11.29.15

Page 1

HOLIDAY DELIGHTS Make your table settings merry and bright

Find out what’s playing with our holiday arts preview guide

Holiday home tours give inspiration and ideas

Feast Magazine shares everything you need to celebrate the season

LIFESTYLE • H1

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S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 1 8 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

SUNDAY • 11.29.2015 • $2.50 • EARLY EDITION

Administrator at Lift For Life Academy tries to have the same impact on students as a seventh-grade teacher had on her

NICU study questions spike in admissions Medical need? More than half of babies of neonatal units are normal weight or at term Possible risks Invasive tests, separation from mothers can stress infants, families BY MICHELE MUNZ St. Louis Post-Dispatch

DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

Katrice Noble, an administrator at Lift For Life Academy, gets a hug last week from middle school student Miyah Franklin at the start of the school day. Noble has been at the St. Louis charter school for about a decade. She grew up on Chicago’s west side.

SEARCHING FOR THE TEACHER WHO

CHANGED HER LIFE BY ELISA CROUCH • St. Louis Post-Dispatch

As the years went by, Katrice Noble grew more curious. She would type the name “Molly Peavy” into a Google search engine hoping to find something. Maybe an address. A news story. A Facebook page. Anything. But nothing. Noble wondered whether her seventhgrade teacher was alive, or still living in Chicago. She wondered how long she had continued teaching at Gladstone Elementary, a three-story red brick school tucked in a working-class section of Chicago’s west side. The need to reach out intensified as Noble followed a similar career path, be-

ginning as a special education teacher and later, working as a school administrator in St. Louis. For about a decade, she has worked at Lift For Life Academy, a charter middle and high school that opened in 2000 and has attracted thousands of children, many of them from troubled backgrounds. It’s not unusual to find students who say they re-

member the moment they first met Noble. Some call it a turning point. That’s how it was in 1983, when Noble walked into Peavy’s seventh-grade classroom. So with each year that passed, Noble would go online and look, searching for

Emily Edwards was just past her due date when she delivered a healthy 9-pound, 12-ounce baby by cesarean section. Mom and baby had done well until four days later when they were about to be discharged from Missouri Baptist Medical Center. Instead, Edwards’ son was admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit because of rapid breathing the medical staff had been concerned about since early that morning. Her baby was in intensive care for a confusing and scary six days. Edwards and her husband spent 15 hours a day at his bedside, consenting to test after test to figure out what was wrong. The couple are still paying See NICU • Page A10

MORE NICU The number of hospitals with a NICU, and the number of NICU beds has been increasing: Year 2000 2006 2013

Hospitals 806 917 983

Beds 14,939 17,938 21,854

Source: American Hospital Association Annual Survey Database

See TEACHER • Page A12

Unsolved case eats at South County family

Friends give crowdfunding boost to 100 Neediest • B1

BY JOEL CURRIER • St. Louis Post-Dispatch

McClellan • Denizen of DeMun lives his dream • B1

ST. LOUIS COUNTY • Before bed at night, Dale

Betty Lou Knight was fatally shot while sitting on her back porch in June

Knight, 86, prays for death so he can join his wife in heaven. His granddaughter, Kelly Miller, 39, lies awake at night, unable to switch of visions of her grandfather holding his wife of 65 years in his arms as she bled to death. Miller’s youngest daughter, Zoe Lou, 6, keeps a second-grade journal with crayon sketches. One of the drawings is her great-grandmother wearing her favorite pink shirt — lying in an open casket adorned with red roses. Grief still consumes generations of Betty Lou Knight’s family five months after she was shot in the neck while sitting with her husband on her back porch in the 5000 block of Crosswood Drive. See SHOOTING • Page A8

Bright ideas

TODAY

Coloring: No longer just child’s play Grown-ups are drawn for the stress relief, and business is booming STL SUNDAY • B1

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FINAL DAY Monday, Nov. 30 9am-9pm

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HOLIDAY DELIGHTS Make your table settings merry and bright

Find out what’s playing with our holiday arts preview guide

Holiday home tours give inspiration and ideas

Feast Magazine shares everything you need to celebrate the season

LIFESTYLE • H1

A&E • C1

LIFESTYLE • H1

SPECIAL SECTION

S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 1 8 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

SUNDAY • 11.29.2015 • $2.50 • FINAL EDITION

Administrator at Lift For Life Academy tries to have the same impact on students as a seventh-grade teacher had on her

NICU study questions spike in admissions Medical need? More than half of babies of neonatal units are normal weight or at term Possible risks Invasive tests, separation from mothers can stress infants, families BY MICHELE MUNZ St. Louis Post-Dispatch

DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

Katrice Noble, an administrator at Lift For Life Academy, gets a hug last week from middle school student Miyah Franklin at the start of the school day. Noble has been at the St. Louis charter school for about a decade. She grew up on Chicago’s west side.

SEARCHING FOR THE TEACHER WHO

CHANGED HER LIFE BY ELISA CROUCH • St. Louis Post-Dispatch

As the years went by, Katrice Noble grew more curious. She would type the name “Molly Peavy” into a Google search engine hoping to find something. Maybe an address. A news story. A Facebook page. Anything. But nothing. Noble wondered whether her seventhgrade teacher was alive, or still living in Chicago. She wondered how long she had continued teaching at Gladstone Elementary, a three-story red brick school tucked in a working-class section of Chicago’s west side. The need to reach out intensified as Noble followed a similar career path, be-

ginning as a special education teacher and later, working as a school administrator in St. Louis. For about a decade, she has worked at Lift For Life Academy, a charter middle and high school that opened in 2000 and has attracted thousands of children, many of them from troubled backgrounds. It’s not unusual to find students who say they re-

member the moment they first met Noble. Some call it a turning point. That’s how it was in 1983, when Noble walked into Peavy’s seventh-grade classroom. So with each year that passed, Noble would go online and look, searching for

Emily Edwards was just past her due date when she delivered a healthy 9-pound, 12-ounce baby by cesarean section. Mom and baby had done well until four days later when they were about to be discharged from Missouri Baptist Medical Center. Instead, Edwards’ son was admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit because of rapid breathing the medical staff had been concerned about since early that morning. Her baby was in intensive care for a confusing and scary six days. Edwards and her husband spent 15 hours a day at his bedside, consenting to test after test to figure out what was wrong. The couple are still paying See NICU • Page A10

MORE NICU The number of hospitals with a NICU, and the number of NICU beds has been increasing: Year 2000 2006 2013

Hospitals 806 917 983

Beds 14,939 17,938 21,854

Source: American Hospital Association Annual Survey Database

See TEACHER • Page A12

Unsolved case eats at South County family

Friends give crowdfunding boost to 100 Neediest • B1

BY JOEL CURRIER • St. Louis Post-Dispatch

McClellan • Denizen of DeMun lives his dream • B1

ST. LOUIS COUNTY • Before bed at night, Dale

Betty Lou Knight was fatally shot while sitting on her back porch in June

Knight, 86, prays for death so he can join his wife in heaven. His granddaughter, Kelly Miller, 39, lies awake at night, unable to switch of visions of her grandfather holding his wife of 65 years in his arms as she bled to death. Miller’s youngest daughter, Zoe Lou, 6, keeps a second-grade journal with crayon sketches. One of the drawings is her great-grandmother wearing her favorite pink shirt — lying in an open casket adorned with red roses. Grief still consumes generations of Betty Lou Knight’s family five months after she was shot in the neck while sitting with her husband on her back porch in the 5000 block of Crosswood Drive. See SHOOTING • Page A8

Bright ideas

TODAY

Burroughs inally takes the title Victory erases memory of tough losses; Chaminade falls short SPORTS • D1

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TOMORROW

49°/40° RAIN LIKELY

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2 M Vol. 137, No. 333 ©2015

L 4 NUA AN TH

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FINAL DAY Monday, Nov. 30 9am-9pm

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LOCAL

A2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUNDAY • 11.29.2015

Follow $50,000 down ethics rabbit hole TONY MESSENGER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Two donations to St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger tell you everything you need to know about how messed up Missouri’s campaign finance laws are. The donations, $25,000 each, were made in July and November, but the story really starts about two years ago, in May 2013. Stenger was on the County Council, which was considering a vote on a $30 million cost overrun at the new family court center. Stenger criticized thenCounty Executive Charlie Dooley for accepting a $10,000 campaign donation from Alberici Construction around the same time the company was seeking the extra $30 million to finish the project. Stenger called it “fishy,” which it was. Of course, Stenger would later challenge and defeat Dooley, in part on a campaign platform that Dooley was in the pocket of his donors. You see, this is the thing about campaign donations: They’re always fishy when the other guy receives them. Whether it’s two Democrats, as in Stenger and Dooley, or Republicans criticizing each other or members of the other party, elected oicials rarely see problems with their own donations, only the other guy’s. That’s why transparency is so important, so voters, and competing candidates, can make fair judgments about the money elected oicials receive to keep them in office.

PHOTO BY SID HASTINGS

St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger assumed oice in January.

Fast-forward to July 13 of this year. That’s when David Richardson, an attorney with Husch Blackwell in St. Louis, filed paperwork with the secretary of state’s oice to form a new limited liability company, Givco LLC. Richardson, who deals primarily in real estate law and tax credits, was merely representing clients, whose names don’t appear on the LLC documents on file with the state. This is legal in Missouri, and quite common. It makes it diicult to track down the people behind the LLC, which isn’t necessarily a problem until that company throws itself into the political process. Givco did that two weeks after it was formed, giving Stenger $25,000. A company with seemingly anonymous backers forms. Two weeks later it gives a big check to a county executive. Fishy, yes? Local government watchdog Tom Sullivan criticized the donation at the next County Council meeting. Nobody paid too much attention, perhaps in part because

nobody knew who was behind the money. Then, on Nov. 5, Givco gave again. Another $25,000 to Stenger. At $50,000 this year, that made Givco the county executive’s biggest individual donor. The people behind Givco, it turns out, are developers David and Bob Glarner, the brothers who are behind a multimilliondollar development to bring life back to the Northwest Plaza area. I know this only because Stenger told me when I asked him about Givco. There is no public record paper trail that ties Givco to the Glarners. “They’re friends of mine,” Stenger says. “I guess they decided they were going to do their contributions through the LLC.” The Glarners have previously donated to other politicians under their own names, and their other corporate entities. “They handed me the check. That’s how I know it was from them.” Mystery solved. But not the problem. Fact is, if Stenger, or Richardson, who also told me his clients were the Glarners, decided not to disclose who the developers were, voters wouldn’t know who was trying to curry favor with the county executive. “There’s nothing transactional” about the check, Stenger says. The Glarners’ Northwest Plaza development did, however, need the approval of the St. Louis Economic Development Partnership in gaining about $6.4 million in federal New Market tax credits to help fund the project. That money had been in the works long before the donations, though at least one vote took place late this summer, Richardson said. Stenger

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM

appoints 11 of the partnership’s 15 board members. In Missouri, of course, all of this is legal, which is why the state received a Dminus in a recent national report on government ethics by the Center for Public Integrity. It starts with being one of the few states to allow unlimited donations, making $25,000 checks relatively common in Missouri politics. Last year there were 441 campaign donations of that amount or higher in the state. In 2015, an of-election year, there have already been 238. They come from developers and law firms, unions and corporations, hedge funds and, yes, hard-to-track LLCs or other political committees. In some cases, the money gets moved from one committee to the next, making it harder to track its original source. And why is this? Because the donors and candidates know big checks draw questions. The result of this combination of big money and lack of transparency, of course, is that the influence an average voter or donor might have is squeezed out by those with bigger checkbooks. In Missouri, every Democrat and every Republican has a story to tell about how their opponent raises his or her money or hides the source of donations. But ask them about their own donations and they give some variation of the “I can’t be bought for the price of a steak sandwich” story. Even in 2015, $50,000 buys an awful lot of steak. Tony Messenger • 314-340-8518 @tonymess on Twitter tmessenger@post-dispatch.com

Find these features and exclusive subscriber content at stltoday.com/extra

REEL TIME IN THE RING The new movie “Creed” is getting rave reviews. Check out seven other critically acclaimed movies about boxing.

THE FORCE IS WITH THEM

’TIS THE SEASON ... FOR BEER

Vote for your favorite “Star Wars” fan in our fan contest. Prizes include Kenrick’s Meat & Catering gift packs and tickets to see the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra perform the music of John Williams.

Seasonal beers are here, and while some are sweet, or spicy, or fruity, they share one characteristic: They vanish after the holidays.

LOTTERY

LAW & ORDER

MULTISTATE GAMES

FLORISSANT > Bank is robbed • Florissant police are looking for a man who robbed the Citizens National Bank on Friday afternoon. Police said the man went into the bank, at 430 St. Ferdinand Street, showed a handgun to the teller and demanded money. The teller gave the man an undetermined amount of money and the suspect left the bank. A witness saw him get into a dark-colored SUV with a temporary Missouri license tag. The man was described as black, in his late 20s or early 30s, about 5 feet 10 inches, a medium build, wearing a gray sweatshirt, blue jeans and a dark baseball hat. He also had some facial hair. Anyone who has information on this incident is asked to call the Florissant Police Department at 314-831-7000.

MEGA MILLIONS Friday: 16-20-39-56-59 Mega ball: 12

Megaplier: 3

Estimated jackpot: $31 million POWERBALL Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $100 million

MISSOURI LOTTERIES LOTTO Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $3.9 million SHOW ME CASH Friday: 02-08-10-20-29 Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $50,000 PICK-3 Friday Midday: 543

Evening: 374

PICK-4 Friday Midday: 3197

Evening: 7599

WHAT’S UP

EDWARDSVILLE > Man pleads guilty to murder charge • A man accused of killing his girlfriend and dumping her body near Bethalto almost three years ago has admitted the crime with the trial date drawing close. Raamon V. Reed, 48, pleaded guilty of first-degree murder and concealing a homicidal death in the shooting of Tabitha

Lynae Milton-Rush, 44. Both lived in St. Louis. Her body was found at the bottom of an embankment along Route 255, about a mile north of Route 140. Madison County Associate Judge Neil Schroeder took the plea in court here Wednesday. The trial was set to start Monday. The prosecution is expected to seek a 40-year prison term at sentencing. Major Case Squad investigators said they believe Reed killed Milton-Rush on the evening of Jan. 1, 2013. Her body was found four days later and Reed turned himself in the next day, saying he heard that police were looking for him. Her family said Milton-Rush formerly ran a day-care center on Natural Bridge Avenue. ST. LOUIS > Bank robber is sought • The FBI and city police are investigating a bank robbery that happened about 10 a.m. Wednesday at the PNC Bank, 4323 North Grand Boulevard. Oicials said a man gave the teller a note demanding money, and indicated he had a weapon but did not show one. He fled with an undisclosed sum. Anyone with information is asked to call CrimeStoppers at 1-866-371-8477.

ILLINOIS LOTTERIES

DIGEST

Evening: 02-04-28-36-45 LOTTO Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $15.25 million PICK-3 Friday Midday: 420 FB: 9

Evening: 915 FB: 3

PICK-4 Friday Midday: 0292 FB: 7 Evening: 7073 FB: 8

STLTODAY.COM/LOTTERY Current and past numbers, plus jackpots from state lotteries around the country.

COLUMBIA, MO. > Library science program gets back its accreditation • A library science program at the University of Missouri has regained accreditation. The Columbia Daily Tribune reports that the American Library Association has reinstated its accreditation of the University of Missouri’s library science master’s program for the next seven years. The association withdrew the program’s accreditation in June. But the university appealed. Kathryn Chval, acting dean of the

College of Education, said Wednesday that the withdrawal of the accreditation wasn’t about the quality of the program. She says the issue was largely because of miscommunication about the structure of the program and the university’s use of data to improve the program. The library program is the only ALAaccredited library science program in the state. The ALA’s accreditation standards examine a program’s planning, curriculum, faculty, students, administration, finances and resources. (AP)

INSIDE Along for the Ride...B2 Bill McClellan ........ B1 Books ................... C13 Business ................. E1 Editorial .............. A16 Horoscopes ......... EV4

MONSANTO FOUNDED John F. Queeny borrows $5,000 to open a saccharin plant and names the company after his wife, Olga Monsanto.

HEADS UP READING CLUB STARTS St. Louis County Library’s Winter Reading Club will kick off Tuesday and run through Feb. 29, 2016. Last year more than 60,000 people participated in the program, which ofers activities and prizes for the whole family. Registration begins Tuesday; simply stop by any open St. Louis County Library branch to sign up. The club has two categories: ages 0-11, and 12-adult. Those in the younger category will be encouraged to read for five hours; those in the older group will be asked to read four books. Those who do will be entered into a prize raffle. All open county library branches will choose three winners in each age group. For more information, call 314-9943300 or visit slcl.org/winter-readingclub. To submit items, email them to headsup@post-dispatch. com or fax them to 314-340-3050.

EVENT

LUCKY DAY LOTTO Friday Midday: 05-09-19-22-27

THIS DAY IN 1901

OPERATION FOOD SEARCH When • 5:30-7:30 p.m. Tuesday Where • Operation Food Search headquarters, 6282 Olive Boulevard, University City How much • $10 in advance; $12 at the door, must be 21 More info • OperationFoodSearch.org, or (314) 726-5355 Ext. 21 The Friends of Operation Food Search are hosting a Holiday Rap ’n Pack Happy Hour on #GivingTuesday. Participants are encouraged to wear festive, casual attire. They will pack weekend meals for children while mingling and enjoying ’90s and holiday jams. Adult beverages and snacks will be served. To list a community event or meeting, submit it online at events.stltoday.com.

CONTACT US Movies ................. C10 Obituaries ........... A21 Puzzles ............. EV3-4 Sports calendar .... D2 Stocks ................... E5 Weather .............. A25

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LOCAL

A2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUNDAY • 11.29.2015

Follow $50,000 down ethics rabbit hole TONY MESSENGER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Two donations to St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger tell you everything you need to know about how messed up Missouri’s campaign finance laws are. The donations, $25,000 each, were made in July and November, but the story really starts about two years ago, in May 2013. Stenger was on the County Council, which was considering a vote on a $30 million cost overrun at the new family court center. Stenger criticized thenCounty Executive Charlie Dooley for accepting a $10,000 campaign donation from Alberici Construction around the same time the company was seeking the extra $30 million to finish the project. Stenger called it “fishy,” which it was. Of course, Stenger would later challenge and defeat Dooley, in part on a campaign platform that Dooley was in the pocket of his donors. You see, this is the thing about campaign donations: They’re always fishy when the other guy receives them. Whether it’s two Democrats, as in Stenger and Dooley, or Republicans criticizing each other or members of the other party, elected oicials rarely see problems with their own donations, only the other guy’s. That’s why transparency is so important, so voters, and competing candidates, can make fair judgments about the money elected oicials receive to keep them in office.

PHOTO BY SID HASTINGS

St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger assumed oice in January.

Fast-forward to July 13 of this year. That’s when David Richardson, an attorney with Husch Blackwell in St. Louis, filed paperwork with the secretary of state’s oice to form a new limited liability company, Givco LLC. Richardson, who deals primarily in real estate law and tax credits, was merely representing clients, whose names don’t appear on the LLC documents on file with the state. This is legal in Missouri, and quite common. It makes it diicult to track down the people behind the LLC, which isn’t necessarily a problem until that company throws itself into the political process. Givco did that two weeks after it was formed, giving Stenger $25,000. A company with seemingly anonymous backers forms. Two weeks later it gives a big check to a county executive. Fishy, yes? Local government watchdog Tom Sullivan criticized the donation at the next County Council meeting. Nobody paid too much attention, perhaps in part because

nobody knew who was behind the money. Then, on Nov. 5, Givco gave again. Another $25,000 to Stenger. At $50,000 this year, that made Givco the county executive’s biggest individual donor. The people behind Givco, it turns out, are developers David and Bob Glarner, the brothers who are behind a multimilliondollar development to bring life back to the Northwest Plaza area. I know this only because Stenger told me when I asked him about Givco. There is no public record paper trail that ties Givco to the Glarners. “They’re friends of mine,” Stenger says. “I guess they decided they were going to do their contributions through the LLC.” The Glarners have previously donated to other politicians under their own names, and their other corporate entities. “They handed me the check. That’s how I know it was from them.” Mystery solved. But not the problem. Fact is, if Stenger, or Richardson, who also told me his clients were the Glarners, decided not to disclose who the developers were, voters wouldn’t know who was trying to curry favor with the county executive. “There’s nothing transactional” about the check, Stenger says. The Glarners’ Northwest Plaza development did, however, need the approval of the St. Louis Economic Development Partnership in gaining about $6.4 million in federal New Market tax credits to help fund the project. That money had been in the works long before the donations, though at least one vote took place late this summer, Richardson said. Stenger

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM

appoints 11 of the partnership’s 15 board members. In Missouri, of course, all of this is legal, which is why the state received a Dminus in a recent national report on government ethics by the Center for Public Integrity. It starts with being one of the few states to allow unlimited donations, making $25,000 checks relatively common in Missouri politics. Last year there were 441 campaign donations of that amount or higher in the state. In 2015, an of-election year, there have already been 238. They come from developers and law firms, unions and corporations, hedge funds and, yes, hard-to-track LLCs or other political committees. In some cases, the money gets moved from one committee to the next, making it harder to track its original source. And why is this? Because the donors and candidates know big checks draw questions. The result of this combination of big money and lack of transparency, of course, is that the influence an average voter or donor might have is squeezed out by those with bigger checkbooks. In Missouri, every Democrat and every Republican has a story to tell about how their opponent raises his or her money or hides the source of donations. But ask them about their own donations and they give some variation of the “I can’t be bought for the price of a steak sandwich” story. Even in 2015, $50,000 buys an awful lot of steak. Tony Messenger • 314-340-8518 @tonymess on Twitter tmessenger@post-dispatch.com

Find these features and exclusive subscriber content at stltoday.com/extra

REEL TIME IN THE RING The new movie “Creed” is getting rave reviews. Check out seven other critically acclaimed movies about boxing.

THE FORCE IS WITH THEM

’TIS THE SEASON ... FOR BEER

Vote for your favorite “Star Wars” fan in our fan contest. Prizes include Kenrick’s Meat & Catering gift packs and tickets to see the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra perform the music of John Williams.

Seasonal beers are here, and while some are sweet, or spicy, or fruity, they share one characteristic: They vanish after the holidays.

LOTTERY

LAW & ORDER

MULTISTATE GAMES

FLORISSANT > Girl, 6, dies of injuries from crash • A 6-year-old girl died Friday from injuries sufered in a crash in Florissant on Thursday night. A Florissant man has been charged with driving under the influence of alcohol and seconddegree assault. Police said the two-vehicle crash happened at 8:50 p.m. southbound on North Highway 67 near St. Jacques Street, according to Florissant police Oicer Craig DeHart, spokesman for the department. DeHart said a vehicle was disabled in the roadway and was struck from behind. The girl was in the stalled vehicle. She was transported to Cardinal Glennon Children’s Medical Center, where she died on Friday. Her name has not been released. Several occupants in the vehicles had minor injuries. The driver of the vehicle that struck the stalled vehicle was Daniel Meade, 31, of the 1600 block of Naomie Avenue in Florissant. He is being held in lieu of $150,000 bail.

POWERBALL Saturday: 02-06-47-66-67 Powerball: 02 Power play: 3 Estimated jackpot: $100 million MEGA MILLIONS Friday: 16-20-39-56-59 Mega ball: 12 Megaplier: 3 Tuesday’s estimated jackpot: $39 million

MISSOURI LOTTERIES LOTTO Saturday: 08-13-30-35-37-43 Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $4 million SHOW ME CASH Saturday: 01-11-20-30-37 Sunday’s estimated jackpot: $64,000 PICK-3 Midday: 077 Evening: 454 PICK-4 Midday: 3441 Evening: 7272 TRIPLE PLAY: 07-17-20-50

ILLINOIS LOTTERIES LUCKY DAY LOTTO Saturday Midday: 08-19-20-25-28 Evening: 16-17-38-40-44 LOTTO Saturday: 04-08-12-37-40-50 Extra shot: 07 Estimated jackpot: $15.25 million PICK-3 Midday: 435 FB: 3 Evening: 022 FB: 7 PICK-4 Midday: 3016 FB: 9 Evening: 6188 FB: 5

STLTODAY.COM/LOTTERY Current and past numbers, plus jackpots from state lotteries around the country.

County is looking for farmhouses that date to before 1860 ASSOCIATED PRESS

SPRINGFIELD, ILL. • Oicials in San-

gamon County are looking to identify

WHAT’S UP mile north of Highway 32 about 3:45 p.m. The front of the truck struck the rear of a car, which was also going southbound. The car went of the road and overturned, and the truck went of the road and struck a tree. A passenger in the car, Charlotte J. French, 67, of Irondale, Mo., and the driver of the truck, Mitchell A. Knight, 45, also of Lowndes, were seriously hurt. The driver of the car sufered moderate injuries, and another passenger in the car sufered minor injuries. Knight was the only person involved who wore a seat belt, the patrol said.

ST. FRANCOIS COUNTY > Woman killed in crash • A southeast Missouri woman was killed in a two-vehicle crash Friday afternoon in St. Francois County, the Missouri Highway Patrol said. Jeanette R. Bunn, 42, of Lowndes, Mo., was pronounced dead at the scene. The patrol said Bunn was a passenger in a truck going south on Highway 67 a

MARION, ILL. > Hypothermia possible cause of death • Authorities in Southern Illinois say foul play is not suspected in the death of a Murphysboro woman, 22, whose body was found by hunters in a national wildlife refuge. The Southern Illinoisan in Carbondale reported an autopsy Friday by Dr. James Jacobi showed injuries to Jeannie Schuur’s body were not a contributing factor. Jacobi said the preliminary cause of death indicated hypothermia, pending toxicology reports. The Williamson County sherif’s oice said Schuur’s body was found Thursday on land in the Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge. Family members reported her missing on Monday after she was last seen two days earlier walking away from a friend’s home.

farmhouses built before the Civil War that are on operating farms. The project was launched by the Sangamon County Historic Preservation Commission and the Sangamon County Farm Bureau, according to the State Journal-Register of Springfield. “These historic farmhouses represent generations of hard work and dedication to the land and the community,” said county farm bureau President Larry Beaty.

“It is important to recognize our local farms that have survived and continue to operate into a new millennium.” The project asks that the farmhouse owners or people familiar with the buildings submit evidence of construction taking place before 1860. The commission would verify the evidence and give certificates to farmhouse owners, with the owner of the oldest one receiving a plaque.

MONSANTO FOUNDED John F. Queeny borrows $5,000 to open a saccharin plant and names the company after his wife, Olga Monsanto.

HEADS UP READING CLUB STARTS St. Louis County Library’s Winter Reading Club will kick off Tuesday and run through Feb. 29, 2016. Last year more than 60,000 people participated in the program, which ofers activities and prizes for the whole family. Registration begins Tuesday; simply stop by any open St. Louis County Library branch to sign up. The club has two categories: ages 0-11, and 12-adult. Those in the younger category will be encouraged to read for five hours; those in the older group will be asked to read four books. Those who do will be entered into a prize raffle. All open county library branches will choose three winners in each age group. For more information, call 314-9943300 or visit slcl.org/winter-readingclub. To submit items, email them to headsup@post-dispatch. com or fax them to 314-340-3050.

EVENT OPERATION FOOD SEARCH When • 5:30-7:30 p.m. Tuesday Where • Operation Food Search headquarters, 6282 Olive Boulevard, University City How much • $10 in advance; $12 at the door, must be 21 More info • OperationFoodSearch.org, or (314) 726-5355 Ext. 21 The Friends of Operation Food Search are hosting a Holiday Rap ’n Pack Happy Hour on #GivingTuesday. Participants are encouraged to wear festive, casual attire. They will pack weekend meals for children while mingling and enjoying ’90s and holiday jams. Adult beverages and snacks will be served. To list a community event or meeting, submit it online at events.stltoday.com.

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SATURDAY’S BEST

11.29.2015 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A3

Defunct New Melle golf course could become park St. Charles County already has 600 acres of land that needs developing BY MARK SCHLINKMANN St. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. CHARLES COUNTY • A defunct golf course in New Melle could be turned into a county park under a plan being considered by the County Council. Council Chairman Joe Brazil wants the county to buy the 152 acres remaining from the old, privately run New Melle Lakes Golf Course, which stopped operating in 2011 because it wasn’t profitable. A big advantage, Brazil said, is that relatively little money beyond the purchase price would be needed to turn it into a park, because the site already has some park-type features. That includes about two miles of asphalt paths, a building once used as a banquet center and a parking lot. There also are four lakes, the largest of which is 26 acres, and a pavilion where a few picnic tables could fit. “It’s ready to go,” said Brazil, a Defiance-area Republican whose district includes the site. However, St. Charles County Executive Steve Ehlmann, a fellow Republican who would have to sign off on any such purchase, has yet to be convinced. Ehlmann said that he had an open mind on the issue but that “I’m not in favor of it yet.” He said his initial reaction was that the money should be spent instead on transforming into park space more of the 600-plus acres the county parks department has acquired over the years and is holding in reserve. That’s in addition to the 11 parks in operation now on a total of 2,509 acres. “We’ve got a lot of land,” he said. “We need to start developing it.” The parks agency’s top development priority, according to a county newsletter last summer, is preparing 116 acres in Weldon Spring for public use. The county bought that site for $6 million last year.

St. Charles County Council Chairman Joe Brazil wants the old New Melle Lakes Golf Course turned into a St. Charles County park.

The site, the former Sammelmann farm and homestead, is bordered by Pitman Hill and Kisker roads, in a heavily populated suburban area. A conceptual map of the planned park shows walking trails, a wetlands and boardwalk area, a disc golf course, several soccer fields, a fishing lake, an off-leash dog park and other features. Ehlmann said that although the New Melle golf course site — on Foristell Road in a semi-rural part of the county — would be a great piece of land to add to the county’s holdings, only 3,000 people lived within a three-mile radius of it. In contrast, he said, 50,000 people live within the same radius of the Sammelmann site. He said that part of the county needed more recreational activities. Ehlmann has proposed a county budget for next year

calling for $13 million to develop current county-owned land into parks, and $3 million to buy land, as in past years’ budgets. But in his accompanying budget message, Ehlmann noted that if the $3 million wasn’t used to buy land, “it can be used to open additional parks.” The budget message mentions developing the Sammelmann site and renovating the interior of the 185-year-old Hays House at Matson Hill Park, a current facility near Defiance. The house was built by a grandson of Daniel Boone. The county director of administration, Joann Leykam, said it would cost at least $9 million to develop the Sammelmann site. She didn’t have an estimate for the Hays House work. Brazil said the county considered buying the old golf course four years ago but the asking price of about $3.5 million for

about 177 acres was too high. Since then, the owner has sold 25 acres of the tract to someone else. He said the per-acre price “is more palatable now” but didn’t elaborate. Another advantage to the site, he said, is that it could be combined with 242 acres nearby, which the parks agency acquired in 2009 and plans to develop eventually. This month council members toured the old golf course, which closed after a 19-year run. They’ll take up the issue again Monday at a work session on parks. Brazil said he had the support of a majority of council members for the purchase. Real estate broker Chris Vatterott is marketing the property for a member of his family who owns it. He declined to comment on the per-acre price he’s seek-

ing, other than to say, “It’s really close to what (county oicials) wanted to pay before.” He said negotiations with the council were continuing. The county started its park system almost from scratch in 1997. The latest tract, the 80-acre College Meadows Park, opened last April next to St. Charles Community College’s campus in Cottleville on land owned by the school. Also opening this year was the final phase of the 494-acre Broemmelsiek Park near O’Fallon. Most of the parks are on the periphery of the county’s population centers and avoid duplicating more intensive activities, such as swimming pools and ball fields, already offered by cities. Mark Schlinkmann • 636-255-7233 @mschlinkmann on Twitter mschlinkmann@post-dispatch.com

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LOCAL

11.29.2015 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A3

Jane Cunningham criticized Children’s charity over Colorado shooting post steps up to replace Union wants her of ire board for slight on irst responders FROM STAFF REPORTS

Monarch Fire Protection District Board director Jane Cunningham has been accused of insulting first responders in a social media posting about Friday’s fatal shootings at the Planned Parenthood clinic in Colorado Springs. The St. Louis County police officers union posted a call on its Facebook page Saturday for Cunningham to resign. Cunningham’s Twitter post Friday evening about the fatal shootings of three people, including a police officer, said in part: “Tragedy, but loss of life is a daily event at Planned Parenthood.” One commenter responded:

“Justify the killing of police officers? There are no words.” Cunningham replied: “Agree, none Cunningham of these killings is justified. I wish there was this much reporting and outrage over the babies too.” After other critical responses, she posted on Twitter early Saturday evening: “My heart goes out to the CO police oicer and all those who lost their lives and their families.” The county police union post calling for her resignation said: “Jane Cunningham has insulted first responders and the victims of the Colorado mass shooting with ridiculous posting. You either support first responders or you do not. Jane Cunningham obviously DOES NOT and should resign immediately.”

It included, “Would the death of Monarch Firefighters or Chesterfield Police Officers be o.k. with her if it was near something she didn’t like? Another horrible legislator that needs to get of social media and actually do something!!!” Cunningham won a seat on the Monarch fire district board in 2013. Shortly after she joined the board, Cunningham, a Republican from Chesterfield, was involved in a controversy over her move along with the board president to ban the Monarch firefighters from their yearly wearing of pink shirts — with a union logo — in honor of breast cancer awareness. In the Missouri Legislature, Cunningham was often a lightning rod for her support of conservative policy, including her anti-abortion stance against embryonic stem cell research and support of tax credits for private school tuition.

School district adopts transgender policy ASSOCIATED PRESS

M A R I O N V I L L E , M O. • A

southwest Missouri school district has a new policy governing bathroom usage for transgender students that some civil rights advocates are calling discriminatory. The Marionville School District recently adopted a policy allowing students to either use a gender-neutral bathroom or a bathroom designated for their biological sex, The Springfield News-Leader reported. The district is among several that have adopted such policies after a group of students protested over a transgender Hillsboro High School student who was allowed to change in the girls’ locker room. Under the new Marionville policy, students who participate in physical education classes requiring a locker room or shower are expected to use facilities designated for their biological

gender. They can also take an alternative PE class that doesn’t require changing clothes or showering. The new Marionville policy also allows students to change their name once every school year, use whatever pronoun they prefer and dress in the same manner as the gender with which they identify as long as they are consistent with school dress code. Sarah Rossi, director of advocacy and policy for the ACLU of Missouri, called Marionville’s policy “blatant discrimination.” She said the policy conflicts with federal guidelines for transgender students, who should be able to use a bathroom or locker room of the gender they identify with. “Transgender students need to be treated with dignity and respect just like any other students, and policies like this do just the opposite,” Rossi said. Marionville’s new policy also

says the needs of each transgender student must be assessed case by case. Marionville superintendent Larry Brown said the School Board adopted the policy based on recommendations from the school’s insurance company and attorney Tom Mickes. Mickes is with the Missouri Consultants for Education, one of two organizations that create and recommend policies for Missouri schools. Mickes said Missouri Consultants created its policy model to counter recommendations from the U.S. Department of Education’s Oice of Civil Rights that include allowing transgender students who identify as being female to shower with biologically born females. “Female students ... have the right not to be naked in front of a male,” Mickes said. “We are going to provide alternatives, but showering with them is not one of the options.”

girl’s stolen wheelchair

Police say there are no new leads in theft of woman’s car BY DOUG MOORE AND BLYTHE BERNHARD St. Louis Post-dispatch DOUG MOORE • P-d

ST. LOUIS • A little girl whose

wheelchair was stolen Wednesday in the Bevo Mill neighborhood should have a new one by Monday, her mother said. Variety the Children’s Charity, which serves children with disabilities, ofered to donate a wheelchair to 2-year-old Fiona, said Tonja Ross. Ross’ SUV with Fiona’s wheelchair and car seat was stolen in front of her home the day before Thanksgiving. Saturday night, police had no new leads in the case, Ross said. Also Saturday night, the family’s GoFundMe fundraising page surpassed its $4,500 goal toward a car and car seat. Ross expressed gratitude for support from across the nation. “For other people to love your child, that’s really beautiful,” she said. Ross returned home Wednesday afternoon after shopping, her SUV filled with groceries, diapers and Christmas gifts. A few minutes later, thieves drove of with her Kia Sportage, Fiona’s wheelchair inside. Fiona has Down syndrome and a rare brain abnormality called holoprosencephaly. Most children with it die before birth. Fiona was home with a nurse while her mother shopped. Ross pulled her Kia in front of her home around 2:30 p.m. She left her keys in the vehicle and went inside to drop of bags and check on her daughter. Heading to the front door to get more items from the vehicle, she saw three men walk down the street and pause in front of her Kia. One of them spotted her and walked toward the house, she said. Ross closed and locked the door. She looked out and saw

Fiona Italiano, 2, has Down syndrome and a rare brain abnormality.

GOFUNDME ACCOUNT FOR FIONA AND HER MOTHER gofundme.com/a7c55hhw

two men getting into her car and a third running away. Enraged, Ross ran back to the door and began screaming, as her vehicle disappeared down the street, near Gravois Avenue and Neosho Street. “It’s not a very expensive car,” Ross said. “I got it with 30,000 miles on it, bought it for $10,000.” It could carry her daughter’s wheelchair, used to help Fiona get to and from her therapy appointments five days a week at St. Louis Children’s Hospital. On Friday, Fiona did not go to therapy. Her car seat was among the items in the stolen vehicle. Ross has a rental car but said she is not comfortable leaving the house. “We don’t feel safe here,” she said. Ross and her boyfriend want to sell the house where they have lived for a year, after moving back to her hometown of St. Louis from Tampa, Fla., for Fiona’s treatment at Children’s. Ross said she is frustrated and tired. But thankful. Thankful that she has a daughter doctors said would never survive when, at 43, Ross became pregnant. “I’m so proud to be her mother,” Ross said. “All we do is strive to be better than the day before.” Doug Moore • 314-340-8125 @dougwmoore on Twitter dmoore@post-dispatch.com

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LOCAL

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 11.29.2015

Former grand juror calls for less secrecy Dispute over lawyer’s removal from panel pulls back curtain on centuries-old process BY ROBERT PATRICK St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Gone but not willing to be forgotten, the lawyer thrown off a St. Louis County grand jury claims the judge who did it — and the prosecutor whose office initiated the process — interfered with a sacrosanct process and misled the public about it. In his first comprehensive interview, Grant Doty, the former grand jury foreman, disputed statements made by St. Louis County Circuit Judge Steven Goldman and the oice of Prosecuting Attorney Robert McCulloch. An appellate court has faulted Goldman’s removal of Doty, saying he did not make an adequate record supporting his decision. But appeals judges also said it was impractical to return Doty to the panel, so the judges dissolved that grand jury and a new one was assembled with different members. Goldman denied any impropriety and said his affidavit about the Doty matter was accurate. And he said that he was “puzzled” that the appeals court did not consider some of what Doty claimed in court filings, such as an email suggesting that prosecutors created a shadow Facebook account to investigate jurors. McCulloch’s office did not respond to requests for comment. The controversy has laid bare the functioning of the centuries-old process in which selected citizens meet in secret to hear evidence of crimes and decide whether to issue indictments to send the accused to trial. It raises questions, at least by Doty and his former employer, the American Civil Liberties Union of Missouri, of whether that secrecy thwarts appropriate scrutiny. ACLU Legal Director Tony Rothert, who represented Doty in his lawsuit to be reinstated,

said, “If there’s an abuse of the system, (the secrecy) allows it to be covered up.” In an interview in the ACLU Doty offices, with Rothert present, Doty was careful not to talk about grand jury matters that were not public, citing the oath he took. Several times, he deferred to what already had been presented in legal filings. After Doty received a jury duty summons in June, he tweeted a picture and called it “cool.” After interviews with Goldman, he said, he was told Aug. 3 that he was on the grand jury as foreman. He recalled Goldman saying it was “good” to have a lawyer there. Doty said he assumed Goldman knew he had worked for the ACLU, because his name is known in legal circles here and because he told the judge, “All I’ve ever done is civil rights work.” Goldman said he knew that Doty graduated from the U.S. Military Academy and works now for the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. The judge’s affidavit says Doty should have volunteered his ACLU link, and that he had represented clients suing McCulloch’s office or the county. After more than 20 years in the Army, Doty worked from 2008-2010 at the Lewis Rice law firm, which represents the Post-Dispatch in some matters. Then he was with the ACLU until this spring.

GRAND JURY’S OWN INVESTIGATION Doty said he spent a month researching grand jury duties and obligations before the first session Sept. 16. He said jurors decided they wanted to hear information about something he had brought up, which he characterized only as something in the news. Asked if they

voted on pursuing it, he said “consensus rules” and that some were unaware they could do their own investigations. Doty said prosecutors were “taken aback” by the request. He insisted that the jury was not at risk of going “rogue.” Goldman said he was aware of the interest in an investigation but couldn’t recall the topic. He said some grand juries perform their own investigations, although it is “not typical.” The next meeting, Sept. 23, followed the pattern: Prosecutors would question a witness, usually a police officer, then jurors got a turn. One of Doty’s questions that day led to his removal. According to legal filings, he asked an officer, “How many police officers he had worked with who were thought by him to be corrupt?” Doty later defended the question, saying it was not meant to accuse the oicer or elicit names but merely as a litmus test of his truthfulness. “Because it was provocative, I went out of my way to ask, professionally and sensitively, the question,” Doty said. He assumed he succeeded, because the witness answered and the prosecutor guiding the inquiry said nothing. A “handful” of cases later, Doty said, he asked the question again. This time, the prosecutor objected. In court documents, prosecutors called it “intimidating.”

THE JUDGE INTERVENES Goldman’s affidavit says that he was asked to intervene by a prosecutor who said that Doty had argued with her and claimed “broad powers including the power to require the officer to answer whatever questions he presents.” The judge told Doty to “focus on the cases at hand.” Doty said that he didn’t like the prosecutor’s demeanor, Goldman’s affidavit says.

Goldman said he had told Doty “not to ofend the witness.” Referring to his own copy of Goldman’s aidavit, Doty said the judge’s recall “is not correct.” Doty admitted challenging the prosecutor but denied arguing with her, or being told not to “ofend” the witness. He recalled the judge saying a grand jury can ask those types of questions, but warning that it may not be “an effective use of your time” and “won’t be particularly useful in your deliberations.” Goldman also said he was not telling jurors what to ask and what not to, Doty said. Doty said he promised the judge, prosecutor and the rest of the jury that he would not ask the question again, and didn’t. But he believes his firmness on the issue — taking charge of the discussion, and asking the prosecutor to leave during the meeting with Goldman — triggered an inquiry by McCulloch’s office that “is what got me kicked of the grand jury.” Goldman’s affidavit says that McCulloch did raise concerns about a conflict because of suits in which Doty was a lawyer, but also that McCulloch did not insist on Doty’s removal. Five days after the second session, Doty was summoned to Goldman’s chambers. He and the judge disagree on what was said. After Goldman cited a perceived or potential conflict of interest, Doty recalls responding: “It’s pretext. The reason I’m being discharged is I challenged the prosecutor. And they didn’t like it.” He said Goldman responded, “Absolutely not. The only reason I’m kicking you off is the potential conflict. I can’t risk these indictments being challenged.” Doty said that Goldman even praised the grand jury’s independence.

LEGAL WORK AT ISSUE Goldman, in an interview, pointed to his affidavit saying Doty had been removed not because he worked for the ACLU, but rather because he had represented plaintiffs in suits against McCulloch’s office and the St. Louis County police. One case was a suit by a member of a different grand jury seeking permission to violate secrecy to speak about a controversial decision not to indict a Ferguson police oicer in last year’s killing of Michael Brown Jr. Doty argues that unlike trial jurors, grand jurors are not required to be unbiased. He cited a Maryland case finding that grand jurors are not “a judicial body” but an “accusing body.” Goldman declined to unseal a transcript of their conversation, saying that it was “not much more” than what already was made public, and that he sees no good reason to do it. It remains unclear whether Doty complaints will lead anywhere. No one had appealed the disbanding of the grand jury he served. Rothert said the most likely avenue for reforming grand jury transparency would have to come through the Missouri Legislature, and he is unaware of any efort being made there. There’s no way, he said, to know if anyone else has been kicked of a grand jury, unless someone comes forward. No one but Doty has. Goldman said that although he had never done it before, he has heard of “several cases” in the past in St. Louis County. Robert Patrick • 314-621-5154 @rxpatrick on Twitter rpatrick@post-dispatch.com

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NATION

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 11.29.2015

Fallout, questions in clinic attack ‘No more baby parts’ Oicial says Robert Lewis Dear used phrase, killed three

Unknown to activists Anti-abortion protesters quick to denounce his actions

Police response Some wonder about length of standof, conlicting reports

WASHINGTON POST

COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO. • The gunman suspected of

storming a Planned Parenthood clinic and killing a police officer and two others used the phrase “no more baby parts” to explain his act, according to a law enforcement oicial, a comment sure to further inflame the heated rhetoric surrounding abortion. Robert Lewis Dear’s attack on the clinic was “definitely politically motivated,’’ said the official, speaking on the condition of anonymity because the investigation is still underway. NBC News, which first reported the comment, said that Dear also mentioned President Barack Obama in a range of statements to investigators that left his precise motivation unclear. Yet even as authorities released few details about Friday’s shootings, the politics of the highly charged abortion issue seemed to outstrip oicials’ efforts to be methodical. While anti-abortion activists denied any knowledge of Dear and said he is not affiliated with their movement, abortion-rights activists countered that comments by conservatives against Planned Parenthood had precipitated the violence. Vicki Cowart, president of Planned Parenthood of the Rocky Mountains, cited “eyewitness accounts” in asserting that Dear “was motivated by opposition to safe and legal abortion.” “We’ve seen an alarming increase in hateful rhetoric and smear campaigns against abortion providers and patients over the last few months,” she said in a statement. “That environment breeds acts of violence.” Planned Parenthood, which provides abortions and other health care services, has been at the center of a political storm as the 2016 presidential

CHRISTIAN MURDOCK • (Colorado Springs) Gazette via AP

Lynn Young cries Saturday during a vigil for those killed in Friday’s shooting at a Planned Parenthood clinic in Colorado Springs, Colo.

campaign heats up. Republican candidates have denounced the organization, especially after an anti-abortion group released a series of surreptitiously filmed videos in which Planned Parenthood officials discussed the techniques and financial aspects of harvesting fetal tissue samples for scientific research. Dear, 57, is accused of fatally shooting University of Colorado police Officer Garrett Swasey and two as-yet unnamed civilians Friday at the Colorado Springs Planned Parenthood clinic. At least four other officers and five more civilians were also injured. Officials said Saturday that the injured victims were expected to recover. Dear was described by people who know him as a malcontent and drifter who has had numerous run-ins with the law. Dear, who moved to Colorado last year, is being held without bail and is scheduled to appear in court Monday, local media outlets reported. He is expected to first face state charges and then additional federal charges, according to a law enforcement oicial. It was

unclear Saturday whether an attorney for Dear had been appointed. On Saturday, witnesses described scenes of chaos and carnage as the gunshots began on a traditionally quiet day after Thanksgiving, with police responding to a call for help from the clinic, in a bustling area near a shopping center, medical building, grocery and restaurants. A burst of gunfire early on gave way to relative calm in the afternoon, but witnesses said gunfire started again in the evening. Many workers and shoppers in the area were told to hunker down, whether it be in the kitchen of their restaurant or the back seat of their car. Some remained there for hours as snow accumulated and the sky darkened. Authorities said that Dear was armed with what they described as a long gun and had also brought into the clinic several unspecified items that could have been explosives. Obama, in his first reaction to the shootings, issued a refrain for more gun-control measures, a familiar ritual after mass shootings.

On the Republican campaign trail, candidates who have been full-throated in their denunciations of Planned Parenthood for much of the year fell nearly silent. Only Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas and Ohio Gov. John Kasich referred to the shootings, but neither mentioned Planned Parenthood. All three leading Democratic candidates issued statements supporting Planned Parenthood, and they were joined by other abortion-rights activists who condemned the criticism of the organization and said it led to the shootings. Referring to anti-abortion groups, Vicki Saporta, president of the National Abortion Federation, an association for abortion providers, said: “They have ignited a firestorm of hate. They knew there could be these types of consequences. ... It’s not a huge surprise that somebody would take this type of action.” Anti-abortion groups were quick to denounce the shooting and distance themselves from Dear, with numerous activists saying they have never interacted with or heard of him. Troy Newman, president of Operation Rescue, a controversial group that tracks abortion clinics and posts information about abortion doctors on its website, said he immediately entered Dear’s name into his membership database and came up empty. “One thing we do know is the guy is a very dangerous, unstable individual who desired to kill people, and that is not in any way what the pro-life movement stands for,” Newman said. The law enforcement response to the shootings also came under scrutiny on Saturday. The first call for help came in about 11:38 a.m. Dear was taken into custody at 4:52 p.m. At various points during the intervening hours, officials said the shooter had been contained, then appeared to reverse themselves.

Obama calls for more gun controls WASHINGTON POST

President Barack Obama on Saturday called for additional gun control measures in the United States, after the slaying of three people Friday at a Planned Parenthood clinic in Colorado. In a statement, Obama said that regardless of the motive, it was unacceptable that these sort of mass shootings happen so frequently in the United States. “This is not normal. We can’t let it become normal,” he said. “If we truly care about this — if we’re going to offer up our thoughts and prayers again, for God knows how many times, with a truly clean conscience — then we have to do something about the easy accessibility of weapons of war on our streets to people who have no business wielding them. Period. Enough is enough.” Administration officials have been scrutinizing whether they can undertake additional gun controls through executive action, but no proposals have yet to be finalized. The leading proposal would impose new background-check requirements for buyers who purchase weapons from highvolume gun dealers. In Saturday’s statement, Obama said, “We don’t yet know what this particular gunman’s so-called motive was for shooting twelve people, or for terrorizing an entire community, when he opened fire with an assault weapon and took hostages at a Planned Parenthood center in Colorado. “What we do know is that he killed a cop in the line of duty, along with two of the citizens that police officer was trying to protect. We know that law enforcement saved lives, as so many of them do every day, all across America,” he said. “And we know that more Americans and their families had fear forced upon them. “May God bless Officer Garrett Swasey and the Americans he tried to save — and may He grant the rest of us the courage to do the same thing,” the president added.

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NATION

11.29.2015 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A5

Graying NPR tries to woo younger public radio listeners BY PAUL FARHI Washington Post

WASHINGTON • As NPR came of age in the 1980s, its audience matured with it. Three decades later, that is starting to look like a problem. Many of the listeners who grew up with NPR are now reaching retirement age, leaving NPR with a challenge: How can it attract younger and middleage audiences — whose numbers are shrinking — to replace them? NPR’s research shows a growing gulf in who is listening to the likes of “Morning Edition” and “All Things Considered,” the daily news programs that have propelled public radio for more than 30 years. Morning listening has dropped 11 percent overall since 2010, according to Nielsen research that NPR has made public; afternoon listening is down 6 percent over the same period. Perhaps more troubling are the broader demographic trends. NPR’s signal has gradually been fading among the young. Listening among “Morning Edition’s” audience, for example, has declined 20 percent among people younger than 55 in the past five years. Listening for “All Things Considered” has dropped about 25 percent among those in the 45-to-54 segment. The growth market? People over 65, who were increasing in both the morning and afternoon hours. The graying of NPR, and the declines overall, are potentially perilous to the public radio ecosystem. NPR, based in Washington, serves programs to nearly 900 “member” stations, which rely in large part on financial contributions from their listeners. The stations, in turn, kick back some of their pledgedrive dollars to NPR to license such programs as “Car Talk,” “Fresh Air” and “Morning Edition” (federal tax dollars supply only a small part of stations’ annual budgets, and virtually none of NPR’s). But as audiences drift to newer on-demand audio sources such as podcasts and streaming, the bonds with local stations — and the contributions that come with them — may be fraying. “It’s a problem, and no one has really figured out what to do about it,” said Jeff Hansen, the program director at Seattle public radio station KUOW. He noted that public radio was invented by people in their 20s in the 1970s, largely at stations funded by colleges and universities. “What they didn’t realize at the time was that what they were inventing was programming for people like themselves — baby boomers with college degrees.” That audience has largely stayed loyal. The median age of public radio listeners has roughly tracked the median age of baby boomers. The median NPR listener was 45 years old in 1995; now he or she is 54, according to Tom Thomas, co-chief executive of the Station Resource Group, a publicradio strategy and research consortium. “The (aging) trend has been gentle and continuous for the last 20 years,” he said. To shore up its appeal to a younger crowd, NPR’s contemporary managers say that they are going where younger ears are, both via digital technology and with programming that has younger people in mind. Although radio is still, by far, the dominant way to listen, NPR’s distribution chain now includes podcasts, Web text and streams, satellite broadcasting and social media. Among its news initiatives, NPR in October and early November launched a series on the lives of 15-year-old girls around the world; it played on all of NPR’s news shows and on NPR.org. NPR also has attempted to foster a community of younger listeners through “Generation Listen,” a website that features audio and text stories, as well as news of

community events hosted by young NPR listeners. In more subtle changes, NPR added two new, younger hosts — Ari Shapiro and Kelly McEvers — to “All Things Considered” this summer, joining Robert Siegel, 68. And it promoted Michel Martin, an African-American woman who is the former host of “Tell Me More” (canceled last year) and now hosts “Weekend All Things Considered.” Editorial Director Michael Oreskes said the anchor reset is “an invitation to both traditional listeners and new ones to

think about the programs in new ways.” Some of the other brand-name talent at NPR illustrates the situation: Talk-show host Diane Rehm is 79; senior national correspondent Linda Wertheimer is 72; legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg is 71, and “Weekend Edition Saturday” host Scott Simon is a relative youngster at 63. Last year, the organization launched a mobile app, NPR One, that streams both national and local public-radio stories

via smartphones and tablets. NPR said downloads of the app have been growing, but it hasn’t released figures (notably, “Serial” — the massively popular and critically praised podcast — was produced not by NPR but by an independent public-radio organization, Chicago Public Media’s “This American Life”). “If someone has decided that their phone is a better way to get information than their radio, we’re not going to change their mind,” said Oreskes, a former New York Times and

Associated Press editor. “So our goal is to be there for them, wherever they are.” Overall, audiences are growing on digital devices, said Emma Carrasco, NPR’s senior vice president for audience development. She estimated that 32 million people per week, about 1 in 10 people in the nation, hear or read (via NPR.org) something NPR has produced. But it is unclear whether digital sources can fully replace the declining broadcast radio audience. No one knows, for example,

how many people actually listen to the podcasts they download, or whether podcasts — still a small share of all listening — are a passing fad or an enduring format. What’s more, NPR has to strike a sometimes awkward balance with its digital forays. By sending its programs directly to listeners via digital means, it risks bypassing and even competing with the stations that broadcast those shows — and supply the dollars that enable NPR to produce them in the first place.

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NATION

11.29.2015 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A5

DIGEST Police erased video of shooting, says restaurant manager A Burger King manager who accuses Chicago police of erasing surveillance video in the case of a black teenager shot last year by a white oicer says he has testiied before a federal grand jury investigating the shooting. Jay Darshane told the Chicago Tribune that the FBI also took the restaurant video recorder containing all of its surveillance images. Federal prosecutors said this past week that their investigation is continuing but would not comment further. Under a judge’s order, the city released police squad car video showing the shooting of Laquan McDonald, 17. Cook County prosecutors also announced this past week that the oicer has been charged with irst-degree murder. The police chief and the Cook County state’s attorney both say no one tampered with the Burger King video. Police say gang targeted boy, 9 • A Chicago man was charged with irst-degree murder Friday in connection with the slaying of a 9-yearold boy who police say was lured from a playground and shot in the head because of his father’s gang ties. Police Superintendent Garry McCarthy said the suspect, Corey Morgan, 27, is a gang member with an extensive criminal history. McCarthy said two other men, including one jailed on an unrelated gun charge, also are suspected in the death of Tyshawn Lee, who was shot in an alley near his grandmother’s home on Nov. 2. Prosecutors allege Morgan was intent on settling the score after an October shooting killed his brother and injured his mother in a months-long gang feud. But his attorney, Jonathan Brayman, said Morgan “absolutely denies” being involved in the boy’s death. McCarthy said the three men’s precise roles were still under investigation, but that all were members of the same gang. “They’re going to be obliterated. That gang just signed its own death warrant,” McCarthy said during a news conference. Black Friday store sales fall; online sales up • Black Friday shopping is shifting from hours spent in line to more time online. Sales at retail stores on Black Friday fell 10 percent to $10.4 billion this year, down from $11.6 billion in 2014, according to research irm ShopperTrak. And sales on Thanksgiving dropped by the same percentage, to $1.8 billion. A big reason for the decline is increased online shopping, as Americans hunt down deals on their smartphones, tablets and computers. And many retailers are ofering bargains long before Thanksgiving, limiting the impact of Black Friday specials. Online retailers have been bombarding customers with email discounts and bargains for weeks. Online sales jumped 14.3 percent on Friday compared with last year, according to Adobe, which tracked activity on 4,500 retail websites. Email promotions drove 25 percent more sales compared with 2014, the company said. Brick-and-mortar retailers saw fewer customer visits on Thanksgiving and Black Friday, compared with last year, according to Kevin Kearns, ShopperTrak’s chief revenue oicer. “Shoppers are researching products ahead of time, targeting their store visits, and arriving in-store with the intention of making a purchase,” Kearns said. The drop in Thanksgiving Day visits may also relect a “social backlash” against stores opening on the holiday, Kearns said. Hogs, residents compete for county’s water supply • Only 1,200 people live in Greeley County, Kansas’ smallest, where using irrigation to quench thirsty crops is no longer an option for many because the water source underneath this arid prairie is nearly exhausted due to decades of overuse. Recognizing that

economic development was at a standstill, county residents narrowly voted ive years ago to allow corporate hog-feeding operations to move in and bolster the tax base in the county that abuts Colorado and is named for New York Tribune editor Horace Greeley of “Go West, young man” fame. A second feeding operation was just approved by the state. It’s a signiicant tradeof: Kansas-based Seaboard Foods is now the county’s top taxpayer, with the nation’s second-largest hog feeding operation accounting for roughly 9 percent of its tax base. Though the thousands

of hogs require less water than it would take to irrigate crops, the company is pumping wells that had been idled for a decade. Environmentalists and some residents fear that instead of preserving the remaining water for residents, the county will be a desert once the hogs and the water are long gone. “We are selling our natural resources for short-term gain,” said Larry Pridey, who shut down his irrigation wells in the 1990s and gets only four gallons of water a minute from his newly drilled household well.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A pig drinks water at Seaboard Foods’ Ladder Creek hog feeding operation near Tribune, Kan. Hogs and human residents are competing for the county’s water supply.

Associated Press

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Special 22.7526.25.

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Reg. $400. From Via Spiga and more. Misses & petites. H WebID 2186766. Women’s prices slightly higher.

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SPECIAL 20%-30% + EXTRA 20% OFF COFFEE, TEA & ESPRESSO MAKERS Special 21.99721.99. Reg. 39.99-$1,289. For example: H WebID 887719.

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NATION

A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 11.29.2015

Bah humbug? Poor often more generous than wealthy, study inds BY MELISSA HEALY Los Angeles Times

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Residents of Los Alamos, N.M., shown in July 2014, live in one of the wealthiest communities in one of the poorest states. Wealthy residents in states with high income inequality have been shown to be less generous than those in states with less disparity.

As the annual “season of giving” dawns, a new study finds that stark income inequity — a dramatically rising trend in the United States — makes the “haves” less generous toward others. Higher-income people were less inclined to be

generous both when they came from states where income inequality is high and when they were made to believe that there was a sharp divide between rich and poor, a new study found. And they tended to be less charitable in both cases than were low-income people. Since the 1980s — the

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end of a 30-year period during which the middle class flourished in the United States — wealth has grown increasingly concentrated at the top of the economic ladder, while low-income Americans have commanded a smaller and smaller share of the nation’s wealth. In 2013, the top 0.1 percent of households received approximately 10 percent of the pretax income, versus approximately 3 percent to 4 percent between 1951 and 1981. The Congressional Budget Office reckoned that between 1979 and 2007, households controlling the top 1 percent of the nation’s wealth increased their incomes 275 percent, while the incomes of those in the economy’s lowest tier picked up a mere 18 percent. A study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences recently compared the giving patterns of rich and poor two ways. Using results from a nationally representative survey that included a donation opportunity at the end, researchers looked at how patterns of giving corresponded to wealth distribution in donors’ home states. Of the 1,498 people who participated in that survey, donation by those with household incomes above $125,000 was more prevalent among those who lived in states in which income inequality was low. Among wealthier survey-takers from states with higher income inequality, fewer took the opportunity to donate. The authors also conducted an experiment in which 704 people were presented with simulated information portraying their home states as having either high or low income inequality, and then given the opportunity to bestow raffle tickets on another participant. W h e n t h ey we re prompted to believe they lived in a state with high income inequality, those with household incomes above $125,000 were less generous than when they believed incomes in their state were more equitably distributed. The authors found no such difference in donor behavior among people whose household income was below $15,000. The new findings may actually somewhat improve the view of wealthy Americans among social science researchers. A wide range of recent studies had suggested that wealthy Americans are, across the board, less generous than less wealthy Americans. This study suggests that the stinginess is, at least, more prominent where the rich are richer and the poor are poorer. The researchers, led by Stanford University sociologist Robb Willer, surmised that wealthy people embedded in a milieu where rich and poor live in starkly different circumstances may feel more entitled to their moneyed status, or more threatened by the prospective loss of privilege that would come if resources were more evenly distributed. They may feel that the system whereby wealth is apportioned is fairer because they so rarely come into contact with those who are poor. And the authors of the study do not shrink from its obvious implications: Progressive taxation policies and social services that lift up the poor might not only lift their boats. They might also make the rich more generous about pitching in a penny or two to do so.


WORLD

A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 11.29.2015

DIGEST Mortar attack hits U.N. base in Mali

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Migrants hurl stones Saturday at Macedonian police in clashes at the Greek-Macedonian border. The migrants became enraged as Macedonian authorities erected a border fence.

Mortars lit up the dawn sky when they were ired on a United Nations base in the northern Mali city of Kidal early Saturday, killing at least three people. The attack came eight days after Islamic extremists attacked a luxury hotel farther south in the capital, Bamako, in which 20 people were killed. Two U.N. peacekeepers and a contractor were killed in the Saturday assault in Kidal that also injured 20 people, leaving four in serious condition, said Olivier Salgado, spokesman for the U.N. mission in Mali.

Guinea’s Ministry of Defense said two of its soldiers were killed. A statement by the U.N. Security Council condemning the attack said the contractor killed was from Burkina Faso. A Kidal resident said about six shells were ired by attackers at dawn. “The earth vibrated, then I saw two lares in the air and then another one burst, which gave me the impression of being a response by the U.N.,” said Assarid Ag Cheick. No group claimed responsibility for the attack in the country’s restless north but Islamic extremists are suspected.

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“I want to reiterate that these attacks will not impede the determination of the United Nations to support the Malian people and the peace process,” said Mongi Hamdi, the head of the U.N. mission. “I express my solidarity and salute the brave men and women serving (the U.N. mission) throughout the country for their eforts to bringing lasting peace to Mali in these diicult conditions.” Migrants clash with Macedonian police • Migrants on the GreekMacedonian border attacked police with stones Saturday, enraged by the sight of Macedonian authorities erecting a fence along the border and an accident that injured a young Moroccan man. Authorities said 18 Macedonian oicers were injured in the brief but intense clashes. Most of them received minor injuries, but two were hospitalized in the nearby town of Gevgelija, Macedonia’s Interior Ministry said. There was no oicial tally of injured migrants, although Macedonian police targeted them with stun grenades and plastic bullets. Doctors from the Red Cross and other nongovernmental organizations said they treated 20 people for head injuries and breathing problems. Suicide bombings in Cameroon • A military oicial says two female suicide bombers staged attacks in north Cameroon, killing at least ive people. Col. Jacob Kodji said Saturday that one teenager set of explosives in a local shop, killing two people, and the other targeted a family in the town of Dabanga near Cameroon’s northern border with Nigeria. He said the suicide bombers were Nigerians who came to Cameroon as refugees. Kodji says 12 others were injured and are receiving treatment at a military camp in Mora. Human rights activist killed in Turkey • A prominent lawyer and human rights defender, who faced a criminal charge for supporting Kurdish rebels, was killed Saturday in an attack in southeast Turkey in which a police oicer also died, oicials said. Tahir Elci was shot while he and other lawyers were making a press statement. Two policemen and a journalist were also injured. It wasn’t immediately clear who was behind the attack, and there were conlicting reports about what led to it. Interior Minister Efkan Ala and other oicials said the assault was against police oicers, and that Elci died in an ensuing clash. However, the Diyarbakir Bar Association said the lawyer, who was Kurdish, was the target of the attack. Elci, 49, was the head of the bar association in the mainly Kurdish city and a human rights activist.

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Iran lures foreign investors with new oil contracts • Iran unveiled a new model of oil contracts Saturday aimed at attracting foreign investment once sanctions are lifted under a landmark nuclear deal reached this year, and said U.S. companies would be welcome to participate. The new Iran Petroleum Contract replaces a previous buyback model, in which contractors paid to develop and operate an oil ield before turning it over to Iranian authorities. Iran has sweetened the terms, hoping to bring in $30 billion in new investment. The new contracts last 15-20 years and allow for the full recovery of costs. The older contracts were shorter term, and investors complained of heavy risks and sufering losses. Investors who produced more than planned amounts received no compensation for the additional barrels. But under the new model, the more they produce, the more they will earn. Foreign investors will also have an option to extend contracts an additional ive years, up to 25 years. Associated Press


11.29.2015 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A7

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A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NEWS

M 1 • SUNDAY • 11.29.2015

Contract canceled without promised concerts City’s deal included 10-year reservation agreement, pushing other events away BY NICHOLAS J.C. PISTOR St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • The city has canceled its agreement with a Los Angeles talent agency to produce concerts after the company failed to pull of either of its promised events this year. Los Angeles-based ICM Partners, which represents some of the biggest names in music, last year was granted exclusive access to the Gateway Mall over Memorial Day and Labor Day weekends to produce “world-class outdoor high-quality music festivals” under the “Summer Rocks” moniker. The city signed a contract with the company that included a 10-year reservation agreement. Some complained that the city’s action would push other events out of downtown, and some, including Budweiser St. Louis Ribfest, did relocate. Mary Ellen Ponder, chief of staf to Mayor Francis Slay, said Friday that the company had paid the city $50,000 for its failure to produce this year’s two concerts, as required by the contract. The cancellation was mutually agreed upon. “This ambitious endeavor did

HUY MACH • hmach@post-dispatch.com

Carmen McGee of Milwaukee enjoys some pork ribs last May at the Budweiser St. Louis Ribfest. The festival moved from Soldiers Memorial to St. Charles because of another agency’s no-compete concert contract.

not come to fruition despite our best eforts, but the city took in fees that far exceeded the time and effort spent pursuing it,” Ponder said in a statement. “We will continue to seek out opportunities that will bring St. Louis the type of world-class music experience that it deserves.” Oicials at ICM Partners could not be reached for comment Friday.

The company had said it hoped to lure big name talent and visitors from throughout the Midwest to downtown St. Louis for the festivals. City officials had envisioned an event on the scale of Lollapalooza in Chicago, a music festival that has brought millions of dollars and visitors to the city’s Grant Park. While a top name in the tal-

ent business, ICM Partners has never produced concerts. The proposed St. Louis event would have been be the company’s first. St. Louis Alderman Jack Coatar, who represents downtown, said Friday that he was relieved the contract was ended. “This is a company that has no track record for hosting concerts,” he said. “I don’t know why we entered into this agreement in

the first place.” With the cancellation of the contract, he said, “I think we’ll have ample opportunity to bring new events downtown.” The Summer Rocks contract includes a noncompete clause banning new, substantially similar for-profit events in the city throughout the summer. The contract forced organizers of Budweiser St. Louis Ribfest to move from the Soldiers Memorial area to St. Charles’ New Town development this year. “I was there (downtown) in 2014 and had a great first run,” Ribfest Director Mike Calvin said Friday. “I wanted to stay downtown, but I had to try an alternative” in 2015 because of the ICM contract. Calvin said the St. Charles event went well, and he is contracted to hold Ribfest there again for Memorial Day 2016. After that, he said, he would be open to discussing a return to downtown. “I am open to looking at anything.” Bluesweek canceled its event entirely for 2015, but officials have said they plan to bring the event back to downtown next year. The fast-growing LouFest in Forest Park was not affected by the ICM Partners contract. Kevin McDermott of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report. Nicholas J.C. Pistor • 314-436-2239 @nickpistor on Twitter npistor@post-dispatch.com

Nearby man often shot at squirrels, neighbors say SHOOTING • FROM A1

Knight, 84, described as the family’s matriarch and her ailing husband’s caretaker, died within minutes of being shot. The unexplained June 26 shooting shook Knight’s quiet suburban Sandalwood subdivision near Oakville and left her family and neighbors wondering who fired the fatal bullet and why the case has yet to be solved. “I’ve never experienced grief this profound,” Miller, of Webster Groves, said. “How could you not have compassion as a human being to see other people sufering, to know that you took someone’s life and just say, ‘I’m sorry. I’m sorry I caused you this pain?’” St. Louis County police say they are still investigating the case. But Knight’s relatives say they are frustrated with the lack of progress and communication from police, who have yet to make an arrest. Police did take the case to prosecutors in August, seeking charges against a man who lives in the neighborhood, apparently under the theory that a stray bullet fired by the man struck Knight. Prosecutors declined to issue charges because of insuicient evidence. Police won’t discuss the case publicly other than what they’ve already released: Knight was shot about 3:30 p.m. that day while sitting next to her husband on her back porch. He called 911 after seeing her bleeding from the neck, but it was too late to save her. He was ruled out as a suspect.

FAMILY PHOTO

Betty Lou Knight, 84, was fatally struck by a bullet while sitting on her back porch in June. Her granddaughter took this photograph a week later.

FAMILY PHOTO

SHOOTING SQUIRRELS?

Dale and Betty Lou Knight of south St. Louis County are shown in an undated photo. The couple, who were married 65 years, had nine grandchildren and ive great-grandchildren.

Betty Knight’s family said the bullet sailed through a half-wall of the covered back porch, zipped past Dale Knight and hit Betty Knight in the neck. She was shot while checking her Facebook page on her iPad. Neighbors interviewed by the Post-Dispatch said that shortly after the shooting, detectives collected guns from nearby homes for ballistics testing and questioned people about a neighbor’s reported habit of shooting squirrels in his backyard. He is the man police eventually sought charges against. Authorities served a search warrant at the man’s home, but documents related to the search are sealed. The man police sought charges against is in his 70s and lives on a block adjacent to the Knight family home. He declined to comment. The Post-Dispatch is not identifying him because he has not been arrested or charged. Police have told the Knight family they have been unable to find a gun that matches the deadly bullet. “We’re pretty sure we know who did it,” said the victim’s daughter, Cindy Johnson, 59, of Bella Villa. “But because there’s no gun, it’s hard to prove it.”

Questions about the case have been circulating the neighborhood for months, and Knight’s family says they have grown weary of being asked about it when running errands around town. “We’re so disappointed and frustrated about everything stalling and nothing happening,” Johnson said. After the shooting of Knight, detectives told the family they found another, older bullet hole in the side of the house. Some residents in the Knight family’s subdivision said they were aware of a neighbor’s penchant for shooting squirrels and have seen squirrel carcasses in his backyard. Eric Arenz, who lives on Lomar Lane near the suspect’s home, said he has spotted dead squirrels in the man’s yard and his own but doesn’t know why they were there. He said he willingly provided police a pellet gun and .22-caliber rifle he said he hadn’t fired in three decades. (Authorities haven’t said what caliber bullet killed Knight.) Detectives returned the guns to Arenz months ago and told him they were close to solving the case,

Arenz said. Now, he, too, wonders why there has been no update on the investigation. “It’s a crying shame,” Arenz, 76, said of the shooting.

‘SHE HAD GOOD YEARS LEFT’ Betty Knight was a grandmother of nine and great-grandmother of five. Her family described her as a “total housewife” who was in “perfect health.” Her daughters said they were hoping to travel the world in whatever time she had left to live. “She had good years left,” said Johnson. “She did not deserve to die like this.” She had nicknames such as “Grandma Birdie” because she loved watching birds crowd her backyard feeders and “Mother Nature” because of her nurturing personality and passion for gardening. They said she also left treats out for the squirrels and didn’t mind when they commandeered the bird feeders. “She made everybody feel so loved and special,” Miller said. “She was just magic.” Betty Knight’s husband has not coped well with her death and has lost about 20 pounds,

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Three generations, Cindy Johnson (from left), Ryan Shanahan, Kelly Miller and Nora Miller, gather in June to talk about Betty Lou Knight at her South County home a couple of days after she was killed.

relatives say. He didn’t want to be interviewed for this story, but his daughters said he routinely recalls gory details of the shooting. They said he recently spoke of a dream he had where he strangled the person who shot his wife, and they said it briefly made him feel better. But that anger has turned into a deep depression. “He’s just like hopeless now,” Miller said. “He doesn’t understand why nothing’s happened.” His daughters say they sometimes overhear him in his bedroom asking God to take his life. “He says, ‘Please, Lord, take me. I want to be with Betty. I can’t live without her,’” Johnson said. Miller’s youngest children are often scared to be alone and cry when they talk about Betty Knight. Her son, Ryder, 4, worries about “bad guys” when he hears strange noises and talks about how guns can kill people. Zoe Lou shows her best friends the homemade dolls that her great-grandmother made her and smells the fabric because it reminds her of her great-grandmother. Miller wants to keep her grandmother’s memory alive.

And to help her family feel closer to her, Miller is sewing heartpatterned pillows for her four children using fabric from Betty Knight’s old clothing. Miller said she is also making a baby blanket out of her grandmother’s old clothes for a cousin, who is expecting a child soon. Meanwhile, the family still clings to the faint chance the person who fired the gun will come forward. They’re pleading with anyone who might know anything about the crime or the gun that was used to call CrimeStoppers at 1-866-371-8477. Tipsters can remain anonymous. “It’s hard to mourn and grieve someone when anger is getting in the way,” Miller said. If nothing else, they say, they want an apology from whomever fired the shot. “He’s a chicken, a coward,” Johnson said. “And if he would have come forward in the beginning, I would have forgiven him. Just tell me you’re sorry. Tell me you’re sorry.” Joel Currier • 314-340-8256 @joelcurrier on Twitter jcurrier@post-dispatch.com


A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

LOCAL

M 2 • SUNDAY • 11.29.2015

State legislators want answers on refugees Missouri House budget panel will question Nixon stafers on Monday BY SUMMER BALLENTINE Associated Press

JEFFERSON CITY • Missouri

lawmakers are set to question oicials in Gov. Jay Nixon’s administration Monday on how the state spends money to help refugees amid concern about the resettling of Syrians in the United States following the deadly attacks in Paris. The House Budget Committee hearing is the latest response by state lawmakers to Nixon’s decision not to join other governors who are seeking to block Syrian refugees fleeing from the Islamic State group from relocating in their states. While Nixon’s decision received support from some lawmakers and faith groups, it also led to a wave of backlash primarily among Republican legislators, who cite concerns with the screening process for refugees and fear terrorists could slip into the country. “Because of our governor’s lack of leadership and this administration’s failed federal foreign policies, we will try to find ways to protect the safety and well-being of the citizens of the Show-Me State,” Senate Presi-

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Faizan Syed of the Council on American Islamic Relations and Rabbi Susan Talve speak at a rally Nov. 22 in University City. The crowd of more than 100 people supported allowing Syrian refugees into the U.S.

dent Pro Tem Ron Richard said in a statement announcing the budget hearing. Senate majority caucus spokeswoman Lauren Hieger said the aim is to figure out what the state financial burden is in terms of refugee assistance. While lawmakers allocate funding, state agencies have some leeway in how they it. Would-be refugees are gen-

erally referred to the U.S. government by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. The process, which includes in-person interviews and fingerprinting, takes Syrians nearly three years on average. There’s no guarantee of approval. According to a federal database 29 Syrian refugees have settled in Missouri so far this year.

Individual states do not have the legal authority to block refugee placement, and the American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana this past week sued Republican Gov. Mike Pence for stopping state agencies from helping resettle Syrian refugees. But Missouri receives federal funding used for programs that assist refugees and chips in some state money, which is al-

located by lawmakers. President and CEO Anna Crosslin of the International Institute of St. Louis, which provides resettlement services to refugees, said it’s important that lawmakers learn about those programs but said state impact is limited. The only area lawmakers “would have any potential effect, would be in any areas where they might have state funding that’s a portion of any particular grant,” Crosslin said. “My belief is that is virtually none.” Examples of how state money is used for refugee assistance include $200,000 allocated to the Department of Health and Senior Services this fiscal year for a contract with bilingual assistant services to help disabled and elderly refugees, spokesman Ryan Hobart said in a statement. The agency this fiscal year also received a $110,000 federal refugee health grant which primarily pays for tuberculosis testing at the State Health Lab, Hobart said. Another roughly $137,000 in federal funding for the AmeriCorps service program in Missouri last year went to the International Institute of St. Louis. The House Budget Committee chairman’s oice says lawmakers asked representatives of the state social services, health, K-12 education and revenue agencies to testify Monday.

Nearby man often shot at squirrels, neighbors say SHOOTING • FROM A1

Knight, 84, described as the family’s matriarch and her ailing husband’s caretaker, died within minutes of being shot. The unexplained June 26 shooting shook Knight’s quiet suburban Sandalwood subdivision near Oakville and left her family and neighbors wondering who fired the fatal bullet and why the case has yet to be solved. “I’ve never experienced grief this profound,” Miller, of Webster Groves, said. “How could you not have compassion as a human being to see other people sufering, to know that you took someone’s life and just say, ‘I’m sorry. I’m sorry I caused you this pain?’” St. Louis County police say they are still investigating the case. But Knight’s relatives say they are frustrated with the lack of progress and communication from police, who have yet to make an arrest. Police did take the case to prosecutors in August, seeking charges against a man who lives in the neighborhood, apparently under the theory that a stray bullet fired by the man struck Knight. Prosecutors declined to issue charges because of insuicient evidence. Police won’t discuss the case publicly other than what they’ve already released: Knight was shot about 3:30 p.m. that day while sitting next to her husband on her back porch. He called 911 after seeing her bleeding from the neck, but it was too late to save her. He was ruled out as a suspect.

FAMILY PHOTO

Betty Lou Knight, 84, was fatally struck by a bullet while sitting on her back porch in June. Her granddaughter took this photograph a week later.

FAMILY PHOTO

SHOOTING SQUIRRELS?

Dale and Betty Lou Knight of south St. Louis County are shown in an undated photo. The couple, who were married 65 years, had nine grandchildren and ive great-grandchildren.

Betty Knight’s family said the bullet sailed through a half-wall of the covered back porch, zipped past Dale Knight and hit Betty Knight in the neck. She was shot while checking her Facebook page on her iPad. Neighbors interviewed by the Post-Dispatch said that shortly after the shooting, detectives collected guns from nearby homes for ballistics testing and questioned people about a neighbor’s reported habit of shooting squirrels in his backyard. He is the man police eventually sought charges against. Authorities served a search warrant at the man’s home, but documents related to the search are sealed. The man police sought charges against is in his 70s and lives on a block adjacent to the Knight family home. He declined to comment. The Post-Dispatch is not identifying him because he has not been arrested or charged. Police have told the Knight family they have been unable to find a gun that matches the deadly bullet. “We’re pretty sure we know who did it,” said the victim’s daughter, Cindy Johnson, 59, of Bella Villa. “But because there’s no gun, it’s hard to prove it.”

Questions about the case have been circulating the neighborhood for months, and Knight’s family says they have grown weary of being asked about it when running errands around town. “We’re so disappointed and frustrated about everything stalling and nothing happening,” Johnson said. After the shooting of Knight, detectives told the family they found another, older bullet hole in the side of the house. Some residents in the Knight family’s subdivision said they were aware of a neighbor’s penchant for shooting squirrels and have seen squirrel carcasses in his backyard. Eric Arenz, who lives on Lomar Lane near the suspect’s home, said he has spotted dead squirrels in the man’s yard and his own but doesn’t know why they were there. He said he willingly provided police a pellet gun and .22-caliber rifle he said he hadn’t fired in three decades. (Authorities haven’t said what caliber bullet killed Knight.) Detectives returned the guns to Arenz months ago and told him they were close to solving the case,

Arenz said. Now, he, too, wonders why there has been no update on the investigation. “It’s a crying shame,” Arenz, 76, said of the shooting.

‘SHE HAD GOOD YEARS LEFT’ Betty Knight was a grandmother of nine and great-grandmother of five. Her family described her as a “total housewife” who was in “perfect health.” Her daughters said they were hoping to travel the world in whatever time she had left to live. “She had good years left,” said Johnson. “She did not deserve to die like this.” She had nicknames such as “Grandma Birdie” because she loved watching birds crowd her backyard feeders and “Mother Nature” because of her nurturing personality and passion for gardening. They said she also left treats out for the squirrels and didn’t mind when they commandeered the bird feeders. “She made everybody feel so loved and special,” Miller said. “She was just magic.” Betty Knight’s husband has not coped well with her death and has lost about 20 pounds,

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Three generations, Cindy Johnson (from left), Ryan Shanahan, Kelly Miller and Nora Miller, gather in June to talk about Betty Lou Knight at her South County home a couple of days after she was killed.

relatives say. He didn’t want to be interviewed for this story, but his daughters said he routinely recalls gory details of the shooting. They said he recently spoke of a dream he had where he strangled the person who shot his wife, and they said it briefly made him feel better. But that anger has turned into a deep depression. “He’s just like hopeless now,” Miller said. “He doesn’t understand why nothing’s happened.” His daughters say they sometimes overhear him in his bedroom asking God to take his life. “He says, ‘Please, Lord, take me. I want to be with Betty. I can’t live without her,’” Johnson said. Miller’s youngest children are often scared to be alone and cry when they talk about Betty Knight. Her son, Ryder, 4, worries about “bad guys” when he hears strange noises and talks about how guns can kill people. Zoe Lou shows her best friends the homemade dolls that her great-grandmother made her and smells the fabric because it reminds her of her great-grandmother. Miller wants to keep her grandmother’s memory alive.

And to help her family feel closer to her, Miller is sewing heartpatterned pillows for her four children using fabric from Betty Knight’s old clothing. Miller said she is also making a baby blanket out of her grandmother’s old clothes for a cousin, who is expecting a child soon. Meanwhile, the family still clings to the faint chance the person who fired the gun will come forward. They’re pleading with anyone who might know anything about the crime or the gun that was used to call CrimeStoppers at 1-866-371-8477. Tipsters can remain anonymous. “It’s hard to mourn and grieve someone when anger is getting in the way,” Miller said. If nothing else, they say, they want an apology from whomever fired the shot. “He’s a chicken, a coward,” Johnson said. “And if he would have come forward in the beginning, I would have forgiven him. Just tell me you’re sorry. Tell me you’re sorry.” Joel Currier • 314-340-8256 @joelcurrier on Twitter jcurrier@post-dispatch.com


NATION

11.29.2015 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A9

HUD head count shows progress, trouble spots in helping homeless BY LISA REIN Washington Post

New figures released by the Department of Housing and Urban Development in late November showed that 564,708 people were homeless on a night in January of this year, a 2 percent drop from 2014. HUD officials said the

decline — which totals 11 percent since 2007 — is an encouraging sign that President Barack Obama’s administration is succeeding in its five-year-old goal of preventing and ending homelessness and addressing what the government calls chronic homelessness by 2017. The so-called point-

in-time count in cities across the country on one night 10 months ago also pointed out the persistent challenges for some populations to find permanent homes, including veterans, children and young adults and the chronically homeless. The count found 180,760 homeless youths under age 25, including 127,787 who were under 18. About 37,000 were children without parents, the data showed. The Department of Education, however, has said those numbers are going up. Advocacy groups say the agency counted more than 1.3 million children and youths in a survey during the 2013-2014 school year, which was a 3.4 percent jump from the prior year. The HUD count is done by volunteers who fan out across major cities every year, looking under bridges, in parks and other known encampments for the homeless. It records the number of people who are in shelters or living outside. But it does not count those who double up

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A homeless man packs up his blankets Friday in Los Angeles. A HUD report indicates the number of homeless in the U.S. is down, although challenges remain among children.

with families and friends for short spurts or longer durations, leading advocates to question whether the government is able to gather accurate information on the problem. HUD officials said they are working to improve strategies for counting homeless youth. Although the count for this population was slightly lower in 2015 than in the previous year, officials cautioned against comparing yearto-year data. They said they are still working on

ways to accurately count young people and want to explore more use of social media and of housing advocates who have direct relationships with young people. Housing officials conceded that they will not reach the administration’s goal of ending veteran homelessness by the end of the year, but pointed to progress in helping a population that has long struggled with the problem. The data put the num-

ber of homeless veterans across the country at just under 48,000 in January, a drop of 2,000 from a year earlier and more than 27,000 since 2010. “The value of having these kinds of urgent and ambitious goals is that it drives more progress than we ever would have achieved otherwise,” Matthew Doherty, executive director of the Interagency Council on Homelessness, said at a news conference with HUD officials to announce the numbers.

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NATION

11.29.2015 • SUNDAY • M 2

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A9

Obama battles Congress, looks for climate deal He heads to Paris for world summit

ASSOCIATED PRESS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON • President Barack

Obama is trying to negotiate a legacy-making climate change pact this coming week in Paris with one hand tied behind his back. Congress can’t even agree whether global warming is real. Scientists point to the global agreement, years in the making, as the last, best hope for averting the worst effects of global warming. Obama has spent months prodding other countries to make ambitious carbon-cutting pledges to the agreement, which he hopes will become the framework for countries to tackle the climate issue long beyond the end of his presidency in early 2017. But Republicans have tried to undermine the president by sowing uncertainty about whether the U.S. will make good on its promises. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., and other GOP leaders have warned other countries not to trust any deal Obama may strike; other GOP allies are working to nullify Obama’s emissions-cutting steps at home. “Congress and more than half of the states have already made clear that he won’t be speaking for us,” according to a McConnell opinion column posted on The Washington Post’s website. He said it would be “irresponsible for an outgoing president to purport to sign the American people up” for a new climate

But it’s not just about whether or not to ratify. In the United States, the talks are entangled in the debate about whether humans really are contributing to climate change, and what, if anything, policymakers should do about it. Almost all Republicans, along with some Democrats, oppose the steps Obama has taken to curb greenhouse gas emissions, arguing they will hurt the economy, shutter coal plants and eliminate jobs in power-producing states. Half the states are suing the administration to try to block Obama’s unprecedented regulations to cut power plant emissions by roughly one-third by 2030. Opponents also are trying to gut the power plant rules through a rarely used legislative maneuver that already has passed the Senate. A House vote is expected while international negotiators are in Paris. Senate Republicans are working to block Obama’s request for the first installment of a $3 billion pledge to a U.N. fund to help countries adapt to climate change, a priority for poorer countries. “America is extremely divided, and there doesn’t seem to be any prospect that’s going to change at least in the next year or two,” Gov. Jerry Brown, D-Calif., who is attending the talks, said in an interview. “America’s leadership is not as great as it should be given the recalcitrance and the continuing obstructionism of the opposition party.”

agreement. About 150 heads of state are set to join Obama for talks on Monday and Tuesday as the deal nears the finish line. The goal is to secure worldwide cuts to emissions of heat-trapping gases to limit the rise of global temperatures to about another 2 degrees from now. With little room for error, leaders have tried to avoid the pitfalls that undercut global climate negotiations in the past — specifically, those in Kyoto, Japan, in the early 1990s and in Denmark during Obama’s first term. The deal in Kyoto — which the U.S. never ratified — spared developing countries such as China and India from mandatory emissions cuts, causing resentment in the U.S. and other industrialized countries. The Paris agreement would be the first to involve all countries. In Copenhagen in 2009, leaders managed only to produce a broadstrokes agreement that fell far short of intended goals. The concept behind a Paris pact is that the 170 or so nations already have filed their plans. They would then promise to fulfill their commitments in a separate arrangement to avoid the need for ratification by the Republican-run Senate. That dual-level agreement could be considered part of a 1992 treaty already approved by the Senate, said Nigel Purvis, an environmental negotiator in the Clinton and George W. Bush administrations.

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NEWS

A10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUNDAY • 11.29.2015

Hospital neonatal units need to be busy to pay for themselves NICU • FROM A1

medical bills, which amounted to about $10,000 even with insurance, said Edwards, 31, of University City. “It was horrible,” she said. “Ultimately, they did every test under the sun and never found anything wrong.” Now 18 months old, Hudson hasn’t even had an ear infection since. The U.S. has seen dramatic increases in the number of neonatal intensive care units and neonatologists specializing in the care of newborns. While advances in neonatal intensive care have greatly reduced death rates, some are beginning to question whether we may have too much of a good thing. In one of the first studies of its kind, Dartmouth researchers recently found that NICU admissions increased by 23 percent in just five years; and by 2012, over half of all admissions were for normal birth weight infants or those born after 37 weeks gestation. “That is a tremendous change to where the field began,” when units were filled with extremely ill and tiny babies and located in large, urban hospitals, said Dr. David Goodman, a pediatrician and researcher at Dartmouth Institute for Healthy Policy and Clinical Practice. “Very little analysis is being done in the way those resources are being used, and very little work has been done to identify overuse and underuse.” Dr. Aaron Carroll from Indiana University’s Center for Health Policy and Professionalism Research says the study should give doctors pause. Too often, Carroll warned, medical need does not end up driving care. “The idea to broaden the distribution was that very sick and at-risk infants could be cared for closer to home and that more deliveries would happen in hospitals where intensive care was available when needed,” Carroll wrote in an editorial about the study. “However, achieving such care meant building many more NICUs. These units need to be busy to pay for themselves. Many hospitals also depend on the revenue these NICUs provide to remain financially sound overall.” Specialized intensive care is not only costly, it is risky. It comes with exposure to infections and invasive medical tests and procedures. It brings increased stress to families and separation during a critical bonding time.

“It is an intervention we should only do with great care,” Cole said, “with the understanding that the reason we are doing that separation is that we are trying to treat something more critical than separating a mother from her baby.” Dr. F. Sessions Cole, head of the NICU at St. Louis Children’s Hospital, on separating a mother from her baby

Dr. F. Sessions Cole, head of the NICU at St. Louis Children’s Hospital, said he tells his trainees that they perform the single most invasive procedure in medicine: separating a mother from her baby. “It is an intervention we should only do with great care,” Cole said, “with the understanding that the reason we are doing that separation is that we are trying to treat something more critical than separating a mother from her baby.”

COMPLICATED ISSUE Since hospitals began opening neonatal intensive care units more than 50 years ago to care for extremely ill and underweight babies, the neonatal mortality rate has gone from 18.73 deaths per 100,000 births in 1960 to 4.04. The decline is mostly attributed to advances in care for very low birth weight infants, but few studies have looked at how and when babies of all weights benefit from neonatal intensive care, Goodman explained. His team was able to take advantage of a 2003 change in birth certificate data that indicated whether a baby was admitted to the NICU. They looked at 18 million admissions in 38 states between 2007 and 2012, at a time when the preterm birth rate in the U.S. was actually declining. The study was not able to look at reasons why or complications, Goodman said, but the increasing likelihood that a newborn will end up in the NICU, the high cost of this care as well as the proliferation of the units and neonatologists (specialists in care of newborns) across the country warrant scrutiny. “We don’t know whether that meets

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an unmet medical need or whether it’s overuse of medical services,” he said. “We don’t know if it’s care that, on balance, provides enough benefit to outweigh the potential harms and risk of care.” Goodman’s past research has shown that the distribution of NICUs and neonatologists varies widely and has no correlation to newborn risk or need. Between 2000 and 2013, the number of neonatal intensive care units in the U.S. went from 806 to 983 and the number of beds in those units has increased 46 percent, from 14,939 to 21,854, according to data provided by the American Hospital Association’s Health Forum. The two previous decades saw even bigger jumps. Dr. John Yeast, vice president of medical education and research at St. Luke’s Hospital in Kansas City, has studied the growth of NICUs in Missouri since the 1980s, when there were only four. A decade later there were nine, and by 2012 there were 17, his tallies show. The latest state health department figures for 2015 show an even higher number: a total of 25 neonatal intensive care units with 737 beds. The increasing access to specialized care does not reflect need, Yeast said. “The delivery rate is flat, and the number of high-risk babies hasn’t changed. Hospitals across the nation have added beds, and it hasn’t necessarily been shown to improve outcomes for babies.” In fact, Yeast said, preliminary findings from his current research indicates high-risk premature babies do better in large, urban academic hospitals under specialists with lots of experience caring for sick babies. “It’s a complicated issue,” Yeast said. “If an obstetrician is in a smaller hospital, and he or she delivers a baby that is suddenly sick … that OB is glad a NICU is there to take care of a baby he or she didn’t anticipate in being sick.” On the other hand, he said, empty beds with high reimbursement rates are tempting to fill. Yeast said he has seen conditions prompting a NICU stay in one hospital but not in another.

body cooling for babies deprived of oxygen during labor. “We are always trying to keep moms and babies together as much as we possibly can, however, there are certainly risk factors associated with the baby’s birth requiring additional diagnostic tests and procedures that are more than what can be done in a mom’s room,” Cole said. “It is something we are always reviewing and looking at.” For example, Cole said, his unit has developed strategies involving medications and soothing techniques to keep drug-addicted babies healthy in the newborn nursery. Dr. Gary Dreyer, head of the 98-bed NICU at Mercy Hospital St. Louis, where most St. Louis area babies are delivered, said around 40 percent of admissions involve normal weight babies over 37 weeks. Another factor driving those babies into intensive care, Dreyer said, is the higher percentage of obese mothers. Their babies tend to have trouble controlling their blood sugar. Dr. Farouk Sadiq, director at Cardinal Glennon Children’s Medical Center, said the 93 NICU beds at his hospital and St. Mary’s have had normal-weight babies making up 47 to 53 percent of patients in recent years. About 40 percent of the patients are referred to the units from other hospitals for highly specialized care, he said. Goodman said the change in capacity has occurred mainly in small, community hospitals; where health systems are vying for business. Next, his research will turn to studying how neonatal intensive care varies across regions and hospitals. “That will help us identify patterns of care that are laudable, and patterns that are worrisome,” he said. Edwards said she would do anything to make sure her son is healthy and is unsure if his six days in intensive care was too much. “It’s so hard,” she said. “Yeah, in some ways I could say it wasn’t necessary because they didn’t find anything, thank God. But who knows?”

ALWAYS REVIEWING

Michele Munz • 314-340-8263 @michelemunz on Twitter mmunz@post-dispatch.com

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SATURDAY’S BEST

11.29.2015 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A11

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

Shoppers wait to enter the Coach store early Friday at St. Louis Premium Outlets. The outdoor mall opened Thanksgiving night and remained open through Black Friday.

Bargain-hunters have easier go of it with thinner mall crowds hursday hours, rain tamp down the usual hustle

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Wearing Santa hats and reindeer antler headbands, the Siesener family of St. Peters showed up early at the St. Louis Galleria, expecting to join throngs of people on the hunt for bargains. Instead, there were fewer shoppers than on past Black Fridays. For Theresa Siesener, who trekked to the mall at 6 a.m. with husband Jerry and two daughters-in-law, it was a bit of a letdown. “I miss the fun of the past,” she said when asked about the lack of holiday shopping hustle and bustle. The smaller turnout at many area stores on Friday morning underscores a shift in consumer behavior that had been predicted for some time by retail analysts. With most big-box retailers kicking off holiday sales on Thanksgiving while ofering sales online and in stores throughout the week, most people no longer find it necessary to wake up early in order to score the best deals on must-have items. The fact that most St. Louis malls closed at midnight on Thanksgiving this year, coupled with the continuous rain Friday morning, also probably affected traic at area stores. Jeni Wideman, 38, of south St. Louis County, arrived at the Galleria at 5 a.m. Friday but had to wait an hour because she wasn’t aware the mall had cut back on Black Friday hours. “It doesn’t take away the fun,” she said, adding that a 20-percent-off sale at

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the Disney Store made the outing worth it. “You don’t get the same deals online that you do in the stores.” Macy’s, which kicked of its sales at 6 p.m. Thanksgiving, was open at the mall throughout the night and into Black Friday. Workers were busy restocking doorbuster sales items, including $7.99 waffle irons and $9.99 hand-held vacuums. The smaller crowds didn’t dampen the enthusiasm of sisters Joyce Kuhl of Maplewood and Donna Ellison of Clifton Heights, who have made Black Friday shopping a tradition for 20 years. The sisters began shopping at 4 a.m. at Target, followed by JCPenney, Home Depot and the Macy’s at the Galleria. Three hours into their shopping trip, they were happy with this year’s crop of sales and found a silver lining to the rain and smaller crowds. “Shopping’s easier because there are no lines,” Kuhl said. Both sisters said their holiday shopping was far from finished. “I’d be disappointed if I finished today, because I enjoy it,” Ellison said. Shoppers will spend an average of $702 this holiday shopping season, up from $677 last year, according to the International Council of Shopping Centers, a New York-based trade group. With many retailers beginning Black Friday sales on Thanksgiving in recent years, shoppers are changing their habits and shopping earlier, said ICSC spokesperson Jesse Tron. “It’s a new tradition, and we’re seeing a rush on Thanksgiving more,” Tron said about shoppers heading out to malls after they’ve finished their Thanksgiving meals. “People like to get a jump start on their shopping.” All malls in the St. Louis region were open by 6 p.m. on Thanksgiving except for Plaza Frontenac, which remained closed for the holiday. The only mall to stay open past midnight on Thanksgiving was St. Louis Premium Outlets in Chesterfield, which

was packed with shoppers Thursday night, but saw thinner crowds Friday morning. “We have been busy since we opened last night,” said Liz Harry, St. Louis Premium Outlets’ director of marketing and business development. “We only have four weeks left until Christmas and many shoppers wanted to get the season started.” John Halas, 56, of Cottleville, said he was shocked by the small number of shoppers he saw at the St. Louis Premium Outlets Friday morning about 9. “I didn’t think we’d be able to park here,” Halas said. He arrived about 8 a.m. and counted eight shoppers, he said. But his wife, Elaine, not a habitual Black Friday shopper, said she enjoyed the lighter crowds. Certain stores, including Kate Spade and Coach, drew modest lines of shoppers waiting their turn to get in. Kate Spade was offering 60 percent off most items — a bargain too good to pass up, said Sarah Scaturro, 28, of St. Charles. “It’s the only time I can afford designer purses,” she said while waiting in the drizzling rain outside the store with her mother. Elsewhere in Chesterfield, the Chesterfield Mall seemed to have more shoppers than the St. Louis Premium Outlets about 11 a.m. and parking was no problem for shoppers. “I think more people are coming out Thanksgiving night,” said Kandice Jimenez, 27, of Ballwin, of the thin mall crowd. She started her Black Friday shopping last night at Target in Ballwin. Evelyn Elliott, 68, of northwestern Indiana, was out shopping for Christmas gifts for her 13 grandchildren ranging in age from 2 to 15. She said the crowds seemed like a normal day of shopping. Lisa Brown • 314-340-8127 @lisabrownstl on Twitter lbrown@post-dispatch.com Samantha Liss • 314-340-8017 @samanthann on Twitter sliss@post-dispatch.com


NATION

11.29.2015 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A11

GOP feels safe with anti-Muslim talk Voting bloc isn’t considered big enough to worry about alienating ASSOCIATED PRESS

Some leading Republican presidential candidates seem to view Muslims as fair game for increasingly harsh words they might use with more caution against any other group for fear of the political cost. That strategy is winning support from conservatives influential in picking the nominee. Many Republicans are heartened by strong rhetoric addressing what they view as a threat to national security by Islam itself, analysts say. Because Muslims are a small voting bloc, the candidates see limited fallout from what they are saying in the campaign. “I think this issue exists on its own island,” said Steve Schmidt, a Republican political consultant who ran Sen. John McCain’s 2008 presidential campaign. “It’s highly unlikely to cause a political penalty, and there is no evidence that it has.” Since the attacks that killed 130 people in Paris, GOP front-runner Donald

Trump has said he wants to register all Muslims in the U.S. and surveil American mosques. He has repeated unsubstantiated claims that Muslim-Americans in New Jersey celebrated by the “thousands” when the World Trade Center was destroyed on Sept. 11, 2001. “Donald Trump is already very well known for being brash and outspoken and is appealing to a group of people — a minority of American voters, but a large minority — who seem to like that kind of tough talk,” said John Green, director of the Bliss Institute of Applied Politics at the University of Akron. Rival Ben Carson said allowing Syrian refugees into the U.S. would be akin to exposing a neighborhood to a “rabid dog.” Former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee said, “I’d like for Barack Obama to resign if he’s not going to protect America and instead protect the image of Islam.” Such statements appeal to Republicans who think Obama and Demo-

cratic front-runner Hillary Clinton, the former secretary of state, have not done enough to fight jihadis, Green said. The sentiment also plays well for evangelicals concerned about violence directed at Christians in the Middle East and angered about restrictions their missionaries face in predominantly Muslim countries. “There’s a religious undercurrent here, aside from foreign policy issues,” Green said. Other inflammatory rhetoric from the Trump and Carson campaigns has generated far diferent reactions. W h e n Tr u m p a n nounced his campaign, he said Mexican immigrants are “bringing crime. They’re rapists.” He was widely denounced. Polls find Latinos strongly disapprove of his candidacy and his remarks alienated other immigrant groups.

CARSON VISITS REFUGEE CAMP Carson said Saturday, after visiting a camp for Syrian refugees, that the

displaced should be absorbed by Middle Eastern countries, with the international community sending aid and “encouragement” to the host nations. Carson toured the Azraq camp in northern Jordan under heavy Jordanian security, with journalists barred. Carson’s campaign also limited access, not providing his itinerary and releasing only a short statement after the camp visit. The candidate has repeatedly struggled to discuss international affairs as they become a greater focus in the 2016 presidential contest. Advisers have conceded that his foreign policy fluency isn’t where it needs to be and have expressed hope missions like his two-day trip to Jordan will help change that. Carson and other Republicans have adopted a harsh tone when discussing President Barack Obama’s plan to welcome 10,000 Syrian refugees to the U.S. in this budget year.

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DALLAS • A slow-moving wintry storm system that has been blamed for more than a dozen deaths began moving eastward out of Texas on Saturday but kept coating some states to the north in ice, making driving dangerous. The band of storms that has been moving through parts of the Plains and the Midwest since Thursday has been blamed for at least 14 deaths, including eight in Texas and six in Kansas.

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A woman, 70, whose car was swept away by flash flooding Friday in Fort Worth remained missing Saturday. Although the icy conditions were expected to persist in parts of Oklahoma and Kansas through the end of Saturday, temperatures on Sunday were expected to be above freezing in the Texas and Oklahoma Panhandles, allowing the region to thaw out, the National Weather Service said. After “a major refreeze” Saturday night, “we’re expecting a much better day” Sunday “and Monday is expected to be beautiful,” said Texas Department of Transportation spokesman Paul Braun in Amarillo. On Saturday, authorities in Kansas blamed icy roads for four Friday traffic deaths near Wichita, adding to two others in the state Thursday. In central and south-

western Oklahoma, broken ice-covered tree limbs downed power lines and cut electricity to more than 60,000 customers. Northeastern Texas and central Arkansas were still expecting up to 4 more inches of rain, adding to the threat of flooding. Seven people were rescued from vehicles in floodwater in separate incidents at the same intersection near Afton in northeastern Oklahoma. The Oklahoma Highway Patrol and Afton firefighters said three small children and two women were rescued from their car after the car was swept into a creek at the intersection of two county roads. Rain was forecast Sunday from Texas to the M i d -At l a n t i c s ta te s. Freezing drizzle was expected in southern Nebraska and central Kansas, while snow was expected from Colorado to the western Dakotas.


NEWS

A12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUNDAY • 11.29.2015

DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

Katrice Noble talks last week with Lift For Life Academy student Aniya Wayne between classes. Some educators say they’ve studied Noble because of the efect she has on students.

Teacher exposed the seventh-grader to possibilities TEACHER • FROM A1

possible clues. Most adults don’t realize the profound impact a teacher has on their lives until decades later. And by then, it’s often too late.

‘YOU’RE DIFFERENT’ Lift For Life is a charter middle and high school that operates inside a former bank building on South Broadway, just east of the Soulard neighborhood. Noble’s oice sits right of the old bank lobby. For seven years she was principal. Now she’s the deputy director of academics and student programs. Essentially, she’s the glue that holds the middle and high schools at Lift For Life together — the one-person central oice who calls in substitute teachers, makes sure buses are on time, serves as a sounding board for teachers and students who come to her oice with problems of every shape. Students come from across St. Louis, most from low-income homes. Some carry around chronic trauma. Some have parents who don’t ask about homework or care if they graduate. One student left his home in the middle of the night to escape the turmoil inside and walked several miles to the school, in the cold. Administrators found him asleep the next morning, curled up inside a broken down school bus on the parking lot. Noble understands those students. She grew up on Chicago’s west side, raised by a mother who gave birth at 15. An addiction to heroin and other drugs sometimes left her mother incapacitated until she quit using later in life. Her uncle lived with them. He was a gang leader who died of a drug overdose in 1992. Her grandmother lived there, too, helping to raise cousins whose mother had died. The children attended Gladstone Elementary, which ofered preschool through eighth grade. Those who completed eighth grade at Gladstone most often went to the neighborhood high school with a high dropout rate. In seventh grade, Peavy was struck by this small and timid girl with a curious mind. She saw a child who questioned nearly everything. She also saw a girl who needed a hug. She told all her students that their brains were big enough for a world of knowledge, and she pushed Noble to work even harder. “She’d talk to me all the time about things,” Noble said. “She’d say, ‘You’re different.’ I’d say, ‘Diferent how?’” Noble didn’t think she stood out. She enjoyed school. She preferred being there than at home.

‘YOU COULD HAVE THIS’ Peavy exposed the girl to possibilities that weren’t always apparent in her neighborhood. She once drove Noble home in her Chrysler New Yorker, which had a voice that would announce whenever a seat belt wasn’t fastened or a door wasn’t completely shut. She saw that her student was fascinated with her new car. “She’d say things like, ‘You

PHOTO COURTESY OF KATRICE NOBLE

Katrice Noble poses with her seventh-grade teacher Molly Peavy in April at a celebration in Chicago for Peavy’s 80th birthday.

Rakeem Golden and Katrice Noble pose in her oice for a photo for a 2012 issue of the Gazette, the student newspaper at Lift For Life Academy. Golden, now in college, credits Noble with helping mold him.

could do this. You could have this,’” Noble said. The following year, she asked Noble to baby-sit her young grandson at her daughter’s wedding, held inside the Marriott hotel in downtown Chicago. Noble agreed. And for the first time, the girl entered one of the tall buildings she had seen from a distance. She explored the hotel room — it was her first time inside one. Then she and Peavy’s 2-yearold grandson went to watch the wedding. She remembers how pretty it was, and how she probably stood out: “I know I had to look a mess — I didn’t have church clothes.” She had never seen a wedding. “I didn’t know that blacks got married,” Noble said inside her oice at Lift For Life. “No one in my family was married, or in the neighborhood for the most part.” Peavy kept pushing Noble, even after she was no longer her student. She urged the girl to apply to Lindblom Tech High School, a selective magnet school 40 minutes from the neighborhood. “It was her recommendation that I get out of the neighborhood,” Noble said. “That I leave.” Noble rode the city bus with her uncle to the admissions interview. That was the extent of her family’s involvement, Noble said. No one at home ever checked to see if her homework was done. No one attended parent-teacher conferences or set foot in her high school — not that she can

remember. The seed Peavy planted in Noble began to sprout at Lindblom, where Noble was exposed to the lives of African-American classmates from middle- and upperclass homes. She was struck by how different they were. They had mothers and fathers. They had designer jeans and Coach purses. Some even owned cars. “Then I’d come back home and I’d look at the neighborhood and I would think, ‘This is not right,’” Noble said. For a few years during her childhood, it wasn’t unusual for a police oicer to kick down the front door because of her uncle’s gang and drug activity. While she was in high school, a family member died every year of illness or drug abuse. At age 15 she gave a false birth date on an application so she could get a job at Burger King. She wanted new clothes and she wanted to fit in at school. Within two years she also saved enough money to buy a used car — a powder blue Mustang. Her manager helped her secure the line of credit. Her mother, who had a job at the time, saved with her for part of the down payment. Teachers at Lindblom pushed and inspired Noble. “My thought process changed,” she said. “At this school, everyone talked about college.” In 1994, Noble graduated with a teaching degree from Southern Illinois University Edwardsville.

‘YOU BELIEVED IN ME’ As time passed, the importance

of that seventh-grade year became more apparent. Noble began to see glimpses of herself in many of the students sitting before her in the English and special education classes she taught at Roosevelt High School. She also began working as an administrator. Her desire to find Peavy intensified at Beaumont High School, where she served as an assistant principal before it closed. At Lift For Life, she began to fear she’d never connect with her teacher. On Nov. 28, 2014, a message popped up on Noble’s Facebook page. It was from Lawrence Woodson, Peavy’s son-in-law. “I see you are looking for Molly Peavy Chatman,” he wrote. Evidently, Peavy had remarried. Woodson passed along Peavy’s email address and phone number. Within minutes, Noble was crafting an email that expressed what she’d wanted to say for many years and feared she’d never get the chance. “I’ve yearned to speak to you because I’ve spoken so much about you for so many years,” she wrote. “As a teacher, you made a diference in my life.” She mentioned the weekend she baby-sat at the wedding. She told her she’s always remembered the Chrysler New Yorker. It was the same model she rented for her senior prom. “More importantly, I remember that you believed in me and you would tell me,” she wrote. “I knew I was smart but you saw something different in me and I’m eternally grateful for your insight.” Noble told her that she’s now married with five children. Two are in college. She has a doctorate and works in a St. Louis charter school. In Chicago, Peavy read this email from a person she once knew as a timid girl named Katrice Calvin. The memory of the child came into focus. That same day, Peavy wrote back. “From time to time, I ‘run into’ one or more of my former students,” Peavy said. “I’m always so happy to see them and to learn that most of them are doing well. ... I never realized that I made such an indelible impression on you.” She printed copies of Noble’s email. She put one in her memory box, filled with things she treasures the most. “I also took it to church and showed it to my pastor,” Peavy said in an interview. She didn’t know the details of Noble’s home life until conversations this year. “She didn’t complain,” Peavy said. “She wasn’t talking about how bad things were at home … She was such a tiny little thing. I’d say, ‘You can do this. You’ve got a big brain.’ I didn’t just say that to her, but to all students.” Peavy retired from Gladstone Elementary in 2004. By 2008, the school’s enrollment had dropped to levels so low that officials in Chicago Public Schools closed the school. In April, about 100 friends, teachers and family members gathered inside a luxury banquet center in Chicago to celebrate

Peavy’s 80th birthday. Peavy invited Noble and asked her former student to speak. When Noble and her husband, Sean, entered the banquet room, it didn’t take long for her to spot her seventh-grade teacher. She wore a green dress. Her short dark hair had become gray. Noble wore a black dress and white and gray pearls. Peavy recognized her immediately.

‘SHE MOLDED ME’ Inside Noble’s office at Lift For Life, a tree is painted on the wall. Its branches are growing tall and wide. Its leaves are still forming. A school’s role is to educate, empower and uplift, Noble said. Teachers plant seeds, and others come along and water them. Often, those involved never see the results. Some educators at Lift For Life say they’ve studied Noble because they see the efect she has on students. “Their lives have been drastically changed,” said Alison Owens, a math teacher. “The impact she’s making on their lives is profound. The impact she’s making on their children’s lives, and their children’s children’s lives — that’s what’s untapped.” A few years ago Noble told a group of parents and students how Molly Peavy had changed her life. It was at the first senior graduation of Lift For Life Academy, which had by then also grown into a high school. Noble’s mother, who moved to St. Louis in 1997 and is a recovering addict, was in the audience. Among the graduates was Rakeem Golden, who had arrived at the school as a sophomore in 2009. Golden had run away from his home in north St. Louis County, where he lived with his grandmother and twin sister. His relationship with his mother was tumultuous. He had been suspended from his high school numerous times. He fought depression. “I was carrying around a lot of crap,” Golden said. “I didn’t have that parent figure.” He frequently found himself in Noble’s oice. “She would say, ‘You have to change,’” he said. And that school year, he did. He began going to church with Noble and her family. She took him and his classmates on field trips to college campuses. Golden needed someone who expected something great from him, he said. There wasn’t a high bar at home. But by his junior year, the behavior problems had dissipated. He no longer dreaded school. “She molded me in a way that I’m a confident being,” he said of Noble. “My personality, leadership style is because of her and her husband.” Golden is scheduled to graduate in 2016 with a bachelor’s degree in sociology from the University of Missouri-Kansas City. He plans to pursue a master’s degree in higher education administration. He wants to be like his mentor, but by working at the college level. Elisa Crouch • 314-340-8119 @elisacrouch on Twitter ecrouch@post-dispatch.com


NATION

11.29.2015 • SunDay • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-DISPaTCH • A13

In wake of Paris, U.S. mayors wonder: Could our town be next? Large cities grasp dangers posed by terrorism, midsize communities don’t, security specialists warn BY SARAH BREITENBACH Stateline.org

WASHINGTON • For Tuscaloosa, Ala., there are lessons to be learned from the terror that gripped Paris this month. After the Islamic State attacks, Democratic Mayor Walter Maddox took note of the Parisian security staf that prevented a suicide bomber from entering the French national soccer stadium. His thoughts turned to Bryant-Denny Stadium — where more than 100,000 people gather for University of Alabama football games. Maddox said he considered what could happen in his city of 95,000. But he and some terrorism and security specialists say many chief executives and police departments in midsize U.S. cities don’t think about how terrorism could put their people and infrastructure at just as much risk as high-profile targets such as New York City and Washington. “The larger cities understand and grasp this,” Maddox said. “I’m not sure that at the midlevel cities the awareness is that high.” But terrorism can and does happen in those places. This year, two men suspected of communicating with overseas terrorists were killed when they attempted to attack a freespeech event in Texas; a gunman killed four people at a military recruiting center in Tennessee, though it was unclear if he had worked with terrorist organizations; and security was heightened across the country during Fourth of July weekend. In the days following the Paris attacks, New York City deployed the first 100 officers in the city’s new Critical Response Command. The 500-officer program will be dedicated to counterterrorism in the city, which spent $170 million this year to bring 1,300 new police officers to its 34,500-oicer force. Conversely, in Wichita, Kan., where an airport worker was arrested after he tried to execute a suicide attack at an airport in 2013, the 437-oicer police force was struggling to stay fully stafed this summer. While it’s diicult to tell how prepared every state and municipality is for a terrorist attack, security specialists say the ability to prevent and react well depends on a communication system and local counterterrorism efforts that are still underdeveloped, even 14 years after 9/11. Chet Lunner, a security consultant and former senior official at the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, said the FBI has counterterrorism investigations in every state, but most places probably lack the resources to prevent or respond to an attack. “You might think that all 50 states are responding to that kind of warning, but I’m not sure that they are at the appropriate level,” Lunner said. The Paris attacks on “soft” targets like the restaurant and the concert hall — places with minimal security — should signal to local governments in the U.S. that they, too, could be at risk. Lunner and Michael Balboni, a security consultant and former New York state senator who wrote homeland security laws for his state, say even if smaller cities and towns aren’t at high risk for violence and are short on the financial resources that big cities have, they should still plan and practice for terrorist attacks. “State and local personnel are literally the tip of the spear,” Lunner said. “They owe it to themselves as well as the communities they serve” to be as prepared as possible. Despite repeated eforts and hundreds of millions of dollars spent on collecting and sharing information nationwide about potential terrorist threats, questions remain about

how much filters down to smaller municipalities. In 2003, Department of Homeland Security officials and the U.S. Department of Justice began creating fusion centers to encourage and ease the sharing of information between federal law-enforcement and counterterrorism officials in states and major urban areas. But a 2012 U.S. Senate subcommittee report found the centers

countering the possibility they could be hit. But they ought to. Less-populated locales are where terrorists may settle to plan or practice attacks, Lunner said. It is up to local police to get to know people and seek out information about potential threats. “In this country, if you dial 911, the CIA does not show up at the end of your driveway,” Lunner said. In Minot, a North Dakota city of less than 50,000, dealing with terrorist threats became a reality in the wake of the Paris attacks as the names

be diicult to get localities invested in sustained antiterrorism work, Balboni said. Balboni, who also served as a New York state homeland security adviser, said the fusion centers need to morph into what he calls “command and control centers” that gather intelligence and work in places where a potential threat or terrorist activity surfaces. People who don’t live in big cities typically viewed as likely terrorist targets may not think about terrorism affecting their communities or about devoting the resources to

yielded little counterterrorism intelligence. In 2011, the White House released the first national strategy and plan to empower local governments to prevent domestic violent extremism and homegrown terrorism. The plan advocates enhancing federal engagement with local communities that may be breeding grounds or targets for violence, though it has been criticized for disproportionately focusing on and alienating Muslims. Until there is centralized information-sharing between the national and local governments, it will

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of six people stationed at the Minot Air Force Base appeared on an Islamic State hit list. The biggest challenge in responding to such a threat, Police Chief Jason Olson said, is the limited amount of resources his department has to focus on gathering intelligence and analyzing data. Minot is a good example of a place that many would not typically consider to be at risk for terrorism. And all Olson and local oicials can do is push for relevant and timely information from the federal government.

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WORLD

11.29.2015 • SunDay • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-DISPaTCH • A15

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A rescue worker searches for victims next to the carcass of a cow in early November after two dams burst near the town of Bento Rodrigues, in Minas Gerais state, Brazil. Dozens died as mud, water and debris looded the town. Weather-related tragedies have accounted for about 90 percent of the world’s disasters over the past 20 years.

Weather is to blame for majority of world disasters since 1995 BY EDITH M. LEDERER associated Press

UNITED NATIONS • Ninety

percent of disasters in the last 20 years have been caused by floods, storms, heat waves and other weather-related events — and these weather-spawned disasters are becoming more frequent, according to a report released recently.

The report said 6,457 weatherrelated disasters that were recorded between 1995 and 2015 claimed 606,000 lives and affected more than 4 billion people. Flooding alone accounted for 47 percent of the weather-related disasters, afecting 2.9 billion people — 95 percent of them living in Asia, which bore the brunt of disasters due mainly to its large and varied landmass in-

cluding multiple river basins and flood plains, it said. In terms of countries, the United States and China reported the highest numbers of weatherrelated disasters during the 20year period, which the report said can be attributed to their large landmasses and population concentrations. According to the report, the 10 countries with the most afected people were China, India, Bangladesh, Philippines, Thailand, Pakistan, Brazil, Vietnam, Kenya and Ethiopia. To be recorded as a natural disaster in the database, the report said an event must meet at least one of four criteria: 10 or more people reported killed, 100 or more people reported to be affected, a declaration of a state of

emergency, or a call for international assistance. Even though cyclones, hurricanes and other storms occurred less frequently, the report said they were the most deadly disasters, killing more than 242,000 people in the last 21 years — 40 percent of the global total. Nearly 90 percent of these deaths were in low-income countries even though they accounted for only 26 percent of the storms, it said. The report said 164,000 deaths were from extreme temperatures, 157,000 from floods, 22,000 from drought and 20,000 from landslides and wildfires. The report, titled “The Human Cost of Weather-related Disasters 1995-2015,” was written by the U.N. Oice for Disaster Risk

Reduction and the Center for Research on the Epidemiology of Disasters at the Catholic University of Louvain in Belgium. The center’s Emergency Events Database contains the world’s most complete record of disasters from 1900 to the present, it said. The database recorded an average of 335 weather-related disasters per year between 2005 and 2014 — a 14 percent increase from 1995-2004 and almost twice the level during 1985-1994. “While scientists cannot calculate what percentage of this rise is due to climate change, predictions of more extreme weather in future almost certainly mean that we will witness a continued upward trend in weather-related disasters in the decades ahead,” the report said.

New Diabetes Study Shows:

INSULIN SHOTS MORE THAN DOUBLE THE RISK OF DEATH IN TYPE II DIABETICS

A New clinical study has shown that the disease of TYPE II DIABETES CAN ACTUALLY BEGIN REVERSING in as little as 1 WEEK! A free guide has just been made available to Type II Diabetics detailing an approach that appears to be more powerful than any drug known to modern science. The free diabetic guide explains in plain English how many diabetics have been able to reduce and eliminate their drugs and insulin injections, lose weight without exercise, reduce and eliminate the risk for diabetic complications, restore pancreatic function, and even become non-diabetic. The free guide also reveals rarely used diagnostic testing that is helping doctors understand potential causes of diabetes beyond weight gain, genetics and lack of exercise.

To receive your copy of this FREE guide (available only while supplies last)

Call toll free 1-800-803-1452 or 314-449-9099 or go to www.StLouisDiabetesReport.com Dr. Duane J. Marquart, D.C.


11.29.2015 • Sunday • M 2

WORLD

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A15

Pope will visit nation’s divided capital Putin orders Central African Republic long wracked by sectarian violence

sanctions against Turkey Erdogan says he regrets downing of Russian jet

ASSOCIATED PRESS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Pope Francis reaches out to kiss a baby after leading a Mass in Kampala, Uganda, on Saturday. Nearly a half-million people attended.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

BANGUI, CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC • Georgette Dossio mourns a son

whose body she can never bury. Sitting on the dirt under a tent of scrap wood and tarp, she is comforted by her neighbors at the airport displaced-persons camp where she has lived for nearly two years. A day earlier, she received the horrific call: Her 35-year-old son, Sincere, had come across a group of Muslim rebel fighters on the outskirts of the camp that is home to thousands of Christians. “They bound his hands behind his back, shot him in the head and then cut him apart piece by piece,” she says, her eyes filling with tears. No one has found his remains. His mother can only clutch an old photo of him as she wails in grief, thinking of her four fatherless grandchildren. On the other side of the sectarian divide, in another part of Bangui, some 15,000 Muslims are essentially blockaded in a neighborhood called PK5, unable to leave without fear of death at the hands of Christian militia fighters known as anti-Balaka who have the section encircled and enforce its boundaries with grenades. This is the maelstrom of Christian vs. Muslim violence into which Pope Francis

will step when he lands in Central African Republic on Sunday with a message of peace and reconciliation. The capital of this long-chaotic country of 4.8 million exploded in fury nearly two years ago, leaving thousands dead, and violence erupted again in September, just when it seemed the nation was stabilizing amid the presence of a U.N. peacekeeping force. At least 100 have died in the latest bloodletting in and around PK5, according to Human Rights Watch. All told, the unrest has left nearly half a million Central Africans displaced within their country; almost another half-million have left for neighboring Cameroon, Chad and Congo, U.N. figures show. The capital’s Muslim population has dropped from about 122,000 to just 15,000 or so, according to Human Rights Watch. The pope intends to travel to the heart of PK5 to meet with members of the besieged Muslim community. Inside the enclave, there is guarded hope the pope can open the hearts of the city’s most hardened fighters. Catholic and Protestant clergy say the anti-Balaka cannot truly be Christians if they are raping, looting and slaughtering civilians. The bloodshed dates to early 2013, when a coalition of mostly Muslim rebel groups from Central African Republic’s anarchic north overthrew the Christian

president. Their power grab was more about greed than ideology, yet their reign saw hatred rise as the rebels carried out brutal attacks on civilians. After the rebels’ leader stepped aside in early 2014, a wave of retaliatory violence by anti-Balaka fighters forced most of the capital’s Muslims to flee. Central African Republic was organizing democratic elections for December when the death of a young Muslim taxi driver in late September reignited tension. Within hours, Muslim fighters known as the Seleka retaliated with attacks on Christians in the neighborhoods surrounding PK5.

UGANDAN CHRISTIANS HONORED Pope Francis on Saturday honored Uganda’s 19th-century Christian martyrs and encouraged its 21st-century Christian youths during a day that saw nearly a half-million Ugandans turn out to see the pontif. The welcome at each of Francis’ many stops was as enthusiastic as he has ever received: Pilgrims camped out overnight under rain showers to score a spot for his morning Mass at the site of Uganda’s most famous shrine. And some 150,000 young people gave him a rock star’s welcome when he arrived in his popemobile for a pep rally.

ANKARA, TURKEY • Russian President Vladimir Putin on Saturday called for sanctions against Turkey, following the downing last week by Turkey of a Russian warplane. The decree published on the Kremlin’s website Saturday came hours after Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan had voiced regret over the incident, saying his country was “truly saddened” by the event and wished it hadn’t occurred. It includes a ban on some goods and forbids extensions of labor contracts for Turks working in Russia as of Jan. 1. It doesn’t specify what goods are to be banned or give other details, but it also calls for ending chartered flights from Russia to Turkey and for Russian tourism companies to stop selling vacation packages that would include a stay in Turkey. Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev had ordered his Cabinet to develop a list of goods to be sanctioned. Putin’s decree also calls for ending visafree travel between Russia and Turkey and orders the tightening of control over Turkish air carriers in Russia “for security reasons.” The decree was issued “to protect Russian citizens from crimes,” a Kremlin statement said. Erdogan’s expression of regret Saturday was the first since Tuesday’s incident in which Turkish F-16 jets shot down the Russian jet for violating Turkey’s airspace despite repeated warnings to change course. It was the first time in half a century that a NATO member shot down a Russian plane and drew a harsh response from Moscow. “We are truly saddened by this incident,” Erdogan said. “We wish it hadn’t happened as such, but unfortunately such a thing has happened.” Addressing supporters in the western city of Balikesir, Erdogan said neither country should allow the incident to escalate or lead to “saddening consequences.” He renewed a call for a meeting with Putin on the sidelines of a climate conference in Paris this week, saying it would be an opportunity to overcome tension. Erdogan’s friendly overture, however, came after he again vigorously defended Turkey’s action and criticized Russia for its operations in Syria. “If we allow our sovereign rights to be violated ... then the territory would no longer be our territory,” Erdogan said.

New Diabetes Study Shows:

INSULIN SHOTS MORE THAN DOUBLE THE RISK OF DEATH IN TYPE II DIABETICS

A New clinical study has shown that the disease of TYPE II DIABETES CAN ACTUALLY BEGIN REVERSING in as little as 1 WEEK! A free guide has just been made available to Type II Diabetics detailing an approach that appears to be more powerful than any drug known to modern science. The free diabetic guide explains in plain English how many diabetics have been able to reduce and eliminate their drugs and insulin injections, lose weight without exercise, reduce and eliminate the risk for diabetic complications, restore pancreatic function, and even become non-diabetic. The free guide also reveals rarely used diagnostic testing that is helping doctors understand potential causes of diabetes beyond weight gain, genetics and lack of exercise.

To receive your copy of this FREE guide (available only while supplies last)

Call toll free 1-800-803-1452 or 314-449-9099 or go to www.StLouisDiabetesReport.com Dr. Duane J. Marquart, D.C.


A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , 1 8 7 8

SUNDAY • 11.29.2015 • A16

HOSTILITY IS ANTI-LIFE Our view • University of Missouri needs to restore women’s health options in mid-Missouri. To say that Missouri is hostile to legal abortion is a gross understatement. In just a few days, access to abortion in Missouri could shrink — again — to just one provider, in St. Louis, making it unduly difficult and expensive for mid-Missouri women to obtain care. The state’s reputation for hostility has steadily declined. In 2000, the Guttmacher Institute, a reproductive health center, included Missouri among 13 states hostile to abortion. By 2014, the state was deemed extremely hostile, along with 18 others, while 27 states were simply hostile. Part of the blame rests with conservative Missouri lawmakers who pressured the former University of Missouri chancellor, R. Bowen Loftin, into withdrawing privileges at its University Hospital in Columbia from the lone mid-Missouri doctor offering abortion. The Columbia Planned Parenthood clinic lost its previous abortion doctor in 2012, and only last July was able to add a new doctor with the required nearby hospital privileges. Those permissions will expire on Dec. 1 if nothing happens. In the latest contorted rationale for further restricting abortion, lawmakers erected a Catch-22 legal mash-up. One law requires abortion doctors be licensed to “refer and follow” any patient into a nearby hospital. But another law prohibits public support for abortion, so opponents now claim such a license constitutes public support and must be stopped. It’s wrong, and likely wouldn’t withstand a court review, but it’s the tactic that anti-abortion advocates used successfully to pressure the previous university leader to let privileges expire. Mr. Loftin even briefly stopped nursing students from training (in non-abortion areas) at Planned Parenthood clinics, a move since loosened. Fortunately, the stop-abortion front has a new, energized opponent, fresh off the racial injustice protest lines that cost the MU chancellor and president, Timothy M. Wolfe, their titles. Social media is full of calls to interim chancellor Hank Foley to reverse course and return hospital access to a mid-Missouri Planned Parenthood doctor. The Twitter hashtag,“#FixItFoley” demands he undo the damage done by Mr. Loftin. Meanwhile, a Facebook page, Mizzou for Planned Parenthood, has a petition signed by 2,500 people. Several faculty groups also are urging Mr. Foley to change course. If no action is taken, on Tuesday, mid-Missouri women in need of an abortion pill prescription or a medical abortion will have to figure out a way to afford to travel 125 miles east. When they get there, they will have to

find a place to stay while they wait out the onerous 72-hour waiting period,another cruel and dangerous hurdle erected over the veto of Gov. Jay Nixon. The next closest option for services is in Kansas or eastern Illinois. What “pro-life” advocates fail to acknowledge is that long waiting periods, inconvenient access and lack of financial aid often force later, more dangerous abortions, a decidedly anti-life position. Mr. Foley should quickly restore hospital privileges to the mid-Missouri doctor willing to offer abortion services. Doing so would show conservative lawmakers, especially state Sen. Kurt Schaefer, R-Columbia, that a university can’t be threatened into submission by holding its budget hostage. Mr. Schaefer, seeking his party’s nomination for attorney general next year, is clearly using the issue to burnish his conservative credentials. Not surprisingly, Missouri’s requirement for hospital access by abortion providers is part of a national scheme to thwart abortion. The American Medical Association says such laws actually serve no medical purpose and only close down safe clinics. The AMA and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists say emergency room physicians and other specialists can cover any urgent medical issues. The Mizzou for Planned Parenthood Facebook page features a poignant appeal from a former law student with polycystic ovarian syndrome. She wrote, “I want you to know that, if I were to become pregnant, my syndrome leaves me with a greater risk of having an ectopic pregnancy which would then put my life in danger. That’s why knowing that there’s a Planned Parenthood in my community that could provide me with all the services I might need, including abortion, is critical to my health.” Her life matters, too. Yet the anti-abortion crusaders, consumed with protecting unborn fetuses, never acknowledge myriad other sides of “life.” That view is shortsighted and dangerous. Mr. Foley should show that the university remains a center for independent, responsible, caring health care, not an institution easily cowed for political gain. Post-Ferguson, post-MU race protests, Missouri faces an increasingly nasty national reputation as a place hostile to minorities. By further restricting abortion, it risks worsening its hostile-to-women reputation. Guttmacher might need a new category: stupidly extremely hostile to abortion. This editorial was commissioned from freelance editorialists and edited by the Post-Dispatch editorial board.

NICK SCHNELLE • Columbia Daily Tribune

Former chancellor R. Bowen Loftin talks to students Nov. 8 on the Mizzou campus.

YOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS Charge zoo admission; don’t raise sales tax Regarding “Tax vote long planned by zoo” (Nov. 23): I have been a Zoo-Goer member for years. I enjoy taking my grandchildren to the zoo. But I do not think it is right for the zoo to ask for an increase in sales tax to meet its needs. Why should people who do not go to the zoo have to pay more in taxes to benefit those of us who go to the zoo? The sales tax is already too high for everybody. Of all the taxes we have, the sales tax is the most regressive. It impacts the poor and the elderly the most. It places an unfair burden on them. There are far more people over 65 who don’t go to the zoo than those who do. Why should their taxes be raised? This is at the same time they receive no increase in Social Security and their cost of medical insurance is going up. No person’s sales tax should be raised for the benefit of the zoo. Those of us who use the zoo should pay for it. It is time for the zoo to charge an admission fee. Just about every zoo in the United States charges a fee. Why can’t St. Louis? It is the only fair and equitable thing to do. John Davis • St. Charles County

Other top zoos charge to get in It is time that the St. Louis Zoo board faces some hard facts. Out of the top 10 zoos in the U.S., St. Louis ranks No. 2. No. 1 is in Omaha (Henry Doorly Zoo), which charges $13.50/adult and $9/child aged 3-11. No. 6 is in San Diego (San Diego Zoo), which charges $42/ adult and $32/child aged 3-11. Closer to home, the Memphis Zoo, ranked No. 5, charges $15/adult and $10/child aged 2-11. The Audubon Zoo, New Orleans, is ranked No. 10 and charges $16/adult and $11/child 2-12. Pick one of these and charge only those who cannot show proof of living in this tax area. Another tax or tax increase is not going to fly. Harry M. Hinchey • Wildwood

Kirkwood board needs to listen to the voters Alvin A. Reid, president of the Kirkwood School District Foundation, is mistaken. The 60 percent of the voters in the district should be insulted by the arrogant letter he wrote (“Editorial about Kirkwood School District was insulting,” Nov. 24). Under the leadership of Superintendent Tom Williams and others, the School Board practiced a campaign of misinformation in the election. The meaningless “tax rate” had not increased in 10 years. My taxes, however, went up over 40 percent. The voters saw through this charade and spoke at the polls. We are not stupid. I think we are well-educated and supportive of our schools. Maybe the board should look inward and make some changes. Has the very well-paid superintendent outlived his usefulness? Should the board begin to listen to the residents and not build what has been rejected. Robert Lischer • Kirkwood

Criticism of trade deal doesn’t recognize intangible factors The editorial on the Trans-Pacific Partnership was clear and well-done (“Partnership problems,” Nov. 23). However, I think the conclusion was incorrect. The editorial failed to recognize intangible factors that have value. These include, but are not limited to, establishment of a baseline, trust generated by the process of reaching an agreement, recognition for leadership in attempting something many thought impossible, and precluding some other country from attempting a much more objectionable agreement independently. In any negotiation, you will never get 100 percent of your desires. That is why they are called “negotiations” and not “cram-downs.” If 20 things were negotiated and you like 10 of the outcomes, that is a win. I believe that to disapprove the whole agreement under the assumption an undefined “future

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administration” will be able to renegotiate the entire package is extremely pollyanna. A new administration will find it much easier to renegotiate 10 points of disagreement and maybe change five. Maybe you will never get the last five, and it may have taken a long time, but at least over that period you have created a better world. Seems to me the long-term outcome is worth the cost. Miles Barnett • High Ridge

Members of Bush administration owe refugees freedom, democracy Now that the full effects of the deliberate destabilization of the Middle East by the Bush administration are being seen in the form of a mass exodus of refugees to Europe, it seems only right that we offer refuge here as well. Moreover, I would like to suggest that those responsible — i.e., George W. Bush, Dick Cheney, Paul Wolfowitz, Donald Rumsfeld, Richard Perle, Condoleezza Rice, fellow members of the Project For The New American Century, and their supporters — be the first to collectively sponsor and import families to the U.S., so that those families can finally experience the promised freedom and democracy that was supposedly going to be exported to them wherever they lived before. They owe it to them. M.T. Nuelle • St. Louis County

Obama ignored military advisers, left vacuum that terrorist groups filled Regarding Michael Gerson’s column “Obama, speaking from the ruins” (Nov. 22): It is interesting to compare President George W. Bush’s troop drawdown plan with President Barack Obama’s drawdown plan for Afghanistan. Bush’s plan was initiated after the Iraq war was won. Obama’s plan was instigated before the Afghan occupation was secured. Bush’s Iraq drawdown plan started in the last year of his presidency (2008) and continued into the first two years of Obama’s, 2009-2011. In the Afghan plan, announcing the exit of our troops before securing our military objectives was like showing your poker hand before playing it. Obama ignored the advice of Secretary of Defense Robert Gates, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staf Mike Mullen, and various field commanders, to retain 16,000-20,000 troops. This left a vacuum that ISIS and other terrorist groups filled. When a president stops listening to his senior government and military advisers, he must accept responsibility for any resultant failure. Obama was commander-in-chief from 20092015, not Bush! Frederick C. Busse • Weldon Spring

Cutting drug prices will reduce research investment The editorial “Cost calamity” (Nov. 20) rightly criticizes Turing and Valeant for outrageous price hikes on their drugs. But urging lawmakers to “empower Medicare to negotiate drug prices” and “allow consumers to order cheaper drugs from Canada” will backfire. The government doesn’t negotiate; it sets prices. Importing drugs from countries with price controls imports those price controls. So both proposals would have the same impact as outright price caps. They’ll drive investors away and decimate research. The biopharmaceutical industry spends more than $51 billion annually developing new drugs. These investments will simply stop if investors stand zero chance of recouping development costs. Indeed, a study from the National Bureau of Economic Research found that cutting drug prices by 40 percent could reduce research investment by up to 60 percent. Price controls won’t put needed medications back into patients’ hands. They’ll just result in fewer new medicines. Peter J. Pitts • New York President, Center for Medicine in the Public Interest

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OTHER VIEWS

11.29.2015 • SUNDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A17

Ron Hartmann of Afton says, “After reading of this lawsuit, my opinion of young Ahmed (Mohamed) and his guiding family have taken a 180. I can see 15 million reasons not to feel sorry or apologetic to these folks.”

MORE LETTERS ONLINE

Kevin Horrigan has the day of.

Corn ethanol has failed by virtually every measure Energy policy • Its total climate impacts are actually making our environment worse, not better. BY MARK PERRY

Only in the skewed reality of an industry-funded special interest lobbying group could a government-mandated policy forcing an artificial market for corn ethanol on the American public be passed off as a conservative, free market policy. And yet, corn ethanol’s newest cheerleader — a lobbying group called Americans for Energy Security and Innovation — is attempting to make the case that this failed mandate is a silver bullet for achieving energy security, improving our environment, and saving consumers pain at the pump (“How we can free America from foreign oil cartel,” Nov. 22) It’s a flawed position that isn’t supported by the scientific and economic facts. If there’s anything we know about Washington lobbying groups (as well as politicians), it’s that just because they say something, it doesn’t mean it’s true. And in the case of corn ethanol

lobbyists, that couldn’t be more spot-on. Here’s the reality that the ethanol lobby refuses to acknowledge: America is more energy-secure today than at any time since the early 1970s thanks to American free-market ingenuity and revolutionary made-in-the-USA technologies that have unlocked our country’s abundant shale resources. Yet after a decade of nearly every imaginable form of government corporate welfare — including an artificially guaranteed market regardless of what consumers want as well as billions of dollars in taxpayer subsidies — it’s clear that corn ethanol has failed by virtually every measure. But don’t take my word for it. Former vice president and environmentalist Al Gore has said the corn ethanol mandate “was not good policy” and that this policy “was a mistake.” Scores of environmental advocates — such as the Environmental Working Group, Sierra Club, and Friends

of the Earth — echo Gore’s concerns and remain staunchly opposed to corn ethanol because of its significantly negative environmental impacts. Why? Because study after study continues to clearly demonstrate, in no uncertain terms, that corn ethanol’s total climate impacts are actually making our environment worse, not better. In fact, a new study from University of Tennessee experts concludes that the Renewable Fuel Standards’ deep if not singular over-reliance on corn ethanol is significantly increasing greenhouse gas emissions. Similar studies from experts at the University of Michigan and University of Minnesota have analyzed corn ethanol’s total emissions impact, concluding that corn ethanol is 70 percent to 100 percent worse for the environment than gasoline. What’s more, the EPA’s inspector general recently launched an investigation into the full climate impacts of the

RFS, including a review of corn ethanol’s complete emissions profile. And in a Congress that can’t agree on much these days, there’s considerable bipartisan agreement to repeal the failed corn ethanol mandate. The timing for meaningful reform couldn’t be better, as the EPA is getting ready to announce new corn ethanol blending levels that could force even more government-mandated and subsidized ethanol into a saturated market that doesn’t want it. In fact, only 6 percent of the cars on the road today, according to the AAA, can safely handle ethanolblended fuel with levels higher than the 10 percent blend that’s most widely available. Further, the ethanol lobby’s claim that corn ethanol has reduced gas prices is flawed. Put the silly politics aside and look exclusively at the chemistry. Ethanol is less energy dense, providing consumers with 27 percent lower fuel economy compared to traditional gasoline.

That means consumers have to burn a lot more ethanol-based fuel to drive the same distance, unnecessarily eating away at increasingly tight family budgets. While ethanol’s Washington lobbyists continue to clamor for government-guaranteed markets, mandates, and handouts to artificially prop up biofuels, America has surpassed Saudi Arabia and Russia to become the world’s No. 1 oil and natural gas producer. And we didn’t achieve that remarkable energy outcome because the government picked winners and losers. Here’s a suggestion for President Obama as he continues to weave together his environmental legacy: Listen carefully to environmentalist and fellow Democrat Al Gore (albeit briefly) and put a nail in the coffin of the broken corn ethanol mandate. For once, he’s got it right. Mark Perry is a resident scholar at The American Enterprise Institute and a professor of economics at the Flint campus of the University of Michigan.

he GOP’s selfinlicted wound Politics • he establishment won its goal but in the process may have lost the party. EUGENE ROBINSON Washington Post

Sen. Ted Cruz

ASSOCIATED PRESS

In Iowa, down the stretch they come 2016 election • Cruz looks positively reasonable in comparison to Trump. MICHAEL GERSON Washington Post

DES MOINES, IOWA • Political

pros in this state are not foolish enough to pick a winner this far out from the caucuses (I am: It will be Ted Cruz, whose mix of frank religiosity and anti-establishment zeal is a good fit for the Iowa Republican electorate, and practically no other) but they do love their typologies. Historically, by one account, there are brand name candidates (think Bob Dole or George H.W. Bush); conservative outsider candidates (think Mike Huckabee or Rick Santorum); and idea candidates (think Jack Kemp or Ron Paul). Most Iowa political types I consulted would pick this as a conservative outsider year. By most accounts, the Republican candidates are competing for control of three “lanes”: HardCore Evangelicals (HCE), who think the GOP’s main problem is a lack of fighting spirit; Practically Minded Evangelicals (PME), who are socially conservative but value electability; and Terry Branstad Republicans (TBR), who, following in the footsteps of a popular and effective governor, want the largest tent possible consistent with their convictions (and feel the HCEs are going off the deep end). Note that whatever lane you choose in Republican Iowa, you are likely to hit an evangelical. This makes the Hawkeye State unique or scary, depending on your cultural predilection. Scott Walker, it is generally believed, flamed out because (among other reasons) he did not “own his lane.” Based on polling and anecdote, HCEs are breaking

toward Cruz. PMEs seem to be moving toward Marco Rubio. And TBRs — a shrinking proportion of Iowa’s GOP electorate — are still divided among a few candidates (many politicos close to Branstad, including his son, are in the Chris Christie camp). No one I consulted can explain the Donald Trump phenomenon, which seems to defy typology, so they tend to talk about downticket conflicts: Cruz vs. Rubio. Rubio vs. Jeb Bush. Ben Carson vs. his foreign policy homework. Cruz is currently benefiting from a common but specious conservative argument — that recent GOP presidential candidates have lost because they weren’t conservative enough. This claim has been around since the days of President Goldwater. But it has gained traction in Iowa, with a twist. Given the perceived political vulnerability of Hillary Clinton, might it be possible to choose and elect a “real” conservative this time around, defined as the rejection of compromise at the highest decibel level? Cruz has the decibel part mastered, and has moved right on immigration in an attempt to sew up conservative support. “He goes where he needs to go,” one Republican strategist told me. Influential and obstreperous Rep. Steve King has endorsed Cruz; influential evangelical Bob Vander Plaats seems about to. Cruz has benefited in one way from the Trump ascendency. He looks positively reasonable in comparison. And Cruz doesn’t have Trump’s main drawback in reaching out to conservatives — that Trump isn’t actually a conservative. Rubio is gaining steam in Iowa, on the strength of a perception that his next-generation conservatism matches up well against Clinton’s old-time liberalism. He seems to be on just about

everyone’s top three list. But the Iowa caucuses are not won by being a fallback choice. Rubio is trying to gain ground by moving right. During recent visits, he has emphasized his role as a conservative revolutionary — which is not easy for anyone once part of the immigration-reform “Gang of Eight.” And since then he has also moved rightward on immigration, demonstrating how Trump’s nativism has pulled many in the GOP toward restrictionism. Rubio’s strategy is not without risk. Heading off Cruz on the right may come across as forced and inauthentic. And siding with antiBranstad forces in Iowa could cause the TBRs to coalesce around Christie or Bush. This seems to be the only possibility for Bush to finish a respectable third or fourth. And the calculations of all the candidates appealing to evangelicals are complicated by Carson — whose autobiography, “Gifted Hands,” is sometimes used as a textbook by homeschoolers. He is slipping but probably not collapsing. All of which leaves large questions unanswered. Can Trump translate poll numbers into caucus-goers? He has hired a strong staff in the state. He is barnstorming in counties heavy in white working-class voters. But will people who have probably never participated in a caucus trudge on a cold night to a high school cafeteria to support a candidate who isn’t part of any ideological movement, other than the Trump-should-run-everything movement? In other words: Can you have a revolution without a cause? As the first test, Iowa will play its accustomed and essential role. Michael Gerson michaelgerson@washpost.com Copyright the Washington Post

As the leading Republican presidential candidates rant and rave about deporting 11 million immigrants, fighting some kind of world war against Islam, implementing gimmicky tax plans that would bankrupt the nation and other such madness, keep one thing in mind: The party establishment brought this plague upon itself. The self-harming was unintentional but inevitable — and should have been foreseeable. Donald Trump and Ben Carson didn’t come out of nowhere. Fully half of the party’s voters didn’t wake up one morning and decide, for no particular reason, that experience as a Republican elected official was the last thing they wanted in a presidential candidate. The insurrection that has reduced Jeb Bush to singledigit support while Trump and Carson soar is nothing more than the understandable reaction of the jilted. Republican leaders have spent the years of the Obama presidency inflaming GOP base voters with extreme rhetoric and wooing them with empty promises. The establishment won its goal — electoral gains in Congress and many statehouses — but in the process may have lost the party. Unrest was brewing among true-believer conservatives even before Barack Obama took office as the first AfricanAmerican president. George W. Bush had angered the base with his budget-busting expenditures for Middle East wars and a new prescription drug benefit under Medicare. What had happened to the party’s commitment to fiscal responsibility? The final straw for many came when the financial crisis hit in 2008 and Bush, in his final days, won authorization of the $700 billion Troubled Asset Relief Program — a massive bailout for the big Wall Street banks. It was a wholesale violation of conservative principles that helped inspire the birth of the tea party movement. With the economy still in crisis, Obama took actions that further riled conservatives — pushing through Congress a messy economic stimulus package and rescuing General Motors and Chrysler. And then the president turned to health care, ultimately winning passage of the Affordable Care Act. The GOP saw a golden political opportunity. Rather than work with Obama toward compromise, Republicans positioned themselves as implacable foes of the president and all he stood for. As the tea party increasingly

came to demonize Obama for being an alleged Muslim or socialist — and even to delegitimize him as supposedly having been born in Kenya — the Republican establishment shamefully played along despite knowing that none of this rubbish was true. The result was a sweeping victory in the 2010 election. Republicans captured the House by electing dozens of tea party-backed candidates, who came to Washington with revolution on their minds. Experienced GOP politicians who should have known better allowed this insurgency to push the party into a series of showdowns with Obama that Republicans could not possibly win. Having told the base that great things could be accomplished by shutting down the government or threatening default on the national debt, the establishment had to say, in effect, never mind. Voters began to realize that they’d been had. The Republican leadership talked a good game at election time, but never delivered. Is it any wonder, then, that 51 percent of Republican voters (according to the Real Clear Politics poll average) say they favor Trump, Carson or Carly Fiorina, none of whom has ever held public office? Or that another 11 percent support Ted Cruz, whose career in the Senate has consisted of vehemently opposing his own party’s leadership as a bunch of weakkneed quislings? If you add it up, roughly six of 10 GOP voters tell pollsters they reject any candidate the Republican establishment likes. That amounts to a party in open revolt. There are those in the Republican establishment who look at prior elections and predict the outsider candidates will eventually fade. There are those who believe the fear of terrorism, post-Paris, will lead voters to choose safety over adventure. Perhaps this is something other than whistling past the graveyard, but that’s what it sounds like to me. Are voters who have been on the raucous, anything-goes Trump bandwagon for months going to fall meekly in line behind someone like Bush or Marco Rubio? It gets harder and harder to imagine such a thing. Meanwhile, the whole field is being pulled so far to the right on issues such as immigration and taxes that any of the likely nominees will have a hard time winning the general election. This is a fine mess the Republican Party has gotten itself into, and we won’t know until the early primaries whether there’s any hope of a way out. Eugene Robinson eugenerobinson@washpost.com Copyright the Washington Post


A18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUNDAY • 11.29.2015

Special to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Produced by the Niche Department of the Suburban Journals of Greater St. Louis, LLC

ST. LOUIS’ BEST BRIDAL

Engagement & Wedding Announcements An Engagement starts the happy news. The main event is the time of commitment for your Wedding!

St. Louis’ Best Bridal now ofers both engagement and wedding announcements FREE online and in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Newly engaged? Let us help spread the word. It is easy and you will receive a special package for planning your special day. Just married? Announce your special day within the last year with us and receive a special mailer tailored for you, the new couple. Just ill out the form and attach a photo at www.StLouisBestBridal.com.

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( WEDDINGS )

Misuraca & Brothers

Barber & Petrof

Lana Maria Misuraca and Mitchell Andrew Brothers were married May 16, 2015, at Sacred Heart Catholic Church, Florissant, by Deacon John Heithaus. A reception followed at Crowne Plaza Hotel, Clayton. The bride’s parents are Peter and Mindy Misuraca of Wentzville, while the groom’s parents, Ernie and Debbie Brothers, are from Evansville, Ill. Tara Belisle was matron of honor. Other bridal attendants were Maureen Geraghty, Kelly Pottorf and Charlene Fox. The groom’s honor attendants were Evan Brothers and Aaron Brothers. Groomsmen were Brandon Misuraca, Tyler Misuraca, John Belisle, Jake Chandler, Lance Busse and Johnathon Spies. Allison Dragoo was flower girl and Jonathan Blasingame was ring bearer. The bride earned a bachelor of science degree in business administration and marketing from Saint Louis University and MBA from Webster University. She is a research manager at GfK. Mr. Brothers received a bachelor of science degree from University of Missouri-St. Louis and is a secondary marketing specialist at Trust Company Bank. After a December 2015 honeymoon in the Dominican Republic, the newlyweds will make their home in Evansville. !

(

Pontello

Devon Noel Barber and Nicholas Petrof were married Oct. 23, 2015, at the Courthouse in Madison County, Ill. The couple shared the ceremony and reception with a small group of loved ones. The bride, daughter of Harold Barber and Desiree Aaron-Barber of West Frankfort, Ill., earned an associate’s degree in applied sciences and is employed with the State of Illinois. The groom, a chef, is the son of Keith and Ginger Behrhorst and Donald Petrof of Hamel. They will celebrate on a honeymoon in 2016. !

ENGAGEMENTS )

& Burns

Gilyard

Tifany Gilyard and Christian Clay announce their engagement. The bride-to-be received a bachelor of arts degree from the University of Missouri-Columbia and master of arts degree in teaching for secondary education from Webster University, Webster Groves, and teaches in the St. Louis Public Schools. Her fiance, who attends the IBEW Union Apprentice School in St. Louis, is an apprentice wireman with Kammerlan Electric, St. Louis. The couple lives in St. Louis and will be married Sept. 25, 2016, in the vault room at City Museum, then celebrate at a reception in the Mahler Ballroom. !

Stephen and Dawsie Pontello of Lake Saint Louis are pleased to announce the upcoming marriage of their daughter, Paige Marie Pontello, to Roy Harrison Burns, son of Susan Burns of Lake Saint Louis and the late Roy Burns. A December 2015 wedding is planned at the Old Stone Chapel in St. Charles. !

Loewe

& Russo

Richard and Diana Loewe of St. Peters are pleased to announce the engagement of their daughter, Ashley Loewe, to Whitley Russo, son of Tracy Russo of Kirkwood and Mark Russo of Philadelphia, Pa. The couple will marry on June 18, 2016, at the Cathedral Basilica of Saint Louis, with reception to follow at Missouri Botanical Garden. In 2004, the bride-to-be graduated from Marquette High School, Chesterfield. She received a bachelor’s degree in 2008 at University of Missouri-Columbia, where she was a member of Alpha Chi Omega Sorority. She is an associate producer at HM Risk Insurance Broker, Clayton. Her fiance earned a bachelor’s degree in 2009 from University of Hartford, Hartford, Conn., and master of business administration degree in 2015 from Washington University, St. Louis. He now works for Edward Jones. The future groom proposed at the site of their first date and plans the honeymoon destination as a surprise for his soon-to-be wife. The couple will reside in Creve Coeur. !

& Clay

Quasebarth

& Molitor

Kris and Mary Quasebarth of Fenton and Al and Sue Molitor of Valley Park announce the engagement of their children, Elizabeth Quasebarth and Ryan Molitor. The bride-to-be earned a bachelor’s degree in biology from Maryville University, Town and Country, and is pursuing a doctoral degree in optometry at the University of Missouri-St. Louis School of Optometry. She is an optometric technician with Antoine Eyecare, St. Louis. Her fiance received a bachelor’s degree in education from the University of Missouri-St. Louis and is a para professional at Blackhurst Elementary School in the St. Charles School District. The couple plans to be married June 4, 2016, at Mount Pleasant Estates in Augusta. !

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NATION

11.29.2015 • Sunday • M 1

BY ROBERT BARNES Washington Post

NEW YORK • When only 16 others in the past two centuries have held the job you currently fill, parallels with the past come easily. Passing judgment on the chief domestic goals of a president of the other political party? Deflecting criticism from a bellicose Congress? Defending the Supreme Court’s most unpopular decisions when the public has soured on the institution? All were in the air earlier in November, when the 17th chief justice of the United States, John Roberts Jr., came to the Historical Society of the New York Courts to celebrate the 11th chief justice of the United States, Charles Evans Hughes, about whom it was once said: “He looked like God and talked like God.” The current self-deprecating chief justice claimed neither distinction in a crisp 16-minute presentation that evoked frequent laughter. And if you listened closely, it said a few things about Roberts as well: the way he views the responsibilities of the job and his low-key response to the controversies surrounding the court. If Roberts was nominated as chief justice as an unknown outside legal circles, Hughes arrived as a “brand,” Roberts said. He had a career in law, politics and diplomacy and a white beard that gave the impression he had been sent from central casting. President Theodore Roosevelt described him as “a bearded iceberg”; Hughes’ political rival William Randolph Hearst labeled him an “animated feather duster.” He defeated Hearst to become governor of New York, where he developed a reputation as a crusader cleaning up Albany. When President William Howard Taft persuaded him to join the Supreme Court in 1910, he delayed the move to spend a few more months as governor. He left the court six years later when the Republican Party drafted him at its convention to run against Woodrow Wilson. Hughes lost by 23 electoral votes. In private practice, he argued cases before the Supreme Court 25 times before President William Harding persuaded him to be secretary of state. And in 1930, President Herbert Hoover nominated him to return to the

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A19

Paying tribute to a predecessor, justice reveals a bit about himself

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Chief Justice John Roberts Jr., shown in March, does not do interviews and seldom gives speeches.

court as chief justice. Hughes, who was 86 when he died in 1948, was so iconic, Roberts said, that a letter bearing only a sketch of Hughes and the address “Washington, DC” was delivered, “no questions asked.” Hughes was leading the court during what Roberts said was the greatest threat to its independence: Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s plan to add enough friendly justices to gain control of the court, which had been striking down Roosevelt’s programs designed to lift the country out of the Great Depression. “It fell to Hughes to guide a very unpopular Supreme Court through that high-noon showdown against America’s most

popular president since George Washington,” Roberts said. With the charismatic FDR in 1937 exhorting the public about the need for changing the court, some urged Hughes to respond in the same way, Roberts said. “But Hughes appreciated that that would be sort of fighting the battle on the enemy’s turf,” the chief justice said. Instead, Roberts explained, Hughes wrote a letter to the Senate documenting the court’s work and detailing how adding justices would only make it harder. He worked “under the radar,” Roberts said, to allow time for Congress to realize the harm that could come from the momentous change Roosevelt was

proposing. “How can that be?” Roberts wondered. The Supreme Court was “the most unpopular institution in the country, that, as far as anyone knows, has been prolonging the Great Depression.” Roosevelt said that “the people are with me,” Roberts continued. “Well, it certainly wasn’t the case that the people were with the court. But, I think they were with the Constitution.” Roberts believes it was Hughes’ actions, not Justice Owen Roberts’ change of heart on one case — the “switch in time that saved nine” — that led FDR ultimately to withdraw his plan. The Supreme Court was different back then, Roberts said,

populated by politicians and others who had made a public name for themselves. Now, all but one justice is a former judge who rose through the ranks. When someone such as he or Justice Samuel Alito is nominated, Roberts said, the first question from the press is “Who is he?” The court’s decisions — on same-sex marriage, on upholding President Barack Obama’s Afordable Care Act — land with as great an efect as those of previous courts. But polls regularly show that Americans struggle to name a single justice. They are much more likely to be able to recall the judges on “American Idol.” If Roberts comes without Hughes’ reputation, the current chief justice seems determined to replicate his predecessor’s style of working. Roberts does not do interviews, and he gives fewer public speeches than his colleagues. He does not respond to criticism — from the right, for his votes in favor of the Affordable Care Act, or from the left, for votes that critics said undermined the Voting Rights Act and campaign finance restrictions. His senior colleagues mix it up more. Antonin Scalia tells liberals who still ask about Bush v. Gore to “get over it.” Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s blunt comments in favor of abortion rights and same-sex marriage outrage conservative critics. Roberts takes a self-deprecating tack, and he avoids controversial statements. Robert A. Katzmann, chief judge of the federal appeals court in New York, speculated in a conversation following Roberts’ presentation that the chief justice had a future in stand-up if he tires of being the nation’s top judicial officer. “I find that I’m regarded as a lot funnier now that I’m chief justice,” Roberts demurred. He prefers talking history rather than explaining his own court’s decisions or its future. Katzmann noted that Roberts had just completed 10 years as chief justice and wondered whether he had thought about what the next decade would be like. Naturally, Roberts declined the bait. “I think about the cases scheduled for the next sitting, the Monday after Thanksgiving,” he replied.

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NATION

A20 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 11.29.2015

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Design consultant Byron Folwell discusses the restoration work needed for the shed at the James Castle home in Boise, Idaho. Castle’s work drew from everyday life in the West.

Idaho artist’s home being restored as a living art piece BY KIMBERLEE KRUESI Associated Press

BOISE, IDAHO • The Idaho home of James Castle, much like his artwork, is easy to miss at first glance. Tucked away in a quiet, residential neighborhood in Boise, the century-old home sits idle and vacant. But inside, oicials working to restore the self-taught artist’s residence say there is much more inside the aging framework than meets the eye. “Anything with a print is potentially part of his story,” said Byron Folwell, an architect and public artist working on the renovation project. “Down to even the patterns on the floor, his surroundings were part of his artwork, which means we have to be careful about everything we do.” Castle’s collections have traveled to the Smithsonian in Washington and to the Museum of Modern Art in New York and across seas to art galleries in Tokyo and London. But while the international art world has long admired

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the artist, his home — located on Castle Drive — nearly missed the opportunity to become just as celebrated as the rest of his collections. That’s why the city of Boise is currently in the middle of a massive restoration project to preserve the noted artist’s home site and give more opportunities for the public to learn about the native Idahoan. Earlier this year, the city bought the Castle house and grounds, which includes the artist’s bunkhouse. “This is a symbol of making do with what you have,” said Rachel Reichert, community relations manager for the Boise Department of Arts and History. The project has been painstaking and tedious. Anything from a pattern on the ceiling or designs on aging wallpaper are possible forms of inspiration for Castle’s work, essentially making the entire property a living art piece. Bags of paper confetti found in the ceiling and walls have been collected to be sifted through and potentially cataloged. Empty matchbooks discarded in a hole by the floor match those in some of Castle’s drawings, Reichert said. Castle was born in 1899 and died in 1977. Born deaf and mute, the self-taught artist’s drawings were made with a sharpened stick dipped in saliva and soot scraped from a woodstove. Isolated psychologically and geographically in what was rural Idaho, Castle’s work expresses details from everyday life in the West that draw from both reality and the imaginary. He extracted dyes from pulped paper with water. For canvases, he used packaging materials, milk cartons and

newspapers. He incorporated scraps of sticks, calendars and strings, similar to fellow contemporary artists Joseph Cornell and Robert Rauschenberg, although it is unlikely Castle ever knew about them or their hodgepodge techniques. “His work paralleled the development of modern art, but what he was doing was on his own, without the influences of others,” said Jacqueline Crist, managing partner of the James Castle Collection and Archives. “Art is driven by the development of humankind. Wherever you are, if you are connected, you are going to express it in a universal way. That’s what he did.” The city’s plan is to transform the home into a space for art exhibitions and ofer an artist-in-residence program by 2017. The majority of the main residence will be largely gutted, with the exception of preserving Castle’s small sleeping porch and any key details. A tiny wooden bunkhouse — where Castle spent most of his time creating his work — will also be restored. Layers of wallpaper, cardboard and newspaper line the interior, which means the city and architects involved in the project must decide how much and what kind should be displayed. The crew is navigating the homesite with no easy answer on the best way to express the artist’s intention. Instead, it will be parsed together, like Castle did, using the clues left on the site. “Castle drew this (bunkhouse) space almost 30 percent bigger than what it is by pushing the walls out, because that’s what the brain does in confined areas,” Folwell said. “This will be the trickiest part, to restore it how he saw it.”

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Helping you honor life.


NEWS

11.29.2015 • Sunday • M 1

To Our Readers To place your loved one’s Funeral Notice, please call the St. Louis Post-Dispatch at 800-365-0820 Ext. 8600 or 314-340-8600 or e-mail us at deathnotices@post-dispatch.com. Please log on to STLtoday.com/obits to share your memories, upload photos and sign the online guest book. As a part of our services, all guest books remain online permanently.

Death Notice Index Auinbauh, Cress - Webster Groves Bell, John P. "Jack" - St. Charles Besserman - see Kruckemeyer Bess, Franklin D. "Hank" - St. Louis Betts, Jane L. - Moscow Mills Blankenship, Kim B. - St. Louis

Bobrowski, Pauline - St. Louis Boiles, John Hamilton - Lake St. Louis Colesworthy, Nancy - St. Louis Collins, John J. "Jack" - St. Louis Craden, Robert W. - St. Ann Doerr, Robert P. - St. Louis Ferder, Jr., James Joseph - Florissant Flynn, Margaret O. "Peggy" - St. Louis

Goforth - see Haferkamp Gruener, Marie J. - St. Louis Haferkamp, Melba Ann - St. Louis

Hamilton, James Tyree - St. Louis Hart, Patricia Ann - St. Peters Hoormann - see Knobbe

Hunt - see Auinbauh Hyder, Elmo - Ellisville Jasper - see Doerr

Klaus, Stanley D. - formerly of Maryland Heights Knobbe, Rita A. - Florissant Kruckemeyer, Myrtle - St. Louis

Lainoff, Fredricka "Fritzi" - Portland, OR, native of St. Louis Macchi, John A. - St. Louis Malick, Albert R. - St. Louis

Beauiful Memorials with Respect and Grace Auinbauh, Cress

at 91 years old on Monday, November 23, 2015. Beloved husband of Joanne Hunt whom he married on Valentine's Day, 1953; Loving father of Kathleen Auinbauh Richmond (Ron), Michael Cress Auinbauh (Susan), David Auinbauh (Marianne); dear grandfather of Kimberly Auinbauh Hannon (Dan), Pamela Auinbauh Rauh (Alex), Melanie Auinbauh Anderson (David), Kerry Auinbauh (fiancé Corey Taylor) and Jacob Cress Auinbauh. Cress was born at home on Providence Avenue in Webster Groves on December 20, 1923 to Pearl Robinson Auinbauh and Harris Cress Auinbauh. Cress was a lifetime resident of Webster Groves, playing football for the Statesman while attending Webster Groves High School and graduating in 1941. He graduated from the University of Missouri in 1950 and served as a Military Policeman during World War II. He met his wife, Joanne at McDonnell Aircraft. Cress was a longtime Webster Groves Lions Club Member and after retirement he became a self-proclaimed Professional Piddler. Services: There will be a private family memorial and in lieu of flowers, an Act of Kindness to those in need. Family and friends may sign the online guestbook at www.gerberchapel.com

Bell, John P. "Jack" Passed away November 22, 2015 at the age of 80. Beloved husband of Beth Bell; loving father of Brian, John (Jan) Xeno, and Sean (Jessica); dear brother-in-law, uncle, cousin, and friend. StLouisCremation.com

Bess, Franklin D. "Hank" November 9, 1933 to November 17, 2015. Loving husband of Shirley (nee Bader); dear father of Carla Droege, Timothy and the late James Bess. Proud grandfather and great-grandfather. Our dear Brother, Father-In-Law, Brother-in-Law, Uncle, Cousin and Friend. U.S. Marine Corp 54-56-CB&Q, BNSF, RRD 40/8. Vet Consortium, Post 37. Services: Memorial Service Saturday, December 5, 2015 Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, 812 Soulard St. 11 a.m. Donations to St. Anthonys Med. Palliative care or Trinity Lutheran Church.

Betts, Jane L. Moscow Mills, MO, 84, 11/25/2015, Vis. 5-8p.m. with Svc. 7:30p.m. on Mon. 11/30/15 McCoy-Blossom Funeral Home, Troy. Graveside 1 p.m. Tues. Grandview Cem. Hannibal, MO

Blankenship, Kim B. unexpectedly, on 11/23/15 at the age of 70. Loving husband of Betsy Giles Blankenship; amazing father to Elizabeth (Ellie) and Brad Blankenship, and special friend to many. Services: Visitation - Friday 12/4 from 4-6 p.m. with service immediately following at Bopp Chapel. Memorials may be made to the Giles Scholarship Fund- New City School, 5209 Waterman, St. Louis, MO 63108. www.boppchapel.com

Death Notice Index Manus, Rev. Dr. Richard, LCMS Pastor Emeritus - St. Louis McCart, Thomas A. - Cedar Hill, MO McCormack, Enid - St. Louis McNamee, Timothy Graven - O'Fallon, MO, formerly of Florissant Moreno, Joseph M. Jr. - St. Louis Murphy, Grace Fooshe - University City Obermoeller, Earl K. "Obie" - St. Louis O'Callaghan, Donald M. "Big Doc" - St. Louis Ochs, Ester A. - St. Louis Okamura, Teiko - Maryland Heights Peter, Francis "Pete" - Collinsville, IL Phelps, Marian Elizabeth - St. Louis Portas, Virginia M. - St. Louis Rapini - see Ray Ray, Mary - St. Louis Richmond - see Auinbauh Rost I, John G. - Arnold Schmidt, Anna "Dolores" - St. Louis Schultz, George R. - St. John Six, Will Ann - St. Charles Staples, Dorothy Jane - St. Louis Thierheimer, William Jay - St. Louis Tralles, Forest Paul Jr. - St. Louis Tucker, Debra A. - St. Louis Vazis - see Staples Wagner, Victoria M. - St. Louis Walbridge, Darline H. - Florissant Ware, Herschel H. - Foley Watkins, Paul K. - St. Louis Zemen, Frank - Affton

314-352-7575 wkf.com

Bobrowski, Pauline Peacefully entered eternal life on November 14, 2015 in Boise, ID. She was surrounded by her children Renee and Ronald, and son-in-law Jeffery Dzieckowski. She is predeceased by her loving husband Stephen. She was a woman of many talents and we will remember her for her untiring spirit of love and giving. She was a dear godmother and aunt, and friend to many. Services: Funeral Thurs., Dec. 3, 10am from BUCHHOLZ Spanish Lake Mortuary, 1645 Redman Ave, to Our Lady of the Rosary Church for 10:30am Mass. Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. Masses preferred. Online guestbook at www.buchholzmortuary.com. Visitation Wed., Dec. 2, 2:30-7pm.

Boiles, John Hamilton age 87, of Lake Saint Louis, MO, died Friday, November 20, 2015. Contact (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com

Colesworthy, Nancy Nov 22, 2015. (nee Hollocher). Services are private with interment at Jefferson Barracks. www.valhallafunerals.net

Collins, John J. "Jack"

fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Friday, November 27, 2015. Beloved husband of the late Catherine Collins (nee Cahill); loving father of Anne (Doug) Milford and Amy (Jim) Heyd; dear grandfather of Buddy, Abby, Grace, Maggie, Teddy and Charley; dear brother of Jill Murphy, Jane Shank and the late Judy Krewson; dear brother-in-law, uncle, cousin and friend to many. Jack was happy, curious and an eternal optimist. He loved his friends and family dearly and they loved him. We will miss him. Services: Visitation Sun., Nov. 29, from 2-6:00 p.m. at Bopp Chapel, 10610 Manchester Rd., in Kirkwood. Funeral Mass 11:30 a.m. Mon., Nov. 30, at St. Peter Catholic Church, 243 W. Argonne, Kirkwood, MO 63122. Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. If desired, memorials may be made to Chaminade College Preparatory School, Class of 1952 Scholarship Fund or Charity of donor's choice. www.boppchapel.com

Reflect ...on their life with the story of your loved one in our obituaries. We can assist you! Call us at 314-340-8600 or visit us online: /obituaries the #1 St. Louis website

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A21

Ferder, Jr., James Joseph

Hamilton, James Tyree

Lainoff, Fredricka "Fritzi"

of Florissant, MO, died on Wednesday, November 25, 2015, at the age of 81. Loving husband of the late Sharon Jean Ferder; beloved son of the late James and Mary Ferder, Sr.; devoted father of Kevin (Gina) Ferder, Kathryn (Loren) Warren, Mark (Kathleen) Ferder, Linda Howard, and Kenny (Julie) Clayton; cherished grandfather of Sarah (Pat) Ponseti, Mark Ferder, Jr., Matthew Howard, and Jennifer Howard; dear brother of Janet (Henry) Schultz, John (Linda) Ferder, and Ed (Tina) Ferder. Services: The family is being served by the Baue Funeral and Memorial Center, 3950 West Clay Street, St. Charles, MO where visitation will be held Sunday, November 29, 2015 4:00-8:00pm. Funeral Service Monday, November 30, 2015, 12:00 pm Baue Funeral and Memorial Center Chapel. Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. Memorials may be made to American Heart Association. Visit Baue.com

Thursday, November 26, 2015. James will be missed by his wife, Dana Hamilton, step-daughter Adrian Bohn, and granddaughters Charlotte and Corinne Bohn- all of Creve Coeur, Missouri. He will also be missed by cousins Dave and Butch Griggs of Columbia, Missouri; George Tyree of Blue Springs, Missouri; Lee Tyree of San Francisco, California; David Hamilton of Iowa City, Iowa; and George Hamilton of Miami, Missouri. Thank you to all of the groups, people, and institutions involved in Jim's life. You served as his inspiration, strength, and gave cause to his travels. Hundreds of friends have crossed his path. Services: Memorial services are forth-coming at the St. Louis Ethical Society. "We shall overcome", "Strive Toward Freedom!", Pete Seeger and Woodie Guthrie protest songs were things adored by James Tyree Hamilton. For full obituary, see www.ortmannstipanovich.com

Native St. Louisan Fredricka "Fritzi" Lainoff, 86, passed away on November 23, 2015 in Portland Oregon. Fritzi distinguished herself as a champion for social justice and a steadfast advocate for America's elders. Over the years she earned numerous accolades for her unwavering commitment to improving the lives of the underserved. Although diminutive in stature, Fritzi's resounding voice was well-known in the hearing rooms of Jefferson City and Washington DC. Fritzi is survived by her husband of 66 years, Harold "Mike" Lainoff of Portland Oregon; son Michael Lainoff and his wife Marna of Eugene, Oregon; daughter Avery Leinova and her partner James Spake of Portland Oregon, and grandson Eden Lainoff of Flagstaff Arizona. Her extended family and countless friends in and beyond the St. Louis area also mourn her passing. Services: Fritzi's funeral will be held at Berger Memorial Chapel, 9430 Olive Blvd., St. Louis MO on Sunday November 29, 2015, 1 p.m. Visitation at 12:00 noon. Interment private. Prior to her passing, she requested that donations in her memory be made to the National Council of Jewish Women (www.ncjw.org ). Please visit bergermemorialchapel.com for more information.

Hart, Patricia Ann

Flynn, Margaret O. "Peggy" baptized into the hope of Christ's Resurrection, Monday, November 23, 2015, in the presence of family and dear friends. Beloved daughter of the late John D. Flynn and Virginia O. Flynn. Loving sister of Jack Flynn and Michael W. (Michele) Flynn. Adored aunt of Janine Flynn, Michael W. (Jana) Flynn Jr., Kelly M. (John M. "Jay") Kerley, and Matthew T. Flynn. Loving great aunt of Chloe Flynn, Connor Flynn, Jamison Flynn, Riley Kerley and Jack Kerley. Lifelong friend of Joan Shinall and her daughter Heather Shinall. Dear cousin and friend to many. Peggy was 4'10" of Irish Lass, full of sass, wit, and good humor. She had an engaging personality and pleasant smile, with an enthusiastic greeting and kind word for friends and strangers alike. She was a loyal and dedicated medical office assistant of Dr. Joseph Ojile and the Caduceus Medical Group where she was happily employed for over eighteen years. Services: Interment private. Memorial Mass at St. Clare of Assisi, Ellisville, Friday, 11:00 a.m. Visitation at the church from 10:00 a.m. until time of Mass. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests contributions be made to the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation, 230 East Ohio Street, Suite 304, Chicago, IL 60611. A service of the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory. Friends may sign the family's on-line guest book at Schrader.com.

Craden, Robert W.

Gruener, Marie J.

fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Sunday, November 22, 2015. Beloved husband of Mary Ann Craden (nee Junkerman); dearest father of Kenneth (Kate) Craden, Nancy Craden, Rosanne (Jim) Moore and Laurie (Robert) Carroll; dear grandfather of Carey, Nicole and Dan; great-grandfather of Brice; our dear brother, brother-in-law, uncle, great-uncle, cousin and friend to many. Mr. Craden was in the United States Marine 1st Division, serving in WWII and was a retiree of the Machinists' Union. Services: Funeral Monday, November 30, 9 a.m. from Collier's Funeral Home, 3400 N. Lindbergh, to Holy Trinity Church, 3500 St. Luke Ln for Mass, 9:30 a.m. Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be made to the American Heart Association. Visitation 4-8 p.m. Sunday. www.colliersfuneralhome.com

Doerr, Robert P.

(nee Chalupny), fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Friday, November 27, 2015. Beloved wife of Robert Gruener; dear mother of Diane (Albert) Maixner, Jane (William) Herod and the late Stephen Gruener; dear grandmother of Steve (Elaine), Amanda, Rachel, Abigail (Brant), Albert (Rae) and Alexander; dear great-grandmother of Aurora Marie; our dear sister-in-law, aunt and friend. Services: Funeral from KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Monday, November 30, 9:30 a.m. to St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church for 10 a.m. Mass. Interment Sts. Peter & Paul Cemetery. Visitation Sunday, 4-8 p.m.

Haferkamp, Melba Ann (nee Goforth), died on Thursday, November 26, 2015. Beloved wife of the late Eugene L. Haferkamp; dear mother of Michael E. (Fran) Haferkamp and Karen L. Haferkamp; loving grandmother of Megan, Caleb, Andrew and Matthew; and numerous other loving family and friends. Services: Visitation will be held on Sunday from 4-8 p.m. at STYGAR FLORISSANT CHAPEL AND CREMATION CENTER, 13980 New Halls Ferry Rd. Service will be held on Monday, 10 a.m. at Church of the Master, 1325 Paddock Dr., Florissant, MO 63033 with a visitation from 9:30-10 a.m. at the church. (MEET AT CHURCH). Interment Lake Charles Cemetery. Online condolences and guestbook may be found at www.stygar.com

fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Wed., Nov. 25, 2015. Beloved wife of Oliver R. Hart. Services: Funeral Tue., Dec. 1, 2015 at 10:15 a.m. from the STYGAR MID RIVERS Funeral Home & Crematory, 5987 Mid Rivers Mall Dr., St. Charles, MO to All Saints Catholic Church, 7 McMenamy, St. Peters, MO for an 11:00 a.m. Mass. Interment National Cemetery, Jefferson Barracks, MO. Visitation Mon., Nov. 30 from 4:00 until 8:00 P.M. For further information visit www.stygar.com.

Macchi, John A.

Hyder, Elmo 83, Nov. 25, 2015. Visit & funeral service at Schrader Funeral Home, Ballwin, Tues. 9:30-11:30am. For more info see Schrader.com.

Klaus, Stanley D. age 60, formerly of Maryland Heights, MO, passed away on Tuesday, November 17, 2015. Visitation was at Tom Wages Funeral Home in Snellville, GA. A funeral Mass was held at St. John Neumann Catholic Church in Lilburn, GA on Saturday, November 21. Stan was preceded in death by his parents August and Jessie Klaus; and nephew Geoffrey Street. Stan is survived by his wife of 34 years, Claudette Klaus (née Laginess), Grayson, Ga.; daughter Morgan Dunlop (Colin), Atlanta, Ga.; daughter Jessica Klaus (Kevin Ewalt), Atlanta, Ga.; son Jordan Klaus, Valdosta, Ga.; sister Valerie Street, St. Louis, Mo.; brother Jim Klaus (Laura), Fenton, Mo.; sister Vickie Miller (David), Hermann, Mo.; numerous nieces, nephews, cousins, family and friends. Stan gave much of his time to church ministry and was involved in numerous charities. Memorial contributions may be made to Children With Hair Loss, the Thanks Mom & Dad Fund or St. John Neumann Catholic Church.

Knobbe, Rita A. 88, Nov. 26, 2015. Visitation 9:30 a.m. until Mass at 10:30 a.m., Wed. Dec. 2, St. Ferdinand. Burial Sacred Heart Cemetery. Hutchens Mortuary.

Kruckemeyer, Myrtle (nee Steinheimer) passed away peacefully on Monday, November 23, 2015 at the age of 94 on her own terms. Preceded in death by her husband, Gustav. Beloved mother of Karen (Kim) Besserman and the late Carla (Michael) Henry, devoted Grammy of Matt (Jenna) Besserman and Sara (Ray) Holmes, loving Grammy "Cookie" of Jack and Helen Besserman, special aunt of Terry Hornsey. Dear sister, aunt, great aunt, cousin and friend to many. In lieu of flowers please send donations to the Humane Society of Missouri or American Diabetes Assn and raise a glass of wine in her memory. Online condolences and guestbook may be found at www.stygar.com

Honor

...your loved one with a condolence message in our online guest book. Visit Us At: /obituaries the #1 St. Louis website

fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Sunday, November 22, 2015. Beloved husband of the late Dolores R. Macchi (nee Berra); dear father of Michael (Elise) Macchi and the late Barbara Macchi; dear grandfather of Nicholas and Maegan Macchi; dear brother of Angelo, Emil and the late Clarence Macchi; our dear uncle, cousin and friend. Mr. Macchi served in the Navy during World War II and Korea. Services: Visitation at St. Ambrose Catholic Church on Monday, November 30, 9 a.m. until funeral mass at 10 a.m. Interment Resurrection Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions to The Hill Sick and Elderly, appreciated. A KUTIS AFFTON SERVICE.

Malick, Albert R. fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Thursday, November 26, 2015. Beloved husband of the late Virginia M. Malick (nee Wisniewski); loving father of Glen (Judy), Gary (Lin) and Greg (Tammi) Malick; dear grandfather of Scott, Andrea, Kevin and Tori; dearest great-grandfather of Andrew, Ben, Jake, A.J. and Halle; our dear brother, brother-in-law, uncle, cousin and friend. Services will begin for Albert on Monday, 9:15 a.m. at STYGAR FLORISSANT CHAPEL AND CREMATION CENTER, 13980 New Halls Ferry Rd. then proceed to St. Angela Merici Catholic Church for 10 a.m. Mass. Interment Sacred Heart Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions to Wounded Warrior Project or Make-AWish Foundation appreciated. VISITATION SUNDAY 3-8 P.M. Online condolences and guestbook may be found at www.stygar.com

Manus, Rev. Dr. Richard, LCMS Pastor Emeritus Died November 23, 2015 surrounded by his wife, Alice (nee Lackey) and children Matthew, Marc (Maxine), and Courtney Manus. Rev. Manus, ordained in 1970, served congregations in the New England, Southern, Texas, and Missouri District; was Campus Ministry Pastor at Texas A&M University, and was National Counselor of Campus Ministry for LCMS World Missions. Services: Funeral Saturday, December 5, 2015 at 2:00 p.m. and visitation at 1:00 p.m. at Hope Lutheran Church, High Ridge, MO Memorials to Hope Lutheran Church. Arrangements by Bopp Chapel.

$4,915.00 fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Wednesday, November 25, 2015. Beloved husband of the late Mary Alice Doerr (nee Jasper). Dear brother of Conrad J. Doerr & the late Olia M. Redeker & Clarence A. Doerr. Uncle of Dolores Krebs & Steven Doerr. Our dear brother-in-law, uncle, great uncle, cousin & friend to many Bob was a longtime Alderman for the city of Bellefontaine Neighbors; he was retired from the St. Louis Post Dispatch as a Pressman and a member of Teamsters Local 38. He was member of the North County Labor Legislative Club and the St. Ferdinand Township Democratic Club American Legion and the VFW. Services: Funeral services on Tuesday, December 1, 2015, 11:00 a.m. at the STYGAR FLORISSANT CHAPEL & CREMATION SERVICE, 13980 New Halls Ferry Rd. Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. Donations to charity of choice appreciated. VISITATION MONDAY 4-9 P.M. Online condolences and guestbook may be found at www.stygar.com

Caring Gestures From a beautiful memorial to a prepared dish or tray, every gesture is appreciated. Let us help.

For a location near you, visit schnucks.com


NEWS

11.29.2015 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A21

Brosnan, John Francis

To Our Readers

Collins, John J. "Jack"

To place your loved one’s Funeral Notice, please call the St. Louis Post-Dispatch at 800-365-0820 Ext. 8600 or 314-340-8600 or e-mail us at deathnotices@post-dispatch.com. Please log on to STLtoday.com/obits to share your memories, upload photos and sign the online guest book. As a part of our services, all guest books remain online permanently.

Death Notice Index

Death Notice Index

Albrecht - see Brennecke Neier Apple, Leonard W. - St. Peters Auinbauh, Cress - Webster Groves Bell, John P. "Jack" - St. Charles Besserman - see Kruckemeyer Bess, Franklin D. "Hank" - St. Louis Betts, Jane L. - Moscow Mills Blankenship, Kim B. - St. Louis Bobrowski, Pauline - St. Louis Boiles, John Hamilton - Lake St. Louis Brennecke Neier, Anna M. - Webster Groves Brosnan, John Francis - St. Louis Brown, Eunice [Toodie] - St. Louis

McNamee, Timothy Graven - O'Fallon, MO, formerly of Florissant Moreno, Joseph M. Jr. - St. Louis Murphy, Grace Fooshe - University City Neville, Judie M. - St. Louis Nitsch, Marilyn E. - Florissant Obermoeller, Earl K. "Obie" - St. Louis O'Callaghan, Donald M. "Big Doc" - St. Louis Ochs, Ester A. - St. Louis Okamura, Teiko - Maryland Heights Olsen, Dennis - San Antonio, TX Penny, Marie A. "Ann" - St. Louis Peter, Francis "Pete" - Collinsville, IL Phelps, Marian Elizabeth - St. Louis Pingel - see Ponder Ponder, Dorothy Marie - Bridgeton Portas, Virginia M. - St. Louis Proctor - see Neville Rapini - see Ray Ray, Mary - St. Louis Richmond - see Auinbauh Roberts - see Apple Rost I, John G. - Arnold Schmidt, Anna "Dolores" - St. Louis Schultz, George R. - St. John Simone, Raymond E. "Ray" - St. Louis Six, Will Ann - St. Charles Slominski, Leona E. - St. Louis Staples, Dorothy Jane - St. Louis Starr, Heather - St. Louis

Caldwell, William Charles "Willie" St. Louis Call, William R. "Will" - Saint Charles Colesworthy, Nancy - St. Louis Collins, John J. "Jack" - St. Louis Craden, Robert W. - St. Ann Doerr, Robert P. - St. Louis Ferder, Jr., James Joseph - Florissant Flynn, Margaret O. "Peggy" - St. Louis Goforth - see Haferkamp Gradolf, Ruth E. - Festus Gruener, Marie J. - St. Louis Haferkamp, Melba Ann - St. Louis Hamilton, James Tyree - St. Louis Hart, Patricia Ann - St. Peters Hoormann - see Knobbe Hunt - see Auinbauh Hyder, Elmo - Ellisville Jasper - see Doerr Kieffer, Catherine L. - St. Peters

Klaus, Stanley D. - formerly of Maryland Heights Knobbe, Rita A. - Florissant Kruckemeyer, Myrtle - St. Louis

Lainoff, Fredricka "Fritzi" - Portland, OR, native of St. Louis Liszewski, Matthew Paul - O'Fallon, MO Love, Mary Ann - O'Fallon, MO Macchi, John A. - St. Louis Malick, Albert R. - St. Louis

Manus, Rev. Dr. Richard, LCMS Pastor Emeritus - St. Louis Martinez, Alvina - St. Louis McCart, Thomas A. - Cedar Hill, MO McCormack, Enid - St. Louis

Beauiful Memorials with Respect and Grace Apple, Leonard W. Mar. 2, 1917 - Nov. 27, 2015. Visitation Tues., Dec. 1, 3-7pm with Funeral Wed., 10am at SHEPARD FUNERAL CHAPEL, 9255 Natural Bridge Rd. at I-170 (314-4266000). Burial follows at Laurel Hill. www.ShepardFuneralChapel.com

Auinbauh, Cress

Strake, Pauline Elizabeth (Deters) - St. Louis Stubits - see Brosnan Thierheimer, William Jay - St. Louis Tralles, Forest Paul Jr. - St. Louis Tucker, Debra A. - St. Louis Turner, Elsie D. - St. Charles Vazis - see Staples Wagner, Victoria M. - St. Louis Walbridge, Darline H. - Florissant Wall, Bernadine "Bunny" - Florissant Wandzel, Carl Richard - St. Charles Ware, Herschel H. - Foley Watkins, Paul K. - St. Louis Wild - see Call Wiseman - see Call Zemen, Frank - Affton Zimbalist, Chaim Herman - St. Louis

314-352-7575 wkf.com

Bess, Franklin D. "Hank" November 9, 1933 to November 17, 2015. Loving husband of Shirley (nee Bader); dear father of Carla Droege, Timothy and the late James Bess. Proud grandfather and great-grandfather. Our dear Brother, Father-In-Law, Brother-in-Law, Uncle, Cousin and Friend. U.S. Marine Corp 54-56-CB&Q, BNSF, RRD 40/8. Vet Consortium, Post 37. Services: Memorial Service Saturday, December 5, 2015 Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, 812 Soulard St. 11 a.m. Donations to St. Anthonys Med. Palliative care or Trinity Lutheran Church.

Betts, Jane L.

at 91 years old on Monday, November 23, 2015. Beloved husband of Joanne Hunt whom he married on Valentine's Day, 1953; Loving father of Kathleen Auinbauh Richmond (Ron), Michael Cress Auinbauh (Susan), David Auinbauh (Marianne); dear grandfather of Kimberly Auinbauh Hannon (Dan), Pamela Auinbauh Rauh (Alex), Melanie Auinbauh Anderson (David), Kerry Auinbauh (fiancé Corey Taylor) and Jacob Cress Auinbauh. Cress was born at home on Providence Avenue in Webster Groves on December 20, 1923 to Pearl Robinson Auinbauh and Harris Cress Auinbauh. Cress was a lifetime resident of Webster Groves, playing football for the Statesman while attending Webster Groves High School and graduating in 1941. He graduated from the University of Missouri in 1950 and served as a Military Policeman during World War II. He met his wife, Joanne at McDonnell Aircraft. Cress was a longtime Webster Groves Lions Club Member and after retirement he became a self-proclaimed Professional Piddler. Services: There will be a private family memorial and in lieu of flowers, an Act of Kindness to those in need. Family and friends may sign the online guestbook at www.gerberchapel.com

Moscow Mills, MO, 84, 11/25/2015, Vis. 5-8p.m. with Svc. 7:30p.m. on Mon. 11/30/15 McCoy-Blossom Funeral Home, Troy. Graveside 1 p.m. Tues. Grandview Cem. Hannibal, MO

Blankenship, Kim B. unexpectedly, on 11/23/15 at the age of 70. Loving husband of Betsy Giles Blankenship; amazing father to Elizabeth (Ellie) and Brad Blankenship, and special friend to many. Services: Visitation - Friday 12/4 from 4-6 p.m. with service immediately following at Bopp Chapel. Memorials may be made to the Giles Scholarship Fund- New City School, 5209 Waterman, St. Louis, MO 63108. www.boppchapel.com

Brennecke Neier, Anna M.

Asleep in Jesus; Friday Nov. 27, 2015. Dearest husband of Kelly Brosnan (nee Stubits); beloved father of Connor Ray Brosnan; dear son of the late Maurice "Dutch" and Ruth Brosnan; dear brother of the late Tom Brosnan; dear brother-in-law of Rhonda Brosnan, Frank and Lisa Stubits; dear uncle of TJ (Amanda) and Jamie (Jon) Brosnan and Tara Stubits; beloved son-in-law of Frank and Dianna Stubits; beloved Godfather of Tara Stubits, Colin Braun and Toni Porter; special friend to the Braun family; dearest nephew, cousin, friend and "The Brother" to all. An Irishman to the end. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois on Tuesday, December 1, 9:30 AM to Church of the Reformation-Lutheran for 10:00 AM service. Interment Resurrection Cemetery. In lieu of flowers memorials to Backstoppers or charity of ones choice appreciated. Visitation Monday 2-9 p.m.

Brown, Eunice [Toodie] 87, Nov 26, 2015, passed peacefully in her sleep following complications from a stroke. She was the owner/operator of Krone Business Systems. Survived by one brother: Jerry Brown, from Alabama, numerous nieces and nephews, and was cherished and loved by all. Preceded in death by her parents, four brothers, and longtime business associate Henry Chappell. Services: Visitation will be held at Bellerive Mausoleum Chapel on Tuesday Dec 1 from 10-11 am, followed by funeral service at 11, with interment at Bellerive Gardens Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be left to the Salvation Army. www.valhallafunerals.net

Caldwell, William Charles "Willie" Thursday, Novemebr 26, 2015. Beloved son of Bill and Cyndy Caldwell; dear brother of Casey (Steve McMahon) Caldwell; beloved nephew and Godson of Pat Voss; dear grandson of Gingie Brooks; dear cousin and nephew to many and friend to all he met. Services: Visitation at KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Tuesday, December 1, 3 p.m. until time of service at 6 p.m. Memorials to Dream Factory or Make a Wish Foundation appreciated.

Call, William R. "Will" of Saint Charles, MO, died on Thursday, November 26, 2015, at the age of 80. Loving husband of Lois Elizabeth (Wild) Call; beloved son of the late LeRoy and Mildred Ruth Call; devoted father of William "Bill" (Kimberly) Call and Susan (Jeff) Wiseman; cherished grandfather of Joshua Call, Nicholas (Morgan) Call, Hannah Wiseman, and Megan Wiseman; treasured great-grandfather of Hazel Grace Call; and his best buddy, his dog, Pepper. He is preceded in death by his brother Terrence Call. Services: The family is being served by the BAUE Funeral Home, 620 Jefferson Street, St. Charles, MO, where visitation will be held Monday, November 30, 2015 ,4:00-8:00 p.m. Funeral Mass on Tuesday, December 1, 2015, 10:30 a.m., St. Charles Borromeo Catholic Church, 601 N. Fourth Street, St. Charles, MO. Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. Memorials to Little Sister's of the Poor or St. Vincent de Paul Society in care of St. Charles Borromeo. Visit Baue.com

Craden, Robert W.

fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Sunday, November 22, 2015. Beloved husband of Mary Ann Craden (nee Junkerman); dearest father of Kenneth (Kate) Craden, Nancy Craden, Rosanne (Jim) Moore and Laurie (Robert) Carroll; dear grandfather of Carey, Nicole and Dan; great-grandfather of Brice; our dear brother, brother-in-law, uncle, great-uncle, cousin and friend to many. Mr. Craden was in the United States Marine 1st Division, serving in WWII and was a retiree of the Machinists' Union. Services: Funeral Monday, November 30, 9 a.m. from Collier's Funeral Home, 3400 N. Lindbergh, to Holy Trinity Church, 3500 St. Luke Ln for Mass, 9:30 a.m. Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be made to the American Heart Association. Visitation 4-8 p.m. Sunday. www.colliersfuneralhome.com

(nee McDowell), 96, of Webster Groves, passed away suddenly on November 26, 2015. Anna was preceded in death by her husbands, Robert C. Brennecke and Robert H. Neier. Survived by her sister Betty Hansen (nee McDowell) of Portland, OR. Loving mother of Robert Jr. (Patricia) Brennecke, Patricia (Ken) Albrecht, and the late Janice A. Brennecke Gamewell. Loving stepmother to Carole (Bill) Lee, Nancy (Robert) Quigley and Robert M. (Vickie) Neier. Dear grandmother of 10. Beloved great grandmother of 18. Loving sister, aunt, cousin and friend to many. Anna loved her home and many friends at Laclede Groves. Services: Visitation will be from 4 pm to 8pm on Wed., December 2nd. Funeral service will be at 11 am on Thurs. December 3rd both at HOFFMEISTER COLONIAL MORTUARY, 6464 Chippewa. Burial to follow at Lakewood Park Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in her name to Affton Presbyterian Church. Messages of condolence may be left at www.hoffmeistercolonial.com.

Nov 22, 2015. (nee Hollocher). Services are private with interment at Jefferson Barracks. www.valhallafunerals.net

Honor ...your loved one with a condolence message in our online guest book. Visit Us At: /obituaries the #1 St. Louis website

fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Wednesday, November 25, 2015. Beloved husband of the late Mary Alice Doerr (nee Jasper); dear brother of Conrad J. Doerr and the late Olivia M. Redeker and Clarence A. Doerr; uncle of Dolores Krebs and Steven Doerr; our dear brother-inlaw, uncle, great-uncle, cousin and friend to many. Bob was a longtime Alderman for the city of Bellefontaine Neighbors; he was retired from the St. Louis Post-Dispatch as a Pressman and a member of Teamsters Local 38. He was member of the North County Labor Legislative Club and the St. Ferdinand Township Democratic Club, American Legion and the VFW. Services: Funeral services on Tuesday, December 1, 2015, 11:00 a.m. at the STYGAR FLORISSANT CHAPEL & CREMATION SERVICE, 13980 New Halls Ferry Rd. Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. Donations to charity of choice appreciated. VISITATION MONDAY 49 P.M. Online condolences and guestbook may be found at www.stygar.com

Caring Gestures From a beautiful memorial to a prepared dish or tray, every gesture is appreciated. Let us help.

Bell, John P. "Jack" Passed away November 22, 2015 at the age of 80. Beloved husband of Beth Bell; loving father of Brian, John (Jan) Xeno, and Sean (Jessica); dear brother-in-law, uncle, cousin, and friend. StLouisCremation.com

Boiles, John Hamilton age 87, of Lake Saint Louis, MO, died Friday, November 20, 2015. Contact (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com

of Florissant, MO, died on Wednesday, November 25, 2015, at the age of 81. Loving husband of the late Sharon Jean Ferder; beloved son of the late James and Mary Ferder, Sr.; devoted father of Kevin (Gina) Ferder, Kathryn (Loren) Warren, Mark (Kathleen) Ferder, Linda Howard, and Kenny (Julie) Clayton; cherished grandfather of Sarah (Pat) Ponseti, Mark Ferder, Jr., Matthew Howard, and Jennifer Howard; dear brother of Janet (Henry) Schultz, John (Linda) Ferder, and Ed (Tina) Ferder. Services: The family is being served by the Baue Funeral and Memorial Center, 3950 West Clay Street, St. Charles, MO where visitation will be held Sunday, November 29, 2015 4:00-8:00pm. Funeral Service Monday, November 30, 2015, 12:00 pm Baue Funeral and Memorial Center Chapel. Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. Memorials may be made to American Heart Association. Visit Baue.com

Flynn, Margaret O. "Peggy" baptized into the hope of Christ's Resurrection, Monday, November 23, 2015, in the presence of family and dear friends. Beloved daughter of the late John D. Flynn and Virginia O. Flynn. Loving sister of Jack Flynn and Michael W. (Michele) Flynn. Adored aunt of Janine Flynn, Michael W. (Jana) Flynn Jr., Kelly M. (John M. "Jay") Kerley, and Matthew T. Flynn. Loving great aunt of Chloe Flynn, Connor Flynn, Jamison Flynn, Riley Kerley and Jack Kerley. Lifelong friend of Joan Shinall and her daughter Heather Shinall. Dear cousin and friend to many. Peggy was 4'10" of Irish Lass, full of sass, wit, and good humor. She had an engaging personality and pleasant smile, with an enthusiastic greeting and kind word for friends and strangers alike. She was a loyal and dedicated medical office assistant of Dr. Joseph Ojile and the Caduceus Medical Group where she was happily employed for over eighteen years. Services: Interment private. Memorial Mass at St. Clare of Assisi, Ellisville, Friday, 11:00 a.m. Visitation at the church from 10:00 a.m. until time of Mass. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests contributions be made to the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation, 230 East Ohio Street, Suite 304, Chicago, IL 60611. A service of the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory. Friends may sign the family's on-line guest book at Schrader.com.

Gradolf, Ruth E. (nee Campbell), Saturday, November 28, 2015. Beloved wife of Clyde W. Gradolf; dear mother of Carol Smith, Steven Gradolf and the late Linda (survived by Donald ) Gould; dear grandmother of Frank, Deana, Nicole, Melissa and Mehgan; dear great-grandmother of Noah and Lucas; our dear greatgrandmother, sister-in-law, aunt, great-aunt , cousin and friend. Services: Visitation at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Friday, December 4, 4 p.m until service at 8 p.m. Service concludes at funeral home. Member of Gateway Arch Bells and an Avon Sales Representative for 18 years. In lieu of flowers, contributions to Shriner's Hospital or The American Cancer Society appreciated.

Gruener, Marie J. Doerr, Robert P.

Colesworthy, Nancy

Bobrowski, Pauline Peacefully entered eternal life on November 14, 2015 in Boise, ID. She was surrounded by her children Renee and Ronald, and son-in-law Jeffery Dzieckowski. She is predeceased by her loving husband Stephen. She was a woman of many talents and we will remember her for her untiring spirit of love and giving. She was a dear godmother and aunt, and friend to many. Services: Funeral Thurs., Dec. 3, 10am from BUCHHOLZ Spanish Lake Mortuary, 1645 Redman Ave, to Our Lady of the Rosary Church for 10:30am Mass. Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. Masses preferred. Online guestbook at www.buchholzmortuary.com. Visitation Wed., Dec. 2, 2:30-7pm.

fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Friday, November 27, 2015. Beloved husband of the late Catherine Collins (nee Cahill); loving father of Anne (Doug) Milford and Amy (Jim) Heyd; dear grandfather of Buddy, Abby, Grace, Maggie, Teddy and Charley; dear brother of Jill Murphy, Jane Shank and the late Judy Krewson; dear brother-in-law, uncle, cousin and friend to many. Jack was happy, curious and an eternal optimist. He loved his friends and family dearly and they loved him. We will miss him. Services: Visitation Sun., Nov. 29, from 2-6:00 p.m. at Bopp Chapel, 10610 Manchester Rd., in Kirkwood. Funeral Mass 11:30 a.m. Mon., Nov. 30, at St. Peter Catholic Church, 243 W. Argonne, Kirkwood, MO 63122. Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. If desired, memorials may be made to Chaminade College Preparatory School, Class of 1952 Scholarship Fund or Charity of donor's choice. www.boppchapel.com

Ferder, Jr., James Joseph

For a location near you, visit schnucks.com

(nee Chalupny), fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Friday, November 27, 2015. Beloved wife of Robert Gruener; dear mother of Diane (Albert) Maixner, Jane (William) Herod and the late Stephen Gruener; dear grandmother of Steve (Elaine), Amanda, Rachel, Abigail (Brant), Albert (Rae) and Alexander; dear great-grandmother of Aurora Marie; our dear sister-in-law, aunt and friend. Services: Funeral from KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Monday, November 30, 9:30 a.m. to St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church for 10 a.m. Mass. Interment Sts. Peter & Paul Cemetery. Visitation Sunday, 4-8 p.m.

Haferkamp, Melba Ann (nee Goforth), died on Thursday, November 26, 2015. Beloved wife of the late Eugene L. Haferkamp; dear mother of Michael E. (Fran) Haferkamp and Karen L. Haferkamp; loving grandmother of Megan, Caleb, Andrew and Matthew; and numerous other loving family and friends. Services: Visitation will be held on Sunday from 4-8 p.m. at STYGAR FLORISSANT CHAPEL AND CREMATION CENTER, 13980 New Halls Ferry Rd. Service will be held on Monday, 10 a.m. at Church of the Master, 1325 Paddock Dr., Florissant, MO 63033 with a visitation from 9:30-10 a.m. at the church. (MEET AT CHURCH). Interment Lake Charles Cemetery. Online condolences and guestbook may be found at www.stygar.com

Hamilton, James Tyree Thursday, November 26, 2015. James will be missed by his wife, Dana Hamilton, step-daughter Adrian Bohn, and granddaughters Charlotte and Corinne Bohn- all of Creve Coeur, Missouri. He will also be missed by cousins Dave and Butch Griggs of Columbia, Missouri; George Tyree of Blue Springs, Missouri; Lee Tyree of San Francisco, California; David Hamilton of Iowa City, Iowa; and George Hamilton of Miami, Missouri. Thank you to all of the groups, people, and institutions involved in Jim's life. You served as his inspiration, strength, and gave cause to his travels. Hundreds of friends have crossed his path. Services: Memorial services are forth-coming at the St. Louis Ethical Society. "We shall overcome", "Strive Toward Freedom!", Pete Seeger and Woodie Guthrie protest songs were things adored by James Tyree Hamilton. For full obituary, see www.ortmannstipanovich.com


NEWS

A22 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 11.29.2015

Technology is increasing access to mental health care Websites, apps help meet growing need for care, are convenient for users BY LENA H. SUN Washington Post

When he’s having a hard time coping, the 23-year-old Maryland man can get extra support with a few quick taps on his smartphone. That takes him to the Big White Wall, an online service that provides help 24/7 to people who are struggling with problems such as depression, stress and anxiety. It ofers educational resources and courses led by mental health professionals. It also offers peer encouragement through virtual conversations. “Talkabouts,” they’re called. The most active users are on Big White Wall between midnight and 4 a.m. — when troubles or loneliness often weigh more heavily. All interactions are anonymous. The service, which has been running in the United Kingdom

McCart, Thomas A. 69, of Cedar Hill, MO, Passed away peacefully on November 25, 2015. Beloved husband of Geraldine (nee Klueter) McCart, loving father to Keith (Tamara), Pat (Terri) and Kevin (Tracy), dear grandfather to Kelsey, Brendan and Megan, dear son to the late William and Stella McCart, dear brother of twelve (12) siblings. Thomas was a dear uncle and friend to many. Thomas was an avid hunter and fisherman. Services: Visitation Sunday, November 29, 2015 from 2 - 7 p.m. at CHAPEL HILL MORTUARY 6300 Highway 30, Cedar Hill, MO. Service Monday at 10 a.m. at CHAPEL HILL MORTUARY, Interment at Chapel Hill Memorial Gardens.

McCormack, Enid on Tuesday, November 24, 2015. Beloved wife of the late Terence K. McCormack; dear mother of Kevin (Anne), Neal and Ellen K. McCormack; dear sister of Frank V. (Patricia) Passuth; dear grandmother of Ian, Christine, Bryony, Tim, and Alice McCormack; and dear greatgrandmother to five. Services: Memorial Mass at the Mother of Good Counsel Home, 6825 Natural Bridge Rd., 63121 on Tuesday, December 1, at 11:00 a.m. In lieu of flowers, donations to Mother of Good Counsel Home, c/o Sr. Christine, appreciated. Interment Oak Grove Cemetery. www.kriegshausermortuary.com

McNamee, Timothy Graven age 68, of O'Fallon, MO, formerly of Florissant, MO, died Thursday, Nov. 26, 2015. Contact (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com

Moreno, Joseph M. Jr. fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Monday, November 23, 2015. Beloved husband of the late Joan M. Moreno (nee Meyer) for 61 years; dearest father of Stephen (Sandra), Timothy (MaryBeth) and Randall (Susan) Moreno; loving grandfather of Christopher (Kim) Moreno, Heather (Samuel) Webb,Timothy, Matthew (Naoja) and Zachary Moreno; great-grandfather of Ali, Sydney, Marissa, Sydney, Kaitlyn and Kylie; great-great-grandfather of Lola; dear brother of Gerri Nassif; dear brother-in-law of Maureen Meyer; our dear uncle, cousin and friend. Services: Memorial visitation at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Monday, November 30, 4-8 p.m. Inurnment J. B. National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorials to the charity of your choice appreciated.

Murphy, Grace Fooshé

for nearly a decade, is now drawing attention from several U.S. health systems looking for ways to increase access, especially in rural areas with few if any psychiatrists, counselors or even social workers. It is part of the rapidly changing landscape of Internet and mobile technologies that experts say could respond to the growing demand for mental health care. Yet that’s just half of it. Digital behavioral health is increasingly viewed as a way for organizations to improve patients’ overall health, reduce unnecessary and expensive hospitalizations and comply with laws requiring insurers to provide mental health benefits at the same level as benefits for other medical care. Some technologies are narrowly focused, such as cognitive therapy sessions that people do on their own like they might use an online program to learn a foreign language. There are also many smartphone applications designed to help people track and manage their emotions. Some can alert a provider of a possible problem by monitoring how much an individual moves

Obermoeller, Earl K. "Obie"

entered into rest Thursday, November 19, 2015. Beloved husband of the late Rosie V. Obermoeller (nee Ewing). Loving companion and friend of Lydia VenJohn. Cherished father of Denise (Richard) Ballentine, Jean (Gary) Lange, Tracy (Mike) Pitts and the late Scott Obermoeller. Dear grandfather of Jaymie Kohl, Kristin Kohl and Daniel Davis. Great-grandfather of Donovan, Elise and the late Philip. Brother of the late Norman Obermoeller. uncle, cousin and friend to many. The family would like to thank the staff at NHC Maryland Heights for the care they gave to Mr. Obermoeller and who treated him as their own. He will be missed by his friends at the Donut Cupboard. Services: Memorial service Saturday, December 5, 11 a.m. at the North County Community Church, 7410 Howdershell Road, Hazelwood, 63042. If desired, contributions may be made to the Humane Society of Missouri or the ASPCA of St. Louis. A service of Hutchens Mortuary and Cremation Center.

O'Callaghan, Donald M. "Big Doc"

Peter, Francis "Pete"

80, of Collinsville, IL, passed away Monday, November 23rd, 2015 at his home. He was born September 17th, 1935 in Millstadt, IL, to John E. and Emma (Burg) Peter Jones. He married Carolyn Jensen October 20th, 1956 in Staunton, IL. Pete is preceded in death by his parents, brothers, Fern, Kenneth and Ralph Jones, and sister, Evelyn Kaase. He is survived by his wife Carolyn, children, Karen Peter of Boston, MA, Gregg Peter of Overland, MO, Diane Peter of Collinsville, IL, brother, John Peter of Belleville, IL, sisters, Dolores (Ralph) Ohnemus of Katy, TX, Vendell (Fred) Busch of Maryville, IL, Shirley (Robert) Stewart of Phoenix, AZ. He is further survived by grandchildren, Amie (David) Wilson of Godfrey, IL, Amanda Dempsey-Gipperich of St. Ann, MO, Andrea (Matthew) Kowalskey of St. Ann, MO, Ashley (C.J.) Smith of Killeen, TX., great-grandchild, C.J. Smith III, wonderful neighbors, Randy, Debbie, Jed Robbins and Caity Boren. Pete retired as a Pressman from the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. He was Secretary-Treasurer of the Pressman's Union Local 38. Services: Memorial Visitation will be from 5:00 pm to 7:00 pm Wednesday, December 2nd, 2015 at Herr Funeral Home, Collinsville, IL. Memorial Service will follow at 7:00 pm at the funeral home. Interment of cremation will be at a later date. Memorials may be made to SSM Unity Hospice.

Phelps, Marian Elizabeth

can rely on.” Mosaic, which provides mental health services to about 25,000 people a year, signed on to Big White Wall in 2014 and ofers it without charge to clients such as that 23-year-old Maryland man. He sees a therapist at one of the organization’s outpatient clinics, but he likes the convenience of Big White Wall and the way trained “wall guides” help foster conversation. “He really liked that when someone started a ‘talkabout’ and people didn’t get involved, that a ‘wall guide’ would jump in” to respond, said Cindy Eikenberg, a Mosaic spokeswoman who relayed the man’s experience because he wanted his privacy protected. “He found the service to be very helpful.” Developed in England in 2007, Big White Wall has been officially endorsed by the National Health Service there and used by more than 36,000 people across the United Kingdom, including current and former military personnel. Independent studies have shown its efectiveness in improving individuals’ ability to manage their mental health, with a 2009 review finding that

Ray, Mary (nee LaMonica) on Wednesday, November 25, 2015 at age 82. Beloved wife of the late Jackie L. Ray; dear mother of Patricia (Vincent, Jr.) Rapini and Steven (Cynthia) Ray; dear grandmother of Jennifer and Vincent S. (Laura Kreke, fiancé) Rapini, Erin (Christopher) Ferrario and Andrew (Jenna)Ray; dearest great-grandmother of Christopher, Luke and Jack Ferrario, Austin, Emma and Audrey Ray; dear sister, sister-in-law, aunt, cousin and friend. Services: Visitation Sunday, 2-8 p.m. at JOHN L. ZIEGENHEIN & SONS South County, 4830 Lemay Ferry Rd. (63129), then on Monday from 9:00 a.m. until time of service 10:00 a.m. at the Evangelical Full Gospel Assembly Church, 11011 Tesson Ferry Rd. (63123). Interment St. Matthews Cemetery. If desired, memorials may be made to the Evangelical Full Gospel Assembly Church.

Rost I, John G.

of Arnold, MO passed away on Thurs, Nov. 26, 2015 at the age of 79. Beloved husband of the late Jacquelyn Rost (nee Powers); loving father of Scott (Mary) Gosnell, Cindy (Dan) Allen and John (Connie) Rost II; dear brother of Ed (Judith) Rost and the late Albert (survived by Barbara) and George (survived by Margaret) Rost; dearest grandfather of 6 and great-grandfather of 9; our dear uncle, great-uncle, cousin and dear friend. Services: Visitation to be held at Heiligtag-Lang-Fendler Funeral Home, 1081 Jeffco Blvd., Arnold, MO on Mon., Nov. 30 from 4-8 p.m. Committal service to be held at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery on Tues., Dec. 1 at 1 p.m. In lieu of flowers, contributions to Greater St. Louis Honor Flight appreciated. Condolences may be offered at www.heiligtagfuneralhome.com.

Schmidt, Anna "Dolores" Thursday, November 26, 2015. Beloved husband of Joyce J. O'Callaghan (nee Greenlay); dear father of Patricia (Thomas) RIchardson, Deborah (Jim) McCall and Mark (Barbara) O'Callaghan; our dear grandfather, great-grandfather, brother, brotherin-law, uncle, great-uncle and friend. Services: Visitation at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY CHAPEL, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Tuesday, December 1, 11:00 a.m. until service at 1:00 p.m. Interment National Cemetery. Donald was retired from the U.S. Air Force and also retired from Defense Mapping. In lieu of flowers, contributions to St. Anthony's Hospice appreciated.

Ochs, Ester A.

Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Wednesday, November 25, 2015. Beloved wife of the late John Carroll Murphy, M.D.; dearest mother of Grace Purcell (John), John Murphy Jr. (Janet), Maureen Ohms, Peter Murphy (Deborah) and the late Katherine Johnston (survived by husband Lowe); dear grandmother of Katherine Miller (Andrew), Anne Kelly (Ryan), Mary Neuwoehner (Ryan), John Purcell Jr. (Mary), Elizabeth Sutherland (Ryan), Charles Ohms (Miranda), Margaret VanDeCar (Ryan), Jennifer White (Joseph), Robert Ohms, Peter Murphy and Patrick Murphy; greatgrandmother of 14; dear sister of the late Peter E. Fooshe Jr. (Marjorie) of St. Paul, Minnesota; dear aunt and a friend to many. Grace was born in St. Paul, Minnesota. She was a graduate of St. Catherine University in St. Paul. She received a Masters Degree in Social Work from St. Louis University. Grace devoted her life to family, relishing her role as wife and mother. She enjoyed spending time with friends, working on needlepoint, and playing bridge, bingo and other card games. The family wishes to express their thanks to her dedicated caregivers at Mari de Villa Retirement Center. Services: The Funeral Mass will be celebrated on Tuesday, December, 1, 10:00 a.m. at Christ the King Catholic Church, 7316 Balson Avenue, University City. Interment Calvary Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be made in Grace's memory to Christ the King Catholic Church. The family will receive friends at THE LUPTON CHAPEL, 7233 Delmar Blvd., University City, on Monday from 4 p.m. until 8 p.m. A SERVICE OF THE LUPTON CHAPEL

around or talks to others that day. Thomas Insel, who just stepped down as director of the National Institute of Mental Health to join Google, says technology used the right way can transform access to mental health care and improve the quality of services. “This isn’t the fix for everything, but just a starting point when you realize that 55 percent of the counties in the United States have no mental health personnel,” he said in an interview. Big White Wall relies on sophisticated algorithms to tailor information to users, who can also take tests that assess depression and anxiety. They can write or draw on the service’s virtual bricks to share their emotions. Some bricks, marked by words like “trapped” or “no future,” reveal pain and despair. “The ones who find it most useful are the ones who have day-to-day variation in their moods and limited ability to cope,” said Supriya Narang, chief medical officer at Baltimorebased Mosaic Community Services. “Those people have found it is a really important piece they

(nee Schnurbusch), fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Thursday, November 26, 2015. Beloved wife of the late Milton G. Ochs; dearest mother of Richard, Robert (Diane) and Ray Ochs; loving grandmother of Erika (Jason) Smiley, Becky Ochs, Monica Ochs, Ryan Ochs, Bobby Ochs, Connie Ochs, Jessica (Greg) Strautmann, Amanda (Nathan) Whitener and Brendan Ochs; greatgrandmother of Brayden, Taytum, Owen and Kaia; dear sister of Verna, Margaret and the late Lorine, Walter, Flora, Lee, Everett and Gertrude; dear sister-in-law of Jackie ochs; our dear aunt, great-aunt, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral from KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Tuesday, December 1, 9:30 a.m to Assumption Catholic Church for 10 a.m. Mass. Interment J.B.National Cemetery. Memorials to Ronald McDonald House appreciated. Visitation Monday, 4-8p.m.

Okamura, Teiko 88, of Maryland Heights entered into rest on Monday, November 23, 2015 at Missouri Baptist Hospital. Loving wife of the late Ted T. Okamura. Beloved mother of Nobuiaki (Mie) Okamura, Keiko (Tetsu) Asada and Edith Yamura. Dear grandmother of six and sister of Takeshi Yamato. Teiko moved to the United States in 1956. Her and husband Ted were owners of Ted & Teiko Japanese Restaurant. She is fondly remembered and dearly missed by all who knew and loved her. Services: Memorial Service will be held on Sunday, December 6, 2015, 1 p.m. at CHAPEL HILL MORUARY, 10301 Big Bend Road, Kirkwood, Missouri. Inurnment to follow services at Oak Hill Cemetery. Family and friends can review and share stories, photos and condolences online at www.stlfuneral.com and follow details of this event and others in the community at www.facebook.com/stlchapelhill.

Wed., Nov. 25, 2015. Visitation Sun., Nov. 29, 3-8p.m. Funeral Mon., Nov. 30, 10a.m at Kutis South County. Interment J.B. National Cemetery.

Schultz, George R. (nee Schoenle), passed away peacefully in her home in Kirkwood on the morning of Wed., Nov. 25, 2015, surrounded by her loving family. She was ninety-six years old. She was preceded in death by her husband James O. Phelps, Jr. She is survived by her daughter Judith Phelps Little (Robert) of St. Louis, son James O. Phelps III (Ling Ling Teng) of Kensington, California, granddaughters Andrea Quinette Little Royce (Charles), of St. Louis, Jennifer Phelps Quinn (Alexander) of Berkeley, California, Susan Adele Little Olcott (Charles) of Brunswick, Maine, and seven cherished greatgrandchildren, Matthew, Lindsey and Katherine Royce, Kylie and Xavier Quinn, and Liliana and Phoebe Olcott. Marian was known and loved by many in her Kirkwood community and always put others ahead of herself. Her interests over her long life included local history (perhaps born of being a seventh generation St. Louisan), golf, sailing with her family (she received a spinnaker from her husband for Christmas one year), ice skating, knitting and calligraphy. Most important was the enjoyment of others, by note, by phone or in small gifts. In her last years some she enjoyed were the caregivers who shared their lives with her. She will be missed. Services: Funeral service Saturday, Nov. 28, 11:00 a.m. at Bopp Chapel, 10610 Manchester Rd., Kirkwood, with visitation following service. Burial at Bellefontaine Cemetery. Donations preferred to the Kirkwood Historical Society, PO Box 220602, Kirkwood, MO 63122, to the St. Louis Symphony, or to a charity of your choice. www.boppchapel.com

Portas, Virginia M. (nee Albee) on November 26, 2015. Virginia was born January 2, 1924 and was married May 5, 1945 to Eugene, who is recently deceased. Loving mother of Gregory (Susan) Portas. Dear aunt to many. Virginia was primarily a homemaker, volunteer and friend to many. She was a member of Dover Place Christian Church for 64 years. Services: The funeral service will be conducted in the Chapel of Hoffmeister South County Chapel 1515 Lemay Ferry Road on Monday, November 30, 2015 at 2:00 p.m. Interment will follow in Mount Hope Cemetery. Visitation at Hoffmeister South County on Monday from 12 noon until time of service.

Mar. 26, 1924 - Nov. 20, 2015. Visitation at SHEPARD FUNERAL CHAPEL, 9255 Natural Bridge Rd. at I-170, Sunday, Nov. 29, 4-8pm with Funeral Mon., 10 am. www.ShepardFuneralChapel.com

Six, Will Ann passed on Saturday, November 21st, 2015 at the age of 73. Beloved wife of Edward Six; mother of Eric Six. Lifelong educator, retired from the Ritenour School District. Beloved and cherished friend to all. Alternative Funeral & Cremation Services, 636-498-5300 Alternativefuneralcremation.com

Staples, Dorothy Jane

95 percent of users reported an improved sense of well-being as a result of their experience. In the United States, “a couple thousand people” are on Big White Wall, said managing director Ileana Waite. Access is only available through participating health organizations and does not yet include the one-onone talk therapy ofered in Britain. Here, organizations typically pay a flat fee to cover access. Kaiser Permanente’s Northwest region has been testing the service in parts of Oregon for the past year. In October, Kaiser broadened the pool to other parts of the state, so 125,000 members now have free access, Waite said. A Kaiser representative declined to share results, saying the health plan is still evaluating the technology. In Texas, the regional health plan Scott and White began offering the technology this month to 42,000 employees and privately insured members. Executives hope to expand to more of the plan’s 220,000 members later. The technology isn’t intended for people with severe illness or thought disorders.

Thierheimer, William Jay

at the age of 64 on Monday, November 23, 2015. Beloved husband of Mary Ellen Benson Thierheimer; loving brother of Karen Nichols, Rev. Dr. Martha Thierheimer, Tracy Kistenmacher and Scott Thierheimer (Susan); dear uncle of Kelly Nichols, Kurt, Tim and Jill Kistenmacher and Shane and Samantha Thierheimer and friend. Services: A Memorial service will be conducted at LUPTON CHAPEL, 7233 Delmar Blvd., University City on Tuesday, December 1, 2015 at 3:00 p.m. The family will receive friends prior to the service from 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Private interment. Memorial contributions appreciated to the charity of the donor's choice. Friends may submit their condolences online at www.luptonchapel.com A SERVICE OF LUPTON CHAPEL

Beloved wife of the late John L. "Doc" Lawler, Mother of the late Elizabeth June Benoist, Mary Ellen Knott, Patricia Dooley/ Bullard, John L. Lawler, Jr. and Maureen B. Lawler. Grandmother of the late George M. Benoist, Jr. Fondly remembered by daughter, Bridget Lawler Brennan, son-inlaw Jerome L. Shen, the Benoist, Knott, Dooley, Lawler and Shen grandchildren; great grandchildren, and great, great grandchildren. Elizabeth was off to Mass each morning and always ready to "doll up" in the evening with her outfit-matched eyeglasses. Elizabeth was a woman of faith, courage, resilience, class and common sense. Her spirit continues to live among us. The Lawler Family.

KEVIN MULLANE

Tralles, Forest Paul Jr. May 22, 1920 to November 23, 2015, died Monday, November 23, 2015, in St Louis. With him were his wife Martha, and sons Paul and Richard. He is survived by his wife Martha Tralles; his son Paul Tralles (daughter-in-law Anne); grandchildren Steve, Clair, Ian, and William, his son Richard Tralles (daughter-inlaw Sharon); his brother George Tralles and George's wife Bonnie, and nephews Steve, Robert, and Dan Tralles, and Hurk Robinson. Services: Memorial service will be at Grace Episcopal Church at 514 E. Argonne, 63122, and the time and date will be anounced later. Also, look for an on line memorial at stlouiscremation.com.

Missing you... Forever! 3/20/88 - 11/29/09

Tucker, Debra A. November 18, 2015. Memorial service at KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois, Saturday, Dec. 5, 2:00 p.m.

Dierbergs Florist Order 24 Hours 314-692-2000 or 800-844-6007 Dierbergs.com

Wagner, Victoria M. (nee Waitkus) Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Monday, November 23, 2015, at the age of 93. Beloved wife of the late Raymond P. Wagner; loving mother of Thomas Wagner, Peggy Lowe, and Joan Wagner; grandmother of Thomas Jr., Carrie, Alison, James, William III, and Lucy; great-grandmother of Meehan, Gavin, Finley, Ellie and Emmitt; dear sister-in-law, aunt, great-aunt, cousin, and friend to all. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions to the American Cancer Society or Masses are appreciated. Services: Monday, leaving JOHN L. ZIEGENHEIN & SONS, 7027 Gravois Avenue (63116) at 12:00 p.m. for a 12:30 p.m. Mass at St. Raphael the Archangel Catholic Church. Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. VISITATION SUNDAY 4:00 - 8:00 p.m.

Walbridge, Darline H.

(nee Stoltz), entered her eternal life, joining her devoted husband Tom there on November 20, 2015. She lived her life with zest and exited it on her own terms, passing away peacefully at age 94 in her independent living apartment at Meramec Bluffs. Loving mother to Mary Jane (Dean) Vazis and Thomas E. Staples; adoring grandmother of Colleen (Jeff) Eldred. Beloved by the O'Neill family- Brian, Renee, Lucas, Dylan and Elise. Dear aunt, cousin and friend to many. Dottie loved to have fun and did so with family and many friends through the years, in her numerous travels, and while volunteering for the Girl Scouts, the St. Louis Zoo and Tapes for the Blind. A special thanks from her family to helpers Karen and Barbara as well as the St. Luke's Hospice team for helping to make her life vital to the end. Services: Her life will be celebrated at a private service at the Meramec Bluffs Chapel followed by burial next to her husband at the Nelson, MO cemetery overlooking the farm where her husband Tom, to whom she was married for 67 years, was born and lived as a child. Donations to the St. Louis Zoo or Forest Park Forever, both loved by Dorothy, appreciated. A service of Kutis Affton Chapel.

Elizabeth C. Lawler, (nee Hayes)

April 24, 1906-November 30, 1990.

(nee Branieki) Wednesday, November 25, 2015. Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church. Beloved wife of Robert J. Walbridge; beloved mother of Deborah Harrison and Todd (Jennifer) Walbridge; loving grandmother of Gregory, Alyssa and Kevin Walbridge; dear sister of Sylvia Frenzel; dear sister-in-law, aunt, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral at HUTCHENS Mortuary 675 Graham Rd., Florissant, 10:00 a.m., Tuesday, December 1. Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. VISITATION 4:00 P.M.8:00 P.M., MONDAY, NOVEMBER 30.

Ware, Herschel H. 44, Foley, MO. , November 25, 2015. Visitation Tues., December 1, from 26 p.m. at Carter-Ricks Funeral Home in Winfield, MO.

Schnucks Florist 65 Metro Locations 314-997-2444 800-286-9557

Honor ...your loved one with a condolence message in our online guest book.

Watkins, Paul K. Nov. 1, 2015. Vis 10-11:30 a.m., Memorial Service 11:30. Church of the Shepherd, Saturday, Dec 5. www.valhallafunerals.net

Zemen, Frank 79, of Affton, Missouri, passed away, Tues., Nov. 24th, 2015 at his home with family and friends. Frank was a loving husband, father, grandfather. Services: A memorial service will be held at 11:00 a.m., Saturday, December 5 at the St. Mary of Victories Historic Church, 744 S. 3rd St., St. Louis, MO 63102. Memorials may be made to BJC Hospice Foundation, PO Box 957421, St. Louis, Mo. 631957421 and the St. Louis Peregrine Society, 2343 Hampton Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 63139.

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A22 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Hart, Patricia Ann

Liszewski, Matthew Paul

fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Wed., Nov. 25, 2015. Beloved wife of Oliver R. Hart. Services: Funeral Tue., Dec. 1, 2015 at 10:15 a.m. from the STYGAR MID RIVERS Funeral Home & Crematory, 5987 Mid Rivers Mall Dr., St. Charles, MO to All Saints Catholic Church, 7 McMenamy, St. Peters, MO for an 11:00 a.m. Mass. Interment National Cemetery, Jefferson Barracks, MO. Visitation Mon., Nov. 30 from 4:00 until 8:00 P.M. For further information visit www.stygar.com.

Hyder, Elmo 83, Nov. 25, 2015. Visit & funeral service at Schrader Funeral Home, Ballwin, Tues. 9:30-11:30am. For more info see Schrader.com.

Kieffer, Catherine L.

(nee: Powell), of St. Peters, MO, died on Wednesday, November 25, 2015, at the age of 77. Beloved daughter of the late Richard and Lyndell Powell; loving life partner of 37 years to George Gerdes; devoted mother of Nikki Dawson, Debbie (Mark) Patrick, Gary Kieffer, and Rhonda Kieffer; cherished grandmother of 7; treasured greatgrandmother of 14; dear sister of Mary Bauser, Patty Powell, and Frances Hicks; and also loving aunt, cousin, and dear friend to many. She is preceded in death by her siblings Richard Powell, William Powell, Jeanie Powell, Carol Powell, and Lois Powell. Services: The family is being served by the Baue Funeral and Memorial Center, 3950 West Clay Street, St. Charles, MO where visitation will be held Sunday, November 29, 2015 10:00-12:00 pm. Funeral Service Sunday, November 29, 2015, 12:00 pm Baue Funeral and Memorial Center Chapel. Interment Memorial Park Cemetery. Memorials may be made to the American Lung Association. Visit Baue.com

of O'Fallon, MO, died on Friday, November 27, 2015, at the age of 75. Loving husband of the late Linda Lou Poe; beloved son of the late Paul and Helen Liszewski; devoted father of Michelle "Mitzi" (Matt) Thomas, Tina (Ron) Menne, and Heather (Michael) St. Clair; cherished grandfather of Molly, Lilly, George, and baby Joseph arriving in January. He is preceded in death by his sisters Sally Delia and Irene Kozuszek. Services: The family is being served by the Baue Funeral Home, 311 Wood Street, O'Fallon, MO where visitation will be held on Tuesday, December 1, 2015 from 3:00-8:00 pm, also visitation will be held on Wednesday, December 2, 2015 from 9:00-10:00 am at Immaculate Conception Chapel Dardenne with a Funeral Mass to follow at 10:00 am. Interment St. Charles Memorial Gardens. Memorials may be made to Cure PSP, 30 E. Padonia Road, Suite 201 Timonium, MD 21093 or visit infor@curepsp.org. Visit Baue.com

Love, Mary Ann (nee Slenker), July 28, 1937 November 24, 2015. Late husband Francis H. Love. Sons Joseph Stuckey, Dr. Mark Stuckey (Michelle), and Charles Stuckey. Grandmother and Great Grandmother. Siblings Clarence Slenker (deceased), Robert Slenker (deceased), Leo Slenker (Betty Lou), Sr. Elizabeth Slenker O.P., Margaret White, Trudy Deering, and Rita Couvion. Attended St. Marks Academy. Lifetime member of Gateway Harmonica Club and Assumption Church, O'Fallon, MO. Services: Memorial Mass Friday, Dec. 4th, 10:30 a.m. Assumption Church. Memorial donations may be made to the charity of your choice or BJC Hospice Home Care, 1935 Belt Way Drive, St. Louis, MO 63114.

Knobbe, Rita A. 88, Nov. 26, 2015. Visitation 9:30 a.m. until Mass at 10:30 a.m., Wed. Dec. 2, St. Ferdinand. Burial Sacred Heart Cemetery. Hutchens Mortuary.

Kruckemeyer, Myrtle (nee Steinheimer) passed away peacefully on Monday, November 23, 2015 at the age of 94 on her own terms. Preceded in death by her husband, Gustav. Beloved mother of Karen (Kim) Besserman and the late Carla (Michael) Henry, devoted Grammy of Matt (Jenna) Besserman and Sara (Ray) Holmes, loving Grammy "Cookie" of Jack and Helen Besserman, special aunt of Terry Hornsey. Dear sister, aunt, great aunt, cousin and friend to many. In lieu of flowers please send donations to the Humane Society of Missouri or American Diabetes Assn and raise a glass of wine in her memory. Online condolences and guestbook may be found at www.stygar.com

Lainoff, Fredricka "Fritzi" Native St. Louisan Fredricka "Fritzi" Lainoff, 86, passed away on November 23, 2015 in Portland Oregon. Fritzi distinguished herself as a champion for social justice and a steadfast advocate for America's elders. Over the years she earned numerous accolades for her unwavering commitment to improving the lives of the underserved. Although diminutive in stature, Fritzi's resounding voice was well-known in the hearing rooms of Jefferson City and Washington DC. Fritzi is survived by her husband of 66 years, Harold "Mike" Lainoff of Portland Oregon; son Michael Lainoff and his wife Marna of Eugene, Oregon; daughter Avery Leinova and her partner James Spake of Portland Oregon, and grandson Eden Lainoff of Flagstaff Arizona. Her extended family and countless friends in and beyond the St. Louis area also mourn her passing. Services: Fritzi's funeral will be held at Berger Memorial Chapel, 9430 Olive Blvd., St. Louis MO on Sunday November 29, 2015, 1 p.m. Visitation at 12:00 noon. Interment private. Prior to her passing, she requested that donations in her memory be made to the National Council of Jewish Women (www.ncjw.org ). Please visit bergermemorialchapel.com for more information.

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on Tuesday, November 24, 2015. Beloved wife of the late Terence K. McCormack; dear mother of Kevin (Anne), Neal and Ellen K. McCormack; dear sister of Frank V. (Patricia) Passuth; dear grandmother of Ian, Christine, Bryony, Tim, and Alice McCormack; and dear greatgrandmother to five. Services: Memorial Mass at the Mother of Good Counsel Home, 6825 Natural Bridge Rd., 63121 on Tuesday, December 1, at 11:00 a.m. In lieu of flowers, donations to Mother of Good Counsel Home, c/o Sr. Christine, appreciated. Interment Oak Grove Cemetery. www.kriegshausermortuary.com

McNamee, Timothy Graven age 68, of O'Fallon, MO, formerly of Florissant, MO, died Thursday, Nov. 26, 2015. Contact (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com

Moreno, Joseph M. Jr. fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Monday, November 23, 2015. Beloved husband of the late Joan M. Moreno (nee Meyer) for 61 years; dearest father of Stephen (Sandra), Timothy (MaryBeth) and Randall (Susan) Moreno; loving grandfather of Christopher (Kim) Moreno, Heather (Samuel) Webb,Timothy, Matthew (Naoja) and Zachary Moreno; great-grandfather of Ali, Sydney, Marissa, Sydney, Kaitlyn and Kylie; great-great-grandfather of Lola; dear brother of Gerri Nassif; dear brother-in-law of Maureen Meyer; our dear uncle, cousin and friend. Services: Memorial visitation at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Monday, November 30, 4-8 p.m. Inurnment J. B. National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorials to the charity of your choice appreciated.

fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Sunday, November 22, 2015. Beloved husband of the late Dolores R. Macchi (nee Berra); dear father of Michael (Elise) Macchi and the late Barbara Macchi; dear grandfather of Nicholas and Maegan Macchi; dear brother of Angelo, Emil and the late Clarence Macchi; our dear uncle, cousin and friend. Mr. Macchi served in the Navy during World War II and Korea. Services: Visitation at St. Ambrose Catholic Church on Monday, November 30, 9 a.m. until funeral mass at 10 a.m. Interment Resurrection Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions to The Hill Sick and Elderly, appreciated. A KUTIS AFFTON SERVICE.

Malick, Albert R. fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Thursday, November 26, 2015. Beloved husband of the late Virginia M. Malick (nee Wisniewski); loving father of Glen (Judy), Gary (Lin) and Greg (Tammi) Malick; dear grandfather of Scott, Andrea, Kevin and Tori; dearest great-grandfather of Andrew, Ben, Jake, A.J. and Halle; our dear brother, brother-in-law, uncle, cousin and friend. Services will begin for Albert on Monday, 9:15 a.m. at STYGAR FLORISSANT CHAPEL AND CREMATION CENTER, 13980 New Halls Ferry Rd. then proceed to St. Angela Merici Catholic Church for 10 a.m. Mass. Interment Sacred Heart Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions to Wounded Warrior Project or Make-AWish Foundation appreciated. VISITATION SUNDAY 3-8 P.M. Online condolences and guestbook may be found at www.stygar.com

Manus, Rev. Dr. Richard, LCMS Pastor Emeritus Entered into eternal rest on November 23, 2015 surrounded by his beloved wife, Alice (nee Lackey) and children Matthew, Marc, and Mary-Courtney Manus. Rev. Manus was a devoted servant of Christ. Ordained in 1970, he was pastor of Lutheran congregations in Crowley and Iota LA, Greenwich, CT, Copperas Cove, TX and Barnhart, MO. He served as Campus Minister at Texas A&M University, and Synod Counselor of Campus Ministries for LCMS World Missions. Services: Funeral Saturday, December 5, 2015 at 2:00pm and Visitation at 1:00pm at Hope Lutheran Church, High Ridge, MO. Memorials to Hope Lutheran Church. Arrangements by Bopp Chapel.

Martinez, Alvina age 88, Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on November 26, 2015. Beloved wife of the late Pedro G. Martinez; loving mother of Savina (Lou) Major, Teresa Mason, Patricia Martinez, Irene Hodge and Pete Martinez Jr.; dearest grandmother of 10 and great-grandmother of 11; dear sister, sister-in-law, aunt, cousin and friend to many. Visitation: Thursday, December 3, 2015 from 4-8 p.m. at HOFFMEISTER COLONIAL Mortuary, 6464 Chippewa at Watson. Mass of Christian Burial: Friday, December 4, 2015 at 11 a.m. at St. Joan of Arc Catholic Church. Interment: Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. Please share memories and condolences at www.hoffmeistercolonial.com.

McCart, Thomas A. 69, of Cedar Hill, MO, Passed away peacefully on November 25, 2015. Beloved husband of Geraldine (nee Klueter) McCart, loving father to Keith (Tamara), Pat (Terri) and Kevin (Tracy), dear grandfather to Kelsey, Brendan and Megan, dear son to the late William and Stella McCart, dear brother of twelve (12) siblings. Thomas was a dear uncle and friend to many. Thomas was an avid hunter and fisherman. Services: Visitation Sunday, November 29, 2015 from 2 - 7 p.m. at CHAPEL HILL MORTUARY 6300 Highway 30, Cedar Hill, MO. Service Monday at 10 a.m. at CHAPEL HILL MORTUARY, Interment at Chapel Hill Memorial Gardens.

Nitsch, Marilyn E.

Olsen, Dennis

Peter, Francis "Pete"

(nee Miller), Asleep in Jesus, Friday, Nov. 27, 2015. Beloved wife of the late James L. Nitsch; dear mother and mother-inlaw of Tamra (Tracy) Mayes, Melinda (Philip) Self, James (MaryJane Copeland) Nitsch, Jr.; dear grandmother of T.J., Travis, Courtney and Chad.; dear brother of the late Clyde C. Miller; dear sister-in-law, aunt, cousin and friend to many. Marilyn was formerly an elementary teacher at Atonement Lutheran School in Florissant, and Blackhurst Elementary School in St. Charles. She was involved with the "Friendship Force" and traveled the world. Services: Visitation 4-8 p.m., Tuesday, Dec. 1 at HUTCHENS Mortuary, Florissant. Funeral 11 a.m., Wed., Dec. 2 at Atonement Lutheran Church, 1285 North New Florissant Road, Florissant, MO. Interment Memorial Park Cemetery. Memorial donations may be made to Atonement Lutheran School or the Alzheimer's Association. www.hutchensmortuary.com

December 2, 1941November 26, 2015 Dennis Olsen, beloved friend, mentor to many, and precious husband and father died Thanksgiving day, November 26, 2015, in the loving presence of his wife of 23 years, Meredith and his family, nearly 4 years after his diagnosis of stage 4 pancreatic cancer. With the help of a brilliant medical team and wonderful family and friends, he outlived the odds. He was born in Springfield, Illinois on December 2, 1941. For over 40 years he dedicated himself to making art, and to educating students of art. He graduated with an M.A. degree for UCLA in 1967, and in that year won a Fulbright scholarship to study printmaking in Florence, Italy, where he then lived for the next 14 years. In 1970 he co-founded the Santa Reparata Graphic Art Centre in Florence (now the Santa Reparata International School of Art) and taught classes there until he returned to the USA in 1981 to join the faculty of UTSA. In 1976, together with his first wife, Suzy Harmon Olsen, he discovered an abandoned Tuscan village and began a restoration with friends that continued over the next 38 years. He and his family spent every summer in that small hamlet where he worked in his studio and taught periodically at the school he founded in Florence. He taught printmaking, drawing, and computer methods at UTSA for 33 years until his retirement as Professor Emeritus in 2014. During his long career, his prints, paintings and drawings were exhibited in over 50 solo exhibitions and 110 group and invitational exhibitions in Europe, South America, and the USA, including the Smithsonian National Gallery of American Art. He was invited to give lectures, workshops, and demonstrations on more than 100 occasions in the USA, Italy, Canada, Peru, Germany, Estonia, Russia, Finland, and Belgium. His artwork encompassed a wide variety of techniques and processes that included both traditional methods and new technologies, and he was considered a tireless experimenter in his field. For that reason, his subject matter and the content of his work varied greatly over the years from traditional interiors and landscapes to abstract, formal works that referenced books, manuscripts, codes, and text. During his final years, he created a series of more than 150 "Fictive Portraits" depicting imaginary characters from a timeless village, for which he composed short narratives about each character. Mr. Olsen was a passionate music lover, an accomplished amateur musician, and a lyrical whistler who sang and played guitar, recorder, crumhorn, autoharp, and harmonica. One of his proudest accomplishments was to have participated in an LP of American and Irish folk music that was recorded in Florence in 1976. He is survived by his wife, Meredith Dean; daughter, Rebecca; son, Erik; stepson, Loren Dean; stepdaughter, Kirsten Boudreault; and grandchildren, James Bruni, Amelia Mavilla, Noah and Adam Dean, Ian, Maggie, and Leo Boudreault. His life is a testimony to creativity, intellectual curiosity and joie de vivre. A dedicated mentor, he gave generously to his family, friends, and students, and is remembered for his tenacity of spirit, sense of humor, and many talents. Our shared sense of loss is one that is very difficult to communicate with words; those who knew him or had the experience of being one of his students, would undoubtedly say that he was one of a kind. He was a man who knew how to live. A Celebration of Life is pending, contact Porter Loring Mortuaries (www.porterloring.com) for information. In lieu of flowers the family requests that donations be sent to the National Pancreatic Cancer Foundation (www.npcf.us/donate/) or a charity of your choice. You are invited to sign the guestbook at www.porterloring.com. Arrangements with PORTER LORING 1101 MCCULLOUGH SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS 210-227-8221

80, of Collinsville, IL, passed away Monday, November 23rd, 2015 at his home. He was born September 17th, 1935 in Millstadt, IL, to John E. and Emma (Burg) Peter Jones. He married Carolyn Jensen October 20th, 1956 in Staunton, IL. Pete is preceded in death by his parents, brothers, Fern, Kenneth and Ralph Jones, and sister, Evelyn Kaase. He is survived by his wife Carolyn, children, Karen Peter of Boston, MA, Gregg Peter of Overland, MO, Diane Peter of Collinsville, IL, brother, John Peter of Belleville, IL, sisters, Dolores (Ralph) Ohnemus of Katy, TX, Vendell (Fred) Busch of Maryville, IL, Shirley (Robert) Stewart of Phoenix, AZ. He is further survived by grandchildren, Amie (David) Wilson of Godfrey, IL, Amanda Dempsey-Gipperich of St. Ann, MO, Andrea (Matthew) Kowalskey of St. Ann, MO, Ashley (C.J.) Smith of Killeen, TX., great-grandchild, C.J. Smith III, wonderful neighbors, Randy, Debbie, Jed Robbins and Caity Boren. Pete retired as a Pressman from the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. He was Secretary-Treasurer of the Pressman's Union Local 38. Services: Memorial Visitation will be from 5:00 pm to 7:00 pm Wednesday, December 2nd, 2015 at Herr Funeral Home, Collinsville, IL. Memorial Service will follow at 7:00 pm at the funeral home. Interment of cremation will be at a later date. Memorials may be made to SSM Unity Hospice.

Obermoeller, Earl K. "Obie"

Murphy, Grace Fooshé

Macchi, John A.

Klaus, Stanley D. age 60, formerly of Maryland Heights, MO, passed away on Tuesday, November 17, 2015. Visitation was at Tom Wages Funeral Home in Snellville, GA. A funeral Mass was held at St. John Neumann Catholic Church in Lilburn, GA on Saturday, November 21. Stan was preceded in death by his parents August and Jessie Klaus; and nephew Geoffrey Street. Stan is survived by his wife of 34 years, Claudette Klaus (née Laginess), Grayson, Ga.; daughter Morgan Dunlop (Colin), Atlanta, Ga.; daughter Jessica Klaus (Kevin Ewalt), Atlanta, Ga.; son Jordan Klaus, Valdosta, Ga.; sister Valerie Street, St. Louis, Mo.; brother Jim Klaus (Laura), Fenton, Mo.; sister Vickie Miller (David), Hermann, Mo.; numerous nieces, nephews, cousins, family and friends. Stan gave much of his time to church ministry and was involved in numerous charities. Memorial contributions may be made to Children With Hair Loss, the Thanks Mom & Dad Fund or St. John Neumann Catholic Church.

McCormack, Enid

Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Wednesday, November 25, 2015. Beloved wife of the late John Carroll Murphy, M.D.; dearest mother of Grace Purcell (John), John Murphy Jr. (Janet), Maureen Ohms, Peter Murphy (Deborah) and the late Katherine Johnston (survived by husband Lowe); dear grandmother of Katherine Miller (Andrew), Anne Kelly (Ryan), Mary Neuwoehner (Ryan), John Purcell Jr. (Mary), Elizabeth Sutherland (Ryan), Charles Ohms (Miranda), Margaret VanDeCar (Ryan), Jennifer White (Joseph), Robert Ohms, Peter Murphy and Patrick Murphy; greatgrandmother of 14; dear sister of the late Peter E. Fooshe Jr. (Marjorie) of St. Paul, Minnesota; dear aunt and a friend to many. Grace was born in St. Paul, Minnesota. She was a graduate of St. Catherine University in St. Paul. She received a Masters Degree in Social Work from St. Louis University. Grace devoted her life to family, relishing her role as wife and mother. She enjoyed spending time with friends, working on needlepoint, and playing bridge, bingo and other card games. The family wishes to express their thanks to her dedicated caregivers at Mari de Villa Retirement Center. Services: The Funeral Mass will be celebrated on Tuesday, December, 1, 10:00 a.m. at Christ the King Catholic Church, 7316 Balson Avenue, University City. Interment Calvary Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be made in Grace's memory to Christ the King Catholic Church. The family will receive friends at THE LUPTON CHAPEL, 7233 Delmar Blvd., University City, on Monday from 4 p.m. until 8 p.m. A SERVICE OF THE LUPTON CHAPEL

Neville, Judie M.

M 2 • SUnDAy • 11.29.2015

entered into rest Thursday, November 19, 2015. Beloved husband of the late Rosie V. Obermoeller (nee Ewing). Loving companion and friend of Lydia VenJohn. Cherished father of Denise (Richard) Ballentine, Jean (Gary) Lange, Tracy (Mike) Pitts and the late Scott Obermoeller. Dear grandfather of Jaymie Kohl, Kristin Kohl and Daniel Davis. Great-grandfather of Donovan, Elise and the late Philip. Brother of the late Norman Obermoeller. uncle, cousin and friend to many. The family would like to thank the staff at NHC Maryland Heights for the care they gave to Mr. Obermoeller and who treated him as their own. He will be missed by his friends at the Donut Cupboard. Services: Memorial service Saturday, December 5, 11 a.m. at the North County Community Church, 7410 Howdershell Road, Hazelwood, 63042. If desired, contributions may be made to the Humane Society of Missouri or the ASPCA of St. Louis. A service of Hutchens Mortuary and Cremation Center.

O'Callaghan, Donald M. "Big Doc"

Thursday, November 26, 2015. Beloved husband of Joyce J. O'Callaghan (nee Greenlay); dear father of Patricia (Thomas) RIchardson, Deborah (Jim) McCall and Mark (Barbara) O'Callaghan; our dear grandfather, great-grandfather, brother, brotherin-law, uncle, great-uncle and friend. Services: Visitation at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY CHAPEL, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Tuesday, December 1, 11:00 a.m. until service at 1:00 p.m. Interment National Cemetery. Donald was retired from the U.S. Air Force and also retired from Defense Mapping. In lieu of flowers, contributions to St. Anthony's Hospice appreciated.

Phelps, Marian Elizabeth

(nee Schoenle), passed away peacefully in her home in Kirkwood on the morning of Wed., Nov. 25, 2015, surrounded by her loving family. She was ninety-six years old. She was preceded in death by her husband James O. Phelps, Jr. She is survived by her daughter Judith Phelps Little (Robert) of St. Louis, son James O. Phelps III (Ling Ling Teng) of Kensington, California, granddaughters Andrea Quinette Little Royce (Charles), of St. Louis, Jennifer Phelps Quinn (Alexander) of Berkeley, California, Susan Adele Little Olcott (Charles) of Brunswick, Maine, and seven cherished greatgrandchildren, Matthew, Lindsey and Katherine Royce, Kylie and Xavier Quinn, and Liliana and Phoebe Olcott. Marian was known and loved by many in her Kirkwood community and always put others ahead of herself. Her interests over her long life included local history (perhaps born of being a seventh generation St. Louisan), golf, sailing with her family (she received a spinnaker from her husband for Christmas one year), ice skating, knitting and calligraphy. Most important was the enjoyment of others, by note, by phone or in small gifts. In her last years some she enjoyed were the caregivers who shared their lives with her. She will be missed. Services: Funeral service Saturday, Nov. 28, 11:00 a.m. at Bopp Chapel, 10610 Manchester Rd., Kirkwood, with visitation following service. Burial at Bellefontaine Cemetery. Donations preferred to the Kirkwood Historical Society, PO Box 220602, Kirkwood, MO 63122, to the St. Louis Symphony, or to a charity of your choice. www.boppchapel.com

Ponder, Dorothy Marie

Penny, Marie A. "Ann"

Ochs, Ester A.

(nee Judie Proctor) of St. Louis, MO and formerly of Minneapolis, MN passed away on November 26, 2015 at age 76 after a full and wonderful life. Judie was bravely fighting Parkinson's for several years. She is survived by her husband of 54 years, James M. Neville, son Steve W. Neville and Renee Schwanke (Grey Eagle, MN), daughter Martha M. Hereford and son-in-law Andrew and Grandson Jimmy Hereford (St. Louis), sister and brother-in-law Mary & Richard Lund (Minneapolis), sisterin-law Kathleen Neville (Boise ID), sister-in-law and brother-in-law Laurie & Peter Frenzel (Middletown CT), sister-in-law Gale Proctor (Minneapolis), and numerous nephews and nieces. She was preceded in death by her parents Robert and Amanda Proctor, her sister Peggy Clark, her brothers David and Frank Proctor, and her brother-in-law Philip Neville. Judie attended Washburn High School in Minneapolis (1957) and Monticello College in Godfrey IL (1959). She enjoyed all sports particularly badminton and tennis. Judie was an avid baseball and football fan, following and rooting for teams in both St. Louis and Minnesota. She volunteered gladly at St. Peter's Episcopal Church (St. Louis) and St. Stephens Episcopal Church (Edina MN) and worked hard for The Haven of Grace (St. Louis). Judie was a very friendly and loving person and, as her many friends know, she loved to dance to rock-nroll. She enjoyed her family trips to New York City, Washington DC, Boston, New Orleans, Florida, Sun Valley & San Francisco. She especially enjoyed spending time with her family at the cabin in Grey Eagle. The family would like to express their appreciation to all the wonderful Caregivers at The Gatesworth and the doctors, nurses and personnel at St. Luke's Hospital. And they are thankful for the care and prayers Judie received from the clergy and congregation of St. Peter's in her time of need. Services: A memorial service will be held at St. Peter's Episcopal Church, 110 N. Warson Rd., St. Louis on December 2nd at 3:00, followed immediately by a reception at Old Warson Country Club, 9811 Old Warson, Ladue MO. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations are preferred to be made to The Haven of Grace, St. Louis, or the donor's choice. www.boppchapel.com

(nee Schnurbusch), fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Thursday, November 26, 2015. Beloved wife of the late Milton G. Ochs; dearest mother of Richard, Robert (Diane) and Ray Ochs; loving grandmother of Erika (Jason) Smiley, Becky Ochs, Monica Ochs, Ryan Ochs, Bobby Ochs, Connie Ochs, Jessica (Greg) Strautmann, Amanda (Nathan) Whitener and Brendan Ochs; greatgrandmother of Brayden, Taytum, Owen and Kaia; dear sister of Verna, Margaret and the late Lorine, Walter, Flora, Lee, Everett and Gertrude; dear sister-in-law of Jackie ochs; our dear aunt, great-aunt, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral from KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Tuesday, December 1, 9:30 a.m to Assumption Catholic Church for 10 a.m. Mass. Interment J.B.National Cemetery. Memorials to Ronald McDonald House appreciated. Visitation Monday, 4-8p.m.

Okamura, Teiko 88, of Maryland Heights entered into rest on Monday, November 23, 2015 at Missouri Baptist Hospital. Loving wife of the late Ted T. Okamura. Beloved mother of Nobuiaki (Mie) Okamura, Keiko (Tetsu) Asada and Edith Yamura. Dear grandmother of six and sister of Takeshi Yamato. Teiko moved to the United States in 1956. Her and husband Ted were owners of Ted & Teiko Japanese Restaurant. She is fondly remembered and dearly missed by all who knew and loved her. Services: Memorial Service will be held on Sunday, December 6, 2015, 1 p.m. at CHAPEL HILL MORUARY, 10301 Big Bend Road, Kirkwood, Missouri. Inurnment to follow services at Oak Hill Cemetery. Family and friends can review and share stories, photos and condolences online at www.stlfuneral.com and follow details of this event and others in the community at www.facebook.com/stlchapelhill.

Asleep in Jesus, Thurs., Nov. 26, 2015. Beloved daughter to the late Herbert and Lorene Kolkmeyer (nee Prange); special friend to Rosemary Kinder; sister to Judy (George) Van Dyke; aunt to Linda Van Dyke and Cynthia (Tim) Peck; our dear aunt, cousin, neighbor and friend. Services: Visitation is Mon., Nov. 30, 2015, 10:30 a.m. until time of service, 12:30 p.m. at Grace Lutheran Chapel, 10015 Lance Dr., Bellefontaine Neighbors, STL, Mo 63137. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations to Grace Lutheran Chapel or the Ronald McDonald House Charities, 300 Ronald McDonald House Ln, STL, Mo 63141 would be appreciated. Interment Friedens Cemetery. Online guestbook at www.buchholzmortuary.com

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(nee Pingel) fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church Thursday, November 26, 2015. Beloved wife of Herman J. Ponder Jr.; dearest mother of Brian (Debbie), Larry, Keith (Mary), Mary (Ken) Moore and Mark (Antonia) Ponder; our dear grandmother, great-grandmother, sister, sister-in-law, aunt, great-aunt, cousin and friend of many. Services: Memorial Visitation Saturday, December 5, 11 AM until time of Mass 12 PM at Holy Spirit Church, 3130 Parkwood Lane (Maryland Heights). Mrs. Ponder donated her remains to SLU School of Medicine. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to the American Heart Association. www.colliersfuneralhome.com

Portas, Virginia M. (nee Albee) on November 26, 2015. Virginia was born January 2, 1924 and was married May 5, 1945 to Eugene, who is recently deceased. Loving mother of Gregory (Susan) Portas. Dear aunt to many. Virginia was primarily a homemaker, volunteer and friend to many. She was a member of Dover Place Christian Church for 64 years. Services: The funeral service will be conducted in the Chapel of Hoffmeister South County Chapel 1515 Lemay Ferry Road on Monday, November 30, 2015 at 2:00 p.m. Interment will follow in Mount Hope Cemetery. Visitation at Hoffmeister South County on Monday from 12 noon until time of service.

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J O I N T H E C O N V E R S AT I O N

A P L AC E F O R N E W S A N D V I E W S O N FA I T H

W W W . S T L T O D A Y. C O M / R E L I G I O N

M 1 SUNDAY • 11.29.2015 • A23

EVENTS SATURDAY Celebration of Lights • Fort Zumwalt Park features displays from area organizations, churches and businesses Nov. 27-Dec. 30. Admission: $10 for cars; $15 for commercial vans and limousines; $1 per person on tour buses ($25 minimum). Bring a foodpantry donation of canned or boxed goods and get a $1 discount per vehicle. 6 p.m. 1000 Jessup Lane, O’Fallon, Mo. Way of Lights • The Shrine of Our Lady of the Snows hosts its Annual Way of Lights Christmas display. 5 p.m. National Shrine of Our Lady of the Snows, 442 South De Mazenod Drive in Belleville. 618-394-6287 SUNDAY A New Bethlehem Journey • A study group that seeks to look with “new eyes” at the scriptures and spiritual practices that can lead us to fresh understandings about preparation for the birth of Jesus at Christmas. Guest speaker will be Rev. Donna Smith-Pupillo, executive director of Deaconess Faith Community Nurse Ministries. 10:45 a.m. Kirkwood United Church of Christ, 1603 Dougherty Ferry Road. 314-822-2240 Worship service • Join Ivy Chapel United Church of Christ, 620 North Woods Mills, for worship, contemplation and fellowship. 10 a.m. 314434-4991 TUESDAY Women’s Bible Study: Culture Shock • Chip Ingram ofers insights on how to confront controversial cultural issues with research, reason and biblical truth. 7 p.m. St. John Church, 15800 Manchester Road. 636-779-2348 THURSDAY A Christmas Carol • Lindenwood University continues its yearly tradition of presenting Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol . 7:30 p.m. Lindenwood University J. Scheidegger Center for the Arts, 2300 West Clay. Theater • “Good Jews, Bad Jews” — it’s all relative in this savage comedy about family, faith and legacy by the New Jewish Theater. 7:30 p.m. Marvin & Harlene Wool Studio Theater on the Millstone Campus of Jewish Community Center, 2 Millstone Campus Drive. 314-442-3283

Spending on ‘Christ’-mas Groups highlight retailers that promote holiday’s faith aspects BY CATHY LYNN GROSSMAN Religion News Service

December is fundraising season, the time when nonprofits hit the airwaves, Internet, social media and good old snail mail with their most distinctive give-to-us pitches. And for a few groups, those pitches are all about campaigns to enforce the words and images of “Christmas” in the public square. They seek to steer consumers toward retailers and brands that blare “Christmas” — emphasis on “Christ” — in advertising words and images. But these Christmas credibility campaigns, such as the Starbucks red-cup-no-“Christmas” flap, don’t move consumers, experts say. They sometimes jar corporations to tweak ads to protect their brand image. But they might score big on media attention, which can translate into donor dollars even if there’s not a measurable dollar’s worth of difference in national consumer behavior. “Consumers are extreme examples of habit-forming people. We like what we like. And we rationalize that our one purchase is not going to have a huge efect. Even if we say we support a boycott, when push comes to shove, we do what we always did in the past,” said sociologist Brayden King, professor of management and organization at the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University. The more subtle measures of success for such campaigns, such as the American Family Association’s annual “Naughty or Nice” list, is the ability to sometimes shift corporations that want to avoid negative media attention, said King. For eight years, the AFA has highlighted “Christmas-friendly” companies and cast a Scrooge shadow on those that don’t measure up. Even if a chain store carries what are clearly Christmas items, if these are not labeled, promoted and advertised under the C-word, the company is dinged for banning Christmas — i.e., banning Christ from the public square, in AFA’s view. “It’s about the birth of Christ, not just another holiday,” said Buddy Smith, senior vice president of AFA. That matters to “Christians who follow the Bible on biblical stewardship and hold ourselves accountable for how we spend our money.” Smith sees success: The Naughty list this year is the shortest ever. Meanwhile, he said, “Wal-Mart, Sam’s Club and Lowe’s, which had gone completely politically correct in not using ‘Christmas,’” have moved to the Nice list in recent years. Plus, the list has indeed boosted donations to AFA, said Smith. “Why not? People are very benevolent during the Christmas season, when God gave his only son. We get lots of donations from our support base at the end of the year and we count on it. “Like any nonprofit, we have

JEAN-MARC GIBOUX • Associated Press

Sears shoppers in Schaumburg, Ill., pursue holiday doorbuster deals on Thursday. Sears opened at 6 p.m. on Thanksgiving Day, ofering more than 1,000 deals. A leading integrated retailer, Sears’ most popular deals included big and small appliances, lawn and garden equipment, consumer electronics, apparel, footwear and fine jewelry. Sears appears on the “nice” list of the America Family Association.

employees to pay and electric bills. And if people are going to give us money, they want to know if our voice is making a diference,” said Smith. “It’s the publicity that counts. Every organization wants to show supporters it is doing something on the issue they care about,” said James Jasper, sociology professor at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York and author of “Protest: A Cultural Introduction to Social Movements.” Chris Stone, founder and CEO of Faith-Driven Consumer, also takes an interest in promoting evangelical views with a list of Christmasy companies at ChristmasBUYcott.com, rather than a boycott of those that promote secular seasonal joy. “Christians and faith-driven consumers are not the same. Only 25 percent of practicing Christians (evangelicals) are faith-driven consumers,” said Stone, who sets their number at 41 million whom he calls “biblically orthodox.” This group, he says, is driven by their Christian faith in deciding “where they buy, what they buy and what entertainment they consume.” (The numbers are based on in-house polling by Faith-Driven Consumer.)

He’s launched a new, yearround campaign for this subset of Christians — a comprehensive 100-point Faith Equality Index assessing companies’ treatment of these “biblically orthodox Christians.” In this index, high points (and maybe a boost of consumer Christmastime attention) go to companies that hire, promote and accommodate the devout. So a retailer’s Christmas-friendly ads are worth only 5 points while the big points go for overall “engagement, public policy, philanthropy, operations and human resources” that align with conservative evangelical views. Stone patterned it after similar indexes by the gay-rights oriented Human Rights Campaign, and black and Hispanic groups. In his view, the devout are “marginalized and excluded” in the marketplace and secular society and thus deserve to be “included in any company’s diversity rainbow.” He said companies are paying attention to the index and consulting with him about “transformation,” but he declined to name any companies. The danger in all these forms of ratings is the potential for backlash, sociologists said. King observes that “for cultural

products such as films and music, boycotts can lead to more consumption, rather than less.” And sometimes they flop completely. King cited a Christian group that has an ongoing boycott of companies that donate to Planned Parenthood, that gets little mainstream media attention and “could be the least effective boycott I have ever seen.” Worse, an ineffective boycott led by vocal evangelicals could, instead, reveal how much social clout they have already lost in the wider society, where about one in four Americans — and one in three millennials — say they have no religious identity. Many of these so-called “nones” are pushing back against religious conservatives who wield claims of “religious freedom” to battle social changes they oppose, such as legalized gay marriage or the health care contraception mandate, said Michele Dillon, past president of the Association for the Sociology of Religion and a professor at the University of New Hampshire. “The highly religious want to rally and remind people they are still here,” she said.

FRIDAY Coventry Dinner and Concert • Manchester United Methodist Church, 129 Woods Mill Road, hosts a catered dinner and holiday concert with the Coventry Choir and the Vesper Bell choir. 6:30 p.m. $30 636-394-7506. Return to Bethlehem • Journey through the town of Bethlehem, as it was 2000 years ago. After the tour, enjoy hot chocolate and cookies. 6 p.m. Lord of Life Lutheran Church, 15750 Baxter Road Chesterfield 636-532-0400 DEC. 5 Hanukkah Hullabaloo • The event will feature: Rabbi James Stone Goodman, performing his series of poems, “Eight Nights”; Will Soll and his raucous Klezmer music; DJ Boogieman, ending with a special “STL Jews Who Rock” set. $10. 7 p.m. Covenant Place, 10 Millstone Campus Drive. 314-432-1610 Submit event listings for free online at events.stltoday.com by registering on the site and following instructions. Only online submissions are accepted.

FAITH PERSPECTIVES

Keeping an open door for strangers pays of GREG WEEKS Manchester United Methodist Church

It’s probably an odd sight if you aren’t expecting it. Walk down the hall of the church I pastor and peer into a classroom. You’ll see women wearing hajibs or burqas. Other men and women sit around them: Hispanic, Asian and Middle Eastern. On the parking lot, talking with each other, there is a fluency in languages I don’t recognize. Inside the classrooms, however, they are silent, listening intently to instructors slowly intoning English diction and grammar. These are students in the English as Second Language classes sponsored by the Parkway School District. My church hosts them during the academic year. As I look into their faces, I wonder what brought them here. Jobs. Family. Violence in their homeland. Perhaps a combination. What unites them is their experience of living in a strange land with bewildering customs and an impossible language. The expressions on their faces often reflect confusion mixed with apprehension. I will occasionally talk with them as they’re arriving or leaving. Though our communicating may be a challenge, I learn enough from the conversations. These are amazing people with amazing stories. They express gratitude for be-

ing invited into our space, regardless of their religion or beliefs. They describe their concern for friends and relatives in their home countries. They share their simple joy of the grace of space where they can connect with other strangers and form friendships. Sometimes there will be a group meeting of all the students. They will gather in our fellowship hall and proudly create displays reflecting their homelands. They will have a talent show, usually featuring singing in their native languages with a fluency you’d never catch from their broken English. The time will end with a meal featuring dishes from their countries. (I don’t know what the dishes are, but they’re great.) Interacting with these guests from foreign lands inspires me. They reflect the strength and resolve of the human spirit, overcoming obstacles by accepting challenges. Entrenched in the Midwest all my life, my vision and perspective can be restricted. It’s easy to stereotype when your only connection with other peoples is cable and Internet. But those stereotypes melt in the faces of real folks with real stories. Courage, hope, and a sense of humor know no boundaries or ethnicities. It is an honor and opportunity to show hospitality to them, connecting with them as friend to friend. I also believe it is a JudaeoChristian mandate to open our doors in such a manner. The Hebrew tradition states it clearly: “You shall not oppress a resident alien; you know the

heart of an alien, for you were aliens in the land of Egypt.” (Exodus 23:9, NRSV). Note that the reason given for not oppressing the alien (or immigrant) is remembering the “heart” of the stranger. In other words, empathy is the motivating factor for hospitality. Christians have a similar mandate: “Do not neglect to show hospitality to strangers, for by doing that some have entertained angels without knowing it.” (Hebrews 13:2, NRSV) Here the rationale is that you can never tell who an angel might be, so look for such a divine being anywhere, especially in the faces of the unfamiliar. I can testify to the truth of that last statement. Those who teach or volunteer in the English as Second Language classroom can as well. In opening the door to the stranger, you receive so much more in return. With Christmas approaching, we’ll read of how the Holy Family fled Herod’s reign of terror. They became refugees, leaving their homeland and seeking shelter in Egypt. Perhaps they met the ancient equivalent of immigration officials at the border, who let them in. Thanks to such hospitality, they found safety until they could return. But in the process, I’m guessing the Egyptians who greeted the couple with the baby Messiah were blessed. How often did they have the opportunity to shelter holy strangers? And how often do we? Weeks serves as senior pastor of Manchester United Methodist Church. He is a contributor to STLtoday.com/religion, where this column first appeared.


NEWS

11.29.2015 • Sunday • M 2

CHAIM HERMAN ZIMBALIST

Longtime Clayton attorney and Missouri legislator BY JENNIFER MANN St. Louis Post-dispatch

Chaim Herman Zimbalist, a longtime attorney and former Missouri state legislator, died Saturday (Nov. 28, 2015) in New Jersey,where he had lived since 2010. Mr. Zimbalist suffered a stroke. He was 87. Mr. Zimbalist represented the 4th Legislative District of St. Louis County, serving in the 68th and 69th General Assemblies. He was the first Jewish representative and Democrat elected from that district when he took office in 1954, according to his family. He

lived first in University City and later in Creve Coeur and Chesterfield. Serving two terms, Mr. Z imbalist successfully introduced statutes establishZimbalist ing Divisions 7 and 8 of the St. Louis County Circuit Court; mandating stricter requirements for patient care in nursing homes; and authorizing a sentencing option that delays punishment and a criminal record for individuals who demonstrate good behavior after being convicted. “He always encouraged good government candidates regardless of party affiliation,” said one of his sons, Michael Zimbalist, 59, of Montclair, N.J. “He was just a great believer in the democratic process.” Mr. Zimbalist was born in St. Louis on May 3, 1928. He was a 1944 graduate of Soldan High School and received a bachelor of arts degree in 1948 and law degree in 1950 from Washington University. He served in the Navy during World War II. Mr. Zimbalist’s general law practice spanned more than six decades. Much of it was spent with the Clayton firm Zimbalist, Sachs, Schramm and Branom. Behind the scenes, he was active in politics. He testified at a U.S. House of Representatives hearing on Electoral

Graying NPR attempts to woo younger public radio listeners

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A23

College reform in 1969. More recently, in 2009, he served on the St. Louis County Election Board. “He was a great patriot,” Michael Zimbalist said. “His passion was very much rooted in the American dream, which is why I think he was drawn to immigration law.” He never truly retired, his family said, keeping his Missouri bar license after he and his wife of 60 years, Marilyn Goldenberg Zimbalist, moved in 2010 to New Jersey to be closer to their children. Funeral services will be held on Tuesday at 10:30 a.m. at Congregation B’nai Amoona, 324 South Mason Road, Creve Coeur. In addition to his wife and son, he is survived by another son, Rabbi Morris Zimbalist of Columbia Md.; a daughter, Alisa Zimbalist Levine of Needham, Mass.; and seven grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to Congregation B’nai Amoona, to which he belonged for many years; or the American Technion Society, 55 East 59th Street, New York, N.Y. 10022.

DEATHS ELSEWHERE Maurice Strong • The diplomat whose work helped lead to the landmark climate summit that begins in Paris on Monday has died at age 86, the head of the U.N.’s environmental agency said Saturday. “Strong will forever be remembered for placing the environment on the international agenda and at the heart of development,” Achim Steiner, executive director of the U.N. Environment Program, said in a statement. The statement did not provide details of Mr. Strong’s death. The Canadian-born Mr. Strong, the irst UNEP chief, organized the Rio Earth Summit in 1992, which led to the launch of the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change. Christiana Figueres, the current head of the U.N. climate agency, posted on Twitter Saturday that “we thank Maurice Strong for his visionary impetus to our understanding of sustainability. We will miss you.” Associated Press

Ray, Mary

Starr, Heather

(nee LaMonica) on Wednesday, November 25, 2015 at age 82. Beloved wife of the late Jackie L. Ray; dear mother of Patricia (Vincent, Jr.) Rapini and Steven (Cynthia) Ray; dear grandmother of Jennifer and Vincent S. (Laura Kreke, fiancé) Rapini, Erin (Christopher) Ferrario and Andrew (Jenna)Ray; dearest great-grandmother of Christopher, Luke and Jack Ferrario, Austin, Emma and Audrey Ray; dear sister, sister-in-law, aunt, cousin and friend. Services: Visitation Sunday, 2-8 p.m. at JOHN L. ZIEGENHEIN & SONS South County, 4830 Lemay Ferry Rd. (63129), then on Monday from 9:00 a.m. until time of service 10:00 a.m. at the Evangelical Full Gospel Assembly Church, 11011 Tesson Ferry Rd. (63123). Interment St. Matthews Cemetery. If desired, memorials may be made to the Evangelical Full Gospel Assembly Church.

Walbridge, Darline H.

55, Nov 25, 2015. Memorial Service on Wed Dec 2, 1 pm at St Michael and St George. www.valhallafunerals.net

(nee Branieki) Wednesday, November 25, 2015. Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church. Beloved wife of Robert J. Walbridge; beloved mother of Deborah Harrison and Todd (Jennifer) Walbridge; loving grandmother of Gregory, Alyssa and Kevin Walbridge; dear sister of Sylvia Frenzel; dear sister-in-law, aunt, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral at HUTCHENS Mortuary 675 Graham Rd., Florissant, 10:00 a.m., Tuesday, December 1. Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. VISITATION 4:00 P.M.8:00 P.M., MONDAY, NOVEMBER 30.

Strake, Pauline Elizabeth (Deters) Passed away on Thursday, November 26, 2015 at the age of 96. Born on September 10, 1919, beloved wife of the late Herbert Strake of 74 years: loving mother of Jane Hartmann, Jim Strake, Judy Huber (late Larry) and John Strake (late Kathie); dear grandmother of 11; dear great-grandmother of 11; mother-in-law, sister-in-law, cousin, aunt, and friend to many. Services: Funeral Mass will be held at St. Monica Catholic Church, 12132 Olive Blvd., Creve Coeur, Monday, November 30, 10:00 a.m. Graveside services 12:30 p.m. at St. Dominic Cemetery, Breese, IL. A service of Kutis Affton Chapel.

Rost I, John G. Thierheimer, William Jay

Wall, Bernadine "Bunny" 82, Florissant, Educator. Visit. Mon. 4-8pm. Funeral Tue. 10am, Archway, 111 Taylor Rd. Interment Bellefontaine Cem. www.archwaychapel.com

Wandzel, Carl Richard Age 73, of St. Charles, MO, died on Thursday, November 26, 2015. Contact (636) 9467811 or visit baue.com

Ware, Herschel H. 44, Foley, MO. , November 25, 2015. Visitation Tues., December 1, from 26 p.m. at Carter-Ricks Funeral Home in Winfield, MO.

Watkins, Paul K.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Michel Martin, weekend host of NPR’s “All Things Considered,” interviews NBA legend Kareem Abdul-Jabbar in October in Washington.

BY PAUL FARHI • Washington Post

WASHINGTON • As NPR came of age in

the 1980s, its audience matured with it. Three decades later, that is starting to look like a problem. Many of the listeners who grew up with NPR are now reaching retirement age, leaving NPR with a challenge: How can it attract younger and middle-age audiences — whose numbers are shrinking — to replace them? NPR’s research shows a growing gulf in who is listening to the likes of “Morning Edition” and “All Things Considered,” the daily news programs that have propelled public radio for more than 30 years. Morning listening has dropped 11 percent overall since 2010, according to Nielsen research that NPR has made public; afternoon listening is down 6 percent over the same period. Perhaps more troubling are the broader demographic trends. NPR’s signal has gradually been fading among the young. Listening among “Morning Edition’s” audience, for example, has declined 20 percent among people younger than 55 in the past five years. Listening for “All Things Considered” has dropped about 25 percent among those in the 45-to-54 segment. The growth market? People over 65, who were increasing in the morning and afternoon hours. The graying of NPR, and the declines overall, are potentially perilous to the public radio ecosystem. NPR, based in Washington, serves programs to nearly 900 “member” stations, which rely in large part on financial contributions from their listeners. The stations, in turn, kick back some of their pledge-drive dollars to NPR to license such programs as “Car Talk,” “Fresh Air” and “Morning Edition” (federal tax dollars supply only a small part of stations’ annual budgets, and virtually none of NPR’s). But as audiences drift to newer on-demand audio sources such as podcasts and streaming, the bonds with local stations — and the contributions that come with them — may be fraying. “It’s a problem, and no one has really figured out what to do about it,” said Jef Hansen, the program director at Seattle public radio station KUOW. He noted that public radio was invented by people in their 20s in the 1970s, largely at stations funded by colleges and universities. “What they didn’t realize at the time was that what they were inventing was programming for people like themselves — baby boomers with college degrees.” That audience has largely stayed loyal. The median age of public radio listeners has roughly tracked the median age of baby boomers. The median NPR listener was 45 in 1995; now he or she is 54, according to Tom Thomas, co-chief executive of the Station Resource Group, a public-radio strategy and research consortium. “The (aging) trend has been gentle and continuous for the last 20 years,” he said. To shore up its appeal to a younger crowd, NPR’s contemporary managers say that they are going where younger ears

are, both via digital technology and with programming that has younger people in mind. Although radio is still, by far, the dominant way to listen, NPR’s distribution chain now includes podcasts, Web text and streams, satellite broadcasting and social media. Among its news initiatives, NPR last month and early this month launched a series on the lives of 15-year-old girls around the world; it played on all of NPR’s news shows and on NPR.org. NPR also has attempted to foster a community of younger listeners through “Generation Listen,” a website that features audio and text stories, as well as news of community events hosted by young NPR listeners. In more subtle changes, NPR added two new, younger hosts — Ari Shapiro and Kelly McEvers — to “All Things Considered” this summer, joining Robert Siegel, 68. And it promoted Michel Martin, an African-American woman who is the former host of “Tell Me More” (canceled last year) and now hosts “Weekend All Things Considered.” Editorial Director Michael Oreskes said the anchor reset is “an invitation to both traditional listeners and new ones to think about the programs in new ways.” Some of the other brand-name talent at NPR illustrates the situation: Talk-show host Diane Rehm is 79; senior national correspondent Linda Wertheimer is 72; legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg is 71, and “Weekend Edition Saturday” host Scott Simon is a relative youngster at 63. Last year, the organization launched a mobile app, NPR One, that streams national and local public-radio stories via smartphones and tablets. NPR said downloads of the app have been growing, but it hasn’t released figures (notably, “Serial” — the massively popular and critically praised podcast — was produced not by NPR but by an independent public-radio organization, Chicago Public Media’s “This American Life”). “If someone has decided that their phone is a better way to get information than their radio, we’re not going to change their mind,” said Oreskes, a former New York Times and Associated Press editor. “So our goal is to be there for them, wherever they are.” Overall, audiences are growing on digital devices, said Emma Carrasco, NPR’s senior vice president for audience development. She estimated that 32 million people per week, about 1 in 10 people in the nation, hear or read (via NPR.org) something NPR has produced. But it is unclear whether digital sources can fully replace the declining broadcast radio audience. No one knows, for example, how many people actually listen to the podcasts they download, or whether podcasts — still a small share of all listening — are a passing fad or an enduring format. What’s more, NPR has to strike a sometimes awkward balance with its digital forays. By sending its programs directly to listeners via digital means, it risks bypassing and even competing with the stations that broadcast those shows — and supply the dollars that enable NPR to produce them in the first place.

of Arnold, MO passed away on Thurs, Nov. 26, 2015 at the age of 79. Beloved husband of the late Jacquelyn Rost (nee Powers); loving father of Scott (Mary) Gosnell, Cindy (Dan) Allen and John (Connie) Rost II; dear brother of Ed (Judith) Rost and the late Albert (survived by Barbara) and George (survived by Margaret) Rost; dearest grandfather of 6 and great-grandfather of 9; our dear uncle, great-uncle, cousin and dear friend. Services: Visitation to be held at Heiligtag-Lang-Fendler Funeral Home, 1081 Jeffco Blvd., Arnold, MO on Mon., Nov. 30 from 4-8 p.m. Committal service to be held at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery on Tues., Dec. 1 at 1 p.m. In lieu of flowers, contributions to Greater St. Louis Honor Flight appreciated. Condolences may be offered at www.heiligtagfuneralhome.com.

Schmidt, Anna "Dolores" Wed., Nov. 25, 2015. Visitation Sun., Nov. 29, 3-8p.m. Funeral Mon., Nov. 30, 10a.m at Kutis South County. Interment J.B. National Cemetery.

Schultz, George R. Mar. 26, 1924 - Nov. 20, 2015. Visitation at SHEPARD FUNERAL CHAPEL, 9255 Natural Bridge Rd. at I-170, Sunday, Nov. 29, 4-8pm with Funeral Mon., 10 am. www.ShepardFuneralChapel.com

Simone, Raymond E. "Ray" on Fri., Nov. 27, 2015. Visitation 4pm until Service at 7pm, Mon., Nov. 30, at Apostolic Pentecostal Church. Please visit www.boppchapel.com

Six, Will Ann passed on Saturday, November 21st, 2015 at the age of 73. Beloved wife of Edward Six; mother of Eric Six. Lifelong educator, retired from the Ritenour School District. Beloved and cherished friend to all. Alternative Funeral & Cremation Services, 636-498-5300 Alternativefuneralcremation.com

Slominski, Leona E. (nee Wishnask), Baptized into the hope of Christ's Resurrection on November 27, 2015. Wife of the late Eugene V. Slominski; beloved mother of Richard (Julie), Robert (the late Kolleen) and Ronald (Molly) Slominski; our dear grandmother, great-grandmother, sisterin-law, aunt, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral Tuesday, 11:30 a.m. at JOHN L. ZIEGENHEIN & SONS, 7027 Gravois. Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. VISITATION TUESDAY, 9:30 a.m. until service time.

Staples, Dorothy Jane

(nee Stoltz), entered her eternal life, joining her devoted husband Tom there on November 20, 2015. She lived her life with zest and exited it on her own terms, passing away peacefully at age 94 in her independent living apartment at Meramec Bluffs. Loving mother to Mary Jane (Dean) Vazis and Thomas E. Staples; adoring grandmother of Colleen (Jeff) Eldred. Beloved by the O'Neill family- Brian, Renee, Lucas, Dylan and Elise. Dear aunt, cousin and friend to many. Dottie loved to have fun and did so with family and many friends through the years, in her numerous travels, and while volunteering for the Girl Scouts, the St. Louis Zoo and Tapes for the Blind. A special thanks from her family to helpers Karen and Barbara as well as the St. Luke's Hospice team for helping to make her life vital to the end. Services: Her life will be celebrated at a private service at the Meramec Bluffs Chapel followed by burial next to her husband at the Nelson, MO cemetery overlooking the farm where her husband Tom, to whom she was married for 67 years, was born and lived as a child. Donations to the St. Louis Zoo or Forest Park Forever, both loved by Dorothy, appreciated. A service of Kutis Affton Chapel.

Nov. 1, 2015. Vis 10-11:30 a.m., Memorial Service 11:30. Church of the Shepherd, Saturday, Dec 5. www.valhallafunerals.net

Zemen, Frank

at the age of 64 on Monday, November 23, 2015. Beloved husband of Mary Ellen Benson Thierheimer; loving brother of Karen Nichols, Rev. Dr. Martha Thierheimer, Tracy Kistenmacher and Scott Thierheimer (Susan); dear uncle of Kelly Nichols, Kurt, Tim and Jill Kistenmacher and Shane and Samantha Thierheimer and friend. Services: A Memorial service will be conducted at LUPTON CHAPEL, 7233 Delmar Blvd., University City on Tuesday, December 1, 2015 at 3:00 p.m. The family will receive friends prior to the service from 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Private interment. Memorial contributions appreciated to the charity of the donor's choice. Friends may submit their condolences online at www.luptonchapel.com A SERVICE OF LUPTON CHAPEL

Tralles, Forest Paul Jr. May 22, 1920 to November 23, 2015, died Monday, November 23, 2015, in St Louis. With him were his wife Martha, and sons Paul and Richard. He is survived by his wife Martha Tralles; his son Paul Tralles (daughter-in-law Anne); grandchildren Steve, Clair, Ian, and William, his son Richard Tralles (daughter-inlaw Sharon); his brother George Tralles and George's wife Bonnie, and nephews Steve, Robert, and Dan Tralles, and Hurk Robinson. Services: Memorial service will be at Grace Episcopal Church at 514 E. Argonne, 63122, and the time and date will be anounced later. Also, look for an on line memorial at stlouiscremation.com.

79, of Affton, Missouri, passed away, Tues., Nov. 24th, 2015 at his home with family and friends. Frank was a loving husband, father, grandfather. Services: A memorial service will be held at 11:00 a.m., Saturday, December 5 at the St. Mary of Victories Historic Church, 744 S. 3rd St., St. Louis, MO 63102. Memorials may be made to BJC Hospice Foundation, PO Box 957421, St. Louis, Mo. 631957421 and the St. Louis Peregrine Society, 2343 Hampton Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 63139.

Zimbalist, Chaim Herman November 27, 2015. Beloved husband of Marilyn Zimbalist; dear father of Michael (Melissa) Zimbalist, Alisa (Glenn) Levine and Rabbi Morris (Alison) Zimbalist; dear grandfather of Dr. Rozzie Levine (Dr. Ben) Rodwin, Avi Levine, Quentin, Peri and Lila Zimbalist, Zachary and Evelyn Zimbalist; dear brother and brotherin-law of Daniel (Shelley) Zimbalist, Milton (Lanie) Goldenberg and Alene (the late Alvin) Wiseman; cherished uncle, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral service Tuesday, December 1, at 10:30 a.m., at Congregation B'nai Amoona, 324 S. Mason Rd. Visitation after 10:00 a.m. Interment at B'nai Amoona Cemetery, 930 North & South Rd. Donations preferred to Congregation B'nai Amoona or to the American Technion Society. Please visit bergermemorialchapel.com for more information. BERGER MEMORIAL SERVICE

Tucker, Debra A. November 18, 2015. Memorial service at KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois, Saturday, Dec. 5, 2:00 p.m.

Turner, Elsie D. (nee Johnson), Entered into the Arms of Jesus on Thursday, November 26, 2015 at the age of 81. Beloved wife of the late Robert M. Turner; loving mother of Kevin (Laura) Turner and Kathy (David) Bueneman; proud Mammer of Samantha (Jarod), Kaitlin (Kyle), Sean and Kyle; great Mammer of Rylee, Lincoln and Layla; our dear aunt, great-aunt, cousin and friend to many. Elsie taught at the Hazelwood School District for many years before retiring. Services: Funeral Thurs., Dec. 3 at 10:00 a.m. at the STYGAR MID RIVERS Funeral Home & Crematory, 5987 Mid Rivers Mall Dr. (St. Charles) Interment National Cemetery (Jefferson Barracks). Visitation on Wed., Dec. 2 from 4:00 until 8:00 p.m. Memorial donations to Alzheimer's Association. www.stygar.com

Elizabeth C. Lawler, (nee Hayes)

April 24, 1906-November 30, 1990. Beloved wife of the late John L. "Doc" Lawler, Mother of the late Elizabeth June Benoist, Mary Ellen Knott, Patricia Dooley/ Bullard, John L. Lawler, Jr. and Maureen B. Lawler. Grandmother of the late George M. Benoist, Jr. Fondly remembered by daughter, Bridget Lawler Brennan, son-inlaw Jerome L. Shen, the Benoist, Knott, Dooley, Lawler and Shen grandchildren; great grandchildren, and great, great grandchildren. Elizabeth was off to Mass each morning and always ready to "doll up" in the evening with her outfit-matched eyeglasses. Elizabeth was a woman of faith, courage, resilience, class and common sense. Her spirit continues to live among us. The Lawler Family.

KEVIN MULLANE

Wagner, Victoria M. (nee Waitkus) Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Monday, November 23, 2015, at the age of 93. Beloved wife of the late Raymond P. Wagner; loving mother of Thomas Wagner, Peggy Lowe, and Joan Wagner; grandmother of Thomas Jr., Carrie, Alison, James, William III, and Lucy; great-grandmother of Meehan, Gavin, Finley, Ellie and Emmitt; dear sister-in-law, aunt, great-aunt, cousin, and friend to all. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions to the American Cancer Society or Masses are appreciated. Services: Monday, leaving JOHN L. ZIEGENHEIN & SONS, 7027 Gravois Avenue (63116) at 12:00 p.m. for a 12:30 p.m. Mass at St. Raphael the Archangel Catholic Church. Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. VISITATION SUNDAY 4:00 - 8:00 p.m.

Missing you... Forever! 3/20/88 - 11/29/09

Dierbergs Florist Order 24 Hours 314-692-2000 or 800-844-6007 Dierbergs.com

Schnucks Florist 65 Metro Locations 314-997-2444 800-286-9557


ENTERTAINMENT

A24 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

SUNDAY NEWS SHOWS

M 1 • SUnDAy • 11.29.2015

K

EDIT CHEC RE NO CR FACE THE NATION • 9:30 a.m., KMOV (4) Republican presidential candidates Carson, Jeb Bush and Lindsey Graham; Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz.

MEET THE PRESS • 8 a.m., KSDK (5) Republican presidential candidates Ben Carson and Donald Trump. STATE OF THE UNION • 8 a.m., CNN Republican presidential candidate Mike Huckabee; Rep. Michael McCaul, R-Texas. FOX NEWS SUNDAY • 9 a.m., KTVI (2) Republican presidential candidate Carly Fiorina; Sen. Richard Burr, R-N.C.

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Associated Press

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Rocker Jack White has opened a Third Man Records store in his hometown, the Motor City. The Grammy-nominated White — the singer, guitarist, drummer and producer who rose to acclaim in the duo The White Stripes — was on hand Friday for the satellite location’s grand opening just north of downtown Detroit. Hundreds locked to the store, which next year plans to launch a vinyl record pressing plant. The shop opened with vinyl reissues from Tamla Records, including releases by Marvin Gaye, the Supremes and the Miracles. White founded Third Man in Detroit in 2001. He left Detroit for Nashville, Tenn., where Third Man is now based. The neighborhood, once considered part of Detroit’s Cass Corridor, had been a mixture of aging houses and run-down buildings. But many of the crumbling structures have been torn down. To the north is Detroit’s strong Midtown neighborhood. A $450 million, 20,000-seat hockey arena for the Detroit Red Wings is being built about 10 blocks to the south and is scheduled to open in 2017. It will anchor a 45-block entertainment district.

Reality healthier for ‘True Detective’ singer • Singer-songwriter Lera Lynn looks nothing like the character she played on season two of HBO’s crime noir series, “True Detective,” who sang woeful drug ballads in a seedy dive bar. Lynn said the main actors Vince Vaughn and Colin Farrell probably never caught a glimpse of her on set without her makeup on, which included track marks and bruises on her arms, dark circles under her eyes, oily hair and yellow teeth. “I looked a lot worse in person than on camera, thankfully,” said Lynn in her home studio in Nashville, Tenn. “I did tell Colin and Vince once, ‘Just so you know, I am a healthy, regular person.’” Lynn was selected by producer and composer T. Bone Burnett to help write and sing the songs that set the mood for the dark, critically acclaimed series. But Burnett and the show’s creator Nic Pizzolatto couldn’t tell her much about the plot when she started working on the show, other than they wanted “narco-ballads,” Lynn said. Grammy-winning singer Rosanne Cash also helped write songs for the show, including the haunting “My Least Favorite Life.” “It was interesting trying to create a character for the show whose function I was completely oblivious to,” Lynn said.

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Actress Diane Ladd is 80. Musician Chuck Mangione is 75. Comedian Garry Shandling is 66. Actorcomedian Howie Mandel is 60. Actor Tom Sizemore is 54. Actor Andrew McCarthy is 53. Actor Don Cheadle is 51. Singer Jonathan Knight is 47. Actress Gena Lee Nolin is 44. Actress Anna Faris is 39. Rapper The Game is 36. Drummer Ringo Garza is 34. Actor Lucas Black is 33.

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GET TO KNOW

SEASON LONG HOLY SPORTS COVERAGE JUMPIN’ N LONG SEASON LONG S COVERAGESPORTS COVE SEASON LONG SPORTS COVERAGE Jeremy Rutherford BLUES LEAD BEAT WRITER

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Home or away, rest assured there’s a St. Louis Post-Dispatch journalist covering your game. So if you miss the game or want to learn more about what REALLY happened, you know where to ind us. RICK HUMMEL

BENJAMIN B HOCHMAN

BEN B FREDERICKSON

D DERRICK GOOLD

JOE STRAUSS

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thepost-dispatchstore.com 1-877-POST-STL (1-877-767-8785) MONDAY - FRIDAY 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

In print, online and always on time. From local colleges to the pros, we were there and will continue to be there, for you.

Shop 24/7 at your St. Louis store.

Limited quantities available. SHOP EARLY!


ENTERTAINMENT

A24 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

SUNDAY NEWS SHOWS

M 2 • SUnDAy • 11.29.2015

K

EDIT CHEC RE NO CR

MEET THE PRESS • 8 a.m., KSDK (5) Republican presidential candidates Ben Carson and Donald Trump; former Defense Secretary Robert Gates. STATE OF THE UNION • 8 a.m., CNN Republican presidential candidate Mike Huckabee; Rep. Michael McCaul, R-Texas. FOX NEWS SUNDAY • 9 a.m., KTVI (2) Republican presidential candidate Carly

Fiorina; Sen. Richard Burr, R-N.C.

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FACE THE NATION • 9:30 a.m., KMOV (4) Republican presidential candidates Carson, Jeb Bush and Lindsey Graham; Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz.

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With “Creed” knocking out audiences and critics alike, Michael B. Jordan acknowledges he would love to lace up the gloves again for a sequel. Jordan openly welcomed the possibility of an eventual “Creed 2” even before writerdirector Ryan Coogler’s new chapter in the Rocky Balboa boxing saga opened to mostly rave reviews and a strong boxoice performance during the ive-day Thanksgiving weekend. “A character so rich as this, and the world he’s in, I want to see what happens to him next and what he does,” Jordan said in a recent interview. “Especially the way it ends of, it’s pretty cool. I think with success and time and circumstances, it would be exciting to come back and work with (co-stars) Sly (Stallone) and Tessa (Thompson) again.” Coogler, too, has expressed enthusiasm for another “Creed.” The ilm, featuring Stallone’s seventh appearance as Rocky, now a trainer to up-and-coming ighter Adonis Creed (Jordan), had a solid holiday weekend that’s projected to hit about $40 million despite daunting competition. “Creed” also received a CinemaScore of A from audiences enthralled by Creed’s rise and Stallone’s much-praised supporting performance as Rocky facing his mortality. With only a reported $35 million budget,

OR

“Creed” is already likely to turn a tidy proit. New Line Cinema and distributor Warner Bros. haven’t publicly announced plans for a sequel.

DOWN

Music is in his life • Rocker Jack White has opened a Third Man Records store in his hometown, the Motor City. The Grammy-nominated White — the singer, guitarist, drummer and producer who rose to acclaim in the duo The White Stripes — was on hand Friday for the satellite location’s grand opening just north of downtown Detroit. Hundreds locked to the store, which next year plans to launch a vinyl record pressing plant. The shop opened with vinyl reissues from Tamla Records, including releases by Marvin Gaye, the Supremes and the Miracles. White founded Third Man in Detroit in 2001. He left Detroit for Nashville, Tenn., where Third Man is now based. The neighborhood, once considered part of Detroit’s Cass Corridor, had been a mixture of aging houses and run-down buildings. But many of the crumbling structures have been torn down. To the north is Detroit’s strong Midtown neighborhood. A $450 million, 20,000-seat hockey arena for the Detroit Red Wings is being built about 10 blocks to the south and is scheduled to open in 2017. It will anchor a 45-block entertainment district.

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Actress Diane Ladd is 80. Musician Chuck Mangione is 75. Comedian Garry Shandling is 66. Actorcomedian Howie Mandel is 60. Actor Tom Sizemore is 54. Actor Andrew McCarthy is 53. Actor Don Cheadle is 51. Singer Jonathan Knight is 47. Actress Gena Lee Nolin is 44. Actress Anna Faris is 39. Rapper The Game is 36. Drummer Ringo Garza is 34. Actor Lucas Black is 33.

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From news services

WheelsForWishes.org

Call: (314) 499-1300

* Wheels For Wishes is a DBA of Car Donation Foundation.

314-832-5300 Mon & Fri 10a-8p •Tue, Wed, Thu 11a-7p • Sat 10a-6p • Sun 12-6p A HOME DECOR LIQUIDATORS COMPANY • NO CREDIT CHECK FINANCING• w w w . h d o u t l e t s . c o m A HOME DECOR LIQUIDATORS COMPANY • NO CREDIT CHECK FINANCING• w w w. h d o u t l e t s . c o m

ST. LOUIS CARDINALS | ST. LOUIS BLUES | ST. LOUIS RAMS | UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI | ST. LOUIS UNIVERSITY AND MORE

GET TO KNOW

SEASON LONG HOLY SPORTS COVERAGE JUMPIN’ N LONG SEASON LONG S COVERAGESPORTS COVE SEASON LONG SPORTS COVERAGE Jeremy Rutherford BLUES LEAD BEAT WRITER

AUTHOR OF “100 THINGS BLUES FANS SHOULD KNOW & DO BEFORE THEY DIE”

WE HAVE BLUES GEAR

Tape to Tape Hoodie

Women’s Puck Script T-Shirt Women’

SEASON LONG SPORTS COVERAGE

Home or away, rest assured there’s a St. Louis Post-Dispatch journalist covering your game. So if you miss the game or want to learn more about what REALLY happened, you know where to ind us. RICK HUMMEL

BENJAMIN B HOCHMAN

BEN B FREDERICKSON

D DERRICK GOOLD

JOE STRAUSS

JJEFF GORDON

DAVE MATTER

JIM THOMAS

JJEREMY RUTHERFORD

STU ST DURANDO

BASEBALL WRITER

SPORTS COLUMNIST

ONLINE SPORTS COMMENTARY

CARDINALS LEAD BEAT WRITER

SPORTS COLUMNIST

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MIZZOU BEAT WRITER

RAMS LEAD BEAT WRITER

BLUES LEAD BEAT WRITER

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HALL OF FAMER

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AP SPORTS EDITORS TOP 10 WRITER

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AUTHOR OF “100 THINGS BLUES FANS SHOULD KNOW & DO BEFORE THEY DIE”

COVERING ST. LOUIS SPORTS FOR MORE THAN 20 YEARS

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thepost-dispatchstore.com 1-877-POST-STL (1-877-767-8785) MONDAY - FRIDAY 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

In print, online and always on time. From local colleges to the pros, we were there and will continue to be there, for you.

Shop 24/7 at your St. Louis store.

Limited quantities available. SHOP EARLY!


WEATHER

11.29.2015 • Sunday • M 1

HURRY! Ameren Rebates End Dec 15th!

WEATHER • LOW 36, HIGH 46 > WINDS NE 5-10 MPH Cloudy and cool on Sunday Cloudy and cool conditions are expected across the region on Sunday. It now looks like much of Sunday will be dry. Highs will be in the middle 40s. Another storm system will bring more rain to the region on Monday into Monday night. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

24-HOUR FORECAST

MORNING

LUNCH

DRIVE

BEDTIME

38°

43°

44°

42°

Cloudy

Cloudy

Cloudy

Cloudy

4-DAY FORECAST

MONDAY

H

W

48 50 44 45 44 45 40 41 41 45 39 45 46

rain cloudy cloudy cloudy cloudy rain cloudy cloudy cloudy rain cloudy cloudy rain

Illinois Bloomington Carbondale Chicago Decatur Effingham Macomb Mount Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Springfield Urbana

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

L

38 44 36 39 36 36 34 33 36 37 32 36 39

WEDNESDAY THURSDAY

39°/49° 33°/45° 30°/48°

Chance of rain Mostly cloudy Partly cloudy Mostly sunny

Shown are Sunday morning’s lows and Sunday afternoon’s highs.

SUNDAY IN THE BI-STATE AREA Missouri Branson Cape Girardeau Columbia Farmington Jefferson City Joplin Kansas City Kirksville Rolla Springfield St. Joseph Union West Plains

TUESDAY

38°/52°

L

H

W

34 42 30 35 36 31 40 33 32 25 35 35

46 48 44 46 47 44 46 45 44 42 46 46

mostly cloudy cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy cloudy mostly cloudy cloudy mostly cloudy cloudy sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy

Chicago 30 / 44

Kirksville 33 / 41 Kansas City 34 /40

Springfield 35 / 46

St. Louis 36 / 46 Carbondale 42 / 48

Joplin

Poplar Bluff 45 / 50

36 / 45

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

ALMANAC Asof7P.M.atLambertField

1.04” 6.06” 3.52” 49.08” 37.73”

TODAY’S AIR QUALITY Very unhealthy

Good

TODAY’S UV INDEX Min.

Very high The higher the UV index number, the greater the need for skin protection.

POLLEN COUNTS Wednesday, Nov. 25th No tree, grass, or weed pollen present Mold - 3,019 (low) HEATING DEGREE DAYS Yesterday 10 Month (Total) 320 Season 489 Year Ago 907

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

PRECIPITATION Last 24 hrs Month (Total) Month (Normal) Year (Total) Year (Normal)

66° 43° 49° 33° 76° 12° 35° 24°

Flood Stage

Current Level

MISSOURI RIVER Kansas City 32 14.00 23 12.85 Jefferson City 21 13.33 Hermann 20 8.64 Washington 25 14.56 St. Charles MISSISSIPPI RIVER Hannibal 16 13.64 Louisiana 15 12.50 Dam 24 25 21.94 Dam 25 26 21.04 Grafton 18 15.82 M.Price, Pool 419 417.40 M.Price, Tail. 21 12.06 St Louis 30 15.05 Chester 27 16.95 Cape Girardeau 32 22.29

Must purchase a complete* Amana System 16-Seer A/C or better, and a 96% Gas Heater. *A/C and Furnace

0% Financing for 12 Months** Rebate Stimulus Package $2295.00 Rebates For You!

*On Select Models Only-Call for Details. **With Approved Credit $150 - $770

Ameren Rebate

$150 - $325

Laclede Gas Rebate

$400 - $1200

Total Comfort Rebate

$2295.00

Potential Savings

BUY NOW - GOOD FOR YOU - GOOD FOR AMERICA! Offer expires 11/30/15

SUN & MOON

Last Dec 3 Sunrise

New Dec 11

First Dec 18

6:57 AM Sunset

Full Dec 25 4:41 PM

Flood Stage

24-Hr Change

Current Level

ILLINOIS RIVER La Salle 20 18.04 18 12.79 Peoria 14 11.52 Beardstown MERAMEC RIVER 15 4.55 Sullivan 16 - 0.07 Valley Park 24 12.00 Arnold BOURBEUSE RIVER Union 15 4.41 OHIO RIVER Cairo 40 25.04

+ 1.26 + 2.77 + 2.80 + 1.05 - 0.12 + 0.96 + 0.57 + 1.41 + 1.00 - 0.08 0.00 + 0.99 + 0.68 - 0.11 - 0.22

FALL SPECIAL!

MAKE SURE YOUR SYSTEM IS WORKING PROPERLY!

Looking to the east around 8 p.m. tonight you will see the red star Betelgeuse. This star is younger and cooler in temperature than our sun.

Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

+ 3.40 + 1.26 + 0.28 + 0.82 + 0.19 + 0.22 + 1.11

Reg. $105

Total Comfort Heating & Cooling • 314-991-2665 • 636-923-2665 Valid only with coupon. Not valid with any other offers or on prior purchase. Residential Units Only. Boilers are extra. Offer expires 11/30/15

EMERGENCY SERVICE 7 DAYS A WEEK, 8AM-9PM NO OVERTIME CHARGES!

Current Level

24-Hr Change

355.20 367.28 502.73 659.04 708.96 661.02 916.61 843.47 599.98 406.56 604.72 445.69

- 0.36 - 0.47 - 2.23 0.00 + 1.42 + 0.19 + 0.11 + 1.44 + 0.03 - 0.02 + 0.05 - 0.08

- 1.22

Maps and weather data provided by:

WE SERVICE ALL BRANDS

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LAKE LEVELS

24-Hr Change

75

$

Moonrise 7:45 PM Moonset 9:20 AM

SOURCE: McDonnell Planetarium

RIVER STAGES

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___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

TEMPERATURES High (12:55 a.m.) Low (3:59 p.m.) Average High Average Low Record High (1989) Record Low (1898) High Last Year Low Last Year

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A25

Get more river & lake stage information at 636-441-8467

Owners: The Donahue & Ross Families Residential & Commercial

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__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

National Extremes High: 86° Brownsville, Texas

TODAY ACROSS THE U.S.

Low: -24° Hartsel, Colorado

EASTERN MO FIREFIGHTERS AGAINST DISTRACTED DRIVING present 40s

20s

20s

30s

Rain

30s

30s 30s

20s 50s

30s 40s

40s 30s

40s

40s

20s

50s 60s

T-storms

50s

Snow

60s

30s

50s

70s 40s

Wintry Mix

60s 80s

Jet Stream

Alaska Low: -11°

Hawaii High: 85°

A frontal boundary will bring wet weather to portions of the Mid-Atlantic, Ohio Valley, Ozarks, and southern Plains. Parts of the central Rockies will see scattered snow showers. Mild temperatures will persist throughout the Southeast. Cold and dry conditions can be expected across the Great Lakes, upper Midwest, and northern Plains. Today L H

Albany, N.Y. 43 Albuquerque 28 Anchorage 37 Atlanta 50 Atlantic City 47 Baltimore 45 Billings 6 Biloxi, Ms. 58 Birmingham 55 Bismarck 7 Boise 14 Boston 50 Buffalo 35 Burlington, Vt. 32 Charleston, S.C. 51 Charleston, W.V. 52 Charlotte 44 Cheyenne 8 Chicago 34 Cincinnati 52 Cleveland 38 Colorado Spgs. 12 Concord, N.H. 44 Dallas 38 Daytona Beach 64 Denver 9 Des Moines 22 62 Destin, Fl. 32 Detroit 39 El Paso 50 Evansville 23 Fairbanks 12 Fargo 15 Flagstaff 64 Fort Myers 11 Great Falls 17 Green Bay 51 Hartford 74 Honolulu 54 Houston 40 Indianapolis 60 Jackson, Ms. 34 Juneau 71 Key West 37 Las Vegas 54 Little Rock 45 Los Angeles 57 Louisville

47 51 37 70 65 64 30 72 73 35 29 51 40 39 74 63 69 26 40 54 43 28 47 42 77 28 32 74 44 55 51 24 35 35 83 34 33 52 84 54 45 74 41 81 51 55 67 58

W

Tomorrow L H W

mostly cloudy mostly cloudy showers partly cloudy mostly cloudy showers partly cloudy partly sunny mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy cloudy showers partly cloudy sunny rain partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy rain showers mostly cloudy mostly cloudy showers partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy rain partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny sunny sunny cloudy partly cloudy showers rain mostly cloudy rain partly cloudy partly cloudy rain sunny rain

27 37 33 52 44 46 13 57 58 13 16 36 25 24 51 50 49 10 30 41 31 16 23 39 64 11 29 60 29 44 44 14 16 16 64 12 15 31 74 56 36 62 37 72 35 48 43 47

45 54 35 68 55 53 31 72 67 32 29 45 41 38 73 57 66 26 44 47 45 32 43 46 77 30 38 73 45 64 52 18 35 37 83 31 37 47 84 67 46 72 40 82 53 52 69 49

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

City

#GoPledge

sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy cloudy cloudy mostly cloudy mostly sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy rain mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny rain partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly sunny sunny partly cloudy showers partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly sunny sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy cloudy mostly cloudy cloudy rain partly cloudy sunny rain sunny rain

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Today L H

48 Macon 74 McAllen, Tx. 61 Memphis 70 Miami 31 Milwaukee 12 Minneapolis Missoula, Mt. -1 55 Mobile Montgomery 54 58 Nashville New Orleans 64 New York City 50 Norfolk, Va. 52 Oklahoma City 30 Omaha 19 Orlando 63 Palm Springs 38 Philadelphia 49 Phoenix 43 Pittsburgh 48 Portland, Me. 44 Portland, Or. 30 Providence 51 Raleigh 44 Rapid City 7 Reno 18 Richmond, Va. 44 Sacramento 31 St. Petersburg 66 Salt Lake City 20 San Antonio 46 San Diego 48 San Francisco 39 Santa Fe 25 Savannah 53 Seattle 31 61 Shreveport 8 Sioux Falls 37 Syracuse 57 Tallahassee 63 Tampa 36 Tucson 34 Tulsa 47 Wash D.C. W. Palm Beach 71 26 Wichita Wilmington, De. 47 44 Yuma

72 78 65 79 38 33 22 77 76 67 77 56 69 34 30 81 68 63 63 49 45 49 52 70 30 31 72 53 78 30 48 66 56 45 75 45 63 31 41 78 79 67 37 66 80 31 62 66

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Tomorrow L H W

partly cloudy showers showers partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy showers mostly cloudy showers partly cloudy freezing rain mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny showers sunny showers mostly cloudy sunny cloudy partly cloudy snow mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny cloudy showers sunny sunny mostly cloudy sunny sunny showers partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny rain showers partly cloudy freezing rain mostly cloudy sunny

47 59 52 68 26 17 3 56 53 56 62 41 53 32 23 63 38 44 43 38 27 29 35 48 11 18 51 30 66 21 45 49 39 32 51 31 54 18 27 55 64 36 36 48 70 28 45 44

72 73 57 80 41 36 22 75 77 60 76 48 65 41 37 80 70 52 63 49 43 47 48 64 29 36 59 53 78 29 52 66 56 49 74 45 58 32 40 77 80 66 40 54 80 36 53 68

#GoPledge now to share your motivation, inspiration, plan or promise – to not drive while drunk or distracted. A selection of pledges will be published in a special issue of GO! Magazine.

All pledgers receive a FREE movie ticket from STL Cinemas

partly cloudy showers rain mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy rain mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy rain cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny cloudy sunny partly cloudy snow showers showers sunny sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny rain mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny cloudy cloudy mostly cloudy cloudy mostly cloudy sunny

TODAY AROUND THE WORLD H

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Acapulco Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Barbados Beijing Berlin Budapest Buenos Aires Cairo Calgary Cancun Cape Town Dublin Frankfurt

75 42 46 55 73 79 21 30 33 59 61 12 73 61 38 32

88 46 72 74 91 86 36 41 40 76 79 38 82 84 47 43

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Geneva Hong Kong Istanbul Jakarta Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Madrid Mecca Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi

27 60 55 73 55 52 32 37 37 69 51 26 25 72 58 57

40 72 59 91 73 76 57 50 57 95 75 33 28 78 74 81

rain and snow partly cloudy rain showers partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy mostly sunny sunny partly cloudy partly sunny partly cloudy partly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy

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YOU CAN SUBMIT A PHOTO, A SENTIMENT OR BOTH:

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Oslo Paris Prague Rio De Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Stockholm Sydney Taipei Tokyo Toronto Vancouver Vienna Warsaw

38 39 29 72 37 75 50 28 41 65 55 43 30 34 29 24

41 50 37 86 50 84 81 37 43 80 77 61 37 44 41 34

partly cloudy partly sunny rain and snow partly cloudy partly sunny partly sunny mostly sunny mostly cloudy showers thunderstorms mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny cloudy

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WEATHER

11.29.2015 • Sunday • M 2

HURRY! Ameren Rebates End Dec 15th!

WEATHER • LOW 36, HIGH 45 > WINDS NE 5-10 MPH Cloudy and cool today Considerable cloudiness along with light northeasterly winds and cool temperatures can be expected across the region today. Highs will top out in the middle 40s. There is a slight chance of rain, mainly later today into tonight. A better chance of rain is expected on Monday. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

24-HOUR FORECAST

MORNING

LUNCH

DRIVE

BEDTIME

38°

42°

43°

41°

Cloudy

Cloudy

Cloudy, slight Cloudy, slight chance of rain chance of rain

4-DAY FORECAST

MONDAY

H

45 49 43 45 45 43 38 38 42 43 36 45 44

Illinois Bloomington Carbondale Chicago Decatur Effingham Macomb Mount Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Springfield Urbana

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L

38 42 34 37 35 36 33 31 34 36 31 35 38

W

rain rain rain cloudy rain rain rain rain rain rain rain cloudy rain

WEDNESDAY THURSDAY

38°/49° 40°/50° 34°/46° 32°/50° Rain likely

Partly sunny

Partly cloudy Mostly sunny

Shown are this morning’s lows and today’s highs

TODAY IN THE BI-STATE AREA Missouri Branson Cape Girardeau Columbia Farmington Jefferson City Joplin Kansas City Kirksville Rolla Springfield St. Joseph Union West Plains

TUESDAY

L

H

W

33 41 29 35 35 31 39 32 32 24 35 34

46 48 43 46 45 41 47 45 42 42 47 46

mostly cloudy rain partly cloudy mostly cloudy cloudy mostly cloudy rain mostly cloudy rain partly cloudy mostly cloudy cloudy

Chicago 29 / 43

Kirksville 31 / 38 Kansas City 33 / 38

Springfield 35 / 47

St. Louis 36 / 45 Carbondale 41 / 48

Joplin

Poplar Bluff 42 / 49

36 / 43

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

ALMANAC Asof7P.M.atLambertField

PRECIPITATION Last 24 hrs Month (Total) Month (Normal) Year (Total) Year (Normal)

0.21” 6.27” 3.66” 49.29” 37.87”

TODAY’S AIR QUALITY Very unhealthy

Good

TODAY’S UV INDEX Min.

Very high The higher the UV index number, the greater the need for skin protection.

POLLEN COUNTS Wednesday, Nov. 25th No tree, grass, or weed pollen present Mold - 3,019 (low) HEATING DEGREE DAYS Yesterday 28 Month (Total) 348 Season 517 Year Ago 933

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

40° 37° 49° 33° 77° 10° 52° 26°

Flood Stage

Current Level

MISSOURI RIVER Kansas City 32 14.37 23 19.20 Jefferson City 21 19.25 Hermann 20 14.16 Washington 25 19.12 St. Charles MISSISSIPPI RIVER Hannibal 16 16.25 Louisiana 15 14.45 Dam 24 25 24.30 Dam 25 26 23.42 Grafton 18 16.52 M.Price, Pool 419 416.20 M.Price, Tail. 21 14.80 St Louis 30 18.31 Chester 27 19.23 Cape Girardeau 32 24.05

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Potential Savings

BUY NOW - GOOD FOR YOU - GOOD FOR AMERICA! Offer expires 11/30/15

SUN & MOON

Last Dec 3

New Dec 11

First Dec 18

6:58 AM Sunset

Sunrise

Full Dec 25 4:41 PM

Flood Stage

24-Hr Change

Current Level

ILLINOIS RIVER La Salle 20 20.05 18 13.64 Peoria 14 12.23 Beardstown MERAMEC RIVER 15 7.06 Sullivan 16 2.35 Valley Park 24 14.46 Arnold BOURBEUSE RIVER Union 15 8.83 OHIO RIVER Cairo 40 25.45

+ 0.37 + 6.35 + 6.02 + 5.52 + 4.56 + 2.61 + 1.95 + 2.36 + 2.38 + 0.70 - 1.20 + 2.74 + 3.26 + 2.28 + 1.76

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+ 2.01 + 0.85 + 0.71 + 2.51 + 2.42 + 2.46 + 4.42

Reg. $105

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Current Level

24-Hr Change

355.05 366.89 504.92 659.76 710.47 662.01 917.08 845.08 600.26 406.81 606.16 445.97

- 0.15 - 0.39 + 2.19 + 0.72 + 1.51 + 0.99 + 0.47 + 1.61 + 0.28 + 0.25 + 1.44 + 0.28

+ 0.41

Maps and weather data provided by:

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Moonrise 8:44 PM Moonset 10:08 AM

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TEMPERATURES High (3:59 p.m.) Low (9:01 a.m.) Average High Average Low Record High (1905) Record Low (1887) High Last Year Low Last Year

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A25

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TODAY ACROSS THE U.S.

National Extremes High: 83° Fort Myers, Florida

Low: -20° West Yellowstone, Montana

EASTERN MO FIREFIGHTERS AGAINST DISTRACTED DRIVING present Rain

40s

30s

30s

30s 30s

20s

30s

T-storms

40s

20s 50s 40s

30s

50s

40s

30s

Snow

60s 60s

50s

40s 50s

70s Wintry Mix

80s Jet Stream

Alaska Low: -7°

Hawaii High: 86°

Wet weather is expected from parts of the Mid-Atlantic back across the Tennessee Valley to the southern Plains in association with a frontal boundary. Dry conditions are expected throughout the Northeast, Great Lakes, Midwest, north-central Plains, and Intermountain West as a large ridge of high pressure will be in control. Today L H

Albany, N.Y. 31 Albuquerque 35 Anchorage 31 Atlanta 53 Atlantic City 46 Baltimore 47 Billings 10 Biloxi, Ms. 59 Birmingham 60 Bismarck 13 Boise 12 Boston 34 Buffalo 26 Burlington, Vt. 20 Charleston, S.C. 50 Charleston, W.V. 51 Charlotte 50 Cheyenne 9 Chicago 29 Cincinnati 40 Cleveland 31 Colorado Spgs. 13 Concord, N.H. 23 Dallas 39 Daytona Beach 64 Denver 11 Des Moines 29 59 Destin, Fl. 26 Detroit 44 El Paso 43 Evansville 14 Fairbanks 15 Fargo 14 Flagstaff 64 Fort Myers 10 Great Falls 17 Green Bay 30 Hartford 74 Honolulu 50 Houston 34 Indianapolis 60 Jackson, Ms. 37 Juneau 71 Key West 35 Las Vegas 45 Little Rock 45 Los Angeles 46 Louisville

44 46 35 69 51 49 29 71 67 32 28 44 40 37 74 54 67 27 43 49 44 29 43 42 77 27 37 73 45 64 49 15 33 36 84 28 36 46 84 55 47 62 41 81 51 49 68 49

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sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy cloudy rain mostly cloudy partly sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy rain mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny rain partly cloudy snow mostly cloudy mostly sunny sunny partly cloudy cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy cloudy mostly cloudy rain rain partly cloudy sunny rain sunny rain

24 28 25 56 33 38 13 58 59 17 15 31 27 19 55 45 52 11 33 39 29 15 16 37 60 15 30 61 29 41 42 5 19 11 64 13 24 25 73 53 35 55 35 72 35 44 44 44

40 38 30 67 51 49 31 73 67 31 29 38 41 34 71 56 54 29 46 53 48 33 38 52 79 33 36 73 45 60 55 7 34 40 84 31 40 40 84 62 50 66 40 82 53 52 69 58

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City

#GoPledge

sunny sunny mostly cloudy showers partly cloudy rain partly cloudy partly sunny cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny mostly cloudy rain showers mostly cloudy rain cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy snow mostly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy cloudy very cold mostly cloudy sunny mostly sunny sunny mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy cloudy cloudy cloudy rain partly cloudy sunny cloudy sunny cloudy

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Today L H

48 Macon 52 McAllen, Tx. 48 Memphis 69 Miami 25 Milwaukee 16 Minneapolis Missoula, Mt. -1 57 Mobile Montgomery 54 54 Nashville New Orleans 64 New York City 40 Norfolk, Va. 53 Oklahoma City 30 Omaha 26 Orlando 63 Palm Springs 42 Philadelphia 46 Phoenix 44 Pittsburgh 38 Portland, Me. 26 Portland, Or. 28 Providence 34 Raleigh 50 Rapid City 11 Reno 15 Richmond, Va. 53 Sacramento 27 St. Petersburg 66 Salt Lake City 21 San Antonio 44 San Diego 48 San Francisco 41 Santa Fe 30 Savannah 51 Seattle 29 49 Shreveport 20 Sioux Falls 28 Syracuse 56 Tallahassee 64 Tampa 33 Tucson 38 Tulsa 51 Wash D.C. W. Palm Beach 70 29 Wichita Wilmington, De. 46 45 Yuma

74 63 54 80 39 34 17 76 75 58 76 49 62 37 34 80 69 50 63 48 42 47 47 67 29 35 61 54 78 29 49 66 56 41 75 44 53 32 40 79 80 64 42 52 80 34 51 66

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partly cloudy showers showers partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy flurries partly cloudy mostly cloudy rain mostly cloudy partly cloudy cloudy rain cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny sunny sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny cloudy sunny partly cloudy snow rain sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny rain mostly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny rain rain partly cloudy rain mostly cloudy sunny

53 59 47 72 32 24 8 58 57 52 61 34 51 34 29 62 40 34 41 33 20 29 29 49 11 16 44 29 67 22 47 46 42 21 54 31 49 24 25 55 65 32 39 40 72 31 34 43

72 71 58 81 45 34 18 76 75 61 76 43 56 47 35 82 70 49 63 49 36 39 41 50 29 40 48 52 79 35 61 68 57 34 74 45 57 28 39 79 81 64 49 50 82 40 49 67

#GoPledge now to share your motivation, inspiration, plan or promise – to not drive while drunk or distracted. A selection of pledges will be published in a special issue of GO! Magazine.

All pledgers receive a FREE movie ticket from STL Cinemas

mostly cloudy cloudy rain partly cloudy mostly cloudy snow flurries mostly cloudy mostly cloudy showers mostly cloudy partly cloudy rain mostly cloudy snow partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy rain cloudy partly cloudy cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy cloudy snow sunny mostly cloudy sunny sunny cloudy rain partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny

TODAY AROUND THE WORLD H

W

Acapulco Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Barbados Beijing Berlin Budapest Buenos Aires Cairo Calgary Cancun Cape Town Dublin Frankfurt

75 43 51 54 73 78 25 33 36 55 59 13 72 61 44 35

87 54 72 72 91 85 41 47 46 76 75 39 82 84 52 50

partly cloudy drizzle partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy drizzle partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy mostly sunny cloudy cloudy

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Geneva Hong Kong Istanbul Jakarta Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Madrid Mecca Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi

30 67 49 73 52 51 32 48 32 72 52 25 18 73 59 55

40 80 54 91 69 80 56 55 58 99 74 35 27 80 72 82

cloudy sunny showers showers partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy showers partly cloudy

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YOU CAN SUBMIT A PHOTO, A SENTIMENT OR BOTH:

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Oslo Paris Prague Rio De Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Stockholm Sydney Taipei Tokyo Toronto Vancouver Vienna Warsaw

31 46 31 74 40 75 52 30 32 64 63 42 28 32 35 30

39 55 41 89 59 82 84 41 41 78 79 59 39 43 47 39

drizzle cloudy cloudy showers sunny partly sunny mostly sunny partly cloudy drizzle thunderstorms partly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy

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A26 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Bommarito Pre-Owned Pr e-Owned Centers 8 Convenient Locations

BLACK FRIDAY

250

$

3-Day

Sales Event

Macy's Day

L A 4 NU AN TH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 11.29.2015

GIFT CARD

*

For Every Preowned Car Sold Mon., Nov. 30 9am-9pm

FINAL DAY! Monday, Nov. 30, 9am-9pm

1000's

OF VEHICLES, EVERY MODEL, ALL PRICE RANGES,

EVERY MANUFACTURER Missouri’s Largest Selection Of Pre-Owned

• CARS • TRUCKS • SUVS Scan with your smartphone to learn more.

Bommarito Pre-Owned Centers

AND FACTORY CERTIFIED

Bommarito WILL BUY YOUR CAR OUTRIGHT...Even if you don't buy a car from us! Visit Any Of Our 8 Bommarito Certified Pre-Owned Center Locations;

West County, South County, St. Peters & Hazelwood OR SHOP US ONLINE AT:

Bommarito.com *Macy's is not a sponsor or co-sponsor of this event or promotion.


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / M E T R O

SUNDAY • 11.29.2015 • B

he denizen of DeMun Avenue Chip Wood is quietly living out his ‘American Dream,’ just as his parents and siblings did, at an apartment that’s long been home

Friends see aid for needy swell through crowdfunding

BILL McCLELLAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Orton Lester Wood was born in August 1901. He did not have much formal education, but was a hard worker with an artistic bent. St. Louis was then a bustling place and Wood was seldom, if ever, out of work. He was working downtown in 1927 when he saw an attractive young woman at the corner

of Seventh and Chestnut streets. Her name was Rachel Lenore Parsons and she was heading back to her secretarial job after having lunch at Famous-Barr. According to family lore, Orton introduced himself and immediately proposed. No matter the truth of that story, they were soon married. They had three children — Gloria, Barbara and Chip. Chip was born in July 1935. At that time, the family lived in an apartment downtown. They moved around in Chip’s early years, and by the time he started

high school, the family lived on the city’s south side. Chip attended Southwest High School. He dropped out his senior year and got a job at the Famous-Barr warehouse. He enlisted in the Navy in 1955. The following year, the family moved into a two-bedroom apartment on DeMun Avenue in Clayton, a block west of the St. Louis city limits. DeMun Avenue was a little neighborhood unto itself, with two- and threestory apartment buildings, some with retail on the ground floor. Among the shops were two gro-

cery stores and a drugstore. The street was wide with no median. The width of the street reflected the fact that a streetcar line used to run up the middle of the street. The streetcar was discontinued in 1949. The Woods’ apartment was just north of South Rosebury Avenue. The front window looked out on DeMun and the Concordia Seminary grounds across the street. Rent was $82 a month. When Chip got out of the Navy in 1959, he moved into the apartSee MCCLELLAN • Page B3

Child’s play no more Grown-ups are increasingly drawn to the booming world of adult coloring books, once a ‘secret guilty pleasure’ lauded for its relaxing and therapeutic beneits

Becky Lohmann (left) and Rob Johnson use crowdfunding to raise money for the 100 Neediest Cases campaign.

BY DOUG MOORE St. Louis Post-Dispatch

After the unrest in Ferguson last year, Becky Lohmann wanted to give back to the community and bring some good into what seemed like a sea of bad. She posted on Facebook information about the 100 Neediest Cases campaign, an annual tradition to help the region’s poorest. Her friend, Rob Johnson, saw the post. He was familiar with the program. His family had adopted cases before. During a text conversation last year, Lohmann asked Johnson: “What do you think about doing this?” Johnson told Lohmann he was definitely in and the two initially planned to go at it alone. But then Johnson suggested extending their reach by setting up an account on GoFundMe, a crowdfunding site, highlighting the case they selected. Then they posted the link to their Facebook pages. “It spread like wildfire,” Johnson said. “We had friends sharing it and people we didn’t really know giving from $10 to $200,” Lohmann said. The two had set a goal of raising $500, but within a few days, donations far surpassed that. Over three weeks, the number grew to $2,655. “When you are in front of a computer, like we all are all day, it’s such an easy way to give,” Lohmann said. Lohmann and Johnson are Catholic high school graduates, taught in environments that encourage giving back. At De Smet Jesuit High School, Johnson’s education was directed

PHOTOS BY ROBERTO RODRIGUEZ

Several customers give adult coloring a try during the Barnes & Noble All-American Art Unwind at Barnes & Noble in Ladue on Nov. 14. Barnes & Noble stores nationwide held the event, which encouraged adults to revisit the world of coloring books. BY DEBRA D. BASS • St. Louis Post-Dispatch

T

he most commonplace childhood playtime pursuit has become an international adult sensation. Coloring books for grown-ups now have an astounding hobbyist caché that no one saw coming. Not even the Scottish illustrator credited with starting the worldwide phenomenon, Johanna Basford. Speaking by phone from her home near Aberdeen, Scotland, Basford said, “A lot of people have said it used to be their secret guilty pleasure.” Now on social media pages, hundreds of thousands of people share their coloring book artwork. Basford introduced sophisticated line drawings signifying a new refinement in coloring books that goes far beyond childish refrigerator art. An illustrator by trade, she works solely in black and white creating intricate hollow designs for companies like Starbucks, Chipotle and liquor labels. Some joked that they liked to color in the lines, and she eventually struck on the idea of an adult coloring book. That was 2013, and the genre wasn’t even large enough to be a niche. For lack of a better option, her first book, “Secret Garden: An Inky Treasure Hunt and Coloring Book” was placed in the children’s activity book section but clearly it wasn’t child’s play.

See SUPPORT • Page B4

GIVING THROUGH CROWDFUNDING Johnson and Lohmann set up a GoFundMe account to raise money for 100 Neediest Cases campaign: www.gofundme.com/stlneedy2015 Eli Gerson, of University City, concentrates as he colors in a geometric design at a Ladue Barnes & Noble Nov. 14.

See BOOKS • Page B2

Tracey Crowder, of St. Louis, colors a greeting card at a Barnes & Noble in Ladue. The adult coloring book genre is a growing segment.

Tracey Crowder (right), and Ursula Austin, both of St. Louis, check out coloring books for grown-ups Nov. 14 at Ladue’s Barnes & Noble.

100 NEEDIEST CASES

PAGE B4

STL SUNDAY

1 M


STL SUNDAY

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUNDAY • 11.29.2015

ALONG FOR THE RIDE

‘Unbuckled’ puts seat belt use in spotlight STATE-BY-STATE LOOK AT REAR SEAT BELT LAWS Missouri is among the 22 states that do not require adults to be belted in when in the back seat at any time.

LEAH THORSEN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Primary enforcement Police can ticket back-seat passengers for not wearing a seat belt without any other traic ofense taking place.

BY LEAH THORSEN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

This weekend, many are hitting the roads to head home after visits to faraway families and friends. AAA estimated that nearly 42 million Americans will drive at least 50 miles from where they live over the Thanksgiving holiday. On a more grim note, the National Safety Council anticipates more than 400 traic fatalities. Both statistics were cited in a report published this month by the Governors Highway Safety Association titled “Unbuckled in Back: An Overlooked Issue in Occupant Protection.” It takes a look at seat belt use by adults riding in the back seat. In 2013, 883 unbuckled backseat passengers died in crashes, the report says: 473 in cars, 244 in SUVs, 98 in pickups and 68 in vans. Yet there are no state or national campaigns that specifically target rear seat belt use by adults, and it’s not highlighted in traic safety messages. While 34 states have primary laws for those in the front seat — meaning police can ticket drivers or passengers for not wearing a seat belt without any other traffic ofense taking place — only 18

Secondary enforcement Police can issue a ticket for not wearing a seat belt only when there is another traic infraction.

Not required Rear seat belt not required by law for adults.

SOURCE: Governors Highway Safety Association

SOME REPORT CONCLUSIONS Four conclusions gleaned from the Governors Highway Safety Association report on seat belt use among adults riding in the back seat: • Adult belt use in the rear seat is 10 to 15 percentage points lower than in the front seat. • Adult belt use in the rear seat is generally higher in states with a primary enforcement rear seat belt law, followed by states with a secondary law, and lower in states with no law. • Adult belt use in the rear seat is generally higher in states with higher front seat belt use. • Adult belt use in the rear seat is substantially higher when the driver is belted.

states, including Illinois, extend that provision to back-seat adult passengers. Ten states have secondary seat

belt laws requiring that adults wear a seat belt in the back seat, so police can issue a ticket for not being belted only when there is

another traic infraction. Missouri is among the 22 states that do not require adults to be belted in when in the back seat at any time. Between 2012 and 2014 across the state, 75 people who rode in the back seat — including children — died in crashes, said Bill Whitfield, highway safety director for the Missouri Department of Transportation. “We definitely support a primary safety belt law for the state for all passengers,” Whitfield said. But such proposals have never garnered enough support in Jefferson City to become law. Critics of seat belt laws say people should be allowed to choose whether to wear them, and that mandating them is government overreach. Whitfield said the state’s seat belt usage rate is 80 percent, below the national average, and the biggest group who won’t wear them are males in pickup trucks. Missouri does have a statewide secondary law for those in the front seat. And 48 cities and counties in the state have passed primary seat belt ordinances, including unincorporated St. Louis County, where adults can ride in the back seat without a seat belt. “We beg people to wear their seat belts no matter what seat they’re sitting in,” said Sgt. Scott Roach, who supervises the county police department’s highway safety unit. He said stressing the importance of wearing a belt while in the back seat is a part of public outreach,

including at schools. And like other states, Missouri sets rules for restraining children in car seats or booster seats, depending on their age and size. The Governors Highway Safety Association report also offers motivation for drivers to encourage their back-seat passengers to buckle up. “In a crash, unbelted rear seat occupants become projectiles that can injure or kill other occupants,” it said. The report cited data showing that a belted driver was more than twice as likely to be fatally injured in a frontal crash when seated in front of an unbelted rear-seat passenger than when seated in front of a belted passenger. It also included statistics showing that rear-seat passengers are three times more likely to die in a crash if unbelted. Also mentioned are highprofile deaths in crashes this year: that of Bob Simon, a correspondent for “60 Minutes” and CBS News, and of John Nash, the mathematician who was the subject of the movie “A Beautiful Mind,” and his wife, Alicia. All three were unbuckled in the back seat — Simon in a limo in Manhattan, the Nashes in a taxi on the New Jersey Turnpike. Said Whitfield, of MoDOT: “We’ve just got to get the public convinced that buckling up is a lifesaving habit.” Leah Thorsen • 314-340-8320 @leahthorsen on Twitter lthorsen@post-dispatch.com

Illustrators ‘gobsmacked’ at popularity of adult coloring books BOOKS • FROM B1

The book became a publishing juggernaut; she has three others that combined have sold nearly 1 million copies this year. She just announced a 2016 calendar. Kris Kleindienst of Left Bank Books predicts that adult coloring books, colored pencils and art pens will be one of their top selling holiday items. She said the Euclid Avenue shop has sold about 1,000 adult coloring books this year. “And that’s about 995 more than we’ve sold any other year,” she said not quite jokingly. Before this adult-coloring boom, she said they only stocked a few Mandala coloring books in the self-help section. Now, the store has 141 diferent titles of adult coloring books. “It can’t last at this pace and level of sales forever; nothing ever does,” Kleindienst said. But, she added, “There are a lot worse things people could be doing with their free time ... and this might actually help their brain health.” Adult coloring falls into the realm of art therapy, an activity credited with reducing stress, increasing concentration, decreasing anxiety and increasing learning functions. But it’s not uncontroversial. Some publishers have taken the “adult” in adult coloring books to the extreme. Really Big Coloring Books of St. Louis recently updated its controversial terrorism-

Jennifer Owen, of Florissant, takes her time with an intricate design. Adult coloring books are growing in popularity.

PHOTOS BY ROBERTO RODRIGUEZ

Eli Gerson (left) and Sara Johnson-Cardona, both of University City, check out each other’s coloring during the Barnes & Noble All-American Art Unwind in Ladue Nov. 14.

themed books to include lessons about the Islamic State. This includes an image of a crucified Christian. Others have ventured into sexual content with marketing copy that reads, “Sex is fun! Coloring is fun! Now, coloring sex is fun!” Still the overwhelming majority of coloring books for adults are graphically illustrated without being graphic. The Rev. Jennifer Owens of St. Mark’s Evangelical Lutheran Church in Clayton said she likes the activity as an escape from the wired world. Proud to call herself a lifelong doodler, she often asks children at her church to draw

pictures related to her sermons. “Invariably, a few adults will give me their drawings, too, which is great,” Owens said. “Some do it jokingly, but they all get the same benefit.” Some people, she said, just need permission to let go of what they think of as acceptable adult behavior. Owens has anonymously given coloring books to parishioners who are going through hard times, saying, “People need to explore a diferent way to relax.” She attended Barnes & Noble’s All-American Art Unwind in Ladue that celebrated adult coloring on Nov. 14. Customers chat-

ted and colored pages by Millie Marotta, another international best-selling coloring book artist known for “Animal Kingdom” and “Tropical World.” Ursula Austin of Northwoods was at the store with her husband and ran into a childhood friend at the huge display of adult coloring books. “We were talking about what a phenomenon it was and how we both had heard about it as a way to destress” and then they announced the in-store event, Austin said. “We were like, ‘For real?’ and we stayed and had a wonderful time, just wonderful.” Artists have known the benefits all along. “I understand why coloring is so relaxing. It’s basically what I do for a living,” said renowned St. Louis illustrator Mary Engelbreit, known for her children’s book

figures who’ve charmed adults all over the world. “You really kind of get in a zone. It really takes you out of yourself.” She’d previously released children’s coloring books. “And I know for a fact that many adults were buying those for themselves,” she said. Engelbreit has a small limitededition book out now, but a new full-length work will be published early next year. Marotta is releasing her third adult coloring book early next year as well. Her publisher asked if she’d be interested in doing a book in 2013 following Basford’s success. “My ears pricked up immediately,” she said speaking from London. Still Marotta said she had no idea of the trend’s magnitude. According to Publisher’s Weekly, coloring books for adults are this year’s “surprise smash hit category.” Marotta’s two previous books sold more than 160,000 copies this year, and the top 10 books in the genre have combined sales of 1.5 million copies, according to Publisher’s Weekly. “I never worried that people would think it was too childish,” Marotta said. “But I struggle to find the words sometimes to express how gobsmacked I am.” Debra D. Bass • 314-340-8236 Fashion editor @debrabass on Twitter dbass@post-dispatch.com

Pat Gauen’s column will appear in Monday’s paper.

Join us to learn about Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) and a possible treatment option Register today by calling 1-844-482-6814 This event is brought to you by Pharmacyclics LLC and Janssen Biotech, Inc; who are the marketers of a treatment option for previously treated CLL.

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For more information please contact: Study Coordinator: Martha Kelley Email: mkelley.rasl@sbcglobal.net 314-839-1211


STL SUNDAY

11.29.2015 • SUNDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • B3

JOE’S ST. LOUIS SPOTLIGHT

‘Sheathing’ hides buildings inside CheckMark site among area examples of structures that now sport ‘a modern skin’ JOE HOLLEMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Safe bet is you’ve seen it, because you attend major sporting or cultural events, or you live south and work in downtown St. Louis. If so, you may have spent a moment wondering what’s inside the orange brick bunker squatting solidly on the northeast corner of Tucker Boulevard and Chouteau Avenue. Oicially, it is CheckMark Communications, the creative arm of Nestlé Purina. The building is part of the company’s corporate headquarters campus. But underneath that bland exterior is an older neo-classical building — the Twelfth Street National Bank — which was covered up in the late 1960s by a construction process known as “sheathing.” “There’s 10 to 15 sheathed buildings like that which still survive in St. Louis,” said Paul Hohmann, an architect with Ebersoldt & Associates who writes about historic buildings and preservation on his website, VanishingSTL.blogspot.com. “After World War II, there was a concerted efort to modernize things, get rid of ‘old stuf.’ Sheathing allowed for the building to remain, but to be covered in a modern skin,” Hohmann said. Most interiors also were renovated into more modern spaces, so old buildings essentially became sandwiched between new shells inside and out, he said. The bank itself is of moderate historical note. Built in 1924, the bank struggled in the Great Depression. President Alfred C.F. Meyer shot and killed himself in 1931 on the grounds of his home near the Sunset Country Club. The bank closed in January 1933 and never reopened. Later, stockholders were hit with lawsuits. The building was sold in 1941 to the Lewin-Mathes Co., which operated a copper pipe and tubing mill in Sauget (the village was then called Monsanto) and a textile mill in north St. Louis. The company later became part of Cerro Flow Products. Ralston Purina bought the building in 1965, and the sheathing took place several years later. Nestlé Purina oicials said the only parts of the old bank still visible inside the building are two iron staircases and a vault in the basement. Hohmann said the chances of restoring CheckMark are virtually nil, because of the sheathing method used. “There are two basic types. One is like taking a curtain and hanging it from the building. While they may have had cornices chiseled of, they are much easier to restore,” Hohmann said, explaining that the curtainlike cover simply can be unfastened from the old structure. One example of that method is the St. Louis Board of Election Commissioners office at 300 North Tucker. It was the Post-Dispatch home from 1917 to 1959. It was later sheathed after the Post-Dispatch moved up the street, and finally unsheathed

COURTESY OF VANISHING STL/PAUL HOHMANN

Looking north on 12th Street, just south of Chouteau Avenue, is the Twelfth Street National Bank (at right), which closed in 1933.

JOE HOLLEMAN • jholleman@post-dispatch.com

The former Twelfth Street National Bank building (upper right) has been sheathed in brick.

in 1999 and restored. But others, like CheckMark and the old Mercantile Library building at Broadway and Locust Street, are examples of the more problematic method of sheathing.

At 80, Chip Wood still a delivery driver MCCLELLAN • FROM B1

ment with his family. By that time, Gloria was married. Chip and his father shared the front bedroom. His mother and Barbara shared the back bedroom. Chip, who had earned his GED while in the Navy, had a series of jobs. He sold men’s clothing at Famous-Barr, and he worked for General Motors. He sold clothes again at E.J. Korvette — a suit and two pairs of pants cost $8 — and he worked as a security guard at the seminary. He could blink his flashlight at his family back in the apartment. He pumped gas at the Mobil station at Big Bend Boulevard and Clayton Road. He also had a series of girlfriends. He was engaged four times. “Twice I chickened out,” he said, “and twice the girls

could read the writing on the wall. I wasn’t going to be successful.” That is, he was not going to make a lot of money. Maybe he didn’t have the ambition. Still, twice as a young man, he left town to seek his fortune. He spent a year in Texas, and then several years in California. He came back to the apartment on DeMun in 1977. It seemed like a surrender of sorts. “Elvis died,” Chip said. “Time to go home.” Orton died in 1982, and then there were just the three of them in the apartment. Rachel, Barbara and Chip. The neighborhood was changing, too. The retail stores had morphed into antique stores. The drugstore, Cytron’s, closed in 1989. By then, I lived in the neighborhood, and I wrote about the end of a neighbor-

“When a building has been sheathed in stone or masonry, they often put it right up against the old wall and glue it, mortar it, right to it.” Hohmann said. “That does a lot more damage when you

hood institution. In 1994, Rachel died. Thirty-eight years after the family had moved into the apartment, they were down to two — Barbara and Chip. Barbara had never married, but she had had a long relationship with a man. “If you asked her about it, she’d say, ‘Why ruin a good friendship?’” Chip said. Barbara worked at Southwestern Bell. Chip was a delivery man. Local stuff. He drove a van. He did not make a lot of money, but between the two of them, they could afford the rent. Which, of course, went up as the years passed and the neighborhood took on a more aluent, hipper character. The antique stores morphed into restaurants, a coffee shop, a candy store, a yoga studio and so on. Barbara died in January. Chip was alone.” I cried for seven days,” he said, “but I still went to work.” He was now alone in the front bedroom, the one he had once shared with his father. By the way, Gloria died in 2014. Chip is now 80 and still in good health. He still makes deliveries five days a week. He has to. His monthly Social Security check is a little more than $700, and rent is

try to strip it away.” Joe Holleman • 314-340-8254 @stlsherpa on Twitter jholleman@post-dispatch.com

$900. Because he has to watch his money, he has never been to any of the restaurants on DeMun. His social life is limited. Every Saturday, he goes to south St. Louis County to visit Marge, a 94-year-old friend he and Barbara met through Gloria. Chip wears an American flag on his collar just as Barbara’s walker, which still sits in the living room, says, “Proud to be an American.” I asked Chip about the American Dream. For many people, the dream includes a house and kids. Does Chip ever think about the women he almost married and what might have been? He thought for a long moment. “Do you ever get a phone call and no one says anything?” he asked. I shook my head. “It happens to me sometimes,” he said. “I know somebody is on the other end, but there’s no sound. I think maybe it’s one of them thinking about me, and I always say something nice.” Bill McClellan • 314-340-8143 @Bill_McClellan on Twitter bmcclellan@post-dispatch.com

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B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

STL SUNDAY

M 1 • SUnDAy • 11.29.2015

100 NEEDIEST CASES: HELPING THOUSANDS

War is still taking a toll on family CASE 37

TWO WAYS TO GIVE

When she fled her home country, HC left much of her family, including her parents, in the clutches of war. Now in St. Louis, the 28-year-old mother is working to learn English and a new culture. She recently found a job through a temp agency. But now she faces the challenge of finding afordable child care that’s reliable and decent for her three daughters, who range in age from 1 to 9. Her girls could use winter clothes, beds and educational toys. HC is asking for help in making the holidays better for them.

• Donors can adopt any of the cases — not just the 100 proiled at STLtoday.com/neediest. The program supplies donors with a list of a family’s needs. All gifts go directly to the family, through a social worker. • The program also accepts monetary gifts. Every dollar will go directly to a needy family, and every family will receive something.

CASE 38

TO HELP

In the St. Louis medical examiner’s morgue, Mrs. Y identified the body of her 30-yearold daughter after she was found shot in the back of the head this past September. Her daughter left behind five children, ages 2, 3, 9, 13 and 15. Mrs. Y is caring for them on a limited budget of $1,100 that must cover $600 in rent plus the cost of utilities and other expenses. She needs help with rent, clothing, shoes for all including herself, food, utilities and other essentials.

Visit 100neediestcases.org Or call 314-421-6060 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on weekdays. Or mail a check payable to: 100 Neediest Cases P.O. Box 955925 St. Louis, Mo. 63195

HOW IT WORKS • For generations, the 100 Neediest Cases campaign has helped thousands of disadvantaged families during the holidays. This year, the program will beneit 13,127 needy households – selected by social service agencies that work with the United Way. The Post-Dispatch is showcasing 100 cases. But all the families will share the cash donations.

CASE 39 K is a single mother of three who has been disabled since she was in a serious car accident several years ago, which left her unable to work. Her sons are 15 and 7 and her daughter is 12. She also has fibromyalgia, hypertension, anxiety and asthma. Her 15-year-old has autism and developmental delays. She keeps most of their belongings in a garage because they have little storage space, but it was just damaged in a fire. The family is hoping for a television and a computer this holiday season. Proiles by Elisa Crouch, Denise Hollinshed and Christine Byers of the Post-Dispatch.

CASSANDRA GALLARDO • MICDS

Friends see donations add up via power of crowdfunding SUPPORT • FROM B1

by the school’s mission statement, which reads, in part, that the young men enrolled there “achieve success through positively impacting the lives of those around them” and they are “committed to doing justice in generous service to the people of God.” At St. Joseph’s Academy, where Lohmann attended, “our community expects these young women to make a profound impact on the world,” the school states on its website. Both are graduates of University of Missouri-Columbia, and were active in Greek organizations that had charitable focuses, Lohmann said.

Lohmann, 28, and Johnson, 29, selected one of the cases published in 2014 in the Post-Dispatch, which partners with the United Way of Greater St. Louis for the annual campaign, now in its 93rd year. Although the tradition of giving is named after the 100 cases published, there are thousands more from which to choose. They adopted a woman who had successfully fought cancer but was struggling with other health issues while raising her three autistic children. “A single mom overcoming cancer and taking care of special needs children pulled at our heart strings,” said Lohmann, a lobbyist for Catalyst, a government afairs firm.

“Her story really stood out,” added Johnson, a client associate for Wells Fargo Advisors. Lohmann, of Columbia, Mo., said there are many great ways to give during the holidays but she chose the 100 Neediest Cases campaign, in part, because there are no administrative fees. Donations for an adopted family are typically funneled through a case manager for one of the 70 social service agencies participating in the campaign. But in this instance, the case manager said that if Lohmann wanted to drop of the gifts, she could. Lohmann and her husband, John, loaded up his truck and delivered the goods, which included clothes, boots, towels, dishes, sheets, games, toys and

two Target gift cards in addition to a $2,200 check. The items included some things that donors wanted to purchase of the family’s wishlist instead of giving cash. “Being able to meet the family face-to-face, it was incredibly emotional,” Lohmann said. “The feeling in your heart is amazing.” Johnson, of Clayton, said he was surprised at the outpouring of support. “It’s really incredible how something as simple as us setting up a GoFundMe account and sharing it on Facebook changed our needy family’s life,” he said. “A bunch of small donations from a big group of friends adds up quickly.” Johnson and Lohmann have

adopted another family this year, an Army veteran who is raising his 15-year-old twin boys. The family of three lives with the man’s mother. They requested food, clothing and financial assistance with rent and utilities. Johnson and Lohmann have set up another GoFundMe account, with a goal of raising $5,000 for the family. They think they can beat that, maybe even double it, learning from their experience last year and the power of social media. “We’re going to blow $2,200 out of the water,” Lohmann said. Doug Moore • 314-340-8125 @dougwmoore on Twitter dmoore@post-dispatch.com

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11.29.2015 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B5


B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 11.29.2015

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HOLIDAY ARTS PREVIEW

SUNDAY • 11.29.2015 • C

FAVORITE STORIES LIVE ON BY JUDITH NEWMARK • St. Louis Post-Dispatch

PHOTO BY LON BRAUER

‘Peter and the Starcatcher’ and ‘Wicked’ play St. Louis theaters for the holidays

At the dawn of the 20th century, two stories were born that would reshape our imagination for years — right up to the present day. In England in 1904, James M. Barrie wrote a play about a flying, eternally youthful boy. In America in 1900, L. Frank Baum wrote a book about a Kansas girl who travels, via tornado, to a magical land of wizards and witches, scarecrows and tin men and cowardly lions. Both stories were immediate hits — and today, we continue to mine them. Most popular culture of the early 1900s is long gone, but “Peter Pan” and “The Wizard of Oz” lie just beneath two of the biggest See HOLIDAYS • Page C3

See more musicals and plays coming this season. PAGE C3

Alyssa Fox plays Elphaba in “Wicked” at the Fox Theatre. Spencer Davis Milford and Betsy Hogg star in “Peter and the Starcatcher” at the Repertory Theatre of St. Louis.

JOAN MARCUS

Classical music concerts for every taste BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The holidays are here; heralding them are this year’s holiday concerts, a variety of music and celebrations. As usual, the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra has the most to offer in terms of the sheer number

and variety of its offerings. This year, the SLSO begins with four performances of Handel’s great oratorio “Messiah;” its cast, led by conductor Bernard Labadie, includes soprano Lydia Teuscher, mezzo-soprano Allison McHardy, tenor Jeremy Ovenden and bass-baritone Philippe Sly, along with the St. Louis Symphony Chorus, directed by Amy

Kaiser. • 8 p.m. Thursday, Friday and Dec. 5; 3 p.m. Dec. 6 at Powell Symphony Hall, 718 North Grand Boulevard. $29-$109. 314-5341700; stlsymphony.org Music director David Robertson leads three performances of “Music of John Williams,” a pops spectacular that includes

selections from “Home Alone,” the “Harry Potter” series and, of course, “Star Wars.” • 7 p.m. Dec. 11 and 12; 2 p.m. Dec. 13, Powell Symphony Hall. $30-$65 The 2015 edition of “A Gospel Christmas” features tenor Thomas Young, the In Unison See CLASSICAL • Page C12

Pop music • Trans-Siberian Orchestra and El Monstero return. PAGE C12 Jazz/dance • Swing into the season with jazz groups and “Nutcracker.” PAGE C5 Family events • Skate with Santa, celebrate Hanukkah and ride the Polar Express. PAGE C6

A&E

Starts ! Friday

1 M

30 ARTISTS...300 COSTUMES... 20 ACTS...“DAZZLING” -The Washington Post

Fox Theatre • December 4- 6 Fri. 7:30PM • Sat. 2 & 7:30PM Sun. 1 & 6PM 314-534-1111 or MetroTix.com


A&E

C2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

ON OUR RADAR

M 1 • SUNDAY • 11.29.2015

JODY MITORI assistant managing editor/features • jmitori@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8240 JANE HENDERSON book editor • jhenderson@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8107 DONNA BISCHOFF A&E advertising • dbischof@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8529 GET YOUR EVENT LISTED events.stltoday.com • stltoday.com/pr

SEE MORE AT STLTODAY.COM/GO SABER BATTLE

WINNERS IN THE RING

WANT TO TRY SOMETHING NEW?

Cast your vote for the area’s biggest “Star Wars” fan in our “Fan Wars” contest.

For the opening of “Creed,” we compiled our list of 7 great boxing ilms.

Critic Ian Froeb found 10 new restaurants that have opened since September.

NEW ON DVD “Amy” ★★★★ (R; 2:08) • Asif Kapadia’s sensitive, superbly constructed, ultimately shattering documentary about singer Amy Winehouse’s life and career, doesn’t traic in the cliches of demons and trainwrecks. Rather, it interrogates them, allowing Winehouse to come into her own as a gifted, conflicted, self-destructive but deeply resilient young woman who died far too soon. (The Washington Post) “Mississippi Grind” ★★★½ (R; 1:48) • Ben Mendelsohn and Ryan Reynolds are perfect in this ’70s-style comedy-drama about a couple of gamblers on a road trip. Written and directed by Anna Boden and Ryan Fleck (“Sugar”). (Calvin Wilson) “Mistress America” ★★★ (R; 1:24) • Greta Gerwig and Lola Kirke star in this tale of a flashy New Yorker and a newcomer to the city who falls under her spell. Slow to get going, but well worth seeing for a sequence of inspired screwball zaniness. Directed by Noah Baumbach (“While We’re Young”), who collaborated with Gerwig on the screenplay. (Calvin Wilson) Coming Dec. 8 • “Ant-Man,” “Minions”

FIND O SH WTIMES & REVIEWS STLTODAY.COM/ MOVIES

TICKET TRACKER ➥ Find more concert announcements. stltoday.com/blender • Journey and the Doobie Brothers, July 30 at Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre, $30.50$152, Livenation.com.

• Down to the River: A Tribute to Bruce Springsteen, 8 p.m. Dec. 30 at Of Broadway, $10. Ticketfly.com.

• Nick Carter, 8 p.m. March 24 at the Ready Room, $35-$40. Ticketfly.com. • America, 8 p.m. June 26 at River City Casino, $39.50-$59.50. Ticketmaster.com.

Photo: Kris Bueltmann, bbmphoto.com

• Hoodie Allen, SuperDuperKyle,

BlackBear, 8 p.m. Feb. 24 at the Pageant, $27.50-$30. Ticketmaster.com.

NEW IN THEATERS “Creed” ★★★★ (PG-13; 2:09) • Michael B. Jordan reteams with “Fruitvale Station” director Ryan Coogler for this thrilling extension of the “Rocky” franchise. Jordan is brilliant as the son of boxer Apollo Creed, and Sylvester Stallone once again plays Rocky Balboa. With Tessa Thompson. (Calvin Wilson) “The Good Dinosaur” ★★★ (PG; 1:40) • “The Lion King” meets “Ice Age”

in this gorgeously animated but all-toopredictable holiday ofering from Pixar. (Sarah Bryan Miller) “Legend” ★★½ (R; 2:11) • Tom Hardy plays twin British gangsters Reggie and Ronnie Kray in this unnecessary and repetitive drama from writer-director Brian Helgeland. The mayhem is hard to watch, but the film is noteworthy for Hardy’s terrific performances. (CW)

“Victor Frankenstein” ★ (PG-13; 1:49) • This forgettable retelling of Mary Shelley’s seminal horror tale has a dash of Marvel Comics and a revisionist perspective thrown in for flavor. Although the mad doctor with a God complex (James McAvoy) gets title billing, the star this time is his faithful assistant Igor (Daniel Radclife). (Miami Herald)

Christmas CandlelightConcert a St. Louis favorite

World-renowned soprano Christine Brewer joins the Bach Society Chorus and Orchestra to sing“The Announcement of Christ’s Birth”from Handel’s Messiah and“O Holy Night”. The St. Louis Children’s Choirs, sponsored by Jan & Katy VerHagen, join in for the candlelight procession and seasonal carols. A St. Louis favorite for decades, this concert is guaranteed to create the perfect holiday family experience. St. Louis Children’s Choirs

For tickets, visit www.bachsociety.org or call: 314-534-1700 A. Dennis Sparger, Music Director and Conductor

Christine Brewer

Wednesday December 23, 2015 7:30 p.m. Powell Hall 718 North Grand Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63103 Presented by


HOLIDAY ARTS PREVIEW

11.29.2015 • Sunday • M 1

JOHN LAMB

Mustard Seed Theatre will remount its production of “All Is Calm: The Christmas Truce of 1914.”

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • C3

HANDOUT

The holiday musical “Elf” plays at the Peabody Opera House in December.

JUSTIN BEEN

From left: Brandon Brendel, Sarajane Alverson and Ryan Wiechmann in “Devil Boys From Beyond” at Stray Dog.

Put down the gingerbread; see what’s on stage BY JUDITH NEWMARK St. Louis Post-dispatch

With “Peter and the Starcatcher” at the Rep and “Wicked” making its fifth return to the Fox, St. Louis hardly lacks for entertainment during the holidays. But besides those two big productions, there’s lots more to choose among — some shows perfect for the season, and some perfect for theatergoers who’d welcome a break from all the tinsel and gingerbread. If you’re feeling totally ho-hoho, there’s “Elf the Musical” at the Peabody Opera House to keep your spirits bright. The show about a misfit elf who spends Christmas in New York comes with a built-in fan base, thanks to the 2003 Will Ferrell movie that inspired the stage production. The songs are by Matthew Sklar and Chad Beguelin. • Dec. 26-27 at the Peabody Opera House, 1400 Market Street. $30$82. 1-800-982-2787; ticketmaster. com “Cirque Dreams Holidaze” promises the ultimate in holiday decorations and thrills with its lavish combination of some 20 acts, 30 performers, 300 costumes and a 30-foot-tall tree. Toy soldiers and snowmen who

walk thin wires and athletic gingerbread men who sail through the air are among the many characters that director Neil Goldberg brings together for this gravity-defying spectacular at the Fox. • Friday through Dec. 6 at the Fox Theatre, 527 North Grand Boulevard. $25-$75. The Dec. 4 show is Kids’ Night at the Fabulous Fox; in certain sections, each child’s ticket is free with the purchase of an adult ticket. For the Fox’s “Thanks 4 Giving” campaign, canned food donations are accepted at the box oice. Each donation of four cans is worth $4 of the price of a ticket. 314-5341111; metrotix.com In a gentler, more thoughtful approach to Christmas, Mustard Seed Theatre remounts its production of “All Is Calm: The Christmas Truce of 1914” for the third time. Hugely successful in its first two outings, the show won the St. Louis Theatre Circle Award for outstanding musical in 2014. Based on real events, “All Is Calm” tells the story of how soldiers on both sides of the conflict, without their superiors’ approval or even their knowledge, lay down their weapons on the first Christmas Eve of World War I to celebrate the holiday

together. An a cappella musical, “All Is Calm” tells its story through carols and period songs in English, French and German. This show sells out fast. • Through Dec. 20 at the Fontbonne University Fine Arts Theatre, 6800 Wydown Boulevard. $25-$30; “pay with a can” of food performances on Thursdays. 314-719-8060; mustardseedtheatre.com But maybe you have enough holiday magic at home, at work and at every store you enter. Maybe you go to the theater in search of something — anything! — else. You too can take your pick. A musical written and directed by Ken Page — one of St. Louis’ favorite Muny and cabaret performers, as well as a St. Louisan himself — makes its world premiere at Max & Louie. In “Sublime Intimacy,” five friends recall their lost loves — each one a dancer who touched him or her profoundly and forever. Alfredo Solivan plays all the dancers, performing a variety of dance styles; Henry Palkes composed the original music. • Friday through Dec. 20 at the Kranzberg Arts Center, 501 North Grand Boulevard. $35-$40. 414795-8778; maxandlouie.com Two tender stories of friendship also hit the boards. In “Animals

out of Paper” at R-S, a brilliant but depressed origami artist finds her self-imposed solitude disrupted when a high school calculus teacher brings her his most gifted student, an origami prodigy. As their relationships develop, all three lives are changed. • Through Dec. 6 at the Chapel, 6238 Alexander Drive. $18-$20. 314-252-8812; r-stheatrics.com In “The Gin Game” — the play that put the Humana Festival of New American Plays on the map and brought the 1978 Pulitzer Prize in drama to author Donald L. Coburn — a man and woman in a nursing home strike up a relationship around an endless series of card games that the woman always wins. As they play, their lengthy conversations turn into a kind of contest, too. Just revived on Broadway, “The Gin Game” continues the “Season of Mind Games” at the St. Louis Actors’ Studio. • Friday through Dec. 20 at the Gaslight Theater, 358 North Boyle Avenue. $30-$35. 1-800-982-2787; ticketmaster.com Looking for comedy? OK, you asked for it. The New Jewish Theatre presents the blistering “Bad Jews” by Josh Harmon, the story of young-adult cousins

who take the occasion of their grandfather’s funeral to lay into each other, particularly in terms of who is or is not a good Jew. Improbable as it may sound, the comedy has been widely produced to big audiences and considerable acclaim. • Thursday through Dec. 20 at the Wool Studio Theatre at the JCC, 2 Millstone Campus Drive. $39.50-$43.50. 314-442-3283; newjewishtheatre.org But for pure silliness, it would be hard to top “Devil Boys From Beyond” at Stray Dog, a campy mash-up that parodies two ’50s-era genres: trashy romance novels and B-grade sci-fi movies. Drawn from the same well that inspired such previous Stray Dog triumphs as “Die! Mommie! Die!” and “Psycho Beach Party,” “Devil Boys from Beyond” was a big hit at the New York Fringe Festival. • Thursday through Dec. 19 at the Tower Grove Abbey, 2336 Tennessee Avenue. $20-$25. 314865-1995; straydogtheatre.com As the bumper sticker says, “Go see a play.” Judith Newmark • 314-340-8243 Theater critic @judithnewmark on Twitter jnewmark@post-dispatch.com

‘Starcatcher’ answers how Peter Pan learned to ly HOLIDAYS • FROM C1

shows of our new century: “Peter and the Starcatcher,” which is about to make its debut at the Repertory Theatre of St. Louis, and the musical “Wicked,” returning to the Fox Theatre for the fifth time. An acclaimed excursion into “story theater,” “Peter and the Starcatcher” uses the simplest of props to create its enchanted world of pirates, mermaids and lost boys. The play (not a musical, though there’s music in it) is a prequel to “Peter Pan,” adapted for the stage by Rick Elice from books by humor columnist Dave Barry and St. Louis author Ridley Pearson. The “Starcatcher” saga was born when Pearson’s daughter Paige, just 5 years old at the time, asked him how Peter Pan learned to fly. Pearson had to admit that he didn’t know. The result was a popular series of books to answer that question, and many others, about the Never Land. “Wicked” also began as a novel, written by Gregory Maguire. Maguire turned Baum’s story of “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz” on its head. The Wicked Witch of the West, Elphaba (a play on Baum’s name), is its heroine, a misunderstood green girl who uses her considerable powers to protect her animal friends and others whom she loves, even from the alien visitor Dorothy Gale. Every story has two sides; with the big boost from songs by Stephen Schwartz, “Wicked” lets Elphaba’s version trump Dorothy’s at long last. In these contemporary retellings, both stories retain the appeal they exerted from the first — an appeal that charms adults as well as children. They have permeated our culture. Maybe they were always there. “The mythology James Barrie created existed before he wrote his story” Elice said. “He just named it for us. Now Peter Pan and Dorothy Gale are in our DNA, in the soup. Even if you never before saw or read ‘Peter Pan’ or ‘The Wizard of Oz,’ you recognize them on a deep emotional level. They rekindle something in us.” We want to reshape them over the years because “we are the children of these stories,” Pearson said. “Every time we reinvent them, we get to bring something new to them — something that brings them back yet keeps them fresh. It’s an homage.”

PHOTO BY JOAN MARCUS

Alyssa Fox and Carrie St. Louis in “Wicked” at the Fox.

Today, “Peter Pan” may refer to anything from a brand of peanut butter to a “complex” describing immature men who “won’t grow up” (as Peter sings in the timeless Moose Charlap/ Carolyn Leigh score, made famous by Mary Martin). If you follow a dream, you may take “the yellow brick road” to the “Emerald City”; if you find yourself in unfamiliar circumstances, you may observe that you’re “not in Kansas any more.” Pulitzer Prize-winning dramatist Tony Kushner employed “The Wizard of Oz” as a running motif in his great, decidedly modern pair of dramas, “Angels in America.” Both stories have been had many versions, on stage and in film. Earlier this year “Pan” was released, starring Hugh Jackman and Levi Miller; next year, the Muny season will open with “The Wizard of Oz.” On Thursday, NBC will broadcast its live holiday musical, “The Wiz”; last year, NBC’s live holiday musical was “Peter Pan.” None of this surprises Dr. Joan Luby, professor of child psychiatry at the Washington University School of Medicine. Both “Peter Pan” and “The Wizard of Oz,” she said, deal with separation from parents — one of the earliest, and most painful, crisis that people have to face. Such universal traumas are the natural wellsprings of art. An actual orphan who is

‘WICKED’ When • Dec. 9-Jan. 3 Where • Fox Theatre, 527 North Grand Boulevard How much • $40-$200 More info • 314-534-1111; metrotix. com; fabulousfox.com

‘PETER AND THE STARCATCHER’ When • Wednesday through Dec. 27 Where • Browning Mainstage at the Loretto-Hilton Center, 130 Edgar Road How much • $17.50-$79.50 More info • 314-968-4925; repstl. org

ripped from her safe, albeit dull, home with her parent-figures, Aunt Em and Uncle Henry, Dorothy visits the Land of Oz “on a journey that’s both wonderful and frightening,” Luby said. Think of the toddler on a playground, she suggests, delighting in the chance to play “all by herself” as long as she can run back to the security of Mom when freedom gets to be too scary. That’s Dorothy’s magic trip in a nutshell — a marvelous adventure that concludes with the realization that “there’s no place like home.” Elphaba, on the other hand, would never say such a thing. Disdained by her father because of her green skin — which hints that she’s not exactly part of

the family anyway — Elphaba encounters more rejection at boarding school. No wonder she develops strong attachments to her one friend, Galinda, and to their handsome classmate Fiyero; she’s had to bottle up her feelings all her life. (Peter, too, is uneasy with emotional expression; he has no idea why Wendy and the little fairy Tinker Bell always want to kiss him.) Looking for a place she belongs and for the father she never had, Elphaba longs to go to the Emerald City. When that turns, catastrophically, into an Oz-wide calamity, Elphaba defies gravity and creates a place of her own: “If you care to find me,” she sings, “Look to the Western sky!/ As someone told me lately: ‘Everyone deserves the chance to fly!’” Like Dorothy Gale, Peter Pan is an orphan — an orphan who, in the “Starcatcher” treatment, is subject to privations that recall English literature’s most famous orphan boy, Oliver Twist. We know, of course that he has better days ahead, the gallant spirit of youth, joy and freedom who will frolic in the Never Land. But ask yourself: At the start of “Peter Pan,” when he’s in his element, why does he spend his nights hanging around the Darling family’s window? He wants to hear bedtime stories! Peter explicitly brings Wendy Darling to the Never Land

to be a story-telling, lullabysinging mother to his gaggle of Lost Boys. (Her brothers, Michael and John, are sort of an afterthought.) Born into Edwardian comfort, the Darling children are far from neglected. But on the night when they fly out the window with Peter, their parents have gone to a party and their father, in a fit of pique, has banished the nurse, Nana, from the children’s room. Nana is a large dog, so perhaps we’re entitled to some doubts about the Darlings’ parenting style. Like Dorothy Gale, Wendy Darling and her brothers enjoy thrilling adventures before they return to the security and comforts of home, bringing the Lost Boys with them. Guilt-stricken, Mr. Darling agrees to adopt them all. The Darlings would be glad to adopt Peter, too, but he’s not interested. In the tension between roots and wings, Peter — like Elphaba — is all about the sky. Both of our favorite new versions of these familiar stories seem to endorse their renegade point of view. Wendy isn’t even a character in “Peter and the Starcatcher”; her precursor Molly, an apprentice starcatcher who befriends Peter, is quite the bold adventurer herself. As for Dorothy, she barely figures in “Wicked” at all. But even if our latest protagonists reject domestic life, the deep-seated roots-and-wings conflict that we all have experienced purrs like an engine at the heart of their stories. That makes them effective as children’s stories, which is how they were seen to begin with. But that struggle between family and individuality never really goes away, Luby points out, and that’s why adults also respond to the original stories as well as to their modern incarnations. “Separation and rapprochement are a huge issue in early childhood,” she explained. “But the thing is, we always need periodic (emotional) refueling. “There’s always that tension between home and away, home and away. And that is why we keep coming back to these stories as adults. We’re talking about a lifelong process.” Judith Newmark • 314-340-8243 Theater critic @judithnewmark on Twitter jnewmark@post-dispatch.com


C4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 11.29.2015

NAUGHTY OR NICE, WICKED TICKETS MAKE A GREAT GIFT

“If every musical had the brain, the heart and the courage of WICKED, Broadway really would be a magical place.” -TIME Magazine

DECEMBER 9 – JANUARY 3 THE FABULOUS FOX THEATRE

GREEN MEANS GO – GET WICKED MetroTix.com 314-534-1111 • Groups 15+ 314-535-2900


HOLIDAY ARTS PREVIEW

11.29.2015 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • C5

‘Nutcracker,’ jazz groups swing into season • Monday at the Fox Theatre, 527 North Grand Boulevard. $31-$125 (plus VIP packages). 314-534-1111; MetroTix.com

BY CALVIN WILSON St. Louis Post-dispatch

Another holiday season brings fine opportunities to hear jazz and take in dance performances. So what if it’s cold outside? It’s just a short trip from the heat of your car to the warmth of the arts — and these Yuletide highlights.

“So You Think You Can Dance”: The popular TV series is on tour, showcasing some of its top performers. And get this: they’re not doing “The Nutcracker.” • Wednesday at the Fox Theatre, 527 North Grand Boulevard. $39.50-$59.50 (plus VIP packages). 314534-1111; MetroTix.com

JAZZ Sylvie Courvoisier and Mark Feldman: If you doubt just how much music can be generated by just two musicians, pianist Courvoisier and violinist Feldman will likely change your worldview. This New Music Circle presentation should be must listening for fans of modern sounds. • Friday at the Stage at KDHX, 3524 Washington Boulevard. $10-$20. newmusiccircle.org

COURTESY OF THE FOX THEATRE

“The Little Dancer: Moved by the Masters”: This annual holiday favorite, inspired by a Degas statuette of a young ballerina, will be performed by COCA’s Ballet Eclectica. •Dec. 11, 13 at COCA, 524 Trinity Avenue. $14-$18. cocastl.org

Moscow Ballet’s “Great Russian Nutcracker” comes to the Fox Theatre on Monday.

Victor Goines Quartet: Perhaps best known for his work with trumpeter Wynton Marsalis, saxophonist Goines has been embraced by local jazz fans through his appearances at the Sheldon Concert Hall. He’ll lead a quartet in a benefit concert for his special guest, the Sheldon’s

North County Big Band. • Dec. 6 at the Sheldon Concert Hall, 3648 Washington Boulevard. $15$35. 314-534-1111; MetroTix. com The 442s Holiday Spectacular: The jazz/classical/ pop quartet celebrates the

Alexandra Ballet: “The Nutcracker”: Alexandra Ballet’s one-hour version of “The Nutcracker” is narrated by Elizabeth Reichert. • Dec. 13 at Purser Center at Logan University in Chesterield. Free-$21.50. alexandraballet.com

holiday season with three very special guests: pianist Peter Martin and vocalists Eric Bode and Brian Owens. • Dec. 8 at 560 Music Center, 560 Trinity Avenue, University City. $15-$25. 314935-6543; edison.wustl.edu

The 442s Holiday Spectacular is Dec. 8 at 560 Music Center.

Wild Lights Visit Kali at U.S. Bank r family waiting for you and you

There are big surprises nell Polar Louis Zoo. Chill at McDon this holiday at the Saint and buzz st Coa fin Puf & n gui Pen Bear Point, waddle by ke merry ma n, The m. ariu Insect through the Monsanto over and ls ma t-up ani with a menagerie of ligh ts! ligh g zlin 500,000 wild, daz . 2–13 Nov. 29 | Wed.–Sun. Dec 30, Jan. 1–3 Nightly Dec. 16–23, 26– 5:30–8:30 p.m.

Matt Wilson’s Christmas Tree-O: Drummer Wilson, who has played alongside such jazz greats as the late Dewey Redman, has become popular with listeners beyond the usual jazz crowd. Wilson’s trio puts its spin on the holiday spirit in a Jazz St. Louis presentation. • Dec. 16-19 at Ferring Jazz Bistro, 3536 Washington Boulevard. $10-$35. jazzstl. org Jazz St. Louis Big Band: Among the joys of jazz is the legendary Duke

Ellington’s version of “The Nutcracker.” And you can hear that swinging creation when the Jazz St. Louis Big Band takes the stage at the Bistro. • Dec. 21-23 at Ferring Jazz Bistro, 3536 Washington Boulevard. $25. jazzstl.org

DANCE Moscow Ballet’s “Great Russian Nutcracker”: Tchaikovsky’s holiday perennial is a perfect match for this Russian company, which brings a touch of cultural authenticity to the proceedings.

St. Louis Ballet: “The Nutcracker”: The Chesterfield-based ballet ensemble has enjoyed success with an approach to the Tchaikovsky classic that has been popular with children and adults alike. • Dec. 17-23 at the Blanche M. Touhill Performing Arts Center, University of Missouri-St. Louis, 8001 Natural Bridge Road, $22-$61. 314-516-4949; touhill.org Missouri Ballet Theatre: “The Nutcracker”: The company offers its take on the holiday favorite. • Dec. 18-20 at the Edison Theatre, Washington University, 6445 Forsyth Boulevard. $40. 314-9356543; edison.wustl.edu Calvin Wilson • 314-340-8346 @calvinwilsonstl on Twitter calvinwilson@post-dispatch.com

O S TH IS

-New York Magazine

N

P R E V I E W O P E N S TO DAY

“Spectacle, wit and joy spill out of it like treasure.”

PE

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HOLIDAY ARTS PREVIEW

C6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 11.29.2015

Family events include ‘Polar Express,’ visits with Santa BY JODY MITORI St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Shaw Boulevard. Prices vary. 314492-4331; mobot.org

Christmas Traditions in St. Charles • The monthlong holiday celebration includes visits to Santa’s Cottage, caroling, marshmallow roasting and more. • Through Dec. 24 on Historic Main Street in St. Charles. Free. stcharleschristmas.com

The Polar Express Train Ride • Take a train ride from St. Louis Union Station and listen to the children’s book “The Polar Express.” The trip also includes hot chocolate and cookies, Christmas carols and a visit from Santa Claus. A Grand Hall Magical Holiday Dinner and Show is also available. • Through Dec. 30 at St. Louis Union Station, 1820 Market Street. $39$75 for train; $20-$25 for bufet. stlpolarexpressride.com

Missouri Botanical Garden • The third year of the Garden Glow, which goes through Jan. 2, features 28 light installations and activities for families. Model trains travel through a landscape of festive plants at the Gardenland Express show, through Jan. 3. Celebrate Hanukkah with a menorah-lighting ceremony and music on Dec. 6. At Saturday With Santa on Dec. 12, kids can share what’s on their Christmas list. On Dec. 30, observe Kwanzaa with craft displays, storytelling and African drumming. • Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344

St. Louis Zoo • Enjoy hundreds of thousands of holiday lights, fireside stories and crafts at Wild Lights through Jan. 3. Meet St. Nick and have a buffet meal at Breakfast With Santa on Dec. 5, 6, 12, 13, 19 and 20. (Reservations required.) Or have Dinner With Santa instead, Dec. 18-20. (Reservations required.) • St. Louis Zoo, Forest Park. Prices

vary. 314-781-0900; stlzoo.org

Historic Holiday Traditions at the Old Courthouse • See authentic Victorian décor in the rotunda and enjoy holiday music in a free concert series. • Noon Wednesday and Dec. 9, 16 and 23 at Old Courthouse, 11 North Fourth Street. Free. 1-877-9821410; gatewayarch.com Maplewood Christmas Tree Walk • Carolers, a visit from Santa and the lighting of the Christmas tree are part of the annual event. • 6-9 p.m. Friday in downtown Maplewood. Free. maplewoodchamber.com Skate With Santa • Forest Park’s historic outdoor rink hosts Santa. • Dec. 5 at Steinberg Skating Rink, Forest Park. $7. steinbergskatingrink.com Christmas Candlelight Tours • Thousands of candles light the

way for visitors to experience an early 1800s Christmas at the Daniel Boone Home. • Friday and Dec. 5 and Dec. 11-12 at Daniel Boone Home and Heritage Center, 868 Highway F, Deiance. $15 for adults, $10 for children. danielboonehome.com Breakfast With Santa • Watch Chris Cakes Catering’s chef toss pancakes in the air, take a photo with Santa and make a holiday craft. • Dec. 6 and 13 at the Magic House, 516 South Kirkwood Road. $20 per person, $15 for members. Reservations required. magichouse.org St. Louis Art Museum • Winter Celebrations from Dec. 11 to 13 is weekend of crafts, caroling and treats. “Kwanzaa: Under the Baobab Tree” on Dec. 27 features performances for a Kwanzaa celebration, sponsored in collaboration with Delta Sigma Theta Sorority’s St. Louis alumnae.

• St. Louis Art Museum, Forest Park. Free. slam.org Family Holiday Evening • “Frozen” sisters Anna and Elsa will perform a holiday story and art projects will be available for kids 12 and under. • Dec. 16, Foundry Art Center, 520 North Main Center, St. Charles. Free. 636-255-0270; foundryartcentre.org

Winter Getaway • Highlights at the Missouri History Museum include screenings of “Happy Feet” (Dec. 26), “Inside Out” (Dec. 27) and “Minions” (Dec. 28) and special performances by Circus Flora (Dec. 29) and The Celia and Little Celia Puppet Show (Dec. 30). Children also are invited to make a craft at drop-in “Make-And-Takes.” • Dec. 26-30 at the Missouri History Museum, Forest Park. Free. mohistory.org Find more on holiday light displays at stltoday. com/hotlist.

Fabulous Holidays at GIFT IDEA - FOX THEATRE TICKETS

EARLY GIFT - SEE A SHOW

JANUARY 19-31

FEBRUARY 12-14

FEB. 23 - MARCH 6

MARCH 11-13

MARCH 15-27

APRIL 5-17

Fox Theatre Gift Cards are also available DECEMBER 4-6

APRIL 26 - MAY 8

314-534-1111

fabulousfox.com

MAY 18-22

MetroTix.com

Sir Winston Churchill, Boats at Cannes Harbor, 1937. Oil on canvas, 24 x 30". National Churchill Museum at Westminster College, Fulton, Missouri. © Churchill Heritage Ltd.

NOVEMBER 13, 2015–FEBRUARY 14, 2016

This exhibition is made possible by the generous support of leadership sponsors Mr. and Mrs. Richard J. Mahoney as well as the J. M Kaplan Fund and

kemperartmuseum.wustl.edu


11.29.2015 • SUNDAY • M 1

A&E: TELEVISION

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • C7

Elaine Hendrix visits St. Louis to help Stray Rescue Known for her work on the FX comedy ‘Sex&Drugs&Rock&Roll,’ the actress also is busy as an animal rights activist GAIL PENNINGTON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Elaine Hendrix as Ava in FX’s “Sex&Drugs&Rock&Roll.” Hendrix is a member of the board of Stray Rescue of St. Louis.

Elaine Hendrix loves acting, but if she had a chance, she might spend all her time helping dogs find homes. Hendrix co-stars with Denis Leary on the comedy “Sex&Drugs&Rock&Roll,” picked up for a second season on FX. During her hiatus, she’s been busy with two movies. But this week, she’ll take a break and fly to St. Louis to join Stray Rescue founder Randy Grim at the “Hope for the Holidays” fundraising gala for the organization, of which she’s a board member. “I might even get to go rescuing,” she says, clearly delighted at the prospect. Hendrix, 45, who grew up in Tennessee and has spent her adult life in Los Angeles, was already an animal rights activist when, “at some event or other,” she met Grim. “We hit it off right away,” she says. “I mean, who doesn’t fall in love with Randy?” (The feeling is mutual. “I love her,” Grim says of Hendrix. “She is like a sister to me.”) After visiting St. Louis and learning about Stray Rescue’s work saving street dogs in dire straits, Hendrix happily joined the board five (“or six?”) years ago. “I get to town at least once a year,” she says. “I love Stray Rescue; it’s such a model for other groups. Randy cares so much, and he does so much.” Hendrix has always loved animals, she says, but her activism was galvanized by an undercover fur video she watched almost by accident. “It was horrifying,” she says. “I cried, and I knew I had to do something.” She didn’t stop at becoming a vegan, but also started working with agencies that promoted pet adoption. She even founded her own website, The Pet Matchmaker, to pair homeless animals with would-be adopters. Her own blog on the site covers animal topics from chickens and llamas to exotic pets. “Animal rights, animal protection, animal welfare — this has become a full-time second career,” she says. “But it’s also my life.” At home in Los Angeles, Hendrix lives with two cats and two dogs, one (a Chihuahua-beagle mix) who came along with her boyfriend. The other dog, Ellie, Hendrix describes as “my soul mate.” Ellie “picked me,” Hendrix says. “I was fostering a litter of puppies, and this one little girl just attached herself to me and wouldn’t leave my side. She’s grown up to be a 50-pound, long-legged super model of dogs.” Ellie won’t be accompanying Hendrix to St. Louis, although she does go along when Hendrix has to be out of town on longer stays. This time, she’s looking forward to “visiting the (Stray Rescue) shelter and seeing all the changes since I was there last. I’ll walk some dogs and catch up with Randy. And if I get a chance, I may go out to rescue.” At the gala, for which Sunday is the last day to get a ticket, “I’m one of the special guests, but we’re playing it by ear, so I’m not sure exactly what my part will be.” The other special guests, also returning, are Stray Rescue friends Seamus and Juliana Dever. He is Detective Kevin Ryan on ABC’s “Castle”; she plays his wife, Jenny. Hendrix notes that this year’s gala takes place on Dec. 4, and “that’s Elaine Hendrix Day. I got a proclamation from the mayor (Francis Slay) saying that. So I’ll be spending Elaine Hendrix Day doing the thing I like best, helping dogs.”

Friday December 4 8p.m.

50th Season Holiday Special!

3 Shows for only $99 Call the Dance St. Louis Box Office at 314.534.6622 for your premium SEAT package today! Offer ends Dec 15, 2015

Gail Pennington • 314-340-8136 TV critic @gailpennington on Twitter gpennington@post-dispatch.com

‘STRAY RESCUE: HOPE FOR THE HOLIDAYS’ When • 6:30 p.m. Friday Where • Khorassan Room, Chase Park Plaza Hotel How much • $200 including dinner, open bar and music Info and tickets • strayrescue.org/gala

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Stray Rescue of St. Louis founder Randy Grim kisses a stray dog last year. The dog, dubbed Snow Pants, had just been picked up.

THE LIST Find hundreds of gifts for every budget with our holiday gift guide. stltoday.com/the list

Jan 29 & 30, 2016

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FEB 26 & 27, 2016

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Valid Nov 16 - Dec 15, 2015. Premium seats include Orchestra, Parterre Center and Dress Circle. Evenings only. Offer not available online or through Touhill box office.

Supporting Season Sponsors


A&E

C8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 11.29.2015

Singer-songwriter Lera Lynn breaks out from ‘True Detective’ BY KRISTIN M. HALL Associated Press

NASHVILLE, TENN. •

Singer songwriter Lera Lynn looks nothing like the character she played on Season 2 of HBO’s crime noir series, “True Detective,” who sang woeful drug ballads in a seedy dive bar. Lynn said the main actors Vince Vaughn and Colin Firth probably never caught a glimpse of her on set without her makeup on, which included track marks and bruises on her arms, dark circles under her eyes, oily hair and yellow teeth. “I looked a lot worse in person than on camera, thankfully,” said Lynn in her home studio in Nashville, Tenn. “I did tell Colin and Vince once, ‘Just so you know, I am a healthy regular person.’” Lynn was selected by producer and composer T. Bone Burnett to help write and sing the songs that set the mood for the dark series. But Burnett and the show’s creator Nic

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Now that “True Detective” is over, Lera Lynn has returned her focus on working on her next album and touring in the United States and overseas.

Pizzolatto couldn’t tell her much about the plot when she started working on the show, other than they wanted “narco-ballads,” Lynn said. Grammywinning singer Rosanne Cash also helped write songs for the show as well, including the haunting “My Least Favorite Life.” “It was interesting trying to create a character for the show whose function I was completely oblivious to,” Lynn said.

But now that the show is over, Lynn has returned her focus on working on her next album and touring. Lynn’s last album, “The Avenues,” released in 2014, is a mix of Americana and country and her voice has a heavenly whisper that invokes comparisons to Joy Williams of The Civil Wars. Her next album, produced by Joshua Grange, is due out early next year. “I think there are

St. Charles County Youth Orchestra (SCCYO) Celebrating 20yrs of Excellence in Music Education

Winter Concert Sunday December 6th - 3:00pm J. Scheidegger Center for the Arts Special Guests St. Charles Christian Home Educators Concert Choir Many seasonal favorites including Sleigh Ride!

St. Louisan’s mysteries to be broadcast on BBC

definitely aspects of the ‘True Detective’ style that run through my music,” Lynn said. “It’s just a sliver of what I do. T. Bone saw that somewhere and I think that’s why he invited me to write and play on the show.” She’s thankful for the extra attention she’s gotten from appearing on the show and said adding the songs from the television series to her set list has also added a dramatic element to the live show. “I throw them in where people least expect it,” Lynn said. “It’s a neat part of the show, I think. It just brings everything way down for a minute. And then we just rock out.”

Three books by novelist Qiu Xiaolong have been turned into radio dramas. St. Louisans will be able to listen to the shows inspired by the Inspector Chen books starting Dec. 5. (One can access them on the Internet via BBC iPlayer.) Set in and near Shanghai as China was opening up to more foreign trade in the 1990s, the stories are based on Qiu’s “Death of a Red Heroine,” “A Loyal Character Dancer” and “When Red is Black.” The shows air at 2:30 p.m. on Dec. 5, 12 and 19 and will be available on iPlayer for 28 days. The St. Louis writer wrote the scripts for the second and third dramas; Joy Wilkinson wrote the script for the first. In a review of the latest Inspector Chen book, “Shanghai Redemption,” Repps Hudson wrote: “One can read his Chen novels and come away with a believable idea of what is taking place behind the headlines in a country evolving rapidly as an economic powerhouse. In some ways, Qui is more of a sociologist than a crime writer.” Qui, who grew up in Shanghai, left his homeland in 1988, coming to St. Louis because of his interest in T.S. Eliot. After the Tiananmen Squire uprising the following year, Qui thought it was too dangerous for him to return to China and managed to get his wife out. — Jane Henderson

Presented in partnership with the

Campbell House Museum

From the Gilded Age to Today

Sunday, DEC 6 | 11am to 4pm | FREE The Gilded Table: Recipes and Table History from the Campbell House, by St. Louis author Suzanne Corbett, features 178 recipes from Virginia Campbell’s handwritten collection and a glimpse into high society during the 1860s and ’70s. Join us for a lecture with the author and a day illed with family-friendly holiday activities. 11am to 4pm: Hands-on activities including gingerbread decorating (while supplies last) 12pm: “Entertainment in the Gilded Age” video vignettes by Etc. Senior Theatre 1pm: The Gilded Table presentation and book signing with Suzanne Corbett 2:30pm: Panel discussion—Changing holiday tables and traditions

Tickets $5.00 & $2.00 at the door

Contact

Forest Park | 314.746.4599 | mohistory.org

sccyo@sccyo.org • 636-916-0515 • sccyo.org

Christmas at the Cathedral

DISCOVER | Saint Charles, Missouri

Featuring the Sonos Handbell Ensemble & Frederica von Stade, mezzo-soprano with the St. Louis Archdiocesan Choirs

Saturday, December 12, 2015 8:00 PM Sunday, December 13, 2015 2:30 PM Welcomed by Favazza’s Italian Restaurant & Enterprise Bank & Trust

Experience the joy of the music of Christmas in the heavenly setting of the Cathedral Basilica of St. Louis

Tickets still available!

Where the Magic begins November 27 to December 24, 2015 FESTIVAL HOURS Opening Day 11am to 9pm Wednesdays and Fridays 6:30 to 9pm Saturdays 11am to 9pm // Sundays Noon to 5pm Christmas Eve 11am to 2pm Collect Character Cards from the Legends of Christmas and Santas from around the World. Enjoy Music by the Cobblestone Wassailiers and Sleigh Bell Singers. Visit the Chestnut Roasters on South Main. “Santa’s Cottage” at Katy Depot in Frontier Park Photos with Santa & Train Land

Experience more Great Music in a Great Space during our 15-16 season!

Opening Day 12-5pm & 6-9pm Fridays 6:30-9pm // Saturdays 11am-5pm Sundays 12-5pm // Christmas Eve 11am-1pm

Weekly Festival Events & Things to See Santa Parade: Saturdays & Sundays 1:30pm

Nathan Laube

Evening Processionals: Wednesdays, Fridays, & Saturdays 8:45pm

International Concert Organist Sunday, January 31, 2016 2:30 PM

The Cobblestone Wassailiers in Concert: Saturdays and Sundays 2:30pm • Berthold Square

Welcomed by Rodgers Organs of St. Louis & The Parkway Hotel

Krampsnachts in Saint Charles: Wednesdays 7-8:30pm • Along Main Street

Polish Baltic Philharmonic

Master of Revels Marshmallow Roast: Fridays 7-8:30pm • Berthold Square

Ernst Van Tiel, Conductor Monday, February 29, 2016 8:00 PM

Candlelight Reading of ‘Twas the Night Before Christmas: Wednesdays 7-8:30pm • First State Capitol

Welcomed by Steinway Piano Gallery Steinway is the Oficial Piano of Cathedral Concerts

Sunday Evening Caroling at the Gazebo: Sunday 4:45pm • Kisker Park Gazebo

For a complete listing of festival events visit StCharlesChristmas.com // 636-946-7776


A&E

C8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

St. Louisan’s mysteries to be broadcast on BBC Radio 4 Three books by novelist Qiu Xiaolong have been turned into radio dramas. St. Louisans will be able to listen to the shows inspired by the Inspector Chen books starting Dec. 5. (One can access them on the Internet via BBC iPlayer.) Set in and near Shanghai as China was opening up to more foreign trade in the 1990s, the stories are based on Qiu’s “Death of a Red Heroine,” “A Loyal Character Dancer” and “When Red is Black.” The shows air at 2:30 p.m. on Dec. 5, 12 and 19 and will be available on iPlayer for 28 days. The St. Louis writer wrote the scripts for the second and third dramas; Joy Wilkinson wrote the script for the first. In a review of the latest Inspector Chen book, “Shanghai Redemption,” Repps Hudson wrote: “One can read his Chen novels and come away with a believable idea of what is taking place behind the headlines in a country evolving rapidly as an economic powerhouse. In some ways, Qui is more of a sociologist than a crime writer.” Qui, who grew up in Shanghai, left his homeland in 1988, coming to St. Louis because of his interest in T.S. Eliot. After the Tiananmen Squire uprising the following year, Qui thought it was too dangerous for him to return to China and managed to get his wife out. — Jane Henderson

M 2 • SUnDAy • 11.29.2015

Wolves rule the night at Powell Symphony Hall Review • SLSO’s less senior wind players get a chance to shine BY ANNE TIMBERLAKE Special to the Post-Dispatch

If the wolf wasn’t quite at the door Friday evening in Powell Symphony Hall, it was just inside — and a little to the left. Immediately past the ticket takers, a table strewn with wolf pelts advertised the work of the Endangered Wolf Center. Upstairs, storybook wolves prowled as the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra and music director David Robertson offered a program of musical yarns and sonic tall tales. But first up, some throat clearing. Every story needs a prologue, and on Friday that role fell to Sergei Prokofiev’s Symphony No. 1, dubbed “Classical” for its stylistic links to an earlier time. It’s the kind of piece in which the trumpet player can pick lint off his jacket, play a note or two, then go back to counting rests. And yet, the work’s straightforwardness belied its shadows. Melodies gushed, then retreated in small, disturbing eddies. Leaden bow strokes alternated with manic bursts of sound. Ragged moments were noticeable, but the orchestra played with life and movement. The evening’s headliner, Prokofiev’s “Peter and the Wolf,” became an instant classic when it was premiered by the Moscow Central Children’s Theater in 1936. It wasn’t hard to see why: the oboe quacked, the clarinet yowled and the bassoon grumbled in an inspired feat of

St. Charles County Youth Orchestra (SCCYO) Celebrating 20yrs of Excellence in Music Education

Winter Concert Sunday December 6th - 3:00pm J. Scheidegger Center for the Arts Special Guests St. Charles Christian Home Educators Concert Choir Many seasonal favorites including Sleigh Ride!

at. Opening with the unearthly keen of Tibetan singing bowls, the concerto soon gathered an electric strength. Harris’ entrance, in which he slid slowly back and forth between tones as though worrying a loose tooth, presaged a restless solo part that prowled the boundaries of the instrument. As Harris’ lone wolf ranged, the orchestra slapped and slid its way forward, painting a richly textured landscape. A bass cadenza kicked off the finale, a series of wild downward slides through which the bass held a single long note — a howl in the dark.

orchestral casting. The work offered some of the SLSO’s less senior wind players a chance to shine, as well as showcasing the work of young collaborators from Webster University. Against the intricacy of the program’s other works, Nikolay Rimsky-Korsakov’s melody-reliant “Snow Maiden” Suite seemed almost simplistic. Opening with an orchestral “ta-da,” the suite relays the tale of a fairytale maiden who loves and dies. And yet, as the SLSO lit into RimskyKorsakov’s rollicking, folk-inspired finale, the rendition began to convince. Sometimes all you need is a simple story, well-told. Earlier in the evening, a slickly produced video previewed what proved to be the story of the night: the U.S. premiere of Chinese composer Tan Dun’s Contrabass Concerto “The Wolf,” featuring double bass soloist Erik Harris. “The melody is sent out and then nature returns it in a different way,” explained Robertson in the video. That Dun’s work was even better than its marketing was nothing to sneeze

DAVID ROBERTSON AND THE ST. LOUIS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA: ‘PETER AND THE WOLF’ When • 3 p.m. Sunday Where • Powell Symphony Hall, 718 North Grand Boulevard How much • $29-$109 More info • 314-534-1700; stlsymphony.org

Presented in partnership with the

Campbell House Museum

From the Gilded Age to Today

Sunday, DEC 6 | 11am to 4pm | FREE The Gilded Table: Recipes and Table History from the Campbell House, by St. Louis author Suzanne Corbett, features 178 recipes from Virginia Campbell’s handwritten collection and a glimpse into high society during the 1860s and ’70s. Join us for a lecture with the author and a day illed with family-friendly holiday activities. 11am to 4pm: Hands-on activities including gingerbread decorating (while supplies last) 12pm: “Entertainment in the Gilded Age” video vignettes by Etc. Senior Theatre 1pm: The Gilded Table presentation and book signing with Suzanne Corbett 2:30pm: Panel discussion—Changing holiday tables and traditions

Tickets $5.00 & $2.00 at the door

Contact

Forest Park | 314.746.4599 | mohistory.org

sccyo@sccyo.org • 636-916-0515 • sccyo.org

Christmas at the Cathedral

DISCOVER | Saint Charles, Missouri

Featuring the Sonos Handbell Ensemble & Frederica von Stade, mezzo-soprano with the St. Louis Archdiocesan Choirs

Saturday, December 12, 2015 8:00 PM Sunday, December 13, 2015 2:30 PM Welcomed by Favazza’s Italian Restaurant & Enterprise Bank & Trust

Experience the joy of the music of Christmas in the heavenly setting of the Cathedral Basilica of St. Louis

Tickets still available!

Where the Magic begins November 27 to December 24, 2015 FESTIVAL HOURS Opening Day 11am to 9pm Wednesdays and Fridays 6:30 to 9pm Saturdays 11am to 9pm // Sundays Noon to 5pm Christmas Eve 11am to 2pm Collect Character Cards from the Legends of Christmas and Santas from around the World. Enjoy Music by the Cobblestone Wassailiers and Sleigh Bell Singers. Visit the Chestnut Roasters on South Main. “Santa’s Cottage” at Katy Depot in Frontier Park Photos with Santa & Train Land

Experience more Great Music in a Great Space during our 15-16 season!

Opening Day 12-5pm & 6-9pm Fridays 6:30-9pm // Saturdays 11am-5pm Sundays 12-5pm // Christmas Eve 11am-1pm

Weekly Festival Events & Things to See Santa Parade: Saturdays & Sundays 1:30pm

Nathan Laube

Evening Processionals: Wednesdays, Fridays, & Saturdays 8:45pm

International Concert Organist Sunday, January 31, 2016 2:30 PM

The Cobblestone Wassailiers in Concert: Saturdays and Sundays 2:30pm • Berthold Square

Welcomed by Rodgers Organs of St. Louis & The Parkway Hotel

Krampsnachts in Saint Charles: Wednesdays 7-8:30pm • Along Main Street

Polish Baltic Philharmonic

Master of Revels Marshmallow Roast: Fridays 7-8:30pm • Berthold Square

Ernst Van Tiel, Conductor Monday, February 29, 2016 8:00 PM

Candlelight Reading of ‘Twas the Night Before Christmas: Wednesdays 7-8:30pm • First State Capitol

Welcomed by Steinway Piano Gallery Steinway is the Oficial Piano of Cathedral Concerts

Sunday Evening Caroling at the Gazebo: Sunday 4:45pm • Kisker Park Gazebo

For a complete listing of festival events visit StCharlesChristmas.com // 636-946-7776


11.29.2015 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • C9

CELEBRATE THE HOLIDAYS

Arrive early for photos with Star Wars ✴ characters!

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DECEMBER 3-6 Thurs, Fri and Sat at 8:00pm, Sun at 3:00pm Bernard Labadie, conductor Lydia Teuscher, soprano Allyson McHardy, mezzo-soprano Jeremy Ovenden, tenor Philippe Sly, bass-baritone St. Louis Symphony Chorus Amy Kaiser, director

DECEMBER 11-13 Fri and Sat at 7:00pm, Sun at 2:00pm David Robertson, conductor Go on a heart-pounding adventure through the magical scores of John Williams. Generations, both young and old, will be captivated by this program exploring the depths of our imaginations and the far reaches of outer space. Bring your family to hear the famous scores from Star Wars before the much anticipated release of Star Wars: Episode VII—The Force Awakens, as well as other selections from Harry Potter, Jurassic Park, Superman, the holiday classic Home Alone and more!

With bright trumpets and the timeless “Hallelujah” Chorus, Handel’s Messiah returns to Powell Hall under the direction of Bernard Labadie. Composed in only 24 days, Messiah remains Handel’s most popular work and one of the most performed classical works of all time. Celebrate the start of the holiday season with this powerful and captivating choral classic.

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YOUNG

KAUFMAN

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DECEMBER 17

DECEMBER 18-20

Thurs at 7:30pm

Fri at 2:00pm and 7:30pm, Sat at 2:00pm and 7:30pm, SOLD OUT Sun at 2:00pm

Kevin McBeth, conductor Thomas Young, tenor St. Louis Symphony IN UNISON Chorus

Steven Jarvi, conductor Whitney Claire Kaufman, vocalist Holiday Festival Chorus; Kevin McBeth, director

Grammy Award-winning tenor Thomas Young joins the STL Symphony and IN UNISON Chorus led by Kevin McBeth. One of the original Three Mo’ Tenors, Young brings his “magniicent and superbly focused and colored tone” (The Boston Globe) to the Powell Hall stage for a night of soul-stirring Gospel music to celebrate the most joyous of seasons.

Join us for St. Louis’ favorite holiday tradition featuring classics like “White Christmas,” “Winter Wonderland,” “It’s the Most Wonderful Time of the Year” and selections from the ilm The Polar Express. Sing along with the holiday classics and enjoy a visit with jolly ol’ St. Nick himself. PRESENTED BY

SUPPORTED BY

MEDIA SUPPORT

ST. LOUIS AMERICAN

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FILM✴ WITH LIVE ✴ ✴ SCORE ✴ ✴ ✴ ✴

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LOUIS POST-DISPATCH AND 102.5 KEZK

SPONSORED BY

MEDIA SUPPORT PROVIDED BY ST.

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DECEMBER 31

JANUARY 2-3

Thurs at 7:30pm

Sat at 7:00pm, Sun at 2:00pm

David Robertson, conductor

Sarah HIcks, conductor

Join David Robertson and the STL Symphony for the tenth annual New Year’s Eve Celebration! End the year on a high note with an evening full of magical music and festive surprises! Don’t miss this widely popular and most entertaining celebration of the New Year.

Bring the whole family to experience the Academy Award-winning ilm Ratatouille on the big screen while the beloved score by composer Michael Giacchino is performed live by the STL Symphony. Presentation licensed by Walt Disney Music Company, Pixar Talking Pictures, Buena Vista Concerts, a division of ABC Inc., and Walk Disney Studios Motion Pictures Non-Theatrical © All rights reserved.

PRESENTED BY MEDIA SUPPORT PROVIDED BY KMOX AND ST.

LOUIS MAGAZINE

stlsymphony.org/holidays 314-534-1700

MEDIA SUPPORT PROVIDED BY

RIVERFRONT TIMES

DOWNLOAD OUR APP


A&E

C10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 11.29.2015

For Martin and Brickell, musical isn’t so wild and crazy may prove to be a felicitous linkup: The reviews for “Bright Star” in its premiere outing in September 2014 at San Diego’s Old Globe Theatre were mixed but encouraging. But the fact is that they, like other luminaries from the worlds of pop music, television and film who have detoured into musical-theater writing, are coming at this dauntingly complex form of collaborative art with little hands-on experience and at a very high level of visibility. And as recent history indicates, the celebrity-minted crossover musical is no guarantee of popular or artistic success. “Bright Star,” which begins performances on Wednesday at Kennedy Center before an official opening on Dec. 17, joins a spate of musicals whose pedigrees are burnished with famous-name creators. Just last season, for instance, the freshman team of Grammy-winning singer-songwriter Sheryl Crow and Oscar-winning film director Barry Levinson unveiled their musical version of Levinson’s beloved 1982 movie “Diner” at Signature Theatre in Arlington, Va. At about the same time, rock superstar Sting was making a

BY PETER MARKS The Washington Post

WASHINGTON • About his

Broadway aspirations, Steve Martin is unequivocal. “We actually set out to create something traditional, that had a strong melody and a strong story,” he said. “We are trying to put on the best show possible, in the tradition of great musicals.” His songwriting partner, the folk-rock recording artist Edie Brickell, could not find herself more in sync. “This is the kind of show I’ve been wanting to see for over 20 years,” she said. “And I feel so lucky that Steve was likeminded, that he felt the same way about the writing and the tone.” To hear these well-known visitors from other avenues of show business speak so confidently about the glories of the American book musical is gratifying — and a little jarring. Nothing in their careers would lead a fan to imagine that a chapter in their biographies would be titled: “Show Tunes!” Brickell, after all, made her name as a performer and composer of genre-bending rock albums; Martin is a paragon of irreverence on film and

THE WASHINGTON POST

Steve Martin and Edie Brickell’s new musical, “Bright Star,” will play in December at The Kennedy Center in advance of its spring opening on Broadway.

television, a comedy original who might be thought of more readily as sending up than dreaming up musicals. And yet, here they are, alighting at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts with their quite serious new show, “Bright Star,” and, as a result, joining the ranks of a fast-growing tribe: stars who write musicals. Their partnership, of course,

high-profile foray onto Broadway with “The Last Ship,” his semiautobiographical musical about hardscrabble life in England’s fading industrial north. The disappointing reception for both of these projects underlines the magnitude of the challenge, even for a musical with the builtin luster of a celebrated originator. “Diner,” suffering from book and other problems, has been retooled for another go next month, at Delaware Theatre Company in Wilmington; “The Last Ship” closed in January after less than four months on Broadway, despite the last-ditch gambit of adding Sting himself to the cast. The musical-theater path that Martin and Brickell have chosen — integrating freshly written songs into an original or adapted story, the “book” of the show — is an endeavor that takes exceptional skill, and in most cases, practice. So these stars are lending their reputations to a genre with a high failure rate, or at least one in which the results do not always match the higher expectations when a famous person is attached. Over the years, celebrity songwriters as diverse as Boy George

(“Taboo”) and Kathie Lee Gifford (“Scandalous”) have seen their efforts quickly wither on Broadway, and musicals by other popular entertainers (Randy Newman with “Faust”; Barry Manilow with “Harmony”) have not even gotten to Broadway. Later this season, pop singer Sara Bareilles joins the march to Broadway, contributing the score of the new musical version of the indie movie “Waitress.” But sometimes, the participation of a celebrity does reap major benefits: witness the Tony Award bestowed upon Cyndi Lauper in 2013 for the score of the hit stage version of “Kinky Boots.” To hear Martin and Brickell tell it, developing “Bright Star” has been sheer pleasure and a thoroughgoing education. He wrote the book, she the lyrics and both composed the bluegrassinfluenced music. “You’re never smart enough or see all the complications, the impact of scenes,” Martin said in a joint phone interview with Brickell as they took a break recently from rehearsals at Manhattan’s 890 Broadway. “You really have to learn things for the first time, every time.”

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() ! CC DVS OC DP

Showtimes and movies change daily and are provided by the theaters.

Sunday, November 29, 2015

Central

St. Charles / O’Fallon

Chase Park Plaza (St. Louis Mid Rivers 14 Cine (Wehrenberg) Cinemas) Kingshighway & Lindell ! Creed (PG-13) DP (10:30 AM 1:20 4:05) 6:45 9:30

314-367-0101 1220 Mid Rivers Mall Dr. www.wehrenberg.com ! Size Zero (Inji Iduppazhagi) (Telugu) (NR) No VIP after 6PM

The Night Before (R) DP

9:00 PM

(10:35 AM 12:45 3:00) 5:15 7:35 9:50

Spectre (PG-13) DP

! The Good Dinosaur in Disney Digital 3D (PG) No VIP after 6PM

Spotlight (R) DP (11:00 AM 1:40 4:20) 7:00 9:40

12:30 3:00 8:00

! Brooklyn (PG-13) DP

! The Good Dinosaur (PG) No VIP after 6PM

(11:10 AM 1:35 4:10) 6:50 9:20

10:00 AM 11:00 AM 11:45 AM 1:30 2:15 4:00 4:45 5:30 6:30 7:15 9:45 10:30

Galleria 6 (St. Louis Cinemas)

Frankenstein (PG-13) No VIP after 6PM

St. Louis Galleria ! Creed (PG-13) DP

2 (PG-13) No VIP after 6PM

! Victor 11:00 AM 1:45 4:30 7:10 9:55

314-725-0808 ! The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part

(10:15 AM 1:10 4:05) 7:05 9:55

! The Good Dinosaur in Disney Digital 3D (PG) DP

10:00 AM 11:00 AM 12:35 2:10 3:45 4:10 5:15 6:55 7:20 8:30 10:00 10:30

! The Night Before (R) No VIP after 6PM 11:00 AM 1:40 4:20 7:05 9:45

9:35 PM

! Secret in Their Eyes (PG-13) No VIP after 6PM

The Good Dinosaur (PG) DP (10:00 AM 12:10 2:30 4:50) 7:15

! Victor Frankenstein (PG-13) DP

(10:10 AM 1:00 4:00) 6:55 9:45 (10:05 AM 12:05 2:15 4:30) 6:45

Spectre (PG-13) DP

9:00 PM

10:00 AM 1:05

(1:15 4:00) 6:45

(1:30 4:15) 7:00 9:45

Omnimax St. Louis Science Center 314-289-4400

Robots (NR)

! The Good Dinosaur (PG) DVS,CC,No VIP after 6PM ! Victor Frankenstein (PG-13) DVS,CC,No VIP after 6P M 11:05 AM 1:40 4:20 7:00 9:40

2 (PG-13) DVS,CC,No VIP after 6PM

! Secret in Their Eyes (PG-13) DVS,CC,No VIP after 6PM 11:10 AM 1:50 4:30 7:45 10:20

Love the Coopers (PG-13) DVS,CC 10:20 AM 12:55 3:30 6:10 8:45

The Peanuts Movie (G) DVS,CC 5:30 7:05 11:00 AM 2:15

Jerusalem (NR)

The Martian (PG-13) DVS,CC

2:00 4:00

9:20 PM

Santa vs. the Snowman IMAX (G) 12:00 PM

314-727-7271 ! Creed (PG-13) DVS,CC,No VIP after 6PM 10:40 AM 10:45 AM 12:15 1:45 3:15 4:45 6:15 7:15 9:15 10:15

(4:35) 9:35 (1:40) 4:20 7:00 9:30

! Suffragette (PG-13) DVS (1:50) 7:15

! Room (R) (1:45) 4:30 7:10 9:40

North St. Louis Mills Stadium 18 (Regal)

! The Good Dinosaur (PG) DVS,CC,No VIP after 6PM 10:00 AM 11:15 AM 11:50 AM 12:30 1:50 2:20 3:00 4:25 4:50 5:30 7:20 9:50

! The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 2 (PG-13) DVS,CC,No VIP after 6PM 10:00 AM 11:30 AM 1:05 2:30 4:10 5:30 7:00 8:00 8:30 10:05

! The Night Before (R) DVS,CC,No VIP after 6PM 11:00 AM 1:35 4:10 7:45 10:15

The Peanuts Movie (G) DVS,CC 10:00 AM 1:40

5555 St. Louis Mills Blvd. (314)227-5503 Spectre (PG-13) DVS,CC 4:00 7:15 10:30 ! TCM Presents Roman Holiday (NR) ! Spotlight (R) DVS,CC,No VIP after 6PM 2:00 7:00

Creed (PG-13) DVS,CC

10:30 AM 1:25 4:20 7:15 10:10 W E H R E N B E RG

(11:10 AM 12:30 1:00 3:50 4:20) 7:10 7:30 10:15 10:35

! The Good Dinosaur in Disney Digital 3D (PG) DVS,CC (11:45 AM 2:30 5:15) 8:00 10:35

! The Good Dinosaur (PG) DVS,CC (11:00 AM 12:45 1:45 3:35 4:30) 7:20 10:00

(11:50 AM 3:30) 7:00

! The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 2 The IMAX Experience (PG-13) DVS,CC 12:00 3:30 7:00 10:20

! The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 2 (PG-13) DVS,CC (11:30 AM 1:35 3:00 4:45) 6:30 8:15 9:50

The Night Before (R) DVS,CC (11:40 AM 2:20 5:10) 7:55 10:35

Secret in Their Eyes (PG-13) DVS,CC (1:40 4:35) 7:25 10:10

Love the Coopers (PG-13) DVS,CC 7:05 9:40

The Man in 3B (R) (2:15 4:50)

The Peanuts Movie (G) DVS,CC (11:10 AM 1:50 4:15) 6:55 9:25

Spectre (PG-13) DVS,CC (12:45 4:35) 8:25

The Last Witch Hunter (PG-13) DVS,CC 7:50 10:30

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(11:55 AM 3:45) 7:15

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11:15 AM 1:40 4:10

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South

12:45 4:05 7:20

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(12:30) 4:00 7:20 10:30 10:00 AM 11:00 AM 11:50 AM 12:30 1:40 2:25 ! The Good Dinosaur in Disney Digital 2:50 3:15 4:30 5:10 5:25 5:55 7:15 8:00 8:30 3D (PG) DVS,CC 9:45 10:35

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(11:40 AM 2:20) 5:00 7:40 10:10

! The Good Dinosaur (PG) DVS,CC (11:10 AM 1:50) 4:30 7:10 9:45

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10:20 AM 1:30 4:35 7:35 10:30

(11:00 AM) 1:30 1:50 4:30 6:50 7:10

! Suffragette (PG-13) DVS

! Room (R) (1:40) 4:15

Minions (PG)

Illinois

(11:10 AM 1:30 4:00) 6:30

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(12:15 12:45 3:40) 4:10 7:00 7:30 10:15 10:45

The Night Before (R) DVS,CC (11:55 AM 2:40) 5:15 8:00 10:50

Secret in Their Eyes (PG-13) DVS,CC

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(10:50 AM 1:30) 4:20 6:50 9:20

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(11:45 AM 3:30) 7:15 10:25

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9:20 PM

! The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part

(11:00 AM 1:40) 4:40 7:25 10:20

10:45 AM 11:40 AM 1:10 2:05 3:25 4:20 5:45 6:45 9:10

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6:45 9:30

The Visit (PG-13)

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11:15 AM 2:00 4:40 7:30 10:15

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12:30 3:45 7:00

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11:00 AM 1:45 4:35 7:30 10:10

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11:40 AM 2:15 4:50 7:20

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(11:00 AM 1:40 4:20) 7:00 9:40

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The Walk (PG)

(11:00 AM 1:40 4:20) 7:00 9:20 7:40

(Landmark)

(1:00) 3:55 7:00

(11:10 AM 1:50 4:20) 6:45 9:10

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10:05 AM 12:30 2:55 5:25 8:00 10:35

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10:35 AM 1:20 4:10 7:00 9:50

Town Square 12 Cine (Wehrenberg)

West

Keller Plaza Cine 8

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10:15 AM 12:35 1:30 3:45 4:40 6:50 7:50

12:40 4:15 7:35 8:00

Victor Frankenstein (PG-13) DVS,CC (11:15 AM 2:10 5:00) 7:50 10:30

(Wehrenberg)

South

(12:15 3:10) 6:30 9:20

Creed (PG-13) DVS,CC

! Victor Frankenstein (PG-13) No VIP after 6PM

Tivoli Theatre (Landmark)

! Trumbo (R)

Arnold 14 Cine

10:30 AM 1:35 4:40

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1:00 3:00 5:00

South

10:45 AM 3:45

314-446-6868 ! The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 2 (PG-13) DP

7:15 9:45

! TCM Presents Roman Holiday (NR)

1:15 6:15 8:45

Moolah Theatre & Lounge (St. Louis Cinemas)

6350 Delmar in the Loop ! By the Sea (R) DVS

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The Intern (PG-13) DVS,CC

! The Good Dinosaur in Disney Digital 3D (PG) DVS,CC,No VIP after 6PM 314-995-6273

40 & Winghaven Blvd.

(11:40 AM 3:25) 6:55

8:00 PM

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1830 First Capitol Dr. 314-995-6273 www.wehrenberg.com ! Creed (PG-13) DVS,CC,No VIP after 6PM

Hi-Pointe Backlot

Lindell & Vandeventer

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St. Charles Stadium 18 Cine (Wehrenberg)

(2:15 5:00) 7:30

1002 Hi-Pointe Place

11:30 AM 2:00 4:30 7:00 9:25

2:00 PM

The Martian (PG-13) DP

Clayton & Skinker

The Peanuts Movie (G)

Hotel Transylvania 2 (PG)

(11:00 AM 2:15) 5:30 8:45

Brooklyn (PG-13) DP

Love the Coopers (PG-13)

11:55 AM 3:30 7:00 10:20

The Peanuts Movie (G) DP

Hi-Pointe Theatre

11:30 AM 2:15 4:50 7:25 10:00 11:15 AM 5:00 7:45 10:20

(11:45 AM 2:10 4:35) 7:00 9:25

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(2:00) 7:00

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(11:30 AM 2:30) 5:30 8:30

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Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials (PG-13) 10:05 AM 1:10 4:15 7:20

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10:15 AM 1:15 4:20 7:15

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Ant-Man (PG-13) 10:20 AM 1:20 4:10 7:00


11.29.2015 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • C11


C12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

HOLIDAY ARTS PREVIEW

M 1 • SUnDAy • 11.29.2015

Holiday concerts include rock, country and even polka BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Whether you are looking for holiday-timed concerts featuring the new country of Tyler Farr and Sam Hunt, the spectacles of Trans-Siberian Orchestra and El Monstero, some snark from John Waters, the polka stylings of Bravo Combo or brass concoctions from the Funky Butt Brass, it’s all here. There’s also a juicy lineup of HoHo Shows from 105.7 the Point including Death Cab for Cutie and Weezer, some new sounds from Adam Lambert with 96.3 FM’s inaugural “Let It Snow” Show and the contemporary Christian music of Amy Grant. There’s even an Xmas Juggalo Bash. Here’s a peek at this season’s holiday concert offerings. 105.7 the Point HoHo Show with X Ambassadors, Saint Motel, 8 p.m. Tuesday, the Pageant, $20$25, Ticketmaster.com TeamSTAGES Holiday Concert, 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, the Sheldon Concert Hall, $10, MetroTix.com 105.7 the Point HoHo Show with Death Cab for Cutie, Wolf Alice, 8 p.m. Wednesday, the Pageant, $40-$45, Ticketmaster.com A John Waters Christmas: Holier and Dirtier, 8 p.m. Thursday, the Sheldon Concert Hall, $35-$45 with a $105 Gold Circle ticket available, MetroTix.com 93.7 the Bull Santa Jam with Big and Rich, the Brothers Osborne, Cam, 7:30 p.m. Thursday, the Pageant, $10-$20, Ticketmaster. com Y98 Mistletoe Show with Third Eye Blind, Nate Ruess, George Ezra, Michael Franti, Karmin, 6:30 p.m. Friday, Family Arena, $19.95-$79.95, MetroTix.com Gift for Jokes with Reggie Edwards presented by Princeton Dew, 8 p.m. Friday, Duck Room

CHRISTOPHER MILLETTE • Erie Times-news

Trans-Siberian Orchestra performs this month in Erie, Pa. From left are guitarist Chris Cafery, bassist Dave Z and violinist Roddy Chong.

at Blueberry Hill, free with an unwrapped toy or donation, Ticketmaster.com 5th Annual Brothers Lazaroff Hanukkah Hullabaloo with Brothers Lazaroff, DJ Boogieman, A Will Soll Klezmer Jam, Rabbi James Stone Goodman and the Eight Night’s Orchestra performing “Eight Nights” and more, 7 p.m. Dec. 5, Jewish Community Center’s Covenant Place, suggested donation $10 or pay what you want at the door with all donations going to Covenant Place Foundation, covenantplacestl.org Bruiser Queen’s 12 Bassists of Christmas with Mike and Jenny or Tortuga, Soddy Daisy, the Vigilettes, 8 p.m. Dec. 5, Off Broadway, $10, Ticketfly.com Holiday Concert featuring Erin Bode, 6 p.m. Dec. 6, Third

Baptist Church, $20-$25, MetroTix.com 105.7 the Point HoHo Show with Greek Fire, the Struts, Highly Suspect, 8 p.m. Dec. 7, the Pageant, $20-$25, Ticketmaster.com 105.7 the Point HoHo Show with Weezer, Wavves, 8 p.m. Dec. 8, Peabody Opera House, $29.50$79.50, Ticketmaster.com David Halen, Peter Martin and Friends, 8 p.m. Dec. 9, the Sheldon Concert Hall, $25-$30, MetroTix.com 92.3 Jinglefest with Tyler Farr, Sam Hunt, Maddie & Tae, 7 p.m. Dec. 10, Family Arena, $35-$50, MetroTix.com 105.7 the Point HoHo Show with the Neighbourhood, Atlas Genius, 8 p.m. Dec. 10, the Pageant, $30-$35, Ticketmaster.com Christmas with Amy Grant and Michael W. Smith, 7 p.m. Dec. 11,

Soprano Brewer stars at Bach Society concert

You have no fewer than five opportunities to enjoy the Holiday Celebration, when even Santa Claus heads to Powell Hall for greetings and photo ops. Resident conductor Steven Jarvi will lead the orchestra and Holiday Festival Chorus, directed by Kevin McBeth in music ranging from holiday favorites like “Sleigh Ride” and “Winter Wonderland” to a holiday sing-along, fueled by hot chocolate. • 2 and 7:30 p.m. Dec. 18 and 19; 2 p.m. Dec. 20, Powell Symphony Hall. $30-$65 One of the best SLSO concerts — and some of the best surprises — of the year always arrive on the last night of the year, the New Year’s Eve Celebration. David Robertson always puts together a satisfying program of great music and guests, and the fact that he doesn’t clue the audience in about what or who is just part of the evening’s sparkling fun. It even gets out in time for you to head to another New Year’s Eve activity. • 7:30 p.m. Dec. 31, Powell Symphony Hall. $40-$125

Many of our most beloved Christmas traditions, from Christmas tree to beloved carols, come from the German-speaking world. This year’s Christmas concert by the St. Louis Chamber Chorus, “Christmas — auf Deutsch,” takes full advantage of those musical traditions, while performing in a traditionally

One of this city’s favorite and longest-running Christmas traditions is the Bach Society of St. Louis’ annual “Christmas Candlelight Concert,” with familiar works, guest stars, the beloved candlelight procession and an audience carol sing-along. This year, the guest star is soprano Christine Brewer, singing music from Handel’s “Messiah” and a new setting of “O Holy Night.” Young singers from the St. Louis Children’s Choirs will take part in the procession. It’s all conducted by artistic director A. Dennis Sparger. Last year’s concert sold out, so don’t wait too long to order tickets. • 7:30 p.m. Dec. 23 at Powell Symphony Hall. $30-$75. 314-534-1700; bachsociety. org This year’s edition of “Christmas at the Cathedral” from Cathedral Concerts features the voice of legendary mezzosoprano Frederica von Stade and the creative musicians of the Sonos Handbell ensemble in two performances in the lush acoustic of the Cathedral Basilica. They’ll join the Archdiocesan Adult Choir, Children’s Choir, Handbell Choir and orchestra, in a program of sacred Christmas music.

Cathedral Concerts’ “Christmas at the Cathedral” features the voice of mezzo-soprano Frederica von Stade.

• 8 p.m. Dec. 12; 2:30 p.m. Dec. 13 at the Cathedral Basilica of St. Louis, 4431 Lindell Boulevard. 314-5337662; cathedralconcerts.org

On the third Sunday in Advent, Bach at the Sem will offer an all-J.S. Bach program of music for the season. Music director Maurice Boyer will lead members of the American Kantorei in Bach’s cantatas “Wie schön leuchtet der Morgenstern,” BWV 1; “Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland,” BWV 61; “Ich freue mich in dir,” BWV 133; and “Dazu ist erschienen der Sohn Gottes,” BWV 40. • 3 p.m. Dec. 13 at the Chapel of St. Timothy and St. Titus,

Six choirs filled with sweet young voices, ages 6 to 18, will perform in the annual holiday concerts by the St. Louis Children’s Choirs. On the program is choral music of the season, both old and new, with a candlelight procession and a finale that brings all 450 children together, their voices uplifted. • 2 p.m. Dec. 5 at Powell Symphony Hall. $14-$56. 314-534-1700; slccsing.org The Masterworks Chorale and Children’s Choruses will celebrate “A Masterworks Christmas” under the direction of Stephen Mager. The highlight of the program is Benjamin Britten’s “A Ceremony of Carols,” accompanied by harpist Megan Stout. There are also works by Mager, traditional carols, a candlelight procession and an audience sing-along. • 7:30 p.m. Dec. 13 at St. Clare of Assisi Roman Catholic Church, 1411 Cross Street, O’Fallon, Ill. $15 in advance, $20 at the door. 618-04-9094; singmasterworks.org The National Lutheran Choir, under the direction

Kevin C. Johnson • 314-340-8191 Pop music critic @kevincjohnson on Twitter kjohnson@post-dispatch.com

of David Cherwien, brings its annual Christmas Festival concert to a new location this year: First Presbyterian Church of Kirkwood. On the program are works by Herbert Howells, Victoria, Dale Warland, David Conte and others. The choir uses every part of the church’s nave for a program intended to take the listener “out of time and space,” and into “a place of awe and beauty.” • 2 p.m. Dec. 19 at First Presbyterian Church of Kirkwood, 100 East Adams Avenue, Kirkwood. $25; $10 students with ID. 612-7222301; nlca.com

Spectacular,” conducted by Edward Dolbashian, with a host of guest artists: soprano Gina Galati, tenor Hugh Smith, baritone Robert Ellison, and the combined voices of the Jennings High School Choir, Gospel Symphonic Choir and East Central College Choir. On the program are sacred works including “O Holy Night,” pops classics like Leroy Anderson’s “Sleigh Ride,” carols and a sing-along “Hallelujah” Chorus from Handel’s “Messiah.” • 7:30 p.m. Dec. 21 at Powell Symphony Hall. $25-$50. 314-534-1700; chband.org

The Gateway Men’s Chorus performs “Make the Yuletide Gay” under the direction of artistic director Robert Stumpf. The choir sings a wide variety of music, from traditional holiday music to “frivolities,” which include men in tutus. You might even be chosen to conduct the chorus for a number. • 8 p.m. Dec. 11-12 at St. Stanislaus Kostka Catholic Church, 1413 North 20th Street. $25; $15 students and seniors. 314-289-4169; gmcstl.org

The championshipwinning Ambassadors of Harmony will present their special mix of barbershop harmonies and choreography in their heartwarming annual holiday concert, “Sounds of the Season.” They’re joined by some special guests, the St. Louis Children’s Choirs. • 8 p.m. Dec. 11; 2 and 8 p.m. Dec. 12; 2 and 7 p.m. Dec. 13 at Touhill Performing Arts Center, 1 University Boulevard. 636-395-0150; aoh.org

The Compton Heights Concert Band will present its 17th annual “Holiday Pops

Sarah Bryan Miller • 314-340-8249 Classical music critic @sbmillermusic on Twitter sbmiller@post-dispatch.com

THE TOUHILL

PERFORMANCES DECEMBER 17-23

: OUHILL.ORG | 516.4949

Dancer Lauren Lane, photo by Kelly Pratt

You’ll believe a rat can cook — and have a conscience — when the SLSO performs composer Michael Giacchino’s score to the Academy Awardwinning “Ratatouille” as the beloved Pixar film plays on Powell Hall’s big screen. Let the holidays let you down easily, but don’t go on an empty stomach. • 7 p.m. Jan. 2; 2 p.m. Jan. 3, Powell Symphony Hall. $35-$65

German Lutheran church. Artistic director Philip Barnes has programmed beautiful works for Advent and Christmas by Felix Mendelssohn, Heinrich Schuetz and others. There’s music from the English-speaking world, too, with contributions from the American Stephen Paulus, Britain’s John Rutter and the Australian Clare Maclean. Each concert in the choir’s 60th anniversary Diamond Jubilee season has a world premiere commission on the program; for Christmas, it’s Yakov Gubanov’s new setting of “Es ist ein Ros entsprungen,” for double choir. • 3 p.m. Dec. 20 at Trinity Lutheran Church, 812 Soulard Street. $37 in advance, $40 at the door, $10 students with ID. 636458-4343; chamberchorus. org

Scottrade Center, $30-$75, Ticketmaster.com KMOX Holiday Radio Show, 7

Concordia Seminary, 801 Seminary Place. Free. 314505-7000; bach.csl.edu

CLASSICAL • FROM C1

Chorus and the SLSO in a rousing selection of gospel tunes for the Christmas season, all under the direction of Kevin McBeth. • 7:30 p.m. Dec. 17, Powell Symphony Hall. $32.75$62.75

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Amy Grant performs with the Georgia Symphony Orchestra last year.

p.m. Dec. 14, the Sheldon Concert Hall, $10-$50, MetroTix. com KSHE Holiday Hair Ball with Steel Panther, 8 p.m. Dec. 15, the Pageant, $20-$25, Ticketmaster.com Winter Wonderland with Zoe Vonder Haar, John Flack, Peter Merideth, Emily Peterson and Steve Neale, 10 a.m. Dec. 15-16, the Sheldon Concert Hall, $12$15, MetroTix.com 96.3 Let It Snow Show with Adam Lambert, Pentatonix, Rachel Platten, 7:30 p.m. Dec. 16, Peabody Opera House, $29.50$89.50, Ticketmaster.com 105.7 the Point HoHo Show with Of Monster and Men, 8 p.m. Dec. 17, Peabody Opera House, $29.50-$49.50, Ticketmaster. com The Brave Combo Holiday Show, 7:30 p.m. Dec. 17, Off Broadway, $15, Ticketfly.com The Few’s 4th Annual Christmas Bash, 6 p.m. Dec. 18, Fubar, $6, Ticketfly.com El Monstero, 8 p.m. Dec. 18, 19, 23, 25, 26 and 27, the Pageant, $27.50-$50, Ticketmaster.com Funky Butt Brass Band Holiday Brasstravaganza, 8 p.m. Dec. 18-19, Off Broadway, $15-$28, Ticketfly.com Xmas Juggalo Bash with Spaide Ripper, P-win, SixOne Nate, Otice, Spite the Dirt, AC, POW, A-Town Mob, Primal Instinct, Cannibal Crew, Filthee Benjaminz, 6 p.m. Dec. 21, Pop’s, $8-$10, Ticketweb.com The Peter Ayres Band Christmas Show, 8 p.m. Dec. 23, Off Broadway, $10, Ticketfly.com Trans-Siberian Orchestra, 3 and 7:30 p.m. Dec. 27, Scottrade Center, $36-$72, Ticketmaster. com

IT FOR

USE) O M ( A

KIN

gazine

e Ma G”~Aliv


11.29.2015 • Sunday • M 1

A&E: BOOKS

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • C13

BEST-SELLERS

NONFICTION

FICTION

Here are the best-selling books from Publishers Weekly for the week that ended Nov. 22.

Two new biographies about Ol’ Blue Eyes

Ill nanny becomes a member of struggling family

HARDCOVER FICTION 1. “The Guilty” • David Baldacci 2. “Tricky Twenty-Two” • Janet Evanovich 3. “Rogue Lawyer” • John Grisham 4. “The Bazaar of Bad Dreams” • Stephen King 5. “See Me” • Nicholas Sparks 6. “All Dressed in White” • Mary Higgins Clark/Alafair Burke 7. “The Pharaoh’s Secret” • Clive Cussler/Graham Brown 8. “The Mistletoe Inn” • Richard Paul Evans

HARDCOVER NONFICTION 1. “The Pioneer Woman Cooks: Dinnertime” • Ree Drummond 2. “Killing Reagan” • Bill O’Reilly/Martin Dugard 3. “Thomas Jeferson and the Tripoli Pirates” • Brian Kilmeade/Don Yaeger 4. “Guinness World Records 2016” • Guinness World Records 5. “Destiny and Power” • Jon Meacham 6. “Troublemaker” • Leah Remini 7. “Fallout 4: Vault Dweller’s Survival Guide” • Prima Games 8. “Crippled America” • Donald J. Trump Best-sellers at area independent stores for the week that ended Nov. 22. Stores reporting: The Book House, Left Bank Books, Main Street Books, The Novel Neighbor, Subterranean Books.

ADULTS 1. “The Matheny Manifesto” • Mike Matheny 2. “Harry Potter Coloring Book” • Scholastic 3. “The Mindfulness Coloring Book” • Emma Farrarons 4. “Missouri’s Mad Doctor McDowell” • Victori Cosner and Lorelie Shannon 5. “The Man in the High Castle” • Philip K. Dick 6. “Pitch by Pitch” • Bob Gibson 7. “The Martian” • Andy Weir 8. “Between the World and Me” • Ta-Nehisi Coates 9. “Find a Way” • Diana Nyad

CHILDREN/ YOUNG ADULTS 1. “Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Old School” • Jef Kinney 2. “Illustrated Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone” • J.K. Rowling 3. “Winter” • Marissa Meyer 4. “Goodnight St. Louis” • June Herman and Julie Dubray 5. “The Day the Crayons Came Home” • Drew Daywalt 6. “Throne of Glass” • Sarah J. Maas 7. “My First Book of Girl Power: DC Super Heroes” • Julie Merberg 8. “What Pet Should I Get?” • Dr. Seuss 9. “McToad Mows Tiny Island” • Tom Angleberger, illustrated by John Hendrix

EVENTS WEDNESDAY Jamie Madigan • Author discusses psychology of video games and “Getting Gamers” at 6:30 p.m. at Subterranean Books, 6275 Delmar Boulevard. Free. 314862-6100. THURSDAY Wm Stage • Novelist discusses “Creatures on Display” at 6:30 p.m. at Subterranean Books, address above. Free. FRIDAY Jef Smith • Author discusses “Mr. Smith Goes to Prison” at 7 p.m. at St. Louis County Library, 1640 South Lindbergh Boulevard. Free. 314-994-3300. SATURDAY, DEC. 5 M.R. Sellars • Novelist discusses his life on the road during a workshop from 10 a.m. to noon at Kirkwood Community Center, 111 South Geyer Road. Free for members of St. Louis Writers Guild; $5 for nonmembers. 314-825-0061. Mitch Albom • Novelist discusses “The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto” at 7 p.m. at the St. Louis County Library, address above. Book purchase required to enter signing line.

Books in time for centennial of Frank Sinatra’s birthday BY HARRY LEVINS Special to the Post-dispatch

With the centennial of Frank Sinatra’s birthday looming on Dec. 12, two writers have given us two very different biographies — one long and slow, the other terse and snappy. First, the “B” Side. Five years ago, James Kaplan gave us Part I of his Sinatra biography, “Frank: The Voice.” That book ran for 800 pages, ending with Sinatra’s Oscar in 1954 for his role in “From Here to Eternity. Part II, “Sinatra: The Chairman,” slogs on for 978 pages, ending with Sinatra’s death in 1998. Kaplan calls Sinatra’s comeback in those years “the greatest second act in show-business history.” Although his movie career never again reached Oscar level, his musical career flourished — thanks in large part, Kaplan says, to talented arrangers like Nelson Riddle, Gordon Jenkins and others. But in wrapping up his biography, Kaplan seems to have included almost every detail of Sinatra’s life — the love affairs, the recording sessions, the tours (including appearances in St. Louis in 1965 and 1968), the temper tantrums, the quiet acts of generosity, the longtime longing for ex-wife Ava Gardner, the ties to mobsters and to the Kennedy White House, and so on. It all rolls in on relentlessly chronological fashion, weighted down with trivia — who sat in on which recording session, who shared the billings in Las Vegas, who produced and directed which movie, which wife put up with which of Sinatra’s affairs, and so on. Despite it all, Sinatra remains Chairman of the Board. But readers of this weighty book may be simply b-o-r-e-d. Many readers thought the last word on Frank Sinatra went to tell-all biographer Kitty Kelley, who gave us “His Way” in 1986. But now, poet (and Sinatra fan) David Lehman gives us a more nuanced study — “Sinatra’s Century,” subtitled “One Hundred Notes on the Man and His World.” Bookstores will display Lehman’s richly illustrated work in the biography section. But actually, it’s a collection of musings about Sinatra’s life. Here, in its entirety, is Note No. 1: “At Zito’s Bakery on Bleecker Street, a Greenwich Village landmark for eighty years before it closed its doors in 2004, customers saw two framed photographs on the wall behind the counter. One was a picture of the pope. The other was a picture of Frank Sinatra.” After that striking start, the book hits all the highlights — and dim days — of Sinatra’s career, starting with his days as a big-band singer who blossomed into an idol for teenage girls in the Word War II years. Lehman quotes jazz critic Gene Lees as noting that in the wartime years, with so many beaus

BY JUNE E. PESCHEL Special to the Post-dispatch

Even so, let this book cast its spell.

The Italian physicist who brought us “The Solitude of Prime Numbers” opens his heart and pours it onto the pages of his latest novel. Paolo Giordano tells the story of Mrs. A. and the fabric of connections and love in “Like Family.” Weaving through the past and the present easily, we see life as it falls apart and comes together after Mrs. A. is diagnosed with cancer. Mrs. A. arrives at the narrator’s home to help his wife, Nora, when her pregnancy “proved unlike the marvelous experience” they envisioned. Mrs. A., their confidant, maid ‘Like Family’ and nanny A novel by Paolo to young Giordano Emanuele, Translated from orchesItalian by Anne Milano trates the Appel order and Published by Pamela activities Dorman Books, 146 of daily pages, $22 life for this On sale Tuesday little family, until one day “she announced her firm intention not to come anymore.” The family must find a way to make sense of their lives without her. Without Mrs. A. as a shield, the father, a brilliant physicist, decides that his son, Emanuele, is “dense.” The couple who relied on Mrs. A. to “witness and validate” their relationship becomes adrift, listless. But after they learn of her cancer diagnosis, the couple takes Mrs. A. to various tests and appointments and to purchase a wig when the need arises. Once the caretaker and director, Mrs. A. becomes another member of this struggling family. Throughout the story, the narrator maintains a matter-of-fact and realistic view of life, the family, and the cancer diagnosis. He is appalled to learn Nora took Mrs. A. to an acupuncturist for treatment when the cancer advanced. Nora’s response: “If it’s as ineffective as you say, then it makes no difference.” If you are expecting a “woe is me” patient or a defiant “cancer warrior,” look elsewhere. This book, based on a “real-life Mrs. A.,” is a refreshing and honest look at the struggles and joys of family, however you define it, as it comes apart and struggles to rebuild. This wonderfully poignant and heart-rending story looks at everyday lives with both reason and compassion. Author Giordano has a lyrical voice and an uncanny ability to create easy dialogue, real characters and a powerful message in this short book. The only fault I can find is that there wasn’t more of it.

Harry Levins of Manchester retired in 2007 as senior writer of the Post-Dispatch.

June E. Peschel, a freelance writer and critic in Iowa, can be reached at junepeschel@yahoo.com.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Frank Sinatra (right) sings along with fellow Rat Pack members Dean Martin (left) and Sammy Davis Jr. on May 22, 1978, in Santa Monica, Calif., to beneit a charity.

‘Sinatra: The Chairman’ By James Kaplan Published by Doubleday, 992 pages, $35

‘Sinatra’s Century’ By David Lehman Published by Harper, 288 pages, $24.99

far away in uniform, Sinatra “said for the boys what they wanted to say. He said to the girls what they wanted to hear.” Like biographer Kelley, Lehman notes Sinatra’s reputation as a womanizer. He cites Rat Pack pal Dean Martin as quipping,“When Frank dies, they’re gonna give his zipper to the Smithsonian.” The book recounts the Sinatra-like singer in “The Godfather” — and how it infuriated Sinatra. Lehman says that because of “The Godfather,” many people believed “Sinatra landed the part of Maggio in From Here to Eternity because a Mafia goon decapitated a stallion and put the bleeding head in the film director’s bed while he slept.” Although Lehman takes note of Sinatra’s many failings as a human, he credits Sinatra’s special skills as an artist, especially in his handling of lyrics. Lehman tells of reminiscing about Sinatra at a lunch with singer Julius La Rosa, who “chose Sinatra’s version of ‘I Get a Kick Out of You’ to illustrate the singer’s approach. ‘He sang the song not as written, not as a band (or dance) song, but as a song with a story to tell,’ La Rosa said. ‘He put a comma here, a period there.’” Lehman sprinkles anecdotal gems throughout the books. Some samples: • “Saddam Hussein may have

been the world’s most ardent admirer of ‘Strangers in the Night.’ In his palace days, Saddam played the song over and over.” • “Graffiti on posters in New York subway stations, circa 1966-67: “TO BE IS TO DO. — NIETZSCHE “TO DO IS TO BE. — SARTRE “DOO BEE DOO BEE DOO. — SINATRA” • “In the Philippines, ‘My Way” seems to be the populace’s karaoke song of choice, but you’d be a fool to sing it, because if you don’t do it justice, you might pay for the failure with your life. There is a subcategory of Filipino crime dubbed the ‘ “My Way” Killings.’ In 2010, the New York Times reported that the song had precipitated the deaths of at least six persons in karaoke bars ‘in the past decade.’” But readers beware. Just as you’re rolling along, Lehman will drop another song title into his text. And if you’re of a certain generation, your attention will stray from the text toward lyrics you still remember: Those fingers in my hair That sly come-hither stare That strips my conscience bare It’s witchcraft.

NONFICTION

Bush bio ranges from WWII to his presidency BY BRIAN BURNES The Kansas City Star

This month, a former president made headlines with comments how another former president — his own son — had been poorly served by advisers. That was George H.W. Bush, the 41st president, speaking of Donald Rumsfeld and Dick Cheney, who were defense secretary and vice president, respectively, to 43rd president George W. Bush. The comments came from “Destiny and Power: The American Odyssey of George Herbert Walker Bush,” by historian Jon Meacham (published by Random House, 836 pages, $35). Meacham knew his book would be released into a hyper-partisan environment, and the pre-publication release of those comments created a big-time book buzz. “My hope is that people will read the book in the spirit in

which was written,” Meacham said a few days before that firestorm. “This is about the 41st president, about George H.W. Bush. It’s not about George W. Bush and it’s not about Jeb Bush.” Meacham had resolved to produce a book with as much personal detail as possible about a president not known for being garrulous. “He has this image of being out of touch, buttoned-down and emotionally distant,” Meacham said. “But he was forthcoming. We are not going to have another president who fought in World War II and had the life experiences he had.” Meacham, who received a Pulitzer Prize for his 2008 biography of Andrew Jackson, enjoyed access to Bush over several years, interviewing him as well as reviewing his White House diaries. “What you get from these diary entries is the remarkable sense

JON MEACHAM When • 7 p.m. Thursday Where • Spencer Road library branch, 427 Spencer Road, St. Peters How much • $39-$44; includes one book and one-two tickets More info • brownpapertickets.com

that you are experiencing history as he experienced it,” Meacham said. “You feel the pressures of the Gulf War and you feel him worrying about (former Soviet Union President Mikhail) Gorbachev and bringing of the Cold War to a safe end. “You hear it, you are there. A lot of times you have to guess what presidents are thinking, but these diaries allow you to know.” Bush also discussed the traumatic events of September 1944, when the 20-year-old U.S. Navy torpedo bomber pilot had to abandon his aircraft after it was disabled by anti-aircraft fire. Bush and two crewmen had been charged with destroying a Japanese radio installation on the Pacific island of Chichi Jima. Although Bush survived in a

life raft before being rescued by a U.S. submarine, the two crewmen did not. Japanese officers on Chichi Jima later were found guilty of atrocities involving captured American airmen whose numbers conceivably could have included Bush. Bush didn’t dodge the topic, Meacham said. “He cried on a number of occasions during our interviews, whether it was about the two crewmen who died on that mission or about the (1953) loss of his daughter (Robin) to leukemia.” The perspective of Bush’s administration, meanwhile, looks better all the time, Meacham said. “He was attacked for raising some taxes in 1990. Bill Clinton will tell you today how that set up the prosperity of the 1990s, which everyone now wants to have back. “We miss a president who believed in Washington working, and who believed in the virtues of compromise, which is now almost a dirty word.”


C14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

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SUNDAY • 11.29.2015 • D

Rams can ease our pain BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Appointment reminder: Root canal, Sunday at noon. That’s what enduring Rams football is like, this painful process that is caring about your team. And then to know that the team ownership doesn’t care about your caring? Yet on Sunday, you’ll put on the dentist-oice bib that is your Rams jersey, lean back and sufer, because a fan isn’t only sometimes a fan, especially if you’ve already been through this much, this long. Surprise us, Rams. Give us something. Anything. Try something creative with the offense. You’re last-call flirting with irrelevance. You’re the Colorado Rockies of the NFL. These next two games, mercifully, will separate this season from its current state of disgusting disappointment to its potential state of disgraceful disaster. Sunday at noon is a Rams road game (1-4 on the See HOCHMAN • Page D2

Keenum is likely to miss start BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

It looks like the benching of Rams quarterback Nick Foles will be short-lived. That’s because Friday came and went at Rams Park with Case Keenum yet to clear the NFL’s concussion protocol. “Unless we get good news (Saturday), then Nick will be our starter,” coach Jeff Fisher said following Friday’s practice. “If Case is completely cleared and he feels good, then he’ll start. But as it is right now, it’s looking like we’re going to potentially have to go with Nick.” Usually, if players don’t clear

Tigers fall to Arkansas in

FINALE Pinkel expects game was last as coach BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

FAYETTEVILLE, ARK. • This time, there was no midfield dance. There was no chariot ride of the field. If tears were shed, they came behind closed doors. When Gary Pinkel entered the postgame interview room Friday at Donald W. Reynolds Razorback Stadium — on this day, the W was for wet — his eyes were bright. His voice didn’t quiver. Pinkel, coming off an emotionally packed two weeks, sounded like a man at peace with his decision to retire. Arkansas had just throttled his Missouri Tigers 28-3 in the Battle Line Rivalry, but this game was not a three-hour funeral for Pinkel’s career. It was closure. “I love Mizzou, and not being on the field again, I don’t know how to embrace that,” he said. “I’ll probably get up thinking I’m going to work tomorrow morning. At the end of the day I feel honored that we could build a program with integrity and a program with a lot of success, even though the last few games we didn’t.” Much like Mizzou’s home finale loss to Tennessee last week, the Razorbacks (7-5, 5-3 SEC) controlled the clock and controlled the scoreboard and most likely put the finishing touches on the Tigers’ season. Missouri (5-7, 1-7) fell short of the six wins required for bowl eligibility, but with a shortage of eligible teams for the postseason’s 41 bowl games, some 5-7 teams might be needed to fill out all the pairings. Pinkel has deferred any bowl decision to athletics director Mack Rhoades, but on Friday, he talked as if he had coached his final game. “It was a great run,” Pinkel said. “I didn’t particularly like it to end this way.” Players struck the same tone. “Normally, 5-7 teams don’t get invited to bowl games,” center Evan Boehm said. “You can’t be getting your hopes on something

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Missouri’s Gary Pinkel watches from the sidelines during the first half Friday in what he expects was his final game.

See RAMS • Page D10

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Arkansas’ Brandon Allen looks for an open receiver during the first half Friday in Fayetteville, Ark.

See MIZZOU • Page D4

> Noon Sunday at Cincinnati, KTVI (2)

CBC is dethroned in Class 6 championship

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

CBC quarterback Blake Charlton is sacked by Blue Springs South defensive end Elijeh Tauai in the second quarter Friday night at the Edward Jones Dome. CBC lost 37-28. High school sports, D9

Fabbri showing hint of potential BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Early in the third period last Saturday night in Pittsburgh, Blues rookie Robby Fabbri entered the Penguins’ zone and sized up his scoring options. Teammate Troy Brouwer looked to be an obvious one, but instead Fabbri took the shot and tied the score on a goal not often seen from a 19-year-old. “That’s a goal-scorer’s goal,” Blues coach Ken Hitchcock said. “I mean, he knew exactly where he was shooting, he knew the angle, he knew everything and zipped it in there. Some guys can stand there all day with a bucket-load of pucks and it never goes in. But people who know how to score goals, they go in from there.” The skill on the play was remarkable, but it was Fabbri’s decision-making process that

CHRIS LEE • P-D

Blues rookie Robby Fabbri collides with Minnesota Wild defenseman Marco Scandella in a game at Scottrade Center.

> 7 p.m. Sat. vs. Columbus, FSM

was perhaps just as impressive

and further illustrates the left winger’s development just 17 games into his NHL career. You see, young players in the league tend to yield to veterans, and remember as Fabbri stepped over the blueline he had the 30-year-old, Stanley Cup-winning Brouwer available. “Over my shoulder I thought I saw ‘Brouw’ had more time,” Fabbri said. “But then when I looked up, the (defenseman) sort of stepped up on him. That’s something they talk about, when the play is not there, don’t make it. So I thought the best thing was to get it on net.” Fabbri’s fourth goal of the season knotted the score 2-2, continuing a penchant for scoring in key situations, though Pittsburgh wound up winning 4-3 in overtime. See BLUES • Page D8

SPORTS

n Says. . . D. C. Chicke

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

SUNDAY • 11.29.2015 • D

Reeling Rams hope to end slide Keenum’s story should be cautionary tale for parents

hree losses in a row have season slipping away

BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Somewhere along the road from Minnesota to Cincinnati, the wheels have fallen of this Rams season. The shimmer of 4-3 and the team’s first winning record in November in nearly a decade is gone. Absolutely crushing losses to Minnesota, Chicago, and Baltimore have the Rams staggering at 4-6 and suddenly bearing the all-too-familiar look of a team headed toward another losing season. Most Rams fans know the milestone years by heart — all together now — no playof berths since 2004 and no winning records since 2003. “Big picture-wise, we have zero room See RAMS • Page D7 > Noon Sunday at Cincinnati, KTVI (2) > What to watch for Sunday. D6 > A look at Sunday’s other NFL games. D7

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Case Keenum sufered an obvious concussion Sunday but even the NFL isn’t foolproof in dealing with them.

The Rams’ quarterback sufered a conspicuous concussion, yet he was somehow left in the game, which makes me wonder — if this can happen in an NFL game, how often does it happen in your son’s youth football game? No protocol is completely protective. As I watch the replay from one week ago, Case Keenum’s head violently slamming into the ground, I think of how regularly this must occur in the playgrounds and fields of St. Louis, and how often concussed kids return to play too soon (and sometimes, like Case’s case, immediately). Keenum’s concussion shook

BLUES FIGHT BACK VS. BLUE JACKETS

us. It should remind everyone involved with football that there’s always more that can be done to prevent concussed players from playing. Of course, trainers are trained and coaches are coached and they all need a certain certification. But does this mean they’re flawless? Parents are confident in, say, a high school team’s medical staf, with a doctor even on the sideline, just in case. But again, a Rams player was concussed so blatantly that guys watching back in St. Louis — even dudes whose only medical experience was telling ladies at Bar Napoli that they’re doctors — knew Keenum had a dang concussion. Yet he continued to play, due to a quirk in the evaluation system. It’s crazy, but Keenum should feel lucky that he “only” blew the game that day. See HOCHMAN • Page D6

HIGH SCHOOLS, D10-11

John Burroughs claims irst state title since 2001

BEN LOEWNAU • STLhighschoolsports.com

John Burroughs wide receiver Ronald Smith gestures to the crowd after the Bombers beat Odessa at the Edward Jones Dome.

JOHN BURROUGHS 30, ODESSA 6

John Burroughs wipes out the memories of recent title-game losses with a triumph against Odessa in Class 3.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Blues’ Paul Stastny (left) and Blue Jackets’ Nick Foligno battle for control of the puck during the third period Saturday.

BLUES JACKETS

3 1

> 7 p.m. Tuesday vs. Florida, FSM > Gunnarsson looking past his mishap that allowed a goal Wednesday. D8

BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Scottie Upshall waited and waited, back-peddling in fact before he let go of a shot six minutes into the third period. The patience paid off as the puck found the back of the net, registering as Upshall’s fourth goal of the season and his first game-winner with the club in a 3-1 victory over Columbus. Upshall’s celebration was worth the price of admission for the 19,927 at Scottrade

Center, which was the club’s fifth sellout of the season. Upshall, whose goal came with 13 minutes, 58 seconds left in regulation, turned and dipped to a knee, pumping his right fist at the blueline where teammates joined him. The Blues celebrated once more, when Alexander Steen pumped in an empty-net goal with under a minute to play for his ninth goal of the season. Jake Allen made 23 saves for his 11th victory of the year. The Blues successively re-

covered from a 4-3 overtime loss to Pittsburgh on Wednesday by successfully recovering from an inauspicious first period Saturday. The team would have had much explaining to do if it failed to respond the way it did in the second period. All of the pre-game playerspeak focused on the fact that they needed a strong start because it was Columbus coming to town on the second night See BLUES • Page D8

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Fort Osage quarterback Skylar Thompson dives across the goal line to score on a keeper in the second quarter Saturday.

FORT OSAGE 63, CHAMINADE 28

Chaminade, playing in the title game for the first time since 1972, comes up short in Class 5 vs. team from Independence. SPORTS

n Says. . . D. C. Chicke

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

SUNDAY • 11.29.2015 • D

Reeling Rams hope to end slide Keenum’s story should be cautionary tale for parents

hree losses in a row have season slipping away

BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Somewhere along the road from Minnesota to Cincinnati, the wheels have fallen of this Rams season. The shimmer of 4-3 and the team’s first winning record in November in nearly a decade is gone. Absolutely crushing losses to Minnesota, Chicago, and Baltimore have the Rams staggering at 4-6 and suddenly bearing the all-too-familiar look of a team headed toward another losing season. Most Rams fans know the milestone years by heart — all together now — no playof berths since 2004 and no winning records since 2003. “Big picture-wise, we have zero room See RAMS • Page D7 > Noon Sunday at Cincinnati, KTVI (2) > What to watch for Sunday. D6 > A look at Sunday’s other NFL games. D7

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Case Keenum sufered an obvious concussion Sunday but even the NFL isn’t foolproof in dealing with them.

The Rams’ quarterback sufered a conspicuous concussion, yet he was somehow left in the game, which makes me wonder — if this can happen in an NFL game, how often does it happen in your son’s youth football game? No protocol is completely protective. As I watch the replay from one week ago, Case Keenum’s head violently slamming into the ground, I think of how regularly this must occur in the playgrounds and fields of St. Louis, and how often concussed kids return to play too soon (and sometimes, like Case’s case, immediately). Keenum’s concussion shook

BLUES FIGHT BACK VS. BLUE JACKETS

us. It should remind everyone involved with football that there’s always more that can be done to prevent concussed players from playing. Of course, trainers are trained and coaches are coached and they all need a certain certification. But does this mean they’re flawless? Parents are confident in, say, a high school team’s medical staf, with a doctor even on the sideline, just in case. But again, a Rams player was concussed so blatantly that guys watching back in St. Louis — even dudes whose only medical experience was telling ladies at Bar Napoli that they’re doctors — knew Keenum had a dang concussion. Yet he continued to play, due to a quirk in the evaluation system. It’s crazy, but Keenum should feel lucky that he “only” blew the game that day. See HOCHMAN • Page D6

HIGH SCHOOLS, D10-11

John Burroughs claims irst state title since 2001

BEN LOEWNAU • STLhighschoolsports.com

John Burroughs wide receiver Ronald Smith gestures to the crowd after the Bombers beat Odessa at the Edward Jones Dome.

JOHN BURROUGHS 30, ODESSA 6

John Burroughs wipes out the memories of recent title-game losses with a triumph against Odessa in Class 3.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Blues’ Paul Stastny (left) and Blue Jackets’ Nick Foligno battle for control of the puck during the third period Saturday.

BLUES JACKETS

3 1

> 7 p.m. Tuesday vs. Florida, FSM > Gunnarsson looking past his mishap that allowed a goal Wednesday. D8

BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Scottie Upshall waited and waited, back-peddling in fact before he let go of a shot six minutes into the third period. The patience paid off as the puck found the back of the net, registering as his fourth goal of the season and first gamewinner with the club in a 3-1 victory over Columbus. “I’ve been shooting the puck a lot lately in practice and feeling good with it,” Upshall

said. “It was just one of those chances, when you’re in the slot, it’s tough to make plays when you’re a shooter, not much of a play-maker. I just threw it on net, saw it go top corner. I was pretty happy.” Pretty happy? Upshall’s celebration was worth the price of admission for the 19,927 at Scottrade Center, which was the club’s fifth sellout of the season. He turned and dipped to a knee, pumping his right fist until he was joined by teammates.

“Yeah, well,” Jake Allen said, “it’s rewarding for guys that don’t get to score a whole lot, especially nice ones like that, it’s worth the celebration.” “That was a good ‘celly,’” Alexander Steen chimed in. It was Allen and Steen who helped make Upshall’s goal stand up as the 22nd gamewinner of his career, with the goaltender making a nifty glove save on Columbus’ Brandon Saad just 17 seconds after See BLUES • Page D8

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Fort Osage quarterback Skylar Thompson dives across the goal line to score on a keeper in the second quarter Saturday.

FORT OSAGE 63, CHAMINADE 28

Chaminade, playing in the title game for the first time since 1972, comes up short in Class 5 vs. team from Independence. SPORTS

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SPORTS

D2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Rams • stlouisrams.com | 314-425-8830 Sunday 11/29 at Cincinnati noon KTVI (2)

Sunday 12/6 vs. Arizona noon KTVI (2)

Sunday 12/13 vs. Detroit noon KTVI (2)

Thursday 12/17 vs. Tampa Bay 7:25 p.m. KMOV (4)/NFL

M 1 • SUnDAy • 11.29.2015

Is Miles in the mix for Mizzou?

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Saturday 11/28 vs. Columbus 7 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 12/1 vs. Florida 7 p.m. FSM

Friday 12/4 at NY Islanders 6:30 p.m. FSM

Saturday 12/5 vs. Toronto 6 p.m. FSM

Mizzou men’s basketball • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Tuesday 12/1 vs. Arkansas St. 8 p.m. SEC Network

Friday 12/4 vs. Northern Illinois 7 p.m.

Wednesday 12/9 vs. Omaha 7 p.m. SEC Network

Sunday 12/13 at Arizona 7 p.m. Pac 12 Networks

Illini • ightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 FOOTBALL

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Saturday 11/28 at Northwestern (Soldier Field) 2:30 p.m., ESPNU

Saturday 11/28 vs. Iowa St. (in Fla.), 6 p.m., CBSSN

Wednesday 12/2 Saturday 12/5 vs. W. Carolina vs. Notre Dame 2 p.m. 8:15 p.m. ESPN2

SLU men’s basketball • slubillikens.com | 314-977-4758 Saturday 11/28 vs. Louisville (Brooklyn) 7 p.m. KDNL-DT2 (30.2)

Wednesday 12/2 vs. Morehead St. 7 p.m. FSM

Saturday 12/5 vs. Wichita State 8 p.m. ESPNU

Saturday 12/12 vs. Alabama A&M 7 p.m.

OTHER EVENTS MAJOR ARENA SOCCER LEAGUE • ST. LOUIS AMBUSH Saturday 11/28: at Chicago, 7:05 p.m. Sunday 12/6: at Milwaukee, 2:05 p.m. FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

ON THE AIR SATURDAY AUTO RACING 7 a.m. Formula One: Abu Dhabi Grand Prix, Qualifying, CNBC BASKETBALL 11 a.m. College: 2K Classic, Bryant at Georgetown, FS2 4 p.m. College: SIU Edwardsville at Butler, FS2, WSIE (88.7 FM) 6 p.m. College: Emerald Coast Classic Championship, Illinois vs. Iowa State (in Florida), CBSSN , WQQX (1490 AM) 6:30 p.m. College: Cleveland State at Maryland, BTN 6:30 p.m. College: Georgia at Seton Hall, FS1 6:30 p.m. College: SIU Carbondale vs. Portland, KATZ (1600 AM) 7 p.m. College: St. Louis U. vs. Louisville in Brooklyn, KDNL-DT2 (30.2, Charter 182) WXOS (101.1 FM) 7 p.m. College: Western Illinois at Creighton, FS2 7:30 p.m. NBA: Denver at Dallas, NBA 11:30 p.m. College: Great Alaska Shootout, inal, Toledo vs. Middle Tennessee or UNC-Asheville, CBSSN BOXING 2 p.m. Premier Boxing Champions, Jermall Charlo vs. Wilky Campfort, KSDK (5) 3:45 p.m. Tyson Fury vs. Wladimir Klitschko, HBO 10 p.m. James DeGale vs. Lucian Bute, SHOW FOOTBALL • College 11 a.m. Ohio State at Michigan, KDNL (30) 11 a.m. Clemson at South Carolina, ESPN 11 a.m. Georgia at Georgia Tech, ESPN2 11 a.m. Southern Methodist at Memphis, ESPNews 11 a.m. Virginia Tech at Virginia, ESPNU 11 a.m. Iowa State at West Virginia, FS1 11 a.m. Southern Mississippi at Louisiana Tech, FSM 11 a.m. Indiana at Purdue, BTN 11 a.m. Maryland at Rutgers, BTN alt. 11 a.m. Cincinnati at East Carolina, CBSSN 11 a.m. Louisville at Kentucky, SEC Network 11:30 a.m. Duke at Wake Forest, KPLR (11) 11:30 a.m. Boston College at Syracuse, FSM Plus 2:30 p.m. UCLA at USC, KDNL (30) 2:30 p.m. Alabama at Auburn, KMOV (4) 2:30 p.m. Penn State at Michigan State, ESPN 2:30 p.m. North Carolina at North Carolina State, ESPN2 2:30 p.m. Illinois vs. Northwestern at Soldier Field, ESPNU, KQQZ (1190 AM) 2:30 p.m. Wisconsin at Minnesota, BTN 2:30 p.m. BYU at Utah State, CBSSN 2:30 p.m. Texas-El Paso at North Texas, FSM 3 p.m. Kansas State at Kansas, FS1 3 p.m. Vanderbilt at Tennessee, SEC Network 4 p.m. The Bayou Classic, Southern at Grambling State, NBCSN 6 p.m. Connecticut at Temple, ESPNU 6:15 p.m. Mississippi at Mississippi State, ESPN2 6:30 p.m. Notre Dame at Stanford, KTVI (2) 6:30 p.m. Florida State at Florida, ESPN 6:30 p.m. Texas A&M at LSU, SEC Network 7 p.m. Oklahoma at Oklahoma State, KDNL (30) 8 p.m. Colorado State at Fresno State, CBSSN 9 p.m. Arizona State at California, FS1 9:15 p.m. Air Force at New Mexico, ESPNU 9:45 p.m. Nevada at San Diego State, ESPN2 GOLF 7 p.m. PGA: Emirates Australian Open, Final round, GOLF 4 a.m. (Sun.) European PGA: Alfred Dunhill Links Championship, inal round, GOLF HOCKEY 6 p.m. Washington at Toronto, NHL Network 7 p.m. Blues vs. Columbus, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) SOCCER 5:30 a.m. English Premier League: Tottenham Hotspur FC vs. Chelsea FC, USA 8:30 a.m. Bundesliga: Bayern Munich vs. Hertha Berlin, FS1 8:30 a.m. Bundesliga: TSG Hofenheim vs. Borussia Monchengladbach, FS2 9 a.m. English Premier League: Manchester City vs. Southampton, NBCSN 11:30 a.m. English Premier League: Leicester City vs. Manchester United, KSDK (5) VOLLEYBALL 1 p.m. College women: Big East, Championship, Teams TBA, FS2 8:30 p.m. College women: Penn State at Nebraska, BTN WINTER SPORTS 2:30 p.m. Skiing: Nature Valley Aspen Winternational, NBCSN

SUNDAY HIGHLIGHTS FOOTBALL Noon Rams at Cincinnati, KTVI (2), WXOS (101.1 FM) Noon NFL: Bufalo at Kansas City, KMOV (4) 3:25 p.m. NFL: Pittsburgh at Seattle, KMOV (4) 5:30 p.m. CFL Grey Cup: Edmonton vs. Ottawa, ESPN2 7:20 p.m. NFL: New England at Denver, KSDK (5)

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HOCHMAN • FROM D1

road) at Cincinnati (4-1 at home). The Bengals allow 18.6 points per game — only three NFL teams allows fewer (Minnesota, Denver and New England). As for the Rams’ offensive points per game, I believe it’s a Blutarsky-GPA of 0.0 … no, wait, just looked it up, it’s 17.9 – only one team averages fewer (San Francisco). Oh, and on Friday, Rams coach Jeff Fisher said Case Keenum hasn’t yet cleared concussion protocol. So that means it’ll likely be Nick Foles quarterbacking behind an ofensive line in its fourth starters combination in the past five weeks (Side note — in an accidental-wording situation, Fisher talked Friday about Keenum’s concussion recovery process, and then the coach said: “Unless we get good news tomorrow, then Nick will be our starter.”) As for the second game, the following week, St. Louisans will again be treated to the worst ingame fan experience I’ve ever experienced, as the home team hosts the Arizona Cardinals, who are first in the Rams’ division and first in NFL points averaged (33.6). At least here’s something to look forward to — you are experiencing the first installment of my new Saturday column, a weekly look at 10 hot topics in sports. Perhaps we can rhyme it with my name and call it “Ten Hochman,” or, in honor of the No. 10 on the 1982 World Series champions,“Ten Oberkfell.” 2. Are “listen to how much I ate” stories Thanksgiving’s equivalent to “listen to how my fantasy football team is doing” stories? 3. Perhaps it’s fitting that in this strange season for Mizzou football, the under-.500 Tigers could play in a bowl game. With Friday’s loss to “rival” Arkansas (I think the only thing Mizzou people hate about Arkansas is that it has “Kansas” in its name), the Tigers finished the regular season at 5-7. But because there probably won’t be enough bowl-eligible teams at weekend’s end, 5-7 squads could “earn” an extra game. So, should Mizzou accept a bowl bid? If retiring Gary Pinkel is cool with coaching in the game, then they definitely should. And he should take a day or two to truly sort out his emotions (Pinkel said after Friday’s loss that it’s not his decision if the team accepts a bid or not). Yes, it’s weird to reward a bowl bid to a losing team — it saturates bowl season and it’s sort of embarrassing for the school involved. OK, but let’s break it down. The bowl bid would give Mizzou free practices. In an era where some kids even leave

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Ravens kicker Justin Tucker celebrates his game-winning ield goal against the Rams in Baltimore on Sunday. The Rams have a bigger challenge this week going up against the 8-2 Cincinnati Bengals.

high school a semester early, just to participate in a college’s spring practices, wouldn’t the Tigers want to take advantage of a free few weeks of practice they otherwise wouldn’t have? Don’t you think that ofensive ofense could benefit from it? And, again, if Pinkel is into it, I bet it would be fun an refreshing for him — there’s little pressure to actually win the bowl game, so it would give him a chance to relax (if Pinkel could possibly relax on a football field). And, of course, it would give him a chance to have a win in his final game. But if Pinkel, who’s retiring because of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, would prefer to call it a career, then accepting a bowl bid is more trouble than it’s worth. They’d wedge the assistant coaches into bigger roles, but these same men could use this time to determine their livelihoods, either looking for new jobs or trying to retain their job with the inevitable newly hired head coach. 4. It’s bizarre to me that the NFL would make the Rams play a home game in London next season, knowing that could possibly be an LA Rams home game — thus missing out on momentum and money from the LA fan base. 5. Wait, the St. Louis Who? This week, the Golden State Warriors went 16-0, the longest win streak to start a season in NBA history. Lists popped up of the longest season-starting streaks in other sports, be it the NFL’s 16-0 Patriots in 2007, the NHL’s 10-0 Sabres in 2006-07 or baseball’s 20-0 St. Louis Maroons in 1884. Turns out, the Maroons played three seasons in our city, starting in the professional league called the Union Association. Their historic 1884 season was played at the Union Grounds, site of present-day Beaumont High School. The Maroons won it all, finishing 94-19, thanks to players such as Handsome Henry Boyle, Buttercup Dickerson and Jack Gleason, who once hit a homer straight to the moon. 6. How good is SLU? We’ll find out soon enough. I’m fired up to see how the Billikens do Saturday against fellow 4-0er Louisville. On Wednesday, Morehead State

DIGEST Comets top Ambush The Missouri Comets showed why they’re the class of the Major Arena Soccer League by posting a 9-4 victory over the Ambush Friday night at Family Arena. The Comets (6-0) have won 31 consecutive regular-season games, dating to 2013. The Ambush, who fell to the Comets 10-3 Nov. 20 in Independence, Mo., dropped to 0-3. Leo Gibson had three goals to lead the Comets. Vahid Assadpour added two goals and three assists. Gordy Gurson and Odaine Sinclair each scored twice for the Ambush, who play the Chicago Mustangs Saturday night at Hofman Estates, Ill. Gut wins giant slalom as Shifrin crashes • Lara Gut of Switzerland won a World Cup giant slalom after irst-run leader Mikaela Shifrin crashed while well ahead and the inish line in sight. Gut completed the course in a two-run combined time of 2 minutes, 2.51 seconds Friday in Aspen, Colo., edging Austria’s Eva-Maria Brem by 0.10 seconds. Federica Brignone of Italy took third. Shifrin was just about to win her irst World Cup race at home when she lost an edge and went down on the third-to-last gate. Britain, Belgium tied in Davis Cup • Andy Murray kept Britain in contention in the Davis Cup inal in Ghent, Belgium, when he beat Belgium’s Ruben Bemelmans in straight sets to leave the two nations tied 1-1 after the opening singles Friday. Murray, ranked No. 2 in the world, made a smooth transition to clay and won 6-3, 6-2, 7-5 against his lefthanded opponent, who is ranked No. 108. Earlier, David Goin rallied to beat Kyle Edmund 3-6, 1-6, 6-2, 6-1, 6-0, overcoming a two-set deicit for the irst time in his career to put Belgium ahead.

comes to campus. And then Saturday is a big one against current No. 20 Wichita State, though the Shockers could be without two top seniors, the injured Fred VanVleet and Anton Grady, who suffered a scary collision in a game Friday. 7. I still have Houston football coach Tom Herman as No. 1 on my Mizzou wish list, but I sense that I have Les Miles way higher than Mizzou does. I know, the university wants a coach on the rise, but I think a rejuvenated Les Miles could be a lot like John Fox, who was let go after a bad season with the Panthers and then won four straight division titles in a new gig with the Broncos. 8. When Vladimir Tarasenko shoots, he often scores, and he scores often. OK, that’s confusing. Here’s what I mean. Since 2014-15, counting the postseason, the Blues’ star has scored 56 goals, behind only Steven Stamkos (61) and Alex Ovechkin (69). And Tarasenko is second in goals per game in that span (0.53) and third is shooting percentage (15.6). 9. Since Friday was the first day after Thanksgiving, that means you can now, officially, start listening to Christmas music. As such, here is a list of 10 within a 10-item list — my 10 favorite (and thus, unequivocally, the best) Christmas songs: 10. Mariah Carey — Santa Claus Is Coming To Town 9. Run DMC – Christmas In Hollis 8. Beach Boys — Little Saint Nick 7. Wham! — Last Christmas 6. Darlene Love — Christmas (Baby Please Come Home) 5. Gene Autry — Here Comes Santa Claus 4. Stevie Wonder — What Christmas Means To Me 3. Andy Williams — It’s The Most Wonderful Time Of The Year 2. Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band — Santa Claus Is Coming To Town 1. Mariah Carey — All I Want For Christmas Is You. And finally … 10. Since we’re talking holiday music, every year I’m let down by the rapper Master P, who doesn’t release a Thanksgiving remix of his song, “Wobble Wobble.” Benjamin Hochman @hochman on Twitter bhochman@post-dispatch.com

BASEBALL NOTEBOOK Belgium is seeking its irst Davis Cup title, while Britain has not won the team competition in 79 years. Schwartzel leads Euro Tour opener • Charl Schwartzel shot a 5-under 67 Friday to open a ive-shot lead after the second round of the European Tour’s season-opening Alfred Dunhill Championship in Malelane, South Africa. South Africa’s Schwartzel, a three-time champion at the Alfred Dunhill, made six birdies and a bogey for an 11-under total of 133 at the halfway point. There was a four-way tie for second with Pablo Martin Benavides, Richard Sterne, Benjamin Hebert and Joost Luiten on 6 under.

Dodgers’ Puig in ight with bouncer at bar Dodgers outielder Yasiel Puig sufered a swollen eye and facial bruises during a ight with a bouncer at a bar in Miami. Miami police spokesman Major Delrish Moss says the injuries happened Wednesday night as Puig was leaving the Blue Martini bar at bouncers’ request following an argument with his sister. Moss says that “at some point” Puig and a bouncer began to ight, leaving Puig with the swollen left eye and “minor bumps and bruises” to his face. He says the bouncer got a busted lip and minor facial bruises. The spokesman says the bouncer claimed Puig sucker-punched him; Puig said the bouncer got too aggressive. Moss says neither wanted to press charges. Limited to 72 games this past season because of hamstring issues, Puig hit .255 with 11 homers and 30 RBIs.

Jones leads Australian Open • Jordan Spieth and Adam Scott went in opposite directions at the Australian Open on Friday while Matt Jones used home-course advantage to shoot a 3-under 68 and take a three-stroke lead after two rounds. Jones, a member at The Australian Golf Club, had a 36-hole total of 7-under 135 on a course that was playing only slightly easier after Thursday’s brutal wind and heat when only 18 players broke par. Australian Todd Sinnott was in second place after a 70, while Spieth, who shot 68, and playing partner Geof Ogilvy (71) were in a group of ive tied for third, four behind Jones. First-round leader Lincoln Tighe of Australia dropped four shots on his inal four holes for a 73 and was also four back. Scott, who had diiculty reading the pace of the slower greens due to earlymorning rain, shot 73 and was at 2-over, two better than the 4-over cut total, but nine strokes out of the lead. Spieth and Scott opened with 71s.

Otis Nixon arrested • Jail records in Atlanta show that former major leaguer Otis Nixon was arrested on charges of contributing to the delinquency of a minor and permitting an unlicensed person to drive. Atlanta police spokesman Oicer Kim Jones said Nixon, 56, was arrested Tuesday night. Jones did not provide any further details. Nixon was released from the Fulton County jail Wednesday after posting a $2,500 bond.

From news services

Associated Press

Happ back with Jays • J.A. Happ is headed back to the Toronto Blue Jays. The lefthander agreed to a $36 million, three-year contract on Friday, returning to the team he pitched for from 2012-14. Happ ills another rotation spot for the AL East champions, who could lose fellow lefties David Price and Mark Buehrle in free agency.


SPORTS

D2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Rams • stlouisrams.com | 314-425-8830 Sunday 11/29 at Cincinnati noon KTVI (2)

Sunday 12/6 vs. Arizona noon KTVI (2)

Sunday 12/13 vs. Detroit noon KTVI (2)

Thursday 12/17 vs. Tampa Bay 7:25 p.m. KMOV (4)/NFL

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Tuesday 12/1 vs. Florida 7 p.m. FSM

Friday 12/4 at NY Islanders 6:30 p.m. FSM

Saturday 12/5 vs. Toronto 6 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 12/8 vs. Arizona 7 p.m. FSM

Mizzou men’s basketball • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Tuesday 12/1 vs. Arkansas St. 8 p.m. SEC Network

Friday 12/4 vs. Northern Illinois 7 p.m.

Wednesday 12/9 vs. Omaha 7 p.m. SEC Network

Sunday 12/13 at Arizona 7 p.m. Pac 12 Networks

Illini men’s basketball • ightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Wednesday 12/2 Saturday 12/5 vs. W. Carolina vs. Notre Dame 2 p.m. 8:15 p.m. ESPN2

Wednesday 12/9 Saturday 12/12 vs. Ill.-Chicago vs. Yale (in Chicago) 7 p.m. 1 p.m.

SLU men’s basketball • slubillikens.com | 314-977-4758 Wednesday 12/2 vs. Morehead St. 7 p.m. FSM

Saturday 12/5 vs. Wichita State 8 p.m. ESPNU

Saturday 12/12 Wednesday 12/16 vs. Alabama A&M vs. Tenn.-Martin 7 p.m. 7 p.m. FSM

OTHER EVENTS MAJOR ARENA SOCCER LEAGUE • ST. LOUIS AMBUSH Sunday 12/6: at Milwaukee, 2:05 p.m. Saturday 12/12: vs. Tacoma, 7:05 p.m. FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

ON THE AIR AUTO RACING 9 p.m. GP2 Series at Yas Marina Circuit, United Arab Emirates, NBCSN BASKETBALL 11:30 a.m. College: AdvoCare Invit., third place, USC vs. Monmouth, ESPN2 11:30 a.m. College: Utah State at Duke, ESPNU 12:30 p.m. College: Jackson State at Marquette, FS1 1 p.m. College women: South Florida at St. John’s, FS2 1:30 p.m. College women: Texas at Tennessee, ESPN 1:30 p.m. College: Wisconsin at Oklahoma, ESPN2 1:30 p.m. College: Wooden Legacy ifth place, UC-Irvine vs. Evansville, ESPNU 3:30 p.m. College: AdvoCare Invitational champ., Xavier vs. Dayton, ESPN2 3:30 p.m. College: Wooden Legacy third place, Boise State vs. Arizona, ESPNU 5 p.m. NBA: Philadelphia at Memphis, FSM 6 p.m. College: AdvoCare Invit. ifth place, Alabama vs. Notre Dame, ESPNU 8:30 p.m. NBA: Indiana at LA Lakers, FSM 9 p.m. College: Wooden Legacy champ., Michigan State. vs. Providence, ESPN2 FOOTBALL Noon NFL: Rams at Cincinnati, KTVI (2), WXOS (101.1 FM) Noon NFL: Bufalo at Kansas City, KMOV (4) 3:25 p.m. NFL: Pittsburgh at Seattle, KMOV (4) 5:30 p.m. CFL: Grey Cup, Edmonton vs. Ottawa, ESPN2 7:30 p.m. NFL: New England at Denver, KSDK (5), WXOS (101.1 FM) SOCCER 8 a.m. English Premier League: West Ham United vs. West Bromwich Albion, USA 8:30 a.m. Bundesliga: Borussia Dortmund vs. VfB Stuttgart, FS1 10 a.m. English Premier League: Liverpool vs. Swansea City, NBCSN 10:20 a.m. Bundesliga: FC Augsburg vs. VfL Wolfsburg, FS2 10:30 a.m. Bundesliga: Bayer Leverkusen vs. Schalke 04, FS1 4 p.m. MLS: Western Conf. champ., leg 2, Portland at FC Dallas, ESPN 6:30 p.m. MLS: Eastern Conf. champ., leg 2, Columbus at NY Red Bulls, FS1 WINTER SPORTS 2 p.m. Skiing: USSA Aspen Winternational, KSDK (5)

M 2 • SUnDAy • 11.29.2015

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

Louisville irst to beat SLU Cardinals pull away late for 77-57 victory ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK • Trey Lewis had 22

points and Mangok Mathiang had career highs of 17 points and 13 rebounds as Louisville pulled away for a 77-57 victory over St. Louis University on Saturday night in the Brooklyn Hoops Holiday Invitational at Barclays Center. The Cardinals (5-0) were in a back-and-forth game with the Billikens (4-1) until they turned to full-court pressure and kept up their huge rebounding advantage. Louisville led 30-27 at halftime and the lead was the same when the Cardinals finally put a run together. Lewis and Damion Lee, the two graduate transfers on Louisville’s roster, had four points each in a 10-0 run that made it 5138. The Billikens never got closer than 10 points the rest of the way. Mike Crawford led the Billikens with a career-high 20 points on 7-of-9 shooting, including 4 of 5 on 3s. Milik Yarbrough added 14 points. However, guard Ash Ya-

coubou, the team’s leading scorer on the season, was held scoreless and attempted only two shots. What made the Cardinals’ win even more impressive was that they managed to go just 5 of 17 from 3-point range, including 1 of 10 in the first half. SLU was 8 of 16 from behind the arc but that didn’t help much with Louisville finishing with a 36-14 rebound advantage. The 6-foot-10 Mathiang, a junior, outrebounded the Billikens by three himself. Lee and Quentin Snider each had 10 points for the Cardinals, who won in their first game this season away from home. They outscored the Billikens 40-20 in the paint and 13-2 on secondchance points. Louisville’s other big advantage came at the free throw line where the Cardinals were 20 of 25 compared to the Billikens’ 9 of 14. SLU went toe to toe with the Cardinals in the first half thanks largely to Crawford, who nailed his first three 3-pointers. But the pounding that Louisville was going to apply on the boards became apparent early and was especially problematic for the Billikens

> UP NEXT • 7 p.m. Wednesday vs. Morehead State, FSM

when the Cardinals were able to generate four shots on one possession before scoring. SLU’s final lead was at 34-33. The Billikens were within 41-38 when Louisville launched its decisive run with the help of a sequence of SLU turnovers. The Billikens kept the margin in the 11- to 14-point range for a while and trailed 64-53 with less than four minutes remaining before a late Louisville flurry SLU shot 49 percent and Louisville shot 53 percent. The crowd at Barclays Center had its biggest buzz early in the second half when Louisville’s Chinanu Onuaku went to the free throw line for the first time and took the shots underhanded, ala Rick Barry in the old days. Onuaku went to the underhanded style after shooting 46.7 from the line as a freshman. He worked on the new technique all summer and with the 1-for-2 effort Saturday he is 3 for 5 this season.

No. 4 Iowa State runs past Illinois

DIGEST Fury beats Klitschko to end heavyweight reign Tyson Fury defeated Wladimir Klitschko by unanimous decision in Duesseldorf, Germany, to end the Ukrainian’s nine-and-a-half-year reign as heavyweight champion and take his WBA, IBF, and WBO heavyweight titles. After a bruising encounter that ended with cuts near both of Klitschko’s eyes, referee Tony Weeks went to the judges’ scorecards. Cesar Ramos and Raul Caiz Sr. scored it 115-112 each, while Ramon Cerdan had it 116-111 in favor of the undefeated Briton, who improved his record to 25 wins with 18 knockouts. Fury taunted and baited the 39-year-old Klitschko at various stages, prompting jeers from fans at the 55,000-seat soccer stadium. Klitschko’s record dropped to 64-4 with 53 knockouts after his irst defeat since April 2004. Jones leads by three • Matt Jones shot a 3-under 68 to hold a three-stroke advantage over a surging Jordan Spieth after the third round of the Australian Open in Sydney. Defending champion Spieth holed out with his shot from the fairway on the par-4 17th for an eagle, then had a tap-in birdie on 18 for a 67. With gusty winds again afecting play on The Australian Golf Club course where Jones is a member, the U.S. -based Australian had a 54-hole total of 10-under 203. Schwartzel leads in South Africa • Charl Schwartzel will take a three-shot lead into the inal round of the European Tour’s seasonopening Alfred Dunhill Championship after a 2-under 70 moved him to 13 under par. Schwartzel has returned to form at one of his favorite tournaments, which he’s won three times before. The South African is ahead of French pair Benjamin Hebert and Sebastien Gros. Shifrin wins World Cup • Mikaela Shifrin shook of the disappointment of a fall the day before and turned in two blistering runs to win a World Cup slalom by 3.07 seconds Saturday, the largest margin of victory in the history of the women’s discipline. The reigning Olympic and world champion lew through the course and inished in a two-run combined time of 1 minute, 39.81 seconds. Minor league star retires • Minor league home run king Mike Hessman says he is retiring as a player and will pursue a career as a coach. Hessman became the career home run leader for U.S.-based minor leagues in August when he hit a grand slam to pass Buzz Arlett with his 433rd homer. Vardy extends scoring streak • Jamie Vardy became the irst player to score in 11 straight English Premier League games in helping Leicester draw 1-1 with Manchester United, capping a frenzied day of goals and drama that ended with Manchester City back in irst place. Associated Press

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ASSOCIATED PRESS

Illinois center Mike Thorne Jr. tries to shoot against Iowa State’s Abdel Nader (right) and Georges Niang in the irst half Saturday.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

NICEVILLE, FLA. • Georges

Niang scored 23 points and helped fourth-ranked Iowa State break open a close game in the second half and beat Illinois 84-73 on Saturday night in the championship game of the Emerald Coast Classic. Jaylon Tate’s layup gave the Illini a 58-57 lead before Iowa State (5-0) went on an 18-4 run to take control. Niang had six points during the spurts, while Monte Norris (20 points, nine rebounds) and Abdel Nader (18 points) had four apiece. Matt Thomas also was in double figures for the Cyclones with

10. The Illini scored seven of the game’s first nine points and were up 12-6 less than five minutes in. Iowa State started slowly cutting into the lead as the last 12 minutes of the half saw six ties and seven lead changes. Malcolm Hill (Belleville East) led Illinois (3-4) with 20 points while Kendrick Nunn added 19 and Mike Thorne Jr. had 10. After shooting 69 percent from the field in a win over Virginia Tech on Friday night, Iowa State struggled from the field in the first half, going 14 of 31. The Cyclones were 19 of 36 in the second half and shot 49.3 percent for the game.

> UP NEXT • 8:15 p.m. Wednesday vs. Notre Dame, ESPN2

No. 4 Iowa St. 84, Illinois 73 FG FT Reb IOWA ST. Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Carter 1 0-1 0-0 1-1 0 0 0 McKay 27 2-6 1-2 2-6 0 1 5 Nader 27 7-10 3-4 2-5 3 4 18 Cooke 10 0-1 0-0 1-2 0 1 0 Morris 37 7-14 6-6 0-9 6 0 20 Mitrou-Long 35 3-11 0-0 1-5 0 2 8 Thomas 28 4-8 0-0 0-3 1 1 10 Ashton 1 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Niang 33 10-15 2-2 3-8 1 3 23 Ernst 1 0-1 0-0 1-1 0 0 0 Totals 200 33-67 12-14 11-40 11 12 84 Percentages: FG.493, FT.857. 3-point goals: 6-25, .240. Team rebounds: 0. Blocked shots: 0. Turnovers: 8. Steals: 6. Technical fouls: None. FG FT Reb ILLINOIS Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Tate 12 2-2 0-1 0-0 2 3 4 Lewis 28 1-7 0-0 0-1 5 2 2 Coleman-Lands 20 2-5 0-0 0-1 0 1 5 Black 22 4-10 0-0 3-8 0 2 8 Hill 38 7-14 2-2 1-5 1 4 20 Morgan 10 0-0 0-0 1-2 1 1 0 Jordan 13 0-1 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Nunn 36 7-15 1-2 0-4 3 0 19 Thorne Jr 13 4-6 2-3 1-7 0 0 10 Finke 7 2-3 0-0 1-1 0 0 5 Austin 1 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Totals 200 29-63 5-8 7-30 12 13 73 Percentages: FG.460, FT.625. 3-point goals: 10-26, .385. Team rebounds: 1. Blocked shots: 0. Turnovers: 10. Steals: 2. Technical fouls: None. Iowa St. 40 44—84 Illinois 39 34—73 A: 2,222. Officials: Mike Eades, Doug Shows, Pat Adams.

Haas leads Purdue past Lehigh

HOW THE TOP 25 FARED

FROM NEWS SERVICES

2. Maryland (6-0) beat Cleveland State 80-63.

Sophomore center Isaac Haas scored 21 of his career-high 24 points in the second half and No. 16 Purdue pulled away to beat winless Lehigh 77-55 on Saturday night. Host Purdue took advantage of foul trouble for reigning Patriot League Player of the Year Tim Kempton to improve to 6-0, with all the victories by at least 22 points. Kempton led Lehigh (0-6) with 17 points and nine rebounds. No. 2 Maryland 80, Cleveland State 63 • Robert Carter had 17 points and eight rebounds to help Maryland (6-0) beat visiting Cleveland State (2-4). No. 24 Cincinnati 61, George Washington 56 • Troy Caupain scored 16 points, including the go-ahead three-point play with 1:38 to play, and Cincinnati (7-0) beat George Washington (6-1) in the championship game of the Barclays Center Classic in New York.

1. Kentucky (6-0) idle. Next: vs. Illinois State, Monday. Next: at No. 9 North Carolina, Tuesday. 3. Michigan State (6-0) idle. Next: vs. Providence, Sun. 4. Iowa St. (5-0) beat Illinois 84-73. Next: vs. North Dakota State, Tuesday. 5. Kansas (4-1) idle. Next: vs. Loyola (Md.), Tuesday. 6. Duke (5-1) idle. Next: vs. Utah State, Sunday. 7. Oklahoma (3-0) idle. Next: vs. Wisconsin, Sunday. 8. Villanova (6-0) idle. Next: at St. Joseph’s, Tuesday. 9. N.C. (5-1) idle. Next: vs. No. 2 Maryland, Tues. 10.Gonzaga (4-1) idle. Next: at Washington St., Wed. 11. Arizona (5-1) idle. Next: vs. Boise St., Sunday. 12. Virginia (5-1) idle. Next: at Ohio State, Tuesday. 13. Indiana (4-2) idle. Next: vs. Alcorn State, Monday.

AREA GAMES

14.California (4-2) idle. Next: vs. Seattle, Tuesday.

SLU women remain unbeaten • Denisha Womack (17) and Jamesia Price (15) registered season scoring highs to lead St. Louis University to a 78-47 victory over Eastern Illinois (1-5) at Chaifetz Arena. The Billikens improved to 5-0 .

15. Miami (5-1) idle. Next: at Nebraska, Tuesday.

MU women win • Missouri improved to 7-0 with a 95-78 victory over host St. Mary’s to win Hilton Concord Thanksgiving Classic in Moraga, Calif.

18. UConn (4-2) idle. Next: vs. Sacred Heart, Wed.

Fletcher leads SIUC to victory • Armon Fletcher (Edwardsville High) hit a tie-breaking 3-pointer with less than two minutes to play and the Southern Illinois Carbondale (6-1) men held of Portland (3-4) 80-79 in the Corpus Christi Coastal Challenge.

21. Oregon (5-0) idle. Next: vs. Fresno State, Monday.

Butler knocks of SIUE • Kellen Dunham matched a career high with 32 points as host Butler (4-1) cruised past Southern Illinois Edwardsville (1-4) in the second half to post an 89-73 win.

16.Purdue (6-0) beat Lehigh 77-55. Next: at Pittsburgh, Tuesday. 17. Notre Dame (4-1) idle. Next: vs. Alabama, Sunday.

19. Vanderbilt (5-1) idle. Next: vs. Detroit, Wednesday. 20.Wichita State (2-3) idle. Next: vs. Iowa, Sunday.

22.LSU (3-2) idle. Next: at College of Charleston, Mon. 23.Xavier (6-0) idle. Next: vs. Dayton, Sunday. 24.Cincinnati (7-0) beat George Washington 61-56. Next: vs. Butler, Wednesday. 25.SMU (3-0) idle. Next: vs. Brown, Sunday. 25.Texas A&M (6-1) idle. Next: vs. Fla. Gulf Coast, Wed.


SPORTS

D2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Rams • stlouisrams.com | 314-425-8830 Sunday 11/29 at Cincinnati noon KTVI (2)

Sunday 12/6 vs. Arizona noon KTVI (2)

Sunday 12/13 vs. Detroit noon KTVI (2)

Thursday 12/17 vs. Tampa Bay 7:25 p.m. KMOV (4)/NFL

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Tuesday 12/1 vs. Florida 7 p.m. FSM

Friday 12/4 at NY Islanders 6:30 p.m. FSM

Saturday 12/5 vs. Toronto 6 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 12/8 vs. Arizona 7 p.m. FSM

Mizzou men’s basketball • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Tuesday 12/1 vs. Arkansas St. 8 p.m. SEC Network

Friday 12/4 vs. Northern Illinois 7 p.m.

Wednesday 12/9 vs. Omaha 7 p.m. SEC Network

Sunday 12/13 at Arizona 7 p.m. Pac 12 Networks

Illini men’s basketball • ightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Wednesday 12/2 Saturday 12/5 vs. W. Carolina vs. Notre Dame 2 p.m. 8:15 p.m. ESPN2

Wednesday 12/9 Saturday 12/12 vs. Ill.-Chicago vs. Yale (in Chicago) 7 p.m. 1 p.m.

SLU men’s basketball • slubillikens.com | 314-977-4758 Wednesday 12/2 vs. Morehead St. 7 p.m. FSM

Saturday 12/5 vs. Wichita State 8 p.m. ESPNU

Saturday 12/12 Wednesday 12/16 vs. Alabama A&M vs. Tenn.-Martin 7 p.m. 7 p.m. FSM

OTHER EVENTS MAJOR ARENA SOCCER LEAGUE • ST. LOUIS AMBUSH Sunday 12/6: at Milwaukee, 2:05 p.m. Saturday 12/12: vs. Tacoma, 7:05 p.m. FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

ON THE AIR AUTO RACING 9 p.m. GP2 Series at Yas Marina Circuit, United Arab Emirates, NBCSN BASKETBALL 11:30 a.m. College: AdvoCare Invit., third place, USC vs. Monmouth, ESPN2 11:30 a.m. College: Utah State at Duke, ESPNU 12:30 p.m. College: Jackson State at Marquette, FS1 1 p.m. College women: South Florida at St. John’s, FS2 1:30 p.m. College women: Texas at Tennessee, ESPN 1:30 p.m. College: Wisconsin at Oklahoma, ESPN2 1:30 p.m. College: Wooden Legacy ifth place, UC-Irvine vs. Evansville, ESPNU 3:30 p.m. College: AdvoCare Invitational champ., Xavier vs. Dayton, ESPN2 3:30 p.m. College: Wooden Legacy third place, Boise State vs. Arizona, ESPNU 5 p.m. NBA: Philadelphia at Memphis, FSM 6 p.m. College: AdvoCare Invit. ifth place, Alabama vs. Notre Dame, ESPNU 8:30 p.m. NBA: Indiana at LA Lakers, FSM 9 p.m. College: Wooden Legacy champ., Michigan State. vs. Providence, ESPN2 FOOTBALL Noon NFL: Rams at Cincinnati, KTVI (2), WXOS (101.1 FM) Noon NFL: Bufalo at Kansas City, KMOV (4) 3:25 p.m. NFL: Pittsburgh at Seattle, KMOV (4) 5:30 p.m. CFL: Grey Cup, Edmonton vs. Ottawa, ESPN2 7:30 p.m. NFL: New England at Denver, KSDK (5), WXOS (101.1 FM) SOCCER 8 a.m. English Premier League: West Ham United vs. West Bromwich Albion, USA 8:30 a.m. Bundesliga: Borussia Dortmund vs. VfB Stuttgart, FS1 10 a.m. English Premier League: Liverpool vs. Swansea City, NBCSN 10:20 a.m. Bundesliga: FC Augsburg vs. VfL Wolfsburg, FS2 10:30 a.m. Bundesliga: Bayer Leverkusen vs. Schalke 04, FS1 4 p.m. MLS: Western Conf. champ., leg 2, Portland at FC Dallas, ESPN 6:30 p.m. MLS: Eastern Conf. champ., leg 2, Columbus at NY Red Bulls, FS1 WINTER SPORTS 2 p.m. Skiing: USSA Aspen Winternational, KSDK (5)

M 3 • SUnDAy • 11.29.2015

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

Louisville irst to beat SLU Cardinals pull away late for 77-57 victory ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK • Trey Lewis got two very diferent views of Rick Pitino around the last two Thanksgivings. Last year he scored 24 points for Cleveland State when Louisville beat the Vikings for Pitino’s 700th win. On Saturday night he was on the same bench with Pitino as a graduate transfer and he scored 22 points to lead the Cardinals to a 77-57 victory over St. Louis University in the Brooklyn Hoops Holiday Invitational at Barclays Center. “It feels great,” Lewis said of playing for rather than against Pitino. “A year ago around this time, I never thought I would be here. So it’s just really a blessing, truly an honor to play for this team, and play for this coach. So I’m just learning as much as I can and try to be in the moment and enjoy this last year of college basketball.” If Louisville (5-0) plays the way it did in pulling away from the Billikens (4-1), Lewis, Pitino and the Louisville fans might really enjoy this season. Mike Crawford led St. Louis U. with 20 points on 7-of-9 shooting, including 4 of 5 on 3s. Milik Yarbrough added 14 points. However, Ash Yacoubou, the team’s leading scorer through four games, was held scoreless and attempted only two shots. Mangok Mathiang had career

highs of 17 points and 13 rebounds for the Cardinals, who were in a back-and-forth game with the Billikens until they turned to fullcourt pressure, started switching defenses and kept up their huge rebounding advantage, which ended at 36-14. “They’re a big physical team and we weren’t really able to rebound with them at all and (Mathiang) was really good tonight,” SLU coach Jim Crews said. “They were getting buckets near the rim and since they were long, we weren’t getting buckets near the rim and I thought that was the main diference.” What made the Cardinals’ win even more impressive was that they managed to go just 5 of 17 from 3-point range, including 1 of 10 in the first half. St. Louis U. was 8 of 16 from behind the arc but that didn’t help much with Louisville’s rebound advantage. The 6-foot-10 Mathiang, a junior, outrebounded the Billikens by three himself. The Billikens played toe to toe with the Cardinals in the first half. They trailed by three in the second half when Louisville went on a decisive 10-0 run. “I’m really happy with my new basketball team,” Pitino said. “Four starters from last year and 85 percent of the scoring are gone. This is a damn good basketball team. “I think we had the best recruiting class in college basketball if you include Lee and Lewis,” Pitino said referencing Damion Lee, another graduate transfer. “Kentucky taught me to coach 1-and-dones except now I have

No. 4 Iowa State runs past Illinois

Fury beats Klitschko to end heavyweight reign

Jones leads by three • Matt Jones shot a 3-under 68 to hold a three-stroke advantage over a surging Jordan Spieth after the third round of the Australian Open in Sydney. Defending champion Spieth holed out with his shot from the fairway on the par-4 17th for an eagle, then had a tap-in birdie on 18 for a 67. With gusty winds again afecting play on The Australian Golf Club course where Jones is a member, the U.S. -based Australian had a 54-hole total of 10-under 203. Schwartzel leads in South Africa • Charl Schwartzel will take a three-shot lead into the inal round of the European Tour’s seasonopening Alfred Dunhill Championship after a 2-under 70 moved him to 13 under par. Schwartzel has returned to form at one of his favorite tournaments, which he’s won three times before. The South African is ahead of French pair Benjamin Hebert and Sebastien Gros. Shifrin wins World Cup • Mikaela Shifrin shook of the disappointment of a fall the day before and turned in two blistering runs to win a World Cup slalom by 3.07 seconds Saturday, the largest margin of victory in the history of the women’s discipline. The reigning Olympic and world champion lew through the course and inished in a two-run combined time of 1 minute, 39.81 seconds.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Illinois center Mike Thorne Jr. tries to shoot against Iowa State’s Abdel Nader (right) and Georges Niang in the irst half Saturday.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

NICEVILLE, FLA. • With Illinois

and No. 4 Iowa State trading the lead for most of Saturday’s championship game in the Emerald Coast Classic, Cyclones guard Monte Norris decided with 10:51 remaining to try and deliver a knockout punch. Iowa State led 59-58 when Norris had the ball at midcourt and saw Abdel Nader had a step on his defender. Norris fired a lob pass and Nader slammed it home. The dunk was part of an 18-4 run in the Cyclones’ 84-73 win. “We practice a lot of lobs and connect. When I was at half-

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half had two more ties and five lead changes before the Cyclones seized control. “It felt like a heavyweight boxing match and then the last 8-9 minutes they imposed their will and for whatever reason we weren’t able to impose ours. Their ability to work to get the shots was better than us,” Illinois coach John Groce said. Malcolm Hill (Belleville East) led Illinois with 20 points, while Kendrick Nunn added 19 and Mike Thorne Jr. had 10. Thorne left midway through the first half with a left knee injury and did not return. Groce said the extent of Thorne’s injury was unknown.

FROM NEWS SERVICES

2. Maryland (6-0) beat Cleveland State 80-63.

No. 2 Maryland 80, Cleveland State 63 • Robert Carter had 17 points and eight rebounds to help Maryland (6-0) beat visiting Cleveland State (2-4).

Must include name, address for veriication. Letters may be edited for length and clarity.

FG FT Reb IOWA ST. Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Carter 1 0-1 0-0 1-1 0 0 0 McKay 27 2-6 1-2 2-6 0 1 5 Nader 27 7-10 3-4 2-5 3 4 18 Cooke 10 0-1 0-0 1-2 0 1 0 Morris 37 7-14 6-6 0-9 6 0 20 Mitrou-Long 35 3-11 0-0 1-5 0 2 8 Thomas 28 4-8 0-0 0-3 1 1 10 Ashton 1 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Niang 33 10-15 2-2 3-8 1 3 23 Ernst 1 0-1 0-0 1-1 0 0 0 Totals 200 33-67 12-14 11-40 11 12 84 Percentages: FG.493, FT.857. 3-point goals: 6-25, .240. Team rebounds: 0. Blocked shots: 0. Turnovers: 8. Steals: 6. Technical fouls: None. FG FT Reb ILLINOIS Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Tate 12 2-2 0-1 0-0 2 3 4 Lewis 28 1-7 0-0 0-1 5 2 2 Coleman-Lands 20 2-5 0-0 0-1 0 1 5 Black 22 4-10 0-0 3-8 0 2 8 Hill 38 7-14 2-2 1-5 1 4 20 Morgan 10 0-0 0-0 1-2 1 1 0 Jordan 13 0-1 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Nunn 36 7-15 1-2 0-4 3 0 19 Thorne Jr 13 4-6 2-3 1-7 0 0 10 Finke 7 2-3 0-0 1-1 0 0 5 Austin 1 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Totals 200 29-63 5-8 7-30 12 13 73 Percentages: FG.460, FT.625. 3-point goals: 10-26, .385. Team rebounds: 1. Blocked shots: 0. Turnovers: 10. Steals: 2. Technical fouls: None. Iowa St. 40 44 — 84 Illinois 39 34 — 73 A: 2,222. Officials: Mike Eades, Doug Shows, Pat Adams.

HOW THE TOP 25 FARED

Vardy extends scoring streak • Jamie Vardy became the irst player to score in 11 straight English Premier League games in helping Leicester draw 1-1 with Manchester United.

HOW TO SUBMIT A LETTER

to wait four years to get them,” he said with a big smile. “Mango plays like that consistently for us every single day. He never has a bad day,” Lewis said. Mathiang gave Lewis the credit for the victory. “First half, he wasn’t playing his game, kind of playing tight,” he said. “... He picked us up tremendously in the second half. Without him I don’t think we would have such a big lead.” Louisville led 30-27 at halftime and the lead was the same when the Cardinals finally put together the 10-0 run to open up a 51-38 advantage.

Haas leads Purdue past Lehigh

Minor league star retires • Minor league home run king Mike Hessman says he is retiring as a player and will pursue a career as a coach. Hessman became the career home run leader for U.S.-based minor leagues in August when he hit a grand slam to pass Buzz Arlett with his 433rd homer.

Wire and news services

> UP NEXT • 7 p.m. Wednesday vs. Morehead State, FSM

> UP NEXT • 8:15 p.m. Wednesday vs. Notre Dame, ESPN2

court I saw him point up. I threw it up there and you saw the results,” said Norris, who had 20 points and nine rebounds and was named tournament MVP. Georges Niang, who led the Cyclones (5-0) with 23 points, had six points during the spurt. For the first 30 minutes, Illinois (3-4) hung in and challenged the Cyclones at both ends of the court. The Illini scored seven of the game’s first nine points and were up 12-6 less than five minutes in. Iowa State started slowly cutting into the lead, as the last 12 minutes of the half saw six ties and seven lead changes. The opening part of the second

Sophomore center Isaac Haas scored 21 of his career-high 24 points in the second half and No. 16 Purdue pulled away to beat winless Lehigh 77-55 on Saturday night. Host Purdue took advantage of foul trouble for reigning Patriot League Player of the Year Tim Kempton to improve to 6-0, with all the victories by at least 22 points. Kempton led Lehigh (0-6) with 17 points and nine rebounds.

Ambush fall at Chicago • The Ambush dropped to 0-4 this season with a 9-5 loss at Chicago in Major Arena Soccer League play Saturday night.

FG FT Reb ST. LOUIS U. Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Agbeko 14 0-2 0-0 1-2 0 0 0 Gillmann 10 0-1 0-0 0-0 0 3 0 Reynolds 23 3-5 0-0 0-0 1 1 8 Yacoubou 23 0-2 0-1 0-4 2 3 0 Crawford 31 7-9 2-3 0-2 3 3 20 Bartley 10 2-4 2-2 0-1 1 4 6 Yarbrough 24 5-9 3-6 1-3 0 1 14 Roby 23 0-1 0-0 0-1 4 2 0 Bishop 10 1-4 2-2 0-0 0 1 5 Neufeld 30 2-3 0-0 0-1 1 1 4 Jolly 2 0-1 0-0 0-0 0 1 0 Totals 200 20-41 9-14 2-14 12 20 57 Percentages: FG.488, FT.643. 3-point goals: 8-16, .500. Team rebounds: 0. Blocked shots: 0. Turnovers: 14. Steals: 4. Technical fouls: None. FG FT Reb LOUISVILLE Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Mathiang 34 6-8 5-6 7-13 0 3 17 Onuaku 11 2-2 1-2 0-2 0 4 5 Lee 20 4-7 1-2 0-0 0 5 10 Snider 39 3-7 3-4 1-1 4 3 10 Lewis 36 7-15 5-6 1-7 2 1 22 Johnson 3 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 2 0 Spalding 7 0-0 0-0 0-1 0 0 0 Mahmoud 25 3-3 1-1 1-4 1 1 7 Levitch 2 0-1 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Mitchell 23 1-6 4-4 0-3 3 2 6 Totals 200 26-49 20-25 13-36 10 21 77 Percentages: FG.531, FT.800. 3-point goals: 5-17, .294. Team rebounds: 5. Blocked shots: 3. Turnovers: 11. Steals: 7. Technical fouls: None. St. Louis U. 27 30 — 57 Louisville 30 47 — 77 A: NA. Officials: Mike Stuart, Doug Sirmons, Gerry Pollard.

No. 4 Iowa State 84, Illinois 73

DIGEST

Tyson Fury defeated Wladimir Klitschko by unanimous decision in Duesseldorf, Germany, to end the Ukrainian’s nine-and-a-half-year reign as heavyweight champion and take his WBA, IBF, and WBO heavyweight titles. After a bruising encounter that ended with cuts near both of Klitschko’s eyes, referee Tony Weeks went to the judges’ scorecards. Cesar Ramos and Raul Caiz Sr. scored it 115-112 each, while Ramon Cerdan had it 116-111 in favor of the undefeated Briton, who improved his record to 25 wins with 18 knockouts. Fury taunted and baited the 39-year-old Klitschko at various stages, prompting jeers from fans at the 55,000-seat soccer stadium. Klitschko’s record dropped to 64-4 with 53 knockouts after his irst defeat since April 2004.

Louisville 77, SLU 57

No. 24 Cincinnati 61, George Washington 56 • Troy Caupain scored 16 points, including the go-ahead three-point play with 1:38 to play, and Cincinnati (7-0) beat George Washington (6-1) in the championship game of the Barclays Center Classic in New York.

1. Kentucky (6-0) idle. Next: vs. Illinois State, Monday. Next: at No. 9 North Carolina, Tuesday. 3. Michigan State (6-0) idle. Next: vs. Providence, Sun. 4. Iowa St. (5-0) beat Illinois 84-73. Next: vs. North Dakota State, Tuesday. 5. Kansas (4-1) idle. Next: vs. Loyola (Md.), Tuesday. 6. Duke (5-1) idle. Next: vs. Utah State, Sunday. 7. Oklahoma (3-0) idle. Next: vs. Wisconsin, Sunday. 8. Villanova (6-0) idle. Next: at St. Joseph’s, Tuesday. 9. N.C. (5-1) idle. Next: vs. No. 2 Maryland, Tues. 10.Gonzaga (4-1) idle. Next: at Washington St., Wed. 11. Arizona (5-1) idle. Next: vs. Boise St., Sunday. 12. Virginia (5-1) idle. Next: at Ohio State, Tuesday. 13. Indiana (4-2) idle. Next: vs. Alcorn State, Monday.

AREA GAMES

14.California (4-2) idle. Next: vs. Seattle, Tuesday.

SLU women remain unbeaten • Denisha Womack (17) and Jamesia Price (15) registered season scoring highs to lead St. Louis University to a 78-47 victory over Eastern Illinois (1-5) at Chaifetz Arena. The Billikens improved to 5-0 .

15. Miami (5-1) idle. Next: at Nebraska, Tuesday.

MU women win • Missouri improved to 7-0 with a 95-78 victory over host St. Mary’s to win Hilton Concord Thanksgiving Classic in Moraga, Calif.

18. UConn (4-2) idle. Next: vs. Sacred Heart, Wed.

Fletcher leads SIUC to victory • Armon Fletcher (Edwardsville High) hit a tie-breaking 3-pointer with less than two minutes to play and the Southern Illinois Carbondale (6-1) men held of Portland (3-4) 80-79 in the Corpus Christi Coastal Challenge.

21. Oregon (5-0) idle. Next: vs. Fresno State, Monday.

Butler knocks of SIUE • Kellen Dunham matched a career high with 32 points as host Butler (4-1) cruised past Southern Illinois Edwardsville (1-4) in the second half to post an 89-73 win.

16.Purdue (6-0) beat Lehigh 77-55. Next: at Pittsburgh, Tuesday. 17. Notre Dame (4-1) idle. Next: vs. Alabama, Sunday.

19. Vanderbilt (5-1) idle. Next: vs. Detroit, Wednesday. 20.Wichita State (2-3) idle. Next: vs. Iowa, Sunday.

22.LSU (3-2) idle. Next: at College of Charleston, Mon. 23.Xavier (6-0) idle. Next: vs. Dayton, Sunday. 24.Cincinnati (7-0) beat George Washington 61-56. Next: vs. Butler, Wednesday. 25.SMU (3-0) idle. Next: vs. Brown, Sunday. 25.Texas A&M (6-1) idle. Next: vs. Fla. Gulf Coast, Wed.


COLLEGE FOOTBALL

11.29.2015 • SunDay • M 1

A lot on the line for Illini Team is playing to lock up a bid to a bowl in game at Chicago BY MARK TUPPER Decatur Herald & Review

CHICAGO • Playing for bowl eligibility. Playing to lift

ILLINOIS VS. NORTHWESTERN When • Saturday, 2:30 p.m. Where • Soldier Field, Chicago TV • ESPNU (Taylor Zarzour, Al Groh) Radio • KQQZ (1190 AM) Records • Illinois 5-6 overall, 2-5 in Big Ten; No. 17 Northwestern 9-2, 5-2 Of note • This is the irst in a three-game series at Soldier Field. Illinois will also move home games against the Wildcats to Chicago in 2017 and 2019.

a coach who’s in limbo. Playing a rivalry game with a traveling trophy. Seniors who could be playing for the final time. There’s a lot going on Saturday when Illinois takes on Northwestern at Soldier Field. But for fifth-year senior Ted Karras, it’s business as usual. “It’s do-or-die on Thanksgiving weekend,” Illinois’ starting right guard said. “Nothing new about that. I’ve been playing do-or-die my entire career.” Karras was injured and watching from the sideline last season when Illinois faced another do-or-die situation in Evanston. Needing a win to become bowl-eligible and likely to save coach Tim Beckman’s job, Illinois delivered one of its best performances of the season. The defense got five turnovers and Reilly O’Toole threw three touchdown passes as Illinois whipped Northwestern 47-33. The story line is eerily similar this season. Once again, Illinois arrives for the final regular-season game with a 5-6 record, needing a victory to lock up bowl eligibility. And instead of Beckman, who was fired in August, it’s interim head coach Bill Cubit whose fate is on the line. ASSOCIATED PRESS Interim Athletics Director Paul Kowalczyk has said Illinois is at full strength at running back with Josh he plans to have a decision on Cubit’s status by Sunday Ferguson (6), Ke’Shawn Vaughn and Kendrick Foster and the Chicago Tribune has reported that the univer- ready to go. sity is exploring a two-year deal that would keep Cubit in place. Cubit has spent much of the week saying he’s worried Gator Bowl,” Northwestern coach Pat Fitzgerald said. “Since the start of January the defensive line and secabout Northwestern, not his job status. He should be worried about the Wildcats, because ondary took over the attitude of this team. they’re 9-2 and ranked No. 16 in the latest College “Those two groups are probably our most consistent, Football Playof Rankings. top to bottom. It’s part a big part of why we’ve been able Northwestern has been doing it with defense and last to win so many close games.” week’s 13-7 victory at Wisconsin was a prime example. Northwestern has won seven games by 10 or fewer The Wildcats limited Wisconsin to minus-26 yards on points. the ground. “Success in that situation breeds confidence,” Illinois feels its has to run the ball to keep the defense Fitzgerald said. “Every coach in the country preaches honest and is finally at full strength at running back ‘finish.’ You put that into your everyday drills and workwith Josh Ferguson, Ke’Shawn Vaughn and Kendrick outs. But until you get evidence in games, it doesn’t Foster all ready to go. really become who you are. It’s become our identity this Because there is a bowl game on the line, Cubit said year.” he’s pulling out all the stops and may be shifting more Twenty-one seniors will be honored on the field prior starters to special teams. to the game, including Karras, who finds it ironic that One of those who could take on extra duty is Illini Northwestern will be the opponent. safety Clayton Fejedelem, who leads the Big Ten in “Not many people know it, but that’s where I wanted tackles. to go,” Karras said. “I’ll admit that. “I talked to (special teams coach Alex Golesh) about it “My dad was a four-year starter there, my uncle a and I’m sure I will be added to a few,” Fejedelem said. “I three-year starter there. I went to camp there but they told him to put me wherever he needs. If they need me didn’t ofer me (a scholarship), so I use that as motivaon all four special teams, that’s fine.” tion.” Ofensively, Northwestern running back Justin JackKarras’ father, Ted, will be on the field when the seson is looking for his fourth straight 100-yard rush- niors are honored. ing game. When he’s not carrying the ball, quarterback “I hope he doesn’t wear his Northwestern letterman’s Clayton Thorson often is. jacket,” the senior lineman said. “He wore it to the game But it’s the defense that has carried Northwestern last year, but he had an Illini hoodie on. since the opening game of the season, a 16-6 victory “So if I didn’t go to Northwestern, I’m glad I went to over Stanford. their rival. I can’t wait to go up there and beat them at “It’s very similar to the 2012 team when we won the Soldier Field.”

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ST. LOuIS POST-DISPaTCH • D3

COLLEGE FOOTBALL NOTEBOOK No. 15 TCU wins in OT against No. 7 Baylor Trevone Boykin threw an 8-yard touchdown pass to KaVontae Turpin in the second overtime and No. 15 TCU beat No. 7 Baylor 28-21 on a rainy Friday night in Forth Worth, Texas, knocking the Bears out of contention for their third straight Big 12 title. Boykin, playing with a heavily taped right ankle after missing a game, threw for 148 yards and two touchdowns, and ran for a 1-yard score in the irst overtime. Josh Carraway returned a fumble 56 yards for a touchdown for the Horned Frogs (10-2, 7-2 Big 12). Devin Chain ran for 119 yards and two scores, and caught a 4-yard TD in the irst overtime, but was stopped short on a fourthand-1 play to end the game. With the loss by Baylor (9-2, 6-2, No. 7 CFP), the Big 12 champion will be the winner Saturday night when No. 5 Oklahoma plays at No. 9 Oklahoma State. No. 21 Houston 52, No. 16 Navy 31 • Greg Ward, Jr. threw for 308 yards and three touchdowns and No. 21 Houston beat No. 16 Navy in Houston to reach the irst American Athletic Conference championship game. Houston (11-1, 7-1 American) won the West Division title and will host Temple or South Florida in the championship game Dec. 5. The Cougars are also well positioned to earn a bid to a New Year’s Six bowl game, likely the Fiesta Bowl, if they win the league championship. Ward was 26-of-35 passing and ran for 83 yards and another score. Brandon Wilson, who was moved from cornerback to running back this week because of injuries, ran for 111 yards and two touchdowns on 22 carries. Demarcus Ayers had eight catches for 161 yards and a touchdown and threw a touchdown pass. Keenan Reynolds rushed for 84 yards on 19 carries and a fourth-quarter touchdown and was 14 of 17 for 312 yards passing and a touchdown for Navy (9-2, 7-1). He scored his 83rd career touchdown to match the FBS record set by Wisconsin’s Montee Ball, a former Timberland High star. Reynolds also set a Navy record with his 29th career TD pass. Navy had its ive-game winning streak snapped. Western Michigan 35, No. 24 Toledo 30 • Corey Davis caught two touchdown passes and visiting Western Michigan upset Toledo to send Northern Illinois to the Mid-American Conference championship game. The Rockets (9-2, 6-2) could have earned the MAC West title and a spot in the league title game, but the Broncos (7-5, 6-2) created a three-way tie for the division. NIU beat Toledo and Western Michigan and will face Bowling Green on Dec. 4 at Ford Field in Detroit. The game turned when Toledo’s Alonzo Russell fumbled a punt to set up Davis’ second touchdown, a 30-yard catch from Zach Terrell with 1:07 to play in the irst half that gave the Broncos a 25-21 lead. Washington 45, No. 20 Washington State 10 • Myles Gaskin rushed for 138 yards and two touchdowns, Sidney Jones, Darren Gardenhire and Azeem Victor all returned turnovers for touchdowns in the second half and host Washington became bowl eligible. The Huskies (6-6, 4-5 Pac12) removed any doubt about their postseason status by stemming the best passing game in the country and taking advantage of seven turnovers by the Cougars (8-4, 6-3), the most by Washington State since 2009 against Hawaii. Peyton Bender made his irst college start for Washington State because of an injury to Luke Falk and threw for 288 yards. No. 18 Oregon 52, Oregon State 42 • Vernon Adams threw for 366 yards and three touchdowns and host Oregon extended its winning streak to six games and

FRIDAY’S SCORES TOP 25 No. 3 Iowa 28, Nebraska 20 No. 15 TCU 28, No. 7 Baylor 21 (2 OT) No. 21 Houston 52, No. 16 Navy 31 No. 18 Oregon 52, Oregon State 42 Washington 45, No. 20 Washington State 10 Western Michigan 35, No. 24 Toledo 24 EAST Miami 29, Pittsburgh 24 UMass 31, Buffalo 26 SOUTH Western Kentucky 49, Marshall 28 Georgia St. 31, Troy 21 Tulsa 45, Tulane 34 MIDWEST Akron 20, Kent St. 0 Cent. Michigan 35, E. Michigan 28 SOUTHWEST Arkansas 28, Missouri 3 FAR WEST Boise St. 40, San Jose St. 23

SATURDAY’S GAMES TOP 25 No. 1 Clemson at South Carolina, 11 a.m. No. 2 Alabama at Auburn, 2:30 p.m. No. 4 Notre Dame at No. 13 Stanford, 6:30 p.m. No. 5 Oklahoma at No. 9 Oklahoma State, 7 p.m. No. 6 Michigan State vs. Penn State, 2:30 p.m. No. 8 Ohio State at No. 12 Michigan, 11 a.m. No. 10 Florida vs. No. 14 Florida State, 6:30 p.m. No. 11 North Carolina at N.C. State, 2:30 p.m. No. 17 Northwestern vs. Illinois at Chicago, 2:30 p.m. No. 19 Mississippi at No. 23 Mississippi State, 6:15 p.m. No. 22 UCLA at Southern Cal, 2:30 p.m. No. 25 Temple vs. UConn, 6 p.m. EAST Maryland (2-9) at Rutgers (4-7), 11 a.m. Iowa St. (3-8) at West Virginia (6-4), 11 a.m. Boston College (3-8) at Syracuse (3-8), 11:30 a.m. SOUTH Cincinnati (6-5) at East Carolina (5-6), 11 a.m. Georgia (8-3) at Georgia Tech (3-8), 11 a.m. Louisville (6-5) at Kentucky (5-6), 11 a.m. Southern Miss. (8-3) at Louisiana Tech (8-3), 11 a.m. SMU (2-9) at Memphis (8-3), 11 a.m. Florida Atlantic (2-9) at Old Dominion (5-6), 11 a.m. Virginia Tech (5-6) at Virginia (4-7), 11 a.m. Duke (6-5) at Wake Forest (3-8), 11:30 a.m. Texas Southern (3-6) at Alabama A&M (2-8), 1 p.m. Louisiana-Lafayette (4-6) at Appalachian St. (8-2), 1 p.m. South Alabama (5-5) at Georgia Southern (7-3), 1 p.m. Southern (6-4) vs. Grambling (8-2) at New Orleans, 1:30 p.m. Alcorn St. (7-3) at Jackson St. (3-7), 2 p.m. Vanderbilt (4-7) at Tennessee (7-4), 3 p.m. Texas A&M (8-3) at LSU (7-3), 6:30 p.m. MIDWEST Indiana (5-6) at Purdue (2-9), 11 a.m. Wisconsin (8-3) at Minnesota (5-6), 2:30 p.m. Kansas St. (4-6) at Kansas (0-11), 3 p.m. SOUTHWEST Middle Tennessee (6-5) at UTSA (3-8), 1:30 p.m. UTEP (4-7) at North Texas (1-10), 2:30 p.m. Charlotte (2-9) at Rice (4-7), 2:30 p.m. FAR WEST UNLV (3-8) at Wyoming (1-10), 1 p.m. Colorado (4-8) at Utah (8-3), 1:30 p.m. BYU (8-3) at Utah St. (6-5), 2:30 p.m. Arkansas St. (7-3) at New Mexico St. (3-7), 3 p.m. Texas St. (3-7) at Idaho (3-8), 4 p.m. Colorado St. (6-5) at Fresno St. (3-8), 8 p.m. Arizona St. (6-5) at California (6-5), 9 p.m. Air Force (8-3) at New Mexico (6-5), 9:15 p.m. Nevada (6-5) at San Diego St. (8-3), 9:45 p.m. Louisiana-Monroe (1-10) at Hawaii (2-10), 10 p.m. FCS PLAYOFFS First Round Western Illinois (6-5) at Dayton (10-1), 11 a.m. Fordham (9-2) at Chattanooga (8-3), noon The Citadel (8-3) at Coastal Carolina (9-2), 1 p.m. Southern Utah (8-3) at Sam Houston State (8-3), 2 p.m. South Dakota State (8-3) at Montana (7-4), 2 p.m. Colgate (7-4) at New Hampshire (7-4), 2:30 p.m. Duquesne (8-3) at William & Mary (8-3), 2:30 p.m. Eastern Illinois (7-4) at Northern Iowa (7-4), 4 p.m.

closed the regular season with a victory over rival Oregon State in the 119th Civil War game. Royce Freeman ran for 167 yards and two touchdowns for the Ducks (9-3, 7-2 Pac-12). It was the ninth straight loss for the Beavers (2-10, 0-9). Oklahoma QB expected to play vs. Oklahoma State • Oklahoma coach Bob Stoops says quarterback Baker Mayield is expected to play Saturday against Oklahoma State after sufering a concussion a week ago. Mayield took a helmetto-helmet hit from TCU linebacker Ty Summers early in the second quarter of a 30-29 win last Saturday. The Heisman hopeful inished the quarter, but didn’t play in the second half after acknowledging he had a headache. Mayield passed the concussion protocol a day after being hit, and Stoops said in a statement Friday that Mayield has practiced all week. Having Mayield available is critical for the Sooners. Fifth-ranked Oklahoma (10-1, 7-1 Big 12) can clinch the Big 12 conference title with a victory over the ninth-ranked Cowboys (10-1, 7-1). The Sooners are No. 3 in the College Football Playof rankings, and likely would clinch a berth in the playof with a win. Associated Press


SEC FOOTBALL

11.29.2015 • Sunday • M 2

MU bowl status unclear but Pinkel won’t coach BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • It remains unclear if Missouri would accept a bowl game invitation after finishing the regular season with a 5-7 record. But it’s clear who won’t be coaching the Tigers should their season continue in the postseason: Gary Pinkel. Athletics director Mack Rhoades appointed quarterbacks coach Andy Hill interim head coach on Saturday, a source confirmed. PowerMizzou. com reported the news first. Hill, MU’s associate head coach, will oversee the program until Rhoades hires Pinkel’s successor. Rhoades met with the team Saturday morning in the wake of Friday’s regular-season finale, a 28-3 loss at Arkansas, sources confirmed. The team had its end-of-the-year banquet Saturday afternoon. Hill, the longest tenured assistant on Mizzou’s staf with 20 seasons as a position coach, held a similar interim job after head coach Larry Smith was fired following the 2000 season. He helped manage the program until Pinkel was hired and stayed on Pinkel’s staf as the lone holdover from Smith’s regime. Hill coached Mizzou wide receivers from 1996-2012. After the 2012 season, he was promoted to associate head coach and took over the quarterback coaching duties. Hill’s interim title signals a clear end to Pinkel’s run as head coach. Pinkel decided in late October that this season would be his last and announced the news Nov. 13. Pinkel was diagnosed with a form on nonHodgkins lymphoma in May. After Friday’s game in Fayetteville, Ark., Pinkel said he was unsure if Missouri would accept a bowl invitation but indicated he was done coaching. “It was a great run,” he said. “I didn’t particularly like it to end this way.” There’s still a chance Missouri could be invited to a bowl game despite falling short of the six-win requirement for bowl eligibility. When the week began, only 71 teams were eligible for the 80 available bowl spots. Between two and five 5-7 teams will be needed to fill out the 40 bowl pairings, which will be finalized

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D3

ROUNDUP

’Bama rolls into title tilt; Clemson stays undefeated

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Quarterbacks coach Andy Hill (above) has been named interim head coach at Missouri in place of Gary Pinkel until a new coach is named.

next Sunday. Over the last two days, four teams won their sixth game to become bowl eligible: Indiana, Virginia Tech, Tulsa and Washington. Three more teams can get to 6-6 on Saturday: Kansas State, Georgia State and South Alabama. The NCAA football oversight committee will decide this week how to choose which 5-7 teams will fill out the remaining bowl spots. Other 5-7 teams that could be available include Illinois, Kentucky, Minnesota and Nebraska. If the Southeastern Conference lands one team in the four-team playoff and another in the Sugar Bowl, there would be only eight more six-win eligible teams to fill out the league’s other nine affiliated bowls. The Independence Bowl, slated for Dec. 26 in Shreveport, La., has the final selection of SEC teams. It’s unclear if the Independence Bowl would be obligated to select a 5-7 SEC team — either Kentucky or Missouri. It’s also unclear if those 5-7 SEC teams would be obligated to accept the bowl’s invitation. The Tigers played in the Independence Bowl under Pinkel in 2003, 2005 and 2011. An SEC spokesman declined to comment Saturday on the possible scenarios until there’s more clarity on the situation. Rhoades is expected to make the final decision on whether Mizzou would consider a bowl invitation.

Lower tier bowl games generally don’t generate revenue for an athletics department once travel and lodging expenses are covered. Extra practices could benefit young players but not if they’re working under the incumbent coaches, many of whom might not be back next season to run their systems. It would be unusual for a newly hired head coach and his staf to coach the team in a bowl game, especially if he stays behind to coach his current team through bowl season or needs time to fill out his coaching staf. As for Rhoades’ search for Pinkel’s successor, two possible candidates could be of the market. Virginia Tech is prepared to name Memphis’ Justin Fuente its new head coach, several outlets reported Saturday. Toledo’s Matt Campbell has emerged as the frontrunner at Iowa State, Sports Illustrated reported Saturday, and could soon be named head coach in Ames. Fuente’s departure could lead Memphis to consider Missouri defensive coordinator Barry Odom, who held the same role at Memphis under Fuente from 2012-14. Odom figures to be in the mix for Missouri’s job as well. Several Mizzou players endorsed Odom for the job after Friday’s loss. Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

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ASSOCIATED PRESS

Derrick Henry carries 46 times, 19 in the fourth quarter, gaining 271 yards and scoring a TD to key Alabama’s victory.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Alabama’s national title hopes remain alive and well. Derrick Henry ran a school-record 46 times for 271 yards to propel No. 2 Alabama to a 29-13 victory Saturday at Auburn, giving the Crimson Tide the title in the Southeaster Conference’s West Division. He broke Trent Richardson’s Alabama single-season rushing mark and had carries on 14 consecutive plays at the end. “He’s the go-to guy,” Tide coach Nick Saban said. “He didn’t want to come out. He wanted to go.” The Heisman Trophy candidate, who produced his fourth 200-yard game of the season against an SEC foe, put the game away with 19 runs in the fourth quarter, then extended his school-record streak of games with a rushing touchdown to 17 in the final minute. Meanwhile, Adam Griffith was a hero this time for the Crimson Tide (11-1, 7-1), kicking five field goals two years after his miss on the last play of the game led to Auburn’s 109-yard return for a TD in what had been a tied game. The Tigers (6-6, 2-6) stayed close into the fourth quarter and were aided by Jason Smith’s 77-yard touchdown catch in the third quarter, in which he twice tipped the ball back to himself. “As I was running, I was like, ‘Man, no way,’” Smith said. “I couldn’t hear anything, at first, until I got in the end zone.” The Tide will play No. 10 Florida next weekend in Atlanta for the SEC championship and if they win almost certainly a second straight berth in the playofs. Alabama entered the game No. 2 in the playof rankings and like No. 1 Clemson had trouble shaking its struggling rival. Clemson survived a 37-32 scare against South Carolina. Alabama’s win also didn’t come without a fight against Auburn. But ’Bama took control down the stretch. “We had opportunities in the fourth quarter,” Auburn coach Gus Malzahn said. “We were right there and just didn’t make the plays to win the game and they did.” No. 1 Clemson 37, South Carolina 32 • Deshaun Watson ran for three touchdowns and passed for one as the visiting Tigers, of the Atlantic Coast Conference, capped an undefeated regular season by holding of the SEC’s Gamecocks. He threw for 279 yards and ran for 114 to keep the Tigers on track for a spot in the College Football Playof — and moved their record to 12-0 for the first time since their 1981 national championship winning season. Next up is No. 11 North Carolina in the Atlantic Coast Conference title game, on Dec. 5. Win that one and it’s of to the national semifinals. South Carolina finished its season at 3-9. No. 19 Mississippi 38, No. 23 Mississippi State 27 • Chad Kelly threw for 236 yards and two touchdowns and ran for a score to power the Rebels (9-3, 6-2), who jumped out to a 28-3 halftime lead by the Bulldogs (8-4, 4-4). Mississippi State struggled in quarterback Dak Prescott’s final home game at Davis Wade Stadium. Prescott completed 31 of 42 passes for 254 yards and two touchdowns, but was sacked seven times and rarely looked comfortable in the pocket. Tennessee 53, Vanderbilt 28 • Joshua Dobbs threw two touchdown passes to Von Pearson and ran for a score to lead the host Volunteers (8-4, 5-3) over the visiting Commodores (4-8, 2-6). Tennessee ends the regular season with its first five-game winning streak since 2007 and has won at least eight games in a season for the first time since that 2007 team finished 10-4. Georgia 13, Georgia Tech 7 • Sony Michel rushed for 149 yards and scored a TD on the first possession of the game, enough for the Bulldogs (9-3) to pull out an ugly nonconference victory over the host Yellow Jackets (3-9). Louisville 38, Kentucky 24 • Lamar Jackson accounted for 316 yards and three TDs, and the visiting Cardinals (7-5) erased a 24-7 halftime deficit with 31 unanswered points to beat the Wildcats (5-7) in a nonconference contest.

SEC STANDINGS Conf. EAST W L Florida 7 1 Georgia 5 3 Tennessee 5 3 Vanderbilt 2 6 Kentucky 2 6 Missouri 1 7 S. Carolina 1 7

Total W L 10 1 9 3 8 4 4 8 5 7 5 7 3 9

Conf. WEST W L Alabama 7 1 Mississippi 6 2 LSU 5 3 Arkansas 5 3 Miss. St. 4 4 Texas A&M 4 4 Auburn 2 6

Total W L 11 1 9 3 8 3 7 5 8 4 8 4 6 6


SEC FOOTBALL

11.29.2015 • Sunday • M 3

Hill interim MU coach; interviews under way BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • It remains unclear if Missouri would accept a bowl game invitation after finishing the regular season with a 5-7 record. But it’s clear who won’t be coaching the Tigers should their season continue in the postseason: Gary Pinkel. Athletics director Mack Rhoades appointed quarterbacks coach Andy Hill interim head coach on Saturday, a source confirmed. PowerMizzou.com reported the news first. Hill, MU’s associate head coach, will oversee the program until Rhoades hires Pinkel’s successor, a process that’s reportedly taking Rhoades to the head coaches at Toledo and Temple for interviews. FootballScoop.com reported Saturday that Rhoades met with Toledo coach Matt Campbell on Saturday and plans to meet with Temple coach Matt Rhule on Sunday, citing anonymous sources. Campbell has also been linked to the vacancy at Iowa State. Rhule’s Temple Owls (10-2) defeated Connecticut Saturday to clinch a spot in next week’s American Athletic Conference championship game against Houston (11-1), coached by Tom Herman, the coach Rhoades hired last November when he was UH’s A.D. Earlier Saturday, Rhoades met with Mizzou players in the wake of Friday’s regular-season finale, a 28-3 loss at Arkansas, sources confirmed. He also attended the team’s end-of-the-year banquet Saturday afternoon. Also on the coaching search front, Virginia Tech is prepared to name Memphis’ Justin Fuente its new head coach, several outlets reported Saturday. Fuente’s departure could lead Memphis to consider Missouri defensive coordinator Barry Odom, who held the same role at Memphis under Fuente from 2012-14. Odom figures to be in the mix for Missouri’s job as well. Several Mizzou players endorsed Odom for the job after Friday’s loss. Hill, the longest tenured assistant on Mizzou’s staff, held a similar interim position after head coach Larry Smith was fired following the 2000 season. He helped manage the program until Pinkel was hired and

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D3

ROUNDUP

’Bama rolls into title tilt; Clemson stays undefeated

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Quarterbacks coach Andy Hill (above) has been named interim head coach at Missouri in place of Gary Pinkel until a new coach is named.

stayed on Pinkel’s staff as the lone holdover from Smith’s regime. Hill coached Mizzou wide receivers from 1996-2012. After the 2012 season, he was promoted to associate head coach and took over the quarterback coaching duties. Hill’s interim title signals a clear end to Pinkel’s run as head coach. Pinkel decided in late October that this season would be his last and announced the news Nov. 13. Pinkel was diagnosed with a form on non-Hodgkin lymphoma in May. After Friday’s game in Fayetteville, Ark., Pinkel said he was unsure if Missouri would accept a bowl invitation but indicated he was done coaching. “It was a great run,” he said. “I didn’t particularly like it to end this way.” There’s still a chance Missouri could be invited to a bowl game despite falling short of the six-win requirement for bowl eligibility. When the week began, only 71 teams were eligible for the 80 available bowl spots.Between two and five 5-7 teams will be needed to fill out the 40 bowl pairings, which will be finalized next Sunday. Over the last two days, four teams won their sixth game to become bowl eligible: Indiana, Virginia Tech, Tulsa and Washington. Three more teams can get to 6-6 on Saturday: Kansas State, Georgia State and South Alabama.

The NCAA football oversight committee will decide this week how to choose which 5-7 teams will fill out the remaining bowl spots. Other 5-7 teams that could be available include Illinois, Kentucky, Minnesota and Nebraska. If the Southeastern Conference lands one team in the four-team playoff and another in the Sugar Bowl, there would be only eight more six-win eligible teams to fill out the league’s other nine affiliated bowls. The Independence Bowl, slated for Dec. 26 in Shreveport, La., has the final selection of SEC teams. It’s unclear if the Independence Bowl would be obligated to select a 5-7 SEC team — either Kentucky or Missouri. It’s also unclear if those 5-7 SEC teams would be obligated to accept the bowl’s invitation. The Tigers played in the Independence Bowl under Pinkel in 2003, 2005 and 2011. An SEC spokesman declined to comment Saturday on the possible scenarios until there’s more clarity on the situation. Rhoades is expected to make the final decision on whether Mizzou would consider a bowl invitation. Lower tier bowl games generally don’t generate revenue for an athletics department once travel and lodging expenses are covered. Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

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ASSOCIATED PRESS

Derrick Henry carries 46 times, 19 in the fourth quarter, gaining 271 yards and scoring a TD to key Alabama’s victory.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Alabama’s national title hopes remain alive and well. Derrick Henry ran a school-record 46 times for 271 yards to propel No. 2 Alabama to a 29-13 victory Saturday at Auburn, giving the Crimson Tide the title in the Southeastern Conference’s West Division. He broke Trent Richardson’s Alabama single-season rushing mark and had carries on 14 consecutive plays at the end. “He’s the go-to guy,” Tide coach Nick Saban said. “He didn’t want to come out. He wanted to go.” The Heisman Trophy candidate, who produced his fourth 200-yard game of the season against an SEC foe, put the game away with 19 runs in the fourth quarter, then extended his school-record streak of games with a rushing touchdown to 17 in the final minute. And Adam Griith was a hero this time for the Crimson Tide (11-1, 7-1), kicking five field goals two years after his miss on the last play of the game led to Auburn’s 109-yard return for a TD in what had been a tied game. The Tide will play No. 10 Florida (which lost Saturday) next weekend in Atlanta for the SEC crown, and if they win almost certainly will be in the playofs. Alabama entered the game No. 2 in the standings for that event. Alabama’s win also didn’t come without a fight against Auburn (6-6, 2-6), which was aided by Jason Smith’s 77yard TD catch in the third quarter, in which he twice tipped the ball to himself. But ’Bama controlled down the stretch. “We had opportunities in the fourth quarter,” Auburn coach Gus Malzahn said. “We were right there and just didn’t make the plays to win the game and they did.” No. 1 Clemson 37, South Carolina 32 • Deshaun Watson ran for three TDs and passed for one as the visiting Tigers, of the Atlantic Coast Conference, capped an undefeated regular season by holding of the SEC’s Gamecocks. He threw for 279 yards and ran for 114 to keep the Tigers on track for the playofs — and moved their record to 12-0 for the first time since their 1981 national championship winning season. Next up is No. 11 North Carolina in the ACC title game, next Saturday. South Carolina finished its season at 3-9. No. 14 Florida State 27, No. 10 Florida 2 • Dalvin Cook ran for 183 yards and two touchdowns to help the visiting Seminoles (10-2), of the ACC, upset the SEC’s Gators. That ended any realistic chance Florida (10-2) had of making the playofs, even if they beat Alabama next weekend. The Seminoles probably locked up a spot in the Chick-fil-A Peach Bowl, on Dec. 31 in Atlanta. LSU 19, Texas A&M 7 • Leonard Fournette ran for 159 yards and a touchdown to help the host Tigers give coach Les Miles a victory in what some thought might have been his final contest with them. But after the game athletics director Joe Alleva said the embattled coach will remain at the school. Before that announcement, players lifted Miles on their shoulders and carried him toward the student section as the crowd chanted “Keep Les Miles!” LSU (8-3, 5-3) ended a three-game skid that had raised questions about Miles’ job security that grew when LSU’s administration had declined comment on his status. Fournette’s performance gave him LSU’s single-season rushing record at 1,741 yards, surpassing the mark of 1,686 yards set by Charles Alexander in 1977. The Aggies fell to 8-4, 4-4. No. 19 Mississippi 38, No. 23 Mississippi State 27 • Chad Kelly threw for 236 yards and two touchdowns and ran for a score to power the Rebels (9-3, 6-2), who jumped out to a 28-3 halftime lead by the Bulldogs (8-4, 4-4). Georgia 13, Georgia Tech 7 • Sony Michel rushed for 149 yards and scored a TD on the first possession of the game, enough for the Bulldogs (9-3) to pull out an ugly nonconference victory over the host Yellow Jackets (3-9). Louisville 38, Kentucky 24 • Lamar Jackson accounted for 316 yards and three TDs, and the visiting Cardinals (7-5) erased a 24-7 halftime deficit with 31 unanswered points to beat the Wildcats (5-7) in a nonconference contest. Tennessee 53, Vanderbilt 28 • Joshua Dobbs threw two touchdown passes to Von Pearson to lift the host Volunteers (8-4, 5-3) by the visiting Commodores (4-8, 2-6).

SEC STANDINGS Conf. EAST W L Florida 7 1 Georgia 5 3 Tennessee 5 3 Vanderbilt 2 6 Kentucky 2 6 Missouri 1 7 S. Carolina 1 7

Total W L 10 2 9 3 8 4 4 8 5 7 5 7 3 9

Conf. WEST W L Alabama 7 1 Mississippi 6 2 LSU 5 3 Arkansas 5 3 Miss. St. 4 4 Texas A&M 4 4 Auburn 2 6

Total W L 11 1 9 3 8 3 7 5 8 4 8 4 6 6


SEC FOOTBALL

11.29.2015 • Sunday • M 4

Hill interim MU coach; interviews under way BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • It remains unclear if Missouri would accept a bowl game invitation after finishing the regular season with a 5-7 record. But it’s clear who won’t be coaching the Tigers should their season continue in the postseason: Gary Pinkel. Athletics director Mack Rhoades appointed quarterbacks coach Andy Hill interim head coach on Saturday, a source confirmed. PowerMizzou.com reported the news first. Hill, MU’s associate head coach, will oversee the program until Rhoades hires Pinkel’s successor, a process that’s reportedly taking Rhoades to the head coaches at Toledo and Temple for interviews. FootballScoop.com reported Saturday that Rhoades met with Toledo coach Matt Campbell on Saturday and plans to meet with Temple coach Matt Rhule on Sunday, citing anonymous sources. Campbell has also been linked to the vacancy at Iowa State. Rhule’s Temple Owls (10-2) defeated Connecticut Saturday to clinch a spot in next week’s American Athletic Conference championship game against Houston (11-1), coached by Tom Herman, the coach Rhoades hired last November when he was UH’s A.D. Earlier Saturday, Rhoades met with Mizzou players in the wake of Friday’s regular-season finale, a 28-3 loss at Arkansas, sources confirmed. He also attended the team’s end-of-the-year banquet Saturday afternoon. Also on the coaching search front, Virginia Tech is prepared to name Memphis’ Justin Fuente its new head coach, several outlets reported Saturday. Fuente’s departure could lead Memphis to consider Missouri defensive coordinator Barry Odom, who held the same role at Memphis under Fuente from 2012-14. Odom figures to be in the mix for Missouri’s job as well. Several Mizzou players endorsed Odom for the job after Friday’s loss. Hill, the longest tenured assistant on Mizzou’s staff, held a similar interim position after head coach Larry Smith was fired following the 2000 season. He helped manage the program until Pinkel was hired and

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D3

ROUNDUP

’Bama rolls into title tilt; LSU wins, will retain Miles

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Quarterbacks coach Andy Hill (above) has been named interim head coach at Missouri in place of Gary Pinkel until a new coach is named.

stayed on Pinkel’s staff as the lone holdover from Smith’s regime. Hill coached Mizzou wide receivers from 1996-2012. After the 2012 season, he was promoted to associate head coach and took over the quarterback coaching duties. Hill’s interim title signals a clear end to Pinkel’s run as head coach. Pinkel decided in late October that this season would be his last and announced the news Nov. 13. Pinkel was diagnosed with a form on non-Hodgkin lymphoma in May. After Friday’s game in Fayetteville, Ark., Pinkel said he was unsure if Missouri would accept a bowl invitation but indicated he was done coaching. “It was a great run,” he said. “I didn’t particularly like it to end this way.” There’s still a chance Missouri could be invited to a bowl game despite falling short of the six-win requirement for bowl eligibility. When the week began, only 71 teams were eligible for the 80 available bowl spots.Between two and five 5-7 teams will be needed to fill out the 40 bowl pairings, which will be finalized next Sunday. Over the last two days, four teams won their sixth game to become bowl eligible: Indiana, Virginia Tech, Tulsa and Washington. Three more teams can get to 6-6 on Saturday: Kansas State, Georgia State and South Alabama.

The NCAA football oversight committee will decide this week how to choose which 5-7 teams will fill out the remaining bowl spots. Other 5-7 teams that could be available include Illinois, Kentucky, Minnesota and Nebraska. If the Southeastern Conference lands one team in the four-team playoff and another in the Sugar Bowl, there would be only eight more six-win eligible teams to fill out the league’s other nine affiliated bowls. The Independence Bowl, slated for Dec. 26 in Shreveport, La., has the final selection of SEC teams. It’s unclear if the Independence Bowl would be obligated to select a 5-7 SEC team — either Kentucky or Missouri. It’s also unclear if those 5-7 SEC teams would be obligated to accept the bowl’s invitation. The Tigers played in the Independence Bowl under Pinkel in 2003, 2005 and 2011. An SEC spokesman declined to comment Saturday on the possible scenarios until there’s more clarity on the situation. Rhoades is expected to make the final decision on whether Mizzou would consider a bowl invitation. Lower tier bowl games generally don’t generate revenue for an athletics department once travel and lodging expenses are covered. Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

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LSU coach Les Miles is carried of the ield after the Tigers won, before it was announced he was staying at the helm.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Alabama’s national title hopes remain alive and well. Derrick Henry ran a school-record 46 times for 271 yards to propel No. 2 Alabama to a 29-13 victory Saturday at Auburn, giving the Crimson Tide the title in the Southeastern Conference’s West Division. He broke Trent Richardson’s Alabama single-season rushing mark and had carries on 14 consecutive plays at the end. “He’s the go-to guy,” Tide coach Nick Saban said. “He didn’t want to come out. He wanted to go.” The Heisman Trophy candidate, who produced his fourth 200-yard game of the season against an SEC foe, put the game away with 19 runs in the fourth quarter, then extended his school-record streak of games with a rushing touchdown to 17 in the final minute. And Adam Griith was a hero this time for the Crimson Tide (11-1, 7-1), kicking five field goals two years after his miss on the last play of the game led to Auburn’s 109-yard return for a TD in what had been a tied game. The Tide will play No. 10 Florida (which lost Saturday) next weekend in Atlanta for the SEC crown, and if they win almost certainly will be in the playofs. Alabama entered the game No. 2 in the standings for that event. Alabama’s win also didn’t come without a fight against Auburn (6-6, 2-6), which was aided by Jason Smith’s 77-yard TD catch in the third quarter, in which he twice tipped the ball to himself. But ’Bama took control down the stretch. “We had opportunities in the fourth quarter,” Auburn coach Gus Malzahn said. “We were right there and just didn’t make the plays to win the game and they did.” LSU 19, Texas A&M 7 • Leonard Fournette ran for 159 yards and a touchdown to help host Louisiana State win in what some thought might have been Les Miles’ final contest with the team. But after the game athletics director Joe Alleva said the embattled coach will be retained, ending a week of speculation and ominous reports about whether Miles would be back — fueled when LSU’s administration had declined to comment on his status. The Tigers (8-3, 5-3) had lost three straight games coming into Saturday night. Miles said Alleva and the school president told him after the game that they wanted him to continue as coach. He is 111-32 with a national title. “It’s great to be the head coach at LSU,” Miles said. It could have cost LSU about $15 million to buy out Miles, though the school could have recouped some of that if he moved into a another job. He said he would consider changes to his staf and the ofense. Before that announcement, players lifted Miles on their shoulders and carried him toward the student section as the crowd chanted “Keep Les Miles! Keep Les Miles!” Meanwhile, Fournette’s performance gave him LSU’s single-season rushing record at 1,741 yards, surpassing the mark of 1,686 yards set by Charles Alexander in 1977. The Aggies fell to 8-4, 4-4. No. 1 Clemson 37, South Carolina 32 • Deshaun Watson ran for three TDs and passed for one as the visiting Tigers, of the Atlantic Coast Conference, capped an undefeated regular season by holding of the SEC’s Gamecocks. He threw for 279 yards and ran for 114 to keep the Tigers on track for the playofs — and moved their record to 12-0 for the first time since their 1981 national championship winning season. Next up is No. 11 North Carolina in the ACC title game, next Saturday. South Carolina finished its season at 3-9. No. 14 Florida State 27, No. 10 Florida 2 • Dalvin Cook ran for 183 yards and two TDs to help the visiting Seminoles (10-2), of the ACC, upset the SEC’s Gators. That ended any realistic chance Florida (10-2) had of making the playofs, even if they beat Alabama next weekend. No. 19 Mississippi 38, No. 23 Mississippi State 27 • Chad Kelly threw for 236 yards and two touchdowns and ran for a score to power the Rebels (9-3, 6-2), who jumped out to a 28-3 halftime lead by the Bulldogs (8-4, 4-4). Georgia 13, Georgia Tech 7 • Sony Michel rushed for 149 yards and scored a TD on the first possession of the game, enough for the Bulldogs (9-3) to pull out an ugly nonconference victory over the host Yellow Jackets (3-9). Louisville 38, Kentucky 24 • Lamar Jackson accounted for 316 yards and three TDs, and the visiting Cardinals (7-5) erased a 24-7 halftime deficit with 31 unanswered points to beat the Wildcats (5-7) in a nonconference contest. Tennessee 53, Vanderbilt 28 • Joshua Dobbs threw two touchdown passes to Von Pearson to lift the host Volunteers (8-4, 5-3) by the visiting Commodores (4-8, 2-6).

SEC STANDINGS Conf. EAST W L Florida 7 1 Georgia 5 3 Tennessee 5 3 Vanderbilt 2 6 Kentucky 2 6 Missouri 1 7 S. Carolina 1 7

Total W L 10 2 9 3 8 4 4 8 5 7 5 7 3 9

Conf. WEST W L Alabama 7 1 Mississippi 6 2 LSU 5 3 Arkansas 5 3 Miss. St. 4 4 Texas A&M 4 4 Auburn 2 6

Total W L 11 1 9 3 8 3 7 5 8 4 8 4 6 6


COLLEGE FOOTBALL

D4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Booster says Miles is done But LSU is saying decision not made ASSOCIATED PRESS

Les Miles’ final game with LSU could be on Saturday, ESPN.com reported, citing another media report. Speaking Friday to the LSU Gridiron Club, a booster organization, Miles indicated that the Tigers’ game against Texas A&M will be his last with the program. “He didn’t use those words, but he made it clear that Saturday is his last game,” one Gridiron club member told the New Orleans Times-Picayune. Miles said he would not be coaching the bowl game, according to the report, and did not stay to answer questions. “He said we’re a second family to him and he’s going to miss us, he appreciates his real friends, and then he told us goodbye,” the source told the newspaper. “It was very emotional but in control.” Meanwhile, LSU’s sports information director said that Miles didn’t tell the booster club that Saturday would be his last game, but rather used the meeting as an opportunity to thank members of the Gridiron Club if Saturday turned out to be his finale with the Tigers. “He was basically using it as an opportunity to thank them because he wasn’t sure if he’d be in front of them again,” SID Michael Bonnette said. “He by no means resigned or gave any indication of tomorrow being his last game at all.”

M 1 • SUnDAy • 11.29.2015

MIZZOU NOTEBOOK

Players back Odom for coach Team says after game Lock has been playing with shoulder injury BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

FAYETTEVILLE, ARK. • Wherever Missouri’s head-coaching search takes athletics director Mack Rhoades, some players hope he doesn’t look far. After Friday’s 28-3 loss at Arkansas, junior linebacker Michael Scherer made an impassioned case for defensive coordinator Barry Odom as the successor to Gary Pinkel, who announced two weeks ago this season will be his last. Odom, 38, has no headcoaching experience at the college level but has been a coordinator each of the last four seasons, three at Memphis and this year at his alma mater. “I think every single person, coach, player, sports staf, trainer respects the heck out of Coach Odom,” Scherer said after Friday’s loss ended Mizzou’s regular season with a 5-7 record. “Everybody loves him. You can ask offense, defense, special teams. Whoever it is, they’re going to tell you they love Coach Odom (for) the way he carries himself. There’s a lot of people in that locker room that are

hopeful for him. Obviously a lot of us hope he is the guy. “But it’s in Mack Rhoades’ hands, and he’s proven to be good at his job. I trust him to do his job and do it well like he has in the past. The ball’s in his court. But I think he knows how much every single person in this program loves Coach Odom and wants him to be around.” At times Friday, Arkansas (75, 5-3) trampled over Odom’s defense, but if Mizzou’s season is indeed complete — there’s an outside chance the Tigers could receive a bowl invitation if not enough teams are eligible — Odom’s debut season as coordinator produced the team’s best average for yards allowed (301.4) since 2004 and fewest points allowed (15.7) since 1981. Odom was requested for interviews after the game but was not available. “Me, personally, I feel like Coach Odom needs to be the head coach,” senior safety Ian Simon said. “I feel like he’d be perfect for the job. He’s a Mizzou man. Played here. Graduated (from) here. I feel like he fits. The team would take on his mentality, just like the defense

did this year.” Before Friday’s game, Scott Rousel of FootballScoop.com reported that Rhoades is expected to interview Odom along with Toledo coach Matt Campbell, citing unnamed sources. Campbell, who turns 36 on Sunday, is 35-15 in four seasons at Toledo, including two losses to Missouri. Campbell, a graduate of Division III Mount Union, has been an ofensive assistant at Mount Union, Bowling Green and Toledo prior to taking over as Toledo’s head coach for the 2011 Military Bowl. With Friday’s loss, Campbell’s 24thranked Rockets (9-2) failed to secure the Mid-American Conference West Division, which could free him up for interviews this week. “I feel very, very confident that Mack Rhoades will do without question the best thing for our football program,” Pinkel said.

LOCK SHOULDERS LOAD Missouri quarterback Drew Lock was sacked 23 times in his eight starts this season, but in the one game he didn’t get sacked — Nov. 14 against

Brigham Young — he suffered a sprained right shoulder, the same shoulder he used to throw 57 passes the last two games. Pinkel revealed the injury after Friday’s loss and Lock later confirmed it happened on his 33-yard run late in MU’s win over BYU. “It was just a freak thing,” he said. “Just a sprain.” Lock said the injury won’t require surgery, just further treatment. He insisted the injury didn’t afect his play the last two weeks, saying it only bothered him during pregame warmups. After the injury, Lock completed 22 of 57 passes for 218 yards and two interceptions in losses to Tennessee and Arkansas. Lock finished the regular season with 1,332 passing yards, four touchdowns and eight interceptions while completing 49.0 percent of his passes. Pinkel said he expects the freshman to have “a tremendous future.” “Like anything,” he said, “he’ll mature remarkably from this.” Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

BIG GAME IN FLORIDA The Florida State-Florida rivalry is nationally relevant again. It has championship implications, big-time bowl possibilities and maybe even a Heisman Trophy contender. It hasn’t been that way very often since 2000. And when the No. 14 Seminoles play at the 10th-ranked Gators on Saturday night, it will be just the third time in the last 15 years that both teams enter the in-state matchup ranked in the top 15. With so much at stake, it raises the intensity in a series that was once considered one of the most significant in college football. “Nothing needs to be said in our locker room,” Florida cornerback Jalen Tabor said. “Those guys up the road, we don’t like them and they don’t like us. We feel like we’re the best team in the state. They feel like they’re the best team in the state. ... They’re going to have to bring everything they’ve got in here.” The Seminoles (9-2) have won four of the last five meetings, including two in a row in Gainesville. Florida State running back Dalvin Cook wasn’t around for either of those road games, but he’s expected to be a pivotal figure in this one. The sophomore is one of the most dynamic backs in the country. He has the program’s single-season rushing record and could make a case for being in the Heisman race with a big game against the Gators. Then again, the Seminoles have scored just six offensive touchdowns in four road games this season, with half of those coming on runs by Cook. And Florida could pose problems considering its defense ranks third in the nation in scoring and sixth in yards allowed. “Anybody we go against, if we play the way that we should play, we’ll dominate him,” safety Keanu Neal said. Florida (10-1) needs a win to maintain a shot at earning a spot in the College Football Playof. If the Gators (No. 12 CFP) beat FSU (No. 13 CFP) and then win the SEC title game next week in Atlanta, they might make a big enough jump to earn a playof berth.

SEC SCHEDULE • Georgia at Georgia Tech at 11 a.m., ESPN2 • Louisville at Kentucky at 11 a.m., SECNetwork • No. 1 Clemson at South Carolina at 11 a.m., ESPN • No. 2 Alabama at Auburn at 2:30 p.m., KMOV (Ch. 4) • Vanderbilt at Tennessee at 3 p.m., SECNetwork • No. 18 Ole Miss at No. 21 Mississippi St. at 6:15 p.m., ESPN2 • No. 13 Florida State at No. 12 Florida at 6:30 p.m., ESPN • Texas A&M at LSU at 6:30 p.m., SECNetwork

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Missouri’s Drew Lock drops back to look for an open receiver during the irst half of Friday’s game in Fayetteville, Ark.

Tigers falter in likely inale for Pinkel MIZZOU • FROM D1

that normally doesn’t happen.” Then again, there was nothing normal about a season that saw starting quarterback Maty Mauk suspended for the last eight games … a player boycott sparked by campus protests to oust the university system president … a power outage on ofense that led to four straight losses … and, ultimately, Pinkel’s stunning resignation. A year ago, his peers in the league voted Pinkel SEC coach of the year when he won a second straight East Division title. Now, he steps into retirement having lost six of his final seven games. “All the bounces went our way the last two years,” left tackle Connor McGovern said. “It just happened that all the bad things happened this year.” The bad things took a break for a few hours Nov. 14 when the Tigers celebrated a comeback victory over Brigham Young in Kansas City. The day before, Pinkel told his players and staf this season would be his last. Pinkel, 63, was diagnosed with a form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma in May and decided in late October he’d retire after the season. The Tigers played their most complete game against BYU. They engulfed Pinkel on

ARKANSAS 28, MISSOURI 3 Missouri 0 3 0 0 — 3 Arkansas 7 14 7 0 — 28 First Quarter Ark: A.Collins 4 run (Hedlund kick), :02. Second Quarter Ark: A.Collins 7 run (Hedlund kick), 8:07. Mo: FG Baggett 35, 6:09. Ark: A.Collins 25 run (Hedlund kick), :39. Third Quarter Ark: Walker 9 run (Hedlund kick), 2:15. A: 72,496. Mo Ark First downs 8 19 Rushes-yards 25-88 52-208 Passing 83 102 Comp-Att-Int 9-27-1 11-17-1 Return Yards 11 5 Punts-Avg. 8-40.3 6-42.7 Fumbles-Lost 3-0 2-0 Penalties-Yards 2-18 1-5 Time of Possession 19:45 40:15 Rushing: Missouri, Witter 6-33, Hunt 7-24, Lock 7-17, Hansbrough 5-14. Arkansas, A.Collins 30-130, Walker 14-77, Cornelius 2-5, Team 1-(minus 2), B.Allen 5-(minus 2). Passing: Missouri, Lock 9-27-1-83. Arkansas, B.Allen 11-17-1-102. Receiving: Missouri, Leftwich 3-49, Hansbrough 3-(minus 1), J’.Moore 2-27, Hilton 1-8. Arkansas, Reed 4-37, Morgan 3-28, Henry 2-28, Mitchell 1-11, A.Collins 1-(minus 2).

the field after the 20-16 win. The momentum didn’t last. Tennessee thumped Mizzou 19-8 last week, spoiling Pinkel’s final home game on a night that ended with Boehm and McGovern carrying their coach of Faurot Field. Pinkel was uncomfortable with the tribute after such a dreadful loss. If Friday’s loss indeed punctuated his career, Pinkel finishes with an overall record of 190110-3 in 25 seasons at Toledo and Missouri. In 15 years at MU, he was 118-73 with more wins than any other Mizzou head

coach in the second-most seasons to Don Faurot (19). Friday’s game was more of the same for a Missouri ofense that finished the regular season as the program’s worst in more than a generation. The Tigers managed just 171 yards and eight first downs. It was the fourth time in freshman quarterback Drew Lock’s eight starts that Mizzou moved the ball less than 250 yards and failed to score a touchdown. Eight of MU’s 12 drives on Saturday failed to cover 10 yards. In 12 regular-season games, the Tigers averaged 280.9 yards per game and 13.6 points. Both figures are the worst in team history since 1971. “It wasn’t what I wanted,” said Lock, who revealed he played with a sprained throwing shoulder the last two games. “It wasn’t how I expected myself to play this year.” With a plan to run the ball in the cold and rainy conditions, Arkansas did just that with a season-high 52 attempts for 208 yards. Three straight first-half possessions ended with Alex Collins rushing touchdowns. Backup running back Kody Walker added another in the third quarter. All season, only Alabama held the Razorbacks to fewer yards than Friday’s total (310),

but behind the biggest ofensive line in football, Bret Bielema’s team doubled Mizzou in time of possession, holding the ball for 40 minutes and 15 seconds. The Hogs had only three drives of more than 50 yards, but their control was never in doubt. “I grabbed (Collins) in pregame,” Bielema said, “and told him through the course of the week … if the weather pans out the way it looks that we were going to ride him.” Collins finished with 130 yards on 30 carries. Mizzou was no match against the SEC’s worst pass defense: Lock completed just nine of 27 passes for 83 yards and an interception. Starting tailback Russell Hansbrough, playing in his final regular-season game, managed just 14 yards on five carries. From here, a final decision on MU’s bowl fate should come in the next few days while Rhoades continues his search for Pinkel’s successor. For Pinkel, the end is here. So is acceptance. “I feel like the luckiest guy in the world,” he said. “I feel very good about what I’m doing. … I’m looking forward to that next chapter, whatever that’s going to be.” Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com


COLLEGE FOOTBALL

D4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

TOP 25 ROUNDUP

M 2 • SUNDAY • 11.29.2015

MEMPHIS QB THROWS SEVEN FIRST-HALF TD PASSES

TOP PLAYER

Memphis’ PAXTON LYNCH ties the FBS record with seven touchdown passes in a half as the Tigers ripped visiting Southern Methodist 63-0. His TD tosses all went to diferent receivers and he was nine of 14 passing for 222 yards — all in the first half — as the Tigers raced to a 56-0 lead. Four others also have seven TD passes in a half.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Ezekiel Elliott runs for 214 yards and two touchdowns Saturday afternoon to lead Ohio State to a 42-13 blasting of Michigan.

Elliott sparks Buckeyes’ rout; Stanford upends Notre Dame Ezekiel Elliott ran through, around and past Michigan’s defense a week after running his mouth. He had 214 yards rushing and two touchdowns, helping No. 8 Ohio State rout the 12th-ranked and host Wolverines 42-13 on Saturday. His spectacular performance came one game after he was held to 12 carries for 33 yards rushing against Michigan State, then publicly criticized the team’s play calling and declared he will skip his senior season to enter the NFL draft. “I regret everything I said,” Elliott insisted before being asked a question in a postgame news conference. The Buckeyes (11-1, 7-1 Big Ten, No. 8 in the playof standings) have won 11 of the last 12 games in what has become a lopsided series. But even with their latest win, to reach the Big Ten title game the defending national champion Buckeyes needed Penn State to beat Michigan State later in the day. That didn’t happen, as MSU romped 55-16. Ohio State’s playof hopes now hinge on upsets elsewhere. Buckeyes quarterback J.T. Barrett had 19 carries for a season-high 139 yards, helping his team run for 369 yards. The Wolverines (9-3, 6-2, No. 10 playof standings) could not stop their rivals from running at will. “They were getting tired and they weren’t getting lined up,” said Elliott, who went to John Burroughs School. Elliott, who has 3,812 yards rushing in his career, passed Eddie George for No. 2 on the school’s career rushing list and trails only two-time Heisman Trophy winner Archie Griin. No. 13 Stanford 38, No. 4 Notre Dame 36 • Conrad Ukropina kicked a 45-yard field goal on the last play of the game to give the host Cardinal a victory that spoiled the Fighting Irish’s playof hopes. The kick came after DeShone Kizer’s 2-yard touchdown run with 30 seconds left tied the game, then Justin Yoon kicked the extra point for the Irish (10-2), who were ranked sixth in the current playof standings. But Kevin Hogan, who threw four TD passes, drove Stanford (10-2) into position for the key kick. No. 11 North Carolina 45, N.C. State 34 • Elijah Hood and T.J. Logan ran for TDs in a dominating first quarter, building a 35-7 lead, as the visiting Tar Heels (11-1, 8-0 Atlantic Coast Conference, No. 14 playof standings) beat the host Wolfpack (7-5, 3-5).

Michigan State defensive tackle Craig Evans (72) celebrates with coach Mark Dantonio after the Spartans won the Big Ten East Division title.

USC 40, No. 22 UCLA 21 • Cody Kessler threw for two TD passes and ran for one as Southern California (8-4, 5-4) stopped the visiting Bruins (8-4, 5-4) to win the Pacific 12 South title. USC is to face Stanford next Saturday for the league crown.

Michigan State blasts Penn State, gains Big Ten title game matchup with Iowa

ASSOCIATED PRESS

No. 15 TCU 28, No. 7 Baylor 21 (2OT) • In a game that ended late Friday night and was played in driving, cold rain, Trevone Boykin threw an 8-yard touchdown pass to KaVontae Turpin in the second overtime to lift Texas Christian (10-2, 7-2 Big 12) over the visiting Bears (9-2, 6-2). Associated Press

CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIPS FRIDAY MAC Bowling Green vs. N. Illinois, 7 p.m. SATURDAY American Temple at Houston, 11 a.m. C-USA Southern Miss. at W. Kentucky, 11 a.m. SEC Florida vs. Alabama, 3 p.m. Mt. West San Diego St. vs. Air Force, 6:30 p.m. Pac-12 Stanford vs. Southern Calif., 6:45 p.m. ACC Clemson vs. North Carolina, 7:10 p.m. Big Ten Iowa vs. Michigan State, 7:15 p.m.

Next: vs. No. 11 N. Carolina (ACC champ.) Sat. No. 2 Alabama (11-1) beat Auburn 29-13. No. 3 Iowa (12-0) beat Nebraska 28-20, Friday. Next: vs. No. 6 Mich. St. (Big Ten champ.) Sat. No. 4 Notre Dame (10-2) lost to No. 13 Stanford, 38-36. Next: vs. TBD. No. 5 Oklahoma (10-1) at No. 9 Oklahoma State, late. Next: vs. TBD. No. 6 Michigan State (11-1) beat Penn St. 55-16.

OTHER GAMES OF NOTE

Kansas State 45, Kansas 14 • The visiting Wildcats (5-6, 2-7 Big 12) scored a pair of touchdowns after botched punts by the Jayhawks (0-12, 0-9) in the first quarter and rolled to victory.

No. 1 Clemson (12-0) beat S. Carolina 37-32.

Next: vs. No. 10 Florida, (SEC champ.) Sat.

No. 25 Temple 27, Connecticut 3 • Jahad Thomas ran for 129 yards and two touchdowns, and P.J. Walker threw for 160 yards and a score, as the Owls (10-2, 7-1) won at home to secure a spot in the American Athletic Conference’s inaugural championship game. They will play next Saturday at No. 21 Houston for the league title. Connecticut fell to 6-6, 4-4. Virginia Tech 23, Virginia 20 • Joey Slye kicked a tiebreaking 41-yard field goal with 1:38 left to help lift the visiting Hokies (6-6, 4-4 Atlantic Coast Conference) to victory, giving Frank Beamer one more game to guide before he retires from his 29-year coaching career at his alma mater. Chuck Clark sealed the outcome with an interception with 59 seconds left. There are reports that Memphis coach Justin Fuente will replace Beamer, and Tech athletics director Whit Babcock did not deny them, saying they are “not oicial at this time,” that the focus should be on Beamer — who will coach the team’s bowl game.

HOW THE TOP 25 FARED

Next: vs. No. 3 Iowa, (Big Ten champ.) Sat. No. 7 Baylor (9-2) lost to No. 15 TCU 28-21, 2OT, Friday. Next: vs. Texas, Saturday. No. 8 Ohio State (11-1) beat No. 12 Michigan 42-13. Next: vs. TBD. No. 9 Oklahoma State (10-1) vs. No. 5 Oklahoma, late. Next: vs. TBD. No. 10 Florida (10-1) vs. No. 14 Florida St., late. Next: vs. No. 2 Alabama, (SEC champ.) Sat.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Michigan State quarterback Connor Cook (18) completed 19 of 26 passes for 248 yards and three touchdowns in the Spartans’ 55-16 pounding of Penn State on Saturday.

No. 11 North Carolina (11-1) beat N.C. State 45-34. Next: vs. No. 1 Clemson (ACC champ.) Sat. No. 12 Michigan (9-3) lost to No. 8 Ohio State 42-13. Next: TBD.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

EAST LANSING, MICH. • Connor Cook

began waving his arms, motioning for the crowd to yell louder. Michigan State had turned its final home game into a blowout, so Cook didn’t need the fans to be quiet as he lined up to take another snap. “I was trying to have fun with it. It’s our last time in Spartan Stadium,” the senior quarterback said. “I just wanted to get the crowd into it, because I knew Jack was going to score.” The sixth-ranked Spartans capped their home finale by letting senior center Jack Allen run for a touchdown, and Michigan State wrapped up a spot in the Big Ten championship game with a 55-16 victory Saturday over Penn State. It was the most emphatic win of the season for the Spartans, who will play unbeaten Iowa for the conference title next weekend. The winner will be in good position to advance to college football’s playofs. Michigan State (11-1, 7-1) is No. 5 in the selection committee’s playof standings. The Spartans finished tied atop the Big Ten East Division with Ohio State, but MSU held the tiebreaker — it upset the Buckeyes the previous weekend while Cook was sidelined because of a shoulder injury. The star quarterback came back Saturday and was brilliant against Penn State (7-5, 4-4), completing 19 of 26 passes for 248 yards and

three touchdowns. “Sitting out stunk,” Cook said. “Obviously, I’ve been very fortunate to be able to play in a lot of games and not have to sit out. That was a reality check.” Michigan State will play in the Big Ten title game for the third time in five seasons. The Spartans also kept the Land-Grant Trophy with their most lopsided win in a series with Penn State that started in 1914. It was 41-16 in the fourth quarter when Malik McDowell intercepted a pass, a ball that had bounced of fellow defensive lineman Shilique Calhoun. McDowell ran it back 13 yards for a TD. After a Penn State fumble on the ensuing kickof gave the Spartans the ball at the 9, Cook took the field and Allen lined up next to him in the backfield. The Nittany Lions couldn’t stop the 296-pound lineman as he rumbled to the end zone. “They were able to dictate the game to us, especially with their offense,” Penn State coach James Franklin said. Ohio State, which easily beat Michigan earlier Saturday, was holding out hope that Penn State would spoil the regular season finale in East Lansing, but the Nittany Lions didn’t come close. “I think that we’re playing our best football down the stretch,” Michigan State coach Mark Dantonio said.

No. 13 Stanford (10-2) beat No. 4 Notre Dame, 38-36. Next: vs. USC (Pac-12 champ.) Sat. No. 14 Florida State (9-2) at No. 10 Florida, late. Next: TBD No. 15 TCU (10-2) beat No. 7 Baylor 28-12, 2OT, Friday. Next: TBD. No. 16 Navy (9-2) lost to No. 21 Houston 52-31, Friday. Next: vs. Army at Philadelphia, Dec. 12. No. 17 Northwestern (10-2) beat Illinois 24-14. Next: TBD. No. 18 Oregon (9-3) beat Oregon State 52-43, Friday. Next: TBD. No. 19 Mississippi (9-3) beat No. 23 Mississippi State 38-27. Next: TBD. No. 20 Washington State (8-4) lost to Washington 45-10, Friday. Next: TBD. No. 21 Houston (11-1) beat No. 16 Navy 52-31, Friday. Next: vs. Temple or South Florida, AAC Championship, Saturday. No. 22 UCLA (8-4) lost to Southern Cal 40-21. Next: TBD. No. 23 Mississippi State (8-4) lost to No. 19 Mississippi 38-27. Next: TBD. No. 24 Toledo (9-2) lost to Western Michigan 35-30, Friday. Next: TBD No. 25 Temple (10-2) beat UConn 27-3. Next: TBD.


COLLEGE FOOTBALL

D4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

TOP 25 ROUNDUP

M 3 • SUNDAY • 11.29.2015

MEMPHIS QB THROWS SEVEN FIRST-HALF TD PASSES

TOP PLAYER

Memphis’ PAXTON LYNCH ties the FBS record with seven touchdown passes in a half as the Tigers ripped visiting Southern Methodist 63-0. His TD tosses all went to diferent receivers and he was nine of 14 passing for 222 yards — all in the first half — as the Tigers raced to a 56-0 lead. Four others also have seven TD passes in a half.

Sooners surge to Big 12 crown No. 5 Oklahoma 58, No. 9 Oklahoma State 23 • Shellacking poises OU for playof slot ASSOCIATED PRESS

Ezekiel Elliott runs for 214 yards and two touchdowns Saturday afternoon to lead Ohio State to a 42-13 blasting of Michigan.

Elliott sparks Buckeyes’ rout; Stanford upends Notre Dame Ezekiel Elliott ran through, around and past Michigan’s defense a week after running his mouth. He had 214 yards rushing and two touchdowns, helping No. 8 Ohio State rout the 12th-ranked and host Wolverines 42-13 on Saturday. His spectacular performance came one game after he was held to 12 carries for 33 yards rushing against Michigan State, then publicly criticized the team’s play calling and declared he will skip his senior season to enter the NFL draft. “I regret everything I said,” Elliott insisted before being asked a question in a postgame news conference. The Buckeyes (11-1, 7-1 Big Ten, No. 8 in the playof standings) have won 11 of the last 12 games in what has become a lopsided series. But even with their latest win, to reach the Big Ten title game the defending national champion Buckeyes needed Penn State to beat Michigan State later in the day. That didn’t happen, as MSU romped 55-16. Ohio State’s playof hopes now hinge on upsets elsewhere. And they got some help later when Notre Dame lost. Buckeyes quarterback J.T. Barrett had 19 carries for a season-high 139 yards, helping his team run for 369 yards. The Wolverines (9-3, 6-2, No. 10 playof standings) could not stop their rivals from running at will. “They were getting tired and they weren’t getting lined up,” said Elliott, who went to John Burroughs School. Elliott has 3,812 yards rushing and passed Eddie George for No. 2 on the school’s career rushing list. He trails twotime Heisman Trophy winner Archie Griin. No. 13 Stanford 38, No. 4 Notre Dame 36 • Kevin Hogan threw four TD passes and drove the Cardinal for Conrad Ukropina’s 45-yard field goal on the last play of the game as they spoiled the visiting Fighting Irish’s playof hopes. Hogan threw for 269 yards and led the winning drive in the final 30 seconds for the Cardinal (10-2, No. 9 in the playof standings), who kept their slim playof hopes alive. They need to beat Southern California in the Pac-12 title game next Saturday, in Santa Clara, Calif., and get help elsewhere. Ukropina’s field goal came just after DeShone Kizer’s 2-yard TD run, followed by Justin Yoon’s extrapoint kick, had given the Irish (10-2, No. 6 playof standings) a one-point lead with 30 seconds left. No. 11 North Carolina 45, N.C. State 34 • Elijah Hood and T.J. Logan ran for TDs in a dominating first quarter, building a 35-7 lead, as the visiting Tar Heels (11-1, 8-0 Atlantic Coast Conference, No. 14 playof standings) beat the host Wolfpack (7-5, 3-5). USC 40, No. 22 UCLA 21 • Cody Kessler threw for two TDs and ran for one as host Southern California (8-4, 5-4) beat the Bruins (8-4, 5-4) to win the Pac-12 South and set up the game with Stanford.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Oklahoma fullback Dimitri Flowers makes a touchdown reception from Baker Mayfield (left), part of the Sooners’ blowout victory Saturday.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Baker Mayfield threw two touchdown passes and ran for another score and No. 5 Oklahoma beat No. 9 Oklahoma State 58-23 on Saturday night to take the Big 12 title and likely a spot in the College Football Playof. Mayfield was knocked out of the previous game because of a concussion, but he was fearless against the host Cowboys, rushing for 77 yards and a touchdown. The Sooners (11-1, 8-1 Big 12, No. 3 in the College Football Playof standings) gained 524 yards, including 344 on the ground, to claim their third win over a ranked opponent in three weeks. Jordan Thomas intercepted two passes and returned one for a touchdown for the Sooners. J.W. Walsh passed for 325 yards and two scores, and James Washington caught seven passes for 169 yards for the Cowboys (10-2, 7-2, No. 11 in the playof standings). Oklahoma State quarterback Mason Rudolph did not start the game. Rudolph limped at times during last weekends’s game against Baylor, when

he threw for 430 yards and three touchdowns. Walsh got the start. He has been a red zone and short-yardage specialist for the Cowboys this season, and has made the Cowboys one of the nation’s most eicient red zone teams in the nation. Walsh entered the game with 11 rushing and 11 passing touchdowns. An Oklahoma State spokesman wouldn’t confirm if Rudolph was injured. Rudolph has passed for 3,591 yards this season, the third-most in a season in Oklahoma State history. He also has thrown for 21 touchdowns with just eight interceptions.

TOLEDO TRIES TO KEEP COACH Toledo’s athletics director says the school has ofered coach Matt Campbell a contract that would make him the highestpaid coach in the Mid-American Conference. The ofer comes as Campbell is being wooed by other schools. Multiple media reports have said Iowa State is targeting the 35-year-old coach. Campbell is 3515 in four seasons with Toledo. Athletics director Mike O’Brien told

The Associated Press on Saturday there is an ofer to Campbell that would boost his current salary of $495,000 per year. O’Brien would not specify the amount of the ofer. “We think very highly of Matt Campbell and have made him a very generous offer to keep him as our head football coach,” O’Brien said. Western Michigan coach P.J. Fleck’s salary is $800,000 this season, highest in the MAC, according to USA Today’s salary database. Iowa State paid coach Paul Rhoads, who was fired last week, $2.2 million this year. There are 12 head coaching vacancies in FBS, including at Missouri, and more expected. Campbell figures to be in the running for several of them. Toledo completed a 9-2 season that included wins against Arkansas and Iowa State on Friday with a loss to Western Michigan that will keep the Rockets out of the MAC championship game. Not having to prepare for a title game leaves Campbell free to meet with potential suitors sooner than other candidates that still have games to coach.

Michigan State blasts Penn State, gains Big Ten title game matchup with Iowa

No. 15 TCU 28, No. 7 Baylor 21 (2OT) • In a game that ended late Friday night, Trevone Boykin threw an 8-yard touchdown pass to KaVontae Turpin in the second overtime to lift Texas Christian (10-2, 7-2 Big 12) over the visiting Bears (9-2, 6-2). Associated Press

CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIPS FRIDAY MAC Bowling Green vs. N. Illinois, 7 p.m. SATURDAY American Temple at Houston, 11 a.m. C-USA Southern Miss. at W. Kentucky, 11 a.m. SEC Florida vs. Alabama, 3 p.m. Mt. West San Diego St. vs. Air Force, 6:30 p.m. Pac-12 Stanford vs. Southern Calif., 6:45 p.m. ACC Clemson vs. North Carolina, 7:10 p.m. Big Ten Iowa vs. Michigan State, 7:15 p.m.

Next: vs. No. 11 N. Carolina (ACC champ.) Sat. No. 2 Alabama (11-1) beat Auburn 29-13. Next: vs. No. 10 Florida, (SEC champ.) Sat.

Next: vs. No. 6 Mich. St. (Big Ten champ.) Sat. No. 4 Notre Dame (10-2) lost to No. 13 Stanford, 38-36. Next: vs. TBD. No. 5 Oklahoma (11-1) beat No. 9 Oklahoma State 58-23. Next: vs. TBD. No. 6 Michigan State (11-1) beat Penn St. 55-16. Next: vs. No. 3 Iowa, (Big Ten champ.) Sat. No. 7 Baylor (9-2) lost to No. 15 TCU 28-21, 2OT, Friday. Next: vs. Texas, Saturday.

OTHER GAMES OF NOTE

Kansas State 45, Kansas 14 • The visiting Wildcats (5-6, 2-7 Big 12) scored a two TDs after botched punts by the Jayhawks (0-12, 0-9) in the first quarter and rolled to victory.

No. 1 Clemson (12-0) beat S. Carolina 37-32.

No. 3 Iowa (12-0) beat Nebraska 28-20, Friday.

No. 25 Temple 27, Connecticut 3 • Jahad Thomas ran for 129 yards and two touchdowns, and P.J. Walker threw for 160 yards and a score, as the Owls (10-2, 7-1) won at home to secure a spot in the American Athletic Conference’s title game. They will play next Saturday at No. 21 Houston. UConn is 6-6, 4-4. Virginia Tech 23, Virginia 20 • Joey Slye kicked a tiebreaking 41-yard field goal with 1:38 left to help lift the visiting Hokies (6-6, 4-4 Atlantic Coast Conference) to victory, giving Frank Beamer one more game to guide before he retires from his 29-year coaching career at his alma mater. Chuck Clark sealed the outcome with an interception with 59 seconds left. There are reports that Memphis coach Justin Fuente will replace Beamer, and Tech athletics director Whit Babcock did not deny them, saying they are “not oicial at this time” and that the focus should be on Beamer — who will coach the team’s bowl game.

HOW THE TOP 25 FARED

No. 8 Ohio State (11-1) beat No. 12 Michigan 42-13. Next: vs. TBD. No. 9 Oklahoma State (10-2) lost to No. 5 Oklahoma 58-23. Next: vs. TBD. No. 10 Florida (10-2) lost to No. 14 Florida St., 27-2. Next: vs. No. 2 Alabama, (SEC champ.) Sat.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Michigan State quarterback Connor Cook (18) completed 19 of 26 passes for 248 yards and three touchdowns in the Spartans’ 55-16 pounding of Penn State on Saturday.

No. 11 North Carolina (11-1) beat N.C. State 45-34. Next: vs. No. 1 Clemson (ACC champ.) Sat. No. 12 Michigan (9-3) lost to No. 8 Ohio State 42-13. Next: TBD.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

EAST LANSING, MICH. • Connor Cook

began waving his arms, motioning for the crowd to yell louder. Michigan State had turned its final home game into a blowout, so Cook didn’t need the fans to be quiet as he lined up to take another snap. “I was trying to have fun with it. It’s our last time in Spartan Stadium,” the senior quarterback said. “I just wanted to get the crowd into it, because I knew Jack was going to score.” The sixth-ranked Spartans capped their home finale by letting senior center Jack Allen run for a touchdown, and Michigan State wrapped up a spot in the Big Ten championship game with a 55-16 victory Saturday over Penn State. It was the most emphatic win of the season for the Spartans, who will play unbeaten Iowa for the conference title next weekend. The winner will be in good position to advance to college football’s playofs. Michigan State (11-1, 7-1) is No. 5 in the selection committee’s playof standings. The Spartans finished tied atop the Big Ten East Division with Ohio State, but MSU held the tiebreaker — it upset the Buckeyes the previous weekend while Cook was sidelined because of a shoulder injury. The star quarterback came back Saturday and was brilliant against Penn State (7-5, 4-4), completing 19 of 26 passes for 248 yards and

three touchdowns. “Sitting out stunk,” Cook said. “Obviously, I’ve been very fortunate to be able to play in a lot of games and not have to sit out. That was a reality check.” Michigan State will play in the Big Ten title game for the third time in five seasons. The Spartans also kept the Land-Grant Trophy with their most lopsided win in a series with Penn State that started in 1914. It was 41-16 in the fourth quarter when Malik McDowell intercepted a pass, a ball that had bounced of fellow defensive lineman Shilique Calhoun. McDowell ran it back 13 yards for a TD. After a Penn State fumble on the ensuing kickof gave the Spartans the ball at the 9, Cook took the field and Allen lined up next to him in the backfield. The Nittany Lions couldn’t stop the 296-pound lineman as he rumbled to the end zone. “They were able to dictate the game to us, especially with their offense,” Penn State coach James Franklin said. Ohio State, which easily beat Michigan earlier Saturday, was holding out hope that Penn State would spoil the regular season finale in East Lansing, but the Nittany Lions didn’t come close. “I think that we’re playing our best football down the stretch,” Michigan State coach Mark Dantonio said.

No. 13 Stanford (10-2) beat No. 4 Notre Dame, 38-36. Next: vs. USC (Pac-12 champ.) Sat. No. 14 Florida State (10-2) beat No. 10 Florida 27-2. Next: TBD No. 15 TCU (10-2) beat No. 7 Baylor 28-12, 2OT, Friday. Next: TBD. No. 16 Navy (9-2) lost to No. 21 Houston 52-31, Friday. Next: vs. Army at Philadelphia, Dec. 12. No. 17 Northwestern (10-2) beat Illinois 24-14. Next: TBD. No. 18 Oregon (9-3) beat Oregon State 52-43, Friday. Next: TBD. No. 19 Mississippi (9-3) beat No. 23 Mississippi State 38-27. Next: TBD. No. 20 Washington State (8-4) lost to Washington 45-10, Friday. Next: TBD. No. 21 Houston (11-1) beat No. 16 Navy 52-31, Friday. Next: vs. Temple or South Florida, AAC Championship, Saturday. No. 22 UCLA (8-4) lost to Southern Cal 40-21. Next: TBD. No. 23 Mississippi State (8-4) lost to No. 19 Mississippi 38-27. Next: TBD. No. 24 Toledo (9-2) lost to Western Michigan 35-30, Friday. Next: TBD No. 25 Temple (10-2) beat UConn 27-3. Next: TBD.


COLLEGES

11.29.2015 • Sunday • M 1

AREA COLLEGE ATHLETES NOTEBOOK

Highland’s Hempen returns as starter for No. 16 Arizona State

Test for undefeated SLU Billikens set to play perennial power Louisville in NYC BY STU DURANDO St. Louis Post-dispatch

BY STEVE EIGHINGER Special to the Post-dispatch

Katie Hempen is ready for the next step at Arizona State. A year ago as a junior, Hempen led the Sun Devils in scoring and to a runner-up Pac-12 finish, not to mention the Sweet 16 of the NCAA Tournament. This time around, the former Highland High School standout is looking for even more success. She is one of four starters back at No. 16 Arizona State, which won a program-record 29 games last season. The 5-foot-9 Hempen made a Sun Devils record 76 3-point field goals last season en route to averaging 12 points and earning a reputation as one of the hardest-nosed players in the Pac-12. Count Arizona State coach Charli Turner Thorne as Hempen’s biggest fan. “I can’t tell you how many people say they love Hempen,” Thorne said. “We love Hempen, too. She talks great, takes charges, finds a way to help you, and she’s so tough and smart. She’s got a good head in terms of seeing things during the game.” Hempen, Highland’s all-time leading scorer, played one year at SIU Edwardsville before transferring. Last summer, she was a reserve on the U.S. gold medal team at the World University Games.

MITCHELL FUELING IOWA If preseason forecasts were any indication, arguably the most unlikely of the potential College Football Playof candidates would be No. 3 Iowa (12-0). Helping fuel the Hawkeyes’ strong run has been junior running back/wide receiver Derrick Mitchell (Vashon). Mitchell has rushed for 151 yards and two touchdowns and caught nine passes for 99 yards. He said the Hawkeyes were positioned for the success they have reaped. “We’re getting better every day as a team,” Mitchell told SiriusXM radio. “We’ve been working on being ready since last January and through the summer. There wasn’t any (added) pressure.” Mitchell’s highlight game came in a 40-10 win Oct. 17 over No. 17 Northwestern that saw him rush for 79 yards and score a TD.

ADAMS CAPS BIG SEASON Westminster College sophomore running back Latif Adams (Hazelwood Central) is the NCAA Division III Upper Midwest Athletic Conference offensive player of the year. Adams was fifth in the nation in yards rushing (1,492) and led the UMAC in six

RICK OSENTOSKI

Katie Hempen made a school-record 76 3-pointers last season.

ofensive categories. He also established a single-game school record with 270 yards and set the Bluejays’ single-season rushing touchdown mark (16).

LOCALS LEAD LEWIS Lewis (Ill.) University now has won more women’s volleyball titles (9) than any other Great Lakes Valley Conference school. Junior defensive specialist Nicole Yuede (Francis Howell North) and sophomore right side Maddie Seliga (Nerinx Hall) have been two of the Flyers’ key contributors. The 5-9 Yuede led Lewis in digs and was among the team assists and service ace leaders. The 5-10 Seliga finished among the team leaders in kills and points.

AROUND THE AREA Sophomore defensive lineman Jonathan Bonner (Parkway Central) has played in eight games for Notre Dame, recording four tackles, including a sack. Bonner spent his freshman season on the Notre Dame scout team and missed the majority of 2015 spring practice following surgery for a turf-toe injury. • Murray State senior setter Sam Bedard (Mater Dei) finished her career second in assists (3,601) at the Ohio Valley Conference school. Murray State finished with a 27-3 record, the most wins in Racers history. • Soccer midfielder Nicole Breece (Parkway South), a four-year starter, closed her senior season with two goals and three assists for a 10-6-3 Illini squad. • Oregon sophomore setter Maggie Scott (Lafayette) has helped the Ducks to a 1413 record and 8-10 mark in the Pac-12. Scott leads Oregon in assists and service aces and is among team leaders in digs.

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D5

The first four games on the St. Louis University schedule ofered an opportunity for the Billikens to work out some kinks and rediscover confidence before tackling more challenging opponents. They took advantage of that scenario by posting four wins before starting a challenging stretch that opens with a meeting with Louisville on Saturday night in Brooklyn. Mentally speaking, the Billikens are in a good place for what comes next. Coach Jim Crews, on the other hand, was evasive when asked if this is a good time to catch a perennial national power. “It’s a great time because they’re next on the schedule,” he said. “So, that’s what we’re going to do. An absolutely perfect time.” Push Crews a little harder and sarcasm gives way to reality. The Cardinals might be unranked at the moment and picked to finish seventh in the ACC, but they have shown some dominant tendencies against the same opponents SLU has faced. “Louisville is Louisville for the last 50 years,” Crews said. “Fifty years. Not two, but 50. They’re extremely long. They physically pound you. They’re quick and well coached. ... Everyone has good God-given players and then there’s this other stuf. They’ve got that other stuf. They’re exceptionally gifted.” As of Friday, the Billikens and Cardinals were two of the country’s 41 undefeated teams. They both have wins over Hartford, St. Francis and North Florida as part of the Brooklyn Hoops Holiday Invitational. SLU won those games by an impressive average margin of 15.3 points. Louisville won them by 35.7 points. Although the Billikens have looked considerably better than a year ago to open the season, the challenge at Barclays Center will be significant. Louisville ranks second in the country in scoring defense, allowing 49.8 points per game. And here’s what might be the truly frightening statistic: The Cardinals have averaged 21 more rebounds than their opponents. After improving to 4-0, SLU guard Ash Yacoubou said the Billikens now feel like they can beat anyone on their schedule. Forward Reggie Agbeko concurred. “We’re pretty deep and everyone can have a great game,” he said. “When someone gets it going, everyone is supportive. We’re more together this year than last year.” The last time these programs met was in the 2014 NCAA Tournament. Louisville pulled away late to beat SLU 66-51. No one

SATURDAY’S GAME SLU (4-0) vs. LOUISVILLE (4-0) When • 7 p.m. Where • Barclays Center, Brooklyn, N.Y. TV, radio • KDNL-DT2 (30.2, Charter 182), WXOS (101.1) All-time series • Louisville leads 46-20 About the Billikens • Guard Ash Yacoubou has started the season leading the team in scoring (15.8 ppg) and rebounding (8.0 rpg). ... Milik Yarbrough is adjusting to his role of the bench and averaging 10.5 ppg, but he is coming of his irst scoreless game at SLU. ... The Billikens have held their irst four opponents to 36.8 percent shooting and 28.4 percent on 3-pointers. ... SLU is 3-2 at Barclays Center, having won the 2013 Atlantic 10 tournament in the building. About the Cardinals • Guard Damion Lee leads the team in scoring with a 19.3 average. He is shooting 56 percent. ... The Cardinals have not given up more than 61 points in a game; SLU has not scored fewer than 70. ... Louisville uses three freshmen and three sophomores among its top nine players. The Cardinals’ 2015 recruiting class was ranked No. 7 by Scout and No. 9 by Rivals. ... Rick Pitino has a record of 372-126 in 15 seasons at Louisville and has won at least 20 games the last 13 years.

on the current SLU roster played in that game. Much has changed in that time, but Louisville coach Rick Pitino and his staff are working to convince folks that the Billikens will be a serious threat. Pitino addressed the Billikens in his blog. “They will make you pay for mistakes on defense,” he wrote. “They are a motion team that is constantly screening and moving. They will try and keep possessions low and we can’t fall into the trap of taking quick shots. Defensively, they play pack line defense, very similar to Virginia. It will be a great test for our young team.” Assistant coach Ralph Willard described SLU as being “much more physical” than any of Louisville’s early opponents. He said the Billikens will be the best defensive team the Cardinals have faced. SLU’s seemingly improved ofense is going to receive its stifest challenge. The Billikens are averaging 75.2 points and shooting 47 percent. But they haven’t faced a team with as much size. Louisville’s rotation includes three players who are 6 feet, 10 inches and one who is 6-9. The Cardinals average six blocked shots and are just generally disruptive. “It’s a great experience to play one of the elite teams in the country and play in New York,” Crews said. “So, it’s a great experience for our kids.” Stu Durando @studurando on Twitter sdurando@post-dispatch.com

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COLLEGE FOOTBALL

11.29.2015 • SunDay • M 2

Cubit gets two-year deal as coach

ST. LOuIS POST-DISPaTCH • D5

Tough luck for Illinois

SATURDAY’S SCORES East Maryland 46.......................... Rutgers 41 Syracuse 20 ................Boston College 17 West Virginia 30 ......................Iowa St. 6

Errors doom Illini as Northwestern wraps up 10-win season

South Alabama 29 ............................ Auburn 13 Alabama A&M 38.........Texas Southern 7 Alcorn St. 14......................Jackson St. 10 Appalachian St. 28 ......... La.-Lafayette 7 Cincinnati 19 ..................East Carolina 16 Clemson 37 .................South Carolina 32 Duke 27 ........................... Wake Forest 21 FAU 33...........................Old Dominion 31 Georgia 13........................Georgia Tech 7 Georgia Southern 55 ......So. Alabama 17 Grambling St. 34 ............ Southern U. 23 Louisville 38.........................Kentucky 24 Memphis 63.................................. SMU 0 North Carolina 45.................NC State 34 Southern Miss. 58.......Louisiana Tech 24 Tennessee 53 .....................Vanderbilt 28 Virginia Tech 23 .....................Virginia 20

BY MARK TUPPER Decatur Herald & Review

BY MARK TUPPER Decatur Herald & Review

CHICAGO • Bill Cubit said it took

15 minutes between meetings at the team hotel Saturday morning to finalize a deal that will remove his interim tag and make him Illinois’ head football coach for the next two years. The deal, which was brokered by interim Athletics Director Paul Kowalczyk, will pay Cubit $1.2 million per year and must be approved by the Board of Trustees. Kowalczyk said he made the offer after close consultation with university President Timothy Killeen and interim Chancellor Barbara Wilson. “Bill has stepped in during an extremely difficult period and done an outstanding job in leading our football program since August,” Kowalczyk said. “Our student-athletes have responded in a positive manner and we feel he is the best person at this time to be the head coach. We wanted to allow Bill to make decisions regarding the program as the head coach without the interim title, and lead the Fighting Illini into Saturday’s game without speculation.” Cubit was named interim head coach on Aug. 28 and led the Fighting Illini to a 5-7 record that included a 24-14 loss to Northwestern on Saturday. “During the past three months, Coach Cubit has led this team with a steady and experienced hand,” Wilson said. “He has earned respect and appreciation from all of us. This move will allow the permanent athletics director to evaluate the program at his or her own schedule and make decisions based on those evaluations once that search is completed.” Cubit joined the Illinois staff as ofensive coordinator in January 2013 before being named interim head coach in August. He has a career head coaching record of 90-70-1 including stints at Widener (34-18-1 from 199296) and Western Michigan (5146 from 2005-12). Sources have told the Herald & Review that Wilson has formed a search committee to find a permanent AD and is exploring use of a search firm.

CHICAGO • What could have been an inspirational bowl-clinching performance that celebrated Bill Cubit’s contract extension Saturday instead became a snapshot of what’s wrong with a struggling Illini football program. Mistakes, including penalties at the worst possible time, a missed field goal, a turnover and dropped passes helped feed the momentum to a Northwestern team that battled to a 24-14 victory in front of a sparse crowd at Soldier Field. For the Wildcats, it wrapped up a 10-win regular season that will result in what coach Pat Fitzgerald said he believes should be a New Year’s Day bowl bid. For the Illini, it ends a tumultuous 5-7 season that is one victory shy of automatic bowl eligibility. After falling behind 21-7 at the half, Illinois dug in on defense and had some chances to make a run at the Wildcats (10-2, 6-2). The momentum swung in Illinois’ direction in the third quarter when linebacker Mason Monheim picked off a Clayton Thorson pass and returned it 58 yards for a touchdown that cut the Wildcats’ lead to 21-14. It was a flashback moment for Monheim, who returned an interception for a touchdown last season in Illinois’ victory over Northwestern. “I don’t know what it is, but I wish we played them more often,” Monheim said. Northwestern tacked on a field goal early in the fourth quarter to increase the lead to 24-14 but Illinois was driving again and had the ball at the Northwestern 25 when quarterback Wes Lunt tried to hit Geronimo Allison with a pass that was picked of by cornerback Matthew Harris. “I can’t do that,” Lunt said. “I tried to get it in a tight spot and that hurt us.” Illinois quickly got another chance after the defense forced a Northwestern punt and this time Lunt used completions of 23 yards to Josh Ferguson and 24 yards to Malik Turner in a drive that pushed the ball inside the Northwestern 5. But on fourth-and-1 from the

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Illinois kicker Taylor Zalewski reacts after missing a ield goal during the second half against Northwestern on Saturday. No. 17 NORTHWESTERN 24, ILLINOIS 14

FINAL BIG TEN STANDINGS

Northwestern 14 7 0 3 — 24 Illinois 7 0 7 0 — 14 First Quarter Ill: Lunt 1 run (Zalewski kick), 8:59. NU: D.Vitale 19 pass from Thorson (Mitchell kick), 6:35. NU: Long 3 run (Mitchell kick), 1:21. Second Quarter NU: Jackson 3 run (Mitchell kick), 11:41. Third Quarter Ill: Monheim 58 interception return (Zalewski kick), :45. Fourth Quarter NU: FG Mitchell 39, 11:27. A: 33,514. NU Ill First downs 18 16 Rushes-yards 54-204 31-78 Passing 146 241 Comp-Att-Int 12-25-1 20-41-1 Return Yards 0 77 Punts-Avg. 8-38.0 7-41.0 Fumbles-Lost 2-1 1-0 Penalties-Yards 1-10 5-55 Time of Possession 33:26 26:34 Rushing: Northwestern, Jackson 37-172, Long 5-25, Thorson 6-7, Je.Roberts 1-6, Team 1-(minus 1), Vault 4-(minus 5). Illinois, Vaughn 12-62, Ferguson 14-40, Team 1-(minus 1), Lunt 4-(minus 23). Passing: Northwestern, Thorson 12-25-1-146. Illinois, Lunt 20-41-1-241. Receiving: Northwestern, Carr 3-61, D.Vitale 3-32, Shuler 2-39, Kidd 1-9, Buckley 1-7, Jackson 1-1, Vault 1-(minus 3). Illinois, Ferguson 7-100, Allison 5-42, Cain 4-52, Turner 3-46, Vaughn 1-1.

EAST Michigan St. Ohio St. Michigan Penn St. Indiana Rutgers Maryland

Wildcats’ four, tackle Christian DiLauro jumped before the snap and the five-yard penalty made it fourth-and-6 from the nine. With that setback, Cubit decided to settle for the field goal but Taylor Zalewski’s kick from 27 yards was wide to the right. “In a lot of these games we’re that close,” Cubit said, holding his fingers an inch apart. “Why aren’t we winning? There’s a chance to go back in there with quality control and see what we’ve got. Some things we’ve got to fix. Dropped passes, those can’t happen. There had to be 10 of them out there today.”

Conf. W L 7 1 7 1 6 2 4 4 2 6 1 7 1 7

WEST W Iowa 8 Northwestern 6 Wisconsin 6 Nebraska 3 Illinois 2 Minnesota 2 Purdue 1

L 0 2 2 5 6 6 7

Total W L 11 1 11 1 9 3 7 5 6 6 4 8 3 9 W 12 10 9 5 5 5 2

L 0 2 3 7 7 7 10

Northwestern once again relied on what Fitzgerald called the team’s “formula” for winning. And he used the postgame opportunity to say he believes the national media, including the College Football Playoff committee, underrates and underappreciates what Northwestern has accomplished. “We didn’t win by 50 today so we’ll continue to get disrespected,” he said. “We’re a Chicago football team, old-school, neck roll, four yards and a cloud of dust. “A lot of people think that’s boring. I could care less what they think. I would love to put up Baylor ofensive numbers but they can’t shake a stick at our defense.”

Midwest Indiana 54...............................Purdue 36 Kansas St. 45 ...........................Kansas 14 Michigan St. 55 ......................Penn St. 16 Northwestern 24 ..................... Illinois 14 Ohio St. 42 ............................Michigan 13 Wisconsin 31 ...................... Minnesota 21 Southwest Middle Tennessee 42................... UTSA 7 Rice 27....................................Charlotte 7 UTEP 20 ...........................North Texas 17 Far West Arkansas St. 52..........New Mexico St. 28 BYU 51 ....................................Utah St. 28 Idaho 38................................ Texas St. 31 Southern Cal 40 .........................UCLA 21 Utah 20 ................................ Colorado 14 Wyoming 35............................... UNLV 28

FCS playofs First Round | Saturday Western Illinois 24.................... Dayton 7 Chattanooga 50...................Fordham 20 The Citadel 41..........Coastal Carolina 38 Sam Houston State 42 .........So. Utah 39 Montana 24..........South Dakota State 17 Colgate 27 ................ New Hampshire 20 William & Mary 52 .............Duquesne 49 Northern Iowa 53 .......Eastern Illinois 17 Second Round | Dec. 5 William & Mary (9-3) at Richmond (8-3), 11 a.m. The Citadel (9-3) at Charleston Southern (9-2), Noon Colgate (8-4) at James Madison (9-2), Noon Western Illinois (7-5) at Illinois State (9-2), 1 p.m. Chattanooga (9-3) at Jacksonville State (10-1), 1 p.m. Montana (8-4) at North Dakota State (9-2), 2:30 p.m. Sam Houston State (9-3) at McNeese State (10-0), 6 p.m. Northern Iowa (8-4) at Portland State (9-2), 9 p.m.

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COLLEGE FOOTBALL

11.29.2015 • SunDay • M 3

Cubit gets two-year deal as coach

ST. LOuIS POST-DISPaTCH • D5

Tough luck for Illinois

SATURDAY’S SCORES East Maryland 46.......................... Rutgers 41 Syracuse 20 ................Boston College 17 Temple 27................................... UConn 3 West Virginia 30 ......................Iowa St. 6

Errors doom Illini as Northwestern wraps up 10-win season

South Alabama 29 ............................ Auburn 13 Alabama A&M 38.........Texas Southern 7 Alcorn St. 14......................Jackson St. 10 Appalachian St. 28 ......... La.-Lafayette 7 Cincinnati 19 ..................East Carolina 16 Clemson 37 .................South Carolina 32 Duke 27 ........................... Wake Forest 21 FAU 33...........................Old Dominion 31 Florida St. 27..............................Florida 2 Georgia 13........................Georgia Tech 7 Georgia Southern 55 ......So. Alabama 17 Grambling St. 34 ............ Southern U. 23 LSU 19 ................................. Texas A&M 7 Louisville 38.........................Kentucky 24 Memphis 63.................................. SMU 0 Mississippi 38 .............. Mississippi St. 27 North Carolina 45.................NC State 34 Southern Miss. 58.......Louisiana Tech 24 Tennessee 53 .....................Vanderbilt 28 Virginia Tech 23 .....................Virginia 20

BY MARK TUPPER Decatur Herald & Review

BY MARK TUPPER Decatur Herald & Review

CHICAGO • Bill Cubit said it took

15 minutes between meetings at the team hotel Saturday morning to finalize a deal that will remove his interim tag and make him Illinois’ head football coach for the next two years. The deal, which was brokered by interim Athletics Director Paul Kowalczyk, will pay Cubit $1.2 million per year and must be approved by the Board of Trustees. Kowalczyk said he made the offer after close consultation with university President Timothy Killeen and interim Chancellor Barbara Wilson. “Bill has stepped in during an extremely difficult period and done an outstanding job in leading our football program since August,” Kowalczyk said. “Our student-athletes have responded in a positive manner and we feel he is the best person at this time to be the head coach. We wanted to allow Bill to make decisions regarding the program as the head coach without the interim title, and lead the Fighting Illini into Saturday’s game without speculation.” Cubit was named interim head coach on Aug. 28 and led the Fighting Illini to a 5-7 record that included a 24-14 loss to Northwestern on Saturday. “During the past three months, Coach Cubit has led this team with a steady and experienced hand,” Wilson said. “He has earned respect and appreciation from all of us. This move will allow the permanent athletics director to evaluate the program at his or her own schedule and make decisions based on those evaluations once that search is completed.” Cubit joined the Illinois staff as ofensive coordinator in January 2013 before being named interim head coach in August. He has a career head coaching record of 90-70-1 including stints at Widener (34-18-1 from 199296) and Western Michigan (5146 from 2005-12). Sources have told the Herald & Review that Wilson has formed a search committee to find a permanent AD and is exploring use of a search firm.

CHICAGO • What could have been an inspirational bowl-clinching performance that celebrated Bill Cubit’s contract extension Saturday instead became a snapshot of what’s wrong with a struggling Illini football program. Mistakes, including penalties at the worst possible time, a missed field goal, a turnover and dropped passes helped feed the momentum to a Northwestern team that battled to a 24-14 victory in front of a sparse crowd at Soldier Field. For the Wildcats, it wrapped up a 10-win regular season that will result in what coach Pat Fitzgerald said he believes should be a New Year’s Day bowl bid. For the Illini, it ends a tumultuous 5-7 season that is one victory shy of automatic bowl eligibility. After falling behind 21-7 at the half, Illinois dug in on defense and had some chances to make a run at the Wildcats (10-2, 6-2). The momentum swung in Illinois’ direction in the third quarter when linebacker Mason Monheim picked off a Clayton Thorson pass and returned it 58 yards for a touchdown that cut the Wildcats’ lead to 21-14. It was a flashback moment for Monheim, who returned an interception for a touchdown last season in Illinois’ victory over Northwestern. “I don’t know what it is, but I wish we played them more often,” Monheim said. Northwestern tacked on a field goal early in the fourth quarter to increase the lead to 24-14 but Illinois was driving again and had the ball at the Northwestern 25 when quarterback Wes Lunt tried to hit Geronimo Allison with a pass that was picked of by cornerback Matthew Harris. “I can’t do that,” Lunt said. “I tried to get it in a tight spot and that hurt us.” Illinois quickly got another chance after the defense forced a Northwestern punt and this time Lunt used completions of 23 yards to Josh Ferguson and 24 yards to Malik Turner in a drive that pushed the ball inside the Northwestern 5. But on fourth-and-1 from the

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Illinois kicker Taylor Zalewski reacts after missing a ield goal during the second half against Northwestern on Saturday. No. 17 NORTHWESTERN 24, ILLINOIS 14

FINAL BIG TEN STANDINGS

Northwestern 14 7 0 3 — 24 Illinois 7 0 7 0 — 14 First Quarter Ill: Lunt 1 run (Zalewski kick), 8:59. NU: D.Vitale 19 pass from Thorson (Mitchell kick), 6:35. NU: Long 3 run (Mitchell kick), 1:21. Second Quarter NU: Jackson 3 run (Mitchell kick), 11:41. Third Quarter Ill: Monheim 58 interception return (Zalewski kick), :45. Fourth Quarter NU: FG Mitchell 39, 11:27. A: 33,514. NU Ill First downs 18 16 Rushes-yards 54-204 31-78 Passing 146 241 Comp-Att-Int 12-25-1 20-41-1 Return Yards 0 77 Punts-Avg. 8-38.0 7-41.0 Fumbles-Lost 2-1 1-0 Penalties-Yards 1-10 5-55 Time of Possession 33:26 26:34 Rushing: Northwestern, Jackson 37-172, Long 5-25, Thorson 6-7, Je.Roberts 1-6, Team 1-(minus 1), Vault 4-(minus 5). Illinois, Vaughn 12-62, Ferguson 14-40, Team 1-(minus 1), Lunt 4-(minus 23). Passing: Northwestern, Thorson 12-25-1-146. Illinois, Lunt 20-41-1-241. Receiving: Northwestern, Carr 3-61, D.Vitale 3-32, Shuler 2-39, Kidd 1-9, Buckley 1-7, Jackson 1-1, Vault 1-(minus 3). Illinois, Ferguson 7-100, Allison 5-42, Cain 4-52, Turner 3-46, Vaughn 1-1.

EAST Michigan St. Ohio St. Michigan Penn St. Indiana Rutgers Maryland

Wildcats’ four, tackle Christian DiLauro jumped before the snap and the five-yard penalty made it fourth-and-6 from the nine. With that setback, Cubit decided to settle for the field goal but Taylor Zalewski’s kick from 27 yards was wide to the right. “In a lot of these games we’re that close,” Cubit said, holding his fingers an inch apart. “Why aren’t we winning? There’s a chance to go back in there with quality control and see what we’ve got. Some things we’ve got to fix. Dropped passes, those can’t happen. There had to be 10 of them out there today.”

Conf. W L 7 1 7 1 6 2 4 4 2 6 1 7 1 7

WEST W Iowa 8 Northwestern 6 Wisconsin 6 Nebraska 3 Illinois 2 Minnesota 2 Purdue 1

L 0 2 2 5 6 6 7

Total W L 11 1 11 1 9 3 7 5 6 6 4 8 3 9 W 12 10 9 5 5 5 2

L 0 2 3 7 7 7 10

Northwestern once again relied on what Fitzgerald called the team’s “formula” for winning. And he used the postgame opportunity to say he believes the national media, including the College Football Playoff committee, underrates and underappreciates what Northwestern has accomplished. “We didn’t win by 50 today so we’ll continue to get disrespected,” he said. “We’re a Chicago football team, old-school, neck roll, four yards and a cloud of dust. “A lot of people think that’s boring. I could care less what they think. I would love to put up Baylor ofensive numbers but they can’t shake a stick at our defense.”

Midwest Indiana 54...............................Purdue 36 Kansas St. 45 ...........................Kansas 14 Michigan St. 55 ......................Penn St. 16 Northwestern 24 ..................... Illinois 14 Ohio St. 42 ............................Michigan 13 Wisconsin 31 ...................... Minnesota 21 Southwest Middle Tennessee 42................... UTSA 7 Oklahoma 58 ................Oklahoma St. 23 Rice 27....................................Charlotte 7 UTEP 20 ...........................North Texas 17 Far West Arkansas St. 52..........New Mexico St. 28 BYU 51 ....................................Utah St. 28 Idaho 38................................ Texas St. 31 Southern Cal 40 .........................UCLA 21 Stanford 38.....................Notre Dame 36 Utah 20 ................................ Colorado 14 Wyoming 35............................... UNLV 28

FCS playofs First Round | Saturday Western Illinois 24.................... Dayton 7 Chattanooga 50...................Fordham 20 The Citadel 41..........Coastal Carolina 38 Sam Houston State 42 .........So. Utah 39 Montana 24..........South Dakota State 17 Colgate 27 ................ New Hampshire 20 William & Mary 52 .............Duquesne 49 Northern Iowa 53 .......Eastern Illinois 17 Second Round | Dec. 5 William & Mary (9-3) at Richmond (8-3), 11 a.m. The Citadel (9-3) at Charleston Southern (9-2), Noon Colgate (8-4) at James Madison (9-2), Noon Western Illinois (7-5) at Illinois State (9-2), 1 p.m. Chattanooga (9-3) at Jacksonville State (10-1), 1 p.m. Montana (8-4) at North Dakota State (9-2), 2:30 p.m. Sam Houston State (9-3) at McNeese State (10-0), 6 p.m. Northern Iowa (8-4) at Portland State (9-2), 9 p.m.

GOING MORE OFTEN? TIME TO JOIN THIS NEW STUDY. CALL

888-771-7077 AND BE A PART OF

AN IMPORTANT NEW MEN’S STUDY.

Urinary symptoms like going often, straining to go, or weak stream are common problems experienced by millions of men. And now you can be part of an important new research study for men and learn more about a potential nonprescription medication that could help with your symptoms. Finding out if you qualify to participate is easy. Just call 888-771-7077.


RAMS

D6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH RAMS ROSTER No. 4 5 6 11 14 15 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 25 26 27 30 31 34 36 37 38 44 46 47 48 50 53 54 55 56 60 61 64 65 67 69 71 73 77 79 83 88 89 90 91 93 94 95 96 97 98 99

M 1 • SUNDAY • 11.29.2015 INJURY REPORT

RAMS AT BENGALS, NOON, KTVI (2)

Name Pos Greg Zuerlein K Nick Foles QB Johnny Hekker P Tavon Austin WR Sean Mannion QB Bradley Marquez WR Case Keenum QB Kenny Britt WR Wes Welker WR Lamarcus Joyner CB Janoris Jenkins CB Trumaine Johnson CB Rodney McLeod FS T.J. McDonald SS Mark Barron SS Tre Mason RB Todd Gurley RB Maurice Alexander SS Chase Reynolds RB Benny Cunningham RB Christian Bryant S Cody Davis S Jake McQuaide LS Cory Harkey TE Marcus Roberson CB Justice Cunningham TE Cameron Lynch LB Daren Bates LB Bryce Hager ILB James Laurinaitis MLB Akeem Ayers OLB Eric Kush C Tim Barnes C Andrew Donnal T Demetrius Rhaney C Brian Folkerts OL Cody Wichmann G Garrett Reynolds T Greg Robinson T Isaiah Battle T Rob Havenstein T Brian Quick WR Lance Kendricks TE Jared Cook TE Michael Brockers DT Chris Long DE Ethan Westbrooks DT Robert Quinn DE William Hayes DE Matt Longacre DE Eugene Sims DE Nick Fairley DT Aaron Donald DT

Ht 6-0 6-6 6-5 5-8 6-6 5-11 6-1 6-3 5-9 5-8 5-10 6-2 5-10 6-2 6-2 5-8 6-1 6-1 6-0 5-10 5-9 6-1 6-2 6-4 6-0 6-3 5-11 5-11 6-1 6-2 6-3 6-4 6-4 6-6 6-2 6-4 6-6 6-7 6-5 6-7 6-7 6-3 6-3 6-5 6-5 6-3 6-3 6-4 6-3 6-3 6-6 6-4 6-1

Wt. Exp. College 196 4 Mo. Western 243 4 Arizona 236 4 Oregon St. 176 3 West Virginia 229 R Oregon St. 201 R Texas Tech 205 3 Houston 223 7 Rutgers 185 12 Texas Tech 184 2 Florida St. 198 4 N. Alabama 208 4 Montana 195 4 Virginia 217 3 USC 213 4 Alabama 207 2 Auburn 222 R Georgia 220 2 Utah St. 205 3 Montana 217 3 Middle Tenn. 198 1 Ohio State 206 3 Texas Tech 244 5 Ohio St. 259 4 UCLA 191 2 Florida 258 1 So. Carolina 229 R Syracuse 225 3 Auburn 234 R Baylor 248 7 Ohio St. 255 5 UCLA 313 3 California (Pa.) 306 4 Missouri 313 R Iowa 301 2 Tenn. St. 310 3 Washburn 315 R Fresno St. 305 7 N. Carolina 332 2 Auburn 290 R Clemson 321 R Wisconsin 218 4 AppalachianSt. 250 5 Wisconsin 254 7 So. Carolina 326 4 LSU 268 8 Virginia 267 2 W. Texas A&M 264 5 N. Carolina 278 8 Winston-Salem 260 R NW Missouri 269 6 W. Texas A&M 308 5 Auburn 285 2 Pittsburgh

RAMS at CINCINNATI — RAMS: OUT: T Andrew Donnal (knee). QUESTIONABLE: T Rob Havenstein (calf), CB Trumaine Johnson (thigh), QB Case Keenum (concussion), DE Robert Quinn (hip, back), K Greg Zuerlein (right groin). BENGALS: QUESTIONABLE: CB Adam Jones (foot), DT Pat Sims (knee). PROBABLE: LB Vontaze Burfict (knee), QB Andy Dalton (groin), TE Tyler Eifert (knee), WR Marvin Jones (hamstring), CB Dre Kirkpatrick (knee), T Andre Smith (thigh), S Shawn Williams (ankle).

7 FOR SUNDAY

NEW ORLEANS at HOUSTON — SAINTS: OUT: LB Dannell Ellerbe (hip), LB David Hawthorne (thigh), CB Damian Swann (concussion). PROBABLE: LB Stephone Anthony (leg), T Terron Armstead (knee), LB Ramon Humber (hamstring), RB Mark Ingram (shoulder), LB Hau’oli Kikaha (ankle), WR Willie Snead (knee). TEXANS: PROBABLE: RB Alfred Blue (back), CB A.J. Bouye (concussion), LB Max Bullough (shoulder, hamstring), LB Jadeveon Clowney (wrist), DT Christian Covington (hip), LB Akeem Dent (hamstring), QB Brian Hoyer (concussion), CB Kareem Jackson (ankle), CB Charles James (foot), C Ben Jones (hand), CB Johnathan Joseph (knee, wrist), LB Whitney Mercilus (back), T Derek Newton (elbow), S Eddie Pleasant (neck), RB Chris Polk (knee, hamstring), WR Nate Washington (hip). MINNESOTA at ATLANTA — VIKINGS: QUESTIONABLE: DE Everson Griffen (hip, shoulder), S Harrison Smith (knee), CB Trae Waynes (ankle). PROBABLE: LB Anthony Barr (hand), S Robert Blanton (ankle), QB Teddy Bridgewater (left shoulder), DT Sharrif Floyd (ankle), T Matt Kalil (toe), LB Eric Kendricks (ribs). FALCONS: OUT: K Matt Bryant (right quadriceps), RB Devonta Freeman (concussion), WR Leonard Hankerson (hamstring). PROBABLE: CB Robert Alford (groin), G Andy Levitre (knee), S Robenson Therezie (hamstring). NY GIANTS at WASHINGTON — GIANTS: OUT: TE Larry Donnell (neck), LB Mark Herzlich (quadriceps), T Justin Pugh (concussion). DOUBTFUL: C Weston Richburg (ankle). QUESTIONABLE: LB J.T. Thomas III (ankle). PROBABLE: CB Prince Amukamara (pectoral), CB Leon McFadden (groin), DE Damontre Moore (hamstring), G Geoff Schwartz (ankle), LB Uani Unga (neck). REDSKINS: OUT: S Trenton Robinson (hamstring). QUESTIONABLE: CB Bashaud Breeland (hamstring, illness), CB Deshazor Everett (hamstring), LB Keenan Robinson (shoulder). PROBABLE: S Dashon Goldson (knee, hamstring, wrist), CB DeAngelo Hall (toe), DE Jason Hatcher (knee), LB Ryan Kerrigan (hand), NT Terrance Knighton (migraine), C Josh LeRibeus (ankle, shoulder), RB Alfred Morris (rib), WR Andre Roberts (ankle), G Brandon Scherff (thigh), T Trent Williams (knee).

Dalton

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

JIM THOMAS • jthomas@post-dispatch.com > @jthom1 on Twitter

Red Rile is having a career year Bengals QB Andy Dalton started against St. Louis as a rookie in 2011, but for the vast majority of Rams, this will be their first time facing the two-time Pro Bowler. The former TCU star is in the midst of a career year with a passer rating of 104.0, 20 TDs, and just five INTs. His passer rating trails only Carson Palmer (108.6) and Tom Brady (107.4) in the NFL. With 262 yards against the Rams, he’ll join Peyton Manning as the only QBs in league history to throw for 3,000 yards-plus in each of their first five NFL seasons.

No. Name

Pos Ht

Wt. Exp. College

2

Mike Nugent

K

5

A.J. McCarron

QB 6-3 210

10 Kevin Huber 12

Mohamed Sanu

P

5-10 190 6-1

214

WR 6-2 210

11 Ohio State 1

Alabama

7

Cincinnati

4 Rutgers

14 Andy Dalton

QB 6-2 216

5

15

WR 5-9 180

R West Virginia

18 A.J. Green

WR 6-4 207

5

Georgia

19 Brandon Tate

WR 6-1

195

7

N. Carolina

Mario Alford

TCU

20 Reggie Nelson

S

5-11 210

9

Florida

24 Adam Jones

CB 5-10 180

9

West Virginia

25 Giorvani Bernard

HB 5-9 205

3

N. Carolina

26 Josh Shaw

CB

R USC

27 Dre Kirkpatrick

CB 6-2 190

6-1

201

29 Leon Hall

CB 5-11 195

9

Michigan

30 Cedric Peerman

HB 5-10 212

6

Virginia

32 Jeremy Hill

HB 6-1

235

2

LSU

33 Burkhead, Rex

HB 5-10 210

3

Nebraska

36 Shawn Williams

S

6-0 210

3

Georgia

37 Chris Lewis-Harris

CB 5-10 186

3

Tenn.-Chatt.

40 Derron Smith

S

5-10 200

R Fresno State

43 George Iloka

S

6-4 225

4 Boise State

46 Clark Harris

LS

6-5 250

7

47 P.J. Dawson

LB 6-0 240

50 A.J. Hawk

LB

51

When it comes to elite receivers, A.J. Green has been one of the league’s standardbearers since taken fourth overall in 2011. He has made the Pro Bowl every year since entering the NFL, and is well on his way to a fifth Pro Bowl berth and a fifth 1,000-yard receiving season. His combination of size (6-4, 207), speed, and athleticism make him a matchup problem for all in the NFL. And it looks like the Rams will be minus one of their starting cornerbacks, Trumaine Johnson, with a thigh injury Sunday.

Green

REST OF THE BUNCH

4 Alabama

Jones

Rutgers

R TCU

What makes the Bengals extra tough to defend is the multiple options in the passing game. Yes, Green remains the go-to guy, but the return to health of Marvin Jones has made it tougher for opposing defenses to gang up on Green. After missing the entire 2014 season with ankle and foot injuries, Jones has become a productive No. 2 receiver (39 for 515). Former Rutgers star Mohamed Sanu (6-2, 210) provides another big target. Don’t be surprised if the Bengals try to pick on Marcus Roberson, Johnson’s replacement.

6-1 240 10 Ohio State

Chris Carter

LB

6-1 240

4 Fresno State

55 Vontaze Burfict

LB

6-1 250

3

Arizona State

THE EIFERT TOWER

MISSING QUINN

57 Vincent Rey

LB 6-0 255

5

Duke

58 Rey Maualuga

LB

7

Southern Cal.

Sorry Gronk, the best tight end in the NFL may be Tyler Eifert, an imposing target at 6-6, 250 who leads the league with 11 TD catches — already a single-season record for a Bengals TE. In case you haven’t noticed, the Rams have had trouble covering tight ends lately. Crockett Gillmore (five for 101) and Zach Miller (five for 107) have topped 100 yards receiving the past two weeks against them. Part of the problem could be that SS T.J. McDonald doesn’t appear to be moving as well after missing the Minnesota game with a foot injury.

Although he’s listed as questionable with a hip/back injury, Rams defensive end Robert Quinn didn’t practice all week and it will be very surprising if he plays against the Bengals. The biggest issue among a series of injuries for Quinn is a back injury; in fact, it’s reaching the point where the Rams may consider shutting him down for the season. Although far from non-existent without him, the Rams’ pass rush simply doesn’t pack as much punch. Quinn hasn’t been the same since the Green Bay game Oct. 11.

6-2 255

59 Emmanuel Lamur

LB 6-4 245

4 Kansas State

60 T.C. Johnson

C

6-4 300

2

61 Russell Bodine

C

6-3 308

1

N. Carolina

65 Clint Boling

G

6-5 305

5

Georgia

S. Carolina

68 Zeitler, Kevin

G

6-4 315

4 Wisconsin

70 Cedric Ogbuehi

T

6-5 306

R Texas A&M

71

OT 6-4 325

7

Alabama

73 Eric Winston

Andre Smith

OT

9

Miami (Fla.)

74 Jake Fisher

OT 6-6 306

77 Andre Whitworth

OT

81 Tyler Krof

TE 6-6 246

R Rutgers

82 Marvin Jones

WR 6-2 198

4 California

85 Tyler Eifert

TE 6-6 250

3

87 C.J. Uzomah

TE 6-6 271

R Auburn

6-7 302

R Oregon

6-7 330 10 LSU

Notre Dame

89 Ryan Hewitt

H-B 6-4 254

2

Stanford

90 Michael Johnson

DE 6-7 280

7

Georgia Tech

91 Marcus Hardison

DT 6-3

R Arizona State

315

92 Pat Sims

DT

6-2 340

8

Auburn

93 Will Clarke

DE 6-6 291

2

West Virginia

94 Domata Peko

DT 6-3 325 10 Michigan St.

95 Wallace Gilberry

DE 6-2 270

8

96 Carlos Dunlap

DE 6-6 280

6

Florida

97 Geno Atkins

DT

6-1 300

5

Georgia

98 Brandon Thompson DT

6-2 305

4 Clemson

99 Margus Hunt

DE 6-8 290

3

Alabama

So. Methodist

BUFFALO at KANSAS CITY — BILLS: OUT: WR Marcus Easley (concussion), G John Miller (ankle), DT Kyle Williams (knee), DE Mario Williams (foot). PROBABLE: DT Marcell Dareus (knee), S Bacarri Rambo (shoulder), QB Tyrod Taylor (right shoulder). CHIEFS: OUT: DE Allen Bailey (calf), LB Dee Ford (back), G Ben Grubbs (neck), WR De’Anthony Thomas (concussion). QUESTIONABLE: TE Travis Kelce (groin), RB Charcandrick West (hamstring). PROBABLE: WR Chris Conley (hand), DE Mike DeVito (shoulder), CB Jamell Fleming (hamstring), LB Tamba Hali (knee), TE Brian Parker (ankle, back), LB Ramik Wilson (ankle). OAKLAND at TENNESSEE — RAIDERS: OUT: LB Neiron Ball (knee), CB Keith McGill (ankle). DOUBTFUL: C Rodney Hudson (ankle). QUESTIONABLE: RB Taiwan Jones (knee). PROBABLE: TE Lee Smith (wrist), S Charles Woodson (shoulder). TITANS: OUT: RB Dexter McCluster (knee), NT Al Woods (ankle). QUESTIONABLE: LB Derrick Morgan (shoulder). PROBABLE: NT Sammie Hill (knee), CB Blidi WrehWilson (hamstring), WR Kendall Wright (knee).

GREEN MEANS GO BENGALS ROSTER

TAMPA BAY at INDIANAPOLIS — BUCCANEERS: OUT: DE George Johnson (calf), S Keith Tandy (concussion). DOUBTFUL: TE Austin Seferian-Jenkins (shoulder). QUESTIONABLE: G Ali Marpet (ankle). PROBABLE: DE Josh Shirley (calf), C Evan Smith (knee). COLTS: OUT: T Anthony Castonzo (knee), WR Phillip Dorsett (ankle), QB Andrew Luck (abdomen, kidney). DOUBTFUL: S Mike Adams (ankle). QUESTIONABLE: CB Greg Toler (groin), LB Erik Walden (foot). PROBABLE: CB Vontae Davis (hamstring), LB Jerrell Freeman (ribs), RB Frank Gore (ankle), LB Sio Moore (back), CB D’Joun Smith (knee), G Hugh Thornton (shoulder).

GROUND TO A HALT

BATTLE OF THE “THREE-TECHS”

With defenses ganging up on Todd Gurley and injuries taking their toll on the ofensive line, the running game hasn’t been nearly as efective lately. After averaging 141.5 yards per game and 6.4 yards per carry in his first four NFL starts, Gurley has averaged only 66.7 yards per game and 3.3 yards per carry in his last three outings. So basically, his production has been cut in half. The Rams have been working on some new wrinkles in their run game this week; we’ll see if they bear fruit against Cincinnati.

The Rams’ Aaron Donald and the Bengals’ Geno Atkins are arguably the game’s top “threetechniques,” the defensive tackle position that showcases quickness and penetration. With seven sacks, 14 tackles for loss, and 24 QB pressures, Donald is on pace to have a better year statistically than in 2014, when he was NFL defensive rookie of the year. Atkins, a three-time Pro Bowler, has seven sacks, nine tackles for loss, and 10 QB hits. He’s a matchup challenge against a Rams interior that starts Demetrius Rhaney and Cody Wichmann.

Eifert

SAN DIEGO at JACKSONVILLE — CHARGERS: OUT: T D.J. Fluker (concussion). DOUBTFUL: T King Dunlap (ankle). QUESTIONABLE: NT Sean Lissemore (concussion), DT Corey Liuget (foot). PROBABLE: S Jahleel Addae (concussion), WR Malcom Floyd (shoulder), TE Antonio Gates (hip), TE Ladarius Green (ankle), LB Manti Te’o (ankle), S Eric Weddle (groin). JAGUARS: OUT: LB Dan Skuta (groin). DOUBTFUL: S Craig Loston (ankle), RB Bernard Pierce (calf), WR Neal Sterling (illness). PROBABLE: DT Michael Bennett (hamstring), RB Toby Gerhart (groin), WR Allen Hurns (foot, thigh), TE Nic Jacobs (hamstring), DT Roy Miller III (knee). MIAMI at NY JETS — DOLPHINS: OUT: T Ja’Wuan James (toe). DOUBTFUL: LB Chris McCain (hip). QUESTIONABLE: LB Jelani Jenkins (ankle), WR Jarvis Landry (knee), LB Koa Misi (abdomen), LB Spencer Paysinger (neck), LB Kelvin Sheppard (hamstring). PROBABLE: S Walt Aikens (ankle), RB Jay Ajayi (elbow), T Branden Albert (not injury related), S Reshad Jones (pectoral), CB Brice McCain (knee). JETS: OUT: CB Darrelle Revis (concussion). DOUBTFUL: S Dion Bailey (ankle). PROBABLE: LB Demario Davis (ribs), TE Kellen Davis (not injury related, hand), WR Eric Decker (knee), QB Ryan Fitzpatrick (left thumb), C Nick Mangold (hand), WR Brandon Marshall (toe), LB Calvin Pace (toe), P Ryan Quigley (right knee), DE Sheldon Richardson (hamstring), CB Buster Skrine (shoulder), WR Devin Smith (foot), CB Marcus Williams (knee). ARIZONA at SAN FRANCISCO — CARDINALS: OUT: DE Cory Redding (ankle), DT Frostee Rucker (ankle). QUESTIONABLE: S Deone Bucannon (concussion), G Jonathan Cooper (knee), WR Michael Floyd (hamstring), CB Patrick Peterson (ankle), DT Ed Stinson (groin). PROBABLE: WR John Brown (hamstring), DE Calais Campbell (knee), WR Larry Fitzgerald (ankle), G Mike Iupati (neck), RB Chris Johnson (knee). 49ERS: OUT: RB Carlos Hyde (foot). QUESTIONABLE: LB Ahmad Brooks (concussion, toe). PROBABLE: DT Arik Armstead (shoulder), WR Anquan Boldin (hamstring), G Alex Boone (triceps), LB NaVorro Bowman (shoulder, finger), DT Tony Jerod-Eddie (hip), G Erik Pears (knee), CB Keith Reaser (ankle), S Jaquiski Tartt (knee). PITTSBURGH at SEATTLE — STEELERS: QUESTIONABLE: LB Ryan Shazier (knee), TE Matt Spaeth (knee). PROBABLE: CB Brandon Boykin (ankle), LB Terence Garvin (knee), LB James Harrison (knee), S Shamarko Thomas (knee). SEAHAWKS: OUT: RB Marshawn Lynch (abdomen), WR Paul Richardson (hamstring). DOUBTFUL: LB Bruce Irvin (knee). QUESTIONABLE: C Patrick Lewis (ankle). PROBABLE: WR Doug Baldwin (ankle), DE Michael Bennett (not injury related), T Garry Gilliam (ankle), RB Thomas Rawls (knee), G J.R. Sweezy (shoulder). NEW ENGLAND at DENVER — PATRIOTS: OUT: CB Justin Coleman (hand), WR Julian Edelman (foot). DOUBTFUL: LB Jamie Collins (illness). QUESTIONABLE: WR Danny Amendola (knee), WR Keshawn Martin (hamstring), TE Michael Williams (knee). PROBABLE: DT Alan Branch (elbow), T Marcus Cannon (toe), G Tre’ Jackson (knee), DE Chandler Jones (abdomen). BRONCOS: OUT: QB Peyton Manning (foot), LB DeMarcus Ware (back). QUESTIONABLE: G Evan Mathis (ankle). PROBABLE: TE Owen Daniels (knee), TE Virgil Green (finger), T Ryan Harris (knee), C Matt Paradis (finger), WR Emmanuel Sanders (ankle, finger), T Michael Schofield (finger), DE Antonio Smith (hip), DE Vance Walker (shoulder). BALTIMORE at CLEVELAND — RAVENS: DNP: WR Marlon Brown (back), T Eugene Monroe (shoulder), G Kelechi Osemele (knee). LIMITED: CB Shareece Wright (back). FULL: TE Nick Boyle (foot). BROWNS: DNP: WR Taylor Gabriel (concussion), CB Joe Haden (concussion), WR Andrew Hawkins (concussion), DT Randy Starks (knee). LIMITED: T Joel Bitonio (ankle). FULL: QB Johnny Manziel (right elbow), QB Josh McCown (ribs), S Donte Whitner (concussion).


RAMS

D6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH RAMS ROSTER No. Name

Wt. Exp. College

Greg Zuerlein

K

5

Nick Foles

QB 6-6 243

6

Johnny Hekker

11

Tavon Austin

P

6-0 196 6-5 236

4 Oregon St.

WR 5-8 176

3

QB 6-6 229

R Oregon St.

15

Bradley Marquez

WR 5-11 201

R Texas Tech

17

Case Keenum

QB 6-1 205

3

Houston

18 Kenny Britt

WR 6-3 223

7

Rutgers

West Virginia

12 Texas Tech

19 Wes Welker

WR 5-9 185

20 Lamarcus Joyner

CB 5-8 184

2

21

Janoris Jenkins

CB 5-10 198

4 N. Alabama

22 Trumaine Johnson

CB 6-2 208

4 Montana

23 Rodney McLeod

FS 5-10 195

4 Virginia

25 T.J. McDonald

SS

6-2

217

3

SS

6-2

213

4 Alabama

USC

27 Tre Mason

RB 5-8 207

2

30 Todd Gurley

RB

6-1

R Georgia

31

SS

6-1 220

2

RB 6-0 205

3

Montana

36 Benny Cunningham RB 5-10 217

3

Middle Tenn.

Auburn

37 Christian Bryant

S

5-9 198

1

Ohio State

S

6-1 206

3

Texas Tech

6-2 244

5

Ohio St.

44 Jake McQuaide

LS

46 Cory Harkey

TE 6-4 259

47 Marcus Roberson

CB 6-0 191

2

50 Cameron Lynch

LB 5-11 229

R Syracuse

4 UCLA Florida

53 Daren Bates

LB 5-11 225

3

54 Bryce Hager

ILB 6-1 234

R Baylor

55 James Laurinaitis

MLB 6-2 248

7

Ohio St.

56 Akeem Ayers

OLB 6-3 255

5

UCLA California (Pa.)

C

6-4 313

3

61 Tim Barnes

C

6-4 306

4 Missouri R Iowa

64 Andrew Donnal

T

6-6 313

65 Demetrius Rhaney

C

6-2 301

2

Tenn. St.

67 Brian Folkerts

OL 6-4 310

3

Washburn

69 Cody Wichmann

G

6-6 315

R Fresno St.

71

T

6-7 305

7

N. Carolina

73 Greg Robinson

T

6-5 332

2

Auburn

77 Isaiah Battle

T

6-7 290

R Clemson

T

6-7

R Wisconsin

321

83 Brian Quick

WR 6-3 218

4 AppalachianSt.

88 Lance Kendricks

TE

6-3 250

5

Wisconsin

89 Jared Cook

TE

6-5 254

7

So. Carolina

90 Michael Brockers

DT 6-5 326

4 LSU

91 Chris Long

DE 6-3 268

8

Virginia

93 Ethan Westbrooks

DT 6-3 267

2

W. Texas A&M

94 Robert Quinn

DE 6-4 264

5

N. Carolina

95 William Hayes

DE 6-3 278

8

Winston-Salem

96 Matt Longacre

DE 6-3 260

R NW Missouri

97 Eugene Sims

DE 6-6 269

6

W. Texas A&M

98 Nick Fairley

DT 6-4 308

5

Auburn

99 Aaron Donald

DT

6-1 285

2

Pittsburgh

TBA Zach Hocker

K

6-0 186

R Arkansas

BENGALS ROSTER No. Name

Pos Ht

Mike Nugent

K

5

A.J. McCarron

QB 6-3 210

12

Mohamed Sanu

P

5-10 190 6-1

214

WR 6-2 210

11 Ohio State 1

Alabama

7

Cincinnati

4 Rutgers

14 Andy Dalton

QB 6-2 216

5

15

WR 5-9 180

R West Virginia

18 A.J. Green

WR 6-4 207

5

Georgia

19 Brandon Tate

WR 6-1

195

7

N. Carolina

5-11 210

9

Florida

Mario Alford

20 Reggie Nelson

S

Dalton

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS JIM THOMAS • jthomas@post-dispatch.com > @jthom1 on Twitter

Red Rile is having a career year Bengals QB Andy Dalton started against St. Louis as a rookie in 2011, but for the vast majority of Rams, this will be their first time facing the two-time Pro Bowler. The former TCU star is in the midst of a career year with a passer rating of 104.0, 20 TDs, and just five INTs. His passer rating trails only Carson Palmer (108.6) and Tom Brady (107.4) in the NFL. With 262 yards against the Rams, he’ll join Peyton Manning as the only QBs in league history to throw for 3,000 yards-plus in each of their first five NFL seasons.

GREEN MEANS GO Wt. Exp. College

2

10 Kevin Huber

NY GIANTS at WASHINGTON — GIANTS: OUT: TE Larry Donnell (neck), LB Mark Herzlich (quadriceps), T Justin Pugh (concussion). DOUBTFUL: C Weston Richburg (ankle). QUESTIONABLE: LB J.T. Thomas III (ankle). PROBABLE: CB Prince Amukamara (pectoral), CB Leon McFadden (groin), DE Damontre Moore (hamstring), G Geoff Schwartz (ankle), LB Uani Unga (neck). REDSKINS: OUT: S Trenton Robinson (hamstring). QUESTIONABLE: CB Bashaud Breeland (hamstring, illness), CB Deshazor Everett (hamstring), LB Keenan Robinson (shoulder). PROBABLE: S Dashon Goldson (knee, hamstring, wrist), CB DeAngelo Hall (toe), DE Jason Hatcher (knee), LB Ryan Kerrigan (hand), NT Terrance Knighton (migraine), C Josh LeRibeus (ankle, shoulder), RB Alfred Morris (rib), WR Andre Roberts (ankle), G Brandon Scherff (thigh), T Trent Williams (knee).

Auburn

60 Eric Kush

79 Rob Havenstein

MINNESOTA at ATLANTA — VIKINGS: OUT: S Harrison Smith (knee). QUESTIONABLE: DE Everson Griffen (hip, shoulder), CB Trae Waynes (ankle). PROBABLE: LB Anthony Barr (hand), S Robert Blanton (ankle), QB Teddy Bridgewater (left shoulder), DT Sharrif Floyd (ankle), T Matt Kalil (toe), LB Eric Kendricks (ribs). FALCONS: OUT: K Matt Bryant (right quadriceps), RB Devonta Freeman (concussion), WR Leonard Hankerson (hamstring). PROBABLE: CB Robert Alford (groin), G Andy Levitre (knee), S Robenson Therezie (hamstring).

Utah St.

38 Cody Davis

Garrett Reynolds

NEW ORLEANS at HOUSTON — SAINTS: OUT: LB Dannell Ellerbe (hip), LB David Hawthorne (thigh), CB Damian Swann (concussion). PROBABLE: LB Stephone Anthony (leg), T Terron Armstead (knee), LB Ramon Humber (hamstring), RB Mark Ingram (shoulder), LB Hau’oli Kikaha (ankle), WR Willie Snead (knee). TEXANS: PROBABLE: RB Alfred Blue (back), CB A.J. Bouye (concussion), LB Max Bullough (shoulder, hamstring), LB Jadeveon Clowney (wrist), DT Christian Covington (hip), LB Akeem Dent (hamstring), QB Brian Hoyer (concussion), CB Kareem Jackson (ankle), CB Charles James (foot), C Ben Jones (hand), CB Johnathan Joseph (knee, wrist), LB Whitney Mercilus (back), T Derek Newton (elbow), S Eddie Pleasant (neck), RB Chris Polk (knee, hamstring), WR Nate Washington (hip).

Florida St.

26 Mark Barron

222

RAMS at CINCINNATI — RAMS: OUT: T Andrew Donnal (knee). QUESTIONABLE: T Rob Havenstein (calf), CB Trumaine Johnson (thigh), QB Case Keenum (concussion), DE Robert Quinn (hip, back), K Greg Zuerlein (right groin). BENGALS: QUESTIONABLE: CB Adam Jones (foot), DT Pat Sims (knee). PROBABLE: LB Vontaze Burfict (knee), QB Andy Dalton (groin), TE Tyler Eifert (knee), WR Marvin Jones (hamstring), CB Dre Kirkpatrick (knee), T Andre Smith (thigh), S Shawn Williams (ankle).

7 FOR SUNDAY

4 Mo. Western 4 Arizona

14 Sean Mannion

34 Chase Reynolds

INJURY REPORT

RAMS AT BENGALS, NOON, KTVI (2)

Pos Ht

4

Maurice Alexander

M 2 • SUNDAY • 11.29.2015

TCU

When it comes to elite receivers, A.J. Green has been one of the league’s standardbearers since taken fourth overall in 2011. He has made the Pro Bowl every year since entering the NFL, and is well on his way to a fifth Pro Bowl berth and a fifth 1,000-yard receiving season. His combination of size (6-4, 207), speed, and athleticism make him a matchup problem for all in the NFL. And it looks like the Rams will be minus one of their starting cornerbacks, Trumaine Johnson, with a thigh injury Sunday.

Green

24 Adam Jones

CB 5-10 180

9

West Virginia

HB 5-9 205

3

N. Carolina

26 Josh Shaw

CB

R USC

27 Dre Kirkpatrick

CB 6-2 190

4 Alabama

REST OF THE BUNCH

29 Leon Hall

CB 5-11 195

9

Michigan

30 Cedric Peerman

HB 5-10 212

6

Virginia

What makes the Bengals extra tough to defend is the multiple options in the passing game. Yes, Green remains the go-to guy, but the return to health of Marvin Jones has made it tougher for opposing defenses to gang up on Green. After missing the entire 2014 season with ankle and foot injuries, Jones has become a productive No. 2 receiver (39 for 515). Former Rutgers star Mohamed Sanu (6-2, 210) provides another big target. Don’t be surprised if the Bengals try to pick on Marcus Roberson, Johnson’s replacement.

201

32 Jeremy Hill

HB 6-1

235

2

LSU

33 Burkhead, Rex

HB 5-10 210

3

Nebraska

36 Shawn Williams

S

6-0 210

3

Georgia

37 Chris Lewis-Harris

CB 5-10 186

3

Tenn.-Chatt.

40 Derron Smith

S

5-10 200

R Fresno State

43 George Iloka

S

6-4 225

4 Boise State

6-5 250

46 Clark Harris

LS

47 P.J. Dawson

LB 6-0 240

7

Rutgers

50 A.J. Hawk

LB

51

Chris Carter

LB

6-1 240

4 Fresno State

55 Vontaze Burfict

LB

6-1 250

3

Arizona State

57 Vincent Rey

LB 6-0 255

5

Duke

58 Rey Maualuga

LB

7

Southern Cal.

59 Emmanuel Lamur

LB 6-4 245

4 Kansas State

60 T.C. Johnson

C

6-4 300

2

S. Carolina

61 Russell Bodine

C

6-3 308

1

N. Carolina Georgia

R TCU

6-1 240 10 Ohio State

6-2 255

65 Clint Boling

G

6-5 305

5

68 Zeitler, Kevin

G

6-4 315

4 Wisconsin

70 Cedric Ogbuehi

T

6-5 306

R Texas A&M

71

OT 6-4 325

7

Alabama

73 Eric Winston

OT

9

Miami (Fla.)

74 Jake Fisher

OT 6-6 306

77 Andre Whitworth

OT

Andre Smith

6-7 302

R Oregon

6-7 330 10 LSU

81 Tyler Krof

TE 6-6 246

R Rutgers

82 Marvin Jones

WR 6-2 198

4 California

85 Tyler Eifert

TE 6-6 250

3

87 C.J. Uzomah

TE 6-6 271

R Auburn

89 Ryan Hewitt

H-B 6-4 254

2

Stanford

90 Michael Johnson

DE 6-7 280

7

Georgia Tech

R Arizona State

315

Notre Dame

91 Marcus Hardison

DT 6-3

92 Pat Sims

DT

6-2 340

8

Auburn

93 Will Clarke

DE 6-6 291

2

West Virginia

94 Domata Peko

DT 6-3 325 10 Michigan St.

95 Wallace Gilberry

DE 6-2 270

8

Alabama

96 Carlos Dunlap

DE 6-6 280

6

Florida

97 Geno Atkins

DT

6-1 300

5

Georgia

98 Brandon Thompson DT

6-2 305

4 Clemson

99 Margus Hunt

Jones

DE 6-8 290

3

So. Methodist

BUFFALO at KANSAS CITY — BILLS: OUT: WR Marcus Easley (concussion), G John Miller (ankle), DT Kyle Williams (knee), DE Mario Williams (foot). PROBABLE: DT Marcell Dareus (knee), S Bacarri Rambo (shoulder), QB Tyrod Taylor (right shoulder). CHIEFS: OUT: DE Allen Bailey (calf), LB Dee Ford (back), G Ben Grubbs (neck), WR De’Anthony Thomas (concussion). QUESTIONABLE: TE Travis Kelce (groin), RB Charcandrick West (hamstring). PROBABLE: WR Chris Conley (hand), DE Mike DeVito (shoulder), CB Jamell Fleming (hamstring), LB Tamba Hali (knee), TE Brian Parker (ankle, back), LB Ramik Wilson (ankle). OAKLAND at TENNESSEE — RAIDERS: OUT: LB Neiron Ball (knee), CB Keith McGill (ankle). DOUBTFUL: C Rodney Hudson (ankle). QUESTIONABLE: RB Taiwan Jones (knee). PROBABLE: TE Lee Smith (wrist), S Charles Woodson (shoulder). TITANS: OUT: RB Dexter McCluster (knee), NT Al Woods (ankle). QUESTIONABLE: LB Derrick Morgan (shoulder). PROBABLE: NT Sammie Hill (knee), CB Blidi WrehWilson (hamstring), WR Kendall Wright (knee). SAN DIEGO at JACKSONVILLE — CHARGERS: OUT: T D.J. Fluker (concussion). DOUBTFUL: T King Dunlap (ankle). QUESTIONABLE: NT Sean Lissemore (concussion), DT Corey Liuget (foot). PROBABLE: S Jahleel Addae (concussion), WR Malcom Floyd (shoulder), TE Antonio Gates (hip), TE Ladarius Green (ankle), LB Manti Te’o (ankle), S Eric Weddle (groin). JAGUARS: OUT: LB Dan Skuta (groin). DOUBTFUL: S Craig Loston (ankle), RB Bernard Pierce (calf), WR Neal Sterling (illness). PROBABLE: DT Michael Bennett (hamstring), RB Toby Gerhart (groin), WR Allen Hurns (foot, thigh), TE Nic Jacobs (hamstring), DT Roy Miller III (knee).

25 Giorvani Bernard

6-1

TAMPA BAY at INDIANAPOLIS — BUCCANEERS: OUT: DE George Johnson (calf), S Keith Tandy (concussion). DOUBTFUL: TE Austin Seferian-Jenkins (shoulder). QUESTIONABLE: G Ali Marpet (ankle). PROBABLE: DE Josh Shirley (calf), C Evan Smith (knee). COLTS: OUT: T Anthony Castonzo (knee), WR Phillip Dorsett (ankle), QB Andrew Luck (abdomen, kidney). DOUBTFUL: S Mike Adams (ankle). QUESTIONABLE: CB Greg Toler (groin), LB Erik Walden (foot). PROBABLE: CB Vontae Davis (hamstring), LB Jerrell Freeman (ribs), RB Frank Gore (ankle), LB Sio Moore (back), CB D’Joun Smith (knee), G Hugh Thornton (shoulder).

THE EIFERT TOWER

MISSING QUINN

Sorry Gronk, the best tight end in the NFL may be Tyler Eifert, an imposing target at 6-6, 250 who leads the league with 11 TD catches — already a single-season record for a Bengals TE. In case you haven’t noticed, the Rams have had trouble covering tight ends lately. Crockett Gillmore (five for 101) and Zach Miller (five for 107) have topped 100 yards receiving the past two weeks against them. Part of the problem could be that SS T.J. McDonald doesn’t appear to be moving as well after missing the Minnesota game with a foot injury.

Although he’s listed as questionable with a hip/back injury, Rams defensive end Robert Quinn didn’t practice all week and it will be very surprising if he plays against the Bengals. The biggest issue among a series of injuries for Quinn is a back injury; in fact, it’s reaching the point where the Rams may consider shutting him down for the season. Although far from non-existent without him, the Rams’ pass rush simply doesn’t pack as much punch. Quinn hasn’t been the same since the Green Bay game Oct. 11.

GROUND TO A HALT

BATTLE OF THE “THREE-TECHS”

With defenses ganging up on Todd Gurley and injuries taking their toll on the ofensive line, the running game hasn’t been nearly as efective lately. After averaging 141.5 yards per game and 6.4 yards per carry in his first four NFL starts, Gurley has averaged only 66.7 yards per game and 3.3 yards per carry in his last three outings. So basically, his production has been cut in half. The Rams have been working on some new wrinkles in their run game this week; we’ll see if they bear fruit against Cincinnati.

The Rams’ Aaron Donald and the Bengals’ Geno Atkins are arguably the game’s top “threetechniques,” the defensive tackle position that showcases quickness and penetration. With seven sacks, 14 tackles for loss, and 24 QB pressures, Donald is on pace to have a better year statistically than in 2014, when he was NFL defensive rookie of the year. Atkins, a three-time Pro Bowler, has seven sacks, nine tackles for loss, and 10 QB hits. He’s a matchup challenge against a Rams interior that starts Demetrius Rhaney and Cody Wichmann.

MIAMI at NY JETS — DOLPHINS: OUT: T Ja’Wuan James (toe). DOUBTFUL: LB Chris McCain (hip). QUESTIONABLE: LB Jelani Jenkins (ankle), WR Jarvis Landry (knee), LB Koa Misi (abdomen), LB Spencer Paysinger (neck), LB Kelvin Sheppard (hamstring). PROBABLE: S Walt Aikens (ankle), RB Jay Ajayi (elbow), T Branden Albert (not injury related), S Reshad Jones (pectoral), CB Brice McCain (knee). JETS: OUT: CB Darrelle Revis (concussion). DOUBTFUL: S Dion Bailey (ankle). PROBABLE: LB Demario Davis (ribs), TE Kellen Davis (not injury related, hand), WR Eric Decker (knee), QB Ryan Fitzpatrick (left thumb), C Nick Mangold (hand), WR Brandon Marshall (toe), LB Calvin Pace (toe), P Ryan Quigley (right knee), DE Sheldon Richardson (hamstring), CB Buster Skrine (shoulder), WR Devin Smith (foot), CB Marcus Williams (knee). ARIZONA at SAN FRANCISCO — CARDINALS: OUT: DE Cory Redding (ankle), DT Frostee Rucker (ankle). QUESTIONABLE: S Deone Bucannon (concussion), G Jonathan Cooper (knee), WR Michael Floyd (hamstring), CB Patrick Peterson (ankle), DT Ed Stinson (groin). PROBABLE: WR John Brown (hamstring), DE Calais Campbell (knee), WR Larry Fitzgerald (ankle), G Mike Iupati (neck), RB Chris Johnson (knee). 49ERS: OUT: RB Carlos Hyde (foot). QUESTIONABLE: LB Ahmad Brooks (concussion, toe). PROBABLE: DT Arik Armstead (shoulder), WR Anquan Boldin (hamstring), G Alex Boone (triceps), LB NaVorro Bowman (shoulder, finger), DT Tony Jerod-Eddie (hip), G Erik Pears (knee), CB Keith Reaser (ankle), S Jaquiski Tartt (knee). PITTSBURGH at SEATTLE — STEELERS: QUESTIONABLE: LB Ryan Shazier (knee), TE Matt Spaeth (knee). PROBABLE: CB Brandon Boykin (ankle), LB Terence Garvin (knee), LB James Harrison (knee), S Shamarko Thomas (knee). SEAHAWKS: OUT: RB Marshawn Lynch (abdomen), WR Paul Richardson (hamstring). DOUBTFUL: LB Bruce Irvin (knee). QUESTIONABLE: C Patrick Lewis (ankle). PROBABLE: WR Doug Baldwin (ankle), DE Michael Bennett (not injury related), T Garry Gilliam (ankle), RB Thomas Rawls (knee), G J.R. Sweezy (shoulder). NEW ENGLAND at DENVER — PATRIOTS: OUT: CB Justin Coleman (hand), WR Julian Edelman (foot). DOUBTFUL: LB Jamie Collins (illness), WR Danny Amendola (knee). QUESTIONABLE: WR Keshawn Martin (hamstring), TE Michael Williams (knee). PROBABLE: DT Alan Branch (elbow), T Marcus Cannon (toe), G Tre’ Jackson (knee), DE Chandler Jones (abdomen). BRONCOS: OUT: QB Peyton Manning (foot), LB DeMarcus Ware (back). QUESTIONABLE: G Evan Mathis (ankle). PROBABLE: TE Owen Daniels (knee), TE Virgil Green (finger), T Ryan Harris (knee), C Matt Paradis (finger), WR Emmanuel Sanders (ankle, finger), T Michael Schofield (finger), DE Antonio Smith (hip), DE Vance Walker (shoulder).

MONDAY BALTIMORE at CLEVELAND — RAVENS: Doubtful: WR Marlon Brown (back), T Eugene Monroe (shoulder), G Kelechi Osemele (knee), TE Chase Ford (shoulder). QUESTIONABLE: CB Shareece Wright (back). PROBABLE: TE Nick Boyle (foot). BROWNS: OUT: WR Taylor Gabriel (concussion), CB Joe Haden (concussion), WR Andrew Hawkins (concussion), DT Randy Starks (knee). QUESTIONABLE: T Joel Bitonio (ankle). PROBABL: QB Johnny Manziel (right elbow), QB Josh McCown (ribs), S Donte Whitner (concussion).

Concussions are cause for concern in all levels of football HOCHMAN • FROM D1

When it comes to concussions, the National Football League is the Phillip Morris of the sports industry. Yes, the NFL has improved its concussion protocol. And Keenum’s concussion prompted swift reaction, including dialogue between trainers of all 32 teams this week. That’s great news for the next Case Keenum. But what about your son in some youth league on some splotchy field with some hand-medown equipment? Are coaches catching every concussion? And if they miss one, or misdiagnose one, surely a 12-year-old won’t say: “If I leave the game, I could come off as unmanly to my teammates, but I’m worried about sub-concussive impact and the looming yet realistic fear of brain damage, dementia or even CTE.” CTE. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy. This is scary stuff. You’ve probably

seen the ads for the upcoming film called “Concussion.” Yes, in America, some would rather watch a football movie called “Giving Concussions,” featuring the brutal bulldozing of ball carriers. Alas, you’re stuck with “Concussion.” I didn’t know the storyline, but after reading about it, the film sounds fascinating. Important. A doctor in Pittsburgh, Bennet Omalu, discovers that a deceased Steeler, Hall of Famer Mike Webster, had suffered from CTE. He writes about it, but the NFL tries to shoot holes in his report. Omalu is steadfast, realizing the league is trying to protect its image, after failing to protect its players. Ultimately, the league sends a doctor to look at Omalu’s slides of Webster’s brain. The doctor, who had studied brains for 30 years, could not believe what he was seeing. The football player’s brain injuries were more severe than even the most-advanced Alzheimer’s cases. And this wasn’t

an isolated case. This is what happened to many in each generation of snarling men. Playing football is smoking a cigarette. Many of you will continue to allow your sons to play, and that’s totally your call. It is, after all, a dang fun game. And a generation of fathers, who played competitive football, ended up just fine. Not every person concussed is ruined, obviously. People get through concussions. But it’s imperative that we ... 1. Minimize concussions overall with strict protocol, protective gear and a defensive eye. 2. Maximize concussion reactions when they happen on the field. 3. Objectively evaluate the cost-benefit analysis of letting a boy play tackle football. I’ll simply say this — as a parent, your whole existence is to make sure your kid is healthy and safe. You worry about every little thing, all the time. So why al-

low a kid to play football, this tornado of a sport in which they play fast and loose with brains? Especially when there are so many other sports through which to learn leadership and teamwork. But I don’t want to turn this column into a soapbox speech. Truly, I don’t. So let’s just focus on the lessons of Case Keenum. Clearly, thousands of St. Louis boys play football. Are you, as a parent, fully educated about what happens in their son’s league, in regards to diagnosing a concussion? Do you yourself know some simple signs of concussions? And what can be improved in your son’s league — or in any local football league — to make sure a concussed boy isn’t accidentally thrown back into the tornado? Here’s hoping the Case Keenum story is a cautionary tale. Benjamin Hochman @hochman on Twitter bhochman@post-dispatch.com


NFL

11.29.2015 • SUNDAY • M 1

Thursday Detroit 45, Philadelphia 14 Carolina 33, Dallas 14 Chicago 17, Green Bay 13 Sunday Rams at Cincinnati, noon, KTVI (2) Bufalo at Kansas City, noon, KMOV (4) New Orleans at Houston, noon Oakland at Tennessee, noon Minnesota at Atlanta, noon NY Giants at Washington, noon Tampa Bay at Indianapolis, noon San Diego at Jacksonville, noon Miami at NY Jets, noon Arizona at San Francisco, 3:05 p.m. Pittsburgh at Seattle, 3:25 p.m., KMOV (4) New England at Denver, 7:30 p.m., KSDK (5) Monday Baltimore at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m., ESPN

NATIONAL FOOTBALL CONFERENCE WEST Arizona Seattle Rams San Francisco EAST NY Giants Washington Philadelphia Dallas SOUTH Carolina Atlanta Tampa Bay New Orleans NORTH Minnesota Green Bay Chicago Detroit

W 8 5 4 3 W 5 4 4 3 W 11 6 5 4 W 7 7 5 4

L 2 5 6 7 L 5 6 7 8 L 0 4 5 6 L 3 4 6 7

T Pct PF PA Home 0 .800 336 216 4-1 0 .500 228 192 3-2 0 .400 179 199 3-2 0 .300 139 252 3-2 T Pct PF PA Home 0 .500 273 253 3-2 0 .400 221 253 4-1 0 .364 243 274 2-3 0 .273 204 261 1-5 T Pct PF PA Home 0 1.000 332 205 6-0 0 .600 250 214 3-2 0 .500 236 254 2-3 0 .400 255 315 3-2 T Pct PF PA Home 0 .700 211 184 4-1 0 .636 262 215 4-2 0 .455 231 264 1-4 0 .364 230 288 3-3

Away 4-1 2-3 1-4 0-5 Away 2-3 0-5 2-4 2-3 Away 5-0 3-2 3-2 1-4 Away 3-2 3-2 4-2 1-4

NFC 5-1 5-4 3-4 2-6 NFC 4-4 4-3 3-6 2-7 NFC 7-0 4-3 4-3 3-5 NFC 4-2 5-3 2-5 3-4

AFC 3-1 0-1 1-2 1-1 AFC 1-1 0-3 1-1 1-1 AFC 4-0 2-1 1-2 1-1 AFC 3-1 2-1 3-1 1-3

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • D7

Div 2-1 2-2 3-0 0-4 Div 2-2 1-1 2-2 2-2 Div 2-0 0-2 2-1 1-2 Div 3-1 2-2 1-3 2-2

AMERICAN FOOTBALL CONFERENCE WEST W L T Pct PF PA Home Away Denver 8 2 0 .800 222 183 3-1 5-1 Kansas City 5 5 0 .500 257 198 2-2 3-3 Oakland 4 6 0 .400 240 259 2-3 2-3 San Diego 2 8 0 .200 213 282 2-4 0-4 EAST W L T Pct PF PA Home Away New England 10 0 0 1.000 323 182 6-0 4-0 Bufalo 5 5 0 .500 244 227 2-3 3-2 NY Jets 5 5 0 .500 234 208 3-2 2-3 Miami 4 6 0 .400 205 249 1-3 3-3 SOUTH W L T Pct PF PA Home Away Indianapolis 5 5 0 .500 224 248 2-3 3-2 Houston 5 5 0 .500 208 228 3-2 2-3 Jacksonville 4 6 0 .400 211 268 3-2 1-4 Tennessee 2 8 0 .200 182 233 0-5 2-3 NORTH W L T Pct PF PA Home Away Cincinnati 8 2 0 .800 266 186 4-1 4-1 Pittsburgh 6 4 0 .600 236 191 4-2 2-2 Baltimore 3 7 0 .300 226 249 2-3 1-4 Cleveland 2 8 0 .200 186 277 1-3 1-5

AFC 4-2 4-2 4-3 1-5 AFC 7-0 5-4 4-4 2-5 AFC 4-3 4-3 4-4 0-6 AFC 7-1 3-4 2-5 2-6

NFC 4-0 1-3 0-3 1-3 NFC 3-0 0-1 1-1 2-1 NFC 1-2 1-2 0-2 2-2 NFC 1-1 3-0 1-2 0-2

Div 2-1 2-1 1-1 0-2 Div 4-0 3-2 1-2 0-4 Div 3-0 2-1 1-2 0-3 Div 3-0 1-2 1-2 1-2

Reeling Rams hope to end slide

WEEK 12 IN THE NFL

SUNDAY’S GAMES

BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

MARQUEE MATCHUP NEW ENGLAND (10-0) at DENVER (8-2) Tom Brady

Time • 7:30 p.m. Fast facts • Patriots QB Tom Brady is four TD throws shy of surpassing Dan Marino for third on all-time list, but his receiving corps has been depleted with injuries to Julian Edelman, Danny Amendola and RB Dion Lewis. ... RB James White scored first two career TDs last week in win over Bufalo. ... Broncos QB Brock Osweiler won his first career start at Chicago last week. He threw for 250 yards and two TDs with no interceptions. ... RB Ronnie Hillman is coming of third 100-yard game of season. ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

NEW ORLEANS (4-6) at HOUSTON (5-5)

BUFFALO (5-5) at KANSAS CITY (5-5)

Time • Noon Fast facts • Saints’ RB Mark Ingram needs two yards to reach 1,000 all-purpose yards for second straight season. ... WR Brandin Cooks has five TDs in last three games combined. ... TE Benjamin Watson is second on team with 46 catches. ... Texans QB Brian Hoyer will start after sitting out last week with concussion. ... WR DeAndre Hopkins is third in NFL with 1,045 yards receiving and his nine receiving TDs are second in league. ... WR Nate Washington has three TD receptions in past four games. ... DE J.J. Watt leads NFL with 11½ sacks.

Time • Noon Fast facts • Kansas City has league-leading 14 TDs rushing. Bufalo is second with 12. ... Bills lead NFL with 16 TDs of 20 yards or more. ... Bills RB LeSean McCoy has had at least 100 yards from scrimmage in four straight games. ... RB Karlos Williams is averaging 53 yards rushing, fourth best among NFL rookies. His five TDs are second to Rams’ Todd Gurley. ... Kansas City has outscored last four opponents by 91 points, best in NFL. ... QB Alex Smith has not thrown pick in franchise-record 253 passes, longest active streak in NFL.

OAKLAND (4-6) at TENNESSEE (2-8) Time • Noon Fast facts • Raiders QB Derek Carr has thrown for 300 yards or more in three of past four games. ... WR Amari Cooper leads NFL rookies with 51 receptions and 736 yards receiving. ... S Charles Woodson needs interception to pass Ken Riley (65) for fifth all-time. ... Titans QB Marcus Mariota leads NFL rookies with 96.1 passer rating and has team rookie record with 13 TD passes. Mariota has thrown for two or more TD passes in four of his eight games. ... LB Brian Orakpo has six sacks in past six games.

Alex Smith

MINNESOTA (7-3) at ATLANTA (6-4)

NY GIANTS (5-5) at WASHINGTON (4-6)

Time • Noon Fast facts • Vikings RB Adrian Peterson leads NFL in rushing with 1,006 yards. ... Falcons have their own league leader: WR Julio Jones has three straight 100-yard receiving games and six for season. Overall, he’s got 89 receptions for 1,189 yards, topping NFL in both categories. ... Vikings QB Teddy Bridgewater is coming of a 296-yard passing game, his second-highest total of season. ... Atlanta RB Devonta Freeman sustained concussion early in last Sunday’s game. It’s not known if NFL’s fifth-leading rusher (764 yards) will be able to go.

Time • Noon Fast facts • If Redskins win, they will pull even with Giants atop NFC East and surpass last season’s victory total. ... Giants lead NFL with a plus-13 turnover margin; Redskins are at minus-5. ... Giants QB Eli Manning’s set to make 178th consecutive start, longest active streak in league. ... WR Odell Beckham Jr. scored four TDs in last three games overall. ... Redskins are 0-5 on road but 4-1 at home, including four victories in row. ... Rookie RB Matt Jones has four fumbles.

TAMPA BAY (5-5) at INDIANAPOLIS (5-5)

SAN DIEGO (2-8) at JACKSONVILLE (4-6)

Time • Noon Fast facts • Tampa Bay QB Jameis Winston threw five touchdown passes last week, giving him 15 for season, four short of tying Bucs’ rookie record. ... RB Doug Martin is tied with Warrick Dunn for second-most 100-yard games (11) in franchise history and needs 59 yards to become second 1,000-yard rusher in league in 2015. ... Forty-yearold Indy QB Matt Hasselbeck is 3-0 in relief of Andrew Luck. ... RB Frank Gore needs 42 yards from scrimmage to move past Hall of Famer Jim Brown (14,811).

Time • Noon Fast facts • Chargers have lost six straight games but have won four in a row in this series. ... Philip Rivers needs two touchdown passes to tie Joe Montana (273) for 12th on all-time list. ... Rivers has topped 300 yards passing six times this season. ... Jaguars QB Blake Bortles needs three TD passes to tie David Garrard’s single-season, franchise record of 23. ... Bortles has led game-winning drive in each of Jacksonville’s four wins. ... Jaguars WRs Allen Hurns and Allen Robinson have combined for 14 TD receptions this season.

MIAMI (4-6) at NEW YORK JETS (5-5)

Chris Johnson

Time • Noon Fast facts • Miami QB Ryan Tannehill has thrown two or more TD passes in seven of last nine and passed for 250 yards or more in four of last five road games. ... RB Lamar Miller averaging 112.8 yards from scrimmage in last six games and has five rushing TDs and two TD catches in that span. ... Jets sticking with QB Ryan Fitzpatrick, who has struggled at times and is playing through surgically repaired left thumb. He has 16 TDs and 11 INTs and is New York’s second-leading rusher with 166 yards.

ARIZONA (8-2) at SAN FRANCISCO (3-7)

PITTSBURGH (6-4) at SEATTLE (5-5)

Time • 3:05 p.m. Fast facts • Arizona QB Carson Palmer tries for 22nd win in last 26 starts. His 27 touchdowns passing are most by Cardinals quarterback in opening 10 games. ... RB Chris Johnson ran for 110 yards and two TDs in first meeting, while WR Larry Fitzgerald had nine catches for 134 yards and two scores. ... Demoted and now injured 49ers QB Colin Kaepernick threw four interceptions in first meeting, two returned for touchdowns. ... LB NaVorro Bowman leads NFC with 97 tackles in comeback season from knee surgery.

Time • 3:25 p.m. Fast facts • Steelers RB DeAngelo Williams averaging 134.7 yards from scrimmage in his past three games. ... WR Antonio Brown, with 27 catches in past two games, tied for fourth most in league history in two-game span. ... WR Martavis Bryant had career-high 178 yards receiving and TD last week. ... Seahawks QB Russell Wilson had three touchdown passes and passer rating of 138.5 last week vs. 49ers. ... RB Thomas Rawls rushed for 209 yards vs. 49ers, second-best game in franchise history. ASSOCIATED PRESS

Somewhere along the road from Minnesota to Cincinnati, the wheels have fallen off this Rams season. The shimmer of 4-3 and the team’s first winning record in November in nearly a decade is gone. Absolutely crushing losses to Minnesota, Chicago, and Baltimore have the Rams staggering at 4-6 and suddenly bearing the all-too-familiar look of a team headed toward another losing season. Most Rams fans know the milestone years by heart — all together now — no playof berths since 2004 and no winning records since 2003. “Big picture-wise, we have zero room for error now,” linebacker James Laurinaitis said. “The way the record is, we’ve made it extremely diicult on ourselves for big picture. But there’s no quit over here.” But now with a supposedly “softer” portion of the schedule behind them, the Rams head into the teeth of two of the NFL’s elite. On Sunday, it’s the 8-2 Cincinnati Bengals in a noon kickof (St. Louis time) at Paul Brown Stadium. “It is definitely frustrating,” said tight end Lance Kendricks. “This team has been in this position a lot in the last few years — since I’ve been here. It’s more frustrating when you have the talent and you have the good players, and you have everything in place. “But injuries to the ofensive line and things like that, it hinders teams that are good. There’s nobody to blame, but I think we just need to find a way to win. That’s kind of where we’re lacking. We’re always in the game, but we just have to find ways to finish.” Getting to the finish line will be tougher than ever these next two Sundays. Smarting from narrow losses back-toback against Houston and Arizona, Cincy wants nothing more than to get well against the reeling Rams. Then comes 8-2 Arizona, looking very much the part of Super Bowl contender these days. One of those two losses came to the Rams way back on Oct. 4, and if you don’t think Big Red coach Bruce Arians wants to avenge that 24-22 loss, well, you don’t know Bruce Arians. Fleshing out the remaining schedule for 2015, supposed cupcakes Detroit and Tampa Bay are playing much better lately. That leaves road games at Seattle (Dec. 27) and at San Francisco (Jan. 3). The Seahawks, always tough to beat in the Pacific Northwest, look like they’re primed for a wild-card run. So how many victories does that leave for Jef Fisher’s Rams? Six? Seven? Can they find a way to eight? As the Rams prepare for the stretch run, they are missing defensive end Robert Quinn with hip and back ailments. He’s the best player on the team not named Aaron Donald or Todd Gurley. On the other side of the ball, the Rams’ ofseason decision to go largely all-rookie on the ofensive line appears to be backfiring in a big way. As the injuries mount, diferent collections of young and inexperienced blockers are assembled to pass protect and open holes in the running game. This week, Cody Wichmann makes his second NFL start and Demetrius Rhaney makes his first. Cincinnati’s all-world defensive tackle, Gene Atkins, will try to make it an afternoon to remember for Wichmann and Rhaney, who will be manning the guard positions. Whether it’s Nick Foles or the recently-concussed Case Keenum behind center, it doesn’t look like the team’s quarterback plan for 2015 will get a passing grade either when all is said and done. In a league where quarterbacks such as Cincy’s Andy Dalton can seemingly complete passes with their eyes closed, the Rams huff and puf to connect on the most basic of passes. The league’s 32nd-ranked passing ofense struggles to move the chains — it’s as if they’re 20 yards apart instead of 10. The Rams are averaging 173.9 yards per game in the air through 10 games this season. That’s on pace to be the lowest per-game average since the 1-15 Rams of Steve Spagnuolo averaged 167.9 yards per game in 2009. And as dire as all that sounds, it almost pales in comparison to a myriad of of-field issues. First and foremost, wide receiver Stedman Bailey remains in intensive care over the weekend after surgery for gunshot wounds in a drive-by shooting Tuesday in the Miami area. The team wants to dedicate the season to Bailey. Teammate and longtime friend Tavon Austin wants to wear Bailey’s jersey No. 12 in his honor in games. Austin and wide receiver Kenny Britt wore No. 12 jerseys in practice Friday. “That’s cool,” Fisher said. “They love Sted. If we had enough jerseys to go around, everybody would’ve had a 12 jersey on, including me.” But it remains to be seen if the emotion of a tough week at Rams Park lifts the team to new heights or leaves the players mentally drained against the Bengals. This season already has seen two players — Bailey and reserve running back Trey Watts — suspended for violating NFL policy on substance abuse. The day before the wrenching 16-13 loss at Baltimore, Fisher benched running back Tre Mason and ofensive tackle Isaiah Battle for missing the team bus to Lambert Airport. Throw in the controversy over concussion protocol and the fact that Keenum stayed in the Baltimore game after banging his head and getting up groggy, and it’s diicult to imagine how anything else could go wrong. In the past under Fisher, the Rams have managed to follow tough losses to lesser foes with surprising upsets over elite teams. Maybe that happens Sunday against the Bengals. Or maybe the Rams continue to tumble through the trap door in a season once full of playof expectations. “We just have to utilize us better,” Kendricks said. “I don’t know how to say that without it sounding bad, but we gotta utilize everybody. That’s part of a good ofense. Good ofenses, everyone gets used. You spread the ball out. “Hopefully we can figure that out. I know we have issues up front. Once we figure that out, I think we’ll be all right. We just gotta keep hanging on.” Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com


NFL

11.29.2015 • SUNDAY • M 2

Thursday Detroit 45, Philadelphia 14 Carolina 33, Dallas 14 Chicago 17, Green Bay 13 Sunday Rams at Cincinnati, noon, KTVI (2) Bufalo at Kansas City, noon, KMOV (4) New Orleans at Houston, noon Oakland at Tennessee, noon Minnesota at Atlanta, noon NY Giants at Washington, noon Tampa Bay at Indianapolis, noon San Diego at Jacksonville, noon Miami at NY Jets, noon Arizona at San Francisco, 3:05 p.m. Pittsburgh at Seattle, 3:25 p.m., KMOV (4) New England at Denver, 7:30 p.m., KSDK (5) Monday Baltimore at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m., ESPN

NATIONAL FOOTBALL CONFERENCE WEST Arizona Seattle Rams San Francisco EAST NY Giants Washington Philadelphia Dallas SOUTH Carolina Atlanta Tampa Bay New Orleans NORTH Minnesota Green Bay Chicago Detroit

W 8 5 4 3 W 5 4 4 3 W 11 6 5 4 W 7 7 5 4

L 2 5 6 7 L 5 6 7 8 L 0 4 5 6 L 3 4 6 7

T Pct PF PA Home 0 .800 336 216 4-1 0 .500 228 192 3-2 0 .400 179 199 3-2 0 .300 139 252 3-2 T Pct PF PA Home 0 .500 273 253 3-2 0 .400 221 253 4-1 0 .364 243 274 2-3 0 .273 204 261 1-5 T Pct PF PA Home 0 1.000 332 205 6-0 0 .600 250 214 3-2 0 .500 236 254 2-3 0 .400 255 315 3-2 T Pct PF PA Home 0 .700 211 184 4-1 0 .636 262 215 4-2 0 .455 231 264 1-4 0 .364 230 288 3-3

Away 4-1 2-3 1-4 0-5 Away 2-3 0-5 2-4 2-3 Away 5-0 3-2 3-2 1-4 Away 3-2 3-2 4-2 1-4

NFC 5-1 5-4 3-4 2-6 NFC 4-4 4-3 3-6 2-7 NFC 7-0 4-3 4-3 3-5 NFC 4-2 5-3 2-5 3-4

AFC 3-1 0-1 1-2 1-1 AFC 1-1 0-3 1-1 1-1 AFC 4-0 2-1 1-2 1-1 AFC 3-1 2-1 3-1 1-3

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • D7

Div 2-1 2-2 3-0 0-4 Div 2-2 1-1 2-2 2-2 Div 2-0 0-2 2-1 1-2 Div 3-1 2-2 1-3 2-2

AMERICAN FOOTBALL CONFERENCE WEST W L T Pct PF PA Home Away Denver 8 2 0 .800 222 183 3-1 5-1 Kansas City 5 5 0 .500 257 198 2-2 3-3 Oakland 4 6 0 .400 240 259 2-3 2-3 San Diego 2 8 0 .200 213 282 2-4 0-4 EAST W L T Pct PF PA Home Away New England 10 0 0 1.000 323 182 6-0 4-0 Bufalo 5 5 0 .500 244 227 2-3 3-2 NY Jets 5 5 0 .500 234 208 3-2 2-3 Miami 4 6 0 .400 205 249 1-3 3-3 SOUTH W L T Pct PF PA Home Away Indianapolis 5 5 0 .500 224 248 2-3 3-2 Houston 5 5 0 .500 208 228 3-2 2-3 Jacksonville 4 6 0 .400 211 268 3-2 1-4 Tennessee 2 8 0 .200 182 233 0-5 2-3 NORTH W L T Pct PF PA Home Away Cincinnati 8 2 0 .800 266 186 4-1 4-1 Pittsburgh 6 4 0 .600 236 191 4-2 2-2 Baltimore 3 7 0 .300 226 249 2-3 1-4 Cleveland 2 8 0 .200 186 277 1-3 1-5

AFC 4-2 4-2 4-3 1-5 AFC 7-0 5-4 4-4 2-5 AFC 4-3 4-3 4-4 0-6 AFC 7-1 3-4 2-5 2-6

NFC 4-0 1-3 0-3 1-3 NFC 3-0 0-1 1-1 2-1 NFC 1-2 1-2 0-2 2-2 NFC 1-1 3-0 1-2 0-2

Div 2-1 2-1 1-1 0-2 Div 4-0 3-2 1-2 0-4 Div 3-0 2-1 1-2 0-3 Div 3-0 1-2 1-2 1-2

Tough road ahead

WEEK 12 IN THE NFL

SUNDAY’S GAMES

RAMS • FROM D1

MARQUEE MATCHUP NEW ENGLAND (10-0) at DENVER (8-2) Time • 7:30 p.m. Fast facts • Patriots QB Tom Brady is four TD throws shy of surpassing Dan Marino for third on all-time list, but his receiving corps has been depleted with injuries to Julian Edelman, Danny Amendola and RB Dion Lewis. ... RB James White scored first two career TDs last week in win over Bufalo. ... Broncos QB Brock Osweiler won his first career start at Chicago last week. He threw for 250 yards and two TDs with no interceptions. ... RB Ronnie Hillman is coming of third 100-yard game of season.

Tom Brady

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

NEW ORLEANS (4-6) at HOUSTON (5-5)

BUFFALO (5-5) at KANSAS CITY (5-5)

Time • Noon Fast facts • Saints’ RB Mark Ingram needs two yards to reach 1,000 all-purpose yards for second straight season. ... WR Brandin Cooks has five TDs in last three games combined. ... TE Benjamin Watson is second on team with 46 catches. ... Texans QB Brian Hoyer will start after sitting out last week with concussion. ... WR DeAndre Hopkins is third in NFL with 1,045 yards receiving and his nine receiving TDs are second in league. ... WR Nate Washington has three TD receptions in past four games. ... DE J.J. Watt leads NFL with 11½ sacks.

Time • Noon Fast facts • Kansas City has league-leading 14 TDs rushing. Bufalo is second with 12. ... Bills lead NFL with 16 TDs of 20 yards or more. ... Bills RB LeSean McCoy has had at least 100 yards from scrimmage in four straight games. ... RB Karlos Williams is averaging 53 yards rushing, fourth best among NFL rookies. His five TDs are second to Rams’ Todd Gurley. ... Kansas City has outscored last four opponents by 91 points, best in NFL. ... QB Alex Smith has not thrown pick in franchise-record 253 passes, longest active streak in NFL.

OAKLAND (4-6) at TENNESSEE (2-8) Time • Noon Fast facts • Raiders QB Derek Carr has thrown for 300 yards or more in three of past four games. ... WR Amari Cooper leads NFL rookies with 51 receptions and 736 yards receiving. ... S Charles Woodson needs interception to pass Ken Riley (65) for fifth all-time. ... Titans QB Marcus Mariota leads NFL rookies with 96.1 passer rating and has team rookie record with 13 TD passes. Mariota has thrown for two or more TD passes in four of his eight games. ... LB Brian Orakpo has six sacks in past six games.

Alex Smith

MINNESOTA (7-3) at ATLANTA (6-4)

NY GIANTS (5-5) at WASHINGTON (4-6)

Time • Noon Fast facts • Vikings RB Adrian Peterson leads NFL in rushing with 1,006 yards. ... Falcons have their own league leader: WR Julio Jones has three straight 100-yard receiving games and six for season. Overall, he’s got 89 receptions for 1,189 yards, topping NFL in both categories. ... Vikings QB Teddy Bridgewater is coming of a 296-yard passing game, his second-highest total of season. ... Atlanta RB Devonta Freeman sustained concussion early in last Sunday’s game. It’s not known if NFL’s fifth-leading rusher (764 yards) will be able to go.

Time • Noon Fast facts • If Redskins win, they will pull even with Giants atop NFC East and surpass last season’s victory total. ... Giants lead NFL with a plus-13 turnover margin; Redskins are at minus-5. ... Giants QB Eli Manning’s set to make 178th consecutive start, longest active streak in league. ... WR Odell Beckham Jr. scored four TDs in last three games overall. ... Redskins are 0-5 on road but 4-1 at home, including four victories in row. ... Rookie RB Matt Jones has four fumbles.

TAMPA BAY (5-5) at INDIANAPOLIS (5-5)

SAN DIEGO (2-8) at JACKSONVILLE (4-6)

Time • Noon Fast facts • Tampa Bay QB Jameis Winston threw five touchdown passes last week, giving him 15 for season, four short of tying Bucs’ rookie record. ... RB Doug Martin is tied with Warrick Dunn for second-most 100-yard games (11) in franchise history and needs 59 yards to become second 1,000-yard rusher in league in 2015. ... Forty-yearold Indy QB Matt Hasselbeck is 3-0 in relief of Andrew Luck. ... RB Frank Gore needs 42 yards from scrimmage to move past Hall of Famer Jim Brown (14,811).

Time • Noon Fast facts • Chargers have lost six straight games but have won four in a row in this series. ... Philip Rivers needs two touchdown passes to tie Joe Montana (273) for 12th on all-time list. ... Rivers has topped 300 yards passing six times this season. ... Jaguars QB Blake Bortles needs three TD passes to tie David Garrard’s single-season, franchise record of 23. ... Bortles has led game-winning drive in each of Jacksonville’s four wins. ... Jaguars WRs Allen Hurns and Allen Robinson have combined for 14 TD receptions this season.

MIAMI (4-6) at NEW YORK JETS (5-5)

Chris Johnson

Time • Noon Fast facts • Miami QB Ryan Tannehill has thrown two or more TD passes in seven of last nine and passed for 250 yards or more in four of last five road games. ... RB Lamar Miller averaging 112.8 yards from scrimmage in last six games and has five rushing TDs and two TD catches in that span. ... Jets sticking with QB Ryan Fitzpatrick, who has struggled at times and is playing through surgically repaired left thumb. He has 16 TDs and 11 INTs and is New York’s second-leading rusher with 166 yards.

ARIZONA (8-2) at SAN FRANCISCO (3-7)

PITTSBURGH (6-4) at SEATTLE (5-5)

Time • 3:05 p.m. Fast facts • Arizona QB Carson Palmer tries for 22nd win in last 26 starts. His 27 touchdowns passing are most by Cardinals quarterback in opening 10 games. ... RB Chris Johnson ran for 110 yards and two TDs in first meeting, while WR Larry Fitzgerald had nine catches for 134 yards and two scores. ... Demoted and now injured 49ers QB Colin Kaepernick threw four interceptions in first meeting, two returned for touchdowns. ... LB NaVorro Bowman leads NFC with 97 tackles in comeback season from knee surgery.

Time • 3:25 p.m. Fast facts • Steelers RB DeAngelo Williams averaging 134.7 yards from scrimmage in his past three games. ... WR Antonio Brown, with 27 catches in past two games, tied for fourth most in league history in two-game span. ... WR Martavis Bryant had career-high 178 yards receiving and TD last week. ... Seahawks QB Russell Wilson had three touchdown passes and passer rating of 138.5 last week vs. 49ers. ... RB Thomas Rawls rushed for 209 yards vs. 49ers, second-best game in franchise history. ASSOCIATED PRESS

for error now,” linebacker James Laurinaitis said. “The way the record is, we’ve made it extremely diicult on ourselves for big picture. But there’s no quit over here.” But now with a supposedly “softer” portion of the schedule behind them, the Rams head into the teeth of two of the NFL’s elite. On Sunday, it’s the 8-2 Cincinnati Bengals in a noon kickof (St. Louis time) at Paul Brown Stadium. “It is definitely frustrating,” said tight end Lance Kendricks. “This team has been in this position a lot in the last few years — since I’ve been here. It’s more frustrating when you have the talent and you have the good players, and you have everything in place. “But injuries to the ofensive line and things like that, it hinders teams that are good. There’s nobody to blame, but I think we just need to find a way to win. That’s kind of where we’re lacking. We’re always in the game, but we just have to find ways to finish.” Getting to the finish line will be tougher than ever these next two Sundays. Smarting from narrow losses back-toback against Houston and Arizona, Cincy wants nothing more than to get well against the reeling Rams. Then comes 8-2 Arizona, looking very much the part of Super Bowl contender these days. One of those two losses came to the Rams way back on Oct. 4, and if you don’t think Big Red coach Bruce Arians wants to avenge that 2422 loss, well, you don’t know Bruce Arians. Fleshing out the remaining schedule for 2015, supposed cupcakes Detroit and Tampa Bay are playing much better lately. That leaves road games at Seattle (Dec. 27) and at San Francisco (Jan. 3). The Seahawks, always tough to beat in the Pacific Northwest, look like they’re primed for a wild-card run. So how many victories does that leave for Jef Fisher’s Rams? Six? Seven? Can they find a way to eight? As the Rams prepare for the stretch run, they are missing defensive end Robert Quinn with hip and back ailments. He’s the best player on the team not named Aaron Donald or Todd Gurley. On the other side of the ball, the Rams’ ofseason decision to go largely all-rookie on the ofensive line appears to be backfiring in a big way. As the injuries mount, diferent collections of young and inexperienced blockers are assembled to pass protect and open holes in the running game. This week, Cody Wichmann makes his second NFL start and Demetrius Rhaney makes his first. Cincinnati’s allworld defensive tackle, Gene Atkins, will try to make it an afternoon to remember for Wichmann and Rhaney, who will be manning the guard positions. Whether it’s Nick Foles or the recently-concussed Case Keenum behind center, it doesn’t look like the team’s quarterback plan for 2015 will get a passing grade either when all is said and done. In a league where quarterbacks such as Cincy’s Andy Dalton can seemingly complete passes with their eyes closed, the Rams huf and puf to connect on the most basic of passes. The league’s 32nd-ranked passing ofense struggles to move the chains — it’s as if they’re 20 yards apart instead of 10. The Rams are averaging 173.9 yards per game in the air through 10 games this season. That’s on pace to be the lowest per-game average since the 1-15 Rams of Steve Spagnuolo averaged 167.9 yards per game in 2009. And as dire as all that sounds, it almost pales in comparison to a myriad of of-field issues. First and foremost, wide receiver Stedman Bailey remains in intensive care over the weekend after surgery for gunshot wounds in a drive-by shooting Tuesday in the Miami area. The team wants to dedicate the season to Bailey. Teammate and longtime friend Tavon Austin wants to wear Bailey’s jersey No. 12 in his honor in games. Austin and wide receiver Kenny Britt wore No. 12 jerseys in practice Friday. “That’s cool,” Fisher said. “They love Sted. If we had enough jerseys to go around, everybody would’ve had a 12 jersey on, including me.” But it remains to be seen if the emotion of a tough week at Rams Park lifts the team to new heights or leaves the players overwrought and mentally drained against the Bengals. This season already has seen two players — Bailey and reserve running back Trey Watts — suspended for violating NFL policy on substance abuse. The day before the wrenching 16-13 loss at Baltimore, Fisher benched running back Tre Mason and rookie offensive tackle Isaiah Battle for missing the team bus to Lambert Airport. Throw in the controversy over concussion protocol and the fact that Keenum stayed in the Baltimore game after banging his head and getting up groggy, and it’s diicult to imagine how anything else could go wrong. “We’ve gotta stay together as a team,” Britt said after the Baltimore game. “If we don’t stay together, everything’s gonna fall apart. We’ve got a great coach. We’ve got great teammates. And I know we’re gonna pull through this.” In the past under Fisher, the Rams have managed to follow tough losses to lesser foes with surprising upsets over elite teams. Maybe that happens Sunday against the Bengals or the following week against Arizona. Or maybe the Rams continue to tumble through the trap door in a season once full of playof expectations. If the Rams are to pull themselves back up, it must start with ofense. With first downs, with third-down conversions, with red zone success — and yes, with completions. “We just have to utilize us better,” Kendricks said. “I don’t know how to say that without it sounding bad, but we gotta utilize everybody. That’s part of a good ofense. Good ofenses, everyone gets used. You spread the ball out. “Hopefully we can figure that out. I know we have issues up front. Once we figure that out, I think we’ll be all right. We just gotta keep hanging on.”

RAMS ADD A KICKER Greg Zuerlein made the trip to Cincinnati but is questionable due to a groin injury, so the Rams added kicker Zach Hocker to the roster Saturday. Hocker began this season with New Orleans. The Rams cut tight end Justice Cunningham to make room for Hocker. Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com


NHL

D8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

BLUES NOTEBOOK

M 1 • SUnDAy • 11.29.2015

NHL STANDINGS EASTERN CONFERENCE

True to form, Elliott is keeping positive attitude He remains on bench Saturday as Allen gets start BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

For the 14th time in the Blues’ last 16 games, Brian Elliott will be watching the start of the night from the bench. Jake Allen will once again be in net when the club hosts Columbus. “It’s hard to come by a start right now, so just trying to stay positive and be the best you can be for the guys,” Elliott said Friday. Being in the background and remaining positive is nothing new for Elliott, who despite holding the franchise lead in shutouts (21) has been the backup to Jaroslav Halak, Ryan Miller and now Allen. “It’s hard to describe to someone that’s not really been in this situation,” Elliott said. “Luckily for me, I’ve been in a lot of situations, so I’ve been able to have experience and know how to handle myself.” Yet, Elliott admitted that this experience has been diferent. He was yet to be charged with a regulation loss at 4-0-1 when Allen took the net and ran with the job. The development has led to Elliott making just three of the team’s last 15 games. All three have seen difficult circumstances. On Nov. 4 in Chicago, Elliott was injured in a collision with the Blackhawks’ Jonathan Toews and left the game. On Nov. 12 in New York, he replaced Allen after Allen allowed three goals on five shots, and because the Blues rallied, Elliott took the loss. Then on Nov. 17, the club was dismal in a 3-1 loss on the second night of back-to-back games. “It’s a challenge because you feel good,” Elliott said. “The last game I got in, you

feel really good, even though you don’t get the result you want, then you don’t really get another opportunity. The tough part is having the mental capacity when you know you’re putting your all in and you’re not really getting opportunity.” Elliott isn’t begrudging Allen, whom he has long supported. “I’ve always told him, even when he came in two or three years ago, ‘You’re going to be the future of this franchise,’ so don’t worry if you have a bad game here or there,’” Elliott said. “It’s about the end product. He’s showing that now, he’s trusting himself. I’ve been in that situation too, where guys have said the same thing to me and you want to pass along that wisdom.” Elliott is doing what he can and saying what he can. “He’s experienced enough to know that things turn,” Blues coach Ken Hitchcock said. “You get an injury or something happens and he’s needed, he’ll be more than ready. He’s been really good, but I wouldn’t expect anything different. It would be concerning if he was, but that’s not an issue with Brian. Brian’s a team guy.”

BLUE NOTES The Blues tinkered with a fourth line of Steve Ott, Scott Gomez and Dmitrij Jaskin in Friday’s practice, leaving Kyle Brodziak out of the mix. But Hitchcock said Brodziak would play “for sure” on Saturday... Defenseman Joel Edmundson, a healthy scratch the past two games, may be back in the lineup Saturday. Jeremy Rutherford @jprutherford on Twitter jrutherford@post-dispatch.com

Atlantic Montreal Ottawa Boston Detroit Tampa Bay Florida Bufalo Toronto Metropolitan NY Rangers Washington Pittsburgh NY Islanders New Jersey Philadelphia Carolina Columbus

GP 24 22 22 23 24 22 23 22 GP 23 22 22 23 22 23 23 24

W 18 12 13 12 11 9 9 7 W 16 16 13 11 11 8 8 10

L 4 5 8 8 10 9 12 10 L 5 5 8 8 9 10 11 14

OT 2 5 1 3 3 4 2 5 OT 2 1 1 4 2 5 4 0

Pts 38 29 27 27 25 22 20 19 Pts 34 33 27 26 24 21 20 20

GF 86 73 73 55 57 58 50 51 GF 70 71 50 64 53 42 47 59

GA 53 64 64 58 55 58 61 62 GA 47 49 51 57 55 65 66 73

Home 9-2-1 5-3-4 5-6-1 6-5-2 6-4-1 6-5-2 5-8-1 3-4-3 Home 10-2-1 10-3-1 8-4-0 7-4-2 5-5-2 5-4-3 4-5-3 4-7-0

Away 9-2-1 7-2-1 8-2-0 6-3-1 5-6-2 3-4-2 4-4-1 4-6-2 Away 6-3-1 6-2-0 5-4-1 4-4-2 6-4-0 3-6-2 4-6-1 6-7-0

Div 7-0-1 4-2-1 6-3-0 6-3-1 4-5-1 3-2-0 3-6-0 0-4-4 Div 4-0-2 4-2-0 1-2-1 3-0-2 4-4-0 3-3-0 1-2-2 4-4-0

Away 9-2-0 8-4-1 5-5-2 5-6-1 3-4-3 6-7-1 6-7-0 Away 6-3-1 10-3-0 7-5-1 6-4-4 3-8-1 3-8-2 3-9-1

Div 2-1-0 5-2-0 2-2-0 1-2-1 5-3-2 3-6-0 2-1-0 Div 3-4-0 2-2-0 7-1-0 4-0-2 2-3-3 2-3-1 3-4-0

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP Dallas 23 Blues 23 Nashville 22 Chicago 23 Minnesota 21 Winnipeg 24 Colorado 22 Pacific GP Los Angeles 22 San Jose 22 Arizona 22 Vancouver 24 Anaheim 24 Calgary 23 Edmonton 23

W 18 14 12 13 11 11 8 W 13 13 12 9 8 8 7

L 5 6 6 8 7 11 13 L 8 9 9 8 11 13 14

OT 0 3 4 2 3 2 1 OT 1 0 1 7 5 2 2

Pts 36 31 28 28 25 24 17 Pts 27 26 25 25 21 18 16

GF 81 62 58 65 60 64 63 GF 55 61 61 69 47 54 59

GA 59 57 56 59 57 75 67 GA 48 56 62 65 65 82 72

Home 9-3-0 6-2-2 7-1-2 8-2-1 8-3-0 5-4-1 2-6-1 Home 7-5-0 3-6-0 5-4-0 3-4-3 5-3-4 5-5-0 4-5-1

Friday Montreal 3, New Jersey 2, SO Florida 3, NY Islanders 2, SO Dallas 3, Vancouver 2, SO Boston 4, NY Rangers 3 Philadelphia 3, Nashville 2, OT Winnipeg 3, Minnesota 1 Chicago 3, Anaheim 2, OT Washington 4, Tampa Bay 2 Buffalo 4, Carolina 1 Columbus 2, Pittsburgh 1, OT Detroit 4, Edmonton 3, OT Arizona 2, Calgary 1, OT Thursday No games Saturday Philadelphia at NY Rangers, 12:30 p.m. Washington at Toronto, 6 p.m. New Jersey at Montreal, 6 p.m. NY Islanders at Tampa Bay, 6 p.m. Edmonton at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. Columbus at Blues, 7 p.m. Buffalo at Nashville, 7 p.m. Dallas at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Winnipeg at Colorado, 9 p.m. Ottawa at Arizona, 9 p.m. Calgary at San Jose, 9 p.m. Chicago at Los Angeles, 9:30 p.m. Sunday Florida at Detroit, 1 p.m.

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss.

Blackhawks rally late, top Ducks in OT FROM NEWS SERVICES

Artem Anisimov scored 1:53 into overtime and the Chicago Blackhawks rallied from a two-goal deficit in the final moments of regulation for a 3-2 victory over the host Anaheim Ducks on Friday. Marian Hossa and Duncan Keith scored man-advantage goals in the final 1:41 of regulation, and Brent Seabrook assisted on all three goals. After 58 minutes of scoreless play, the defending Stanley Cup champions roared from behind in their first trip to Anaheim since winning Game 7 of the Western Conference finals here six months ago. Hossa ended John Gibson’s shutout bid during a 6-on-4 power play with 1:41 to play, and Keith got the tying goal with 26.6 seconds left. Patrick Kane extended his points streak to 18 games with an assist on Keith’s score, and Corey Crawford stopped 23

shots. Andrew Cogliano and Chris Stewart scored early goals for Anaheim, and Gibson stopped 29 shots. Predators fall • Shayne Gostisbehere scored on the power play with 52 seconds left in overtime to lift the host Philadelphia Flyers to a 3-2 win over the Nashville Predators. Colin McDonald and Michael Del Zotto also scored for Philadelphia, Colin McDonald and Michael Del Zotto also scored for Philadelphia, which won for just the fourth time in 16 games. The Flyers gave up the tying goal to Michael Fisher with 20 seconds left in regulation.

NOTEBOOK Rangers’ Stepan injured • New York Rangers forward Derek Stepan suffered broken ribs and is out indefinitely after being hit by Boston Bruins forward Matt Beleskey in host Boston’s 4-3 win Friday.

NHL SUMMARIES Panthers 3, Islanders 2 (SO)

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Minnesota Wild goaltender Devan Dubnyk clears the puck away from Robby Fabbri in a game at Scottrade Center on Oct. 31.

Summer work paying of for Fabbri BLUES • FROM D1

BLUES VS. COLUMBUS

If there are subtle things players and teams take away from losses, however, this was one of them. The 2014 firstround draft pick is now practicing the patience that teammates and coaches are preaching to him. “He’s extremely intelligent,” Blues captain David Backes said. “I think it’s an adjustment for anyone playing in the NHL, especially a 19-year-old right out of junior (hockey). But he’s coming along every game, seems to be getting better and making more plays and thinking at the speed that it needs to be played at. “He’s got ‘Brouw’ and I next to him to keep him on track and ‘Hey, worry about the next shift and these are some things that we can do better.’ He’s taken well to it, listening and implementing it right away and that shows his hockey IQ, his ability to think on the fly, and that’s great to see.” Fabbri had two goals on the recent road trip, and while there was a lot less skill involved in his third of the season in Buffalo on Monday (the puck hit him and then went in of Sabres defenseman Josh Gorges), it was the game-winning goal. It was the second GWG of Fabbri’s young career, and in fact, all four have been important. His other game-winner came in his first NHL game on Oct. 8 against Edmonton. His second goal came on Nov. 4 against Chicago, cutting the Blackhawks’ lead to 3-2 and enabling the club to claw back for a 6-5 overtime win. “I guess when you’re playing desperation hockey, you’re going to do anything you can,” Fabbri said. It’s more than desperation. In three years with the Guelph Storm of the Ontario Hockey League, Fabbri had 80 goals and 171 points in 147 games. In 201314, he was the OHL’s playof MVP with 28 points (13 goals, 15 assists) in 16 games. “That’s his pedigree,” Blues general manager Doug Armstrong said. “He played in a Memorial Cup in his draft year. He’s a point producer and he plays in those big minutes and he thrives in that environment.” Hitchcock went as far as to say that you can’t teach what Fabbri possesses. “He wants the puck, he’s hungry for the puck, he wants to score,” Hitchcock said. “He doesn’t care who the guy is he’s playing against, how big he is, how quick he is, he doesn’t care. He just wants the puck and he wants to be a factor.” But at 5-foot-10 and 180 pounds, Fabbri is not always going to win those battles. “The biggest thing for him is going to be to get the time and space to get those

When • Saturday at 7 p.m. Where • Scottrade Center TV, radio • FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) Blues • The Blues returned to the ice Friday after having the Thanksgiving holiday of. It marked the irst time since Nov. 8-9 that the club had back-to-back days without a game. Ken Hitchcock used Friday’s practice to pick up the tempo in his team’s game, and he felt like the players responded well. They will have a chance Saturday to avenge a 3-1 loss to Columbus on Nov. 17, arguably one of their worst performances of the season. That was a rare start for goaltender Brian Elliott, who played well, but this time Jake Allen will be in net. Blue Jackets • Yet another Blues’ opponent will be traveling to St. Louis for the second night of a back-to-back set. Columbus hosted Pittsburgh Friday night at Nationwide Arena, a game that went to overtime before the Blue Jackets’ Cam Atkinson put it away with 2 minutes, 18 seconds remaining. Since beating the Blues on Nov. 17, the club is 3-2 with wins over Nashville, New Jersey and now Pittsburgh. Sergei Bobrovsky got the start Friday, and allowed one goal on 26 shots. There is a decent chance that the Blues see backup Curtis McElhinney Saturday. Injuries • Blues — LW Jaden Schwartz (ankle), out; Blue Jackets — D Fedor Tyutin (nose), questionable; RW Rene Bourque (upper-body), D Cody Goloubef (jaw), RW Jared Boll (foot) and RW David Clarkson (back), out. Jeremy Rutherford

shots,” Blues goalie Jake Allen said. “I think that’s going to be the hardest thing to learn. But once he’s able to find that, the goals are going to come easily and come in bunches.” In the meantime, Fabbri is showing that a productive summer training session in St. Louis is paying off. But now after earning a chance to stay in the NHL for the entire season, he’s focused on staying in the starting lineup. “He’s probably the poster boy for our other draft picks,” Armstrong said. “He’s someone that’s put the time in who’s finding the benefits. But as I’ve said, the 18- and 19-year olds, they’re at peak psychological condition to start training camp when the veteran players are more getting into their rhythm. So usually you find in December and January, if these guys are going to fall of, it’s going to be starting now. It’s up to him to make sure there is no down time.”

Blue Jackets 2, Penguins 1 (OT)

NY Islanders 0 0 2 0 — 2 Florida 1 1 0 0 — 3 First period: 1, Florida, Pirri 4 (Jagr, Gudbranson), 8:38. Penalties: None. Second period: 2, Florida, Jokinen 6 (Trocheck), 4:42. Penalties: Grabovski, NYI (hooking), 6:19. Third period: 3, NY Islanders, Strome 2 (Grabovski, Zidlicky), 5:36. 4, NY Islanders, Bailey 4 (Nielsen, Zidlicky), 8:39. Penalties: Martin, NYI (roughing), 14:25; Cizikas, NYI (roughing), 14:25; MacKenzie, Fla (roughing), 14:25; Petrovic, Fla (roughing), 14:25; Florida bench, served by Brickley (too many men), 18:35. Overtime: None. Penalties: None. Shootout: NY Islanders 4 (Nielsen G, Okposo G, Tavares G, Bailey G, Nelson NG), Florida 5 (Pirri G, Trocheck G, Bjugstad G, Huberdeau G, Barkov G). Shots: NY Islanders 9-6-9-1: 25. Florida 11-7-5-4: 27. Power-plays: NY Islanders 0 of 1; Florida 0 of 1. Goalies: NY Islanders, Halak 6-4-2 (27 shots-25 saves). Florida, Luongo 7-8-3 (25-23). A: 14,598. Referees: Jean Hebert, Mike Leggo. Linesmen: Jonny Murray, Pierre Racicot.

Pittsburgh 0 0 1 0 — 1 Columbus 0 0 1 1 — 2 First period: None. Penalties: Cole, Pit (hooking), 3:00; Falk, Clm (tripping), 11:48; Malkin, Pit (slashing), 19:45. Second period: None. Penalties: Malkin, Pit (slashing), 6:18; R.Murray, Clm (roughing), 13:01; Hornqvist, Pit (unsportsmanlike conduct), 18:40; Hartnell, Clm (unsportsmanlike conduct), 18:40; Dubinsky, Clm (crosschecking), 18:40; Malkin, Pit, major (fighting), 19:18; Johnson, Clm, major (fighting), 19:18. Third period: 1, Pittsburgh, Malkin 9 (Crosby), 9:15 (pp). 2, Columbus, Johansen 5 (Saad, Connauton), 11:57. Penalties: Plotnikov, Pit (roughing), 6:10; Rychel, Clm (high-sticking), 6:10; R.Murray, Clm (hooking), 8:12; Kunitz, Pit (roughing), 9:42. Overtime: 3, Columbus, Atkinson 6 (Dubinsky, Johnson), 2:42. Penalties: None. Shots: Pittsburgh 7-8-9-1: 25. Columbus 15-9-13-6: 43. Power-plays: Pittsburgh 1 of 4; Columbus 0 of 4. Goalies: Pittsburgh, Fleury 11-7-1 (43 shots-41 saves). Columbus, Bobrovsky 10-10-0 (25-24). A: 18,205. Referees: Steve Kozari, Brad Meier. Linesmen: Shandor Alphonso, Scott Driscoll.

Red Wings 4, Oilers 3 (OT)

Blackhawks 3, Ducks 2 (OT)

Edmonton 0 2 1 0 — 3 Detroit 0 3 0 1 — 4 First period: None. Penalties: Hendricks, Edm (roughing), 7:00; Larkin, Det (hooking), 8:35; Eberle, Edm (holding), 19:12. Second period: 1, Detroit, Nyquist 8 (Green, Tatar), 5:11. 2, Detroit, Tatar 8 (Nyquist, Ericsson), 12:07. 3, Edmonton, Pakarinen 2 (Lander, Purcell), 15:17. 4, Edmonton, Sekera 2 (Letestu, Pouliot), 17:44 (pp). 5, Detroit, Larkin 9 (Zetterberg), 19:24. Penalties: Glendening, Det (interference), 16:46. Third period: 6, Edmonton, Pakarinen 3, 8:45. Penalties: None. Overtime: 7, Detroit, Kronwall 1 (Larkin, Zetterberg), :26. Penalties: None. Shots: Edmonton 4-11-9-0: 24. Detroit 9-16-6-1: 32. Power-plays: Edmonton 1 of 2; Detroit 0 of 2. Goalies: Edmonton, Talbot 3-8-1 (32 shots-28 saves). Detroit, Howard 6-4-1 (24-21). A: 20,027. Referees: Kevin Pollock, Justin St. Pierre. Linesmen: Brad Kovachik, Derek Amell.

Chicago 0 0 2 1 — 3 Anaheim 1 1 0 0 — 2 First period: 1, Anaheim, Cogliano 3 (Hagelin, Fowler), 1:02. Penalties: Maroon, Ana (interference), 10:09; Vatanen, Ana (holding), 12:24; Toews, Chi (roughing), 18:35; Kesler, Ana (roughing), 18:35. Second period: 2, Anaheim, Stewart 4 (Lindholm, Kesler), 7:34. Penalties: Stoner, Ana (hooking), 3:10; Shaw, Chi (slashing), 5:28; Hjalmarsson, Chi (holding), 19:52. Third period: 3, Chicago, Hossa 4 (Keith, Seabrook), 18:19 (pp). 4, Chicago, Keith 4 (Seabrook, Kane), 19:33. Penalties: Shaw, Chi (tripping), 4:54; Getzlaf, Ana, served by Perry (tripping), 17:53. Overtime: 5, Chicago, Anisimov 10 (Seabrook), 1:53. Penalties: None. Shots: Chicago 9-14-7-2: 32. Anaheim 8-8-9-0: 25. Power-plays: Chicago 1 of 4; Anaheim 0 of 3. Goalies: Chicago, Crawford 11-6-1 (25 shots23 saves). Anaheim, Gibson 1-1-1 (32-29). A: 17,174. Referees: TJ Luxmore, Dean Morton. Linesmen: Ryan Gibbons, Don Henderson.

Canadiens 3, Devils 2 (SO) Montreal 0 1 1 0 — 3 New Jersey 0 2 0 0 — 2 First period: None. Penalties: Stempniak, NJ (interference), 5:10; Smith-Pelly, Mon (interference), 11:44. Second period: 1, New Jersey, Henrique 11 (Moore, Stempniak), 1:09. 2, New Jersey, Stempniak 5 (Cammalleri, Elias), 9:06 (pp). 3, Montreal, Andrighetto 2 (Eller), 15:17. Penalties: Gelinas, NJ (interference), 2:06; Subban, Mon (tripping), 8:15; Pateryn, Mon (holding), 9:28. Third period: 4, Montreal, Galchenyuk 5 (Pacioretty, Markov), 11:14. Penalties: Josefson, NJ (tripping), 7:53. Overtime: None. Penalties: Andrighetto, Mon (holding), 2:24; Gelinas, NJ (hooking), 3:24. Shootout: Montreal 2 (Galchenyuk G, Desharnais NG, Pacioretty NG, Eller NG, Andrighetto G), New Jersey 1 (Cammalleri NG, Josefson G, Stempniak NG, Henrique NG, Elias NG). Shots: Montreal 5-9-8-5: 27. New Jersey 9-13-4-1: 27. Power-plays: Montreal 0 of 4; New Jersey 1 of 4. Goalies: Montreal, Condon 8-2-2 (27 shots-25 saves). New Jersey, Schneider 10-6-2 (27-25). A: 16,514. Referees: Brad Watson, Frederick L’Ecuyer. Linesmen: Trent Knorr, David Brisebois.

Sabres 4, Hurricanes 1 Carolina 0 1 0 — 1 Buffalo 1 2 1 — 4 First period: 1, Buffalo, Gorges 1 (Ristolainen, J.McGinn), 8:57. Penalties: Nash, Car (interference), 19:17; Kane, Buf (high-sticking), 19:17. Second period: 2, Carolina, Rask 7 (E.Staal, Lindholm), 4:59. 3, Buffalo, Eichel 8, 12:24. 4, Buffalo, Gionta 2 (Moulson), 19:37. Penalties: Nordstrom, Car (high-sticking), 1:24; Bogosian, Buf (interference), 10:16. Third period: 5, Buffalo, Legwand 2 (J.McGinn, Schaller), 6:36. Penalties: Deslauriers, Buf (hooking), 10:09. Shots: Carolina 11-12-5: 28. Buffalo 3-11-7: 21. Power-plays: Carolina 0 of 2; Buffalo 0 of 1. Goalies: Carolina, Ward 7-7-3 (14 shots-11 saves), Lack (0:00 third, 7-6). Buffalo, Johnson 5-7-1 (28-27). A: 18,052. Referees: Eric Furlatt, Tom Kowal. Linesmen: Scott Cherrey, Mark Shewchyk.

Flyers 3, Predators 2 (OT) Nashville 1 0 1 0 — 2 Philadelphia 1 0 1 1 — 3 First period: 1, Nashville, Forsberg 3 (Ribeiro, Neal), 1:44. 2, Philadelphia, Del Zotto 1 (B.Schenn, Giroux), 4:00. Penalties: Read, Phi (hooking), 6:53; Voracek, Phi (holding), 15:38. Second period: None. Penalties: Wilson, Nas (tripping), 14:11. Third period: 3, Philadelphia, McDonald 1 (Medvedev, Laughton), 4:57. 4, Nashville, Fisher 4 (Forsberg, Josi), 19:40. Penalties: Jackman, Nas, major (fighting), 10:25; McDonald, Phi, major (fighting), 10:25. Overtime: 5, Philadelphia, Gostisbehere 3 (Giroux, Voracek), 4:08 (pp). Penalties: Nashville bench, served by Hodgson (too many men), 2:40. Shots: Nashville 12-10-12-1: 35. Philadelphia 10-10-10-6: 36. Power-plays: Nashville 0 of 2; Philadelphia 1 of 2. Goalies: Nashville, Rinne 10-5-4 (36 shots-33 saves). Philadelphia, Neuvirth 5-3-1 (35-33). A: 19,818. Referees: Francis Charron, Kendrick Nicholson. Linesmen: Steve Barton, Michel Cormier.

Bruins 4, Rangers 3 NY Rangers 0 2 1 — 3 Boston 1 1 2 — 4 First period: 1, Boston, Bergeron 8 (Krug), 14:15. Penalties: C.Miller, Bos (hooking), 10:18. Second period: 2, NY Rangers, Lindberg 8 (J.Miller, Fast), 2:10. 3, NY Rangers, Nash 8 (McDonagh), 5:15. 4, Boston, Connolly 5 (C.Miller, J.Hayes), 9:34 (pp). Penalties: McIlrath, NYR, served by Kreider, minor-major-misconduct (instigator, fighting), 8:06; Beleskey, Bos, major (fighting), 8:06; Boston bench, served by Connolly (too many men), 17:02. Third period: 5, NY Rangers, J.Miller 4 (Yandle, Klein), 9:28 (pp). 6, Boston, Spooner 5 (Eriksson, Krug), 16:14 (pp). 7, Boston, Krejci 9, 18:17. Penalties: Brassard, NYR (tripping), 3:22; Marchand, Bos (goaltender interference), 7:59; Fast, NYR (holding), 14:54. Shots: NY Rangers 7-10-10: 27. Boston 12-11-11: 34. Power-plays: NY Rangers 1 of 3; Boston 2 of 3. Goalies: NY Rangers, Lundqvist 12-5-2 (34 shots-30 saves). Boston, Rask 8-7-1 (27-24). A: 17,565. Referees: Wes McCauley, Chris Rooney. Linesmen: Matt MacPherson, Brian Murphy.

Capitals 4, Lightning 2

Stars 3, Canucks 2 (SO)

Tampa Bay 0 0 2 — 2 Washington 1 2 1 — 4 First period: 1, Washington, Ovechkin 12 (Chimera, Kuznetsov), 7:09 (pp). Penalties: Hedman, TB (high-sticking), 5:17; Callahan, TB (roughing), 14:43; Latta, Was (roughing), 14:43; Callahan, TB (tripping), 17:30. Second period: 2, Washington, Chimera 6 (Kuznetsov, Niskanen), 18:03 (pp). 3, Washington, Johansson 4 (Carlson, Schmidt), 19:18. Penalties: Coburn, TB (delay of game), 16:05. Third period: 4, Washington, Oshie 6 (Backstrom, Carlson), 5:16 (pp). 5, Tampa Bay, Boyle 5 (Callahan, J.Brown), 10:49. 6, Tampa Bay, Hedman 2 (Namestnikov), 12:45. Penalties: Sustr, TB (hooking), 4:00; Ovechkin, Was (slashing), 15:16; Johansson, Was (delay of game), 19:48. Shots: Tampa Bay 9-5-20: 34. Washington 18-13-6: 37. Power-plays: Tampa Bay 0 of 2; Washington 3 of 4. Goalies: Tampa Bay, Vasilevskiy 2-3-0 (37 shots-33 saves). Washington, Holtby 14-4-0 (34-32). A: 18,506. Referees: Trevor Hanson, Brian Pochmara. Linesmen: Mike Cvik, Steve Miller.

Jets 3, Wild 1

Vancouver 0 1 1 0 — 2 Dallas 1 1 0 0 — 3 First period: 1, Dallas, Ja.Benn 17 (Sharp, Seguin), 15:27 (pp). Penalties: Roussel, Dal (interference), 1:07; Ja.Benn, Dal, double minor (high-sticking), 6:22; D.Sedin, Van (tripping), 14:10. Second period: 2, Vancouver, D.Sedin 11 (Hansen), 3:10. 3, Dallas, Spezza 9 (Klingberg, Sharp), 11:52 (pp). Penalties: Sbisa, Van (interference), 7:34; Baertschi, Van (tripping), 11:25; Sceviour, Dal (interference), 19:54. Third period: 4, Vancouver, H.Sedin 8 (D.Sedin, Vrbata), 15:50 (pp). Penalties: Goligoski, Dal (delay of game), 6:36; Burrows, Van (high-sticking), 7:08; Hemsky, Dal (interference), 13:20; Ja.Benn, Dal (tripping), 14:55. Overtime: None. Penalties: Vancouver bench, served by Hansen (too many men), 2:31. Shootout: Vancouver 0 (Burrows NG, Vrbata NG, Higgins NG), Dallas 1 (Seguin G, Spezza NG, Ja.Benn NG). Shots: Vancouver 14-7-13-2: 36. Dallas 8-6-5-6: 25. Power-plays: Vancouver 1 of 7; Dallas 2 of 5. Goalies: Vancouver, Miller 7-7-6 (25 shots-23 saves). Dallas, Niemi 9-4-0 (36-34). A: 18,532. Referees: Gord Dwyer, Ghislain Hebert. Linesmen: John Grandt, Derek Nansen.

Winnipeg 0 1 2 — 3 Minnesota 0 0 1 — 1 First period: None. Penalties: Peluso, Wpg, major (fighting), 2:14; Gabriel, Min, major (fighting), 2:14; Perreault, Wpg (slashing), 8:27; Dumba, Min (unsportsmanlike conduct), 8:27; Stuart, Wpg (roughing, slashing), 13:16; Carter, Min (roughing), 13:16; Brodin, Min (hooking), 17:29. Second period: 1, Winnipeg, Perreault 3 (Byfuglien, Wheeler), 16:26 (pp). Penalties: Zucker, Min (elbowing), 15:45. Third period: 2, Winnipeg, Byfuglien 7 (Lowry, Burmistrov), 2:24. 3, Minnesota, Carter 3 (Porter, Brodin), 9:09. 4, Winnipeg, Ehlers 5 (Thorburn), 17:00. Penalties: Granlund, Min (hooking), 19:46. Shots: Winnipeg 11-6-12: 29. Minnesota 3-7-5: 15. Power-plays: Winnipeg 1 of 3; Minnesota 0 of 1. Goalies: Winnipeg, Hellebuyck 1-0-0 (15 shots-14 saves). Minnesota, Dubnyk 11-7-2 (29-26). A: 19,055. Referees: Graham Skilliter, Jon McIsaac. Linesmen: Mark Wheler, Devin Berg.

Calgary 0 1 0 0 — 1 Arizona 0 1 0 1 — 2 First period: None. Penalties: Murphy, Ari (hooking), 10:58; Ferland, Cal (charging), 13:58; Duclair, Ari (interference), 18:00. Second period: 1, Arizona, Hanzal 5 (Rieder), :29. 2, Calgary, Giordano 5 (Gaudreau, Hudler), 16:40 (pp). Penalties: Murphy, Ari (tripping), 9:09; Stone, Ari (hooking), 15:10. Third period: None. Penalties: Russell, Cal (hooking), 1:00; Ekman-Larsson, Ari (crosschecking), 2:46; Murphy, Ari (high-sticking), 4:54; Brodie, Cal (cross-checking), 16:36; Ekman-Larsson, Ari (boarding), 16:36. Overtime: 3, Arizona, Ekman-Larsson 5 (Richardson, Domi), 4:20. Penalties: None. Shots: Calgary 12-9-4-1: 26. Arizona 8-5-5-3: 21. Power-plays: Calgary 1 of 6; Arizona 0 of 2. Goalies: Calgary, Ramo 6-8-1 (21 shots-19 saves). Arizona, M.Smith 10-5-1 (26-25). A: 11,495. Referees: Tom Chmielewski, Ian Walsh. Linesmen: Lonnie Cameron, Kiel Murchison.

Coyotes 2, Flames 1 (OT)


D8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NHL

BLUES NOTEBOOK

NHL STANDINGS

Gunnarsson gets past gafe Teammates help after mistake in game at Pittsburgh BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

When defenseman Carl Gunnarsson gift-wrapped the first of Sidney Crosby’s two goals in Pittsburgh’s overtime win against the Blues Wednesday, it was an opportunity for the defenseman’s critics to call for his benching. There was a personnel change on the blueline Saturday against Columbus, but it didn’t involve Gunnarsson. Robert Bortuzzo came out of the lineup in favor of Joel Edmundson, who had been a healthy scratch the past two games. Three days after Gunnarsson’s gafe in Pittsburgh, he was looking to move past a mishap in which he squirted a pass in front of the net, where Crosby walked in and tied the score 1-1 late in the first period. The Blues rallied on a couple of occasions, but the Penguins prevailed 4-3 in OT. “That’s in the back of your head, giving up a goal like that,” Gunnarsson said. “You try to forget it, but it’s tough. That’s what you’ve got to deal with every time you make a mistake — boom,

M 2 • SUNDAY • 11.29.2015

you’re back on the ice and you can’t make it again. “(Stuf) is going to happen, and no matter who it is, you’ve just got to pick that guy up, bring him back on the team and make sure he feels comfortable again. Coming into the locker room after, it was all, ‘Hey we’ll get that one back for you.’ That’s a good sign, we have a good group here.” Blues coach Ken Hitchcock agreed with Gunnarsson. “That’s where the players and the leaders have to take over,” Hitchcock said. “They really worked with him on the bench. The veteran player handles it better, he’s able to move forward. ... I think a veteran player making that type of mistake, you’re able to move on quickly and I think your teammates have to help you a little bit along the way.” Gunnarsson played a seasonhigh 22 minutes, 20 seconds Wednesday in Pittsburgh and was a minus-1. For the season, he is a plus-6, which is the secondbest plus-minus rating among the Blues’ seven defensemen. He is averaging 18:16 of ice time, which ranks fifth on the team’s blueline. “I’ve kind of found my role, and I’m trying to make the most of it,” Gunnarsson said. “Trying to take some minutes of the big guys on the team here, help them out. It’s been feeling good.

The last two games, both for me and the whole team, we’ve been struggling a little bit. We’ve got to get back to what we had before that. Me too.” On the whole, Hitchcock said the Blues have been fine with Gunnarsson’s performance this season. But he noticed a trend that Gunnarsson plays better with Colton Parayko than Kevin Shattenkirk, so he made that change Saturday against Columbus. Gunnarsson played with Parayko when Shattenkirk was out with groin injury, and in 10 those games he was a plus-3. “I think him and Colton have been a great pair,” Hitchcock said. “Colton’s game has brought out the best in Gunny and viceversa. I think Gunny has been a harder guy to play against, he’s been much stronger one on one, obviously being healthy. I think all of us have really liked the way he’s played.”

BLUE NOTES Shattenkirk entered Saturday’s game with a seven-game point streak (two goals, seven assists). ... In addition to Bortuzzo, the healthy scratches against Columbus included forwards Scott Gomez and Dmitrij Jaskin. Jeremy Rutherford @jprutherford on Twitter jrutherford@post-dispatch.com

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W Montreal 25 18 Ottawa 22 12 Boston 22 13 Detroit 23 12 Tampa Bay 25 11 Florida 22 9 Bufalo 24 10 Toronto 23 7 Metropolitan GP W Washington 23 17 NY Rangers 24 16 Pittsburgh 23 13 NY Islanders 24 12 New Jersey 23 12 Philadelphia 24 9 Carolina 23 8 Columbus 25 10

L 4 5 8 8 11 9 12 11 L 5 6 8 8 9 10 11 15

OT 3 5 1 3 3 4 2 5 OT 1 2 2 4 2 5 4 0

Pts 39 29 27 27 25 22 22 19 Pts 35 34 28 28 26 23 20 20

GF 88 73 73 55 59 58 54 53 GF 75 70 52 67 56 45 47 60

GA 56 64 64 58 58 58 62 66 GA 51 50 54 59 57 65 66 76

Home 9-2-2 5-3-4 5-6-1 6-5-2 6-5-1 6-5-2 5-8-1 3-5-3 Home 10-3-1 10-3-1 8-4-1 7-4-2 5-5-2 5-4-3 4-5-3 4-7-0

Away 9-2-1 7-2-1 8-2-0 6-3-1 5-6-2 3-4-2 5-4-1 4-6-2 Away 7-2-0 6-3-1 5-4-1 5-4-2 7-4-0 4-6-2 4-6-1 6-8-0

Div 7-0-1 4-2-1 6-3-0 6-3-1 4-5-1 3-2-0 3-6-0 0-4-4 Div 4-2-0 4-1-2 1-2-1 3-0-2 4-4-0 4-3-0 1-2-2 4-4-0

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W Dallas 24 19 Blues 24 15 Chicago 23 13 Nashville 23 12 Minnesota 22 11 Winnipeg 24 11 Colorado 22 8 Pacific GP W Los Angeles 22 13 San Jose 22 13 Arizona 22 12 Vancouver 24 9 Anaheim 24 8 Calgary 23 8 Edmonton 24 8

L 5 6 8 7 7 11 13 L 8 9 9 8 11 13 14

OT 0 3 2 4 4 2 1 OT 1 0 1 7 5 2 2

Pts 38 33 28 28 26 24 17 Pts 27 26 25 25 21 18 18

GF 85 65 65 59 63 64 63 GF 55 61 61 69 47 54 62

GA 62 58 59 60 61 75 67 GA 48 56 62 65 65 82 74

Home Away 9-3-0 10-2-0 7-2-2 8-4-1 8-2-1 5-6-1 7-2-2 5-5-2 8-3-1 3-4-3 5-4-1 6-7-1 2-6-1 6-7-0 Home Away 7-5-0 6-3-1 3-6-0 10-3-0 5-4-0 7-5-1 3-4-3 6-4-4 5-3-4 3-8-1 5-5-0 3-8-2 4-5-1 4-9-1

Div 3-1-0 5-2-0 1-2-1 2-2-0 5-3-3 3-6-0 2-1-0 Div 3-4-0 2-2-0 7-1-0 4-0-2 2-3-3 2-3-1 3-4-0

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Sunday Florida at Detroit, 1 p.m. Monday Colorado at NY Islanders, 6 p.m. Carolina at NY Rangers, 6 p.m. Edmonton at Toronto, 6:30 p.m. Vancouver at Anaheim, 9 p.m.

Friday Montreal 3, New Jersey 2, SO Florida 3, NY Islanders 2, SO Dallas 3, Vancouver 2, SO Boston 4, NY Rangers 3 Philadelphia 3, Nashville 2, OT Winnipeg 3, Minnesota 1 Chicago 3, Anaheim 2, OT Washington 4, Tampa Bay 2 Buffalo 4, Carolina 1 Columbus 2, Pittsburgh 1, OT Detroit 4, Edmonton 3, OT Arizona 2, Calgary 1, OT

Saturday Edmonton 3, Pittsburgh 2, SO Philadelphia 3, NY Rangers 0 Washington 4, Toronto 2 New Jersey 3, Montreal 2, OT NY Islanders 3, Tampa Bay 2 Blues 3, Columbus 1 Buffalo 4, Nashville 1 Dallas 4, Minnesota 3, OT Winnipeg at Colorado, late Ottawa at Arizona, late Calgary at San Jose, late Chicago at Los Angeles, late

NHL SUMMARIES Oilers 3, Penguins 2, SO

BLUES 3, BLUE JACKETS 1 Columbus Blues

1 0

0 1

0 2

— —

1 3

First period C: Johansen 6 (Savard), 14:46. Penalties: None. Second period B: Tarasenko 14 (Shattenkirk, Steen), 2:09 (pp). Penalties: Jenner, Clm (tripping), :24; Bouwmeester, StL (slashing), 4:43; Hartnell, Clm (holding), 15:58; Campbell, Clm (delay of game), 16:45. Third period B: Upshall 4 (Backes), 6:02. B: Steen 9 (Tarasenko), 19:05 (en). Penalties: None. Shots on goal Columbus 6 8 10 24 Blues 6 18 8 32 Power-plays Columbus 0 of 1; Blues 1 of 3. Goaltenders Columbus, Bobrovsky 10-11-0 (31 shots-29 saves). Blues, Allen 11-4-2 (24-23). A: 19,227. Referees: Brad Meier, Graham Skilliter. Linesmen: Scott Driscoll, Bryan Pancich.

Flyers 3, Rangers 0

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Blue Jackets’ David Savard (right) skates of as Blues players celebrate Vladimir Tarasenko’s goal.

Big third period lifts Blues to victory BLUES • FROM D1

of a back-to-back set and playing its third game in four nights. But instead of taking it to the Blue Jackets, the Blues spent the first period searching for their rhythm. They gave up the first goal of the game, marking the 14th time in 24 games that has happened this season. But what is perhaps more disturbing it that is has now happened for the seventh time in 11 games at Scottrade Center, including four of the last six on home ice. Columbus went more than nine minutes without a shot on goal, but then scored to take a 1-0 lead with 5:14 left in the opening period. The Blues’ Vladimir Tarasenko failed to clear the puck out of the zone, and the Blue Jackets’ David Savard kept it in at the point. He then banked a pass of the end boards, behind Allen, which ricocheted in front to Ryan Johansen, who knocked it in for his 12th goal of the season. It was originally awarded to Boone Jenner, who along with Johansen was standing between Allen and the Blues’ defensive pair of Alex Pietrangelo and Jay Bouwmeester.

But the Blues had a substantial response in the second period, tying the score on Tarasenko’s 14th goal of the season, surpassing Chicago’s Patrick Kane for second in the NHL this season. Tarasenko was tripped by Jenner 24 seconds into the second period, putting the Blues’ top power-play unit on the ice. They did not come off the ice until Tarasenko scored 1:45 later. After hitting the post early on in the man-advantage, Tarasenko took a pass from Kevin Shattenkirk and ripped a shot from the left circle, beating Columbus goalie Sergei Bobrovsky over the shoulder. The primary assist extended Shattenkirk’s pointstreak to eight games (two goals, eight assists). The wasn’t the only time in the period that Tarasenko was in full camera view. He took a check from Johansen that he didn’t like and turned around and slashed the Blue Jackets’ center. Moving toward center ice, Tarasenko kept after him, but the temperature eventually simmered. The Blues had a chance to go ahead when they went on a twoman advantage with 3:15 left in the second period, after Scott Hartnell (holding) and Gregory

Campbell (delay of game) followed each other to the penalty box. The Blues had a couple of scoring chances, but posted no oicial shots on net. But overall, the second period was much more lively than the first, particularly from the Blues’ perspective. They outshot Columbus 18-8 in the period, posting the most shots in a single period this season. Including missed shots and blocked shots, they directed 34 at the net in the middle frame alone. The club also won 17 of 23 faceofs in the second period and enjoyed a 71-percent winning percentage on draws at the second intermission. But despite starting to dictate the play, the Blues couldn’t make it translate into any scoring. Upshall changed that in the third period, scoring the 22nd game-winner of his career on a feed from David Backes, who with the assist tied former Blue Keith Tkachuk for seventh on the franchise’s all-time point list with 427. Jeremy Rutherford @jprutherford on Twitter jrutherford@post-dispatch.com

Flyers record fourth shutout to beat Rangers ASSOCIATED PRESS

After a slow start, the Philadelphia Flyers are getting their season turned around. Wayne Simmonds had two goals and an assist and Steve Mason made 24 saves as the Flyers beat the host New York Rangers 3-0 Saturday. “Everybody (is) figuring some things out, team-wise,” Flyers coach Dave Kakstol said. “I haven’t seen any (cracks) in that armor over the last few weeks. Guys have battled hard for each other.”

The shutout was Philadelphia’s league-leading fourth this season. Reserve goaltender Michal Neuvirth has Philadelphia’s other three shutouts. Sean Couturier also scored for the Flyers, who have won two straight. Following a strong start to the season, New York has dropped three in a row.

NOTEBOOK Vigneault criticizes Julien • Rangers coach Alain Vigneault has criticized Bruins coach Claude Julien for making dispar-

aging comments about New York goaltender Henrik Lundqvist. Boston forward Brad Marchand was penalized for goaltender interference 7:59 into the third period of Friday’s game. After the game, Julien said Lundqvist embellished the contact. “The comments were very inappropriate,” Vigneault said. “The way (Lundqvist) conducts himself on the ice, away from the rink, of the ice, the example that he sets. Who would you rather have as a son, Henrik (Lundqvist) or Brad Marchand?”

Philadelphia 0 1 2 — 3 NY Rangers 0 0 0 — 0 First period: None. Penalties: L.Schenn, Phi, served by B.Schenn, minor-major-misconduct (instigator, fighting), 10:58; McIlrath, NYR, major (fighting), 10:58; Gudas, Phi (unsportsmanlike conduct), 18:57. Second period: 1, Philadelphia, Simmonds 4 (Read, Del Zotto), 12:24. Penalties: None. Third period: 2, Philadelphia, Couturier 2 (Simmonds, Laughton), 3:06. 3, Philadelphia, Simmonds 5, 19:10 (en). Penalties: McIlrath, NYR (hooking), 6:46; Stoll, NYR (slashing), 7:43. Shots: Philadelphia 4-18-12: 34. NY Rangers 10-7-7: 24. Power-plays: Philadelphia 0 of 2; NY Rangers 0 of 2. Goalies: Philadelphia, Mason 4-7-4 (24 shots-24 saves). NY Rangers, Raanta 4-1-0 (33-31). A: 18,006. Referees: Kelly Sutherland, Brad Watson. Linesmen: Tim Nowak, Tony Sericolo.

Islanders 3, Lightning 2 N.Y. Islanders 0 2 1 — 3 Tampa Bay 1 1 0 — 2 First period: 1, Tampa Bay, Killorn 4 (Stamkos, Stralman), 16:20. Penalties: Boychuk, NYI (interference), 11:16; Namestnikov, TB (hooking), 17:31; Okposo, NYI, major (fighting), 18:05; Callahan, TB, major (fighting), 18:05. Second period: 2, Tampa Bay, Stralman 2 (Stamkos, Filppula), 1:39. 3, N.Y. Islanders, Bailey 5 (Nelson, Strome), 3:51 (pp). 4, N.Y. Islanders, Clutterbuck 5, 16:51. Penalties: Namestnikov, TB (high-sticking), 2:59; Martin, NYI, major (fighting), 4:15; Coburn, TB, major (fighting), 4:15; Bailey, NYI (cross-checking), 17:57. Third period: 5, N.Y. Islanders, Tavares 11 (Nielsen, Leddy), 16:24 (pp). Penalties: Hickey, NYI (hooking), 2:47; Okposo, NYI (hooking), 11:47; Condra, TB (hooking), 15:31. Missed Penalty Shot: Stamkos, TB, 10:26 second. Shots: N.Y. Islanders 6-7-9: 22. Tampa Bay 9-17-5: 31. Power-plays: N.Y. Islanders 2 of 3; Tampa Bay 0 of 4. Goalies: N.Y. Islanders, Greiss 6-3-2 (31 shots-29 saves). Tampa Bay, Bishop 9-8-2 (22-19). A: 19,092. Referees: Mike Leggo, Jean Hebert. Linesmen: Jonny Murray, Pierre Racicot.

Capitals 4, Maple Leafs 2 Washington 1 3 0 — 4 Toronto 1 1 0 — 2 First period: 1, Washington, Chimera 7, 3:43. 2, Toronto, Holland 4 (Phaneuf), 6:13. Penalties: None. Second period: 3, Washington, T.Wilson 1 (Niskanen, Latta), 4:06. 4, Toronto, Komarov 8 (Phaneuf, van Riemsdyk), 6:26 (pp). 5, Washington, Johansson 5 (Ovechkin, Carlson), 11:08 (pp). 6, Washington, Williams 7 (Chimera, Backstrom), 13:26 (pp). Penalties: Carlson, Was (interference), 6:17; Kadri, Tor (high-sticking), 10:46; Phaneuf, Tor (interference), 12:15; Rielly, Tor (hooking), 17:34. Third period: None. Penalties: Ovechkin, Was (cross-checking), 10:08. Shots: Washington 4-11-8: 23. Toronto 16-4-14: 34. Power-plays: Washington 2 of 3; Toronto 1 of 2. Goalies: Washington, Holtby 15-4-0 (34 shots-32 saves). Toronto, Bernier 0-8-1 (23-19). A: 19,053. Referees: Marc Joannette, Rob Martell. Linesmen: Scott Cherrey, Mark Shewchyk.

Edmonton 2 0 0 0 — 3 Pittsburgh 0 2 0 0 — 2 Edmonton won shootout 2-0 First period: 1, Edmonton, Draisaitl 8 (Hall, Purcell), 2:02. 2, Edmonton, Korpikoski 3 (Sekera, Nugent-Hopkins), 7:30 (pp). Penalties: Scuderi, Pit (tripping), 7:25; B.Pouliot, Edm (tripping), 17:29. Second period: 3, Pittsburgh, Malkin 10, :48. 4, Pittsburgh, Malkin 11 (Letang, Crosby), 3:29 (pp). Penalties: Fayne, Edm (hooking), 3:23; Clendening, Pit (slashing), 10:52; Hall, Edm (high-sticking), 17:36; Schultz, Edm (delay of game), 18:40. Third period: None. Penalties: Dupuis, Pit (interference), 7:28. Overtime: None. Penalties: Crosby, Pit (holding), 2:45. Shootout: Edmonton 2 (Hendricks G, Eberle G), Pittsburgh 0 (Perron NG, Crosby NG). Shots: Edmonton 13-9-11-3: 36. Pittsburgh 14-11-11-5: 41. Power-plays: Edmonton 1 of 4; Pittsburgh 1 of 4. Goalies: Edmonton, Nilsson 5-6-1 (41 shots-39 saves). Pittsburgh, Zatkoff 2-1-1 (36-34). A: 18,656. Referees: Tom Kowal, Brian Pochmara. Linesmen: David Brisebois, Steve Miller.

Devils 3, Canadiens 2, OT New Jersey 0 0 2 1 — 3 Montreal 0 1 1 0 — 2 First period: None. Penalties: Galchenyuk, Mon (holding), 10:55; Zajac, NJ (holding), 16:04. Second period: 1, Montreal, Galchenyuk 6 (Beaulieu, Eller), 9:06. Penalties: Pacioretty, Mon (hooking), 14:47. Third period: 2, Montreal, Galchenyuk 7 (Pacioretty, Plekanec), 8:50 (pp). 3, New Jersey, Elias 1 (Larsson, Zajac), 11:01. 4, New Jersey, Palmieri 8 (Moore, Henrique), 19:38. Penalties: Elias, NJ (interference), 8:41. Overtime: 5, New Jersey, Moore 2 (Henrique), 2:31. Penalties: None. Shots: New Jersey 5-12-12-2: 31. Montreal 10-8-12-2: 32. Power-plays: New Jersey 0 of 2; Montreal 1 of 2. Goalies: New Jersey, Schneider 11-6-2 (32 shots-30 saves). Montreal, Condon 8-2-3 (31-28). A: 21,288. Referees: Francis Charron, Trevor Hanson. Linesmen: Derek Amell, Ryan Galloway.

Stars 4, Wild 3, OT Dallas 0 0 3 1 — 4 Minnesota 2 1 0 0 — 3 First period: 1, Minnesota, Vanek 10 (Brodin, Coyle), 5:52. 2, Minnesota, Coyle 6 (Vanek, Fontaine), 13:27. Penalties: Pominville, Min (slashing), 19:04. Second period: 3, Minnesota, Pominville 1 (Granlund), 1:11. Penalties: Roussel, Dal (unsportsmanlike conduct), 1:17. Third period: 4, Dallas, Goligoski 2 (Jo.Benn, Nichushkin), 4:57. 5, Dallas, Ja.Benn 18 (Eakin), 9:43 (sh). 6, Dallas, Klingberg 5 (Eakin, Seguin), 14:34. Penalties: Suter, Min (cross-checking), 2:40; Oduya, Dal (cross-checking), 8:33. Overtime: 7, Dallas, Seguin 13 (Ja.Benn, Klingberg), 3:57. Penalties: None. Shots: Dallas 7-19-16-2: 44. Minnesota 9-8-7-2: 26. Power-plays: Dallas 0 of 2; Minnesota 0 of 2. Goalies: Dallas, Niemi 10-4-0 (26 shots-23 saves). Minnesota, Kuemper 0-0-2 (44-40). A: 19,024. Referees: Tim Peel, Justin St. Pierre. Linesmen: Andy McElman, Mark Wheler. LATE FRIDAY

Stars 3, Canucks 2 (SO) Vancouver 0 1 1 0 — 2 Dallas 1 1 0 0 — 3 First period: 1, Dallas, Ja.Benn 17 (Sharp, Seguin), 15:27 (pp). Penalties: Roussel, Dal (interference), 1:07; Ja.Benn, Dal, double minor (high-sticking), 6:22; D.Sedin, Van (tripping), 14:10. Second period: 2, Vancouver, D.Sedin 11 (Hansen), 3:10. 3, Dallas, Spezza 9 (Klingberg, Sharp), 11:52 (pp). Penalties: Sbisa, Van (interference), 7:34; Baertschi, Van (tripping), 11:25; Sceviour, Dal (interference), 19:54. Third period: 4, Vancouver, H.Sedin 8 (D.Sedin, Vrbata), 15:50 (pp). Penalties: Goligoski, Dal (delay of game), 6:36; Burrows, Van (high-sticking), 7:08; Hemsky, Dal (interference), 13:20; Ja.Benn, Dal (tripping), 14:55. Overtime: None. Penalties: Vancouver bench, served by Hansen (too many men), 2:31. Shootout: Vancouver 0 (Burrows NG, Vrbata NG, Higgins NG), Dallas 1 (Seguin G, Spezza NG, Ja.Benn NG). Shots: Vancouver 14-7-13-2: 36. Dallas 8-6-5-6: 25. Power-plays: Vancouver 1 of 7; Dallas 2 of 5. Goalies: Vancouver, Miller 7-7-6 (25 shots-23 saves). Dallas, Niemi 9-4-0 (36-34). A: 18,532. Referees: Gord Dwyer, Ghislain Hebert. Linesmen: John Grandt, Derek Nansen.

BLUES STATISTICS Player Vladimir Tarasenko Alexander Steen Troy Brouwer Colton Parayko David Backes Jori Lehtera Alex Pietrangelo Kevin Shattenkirk Scott Gomez Paul Stastny Jay Bouwmeester Robby Fabbri Dmitrij Jaskin Carl Gunnarsson Schwartz - RES Kyle Brodziak Scottie Upshall Joel Edmundson Steve Ott Magnus Paajarvi Ty Rattie, MNR Robert Bortuzzo Chris Butler, MNR Ryan Reaves Jeremy Welsh, MNR Goalie Jake Allen Brian Elliott

GP 17 8

GP 22 23 23 21 23 23 23 13 16 7 23 17 22 23 7 23 17 20 17 11 5 14 2 15 2 Min 972 423

Through Friday’s games.

G 13 8 5 5 5 3 2 2 1 2 1 4 1 1 0 2 3 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0

A 9 11 8 7 6 8 9 8 7 5 5 2 4 3 4 1 0 2 2 1 2 0 0 0 0 GAA 2.10 2.70

P 22 19 13 12 11 11 11 10 8 7 6 6 5 4 4 3 3 2 2 2 2 1 0 0 0 W 10 4

+/4 4 2 10 1 5 -2 -2 -3 3 0 -1 -1 6 4 -2 -1 -1 -1 -1 1 1 2 0 0 L 4 2

PIM 8 20 25 8 23 12 4 8 2 2 10 0 10 12 2 11 10 20 32 2 2 22 2 6 2 OT 2 1

PP 3 0 1 2 1 0 1 1 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 SO 3 0

SH 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 GA 34 19

GW 2 0 0 3 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 SA 473 187

S 82 69 39 49 38 29 54 28 8 16 36 32 35 22 15 18 33 23 19 23 --19 --3 --Sv% .928 .898


D8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NHL

BLUES NOTEBOOK

NHL STANDINGS

Gunnarsson gets past gafe Teammates help after mistake in game at Pittsburgh BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

When defenseman Carl Gunnarsson gift-wrapped the first of Sidney Crosby’s two goals in Pittsburgh’s overtime win against the Blues Wednesday, it was an opportunity for the defenseman’s critics to call for his benching. There was a personnel change on the blueline Saturday against Columbus, but it didn’t involve Gunnarsson. Robert Bortuzzo came out of the lineup in favor of Joel Edmundson, who had been a healthy scratch the past two games. Three days after Gunnarsson’s gafe in Pittsburgh, he was looking to move past a mishap in which he squirted a pass in front of the net, where Crosby walked in and tied the score 1-1 late in the first period. The Blues rallied on a couple of occasions, but the Penguins prevailed 4-3 in OT. “That’s in the back of your head, giving up a goal like that,” Gunnarsson said. “You try to forget it, but it’s tough. That’s what you’ve got to deal with every time you make a mistake — boom,

M 3 • SUNDAY • 11.29.2015

you’re back on the ice and you can’t make it again. “(Stuf) is going to happen, and no matter who it is, you’ve just got to pick that guy up, bring him back on the team and make sure he feels comfortable again. Coming into the locker room after, it was all, ‘Hey we’ll get that one back for you.’ That’s a good sign, we have a good group here.” Blues coach Ken Hitchcock agreed with Gunnarsson. “That’s where the players and the leaders have to take over,” Hitchcock said. “They really worked with him on the bench. The veteran player handles it better, he’s able to move forward. ... I think a veteran player making that type of mistake, you’re able to move on quickly and I think your teammates have to help you a little bit along the way.” Gunnarsson played a seasonhigh 22 minutes, 20 seconds Wednesday in Pittsburgh and was a minus-1. For the season, he is a plus-6, which is the secondbest plus-minus rating among the Blues’ seven defensemen. He is averaging 18:16 of ice time, which ranks fifth on the team’s blueline. “I’ve kind of found my role, and I’m trying to make the most of it,” Gunnarsson said. “Trying to take some minutes of the big guys on the team here, help them out. It’s been feeling good.

The last two games, both for me and the whole team, we’ve been struggling a little bit. We’ve got to get back to what we had before that. Me too.” On the whole, Hitchcock said the Blues have been fine with Gunnarsson’s performance this season. But he noticed a trend that Gunnarsson plays better with Colton Parayko than Kevin Shattenkirk, so he made that change Saturday against Columbus. Gunnarsson played with Parayko when Shattenkirk was out with groin injury, and in 10 those games he was a plus-3. “I think him and Colton have been a great pair,” Hitchcock said. “Colton’s game has brought out the best in Gunny and viceversa. I think Gunny has been a harder guy to play against, he’s been much stronger one on one, obviously being healthy. I think all of us have really liked the way he’s played.”

BLUE NOTES Shattenkirk entered Saturday’s game with a seven-game point streak (two goals, seven assists). ... In addition to Bortuzzo, the healthy scratches against Columbus included forwards Scott Gomez and Dmitrij Jaskin. Jeremy Rutherford @jprutherford on Twitter jrutherford@post-dispatch.com

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W Montreal 25 18 Ottawa 22 12 Boston 22 13 Detroit 23 12 Tampa Bay 25 11 Florida 22 9 Bufalo 24 10 Toronto 23 7 Metropolitan GP W Washington 23 17 NY Rangers 24 16 Pittsburgh 23 13 NY Islanders 24 12 New Jersey 23 12 Philadelphia 24 9 Carolina 23 8 Columbus 25 10

L 4 5 8 8 11 9 12 11 L 5 6 8 8 9 10 11 15

OT 3 5 1 3 3 4 2 5 OT 1 2 2 4 2 5 4 0

Pts 39 29 27 27 25 22 22 19 Pts 35 34 28 28 26 23 20 20

GF 88 73 73 55 59 58 54 53 GF 75 70 52 67 56 45 47 60

GA 56 64 64 58 58 58 62 66 GA 51 50 54 59 57 65 66 76

Home 9-2-2 5-3-4 5-6-1 6-5-2 6-5-1 6-5-2 5-8-1 3-5-3 Home 10-3-1 10-3-1 8-4-1 7-4-2 5-5-2 5-4-3 4-5-3 4-7-0

Away 9-2-1 7-2-1 8-2-0 6-3-1 5-6-2 3-4-2 5-4-1 4-6-2 Away 7-2-0 6-3-1 5-4-1 5-4-2 7-4-0 4-6-2 4-6-1 6-8-0

Div 7-0-1 4-2-1 6-3-0 6-3-1 4-5-1 3-2-0 3-6-0 0-4-4 Div 4-2-0 4-1-2 1-2-1 3-0-2 4-4-0 4-3-0 1-2-2 4-4-0

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W Dallas 24 19 Blues 24 15 Chicago 23 13 Nashville 23 12 Minnesota 22 11 Winnipeg 24 11 Colorado 22 8 Pacific GP W Los Angeles 22 13 San Jose 22 13 Arizona 22 12 Vancouver 24 9 Anaheim 24 8 Calgary 23 8 Edmonton 24 8

L 5 6 8 7 7 11 13 L 8 9 9 8 11 13 14

OT 0 3 2 4 4 2 1 OT 1 0 1 7 5 2 2

Pts 38 33 28 28 26 24 17 Pts 27 26 25 25 21 18 18

GF 85 65 65 59 63 64 63 GF 55 61 61 69 47 54 62

GA 62 58 59 60 61 75 67 GA 48 56 62 65 65 82 74

Home Away 9-3-0 10-2-0 7-2-2 8-4-1 8-2-1 5-6-1 7-2-2 5-5-2 8-3-1 3-4-3 5-4-1 6-7-1 2-6-1 6-7-0 Home Away 7-5-0 6-3-1 3-6-0 10-3-0 5-4-0 7-5-1 3-4-3 6-4-4 5-3-4 3-8-1 5-5-0 3-8-2 4-5-1 4-9-1

Div 3-1-0 5-2-0 1-2-1 2-2-0 5-3-3 3-6-0 2-1-0 Div 3-4-0 2-2-0 7-1-0 4-0-2 2-3-3 2-3-1 3-4-0

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Sunday Florida at Detroit, 1 p.m. Monday Colorado at NY Islanders, 6 p.m. Carolina at NY Rangers, 6 p.m. Edmonton at Toronto, 6:30 p.m. Vancouver at Anaheim, 9 p.m.

Friday Montreal 3, New Jersey 2, SO Florida 3, NY Islanders 2, SO Dallas 3, Vancouver 2, SO Boston 4, NY Rangers 3 Philadelphia 3, Nashville 2, OT Winnipeg 3, Minnesota 1 Chicago 3, Anaheim 2, OT Washington 4, Tampa Bay 2 Buffalo 4, Carolina 1 Columbus 2, Pittsburgh 1, OT Detroit 4, Edmonton 3, OT Arizona 2, Calgary 1, OT

Saturday Blues 3, Columbus 1 Edmonton 3, Pittsburgh 2, SO Philadelphia 3, NY Rangers 0 Washington 4, Toronto 2 New Jersey 3, Montreal 2, OT NY Islanders 3, Tampa Bay 2 Buffalo 4, Nashville 1 Dallas 4, Minnesota 3, OT Winnipeg at Colorado, late Ottawa at Arizona, late Calgary at San Jose, late Chicago at Los Angeles, late

NHL SUMMARIES Devils 3, Canadiens 2, OT

BLUES 3, BLUE JACKETS 1 Columbus Blues

1 0

0 1

0 2

— —

1 3

First period C: Johansen 6 (Savard), 14:46. Penalties: None. Second period B: Tarasenko 14 (Shattenkirk, Steen), 2:09 (pp). Penalties: Jenner, Clm (tripping), :24; Bouwmeester, StL (slashing), 4:43; Hartnell, Clm (holding), 15:58; Campbell, Clm (delay of game), 16:45. Third period B: Upshall 4 (Backes), 6:02. B: Steen 9 (Tarasenko), 19:05 (en). Penalties: None. Shots on goal Columbus 6 8 10 24 Blues 6 18 8 32 Power-plays Columbus 0 of 1; Blues 1 of 3. Goaltenders Columbus, Bobrovsky 10-11-0 (31 shots-29 saves). Blues, Allen 11-4-2 (24-23). A: 19,227. Referees: Brad Meier, Graham Skilliter. Linesmen: Scott Driscoll, Bryan Pancich.

Capitals 4, Maple Leafs 2 ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Blue Jackets’ David Savard (right) skates of as Blues players celebrate Vladimir Tarasenko’s goal.

Big third period lifts Blues to victory BLUES • FROM D1

Upshall scored and the forward adding an empty-netter with 55 seconds remaining. So in the end, the Blues successively recovered from a 4-3 overtime loss to Pittsburgh on Wednesday by recovering from an inauspicious first period Saturday. They would have had much explaining to do if they failed to respond the way they did in the second. All of the pregame playerspeak focused on the fact that they needed a strong start because it was Columbus coming to town on the second night of a back-to-back set and playing its third game in four nights. But instead of taking it to the Blue Jackets, the Blues spent the first period searching for their rhythm. They gave up the first goal of the game, marking the 14th time in 24 games that has happened this season. But what is perhaps more disturbing is that it has now happened for the seventh time in 11 games at Scottrade Center, including four of the last six on home ice. Columbus went more than nine minutes without a shot on goal, but then scored to take a 1-0 lead with 5:14 left in the opening period. The Blues’ Vladimir Tarasenko failed to clear the puck, and the Blue Jackets’ David Savard kept it in at the point. He then banked a pass of the end boards, which ricocheted in front to Ryan Johansen, who knocked it in for his

sixth goal of the season. It was originally awarded to Boone Jenner, who along with Johansen was camped in front of the net. “Those bounces happen,” Alex Pietrangelo said. “I don’t even know how it went in, but that’s going to happen. We’re going to get bounces like that and bounces like that are going to go against us. Those are the ones that wake you up. It seemed like we picked up the tempo after that.” The Blues had a substantial response in the second period, tying the score on Tarasenko’s 14th goal of the season. Tarasenko was tripped by Jenner 24 seconds into the second period, putting the Blues’ top power-play unit on the ice. They did not come off the ice until Tarasenko scored 1:45 later. After hitting the post early on in the man-advantage, Tarasenko took a pass from Kevin Shattenkirk and ripped a shot from the left circle, beating Columbus goalie Sergei Bobrovsky over the shoulder. “Even if we didn’t score, that’s what you want from a momentum standpoint,” Blues coach Ken Hitchcock said. The Blues were in position to take their first lead of the game when they went on a five-onthree power play with 3:15 left in the second period. They had a couple of scoring chances, but posted no oicial shots on net. But overall, the second period was much more lively than the first, particularly from the Blues’ perspective. “Best we’ve played in a little

while here,” Hitchcock said. They outshot Columbus 18-8 in the period, posting the most shots in a single period this season. Including missed shots and blocked shots, they directed 34 at the net in the middle frame alone. The club also won 17 of 23 faceofs in the second period and enjoyed a 71-percent winning percentage on draws at the second intermission. (They finished the game winning 69.8 percent, the highest total of the season). “In the first period they sat back and trapped us a little bit and again we were a little slow with the puck and it played into the game they wanted,” Steen said. “The longer the game went on, we had a feeling this was going to turn if we just kept pushing in that direction.” But despite starting to dictate the play, the Blues couldn’t make it translate into any scoring. Upshall changed that in the third period, scoring the gamewinner on a feed from David Backes, who with the assist tied former Blue Keith Tkachuk for seventh on the franchise’s alltime point list with 427. But it was Upshall who was rejoicing. “I was fired up,” he said. “I like scoring. I used to do a lot of it.” The Blues celebrated once more, when Steen pumped in an empty-net goal with under a minute to play for his ninth goal of the season. Jeremy Rutherford @jprutherford on Twitter jrutherford@post-dispatch.com

Flyers record fourth shutout to beat Rangers ASSOCIATED PRESS

After a slow start, the Philadelphia Flyers are getting their season turned around. Wayne Simmonds had two goals and an assist and Steve Mason made 24 saves as the Flyers beat the host New York Rangers 3-0 Saturday. “Everybody (is) figuring some things out, team-wise,” Flyers coach Dave Kakstol said. “I haven’t seen any (cracks) in that armor over the last few weeks. Guys have battled hard for each other.”

The shutout was Philadelphia’s league-leading fourth this season. Reserve goaltender Michal Neuvirth has Philadelphia’s other three shutouts. Sean Couturier also scored for the Flyers, who have won two straight. Following a strong start to the season, New York has dropped three in a row.

NOTEBOOK Vigneault criticizes Julien • Rangers coach Alain Vigneault has criticized Bruins coach Claude Julien for making dispar-

aging comments about New York goaltender Henrik Lundqvist. Boston forward Brad Marchand was penalized for goaltender interference 7:59 into the third period of Friday’s game. After the game, Julien said Lundqvist embellished the contact. “The comments were very inappropriate,” Vigneault said. “The way (Lundqvist) conducts himself on the ice, away from the rink, of the ice, the example that he sets. Who would you rather have as a son, Henrik (Lundqvist) or Brad Marchand?”

Washington 1 3 0 — 4 Toronto 1 1 0 — 2 First period: 1, Washington, Chimera 7, 3:43. 2, Toronto, Holland 4 (Phaneuf), 6:13. Penalties: None. Second period: 3, Washington, T.Wilson 1 (Niskanen, Latta), 4:06. 4, Toronto, Komarov 8 (Phaneuf, van Riemsdyk), 6:26 (pp). 5, Washington, Johansson 5 (Ovechkin, Carlson), 11:08 (pp). 6, Washington, Williams 7 (Chimera, Backstrom), 13:26 (pp). Penalties: Carlson, Was (interference), 6:17; Kadri, Tor (high-sticking), 10:46; Phaneuf, Tor (interference), 12:15; Rielly, Tor (hooking), 17:34. Third period: None. Penalties: Ovechkin, Was (cross-checking), 10:08. Shots: Washington 4-11-8: 23. Toronto 16-4-14: 34. Power-plays: Washington 2 of 3; Toronto 1 of 2. Goalies: Washington, Holtby 15-4-0 (34 shots-32 saves). Toronto, Bernier 0-8-1 (23-19). A: 19,053. Referees: Marc Joannette, Rob Martell. Linesmen: Scott Cherrey, Mark Shewchyk.

Islanders 3, Lightning 2 N.Y. Islanders 0 2 1 — 3 Tampa Bay 1 1 0 — 2 First period: 1, Tampa Bay, Killorn 4 (Stamkos, Stralman), 16:20. Penalties: Boychuk, NYI (interference), 11:16; Namestnikov, TB (hooking), 17:31; Okposo, NYI, major (fighting), 18:05; Callahan, TB, major (fighting), 18:05. Second period: 2, Tampa Bay, Stralman 2 (Stamkos, Filppula), 1:39. 3, N.Y. Islanders, Bailey 5 (Nelson, Strome), 3:51 (pp). 4, N.Y. Islanders, Clutterbuck 5, 16:51. Penalties: Namestnikov, TB (high-sticking), 2:59; Martin, NYI, major (fighting), 4:15; Coburn, TB, major (fighting), 4:15; Bailey, NYI (cross-checking), 17:57. Third period: 5, N.Y. Islanders, Tavares 11 (Nielsen, Leddy), 16:24 (pp). Penalties: Hickey, NYI (hooking), 2:47; Okposo, NYI (hooking), 11:47; Condra, TB (hooking), 15:31. Missed Penalty Shot: Stamkos, TB, 10:26 second. Shots: N.Y. Islanders 6-7-9: 22. Tampa Bay 9-17-5: 31. Power-plays: N.Y. Islanders 2 of 3; Tampa Bay 0 of 4. Goalies: N.Y. Islanders, Greiss 6-3-2 (31 shots-29 saves). Tampa Bay, Bishop 9-8-2 (22-19). A: 19,092. Referees: Mike Leggo, Jean Hebert. Linesmen: Jonny Murray, Pierre Racicot.

New Jersey 0 0 2 1 — 3 Montreal 0 1 1 0 — 2 First period: None. Penalties: Galchenyuk, Mon (holding), 10:55; Zajac, NJ (holding), 16:04. Second period: 1, Montreal, Galchenyuk 6 (Beaulieu, Eller), 9:06. Penalties: Pacioretty, Mon (hooking), 14:47. Third period: 2, Montreal, Galchenyuk 7 (Pacioretty, Plekanec), 8:50 (pp). 3, New Jersey, Elias 1 (Larsson, Zajac), 11:01. 4, New Jersey, Palmieri 8 (Moore, Henrique), 19:38. Penalties: Elias, NJ (interference), 8:41. Overtime: 5, New Jersey, Moore 2 (Henrique), 2:31. Penalties: None. Shots: New Jersey 5-12-12-2: 31. Montreal 10-8-12-2: 32. Power-plays: New Jersey 0 of 2; Montreal 1 of 2. Goalies: New Jersey, Schneider 11-6-2 (32 shots-30 saves). Montreal, Condon 8-2-3 (31-28). A: 21,288. Referees: Francis Charron, Trevor Hanson. Linesmen: Derek Amell, Ryan Galloway.

Stars 4, Wild 3, OT Dallas 0 0 3 1 — 4 Minnesota 2 1 0 0 — 3 First period: 1, Minnesota, Vanek 10 (Brodin, Coyle), 5:52. 2, Minnesota, Coyle 6 (Vanek, Fontaine), 13:27. Penalties: Pominville, Min (slashing), 19:04. Second period: 3, Minnesota, Pominville 1 (Granlund), 1:11. Penalties: Roussel, Dal (unsportsmanlike conduct), 1:17. Third period: 4, Dallas, Goligoski 2 (Jo.Benn, Nichushkin), 4:57. 5, Dallas, Ja.Benn 18 (Eakin), 9:43 (sh). 6, Dallas, Klingberg 5 (Eakin, Seguin), 14:34. Penalties: Suter, Min (cross-checking), 2:40; Oduya, Dal (cross-checking), 8:33. Overtime: 7, Dallas, Seguin 13 (Ja.Benn, Klingberg), 3:57. Penalties: None. Shots: Dallas 7-19-16-2: 44. Minnesota 9-8-7-2: 26. Power-plays: Dallas 0 of 2; Minnesota 0 of 2. Goalies: Dallas, Niemi 10-4-0 (26 shots-23 saves). Minnesota, Kuemper 0-0-2 (44-40). A: 19,024. Referees: Tim Peel, Justin St. Pierre. Linesmen: Andy McElman, Mark Wheler.

Flyers 3, Rangers 0 Philadelphia 0 1 2 — 3 NY Rangers 0 0 0 — 0 First period: None. Penalties: L.Schenn, Phi, served by B.Schenn, minor-major-misconduct (instigator, fighting), 10:58; McIlrath, NYR, major (fighting), 10:58; Gudas, Phi (unsportsmanlike conduct), 18:57. Second period: 1, Philadelphia, Simmonds 4 (Read, Del Zotto), 12:24. Penalties: None. Third period: 2, Philadelphia, Couturier 2 (Simmonds, Laughton), 3:06. 3, Philadelphia, Simmonds 5, 19:10 (en). Penalties: McIlrath, NYR (hooking), 6:46; Stoll, NYR (slashing), 7:43. Shots: Philadelphia 4-18-12: 34. NY Rangers 10-7-7: 24. Power-plays: Philadelphia 0 of 2; NY Rangers 0 of 2. Goalies: Philadelphia, Mason 4-7-4 (24 shots-24 saves). NY Rangers, Raanta 4-1-0 (33-31). A: 18,006. Referees: Kelly Sutherland, Brad Watson. Linesmen: Tim Nowak, Tony Sericolo.

Oilers 3, Penguins 2, SO Edmonton 2 0 0 0 — 3 Pittsburgh 0 2 0 0 — 2 Edmonton won shootout 2-0 First period: 1, Edmonton, Draisaitl 8 (Hall, Purcell), 2:02. 2, Edmonton, Korpikoski 3 (Sekera, Nugent-Hopkins), 7:30 (pp). Penalties: Scuderi, Pit (tripping), 7:25; B.Pouliot, Edm (tripping), 17:29. Second period: 3, Pittsburgh, Malkin 10, :48. 4, Pittsburgh, Malkin 11 (Letang, Crosby), 3:29 (pp). Penalties: Fayne, Edm (hooking), 3:23; Clendening, Pit (slashing), 10:52; Hall, Edm (high-sticking), 17:36; Schultz, Edm (delay of game), 18:40. Third period: None. Penalties: Dupuis, Pit (interference), 7:28. Overtime: None. Penalties: Crosby, Pit (holding), 2:45. Shootout: Edmonton 2 (Hendricks G, Eberle G), Pittsburgh 0 (Perron NG, Crosby NG). Shots: Edmonton 13-9-11-3: 36. Pittsburgh 14-11-11-5: 41. Power-plays: Edmonton 1 of 4; Pittsburgh 1 of 4. Goalies: Edmonton, Nilsson 5-6-1 (41 shots-39 saves). Pittsburgh, Zatkoff 2-1-1 (36-34). A: 18,656. Referees: Tom Kowal, Brian Pochmara. Linesmen: David Brisebois, Steve Miller.

Sabres 4, Predators 1 Buffalo 0 2 2 — 4 Nashville 1 0 0 — 1 First period: 1, Nashville, Fisher 5 (Neal), 11:42 (pp). Penalties: C.Smith, Nas (delay of game), 1:08; S.Reinhart, Buf (tripping), 11:38. Second period: 2, Buffalo, McGinn 4 (R.O’Reilly, Franson), 13:09 (pp). 3, Buffalo, S.Reinhart 5 (Moulson, Legwand), 16:13 (pp). Penalties: Girgensons, Buf (holding), 9:09; Arvidsson, Nas, served by Hodgson, major-game misconduct (cross checking), 11:43. Third period: 4, Buffalo, S.Reinhart 6 (McCabe, Kane), :58. 5, Buffalo, R.O’Reilly 8 (Kane), 17:47 (en). Penalties: Franson, Buf (cross-checking), 10:49. Shots: Buffalo 9-10-5: 24. Nashville 13-7-9: 29. Power-plays: Buffalo 2 of 4; Nashville 1 of 3. Goalies: Buffalo, Johnson 6-7-1 (29 shots-28 saves). Nashville, Saros 0-1-0 (23-20). A: 17,217. Referees: Steve Kozari, Dan O’Halloran. Linesmen: Shandor Alphonso, Derek Nansen.

BLUES STATISTICS

Through Friday’s games.

Player

GP

G

A

P

+/-

PIM

PP

SH

GW

S

Vladimir Tarasenko

22

13

9

22

4

8

3

0

2

82 69

Alexander Steen

23

8

11

19

4

20

0

0

0

Troy Brouwer

23

5

8

13

2

25

1

0

0

39

Colton Parayko

21

5

7

12

10

8

2

0

3

49

David Backes

23

5

6

11

1

23

1

0

2

38

Jori Lehtera

23

3

8

11

5

12

0

0

0

29

Alex Pietrangelo

23

2

9

11

-2

4

1

0

0

54

Kevin Shattenkirk

13

2

8

10

-2

8

1

0

0

28

Scott Gomez

16

1

7

8

-3

2

0

0

1

8

Paul Stastny

7

2

5

7

3

2

2

0

1

16 36

Jay Bouwmeester

23

1

5

6

0

10

1

0

0

Robby Fabbri

17

4

2

6

-1

0

0

0

2

32

Dmitrij Jaskin

22

1

4

5

-1

10

0

0

0

35

Carl Gunnarsson

22

23

1

3

4

6

12

1

0

0

Schwartz - RES

7

0

4

4

4

2

0

0

0

15

Kyle Brodziak

23

2

1

3

-2

11

0

0

1

18

Scottie Upshall

17

3

0

3

-1

10

0

0

0

33

Joel Edmundson

20

0

2

2

-1

20

0

0

0

23

Steve Ott

17

0

2

2

-1

32

0

0

0

19

Magnus Paajarvi

11

1

1

2

-1

2

0

0

0

23 ---

Ty Rattie, MNR

5

0

2

2

1

2

0

0

0

Robert Bortuzzo

14

1

0

1

1

22

0

0

0

19

Chris Butler, MNR

2

0

0

0

2

2

0

0

0

---

15

0

0

0

0

6

0

0

0

3

Jeremy Welsh, MNR

Ryan Reaves

2

0

0

0

0

2

0

0

0

---

Goalie

GP

Min

GAA

W

L

OT

SO

GA

SA

17

972

2.10

10

4

2

3

34

473

.928

8

423

2.70

4

2

1

0

19

187

.898

Jake Allen Brian Elliott

Sv%


D8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NHL

BLUES NOTEBOOK

NHL STANDINGS

Gunnarsson gets past gaffe Teammates help after mistake in game at Pittsburgh BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

When defenseman Carl Gunnarsson gift-wrapped the first of Sidney Crosby’s two goals in Pittsburgh’s overtime win against the Blues Wednesday, it was an opportunity for the defenseman’s critics to call for his benching. There was a personnel change on the blueline Saturday against Columbus, but it didn’t involve Gunnarsson. Robert Bortuzzo came out of the lineup in favor of Joel Edmundson, who had been a healthy scratch the past two games. Three days after Gunnarsson’s gafe in Pittsburgh, he was looking to move past a mishap in which he squirted a pass in front of the net, where Crosby walked in and tied the score 1-1 late in the first period. The Blues rallied on a couple of occasions, but the Penguins prevailed 4-3 in OT. “That’s in the back of your head, giving up a goal like that,” Gunnarsson said. “You try to forget it, but it’s tough. That’s what you’ve got to deal with every time you make a mistake — boom,

M 4 • SUnDAy • 11.29.2015

you’re back on the ice and you can’t make it again. “(Stuf) is going to happen, and no matter who it is, you’ve just got to pick that guy up, bring him back on the team and make sure he feels comfortable again. Coming into the locker room after, it was all, ‘Hey we’ll get that one back for you.’ That’s a good sign, we have a good group here.” Blues coach Ken Hitchcock agreed with Gunnarsson. “That’s where the players and the leaders have to take over,” Hitchcock said. “They really worked with him on the bench. The veteran player handles it better, he’s able to move forward. ... I think a veteran player making that type of mistake, you’re able to move on quickly and I think your teammates have to help you a little bit along the way.” Gunnarsson played a seasonhigh 22 minutes, 20 seconds Wednesday in Pittsburgh and was a minus-1. For the season, he is a plus-6, which is the secondbest plus-minus rating among the Blues’ seven defensemen. He is averaging 18:16 of ice time, which ranks fifth on the team’s blueline. “I’ve kind of found my role, and I’m trying to make the most of it,” Gunnarsson said. “Trying to take some minutes of the big guys on the team here, help them out. It’s been feeling good.

The last two games, both for me and the whole team, we’ve been struggling a little bit. We’ve got to get back to what we had before that. Me too.” On the whole, Hitchcock said the Blues have been fine with Gunnarsson’s performance this season. But he noticed a trend that Gunnarsson plays better with Colton Parayko than Kevin Shattenkirk, so he made that change Saturday against Columbus. Gunnarsson played with Parayko when Shattenkirk was out with groin injury, and in 10 those games he was a plus-3. “I think him and Colton have been a great pair,” Hitchcock said. “Colton’s game has brought out the best in Gunny and viceversa. I think Gunny has been a harder guy to play against, he’s been much stronger one on one, obviously being healthy. I think all of us have really liked the way he’s played.”

BLUE NOTES Shattenkirk entered Saturday’s game with a seven-game point streak (two goals, seven assists). ... In addition to Bortuzzo, the healthy scratches against Columbus included forwards Scott Gomez and Dmitrij Jaskin. Jeremy Rutherford @jprutherford on Twitter jrutherford@post-dispatch.com

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W Montreal 25 18 Ottawa 23 12 Boston 22 13 Detroit 23 12 Tampa Bay 25 11 Florida 22 9 Bufalo 24 10 Toronto 23 7 Metropolitan GP W Washington 23 17 NY Rangers 24 16 Pittsburgh 23 13 NY Islanders 24 12 New Jersey 23 12 Philadelphia 24 9 Carolina 23 8 Columbus 25 10

L 4 6 8 8 11 9 12 11 L 5 6 8 8 9 10 11 15

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L Dallas 24 19 5 Blues 24 15 6 Chicago 24 13 8 Nashville 23 12 7 Minnesota 22 11 7 Winnipeg 25 11 12 Colorado 23 9 13 Paciic GP W L Los Angeles 23 14 8 San Jose 23 14 9 Arizona 23 13 9 Vancouver 24 9 8 Anaheim 24 8 11 Calgary 24 8 14 Edmonton 24 8 14

OT 3 5 1 3 3 4 2 5 OT 1 2 2 4 2 5 4 0

OT 0 3 3 4 4 2 1 OT 1 0 1 7 5 2 2

Pts 39 29 27 27 25 22 22 19 Pts 35 34 28 28 26 23 20 20

Pts 38 33 29 28 26 24 19 Pts 29 28 27 25 21 18 18

GF 88 76 73 55 59 58 54 53 GF 75 70 52 67 56 45 47 60

GA 56 68 64 58 58 58 62 66 GA 51 50 54 59 57 65 66 76

GF 85 65 67 59 63 67 68 GF 58 66 65 69 47 56 62

GA 62 58 62 60 61 80 70 GA 50 58 65 65 65 87 74

Home 9-2-2 5-3-4 5-6-1 6-5-2 6-5-1 6-5-2 5-8-1 3-5-3 Home 10-3-1 10-3-1 8-4-1 7-4-2 5-5-2 5-4-3 4-5-3 4-7-0

Away 9-2-1 7-3-1 8-2-0 6-3-1 5-6-2 3-4-2 5-4-1 4-6-2 Away 7-2-0 6-3-1 5-4-1 5-4-2 7-4-0 4-6-2 4-6-1 6-8-0

Div 7-0-1 4-2-1 6-3-0 6-3-1 4-5-1 3-2-0 3-6-0 0-4-4 Div 4-2-0 4-1-2 1-2-1 3-0-2 4-4-0 4-3-0 1-2-2 4-4-0

Home 9-3-0 7-2-2 8-2-1 7-2-2 8-3-1 5-4-1 3-6-1 Home 8-5-0 4-6-0 6-4-0 3-4-3 5-3-4 5-5-0 4-5-1

Away Div 10-2-0 3-1-0 8-4-1 5-2-0 5-6-2 1-2-1 5-5-2 2-2-0 3-4-3 5-3-3 6-8-1 3-7-0 6-7-0 3-1-0 Away Div 6-3-1 3-4-0 10-3-0 3-2-0 7-5-1 7-1-0 6-4-4 4-0-2 3-8-1 2-3-3 3-9-2 2-4-1 4-9-1 3-4-0

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Saturday Blues 3, Columbus 1 Edmonton 3, Pittsburgh 2, SO Philadelphia 3, NY Rangers 0 Washington 4, Toronto 2 New Jersey 3, Montreal 2, OT NY Islanders 3, Tampa Bay 2 Buffalo 4, Nashville 1 Dallas 4, Minnesota 3, OT Colorado 5, Winnipeg 3 Arizona 4, Ottawa 3

San Jose 5, Calgary 2 Los Angeles 3, Chicago 2, OT Friday Montreal 3, New Jersey 2, SO Florida 3, NY Islanders 2, SO Dallas 3, Vancouver 2, SO Boston 4, NY Rangers 3 Philadelphia 3, Nashville 2, OT Winnipeg 3, Minnesota 1 Chicago 3, Anaheim 2, OT Washington 4, Tampa Bay 2

Buffalo 4, Carolina 1 Columbus 2, Pittsburgh 1, OT Detroit 4, Edmonton 3, OT Arizona 2, Calgary 1, OT Sunday Florida at Detroit, 1 p.m. Monday Colorado at NY Islanders, 6 p.m. Carolina at NY Rangers, 6 p.m. Edmonton at Toronto, 6:30 p.m. Vancouver at Anaheim, 9 p.m.

NHL SUMMARIES Sabres 4, Predators 1

BLUES 3, BLUE JACKETS 1 Columbus Blues

1 0

0 1

0 2

— —

1 3

First period C: Johansen 6 (Savard), 14:46. Penalties: None. Second period B: Tarasenko 14 (Shattenkirk, Steen), 2:09 (pp). Penalties: Jenner, Clm (tripping), :24; Bouwmeester, StL (slashing), 4:43; Hartnell, Clm (holding), 15:58; Campbell, Clm (delay of game), 16:45. Third period B: Upshall 4 (Backes), 6:02. B: Steen 9 (Tarasenko), 19:05 (en). Penalties: None. Shots on goal Columbus 6 8 10 24 Blues 6 18 8 32 Power-plays: Columbus 0 of 1; Blues 1 of 3. Goaltenders: Columbus, Bobrovsky 10-11-0 (31 shots-29 saves). Blues, Allen 11-4-2 (24-23). A: 19,227. Referees: Brad Meier, Graham Skilliter. Linesmen: Scott Driscoll, Bryan Pancich.

Avalanche 5, Jets 3

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Blue Jackets’ David Savard (right) skates of as Blues players celebrate Vladimir Tarasenko’s goal.

Big third period lifts Blues to victory BLUES • FROM D1

Upshall scored and the forward adding an empty-netter with 55 seconds remaining. So in the end, the Blues successively recovered from a 4-3 overtime loss to Pittsburgh on Wednesday by recovering from an inauspicious first period Saturday. They would have had much explaining to do if they failed to respond the way they did in the second. All of the pregame playerspeak focused on the fact that they needed a strong start because it was Columbus coming to town on the second night of a back-to-back set and playing its third game in four nights. But instead of taking it to the Blue Jackets, the Blues spent the first period searching for their rhythm. They gave up the first goal of the game, marking the 14th time in 24 games that has happened this season. But what is perhaps more disturbing is that it has now happened for the seventh time in 11 games at Scottrade Center, including four of the last six on home ice. Columbus went more than nine minutes without a shot on goal, but then scored to take a 1-0 lead with 5:14 left in the opening period. The Blues’ Vladimir Tarasenko failed to clear the puck, and the Blue Jackets’ David Savard kept it in at the point. He then banked a pass of the end boards, which ricocheted in front to Ryan Johansen, who knocked it in for his

sixth goal of the season. It was originally awarded to Boone Jenner, who along with Johansen was camped in front of the net. “Those bounces happen,” Alex Pietrangelo said. “I don’t even know how it went in, but that’s going to happen. We’re going to get bounces like that and bounces like that are going to go against us. Those are the ones that wake you up. It seemed like we picked up the tempo after that.” The Blues had a substantial response in the second period, tying the score on Tarasenko’s 14th goal of the season. Tarasenko was tripped by Jenner 24 seconds into the second period, putting the Blues’ top power-play unit on the ice. They did not come off the ice until Tarasenko scored 1:45 later. After hitting the post early on in the man-advantage, Tarasenko took a pass from Kevin Shattenkirk and ripped a shot from the left circle, beating Columbus goalie Sergei Bobrovsky over the shoulder. “Even if we didn’t score, that’s what you want from a momentum standpoint,” Blues coach Ken Hitchcock said. The Blues were in position to take their first lead of the game when they went on a five-onthree power play with 3:15 left in the second period. They had a couple of scoring chances, but posted no oicial shots on net. But overall, the second period was much more lively than the first, particularly from the Blues’ perspective. “Best we’ve played in a little

while here,” Hitchcock said. They outshot Columbus 18-8 in the period, posting the most shots in a single period this season. Including missed shots and blocked shots, they directed 34 at the net in the middle frame alone. The club also won 17 of 23 faceofs in the second period and enjoyed a 71-percent winning percentage on draws at the second intermission. (They finished the game winning 69.8 percent, the highest total of the season). “In the first period they sat back and trapped us a little bit and again we were a little slow with the puck and it played into the game they wanted,” Steen said. “The longer the game went on, we had a feeling this was going to turn if we just kept pushing in that direction.” But despite starting to dictate the play, the Blues couldn’t make it translate into any scoring. Upshall changed that in the third period, scoring the gamewinner on a feed from David Backes, who with the assist tied former Blue Keith Tkachuk for seventh on the franchise’s alltime point list with 427. But it was Upshall who was rejoicing. “I was fired up,” he said. “I like scoring. I used to do a lot of it.” The Blues celebrated once more, when Steen pumped in an empty-net goal with under a minute to play for his ninth goal of the season. Jeremy Rutherford @jprutherford on Twitter jrutherford@post-dispatch.com

Flyers record fourth shutout to beat Rangers ASSOCIATED PRESS

After a slow start, the Philadelphia Flyers are getting their season turned around. Wayne Simmonds had two goals and an assist and Steve Mason made 24 saves as the Flyers beat the host New York Rangers 3-0 Saturday. “Everybody (is) figuring some things out, team-wise,” Flyers coach Dave Kakstol said. “I haven’t seen any (cracks) in that armor over the last few weeks. Guys have battled hard for each other.”

The shutout was Philadelphia’s league-leading fourth this season. Reserve goaltender Michal Neuvirth has Philadelphia’s other three shutouts. Sean Couturier also scored for the Flyers, who have won two straight. Following a strong start to the season, New York has dropped three in a row.

NOTEBOOK Vigneault criticizes Julien • Rangers coach Alain Vigneault has criticized Bruins coach Claude Julien for making dispar-

aging comments about New York goaltender Henrik Lundqvist. Boston forward Brad Marchand was penalized for goaltender interference 7:59 into the third period of Friday’s game. After the game, Julien said Lundqvist embellished the contact. “The comments were very inappropriate,” Vigneault said. “The way (Lundqvist) conducts himself on the ice, away from the rink, of the ice, the example that he sets. Who would you rather have as a son, Henrik (Lundqvist) or Brad Marchand?”

Winnipeg 0 2 1 — 3 Colorado 2 1 2 — 5 First period: 1, Colorado, Comeau 3, 6:35. 2, Colorado, Landeskog 7 (Duchene, Beauchemin), 11:01. Penalties: None. Second period: 3, Colorado, Soderberg 4 (Duchene, Landeskog), 5:55. 4, Winnipeg, Ladd 6 (Trouba, Lowry), 9:05. 5, Winnipeg, Wheeler 9 (Burmistrov), 13:37 (sh). Penalties: Beauchemin, Col (high-sticking), 6:09; Lowry, Wpg, major (fighting), 11:33; Iginla, Col, major (fighting), 11:33; Peluso, Wpg (tripping), 11:46; Enstrom, Wpg (holding), 14:40. Third period: 6, Colorado, Wagner 2 (Skille, Martinsen), 2:48. 7, Winnipeg, Trouba 2 (Byfuglien, Perreault), 10:54. 8, Colorado, Duchene 12 (Landeskog, MacKinnon), 19:43 (en-pp). Penalties: Holden, Col (tripping), 6:58; Trouba, Wpg (tripping), 19:14. Shots: Winnipeg 11-11-6: 28. Colorado 11-9-5: 25. Power-plays: Winnipeg 0 of 2; Colorado 1 of 3. Goalies: Winnipeg, Hutchinson 5-6-1 (24 shots-20 saves). Colorado, Varlamov 5-6-1 (28-25). A: 16,311.

Stars 4, Wild 3, OT Dallas 0 0 3 1 — 4 Minnesota 2 1 0 0 — 3 First period: 1, Minnesota, Vanek 10 (Brodin, Coyle), 5:52. 2, Minnesota, Coyle 6 (Vanek, Fontaine), 13:27. Penalties: Pominville, Min (slashing), 19:04. Second period: 3, Minnesota, Pominville 1 (Granlund), 1:11. Penalties: Roussel, Dal (unsportsmanlike conduct), 1:17. Third period: 4, Dallas, Goligoski 2 (Jo.Benn, Nichushkin), 4:57. 5, Dallas, Ja.Benn 18 (Eakin), 9:43 (sh). 6, Dallas, Klingberg 5 (Eakin, Seguin), 14:34. Penalties: Suter, Min (cross-checking), 2:40; Oduya, Dal (cross-checking), 8:33. Overtime: 7, Dallas, Seguin 13 (Ja.Benn, Klingberg), 3:57. Penalties: None. Shots: Dallas 7-19-16-2: 44. Minnesota 9-8-7-2: 26. Power-plays: Dallas 0 of 2; Minnesota 0 of 2. Goalies: Dallas, Niemi 10-4-0 (26 shots-23 saves). Minnesota, Kuemper 0-0-2 (44-40). A: 19,024. .

Devils 3, Canadiens 2, OT New Jersey 0 0 2 1 — 3 Montreal 0 1 1 0 — 2 First period: None. Penalties: Galchenyuk, Mon (holding), 10:55; Zajac, NJ (holding), 16:04. Second period: 1, Montreal, Galchenyuk 6 (Beaulieu, Eller), 9:06. Penalties: Pacioretty, Mon (hooking), 14:47. Third period: 2, Montreal, Galchenyuk 7 (Pacioretty, Plekanec), 8:50 (pp). 3, New Jersey, Elias 1 (Larsson, Zajac), 11:01. 4, New Jersey, Palmieri 8 (Moore, Henrique), 19:38. Penalties: Elias, NJ (interference), 8:41. Overtime: 5, New Jersey, Moore 2 (Henrique), 2:31. Penalties: None. Shots: NJ 5-12-12-2: 31. Montreal 10-8-12-2: 32. Power-plays: New Jersey 0 of 2; Montreal 1 of 2. Goalies: New Jersey, Schneider 11-6-2 (32 shots-30 saves). Montreal, Condon 8-2-3 (31-28). A: 21,288.

Oilers 3, Penguins 2, SO Edmonton 2 0 0 0 — 3 Pittsburgh 0 2 0 0 — 2 Edmonton won shootout 2-0 First period: 1, Edmonton, Draisaitl 8 (Hall, Purcell), 2:02. 2, Edmonton, Korpikoski 3 (Sekera, Nugent-Hopkins), 7:30 (pp). Penalties: Scuderi, Pit (tripping), 7:25; B.Pouliot, Edm (tripping), 17:29. Second period: 3, Pittsburgh, Malkin 10, :48. 4, Pittsburgh, Malkin 11 (Letang, Crosby), 3:29 (pp). Penalties: Fayne, Edm (hooking), 3:23; Clendening, Pit (slashing), 10:52; Hall, Edm (high-sticking), 17:36; Schultz, Edm (delay of game), 18:40. Third period: None. Penalties: Dupuis, Pit (interference), 7:28. OT: None. Penalties: Crosby, Pit (holding), 2:45. Shootout: Edmonton 2 (Hendricks G, Eberle G), Pittsburgh 0 (Perron NG, Crosby NG). Shots: EDM 13-9-11-3: 36. PIT 14-11-11-5: 41. Power-plays: Edmonton 1 of 4; Pittsburgh 1 of 4. Goalies: Edmonton, Nilsson 5-6-1 (41 shots-39 saves). Pittsburgh, Zatkoff 2-1-1 (36-34). A: 18,656.

Capitals 4, Maple Leafs 2 Washington 1 3 0 — 4 Toronto 1 1 0 — 2 First period: 1, Washington, Chimera 7, 3:43. 2, Toronto, Holland 4 (Phaneuf), 6:13. Penalties: None. Second period: 3, Washington, T.Wilson 1 (Niskanen, Latta), 4:06. 4, Toronto, Komarov 8 (Phaneuf, van Riemsdyk), 6:26 (pp). 5, Washington, Johansson 5 (Ovechkin, Carlson), 11:08 (pp). 6, Washington, Williams 7 (Chimera, Backstrom), 13:26 (pp). Penalties: Carlson, Was (interference), 6:17; Kadri, Tor (high-sticking), 10:46; Phaneuf, Tor (interference), 12:15; Rielly, Tor (hooking), 17:34. Third period: None. Penalties: Ovechkin, Was (cross-checking), 10:08. Shots: Washington 4-11-8: 23. Toronto 16-4-14: 34. Power-plays: Washington 2 of 3; Toronto 1 of 2. Goalies: Washington, Holtby 15-4-0 (34 shots-32 saves). Toronto, Bernier 0-8-1 (23-19). A: 19,053.

Buffalo 0 2 2 — 4 Nashville 1 0 0 — 1 First period: 1, Nashville, Fisher 5 (Neal), 11:42 (pp). Penalties: C.Smith, Nas (delay of game), 1:08; S.Reinhart, Buf (tripping), 11:38. Second period: 2, Buffalo, McGinn 4 (R.O’Reilly, Franson), 13:09 (pp). 3, Buffalo, S.Reinhart 5 (Moulson, Legwand), 16:13 (pp). Penalties: Girgensons, Buf (holding), 9:09; Arvidsson, Nas, served by Hodgson, major-game misconduct (cross checking), 11:43. Third period: 4, Buffalo, S.Reinhart 6 (McCabe, Kane), :58. 5, Buffalo, R.O’Reilly 8 (Kane), 17:47 (en). Penalties: Franson, Buf (cross-checking), 10:49. Shots: Buffalo 9-10-5: 24. Nashville 13-7-9: 29. Power-plays: Buffalo 2 of 4; Nashville 1 of 3. Goalies: Buffalo, Johnson 6-7-1 (29 shots-28 saves). Nashville, Saros 0-1-0 (23-20). A: 17,217.

Sharks 5, Flames 2 Calgary 0 0 2 — San Jose 2 2 1 — First period: 1, San Jose, Wingels 2 (Vlasic, Hertl), 9:03. 2, San Jose, Hertl 3 (Dillon), 12:36. Penalties: None. Second period: 3, San Jose, Ward 9 (Pavelski, Thornton), 10:04 (pp). 4, San Jose, Marleau 9 (Pavelski, Burns), 10:54 (pp). Penalties: Marleau, SJ (hooking), 1:39; Mueller, SJ (charging), 4:23; Engelland, Cal (roughing), 8:16; Wideman, Cal (high-sticking), 9:51. Third period: 5, Calgary, Granlund 1 (Brodie, Giordano), 9:42. 6, San Jose, Vlasic 3 (Wingels, Nieto), 10:07. 7, Calgary, Ferland 1 (D.Jones), 18:43. Penalties: Colborne, Cal, major (fighting), 9:01; Mueller, SJ, major (fighting), 9:01; Dillon, SJ (hooking), 11:40. Shots: Calgary 10-7-10: 27. San Jose 11-12-6: 29. Power-plays: Calgary 0 of 3; San Jose 2 of 2. Goalies: Calgary, Hiller 2-4-0 (29 shots-24 saves). San Jose, M.Jones 12-6-0 (27-25). A: 17,283.

2 5

Islanders 3, Lightning 2 N.Y. Islanders 0 2 1 — 3 Tampa Bay 1 1 0 — 2 First period: 1, Tampa Bay, Killorn 4 (Stamkos, Stralman), 16:20. Penalties: Boychuk, NYI (interference), 11:16; Namestnikov, TB (hooking), 17:31; Okposo, NYI, major (fighting), 18:05; Callahan, TB, major (fighting), 18:05. Second period: 2, Tampa Bay, Stralman 2 (Stamkos, Filppula), 1:39. 3, N.Y. Islanders, Bailey 5 (Nelson, Strome), 3:51 (pp). 4, N.Y. Islanders, Clutterbuck 5, 16:51. Penalties: Namestnikov, TB (high-sticking), 2:59; Martin, NYI, major (fighting), 4:15; Coburn, TB, major (fighting), 4:15; Bailey, NYI (cross-checking), 17:57. Third period: 5, N.Y. Islanders, Tavares 11 (Nielsen, Leddy), 16:24 (pp). Penalties: Hickey, NYI (hooking), 2:47; Okposo, NYI (hooking), 11:47; Condra, TB (hooking), 15:31. Missed Penalty Shot: Stamkos, TB, 10:26 second. Shots: N.Y. Islanders 6-7-9: 22. Tampa Bay 9-17-5: 31. Power-plays: N.Y. Islanders 2 of 3; Tampa Bay 0 of 4. Goalies: N.Y. Islanders, Greiss 6-3-2 (31 shots-29 saves). Tampa Bay, Bishop 9-8-2 (22-19). A: 19,092.

Coyotes 4, Senators 3 Ottawa 1 1 1 — 3 Arizona 1 2 1 — 4 First period: 1, Arizona, Boedker 7 (Mi.Stone), :38. 2, Ottawa, Hoffman 9 (Ryan, Turris), 7:28. Penalties: Vermette, Ari (hooking), 2:42. Second period: 3, Arizona, Boedker 8 (Vermette, Mi.Stone), :41. 4, Arizona, Jeffrey 1 (Rieder), 4:00. 5, Ottawa, Hoffman 10 (Karlsson, Ma.Stone), 17:57 (pp). Penalties: Jeffrey, Ari (tripping), 1:53; Chiasson, Ott, served by Ryan (interference), 10:28; Murphy, Ari (hooking), 17:30. Third period: 6, Arizona, Boedker 9 (Domi, Vermette), 13:29. 7, Ottawa, Ma.Stone 5 (Karlsson, Methot), 14:44. Penalties: Turris, Ott (slashing), 19:25. Shots: Ottawa 18-8-12: 38. Arizona 4-10-5: 19. Power-plays: Ottawa 1 of 3; Arizona 0 of 2. Goalies: Ottawa, Anderson 10-5-3 (19 shots-15 saves). Arizona, Lindback 3-4-0 (38-35). A: 12,727.

BLUES STATISTICS Through Friday’s games. Player

GP

G

A

P

Vladimir Tarasenko

22

13

9

22

+/-

4

Alexander Steen

23

8

11

19

4

Troy Brouwer

23

5

8

13

2

Colton Parayko

21

5

7

12

10

David Backes

23

5

6

11

1

Jori Lehtera

23

3

8

11

5

Alex Pietrangelo

23

2

9

11

-2

Kevin Shattenkirk

13

2

8

10

-2

Scott Gomez

16

1

7

8

-3

Paul Stastny

7

2

5

7

3

23

1

5

6

0

Jay Bouwmeester Robby Fabbri

17

4

2

6

-1

Dmitrij Jaskin

22

1

4

5

-1

Carl Gunnarsson

23

1

3

4

6

Schwartz - RES

7

0

4

4

4

Flyers 3, Rangers 0

Kyle Brodziak

23

2

1

3

-2

Philadelphia 0 1 2 — 3 NY Rangers 0 0 0 — 0 First period: None. Penalties: L.Schenn, Phi, served by B.Schenn, minor-major-misconduct (instigator, fighting), 10:58; McIlrath, NYR, major (fighting), 10:58; Gudas, Phi (unsportsmanlike conduct), 18:57. Second period: 1, Philadelphia, Simmonds 4 (Read, Del Zotto), 12:24. Penalties: None. Third period: 2, Philadelphia, Couturier 2 (Simmonds, Laughton), 3:06. 3, Philadelphia, Simmonds 5, 19:10 (en). Penalties: McIlrath, NYR (hooking), 6:46; Stoll, NYR (slashing), 7:43. Shots: Philadelphia 4-18-12: 34. NY Rangers 10-7-7: 24. Power-plays: Philadelphia 0 of 2; NY Rangers 0 of 2. Goalies: Philadelphia, Mason 4-7-4 (24 shots-24 saves). NY Rangers, Raanta 4-1-0 (33-31). A: 18,006.

Scottie Upshall

17

3

0

3

-1

Joel Edmundson

20

0

2

2

-1

Steve Ott

17

0

2

2

-1

Magnus Paajarvi

11

1

1

2

-1

5

0

2

2

1

Robert Bortuzzo

Ty Rattie, MNR

14

1

0

1

1

Ryan Reaves

15

0

0

0

0

Goalie J.Allen B. Elliott

GP Min GAA W L OT SO GA SA Sv% 17 972 2.10 10 4

2

3 34 473 .928

8 423 2.70 4 2

1

0 19 187 .898


STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

11.29.2015 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D9

FOOTBALL STATE CHAMPIONSHIPS MISSOURI CLASS 6 • BLUE SPRINGS SOUTH 37, CBC 28

DETHRONED

FOOTBALL ROUNDUP

Kearney halts Webb City’s run BY STEVE OVERBEY AND ADAM ZUVANICH STLhighschoolsports.com

PHOTO BY CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

CBC quarterback Blake Charlton (10) walks of the field with teammates after failing to convert on 4th-and-17 in fourth quarter action during the Class 6 state championship game Friday against Blue Springs South at Edward Jones Dome.

Jaguars surge in second half to take title from Cadets BY DAVID KVIDAHL STLhighschoolsports.com

There must be something about those golden domes. For the third time in its history, Blue Springs South is the Class 6 state football champion. It’s the third time the Jaguars stuck CBC with the runner-up trophy. Blue Springs South put on an epic performance in the last two minutes of the first half and all of the second half for a 37-28 victory Friday night at Edward Jones Dome. The No. 1 team in the STLhigschoolsports.com large-schools rankings and No. 1 in Class 6, CBC (13-1) had its 27-game win streak snapped and its championship defense end on the same field it began. No. 3 Blue Springs South (14-0) trailed CBC 21-6 with two minutes to play in the first half. The Jaguars scored 10 points to cut the lead to 2116 at halftime. Bryce Stone connected on 39-yard field goal as time expired to send the Jaguars into the locker room with a wave of momentum. They rode it all the way to the final whistle. “I went into halftime thinking being down 21-16 is a little bit diferent score,” CBC coach Scott Pingel said. “We never could overcome it.” Senior running back Adam Cofield undid CBC. He rushed for 149 yards and three touchdowns. He caught

two passes for 78 yards and scored on a 67-yard pass from quarterback Noah Nigro to put the Jaguars ahead 30-21 with 3 minutes and 59 seconds to play in the third quarter. The Cadets were unable to contain the Jaguars’ rushing attack. Senior running back Kaylob Hutsell rushed for a 61-yard touchdown late in the third quarter to extend the lead to 3728. Hutsell finished with 81 yards on six carries. Already undermanned on the front line, CBC lost senior defensive end Brien Bledsoe to an apparent shoulder injury with 2:49 left in the first half. “We were pretty thin at D-line, so when we lost Brien I knew that it was going to put us in a bind,” Pingel said. “We tried three or four combinations and they gave us everything they could. But you know, we fought to the end. I like that we kept going but losing him definitely hurt.” The loss overshadowed a recordsetting game by CBC standout running back Tre Bryant. The Nebraskabound star rushed for 186 yards and three touchdowns. He set CBC’s single-season touchdown record with his 29th score of the season. Rayon Simmons, a 2008 graduate, held the record with 28. “You can’t simulate a guy like that in practice,” Blue Springs South coach Greg Oder said. “We haven’t faced a back that big and strong all

year.” CBC quarterback Blake Charlton struggled against Blue Springs South’s defense. He hit on 16 of 25 passes for 224 yards but was intercepted twice. Charlton fumbled in the first half as well. He was sacked six times, including three on the final drive as CBC tried desperately to move the ball down the field. “There was some pressure and they covered pretty well,” Charlton said. “They were good. It was a tough game.” Charlton completed a 25-yard touchdown pass to Roddrick Bryant with 49 seconds to play in the third quarter to cut the Jaguars lead to 3028. Cofield was as much a problem on ofense as he was defense. He came in at linebacker and finished with three sacks. He was the Suburban Gold Conference defensive player of the year. Nigro completed eight of his 12 passes for 195 yards and one touchdown. He rushed for 82 yards on 12 carries but did fumble at the 2-yard line with 4:05 to play and gave CBC one last gasp. Charlton was picked of inside the 20-yard line by Collin West who returned it 47 yards with 2:09 to play. Blue Springs South, which scored 31 of the game’s final 38 points, tallied 21 points in a span of 10:18 in the third quarter.

Kearney High senior quarterback Logan Hinck tried hard to pretend his team wasn’t facing five-time defending state champion Webb City in Friday’s Class 4 state championship football game at Edward Jones Dome. “We respected them,” Hinck said. “How can you not, they’ve been so good for so long? But we were not afraid.” Hinck’s strategy worked wonders as the Bulldogs used a late defensive stand to put an end to Webb City’s dominance with a hard-fought 17-14 win. Kearney (14-1) claimed its fourth state title but first since 2009 by upsetting a Webb City team that carried a 42-game winning streak into the contest. The Cardinals (14-1), long the definitive word in Class 4, had won 88 of their previous 89 games and had not lost to a Missouri opponent since dropping a 2009 semifinal game to Kearney 38-13. Junior safetly Ethan Luft recovered a Webb City fumble in the end zone with 10 seconds left to seal the deal. The Cardinals rallied from a 17-7 deficit and were faced with a secondand-goal from the 1-yard line before Luft came up big. Kearney dictated the tempo early, holding Webb City to 76 yards in the first half on the way to a 10-7 lead. Hinck connected with Aaron Mello on an 8-yard scoring strike late in the first quarter. Marcus Harris provided the eventual game-winning margin with a short scoring run late in the third quarter.

CLASS 2 The first time Lamar gained possession of the football, it gave it right back to Malden. But fumbling away a first-quarter punt wasn’t a bad omen for the Tigers in their quest for an unbeaten

season and a fifth consecutive title. It just delayed their domination by one measly play. Hunter Gepner returned an interception 58 yards for a touchdown one snap after Malden’s Kylus Thompson recovered a muffed punt by Luke Hardman early in the Class 2 final. Lamar never looked back in a 37-0 rout. Other than the early miscue by Hardman — who atoned with a touchdown reception and an interception — and a botched extra point following the only score of the second half, the Tigers (15-0) couldn’t have won much more convincingly. They shut out a team that was averaging 47.7 points per game this season — the Green Wave (14-1) hadn’t scored fewer than 24 in a game before Friday — and did almost as they pleased ofensively.

8-MAN Cory Luke got burned in the defensive backfield early against North Andrew, and he fumbled the football the first time he tried to run with it. Those plays contributed to an early deficit for Stanberry, which trailed throughout the first half in the 8-man state championship. But the Bulldogs didn’t get discouraged, and neither did their junior quarterback and cornerback. Luke accounted for 262 total yards and five touchdowns, including the goahead score on a 35-yard run with 1 minute, 42 seconds remaining. He then teamed up with Tyler Hunter to tackle North Andrew quarterback Gunner Hughes 1 yard short of the end zone as time expired, leading Stanberry to a 46-42 win. Luke helped secure the second state title in four years for Stanberry (13-0), which beat North Andrew (12-1) in the 2012 championship game and lost to the Cardinals in each of the last two finals. The Cardinals had won 37 consecutive games since the 2012 loss to the Bulldogs.

ILLINOIS CLASS 4A • CHICAGO PHILLIPS 51, ALTHOFF 7

Wildcats make history at Crusaders’ expense BY JIM INGHRAM STLhighschoolsports.com

DEKALB • They’ve been playing high school football in the state of Illinois for a long time — way back since 1885. It took almost 100 years for the first state playofs to happen in 1974, and in all that time no Chicago Public schools team had ever taken home a state title. That changed Friday. Chicago Phillips Academy barely had football five years ago but made history with a 51-7 victory against Althof in the Class 4A championship at Northern Illinois University’s Huskie Stadium.

The victory is significant for the Windy City and its thousands and thousands of players, fans and coaches. It’s unfortunate from the Crusaders’ perspective that it came up short at the end of a magnificent season. “It’s really been a long time coming,” Phillips coach Troy McAllister said. “You look at these young men, the crowd. It’s very exciting. We lost (in the championship) last year, so it makes it all the more special.” Things looked good early for Althoff (13-1), which stuffed Phillips (14-0) on its first possession and needed only six plays to go

61 yards and score the first time it had the ball. Senior quarterback Jordan Augustine connected with junior CJ Coldon on an 8-yard touchdown pass for a 7-0 lead. But it was the end of the good times for the Crusaders. The dynamic defensive tandem of senior Amir Watts (6-2, 265) and junior Chris Elmore helped swing the fortunes in Phillips’ favor. “ We s t r u g g l e d u p front,” Althoff coach Ken Turner said. “The Watts kid is pretty good, probably the best we’ve seen in four years. The Elmore kid was pretty good, too. They were just faster and

stronger than us up front. We thought we could some things if we had time, but we didn’t have time. They beat us up front on both sides of the ball.” Phillips defensive ends Malcolm Fox and Devin Johnson are both 225 pounds and quick. They caused numerous headaches for the Crusaders. Althoff gained 61 yards on its first possession and had a combined 55 yards on its next eight, which covered the second and third quarters. “They just dug in on the line,” Turner said. “Athlete wise we matched up well, but we couldn’t handle them up front.”

FRIDAY’S RESULTS FOOTBALL Kearney 7 3 7 0 17 Webb City 0 7 0 7 14 K: Hinck 8 pass from Mello (Goepferich kick), 7:57 W: Burroughs 5 run (Duley kick), 11:12 K: Goepferich 44 FG, 1:32 K: Harris 1 run (Goepferich kick), 1:05 W: Roderique 3 run (Duley kick), 4:22 Malden 0 0 0 0 0 Lamar 14 17 6 0 37 L: H. Gepner 58 interception (Morrow kick), 11:21 L: Lucas 1 run (Morrow kick), 6:25 L: Morrow 20 FG, 9:28 L: Hardman 14 pass from McKarus (Morrow kick), 4:57 L: Wilkerson 7 pass from McKarus (Morrow kick), 1:02 L: Embry 1 run (kick failed), 3:56 Althof 7 0 0 0 7 Chicago Phill 14 14 20 3 51 A: Coldon 8 pass from Augustine (Galloway kick), 6:42 C: Skanes 41 run (Osei kick), 5:08 C: Weatherley 36 pass from Skanes (Osei kick), 1:13 C: 31 run (Osei kick), 11:05 C: Mosby 8 run (Osei kick), 4:02 C: Skanes 3 run (Osei kick), 10:40 C: Skanes 36 run (kick failed), 6:59 C: Watts 16 fumble recovery (Osei kick), 2:00 C: Osei 21 FG, 4:39

BOYS BASKETBALL Freeburg 5 6 8 10 29 Roxana 17 15 9 11 52 F: Diecker 8, Haug 8. FG 10 (1), FT 8-14. R: Gentry 21, Golenor 17. FG 18 (9), FT 7-11.

SEAN KING • Special to STLhighschoolsports.com

Belleville Althof’s Ta’Jarin Falconer (70) consoles Keenen Young (1) after a loss to Chicago Phillips in a 4A state final game at Huskie Stadium in DeKalb, IL on Friday.

As dominant as the Wildcats defense was, senior quarterback Quayvon Skanes did just as much damage on the offensive side of the ball. Less than two minutes after the Crusaders scored,

Skanes, a Connecticut recruit, scored the first of his four touchdowns on a 41-yard run. A minute into the second quarter, Skanes scored again — this time from 31 yards — to give Phillips the lead for good.

SATURDAY’S SCHEDULE Wood River 10 20 16 11 57 Marissa 11 8 15 18 52 W: Marks 25. FG 16 (3), FT 22-36.M: Stoddard 23, Howie 14. FG 19 (5), FT 9-17.

Triad 9 13 24 16 62 Nokomis 10 8 8 21 47 T: Moss 24. FG 22 (5), FT 13-16. N: Detmer 12, Sabol 12. FG 16 (2), FT 13-16.

Dupo 11 16 11 12 50 Christ Our Ro 11 23 8 12 54 D: Francis 17, Overbay 11, Cozart 10. FG 15 (6), FT 14-20. C: Palm 18, Fleeman 11, Heard 10. FG 20 (4), FT 10-13.

E. St. Louis 14 18 12 10 54 Peoria Manual 20 16 19 13 68 E: Estes 20, Roberson 12. FG 22 (2), FT 8-22.

Litchfield 28 10 10 9 57 Southwestern 25 14 14 20 73 L: Franke 21, Simmons 17, Scharf 11. FG 22 (5), FT 8-12. S: J. Bailey 40, Baumgartner 18. FG 25 (12), FT 11-20. Gillespie 16 8 11 12 47 Gibault 21 13 12 23 69 Gl: N. Price 18, Fox 12. FG 15 (11), FT 6-9. Gb: Davis 26, Deterding 19. FG 29 (5), FT 6-8. Carbondale 18 20 15 Highland 11 9 10 H: Portell 20. FG 22 (4), FT 3-7.

11 21

64 51

Roxana 21 29 23 9 82 Odin 9 17 15 11 52 R: Gentry 29, Golenor 15, Vandiver 15. FG 32 (17), FT 1-3. O: Quick 23, Sanders 12. FG 19 (5), FT 9-18. Jacksonville 15 14 21 14 64 Northwest Ac. 8 21 10 23 62 J: Hays 30, McCombs 14, T. Rose 11. FG 22 (6), FT 14-29. N: James 14, Williams 12, Childs 11, W. Warren 10. FG 22 (7), FT 11-15.

Wood River 15 15 9 20 Valmeyer 14 8 8 9 V: Chism 11. FG 17 (1), FT 4-11.

59 39

Civic Mem. 22 11 10 25 68 Taylorville 14 15 11 12 52 C: D. Lane 13, Adams 12, J. Williams 12, Hill 11. FG 23 (6), FT 16-22. Cahokia 15 11 11 11 48 Champaign Cen 17 9 15 22 63 Ca: Bell 12, Crumble 11. FG 20 (4), FT 4-9.

Collinsville 9 14 7 26 56 Marion 15 7 15 17 54 C: Midgett 21, Maden 12, Johnson 11. FG 23 (6), FT 4-5. M: Shadowens 20, Lacy 15. FG 20 (3), FT 11-16. Gibault 13 11 12 13 49 A. Marquette 11 11 15 8 45 G: Deterding 20, Davis 17. FG 22 (3), FT 2-5. CBC 18 17 25 19 79 Lanphier 24 17 18 14 73 C: Willis 21, Barnes 20, Catchings 16, Clark 11, Nunn 11. FG 24 (8), FT 23-33.

GIRLS BASKETBALL Champaign Cen 6 7 6 4 23 Edwardsville 23 19 27 12 81 E: Silvey 22, Martin 15, Pranger 14. FG 31 (6), FT 13-18.

O’Fallon 11 12 21 23 67 Althof 21 16 19 25 81 O: Dunlap 23, Armstrong 15, Norfleet 12. FG 26 (7), FT 8-10.

Dexter 12 10 19 19 60 St. Joseph’s 10 25 13 16 64 D: Reynolds 21, C. Mosby 19. FG 22 (8), FT 8-26. S: McLaughlin 25, Stock 11, Kerr 10. FG 20 (2), FT 22-34.

Glenwood 6 11 13 17 47 Alton 19 11 11 17 58 G: Allen 22, Hunt 11. FG 19 (2), FT 7-9. A: Edwards 20, Latham 13, Caldwell 10. FG 17 (9), FT 15-22.

Rock Bridge 10 4 10 10 34 Kirkwood 14 15 16 11 56 R: Ellis 11. FG 11 (1), FT 11-13. K: Roundtree 21, Bracy 10. FG 21 (6), FT 8-17.

Bellvl. East 18 2 12 7 39 Centralia, Il 18 10 20 13 61 B: Pickett 20, Sylvester 11. FG 15 (5), FT 4-8. C: Billberry 15, Owens 14, Berry 12, Poennies 12. FG 23 (6), FT 9-14.

Metro Acad 2 7 3 7 19 Edwardsville 23 22 20 8 73 E: Silvey 17, Martin 15, Waters 14, Pranger 11. FG 31 (3), FT 8-11. Pky. North 18 11 20 24 73 Tucker (Ga.) 9 19 8 18 54 P: Sutton 24, May 11. FG 30 (5), FT 8-16.

Fort Zumwalt East vs. Ladue, at Afton Rink, 7:30 p.m. Webster Groves vs. St. Mary’s, at Webster Rink, 8:45 p.m. Parkway South vs. Lutheran South, at Afton Rink, 9:15 p.m. Lafayette vs. Kirkwood, at Kirkwood Rink, 9:15 p.m. Marquette vs. Seckman, at Webster Rink, 10:30 p.m.

McCluer North vs. Cardinal Ritter, at Borgia, 6 p.m. Jerseyville vs. Mascoutah, at Centralia, Il, 6:15 p.m. Mount Vernon vs. Collinsville, at Herrin, 6:30 p.m. Nashville at Lebanon, 6:30 p.m. Jacksonville at Alton, 7:30 p.m. North Tech at Borgia, 7:30 p.m. Sumner at Murphysboro, 7:30 p.m. Wesclin vs. Columbia, at Lebanon, 8 p.m. Columbia at Wesclin, 8 p.m. CBC vs. Peoria Manual at Springfield Lanphier, 8 p.m.

WRESTLING

GIRLS BASKETBALL

HOCKEY

Belleville West at Lockport, 9 a.m. Belleville West vs. Chicago Mt. Carmel, at Lockport, 10 a.m. O’Fallon Duals at O’Fallon, 11 a.m. Belleville West vs. Minooka, at Lockport, 11 a.m.

BOYS BASKETBALL Dupo vs. Marissa, at ME Lutheran, 10:30 a.m. Jerseyville vs. Belleville East, at Centralia, 11 a.m. Staunton vs. Freeburg, at ME Lutheran, 11:30 a.m. Washington vs. Normandy, at Borgia, noon Mascoutah vs. Springfield, IL, at Centralia, Il, 12:30 p.m. Cartervillevs.Sumner,atMurphysboro,12:30p.m. Union vs. Fatima, at Borgia, 1:30 p.m. Carbondale at Waterloo, 2 p.m. Vashon at New Madrid CC, 2:30 p.m. North Clay vs. Okawville, at Carlyle, 3 p.m. Blue Knights vs. Carnahan, at Borgia, 3 p.m. Highland vs. O’Fallon, at Waterloo, 3:30 p.m. Granite City vs. Civic Mem., at Nokomis, 4:30 p.m. Carlyle vs. Flora, at Carlyle, 4:30 p.m. Soldan vs. Pacific, at Borgia, 4:30 p.m. Althof vs. Edwardsville, at Waterloo, 5 p.m. Gillespie vs. Litchfield, at ME Luth., 5:30 p.m. Chatham vs. NW Academy, at Alton, 6 p.m.

Rochester vs. East St. Louis, at Southeast, 9 a.m. Carlyle vs. Belleville East, at Salem, 10:30 a.m. Haz. Central vs. Cor Jesu, at Ursuline, 11 a.m. Althof at Morton, 11:45 a.m. Highland vs. Teutopolis, at Salem, noon Freeburg vs. Mount Vernon, at Nashville, noon Highland vs. Teutopolis, at Salem, noon Jackson at St. James, 12:30 p.m. North Tech vs. MICDS, at Ursuline, 1 p.m. Dexter vs. Kirkwood, at St. Joseph’s, 1 p.m. Civic Memorial at Salem, 1:30 p.m. Rochestervs.Edwardsville,atSoutheast,1:30p.m. Brussels at Canton, 2 p.m. John Burroughs at Ursuline, 3 p.m. East St. Louis vs. Champaign Central, at Southeast, 3 p.m. Althof vs. Normal, at Morton, 3:15 p.m. Rock Bridge at St. Joseph’s, 4 p.m. Parkway North vs. Arch.McCarthy(Fla., at Murfreesboro, 4:30 p.m. Metro at Spg. Southeast, 4:30 p.m. Incarnate Word vs. Alton Marquette, at Ursuline, 5 p.m. Edwardsville vs. Peoria Central, at Southeast, 6 p.m. Park Hills Central vs. St. Charles, at St. James, 6:30 p.m.


SPORTS

11.29.2015 • Sunday • M 2 AMERICA’S LINE

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

NFL

NFL Favorite

Division II playofs

Leaders • Week 12

SECOND ROUND • SATURDAY, NOV. 28 Northwest Missouri St. 54, Humboldt State 7 Shepherd 17, Indiana (Pa.) 13 West Georgia 27, Valdosta State 20 Slippery Rock 41, Assumption 39 Grand Valley State 38, Ferris State 34 Tuskegee 35, North Alabama 31 Emporia State 29, Henderson State 3 Colorado State-Pueblo 26, Midwestern State (Texas) 17 QUARTERFINALS • DEC. 5 Shepherd (11-0) vs. Slippery Rock (12-1), TBA West Georgia (10-1) vs. Tuskegee (10-2), TBA Colorado State-Pueblo (12-1) vs. Grand Valley State (11-2), TBA Northwest Missouri State (11-0) vs. Emporia State (10-2), TBA SEMIFINALS • DEC. 12 Shepherd-Slippery Rock winner vs. Colorado State-Pueblo-Grand Valley State winner, TBA West Georgia-Tuskegee winner vs. Northwest Missouri State-Emporia State winner, TBA CHAMPIONSHIP • DEC. 19 Kansas City, Kan., 3 p.m.

SCORING

Points Underdog Open-Current TEXANS 3-3 Saints FALCONS 2-2 Vikings BENGALS 8.5-9 Rams COLTS 3-3 Bucs Giants 1.5-2.5 WASHINGTON Raiders 2-1 TITANS CHIEFS NL-6 Bills JETS 3.5-4 Dolphins JAGUARS 4-5 Chargers Cards 10-10 49ERS SEAHAWKS 4.5-4 Steelers Patriots 3-3 BRONCOS Monday BROWNS 1-3 Ravens NBA Favorite Points Underdog HORNETS 6.5 Bucks CLIPPERS 8 T’Wolves RAPTORS 5 Suns Pistons 4.5 NETS GRIZZLIES 11 76ers Celtics 1.5 MAGIC Rockets 1.5 KNICKS Pacers 9 LAKERS COLLEGE BASKETBALL Favorite Points Underdog DUKE 16 Utah St OKLAHOMA 8.5 Wisconsin SMU 23 Brown TEMPLE 12 Delaware ARIZONA ST 8 Cal-Santa Barb UT-Arlington 3.5 RICE UCLA 17 CS-Northridge Advocare Invitational Orlando, FL Iowa 4.5 Wichita St Usc NL Monmouth Xavier 3.5 Dayton Notre Dame 10 Alabama DirecTV Wooden Classic Anaheim, CA Cal-Irvine 1 Evansville Arizona 4 Boise St Boston College 7 Santa Clara Michigan St 8.5 Providence Sacramento State Tournament Sacramento, CA S Dakota NL E Washington SACRAMENTO ST NL Pacific Added Games RHODE ISLAND 12 Rider COLORADO 25 No Colorado n-W Michigan PK Mercer PEPPERDINE 8 Montana n- Nashville, TN. NHL Favorite Odds Underdog RED WINGS -$140/+$120 Panthers Home team in CAPS © 2015 Benjamin Eckstein

TRANSACTIONS FOOTBALL • NFL CHICAGO BEARS — Signed LS Patrick Scales. Waived LS Thomas Gafford. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS — Activated CB Jeremy Lane from the PUP list. Released RB Bryce Brown. TENNESSEE TITANS — Signed LB Yannik Cudjoe-Virgil from the practice squad. Waived WR Rico Richardson. HOCKEY • NHL NHL — Suspended Columbus F Brandon Dubinsky one game for cross-checking Pittsburgh F Sidney Crosby in the back of the head during a Nov. 27 game. DETROIT RED WINGS — Recalled RW Tomas Jurco from Grand Rapids (AHL) TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING — Recalled F Mike Angelidis from the Syracuse (AHL). COLLEGE FLORIDA — Sus. WR Demarcus Robinson. ILLINOIS — Agreed to terms with football coach Bill Cubit on a two-year contract. TULANE — Fired fb coach Curtis Johnson.

AREA COLLEGES Saturday’s scores FOOTBALL Northwestern 24, Illinois 14 Northwest Missouri 54, Humboldt State (Calif.) 7 UNI 53, Eastern Illinois 17 WOMEN’S BASKETBALL Truman State 61, Culver-Stockton 42 UMSL 74, Findlay 59 Webster University 56, Augustana (Ill.) 50 SLU 78, Eastern Illinois 47 MEN’S BASKETBALL Louisville 77, SLU 57 No. 4 Iowa State 84, Illinois 73 Green Bay 81, Eastern Illinois 72 SIU-Carbondale 80, Portland 79 Butler 89, SIU-Edwardsville 73 Loyola Marymount 73, South East Missouri State 60 Ole Miss 67, Bradley 54 William Jewell 90, Wayne State 87 Rust College 83, Webster University 70 Maryville 79, Hannibal-LaGrange 77 Fontbonne 112, Concordia Chicago 102 Washington University 49, Illinois College 51 McKendree 86, Trevecca Nazarene 80 WOMEN’S VOLLEYBALL Wichita State 3, Missouri State 2 (24-26, 20-25, 27-25, 25-17, 18-16) SUNDAY BASKETBALL SCHEDULE M: Washington at Hanover, 2 p.m. W: Washington vs. DePaul/ Illinois Wesleyan, TBA MONDAY BASKETBALL SCHEDULE W: SIUC at Memphis, 2 p.m. W: SLU vs. Missouri-St. Louis, 7 p.m. M: SIUE vs. Green Bay, 7 p.m. M: Southwestern Illinois vs. Washington U. JV, 7 p.m. W: Lewis & Clark at Missouri Valley JV, 8 p.m.

GOLF EURO TOUR • Alfred Dunhill Championship leaders Saturday | Malelane, South Africa Purse: $1.6 million Yardage: 7,287; Par: 72 Third Round C. Schwartzel, S. Africa 66-67-70 B. Hebert, France 68-70-68 S. Gros, France 71-72-63 D. Frittelli, S. Africa 69-73-66 D. Drysdale, Scotland 71-69-69 J. Luiten, Netherlands 68-70-71 G. Bourdy, France 70-72-67 L. Jensen, Denmark 70-72-67 M. Ford, England 67-74-69 B. Grace, South Africa 71-73-66 T. Linard, France 72-71-67 J. Scrivener, Australia 69-70-72 D. Burmester, S. Africa 71-70-70 S. Norris, South Africa 70-70-71 V. Groenewald, S. Africa 68-73-70 T. Murray, England 71-71-69 N. Fasth, Sweden 68-74-69 K. Horne, South Africa 70-72-69 A. Curlewis, South Africa 70-72-69

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

203 206 206 208 209 209 209 209 210 210 210 211 211 211 211 211 211 211 211

PGA • Australian Open leaders Saturday | Sydney Purse: $901,170 Yardage: 7,230; Par: 71 Third Round Matt Jones, Australia 67-68-68 — 203 Jordan Spieth, U.S. 71-68-67 — 206 Rhein Gibson, Australia 72-68-68 — 208 Lincoln Tighe, Australia 66-73-70 — 209 Aron Price, Australia 71-68-70 — 209 Geoff Ogilvy, Australia 68-71-71 — 210 Adam Scott, Australia 71-73-68 — 212 Brett Rumford, Australia 69-74-69 — 212 Darren Clarke, N. Ireland 75-67-70 — 212 Todd Sinnott, Australia 68-70-74 — 212 Nick Cullen, Australia 70-73-70 — 213 Geoff Drakeford, Australia 75-71-68 — 214 Jinho Choi, South Korea 75-68-71 — 214 Anthony Houston, Australia 71-74-70 — 215 Rohan Blizard, Australia 73-71-71 — 215 James Nitties, Australia 73-71-71 — 215 Gareth Paddison, NZ 73-71-71 — 215 Wade Ormsby, Australia 71-71-73 — 215 Terry Pilkadaris, Australia 71-71-73 — 215 Brett Rankin, Australia 73-68-74 — 215 Nicolas Colsaerts, Belgium 73-66-76 — 215 Daniel Valente, Australia 72-74-70 — 216 a-Jordan Niebrugge, U.S. 77-69-70 — 216 Paul Hayden, Australia 75-71-70 — 216 Daniel Fox, Australia 75-71-70 — 216 David Bransdon, Australia 73-73-70 — 216 Aaron Pike, Australia 73-72-71 — 216 a-Yu Chun-an, Taiwan 68-76-72 — 216 Pan Cheng-tsung, Taiwan 73-70-73 — 216 David Klein, Germany 72-71-73 — 216 Alistair Presnell, Australia 69-73-74 — 216 a-Bryson DeChambeau, U.S. 70-72-74 — 216 Grant Thomas, Australia 70-72-74 — 216 Richard Green, Australia 72-69-75 — 216

MOTOR SPORTS Abu Dhabi Grand Prix lineup After Saturday qualifying; race Sunday At Yas Marina Circuit | Abu Dhabi, UAE Lap length: 3.451 miles THIRD SESSION 1. Nico Rosberg, Germany, Mercedes 1:40.237 2. Lewis Hamilton, ENG, Mercedes 1:40.614 3. Kimi Raikkonen, Finland, Ferrari 1:41.051 4. Sergio Perez, Mexico, Force India 1:41.184 5. Daniel Ricciardo, AUS, Red Bull 1:41.444 6. Valtteri Bottas, Finland, Williams 1:41.656 7. Nico Hulkenberg, GER, Force India 1:41.686 8. Felipe Massa, Brazil, Williams 1:41.759 9. Daniil Kvyat, Russia, Red Bull 1:41.933 10. Carlos Sainz Jr., SP, Toro Rosso 1:42.708 Eliminated after second session 11. Max Verstappen, NET, Toro Rosso 1:42.521 12. Jenson Button, ENG, McLaren 1:42.668 13. Pastor Maldonado, VEN, Lotus 1:42.807 14. Felipe Nasr, Brazil, Sauber 1:43.614 Eliminated after first session 15. Romain Grosjean, France, Lotus 1:42.585 16. Sebastian Vettel, GER, Ferrari 1:42.941 17. Fernando Alonso, SP, McLaren 1:43.187 18. Marcus Ericsson, SWE, Sauber 1:43.838 19. Will Stevens, England, Marussia 1:46.297 20. Roberto Merhi, Spain, Marussia 1:47.434

Division III playofs First Round • Nov. 21 Thomas More 51, Washington & Lee 21 Wabash 35, Albion 14 Cortland State 45, Salisbury 21 Mount Union 55, St. Lawrence 23 Albright 49, Norwich 0 Wesley 42, Framingham State 22 John Hopkins 52, Western New England 20 Ohio Northern 27, Franklin 22 St. Thomas (Minn.) 57, LaVerne 14 St. John’s (Minn.) 51), Dubuque 7 Huntingdon 38, Hendrix 27 Mary Hardin-Baylor 37, Hardin-Simmons 19 Wisconsin-Whitewater 48, St. Norbert 0 Wheaton (Ill.) 55, Lakeland 6 Linfield 48, Whitworth 10 Wisconsin-Oshkosh 48, St. Scholastica 0 Second Round • Nov. 28 Mount Union 66, Albright 7 Wesley 42, Johns Hopkins 37 Wabash 33, Thomas More 27, OT St. Thomas (Minn.) 38, St. John’s (Minn.) 19 Wisconsin-Whitewater 31, Wheaton (Ill.) 17 Mary Hardin-Baylor 43, Huntingdon 23 Wisconsin-Oshkosh 42, Ohio Northern 7 Linfield 38, Cortland State 22 Quarterfinals • Dec. 5 St. Thomas (Minn.) (12-0) vs. Wabash (12-0) Linfield (11-0) vs. Mary Hardin-Baylor (11-1) Mount Union (12-0) vs. Wesley (11-1) Wisconsin-Oshkosh (11-1) vs. Wisconsin-Whitewater (11-1) Semifinals • Dec. 12 TBA Championship • Dec. 18 6 p.m., Salem, Va.

FCS playofs FIRST ROUND • SATURDAY, NOV. 28 Western Illinois 24, Dayton 7 Chattanooga 50, Fordham 20 The Citadel 41, Coastal Carolina 38 Sam Houston State 42, Southern Utah 39 Montana 24, South Dakota State 17 Colgate 27, New Hampshire 20 William & Mary 52, Duquesne 49 Northern Iowa 53, Eastern Illinois 17 SECOND ROUND • DEC. 5 William & Mary (9-3) at Richmond (8-3), 11 a.m. The Citadel (9-3) at Charleston Southern (9-2), Noon Colgate (8-4) at James Madison (9-2), Noon W. Illinois (7-5) at Illinois State (9-2), 1 p.m. Chattanooga (9-3) at Jacksonville State (10-1), 1 p.m. Montana (8-4) at ND State (9-2), 2:30 p.m. Sam Houston State (9-3) at McNeese State (10-0), 6 p.m. N. Iowa (8-4) at Portland St. (9-2), 9 p.m. Quarterfinals • Dec. 11-12 TBD Semifinals • Dec. 18-19 TBD Championship • Jan. 9 11 a.m., Frisco, Texas

HOCKEY NHL leaders Through Friday’s games GOALS Jamie Benn DAL Patrick Kane CHI Vladimir Tarasenko STL Alex Ovechkin, WAS Max Pacioretty MON Joe Pavelski SJ Tyler Seguin DAL Matt Duchene COL Adam Henrique NJ Boone Jenner COL Daniel Sedin VAN Steven Stamkos TB Tyler Toffoli LA Kyle Turris, Ottawa

GP 23 23 22 21 24 22 23 22 22 24 24 24 22 22

G 17 13 13 12 12 12 12 11 11 11 11 11 11 11

ASSISTS Patrick Kane CHI John Klingberg DAL Tyler Seguin DAL Erik Karlsson OTT P.K. Subban MON Evgeny Kuznetsov WAS Ryan Suter MIN

GP 23 23 23 22 24 22 21

A 22 21 20 19 19 18 17

POWER PLAY GOALS Jamie Benn DAL Justin Faulk CAR Patrick Kane CHI Steven Stamkos TB Patrice Bergeron BOS Loui Eriksson BOS Evgeni Malkin PIT Corey Perry ANA Brandon Saad COL Shea Weber NAS

GP 23 23 23 24 22 22 22 24 23 22

PP 8 8 6 6 5 5 5 5 5 5

SHORT HANDED GOALS Jean-Gabriel Pagea OTT Artem Anisimov CHI Paul Byron MON Cody Eakin DAL Eric Fehr PIT Adam Henrique NJ Bryan Little WIN Brad Marchand BOS Mika Zibanejad OTT

GP 22 23 12 23 12 22 24 20 22

SH 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

Shots Alex Ovechkin WAS Brent Burns SJ Taylor Hall EDM Daniel Sedin VAN Max Pacioretty MON Tyler Seguin DAL Nazem Kadri TOR Patrick Kane CHI Radim Vrbata VAN Nathan MacKinnon COL Vladimir Tarasenko St Louis

GP 21 22 23 24 24 23 22 23 22 22 22

S 115 102 96 93 92 90 87 86 83 82 82

PLUS/MINUS Jeff Carter LA Evgeny Kuznetsov WAS Patrick Kane CHI Kevin Klein NYR Dylan Larkin DET Ryan McDonagh NYR P.K. Subban MON Tyler Toffoli LA Tom Gilbert MON

GP 22 22 23 23 23 23 24 22 24

+/14 14 13 13 13 13 13 13 12

GOALIES GAA GPI MINS GA AVG Braden Holtby WAS 18 1076 35 1.95 Ben Bishop TB 18 1087 36 1.99 Jaroslav Halak NYI 13 743 25 2.02 Cory Schneider NJ 18 1090 37 2.04 Michal Neuvirth PHI 11 615 21 2.05 Henrik Lundqvist NYR 19 1140 39 2.05 Carey Price MON 12 698 24 2.06 James Reimer TOR 15 899 31 2.07 Jake Allen STL 17 972 34 2.10 Martin Jones SJ 18 1011 36 2.14 SAVES MIN Michal Neuvirth PHI 615 Henrik Lundqvist NYR 1140 Carey Price MON 698 James Reimer TOR 899 Petr Mrazek DET 734 Ben Bishop TB 1087 Jake Allen STL 972 Cory Schneider NJ 1090 Thomas Greiss NYI 584 Marc-Andre Fleury PIT 1135

GA 21 39 24 31 27 36 34 37 22 42

SA 345 611 365 468 393 505 473 508 300 569

W-L-O 5-3-1 12-5-2 10-2-0 7-3-4 6-4-2 9-7-2 10-4-2 10-6-2 5-3-2 11-7-1

RECORD GPI MIN W-L-OT Braden Holtby WAS 18 1076 14-4-0 Henrik Lundqvist NYR 19 1140 12-5-2 Corey Crawford CHI 18 1039 11-6-1 Martin Jones SJ 18 1011 11-6-0 Devan Dubnyk MIN 20 1177 11-7-2 Marc-Andre Fleury PIT 19 1135 11-7-1 Carey Price MON 12 698 10-2-0 Jake Allen STL 17 972 10-4-2 Craig Anderson OTT 17 1041 10-4-3 Pekka Rinne NAS 19 1152 10-5-4 SHUTOUTS Jake Allen STL Devan Dubnyk MIN Martin Jones SJ Michal Neuvirth PHI Craig Anderson OTT Reto Berra COL Corey Crawford CHI Marc-Andre Fleury PIT Jaroslav Halak NYI Henrik Lundqvist NYR

GPI 17 20 18 11 17 12 18 19 13 19

SO 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2

W-L-OT 10-4-2 11-7-2 11-6-0 5-3-1 10-4-3 4-7-0 11-6-1 11-7-1 6-4-2 12-5-2

BASKETBALL NBA scoring leaders Through Friday’s games Scoring G Curry, GOL 17 Harden, HOU 16 Westbrook, OKC 17 George, IND 15 James, CLE 16 Lillard, POR 16 Griffin, LAC 16 Davis, NOR 13 Bledsoe, PHX 15 Anthony, NYK 17

FG 184 135 160 131 154 140 163 110 120 130

FT 100 165 115 88 82 77 72 71 73 88

PTS 555 481 463 396 410 402 401 299 341 376

AVG 32.6 30.1 27.2 26.4 25.6 25.1 25.1 23.0 22.7 22.1

NBA STANDINGS EASTERN CONFERENCE

NONKICKERS TD Rus Rec Ret X2 Pts Eifert, CIN 11 0 11 0 0 66 D. Freeman, ATL 11 9 2 0 0 66 De. Hopkins, HOU 9 0 9 0 1 56 Je. Hill, CIN 8 7 1 0 1 50 Beckham Jr., NYG 8 0 8 0 0 48 Gronkowski, NWE 8 0 8 0 0 48 Jam. Jones, GBY 7 0 7 0 1 44 J. Langford, CHI 7 6 1 0 1 44 T. Austin, STL 7 2 4 1 0 42 Barnidge, CLE 7 0 7 0 0 42 Blount, NWE 7 6 1 0 0 42 Decker, NYJ 7 0 7 0 0 42 Edelman, NWE 7 0 7 0 0 42 Fitzgerald, ARI 7 0 7 0 0 42 Hurns, JAX 7 0 7 0 0 42 Ivory, NYJ 7 6 1 0 0 42 Da. Johnson, ARI 7 3 3 1 0 42 Ju. Jones, ATL 7 0 6 0 0 42 B. Marshall, NYJ 7 0 7 0 0 42 L. Miller, MIA 7 5 2 0 0 42 C. Newton, CAR 7 7 0 0 0 42 A. Robinson, JAX 7 0 7 0 0 42 Ka. Williams, BUF 7 5 2 0 0 42 KICKERS Gano, CAR Gostkowski, NWE Jos. Brown, NYG Santos, KAN Catanzaro, ARI Gould, CHI Tucker, BAL Walsh, MIN Da. Bailey, DAL Crosby, GBY Hauschka, SEA McManus, DEN J. Myers, JAX Janikowski, OAK Nugent, CIN Lambo, SND Du. Hopkins, WAS Mat. Bryant, ATL D. Carpenter, BUF Prater, DET Coons, CLE Zuerlein, STL Barth, TAM Vinatieri, IND Ph. Dawson, SNF Folk, NYJ Sturgis, PHL Succop, TEN Boswell, PIT Franks, MIA

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D9

PAT 35/37 36/36 26/27 24/25 38/40 17/18 20/20 17/20 19/19 25/25 19/21 22/22 19/22 27/27 30/31 17/20 21/21 26/26 24/26 22/25 14/16 16/17 15/15 24/25 11/11 19/19 18/20 18/18 10/11 23/25

FG 25/30 23/24 23/23 23/28 18/20 24/27 22/28 22/26 21/22 19/21 21/22 20/21 18/22 15/18 14/17 18/20 16/17 14/18 14/17 14/14 16/16 15/23 15/17 12/14 16/17 13/16 13/17 12/14 14/15 8/10

Lg Pts 52 110 57 105 53 95 51 93 43 92 55 89 52 86 53 83 53 82 56 82 54 82 57 82 58 73 56 72 47 72 54 71 54 69 47 68 52 66 52 64 44 62 61 61 53 60 55 60 54 59 55 58 53 57 51 54 51 52 53 47

Pct 64.2 66.3 65.1 69.5 67.9 63.3 68.6 60.5 66.8 64.6 67.5 65.3 65 63.9 59.5 63.2 64.9 68.3 65.5 57.2 62.8 64.6 58.3 64.4 63.9 56.5 58.4 59 56.6 55.3 59.9 53.1

Yds TD 3066 27 3320 25 2738 20 2972 20 1669 11 2565 21 3211 19 2684 24 1887 10 2700 21 2378 13 2026 13 1897 11 2426 10 1704 13 2510 14 2944 20 2485 15 2982 15 2466 20 2640 17 2106 8 2405 15 2791 14 2297 11 2623 20 2199 16 1615 6 1678 7 1881 15 2180 9 770 3

PASSERS Att/Comp C. Palmer, ARI 338/217 Brady, NWE 409/271 Dalton, CIN 335/218 Brees, NOR 370/257 T. Taylor, BUF 212/144 D. Carr, OAK 341/216 Rivers, SND 420/288 A. Rodgers, GBY 390/236 Roethlisberger, PIT 211/141 E. Manning, NYG 384/248 Ru. Wilson, SEA 295/199 Mariota, TEN 259/169 J. McCown, CLE 254/165 Al. Smith, KAN 324/207 Hoyer, HOU 237/141 Cutler, CHI 334/211 M. Stafford, DET 410/266 Cousins, WAS 363/248 M. Ryan, ATL 403/264 C. Newton, CAR 332/190 Tannehill, MIA 358/225 Bridgewater, MIN 291/188 J. Winston, TAM 314/183 Flacco, BAL 413/266 Bradford, PHL 335/214 Bortles, JAX 386/218 Fitzpatrick, NYJ 322/188 Kaepernick, SNF 244/144 Foles, STL 256/145 Luck, IND 293/162 P. Manning, DEN 322/193 Mallett, HOU 147/78

RECEIVERS RECEPTIONS Ju. Jones, ATL An. Brown, PIT De. Hopkins, HOU Fitzgerald, ARI Dem. Thomas, DEN Ca. Johnson, DET K. Allen, SND Beckham Jr., NYG Landry, MIA B. Marshall, NYJ Edelman, NWE A. Green, CIN G. Tate, DET Jo. Matthews, PHL Crabtree, OAK Witten, DAL T. Riddick, DET Olsen, CAR R. Cobb, GBY D. Walker, TEN Gronkowski, NWE A. Cooper, OAK A. Robinson, JAX Cooks, NOR T. Kelce, KAN Ma. Bennett, CHI Amendola, NWE T. Benjamin, CLE Barnidge, CLE

No 89 79 76 73 71 67 67 63 63 62 61 59 59 58 57 55 55 53 53 53 51 51 50 50 50 50 49 48 48

Yds 1189 1141 1045 926 875 921 725 863 651 800 692 848 552 625 696 508 507 788 627 617 843 736 871 701 620 425 520 736 667

Avg Long TD 13.4 54 6 14.4 59 5 13.8 61t 9 12.7 44 7 12.3 48t 2 13.7 57 6 10.8 38 4 13.7 87t 8 10.3 50t 3 12.9 58 7 11.3 59t 7 14.4 80t 4 9.4 43 2 10.8 41t 3 12.2 38t 5 9.2 35 2 9.2 34 3 14.9 52 6 11.8 53t 6 11.6 61t 3 16.5 76t 8 14.4 68t 4 17.4 52 7 14.0 60t 6 12.4 42t 3 8.5 24t 3 10.6 41 2 15.3 61 4 13.9 40 7

YARDS Ju. Jones, ATL An. Brown, PIT De. Hopkins, HOU Fitzgerald, ARI Ca. Johnson, DET Dem. Thomas, DEN A. Robinson, JAX Beckham Jr., NYG A. Green, CIN Gronkowski, NWE B. Marshall, NYJ Olsen, CAR T. Benjamin, CLE A. Cooper, OAK K. Allen, SND M. Evans, TAM Hilton, IND Hurns, JAX Cooks, NOR Crabtree, OAK Edelman, NWE Smith Sr., BAL Barnidge, CLE R. Matthews, MIA Landry, MIA Sanders, DEN Decker, NYJ R. Cobb, GBY Snead, NOR Jo. Matthews, PHL

Yds 1189 1141 1045 926 921 875 871 863 848 843 800 788 736 736 725 725 724 716 701 696 692 670 667 662 651 639 638 627 626 625

No 89 79 76 73 67 71 50 63 59 51 62 53 48 51 67 44 45 44 50 57 61 46 48 43 63 46 46 53 41 58

Avg Long TD 13.4 54 6 14.4 59 5 13.8 61t 9 12.7 44 7 13.7 57 6 12.3 48t 2 17.4 52 7 13.7 87t 8 14.4 80t 4 16.5 76t 8 12.9 58 7 14.9 52 6 15.3 61 4 14.4 68t 4 10.8 38 4 16.5 68 2 16.1 87t 3 16.3 59t 7 14.0 60t 6 12.2 38t 5 11.3 59t 7 14.6 50t 3 13.9 40 7 15.4 53t 4 10.3 50t 3 13.9 75t 4 13.9 35 7 11.8 53t 6 15.3 63 3 10.8 41t 3

RUSHERS A. Peterson, MIN D. Martin, TAM J. Stewart, CAR Chr. Johnson, ARI Gurley, STL D. Freeman, ATL L. Murray, OAK Ivory, NYJ Ma. Ingram, NOR Forsett, BAL D. McFadden, DAL Gore, IND L. McCoy, BUF Rawls, SEA Forte, CHI Yeldon, JAX Blount, NWE Bernard, CIN L. Miller, MIA L. Bell, PIT D. Murray, PHL De. Williams, PIT Hillman, DEN Lacy, GBY C. Hyde, SNF M. Gordon, SND J. Starks, GBY Ry. Mathews, PHL C. Newton, CAR M. Lynch, SEA

Att Yards 208 1006 188 941 211 832 184 797 155 775 167 764 157 706 164 679 145 661 151 641 169 634 162 633 133 610 101 604 151 592 147 585 133 569 105 565 114 565 113 556 155 545 107 534 124 528 122 513 115 470 129 450 108 429 75 427 98 427 111 417

Avg Long TD 4.8 80t 6 5.0 84 3 3.9 36 4 4.3 62 3 5.0 71t 6 4.6 39 9 4.5 54 4 4.1 54 6 4.6 70 5 4.2 33 2 3.8 35 2 3.9 25 4 4.6 48t 3 6.0 69t 2 3.9 27 2 4.0 45 1 4.3 38t 6 5.4 28 2 5.0 85t 5 4.9 42 3 3.5 30 4 5.0 55 5 4.3 72t 5 4.2 29 2 4.1 22 3 3.5 27 0 4.0 65t 1 5.7 63t 5 4.4 23 7 3.8 24 3

INTERCEPTIONS Int Yds Long TD K. Coleman, CAR 5 79 36t 1 R. Nelson, CIN 5 74 37 0 M. Adams, IND 5 63 38 1 Woodson, OAK 5 22 11 0 Norman, CAR 4 110 46t 2 M. Peters, KAN 4 83 55t 1 Tr. Johnson, STL 4 69 29 0 L. Ryan, NWE 4 39 25 0 Marc. Williams, NYJ 4 26 18 0 Ras. Johnson, ARI 4 21 11 0 Talib, DEN 3 123 63t 2 Lowery, IND 3 95 69t 1 Tru. McBride, NYG 3 84 63t 1 Mathieu, ARI 3 74 33t 1 Rodgers-Cromartie, NYG 3 72 58t 1 Thurmond, PHL 3 67 44 0 R. Jones, MIA 3 60 30t 2 Hal, HOU 3 54 31t 1 Harmon, NWE 3 50 30 0 Kuechly, CAR 3 48 32t 1 Acker, SNF 3 45 45 0 Gilmore, BUF 3 33 29 0 E. Thomas, SEA 3 32 32 0 Brock, SNF 3 26 26 0 B. Grimes, MIA 3 19 17 0 M. Mitchell, PIT 3 16 9 0 Revis, NYJ 3 6 6 0 Th. Davis, CAR 3 0 1 0 SACKS Sacks Ansah, DET 11.5 J. Watt, HOU 11.5 Cha. Jones, NWE 10.5 C. Dunlap, CIN 8.5 J. Houston, KAN 7.5 Atkins, CIN 7.0 Donald, STL 7.0 Orakpo, TEN 7.0 Wake, MIA 7.0 Wilkerson, NYJ 7.0 Avril, SEA 6.5 Mi. Bennett, SEA 6.5 Griffen, MIN 6.5 A. Lynch, SNF 6.5 Mercilus, HOU 6.5 D. Ware, DEN 6.5

Atlantic Toronto Boston New York Brooklyn Philadelphia Southeast Miami Atlanta Charlotte Orlando Washington Central Cleveland Indiana Chicago Detroit Milwaukee

W 11 9 8 3 0 W 10 11 9 8 6 W 13 10 9 8 6

L 6 7 9 13 17 L 5 8 7 8 8 L 4 5 5 8 10

Pct .647 .563 .471 .188 .000 Pct .667 .579 .563 .500 .429 Pct .765 .667 .643 .500 .375

GB — 1½ 3 7½ 11 GB — 1 1½ 2½ 3½ GB — 2 2½ 4½ 6½

L10 6-4 6-4 5-5 3-7 0-10 L10 7-3 3-7 7-3 6-4 4-6 L10 7-3 8-2 6-4 3-7 3-7

Str W-4 W-2 L-3 L-2 L-17 Str W-1 L-1 L-1 W-2 L-4 Str W-2 W-4 L-1 L-1 L-2

Home 4-1 6-4 3-5 2-3 0-7 Home 8-2 6-3 7-2 6-3 3-4 Home 9-0 6-2 5-1 4-2 4-4

Away 7-5 3-3 5-4 1-10 0-10 Away 2-3 5-5 2-5 2-5 3-4 Away 4-4 4-3 4-4 4-6 2-6

Conf 6-3 7-5 4-8 2-7 0-11 Conf 5-4 7-4 5-6 4-5 5-7 Conf 11-4 9-3 6-3 4-3 6-8

Home 9-0 4-2 5-3 4-7 3-4 Home 8-3 2-6 2-2 3-6 3-4 Home 9-0 6-4 5-5 4-6 1-5

Away 5-3 5-5 4-5 2-3 1-8 Away 3-3 6-2 5-5 3-4 3-6 Away 8-0 2-4 2-4 2-5 1-7

Conf 8-2 7-5 7-6 4-6 4-7 Conf 6-2 3-3 3-3 5-10 6-7 Conf 13-0 7-7 7-7 1-8 0-8

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest San Antonio Dallas Memphis Houston New Orleans Northwest Oklahoma City Minnesota Utah Denver Portland Paciic Golden State LA Clippers Phoenix Sacramento LA Lakers

W 14 9 9 6 4 W 11 8 7 6 6 W 17 8 7 6 2

L Pct 3 .824 7 .563 8 .529 10 .375 12 .250 L Pct 6 .647 8 .500 7 .500 10 .375 10 .375 L Pct 0 1.000 8 .500 9 .438 11 .353 12 .143

GB — 4½ 5 7½ 9½ GB — 2½ 2½ 4½ 4½ GB — 8½ 9½ 11 13½

L10 9-1 6-4 6-4 3-7 4-6 L10 7-3 4-6 5-5 4-6 2-8 L10 10-0 4-6 4-6 5-5 2-8

Str W-5 L-3 L-1 W-1 L-1 Str W-4 W-3 W-1 L-5 L-1 Str W-17 W-1 L-4 L-1 L-4

Saturday Toronto 84, Washington 82 Cleveland 90, Brooklyn 88 San Antonio 108, Atlanta 88 Denver at Dallas, late New Orleans at Utah, late LA Lakers at Portland, late Sacramento at Golden State, late Friday Orlando 114, Milwaukee 90 Cleveland 95, Charlotte 90 Boston 111, Washington 78 Miami 97, New York 78 Atlanta 116, Memphis 101 Oklahoma City 103, Detroit 87 Houston 116, Philadelphia 114 Indiana 104, Chicago 92 San Antonio 91, Denver 80 Golden State 135, Phoenix 116 Minnesota 101, Sacramento 91 LA Clippers 111, New Orleans 90 Sunday Milwaukee at Charlotte, 1 p.m. Minnesota at LA Clippers, 2:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Memphis, 5 p.m. Phoenix at Toronto, 5 p.m. Detroit at Brooklyn, 5 p.m. Boston at Orlando, 5 p.m. Houston at New York, 6:30 p.m. Indiana at LA Lakers, 8:30 p.m. Monday Boston at Miami, 6:30 p.m. Houston at Detroit, 6:30 p.m. San Antonio at Chicago, 7 p.m. Denver at Milwaukee, 7 p.m. Oklahoma City at Atlanta, 7 p.m. Golden State at Utah, 8 p.m. Dallas at Sacramento, 9 p.m. Portland at LA Clippers, 9:30 p.m.

Joseph beats buzzer to beat Wizards ASSOCIATED PRESS

Cory Joseph made a 3-pointer at the buzzer to give the Toronto Raptors an 84-82 victory over the Washington Wizards on Saturday night. Kyle Lowry scored 27 points for the Raptors, who before Joseph’s 3 had not led since early in the first quarter. Joseph took DeMar DeRozan’s pass in the corner and nailed the winning shot. He finished with 12 points as Toronto won its fourth straight despite tying a season high with 22 turnovers Bradley Beal (Chaminade) scored 20 points for Washington, which lost its fourth straight despite allowing its fewest points of the season. John Wall had eight of his 18 points in the fourth quarter, but missed a pair of late free throws that opened the door for Toronto to win in regulation. With 3.0 seconds left following those misses and a timeout, DeRozan got the ball, drove toward the baseline and kicked the ball out to Joseph in the left corner. Joseph rose and sank his 3-pointer as time expired. Washington failed to hit a field goal over the final 4:24 to fall to 1-8 in its last nine regular-season games against Toronto. The Wizards did sweep the Raptors in the first round of last season’s Eastern Conference playofs.

NOTEBOOK Okafor involved in ight • Boston police say a man has come forward saying he’s the victim in a fight involving Philadelphia 76ers center Jahlil Okafor that was recorded and posted online.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Washington guard Bradley Beal passes over Toronto’s Cory Joseph, who made a 3-pointer to win the game.

Authorities say a man filed a police report Friday saying the fight outside a nightclub left him with stitches over his eye. Police say the alleged victim reported the fight began after some of his female friends refused the advances of two men, including one believed to be Okafor. The man told police Okafor punched him and knocked him to the ground. Okafor says he’s embarrassed about the scuffle and is dealing with the team and league on possible discipline. The confrontation happened early Thursday morning after the 76ers fell to 0-16 on the season.

The Sixers rookie said he was being heckled. LeBron has no plans to be owner • LeBron James followed Michael Jordan’s jersey number and in some ways followed his trajectory to the top of the NBA. But he’s not ready to follow him onto the other side of the bargaining table. At least, he’s not ready to start talking about it. “I’m not there,” James said Friday when asked if he’d like to own an NBA team one day. “I’m not there right now.” James is still in the prime of his career. He will turn 31 in December.

NBA SUMMARIES Raptors 84, Wizards 82

Spurs 108, Hawks 88

Hawks 112, Knicks 101

Toronto: Carroll 1-8 2-2 4, Scola 3-6 0-0 6, Biyombo 0-1 0-0 0, Lowry 9-19 3-4 27, DeRozan 9-21 3-4 23, Patterson 2-4 1-2 7, Joseph 4-6 0-0 9, Ross 1-4 2-2 4, Johnson 2-3 0-0 4. Totals 31-72 11-14 84. Washington: Porter 3-10 4-4 13, Dudley 3-7 0-0 7, Gortat 8-14 0-1 16, Wall 6-25 5-8 18, Beal 5-9 8-8 20, Sessions 0-7 3-4 3, Temple 0-6 1-2 1, Humphries 2-3 0-0 4, Oubre Jr. 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 27-82 21-27 82. Toronto 16 23 23 22 — 84 Washington 23 22 23 14 — 82 3-point goals: Toronto 11-24 (Lowry 6-11, Patterson 2-3, DeRozan 2-3, Joseph 1-1, Scola 0-1, Ross 0-2, Carroll 0-3), Washington 7-23 (Porter 3-5, Beal 2-4, Dudley 1-3, Wall 1-4, Sessions 0-3, Temple 0-4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Toronto 52 (Biyombo 16), Washington 53 (Gortat 10). Assists: Toronto 17 (Joseph 6), Washington 20 (Beal 6). Total fouls: Toronto 21, Washington 16. A: 16,841 (20,308).

Atlanta: Sefolosha 3-5 1-2 8, Millsap 3-9 2-5 8, Horford 4-11 2-2 10, Teague 2-10 1-2 6, Korver 3-4 0-0 6, Muscala 3-8 0-0 6, Bazemore 5-10 1-1 11, Schroder 4-7 1-1 9, Patterson 1-4 0-0 3, Scott 5-9 0-0 12, Hardaway Jr. 1-5 0-0 2, Holiday 2-3 0-0 5, Mack 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 37-87 8-13 88. San Antonio: Leonard 6-11 7-7 22, Aldridge 6-15 1-1 13, Duncan 5-9 0-0 10, Parker 5-9 1-1 11, Green 2-6 0-0 5, Ginobili 3-8 6-6 12, Mills 5-6 0-0 13, Diaw 4-6 0-0 9, Anderson 1-3 2-2 5, West 1-2 0-0 2, Simmons 2-5 1-1 5, Butler 0-3 0-0 0, Marjanovic 0-2 1-2 1. Totals 40-85 19-20 108. Atlanta 25 12 22 29 — 88 San Antonio 23 31 26 28 — 108 3-point goals: Atlanta 6-26 (Scott 2-3, Holiday 1-2, Patterson 1-3, Sefolosha 1-3, Teague 1-4, Korver 0-1, Millsap 0-1, Muscala 0-1, Horford 0-1, Schroder 0-2, Bazemore 0-2, Hardaway Jr. 0-3), San Antonio 9-17 (Leonard 3-3, Mills 3-4, Diaw 1-1, Anderson 1-1, Green 1-2, Simmons 0-1, Parker 0-1, Ginobili 0-4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Atlanta 49 (Millsap 8), San Antonio 52 (Duncan 18). Assists: Atlanta 28 (Schroder 6), San Antonio 25 (Parker 6). Total fouls: Atlanta 17, San Antonio 14. Technicals: Bazemore, San Antonio Coach Popovich. A: 18,418 (18,797).

Atlanta: Bazemore 2-6 0-0 5, Millsap 3-11 4-8 11, Horford 9-18 1-2 21, Teague 7-12 9-10 23, Korver 6-8 0-0 15, Splitter 4-6 2-2 10, Holiday 1-2 0-0 2, Schroder 6-11 0-0 13, Patterson 3-5 1-2 9, Scott 1-4 0-0 2, Tavares 0-0 1-2 1. Totals 42-83 18-26 112. New York: Anthony 10-27 5-5 25, Porzingis 4-10 2-2 10, Lopez 8-11 2-2 18, Calderon 0-5 2-2 2, Vujacic 2-8 0-0 6, O’Quinn 5-9 0-0 10, Galloway 2-4 2-2 8, Williams 3-9 3-4 9, Grant 2-4 1-2 5, Thomas 2-6 2-2 8, Early 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 38-93 19-21 101. Atlanta 30 31 23 28 — 112 New York 20 25 27 29 — 101 3-point goals: Atlanta 10-24 (Korver 3-5, Patterson 2-3, Horford 2-5, Bazemore 1-2, Millsap 1-2, Schroder 1-3, Holiday 0-1, Scott 0-1, Teague 0-2), New York 6-29 (Thomas 2-3, Galloway 2-4, Vujacic 2-6, Calderon 0-2, Williams 0-3, Porzingis 0-4, Anthony 0-7). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Atlanta 49 (Millsap 11), New York 57 (O’Quinn 10). Assists: Atlanta 26 (Teague 8), New York 21 (Grant 7). Total fouls: Atlanta 18, New York 24. Technicals: New York Coach Fisher. A: 19,812 (19,763).

Cavaliers 90, Nets 88 Brooklyn: Johnson 5-11 5-5 17, Young 7-16 2-4 16, Lopez 10-15 2-5 22, Jack 3-13 4-4 12, Hollis-Jefferson 2-4 2-2 6, Bargnani 3-9 0-0 6, Bogdanovic 1-4 0-0 2, Larkin 2-5 3-4 7, Karasev 0-0 0-0 0, Robinson 0-0 0-0 0, Ellington 0-4 0-0 0. Totals 33-81 18-24 88. Cleveland: James 10-22 5-6 26, Love 8-14 4-4 26, Mozgov 1-7 0-0 2, Williams 7-13 0-0 14, Smith 3-12 0-2 6, Thompson 4-11 2-5 10, Jones 1-1 0-0 3, Dellavedova 1-5 0-0 3, Jefferson 0-2 0-0 0, Varejao 0-0 0-0 0, Cunningham 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 35-87 11-17 90. Brooklyn 24 26 18 20 — 88 Cleveland 17 27 25 21 — 90 3-point goals: Brooklyn 4-17 (Johnson 2-5, Jack 2-5, Bogdanovic 0-1, Bargnani 0-1, Young 0-1, Ellington 0-4), Cleveland 9-27 (Love 6-11, Jones 1-1, Dellavedova 1-2, James 1-6, Williams 0-1, Jefferson 0-1, Mozgov 0-1, Smith 0-4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Brooklyn 54 (Young 12), Cleveland 58 (Thompson 11). Assists: Brooklyn 21 (Jack 14), Cleveland 20 (Dellavedova 6). Total fouls: Brooklyn 18, Cleveland 19. Technicals: Jack, Williams. A: 20,562 (20,562).

LATE FRIDAY

Grizzlies 112, Pacers 103 Memphis: T.Allen 4-11 1-2 9, Randolph 3-11 5-6 11, Gasol 7-13 6-7 20, Conley 5-11 2-2 13, Lee 4-9 2-2 10, Je.Green 5-6 0-0 12, Udrih 5-6 2-2 13, Barnes 3-7 1-2 10, Wright 4-4 1-2 9, Ja.Green 1-4 3-4 5. Totals 41-82 23-29 112. Indiana: George 5-15 6-6 18, J.Hill 2-6 0-0 4, Mahinmi 5-7 1-2 11, G.Hill 6-15 5-6 20, Ellis 3-12 2-3 9, Budinger 2-3 0-0 6, Stuckey 4-6 1-2 9, Turner 4-6 0-2 8, Miles 6-8 2-3 18, L.Allen 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 37-78 17-24 103. Memphis 29 21 23 39 — 112 Indiana 20 29 26 28 — 103 3-point goals: Memphis 7-16 (Barnes 3-6, Je.Green 2-2, Conley 1-1, Udrih 1-2, T.Allen 0-1, Lee 0-4), Indiana 12-30 (Miles 4-6, G.Hill 3-8, Budinger 2-3, George 2-8, Ellis 1-4, Stuckey 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Memphis 49 (Randolph, Gasol 8), Indiana 46 (Mahinmi 9). Assists: Memphis 26 (Conley 10), Indiana 23 (Stuckey, George 5). Total fouls: Memphis 25, Indiana 22. Technicals: George, G.Hill. A: 18,165 (18,165).

T’Wolves 112, Lakers 111 Minnesota: Prince 0-0 2-4 2, Garnett 2-4 0-0 4, Towns 6-10 2-2 14, Rubio 10-17 6-7 28, Wiggins 2-10 5-6 9, Bjelica 3-6 0-0 8, Martin 6-15 11-12 23, Muhammad 3-5 3-4 10, LaVine 4-10 0-0 8, Dieng 1-4 2-2 4, Payne 0-1 0-0 0, Rudez 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 38-83 31-37 112. L.A. Lakers: Bryant 8-24 5-5 24, Randle 5-13 5-6 15, Hibbert 1-4 10-10 12, Russell 2-7 0-0 4, Clarkson 5-12 4-6 14, Williams 6-14 7-7 21, Young 5-8 0-0 14, Kelly 1-5 1-1 3, Bass 1-4 0-0 2, Huertas 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 35-93 32-35 111. Minnesota 22 29 37 24 — 112 L.A. Lakers 31 29 35 16 — 111 3-point goals: Minnesota 5-20 (Bjelica 2-4, Rubio 2-4, Muhammad 1-2, Towns 0-1, LaVine 0-2, Wiggins 0-2, Martin 0-5), L.A. Lakers 9-35 (Young 4-7, Bryant 3-13, Williams 2-7, Huertas 0-1, Clarkson 0-2, Kelly 0-2, Russell 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Minnesota 48 (Towns 12), L.A. Lakers 64 (Randle 11). Assists: Minnesota 24 (Rubio 14), L.A. Lakers 18 (Hibbert 4). Total fouls: Minnesota 26, L.A. Lakers 29. Technicals: Garnett, Minnesota Coach Mitchell, L.A. Lakers defensive three second. A: 18,997 (18,997).


SPORTS

11.29.2015 • Sunday • M 3 AMERICA’S LINE

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

NFL

NFL Favorite

Division II playofs

Leaders • Week 12

SECOND ROUND • SATURDAY, NOV. 28 Northwest Missouri St. 54, Humboldt State 7 Shepherd 17, Indiana (Pa.) 13 West Georgia 27, Valdosta State 20 Slippery Rock 41, Assumption 39 Grand Valley State 38, Ferris State 34 Tuskegee 35, North Alabama 31 Emporia State 29, Henderson State 3 Colorado State-Pueblo 26, Midwestern State (Texas) 17 QUARTERFINALS • DEC. 5 Shepherd (11-0) vs. Slippery Rock (12-1), TBA West Georgia (10-1) vs. Tuskegee (10-2), TBA Colorado State-Pueblo (12-1) vs. Grand Valley State (11-2), TBA Northwest Missouri State (11-0) vs. Emporia State (10-2), TBA SEMIFINALS • DEC. 12 Shepherd-Slippery Rock winner vs. Colorado State-Pueblo-Grand Valley State winner, TBA West Georgia-Tuskegee winner vs. Northwest Missouri State-Emporia State winner, TBA CHAMPIONSHIP • DEC. 19 Kansas City, Kan., 3 p.m.

SCORING

Division III playofs

KICKERS Gano, CAR Gostkowski, NWE Jos. Brown, NYG Santos, KAN Catanzaro, ARI Gould, CHI Tucker, BAL Walsh, MIN Da. Bailey, DAL Crosby, GBY Hauschka, SEA McManus, DEN J. Myers, JAX Janikowski, OAK Nugent, CIN Lambo, SND Du. Hopkins, WAS Mat. Bryant, ATL D. Carpenter, BUF Prater, DET Coons, CLE Zuerlein, STL Barth, TAM Vinatieri, IND Ph. Dawson, SNF Folk, NYJ Sturgis, PHL Succop, TEN Boswell, PIT Franks, MIA

Points Underdog Open-Current TEXANS 3-3 Saints FALCONS 2-2 Vikings BENGALS 8.5-9 Rams COLTS 3-3 Bucs Giants 1.5-2.5 WASHINGTON Raiders 2-1 TITANS CHIEFS NL-6 Bills JETS 3.5-4 Dolphins JAGUARS 4-5 Chargers Cards 10-10 49ERS SEAHAWKS 4.5-4 Steelers Patriots 3-3 BRONCOS Monday BROWNS 1-3 Ravens NBA Favorite Points Underdog HORNETS 6.5 Bucks CLIPPERS 8 T’Wolves RAPTORS 5 Suns Pistons 4.5 NETS GRIZZLIES 11 76ers Celtics 1.5 MAGIC Rockets 1.5 KNICKS Pacers 9 LAKERS COLLEGE BASKETBALL Favorite Points Underdog DUKE 16 Utah St OKLAHOMA 8.5 Wisconsin SMU 23 Brown TEMPLE 12 Delaware ARIZONA ST 8 Cal-Santa Barb UT-Arlington 3.5 RICE UCLA 17 CS-Northridge Advocare Invitational Orlando, FL Iowa 4.5 Wichita St Usc NL Monmouth Xavier 3.5 Dayton Notre Dame 10 Alabama DirecTV Wooden Classic Anaheim, CA Cal-Irvine 1 Evansville Arizona 4 Boise St Boston College 7 Santa Clara Michigan St 8.5 Providence Sacramento State Tournament Sacramento, CA S Dakota NL E Washington SACRAMENTO ST NL Pacific Added Games RHODE ISLAND 12 Rider COLORADO 25 No Colorado n-W Michigan PK Mercer PEPPERDINE 8 Montana n- Nashville, TN. NHL Favorite Odds Underdog RED WINGS -$140/+$120 Panthers Home team in CAPS © 2015 Benjamin Eckstein

TRANSACTIONS FOOTBALL • NFL CHICAGO BEARS — Signed LS Patrick Scales. Waived LS Thomas Gafford. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS — Activated CB Jeremy Lane from the PUP list. Released RB Bryce Brown. TENNESSEE TITANS — Signed LB Yannik Cudjoe-Virgil from the practice squad. Waived WR Rico Richardson. HOCKEY • NHL NHL — Suspended Columbus F Brandon Dubinsky one game for cross-checking Pittsburgh F Sidney Crosby in the back of the head during a Nov. 27 game. DETROIT RED WINGS — Recalled RW Tomas Jurco from Grand Rapids (AHL) TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING — Recalled F Mike Angelidis from the Syracuse (AHL). COLLEGE FLORIDA — Sus. WR Demarcus Robinson. ILLINOIS — Agreed to terms with football coach Bill Cubit on a two-year contract. TULANE — Fired fb coach Curtis Johnson.

AREA COLLEGES Saturday’s scores FOOTBALL Northwestern 24, Illinois 14 Northwest Missouri 54, Humboldt State (Calif.) 7 UNI 53, Eastern Illinois 17 WOMEN’S BASKETBALL Truman State 61, Culver-Stockton 42 UMSL 74, Findlay 59 Webster University 56, Augustana (Ill.) 50 SLU 78, Eastern Illinois 47 MEN’S BASKETBALL Louisville 77, SLU 57 No. 4 Iowa State 84, Illinois 73 Green Bay 81, Eastern Illinois 72 SIU-Carbondale 80, Portland 79 Butler 89, SIU-Edwardsville 73 Loyola Marymount 73, South East Missouri State 60 Ole Miss 67, Bradley 54 William Jewell 90, Wayne State 87 Rust College 83, Webster University 70 Maryville 79, Hannibal-LaGrange 77 Fontbonne 112, Concordia Chicago 102 Washington University 49, Illinois College 51 McKendree 86, Trevecca Nazarene 80 WOMEN’S VOLLEYBALL Wichita State 3, Missouri State 2 (24-26, 20-25, 27-25, 25-17, 18-16) SUNDAY BASKETBALL SCHEDULE M: Washington at Hanover, 2 p.m. W: Washington vs. DePaul/ Illinois Wesleyan, TBA MONDAY BASKETBALL SCHEDULE W: SIUC at Memphis, 2 p.m. W: SLU vs. Missouri-St. Louis, 7 p.m. M: SIUE vs. Green Bay, 7 p.m. M: Southwestern Illinois vs. Washington U. JV, 7 p.m. W: Lewis & Clark at Missouri Valley JV, 8 p.m.

GOLF EURO TOUR • Alfred Dunhill Championship leaders Saturday | Malelane, South Africa Purse: $1.6 million Yardage: 7,287; Par: 72 Third Round C. Schwartzel, S. Africa 66-67-70 B. Hebert, France 68-70-68 S. Gros, France 71-72-63 D. Frittelli, S. Africa 69-73-66 D. Drysdale, Scotland 71-69-69 J. Luiten, Netherlands 68-70-71 G. Bourdy, France 70-72-67 L. Jensen, Denmark 70-72-67 M. Ford, England 67-74-69 B. Grace, South Africa 71-73-66 T. Linard, France 72-71-67 J. Scrivener, Australia 69-70-72 D. Burmester, S. Africa 71-70-70 S. Norris, South Africa 70-70-71 V. Groenewald, S. Africa 68-73-70 T. Murray, England 71-71-69 N. Fasth, Sweden 68-74-69 K. Horne, South Africa 70-72-69 A. Curlewis, South Africa 70-72-69

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

203 206 206 208 209 209 209 209 210 210 210 211 211 211 211 211 211 211 211

PGA • Australian Open leaders Saturday | Sydney Purse: $901,170 Yardage: 7,230; Par: 71 Third Round Matt Jones, Australia 67-68-68 — 203 Jordan Spieth, U.S. 71-68-67 — 206 Rhein Gibson, Australia 72-68-68 — 208 Lincoln Tighe, Australia 66-73-70 — 209 Aron Price, Australia 71-68-70 — 209 Geoff Ogilvy, Australia 68-71-71 — 210 Adam Scott, Australia 71-73-68 — 212 Brett Rumford, Australia 69-74-69 — 212 Darren Clarke, N. Ireland 75-67-70 — 212 Todd Sinnott, Australia 68-70-74 — 212 Nick Cullen, Australia 70-73-70 — 213 Geoff Drakeford, Australia 75-71-68 — 214 Jinho Choi, South Korea 75-68-71 — 214 Anthony Houston, Australia 71-74-70 — 215 Rohan Blizard, Australia 73-71-71 — 215 James Nitties, Australia 73-71-71 — 215 Gareth Paddison, NZ 73-71-71 — 215 Wade Ormsby, Australia 71-71-73 — 215 Terry Pilkadaris, Australia 71-71-73 — 215 Brett Rankin, Australia 73-68-74 — 215 Nicolas Colsaerts, Belgium 73-66-76 — 215 Daniel Valente, Australia 72-74-70 — 216 a-Jordan Niebrugge, U.S. 77-69-70 — 216 Paul Hayden, Australia 75-71-70 — 216 Daniel Fox, Australia 75-71-70 — 216 David Bransdon, Australia 73-73-70 — 216 Aaron Pike, Australia 73-72-71 — 216 a-Yu Chun-an, Taiwan 68-76-72 — 216 Pan Cheng-tsung, Taiwan 73-70-73 — 216 David Klein, Germany 72-71-73 — 216 Alistair Presnell, Australia 69-73-74 — 216 a-Bryson DeChambeau, U.S. 70-72-74 — 216 Grant Thomas, Australia 70-72-74 — 216 Richard Green, Australia 72-69-75 — 216

MOTOR SPORTS Abu Dhabi Grand Prix lineup After Saturday qualifying; race Sunday At Yas Marina Circuit | Abu Dhabi, UAE Lap length: 3.451 miles THIRD SESSION 1. Nico Rosberg, Germany, Mercedes 1:40.237 2. Lewis Hamilton, ENG, Mercedes 1:40.614 3. Kimi Raikkonen, Finland, Ferrari 1:41.051 4. Sergio Perez, Mexico, Force India 1:41.184 5. Daniel Ricciardo, AUS, Red Bull 1:41.444 6. Valtteri Bottas, Finland, Williams 1:41.656 7. Nico Hulkenberg, GER, Force India 1:41.686 8. Felipe Massa, Brazil, Williams 1:41.759 9. Daniil Kvyat, Russia, Red Bull 1:41.933 10. Carlos Sainz Jr., SP, Toro Rosso 1:42.708 Eliminated after second session 11. Max Verstappen, NET, Toro Rosso 1:42.521 12. Jenson Button, ENG, McLaren 1:42.668 13. Pastor Maldonado, VEN, Lotus 1:42.807 14. Felipe Nasr, Brazil, Sauber 1:43.614 Eliminated after first session 15. Romain Grosjean, France, Lotus 1:42.585 16. Sebastian Vettel, GER, Ferrari 1:42.941 17. Fernando Alonso, SP, McLaren 1:43.187 18. Marcus Ericsson, SWE, Sauber 1:43.838 19. Will Stevens, England, Marussia 1:46.297 20. Roberto Merhi, Spain, Marussia 1:47.434

First Round • Nov. 21 Thomas More 51, Washington & Lee 21 Wabash 35, Albion 14 Cortland State 45, Salisbury 21 Mount Union 55, St. Lawrence 23 Albright 49, Norwich 0 Wesley 42, Framingham State 22 John Hopkins 52, Western New England 20 Ohio Northern 27, Franklin 22 St. Thomas (Minn.) 57, LaVerne 14 St. John’s (Minn.) 51), Dubuque 7 Huntingdon 38, Hendrix 27 Mary Hardin-Baylor 37, Hardin-Simmons 19 Wisconsin-Whitewater 48, St. Norbert 0 Wheaton (Ill.) 55, Lakeland 6 Linfield 48, Whitworth 10 Wisconsin-Oshkosh 48, St. Scholastica 0 Second Round • Nov. 28 Mount Union 66, Albright 7 Wesley 42, Johns Hopkins 37 Wabash 33, Thomas More 27, OT St. Thomas (Minn.) 38, St. John’s (Minn.) 19 Wisconsin-Whitewater 31, Wheaton (Ill.) 17 Mary Hardin-Baylor 43, Huntingdon 23 Wisconsin-Oshkosh 42, Ohio Northern 7 Linfield 38, Cortland State 22 Quarterfinals • Dec. 5 St. Thomas (Minn.) (12-0) vs. Wabash (12-0) Linfield (11-0) vs. Mary Hardin-Baylor (11-1) Mount Union (12-0) vs. Wesley (11-1) Wisconsin-Oshkosh (11-1) vs. Wisconsin-Whitewater (11-1) Semifinals • Dec. 12 TBA Championship • Dec. 18 6 p.m., Salem, Va.

FCS playofs FIRST ROUND • SATURDAY, NOV. 28 Western Illinois 24, Dayton 7 Chattanooga 50, Fordham 20 The Citadel 41, Coastal Carolina 38 Sam Houston State 42, Southern Utah 39 Montana 24, South Dakota State 17 Colgate 27, New Hampshire 20 William & Mary 52, Duquesne 49 Northern Iowa 53, Eastern Illinois 17 SECOND ROUND • DEC. 5 William & Mary (9-3) at Richmond (8-3), 11 a.m. The Citadel (9-3) at Charleston Southern (9-2), Noon Colgate (8-4) at James Madison (9-2), Noon W. Illinois (7-5) at Illinois State (9-2), 1 p.m. Chattanooga (9-3) at Jacksonville State (10-1), 1 p.m. Montana (8-4) at ND State (9-2), 2:30 p.m. Sam Houston State (9-3) at McNeese State (10-0), 6 p.m. N. Iowa (8-4) at Portland St. (9-2), 9 p.m. Quarterfinals • Dec. 11-12 TBD Semifinals • Dec. 18-19 TBD Championship • Jan. 9 11 a.m., Frisco, Texas

HOCKEY NHL leaders Through Friday’s games GOALS Jamie Benn DAL Patrick Kane CHI Vladimir Tarasenko STL Alex Ovechkin, WAS Max Pacioretty MON Joe Pavelski SJ Tyler Seguin DAL Matt Duchene COL Adam Henrique NJ Boone Jenner COL Daniel Sedin VAN Steven Stamkos TB Tyler Toffoli LA Kyle Turris, Ottawa

GP 23 23 22 21 24 22 23 22 22 24 24 24 22 22

G 17 13 13 12 12 12 12 11 11 11 11 11 11 11

ASSISTS Patrick Kane CHI John Klingberg DAL Tyler Seguin DAL Erik Karlsson OTT P.K. Subban MON Evgeny Kuznetsov WAS Ryan Suter MIN

GP 23 23 23 22 24 22 21

A 22 21 20 19 19 18 17

POWER PLAY GOALS Jamie Benn DAL Justin Faulk CAR Patrick Kane CHI Steven Stamkos TB Patrice Bergeron BOS Loui Eriksson BOS Evgeni Malkin PIT Corey Perry ANA Brandon Saad COL Shea Weber NAS

GP 23 23 23 24 22 22 22 24 23 22

PP 8 8 6 6 5 5 5 5 5 5

SHORT HANDED GOALS Jean-Gabriel Pagea OTT Artem Anisimov CHI Paul Byron MON Cody Eakin DAL Eric Fehr PIT Adam Henrique NJ Bryan Little WIN Brad Marchand BOS Mika Zibanejad OTT

GP 22 23 12 23 12 22 24 20 22

SH 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

Shots Alex Ovechkin WAS Brent Burns SJ Taylor Hall EDM Daniel Sedin VAN Max Pacioretty MON Tyler Seguin DAL Nazem Kadri TOR Patrick Kane CHI Radim Vrbata VAN Nathan MacKinnon COL Vladimir Tarasenko St Louis

GP 21 22 23 24 24 23 22 23 22 22 22

S 115 102 96 93 92 90 87 86 83 82 82

PLUS/MINUS Jeff Carter LA Evgeny Kuznetsov WAS Patrick Kane CHI Kevin Klein NYR Dylan Larkin DET Ryan McDonagh NYR P.K. Subban MON Tyler Toffoli LA Tom Gilbert MON

GP 22 22 23 23 23 23 24 22 24

+/14 14 13 13 13 13 13 13 12

GOALIES GAA GPI MINS GA AVG Braden Holtby WAS 18 1076 35 1.95 Ben Bishop TB 18 1087 36 1.99 Jaroslav Halak NYI 13 743 25 2.02 Cory Schneider NJ 18 1090 37 2.04 Michal Neuvirth PHI 11 615 21 2.05 Henrik Lundqvist NYR 19 1140 39 2.05 Carey Price MON 12 698 24 2.06 James Reimer TOR 15 899 31 2.07 Jake Allen STL 17 972 34 2.10 Martin Jones SJ 18 1011 36 2.14 SAVES MIN Michal Neuvirth PHI 615 Henrik Lundqvist NYR 1140 Carey Price MON 698 James Reimer TOR 899 Petr Mrazek DET 734 Ben Bishop TB 1087 Jake Allen STL 972 Cory Schneider NJ 1090 Thomas Greiss NYI 584 Marc-Andre Fleury PIT 1135

GA 21 39 24 31 27 36 34 37 22 42

SA 345 611 365 468 393 505 473 508 300 569

W-L-O 5-3-1 12-5-2 10-2-0 7-3-4 6-4-2 9-7-2 10-4-2 10-6-2 5-3-2 11-7-1

RECORD GPI MIN W-L-OT Braden Holtby WAS 18 1076 14-4-0 Henrik Lundqvist NYR 19 1140 12-5-2 Corey Crawford CHI 18 1039 11-6-1 Martin Jones SJ 18 1011 11-6-0 Devan Dubnyk MIN 20 1177 11-7-2 Marc-Andre Fleury PIT 19 1135 11-7-1 Carey Price MON 12 698 10-2-0 Jake Allen STL 17 972 10-4-2 Craig Anderson OTT 17 1041 10-4-3 Pekka Rinne NAS 19 1152 10-5-4 SHUTOUTS Jake Allen STL Devan Dubnyk MIN Martin Jones SJ Michal Neuvirth PHI Craig Anderson OTT Reto Berra COL Corey Crawford CHI Marc-Andre Fleury PIT Jaroslav Halak NYI Henrik Lundqvist NYR

GPI 17 20 18 11 17 12 18 19 13 19

SO 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2

W-L-OT 10-4-2 11-7-2 11-6-0 5-3-1 10-4-3 4-7-0 11-6-1 11-7-1 6-4-2 12-5-2

BASKETBALL NBA scoring leaders Through Friday’s games Scoring G Curry, GOL 17 Harden, HOU 16 Westbrook, OKC 17 George, IND 15 James, CLE 16 Lillard, POR 16 Griffin, LAC 16 Davis, NOR 13 Bledsoe, PHX 15 Anthony, NYK 17

FG 184 135 160 131 154 140 163 110 120 130

FT 100 165 115 88 82 77 72 71 73 88

PTS 555 481 463 396 410 402 401 299 341 376

AVG 32.6 30.1 27.2 26.4 25.6 25.1 25.1 23.0 22.7 22.1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D9

NBA STANDINGS EASTERN CONFERENCE

NONKICKERS TD Rus Rec Ret X2 Pts Eifert, CIN 11 0 11 0 0 66 D. Freeman, ATL 11 9 2 0 0 66 De. Hopkins, HOU 9 0 9 0 1 56 Je. Hill, CIN 8 7 1 0 1 50 Beckham Jr., NYG 8 0 8 0 0 48 Gronkowski, NWE 8 0 8 0 0 48 Jam. Jones, GBY 7 0 7 0 1 44 J. Langford, CHI 7 6 1 0 1 44 T. Austin, STL 7 2 4 1 0 42 Barnidge, CLE 7 0 7 0 0 42 Blount, NWE 7 6 1 0 0 42 Decker, NYJ 7 0 7 0 0 42 Edelman, NWE 7 0 7 0 0 42 Fitzgerald, ARI 7 0 7 0 0 42 Hurns, JAX 7 0 7 0 0 42 Ivory, NYJ 7 6 1 0 0 42 Da. Johnson, ARI 7 3 3 1 0 42 Ju. Jones, ATL 7 0 6 0 0 42 B. Marshall, NYJ 7 0 7 0 0 42 L. Miller, MIA 7 5 2 0 0 42 C. Newton, CAR 7 7 0 0 0 42 A. Robinson, JAX 7 0 7 0 0 42 Ka. Williams, BUF 7 5 2 0 0 42 PAT 35/37 36/36 26/27 24/25 38/40 17/18 20/20 17/20 19/19 25/25 19/21 22/22 19/22 27/27 30/31 17/20 21/21 26/26 24/26 22/25 14/16 16/17 15/15 24/25 11/11 19/19 18/20 18/18 10/11 23/25

FG 25/30 23/24 23/23 23/28 18/20 24/27 22/28 22/26 21/22 19/21 21/22 20/21 18/22 15/18 14/17 18/20 16/17 14/18 14/17 14/14 16/16 15/23 15/17 12/14 16/17 13/16 13/17 12/14 14/15 8/10

Lg Pts 52 110 57 105 53 95 51 93 43 92 55 89 52 86 53 83 53 82 56 82 54 82 57 82 58 73 56