis. Memorial contributions may be sent to Legal Services of Eastern Missouri, 4232 Lindell Boulevard. Kurt Erickson • 573-556-6181 @KurtEricksonPD on Twitter kerickson@post-dispatch.com

Specifically, he mentioned the work that students and faculty are doing around the campus in north St. Louis County, and similar opportunities that all of the campuses can leverage for federal grants. That impressed Patricia

Choi said he expects to announce his plans on the search for a new chancellor at Mizzou. Hank Foley has served as the interim chancellor since R. Bowen Loftin stepped down during November 2015, the same day that system president Timothy M. Wolfe resigned. “Right now I’m in the process of meeting with the stakeholders both with the Mizzou campus and the Board of Curators, and I plan on making a decision soon,” Choi told the Post-Dispatch. Choi also announced that he is meeting with governor-elect Eric Greitens on Dec. 11 to discuss their respective higher education priorities. Wednesday, Choi meets with oicials at the Missouri University of Science and Technology. He then travels to Mizzou on Thursday and finishes the week out Friday at the University of Missouri-Kansas City. Ashley Jost • 314-340-8169 @ajost on Twitter ajost@post-dispatch.com

MLS president: SC STL is the ‘only contender’ for St. Louis team ownership MLS • FROM A1

stadium. SC STL has proposed putting a stadium tax on the April ballot that could pay for up to 40 percent of the stadium costs. “We have worked with SC STL for over a year and we vet ownership groups very thoroughly,” Abbott said. “We have great confidence in their commitment and the capacity they have to fulfill their obligations under what’s required by the league.” Former Anheuser-Busch president and SC STL investor Dave Peacock helped bring MLS Commissioner Don Garber to St. Louis in May 2015. Garber met with potential investors as well as Gov. Jay Nixon and toured possible stadium sites. Abbott said the league has had “general conversations” with Foundry St. Louis, but that organization led by former Express Scripts senior staff member Dan Cordes among about a dozen total investors, never provided specifics. Foundry leaders “have been very general about ideas they have without any specifics or a plan or anything that really would give us confidence or belief it was something they could execute on or be successful with,” Abbott said. “I contrast that with the very specific and extensive discussions over the course of the last year that we’ve been having with (SC STL chairman) Paul Edgerley and his group that have given us great confidence in their ability.” Edgerley, a Kansas City native, is a former executive at Bain Capital in Boston and minority owner of the Boston Celtics and AS Roma soccer team in Italy. Responding to Abbott, Cordes said in an email that “Foundry St. Louis understands the direction that MLS prefers to take regarding ownership.” SC STL members have not responded to a reporter’s request for comment on Foundry’s proposal. Cordes said: “We stand behind the (SC STL) plan and remain passionate about bringing an MLS team to St. Louis, but still wholeheartedly believe that St. Louis taxpayers should not be on the hook for a professional soccer team or stadium.” Foundry’s investors include Dr. Rick Lehman, an area orthopedist who was formerly the team doctor for the St. Louis Blues and a part-owner of the Florida Panthers in the National Hockey League. Others in Foundry’s group of lead investors haven’t been publicly named. Maggie Crane, spokeswoman for Mayor

DIGEST ST. LOUIS > Food kiosks headed to MetroLink stations • Food kiosks are coming to the North Hanley and Wellston MetroLink stations sometime next year. The 18-month pilot program being undertaken by the Bi-State Development Research Institute, the nonproit arm of Bi-State Development which oversees Metro Transit, is being funded by a $583,958 grant from the Missouri Foundation for Health, Metro said Tuesday. The goal is to bring more healthful food options closer to Metro riders and residents who live near the stations by increasing the availability of fresh fruits, vegetables and other healthful foods to those without convenient access to grocery stores and farmers’ markets. Between 15 and 45 percent of households in north St. Louis County do not own a car, a number that jumps to between 45 and 70 percent for those living near the North Hanley Transit Center, Metro said. The University of Missouri Extension is set to host sessions to give nutrition advice to kiosk patrons and transit riders. (Leah Thorsen)

Francis Slay, said Slay supports the league’s vote of confidence in SC STL and is negotiating with them on a stadium funding proposition. Crane said if Foundry wants to get involved in the stadium project the group would need to make its case to the league and present specifics on how it would work. “If (Foundry) really legitimately have something to offer, I would hope they call the MLS just as SC STL has, develop those relationships and put forth a plan,” Crane said. “At this point we’re following the MLS. They’ve picked owners. They’ve made their choice.” Slay met Tuesday with SC STL vice chairman Jim Kavanaugh, Edgerley and Terry Matlack, another SC STL investor. Kavanaugh, the founder of St. Louis FC, previously said if voters approve public funding in April, the city could have a soccer team playing in 2020 or 2021. Abbott would not comment on a time frame for league expansion, but said he hopes it can be announced soon. Abbott said it’s still possible SC STL would have to pay an expansion fee up to $200 million. The league has yet to decide the fee for securing future teams, but Abbott previously said the amount could be that much. The stadium would seat 22,000 and be designed for eventual expansion to 28,000. The city would own the stadium under SC STL’s proposal, on 24 acres just west of Union Station. The land is currently owned by the state Department of Transportation, but SC STL’s attorneys at Husch Blackwell drafted an agreement giving the city an exclusive two-year option to buy the land. It’s not clear what other costs the city would incur annually from a stadium, such as operations and maintenance costs, nor what projected revenue would be. “It’s all part of negotiations,” Crane said. “At the end of the day this is going to have to be something taxpayers would vote for.” Before proposing it join forces with SC STL, Foundry St. Louis was opposed to the downtown stadium location. Foundry favored a 13-acre site at the northwest corner of Grand Boulevard and Chouteau Avenue owned by St. Louis University. That idea now appears to have been shelved. More information on MLS expansion is expected following either Garber’s “State of the League” address Dec. 6 or the MLS Board of Governors meeting Dec. 15 in New York. Mike Faulk • 314-340-8656 @mike_faulk on Twitter mfaulk@post-dispatch.com

UNIVERSITY CITY > City manager suspension is indeinite • City Manager Lehman Walker, under ire during his six-plus years running municipal afairs, has been suspended indeinitely pending further action by the City Council. Sources say Walker was informed of the suspension Tuesday. The suspension was imposed by a council majority in a closed door session Monday. Former University City Police Chief Charles Adams has been appointed interim city manager. Lehman while suspended will continue to receive a $130,000-per-year salary from the city. The council in closed session also authorized the hiring of a special counsel to represent four council members threatened with possible civil action by Walker. The city manager’s attorney in mid-November notiied council members Paulette Carr, Bwayne Smotherson, Terry Crow and Steve McMahon that his client is contemplating a defamation suit in response to criticism leveled at him by the four. Attorney David Heimos ofered to waive the legal proceedings in exchange for University City accepting Walker’s resignation with a $500,000 buyout. Heimos was defeated in April in a bid to unseat Carr. (Steve Giegerich)


NATION

A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 11.30.2016

Trump wants punishment for lag-burners BY JOHN WAGNER Washington Post

President-elect Donald Trump on Tuesday threatened loss of citizenship or jail for those who burn the American flag, saying such protests — which the Supreme Court has declared to be free speech — should carry “consequences.” Trump ofered his thoughts in an earlymorning post on Twitter, saying, “Nobody should be allowed to burn the American flag.” Flag-burning was ruled to be constitutionally protected speech under the First Amendment in a 1990 Supreme Court case, United States v. Eichman, that struck down a law seeking to prevent the flag’s desecration. Moreover, a 1967 Supreme Court decision rejected the practice of stripping U.S. citizenship as a form of

criminal punishment. Trump did not say what inspired his proposal, but it comes just days after a college in western Massachusetts decided to stop flying all flags, including U.S. flags, after someone there burned one to protest Trump’s election victory over Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton. Hundreds of veterans and others gathered Sunday to protest the decision by Hampshire College in Amherst, Mass., to remove the flag. Trump’s latest interest in curbing First Amendment protections follows several other actions related to free speech, including his blacklisting of reporters who fell out of favor with his campaign and a suggestion that he would “open up” libel laws to make it easier to sue the news media. Trump’s tweet also demonstrated an

ability, which has continued beyond his campaign, to divert public attention from other issues of the day. Earlier this week, he caused an uproar by asserting on Twitter, without evidence, that millions of people “voted illegally” for Clinton. During a television appearance Tuesday shortly after Trump’s tweet, House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., suggested that Congress is unlikely to move on the issue of flag-burning. “We have a First Amendment right, but where I come from, you honor the flag,” McCarthy said on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe.” “If someone wanted to show their First Amendment right, I’d be afraid for their safety, but we’ll protect our First Amendment.” Trump transition spokesman Jason Miller defended his boss’s position during an appearance on CNN.

“Flag-burning should be illegal,” he said repeatedly on the CNN’s “New Day.” Trump’s tweet revives a debate that was settled in the courts more than 25 years ago. In 1989, a closely divided Supreme Court struck down on First Amendment grounds a Texas statute banning flagburning. Congress responded swiftly by passing the Flag Protection Act of 1989 — a law that was invalidated by the court’s 1990 ruling. There is little recent polling related to flag-burning, but past surveys have shown the issue divides Americans. In 2011, a State of the First Amendment survey found that 39 percent supported a constitutional amendment to make flagburning illegal while 58 percent opposed it. The survey presented brief arguments for both positions before posing the question.

housands of tourists, residents lee through lames FIRES • FROM A1

tourists were forced to evacuate the city in the mountains, where some hot spots persisted and a curfew was planned for Tuesday night. No details on the deaths were immediately available. More than a dozen people were injured. The winds calmed and rain fell on some of the fires early Tuesday, but oicials were worried that fire could spread again by evening, with forecasts calling for winds up to 60 mph. Gatlinburg Fire Chief Greg Miller said oicials were still conducting search-andrescue missions. “We have not been able to get in all of the areas,” Miller said. “We pray that we don’t experience any more fatalities, but there are still areas that we are trying to get to” because of downed trees and power lines. Photos of the Gatlinburg area showed scorched cars and buildings and sootcovered debris scattered across roads. A smoky haze hung in the air, obscuring picturesque fall views of the mountains awash in red, yellow and gold leaves. Though wildfires have been burning for several weeks across the drought-stricken South, Monday marked the first time any homes and businesses were destroyed on a large scale. The wildfires spread when winds blew trees onto power lines, sparking new fires and shooting embers over long distances. Hundreds of homes and other buildings, including a 16-story hotel, were damaged or destroyed. Emergency oicials ordered evacuations in downtown Gatlinburg and Pigeon Forge and in other areas of Sevier County near the Great Smoky Mountains. About 1,200 people took shelter at

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Burned structures are seen Tuesday from a National Guard helicopter near Gatlinburg, Tenn. The ires spread quickly on Monday night, when winds topping 87 mph whipped up the lames, catching residents and tourists in the Gatlinburg area by surprise.

the Gatlinburg Community Center and the Rocky Top Sports World, an 80-acre sports facility that was used as a shelter. Tammy Dillon had just come home from work when police banged on her door around 9:30 p.m. Monday. She said she drove through a fiery scene to get to Rocky Top Sports World, where she spent the night in a car. “We drove through flames, over hot em-

Cabinet is stocked with billionaires TRUMP • FROM A1

Mnuchin’s oicial announcement was expected as early as Wednesday, according to a person familiar with the decision who insisted on anonymity in order to confirm the pick ahead of time. Mnuchin, 53, led Trump’s finance operations during the presidential campaign and become close with the president-elect and his family. But he has no government experience, which could prove a hurdle in navigating the tricky politics of Washington. Mnuchin would be the latest wealthy investor to join what is already shaping up to be an extraordinarily well-of Cabinet. Trump also is expected to nominate industrialist billionaire Wilbur Ross to lead the Commerce Department. Michigan billionaire Betsy DeVos was named as Trump’s pick for education secretary last week. Mnuchin made his fortune on Wall Street, first at the New York investment bank Goldman Sachs and then as the head of his own private-equity fund. His close ties to an industry he would be in charge of regulating have the potential to complicate his confirmation and could undermine Trump’s populist message. Price, picked to lead the Department of Health and Human Services after more than a decade in Congress, helped craft House Speaker Paul Ryan’s plan to privatize Medicare — a position Trump opposed in the campaign. Chao, who was the first Asian-American woman to serve in a president’s Cabinet — she served under George W. Bush — is married to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, who said Tuesday he would not recuse himself from her confirmation. Price’s selection raised questions about the incoming president’s commitment to Medicare, among other popular entitlement programs he repeatedly vowed to preserve before the election. The Georgia congressman led GOP efforts on Capitol Hill to transform Medicare into a voucher-like system, a change that if enacted, would likely dramatically reduce government spending on the health care program that serves an estimated 57 million people. Trump did not address Price’s position on Medicare in a statement released by his transition team. The team did not respond to subsequent questions about it. “Chairman Price, a renowned physician, has earned a reputation for being a tireless problem solver and the go-to expert on health care policy, making him

the ideal choice to serve in this capacity,” Trump said. “He is exceptionally qualified to shepherd our commitment to repeal and replace Obamacare and bring afordable and accessible health care to every American.” Trump, in a 2015 interview promoted on his campaign website, pledged not to cut expensive entitlement programs that Republicans have fought for years to cut to help reduce the federal deficit. “I’m not going to cut Social Security like every other Republican. And I’m not going to cut Medicare or Medicaid. Every other Republican’s going to cut,” Trump told the Daily Signal. He later changed his mind on Medicaid, embracing the GOP concept of turning the program over to the states with a fixed amount of federal “block grant” funding. Like any Cabinet oicial, Price would carry out the wishes of the president. And a sweeping Medicare initiative would have to go through Congress with some Democratic support, which would be unlikely. Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont charged that Price “has a long history of wanting to do exactly the opposite of what Trump campaigned on.” Trump’s team also announced that Seema Verma has been chosen to be administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

bers in the road. It was awful,” Dillon said. In downtown Gatlinburg, workers at Ripley’s Aquarium of the Smokies left behind more than 10,000 fish and other animals. Police escorted a team of marine biologists and life support experts back into the aquarium Tuesday, and the animals were doing fine, Ripley’s later reported. Based on preliminary surveys, the Westgate Smoky Mountain Resort & Spa in Gatlinburg “is likely entirely gone,” the Tennessee Emergency Management Agency announced. Although Dollywood was not damaged, more than a dozen cabins operated by the park were. Dollywood suspended operations through at least Wednesday. Its DreamMore resort will be open on a limited basis as a shelter and for registered guests. Just hours before the fires spread, the singer appeared in a 30-second video released by the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, telling people to avoid burning

leaves and parking vehicles on dry grass and warning that even a campfire can spark a wildfire. Parton said in a statement Tuesday that she was heartbroken. “I am praying for all the families affected by the fire and the firefighters who are working so hard to keep everyone safe,” Parton said. “It is a blessing that my Dollywood theme park, the DreamMore resort and so many businesses in Pigeon Forge have been spared.” In the mid-1980s, Parton partnered with the Herschend family who ran the park, then known as Silver Dollar City. It opened under the new name of Dollywood in 1986. Rain forecast for much of Wednesday should help the area after weeks of punishing drought, but the bone-dry ground should soak up the moisture quickly, forecasters said. Rainfall amounts have been 10 to 15 inches below normal during the past three months in many parts of the South.

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CHAO’S RECORD Like Price, Chao is well-known in Washington, having led the Department of Labor for several years. Chao’s record suggests she’d be skeptical of new safety regulations and may attempt to roll back existing regulations. Under Chao, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration didn’t issue a single significant new safety regulation for four years, and mine safety inspectors were cut and inspections reduced, said Thomas McGarity, a University of Texas law professor and author of “Freedom to Harm,” a book about the labor department that includes Chao’s tenure. Among the pressing issues facing the next transportation secretary will be how to boost the nation’s aging infrastructure so that it can accommodate population growth and not become a drag on the economy, modernizing the nation’s air traffic control system and ensuring that new transportation technologies are adopted in a safe manner. The Washington Post contributed to this report.

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NATION

11.30.2016 • WEdnEsday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A7

Attacker railed against U.S. treatment of Muslims Somali-born student killed at Ohio State wasn’t on any watch list

Artan

BY ERIC TUCKER, TAMI ABDOLLAH AND ANDREW WELSH-HUGGINS associated Press

COLUMBUS, OHIO • The Somali-born student who carried out the car-andknife attack at Ohio State University stewed over the treatment of Muslims while apparently staying under the radar of federal law enforcement, underscoring the diiculty authorities face in identifying and stopping loners bent on violence. Abdul Razak Ali Artan was not known to FBI counterterrorism authorities before Monday’s rampage, which ended with Artan being shot to death by police and 11 people injured, a law enforcement oicial told The Associated Press. That’s in contrast to several other recent attacks, including those in New York City; Orlando, Fla.; and Garland, Texas, in which those blamed for the bloodshed had previously come to the attention of federal agents. Law enforcement officials have not identified a motive for the Ohio State violence but have suggested terrorism as a possibility. FBI agents continued to search Artan’s apartment for clues. The mode of attack — plowing a car into civilians, then slashing victims with a butcher knife — was in keeping with the recommended tactics of jihadist propaganda. And Facebook posts that were apparently written shortly before the attack and came to light afterward show Artan nursed grievances against the U.S. He railed against U.S. intervention in

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Crime scene investigators collect evidence after an attack Monday at Ohio State University. Eleven people were injured, and the attacker was shot dead by police.

Muslim lands and warned, “If you want us Muslims to stop carrying lone wolf attacks, then make peace” with the Islamic State group. “America! Stop interfering with other countries, especially the Muslim Ummah. We are not weak. We are not weak, remember that,” he wrote, using the Arabic term for the world’s Muslim community. He also warned that other Muslims are in sleeper cells, “waiting for a signal. I am warning you Oh America!” The posts were recounted by a law enforcement official who was briefed on the investigation but wasn’t authorized to discuss it publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity. The posts were taken down after the attack. On Tuesday, a self-described Islamic

State news agency called Artan “a soldier of the Islamic State” who “carried out the operation in response to calls to target citizens of international coalition countries.” The Islamic State group has previously described other attackers around the world as its “soldiers” without specifically claiming to have organized the acts of violence.

SETTING UP ‘TRIP WIRES’ Artan graduated with honors from Columbus State Community College last May, earning an associate of arts degree. A video of his graduation ceremony shows him jumping and spinning on stage and smiling broadly, drawing laughs, cheers and smiles from graduates and faculty members.

The school said he had no behavioral or disciplinary problems while he was there from the fall of 2014 until this past summer. He started at Ohio State in August as a business student studying logistics management. A law enforcement official said Artan came to the U.S. in 2014 as the child of a refugee. He had been living in Pakistan from 2007 to 2014. It is not uncommon for refugees to go to a third-party country before being permanently resettled. Several acts of jihadist-inspired violence in the past two years have involved individuals known to the FBI. The FBI investigated Omar Mateen, the gunman in the Orlando nightclub attack in June, for 10 months in 2013 after he boasted of mutual acquaintances with the Boston Marathon bombers and said things to co-workers that suggested he had radical, violent intentions. Agents found nothing to justify continued scrutiny and closed the matter but looked into him again the next year as part of a separate investigation into a suicide bomber who attended the same Florida mosque. Federal authorities in 2014 looked into Ahmad Khan Rahimi after he was accused of stabbing a relative and his father expressed concerns he might be a terrorist. The FBI said it found nothing in its databases tying Rahimi to terrorism and closed its review. Rahimi was charged with setting of bombs in New York and New Jersey in September. FBI counterterrorism authorities have a “number of trip wires” set up to spot would-be jihadists and have a generally good sense of individuals who are drawn to terrorist propaganda, which is why many people who have gone on to commit violence have at some point come under scrutiny, said Seamus Hughes, deputy director of the George Washington University’s Program on Extremism.

DIGEST Carrier, Trump reach deal on U.S. jobs Air conditioning company Carrier said Tuesday that it had reached a deal with President-elect Donald Trump to keep nearly 1,000 jobs in Indiana. Trump and Vice President-elect Mike Pence planned to travel to the state Thursday to unveil the agreement alongside company oicials.

Trump spent much of his campaign pledging to keep companies such as Carrier from moving jobs overseas. The details of the agreement were unclear. Carrier tweeted that the company was “pleased to have reached a deal” with Trump and Pence to keep the jobs in Indianapolis. ‘March for Love’ planned to counter KKK • A group

of Charlotte, N.C., clergy and community activists are organizing a “March for Love” on Saturday to counter a Ku Klux Klan march planned elsewhere in North Carolina on the same day. The Charlotte march is scheduled for noon Saturday at Marshall Park “to celebrate the values our state holds dear, including love, unity, compassion and hope,” organizers said in

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announcing the event. No location has been announced for the KKK march.

in Antioch, Calif. The meal hosted by the Golden Hills Community Church is an annual tradition.

3 die after church’s Thanksgiving meal • San Francisco Bay Area health oicials warned the public Tuesday to throw out any leftovers from a community Thanksgiving meal they suspect sickened at least 16 people, including three who died. Oicials are still trying to determine what caused the illness, but they appear to have narrowed the source to a church-sponsored meal at the American Legion Hall

Obama visits soldiers at Walter Reed • President Barack Obama spent part of Tuesday visiting with wounded soldiers at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md. The White House said the president met with 13 Army service members and that he awarded 12 Purple Hearts. The president visits the nation’s largest military hospital a few times each year. He spent about an hour

Hundreds attend funeral for homeless veteran • Hundreds of people gathered at the Wyoming Veterans Cemetery for the funeral of a homeless U.S. Navy veteran that most of them had never met. The Casper Star-Tribune reports there was standing room only at the chapel in Evansville Tuesday for the funeral of Stephen Carl Reiman, 63. Reiman died on Nov. 17 at Wyoming Medical Center in Casper. Natrona County Coroner Connie Jacobson had diiculty inding any family and asked people from the community to attend Reiman’s funeral.

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Kellogg discontinues ads on Breitbart • Kellogg says it will no longer advertise on Breitbart.com, the website formerly run by one of President-elect Donald Trump’s top aides, Steve Bannon. Kellogg Co. spokeswoman Kris Charles says the food company did not want to advertise on sites “that aren’t aligned with our values as a company.” Breitbart has been condemned as racist, sexist and anti-Semitic. A Breitbart spokeswoman didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.

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M 1 WEDNESDAY • 11.30.2016 • A8

Apartments planned for old Shriners, CID buildings

Anthem, Cigna CEO testimony reveals deep clash over deal

The original Shriners Hospital, at 700 South Euclid Avenue.

BLOOMBERG

BY TIM BRYANT St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Washington University is planning a multimillion-dollar apartment conversion of St. Louis’ first Shriners Hospital and the nearby vacant Central Institute for the Deaf. Both buildings are in the Central West End, at the southern edge of the Washington University and BJC HealthCare medical campus. Work on the 189 apartments might begin nearly next year, said Mary Campbell, the university’s associate vice chancellor for real estate. She said Tuesday the market-rate units, to be owned by a for-profit university ailiate, could be ready for tenants in mid-2018. The Shriners Hospital building, at 700 South Euclid Avenue, opened in 1924 to care for kids with polio. Oices that occupy part of the former hospital will be moved to other buildings nearby, including the nearly completed Mid Campus Center at 4570 Children’s Place. The CID building, at 4575 Clayton Avenue, has been vacant more than a decade, Campbell said. Both buildings are on the National Register of Historic Places. The listings, obtained by the university, qualify the renovation project for historic preservation tax credits. City building permit applications filed Nov. 23 estimate a $4.6 million cost for the CID building and $6.9 million for the Shriners portion of the project. The project’s design is similar to the university’s rehab several years ago of its apartment building at 6188 McPherson Avenue, Campbell said. The six-story building was redone with small furnished apartments aimed at graduate students, traveling corporate executives and others who need short-term housing.

Campbell said apartments at the Shriners and CID buildings should attract residents from the medical center, the nearby St. Louis College of Pharmacy and workers at the Cortex tech district five blocks east. Rents have yet to be determined. The gym at the former CID building could be redone as a fitness center, Campbell said. Other large spaces in the building will be available for events, she added. According to the Shriners building’s National Register nomination, the St. Louis hospital had been the largest within the Shriners system. Its medical firsts were an operation in 1924 to lengthen a leg and the use of “skeletal traction” in 1930 to correct congenital hip dislocation, oicials have said. The National Register nomination was based on the building’s importance in health and medicine, even though the architect was William Ittner, famed for innovative designs for schools. Four years after the original building opened, Shriners added wings for classrooms and a nurses’ residence. Shriners closed the 100-bed hospital in 1963 after it relocated the operation to 2001 South Lindbergh Boulevard, in Frontenac. Shriners sold the Ittner-designed hospital to Washington University shortly after its closure and, decades later, moved back to the city when it opened its $50 million, 12-bed orthopedic hospital last year at 4400 Clayton Avenue. CID relocated to 825 South Taylor Avenue in 2000. Tim Bryant • 314-340-8206 tbryant@post-dispatch.com @tbry51 on Twitter

The deep rift between merging health insurance companies Cigna Corp. and Anthem Inc. came further into public view Tuesday as transcripts of testimony from both companies’ chief executives were unsealed during a U.S. antitrust trial in Washington. Cigna CEO David Cordani, who has publicly defended the tie-up, revealed his doubts about the benefits of the merger for his company under questioning by the Justice Department, which has filed a lawsuit to block the deal. And Anthem CEO Joseph Swedish disclosed his company had created a secret team to plan its integration while keeping Cigna executives in the dark because of their lack of cooperation. Both executives testified in a closed courtroom Nov. 22. Their testimony was unsealed Monday and released Tuesday. Cordani told U.S. District Judge Amy Berman Jackson his company stopped work on the $48 billion tieup when faced with the Justice Department’s July lawsuit. By that time his company was already confronting an Anthem integration and rebranding strategy called “Bias Blue,” which in his view would weaken Cigna by shifting members to the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association, a network of insurers that includes Anthem Those concerns were outlined in a letter included in the transcript from Cigna’s general counsel Nicole Jones to Anthem’s, Tom Zielinski. “Your approach to the regulatory strategy, when coupled with your approach to integration and other matters, appear to be designed to cause commercial harm to Cigna while simultaneously strengthening your fellow Blues.” The clash between the two executives undercuts one of Anthem’s key arguments in favor of the deal: that combining with Cigna will lead to more eicient operations, which will lower costs for customers. The gov-

ernment counters that the hostility between the two will prevent them from successfully integrating. At stake is the $1.85 billion breakup fee Anthem must pay Cigna if the deal is blocked on antitrust grounds. Anthem won’t have to pay if it proves Cigna committed a “willful breach” of the agreement. When asked about a newspaper advertisement placed by Anthem the day after the U.S. lawsuit, which said the merger would bring greater benefits and choice to consumers, Cordani said he disagreed because in his view the deal would narrow consumer choice by weakening Cigna oferings. Cordani also rejected Anthem’s estimate that the merger could generate some $2 billion in savings for selfinsured employer customers because the analysis was only focused on opportunities to generate discounts. “We view that it is, at best, incomplete and, therefore, inaccurate,” Cordani said. In his testimony, Swedish conceded his company had created a team to plan the insurers’ integration, that it kept secret from Cigna, prompting the judge to ask him, “How do you work on integration without talking to the person you’re integrating with?” “Very good question,” Anthem’s CEO responded, explaining the move was prompted by Cigna’s decision to stop work on the combination. “We wanted to proceed and they didn’t want it, and so we decided to continue, knowing that they would come back in when the time was right for them,” Swedish said, according to the transcript. Spokesmen for both companies declined to comment on the unsealed testimony. Citing too much concentration in the health insurance market, the Justice Department has also sued to stop Aetna Inc. from combining with Humana Inc. That Washington federal court trial starts before a different judge on Dec. 5.

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MARKET WATCH

11.30.2016 • WEdnEsday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A9

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM /BUSINESS U.S. stocks finished slightly higher Tuesday led by health care companies. Energy companies skidded with the price of oil as investors grew doubtful that OPEC nations will strike a deal to cut oil production at a meeting on Wednesday.

Tiffany

$160

$24

$120

150

22

100

70

140

20

80

60

130

18

S O 52-week range

N

Dow Jones industrials

18,980

Close: 19,121.60 Change: 23.70 (0.1%)

2,200

19,000

2,200

18,000

$10.26

60

N $23.70

Vol.: 1.5m (1.3x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $2.49 b

CLOSE

CHG

Corn

Dec 16 Jan 17 Dec 16

336.75 1042.50 384

-11.75 -13.50 -5.50

CHICAGO MERC

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Feeder cattle

Jan 17 Dec 16 Dec 16 Nov 16 Dec 16

126.97 108.92 50.35 16.72 259.50

+.17 -.38 -.07 -6.15

ICE

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Cotton

Dec 16 Dec 16 Jan 17

72.38 149.90 28.66

-.89 -3.10 +.08

NEW YORK

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Crude oil

Jan 17 Dec 16 Dec 16 Jan 17

45.23 1.3771 146.27 3.315

-1.85 -.0356 -5.01 -.005

2,150

Live cattle

2,100

Hogs Milk Copper

J

A

S

O

1,950

N

J

J

A

S

O

N

Coffee

StocksRecap NYSE

NASD

3,620 3,399 1440 1540 136 26

1,713 1,549 1351 1428 197 39

DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

HIGH 19144.40 8991.61 657.53 10842.28 5403.86 2210.46 1636.58 23111.62 1335.44

LOW 19062.22 8938.43 649.57 10786.40 5360.56 2198.18 1626.16 22979.30 1327.01

CLOSE 19121.60 8943.58 654.54 10817.70 5379.92 2204.66 1631.11 23046.99 1328.22

CHG. +23.70 -18.88 +2.80 +9.06 +11.11 +2.94 +2.43 +17.71 -1.61

%CHG. WK +0.12% s -0.21% s +0.43% s +0.08% t +0.21% t +0.13% s +0.15% s +0.08% r -0.12% t

MO QTR s s s s t t s s s s s s s s s s s s

YTD +9.74% +19.11% +13.28% +6.65% +7.44% +7.86% +16.63% +8.88% +16.93%

Sugar

Gas blend Heating oil Natural gas

FOREIGN CURRENCY IN DOLLARS CLOSE

Argentina Australia Brazil Britain Canada China Euro India Israel Japan Mexico Russia So. Africa So. Korea Switzerland

TKR

AT&T Inc Aegion Corp Allied Health Amdocs Ameren Corp American Railcar ABInBev Arch Coal Bank of America Belden Inc Boeing Build-A-Bear Wkshp Caleres Inc. Cass Info. Systems Centene Corp. Charter Citigroup Commerce Banc. Edgewell Emerson Energizer Holdings Enterprise Financial Esco Technologies Express Scripts Foresight Energy FutureFuel General Motors Home Depot Huttig Building Prod Isle of Capri LMI Aerospace

T AEGN AHPI DOX AEE ARII BUD ARCH BAC BDC BA BBW CAL CASS CNC CHTR C CBSH EPC EMR ENR EFSC ESE ESRX FELP FF GM HD HBP ISLE LMIA

52-WK LO HI 33.09 16.00 0.50 50.06 41.33 35.43 101.00 59.05 10.99 36.51 102.10 10.01 21.27 45.05 47.36 214.06 34.52 37.44 67.94 41.25 28.86 25.01 31.50 64.46 1.07 9.77 26.69 109.62 3.01 10.62 7.01

43.89 25.63 1.91 61.33 54.08 57.57 136.08 86.47 20.88 75.91 150.81 14.98 33.70 72.45 75.57 281.36 56.83 58.21 88.00 56.82 53.41 39.45 57.20 89.00 7.80 14.80 36.52 139.00 7.00 23.32 10.55

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV NAME 39.48 24.50 1.24 58.97 50.93 44.02 104.81 75.83 20.29 74.30 151.64 14.45 32.55 70.65 57.60 280.49 55.52 57.50 80.29 54.40 44.01 38.60 55.70 76.86 6.21 13.71 34.57 129.62 6.03 22.22 8.96

-.06 -.10 -.04 -1.51 -.15 -.01 -.01 -.34 -.01 -.16 +1.87 -.15 -.51 -.32 +2.15 +9.67 +.05 +.33 -.46 -.03 +.96 -.15 -.45 +.11 -.14 +.07 +.52 -.33 +.22 +.20 +.35

-0.2 -0.4 -3.0 -2.5 -0.3 ... ... -0.4 ... -0.2 +1.2 -1.0 -1.5 -0.5 +3.9 +3.6 +0.1 +0.6 -0.6 -0.1 +2.2 -0.4 -0.8 +0.1 -2.2 +0.5 +1.5 -0.3 +3.8 +0.9 +4.1

+14.7 +23.5 15 +26.9 +13.3 30 +11.0 +10.3 dd +8.1 +7.2 17 +17.8 +21.9 19 -4.9 -19.1 10 -16.2 -15.7 +20.4+6762.2 +20.6 +17.4 16 +55.8 +17.9 16 +4.9 +4.9 20 +18.1 +8.1 22 +21.4 +13.2 17 +37.3 +34.7 33 -12.5 -5.6 14 +23.3 +30.8 +7.3 +3.1 15 +35.2 +26.2 22 +2.4 -2.0 30 +13.7 +12.0 21 +29.2 +28.4 20 +36.2 +32.5 18 +54.1 +42.7 27 -12.1 -10.5 16 +75.9 +42.7 dd +1.6 -4.5 9 +1.6 -2.3 6 -2.0 -1.1 21 +58.7 +57.5 5 +59.5 +16.9 17 -11.0 -18.5 dd

1.96f ... ... 0.78 1.70 1.60 3.94e ... 0.30f 0.20 4.36 ... 0.28 0.92f ... ... 0.64 0.90b ... 1.92f 1.10f 0.44 0.32 ... 0.68m 0.24 1.52 2.76 ... ... ...

TKR

52-WK LO HI

An investor group that includes the state treasurers of Connecticut and Illinois is calling on Wells Fargo & Co. to require an independent board chair, saying the bank needs stronger oversight in the wake of a scandal over fake customer accounts. Connecticut Treasurer Denise Nappier on Tuesday said the investor group has iled a shareholder resolution for the San Francisco bank’s annual meeting in the spring seeking a change in its bylaws. Improvements need to formalized, she said, because a board whose chair is also chief executive — the dual role once held by John Stumpf — creates a potential conlict of interest. Via email, Wells Fargo spokesman Ancel Martinez said, “We appreciate the feedback that we receive from our investors and we will review the proposal.” Co-ilers of the resolution included Illinois State Treasurer Michael Frerichs, shareholder adviser Hermes EOS and the Needmor Fund.

LEE

1.15

LOW

62.62

83.65 70.71

85.83 52.42 -5.25 -9.1 -29.8 -13.0

3.92

3.25 +.20 +6.6 +93.5 +76.3 -.49 -0.7

Mallinckrodt plc

MNK

50.90

MasterCard

MA

78.52 108.93 103.82 +.46 +0.4

McDonald’s

MCD

Monsanto Co

MON

83.73 114.26 102.39 +.36 +0.4

Olin

OLN

12.29

Panera Bread

PNRA 178.99 224.15 211.84

110.33 131.96 120.68

Peak Resorts

SKIS

2.60

Perficient

PRFT

14.15

26.46 25.32 7.70

4.65

22.66 18.06

-.20 -0.2

-7.0

7

...

-6.3 19

1.40 ...

+6.6 +5.5 30

0.76

+2.1 +9.0 23 3.76f +3.9 +9.2 23

2.16

-.04 -0.2 +46.7 +19.6 36

0.80

-.35 -0.2

+8.8 +16.5 35

...

-.15 -3.1 -22.6 -32.5 dd

0.55

-.06 -0.3

+5.5 +3.6 22

Cyber Monday sales set record • Shoppers spent $3.45 billion on Cyber Monday on Samsung 4K TVs, PlayStation 4s and Barbie dolls among other products, marking the largest online sales day in U.S. history. The data compiled by Adobe Digital Insights, easily surpassed prior estimates, and dismissed fears that strong web sales during the Thanksgiving weekend would hurt sales on Cyber Monday — usually the busiest day of the year for internet shopping. It also underscored the broader shift to shopping online, which is making up for slower spending in stores. Cyber Monday sales jumped 12.1 percent year-over-year and surpassed initial expectations that called for sales of $3.36 billion, according to Adobe Digital Insights.

POST

50.93

ReinsGrp

RGA

76.96 122.97 121.92 +.36 +0.3 +42.5 +33.4 13 1.64f

89.00 77.89 +1.11 +1.4 +26.2 +8.2 70

Reliv

RELV SR

55.24

71.21 66.25 +.30 +0.5 +11.5 +15.8 19 2.10f

Stifel Financial

SF

25.00

50.92 49.16 +.25 +0.5 +16.1 +7.0 21

...

SunEdison Semi

SEMI

11.98 11.96 +.02 +0.2 +52.6 +25.7

...

Supervalu Inc.

SVU

3.94

Target Corp.

TGT

65.50

UPS B

UPS

87.30 116.47 116.28 +.59 +0.5 +20.8 +14.0 21

US Bancorp

USB

37.07

US Steel

X

3.84

3.24

6.15

55.37

7.17

4.38 +.07 +1.6 -84.6 -10.6

4.74 +.10 +2.2 -30.1 -34.0

84.14 78.41 +.69 +0.9

Home prices top pre-recession peak • U.S. home prices have fully recovered from their steep plunge during the housing bust and Great Recession, according to a private measure. The Standard & Poor’s CoreLogic

From news services

The yield on the 10-year Treasury fell to 2.29 percent on Tuesday. Yields affect rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.

-2.90 +.08 -2.00

PRIME FED RATE FUNDS

...

7

YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO

.38 .38 .13

3.50 3.50 3.25

TREASURIES

LAST

NET CHG

1YR AGO

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 52-wk T-bill 2-year T-note 5-year T-note 10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

.47 .56 .76 1.09 1.78 2.29 2.95

-0.01 -0.04 -0.03 -0.01 -0.01 -0.02 -0.03

.19 .41 .48 .93 1.65 2.21 2.97

NET 1YR LAST CHG AGO

BONDS

...

Spire Inc

AP Muni Bond Idx

2.68 +0.02

...

Barclays Glob Agg Bd

1.58 -0.03

...

Barclays USAggregate

2.55 -0.04 2.49

Barclays US High Yield 6.59 -0.03 8.04 Moodys AAA Corp Idx

3.98 -0.04 4.00

Barclays US Corp

3.36 -0.03 3.50

10-Yr. TIPS

.41 -0.02

.59

...

+8.0 +9.0 13 2.40f

33.78 31.16 -1.01 -3.1 +290.5+300.6 dd

GlobalMarkets

3.12

49.57 49.10 +.20 +0.4 +15.1 +13.8 15 1.12f 0.20

Verizon

VZ

43.79

56.95 50.96

WalMart

WMT

58.67

75.19 71.37 +.18 +0.3 +16.4 +22.2 15 2.00f

Walgreen Boots

WBA

71.50

87.05 85.53 +.18 +0.2

+0.4 +3.1 19

1.50

Wells Fargo

WFC

43.55

56.24 51.86 +.28 +0.5

-4.6

-4.1 13

1.52

World Point Term.

WPT

11.79

17.65 16.97 +.07 +0.4 +26.6 +39.7 17

1.20

U.S. economy grew at 3.2 percent in third quarter • The U.S. economy in the third quarter grew at the fastest pace in two years, with a revised report showing stronger consumer spending than irst estimated. The gross domestic product, the country’s total output of goods and services, expanded at an annual rate of 3.2 percent in the JulySeptember period, the Commerce Department reported Tuesday. That is up from a previous estimate of 2.9 percent. The revision was signiicantly better than the meager gains of 0.8 percent in the irst quarter and 1.4 percent in the second quarter when the economy was being held back by a strong dollar and weak business investment.

Silver

...

Post Holdings

Consumer conidence jumps to highest level in 9 years • U.S. consumer conidence rebounded this month to the highest level in more than nine years as Americans appeared unfazed by a tumultuous election campaign. The Conference Board says its consumer conidence index registered 107.1 in November, up from 100.8 last month and highest since July 2007. Americans’ assessment of current economic conditions was also the sunniest since July 2007. Their expectations for the next six months were the most optimistic since June 2015. The survey was mostly taken before the Nov. 8 election.

CHG

CLOSE

1187.90 16.66 921.30

Gold

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV

Lowes

Case-Shiller national home price index, released Tuesday, is slightly above the peak it set in July 2006, after rising 5.5 percent in September from a year earlier. The milestone comes after more than four years of steady gains. Seattle, Portland and Denver reported the largest annual gains in September for the eighth straight month. Still, a number of cities remain below their pre-recession peaks, including those that have seen large gains since the downturn, such as Miami, Tampa, Fla., Phoenix and Las Vegas. St. Louis isn’t among major cities included in the widely followed index.

PreciousMetals

Platinum

-.16 -0.3 +10.3 +18.0 14 2.31f

Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months.

Investors want stronger oversight at Wells Fargo

.0643 .7477 .2953 1.2414 .7453 .1445 1.0597 .0146 .2602 .008908 .048473 .0154 .0728 .000852 .9862

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Close: 2,204.66 Change: 2.94 (0.1%)

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Close: $101.84 11.40 or 12.6% The maker of the Airstream and other RV brands posted stronger-than-expected quarterly results.

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Close: $20.80 0.05 or 0.2% The digital video recorder maker said it’s expanded its partnership with Netflix.

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Vol.: 9.4m (5.9x avg.) PE: 23.0 Mkt. Cap: $10.07 b Yield: 2.2%

Charts show stocks that made the news yesterday.

TiVo

UNH

Close: $157.59 5.48 or 3.6% The largest U.S. health insurer reaffirmed its annual targets and forecast strong earnings in 2017.

Close: $80.60 2.46 or 3.1% The luxury jeweler reported better-than-expected results and stronger sales in Asia.

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IT irm Contegix merging with Pennsylvania company BY JACOB BARKER st. Louis Post-dispatch

St. Louis cloud hosting firm Contegix is merging with another business information technology company and plans an immediate expansion in Kansas City. Contegix announced Tuesday it had an agreement to merge with DSS Inc., a hosting and IT services firm based in Reading, Pa. Financial terms of the deal weren’t disclosed. The combined company will continue to operate as Contegix, and DSS founder and CEO Jim Sweeney will become a Contegix board member. The merger comes just less than a month after Austin, Texas, private equity firm Strattam Capital announced it would acquire Contegix. The private equity firm installed David Turner as CEO of the IT company, while Contegix co-founder Matthew Porter be-

came vice chairman. Turner commended DSS’s “high-touch, white glove service desk” as a complement to Contegix’s hosting and application management services. Strattam Capital financed Contegix’s merger with DSS and plans other investments designed to speed up the company’s growth, including the expansion to Kansas City. More details on that expansion will be released in the coming weeks, Turner said in an interview. He did say Strattam’s plans to grow the company include adding sales and marketing workers as well as new products and services. “A lot of that growth will come from additional hires and expanding our workforce,” Turner said. “We are going to be able to attract a whole new level of talent based on our (larger) size and our scope.” Contegix had about 50 local

employees prior to the deal. The combined company will generate over $50 million in revenue from 700 clients and employ 190 people at its St. Louis and Reading, Pa., locations. Contegix was based in downtown St. Louis and operates a data center there, in Dallas and in Amsterdam. Turner is based in Denver, and he said the combined company doesn’t have a set headquarters but that Contegix will invest in the workforce in both St. Louis and Reading, Pa. Contegix clients include startups and Fortune 500 companies. It specializes in hosting and managing applications built by business collaboration software company Atlassian. Atlassian held an initial public ofering a year ago, and Contegix has partnered with the firm since 2002. Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com

Employees of Fields Foods will vote on union BY BRYCE GRAY st. Louis Post-dispatch

The union that represents workers at three major St. Louis area grocery chains has set its sights on an independent grocer in Lafayette Square. Local 655 of the United Food and Commercial Workers says it has enough signatures from employees of Fields Foods, 1500 Lafayette Avenue, to petition for a representation election. A date has not been set by the National Labor Relations Board, but Collin Reischman, communications director for Local 655, expects a vote in December. Reischman said about 60 percent of store employees support holding the union election. “These are folks who have

expressed desire to get a better economic package and more respect on the job, and we’re really hopeful we can get that for them,” Reischman said. Wayne Black, a Fields Foods representative, said the St. Louis-based company had received “no oicial notification” regarding the union’s petition. Black said the location near Lafayette Square, which opened in January 2014, is the company’s only store. Leonard Perez, assistant to the regional director of the National Labor Relations Board, confirmed Tuesday that the agency had received a petition from Local 655. Perez said the agency’s next step is to try to get the union and the company — which he says

employs around 50 people — to agree to a hold a vote. If a voluntary agreement cannot be reached, Perez said a hearing would be held Friday to assess the issues and determine whether an election is appropriate and which workers would be eligible to vote. That decision, made by the NLRB regional director, would also determine a time and place for the election. Local 655 has about 10,000 members, Reischman said. The majority of those workers are employed at Schnucks, Shop ’n Save and Dierbergs, three major chains that recently reached new labor agreements with the union. Bryce Gray • 314-340-8307 @_BryceGray on Twitter bgray@post-dispatch.com


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11.30.2016 • WEdnEsday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A11

Brazilian soccer team’s jet crashes; 6 survive 71 dead; squad was en route to regional tournament inal BY FERNANDO VERGARA AND JOSHUA GOODMAN associated Press

L A UNION, COLOMBIA

Colombian authorities searched for answers Tuesday into the crash of a chartered airliner that slammed into the Andes mountains while transporting a Brazilian soccer team whose Cinderella story had won it a spot in the finals of one of South America’s most prestigious regional tournaments. All but six of the 77 people on board were killed. The British Aerospace 146 short-haul plane declared an emergency and lost contact just before 10 p.m. Monday, according to Colombia’s aviation agency. It said the plane’s “black box” data and voice recorders had been recovered and were being analyzed. The aircraft, which departed from Santa Cruz, Bolivia, was carrying the Chapecoense soccer team from southern Brazil for Wednesday’s first leg of the two-game Copa Sudamericana final against Atletico Nacional of Medellin. Twenty-one Brazilian journalists were also on board the flight. Colombian officials initially

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Rescue workers recover a body Tuesday from the wreckage of an airplane crash in La Union, a mountainous area near Medellin, Colombia. The charter plane carried Brazil’s Chapecoense soccer team and 21 journalists.

said the plane suffered an electrical failure, but there was also heavy rainfall at the time of the crash. Authorities also said they were not ruling out the possibility, relayed to rescuers by a surviving flight attendant, that the plane ran out of fuel minutes before its scheduled landing at Jose Maria Cordova airport outside Medellin. Whatever the cause, the emo-

tional pain of Colombia’s deadliest air tragedy in two decades was felt across the soccer world. Expressions of grief poured in as South America’s federation canceled all scheduled matches in a show of solidarity. Real Madrid’s squad interrupted its training for a minute of silence, and Argentine legend Diego Maradona sent his condolences to the victims’ families over

Facebook. Brazil’s top teams offered to lend the small club players next season so they can rebuild following the sudden end to a fairy tale season that saw Chapecoense reach the tournament final just two years after making it into the first division for the first time since the 1970s. “It is the minimum gesture of solidarity that is within our

reach,” the teams said in a statement. Sportsmanship also prevailed, with Atletico Nacional asking that the championship title be given to its rival, whose upstart run had electrified soccer-crazed Brazil. Rescuers working through the night were initially heartened after pulling three people alive from the wreckage. But as the hours passed, heavy fog and stormy weather grounded helicopters and slowed efforts to reach the crash site. At daybreak, dozens of bodies scattered across a muddy mountainside were collected into white bags. The plane’s fuselage appeared to have broken into two, with the nose facing downward into a steep valley. Officials initially reported 81 people were on board the flight but later revised that to 77, saying four people on the flight manifest did not get on the plane. The aircraft is owned by LaMia, a charter company that started of in Venezuela but later relocated to Bolivia, where it was certified to operate last January. Bolivia’s civil aviation agency said the aircraft picked up the Brazilian team in Santa Cruz, where the players had arrived on a commercial flight from Sao Paulo. Spokesman Cesar Torrico said the plane underwent an inspection before departing for Colombia and reported no problems.

housands mourn, world leaders gather to honor Castro ASSOCIATED PRESS

HAVANA • Regional leaders and tens of thousands of Cubans filled Havana’s Plaza of the Revolution Tuesday night for a service honoring Fidel Castro on the wide plaza where the Cuban leader delivered fiery speeches to mammoth crowds in the years after he seized power. The presidents of Mexico, Ecuador, Bolivia, Venezuela, Panama, South Africa and Zimbabwe, along with leaders of a host of smaller Caribbean nations, flew in to Havana to pay tribute

to Castro, who died Friday night at 90. South African President Jacob Zuma praised Cuba under Castro for its record on education and health care and its support for African independence struggles. Castro will be remembered as “a great fighter for the idea that the poor have a right to live with dignity,” Zuma told the crowd. The rally began with blackand-white revolution-era footage of Castro and other guerrillas on a big screen and the playing of the Cuban national an-

them. Castro’s younger brother and successor, President Raul Castro, saluted. Cuban state media reported that an urn containing Fidel Castro’s ashes was being kept in a room at the Defense Ministry where Raul and top Communist Party officials paid tribute the previous evening. D u r i n g t h e d ay, l i n e s stretched for hours outside the Plaza of the Revolution, the heart of government power. In Havana and across the island, people signed condolence books and an oath of loyalty to Cas-

tro’s sweeping May 2000 proclamation of the Cuban revolution as an unending battle for socialism, nationalism and an outsize role for the island on the world stage. “I feel a deep sadness, but immense pride in having had him near,” said Ana Beatriz Perez, 50, a medical researcher who was advancing in the slow-moving line with the help of crutches. “His physical departure gives us strength to continue advancing in his ideology. This isn’t going away, because we are millions.”

Tribute sites were set up in hundreds of places across the island as the government urged Cubans to reaffirm their belief in a socialist, single-party system that in recent years has struggled to maintain the fervor that was widespread at the triumph of the 1959 revolution. Many mourners came on their own accord, but thousands were sent in groups by the communist government, which still employs about 80 percent of the working people in Cuba despite the growth of the private sector under Raul.

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WEDNESDAy • 11.30.2016 • A12 RAY FARRIS PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER •

GILBERT BAILON EDITOR •

TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

Keep the change he lure to help panhandlers is strong. Don’t give.

T

uesday was the national day of giving, which typically kicks of the season when Americans open their hearts and wallets to help the neediest among us. The holiday season always plays on people’s desires, especially when the weather turns cold and nasty, to ease the plight of homeless people panhandling at intersections. The impulse is strong to hand over whatever spare change is available. This will seem heartless, but our counsel, along with that of homeless advocacy groups, is to pocket those goodwill urges and do not give money on the streets. We know it feels awful to say no, particularly when the person holding the cardboard sign seems earnestly to be trying to get back on his or her feet. The Post-Dispatch has published far too many stories in recent weeks of drug overdoses among the homeless, including hundreds in the neighborhood surrounding New Life Evangelistic Center downtown. New Life is in perpetual battle with city authorities over code and permitting violations, and anything that feeds the drug-abuse epidemic only makes the homeless problem harder to solve. Meantime, the repeated trips by police and ambulances to help overdose victims add to the image of downtown as a place to be avoided. The money paid for these drugs doesn’t materialize from out of nowhere. It comes from well-meaning people who hand it over at intersections, mistakenly believing they’re helping. As the Post-Dispatch’s Joel Currier reported Tuesday, there’s little deterrent value among the homeless in repeatedly seeing their friends overdose or experiencing it themselves. If the money reaches their hands, they will continue to abuse drugs. Cassandra Clinton spent six days in a hospital after overdosing on the synthetic drug K2, but that hasn’t stopped her from smoking marijuana, Currier reported. “Now, I smoke a stick every now and then, but I need to quit,” she said. The drugs are

the product of low-life chemists who constantly play with mixtures to circumvent laws designed to keep dangerous, untested synthetic intoxicants off the streets. The products are cheap to make and easy to buy. All it takes is a little bit of pocket change to get high. And overdose. There are far more effective ways to put your money to work for the needy, but neither handouts on the street nor donations to New Life are among them. Eddie Roth, director of the city’s Department of Human Services, specifically urges St. Louis residents not to contribute even food or clothing in the area of New Life because the donations are at risk of being wasted or feeding the pervasive drug culture in the neighborhood. If you really want to help, try volunteering. Or write a check to the organizations that know best how to channel it for maximum effectiveness. But don’t give money to panhandlers.

Want to help? Try volunteering. Gateway 180 — Principal emergency shelter for women and families. Volunteer opportunities include Operation Brown Bag, Fresh Start Program, and Serve a Meal. Contact: Mary Eveker, volunteer coordinator, 314-899-5233 or meveker@ gatewayhomeless.org St. Patrick Center — Volunteer opportunities include sorting donations, working fundraising events, performing administrative duties, serving lunch. Contact: Michele Prevedel, volunteer specialist, 314-802-0681, or mprevedel@ stpatrickcenter.org St. Vincent de Paul — Active social ministry includes daily lunch program. Contact: Jim Votino, volunteer manager, 314-231-9328 or 314-200-6853. Habitat for Humanity St. Louis — Opportunities include weekday and Saturday build crews to help establish low-income housing. Email: volunteers@ habitatstl.org.

yOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS News story about Trump’s Commerce pick editorializes The Post-Dispatch editorializes on the front page. I can’t get the “who, what, where, when and why” of honest journalism here without a dose of how Josh Boak of The Associated Press feels about the subject of his article. This used to be reserved for the editorial page when newspapers reported the news, not their personal feelings about the news. “Billionaire,” “king of bankruptcy” and “generated profits at cost of worker benefits” — just the headline is an editorial. All skew how we should think because we obviously can’t think for ourselves. It is insulting. It panders to the rich-vs.poor divide in this country. Is the value of Wilbur Ross’ art collection relevant to his value as head of Commerce or just a sensational tidbit to turn less fortunate folk against him? I read in the same article that he is smart enough and knows the system well enough to benefit from it. Doesn’t it follow that he can see where it could be improved for Americans? Boak has decided that Ross and Donald Trump couldn’t possibly care about citizens of other countries as Trump wants to “put America first.” Can you imagine? A leader who cares first and foremost about the country he was elected to represent? Boak concludes that means they can’t care about foreign citizens. I want to read the news and not what the author feels about the news. Let’s hope our town’s newspaper gets back to the integrity and values we used to depend on from the media. Patricia Presti • St. Louis County

Trump should get rid of stocks that could cause a conlict

LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

American lags being burned on Flora Place during a night of protest in 2014.

Faux lag lap Legal but ill-advised: banner burning and hostile Trump tweets.

S

o now President-elect Donald Trump wants to strip citizenship rights from anyone burning an American flag and subject them to a year in jail. What is this? The 1980s? Trump apparently woke up Tuesday morning and decided that weighing in on settled law would be a good idea. He reached for his smartphone and, before the sun was up, tweeted,“Nobody should be allowed to burn the American flag — if they do, there must be consequences — perhaps loss of citizenship or year in jail!” By sheer coincidence, Fox News was about to do a segment on a protest at Hampshire College in Amherst, Mass. The college had forbidden the flying of all flags after someone burned one in protest of Trump’s presidential victory. So a stupid, but legal, decision by a small college in reaction to a stupid, but legal, decision by an individual prompted the president-elect of the United States to make a stupid, but legal, comment on social media. Trump has an absolute gift for the inflammatory and distracting. Whether he has similar gifts for governance remains an open question. His notion of coercive, court-enforced patriotism is downright frightening. The U.S. Supreme Court has twice ruled that burning a flag is a protected form of free speech. The first time was in 1989. When Congress reacted by passing a law outlawing flag burning, the high court in

1990 said the law was unconstitutional. In both cases, Justice Antonin Scalia — the jurist whose views Trump says his Supreme Court nominees will reflect — voted with the majority. Scalia, who died in February, was a First Amendment absolutist. Scalia took some heat over his flagburning decisions but never backed down. Three months before his death, in an appearance at Princeton University, he said,“If it were up to me, I would put in jail every sandal-wearing, scruffy-bearded weirdo who burns the American flag. But I am not king.” The court also ruled in 1967 that stripping someone of his citizenship rights cannot be used as a form of criminal punishment. So as loathsome as flag-burning might be — and we agree that it is — it is a protected form of speech. The First Amendment was inspired by the great thinkers of the Enlightenment. One of them, the French philosopher known as Voltaire, is often credited with saying,“I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it.” In fact it was his biographer, Evelyn Beatrice Hall, summarizing his views in 1906. But the point stands. Trump has capitalized on it. As an individual, he has a right to his views, however ill-informed or inflammatory. As the leader of the free world, he will need some restraint.

Regarding “Trump’s stock in pipeline company raises concern” (Nov. 26): I am a retired federal employee. My husband is still a federal employee. During my employment, I had to fill out a report each year of all the financial stocks or other interests I had in any and all companies. I also had to report any holdings my spouse had. My husband still has to report all of this each year. At one time my husband had to sell a good stock that he owned because it was on a list of restricted companies that do business with the agency we worked for. Neither one of us was ever in a position in which we had appreciable influence over major agency purchases. Opportunity for conflict of interest was almost zero, yet we were scrutinized by virtue of our employment by the federal government. The federal government does business with many large corporations, which limits employees’ selection of investment opportunities. It is part of the deal for signing on as a federal servant. How then does the president, also a federal servant, expect to make decisions for the good of all taxpayers when his own, and his family’s, financial interests are directly tied to the companies that are affected by his decisions? Where is his list of restricted companies? He should get rid of any holdings that can be affected by his decisions in office. And he should do it before he takes the oath. This is so obvious and logical that it shouldn’t even need to be said. And yet I guess it does. I guess he takes the good people of this nation for a bunch of fools. Sue Jarrett • Oakland

Trump’s actions show his ignorance Shame on the Post-Dispatch for the false impression given by the front-page headline “Trump decides not to ‘lock her up’ ” (Nov. 23). It inaccurately gives Donald Trump the decision as to whether or not to do so.

Further it implies that he is acting magnanimously when in fact he’s acting in ignorance. As law professor Stephen Vladeck states elsewhere in the article,“The presidentelect has demonstrated his complete lack of understanding of how the government makes these kinds of decisions.” Trump is quoted as saying that he doesn’t “want to hurt the Clintons, I really don’t.” Now who is going to believe that lie? Ann H. Zahniser • Greenville

Increase funding for sexual violence services Our nation has a sexual assault epidemic. Roughly one out of every five women in the United States has been the victim of a rape or attempted rape. For some populations the rates of sexual violence are even greater. Sexual violence is tolerated, dare I say, blatantly accepted by our nation. The presidential election results have many concerned, and for good reason. The president-elect was recorded blatantly bragging about grabbing women’s genitals without consent.Touching another person in a sexual way without their explicit and freely given consent is sexual assault. Sexual assault can have horrific efects on the health of survivors. People who have experienced sexual violence are at increased risk for suicide, substance abuse, depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder, among many other concerns. The acceptance of the presidentelect’s rhetoric is massively harmful and has created a situation where the mental and physical safety and well-being of so many may be in jeopardy. It is crucial that we have an open dialogue about violence. I call on the Missouri Legislature to increase funding for sexual violence services from a mere $500,000 in 2016 to $2 million by the end of 2017. This increase in funding would allow agencies all across Missouri to serve more survivors. Because of the election’s results, I fear many will stop speaking out because they do not feel heard. To anyone suffering currently: I hear you, I believe you and I support you. Hannah Dismer • University City

Make SLU redevelopment area pedestrian-friendly In considering the St. Louis University redevelopment plan for Grand and Chouteau, I believe it is important to make the redevelopment area adjacent to the multibillion-dollar public investment pedestrian-friendly (“SLU plan calls for demolishing Pevely Dairy, saving tower,” Nov. 15). The environment should complement and support transit. You will find successful cities around the world implement urban design policies that protect the public interest and investments in situations like this. Not so St. Louis. The city long ago approved the adjacent suburban-style Doisy Center, whose site plan pretends pedestrians and transit don’t exist. What is troubling is that these are the same people the city wants to give control of issuing their own tax breaks. It is hard to believe any private entity would get that privilege. The Board of Aldermen should serve the people for a change and show some leadership. The board should absolutely control all of the already dubious corporate tax giveaways. These tax gifts should be leveraged by the board to insure the public interest is met and that a walkable, pedestrian environment with excellent access to transit is created. Greg Michaud • St. Louis Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON Editorial Page Editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382 KEVIN HORRIGAN Deputy Editorial Page Editor • khorrigan@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8135

I know that my retirement will make no diference in its cardinal principles, that it will always ight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always ight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

STLtoday.com/ThePlatform Find us at facebook/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial E-MAIL MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, letters@post-dispatch.com 900 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days.


OTHER VIEWS

11.30.2016 • WEDNESDAY • M 1 100 YEARS AGO TODAY ON THE EDITORIAL PAGE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A13

OUR TURKEY-FED CONVICTS • Sentiments of anger, resentment or whatever it may be called over the supply of turkey at present high prices to the

inmates of penal institutions seem not to be confined to the St. Louisan who lately wrote the Post-Dispatch. Is the great religious holiday worth very much if it does not induce us to count our blessings? Access the full item at stltoday.com/news/opinion

Trump should support the Cuba deal

As Donald Trump’s campaign promises have been dunked in reality’s strong solvent, many have been transformed in one way or another — modified, moderated, qualified, abandoned or pushed of into the distant future.

Hard-line U.S. policy through the years has been counterproductive. EUGENE ROBINSON Washington Post

DAN MARTIN • dmartin@post-dispatch.com

Trump’s hypocrisy is good for America Some of his strongest supporters seem to assume his cynicism. MICHAEL GERSON Washington Post

As Donald Trump’s campaign promises have been dunked in reality’s strong solvent, many have been transformed in one way or another — modified, moderated, qualified, abandoned or pushed off into the distant future. Not a wall across the whole southern border. Not every part of Obamacare repealed. Not all illegal immigrants deported, at least in the foreseeable future. Not literally tearing up the Iran agreement. Not an actual prison cell for Hillary Clinton. All this has opened up Trump to the charge of being a hypocrite. For the nation’s sake, let’s hope so. Hypocrisy has always been a complicated vice. It is the easiest, most common charge made in politics (“My opponent claims to love apple pie but uses them regularly in unspeakable acts.”) Most of us feel a visceral reaction when a crusading prosecutor makes use of prostitutes, or a law-and-order judge takes bribes, or a moralizing pastor tends to his or her flock a little too closely. But we should take care in defining hypocrisy.“A hypocrite is a person who — but who isn’t?” said Don Marquis. More helpfully, British political scientist David Runciman says that hypocrisy involves “claims to a consistency that one cannot sustain, claims to a loyalty that one does not possess, claims to an identity that one does not hold.” Hypocrisy comes in a long continuum of seriousness. You can wear a false face in displaying good manners toward someone you secretly despise. There is often hypocritical deception involved in political or diplomatic negotiations, which generally start with principled, nonnegotiable demands that are negotiated away in the process of finding a compromise. Hypocrisy can come

in accommodating human realities that don’t quite fit our ideals, as in the widespread use of artificial birth control by American Catholics. Or it may be that you have simply changed your mind in light of new circumstances — as President George H.W. Bush did in violating the pledge: “Read my lips; no new taxes.”

Not a wall across the whole southern border. Not every part of Obamacare repealed. Not all illegal immigrants deported, at least in the foreseeable future. Not literally tearing up the Iran agreement. Not an actual prison cell for Hillary Clinton.

In one sense, hypocrisy is unavoidable and necessary.If people were required, at all times, to live up to ideals of honesty, loyalty and compassion in order for those ideals to exist, there would be no ideals. Being a moral person is a struggle in which everyone repeatedly fails, becoming a hypocrite at each of those moments. A just and peaceful society depends on hypocrites who ultimately refuse to abandon the ideals they betray. Before we become overly self-forgiving, it is worth recalling that the founder of Christianity took hypocrisy quite seriously: “Be careful not to practice your righteousness in front of others to be seen by them.” Purity of heart and motivation, in the Christian tradition, does matter. But the hunt for hypocrisy should begin in the mirror. The issue at hand, however, is a certain kind of political hypocrisy — the conscious use of a mask to fool

the public and gain political benefit. Most would concede that this type of hypocrisy is generally harmful for a democracy, in which self-government requires informed choices. Trump’s brand of personalitydriven politics — emphasizing the virtues of a single leader — exaggerates the challenge. Trump arrives in Washington claiming to be the only honest man in a world of mendacity. It is a long way down from such a pedestal. Some of Trump’s strongest supporters seem to assume his cynicism. The part about forcing Mexicans to pay for the wall, according to Newt Gingrich, was “a great campaign device.” Of the largest construction project since the Qin dynasty, Rush Limbaugh now says he never expected Trump to do it. In this case, perhaps surprisingly, I am all for the wisdom of Gingrich and Limbaugh. Trump presents a special case, in which the normal criticisms of political hypocrisy should be suspended. Every time the Trump agenda is reshaped or refined to better fit reality, even Trump’s most dedicated critics have reason to applaud. This is a rare ethical circumstance in which realism and good sense take the form of hypocrisy. On a variety of issues, the sincerity of Trump’s current intentions — or the cynicism of his past intentions — should not matter. If the candidate who gave a wink and nod toward white nationalism now repudiates the alt-right and promises to “bring this country together,” so much the better. If the candidate who promised a trade war with China reconsiders, it is all to the good. It is admittedly an odd thing to cheer for cynicism. But in this strange, new political era, hypocrisy is our best hope.

Michael Gerson michaelgerson@washpost.com Copyright The Washington Post

At long last, Fidel Castro is dead. Now the oppressive system he installed in Cuba can wither and die, too — unless Donald Trump reverts to Cold War policies and gives Cuba’s failing dictatorship new life. It is tempting to see Castro’s death as little more than a formality. After all, his brother Raul has been running the country for a decade, ever since ill health forced Fidel to step aside and kept him from reassuming command. But the very fact that Fidel still drew breath served as a limiting factor in the program of economic reform Raul has been trying to enact. According to The Washington Post, Raul Castro gave a speech in April in which he joked that “we have two parties here, just like in the United States — Fidel’s and mine.” Fidel’s is the Communist one, he added, “and you can call mine whatever you want.” There is considerable truth in those words. Raul has been trying to move his country toward the Chinese model of authoritarian one-party rule combined with some degree of free-market economic development. Fidel, a true believer in the brutal communist experiment, has consistently tried to slow, derail or reverse any meaningful economic change. Fidel was reportedly appalled at the way Mao Zedong’s China was transformed by Deng Xiaoping’s reforms. He saw the society dividing into haves and havenots. Worse, in his mind, he saw the Chinese Communist Party potentially sowing the seeds of its own demise by allowing the accumulation of private wealth and the development of civil society. He was determined that the Communist Party of Cuba would not make the same mistake. But the Cuban leadership no longer had a choice. Fidel barely managed to survive the collapse of the Soviet empire and the loss of huge subsidies from the USSR and Eastern Europe. Cubans were hungry in the mid-1990s, and there were violent antigovernment riots, but El Comandante loosened strictures on private agriculture and enterprise — and then tightened them again as the crisis abated. The Castro regime got another lifeline from the late Venezuelan strongman, Hugo Chavez, whom Fidel cultivated as a protege. Chavez gave his mentor billions of dollars’ worth of oil, so much that the Cubans were able to satisfy their own needs

and sell the surplus on the world market for precious hard currency. But Chavez died, Venezuela’s economy melted down and the Castro regime found itself fresh out of saviors. That explains Raul’s willingness to work with President Obama to normalize relations. Those who complained that the United States didn’t “get more” in the deal fail to understand the reality of today’s Cuba. From their point of view, Cuba’s leaders were surrendering one of their primary instruments of power and control: the “threat” from Cuba’s hostile neighbor to the north. For half a century, the Castros cited the U.S.-imposed trade embargo, the travel ban for U.S. citizens and other such measures as “proof” that the Cuban revolution was under sustained attack by the United States. From my experience — I’ve made 10 trips to Cuba and written a book about the place — most Cubans are not gullible; they see their government for what it is. But they are nationalistic. Even most of the brave dissidents who stood up to the Castro regime argued that hard-line U.S. policy was counterproductive, doing more to shore up the system than weaken it. Raul Castro knows he needs the economic boost that an opening to the United States will produce. But the price he is paying — allowing more free-market economic development, permitting freer access to the internet, letting more Cubans have smartphones — will make any return to a “purer” form of communism impossible. That’s where things stand now, and Fidel’s death should hasten change on the island. Unless a certain presidentelect does something tragically dumb. “If Cuba is unwilling to make a better deal for the Cuban people, the Cuban/ American people and the U.S. as a whole,” Trump tweeted Monday, “I will terminate deal.” I’m betting that no one, including Trump, knows exactly what that means in concrete policy terms. But we do know that now, for the first time since the Kennedy administration, we have the chance to flood Cuba with American ideas and values. That is how we promote freedom. If Trump goes back to a posture of implacable U.S. hostility, he will disappoint and discourage millions of Cubans while strengthening the hand of only one: Raul Castro, who will be all too happy to play David to Trump’s Goliath.

Eugene Robinson eugenerobinson@washpost.com Copyright The Washington Post

A guide to combating gender inequality through advocacy Women must empower each other, take risks in the business world. BY DR. TONIYA SINGH

In light of the presidential election results, combating gender inequality has become a top priority for women around the country. Women in Missouri, for example, are paid 77 cents for every dollar paid to men. As a solution-oriented person, I think it’s time for women to take some ownership of this gender disparity in the Singh workplace. It’s time to teach the next generation of women that the more we accept personal responsibility for our own lives, the more successful we can be. Here’s how you can become your own best advocate: • Be informed. Whether you’re negotiating salary or asking for a promotion, it’s important to know what those in similar positions are

making and what kind of experience they have. While your peers don’t necessarily define your worth, having this information in your back pocket — should you need it — makes for a much more compelling argument. • Be confident. It’s been said that men will apply for a job if they meet only 60 percent of the qualifications, but women will only apply if they meet 100 percent of the qualifications. What does that tell us? Women need to be more confident in their abilities. You have trained hard, you are capable, and you bring value to the market. You know your worth, so stand firm when articulating it. • Operate under the assumption that you are being treated as an equal. During any conversation about advancing your career, your goals and skill sets should be your main arguing points. Don’t even bring gender into the equation. Conversely, know that no one has

the right to ask you any genderbiased questions in a professional setting. There is rarely a reason for you to discuss your children, relationship, or plans for pregnancy while applying for a job or negotiating a raise. • Find a mentor/sponsor. There is perhaps nothing more valuable than soaking up the wisdom of others who have been in your position or who are in a position in which you want to be. And having an ally who is invested in your career will only increase your chances for success. Start by making a list of people whose career track you’d like to follow, and reach out to them. Keep in mind, too, that as your career goals and plans change, so may your mentors and sponsors. • Take risks. In her Ted Talk, Reshma Saujani explains that most girls are taught to avoid risk and failure in order to pursue perfection, while boys are taught to take

risks and be brave.“And by the time they’re adults,” Saujani says, “whether they’re negotiating a raise or even asking someone out on a date, they’re habituated to take risk after risk. They’re rewarded for it.” The lesson to be learned here is that in order to get what you want, you must get comfortable being uncomfortable. Taking risks will always get you further than the “be complacent and complain” approach. • Take action. I can’t tell you how many times I have heard female colleagues complain that they are never given the opportunity to be in a position of authority. Yet, when industry organizations are seeking volunteer speakers or representatives, they are not the first to volunteer. If you want to be respected, you must put yourself in a position that demands respect. Volunteer. Be responsive. Put yourself out there. Let the world know that you will be taken

seriously. It is not easy, but nothing good ever is. My hope today is that every woman, at every stage in her career, will adopt this mindset of empowerment. Let’s empower each other. Passing on opportunities (that may not be right for us, in the moment) to other competent, capable women allows us to empower them, which puts us in a position of power as well. Let’s teach the next generation that they need not be defined by gender disparities in the workplace, but rather their talent and willingness to succeed. Let’s effectively advocate for ourselves, take risks, and take action.

Dr. Toniya Singh is an invasive, noninterventional cardiologist and a managing partner at St. Louis Heart and Vascular. She is also the founding President of the Missouri chapter of Women in Cardiology section of The American College of Cardiology.


A14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 11.30.2016

OBITUARIES Donnelly, Dianna Georgia

To Our Readers

On Sun., November 27, 2016. Visitation information: Stygar Florissant Chapel, 13980 New Halls Ferry Rd., Thursday 3:00 to 9:00. Service information: Friday, December 2, 2016. St. Rose Philippine Duchesne Catholic Church. Online condolences and guestbook may be found at www.stygar.com

To place or share an obituary for your loved one, visit us at: www.stltoday.com/obits For more information you can contact us by phone at 800-365-0820 ext 5, or 314-340-8600 or by email at deathnotices@post-dispatch.com Biedenstein - see Schorfheide Blumer, William G. "Willouby" - Pevely, MO Boschert, Douglas F. - St. Charles Clark, Dorothea M. - St. Charles Concannon, John K. - St. Louis deJong, Marie M. - St. Louis Donahue, Donald V. - St. Louis

Donnelly, Dianna Georgia - St. Louis and Naples, FL, Doyle, Marjorie - Fairview Heights Easley - see Gollaher Feeler, Patricia A. - St. Louis Fooks - see Donahue Gau, Edward C. Jr. - St. Louis Gillam, Mark E. - St. Louis Gollaher, Mary Ruth - St. John Greer, Jr., Warner William "Bill" - Scottsdale, AZ, formerly of St. Louis Gruss, Donna J. - St. Louis Hanebrink, Loretta M - O'Fallon, MO Hannah, Donald William - St. Louis Haynes - see Naile Jorke, Patricia D. - formerly of St. Louis

Kothe, Martin "Marty" P. - Wright City Lewandowski - see Vollmar Mackey, Eugene J. III - Ladue Mann - see deJong Martin - see Donnelly Naile, Era Ellon - St. Louis Pieper, Cornell H. - O'Fallon, MO Pugliese - see Donnelly Rackers - see Vollmar Robbins, James B. - St. Louis Schorfheide, Corinne K. - St. Louis Solovic, Milton - St. Louis Spalinger, Zoa "Joanne" - Shell Knob, MO Spindell, Robert C. - St. Louis Sutton, James L. - St. Louis Thielmeier, Garry L. - St. Charles Varrone, Nicholas J. Sr. - St. Louis Vitale, John - St. Peters Vollmar, Clarence L. - St. Charles Voss, E. Darlene - St. Louis Walker, John C. "Jack" - St. Louis White, John - Plano, TX formerly of St. Louis Wolfinger, Linda Ann - St. Louis

Expressing your thoughtfulness respectfully & gracefully Concannon, John K.

Blumer, William G. "Willouby" Age 70, of Pevely, MO. Nov. 22, 2016. Beloved husband of Linda (nee Schmidt) Blumer; dear father of Elizabeth and William Michael (Jessica) Blumer. Services: Gathering 5-8 p.m. Friday with Service 11 a.m. Saturday at VINYARD'S, Pevely. For more information see www.vinyardfuneralhomes.com.

Boschert, Douglas F.

of Saint Charles, MO, died on Sunday November 27, 2016, at the age of 95. Loving husband of Leaetta Boschert; beloved son of the late Hubert and Mabel Boschert; dear brother of Hubert Boschert, Joan (Bud) Schaeffer, and Jean Boschert. Doug was preceded in death by sisters Geraldine and Lois and brothers Donald, Maurice, Paul and Spud (Orville). Uncle, greatuncle, and friend to many. Doug proudly served his country in the United States Air Force during World War II. He was Mayor of St. Charles from 1979 to 1983 and served as State representative for 8 years. Doug was a presiding Judge of St. Charles County. He was a member at American Legion Post 312 and Kiwanis Club. Doug owned and operated "BK Market" grocery store for many years. He was loved and will be dearly missed by all who knew him. Services: The family is being served by the Baue Funeral Home. Visitation will be held Thursday, December 1, 2016 from 4:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. at Baue Funeral Home, 620 Jefferson Street, St. Charles, MO 63301. Funeral Mass will be held Friday, December 2, 2016 at 10:00 a.m. at St. Charles Borromeo Catholic Church. Interment will take place with St. Charles Memorial Gardens. Memorials may be made to St. Charles Borromeo Catholic Church or American Legion Post 312. Visit Baue.com

Clark, Dorothea M. age 88, of St. Charles, Missouri, died Sunday, November 27, 2016. Contact (636) 940-1000 or visit baue.com

Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Saturday, November 26, 2016. Beloved husband of Adria Concannon (nee Gutierrez); dear father of Emmett and Elliot Concannon; dear son of Michael G. and Jane Leiendecker Concannon; dear brother of James (Jason Nichols), Jeffrey (Maria) Concannon, and Julie (Larry) Hickman; our dear son-in-law, nephew, uncle, cousin, and friend. John was a graduate of DeSmet High School and the University of Missouri. He worked in his family insurance business for the past 14 years and was a lifelong parishioner of St. Richard Catholic Church. Services: Visitation at Kriegshauser West, 9450 Olive Blvd., On Friday, December 2, from 4:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m., then to St. Richard Church, 11223 Schuetz Rd., on Saturday, December 3, from 9:00 a.m. until time of Mass at 10:00 a.m. Interment at Calvary Cemetery. Memorials to www.unbound.org appreciated. www.kriegshausermortuary.com.

deJong, Marie M. (nee Seib) Monday, November 28, 2016. Beloved wife of the late Roy C. deJong II; dear mother of Carol Mann and Dennis deJong (Melody), Scott deJong and the late Roy C. deJong III; dear grandmother of Lea Ann Locklear, Jacquelyn Mann (Jeremy), Victoria Martin (John), Christina Gent (Christopher), Kristen, Jennifer and Jeffrey deJong; our dear greatgrandmother, aunt, great-aunt and friend. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois, Friday, December 2, 9:00 a.m. Interment National Cemetery. Memorials to deGreeff Hospice House appreciated. Visitation Thursday, 5-8 p.m.

314-352-7575 wkf.com

Donahue, Donald V. 86, Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Saturday, Nov. 26, 2016. Beloved husband of the late Alice N. (nee Baker); loving father of Michael (Susie) Donahue, Gloria (Mitchell) Fooks, and Tracy Donahue; dear grandfather of Lorraine (Michael) Harris, Ryan Hoff, Tom Donahue, and Matthew Fooks; great grandfather of Kingston Harris. SERVICES: Visitation Saturday, December 3, 2016 until time of service at 12pm at KRIEGSHAUSER WEST MORTUARY 9450 Olive Blvd., St. Louis. Interment with Military Honors Mount Lebanon Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions are suggested to the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation. Condolences may be offered through www.kriegshausermortuary.com.

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(nee Voellinger) Beloved wife of Robert "Bob" Donnelly for nearly 58 years; Mother to Robert "Bob", Jr. (Barbara), Steven, Elizabeth Pugliese, Deidre Donnelly and Maura Martin (Chris). Grandmother to Ryan (Christina), Blake Pugliese, Megan, Bobby, Drew, Max, Fiona Martin, and Kylie Martin. Great-Grandmother to Jade Dianna. Mother-in-law to Debbie. Preceded in death by her infant son Christopher, younger brother Arthur J. Voellinger II and her parents Georgia Webb and Arthur J. Voellinger of St. Louis. Dianna graduated from St. Joseph's Academy in 1957 and attended Fontbonne College. Before the dawn of commonplace mainframe computers, she provided some of the human mathematical brainpower required to solve many aeronautical equations and assisted with projects at McDonnell-Douglas in the years leading up to the space program. A lifelong St. Louisan, she spent every summer since 1967 in her cottage at New Piasa Chautauqua, Illinois, and every winter since 1985 in Naples, Florida. An avid boater for most of her life, she served as first mate on "Miss Print" from the headwaters of the Mississippi River through most of this country's major inland waterways and later accompanied husband Bob on her namesake vessel M/Y "Dianna" for many international bluewater adventures. While her peers were settling into retirement, Dianna took her love of nature one step further, earning the title of Master Gardener in Florida. A cancer survivor for thirty-six years, she faced every adversity and challenge with strength, style, dignity and grace. Services: A Funeral Mass will be celebrated at the Church of The Immacolata, 8900 Clayton Road, Richmond Heights on Saturday, December 3, 2016 at 11:00 a.m. Visitation at the Church beginning at 10 a.m. Saturday morning. Interment Calvary Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions appreciated to Siteman Cancer Center, 4921 Parkview Place, St Louis, Missouri 63110. Friends may visit www.luptonchapel.com to offer their condolences. A SERVICE OF THE LUPTON CHAPEL

Doyle, Marjorie age 88. Visitation and will be held from 9-11a, with a Mem Mass at 11a, on Fri., Dec. 2, at Holy Trinity Catholic Church, Fairview Heights, IL.

Feeler, Patricia A. (nee Gaab) Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church Saturday, November 26, 2016. Beloved wife of the late Willis Feeler; loving mother of Linda (the late Dock) Williams, Susan Feeler, Louis (the late Wanda) Feeler, Sharon Craig and Matthew (Danielle) Feeler; our dearest grandmother, great-grandmother, great-greatgrandmother; aunt, great-aunt, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral from KUTIS CITY CHAPEL, 2906 Gravois, Friday, December 2, 9:45 a.m. to St. Wenceslaus Church for 10:00 a.m. Mass. Interment Memorial Park Cemetery. Visitation Thursday, 4-8 p.m.

Gau, Edward C. Jr. Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church Saturday, November 26, 2016. Loving father of Jim (Kathleen Foley) Gau, Christine (late Tim) Mataya and the late Kevin (surviving Laura) Gau; loving brother of Evelyn (John) Stockman and Mary Ann Aulbach; our dear grandfather, great-grandfather, uncle, greatuncle, cousin and friend. Edward was a 64 year member of Roofers Local #2. Services: Funeral from KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY CHAPEL 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Friday, December 2, 10:30 for 11:00 a.m. Mass at Immaculate Conception Catholic Church (Arnold). Interment JB National Cemetery. Visitation Thursday, 5-9 p.m.

Passed away peacefully, Thursday November 24, 2016 at age 59. Beloved brother, uncle, friend, and father. Mark was a member of Lion's Club International. Services: Memorial visitation at KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois, Saturday, December 3, 1 p.m. until Service at 3 p.m. (Lion's Club Rose Service at 2:30 pm) In lieu of flowers, memorials to Lion's Club International Saving Sight Program appreciated.

Gollaher, Mary Ruth (nee Claywell), 90 of St. John, Sunday, Nov. 27, 2016. Beloved wife for 61 years of the late Joseph P. Gollaher; dearest mother of Joseph Wayne (Carol) Gollaher; cherished grandmother of Diane Gollaher, Denise (Jon) Koch and Darlene (Matt) Tilley; dear sister of Joan Johnson, Howard "Buddy" Easley and the late Thelma Hooks, Ruby Carey, Grace Dolan and Roy Easley; our uncle, cousin and friend. Services: Vis., at SHEPARD FUNERAL CHAPEL, 9255 Natural Bridge Rd. at I-170, Fri., Dec. 2, 4-8pm, Funeral Service, Sat., 10:30am. Burial follows at Mt. Lebanon Cemetery. www.ShepardFuneralChapel.com

Greer, Jr., Warner William "Bill"

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(nee Dalton), of O'Fallon, MO, passed away on Sunday, November 27, 2016 at the age of 89. Loving mother of Larry (Sue) Hanebrink, and Bill (Susan) Voges. Dear step-mother of Steven Hanebrink and Mary Beth Hanebrink. Beloved grandmother of Kerri (Robert) Goodrich, Kevin (Fran) Hanebrink, Kristen Hanebrink, Shannon (Jeff) Voges-Haupt, and Brandon (Lisa) Voges. Cherished great-grandmother of Nicole (Nikki), Dylan, Keats, Flannery, Beckett, Soren, Twain, Raph, Ross, Alicia, Kath, Jackie, Adam, Erica, Scott, and Loren. Services: The family is being served by The Baue Funeral and Memorial Center, 3950 West Clay Street, St. Charles, MO 63301, Visitation from 4:00-7:00 p.m. on Thursday, Dec. 1, 2016. Funeral Service 10:00 a.m. on Friday, Dec. 2, 2016 at the funeral home. Memorials may be made to Backstoppers.

Hannah, Donald William

Beloved husband of Amy Galloway Hannah. Loving Dad of Debra (John) Grygiel, Kelly (Steve) DesSaint, Scott (Cindy) Hannah, Michael Hannah, and Mark (Sara) Hannah. Wonderful Granddaddy of Christopher, Ashley, Tyler, Dan, Megan, Nick, Will, Benjamin, and Brody. Son of the late Glenn and Elizabeth Henderson Hannah, of Gary, Indiana. Devoted brother, brother-in-law, uncle, great uncle, cousin, and friend to all he met. Retired from Engineered Lubricants Co. Generous supporter of Gateway Region YMCA. Don's biggest honor was receiving the 2008 J. Clinton Hawkins Award for volunteerism. Faithful member of Christ Memorial Lutheran Church. Proud graduate of the University of Michigan, where he was a quarterback for their football team, and Northwestern University Kellogg School of Business. Inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame for the longest point-after-touchdown pass in NCAA history. Don enjoyed spending time with family and friends, traveling, golf, and watching sports, especially University of Michigan football. GO BLUE! And he had an infectious sense of humor that will live on in our hearts and memories. Services: Memorial service plans are pending. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to South County Family YMCA. ST. LOUIS CREMATION

Jorke, Patricia D. formerly of St. Louis on November 5, 2016. Loving mother of Laurie (Steve) Strassburger, Michelle Jorke and Michael Jorke; loving daughter of Loeta Burke and the late Paul Schmidt; our dear grandmother, sister, sister-in-law, aunt, cousin and friend. Services: Visitation at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY CHAPEL, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd. on Friday, December 2, 5-9 p.m. Private services to be held.

Kothe, Martin "Marty" P. 53, of Wright City, MO, Fortified with the Sacraments of the Holy Mother Church November 25, 2016. Devoted husband of Lisa Kothe (nee Graeler); loving son of Kenneth Kothe; beloved father of Lindsey R. (Nick) Knaust, Emily A. Kothe and Danielle E. Kothe; dear brother of Andy (Jean) Kothe, Jerry (Cindy) Kothe, Tom (Rita) Kothe and Sharon (Corey) Ketchum; he was preceded in death by his mother, Rosalie Kothe nee Vehige. Services: Memorial Mass on Friday December 2, 2016 at 11am at St. Patrick Catholic Church, Wentzville, MO. Visitation prior to the service from 10-11 am at the church. Inurnment at St. Patrick Catholic Church Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made payable to the St. Dominic High School or The Maggie Welby Foundation in care of Pitman Funeral Home, P.O. Box 248, Wentzville, MO 63385. Memories and condolences may be expressed at www.pitmanfuneralhome.com.

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82, passed away November 17, 2016. He is survived by his wife Monica; daughter Christy Crowell; grandson Jacob Crowell. He is preceded in death by his loving daughter Tracy Greer and parents Warner and Dorothy Greer. He retired from Hartford Insurance in St. Louis after 27 years and moved to Scottsdale, AZ. Services: A memorial service to held on Saturday, December 3, 2016 at Messingers Funeral Home, 7601 E. Indian School Rd., Scottsdale, AZ. In lieu of flowers, a donation to the Parkinson Nation Foundation, 200 SE 1st., Ste 800, Miami, FL 33131. MESSINGERS FUNERAL HOME

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Eugene J. Mackey, III went to be with the Lord on Sunday, November 27, 2016. Beloved husband of Ann Meyer Mackey; loving father of Elizabeth A. "Libby" Mackey Perrin, Augustine M. "Tina" Mackey Shodeen (Mark), Eugene J. "Gene" Mackey, IV and Philip J. Mackey (Mary); dear grandfather of William, Jennifer and Andrew, Claire, Grace and E.J., Madison, P.J. and Cadence; dear step-father of Barbie Mattie, Clint Whittemore and Katie McAllister; dear step-grandfather of Nora, Emma and Sterling; dear brother of Ellen Mackey and the late John E. Mackey; dear brother-in-law of Jan Shapleigh Mackey and Jim Meyer; dear uncle of Alex, John and Janie. He was preceded in death by his parents Eugene J. Mackey, Jr. and Mary Mackey Layton, and his brother John E. Mackey. Gene graduated from Ladue Horton Watkins High School in 1956, and received his Bachelor's Degree from Washington University in 1962. He received his Master's in Architecture from Harvard University in 1963. He founded Eugene J. Mackey, III Architects in 1968, which later became Mackey Mitchell Architects. Gene's work left an indelible mark on St. Louis, exemplified by projects such as the renovation of the Old Cathedral, which followed his father's renovation of that historic landmark in 1960. Other notable projects include Chaifetz Arena, the Alberici Headquarters, a LEED Platinum building, Central Institute for the Deaf, Jones Visitor Center in Forest Park, CBC High School, the design of the fountain at the Missouri History Museum, and the current renovation of Soldiers Memorial and Court of Honor, originally designed by his father more than 60 years ago. Gene also expanded his family's legacy at the Missouri Botanical Garden, where his father designed the Climatron, with multiple projects including design of the Japanese Garden, renovation of Spink Pavilion and design of the Shapleigh Fountain, a project he considered to be one of his favorites. Gene's accomplishments garnered widespread professional recognition, including serving two terms as President of the St. Louis Chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA), and being named a Fellow of the AIA, the highest membership level offered by the Institute. He was presented with the Leslie N. Boney Spirit of Fellowship Award by the College of Fellows and received the Distinguished Service Award from AIA Missouri. Gene also received the Gold Honor Award from the St. Louis AIA Chapter, the highest individual award an architect can receive. He was one of only 15 members to have ever received this honor. Gene built his firm into a national practice focused on student life projects, including a 40-year relationship with Washington University which included the complete transformation of the South 40 residential campus that resulted in the University being named #1 on The Princeton Review list of "Best College Dorms." Other Mackey Mitchell university projects were completed at St. Louis University, University of Missouri, University of Notre Dame, Westminister College, Texas Tech University, University of Rhode Island, University of Pittsburgh, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Northwestern University, Miami (Ohio) University, SIUE, Pennsylvania State University, University of Colorado-Boulder, Ohio Wesleyan University, University of Alabama, University of Minnesota, University of Nebraska, Indiana University, Truman State University, Webster University, and many more. Gene was a giant as a civic leader and tireless advocate for the City of St. Louis and the region throughout his life. He was a trusted advisor and mentor to many friends and business leaders in the community for over 50 years. His impact on the St. Louis community and beyond is profound, deep and wide ranging, and will be felt for generations to come. Gene's passion and enthusiasm for architecture and the advancement of the St. Louis community was only surpassed by his love for his family. He was a devoted husband and always cherished the time he spent with his children and grandchildren. Whether the time was spent drawing, apple picking, golfing, on family trips or just talking about life, Gene was the consummate patriarch and a true family man. Gene was a man of deep faith and an eternal optimist, who sincerely believed each day was a gift from God to be celebrated. He demonstrated that belief each and every day in the way he impacted others and lived his life. He would frequently give the advice that we should "always remain curious" in life, and was a dedicated scholar and historian. Gene was an unwavering and true "gentleman" as anyone who had the privilege of meeting him will attest. We will all miss his calm counsel, guidance and inspiration, but his legacy will live on. Services: The family will receive friends at a visitation to be held at THE LUPTON CHAPEL, 7233 Delmar Blvd., University City on Sunday, December 4, from 12:00 Noon until 5:00 p.m. The Funeral and Interment will be private. A SERVICE OF THE LUPTON CHAPEL

Naile, Era Ellon (nee Haynes) on November 24, 2016. Beloved wife of the late Rev. Jesse Naile; dear sister of Bill and Eugene Haynes and the late Nadine Everright, David Haynes and LaVone Nuzum Kennedy; our dear aunt, great-aunt, great-great-aunt, and friend to many. Services: Vistation at KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois, on Friday December 2 from 1 pm until Service time at 2 pm. Interment Park Lawn Cemetery. Donations to Retired Ministers Fund (c/o Twin Rivers Worship Center, 10575 Tesson Ferry Road, 63123)

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11.30.2016 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • A15

WORLD DIGEST

afternoon. Many ANC members have blamed Zuma’s corruption scandals for the party’s poor performance in local elections in August.

Girls dormitory ire kills 12 in Turkey A ire at a middle school dormitory for girls in southern Turkey left 12 people dead and 22 injured Tuesday night, a Turkish governor and state-run media said. Adana Governor Mahmut Demirtas said one teacher and 11 students were killed in the ire in the town of Aladag and the wounded were taken to a hospital, according to the state-run Anadolu Agency, which described the building as a middle school dormitory for girls. Speaking to reporters at the scene, Demirtas said the dormitory had 34 people and the ire may have been caused by an electrical problem. No one was left in the building, he said. Egypt cracks down on NGOs, rights groups • The Egyptian parliament on Tuesday voted in favor of a new law aimed at regulating nongovernmental organizations but efectively gives security agencies extensive powers and the upper hand over the inancing, registration, and activities of NGOs and rights groups. Since the overthrow of Egypt’s President Hosni Mubarak in a mass uprising in 2011, Egypt’s rights groups have faced a heavy security crackdown and concerted state-media campaign that accused them of being architects of instability and advocates of regime change.

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A worker explains the structure Tuesday of an arch-shaped enclosure in Chernobyl, Ukraine. The gargantuan enclosure was moved into place over the nuclear reactor, which melted down 30 years ago in the worst nuclear accident in history.

leader and lock out his exiled chief rival, Mohammed Dahlan, from decision making for at least the next ive years. Some 1,400 members of Fatah gathered in Ramallah for the ive-day conference, where delegates are to hold elections for the party’s two main decision-making bodies.

Fatah movement to cement Abbas’ rule • President Mahmoud Abbas’ longdominant Fatah movement on Tuesday opened a conference that is expected to cement the rule of the 81-year-old Palestinian

Massive shelter covers Chernobyl reactor • Workers completed a massive shelter over the Chernobyl nuclear plant’s exploded reactor on Tuesday, one of the most ambitious engineering projects in the world that one expert said had closed “a nuclear wound.” The half cylinder-shaped shelter was locked in place over the plant’s reactor

Pieper, Cornell H.

Solovic, Milton

of O'Fallon, MO, died Monday, November 28, 2016, at the age of 88. Loving husband of 66 years to Betty L. Pieper; Beloved son of the late Hilary and Ann Pieper; devoted father of Marcia Fischer, Michele (Frank Makaryk) Gonser, Michael (Kerry Lafky) Pieper, and Mark Pieper; cherished grandfather of Kelly (Ian) Phillips, Chad Gonser, Cory (Amber) Fischer, and Colton Pieper; and treasured great-grandfather of Blake Phillips. He was also preceded in death by his sister, Dolores Conoyer. Dr. Pieper graduated from Logan Chiropractic College in 1951, and practiced for 40 years in Wentzville, Warrenton, and O'Fallon. He was a WWII Army veteran serving in postwar Japan. He was also a 63-year life member of the American Legion, holding many positions in Legion Post 388. Dr. Pieper was responsible for recruiting numerous members for the Post. He completed 459 honor guard ceremonies at Jefferson Barracks prior to his passing. Services: The family is being served by the Baue Funeral Home, 311 Wood Street, O'Fallon, MO. Visitation will be held on Friday, December 2, 2016 from 4:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. at the funeral home. Funeral Service will be held on Saturday, December 3, 2016 at 12:00 p.m. at the funeral home. Interment will follow at a later date at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to American Legion Post 388. Visit Baue.com

Robbins, James B. on Saturday, 11/26/16. Loving father of Courtney and Hayley Robbins. Loving brother of Kathleen (Gene) Reinke; our dear uncle, great-uncle, cousin and friend to many. Services: Visitation at Canaan Baptist Church (5409 Baumgartner Rd., St. Louis 63129) on Tuesday, 11/29, 9:00 a.m. until time of service at 9:30 a.m. Interment JB National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations to Stray Rescue of St. Louis or Ronald McDonald Family Room at St. Louis Children's Hospital. A KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY SERVICE.

Schorfheide, Corinne K. (nee Barlow), Fri., Nov. 25, 2016. Dear wife of the late Junior John Schorfheide; dear mother of James (Julie) Schorfheide, Barbara (Gerry) Biedenstein and the late Karl Schorfheide; dear grandmother of Christine (Tom Ashley), Jeffrey & Laura Schorfheide, Michael (Lindsay) & Andrew Biedenstein; dear greatgrandmother of Constance Susanne & George Vincent Biedenstein; dear aunt, great-aunt & sister-in-law. Services: Funeral service Fri., Dec. 2, 9:30 a.m. at BOPP Chapel, 10610 Manchester Rd., Kirkwood. Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to Manor Grove of Kirkwood or to a charity of your choice. Visitation Thur. 5-8 pm. www.boppchapel.com

No. 4 after being moved in on hydraulic jacks for two weeks. It marks a signiicant step toward containing the consequences of the world’s worst nuclear accident, which occurred 30 years ago in what is now Ukraine. Workers will now begin dismantling unstable parts of the original cover, the so-called sarcophagus, which was built over the reactor shortly after the disaster to contain radiation. ‘No breakthroughs’ in Ukraine peace talks • A meeting of foreign ministers of Russia, Ukraine, France and Germany intended to shore up a shaky peace process in eastern Ukraine ended Tuesday without any visible progress. Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov told reporters

South African president escapes ouster • President Jacob Zuma escaped a move to oust him as the leader of South Africa by senior members of his ruling party, it was announced Tuesday. A motion to dismiss Zuma, 74, over a string of corruption allegations since he came to oice in 2009 was introduced at a meeting of the National Executive Committee, or NEC, of the

Vollmar, Clarence L.

White, John

94, Asleep in Jesus on Monday, November 28, 2016. Beloved husband of Juanita Solovic (nee Jackson) for 69 years; loving father of Sandra Kay (Ronald) Ackerman; grandfather of David (Mai Hong) Ackerman and Matthew (Sadie) Ackerman and the late Miriam (Jonathan) Kovac; greatgrandfather of Norah Kovac and Neil Ackerman; brother of Emily Koberna, Rudy Solovic and the late Olga Lane, Paul, George, John and Walter Solovic; our dear father-in-law, brother-in-law, uncle and friend. Milton served our country during WWII in the Pacific as a proud member of the 1st Marine Raiders; 4th Marine Regiment; 1st Provisional Marine Brigade and 6th Marine Division. He especially enjoyed traveling, doing work for His Lord, and the 25 years he volunteered in the activity department of a nursing home. Sempi Fi. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois, Friday, December 2, 11:00 a.m. Interment St. Trinity Cemetery. Memorials to VFW, Laclede Groves (Lutheran Senior Services) or the charity of your choice. Visitation Thursday, 3-8 p.m.

Baptized in the Hope of Christ's Resurrection Sunday, November 27, 2016. Beloved husband of the late Dorothy Vollmar (nee: Kaczmarski). Loving father of Mary Cay Rackers. Loving father-in-law to Robert M. Lewandowski. Dearest grandfather of Chad (Carrie) and Neil (Rachel) Rackers. Beloved great-grandfather of Jacob, Annabel and Brendan. Dear brother-in-law, uncle, great uncle and friend. All family and friends attending are asked to wear Cardinal Baseball attire or red and white in honor of Clarence's passion for his St. Louis Cardinals. Services: Funeral 9:15 a.m. Friday, December 2, 2016 from HutchensStygar Mid Rivers Mortuary, 5987 Mid Rivers Mall Drive, St. Peters, MO 63304 to St. Joseph Cottleville Catholic Church for a 10 a.m. Mass. Interment Sacred Heart Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Kaufman Fund for Veterans or Lutheran Senior Services Hospice at Breese Park would be appreciated. Online guestbook at buchholzmortuary.com. A BUCHHOLZ Valley of Flowers Mortuary service. VISITATION THURS, 4-8 P.M. at Hutchens-Stygar Mid Rivers Mortuary.

Spalinger, Zoa "Joanne"

Voss, E. Darlene

72, of Shell Knob, MO. Entered into rest on Sun. Nov. 27, 2016 Vis. Thur. 4-8pm Serv. Fri. 11am CHAPEL HILL MORTUARY, Kirkwood, MO

Spindell, Robert C. 82, VISITATION SUNDAY, Dec. 4th, 4 - 8 p.m. See www.hutchensmortuary.com for more info.

Sutton, James L. Sunday, Nov. 27, 2016. Vis. at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY, Thur. Dec. 1, 4 - 8 pm and service Fri. 9 am. Interment Annapolis Cemetery Fri. at 1pm.

(nee Sappington), Nov. 26, 2016 Survived by husband of 63 years, William Voss; dear mother of Linda Keller and the the late Joe Voss; grandmother of Amy Keller; dear aunt, cousin and friend to many. Services: Visitation Thurs., Dec 1, 48 p.m. at HUTCHENS Mortuary, 675 Graham Rd, Florissant MO. Funeral Mass 10 a.m. at Sacred Heart Catholic Church, 751 Jefferson St., Florissant, MO. Interment Crossroads Baptist Church Cemetery, Leasburg, MO.

Walker, John C. "Jack"

Thielmeier, Garry L. age 65, of St. Charles, MO, died on Sunday, November 27, 2016. Contact (636) 940-1000 or visit baue.com

Varrone, Nicholas J. Sr. 92, Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church Saturday, November 26, 2016. Beloved husband of Ann M. Varrone (nee Steger); dear father of Nicholas Jr. (Ellie) and Timothy (Marilyn) Varrone and Denise (Steve) Bihr; our dear grandfather, greatgrandfather, brother-in-law, uncle, great-uncle and friend. Nicholas was a Knight of the 4th Degree. Services: Funeral from KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY CHAPEL, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Friday, December 2, 9:30 a.m. to St. Margaret Mary Alacoque Church for 10:00 a.m. Mass. Interment JB National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions to the charity of your choice appreciated. Visitation Thursday, 5-8 p.m.

Vitale, John fortified with the Sacrament of Holy Mother Church, on Friday, November 18, 2016. Loving husband of the late Mildred Rose (nee Schuepbach); loving father of Vicky L.(Alan) and Lawrence J. (Cindy); loving grandfather of Christine (James), Michael, Kevin and Phil (Ronda). Loving great-grandfather of Kylie, Alexis, Nicholas, Lydia Grace, Chase, Chloe, Hunter, A.J., Jason, and Caelan. Services: Memorial Service 12:00 Noon Sunday, December 4, Newcomer Funeral Home, 837 Mid Rivers Mall Drive, St. Peters, MO 63376.

after the talks that “there were no breakthroughs,” adding that sharp disagreements on security and other issues remain. Russia and Ukraine have blamed each other for the lack of progress in settling the conlict that has killed more than 9,600 since April 2014.

Thurs., Nov. 24, 2016. Beloved father of David (Karen Spraul) Walker, Susan (Steven) Siemers, Bryan (Tamra Leible) Walker, Tracy Walker (Charles Clarke) and the late John Walker; dear grandfather of Sara and Stephanie Kaiser, Alexandra, Michael and Kaitlyn Clarke; brother of James Walker; great-grandfather of Madelynn and Tyler; our dear brother-in-law, uncle, cousin and friend to many. Services: Graveside Committal Service Friday, December 2, 10:30 a.m. at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be given to Missouri Veterans Home, 10600 Lewis & Clark Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63136. www.colliersfuneralhome.com

African National Congress in Pretoria on Saturday. The majority of the ANC’s 80 executive committee members voted to keep Zuma in oice, the party’s secretary general Gwede Mantashe told journalists in Johannesburg on Tuesday

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November 27, 2016. was born on May 2, 1932, in Durham, Arkansas. John was one of four children born to Curney and Virginia White. He grew up in Fayeteville, Arkansas, but later moved to St Louis, MO and attended Affton Highschool where he played basketball. After that, he served his country in the army during the Korean War where he trained as a medic. He attended the University of Arkansas and graduated with a degree in chemical engineering. It was there that he met the love of his life, Marcy White. They married in 1957. He took a job in St. Louis, where they raised their family and lived for over 40 years. They had three children, Karen, Kraig and Kathy. John also attended Washington University while living in St. Louis, and received a Masters degree in engineering administration. He worked for Monsanto Company for over 27 years and then for Mallinckrodt Company for 9 years. All three of his children are happily married and he has 4 grandchildren and 2 great grandchildren. Five years ago, John and Marcy moved to Plano, TX, to be closer to family. John was an avid sports fan and specifically a fan of the Arkansas Razorbacks and the St. Louis Cardinals. He became a Christian later in life at the age of 50. He was an active member at South County Baptist Church and served as a deacon for several years. He enjoyed crossword puzzles and had a love of finances and the stock market. He was also very politically astute and engaged and kept up with all current events. John and Marcy were married for 58 1/2 years before she passed away this past April. He was already suffering from Alzheimer's disease and steadily declined after his great loss. Survivors include his children Karen Diane Voss (Earl), Kraig David White (Barbara) and Kathryn Dawn White (David); Grandchildren Earl Voss III, Brandon White, Sierra White and Trenton White; Great Grandchildren Logan and Landon Voss; Sisters Evlyn Knoll and Marilyn Fisher (Bud). Services: A private family memorial will be held at 12 noon on Thursday, December first at Allen Family Funeral Options. Private interment at Dallas Ft. Worth National Cemetery. If it is your wish, donations may be made in John's name to the Alzheimer's Association at www.alz.org.

(nee Verseman), passed away, Wednesday, November 23, 2016 at Missouri Baptist Hospital with her family surrounding her. Linda was born on November 24, 1946 at home in Farrar, MO, to the late Edwin and Ruth Verseman (nee Kassel). She was married to William D. Wolfinger in Cape Girardeau, MO on May 22, 1976. She is survived by her husband; her daughter, Anne (Jason) Knollmann; newly born grandsons, Isaac and Ben; her sister, Helen (Robert) Heeszel; nieces, Sara (Adam) Wedel, Susan (Doug) Fiehler, Danielle (John) Rinaldi, Angela Cevallos, and Momi Howard; and nephew, John (Amy) Verseman. Services: Funeral service at Concordia Lutheran Church, 505 S. Kirkwood Road, Kirkwood, Friday, December 2, 2016, 11:00 a.m. Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to American Diabetes Association or American Lung Association. Visitation at the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory, 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, Thursday 5-8 p.m. and at the church, Friday, 10 a.m. until time of service. Friends may sign the family's on-line guestbook at Schrader.com.

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Please be advised of the death of Edward Roach Sr. 11/25/16 Gold Card Services: St. Anthony of Padua 3140 Meramec, Wed, 10 a.m. William Lister, Pres. John McLaughlin,, Secy.

Happy Birthday Joanne November 30, 2016 We Love You and Miss You

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Dutch lawmakers approve burqa ban • Lawmakers in the lower house of Dutch parliament have approved a limited ban on “facecovering clothing” including Islamic veils and robes such as the burqa and niqab. The legislation approved Tuesday by a large majority in the 150-seat lower house must now be approved by the upper house of parliament before it can be signed into law. Studies suggest that only a few hundred women in the Netherlands wear niqabs or full-face burqas, but successive governments have attempted to ban the garments, following the example of European countries such as France and Belgium. The Dutch proposal, described by the government as “religion-neutral,” does not go as far as the complete bans in those countries. It applies on public transport, education institutions, health institutions such as hospitals, and government buildings.

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NEWS

A16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Groups call on Trump to denounce bias crime

WEATHER • LOW 39, HIGH 49 • WINDS W 8-17 MPH Cooler today Increasing clouds along with moderate westerly winds and cooler temperatures can be expected across the St. Louis area today. Highs will be in the upper 40s. Dry and seasonable conditions can be expected over the next few days. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

24-HOUR FORECAST

MORNING

LUNCH

DRIVE

BEDTIME

41°

45°

47°

41°

Mostly sunny

Increasing clouds

Mostly cloudy Mostly to partly cloudy

4-DAY FORECAST

H

49 53 45 49 46 48 45 43 46 46 44 47 48

W

partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy

Illinois Bloomington Carbondale Chicago Decatur Effingham Macomb Mount Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Springfield Urbana

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

L

36 44 32 36 33 32 35 31 35 32 32 34 35

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

35°/47°

33°/46°

SATURDAY

Partly cloudy Partly cloudy

SUNDAY

33°/45° 35°/48° Partly sunny Chance of rain

Shown are this morning’s lows and today’s highs

L

H

W

37 42 39 38 41 31 41 35 33 33 36 39

46 52 43 47 48 42 51 44 44 40 46 47

mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy

Chicago 39 / 43

Kirksville 31 / 43 Kansas City 35 / 45

Springfield 36 / 46

St. Louis 39 / 49 Carbondale 42 / 52

Joplin 32 / 48

Poplar Bluff 44 / 54

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ALMANAC Asof7P.M.atLambertField 63° 45° 48° 32° 75° 8° 42° 39°

0.00” 3.73” 3.78” 40.31” 37.99”

TODAY’S AIR QUALITY Very unhealthy

Good

TODAY’S UV INDEX Min.

Very high The higher the UV index number, the greater the need for skin protection.

POLLEN COUNTS Tuesday, Nov. 29th No tree, grass, or weed pollen present Mold - 10,440 (moderate) HEATING DEGREE DAYS 11 Yesterday 375 Month (Total) 466 Season 541 Year Ago

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

PRECIPITATION Last 24 hrs Month (Total) Month (Normal) Year (Total) Year (Normal)

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

TEMPERATURES High (2:28 p.m.) Low (1:33 a.m.) Average High Average Low Record High (1933) Record Low (1976) High Last Year Low Last Year

SUN & MOON

First Dec 7 Sunrise

Full Dec 13

Last Dec 20

New Dec 29

6:59 AM Sunset

4:40 PM

Moonrise 7:43 AM Moonset 5:58 PM

Jupiter is more massive than the Earth so you would weigh more on this planet. To find your weight on Jupiter, multiply your Earth weight by 2.14.

SOURCE: McDonnell Planetarium

RIVER STAGES

Flood Stage

Current Level

MISSOURI RIVER Kansas City 32 9.94 23 6.79 Jefferson City 21 6.27 Hermann 20 3.69 Washington 25 10.26 St. Charles MISSISSIPPI RIVER Hannibal 16 11.78 Louisiana 15 11.87 Dam 24 25 18.83 Dam 25 26 17.10 Grafton 18 15.62 M.Price, Pool 419 418.60 M.Price, Tail. 21 6.73 St Louis 30 7.59 Chester 27 11.19 Cape Girardeau 32 16.47

24-Hr Change

Flood Stage

Current Level

ILLINOIS RIVER La Salle 20 16.71 18 12.29 Peoria 14 10.58 Beardstown MERAMEC RIVER 15 2.94 Sullivan 16 - 2.23 Valley Park 24 6.11 Arnold BOURBEUSE RIVER Union 15 2.09 OHIO RIVER Cairo 40 14.53

- 0.17 - 0.06 - 0.14 - 0.24 - 0.14 + 0.51 + 0.03 + 0.38 - 0.66 - 0.27 0.00 - 0.05 - 0.26 + 0.50 + 1.15

LAKE LEVELS

24-Hr Change

Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

+ 2.57 + 0.17 + 0.04 0.00 + 0.01 - 0.04 0.00

Current Level

24-Hr Change

354.76 360.17 495.00 658.26 705.96 652.13 909.60 840.32 600.40 405.92 602.34 445.02

- 0.17 + 0.07 + 0.17 + 0.01 - 0.02 - 0.16 + 0.02 - 0.02 + 0.23 - 0.08 - 0.10 - 0.05

+ 0.58

Maps and weather data provided by:

Scorsese to meet Pope Francis after ‘Silence’ screening

Get more river & lake stage information at 636-441-8467

WASHINGTON • Civil

rights groups are calling for President-elect Donald Trump to forcefully and publicly denounce racism and bigotry, pointing to more than 860 bias-related incidents recorded in the 10 days following his Nov. 8 victory. After running a divisive campaign, Trump promised — after winning — to be a president for all Americans, said representatives of the Southern Poverty Law Center, the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, the National Council of La Raza and the American Federation of Teachers. Trump needs to follow through on that pledge and publicly denounce the bias- and hate-related incidents that popped up around the country, said Richard Cohen, the Southern Poverty Law Center’s president. “One of our great, great hopes at the Southern Poverty Law Center is that Mr. Trump mightily disappoints the white supremacists, the white nationalists who are celebrating his victory now,” Cohen said. “A president-elect has to create a climate that keeps all Americans safe,” said Randi Weingarten, president of the American Federation of Teachers. In the 10 days following the November election, SPLC said it collected 867 hate-related incidents on its website and through the media from almost every state, with Hawaii, Wyoming, North Dakota and South Dakota the only exceptions, most against foreign nationals.

National Extremes High: 94° McAllen, Texas

Oscar-winning director Martin Scorsese is getting the Vatican-style red carpet treatment, meeting Wednesday with Pope Francis after screening his new ilm, “Silence,” in Rome. The ilm is about two Jesuit missionaries who search for their mentor in 17th-century Japan, when Christians were persecuted. The plot is likely of interest to Francis, who as a young man joined the Jesuit order in hopes of becoming a missionary in Japan. He never made it because of his health, but he has spoken out frequently about the church’s past and present martyrs. The ilm was being screened Tuesday for Jesuit priests at a pontiical university. The Vatican said Francis would receive Scorsese in the Apostolic Palace before his general audience. Francis has met with several Hollywood bigwigs, including Angelina Jolie and Leonardo DiCaprio. Guns N’ Roses return actually may happen • It looks as if Guns N’ Roses will make its long-awaited return to St. Louis, pop music critic Kevin C. Johnson reports in the Blender at STLtoday.com. Fans of the rock band may remember back in

March when an oicial teaser video clip revealed St. Louis was one of the cities Guns N’ Roses would play the summer of 2016, only to see St. Louis dropped when the tour dates were released a week later. Now, electronic billboards have popped up around town teasing that the “Not in This Lifetime...” tour would play St. Louis. Another sign says “Patience,” making reference to a Guns N’ Roses song. Live Nation, which produced the band’s summer tour, had no comment when asked about additional information about a Guns N’ Roses concert in St. Louis. A formal announcement appears imminent.

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS Actor Robert Guillaume is 89. Director Ridley Scott is 79. Bassist Roger Glover is 71. Singer-actor Mandy Patinkin is 64. Guitarist Shuggie Otis is 63. Country singer Jeannie Kendall is 62. Singer Billy Idol is 61. Guitarist John Ashton is 59. Rapper Jalil is 53. Actor-director Ben Stiller is 51. Actress Sandra Oh is 46. Singer Clay Aiken is 38. Actress Elisha Cuthbert is 34. Actress Kaley Cuoco is 31. Model Chrissy Teigen is 31. From staf and wire reports

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TODAY IN THE BI-STATE AREA Missouri Branson Cape Girardeau Columbia Farmington Jefferson City Joplin Kansas City Kirksville Rolla Springfield St. Joseph Union West Plains

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 11.30.2016

Low: -11° Crested Butte, Colorado 110s 100s 90s

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80s 70s 60s

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Wintry Mix

0s -0s Alaska Low: -41°

-10s

Hawaii High: 82°

Jet Stream

Lower 48 temps only

A cold front will continue to push eastward and trigger showers across the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic, and eastern Great Lakes. Some thunderstorms are also expected across parts of the Southeast and eastern Gulf Coast. Scattered rain and snow showers are forecast across the upper Midwest, northern Plains, and Pacific Northwest. Today L H

Albany, N.Y. 41 Albuquerque 21 Anchorage 3 Atlanta 64 Atlantic City 53 Baltimore 54 Billings 23 Biloxi, Ms. 66 Birmingham 63 Bismarck 26 Boise 29 Boston 45 Buffalo 45 Burlington, Vt. 40 Charleston, S.C. 66 Charleston, W.V. 55 Charlotte 62 Cheyenne 17 Chicago 39 Cincinnati 52 Cleveland 50 Colorado Spgs. 15 Concord, N.H. 36 Dallas 43 Daytona Beach 68 Denver 14 Des Moines 34 70 Destin, Fl. 45 Detroit 30 El Paso 47 Evansville -30 Fairbanks 32 Fargo 7 Flagstaff 66 Fort Myers 18 Great Falls 31 Green Bay 39 Hartford 73 Honolulu 52 Houston 46 Indianapolis 56 Jackson, Ms. 38 Juneau 75 Key West 35 Las Vegas 42 Little Rock 48 Los Angeles 55 Louisville

50 40 15 69 63 68 38 72 63 31 41 51 58 49 80 67 73 34 43 60 60 38 49 61 84 41 40 75 54 53 55 -17 36 36 83 38 43 53 84 67 52 64 41 83 54 55 68 61

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rain sunny mostly cloudy showers rain showers partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms snow mostly cloudy rain rain rain mostly cloudy showers showers sunny mostly cloudy showers showers sunny rain sunny partly cloudy sunny cloudy thunderstorms mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy snow sunny mostly sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy rain showers sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy rain partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy

45 23 11 42 52 48 27 43 38 23 28 47 42 43 60 40 47 15 35 36 39 16 41 38 66 17 31 52 37 31 34 -21 29 11 67 27 33 45 72 42 33 35 37 76 37 33 50 36

52 43 24 57 58 56 38 64 58 29 39 55 45 48 69 49 62 36 41 44 45 37 52 64 78 39 39 66 44 59 46 -3 32 39 84 38 41 55 83 67 42 60 38 82 56 56 66 47

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mostly cloudy partly cloudy cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny sunny cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy showers cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy cloudy mostly cloudy cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny cloudy sunny sunny snow mostly cloudy sunny sunny mostly cloudy cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny rain partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy

City

Today L H

64 Macon 64 McAllen, Tx. 48 Memphis 72 Miami 35 Milwaukee Minneapolis 36 Missoula, Mt. 18 67 Mobile Montgomery 69 56 Nashville New Orleans 66 New York City 54 Norfolk, Va. 63 Oklahoma City 32 Omaha 34 Orlando 66 Palm Springs 44 Philadelphia 56 Phoenix 41 Pittsburgh 48 Portland, Me. 39 Portland, Or. 44 Providence 47 Raleigh 64 Rapid City 23 Reno 23 Richmond, Va. 64 Sacramento 37 St. Petersburg 68 Salt Lake City 23 San Antonio 47 San Diego 50 San Francisco 46 Santa Fe 12 Savannah 65 Seattle 43 44 Shreveport 31 Sioux Falls 45 Syracuse 67 Tallahassee 68 Tampa 32 Tucson 34 Tulsa 57 Wash D.C. W. Palm Beach 72 30 Wichita Wilmington, De. 54 45 Yuma

76 79 57 82 44 40 36 71 69 62 69 61 76 55 39 85 65 65 63 60 47 51 55 76 35 48 75 54 79 37 68 69 57 36 82 48 62 34 54 80 82 62 53 70 82 50 66 65

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showers mostly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy rain and snow cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms mostly cloudy thunderstorms rain mostly cloudy sunny cloudy partly cloudy sunny rain sunny rain rain showers rain mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy showers partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny sunny mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy showers partly cloudy snow rain thunderstorms mostly cloudy sunny sunny showers partly cloudy sunny rain sunny

43 53 36 71 35 34 26 43 40 36 47 51 58 30 27 66 45 50 41 39 42 40 49 53 18 27 51 38 69 26 40 49 46 15 59 41 36 29 45 53 69 31 32 49 70 26 49 42

64 77 55 84 43 37 38 64 62 52 62 56 65 60 39 83 65 56 65 42 50 49 57 62 37 40 63 57 79 37 67 65 59 40 68 46 64 33 46 69 79 65 58 58 83 51 56 68

sunny mostly sunny sunny mostly cloudy cloudy cloudy cloudy sunny sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny

H

W

83 46 48 70 89 86 48 39 39 79 73 32 86 77 45 38

sunny cloudy showers partly cloudy mostly sunny partly sunny mostly sunny cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy

City

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Geneva Hong Kong Istanbul Jakarta Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Madrid Mecca Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi

34 64 41 73 52 61 36 26 43 74 46 36 10 73 59 52

50 72 45 88 60 84 59 40 55 91 75 45 15 82 71 84

sunny sunny showers partly cloudy showers partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy cloudy sunny partly cloudy cloudy cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy

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70 26 45 49 72 79 27 27 26 65 64 14 72 61 34 23

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City

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32 27 24 72 37 76 52 36 31 65 67 47 43 43 26 29

36 40 38 76 50 84 89 45 36 85 76 52 50 47 41 35

partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly sunny sunny mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy rain cloudy partly cloudy snow

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NEWS

11.30.2016 • WEDNESDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A17

Declining caribou herd stumps biologists

ALASKA DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND GAME

This undated photo shows caribou in Alaska. Researchers are investigating why the Central Arctic caribou herd in Alaska has dropped by half over the last three years.

Size of Alaskan group has mysteriously dropped by more than 50 percent

BY BECKY BOHRER Associated Press

JUNEAU, ALASKA • The size of a large caribou herd in Alaska’s Arctic region has dropped by more than 50 percent over the last three years, and researchers who have tentatively ruled out hunting and predation as significant factors for the decline are trying to determine why. The state’s Central Arctic herd, which roams an area of north-central Alaska about the size of Ohio, hit a peak of about 70,000 caribou in 2010. It fell to 50,000 in 2013. That year, spring arrived late, meaning caribou had to trudge through snow later than usual at a time when their bodies are already stressed and not getting the grasses they need for nutrition. Surveys by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game suggest the herd dwindled to about 22,000 caribou this year. There has been a higher than normal rate of death among adult female caribou tracked with radio collars, but the reason for that is unclear, said state wildlife biologist Beth Lenart.

The department does not believe hunting is a factor in the decline, saying caribou killed by hunters account for a small portion of overall deaths. The department doesn’t think predation by wolves and bears plays a large role in regulating Arctic caribou herds, and biologists so far have not detected diseases afecting the herd, Lenart said. Pregnancy rates for female caribou are down slightly since 2013, but not alarmingly so, she said. Fewer adult males are tracked by tracking collars, making it more diicult to spot trends in their numbers. Researchers conclude that caribou have likely died when the sensors on their collars indicate the animals have not moved for at least 12 hours. Lenart plans to review more closely weather data to see if there might have been changes that biologists hadn’t picked

up on, such as efects on vegetation that could impact caribou nutrition. “But other than that, it’s pretty challenging” pinpointing a cause, she said. The caribou’s diet includes mushrooms, lichen, willow leaves, small shrubs and grasslike plants called sedges. Some of the Central Arctic herd caribou may have joined other herds, though the extent to which that may have happened is unclear, Lenart said. The herd’s territory covers 44,400 square miles from the Arctic coast to the Prudhoe Bay oil fields to the southern side of the Brooks Range of mountains. It’s not unusual for there to be rises and falls in the numbers of caribou in herds, but Lenart described the change for the Central Arctic herd as “definitely a steep decline.” While there’s no evidence that climate change is afecting the herd yet, the Arctic

is seeing the efects of a warming climate, with polar bears serving as a poster child of sorts for the change. The International Union for Conservation of Nature estimates the worldwide polar bear population at about 26,000 animals, but there are no comparable historical numbers. Polar Bears International, an advocacy group, says the bears are traditionally difficult to count because it’s expensive to survey the remote locations where they live. The U.S. government has protected polar bears and some seals, citing long-term threats posed to them by shrinking sea ice. The U.S. Geological Survey is trying to understand how future environmental change might afect caribou habitat, food and reproduction. The state Department of Fish and Game said it plans to recommend an overall reduction in the number of caribou that can be killed from the Central Arctic herd because it now has fewer than the 28,000 to 32,000 animals considered its optimal management size.

Great Barrier Reef sees record coral deaths this year Australian scientists say warming oceans have caused drastic die-of

BY ROD MCGUIRK • Associated Press

CANBERRA, AUSTRALIA • Warming oceans this year have caused the largest die-of of corals ever recorded on Aus-

CELEBRATING 50 YEARS OF THE ST. LOUIS BLUES

tralia’s Great Barrier Reef, scientists said Tuesday. The worst-afected area is a 400-mile swath in the north of the World Heritage-listed 1,400-mile chain of reefs of Australia’s northeast coast, said the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies. The center, based at James Cook University in Queensland state, found during dive surveys in October and November that the swath north of Port Douglas had lost an average of 67 percent of its shallow-water corals in the past nine months. Farther south, over the vast central and southern regions that cover most of the reef, scientists found a much lower death toll. The central region lost 6 percent of bleached coral and the southern region only 1 percent. “The mortality we’ve measured along the length of the Great Barrier Reef is incredibly patchy,” the center’s director, Terry Hughes, told reporters. “There’s very severe damage in the northern section of the reef.” “The good news is that south of Port Douglas, including the major tourist areas around Cairns and the Whitsundays (Whitsunday Islands), have had relatively low levels of mortality,” he added. The governments of Australia and Queensland will update the UNESCO World Heritage Center this week on progress being made to protect and improve the reef, including their response to coral bleaching. Providing a status update to the World Heritage Commit-

tee was required as part of its decision in June last year not to list the reef as “in danger.” Federal Minister for the Environment and Energy Josh Frydenberg said Tuesday that the reef’s coral cover had increased by 19 percent in recent years before it sufered a “significant bleaching event” this year, caused by the El Nino weather efect and climate change. “What that shows is that the Great Barrier Reef is very resilient and quite strong,” Frydenberg’s office said in a statement. The governments plan to spend $1.5 billion over the next decade on improving the reef’s health. Scientists expect that the northern region will take at least 10 to 15 years to regain the lost corals. They are concerned that another bleaching event could interrupt that recovery. There have been three extreme mass bleaching events in 18 years on the reef. In each case, the areas that sufered the worst bleaching were where the water was hottest for the longest period of time. Graeme Kelleher, who headed the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority for 16 years, said last week that Australians must not buy the “political lie” that they can have the reef as well as major coal mines nearby. “We’ve lost 50 percent of the coral cover on the Great Barrier Reef in the last 30 years and the main cause of that is the burning of fossil fuel. I sincerely hope UNESCO rejects the claim that the government is doing enough,” Kelleher said.

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NEWS

A18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Kerry defends Obama administration’s legacy on foreign policy

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 11.30.2016

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Secretary of State John Kerry on Tuesday defended the Obama administration’s foreign policy legacy, arguing that from nuclear weapons proliferation to climate change, it has made the world more secure. In a speech to the Women’s Foreign Policy Group, Kerry seemed to make an appeal to President-elect Donald Trump not to abandon international agreements or undermine alliances. Kerry did not mention Trump by name but said democracy is measured not by a particular vote, but by “whether we have the maturity to place the needs of the country above partisan concerns.” Trump has vowed to dismantle or undercut much of what Kerry sees as the administration’s diplomatic achievements, including the Iran nuclear deal, the rapprochement with Cuba, the Paris agreement on climate change and the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal. “It’s little wonder that some Americans want to turn inward and search for ways to fence of our own safety and prosperity from that of the international community,” Kerry said, in a reference to international trade deals. “No politician, no prime minister, no president can by edict or parliamentary decree shut of globalization. Because people want it. It is folly to think we can build a brighter future by hiding from the real world or by severing our connections to it.” Kerry defended the Iran nuclear deal, saying it had blocked Tehran’s ability to obtain a nuclear weapon. He also made a case for continuing to support the climate change accord that more than 190 countries reached in Paris a year ago. Trump has said he would “cancel” it, though he has seemed to reconsider that position recently. “Climate change is a dire threat to the future security and prosperity of our planet,” Kerry said. “Logic screams out to us that no country can plausibly claim to be a global leader if it fails to lead on climate change.”

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Shannon, Cards are in standof over building, A2 J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

WEDNESDAY • 11.30.2016 • B

Openness important in race for MLS After Kroenke, St. Louisans must have competing groups be forthright JOSE de JESUS ORTIZ St. Louis Post-Dispatch

To paraphrase the great soccer philosopher Hope Solo, it can appear cowardly when a team refuses to play an open, attacking style of soccer. The U.S. legend and former St. Louis Athletica star created quite a stir at the Rio Olympics after she claimed Sweden played like “a bunch of cowards” for sitting back against the U.S.

Solo let her emotions get the best of her, but there’s no denying the beautiful game can appear quite ugly when one team parks the bus defensively and essentially hunkers down to hide its inferior talent. Whenever you hunker down, you’re usually hiding something. If the antics of the two fledgling groups eager to bring Major League Soccer to St. Louis are any indication of the style of soccer they’ll play, the Gateway to the West might be better off pursuing a National Basketball Association franchise. The SC St. Louis group, which has MLS’ backing, now is trying to

make its case to the St. Louis community in an open fashion after a period of relative silence. Those in the group realize they need to be as open as possible as they seek an estimated $80 million in public funds to build their soccer-specific stadium downtown. The competing Foundry St. Louis group isn’t very open. If this were an actual game, Foundry St. Louis would be the equivalent of a team content with playing kickball by launching long balls from the defensive third of the field in hope of scoring a fluke goal with a counter attack.

If that soccer jargon is a tad confusing, trust me when I tell you that it’s an insult when somebody describes your soccer style as kickball. Usually teams that park the bus defensively merely are buying time for themselves in hope of escaping with a tie or an ugly win. Until Foundry St. Louis CEO Dan Cordes is willing to actually answer questions, you have to wonder if his group’s recent news release promising to cover the $80 million in public funding was a publicity stunt or worse. See ORTIZ • Page B4

> MLS PRESIDENT CALLS ONE GROUP THE ‘ONLY CONTENDER’ TO OWN A ST. LOUIS TEAM IN THE LEAGUE. PAGE A1

Bortuzzo itting in perfectly

“They (Foundry) have been very general about ideas they have without any specifics or a plan or anything that really would give us confidence ... it was something they could execute on or be successful with.” — Mark Abbott, MLS president

SLU STUMBLES OUT OF GATE

Defenseman trying to keep lineup spot

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Blues defenseman Robert Bortuzzo (41) collides with the Dallas Stars’ Gemel Smith. BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Robert Bortuzzo has dressed up as Big Bird and once even as a Playboy bunny, but his best costume was a unicorn. It wasn’t any unicorn ensemble — imagine a 6-foot-4, 221-pound NHL defenseman in a ‘onesie.’ “I think it was actually a women’s onesie, like XXL,” Bortuzzo said. “The boys got a good chuckle.” Since arriving in a 2015 trade with Pittsburgh, Bortuzzo has had no problem fitting in the Blues. The player teammates call ‘Bobbo’ has plenty of friends, and for good reason. “He’s the most positive guy,” left winger Robby Fabbri said. “He’s just a great guy away from the rink.” Bortuzzo, 27, is fine with that reputation, but where he wants to really fit in with the Blues is on the ice, and that is finally happening in 2016-17. He’s played in nine of the 14 games in which he’s been healthy, including the last five. While logging an average of 16 minutes, 28 seconds of ice time per night in those games, he has one goal and one assist and he’s a plus-4. His goal came See BLUES • Page B5

> Blues up next: 7 p.m. Thursday vs. Tampa Bay, FSM > Blues need finishing touch. B5

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Samford guard Josh Sharkey falls awkwardly after being fouled by St. Louis U. forward Elliott Welmer on a layup attempt in the first half.

SAMFORD 68 SLU 64 > 7 p.m. Saturday vs. Kansas State, FSM Plus

INSIDE > Duke tops Michigan State. B3 > Illinois pulls away from North Carolina State. B3

Another slow start hurts the Billikens in four-point loss to Samford BY STU DURANDO St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The characteristics and trends of Travis Ford’s first St. Louis University team are becoming more easily identified, and slow starts have become one of the problems with which the Billikens must contend. That was the case in losses to Ball State and Brigham Young and a

close call with Eastern Illinois. On Tuesday night it was Samford that delivered the initial blow on the way to a huge first-half lead and a 68-64 win over SLU at Chaifetz Arena. A flurry of 3-pointers to start the game left the Billikens chasing the Bulldogs all night. It was an uphill battle they never overcame despite a second-half rally that gave them

multiple chances to take the lead. Samford blew a 16-point lead at Cincinnati on Nov. 23 and ended up losing by 15. The Bulldogs built a 15-point bulge on the Billikens and saw it dwindle to one with under two minutes remaining, but SLU (2-4) never could fully erase the deficit. See SLU • Page B3

Sport goes out of the pool hall and into Ballpark Village BY DAN O’NEILL St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Mark Wilson grew up in Moline, Ill., world headquarters for John Deere. He had a goodpaying construction job, as young men might in Moline. It was physically demanding, but financially rewarding and thoroughly stable. He had been a fine athlete in high school, playing the

popular team sports, excelling in baseball. He went to college, to play baseball and prepare for law school. Then Wilson one day, he got a big idea. With $2,000 in the bank and an erroneous sense of confidence, he decided to chuck it all and play pool. Imagine how that announce-

ment went over in the Wilson household, and remember this is a family medium. Picture a lead balloon tied to an anvil. “My parents were mortified,” Wilson acknowledged. “My mom was thinking it was something Charles Manson would do. They were like, ‘Where did we go wrong? He was such a good boy ...’ “And now, here I am.” The segue covers some 40

years. From those awkward beginnings, Wilson went on to become one of the premier players in the U.S., ascending to the upper tier of the world rankings, traveling the far corners of the earth, doing television commentary for ESPN and eventually starting a billiards program at Lindenwood University. He has been living See BILLIARDS • Page B5

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Shannon, Cards are in standof over building, A2 J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

WEDNESDAY • 11.30.2016 • B

Openness important in race for MLS After Kroenke, St. Louisans must have competing groups be forthright JOSE de JESUS ORTIZ St. Louis Post-Dispatch

To paraphrase the great soccer philosopher Hope Solo, it can appear cowardly when a team refuses to play an open, attacking style of soccer. The U.S. legend and former St. Louis Athletica star created quite a stir at the Rio Olympics after she claimed Sweden played like “a bunch of cowards” for sitting back against the U.S.

Solo let her emotions get the best of her, but there’s no denying the beautiful game can appear quite ugly when one team parks the bus defensively and essentially hunkers down to hide its inferior talent. Whenever you hunker down, you’re usually hiding something. If the antics of the two fledgling groups eager to bring Major League Soccer to St. Louis are any indication of the style of soccer they’ll play, the Gateway to the West might be better off pursuing a National Basketball Association franchise. The SC St. Louis group, which has MLS’ backing, now is trying to

make its case to the St. Louis community in an open fashion after a period of relative silence. Those in the group realize they need to be as open as possible as they seek an estimated $80 million in public funds to build their soccer-specific stadium downtown. The competing Foundry St. Louis group isn’t very open. If this were an actual game, Foundry St. Louis would be the equivalent of a team content with playing kickball by launching long balls from the defensive third of the field in hope of scoring a fluke goal with a counter attack.

If that soccer jargon is a tad confusing, trust me when I tell you that it’s an insult when somebody describes your soccer style as kickball. Usually teams that park the bus defensively merely are buying time for themselves in hope of escaping with a tie or an ugly win. Until Foundry St. Louis CEO Dan Cordes is willing to actually answer questions, you have to wonder if his group’s recent news release promising to cover the $80 million in public funding was a publicity stunt or worse. See ORTIZ • Page B4

> MLS PRESIDENT CALLS ONE GROUP THE ‘ONLY CONTENDER’ TO OWN A ST. LOUIS TEAM IN THE LEAGUE. PAGE A1

Bortuzzo itting in perfectly

“They (Foundry) have been very general about ideas they have without any specifics or a plan or anything that really would give us confidence ... it was something they could execute on or be successful with.” — Mark Abbott, MLS president

SLU STUMBLES OUT OF GATE

Defenseman trying to keep lineup spot

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Blues defenseman Robert Bortuzzo (41) collides with the Dallas Stars’ Gemel Smith. BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Robert Bortuzzo has dressed up as Big Bird and once even as a Playboy bunny, but his best costume was a unicorn. It wasn’t any unicorn ensemble — imagine a 6-foot-4, 221-pound NHL defenseman in a ‘onesie.’ “I think it was actually a women’s onesie, like XXL,” Bortuzzo said. “The boys got a good chuckle.” Since arriving in a 2015 trade with Pittsburgh, Bortuzzo has had no problem fitting in the Blues. The player teammates call ‘Bobbo’ has plenty of friends, and for good reason. “He’s the most positive guy,” left winger Robby Fabbri said. “He’s just a great guy away from the rink.” Bortuzzo, 27, is fine with that reputation, but where he wants to really fit in with the Blues is on the ice, and that is finally happening in 2016-17. He’s played in nine of the 14 games in which he’s been healthy, including the last five. While logging an average of 16 minutes, 28 seconds of ice time per night in those games, he has one goal and one assist and he’s a plus-4. His goal came See BLUES • Page B5

> Blues up next: 7 p.m. Thursday vs. Tampa Bay, FSM > Blues need finishing touch. B5

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Samford guard Josh Sharkey falls awkwardly after being fouled by St. Louis U. forward Elliott Welmer on a layup attempt in the first half.

SAMFORD 68 SLU 64 > 7 p.m. Saturday vs. Kansas State, FSM Plus

INSIDE > Duke tops Michigan State. B3 > Illinois pulls away from North Carolina State. B3

Another slow start hurts the Billikens as loss leaves Ford steaming BY STU DURANDO St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The persona of patience and silver linings that Travis Ford worked hard to emphasize after each of St. Louis University’s first three losses developed some jagged edges before the first-year coach escaped November. A 68-64 loss to Samford on

Tuesday turned Ford sour, not only on his team but on his own approach. Another in a growing list of slow starts hurt the Billikens, who chased the Bulldogs all night after the visitors hit four 3-pointers to open the game at Chaifetz Arena. Ford emerged from a team meeting and discussion with his staf looking drained and express-

ing his frustration in a way that hasn’t been heard since the season started. “I had two people who know me well come up and say, ‘You’ve been awfully nice to this team,’” Ford said. “I thought about that. I don’t know if it’s about being nice as much as I probably coddled them See SLU • Page B3

Sport goes out of the pool hall and into Ballpark Village BY DAN O’NEILL St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Mark Wilson grew up in Moline, Ill., world headquarters for John Deere. He had a goodpaying construction job, as young men might in Moline. It was physically demanding, but financially rewarding and thoroughly stable. He had been a fine athlete in high school, playing the

popular team sports, excelling in baseball. He went to college, to play baseball and prepare for law school. Then Wilson one day, he got a big idea. With $2,000 in the bank and an erroneous sense of confidence, he decided to chuck it all and play pool. Imagine how that announce-

ment went over in the Wilson household, and remember this is a family medium. Picture a lead balloon tied to an anvil. “My parents were mortified,” Wilson acknowledged. “My mom was thinking it was something Charles Manson would do. They were like, ‘Where did we go wrong? He was such a good boy ...’ “And now, here I am.” The segue covers some 40

years. From those awkward beginnings, Wilson went on to become one of the premier players in the U.S., ascending to the upper tier of the world rankings, traveling the far corners of the earth, doing television commentary for ESPN and eventually starting a billiards program at Lindenwood University. He has been living See BILLIARDS • Page B5

SPORTS

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B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Thursday 12/1 vs. Tampa Bay 7 p.m. FSM

Saturday 12/3 vs. Winnipeg 6 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 12/6 vs. Montreal 7 p.m. FSM

Thursday 12/8 at NY Islanders 6 p.m. FSM

Mizzou men’s basketball • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Saturday 12/3 vs. Western Kentucky 2 p.m.

Tuesday 12/6 vs. Miami (Ohio) 7 p.m.

Saturday 12/10 vs. Arizona 11 a.m. ESPN2

Saturday 12/17 vs. Eastern Ill. 2:30 p.m. SEC Network

SLU men’s basketball • slubillikens.com | 314-977-4758 Saturday 12/3 vs. Kansas State 7 p.m. FSM Plus

Tuesday 12/6 at Wichita State 7 p.m. FSM Plus

Sunday 12/11 vs. Chicago State 2 p.m.

Wednesday 12/14 at SIU C-dale 7 p.m.

Illinois men’s basketball • ightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Saturday 12/3 vs. VCU (in Miami) 2 p.m., CBSSN

Tuesday 12/6 vs. IUPUI 7 p.m.

Saturday 12/10 vs. Central Michigan 2 p.m.

Saturday 12/17 vs. BYU (Chicago) 8:30 p.m. BTN

OTHER EVENTS MAJOR ARENA SOCCER LEAGUE • St. Louis Ambush home games Fri. 12/9: vs. Florida, 7:35 p.m. Sun. 12/18: vs. Cedar Rapids, 3:05 p.m. FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

TICKET INFORMATION Cardinals Blues SLU Raiders Fairmount

314-345-9000 Rascals 636-240-2287 Grizzlies 618-337-3000 314-622-2583 Illinois 217-333-3470 Mizzou 800-228-7297 314-977-4758 SIUE 855-748-3849 Ambush 636-477-6363 636-294-9662 STL FC 636-680-0997 314-436-1516 • 618-345-4300

ON THE AIR BASKETBALL Noon College women: Butler at Texas Christian, FSM 5:30 p.m. College: Coppin State at Georgetown, FSM 5:30 p.m. College: New Hampshire at Providence, FS2 6 p.m. College women: Florida State at Minnesota, BTN 6 p.m. College: Temple at St. Joseph’s, CBSSN 6:15 p.m. College: Purdue at Louisville, ESPN 6:15 p.m. College: Virginia Tech at Michigan, ESPN2 6:15 p.m. College: Rutgers at Miami, ESPNU 6:30 p.m. NBA: Pistons at Celtics, NBA 7:30 p.m. College: Drake at DePaul, FSM 7:30 p.m. College: Western Carolina at Marquette, FS2 8 p.m. College women: Notre Dame at Iowa, BTN 8:15 p.m. College: North Carolina at Indiana, ESPN 8:15 p.m. College: Ohio State at Virginia, ESPN2 8:15 p.m. College: Nebraska at Clemson, ESPNU 9 p.m. NBA: Pacers at Trail Blazers, FSM Plus, NBA GOLF 7 p.m. European PGA: Australian PGA Championship, Golf Channel 2:30 a.m. (Thu.) European PGA: Alfred Dunhill Championship, Golf Channel HOCKEY 7 p.m. Penguins at Islanders, NBCSN 9:40 p.m. Sharks at Kings, NBCSN SOCCER 6 p.m. MLS playofs: Montreal Impact at Toronto FC, FS1

DIGEST Roush Fenway is cutting back to two cars Roush Fenway Racing will be a two-car Cup program next season and its third charter will be leased to JTG Daugherty Racing. Roush will ield cars at NASCAR’s top level for Trevor Bayne and Ricky Stenhouse Jr. It will mark the irst time since 1995 that Roush will ield only two cars. The organization peaked at ive in 2009. Roush announced the scaleback Tuesday. JTG will lease the Roush charter that had been designated as Greg Bile’s car with the team. Bile and Roush parted ways last week, and the entry will be driven at JTG by Chris Buescher. Buescher and AJ Allmendinger will be teammates for JTG. Italian GP is saved • The Italian Automobile Club says it has signed a deal with Formula One boss Bernie Ecclestone to keep the Italian Grand Prix in Monza for the next three years. While details were not announced, the deal is reportedly worth 68 million euros ($72 million), slightly less than the 25 million euros ($26.5 million) a year Ecclestone requested. Sharper sentenced • Former NFL star Darren Sharper was sentenced to a 20-year prison term, ending a tour of shame and punishment in the Los Angeles courthouse where he irst admitted drugging and raping women in four states. Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Michael Pastor denounced Sharper’s “horrible conduct” and “disgraceful abuse of trust” during the hearing, which concluded prosecutions that unmasked the popular former All-Pro safety and Super Bowl champ as a serial rapist. Sharper will be eligible for parole in about eight years. He has been behind bars more than two years. Youth soccer coaches investigated • British police investigating sexual abuse in soccer have received calls from 250 people, the government announced, as FIFA said the high-proile scandal could lead to ofenses by youth development coaches being exposed worldwide. In a day of developments, Chelsea also opened an investigation into an employee from the 1970s who is now dead, while the English Football Association acknowledged it expects compensation claims. Former professionals have been speaking publicly for the irst time over the last two weeks about the ordeals they went through as youngsters. Some of the victims previously gave evidence to convict ofenders without being named, but new allegations are also being reported. Del Potro continuing comeback • Former U.S. Open champion Juan Martin del Potro will attempt to extend his remarkable comeback when he launches the 2017 season at Auckland’s ASB Tennis Classic in January. Del Potro, who played only six tournaments in 2014 and 2015 because of a wrist injury, was named the ATP’s comeback player of the year after lifting his ranking from 1,045 in February to 38. Russian athlete loses medals • Russian heptathlete Tatyana Chernova has been stripped of a world championship gold medal and an Olympic bronze medal because of a doping ofense. The Court of Arbitration for Sport also handed Chernova a ban of 3 years, 8 months, for a separate blood doping violation. Russian runners Ekaterina Sharmina and Kristina Ugarova also received doping suspensions. Associated Press

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M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 11.30.2016

COLLEGE FOOTBALL NOTEBOOK

New rankings open questions Playof ield will be set Sunday morning THE WASHINGTON POST

Tuesday night’s penultimate College Football Playoff rankings established two options, one of them dull and one delicious. The final weekend of play will either reveal an obvious four-team bracket or crack open arguments that will leave at least one fan base permanently bitter and perhaps, given the times, demanding a recount. The drama arrived not at the top, where No. 1 Alabama and No. 2 Ohio State, fresh of its doubleovertime survival of Michigan, remained firm. It didn’t even come at No. 3 or No. 4, where Clemson held and Washington slipped in, replacing the vanquished Wolverines in the all-important top four. The spectacle, and the potential for final-weekend pyrotechnics, arrived at No. 5. That’s where now-idle Michigan sat directly ahead of No. 6 Wisconsin, No. 7 Penn State and No. 8 Colorado — three teams the Wolverines beat, but also three teams still with a conference championship to play for, one of which is guaranteed to win its league title. This weekend could change nothing,or it could explode half the bracket. Alabama could send a Birmingham high school squad in its place to Saturday’s Southeastern Conference championship game to be pummeled by Florida and still waltz into the playofs. Ohio State, runner-up in the Big Ten East by virtue of its loss to Penn State, is assuredly safe sitting at home. It seems if there is no way Penn State can pass Ohio State in the final rankings. “They’re not close in the eyes of the selection committee, chairman Kirby Hocutt said on ESPN. The final two slots provide potential intrigue that would bring certain caterwauling. Clemson faces Virginia Tech in the Atlatnic Coast Conference title game Saturday in Orlando, Fla., and Washington will play Colorado for the Pacific-12 crown Friday night in Santa Clara, Calif. If both beat quality opponents, there would seem to be no room for change in the top four. The bracket, set to be announced at 11 a.m. Sunday, evidently would be set late Saturday. But if Clemson or Washington loses and opens a spot, the committee would face a series of vexing questions. Regardless of whether Wisconsin or Penn State wins Saturday night’s Big Ten championship in Indianapolis, Michigan will have defeated the Big Ten champion. The Wolverines beat Wisconsin 14-7 and crushed Penn State 4910. In case Colorado upsets Washington, it is worth remembering Michigan also defeated Colorado, 45-28, in September.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Mike Weber (top) scores a touchdown to help Ohio State beat Michigan on Saturday, but the Wolverines still have a shot at making the playofs. College Football Playof Rankings Record 1. Alabama 12-0 2. Ohio St. 11-1 3. Clemson 11-1 4. Washington 11-1 5. Michigan 10-2 6. Wisconsin 10-2 7. Penn St. 10-2 8. Colorado 10-2 9. Oklahoma 9-2 10. Oklahoma St. 9-2 11. Southern Cal 9-3 12. Florida St. 9-3 13. Louisville 9-3 14. Auburn 8-4 15. Florida 8-3 16. West Virginia 9-2 17. Western Michigan 12-0 18. Stanford 9-3 19. Navy 9-2 20. Utah 8-4 21. LSU 7-4 22. Tennessee 8-4 23. Virginia Tech 9-3 24. Houston 9-3 25. Pittsburgh 8-4 The College Football Playoff Selection Committee will issue weekly rankings each Tuesday, with the final rankings being announced at 11 a.m. Sunday. The playoff semifinals will match the No. 1 seed vs. the No. 4 seed, and No. 2 will face No. 3. The semifinals will be hosted at the Fiesta Bowl and Peach Bowl on Dec. 31, 2016. The championship game will be played on Jan. 9, 2017 at Tampa, Fla.

So if Clemson or Washington fall, could the committee send two teams to the playofs from the Big Ten without sending the conference champion? Then again, having established Michigan as its No. 5 team, could it leapfrog a team over Michigan that Michigan beat? In the unlikely event both Clemson and Washington lose, the committee would stare at an even thornier picture. Could it send three teams to the playoff from one conference? The Big Ten could make cases for its champion, Ohio State and Michigan, especially considering the Wolverines’ victory over Colorado.

Then again, the committee has shown conference champions favor in the past, and it could determine that Colorado’s Pac-12 title and a six-game winning streak matter more than a September result, thereby bypassing Michigan. The committee does appear fond of Michigan. Hocutt, its chairman, said the group views the separation between Washington and Michigan as “extremely small.” Hocutt also said Washington’s weak schedule “continues to be a concern,” which might mean the Huskies should not celebrate even if they beat the Bufaloes. Oregon ires coach • Mark Helfrich was fired by the Oregon after the Ducks were 4-8 this season. He was coach of the Ducks for four seasons, leading them to the first College Football Playoff championship game two years ago. But this season the Ducks finished at the bottom of the Pac-12 North standings, with just two conference wins. Helfrich was 3716 after taking over from Chip Kelly in 2013. He had an $11.6 million buyout on his contract. (AP) Zaire to leave Notre Dame • Former Notre Dame starting quarterback Malik Zaire, who is expected to graduate in December, will receive his release from the school so he can explore transfer options that include Florida, Michigan State, Pittsburgh and Wisconsin, according to Irish Illustrated. (Chicago Tribune)

BASEBALL NOTEBOOK Cespedes gets big payday The New York Mets have agreed to terms on a four-year, $110 million contract to retain left ielder Yoenis Cespedes, sources conirmed Tuesday. The deal is pending a physical, according to sources. At $27.5 million per year, the 31-year old Cespedes will earn the highest average annual value for any outielder in big-league history. It is the second-highest average annual value overall, behind only the Tigers’ Miguel Cabrera. Cespedes hit .280 with 31 homers and 86 RBIs for the Mets last season. With Cespedes back in the fold, the Mets are expected to trade an outielder, with Jay Bruce likely to be shopped, though sources said clubs have also expressed interest in Michael Conforto and Curtis Granderson. (AP) Porcello, Rendon honored • Boston Red Sox pitcher Rick Porcello has won the AL Comeback Player of the Year award, while Washington Nationals third baseman Anthony Rendon received the NL honor. Porcello also won the Cy Young Award in his second season with the Red Sox, helping Boston to its second AL East title in four seasons. The righthander went 22-4 with a 3.15 ERA over 33 starts. Rendon hit .270 with 20 home runs and 85 RBIs in 156 games in his fourth season. He had a .348 on-base percentage and a .450 slugging percentage to help the Nationals win the NL East for the second time in three seasons. (AP) Jay joins Cubs • The Chicago Cubs announced they have signed free agent Jon Jay to a one-year contract. Jay, 31, a career .287 hitter with the Cardinals and San Diego Padres over seven seasons, is expected to earn $8 million. Jay has a lifetime .352 on-base

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Yoenis Cespedes agreed to a four-year deal with the New York Mets that is worth $110 million, or an average annual salary of $27.5 million.

percentage and has batted higher than .290 in ive of his seven seasons. Jay can play all three outield positions but could share time in center ield with Albert Almora Jr. (AP) Paletta returns • The Cardinals announced Tuesday that orthopedic surgeon George Paletta will return as the team’s head orthopedic physician. The team also announced that Paletta will work with the physicians at Mercy Health East Sports Medicine. Although Paletta last had a title with the Cardinals during the 2013 season, he recently performed surgery on Tyler Lyons to promote healing in the lefthander’s knee. In the past two years he also operated on Adam Wainwright (Achilles tendon), Seth Maness (elbow) and Mitch Harris (elbow). Players have sought him out for second opinions and for surgical procedures. (Derrick Goold) Pirates designate Locke • The

Pittsburgh Pirates are done waiting to see if pitcher Jef Locke can return to the form that made him an All-Star in 2013. The team designated Locke for assignment to make room on the 40-man roster for minor league pitcher Lisalverto Bonilla. (AP) Brewers sign Thames • The Milwaukee Brewers signed free agent Eric Thames, who spent the last three seasons in Korea, and designated slugging irst baseman Chris Carter for assignment. Carter tied for the National League lead in home runs with 41 in 2016, while batting .222 and leading the league in strikeouts (206). He is eligible for arbitration. A irst baseman-outielder, the 30-year old Thames signed a threeyear contract with a club option for 2020. He batted .348 with 124 home runs, 379 RBIs and 64 steals in 388 games with NC Dinos of the Korean Baseball Organization. (AP)


COLLEGE BASKETBALL

11.30.2016 • WEdnEsday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B3

Hill carries Fighting Illini to victory Illinois makes 50 percent of its ield-goal tries en route to sinking North Carolina State ASSOCIATED PRESS

CHAMPAIGN, ILL. • Malcolm

Hill scored 22 points to lead Illinois to an 88-74 victory over North Carolina State on Tuesday night in the ACC/Big Ten Challenge. Illinois (5-3) made 30 of 60 shots from the field to outlast N.C. State in what was a tightly contested game in which neither team had a double-digit lead until the Illini went ahead 67-57 with about eight minutes left. The Wolfpack held a 33-32 edge at the half but Illinois came out firing, shooting 68 percent in the second half and creating large leads that the Wolfpack could not overcome. The Illini’s bench outscored the Wolfpack’s 39-22 and was led by Leron Black, who scored 15 points and brought in eight rebounds. Torin Dorn scored 17 points to lead N.C. State (5-2), which shot 53 percent from the field. Despite the hot shooting, the Wolfpack committed 19 turnovers, which resulted in 17 Illinois points.

Illinois 88, NC State 74 FG FT Reb NC STATE Min M-A M-A O-T A PF Abu 31 6-9 4-4 2-5 1 4 Anya 6 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 3 Dorn 31 7-11 0-0 0-7 1 2 Henderson 39 2-8 2-3 0-0 5 0 Smith 38 4-11 4-4 0-7 4 3 Hicks 2 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 1 Kirk -0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 Kapita -6-9 1-1 2-5 0 3 Johnson -3-5 1-1 0-1 1 5 Totals 200 28-53 12-13 4-25 12 21 Percentages: FG.528, FT.923. 3-point goals: 6-16, .375. Team rebounds: 3. Team Turnovers: 18. Blocked shots: 3. Turnovers: 18. Steals: 7. Technical fouls: Johnson, 12:13 second. FG FT Reb ILLINOIS Min M-A M-A O-T A PF Finke -1-4 0-0 0-1 0 0 Thorne -2-3 3-4 1-1 0 1 Abrams -- 6-10 2-2 0-1 1 1 Hill -- 5-12 12-15 2-9 4 2 Tate -0-1 0-0 0-1 2 1 Jordan -0-1 0-0 1-1 1 0 Black -- 7-14 1-1 4-8 2 4 Morgan -3-5 3-4 1-6 0 1 Coleman-Lands -4-7 0-0 1-1 1 3 Williams -- 0-0 0-0 0-0 1 1 Lucas -2-3 0-0 0-0 0 2 Totals 200 30-60 21-26 10-29 12 16 Percentages: FG.500, FT.808. 3-point goals: 7-18, .389. Team rebounds: 2. Team Turnovers: 10. Blocked shots: 2. Turnovers: 10. Steals: 10. Technical fouls: Lucas, 12:13 second. NC State 33 41 — Illinois 32 56 —

PTS 16 0 17 7 12 0 0 13 9 74

PTS 3 7 17 22 0 0 15 9 11 0 4 88

74 88

prove it’s an NCAA Tournament team. North Carolina State • Time will tell whether this was a respectable loss. The Wolfpack will have a relatively easy path to the start of conference play.

UP NEXT Illinois • Travels to Miami on Saturday, where it will play Virginia Commonwealth in the Hoophall Miami Invitational. ASSOCIATED PRESS

North Carolina State • Will host Boston University on Saturday.

Duke upends Michigan St. Grayson Allen scored 24 points to lead No. 5 Duke to an 78-69 victory at home over Michigan State on Tuesday night. The game was tied 35-35 at halftime, but the Blue Devils (7-1) gradually pulled away thereafter. Amile Jeferson added 17 points and 12 rebounds for Duke. Eron Harris scored 14 points to pace the Spartans (4-4). Valparaiso 65, No. 21 Rhode Island 62 • Alec Peters scored 27 points to help Valparaiso win at home. Fourth in the nation in scoring at just over 25 points per game, Peters scored six points down the stretch and got a piece of Jarvis Garrett’s potential gametying 3-pointer as time expired. Jubril Adekoya chipped in 13 points and Tevonn Walker had 10 for the Crusaders (7-1), who will take more than a week of before a trip to No. 1 Kentucky. Jared Terrell scored 21 points for Rhode Island (5-2) in the Rams’ irst road game of the season. Hassan Martin added 16 points and six rebounds.

THE BIG PICTURE Illinois • The Illini got a muchneeded win against a respectable Atlantic Coast Conference opponent after a disastrous Thanksgiving week. Illinois will need to win most if not all of the remaining nonconference games if it wants to

ROUNDUP

Illinois guard Te’Jon Lucas tries to drive past North Carolina State guard Markell Johnson in the irst half Tuesday night.

Billikens endure another slow start

No. 17 Wisconsin 77, No. 22 Syracuse 60 • Ethan Happ had 24 points and 13 rebounds, and zone-busting guard Bronson Koenig scored 20 points to help the Badgers win at home. Koenig was six of nine from 3-point range, and the Badgers (6-2) shot 48 percent overall (11 of 23) from behind the arc against the Orange’s 2-3 zone. Wisconsin led by as many as 17 points in the second half before Syracuse (4-2) went on a 6-0 run capped by John Gillon’s layup with 11:25 left. Two Wisconsin turnovers in that span with Koenig on the bench gave Syracuse the opening. Coach Greg Gard inserted Koenig back in the game and the Badgers went on a 7-2 run to retake a 16-point lead with 9:24 left. Texas-Arlington 72, Texas 61 • Kevin Hervey scored 18 points and grabbed 10 rebounds to help the visitors beat the Longhorns for the irst time. Texas won the irst 11 games in the series but needed overtime for a seven-point victory last season. This time, Tevin Mack led Texas (3-3) with 19 points. The Mavericks are 5-3. SIUC 89, Murray State 85 • Sean O’Brien tipped in Mike Rodriguez’s missed layup with one second left in overtime to break an 85-85 tie and lift Southern Illinois University Carbondale to victory at home. Rodriguez added two free throws to wrap it up for the Salukis (4-3). His 21 points led the team. Jonathan Stark scored 29 to pace the Racers (3-4).

WOMEN Missouri 71, Western Illinois 68 • Sophie Cunningham had 17 points and 10 rebounds, while Cierra Porter added 13 points and 15 rebounds to boost the host Tigers (5-2). The Leathernecks (5-2) missed two potential game-tying 3-pointers in the inal eight seconds. SLU 89, SEMO 50 • Sadie Stipanovich scored 16 points and St. Louis University shot 52 percent as the Billikens won at Southeast Missouri State. Olivia Jakubicek had 12 points and 11 rebounds as the Billikens (5-1) outrebounded SEMO (3-4) 48-29. From news services

HOW THE TOP 25 FARED

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

St. Louis U. forward Elliott Welmer (left) competes for a rebound against teammate Mike Crawford in the irst half Tuesday night.

SLU • FROM B1

The first few minutes were recognizable. Ball State jumped on the Billikens 15-3 in the season opener. Eastern Illinois led by 11 at halftime at Chaifetz. And BYU scored the game’s first 11 points last week in Las Vegas. So, when Samford (4-3) connected on its first four 3-pointers in four minutes, there was a sense of deja vu. As it turned out, the closing minutes were a microcosm of the last outing against Alabama, which wiped out SLU’s ninepoint lead in the last five minutes. Down a point, guard Jermaine Bishop threw the ball away. Down three, Mike Crawford had a baseline jumper go of the top of the backboard. And trying to remain within striking distance, three players combined to miss five of seven free throws in an 18-second span with less than a minute remaining. Afterward, the team had its second postgame meeting of roughly 30 minutes before emerging from the locker room. Crawford compensated for his

continued long-distance shooting slump to lead the Billikens with 16 points, thanks to numerous forays into the lane for high-percentage shots and layups. He made one of seven 3’s but was six for seven inside the arc. But SLU again had of nights by too many players it relies upon to come out on top. Forward Reggie Agbeko struggled all night with his shooting and finished two for 10. Leading scorer Davell Roby got into foul trouble and didn’t score until the second half, finishing with six points. After a dismal first half by SLU left the Billikens trailing by only 11, they quickly climbed back into the game with some improved shooting. They hit seven of nine during an early stretch of the second half, and a Roby 3-pointer — his first points of the game — pulled SLU within two. The Billikens remained within two points and had three chances to tie or take the lead, but two misses and a turnover allowed Samford to regain a cushion of eight.

Samford 68, St. Louis U. 64 FG FT Reb SAMFORD Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Thompson 28 5-9 4-7 0-6 0 1 17 Walker 31 6-9 3-6 3-11 0 3 15 Chambers 20 1-2 0-0 0-1 0 1 3 Cunningham 35 1-11 2-3 0-0 8 1 5 Denzel-Dyson 31 4-10 0-3 0-7 0 4 10 Sharkey 20 1-3 3-6 0-0 7 3 5 Hopkins 13 2-3 0-0 0-2 2 0 5 Boone 7 0-1 0-0 0-0 1 0 0 Peters 5 2-2 0-0 1-1 0 3 4 Brutus 5 1-1 0-1 0-0 0 2 2 Smith 3 1-2 0-0 0-1 0 1 2 Adams 2 0-0 0-0 0-1 0 1 0 Totals 200 24-53 12-26 4-30 18 20 68 Percentages: FG.453, FT.462. 3-point goals: 8-16, .500. Team rebounds: 4. Team Turnovers: 8. Blocked shots: 4. Turnovers: 8. Steals: 6. Technical fouls: None. FG FT Reb ST. LOUIS U. Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Agbeko 36 2-10 2-4 2-11 1 4 6 Welmer 25 5-9 0-1 1-9 1 3 10 Bishop 32 6-11 1-1 1-2 2 4 15 Crawford 38 7-14 1-1 0-6 5 2 16 Roby 30 1-3 3-5 2-3 6 2 6 Johnson 15 3-9 1-2 1-4 0 2 7 Moore 9 0-1 0-1 0-1 2 1 0 Gillmann 6 1-1 0-0 1-2 0 1 2 Hines 6 1-2 0-0 0-0 1 3 2 Neufeld 3 0-1 0-0 0-1 0 1 0 Totals 200 26-61 8-15 8-39 18 23 64 Percentages: FG.426, FT.533. 3-point goals: 4-23, .174. Team rebounds: 4. Team Turnovers: 13. Blocked shots: 5. Turnovers: 13. Steals: 3. Technical fouls: None. Samford 39 29 — 68 St. Louis U. 28 36 — 64 A: 4,916.

Wyatt Walker was the diference during that stretch. The 6-foot-9 center, who entered the game with a double-double in all six games, scored eight consecutive points for the Bull-

dogs as the lead grew to 57-49 with six minutes left. The first half started the same way the Billikens’ loss against Alabama ended last week — with a flurry of 3-pointers. After the Crimson Tide ended their come-from-behind efort with four 3-pointers, the Bulldogs’ first four field goals were 3’s. So, before the first media timeout, Samford had jumped in front 12-6. The Bulldogs ended the half making eight of 11 while the Billikens made one of 11. So, despite a brief SLU surge that allowed the Billikens to tie the score at 16, Samford eventually pushed its lead to as many as 15 points. The margin could have been bigger at the half, but the visitors made only five of 12 free throws. The margin could have been smaller, but Agbeko, who entered the game shooting 68 percent, missed all six of his shots in the half. Stu Durando @studurando on Twitter sdurando@post-dispatch.com

1. Kentucky (7-0) idle. Next: vs. No. 11 UCLA, Saturday. 2. Villanova (7-0) beat Pennsylvania 82-57. Next: vs. Saint Joseph’s, Saturday. 3. North Carolina (7-0) idle. Next: at No. 13 Indiana, Wednesday. 4. Kansas (6-1) beat Long Beach State 91-61. Next: vs. Stanford, Saturday. 5. Duke (7-1) beat Michigan State, 78-69. Next: vs. Maine, Saturday. 6. Virginia (6-0) idle. Next: vs. Ohio State, Wednesday. 7. Xavier (7-0) beat North Dakota State 85-55. Next: vs. No. 9 Baylor, Saturday. 8. Gonzaga (6-0) idle. Next: vs. MVSU, Thursday. 9. Baylor (6-0) idle. Next: vs. Sam Houston State, Wednesday. 10. Creighton (7-0) beat Buffalo 93-72. Next: vs. Akron, Saturday. 11. UCLA (7-0) idle. Next: vs. UC Riverside, Wednesday. 12. Saint Mary’s (Cal) (5-0) idle. Next: at Stanford, Wednesday. 13. Indiana (4-1) idle. Next: vs. No. 3 North Carolina, Wednesday. 14. Louisville (5-1) idle. Next: vs. No. 15 Purdue, Wednesday. 15. Purdue (5-1) idle. Next: at No. 14 Louisville, Wednesday. 16. Arizona (5-1) idle. Next: vs. Texas Southern, Wednesday. 17. Wisconsin (6-2) beat No. 22 Syracuse 77-60. Next: vs. Oklahoma, Saturday. 18. Butler (7-0) idle. Next: vs. Central Arkansas, Saturday. 19. Iowa State (5-1) idle. Next: vs. Cincinnati, Thursday. 20. South Carolina (6-0) idle. Next: vs. Vermont, Thursday. 21. Rhode Island (5-2) lost to Valparaiso 65-62. Next: at Providence, Saturday. 22. Syracuse (4-2) lost to No. 17 Wisconsin 77-60. Next: vs. North Florida, Saturday. 23. Oregon (5-2) idle. Next: vs. Western Oregon, Wednesday. 24. Florida (6-1) idle. Next: at North Florida, Thursday. 25. West Virginia (5-1) idle. Next: at No. 6 Virginia, Saturday.


11.30.2016 • WEdnEsday • M 2

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B3

Hill carries Fighting Illini to victory Illinois makes 50 percent of its ield-goal tries en route to sinking North Carolina State Illinois 88, NC State 74

BY MARK TUPPER decatur Herald & Review

CHAMPAIGN, ILL. • The Orange Krush is not a good barometer for the atmosphere at the State Farm Center. The loud and lusty student cheering section always brings the noise. But the Krush seemed to have it in high gear Tuesday night, begging a struggling Illini basketball team to reverse a gruesome week that brought three losses and a world of doubt. The night-long message: Just give us something to feel good about. The Illini answered that plea, playing with spirit and fight in a strong second half that took down North Carolina State 8874 in the ACC/Big Ten Challenge on a night when Illinios made 30 of its 60 shots from the field. The victory ended a losing streak at three games and was sparked by the inspired performance by three Illini players. Malcolm Hill, held without a basket in the first half, led the way with 22 points, nine rebounds and four assists. He had 16 points in the second half. Leron Black came off the bench and finished with 15 points and eight rebounds. And senior point guard Tracy Abrams had 17 points and no turnovers in 31 minutes. The decision to lean more heavily on bench players Black and freshman guard Te’Jon Lucas in the second half paid dividends for coach John Groce. The result had to be a great relief for an Illini team that faced the unpleasant prospect of losing four straight nonconference games for the first time since 1967. Hill said the trick was not focusing on the negative.

FG FT Reb NC STATE Min M-A M-A O-T A PF Abu 31 6-9 4-4 2-5 1 4 Anya 6 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 3 Dorn 31 7-11 0-0 0-7 1 2 Henderson 39 2-8 2-3 0-0 5 0 Smith 38 4-11 4-4 0-7 4 3 Hicks 2 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 1 Kirk -0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 Kapita -6-9 1-1 2-5 0 3 Johnson -3-5 1-1 0-1 1 5 Totals 200 28-53 12-13 4-25 12 21 Percentages: FG.528, FT.923. 3-point goals: 6-16, .375. Team rebounds: 3. Team Turnovers: 18. Blocked shots: 3. Turnovers: 18. Steals: 7. Technical fouls: Johnson, 12:13 second. FG FT Reb ILLINOIS Min M-A M-A O-T A PF Finke -1-4 0-0 0-1 0 0 Thorne -2-3 3-4 1-1 0 1 Abrams -- 6-10 2-2 0-1 1 1 Hill -- 5-12 12-15 2-9 4 2 Tate -0-1 0-0 0-1 2 1 Jordan -0-1 0-0 1-1 1 0 Black -- 7-14 1-1 4-8 2 4 Morgan -3-5 3-4 1-6 0 1 Coleman-Lands -4-7 0-0 1-1 1 3 Williams -- 0-0 0-0 0-0 1 1 Lucas -2-3 0-0 0-0 0 2 Totals 200 30-60 21-26 10-29 12 16 Percentages: FG.500, FT.808. 3-point goals: 7-18, .389. Team rebounds: 2. Team Turnovers: 10. Blocked shots: 2. Turnovers: 10. Steals: 10. Technical fouls: Lucas, 12:13 second. NC State 33 41 — Illinois 32 56 —

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Illinois guard Te’Jon Lucas tries to drive past North Carolina State guard Markell Johnson in the irst half Tuesday night.

“It was just not thinking about being on a losing streak,” he said. “We didn’t feel desperate at all. We were thinking about beating North Carolina State. It’s still early in the season. (Today) we’ll focus on beating Virginia Commonwealth,” the Illini’s next foe. After shooting just 34.4 percent (11 of 32) in the first half and trailing 33-32 at intermission, Illinois came out blazing to open the second half. Illinois (5-3) played with an urgency and started taking better

care of the ball, scoring on seven of its first eight possessions to take back the lead for good. Hill and Black each had two baskets in the push that opened the second half, and after Jalen Coleman-Lands hit a 3-pointer out of the corner with 16:27 to go, Illinois had a 46-42 lead. Another burst would follow. A hook shot by Maverick Morgan, another jumper by Hill and two free throws by Morgan opened a 52-45 lead. Effort was never an issue for the Fighting Illini as they scram-

PTS 16 0 17 7 12 0 0 13 9 74

PTS 3 7 17 22 0 0 15 9 11 0 4 88

74 88

bled for loose balls and rebounds. But the problem early on was shooting. No player could get hot from the perimeter with the quartet of Hill, Jalen ColemanLands, Black and Michael Finke making just three of 16 shots in the first half. “I just didn’t think we played real smart,” Groce said. The savior was Abrams, who battled to get inside and led the Illini with 10 first-half points. Then they took control late. Unlike last week, when Illinois blew a 10-point lead to Winthrop in the final three minutes, Groce liked the way his team finished this game. “I thought we actually played harder as the game went on,” he said. Illinois goes on the road Saturday and will take on Virginia Commonwealth (6-1) at American Airlines Arena in Miami.

Billikens endure another slow start

ROUNDUP Duke upends Michigan St. as ailing Allen produces Grayson Allen keeps putting up huge numbers for No. 5 Duke. Imagine how much more impressive they might be if he were healthy enough to practice. Allen scored 24 points, Luke Kennard added 20 and the host Blue Devils beat Michigan State 78-69 on Tuesday night in the ACC/ Big Ten Challenge. Allen has been dealing with lingering foot injuries for the past two weeks, with coach Mike Krzyzewski saying Allen hurt a toe before the Penn State game on Nov. 19 and limped through the Rhode Island game the next day. Then he checked out of the Appalachian State game early three days ago when he reinjured the toe. “Grayson does not practice one second,” Krzyzewski said. “So when he’s out on that court, it’s a gutty performance. ... That kid has played unbelievably, and he’s limping.” Amile Jeferson had 17 points and 13 rebounds while freshman Frank Jackson inished with 11 points and keyed a timely 11-0 run for the Blue Devils (7-1), who won their fourth straight despite shooting just 27 percent from 3-point range. Eron Harris scored 14 points for Michigan State (4-4). Playing their irst game as an unranked team since March 2015, the Spartans had 18 turnovers. “Too much AAU ball, not enough college ball,” coach Tom Izzo said. Valparaiso 65, No. 21 Rhode Island 62 • Alec Peters scored 27 points to help Valparaiso win at home. Peters scored six points down the stretch and got a piece of Jarvis Garrett’s potential gametying 3-pointer as time expired. Jubril Adekoya chipped in 13 points and Tevonn Walker had 10 for the Crusaders (7-1), who will take more than a week of before a trip to No. 1 Kentucky. Jared Terrell scored 21 points for Rhode Island (5-2) in the Rams’ irst road game of the season. Texas-Arlington 72, Texas 61 • Kevin Hervey scored 18 points and grabbed 10 rebounds to help the visiting Mavericks (5-3) beat the Longhorns for the irst time in the series, which now is 12 games. SIUC 89, Murray State 85 • Sean O’Brien tipped in Mike Rodriguez’s missed layup with one second left in overtime to break an 85-85 tie and lift Southern Illinois University Carbondale to victory at home. Rodriguez added two free throws to wrap it up for the Salukis (4-3). His 21 points led the team. Jonathan Stark scored 29 to pace the Racers (3-4).

WOMEN Missouri 71, Western Illinois 68 • Sophie Cunningham had 17 points and 10 rebounds, while Cierra Porter added 13 points and 15 rebounds to boost the host Tigers (5-2). The Leathernecks (5-2) missed two potential game-tying 3-pointers in the inal eight seconds. SLU 89, SEMO 50 • Sadie Stipanovich scored 16 points and St. Louis University shot 52 percent as it won at Southeast Missouri State. Olivia Jakubicek had 12 points and 11 rebounds as the Billikens (5-1) outrebounded SEMO (3-4) 48-29. From news services

HOW THE TOP 25 FARED

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

St. Louis U. forward Elliott Welmer (left) competes for a rebound against teammate Mike Crawford in the irst half Tuesday night.

SLU • FROM B1

to an extent. I’ve done a poor job of implementing my personality. “I told them I’ve put up with some things but those days are over. They’re going to do it the way I want, or they’re not playing. We’ve got guys who are comfortable and know they’re going to play. They’re going through the motions at times and think they can turn it off and on. That’s not how we are.” Ford said he will contemplate changes to the starting lineup, which has been the same for six games, after another poor start. Samford (4-3) blew a 16-point lead at Cincinnati on Nov. 23 and ended up losing by 15. The Bulldogs built a 15-point bulge on the Billikens and saw it dwindle to one with under two minutes remaining, but SLU (2-4) never could fully erase the deficit. “I’m going to put that on myself,” senior Mike Crawford said. “As a senior, I’m not getting those guys ready to play. We’ve got to come out better. It’s hard when you go out in the first half and you’re down 11 (at halftime) and have to fight back. We’re all gassed at the end, but we have to be gassed the first four minutes. We have to put them on their heels instead of being on our heels.”

The first few minutes were recognizable. Ball State jumped on the Billikens 15-3 in the season opener. Eastern Illinois led by 11 at halftime at Chaifetz. And Brigham Young scored the game’s first 11 points last week in Las Vegas. So, when Samford connected on its first four 3-pointers in four minutes, there was a sense of deja vu. As it turned out, the closing minutes were a microcosm of the last outing against Alabama, which wiped out SLU’s ninepoint lead in the last five minutes. Down a point, guard Jermaine Bishop threw the ball away. Down three, Crawford had a baseline jumper go off the top of the backboard. And trying to remain within striking distance, three players combined to miss five of seven free throws in an 18-second span with less than a minute remaining. A tweak in the starting lineup could be in order when the Billikens play Kansas State on Saturday at Chaifetz. “We talked about that as a staff and it’s something we’re actually going to look at,” Ford said. “We’ve probably allowed guys to be a little too comfortable. I told them I’m going to get back to coaching the way I coach. They may not like it and

Samford 68, St. Louis U. 64 FG FT Reb SAMFORD Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Thompson 28 5-9 4-7 0-6 0 1 17 Walker 31 6-9 3-6 3-11 0 3 15 Chambers 20 1-2 0-0 0-1 0 1 3 Cunningham 35 1-11 2-3 0-0 8 1 5 Denzel-Dyson 31 4-10 0-3 0-7 0 4 10 Sharkey 20 1-3 3-6 0-0 7 3 5 Hopkins 13 2-3 0-0 0-2 2 0 5 Boone 7 0-1 0-0 0-0 1 0 0 Peters 5 2-2 0-0 1-1 0 3 4 Brutus 5 1-1 0-1 0-0 0 2 2 Smith 3 1-2 0-0 0-1 0 1 2 Adams 2 0-0 0-0 0-1 0 1 0 Totals 200 24-53 12-26 4-30 18 20 68 Percentages: FG.453, FT.462. 3-point goals: 8-16, .500. Team rebounds: 4. Team Turnovers: 8. Blocked shots: 4. Turnovers: 8. Steals: 6. Technical fouls: None. FG FT Reb ST. LOUIS U. Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Agbeko 36 2-10 2-4 2-11 1 4 6 Welmer 25 5-9 0-1 1-9 1 3 10 Bishop 32 6-11 1-1 1-2 2 4 15 Crawford 38 7-14 1-1 0-6 5 2 16 Roby 30 1-3 3-5 2-3 6 2 6 Johnson 15 3-9 1-2 1-4 0 2 7 Moore 9 0-1 0-1 0-1 2 1 0 Gillmann 6 1-1 0-0 1-2 0 1 2 Hines 6 1-2 0-0 0-0 1 3 2 Neufeld 3 0-1 0-0 0-1 0 1 0 Totals 200 26-61 8-15 8-39 18 23 64 Percentages: FG.426, FT.533. 3-point goals: 4-23, .174. Team rebounds: 4. Team Turnovers: 13. Blocked shots: 5. Turnovers: 13. Steals: 3. Technical fouls: None. Samford 39 29 — 68 St. Louis U. 28 36 — 64 A: 4,916.

it will probably hurt some feelings.” Said Bishop, “I think we’re ready for it. It’s going to push us and going to make us better, so we’ll see how it goes.” Ford remains concerned that the Billikens seem to get strong performances from a couple of players each game, emphasizing they need something from everyone to be competitive.

Crawford compensated for his continued long-distance shooting slump to lead the team with 16 points thanks to numerous forays into the lane for highpercentage shots and layups. He made one of seven 3s but was six for seven inside the arc. Forward Reggie Agbeko struggled all night with his shooting and finished two for 10. Leading scorer Davell Roby got into foul trouble and didn’t score until the second half, finishing with six points. After a dismal first half by SLU left the Billikens trailing by only 11, they quickly climbed back into the game with some improved shooting. They hit seven of nine during an early stretch of the second half, and a Roby 3-pointer pulled SLU within two. The Billikens had three chances to tie or take the lead, but two misses and a turnover allowed Samford to regain a cushion of eight. Wyatt Walker was the diference during that stretch. The 6-foot-9 center, who entered the game with a double-double in all six games, scored eight consecutive points for the Bulldogs as the lead grew to 57-49 with six minutes left. Stu Durando @studurando on Twitter sdurando@post-dispatch.com

1. Kentucky (7-0) idle. Next: vs. No. 11 UCLA, Saturday. 2. Villanova (7-0) beat Pennsylvania 82-57. Next: vs. Saint Joseph’s, Saturday. 3. North Carolina (7-0) idle. Next: at No. 13 Indiana, Wednesday. 4. Kansas (6-1) beat Long Beach State 91-61. Next: vs. Stanford, Saturday. 5. Duke (7-1) beat Michigan State, 78-69. Next: vs. Maine, Saturday. 6. Virginia (6-0) idle. Next: vs. Ohio State, Wednesday. 7. Xavier (7-0) beat North Dakota State 85-55. Next: vs. No. 9 Baylor, Saturday. 8. Gonzaga (6-0) idle. Next: vs. MVSU, Thursday. 9. Baylor (6-0) idle. Next: vs. Sam Houston State, Wednesday. 10. Creighton (7-0) beat Buffalo 93-72. Next: vs. Akron, Saturday. 11. UCLA (7-0) idle. Next: vs. UC Riverside, Wednesday. 12. Saint Mary’s (Cal) (5-0) idle. Next: at Stanford, Wednesday. 13. Indiana (4-1) idle. Next: vs. No. 3 North Carolina, Wednesday. 14. Louisville (5-1) idle. Next: vs. No. 15 Purdue, Wednesday. 15. Purdue (5-1) idle. Next: at No. 14 Louisville, Wednesday. 16. Arizona (5-1) idle. Next: vs. Texas Southern, Wednesday. 17. Wisconsin (6-2) beat No. 22 Syracuse 77-60. Next: vs. Oklahoma, Saturday. 18. Butler (7-0) idle. Next: vs. Central Arkansas, Saturday. 19. Iowa State (5-1) idle. Next: vs. Cincinnati, Thursday. 20. South Carolina (6-0) idle. Next: vs. Vermont, Thursday. 21. Rhode Island (5-2) lost to Valparaiso 65-62. Next: at Providence, Saturday. 22. Syracuse (4-2) lost to No. 17 Wisconsin 77-60. Next: vs. North Florida, Saturday. 23. Oregon (5-2) idle. Next: vs. Western Oregon, Wednesday. 24. Florida (6-1) idle. Next: at North Florida, Thursday. 25. West Virginia (5-1) idle. Next: at No. 6 Virginia, Saturday.


B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

SPORTS

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 11.30.2016

U.S. soccer ‘ighting for our lives’

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Bruce Arena, back in charge of the U.S. national soccer team for the irst time in a decade, is interviewed in New York on Tuesday.

Arena talks about challenges in his return as national team coach ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK • Bruce Arena opened a binder to a page with 48 names, his depth chart for the U.S. soccer team. Back in charge for the first time in a decade, he views the Americans’ state as urgent following losses in the first two games of the final round of World Cup qualifying and already has plans. “We’re fighting for our lives starting March 24. We’re behind the eight ball,” he said. “We’ve got to close the gap, and we get six points in the next two games, the gap is closed.” During an hourlong session with reporters Tuesday, Arena said comments he made in 2013 about foreign-born players on the national team were aimed at the U.S. player development system, not a criticism of German-Americans who made up almost a quarter of the 2014 World Cup roster under Jurgen Klinsmann. “I was told today, somebody, they referenced me in Spain as the Donald Trump of soccer,” Arena said. “I think that I’m at fault obviously for those statements, but I would like to clear that up. It’s absolutely ridiculous. It’s no way in the way I think.” “I think the phrase foreign nationals is a very poor term, whoever uses it, and I will not use it. I will not use dual citizens. They’re national team players,” he explained. “The comment regarding foreign-born players, at the time I believe was referencing player development. And I was simply saying that if our senior national team program consists of a large minority of players, large majority of players that were born elsewhere, where are we going with our development? It has nothing to do with who should be playing on the national team, who should not.”

In this photo from July 1, 2014, former coach Juergen Klinsmann reacts during the World Cup round of 16 soccer match between Belgium and the USA in Salvador, Brazil.

Now 65 and a member of the U.S. National Soccer Hall of Fame, Arena coached the U.S. from 1998-2006 and is the winningest coach in team history. He led the Americans to the 2002 World Cup quarterfinals, their best finish since the first tournament in 1930, then was fired after a first-round elimination in 2006. He took over from Klinsmann last week following a 2-1 home loss to Mexico and a 4-0 rout at Costa Rica. “Mexico certainly came out and took control of the game early, and I don’t think that should happen at home,” Arena said. “I think the game in Costa Rica was not good from start to finish. In general, I think the theme in both games: Our back line played poorly, and I don’t think they’re poor players. I think they can play better, so we’ve got to get them organized, get the right players in the right spots and get them playing bet-

ter as a unit.” Arena plans to open training camp in Carson, Calif., around Jan. 8 and follow with a pair of exhibitions with a roster mostly from Major League Soccer. Qualifying resumes March 24 with a home game against Honduras, followed four days later by a match at Panama. Arena says goalkeepers Tim Howard and Brad Guzan need competition from the rest of the player pool, 31-year-old midfielder Benny Feilhaber probably will get an opportunity to return after playing just three games under Klinsmann and 35-yearold midfielder Jermaine Jones “certainly still has something to ofer.” He views captain Michael Bradley as a defensive midfielder rather than a playmaker, a role Klinsmann encouraged Bradley to assume. “He plays an important position and at his best he’s a key

figure, and we’ve got to get him at his best,” Arena said. Settling on the center of the field is one of Arena’s keys. “We need a better passer in the midfield than we have. We need to have a player in the attacking half of the field that can deliver the right ball at the right time,” he said. “Who that is remains to be seen. There’s a couple of domestic players that are very good at that that we’ll look at in camp in January, and that to me is an area that we’ve got to identify. And that will help establish how we play. Do we play with one striker, two strikers? Do we play with three? How do we define our midfield shape based on that?” Arena’s oice at the StubHub Center moves only about 30 feet from his previous job as coach of the LA Galaxy, and his parking spot remains the same. As he takes over, he wants to change the Americans’ mentality and consistency. “Too many peaks and valleys,” he said, moving his hands up and down. “We’ve got to get them to level out their performance a little bit more.” A former German star player and coach, Klinsmann criticized the level of play in Major League Soccer. Arena said it has come a long way. “MLS isn’t on the level of the EPL or the Bundesliga or La Liga, Serie A. We know that,” he said. “But right after that, we’re in that area below that, and it will get better.” Arena doesn’t tweet and isn’t that interested in statistics. “I’m not a person that digs deep into analytics because I don’t think the sport of soccer is an analytic sport,” he said. “I think baseball clearly is. I think football can be, obviously, basketball a little bit more. I think soccer is a hard one.”

SC leads Foundry in transparency ORTIZ • FROM B1

Does Foundry St. Louis really have $80 million, or did it put out the news release Monday night to damage SC St. Louis’ bid for public financing? You must have serious doubts about Foundry St. Louis’ motives. Whether you agree with public financing for stadiums, you have to admit that St. Louisans deserve an open, transparent process. MLS has vetted SC St. Louis’ group thoroughly and backed it. As MLS President Mark Abbott reiterated Tuesday to PostDispatch reporter Mike Faulk, Foundry St. Louis didn’t pass the vetting process. “They have been very general about ideas they have without any specifics or a plan or anything that really would give us confidence or belief it was something they could execute on or be successful with,” Abbott told Faulk. Considering the Rams debacle, St. Louisans must hold SC St. Louis and Foundry St. Louis accountable. The potential MLS ownership

groups must be as accessible as owners Bill DeWitt Jr. of the Cardinals and Tom Stillman of the Blues. When I had doubts about manager Mike Matheny’s job status, I secured an interview with DeWitt within hours. Stillman’s even more of a presence around his Blues. You usually can find him in the dressing room after games, or reach him via phone if necessary. DeWitt Jr. and Stillman are committed to St. Louis. Conversely, infamous Rams owner Stan Kroenke never addressed the local media after he introduced Jeff Fisher as coach on Jan. 17, 2012. Kroenke never bothered to be accountable to the St. Louisans who still owe millions of dollars on the building he deemed unworthy of housing his Rams. In their desperate attempt to land the NFL back after the football Cardinals left, St. Lous officials made a poor deal that eventually was exploited when Kroenke fled to Los Angeles. SC St. Louis chairman Paul Edgerley and vice chairman

Jim Kavanaugh, a St. Louis native and minority partner of the Blues, realize they cannot aford to be compared to Kroenke. Although Edgerley has been based in Boston for most of the last three decades, he’s a Kansas City native. Kavanaugh knows St. Louis as well as anybody, and very few businessmen or women in town can match his soccer résumé. “We’re committed to doing this,” Kavanaugh said. “We got the group in place. We’ve been vetted by the MLS.” Edgerley and Kavanaugh appear tremendously more open than the Foundry St. Louis folks — or Kroenke. That’s not to say they were rushing to address members of the media Tuesday, but they ultimately came around after a few kicks on the shins. “As soon as we felt like we had a deal put together with both the equity and the MLS, I think our view is we should be open,” Edgerley said Tuesday in his first public comments since the SC St. Louis’ ownership group was announced this month. “I’m a great believer that having good

owners who are part of the community and care about the community is important.” Edgerley and Kavanaugh both met with St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay on Tuesday. “I thought it was a great meeting,” Edgerley said. “I’ve been impressed with him. I think he’s a straightforward, smart guy who is trying to do the right thing for the city. I think it was a good discussion about a bunch of different issues. He’s been a good voice to help us think about how to go forward.” This isn’t a column meant to take a stance for or against public funding for a soccer-specific stadium. We can discuss that matter at a later date, when we have more information. But based on the transparency of both groups, I’m more willing to give the SC St. Louis group the benefit of the doubt while I wonder what Foundry St. Louis truly wants to accomplish. Jose de Jesus Ortiz @OrtizKicks on Twitter jortiz@post-dispatch.com

NFL NOTEBOOK Dickerson, Fisher feud One of the best players in the history of the NFL is in a standof with the league’s second-losingest coach that has gotten ugly — and both represent the same team. Dickerson, a Hall of Fame running back who began his NFL career with the Los Angeles Rams in the early 1980s, said he won’t attend the team’s games anymore as long as Fisher is the coach. Dickerson has a radio show in Southern California and has been critical on the air of the Rams, who have lost six of their last seven games to fall to 4-7. Fisher’s career record has dropped to 173-163-1 in 22 NFL seasons and only Dan Reeves, with 165 defeats, has lost more. Dickerson said on the air that he had received a call from someone in the team’s “upper management” who told him that he made players uncomfortable and was not welcome on the sideline. He later said that person was Fisher. “He’s totally entitled to his opinion,” Fisher said Tuesday. “He has every right to be critical, but as I told him in the conversation, you can’t have it both ways. You can’t be critical and then come back and ask for this and ask for that (such as tickets and sideline passes for friends). That’s just common sense.” Dickerson, the Los Angeles Times reported, said he got a call from Fisher on Monday about the matter. The Times quoted Dickerson’s description of the conversation: “(Fisher) said, ‘... I want to tell you a few things here. I don’t have time for this, but I’m going to tell you. You’re not going to be talking about the football team, talking about our team, talking about my coaches, expecting to get things from this football team. We’re not going to give you anything. We’re not going to support you in anything. As long as I’m here as coach, we feel uncomfortable with you coming on the sideline. The players are uncomfortable with that. So as long as I’m head coach here, I’m just going to let you know it’s not going to happen.’” Dickerson said he told Fisher, “... Jef, thank you for the call. I appreciate it. I heard somebody might call me. But, Jef, I want to say this to you: ‘I am a grown ... man. I am not a little kid. I do not work for the Los Angeles Rams.’ I said, ‘I don’t give a damn what you think. My thing is, I want my football team to win. That’s all I care about. I don’t care whose feelings I hurt.’ “I said, ‘Jef, I’m all about the Los Angeles Rams. I want to win.’ I said, ‘You think I’ve been sitting around waiting for the Rams to come back (from St. Louis, as they did in the ofseason)? Jef, anybody who knows me knows about Eric Dickerson. I don’t have my hand out. If y’all feel like I owe you something, send me a bill in the mail. Send me something and I will pay it. I don’t want nothing from you guys.’ My mother taught me this: When you go to somebody’s house, don’t you go eating up everything. You come home and eat. “I said, ‘Jef, and by the way, you can coach the Rams, you can go back to the Titans, you might coach the Browns, you can go to (Southern Cal) ... I will always be Eric Dickerson of the Los Angeles Rams. That’s why I have that gold (Hall of Fame) jacket. I’m a player irst, and I will always be a player. Always. I’m always for the players. Know that. “So he said, ‘Eric, man, that’s not what we want. We want you to come around. Jackie Slater comes over. Jack Youngblood. ...’ Then he goes on and says, ‘I want you to be around. I want you to be part of the team.’ I didn’t say nothing. I just listened. I said, ‘Jef, I’m going to say this much to you. It’s my last thing. First of all, I like (former Titans running back) Eddie George. Eddie George speaks very highly of you. I give you a pass because of Eddie. But I’m going to say this to you, Jef: You never ever have to worry about me at a game again at the Coliseum as long as you’re coaching. I’m not coming ever again. I don’t want nobody to feel uncomfortable.” Fisher tried to quell the lap. “He’s welcome,” Fisher said Tuesday. “He’s always been welcome ... and I want him to be around. I want him to be a part of this. I don’t know where (the criticism) came from, but we’re moving on.” Elsewhere • Vikings running back Adrian Peterson is progressing from the surgery he had on his right knee. Though there is no timetable for his’s return, the fourtime All-Pro pick could be ready sometime in December. • Browns quarterback Robert Griin III was cleared for contact and might be able to play Dec. 11, when Cleveland faces Cincinnati in its next game. He has been out since sufering a broken left (nonthrowing) shoulder in the season opener. • The Panthers put All-Pro center Ryan Kalil (shoulder injury) and his main backup, Gino Gradkowski (knee), on injured reserve. • The NFL suspended Bills ofensive tackle Seantrel Henderson for 10 games for what his agent said was Henderson’s use of marijuana to relieve the efects of Crohn’s disease. The ban extends into next season. From news services


11.30.2016 • WEdnEsday • M 1

SPORTS

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B5

BLUES NOTEBOOK

Blues look to apply a inishing touch Team has allowed leads to slip away in the waning moments of last two games BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD st. Louis Post-dispatch

The Blues haven’t had much experience playing with multigoal leads lately, and it showed against Dallas on Monday. When the Blues took a 2-0 lead on the Stars, it marked the first time the club had held a two-goal advantage before the third period in its last nine games, dating back to a 5-1 win over Colorado on Nov. 6. Ken Hitchcock’s team had won five games since then, but the Blues were never ahead by more than one goal before heading into

the final frame. “We were playing great,” Hitchcock said. “This is one of the best games we’ve played all year until (the Stars) scored their first goal and that gave them the momentum, but they had no momentum going. We were really checking well, we were managing the puck perfectly and then we started to stop checking, stop managing the puck ... and came back and hurt us.” For the second straight game, the Blues let a lead slip late in regulation, allowing the game to slip into overtime. They held on for the win in each, including a

4-3 OT win over Dallas and a 4-3 shootout win over Minnesota on Saturday. Despite the Blues playing in many tight games the past month, Hitchcock admitted that he was bothered by the fact that his club seems to set the cruise control when holding a multigoal lead. “You can practice it, but they have to be in your DNA and our DNA is when it gets comfortable, we get loose, and that’s something that works at home because you can build momentum because the fans are helping you along and I got the matchups that

I want,” Hitchcock said. “But it has killed us on the road, and it’s going to continue to kill us unless we fix it.” When pressed to answer how a team’s DNA can be changed, Hitchcock responded, “We’ll change it. No problem, we’ll get her done.”

TURNING THE CORNER Blues forward Alexander Steen spoke Tuesday about the upperbody injury that has kept him out of the past six games. “I think it was a little more complicated than I thought it was going to be when it first

happened,” Steen said. “But I’m starting to feel a little bit better. It’s starting to feel a little bit better, I feel like I’m starting to turn that last little corner, hopefully soon.” Even though Steen had been doing more on the ice individually lately, Hitchcock said that Tuesday was considered his first day on the ice as a full-participant with the team. His timetable is still uncertain, but it appears that his return is finally not far of. Jeremy Rutherford @jprutherford on Twitter jrutherford@post-dispatch.com

Bortuzzo is making a case to stay in the lineup BLUES • FROM B1

in the Blues’ 4-2 win over Boston on Nov. 22 and he assisted on Robby Fabbri’s tally in Monday’s 4-3 overtime win over Dallas. But that’s not all: In the same stretch, Bortuzzo has posted 10 shots, dished out eight hits and blocked 10 opposing attempts. He became the first Blues defenseman since Roman Polak on Jan. 19, 2012, to rack up three shots, five hits and four blocked shots in one game, which happened in Saturday’s 4-3 shootout win over Minnesota. “He’s playing great,” Blues goalie Jake Allen said. “He’s playing on his toes, which is the biggest thing. He’s being aggressive, he’s not being hesitant. He’s jumping into the rush at good times, he’s blocking shots. He’s keeping the game simple, but when he has an opportunity, he’s doing the right things.” But when the Blues face Tampa Bay on Thursday at Scottrade Center, there are no guarantees that Bortuzzo will be in the lineup. Joel Edmundson is ready to return from an upper-body injury that has kept him out the past 10 games, and if he’s cleared, it could mean that either Bortuzzo or Carl Gunnarsson will be a healthy scratch. Blues coach Ken Hitchcock has gone out of his way to compliment Bortuzzo’s play of late, saying, “He’s a lot better ofensive player than people give him credit for. Good play with the puck, better play without it. He’s in control defensively. Better positional play, not running after

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Dallas Stars’ Radek Faksa tries to maintain possession with Blues defenseman Robert Bortuzzo in hot pursuit Monday night at Scottrade Center. Bortuzzo assisted on a goal in the Blues’ 4-3 overtime win.

contact, seems like the game’s slowed down to him. He’s able to play with great composure. He’s always had tremendous character that his teammates love, but he’s followed it up with good play and he’s earned the right to play more and more every night.” But Hitchcock stopped short of ensuring that Bortuzzo will stay in, concluding: “He’s going to be a tough guy to take out of the lineup if he continues to play at this pace right now.” Bortuzzo credited his teammates for his recent run, in-

sisting, “The guys around me help,” and he thanked Hitchcock for his kind words, admitting, “It’s nice to hear coaches saying good things about you.” But the Penguins’ third-round pick from 2007 has been around long enough to know it’s difficult to get a stranglehold on a top-six job. That was underscored in 201516 when the Blues said that Bortuzzo, who signed a two-year, $2.1 million contract extension the summer before, would be penciled into the starting lineup.

But the job disappeared when Edmundson and Colton Parayko, then rookies, climbed the depth chart and claimed the final defensive spots. “In this league, there’s no such thing as ‘penciled in,’” Bortuzzo said. “I’ve never looked at it that way. It’s a competitive league and we obviously have a great back end, so it’s about your attitude. It’s having the right mentality that you know you’re confident in your abilities and you can persevere through things and they’ll work out.”

So this past offseason, Bortuzzo, who is a righthanded shot, continued working out on the left side, his of side, in the event that the Blues could use him there. In the past, the team has valued having three lefties and three righties in the regular rotation, and that was part of what kept him out of the lineup last season. “It was tough sitting out games knowing the righty-lefty thing all last year, so I was conscious about that over the summer,” Bortuzzo said. “It’s definitely a transition, but it’s something I’ve worked on every day, just to have that versatility.” The Blues have already said Bortuzzo’s play on the left side has been so impressive that the fact he’s a right shot will have no bearing on their pending decision. “He’s been on the left side, which he’s not used to, but he’s done a great job,” Blues captain Alex Pietrangelo said. “Bobbo knows his game, he’s been consistent. It’s great. He’s one of the best locker room guys I’ve ever seen. Everybody loves him around here, so anytime he’s having success it’s a good thing.” Bortuzzo doesn’t mind dressing up in onesies. But he’d prefer to keep suiting up in his Blues No. 41 uniform. “We have a great group of guys, and I definitely feel I’m a part of this thing,” he said. Jeremy Rutherford @jprutherford on Twitter jrutherford@post-dispatch.com

Top names in billiards will be competing here BILLIARDS • FROM B1

modestly, but living large. “This makes going to work to earn a living so much easier mentally, because you love what you do,” Wilson said. “I’m not interested in working at something so that I might be able to retire and just enjoy whatever is left of life. “The trade-of is that you will not be able to provide for children, drive new cars, have health insurance or generate a large amount of cash. But you will be very wealthy in life if you live for the joy of your work.” You don’t get rich in professional billiards. After traveling expenses, the top player in the world might approach six figures, the next best might make half as much. Still, it’s diicult to imagine anyone could enjoy work more than Wilson. His passion never wanes for a sport that knows a Rodney Dangerfield existence. In a rec room, in a bar, through a haze of smoke and a slew of empty beer bottles, the pool table is readily accepted, synonymous with “doubledown” bets and hustling names like “Fats” and “Deadeye.” On the ever-expanding landscape of spectator sports, it gets less respect than hot-dog eating and lumberjacking. “Times have changed so much since I was just a kid,” said Wilson, 61, who features a full head of white hair and undying loyalty to his second greatest love — the Cardinals. His business card is a quasi-baseball card, featuring him in a Cardinals jersey and cap, holding a cue stick. “There is the Internet, casinos, video games, 150 channels of satellite TV. There was no such thing as DVDs and movies for a dollar when I was kid. You got three channels of TV, and one of them didn’t come in very well.” Billiards — the proper term for the genre of cue sports — started on lawns in France more than

JP PARMENTIER • Matchroom sport

Fairview Heights native Justin Bergman, 29, is a member of the U.S. team for the Mosconi Cup, to be played in London next week. Bergman is among those participating in the Billiards at Ballpark Village event Wednesday.

1000 years ago. It moved indoors to table tops 600 years later, arrived in America in 1700 and spread through the colonies. By the 1830s, public rooms were devoted to the sport and during the Civil War, players were renowned enough to be featured on cigarette cards. The game has been a part of the American culture since, fluctuating in popularity. There was an uptick in the 1960s, when Paul Newman starred in a black-andwhite film that romanticized the life of “The Hustler.” New pool halls opened around the country and the game enjoyed a surge. In 1986, Newman returned in “The Color of Money” to mentor young Tom Cruise as an up-andcoming pool shark. Once again, billiards got a boost, as upscale rooms opened to the sound of clicking balls and chalk-squeaking cue tips. In the years since, competition for attention and leisure-time dollars

has exploded and billiards has lost ground. An IBISWorld study released in May 2014 noted the number of billiards participants in the U.S. had declined from 51.1 million in 2007, to 35.2 million in 2012. In Wilson’s opinion, the American audience has never fully separated the sophisticated artistry of billiards from the more granular properties of “shooting pool.” “People have this imaginary idea that it’s two guys who smoke and drink and finally one hits the other one with a pool stick,” Wilson said. “That’s the game of pool, and our sport always gets painted with that game-of-pool paintbrush.” The canvas looks different elsewhere. When the 23rd playing of the Mosconi Cup is conducted Dec. 6-9 at Alexandra Palace in London, it will be on prime-time television. Sold out for 10 months, the event will fea-

ture attendance of 2,200 each night, and a live feed reaching millions of homes in Europe and Asia. The Mosconi Cup — named after legendary player Willie Mosconi — is the sport’s version of the Ryder Cup. Conducted annually, it features a five-man team from the U.S. versus a team from Europe. Players compete for spots during 28 points-earning events throughout the year. Wilson was a member of the victorious 1996 Mosconi Cup team, sinking the clinching ball for the U.S. He is now the nonplaying captain of the U.S team, which will try to snap Europe’s six-year winning streak next week. The U.S. clings to an 11-10 edge in the series, with one tournament ending in a 12-12 tie. “Just to play in the event, much less win it, is a career-defining moment,” Wilson said. A preview to the spectacle will take place Wednesday at Ballpark Village in downtown St. Louis, when Wilson’s U.S. Mosconi Cup squad squares off with some of the legendary names of the sport. The event begins at 11 a.m. with a single-elimination tournament among eight teams of top players from around the Midwest, including members of Wilson’s Lindenwood team. The USA team then takes the floor at 5 p.m. to go head-to-head with a veritable dream-team of billiards stars, a group than includes Jeanette Lee, other wise known as “The Black Widow.” Among the headliners on Team USA is Fairview Heights native Justin Bergman, poised to play in his third Mosconi Cup. The team also features Shane Van Boening from South Dakota, the No. 1 player in the U.S. He is hearingimpaired and eschews alcohol, ofering a more wholesome edge to the sports’ gritty reputation. “This is a chance to display this in a completely different way,” Wilson said. “In a classy

venue, in a credible manner, in a way that highlights the true beauty and character of our sport. I’m not saying pool is major league baseball, or the NHL or the NFL. But it deserves more respect than it gets.” There will be as many as four tables, each with six pockets. There will nine balls on each, in striped and solid colors. They will be propelled by cue sticks 58.5 inches long, manipulated by some of the most virtuosic hands you might ever see. There will be singles and doubles matches, based on surprising developments, dramatic moments, entertaining prowess. Billiards at its best contains the captivating qualities of other competitions, if not the same cachet. There is artistry, pressure and emotion. A similar event at Ballpark Village last year drew more than 1,000 people, and compliments from first-time spectators. “I had probably four or five people who came last year, not to see the event but just to visit Ballpark Village,” Wilson said. “They planned on being there an hour and and four hours later, they said, ‘I’ve never seen anything like this.’ “And when you get to know the players a little bit, and you get emotionally involved, it’s even more compelling.” It’s not a courtroom, nor a construction site. But the sport of billiards was compelling enough to change the future for a kid from Moline, and he’s thankful it did. “I just want to leave the sport in a better place than it was when I came along,” Wilson said. “I don’t know if I can say I’ve done that. But I’m going to keep trying.” Dan O’Neill @wwdod on Twitter doneill@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NHL STANDINGS

NBA STANDINGS

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Montreal Ottawa Tampa Bay Boston Detroit Florida Toronto Bufalo Metropolitan NY Rangers Pittsburgh Washington Columbus New Jersey Philadelphia Carolina NY Islanders

GP 22 23 24 23 23 22 21 22 GP 24 22 21 21 22 24 22 21

W 16 14 13 12 11 11 9 8 W 16 13 13 12 10 11 9 7

L 4 8 10 10 10 10 8 9 L 7 6 6 5 7 10 9 10

OT 2 1 1 1 2 1 4 5 OT 1 3 2 4 5 3 4 4

Pts 34 29 27 25 24 23 22 21 Pts 33 29 28 28 25 25 22 18

GF 67 55 71 55 57 57 66 44 GF 88 66 57 67 55 77 54 51

GA 48 56 65 53 59 58 69 57 GA 59 65 48 48 58 80 59 64

Home 12-1-1 8-5-1 6-3-1 5-5-0 6-6-1 7-4-0 8-3-0 3-4-3 Home 9-4-1 8-2-1 8-3-0 8-3-1 7-0-2 7-5-2 6-3-0 6-4-3

Away 4-3-1 6-3-0 7-7-0 7-5-1 5-4-1 4-6-1 1-5-4 5-5-2 Away 7-3-0 5-4-2 5-3-2 4-2-3 3-7-3 4-5-1 3-6-4 1-6-1

Div 8-1-2 5-5-0 6-3-1 5-4-0 2-6-1 5-4-1 4-3-1 3-4-2 Div 5-3-0 6-2-0 2-3-2 3-0-0 2-0-1 3-2-0 2-4-1 0-3-2

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP Chicago 23 Blues 23 Minnesota 21 Dallas 24 Winnipeg 25 Nashville 21 Colorado 20 Paciic GP Edmonton 23 Los Angeles 22 San Jose 22 Anaheim 22 Calgary 25 Vancouver 22 Arizona 20

W 14 13 11 9 11 10 9 W 12 12 12 10 10 9 8

L 6 7 7 9 12 8 10 L 9 9 9 8 13 11 10

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 11.30.2016

OT 3 3 3 6 2 3 1 OT 2 1 1 4 2 2 2

Pts 31 29 25 24 24 23 19 Pts 26 25 25 24 22 20 18

GF 66 62 58 61 66 60 44 GF 68 57 52 57 57 49 50

GA 59 63 42 79 72 54 58 GA 59 54 48 54 77 66 63

Home 8-1-2 10-1-2 7-3-0 6-3-2 8-4-0 8-1-1 4-5-1 Home 5-5-0 9-2-0 7-3-0 6-4-1 3-7-0 6-4-1 5-4-0

Away 6-5-1 3-6-1 4-4-3 3-6-4 3-8-2 2-7-2 5-5-0 Away 7-4-2 3-7-1 5-6-1 4-4-3 7-6-2 3-7-1 3-6-2

Div 5-3-0 6-2-1 3-3-2 5-6-2 5-4-1 5-4-0 4-5-0 Div 3-3-1 4-2-0 2-3-1 6-1-1 2-4-1 3-2-1 4-2-2

Tuesday NY Rangers 3, Carolina 2 Columbus 5, Tampa Bay 1 Buffalo 5, Ottawa 4 Detroit 3, Dallas 1 Philadelphia 3, Boston 2, SO Winnipeg 3, New Jersey 2 Florida at Chicago, late. Toronto at Edmonton, late Nashville at Colorado, late Minnesota at Vancouver, late Arizona at San Jose, late Montreal at Anaheim, late Monday NY Islanders 2, Calgary 1, OT Blues 4, Dallas 3, OT Wednesday Pittsburgh at NY Islanders, 7 p.m. Toronto at Calgary, 7:30 p.m. San Jose at Los Angeles, 9:30 p.m. Thursday Carolina at Boston, 6 p.m. NY Rangers at Buffalo, 6 p.m. Dallas at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. NY Islanders at Washington, 6 p.m. Florida at Detroit, 6:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Ottawa, 6:30 p.m. Tampa Bay at Blues, 7 p.m. Edmonton at Winnipeg, 7 p.m. New Jersey at Chicago, 7:30 p.m. Columbus at Colorado, 8 p.m. Los Angeles at Arizona, 8 p.m. Anaheim at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Friday Minnesota at Calgary, 8 p.m. Montreal at San Jose, 9:30 p.m.

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Toronto 11 6 Boston 10 7 New York 8 9 Brooklyn 5 12 Philadelphia 4 14 Southeast W L Charlotte 10 8 Atlanta 10 8 Orlando 7 11 Washington 6 10 Miami 5 12 Central W L Cleveland 13 3 Chicago 10 6 Milwaukee 8 8 Indiana 9 9 Detroit 9 10 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L San Antonio 14 4 Houston 11 6 Memphis 11 7 New Orleans 7 12 Dallas 3 13 Northwest W L Oklahoma City 11 8 Utah 10 8 Portland 9 10 Denver 7 10 Minnesota 5 12 Paciic W L Golden State 16 2 LA Clippers 14 5 LA Lakers 9 10 Sacramento 7 11 Phoenix 5 13

Pct .647 .588 .471 .294 .222 Pct .556 .556 .389 .375 .294 Pct .813 .625 .500 .500 .474

Pct .778 .647 .611 .368 .188 Pct .579 .556 .474 .412 .294 Pct .889 .737 .474 .389 .278

GB — 1 3 6 7½ GB — — 3 3 4½ GB — 3 5 5 5½

GB — 2½ 3 7½ 10 GB — ½ 2 3 5 GB — 2½ 7½ 9 11

L10 6-4 7-3 5-5 2-8 3-7 L10 4-6 4-6 4-6 5-5 3-7 L10 7-3 7-3 4-6 5-5 5-5

L10 9-1 7-3 7-3 6-4 2-8 L10 5-5 5-5 4-6 4-6 3-7 L10 10-0 6-4 4-6 4-6 3-7

Str W-3 W-1 L-2 W-1 L-4 Str L-1 L-3 W-1 W-1 L-2 Str L-1 W-1 W-2 W-2 W-1

Home 5-3 4-3 7-3 4-5 4-8 Home 5-5 6-2 4-6 5-5 2-7 Home 9-1 4-1 6-4 8-4 7-2

Away 6-3 6-4 1-6 1-7 0-6 Away 5-3 4-6 3-5 1-5 3-5 Away 4-2 6-5 2-4 1-5 2-8

Conf 7-2 8-3 5-6 2-7 3-9 Conf 7-5 8-3 2-8 4-7 3-7 Conf 10-3 7-4 5-5 5-7 5-5

Str L-1 W-2 L-1 W-1 W-1 Str W-3 W-3 L-1 W-1 L-2 Str W-12 L-3 L-1 L-1 L-2

Home 4-4 4-2 5-4 5-5 2-4 Home 7-4 4-3 5-4 3-5 3-5 Home 7-1 7-2 6-4 4-5 2-5

Away 10-0 7-4 6-3 2-7 1-9 Away 4-4 6-5 4-6 4-5 2-7 Away 9-1 7-3 3-6 3-6 3-8

Conf 8-3 7-3 7-3 3-10 2-8 Conf 6-4 5-6 8-7 5-6 3-9 Conf 11-2 10-2 6-8 4-6 2-10

Tuesday Detroit 112, Charlotte 89 Brooklyn 127, LA Clippers 122, 2OT Milwaukee 118, Cleveland 101 New Orleans 105, LA Lakers 88 Orlando 95, San Antonio 83 Houston at Utah, late Monday Washington 101, Sacramento 95, OT Boston 112, Miami 104 Oklahoma City 112, New York 103 Toronto 122, Philadelphia 95 Charlotte 104, Memphis 85 Utah 112, Minnesota 103 Golden State 105, Atlanta 100 Wednesday Sacramento at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Detroit at Boston, 6:30 p.m. Memphis at Toronto, 6:30 p.m. LA Lakers at Chicago, 7 p.m. New York at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Washington at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m. San Antonio at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Atlanta at Phoenix, 8 p.m. Miami at Denver, 8 p.m. Indiana at Portland, 9 p.m. Thursday Dallas at Charlotte, 6 p.m. Milwaukee at Brooklyn, 6:30 p.m. LA Clippers at Cleveland, 7 p.m. Orlando at Memphis, 7 p.m. Miami at Utah, 8 p.m. Houston at Golden State, 9:30 p.m.

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss.

Blue Jackets beat Lightning again ASSOCIATED PRESS

Josh Anderson had a goal and two assists, Sergei Bobrovsky stopped 26 shots and the Columbus Blue Jackets beat the Tampa Bay Lightning 5-1 on Tuesday night. Scott Hartnell had a goal and an assist, and William Karlsson, Alexander Wennberg and Sam Gagner also scored as Columbus beat Tampa Bay for the second time in five days. The Blue Jackets are 8-1-1 in their last 10 home games. Andrei Vasilevskiy made 33 saves, and Valtteri Filppula scored for the Lightning with less than 3 minutes left to spoil the shutout. Toews still out • Chicago Blackhawks star Jonathan Toews missed his third consecutive game Tuesday with an upper-body

Bucks snap Cavaliers’ winning streak

injury. Toews was hurt during Chicago’s 2-1 loss at San Jose last Wednesday. He did not participate in the Blackhawks’ morning skate before Tuesday’s matchup with Florida, and coach Joel Quenneville said the center is questionable for Thursday night’s game against New Jersey. Moen retires • Dallas Stars left winger Travis Moen has retired at age 34 after 12 NHL seasons. Moen helped the Anaheim Ducks win the Stanley Cup in 2007. He also played for Chicago, San Jose and Montreal. He reached the playofs with the Stars last season, totaling no goals and two assists in 23 games. Moen was bothered by a broken wrist and lower-body injuries last season. He finished his carer with 59 goals and 77 assists.

NHL SUMMARIES Blue Jackets 5, Lightning 1

Flyers 3, Bruins 2 (SO)

NHL Scoring Leaders

Tampa Bay 0 0 1 — 1 Columbus 1 2 2 — 5 First period: 1, Columbus, Karlsson 4 (Murray, Anderson), 5:30. Penalties: Jenner, CBJ, (tripping), 10:10; Filppula, TB, (tripping), 15:34. Second period: 2, Columbus, Wennberg 5 (Jones), 3:40. 3, Columbus, Anderson 7 (Hartnell, Nutivaara), 16:00. Penalties: None. Third period: 4, Columbus, Hartnell 5 (Savard, Anderson), 1:57. 5, Columbus, Gagner 8, 12:38. 6, Tampa Bay, Filppula 5 (Sustr, Point), 17:10. Penalties: None. Shots: Tampa Bay 6-7-14: 27. Columbus 16-11-11: 38. Power-plays: Tampa Bay 0 of 1; Columbus 0 of 1. Goalies: Tampa Bay, Vasilevskiy 6-2-1 (38 shots-33 saves). Columbus, Bobrovsky 12-5-2 (27-26). A: 10,366. Referees: Mike Leggo, Tim Peel. Linesmen: Ryan Galloway, Brian Mach.

Boston 0 0 2 0 — 2 Philadelphia 2 0 0 0 — 3 Philadelphia won shootout 2-1. First period: 1, Philadelphia, Del zotto 2 (Konecny, Simmonds), 13:56. 2, Philadelphia, Giroux 5 (Schenn, Voracek), 15:28 (pp). Penalties: Raffl, PHI, (slashing), 10:12; Czarnik, BOS, (slashing), 14:00. Second period: None. Penalties: Beleskey, BOS, (high sticking), 0:26; Vandevelde, PHI, (roughing), 11:03; Backes, BOS, (hooking), 11:53; Beleskey, BOS, (roughing), 16:08; Cousins, PHI, (tripping), 18:20. Third period: 3, Boston, Krejci 3 (Krug), 4:26. 4, Boston, Marchand 7 (Carlo, Krug), 5:44. Penalties: Pastrnak, BOS, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 5:28; Cousins, PHI, (tripping), 5:28; Morrow, BOS, Penalty Shot (interference on breakaway (penalty shot)), 6:23; Marchand, BOS, (roughing), 13:24; Konecny, PHI, (tripping), 16:24. Overtime: None. Penalties: Simmonds, PHI, (roughing), 3:53; Marchand, BOS, (roughing), 3:53. Shootout: Boston 1 (Nash NG, Pastrnak NG, Marchand G, Backes NG), Philadelphia 2 (Cousins NG, Simmonds NG, Konecny NG, Voracek G, Lyubimov NG, Schenn NG, Read NG, Gostisbehere G). Shots: Boston 19-11-11-6: 47. Philadelphia 9-6-5-1: 21. Power-plays: Boston 0 of 4; Philadelphia 1 of 5. Goalies: Boston, Rask 12-4-1 (21 shots-19 saves). Philadelphia, Mason 6-8-3 (47-45). A: 19,558. Referees: Jake Brenk, Chris Lee. Linesmen: Jonny Murray, Tim Nowak.

Through Monday, November 28, 2016 GP G A PTS Connor McDavid, EDM 23 10 19 29 Nikita Kucherov, TB 22 11 15 26 Mark Scheifele, WPG 24 12 12 24 Patrick Kane, CHI 23 8 15 23 Alex Galchenyuk, MON 22 9 13 22 Vladimir Tarasenko, STL 22 9 13 22 Tyler Seguin, DAL 22 7 15 22 Wayne Simmonds, PHI 23 11 10 21 Artemi Panarin, CHI 23 8 13 21 Evgeni Malkin, PIT 22 8 13 21 Phil Kessel, PIT 22 6 15 21 7 tied with 20 pts. Power Play Goals Name Team Shea Weber Montreal Matt Moulson Buffalo Logan Couture San Jose Sidney Crosby Pittsburgh Leon Draisaitl Edmonton Patrick Eaves Dallas Ryan Kesler Anaheim Patrik Laine Winnipeg Wayne Simmonds Philadelphia Cam Atkinson Columbus Jamie Benn Dallas Nick Foligno Columbus Cam Fowler Anaheim Patric Hornqvist Pittsburgh Tyler Johnson Tampa Bay William Nylander Toronto Alex Ovechkin Washington David Pastrnak Boston Tyler Seguin Dallas Ryan Johansen Nashville

GP 22 21 22 16 23 21 22 24 23 20 22 20 22 16 23 20 21 17 22 21

PP 7 6 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3

Jets 3, Devils 2

Short Handed Goals Name Team Andrew Cogliano Anaheim Michael Frolik Calgary Bo Horvat Vancouver Mark Letestu Edmonton Dominic Moore Boston Frans Nielsen Detroit Brad Richardson Arizona Colton Sceviour Florida Cam Atkinson Columbus Jay Beagle Washington Johnny Boychuk NY Islanders J.T. Brown Tampa Bay Matt Calvert Columbus Laurent Dauphin Arizona Vernon Fiddler New Jersey Andy Greene New Jersey Leo Komarov Toronto T.J. Oshie Washington Jakob Silfverberg Anaheim Ryan Suter Minnesota

GP 22 25 22 20 22 22 16 22 20 21 21 19 17 16 21 21 21 17 22 21

SH 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Rangers 3, Hurricanes 2 Carolina 2 0 0 — 2 NY Rangers 0 1 2 — 3 First period: 1, Carolina, Stalberg 5 (Tennyson, Nordstrom), 5:22. 2, Carolina, Stalberg 6 (Mcclement), 12:55. Penalties: Stepan, NYR, (hooking), 10:06. Second period: 3, NY Rangers, Holden 3, 9:13. Penalties: Staal, NYR, (high sticking), 1:25. Third period: 4, NY Rangers, Nash 10, 0:24. 5, NY Rangers, Vesey 8 (Nash, Skjei), 14:48 (pp). Penalties: Mcclement, CAR, (high sticking), 8:15; Lindberg, NYR, (roughing), 11:32; Hanifin, CAR, (roughing), 11:32; Hainsey, CAR, (hooking), 13:13; Hainsey, CAR, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 13:13. Shots: Carolina 8-12-8: 28. NY Rangers 7-5-9: 21. Power-plays: Carolina 0 of 2; NY Rangers 1 of 2. Goalies: Carolina, Ward 7-7-3 (21 shots-18 saves). NY Rangers, Lundqvist 11-6-1 (28-26). A: 18,006. Referees: Kendrick Nicholson, Dan O’Rourke. Linesmen: Michel Cormier, John Grandt.

Sabres 5, Senators 4 Buffalo 3 1 1 — 5 Ottawa 1 2 1 — 4 First period: 1, Buffalo, Okposo 7 (Ristolainen, Eichel), 6:16 (pp). 2, Buffalo, Eichel 1 (O’reilly, Ristolainen), 9:31 (pp). 3, Ottawa, Hoffman 5 (Borowiecki, Brassard), 13:47. 4, Buffalo, O’reilly 5 (Franson, Gorges), 14:18. Penalties: Brassard, OTT, (high sticking), 6:09; Borowiecki, OTT, (hooking), 8:21; Wideman, OTT, (slashing), 16:15; Foligno, BUF, Major (fighting), 16:15; Borowiecki, OTT, Major (fighting), 16:15. Second period: 5, Ottawa, Stone 7 (Hoffman, Turris), 8:20 (pp). 6, Buffalo, Reinhart 5 (Kane), 17:08. 7, Ottawa, Hoffman 6 (Karlsson, Stone), 17:51. Penalties: Gorges, BUF, (interference), 2:55; Carrier, BUF, (tripping), 6:29; Turris, OTT, (tripping), 12:18. Third period: 8, Buffalo, O’reilly 6 (Reinhart, Okposo), 16:43 (pp). 9, Ottawa, Hoffman 7 (Karlsson, Phaneuf), 18:29 (pp). Penalties: Eichel, BUF, (delay of game), 5:03; Karlsson, OTT, (interference), 16:01; Larsson, BUF, (interference), 17:14. Shots: Buffalo 14-4-10: 28. Ottawa 7-17-11: 35. Power-plays: Buffalo 3 of 5; Ottawa 2 of 4. Goalies: Buffalo, Lehner 5-7-3 (6 shots-5 saves), Nilsson 3-2-2 (29-26). Ottawa, Anderson 12-5-1 (28-23). A: 14,259. Referees: Eric Furlatt, Jon Mclsaac. Linesmen: Steve Barton, Scott Driscoll.

Red Wings 3, Stars 1 Dallas 1 0 0 — 1 Detroit 1 1 1 — 3 First period: 1, Dallas, Lindell 2 (Eakin, Seguin), 0:16. 2, Detroit, Larkin 7 (Nielsen, Green), 19:21 (pp). Penalties: Sproul, DET, (high sticking), 9:47; Johns, DAL, (interference), 19:15. Second period: 3, Detroit, Mantha 3 (Kronwall, Zetterberg), 7:56 (pp). Penalties: Benn, DAL, (hooking), 6:19; Kronwall, DET, (slashing), 10:39; Mckenzie, DAL, (tripping), 16:26. Third period: 4, Detroit, Ott 2 (Vanek), 18:57. Penalties: Tatar, DET, (tripping), 4:27; Spezza, DAL, (high sticking), 8:09; Ericsson, DET, (interference), 11:26; Ott, DET, (tripping), 12:40; Roussel, DAL, Major (fighting), 14:37; Ouellet, DET, Major (fighting), 14:37; Sharp, DAL, (roughing), 16:13; Mrazek, DET, served by Vanek, (roughing), 16:13. Shots: Dallas 9-9-17: 35. Detroit 7-10-3: 20. Power-plays: Dallas 0 of 5; Detroit 2 of 4. Goalies: Dallas, Lehtonen 4-7-3 (19 shots-17 saves). Detroit, Mrazek 6-5-2 (35-34). A: 20,027. Referees: Marc Joannette, TJ Luxmore. Linesmen: Shandor Alphonso, Devin Berg.

New Jersey 0 0 2 — 2 Winnipeg 0 2 1 — 3 First period: None. Penalties: Josefson, NJ, (high sticking), 2:51; Stafford, WPG, (tripping), 9:40. Second period: 1, Winnipeg, Scheifele 13 (Byfuglien, Ehlers), 11:20. 2, Winnipeg, Wheeler 8 (Trouba, Copp), 13:21. Penalties: Merrill, NJ, (hooking), 1:53; Fiddler, NJ, (tripping), 2:12; Merrill, NJ, (tripping), 6:03; Wheeler, WPG, (slashing), 6:56; Morrissey, WPG, Penalty Shot (interference on breakaway (penalty shot)), 14:33; Severson, NJ, (holding stick), 15:02; Byfuglien, WPG, (interference), 18:43. Third period: 3, New Jersey, Wood 1 (Henrique), 2:52. 4, Winnipeg, Laine 13 (Chiarot, Scheifele), 4:47. 5, New Jersey, Lappin 4 (Severson), 7:58. Penalties: Stuart, WPG, (interference), 11:51. Shots: New Jersey 7-7-11: 25. Winnipeg 6-16-7: 29. Power-plays: New Jersey 0 of 4; Winnipeg 0 of 5. Goalies: New Jersey, Schneider 8-6-3 (29 shots-26 saves). Winnipeg, Hellebuyck 9-8-0 (25-23). A: 15,294. Referees: Trevor Hanson, Dan O’Halloran. Linesmen: David Brisebois, Mark Wheler. MONDAY BOX SCORE

Islanders 2, Flames 1 Calgary 0 0 1 0 — NY Islanders 1 0 0 1 — First period: 1, NY Islanders, Tavares 6 (Bailey), 7:28. Penalties: Clutterbuck, NYI, (tripping), 5:02; Engelland, CGY, (cross checking), 8:32. Second period: None. Penalties: Giordano, CGY, (tripping), 7:09; Engelland, CGY, (elbowing), 15:52. Third period: 2, Calgary, Monahan 6 (Engelland, Versteeg), 5:51. Penalties: Hamilton, CGY, (tripping), 15:09. Overtime: 3, NY Islanders, Hickey 2 (Tavares, Prince), 1:53. Penalties: None. Shots: Calgary 4-11-11: 26. NY Islanders 9-10-6-2: 27. Power-plays: Calgary 0 of 1; NY Islanders 0 of 4. Goalies: Calgary, Elliott 3-9-1 (27 shots-25 saves). NY Islanders, Greiss 4-4-0 (26-25). A: 10,772. Referees: Garrett Rank, Kelly Sutherland. Linesmen: Scott Cherrey, Ryan Daisy.

1 2

Goaltenders Win Record Name Team GPI MINS W L OT Carey Price Montreal 15 904 13 1 1 Craig Anderson Ottawa 17 1034 12 4 1 Peter Budaj Los Angeles 20 1118 12 6 1 Tuukka Rask Boston 16 960 12 4 0 Sergei Bobrovsky Columbus 18 1032 11 5 2 Cam Talbot Edmonton 21 1250 11 8 2 Jake Allen St. Louis 17 103110 3 3 Corey Crawford Chicago 18 106410 6 2 Braden Holtby Washington 16 96310 5 1 Martin Jones San Jose 19 108710 8 1 Henrik Lundqvist NY Rangers17 93910 6 1 Frederik Andersen Toronto 18 1049 9 6 3 Devan Dubnyk Minnesota 17 1015 9 6 2 Pekka Rinne Nashville 17 1001 9 5 3 Connor Hellebuyck Winnipeg17 957 8 8 0 Roberto Luongo Florida 14 845 8 6 0 Cory Schneider New Jersey 16 973 8 5 3 Ben Bishop Tampa Bay 15 886 7 8 0 Chad Johnson Calgary 12 725 7 4 1 Cam Ward Carolina 16 963 7 6 3 Assists Name Team Connor McDavid Edmonton Ryan Getzlaf Anaheim Nikolaj Ehlers Winnipeg Claude Giroux Philadelphia Patrick Kane Chicago Duncan Keith Chicago Phil Kessel Pittsburgh Nikita Kucherov Tampa Bay Andrei Markov Montreal Tyler Seguin Dallas Alexander Wennberg Columbus Nicklas Backstrom Washington Filip Forsberg Nashville Corey Perry Anaheim Alexander Radulov Montreal Alex Galchenyuk Montreal Ryan McDonagh NY Rangers Artemi Panarin Chicago Joe Pavelski San Jose Vladimir Tarasenko St. Louis

GP 23 19 24 23 23 23 22 22 22 22 20 21 21 22 20 22 23 23 22 22

A 19 16 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 14 14 14 14 13 13 13 13 13

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Cleveland’s LeBron James reacts to a call during the second half of an NBA game against the Milwaukee Bucks on Tuesday night in Milwaukee.

eight points before leading 58-54 at the half.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Giannis Antetokounmpo tied a career high with 34 points and the Milwaukee Bucks stunned the visiting Cleveland Cavaliers 118-101 on Tuesday night. Antetokounmpo added 12 rebounds and five assists while Milwaukee ended Cleveland’s four-game winning streak. Jabari Parker had 18 points and Michael Beasley had 17 of the bench for the Bucks. LeBron James had 22 points for the Cavaliers, who fell to 13-3. Kyrie Irving added 20 points. Milwaukee led by 22 points in the fourth quarter and cruised past the defending champions, who benched their starters midway through the final period. The Bucks outscored Cleveland by 14 points in the third quarter. Cleveland rode hot early shooting to a 14-point first quarter lead, but Milwaukee closed on a 10-0 run and trailed by only two at the end of the period. The hot hands of Antetokounmpo and Beasley sparked Milwaukee in the second quarter as the Bucks built an advantage of

Davis enjoys big night • Anthony Davis had 41 points and 16 rebounds while leading the New Orleans Pelicans to a 105-88 victory over the short-handed Los Angeles Lakers. The 6-foot-11 Davis also had four steals, three assists and two blocks. Grizzlies lose Conley • The Memphis Grizzlies now have taken their biggest hit yet this season with star guard Mike Conley the latest to land on the injury list. The Grizzlies announced Tuesday that Conley will miss at least six weeks after being diagnosed with fractures of the transverse process bones in the vertebrae of his lower back. Conley will be re-evaluated in four weeks. Conley was hurt Monday night during the third quarter of a 104-85 loss to Charlotte after taking a charge from Michael Kidd-Gilchrist. He went down hard on his back and stayed on the floor in obvious pain before leaving the game.

NBA SUMMARIES Pistons 112, Hornets 89

Bucks 118, Cavaliers 101

Pelicans 105, Lakers 88

Detroit: Harris 9-12 3-3 24, Morris 8-18 0-0 18, Drummond 1-6 1-1 3, Smith 6-10 1-1 13, Caldwell-Pope 6-14 2-2 18, Hilliard 2-4 0-1 5, Johnson 1-1 0-0 2, Baynes 3-7 2-2 8, Leuer 5-12 1-1 12, Marjanovic 0-1 0-0 0, Udrih 3-5 0-0 7, Gbinije 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 45-92 10-11 112. Charlotte: Kidd-Gilchrist 3-7 4-4 10, Kaminsky 1-11 0-0 2, Zeller 4-6 0-0 8, Walker 9-16 1-2 23, Batum 3-11 0-0 8, Hawes 3-5 0-0 8, Hibbert 1-2 2-3 4, Roberts 0-0 4-4 4, Sessions 2-4 3-4 7, Graham 0-0 0-0 0, Harrison 0-1 0-0 0, Belinelli 4-10 2-2 11, Lamb 1-5 2-2 4. Totals 31-78 18-21 89. Detroit 33 24 27 28 — 112 Charlotte 25 29 20 15 — 89 3-point goals: Detroit 12-28 (Caldwell-Pope 4-8, Harris 3-5, Morris 2-6, Udrih 1-1, Hilliard 1-2, Leuer 1-3, Smith 0-3), Charlotte 9-27 (Walker 4-7, Hawes 2-2, Batum 2-5, Belinelli 1-4, Harrison 0-1, Lamb 0-2, Kaminsky 0-6). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Detroit 44 (Baynes 8), Charlotte 40 (Batum 11). Assists: Detroit 21 (Udrih, Caldwell-Pope 7), Charlotte 21 (Batum 5). Total fouls: Detroit 19, Charlotte 16. Technicals: Charlotte defensive three second, Charlotte team. Ejected: Drummond. A: 14,266 (19,077).

Cleveland: James 8-16 3-7 22, Love 3-10 5-7 13, Thompson 3-6 2-4 8, Irving 5-12 8-8 20, Smith 2-7 0-0 6, Jefferson 2-4 2-2 8, Andersen 0-1 2-2 2, Felder 0-0 0-0 0, Dunleavy 2-4 0-0 5, Liggins 1-2 1-1 3, McRae 4-7 0-0 9, Jones 1-3 0-0 3, Shumpert 1-3 0-0 2. Totals 32-75 23-31 101. Milwaukee: Antetokounmpo 13-19 7-10 34, Snell 3-8 1-2 8, Henson 3-7 1-1 7, Parker 7-17 3-3 18, Dellavedova 1-5 1-1 3, Beasley 7-10 2-2 17, Maker 1-2 2-2 4, Novak 0-1 0-0 0, Monroe 6-8 2-2 14, Plumlee 0-0 0-0 0, Terry 1-4 0-0 3, Brogdon 4-5 0-0 10. Totals 46-86 19-23 118. Cleveland 32 22 20 27 — 101 Milwaukee 30 28 34 26 — 118 3-point goals: Cleveland 14-39 (James 3-8, Jefferson 2-3, Irving 2-5, Love 2-7, Smith 2-7, McRae 1-2, Jones 1-2, Dunleavy 1-3, Shumpert 0-2), Milwaukee 7-19 (Brogdon 2-2, Beasley 1-1, Antetokounmpo 1-2, Terry 1-3, Parker 1-3, Snell 1-6, Dellavedova 0-1, Novak 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Cleveland 35 (Love 13), Milwaukee 43 (Antetokounmpo 12). Assists: Cleveland 17 (James 4), Milwaukee 27 (Dellavedova 7). Total fouls: Cleveland 19, Milwaukee 22. Technicals: Cleveland defensive three second, Cleveland team. A: 16,559 (18,717).

L.A. Lakers: Young 0-0 0-0 0, Deng 2-6 0-0 5, Randle 6-9 0-2 12, Mozgov 5-8 0-0 10, Calderon 1-5 0-0 2, World Peace 1-5 0-0 2, Ingram 4-10 0-1 9, Nance 4-7 0-0 8, Robinson 1-2 4-4 6, Black 4-6 1-2 9, Huertas 0-1 0-4 0, Williams 5-14 4-5 16, Clarkson 4-14 0-0 9. Totals 37-87 9-18 88. New Orleans: Hill 0-4 3-4 3, Davis 14-27 12-14 41, Asik 4-6 2-2 10, Holiday 8-15 2-3 22, Frazier 3-7 0-0 6, Brown 3-5 0-0 7, Jones 2-7 2-2 6, Diallo 0-0 0-0 0, Galloway 3-9 0-0 8, Hield 0-1 0-0 0, Moore 1-7 0-0 2. Totals 38-88 21-25 105. L.A. Lakers 22 19 22 25 — 88 New Orleans 33 32 24 16 — 105 3-point goals: L.A. Lakers 5-30 (Williams 2-7, Ingram 1-3, Deng 1-4, Clarkson 1-7, Huertas 0-1, Randle 0-1, Nance 0-1, World Peace 0-3, Calderon 0-3), New Orleans 8-31 (Holiday 4-7, Galloway 2-6, Brown 1-2, Davis 1-4, Hield 0-1, Frazier 0-2, Moore 0-3, Jones 0-3, Hill 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: L.A. Lakers 47 (Randle 10), New Orleans 54 (Davis 16). Assists: L.A. Lakers 26 (Calderon 6), New Orleans 24 (Moore, Holiday, Frazier 5). Total fouls: L.A. Lakers 17, New Orleans 17. A: 14,024 (16,867).

Magic 95, Spurs 83

MONDAY BOX SCORE

Nets 127, Clippers 122 L.A. Clippers: Pierce 1-7 2-2 5, Mbah a Moute 0-3 2-4 2, Jordan 9-13 3-4 21, Paul 11-26 0-0 26, Redick 7-18 1-1 18, W.Johnson 2-4 0-0 5, Speights 1-4 4-4 6, Bass 3-4 0-0 6, Felton 3-6 0-0 7, Rivers 5-9 3-5 15, Crawford 4-15 2-2 11. Totals 46-109 17-22 122. Brooklyn: Booker 7-13 1-1 15, Lopez 11-20 1-1 27, Whitehead 2-8 1-3 6, Bogdanovic 2-7 10-12 14, Kilpatrick 14-34 6-8 38, Scola 1-2 0-2 2, Hamilton 2-6 2-4 7, Harris 5-9 3-5 15, Foye 1-5 0-0 3. Totals 45-104 24-36 127. L.A. Clippers 28 37 21 21 11 4 — 122 Brooklyn 24 29 20 34 11 9 — 127 3-point goals: L.A. Clippers 13-40 (Paul 4-7, Redick 3-10, Rivers 2-4, W.Johnson 1-3, Felton 1-3, Crawford 1-4, Pierce 1-5, Jordan 0-1, Mbah a Moute 0-1, Speights 0-2), Brooklyn 13-38 (Lopez 4-9, Kilpatrick 4-12, Harris 2-4, Foye 1-2, Whitehead 1-3, Hamilton 1-3, Booker 0-2, Bogdanovic 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: L.A. Clippers 57 (Jordan 23), Brooklyn 53 (Kilpatrick 14). Assists: L.A. Clippers 21 (Paul 13), Brooklyn 22 (Booker 5). Total fouls: L.A. Clippers 29, Brooklyn 23. Technicals: Speights, L.A. Clippers coach Doc Rivers 2. A: 15,681 (17,732).

Orlando: Fournier 4-9 4-4 13, Gordon 5-9 0-0 11, Ibaka 7-11 2-2 18, Biyombo 3-11 3-4 9, Augustin 2-6 2-2 7, Rudez 0-1 0-0 0, J.Green 3-10 0-0 6, Onuaku 1-1 0-0 2, Vucevic 6-16 0-0 12, Payton 5-9 0-0 10, Watson 3-3 0-0 7, Hezonja 0-0 0-0 0, Wilcox 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 39-86 11-12 95. San Antonio: Leonard 6-16 8-9 21, Aldridge 7-12 1-2 16, Gasol 2-6 2-2 6, Parker 0-6 2-2 2, D.Green 1-4 0-0 2, Anderson 0-0 0-0 0, Bertans 0-1 0-0 0, Lee 0-4 2-2 2, Dedmon 3-4 0-1 6, Murray 0-1 2-2 2, Mills 2-5 2-2 7, Simmons 3-8 0-0 6, Ginobili 4-9 3-4 13. Totals 28-76 22-26 83. Orlando 16 29 30 20 — 95 San Antonio 20 23 21 19 — 83 3-point goals: Orlando 6-15 (Ibaka 2-4, Gordon 1-1, Watson 1-1, Fournier 1-2, Augustin 1-3, Vucevic 0-1, Rudez 0-1, J.Green 0-2), San Antonio 5-20 (Ginobili 2-5, Aldridge 1-1, Mills 1-3, Leonard 1-4, Murray 0-1, Gasol 0-1, Simmons 0-2, D.Green 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Orlando 40 (Vucevic 10), San Antonio 45 (Dedmon 8). Assists: Orlando 25 (Fournier 7), San Antonio 19 (Ginobili, Aldridge, Gasol, Parker 3). Total fouls: Orlando 21, San Antonio 17.

Warriors 105, Hawks 100 Atlanta: Bazemore 4-15 0-0 8, Millsap 3-11 6-7 14, Howard 5-8 4-8 14, Schroder 10-20 3-4 24, Korver 1-6 0-0 3, Sefolosha 3-8 3-4 9, Muscala 4-5 0-1 9, Delaney 3-5 2-2 9, Hardaway Jr. 3-8 3-4 10. Totals 36-86 21-30 100. Golden State: Durant 8-16 8-8 25, Green 2-9 0-0 4, Pachulia 2-2 0-0 4, Curry 6-17 9-11 25, Thompson 8-18 1-1 20, West 0-1 0-0 0, McGee 0-1 0-0 0, Livingston 3-5 0-0 6, Clark 3-6 0-0 8, McCaw 0-1 1-2 1, Iguodala 5-9 0-2 12. Totals 37-85 19-24 105. Atlanta 27 26 28 19 — 100 Golden State 29 21 30 25 — 105 3-point goals: Atlanta 7-29 (Millsap 2-5, Delaney 1-2, Muscala 1-2, Schroder 1-4, Korver 1-4, Hardaway Jr. 1-6, Bazemore 0-6), Golden State 12-35 (Curry 4-11, Thompson 3-6, Clark 2-5, Iguodala 2-6, Durant 1-3, McCaw 0-1, Green 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Atlanta 51 (Howard 16), Golden State 41 (Durant 14). Assists: Atlanta 20 (Schroder 6), Golden State 25 (Green 7). Total fouls: Atlanta 22, Golden State 20. A: 19,596 (19,596).


SPORTS

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NHL STANDINGS

NBA STANDINGS

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Chicago Blues Nashville Minnesota Dallas Winnipeg Colorado Paciic San Jose Anaheim Edmonton Los Angeles Vancouver Calgary Arizona

GP 24 23 22 22 24 25 21 GP 23 23 24 22 23 25 21

W 15 13 11 11 9 11 9 W 13 11 12 12 10 10 8

L 6 7 8 8 9 12 11 L 9 8 10 9 11 13 10

OT 3 3 3 3 6 2 1 OT 1 4 2 1 2 2 3

Pts 33 29 25 25 24 24 19 Pts 27 26 26 25 22 22 19

GF 68 62 65 62 61 66 47 GF 54 59 70 57 54 57 51

GA 60 63 57 47 79 72 63 GA 49 55 63 54 70 77 65

Home 9-1-2 10-1-2 8-1-1 7-3-0 6-3-2 8-4-0 4-6-1 Home 8-3-0 7-4-1 5-6-0 9-2-0 7-4-1 3-7-0 5-4-0

Away 6-5-1 3-6-1 3-7-2 4-5-3 3-6-4 3-8-2 5-5-0 Away 5-6-1 4-4-3 7-4-2 3-7-1 3-7-1 7-6-2 3-6-3

Div 5-3-0 6-2-1 6-4-0 3-3-2 5-6-2 5-4-1 4-6-0 Div 3-3-1 6-1-1 3-3-1 4-2-0 3-2-1 2-4-1 4-2-3

L 5 8 10 10 8 10 10 9 L 7 6 6 5 7 10 9 10

OT 2 1 1 1 4 2 2 5 OT 1 3 2 4 5 3 4 4

Pts 34 29 27 25 24 24 24 21 Pts 33 29 28 28 25 25 22 18

GF 68 55 71 55 70 57 58 44 GF 88 66 57 67 55 77 54 51

GA 50 56 65 53 71 59 60 57 GA 59 65 48 48 58 80 59 64

Home 12-1-1 8-5-1 6-3-1 5-5-0 8-3-0 6-6-1 7-4-0 3-4-3 Home 9-4-1 8-2-1 8-3-0 8-3-1 7-0-2 7-5-2 6-3-0 6-4-3

Away 4-4-1 6-3-0 7-7-0 7-5-1 2-5-4 5-4-1 4-6-2 5-5-2 Away 7-3-0 5-4-2 5-3-2 4-2-3 3-7-3 4-5-1 3-6-4 1-6-1

Div 8-1-2 5-5-0 6-3-1 5-4-0 4-3-1 2-6-1 5-4-1 3-4-2 Div 5-3-0 6-2-0 2-3-2 3-0-0 2-0-1 3-2-0 2-4-1 0-3-2

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Montreal Ottawa Tampa Bay Boston Toronto Detroit Florida Bufalo Metropolitan NY Rangers Pittsburgh Washington Columbus New Jersey Philadelphia Carolina NY Islanders

GP 23 23 24 23 22 23 23 22 GP 24 22 21 21 22 24 22 21

W 16 14 13 12 10 11 11 8 W 16 13 13 12 10 11 9 7

M 2 • WeDneSDAy • 11.30.2016

Tuesday NY Rangers 3, Carolina 2 Columbus 5, Tampa Bay 1 Buffalo 5, Ottawa 4 Detroit 3, Dallas 1 Philadelphia 3, Boston 2, SO Winnipeg 3, New Jersey 2 Chicago 2, Florida 1, SO Toronto 4, Edmonton 2 Nashville 5, Colorado 3 San Jose 2, Arizona 1, OT Anaheim 2, Montreal 1 Vancouver 5, Minnesota 4 Monday Blues 4, Dallas 3, OT NY Islanders 2, Calgary 1, OT Wednesday Pittsburgh at NY Islanders, 7 p.m. Toronto at Calgary, 7:30 p.m. San Jose at Los Angeles, 9:30 p.m. Thursday Carolina at Boston, 6 p.m. NY Rangers at Buffalo, 6 p.m. Dallas at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. NY Islanders at Washington, 6 p.m. Florida at Detroit, 6:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Ottawa, 6:30 p.m. Tampa Bay at Blues, 7 p.m. Edmonton at Winnipeg, 7 p.m. New Jersey at Chicago, 7:30 p.m. Columbus at Colorado, 8 p.m. Los Angeles at Arizona, 8 p.m. Anaheim at Vancouver, 9 p.m.

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Toronto Boston New York Brooklyn Philadelphia Southeast Charlotte Atlanta Orlando Washington Miami Central Cleveland Chicago Milwaukee Indiana Detroit

W 11 10 8 5 4 W 10 10 7 6 5 W 13 10 8 9 9

L 6 7 9 12 14 L 8 8 11 10 12 L 3 6 8 9 10

Pct .647 .588 .471 .294 .222 Pct .556 .556 .389 .375 .294 Pct .813 .625 .500 .500 .474

GB — 1 3 6 7½ GB — — 3 3 4½ GB — 3 5 5 5½

L10 6-4 7-3 5-5 2-8 3-7 L10 4-6 4-6 4-6 5-5 3-7 L10 7-3 7-3 4-6 5-5 5-5

Str W-3 W-1 L-2 W-1 L-4 Str L-1 L-3 W-1 W-1 L-2 Str L-1 W-1 W-2 W-2 W-1

Home 5-3 4-3 7-3 4-5 4-8 Home 5-5 6-2 4-6 5-5 2-7 Home 9-1 4-1 6-4 8-4 7-2

Away 6-3 6-4 1-6 1-7 0-6 Away 5-3 4-6 3-5 1-5 3-5 Away 4-2 6-5 2-4 1-5 2-8

Conf 7-2 8-3 5-6 2-7 3-9 Conf 7-5 8-3 2-8 4-7 3-7 Conf 10-3 7-4 5-5 5-7 5-5

Home 4-4 5-4 4-2 5-5 2-4 Home 7-4 5-3 5-4 3-5 3-5 Home 7-1 7-2 6-4 4-5 2-5

Away 10-0 6-3 7-5 2-7 1-9 Away 4-4 6-5 4-6 4-5 2-7 Away 9-1 7-3 3-6 3-6 3-8

Conf 8-3 7-3 7-4 3-10 2-8 Conf 6-4 6-6 8-7 5-6 3-9 Conf 11-2 10-2 6-8 4-6 2-10

WESTERN CONFERENCE

Blue Jackets beat Lightning again

Bucks snap Cavaliers’ winning streak

Josh Anderson had a goal and two assists, Sergei Bobrovsky stopped 26 shots and the Columbus Blue Jackets beat the Tampa Bay Lightning 5-1 on Tuesday night. Scott Hartnell had a goal and an assist, and William Karlsson, Alexander Wennberg and Sam Gagner also scored as Columbus beat Tampa Bay for the second time in five days. The Blue Jackets are 8-1-1 in their last 10 home games. Andrei Vasilevskiy made 33 saves, and Valtteri Filppula scored for the Lightning with less than 3 minutes left to spoil the shutout. Toews still out • Chicago Blackhawks star Jonathan Toews missed his third consecutive game Tuesday with an upper-body

Pct .778 .611 .611 .368 .188 Pct .579 .579 .474 .412 .294 Pct .889 .737 .474 .389 .278

GB — 3 3 7½ 10 GB — — 2 3 5 GB — 2½ 7½ 9 11

L10 Str 9-1 L-1 7-3 L-1 6-4 L-1 6-4 W-1 2-8 W-1 L10 Str 5-5 W-3 6-4 W-4 4-6 L-1 4-6 W-1 3-7 L-2 L10 Str 10-0 W-12 6-4 L-3 4-6 L-1 4-6 L-1 3-7 L-2

Wednesday Sacramento at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Detroit at Boston, 6:30 p.m. Memphis at Toronto, 6:30 p.m. LA Lakers at Chicago, 7 p.m. New York at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Washington at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m. San Antonio at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Atlanta at Phoenix, 8 p.m. Miami at Denver, 8 p.m. Indiana at Portland, 9 p.m.

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

L 4 7 7 12 13 L 8 8 10 10 12 L 2 5 10 11 13

Monday Washington 101, Sacramento 95, OT Boston 112, Miami 104 Oklahoma City 112, New York 103 Toronto 122, Philadelphia 95 Charlotte 104, Memphis 85 Utah 112, Minnesota 103 Golden St. 105, Atlanta 100

Southwest San Antonio Memphis Houston New Orleans Dallas Northwest Oklahoma City Utah Portland Denver Minnesota Paciic Golden State LA Clippers LA Lakers Sacramento Phoenix

Friday Minnesota at Calgary, 8 p.m. Montreal at San Jose, 9:30 p.m.

W 14 11 11 7 3 W 11 11 9 7 5 W 16 14 9 7 5

Tuesday Detroit 112, Charlotte 89 Brooklyn 127, LA Clippers 122, 2OT Milwaukee 118, Cleveland 101 New Orleans 105, LA Lakers 88 Orlando 95, San Antonio 83 Utah 120, Houston 101

Thursday Dallas at Charlotte, 6 p.m. Milwaukee at Brooklyn, 6:30 p.m. LA Clippers at Cleveland, 7 p.m. Orlando at Memphis, 7 p.m. Miami at Utah, 8 p.m. Houston at Golden State, 9:30 p.m.

injury. Toews was hurt during Chicago’s 2-1 loss at San Jose last Wednesday. He did not participate in the Blackhawks’ morning skate before Tuesday’s matchup with Florida, and coach Joel Quenneville said the center is questionable for Thursday night’s game against New Jersey. Moen retires • Dallas Stars left winger Travis Moen has retired at age 34 after 12 NHL seasons. Moen helped the Anaheim Ducks win the Stanley Cup in 2007. He also played for Chicago, San Jose and Montreal. He reached the playofs with the Stars last season, totaling no goals and two assists in 23 games. Moen was bothered by a broken wrist and lower-body injuries last season. He finished his carer with 59 goals and 77 assists.

NHL SUMMARIES Blue Jackets 5, Lightning 1

Flyers 3, Bruins 2 (SO)

Blackhawks 2, Panthers 1, SO

Tampa Bay 0 0 1 — 1 Columbus 1 2 2 — 5 First period: 1, Columbus, Karlsson 4 (Murray, Anderson), 5:30. Penalties: Jenner, CBJ, (tripping), 10:10; Filppula, TB, (tripping), 15:34. Second period: 2, Columbus, Wennberg 5 (Jones), 3:40. 3, Columbus, Anderson 7 (Hartnell, Nutivaara), 16:00. Penalties: None. Third period: 4, Columbus, Hartnell 5 (Savard, Anderson), 1:57. 5, Columbus, Gagner 8, 12:38. 6, Tampa Bay, Filppula 5 (Sustr, Point), 17:10. Penalties: None. Shots: Tampa Bay 6-7-14: 27. Columbus 16-11-11: 38. Power-plays: Tampa Bay 0 of 1; Columbus 0 of 1. Goalies: Tampa Bay, Vasilevskiy 6-2-1 (38 shots-33 saves). Columbus, Bobrovsky 12-5-2 (27-26). A: 10,366. Referees: Mike Leggo, Tim Peel. Linesmen: Ryan Galloway, Brian Mach.

Boston 0 0 2 0 — 2 Philadelphia 2 0 0 0 — 3 Philadelphia won shootout 2-1. First period: 1, Philadelphia, Del zotto 2 (Konecny, Simmonds), 13:56. 2, Philadelphia, Giroux 5 (Schenn, Voracek), 15:28 (pp). Penalties: Raffl, PHI, (slashing), 10:12; Czarnik, BOS, (slashing), 14:00. Second period: None. Penalties: Beleskey, BOS, (high sticking), 0:26; Vandevelde, PHI, (roughing), 11:03; Backes, BOS, (hooking), 11:53; Beleskey, BOS, (roughing), 16:08; Cousins, PHI, (tripping), 18:20. Third period: 3, Boston, Krejci 3 (Krug), 4:26. 4, Boston, Marchand 7 (Carlo, Krug), 5:44. Penalties: Pastrnak, BOS, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 5:28; Cousins, PHI, (tripping), 5:28; Morrow, BOS, Penalty Shot (interference on breakaway (penalty shot)), 6:23; Marchand, BOS, (roughing), 13:24; Konecny, PHI, (tripping), 16:24. Overtime: None. Penalties: Simmonds, PHI, (roughing), 3:53; Marchand, BOS, (roughing), 3:53. Shootout: Boston 1 (Nash NG, Pastrnak NG, Marchand G, Backes NG), Philadelphia 2 (Cousins NG, Simmonds NG, Konecny NG, Voracek G, Lyubimov NG, Schenn NG, Read NG, Gostisbehere G). Shots: Boston 19-11-11-6: 47. Philadelphia 9-6-5-1: 21. Power-plays: Boston 0 of 4; PHI 1 of 5. Goalies: Boston, Rask 12-4-1 (21 shots-19 saves). PHI, Mason 6-8-3 (47-45). A: 19,558.

Florida 0 0 1 0 — 1 Chicago 1 0 0 0 — 2 Chicago won shootout 2-0. First period: 1, Chicago, Panik 7 (Kruger, Rasmussen), 17:50. Penalties: None. Second period: None. Penalties: Demers, FLA, (interference), 11:30; Panik, CHI, (holding), 14:45; Hjalmarsson, CHI, (hooking), 19:08. Third period: 2, Florida, Jagr 4 (Marchessault, Ekblad), 0:35 (pp). Penalties: Kindl, FLA, (hooking), 11:57; Kane, CHI, (high sticking), 19:40. Overtime: None. Penalties: None. Shootout: Florida 0 (Barkov NG), Chicago 2 (Kane NG, Panarin G, Panik G). Shots: Florida 13-12-10-4: 39. Chicago 8-11-11-3: 33. Power-plays: Florida 1 of 3; Chicago 0 of 2. Goalies: Florida, Luongo 8-6-1 (33 shots-32 saves). Chicago, Crawford 11-6-2 (39-38). A: 21,475. Referees: Frederick L’Ecuyer, Francois St Laurent. Linesmen: Darren Gibbs, Bryan Pancich.

Sabres 5, Senators 4 Buffalo 3 1 1 — 5 Ottawa 1 2 1 — 4 First period: 1, Buffalo, Okposo 7 (Ristolainen, Eichel), 6:16 (pp). 2, Buffalo, Eichel 1 (O’reilly, Ristolainen), 9:31 (pp). 3, Ottawa, Hoffman 5 (Borowiecki, Brassard), 13:47. 4, Buffalo, O’reilly 5 (Franson, Gorges), 14:18. Penalties: Brassard, OTT, (high sticking), 6:09; Borowiecki, OTT, (hooking), 8:21; Wideman, OTT, (slashing), 16:15; Foligno, BUF, Major (fighting), 16:15; Borowiecki, OTT, Major (fighting), 16:15. Second period: 5, Ottawa, Stone 7 (Hoffman, Turris), 8:20 (pp). 6, Buffalo, Reinhart 5 (Kane), 17:08. 7, Ottawa, Hoffman 6 (Karlsson, Stone), 17:51. Penalties: Gorges, BUF, (interference), 2:55; Carrier, BUF, (tripping), 6:29; Turris, OTT, (tripping), 12:18. Third period: 8, Buffalo, O’reilly 6 (Reinhart, Okposo), 16:43 (pp). 9, Ottawa, Hoffman 7 (Karlsson, Phaneuf), 18:29 (pp). Penalties: Eichel, BUF, (delay of game), 5:03; Karlsson, OTT, (interference), 16:01; Larsson, BUF, (interference), 17:14. Shots: Buffalo 14-4-10: 28. Ottawa 7-17-11: 35. Power-plays: Buffalo 3 of 5; Ottawa 2 of 4. Goalies: Buffalo, Lehner 5-7-3 (6 shots-5 saves), Nilsson 3-2-2 (29-26). Ottawa, Anderson 12-5-1 (28-23). A: 14,259. Referees: Eric Furlatt, Jon Mclsaac. Linesmen: Steve Barton, Scott Driscoll.

Red Wings 3, Stars 1 Dallas 1 0 0 — 1 Detroit 1 1 1 — 3 First period: 1, Dallas, Lindell 2 (Eakin, Seguin), 0:16. 2, Detroit, Larkin 7 (Nielsen, Green), 19:21 (pp). Penalties: Sproul, DET, (high sticking), 9:47; Johns, DAL, (interference), 19:15. Second period: 3, Detroit, Mantha 3 (Kronwall, Zetterberg), 7:56 (pp). Penalties: Benn, DAL, (hooking), 6:19; Kronwall, DET, (slashing), 10:39; Mckenzie, DAL, (tripping), 16:26. Third period: 4, Detroit, Ott 2 (Vanek), 18:57. Penalties: Tatar, DET, (tripping), 4:27; Spezza, DAL, (high sticking), 8:09; Ericsson, DET, (interference), 11:26; Ott, DET, (tripping), 12:40; Roussel, DAL, Major (fighting), 14:37; Ouellet, DET, Major (fighting), 14:37; Sharp, DAL, (roughing), 16:13; Mrazek, DET, served by Vanek, (roughing), 16:13. Shots: Dallas 9-9-17: 35. Detroit 7-10-3: 20. Power-plays: Dallas 0 of 5; Detroit 2 of 4. Goalies: Dallas, Lehtonen 4-7-3 (19 shots-17 saves). Detroit, Mrazek 6-5-2 (35-34). A: 20,027. Referees: Marc Joannette, TJ Luxmore. Linesmen: Shandor Alphonso, Devin Berg.

Jets 3, Devils 2 New Jersey 0 0 2 — 2 Winnipeg 0 2 1 — 3 First period: None. Penalties: Josefson, NJ, (high sticking), 2:51; Stafford, WPG, (tripping), 9:40. Second period: 1, Winnipeg, Scheifele 13 (Byfuglien, Ehlers), 11:20. 2, Winnipeg, Wheeler 8 (Trouba, Copp), 13:21. Penalties: Merrill, NJ, (hooking), 1:53; Fiddler, NJ, (tripping), 2:12; Merrill, NJ, (tripping), 6:03; Wheeler, WPG, (slashing), 6:56; Morrissey, WPG, Penalty Shot (interference on breakaway (penalty shot)), 14:33; Severson, NJ, (holding stick), 15:02; Byfuglien, WPG, (interference), 18:43. Third period: 3, New Jersey, Wood 1 (Henrique), 2:52. 4, Winnipeg, Laine 13 (Chiarot, Scheifele), 4:47. 5, New Jersey, Lappin 4 (Severson), 7:58. Penalties: Stuart, WPG, (interference), 11:51. Shots: New Jersey 7-7-11: 25. Winnipeg 6-16-7: 29. Power-plays: New Jersey 0 of 4; Winnipeg 0 of 5. Goalies: New Jersey, Schneider 8-6-3 (29 shots-26 saves). Winnipeg, Hellebuyck 9-8-0 (25-23). A: 15,294.

Predators 5, Avalanche 3 Nashville 1 2 2 — 5 Colorado 1 1 1 — 3 First period: 1, Nashville, Fisher 5 (Watson, Bitetto), 14:52. 2, Colorado, Rantanen 3 (Bourque, Tyutin), 15:58. Penalties: None. Second period: 3, Nashville, Arvidsson 7 (Subban, Johansen), 0:07. 4, Nashville, Fiala 3 (Ribeiro, Josi), 3:04. 5, Colorado, Bourque 8 (Rantanen, Zadorov), 16:25. Penalties: Watson, NSH, Major (fighting), 3:30; Mcleod, COL, Major (fighting), 3:30; Irwin, NSH, (holding), 13:12. Third period: 6, Nashville, Johansen 5, 0:34. 7, Nashville, Watson 1 (Josi, Gaudreau), 2:42. 8, Colorado, Grigorenko 3 (Barrie, Duchene), 4:01. Penalties: Johnson, COL, (illegal equipment), 4:45; Colorado bench, served by Iginla (too many men on the ice), 15:53. Shots: Nashville 14-11-8: 33. Colorado 15-10-15: 40. Power-plays: Nashville 0 of 2; Colorado 0 of 1. Goalies: Nashville, Rinne 10-5-3 (40 shots-37 saves). Colorado, Pickard 4-2-1 (33-28). A: 12,082.

Maple Leafs 4, Oilers 2 Toronto 1 3 0 — 4 Edmonton 0 1 1 — 2 First period: 1, Toronto, Matthews 10 (Zaitsev, Nylander), 5:45. Penalties: Matthews, TOR, (hooking), 3:16; Lucic, EDM, (interference), 3:45; Kadri, TOR, (interference), 14:29; Van riemsdyk, TOR, (roughing), 17:32; Hendricks, EDM, (roughing), 17:32. Second period: 2, Toronto, Van riemsdyk 10 (Marner, Bozak), 2:49. 3, Edmonton, Sekera 3 (Russell, Mcdavid), 4:50. 4, Toronto, Kadri 10 (Komarov), 6:00. 5, Toronto, Hyman 3, 17:58. Penalties: Toronto bench, served by Bozak (), 6:32; Maroon, EDM, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 13:11; Larsson, EDM, (roughing), 14:42; Kadri, TOR, (charging), 14:42; Kadri, TOR, served by Bozak, (slashing), 14:42; Hyman, TOR, (hooking), 15:37. Third period: 6, Edmonton, Mcdavid 11 (Lucic), 3:58. Penalties: Marner, TOR, (hooking), 1:24; Mcdavid, EDM, (holding), 8:14; Nugent-hopkins, EDM, (holding), 16:38. Shots: Toronto 7-7-9: 23. Edmonton 12-10-8: 30. Power-plays: Toronto 0 of 4; Edmonton 0 of 6. Goalies: Toronto, Andersen 10-6-3 (30 shots-28 saves). Edmonton, Talbot 11-9-2 (14-10), Gustavsson 1-1-0 (9-9). A: 18,347.

Rangers 3, Hurricanes 2 Carolina 2 0 0 — 2 NY Rangers 0 1 2 — 3 First period: 1, Carolina, Stalberg 5 (Tennyson, Nordstrom), 5:22. 2, Carolina, Stalberg 6 (Mcclement), 12:55. Penalties: Stepan, NYR, (hooking), 10:06. Second period: 3, NY Rangers, Holden 3, 9:13. Penalties: Staal, NYR, (high sticking), 1:25. Third period: 4, NY Rangers, Nash 10, 0:24. 5, NY Rangers, Vesey 8 (Nash, Skjei), 14:48 (pp). Penalties: Mcclement, CAR, (high sticking), 8:15; Lindberg, NYR, (roughing), 11:32; Hanifin, CAR, (roughing), 11:32; Hainsey, CAR, (hooking), 13:13; Hainsey, CAR, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 13:13. Shots: Carolina 8-12-8: 28. NY Rangers 7-5-9: 21. Power-plays: Carolina 0 of 2; NY Rangers 1 of 2. Goalies: Carolina, Ward 7-7-3 (21 shots-18 saves). NY Rangers, Lundqvist 11-6-1 (28-26). A: 18,006.

Canucks 5, Wild 4 Minnesota 1 1 2 — 4 Vancouver 0 2 3 — 5 First period: 1, Minnesota, Pominville 4 (Niederreiter, Scandella), 5:07. Penalties: None. Second period: 2, Minnesota, Pominville 5 (Zucker, Haula), 3:24. 3, Vancouver, Sutter 6 (Stecher, Sedin), 9:23 (pp). 4, Vancouver, Hutton 3 (Sedin, Sedin), 11:22 (pp). Penalties: Stecher, VAN, (high sticking), 6:10; Dumba, MIN, (interference), 7:51; Brodin, MIN, (hooking), 9:41. Third period: 5, Vancouver, Eriksson 6 (Hutton, Chaput), 1:09. 6, Vancouver, Horvat 8 (Sutter, Sbisa), 2:08. 7, Minnesota, Zucker 3, 3:20. 8, Minnesota, Haula 4 (Suter, Spurgeon), 14:11. 9, Vancouver, Baertschi 3 (Stecher, Burrows), 17:25. Penalties: Granlund, VAN, (interference), 4:55; Graovac, MIN, (high sticking), 11:03. Shots: Minnesota 14-16-12: 42. Vancouver 7-16-12: 35. Power-plays: Minnesota 0 of 2; Vancouver 2 of 3. Goalies: Minnesota, Kuemper 2-2-1 (35 shots30 saves). Vancouver, Miller 4-8-0 (42-38). A: 17,917. Referees: Wes McCauley, Graham Skilliter. Linesmen: Lonnie Cameron, Vaughan Rody.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Cleveland’s LeBron James reacts to a call during the second half of an NBA game against the Milwaukee Bucks on Tuesday night in Milwaukee.

eight points before leading 58-54 at the half.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Giannis Antetokounmpo tied a career high with 34 points and the Milwaukee Bucks stunned the visiting Cleveland Cavaliers 118-101 on Tuesday night. Antetokounmpo added 12 rebounds and five assists while Milwaukee ended Cleveland’s four-game winning streak. Jabari Parker had 18 points and Michael Beasley had 17 of the bench for the Bucks. LeBron James had 22 points for the Cavaliers, who fell to 13-3. Kyrie Irving added 20 points. Milwaukee led by 22 points in the fourth quarter and cruised past the defending champions, who benched their starters midway through the final period. The Bucks outscored Cleveland by 14 points in the third quarter. Cleveland rode hot early shooting to a 14-point first quarter lead, but Milwaukee closed on a 10-0 run and trailed by only two at the end of the period. The hot hands of Antetokounmpo and Beasley sparked Milwaukee in the second quarter as the Bucks built an advantage of

Davis enjoys big night • Anthony Davis had 41 points and 16 rebounds while leading the New Orleans Pelicans to a 105-88 victory over the short-handed Los Angeles Lakers. The 6-foot-11 Davis also had four steals, three assists and two blocks. Grizzlies lose Conley • The Memphis Grizzlies now have taken their biggest hit yet this season with star guard Mike Conley the latest to land on the injury list. The Grizzlies announced Tuesday that Conley will miss at least six weeks after being diagnosed with fractures of the transverse process bones in the vertebrae of his lower back. Conley will be re-evaluated in four weeks. Conley was hurt Monday night during the third quarter of a 104-85 loss to Charlotte after taking a charge from Michael Kidd-Gilchrist. He went down hard on his back and stayed on the floor in obvious pain before leaving the game.

Ducks 2, Canadiens 1 Montreal 0 0 1 — 1 Anaheim 1 1 0 — 2 First period: 1, Anaheim, Rakell 9 (Kesler, Vatanen), 16:50 (pp). Penalties: Ritchie, ANA, (interference), 4:36; Perry, ANA, (high sticking), 9:39; Perry, ANA, Major (fighting), 14:57; Shaw, MTL, Major (fighting), 14:57; Weber, MTL, (roughing), 16:04. Second period: 2, Anaheim, Fowler 7 (Kesler, Silfverberg), 11:56. Penalties: Carr, MTL, (tripping), 18:21; Emelin, MTL, (hooking), 19:57. Third period: 3, Montreal, Shaw 5 (Gallagher, Pacioretty), 18:00. Penalties: Cogliano, ANA, (hooking), 13:43; Shaw, MTL, Misconduct (misconduct), 19:32; Shaw, MTL, (hooking), 19:32; Vermette, ANA, (high sticking), 19:38. Shots: Montreal 17-13-10: 40. Anaheim 10-21-7: 38. Power-plays: Montreal 0 of 3; Anaheim 1 of 4. Goalies: Montreal, Price 13-2-1 (38 shots-36 saves). Anaheim, Gibson 7-7-3 (40-39). A: 14,830.

Sharks 2, Coyotes 1, OT Arizona 0 1 0 0 — 1 San Jose 0 1 0 1 — 2 First period: None. Penalties: Ward, SJ, (hooking), 7:53. Second period: 1, Arizona, Domi 4 (Vrbata, Schenn), 7:19. 2, San Jose, Tierney 2 (Boedker, Braun), 15:29. Penalties: None. Third period: None. Penalties: Murphy, ARI, (hooking), 0:28; Labanc, SJ, (roughing), 8:44; Mcginn, ARI, (roughing), 8:44; White, ARI, Misconduct (misconduct), 12:31; Dillon, SJ, (interference), 12:31; Hanzal, ARI, (high sticking), 19:59. Overtime: 3, San Jose, Burns 9 (Couture, Pavelski), 0:19 (pp). Penalties: None. Shots: Arizona 5-5-9: 19. San Jose 13-16-12-1: 42. Power-plays: Arizona 0 of 2; San Jose 1 of 2. Goalies: Arizona, Smith 4-1-2 (42 shots-40 saves). San Jose, Jones 11-8-1 (19-18). A: 17,377.

Goal scoring leaders *Through Monday GP G A PTS Connor McDavid, EDM 23 10 19 29 Nikita Kucherov, TB 22 11 15 26 Mark Scheifele, WPG 24 12 12 24 Patrick Kane, CHI 23 8 15 23 Alex Galchenyuk, MON 22 9 13 22 Vladimir Tarasenko, STL 22 9 13 22 Tyler Seguin, DAL 22 7 15 22 Wayne Simmonds, PHI 23 11 10 21 Artemi Panarin, CHI 23 8 13 21 Evgeni Malkin, PIT 22 8 13 21 Phil Kessel, PIT 22 6 15 21

NBA SUMMARIES Pistons 112, Hornets 89

Bucks 118, Cavaliers 101

Pelicans 105, Lakers 88

Detroit: Harris 9-12 3-3 24, Morris 8-18 0-0 18, Drummond 1-6 1-1 3, Smith 6-10 1-1 13, Caldwell-Pope 6-14 2-2 18, Hilliard 2-4 0-1 5, Johnson 1-1 0-0 2, Baynes 3-7 2-2 8, Leuer 5-12 1-1 12, Marjanovic 0-1 0-0 0, Udrih 3-5 0-0 7, Gbinije 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 45-92 10-11 112. Charlotte: Kidd-Gilchrist 3-7 4-4 10, Kaminsky 1-11 0-0 2, Zeller 4-6 0-0 8, Walker 9-16 1-2 23, Batum 3-11 0-0 8, Hawes 3-5 0-0 8, Hibbert 1-2 2-3 4, Roberts 0-0 4-4 4, Sessions 2-4 3-4 7, Graham 0-0 0-0 0, Harrison 0-1 0-0 0, Belinelli 4-10 2-2 11, Lamb 1-5 2-2 4. Totals 31-78 18-21 89. Detroit 33 24 27 28 — 112 Charlotte 25 29 20 15 — 89 3-point goals: Detroit 12-28 (Caldwell-Pope 4-8, Harris 3-5, Morris 2-6, Udrih 1-1, Hilliard 1-2, Leuer 1-3, Smith 0-3), Charlotte 9-27 (Walker 4-7, Hawes 2-2, Batum 2-5, Belinelli 1-4, Harrison 0-1, Lamb 0-2, Kaminsky 0-6). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Detroit 44 (Baynes 8), Charlotte 40 (Batum 11). Assists: Detroit 21 (Udrih, Caldwell-Pope 7), Charlotte 21 (Batum 5). Total fouls: Detroit 19, Charlotte 16. Technicals: Charlotte defensive three second, Charlotte team. Ejected: Drummond. A: 14,266 (19,077).

Cleveland: James 8-16 3-7 22, Love 3-10 5-7 13, Thompson 3-6 2-4 8, Irving 5-12 8-8 20, Smith 2-7 0-0 6, Jefferson 2-4 2-2 8, Andersen 0-1 2-2 2, Felder 0-0 0-0 0, Dunleavy 2-4 0-0 5, Liggins 1-2 1-1 3, McRae 4-7 0-0 9, Jones 1-3 0-0 3, Shumpert 1-3 0-0 2. Totals 32-75 23-31 101. Milwaukee: Antetokounmpo 13-19 7-10 34, Snell 3-8 1-2 8, Henson 3-7 1-1 7, Parker 7-17 3-3 18, Dellavedova 1-5 1-1 3, Beasley 7-10 2-2 17, Maker 1-2 2-2 4, Novak 0-1 0-0 0, Monroe 6-8 2-2 14, Plumlee 0-0 0-0 0, Terry 1-4 0-0 3, Brogdon 4-5 0-0 10. Totals 46-86 19-23 118. Cleveland 32 22 20 27 — 101 Milwaukee 30 28 34 26 — 118 3-point goals: Cleveland 14-39 (James 3-8, Jefferson 2-3, Irving 2-5, Love 2-7, Smith 2-7, McRae 1-2, Jones 1-2, Dunleavy 1-3, Shumpert 0-2), Milwaukee 7-19 (Brogdon 2-2, Beasley 1-1, Antetokounmpo 1-2, Terry 1-3, Parker 1-3, Snell 1-6, Dellavedova 0-1, Novak 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Cleveland 35 (Love 13), Milwaukee 43 (Antetokounmpo 12). Assists: Cleveland 17 (James 4), Milwaukee 27 (Dellavedova 7). Total fouls: Cleveland 19, Milwaukee 22. Technicals: Cleveland defensive three second, Cleveland team. A: 16,559 (18,717).

L.A. Lakers: Young 0-0 0-0 0, Deng 2-6 0-0 5, Randle 6-9 0-2 12, Mozgov 5-8 0-0 10, Calderon 1-5 0-0 2, World Peace 1-5 0-0 2, Ingram 4-10 0-1 9, Nance 4-7 0-0 8, Robinson 1-2 4-4 6, Black 4-6 1-2 9, Huertas 0-1 0-4 0, Williams 5-14 4-5 16, Clarkson 4-14 0-0 9. Totals 37-87 9-18 88. New Orleans: Hill 0-4 3-4 3, Davis 14-27 12-14 41, Asik 4-6 2-2 10, Holiday 8-15 2-3 22, Frazier 3-7 0-0 6, Brown 3-5 0-0 7, Jones 2-7 2-2 6, Diallo 0-0 0-0 0, Galloway 3-9 0-0 8, Hield 0-1 0-0 0, Moore 1-7 0-0 2. Totals 38-88 21-25 105. L.A. Lakers 22 19 22 25 — 88 New Orleans 33 32 24 16 — 105 3-point goals: L.A. Lakers 5-30 (Williams 2-7, Ingram 1-3, Deng 1-4, Clarkson 1-7, Huertas 0-1, Randle 0-1, Nance 0-1, World Peace 0-3, Calderon 0-3), New Orleans 8-31 (Holiday 4-7, Galloway 2-6, Brown 1-2, Davis 1-4, Hield 0-1, Frazier 0-2, Moore 0-3, Jones 0-3, Hill 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: L.A. Lakers 47 (Randle 10), New Orleans 54 (Davis 16). Assists: L.A. Lakers 26 (Calderon 6), New Orleans 24 (Moore, Holiday, Frazier 5). Total fouls: L.A. Lakers 17, New Orleans 17. A: 14,024 (16,867).

Nets 127, Clippers 122 L.A. Clippers: Pierce 1-7 2-2 5, Mbah a Moute 0-3 2-4 2, Jordan 9-13 3-4 21, Paul 11-26 0-0 26, Redick 7-18 1-1 18, W.Johnson 2-4 0-0 5, Speights 1-4 4-4 6, Bass 3-4 0-0 6, Felton 3-6 0-0 7, Rivers 5-9 3-5 15, Crawford 4-15 2-2 11. Totals 46-109 17-22 122. Brooklyn: Booker 7-13 1-1 15, Lopez 11-20 1-1 27, Whitehead 2-8 1-3 6, Bogdanovic 2-7 10-12 14, Kilpatrick 14-34 6-8 38, Scola 1-2 0-2 2, Hamilton 2-6 2-4 7, Harris 5-9 3-5 15, Foye 1-5 0-0 3. Totals 45-104 24-36 127. L.A. Clippers 28 37 21 21 11 4 — 122 Brooklyn 24 29 20 34 11 9 — 127 3-point goals: L.A. Clippers 13-40 (Paul 4-7, Redick 3-10, Rivers 2-4, W.Johnson 1-3, Felton 1-3, Crawford 1-4, Pierce 1-5, Jordan 0-1, Mbah a Moute 0-1, Speights 0-2), Brooklyn 13-38 (Lopez 4-9, Kilpatrick 4-12, Harris 2-4, Foye 1-2, Whitehead 1-3, Hamilton 1-3, Booker 0-2, Bogdanovic 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: L.A. Clippers 57 (Jordan 23), Brooklyn 53 (Kilpatrick 14). Assists: L.A. Clippers 21 (Paul 13), Brooklyn 22 (Booker 5). Total fouls: L.A. Clippers 29, Brooklyn 23. Technicals: Speights, L.A. Clippers coach Doc Rivers 2. A: 15,681 (17,732).

Magic 95, Spurs 83 Orlando: Fournier 4-9 4-4 13, Gordon 5-9 0-0 11, Ibaka 7-11 2-2 18, Biyombo 3-11 3-4 9, Augustin 2-6 2-2 7, Rudez 0-1 0-0 0, J.Green 3-10 0-0 6, Onuaku 1-1 0-0 2, Vucevic 6-16 0-0 12, Payton 5-9 0-0 10, Watson 3-3 0-0 7, Hezonja 0-0 0-0 0, Wilcox 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 39-86 11-12 95. San Antonio: Leonard 6-16 8-9 21, Aldridge 7-12 1-2 16, Gasol 2-6 2-2 6, Parker 0-6 2-2 2, D.Green 1-4 0-0 2, Anderson 0-0 0-0 0, Bertans 0-1 0-0 0, Lee 0-4 2-2 2, Dedmon 3-4 0-1 6, Murray 0-1 2-2 2, Mills 2-5 2-2 7, Simmons 3-8 0-0 6, Ginobili 4-9 3-4 13. Totals 28-76 22-26 83. Orlando 16 29 30 20 — 95 San Antonio 20 23 21 19 — 83 3-point goals: Orlando 6-15 (Ibaka 2-4, Gordon 1-1, Watson 1-1, Fournier 1-2, Augustin 1-3, Vucevic 0-1, Rudez 0-1, J.Green 0-2), San Antonio 5-20 (Ginobili 2-5, Aldridge 1-1, Mills 1-3, Leonard 1-4, Murray 0-1, Gasol 0-1, Simmons 0-2, D.Green 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Orlando 40 (Vucevic 10), San Antonio 45 (Dedmon 8). Assists: Orlando 25 (Fournier 7), San Antonio 19 (Ginobili, Aldridge, Gasol, Parker 3). Total fouls: Orlando 21, San Antonio 17.

Jazz 120, Rockets 101 Houston: Ariza 3-8 0-0 6, Anderson 4-7 0-0 11, Capela 4-6 0-0 8, Beverley 2-5 2-2 6, Harden 8-23 8-10 26, Dekker 4-8 1-2 10, Brewer 0-4 0-0 0, Harrell 1-3 0-0 2, Hilario 2-8 0-1 4, Ennis 0-0 0-0 0, Gordon 8-17 4-5 24, McDaniels 1-2 1-2 4. Totals 37-91 16-22 101. Utah: Hayward 8-16 12-13 31, Gobert 5-7 6-8 16, Diaw 2-2 0-0 4, Hill 2-6 2-2 8, Hood 7-15 2-2 19, Johnson 4-7 0-0 11, Ingles 1-1 0-0 3, Lyles 5-8 1-2 13, Withey 2-3 0-0 4, Exum 1-4 0-0 2, Mack 4-5 0-0 9. Totals 41-74 23-27 120. Houston 29 21 23 28 — 101 Utah 38 24 23 35 — 120 3-point goals: Houston 11-30 (Gordon 4-9, Anderson 3-5, Harden 2-6, McDaniels 1-1, Dekker 1-2, Beverley 0-1, Brewer 0-2, Ariza 0-4), Utah 15-28 (Johnson 3-5, Hayward 3-6, Hood 3-6, Hill 2-3, Lyles 2-3, Ingles 1-1, Mack 1-2, Exum 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Houston 38 (Beverley, Dekker, Capela 6), Utah 40 (Gobert 14). Assists: Houston 14 (Harden 7), Utah 23 (Hayward 7). Total fouls: Houston 20, Utah 20. Technicals: Beverley. A: 19,911 (19,911).


STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

11.30.2016 • WEdnEsday • M 1

GIRLS SWIMMING PREVIEW • SOPHIA MARUSIC

TUESDAY’S RESULTS GIRLS BASKETBALL Afton 15 16 13 14 58 Hancock 11 9 8 7 35 A: Brown 20, Serra 13, Cherestal 10. FG 23 (6), FT 6-14. H: Stewart 12, Turner 10. FG 13 (2), FT 5-13.

Troy 2 17 16 St. Charles 11 11 18 T: Edwards 18. FG 9 (0), FT 0-0. S: Chairs 13. FG 17 (3), FT 16-28.

9 13

44 53

28 48

St. Clair 8 11 10 16 45 Festus 11 8 22 13 54 S: Buscher 16. FG 19 (4), FT 3-7. F: J. Oetting 14, Frazier 13. FG 22 (6), FT 4-7.

DuBourg 17 13 16 12 58 Bayless 3 8 7 5 23 D: Nelson 20, Rackley 12. FG 26 (1), FT 5-16. B: Clemons 7. FG 9 (1), FT 4-5.

Granite City 27 6 6 26 65 Madison 19 0 16 24 59 G: Moore 29, Garrett 15. FG 25 (2), FT 13-16. M (3-2): FG 0 (0), FT 0-0.

Borgia 69 Jennings 42 B: Moss 20, Gettemeier 13, Carr 10. FG 23 (3), FT 20-24.

Alton 10 12 11 10 43 Bellvl. East 16 17 20 8 61 B (5-1): Dowell 14, Rainey 12, Nitz 10. FG 20 (2), FT 19-30.

St.Chas. West 37 Lutheran SC 11 16 13 15 55 S: Poindexter 17. FG 13 (4), FT 7-19. L: Lindesmith 17, A. Ernstmeyer 11. FG 22 (3), FT 8-12.

Chester 8 10 14 15 47 Gibault 10 3 8 14 35 G (3-2): Deterding 13. FG 13 (1), FT 8-17.

Westminster 5 5 7 Hickman 18 9 13 W: McKee 12. FG 8 (1), FT 11-14.

11 8

Washington 22 14 12 4 52 Union 6 5 4 8 23 W: R. Arnold 18, Hardesty 15. FG 21 (10), FT 0-2. U: Reeser 9. FG 8 (1), FT 6-9. St. Dominic FZ South S: Kasubke 12. FG 9 (0), FT 12-19.

30 37

Windsor 3 6 3 4 Fox 11 13 23 4 W: Kmetz 3, Lynch 3. FG 6 (2), FT 2-9. F: Farrell 18. FG 20 (3), FT 8-14.

16 51

GIRLS SWIMMING Timberland 90, Fort Zumwalt West 85 Ursuline 115, St. Dominic 114, Incarnate W. 75 Marquette 150, Mehlville 30

WRESTLING

V. Duchesne 8 8 6 8 30 Ladue 9 13 13 13 48 V: Gast 14. FG 12 (0), FT 6-11. L: Minkler 16, Walker-Foster 14. FG 19 (5), FT 5-11. Miller Career 27 30 9 6 72 Carnahan 0 2 0 4 6 M: Seltzer 22, C. Hodges 15, Z. Hodges 10. FG 34 (3), FT 1-7. C: T. Williams 4. FG 3 (0), FT 0-2. Cor Jesu 19 0 2 6 27 In. Word 34 0 15 15 64 C: Carlson 8. FG 11 (2), FT 3-9. I: Johnson 18, Morris 18, Jackson-Morris 11. FG 24 (5), FT 11-15. Fath.McGivney 7 10 11 4 Dupo 6 6 6 10 F (2-4): Hoppes 13. FG 14 (2), FT 2-8. D (0-7): Jones 16. FG 14 (0), FT 0-2.

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B7

32 28

Valley Park 7 11 16 4 38 Liberty 22 16 23 7 68 V: Memisevic 8. FG 16 (3), FT 3-11. L: Kruse 27, Ingle 16, Shaefer 12. FG 24 (5), FT 15-24. Mehlville 9 7 13 6 35 Lindbergh 11 21 10 10 52 L: J. Baudendistel 25. FG 21 (1), FT 9-13. Gateway STEM 4 9 6 5 24 Luth. South 14 15 19 7 55 L: Member-Meneh 23, Lawson 18. FG 21 (0), FT 13-21. Timberland 10 11 11 17 49 Luth. North 7 10 22 16 55 T: Armstrong 25, Kiner 10. FG 17 (1), FT 14-22. L: M. Buford 13, Dukes 10. FG 19 (3), FT 14-24.

John Burroughs 54, Lutheran South 15 220: Lawrence Jones, JB, pin Seth Day, 2:50 113: Joseph Bruhn, LS, dec. Sandeep Amarnath, 6-5 120: Adam Banga, JB, pin Carson Heskett, 3:34 138: Evan Williams, JB, pin Andreas Sherman, 5:12 152: Caleb Hughes, JB, pin Andrew Long, 4:20 160: Sam Mulligan, JB, pin Alex Dippold, 1:10 170: Jack Nelson, JB, pin Jacob Guebert, :52 182: Aidan Reid, JB, pin Alex Gardner, 1:44 Won by forfeit JB: Jason Kemp (195), Louis RothweilerLightfoot (285) LS: Brandon Miller (106), Carl Paetow (132) John Burroughs 48, O’Fallon Christian 24 285: Chase McCoy, OC, pin Louis Rothweiler-Lightfoot, 2:32 138: Daniel Motto, OC, pin Evan Williams, :50 160: Sam Mulligan, JB, pin Peter Deschu, :18 220: Lawrence Jones, JB, pin Blake Ayers, 2:45 Won by forfeit JB: Sandeep Amarnath (113), Adam Banga (120), Caleb Hughes (152), Jack Nelson (170), Aidan Reid (182), Jason Kemp (195) OC: Jonathan Cochrum (106), Jacob Ottenlips (145) OTHER SCORES: Rolla 48, Washington 18 Washington 39, Owensville 13 De Smet 41, St. Clair 36 Hazelwood West 48, SLUH 27

MORE COVERAGE ON STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

WRITE ON John Burroughs senior hopes career has storybook ending BY STEVE OVERBEY sTLhighschoolsports.com

Sophia Marusic likes to write. Short stories, fiction, poems. You name it, the John Burroughs girls swimming standout can literate it. Soon, she might be able to put her two passions together. Maybe a story about a young swimmer who got better every year on the way to finally winning a state championship in her last try. The multi-talented Marusic is well on her way to doing just that. Marusic returns for her fourth season in the pool with high hopes after a fifth-place finish in the 200 freestyle at the state meet last February. “I’m really looking forward to this season,” Marusic said. “It’s not only going to be fun, but I think we can be successful, too.” Marusic has a legitimate shot at a top-three finish in the 200, her signature event, as two of the four swimmers who finished ahead of her at the state meet last season graduated. Plus, she and the three other John Burroughs seniors have a top-10 team finish in mind as well. The Bombers gradually have improved from 24th place in the standings at state to 17th in 2015 and 12th last season. And Marusic is one of the main reasons for that progression. “She’s the backbone of our team,” John Burroughs coach Leslie Kehr said. Marusic recorded a state qualifying time in every individual event except the 100 breaststroke last sea-

BEN LOEWNAU • sTLhighschoolsports.com

Sophia Marusic is one of the top returning swimmers for the John Burroughs swimming and diving team after inishing in ifth place in Missouri in the 200 freestyle.

son. She helped her team qualify for state in the 200 medley and 400 freestyle relays and also placed ninth in the 100 butterfly. “You can put her in any event,” senior teammate Katie Jackson said. “And she’ll give it her best. We count on her for almost everything.” Marusic is not your typical 18-year-old. She has a wide variety of interests. In addition to her penchant for writing, she carries a 4.5 grade-point average with a rugged schedule of honors classes. She is not sure of a career path just yet, but the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is at the top of her college list. Marusic’s writing skills are just as impressive as her swimming numbers. The past two summers, she attended the Iowa Young Writers’ Workshop at the University of Iowa and the Sewanee Young Writers’ Conference at the Uni-

versity of the South in Sewanee, Tennessee. And she has the ability to think outside the box. Marusic recently formed a Cloud Club at John Burroughs, a group of students that study cloud formations. “Just a cloud appreciation group,” Marusic said. “We take pictures and admire the formations and things like that.” Marusic also is a big fan of goats. Yes, goats. “That’s something she probably doesn’t want everyone to know,” said Jackson. “She just loves goats. She’s the only person I know that I can say that about.” Marusic is extremely proud of her poetry and short story skills. Her works have been published by several magazines in addition to appearing on a regular basis in the school newspaper. She was awarded a first-place prize at the Nuclear Age Peace

Foundation Poetry Awards in Oct. 2014 for a work called, “Vietnam: January 28, 1973.” A short story called “Here” about family relationships is among her top works, she said. “It’s just something I enjoy doing,” Marusic said. Marusic is a member of the Clayton Shaw Park Tideriders, a club team, and she swims year-round. “That’s one of the things that helps her,” Kehr said. “She’s serious about what she does.” Marusic considers herself a “power swimmer.” She hits the weight room on a regular basis and that increased strength and muscle mass are among the reasons she carries high hopes into the upcoming campaign. “I think we’re all looking forward to this season,” Marusic said. “As a team, we’re all swimming our best and can’t wait to get started.”

PAUL KOPSKY • sTLhighschoolsports.com

Josie Lindemann (right) of Borgia goes up for a shot as Aaliyah Scott of Jennings reaches in during a game in the Lutheran South Round Robin on Tuesday.

PAUL KOPSKY • sTLhighschoolsports.com

Leketor Member-Meneh (right) of Lutheran South receives an award for setting the school’s single-season scoring record last season on Tuesday.

GIRLS SWIMMERS TO WATCH Alyssa Lemon, senior, Marquette A top-notch freestylist, Lemon inished second at state in the 500 freestyle and fourth in the 200 last season. She posted the top times in the area in both events. Lemon inished third in both of races as a sophomore.

Evie Mauze, senior, MICDS Returns after a two-year absence from high school swimming. Turned heads as a freshman with a second-place efort in the 500 freestyle. Also helped the 400 free relay team to a fourth-place performance that season.

Franceska Petrosino, junior, Lafayette Swam the leadof leg on the state champion 400 freestyle relay team. Also placed third in the 200 free. Made noise at state as a freshman with a pair of third-place individual inishes.

Maria Newton, sophomore, Parkway West Kick-started the Longhorns’ 400 freestyle and 200 medley relay teams to second-place inishes by swimming the opening leg. Also, came in seventh individually in the 500 freestyle.

Emma Brabham, junior, Francis Howell Brabham burst onto the scene as a freshman, swimming the anchor leg to lead the Vikings to an upset win the 200 freestyle relay. She posted the third-fastest time in the area with a ifth-place inish at state in the 100 butterly last season.

MORE COVERAGE ONLINE Check out STLhighschoolsports.com for stats, box scores, photos and more.

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULES, RESULTS BOYS BASKETBALL -KASKASKIAN CLASSIC at Carlyle Hillsboro, Ill. 47, New Athens 29 Carlyle 52, Woodlawn 40 Okawville vs Hillsboro, Ill., 6 p.m. Wed. Pinckneyville vs Carlyle, 7:30 p.m. Wed. -JERRY BOECKMAN MEMORIAL INVIT. at Vianney Bracket Play Vianney vs. SLUH, 4:30 p.m. Wednesday Eureka 79, Ladue 77 Pool Play Farmington 54, Belleville West 46 Haz. Central vs Belleville West, 6 p.m. Wed. -42ND VALLEY PARK INVITATIONAL at Valley Park Brentwood 70, Brussels 29 Valley Park 79, Crossroads 12 Consolation semiinal Brussels vs Gateway Science, 5 p.m. Wed.

Crossroads vs Kennedy, 6:30 p.m. Wed. -ST. CHARLES TIP-OFF CLASSIC at St. Charles Luth. SC vs Luth. South, 5:30 p.m. Wed. Clayton vs St. Charles, 7 p.m. Wed. -SOUTHSIDE CLASSIC at Mehlville Consolation semiinal Mehlville vs Bayless, 3:30 p.m. Wednesday. Windsor vs DuBourg, 5 p.m. Wednesday. Semiinal Afton vs Lindbergh, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. Hancock vs John Burroughs, 8 p.m. Wed. -GERALD LINNEMAN MEMORIAL TIP-OFF Parkway W. vs Parkway C., 7 p.m. Wednesday. Parkway N. vs Parkway S., 7 p.m. Wednesday. -PATTONVILLE TOURNAMENT Consolation semiinal McCluer vs Univ. City, 3:45 p.m. Wednesday. Trinity vs Haz. East, 5:15 p.m. Wednesday.

Semiinal Jennings vs Pattonville, 6:45 p.m. Wed. Maplewood-RH vs Whitield, 8:15 p.m. Wed. -46TH TROY INVITATIONAL Consolation semiinal Holt vs Hannibal, 5:30 p.m. Wednesday. Westminster vs FZ South, 4 p.m. Wednesday. Semiinal Troy vs Rock Bridge, 7 p.m. Wednesday. Hickman vs Francis Howell, 8:30 p.m. Wed. -WINFIELD CLASSIC First round, Tuesday Timberland def. North County Chr. O’Fallon Christian 42, Elsberry 36 Fort Zumwalt East 50, Winield 42 Warrenton 65, St. Louis Knights 42 -CRYSTAL CITY TOURNAMENT Semiinals Jeferson vs. Saxony Luth., 5:30 p.m., Wed. St. Vincent vs. Crystal City, 7:30 p.m., Wed.

GIRLS BASKETBALL -MONTGOMERY COUNTY INVITATIONAL Consolation semiinal Mont. County vs Wellsville, 5:30 p.m. Wed. Fulton vs Silex, 7 p.m. Wednesday. Semiinal New Haven vs Clopton, 5:30 p.m. Wed. Bowling Green vs Hermann, 7 p.m. Wed. -MARQUETTE TOURNAMENT Consolation semiinal Fort Zumwalt West vs Nerinx Hall, 4 p.m. Marquette vs Summit, 5:30 p.m. Semiinal Lafayette vs Webster Groves, 7 p.m. Francis Howell vs Paciic, 8:30 p.m. -NORTHWEST-CEDAR HILL TOURNAMENT Semiinals 5:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. -GERALD LINNEMAN MEMORIAL TIP-OFF Parkway W. at Parkway C., 5:30 p.m. Wed. Parkway N. at Parkway S., 5:30 p.m. Wed.

-SOUTHSIDE CLASSIC at Afton Consolation semiinal Afton 58, Hancock 35 DuBourg 58, Bayless 23 Semiinal Lindbergh 52, Mehlville 35 Fox 51, Windsor 16 -WINFIELD CLASSIC Consolation semiinal Hannibal vs Warrenton JV, 3:30 p.m. Wed. Fort Zumwalt East vs Winield, 5 p.m. Wed. Semiinal Trinity vs Lift For Life , 6:30 p.m. Wed. Elsberry vs North Tech, 8 p.m. Wed. -LUTHERAN ST. CHARLES TOURNAMENT Semiinal Francis Howell Central vs MICDS, 5:30 p.m. Wednesday. Luth. SC vs. Luth. North, 7 p.m. Wednesday.

-KENNEDY TOURNAMENT Semiinal Grandview vs Principia, 5 p.m. Wednesday. Liberty vs. Herculaneum, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. -LUTHERAN SOUTH ROUND ROBIN Borgia 69, Jennings 42 Luth. South 55, Gateway STEM 24 -29TH TROY CLASSIC First round Hickman 48, Westminster 28 FZ South 37, St. Dominic 30 St. Charles 53, Troy 44 Eureka 46, Holt 44

WEDNESDAY’S NON-TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE BOYS BASKETBALL

WRESTLING

McCluer at University City, 3:45 p.m. St. Louis U. High at Vianney, 4:30 p.m. Metro at Cleveland, 5 p.m. Trinity at Hazelwood East, 5:15 p.m. Conluence at Harrisburg, 5:30 p.m. Holt vs. Hannibal, at Troy, 5:30 p.m. Lift For Life at Miller Career, 6 p.m. Medicine and Biosc vs. McKinley, at Cleveland, 6:30 p.m. Jennings at Pattonville, 6:45 p.m. Cahokia at Hazelwood West, 7 p.m. Pinckneyville at Carlyle, 7:30 p.m. Columbia at Wesclin, 7:30 p.m. Roosevelt at Murphysboro, 7:45 p.m.

at Liberty, 5 p.m. Holt and Liberty at Warrenton, 5 p.m. Hannibal, Helias and Warrenton at Battle, 5:30 p.m. Troy and Battle at Fort Zumwalt North, 6 p.m. Oakville, Fort Zumwalt North and Summit at Lafayette, 6 p.m. Timberland and Lafayette at Francis Howell, 6 p.m. Fort Zumwalt South and Francis Howell at St. Charles West, 6 p.m. FH North and St. Charles West at Northwest-CH, 7:30 p.m. FH Central and Northwest-CH

GIRLS BASKETBALL Fort Zumwalt East at Winield, 5 p.m. Medicine and Biosc at Soldan, 6 p.m. John Burroughs vs. Metro, at Matthews-D., 6 p.m. Belleville West at Mater Dei, 6 p.m. Alton Marquette at Dupo, 6 p.m. Cleveland vs. Roosevelt, at Gateway STEM, 6 p.m. Ritenour at Clayton, 6 p.m. Belleville East at O’Fallon, 7:30 p.m. Crystal City at Valle Catholic, 7:30 p.m.

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GIRLS SWIMMING at Rec-Plex, 3:30 p.m. St. Dominic and Fort Zumwalt North at Ritenour, 4 p.m. Hazelwood Central and Ritenour

SEEKING AREA COLLEGE SIGNINGS STLhighschoolsports.com will publish a list of area athletes who sign, as well as a small colleges list that includes commitments to NCAA Division III, NAIA and junior college institutions. Submissions to the lists will be accepted from the university or from the high school coach or athletics director via email to chollway@post-dispatch.com. Include irst and last name, high school, sport and university. No faxes or phone calls, please.

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STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

11.30.2016 • WEdnEsday • M 2

GIRLS SWIMMING PREVIEW • SOPHIA MARUSIC

TUESDAY’S RESULTS BOYS BASKETBALL St. Louis Knights 10 11 6 15 Warrenton 19 11 14 21 H: Alberternst 11, Tonioli 10. FG 23 (4), FT 15-20.

42 65

Eureka 11 23 20 25 79 Ladue 20 14 24 19 77 H: Hotz 20, Rhoads 12. FG 27 (10), FT 13-22. Brentwood 23 11 25 11 70 Brussels 7 12 6 4 29 Be: C. Hill 16, McGhee 15, Tate 11. FG 28 (7), FT 7-13. New Haven 2 11 12 Hermann 11 6 13 N: Kruse 12. FG 13 (1), FT 6-9. H: McKague 10. FG 14 (1), FT 9-10.

8 8

33 38

Salem 9 10 13 7 39 Mascoutah 15 5 11 12 43 H (3-2): Weiss 17, Brandon 11. FG 15 (6), FT 7-13. Fath.McGivney 2 4 10 2 18 Columbia 21 23 9 12 65 F: Jones 12. FG 9 (0), FT 0-0. H: Peterson 19, Holmes 11. FG 27 (3), FT 8-9. Bellvl. West 6 15 15 10 46 Farmington 13 10 15 16 54 B: Dancy 13, Liddell 13. FG 19 (5), FT 3-8. H: FG 0 (0), FT 0-0. St. Louis Pat Crystal City H: DeGeare 41. FG 20 (0), FT 28-38.

60 68

Elverado 5 12 2 10 29 Marissa 14 17 12 15 58 H (3-2): K. Smith 29, Stoddard 10. FG 20 (8), FT 10-17. FZ West 18 8 13 10 49 Liberty 7 14 23 11 55 F: White 14, Hampton 10. FG 18 (2), FT 11-22. H: Overall 18, Jones 11. FG 19 (5), FT 12-20. Conluence 5 12 15 18 50 Priory 17 15 18 12 62 H: Berns 18, Hanley 15, Kacmarek 12. FG 24 (5), FT 9-18. Crossroads 2 4 2 4 12 Valley Park 30 20 17 12 79 C: Chester 6. FG 4 (1), FT 3-5. H: Courtney 17, Shaw 14, Rogers 10. FG 34 (2), FT 9-19. Festus Paciic H: Klenke 14. FG 26 (4), FT 0-3.

34 56

Northwest-CH 14 12 2 6 Hillsboro 26 11 23 11 H: Pinkley 22, Brewer 16. FG 24 (4), FT 16-19.

34 71

St. Dominic 3 9 7 FZ South 12 7 4 S: Kasubke 12. FG 9 (0), FT 12-19. H: Karl 11. FG 12 (1), FT 12-21.

11 14

30 37

Woodlawn 2 17 9 12 40 Carlyle 7 20 9 16 52 W: Hoppa 12, Wollerman 11. FG 15 (4), FT 6-8. H: Siever 20, Cox 16. FG 17 (2), FT 16-25. 54 57

Nashville 20 16 19 10 65 Lebanon 4 6 8 15 33 N: Briles 16, Kemp 16, Brink 10. FG 24 (1), FT 16-25. H: Grob 8. FG 11 (2), FT 9-16.

Miller Career 27 30 9 6 72 Carnahan 0 2 0 4 6 M: Seltzer 22, C. Hodges 15, Z. Hodges 10. FG 34 (3), FT 1-7. H: T. Williams 4. FG 3 (0), FT 0-2.

John Burroughs senior hopes career has storybook ending

Cor Jesu 19 0 2 6 27 In. Word 34 0 15 15 64 C: Carlson 8. FG 11 (2), FT 3-9. H: Johnson 18, Morris 18, Jackson-Morris 11. FG 24 (5), FT 11-15.

BY STEVE OVERBEY sTLhighschoolsports.com

Fath.McGivney 7 10 11 4 Dupo 6 6 6 10 F (2-4): Hoppes 13. FG 14 (2), FT 2-8. H (0-7): Jones 16. FG 14 (0), FT 0-2.

32 28

Valley Park 7 11 16 4 38 Liberty 22 16 23 7 68 V: Memisevic 8. FG 16 (3), FT 3-11. H: Kruse 27, Ingle 16, Shaefer 12. FG 24 (5), FT 15-24. Mehlville 9 7 13 6 35 Lindbergh 11 21 10 10 52 H: J. Baudendistel 25. FG 21 (1), FT 9-13. Gateway STEM 4 9 6 5 24 Luth. South 14 15 19 7 55 H: Member-Meneh 23, Lawson 18. FG 21 (0), FT 13-21. Timberland 10 11 11 17 49 Luth. North 7 10 22 16 55 T: Armstrong 25, Kiner 10. FG 17 (1), FT 14-22. H: M. Buford 13, Dukes 10. FG 19 (3), FT 14-24. Troy 2 17 16 St. Charles 11 11 18 T: Edwards 18. FG 18 (4), FT 4-6. H: Chairs 13. FG 17 (3), FT 16-28.

9 13

44 53

St. Clair 8 11 10 16 45 Festus 11 8 22 13 54 S: Buscher 16. FG 19 (4), FT 3-7. H: J. Oetting 14, Frazier 13. FG 22 (6), FT 4-7. Granite City 27 6 6 26 65 Madison 19 0 16 24 59 G: Moore 29, Garrett 15. FG 25 (2), FT 13-16. Alton 10 12 11 10 43 Bellvl. East 16 17 20 8 61 H (5-1): Dowell 14, Rainey 12, Nitz 10. FG 20 (2), FT 19-30.

Windsor 3 6 3 4 Fox 11 13 23 4 W: Kmetz 3, Lynch 3. FG 6 (2), FT 2-9. H: Farrell 18. FG 20 (3), FT 8-14.

16 51

Eureka 8 7 11 20 46 Holt 11 13 2 18 44 E: Farmer 13. FG 13 (5), FT 15-22. H: Starke 12, A. Meyer 10. FG 17 (4), FT 6-10.

GIRLS SWIMMING Timberland 90, Fort Zumwalt West 85 Ursuline 115, St. Dominic 114, Incarnate W. 75 Marquette 150, Mehlville 30

WRESTLING

St.Chas. West 37 Lutheran SC 11 16 13 15 55 S: Poindexter 17. FG 13 (4), FT 7-19. H: Lindesmith 17, A. Ernstmeyer 11. FG 22 (3), FT 8-12.

John Burroughs 54, Lutheran South 15 220: Lawrence Jones, JB, pin Seth Day, 2:50 113: Joseph Bruhn, LS, dec. Sandeep Amarnath, 6-5 120: Adam Banga, JB, pin Carson Heskett, 3:34 138: Evan Williams, JB, pin Andreas Sherman, 5:12 152: Caleb Hughes, JB, pin Andrew Long, 4:20 160: Sam Mulligan, JB, pin Alex Dippold, 1:10 170: Jack Nelson, JB, pin Jacob Guebert, :52 182: Aidan Reid, JB, pin Alex Gardner, 1:44 Won by forfeit JB: Jason Kemp (195), Louis RothweilerLightfoot (285) LS: Brandon Miller (106), Carl Paetow (132) John Burroughs 48, O’Fallon Christian 24 285: Chase McCoy, OC, pin Louis Rothweiler-Lightfoot, 2:32 138: Daniel Motto, OC, pin Evan Williams, :50 160: Sam Mulligan, JB, pin Peter Deschu, :18 220: Lawrence Jones, JB, pin Blake Ayers, 2:45 Won by forfeit JB: Sandeep Amarnath (113), Adam Banga (120), Caleb Hughes (152), Jack Nelson (170), Aidan Reid (182), Jason Kemp (195) OC: Jonathan Cochrum (106), Jacob Ottenlips (145)

Washington 22 14 12 4 52 Union 6 5 4 8 23 W: R. Arnold 18, Hardesty 15. FG 21 (10), FT 0-2. H: Reeser 9. FG 8 (1), FT 6-9.

OTHER SCORES: Rolla 48, Washington 18 Washington 39, Owensville 13 De Smet 41, St. Clair 36 Hazelwood West 48, SLUH 27

GIRLS BASKETBALL Afton 15 16 13 14 58 Hancock 11 9 8 7 35 A: Brown 20, Serra 13, Cherestal 10. FG 23 (6), FT 6-14. H: Stewart 12, Turner 10. FG 13 (2), FT 5-13. Westminster 5 5 7 11 28 Hickman 18 9 13 8 48 W: McKee 12. FG 8 (1), FT 11-14. H: Nichols 21, White 12. FG 22 (2), FT 2-3. DuBourg 17 13 16 12 58 Bayless 3 8 7 5 23 D: Nelson 20, Rackley 12. FG 26 (1), FT 5-16. H: Clemons 7. FG 9 (1), FT 4-5. Borgia 69 Jennings 42 B: Moss 20, Gettemeier 13, Carr 10. FG 23 (3), FT 20-24.

WRITE ON

V. Duchesne 8 8 6 8 30 Ladue 9 13 13 13 48 V: Gast 14. FG 12 (0), FT 6-11. H: Minkler 16, Walker-Foster 14. FG 19 (5), FT 5-11.

Chester 8 10 14 15 47 Gibault 10 3 8 14 35 H (3-2): Deterding 13. FG 13 (1), FT 8-17.

Barat 12 9 21 10 52 Wright City 6 10 12 13 41 B: Reeves 21, Kuan 19. FG 17 (8), FT 10-12.

A. Marquette 12 9 9 24 Civic Mem. 9 18 13 17 H (3-2): Adams 13. FG 18 (5), FT 16-26.

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B7

PAUL KOPSKY • sTLhighschoolsports.com

Leketor Member-Meneh (right) of Lutheran South receives an award for setting the school’s single-season scoring record last season on Tuesday.

Sophia Marusic likes to write. Short stories, fiction, poems. You name it, the John Burroughs girls swimming standout can literate it. Soon, she might be able to put her two passions together. Maybe a story about a young swimmer who got better every year on the way to finally winning a state championship in her last try. The multi-talented Marusic is well on her way to doing just that. Marusic returns for her fourth season in the pool with high hopes after a fifth-place finish in the 200 freestyle at the state meet last February. “I’m really looking forward to this season,” Marusic said. “It’s not only going to be fun, but I think we can be successful, too.” Marusic has a legitimate shot at a top-three finish in the 200, her signature event, as two of the four swimmers who finished ahead of her at the state meet last season graduated. Plus, she and the three other John Burroughs seniors have a top-10 team finish in mind as well. The Bombers gradually have improved from 24th place in the standings at state to 17th in 2015 and 12th last season. And Marusic is one of the main reasons for that progression. “She’s the backbone of our team,” John Burroughs coach Leslie Kehr said. Marusic recorded a state qualifying time in every individual event except the 100 breaststroke last sea-

BEN LOEWNAU • sTLhighschoolsports.com

Sophia Marusic is one of the top returning swimmers for the John Burroughs swimming and diving team after inishing in ifth place in Missouri in the 200 freestyle.

son. She helped her team qualify for state in the 200 medley and 400 freestyle relays and also placed ninth in the 100 butterfly. “You can put her in any event,” senior teammate Katie Jackson said. “And she’ll give it her best. We count on her for almost everything.” Marusic is not your typical 18-year-old. She has a wide variety of interests. In addition to her penchant for writing, she carries a 4.5 grade-point average with a rugged schedule of honors classes. She is not sure of a career path just yet, but the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is at the top of her college list. Marusic’s writing skills are just as impressive as her swimming numbers. The past two summers, she attended the Iowa Young Writers’ Workshop at the University of Iowa and the Sewanee Young Writers’ Conference at the Uni-

versity of the South in Sewanee, Tennessee. And she has the ability to think outside the box. Marusic recently formed a Cloud Club at John Burroughs, a group of students that study cloud formations. “Just a cloud appreciation group,” Marusic said. “We take pictures and admire the formations and things like that.” Marusic also is a big fan of goats. Yes, goats. “That’s something she probably doesn’t want everyone to know,” said Jackson. “She just loves goats. She’s the only person I know that I can say that about.” Marusic is extremely proud of her poetry and short story skills. Her works have been published by several magazines in addition to appearing on a regular basis in the school newspaper. She was awarded a first-place prize at the Nuclear Age Peace

Foundation Poetry Awards in Oct. 2014 for a work called, “Vietnam: January 28, 1973.” A short story called “Here” about family relationships is among her top works, she said. “It’s just something I enjoy doing,” Marusic said. Marusic is a member of the Clayton Shaw Park Tideriders, a club team, and she swims year-round. “That’s one of the things that helps her,” Kehr said. “She’s serious about what she does.” Marusic considers herself a “power swimmer.” She hits the weight room on a regular basis and that increased strength and muscle mass are among the reasons she carries high hopes into the upcoming campaign. “I think we’re all looking forward to this season,” Marusic said. “As a team, we’re all swimming our best and can’t wait to get started.”

GIRLS SWIMMERS TO WATCH Alyssa Lemon, senior, Marquette A top-notch freestylist, Lemon inished second at state in the 500 freestyle and fourth in the 200 last season. She posted the top times in the area in both events. Lemon inished third in both of races as a sophomore.

Evie Mauze, senior, MICDS Returns after a two-year absence from high school swimming. Turned heads as a freshman with a second-place efort in the 500 freestyle. Also helped the 400 free relay team to a fourth-place performance that season.

Franceska Petrosino, junior, Lafayette Swam the leadof leg on the state champion 400 freestyle relay team. Also placed third in the 200 free. Made noise at state as a freshman with a pair of third-place individual inishes.

Maria Newton, sophomore, Parkway West Kick-started the Longhorns’ 400 freestyle and 200 medley relay teams to second-place inishes by swimming the opening leg. Also, came in seventh individually in the 500 freestyle.

Emma Brabham, junior, Francis Howell Brabham burst onto the scene as a freshman, swimming the anchor leg to lead the Vikings to an upset win the 200 freestyle relay. She posted the third-fastest time in the area with a ifth-place inish at state in the 100 butterly last season.

MORE COVERAGE ONLINE Check out STLhighschoolsports.com for stats, box scores, photos and more.

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULES, RESULTS BOYS BASKETBALL -KASKASKIAN CLASSIC at Carlyle Hillsboro, Ill. 47, New Athens 29 Carlyle 52, Woodlawn 40 Okawville vs Hillsboro, Ill., 6 p.m. Wed. Pinckneyville vs Carlyle, 7:30 p.m. Wed. -JERRY BOECKMAN MEMORIAL INVIT. at Vianney Bracket Play Vianney vs. SLUH, 4:30 p.m. Wednesday Eureka 79, Ladue 77 Pool Play Farmington 54, Belleville West 46 Haz. Central vs Belleville West, 6 p.m. Wed. -42ND VALLEY PARK INVITATIONAL at Valley Park Brentwood 70, Brussels 29 Valley Park 79, Crossroads 12

Consolation semiinal Brussels vs Gateway Science, 5 p.m. Wed. Crossroads vs Kennedy, 6:30 p.m. Wed. -ST. CHARLES TIP-OFF CLASSIC at St. Charles Luth. SC vs Luth. South, 5:30 p.m. Wed. Clayton vs St. Charles, 7 p.m. Wed. -SOUTHSIDE CLASSIC at Mehlville Consolation semiinal Mehlville vs Bayless, 3:30 p.m. Wednesday. Windsor vs DuBourg, 5 p.m. Wednesday. Semiinal Afton vs Lindbergh, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. Hancock vs John Burroughs, 8 p.m. Wed. -GERALD LINNEMAN MEMORIAL TIP-OFF Parkway W. vs Parkway C., 7 p.m. Wednesday. Parkway N. vs Parkway S., 7 p.m. Wednesday.

-PATTONVILLE TOURNAMENT Consolation semiinal McCluer vs Univ. City, 3:45 p.m. Wednesday. Trinity vs Haz. East, 5:15 p.m. Wednesday.

-CRYSTAL CITY TOURNAMENT Semiinals Jeferson vs. Saxony Luth., 5:30 p.m., Wed. St. Vincent vs. Crystal City, 7:30 p.m., Wed.

Semiinal Jennings vs Pattonville, 6:45 p.m. Wed. Maplewood-RH vs Whitield, 8:15 p.m. Wed. -46TH TROY INVITATIONAL Consolation semiinal Holt vs Hannibal, 5:30 p.m. Wednesday. Westminster vs FZ South, 4 p.m. Wednesday. Semiinal Troy vs Rock Bridge, 7 p.m. Wednesday. Hickman vs Francis Howell, 8:30 p.m. Wed. -WINFIELD CLASSIC First round, Tuesday Timberland def. North County Chr. O’Fallon Christian 42, Elsberry 36 Fort Zumwalt East 50, Winield 42 Warrenton 65, St. Louis Knights 42

GIRLS BASKETBALL -MONTGOMERY COUNTY INVITATIONAL Consolation semiinal Mont. County vs Wellsville, 5:30 p.m. Wed. Fulton vs Silex, 7 p.m. Wednesday. Semiinal New Haven vs Clopton, 5:30 p.m. Wed. Bowling Green vs Hermann, 7 p.m. Wed. -MARQUETTE TOURNAMENT Consolation semiinal Fort Zumwalt West vs Nerinx Hall, 4 p.m. Marquette vs Summit, 5:30 p.m. Semiinal Lafayette vs Webster Groves, 7 p.m. Francis Howell vs Paciic, 8:30 p.m.

-NORTHWEST-CEDAR HILL TOURNAMENT Semiinals 5:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. -GERALD LINNEMAN MEMORIAL TIP-OFF Parkway W. at Parkway C., 5:30 p.m. Wed. Parkway N. at Parkway S., 5:30 p.m. Wed. -SOUTHSIDE CLASSIC at Afton Consolation semiinal Afton 58, Hancock 35 DuBourg 58, Bayless 23 Semiinal Lindbergh 52, Mehlville 35 Fox 51, Windsor 16 -WINFIELD CLASSIC Consolation semiinal Hannibal vs Warrenton JV, 3:30 p.m. Wed. Fort Zumwalt East vs Winield, 5 p.m. Wed. Semiinal Trinity vs Lift For Life , 6:30 p.m. Wed. Elsberry vs North Tech, 8 p.m. Wed.

-LUTHERAN ST. CHARLES TOURNAMENT Semiinal Francis Howell Central vs MICDS, 5:30 p.m. Wednesday. Luth. SC vs. Luth. North, 7 p.m. Wednesday. -KENNEDY TOURNAMENT Semiinal Grandview vs Principia, 5 p.m. Wednesday. Liberty vs. Herculaneum, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. -LUTHERAN SOUTH ROUND ROBIN Borgia 69, Jennings 42 Luth. South 55, Gateway STEM 24 -29TH TROY CLASSIC First round Hickman 48, Westminster 28 FZ South 37, St. Dominic 30 St. Charles 53, Troy 44 Eureka 46, Holt 44

WEDNESDAY’S NON-TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE BOYS BASKETBALL

WRESTLING

McCluer at University City, 3:45 p.m. St. Louis U. High at Vianney, 4:30 p.m. Metro at Cleveland, 5 p.m. Trinity at Hazelwood East, 5:15 p.m. Conluence at Harrisburg, 5:30 p.m. Holt vs. Hannibal, at Troy, 5:30 p.m. Lift For Life at Miller Career, 6 p.m. Medicine and Biosc vs. McKinley, at Cleveland, 6:30 p.m. Jennings at Pattonville, 6:45 p.m. Cahokia at Hazelwood West, 7 p.m. Pinckneyville at Carlyle, 7:30 p.m. Columbia at Wesclin, 7:30 p.m. Roosevelt at Murphysboro, 7:45 p.m.

at Liberty, 5 p.m. Holt and Liberty at Warrenton, 5 p.m. Hannibal, Helias and Warrenton at Battle, 5:30 p.m. Troy and Battle at Fort Zumwalt North, 6 p.m. Oakville, Fort Zumwalt North and Summit at Lafayette, 6 p.m. Timberland and Lafayette at Francis Howell, 6 p.m. Fort Zumwalt South and Francis Howell at St. Charles West, 6 p.m. FH North and St. Charles West at Northwest-CH, 7:30 p.m. FH Central and Northwest-CH

GIRLS BASKETBALL Fort Zumwalt East at Winield, 5 p.m. Medicine and Biosc at Soldan, 6 p.m. John Burroughs vs. Metro, at Matthews-D., 6 p.m. Belleville West at Mater Dei, 6 p.m. Alton Marquette at Dupo, 6 p.m. Cleveland vs. Roosevelt, at Gateway STEM, 6 p.m. Ritenour at Clayton, 6 p.m. Belleville East at O’Fallon, 7:30 p.m. Crystal City at Valle Catholic, 7:30 p.m.

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH TICKET USE PROMO CODE SLUSTL AT SLUBILLIKENS.COM FOR $10.00 TICKETS

GIRLS SWIMMING at Rec-Plex, 3:30 p.m. St. Dominic and Fort Zumwalt North at Ritenour, 4 p.m. Hazelwood Central and Ritenour

SEEKING AREA COLLEGE SIGNINGS STLhighschoolsports.com will publish a list of area athletes who sign, as well as a small colleges list that includes commitments to NCAA Division III, NAIA and junior college institutions. Submissions to the lists will be accepted from the university or from the high school coach or athletics director via email to chollway@post-dispatch.com. Include irst and last name, high school, sport and university. No faxes or phone calls, please.

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FOR THE RECORD

B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 11.30.2016

AMERICA’S LINE

MLS PLAYOFFS

GOLF • HOLES IN ONE

NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE

NFL Favorite Open Current Underdog Thursday Cowboys 3.5 3.5 VIKINGS Sunday Broncos 5 5 JAGUARS FALCONS 3.5 3.5 Chiefs PACKERS 6 6 Texans Eagles 1.5 1.5 BENGALS SAINTS 5 5.5 Lions BEARS 2.5 2.5 49ers PATRIOTS 13.5 13.5 Rams RAVENS 3.5 3.5 Dolphins RAIDERS 3.5 3 Bills CHARGERS 4 4 Bucs CARDS 2.5 2.5 Washington STEELERS 5.5 6 Giants SEAHAWKS 6.5 6.5 Panthers Monday Colts 1 1 JETS Bye week: Browns, Titans. COLLEGE FOOTBALL Favorite Open Current Underdog Friday MAC Championship Game | Detroit, MI W Michigan 18.5 18.5 Ohio U PAC 12 Championship | Santa Clara, CA Washington 7 7.5 Colorado Saturday W VIRGINIA 16 17 Baylor TCU 4 4 Kansas St S ALABAMA 11.5 11.5 New Mexico St Troy 8.5 7.5 GA SOUTHERN UL-Lafayette 7 7 UL-MONROE OKLAHOMA 13 12 Oklahoma St Arkansas St 23 23.5 TEXAS ST IDAHO 7 6.5 Georgia St Saturday Conf. USA Championship | Bowling Green W KENTUCKY 7.5 9.5 La Tech AAC Championship Game | Annapolis, MD NAVY 3 3 Temple SEC Championship Game | Atlanta, GA Alabama 23 24 Florida Mountain West Championship | Laramie, WY San Diego St 6 7 WYOMING ACC Championship Game | Charlotte, NC Clemson 9 10 Va Tech BIG 10 Championship | Indianapolis, IN Wisconsin 3 2.5 Penn St NBA Favorite Points Underdog Kings 5 76ERS RAPTORS 10.5 Grizzlies CELTICS 8 Pistons THUNDER 5 Wizards T’WOLVES 3 Knicks BULLS 10 Lakers Spurs 9 MAVERICKS NUGGETS 5.5 Heat Hawks 5.5 SUNS BLAZERS 8 Pacers COLLEGE BASKETBALL Favorite Points Underdog E Michigan 7 DETROIT Northeastern 2.5 CORNELL CHARLOTTE 4.5 James Madison OLD DOMINION 14.5 Dartmouth ELON 10.5 Florida Int’l MIAMI-FLORIDA 16.5 Rutgers MICHIGAN 4.5 Virginia Tech LOUISVILLE 6.5 Purdue MARSHALL PK Ohio U GEORGIA ST 7.5 Wright St NC-Wilmington 5.5 W MICHIGAN TCU 7.5 Washington ST. JOSEPH’S 1 Temple INDIANA ST 5 No Illinois S Alabama 3.5 SOUTHERN MISS NORTHERN IOWA 14 George Mason MISSISSIPPI 5 Middle Tenn St KANSAS ST 13.5 Wisc-Green Bay ARKANSAS ST 6 Cleveland St DEPAUL 9.5 Drake CLEMSON 10.5 Nebraska Smu 5 BOISE ST s-Byu 8.5 Utah St COLORADO 14 Colorado St N Carolina 4 INDIANA VIRGINIA 10 Ohio St CALIFORNIA 13.5 Louisiana Tech Usc 16 SAN DIEGO SANTA CLARA 1 Cal-Irvine St. Mary’s-CA 2 STANFORD UCLA 24 Cal-Riverside Added Games MOREHEAD ST 6.5 No Kentucky ILLINOIS ST 10.5 Iupui Ipfw 5 AUSTIN PEAY ST. BONA 7.5 Siena E KENTUCKY 1 W Kentucky MARQUETTE 25 W Carolina WYOMING 7 Denver Unlv 9.5 SOUTHERN UTAH Nebraska-Omaha 3.5 CS-FULLERTON s- Salt Lake City, UT. NHL Favorite Odds Underdog Penguins -$145/+$125 ISLANDERS FLAMES -$135/+$115 Maple Leafs KINGS -$140/+$120 Sharks Grand Salami: Over/under 16.5 goals. Home team in CAPS © 2016 Benjamin Eckstein

Eastern Conference Montreal 3, Toronto FC 2 Wednesday: Montreal at Toronto FC, 6 p.m. Western Conference Seattle 2, Colorado 1, Seattle 1, Colorado 0 Seattle advances 3-1 on aggregate MLS Cup Dec. 10: Seattle vs. Montreal or Toronto FC

Pomme Creek • Ernie Perez, hole No. 17, 110 yards, wedge, Nov. 22.

AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L New England 9 2 Miami 7 4 Buffalo 6 5 N.Y. Jets 3 8 South W L Houston 6 5 Tennessee 6 6 Indianapolis 5 6 Jacksonville 2 9 North W L Baltimore 6 5 Pittsburgh 6 5 Cincinnati 3 7 Cleveland 0 12 West W L Oakland 9 2 Kansas City 8 3 Denver 7 4 San Diego 5 6

Birch Creek • Ralph Tiffany, hole No. 16, 120 yards, 9-iron. Forest Park • John Mazzola, hole No. 5 (Dogwood), 115 yards, 9-iron, Nov. 29.

COLLEGES Area colleges

Women’s basketball top 25

Women’s volleyball NAIA: Jamestown (N.D.) 3, Missouri Baptist 2 Women’s basketball SLU 89, SEMO 50 STLCC 57, Missouri Baptist JV 31 Men’s basketball Bradley 87, Eastern Illinois 83, OT

1. 2.

WEDNESDAY BASKETBALL SCHEDULE W: Olney Central at SW Illinois, 5:30 p.m. W: Greenville at Webster, 6 p.m. M: RMU-Springfield at Lindenwood, 7 p.m. M: Olney Central at SW Illinois, 7:30 p.m. M: Greenville at Webster, 8 p.m. M: Fontbonne at Westminster, 8 p.m.

5.

Football

9.

3. 4.

6. 7. 8.

TOP 25 SCHEDULE Friday No. 4 Washington vs. No. 9 Colorado, Pac-12 championship at Santa Clara, Calif., 8 p.m. No. 13 Western Michigan vs. Ohio, MAC championship at Detroit, 6 p.m. Saturday No. 1 Alabama vs. No. 15 Florida, SEC championship at Atlanta, 3 p.m. No. 3 Clemson vs. No. 19 Virginia Tech, ACC championship at Orlando, Fla., 7 p.m. No. 6 Wisconsin vs. No. 8 Penn State, Big Ten championship at Indianapolis, 7:17 p.m. No. 7 Oklahoma vs. No. 11 Oklahoma State, 11:20 a.m. No. 14 West Virginia vs. Baylor, 2:30 p.m. No. 20 Navy vs. Temple, AAC championship, 11 a.m.

CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIPS FRIDAY Mid-American: Ohio vs. Western Michigan at Detroit, 6 p.m., ESPN2 Pac-12: Washington vs. Colorado at Santa Clara, Calif. , 8 p.m., KTVI (2) SATURDAY American Athletic: Temple at Navy, 11 a.m., KDNL (30) Conference USA: Louisiana Tech at Western Kentucky, 11 a.m., ESPN Southeastern: Alabama vs. Florida at Atlanta, 3 p.m., KMOV (4) Southwestern Athletic: Alcorn State vs. Grambling State, 3 p.m., ESPNU Mountain West: San Diego State at Wyoming, 6:45 p.m., ESPN Atlantic Coast: Clemson vs. Virginia Tech at Orlando, Fla., 7 p.m., KDNL (30) Big Ten: Wisconsin vs. Penn State at Indianapolis, 7:15 p.m., KTVI (2)

FCS PLAYOFFS Second Round | Saturday New Hampshire (8-4) at James Madison (10-1), 1 p.m. Youngstown St. (9-3) at Jacksonville St. (10-1), 1 p.m. Villanova (9-3) at S. Dakota St. (8-3), 2 p.m. Chattanooga (9-3) at Sam Houston St. (11-0), 2 p.m. San Diego (10-1) at North Dakota St. (10-1), 2:30 p.m. Central Arkansas (10-2) at Eastern Washington (10-1), 3 p.m. Wofford (9-3) at The Citadel (10-1), 5 p.m. Richmond (9-3) at North Dakota (9-2), 5 p.m.

DIVISION II PLAYOFFS Quarterfinals | Saturday Shepherd (12-0) at California (Pa.) (11-0), Noon Ferris St. (11-2) at Grand Valley St. (12-0), Noon Harding (13-0) at NW Missouri St. (12-0), 1 p.m. N. Greenville (9-4) at N. Alabama (9-1), 1 p.m.

DIVISION III PLAYOFFS Quarterfinals | Saturday Mount Union (11-1) at Alfred (12-0), 11 a.m. Wisconsin-Whitewater (13-0) at John Carroll (11-1), 11 a.m. Wheaton (11-1) at Mary Hardin-Baylor (12-0), Noon Wisconsin-Oshkosh (11-1) at St. Thomas (Minn.) (12-0), Noon

10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25.

Notre Dame (6-0) Next: at Iowa, Wed. UConn (5-0) beat Chattanooga 80-43. Next: vs. No. 15 DePaul, Thursday. South Carolina (5-0) Next: at No. 14 Texas, Thursday. Baylor (7-1) Next: vs. Abilene Christian, Thursday. Maryland (6-0) Next: at No. 7 Louisville, Thursday. Mississippi State (7-0) Next: at Iowa State, Saturday. Louisville (6-1) Next: vs. No. 5 Maryland, Thursday. Florida State (6-1) Next: at Minnesota, Wednesday. Ohio State (5-2) Next: vs. No. 18 Miami, Thursday. UCLA (5-1) Next: vs. Hawaii, Sunday. Stanford (6-1) Next: at Cal State Bakersfield, Thursday. Oklahoma (5-0) Next: at No. 17 Kentucky, Thursday. Washington (6-1) Next: at Grand Canyon, Thursday. Texas (2-2) Next: vs. No. 3 South Carolina, Thursday. DePaul (5-1) Next: at No. 2 UConn, Thur. West Virginia (7-0) Next: vs. Morehead State, Wednesday. Kentucky (5-1) Next: vs. No. 12 Oklahoma, Thursday. Miami (5-1) Next: at No. 9 Ohio State, Thursday. Florida (4-1) Next: vs. Wofford, Wed. Syracuse (4-3) Next: vs. Michigan State, Wednesday. Colorado (6-0) Next: vs. Southeastern Louisiana, Wed. Tennessee (3-2) Next: vs. Tennessee State, Wednesday. Auburn (6-1) Next: at Kansas St., Thur. Oregon State (3-1) Next: vs. Idaho, Fri. Texas A&M (5-0) Next: vs. Southern Cal, Wednesday.

Men’s basketball scores East American U. 57, W. Illinois 50 Colgate 91, Union (NY) 68 Delaware St. 79, St. John’s 72 G. Wash. 77, Harvard 74 Hofstra 88, Columbia 86 Marist 81, Mass.-Lowell 69 Penn St. 67, Georgia Tech 60 Villanova 82, Penn 57 South Alabama 76, Charleston S. 46 Auburn 90, SC-Upstate 83 Belmont 64, Lipscomb 62 Chattanooga 68, Coast. Carolina 52 Davidson 78, Mercer 57 East Carolina 68, Hampton 48 Florida G.C. 120, Ave Maria 60 Gard.-Webb 102, Coker 54 Jacksonville St. 72, Alabama St. 69 Liberty 62, Central Penn College 48 New Orleans 74, Tulane 59 Pittsburgh 73, Maryland 59 Southern U. 91, Paul Quinn College 79 UAB 75, Alabama A&M 45 UNC-Asheville 68, Brevard College 48 UNC-Greensboro 86, NC A&T 66 UT Martin 82, FAU 81 VCU 81, Princeton 70 Vanderbilt 83, Tennessee St. 59 Wofford 79, Mars Hill 76 Midwest Ball St. 92, Indiana-Kokomo 52 Bowling Green 86, Notre Dame College 60 Bradley 87, E. Illinois 83 Cent. Michigan 91, William & Mary 81 Creighton 93, Buffalo 72 Kansas 91, Long Beach St. 61 S. Illinois 89, Murray St. 85 Samford 68, Saint Louis 64 Valparaiso 65, Rhode Island 62 Wichita St. 87, Southern Nazarene 57 Wisconsin 77, Syracuse 60 Xavier 85, N. Dakota St. 55 Southwest Oklahoma 87, N. Colorado 66 Texas A&M-CC 84, Rio Grande 68 Texas State 80, McNeese St. 68 Texas-Arlington 72, Texas 61 UALR 89, Cent. Arkansas 87

T 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 1 0 T 0 0 0 0

Pct .818 .636 .545 .273 Pct .545 .500 .455 .182 Pct .545 .545 .318 .000 Pct .818 .727 .636 .455

Thursday Dallas at Minnesota, 7:25 p.m., KSDK-5, NFL Net. Sunday Kansas City at Atlanta, noon, KMOV-4 Los Angeles at New England, noon, KTVI-2 Philadelphia at Cincinnati, noon

NFL LEADERS SCORING NONKICKERS David Johnson, ARI Blount, NE E. Elliott, DAL Gordon, SD D. Murray, TEN Mi. Evans, TAM L. McCoy, BUF Anto. Brown, PIT L. Murray, OAK Jo. Nelson, GBY KICKERS Du. Hopkins, WAS Santos, KC Sturgis, PHL Tucker, BAL Lambo, SD D. Bailey, DAL McManus, DEN Janikowski, OAK Crosby, GBY Lutz, NOR Novak, HOU PASSERS Brady, NE M. Ryan, ATL Brees, NOR Prescott, DAL Mariota, TEN Cousins, WAS D. Carr, OAK Roethlisb..., PIT M. Stafford, DET Bradford, MIN Hoyer, CHI Rodgers, GBY Tannehill, MIA Luck, IND Rivers, SD Ru. Wilson, SEA Kessler, CLE Manning, NYG Dalton, CIN Al. Smith, KC J. Winston, TAM

TDRusRecRetX2Pts 13 10 3 0 0 78 12 12 0 0 0 72 12 11 1 0 0 72 11 9 2 0 0 66 11 8 3 0 0 66 10 0 10 0 1 62 10 9 1 0 1 62 10 0 10 0 0 60 9 9 0 0 0 54 9 0 9 0 0 54 PAT FG Lg Pts 25/27 25/31 50 100 21/22 25/28 54 96 21/22 25/29 55 96 15/15 27/27 57 96 32/35 21/24 47 95 34/34 20/22 56 94 25/26 23/27 55 94 29/29 20/26 56 89 26/28 20/23 46 86 38/39 16/22 57 86 17/18 23/28 53 86

Att Cmp Pct Yds TD Int 256 175 68.4 2201 18 1 380 262 68.9 3516 26 6 456 326 71.5 3587 30 8 340 231 67.9 2835 18 2 378 243 64.3 2998 25 8 437 299 68.4 3540 20 7 423 281 66.4 3115 22 5 373 242 64.9 2745 23 7 391 261 66.8 2883 19 5 348 248 71.3 2415 12 3 200 134 67 1445 6 0 449 289 64.4 3074 27 7 329 217 66 2574 15 8 375 236 62.9 2827 19 8 399 251 62.9 3128 23 12 368 238 64.7 2865 11 4 192 126 65.6 1369 6 2 413 261 63.2 2902 20 10 408 259 63.5 3043 12 6 346 229 66.2 2297 10 4 406 249 61.3 2900 22 11

PF 293 249 281 196 PF 194 308 270 214 PF 218 266 213 197 PF 307 252 266 313

PA 197 240 236 266 PA 236 296 301 293 PA 201 222 245 352 PA 275 214 219 291

NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L Dallas 10 1 N.Y. Giants 8 3 Washington 6 4 Philadelphia 5 6 South W L Atlanta 7 4 Tampa Bay 6 5 New Orleans 5 6 Carolina 4 7 North W L Detroit 7 4 Minnesota 6 5 Green Bay 5 6 Chicago 2 9 West W L Seattle 7 3 Arizona 4 6 Los Angeles 4 7 San Francisco 1 10

T 0 0 1 0 T 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0 T 1 1 0 0

Pct .909 .727 .591 .455 Pct .636 .545 .455 .364 Pct .636 .545 .455 .182 Pct .682 .409 .364 .091

PF 316 231 280 254 PF 358 249 334 276 PF 247 218 274 178 PF 224 245 170 228

PA 213 213 264 213 PA 302 264 307 281 PA 238 192 289 264 PA 187 228 236 344

Miami at Baltimore, noon Denver at Jacksonville, noon Detroit at New Orleans, noon San Francisco at Chicago, noon Houston at Green Bay, noon Buffalo at Oakland, 3:05 p.m. Washington at Arizona, 3:25 p.m.

Tampa Bay at San Diego, 3:25 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Pittsburgh, 3:25 p.m., KTVI-2 Carolina at Seattle, 7:30 p.m., KSDK-5 Open: Tennessee, Cleveland Monday Indianapolis at N.Y. Jets, 7:30 p.m., ESPN

RECEIVERS

Gore, IND Je. Hill, CIN Gurley, LA Crowell, CLE T. West, BAL C. Hyde, SNF

RECEPTIONS No Yds Avg Long TD Anto. Brown, PIT 82 998 12.2 51 10 Fitzgerald, ARI 78 802 10.3 32 5 Mi. Evans, TAM 73 1020 14.0 45t 10 S. Diggs, MIN 67 747 11.1 46 2 A. Green, CIN 66 964 14.6 54t 4 A. Cooper, OAK 66 922 14.0 64t 3 Ju. Jones, ATL 65 1140 17.5 75t 5 Beckham, NYG 65 915 14.1 75t 8 Michael Thomas, NOR 65 789 12.1 35 7 Landry, MIA 64 733 11.5 42t 2 Edelman, NE 64 617 9.6 33 2 T. Pryor, CLE 62 855 13.8 54 4 Sanders, DEN 61 830 13.6 64 4 Baldwin, SEA 61 767 12.6 59 5 Jo. Nelson, GBY 61 754 12.4 58 9 YARDS Yds No Avg Long TD Ju. Jones, ATL 1140 65 17.5 75t 5 Mi. Evans, TAM 1020 73 14.0 45t 10 Anto. Brown, PIT 998 82 12.2 51 10 A. Green, CIN 964 66 14.6 54t 4 Hilton, IND 942 60 15.7 63t 5 A. Cooper, OAK 922 66 14.0 64t 3 Beckham, NYG 915 65 14.1 75t 8 T. Pryor, CLE 855 62 13.8 54 4 Sanders, DEN 830 61 13.6 64 4 Fitzgerald, ARI 802 78 10.3 32 5 M. Wallace, BAL 792 51 15.5 95t 4 Olsen, CAR 790 58 13.6 78t 3 Ty. Williams, SD 790 51 15.5 51t 5 Michael Thomas, NOR 789 65 12.1 35 7 K. Britt, LA 788 54 14.6 47 4 RUSHERS E. Elliott, DAL D. Murray, TEN David Johnson, ARI Gordon, SD L. Miller, HOU Blount, NE Ajayi, MIA L. McCoy, BUF Jo. Howard, CHI Forte, NYJ D. Freeman, ATL Ma. Ingram, NOR S. Ware, KC L. Bell, PIT

Att 243 229 210 234 211 212 161 157 149 202 161 136 149 151

YdsAvg 1199 4.9 1043 4.6 921 4.4 908 3.9 881 4.2 869 4.1 847 5.3 819 5.2 766 5.1 759 3.8 729 4.5 721 5.3 705 4.7 699 4.6

LngTD 60t 11 75t 8 58t 10 48 9 45 3 44 12 62t 7 75t 9 69 2 32 7 48 5 75t 3 46 2 44 3

178 147 200 145 153 154

TOTAL YARDS David Johnson, ARI E. Elliott, DAL D. Murray, TEN Gordon, SD Ju. Jones, ATL L. Bell, PIT S. Ware, KC L. Miller, HOU Mi. Evans, TAM Jo. Howard, CHI Anto. Brown, PIT D. Freeman, ATL L. McCoy, BUF Ma. Ingram, NOR A. Green, CIN KICK RETURNERS Patterson, MIN Erickson, CIN Cunningham, LA Dw. Harris, NYG Hester, BAL Lockett, SEA B. Tate, BUF J. Grant, MIA Weems, ATL

670 3.8 22 4 644 4.4 74t 6 641 3.2 24t 4 605 4.2 85t 5 600 3.9 35 4 594 3.9 34 6

Total Rush 1534 921 1502 1199 1352 1043 1273 908 1140 0 1136 699 1077 705 1032 881 1020 0 1008 766 1007 9 998 729 994 819 969 721 964 0 No Yards 16 500 15 451 18 507 16 410 16 409 14 348 15 367 14 341 16 374

INTERCEPTIONS Hayward, SD Lan. Collins, NYG M. Peters, KC Rhodes, MIN Gilmore, BUF R. Sherman, SEA

Int 6 5 5 4 4 4

Rec 613 303 309 365 1140 437 372 151 1020 242 998 269 175 248 964

Avg Long TD 31.2 104t 1 30.1 84 0 28.2 61 0 25.6 46 0 25.6 60 0 24.9 43 0 24.5 45 0 24.4 45 0 23.4 42 0 Yds Long TD 100 31 1 72 44t 1 47 28 0 129 100t 1 104 49 0 37 31 0

SACKS • V. Miller, DEN, 12.5; L. Alexander, BUF, 10.0; Avril, SEA, 10.0; Ford, KC, 10.0; V. Beasley, ATL, 9.5; Kerrigan, WAS, 9.0; K. Mack, OAK, 9.0; Orakpo, TEN, 9.0; Wake, MIA, 8.5; Cha. Jones, ARI, 8.0; De. Morgan, TEN, 8.0; N. Perry, GBY, 8.0; Suggs, BAL, 8.0; Walden, IND, 8.0.

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL • NL MILWAUKEE — Designated 1B Chris Carter and OF Adam Walker for assignment. Agreed to terms with 1B Eric Thames on a three-year contract. Claimed RHP Steve Geltz off waivers from Tampa Bay. CARDINALS — Released C Brayan Pena. Named Dr. George Paletta Jr. head orthopedic physician, Dr.’s Lyndon Gross, Husam Nawas, Mahesh Bagwe and Julienne Lippe team orthopedists, Dr. Charles Rehm chief medical administrative officer and Dr. Adam Fedyk vision consultant. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association PHILADELPHIA — Assigned G/F Timothe Luwawu-Cabarrot to Delaware (NBADL). NBA Development League DELAWARE — Released C Jordan

Railey and G Roberto Nelson. Added G Von Wafer to the active roster. FOOTBALL • NFL NFL — Suspended Buffalo OT Seantrel Henderson 10 games for violating the NFL Policy and Program for Substances of Abuse. ARIZONA — Re-signed WR Chris Hubert to the practice squad. BUFFALO — Signed DT Deandre Coleman and WR Dezmin Lewis from the practice squad and TE Gerald Christian to the practice squad. CAROLINA — Placed Cs Ryan Kalil and Gino Gradkowski on injured reserve. Signed C Ryan Wendell. Signed OT Dan France from Cleveland’s practice squad. CHICAGO — Placed LB Danny Trevathan on injured reserve. Signed WR Daniel Braverman. Signed TE Justin

Perillo to the practice squad. SAN FRANCISCO — Placed LB Shane Skov on IR. Signed S Marcus Ball from practice squad and LB Wynton McManis to practice squad. TAMPA BAY — Waived RB Mike James. Agreed to terms with S Major Wright. Waived WR Louis Murphy from the PUP list. TENNESSEE — Signed CB D’Joun Smith to the practice squad. HOCKEY • NHL LW Travis Moen announced his retirement. SOCCER • MLS MINNESOTA U. — Named Adrian Heath coach. SPORTING KANSAS CITY — Signed manager and technical director Peter Vermes to a contract extension through the 2019 season. COLLEGE SIU EDWARDSVILLE — Named Paul Dodson assistant athletic director of marketing.

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FOR THE RECORD

B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • WeDneSDAy • 11.30.2016

AMERICA’S LINE

MLS PLAYOFFS

GOLF • HOLES IN ONE

NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE

NFL Favorite Open Current Underdog Thursday Cowboys 3.5 3.5 VIKINGS Sunday Broncos 5 5 JAGUARS FALCONS 3.5 3.5 Chiefs PACKERS 6 6 Texans Eagles 1.5 1.5 BENGALS SAINTS 5 5.5 Lions BEARS 2.5 2.5 49ers PATRIOTS 13.5 13.5 Rams RAVENS 3.5 3.5 Dolphins RAIDERS 3.5 3 Bills CHARGERS 4 4 Bucs CARDS 2.5 2.5 Washington STEELERS 5.5 6 Giants SEAHAWKS 6.5 6.5 Panthers Monday Colts 1 1 JETS Bye week: Browns, Titans. COLLEGE FOOTBALL Favorite Open Current Underdog Friday MAC Championship Game | Detroit, MI W Michigan 18.5 18.5 Ohio U PAC 12 Championship | Santa Clara, CA Washington 7 7.5 Colorado Saturday W VIRGINIA 16 17 Baylor TCU 4 4 Kansas St S ALABAMA 11.5 11.5 New Mexico St Troy 8.5 7.5 GA SOUTHERN UL-Lafayette 7 7 UL-MONROE OKLAHOMA 13 12 Oklahoma St Arkansas St 23 23.5 TEXAS ST IDAHO 7 6.5 Georgia St Saturday Conf. USA Championship | Bowling Green W KENTUCKY 7.5 9.5 La Tech AAC Championship Game | Annapolis, MD NAVY 3 3 Temple SEC Championship Game | Atlanta, GA Alabama 23 24 Florida Mountain West Championship | Laramie, WY San Diego St 6 7 WYOMING ACC Championship Game | Charlotte, NC Clemson 9 10 Va Tech BIG 10 Championship | Indianapolis, IN Wisconsin 3 2.5 Penn St NBA Favorite Points Underdog Kings 5 76ERS RAPTORS 10.5 Grizzlies CELTICS 8 Pistons THUNDER 5 Wizards T’WOLVES 3 Knicks BULLS 10 Lakers Spurs 9 MAVERICKS NUGGETS 5.5 Heat Hawks 5.5 SUNS BLAZERS 8 Pacers COLLEGE BASKETBALL Favorite Points Underdog E Michigan 7 DETROIT Northeastern 2.5 CORNELL CHARLOTTE 4.5 James Madison OLD DOMINION 14.5 Dartmouth ELON 10.5 Florida Int’l MIAMI-FLORIDA 16.5 Rutgers MICHIGAN 4.5 Virginia Tech LOUISVILLE 6.5 Purdue MARSHALL PK Ohio U GEORGIA ST 7.5 Wright St NC-Wilmington 5.5 W MICHIGAN TCU 7.5 Washington ST. JOSEPH’S 1 Temple INDIANA ST 5 No Illinois S Alabama 3.5 SOUTHERN MISS NORTHERN IOWA 14 George Mason MISSISSIPPI 5 Middle Tenn St KANSAS ST 13.5 Wisc-Green Bay ARKANSAS ST 6 Cleveland St DEPAUL 9.5 Drake CLEMSON 10.5 Nebraska Smu 5 BOISE ST s-Byu 8.5 Utah St COLORADO 14 Colorado St N Carolina 4 INDIANA VIRGINIA 10 Ohio St CALIFORNIA 13.5 Louisiana Tech Usc 16 SAN DIEGO SANTA CLARA 1 Cal-Irvine St. Mary’s-CA 2 STANFORD UCLA 24 Cal-Riverside Added Games MOREHEAD ST 6.5 No Kentucky ILLINOIS ST 10.5 Iupui Ipfw 5 AUSTIN PEAY ST. BONA 7.5 Siena E KENTUCKY 1 W Kentucky MARQUETTE 25 W Carolina WYOMING 7 Denver Unlv 9.5 SOUTHERN UTAH Nebraska-Omaha 3.5 CS-FULLERTON s- Salt Lake City, UT. NHL Favorite Odds Underdog Penguins -$145/+$125 ISLANDERS FLAMES -$135/+$115 Maple Leafs KINGS -$140/+$120 Sharks Grand Salami: Over/under 16.5 goals. Home team in CAPS © 2016 Benjamin Eckstein

Eastern Conference Montreal 3, Toronto FC 2 Wednesday: Montreal at Toronto FC, 6 p.m. Western Conference Seattle 2, Colorado 1, Seattle 1, Colorado 0 Seattle advances 3-1 on aggregate MLS Cup Dec. 10: Seattle vs. Montreal or Toronto FC

Pomme Creek • Ernie Perez, hole No. 17, 110 yards, wedge, Nov. 22.

COLLEGES

Women’s basketball top 25

Area colleges

1. 2.

AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L New England 9 2 Miami 7 4 Buffalo 6 5 N.Y. Jets 3 8 South W L Houston 6 5 Tennessee 6 6 Indianapolis 5 6 Jacksonville 2 9 North W L Baltimore 6 5 Pittsburgh 6 5 Cincinnati 3 7 Cleveland 0 12 West W L Oakland 9 2 Kansas City 8 3 Denver 7 4 San Diego 5 6

Women’s volleyball NAIA: Jamestown (N.D.) 3, Missouri Baptist 2 Women’s basketball SLU 89, SEMO 50 STLCC 57, Missouri Baptist JV 31 Men’s basketball Bradley 87, Eastern Illinois 83, OT WEDNESDAY BASKETBALL SCHEDULE W: Olney Central at SW Illinois, 5:30 p.m. W: Greenville at Webster, 6 p.m. M: RMU-Springfield at Lindenwood, 7 p.m. M: Olney Central at SW Illinois, 7:30 p.m. M: Greenville at Webster, 8 p.m. M: Fontbonne at Westminster, 8 p.m.

Football TOP 25 SCHEDULE Friday No. 4 Washington vs. No. 9 Colorado, Pac-12 championship at Santa Clara, Calif., 8 p.m. No. 13 Western Michigan vs. Ohio, MAC championship at Detroit, 6 p.m. Saturday No. 1 Alabama vs. No. 15 Florida, SEC championship at Atlanta, 3 p.m. No. 3 Clemson vs. No. 19 Virginia Tech, ACC championship at Orlando, Fla., 7 p.m. No. 6 Wisconsin vs. No. 8 Penn State, Big Ten championship at Indianapolis, 7:17 p.m. No. 7 Oklahoma vs. No. 11 Oklahoma State, 11:20 a.m. No. 14 West Virginia vs. Baylor, 2:30 p.m. No. 20 Navy vs. Temple, AAC championship, 11 a.m.

CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIPS FRIDAY Mid-American: Ohio vs. Western Michigan at Detroit, 6 p.m., ESPN2 Pac-12: Washington vs. Colorado at Santa Clara, Calif. , 8 p.m., KTVI (2) SATURDAY American Athletic: Temple at Navy, 11 a.m., KDNL (30) Conference USA: Louisiana Tech at Western Kentucky, 11 a.m., ESPN Southeastern: Alabama vs. Florida at Atlanta, 3 p.m., KMOV (4) Southwestern Athletic: Alcorn State vs. Grambling State, 3 p.m., ESPNU Mountain West: San Diego State at Wyoming, 6:45 p.m., ESPN Atlantic Coast: Clemson vs. Virginia Tech at Orlando, Fla., 7 p.m., KDNL (30) Big Ten: Wisconsin vs. Penn State at Indianapolis, 7:15 p.m., KTVI (2)

FCS PLAYOFFS Second Round | Saturday New Hampshire (8-4) at James Madison (10-1), 1 p.m. Youngstown St. (9-3) at Jacksonville St. (10-1), 1 p.m. Villanova (9-3) at S. Dakota St. (8-3), 2 p.m. Chattanooga (9-3) at Sam Houston St. (11-0), 2 p.m. San Diego (10-1) at North Dakota St. (10-1), 2:30 p.m. Central Arkansas (10-2) at Eastern Washington (10-1), 3 p.m. Wofford (9-3) at The Citadel (10-1), 5 p.m. Richmond (9-3) at North Dakota (9-2), 5 p.m.

DIVISION II PLAYOFFS Quarterfinals | Saturday Shepherd (12-0) at California (Pa.) (11-0), Noon Ferris St. (11-2) at Grand Valley St. (12-0), Noon Harding (13-0) at NW Missouri St. (12-0), 1 p.m. N. Greenville (9-4) at N. Alabama (9-1), 1 p.m.

DIVISION III PLAYOFFS Quarterfinals | Saturday Mount Union (11-1) at Alfred (12-0), 11 a.m. Wisconsin-Whitewater (13-0) at John Carroll (11-1), 11 a.m. Wheaton (11-1) at Mary Hardin-Baylor (12-0), Noon Wisconsin-Oshkosh (11-1) at St. Thomas (Minn.) (12-0), Noon

Birch Creek • Ralph Tiffany, hole No. 16, 120 yards, 9-iron. Forest Park • John Mazzola, hole No. 5 (Dogwood), 115 yards, 9-iron, Nov. 29.

3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25.

Notre Dame (6-0) Next: at Iowa, Wed. UConn (5-0) beat Chattanooga 80-43. Next: vs. No. 15 DePaul, Thursday. South Carolina (5-0) Next: at No. 14 Texas, Thursday. Baylor (7-1) Next: vs. Abilene Christian, Thursday. Maryland (6-0) Next: at No. 7 Louisville, Thursday. Mississippi State (7-0) Next: at Iowa State, Saturday. Louisville (6-1) Next: vs. No. 5 Maryland, Thursday. Florida State (6-1) Next: at Minnesota, Wednesday. Ohio State (5-2) Next: vs. No. 18 Miami, Thursday. UCLA (5-1) Next: vs. Hawaii, Sunday. Stanford (6-1) Next: at Cal State Bakersfield, Thursday. Oklahoma (5-0) Next: at No. 17 Kentucky, Thursday. Washington (6-1) Next: at Grand Canyon, Thursday. Texas (2-2) Next: vs. No. 3 South Carolina, Thursday. DePaul (5-1) Next: at No. 2 UConn, Thur. West Virginia (7-0) Next: vs. Morehead State, Wednesday. Kentucky (5-1) Next: vs. No. 12 Oklahoma, Thursday. Miami (5-1) Next: at No. 9 Ohio State, Thursday. Florida (4-1) Next: vs. Wofford, Wed. Syracuse (4-3) Next: vs. Michigan State, Wednesday. Colorado (6-0) Next: vs. Southeastern Louisiana, Wed. Tennessee (3-2) Next: vs. Tennessee State, Wednesday. Auburn (6-1) Next: at Kansas St., Thur. Oregon State (3-1) Next: vs. Idaho, Fri. Texas A&M (5-0) Next: vs. Southern Cal, Wednesday.

Men’s basketball scores East American U. 57, W. Illinois 50 Colgate 91, Union (NY) 68 Delaware St. 79, St. John’s 72 G. Wash. 77, Harvard 74 Hofstra 88, Columbia 86 Marist 81, Mass.-Lowell 69 Penn St. 67, Georgia Tech 60 Villanova 82, Penn 57 South Alabama 76, Charleston S. 46 Auburn 90, SC-Upstate 83 Belmont 64, Lipscomb 62 Chattanooga 68, Coast. Carolina 52 Davidson 78, Mercer 57 Duke 78, Michigan St. 69 East Carolina 68, Hampton 48 Florida G.C. 120, Ave Maria 60 Jacksonville St. 72, Alabama St. 69 LSU 84, Houston 65 New Orleans 74, Tulane 59 Pittsburgh 73, Maryland 59 Southern U. 91, Paul Quinn College 79 UAB 75, Alabama A&M 45 UNC-Asheville 68, Brevard College 50 UNC-Greensboro 86, NC A&T 66 UT Martin 82, FAU 81 VCU 81, Princeton 70 Vanderbilt 83, Tennessee St. 59 Midwest Ball St. 92, Indiana-Kokomo 52 Bowling Green 86, Notre Dame College 60 Bradley 87, E. Illinois 83 Cent. Michigan 91, William & Mary 81 Creighton 93, Buffalo 72 Illinois 88, NC State 74 Kansas 91, Long Beach St. 61 Notre Dame 92, Iowa 78 S. Illinois 89, Murray St. 85 Samford 68, Saint Louis 64 Valparaiso 65, Rhode Island 62 Wichita St. 87, Southern Nazarene 57 Wisconsin 77, Syracuse 60 Xavier 85, N. Dakota St. 55 Southwest Oklahoma 87, N. Colorado 66 Texas A&M-CC 84, Rio Grande 68 Texas State 80, McNeese St. 68 Texas-Arlington 72, Texas 61 UALR 89, Cent. Arkansas 87 Far West Nevada 77, Pacific 67 San Jose St. 58, Idaho 49

T 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 1 0 T 0 0 0 0

Pct .818 .636 .545 .273 Pct .545 .500 .455 .182 Pct .545 .545 .318 .000 Pct .818 .727 .636 .455

Thursday Dallas at Minnesota, 7:25 p.m., KSDK-5, NFL Net. Sunday Kansas City at Atlanta, noon, KMOV-4 Los Angeles at New England, noon, KTVI-2 Philadelphia at Cincinnati, noon

NFL LEADERS SCORING NONKICKERS David Johnson, ARI Blount, NE E. Elliott, DAL Gordon, SD D. Murray, TEN Mi. Evans, TAM L. McCoy, BUF Anto. Brown, PIT L. Murray, OAK Jo. Nelson, GBY KICKERS Du. Hopkins, WAS Santos, KC Sturgis, PHL Tucker, BAL Lambo, SD D. Bailey, DAL McManus, DEN Janikowski, OAK Crosby, GBY Lutz, NOR Novak, HOU PASSERS Brady, NE M. Ryan, ATL Brees, NOR Prescott, DAL Mariota, TEN Cousins, WAS D. Carr, OAK Roethlisb..., PIT M. Stafford, DET Bradford, MIN Hoyer, CHI Rodgers, GBY Tannehill, MIA Luck, IND Rivers, SD Ru. Wilson, SEA Kessler, CLE Manning, NYG Dalton, CIN Al. Smith, KC J. Winston, TAM

TDRusRecRetX2Pts 13 10 3 0 0 78 12 12 0 0 0 72 12 11 1 0 0 72 11 9 2 0 0 66 11 8 3 0 0 66 10 0 10 0 1 62 10 9 1 0 1 62 10 0 10 0 0 60 9 9 0 0 0 54 9 0 9 0 0 54 PAT FG Lg Pts 25/27 25/31 50 100 21/22 25/28 54 96 21/22 25/29 55 96 15/15 27/27 57 96 32/35 21/24 47 95 34/34 20/22 56 94 25/26 23/27 55 94 29/29 20/26 56 89 26/28 20/23 46 86 38/39 16/22 57 86 17/18 23/28 53 86

Att Cmp Pct Yds TD Int 256 175 68.4 2201 18 1 380 262 68.9 3516 26 6 456 326 71.5 3587 30 8 340 231 67.9 2835 18 2 378 243 64.3 2998 25 8 437 299 68.4 3540 20 7 423 281 66.4 3115 22 5 373 242 64.9 2745 23 7 391 261 66.8 2883 19 5 348 248 71.3 2415 12 3 200 134 67 1445 6 0 449 289 64.4 3074 27 7 329 217 66 2574 15 8 375 236 62.9 2827 19 8 399 251 62.9 3128 23 12 368 238 64.7 2865 11 4 192 126 65.6 1369 6 2 413 261 63.2 2902 20 10 408 259 63.5 3043 12 6 346 229 66.2 2297 10 4 406 249 61.3 2900 22 11

PF 293 249 281 196 PF 194 308 270 214 PF 218 266 213 197 PF 307 252 266 313

PA 197 240 236 266 PA 236 296 301 293 PA 201 222 245 352 PA 275 214 219 291

NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L Dallas 10 1 N.Y. Giants 8 3 Washington 6 4 Philadelphia 5 6 South W L Atlanta 7 4 Tampa Bay 6 5 New Orleans 5 6 Carolina 4 7 North W L Detroit 7 4 Minnesota 6 5 Green Bay 5 6 Chicago 2 9 West W L Seattle 7 3 Arizona 4 6 Los Angeles 4 7 San Francisco 1 10

T 0 0 1 0 T 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0 T 1 1 0 0

Pct .909 .727 .591 .455 Pct .636 .545 .455 .364 Pct .636 .545 .455 .182 Pct .682 .409 .364 .091

PF 316 231 280 254 PF 358 249 334 276 PF 247 218 274 178 PF 224 245 170 228

PA 213 213 264 213 PA 302 264 307 281 PA 238 192 289 264 PA 187 228 236 344

Miami at Baltimore, noon Denver at Jacksonville, noon Detroit at New Orleans, noon San Francisco at Chicago, noon Houston at Green Bay, noon Buffalo at Oakland, 3:05 p.m. Washington at Arizona, 3:25 p.m.

Tampa Bay at San Diego, 3:25 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Pittsburgh, 3:25 p.m., KTVI-2 Carolina at Seattle, 7:30 p.m., KSDK-5 Open: Tennessee, Cleveland Monday Indianapolis at N.Y. Jets, 7:30 p.m., ESPN

RECEIVERS

Gore, IND Je. Hill, CIN Gurley, LA Crowell, CLE T. West, BAL C. Hyde, SNF

RECEPTIONS No Yds Avg Long TD Anto. Brown, PIT 82 998 12.2 51 10 Fitzgerald, ARI 78 802 10.3 32 5 Mi. Evans, TAM 73 1020 14.0 45t 10 S. Diggs, MIN 67 747 11.1 46 2 A. Green, CIN 66 964 14.6 54t 4 A. Cooper, OAK 66 922 14.0 64t 3 Ju. Jones, ATL 65 1140 17.5 75t 5 Beckham, NYG 65 915 14.1 75t 8 Michael Thomas, NOR 65 789 12.1 35 7 Landry, MIA 64 733 11.5 42t 2 Edelman, NE 64 617 9.6 33 2 T. Pryor, CLE 62 855 13.8 54 4 Sanders, DEN 61 830 13.6 64 4 Baldwin, SEA 61 767 12.6 59 5 Jo. Nelson, GBY 61 754 12.4 58 9 YARDS Yds No Avg Long TD Ju. Jones, ATL 1140 65 17.5 75t 5 Mi. Evans, TAM 1020 73 14.0 45t 10 Anto. Brown, PIT 998 82 12.2 51 10 A. Green, CIN 964 66 14.6 54t 4 Hilton, IND 942 60 15.7 63t 5 A. Cooper, OAK 922 66 14.0 64t 3 Beckham, NYG 915 65 14.1 75t 8 T. Pryor, CLE 855 62 13.8 54 4 Sanders, DEN 830 61 13.6 64 4 Fitzgerald, ARI 802 78 10.3 32 5 M. Wallace, BAL 792 51 15.5 95t 4 Olsen, CAR 790 58 13.6 78t 3 Ty. Williams, SD 790 51 15.5 51t 5 Michael Thomas, NOR 789 65 12.1 35 7 K. Britt, LA 788 54 14.6 47 4 RUSHERS E. Elliott, DAL D. Murray, TEN David Johnson, ARI Gordon, SD L. Miller, HOU Blount, NE Ajayi, MIA L. McCoy, BUF Jo. Howard, CHI Forte, NYJ D. Freeman, ATL Ma. Ingram, NOR S. Ware, KC L. Bell, PIT

Att 243 229 210 234 211 212 161 157 149 202 161 136 149 151

YdsAvg 1199 4.9 1043 4.6 921 4.4 908 3.9 881 4.2 869 4.1 847 5.3 819 5.2 766 5.1 759 3.8 729 4.5 721 5.3 705 4.7 699 4.6

LngTD 60t 11 75t 8 58t 10 48 9 45 3 44 12 62t 7 75t 9 69 2 32 7 48 5 75t 3 46 2 44 3

178 147 200 145 153 154

TOTAL YARDS David Johnson, ARI E. Elliott, DAL D. Murray, TEN Gordon, SD Ju. Jones, ATL L. Bell, PIT S. Ware, KC L. Miller, HOU Mi. Evans, TAM Jo. Howard, CHI Anto. Brown, PIT D. Freeman, ATL L. McCoy, BUF Ma. Ingram, NOR A. Green, CIN KICK RETURNERS Patterson, MIN Erickson, CIN Cunningham, LA Dw. Harris, NYG Hester, BAL Lockett, SEA B. Tate, BUF J. Grant, MIA Weems, ATL

670 3.8 22 4 644 4.4 74t 6 641 3.2 24t 4 605 4.2 85t 5 600 3.9 35 4 594 3.9 34 6

Total Rush 1534 921 1502 1199 1352 1043 1273 908 1140 0 1136 699 1077 705 1032 881 1020 0 1008 766 1007 9 998 729 994 819 969 721 964 0 No Yards 16 500 15 451 18 507 16 410 16 409 14 348 15 367 14 341 16 374

INTERCEPTIONS Hayward, SD Lan. Collins, NYG M. Peters, KC Rhodes, MIN Gilmore, BUF R. Sherman, SEA

Int 6 5 5 4 4 4

Rec 613 303 309 365 1140 437 372 151 1020 242 998 269 175 248 964

Avg Long TD 31.2 104t 1 30.1 84 0 28.2 61 0 25.6 46 0 25.6 60 0 24.9 43 0 24.5 45 0 24.4 45 0 23.4 42 0 Yds Long TD 100 31 1 72 44t 1 47 28 0 129 100t 1 104 49 0 37 31 0

SACKS • V. Miller, DEN, 12.5; L. Alexander, BUF, 10.0; Avril, SEA, 10.0; Ford, KC, 10.0; V. Beasley, ATL, 9.5; Kerrigan, WAS, 9.0; K. Mack, OAK, 9.0; Orakpo, TEN, 9.0; Wake, MIA, 8.5; Cha. Jones, ARI, 8.0; De. Morgan, TEN, 8.0; N. Perry, GBY, 8.0; Suggs, BAL, 8.0; Walden, IND, 8.0.

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL • NL MILWAUKEE — Designated 1B Chris Carter and OF Adam Walker for assignment. Agreed to terms with 1B Eric Thames on a three-year contract. Claimed RHP Steve Geltz off waivers from Tampa Bay. CARDINALS — Released C Brayan Pena. Named Dr. George Paletta Jr. head orthopedic physician, Dr.’s Lyndon Gross, Husam Nawas, Mahesh Bagwe and Julienne Lippe team orthopedists, Dr. Charles Rehm chief medical administrative officer and Dr. Adam Fedyk vision consultant. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association PHILADELPHIA — Assigned G/F Timothe Luwawu-Cabarrot to Delaware (NBADL). NBA Development League DELAWARE — Released C Jordan

Railey and G Roberto Nelson. Added G Von Wafer to the active roster. FOOTBALL • NFL NFL — Suspended Buffalo OT Seantrel Henderson 10 games for violating the NFL Policy and Program for Substances of Abuse. ARIZONA — Re-signed WR Chris Hubert to the practice squad. BUFFALO — Signed DT Deandre Coleman and WR Dezmin Lewis from the practice squad and TE Gerald Christian to the practice squad. CAROLINA — Placed Cs Ryan Kalil and Gino Gradkowski on injured reserve. Signed C Ryan Wendell. Signed OT Dan France from Cleveland’s practice squad. CHICAGO — Placed LB Danny Trevathan on injured reserve. Signed WR Daniel Braverman. Signed TE Justin

Perillo to the practice squad. SAN FRANCISCO — Placed LB Shane Skov on IR. Signed S Marcus Ball from practice squad and LB Wynton McManis to practice squad. TAMPA BAY — Waived RB Mike James. Agreed to terms with S Major Wright. Waived WR Louis Murphy from the PUP list. TENNESSEE — Signed CB D’Joun Smith to the practice squad. HOCKEY • NHL LW Travis Moen announced his retirement. SOCCER • MLS MINNESOTA U. — Named Adrian Heath coach. SPORTING KANSAS CITY — Signed manager and technical director Peter Vermes to a contract extension through the 2019 season. COLLEGE SIU EDWARDSVILLE — Named Paul Dodson assistant athletic director of marketing.

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WEDNESDAY

11.30.2016

DRIVING WITH DAN:

2018 Ford EcoSport Blue Oval’s microute coming to U.S. There was a time when the acronym SUV conjured images of behemoths — Chevy Suburban, Ford Excursion, even the Hummer H1. Today, the sport-utility segment is thriving, but its core has evolved from a collection of truck-based bad boys to a group of more domesticated car-based “crossovers.” The smallest of these CUVs comprise an SUV sub-segment that’s growing. Among the competitors in the burgeoning category of subcompact crossovers are Honda’s HR-V, Chevy’s Trax, Mazda’s CX-3, Fiat’s 500X and Jeep’s Renegade. Ford — at least in the U.S. — has been noticeably AWOL from the party. Until now. Set to arrive stateside a tad over a year from now is the Ford EcoSport, Dan Wiese a micro-ute the Blue Oval has been Automotive Writer offering in global markets for some time. Altered somewhat for our Yankee sensibilities, the U.S version of EcoSport, to be offered in S, SE, SES and Titanium trims, will nonetheless retain its Fiesta foundation, diminutive dimensions, mini-Escape styling — although EcoSport’s side-hinged cargo door is an intriguing departure — and modest engine displacement. Regarding engine choices, there will be two offered to U.S. customers: a 1.0-liter turbocharged EcoBoost I-3 and a 2.0-liter naturally aspirated I-4. The turbo 3 powers EcoSport’s front wheels only, the four-banger comes standard with all-wheel drive. Regardless, a sixspeed automatic is the transmission. Of course, automakers these days are designing vehicles — particularly small vehicles — for the smartphone generation and the U.S.-spec EcoSport is no exception. Among this micro-ute’s available perks will be a 10-speaker, 675-watt B&O PLAY audio system — a system, Ford says, that’s tuned specifically for the EcoSport cabin by Harman acoustic engineers. Standard on the top-trim Titanium, that system also boasts HD Radio, a satellite-radio receiver and a “dual FM radio antenna” said to boost range and clarity. Owners longing to stay connected to distant friends,

Based on the Fiesta platform, the Ford EcoSport subcompact crossover SUV debuts stateside in early 2018. not to mention their own EcoSport should it be in the distance, will find a variety of ways to do so via Ford’s SYNC 3, hands-free capable communications and entertainment system. In EcoSport, SYNC 3 gets mated to a touch screen designed to be familiar to users of smartphones and tablets. The 8-inch screen provides access to Apple CarPlay, Android Auto and to various audio settings, among other things. Drivers also have the ability to start, lock, unlock and locate their EcoSport from remote locations using the available SYNC Connect with FordPass app. That mobile app also lets owners view vehicle information, such as the fuel level and odometer reading, when not in the vehicle. Look for the diminutive EcoSport to arrive in early 2018. Although Ford has not designated a model year yet — vehicles built after Jan. 1, 2018, qualify to be designated 2019 models — we’re guessing it’ll be a 2018 EcoSport that arrives stateside.

FORD ECOSPORT (specs are for the international model, from which the U.S. version is derived) DRIVE FORMAT: Front- or all-wheel drive BASE PRICE: N/A ENGINES: 1.0-liter turbo I-3; 2.0-liter I-4 HORSEPOWER (est.): I-3: 120; I-4: 140 TORQUE: (est.): I-3: 125 lb.-ft.; I-4: 140 lb.-ft. RECOMMENDED FUEL: Regular TRANSMISSION: Six-speed automatic

Dan Wiese is a freelance automotive writer. He is a regular contributor to the Post-Dispatch and to AAA Midwest Traveler magazine’s online Web Bonus. You can email him at drivingwithdan@gmail.com.

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Classified

C2

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, as amended which makes it illegal to advertise 'any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.' This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate whichh is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertising in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.

R E Auctions

1234 Chevrolet

Real Estate Auction Thur., Dec 1 at 12PM 3529 Circle Dr, Imperial MO Open House: Sun., Nov 27, 12-2PM Charming 2-3BR, 1BA home on 1.7AC lot. Spacious eat-in kitchen, LR & part walk-out bsmnt. 2-car det gar. adamsauctions.com

ADAM'S AUCTIONS 618-234-8751

Real Estate Auction Wed., Dec 7 at 2PM 102 W 3rd St., PEVELY MO Open House: Sun., Dec 4, 12-2PM 5BR, 2BA split level home on corner lot. Custom woodwork & lg open kitchen. . adamsauctions.com

ADAM'S AUCTIONS 618-234-8751

Antique/Classic Special Interest

4020

WEBUY CARS Cash Paid Today 6 3 6 -9 4 0 -9 9 6 9 fastlanecars.com

Acura

'1 4 Acu ra MDX, Tech pk g, Black, Local Trade. $ 3 6 ,4 9 0

'10 Acura TL 3.7: Clean Carfax, Backup Camera, Navigation, Bluetooth $14,490 #94533D

'0 7 Acura RDX: Technology Package, One Owner, Clean Carfax, Navigation, Sunroof/Moonroof, $ 9 ,9 9 0 #8 9 4 9 A

Audi

4040 '0 5 Audi A6 4 .2 #4 5 6 7 7 -2 $ 9 ,9 9 5 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (8 6 6 )6 7 2 -4 0 2 0

'1 1 Audi Q7 Prestige Qu a ttr o , 5 5 K Mi, Has It All! #B7 9 2 6 , $ 3 4 ,9 9 0

'15 Audi A3 2.0T Quattro: 10K Miles, Convertible, Leather, White $32,000 #84130A

BMW

4050

'03 BMW 525I: $7,850 #183822

'12 BMW 650xi Convertible, Spt Pkg, 41K, Black, #B7997, $41,400 '1 0 BMW 5 3 5 i xDrive: AWD, Clean CARFAX, Sunroof/Moonroof, Bluetooth, Heated Front Seats $ 1 3 ,9 9 0 #P8723A

'11 BMW 328i xDrive: Clean CARFAX, AWD, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof/Moonroof, $13,490 #10772A

$11,499 #SC1415

'1 4 Chevy Malibu LTZ, A lot of car for little money, #B7653B, $ 1 5 ,9 9 0 '12 Chevy Malibu 1LS: FWD, One Owner, Clean Carfax, Keyless Entry, Premium Sound, $7,990 #95418A

'11 Chevy Malibu 1LT: Bluetooth, Flex Fuel, Satellite Radio, Keyless Entry, Call Today, $7,990 #38111D

'14 Chevy Cruze: ECO 4 Cyl, FWD, Clean CARFAX, GM Certified, Bluetooth, Manual Transmission $10,990 #35252A

'14 Chevy Cruze ECO: 4 Cyl, FED, One Owner Clean Carfax, GM Certified $10,990 #35252A

'10 Chevy Cobalt LS: 4 Cyl, FWD, Bluetooth, Priced Below Average, Motor Trend Certified Call Today, $7,490 #10898A

'14 Chevy Malibu LS: Alloys, 4 Cyl, One Owner, $13,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '13 Chevy Camaro SS-2SS, 6.2L, GM Certified Warranty #C10818Q, $21,978 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '1 5 Chevy Malibu LT 12xxx Mi., 2 .5 L, GM Certified Warranty, #C1077XP, $ 1 5 ,4 0 0 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (8 6 6 ) 6 0 2 -1 7 7 0 '1 6 Chev y Malibu LT: 2 K Miles, $ 2 0 ,0 0 0 #C160918L LOU FUSZ CHEVY (8 6 6 ) 6 0 2 -1 7 7 0 '11 Chevy Aveo: Red, 35 MPG, Economy Car $7,500 #14840A

'07 BMW 328xi : AWD, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats, Moonroof $11,990 #27061A

'08 BMW 328 xi Moonroof, AWD, Low Miles, #X16642A, $11,388 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701

Buick

4055

'12 Buick Verano: One Owner, $11,777 #23886-1

2 0 1 0 Buick LaCrosse CX Stk #9 4 3 9 9 -1 $ 1 0 ,9 9 5 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (8 6 6 )6 7 2 -4 0 2 0

'15 Buick LaCrosse: Black, Leather, 2.4L, 14K Miles, GM Certified, $19,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '1 1 LaCrosse CXL: 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Sunroof, Remote Start, Bluetooth $ 1 2 ,9 9 0 #3 9 0 2 6 A

Cadillac

4060

1 4 Cadillac ATS: 4Dr. Turbo, AWD, Navi/Luxury Edition, Silver, Only 1 5 K Miles Now $ 2 4 ,4 9 9 #AT1640

'09 Cadillac SRX V6: Leather and Theater Packages, AWD, Clean Carfax, Sunroof $9,990 #8870B

20 0 8 Cadillac DTS #45718-1 $11,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 '0 8 Cadillac CTS: 4 Dr, Sunroof, Navigation, Black, Sharp, $ 1 1 ,9 9 5 Don Brow n Chevrolet

Chevrolet

4065

'13 Camaro ZL1 10K Mi., Loaded, Fresh Tires, Local Trade, #B7838A $41,400

'1 3 Chrysler 2 0 0 : Limited, V6 , Sunroof, 2 1 K Miles, 1 Ow ner, $ 1 4 ,9 9 5 Don Brow n Chevrolet 1 -8 6 6 -8 8 3 -8 8 4 1 '14 300S, AWD, Sunroof, Nav, 24K Miles, One Owner, $22,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '05 300 Single Owner, Rear A/C, CD $8,995 #UH513EP Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129 '0 9 PTCruiser: Price Below Average #UH5129EP $ 3 ,9 0 1 Lou Fusz Economy Lot W est (6 3 6 ) 2 0 0 -2 1 2 9

Corvette

4080

'16 Corvette Z06 2LZ: Auto, Black, 6K Miles, GMCertified, $72,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

Dodge

'1 4 Charger R /T: Chromes, 4 New Tires $ 2 4 ,4 8 0

'08 Dodge Avenger SE: 2.4L, 4 Cyl, Auto, FWD, Power Windows & Locks, Remote Keyless Entry, Call Today, $5,490 #P8346B

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Ford

4110

'12 Ford Focus SE: $7,375 #GD16106A 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '1 6 Ford Edge SEL $ 3 2 ,4 0 3 #GC42365 1 -8 6 6 -3 1 1 -8 3 5 0 For details go to w w w .ceram e.com '16 Ford Mustang ECO $24,967 #E47233 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '13 Ford Focus $11,248 #G310147A 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '14 Ford Fiesta SE $10,794 #K1829P 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '15 Ford Mustang GT: Silver, 14K Miles, Call Today! $31,499 #H170127A

'16 Chevy Trax LT: AWD, 15K Miles $19,995 #P3577

'13 Ford Fusion Hybrid SE, #V15493B, $14,990

'10 Chevy Malibu: 2LT, Only 52K Miles $11,477 #P3501-1

'10 Chevy Malibu LS 1LS: 88K Miles, CD Player, ABS $9,995 #UH5264EP Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129

'14 Corvette Triple Black, 3LT, 6K Mi., Auto, #B8212 $52,980 '15 Chevy Sonic LT: 4 Dr, Alloys, 2K Miles, GMCertified, $14,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '14 Chevy Camaro SS: Convertible, 2SS Pkg, 9K Miles, GM Certified, $25,499 #C160102M LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770

of South County 1 -8 5 5 -9 0 3 -8 6 9 6

'12 Chevy Cruze LTZ: Leather, 93K Miles, Only $8,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '12 Chevy Cruze LT: Turbo, 33K Miles, One Owner, $11,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '11 Chevy Cruze LT: Turbo, 53K Miles, Alloys, $10,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '16 Chevy Cruze LT: 11K Miles, GM Certified, Warranty, $14,714 #C161954A LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770

2 0 0 6 Chevy HHR LT #4 2 4 1 8 -2 $ 4 ,9 9 5 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (8 6 6 )6 72 -4 0 2 0 '10 Chevy HHR LS: 4 Cyl, 80K Miles, Local Trade, $7,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '07 Chevy Impala LS Cloth Seats, Aux Input, FWD, 46K, #M470XP, $11, 512 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '1 6 Impala LT Stk #P8 6 4 7 , $ 2 1 ,2 7 2

2 0 0 7 Ford Taurus SEL Stk #4 5 4 5 5 -2 $ 3 ,9 9 5 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (8 6 6 )6 7 2 -4 0 2 0

'10 Taurus SEL Stk #45592A, $10,471

'1 3 Ford Fusion SE: Sterling Gray, Only 6 K Miles, Call Today,

'12 Chevy Impala LS: V6, Alloys, Warranty, 91K Miles, $7,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '15 Chevy Impala LS: 4 Cyl, 14K Miles, GM Certified, $18,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '12 Chevy Impala LT: V6, 60K Miles, One Owner, Sharp, $10,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '16 Chevy Impala LTZ: V6, 16K Miles, GM Certified, $25,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '1 5 Chevy Impala LT: FW D, 1 5 K Miles, GM Certified, Wrnty, #C161955A $ 1 9 ,6 1 2 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (8 6 6 ) 6 0 2 -1 7 7 0 '15 Chevy Impala LT: FWD, GM Certified, Warranty, $18,612 #C170004A LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '13 Chevy Malibu LTZ: Sunroof, 4 Cyl, Leather, 78K Miles, $14,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 20 15 Chevy Spark LS Stk #45462-1 $9,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'13 Chevy Spark LS: 5 Dr, Alloys, 26K Miles, GMCertified, $9,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

'16 Hyundai Genesis: AWD, 4K Sunroof, Navi #C8268A, $42,490

Honda

4120

'14 Accord EX-L Coupe, 17K miles, Black/Black #C7793B $20,490

'08 Honda Accord EX: 4 Cyl, Black, Power Seat, Moonroof, 90K Miles, $9,899 #DL1325

'13 Honda Civic LX: 7 To Choose, Polished Metal, 37K Miles, Largest Selection in Midwest, Starting At $13,299 #X3008

'13 Honda Accord LX: 4 Dr, Silver Metallic, 41K Miles, Bluetooth, Alloys, B/U Camera, Auto Climate Control, $15,999 #X3035

'12 Honda Accord: EXL, 2 Door, $15,750 #179341

'1 3 Hyundai Veloster: Hatchback, 4 Cyl, FWD, Clean Carfax, Bluetooth, Nav/GPS, Backup Camera, $ 1 2 ,9 9 0 #2 7 0 5 7 B

'12 Hyundai Sonata: Leather Heated Front Seats, Bluetooth, Sunroof/Moonroof $11,490 #10773A

'16 Hyundai Elantra SE: 4 Door, 27K Miles, One Owner, $12,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 2 0 1 2 Hyundai Veloster Stk #6 5 9 9 9 -1 $ 9 ,9 9 5 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (8 6 6 )6 7 2 -4 0 2 0 2 0 1 1 Hyundai Tucson GLS Stk #6 6 0 8 4 -1 $ 1 1 ,9 9 5 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (8 6 6 )6 7 2 -4 0 2 0

2 0 1 3 Hyundai Elantra #6 6 3 0 9 -1 $ 1 1 ,9 9 7 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (8 6 6 )6 72 -4 0 2 0 '13 Hyundai Elantra GLS: White, 20K Miles, Call Today,

'13 Honda Fit: 5 Dr, Hatchback, Honda Certified, H160695A, Crystal Black, Only 24K Miles $13,499 #H160695A

'14 Honda Civic LX: FWD, One Owner Clean CARFAX, Motor Trend Certified, Low Miles, $12,990 #26544A

'12 Honda Civic Si: Clean Carfax, 6 Speed Sunroof/Moonroof, Navigation, Bluetooth Premium Sound $13,990 #10835B

20 0 8 Honda Accord LX Stk#94227-1 $10 ,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'1 2 Elantra LTD: Only 4 8 K Miles, Beige Metallic, Will Go Fast! #H161936A $ 1 0 ,2 9 9

2 0 1 3 Hyundai Sonata Stk#66884-1 $ 1 1 ,9 9 5 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (8 6 6 )6 7 2 -4 0 2 0 2 0 1 2 Hyundai Sonata Stk #6 6 6 8 2 -2 $ 8 ,9 9 5 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (8 6 6 )6 7 2 -4 0 2 0 20 0 9 Hyundai Sonata Stk #670 94-1 $5,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'13 Hyundai Sonata One Owner, Alloys, Leather, Bluetooth, 24K Mi., #K1081XP, $15,440 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '11 Hyundai Sonata: Auto, Satellite Radio, Keyless Entry, $10,315 #M472XP LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '11 Hyundai Sonata Leather Seats, Keyless Entry, 35 MPG, #X17064A, $12,055 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '13 Sonata GLS Leather, Heated Seats, 24K Miles, 35 MPG, Stk #X2712BMP $15,188 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701

Ininiti

20 0 3 Honda Accord EX #45264-1 $4,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'09 Infiniti G37x Base: AWD, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats, Bluetooth, Sunnroof Call Today, $13,990 #26670A

'15 Ford Fusion SE: Backup Cam, Black on Black, Moonroof, Tint $16,990 #D14841A

'11 Ford Taurus: Black, SEL, Leather, Heat Seat $13,990 #D84853A

' 10 Ford Fusion SE: 4 Cyl, Only 83K Miles $10,990 #16306A

'04 Ford F-150 4x4: Regular Cab, Cloth Seats, 5 Speed Manual, 105K mi, Call for Price

'16 Ford Mustang GT: Premium, Leather, 4K Miles, $30,990

'10 Ford Focus SE: FWD, CD, Blue, 34MPG #UH5172EP $9,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129

20 13 Ford Focus SE Stk #6690 9-1 $10 ,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 20 0 9 Ford Focus SES Stk #45280 -2 $4,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

2 0 1 3 Ford Focus SE Stk #6 6 7 2 7 -1 $ 1 1 ,9 9 5 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (8 6 6 )6 7 2 -4 0 2 0 2 0 1 2 Ford Fusion SE #6 6 0 3 8 -1 $ 7 ,9 9 5 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (8 6 6 )6 7 2 -4 0 2 0 '1 6 Fusion SE Stk #P8 6 6 2 $ 1 6 ,3 6 4

stltoday.com/classifieds of South County 1 -8 5 5 -9 0 3 -8 6 9 6

'06 Infiniti M35x: AWD, Low Miles, Sunroof, Heated Front Seats, Bose System $10,490 #27172A

'0 9 Civic LX: Blue, Pwr W indows, $ 6 ,9 9 5 #P4 0 7 3 1

'08 Infiniti EX35: Black, Loaded $12,888 #P3568-1 '12 Honda Civic EX: 4 Cyl, FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Sunroof, Premium Sound, Keyless Entry, $11,999 #H162017A

$10,999 #H162147B

'12 Honda Civic LX Traction Control, Keyless Entry, #X2740P, $12,628 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701

BOMMARITO HONDA SUPERSTORE 1-888-204-9202

BLACK FRIDAY BLOW-OUT PRICING SPECIAL APR 1.9% ON CERTIFIED HONDAS 7 Year/100K Mile Warranty

'12 Ford Fusion: SEL, Leather Sunroof, 50K Miles Call for Pricing #T17135

4220 Toyota

'12 Toyota Prius: Hatchback, 1 Owner, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Navigation $11,990 #P8751

'07 Lexus IS 250: One Owner, Clean Carfax, AWD, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats $14,990 #39052A

20 12 Nissan Altima 2.5 Stk #45695-2 $11,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'13 Toyota Corolla LE: 4 Cyl, FWD, Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified $13,490 #38249A

4170

'06 Lincoln LS Sport: Chromes, Well Serviced #M16443B $7,990

Mazda

4185

'12 Mazda Mazda2: Touring, Hatchback, Clean Carfax, Red, Cruise Control $8,990 #10881A

'12 Mazda Mazda CX-7i: 1 Owner, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Keyless Entry, Cruise Control, $10,990 #10779A

'1 5 Mazda Mazda3 i: Sport, One Owner Clean CARFAX, Madza Certified, Includes Balance of Warrenty $ 1 4 ,9 9 0 #8 8 9 4 A

'12 Mazda Mazda 3i: Touring, One Owner, Clean Carfax, Mazda Certified Pre-Owned $11,490 #10827A

'13 Mazda Mazda3 i: Sport, 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Mazda Certifed $14,490 #38264A

'1 3 Mazda Mazda3 i: Touring, One Owner, Clean CARFAX, Mazda Fuel Efficient, Premium Sound, $ 1 2 ,4 9 0 #1 0 6 4 0 A

2 0 1 0 Mazda Tribute i Stk #4 5 8 7 2 -1 $ 7 ,9 9 5 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (8 6 6 )6 7 2 -4 0 2 0 2 0 0 6 Mazda Tribute i Stk #6 4 5 1 8 -3 $ 3 ,9 9 5 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (8 6 6 )6 7 2 -4 0 2 0 20 0 6 Mazda Tribute i #66518-1 $3,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

Mercedes Benz

4190

'08 Mercedes Benz E Class Base: Clean CARFAX, Low Miles, Leather Trimmed Seats, $11,990 #26680A

Mercury

4207

'04 Mini Cooper S: Local Trade, White Hatchback #C8248A $7,490

'1 1 Mini Cooper S: Contryman, Clean Carfax, Sunroof, Turbocharged Call Today, $ 1 4 ,9 9 0 #2 6 7 1 7 B

Misc. Autos

2 0 1 3 Nissan Sentra SR Stk#45937-1 $ 1 1 ,9 9 5 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (8 6 6 )6 7 2 -4 0 2 0

2 0 1 4 Nissan Sentra #4 5 2 1 6 -1 $ 1 1 ,9 9 5 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (8 6 6 )6 7 2 -4 0 2 0 20 13 Nissan Sentra Stk#42154-1 $12,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

20 13 Nissan Sentra S #45420 -1 $10 ,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 '1 3 Nissan Sentra #4 6 1 3 3 -1 $ 1 2 ,9 9 5 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (8 6 6 )6 7 2 -4 0 2 0 20 14 Nissan Sentra SV #45912-1 $11,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

2 0 1 6 Nissan Versa 1 .6 S Stk#45820-1 $ 1 1 ,9 9 5 St. Charles Nissan /Hyundai (8 6 6 )6 7 2 -4 0 2 0 2 0 1 5 Nissan Versa Note Stk #4 6 0 4 9 -1 $ 1 1 ,9 9 5 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (8 6 6 )6 7 2 -4 0 2 0 20 16 Nissan Versa 1.6S Stk #66214-2 $11,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

Pontiac

4250

'07 Pontiac G6 GT: Convertible, 79K Miles, Heated Leather Seats, Power Top $7,990

'1 5 Camry LE Stk #P8 6 5 1 $ 1 6 ,0 3 0

Volkswagen

4310

Bommarito ST. PETERS DISCOUNT CORNER 1-866-2449085 '12 Toyota Avalon Limited: Leather, Sunroof, Auto $18,490 '13 Chevy Traverse LTZ: AWD, 44K Miles, Loaded, $28,490 '13 Ford Fusion Hybrid: Awesome MPG!! $14,990 '12 BWM 650: Convertible, x-Drive, Nav, Auto, Black $41,490 '12 Toyota Rav 4 Sport: 43K Miles, 4WD, Black, $16,900

4280

Scion

4283

'10 Scion XB: Burgundy $9,995 #181802

'13 Focus ST: Lthr, Nav, Roof, 11K Miles, $19,900 '14 Subaru Legacy: 3.6L, Auto, Full Pwr $20,400 '14 GMC Sierra: 16K Mi, Local Trade, $19,400

'09 VW EOS: Auto, 75K Miles, $11,490

'15 VW Passat Wolfsburg $13,597 #KE13968 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '15 VW Passat $12,997 #KE34825 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com

'12 VW Tiguan: 95K Miles, Gray $12,835 #186121

'0 9 V W EOS Luxury, Auto, Black, V8 1 1 4 $ 1 1 ,4 0 0

'13 VW Jetta 2.5L: 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, Bluetooth, Sunroof $14,990 #38263A

'12 Volkswagen Jetta Sedan, 2.5L SE, 31 MPG, Traction Control, #X161009A, $10,688 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701

Volvo '1 6 Scion iM: Base Stk #4 5 8 4 4 A, $ 1 8 ,9 9 5

'14 Ridgeline RTL: 4WD, Silver Metallic, Only 22K Miles! $31,499 #H170174A

'13 Civic LX: 4 DR's, 7 To Choose, Polished Metal, B/U Camera, Bluetooth, 37K Miles, Largest Inventory in Midwest Now Starting at $13,299! #X3008 '13 CRV EX: AWD, Crystal Black, 41K Miles, Alloys, Moonroof, Bluetooth, Back Up Camera, $18,999 #X3012 '13 Accord Sport (s): (4) to Choose From! 18" Alloys, Fog Lights, White, $17,999 #H170190A '14 CRV LX: AWD, Pearl White, 34K Miles, Bluetooth, Backup Camera, $18,699 #H161558C '13 Accord LX: 4 Door, Silver Metallic, Bluetooth, Alloys, Backup Camera, Auto Climate, 41K, Priced To Sell Fast, $15,999 #X3035 '14 Odyssey EXL: With Rear DVD, Smoky Topaz, Loaded! $28,499 #H162304A '13 Civic EX: Coupe, Polished Metal Metallic, Moonroof, Alloy Wheels, Bluetooth, Camera, 38K Miles, Reduced $13,999! #X2980 '12 Pilot EXL: 4WD, Polished Metal, Power Moonroof, Only 48K Miles, Heated Leather, $25,999! #H162133B

'12 Toyota Avalon: Limited, 50K Miles, Loaded, $18,400

Jeep

4145

'15 Jeep Cherokee Trailhawk $25,162 #ET86199 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '16 Jeep Patriot $16,592 #KTE12540 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '09 Jeep Wrangler: Rubicon, Hard Top, 4x4, 5 Speed Manual, 102K Miles $19,990 #T16657A

'16 Jeep Cherokee: Latitude, Nav, 25K Miles, One Owner, $18,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '16 Jeep Patriot Sport: FWD, 4Cyl, 21K Miles, $14,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

Kia

4155

'1 4 Kia Sorento LX: Gray, Only 2 1 K Miles, Bluetooth, 1 7 " Alloys, Nice Price, Call Now! #SC1362 $ 1 4 ,9 9 5

'13 Kia Optima LX: 19K Miles, Gray, $13,499 SC1377 2 others to choose from

'13 Ford Focus ST: 11K Mi, Leather, Roof $19,990 '07 Cadillac CTS: Auto, Leather, 76K Miles, $11,400 '13 Chevy Camero ZT1: 10K Miles, Local Trade, $40,400

'13 Jeep Wrangler: Unlimited, Auto, Hard-Top, 40K Mi, $30,900 '12 BMW 650xi: Convertible 41K Miles, Auto, Like New, $41,400 '05 Porsche 911:

Mitsubishi

'15 Mitsubishi Mirage FWD, Traction Control #U5188P, $8,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129

2 0 0 4 Mits Endeavor Stk #4 5 6 7 3 -1 $ 5 ,9 9 5 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (8 6 6 )6 7 2 -4 0 2 0

Nissan/Datsun '16 Kia Cadenza Premium, Navi, (2) Moonroofs, Black on Black, Only 7,382 miles $23,499 #AT1640

'14 Kia Forte: Sedan, LX, Black, 26K #SC1379 Call Today $11,899

'1 1 K ia Forte EX: 6 0 K Miles, Auto, Local Trade, $ 9 ,4 9 0

'13 Kia Soul: 5 Door Plus!, Silver, 28K Miles, One Owner, $13,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 314-621-6666 • stltoday.com/jobs

Lexus

4165

'09 Lexus GS450: $16,850 #P40492

'08 Lexus ES 350 Base: Clean CARFAX, Low Miles, Leather, Sunroof/Moonroof Call Today, $13,990 #P8673A

4215

'0 7 Mitsubishi Eclipse Spyder GS Convertible: Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Premium Sound System $ 7 ,9 9 0 #2 7 1 1 6 B

4220

'15 Nissan Sentra $13,367 #KE30903 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '15 Nissan Versa $10,899 #KE77276 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '1 3 Nissan Maxima SV: Only 1 5 K Miles, Silver Metallic, Htd Power Leather, Moonroof, 3 .5 V6 , Nice! $ 1 9 ,6 9 9 #SC1343

'12 Nissan Altima 2.5 S: 4 Cyl, FWD, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Premium Sound Call Today! $10,490 #95459A

'1 3 Nissan Altima 2 .5 : Clean Carfax, Leather Trimmed Seats, Heated Front Seats, Bluetooth, Sunroof/Moonroof, $ 1 4 ,4 9 0 #P8725A

'11 Nissan Altima 2.5 S: 4 Cyl, FWD, Clean CARFAX, Motor Trend Certified, Low Miles, Call Today, $10,490 #26063B

'10 Nissan Versa 1.8 S Only 50xxx Miles, Silver, 32 MPG Hwy, stk #X17019A $8,359 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701

314-621-6666 stltoday.com/classifieds

'13 Toyota Tacoma: Alloy Wheels, 4x4, Bed Cover, Crew Cab, 25k Miles #M527JDP, $29,905 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298

Dodge Plymouth Trucks 4335 '15 Dodge Ram1500 $31,374 #ET61517 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com 2 0 0 8 Dodge Durango SLT #6 6 9 5 6 -1 $ 7 ,9 9 5 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (8 6 6 )6 7 2 -4 0 2 0 2 0 0 4 Dodge Ram 1 5 0 0 Quad Cab Stk#94378-2 $ 8 ,9 9 5 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (8 6 6 )6 7 2 -4 0 2 0

'1 5 Ram 2 5 0 0 Laramie, Stk #P8 5 9 6 $ 4 4 ,7 0 0

of South County 1 -8 5 5 -9 0 3 -8 6 9 6

'16 Dodge Ram 1500 SLT: Quad Cab, 4x4, Big Horn, HEMI, $28,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

'1 2 Ram 2 5 0 0 : L a r a m ie, 4WD, #M 16648A $ 4 2 ,4 7 0

'06 Ram 1500 ST: Priced Below Average $8,995 #U4907Q Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129

Ford Trucks

4340

'15 Ford F-250 Lariat $41,899 #T3786E 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '14 Ford F-150 STX: Extended Cab, 4x4, V6, Black, 12K Miles, One Owner, $26,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '13 Ford F-150 Lariat: Supercab, 4x4, Leather Ecoboost, Moonroof $33,000 #A9386

'06 Ranger V6 3.0L, Black, 131K Miles, Stk #UH5108EP $9,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129

GMC Trucks

4345

'14 GMC Sierra A Must Sell, Very Cheap, #V16121A, $19,400

'15 GMC Sierra 1500: SLT, Crew, Leather, 1 Owner, 15K Miles, $43,500 #T16000A

'1 6 Volvo S6 0 T5 : Drive EPremier $ 2 7 ,8 8 0 #L1 2 1 4

'15 GMC Sierra 1500 SLT: Crew Cab, 8 Cyl, Heated Seats, BU Cam Call for Pricing #T16417A

of South County 1 -8 5 5 -9 0 3 -8 6 9 6

Subaru

4290

20 0 8 Subaru Tribeca Limited #66633-1 $11,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'07 Subaru Impreza Outback Sport: Alloy Wheels, Power Windows, CD Player, Automatic, 92K Miles #MS17460A, $8,769 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298

'1 4 Subaru Outback 2 .5 I: Limited $ 2 1 ,8 8 0 #L-1 1 7 6 -1

'09 Volvo S60 2.5T: 96K, Lthr, Sun #184642 $8,825

'13 Volvo XC60 T6: $27,870 #L1169

'1 5 Volvo XC60 T5 : Premier $ 2 9 ,8 0 0 #P4 0 6 3

Honda Trucks

4347

'10 Honda Ridgeline RT 4WD, Silver, 127K Miles, Timing Service Completed, 1 Owner, Clean Carfax #H170086A $14,999

'1 3 Ridgeline RTL Stk #4 5 6 6 0 A $ 3 1 ,2 4 8

of South County 1 -8 5 5 -9 0 3 -8 6 9 6

'11 Audi Q7 S-Line: Quattro, Black, 55K Mi, $34,900 '14 Honda Accord: EX-L, Coupe, 17K, Black, $20,400

'16 Silverado 2500HD: Under 1K Miles, 6.0L V8, 4-Door, 8 Ft Bed $39,990 #84590

4315

4210

Bommarito St. Peters ALL JUST REDUCED!! 1-866-2449085

'07 Silverado 4WD, Black, 72K #C8240A, $19,490

'12 VW CC R-Line $11,400

'12 GMC Acadia: SLT1, 66K, Leather, Quad Seats

'08 Saturn Vue XE: FWD, Keyless Entry, New Tires, 26 MPH, $6,995 #UH4865EP Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129 '08 Saturn Vue XR: FWD, 6 Cyl, CD Player #UH5232P $7,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129

'13 Silverado 1500 LT Stk #P8583, $19,433

of South County 1 -8 5 5 -9 0 3 -8 6 9 6 ¢

'07 Pontiac G6 GT: Convertible, Leather 79K Miles $7,990

'09 Pontiac G6 Coupe: 59K Miles, Automatic, Warranty $7,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '09 Pontiac G8 6 Cyl, Auto, Moonroof, Power Seat, Sat Radio, Alloys, 76K, #KD65027A, $13,567 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '05 Pontiac Bonneville SE, 105K, Keyless Entry, #UH5323EP, $5,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129

4330

2 0 0 3 Chevy Silverado 1 5 0 0 HD Stk #4 2 6 4 1 -2 $ 8 ,9 9 5 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (8 6 6 )6 7 2 -4 0 2 0

of South County 1-855-903-8696 20 10 Toyota Camry #46221-1 $9,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'14 Honda Ridgeline SE: Lthr, Navigation, $30,490

4195 Saturn

2 0 0 1 Mercury Grand Marquis GS Stk# 6 6 4 0 6 -1 $ 3 ,9 9 5 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (8 6 6 )6 7 2 -4 0 2 0

Mini Cooper

2 0 0 8 Nissan Altima 2 .5 S Stk #4 6 2 7 5 -1 $ 6 ,9 9 5 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (8 6 6 )6 7 2 -4 0 2 0

STLTODAY.COM

4300 Chevrolet Trucks

'11 Nissan Altima: S Type, Only 100K Miles, 4 Cyl, $8,990 #16671A

$9,999 #DL1373

'11 Honda Civic LX: White, Only 71K Miles, High Quality,

'13 Ford Taurus: White, Sync, SEL, My Ford Touch, $16,500 #D14679A

4130

'0 6 Infiniti G3 5 X: Clean Carfax, AWD, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, Premium Package $ 1 0 ,4 9 0 #9 5 1 6 3 B

'08 Honda Accord EXL: V6, Silver, 121K Miles, Loaded, Sunroof, Heated Leather,

'15 Ford Fusion: Backup Camera, 34 MPG, White, Sync, $16,500 #A9373

4165 Nissan/Datsun

NOVEMBER 30, 2016

'07 Lexus RX 350: Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, AWD, Sunroof Call Today! $11,990 #96060A

$12,499 #SC1435

'1 5 Honda CRZ: 2 Dr, Hybrid, Black, Only 1,xxx Miles, Like New, Honda Certified $ 1 5 ,9 9 9 #X2 8 8 0

'14 Ford Taurus Loaded, 38K, #C15246RA, $27,990

'13 Ford Mustang GT: Stick Shift, Alloy Wheels, 35K Miles, Leather, Tinted #MS17113A, $24,001 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '14 Ford Escape: Blue, Sync, Ecoboost, 32MPG, $17,000 #A9414

WEDNESDAY

$ 1 5 ,7 9 9 #H161997A

'13 Ford Focus ST Roof, Leather, #B7855, $19,900

'12 Ford Fusion SEL: 4 Cyl, FWD, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, Low Miles $11,990 #26408B

4125 Lexus

'16 Hyundai Elantra SE $15,995 #E74069 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '16 Hyundai Accent SE $12,996 #KE67832 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '14 Hyundai Sonata LTD: Harbor Gray, Only 23K Miles, Heated & Cooled Leather, Loaded! Only $17,499 #SC1409

Lincoln of South County 1-855-903-8696

'12 Honda Accord EX-L Sedan: Leather, Heated Seats, Moonroof, #X17081A, $13,387 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '13 Honda Civic EX: Motor Trend Certified, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Bluetooth $13,976 #P8703A

314-621-6666 '16 Chevy Cruze Lmtd $15,178 #KE17080 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com

4110 Hyundai

'07 Ford Mustang Convertible: Keyless Entry, Priced Below Avg, #UH5144EP, $8,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129

'13 Fit Hatchback: (3) to choose from Now Starting at $13,499 Crystal Black, Only 24K Miles! #H160695A of South County 1 -8 5 5 -9 0 3 -8 6 9 6

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

4085

'13 Ford Focus: Lthr, Roof, Nav, 33K Mi, #B8267 $12,990

20 11 Chevy HHR LT #46343-1 $5,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 '14 Buick LaCrosse: Leather, Own Owner $20,888 #P3569

4070 Ford

'1 2 Chrysler 2 0 0 Touring Convertible $ 1 2 ,2 8 4 #E92077A 1 -8 6 6 -3 1 1 -8 3 5 0 For details go to w w w .ceram e.com 14 Chrysler 300S, AWD, Black/Black, Sharp, Only 17K Miles $22,290 #SC1400

'14 Chevy Malibu LT: One Owner, $15,888 #P3575

'0 5 Cobalt Base Stk #P8645A $ 6 ,5 0 0

'10 BMW 535i xDrive : Heated Front Seats, Navigation, Bluetooth, Heated Door Mirrors, Seat Memory $10,990 #26693B

Chrysler

4065

'15 Chevy Sonic: Hatchback, Silver, Only 8K Miles, Nice Price

4025

'12 Acura TL: AWD, White, 58K Miles, Sharp! #V17146A, $21,980

M 1

'14 Subaru Legacy 2.5i: Certified One Owner, Alloy Wheels, Fog Lights, Automatic, 30K Miles, #MS17440A, $17,957 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '1 3 Subaru XV Crosstrek: Premium AWD Crossover, Pearl White, Only 2 4 K Miles, Call Today #SC1327 $ 1 8 ,4 9 9

'16 Subaru Legacy Ltd Nav, Certified, Leather, Roof, 10K, #MS383L, $27,989 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '14 Subaru Legacy: Alloy Whls, Auto, AWD, One Owner, Certified, $18,536 #MS17440A LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '14 Subaru Legacy: Alloy Whls, Auto, AWD, One Owner, Certified, $18,536 #MS17440A LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298

Toyota

'15 Volvo XC60 T6: Leather, AWD, Moonroof, 15K Miles $29,000 #D84408A

'13 Volvo XC90: AWD, Lthr, 7 Pass $27,850 #L1221

'12 Volvo S60 T5: 45K Mi, Lthr, Roof $16,995 #185191

'1 3 Volvo S6 0 T5 : 3 4 K Miles, $ 1 8 ,9 8 0 #1 1 2 1 9

'13 Toyota Prius II: Hybrid, Black, 35K Mi, 51 MPG City, 48 MPG Hwy, 2 to Choose, Starting at $13,990 #SC1391

'12 Toyota Avalon Limited: Has It All!, Certified, #B7847 $18,400 '12 Toyota Corolla: Clean CARFAX, Fuel Efficient, Bluetooth, Sunroof/Moonroof, $9,990 #P8670D

'14 Toyota Prius: Hatchback, Includes Balance of Factory Warranty $14,990 #P8479

'02 Lincoln Blackwood, 59K, Leather, Sunroof, C17184A $17,490

Nissan/Datsun Trucks 4380

of South County 1 -8 5 5 -9 0 3 -8 6 9 6

Toyota Trucks 314-621-6666 • stltoday.com/homes

Chevrolet Trucks '15 Toyota Avalon XLE $22,294 #KE73623 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '15 Toyota Corolla $14,439 #KE66473 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '14 Toyota Corolla: 2 To Choose From, Magnetic Gray, 19K Miles, Starting at $12,999 #SC1401

4370

'0 2 Lincoln Blackwood: 5 9 K, Black, Sunroof C17184A $ 1 7 ,4 9 0

'1 6 Maxima Stk #P8 6 5 9 , $ 2 5 ,4 2 2

4300

'11 Corolla S Red, Only 76xxx Miles, Will Sell Fast At $10,499 #H161845B

Misc Trucks

4330

'14 Chevy 1500 LT: Crew Cab, 4x4, V8, 28K Miles, GM Certified, $30,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '14 Chevy Silverado Crew Cab, LTZ, GM Certified Warranty #C17058A $33,201 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '12 Chevy Colorado LT Crew Cab, 4WD, GM Certified Warranty, #C161610C, $17,297 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '10 Chevy Silverado 1500 LT: 4WD, Crew Cab, 5.3L V8, #C161817A, $22,401 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '04 Chevy Silverado1500 4X4, ABS, Priced Below Avg, #UH5332EP, $9,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129 '05 Chevy Silverado 1500: AWD, Security System, Priced Below Average $7,990 #77552B

4385

'13 Mazda Mazda3: Sedan, 30K Miles, Silver Last One, Hurry In! $12,299 #SC1430

'13 Toyota Tacoma Stk #P8638, $32,725

of South County 1-855-903-8696 '14 Toyota Tundra Stk #45331B, $29,472

of South County 1-855-903-8696

'1 2 Tundra Stk #4 3 4 9 9 B $ 3 2 ,2 2 0

of South County 1 -8 5 5 -9 0 3 -8 6 9 6 '15 Chevy 1500 LT: 4x4, V8, All Star, GM Certified, 18K Miles, $33,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '15 Chevy 1500 LT: Double Cab, 4x4, V6, GM Certified, 12K Mi, $27,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '14 Chevy 2500: HD, Reg Cab, 4x4 WT, V8, One Owner, $22,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

'1 4 Toyota Tundra Stk #P8 6 3 0 , $ 3 9 ,1 0 6

of South County 1 -8 5 5 -9 0 3 -8 6 9 6


Classified

M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

WEDNESDAY

NOVEMBER 30, 2016

STLTODAY.COM

SUNDAY COUPONS

THEY JUST MAKE CENTS Whether you use a couple or couple dozen every week, you end up with more groceries in your cart and change in your pocket. And that Sunday newspaper you just bought? It has paid for itself. Now that is what we call savvy shopping. SUBSCRIBE TODAY at STLtoday.com/subscribe

C3


Classified

C4

M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

WEDNESDAY

NOVEMBER 30, 2016

STLTODAY.COM

5TH ANNUAL AL L

BommaritoNISSAN BLACK FRIDAY 3 Day Sales Event FINAL DAY! SALE ENDS TODAY!

2017 NISSAN VERSA

2016 NISSAN ALTIMA 2.5

WED., NOV. 30TH AT 9PM 2016 NISSAN ROGUE

A/C, BLUETOOTH MSRP $13,200

$

EVERYONE QUALIFIES

9,999

BLUETOOTH, POWER WINDOWS & LOCKS MSRP $23,535

Versa Model #11157, Vin. #806146. 2 or More At This Price At Each Location.

EVERYONE QUALIFIES BACKUP CAMERA, CRUISE, SATELLITE RADIO MSRP $24,140

EVERYONE QUALIFIES

SIMILAR SAVINGS ON OVER 900 NISSANS

$

17,999

$

Altima Model #13016, Vin. #109787. 2 or More At This Price At Each Location.

19,999

SIMILAR SAVINGS ON OVER 900 NISSANS

Rogue Model #22116, Vin. #617267. 2 or More At This Price At Each Location.

"WHERE PRICE SELLS CARS"

A

Bommarito EXCLUSIVE

10 YEAR/200,000 MILE

NATIONWIDE WARRANTY† WITH EVERY NEW NISSAN PURCHASE

NOW 2 GREAT LOCATIONS TO BETTER SERVE YOU!

HAZELWOOD

661 Dunn Road AT THE BIG CORNER I-270 & N. LINDBERGH

314-731-2228

BALLWIN

636-394-0330

14747 Manchester Rd. BALLWIN, MISSOURI

BommaritoNissan.com

†Sale on in stock units only. Includes all rebates and incentives. See dealer for warranty details.

5TH ANNUA ANNUA AL

Bommarito Honda BLACK FRIDAY 3 Day Sales Event 2016 Honda

CIVIC LX

FINAL DAY!

2017 Honda

ACCORD LX

SALE ENDS TODAY!

AUTOMATIC EVERYONE QUALIFIES

149

$

** PER MONTH

**36 month lease, 12K miles per year, more miles available, total cost of lease $6,864 with $1,500 down cash or trade. Taxes, title, license dealer fee & accessories extra.

36 MONTH LEASE

SIMILAR SAVINGS ON OVER 600 Hondas

WED., NOV. 30TH AT 9PM

EVERYONE QUALIFIES

159

$

** PER MONTH

**36 month lease, 12K miles per year, more miles available, total cost of lease $7,224 with $1,500 down cash or trade. Taxes, title, license dealer fee & accessories extra.

36 MONTH LEASE

2016 Honda

CR-V LX 2WD EVERYONE QUALIFIES

AUTOMATIC

$

169

** PER MONTH

36 MONTH LEASE

SIMILAR SAVINGS ON OVER 600 Hondas

**36 month lease, 12K miles per year, more miles available, total cost of lease $7,584 with $1,500 down cash or trade. Taxes, title, license dealer fee & accessories extra.

A

Bommarito EXCLUSIVE

10 YEAR/200,000 MILE

NATIONWIDE WARRANTY† WITH EVERY NEW Honda PURCHASE

"WHERE PRICE SELLS CARS"

330 Brookes Drive, Hazelwood MO AT THE BIG CORNER I-270 & N. LINDBERGH

314-731-9777

BommaritoHonda.com

**In stock units only. †See dealer for warranty details.


Classified Crossovers

4387 Sport Utilitiy

'1 0 Audi Q5 : Qu a ttr o , AWD, Roof, Na v , $ 1 9 ,9 9 0

'13 Fo r d Ed g e SEL AWD, R o o f , Na v , Wh it e, B 7963 $23,990

'1 4 Nissan Juke 9 0 0 Mi. Like New ! #C16244R A,

Sport Utilitiy

4390

'10 Buick Envlave $16,987 #KT76448A 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '14 Buick Encore: 1.4L Turbo, 20K Miles, One Owner, GM Certified, $17,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '12 Buick Enclave: Leather, Captain's Chairs, 85K Miles Call for Price T15037B

'15 Buick Encore: One Owner, 20K Miles $17,901 #48259-1

'09 Buick Enclave CXL: Navigation, Heated Front Seats, DVD, Bluetooth, Sunroof $13,990 #27097B

'17 Cadillac XT5: Luxury, Black C17027R $45,740

'1 5 Chev y Suburban $ 4 6 ,8 8 8 #KT2017E 1 -8 6 6 -3 1 1 -8 3 5 0 For details go to w w w .ceram e.com

'0 6 Ch ev y Trailblazer, DVD, 3 rd Row V 16388B $ 6 ,4 9 0 '1 3 Ch ev y Equinox AWD, Leather, Sunroof, 2 8 K, B8 1 5 4

'1 3 Ch ev y Traverse L TZ : AWD, Loaded, $ 3 2 ,4 9 0 #B8 0 6 5

'08 Chevy Suburban 1500T: New Tires, Clean Carfax, 4WD, Heated Front Seats, Premium Package, $15,490 #77162A

'1 0 Chevy Equinox LT: 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Sunroof, Bluetooth, Back Up Camera, $ 1 1 ,9 9 0 #1 0 8 5 7 A

'05 Chevy Avalanche 1500: Low Miles, 4WD, Sunroof, Alloy Wheels, Flex Fuel Bose System $11,990 #27114B

'10 Chevy Equinox LT: One Owner, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Bluetooth, Sunroof $12,990 #95248A

'1 3 Chevy Equinox 1LT: 1 Owner Clean Carfax, AWD, Low Miles, Backup Camera, Bluetooth $ 1 9 ,9 9 0 #7 8 1 4 0 A

'12 Chevy Equinox LS: 4 Cyl, FWD, Clean CARFAX, Remote Keyless Entry, Satellite Radio, $6,990 77269A

'15 Chevy Tahoe LT: 4x4, Sunroof, DVD, 25K Miles, GM Certified, $44,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '12 Chevy Traverse LS V6, Blue, 45K Mi, GM Certified, One Owner, $16,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 314-772-1400 '14 Chevy Tahoe LTZ 40,xxx Miles, GM Certified Warranty #C10840P $40,656 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '1 3 Chevy Tahoe LT, 4WD, 35,xxx Miles, GM Certified #C10829P $ 3 5 ,3 5 7 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (8 6 6 ) 6 0 2 -1 7 7 0 '13 Chevy Equinox LT FWD, 31xxx Mi., GM Certified Warranty, #C10764P, $16,614 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '1 4 Chevy Equinox LT, FW D, 28,xxx Miles, GM Certified #C10826P, $ 1 8 ,6 8 2 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (8 6 6 ) 6 0 2 -1 7 7 0 '1 4 Chev y Equinox LS FWD, GM Certified Warranty #C10845P , $ 1 5 ,9 9 2 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (8 6 6 ) 6 0 2 -1 7 7 0 ' 10 Chevy Equinox: 99K Miles, Backup Camera, Navigation $11,990 #T16552A

M 1

4390 Sport Utilitiy

' 10 Chevy Equinox LS: FWD, New Tires, Only 100K Miles $8,990 #R1416A

4390

'14 Ford Edge SE: Bluetooth, $18,990 #T16642A

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

WEDNESDAY

ST. LOUIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING FINAL NOTICE AND EXPLANATION TO THE PUBLIC OF PROPOSED ACTIVITIES IN THE FLOODPLAIN To all interested agencies, groups and persons:

'11 Chevy Avalanche LTZ: Sunroof, Leather, 40K Miles $29,995

'16 Chevy Equinox LS: AWD, One Owner $19,990 #48061-1

'14 Chevy Traverse LTZ: Nav, Dual Roof, Lthr $26,901 #23892-1

'11 CRV AWD EX Crystal Black, 47xxx Miles, Moonroof, Alloys, Honda Quality Reduced! $16,999 #H161420A

2 0 0 7 Chevy Equinox LT Stk #9 4 2 9 8 -2 $ 7 ,9 9 5 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (8 6 6 )6 7 2 -4 0 2 0 '08 Equinox Sport AWD, One Owner, Leather, Alloys, 102K, #KD77002A, $11,795 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '15 Chevy Equinox LS: 4 Cyl, 25K Miles, GM Certified, $18,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '11 Chevy Equinox LT Sat Radio, 1 Owner, Bluetooth, 32 MPG, #X17073A, $11,699 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '16 Chevy Equinox LT Backup Camera, Bluetooth, 5K, 32 MPG, #X17050A, $21,999 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '15 Chevy Equinox LT: 4 Cyl, 23K Miles, One Owner, GMCertified, $19,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '14 Chevy Equinox LT: AWD, 4 Cyl, 34K Miles, GMCertified, $19,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '15 Chevy Suburban LT: 4x4, Sunroof, Heated Lthr, Dual DVD, Black, GM Certified, $45,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '13 Tahoe LT 4x4 Heated Leather, 82K Miles, 3rd Row, $26,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '10 Dodge Journey SXT 62K Mi., Red Crystal Pearl, #X17016A, $11,291 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '10 Journey SXT NHTSA 5-Star Rating, Sat Radio, Red, Stk #X17016A $12,412 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701

'1 4 Escalade AWD, Black, Certified, $ 5 3 ,9 9 0

'12 Expedition EL, 4WD, Leather, White, B8230 $20,980

'16 Ford Explorer Ltd $35,989 #TE45305 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '11 Ford Edge Sport $20,492 #TGB15739A 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '13 Ford Escape Titanium $18,994 #T3780X 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '14 Ford Explorer LTD $29,978 #TL52466 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '13 Ford Edge Sport Black, V6, Navi, 2 Sunroofs, 12 Speaker Premium Audio, Only 34k Miles $24,499 #H161943A

' 07 Ford Escape LTD: Leather, Roof, Alloy Wheels Only $6,990 #T15312B

Public notice is hereby given that St. Louis County, in accordance with Executive Order 11988 and 24 CFR Section 58.30, is proposing to include the activities listed below in its St. Louis HOME Consortium Consolidated Plan for iscal year 2017 for the Community Development Block Grant program. Funding for this program is being provided by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. The following proposed activities would upgrade or improve existing facilities located in the loodplain as shown on Federal Emergency Management Agency Flood Rate maps:

'14 Ford Edge SEL: 1 Owner, Power Tailgate, 6KMiles Call for Price #R1625

• The Village of Hanley Hills is proposing street improvements to the following addresses: 1901 - 2045 Bainbridge Dr., 1900 - 1949 Farrell Dr., 1900 - 1929 Eagle Dr., 1900 - 1915 Owen Dr., 1912 - 1946 Larch Dr., 7401 - 7563 Haywood Dr., and 7400 - 7501 Balfour Dr. • The City of Valley Park is proposing street improvements to the following addresses: Third St. between Benton St. and St. Louis Ave.; Sixth St. between Benton St. and St. Louis Ave.; Seventh St. between Benton St. and St. Louis Ave.; Eighth St. between Benton St. and St. Louis Ave. • The City of Berkeley is proposing the clearance and demolition of 8434 Alder Ave. and sidewalk improvements to the 8400 block of Alder Ave. and the 6400 block of Evergreen Blvd. • The City of Ferguson is proposing street improvements to the following streets: Kirk Dr., Lang Dr., Royce Dr., and South Dellwood Dr. • The City of Pagedale is proposing clearance and demolition of 7126 and 7124 Eltora Ave., 1311 and 1313 Pennsylvania Ave., 1250 and 1272 Purcell Ave., and 1540 Engelholm Ave. • The City of Moline Acres is proposing clearance and demolition of 2474 Moline Dr. • City of Velda Village Hills is proposing street improvements to the 6500 - 6700 blocks of Myron Ave.

'14 Ford Escape Titanium: Navigation, 20K Miles, 1 Owner, Blind Spot Detector Please Call for Price

'12 Ford Explorer XLT: Backup Camera, Black Metallic, Bluetooth, #P7505 Call for Pricing

'14 Ford Edge SEL: Leather, 6K Miles, 1 Owner Call for Price R1625

'08 Ford Edge Limited: Lthr, Heated Seats $13,997 #UH5314EP Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129 2 0 0 7 Ford Edge SEL Stk #6 6 9 8 8 -1 $ 1 0 ,9 9 5 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (8 6 6 )6 7 2 -4 0 2 0

2 0 0 7 Ford Edge SEL Stk #4 5 8 31 -2 $ 8 ,9 9 5 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (8 6 6 )6 72 -4 0 2 0 20 12 Ford Escape XLT Stk# 66953-1 $10 ,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai

20 0 8 Ford Escape XLT 3.0 L #45685-1 $8,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'10 GMC Yukon XL 1500: One Owner, Clean CARFAX, 4WD, Navigation, Backup Camera, $14,990 #27205A

'1 2 GMC Terrain SLE-1: Clean Carfax, Backup Camera, Bluetooth, Satellite Radio Call Today! $ 1 2 ,9 9 0 #9 5 1 5 6 B

'13 GMC Terrain SLE-1: FWD, One Owner, Clean Carfax, Backup Camera Call Now! $9,990 #94710C

'14 GMC Sierra1500: V6, Regular Cab $16,777 #47470-1

'13 GMC Yukon XL: Denali, DVD, Sunroof, Loaded $36,888 #48225-1

Any comments relative to these proposed expenditures of federal funds in an area identiied as a lood hazard area should be submitted in writing and must be received on or before December 9, 2016. Comments should be addressed to the attention of Mr. Jim Holtzman, address below. Comments may also be submitted via email at JHoltzman2@stlouisco.com. St. Louis County Department of Planning Ofice of Community Development 41 South Central Avenue – 5th Floor Clayton, Missouri 63105 Phone: (314) 615-4140 (voice) (314) 615-5889 (TTY) 1-800-735-2466 (Relay MO) Ofice Hours M – F 8am – 5pm EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER ST. LOUIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING OFFICE OF COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

Sport Utilitiy

4390 Sport Utilitiy

20 0 9 Hyundai Santa Fe #42572-2 $11,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

2 0 1 0 Hyundai Santa Fe Stk #9 4 5 8 3 -1 $ 5 ,9 9 5 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (8 6 6 )6 7 2 -4 0 2 0

'13 Infiniti EX-37 Journey: Loaded, #B8167, $27,990 '08 Jeep Commander Candy Red, 4WD, LTD., Sunroof, DVD, Loaded! Call Today, $9,299 #DL1340

'13 Jeep Wrangler Sahara, Auto, Hard Top, #B7990, $31,400

'15 GMC Acadia SLE-1: 7 Passenger, Must See $24,901 #47952-1

'11 GMC Acadia SLT Stk #45198B $15,250

'10 Ford Edge Lmtd: One Owner, Clean CARFAX, Heated Front Seats, Bluetooth, Sunroof/Moonroof $11,990 #95424A

'14 Ford Escape Titanium: 20K Miles, Lthr, Bu Cam, Htd Seat $22,000 #A9385

There are three primary purposes for this notice. First, people who may be affected by activities in loodplains and those who have an interest in the protection of the natural environment should be given an opportunity to express their concerns and provide information about these areas. Second, an adequate public notice program can be an important public educational tool. The dissemination of information about loodplains can facilitate and enhance Federal efforts to reduce the risks associated with the occupancy and modiication of these special areas. Third, as a matter of fairness, when the Federal government determines it will participate in actions taking place in loodplains, it must inform those who may be put at greater or continued risk.

'09 Jeep Liberty: Sport, Green, V6, 4x4 $11,300 #T12026A

'12 GMC Acadia SLT: AWD, Sunroof, DVD, 91K Miles, Black, $18,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 'GMC Terrain SLE: One Owner $18,901 #P3553

'14 Ford Explorer XLT: Silver, 4x4, Black Cloth, Sirius XM $26,490 #A9365

These activities will have no signiicant impact on the environment for the following reasons: The possible effects of not undertaking these activities were examined and it was determined there was an overriding public need for the activities and improvements which clearly outweigh the order’s requirements to avoid the loodplain. Non-loodplain activities do not appear to be practicable. Any proposed improvement of existing infrastructure will incorporate measures designed to mitigate potential side effects of possible looding and the few adverse effects caused by construction will be temporary. Environmental iles that document compliance with steps 3 through 6 of Executive Order 11988 are available for public inspection, review and copying upon request at the times and location delineated in the last paragraph of this notice for receipt of comments.

'13 GMC Acadia SLT: AWD, Roof, Quad Seats, $28,900 #B8066

of South County 1-855-903-8696

'15 Ford Escape: 32 MPG, 1 Owner, Backup Camera, Black $16,490 #A9367

The clearance and demolition activities will reduce liability for loss of property and life in the event of a lood. Furthermore, removing debris and dangerous and derelict structures from the loodplain will make the looded environment safer by ensuring that dangerous debris is not part of a lood event. The alternative of not undertaking these activities was rejected due to the life safety beneits that will be made available to residents in the event of a lood.

'16 GMC Terrain $25,115 #TE69971 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com

'1 1 Ford Edge SE: One Owner Clean CARFAX, Low miles, Parking Sensors, Spoiler, $ 1 2 ,9 9 0 #7 8 1 0 0 A

'14 Ford Edge Limited: Lthr, Moonroof, Nav., Chrome Wheels, $24,990 #T16109A

Alternative Sites, Actions and Determinations The proposed street and sidewalk improvements cannot be relocated as the infrastructure is existing in well-established residential areas. The alternative of not undertaking these activities was considered and rejected due to the overwhelming public beneit of this improvement. If streets and sidewalks are not improved, deterioration would be unsafe.

'07 Honda CRV EX: 1 Owner Clean Carfax, AWD, Sunroof, Multi-Disc changer. Perfect Color Combination $9,490 #10819A

'1 5 Hyundai Sonata: White Auto, 1 0 K Mi., #B8 0 1 0 ,

'0 7 Hyundai Santa Fe GLS: w/XM, 2 .7 LV6 , FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Low Miles, $ 7 ,9 9 0 #1 0 5 8 2 B

'14 CR-V EX Moonroof, Backup Camera, Electronic Stability, 30 MPG, Stk #X17104A $20,988 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701

'12 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo: 4WD, Power Windows, 93K, M457BMP, $18,818 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '11 Kia Sportage: Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified Call Today, $13,990 #75452A

'1 1 Kia Sorrento: Keyless Entry #UH5172EP $ 9 ,9 9 5 Lou Fusz Economy Lot W est (6 3 6 ) 2 0 0 -2 1 2 9 '13 Kia Sorento LX Heated Seats, 28K Mi., Backup Camera, #X2725P, $17,240 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701

20 12 Kia Sportage LX #42137-1 $11,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 '04 Lexus RX 330: 303L V6, AWD, Heated Leather Seats, Premium Sound, Call Today, $7,990 #95427A

'07 Lincoln Navigator $13,995 #KT79980B 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com

'09 Lincoln MKX: Black, Chromes, Call Today, C8247A $12,990

'08 Mercury Mountaineer: AWD Clean Carfax, Sunroof, Heated Front Seats, $10,990 #77437B

314-621-6666 • stltoday.com/classifieds

Auctions, Estate Sales & Antiques

To place your ad, call 314-621-6666 or 800-365-8020 ext.6666 Antiques Wanted

6290

20 0 4 Nissan Xterra #45570 -1 $4,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'1 1 Porsche Cayenne S: $ 3 3 ,8 5 0 #1 8 5 2 1 1

'1 4 Rav4 Limited AWD Auto, Roof, Nav, Stk #C8109A $ 2 4 ,9 9 0

'14 Subaru Outback: Premium, Alloys, AWD, Auto, Power Seat, Heated Seats, $20,816 #MS17384A LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298

'15 Tahoe LTZ 20xxx Miles, Every Option, White!! Stk #C16349A $56,490 '15 Toyota RAV4 $21,994 #KTE89534 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '09 Toyota RAV 4 Sport: Alloy Wheels, 4WD, 6 Cyl, CD Player, 55K Miles, . #M161021A, $13,894 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298

'10 Toyota 4 Runner Limited : $25,850

'08 Toyota FJ Cruiser: Manual Trans, 4WD, Low Miles, One Owner, 68K miles #MS17335A, $22,518 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '10 Toyota 4runner 4WD, Leather, Heated Seats, CD Player, 111K, #MS17045A, $22,309 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298

of South County 1 -8 5 5 -9 0 3 -8 6 9 6

'1 2 Toyota Rav4 #P8 6 1 1 $ 1 8 ,0 8 1

of South County 1 -8 5 5 -9 0 3 -8 6 9 6

Mini vans

4420

'16 Chrysler Town & Country: Touring, (2) To Choose, DVD, Loaded, Black, 25K Miles, Just Reduced! $20,999 AT1661

Date of First Publication: 11/30/2016 City of St. Louis, Missouri Ofice of the Mayor 1200 Market Street – Room 200 St. Louis, Missouri 63103 (314) 622-3723 These notices shall satisfy two separate but related procedural requirements for activities to be undertaken by the City of St. Louis. REQUEST FOR RELEASE OF FUNDS On or after 12/16/2016 the City of St. Louis will submit a request to the U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development (HUD) for the release of Community Development Block Grant funds under Title 1 of the Community Development Act of 1974, PL93-383, as amended, 42 U.S.C.-5301 et seq., to undertake the following project, comprising part of the City’s 2013 Action Plan: Project Title: Red Sea Eritrean Community Center & Parking Lot Purpose: Construction of community center and parking lot. Location: 1039-41, 1043, 1045-47 & 1053 N. Grand, St. Louis, Missouri 63112 Estimated Cost: Total development cost of this project is approximately $686,630.00, with approximately $225,000.00 of funding coming from the City of St. Louis’ Year 2013 Action Plan CDBG funds. FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT The City of St. Louis has determined that the project will have no signiicant impact on the human environment. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) is not required. Additional project information is contained in the Environmental Review Record (ERR) on ile at City of St. Louis’ Planning & Urban Design Agency, (PDA), 1520 Market Street, Suite 2000, St. Louis, Missouri 63103 and may be examined or copied weekdays 8 A.M to 5 P.M. PUBLIC COMMENTS Any individual, group, or agency may submit written comments on the ERR to Mark G. Jefferies, Environmental Review Oficer, PDA, at the address listed above. All comments received by 12/15/2016 will be considered by the City of St. Louis prior to authorizing submission of a request for release of funds. Comments should specify which Notice they are addressing. RELEASE OF FUNDS The City of St. Louis certiies to HUD that Francis Slay, in his capacity as Mayor of the City of St. Louis consents to accept the jurisdiction of the Federal Courts if an action is brought to enforce responsibilities in relation to the environmental review process and that these responsibilities have been satisied. HUD’s approval of the certiication satisies its responsibilities under NEPA and related laws and authorities and allows the City of St. Louis to use HUD program funds. OBJECTIONS TO RELEASE OF FUNDS HUD will accept objections to its release of fund and the City of St. Louis’ certiication for a period of ifteen days following the anticipated submission date or its actual receipt of the request (whichever is later) only if they are on one of the following bases: (a) the certiication was not executed by the Certifying Oficer of the City of St. Louis; (b) the City of St. Louis has omitted a step or failed to make a decision or inding required by HUD regulations at 24 CFR part 58; (c) the grant recipient or other participants in the development process have committed funds, incurred costs or undertaken activities not authorized by 24 CFR Part 58 before approval of a release of funds by HUD; or (d) another Federal agency acting pursuant to 40 CFR Part 1504 has submitted a written inding that the project is unsatisfactory from the standpoint of environmental quality. Objections must be prepared and submitted in accordance with the required procedures (24 CFR Part 58, Sec. 58.76) and shall be addressed to HUD, at 1222 Spruce Street, St. Louis, Missouri 63103, attn.: Dee Ann Ducote, Director of Community Planning & Development. Potential objectors should contact HUD to verify the actual last day of the objection period.

DISTRICT COURT DIVISION OF AUGUSTA DOCKET NO. RE-16-19

STATE OF MAINE KENNEBEC: ss. WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. PLAINTIFF v. CHERI A. CAUDILL AND HEATHER M. ROESGER DEFENDANTS

) ) ) ) ) ) )

ORDER ON PLAINTIFF’S MOTION FOR SERVICE BY PUBLICATION

This is an action for the foreclosure of a mortgage on real property and may effect real property of the Defendants located at, 20 Kennison Street, Augusta, ME 04330, and described in such Mortgage Deed as recorded in Book 11683 at Page 100 in the Kennebec Registry of Deeds. This Court has reviewed the motion of the Plaintiff for service by publication pursuant to Rule 4(g) of the Maine Rules of Civil Procedure Rule 6(b) and inds that Plaintiff is in compliance with Rule 4(g)(1)(A)-(C). It is ORDERED that service be made upon the Defendant Heather M. Roesger by publishing a copy of this Order once a week for three (3) successive weeks in the, St. Louis Post-Dispatch and Kennebec Journal, newspapers of general circulation in St. Louis, Missouri, and Augusta, Maine. It is FURTHER ORDERED that the Defendant Heather M. Roesger being served by publication appear and serve an answer to the motion or complaint on counsel for Plaintiff, Bendett & McHugh, PC, 270 Farmington Avenue, Suite 151, Farmington, CT 06032. The answer must be iled with the Court within forty-one (41) days after the irst publication of this Order. It is FURTHER ORDERED that the Plaintiff mail a copy of the Order as published to the Defendant at 20 Kennison Street, Augusta, ME 04330, the last known address of Defendant Heather M. Roesger. Failing to serve an answer will cause judgment by default to be entered, granting relief sought in the motion or complaint. The clerk may incorporate this order by reference on the docket. DATE:

Judge Please Print Name:

'16 Chrysler Town & Legal Notices 9000 Legal Notices 9000 Country: Touring, Rear DVD, Leather, 4 TO CHOOSE! $21,995 Notice is given that an ap- Notice is hereby given Don Brown Chevrolet plication has been made that Enterprise Bank and 1-866-883-8841 to the Comptroller of the Trust, a Missouri state-charCurrency, North- eastern tered bank, with its princi'07 Chrysler T & C District Office, 340 Madi- pal place of business at LWB Touring: son Avenue, Fifth Floor, 1 2 8 1 N. Warson Road, 3rd Row Seating, New York, NY 10173, for St. Louis, MO 6 3 1 3 2 , has Backup Camera, consent to merge: filed an application with #UH5267EP, $5,995 the Federal Deposit InsurLou Fusz Economy Lot Scottrade Bank a n c e C o rp o ra ti o n West (636) 200-2129 Saint Louis, Missouri ("FDIC") for consent to ac'16 Dodge Journey SXT: into quire through merger EaGray, TD Bank, National g le Ba n k a n d Trust 25K Miles, Association Company of Missouri, a Hurry In! Wilmington, Delaware Missouri state- chartered $17,399 #AT1704 bank, with its principal It is contemplated that the place of business at main office and branch of- 1 0 5 9 6 Highway 2 1 , fices of TD Bank, National Hillsboro, MO 6 3 0 5 0 . Association will continue to operate, except that Any person wishing to com'0 9 Dodge Grand Scottrade Bank's main of- ment on this application Caravan SXT: 3 .8 LV6 , fice in St. Louis, MO will may file his or her comFWD, Clean Carfax, Low be closed. ments in writing with the Miles, regional director of the 3 rd Row Seating, This notice is published FDIC at the appropriate $ 8 ,9 9 0 #9 5 4 2 8 B pursuant to 1 2 U. S . C. FDIC office, located at 215c and 1828(c) and 12 1 1 0 0 W alnut Street, Suite C.F.R. Part 5 . Anyone 2 1 0 0 , Kansas City, MO may submit written com- 6 4 1 0 6 -2 1 8 0 , not later '15 Dodge Grand ments on this application than December 5 , 2 0 1 6 . Caravan SXT: Stow 'N by December 3 0 , 2016, The nonconfidential porGo, 32K Miles, $17,995 3 0 days after the initial tions of the application Don Brown Chevrolet publication of this notice, are on file at the appropri1-866-883-8841 to: Director of District Li- ate FDIC office and are censing, Office of the a va ila b le for p ub lic '15 Kia Sedona LX C o mp tro lle r o f th e inspection during regular One Owner, Alloys, CD Currency, North- eastern business hours. PhotoPlayer, Bluetooth, District Office, 340 Madicopies of the nonconfiden19K Mi., #K1015BMP, son Avenue, Fifth Floor, tial portion of the applica$20,332 New York, NY 1 0 1 7 3 or tion file will be made LOU FUSZ SUBARU NE. L i c e n s i n g @ available upon request. (888) 681-8298 occ.treas.gov. 20 0 8 Nissan Quest The public file is available Stk #94143-1 $6,995 for inspection in the disSt. Charles Nissan/ trict office during regular Hyundai business hours. Written (866)672-4020 requests for a copy of the public file on the applica2 0 0 7 Toyota Sienna tion should be sent to the Stk# 4 5 8 6 2 -2 $ 7 ,9 9 5 Director of District LicensSt. Charles Nissan/ ing at the address noted Hyundai above. (8 6 6 )6 7 2 -4 0 2 0 Scottrade Bank, St. Louis, MO Vans 4430 TD Bank, National Association, Wilmington, DE '16 2500 Express Van LT: 12 Passenger, 24K Miles, $23,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '16 Ford T250 Cargo Van $25,992 #TE32065 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com

Firewood/Fuel

Invitation to Bid: E.M. Harris Construction Company (EMH), 2600 Delmar Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63103 is seeking subcontractor bids for construction of the Chippewa Park Project located in St. Louis, MO. Scopes of work include, but are not limited to: Gut Rehab of 16 existing buildings into 46 dwelling units. Section 3, Minority, Women and Disadvantaged Business Enterprises are strongly encouraged to bid. Project plans & specifications are available for viewing online through an Invitation to Bid and at: ï MOKAN Planroom 4666 Natural Bridge, 63115 - 314-565-9675 ï SLDC Planroom 1712 Macklind Ave., 63110 - 314-678-0087 ïEMH Planroom 2600 Delmar, 63103 314-436-4426 All bids are due to EMH office by Dec. 23, 2016, 1PM; (314) 436- 6691. PREVAILING WAGES (as set by US Department of Labor and Missouri Housing Development Commission immediately prior to start of construction) MUST BE PAID TO ALL WORKERS; CERTIFIED PAYROLL REPORTS REQUIRED. For questions or additional information, please contact Phil Krull, pkrull@emharris.com. EMH is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Accepting Sealed RFP's for th e "PURC HAS E O R LEAS E PURCHASE FOR UP TO 2 4 C LAS S C SCHOOL BUSES"

Sell it today and find a home that fits just right.

Historian will pay top $$ for German-Japanese WW II relics 314-438-8665

9005

WENTZVILLE R-IV SCHOOL DISTRICT

Quarters getting a little cramped?

of South County 1 -8 5 5 -9 0 3 -8 6 9 6

Bids/Proposals

6095

Seasoned Oak and Hickory Delivered & Stacked. 23 yrs of Service. 573-513-6510

'1 2 RAV4 Limited Stk #P8 6 2 9 $ 2 2 ,2 5 2

C5

NOTICE OF FINDING OF NO SIGNFICANT IMPACT AND NOTICE OF INTENT TO REQUEST RELEASE OF FUNDS

4390

'1 4 Toyota Rav4 XLE Stk #P8 6 1 7 , $ 2 3 ,4 8 5

'13 Nissan Rogue SL, AWD, Roof, Nav, Leather, #B8163, $18,990 '13 Nissan Pathfinder SV, 3rd Row Seating, Backup Camera, Parking Sensors, stk# X17140A $18,325 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '06 Nissan Murano: Priced Below Average $7,995 #UH5325EP Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129 '15 Nissan Murano: Platinum, Lthr, Backup Camera, 28 MPG, # X17166A $24,319 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701

STLTODAY.COM

Francis G. Slay, Mayor Certifying Oficer

4390 Sport Utilitiy

'1 4 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport ES: 2 3 K Miles, FW D, Traction Control, #X2730P, $ 1 4 ,8 3 0 LOU FUSZ SUBAR U (8 8 8 ) 3 4 7 -0 7 0 1 '15 Nissan Pathfinder $25,992 #KTE34632 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com

NOVEMBER 30, 2016

RFP Due & Public Opening on December 9, 2016 @ 10:30 AM CST

314-621-6666 stltoday.com/homes

100 Logistics Center Drive Wentzville, 63385 For Bid Information contact David Wilson davidw il son@wsdr4.org Or visit h t t p : / / w e n t z v i lle.k12.mo.us Departments/Business/ Purchasing-Open Bids

Pets & Stuff

Public & Self Storage 9003

To place your ad, call at 314-621-6666 or 800-365-0820, ext. 6666.

WENTZVILLE RIV SCHOOL DISTRICT

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Dogs

5005 Dogs

5005 Dogs

English Bulldog male pupAKC Soft Coated Whea t en puppies. Vet py AKC Health papers Born May 3 0 Potty & Check, shots and wormed, not a puppy mill, crate Traine d $ 1 2 5 0 . will deliver to St . Louis 620-543-6587 text 636-208-2012 Full bld Labradoodles Ready 11/28 hawthornedoodles.com Springfield, IL $1200 (217)-572-8148

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STLTODAY.COM/FOOD WEDNESDAY • 11.30.2016 • L

the art of soup HILLARY LEVIN • hlevin@post-dispatch.com

BY DANIEL NEMAN • St. Louis Post-Dispatch

It wasn’t the best advertising line, but it was undeniably true: Soup is good food. ❡ On a frosty night when the wind is blowing, and the chill sinks deep into your bones, what is it that you turn to? Soup. When you want something warming and comforting after a diicult day, what is it that you most desire? Soup. When you have a cold, what is the only thing that can make you feel better? Soup, especially if it has chicken and noodles in it. ❡ It restoreth the soul. And of course it is always best when your cup runneth over. ❡ At its most elemental level, soup is just water with a bunch of other stuf cooked in it. And that is what makes it so exciting. You can have a free hand to do with it what you will. See SOUP • Page L4

4 recipes • Mom’s Cabbage Soup (above), Curried Cream of Cauliflower and Apple Soup, Flemish Onion Soup With Cheese and Lentil Soup. PAGE L4

Cooking shows aren’t what they used to be DANIEL NEMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

What is happening to all the great cooking shows? I watch very little food-based television anymore. Recently, I had the occasion to see the Food Network’s “Chopped!” for the first time in years, and it only reminded me why I haven’t been watching it (also, I try to avoid anything that has an exclamation point in the title). It also reminded me why I haven’t watched the Food Network for a long time. All that false drama. All that hyperkinetic camera work. All that percussive music. All that lipstick on a wholeroasted suckling pig.

But there are a couple of shows that are still worth watching. Or were. Because both are now in turmoil. Did you happen to catch Christopher Kimball when he came to town a few months ago? Probably not, because there could not have been more than a couple of hundred people there — which is in itself a bad sign. A big-time television star such as Kimball ought to be able to fill the large auditorium at UMSL. Until recently, Kimball was the host of “America’s Test Kitchen,” both on television and on the radio. He also was the publisher of Cook’s Illustrated magazine, and wrote a well-regarded, folksy column for it. Then he left “America’s Test Kitchen” — which he See NEMAN • Page L5

REALTOR LOVES TO COOK ITALIAN FOOD AND A WHOLE LOT MORE. PAGE L2

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Make biscotti for a snack or a gift BY MELISSA D’ARABIAN • Associated Press

I remember the first party I ever hosted. I was 5 and my mom invited all of my kindergarten girlfriends and their moms for

a holiday singing gathering. We knoshed on homemade cookies dunked in hot cocoa made from packets of powder dissolved in boiling water. Standing there around our piano, surrounded by tiny off-key singers with

crumby, smiling mouths and steamy chocolate breath, I fell in love with hospitality. I felt in my heart the joy of feeding people, especially around the holidays. See BISCOTTI • Page L5

LEMON SLICES GIVE MANDARIN GARDEN’S LEMON CHICKEN A FRESH FLAVOR. PAGE L3 LET’S EAT

1 M


LET’S EAT

L2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

ON OUR RADAR WINE FINDS

Sonoma and Napa Sauvignon Blanc BY GAIL APPLESON • Special to the Post-Dispatch

One of the best ways to entice grocery shoppers to buy a wine that’s not on their radar is to give them a taste. That was certainly the case recently when I made an afterwork stop at Dierbergs to pick up a few items. While I was rapidly steering toward the dairy department, I was offered a sample of the Rodney Strong Estate Vineyards Charlotte’s Home Sauvignon Blanc. Wine wasn’t on my shopping list that night, but it only took one sip to persuade me to grab a bottle. The wine is compared below with a Napa Valley sauvignon blanc from the well-regarded Markham Vineyards.

RODNEY STRONG ESTATE VINEYARDS 2015 CHARLOTTE’S HOME SAUVIGNON BLANC, NORTHERN SONOMA, SONOMA COUNTY

MARKHAM VINEYARDS 2015 SAUVIGNON BLANC NAPA VALLEY

Bought • Dierbergs, 8450 Eager Road, in November for $10.99 Description • Clean and crisp, this aromatic wine is reminiscent of a Bordeaux blanc. Scoring 90 points from Wine Spectator, it has a refreshing acidity and combines citrus and tropical fruit flavors with the right amount of grassiness and herbs. A small percentage of the wine was fermented in French oak, which adds complexity. It would go well with seafood and vegetable dishes.

Bought • Dierbergs, 8450 Eager Road, in November for $14.99 Description • The Markham is a diferent style than the Rodney Strong Sauvignon. Made from 92 percent sauvignon blanc and 8 percent semillón, it’s bigger bodied and softer with less acidity. However, the Markham also has a tropical bent. It marries melon and pineapple fruit with citrus flavors. This rich sauvignon blanc is a good match for fish and chicken dishes with cream sauces.

M 1 • WEDNESDAY • 11.30.2016

AMY BERTRAND Let’s Eat and features editor • abertrand@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8284 DANIEL NEMAN food writer • dneman@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8133 DONNA BISCHOFF vice president of advertising • dbischof@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8529

BEST BITES: SIMPLY NATURE CREAMY ALMOND BUTTER For those people who believe that nothing can be better than peanut butter, we bring you almond butter. A little more sophisticated, a little more classy and considerably richer in flavor, almond butter is great for all ages. The SimplyNature brand is a bit sweet — it has cane sugar, and I like my nut butters plain — but silky smooth due to added palm oil. It’s not low-cal, but it’s delicious. Size • 12 ounces Price • $4.99 Available • Aldi — Daniel Neman

PREP SCHOOL

Make your own limoncello Now that the holiday season has begun, we are bringing back one of our very favorite Prep School videos: How to make your own, deliriously delicious limoncello. It would make a memorable and greatly appreciated present — but be sure to keep a bottle or two for yourself.

stltoday.com/food

Follow Gail on Twitter @GailAppleson.

WHAT’S COOKING

DINNER IN 20 MINUTES

Realtor is known for his Italian cooking

Rarebit indulges comfort-food, cheesy cravings

TOM’S LASAGNA Yield: 12-15 servings 2 pounds bulk Italian sausage 2 medium onions finely chopped 2 tablespoons olive oil Pinch of crushed red pepper (or to taste) 2 (28-ounce) cans crushed tomatoes 2 tablespoons granulated sugar (or to taste) 1 (16-ounce) container ricotta cheese 8 ounces shredded mozzarella cheese 8 ounces grated Romano cheese 8 ounces shredded provolone cheese 2 medium eggs ¼ cup milk 2 tablespoons chifonade of basil (see note) 2 cloves garlic, minced 8 ounces grated ParmigianoReggiano cheese 1 (16-ounce) package no-bake lasagna noodles PHOTOS BY GUY SELBERT

bikes and not have to worry about cars. We rent a bounce house for them.

BY PAMELA SELBERT Special to the Post-Dispatch

Though Tom Fanara is a Realtor by vocation and serious bowler by avocation (he’s been a member of various leagues since he was a kid and consistently averages in the 220s, he says), he is probably better known around the neighborhood for his culinary skills. That’s because he’s also a member of an unofficial committee that provides the meats and other entrees for his street’s annual block party, an event generally held in September that draws as many as 125 friends and neighbors. His lasagna and other Italian dishes are “amazing,” a neighbor says enthusiastically. But Fanara doesn’t stop there: he also does nearly all the cooking for his family. What prompted your interest in cooking? I like to eat! My mother was a good cook, and when we were young, my brother, sister and I would watch — and learn — as she prepared the various Italian dishes. She was actually German — and grew up on traditional German food that was either fried or boiled. But after she married my dad, who is Italian, his mother taught her to cook Italian. Every Sunday morning he’d take us kids to visit his parents, our grandparents, and my mom stayed home to cook. She’d have spaghetti and meatballs ready when we got back. Have you always done the cooking for your family? Yes — my wife doesn’t like

TOM FANARA Age • 52 Family • Wife, Trish, a certified public accountant; daughter Andrea, 20, a junior at Truman State University; son Patrick, 16, a junior at Bishop DuBourg High School; and dog Alley, 8, a pug. Occupation • Realtor Home • St. Louis Hills

to cook; I do. But my repertoire isn’t limited to Italian dishes. I make what I like to eat — and what sounds good on the TV cooking shows I watch. I’m a big fan of the Food Network. If a particular dish sounds appealing and I have the ingredients, I follow the recipe — and if I don’t have all the ingredients, I improvise. I have a lot of fun with cooking. How long have you cooked for the block parties? Well, we’ve been here about 10 years. The committee tries to prepare a different meat every year — such as pork steaks, pulled pork; one year we had a whole roast pig. Everyone else brings a side dish. It’s a fun time. We get a permit and close off the street. Kids get to ride their

What’s important to you in cooking for your family? I try to make meals that not only taste good — and appeal to all members of the family — but also have some nutritional value. And being Italian, I never prepare only enough for one meal — I make plenty extra for leftovers. I also make my own sauce. Where did you get the recipe for the sauce? My wife and I both grew up in St. Louis, but before we moved to this house, we lived for two years just outside Omaha, Neb. There was an Italian restaurant nearby called Buca di Beppo that we especially liked — I remember it had a bust of the Pope in the dining room! — and whenever we invited friends out for dinner we took them there. The restaurant also had a few tables in the kitchen, where diners could watch the cooks at work. Once the manager gave us a tour of the kitchen — starting with the 25- or 30-gallon pots where the pasta sauce was simmering. He explained that his sauce consisted only of crushed tomatoes and chopped onions sauteed in olive oil. I’ve used that simple recipe ever since, though I doctor mine a little, adding a pinch of red pepper for a kick, and several tablespoons of sugar to sweeten. The dish I’m presenting is a family favorite — I found it on the Food Network. But the sauce recipe is my own.

Note: To make a chifonade, stack fresh basil leaves, roll tightly, then slice into thin strips perpendicular to the roll. 1. Brown Italian sausage in a skillet over medium heat, breaking into small pieces as it cooks. Remove from pan, and drain sausage on a paper towel. 2. Heat olive oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add onions and crushed red pepper, and saute until soft. Add tomatoes, sugar and meat, then let the sauce simmer until thickened, about 2 hours, stirring periodically to prevent sticking. 3. Combine the ricotta, mozzarella, Romano and provolone cheese in a large bowl and stir in eggs, milk, basil and garlic, mixing thoroughly. 4. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Prepare a lasagna pan or 9-by-13inch baking dish with cooking spray. 5. Cover the bottom of the pan with 2 cups of the sauce. 6. Place one layer of the lasagna noodles over the sauce, breaking noodles if necessary to cover the entire pan bottom. 7. Spread about one-third of the cheese mixture over the noodles. 8. Repeat these three layers (sauce, noodles, cheese) twice. Cover with remaining sauce. 9. Sprinkle the ParmigianoReggiano cheese evenly over the top. Cover with foil, being careful to not let the foil touch the cheese. 10. Bake for 1 hour, or until bubbling on the edges. 11. Remove the foil, and continue baking 15 more minutes, or until the cheese on top begins to brown. 12. Remove from oven and let rest for 15 to 20 minutes before serving. Per serving: 657 calories; 41g fat; 20g saturated fat; 124mg cholesterol; 34g protein; 36g carbohydrate; 8g sugar; 3g fiber; 1,222mg sodium; 690mg calcium.

WANT TO BE IN WHAT’S COOKING? Send your favorite recipe (or nominate a friend or relative), plus your name, address, email and telephone number to: abertrand@postdispatch.com or What’s Cooking, St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 900 North Tucker Boulevard, St. Louis, Mo. 63101

BY BONNIE S. BENWICK The Washington Post

Rarebit, a.k.a. Welsh rabbit, is an oddsounding name for a dish that’s several hundred years old and has nothing to do with bunnies. For those who don’t know it, it’s a roux-based cheese sauce that’s typically flavored with something sharp, like mustard or Worcestershire sauce, and maybe spices, and beer or cider. It might look like Velveeta, but trust me, that’s where the similarity ends. In this application, James Beard Awardwinning cookbook author Diana Henry pours it over thick toast and broils it just until browned and bubbly — very quick comfort food for which you could skip the reading of the nutritional analysis, just this once, and indulge. It’s posh and humble at the same time. Henry included it in her new cookbook, “Simple: Effortless Food, Big Flavors,” with the added richness of a whisked-in egg and a skosh of apple brandy. But years before, she had featured in her column for the Telegraph a version with ripe pear, and that gives the dish just enough substance to pass for dinner at my house. With a salad.

HARD CIDER RAREBIT Yield: 3 servings 3 thick slices crusty bread 2 tablespoons unsalted butter 2 tablespoons plus 1½ teaspoons allpurpose flour ½ cup dry cider 1 cup grated sharp cheddar cheese ½ teaspoon mustard, preferably Colman’s (English, not powdered) or Dijon Pinch freshly grated nutmeg Freshly ground black pepper 1 large Bosc or Bartlett pear 1 large egg 1½ teaspoons apple brandy or Calvados 3 sprigs fresh thyme (may substitute finely chopped chives) 1. Position an oven rack 4 to 6 inches from the broiler element; preheat the broiler. 2. Meanwhile, toast the bread. Place each slice in an individual gratin dish. 3. Melt the butter in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Whisk in the flour to form a roux, then remove the pan from the heat just long enough to gradually whisk in the cider until smooth. 4. Return to the heat; once the mixture is bubbling, reduce the heat to low. Stir in the cheese, mustard and nutmeg. Remove from the heat and season generously with the pepper. 5. Peel and core the pear. Cut half of it into long wedges that are not too thick, and cut the rest into small dice. 6. Crack the egg into a liquid measuring cup. Add the apple brandy or Calvados and stir until lightly beaten. Whisk a few spoonfuls of the cheese mixture into the egg (to temper it), then pour it all into the saucepan, whisking until well incorporated. Add the diced pear and stir to incorporate. 7. Arrange some pear wedges on each piece of toast, then pour the cheese sauce over them, dividing it evenly among the gratin dishes. Broil for a minute or two, watching closely, just until lightly browned on top and bubbling. Pluck the leaves from each thyme sprig, letting some fall on top of each portion. Serve hot. Per serving: 410 calories; 15g protein; 36g carbohydrates; 21g fat; 12g saturated fat; 120mg cholesterol; 480mg sodium; 3g fiber; 10g sugar


LET’S EAT

11.30.2016 • WEdnEsday • M 1

LEMON CHICKEN FROM MANDARIN GARDEN Yield: 3 servings 2 chicken breasts, boneless and skinless (approximately 1 pound) 4 tablespoons cornstarch, divided 2 tablespoons all-purpose lour ½ teaspoon baking powder 1 large egg 2 cups vegetable oil

1 medium thin-skinned lemon cut into very thin slices — about 1/8-inch thick 1 cup of shredded green or Napa cabbage 1 (14.5 ounce) or (16-ounce) can chicken broth 2 tablespoons lemon juice from concentrate 6 tablespoons granulated sugar

Notes: Make sure the baking powder is fresh for this recipe. • Use a medium lemon with a thinner skin for best taste with the lemon slices. Mandarin Garden uses RealLemon® juice from concentrate in its chicken. 1. Slice chicken breasts in half lengthwise to make 4 thin illets. 2. Stir or whisk 2 tablespoons of cornstarch, lour and baking powder together in a small container. 3. Crack egg into a medium mixing bowl and stir to mix yolk and white. Gradually stir or whisk in cornstarch, lour and baking powder. Add 4 chicken pieces and turn to coat. 4. Heat vegetable oil in a large wok or sauté pan over medium high heat until the oil begins to shimmer, then test the temperature. A good temperature for frying chicken is about 350 degrees. If you don’t have an oil/candy thermometer, add a tiny droplet of the chicken batter to the oil. If the batter doesn’t bubble, the oil isn’t ready. If it smokes, spatters or boils very quickly, it’s a little too hot. 5. Use a slotted spoon or tongs to place the pieces in the hot oil until they are golden brown, about 4 to 5 minutes. The pieces will rise to the top of oil. 6. Remove from oil with a slotted spoon and drain on paper towels. Let the pieces cool. 7. Slice the cabbage into ine shreds and place on a large deeper plate or platter. 8. Carefully cut the fried chicken on the diagonal across each illet into thin pieces. Arrange evenly across the cabbage. Top all with the thinly sliced lemon. 9. In a 1 ½- or 2-quart saucepan, bring the chicken broth to a low boil. 10. Stir in lemon juice. 11. Stir the remaining 2 tablespoons of cornstarch with cold water to make a medium slurry. Add cornstarch mixture to the hot broth in thirds, stirring in each addition until desired thickness is reached. 12. Add sugar to the lemon-chicken sauce and cook over medium low heat, stirring as you cook, until the sugar dissolves. 13. Pour sauce over the chicken, lemon and cabbage and serve. Per serving: 402 calories; 10g fat; 2g saturated fat; 146mg cholesterol; 34g protein; 43g carbohydrate; 27g sugar; 2g iber; 665mg sodium; 148mg calcium. To request a recipe • Would you like to request a recipe from a restaurant that is still open in the St. Louis area? Send your request along with your full name and the city you live in to reciperequest@ post-dispatch.com.

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • L3

SPECIAL REQUEST

Mandarin Garden’s Lemon Chicken gets zing from fresh lemon slices

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

BY PAT EBY special to the Post-dispatch

Q • I would like the recipe for the Lemon Chicken at the Mandarin Garden restaurant in St. Peters. I have been going to this restaurant for years and the only thing I order is the Lemon Chicken. — Kathy Sivils, Wright City

A • When Duke and Edna Wang opened their popular Mandarin Garden in St. Peters in 1987, they soon built a loyal following in the rapidly growing city. Then, as now, Duke Wang cooked everything from scratch using fresh foods and top-quality ingredients. Edna interacted with the customers and managed the little restaurant. They soon expanded to an adjacent storefront

Holiday lavors, bright and early

MANDARIN GARDEN 36 Plaza 94, St. Peters 636-928-9568

as their loyal customer base grew. “Today, we still serve many of our original families,” Duke Wang says. “People who first came here as children, now grown, still come to see us – with their children. It’s not unusual to have three generations at one table.” In fact, the Family Dinner options on their extensive menu are the biggest sellers at the dinner service. These preset packages offer appetizers, soup, main courses and rice in nicely balanced choices. Each selection offers one substitution as well. Mandarin Garden also offers lunch specials Monday through Friday,

a popular choice for those who want fresh food served quickly in a nice setting. The regular menu is available as well at lunch. “We close between lunch and dinner,” Duke Wang says. “That gives us time to prepare for dinner.” Customer favorites include the Lemon Chicken reader Kathy Sivils requested. “The thinly sliced lemons give this dish a very fresh flavor,” Duke Wang says. “Our customers also like General Tso’s chicken, which is spicy, and Orange Chicken, another sweet and sour flavor. Mandarin Beef in a special garlic sauce is also popular.” Next year, the Mandarin Garden will celebrate 30 years in business. Duke Wang, who came to the United States to study

engineering in college, still enjoys cooking every day. “When I got my engineering degree, the country was in an economic downturn and no jobs were available,” he says. “I cooked first in a few other restaurants. When Edna and I married, we started our restaurant.” The Wangs raised two sons who will celebrate the anniversary year with them in spirit. Neither son is interested in taking over the restaurant. “My oldest son graduated from Juilliard. He plays the violin and lives and works in New York City. He’s auditioning for symphony positions. My youngest son is in his second year of medical school,” Duke Wang says. “This is how Edna and I stay busy – serving our customers.”

You won’t miss what’s missing

GORAN KOSANOVIC • special to The Washington Post BY ELLIE KRIEGER special to Washington Post

DEB LINDSEY • special to The Washington Post BY ELLIE KRIEGER special to The Washington Post

These waffles are a smile-inducing way to get you back in gear the morning(s) after your holiday feast, and to use up leftover pumpkin puree and cranberries while you’re at it. But more than that, they have so much holiday spirit — bejeweled with cranberries and fragrant with homey pumpkin spices — and they are so easy to make, you’ll want to enjoy them throughout the holiday season. You can feel good about eating them often, because they give you all the comfort-food satisfaction you expect yet are considerably better for you than a typical waffle. First, they are made with whole-grain flour; I use whole-grain pastry flour to create an exceptionally soft,

tender texture, but you could use regular whole-wheat flour if you prefer. A few tablespoons of wheat germ in the batter add a hearty texture, toasty flavor and concentrated nutrition. Pumpkin puree provides quintessential holiday flavor and hue and also contributes moisture and richness, allowing for less added fat in the batter. Cranberries heighten the seasonal cheer healthfully, and rather than being laden with white sugar, these waffles are gently sweetened with deeply flavorful pure maple syrup. You can make the batter a day ahead and keep it in the refrigerator; or cook the waffles, allow them to cool, wrap them individually and freeze them in a zip-top bag. Then just pop them into the toaster for a convenient, warm and satisfying way to fuel you through the holidays.

PUMPKIN CRANBERRY WAFFLES Yield: 4 servings (makes 4 large or 8 small wales), 1 cup whole-wheat pastry lour 3 tablespoons toasted wheat germ ½ teaspoon baking powder ½ teaspoon baking soda ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon ¼ teaspoon ground ginger ¼ teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg 1/8 teaspoon salt 1 cup well-shaken low-fat buttermilk

½ cup pure pumpkin puree 2 large eggs 3 tablespoons pure maple syrup, plus more for serving 1 tablespoon canola oil or other neutraltasting oil, plus more for the wale iron ¾ cup fresh or frozen cranberries, each cut in half or quartered, as needed

This cake’s name refers to some key ingredients the recipe doesn’t call for, which were rationed in America during World Wars I and II: butter, milk and eggs. But I like it for what it has aplenty: big chocolate flavor, a moist, fudgy crumb and one-pan ease. Healthful oil replaces the butter, making this version better for you than a typical chocolate cake. I take that goodness a step further by using mostly whole-grain pastry flour and just enough sugar so the cake definitely tastes like dessert but it is not overly sweet. The way to make it is so different, it almost feels as if you are performing magic, but the steps make perfect sense when you understand the reasoning behind them. Most methods for making cake revolve around minimizing the development of gluten, the mixture of proteins that typically makes the crumb less tender. Because gluten forms when the flour is hydrated, most cake recipes have you either add the dry ingredients

directly to the fat before adding the liquid or combine the fat and liquid and then add the flour. That way, the flour becomes coated with fat, creating a barrier against the liquid and minimizes gluten. In this recipe, you want the opposite effect. It is essential to develop the gluten because that structure holds the crumb together: There are no eggs or milk to do it. That’s why, after combining the dry ingredients right in the baking dish, you make a well in the center and pour in the oil and vanilla extract. Then you sprinkle a mixture of water and cider vinegar directly over the top of the dry ingredients to hydrate the flour before mixing the whole thing together. (Why vinegar? It provides the acid that activates the gluten further, and it also balances the pH of the baking soda.) Once the batter is mixed, I double down on the star ingredient by stirring in mini chocolate chips that melt into the tender, rich cake as it bakes. You won’t miss what’s not there, and peace will reign in your dessert kingdom.

DOUBLE CHOCOLATE ‘WAR’ CAKE Yield: 9 to 12 servings 1 cup whole-grain pastry lour ½ cup all-purpose lour ¾ cup granulated sugar 1/3 cup unsweetened natural cocoa powder 1 teaspoon baking soda ½ teaspoon salt 1 cup cold water

1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar 1/3 cup canola oil or other neutral-lavored oil 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract ½ cup bittersweet mini chocolate chips Powdered sugar, for dusting

1. Whisk together the lour, wheat germ, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg and salt in a mixing bowl. 2. Whisk together the buttermilk, pumpkin puree, eggs, 3 tablespoons of maple syrup and 1 tablespoon of oil in a separate bowl until well combined. Pour into the lour mixture, stirring just enough so that no dry ingredients are left, then stir in the cranberries. 3. Brush a wale iron with oil and preheat it according to the manufacturer’s directions. Ladle enough of the batter to cover three-fourths of the surface of the wale iron, close it, and cook for 3 to 5 minutes, until golden brown. Repeat with remaining batter. 4. Serve hot, with maple syrup passed at the table. Per serving: 270 calories; 8g protein; 42g carbohydrates; 7g fat; 2g saturated fat; 95mg cholesterol; 350mg sodium; 6g iber; 15g sugar

1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Whisk together the whole-grain pastry lour, all-purpose lour, granulated sugar, cocoa powder, baking soda and salt in an 8-by-8 baking pan. 2. Combine the water and vinegar in a small bowl. 3. Make a well in the center of the lour mixture; pour the oil and the vanilla extract there. Sprinkle the water-vinegar mixture over the dry ingredients; stir to form a smooth batter. Scatter the chocolate chips over the surface, then stir them in so they are evenly distributed. 4. Bake (middle rack) for 35 to 40 minutes, until the cake is set and a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. Transfer the pan to a wire rack for the cake to cool. 5. Before serving, dust the top of the cooled cake lightly with powdered sugar. Per serving (based on 12): 210 calories; 3g protein; 31g carbohydrates; 9g fat; 2g saturated fat; no cholesterol; 170mg sodium; 2g iber; 18g sugar

From nutritionist and cookbook author Ellie Krieger.

From nutritionist and cookbook author Ellie Krieger.


L4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

LET’S EAT

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 11.30.2016

Recipe was derived from deli’s version SOUP • FROM L1

Take, for instance, my mother’s cabbage soup, which is still one of my favorite soups ever. When she and my father were first married, she asked if he had any favorite dishes he wanted her to prepare. He said he loved a cabbage soup from a famous local delicatessen. My mother called the wife of the deli owner and asked for the recipe. The woman was happy to oblige — but she only knew how to make it for a restaurant, and even then her measurements were inexact. So my mother mixed a bit of this and a handful of that, then threw in a dash of something else, and ended up with a cabbage soup. She served it to my father, who said it wasn’t at all like the original soup from the delicatessen. It was better. She has been making it ever since. Many years ago, I asked my mother for the recipe. She wasn’t very specific. She said to use a bit of this and a handful of that and maybe a dash of something else. I took down as much of this non-recipe as I could and tried making it for myself. It tasted remarkably like my mother’s. What I love so much about the soup are its contradictions. It is a thin broth, but it is filled with hearty pieces of beef and cabbage. It is made with a lot of tomatoes, but it isn’t remotely a tomato soup. It is both sweet and sour. And it has seasonings that you would not expect to find in soup, such as allspice and cloves. It is unlike other soups you have had, and it is certainly unlike the soup they sold at the delicatessen, but it is little short of wonderful. Next, I made an onion soup, but I didn’t want a familiar, traditional French onion soup. So I went next door to Belgium to cook a Flemish Onion Soup. What is the difference? There are several, beginning with the onions that are only lightly browned, yielding a taste that is less sweet and more oniony. The soup is flavored with potatoes and then pureed, and only then is it enlivened with milk. Even with croutons and cheese on top, it is a completely different soup — and not just because the cheese is sprinkled rather than melted. This version is a much lighter soup, with a comforting onion flavor that is subtle and beautifully tempered by the blended potatoes. It’s irresistible without being overpowering.

PHOTOS BY HILLARY LEVIN • hlevin@post-dispatch.com

Flemish Onion Soup is less sweet and more oniony than traditional French onion soup.

The other main ingredient in this soup is apples. Golden Delicious apples, which the recipe recommends, are sweet but not too sweet, just enough to balance the heat from the curry. All together, the soup is smooth and almost silky. It is a dish to serve when you want to impress someone, but it is easy enough that you’ll want to make it for yourself. Finally, I cooked the best lentil soup I have ever made. This one begins with red lentils, which cook faster and more thoroughly than the more popular green kind. They dissolve into a kind of thickness, like a puree without having to puree. The spice is not heavy — a little cumin and coriander, plus garlic, and a pinch of pepper. What makes the soup stand out so much is the juice from a lemon, which brightens the flavor and brilliantly contrasts with the earthiness of the lentils. Try it and you won’t want to stop eating it. It’s M’m! M’m! good. Red lentils cook faster and more thoroughly than the green kind in Lentil Soup.

Subtlety is also the key to a gorgeous curried cauliflower

soup. Curry and cauliflower are a classic combination, and so are

curry and cream — though this soup uses relatively little cream.

Daniel Neman • 314-340-8133 Food writer @dnemanfood on Twitter dneman@post-dispatch.com

MOM’S CABBAGE SOUP

LENTIL SOUP

Yield: 8 servings

Yield: 6 to 8 servings

1½ pounds short ribs 2 tablespoons oil 1 large onion, sliced thin 7 cups water ½ small head cabbage, sliced thin 12 whole allspice berries

1. Trim the fat from the ribs. In a large pot or Dutch oven, heat oil over medium-high heat. Add ribs and onions, season with salt and pepper, and cook until the beef is browned on all sides and the onions are translucent, about 8 minutes. Pour out the fat. 2. Add water, cabbage and allspice berries. Bring to a boil, then lower the temperature and simmer 30 minutes, skimming foam of the top when necessary. 3. Break up tomatoes with your hands or in a blender. Add tomatoes, brown sugar, vinegar, pepper and ground allspice. Bring to a boil, lower temperature and simmer until meat is completely cooked and has pulled away at least ½ inch from the edge of the bone, about 30 minutes. Taste and correct for salt and pepper. If the broth is too weak, continue simmering until the lavors are more concentrated. Per serving: 188 calories; 7g fat; 2g saturated fat; 20mg cholesterol; 8g protein; 22g carbohydrate; 16g sugar; 3g iber; 312mg sodium; 73mg calcium.

FLEMISH ONION SOUP WITH CHEESE Yield: 6 servings 4 tablespoons (½ stick) unsalted butter 2 pounds yellow onions, thinly sliced 2 large baking potatoes, peeled and cubed 4 cups water 1 bay leaf 1 cup milk

3 tablespoons olive oil 1 large onion, chopped 3 cloves garlic, crushed 1 to 1½ teaspoons cumin 1 to 1½ teaspoons ground coriander Pinch of cayenne pepper 1¾ cups split red lentils Bunch of celery leaves, chopped, or 1 rib celery, sliced 1 carrot, inely chopped 2 quarts chicken stock Salt and pepper Juice of 1 lemon To garnish 1½ to 2 large onions, sliced 2 to 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1 to 1½ pita breads to make croutons, optional 1 lemon, sliced into wedges, for serving, optional

2 (14½-ounce) cans stewed tomatoes ¼ cup plus 1 tablespoon brown sugar ¼ cup red wine vinegar ¼ teaspoon black pepper ½ teaspoon ground allspice

Salt and white pepper, to taste Ground nutmeg, preferably fresh, to taste 3 tablespoons minced chives, optional Croutons, optional ¾ cup grated Gruyère cheese

1. Melt the butter in a heavy soup pot over low heat. Add the onions and increase the heat to medium. Cook stirring occasionally, until translucent, 10 minutes. Let the onions brown slightly for a more pronounced lavor. 2. Add the potatoes, water and bay leaf. Bring to a boil and reduce the heat. Simmer, covered, until the potatoes are soft, 20 to 25 minutes. 3. Discard the bay leaf and let the soup cool slightly. Press the soup through a food mill or purée in batches in a blender or food processor until smooth. 4. Return the purée to the pot and gradually stir in the milk. Season with salt, pepper and nutmeg. 5. Reheat the soup gently before serving. Do not let it boil. Serve hot, in warmed soup plates. If desired, sprinkle with chives and loat croutons in each soup plate. Place the grated cheese in a bowl and pass at the table. Per serving: 223 calories; 14g fat; 8g saturated fat; 39mg cholesterol; 8g protein; 19g carbohydrate; 3g sugar; 2g iber; 154mg sodium; 208mg calcium. Recipe from “Everybody Eats Well in Belgium Cookbook,” by Ruth Van Waerebeek, with Maria Robbins

CURRIED CREAM OF CAULIFLOWER AND APPLE SOUP Yield: 4 to 6 servings For the curried cream of caulilower 4 cups chicken stock 1½ tablespoons sweet (unsalted) butter 1 cup onions, chopped 2 teaspoons Madras curry powder ½ teaspoon safron threads or 2 pinches safron powder 1 cup Golden Delicious apple (or other apple), peeled, split, cored and sliced

4 cups caulilower (about 1 small to medium head), broken into lorets 1 cup heavy cream Salt and pepper 1 tablespoon chives, minced For the curried apple dice 1 cup Golden Delicious apple (or other apple), peeled, split, cored, in ¼-inch dice 1 teaspoon Madras curry powder ¼ teaspoon safron threads or 1 pinch safron powder Salt and pepper

1. For the curried cream of caulilower: Warm the chicken stock over medium heat. Melt the butter in a heavy pot over medium-low heat. Add the onions, curry powder and safron and sweat for 2 minutes, stirring often. Add the sliced apple and sweat for 5 more minutes, stirring often. Add the caulilower and warm chicken stock and bring to a boil. 2. Boil until the caulilower is tender when pierced with a knife, about 20 minutes. Add the cream and cook for 3 more minutes. Salt and pepper to taste. Transfer the soup in batches to a blender or food processor and purée at high speed until very smooth. Keep warm until ready to serve, or refrigerate when cool and reheat just before serving. 3. For the curried apple dice: Place the apple dice with 1 tablespoon of water in a pan over medium heat. Add the curry powder and safron, and season to taste with salt and pepper. Mix well, cover with a lid, and cook for 3 minutes. Strain and keep warm on the side. Per serving (based on 6): 273 calories; 20g fat; 12g saturated fat; 58mg cholesterol; 7g protein; 19g carbohydrate; 10g sugar; 3g iber; 263mg sodium; 62mg calcium. Recipe from “Cooking With Daniel Boulud,” by Daniel Boulud

1. Heat oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add onion and cook until softened. Add the garlic, cumin, coriander and cayenne pepper, and stir. 2. Add the lentils, celery leaves and carrot, pour in the stock, and simmer 30 to 45 minutes until the lentils have largely disintegrated. Add salt and pepper, and water if the soup needs thickening; it should be thin, like light cream. Stir in the lemon juice. 3. For the garnish, fry the onions in the oil, irst covered over low heat, stirring occasionally, then uncovered over medium and high heat, stirring often, until very brown and almost crisp. 4. Split and open the pita breads and toast in the oven or in a toaster oven, until they are crisp and lightly browned. Break them into small pieces to make croutons. 5. Serve the soup very hot. Garnish each serving with a tablespoon of fried onions and pass the lemon wedges and croutons, if you like, for people to help themselves. Per serving (based on 8): 343 calories; 13g fat; 2g saturated fat; 7mg cholesterol; 17g protein; 41g carbohydrate; 6g sugar; 6g iber; 358mg sodium; 48mg calcium. Adapted from “The New Book of Middle Eastern Food,” by Claudia Roden


LET’S EAT

11.30.2016 • WEdnEsday • M 1

Add winter lavors to cookies BISCOTTI • FROM L1

Joy to the world, indeed. As the days grow colder and shorter, and cookiebaking season is ushered in, the calorie-counter in me steps aside just enough to strike that balance of reasonable, but small, indulgence. A perfect example of smart cookie indulgence is the biscotti. Biscotti are firm, dry Italian cookies that are typically served alongside an espresso or coffee for dunking. Biscotti are drier and harder than your average cookie, due to a doublebaking process (which is easy, so don’t be intimidated) and relatively lower amounts of fat and sugar. But the harder texture has a huge tactical advantage: biscotti take longer to nibble your way through, so the chances of my accidentally downing seven or eight are pretty small. One or two of these little guys, especially with an espresso, and I feel like I’ve participated in the joy of holiday dessert. Plus, biscotti feel a little fancy. Fancy enough, in fact, to double as a holiday gift — wrap some up in cellophane and take as a hostess or neighbor gift, or even send home with your guests as a little party favor. Today’s recipe is flavored with dark chocolate and rosemary because they are classic winter flavors that I love together, but feel free to play with zests, spices, herbs and chocolate types to make a combo you love. Bonus points if you eat them with friends singing around the piano.

DARK CHOCOLATE ROSEMARY BISCOTTI Yield: 16 biscotti 1 cup white whole wheat lour ½ cup all-purpose lour ¼ teaspoon kosher salt 1 teaspoon baking powder 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened ½ cup granulated sugar 2 eggs 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 teaspoon inely grated orange zest 2 teaspoons fresh rosemary, inely minced ½ cup dark chocolate chips, inely chopped ¼ cup sliced almonds, toasted 1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Combine the lours, salt and baking powder in a small bowl and set aside. In a medium bowl, cream the butter and sugar together with a hand or stand mixer until light in color, lufy and creamy, about 3 minutes. 2. Add the eggs in, one at a time, mixing well after each one. Add the vanilla, zest and rosemary and mix until incorporated. Add the lour, half at a time, mixing until incorporated after each half. Use a rubber spatula to fold in the dark chocolate and the almonds. 3. Place the dough on a lightly loured surface and divide into two. Shape into two logs, about 14 inches each, and place on a large baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Lightly press each log latter, to make a rounded strip, about 15 inches long by 2 ½ inches wide. Remove excess lour with a clean pastry brush. 4. Bake the logs until golden, about 20 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool 10 minutes. Meanwhile, reduce the oven temperature to 300 degrees. Carefully transfer each lattened log to a cutting board and cut each log on the bias into 8 slices (16 slices total). Place the slices cut side down on the parchment-lined baking sheet and continue baking until the cookies are golden and crisp, about 30 more minutes. 5. Once baked, let cool completely. Can be stored in airtight container for several days. Per serving: 133 calories; 7g fat; 35mg cholesterol; 41mg sodium; 18g carbohydrate; 2g iber; 9g sugar; 3g protein.

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • L5

Use this edamame dish as a side or the star BY MELISSA D’ARABIAN associated Press

I’m a fan of stocking my kitchen with healthy, nutrient-dense ingredients that can be used on the fly on those busy days when 5 p.m. sneaks up without notice. Frozen edamame, or soybeans, are a great example. Buy both shelled and unshelled versions and keep them in the freezer. The edamame in the pod are perfect to grab to stave off hungry kiddos while dinner is being prepared — a quick steam

EDAMAME QUINOA SALAD WITH TANGY VINAIGRETTE

or microwave visit, plus a bit of garlic or spices, and a healthy nibble is ready. Edamame pods are also great for boosting the protein and fiber in lunchboxes, or as a perfectly placed dinner party appetizer. Toss a handful of frozen edamame into soup before serving, slip into taco fillings or blend up into hummus. Combine this freezer staple with fellow weeknight staple quinoa to make a power side dish whose leftovers can easily be taken to lunch as a main dish the next day.

Yield: 4 servings Salad 1 cup frozen shelled edamame, thawed 1 cup cooked quinoa ½ cup small grape tomatoes, halved ½ cup parsley, chopped ¼ cup toasted almonds, roughly chopped ¼ cup feta cheese crumbles

1. Place the edamame, quinoa, tomatoes, parsley, almond and feta in a large salad bowl. 2. In a medium bowl, whisk together the mustard and lemon juice. Drizzle in the olive oil, whisking into an emulsion. Add the dill, shallot, salt and pepper and mix. Add 1 or 2 tablespoons of water if the dressing is too thick. 3. Pour the dressing on the salad and toss. Serve immediately, or chill. Per serving: 238 calories; 14g fat; 8mg cholesterol; 277mg sodium; 21g carbohydrate; 5g iber; 4g sugar; 9g protein.

Cooking shows go on, but they aren’t the same NEMAN • FROM L1

co-founded — and started a new venture called Milk Street Kitchen, named for the location of its headquarters in Boston. But then a nearby restaurant called Milk Street Café sued, claiming that his company’s name was too similar to theirs, and might cause confusion. So now his company is called Christopher Kimball’s Milk Street, which does not have the same panache. But if the story stopped there, we would not be talking about it. Last month, America’s Test Kitchen sued Kimball and Milk Street, claiming

Vinaigrette 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard ¼ cup fresh lemon juice 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 2 tablespoons fresh dill, chopped 1 small shallot, minced ¼ teaspoons salt ¼ teaspoon pepper

that Kimball copied the entire America’s Test Kitchen concept and format, that he stole proprietary information (and some actual property) from America’s Test Kitchen, that he poached a large number of staff from America’s Test Kitchen and that he created Milk Street when he was on the clock for America’s Test Kitchen — which at the time was paying him more than $1 million a year. It is an ugly story and may only get uglier if the case makes it to trial. Meanwhile, I have seen the new magazine and the

America’s Test Kitchen people have a point: It sure seems to follow the look and content of Cook’s Illustrated magazine. Scott Lashway, the attorney for Milk Street, Kimball and the other defendants, had no comment about the suit. The “America’s Test Kitchen” television show will soldier on without Kimball, with co-hosts Julia Collin Davison and Bridget Lancaster now front and center. The show will go on, but it won’t be the same. And that is true also of my favorite cooking show, “The Great British Baking Show,” known in England as “The Great British Bake-Off.” As has widely and thoroughly been reported, the producers of the show decided to leave the BBC,

which had presented the show for seven years, for the far greener pastures of Channel 4. Channel 4 offered to pay more than $31 million per year for three years, which is more than four times what the commercial-free BBC could pay. The show left, but three of the four hosts did not. The delightful Mary Berry announced that she was going to stay with the BBC, which has been so good to her for seven years. In short order, presenters Mel Geidroyc and Sue Perkins (who were actually friends in college) announced that they, too, were staying with the BBC. Only co-host Paul Hollywood — who sort of looks and acts like his name — will be accompanying the show to

100 YEARS IN BUSINESS

Channel 4. It was recently announced that the 81-year-old Berry encouraged Hollywood to follow the show, saying that she would have done the same if she were his age, which is 50. The production company is looking for people to replace Berry, Geidroyc and Perkins. They haven’t found anyone suitable yet, but no doubt they will. The money is certainly there. But the show won’t be the same without them. And once it has commercials? It’s just one more show I won’t be watching. Daniel Neman • 314-340-8133 Food writer @dnemanfood on Twitter dneman@post-dispatch.com

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L6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 11.30.2016

top 10 cabernets our top pick! for the holidays

#

1

WRITTEN BY Daniel Puma

Cabernet Sauvignon wines are bold, rich wines with flavors including currants, cherry, blackberries, dark cocoa, tobacco and espresso. Cabernets pair perfectly with red meat; this holiday season, open up a bottle, prepare some hearty beef stew and warm up by the fireplace.

#

#

#

2

4

6

OWL RIDGE CABERNET SAUVIGNON

8

#

Hailing from the Alexander Valley, Owl Ridge Cabernet’s blend of cherry and raspberry leads to an underlying oak tone. Lighter on the Cab spectrum, this wine pairs well with pasta or a burger with blue cheese.

3

10

With bold flavors of dark fruits, tofee, cocoa and espresso, Olema Cabernet is the quintessential wine for the winter season. Great on its own after a big dinner, this wine also pairs perfectly with roasted meats.

BALDACCI FOUR SONS FRATERNITY NAPA VALLEY Fraternity is a blend consisting mostly of Cabernet Sauvignon and a bit of Syrah. It's nuanced with flavors of tobacco, chocolate and oak. Pair Fraternity with a grilled rib-eye or rack of lamb.

California, 750mL, $19.99

California, 750mL, $36.99

KICKER CANE CABERNET ALEXANDER VALLEY

CARSON RIDGE CABERNET PASO ROBLES

#

5

Medium-bodied with lots of flavor, Kicker Cane Cabernet is a great, crowd-pleasing red. This powerful, luscious wine drinks smoothly; it's light enough to enjoy with goose, duck or pasta.

Emboldened by the Alexander Valley terroir, this medium-bodied Cab has a strong finish with hints of black pepper. Carson Ridge Cabernet pairs wonderfully with duck, but can also be enjoyed solo or after dinner.

California, 750mL, $19.99

California, 750mL, $12.99

PASO RANCHES CABERNET PASO ROBLES

OAK RIDGE CABERNET LODI

#

Intense, concentrated flavors of black cherries are balanced by hints of cofee and chocolate, and finishes spicy with cinnamon and nutmeg. Paso Ranches Cabernet complements barbecue and steak.

7

CRUZ ALTA CABERNET RESERVE

#

Cruz Alta is less fruit forward than traditional Cabs, displaying forestlike notes of oak, herbs and char. It's balanced with plums and cassis. Pair this unique Cab with a rack of lamb or a rich beef stew.

9

FIRST & LOCAL CABERNET Approachable for those looking to get into Cabernet Sauvignon, First & Local is a balance of dark fruits with hints of smoke and currants. The crisp, balanced finish helps ease the intense, concentrated flavors. This Cab pairs with grilled meats or spaghetti.

California, 750mL, $12.99

CRIMSON RANCH CABERNET Crimson Ranch Cabernet has rich, luscious flavors with a full-bodied, mouth-coating texture. A delicate finish makes it an easy sipper throughout the day. It pairs well with charcuterie.

California, 750mL, $14.99

This blend of Cabernet and Zinfandel is characterized by flavors of blackberries and cherries. The Zinfandel brings spice and notes of black pepper and oregano, while the barrel aging lends vanilla and cedar. Pair Oak Ridge Cabernet with a robust marinara sauce.

California, 750mL, $14.49

Argentina, 750mL, $12.49

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James Suckling – 91

California, 750mL, $25.99

California, 750mL, $17.99

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OLEMA CABERNET, 2013

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Wednesday • 11.30.2016 • eV DUSTIN • By Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker

DILBERT • By Scott Adams

SALLY FORTH • By Francesco Marciuliano and Jim Keefe

BABY BLUES • By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE • By Stephan Pastis GARFIELD • By Jim Davis

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM • By Mike Peters MUTTS • By Patrick McDonnell

DEFLOCKED • By Jeff Corriveau PRICKLY CITY • By Scott Stantis

PICKLES • By Brian Crane

HI AND LOIS • By Brian and Greg Walker and Chance Browne

RHYMES WITH ORANGE • By Hilary B. Price

BEETLE BAILEY • By Mort and Greg Walker

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE • By Lynn Johnston

SUDOKU

THE PAJAMA DIARIES • By Terri Libenson

EVERYDAY


EVERYDAY

EV2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

BRIDGE TIPS • BOB JONES North-South vulnerable, West deals. NORTH ♠A Q 8 3 2 ♥A 9 5 ♦A 5 ♣A 10 7 WEST EAST ♠9 5 ♠K J 7 4 ♥Q J 6 4 ♥10 3 ♦10 7 4 ♦J 9 8 3 2 ♣J 9 5 4 ♣K Q SOUTH ♠10 6 ♥K 8 7 2 ♦K Q 6 ♣8 6 3 2 The bidding: WEST NORTH EAST SOUTH Pass 1♠ Pass 1NT Pass 2NT Pass 3NT All pass Opening lead: Four of ♣ Today’s deal was played at the recent World Championships in Poland. Virtually all pairs got to three no trump, though the bidding route to get there varied greatly. We have offered the simple auction above. All of the declarers saw that the easiest road to nine tricks was to get three tricks from the spade suit. Some tried the 10 of spades, and played the queen when West didn’t cover the 10. They failed when East proved to have three spade stoppers. A few, including Sjo-

ert Brink of the Netherlands, showed their appreciation for the power of the spade 10. Brink ducked the opening club lead to East’s queen. East shifted to a diamond, won in dummy with the ace. Brink now led a low spade toward his 10 and East was helpless. East chose to duck — it would not have helped him to win the jack — and Brink’s 10 held the trick. A spade to the ace and another spade knocked out one of East’s stoppers, and dummy still had enough entries to knock out East’s other spade honor and get back for the last spade. Three spades, two hearts, three diamonds, and a club gave Brink the nine tricks that he needed. Even at the World Championship level, it pays to know your card combinations. Other plays would have worked as well, but leading the 10 and overtaking it with the queen was a sad waste of a 10. (11/30/16) tcaeditors@tribune.com

CRYPTOQUIP

WORD GAME November 30 WORD — QUARTZITE (QUARTZITE: KWORT-site: A rock formed by the metamorphism of quartz sandstone.) Average mark 25 words. Time limit 40 minutes. Can you find 37 or more words in QUARTZITE? The list will be published tomorrow. YESTERDAY’S WORD — CULTURE cutler celt ulcer clue lucre cruel lure cruet lute culet truce cult true cure tule curl rule curt ecru cute eruct cuter RULES OF THE GAME: 1. Words must be of four or more letters. 2. Words that acquire four letters by the addition of “s,” such as “bats” or “dies,” are not allowed. 3. Additional words made by adding a “d” or an “s” may not be used. For example, if “bake” is used, “baked” or “bakes” are not allowed, but “bake” and “baking” are admissible. 4. Proper nouns, slang words, or vulgar or sexually explicit words are not allowed.

CROSSWORD

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 11.30.2016

Across

34 Robin Hood, notably 35 Verbal zinger 36 Countess’s man 37 Basic spreadsheet function 38 Like much Gene Wilder humor 39 Roll call vote 40 Port of Iraq 42 Like cobra/ mongoose encounters, to cobras 43 “Fast Times” school 46 Indian bread 47 Running by itself 50 Low-altitude clouds 53 Certain Indonesian

1 Places for hosp. scrubs 4 Arab Spring country 9 Overcaffeinated 14 Bring home 15 “Too rich for me” 16 Month after diciembre 17 Blacktop material 18 Source of start-up cash, perhaps 20 ___ Cup 22 Makes up (for) 23 Prefix with science or intellectual 24 Hot 17-Across, e.g. 25 Guava or papaya 32 Certain pool sites, for short

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE D E A T H S

U N R E A L

S T R A T A

C O G N A T E

T R A I N C A R

H O T M E A L S

T Y R E O W T C L A T E R H E L E R O W T E N B A L B A P M C A T S

G U L L S

I N S E T

D U N E E L A R A C P R T O

N S A S D N A R L E G H I H A R D S O T H V S J U T A B H U O N U T

E C O L

A R O U S T E I N M S A E R L I P N O P S R A

M A S T I C

S P E E C H

E A G E R E S T

R E T E S T S

55 Not dress overmodestly … or what 18-, 25- and 43Across each do? 57 GI fare 58 Figure head? 59 “Meet the Press” feature 60 ___ rule 61 Glove material 62 It’s a blessing 63 Zippo

Down 1 Ready to pour 2 Enlarges, as a hole 3 Good rep 4 Sexual appetites 5 Sgt. Friday catchphrase 6 ___ fide 7 Big laughs 8 NATO part: abbr. 9 Exploded 10 Like winter soccer, most likely 11 Rider’s handful 12 Fish-eating raptor 13 Feet, slangily 19 Sea ___ (12-Down) 21 Like Mayberry 26 “For real!” 27 Butter maker

HOROSCOPE • JACQUELINE BIGAR Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. The stars show the kind of day you’ll have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Diicult.

might not reach an agreement easily, but you’ll want to at least try to understand where a loved one is coming from. Allowing someone you care about to make the plans is likely to alleviate some of your stress. Tonight: Go along with the moment.

If Nov. 30 is your birthday • This year you become much more in touch with what is going on within your immediate circle. If you are single, you’re likely to date someone who is more mature or older than you are. If you are attached, the two of you enjoy a very special bond. Remember to be sensitive to your signiicant other’s needs. A fellow Sagittarius sees you as self-centered.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) ★★★★ You are in a period of fast changes. You will be able to work through a problem, despite a tendency to get emotional over the issues involved. Tonight: In the thick of the moment.

ARIES (March 21-April 19) ★★★★ Someone seems overly serious and diicult to deal with. You are very sure of yourself, yet sometimes you act in the most unpredictable manner. Tonight: Schedule a happening in the near future. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) ★★★★★ You might want to rethink a decision. Weigh the pros and cons carefully. A loved one can give you feedback, but ultimately it is your call. Tonight: A close encounter. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) ★★★★★ Be open about what you believe is going on. A friend keeps your life exciting with lots of unexpected developments. You might wonder what life would be without this person at times. Tonight: Let your hair down. CANCER (June 21-July 22) ★★★★ You are often thought of as an emotional sign, but you also are exceptionally practical. How you choose to handle a changeable situation could have long-term implications. Tonight: Routine works. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) ★★★★★ You could be at the point where you aren’t sure what to do. Your creativity might cause you to rethink a problem, and as a result you are likely to come up with a solution. Know what you want. Tonight: Add spice to your life. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) ★★★★ Defer to others. You

Find more free games, or subscribe to get access to more than 50 others, at STLtoday.com/games, where you’ll also find a link to the Puzzle Society.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) ★★★ Pace yourself with the knowledge of what you must accomplish. You could be uptight about a money matter and not know which way to go. Perhaps opening up a discussion would be helpful. Tonight: In the limelight.

Puzzle by Scott Yut

28 Shoot for 29 “Kill Bill” co-star 30 Inner Hebrides isle 31 Texter’s “ciao” 32 Wine bottle datum 33 “Please?” 38 Restaurant guide name since 1979 40 “No clue”

41 Prenatal test, for short 42 Acquire by deceit 44 Chewed like a chipmunk 45 Onetime for-girls-only course, for short 48 Sets of foot bones

Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/puzzleforum. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords. No. 1026

WORD SCRIMMAGE

Solutions at bottom of page

WONDERWORD

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) ★★★★★ You wake up knowing what you are going to do. Your sense of humor emerges as you greet the unexpected. You might want to rethink a decision involving your personal life. Tonight: As you like it. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) ★★★ Play it low-key today, and don’t worry about what you should be doing. A personal issue might keep going through your mind. The answer is clear, but you might not be ready to accept it. Tonight: Not to be found. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) ★★★★ Where your friends are hanging out is where you would prefer to be. Honor a sense of duty, and you will head in the right direction. Not everything is as clear as you might believe it to be. Tonight: At a favorite restaurant.

49 Tatum who won an Oscar at 10 50 JFK landers until 2003 51 G 52 Tedious way to learn 53 Blacken on a grill 54 Neighbor of the funny bone 56 High fig. for a hybrid car

WORDY GURDY

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) ★★★ Pressure is intense. You would much prefer playing a diferent role or enjoying yourself doing something totally diferent. Your imagination can take some of the drudgery out of the task, if you so choose. You’ll gain a sudden insight from a friend. Tonight: A must show. STLtoday.com/horoscopes Get expanded horoscope information: star charts, peak times, outlooks and Chinese Zodiac data.

JUMBLE


EVERYDAY

11.30.2016 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • EV3

DEAR ABBY

WHAT’S THE DIFF? Find six diferences between the panels.

Breaking up entrepreneur’s harem Dear Willing To Do Anything • I wish you had more clearly defined what “prone to seduction” means. Was he saying that because years ago he had little success with women he is enjoying the attention? While you may be willing to “do anything” to have him all to yourself, if this man craves variety and is trying to make up for lost time, there’s nothing you can do to dissuade him. If you want a man who is willing to have an exclusive relationship, you���re going to have to look elsewhere. Dear Abby • I was just ofered a HUGE promotion at my company. It will mean more than a 40 percent increase in pay, which is unheard of in my company, which has more than 10,000 employees. People in my department are not taking it well. Even my director did not congratulate me. Taking on this new endeavor kind of scares me. I have had a tough year in my current position, and this new job is seriously tailored to me. My current manager

— who is new to the department — feels this job was meant for me. She says I need a fresh start, and she has faith in me. What’s awkward is, the position involves working with some of the same people I worked with previously. Am I taking on too much? — UNSURE IN THE MIDWEST Dear Unsure • If your boss and new manager didn’t feel you were capable of taking on the new assignment, they could have ofered the job to the numerous other people at the company. Your former director may not have congratulated you because he/she was jealous, so do not take the silence to heart. As to your fear that you won’t succeed, all you can do is give it your best and keep moving forward. If you do that, you won’t let anybody down — including yourself. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, Calif. 90069.

Diferences: 1. Arm is lower. 2. Helmet is larger. 3. Mouth is diferent. 4. Neckline is diferent. 5. Nose is smaller. 6. Ear is smaller.

Dear Abby • I recently started seeing a self-made entrepreneur. He’s intelligent, and basically the most amazing man I have ever been with. Because of his position and stature, many beautiful and sophisticated women throw themselves at him. A friend of his told me that in the months that I’ve known him, he has had sex with at least five other women, several on the first date. I’m not angry about it since we never formally agreed to be exclusive, but I’m in love with him and want him all to myself. When I confronted him, he said that because he never had success with women previously, he is prone to seduction. He said they didn’t mean anything to him and that he wants to be with me. I have dropped the matter for now, but I’m still concerned. I have tried to step up my game in the bedroom, and I’m willing to do anything to stop him from looking elsewhere. How do I make him give up his harem? — WILLING TO DO ANYTHING

CAROLYN HAX

TV WEDNESDAY

Wife has anger issues, resists therapy

For complete channels and 24-hour program information, customize your own TV listings at STLtoday.com/tv.

Hi, Carolyn • My wife and I have been married for 28 years. Ninety-five percent of the time we get along great. We have both had our demons, however, and have been through various therapies, apart and together. She was one of 14 children and has issues with abandonment and neglect. There is a little girl inside her who is hurt and very sensitive. In the past, her anger issues resulted in yelling and occasional physical violence — throwing things and damaging property. She has stopped doing those things but settled into a pattern targeting me for angry words and avoidance. She often acknowledges that her anger stems from age-old feelings of inadequacy and shame. When I ask, “Where are the car keys?” she is reminded that she didn’t put them where they usually go and isn’t as organized as

she’d like. So, I get the rattlesnake response. When I complain, she erupts in anger and leaves, saying she needs to work it out. Though she rarely apologizes, she tries to make it up to me later with afection, a massage, etc. Sometimes I feel like a battered spouse, being told by an abuser that what happened “wasn’t that bad” and was actually my fault. She resists therapy nowadays. I used to hope that, as with other problems we’ve overcome, we would get past this. We are now 60 and I don’t have that hope anymore. Any thoughts? — Please Don’t Be Angry at Me for Asking Answer • I could make the argument that your wife is indeed an abuser — just emotionally threatening now where she used to be physically threatening, which isn’t cause for much celebration. Certainly she’s controlling your actions and word choices.

But you want this marriage to work, not end, I get it, and you also sound quite capable of standing up for yourself should things deteriorate to the point where you do need to leave. She goes rattlesnake on you out of her sense of inadequacy, yes? And in response, you’re likewise declaring your perceived inadequacies. That creates a highly personal she-vs.-he standof just as she’s lost her emotional grip. That’s escalating. As the calmer, healthier party, you can break this fire-with-fire pattern by making your response observational vs. emotional and about her vs. you: “I’ve apparently touched a nerve; do you need a moment?” De-escalating, self-respect intact. And if she attacks again, “I’ll step away for a bit.” De-escalating, self-respect intact. tellme@washpost.com

11/30/16

7:00

7:30

FOX Lethal Weapon A $1 2 million heist turns deadly. (N) CBS 4

Survivor (N) (cc)

8:00

8:30

Empire Cookie needs to impress Angelo’s mom. (N)

9:00

9:30

Fox 2 News at 9:00pm (N) (cc)

Criminal Minds: Mirror Code Black An exploImage. (N) (cc) sive bullet is lodged in a leg. (N)

NBC Christmas in Rockefell- DOLLY PARTON’S CHRISTMAS OF MANY COLORS: 5 er Center (N) (cc) CIRCLE OF LOVE (’16) (Jennifer Nettles) (cc) PBS John Denver: Country Boy Life and ÍGet Down Tonight: The Disco Ex9 legacy of singer John Denver. (cc) plosion Bee Gees, Leo Sayer. (cc) CW 11

News 11 at 7:00PM (N) (cc)

IND Judge 24 Hatchett (cc)

Arrow: Invasion! Felic- Frequency: Interferity faces a new threat. ence. Raimy receives a (N) (cc) visitor. (N) (cc)

Justice for Daniel Boone All

blackish ABC The Gold- Speechless Modern 30 bergs (N) (N) (cc) Family (N) (8:31) (N)

Here’s Help The Andy Griffith Show Designated Survivor: The Results. (N) (cc)

MYTV Law & Order: The Ring. Law & Order: Hitman. Law & Order Acquittal 46 Ring identifies victim. Hit man guns down hus- leads to attorney’s mur(cc) band. (cc) der. (cc)

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EVERYDAY

EV4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

THE FAMILY CIRCUS • By Bil Keane

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 11.30.2016

DR. KEITH ROACH

ZITS • By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

Is there a cancer of the heart? Dear Dr. Roach • I have heard of almost every organ or part of the body being attacked by cancer, but I’ve never heard of cancer of the heart. Can that be the case? — C.L.

FUNKY WINKERBEAN • By Tom Batiuk

SPEED BUMP • By Dave Coverly

Answer • Tumors of the heart are extremely rare, seen in less than one person in a thousand, and an even smaller subset of those tumors are cancer. The most common tumor of the heart is called a myxoma, and these occur in the left or right atrium. They are common enough that I have seen a few in my career. They can grow to a large size, and they cause problems by interfering with blood flow, and by predisposing a person to embolization — when small bits of tumor or clot break of, they can go to the lung, or in the case of left-sided tumors (or a septal defect, “hole in the heart’’), to the brain. About 15 percent of cardiac tumors are cancers. The most common is a sarcoma, a cancer of connective tissue, such as muscle or the lining of the blood vessels. I fortunately have never had a patient with one of these.

BIZARRO • By Dan Piraro

CORNERED • By Mike Baldwin NON SEQUITUR • By Wiley Miller

Dear Dr. Roach • Four years ago, and again three years ago, I had colonoscopies, with Dulcolax tablets and Miralax powder drink as the prescribed cleansers. Since that time, my regular early-morning bowel movement has become much less predictable, once or twice a week requiring prune juice or occasionally a docusate capsule. Is it possible that the laxative cleansers changed something in my natural rhythms? If so, do you have any suggestions for alternatives? — H.S.

DUPLEX • By Glenn McCoy

MARMADUKE • By Brad Anderson

TINA’S GROOVE • By Rina Piccolo

Answer • I see people with changes in their bowel habits after colonoscopy fairly routinely, and people are happy with the changes more often than they are unhappy. Usually the changes are shortlived, and although I don’t have definitive proof of my guess, I do think that people with longer-lasting changes have undergone a change in their gut bacteria due to the colonoscopy preparation. Our gut bacteria are responsible for many effects in the body, and I wonder if you lost a healthy strain. I have recently written about probiotics, and I think it may be worthwhile for you to try a course of probiotics (there are many commercial products) to try to return to your natural rhythm.

DRABBLE • By Kevin Fagan

MARK TRAIL • By James Allen

Dr. Roach regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but will incorporate them in the column whenever possible. Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med.cornell.edu or request an order form of available health newsletters at 628 Virginia Drive, Orlando, Fla. 32803. Health newsletters may be ordered from rbmamall.com.

LOLA • By Todd Clark ZIGGY • By Tom Wilson

OTHER COAST • By Adrian Raeside

TAKE IT FROM THE TINKERSONS • By Bill Bettwy

THE ARGYLE SWEATER • By Scott Hilburn

BLONDIE • By Dean Young and John Marshall

See more comics and play interactive games at STLtoday.com/comics


11.30.16