Page 1

S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 19 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

UP TO

$183 OF CO UP INSIDEONS

SUNDAY • 11.10.2019 • $4.00 • EARLY EDITION

CLIMATE CHANGE STRESSES AGING INFRASTRUCTURE

‘ONE-TWO PUNCH’ • New extremes are buckling pavement, shuttering electric plants

• Some worry governments, utilities aren’t adapting fast enough BY BRYCE GRAY

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

OLD MONROE — Less than an hour north of St. Louis, Missouri Highway 79 has dealt with a range of complications and closures from major flooding in recent years. But even when the nearby Mississippi River is calm, the roadway can’t catch a break from the elements — something illustrated this summer, when punishing heat caused its pavement to buckle, creating a bump that work crews had to fix. With the region — and practically everywhere — exposed to hotter and ever more erratic climate conditions, roads like Highway 79 aren’t the only types of infrastructure pushed to their breaking points. As society confronts an increasingly unfamiliar climate, there are signs that the engineered backbones of modern civilization are at risk across the U.S.: Rising seas spoiling water supplies. Power plants idled because water from ponds and rivers, used to cool generators, is no longer as chilly as it used to be. Dams threatened by torrential rains and runoff. ROBERT COHEN, RCOHEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM New extremes are testing roads, bridges, dams and utilities to unprecedented degrees, even as they age beyond their Floodwater covers Highway 79 in May, leading officials to close it between Winfield and Foley in Lincoln County. Later in the summer, punishing heat Please see INFRASTRUCTURE, Page A8 caused its pavement to buckle, creating a bump that work crews had to fix.

A splash of fall color

CHRISTIAN GOODEN, CGOODEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

What happened to Kent Gerst? Police believe the semi-pro ballplayer fell to his death in 2012 But family is haunted by inconsistencies, officer’s role BY CHRISTINE BYERS

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

O’FALLON, Mo. — This stretch of Peruque Creek, just north of Interstate 70, is unremarkable in almost every way. Small boulders are embedded in its concrete banks. Trees have grown through the banks’ cracks. Islands of brush force the current to snake through the channel, barely making a sound. On most days, the water is perhaps 18 inches deep. But standing Gerst on the roadway above, one thing is clear: It’s a long fall to the concrete below. And police here still say that’s what killed Kent Clothier Gerst. A search party found his body in the water seven years ago, wedged against a bridge pillar. Police believe Gerst, 24, a semipro baseball player, accidentally fell about 35 feet to his death. Some of the circumstances are undisputed: Gerst went out drinking that September night. He ran into an old friend. Later that night, the old friend attacked Gerst in the bar’s parking lot, punching him and chasing him out of the lot and down the road. Then Gerst drowned in Peruque Creek. But Gerst’s brother and father don’t think he fell from the bridge. They don’t understand why an O’Fallon officer was at the bar, involved in the incident, but denied his role. They don’t believe that O’Fallon police missed these same inconsistencies. For seven years, they’ve been trying to get officials, prosecutors

A vine with bright red leaves creeps across the doorway of a vacant building at Vandeventer and Sullivan avenues in north St. Louis in late October. The region has seen falling temperatures and changing colors in recent weeks.

Please see GERST, Page A9

Messenger: Public defenders may get relief • A2

Perks club Even for St. Louis’ free museums, membership pays dividends. B1

Coworking giant WeWork gets mixed welcome • C1 Sultan: Missouri officials, let’s talk about periods • B1 Century of salutes

TODAY

56°/32° INCREASING CLOUDS

TOMORROW

34°/17° RAIN AND SNOW

WEATHER D9 POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

STRASBURG

Mentoring girls Rising Leaders helps them explore career possibilities. C1

BEGINS FRIDAY!

COLE

RENDON

IN THE CARDS? NOT LIKELY The chances the Redbirds will sign top-tier free agents are low. D7

FABULOUS FOX • NOVEMBER 15-17 • 314-534-1111 • MetroTix.com

1 M Vol. 141, No. 314 ©2019


S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 19 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

UP TO

$183 OF CO UP INSIDEONS

SUNDAY • 11.10.2019 • $4.00 • FINAL EDITION

CLIMATE CHANGE STRESSES AGING INFRASTRUCTURE

‘ONE-TWO PUNCH’ • New extremes are buckling pavement, shuttering electric plants

• Some worry governments, utilities aren’t adapting fast enough BY BRYCE GRAY

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

OLD MONROE — Less than an hour north of St. Louis, Missouri Highway 79 has dealt with a range of complications and closures from major flooding in recent years. But even when the nearby Mississippi River is calm, the roadway can’t catch a break from the elements — something illustrated this summer, when punishing heat caused its pavement to buckle, creating a bump that work crews had to fix. With the region — and practically everywhere — exposed to hotter and ever more erratic climate conditions, roads like Highway 79 aren’t the only types of infrastructure pushed to their breaking points. As society confronts an increasingly unfamiliar climate, there are signs that the engineered backbones of modern civilization are at risk across the U.S.: Rising seas spoiling water supplies. Power plants idled because water from ponds and rivers, used to cool generators, is no longer as chilly as it used to be. Dams threatened by torrential rains and runoff. ROBERT COHEN, RCOHEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM New extremes are testing roads, bridges, dams and utilities to unprecedented degrees, even as they age beyond their Floodwater covers Highway 79 in May, leading officials to close it between Winfield and Foley in Lincoln County. Later in the summer, punishing heat Please see INFRASTRUCTURE, Page A8 caused its pavement to buckle, creating a bump that work crews had to fix.

THE NEXT GENERATION

ROBERT COHEN, RCOHEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Johnny Spiva, 73, looks over Navy junior ROTC cadets from Riverview Gardens as they march downtown in the Veterans Day parade on Saturday. Spiva served in the Navy aboard USS Hornet during the Vietnam War and the space race from 1964-68. The aircraft carrier deployed to Vietnam multiple times, and in 1966 it recovered the second unmanned Apollo Command Module during testing in advance of the first moon landing.

What happened to Kent Gerst? Police believe the semi-pro ballplayer fell to his death in 2012 But family is haunted by inconsistencies, officer’s role BY CHRISTINE BYERS

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

O’FALLON, Mo. — This stretch of Peruque Creek, just north of Interstate 70, is unremarkable in almost every way. Small boulders are embedded in its concrete banks. Trees have grown through the banks’ cracks. Islands of brush force the current to snake through the channel, barely making a sound. On most days, the water is perhaps 18 inches deep. But standing Gerst on the roadway above, one thing is clear: It’s a long fall to the concrete below. And police here still say that’s what killed Kent Clothier Gerst. A search party found his body in the water seven years ago, wedged against a bridge pillar. Police believe Gerst, 24, a semipro baseball player, accidentally fell about 35 feet to his death. Some of the circumstances are undisputed: Gerst went out drinking that September night. He ran into an old friend. Later that night, the old friend attacked Gerst in the bar’s parking lot, punching him and chasing him out of the lot and down the road. Then Gerst drowned in Peruque Creek. But Gerst’s brother and father don’t think he fell from the bridge. They don’t understand why an O’Fallon officer was at the bar, involved in the incident, but denied his role. They don’t believe that O’Fallon police missed these same inconsistencies. For seven years, they’ve been trying to get officials, prosecutors

• More Veterans Day coverage, A3

Please see GERST, Page A9

Messenger: Public defenders may get relief • A2

Perks club Even for St. Louis’ free museums, membership pays dividends. B1

Rising Leaders helps girls explore careers • C1 MU moves closer to .500 after loss to Georgia • D1 Century of salutes

TODAY

62°/35° MOSTLY SUNNY

TOMORROW

37°/15° RAIN AND SNOW

WEATHER D9 POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

STRASBURG

SLU holds on Valparaiso gets within one point, but Billikens hold on for 81-70 win. D1

BEGINS FRIDAY!

COLE

RENDON

IN THE CARDS? NOT LIKELY The chances the Redbirds will sign top-tier free agents are low. D1

FABULOUS FOX • NOVEMBER 15-17 • 314-534-1111 • MetroTix.com

2 M Vol. 141, No. 314 ©2019


A2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUNDAY • 11.10.2019 M 1 SUNDAY • 11.10.2019 • A2

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM Emerson under attack

Chainsmokers iParty

Upcoming chats

An activist hedge fund wants Emerson to split itself in two. David Nicklaus and Jim Gallagher discuss how this proposal might reshape one of St. Louis’ biggest companies. stltoday.com/watch

The duo brought their show to Enterprise Center on Friday night — see who showed up for the show. stltoday.com/multimedia

Talk Cardinals baseball, 1 p.m. Sports columnist Ben Frederickson, 11 a.m. Wednesday Ask the Road Crew, 1 p.m. Jim Thomas talks Blues, 1 p.m. Thursday MU sports with Dave Matter, 11 a.m. Friday STL sports with Jeff Gordon, 1 p.m. Monday Tuesday

TONY’S TAKE

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CONTACT US For news tips only, phone: 314-340-8222 Submit news tips: metro@post-dispatch.com Submit calendar events: events.stltoday.com Main number: 314-340-8000 Editor: Gilbert Bailon 314-340-8387 Features: Amy Bertrand 314-340-8284 Local news: Marcia Koenig 314-340-8142 Online: Amanda St. Amand 314-340-8201 Sports: Roger Hensley 314-340-8301

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FULL ACCESS SUBSCRIPTIONS The Post-Dispatch is a Lee Enterprises Newspaper and is published daily. USPS: 476-580. Postmaster send address changes to St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 901 N 10th Street St. Louis MO 63101-1250. Periodical postage paid at St. Louis. Suggested average weekly retail prices for home delivery with full digital access are: Monday-Sunday $14.25, Sunday-Friday $14.25, Monday-Friday $11.75, Thursday-Sunday $11.75, Sat-Mon $10.50, Fri-Sun $10.50, Sun-Mon $8.00, Sat-Sun Only $8.00, Sunday Only $5.50.The subscription price includes all applicable sales tax and a charge for the convenience of having the paper delivered. To avoid delivery charges, call 1-314-340-8888 to arrange pickup of your paper at a local distribution center. Rates are based on the annual charges for premium days and/or plus sections delivered on 12/23/18, 12/25/18, 1/13/19, 1/27/19, 2/17/19, 2/24/19, 3/10/19, 3/17/19, 3/31/19, 4/14/19, 4/21/19, 5/19/19, 5/26/19, 6/16/19, 6/23/19, 6/30/19, 7/14/19, 7/21/19, 8/11/19, 8/18/19, 8/25/19, 9/01/19, 9/8/19, 9/15/19, 9/22/19, 9/29/19, 10/27/19, 11/17/19, 11/28/19, 12/08/19, 12/22/19, 12/29/19, and timing of these charges may affect the length of the subscription. A nonrefundable account setup fee will be charged to qualifying new starts. All Full Access Subscriptions include unlimited digital access. To access these benefits, you must first provide your email address, register with STLtoday.com and activate your account online. To activate your digital account, visit STLtoday. com/activate. For assistance setting up your account, visit STLtoday.com/ subscriberservices or call 1-314-340-8888.

LOTTERY Multistate games MEGA MILLIONS Friday: 3-4-10-39-58 Mega ball: 14 Megaplier: 3 Estimated jackpot: $145 million POWERBALL Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $50 million

Missouri lotteries LOTTO Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $2.1 million SHOW ME CASH Friday: 5-13-29-35-39 Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $64,000 PICK-3 Friday Midday: 310 Evening: 135 PICK-4 Friday Midday: 8193 Evening: 6625

Illinois lotteries LUCKY DAY LOTTO Friday Midday: 12-28-29-31-39 Evening: 2-13-16-35-43 LOTTO Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $10.5 million PICK-3 Friday Midday: 778 FB: 6 Evening: 843 FB: 9 PICK-4 Friday Midday: 5024 FB: 3 Evening: 2769 FB: 0

Overworked public defenders finally may get some relief a solution. That’s what Reynolds did. He made his case, showing that nearly all of TONY MESSENGER the public defenders in the county have St. Louis Post-Dispatch caseloads that are more than twice as high as a standard set by one of the many studies of this persistent problem. Reynolds sought a wait list as well as help Stephen Reynolds was standing up for from private attorneys appointed by the the people of St. Louis County, particu- court to take some of the cases. The judges agreed with him. larly those who face financial difficulties. Then-Prosecuting Attorney Robert It was January 2018 and the head public defender in the county asked the cir- McCulloch stood in the way. In a letter to then-Presiding Judge cuit court to address a problem that had Douglas Beach, McCulloch took issue been building for more than a decade. with Reynolds’ request for help, accusing Defendants in the county who qualified the office of “creating a crisis by refusing for public defender services when they to do their sworn duty … .” were charged with a crime didn’t have Beach disagreed. He issued an order proper access to the legal representation providing relief for the defendants in the the Sixth Amendment of the U.S. Concounty who qualified for public defender stitution requires them to have. services. McCulloch appealed the order, That’s because for a decade or longer, Missouri has had a public defender crisis. which delayed the help. Then McCulloch lost the election The state has the second-lowest funded last year to Wesley Bell, a former public public defender’s office in the country, and the result, highlighted most recently defender and municipal judge who had a different philosophy about the imby a Brennan Center report, is that people waste away in jail mostly because portance of protecting the civil rights of poor defendants . Bell withdrew the appublic defenders have such ridiculous peal of Beach’s order. caseloads that they can’t get to all the Then Beach retired. people who deserve and qualify for their Now Reynolds is back. In late October, services. Meanwhile, public defenders put their he filed a new motion, seeking relief from law licenses in jeopardy nearly every day. the new presiding judge of the court, Judge Gloria Reno. They know they are not fulfilling their He’s likely going to get it. ethical obligations to each individual “We have a responsibility to make sure client by providing them the proper representation, but if they refuse cases, the that every defendant who appears in front of us has effective representation,” courts will discipline them. Reno said in an interview. “We have a It is literally a constitutional crisis. duty to act.” Reynolds sought relief. Under a law In fact, the circuit courts already did. passed by the Missouri Legislature to address the crisis, a public defender’s office This summer the judges passed a rule can request a conference with the judges that allows them to appoint private attorneys who have been properly trained and the prosecutor in the circuit to seek

to handle some of the overflow of public defender cases. The attorneys must handle the cases pro bono but can be reimbursed for certain legal expenses. Reynolds now hopes the court reissues an order allowing him to develop a wait list of defendants who have been released from jail and face lower-level felonies, such as stealing or nonviolent drug cases. Then the private attorneys can be appointed by the court to handle some of the wait-list cases. “In a perfect world, there would be no wait list,” Reynolds said. Of course, in a perfect world, state legislators would understand that they undermine the entire basis of the criminal justice system when they provide funding for one end of the system — prosecutors — but not the other side, public defenders. It creates a dichotomy, and as in most situations in the criminal justice system, people without money lose. They wait in jail because they can’t afford bail, before they’ve been convicted of anything. If they’re lucky, they get 5 minutes of face time with a public defender who has to move on quickly to his or her 300 or 400 other cases. The best solution here is for Missouri to properly fund its constitutionally necessary public defender system so that the civil rights of its most vulnerable citizens will be protected. But Reno knows that’s not going to happen. “The chances of us getting the Legislature to give us the proper funding for the public defenders system are slim and none,” she says. So the criminal justice system in St. Louis County is taking matters into its own hands.

LAW AND ORDER ST. LOUIS — Cure Violence areas chosen: The city has selected three areas to be the target of its effort with Cure Violence, a nonprofit group that treats violence as a public health problem. The sites include parts of three neighborhoods: Wells-Goodfellow/Hamilton Heights, Walnut Park and Dutchtown. Jacob Long, a spokesman for Mayor Lyda Krewson, said in a statement that the city’s Health Department will be “taking the lead on this effort.” Long said the areas were selected “based on crime analysis data” from the police department. He added that Krewson is working with other officials on which agencies will carry out the Cure Violence effort. ST. LOUIS — Executive indicted: A senior sales director for a St. Louis wholesale food supplier was indicted by a federal grand jury Thursday on three counts of wire fraud. Tara Sabatini, 44, of St. Charles, is accused of using her corporate credit card to pay personal expenses in 2017 and 2018, including buying plane tickets for relatives and friends, paying for hotel rooms for her husband and his friends and buying gift cards for her own use. Sabatini also is accused of buying luxury ticket packages from a New York baseball team. She attended some games herself, gave tickets to friends and family and sold some of the tickets and deposited the proceeds in a personal account she shared with her husband, according to a news release from the U.S. attorney’s office. The company was not identified. Each charge of wire fraud carries a maximum penalty of 20 years in prison and a $250,000 fine. The FBI is involved in the case. CLAYTON — Man gets life sentence: A Northwoods man has received a life prison term after pleading guilty in a double homicide and robbery in St. Louis County’s Castle Point area in 2016. Brandon J. Harris, 35, of the 7100 block of Florian Avenue, on Thursday received six concurrent life terms (each calculated at

30 years) after pleading guilty in October to first-degree robbery, three counts of armed criminal action, unlawful gun possession and two reduced counts of second-degree murder. Prosecutors said he shot Dana Robinson, 35, and Antonio C. Harris, 37, during an armed robbery on July 20, 2016, in the 10100 block of Duke Drive, where Harris lived. Robinson died at the scene; Harris died later at the age of 39. Brandon Harris admitted holding up the victims with a .380 semi-automatic handgun and demanding money before shooting them. He took money and electronics from the home before leaving, charges said. Police said the shootings appeared to be drug-related. St. Louis County Circuit Judge Nancy McLaughlin Watkins sentenced Brandon Harris to life plus another concurrent seven-year term for unlawful gun possession. The judge also gave him another concurrent life term for his guilty plea in another robbery five days before the double shooting. Brandon Harris also has pending charges stemming from two homicides in St. Louis in July 2016. He is accused of killing Travis Jones, 32, on July 14, 2016, inside his apartment in the 100 block of Bellerive Boulevard. He is also accused of murdering Patrick Wilhite, 37, in a shooting two days later. Charges say Harris has admitted to both shootings. Those cases are set for trial Dec. 9 before Circuit Judge Bryan Hettenbach. BELLEVILLE — Woman sentenced in fatal DUI: A woman from Shiloh was given a sixyear sentence for killing a man on a motorcycle while she was driving drunk in 2016. Patricia Schantz, 51, pleaded guilty to one count of aggravated DUI on Thursday, according to the St. Clair County state’s attorney’s office. On April 1, 2016, Schantz was driving along Illinois 161 when she turned left toward Shiloh Station Road and hit the motorcyclist, 23-year-old Douglass Landers. Under Illinois law, Schantz must serve at least 85% of her sentence.

ALTON — Three held in car burglaries: Authorities say they have two 19-year-olds and a minor in custody on suspicion of entering 150 cars in Madison County. The Madison County sheriff’s office said it began Thursday to investigate an unspecified number of reports of change and other small miscellaneous items stolen from cars. Two vehicles had also been stolen, the sheriff’s office said. Authorities said they recovered one of the stolen vehicles and have three people in custody: Keisha Lytle of Wood River, Deandre Gilmore of Alton and a minor. The three face a number of charges, including burglary,from the Madison County state’s attorney’s office. The minor suspect is also charged with aggravated assault on a police officer. The Madison County sheriff’s office and Alton Police Department said they concluded after a joint investigation that the group had entered more than 150 vehicles in the past week. Officials said most of the people whose cars were entered were either unaware or didn’t file a report because the cars were unlocked and entry wasn’t forced. The sheriff’s office said it would not release any additional information. Bond for Lytle and Gilmore was set at $100,000. ST. LOUIS — Triple murder trial pushed back: The triple murder trial of 30-yearold Eric Lawson is going to be delayed until 2020. Lawson is accused of killing his exgirlfriend and her mother and setting an apartment fire that killed his 10-monthold son in 2012. Last week, a circuit court judge, prosecutors, and Lawson’s lawyer questioned and eliminated some jurors because of scheduling conflicts. Other prospective jurors were opposed to serving at a trial involving the death penalty. Officials say the trial, which was initially expected to wrap up by Thanksgiving, will start next year. Lawson was charged in 2012.

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS Film composer Ennio Morricone is 91. Blues singer Bobby Rush is 85. Actor Albert Hall (“Ally McBeal,” Morgan “Beloved”) is 82. Country singer Donna Fargo is 78. Lyricist Tim Rice is 75. Actress-dancer Ann Reinking is 70. Actor Jack Scalia is 69. Actor-comedian

Sinbad is 63. Actress Mackenzie Phillips (“One Day at a Time”) is 60. Actor Hugh Bonneville Lambert (“Downton Abbey”) is 56. Comedian Tommy Davidson (“In Living Color”) is 56. Actor Michael Jai White is 55. Country singer Chris Cagle is

51. Comedian Tracy Morgan (“30 Rock”) is 51. Actress Ellen Pompeo (“Grey’s Anatomy”) is 50. Actor Orny Adams (TV’s “Teen Wolf”) is 49. Rapper U-God of Wu-Tang Clan is 49. Rapper Warren G is 49. Actor Walton Goggins (“The Unicorn,” “The Shield”) is 48. Contemporary Christian singer Matt Maher is 45. Singer-guitarist Jim Adkins of Jimmy Eat World is 44.

Rapper Eve is 41. Bassist Chris Joannou of Silverchair is 40. Actress Heather Matarazzo is 37. Country singer Miranda Lambert is 36. Actor Josh Peck (“Drake and Josh”) is 33. Singer Vinz Dery of Nico and Vinz is 29. Actress Zoey Deutch (“Vampire Academy”) is 25. Actress Kiernan Shipka (“Mad Men”) is 20. Actress Mackenzie Foy (“Twilight”) is 19. — Associated Press


A2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUNDAY • 11.10.2019 M 2 SUNDAY • 11.10.2019 • A2

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM Emerson under attack

Chainsmokers iParty

Upcoming chats

An activist hedge fund wants Emerson to split itself in two. David Nicklaus and Jim Gallagher discuss how this proposal might reshape one of St. Louis’ biggest companies. stltoday.com/watch

The duo brought their show to Enterprise Center on Friday night — see who showed up for the show. stltoday.com/multimedia

Talk Cardinals baseball, 1 p.m. Sports columnist Ben Frederickson, 11 a.m. Wednesday Ask the Road Crew, 1 p.m. Jim Thomas talks Blues, 1 p.m. Thursday MU sports with Dave Matter, 11 a.m. Friday STL sports with Jeff Gordon, 1 p.m. Monday Tuesday

TONY’S TAKE

CUSTOMER SERVICE 314-340-8888 Customer service hours 6:30 a.m.–4 p.m. Monday-Friday 7–11 a.m. Saturday-Sunday 7–10 a.m. on holidays service@stltoday.com SUBSCRIBE STLtoday.com/subscriberservices 888-785-3201 PLACE DEATH NOTICES STLtoday.com or 800-365-0820 ext. 8600 PLACE CLASSIFIED OR OTHER ADVERTISING STLtoday.com or 314-621-6666 FAX AD INFORMATION: 314-340-8664 BUY REPRINTS: STLtoday.mycapture.com

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Overworked public defenders finally may get some relief to seek a solution. That’s what Reynolds did. He made his case, showing TONY MESSENGER that nearly all of the public defenders St. Louis Post-Dispatch in the county have caseloads that are more than twice as high as a standard set by one of the many studies of this persistent problem. Reynolds sought a Stephen Reynolds was standing up for wait list as well as help from private atthe people of St. Louis County, particu- torneys appointed by the court to take some of the cases. larly those who face financial difficulThe judges agreed with him. ties. Then-Prosecuting Attorney Robert It was January 2018 and the head McCulloch stood in the way. public defender in the county asked In a letter to then-Presiding Judge the circuit court to address a problem Douglas Beach, McCulloch took issue that had been building for more than a with Reynolds’ request for help, accusdecade. Defendants in the county who ing the office of “creating a crisis by requalified for public defender services fusing to do their sworn duty … .” when they were charged with a crime Beach disagreed. He issued an order didn’t have proper access to the legal providing relief for the defendants in representation the Sixth Amendment the county who qualified for public deof the U.S. Constitution requires them fender services. McCulloch appealed to have. the order, which delayed the help. That’s because for a decade or lonThen McCulloch lost the election ger, Missouri has had a public defender last year to Wesley Bell, a former public crisis. The state has the second-lowest defender and municipal judge who had funded public defender’s office in the a different philosophy about the imporcountry, and the result, highlighted tance of protecting the civil rights of most recently by a Brennan Center repoor defendants . Bell withdrew the apport, is that people waste away in jail peal of Beach’s order. mostly because public defenders have Then Beach retired. such ridiculous caseloads that they Now Reynolds is back. In late Octocan’t get to all the people who deserve ber, he filed a new motion, seeking relief and qualify for their services. Meanwhile, public defenders put their from the new presiding judge of the court, Judge Gloria Reno. law licenses in jeopardy nearly every He’s likely going to get it. day. They know they are not fulfilling “We have a responsibility to make their ethical obligations to each individual client by providing them the proper sure that every defendant who appears representation, but if they refuse cases, in front of us has effective representation,” Reno said in an interview. “We the courts will discipline them. have a duty to act.” It is literally a constitutional crisis. In fact, the circuit courts already did. Reynolds sought relief. Under a law This summer the judges passed a rule passed by the Missouri Legislature to that allows them to appoint private ataddress the crisis, a public defender’s office can request a conference with the torneys who have been properly trained judges and the prosecutor in the circuit to handle some of the overflow of public

defender cases. The attorneys must handle the cases pro bono but can be reimbursed for certain legal expenses. Reynolds now hopes the court reissues an order allowing him to develop a wait list of defendants who have been released from jail and face lower-level felonies, such as stealing or nonviolent drug cases. Then the private attorneys can be appointed by the court to handle some of the wait-list cases. “In a perfect world, there would be no wait list,” Reynolds said. Of course, in a perfect world, state legislators would understand that they undermine the entire basis of the criminal justice system when they provide funding for one end of the system — prosecutors — but not the other side, public defenders. It creates a dichotomy, and as in most situations in the criminal justice system, people without money lose. They wait in jail because they can’t afford bail, before they’ve been convicted of anything. If they’re lucky, they get 5 minutes of face time with a public defender who has to move on quickly to his or her 300 or 400 other cases. The best solution here is for Missouri to properly fund its constitutionally necessary public defender system so that the civil rights of its most vulnerable citizens will be protected. But Reno knows that’s not going to happen. “The chances of us getting the Legislature to give us the proper funding for the public defenders system are slim and none,” she says. So the criminal justice system in St. Louis County is taking matters into its own hands. Tony Messenger • 314-340-8518 @tonymess on Twitter tmessenger@post-dispatch.com

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KILLING TIME BY TICKLING KEYS

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LOTTERY Multistate games POWERBALL Saturday: N/A Powerball: N/A Power play: N/A Estimated jackpot: $50 million MEGA MILLIONS Friday: 3-4-10-39-58 Mega ball: 14 Megaplier: 3 Tuesday’s estimated jackpot: $163 million

TROY STOLT, TSTOLT@POST-DISPATCH.COM

L’niya Thomas, 3, her brother Dematrius, 2, and Shamiya Williamson, 8, play the keyboard Saturday inside Williams Temple Church of God in Christ, 1500 North Union Boulevard, as they wait to get haircuts. The church’s annual Christmas in November event distributes free groceries, clothes, appliances, cosmetics, toys, hot lunches, haircuts and cellphones to those in need.

Missouri lotteries LOTTO Saturday: 7-11-18-22-38-39 Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $2.2 million SHOW ME CASH Saturday: 18-20-30-35-37 Sunday’s estimated jackpot: $80,000 PICK-3 Midday: 847 Evening: 450 PICK-4 Midday: 4167 Evening: 7464

Illinois lotteries LUCKY DAY LOTTO Saturday Midday: 11-16-18-32-45 Evening: 1-13-16-18-23 LOTTO Saturday: 8-10-15-20-39-40 Extra shot: 21 Estimated jackpot: $10.5 million PICK-3 Midday: 134 FB: 3 Evening: 277 FB: 5 PICK-4 Midday: 5085 FB: 4 Evening: 1420 FB: 3

LAW AND ORDER

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS Film composer Ennio Morricone is 91. Blues singer Bobby Rush is 85. Actor Albert Hall (“Ally McBeal,” “Beloved”) is 82. Country singer Donna Fargo is 78. Lyricist Tim Morgan Rice is 75. Actress-dancer Ann Reinking is 70. Actor Jack Scalia is 69. Actor-comedian Sinbad is 63. Actress Mackenzie Phillips (“One Day at a Time”) is 60. Actor Hugh Bonneville (“Downton Abbey”) is 56. Comedian Tommy Davidson (“In Living Color”) is 56. Actor Michael Jai White is 55. Country singer Chris Cagle is 51. Comedian Tracy Morgan (“30 Rock”) is 51. Actress Ellen Pompeo (“Grey’s Anatomy”) is 50. Actor Orny Adams (TV’s

“Teen Wolf”) is 49. Rapper U-God of Wu-Tang Clan is 49. Rapper Warren G is 49. Actor Walton Goggins (“The Unicorn,” “The Shield”) is 48. Contemporary Christian singer Matt Maher is 45. Lambert Singer-guitarist Jim Adkins of Jimmy Eat World is 44. Rapper Eve is 41. Bassist Chris Joannou of Silverchair is 40. Actress Heather Matarazzo is 37. Country singer Miranda Lambert is 36. Actor Josh Peck (“Drake and Josh”) is 33. Singer Vinz Dery of Nico and Vinz is 29. Actress Zoey Deutch (“Vampire Academy”) is 25. Actress Kiernan Shipka (“Mad Men”) is 20. Actress Mackenzie Foy (“Twilight”) is 19. — Associated Press

ST. LOUIS COUNTY — Teen shot while walking: A boy, 14, was shot in the lower body about 3:15 p.m. Saturday while walking in the 1600 block of El Tigre Terrace in the Spanish Lake area. He was taken a hospital with an injury that was not life-threatening, said St. Louis County police. Detectives later Saturday were trying to determine the exact location of the shooting. ST. LOUIS COUNTY — Accidental mall shooting: A man, 22, accidentally shot himself inside a bathroom in the South County Center shopping mall about 2:30 p.m. Saturday, county police said. Police said the man, whose name wasn’t released, was taken to a hospital with an injury that was not lifethreatening.


NATION

11.10.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A3

Massive American Dream mall to open BY ANNE D’INNOCENZIO AND DAVID PORTER

As vacancy rates increase, malls add new attractions

Associated Press

U.S. malls have seen a steady increase of non-retail/non-restaurant space such as options for entertainment, recreation, educational services, finance, insurance, health care, professional and technical services.

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — More than two decades ago when a mega entertainment and shopping complex was being conceived on a vast swath of swamp land in New Jersey, the iPhone didn’t exist, Amazon was only selling books online and malls were where you went for all your shopping needs. Now, after endless fits and starts and billions of dollars spent, American Dream is officially opening its doors to the public as the second largest mall in the country, and third largest in North America. It will showcase 3 million square feet of leasable space dedicated to more than a dozen entertainment attractions like a 16-story indoor ski slope, roller coaster, waterpark and eventually 450 retail, food and specialty shops. The big question is: Who will come? In today’s retail landscape, consumers are glued to their iPhones and smartphones, where they can do their shopping without ever leaving their couch. Amazon has morphed into the biggest online retailer in the world. And overall traffic at malls, which had been on the rise in the late 1990s, has declined 10% since, according to an estimate by Coresight Research. A report from Credit Suisse published two years ago predicted that up to a quarter of the shopping malls will close by 2022 given the increasing popularity of online shopping and a rash of store closings. Since 2015, only nine malls have been built, a dramatic fall from their peak construction in 1973 of 43, according to CoStar Group, a real estate research firm. Amid that new reality, American Dream is looking to draw 40 million visitors in its first year, with entertainment accounting for more than half of its space. Attractions include a bunny field and an aviary. There will also be such amenities as a doggy day care and a luxury wing, where shoppers can sip champagne and sample caviar as they wait to have their designer handbags wrapped. Two hotels with a total of 3,500 rooms are being planned next to the complex. The mall won’t be completely operational until next spring when several hundred stores will open. The Nickelodeon amuse-

VACANCY RATES

MALLS BUILT

NON-RETAIL/NON-RESTAURANT Super regionals have three or more anchors

1970s: 37 per year

10%

45 36 27

8 ’90s 14

0

25.1%

Super regional malls

’00

’10 ’19

20 Regional malls

Mid-level*

15

2 0

’90

25

3.9

4 ’10s 1.8

9

’80

7.2%

6 ’00s 10

18

’70

30% Lower-end*

’80s 24

17 Higher-end malls*

1.8

’12 ’13 ’14 ’15 ’16 ’17 ’18 ’19

10 ’12 ’13 ’14 ’15 ’16 ’17 ’18 ’19

Note: Higher-end malls have total income earned by residents of at least $700 million; Mid-level earned $375-$700 million; Lower-end less. Associated Press graphic

Source: CoStar Portfolio Strategy

JULIO CORTEZ, ASSOCIATED PRESS

This April photo shows the exterior view of the construction site of the American Dream mall in East Rutherford, N.J. Now, after endless fits and starts and billions of dollars later, American Dream is officially opening its doors to the public as the second largest mall in the country and third largest in North America. ment park and an ice skating rink opened at the end of October; its other attractions will open in phases by the end of this year. “You can make it your backyard playground if you live in Manhattan or even if you’re in New Jersey,” said Ken Downing, chief creative officer for Triple Five Group, the mall’s developer. “It’s a staycation. So, it’s a little bit of competing with mindset and emotion, far more than a

property or even Disneyland.” Downing says American Dream was designed to adapt to different events and trends. A grand court’s fountain, for example, can convert into a catwalk for a runway show. The ice rink can be transformed into a concert venue. Canada-based mall and entertainment conglomerate Triple Five in 2011 took over the massive project originally dubbed

Xanadu from two developers, whose plans included building the world’s largest Ferris wheel. The project broke ground in 2004 but it languished during the early years, with its multicolored, checkerboard exterior — since removed — drawing derision, including from thenNew Jersey Gov. Chris Christie who called it “an offense to the eyes” and “the ugliest damn building in New Jersey and

maybe America.” The project was suspended in 2009 during the financial crisis after a Lehmann Bros. affiliate failed to fund its share of the construction. Creditors seized the project in 2010, and Triple Five came on board a year later, renaming it American Dream. Triple Five reimagined American Dream as a community hub for tourists and locals, taking a page from two other malls it had developed, West Edmonton Mall in Alberta, Canada and Mall of America in Bloomington, Minnesota — the two largest malls in North America. Entertainment was a big selling point for both, accounting for 20% of the West Edmonton Mall’s space and 30% of Mall of America’s. That compares with the 6% average for U.S. malls, according to CoStar. American Dream has its fair share of skeptics who wonder about its chances of success, especially given its proximity to New York City less than 10 miles away. “This development will either sink or swim,” said Jason Goldberg, chief commerce strategy officer of Publicis Communications. “It’s going to be tough to get a lot of attention when you are next to a much bigger amusement park — Manhattan.” Goldberg believes the complex could work if the amusement park entices enough families in New Jersey to get into their cars and drive out there. But he’s not sure about how stores will fare since many of the tenants like Zara and Uniqlo can be found elsewhere. Another thorny situation: The mall will abide by the blue laws, meaning retail will be closed Sundays even though the restaurants and theme parks will be open, says James Cassella, the East Rutherford, N.J., mayor. Still, there’s reason for hope. While vacancy rates on average at the nation’s malls are currently at 4%, top malls have been the industry’s bright spot, boasting strong traffic and currently averaging a 2% vacancy rate, says CoStar. That’s compared with the bottom rung of malls, which are wrestling with a 7% average vacancy rate. David Smiley, assistant director of urban design at Columbia University, predicts American Dream “will do quite well.” “There’s a lot of uncertainty in the retail world,” Smiley said. “But American Dream is unusual. It is not a typical mall.”

Deal-hunters find scores at online thrift stores BY TALI ARBEL

Associated Press

NEW YORK — It’s not just eBay anymore. A slew of websites and apps act as virtual thrift stores for vintage devotees, deal hunters and those just looking to unload stuff they don’t want anymore. These sites have proliferated as the recession of a decade ago and the slow comeback in wages since then dramatically altered how people shop. Discounters like T.J. Maxx have been sweeping up, while many traditional retailers have shrunk, gone bankrupt or disappeared. The stigma of “used” has fallen away, and many now shop knowing full well they can sell their pieces later and get some money back. Some consider buying used clothes online a more eco-conscious approach to trends. There’s a range to the Goodwills and consignment stores of the internet. Some cater to kids or young adults; some are specifically for high-end fashion; some are a free-for-all. Online, stuff may be more expensive than at an actual thrift store, especially when you add in shipping costs. But in many cases, it’s also easier to find stuff — no dusty racks, no piles of clothing, and you can search for a brand name and item without leaving your couch. There’s often room to negotiate price. The best sites create an experience for shoppers that’s not only easier to navigate than an actual thrift store but better than going to a traditional store and buying something new (at full price), said Anita Balchandani, a McKinsey partner. It’s hard to determine how big the used-clothing

market is but you can see increasing consumer interest in it due to the growing number of companies engaged in it, said Balchandani, who is co-author of a report predicting that consumers will use more “preowned” or rented clothing, a la Rent the Runway’s model of renting out clothes to its subscribers. The best-known online marketplace that connects individual sellers and buyers is eBay. But sites built for different purposes also function as bargain-hunting middlemen. You can list your wares on neighborhood app Nextdoor, Craigslist and Facebook’s marketplace. In these cases, you’re typically limited by geography as these sites mostly connect locals, pointed out Kathy Kristof, editor of the SideHusl website that gives tips on gig jobs. Some people also use Facebook’s groups function, dedicated to specific brands, and ship to each other across the country. Etsy also is more wide-ranging. Fraud protections vary on these platforms. Etsy and eBay have a process to resolve disputes. On the others, it may be free to post listings, but that means there is no mediator when things go wrong. On some sites, sellers manage their own “closets.” They can try to develop a personal following by using social media to promote themselves and ingratiate themselves to buyers by enclosing thank-you notes with purchases. “A lot of my sales come solely from Instagram,” said Haley Gibbs, 24, who resells clothes that she picks up from thrift stores in Minneapolis, where she lives. She sells on Poshmark, a

site that’s a grab-bag of styles and prices. She sends handwritten notes to her buyers, whom she considers a supportive community that helped her transition to selling full-time. The whole look and feel of Depop, an app popular with teens and young adults, is reminiscent of Instagram, complete with stylized posts by wannabe influencers. Other sites cater to parents of young children, like Kidizen. It’s a market that makes particular sense for used clothing, since kids grow so fast. For those focused on high-end items, like deluxe watches, designer garments and gently used handbags that cost hundreds or even thousands of dollars, a model like TheRealReal guarantees that the merchandise is authentic. The company’s employees, not individual sellers, sets prices and the site takes a hefty cut — it can be over half of the selling price. But buyers are able to trust that a Hermes scarf is actually Hermes. Reselling and refurbishing used clothes is attracting so much attention that some resale sites are striking partnerships with retail names more than a century old. J.C. Penney and Macy’s are working with ThredUP, which operates similarly to TheRealReal in that a customer buys from the middleman, not from another individual. (ThredUP does not have the same singular high-end focus, though.) Neiman Marcus has an arrangement with Fashionphile, in which it owns a minority stake. There’s a plan for customers to be able to sell their old handbags and accessories to Fashionphile inside Neiman Marcus’ luxury department stores.

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Wednesday, November 13 Mid Rivers Mall • 10 AM - 8 PM

Friday, November 15 St. Louis Galleria • 10 AM - 8 PM

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LOCAL

11.10.2019 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A3

‘NO THANK YOU WILL EVER BE ENOUGH’ Former hostage Rocky Sickmann praises fellow veterans BY DANIEL NEMAN

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS — From Nov. 4, 1979, to Jan. 20, 1981, Rodney “Rocky” Sickmann went outside a total of seven times for just 15 minutes each time. Sickmann was 22 years old and a Marine. He had just begun his tour as a security guard at the U.S. Embassy in Tehran, Iran, 28 days before the embassy was stormed by radical Islamist students. Sickmann and 51 other Americans were held hostage by the students for 444 days before they were released. Sickmann spoke at the 36th Annual St. Louis Regional Veterans Day Observance Ceremony at the Solders Memorial Military Museum on Saturday. His keynote address recalled those difficult times when he and the other hostages spent almost the entire time of their captivity in a single room. They were subjected to mind games practiced by their captors, from forced games of Russian roulette to mock executions. He said the hostages were “stripped of their freedom, their dignity and their pride.” Sickmann came out of the experience with a new appreciation of things. “Life is a gift we sometimes take for granted,” he said. And no matter what circumstances he finds himself in, “I need to count my blessings,” he said. He also said he never forgets the eight U.S. servicemen who died trying to rescue the hostages in 1980. “These people were willing to put their life on the line to try to secure my freedom,” he said. That was a theme he returned to repeatedly during the speech, which was part of the local celebration of the nation’s 100th Veterans Day commemoration: the willingness of his fellow vets to sacrifice their lives for America. “You are the reason why we are the land of the free and the home of brave. No thank you will ever be enough,” he said to the many veterans in attendance. He also paid tribute to the Gold Star Mothers at the

ROBERT COHEN PHOTOS, RCOHEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Lanora Blasa, 7, plays on a flagpole as McCluer High School junior ROTC students gather for the Veterans Day Observance at the Soldiers Memorial Military Museum downtown on Saturday. event. Their sons or daughters died during combat. Sickmann grew up in Krakow in Franklin County “with a loving family, loving faith and loving my country.” When he left the Marine Corps after six years, he worked in advertising and then joined AnheuserBusch (now AnheuserBusch InBev). He retired in 2016 as the beer company’s U.S. national director for military and industry affairs. These days, he works for Folds of Honor, a nonprofit organization that provides scholarship money to the spouses and children of U.S. servicemen and women who were killed or disabled while serving the country. After the ceremony, Sickmann served as grand marshal of the annual Veterans Day parade. Daniel Neman • 314-340-8133 Food writer @dnemanfood on Twitter dneman@post-dispatch.com

The reflections of servicemen can be seen on the surface of the granite cenotaph at the Soldiers Memorial Military Museum Saturday. The memorial contains the names of 1,075 St. Louisans who died in World War I.

LAW AND ORDER VALLEY PARK — Man charged with fatally stabbing neighbor: Timothy Rall, 37, of the 700 block of Vest Avenue, was charged with fatally stabbing a n e i g h b o r, Anthony Morgan, 27, Rall during an argument about 1:45 a.m. Saturday. Rall fled the scene but was arrested in St. Louis a short time later by city police. Morgan, who had multiple wounds, died after being taken to a local hospital. Rall was charged with second-degree murder, armed criminal action and assault. He was being held with bail set at $250,000. St. Louis County police said another neighbor who tried to break up the fight, Jon Londal, was cut twice by Rall and had minor injuries.

ST. LOUIS — One killed, two hurt in shooting: A man was killed and two others injured in a shooting about 2:15 a.m. Saturday at the Upper Level Restaurant & Lounge in the 2500 block of North Grand Boulevard, police said. Police said a man, 44, who was found with multiple gunshot wounds, died after he was taken to a hospital. Another victim, 47, told police he was sitting at the bar when he heard an argument at the front door followed by gunshots. He said he felt a pain in his leg and ran outside, where he collapsed. He was in critical condition at a hospital, police said. The third victim, 41, took himself to a hospital with a gunshot wound to the abdomen. He was in stable condition. Police said he refused to answer questions. The names of the three men were not re-

leased. ST. LOUIS — Man dies in crash: Tommie Jackson, 33, of the 1600 block of Beale Street in St. Charles, was killed about 12:30 a.m. Saturday when his vehicle veered off southbound Interstate 55 near Weber Road and hit two trees. Witnesses said the vehicle was moving at a high rate of speed. St. Louis police said the vehicle crashed with such force that it broke into two pieces. ST. LOUIS COUNTY — Police investigate homicide: St. Louis County detectives were investigating a homicide that took place about 9:10 a.m. Saturday in the 1400 block of Dunn Road in the Spanish Lake area of north St. Louis County. Police said the victim was a man but didn’t release further details.

BRA FIT EVENT Tuesday, November 12 South County Center • 10 AM - 8 PM

Wednesday, November 13 Mid Rivers Mall • 10 AM - 8 PM

Friday, November 15 St. Louis Galleria • 10 AM - 8 PM

Don't change your body, just change your bra! If your straps slip, the back rides up, or your bra is just uncomfortable, come in and get fitted by an expert. We have certified bra fitters who will help you find the perfect bra for your figure. In addition, Dillard's will donate $2 for every regular price bra, shapewear, robe, and sleepwear piece purchased on the day of the event to the National Breast Cancer Foundation.

DIGEST MARYLAND HEIGHTS — Municipal League has headquarters lease: The Municipal League of Metro St. Louis now has a monthly lease after its recent move to vacant space at Maryland Heights City Hall, 11911 Dorsett Road, to house its headquarters and staff. The league is paying $500 monthly for the use of three desks and cubicles, and occasional use of available meeting rooms, under a contract approved by the City Council on Thursday night. The lease will be renewable automatically unless changes are proposed by either side. The league will still hold its monthly general membership meetings at scattered cities and locations. Cost to the league for the new site is less than half what it was paying

for slightly more space in Richmond Heights, where it had been since 2013. The league had been facing a cost increase and other issues in Richmond Heights, executive director Pat Kelly said. EMINENCE, Mo. — Wild horses adopted: A herd of seven wild horses that were causing problems at Echo Bluff State Park have been rounded up and adopted by horse lovers. Visitors to the park were feeding the horses, raising concerns that someone might be seriously injured, the Springfield NewsLeader reported. While that didn’t happen, one horse chewed up a park visitor’s motorcycle seat. Several cars received paint damage from horses in the lodge’s parking lot, said Carolyn Dyer, secre-

tary of the Missouri Wild Horse League. One horse even seemed to figure out how to use its nose to press the button to open the lodge’s front door. The league has an agreement with the federal government to manage wild horses that have been living along the Current and Jacks Fork rivers for more than 100 years. The Echo Bluff horses were among them. Dyer said the horses rounded up, including three that had caused the problems, were descendants of a wild appaloosa, a breed famous for spotted coats. She said it was the “best outcome” that all of them found new homes. Even after the roundup, about 30 wild horses in four or five herds still roam in Shannon County, where traffic signs caution motorists to watch for them.

Receive a faux leather pouch with any $80 Le Mystere purchase. While supplies last.

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NATION

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 11.10.2019

Holiday staffing issues a big stressor BY JOYCE M. ROSENBERG

Associated Press

NEW YORK — In the early days of Kristen David’s law firm, she told staffers they could all take off the day after Thanksgiving. But before the holiday, they learned an upcoming trial would start Monday, right after the long weekend. “I had given them the weekend off. They had made travel plans and weren’t even going to be in town,” said David, who ended up working solo through the weekend to be sure the firm was ready for the trial. Holiday staffing can be one of a small business owner’s biggest stressors — even companies that aren’t retailers or restaurants can have a year-end busy season, just when employees all want to take time off. Accounting and other financial advisory firms, for example, must get work done for clients by Dec. 31, and the nature of their work doesn’t allow them to use temporary help. Companies can also have an unexpected crisis or project that can force an owner to change holiday plans, a hard lesson that can affect a company’s vacation policy going forward. And owners can discover they’re vulnerable to staffing issues at other companies. David learned a lesson about managing staffers’ expectations.

Now, “we let the team know that while we’d love to give everyone the Friday off after Thanksgiving, or Monday after a holiday as an extra bonus, we’ll have to wait until just before the holiday to determine the final schedule,” she says. The experience also taught David, who now works as a business coach based in Seattle, that everyone couldn’t be out of the office at the same time. The firm changed its vacation policy and encouraged staffers to request just a few days off so everyone could have a chance to be off during the holidays. While some holiday staffing issues can’t be predicted, owners can lessen the likelihood of problems by setting expectations well in advance, says Kate Zabriskie, president of Business Training Works, a company that offers management training. “People don’t like being told one thing and then finding out it’s not so,” Zabriskie says. The clients at Dawson Whitfield’s graphic design company include entrepreneurs who need logos created ASAP, even if the holidays are in full swing. “Right when everyone in the office wants to ramp down for vacation, our customers are ramping up to finally follow that New Year’s

MARY ALTAFFER, ASSOCIATED PRESS

People work in their office after the Rockefeller Center Christmas tree is lit during the 86th annual Rockefeller Center Christmas tree-lighting ceremony last year in New York. Holiday staffing is one of a small business owner’s biggest stressors. Even companies that aren’t retailers or restaurants can have a year-end busy season, just when employees all want to take time off. resolution of launching a business,” says Whitfield, owner of Toronto-based Looka. When Whitfield hires a staffer, he tells them that it will be hard to take time off in December. He does let employees take some days, but of course everyone wants the prime days, a common problem at companies of all sizes. His solution is to remind staffers that designing logos is a key part of the company’s mission and, rather than dictating a solution, he asks them to work out a schedule for time off. “When they can be part of the solution, and the so-

lution comes to them, it’s more palatable to them,” he says. Many small businesses that provide specialized or professional services can’t bring in temporary staffers the way retailers, restaurants and delivery services do. Architecture, accounting and law firms, for example, tend to work on an ongoing basis with clients, and freelancers or temporary employees won’t be able to just jump in and

take over the work. Moreover, even companies that can use temporary help can struggle to find it because of the shrunken labor pool, a result of low unemployment. Owners can find out the hard way that they can be hurt by other companies’ staffing problems. Chase Fisher has learned he needs to be concerned not only about having enough people in his eyewear retailing business but also about the number of employees in the companies he deals with. Fisher, owner of Blenders Eyewear, has realized that several months before Black Friday, he needs to meet with the companies that take the orders and pack and ship his sunglasses and ski goggles. If those companies are understaffed, then deliveries of his merchandise will be delayed and customers will post negative reviews online about his business. Fisher, who has an internet business and a physical store in San Diego, expects nearly two-thirds of his holiday customers to be first-time shoppers. If an order is shipped late, “that’s something that will break

your trust immediately,” he says. Small businesses that rely on freelancers or independent contractors to get their work done can also struggle with staffing issues — but these are workers an owner has no control over. Robyn Flint hires building contractors to fix up houses that have been damaged in natural disasters or fires. Her company, Property Wise, is based in Bedford, Virginia. Some of the work is done for owners who need to get back into their homes; Flint also needs rehabilitation work on houses she buys and plans to resell. But, she says, “during the holidays it is hard to find people to keep the work going.” Most of the contractors are self-employed and make their own hours, and many decide to take the holidays off. Some leave in the middle of a job. Meanwhile, Flint has frustrated homeowners waiting, or she’s paying interest and taxes on houses that can’t be sold until she can get contractors to renovate them. “We’re at their mercy or we have to find someone else if we can,” she says.

Fall is coming soon! Find these fall Arrangements and more at Alex Waldbart Florist.

We buy, sell, repair, and restore collectible cars Over 50 classics and performance cars in a 50,000 sq. ft. state of the art facility.

Alex Waldbart aldbart Florist 7801 Clayton Rd., Saint Louis, MO 63105 (314) 644-3566 Your one stop shop for repair, restoration, sales Down draft heated paint booth • Laser alignment • Vapor blasting • Road force balancing • Classic auto air and 5 speed conversion Please call if you have a classic car for sale. • Follow us on Facebook at It’s Alive Automotive 11714 Saint Charles Rock Road • Bridgeton, MO 63044 • 314-348-5774 • Jeff@ItsAliveAuto.com • ItsAliveAuto.com

* OFF EVERYTHING %

11

11% Off* and prices good Sunday, November 10 – Saturday, November 16, 2019.

THE POST FRAME STORE

Gobblin' Good Deals!

20

LVT %Off Mohawk Laminate *

SUGGESTED RETAIL PRICE

and Tile

*Available to qualified buyers. Contact Commerce Bank for additional information.Installed material Only Minimum Labor Rates Apply. New Contracts Only!

Clark Floor Co. Family owned and operated for Over 38 years.

7525 S. Lindbergh

Sale expires November 30th, 2019

314-487-0151 HRS: M-W-F 9:00 to 7:30, Tues. & Thur. 9:00 to 5:00, Sat. 9:00 to 3:00

clarkfloor.com .com

Hear Better. Live Better. Total body health begins with better hearing health! Tinnitus affects 1 in 5 people, and 90% of people of tinnitus also have a hearing loss

Those with hearing loss experience 30-40% greater cognitive decline

Hearing loss is twice as common in those with diabetes

Heart Health - the inner ear is highly sensitive to blood flow!

Ototoxicity is caused by more than 200 medications that are known to cause hearing loss

Start a better health and wellness conversation today!

314-647-EARS (3277)

36’W x 48’L x 16’H Agricultural Building

LET

190-4310

TURN YOUR DREAM INTO A REALITY!

If you are looking to build a post frame building, to help with over 50 years of experience!

is here

THREE WAYS THR S TO BUY! 1. PREPRICED POST FRAMES

2. POST FRAME ESTIMATOR

3. BUILDING DESIGN SERVICES

SHOP TODAY AT MENARDS.COM/POSTFRAME APPROXIMATE PRICE** 11% OFF*

FINAL PRICE**

6,859.00 754.49

6,10451

Approximate price per material list

30’W x 40’L x 10’H Gable Entry • Materials include framing, 8’ on center posts and trusses, steel, trim, one 9 x 7 overhead door, one service door, fasteners, and post frame mini-print 190-6410 APPROXIMATE PRICE** 11% OFF*

FINAL PRICE**

5,599.00 615.89

4,98311

Approximate price per material list

24’W x 36’L x 10’H Gable Entry • Materials include framing, 9’ on center posts and trusses, steel, trim, one 16 x 7 overhead door, one service door, fasteners, and post frame mini-print 190-6400 prices are approximate. Actual price may vary slightly higher or lower due to pricing changes after publication date. Stop in and review **These the specifications. You may buy all the materials or any part at low cash and carry prices. Some items may be special order or not available. Because of code variances, we cannot guarantee the materials listed will meet your code requirements. These are suggested designs and material lists only. We do not guarantee the completeness or prices. Labor, concrete floor/foundation, steel beams, paint, cabinets, Finish flooring, electrical, HVAC, plumbing and delivery not included unless otherwise indicated. Some special order trusses must be jobsite delivered. Delivery is extra.

Hear the Difference a Doctor of Audiology Can Make

315 6651 Chippewa St., Suite Ste. 217 St. Louis, MO 63109

Nancy M. Richman, Au.D., CCC-A Owner, Doctor of Audiology

314-647-EARS (3277) www.SouthCityHearing.com © 2015 Starkey. All Rights Reserved. 3/15 34154-15

ACCREDITED BUSINESS

Mail-in Rebate. Rebate is in form of merchandise credit check, valid in-store only. Merchandise credit check is not valid towards purchases made on MENARDS.COM®. Limited to stock on hand. No sorry slips. First come, first served. Future sale price adjustments, exchanges and merchandise returns will void the 11% rebate on the items adjusted, exchanged and/or returned. Rebate is valid on special ordered products but does not extend to the special ordering of any normally stocked items. Not good with any other coupons or offers except Menards® coupons, Menards rebates and manufacturers’ coupons. Multiple receipts may accompany one rebate certificate. Menards reserves the right to limit purchases of any and all items to reasonable job lot quantities. Excludes event tickets, gift cards, propane purchases, delivery and handling charges, all rental items, minuteKEY®, processing fees, packaging charges and extended service agreements. By submitting any rebate form, you agree to resolve any disputes related to rebate redemption by binding arbitration and you waive any right to file or participate in a class action. Terms and conditions available at www.rebateinternational.com


NATION

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 11.10.2019

Supreme Court to hear case weighing fate of DACA immigrants BY GREG STOHR

Tribune News Service

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Supreme Court is again poised to test the bounds of Donald Trump’s presidential powers, this time in a politically charged clash over the fate of 700,000 people who were brought into the country illegally as children. The case, set for argument Tuesday, will mark the climax of Trump’s twoyear campaign to unravel former President Barack Obama’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. DACA, as it’s known, protects those immigrants from deportation and lets them seek jobs. The dispute is timed to be decided during the heart of next year’s presidential campaign, underscoring the stakes for the divisive subject of immigration and for the court itself. The administration is challenging lower court rulings that blocked it from rescinding the program. Democratic-led states, universities, labor unions, Microsoft Corp. and DACA recipients are battling to keep the program alive at least through the election. “These are people who are contributing in fundamental ways to the American economy,” said Microsoft President Brad Smith, whose company has 66 employees with DACA status. “These are people who for the most part could not be deported

J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE, ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Supreme Court will hear arguments Tuesday over a challenge to the DACA program. to another home because they’ve never known another home.” It’s the third time in as many terms the Supreme Court has weighed a major Trump administration initiative, following rulings that upheld the president’s travel ban and blocked the use of a question about citizenship in the 2020 census. The administration moved to rescind DACA in September 2017 in the face of a threatened challenge to the program by Republican-led states. At the time, the administration said it agreed with those states that the program went beyond Obama’s authority under the federal immigration laws. Trump’s team has since tried to supplement that legal rationale with addi-

tional reasons based on policy grounds. In a June 2018 memo, then-Secretary of Homeland Security Kirstjen Nielsen said the administration believed a case-by-case approach would be wiser than DACA’s exemption of a broad category of people from immigration enforcement. “It is critically important for DHS to project a message that leaves no doubt regarding the clear, consistent and transparent enforcement of the immigration laws against all classes and categories of aliens,” Nielsen wrote. Solicitor General Noel Francisco, the administration’s top Supreme Court lawyer, said in court papers that “DHS provided multiple, independently sufficient grounds for with-

drawing DACA.” Defenders of DACA say it’s simply a broad exercise of the president’s accepted power to set priorities in deciding who should be deported. Obama created the program in 2012, bypassing Congress after legislation known as the Dream Act had stalled. The Dream Act would have created a path to legal status for young undocumented immigrants. DACA made an estimated 1.7 million young people eligible for the program, which offers successful applicants a renewable two-year shield from deportation and the

right to apply for work permits. “It seemed to me that this was a group of people who really didn’t deserve living under fear of deportation and having the weight of the federal government on their backs,” said Janet Napolitano, who proposed the DACA program as Obama’s Homeland Security secretary. “It was also a group of young people who need the ability to work.” Napolitano is now president of the University of California, which is among the challengers to Trump’s rescission. The university has at least 1,700 DACA recipients among its undergraduate population, she said. More than 660,000 people had active DACA status as of June 30, and they had an average age of 25½, according to government data. A 2017 study found that 91% of DACA recipients were employed, and 45% were enrolled in school. They arrived in the U.S. at an average age of 6½, and the vast majority were born in Mexico. A ruling in the Trump administration’s favor wouldn’t necessarily mean all, or even any, of those people would be deported. Before the courts intervened, the administration

was trying to wind down the program gradually, barring people from renewing their status after a specified date but not challenging their current rights. It’s not clear that Trump is especially eager to start deporting DACA recipients. He suggested last month that his goal was to gain leverage in negotiations with lawmakers. If the court lets DACA be rescinded,“the Republicans and Democrats will have a DEAL to let them stay in our Country,” Trump tweeted. “It would actually benefit DACA and be done the right way!” A loss for Trump at the Supreme Court could leave room for him to try again to rescind DACA using a different explanation, though he might be hard-pressed to do so before the 2020 election. No matter which side prevails, Congress needs to step in and provide permanent protection, said Christopher Eisgruber, the president of Princeton University, which sued the Trump administration in 2017. “The only path that gives security to the Dreamers is a path that gives them a road to citizenship,” Eisgruber said. “And that needs to come from Congress.”

Fall is coming soon! Find these fall Arrangements and more at Alex Waldbart Florist.

We buy, sell, repair, and restore collectible cars Over 50 classics and performance cars in a 50,000 sq. ft. state of the art facility.

Alex Waldbart aldbart Florist 7801 Clayton Rd., Saint Louis, MO 63105 (314) 644-3566 Your one stop shop for repair, restoration, sales Down draft heated paint booth • Laser alignment • Vapor blasting • Road force balancing • Classic auto air and 5 speed conversion Please call if you have a classic car for sale. • Follow us on Facebook at It’s Alive Automotive 11714 Saint Charles Rock Road • Bridgeton, MO 63044 • 314-348-5774 • Jeff@ItsAliveAuto.com • ItsAliveAuto.com

* OFF EVERYTHING %

11

11% Off* and prices good Sunday, November 10 – Saturday, November 16, 2019.

THE POST FRAME STORE

Gobblin' Good Deals!

20

LVT %Off Mohawk Laminate *

SUGGESTED RETAIL PRICE

and Tile

*Available to qualified buyers. Contact Commerce Bank for additional information.Installed material Only Minimum Labor Rates Apply. New Contracts Only!

Clark Floor Co. Family owned and operated for Over 38 years.

7525 S. Lindbergh

Sale expires November 30th, 2019

314-487-0151 HRS: M-W-F 9:00 to 7:30, Tues. & Thur. 9:00 to 5:00, Sat. 9:00 to 3:00

clarkfloor.com .com

Hear Better. Live Better. Total body health begins with better hearing health! Tinnitus affects 1 in 5 people, and 90% of people of tinnitus also have a hearing loss

Those with hearing loss experience 30-40% greater cognitive decline

Hearing loss is twice as common in those with diabetes

Heart Health - the inner ear is highly sensitive to blood flow!

Ototoxicity is caused by more than 200 medications that are known to cause hearing loss

Start a better health and wellness conversation today!

314-647-EARS (3277)

36’W x 48’L x 16’H Agricultural Building

LET

190-4310

TURN YOUR DREAM INTO A REALITY!

If you are looking to build a post frame building, to help with over 50 years of experience!

is here

THREE WAYS THR S TO BUY! 1. PREPRICED POST FRAMES

2. POST FRAME ESTIMATOR

3. BUILDING DESIGN SERVICES

SHOP TODAY AT MENARDS.COM/POSTFRAME APPROXIMATE PRICE** 11% OFF*

FINAL PRICE**

6,859.00 754.49

6,10451

Approximate price per material list

30’W x 40’L x 10’H Gable Entry • Materials include framing, 8’ on center posts and trusses, steel, trim, one 9 x 7 overhead door, one service door, fasteners, and post frame mini-print 190-6410 APPROXIMATE PRICE** 11% OFF*

FINAL PRICE**

5,599.00 615.89

4,98311

Approximate price per material list

24’W x 36’L x 10’H Gable Entry • Materials include framing, 9’ on center posts and trusses, steel, trim, one 16 x 7 overhead door, one service door, fasteners, and post frame mini-print 190-6400 prices are approximate. Actual price may vary slightly higher or lower due to pricing changes after publication date. Stop in and review **These the specifications. You may buy all the materials or any part at low cash and carry prices. Some items may be special order or not available. Because of code variances, we cannot guarantee the materials listed will meet your code requirements. These are suggested designs and material lists only. We do not guarantee the completeness or prices. Labor, concrete floor/foundation, steel beams, paint, cabinets, Finish flooring, electrical, HVAC, plumbing and delivery not included unless otherwise indicated. Some special order trusses must be jobsite delivered. Delivery is extra.

Hear the Difference a Doctor of Audiology Can Make

315 6651 Chippewa St., Suite Ste. 217 St. Louis, MO 63109

Nancy M. Richman, Au.D., CCC-A Owner, Doctor of Audiology

314-647-EARS (3277) www.SouthCityHearing.com © 2015 Starkey. All Rights Reserved. 3/15 34154-15

ACCREDITED BUSINESS

Mail-in Rebate. Rebate is in form of merchandise credit check, valid in-store only. Merchandise credit check is not valid towards purchases made on MENARDS.COM®. Limited to stock on hand. No sorry slips. First come, first served. Future sale price adjustments, exchanges and merchandise returns will void the 11% rebate on the items adjusted, exchanged and/or returned. Rebate is valid on special ordered products but does not extend to the special ordering of any normally stocked items. Not good with any other coupons or offers except Menards® coupons, Menards rebates and manufacturers’ coupons. Multiple receipts may accompany one rebate certificate. Menards reserves the right to limit purchases of any and all items to reasonable job lot quantities. Excludes event tickets, gift cards, propane purchases, delivery and handling charges, all rental items, minuteKEY®, processing fees, packaging charges and extended service agreements. By submitting any rebate form, you agree to resolve any disputes related to rebate redemption by binding arbitration and you waive any right to file or participate in a class action. Terms and conditions available at www.rebateinternational.com


NATION

11.10.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A5

Rebate checks are in the mail About 400,000 checks went out this week and all 1.2 million checks — sent out in zip code order — should be in the mail by Dec. 2, the agency said in a statement. It will cost about $700,000 to send the checks. Republican Gov. Henry McMaster originally suggested $200 million be sent back to taxpayers as the state had an influx of money from lawsuit settlements and from rising tax revenues as the economy hums along and more people move in.

BY JEFFREY COLLINS

Associated Press

COLUMBIA, S.C. — More than a year after someone in South Carolina won an $878 million lottery jackpot, 1.2 million of the state’s taxpayers are getting their own modest windfall from that lucky day. The South Carolina Revenue Department said Friday it began mailing out $50 rebate checks to state income taxpayers. The money represents the taxes paid on the gargantuan winnings.

But lawmakers saw an even rarer pot of money — the $61 million in state income tax that would have to be paid by the person who bought the only winning lottery ticket for a $1.5 billion Mega Millions jackpot in October 2018 at the KC Mart in Simpsonville. The lottery winner opted for a $878 million one-time payment, but the taxes remained the same. The General Assembly decided to send that windfall back to taxpayers after waiting for almost

five months for the winner, who chose to remain anonymous under state law, to cash in the ticket. Each filer who sent at least $50 in income tax to the state will get $50 back. But the money is based on returns, not on individuals. So married couples will have to split that $50 check — maybe on a nice dinner? “Any time the government funds essential programs and agencies and has money left over, we should strive to send

it back to the people who earned it,” McMaster said in a statement. Some Democratic lawmakers suggested instead of a small rebate, the money could be used for a raise for state workers whose salaries have been stagnant for most of this decade. Some Republicans who supported the rebate said it would be better if the state cut taxes or reformed tax laws so there wouldn’t be as much extra revenue in the first place.

TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

With companies closing stores and filing for bankruptcy, the rule with gift cards is use ‘em or lose ‘em.

Use gift cards before bankruptcy shuts doors BY JOHN EWOLDT

Tribune News Service

EDWARDS CARPET

N ' S A R D E A T Y E V

FLOORING

SALE Sale Ends Nov 11th Open Veteran's Day

SID MALTZMAN

FOUNDER OF EDWARDS CARPET WORLD WAR II WAR HERO 2 PURPLE HEARTS 3 BRONZE STARS Edwards Carpet would like to Thank All our country's Veterans!

12 Months Interest Free! We Take Up & Haul Away Old Carpet. Move Regular Furniture FREE!

Textured Carpet 99 Reg. 4 sq. ft.

$ 99

Now

2

sq. ft.

Includes 8 lb Pad and Installation

Tonal Plush 25 yr Warranty

Anso Nylon Carpet Non Pro Rated 20 yr Warranty

99 Reg. sq. ft.

6

Reg.

99

7 sq. ft.

$ 99* Now$ 99 Now

4

5

sq. ft.

sq. ft.

Includes 8 lb Pad and Installation

Includes 8 lb Pad and Installation

Last Chance at These Prices!

CREVE COEUR

ELLISVILLE

SOUTH COUNTY

1000 N. Lindbergh (at Olive)

15763 Manchester (just east of Clarkson)

6925 S. Lindbergh (Marshall’s Plaza)

314-993-0808

636-391-8070

314-892-4499

DES PERES

ST. CHARLES

ALL STORE HOURS

Des Peres Store Hours

13384 Manchester Rd. (Just west of 270)

Regency Plaza (Bogey Rd., West of 94)

(except Des Peres)

Tue-Fri 10-7 • Sat 9-6 Closed Sun & Mon

314-909-7474

636-940-2244

Mon-Fri 9-7 Sat 9-6 Sun 12-5

www.EdwardsCarpet.com

Previous sales excluded *On Approved Credit, 1/3 deposit required, minimum payment, See Store for full details. Extra charge for glue down pull up.

On Sept. 22, Smaaash gocarts at Mall of America in Bloomington, Minnesota, abruptly closed its doors. Based in India, the company has no other U.S. locations and left no forwarding information on how to contact it. That left Randy Kraemer of Rosemount, Minnesota, wondering if he had any recourse. “I’m sitting on a $100 gift card,” he said. “How do I get a refund now that Smaaash@MOA is closed?” That’s a question consumers need to ask about any unused gift card, especially as more retailers and restaurants close their doors without warning, leaving consumers with a worthless piece of plastic. We all know we should redeem gift cards quickly, so why don’t we? “People don’t keep them handy,” said Shelley Hunter, a gift card expert at Giftcards. com. People should keep them next to the debit or credit cards they use most often or add them to their mobile wallet. “If you don’t want to carry them around, put them by your computer so they’re available when you’re shopping online,” she said. Retailers that have announced select store closings should put consumers on alert. Rumors of Gander Mountain’s bankruptcy started in March 2017 and people could still redeem its gift cards, but by May, the stores quit accepting them. Now, almost 40 of 200 Gander Outdoors stores, which emerged from Gander Mountain’s bankruptcy, are in the process of closing nationwide. CreditMonitorRisk.com put Gander’s parent company Camping World on a list of companies with a high chance of bankruptcy. Other retailers on the list? Christopher & Banks, J Crew, Neiman Marcus, J.C. Penney, Pier One and Rite Aid. Retailers with an elevated risk include Express, Francesca’s, J. Jill, Container Store, Kirkland’s, Sears, GNC, At Home and Build-A-Bear. Even retailers that aren’t on a bankruptcy watch list close stores, including Forever 21, Lowe’s, Walmart, Target, CVS and Walgreens, but Hunter said no gift card should collect dust in today’s retail climate. Restaurants are no different. National chains that have closed locations in 2019 include Famous Dave’s, Applebee’s, Noodles, Tim Hortons, Papa John’s and Subway. Locally, Libertine, Revolution Hall, It’s Greek to Me, Sporty’s Pub & Grill and Corner Table have closed. When a company still has locations open in other cities, consumers can trying selling theirs for a discount on sites such as Giftcardgranny, Cardpool and Raise. For retailers or restaurants that have already closed, Consumer Reports said it’s difficult to collect. It’s better to use a gift card before a troubled retailer such as Sears or Camping World (Gander Outdoors) starts a companywide liquidation. “Some people want to wait until the liquidation starts to max out the savings, but gift cards are often not accepted once the liquidation starts,” Hunter said. With the holidays approaching, redeeming gift cards now is a sound strategy because many retailers and restaurants give up the ghost in December and January when holiday sales disappoint. For those with a dusty Toys R Us gift card who are excited about the toy company’s return during the holiday season, you’re still out of luck, Hunter said.


NATION

11.10.2019 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A5

Facing lawsuit, DeVos erases more student loans In all, about $11 million will be automatically canceled. Students who attended another 24 schools owned by the same company will be able to get their loans erased if they enrolled after June 29, 2018. Federal rules typically allow students to get loans erased if their schools close within 120 days after they enroll, but DeVos said she is expanding the window in this case. It’s meant to provide relief to students who took on debt to attend colleges owned by Dream Center Education Holdings, which collapsed last year and shuttered campuses across

BY COLLIN BINKLEY

Associated Press

Facing a federal lawsuit and mounting criticism, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos on Friday said she will forgive certain student loans for more than 1,500 borrowers who attended a pair of for-profit colleges that shut down last year. Students who attended the Art Institute of Colorado and the Illinois Institute of Art will not have to repay federal student loans borrowed between Jan. 20, 2018, through the end of last year, DeVos said, although they will still be responsible for any previous loans.

the nation. But some critics say it doesn’t go far enough, and still leaves many students carrying debt from a defunct chain. “For the vast majority of defrauded students, this announcement cancels only a small portion of the loans they took out to attend a failing school,” said Rep. Bobby Scott, D-Va., chairman of the House education committee. The relief goes “well short” of what Congress requested and what students deserve, he added. DeVos has faced mounting criticism over her handling of federal loan forgiveness programs, which were

expanded by the Obama administration following the collapse of Corinthian Colleges and other for-profit college chains accused of aggressive and deceptive marketing tactics. Under DeVos, the Education Department has stopped processing claims from students who say they were defrauded by their schools, leaving tens of thousands of borrowers in limbo as they seek loan cancellations. DeVos has instead moved to tighten eligibility rules, prompting backlash from Democrats and a flurry of lawsuits from students and advo-

cacy groups. In the latest case, a federal lawsuit says the Education Department failed to cut funding from the Colorado and Illinois schools even after they lost the seal of approval of their accreditor. Losing approval should have made the schools ineligible for funding, the suit says, but instead they were allowed to keep operating without telling students of their troubles. DeVos, however, shifted blame to the schools’ accrediting group on Friday. The department said the Higher Learning Commission assigned the schools a

EDWARDS CARPET

“newly developed and improperly defined accreditation status.” The Higher Learning Commission applauded DeVos for providing relief but insisted it followed proper policies. Schools are required to notify students of any changes to their accreditation, the group said, and “in this instance, the institutions did not appropriately inform their students.” The Education Department’s debt relief was celebrated as a victory by a legal group representing the former Dream Center students who sued DeVos.

Brrrrutal! Cold snap is bearing down on half of US BY JASON SAMENOW

Washington Post

N ' S A R D E A T Y E V

FLOORING

SALE Sale Ends Nov 11th Open Veteran's Day

SID MALTZMAN

FOUNDER OF EDWARDS CARPET WORLD WAR II WAR HERO 2 PURPLE HEARTS 3 BRONZE STARS Edwards Carpet would like to Thank All our country's Veterans!

12 Months Interest Free! We Take Up & Haul Away Old Carpet. Move Regular Furniture FREE!

Textured Carpet 99 Reg. 4 sq. ft.

$ 99

Now

2

sq. ft.

Includes 8 lb Pad and Installation

Tonal Plush 25 yr Warranty

Anso Nylon Carpet Non Pro Rated 20 yr Warranty

99 Reg. sq. ft.

6

Reg.

99

7 sq. ft.

$ 99* Now$ 99 Now

4

5

sq. ft.

sq. ft.

Includes 8 lb Pad and Installation

Includes 8 lb Pad and Installation

Last Chance at These Prices!

CREVE COEUR

ELLISVILLE

SOUTH COUNTY

1000 N. Lindbergh (at Olive)

15763 Manchester (just east of Clarkson)

6925 S. Lindbergh (Marshall’s Plaza)

314-993-0808

636-391-8070

314-892-4499

DES PERES

ST. CHARLES

ALL STORE HOURS

Des Peres Store Hours

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The Arctic blast engulfing the eastern half of the Lower 48 will make mid-November feel like mid-January. Between Sunday and Wednesday, temperatures will sink to levels 15 to 30 degrees colder than normal from the Plains to the East Coast. The National Weather Service is predicting that about 250 cold records will be established as a result of this polar plunge, from the Gulf Coast to the Great Lakes. This week’s cold snap is the second and stronger of back-to-back Arctic fronts sweeping across the nation. The first front raced from the Midwest to the East Coast between Wednesday and Friday last week. It caused temperatures to drop 15 to 20 degrees in 24 hours along the Eastern Seaboard between Thursday and Friday morning and supported the season’s first snow flurries in Washington. But temperatures are poised to take an even deeper dive as the second front invades. The cold front was expected to drop into the Northern Plains and Upper Midwest on Saturday night and into Sunday, passing through Minneapolis and Chicago. On Monday morning, the front will have rapidly progressed eastward, stretching from interior New England southwest to Texas, having sliced through Buffalo, Detroit, Cleveland, Kansas City, St. Louis and Oklahoma City. By Tuesday morning, it will have reached the East Coast, having passed through all but southeast South Carolina and Florida, which it will cross by Wednesday morning. On Monday,when the core of the cold grips the Upper Midwest and Great Lakes, Minneapolis will not escape the high teens while Chicago hovers in the 20s. Both cities are likely to see their coldest Veterans Day on record. “Record low-max and record low mins could be in jeopardy of being tied/broken for both Monday and Tuesday,” wrote the National Weather Service office serving Chicago, adding that this is “impressively cold air for early-mid November.” By Tuesday morning, low temperatures will drop into the single digits across the Dakotas, Nebraska, Iowa, Minnesota and most of Wisconsin. Temperatures in the teens will penetrate as far south as Oklahoma and the Texas Panhandle. On Tuesday afternoon, subfreezing highs will cover a wide swath of western New York and Pennsylvania into the Southern Plains. Numerous locations in the Ohio and Tennessee valleys, where highs are forecast to only reach the 20s to 30s, are predicted to post daily records for cold high temperatures. The cold will reach the Gulf Coast, where even Houston and New Orleans will struggle to hit 50. By Wednesday morning, freezing temperatures are forecast to reach the Gulf Coast, near-record lows for the date in a number of areas. Almost the entirety of the eastern half of the U.S. will be below freezing with teens and 20s most common.


WORLD

A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 11.10.2019

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS | ANALYSIS A heavy water nuclear facility is shown in 2011 in Arak, Iran. ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

A look at Iran’s nuclear program As deal unravels, nation is ramping up enrichment JON GAMBRELL | Associated Press

I

ran announced this week it would inject uranium gas into 1,044 centrifuges that had previously been kept empty under its 2015 nuclear deal with world powers. The decision marks what Iran calls its “fourth step” away from the accord, which saw Iran agree to limit its nuclear program in exchange for the lifting of economic sanctions. The deal began to unravel over a year ago when President Donald Trump unilaterally pulled America out of the accord. In the time since, regional tensions have risen dramatically. Here’s where the deal now stands and what Tehran has done to ramp-up its atomic program:

The nuclear deal Iran struck the nuclear deal in 2015 with the United States, France, Germany, the United Kingdom, Russia and China. The deal, formally known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, grew out of secret talks President Barack Obama’s administration held with Iran after President Hassan Rouhani, a relative moderate, took office. Iran agreed to limit its enrichment of uranium under the watch of U.N. inspectors in exchange for the lifting of sanctions. International businesses rushed to do deals with Iran, most notably with billion-dollar sales by Airbus and Boeing Co. Trump, who campaigned on a promise of tearing up the deal because it didn’t address Iran’s ballistic missile program or its involvement in regional conflicts, withdrew America from the accord in May 2018. That halted promised international business deals and dealt a heavy blow to Iran’s already ailing economy. In the time since, the Trump administration has said any country that imports Iranian crude will face U.S. sanctions.

Three versions of domestically built centrifuges are shown in a live TV program from Natanz, an Iranian uranium enrichment plant, in Iran. produce enriched uranium 10 times as fast Under terms of the nuclear deal, Iran as an IR-1, Iranian officials say. can keep a stockpile of no more than 661 pounds of low-enriched uranium. That’s Iran’s nuclear facilities Natanz,in Iran’s central Isfahan province, compared to the 22,046 pounds of higherhosts the country’s main uranium enrichenriched uranium it once had. Currently, the accord limits Iran to enriching ura- ment facility, located underground. Iran has nium to 3.67%, which can fuel a commer- one operating nuclear power plant in Bushcial nuclear power plant. Weapons-grade ehr, which it opened with Russia’s help in uranium needs to be enriched to around 2011. Under the accord, Iran reconfigured a 90%. However, once a country enriches heavy-water reactor so it couldn’t produce uranium to around 20%, scientists say plutonium and agreed to convert its Fordo the time needed to reach 90% is halved. enrichment site — dug deep into a mounIran previously has enriched to 20%. Iran tainside — into a research center. Tehran in July broke the 300-kilogram limit and also operates an over 50-year-old research boosted its enrichment to up to 4.5%, reactor in Tehran. breaking that limit as well. Iran says it has gone from producing 1 pound of low-en- From ‘atoms for peace’ riched uranium a day to 11 pounds. Teh- to Stuxnet ran says it now holds over 1,102 pounds of Iran’s nuclear program actually began low-enriched uranium. with the help of the United States. Under

Iran’s uranium stockpile

its “Atoms for Peace” program, America supplied a test reactor that came online in Tehran in 1967 under the rule of Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi. That help ended once Iran’s 1979 Islamic Revolution overthrew the shah. In the 1990s, Iran expanded its program, including buying equipment from Pakistan’s top nuclear scientist Abdul Qadeer Khan. Among its activities, Iran “may have received design information” for a bomb and researched explosive detonators, according to the International Atomic Energy Agency. By August 2002, Western intelligence services and an Iranian opposition group revealed a covert nuclear site at Natanz.Iran to this day denies its nuclear program had a military dimension.Iran suspended enrichment in 2003 but resumed it in 2005.Hardline President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad then accelerated it. World powers imposed crippling U.N.sanctions in response.The Stuxnet computer virus, widely believed to be a joint U.S.-Israeli creation, soon disrupted thousands of Iranian centrifuges.

Iran’s nuclear facilities Natanz, in Iran’s central Isfahan province, hosts the country’s main uranium enrichment facility, located underground. Iran has one operating nuclear power plant in Bushehr, which it opened with Russia’s help in 2011. Under the accord, Iran reconfigured a heavy-water reactor so it couldn’t produce plutonium and agreed to convert its Fordo enrichment site — dug deep into a mountainside — into a research center.Tehran also operatesanover50-year-oldresearchreactor in Tehran.

Iran’s centrifuges A centrifuge is a device that enriches uranium by rapidly spinning uranium hexafluoride gas. Under the atomic accord, Iran had been limited to operating 5,060 older-model IR-1 centrifuges at Natanz only. Rouhani said Tuesday that Iran would inject uranium gas into an additional 1,044 IR-1 centrifuges that had been spinning empty at Fordo. On Monday, Iran announced it now is spinning 60 IR-6 advanced centrifuges as well. An IR-6 can

PUBLIC EQUIPMENT

AUCTION Featuring

BR A N D AV E. ST U DIOS CON T EN T

The Saint Louis Science Center opens renovated OMNIMAX® Theater SPONSORED CONTENT BY THE SAINT LOUIS SCIENCE CENTER

The Saint Louis Science Center is reopening the newly renovated OMNIMAX Theater on Friday, Nov. 29, after undergoing the largest renovation since the theater opened in 1991. The theater will open on Nov. 29 with the feature-length film “Frozen 2,” along with IMAX® documentary “Great Bear Rainforest.” In addition, the IMAX documentary “Volcanoes: The Fires of Creation” will return to the theater. The OMNIMAX has been closed since the end of July when the construction on the new improvements began.

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THE THEATER WILL NOW FEATURE: • IMAX’s next-generation laser technology designed for 180-degree domed theater environments – IMAX® with Laser. The groundbreaking new laser technology will further enhance The IMAX Experience® for guests. IMAX with Laser represents a quantum leap forward in cinema technology – providing audiences with the sharpest, brightest, clearest and most vivid digital images ever combined with powerful, immersive audio. The new technology will allow the Science Center to deliver a wider array of the highest-quality digital content – including documentaries and blockbuster films – and lead the industry with new kinds of cutting-edge educational experiences. • IMAX’s state-of-the-art sound technology, which delivers the ultimate in power and precision. IMAX’s six-laseraligned loudspeakers distribute equal volume throughout the theater to create an optimum listening environment that ensures every seat is the best seat in the house. Whether it’s hearing a pin drop or feeling the heart-palpitating force of a volcano erupting, audiences will experience complete audio immersion. • New NanoSeam™ screen, making every inch of the dome surface completely uniform and seam-free. • The ability to livestream and simulcast content, increasing the variety of presentation events. • Wider seats with retractable arm rests, creating a more comfortable experience for guests.

THE THEATER WILL ADD A WIDER VARIETY OF ACCESSIBILITY OPTIONS, INCLUDING: • More accessible seating space for visitors in wheelchairs and their guests. (Guests who are in wheelchairs, use walkers or have difficulty with stairs should enter via the 3rd floor.) • New personalized, adjustable captioning devices allow guests to see captions for their film using a device with adjustable privacy visors and mounts. • New hearing assistance devices with optional Descriptive Video Services (DVS). This allows visitors with visual and hearing impairments to hear audio more clearly or hear descriptive narration of the film alongside film audio through headphones. • Telecoil for those with compatible hearing aids and implants – no additional hardware is needed because visitors can set their devices to a t-coil or magnet setting and have theater audio directly transmitted into their device. Compatible with at least 70 precent of hearing aids currently in use. Tickets for OMNIMAX documentaries and films are now available at slsc.org.

PHOTO PROVIDED BY THE SAINT LOUIS SCIENCE CENTER

The mission of the Saint Louis Science Center is to ignite and sustain lifelong science and technology learning. Named a Smithsonian Institution Affiliate in 2016, the Saint Louis Science Center features more than 700 interactive exhibits, as well as the five-story OMNIMAX® Theater, Boeing Hall and the James S. McDonnell Planetarium. For more information about the Saint Louis Science Center, please visit slsc.org.

This content was produced by Brand Ave. Studios in collaboration with The Saint Louis Science Center. The news and editorial departments of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch had no role in its creation or display. For more information about Brand Ave. Studios, contact tgriffin@stltoday.com.


WORLD

A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 11.10.2019

‘Paradise’ lost: Final funeral held in border killings BY PETER ORSI

Associated Press

COLONIA LEBARON, Mexico — Family and friends said goodbye Saturday to the final victim of a cartel ambush that killed nine American women and children from a Mormon community in northern Mexico where cartels have disrupted an otherwise peaceful, rural existence. In the attack Monday, Christina Langford Johnson jumped out of her vehicle and waved her hands to show she was no threat. Children who survived the assault told family members she was shot anyway, twice in the heart. Her daughter Faith Marie Johnson, 7 months old, was found unharmed in a car seat. Her funeral, the third in as many days, culminates an outpouring of grief in the closely knit community with family ties in two Mexican states and across the border in many western U.S. states. What had been a largely tranquil existence in a valley in Chihuahua state about 70 miles from the border with Arizona became increasingly dangerous in recent years. Cartels exerted their power and battled each other in a region that is a drug smuggling hotbed. More than 300 people overflowed the pews of the local church in LeBaron on Saturday, where white flowers spelled out “mommy” next to a heart of roses. The victim’s mother,

MARCO UGARTE, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Family and friends attend a funeral service Saturday to remember Christina Langford Johnson, one of nine American women and children killed in a cartel ambush last week in Colonia Le Baron, Mexico. Amelia Langford, eulogized her daughter as a “mama hen” who was fiercely protective of her six children. “Mexico was her paradise,” the mother said. Others remembered Christina, who would have turned 32 this month, as a lover of nature, wildflowers and the piano. Jeremiah Garret Langford, who presided over the funeral, thanked mourners who had traveled from La Mora, saying they had traversed “a war zone.” La Mora, a hamlet of about 300 people established decades ago in neighboring Sonora state by their Mormon ancestors, and where residents raise cattle

and cultivate pomegranates, has been deeply scarred by the killings. The attack occurred as the women were traveling in multiple vehicles with their children to visit relatives. Many community members are now wondering whether they should stay or flee the cartel presence, a constant both there and in the sibling community of Colonia LeBaron on the other side of the mountains. A caravan of more than a dozen vehicles set out for Arizona on Saturday from La Mora, carrying La Mora residents planning to leave Mexico for good. Others planned to depart in coming days.

Many residents of the two communities that are a five-hour drive apart are related. The spread-out communities trace their origins to the end of polygamy more than a century ago by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, forcing Mormon families in the U.S. with multiple wives to establish offshoots elsewhere. These days, many from the community live in the U.S., but visit frequently despite the growing violence and sense of unease. Some now fear retaliation from the cartels after Mexican officials made arrests in the wake of the murders. The governments

of Chihuahua and Sonora said Friday that an “important number” of security agents had been deployed to the region since the “lamentable” attack, resulting in arrests and seizures of weapons, drugs and stolen vehicles. LeBaron is said to be under the thumb of a Juarez cartel-aligned gang known as La Linea. Around La Mora, it’s the Sinaloa cartel of convicted drug lord Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán, who is serving a life sentence in a Colorado maximum-security prison. Multiple people said there is a tendency for members in the two communities to view the cartel in their own area as “the good guys,” who can be tolerated, and those on the other side as the bad ones. It’s a mentality that David Langford of La Mora excoriated this week at the funeral for his wife, Dawna, and young sons Trevor and Rogan, who were killed in the attack. “I know there’s been an argument over which ‘sicas’ (short for sicarios, or cartel assassins) are the worst ones and which ‘sicas’ caused the problem. To me there’s not a winner in that argument,” Langford said. “There’s no good ‘sicas.’ This is because of having a ‘sica’ problem.” His sister, Leah LangfordStaddon, said her mother and another sister, Amy, were headed north toward Arizona on Saturday with as many belongings as they

could pack into their vehicles. They were traveling from La Mora in a caravan of more than a dozen vehicles, hoping the heavy military presence in the area since the killings would provide some safety over the dirt roads. Their intention, she said, is to build a new community in the U.S. “They spent the whole day yesterday packing. It was frantic,” she said by phone from Tucson, where she is standing watch at a hospital that is treating five children wounded in the attack. Langford-Staddon lives in Phoenix but was born and raised in La Mora. She described her childhood as a “dream” and said La Mora was once “very, very peaceful.” Now, she expects it to be a ghost town. Her sister and mother were among about 100 full-time residents still there. Julián LeBarón, whose brother Benjamín was slain in 2009 after standing up to local thugs in LeBaron, said people are stopped regularly by men with guns who ask where they are going. “It’s almost like it’s so integrated in our community that everybody buys and sells or deals with these people on different levels,” LeBarón said. “These people are murderers and if we tolerate crime in the hopes that it’s not going to happen to us, eventually it will,” he said.

Freed ex-president pledges to fight to restore left to power in Brazil BY MARIO LOBÃO AND DIANE JEANTET

Associated Press

SAO BERNARDO DO CAMPO, Brazil — Freed from his cell, former President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva told thousands of jubilant supporters Saturday that the left can take back Brazil’s presidency in the 2022 election. Dressed in a black blazer and T-shirt, da Silva spoke from a town in Sao Paulo outside the union that he once led and that served as the base for his political career. The crowd of red-clad supporters cheered and waved flags. “We are going to do a lot of fighting. Fighting is not one day on, then three months off, then back. Fighting is every day,” said da Silva, a

74-year-old who promised to bring the energy of a 30-year-old to the streets. In his 45-minute speech, he spoke briefly of conservative President Jair Bolsonaro, who won the 2018 election after da Silva’s corruption conviction barred him from running. Da Silva said Brazilians must accept the results of the democratic election and work to defeat the “ultra-right” in 2022. He also called for solidarity with fellow South American countries and lambasted U.S. President Donald Trump, saying his border wall plan is unacceptable and aimed at keeping out poor people. “Trump should resolve Americans’ problems and not bother Latin Americans. He wasn’t elected to

be the world’s sheriff,” said da Silva, who in a Twitter post Friday backed U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders’ presidential campaign. Brazil’s Supreme Court on Thursday ruled that a person can be jailed only after all appeals to higher courts have been exhausted. Da Silva was released the next day, after 19 months imprisonment. He is still appealing his conviction related to the alleged purchase of a beachfront apartment, and remains entangled in other cases. He was also convicted by a lower court judge in a case involving ownership of a farmhouse in Atibaia, outside Sao Paulo. If he loses his appeals in either conviction, he could be locked up again. Da Silva has denied any

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wrongdoing and accused prosecutors and Sergio Moro, then a judge and now justice minister, of manipulating the case against him. Moro said on Twitter earlier that the Supreme Court’s decision should be respected, but Congress could alter the constitution to change when convicted criminals start serving their sentences.

Some Brazilian groups organized demonstrations in dozens of cities in support of the Bolsonaro administration, but turnout was low. The president’s son, Eduardo Bolsonaro, said on Twitter that da Silva’s release will prompt people to set aside differences and unite against the Workers’ Party, a sentiment that helped carry his father to the BR A N D AV E. ST U DIOS CON T EN T

The Saint Louis Science Center opens renovated OMNIMAX® Theater SPONSORED CONTENT BY THE SAINT LOUIS SCIENCE CENTER

The Saint Louis Science Center is reopening the newly renovated OMNIMAX Theater on Friday, Nov. 29, after undergoing the largest renovation since the theater opened in 1991. The theater will open on Nov. 29 with the feature-length film “Frozen 2,” along with IMAX® documentary “Great Bear Rainforest.” In addition, the IMAX documentary “Volcanoes: The Fires of Creation” will return to the theater. The OMNIMAX has been closed since the end of July when the construction on the new improvements began.

Missouri Equipment Auction in Columbia, MO November 22, 2019 beginning at noon.

Featuring 30+ Absolute Ameren Missouri Units and OVER 65 TOTAL UNITS Visit

MissouriEquipmentAuction.com for full run list or call

573-886-0032 for more details.

Enter DAILY to win a $100 gift card that can go toward your Thanksgiving grocery bill or a fabulous Black Friday deal!

Enter through November 18: STLtoday.com/contests

presidency. Jair Bolsonaro had refrained from commenting on da Silva, but when asked by journalists about the case Saturday, the president responded: “He is free, but he still has all his crimes on his back.” Da Silva said he had a message for his opponents in power: “I want to say to them: I’m back.”

THE THEATER WILL NOW FEATURE: • IMAX’s next-generation laser technology designed for 180-degree domed theater environments – IMAX® with Laser. The groundbreaking new laser technology will further enhance The IMAX Experience® for guests. IMAX with Laser represents a quantum leap forward in cinema technology – providing audiences with the sharpest, brightest, clearest and most vivid digital images ever combined with powerful, immersive audio. The new technology will allow the Science Center to deliver a wider array of the highest-quality digital content – including documentaries and blockbuster films – and lead the industry with new kinds of cutting-edge educational experiences. • IMAX’s state-of-the-art sound technology, which delivers the ultimate in power and precision. IMAX’s six-laseraligned loudspeakers distribute equal volume throughout the theater to create an optimum listening environment that ensures every seat is the best seat in the house. Whether it’s hearing a pin drop or feeling the heart-palpitating force of a volcano erupting, audiences will experience complete audio immersion. • New NanoSeam™ screen, making every inch of the dome surface completely uniform and seam-free. • The ability to livestream and simulcast content, increasing the variety of presentation events. • Wider seats with retractable arm rests, creating a more comfortable experience for guests.

THE THEATER WILL ADD A WIDER VARIETY OF ACCESSIBILITY OPTIONS, INCLUDING: • More accessible seating space for visitors in wheelchairs and their guests. (Guests who are in wheelchairs, use walkers or have difficulty with stairs should enter via the 3rd floor.) • New personalized, adjustable captioning devices allow guests to see captions for their film using a device with adjustable privacy visors and mounts. • New hearing assistance devices with optional Descriptive Video Services (DVS). This allows visitors with visual and hearing impairments to hear audio more clearly or hear descriptive narration of the film alongside film audio through headphones. • Telecoil for those with compatible hearing aids and implants – no additional hardware is needed because visitors can set their devices to a t-coil or magnet setting and have theater audio directly transmitted into their device. Compatible with at least 70 precent of hearing aids currently in use. Tickets for OMNIMAX documentaries and films are now available at slsc.org.

PHOTO PROVIDED BY THE SAINT LOUIS SCIENCE CENTER

The mission of the Saint Louis Science Center is to ignite and sustain lifelong science and technology learning. Named a Smithsonian Institution Affiliate in 2016, the Saint Louis Science Center features more than 700 interactive exhibits, as well as the five-story OMNIMAX® Theater, Boeing Hall and the James S. McDonnell Planetarium. For more information about the Saint Louis Science Center, please visit slsc.org.

This content was produced by Brand Ave. Studios in collaboration with The Saint Louis Science Center. The news and editorial departments of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch had no role in its creation or display. For more information about Brand Ave. Studios, contact tgriffin@stltoday.com.


11.10.2019 • Sunday • M 1

NEWS

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A7

Travel industry to Chinese tourists: What trade war? BY BANI SAPRA

Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Washington, D.C., has dangled hotel discounts tied to the Chinese Lunar New Year. Arizona has promoted its outdoor attractions to draw visitors during another popular Chinese holiday. San Francisco has expanded its social media presence on Chinese apps to market year-round travel to millennial tourists. Across the country, the U.S. tourism industry is trying to counter one of the casualties of the trade war with China that is still raging despite a temporary truce this fall: A drop in the flow of affluent Chinese visitors to the U.S. As the conflict has dragged on for 15 months with no meaningful breakthrough, the travel industry is trying to

minimize the damage. It has good reason. An enlarged Chinese middle class has become a lucrative market for the U.S. travel industry. Close to 3 million Chinese tourists visited the U.S. last year. And they spent liberally: An estimated average of $6,700 per person per trip — exceeding the average spending of international tourists by more than 50% — according to the U.S. Travel Association. Concerns among U.S. tourism agencies have grown as Beijing has warned that Chinese travelers to the United States may face harassment. Compounding the problem is increased difficulty in obtaining U.S. visas. The number of visitors from China dropped nearly 4% in the first half of this

year after a nearly 6% drop in 2018. More broadly, the U.S. share of the global travel market has slipped in the past year, and travel and hospitality groups blame the trade conflicts and intensified competition from rival countries. To close the gap, they’ve urged the government to extend funding for the U.S. national tourism marketing agency and to work more closely with overseas trade fairs and tour groups. At the same time, tourism marketing agencies for states and cities are hedging their bets by intensifying their outreach to countries other than China. Utah and Los Angeles, among others, are trying to expand their presence in nations like India, whose large and youthful middle class is seen as a

potentially rich source of tourist dollars. Yet there is no easy way to replace a drop in Chinese tourism. Some U.S. tourism agencies say they worry that Chinese travelers feel unwelcome in the country under the Trump administration. Warnings from Beijing about traveling to the U.S. have likely reinforced that view. “With the trade war, with some of the travel warnings, with some of our visa challenges that we’ve had, we’ve seen a little bit of a dip in Chinese visitors,” said Theresa Belpulsi, a senior official at Destination DC, the city’s tourism marketing office. Tourism is one of the few industries where the U.S. has enjoyed a substantial advantage over China. In 2018, Chinese tourists

traveling to the U.S. spent $30 billion more than American tourists visiting China did. Yet that edge may be shrinking. “The U.S. is just losing market share,” said Adam Sacks, president of consulting company Tourism Economics. “Something’s made the U.S. uncompetitive, and I would target the trade war as one of the reasons.” Larry Yu, a professor of hospitality management at George Washington University, warns that once impressions of an unwelcome environment take hold, they’re hard to erase. “The trade war creates a kind of environment in China that makes people think twice,” Yu said. “Even though we know that Chinese demand is high, the current environment makes people substitute the U.S. for another place.” Beijing has issued two warnings to would-be visitors to the United States — one about gun violence, the other about harassment by U.S. law enforcement. Visa approvals for Chinese visitors have meanwhile become more diffi-

cult. The rejection rate for Chinese tourist visa applications to the U.S. reached 17% in the 2018 fiscal year from a low of 8.5% in 2013. Some tourism companies are feeling squeezed. DFS Hawaii, which operates duty-free stores in Hawaiian airports, plans to shed a quarter of its workforce and has pointed to a drop-off in tourists from China and elsewhere in Asia as a reason. As of August, Chinese tourist visits to Hawaii are down 27% this year. “There is no foreseeable indication this will be reversed in the near term,” said Tim DeLessio of the DFS Group, parent company of DFS Hawaii. Sacks of Tourism Economics says he holds out hope that local travel marketing agencies can reverse the trend. The District of Columbia, for one, says its outreach to China has intensified. Destination DC’s latest initiative — hotel discounts for the Lunar New Year early in 2020, with events and performances tailored for Chinese tourists — builds on a sistercity partnership with Beijing.

BANI SAPRA, ASSOCIATED PRESS

A Chinese tourist takes pictures of Washington, D.C., T-shirts on Oct. 15 at a tourism kiosk in Washington. Across the country, the U.S. tourism industry is trying to counter one of the casualties of the trade war with China that is still raging despite a temporary truce: a drop in the flow of affluent Chinese visitors to the U.S.

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NATION

11.10.2019 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A7

Dazed and confused? Busts highlight hemp dilemma BY MICHAEL R. SISAK

Associated Press

NEW YORK — The CBD craze might be leaving the war on drugs a bit dazed and confused. The extract that’s been showing up in everything from candy to coffee is legally derived from hemp plants, which look and smell an awful lot like that other kind of cannabis — marijuana. They’re so similar, police officers and the field tests they use on suspected drugs sometimes can’t tell the difference. Case in point, New York City police boasted on social media last week about what seemed like a significant drug bust: 106 pounds of funky, green plants that officers thought were likely marijuana. But the Vermont farm that grew the plants and

NEW YORK POLICE DEPARTMENT VIA AP

New York Police Department officers are shown in a photo that appeared on the department’s Facebook page with what was believed to be marijuana when it was confiscated in New York on Nov. 2. The Vermont farm that grew the plants and the Brooklyn CBD shop that ordered them have said it’s legal industrial hemp. the Brooklyn CBD shop that ordered them insisted they’re actually industrial hemp, and perfectly legal. And, they said, they have paperwork to prove it. Nevertheless, when the

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shop owner’s brother went to the police station to straighten things out, he was arrested. Police said a field test had come back positive for marijuana. Shop owner Oren Levy

said that’s likely because hemp often tests positive for a permissible, trace amount of THC, or tetrahydrocannabinol, which is the chemical in cannabis that causes people to get high. Field tests used by law enforcement officers can detect THC but aren’t sophisticated enough to specify whether a shipment is legal hemp or lowgrade illegal pot, and drugsniffing dogs will alert on both. “He was a hungry cop. He thought he had the bust of the day,” said Levy, whose Green Angel CBD NYC sells oils, teas and other products containing the extract. He said he fears the seizure could force him out of business. CBD, or cannabidiol, is also found in marijuana but

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does not have an intoxicating effect. Some people say it provides them with pain and anxiety relief. “I can’t believe I’m going through this for a legal business,” Levy said. “I can’t believe my poor brother got locked up.” Oren and Ronen Levy are not alone. Since the U.S. government removed industrial hemp last year from the list of illegal drugs, a number of similar cases have cropped up across the country. In July, a man who said he was delivering 300 pounds of hemp to a Minnesota CBD-oil processing company was arrested in South Dakota after authorities there said it tested positive for THC. The substance “looked and smelled like raw marijuana,” a state trooper said. In January, Idaho authorities arrested a truck driver and seized nearly 7,000 pounds of what they believed to be marijuana, even though the company shipping the material said accompanying paperwork made clear it was industrial hemp. At least two other truckers and two security guards involved in transporting what they said was industrial hemp have been arrested and charged with felony drug trafficking. In May, the U.S. Agriculture Department sent a memorandum instructing states not to block the transportation of hemp that contains 0.3% or less THC. The Nov. 2 Brooklyn bust that landed Ronen Levy in handcuffs stemmed from a tip from a FedEx worker who suspected the load of plants on their way from Fox Holler Farms in Fair Haven, Vermont, to Levy’s shop were marijuana, New York City police said. “We got information about a large package of drugs. We got it in here. We field-tested it as marijuana, called the individual in. He was placed under arrest,”

said NYPD Chief of Department Terence Monahan. “It is currently at the lab at this point to make a final determination: Was it hemp?” Monahan said. “The individual had no bill of lading justifying its delivery.” Ronen Levy, who runs his own CBD business catering to pets, pleaded not guilty to multiple counts of felony criminal possession of marijuana. He was released on his own recognizance and is due back in court on Nov. 19. The police department drew attention to the bust by posting pictures on its official Facebook and Twitter accounts showing the officers in a room full of the seized plants. Oren Levy and the farm fought back with posts of their own. Fox Holler Farms said in a statement posted on its Facebook page that the shipment bound for Levy’s shop was fully compliant with Vermont, New York and federal laws. The farm’s lawyer, Timothy Fair, said that before the hemp shipment left Vermont, it was tested at FedEx’s request by a local police department. The level of THC was less than half the allowable threshold, he said. A FedEx spokeswoman said even if the plants were hemp, they should not have been shipped using its service. The company’s service guide lists hemp plants, leaves, oil and CBD derived from hemp among its prohibited items. Oren Levy said he would’ve gone to the police station himself but couldn’t because he was recovering from a recent surgery. Soon enough, Oren Levy said, Ronen texted him: “I think I’m getting arrested.” “They treated him like a drug dealer,” Oren Levy said. “He’s never been to jail in his whole life. He still hasn’t slept. He’s paranoid.”

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A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

FROM A1

M 1 • SUnDAy • 11.10.2019

One of Europe’s last wild rivers in danger of being tamed BY ELENA BECATOROS AND JOHN FLESHER

Associated Press

ALONG THE VJOSA RIVER — Under a broad plane tree near Albania’s border with Greece, Jorgji Ilia fills a battered flask from one of the Vjosa River’s many springs. “There is nothing else better than the river,” the retired schoolteacher says. “The Vjosa gives beauty to our village.” The Vjosa is temperamental and fickle, changing from translucent cobalt blue to sludge brown to emerald green, from a steady flow to a raging torrent. Nothing holds it back for more than 170 miles in its course through the forest-covered slopes of Greece’s Pindus mountains to Albania’s Adriatic coast. This is one of Europe’s last wild rivers. But for how long? Albania’s government has set in motion plans to dam the Vjosa and its tributaries to generate muchneeded electricity for one of Europe’s poorest countries, with the intent to build eight dams along the main river. It’s part of a world hydropower boom, mainly in Southeast Asia, South America, Africa and less developed parts of Europe. In the Balkans alone, about 2,800 projects to tame rivers are underway or planned, says Olsi Nika of EcoAlbania, a nonprofit that opposes the projects. Some tout hydropower as a reliable, cheap and renewable energy source that helps curb dependence on planet-warming fossil fuels. But some recent studies question hydropower’s value in the fight against global warming. Critics say the benefits of hydropower are overstated — and outweighed by the harm dams can do. Rivers are a crucial part of the global water cycle. They act as nature’s arteries, carrying energy and nutrients across vast landscapes, providing water for drinking, food production and industry. They’re a means of transportation for people and goods, and a haven

FELIPE DANA, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Jorgji Ilia, 71, stands on the shore of the Vjosa River after collecting water June 14 from a small spring in the village of Kanikol, Albania. “There is nothing else better than the river,” the retired schoolteacher said. “The Vjosa gives beauty to our village.” for boaters and anglers. Rivers are home to a diversity of fish — including tiny minnows, trout and salmon — and provide shelter and food for birds and mammals. But dams interrupt their flow, and the life in and around them. While installing fish ladders and widening tunnels to bypass dams helps some species, it hasn’t worked in places like the Amazon, says Julian Olden, a University of Washington ecologist. Dams block the natural flow of water and sediment. They also can change the chemistry of the water and cause toxic algae to grow. Those who live along the riverbank or rely on the waterway for their livelihood fear dams could kill the Vjosa as they know it. Its fragile ecosystem will be irreversibly altered, and many residents will lose their land and homes. In the 1990s, an Italian com-

pany was awarded a contract to build a dam along the Vjosa in southern Albania. Construction began on the Kalivac dam, but never was completed, plagued with delays and financial woes. Now, the government has awarded a new contract for the site to a Turkish company. Energy ministry officials rejected multiple interview requests to discuss their hydropower plans. Many locals oppose the plans. Dozens of residents from the village of Kute joined nonprofits to file what was Albania’s first environmental lawsuit against the construction of a dam in the Pocem gorge, a short distance downriver from Kalivac. They won in 2017, but the government has appealed. The victory, while significant, was just one battle. A week later, the government issued the Kali-

vac contract. EcoAlbania plans to fight that project, too. Ecologically, there is a lot at stake. A recent study found the Vjosa was incredibly diverse. More than 90 types of aquatic invertebrates were found in the places where dams are planned, plus hundreds of fish, amphibian and reptile species, some endangered and others endemic to the Balkans. Dams can unravel food chains, but the most well-known problem with building dams is that they block the paths of fish trying to migrate upstream to spawn. As pressure to build dams intensifies in less developed countries, the opposite is happening in the U.S. and western Europe, where there’s a movement to tear down dams considered obsolete and environmentally destructive. More than 1,600 have been dis-

mantled in the U.S., most within the past 30 years, according to the advocacy group American Rivers. In Europe, the largestever removal began this year in France, where two dams are being torn down on Normandy’s Selune River. With so few wild rivers left around the globe, the Vjosa also is a valuable resource for studying river behavior. “Science is only at the beginning of understanding how biodiversity in river networks is structured and maintained,” says researcher Gabriel Singer of the Leibniz-Institute in Germany. “The Vjosa is a unique system.” For Shyqyri Seiti, it’s much more personal. The 65-year-old boatman has been transporting locals, goods and livestock across the river for about a quarter century. The construction of the Kalivac dam would spell disaster for him. Many of the fields and some of the houses in his nearby village of Ane Vjose would be lost. “Someone will benefit from the construction of the dam, but it will flood everyone in the area,” he says. “What if they were in our place, how would they feel to lose everything?” But the mayor, Metat Shehu, insists his community “has no interest” in the matter. “The Vjosa is polluted. The plants and creatures of Vjosa have vanished,” Shehu says. The biggest issue, he adds, is that villagers are being offered too little to give up their land. He hopes the dam will bring investment to the area. Jonus Jonuzi, a 70-year-old farmer who grew up along the river, is hopeful the Vjosa will stay wild. “Albania needs electrical energy. But not by creating one thing and destroying another,” he says. “Why do such damage that will be irreparable for life, that future generations will blame us for what we’ve done?”

Infrastructure From A1

intended lifespan. “It’s kind of a one-two punch of more stress being put on these systems at a time when they are already fragile,” said Mark Abkowitz, a professor of civil and environmental engineering at Vanderbilt University with a special focus on infrastructure resilience to extreme weather. Climate extremes are becoming more common in the region. St. Louis has seen record-high temperatures with greater frequency in recent years, according the National Weather Service — including a peak of 21 days of record-setting warmth in 2012. It’s also not getting as cold here, as shown by a rise in the number of “record-warm lows,” in which daily low temperatures register as the warmest on record for a given date. Overall, average annual temperatures in the city are now about 3 degrees warmer than they were 80 years ago. Moreover, warmer days make weather more extreme: harder rains, deeper snows and more frequent floods — but also more drought. That change — and unpredictability — matters for engineers who must take climate into account when designing infrastructure, by anticipating the range of conditions that it must withstand. But now, climate-related bell curves and bedrock assumptions are shifting beneath their feet. The same is true for infrastructure that already exists: Some of what was built decades ago now faces conditions that it wasn’t designed to withstand. Rising seas mean that coastal areas not only confront increased tidal flooding, but also underground saltwater intrusion, forcing some Miami-area municipalities, for example, to shut down or relocate well fields for their municipal freshwater supply. Inland, Toledo, Ohio, briefly saw its water supply choked off in 2014 by Lake Erie’s toxic algae blooms — episodes fueled by agricultural runoff, but made more likely in the hot conditions abetted by climate change. Elsewhere, aging dams and reservoirs are not designed to accommodate increasingly torrential runoff, as shown by evacuations and the threat of failure at California’s Oroville Dam in 2017. And widespread fires in the state, fanned by hotter, drier weather, have led utilities to deliberately cut power to hundreds of thousands of residents, to keep power lines from sparking more.

St. Louis heat The St. Louis area offers some of its own examples of infrastructure problems amid hot and extreme conditions. Just ask the local road crews. “Everything expands when it

DAVID CARSON, DCARSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Floodwater from the Meramec River swamps the intersection of Highway 141 and Interstate 44 on Dec. 30, 2015. The flooding forced a shutdown of a 24-mile stretch off I-44. wiggle more and wear out faster. The heat can hurt the electric grid, too. When historic heat and drought gripped the Midwest in 2012, one power plant shut down because it couldn’t access cooling water. Water levels had dropped below the plant’s intake pipe, according to the Midcontinent Independent System Operator, or MISO, tasked with managing the electric grid around St. Louis and across parts of 15 states. Multiple plants had to ramp down production that year because cooling water was too warm, according to a report in the New York Times. POST-DISPATCH St. Louis power company AmeA motorist drives around a buckled section pavement on Theresa Avenue ren said it had not run into similar issues. near Locust Street, west of downtown on July 14, 1980. It was one of several breaks in area streets caused by expansion during a relentless Clogged pipes heat wave. Flooding can also complicate operations for riverfront power gets hot. And pavement does the quent major floods add to road- generating facilities. Amid the same thing,” explained Bob Becker, way woes, deteriorating asphalt region’s major floods earlier this a maintenance engineer for the and eroding support materials year, one Missouri plant had Missouri Department of Trans- underneath, according to MoDOT flood debris clog its intake pipe, portation, discussing episodes of — which, earlier this year, faced according to John Grotzinger, pavement buckling. “If that pres- at least $30 million in unexpected the vice president of engineering sure gets great enough, it’ll pop up. damage from high water in the operations and power supply for It’s no different than pushing on state. The same episodes can in- the Missouri Public Utility Allia piece of paper from both sides.” crease risk for bridges, by scouring ance. Grotzinger didn’t identify He says those occurrences — away sediment from around their the plant. also known as “blowups” — typi- support structures, Abkowitz said. When floodwater was near its cally happen on concrete paveBridges are another place apex in early June, the industrial ment instead of asphalt surfaces, where heat-related complica- plant that runs a “steam loop” to because the material is less flex- tions can arise, with road joints supply heat and hot water to many ible. that expand and contract. The downtown St. Louis buildings and “If we have long periods of hot joints are designed to wiggle with hotels was overwhelmed by 10 to days and hot nights, it makes traffic, wind and weather. And 12 feet of water, after a Mississippi things worse,” said Becker. “It’s occasionally all of that wiggle River pump station failed. The incredibly weather dependent.” leads them to wear out. Temper- system’s ensuing shutdown came The region’s increasingly fre- ature extremes mean they could at a highly inopportune time, right

as the Stanley Cup Final came to the city, and sparked a desperate scramble to bring in temporary boilers from as far as Chicago, Indianapolis and Minnesota. The substitute boilers served a dozen buildings, including major hotels, a city jail, and parts of Busch Stadium, where the St. Louis Cardinals hosted a weekend series with the Chicago Cubs. Experts say all of these events are just hints at what might come. Some are working to prepare. Ameren, for instance, is installing 12,000 new utility poles — “many fortified with composite materials to better withstand severe weather.” It is also adding 400 miles of new cable underground. MISO said the grid is designed with hot extremes in mind. Others worry governments and utilities aren’t investing in maintenance, and won’t adapt fast enough to climate change. And there are immense technical challenges, like the absence of historical precedents, as engineers design things for a more unpredictable, extreme climate. “There’s no question that the folks that construct and maintain our infrastructure are not keeping up with, in my opinion, the practices that they need to consider, going forward,” said Abkowitz. “A lot of the design and construction that’s going on is sort of based on knowledge that we’ve accumulated up to this point in time.” Bryce Gray • 314-340-8307 @_BryceGray on Twitter bgray@post-dispatch.com


11.10.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A9

WEEK IN REVIEW

VISIT OUR WEBSITE TO VIEW MORE WEEK IN REVIEW CONTENT

IN THE NEWS Public hearings on impeachment

IN THE NEWS US pulling out of climate pact

Democrats announced Wednesday they will launch public impeachment hearings this coming week, intending to bring to life weeks of closed-door testimony and lay out a convincing narrative of presidential misconduct by Donald Trump. First to testify will be William Taylor, the top diplomat in Ukraine, who has relayed in private his understanding that there was a blatant quid pro quo with Trump holding up military aid to a U.S. ally facing threats from Russia. That aid, at the heart of the impeachment inquiry, is alleged to have been held hostage until Ukraine agreed to investigate political foe Joe Biden and the idea, out of the mainstream of U.S. intelligence findings, that Ukraine interfered in the 2016 U.S. election.

The United States has begun the process of pulling out of the landmark 2015 Paris climate agreement. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said Monday that he submitted a formal notice to the United Nations. That starts a withdrawal process that does not become official for a year. His statement touted America’s carbon pollution cuts and called the Paris deal an “unfair economic burden” to the U.S. economy. Nearly 200 nations signed the climate deal in which each country provides its own goals to curb emissions of heattrapping gases that lead to climate change.

EX-ENVOY TESTIFIES: Former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch told House investigators that Ukrainian officials warned her in advance that Rudy Giuliani and other allies of President Donald Trump were planning to “do things, including to me” and were “looking to hurt” her. Her testimony was included in transcripts released Monday. SONDLAND: Diplomat Gordon Sondland handed House impeachment investigators another key piece of corroborating testimony Tuesday, acknowledging what Democrats contend was a quid pro quo, pushed by President Donald Trump and Rudy Giuliani, with Ukraine. WHISTLEBLOWER: A lawyer for the whistleblower who raised alarms about President Donald Trump’s dealings with Ukraine said last Sunday his client is willing to answer written questions submitted by House Republicans.

MARCO UGARTE, ASSOCIATED PRESS

NINE US CITIZENS KILLED IN DRUG CARTEL AMBUSH Drug cartel gunmen ambushed three SUVs along a dirt road Monday, slaughtering six children and three women — all U.S. citizens living in northern Mexico — in a grisly attack that left one vehicle a burned-out, bullet-riddled hulk, authorities said. The dead included 8-month-old twins. Eight youngsters were found alive after escaping from the vehicles and hiding in the brush, but at least five had gunshot wounds or other injuries and were taken to Phoenix for treatment. Above, relatives of the LeBaron family mourn Wednesday at the site where the victims, who were related to the extended LeBaron family, were killed.

BIG NUMBER

THE WATER COOLER

27,674.80

AMA PERFORMERS: The two biggest breakthrough acts in music this year, Billie Eilish and Lizzo, will perform at the 2019 American Music Awards later this month. Dick Clark Productions announced Wednesday that other performers at the Nov. 24 event include Camila Cabello and Dua Lipa.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average’s record-setting close on Thursday. The S&P 500 also set a record on Thursday, closing at 3,085.18. Thursday’s activity was the continuation of a weeklong rally on Wall Street.

HE SAID ...

Virginia is blue. I want everyone to know that.” — Democratic Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam, after Democrats gained control of the statehouse in Tuesday’s election.

SONGWRITERS: The Neptunes, the creative, innovative production-songwriting duo of Pharrell Williams and Chad Hugo, are nominated for the prestigious Songwriters Hall of Fame. Joining the Neptunes as nominees for the 2020 class are rap icons Outkast and rock pioneers R.E.M.

Gerst From A1

and police chiefs to listen to their pleas. Just this fall, O’Fallon’s new police chief, Timothy Clothier, agreed to review the investigation. “The statute of limitations may have run out on any crimes that could have occurred that night, but there is no statute of limitations for internal misconduct,” Clothier said then. “I will hold my staff accountable; it’s just got to happen. Anything less is unacceptable.” The Gerst family and Clothier agreed to interviews for this PHOTO BY PAUL BAILLARGEON story. Gateway Grizzlies outfielder Kent Gerst is welcomed back into the Other officers and witnesses dugout after hitting a home run during a 2011 game against the Florence did not return calls and messages Freedom at GCS Ballpark in Sauget. seeking comment.

At Moudy’s Kent Gerst graduated from Fort Zumwalt West High School in 2006 with professional baseball teams knocking on his door. He was picked in the eighth round by the Chicago White Sox — the highest any area high schooler was picked in the draft that year. “It’s something I’ve worked for my whole life,” Gerst told the Post-Dispatch at the time. “My dreams just came true.” He made it as high as Class AAA for the White Sox but was released in 2010. By 2012, he was an outfielder for the Gateway Grizzlies, an independent minor-league team in Sauget. On Sept. 8 of that year, he and a childhood friend, Edward Morelli, went to Moudy’s Bar & Grill in O’Fallon. Morelli drove. There, Gerst ran into another childhood friend and fellow baseball player, Josh Hankins, and his father, Jeff. They had just finished a day of golfing. After several drinks, Gerst and Morelli went out to the parking lot, Morelli to smoke and Gerst to call his brother, who was mad that Gerst wouldn’t meet him at a friend’s house in Clayton. “He told me Edward was too drunk to drive, and I told him they were too far away for me to pick them up,” brother Matt Gerst, now 36, recalled. “So we bickered like that for three minutes. And that was the last time I ever talked to my brother.” Also outside the bar to smoke was an off-duty O’Fallon police

sergeant, Mike Toedebusch. The next few minutes may have created the incident that led to Gerst’s death: Toedebusch saw the trunk of Morelli’s car open, he later told investigators. A bag of golf clubs lay on the ground next to the car. Toedebusch, who believed the clubs to be the Hankins’, went back inside the bar and told the father and son that someone was trying to steal their golf clubs, Josh Hankins told investigators. Toedebusch returned to his friends at the bar, according to the official O’Fallon police report. The Hankinses ran out to the parking lot. Outside, Morelli saw the two men running at him. He pointed at Gerst, standing nearby, Josh Hankins told police. Witnesses confirm that Hankins attacked Gerst, punching him and then chasing him across the parking lot and out of sight. Hankins returned, bragging about how he hit Gerst one more time before Gerst “took off” down the road, according to the police report from the night. Two women riding in a car later told police they saw a man matching Gerst’s description “trip or stumble” along West Terra Drive. He was last seen running along the road toward the bridge, about 1,500 feet from the bar. The next day, Matt Gerst went to his parents’ house for their weekly Sunday dinner. When Kent Gerst didn’t show, his father

called Morelli. But Morelli’s stories didn’t make sense, the Gersts said. He first said Kent left with Matt, then said Kent left with a woman. The family filed a missing person report about 6:30 p.m. About 7 p.m., Adam Hamby, who was at the bar, told the Gersts about the fight Kent had with Josh Hankins, according to the report. A group gathered at Moudy’s to start retracing Gerst’s steps. O’Fallon police joined the search. So did Clark Morelli, Edward Morelli’s father. About three and a half hours in, at 10:41 p.m., Clark Morelli and O’Fallon Lt. Scott Walker stopped at the bridge over Peruque Creek. Morelli peered over the edge and asked Walker to shine his light. He “thought he saw a hand,” he told Walker, according to the report. Walker leaned as far as he could over the bridge’s short guardrail. Even then, he wasn’t sure what he was seeing. He turned back toward the embankment and hiked through rock and brush to the creek’s bottom. There, eight feet under the bridge, 35 feet under the roadway, he found Gerst’s body.

Doubts Two days later, O’Fallon detectives Kevin Mountain and Matthew Wolf told the Gersts that their son “had injuries which were indicative of a fall,” the report said. Gerst, the detectives said, had drowned.

‘MAD’ REVIVAL: Carol Burnett will be among the familiar faces gracing the “Mad About You” revival. Sony Pictures Television announced Monday that Burnett will reprise her Emmywinning role as the mother of Helen Hunt’s character. “Mad About You” is returning for a limited run on the Spectrum Originals streaming service on Nov. 20. DEGENERES HONORED: The Golden Globe Awards will give its new TV special achievement trophy to Ellen DeGeneres. The Carol Burnett Award is the small-screen version of the group’s film counterpart, the Cecil B. DeMille Award.

But as weeks stretched into months, and as the Gersts kept asking questions, other officials became uncertain about O’Fallon’s findings. St. Louis County Medical Examiner Dr. Mary Case performed Gerst’s autopsy. She measured his blood alcohol content at .205, more than double the legal limit to drive. She also determined that Gerst had one broken rib and a broken wrist — injuries that weren’t consistent with a fall from that height. Case was so concerned that, for the second time in her then-37year career, she visited the crime scene. She ruled the death an accident by drowning. But she still says the facts don’t add up: “If he went over the top of the bridge, he would have more injuries from falling and he didn’t have that,” Case told the PostDispatch. “It’s not clear how he gets down there.” In early 2013, newly appointed St. Charles County Prosecutor Tim Lohmar ran into Gerst’s mother, who told him her son’s necklace and watch went missing that night, Lohmar said . Lohmar ordered his investigator, veteran Mike Harvey, to review the case. Harvey watched the surveillance footage from Moudy’s — just as O’Fallon police had months before. But Harvey spotted things not noted in the O’Fallon report: Kent Gerst was wearing the watch his brother gave him. And, sandwiched between the Hankinses as they rushed out the door to confront the golf club thief, Harvey saw a third man: Sgt. Toedebusch. The footage showed Toedebusch did not return to his party, as police reported. He never returned to the bar at all that night, according to the footage. Harvey took his findings to O’Fallon Lt. Michael Grawitch. They interviewed Toedebusch together. Toedebusch initially stuck to his original story. The men told him the video contradicted his statement. He then said he didn’t “remember physically walking outside” that night. Then he said he did go outside, but insisted he didn’t see anything. “I didn’t see a fight happen,” he told them. “I cannot tell you what I did not see.” He said he went home for the

SYRIA: President Donald Trump has approved an expanded military mission to secure oil fields across eastern Syria, raising a number of difficult legal questions about whether U.S. troops can launch strikes against Syrian, Russian or other forces if they threaten the oil. The decision, coming after a meeting recently between Trump and his defense leaders, locks hundreds of U.S. troops into a more complicated presence in Syria. TWITTER RECRUITS: The Saudi government recruited two Twitter employees to get personal account information of their critics, prosecutors said Wednesday. The workers were charged with acting as agents of Saudi Arabia without registering with the U.S. government. UPRIGHT APE: The remains of an ancient ape found in a Bavarian clay pit suggest that humans’ ancestors began standing upright almost 12 million years ago, millions of years earlier than previously thought, scientists said Wednesday. — Associated Press

night after he ran outside. The Gersts, livid with the department, have since persuaded two O’Fallon police chiefs to review the investigation. Then-Chief Roy Joachimstaler emailed Gary Gerst on Aug. 7, 2014, saying department investigators did not find any evidence of wrongdoing on the part of their officers and that no further action would be taken. Clothier, who replaced Joachimstaler in May, assigned two detectives and a lieutenant this fall to review the Gerst case once more. He promised fresh eyes, an objective look and, if he still wasn’t satisfied, a review by an outside agency. But on Thursday, Clothier, too, closed the inquiry, saying they had found no “intentional” acts of misconduct. “Detectives are humans — they can make mistakes — but there is a big difference between an intentional act of misconduct and a mistake,” Clothier said. “There was some failures on the part of the police department, and those have been addressed. The officer involved in all of this was reprimanded.” Clothier inherited a department that has been going through internal strife for a couple years, with officers suing officers alleging cover ups and conspiracies. Clothier has since enacted a policy requiring outside agencies to investigate cases in O’Fallon should a conflict of interest — such as Toedebush’s involvement — be discovered. Under the new policy, O’Fallon no longer investigates its own officer-involved shootings, but its Internal Affairs Division still reviews them for any policy violations. Toedebusch left the department in May 2013 after more than 16 years there — and not long after his interview with Harvey and Grawitch. The Gersts no longer believe they will learn the truth about Kent’s death. “We will never have all the answers,” Matt Gerst said. But one thing has changed in the years since his brother died. A chain link fence supplements the concrete guardrail on the bridge over Peruque Creek. Now, no one can fall over the bridge. Christine Byers • 314-340-8087 @christinedbyers on Twitter cbyers@post-dispatch.com


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NATION

11.10.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A11

ELECTION 2020 | PRESIDENTIAL RACE

WHERE THINGS

Elizabeth Warren ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

STAND What to watch in the campaign right now BY STEVE PEOPLES | Associated Press

The narrative A new, turbulent phase of the Democratic primary has begun after Beto O’Rourke’s decision to leave the race and Kamala Harris’ move to shutter her New Hampshire campaign. It’s the truth hour for candidates not named Joe Biden, Elizabeth Warren, Bernie Sanders and Pete Buttigieg. Under increasing pressure to make a move, more lower-tier candidates will be forced to shake up their staff or strategy or call it quits.

Joe Biden

The big questions Can Biden step up in the early states?

Can AOC help Sanders overcome health concerns?

National polls are easy to talk about, but, unfortunately for Biden, they have little bearing on how presidential nominees are chosen. While Biden continues to lead many nationwide surveys, the former vice president has finished no better than third in the two most recent Iowa and New Hampshire polls. While many voters have yet to make firm decisions, that’s not where Biden wants to be three months out from Iowa, and his increasingly aggressive posture with Warren in particular reflects growing concern from his campaign.

One of the Democratic Party’s brightest young stars, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, will make multiple campaign appearances alongside Sanders late this week in Iowa. This comes just a month after the 78-year-old Vermont senator suffered a heart attack that raised new concerns about his age and health. And it offers a powerful reminder that Sanders remains a political force in 2020, even if he’s viewed skeptically by the political establishment. Can Ocasio-Cortez give Sanders the kind of bump on the ground in Iowa he needs? It’s a heavy lift.

How does Warren sell her health care payment plan? The Massachusetts senator answered the biggest policy question of her campaign late last week by unveiling a detailed proposal to spend $20 trillion over 10 years to fund her single-payer health care plan. Predictably, rivals in both major political parties pounced. She’s now tasked with finding a message in the longer term that will satisfy liberals and skeptical moderates. After drawing mixed reviews for sidestepping related questions in the last debate, she’s just beginning to confront a key issue underlying broader concerns that she may be too far left to win the general election.

Pete Buttigieg

Will things get more difficult for Buttigieg? Buttigieg, the feel-good story of 2020, is rising, but he’s largely escaped the kind of scrutiny that typically follows top-tier presidential candidates. That may be about to change. The 37-year-old South Bend, Indiana, mayor last week suggested Iowa has essentially become a two-person race between himself and Warren. New polling suggests he belongs in the top-tier conversation, even if Iowa is far from a two-person race. Still, the novelty of a fresh-faced midwestern Rhodes scholar with a hardto-pronounce name can only go so far.

The final thought The big questions above underscore a stark reality: With the Iowa caucuses rapidly approaching, uncertainty and anxiety are rising among most Democratic primary voters who are far from settled on their final pick. Why? All of the top candidates are making little progress in addressing glaring vulnerabilities that threaten their presidential ambitions.

Bernie Sanders

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WORLD

11.10.2019 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A11

Global debate begins over married Catholic priests BY KIRSTEN GRIESHABER

Associated Press

BERLIN — Germany’s Catholics reacted enthusiastically when bishops from across the Amazon called for the ordination of married men as priests to address the clergy shortage in that region. Such reforms have been pushed for decades by many German bishops and lay groups who hope it can lead to the liberalization of centuries of Roman Catholic tradition. There is resistance elsewhere for the proposal, however, with the conservative Catholic establishment making sure its voice is heard as Pope Francis prepares his own document — expected by year’s end — that could determine whether married priests and female deacons eventually become a reality in the Amazon. Bishop Franz-Josef Bode from Osnabrueck, Germany, welcomed the proposals and suggested that a European synod similar to last month’s assembly by the Amazon bishops could be a useful way to address pressing issues on the continent. He told the Osnabrueck Diocese paper Kirchenbote that while the Amazon Synod’s recommendations would not be transferable one-to-one in Europe, they might show the way forward to a similar type of priesthood in Germany that allows for combining work and family. “Regarding the role of women in our societal and ecclesiastical situation, the recommendations are a tail wind for our efforts so far,” Bode said. A powerful lay organization, the Central Committee of German Catholics, or ZdK, stressed that its congregations also are concerned about such problems. “The question of whether we still have enough priests who live in celibacy and can fulfill all the tasks needed in the community is one that needs to be asked in Germany as well,” ZdK Vice President Karin Kortmann told The Associated Press on Friday. “It’s right to ask how we can open offices within the church without jeopardizing the basic principles,” Kortmann said. “It is also a question of credibility that we discuss women’s access to all offices within the church.” The ZdK will take part in the two-year “synodal path” meetings

JENS MEYER, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Catholics celebrate Mass on Sept. 15 during the traditional diocese pilgrimage at the Cathedral Mariendom (Cathedral of Mary) in Erfurt, Germany. Catholic groups in Germany reacted enthusiastically when bishops from across the Amazon called for the ordination of married men as priests to address the clergy shortage in that region, although there is resistance to the idea elsewhere. with the German Bishops Conference that holds its first plenary session in January in Frankfurt. It is widely expected to push for married priests and the ordination of women, among other reforms. Vicar generals from 10 German archdioceses sent a letter Tuesday to the bishops conference and the ZdK, saying they also consider “fundamental reforms of the church in Germany to be urgently necessary, indeed essential.” Cardinal Reinhard Marx, the archbishop of Munich and chairman of the bishops conference, expressed support for the Amazon Synod’s proposal, but stopped short of calling for a global recognition of married priests. In a statement after it ended, Marx tried to dampen expectations among German Catholics by saying, “The synod was not about the abolishment of celibacy; that’s not going to happen.” The Catholic Church already allows for married priests in Eastern Rite churches and in cases where married Anglican, Lutheran or other Protestant priests have converted to Catholicism. But if Francis accepts the synod’s pro-

posal, it would mark a first for the Latin Rite church in a millennium and could help the church compete with evangelical and Protestant churches that are gaining converts, especially in South America. The synod’s proposals have not been universally embraced outside the region. Some key cardinals at the Vatican and elsewhere have voiced opposition, warning that married priests in the Amazon would create far-reaching, negative effects on the priesthood elsewhere for the 1.2 billion-member church, while also opening the door to an even greater problem: What to do about divorced priests. Most of these critics are from the hierarchy’s conservative camp that has grown bolder in voicing skepticism or outright opposition to Francis. They form part of the high-level criticism that is buffeting the papacy over issues such as the clerical sexual abuse scandal, allegations of financial improprieties in the Holy See and doctrinal concerns. Perhaps the most surprising critic was Cardinal Marc Ouellet,

head of the Vatican’s powerful bishops office and a top adviser to Francis. Ouellet, considered a possible papal contender, published a book on the eve of the Amazon Synod affirming the value of the celibate priesthood and expressing skepticism that married priests would solve its clergy shortage. A more predictable “no” came from Cardinal Robert Sarah, an arch-conservative from Guinea whom Francis has kept on at the Vatican’s liturgy office despite sharp ideological differences. He also published a book on the eve of the synod lamenting the “dark night” of crisis for the church, citing the sexual abuse scandal as well as overall doubt about Catholic doctrine and morals, and insisting on the value of priestly celibacy. “I often hear people say that (celibacy) is only a question of historical discipline. I think that is wrong. Celibacy reveals the very essence of the Christian priesthood. To speak about it as a secondary reality is hurtful to all the priests of the world,” he said. Outside the Vatican, Cardinal

Camillo Ruini — a conservative who was St. John Paul II’s vicar for Rome and head of the Italian bishops conference — also criticized the proposal and said he “hopes and prays that the pope ... doesn’t confirm it.” Ruini acknowledged the priest shortage in the Amazon and said the proposal was understandable, “but I think it’s the wrong choice,” he told Corriere della Sera. “The celibacy of priests is a great sign of total dedication to God in the service of your brothers, especially in an eroticized context like today’s.” Ruini also suggested married priests would inevitably lead to divorced priests. “Today marriage is profoundly in crisis: Married priests and their wives would be exposed to the effects of this crisis, and their human and spiritual condition wouldn’t be able to avoid it,” he said. Many U.S. bishops have so far avoided emphatic pronouncements about the synod. One of the more outspoken is Bishop Richard Stika of Knoxville, Tennessee, who has said celibacy “is a living gift of a man to the church and should be the norm.” In an interview with the AP, Stika said there are practical reasons for excluding married priests, at least in the U.S. Many dioceses are struggling financially and would be hard-pressed to support a household that included a priest’s wife and children, he said. It might also limit a bishop’s ability to transfer priests with a family. Brazilian Bishop Mário Antônio da Silva of the Amazonian diocese of Roraima, who attended the synod, said married priests and ordained women are needed in the Amazon. “I defend celibacy for those who feel the priestly calling. But I also say: We need new collaborators in our communities,” da Silva told the AP. “The ordination of married men meets this need, so I’m in favor.” He suggested the concept might eventually spread beyond the Amazon. “It’s a process that must advance for the maturity of our church,” da Silva said, “not just in the Amazon, but who knows, maybe in other parts of the church, in our continent, and the whole world.”

TOMORROW’S I N N O VAT O R S SCHOLARSHIP Maryville University has partnered with the St. Louis Post Dispatch to recognize area students who have demonstrated innovation in projects, leadership, or activities. High school counselors, principals, teachers, or homeschool educators can nominate high school seniors online.

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A12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

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NATION&WORLD DIGEST

US-CHINA TRADE

Rockets target Iraqi coalition base

Trump disputes deal

BAGHDAD — A barrage of Katyusha rockets targeted an Iraqi air base that houses American troops south of the city of Mosul on Friday, officials said. No members of the U.S.-led coalition were injured. The rocket fire appears to have originated in Mosul and struck the Iraqi army base in Qayyara, about 38 miles south of Mosul, where coalition forces are helping the Iraqis battle remnants of the Islamic State group, Iraqi security officials said. They spoke on condition of anonymity. There was no immediate claim of responsibility nor was it clear if any of the rockets struck the base. Iraqi officials did not immediately say whether there were any casualties, though a coalition spokeswoman later said no coalition troops had been injured.

Pushback suggests that talks haven’t advanced as far as some hoped BY CHRISTOPHER RUGABER

Associated Press

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump on Friday dismissed a Chinese official’s assertion that his administration has agreed to roll back some of the higher tariffs it’s imposed on Chinese goods. The Chinese official said Thursday that the two sides had agreed to a phased cancellation of their tariff hikes as part of an emerging agreement. Trump’s pushback suggested that negotiations haven’t progressed as far as hoped as the

world’s two biggest economies struggle to negotiate an end to their trade war, which has hurt both economies. “They’d like to have a rollback,” Trump told reporters at the White House, referring to the Chinese. “I haven’t agreed to anything.” The two sides have been working on an initial “Phase 1” deal that was announced Oct. 12 but that still isn’t final. Financial markets in the U.S. and globally rallied Thursday at the prospect of an agreement to wind down the U.S.-China trade fight, but then stumbled Friday on Trump’s comments before eking out small gains. The Dow Jones Industrial Average finished up 6.44 points, or less than 0.1%, after shedding as many as 96 points earlier in the day.

Trump repeated his claims that China wants a deal more than the United States and that the United States benefits from extra tariff revenue. The president says the tariffs are paid by China, but studies conducted since the duties were imposed find that Americans businesses and consumers are paying them. “Frankly, they want to make a deal a lot more than I do,” Trump said. “I’m very happy right now. We’re taking in billions of dollars.” A private sector source with knowledge of the talks said Thursday that the United States had agreed to suspend the duties Trump threatened to impose December 15 on about $160 billion of Chinese imports as part of the agreement. But there is dissen-

sion in the White House about whether and by how much to roll back 15% duties on another $112 billion of goods imposed Sept. 1. White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow also told Bloomberg News Thursday that if a deal were reached, it would include reduced tariffs. “The White House never speaks with one voice,” Mary Lovely, a trade economist at the Peterson Institute for International Economics, said Thursday. Despite Trump’s cavalier comments, analysts say the administration has plenty of incentives to reach a deal soon. Trump said last month that the “Phase 1” pact would include the purchase of tens of billions of dollars of U.S. farm products by China, which would benefit farm states.

Trump lawyers to pursue tax case NEW YORK — Lawyers for President Donald Trump say they’ll ask the U.S. Supreme Court by Thursday to hear an appeal of rulings saying New York state prosecutors can obtain his tax records. Lawyers for Trump and the state prosecutor said in a letter to U.S. District Judge Victor Marrero Friday that they can fully brief the matter no later than Nov. 25 if the high court agrees to review rulings against Trump by Marrero and an appeals court. That schedule would let the Supreme Court decide the case in its current term. A criminal probe pertains in part to payments made to silence two women who claimed affairs with Trump. BRIEFLY WHISTLEBLOWER: Facebook said Friday it is deleting the name of the person identified in conservative circles as the whistleblower who triggered a congressional impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump’s actions. On Twitter, though, the alleged whistleblower’s name was circulating widely on Friday. The company does not have a policy against identifying whistleblowers. DEADLY INFECTION: A Pennsylvania hospital said Friday it has discovered the source of a waterborne germ that sickened at least eight premature infants, killing three. Geisinger Medical Center in Danville said the process it was using to prepare donor breast milk led to the deadly outbreak in the hospital’s neonatal intensive care unit. POSSIBLE CANDIDACY: Michael Bloomberg is reaching out to prominent Democrats in key states and scrambling to meet fast-approaching primary filing deadlines, his first steps toward formalizing a late run for the Democratic presidential nomination. Advisers said this week the former New York City mayor has not made a final decision. ELECTION 2020: President Donald Trump launched a new “Black Voices for Trump” outreach initiative in Atlanta on Friday dedicated to “recruiting and activating Black Americans in support of President Trump,” according to the campaign. Much of that effort will focus on highlighting ways that African Americans benefited from the Trump economy, advisers said. BRAZIL: Former Brazilian President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva walked out of prison on Friday, injecting new energy into a weakened opposition. Hundreds of red-shirted Brazilians applauded the popular, 74-year-old politician as he walked out of the federal police building. His release came less than a day after the Supreme Court ruled that a person can be imprisoned only after all appeals are exhausted. EARTHQUAKE: A magnitude 5.9 earthquake struck northwestern Iran early Friday, killing at least five people and injuring more than 300 others, officials said. More than 40 aftershocks rattled the rural region nestled in the Alborz Mountains, and residents rushed out of their homes in fear. The quake injured at least 312 people, state television reported, though only 13 needed to be hospitalized. — Associated Press

MARKUS SCHREIBER, ASSOCIATED PRESS

REAGAN STATUE UNVEILED ON EVE OF BERLIN WALL ANNIVERSARY The U.S. Embassy in Berlin unveiled a statue of Ronald Reagan on Friday at a site overlooking the location of the former president’s iconic speech imploring the Soviet Union to remove the Berlin Wall. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo called the inauguration of the work a “monumental moment” before helping remove the cover from the larger-than-life statue on the Embassy’s terrace, at eye level with the top of the landmark Brandenburg Gate. Saturday marks the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. Above, U.S. Ambassador to Germany Richard Grenell, right, Reagan Foundation board chairman Fred Ryan, left, and Pompeo examine the statue.

MEDICARE

‘Part B’ premium rising nearly 7% Increase comes after small cost-of-living raise in Social Security BY RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR

Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Medicare’s “Part B” premium for outpatient care will rise by nearly 7% to $144.60 a month next year, officials said Friday. They blamed rising spending on medications. The $9.10 monthly increase follows a smaller $1.50 rise this year. It comes after Social Security announced a modest cost-of-living raise for 2020 that works out to about $24 a month for the average retired worker.

“People who are really counting on that Social Security (raise) will lose some of that to this Medicare increase,” said Fred Riccardi, president of the Medicare Rights Center, a group that advocates on health care issues. “For people who live with little to no savings, any increase in Medicare premiums or drug costs is going to be a struggle.” Medicare blamed the premium increase largely on rising spending for drugs administered in doctors’ offices. Those medications are covered under the Part B outpatient benefit and include many cancer drugs. “These higher costs have a ripple effect and result in higher Part B premiums and deductible,” the

Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services said in a statement. Pharmacy drugs are covered by another part of Medicare, the Part D prescription program. The announcement on premiums comes amid growing uncertainty about pending legislation to rein in drug costs for seniors. The White House and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi parted ways this week on her bill that calls for Medicare to negotiate drug prices. President Donald Trump instead has thrown his support to a bipartisan Senate bill that would require drugmakers to pay rebates to Medicare if they increase prices beyond the inflation. Meanwhile, a Trump administration regulation that would try

to lower what Medicare pays for drugs administered in doctors’ offices has yet to be finalized. The Part B standard premium is what many seniors use as an unofficial yardstick to track what health care is costing them. Part B covers doctor visits and outpatient care. Medicare also announced that annual Part B outpatient deductible will increase by $13, to $198 next year. The Part A in-patient deductible will increase by $44, to $1,408 in 2020. A recent study found that more than half of seriously ill Medicare enrollees face financial hardships over medical bills, and prescription drugs are the leading problem.

Paradise honors Bannon: Stone viewed victims of wildfire as link to WikiLeaks On anniversary, Calif. community remembers those who died in blaze BY ADAM BEAM

Associated Press

PARADISE, Calif. — One year after Paradise burned, hundreds of people gathered in the parking lot of a former bank building in the Northern California town to pause for 85 seconds — one for each person who died. The Rev. Richard Yale moved quietly through the crowd, wearing a blue vest with the words “emotional wellness volunteer” across the back. A man reached out and grabbed his shoulder as he passed by. “I said, ‘How are you doing?’ He said: ‘I’m alive, thank you.’ And that was all he needed,” Yale said.

The crowd held onto each other for most of the ceremony on Friday morning. Holding hands, touching shoulders and remembering the terrible day when the most destructive wildfire in California history — dubbed the Camp Fire — swept through their town and destroyed roughly 19,000 buildings. In the year since the fire, crews have removed more than 3.66 million tons of debris — twice the amount that was removed from the World Trade Center site following the 9/11 terrorist attacks. Twelve homes have been rebuilt so far. The fire’s impacts have been felt far beyond Paradise. State officials say 20,000 people have moved to nearby Chico, boosting that city’s population by more than 20% and putting a strain on public services.

Ex-campaign CEO testifies Trump ally boasted of connection BY ASHRAF KHALIL AND MICHAEL BALSAMO

Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Donald Trump’s campaign viewed Roger Stone as an “access point” to WikiLeaks and tried to use him to get advanced word about hacked emails damaging to Hillary Clinton, a former top presidential adviser testified Friday. In reluctant testimony, former campaign CEO Steve Bannon told a federal court that Stone, on trial for lying to Congress and witness tampering, had boasted about his ties to WikiLeaks and its founder Julian Assange, alerting them to pending new batches of damaging emails.

“The campaign had no official access to WikiLeaks or to Julian Assange,” Bannon told the court. “But Roger would be considered if we needed an access point.” It was the first time that anyone affiliated with the Trump campaign acknowledged in court that they had actively sought material from WikiLeaks, which released emails that U.S. intelligence agencies determined had been hacked by the Russian government in order to damage Clinton. The White House had no immediate comment. Stone, a Trump ally, is charged with witness tampering and lying to Congress about his attempts to contacts WikiLeaks about the damaging material during the 2016 presidential campaign. Stone repeatedly “implied that he had a connection with WikiLeaks” but never stated it directly, Bannon said.


A12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

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NATION&WORLD DIGEST

Court rules in India Hindu temple case NEW DELHI — India’s Supreme Court ruled in favor of a Hindu temple on a disputed religious ground in the country’s north and ordered that alternative land be given to Muslims to build a mosque — a verdict in a highly contentious case that was immediately deplored by a key Muslim body. The dispute over land ownership has been one of India’s most heated issues, with Hindu nationalists demanding a temple on the site in the town of Ayodhya in Uttar Pradesh state for more than a century. The 16th-century Babri Masjid mosque was destroyed by Hindu hard-liners in December 1992, sparking massive HinduMuslim violence that left some 2,000 people dead. Saturday’s verdict paves the way for building the temple in place of the demolished mosque. It is expected to give a boost to Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s Bharatiya Janata Party, which has been promising the majority Hindus a temple as part of its election strategy for decades.

Divided Spain set to vote BY ARITZ PARRA

Associated Press

MADRID — Spain is holding its fourth general election in as many years — and the second this year — amid voter distrust and a renewed Catalan independence bid that has bolstered the far right. The first obstacle for whoever wins Sunday’s vote will be to overcome the country’s increasingly fragmented and polarized politics to build a parliamentary majority to back his government. That could prove difficult. Pedro Sánchez’s Socialists appear poised to again win the most seats in Parliament, but fewer even than they won in April, when Sánchez was unable to get the support of his left-wing rivals to keep his party in power. Sánchez is up against five other men for the job as prime minister. In recent days, he has tried to lure undecided and centrist voters by saying he will focus his next term on economic issues and by toughening his stand on Catalan separatists.

His efforts come as support for the conservative Popular Party and the far-right Vox is growing following massive protests in Catalonia last month, when nine leaders of its separatist movement were sentenced to prison for the wealthy’s region attempt to break away two years ago. In trying to appeal to Spaniards frustrated by the secession attempt, Sánchez has promised to bring back prison terms for those who hold banned referenda for independence, overturning a previous Socialist position. “I will not allow another extreme nationalist outbreak, fueled by false narratives and replete with lies, to undermine the success of Spanish democracy,” the 47-year-old leader wrote in a commentary published this week in several European newspapers. But political analyst Pablo Simón, a professor at Carlos III University, says the context of the election makes it even harder to win over voters. “The public opinion is angry at

the electoral repeat, with record levels of discontent toward the political class and great pessimism over how the economy will perform next year,” he said. Even if Sánchez succeeds in rallying support from the antiausterity United We Can and its new splinter, More Country, a Socialist cabinet likely will need either the backing of small regional parties or for the rightwing opposition to abstain. The eurozone’s No. 4 economy has been functioning without a stable government since mid2018, when Sánchez ousted the graft-tainted conservatives in a parliamentary confidence vote. The center-left minority government then crumbled in less than a year after losing the parliamentary support of regionalist parties. Sánchez’s Socialists went from 85 to 123 seats in the late April election. But he needed support from an absolute majority, or 176 of 350 lawmakers, and a falling out with United We Can leader Pablo Iglesias left him without enough votes.

The latest polls show both of those left-wing parties could lose ground. The Popular Party, meanwhile, is recovering after losing more than half of its parliamentary representation in April, falling to 66 seats. Polls show the conservatives could win more seats in this election. But leader Pablo Casado’s chances to form government are lower than Sánchez’s, given that the party’s natural ally, the centerright Citizens, isn’t expected to do well. The party benefiting most so far from the Catalan crisis has been Vox, with its mix of Spanish nationalism and populism. In addition to calling for deposing Catalonia of its self-government powers and outlawing regional separatist parties, Vox has stepped up its anti-immigration rhetoric. The party has released campaign videos linking migrants with criminality, and its leaders have held rallies outside centers where authorities care for unaccompanied teenage migrants.

Three dead in Australia wildfires CANBERRA, Australia — Wildfires razing Australia’s drought-stricken east coast have left three people dead, several missing and dozens injured, with over 150 homes destroyed, officials said Saturday. Around 1,500 firefighters were battling more than 70 fires across Australia’s most populous state, New South Wales, with the most intense in the northeast, where flames were fanned by strong winds, Rural Fire Service Commissioner Shane Fitzsimmons said. Prime Minister Scott Morrison warned Australia to expect more bad news from the fire zones. His warning came before the third victim was confirmed. “The devastating and horrific fires that we have seen, particularly in New South Wales but also in Queensland, have been absolutely chilling,” Morrison said. BRIEFLY ‘BABY TRUMP’ SLASHED: A towering Baby Trump protest balloon was knifed and deflated by someone unhappy with its appearance during President Donald Trump’s Saturday trip to watch the University of Alabama football game, organizers said. An unidentified man was reportedly arrested, but Tuscaloosa police did not immediately respond to a request for details. BOLIVIA: Police guards outside the presidential palace in Bolivia left their posts on Saturday, increasing pressure on President Evo Morales as he tries to curb nationwide unrest after a disputed election. Growing dissension in police ranks poses a new threat to Morales, who claimed victory after the Oct. 20 vote but has since faced protests. SCAMS: Paul Manafort’s former son-in-law Jeffrey Yohai has been sentenced in Los Angeles to nine years in prison for pulling a series of schemes totaling more than $13 million, including one that bilked $3 million from actor Dustin Hoffman. Some of the schemes were carried out while Yohai was released on bond for similar crimes. CYCLONE: Bangladesh authorities used more than 50,000 volunteers and officials Saturday to evacuate hundreds of thousands of people to shelters across the low-lying delta nation’s vast coastal region in advance of a strong cyclone hitting the area. ASSAULT: A Utah man accused of groping another passenger on a Salt Lake City-bound American Airlines flight that diverted to Tulsa for his arrest has been charged with abusive sexual contact. The man, identified as James Clayton CholewinskiBoy, 32, was charged by federal prosecutors Friday. ABUSE: French bishops on Saturday approved plans to financially compensate people abused sexually within the Roman Catholic Church. Any victim will be eligible to receive money, they said, and the church will appeal for donations to foot the bill. Bishops also voted to allocate $5.5 million to an independent commission examining church sex abuse in France and to support prevention efforts. — Associated Press

CRAIG RUTTLE, ASSOCIATED PRESS

ROCKEFELLER CENTER CHRISTMAS TREE LIFTED INTO PLACE A Norway spruce that was purchased as a sapling 60 years ago has been installed at New York City’s Rockefeller Center as the anchor of the upcoming Christmas festivities. The 77-foot tree from the village of Florida, New York, was lifted into place Saturday. The tree was chopped down Thursday and lifted by crane onto a flatbed truck. The televised lighting ceremony will be held Dec. 4. Above, the tree is prepared for setting on a platform.

UNREST

Iraqi forces kill 6 more protesters Demonstrations and security crackdown have left over 250 dead BY QASSIM ABDUL-ZAHRA

Associated Press

BAGHDAD — Iraqi security forces killed six anti-government protesters and wounded more than 100 others on Saturday, pushing them back from three flashpoint bridges in central Baghdad, medical and security officials said. Five of the protesters were killed by live ammunition, while the sixth died after being shot in the head with a tear gas canister. The Iraqi officials spoke on condition of anonymity in line with regulations. The current cycle of anti-government protests and the heavyhanded security crackdown has left more than 250 people dead. Mass protests erupted in Baghdad and across southern Iraq last

month, calling for the overhaul of the political system established after the 2003 U.S.-led invasion. The deaths occurred Saturday as the protests intensified in the afternoon, when demonstrators tried to reach the three bridges spanning the Tigris River to the heavily fortified Green Zone, the seat of government. Protesters have tried to force their way across on an almost daily basis. The protesters were pushed from the Sinak bridge to the nearby Khilani square, where 35 people were wounded, according to medical officials. Security forces also regained control of the nearby Ahrar and Shuhada bridges. The day before, authorities found a bomb under the Sinak bridge and carried out a controlled explosion of it, according to state television. In the southern city of Basra, three more protesters were killed overnight, raising the death toll there to eight since Thursday.

Clashes with security forces also wounded 10 people in other parts of southern Iraq, including the city of Nasiriyah, according to security officials. The demonstrators complain of widespread corruption, lack of job opportunities and poor basic services, including regular power cuts, despite Iraq’s vast oil reserves. They have rejected government proposals for limited economic reforms, and instead called on the country’s political leadership to resign, including Prime Minister Adel AbdulMahdi. “We consider the peaceful protests of our people as among the most important events since 2003,” Abdul-Mahdi said in a statement Saturday. He added that electoral reforms would be put forward soon along with “an important government reshuffle” in response to the protests against the sectarian system imposed in 2003.

Iraq’s top Shiite cleric, Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, released a statement saying his office was not part of a deal reportedly reached to keep the prime minister in his post and put an end to the protests. Al-Sistani’s office said the government should respond to protesters’ demands, adding that the cleric’s name was being used for “political exploitation.” In al-Sistani’s Friday sermon, which was delivered by his representative Abdul Mahdi al-Karbalai, the top cleric said it is the responsibility of the security forces to ensure protests are peaceful and to avoid using excessive force against the demonstrators. The prime minister also acknowledged Saturday that the government has been blocking access to the internet. Shortly after the statement’s release, internet on cellphones resumed for half an hour before being cut again.

Iran says case open on missing ex-FBI agent BY JON GAMBRELL

Associated Press

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates — Iran is acknowledging for the first time it has an open case before its Revolutionary Court over the 2007 disappearance of a former FBI agent on an unauthorized CIA mission to the country, renewing questions over what happened to him. In a filing to the United Nations, Iran said the case over Robert Levinson was “on going,” without elaborating. It wasn’t immediately clear how long the case had been open, nor the circumstances by which it

started. However, it comes amid a renewed push to find him with an offer of $20 million for information from the Trump administration amid heightened tensions between Iran and the U.S. over Tehran’s collapsing nuclear deal with world powers. That’s in addition to $5 million earlier offered by the FBI. The Associated Press on Saturday obtained the text of Iran’s filing to the U.N.’s Working Group on Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances. “According to the last statement of Tehran’s Justice Department, Mr. Robert Alan Levinson

has an on going case in the Public Prosecution and Revolutionary Court of Tehran,” the filing said. It did not elaborate. Iran’s Revolutionary Court typically handles espionage cases and others involving smuggling, blasphemy and attempts to overthrow its Islamic government. Westerners and Iranian dual nationals with ties to the West often find themselves tried and convicted in closed-door trials in these courts, only later to be used as bargaining chips in negotiations. Iran’s mission to the U.N. did not immediately respond to a request for comment, and its state

media has not acknowledged the case. The U.S. State Department did not respond to a request for comment about Iran’s acknowledgment. Levinson disappeared from Iran’s Kish Island on March 9, 2007. For years, U.S. officials would only say that Levinson, a meticulous FBI investigator credited with busting Russian and Italian mobsters, was working for a private firm on his trip. In December 2013, the AP revealed Levinson in fact had been on a mission for CIA analysts who had no authority to run spy operations.


NATION

11.10.2019 • SUNDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A13

WHITE HOUSE | IMPEACHMENT INQUIRY

What a Trump trial might look like BY MARK SHERMAN | Associated Press

Senate rules call on the person impeached, or a representative, to answer the charges. In 1999, the Clinton legal team included his top White House lawyers, but also Dale Bumpers, a former Democratic senator from Arkansas who was at ease in the chamber in which he served for nearly a quarter-century.

A

s House Democrats quickly move forward with impeachment proceedings, the likelihood grows that Donald Trump will become the third president to face a Senate trial to determine whether he should be removed from office. The examples of Andrew Johnson and Bill Clinton, who were both acquitted, offer insight into the process Trump would face. Still, much remains unknown about how a trial would proceed, including what the charges would be. A look at what’s known about the impeachment trial:

How long?

Impeachment in the House Formal articles of impeachment probably would be developed and approved by the House Judiciary Committee and then sent on to the full, Democratic-led House for a vote. Not all proposed articles are certain to be adopted, even if Democrats control the process. The Republican-led House approved two and rejected two for Clinton. (In 1974, the House Judiciary Committee adopted three articles of impeachment against President Richard Nixon and rejected two others. Nixon resigned before the full House voted.)

On to the Senate If impeachment articles are adopted, the House will appoint members to serve as managers who will prosecute the case in the Senate. For Clinton’s trial, Republicans on the House Judiciary Committee made the case against the president. One House manager was Lindsey Graham, now a senator from South Carolina. Twenty years ago, the House managers walked silently across the Capitol to the Senate, where the sergeant-at-arms escorted them to the well of the chamber and Rep. Henry Hyde, R-Ill., then the House Judiciary Committee chairman, read the impeachment articles aloud. It’s not clear whom Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., would appoint as managers, but one lawmaker who’s not on the Judiciary Committee seems a good bet: Adam Schiff of California, a former prosecutor who has been leading the impeachment inquiry as House Intelligence Committee chairman. After impeachment articles are read, Chief Justice John Roberts would be sworn in to preside over the trial. Last time, they also signed an oath book and kept commemorative pens the Senate produced for

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Above, a facsimile of a ticket used during the impeachment trial of Andrew Johnson, the first U.S. president to be impeached. Johnson was acquitted at trial. the historic moment,though with an unfortunate misspelling:“Untied States Senator.”

there) to convict and remove the president from office. For another, while senators are jurors, they also set the rules for the trial, may ask questions and can be witnesses. While courtroom jurors are screened for possible biases, voters already have selected the jury in elections that gave Republicans a Senate majority, with 53 seats. The GOP could insist on rules benefiting Trump, including limiting witnesses against him, though it would take just three Republicans to foil a party-line effort. Even if all Democrats vote to convict Trump, the Democratic House managers still need to win over more than one-third of Republican senators for a conviction — a formidable task. By comparison, in the Clinton trial, Republican managers couldn’t win over a single Democrat. To make their case, the managers are likely to give opening and closing arguments that could last for several days and respond to senators’ questions that also could be time-consuming. They also might question any witnesses. Trump’s defense team would have equal time to rebut the charges. Each step, as well as the time it takes to reach agreement on the rules, takes days, if not weeks.

The preliminaries The Senate has rules for impeachment trials, but some key questions, such as the length of the proceeding, are likely to be decided in negotiations between Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., and Sen. Chuck Schumer of New York, the Democratic leader. One important issue to be resolved is who, if anyone, will be called as witnesses. In Clinton’s trial, the House Republican managers sought to call witnesses. Democrats strenuously objected that this would drag out the trial. In the end, there were only three witnesses: Monica Lewinsky,White House aide Sidney Blumenthal and Clinton confidant Vernon Jordan. All were questioned in private by both sides with a senator of each party present. Excerpts of their videotaped depositions were shown at the trial.

How will the trial work? In some respects, a Senate impeachment trial resembles a typical courtroom proceeding with a judge presiding and an unusually large jury of 100 senators. But there are important differences. For one, it takes a vote of two-thirds of those present (67 out of 100 if everyone is

Could Trump take part? Yes, but that would be unprecedented.

The chief justice The chief justice presides over an impeachment trial of the president because the Constitution says so. Roberts would decide questions of evidence and procedure that are not spelled out in Senate rules. But unlike in a courtroom where the judge’s ruling is final, the Senate can override Roberts’ decisions by a majority vote. When senators have questions for lawyers or witnesses, they submit them to the chief justice, who does the asking.

The endgame Eventually, senators will deliberate. Whether that’s done in private is up to them. In 1999, the Senate defeated a Democratic effort to open up deliberations. Once a decision has been reached, the Senate meets in open session to vote on each article of impeachment. Senators will stand one by one at their desks and offer their verdict, guilty or not guilty. To convict Trump, Democrats need to draw 20 Republican senators, assuming all 45 Democrats and two Democratic-allied independents vote against the president. If Trump is not convicted, the trial ends and he remains in office.

Ivanka Trump: Whistleblower’s ID irrelevant

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The Senate will determine the length of the trial. In theory, it could be cut off almost at the outset if a majority of the Senate votes to dismiss the charges. McConnell has suggested that is not likely, despite the Republicans’ 53-47 majority. In Clinton’s trial, Trent Lott, R-Miss., and Tom Daschle, D-S.D., allowed Democratic Sen. Robert Byrd of West Virginia to move for dismissal a couple of weeks after the proceeding began, but it failed basically along party lines. Clinton’s trial began Jan. 7, 1999. Three weeks after the trial began, senators agreed that they would hold a final vote no later than Feb. 12. President Johnson’s impeachment trial lasted just over two months.

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RABAT, Morocco — Ivanka Trump on Friday echoed her father’s view that the House impeachment investigation is an attempt to overturn the 2016 election. But, in an interview with The Associated Press, she parted ways with President Donald Trump by calling the identity of the impeachment whistleblower “not particularly relevant.” The Republican president and some of his allies have been pressing the news media to publicize the whistleblower’s name, but Ivanka Trump said the person’s motives were more important. And she declined to speculate on what they may have been. “The whistleblower shouldn’t be a substantive part of the conversation,” she told the AP, saying the person “did not have firsthand information.” She added that, “to me, it’s not particularly relevant aside from what the motivation behind all of this was.” In a wide-ranging, 25-minute interview, Ivanka Trump also addressed her family’s criticism of Democrat Joe Biden and his son

Hunter, whether she wants four more years in the White House and the possible future sale of her family’s landmark Washington hotel, which she helped develop and referred to as “my baby.” She said she shares her father’s oft-repeated view that the impeachment investigation is about “overturning the results of the 2016 election.” House Democrats, by contrast, maintain the inquiry is about whether Trump abused his office by putting his political interests first. “Basically since the election, this has been the experience that our administration and our family has been having,” Ivanka Trump said of persistent criticism of the president. “Rather than wait, under a year, until the people can decide for themselves based on his record and based on his accomplishments, this new effort has commenced.” Asked whether impeachment marked a low point for the president, she demurred: “I think when Americans are winning, we’re feeling great, so I wouldn’t consider it a low point. I think Americans are prospering like never before.”

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11.10.2019 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A13

Democrats, GOP gear up for hearings to begin exandra Chalupa, a Ukrainian American who worked with the Democratic National Committee. Republicans also asked to call two witnesses who have already testified behind closed doors, a request that appears likely to be granted by Democrats: National Security Council official Tim Morrison and former Ukraine envoy Kurt Volker, each of whom corroborated parts of the whistleblower’s complaint while also providing some cover for Republicans. Rep. Devin Nunes of California, the ranking Republican on the intelligence panel, argued that witnesses such as Biden and Archer would “assist the American public in understanding the nature and extent of Ukraine’s pervasive corruption, information that bears directly on President Trump’s longstanding and deeply held skepticism of the country.” Schiff said Democrats would evaluate the requests but added in a statement that the inquiry “will not serve ... as a vehicle to undertake the same sham investigations into the Bidens or 2016 that the President pressed Ukraine to conduct for his personal political benefit, or to facilitate the President’s effort to threaten, intimidate and retaliate against the whistleblower who courageously raised the initial alarm.” In their questioning of witnesses so far, Republican lawmakers have been particularly focused on Hunter Biden, who received $50,000 a month for sitting on the board of the Ukrainian energy company Burisma while his father was U.S. vice president. They also sought to have witnesses elaborate on why Trump may have been upset

BY RACHAEL BADE, KAROUN DEMIRJIAN AND COLBY ITKOWITZ

Washington Post

WASHINGTON — House Republicans on Saturday pressed ahead with their efforts to move the impeachment inquiry away from President Donald Trump, calling on Democrats to add witnesses to the probe including former Vice President Joe Biden’s son and the whistleblower whose initial complaint kicked off the investigation. The GOP demands were met with immediate skepticism from House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., who warned against “sham investigations” of the Bidens and other issues in a clear signal that many of the witnesses were unlikely to be called. The clash came as Democrats prepare to enter a new phase of the impeachment inquiry with public hearings beginning Wednesday, which will focus on Trump’s alleged efforts to pressure Ukrainian officials to dig up dirt on Joe Biden and other Democrats in exchange for military aid or a White House visit by the Ukrainian president. Witnesses who have testified out of public view have largely corroborated the whistleblower’s initial allegations. Republicans have complained that the Democratic-run inquiry is unfairly partisan, and Trump said Saturday that he will “probably” release a transcript next week of an April call that he made to congratulate Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy on his election victory. In the weeks ahead, the GOP’s focus will be to try to minimize Trump’s role in the Ukraine pressure

ANDREW HARNIK, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Rep. Devin Nunes, R-Calif., the ranking Republican on the House Intelligence Committee, arrives on Capitol Hill on Oct. 22 to hear testimony from former U.S. Ambassador William Taylor. campaign and to justify his actions by highlighting that country’s history of corruption problems, according to Republicans familiar with the party’s strategy who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss internal deliberations. More than 2,500 pages of interview transcripts released over the past week provide a road map for the emerging Republican strategy. The documents show the extent to which GOP lawmakers involved in the hearings have focused on unsubstantiated conspiracy theories, Democratic political targets and other subjects favored by Trump allies — much of it ancillary to the probe at hand, according to a Washington Post review of the documents. One GOP lawmaker repeatedly tried to pressure a witness into saying what he wanted to hear about a Ukrainian company that employed Biden’s son. Another member quizzed a former ambassador in the impeachment inquiry about her national heritage, seeming to probe for bias. And a third Republican interrogated the same

diplomat about whether her staff “monitored” the social media account of an alt-right conspiracy theorist, whose main claim to fame is smearing a Washington pizzeria as the site of a fictional Democratic pedophile ring. There were also questions about the Clinton Foundation and long-gone officials from the Obama administration; probing of witnesses over the attorneys they hired or the release of opening statements; and inquiries about whether witnesses improperly “unmasked” the identities of Trump officials under investigation. The sprawling list of potential witnesses named by Republicans on Saturday continued the pattern. They included Hunter Biden, whose father is a leading Democratic candidate to challenge Trump in 2020; Hunter Biden’s business partner Devon Archer; the unnamed whistleblower, who Trump and some of his allies have campaigned to publicly identify; the researcher Nellie Ohr of Fusion GPS, which commissioned a dossier linking Russia and Trump; and Al-

with Ukraine and therefore potentially justified in holding back military funding, including asking questions about Ukrainian politicians who said negative things about Trump during his 2016 campaign, the transcripts show. Some Trump allies have suggested that the negative remarks amounted to Ukraine’s interfering in the 2016 election — a contention that Democrats, intelligence experts and even some Republicans dismiss as an attempt to muddy the waters over Russia’s systematic interference in the election to help Trump. That line of inquiry — including suggestions that Ukrainians were out to get Trump or that the Bidens did something corrupt — is expected to be a recurring theme for Republicans in public hearings this month. The contrast between the two sides was evident during the testimony of the top U.S. diplomat in Ukraine, William Taylor Jr., who told lawmakers Oct. 22 that the White House had threatened to withdraw muchneeded military aid unless Kyiv announced investigations for Trump’s political benefit. The unexpected level of detail in Taylor’s opening statement made many in the room gasp, officials said, and Democratic lawmakers spent their first hour of questioning that day dissecting the details. But when it was their turn, Republicans didn’t ask a single question about Taylor’s opening remarks during their first allotted hour, according to the newly released transcript of the session. Instead, they focused on the Bidens and a 2017 Politico article about how some Ukrainian officials had criticized Trump as a candidate in 2016.

“You mentioned that the company Burisma was a bit of a shady organization?” GOP staff attorney Steve Castor said, moving the conversation with Taylor toward the company that hired Hunter Biden. “Do you think it’s possible that he was tapped for the board because his dad was the vice president?” Taylor demurred: “So, Mr. Castor, I’m here as a fact witness. I don’t have any facts on that.” In multiple interviews, Nunes used his time to question the origins of the FBI’s Russia investigation and to press allegations of bias in the Justice Department. That included attempts to get witnesses to say that the “Steele dossier,” a document alleging links between Trump and Russia, had a Ukrainian connection. Most witnesses told Nunes they had no idea what he was talking about. “Are you aware of who paid for the dossier?” Nunes asked Ambassador to the European Union Gordon Sondland. When Sondland said no, Nunes pressed again: “Would it surprise you to learn that the Clinton campaign and the Democrat National Committee paid for the dossier?” “I don’t know anything about it,” Sondland said, later echoing the same comment when Nunes persisted with his line of questioning. “I don’t know anything about that, Congressman, I’m sorry. ... Again, I haven’t been following the Steele dossier.” Rep. Mark Meadows, RN.C., asked former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch about the origins of her nickname, Masha, seeming to suggest it was Ukrainian; Yovanovitch informed him it was actually Russian.

Trump camp using impeachment in get-out-the vote push

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BY MICHELLE L. PRICE AND ZEKE MILLER

Associated Press

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LAS VEGAS — Gregory Hafen II looked out at a small group of fellow Republicans and tried to hammer home just how wronged he thinks President Donald Trump has been. The impeachment investigation in Washington is a mere political attack, he argued. “It’s witch hunt after witch hunt,” he said, glancing occasionally at his notes. Hafen, a Republican state lawmaker and the rural Nevada chairman of Trump’s reelection campaign, had gathered with a small group of volunteers in a suburban Las Vegas public library to teach them to spread the word: “That’s why we’re here today, to encourage everyone to volunteer.” At doorsteps and protests, in phone calls and social media posts, Trump’s campaign is marshalling its army of devoted followers to defend the president against the threat of impeachment. Certain the war in Washington only fires up Trump fans, the campaign is training volunteers how to stoke that frustration and channel it against Democrats. In battlegrounds states such as Nevada, the

effort — dubbed “Stop the Madness” — has quickly merged with a canvassing campaign already making regular contact with voters ahead of next year’s election. “It didn’t seem possible to get President Trump’s supporters more fired up than they already were,” said Tim Murtaugh, the Trump campaign’s spokesman.“Democrats have done it with their sham impeachment proceedings,” The effort reflects the Trump campaign’s confidence that the impeachment fight will not only energize his diehard supporters, but also turn off voters weary of the fighting in Washington and willing to blame Democrats for the latest battle. Trump’s campaign isn’t just waiting for voters to bring up impeachment — it’s “owning it,” raising it on phone calls and doorknocks across the country, said Rick Gorka, a spokesman for Trump’s campaign and the Republican National Committee. The campaign and the RNC have spent more than $10 million in impeachment-related TV ads already, with more expected in the coming weeks as Democrats begin their open hearings.

FREE PUBLIC TALK

A New View of God and its effect on well-being

Phillip Hockley, CS

After sustaining a debilitating injury which was diagnosed as rendering him permanently disabled, Hockley began investigating ways to improve his situation. Along the course of his search, he attended a lecture on Christian Science. “I found something that was indeed life-transforming. Christian Science gave me a new view of God that I’d not had before: a view of God as Love itself, divine Love that loved me fully. I also discovered that this loving God was not the source of my troubles (which were many) but the solution to them. My life began to improve quickly and I became a healthy man.”

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A14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 11.10.2019

Trump move could spark researcher exodus BY KATIA DMITRIEVA

Tribune News Service

WASHINGTON — Donald Trump has called its work “phony.” His Acting Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney warned that President Barack Obama was “manipulating” its numbers. Economic adviser Larry Kudlow termed one of its reports “very fluky.” Is it a House oversight committee? A Democratic think tank? No, it’s the gold standard of research and impartiality on U.S. inflation, employment and productivity: The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Now, 70% of the bureau’s staff of 1,800 is likely to leave by 2022, according to a survey by the union that represents most of its workers. The reason: The administration plans to move the bureau’s current headquarters from Washington, near the Union Station transit hub, to an office building in Suitland, Md. Current and former government employees said they’re concerned the

administration is seeking to drive out civil servants whose work could undermine the president’s agenda. These researchers are in a position to document, for example, a slowdown in manufacturing employment in part because of Trump’s tariffs. Roughly 90% of the bureau’s employees oppose the move because traffic and lack of transit options would add on average an hour to their daily commutes — in some cases, as much as two hours — even though the new office is only seven miles away and near a subway station. They also worry it will isolate them from Capitol Hill policymakers and that the new digs are too small to fit the staff. The White House has said it is promoting efficiency by consolidating three agencies. The Bureau of Labor Statistics, or BLS, now part of the Labor Department, will join the Census Bureau and the Bureau of Economic Analysis

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in a single, lower-cost location. The Obama administration had also indicated an interest in consolidating these agencies, though it never happened. Trump’s “phony” comment and the critical words of Mulvaney and Kudlow all referred to BLS jobs reports. During the Obama administration, Trump said they overstated the health of hiring. “So far, the BLS has avoided politicization from the Trump administration,” said Michael Havlin, an economist at the agency and union member. “But the economic data has been pretty positive the last three or four years — that might not be the case in a year or so.” The Labor Department said the government had

awarded a contract to conduct a six-month study on the move. The agency declined to answer further questions. The BLS move joins a series of initiatives that would uproot federal bureaucracies from Washington. The Agriculture Department, for example, is moving the Economic Research Service, which produces widely watched reports on farming, to the Kansas City area. In that case, only about 70 of roughly 250 workers are expected to stay with the service. That exodus raised similar questions about whether officials were seeking to gut an agency that had produced reports angering the administration — something the government denied. Also sparking concern about employee attrition, the Bureau of Land Management, responsible for 10% of the nation’s land and about one-third of its resources, is scattering staff positions from Wash-

ington across several locations in the western U.S. The bureau said the move is intended to reduce costs and bring employees closer to the lands it manages. “It’s a reasonable thing for members of the civil service here to feel like the real motive is an attack on expertise, because we’re seeing that across the administration,” said Jeff Hauser, executive director of the Revolving Door Project, which examines executive branch appointments. “A lot of pressure is going on experts to conform their opinions to political appointees.” Agency relocations under previous administrations have also caused headaches for workers. But attrition rates were much lower than those now being forecast. The Bureau of Economic Analysis, the agency that releases the quarterly gross domestic product data among other reports, moved from Washington to the Maryland building under Obama. A quarter of

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the staff left. The Bureau of Labor Statistics has a rich history. It dates to 1884, when it was established under the administration of President Chester Arthur. From the beginning, impartiality was a concern because of fear it would be beholden to the labor movement. Its first commissioner said the bureau’s mandate was “the fearless publication of the facts.” One of its early projects, especially relevant in the age of Trump: evaluating the economic effect of the 1890 tariffs supported by the future President William McKinley. Until then, there was no national index of wholesale or retail prices. Today, Fed officials, investors and researchers seeking to understand the health of the world’s largest economy still depend on BLS data. The monthly jobs market report for September documented a 50-yearlow unemployment rate but a slower pace of wage gains.

Hear from an expert and meet others living with SMA.

Register for an educational event about spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), where you’ll gain information and interact with caregivers and others living with SMA. It’s a free event sponsored by Biogen, a leader in neurology research.

Location:

Date:

Sheraton Westport Plaza Hotel

Saturday, November 23, 2019

900 Westport Plaza

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St. Louis, MO 63146

9:30 AM to 10:00 AM

HCP Speaker: Ryan Coates, MD Peer Speaker: Mark M. -Patient Food/Parking: Complimentary breakfast will be provided. Self Parking is available. Register today at LivingWithSMA.org or call 1-888-615-4343. Please keep in mind that your healthcare provider (HCP) is always your primary resource when it comes to your spinal muscular atrophy. ©2018 Biogen. All rights reserved. 04/18 SMA-US-0370 v2 225 Binney Street, Cambridge, MA 02142 • 1-800-456-2255

COURAGE AND SACRIFICE HAVE A HISTORY.

Downtown St. Louis • Open daily: 10am–5pm Free admission • mohistory.org/SoldiersMemorial


NATION

A14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 11.10.2019

Harris, Warren compete for support from black female voters BY ERRIN HAINES

Associated Press

Kamala Harris got a much needed boost this month when the California senator picked up the endorsement of Higher Heights, the country’s largest political organization aimed at electing black women. But Elizabeth Warren would not be outdone. A day after Harris’ announcement, the Massachusetts senator won the backing of more than 100 black female activists. She also picked up the coveted endorsement of Rep. Ayanna Pressley, a black woman from her home state and the only member of the so-called squad of progressive lawmakers not to side with presidential candidate Bernie Sanders. The dueling endorsements signal an emerging battle between Warren and Harris for the support of black women, who are the Democratic Party’s most loyal and consistent voters. Both White House hopefuls are struggling with black voters, who have sided with Joe Biden by large margins. But as the election moves into a critical phase with just months before voting begins, the announcements this week highlight the contrasting styles of the surging progressive firebrand and the lone black woman in the Democratic field. “We’re still on a long road, and black women are still shopping,” said Higher Heights co-founder Glynda Carr. Harris is “exactly what our organization was built on, to be able to help support and

RINGO H.W. CHIU, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., speaks at the SEIU Unions For All Summit on Oct. 4 in Los Angeles. A battle is emerging between presidential candidates Elizabeth Warren and Harris for the support of black women, the Democratic Party’s most loyal and consistent voters. invest in qualified black women to run for offices at all levels. At the end of the day, even if she ends up not being your top choice, black women should be celebrating this moment.” Both candidates are expected to keep up their outreach in the weeks ahead. Warren will deliver a speech about the legacy of black female workers at historically black Clark Atlanta University later this month. Around the same time, Harris also plans to participate in a South Carolina town hall with Higher Heights. They’ve both courted black women almost since the begin-

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ning of their campaigns. When Harris launched her presidential bid on Martin Luther King Jr. Day, many observers assumed her bona fides as a graduate of historically black Howard University and a member of Alpha Kappa Alpha — the nation’s oldest black sorority — would give her an advantage among the throng of candidates. Many young black women were especially excited about her candidacy. But that hasn’t yet translated into support as Harris falls in the polls. In a call with reporters this week, Harris acknowledged the campaign still has work to do to

win black women. “I am fully aware that we are asking people to believe in something that they’ve not seen before,” Harris said. “This is the challenge I’ve faced in every office I’ve run for.” Marcia Fudge, a Democratic congresswoman from Ohio and a Harris surrogate, said the senator is running a campaign of belief that is common for black women. “We kind of get counted out an awful lot,” Fudge said. “Our culture just is not a very trusting culture. We have to convince black women, in particular, that if we support her, we can win. Black women want to support another woman. She’s the only other choice. If they believe Kamala is not viable, (Warren) is the fallback position.” Warren began attracting attention from black women this spring after announcing her plan to address racial disparities in maternal mortality at a town hall for female voters of color. At a campaign stop this week at North Carolina A&T University — another HBCU — she was the guest on political strategist Angela Rye’s podcast. Pressley also joined her for the event. As a white woman, Warren, however, faced skepticism from black activists. “We have experiences on the day-to-day that remind us that white women are likely to throw us under the bus if it means protecting themselves,” said Angela

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Living with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) or caring for someone who is?

Peoples, the director of the organizing group Black Womxn For. She was photographed during the 2017 Women’s March sucking a lollipop and holding a sign that read: “Don’t Forget White Women Voted For Trump.” But Warren’s policy proposals were getting attention. Leslie Mac, another activist involved in organizing this week’s endorsement of Warren, said her group text chat with black girlfriends began buzzing about Warren over the summer. “There was literally that question of ‘Have y’all been looking at Elizabeth Warren?’” Mac recalled. “‘Is she for real? If we wanted to meet with her, would she come?’” Warren met with the activists at the Netroots conference in July. Sitting across the table from Warren, they questioned her candidly on her policies and, more fundamentally, whether they could trust her to advocate for them. The senator ultimately committed to several requests from the group to address inequality and promote diversity in her wouldbe administration. Mac said her decision to back Warren came down to choosing a candidate who is “organizable and that can be held accountable.” “She has strong plans that will positively affect the material lives of black people,” Mac said. “I can appreciate the work Sen. Harris has done in her career and campaign and also feel that she is not the candidate for me.”

Hear from an expert and meet others living with SMA.

Register for an educational event about spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), where you’ll gain information and interact with caregivers and others living with SMA. It’s a free event sponsored by Biogen, a leader in neurology research.

Location:

Date:

Sheraton Westport Plaza Hotel

Saturday, November 23, 2019

900 Westport Plaza

Check in:

St. Louis, MO 63146

9:30 AM to 10:00 AM

HCP Speaker: Ryan Coates, MD Peer Speaker: Mark M. -Patient Food/Parking: Complimentary breakfast will be provided. Self Parking is available. Register today at LivingWithSMA.org or call 1-888-615-4343. Please keep in mind that your healthcare provider (HCP) is always your primary resource when it comes to your spinal muscular atrophy. ©2018 Biogen. All rights reserved. 04/18 SMA-US-0370 v2 225 Binney Street, Cambridge, MA 02142 • 1-800-456-2255

COURAGE AND SACRIFICE HAVE A HISTORY.

Downtown St. Louis • Open daily: 10am–5pm Free admission • mohistory.org/SoldiersMemorial


11.10.2019 • Sunday • M 1

NATION

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A15

Partisan divide reaches into higher education BY CAROLINE SIMON

Tribune News Service

WASHINGTON — Once, American colleges and universities enjoyed bipartisan support, and Republicans and Democrats alike believed in the value of higher education. Today, not so much. And that could be a big issue as Congress considers reauthorizing the Higher Education Act, a version of which House Democrats unveiled Oct. 15. While many liberal-leaning Americans continue to put their faith in higher education,conservative-leaning ones have begun to grow skeptical — a phenomenon traced to several factors: media portrayals of college campuses, skyrocketing costs and declining trust in institutions at large. According to a recent Pew Research Center study, the number of Republicans and Republican-leaning Americans who believe colleges and universities have a positive impact on the country has plummeted from 58% in 2010 to 33% in 2019. The views of Democrats and Democratic-leaning Americans have remained relatively steady: 65% in 2010 and 67% in 2019.

“Obviously this is disappointing. It’s regrettable and disappointing,” said Terry Hartle, senior vice president for government and public affairs at the American Council on Education. “Higher education has been so successful in the United States in large part because it has for so long enjoyed broad and deep public support.” A primary driver of conservative concern is access to free speech on college campuses — a worry that’s been reinforced by portrayals of university protests as violent in right-leaning media and instances of conservative speakers being disinvited from graduations and other events. “There’s whole segments on all those conservative channels on how absurd life at universities is,” said Jeffrey Kidder, a sociology professor at Northern Illinois University. “It’s just a key talking point on the right side of the political spectrum these days, about universities being not only filled with progressives, but also that conservative voices are being silenced.” According to a June Pew report, 87% of Democratic and Democrat-leaning re-

ANDREA PISTOLESI, TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

While American colleges and universities used to enjoy bipartisan support, that support is starting to weaken, especially among conservatives. Above, Harvard University is seen in 2013. spondents said colleges and universities are open to a wide range of viewpoints. Just 44% of Republican and Republican-leaning respondents agreed. Some of that perception is rooted in university structure, said Kidder, who is working on a research project involving interviews with conservative-leaning and liberal-leaning college students at the University of Colorado Boulder, the University of Arizona, the University of Virginia and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Universities often provide an easy path for progressive students to engage in activism (through student centers or extracurricular activities),

while conservative activists depend more heavily on outside groups, such as Turning Point USA and Young America’s Foundation. “Progressives across the board are kind of embedded within different types of centers and other things that are part of the university itself. Conservative students have a lot of resources, there’s a lot of money, guidance, swag from the right — but it’s not from the university,” Kidder said. Another factor that has prompted Americans more broadly to question the value of college is climbing tuition prices and mounting student debt. Since the 1985-1986 academic year, average annual tuition prices

at all institutions have risen from $4,885 to $23,091 (in current dollars). Americans collectively owe $1.5 trillion in student debt, according to the Education Department’s National Center for Education Statistics. Public university systems, which rely on state support, have faced unique struggles, Hartle said, in part because other destinations for public money — prisons, elementary and secondary education and Medicaid — don’t have paying customers. Higher education is the only major sector where higher prices can be charged. Issues of cost and debt are certainly prevalent on the left — presidential candidates Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren have both proposed plans to effectively cancel tuition at public colleges. And House Democrats have dubbed their Higher Education Act reauthorization the College Affordability Act. “This proposal immediately cuts the cost of college for students and families and provides relief for existing borrowers. At the same time, it improves the quality of education by holding schools accountable for their students’ success, and

it meets students’ individual needs by expanding access to more flexible college options and stronger support — helping students graduate on time and move into the workforce,” Education and Labor Chairman Robert C. Scott, a Virginia Democrat, said in a statement. Concerns on the right, Hartle said, are focused on the practical applications of higher education and the necessity of using college to find a good-paying job. Several university systems in states with Republican legislatures have sought to ensure that college educations are leading directly to practical career applications. In 2015, Wisconsin’s Republican governor at the time, Scott Walker, submitted a budget proposal in 2015 that would have removed “search for truth” and “improve the human condition” in the state public university’s mission statement and insert “meet the state’s workforce needs” (He later said the change was a mistake). And in 2018, the University of Colorado Board of Regents heard a proposal to remove “liberal” from the phrase “liberal education” in the system’s mission statement.


11.10.2019 • Sunday • M 2

NATION

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A15

Massive American Dream mall to open BY ANNE D’INNOCENZIO AND DAVID PORTER

Associated Press

EAST RUTHERFORD,N.J. — More than two decades ago when a mega entertainment and shopping complex was being conceived on a vast swath of swamp land in New Jersey,the iPhone didn’t exist, Amazon was only selling books online and malls were where you went for all your shopping needs. Now, after endless fits and starts and billions of dollars spent, American Dream is officially opening its doors to the public as the second largest mall in the country, and third largest in North America. It will showcase 3 million square feet of leasable space dedicated to more than a dozen entertainment attractions like a 16-story indoor ski slope, roller coaster, waterpark and eventually 450 retail,food and specialty shops. The big question is: Who will come? In today’s retail landscape, consumers are glued to their iPhones and smartphones, where they can do their shopping without ever leaving their couch. Amazon has morphed into the biggest online retailer in the world.And overall traffic at malls, which

JULIO CORTEZ, ASSOCIATED PRESS

This April photo shows the exterior view of the construction site of the American Dream mall in East Rutherford, N.J. Now, after endless fits and starts and billions of dollars later, American Dream is officially opening its doors to the public as the second largest mall in the country and third largest in North America. had been on the rise in the late 1990s, has declined 10% since, according to an estimate by Coresight Research. A report from Credit Suisse published two years ago predicted that up to a quarter of the shopping malls will close by 2022 given the increasing popularity of online shopping and a rash of store closings. Since 2015, only nine malls have been built, a dramatic fall from their peak construction in 1973 of 43, according to CoStar Group, a real estate research firm. Amid that new reality,

American Dream is looking to draw 40 million visitors in its first year, with entertainment accounting for more than half of its space. Attractions include a bunny field and an aviary. There will also be such amenities as a doggy day care and a luxury wing, where shoppers can sip champagne and sample caviar as they wait to have their designer handbags wrapped. Two hotels with a total of 3,500 rooms are being planned next to the complex. The mall won’t be com-

pletely operational until next spring when several hundred stores will open.The Nickelodeon amusement park and an ice skating rink opened at the end of October; its other attractions will open in phases by the end of this year. “You can make it your backyard playground if you live in Manhattan or even if you’re in New Jersey,” said Ken Downing, chief creative officer for Triple Five Group, the mall’s developer. “It’s a staycation. So, it’s a little bit of competing with mindset and emotion, far more than a property or even Disneyland.” Downing says American Dream was designed to adapt to different events and trends. A grand court’s fountain, for example, can convert into a catwalk for a runway show. The ice rink can be transformed into a concert venue. Canada-based mall and entertainment conglomerate Triple Five in 2011 took over the massive project originally dubbed Xanadu from two developers, whose plans included building the world’s largest Ferris wheel. The project broke ground in 2004 but it languished during the early years, with its

multi-colored,checkerboard exterior — since removed — drawing derision, including from then-New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie who called it “an offense to the eyes” and “the ugliest damn building in New Jersey and maybe America.” Theprojectwassuspended in 2009 during the financial crisis after a Lehmann Bros. affiliate failed to fund its share of the construction. Creditors seized the project in 2010,and Triple Five came on board a year later, renaming it American Dream. Triple Five reimagined American Dream as a community hub for tourists and locals,taking a page from two other malls it had developed, West Edmonton Mall in Alberta, Canada and Mall of America in Bloomington, Minnesota — the two largest malls in North America. Entertainment was a big selling point for both, accounting for 20% of the West Edmonton Mall’s space and 30% of Mall of America’s. That compares with the 6% average for U.S. malls, according to CoStar. American Dream has its fair share of skeptics who wonder about its chances of success, especially given its proximity to New York City

less than 10 miles away. “This development will either sink or swim,” said Jason Goldberg, chief commerce strategy officer of Publicis Communications. “It’s going to be tough to get a lot of attention when you are next to a much bigger amusement park — Manhattan.” Goldberg believes the complex could work if the amusement park entices enough families in New Jersey to get into their cars and drive out there. But he’s not sure about how stores will fare since many of the tenants like Zara and Uniqlo can be found elsewhere.Another thorny situation: The mall will abide by the blue laws, meaning retail will be closed Sundays even though the restaurants and theme parks will be open,says James Cassella, the East Rutherford, N.J., mayor. Still, there’s reason for hope.While vacancy rates on average at the nation’s malls are currently at 4%, top malls have been the industry’s bright spot, boasting strong traffic and currently averaging a 2% vacancy rate, says CoStar. That’s compared with the bottom rung of malls, which are wrestling with a 7% average vacancy rate.


A16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 11.10.2019

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Winning photos will be published in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and online at STLtoday.com! Enter your photos through November 24: STLtoday.com/contests


11.10.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A17 BR A N D AV E. ST U DIOS CON T EN T

The votes are in, St. Louis, and a season has been chosen! SPONSORED CONTENT BY THE MUNY

Much like the 102-year-old amphitheatre, the sky truly is the limit when it comes to crafting a magical, one-of-a-kind lineup just for St. Louis. In July, Muny-goers were given a show selection survey with over 35 titles from which to select a dream season, including timeless Muny favorites and new, up-andcoming works. How do those 35-plus titles make it to the survey? The Muny formula is simple – a healthy mix of classics and Muny favorites, premieres and a show tailored specifically for families. The common theme throughout? A season for St. Louis, chosen by St. Louis. The Muny’s second season of its second century brings this tradition centerstage. “Our 2020 season continues the tradition of ‘something for everyone’ in St. Louis,” said Muny artistic director and executive producer, Mike Isaacson. “These shows offer incredible variety, beauty, fun and drama, and we’ll create with the fullness and power of our amazing new stage.” “After kicking off our second century with an ‘only at The Muny’ moment-filled 101st season, St. Louis has chosen a blockbuster lineup for 102,” said Muny president and CEO, Denny Reagan. “We expect this season to have a broad appeal with a mix of titles tailored specifically to what Muny-goers voted to see.” WITH NEARLY 8,500 HAND-TALLIED VOTES, ST. LOUIS HAS SPOKEN. This summer, Kander and Ebb’s legendary, six-time Tony Award-winning musical, CHICAGO tells an iconic story about fame, acquittal and…all that jazz. Following the vaudeville favorite, Disney and Cameron Mackintosh’s practically perfect fairytale fantasy MARY POPPINS flies into The Muny with two extended, non-subscriber performances. After a visit to the Windy City and Cherry Tree Lane, Muny audiences make a dangerous dash down Fleet Street for the Muny premiere of Stephen Sondheim’s masterpiece musical thriller, SWEENEY TODD. Following a clean shave, the 102nd season journeys to St. Louis’ historic Gaslight Square with Broadway’s longest-running musical revue, SMOKEY JOE’S

CAFE. Featuring generation-defining hits from the ‘50s and ‘60s, including “Yakety Yak,” “Jailhouse Rock,” “On Broadway” and “Love Potion No. 9,” this Muny first will have everyone dancing in the aisles. Next, the hearts of Muny audiences “will be blessed” with what many consider to be the world’s most beloved musical, THE SOUND OF MUSIC. From Austria to the sun-drenched beaches of Miami, The Muny ushers in another first, ON YOUR FEET! Based on the inspiring true story of the queen of Latin pop, Gloria Estefan and her husband, Emilio, this conga-filled musical makes its Midwest regional debut in the heart of Forest Park. Bringing this blockbuster season to a rollicking close, is the toe tappin’, barn raisin’ Golden Age classic, SEVEN BRIDES FOR SEVEN BROTHERS. MAGICAL. MAGNIFICENT. AND JUST FOR YOU. With several familiar Muny titles returning this season, another Muny favorite reprises its 100-year-old role – the stage trees. Following a successful Phase One of its multi-year campus renovation, which featured a new state-of-the-art stage, The Muny’s Phase Two will culminate in the spring of 2020 with the planting of seven large trees – marking the return of the iconic Muny stage canopy. Selected in 2016, these trees have been cultivated at a nationally-renowned tree farm and will be 35-40 feet in height when they make their Muny debut. Other Phase Two projects include a renovation of the West Rehearsal Platform and West Lawn, set to be completed before the 2020 season. Additional phases of the campus rejuvenation will continue over the next several years. The first of its kind, The Muny began as a civic idea that shared experiences bring us together, making our community stronger. Under the stars since 1919, The Muny remains inspired, transformed and united in this great, time-honored tradition. That idea of a shared, singular experience has turned into an enduring legacy, a family tradition and is embedded in the fabric of St. Louis’ identity. This content was produced by Brand Ave. Studios in collaboration with The Muny. The news and editorial departments of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch had no role in its creation or display. For more information about Brand Ave. Studios, contact tgriffin@stltoday.com.

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A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , 1 8 7 8

SUNDAy • 11.10.2019 • A18 RAY FARRIS PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER

GILBERT BAILON EDITOR •

TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

Inspiration in Jeff-Vander-Lou In a neighborhood beset by blight, a homegrown rebuilding effort blossoms.

P

robably one of the most useful things Pastor Andre Alexander has learned during his many years of blight-fighting activism in the Jeff-Vander-Lou neighborhood is not to sit around waiting for answers from City Hall. It’s one of the toughest and most frustrating lessons to learn, especially for taxpayers in neglected areas who have every right to expect help from the city to fight crime, urban decay, rampant code violations and other conditions that cause residents to flee. The frustration of city neglect taught Alexander and other residents to seize the initiative and take substantive action themselves to start fixing what’s broken. Or at least fix what they can. As the Post-Dispatch’s Janelle O’Dea reported last Sunday, the nonprofit Tabernacle Community Development Corp. that Alexander heads is identifying and purchasing properties for rehabilitation, repair or replacement. The group’s volunteers might only be making a small dent in the problem, but the effort serves as an inspiration for others to get up and get involved. Their goal is to revive a oncethriving community that has suffered the worst population decline of any neighborhood in the city. Tabernacle helps provide housing for people who need it and who want to stay in the area, as opposed to the motivation of outside developers who buy up vacant property for pennies on the dollar, redevelop, then resell at the highest-possible price, even if it leads to gentrification and mass displacement. In 1950, Jeff-Vander-Lou was booming, with a population of more than 40,000 and major employment sources, including Carter Carburetor and Coca-Cola. In 2017, the population had dropped to 5,502. The neighborhood’s challenges are the stuff of legends. The Environmental Protection Agency recently announced that the abandoned Carter Carburetor site had

CHRISTIAN GOODEN, POST-DISPATCH

A child walks past an entire block of vacant buildings in the 2700 block of East Prairie Avenue in the Jeff-Vander-Lou neighborhood of St. Louis. been placed on the agency’s list of the nation’s most urgent Superfund cleanup sites. The single-largest private property owner in Jeff-Vander-Lou is Paul McKee’s NorthSide Regeneration, whose crumbling houses and empty lots have, for years, served as a major nuisance and helped drag down property values. Jeff-Vander-Lou has the largest number of vacant properties of any neighborhood in the city, with more than 2,000, according to a city count. Using listings on stlvacancy.com, we counted 839 properties in the neighborhood registered to NorthSide Regeneration. In other words, people like Alexander who want to revive their community are facing a mountain of obstacles and can expect minimal help from a city that has, for too long, nurtured rather than cracked down on the irresponsible behavior of McKee and other absentee owners. The residents who remain in JeffVander-Lou have witnessed the steady, painful disintegration of a once-stable community. One demolition after another sent a message of disaster and ruin. Their rebuilding effort, which includes programs to help residents obtain loans and employment to get credit flowing again, marks an important step toward building self-reliance and taking back the neighborhood they have long called home.

All the ‘access’ money can buy Payday loan video gives a peek at how to buy influence in Trump’s White House.

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eaders in the payday loan industry have reminded us that “quid pro quo” doesn’t just refer to President Donald Trump and Ukraine. The Washington Post obtained a webcast in which two industry leaders specify to other payday lenders that if they want to ensure the rollback of reform laws that prevent them from fleecing their customers, they need to make political donations to Trump. The influence of money in politics is, of course, nothing new, but the cynicism at play here is nonetheless shocking. It shows the kinds of political players who want Trump reelected, and why. Payday loan companies charge exorbitant interest rates for small cash loans to those who can’t get them elsewhere. It’s been standard practice in the industry to ensnare their low-income customers in ever spiraling cycles of debt when they can’t keep up with payments. Under President Barack Obama, the federal government worked to reform the industry by, among other things, requiring that lenders verify that borrowers have the financial ability to repay their loans before they approve them. It’s the kind of requirement any legitimate lender would want, but for predatory payday lenders, it interferes with the ensnarement goal. Trump, a darling of the financial industry, has gotten rid of that requirement, as the administration announced in February. Why? The official line was

that the rule would restrict access to credit. That’s an odd rationale, given that the whole point was to restrict access to credit for those who couldn’t afford it and could find themselves ensnared more deeply in debt by obtaining it. The webinar by payday lending lobbyist and Trump fundraiser Michael Hodges may shed some light on it. “Every dollar, no matter how small or large it is,” can leverage influence with the administration, Hodges told his fellow payday loan executives in the video, recorded in September. He went on to give the example of calling Republican National Committee Chair Ronna McDaniel for “help on something,” and her calling the White House and saying, “‘Hey, we have one of our large givers. They need an audience. … They need to be heard and you need to listen to them.’” Is that how the industry got rid of the rule that was preventing lenders from dragging borrowers in over their heads? Just imagine how useful such a pipeline could be on other issues affecting the lenders. Another lender said during the webinar: “When Trump was elected, the needle moved in our favor — finally.” He added that Trump’s reelection would give the payday loan industry “access in the event that we need to have access to the president.” He’s no doubt right. Voters who care about reining in unscrupulous industries like this one should remember that in November 2020.

yOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS

Courageous defense of gay rights deserves applause Regarding “Jurors say police sergeant should get almost $20 million in discrimination suit against St. Louis County police” (Oct. 26): Good for the jurors, who with their award of nearly $20 million, sent a message not only to the St. Louis County Police Department but to all LGBTQ employees, students and others who live in the St. Louis area. Kudos to Sgt. Keith Wildhaber, who had the courage to sue the department for discriminating against him because of his sexual orientation. According to the Post-Dispatch, the case included testimony about Wildhaber being passed over 23 times for promotion and enduring a downgrade transfer in retaliation for filing a federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission complaint. It took guts for Donna Woodland to come forward to testify that police Captain Guy Means had called Wildhaber “fruity” at an event held four years ago. I appreciate those who come forward to fight discrimination of any kind when their jobs and perhaps very lives are at stake. Those of us who believe in an individual’s right to love whomever they wish send our appreciation. Esther Talbot Fenning • St. Charles

County leaders should stick to the law, not opinions Regarding “Two lawyers cited Missouri law that it’s legal to discriminate against gays. The St. Louis County Executive got angry.” (Nov. 1): I was outraged by County Executive Sam Page’s comments. He is quoted as saying he was “horrified and surprised that argument [sexual orientation is not a protected class under Missouri law] was used, and I don’t want to see it used again.” Page is not a member of the Legislature. He doesn’t make the law. His job is to enforce the law, fairly and impartially. If Page wants to change the law, he should contact his representatives. His constituents will pay the price for his unilateral action. Even more outrageous were the statements of County Counselor Beth Orwick, who said, “No matter what state law says, sexual orientation discrimination is unacceptable. I specifically instructed the lawyers involved not to make this argument.” Orwick is an attorney, and the people of the St. Louis County are her clients. Ordering members of her staff not to pursue a clearly legal and valid defense is unethical. As much as these events may frustrate Page and Orwick, it serves an important purpose. If we abandon the rule of law in favor of the rule of “good intentions,” our republic is not long for this world. Discrimination based on sexual orientation may be morally reprehensible, but it is not a violation of the Missouri Human Rights Act. Page and Orwick have no right to act otherwise, no matter what their intentions. Christopher Thornton • Brentwood

Landlords represent an embarrassment to all of St. Louis Regarding “Landlord an embarrassment to Jewish community” (Nov. 3): This letter from Norman Pressman missed one important point. The fact is that there are miscreant members of every group, regardless of race, sexual

orientation, religion, etc. This is the reason why the bigotry and prejudice Pressman wrote about is unfair. I don’t agree with his assessment that there is disproportionate representation of these miscreants among people of the Jewish faith. I do agree with his assessment that these landlords are indeed an embarrassment to both the Jewish community and the world in general. Ken Cohen • Creve Coeur

Democrats’ only goal is to prevent Trump’s reelection There is not a prosecutor in the country who would try a person if the facts did not support a conviction. Rep. Adam Schiff, Chairman of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, knows that the case to impeach President Donald Trump will not result in a conviction. He absolutely knows that there will never be a two-thirds majority in the Senate to support impeachment. Why, then, are he and the Democratic Party pursuing impeachment? Politics, pure and simple. They hope that the process will damage the president’s chances of returning to the White House in 2020. Truth and the American public mean absolutely nothing to the Democratic Party. Power is its only objective. Hopefully, there are enough rightthinking Democrats out there that will recognize the truth and act accordingly in November. Jim McLaughlin • Frontenac

Create an Illinois Electoral College to battle Chicago I have only a few things to add to the Electoral College debate: Pat Quinn, Michael Madigan and Illinois elections. Former Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn was elected mostly on the votes of only two counties and basically the votes of two cities in those counties. Michael Madigan, speaker of the Illinois House of Representatives, continues to stay in power on the votes of one city in the state. Maybe Illinois needs an Electoral College. William Hart • Troy, Ill.

Trump defenders’ voices will soon grow smaller Regarding impeachment, there are only two questions to answer. One, is it ever OK for a U.S. president to stop payment of $400 million in approved foreign aid and ask that foreign country to start an investigation of a future political opponent as a “favor”? Of course not. And two, if not, then is that abuse of power an impeachable offense? Of course it is. To make any argument against those conclusions is to give up on our democracy. Conservatives and Republicans have been demonizing progressives and Democrats for so long that they have lost touch with reality. President Donald Trump pretty much has ruined everything he has touched. Even a poor businessman would not be forced to go through six bankruptcies and be unable to make money on a casino. It is too bad that Republicans tied their wagon to Trump’s horse, but they did, and they have to accept the consequences. The more they try to defend the indefensible, the smaller their voices become until people just stop listening. Kurt Hoener • Ballwin Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON Editorial Page Editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382

STLtoday.com/opinion Find us at facebook/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial I know that my retirement will make no difference in its cardinal principles, that it will always fight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always fight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisfied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, E-MAIL 901 N 10th Street St. Louis MO 63101-1250 letters@post-dispatch.com Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days.


OTHER VIEWS

11.10.2019 • SUNDAY • M 1

75 YEARS AGO TODAY ON THE EDITORIAL PAGE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A19

LET THE PUBLIC KNOW • Now that two military courts have completed their reports on the Pearl Harbor disaster, the major conclusions should be

made public. The argument that nothing must be released that would affect military security is a good argument, but has it not been worked somewhat strenuously in the case of the Pearl Harbor inquiry? Access the full item at stltoday.com/opinion

How we’re expressing appreciation on Veterans Day Mortgage-free homes for four who sacrificed is our way of saying thanks. BY LEN MCMORROW AND TOM KILGANNON

On Veterans Day, four veterans of Afghanistan and Iraq will receive mortgage-free homes to recognize their sacrifices and honor their service to our nation. Teams from U.S. Bank and Freedom Alliance will gather on the front porches of newly renovated homes in Arnold, Missouri; Owensboro, Kentucky; Sheffield Village, Ohio; and Cleveland, Ohio. We’ll be joined by the service members’ family and friends, as well as volunteers, neighbors and community leaders. After our guests of honor walk up the red carpet to the front door, we’ll present them with the keys to a house that they will make their home. Each house will provide stability and offer new opportunity

to families whose lives have been shaped by frequent transfers, dangerous deployments, medical emergencies, uncertainty, anxiety and more. For combat veterans who’ve had to rest their heads in tents, foxholes and hospital beds, a peaceful and permanent structure is a welcome addition to their lives. The home in Owensboro will be given to Master Sgt. Ed Hawk, who enlisted in the Army at age 18 and served more than 21 years. He fought in Operation Desert Shield/ Desert Storm, served in Haiti, and deployed to Afghanistan and Iraq. He’s been awarded two Bronze Stars, a Purple Heart, two Meritorious Service Medals, and numerous other decorations. Ed is a warrior with a big heart. He

and his wife, Amy, adopted three children and opened their home to more than 150 foster children over the years. Spec. Todd O’Neal will receive a home in Arnold. At age 15, Todd left school and worked full-time to provide for his family. He joined the Army at the age of 20, was assigned to the 10th Mountain Division, and celebrated his 21st birthday in a guard tower in Iraq, where he was exposed to dozens of roadside bombs and kept a constant pace of operations. Back at home, Todd proposed to Crystal, his high school sweetheart. They were married while he was on leave from Iraq. Today they have four children. When he joined the Army, Todd had only two options for his military occupational specialty — laundry or infantry. He joined the infantry but jokes that if he’d known four kids were

in his future, he might have chosen laundry. Sgt. First Class Bryan Schrader receives specialized care for his injuries at the Cleveland Clinic and travels there several times a year from his home in Texas. His commute to the renowned facility will be easier after he moves into his new Ohio home in Sheffield Village with his wife, Courtney, and their daughter. Bryan comes from a family with a long history of military service. He enlisted at age 18, was a member of the 1st Ranger Battalion, and served more than 22 years in the Army. On the morning of Sept. 11, 2001, Bryan had just finished his workout at Fort Benning when he saw the news of the terrorist attacks. He said goodbye to his son, and, as a member of the elite 75th Regimental Reconnaissance Detachment, was in Afghanistan within days of the attack. It was one

of his numerous deployments. Later, he served as a Military Freefall Instructor and suffered a near-fatal parachute accident. Sgt. Mark Bricker and his partner, Kira, will relocate from North Carolina to Cleveland and receive a home near Lake Eire. Mark wanted to join the military from a young age. He enlisted in the Army in 2005 at the age of 17 and found himself in Iraq on his 18th birthday. He served with the 82nd Airborne Division and completed two deployments to Iraq. Mark was badly hurt during a parachute jump, an injury that still causes him significant pain. One of the highlights of his service was helping the Iraqis carry out their parliamentary elections. These veterans are representative of millions of our fellow Americans who’ve served our nation. The homes we provide through U.S. Bank’s

Housing Opportunities after Military Engagement and Freedom Alliance’s Heroes to Homeowners program are part of our organizations’ efforts to address their needs. Originally, Veterans Day was known as Armistice Day and was first celebrated in 1919, marking the end of World War I. In 1954, President Eisenhower signed legislation to rename it and shift the focus to Americans who sacrificed for their country. A hundred years later, the need still exists for more citizen engagement in our veterans’ well-being. Providing these homes is a first step to embrace them within a community of loving and caring neighbors. Len McMorrow is a senior vice president at U.S. Bank. Tom Kilgannon is the president of Freedom Alliance, a nonprofit organization providing support to wounded service members and military families.

Call Trump’s crime what it is: bribery No quids or quos about it, president committed a crime and should be impeached. EUGENE ROBINSON Washington Post

NATI HARNIK, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Democratic presidential candidate South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg speaks during the Iowa Democratic Party’s Liberty and Justice Celebration on Nov. 1 in Des Moines, Iowa. Buttigieg, 37, is the first millennial to launch a serious presidential bid.

Revenge of the millennials ‘OK boomer’ becomes a war cry for a generation that’s had enough. digital equivalent of an eye roll.” It was originally aimed at older folks’ lack of technological acumen: “OK Boomer, go back to figuring out how your computing device works,” to cite one Twitter exchange. But it has expanded American G.I.s came home to an indictment of how the old from World War II to be greeted have compromised the future of by a strong post-war economy, the young on topics like college the first white picket fences of debt and climate change. suburbia, and — well — their One young Australian lawwives. In the fertility-fest that maker, giving an impassioned followed, from the mid-1940s to mid-1960s, almost 80 million speech about global warming, recently shut down an older new Americans would join the heckler with an “OK boomer” world. tossed off so efficiently that she It’s easy to disparage the Baby barely broke from her script. It Boomers today as aging hippie Social Security sponges who have went viral. Some boomers are pushing back. One conservaleft their descendants melting tive radio host has, ridiculously, glaciers and mountains of debt. But they were also the generation declared the phrase “the n-word of ageism.” that mainstreamed Civil Rights, It’s a rift between two genfeminism and the modern principle (however imperfectly applied) erations that, historically, have much in common. The boomthat bigotry in all its forms is ers opposed the Vietnam War, fundamentally un-American. Every previous generation toler- embraced racial equality and demanded a lower voting age. ated intolerance in ways that, The millennials oppose envitoday, most Americans would ronmental destruction, embrace find unthinkable. Whatever the marriage equality, and have seen boomers have taken, they gave their voting rights trampled by a America that. national political party. The boomers have long been And both have serious canthe largest living generation in didates in the running for the the U.S. But they’re now being Democratic presidential nomidethroned by the millennination. Which is likely to only als — Americans born from 1981 through 1996. Millennials’ num- deepen the rift. The latest polls show essenbers are projected to top 73 miltially a four-way race between lion this year with a boost from three boomers — Elizabeth Warimmigration, while the boomers ren, 70; Joe Biden, 76; and Bernie drop to 72 million as members Sanders, 78 — and Pete Buttigieg, die off. who is 37. As they cross paths, the milIn addition to being the first lennials are greeting their grandopenly gay serious presidential parents with: “Ok, boomer.” candidate, Buttigieg is the first If you’ve seen the phrase in millennial. And (OK, boomers, context on social media, you I’m just going to say this) that know it isn’t a friendly hello. Millennials (and their younger alone might be reason enough Gen Z siblings) use the phrase, as to stop treating him like a mere curiosity. one online explainer puts it, to It’s not that I don’t respect “mock Baby Boomers and those the wisdom of age; the older I who are perceived as old-fashget, the more I respect it. But ioned and being out-of-touch.” The New York Times calls it “the if removing President Donald KEVIN MCDERMOTT St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Trump next year is an existential imperative for the Democratic Party (and the nation, and the world), why would you nominate someone with one of the same major problems? Trump is 73, which, were he to win reelection, would make him older than Ronald Reagan in his second term — a term we now know may have been affected by Alzheimer’s disease. Trump would be unfit for office at any age, but his age is a legitimate issue. Yet it’s one that three of the four leading Democrats can’t realistically raise. Buttigieg’s deficits are real, but navigable. Yes, anti-gay bigotry is still a factor in U.S. politics, but anyone who refuses to vote for an openly gay candidate probably isn’t going to vote Democratic no matter who the nominee is. Yes, being mayor of a smallish city feels like a thin resume — but thinner than an incumbent whose pre-presidential resume consisted entirely of being a crooked, bankrupt businessman? As for the knock that Buttigieg is simply too young: How are things going with that 73-yearold? If it’s not Mayor Pete this time, it will be another millennial in the near future. They are soon going to be in charge, and for a long time, just by virtue of their numbers. And they should be in charge, by virtue of their values. All these arguments that feel so epic today — about immigration and gay rights and voting rights and tax fairness and climate change and access to health care and education and the ethnic kaleidoscope that America is becoming — are arguments that have, in reality, already been settled, by biology. Not to put it too harshly, but those on the wrong side of these issues are going to die off first. Checkmate, boomer.

Enough with all the Latin. “Quid pro quo” is a nambypamby, wishy-washy way to describe the crime President Trump clearly committed in his dealings with Ukraine. The correct term is bribery, and the punishment under federal law is up to 15 years in prison. One thing Trump understands is the value of simplicity and repetition in getting a message across. Those seeking to hold him accountable through impeachment — an undertaking that requires and deserves public support — must heed that same lesson. Legalese in a long-dead language is the wrong approach. Instead, call the thing by its name. “Read the transcript,” Trump regularly demands on Twitter. Well, I did read the rough and incomplete transcript of his July 25 phone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy, which Trump claims was “perfect,” and I’ve also been plowing through the transcripts of the closed-door House interviews of various witnesses. My conclusion is that Trump’s conduct is better described as bribery than as extortion. Federal law states that a public official is guilty of bribery if he or she “directly or indirectly, corruptly demands, seeks, receives, accepts, or agrees to receive or accept anything of value personally or for any other person or entity, in return for ... being influenced in the performance of any official act.” You don’t have to be a lawyer to see that all the elements of the crime are present. Obviously, Trump is a public official. I suppose there could be debate about whether his demand to Zelenskiy — “I would like you to do us a favor though” — was direct or indirect. It seems straightforward and unambiguous to me. We know that Trump was demanding or seeking something of value for himself. He asked Zelenskiy to investigate Joe Biden and his son Hunter, which would benefit Trump by soiling the reputation of the potential Democratic nominee who, according to the polls, would fare best against him in the coming election. And Trump asked Zelenskiy to pursue a conspiracy theory that would relieve him of the onus of having won the 2016 election with Russian help. We know of two official acts that Trump made contingent on the “favor” he was asking for: release of nearly $400 million in military aid, which Ukraine desperately needed; and a face-to-face meeting with Zelenskiy.

William Taylor, the acting U.S. ambassador to Ukraine — who on Wednesday will be the first witness to testify publicly in the impeachment probe — told House investigators that he understood the aid was being withheld until Zelenskiy announced the investigations Trump wanted. Gordon Sondland, the U.S. ambassador to the European Union, told the House in amended testimony that he saw the same tit-fortat deal being arranged, or at least sought. That leaves only the question of whether Trump was acting “corruptly.” Anyone who claims there is any doubt about corrupt intent should have to explain why Trump spent months trying to make this transaction — which former national security adviser John Bolton reportedly called a “drug deal” — not through regular diplomatic channels but by using his personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, as a non-official emissary. Apologists also must explain why Giuliani was being assisted by two shadowy Soviet-born businessmen now facing federal charges for allegedly conspiring to funnel foreign funds to U.S. politicians. The Constitution leaves it to Congress to decide what meets the “high crimes and misdemeanors” threshold for impeachment and does not require the president to have committed a statutory crime. The charges that were being prepared against Richard Nixon before his resignation cited instances in which he “misused” his executive power and the agencies under his control. What Trump did with the Ukraine funding, which had been duly approved by Congress, was clearly a flagrant misuse or abuse of power. But it was also a plain, old-fashioned crime. It was bribery. House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., who is leading the impeachment inquiry, is an experienced prosecutor. Given all the information he has uncovered so far, he obviously knows what he’s doing. But it is important that the public understand both the process and its findings. Testimony transcripts are long and dense. The truth can get lost in the weeds unless it is distilled and highlighted in language that everyone can understand. And not everybody speaks Latin. If a traffic cop asked for money to tear up a speeding ticket, that would be criminal and the cop should be fired. What Trump did to Ukraine was essentially the same thing. No quids or quos about it, he should be impeached and removed. Eugene Robinson eugenerobinson@washpost.com Copyright The Washington Post


A20 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 11.10.2019

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ets often pick up on our stress level during this time of year because their schedules are askew too. Here’s what you can do to reduce their anxiety.

KEEP RIBBON UNDER WRAPS Cats and dogs are so fascinated by ribbon they may eat it. And that keeps vets busy surgically removing hazardous foreign bodies from the bodies of our furry little friends. So think about your pet’s safety when it comes to presents. Stash unopened gifts where pets can’t reach them. Either ban ribbons and bows or be ready to throw gift wrap in a garbage bag as soon as presents are opened. Take care of packing materials right away too. Pets can choke on packing peanuts or shredded paper.

DITCH DANGEROUS DECOR Kissing under the mistletoe is romantic, but when eaten, this plant is toxic to your

Look for a Christmas tree with pet-friendly pliable needles, such as a Douglas fir or white pine. Their needles won’t stick in your pet’s paws. Some pets like to eat stray needles, which can

KEEP KITTY OUT OF THE TREE From your cat’s perspective, Christmas trees may be the best gift ever. It’s just not realistic to think that your cat won’t try and scamper up the tree. Secure the tree to the ceiling or wall with fishing line. Keep your little lumberjack on the ground by setting up a small latticework fence around the base of the tree. And just in case he’s a jumper, display fragile antique or glass ornaments and tree toppers elsewhere.

SET UP A SANCTUARY

SNUG HUGS REDUCE ANXIETY By snug hugs we mean the gentle-pressure hug of a compression garment (e.g., ThunderShirt) that induces feelings of wellbeing for some dogs—and occasionally cats. Some compression garments include mild vibrations or music to further calm your dog.

CONSULT YOUR VETERINARIAN

Keep your cat or dog calm by stationing him inside a spare room where you can block out noisemakers, loud music, and

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Preempt fear by talking to your vet about medications or supplements to help your pet relax. Your vet may advise working with a veterinary behaviorist or rewards-based trainer who can help you anticipate and modify a pet’s fears with techniques like counterconditioning and desensitization.

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Colorful or metallic helium balloons make great party decorations, but they don’t make safe toys for dogs and cats—especially if they’re dangling long, shiny ribbons. Cats enjoy chasing those ribbons and chewing them if the hunt is successful. Dogs and cats may get scared if the balloons pop, or they may swallow pieces of latex or polyester film they mistake for food (and choke on them as a result).

Don’t take your pet with you to fireworks displays. Keep cats indoors. And try to take your dog on potty breaks early in the evening, before most fireworks go off. Minimize flashes of fireworks by blocking windows or moving the pet to a room with limited views of the outdoors. Provide high hideaways for cats to use as retreats. Let dogs take refuge in noise-buffered safe spaces, such as closets or bedrooms with blackout curtains.

flashing lights. Play soothing classical, reggae, or soft rock music, or dampen scary sounds with a burbling fountain, fan, or white noise machine. Use pheromone sprays or plug-ins to bring a sense of calm to the room.

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ew Year’s festivities can be stressful for pets who think loud noise and change in their environments are scary. Calm things down with these tips.

PETS AND FIREWORKS DON’T MIX

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NEW YEAR’S EVE

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You’ll find more ways to help your dog or cat lead a full and healthy life in Happy Paws™ magazine. Pick up a copy on newsstands or at magazine.store.

DODGE CHRISTMAS TREE TRAUMA

cause choking and upset tummies. Keep your vacuum handy while the tree is up to keep the floor clear of debris. There’s nothing you can pour into the tree stand that will lengthen a Christmas tree’s life aside from fresh water. So leave out “helpful” additives. All they’ll do is make stagnant water even more dangerous for a pet to drink. Cover the stand with a tree skirt to help prevent your pet from quenching his thirst. Keep paws away from wires, electrical cords, batteries, and ornaments. If chewed, wires and cords can cause a potentially fatal electrical shock. Punctured batteries can leak alkaline or acidic material that will damage your pet’s mouth and esophagus. Broken ornaments should be cleaned up right away to keep your pet from stepping on—or ingesting— sharp shards of glass or plastic.

For more on keeping pets calm, visit: fearfreehappyhomes.com/fears-anxieties

BAN THE BALLOONS

FOR THE LOVE OF PETS

pets—leading to gastrointestinal upset and cardiovascular problems. Holly can cause pets to suffer nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Look out for lilies; if ingested, some varieties can cause kidney failure in cats. Nor are poinsettias a healthy snack choice for cats or dogs. Either move these seasonal plants to where your pets can’t get at them or make the most of artificial silk or plastic plants. Think twice about using real candles, which are fire hazards that are easily knocked over by curious pets. Plus, your pet can get singed brushing up against the flame. The best candles may be the kind you plug in or that use batteries. Keep in mind that small pieces can make big problems, so make sure chocolate coins and dreidels are stored safely when not in use.

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A constant flow of grandparents, aunts, uncles, and cousins can be upsetting to pets (even more so than it is to you). If that’s the forecast, seclude your dog or cat in a quiet den, bedroom, or basement. Plug in a pheromone diffuser several days before the event to reduce stress and allow your pet to relax. Put on classical music or easy-listening tunes to minimize the sounds of laughing— or squabbling—in the other room. Offer brain-teasing food puzzles to keep your pet occupied while family members eat, drink, and be merry. Caution: If you live in a multipet household, the use of food puzzles may lead to competition and negative interactions between pets. If so, keep the pets in separate sanctuary rooms.

CHRISTMAS

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SOLITUDE FOR SAFETY’S SAKE

The holidays provide a cornucopia of memories for your family. Make all of them happy ones by considering your furry friends when you plan your celebrations.

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Food rules this holiday. Chances are your pet will try to make a pit stop at the kitchen counter or dining room table where family favorites are being made or displayed. Unfortunately, any food that isn’t a regular part of a pet’s diet—especially foods high in fat like ham, gravy, and dark turkey meat—can cause issues ranging from diarrhea to pancreatitis. Plus, chewing and swallowing bones may cause a life-threatening obstruction that requires emergency surgery. Alcohol is dangerous too. Your pet can get alcohol poisoning—even if he doesn’t drink the spiked punch—just by eating unbaked yeast dough. Yeast works by releasing ethanol and carbon dioxide to make dough rise. This same action can cause severe bloating from the release of gas and possible poisoning from a pet’s inability to process the ethanol. While a pet licking a greasy plate may be fine, feeding him multiple bites of turkey, green bean casserole, and pumpkin pie is not. Ask your guests ahead of time not to feed your pets. Program your cell phone with your vet hospital, on-call emergency vet if you have one, and the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (888/4264435). That way, if something does go wrong, you have a team of medical pros at the ready.

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NO GOBBLING ALLOWED

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ith all the focus on food, fun, and football, the fur kids may get forgotten. Try to make sure their Thanksgiving is as enjoyable as yours.

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THANKSGIVING

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WORLD

11.10.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A21

#1 Gravois, Gravois FFenton, MO • 636-343-9447 www.dennydennis.com WEEK LONG CELEBRATION Veterans and first responders only.

10%

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Demobilized child soldiers line up to receive school materials and other supplies during a child soldier release program Feb. 12 in Yambio, South Sudan.

South Sudan’s former child soldiers struggle to move on BY SAM MEDNICK

Associated Press

YAMBIO, South Sudan — When he escaped the armed group that had abducted him at the age of 15, the child soldier swore he’d never go back. But the South Sudanese teen still thinks about returning to the bush, six months after the United Nations secured his release. “Being asked to kill someone is the hardest thing,” he told The Associated Press, speaking on condition of anonymity for his safety. And yet the army offered him a kind of stability he has yet to find outside it. “I had everything, bedding and clothes, I’d just steal what I needed ... here, I haven’t received what I was expecting,” he said. He lives with family, adrift, waiting to attend a U.N.-sponsored job skills program, struggling to forget his past. There are an estimated 19,000 child soldiers in South Sudan, one of the highest rates in the world, according to the U.N. As the country emerges from a five-year civil war that killed almost 400,000 people and displaced millions, some worry the fighting could re-ignite if former child soldiers aren’t properly reintegrated into society. “Without more support, the consequence is that the children will move towards the barracks where there’s social connection, food and something to do,” said William Deng Deng, chairman for South Sudan’s national disarmament demobilization and reintegration commission. “They loot and raid and it will begin to create insecurity.” Since the fighting broke out in 2013, the U.N. children’s agency has facilitated the release of more than 3,200 child soldiers from both government and opposition forces. Yet even after a peace deal was signed a year ago, the rate of forced child soldier recruitment by both sides in the conflict is increasing, the U.N. Commission on Human Rights in South Sudan said in a statement earlier this month. “Ironically, the prospect of a peace deal has accelerated the forced recruitment of children, with various groups now seeking to boost their numbers before they move into the cantonment sites,” said commission chairwoman Yasmin Sooka. According to the peace deal the government and opposition should have 41,500 troops trained and unified into one national army. Children who leave armed groups often struggle to adjust. The AP followed several child soldiers among 121 released in February. Many said they are still haunted by their pasts, unable to talk about their experiences for fear of being stigmatized and often incapable of controlling their anger.

“Whenever I think about the bush, even if I’m playing football, I feel like stopping and picking something up and hitting my friends,” said a 13-year-old. The AP is not using the names of the former child soldiers to protect their identities. Abducted by armed men when he was 11, he worked as a spy for an opposition group and at times was forced to witness and partake in horrific acts. He watched a soldier kill a child for refusing to do his chores, and he was forced to set a house on fire, burning alive everyone inside. “I hear those people screaming in my dreams,” he said. Once released, the former child soldiers are given a three-month reintegration package including food and the opportunity for educational and psychosocial support. However, the system is overburdened and underfunded. “It’s a lot of work. Sometimes I can only spend 15 to 20 minutes with each child,” said Joseph Ndepi, a social worker with World Vision who is supporting 46 children. Many families don’t know how to deal with their children’s change in behavior once they’ve returned. “When he initially got out he was so rough he’d beat the kids, and when our mom tried to intervene he’d turn on her,” one 16-year-old said of her elder brother. Both children were abducted and released from armed groups at the same time. While the girl wanted to forget the past, her brother tried to relive it. At night he’d sneak out of the house and perform mock ambushes to see how close he could get to robbing people’s properties without being caught, the 17-year-old said. Since starting therapy he has stopped the late-night excursions and reined in his temper. Some of the children’s behavior is related to the power they felt in the army, said Kutiote Justin, a social worker with Catholic Medical Mission Board, an international aid group. One former child soldier he works with insists on calling himself “the commander.” A lack of resources for reintegration could hurt long-term assistance. About 420 children have participated in vocational courses to learn professions such as welding, carpentry and tailoring, yet it’s unclear if there will be enough funding to continue past December. Almost $5 million is needed for the next two years but currently only $500,000 is available, according to UNICEF. “Donors aren’t funding to the same extent they used to and now there’s potentially an even greater need,” said spokesman Yves Willemot. And more child soldiers are expected to be released in the near future, he said.


NATION

11.10.2019 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A21

#1 Gravois, Gravois FFenton, MO • 636-343-9447 www.dennydennis.com WEEK LONG CELEBRATION Veterans and first responders only.

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LUIS SINCO, TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

TH

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Shopekeepers Sodhi Singh, left, and Navneet Singh prepare to close their gas station and convenience store after the lights went out Oct. 26 in Healdsburg, Calif., ahead of expected high winds in the area of the Kincade fire.

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A pair of firefighters mop up hot spots Oct. 25 at two homes along Red Wine Road in Geyserville, Calif., that burned in the Kincade fire.

Wildfires show dangers of cellphone outages BY LEILA MILLER AND RONG-GONG LIN II

Tribune News Service

LOS ANGELES — When Ted Atz, a 75-year-old retiree in Marin County, learned that his power would go out during the Kincade fire, he texted his loved ones that he might lose cell service. He was right. For four long days, Atz couldn’t make or receive calls. He’d drive around his hometown of San Anselmo, hoping to find better reception. He had no luck and was frustrated by the knowledge that if he suffered some kind of medical or other emergency, he couldn’t reach 911. “I would have liked to let family know that I was OK,” Atz said. Atz wasn’t alone. California saw significant interruptions of cellphone service due to the planned power shut-offs at precisely the time customers needed to be alerted about evacuation warnings — raising questions about how prepared California is for future electric shut-offs and other public safety emergencies, such as a major earthquake. At one point, Marin County saw 57% of its 280 cellphone tower sites out of service. Other counties also saw major disruptions: Sonoma, Lake, Santa Cruz, Humboldt and Calaveras all encountered days in which more than 20% of cellphone towers were out; Napa County saw a day when 19% of cell towers were not working, according to data released by the Federal Communications Commission. In the central Bay Area, San Mateo and Contra Costa counties saw more than 11% of cell towers fail to work. The problems weren’t limited to cellphones. Some customers who get their landline phone service through their broadband internet service provider saw their phone lines go out, despite having their phones charged and equipped with battery backups. Even traditional copperbased landline phones had problems in at least some areas. A resident of Lake County said his AT&T copper-based landline phone signal cut out following the first 24 hours after the lights went out; he said he was told by AT&T that there’s limited backup power for that system. He lost phone service for a combined five days over the course of three power outages. Local government officials and consumer safety advocates were incensed at the widespread phone service failures, which came despite days of warnings that the power would be shut off to help prevent ignition of wildfires by power lines and other electrical equipment damaged from severe Diablo winds. Sonoma County Supervisor Lynda Hopkins, whose district includes areas under evacuation during the Kincade fire, said that the cellphone network outages posed significant safety concerns. Fire stations were forced to communicate by radio,

creating excess traffic at a time when officials had to rapidly deliver information about an active fire. And while evacuation warnings were delivered before the planned power shut-offs, Hopkins said residents in rural communities without cellphone or internet service would have had no way to receive additional warnings. “Had there been a second fire, had the fire suddenly been reinvigorated and moved quickly toward some of these communities, we would not have been able to effectively communicate with the residents,” she said. Federal regulators said they do not release data on how many cell signal sites went down by company. Phone carriers said they did the best they could. Heidi Flato, a spokeswoman for Verizon, said in an email that the company has generators and backup batteries at most of its cell towers and at all of its switch locations. “While we are doing everything we can to minimize the impact of the (power shut-off), there are discrete areas of our network that will experience service disruption or degradation, due to topographical and other technological constraints,” she said. AT&T spokesman Ryan Oliver said that before the Kincade fire, the company deployed hundreds of additional generators and technicians from across the country, and had crews working 24 hours a day to refuel and deploy generators as needed. A statement provided by T-Mobile spokesman Joel Rushing said the company deployed and refueled generators to more than 260 sites. Permanent generators are in place at key cell sites, while others are prepared with a battery backup; the company also has a fleet of temporary generators that can be deployed as needed. Comcast’s Xfinity services require commercial power to operate, spokeswoman Joan Hammel said in a statement. “Generators may be deployed in a limited manner to address Comcast outages in vital public safety facilities,” the statement said. Consumer advocates, however, say the carriers failed to keep phone signals alive at precisely the moment they were needed most — when customers needed to communicate with loved ones and receive evacuation warnings. There are no federal or state regulations that mandate cell carriers have backup power for cell service, said Ana Maria Johnson, program manager with the Public Advocates Office, an independent organization of the California Public Utilities Commission that advocates on behalf of consumers. “What this tells us is that the communications network is vulnerable. It’s not resilient. The companies were not prepared. And requirements must be put in place to require backup power,” Johnson said.


A22 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 11.10.2019

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ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A23

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NEWS

A24 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 11.10.2019

Switch to the local Medicare plan that gives you more. LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

In this 1915-1923 photo made available by the Library of Congress, a doctor examines a child with a stethoscope, accompanied by a nurse, in the United States.

Is the stethoscope dying? High-tech rivals pose a threat BY LINDSEY TANNER

Associated Press

CHICAGO — Two centuries after its invention, the stethoscope — the very symbol of the medical profession — is facing an uncertain prognosis. It is threatened by handheld devices that are also pressed against the chest but rely on ultrasound technology, artificial intelligence and smartphone apps instead of doctors’ ears to help detect leaks, murmurs, abnormal rhythms and other problems in the heart, lungs and elsewhere. Some of these instruments can yield images of the beating heart or create electrocardiogram graphs. Dr. Eric Topol, a worldrenowned cardiologist, considers the stethoscope obsolete, nothing more than a pair of “rubber tubes.” It “was OK for 200 years,” Topol said. But “we need to go beyond that. We can do better.” In a longstanding tradition, nearly every U.S. medical school presents incoming students with a white coat and stethoscope to launch their careers. It’s more than symbolic — stethoscope skills are still taught, and proficiency is required for doctors to get their licenses. Over the last decade, though, the tech industry has downsized ultrasound scanners into devices resembling TV remotes. It has also created digital stethoscopes that can be paired with smartphones to create moving pictures and readouts. Proponents say these devices are nearly as easy to use as stethoscopes and allow doctors to watch the body in motion and actually see things such as leaky valves. “There’s no reason you would listen to sounds when you can see everything,” Topol said. At many medical schools, it’s the newer devices that really get students’ hearts pumping. “Wow!” “Whoa!” “This is awesome,” Indiana University medical students exclaimed in a recent class as they learned how to use a hand-held ultrasound device on a classmate, watching images of his lubdubbing heart on a tablet screen. The Butterfly iQ device, made by Guilford, Connecticut-based Butterfly Network Inc., went on the market last year. An update will include artificial intelligence to help users position the probe and interpret the images. Students at the Indianapolis-based medical school, one of the nation’s largest, learn stethoscope skills but also get training in hand-held ultrasound in a program launched there last year by Dr. Paul Wallach, an executive associate dean. He created a similar program five years ago at the Medical College of Georgia and predicts that within the next decade, handheld ultrasound devices will become part of the routine physical exam, just like the reflex hammer. The devices advance “our ability to take peek under the skin into the body,” he said. But Wallach added that, unlike some of his colleagues, he isn’t ready to declare the stethoscope dead. He envisions the next generation of physicians wearing “a stethoscope around the neck and an ultrasound in the pocket.”

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James Thomas, a cardiologist at Northwestern Hospital in Chicago, examines Dennis Calling, a retired Chicago inspector, earlier this year. With medical advances and competing devices over the past few decades, “the old stethoscope is kind of falling on hard times in terms of rigorous training,” Thomas said. Modern-day stethoscopes bear little resemblance to the first stethoscope, invented in the early 1800s by Frenchman Rene Laennec, but they work essentially the same way. Laennec’s creation was a hollow tube of wood, almost a foot long, that made it easier to hear heart and lung sounds than pressing an ear against the chest. Rubber tubes, earpieces and the often cold metal attachment that is placed against the chest came later, helping to amplify the sounds. When the stethoscope is pressed against the body, sound waves make the diaphragm — the flat metal disc part of the device — and the bell-shaped underside vibrate. That channels the sound waves up through the tubes to the ears. Conventional stethoscopes typically cost under $200, compared with at least a few thousand dollars for some of the high-tech devices. But picking up and interpreting body sounds is subjective and requires a sensitive ear — and a trained one. With medical advances and competing devices over the past few decades, “the old stethoscope is kind of falling on hard times in terms of rigorous training,” said Dr. James Thomas, a cardiologist at Northwestern Medicine in Chicago. “Some recent studies have shown that graduates in internal medicine and emergency medicine may miss as many of half of murmurs using a stethoscope.” Northwestern is involved in testing new technology created by Eko, a Berkeley, California-based maker of smart stethoscopes. To improve detection of heart murmurs, Eko is developing artificial intelligence algorithms for its devices, using recordings of thousands of heartbeats. The devices produce a screen message telling the doctor whether the heart sounds are normal or if murmurs are present. Dennis Callinan, a retired Chicago city employee with heart disease, is among the study participants. At age 70, he has had plenty of stethoscope exams but said he feels no nostalgia for the devices. “If they can get a better reading using the new technology, great,” Callinan said. Chicago pediatrician Dr. Dave Drelicharz has been in practice for just over a decade and knows the allure of newer devices. But until the price comes down, the old stalwart “is still your best tool,” Drelicharz said. Once you learn to use the stethoscope, he said, it “becomes second nature.” “During my work hours in my office, if I don’t have it around my shoulders,” he said, “it’s as though I was feeling almost naked.”

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A26 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 11.10.2019

OBITUARIES

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Celebrations of Life

Banjanin, Stanko - St. Louis

Green, Byron L. - Macclenny, FL

Mugan, Gwendolyn L. - Maryland Heights, MO

Barry, Mary Ann - St. Louis

Green, Charles E. "Charlie" - St. Louis

Pardeck, Dawn Marie - St. Louis

Boswell, Deborah S. - St. Louis

Grieshaber, David Paul - St. Louis

Broderick, Letichia "Tish" - St. Charles

Irvine, Robert Walter - St. Charles, MO

Brown, Carolyn A. - Sparta, IL

Kasal, Mary H. - St. Louis

Buck, Martha Mary "Mardi" - St. Louis

Kittle, Louis E. - Manchester, MO

Cantwell, Robert Murray - St. Louis

Kneeland, Betty R. - Winfield

Schopp, A.J. - St. Louis

Coleman, Henry ''Hank'' David - St. Louis

Koeller, John E. ''Jack'' - St. Charles

Shymanski, Susan - St. Louis

Corona, Francis B. "Frank" - St. Louis

Koman, William J. "Bill" - Ladue

Sisak, Michael John - Columbia, MO formerly of Troy

Cseri, Elizabeth - Iowa City, IA

Kopff, Mary Catherine - Arnold, MO

Curran, MaryLee A. - St. Louis

Ley, Robert E. - St. Louis

Dempster, Catherine "Nan" - St. Louis

Long, Karen Lorraine - St. Louis

Diamond, Linda S. - St. Louis

Long, Michael James - St. Louis

Eakle, Beverly Ann - Maryland Heights

Marmigas, Dena - Kirkwood, MO

Vitoux - See Brown

Forest, Carol - St. Louis

Mayne, Martha Louise - Richmond Heights

Wilke - see Long

Buck, Martha Mary "Mardi"

Thursday, November 7, 2019. Beloved daughter of the late Lorraine (nee Heller) and Fred F. Buck; dear sister of Mary (Paul) Huelsing, Fred (Terri) Buck, Joseph (Carol) Buck, Thomas (Julie) Buck, and Paul Buck; beloved aunt of David (Maggie) Huelsing, Sheila Hicks, Derek (Stephanie) Buck, Erin Murphy, Matt, Alex and Will Buck; dear great- aunt of Logan, Ryan and Carson Hicks, Emily and Natalie Huelsing, Cole Bornhop and Payton, Carmen, Libby and Lucy Buck; beloved friend of Bill Kahle; dear niece, cousin and friend. Services: Memorial Mass will be held at Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church Saturday, November 16 at 10 a.m. Donations preferred to the Humane Society of Missouri. KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY SERVICE.

Cantwell, Robert Murray Jr.

88, peacefully, on Wendesday, October 30, 2019. Son of the late Murray and Zita Cantwell; brother of the late Zita Cantwell and the late Bill (surviving Dorothy) Cantwell, John (Sally) Cantwell; uncle of Edward (Lisa) Cantwell, Carolyn Cantwell, and Robert (Emily) Banjanin, Stanko A celebration of Stanko’s life will be at the Whittemore House, Cantwell, Betsy (Bryan) Simmons, Sarah (Pat) McDermott, Anna 6440 Forsyth Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63105 on Sunday, November 17, (Tom) Ourth; dear great-uncle and friend. Services: A vistation at 9 a.m. followed by a Funeral Mass will be 2019 at 11:00 a.m. A SERVICE OF LUPTON CHAPEL celebrated Saturday, November 16, 10 a.m. at Immaculate Conception in Maplewood. Interment Calvary Cemetery Barry, Mary Ann In lieu of flowers, donations to the St Patrick's Center. (nee Hogan) fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Online condolences at ambrusterchapel.com. Tues., Nov. 5, 2019. Beloved wife of Michael Gregory Barry, dear Coleman, Henry ''Hank'' David mother of Michael (Cathy), Bridget Fortified with Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, at age (Rich) Kirkendall, Mark (Tammy), 94, on Tuesday, November 5, 2019. Loving husband of the Matthew (Megan), Maggie (Kelly) late Marion Lucille (nee Gray) Coleman; dear father of Keady, Ann (Joe) Hennessey, Nora Joanne (Andy) Klein, John (Brenda) Coleman, Susan (Steve) Kurtz, (Kevin) Petersen, Molly (Joe) Joseph Coleman, Kenneth (Patricia) Coleman, Patricia (Michael) Wagner, and Patrick (Allison) Reeder, Robert (Linda) Coleman, Daniel (Aurora) Coleman, Karen Barry, dear daughter of the late (Jefrey) Smith, Michael (Kimberley) Coleman, and William James O. and Lorine E. (nee Coleman; loving grandfather of 25; dear great-grandfather of 34; Staehlin) Hogan, dear grandmother dear family member and friend to many. In lieu of flowers, of Michael, Mary Grace, Daniel, Ann memorial donations may be made to American Cancer Society, Marie, Grace, Clare, Finn and James Barry, Lucy and Kit Kirkendall, Marine Corps Toys for Tots, or Disabled American Veterans. Molly, Conor and Rory Keady, Catherine, Maggie, Sean and Patsy Services: Visit Tues. 11/12 from 3-9 p.m. at John L. Ziegenhein & Hennessey, Abby, Will, Callum, Kevin, and Mia Petersen, Henry, Sons Funeral Home (7027 Gravois). Mass Wed. 11/13 at Leo, Billy, Tommy, Audrey, Josie and Peter Wagner, dear sister of 10:30 a.m. at St. Clare of Assisi (Ellisville, MO). Interment the late Sister James Lorene Hogan, C.S.J., Rosemary (William) Jefferson Barracks Nat’l Cemetery. Childress, Monsignor Daniel Hogan, and Kathleen (Jack) Geary, dear daughter-in-law of the late Michael David and Helen Margaret Barry, dear aunt, great-aunt, and cousin. Corona, Francis B. "Frank" Services: Visitation and funeral Mass will be held Tues., Nov. 12 at Died peacefully in his sleep on Sunday, November 3, 2019. Beloved Christ the King Catholic Church, 7316 Balson Ave., University City. husband of Stephany (nee Theodore); son of the late Lawrence Visitation at 9:30 a.m. with the Mass to follow at 11 a.m. Interment and Sophia Corona; brother of Bernadette Sieli, Anthony Corona, Calvary Cemetery. and the late Lawrence Corona; brother-in-law of George Theodore; KRIEGSHAUSER BROTHERS uncle, cousin and friend to many. Mr. Corona was a Police Officer with the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department for 31 years, retiring as Sergeant. He then became an investigator for the Board of Healing Arts for the State Boswell, Deborah S. (nee Heier), passed away on Nov. 8, 2019. Beloved wife of Clifford of Missouri for 20 years. "Bud" Boswell; step-mother of Sharon (Gabby) Cano, Services: At the family's request, Mr. Corona's funeral was step-grandmother of Adam Cano; sister of Rhonda (Larry) Schubel; private. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions are greatly appreciated to The Backstoppers, 104 Clayton Rd., Ste 203, St. sister-in-law of Tony, Kathy and Susan. Services: Funeral from Kutis South County Chapel, 5255 Lemay Louis, MO 63131. The family was served by the Ortmann Stipanovich Funeral Home. Ferry, on Wed., Nov. 13, 11 a.m. Interment J.B. National Ortmann Stipanovich Funeral Home osfuneralhomes.com Cemetery. Memorials to The Diabetes or Kidney Foundations appreciated. Visitation Tuesday, 4-8 p.m.

Broderick, Letichia "Tish"

Cseri,

Thurs., Nov. 7, 2019 at the age of 58. Visit. Friday, 5-8pm w/ service 10 am Saturday, all at Hutchens-Stygar (St. Charles). Interment Our Lady Cemetery. www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com

Brown, Carolyn A.

(nee Vitoux) Friday, October 25, 2019. Born to Ron and Imogene “Imy” Vitoux; beloved wife of Mark V. Brown; dear sister to Suzy (Bill) Schulenburg, Kurt (Dina) Vitoux, and Brett (Sharon) Vitoux; birth mother to Aaron; dear aunt to many. Carolyn lived in Illinois for the last 31 years with husband, Mark. She loved her collections, her pets, nature and, most of all, family. She fought a brave 2-year battle with cancer. Services: Memorial visitation Sat., Nov. 16th, 10 a.m. followed by service, 11 a.m., at St. Philip’s United Church of Christ, 10708 Lavinia, Affton, Mo. Memorial donations may be made to the American Cancer Society, StandUpToCancer.org, Stray Rescue, and the Humane Society of Missouri. Arrangements by Bopp Chapel. “The best and most beautiful things in the world cannot be seen, nor touched, but are felt in the heart.” HELEN KELLER

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Rambo, Lawrence - Ballwin Safron, George - St. Louis Schmidt, Richard O. - St. Louis

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Eakle, Beverly Ann

79, of Maryland Heights, Missouri, passed away peacefully but unexpectedly on Sunday, November 3, 2019 surrounded by her loving family. Beverly was born on September 1, 1940, in Buffalo, NY. She was the oldest daughter of Albert E. and Katherine J. Gehrs Hodgson. She graduated from St John's School of Nursing School in Tulsa, OK and worked as an RN for many years. Beverly married Charles Eugene "Gene" Eakle in 1962. On November 16 they would have celebrated 57 years of marriage. She is survived by her husband Gene Eakle, two sons David (Shannon Sheehan), Bloomington, IL and Darin (Amy Ohlendorf), Des Peres, MO. Her beloved grandchildren, Mary, Christopher, Brian, Janie, Andrew, Lindsey, Shelby, and Kara Eakle as well as Nichole (Matt) Rave, Connor, Kennedy, and Meghan Sheehan. Sister, Suzanne Walker. She was preceded in death by her parents and brother-in-law Jimmy Walker. Beverly kept her mind sharp by reading endless books and working crossword puzzles. She loved watching her boys and grandchildren play sports or perform in school performances as they were growing up . She went to every event and was known as their "Biggest Fan". Beverly remembered EVERY birthday, anniversary, and holiday. She always called and gave or sent the perfect card with a generous gift. Her purse had an endless supply of Juicy Fruit gum, "treat money", and $1 bills for when the kids scored a goal! The grandchildren were often told "just don't tell Grandad" when "Gramma" was handing out money. She always made each grandchild feel special and was so very proud of her sons, David and Darin. Services: Memorial Service will be held Friday, November 15, 2019, 5:30 p.m. at St. Gerard Majella Catholic Church, 1971 Dougherty Ferry Road, Kirkwood, MO 63122. A Celebration of Life /Visitation immediately following in Ligouri Hall at St. Gerard. The family will have a private Graveside service. In lieu of flowers, Memorial Contributions may be given to the St. Louis County Parks Foundation, PO Box 31158, Des Peres, MO 63131 www.stlcountyparksfoundation.org in memory of Beverly Eakle who loved to watch her children and grandchildren play.

Forest, Carol

(nee Fick), 80, passed on Nov 3, 2019 Services: Newcomer Funeral Home in St Peters, Visitation: Nov 11th 5-7pm Service: Nov 11th at 7pm www.newcomerstlouis.com

Green, Byron L.

Mr. Byron L. "Les" Green, 78, of Macclenny, FL passed away on Monday, October 28, 2019, at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, FL after a brief illness. He was born on June 23, 1941, in Detroit, MI to Byron L. and Jessie Roberta (Link) Green. Mr. Green was a retired public relations manager with Southwestern Bell and moved to Macclenny with his wife in 2013. He enjoyed being a HAM Radio Operator for over 60 years (K0LG), bicycling, and spending time with his beloved

family. Les was preceded in death by his parents; wife, Pat (Arnold) Green in 1989; and wife, Mary C. Green in 2018. He is survived by his daughter, Mary Helen Kirsch (Michael) of Waldwick, NJ; stepdaughters, Linda Marie Funk of Macclenny, FL and Debra Elizabeth Copeland (Mark) of Dallas, TX; grandchildren, James Cody Green, Elizabeth Cseri of Iowa City passed Ryan Copeland, Josh Copeland, Corey Paine, and Callie Paine; his away peacefully on November 2, beloved dog, Buddy; along with other family members and friends. 2019 in Osceola, Iowa. Born on April 10, 1940 in Hungary, Services: A Celebration of Life will be announced at a later date. Elizabeth is survived by her daughter, Tundi Brady (Nate) of Iowa City, Iowa, and son Zoltan Cseri Jr. of St Louis, Missouri, 7 Green, Charles E. "Charlie" grandchildren, and brothers Bela 11/3/2019. Loving husband, father, papa, great-grandpapa Bekker of Hungary and Zoltan & uncle. Memorial Mass Sat., 11/23, 10am, St. Gabriel's. Bekker of Colorado. www.hoffmeistercolonial.com or call 314-832-7770 Lensing Funeral Service, Iowa City, IA. www.lensingfuneral.com

Grieshaber, David Paul

Curran, MaryLee A.

(nee Venneman) Wednesday, October 30, 2019. Beloved wife of Norman Curran for 50 years; beloved mother of Mark (Kerry) and Steve (Jennifer) Curran; dearest MawMaw of Andy, Maggie, David and Paul; dear sister, sister-in-law, aunt, cousin and friend to many. Services: Memorial Mass at Queen of All Saints Church, 6603 Christopher Dr., (63129), on Saturday, November 16, 10 a.m. Concludes at church. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions to St. Luke's United Methodist Church, 2761 Telegraph Rd., (63125) appreciated.

Grieshaber, David Paul (June 8, 1961) died at home on Nov. 5, 2019. David was the beloved son of Dr. Aloysius V. Grieshaber and the late Virginia Heher Grieshaber. Dear brother of Mark (Sue), Mary Rupp (Brent), Matthew & Kathryn Sienna. Loving uncle of Ely Kale, Rebecca & Sarah. Services: A memorial Mass will be held at St. Justin The Martyr in Sunset Hills on Sat., Dec. 14, at 10 a.m. with visitation at 9:30. Thank you to Vitas Hospice for their compassionate care. Donations in David's name are appreciated & can be made to The Humane Society of Missouri.

Irvine, Robert Walter

72, of St. Charles, MO. November 02, 2019.Alternative Funeral & Cremation Services. 636-498-5300. Alternativefuneralcremation.com

Kasal, Mary H.

10/29/19. Memorial vis Kutis Affton Chapel, 10151 Gravois Thurs., 11/14, 6-8 p.m. Memorial Mass Fri., 11/15, 10 a.m., Dempster, Catherine "Nan" (nee Madigan) fortified with the St. Justin Martyr Catholic Church. Interment J.B. National. Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Sunday, November 3, 2019. Kittle, Louis E. Loving daughter of the late John 80, of St. Clair, passed away Nov. 6th, 2019. Services: Midlawn and Catherine Madigan; beloved Funeral Home in Union, Memorial Visitation, Wednesday, Nov. wife of David Dempster for 59 13th from 5-7 p.m. with memorial at 7p.m. years; loving mother of Mary (Pat) McHugh, David Dempster Jr., Kneeland, Betty R. Michael (Connie) Dempster, Tho- Tues. Oct. 29, 2019, 87. Celebration of Betty's life on Sat. mas Dempster, Daniel (Nichole) Nov. 16, 2 p.m. at First Baptist Church of Winfield, 3700 E. Dempster; cherished grandmother Highway 47, Winfield, MO 63381. A Buchholz Service. of Patrick, Joey, Mike and Jimmy McHugh; Michael, Jack, Nick and Koeller, John E. ''Jack'' Carly Dempster; Drew Dempster 78 yrs., Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother and Quinn Plunkett; dear sister of John (Vicki) Madigan and Jim Church, Wed., November 6, 2019. (Peggy) Madigan; dear cousin to 40, aunt and friend to many. Beloved husband of Barbara (nee Morhmann); dear Services: Visitation 4-8:00 p.m. on Sun., Nov. 10, at Bopp Chapel, 10610 Manchester Rd., in Kirkwood, MO. Funeral Mass 10 a.m. on father of Laura Ravenscraft, Lisa (Tom) Lard, John J. Koeller and Mon., Nov. 11, at St. Gerard Majella Catholic Church, 1969 the late Christopher Koeller; dear grandfather of Christopher, Dougherty Ferry Rd., Kirkwood, MO 63122. Interment Resurrection Andrew, Madison and Claire Ravenscraft, Alison and Audrey Lard Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to BJC and loving great-grandfather. Dear brother of Joseph and Gary Hospice, PO Box 790369, St. Louis, Mo 63179 and Marygrove, 2705 (Sherry) Koeller; dear brother-in-law, uncle, cousin and friend. Jack was a McBride H.S. graduate, served in the U.S. Army, was a Mullanphy Rd., Florissant, MO 63031. www.boppchapel.com St. Louis City Police Officer, and worked at Boeing for 36 years as a Security Guard. Jack was a friend to many and never met a Diamond, Linda S. stranger. (nee Spinner), on Thursday, November 7, 2019. Visitation at Kutis Services: Memorial Visitation 9-10 a.m. Sat., Nov. 23 with Affton Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Tuesday, November 12, 9 a.m. until Memorial Mass to follow at 10 a.m. at St. Cletus Church, St. service at 11 a.m. Interment Sunset Cemetery. Charles. Memorials to Backstoppers. Hutchens Funeral Homes.

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A26 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 11.10.2019

OBITUARIES Banjanin, Stanko - St. Louis

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Celebrations of Life

Green, Byron L. - Macclenny, FL

Mugan, Gwendolyn L. - Maryland Heights, MO

Barry, Mary Ann - St. Louis

Green, Charles E. "Charlie" - St. Louis

Murphy, Patrick Joseph Sr. - St. Louis

Boswell, Deborah S. - St. Louis

Grieshaber, David Paul - St. Louis

Pardeck, Dawn Marie - St. Louis

Broderick, Letichia "Tish" - St. Charles

Gurley, Marilyn - Arnold

Rambo, Lawrence - Ballwin

Brown, Carolyn A. - Sparta, IL

Heinemann, Jane F. - Fenton

Safron, George - St. Louis

Buck, Martha Mary "Mardi" - St. Louis

Irvine, Robert Walter - St. Charles, MO

Schierholz, William F. - Sarasota, FL

Cantwell, Robert Murray - St. Louis

Kasal, Mary H. - St. Louis

Schlarman, Anna - Arnold

Coleman, Henry ''Hank'' David - St. Louis

Kittle, Louis E. - Manchester, MO

Schmidt, Richard O. - St. Louis

Colombo, Evelyn R. - St. Louis

Kneeland, Betty R. - Winfield

Schopp, A.J. - St. Louis

Corona, Francis B. "Frank" - St. Louis

Koeller, John E. ''Jack'' - St. Charles

Shymanski, Susan - St. Louis

Cseri, Elizabeth - Iowa City, IA Curran, MaryLee A. - St. Louis Dempster, Catherine "Nan" - St. Louis Diamond, Linda S. - St. Louis Eakle, Beverly Ann - Maryland Heights Forest, Carol - St. Louis Garegnani, Jennie - St. Louis

Koman, William J. "Bill" - Ladue Kopff, Mary Catherine - Arnold, MO Ley, Robert E. - St. Louis

Stark, Bonnie Ruth - St. Pete Beach, FL

Long, Michael James - St. Louis

Stoecker, Ann - Town and Country, MO

Marmigas, Dena - Kirkwood, MO Mayne, Martha Louise - Richmond Heights Mogerman, Dr. Donald M. D.O.F.A.C.O.S. - Lincoln County, MO

Goessling, Thomas James - St. Louis

Morgan - See Garegnani Fortified with Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, at age 94, on Tuesday, November 5, 2019. Loving husband of the late Marion Lucille (nee Gray) Coleman; dear father of Joanne (Andy) Klein, John (Brenda) Coleman, Susan (Steve) Kurtz, Joseph Coleman, Kenneth (Patricia) Coleman, Patricia (Michael) Reeder, Robert (Linda) Coleman, Daniel (Aurora) Coleman, Karen (Jefrey) Smith, Michael (Kimberley) Coleman, and William Coleman; loving grandfather of 25; dear great-grandfather of 34; dear family member and friend to many. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to American Cancer Society, Marine Corps Toys for Tots, or Disabled American Veterans. Services: Visit Tues. 11/12 from 3-9 p.m. at John L. Ziegenhein & Sons Funeral Home (7027 Gravois). Mass Wed. 11/13 at 10:30 a.m. at St. Clare of Assisi (Ellisville, MO). Interment Jefferson Barracks Nat’l Cemetery.

Colombo, Evelyn R.

Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church Saturday, November 9, 2019. Banjanin, Stanko Beloved wife of the late Jasper Colombo; loving mother of A celebration of Stanko’s life will be at the Whittemore House, Susan (the late Dan) Gross, Stephen (Cindy) and Paul Colombo; 6440 Forsyth Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63105 on Sunday, November 17, dearest grandmother of Martin, Caroline, Sarah, Matthew, 2019 at 11:00 a.m. A SERVICE OF LUPTON CHAPEL Elizabeth, and Katherine; dear aunt, great-aunt, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral Mass at Assumption Catholic Church, 4725 Mattis Rd., Tuesday, November 12, 10:00 a.m. Interment Barry, Mary Ann Resurrection Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions (nee Hogan) fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, may be made to American Cancer Society. A KUTIS AFFTON Tues., Nov. 5, 2019. Beloved wife of SERVICE. Michael Gregory Barry, dear mother of Michael (Cathy), Bridget Corona, Francis B. "Frank" (Rich) Kirkendall, Mark (Tammy), Died peacefully in his sleep on Sunday, November 3, 2019. Beloved Matthew (Megan), Maggie (Kelly) husband of Stephany (nee Theodore); son of the late Lawrence Keady, Ann (Joe) Hennessey, Nora and Sophia Corona; brother of Bernadette Sieli, Anthony Corona, (Kevin) Petersen, Molly (Joe) and the late Lawrence Corona; brother-in-law of George Theodore; Wagner, and Patrick (Allison) uncle, cousin and friend to many. Barry, dear daughter of the late Mr. Corona was a Police Officer with the St. Louis Metropolitan James O. and Lorine E. (nee Police Department for 31 years, retiring as Sergeant. He then Staehlin) Hogan, dear grandmother became an investigator for the Board of Healing Arts for the State of Michael, Mary Grace, Daniel, Ann of Missouri for 20 years. Marie, Grace, Clare, Finn and James Barry, Lucy and Kit Kirkendall, Services: At the family's request, Mr. Corona's funeral was Molly, Conor and Rory Keady, Catherine, Maggie, Sean and Patsy private. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions are greatly Hennessey, Abby, Will, Callum, Kevin, and Mia Petersen, Henry, appreciated to The Backstoppers, 104 Clayton Rd., Ste 203, St. Leo, Billy, Tommy, Audrey, Josie and Peter Wagner, dear sister of Louis, MO 63131. The family was served by the Ortmann the late Sister James Lorene Hogan, C.S.J., Rosemary (William) Stipanovich Funeral Home. Childress, Monsignor Daniel Hogan, and Kathleen (Jack) Geary, Ortmann Stipanovich Funeral Home osfuneralhomes.com dear daughter-in-law of the late Michael David and Helen Margaret Barry, dear aunt, great-aunt, and cousin. Cseri, Elizabeth Services: Visitation and funeral Mass will be held Tues., Nov. 12 at Elizabeth Cseri of Iowa City passed Christ the King Catholic Church, 7316 Balson Ave., University City. away peacefully on November 2, Visitation at 9:30 a.m. with the Mass to follow at 11 a.m. Interment 2019 in Osceola, Iowa. Born on Calvary Cemetery. April 10, 1940 in Hungary, KRIEGSHAUSER BROTHERS Elizabeth is survived by her daughter, Tundi Brady (Nate) of Iowa City, Iowa, and son Zoltan Boswell, Deborah S. Cseri Jr. of St Louis, Missouri, 7 (nee Heier), passed away on Nov. 8, 2019. Beloved wife of Clifford grandchildren, and brothers Bela "Bud" Boswell; step-mother of Sharon (Gabby) Cano, Bekker of Hungary and Zoltan step-grandmother of Adam Cano; sister of Rhonda (Larry) Schubel; Bekker of Colorado. sister-in-law of Tony, Kathy and Susan. Lensing Funeral Service, Iowa City, Services: Funeral from Kutis South County Chapel, 5255 Lemay IA. www.lensingfuneral.com Ferry, on Wed., Nov. 13, 11 a.m. Interment J.B. National Cemetery. Memorials to The Diabetes or Kidney Foundations appreciated. Visitation Tuesday, 4-8 p.m. Curran, MaryLee A. (nee Venneman) Wednesday, Broderick, Letichia "Tish" October 30, 2019. Beloved wife of Thurs., Nov. 7, 2019 at the age of 58. Visit. Friday, 5-8pm w/ Norman Curran for 50 years; service 10 am Saturday, all at Hutchens-Stygar (St. Charles). beloved mother of Mark (Kerry) Interment Our Lady Cemetery. www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com and Steve (Jennifer) Curran; dearest MawMaw of Andy, Maggie, David and Paul; dear sister, Brown, Carolyn A. sister-in-law, aunt, cousin and (nee Vitoux) Friday, October 25, friend to many. 2019. Born to Ron and Imogene Services: Memorial Mass at Queen “Imy” Vitoux; beloved wife of Mark V. of All Saints Church, 6603 Brown; dear sister to Suzy (Bill) Christopher Dr., (63129), on Schulenburg, Kurt (Dina) Vitoux, Saturday, November 16, 10 a.m. and Brett (Sharon) Vitoux; birth Concludes at church. In lieu mother to Aaron; dear aunt to many. Carolyn lived in Illinois for of flowers, memorial contributions to St. Luke's United the last 31 years with husband, Methodist Church, 2761 Telegraph Rd., (63125) appreciated. Mark. She loved her collections, her pets, nature and, most of all, Dempster, Catherine "Nan" family. She fought a brave 2-year (nee Madigan) fortified with the battle with cancer. Sacraments of Holy Mother Church Services: Memorial visitation Sat., on Sunday, November 3, 2019. Nov. 16th, 10 a.m. followed by service, 11 a.m., at St. Philip’s United Loving daughter of the late John Church of Christ, 10708 Lavinia, Affton, Mo. Memorial donations and Catherine Madigan; beloved may be made to the American Cancer Society, wife of David Dempster for 59 StandUpToCancer.org, Stray Rescue, and the Humane Society of years; loving mother of Mary (Pat) Missouri. Arrangements by Bopp Chapel. McHugh, David Dempster Jr., Michael (Connie) Dempster, Thomas Dempster, Daniel (Nichole) Buck, Martha Mary "Mardi" Dempster; cherished grandmother Thursday, November 7, 2019. Beloved daughter of the late of Patrick, Joey, Mike and Jimmy Lorraine (nee Heller) and Fred F. Buck; dear sister of Mary (Paul) McHugh; Michael, Jack, Nick and Huelsing, Fred (Terri) Buck, Joseph (Carol) Buck, Thomas (Julie) Carly Dempster; Drew Dempster Buck, and Paul Buck; beloved aunt of David (Maggie) Huelsing, Sheila Hicks, Derek (Stephanie) Buck, Erin Murphy, Matt, Alex and and Quinn Plunkett; dear sister of John (Vicki) Madigan and Jim Will Buck; dear great- aunt of Logan, Ryan and Carson Hicks, Emily (Peggy) Madigan; dear cousin to 40, aunt and friend to many. Services: Visitation 4-8:00 p.m. on Sun., Nov. 10, at Bopp Chapel, and Natalie Huelsing, Cole Bornhop and Payton, Carmen, Libby and Lucy Buck; beloved friend of Bill Kahle; dear niece, cousin and 10610 Manchester Rd., in Kirkwood, MO. Funeral Mass 10 a.m. on Mon., Nov. 11, at St. Gerard Majella Catholic Church, 1969 friend. Dougherty Ferry Rd., Kirkwood, MO 63122. Interment Resurrection Services: Memorial Mass will be held at Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church Saturday, November 16 at 10 a.m. Donations Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to BJC Hospice, PO Box 790369, St. Louis, Mo 63179 and Marygrove, 2705 preferred to the Humane Society of Missouri. KUTIS SOUTH Mullanphy Rd., Florissant, MO 63031. www.boppchapel.com COUNTY SERVICE.

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Sutter, Rita A. - St. Louis Unger, Raymond A. - St. Louis Vitoux - See Brown Wilke - see Long

Coleman, Henry ''Hank'' David

Cantwell, Robert Murray Jr.

Sisk, Mary Ellen - St. Louis Stapf, Constance M. - St. Louis

Long, Karen Lorraine - St. Louis

Gelber, Gloria Gale - St. Louis

88, peacefully, on Wendesday, October 30, 2019. Son of the late Murray and Zita Cantwell; brother of the late Zita Cantwell and the late Bill (surviving Dorothy) Cantwell, John (Sally) Cantwell; uncle of Edward (Lisa) Cantwell, Carolyn Cantwell, and Robert (Emily) Cantwell, Betsy (Bryan) Simmons, Sarah (Pat) McDermott, Anna (Tom) Ourth; dear great-uncle and friend. Services: A vistation at 9 a.m. followed by a Funeral Mass will be celebrated Saturday, November 16, 10 a.m. at Immaculate Conception in Maplewood. Interment Calvary Cemetery In lieu of flowers, donations to the St Patrick's Center. Online condolences at ambrusterchapel.com.

Sisak, Michael John - Columbia, MO formerly of Troy

Eakle, Beverly Ann

79, of Maryland Heights, Missouri, passed away peacefully but unexpectedly on Sunday, November 3, 2019 surrounded by her loving family. Beverly was born on September 1, 1940, in Buffalo, NY. She was the oldest daughter of Albert E. and Katherine J. Gehrs Hodgson. She graduated from St John's School of Nursing School in Tulsa, OK and worked as an RN for many years. Beverly married Charles Eugene "Gene" Eakle in 1962. On November 16 they would have celebrated 57 years of marriage. She is survived by her husband Gene Eakle, two sons David (Shannon Sheehan), Bloomington, IL and Darin (Amy Ohlendorf), Des Peres, MO. Her beloved grandchildren, Mary, Christopher, Brian, Janie, Andrew, Lindsey, Shelby, and Kara Eakle as well as Nichole (Matt) Rave, Connor, Kennedy, and Meghan Sheehan. Sister, Suzanne Walker. She was preceded in death by her parents and brother-in-law Jimmy Walker. Beverly kept her mind sharp by reading endless books and working crossword puzzles. She loved watching her boys and grandchildren play sports or perform in school performances as they were growing up . She went to every event and was known as their "Biggest Fan". Beverly remembered EVERY birthday, anniversary, and holiday. She always called and gave or sent the perfect card with a generous gift. Her purse had an endless supply of Juicy Fruit gum, "treat money", and $1 bills for when the kids scored a goal! The grandchildren were often told "just don't tell Grandad" when "Gramma" was handing out money. She always made each grandchild feel special and was so very proud of her sons, David and Darin. Services: Memorial Service will be held Friday, November 15, 2019, 5:30 p.m. at St. Gerard Majella Catholic Church, 1971 Dougherty Ferry Road, Kirkwood, MO 63122. A Celebration of Life /Visitation immediately following in Ligouri Hall at St. Gerard. The family will have a private Graveside service. In lieu of flowers, Memorial Contributions may be given to the St. Louis County Parks Foundation, PO Box 31158, Des Peres, MO 63131 www.stlcountyparksfoundation.org in memory of Beverly Eakle who loved to watch her children and grandchildren play.

Forest, Carol

(nee Fick), 80, passed on Nov 3, 2019 Services: Newcomer Funeral Home in St Peters, Visitation: Nov 11th 5-7pm Service: Nov 11th at 7pm www.newcomerstlouis.com

Garegnani, Jennie

(nee Tedoni) Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church. Passed away on Friday, November 8, 2019. Beloved wife of the late Jimmy Garegnani; dear mother of Barbara Morgan and James Garegnani; loving grandmother, great-grandmother, great great-grandmother, sister, aunt and friend to all. Services: Funeral Mass Wednesday, November 13th 11:00 am at St. Ambrose Catholic Church, 5130 Wilson Ave.; 63110. Interment at Resurrection Cemetery. Visitation prior to mass from 9:00 am until 11:00 am at St. Ambrose. If desired, memorial donations in Jennie's name may be made to The Sick and Elderly Program of the Hill.

Gelber, Gloria Gale

November 7, 2019 beloved wife of the late Benjamin Gelber; dear mother and mother-in-law of Jeffrey Gelber (Barbara), Rick Gelber (Cindy) and Vicki Mahon (Robert); dear grandmother of Megan Perry (Taylor), Katelyn Meyer (Kyle), Mattison Gelber and Parker Gelber, Sydney George, Shelby Swartz (Kyle) and Spencer George; dear great-grandmother of Lyric Perry, Juliette, Charlie and Florence Meyer; dear sister of Audrey Cohen, Bonnie Cohn and the late Glen Gale; dear sister-in-law of Morty Gelber; our dear aunt, cousin and friend to many. Services: Graveside service Monday, November 11th, 1:00 PM at Beth Hamedrosh Hagodol Cemetery, 9125 Ladue Road. Memorial contributions preferred to the Humane Society of Missouri, 1201 Macklind Ave, 63110 or Stray Rescue, 2320 Pine Street, 63103. Visit bergermemorialchapel.com for more information. BERGER MEMORIAL SERVICE

Goessling, Thomas James

October 25, 2019. Beloved son of Artys Goessling and the late James Goessling; brother of Jane Shaw (Booker); uncle of Steven Shaw. Services are private at Valhalla Mausoleum

Green, Byron L.

Mr. Byron L. "Les" Green, 78, of Macclenny, FL passed away on Monday, October 28, 2019, at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, FL after a brief illness. He was born on June 23, 1941, in Detroit, MI to Byron L. and Jessie Roberta (Link) Green. Mr. Green was a retired public relations manager with Southwestern Bell and moved to Macclenny with his wife in 2013. He enjoyed being a HAM Radio Operator for over 60 years (K0LG), bicycling, and spending time with his beloved

family. Les was preceded in death by his parents; wife, Pat (Arnold) Green in 1989; and wife, Mary C. Green in 2018. He is survived by his daughter, Mary Helen Kirsch (Michael) of Waldwick, NJ; stepdaughters, Linda Marie Funk of Macclenny, FL and Debra Copeland (Mark) of Dallas, TX; grandchildren, James Cody Green, Diamond, Linda S. (nee Spinner), on Thursday, November 7, 2019. Visitation at Kutis Ryan Copeland, Josh Copeland, Corey Paine, and Callie Paine; his Affton Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Tuesday, November 12, 9 a.m. until beloved dog, Buddy; along with other family members and friends. service at 11 a.m. Interment Sunset Cemetery. Services: A Celebration of Life will be announced at a later date. “The best and most beautiful things in the world cannot be seen, nor touched, but are felt in the heart.” HELEN KELLER

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Green, Charles E. "Charlie"

11/3/2019. Loving husband, father, papa, great-grandpapa & uncle. Memorial Mass Sat., 11/23, 10am, St. Gabriel's. www.hoffmeistercolonial.com or call 314-832-7770

Grieshaber, David Paul

Grieshaber, David Paul (June 8, 1961) died at home on Nov. 5, 2019. David was the beloved son of Dr. Aloysius V. Grieshaber and the late Virginia Heher Grieshaber. Dear brother of Mark (Sue), Mary Rupp (Brent), Matthew & Kathryn Sienna. Loving uncle of Ely Kale, Rebecca & Sarah. Services: A memorial Mass will be held at St. Justin The Martyr in Sunset Hills on Sat., Dec. 14, at 10 a.m. with visitation at 9:30. Thank you to Vitas Hospice for their compassionate care. Donations in David's name are appreciated & can be made to The Humane Society of Missouri.


NEWS

11.10.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A27

New 9/11 exhibit stages hunt for Osama bin Laden BY VERENA DOBNIK

Associated Press

NEW YORK — Declassified U.S. government documents and artifacts will be part of a new exhibit about the decade-long search for Osama bin Laden at the site of the New York terrorist attack he masterminded. “Revealed: The Hunt for Bin Laden” opens Nov. 15 at the National September 11 Memorial & Museum, a multimedia account of

the mission that ended with bin Laden’s death in Pakistan in 2011. With direct access to the operatives who led America’s feverish post-9/11 hunt for the top terrorist, the exhibit presents a sort of whodunit drama with graphics, videos and the voices of the protagonists. Those include intelligence agents, former President Barack Obama and members of the U.S. Navy SEALs team that raided the

compound where bin Laden was shot and killed in his bedroom. “This is essentially a kind of crime story, however, at a horrific scale of crime and at a global scale of pursuit, with many trials and tribulations,” the exhibit’s main designer, Jonathan Alger, said at a recent news conference at the museum. “The entire space is cinematic,” he said. “At the time, every single minute and second,

OBITUARIES Koman, William J. "Bill"

Former all-Pro linebacker for the St. Louis Cardinals, died peacefully Nov. 1, 2019 at his home in St. Louis. He was 85. Bill reached the pinnacle of achievement in his careers as an athlete, entrepreneur and philanthropist. He was also a beloved husband for 63 years to his wife, Joan, a father, a grandfather and a friend. He learned at an early age that his success would depend on his own sheer determination and focus. Nobody would outwork him. Growing up in post- depression western Pennsylvania, Bill overcame a crippling childhood accident that left him with 50 percent mobility in one leg. Late to the game of football, he had to hone his mental acumen. He began playing as a junior at Hopewell High School, which later named its field house in his honor. Undeterred by injury, he found his way to the University of North Carolina. There, he excelled both academically and on the football field. Graduating in 1956 with a degree in economics, Bill embarked on his first career as a star NFL linebacker. He played 12 years in the NFL, first drafted by the Baltimore Colts. He, John Unitas and Lenny Moore would be the only rookies to make the team. Bill would later say, "This is a tough man's game and I'm as tough as anyone out there." One sportswriter dubbed him the "NFL's ironman of the 1960’s." He played for 2 years for the Philadelphia Eagles and spent his final 9 years with the St. Louis Cardinals. Known as a fierce and highly capable player, he once played 120 consecutive games for the Big Red. He was selected for two Pro Bowls and was twice named first team All Pro. Other accolades include being named to the top St. Louis Cardinals of All Time, Top 25 linebackers of the ACC, the Pennsylvania Sports Hall of Fame, and the one of which he was the most proud--NFL Father of the Year in 1968. The end of his football career in 1968 opened the door to his next chapter as a civic leader, entrepreneur and business man. His mental toughness would serve him well. Bill chose to stay in his adopted hometown of St. Louis to raise his family. As a developer and founder of The Koman Group, he built both commercial and residential projects across the metropolitan area. He was one of the original five founding members of the Casino Queen ownership group. The casino would prove to be an economic boon to East St. Louis and stabilize its economy for decades. Philanthropically, Bill served on the boards of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, Make-A-Wish Foundation of Missouri and numerous others. His giving has made a lasting impact for medical research and treatment of cystic fibrosis and cancer. He was an active funder of scholarships and programs at schools in the local area and his alma mater University of North Carolina. Above all else, Bill Koman was always there for his family. Nothing gave him more joy than spending time with his wife Joan, his children and extended family. He was an inspiration and mentor to his children. To his grandchildren, he was "Papa", always ready for an adventure, a joke or sage guidance. Bill never knew a stranger and his wide network of friends knew he could be counted on to stand by them and support their endeavors. Bill is survived by his cherished wife Joan; children and spouses: Karen Koman and Peter Hamilton, William and Amy Koman, Janis Koman Forsen and Dr. James Forsen Jr., James and Jennifer Koman, and Elizabeth Koman. He will be greatly missed by his grandchildren: Peter J. Hamilton, Oliver Hamilton, Katherine Hamilton, Samantha Kichman, Nicole Koman, Laine Koman, Blaire Koman, Elizabeth Forsen, James William Forsen lll, John Forsen, Michael Koman, Lucas Koman and Caroline Koman, and his sisters: Dolores Yurkovich and Louise DiNardo. He was preceded in death by sons, John Koman and Michael Koman. Services will be private. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Bill's memory to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Post Office Box 309, Chapel Hill, N.C. 27514 or online at give.unc.edu as well as to Pedal the Cause. Pedal, founded by his son Bill, provides funds to advance cancer research. A SERVICE OF THE LUPTON CHAPEL

Kopff, Mary Catherine

73, of Arnold MO, died peacefully on 10/31/19. Loving Sister to Virginia Landers, Margaret Frasca and Frances Wiegers. Preceded in death by her Parents Lawrence and Margaret Kopff. In lieu of flowers, donation to St Baldricks or St. Vincent DePaul Services: Memorial Service at Immaculate Conception Church in Arnold, MO on Nov. 18th at 10 a.m.

Ley, Robert E.

it was a cliffhanger.” Photos show the scenes of the search, including caves and a wild mountain range in Afghanistan where bin Laden was believed to be hiding. He was under protection of the Taliban, which issued al-Qaida members passports allowing them to move around freely. One of those passports will be displayed, along with enrollment forms used by al-Qaida to recruit

Celebrations of Life

Long, Karen Lorraine

(nee Wilke) Asleep in Jesus on Wed., Nov. 6, 2019. Beloved wife of the late James Michael Long; dearest mother of Todd (Michelle) and Jeff (Gina) Long; loving grandmother of Audrey and Avery, Dominic and Michael; dear daughter of the late Melvin and Arline (nee Gayou) Wilke; dear sister of Judy (Greg) Schmittgens, Mike (Tracy) Wilke and Jean (John) Lang; our dear sister-in-law, aunt, cousin, godmother and friend. Services: Visitation at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Road, Mon., Nov. 11, 4-8 p.m. Then to Peace Lutheran Church, 737 Barracksview Road, on Tues., Nov. 12 for 10 a.m. Service. Interment J.B. National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorials to Siteman Cancer Center appreciated.

Marmigas, Dena

new members. In other images, American anti-terrorism military units are seen on terrain they’re combing for possible clues to bin Laden’s whereabouts. A trunk on display contains items collected during U.S. raids, including some from bin Laden’s compound. A declassified, pre-9/11 U.S. intelligence document reveals: “Bin Laden Determined to Strike in US.”

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Sisak, Michael John

61, of Columbia, formerly of Troy, passed away on Friday, November 8, 2019. Celebration of Life services will be at 5:00 p.m., Wednesday, November 13, 2019 at Bach-Yager Funeral Chapel. Family will receive friends from 4:00 p.m. until start of the service. Mike was born on October 3, 1958 in St. Charles, the son of Harold and JoAnn Cooke Sisak. On March 16, 1990, he married Judy McMurray in Arkansas. After 33 years of service, Mike retired from Laclede Gas on December 13, 2013. After he retired, he was a member of the Elks in Troy which gave him purpose and fulfilled him in many ways. Mike is survived by his wife, Judith; three children, Jacqueline Buell (Scott) and Craig Sisak, all of St. Peters and Katlyn Sapp (Shelby) of Ashland; two grandchildren, Hadley June Ann Buell and Robert Harlan Sapp; mother, JoAnn Sisak of St. Peters; sister, Diane Redden (Michael) of St. Peters and nephew, Andrew Redden. Memorial contributions are suggested to American Heart Association or American Diabetes Association, c/o Bach-Yager Funeral Chapel, 1610 N. Garth Ave., Columbia, MO 65202.Online condolences and tributes may be shared with the family at www.bachyager.com.

Dear daughter of the late Christos and Panayta Marmigas; dear sister of Mary (John) Volas and the late Nick Marmigas; dear cousin and friend to many. Services: Funeral Service Tuesday, November 12th, 10:00 am at St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church, 4967 Forest Park Ave.; St. Louis, MO 63108. Interment at St. Matthew Cemetery. Visitation Monday, November 11th from 4:00 pm – 8:00 pm at Hoffmeister Colonial Mortuary. If desired, donations in Dena's name Sisk, Mary Ellen may be made to St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Facility (nee Venker) Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Improvement Fund. www.hoffmeistercolonial.com Wednesday, November 6, 2019. Beloved wife of Ronald Sisk for over 42 years; loving mother of Rachel (John) Wampler, Amy Mayne, Martha Louise (Bryan) Stokes and Dr. Bryan (Kay) Sisk; adoring grandmother of 81, passed away on October 16, 2019. Daughter of the late John A. Mikayla, Jonathon, Morgan, Madelyn, Mackenzie, Jack, David and and Charlotte Mayne;: sister of John P. (Sally) Mayne; beloved William; dear sister of the late Michael (surviving Jeannie) Venker; mother of Susan (Timothy) Keith, Joseph McDonnell, James (Linda our dearest sister-in-law, aunt, great-aunt, cousin and friend to Calahan) McDonnell; and Margaret (John) Brotherton; dear many. grandmother of Kevin (Amy) and Daniel Keith, Jedediah, John Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois, on (Kate Zydiak), James (Tory Freeman), Kaetlyn, and Michael Tuesday, November 12 at 9:30 a.m. to St. Gabriel the Archangel for McDonnell; and Olivia Brotherton; life-long friend of Patricia 10 a.m. Mass. Interment at Sunset Cemetery. In lieu of Beard and Nancy Berg Marron; loving aunt, friend, teacher, and flowers, contributions to Backstoppers appreciated. Universal Mom. Visitation Monday, 3-9 p.m. Celebration of Life TBA. In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to: BuffaloFieldCampaign.org Stoecker, Ann (nee Conrad), age 80, passed away, Friday, October 25, 2019. She was the beloved wife of David Thomas Stoecker, who preceded her Mugan, Gwendolyn L. in death April 15, 2015; the dear mother of Lisa Stoecker and Friday, November 8, 2019. Visitation Thursday, November Susan (William) Fiala; and the loving grandmother of Sarah Jane, 14, 9am until Mass time of 10am, at Holy Spirit Church Hannah, Emma and Ella; dear sister of Mary Elizabeth (Jon) (Maryland Heights). www.colliersfuneralhome.com Armstrong. She was preceded in death by her husband, parents, and two brothers, Donald and Richard Conrad. Pardeck, Dawn Marie Ann was born February 17, 1939 in St. Louis to Donald and (nee Crews), January 15, 1964-November 2, 2019. Services: Elizabeth (nee Engelmann) Conrad. She earned a Bachelor's Private for the family. For more information and to share Degree from Indiana University, Bloomington, and was a proud condolences, please visit www.ShepardFuneralChapel.com homemaker, mother, grandmother and sister. Services: Memorial visitation at the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory, 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, Friday, November 29, 2019, from 10:00 a.m. until 12 noon. In lieu of Rambo, Lawrence Baptized into the hope of Christ's Resurrection, d. 10/25/19. flowers, contributions may be made to Engelmann Family Survived by his wife Margaret and a host of relatives & friends. Cemetery Association, Assistance League of St. Louis or to P.E.O. International. Friends may sign the family’s on-line Service 11/14/19, Concordia Lutheran Church, Kirkwood, 1 p.m. guestbook at Schrader.com.

Safron, George

given Eternal Rest in the arms of Jesus on, Saturday, November 2, 2019 at the age of 61. George graduated from University City High School. Beloved husband of Mary (Wehrenbrecht) Safron; dear Father of Courtney Safron; Son of the late Joseph & Valerie B. Safron; Brother of Phyllis (Dennis) Meichel, Ingrid (Mark) Bremer, Fletcher (Rorey) Lane, Joe Safron, Helen (John) Costello, Valerie (Dave) Collins, Mary (Martin Knoesel) Safron. Son-in-law to the late Jere & Blanche Wehrenbrecht; Brother-in-law to Debbie Wehrenbrecht, Jimmy (Dorothy) Wehrenbrecht and Barbie (Bill) Anello. George leaves behind a large family who loved him dearly. He will be missed by all. Services: Private Memorial Mass to be held at a later date. A Service of Lupton Chapel

Unger, Raymond A.

Baptized into the hope of Christ's Resurrection, Wednesday, November 6, 2019. Beloved husband of the late Tessy Ann "T.A." Unger (nee Betz); dearest father of Deborah Gash, Ruth (Anthony) Pendino and Kathy (Don) Lillicrap; loving grandfather of Jen LaPerle, Chris Gash, Kim Stofega, Leandra Kohnen, Melissa Castaldi, Steven Michaeli and Don Lillicrap, Jr.; great-grandfather of Lexi, Tyler, CeCe, Chloe, Lily, Charlie, Emily, Dominic, April and Jessica; our

dear uncle, cousin and friend. Retiree of AB after over 45 years of service and 25-year volunteer at Aging Ahead South County Senior Center. Services: Funeral from KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Wednesday, November 13, 9:30 a.m. to St. Andrew Catholic Church for 10 a.m. Mass. Interment Mt. Olive Cemetery. Memorials to Aging Ahead South County Senior Center, 225 Lemay Ferry Rd. (63125), appreciated. Visitation Tuesday, 3-8 p.m.

Robert E. Ley "Gene", born Jan 1, 1949-died Oct 31, 2019 Schmidt, Richard O. following a long illness. He was preceded in death by his Thursday, October 31, 2019. 66, of Hillsboro, MO Cemeteries and Mausoleums son Benjamin Ley, parents Richard & Charlotte (Spann) Beloved brother of Susan (Thomas) Howat (nee Schmidt) Ley, sister Mary (George) Ley and brother Raymond Ley. He is Memorial Service Tues. Nov.12 at 11 a.m. Chapel Hill Mortuary. survived by his sister Nancy (Buck) and his brother Daniel Ley and 3 Lots , Memorial Park Cemetery, Sec. 10, Lot 337. Very many nieces, nephews, cousins, and friends. A life-long St. Louis Reasonable, Lucas & Hunt & Hwy. 70. 314-831-1891. Schopp, A.J. resident, Gene loved hunting, fishing, scuba diving and music. He was born in St. Louis, MO, the even played the guitar with his brother Dan. Gene was a combat Florist beloved only child of Cassell and veteran who proudly served in the 1st Infantry in Vietnam. His job Alfred Schopp, Sr. A.J. enlisted in took him through the U. S. and Europe and spent a good time in Dierbergs Florist 1962, serving honorably as an Leipzig, Germany forming lasting friendships. Gene will be fondly Order 24 Hours active duty Army reservist. He is remembered for his love of family, his patriotism and generous 314-692-2000 or 800-844-6007 survived by his wife of nearly 50 spirit, and his willingness to help anyone in need. The family Dierbergs.com years, Julie Bruning Schopp; their deeply appreciates the care and dignity Gene received while on sons and their families: Jacob and hospice at Jefferson Barracks. Schnucks Florist Lara and daughter, Caroline (15), of 65 Metro Locations Services: A memorial Mass will be at 10:00 a.m. on Wed., Nov. 13, 314-997-2444; 800-286-9557 Kansas City, and Nicholas and 2019 at Sacred Heart Church, 17 Ann Ave., Valley Park, MO. A Kymberlee and sons Wyatt (13), luncheon will be served in the parish hall immediately following Colton (11) and Oliver (8), of St. the service. Interment will be at Resurrection Cemetery, 6901 Louis. He is also survived by cousin MacKenzie Rd. in Affton. Marigay Schopp and her partner, Mary Jacobson, his friends of nearly 50 years, Cheryl and Tom Erman and Lillyann and Jim Baldanza, and the Long, James Michael wonderful community of horse lovers that have shared Asleep in Jesus on Saturday, his passion. November 2, 2019. Beloved husband of Karen Long (nee Wilke) Shymanski, Susan "Suzi" R. for 46 years; dearest father of Todd (Michelle) and Jeff (Gina) age 76, passed away on November 4, 2019 in Downers Grove, Long; loving grandfather of Audrey Illinois, surrounded by her family. Suzi was the loving mother of and Avery, Dominic and Michael; Kurt (Karla) Shymanski of Denver, CO, Karen Shymanski of St. dear son of Evelyn (nee Hof) and Louis, MO, and Kim (Steve) Peters of Downers Grove, IL; cherished the late Wilbert Long; dear brother Nana of Keara and Kaden Shymanski, Justin, Kyle and Jillian of Sharon (Bill) Applegate; our dear Peters; dear sister of Tom (Kathy) Anton and Judy (Dave) Lynch; brother-in-law, uncle, cousin, fond aunt to many nieces and nephews. She is preceded in death by her parents, Marjorie and Russell Anton. Godfather and friend. Services: Friends and family are invited to attend a celebration of Services: Visitation at KUTIS Suzi's life on November 23, 2019, from 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at SOUTH COUNTY Chapel, the Butterfly House located at 15193 Olive Blvd., Chesterfield, MO 5255 Lemay Ferry Road, on Monday, November 11 63017. In lieu of flowers, please remember Suzi with a from 4-8 p.m. Funeral at Peace Lutheran Church, 737 Barracksview Road, on Tuesday, November 12 for 10 contribution to the Humane Society of Missouri at www.hsmo.org. a.m. service. Interment J.B. National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, Arrangements by Adams-Winterfield & Sullivan Funeral Home. 630-968-1000 or www.adamswinterfieldsullivan.com memorials to Siteman Cancer Center appreciated.

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ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A27

OBITUARIES Gurley, Marilyn

(nee Hopkins) 85, Arnold. She is survived by Sandra (Tom) Colvin; Larry, Raymond Jr. (Sandy) and Kevin Gurley. Service: Weds. 10 am, Visitation Tues. 4–8 Jay B. Smith (Fenton). jaybsmith.com.

Celebrations of Life

Long, James Michael

(nee Young), Baptized into the hope of Christ's Resurrection, Friday, November 8, 2019. Beloved wife of the late Fred Heinemann; dearest mother of Terry (Robin), Larry (Mary) and the late Gary Heinemann; dear grandmother of five and great-grandmother of seven; our dear sister, sister-in-law, aunt, great-aunt and friend. Services: Funeral from the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory, 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, Tuesday, November 12, 9:30 a.m. to St. Paul Catholic Church, Fenton for 10:00 a.m. Mass. Interment Sacred Heart Cemetery, Valley Park. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Alzheimer's Association or Valley Park Lions Club. Visitation Monday, November 11, from 4-8 p.m. Friends may sign the family’s on-line guestbook at Schrader.com.

Asleep in Jesus on Saturday, November 2, 2019. Beloved husband of Karen Long (nee Wilke) for 46 years; dearest father of Todd (Michelle) and Jeff (Gina) Long; loving grandfather of Audrey and Avery, Dominic and Michael; dear son of Evelyn (nee Hof) and the late Wilbert Long; dear brother of Sharon (Bill) Applegate; our dear brother-in-law, uncle, cousin, Godfather and friend. Services: Visitation at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Road, on Monday, November 11 from 4-8 p.m. Funeral at Peace Lutheran Church, 737 Barracksview Road, on Tuesday, November 12 for 10 a.m. service. Interment J.B. National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorials to Siteman Cancer Center appreciated.

Irvine, Robert Walter

Long, Karen Lorraine

Heinemann, Jane F.

72, of St. Charles, MO. November 02, 2019.Alternative Funeral & Cremation Services. 636-498-5300. Alternativefuneralcremation.com

Kasal, Mary H.

10/29/19. Memorial vis Kutis Affton Chapel, 10151 Gravois Thurs., 11/14, 6-8 p.m. Memorial Mass Fri., 11/15, 10 a.m., St. Justin Martyr Catholic Church. Interment J.B. National.

Kittle, Louis E.

80, of St. Clair, passed away Nov. 6th, 2019. Services: Midlawn Funeral Home in Union, Memorial Visitation, Wednesday, Nov. 13th from 5-7 p.m. with memorial at 7p.m.

Kneeland, Betty R.

Tues. Oct. 29, 2019, 87. Celebration of Betty's life on Sat. Nov. 16, 2 p.m. at First Baptist Church of Winfield, 3700 E. Highway 47, Winfield, MO 63381. A Buchholz Service.

Koeller, John E. ''Jack''

78 yrs., Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Wed., November 6, 2019. Beloved husband of Barbara (nee Morhmann); dear father of Laura Ravenscraft, Lisa (Tom) Lard, John J. Koeller and the late Christopher Koeller; dear grandfather of Christopher, Andrew, Madison and Claire Ravenscraft, Alison and Audrey Lard and loving great-grandfather. Dear brother of Joseph and Gary (Sherry) Koeller; dear brother-in-law, uncle, cousin and friend. Jack was a McBride H.S. graduate, served in the U.S. Army, was a St. Louis City Police Officer, and worked at Boeing for 36 years as a Security Guard. Jack was a friend to many and never met a stranger. Services: Memorial Visitation 9-10 a.m. Sat., Nov. 23 with Memorial Mass to follow at 10 a.m. at St. Cletus Church, St. Charles. Memorials to Backstoppers. Hutchens Funeral Homes.

Koman, William J. "Bill"

Former all-Pro linebacker for the St. Louis Cardinals, died peacefully Nov. 1, 2019 at his home in St. Louis. He was 85. Bill reached the pinnacle of achievement in his careers as an athlete, entrepreneur and philanthropist. He was also a beloved husband for 63 years to his wife, Joan, a father, a grandfather and a friend. He learned at an early age that his success would depend on his own sheer determination and focus. Nobody would outwork him. Growing up in post- depression western Pennsylvania, Bill overcame a crippling childhood accident that left him with 50 percent mobility in one leg. Late to the game of football, he had to hone his mental acumen. He began playing as a junior at Hopewell High School, which later named its field house in his honor. Undeterred by injury, he found his way to the University of North Carolina. There, he excelled both academically and on the football field. Graduating in 1956 with a degree in economics, Bill embarked on his first career as a star NFL linebacker. He played 12 years in the NFL, first drafted by the Baltimore Colts. He, John Unitas and Lenny Moore would be the only rookies to make the team. Bill would later say, "This is a tough man's game and I'm as tough as anyone out there." One sportswriter dubbed him the "NFL's ironman of the 1960’s." He played for 2 years for the Philadelphia Eagles and spent his final 9 years with the St. Louis Cardinals. Known as a fierce and highly capable player, he once played 120 consecutive games for the Big Red. He was selected for two Pro Bowls and was twice named first team All Pro. Other accolades include being named to the top St. Louis Cardinals of All Time, Top 25 linebackers of the ACC, the Pennsylvania Sports Hall of Fame, and the one of which he was the most proud--NFL Father of the Year in 1968. The end of his football career in 1968 opened the door to his next chapter as a civic leader, entrepreneur and business man. His mental toughness would serve him well. Bill chose to stay in his adopted hometown of St. Louis to raise his family. As a developer and founder of The Koman Group, he built both commercial and residential projects across the metropolitan area. He was one of the original five founding members of the Casino Queen ownership group. The casino would prove to be an economic boon to East St. Louis and stabilize its economy for decades. Philanthropically, Bill served on the boards of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, Make-A-Wish Foundation of Missouri and numerous others. His giving has made a lasting impact for medical research and treatment of cystic fibrosis and cancer. He was an active funder of scholarships and programs at schools in the local area and his alma mater University of North Carolina. Above all else, Bill Koman was always there for his family. Nothing gave him more joy than spending time with his wife Joan, his children and extended family. He was an inspiration and mentor to his children. To his grandchildren, he was "Papa", always ready for an adventure, a joke or sage guidance. Bill never knew a stranger and his wide network of friends knew he could be counted on to stand by them and support their endeavors. Bill is survived by his cherished wife Joan; children and spouses: Karen Koman and Peter Hamilton, William and Amy Koman, Janis Koman Forsen and Dr. James Forsen Jr., James and Jennifer Koman, and Elizabeth Koman. He will be greatly missed by his grandchildren: Peter J. Hamilton, Oliver Hamilton, Katherine Hamilton, Samantha Kichman, Nicole Koman, Laine Koman, Blaire Koman, Elizabeth Forsen, James William Forsen lll, John Forsen, Michael Koman, Lucas Koman and Caroline Koman, and his sisters: Dolores Yurkovich and Louise DiNardo. He was preceded in death by sons, John Koman and Michael Koman. Services will be private. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Bill's memory to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Post Office Box 309, Chapel Hill, N.C. 27514 or online at give.unc.edu as well as to Pedal the Cause. Pedal, founded by his son Bill, provides funds to advance cancer research. A SERVICE OF THE LUPTON CHAPEL

Kopff, Mary Catherine

73, of Arnold MO, died peacefully on 10/31/19. Loving Sister to Virginia Landers, Margaret Frasca and Frances Wiegers. Preceded in death by her Parents Lawrence and Margaret Kopff. In lieu of flowers, donation to St Baldricks or St. Vincent DePaul Services: Memorial Service at Immaculate Conception Church in Arnold, MO on Nov. 18th at 10 a.m.

Ley, Robert E.

Robert E. Ley "Gene", born Jan 1, 1949-died Oct 31, 2019 following a long illness. He was preceded in death by his son Benjamin Ley, parents Richard & Charlotte (Spann) Ley, sister Mary (George) Ley and brother Raymond Ley. He is survived by his sister Nancy (Buck) and his brother Daniel Ley and many nieces, nephews, cousins, and friends. A life-long St. Louis resident, Gene loved hunting, fishing, scuba diving and music. He even played the guitar with his brother Dan. Gene was a combat veteran who proudly served in the 1st Infantry in Vietnam. His job took him through the U. S. and Europe and spent a good time in Leipzig, Germany forming lasting friendships. Gene will be fondly remembered for his love of family, his patriotism and generous spirit, and his willingness to help anyone in need. The family deeply appreciates the care and dignity Gene received while on hospice at Jefferson Barracks. Services: A memorial Mass will be at 10:00 a.m. on Wed., Nov. 13, 2019 at Sacred Heart Church, 17 Ann Ave., Valley Park, MO. A luncheon will be served in the parish hall immediately following the service. Interment will be at Resurrection Cemetery, 6901 MacKenzie Rd. in Affton.

(nee Wilke) Asleep in Jesus on Wed., Nov. 6, 2019. Beloved wife of the late James Michael Long; dearest mother of Todd (Michelle) and Jeff (Gina) Long; loving grandmother of Audrey and Avery, Dominic and Michael; dear daughter of the late Melvin and Arline (nee Gayou) Wilke; dear sister of Judy (Greg) Schmittgens, Mike (Tracy) Wilke and Jean (John) Lang; our dear sister-in-law, aunt, cousin, godmother and friend. Services: Visitation at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Road, Mon., Nov. 11, 4-8 p.m. Then to Peace Lutheran Church, 737 Barracksview Road, on Tues., Nov. 12 for 10 a.m. Service. Interment J.B. National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorials to Siteman Cancer Center appreciated.

Marmigas, Dena

Dear daughter of the late Christos and Panayta Marmigas; dear sister of Mary (John) Volas and the late Nick Marmigas; dear cousin and friend to many. Services: Funeral Service Tuesday, November 12th, 10:00 am at St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church, 4967 Forest Park Ave.; St. Louis, MO 63108. Interment at St. Matthew Cemetery. Visitation Monday, November 11th from 4:00 pm – 8:00 pm at Hoffmeister Colonial Mortuary. If desired, donations in Dena's name may be made to St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Facility Improvement Fund. www.hoffmeistercolonial.com

Mayne, Martha Louise

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Pardeck, Dawn Marie

(nee Crews), January 15, 1964-November 2, 2019. Services: Private for the family. For more information and to share condolences, please visit www.ShepardFuneralChapel.com

Rambo, Lawrence

Baptized into the hope of Christ's Resurrection, d. 10/25/19. Survived by his wife Margaret and a host of relatives & friends. Service 11/14/19, Concordia Lutheran Church, Kirkwood, 1 p.m.

Safron, George

given Eternal Rest in the arms of Jesus on, Saturday, November 2, 2019 at the age of 61. George graduated from University City High School. Beloved husband of Mary (Wehrenbrecht) Safron; dear Father of Courtney Safron; Son of the late Joseph & Valerie B. Safron; Brother of Phyllis (Dennis) Meichel, Ingrid (Mark) Bremer, Fletcher (Rorey) Lane, Joe Safron, Helen (John) Costello, Valerie (Dave) Collins, Mary (Martin Knoesel) Safron. Son-in-law to the late Jere & Blanche Wehrenbrecht; Brother-in-law to Debbie Wehrenbrecht, Jimmy (Dorothy) Wehrenbrecht and Barbie (Bill) Anello. George leaves behind a large family who loved him dearly. He will be missed by all. Services: Private Memorial Mass to be held at a later date. A Service of Lupton Chapel

Schierholz, William F.

passed away peacefully in Sarasota, Fl last summer. Born in 1921 in St. Louis, Bill was a life-long resident of St. Louis until retiring to Florida. Predeceased by his beloved wife of 69 years, Joan (Flavin), and son William, he is survived by daughter Peg, son John, daughters-in-law Jan & Lisa, grandchildren Katie (Greffet), Landon, Anna, Will, and Christine, and great-grandchildren Will, and Violet. Bill graduated from The Principia in 1939. He enlisted in the Army Air Corp. in 1942, serving in the Pacific, and rising to rank of Captain and Squadron Commander. After the war, he re-enrolled at Washington University, graduating in 1948. It was there he met Joan. In 1956, Bill founded Chemtech Industries which he grew to achieve revenues exceeding $200 million in 2019 dollars. In 1981, he was named Missouri Business Leader of the Year by the Missouri Chamber of Commerce. Bill believed in civic service, holding senior leadership positions in his church, the United Way, Rotary, the Boy Scouts, RCGA, Junior Achievement, AAIM, Washington University, the Missouri Highway Department, and many others. He was a man of the highest ethics; deeply committed to God, country, family, employees, and community.

81, passed away on October 16, 2019. Daughter of the late John A. and Charlotte Mayne;: sister of John P. (Sally) Mayne; beloved mother of Susan (Timothy) Keith, Joseph McDonnell, James (Linda Calahan) McDonnell; and Margaret (John) Brotherton; dear grandmother of Kevin (Amy) and Daniel Keith, Jedediah, John (Kate Zydiak), James (Tory Freeman), Kaetlyn, and Michael McDonnell; and Olivia Brotherton; life-long friend of Patricia Services: A memorial will be held at 11:00 a.m., Saturday, Beard and Nancy Berg Marron; loving aunt, friend, teacher, and November 16, at the First Church of Christ Scientist, Creve Coeur, 10939 Ladue Road. Universal Mom. Celebration of Life TBA. In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to: BuffaloFieldCampaign.org

Mogerman, Dr. Donald M. D.O.F.A.C.O.S.

Schlarman, Anna

(nee Kappel) Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church Friday, November 8, 2019. Beloved wife of the late Leo A. Schlarman; dear mother of Joyce (Ronald) Voss, Tom Schlarman and the late David Schlarman (survived by Dana); dear grandmother of Michelle, Marty, Angela, James, Daniel and Ryan; our dear great-grandmother of 10, aunt, great-aunt and friend. Services: Funeral from KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY CHAPEL, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Wednesday November 13, 9:30 a.m. to St. Joseph Church (Imperial) for 10 a.m. Mass. Interment St. Joseph Cemetery. Masses or contributions to Maryknoll Fathers & Brothers, PO Box 301, Maryknoll, NY 10545-0301 appreciated. Visitation Tuesday, 4-8 p.m.

on Friday, November 8, 2019 at the age of 86 years. Beloved husband of Sallie Mogerman. Dear father of Cary Jon (Dee Ann Dundore) Mogerman, Dr. Jaime Lynn Mogerman(Charles Fausette) Dodd, Cathriel Mogerman (Douglas) Stotler, and Jordan Parsons (Desiree Cabell) Mogerman. Dear grandfather of 6, great grandfather of 1. Dr. Mogerman was a Lincoln County, MO surgeon for 45 years. Schmidt, Richard O. Services: Monday, Nov. 11, 2019 at Thursday, October 31, 2019. 66, of Hillsboro, MO 1PM at Congregation Temple Israel, 1 Rabbi Alvan D. Beloved brother of Susan (Thomas) Howat (nee Schmidt) Rubin Dr., St. Louis 63141. Burial in the Bellerive Gardens Memorial Service Tues. Nov.12 at 11 a.m. Chapel Hill Mortuary. Cemetery in Creve Couer. Memorials to Alzheimers Association. Visitation: Sunday, Nov. 10, from 3-5 PM at Schopp, A.J. Pitman Funeral Home, 1545 Wentzville Parkway, Wentzville was born in St. Louis, MO, the 63385. beloved only child of Cassell and Alfred Schopp, Sr. A.J. enlisted in Mugan, Gwendolyn L. 1962, serving honorably as an Friday, November 8, 2019. Visitation Thursday, November active duty Army reservist. He is 14, 9am until Mass time of 10am, at Holy Spirit Church survived by his wife of nearly 50 (Maryland Heights). www.colliersfuneralhome.com years, Julie Bruning Schopp; their sons and their families: Jacob and Murphy, Patrick Joseph Sr. Lara and daughter, Caroline (15), of born on September 30, 1940 and Kansas City, and Nicholas and Baptized with the Hope of Christ's Kymberlee and sons Wyatt (13), Resurrection, passed away peaceColton (11) and Oliver (8), of St. fully November 7, 2019. Married Louis. He is also survived by cousin for 53 years to Jean (nee Pape); Marigay Schopp and her partner, loving Father to Patrick Jr. (Laura), Mary Jacobson, his friends of nearly 50 years, Cheryl and Heather, Michael Shea (Laurie), Tom Erman and Lillyann and Jim Baldanza, and the and Sean Christopher; affectionwonderful community of horse lovers that have shared ately called Pops by his his passion. grandchildren Megan Murphy, Anne Marie Murphy, Michael Shymanski, Susan "Suzi" R. Murphy, Patrick Murphy III, and Joseph Murphy; son of the late age 76, passed away on November 4, 2019 in Downers Grove, Jerry J. and Ruth C. Murphy; Illinois, surrounded by her family. Suzi was the loving mother of brother of the late Mary Fuegner (Rich); uncle, cousin, and friend. Kurt (Karla) Shymanski of Denver, CO, Karen Shymanski of St. A real character and full of life, he spent 58 years as a Vice Louis, MO, and Kim (Steve) Peters of Downers Grove, IL; cherished President of the Company that he loved, Murphy Company Nana of Keara and Kaden Shymanski, Justin, Kyle and Jillian Mechanical Contractor and Engineers, the largest mechanical Peters; dear sister of Tom (Kathy) Anton and Judy (Dave) Lynch; contractor in St Louis. He treasured his time working closely with fond aunt to many nieces and nephews. She is preceded in death the skilled crafts who also became his life-long friends. A rancher by her parents, Marjorie and Russell Anton. at heart, he and Jean purchased a property in Beulah, Missouri in Services: Friends and family are invited to attend a celebration of 2003. "It's a Boy" and "It's a Girl" flags proudly raised whenever a Suzi's life on November 23, 2019, from 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at new cow was born into the herd. A perfect mix of his Irish and the Butterfly House located at 15193 Olive Blvd., Chesterfield, MO German heritage; hard working, dedicated, stubborn, always right, 63017. In lieu of flowers, please remember Suzi with a and quick to turn any situation into an opportunity for a story or contribution to the Humane Society of Missouri at www.hsmo.org. joke. He lived by the mantra LTD, "Listen, think, do", which his Arrangements by Adams-Winterfield & Sullivan Funeral Home. children always heard him say anytime when an important 630-968-1000 or www.adamswinterfieldsullivan.com decision was required. Services: Monday November 11, 2019, Visitation 9:00 am, Catholic Mass 10:00 am, Ascension Catholic Sisak, Michael John Church, 230 Santa Maria Drive, Chesterfield, MO 63005. 61, of Columbia, formerly of Troy, Internment for family at Calvary Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, passed away on Friday, November donations in Pat’s name to The St. Patrick Center, 800 N Tucker 8, 2019. Blvd., St Louis, MO 63101 would be greatly appreciated. Celebration of Life services will be at 5:00 p.m., Wednesday, November 13, 2019 at Bach-Yager Funeral Chapel. Family will receive friends from 4:00 p.m. until start of the service. Mike was born on October 3, 1958 in St. Charles, the son of Harold and JoAnn Cooke Sisak. On March 16, 1990, he married Judy McMurray in Arkansas. After 33 years of service, Mike retired from Laclede Gas on December 13, 2013. After he retired, he was a member of the Elks in Troy which gave him purpose and fulfilled him in many ways. Mike is survived by his wife, Judith; three children, Jacqueline Buell (Scott) and Craig Sisak, all of St. Peters and Katlyn Sapp (Shelby) of Ashland; two grandchildren, Hadley June Ann Buell and Robert Harlan Sapp; mother, JoAnn Sisak of St. Peters; sister, Diane Redden (Michael) of St. Peters and nephew, Andrew Redden. Memorial contributions are suggested to American Heart Association or American Diabetes Association, c/o Bach-Yager At Schnucks Florist & Gifts, our Funeral Chapel, 1610 N. Garth Ave., Columbia, MO 65202.Online experienced staff of floral designers condolences and tributes may be shared with the family at www.bachyager.com. is dedicated to the highest level of personal service.

Beautiful Memorials

Sisk, Mary Ellen

Order 24 Hours schnucksfloral.com (314) 997-2444 or (800) 286-9557

(nee Venker) Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Wednesday, November 6, 2019. Beloved wife of Ronald Sisk for over 42 years; loving mother of Rachel (John) Wampler, Amy (Bryan) Stokes and Dr. Bryan (Kay) Sisk; adoring grandmother of Mikayla, Jonathon, Morgan, Madelyn, Mackenzie, Jack, David and William; dear sister of the late Michael (surviving Jeannie) Venker; our dearest sister-in-law, aunt, great-aunt, cousin and friend to many. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois, on Tuesday, November 12 at 9:30 a.m. to St. Gabriel the Archangel for 10 a.m. Mass. Interment at Sunset Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions to Backstoppers appreciated. Visitation Monday, 3-9 p.m.


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A28 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 11.10.2019

BERLIN WALL | 30 YEARS LATER Fatima, Portugal

OFF THE WALL Torn-down barrier now art around world DAVID RISING | Associated Press

F

or nearly three decades, the Berlin Wall encircled West Berlin, built by communist East German authorities ostensibly to protect the country from “fascists,” but in reality to prevent their own citizens from fleeing into the democratic half of the divided city, a portal to the rest of the free world. For a barrier meant to prevent travel, chips, chunks and full segments of the 97.2 mile-long reinforced concrete Berlin Wall have done a pretty good job themselves getting around Germany and the rest of the world in the past 30 years. The Berlin Wall divided the city from 1961 until it was first opened on Nov. 9, 1989, though it took much longer to be removed entirely. In Berlin today, some symbolic segments still stand in their original locations, left in place as a reminder of what was known as the front line of the Cold War, a daily physical reminder of the metaphorical Iron Curtain between eastern and western Europe during those tense times. As jubilant Germans tore at the Berlin Wall in 1989, many pocketed small pieces to take with them, and small stands were set up almost immediately by the more enterprising to sell larger chunks as souvenirs. Today, bits of unknown provenance are still for sale in tourist shops in the German capital. Larger slabs have been purchased or given to display in museums, embassies, schools, parks, memorials and in other locations around the world.

Tokyo

Jakarta, Indonesia

Las Vegas

Frankfurt, Germany

New York

San Jose, Costa Rica

London

Tallinn, Estonia

Brussels

Normandy, France


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A28 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 11.10.2019

Germany, allies mark 30 years since Berlin Wall fell BY FRANK JORDANS

Associated Press

BERLIN — Germany marked the 30th anniversary Saturday of the opening of the Berlin Wall,a pivotal moment in the events that brought down Communism in eastern Europe. Leaders from Germany, Poland, Hungary, Slovakia and the Czech Republic attended a ceremony at Bernauer Strasse — where one of the last parts of the Berlin Wall remains — before placing roses in the once-fearsome barrier that divided the city for 28 years. “The Berlin Wall, ladies and gentlemen, is history,” German Chancellor Angela Merkel said later at a memorial service inside a small chapel near where the Wall once stood. “It teaches us: No wall that keeps people out and restricts freedom is so high or so wide that it can’t be broken down.” Noting the cruelty of the East German regime — which had torn down a previous church on the former death strip site so snipers could get a better shot at people fleeing to the West — Merkel paid tribute to those who were killed or imprisoned during the Communist dictatorship and insisted that the fight for freedom worldwide isn’t over. “We are bereft of excuses, challenged to do our part for freedom and democracy,” she said. In a statement issued by his office, President Donald Trump congratulated Germany on its anniversary, saying that “courageous men and women from both East and West Germany united to tear down a wall that stood as a symbol of oppression and failed socialism for more than a quarter of a century.” “The United States and our allies and partners remain steadfast in our unwavering allegiance to advancing the principles of individual liberty and freedom that have sustained peace and spawned unparalleled prosperity,” he added. Speaking to European leaders at Bernauer Strasse, head of the Berlin Wall memorial site, Axel Klausmeier,recalled the images of delirious Berliners from East and West crying tears of joy as they hugged each other on the evening of Nov. 9, 1989. The collapse of the Berlin Wall was brought about largely by peaceful protests and a stream of people fleeing East Germany that piled pressure on the country’s Communist government to open its borders to the West and ultimately end the nation’s post-war division. Thirty years on, Germany has become the most powerful economic and political force on the continent, but there remain deep misgivings among some in the country about how the transition from socialism to capitalism was managed. Merkel acknowledged this in a recent interview with daily Sueddeutsche Zeitung, saying that “with some things, where one might have thought that East and West would have aligned, one can see today that it might rather take half a century or more.” She also recalled that Nov. 9

MARKUS SCHREIBER, ASSOCIATED PRESS

A tourist from Greece looks through the hole in remains of the Berlin Wall after commemorations Saturday celebrating the 30th anniversary of the fall of the wall.

MICHAEL SOHN, ASSOCIATED PRESS

German Chancellor Angela Merkel arrives Saturday at the Berlin Wall Memorial in Berlin.

MARKUS SCHREIBER, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Flowers are stuck in remains of the Berlin Wall during a commemoration ceremony Saturday to celebrate the 30th anniversary of the fall of the wall.

remains a fraught date in German history, as it also marks the anniversary of the so-called Night of Broken Glass, an anti-Jewish pogrom in 1938 that foreshadowed the Nazi Holocaust. Light installations, concerts and public debates were planned throughout the city and other parts of Germany to mark the fall of the Wall,including a concert at Berlin’s iconic Brandenburg Gate. Among those who had come to Berlin to celebrate were members of the Trabant Club Middle Hesse, an association that promotes the old East German car affectionately known as the Trabi. Jens Schmidt,who fled East Germany before the fall of the Wall by driving his Trabi to Hungary and then across the open border to the West,said the club has many young members for whom learning to repair the simple but sturdy vehicles can be a lesson in history and civics, too. “The team spirit,” he said. “It was stronger back then.”

In this Nov. 13, 1989, photo, East German border guards stand in front of segments of the Berlin Wall, which were removed to open the wall at Potsdamer Platz passage in Berlin. JOHN GAPS III, ASSOCIATED PRESS

OBITUARIES Stapf, Constance M.

(nee Callahan), age 91, passed away, Thursday, November 7, 2019. The eighth and youngest child of Daniel and Genevieve (nee Kelly) Callahan. Loving mother of David (Patty), Jan (Kris) Kroen, Karen (Jerry) Hilf, and Neal (Amy). Former wife of the late Charlie Stapf. Loving grandmother of 11 and great-grandmother of 10. Aunt and friend to many. Services: Visitation at J. B. Smith Funeral Home, 7456 Manchester Road, in Maplewood, Friday, November 15 from 4-8 p.m. Mass at St. Mary Magdalen Saturday, November 16, 11:30 a.m. with Interment following at Resurrection Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations to the APA in Brentwood or the CARE organization at STMM (Brentwood).

Stark, Bonnie Ruth

85, of St. Pete Beach, FL, has joined our loving Creator on Monday, November 4, 2019. She was born March 23, 1934, in Ridgely, TN. Beloved wife of Edwin E. Stark; mother of Cynthia (Jim) Glauert of St. Louis, James Reed and Jennifer Harris (close friend) of Ocala, FL; step-mother of Robert (Amy) Stark of St. Louis; grandmother, great-grandmother, sister, aunt and friend to many. Services: Funeral service on Thursday, November 14th, 10:00 a.m. at Hoffmeister Colonial Mortuary, 6464 Chippewa St. Interment at Sunset Memorial Park. Visitation Wednesday, November 13th from 6 to 8 p.m. at Hoffmeister Colonial. In lieu of flowers, the family is asking for donations in her name to the Alzheimer’s Association of Greater Missouri. https:/www.alz.org reatermissouri

Stoecker, Ann

(nee Conrad), age 80, passed away, Friday, October 25, 2019. She was the beloved wife of David Thomas Stoecker, who preceded her in death April 15, 2015; the dear mother of Lisa Stoecker and Susan (William) Fiala; and the loving grandmother of Sarah Jane, Hannah, Emma and Ella; dear sister of Mary Elizabeth (Jon) Armstrong. She was preceded in death by her husband, parents, and two brothers, Donald and Richard Conrad. Ann was born February 17, 1939 in St. Louis to Donald and Elizabeth (nee Engelmann) Conrad. She earned a Bachelor's Degree from Indiana University, Bloomington, and was a proud homemaker, mother, grandmother and sister. Services: Memorial visitation at the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory, 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, Friday, November 29, 2019, from 10:00 a.m. until 12 noon. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Engelmann Family Cemetery Association, Assistance League of St. Louis or to P.E.O. International. Friends may sign the family’s on-line guestbook at Schrader.com.

Celebrations of Life

Sutter, Rita A.

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Florist

Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Friday, Dierbergs Florist Order 24 Hours November 8, 2019. Beloved wife of 314-692-2000 or 800-844-6007 Robert Sutter Sr. of 63 years; Dierbergs.com dearest mother of Bob Jr., Jim (Sally) Sutter and Judy (Rick) Navarre; dear grandmother of Cemeteries and Mausoleums Nicole (Charles), Michelle (fiance Trey), Christie, Allie, Alex, Ashley and Austin; soon to be great- 3 Lots , Memorial Park Cemetery, Sec. 10, Lot 337. Very grandmother; our dear great-aunt, Reasonable, Lucas & Hunt & Hwy. 70. 314-831-1891. cousin and friend of many. Services: Tuesday, November 12, 9:30 a.m. from HUTCHENS Mortuary, 675 Graham Rd. to St. Ferdinand Church, 1765 Charbonier Rd. (Florissant) for 10:00 a.m. Mass. Interment Sacred Heart Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be given to Our Lady's Inn or a Charity of your Choice. Visitation Monday 3:00 - 7:00 p.m. www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com

Unger, Raymond A.

Baptized into the hope of Christ's Resurrection, Wednesday, November 6, 2019. Beloved husband of the late Tessy Ann "T.A." Unger (nee Betz); dearest father of Deborah Gash, Ruth (Anthony) Pendino and Kathy (Don) Lillicrap; loving grandfather of Jen LaPerle, Chris Gash, Kim Stofega, Leandra Kohnen, Melissa Castaldi, Steven Michaeli and Don Lillicrap, Jr.; great-grandfather of Lexi, Tyler, CeCe, Chloe, Lily, Charlie, Emily, Dominic, April and Jessica; our

dear uncle, cousin and friend. Retiree of AB after over 45 years of service and 25-year volunteer at Aging Ahead South County Senior Center. Services: Funeral from KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Wednesday, November 13, 9:30 a.m. to St. Andrew Catholic Church for 10 a.m. Mass. Interment Mt. Olive Cemetery. Memorials to Aging Ahead South County Senior Center, 225 Lemay Ferry Rd. (63125), appreciated. Visitation Tuesday, 3-8 p.m.

Florist Schnucks Florist 65 Metro Locations 314-997-2444; 800-286-9557


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11.10.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A29

BERLIN WALL | 30 YEARS AFTER THE FALL

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

A ship moves under the Glienicke Bridge on Oct. 23 in Potsdam, Germany. The bridge is two shades of green as a result of opposing sides making repairs to the bridge differently.

Reminders of a divided city Signs of East-West split linger after 30 years FRANK JORDANS | Associated Press

T

hirty years after the fall of the Berlin Wall, the German capital — divided for decades by bricks and barbed wire — has slowly grown back together. Few visible scars remain other than those intentionally left in place to remind Berliners and tourists of the brutal border that claimed the lives of scores of East Germans trying to flee the communist country. But those who look closely will spot other signs that the city was once split in half: from stoplights to manhole covers, the differences that marked East and West Berlin have survived into the new century:

Little green men The Ampelmaennchen — literally the “little traffic light man” — was nearly discarded after the fall of the wall in 1989. The slightly portly green figure with a wide-brimmed hat who told East Germans when they could cross the street faced strong competition from his taller, more sober counterpart in the West. But a mixture of nostalgia and common sense prevailed. “Ampelmaennchen is considerably brighter,” said Derk Ehlert, a spokesman for Berlin’s transportation department. In 2004, the city decided to use only the eastern version, and now almost two-thirds of pedestrian traffic lights in Berlin feature the jolly-looking character purposely walking when it’s green, or arms outstretched when it’s red. He’s also a tourist favorite, showing up on tote bags, keychains and even in gummy candy form.

Trams to the East Berlin’s complex public transport system — composed of buses, subway trains, commuter railways and trams — was strictly divided between East and West until reunification. One form of transport that vanished completely from West Berlin was the streetcar system. Tram-spotters nowadays will catch a few outside the former East Berlin. Over the past 30 years, a few lines have been tentatively extended into the West. But by and large, trams remain firmly part of life in the East of the city.

Bridging the divide During the Cold War,the Glienicke Bridge connecting West Berlin to Potsdam in East Germany was famously used as a site for exchanging captured foreign agents. That earned it the nickname “Bridge of Spies” — as seen in the 2015 Tom Hanks film of the same name focused on the exchange of U.S. Air Force pilot Francis Gary Powers for a KGB spy. Because the two opposing sides couldn’t agree to work together when the bridge required repairs, each conducted them separately. The paint was applied differently, and the two shades of green meeting at the middle of the bridge are still clearly visible.

Cold hard cash The East’s ailing economy was expected to converge with that of the capitalist West after a period of transition, but numerous differences remain. Even people who only joined the workforce after German reunification in 1990 will find their pensions adjusted depending on which side of the now-nonexistent wall they worked on. Employees on the same street may get different amounts based on the invisible line that exists to this day.

A manhole cover survives from communist times in Berlin, when Volkseigene Betriebe, or Publicly Owned Enterprises, manufactured manhole covers for East German streets.

Metal plates Aficionados of industrial design should keep their eyes on the road. A wide variety of manhole covers exist in Berlin, with some motifs so fetching that entrepreneurs have taken to selling T-shirts featuring them. Among the more unusual ones are those surviving from communist times, when Volkseigene Betriebe — or Publicly Owned Enterprises — manufactured manhole covers for East German streets. While the East German designs will eventually be replaced because they don’t conform to new standards, Ehlert says there’s an ample supply in storage for now.

Concrete jungle Many buildings in Berlin had become uninhabitable due to the destruction of World War II. Instead of attempting to rebuild the old buildings, the new communist leadership in the East decided to create vast housing projects on the edge of the city using prefabricated concrete slabs that were cheap to produce and assemble. While these so-called Plattenbauten exist in the West of the city, too, they remain most distinctive of the East.

For migrants, stopover in Yemen often means rape, torture BY MAGGIE MICHAEL

Associated Press

RAS AL-ARA, Yemen — Zahra struggled in the blue waters of the Gulf of Aden, grasping for the hands of fellow migrants. Hundreds of men, women and teenagers clambered out of a boat and through the surf emerging, exhausted, on the shores of Yemen. The 20-year-old Ethiopian saw men armed with automatic rifles waiting for them on the beach and she clenched in terror. She had heard migrants’ stories of brutal traffickers, lurking like monsters in a nightmare. They are known by the Arabic nickname AbdulQawi — which means Worshipper of the Strong. “What will they do to us?” Zahra thought. She and 300 other Africans had just endured six hours crammed in a wooden smuggling boat to cross the narrow strait between the Red Sea and the gulf. When they landed, the traffickers loaded them into trucks and drove them to ramshackle compounds in the desert outside the coastal village of Ras al-Ara. There was Zahra’s answer. She was imprisoned for a month in a tin-roofed hut, broiling and hungry, ordered to call home each day to beseech her family to wire $2,000. She said she did not have family she could ask for money and pleaded for her freedom. Instead, her captors raped her. And they raped the 20 other women with her — for weeks, different men all the time. “They used each of the girls,” she told The Associated Press. “Every night there was rape.” With its systematic torture, Ras al-Ara is a particular hell on the arduous, 900-mile journey from the Horn of Africa to oil-rich Saudi Arabia. Migrants leave home on sandaled feet

NARIMAN EL-MOFTY, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Ethiopian migrant Zahra, 20, a rape victim, adjusts her veil for a photograph earlier this year in Basateen, a district of Aden, Yemen. She was imprisoned for a month in a tin-roofed hut, broiling and hungry, ordered to call home each day to beseech her family to wire $2,000. She said she did not have family to ask for money and pleaded for her freedom. Instead, her captors raped her. with dreams of escaping poverty. They trek through mountains and deserts, sandstorms and 113-degree temperatures, surviving on crumbs of bread and salty water from ancient wells. In Djibouti, long lines of migrants descend single file down mountain slopes to the rocky coastal plain, where many lay eyes on the sea for first time and eventually board the boats. Some find their way safely across wartorn Yemen to Saudi Arabia, only to be caught and tossed back over the border. The lucky ones make it into the kingdom and earn their livings as servants and laborers. But others are stranded in Yemen’s nightmare — in some measure because Europe has been

shutting its doors, outsourcing migrants to other countries. More than 150,000 migrants landed in Yemen in 2018, a 50% increase from the year before, according to the International Organization for Migration. This year, more than 107,000 had arrived by the end of September, along with perhaps tens of thousands more the organization was unable to track — or who were buried in graves along the trail. The European Union has provided funding to Ethiopia to crack down on migrant smugglers and intensified border controls. Arrests of known brokers have prompted migrants to turn to unreliable traffickers, taking more

dangerous paths and increasing the risk of abuses. Many of those migrants end up in Ras al-Ara. The AP spoke to more than two dozen Ethiopians who survived torture there. Nearly all reported witnessing deaths, and one man died of starvation hours after the AP saw him. The imprisonment and torture are largely ignored by Yemeni authorities. The AP saw trucks full of migrants passing unhindered through military checkpoints as they went from the beaches to drop their human cargo at each desert compound, known in Arabic as a “hosh.” “The traffickers move freely, in public, giving bribes at the

checkpoints,” said Mohammed Said, a former coast guard officer who now runs a gas station in the center of town. The smugglers are well-known Yemenis and Ethiopians. One of them, a Yemeni named Mohammed al-Usili, runs more than 20 hosh and drives a red Nissan SUV through town. Others belong to Sabaha, one of the biggest tribes in southern Yemen, some of whom are famous for their involvement in illicit businesses. Yemenis call the Sabaha “bandits” who have no political loyalties to any of the warring parties. From time to time, Ethiopians escape or are released and stagger out of the desert into town. Eman Idrees, 27, and her husband were held for eight months by an Ethiopian smuggler. She recalled the savage beatings they endured, which left a scar on her shoulder; the smuggler received $700 to take her to Saudi Arabia, but wouldn’t let her go, because “he wanted me.” Several young men showed deep gashes in their arms from ropes that had bound them. One who had bruises from being lashed with a cable said the women imprisoned in the hosh with him were all raped and three men had died. Another, Ibrahim Hassan, trembled as he showed how he was tied up in like a ball, arms behind his back, knees bound against his chest. The 24-yearold said he was bound like that nonstop for 11 days and frequently beaten. Hassan said he was freed after his father went door to door in their hometown to borrow the $2,600 that the smugglers demanded. “My family is extremely poor,” Hassan said, breaking down in tears. “My father is a farmer and I have five siblings.”


WORLD

11.10.2019 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A29

BERLIN WALL | 30 YEARS LATER Fatima, Portugal

OFF THE WALL Torn-down barrier now art around world DAVID RISING | Associated Press

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or nearly three decades, the Berlin Wall encircled West Berlin, built by communist East German authorities ostensibly to protect the country from “fascists,” but in reality to prevent their own citizens from fleeing into the democratic half of the divided city, a portal to the rest of the free world. For a barrier meant to prevent travel, chips, chunks and full segments of the 97.2 mile-long reinforced concrete Berlin Wall have done a pretty good job themselves getting around Germany and the rest of the world in the past 30 years. The Berlin Wall divided the city from 1961 until it was first opened on Nov. 9, 1989, though it took much longer to be removed entirely. In Berlin today, some symbolic segments still stand in their original locations, left in place as a reminder of what was known as the front line of the Cold War, a daily physical reminder of the metaphorical Iron Curtain between eastern and western Europe during those tense times. As jubilant Germans tore at the Berlin Wall in 1989, many pocketed small pieces to take with them, and small stands were set up almost immediately by the more enterprising to sell larger chunks as souvenirs. Today, bits of unknown provenance are still for sale in tourist shops in the German capital. Larger slabs have been purchased or given to display in museums, embassies, schools, parks, memorials and in other locations around the world.

Tokyo

Jakarta, Indonesia

Las Vegas

Frankfurt, Germany

New York

San Jose, Costa Rica

London

Tallinn, Estonia

Brussels

Normandy, France


NEWS

A30 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 11.10.2019

Hospitals may do more harm by keeping patients in bed according to her cousin and caretaker, Melissa Rowley. “They’re not letting me get up out of bed,” Twigg protested in phone calls, Rowley recalled. In just a few days at the Ohio hospital,where she had no occupational or physical therapy, Twigg grew so weak that it took three months of rehab to regain the ability to walk and take care of herself, Rowley said. Twigg repeated

BY MELISSA BAILEY

Tribune News Service

Dorothy Twigg was living on her own, cooking and walking without help until a dizzy spell landed her in the emergency room. She spent three days confined to a hospital bed, allowed to get up only to use a bedside commode.Twigg,who was in her 80s, was livid about being stuck in a bed with side rails and a motion sensor alarm,

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the same pattern — three days in bed in a hospital, three months of rehab — at least five times in two years. Falls remain the leading cause of fatal and nonfatal injuries for older Americans. Hospitals face financial penalties when they occur. Nurses and aides get blamed or reprimanded if a patient under their supervision hits the ground. But hospitals have become so overzealous in fall prevention that they are producing an “epidemic of immobility,” experts say. To ensure that patients will never fall, hospitalized patients who could benefit from activity

are told not to get up on their own — their bedbound state reinforced by bed alarms and a lack of staff to help them move. That’s especially dangerous for older patients, often weak to begin with. After just a few days of bed rest, their muscles can deteriorate enough to bring severe longterm consequences. “Older patients face staggering rates of disability after hospitalizations,” said Dr. Kenneth Covinsky, a geriatrician and researcher at the University of San FranciscoCalifornia. His research found that one-third of patients age 70 and older leave

the hospital more disabled than when they arrived. The first penalties took effect in 2008, when the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services declared that falls in hospitals should never happen. Those penalties are not severe: If a patient gets hurt in a hospital fall, CMS still pays for the patient’s care but no longer bumps up payment to a higher tier to cover treatment of fall-related conditions. Still, Covinsky said that policy has created “a climate of fear of falling,” where nurses“feel that if somebody falls on their watch,they’ll be blamed for it.” The result, he

said, is “patients are told not to move,” and they don’t get the help they need. To make matters worse, he added, when patients grow weaker, they are more likely to get hurt if they fall. Congress introduced stiffer penalties with the Affordable Care Act, and CMS began to reduce federal payments by 1% for the quartile of hospitals with the highest rates of falls and other hospital-acquired conditions. That’s substantial because nearly a third of U.S. hospitals have negative operating margins, according to the American Hospital Association.

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STLTODAY.COM/LIFE • STLTODAY.COM/GO • SUNDAY • 11.10.2019 • B

ARTS + HOME + TRAVEL

CRISTINA M. FLETES, POST-DISPATCH

St. Louis Art Museum members listen as docent Susan Toelle explains the piece “Burning Rods” by Anselm Kiefer at a Member Mornings event Oct. 29.

PERKS CLUB

Is membership worth it?

BY VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN | St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Even for St. Louis’ free museums, it pays dividends

A

s the insurance companies and credit unions like to say: It pays to be a member. • But at so many St. Louis institutions and museums, where so many offer free admission anyway, does membership really pay? • If you’d like free or reduced admission to other museums and gardens around the country, sure. If you want to get invited to special events, receive newsletters and magazines with behind-the-scenes information, and meet like-minded neighbors, yes. Please see MEMBERSHIP, Page B4

Nate Chinen dives deep into evolution of jazz

A battle of words among lawyers

‘Playing Changes’ addresses how artists are expanding the genre and moving it forward

BILL McCLELLAN

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Two seasoned attorneys faced off at the Missouri Supreme Court in Jefferson City on Wednesday morning. Alan Pratzel, acting in the role of prosecutor, spoke first and told the judges that attorney John K. Sheehan of Kirkwood had violated rules of professional conduct and should have his law license suspended indefinitely with no leave to reapply for two years. Richard Wuestling, acting in the role of defense attorney, then said the same thing, that Sheehan had violated rules of professional conduct and should have his law license suspended indefinitely with no leave to reapply for two years. The judges seemed to listen intently. Hmm. This was a tough one. And actually, it is. The real dispute has to do with a few words. How do you define a lawyer who has gone off the rails? No one disputes that Sheehan has. He was the family lawyer for Carl and Geraldine Weber and their son Scott. Please see MCCLELLAN, Page B2

BY DANIEL DURCHHOLZ LAURIE SKRIVAN, POST-DISPATCH

the private data of women who came to the one remaining abortion provider in Missouri. These investigators analyzed patients’ self-reported menstrual cycle dates along with abortion procedure dates on a hunt to find medical complications, which are rare. It looks like the state was trying to build a political case to shut down the lone Planned Parenthood clinic, but that’s probably just our lady hormones acting up. Please see SULTAN, Page B2

Please see CHINEN, Page B6

Hey, Missouri officials, let’s talk about our periods AISHA SULTAN

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Since Missouri’s department of health is so interested, let’s talk about our periods. Put aside your spreadsheet, and pull up a chair, Dr. Randy Williams. As the Kansas City Star first reported, your health department investigators filtered through

Special to the Post-Dispatch

When jazz critic Nate Chinen talks about artists whose recent work excites him, he’s quick to mention vocalist Cecile McLorin Salvant. Hers is the first name encountered in Chinen’s book “Playing Changes: Jazz for the New Century,” which he will discuss at two Jazz St. Louis events this week, and its placement there is by design. “In some ways, it’s a book about our changing relationship to tradition,” Chinen Chinen said by phone from his home in New York’s Hudson Valley. “The way we talked about the jazz tradition at the end of the 20th century is different from the way we talk about it now.” Chinen sees McLorin Salvant as having solved one of the essential questions facing jazz artists today: how to absorb and acknowledge the genre’s long and

Activists wearing costumes inspired by “The Handmaid’s Tale” stand in silence Oct. 31 outside the Wainwright State Office Building before hearings between Planned Parenthood and the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services.

AT HOME MIDCENTURY RANCH IS FILLED WITH COLOR, VINTAGE CHARM

BOOKS LINDY WEST RECKONS WITH SOCIETY IN ‘WITCHES ARE COMING’

TRAVEL NATIONAL VETERANS MUSEUM IN OHIO TELLS A STORY

Page B3

Page B7

Page B9 STLLIFE

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ON OUR RADAR

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

AMY BERTRAND lifestyle and features editor abertrand@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8284

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GABE HARTWIG deputy features editor ghartwig@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8353

M 1 • SUnDAy • 11.10.2019

JANE HENDERSON books editor jhenderson@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8107

DONNA BISCHOFF vice president of advertising dbischoff@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8529

Felicity is a 6-month-old Parson Russell terrier mix puppy with expressive ears and a fun-loving personality. Give her a squeaky toy or ball, and she’ll be the center of entertainment. Because she’s still a puppy, Felicity would love a family to help her with housetraining, obedience and all the other skills she needs to be a very good girl. Felicity’s tail is always wagging — and she is so cute, she’ll wag her way right into your home and heart.

Seven-month-old Rebecca is a “purrfect” patchwork of orange and black fur with striking green eyes. Rebecca is ready to chase feathers, crinkle balls, toy mice and any other toy you’ve got. She’s an active kitten who knows how to use the litter box and the basics of being a good kitty. Rebecca would love a family that will spend lots of time playing with her, cuddling her once she’s all tuckered out and giving her the security of a loving forever home.

To adopt • Apply in person at the Humane Society’s Best Buddy Pet Center in Maryland Heights.

To adopt • Apply in person at the Humane Society’s Macklind Avenue headquarters in St. Louis.

PETS OF THE WEEK

PREP SCHOOL Our food writer Daniel Neman shows you how to make savory French toast. stltoday.com/food

CONTEST TIME! • Did you take a great travel photo this year? We want to see it. • Do you have a yummy holiday cookie recipe? We want to eat it. Enter at stltoday.com/contests

Manny is an 11-year-old Toggenburg goat cross who is friendly and loves people. He was born at the Humane Society’s Longmeadow Rescue Ranch and was adopted when he was young but unfortunately was returned due to personal circumstances. As the lone goat on the ranch property, he currently resides with three donkeys, so he is good with sharing space and making friends with other farm animals. For the month of November, Manny’s adoption fee is $15 off to celebrate Adopt a Senior Pet Month. To adopt • Apply in person at Longmeadow Rescue Ranch in Union. Visit longmeadowrescueranch.org for hours, directions and more information.

Last week’s featured pets • A cat named Sarah and a guinea pig named EmEm are still available for adoption. A dog named Asher has been adopted.

NEW ON DVD MOVIES Coming Tuesday • “Good Boys”; “The Angry Birds Movie 2”; “47 Meters Down: Uncaged”; “The Peanut Butter Falcon”; “The Farewell”; “Brian Banks”; “After the Wedding”; “Snow White Christmas”; “Polaroid”; “The Weekend” Coming Nov. 19 • “Dora and the Lost City of Gold”; “Blinded by the Light”; “Cold War”; “American Dreamer”; “Catch-22” TELEVISION Coming Tuesday • “Cobra Kai,” Seasons 1-2; “Poldark,” Season 5; “Star Trek: Discovery,” Season 2; “The 100,” Season 6; “The Big Bang Theory,” Season 12 Coming Nov. 19 • “The Handmaid’s Tale,” Season 3; “The Kominsky Method,” Season 1

For hours and directions • hsmo.org

GARDENING Q&A

LAURIE SKRIVAN, POST-DISPATCH

Dr. Randall Williams, director of the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, answers questions during his testimony on the second day of hearings between Planned Parenthood and Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services.

Sultan From B1 SID HASTINGS

Wait to divide hostas until spring BY CHIP TYNAN

Missouri Botanical Garden

Q • I need to know when is the best time to divide hostas and how to do it?

A • Spring, just as new growth begins, is the ideal time. However, fall division is OK but perennials need about six to eight weeks of good growing weather to re-establish themselves in fall, so division needs to have been done by mid-October. Division can be done by either digging the entire plant and cutting it into several sections, or leaving the plant in the ground and just slicing off a chunk of the root in place. Just make sure each division contains one or more “eyes” (dormant shoot or bud), plus a section of roots attached. Write to Chip Tynan of the Missouri Botanical Garden at chip.tynan@mobot.org or Horticultural Answer Service, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, 63110.

THINGS TO DO IN THE GARDEN THIS WEEK • Drain in-ground irrigation systems before winter weather arrives. • Clean leaves and other debris from house gutters. • Rough-tilling vegetable garden soils in fall exposes pests to winter cold, reducing their numbers next year. garden soils in fall exposes pests to winter cold, reducing their numbers next year.ed in fall. • Plan now for late autumn foliage color next year. “Red Sunset” and “October Glory” red maples, Japanese maples, American smoketree and Virginia sweetspire are among the most reliable producers of late-fall leaf color in local gardens. • Complete fall fertilization of trees, shrubs and cool-season lawns. Most roots are actively growing and absorbing nutrients as long as soil temperatures remain above 40 degrees.

However, once the rest of the country learned about how patients’ medical data were being used by your investigators, even plenty of non-menstruating people were horrified. Did these women consent to turning their menstrual cycle information over to the state to be used for political purposes? It seems counterintuitive that women seeking an abortion would want their private medical information used in an attempt to shut down the only place in the state that they can get one. But Randy knows best, right? Of course, the department denies that you ever asked for or even had possession of this information, which was emailed around

McClellan From B1

Carl, who died in 2014, had been a traveling salesman. Women’s wear. He was long retired at the time of his death. Geraldine, who died less than a year after her husband, stayed home and reared their three children. Scott was the youngest of those kids. He had cerebral palsy and lived at home with his parents. He died in 2011 at the age of 49. He never married and had no children. Sheehan had prepared Scott’s will. He also served as the personal representative for his estate. Sheehan also prepared trusts for Carl and Geraldine. He was trustee for both estates. From the beginning — that is, the time of Scott’s death — there were problems. Surviving family members were unable to get any information. The problems worsened with the deaths of Carl and Geraldine. Litigation followed. In September 2017, a probate court

with an “erroneous” subject line marking it “Director’s Request.” And we’re sure it has nothing to do with the state’s Republican lawmakers’ personal crusade to deny women the right to make their own health care decisions. You have to admit that our Legislature pays special attention to men’s opinions and beliefs about whether women they’ve never met should be forced to carry a fetus and give birth after they’ve been raped. We can see how that might lead you to think your speculum can slide into any lady’s private data, Randy, but hold up one bloody minute. If the state is so deeply concerned about our reproductive health, why did your department try earlier this year to force doctors to perform additional, medically unnecessary vaginal exams three days before an abortion? Doctors already perform a pelvic exam

just before a procedure. This seemed like another weirdly invasive call by your department. Unsurprisingly, it led to another national outcry. Eventually, you backed down from that new requirement, but we can’t help but notice a strange pattern here. You’re awfully interested in what’s happening with our vaginas. So, we’re going to save you and your department from creating another Aunt Flo registry. Here’s what women can tell you about tracking our periods. Our cycles can be irregular. We don’t always exactly recall the first day of our last cycle. We trust our doctors far more than government bureaucrats to advise us on our medical options and risks. We see through politicians’ lip service about being “prolife” when they won’t act to lower the state’s sky-high rate of gun deaths or the high

in St. Louis County entered a judgment against Sheehan for $46,620 for “unaccounted for/and unauthorized expenditures” regarding Scott’s estate. In January 2018, a similar judgment was entered against Sheehan for $224,734 in regards to the estates of Carl and Geraldine. Also, a bar complaint. That’s a layperson’s term. In Missouri, complaints against attorneys are directed to the Supreme Court’s Office of Chief Disciplinary Counsel. If the OCDC substantiates the complaint, it goes to a threeperson Disciplinary Hearing Panel for a trial. Not surprisingly, the complaint against Sheehan was substantiated. Pratzel heads the OCDC. He investigates lawyers. It’s a tough job, like a cop working in internal affairs. People in your world don’t quite trust you, and outsiders question your zeal. Wuestling defends lawyers. That’s a joking matter unless you’re a lawyer in distress. They worked out a pretrial agreement in which both sides agreed — stipulated — that

Sheehan had been guilty of professional misconduct, but not misconduct involving dishonesty, fraud or deceit. After all, the judgments cited only unaccounted or unauthorized expenditures. The agreement also included the indefinite suspension. But at the subsequent trial, the panel chairperson, Elizabeth McCarter, said, “To me, as a probate attorney, when you pay yourself an excessive fee without the consent of the heirs, you have misappropriated funds from the estate. That’s like stealing money.” So she unstipulated the stipulated facts. She accepted the deal but included the part about dishonesty and fraud and deceit. That is what the hearing Wednesday was about. Should her override of the deal stand? Pratzel and Wuestling agreed it should not. The agreement was reached before the trial. I am not sure what to think. What I mean is, what happened? Sheehan has been practicing law since 1979. Apparently, he has never had a complaint lodged against him.

maternal mortality rate. Hypocrisy leaves the nastiest stain. Perhaps state officials have miscalculated how some women are going to respond to these extreme measures to control, track and regulate our bodies. Women in suburban areas in Missouri may not be so keen on having a governmental cycle tracker. Earlier this week, voters in a traditionally Republican St. Louis suburb flipped the 99th District state House seat in a massive swing. In 2018, the Republican candidate won this seat by 6 percentage points. Democrat Trish Gunby beat her opponent on Tuesday by 8. Track those numbers, Randy. Aisha Sultan • 314-340-8300 Home and family editor @aishas on Twitter asultan@post-dispatch.com

And then suddenly this. I tried unsuccessfully to reach him, and he was not at the hearing Wednesday. As far as I can tell, his defense seems to be that he just quit keeping track of things. I can imagine that. Life has a certain momentum, and it’s downhill. You miss a few things and pretty soon it’s hopeless. Then you let go. I remember when I quit going to class in college. Under that admittedly charitable view, the expenditures were valid, just undocumented, and there was no fraud or dishonesty or deceit. Or just a little. By the way, Sheehan could have accepted the verdict. The penalty is the same: Indefinite suspension with no leave to reapply for two years. This case seems far too vague to ever get to criminal court. Why then the challenge? What’s the point? I asked Wuestling. He looked at me in disbelief, like I had asked a really dumb question. Bill McClellan • 314-340-8143 @Bill_McClellan on Twitter bmcclellan@post-dispatch.com


11.10.2019 • Sunday • M 1

HOME

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B3

AT HOME WITH MARTINA AND DAVE DEVINE

A window over the bed in the master bedroom was closed off The original front door with a fanciful doorknob. “We’re huge by previous owners for privacy reasons. Martina used it as an preservationists, so we can’t just buy something new and get opportunity to bring in more color and visual interest. what we want,” says Martina Devine.

The Devines’ love of Elvis is on prominent display throughout the house, including the foyer, which features multiple photos of the King mounted on wood.

COLOR, VINTAGE CHARM FILL ST. LOUIS HILLS HOME BY AMY BURGER

Special to the Post-Dispatch

Though they just closed on their midcentury ranch in St. Louis Hills Estates a couple of months ago, Martina and Dave Devine have already settled in and filled the home with their own unique vintage style. Their adventure began when Martina stumbled upon some real estate photos of the home’s fully intact original crimson and pink tile bathroom. A real-estate agent, she likes to take photos of vintage bathrooms she sees in houses and share them on her Instagram. “I came just to get photos of it and decided that I had to buy it. It just had a feeling to it,” she says. She went home and told Dave about her revelation. He remembers, “I knew from her tone of voice that it was going to happen. It was just a matter of how soon.” Built in 1954, the house was well-preserved, including original features like the tile bathroom, the kitchen with all-metal cabinetry and beautifully restored hardwood floors. “We’re huge preservationists, so we can’t just buy something new and get what we want,” says Martina. Both Dave and Martina have collected midcentury modern furnishings and accessories since their teens. Their previous home in nearby Lindenwood Park was built in the 1920s, and while they filled it with their collected style, it was never an ideal a match. “I told Dave, wait until you see our furniture in this house,” says Martina. “We kept trying to make our furniture fit into a 1920s home.” Their furniture, vintage artwork and collectibles (much of it purchased at the Future Antiques on Chippewa) is on display in every room, as are numerous pictures of Elvis, a shared obsession. From the bright turquoise foyer to the sunny yellow living room with accent stripes, to the powder pink ceiling in the dining room, the house is a Crayon-box of colors that match Martina’s electric personality. “Color is my favorite color,” she jokes. Of Spanish descent, Martina also has a number of collectibles and artwork featuring toreadors and flamenco dancers (her grandmother was one), some passed down from her family, and others purchased in homage. The culture also helped influence her color choices. “I wanted it to feel really warm and have an adobe feeling, so I knew I wanted golds and aquas and sages,” she says. For Dave, the knotty pine basement rec room is what sold him on the house. The spacious room is perfect for entertaining as well as relaxing and watching TV. Shelves above the built-in bar offer the ideal spot to show off a pair of vintage Pabst Blue Ribbon round lights Dave has had for more than 20 years. The furniture, velvet paintings and a ’70s-inspired shag rug from Novogratz complete the groovy vibe. The biggest project the Devines have tackled since purchasing the house was rebuilding a small room

PHOTOS BY HILLARY LEVIN, POST-DISPATCH

The living room is painted sunny yellow, with a multi-colored stripe on two walls. Turquoise accents pick up the color of the foyer. Midcentury furniture is mixed with modern touches, like the wall shelving units from CB2.

The knotty pine finished basement rec room with its built-in bar is what sold the house for Dave. A Retro Wave Red Shag rug from Novogratz adds to the room’s groovy vibe.

The original crimson and pink tile bathroom is what first drew Martina to the house, simply to photograph it. The Devines feel lucky it remains in such perfectly preserved condition.

One of the Devines’ first projects was restoring this addition room, once a screened porch that was in dilapidated condition. The light-filled space now serves as Martina’s home office. off the dining room that was originally a screened porch. While previous owners had enclosed the space, years of neglect left the wood rotting and the space infested with ants. They replaced the walls, both interior and exterior, as well as the windows and painted the room a soft mint green to create a cozy home office for Martina Spanish artwork throughout the house is a nod to Martina’s overlooking the back yard. family heritage. The dining room features a pink cove ceiling. Now, it’s her favorite spot. The midcentury dining table belonged to Dave’s grandfather. That, and of course, the vintage bathroom that started it all. Now that they’ve had a chance to settle in, the Devines are enjoying their new neighborhood, meeting neighbors and continuing to perfect their unique space. “We are trying to put our personal touch on it,” says Martina. “It’s an absolute dream come true for us.”

In a corner of the living room, Martina hand-painted a multicolored stripe pattern. A vintage salon hair dryer chair she has had since her teen years adds a touch of fun punctuated with a pink throw pillow.

Martina and Dave Devine Ages • She is 36; he is 49. Occupations • Martina is a real-estate agent with Garcia Properties, and Dave is owner of the Southtown Barber Shop. Home • St. Louis Hills Estates


B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

STL LIFE

M 1 • SUnDAy • 11.10.2019

Membership From B1

Museums and institutions like to have members because they want feedback, they appreciate the reliable money source, and they want people to act as advocates. The St. Louis Art Museum has just under 18,000 memberships, and they love it when those people spread the word, said Jennifer Thomas, director of annual programs. “If their friend says, ‘Oh, I haven’t been there since my fourth grade field trip,’ they can tell them to go. Those are things we can’t buy — their seal of approval.” Many institutions offer discount memberships around the holiday shopping season, especially Cyber Monday. Watch their social media accounts and websites.

St. Louis Art Museum Starts at $65 for membership for two More info • slam.org The museum likes to highlight its reciprocal program, where members at the $150 level get discounted or free admission to more than 900 art museums throughout the country. But one of the most popular benefits of a membership is the museum’s Member Morning program, where people come in before the museum opens to the general public to do a docent tour of the permanent collection. Members get “the ability to really engage with the art in a different way, even if they’ve looked at the piece 12 times in over 10 years,” said Thomas. One group of friends meets for Member Mornings once a month. Some first met about seven years ago, growing to about eight regulars who now share pictures of grandchildren and family trips. They start the morning meeting for coffee, attend the lecture or tour, and then end the outing with lunch at Panorama, the museum’s restaurant. “I think we just find the St. Louis Art Museum a treasure, and of course the docents are wonderful, said Fran Schlapprizzi, 81, of south St. Louis County. She and friend Ann Schmid both used the word “serendipitous” when describing the group’s evolution. “I know many people come because they love art,” said Schmid, 72, a retired gifted education teacher from Weldon Spring. “The friendships are a bonus.”

PHOTOS BY CRISTINA M. FLETES, POST-DISPATCH

A group of friends, seated at the far right table, meets at Panorama, a restaurant in the St. Louis Art Museum. The friends are all members of the St. Louis Art Museum and most have been meeting together at the art museum for about six years. popular among extended families who might visit one another in other cities that also have children’s museums, she said. Most memberships offer 50 percent discounts at 200 children’s museums around the country.

St. Louis Science Center Memberships start at $50 for science supporter membership

Noëlle Gunter points as she observes different elements in the piece “Burning Rods” by Anselm Kiefer during a Member Mornings event at the St. Louis Art Museum on Oct. 29. She is flanked by friends Fran Schlapprizzi, left, 81, of Affton, and Ann Schmid, 72, of Weldon Spring. a zoo in another city where they can get free or discounted admission with their St. Louis Zoo membership. The membership makes for more aware visitors, who can spread the word about what the zoo does beyond its walls. “They really have a sense of pride; they see what we’re doing in the zoo but also in the wild,” she said. “We find that our members understand our conservation efforts better than nonmembers.”

Missouri Botanical Garden Starts at $50 for individual membership More info • mobot.org Kate Gleason, in charge of membership programs at the Missouri Botanical Garden, says members often don’t realize they get free admission to the garden as well as its two sister institutions: the Shaw Nature Reserve in Grey Summit and the Butterfly House in Chesterfield. They also may not know about the reciprocal program: Members can get free or reduced admission to 320 other botanical gardens, many of which have higher admissions than Mobot. Members can come to a monthly lecture speaker series, get a discount on a class or to events like the Garden Glow or the Best of Missouri Market. “I don’t think people think of the social benefits of being a member,” she said. “You really are joining a network of friends and like-minded supporters. Even in our membership base, which is around 45,000 people, you tend to see the same people over and over again.”

St. Louis Zoo Starts at $50 for conservation advocate or senior/student membership More info • stlzoo.org Members of the zoo might enjoy perks like free parking, discounts on special events like Boo at the Zoo, and even a zoo

Magic House Ann Schmid, left, of Weldon Spring, shows Noëlle Gunter, 78, of St. Louis, photos of her newborn grandchild, during lunch with friends at Panorama in the St. Louis Art Museum. Also pictured are Lindy Stacy, center right, 65, of St. Peters, and Mary Wojciechowski, far right, 74, of Kirkwood.

Memberships start at $25 for individual child membership, $50 family membership for the Magic House@MADE

More info • magichouse.org For the Magic House, the membership program is about making sure families can afford to go often and think of it as a welcoming backyard spot. Members get the chance to bring in four friends on the Fourth Friday of the month, giving families a chance to arrange a standing playdate. Guests also get unlimited half-price admission. Grandparents also have a special membership, starting at $125 for two grandparents and up to four grandchildren. Spokeswoman Carrie Hutchcraft knows of one gentleman who comes every Wednesday for a special day out. “It’s a chance for us to build relationships with those famiKatie Ward, 74, of St. Peters, looks at a painting by Kehinde Wiley during a lies,” she said. “They’re our more Member Mornings event at the St. Louis Art Museum. frequent visitors. They’re more likely to have a birthday party chuckle. “Usually it’s because it here, more likely to come for calendar with animal photos. summer camp, and our best hasn’t been mailed yet.” The calendar has become a bit Members also enjoy the “brag- shoppers are our most loyal of a collectors’ item, says Lucia Clifton, director of membership. ging rights” they get by being the visitors as well. For us, it’s about “If people don’t get their calen- first invited to see a new exhibit, ways St. Louis families can come here, and it becomes their own.” such as Grizzly Ridge, she said. dar, we get calls — ‘I don’t have Museum memberships are Others plan a vacation around my calendar!’” she says with a

More info • slsc.org The St. Louis Science Center knows many of its 16,000 members know about the basic benefits of memberships: free tickets to the Omnimax theater, Planetarium and Discovery Room, and discounts on things like summer camp and special exhibits. They also ask members to come in and look at prototypes for special exhibits and get involved in the design process. They’ve developed more programs and events around membership, getting about 6,000 members in the last two and a half years. “Our members become invested, and they are fans,” said Amy Martin, the senior director overseeing individual giving and membership. “They believe in our mission work.” She said two members who gave feedback on their recent Destination Moon exhibit got photos taken in front of the Apollo 11 capsule and used that picture in their wedding invitation, which they sent to membership staff at the center. Science center members are part of the Association of Science-Technology Centers Passport program, which gets them free or discounted admission to science museums around the country and world. “What we really like about a membership is it’s more about purchasing an item, it’s about expanding people’s minds and really engaging them in a variety of science topics and areas,” she said.

Other museum memberships Missouri History Museum, $75 and up, mohistory.org/support/ membership-benefits National Blues Museum, $50 and up, nationalbluesmuseum.org/ membership/ International Photography Hall of Fame, $55 and up, iphf.org/ donate-now/#become-member Contemporary Art Museum, $35 and up, camstl.org/join-give/ membership/ Miniature Museum of Greater St. Louis, $15 and up, miniaturemuseum.org/ Membership.html Gateway Arch Park Foundation, $50 and up, archpark.org/support/ membership Forest Park Forever, $50 and up, forestparkforever.org/join Valerie Schremp Hahn • 314-340-8246 @valeriehahn on Twitter vhahn@post-dispatch.com


11.10.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B5


B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

ARTS

M 1 • SUNDAY • 11.10.2019

Chinen From B1

incredibly rich history without being trapped into merely emulating it. “Cecile is so deeply in tune with jazz history and with cultural history,” Chinen says. “She’s not just retracing those steps; she’s really interrogating it, she’s turning it on its side, she’s finding her own way to speak that language.” Of course, there’s no one prescribed method of approaching jazz, and “Playing Changes” addresses some of the myriad ways that today’s artists are expanding the genre and moving the music forward. The book profiles a host of jazz innovators including pianists Vijay Iyer, Jason Moran, Brad Mehldau, Robert Glasper and “Late Show With Stephen Colbert” bandleader Jon Batiste; guitarist Mary Halvorson; saxophonists Kamasi Washington, Steve Coleman, John Zorn (who studied at Webster University) and Donny McCaslin, whose band accompanied David Bowie on his final album; and bassist Esperanza Spalding, who has used social media to lay bare her creative process. “Playing Changes” is a deep dive into the language of jazz and the mysteries of artistic creation, but it’s intended for a general audience. “I wrote the book certainly with the idea that a jazz initiate would appreciate it and get something out of it,” Chinen says. “I didn’t want it to be too insidebaseball.” Chinen is the editorial director of Newark, N.J., jazz radio station WBGO, a frequent contributor to NPR music coverage and also works closely with the multimedia program “Jazz Night in America,” which last year produced a program featuring the Bad Plus playing live at the Ferring Jazz Bistro. Previously, he was a regular contributor to the New York Times and a longtime columnist for JazzTimes. The book opens with a provocative chapter on Washington, whom some have crowned a new jazz savior — the implication being, of course, that jazz needs saving. “I really do feel like we weren’t talking about jazz saviors prior to the period where jazz stopped being a popular music,” Chinen says. Rock ’n’ roll took

“Playing Changes: Jazz for the New Century” By Nate Chinen Published by Vintage, 288 pages, $16.95

Nate Chinen With the Jazz St. Louis Book Club When • 7 p.m. Tuesday Where • Nancy’s Lounge, Harold and Dorothy Steward Center for Jazz, 3536 Washington Boulevard How much • Free; ticket required More info • jazzstl.org Whitaker Jazz Speaks presentation on “Playing Changes” When • 7 p.m. Wednesday Where • Schlafly library auditorium, 225 North Euclid Avenue How much • Free ASSOCIATED PRESS

More info • jazzstl.org

Kamasi Washington performs May 3 at the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival. hold commercially in the late 1950s, after which jazz became “something much more elevated — more of a sophisticated niche taste.” Chinen charts that course by which jazz came to be called, in that famous — and to some degree infamous — phrase, “America’s classical music.” As jazz staked out its cultural significance, it emphasized preservation over innovation and sought institutional support and academic respectability. In short, it went uptown. Its power center is quite literally in uptown Manhattan: Jazz at Lincoln Center. Along with its managing and artistic director, Wynton Marsalis — who in his earlier days was hailed as a jazz savior, too — JALC became a symbol of the stultifying conservatism that eventually took hold

of the music. On the one hand, Chinen says, the success of Jazz at Lincoln Center “is self-evident, and I think it’s a really positive thing. But there’s a cost to that, in the sense that, if jazz is high culture, it’s no longer in touch with the noise and chaos of the streets.” As for Marsalis, Chinen says he sought to present a nuanced portrait of him in the book. “I have enormous admiration for him, but I also harbor certain ambivalences about his philosophy. To me, he’s definitely not a villain, but he’s also not unequivocally a hero. It’s complicated.” Still, with notable exceptions like New York’s downtown scene, centered at the Knitting Factory, the latter decades of the 20th century were rife with the sense that jazz was walling itself off and constantly policing its borders.

“In the ’90s, I was aware of a constant set of questions around defining the music,” Chinen says. “What is jazz, and when you say that, what are you excluding? I feel like, with the rise of another generation of artists, those questions feel increasingly irrelevant and beside the point.” One of those artists is Glasper, who, around the turn of the century, was among a number of jazz musicians who began to collaborate with hip-hop, R&B and soul artists, creating new hybrids as they went along. For his part, Glasper doesn’t seem to feel the need to be polite about it. His most recent release is a mixtape featuring guest artists ranging from Herbie Hancock and Bilal to Andra Day and Yassin Bey (formerly Mos Def). It’s titled “F— Yo Feelings.” “You know, Glasper likes to

stir the pot,” Chinen says with a laugh. “But really, I see him as really important in terms of changing the conversation around jazz’s relationship to black music.” When Glasper arrived on the scene, he says, “it wasn’t all that intuitive for pop or hip-hop or R&B artists to seek out jazz musicians to collaborate, and Glasper really made it a natural evolution.” The results, Chinen contends, “have implications that go far beyond whatever our genre silo may be when you consider that this conversation includes Kendrick Lamar, Brittany Howard, people like Flying Lotus, Anderson.Paak and Solange. There’s a whole constellation of really interesting African American artists who are in dialogue with jazz, even if you wouldn’t call what they’re making jazz.”

Digital James Dean cast in new film sparks an outcry BY JAKE COYLE

Associated Press

NETFLIX

Glutz (left, voiced by Jillian Bell) and McWinkle (Jeffrey Wright) in the series “Green Eggs and Ham.”

Netflix serves up ‘Green Eggs and Ham’ with all-star cast BY LYNN ELBER

at green eggs and ham and Adam Associated Press Devine as Sam-I-am, the dish’s cheerleader. Other big-name LOS ANGELES — When actors along for the ride include screenwriter Jared Stern was Diane Keaton, Eddie Izzard, approached about developTracy Morgan, John Turturro ing Dr. Seuss’ “Green Eggs and and Jeffrey Wright. (“Having Ham” as an animated series, he Ellen DeGeneres as an executive sought advice from one imporproducer certainly helps,” Stern tant woman and the consent of said.) another. Stern understood Audrey “I mentioned it to my grandGeisel’s initial doubts, since he mother, and she said, ‘That was shared them when the project your favorite book when you were little. You used to read it to was proposed by Kleeman, president of DeGeneres’ producme all the time,’” Stern fondly tion company. Stern’s first reacrecalled. “I basically learned to tion: Why mess with perfection? read reading this book.” Then he gave the 1960 book But he needed more than another look. grandma behind him. The “I started flipping through project required approval from it and realized, ‘Oh, it’s an odd the widow of Theodor Geisel, couple.’ There’s the grumpy guy the singular writer known as who’s closed off to things and a Dr. Seuss. So Stern and fellow playful guy who’s open to things. executive producer Jeff KleeAnd not only that, it’s a road trip man made a pilgrimage to her San Diego-area home about five because he won’t eat the eggs years ago. Audrey Geisel died last in a car, on a train, on a boat — here, there and everywhere,” he year; her husband died in 1991. said, allowing the original story “I had to pitch the story to her, and it was incredibly scary,” to be opened up while staying Stern said. “Once it was over, she true to its message and spirit. Devine, of the “Pitch Perfect” said something to the effect of, ‘I movies and TV’s “The Righteous wondered what you were going Gemstones” and “Modern Famto do with this. But I think you ily,” said he focused on bringing really captured it, and you have “manic little-kid enthusiasm” to our blessing.’” Sam-I-Am. The result is a 13-episode “I’m basically doing an series that debuted Friday on impression of myself opening Netflix with a voice cast that includes Michael Douglas as the Christmas presents. ... Just how character who turns up his nose excited you would get when

you’re a kid, and you want to explain all your toys and explain how you’re going to play with them,” Devine said. The series lets him play with his lines. “The dialogue is just so fun. When you actually get through a chunk where you’re doing a lot of Seussian-type dialogue, you feel so good about yourself.” Stern, whose big-screen animation writing credits include “The Lego Batman Movie” and “Wreck-It Ralph,” has a close familiarity with the various styles of animation, including the now-common CGI. But the majority of the characters and backgrounds in “Green Eggs and Ham” are traditional 2D handdrawn animation, which evokes Seuss’ charming storybook illustrations and involved 300 artists over the course of four years of production. That severely tested her patience, joked DeGeneres. But the result is something parents who remember the book warmly can watch with their kids, she said, and without having their own limits pushed. “It’s great for kids and it’s great for parents to have on without being annoyed. It’s not going to be somebody singing, ‘Baby shark, doo doo doo doo doo doo,’” she said reciting the omnipresent video ditty. “That could drive parents crazy.”

NEW YORK — James Dean hasn’t been alive in 64 years, but the “Rebel Without a Cause” actor has been cast in a new film about the Vietnam War. The filmmakers behind the independent film “Finding Jack” said Wednesday that a computergenerated Dean will play a costarring role in the upcoming production. The digital Dean is to be assembled through old footage and photos and voiced by another actor. Digitally manipulated posthumous performances have made some inroads into films. But those have been largely roles the actors already played, including Carrie Fisher and Peter Cushing, who first appeared together in “Star Wars” and were prominently featured in the 2016 spinoff “Rogue One.” But the prospect of one of the movies’ most beloved former stars being digitally resurrected was met with widespread criticism after the news was first reported by The Hollywood Reporter. Chris Evans, the “Captain America” actor, was among those who called the plans disrespectful and wrongheaded. “Maybe we can get a computer to paint us a new Picasso. Or write a couple new John Lennon tunes,” Evans said on Twitter. “The complete lack of understanding here is shameful.” Rights to Dean’s likeness were acquired by the filmmakers and the production company Magic City Films through CMG Worldwide. The company represents Dean’s family along with the intellectual property rights associated with many other deceased personalities including Neil Armstrong, Bette Davis and Burt Reynolds. Mark Roesler, chairman and chief executive of CMG, defended the usage of Dean and said the company has represented his family for decades. Noting that Dean has more than 183,000 followers on Instagram, Roesler said he still resonates today.

James Dean as he appeared in the 1955 film “Rebel Without a Cause.” “James Dean was known as Hollywood’s ‘rebel,’ and he famously said, ‘If a man can bridge the gap between life and death, if he can live after he’s died, then maybe he was a great man. Immortality is the only true success,’” said Roesler. “What was considered rebellious in the ’50s is very different than what is rebellious today, and we feel confident that he would support this modern day act of rebellion.” Adapted from Gareth Crocker’s novel, “Finding Jack” is a liveaction movie about the U.S. military’s abandonment of canine units following the Vietnam War. Directors Anton Ernst and Tati Golykh are to begin shooting Nov. 17. In an email, Ernst said they “tremendously” respect Dean’s legacy. “The movie subject matter is one of hope and love, and he is still relevant like the theme of the film we are portraying,” Ernst said. “There is still a lot of James Dean fans worldwide who would love to see their favorite icon back on screen. There would always be critics, and all we can do is tell a great story with humanity and grace.” Dean had just three leading roles before he died in a car crash in 1955 at age 24: “Rebel Without a Cause,” “East of Eden” and “Giant.”


ARTS

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUNDAY • 11.10.2019

Chinen From B1

incredibly rich history without being trapped into merely emulating it. “Cecile is so deeply in tune with jazz history and with cultural history,” Chinen says. “She’s not just retracing those steps; she’s really interrogating it, she’s turning it on its side, she’s finding her own way to speak that language.” Of course, there’s no one prescribed method of approaching jazz, and “Playing Changes” addresses some of the myriad ways that today’s artists are expanding the genre and moving the music forward. The book profiles a host of jazz innovators including pianists Vijay Iyer, Jason Moran, Brad Mehldau, Robert Glasper and “Late Show With Stephen Colbert” bandleader Jon Batiste; guitarist Mary Halvorson; saxophonists Kamasi Washington, Steve Coleman, John Zorn (who studied at Webster University) and Donny McCaslin, whose band accompanied David Bowie on his final album; and bassist Esperanza Spalding, who has used social media to lay bare her creative process. “Playing Changes” is a deep dive into the language of jazz and the mysteries of artistic creation, but it’s intended for a general audience. “I wrote the book certainly with the idea that a jazz initiate would appreciate it and get something out of it,” Chinen says. “I didn’t want it to be too inside-baseball.” Chinen is the editorial director of Newark, N.J., jazz radio station WBGO, a frequent contributor to NPR music coverage and also works closely with the multimedia program “Jazz Night in America,” which last year produced a program featuring the Bad Plus playing live at the Ferring Jazz Bistro. Previously, he was a regular contributor to the New York Times and a longtime columnist for JazzTimes. The book opens with a provocative chapter on Washington, whom some have crowned a new jazz savior — the implication being, of course, that jazz needs saving. “I really do feel like we weren’t talking about jazz saviors prior to the period where jazz stopped being a popular music,” Chinen says. Rock ’n’ roll took hold commercially in the late 1950s, after

“Playing Changes: Jazz for the New Century” By Nate Chinen Published by Vintage, 288 pages, $16.95

Nate Chinen With the Jazz St. Louis Book Club When • 7 p.m. Tuesday Where • Nancy’s Lounge, Harold and Dorothy Steward Center for Jazz, 3536 Washington Boulevard How much • Free; ticket required More info • jazzstl.org Whitaker Jazz Speaks presentation on “Playing Changes” When • 7 p.m. Wednesday Where • Schlafly library auditorium, 225 North Euclid Avenue How much • Free ASSOCIATED PRESS

More info • jazzstl.org

Kamasi Washington performs May 3 at the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival. which jazz became “something much more elevated — more of a sophisticated niche taste.” Chinen charts that course by which jazz came to be called, in that famous — and to some degree infamous — phrase, “America’s classical music.” As jazz staked out its cultural significance, it emphasized preservation over innovation and sought institutional support and academic respectability. In short, it went uptown. Its power center is quite literally in uptown Manhattan: Jazz at Lincoln Center. Along with its managing and artistic director, Wynton Marsalis — who in his earlier days was hailed as a jazz savior, too — JALC became a symbol of the stultifying conservatism that eventually took hold of the music. On the one hand, Chinen says,

the success of Jazz at Lincoln Center “is self-evident, and I think it’s a really positive thing. But there’s a cost to that, in the sense that, if jazz is high culture, it’s no longer in touch with the noise and chaos of the streets.” As for Marsalis, Chinen says he sought to present a nuanced portrait of him in the book. “I have enormous admiration for him, but I also harbor certain ambivalences about his philosophy. To me, he’s definitely not a villain, but he’s also not unequivocally a hero. It’s complicated.” Still, with notable exceptions like New York’s downtown scene, centered at the Knitting Factory, the latter decades of the 20th century were rife with the sense that jazz was walling itself off and constantly policing its borders.

CONCERT REVIEW

“In the ’90s, I was aware of a constant set of questions around defining the music,” Chinen says. “What is jazz, and when you say that, what are you excluding? I feel like, with the rise of another generation of artists, those questions feel increasingly irrelevant and beside the point.” One of those artists is Glasper, who, around the turn of the century, was among a number of jazz musicians who began to collaborate with hip-hop, R&B and soul artists, creating new hybrids as they went along. For his part, Glasper doesn’t seem to feel the need to be polite about it. His most recent release is a mixtape featuring guest artists ranging from Herbie Hancock and Bilal to Andra Day and Yassin Bey (formerly Mos Def). It’s titled “F— Yo Feelings.”

“You know, Glasper likes to stir the pot,” Chinen says with a laugh. “But really, I see him as really important in terms of changing the conversation around jazz’s relationship to black music.” When Glasper arrived on the scene, he says, “it wasn’t all that intuitive for pop or hip-hop or R&B artists to seek out jazz musicians to collaborate, and Glasper really made it a natural evolution.” The results, Chinen contends, “have implications that go far beyond whatever our genre silo may be when you consider that this conversation includes Kendrick Lamar, Brittany Howard, people like Flying Lotus, Anderson.Paak and Solange. There’s a whole constellation of really interesting African American artists who are in dialogue with jazz, even if you wouldn’t call what they’re making jazz.”

OPERA REVIEW

An enjoyable evening with Chainsmokers bring disposable, processed fun to Enterprise Center ‘Pirates’ at Winter Opera BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

For works created largely as topical humor, the Savoy Operas of Gilbert & Sullivan have had remarkable staying power. Many of Arthur S. Sullivan’s compositions were written as parodies of other composers and other styles, but their tunefulness — and, sometimes, real beauty — have given them lives of their own. William S. Gilbert’s way with words is as engaging and witty as can be. It’s no wonder audiences are still attending operettas like “The Pirates of Penzance, or The Slave of Duty” almost 140 years after it had its premiere. On Friday night, Winter Opera St. Louis opened its 13th season with “Pirates.” It’s a winning, cheery production of one of G&S’s best, with some fine voices and good energy, albeit with a whiff of community theater. Director John Stephens (who, as a singer, has appeared in numerous productions of “Pirates,” and who has directed it several times before) knows the score well. His staging was proficient and frequently comical, with a few cheap laughs thrown in. (Painting “STANLEY” on the MajorGeneral’s purchased family tombs was heavy-handed, unnecessary and just looked like graffiti: we got the joke from the dialogue.) His cast was more than competent and did a fine job overall with Gilbert’s literary language. As Frederic, whose dedication to doing his duty under all circumstances drives the plot, tenor Pedro Barbosa made a handsome romantic lead, moved well and sang sweetly; it’s not a large voice, but he uses it well. He and the high-flying Mabel of Chelsea Friedlander were wellmatched physically and vocally, and were an appealing couple altogether. The production had a real contralto in Sara Couden’s Ruth, the piratical maid-of-all-work. Couden has a strong presence and a

The Chainsmokers’ concert Friday night at Enterprise Center had everything you could want in a big arena show — or depending on how you feel about those, everything you hate. All the excesses were there. At one point, a colorfully dressed motorcycle duo sped around the stage for no apparent reason. A huge ballshaped cage descended from the ceiling, allowing Chainsmokers singer Drew Taggart to sing from inside it as he leaped around like a trapped animal. Later, the cyclists returned, entered the ball and dizzyingly drove around it as two women stood in the center. Was this a Chainsmokers concert or some sort of deathdefying thrill-seeker show? Apparently, the group’s new “World Wide Joy” tour is some of both, and it was unashamedly extra, for extra’s sake. Such was the DJ-driven group’s return to St. Louis for its latest high-tech spectacle, attended by 9,000 fans who were on their feet during most of the throbbing set. While it’s too easy to rag on the Chainsmokers, a clear critical dud, the group has at least successfully bridged the gap between EDM (electronic dance music — if the kids are still even calling it that) and pop music. The group stayed in both worlds during the show with a flurry of pop tunes including “Closer,” “Something Just Like This” and “Roses.” Interspersed throughout were moments that brought rave-like energy as the group performed songs by other acts such as Sheck Wes, Codeko and Carnage, just to show the Chainsmokers hadn’t forgotten their roots. The Chainsmokers’ Taggart,

PHOTO BY JON GITCHOFF

The Chainsmokers perform at Enterprise Center in St. Louis on Friday.

Alex Pall (handling programming/beats) and adjunct drummer Matt McGuire took to the stage carrying lit torches triumphantly as they settled into the set for opening song, “Takeaway.” One of the opening acts, Lennon Stella, joined them on the song; the group recorded the song with her. Amid unlimited pyro, smoke cannons and lasers, the Chainsmokers doled out tunes such as “Paris,” “Don’t Let Me Down” and “Hope” while also playing tracks from the upcoming album “World Wide Joy” such as “Call You Mine” and “Who Do You Love,” which brought the opening act, 5 Seconds of Summer, back to the stage. “The next song came out today,” Taggart said just before “Push My Luck,” amid cheers. “That means you already know it.” Taggart spent much of the set running up and down a lengthy stage extension, when he wasn’t in the cage or being airlifted over the audience. A detour into Red Hot Chili Peppers’ “Under the Bridge” felt like a random choice, ending with Taggart telling

the crowd: “St. Louis, reach for the sky.” Taggart said the group had played St. Louis many times, recalling an early gig at a piano bar and a show he said was in conjunction with a local college and on a major street (we remember a 2015 show at the Pageant and a 2017 show at Scottrade Center before it became Enterprise Center). Overall, the evening provided disposable, processed fun, and no one was ruined in the process. 5 Seconds of Summer, which headlined at Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre in 2016, has seemingly fallen back a notch opening for the Chainsmokers. The band performed solidly for an hour with cuts including “Youngblood,” “If Walls Could Talk,” “Talk Fast,” “Want You Back” and “Waste the Night.” The band didn’t come off too bland, an issue in the past, and said a new album was on the way in 2020. Kevin C. Johnson 314-340-8191 Pop music critic @kevincjohnson on Twitter kjohnson@post-dispatch.com

Winter Opera St. Louis: “The Pirates of Penzance” When · 3 p.m. Sunday Where · Viragh Center for the Arts, Chaminade College Preparatory School, 425 South Lindbergh Boulevard, Creve Coeur How much · $10-$55 More info · 314-865-0038 or winteroperastl.org great sense of comic timing, and she greatly helped out the small chorus tenor section in Act II. Andrew Pardini’s Pirate King could have been a little more swashbuckling, but sang well, with a full-bodied baritone. Gary Moss was a vocally nimble Major-General Stanley. Jason Mallory turned in another first-rate comprimario performance as the pirate Samuel. Baritone Robert McNichols nailed the fumbling physical comedy of the Sergeant of Police but, peculiarly, didn’t sing all his lines as written. The smaller roles were wellcast. The women in chorus master Rebecca Koebbe’s ensemble were generally stronger vocally than the men but they all performed with musicality and a proper sense of fun. Conductor Scott Schoonover kept things moving and together musically. Scenic designer Scott Loebl’s sets were well-designed, with visual interest and multiple levels, making Stephens’ job a little easier. Felia Davenport’s costumes were better in the second act than the first, with the sailorsuit robes of Stanley’s daughters a particularly nice touch. An English vicar at the time would be unlikely to wear a cassock for everyday, but if he did, he’d wear it with a band cincture. Sarah Bryan Miller • 314-340-8249 Classical music critic @sbmillermusic on Twitter sbmiller@post-dispatch.com


ARTS

11.10.2019 • SUNDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • B7

AUTHOR INTERVIEW

In ‘Witches Are Coming,’ essayist reckons with society BY JENNA ROSS

Lindy West

Star Tribune (Minneapolis)

As a girl, Lindy West obsessed about pop culture. As a critic and columnist, she analyzed it. Now she’s creating it. Which isn’t to say that West has stopped obsessing or analyzing. In her wise, witty new collection of essays, “The Witches Are Coming,” West blasts the misogyny lurking in the media we love, from “Reality Bites” to “Billy Madison,” stories that revere waifish women and angry man-boys. She argues that bad stories birth bad politics. That Twitter trolls led to President Donald Trump. (She goes further than that, actually, labeling the president himself a Twitter troll.) But West’s smart takes have deepened since she

When • 7 p.m. Wednesday Where • .Zack, 3224 Locust Street How much • $30, includes 1 ticket and book More info • left-bank.com; metrotix.com

a lot of power to change the world around us by changing the stories that “The Witches Are Coming” we tell,” as she said by By Lindy West phone recently. Published by Hachette, 260 So when West got to tell pages, $27 the story, she told a radical one with a fat, feminist created “Shrill,” a bodywoman — usually relegated positive Hulu show based on her 2016 memoir of the to the role of sassy sidesame name. Her peeks into kick — at its center. In her that process — from pitch- new book, she asks: Why is it radical to show a fat ing producers to shaping plots — make personal her woman having fun, having sex, having a life? argument that “we have “I said in every meeting: This isn’t a show about a fat woman trying to lose weight,” West said. “This isn’t a show about a woman who’s fat who’s miserable and lonely. ... This is not a show where at any point the main characMainstage ter will step on a scale and Sponsored by look down and sigh.” Instead, that character, Annie, a fledgling alt“Smart and endearingly playful” weekly writer played by —Calvin Wilson, St. Louis Post-Dispatch “SNL” comedian Aidy Bryant, stops apologiz“Biting comedy” & “An amazing ing. She confronts a troll work of theater” harassing her online. She —Rob Levy, Broadway World dives into the water at a fat-acceptance pool party, a luminous scene revelatory in its joy and beauty. She also has an abortion — not in some Very Special Episode. But right away. In the pilot. “It’s sort of the catalyst for Annie’s whole story,” West said. It was a catalyst for West, too. She covered that ground in “Shrill: Notes by Jeremy Kareken, David Murrell & Gordon Farrell From a Loud Woman,” the Directed by Meredith McDonough bestselling collection of essays that codified the fame she’d earned online with her funny, feminist takes during the reign of Sponsored by THE FISCHER FAMILY Studio the first-person essay. But her new book features

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fewer personal stories and more of West’s eye for connecting pop culture to the political, as she has writing columns for the Guardian and the New York Times. “The Witches Are Coming” draws its title from an essay in which she eviscerates Trump’s constant use of the term “witch hunt,” pointing out its origins in the witch trials of early modern Europe and colonial America, when women were hanged, beheaded or burned at the stake. (“Very, very similar to the modern-day witch hunts against men!”) She then flips the term, embracing its power in this #MeToo moment. “So fine, if you insist,” she writes. “This is a witch hunt. We’re witches, and we’re hunting you.” We caught up with West at home in Seattle the day after she spoke in Memphis, Tenn., at an event for a reproductive health center. She’s been doing more of those gigs lately, especially in states facing restrictions on abortion rights. (She’ll be in St. Louis on Wednesday.) “I’m really lucky to have a family and a community where abortion isn’t stigmatized,” she said. “It feels like the least I can do. ... I’m not any kind of expert. I’m just a lady who had an abortion and won’t shut up about it.” In the Hulu series, which has a second season coming in 2020, Annie takes a pregnancy test and discovers that the Plan B pill she took after sleeping with her bearded sort-of boyfriend didn’t work. We watch her face, in closeup, during the procedure. A friend rubs her shoulder. Afterward, cuddling with that friend at home, Annie smiles. “At the close of my career, whenever that comes,” West writes, “Annie’s abortion just may be the thing I’m most proud of.” Trolls have harassed

West for her weight, her feminism and her confidence in speaking about both. Famously, she had a conversation with the worst of them: a man who sent her terrible tweets from an account purporting to be her father, who had recently died. She called the troll up for an episode of “This American Life,” asked him tough questions and accepted his apology. “It felt really easy, comfortable even, to talk to my troll,” she admits. “I liked him, and I didn’t know what to do with that.” Her writing, too, is richer because of these unexpected turns. In one essay, about Adam Sandler, she declines to take “the big fat feminist dunk” about how Sandler’s movies “indoctrinated a generation of boys into the notion that the world was theirs for the taking whether they bothered to grow up or try hard or do a good job or not.” Instead, she admits that while watching a taping of an “SNL” episode in which Sandler hosts, she cried. “I cried my ass off.” She was nostalgic, she writes, for “the years when you can love things so purely without complication.” Doesn’t that go against her mantra to take a hard look at why we love the things we love? “Everyone wants to be a perfect, political being who lives their values all the time,” West said. “But that’s just not a realistic way to live. Sometimes my writing veers in that direction, and it’s important to me to always soften it a little bit. ... The other path is self-righteousness.” West knowingly refers to herself as “a committed feminist killjoy,” a joke that works because her writing is filled with joy. Even while interrogating TV shows and film, West remains a fan, refusing to abandon her younger, TV-obsessed self. She’s a

sarcasm master. But when she speaks about the power of pop culture, her voice softens. She gets sincere. “I really believe in this stuff,” she said. “I could write stuff that gets me less abuse and makes me a lot more money, but I choose to write about this stuff because it’s important to me.” Still, she points out the limits of creating new, better pop culture. While promoting her TV series, she participated in a panel with Bryant and actor/director Elizabeth Banks, the show’s executive producer. A Frenchman in the back asked why Banks, a beautiful woman, would be drawn to this story. The “Hunger Games” star answered “with poise and patience,” West writes in “The Witches,” but then an older woman asked essentially the same question: “But Elizabeth! You’re gorgeous! You’ve always been gorgeous! What could possibly interest you in a story like this?” Forget the show’s takes on work, family and friendship. What followed were “several more decades of variations on the question of Elizabeth’s hot body,” she writes. “We’d actually succeeded in making a relatively radical piece of feminist art and bringing it in the mainstream, and here was a room full of people who had watched the show, and all they could think about was how much bigger and less desirable my body and Aidy’s body were than Liz’s.” It was a reality check, West said by phone. “When I’m out here saying things like, ‘We can change the world if we change the stories we tell,’ that makes it sound so easy,” she said. “It’s not that easy. These ideas are really entrenched. ... There’s a kind of magic in this storytelling, but also, like, there’s no such thing as magic.”

as hilarious as it is haunting” —Calvin Wilson, St. Louis Post-Dispatch

THEATER REVIEW

Well-acted ‘Lockerbie’ channels Greek tragedy BY CALVIN WILSON

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

NOW–NOV 17 by Kirsten Greenidge | Directed by Daniel Bryant Family Theatre—Tix only $10 November 23 10:30 AM* 12:30 PM* 3:00 PM *Sensory-Friendly Performance

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Grief can be a challenge to deal with. For some people, it’s a blow from which they gradually recover. For others, it’s a wound that won’t heal. In “The Women of Lockerbie,” running through Nov. 23 in a wellacted SATE production, grief suffuses the stage. Playwright Deborah Brevoort crafts a story inspired by a notorious act of terrorism: A bomb planted on Pan Am transatlantic Flight 103 exploded over Lockerbie, Scotland, on Dec. 21, 1988, killing all 259 people on the plane and 11 on the ground. In the spirit of Greek tragedy, Brevoort has a penchant for high-flown

‘The Women of Lockerbie’ When • Through Nov. 23 Where • The Chapel, 6238 Alexander Drive How much • $15-$20 More info • brownpapertickets.com language. Unfortunately, “The Women of Lockerbie” is more prosaic than profound. The play focuses on an American couple whose son was a passenger on the flight. Seven years after the bombing, bereaved mom Madeline Livingston (Margeau Baue Steinau) wanders the hills of Lockerbie, desperate to find an article of his

clothing or some other tangible reminder of his existence. Husband Bill (David Wassilak) can do little but look on forlornly. Offering as much comfort as they can are local women who give the play its title. Olive Allison (Leslie Wobbe) is the most consoling, along with three who serve as a sort of Greek chorus, each named for a distinct trait: intellect, emotion and memory. Directed by Pamela Reckamp, “The Women of Lockerbie” strives for gravitas but musters only melodrama — much of it concerning whether a U.S. government official (Michael Cassidy Flynn) will allow the women to extend a gesture of sympathy to the families of

the bombing victims. But the performances are compelling. Steinau poignantly captures Madeline’s despair, and Wassilak persuasively balances empathy and exasperation. The cast also includes Sarajane Alverson, Kim Furlow, Jennifer Theby-Quinn and Teresa Doggett. The production’s stagecraft is solid. Of particular note is Bess Moynihan’s scenic and lighting design, which conjures the appropriately contemplative mood. For all its ambition, “The Women of Lockerbie” is best appreciated as an acting showcase. Calvin Wilson • 314-340-8346 Theater critic @calvinwilsonstl on Twitter calvinwilson@post-dispatch.com

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B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

BOOKS

M 1 • SUnDAy • 11.10.2019

BESTSELLERS

FICTION

NONFICTION

Here are the bestselling books from Publishers Weekly for the week that ended Nov. 2.

Secretaries keep secrets in excellent Cold War novel

Vital book unmasks study that changed psychiatry

HARDCOVER FICTION 1. “Blue Moon” • Lee Child 2. “The Guardians” • John Grisham 3. “The Night Fire” • Michael Connelly 4. “The Lost Causes of Bleak Creek” • McLaughlin/Neal 5. “The Dutch House” • Ann Patchett 6. “Find Me” • André Aciman 7. “The Institute” • Stephen King 8. “The Water Dancer” • Ta-Nehisi Coates 9. “The 19th Christmas” • James Patterson and Maxine Paetro 10. “The Deserter” • Demille/ DeMille HARDCOVER NONFICTION 1. “The Pioneer Woman Cooks” • Ree Drummond 2. “The Beautiful Ones” • Prince 3. “Blowout” • Rachel Maddow 4. “The Plot Against the President” • Lee Smith 5. “Me” • Elton John 6. “Half Baked Harvest: Super Simple” • Tieghan Gerard 7. “Catch and Kill” • Ronan Farrow 8. “The Book of Gutsy Women” • Hillary Rodham Clinton and Chelsea Clinton 9. “Talking to Strangers” • Malcolm Gladwell 10. “The American Story” • David M. Rubenstein MASS MARKET PAPERBACKS 1. “Wyoming Heart” • Diana Palmer 2. “Beauchamp Hall” • Danielle Steel 3. “Sea of Greed” • Cussler/ Brown 4. “Never Tell” • Lisa Gardner 5. “A Jensen Family Christmas” • William W. Johnstone 6. “Dark Sacred Night” • Michael Connelly 7. “Meant to Be Yours” • Susan Mallery 8. “Doctor Sleep” (movie tie-in) • Stephen King 9. “The House Next Door” • James Patterson 10. “Season of Love” • Debbie Macomber TRADE PAPERBACKS 1. “Every Breath” • Nicholas Sparks 2. “The Great Alone” • Kristin Hannah 3. “Redemption” • David Baldacci 4. “Open Borders” • Caplan/ Weinersmith 5. “The 18th Abduction” • Patterson/Paetro 6. “Of Blood and Bone” • Nora Roberts 7. “The Overstory” • Richard Powers 8. “Before We Were Yours” • Lisa Wingate 9. “Nine Perfect Strangers” • Liane Moriarty 10. “Little Fires Everywhere” • Celeste Ng Here are the bestsellers at area independent stores for the week that ended Nov. 3. Stores reporting: The Book House, Left Bank Books, Main Street Books, the Novel Neighbor, Subterranean Books. ADULTS 1. “The Dutch House” • Ann Patchett 2. “’69 Chiefs: A Team, A Season, and the Birth of Modern Kansas City” • Michael MacCambridge 3. “The Raven Tower” • Anne Leckie 4. “The 7½ Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle” • Stuart Turton 5. “Ninth House” • Leigh Bardugo 6. “Find Me” • Andre Aciman 7. “Olive, Again” • Elizabeth Strout 8. “The Testaments” • Margaret Atwood 9. “Atlas Obscura” • Joshua Foer 10. “The Overstory” • Richard Powers CHILDREN/YOUNG ADULTS 1. “Guts” • Raina Telgemeier 2. “Dog Man: For Whom the Ball Rolls” • Dav Pilkey 3. “Juno Valentine and the Fantastic Fashion Adventure” • Eva Chen 4. “Flygirl” • Sherri L. Smith 5. “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland & Through the Looking Glass” (Harper Design) • Lewis Carroll 6. “Tristan Strong Punches a Hole in the Sky” • Kwame Mbalia 7. “Just in Case You Want to Fly” • Julie Fogliano 8. “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire” (illustrated edition) • J.K. Rowling 9. “The Skin I’m In” (20th anniversary edition) • Sharon Flake 10. “Momentous Events in the Life of a Cactus” • Dusti Bowling

Prescott melds political and personal through lives of 3 women BY DALE SINGER

model for Lara, the heroine of “Doctor Zhivago.” She says that their “first year You may have never thought together he said he made more about it before, but according to progress on the novel than he had this evocative, engrossing novel in the previous three years comabout espionage in the 1950s, the bined … to me, he was more than words “secretary” and “secret” the famous poet up on the stage, come from the same linguistic the photograph in the newspaper, root. the person in the spotlight.” And the main characters in “The Last, bridging the cultures of Secrets We Kept,” though they Russia and America, there’s Irina, live thousands of miles apart in who leaves her homeland and Russia and in Washington, D.C., comes to Washington to work at share what the two words signify the Agency in whatever role she — keeping track of what has been could fill. said and making sure valuable but “What made Irina stand out covert information doesn’t get in the typing pool was precisely into the wrong hands. that Irina didn’t stand out in the The secrets involved here typing pool. Despite the winning come from all realms of life in the lottery of ingredients comprishyper-paranoid post-war, Cold “The Secrets We Kept” ing her physical appearance, she War world: government secrets, A novel by Lara Prescott had the ability to go unnoticed international secrets, sexual Published by Knopf, 349 pages, …. At lunch in the cafeteria she’d secrets, even literary secrets. $26.95 get up to say she had to return to In her debut novel, Lara work when no one remembered Prescott centers the story on the her having sat down with us in the writing and release of “Doctor first place.” Zhivago.” The landmark work by And Prescott sprinkles in tips Boris Pasternak was suppressed When • 7 p.m. on how international skulldugby leaders of his native Russia but Thursday gery works and what pitfalls to spread surreptitiously throughout avoid. Irina explains one of those the world, leading to a Nobel Prize Where • Left Bank valuable skills as related by her that Pasternak was forced to turn Books, 399 North Euclid Avenue handler. his back on, to avoid dire conseHow much • Free “He taught me how to tell if quences in his homeland. someone was following me — to Leaders of the Central IntelMore info • 314-367-6731 look out for anyone suspicious, ligence Agency — simply known as anyone watching, and especially the Agency to the novel’s secretar- skillfully melds the political and personal through the lives of three to be careful of LOPs. ‘Little Old ies and typists who worked there People have a lot of time on their — knew that the love story of Yuri women. hands,’ he explained. ‘They sit in In Washington, there’s Sally, and Lara, against the backdrop of parks for hours and will call the who is adept at playing whatever Soviet repression, could undercops at the drop of a hat if they see role the Agency needs — from mine Russia in ways that military something out of the ordinary.’” nurse to waitress to heiress, from hardware and cloak-and-dagger “The Secrets We Kept” is far mistress to fiancee. methods might never do. One of “I could become just about any- from ordinary. Not surprisingly, them refers to the novel as “our one,” she says. “I had one of those Prescott’s novel appeared on bestliterary weapon of mass destrucseller lists almost as soon as it was faces — the wide eyes, the ready tion.” smile that suggested I was an open released, so its achievement has And it was a weapon “the book, someone who had no secrets hardly been a secret. It deserves all Agency wanted to obtain and to keep, and if she did wouldn’t be of the attention it gets. smuggle back behind the Iron able to keep them anyway.” Curtain for its own citizens to Dale Singer retired in 2017 after a 45-year In Russia, there’s Olga, whom detonate.” career in journalism in St. Louis. He lives in west Pasternak calls his muse, the To tell her story, Prescott St. Louis County.

Special to the Post-Dispatch

Lara Prescott

FICTION

‘Nothing to See Here’ except kids on fire in Kevin Wilson novel BY RON CHARLES

entertainment, she smokes pot in her mother’s attic. What makes this torpid state all the more tragic Children are weird. is that Lillian once almost escaped. Of course, they’re also curious, In her teens, she briefly attended sweet, creative and lots of other a fancy girls’ school where she delightful things, but it’s their befriended a wealthy student uncanniness that makes them so named Madison. That education hard to get right in novels. The might have led to a radically better slightest false element in the future, but when Madison broke portrayal of a child repels like the the school rules, Lillian took the tangy smell of spoiled mayonfall and returned to her drab home, naise. where she’s been moldering away Kevin Wilson scrapes away all the cloying sentimentality that so ever since. When the novel opens, Lillian often sticks to young characters. receives a mysterious letter from The 10-year-old twins at the Madison, an old friend. Since high center of his new novel, “Nothschool, her wealthy friend’s life has ing to See Here,” burst into actual flames whenever they get angry or only grown more fabulous. Still agitated. Such pyrotechnics sound impossibly beautiful, Madison is now the mother of a small boy, and like something from the macabre she’s married to a U.S. senator in world of Stephen King — another author who knows children — but Tennessee. The only problem is the senator’s 10-year-old twins, that’s the most wonderful aspect of Wilson’s story: It’s entirely true Roland and Bessie, left motherless to life ... except that now and then, after the death of his former wife. With all the trips to Washington the kids spontaneously combust. and the prospect of loftier political If you’re a parent, you may not power, who has the time to take think that’s much of a metaphor. care of them? Would Lillian mind We’ve all endured a few meltcoming to their vast estate and downs, usually in some public place set for maximum attention: working as the twins’ nanny? The setup sounds like a modernthe flushed cheeks, the spiking day twist on “The Turn of the fury, the sudden explosion of Screw,” but Wilson will flip that rage that can be contained but story on its head. Once Lillian not extinguished until the fuel is arrives at the mansion but before spent. Face it: To love a child is to she sees the children, Madison get burned from time to time. I’ve enjoyed Wilson’s work since says: “They have a unique — I don’t know what to call it — kind of 2011, when he published his first affliction. ... They get really overnovel, a quirky domestic comedy heated.” By the time Lillian undercalled “The Family Fang,” about stands what that means, she’s the adult children of a pair of avant-garde performance artists. already committed to the job. The first incident is, literally, Wilson understands the mixture of affection and embarrassment that incandescent. Lillian meets Roland and Bessie in the pool. The boy runs through all loving families. runs off; the girl bites her: His satire is always marbled with “Her shirt started smoking, the tenderness. fabric singeing along the neckline, “Nothing to See Here,” which but it was soaking wet and couldn’t has been chosen for the “Today” really catch fire. I realized there show book club, raises the temwere delicate waves of yellow perature on themes Wilson has flame moving up and down Besexplored before. The result is his sie’s little arms. And then, like a most perfect novel. Paradoxically crack of lightning, she burst fully light and melancholy, it hews to into flames, her body a kind of firethe border of fantasy but stays in work, the fire white and blue and the land of realism. red all at once. It was beautiful, no The narrator is Lillian, a lie, to watch a person burn.” depressed young woman With this bizarre setup, Wilson’s approaching 30 without romantic challenge is to keep the novel from, or professional prospects. For well, flaming out. After all, no matmoney, she works two deadter how hypnotically he describes end jobs at grocery stores; for

Washington Post

“Nothing to See Here” A novel by Kevin Wilson Published by Ecco, 272 pages, $26.99

Kevin Wilson When • 7 p.m. Friday Where • The High Low, 3301 Washington Boulevard How much • Free More info • left-bank.com these pint-size conflagrations, the thrill of seeing the twins enveloped in fire would eventually cool. His solution to that problem is to keep the story focused on its smoldering emotional issues, particularly the feelings that develop between this reluctant nanny and these two odd children. We’re all pretty ill-equipped to handle the children we get, I suppose, but Lillian’s situation is, admittedly, more severe. Soon, though, she finds she has a natural point of connection with the twins. We don’t hear from the kids directly, but Wilson is clearly writing from a point of deep sympathy. He recently said on NPR that as an adult he had been diagnosed with a form of Tourette’s syndrome. As a young person, his condition presented few physical symptoms, but it sometimes made him obsessed with disturbing images. With this fantastical novel, he’s managed to capture the poignant paradox of loving troubled children. “You take care of people,” Lillian says, “by not letting them know how badly you wanted your life to be different,” which is so painfully true that I had to put the book down for a moment. Considering the grim future awaiting these twins, Lillian thinks, “I had to write a better story for them, for me, for everyone.” That’s what Wilson has done. This novel may seem slight and quirky, but don’t be fooled. There’s a lot to see here.

BY MARION WINIK

Star Tribune (Minneapolis)

In her acclaimed debut, “Brain on Fire: My Month of Madness,” Susannah Cahalan documented the psychotic break she suffered at 24, a terrifying episode that ended happily when it was determined that she had a completely curable autoimmune disorder — a neurological problem rather than a psychiatric one. What she had been saved from became achingly clear when, on tour for the book, she was told about another young woman with the same condition. Misdiagnosed and mistreated for two years instead of just a month, this woman’s cognitive abilities had grown so diminished that she could no longer care for “The Great herself. Pretender” Stunned by By Susannah the precariousness of psychiat- Cahalan ric diagnosis and Published by Grand the disastrous Central, 382 outcomes it pages, $28 can sometimes cause, Cahalan began the investigation documented in “The Great Pretender.” This vital book, full of intelligence and brio, is a mustread for anyone who has mental illness issues somewhere in their life — i.e., everyone. Cahalan’s main focus is a study conducted in the 1970s by the late David Rosenhan of Stanford University. In it, eight patients, including Rosenhan himself, managed to get themselves diagnosed with schizophrenia and checked into mental wards simply by showing up and claiming that they were hearing voices. The “pseudopatients” then spent from two weeks to 52 days institutionalized, treated and medicated (Rosenhan taught them to “cheek” their drugs) until they got themselves released, often with difficulty. When the results of this study were published in Science magazine, humiliation rocked the psychiatric profession. The most significant long-range effects of Rosenhan’s landmark work included the widespread closing of hospitals and the vigorous revision and expansion of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders — the DSM-III. This book, “as important to psychiatrists as the Constitution is to the U.S. government or the Bible is to Christians,” according to one of Cahalan’s sources, was written with the specter of those eight false diagnoses hanging over every page. Beginning with boxes of notes and an unpublished book manuscript, Cahalan sets out to find the research participants. It does not go well. Finally, after pursuing myriad clues and dead ends, after interviewing Rosenhan’s family and colleagues, Cahalan begins to have serious doubts about the man’s integrity. As the monument begins to crumble, Cahalan was “clinging to the hope that all this would work out like a Doomsday cult member clings to her belief that the end is nigh even as the sun rises the next morning.” By that point, you will be as caught up as she was. And though some questions remain unanswered, Cahalan crowns the work with a conclusion that offers chilling data about the credibility of research in all fields of science — yet finds a ray of hope for the benighted field of psychiatry. Marion Winik is the author of “The Big Book of the Dead” and the host of the Weekly Reader podcast. She is on the board of the National Book Critics Circle.

Susannah Cahalan When • 7 p.m. Tuesday Where • .Zack, 3224 Locust Street How much • $31-$36, includes 1-2 tickets and copy of book More info • left-bank.com; metrotix.com


11.10.2019 • Sunday • M 1

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ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B9

‘THIS MUSEUM IS MEANT TO SPUR DISCUSSION, TO SPUR QUESTIONS.’

JOHN MINCHILLO PHOTOS, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Giant photos hang from rafters of the National Veterans Museum and Memorial, portraits by Stacy Pearsall of men and women as they entered various branches of service. Take a few steps and look at the other side, and the same veterans are shown how they look today.

Telling a

story Columbus’ National Veterans Memorial and Museum aims to ‘honor, connect, inspire and educate’

As you walk in the doors of the National Veterans Museum and Memorial, the words “Honor, connect, inspire and educate” greet you above the welcome desk. The more than 50,000-squarefoot National Veterans Museum and Memorial honors the unifying experiences of U.S. military veterans outside the traditional trappings of military museums and war memorials.

BY AMY BERTRAND

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

COLUMBUS, OHIO — One man, wearing a navy polo shirt emblazoned with the name of Seneca County Veterans Council, held his hand over his heart as he stood in front of a tattered American flag. A woman wiped tears from her eyes as she watched the video “Coming Home,” which featured some soldiers who did not. She looked around and saw a couple of other people, also wiping tears. A toddler asked a grandpa, “Was this your war?” He smiled slightly and looked away as a woman scooped up the child. Emotions — good and bad — but full and sometimes all-consuming were as much a part of the new National Veterans Memorial and Museum as the award-winning architecture and firstclass exhibits. “This is not a collection museum,” said Shelly Hoffman, associate director of external affairs for the museum. “This is a storytelling museum.” The museum opened about a year ago in an effort spearheaded by former astronaut and U.S. Sen. John Glenn, who was a Marine fighter pilot during World War II and the Korean War. “He used to live across the way,” Hoffman said pointing across the street from the museum and beyond the Center of Science and Industry, which sits along the Scioto River in a burgeoning area of the city. As she tells it, Glenn would look at the spot where the museum now sits. It was then the older Franklin County Veterans Memorial auditorium. He declared that veterans needed something better. So Glenn (who died in 2016 at age 95) began a discussion several years before with area veterans who told him they did not consider themselves Ohio veterans but U.S. veterans. That evolved into a larger discussion as they learned there was no national veterans museum. Yes, there were conflict-specific museums and branch-specific museums, but no national veterans museum. Next, they began to seek funding. They got private funding, $82 million from individual members and corporate sponsors, (including land from the county and capital funding from the state). They sought designers and artists who would create a masterpiece in the middle of Columbus, in the middle of the country, so as many as possible of the 20 million living U.S. veterans would be able to visit. Brad Cloepfil’s Allied Works won the competition to design the museum. He designed the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis. As he

discussion, to spur questions. It’s about coming home, the transitions.” It’s why the museum also hosts job fairs and other outreach programs. WHERE: 300 West Broad Street, ColumThere’s a dress-up station for kids, bus, Ohio a few weapons on display and a cool interactive map that tells where U.S. GETTING THERE: Columbus is a little military have been stationed over the more than 400 miles from St. Louis, years. A wall (much like the one at about a 6-hour drive. the Newseum in Washington) with HOW MUCH: The museum is free for 4-by-6-inch digital photographs that veterans, Gold Star families and activechange to tell the story of the serviceduty military. $17 for adults; $15 seniors; men and women’s lives. $12 college students; $10 youth; under 5 You can even enter your (or a loved is free one’s) name, home and service corps to have his or her name appear on a MORE INFO: nationalvmm.org; 1-888star in the museum for a bit. 987-6866; On the upper level, you’ll find a HOURS: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m Wednesday to sanctuary for reflection as well as a Sunday (holiday hours may change) remembrance gallery with the infinity flag flown over the tomb of the unknown soldier and stained glass with wide, open hallways, the entire museum is very accessible. “That was installation inspired by military campaign ribbons. “Taps” plays every 15 very important to us,” Hoffman says. minutes. To the left, the Veterans Portrait Walk out the doors on that level Project takes your breath away. Giant photos hang from rafters, portraits by and you’ll find an amphitheater event space. It’s up high, on the roof, with Stacy Pearsall of men and women as they entered various branches of ser- great views of the city, river and Memorial Grove below, but you are vice. Take a few steps and look at the surrounded by a prairie. Remember, other side, and the same veterans are the architects wanted it to look like it shown as they look today. was rising from the ground, so at cerAs you follow the main path of the tain points, the ground was raised up museum, try to get in on a tour. They to meet it. are scheduled at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m., Look out at the Memorial Grove, but if there are enough big groups and “for people to take a few moments and enough volunteers, tours can happen almost any time. The museum follows reflect,” says Hoffman of the green a historical journey of American vets. space created by OLIN landscaping with benches and a 350-foot locally You’ll see the story of a few over the sourced limestone wall that creates a course of your walk thorough it. These aren’t necessarily the big gen- beautiful waterfall. One of its main features is a grove erals but sometimes regular people, from the Revolutionary War until now. of elm trees. Elms have signified hallowed ground throughout military In one exhibit, open a crate to see old photographs and hear stories with history. Corwin Kuhn is a volunteer tour audio of veterans from different points guide at the museum. “This place is an in time. architectural marvel,” he said. “We tell a story here that is some“I get to meet the most incredible times subtle,” Hoffman says. In one people from all over the world,” he exhibit, a photograph shows a segsays. “This place means so much to so regated Army. It morphs into a curmany people. It’s a special place.” rent photo of the Army, very much integrated. “It’s a social history of our Amy Bertrand • 314-340-8284 country,” she says. @abertrand on Twitter “This museum is meant to spur abertrand@post-dispatch.com

National Veterans Memorial and Museum

A giant cube screen has quotes from some of the 25 veterans whose stories are woven throughout the exhibit as well as some famous Americans. describes the veterans building in literature, it’s an “act of structure, where a series of concentric arches rise from the earth to hold the sanctuary above. These bands of interwoven concrete hold and protect the museum and its occupants within, creating a journey of exhibitions that illuminate ideas of service, duty and remembrance.” Architectural Digest named it one of the best designed buildings of 2018. Ralph Appelbaum Associates created the exhibits; the firm also designed the exhibits at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and the Newseum. The veterans museum itself is 53,000 square feet. Outside is a 2.5 acre memorial garden. You spot the white, circular, almost spiraling building from several blocks away. It’s made of reinforced concrete with no interior support beams. “It’s made to look like it’s rising from the earth and taking you on a circular journey, of a veteran’s path,” Hoffman says. As you walk in the doors, the words “Honor, connect, inspire and educate” greet you above the welcome desk. To the right, begin the journey — the story of a veteran’s path through service, through history. Ahead, a giant cube screen has quotes from some of the 25 veterans whose stories are woven throughout the exhibit as well as some famous Americans. It also overlooks a hall for changing exhibits below. That’s also where you’ll find the accessible entrance. In fact,


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M 1 • SUnDAy • 11.10.2019

TRAVEL TROUBLESHOOTER

Agent? Adviser? In travel, terms are changing BY CHRISTOPHER ELLIOTT

Special to the Washington Post

Finding the right travel agent used to be easy. The top agents had a defined set of skills and certifications, and they belonged to the same trade groups. So for someone like Kathleen Corcos, who recently contacted me for help finding a “reputable” travel agency in the Chicago area, the answer should have been pretty straightforward. “I’m planning a trip to Europe and I need someone with experience in booking rail trips,” said Corcos, a retired university administrator from River Forest, Illinois. A quick visit to what was then the American Society of Travel Agents’ website to find a specialist in European travel would have yielded a few usable leads. But in the fast-changing world of travel, is anything that simple? Maybe not. Airline, car rental and hotel sites enable you to act as your own travel agent. If you need a little hand-holding, you can visit an online travel agency and avoid some fees. And now, to add to the confusion,

some travel agents aren’t even calling themselves agents anymore. That’s right, those agents are now advisers. Last year, the American Society of Travel Agents changed its name to the American Society of Travel Advisors. Paul Metselaar says it’s an important shift. Travel agents are no longer “order takers,” or intermediaries between the traveler and a company, he says. People now think of them as professionals, like lawyers or accountants. As the CEO of Ovation Travel Group, a New Yorkbased agency, he was among the first to discard the “agent” label in favor of “adviser.” “As travel advisers, we’ve built a significant level of trust with each of our customers on a highly personalized level,” he says. In the face of fierce competition from online agencies, travel agents are also upping their game, says Dave Hershberger, ASTA’s chairman and owner of a Travel Leaders agency in Cincinnati. “That’s the biggest change,” he says.

Instead of offering a broad range of services, many agents now specialize in niche products such as honeymoons or cruises. If agents — or advisers — don’t see themselves as intermediaries anymore, are there some trips you should book yourself? Yes. For a simple weekend trip, selfbooking might be easier. Plus, you can avoid an adviser’s consulting fee, which averages about $100 per trip. But for a complicated rail adventure through Europe, like the one Corcos is planning, you’ll probably want to hire an adviser. So how to find one in this topsy-turvy world of travel? You’ll still want to look for certifications and association memberships. For example, the Travel Institute’s Certified Travel Associate and Certified Travel Counselor designations mean an agent has taken the time to study and understand travel. In 2017, ASTA created a Verified Travel Advisor program, which indicates an adviser has met “a higher level of verifiable professional knowledge.” Of course, membership in ASTA or in the Association of

Retail Travel Agents is also a sign that your travel adviser means business. Some of the best travel agents, or advisers, are affiliated with well-known franchises, such as American Express or Carlson Wagonlit Travel, or with an agency network such as Travel Leaders, Signature or Virtuoso. These affiliations offer peace of mind and, sometimes, lower prices. For example, membership in Travel Leaders or a similar network means that the agent is properly trained and insured and that there’s an 800 number you can call 24/7. “It ensures that you have someone to help you if your trip is disrupted or you need advice once you arrive in your destination,” says Roger Block, president of the Travel Leaders Network. There’s more, says Matthew Upchurch, the CEO of Virtuoso, a network of luxury travel advisers. “Reputation, experience and professionalism certainly come into play,” he says. “But then you have to count on the X-factor, which really comes down to chemistry.”

BRING IT ON HOME • TEXAS Who and where • Francie Broderick of St. Louis on the Boquillas Canyon Trail overlooking the Rio Grande at the Big Bend National Park in southwest Texas. The trip • Big Bend is a remote national park desert, mountains and river lowlands. It is known for great hiking trails. Travel tip • “Bring your passport and you can take a rowboat over to the tiny village of Boquillas, safe and friendly. Great tacos at Falcon’s restaurant.” MARKUS SCHREIBER PHOTOS

An escape tunnel underneath the Berlin Wall, which divided the city for 28 years during the Cold War.

Escape tunnel underneath Berlin Wall opens to public BY KIRSTEN GRIESHABER

Associated Press

BERLIN — An escape tunnel underneath the Berlin Wall opened to the public on Thursday for the first time amid celebrations of the 30-year anniversary of the opening of communist East Germany’s border. The tunnel at Bernauer Strasse, near the city’s main Wall memorial, was opened by Mayor Michael Mueller. He thanked those who started digging the 100-meter tunnel in late 1970, nine years after East Germany sealed its border. “It’s great to see that the battle for freedom was also taken underground,” Mueller said before he took a tour of the new exhibit. “One can authentically experience ... the courage of the women and men who tried to take people to freedom and resisted the East German regime,” he added. The tunnel was built by a group of people who had escaped earlier to West Berlin. They wanted to help friends and family to flee to the West but, days before it was finished, somebody informed East German officials about it. East German authorities then found the tunnel by using ultrasound tracking and partially destroyed it. Built in 1961, the Wall stood at the front line of the Cold War. It cut off East Germans from the supposed ideological contamination of the West and stemmed the tide of people fleeing the country. In the 28 years that the Wall divided the city , more than 70 tunnels were built underneath the 97.2-mile barrier, and around 300 people managed to escape through them, according to the Berlin Underworlds Association, which conducts tours of the city’s historic bunkers and tunnels. Most tunnels were dug from the West to the East. Bernauer Strasse in the city’s Mitte neighborhood was one of the most popular spots for tunnel diggers because of the high amount of clay in the soil. The newly opened tunnel at Bernauer Strasse can be reached through an access tunnel built by the Underworlds Association. Through two windows, 24.6 feet under the ground,

Ulrich Pfeifer, a civil engineer, was one of the builders of the tunnel that was recently revealed to the public in Berlin, Germany. visitors can peek into the dimly lit 1970 tunnel but not get inside. The original tunnel is so narrow that the men who built it could only crawl through it. It led from the basement of a corner building on the western side of the Wall to another building on the eastern side. Ulrich Pfeifer, a civil engineer and one of the builders of the tunnel, made calculations and created maps for the project. Pfeifer fled to West Berlin through the sewerage system just a few

weeks after the Wall was erected in August 1961. “As a Berliner this wall was inconceivable,” the 84-year-old said. “It was tearing apart families, it was separating all of us.” He said his motivation to dig escape tunnels was “the conviction of my girlfriend, who got seven years in prison.” “She was 22 years old and was sentenced for nothing other than an escape attempt,” he said, still angry with the East German regime 30 years after its collapse.

DONATE YOUR CAR

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*We also accept Trucks, RVs, SUVs & Boats

WheelsForWishes.org Call: (314) 499-1300 *Wheels For Wishes is a DBA of Car Donation Foundation.

Contribute • Email your photo to stlpost@gmail.com. Include the full names of everyone in the photo, including where they are from and where you are standing in the photo. Also include your address and phone number. Please also tell us a little about the trip and a travel tip. We’re looking for interesting, well-composed, welllighted photos.

Virtuoso’s directory of advisers includes detailed biographical information, such as years of experience, languages spoken, verified reviews and recommendations from clients, travel specialties, and destinations personally visited. “A great travel adviser will be happy to provide references — not just online testimonials, which can be posted by anyone,” says Christine Hardenberger, owner of Modern Travel Professionals, a full-service travel agency in Virginia Beach. “People are less likely to lie when contacted directly.” Above all, stay flexible as the industry changes. Behind the scenes, the economics of being a travel adviser are still shifting, says Jack Ezon, the founder of Embark, a new platform for travel agencies. “The next generation of travel advisers will turn the entire model upside down to be more customer-centric.” That would be good — for everyone. Christopher Elliott is a consumer advocate, journalist and co-founder of the advocacy group Travelers United.


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / B U S I N E S S

SUNDAY • 11.10.2019 • C

TWITTER GOOD, FACEBOOK BAD? Money motives are behind all political ad policies DAVID NICKLAUS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

In some circles, Twitter is being cast as a hero for its ban on political ads while Facebook is called a villain for allowing politicians to lie.

Just remember that these are both businesses trying to make a buck. Facebook attracted an estimated $283 million in advertising related to the 2018 election. Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg may be sincere in his pro-FirstAmendment stance, but he also knows where his bread is buttered. Twitter, on the other hand, sold only $3 million in political ads

during the election cycle. Chief Executive Jack Dorsey can afford to take the moral high ground, and he has other ways to profit from political chatter. In announcing his ad ban, Dorsey declared that “political message reach should be earned, not bought.” Earned reach on Twitter is measured in followers, impressions and retweets, all of which are data points the site uses

to sell non-political ads. The first number on Twitter’s investor fact sheet is a metric known as MDAU, for monetizable daily active usage. By telling activists on all sides that he won’t let the conversation be dominated by deep-pocketed advertisers, Dorsey encourages them to keep contributing to MDAU. “The people who are really good at advertising, they’re going to be on Facebook,” says Mark Jamison, a visiting scholar at the conservative American Enterprise Insti-

A FARM TEAM FOR WOMEN IN BUSINESS Rising Leaders helps girls see career possibilities

tute. “The people who are good at creating conversations around content, they will be on Twitter.” For both Facebook and Twitter, the definition of a political ad becomes a critical question. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, a Democratic presidential candidate, has already criticized Twitter for including politically sensitive issues, such as climate change, in its ban. Warren famously drew Please see NICKLAUS, Page C4

CEO’s ouster reflects trend in workplace relationships More companies now have romance policies BY ALEXANDRA OLSON AND DEE-ANN DURBIN

Associated Press

CRISTINA M. FLETES PHOTOS, CFLETES@POST-DISPATCH.COM.

Alanna Hopson-Morris, left, a senior at Rosati-Kain High School, meets Thursday with her mentor, Sylvaine Hartmann, at RISE Collaborative Workspace at 8820 Ladue Road in Ladue. Hopson-Morris is part of the Rising Leaders mentorship program at RISE that pairs juniors or seniors in high school with other RISE members to provide career guidance. BY COLLEEN SCHRAPPEN

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Grace Elsner’s schedule doesn’t have much wiggle room. The Visitation Academy senior edits the yearbook and coordinates volunteers for the ambassador program at her school in Town and Country. She runs track — and a babysitting business. In the summer of 2018, her school counselor sent an email about a new mentoring program through RISE Collaborative Workspace in Ladue. Grace, now 17, decided it was worth squeezing in between tennis practice and high school web-

design meetings. The Rising Leaders Mentor Program introduces girls on the edge of post-high school life to women from a variety of professional fields: entrepreneurs, filmmakers, project managers, digital marketers. “It’s about getting your foot in the door early in the real world,” said Grace, who wants to study finance and marketing in college. “I don’t think high schoolers are taught that enough.” RISE is one of more than a dozen coworking spaces in the region. Its membership and Please see MENTOR, Page C4

Alanna Hopson-Morris, right, helps sew a garment during costume club last month. At left is Maddie Schwantner, a junior.

NEW YORK — Workplace couples are often romanticized — think Bill and Melinda Gates or Michelle and Barack Obama. But when the relationship involves two people with unequal power, it can also be fraught with peril, especially in the #MeToo era. McDonald’s CEO Steve Easterbrook is only the latest chief executive to be ousted over a consensual relationship with an employee. Increasingly, U.S. companies are adopting policies addressing workplace romances, a trend that began well before the #MeToo movement galvanized a national conversation surrounding sexual misconduct. Addressing workplace romance can be complicated, but many companies have removed any gray areas by forbidding managers, especially C-suite executives, from having relationships with subordinates given the potential for favoritism or lawsuits if the relationship sours. There are questions about whether consent is truly possible when the power imbalance is especially great. Many women who have come forward to share their #MeToo stories have said that they feared the consequences of saying no to a powerful person who could influence their careers. “That power difference can create a dynamic where the relationship can never truly be consensual,” said Debra Katz, a founder partner of the law firm Katz Marshall & Banks who has represented women in several prominent sexual harassment cases. “The #MeToo movement has shown how quickly it can go Please see ROMANCE, Page C4

Coworking giant WeWork arrives in St. Louis to mixed welcome BY ANNIKA MERRILEES

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS — Weeks before WeWork opened its downtown offices, one of the coworking giant’s account executives sent an email blast to the clients of at least one other local shared-office company. “Just wanted you to know there is another great option in STL,” wrote the executive, Jerod Williams. One of the emails went to attorney Jase Carter. He is a member at Nebula, which renovated two century-old buildings off the ultra-hip Cherokee Street in south St. Louis and now rents desks to lawyers, artists, filmmakers and

others looking for shared, flexible office space. Carter’s response to WeWork was stern. “Please do not send me any more emails,” he said. “The St. Louis startup scene is very inviting and encouraging, so the idea of WeWork poaching businesses from existing workspaces shows a remarkable lack of judgment.” WeWork’s St. Louis launch on Monday has sparked anticipation from the local business community. It’s also caused some early friction. Some see the company’s expansion here as a sign of the area’s economic health. Others were put off by WeWork’s tactics in enter-

ing the market, and have called the company out for marketing to individuals who already belong to a local coworking space. “I just felt like it was … at the very least, tone-deaf,” said Carter, who runs his business, Carter Law Firm, out of Nebula. WeWork declined to comment on the email. That said, Carter — and others — said they think the market can support all of the region’s coworking spaces, including WeWork, as the U.S. workforce grows increasingly mobile. CHRISTIAN GOODEN, CGOODEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM New York-based WeWork has been in the spotlight in recent Guests tour a hallway that gives way to meeting spaces and conference rooms during an open house Nov. 4 at the new WeWork office space on Please see WORK, Page C3 the 22nd floor of One Metropolitan Square in downtown St. Louis.

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Beware holiday credit card offers Before signing up for one, consider whether you truly need or can afford the card

US not yet up to speed on payment systems that can curb your costs BY LIZ WESTON

BY SARAH SKIDMORE SELL

NerdWallet

Associated Press

Here’s an illustration — drawing on the “The Simpsons” — of the many ways slow payment systems can inconvenience you and cost you money. Let’s say Homer is two days from payday. The family checking account at First Bank of Springfield is on fumes. There’s just enough in the account, Homer thinks, to gas up his Plymouth sedan and buy Bart a Squishee at the Kwik-E-Mart. But Marge checked the account balance too, and thought she could safely buy groceries. Because Homer and Marge didn’t realize they were spending the same money, one of the transactions triggers an overdraft fee. Plus, they forgot the power bill is due, and utility owner Mr. Burns charges a wicked late fee. Homer hits up Lenny and Carl for a loan, but Lenny uses Venmo, Carl uses PayPal and Homer uses only Zelle. Lenny writes Homer a check, but it’s from National Bank of Springfield, so First Bank puts a hold on the deposit. Desperate, Marge breaks into Lisa’s piggy bank for money to pay the power bill, but has to pay a fee to “expedite” a same-day bill payment. The animated “Simpsons” television show might use this scenario to get laughs, but it’s not funny for Americans who pay billions of dollars in overdraft charges and late fees, thanks in part to antiquated payment systems. The most vulnerable people turn to high-cost payday loans to bridge cash flow gaps, and some leave the banking system altogether because of high, unpredictable fees. It doesn’t have to be this way. Many other countries have real-time payments that clear almost instantly. Federal regulators urged U.S. banks to update their payment systems, but the banking industry has balked. Finally, after years of nagging, the Federal Reserve announced in August it’s developing its own service, FedNow, that will allow all U.S. banks to offer real-time payments. Big banks, predictably, aren’t happy. That’s because the largest banks have already created a real-time payment system through a payment-processing company they own called The Clearing House. The big banks have yet to convince a critical mass of other institutions to make the investments required to connect to it, however. Meanwhile, a bunch of person-toperson payment systems — PayPal, Venmo, Square Cash, Zelle and so on — promise to move money more quickly between individuals. Many require both parties to have an account, and the cash can sometimes take days to transfer. We’re still a long way from everyone having the ability to pay anyone instantly. The current landscape underscores why the Federal Reserve needed to step in, says Lauren Saunders, associate director for the National Consumer Law Center. “It’s just really important that a public entity that answers to everybody, and not just the biggest banks, have a strong role in making sure that the payments work for everybody,” Saunders says. Only the Fed, which is the central bank in the United States, can make sure faster payments are available at financial institutions of all sizes, which means consumers everywhere can benefit, says Christina Tetreault, senior policy counsel for Consumer Reports. Unfortunately, this transformation won’t happen overnight, even though we’re already decades behind some countries. (Real-time payments came to Japan in 1973 and to Switzerland in 1987.) The Fed is shooting for implementation by 2024. In the meantime, here are some steps that could help you minimize the cost of slow payments:

Most shoppers know the routine: It’s time to check out and the cashier (or website) offers a discount if you sign up for the store credit card. The offer can be hard to refuse, but experts say some shoppers should do just that. Sign-ups for retailer credit cards soar during the holidays. But the cards’ perks don’t always outweigh the downsides for everyone. Here’s what to consider:

How they work Retailer credit cards work in one of two ways. Cards that can only be used for purchases at that chain — like Target or Macy’s— are known as “closed-loop” cards. “Open loop” cards, on the other hand, such as the Amazon Prime Rewards Visa or the Capital One Walmart Rewards card, can be used anywhere but tend to earn better perks at the named retailer. Holidays are when Americans tend to shop the most, so it’s no surprise that signups for credit cards jump at the end of the year. Credit reporting agency Transunion says that credit card originations jump in November and December for both general and private label cards. But those associated retailers tend to be more sensitive to the holiday surge, said Matthew Komos, vice president of financial services, research and consulting at Transunion. Transunion has studied this issue for several years and found that private label card originations can double during the holiday period. For department stores and clothing stores alone last year, originations were 65% higher during the two-month holiday season compared with the rest of the year.

Pros There are some perks to retailer cards. A closed-loop card is easier to acquire than a traditional credit card. That’s good news for folks who are just starting to build, or rebuild, their credit. The cards can save you significant money if you are making a large purchase — say a refrigerator, mattress or a particularly large haul of goods. The discount and loyalty perks can also be a good thing if it’s a store you already shop at regularly. Other benefits vary by card, and include free shipping, early access to sales or more generous return policies. Nordstrom, for example, offers its loyalty members and cardholders curbside pickup for purchases and free alterations. There’s also a quick approval process, which is appealing in the rush of holiday shopping.

Cons The most notable downside of store cards is interest rates. The average interest rate on a retail card is about 26%, compared with 21% for a traditional credit card, according to Ted Rossman, industry analyst at Creditcards.com. That’s just the midpoint of the range based on credit worthiness, Rossman warns. Some branded cards easily run into the 30% range. That’s no big deal if you pay your card off in full each month, but for people that carry a balance, it can be a big expense. Also consider your credit score. Too many inquiries could lower your score slightly and too much debt can drag it down. Additionally, store cards typically come with much lower credit limits than a normal card, which means if you run up $400 on your store card with a $500 credit limit, you could be hurting the utilization rate that goes into determining your score as well. These cards may also encourage you to make purchases you wouldn’t otherwise make, said Kit Yarrow, a consumer psychologist and author of the book “Decoding the Consumer Mind.” Having a store credit card might incite you to make a purchase there rather than shop for the most competitive price, she said. You also open yourself up to more marketing, which may induce you to buy

CRAIG MATTHEWS, THE PRESS OF ATLANTIC CITY VIA AP

Salesman Kyle Pancoast, right, assists Albie Mansfield, who was returning a pair of sneakers at Foot Locker at Hamilton Mall in Mays Landing, N.J., on Dec. 26, 2017. The holiday shopping season typically sees an uptick in credit card sign-ups, but experts warn consumers to think carefully before doing so. more than you can afford. Consumers predominantly sign up for these cards on impulse, but their financial impact is long lasting. Yarrow urges shoppers to stop and consider if they just want the discount versus

really needing another credit card. And that can be hard to do during the holiday rush. “There’s a two-month period of time where rational people become a little insane and it’s during holiday shopping,” she said.

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Ben & Jerry’s sued over ‘happy cows’ claim Ben & Jerry’s has been sued by an environmental advocate who said the company deceived consumers by touting that the milk and cream it uses to make ice cream came exclusively from “happy cows.” In a complaint filed late last month, James Ehlers said Ben & Jerry’s “breached consumer trust” by representing that the milk and cream were sourced from cows on Vermont dairies that participate in its “Caring Dairy” program. Ehlers said less than half the milk and

cream actually came from “happy cows,” with the rest coming from “factory-style, mass-production” dairy operations. He said the deception enabled Ben & Jerry’s and its parent Unilever to charge premium prices, unjustly enriching themselves and violating a Vermont consumer protection law. The proposed class action filed on Oct. 31 in the federal court in Burlington, Vermont, seeks damages for ice cream purchasers nationwide and in Vermont, and to stop Ben & Jerry’s from claiming its milk and

BOTTOM LINE

MARKETS • WEEK IN REVIEW

REUTERS

Emerson under attack: An activist hedge fund wants Emerson to split itself in two. David Nicklaus and Jim Gallagher discuss whether the investor’s criticisms are valid and how its proposal might reshape one of St. Louis’ biggest companies. stltoday.com/watch

cream came from “happy cows” on “Caring Dairy” farms. Ben & Jerry’s spokeswoman Laura Peterson said the company does not discuss pending lawsuits, but was “committed to building a resilient, regenerative dairy supply” and considered its Caring Dairy program “the most progressive in the industry.” According to Ben & Jerry’s website, the Caring Dairy program requires participating farms to meet a variety of standards to ensure the humane treatment of cows.

Keep a cushion Many financial planners recommend keeping an amount equal to one month’s bills, but that may not be possible. Even an extra $100 can help avoid overdrafts.

Credit access Charging an emergency expense or getting a cash advance from a credit card is ultimately a lot cheaper than a payday loan.

Reject courtesy overdraft This coverage, also sometimes known as “bounce protection,” “courtesy pay” or “overdraft privilege,” is an expensive option that can trigger multiple $35 fees. Opting out means ATM and debit card transactions that exceed your balance will be declined. Or you can choose the less expensive “overdraft protection” that links your checking account to your savings account or a line of credit.

Reminders and alerts Dow Jones

Nasdaq

S&P 500

+333.88

+88.91

+26.17

27,681.24

8,475.31

+26.17

SOURCE: Reuters

MARKET WATCH: Page C5

You can use a budget app to download and monitor bank account transactions, or check your accounts frequently online. Note every bill’s due date on your calendar and set up alerts for low balances, due dates and unpaid bills. Such vigilance is a hassle, but can save a lot of money while we wait for real-time payments to arrive.


BUSINESS

11.10.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • C3

CHRISTIAN GOODEN PHOTOS, CGOODEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Guests mingle during an open house Nov. 4 at the new WeWork office space at One Metropolitan Square.

Work From C1

months, as it withdrew an initial public offering and removed founder Adam Neumann from his position as chief executive officer. SoftBank, a Japanese technology conglomerate, announced a $9.5 billion bailout last month, including $5 billion in new financing. SoftBank has cut WeWork’s market value to below $8 billion, a fraction of the $47 billion valuation it gave in January. But the company is still opening locations rapidly; a Reuters analysis showed 622 sites open on Oct. 10, up from 528 on June 30. In August, the Chicago-

based real estate firm Jones Lang LaSalle announced that WeWork would lease the entire 22nd and 23rd floors of St. Louis’ tallest high-rise, the One Metropolitan Square building. WeWork’s new space has expansive rows of offices, along with new mothers’ rooms, wellness rooms, classrooms, printing stations and kitchen areas. It is the only place in the building that allows dogs, according to WeWork. Danielle Hohmeier, director of marketing for the legal analytics company Juristat, moved into WeWork on Nov. 1, drawn by the flexibility of a coworking space — and the scope of WeWork.

Juristat currently has 22 employees, but only 15 are locally based. Through the company’s memberships, the employees in other cities can use the WeWork offices nearest to them. And when employees travel to meet with clients in other cities, they can base themselves out of WeWork, rather than camping out in a coffee shop or another less convenient location. Hohmeier also likes that the coworking company takes care of day-to-day management. In a previous building, Juristat’s director of operations often Guests hang out in a section of the working space at the new WeWork office site, which had had to make coffee and fill its St. Louis launch this past week. bathroom towel dispensers, she said. Now those by WeWork. inspired piece of neon art, Covo’s San Francisco locaissues are all taken care of WeWork offers private a Forest Park-inspired tion received emails from offices, office suites and painting, a chess board WeWork in the past. event space. Clients can (a nod to the World Chess That said, Pan said she also purchase access to a Hall of Fame) and an arch- still thinks WeWork’s endedicated desk, or choose way shaped like the monu- trance into the St. Louis a “hot desk” option, which ment. market will be positive. means they can take any Rebecca Pan, CEO of “They do increase the open seat. Covo, another downtown credibility of coworking At WeWork’s downtown coworking space, said in every city that they’re space, the main areas are WeWork’s expansion here in,” Pan said. smattered with references could help raise awareness Annika Merrilees • 314-340-8528 to St. Louis institutions, of coworking. @annie3mer on Twitter like an Anheuser-BuschPan said her members at amerrilees@post-dispatch.com

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Savings Update

4 questions to ask before tapping home equity By Sabrina Karl If you’ve owned your home for many years, chances are good you have equity built up that you can use for another purpose. But since taking on debt should always be a carefully weighed decision, it’s important to ask yourself specific questions before you tap in.

for a bigger problem that needs a more permanent solution? If you plan to use home equity to pay off other debt, what are you doing to avoid landing yourself in this kind of expensive debt situation in the future? Third, have you calculated exactly what budget commitment you’ll need to pay this debt off? This involves deciding how many years you’ll stretch it out, how much you’ll tap, what the resulting payment will be, and whether you can reliably fit this into your budget for the duration of repayment.

The most important starting point is to ask whether what you plan to spend the equity on is something that adds value. Making a major home improvement or retiring highercost debt can result in net financial gains. A major expense like long-term care may also be more economical to pay with home Lastly, is this your best option? You may determine that spending less and instead equity funds than with retirement savings. using savings will ultimately bear more But spending the funds on a vacation or financial fruit than taking out home equity. a highly discretionary purchase that loses Or you may find that borrowing through a value may leave you paying years of inter- different avenue will have stronger advanest on something with no monetary value tages. In any case, be sure you go in with a sharpened pencil and a realistic plan so in the end. that you maximize positive gains and miniSecond, is home equity just a short-term fix mize risks. Rate Criteria: Rates effective as of 11/05/19 and may change without notice. RateSeeker, LLC. does not guarantee the accuracy of the information appearing above or the availability of rates in this table. Banks, Thrifts and credit unions pay to advertise in this guide. NA means rates are not available or not offered at the time rates were surveyed. All institutions are FDIC or NCUA insured. Yields represent annual percentage yield (APY) paid by participating institutions. Rates may change after the account is opened. Fees may reduce the earnings on the account. A penalty may be imposed for early withdrawal. To appear in this table, call 773-320-8492.


C4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

BUSINESS

M 1 • SUnDAy • 11.10.2019

SEC eases rules, putting investors at risk, some say BY KATANGA JOHNSON

Reuters

WASHINGTON — The United States’top market cop is slowly taking the shackles off corporations. Since becoming head of the Securities and Exchange Commission in 2017, Jay Clayton has presided over more than two dozen measures that make life easier for America’s corporations., according to a Reuters analysis of SEC announcements and interviews with more than a dozen lawyers, academics and advocacy groups. The changes — 17 implemented so far with a further nine proposed — are part of a broader push to help reverse a 20-year decline in U.S. public company listings by modernizing disclosures and cutting regulatory costs for firms. But a majority of them will weaken investor safeguards or diminish their rights, according to lawyers, consumer and investor groups and SEC sources. “Under Clayton’s leadership, the Securities and Exchange Commission has been quietly chipping away at an array of rules, many quite technical in nature,” said Anna Pinedo,a partner at law firm Mayer Brown. “Although individually these haven’t gotten much attention, in aggregate the SEC’s rulemaking agenda under Clayton adds up to positive changes for public companies.” Clayton declined to be inter-

viewed for this story but his spokeswoman said protecting the interests of Main Street investors was a top priority. “The initiatives advanced under his leadership maintain or enhance investor protections, including by ensuring today’s investors receive the material information necessary to make investment decisions,” Natalie Strom said in a statement. Appointed by President Donald Trump with a mandate to entice more companies to go public, Clayton pledged to boost jobs and pension pots by making it more attractive for small companies to sell shares on stock exchanges while also protecting mom-and-pop investors. Corporations led by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the country’s biggest business group, have said red tape is partly to blame for a 50% decline in the number of listed companies over the past two decades. “Clayton recognizes that the decline of public companies is a threat to the long-term competitiveness of the American economy,” said Tom Quaadman, executive vice president of the Chamber’s Center for Capital Markets Competitiveness. “Clayton has taken a holistic step-by-step approach to reverse this situation.” But trimming companies’disclosure requirements, for example by giving them more leeway over how

and what they divulge in regulatory filings, and more freedom to make redactions,means investors will get less information, say critics. It is still too early to see the full effects of most of the changes but corporate governance experts worry that they swing the balance in favor of companies and make public markets more treacherous for both institutional and retail investors. “The deregulatory agenda now advancing at the SEC is too often driven by lobbyist intuition rather than hard facts about the markets we oversee,” Robert Jackson, one of five SEC commissioners, told Reuters. He has opposed several of the measures. One of Clayton’s most contentious proposals would relax a requirement, created by Congress in 2002 following the Enron accounting scandal,for companies with less than $100 million in revenues to get their internal financial reporting controls signed off by an independent auditor. Another controversial proposal to cap financial rewards for whistleblowers could reduce the incentive for company insiders to come forward with evidence of wrongdoing. After fierce attacks by corporate governance advocates, that proposal may be softened as Clayton tries to get it across the line in coming months. This week, he proposed changes that would limit the ability of

shareholders to submit proposals on items like executive compensation to company management. To be sure, Clayton has toughened market oversight in some areas. Some of the measures aimed at simplifying financial disclosures make it easier for investors to identify material information and give them more information on certain topics, such as how company employees deal in their stock. Cryptocurrency offerings have slumped after Clayton said they should be regulated like stock offerings, and he passed a package of measures this year requiring stockbrokers to disclose potential conflicts of interest, and the commissions they earn, when giving financial advice. The broker rules, however, were heavily criticized by advocates for mom-and-pop investors who said they still left investors exposed to conflicted advice.

Real costs for real people Going public is expensive. Investment bankers, lawyers and auditors collectively charge millions of dollars to prepare companies for their stock market debut and it can cost millions more to comply with ongoing regulatory requirements. But there are other reasons why companies are staying private, denying ordinary investors the sort of investment opportunities they traditionally rely on to fund their retirement.

Mentor

Nicklaus

From C1

From C1

programming are female-focused, and part of its mission is to help women establish professional connections. A mentorship program was a natural extension of RISE’s core philosophy of women helping women, according to its founders. Rising Leaders recruits junior and senior girls who, like Grace, are eager for an opportunity to preview professional life. The girls in this year’s cohort, the program’s second, come from 12 different schools and have a range of college and career goals. What they share is an enthusiasm for meeting and learning from women about how to chart a path in their CRISTINA M. FLETES, CFLETES@POST-DISPATCH.COM work world. It’s like a farm team for Alanna Hopson-Morris smiles as she locates a jacket that may be used in an upcoming play during costume club. women in business.

attention to Facebook’s policies by running deliberately false ads claiming that Zuckerberg had endorsed President Donald Trump. Facebook apparently does, however, fact-check ads that aren’t placed directly by politicians. In an era when well-funded advocacy groups often spend more than the campaigns themselves, that distinction is bound to be a messy one. Every television viewer knows to expect half-truths and deceptive statements during election years. TV executives say federal rules preventthemfromcensoringcandidate ads. Social media seems different. Its ability to target voters gives it a power that mass-media commercials don’t have. “If the old model uses a megaphone and a soapbox, the new model is a magnet attracting iron filings,” says James Fisher,professor ofmarketingatSt.LouisUniversity. Social media creates a bubble wheremuchofwhatweread,trueor not,fitsourpreconceivedviews.Be-

Building social capital Stacy Taubman, RISE’s cofounder and CEO, opened the workspace in early 2017. The former teacher had started a math coaching business, Girls Dreaming Big, and was feeling isolated working from home. She surveyed other female business owners and found they were also looking for ways to connect, even as they focused on their own companies. “Social capital is the most important thing,” said Taubman. A year after RISE was up and running, Taubman and partner Kate Wiegmann implemented the second phase of their business plan, launching RISE Society, the nonprofit arm that coordinates the $25-a-month mentoring program, which also offers scholarship assistance to mentees. They culled mentors from their 300 RISE members. Denise Purdy, who owns a life coaching business in Jefferson County, signed on as a mentor as soon as she heard about the program. “It gives (girls) a voice, that’s the bottom line,” said Purdy, who mentored Grace last year. “It gives them a voice they might not have used before.” And it introduces them to women in careers they may not have considered. “Part of it is they come into a

Romance From C1

fromconsensualinthebeginningto a huge problem when the relationship goes awry.” Easterbrook’s departure comes as McDonald’s steps up its efforts to stopsexualharassmentafterdozens of employee complaints. Over the last three years, more than50McDonald’semployeeshave filed cases alleging sexual harassment with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission or instatecourts,accordingtoFightfor $15, a labor advocacy group. In August, the hamburger chain unveiled a program to teach its 850,000 U.S. employees how to recognize and report harassment and bullying. Franchisees — who own 95% of McDonald’s 14,000 U.S.restaurants—aren’trequiredto offer the training, but the company expects them to provide it. McDonald’s said Easterbrook violated company policy forbid-

professional work environment to see what it is like. We give them the opportunity to connect and meet and build their social capital,” Taubman said. “You can’t be what you can’t see.” The program is open to 20 high school juniors and seniors from any public or private school in the area. This year’s group includes students from the St. Louis Public, Fox, Parkway and Ladue school districts. RISE promotes the mentorship to school counselors and principals, community organizations and parent groups to ensure a diverse group. “It’s a nice mix,” Taubman said. “Some girls are gung-ho and come in really focused. Others say, ‘I want to become a more well-rounded person and leader.’” The girls and their mentors meet at RISE monthly, September to April, to talk through lessons such as time management, dealing with failure, setting goals and navigating conflict. The pairs are matched according to interest, and, while they are provided a curriculum, the conversations tend to veer toward personal goals: how to save for a car, find an internship, become a better public speaker. Despite the curriculum, it’s not like sitting in a classroom, said 17-year-old Alanna Hop-

ding managers from having romantic relationships with direct or indirect subordinates. In an email to employees, Easterbrook said the relationship was a mistake and he agreed“itistimeformetomoveon.” He was replaced by Chris Kempczinski, who recently served as president of McDonald’s USA. Time’s Up, a group that fights harassment and has been supporting workers’ legal cases, said Easterbrook’s departure should provide an opportunity for McDonald’s to do more, including making sexual harassment training mandatory. “Under the new leadership of Chris Kempczinski, McDonald’s has an opportunity, and obligation, to act to ensure that all of its locations are safe and equitable for all,” said Jennifer Klein, chief strategy and policy officer at Time’s Up. Easterbrook followed in the footsteps of Intel Chief Executive Brian Krzanich, who resigned last year after the chipmaker found he engaged in a relationship that violated

son-Morris, a senior at RosatiKain High School in St. Louis. “I’m very used to being lectured. I wasn’t expecting it to be a dialogue,” she said of her first mentor, commercial real estate broker Dominique Novelly Costello. “We focused more on me as a person and being able to navigate the professional world.” Alanna, like Grace, has reupped for a second year in the program. They have new mentors, who they hope will be sounding boards as they apply to colleges and finalize their majors. “A lot of times young girls are taught to downplay their abilities and feel bad for having confidence in themselves. This is a great way to help girls break out of their shell,” said Alanna, who is interested in biochemistry and economics. Novelly Castro sees the Rising Mentors program as a way to break down barriers for young women entering the work world. “Many times, they’re not getting the encouragement they need. They’re not getting taken seriously,” she said. “But this lets you know you have a team backing you up.” Colleen Schrappen • 314-340-8072 @cschrappen on Twitter cschrappen@post-dispatch.com

a “non-fraternization” policy that applies to all managers. Other CEOs who have been pushed out over consensual relationships include Darren Huston of online travel company Priceline, Brian Dunn of Best Buy and Harry Stonecipher of aerospace company Boeing. In 2005 — the year Stonecipher was pushed out — just a quarter of U.S. workplaces had policies addressing consensual relationships, according to the Society for Human ResourcesManagement,theworld’s largest group of human resources professionals. By 2013, the number had jumped to42%,accordingtoaSHRMsurvey that year of 384 of its members. Of those workplaces, 99% prohibited romance between a supervisor and a direct report. SHRM has not conducted a more recentsurveyontheissue,butother research suggests such policies are even more common now. In a 2018 survey of 150 human resources executives, the executive coaching

For one, deregulation in the private market since 1996 has made it easier for firms to raise money from private investors,cutting most Americans out of the equation. Record low interest rates in recent years have spurred those wealthy individuals and institutions to put more cash into start-up investments. Over the past five years, there has been at least $150 billion raised in private equity and debt placements, compared to $90 billion over the previous period, according to data from Dealogic. The overall figure is likely to be far larger as data on such private deals is not comprehensive. And while the total number of public companies is lower than 20 years ago, the total value of public companies has doubled, partly due to mergers and acquisitions. A former Wall Street deals lawyer who has represented a roster of big banks and hedge funds,including Goldman Sachs and Deutsche Bank, Clayton initially disappointed Republicans and corporate lobbyists who had hoped he would hand them quick big wins. Instead, Clayton focused on building consensus with the four other commissioners who decide on rule-making and enforcement actions at the SEC. Two of the five current commissioners were picked by the Democratic party. The rest, including Clayton, are Republican appointees.

cause it’s a relatively new medium, most people haven’t developed the skepticism they have for, say, male enhancementadsinthenewspaper. “I think we all need to pull ourselves up to the table and be responsible for the information we take in,” says Perry Drake, assistant professor of digital marketing at the University of Missouri-St.Louis.“I don’t think it’s their responsibility to censor.” For all the attention paid to digital political ads, they absorbed 5% or less of campaigns’ spending in 2018, compared with 50% for television and direct mail. As more money shifts online, both Twitter and Facebook probably will reassess their policies. Dorsey may someday decide he needs a share of lucrative political dollars. Zuckerberg, facing intense criticism even from his own employees, may have to find a way to police political content. By 2022 or 2024, the two sites’ political ad policies may look more alike than different. For now, business imperatives are pushing them in opposite directions. David Nicklaus • 314-340-8213 @dnickbiz on Twitter dnicklaus@post-dispatch.com

MOUND CITY MONEY From David Nicklaus’ blog about St. Louis business: stltoday.com/moundcitymoney

Farm sector boosts Missouri GDP: A rebound in Missouri’s slumping farm sector helped the state keep pace with the nation’s 2% economic growth in this year’s second quarter. New inflation-adjusted data from the Commerce Department shows Missouri’s gross domestic product growth as 18th best among states in the April-June quarter. Illinois, with GDP growth of 1.2%, ranked 41st. Missouri’s $330.5 billion economy accounts for 1.5% of US GDP. Illinois’ $893.6 billion GDP is 4.2% of the national total. The scientific and professional services industry was the biggest contributor to growth in Missouri, followed closely by agriculture.The farm economy, hurt by low commodity prices, had been a drag on growth in recent years. Texas had the fastest-growing state economy in the second quarter; Hawaii had the slowest.

firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas found that 78% of companies had policies discouraging dating between subordinates and managers. Much more complicated is how far to go with such policies. Not all policies pertain just to bosses and their underlings. The SHRM study found that 45% of employers with workplace romance policies forbid relationships between employees of significant rank differences,while 35% prohibited them between employees who report to the same supervisor. Many human resources professionals, however, believe it’s unrealistic to adopt a blanket ban on workplace romance. A SHRM survey from January 2019foundthatone-thirdofAmerican adults have been in a romantic relationship with someone at work. “People meet at work. It’s not an uncommon place for romantic relationships to start,” said John Gannon, an employment law attorney with Skoler Abbott in Springfield, Massachusetts.

$60 million IPO for St. Louis’ Galera: Biopharmaceutical firm Galera Therapeutics, which was founded in St. Louis a decade ago, is now a public company traded on Nasdaq. Galera raised $60 million Wednesdayinitsinitialpublicstock offering, selling 5 million shares at $12 apiece. The shares surged as high as $13.43 in Thursday morning tradingbeforesettlingbacknearthe $12 level. Galera moved its headquarters to Malvern,Pennsylvania,in 2012,but its founders still run the company’s research efforts from Creve Coeur. Thecompanyisdevelopingadrug that reduces the side effects of radiation in cancer patients. It’s part of a class of chemicals discovered by Dennis Riley, Galera’s chief scientific officer, when he worked for Monsanto’sformerdrugsubsidiary. Galera was launched in 2009 and receivedseedfundingfromBioGenerator, members of the St. Louis Arch Angels and ABC Laboratories of Columbia, Missouri. Cultivation CapitalofSt.Louiswasalsoanearly investor.

A growing trend among small companies is to sponsor happy hours for their staffers to increase camaraderie, said David Lewis, CEO of HR provider OperationsInc, based in Norwalk, Connecticut. Those events can be fertile ground for romantic relationships, so it’s hardforabusinessownertothentell staffers to break up or quit, he said. Some companies have what are known as “love contracts,” which require disclosing relationships to the company and agreeing to act appropriately. Lewis said he has seen a big increase in business owners asking for on-site training sessions for employees to raise their awareness on what constitutes harassment. Thosesessionsdiscussrelationships betweenstaffersandwarnthatboth partners in a relationship must act professionally with no public displays of affection. And they’re expectedtoremainprofessionalifthey break up. AP Business writer Joyce Rosenberg contributed to this story.


MARKET WATCH

11.10.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • C5

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM/BUSINESS .com 15 BEST LARGE-CAP STOCKS COMPANY

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... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .6 3.9 ... ... ... ... ...

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

... 109.00 ... 27.99 33 27.00 dd 32.86 dd 37.13 31 53.87 dd 16.59 13 21.99 6 27.64 7 3.82 dd 29.95 96 42.00 cc 74.93 48 197.80 51 53.50

13.86 18.20 9.52 19.04 20.84 26.34 5.14 11.46 11.16 1.23 14.79 13.06 39.43 41.19 19.57

FRIDAY $CHG %CHG %CHG %RTN CLOSE 1WK 1WK 1MO 1YR 82.89 33.00 15.70 29.43 31.48 59.01 15.18 19.90 27.70 2.56 31.58 40.44 65.29 69.07 25.54

COMPANY

55.54 203.1 204.7 | 0.0 10.46 46.4 71.9 | 0.0 4.39 38.8 40.1 9754321| -39.0 7.42 33.7 44.3 |6531 5.9 7.73 32.5 45.5 |76521 12.8 13.97 31.0 45.7 9 | 86532 48.7 3.33 28.1 51.3 9 | 9876 81.8 4.33 27.8 25.2 |6541 6.4 5.75 26.2 30.3 |8743 22.7 0.53 26.1 34.4 87421| -22.6 6.51 26.0 41.3 |8764321 26.6 8.34 26.0 66.0 | 0.0 12.77 24.3 22.8 |5432 3.4 13.05 23.3 41.9 9876531| -55.7 4.60 22.0 1.5 98653| -48.5

TICKER

RAPT Therapeutics Constellation Phar Fulgent Genetics Inc Clovis Oncology Inc Agile Therapeutics Vericity Inc Collegium Pharma Silverbow Resources Satsuma Pharmeceut Venator Materials Vista Outdoor Veritiv Corp EverQuote Inc TrueCar Inc Earthstone Energy

COMPANY

-26.5 -26.7 86521| -22.4 -16.8 0.3 |9996 101.3 -16.5 -6.6 |97 40.1 -13.9 -10.4 | 0.0 -13.1 -9.8 952| -34.3 -11.6 -8.1 |76431 13.7 -10.5 -6.8 98643| -53.5 -8.5 -17.1 9 | 986541 87.2 -8.3 7.0 |987643 61.6 -8.1 -9.9 |7432 9.8

TICKER

Chesapk Engy Plantronics Inc Insperity Inc Myriad Genetics Inc Shake Shack Supernus Pharm The RealReal Inc Aarons Inc TripAdvisor Inc Avanos Medical

DIV

YLD P/E

CHK ... PLT .60 NSP 1.20 MYGN ... SHAK ... SUPN ... REAL ... AAN .16f TRIP 3.50e AVNS ...

... 2.4 1.7 ... ... ... ... .3 ... ...

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

1 3.78 8 57.79 23 144.92 49 48.40 cc 105.84 10 49.25 ... 30.05 13 78.65 50 69.00 18 53.45

.79 23.14 67.06 20.10 40.67 19.35 12.58 39.28 29.27 31.78

YLD P/E

52-WEEK FRIDAY HIGH LOW CLOSE

$CHG %CHG %CHG %RTN 1WK 1WK 1MO 1YR

... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...

22.45 45.42 13.59 32.05 2.97 33.12 19.97 29.49 19.90 7.24 14.04 36.70 30.34 11.67 8.05

15.40 121.3 116.2 | 0.0 16.78 118.8 254.9 |9986543 430.3 6.41 68.1 42.8 |9986543 260.2 2.30 64.0 79.5 99| -73.2 0.83 61.5 92.9 |9986543 126.8 2.74 15.1 59.3 | 0.0 7.11 55.3 69.3 7| 652 16.3 4.38 51.7 41.8 983| -55.5 5.68 47.5 81.2 | 0.0 1.24 46.6 67.4 964| -42.4 3.00 45.0 53.2 876541| -35.6 6.21 44.9 32.6 93| -37.2 8.83 40.6 56.4 |9986543 136.3 1.33 38.6 49.4 986431| -61.4 1.55 37.8 49.9 876521| -34.8

... dd ... dd dd ... dd ... ... ... dd dd dd dd dd

11.85 4.01 3.02 2.93 .35 12.00 10.01 7.10 8.61 1.85 4.30 12.83 4.05 3.01 3.00

28.10 30.91 15.82 5.88 2.18 20.89 19.96 12.86 17.63 3.90 9.67 20.03 30.58 4.78 5.65

10 WORST SMALL-CAP STOCKS

FRIDAY $CHG CLOSE 1WK

%CHG %CHG %RTN 1WK 1MO 1YR

0.90 25.47 68.88 23.64 62.06 21.72 17.66 58.22 31.96 35.54

-37.5 -37.2 -36.0 -30.1 -25.0 -24.5 -23.0 -21.3 -20.9 -20.6

-0.54 -15.11 -38.79 -10.16 -20.71 -7.05 -5.27 -15.79 -8.44 -9.24

DIV

RAPT ... CNST ... FLGT ... CLVS ... AGRX ... VERY 6.25e COLL ... SBOW ... STSA ... VNTR ... VSTO ... VRTV ... EVER ... TRUE ... ESTE ...

10 WORST MID-CAP STOCKS

%CHG %CHG %RTN 1WK 1MO 1YR

-36.48 -24.56 -5.18 -4.36 -11.36 -7.40 -2.07 -12.12 -0.83 -10.23

YLD P/E

15 BEST SMALL-CAP STOCKS

COMPANY

-35.3 99987532| -75.6 -27.3 9987632| -57.1 -31.7 9931| -39.8 -19.9 9764321| -28.3 -32.3 |95421 21.8 -16.0 9986521| -53.2 -20.2 | 0.0 -15.4 |876321 17.8 -18.3 9974321| -45.5 -10.1 98543| -31.7

TICKER

AnaptysBio Inc ObsEva Party City Holdco Fluidigm Corp BlueLinx Holdings McDermott Intl Modine Mfg EyePoint Pharma Ceragon Networks Ltd Eloxx Pharmaceutic

ANAB OBSV PRTY FLDM BXC MDR MOD EYPT CRNT ELOX

DIV ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...

YLD P/E ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...

... ... 2 dd 5 1 5 dd ... 64

52-WEEK HIGH LOW 87.49 16.50 12.37 14.90 35.40 10.99 16.67 2.82 5.04 17.50

29.44 2.75 1.98 2.34 13.48 1.37 9.50 1.19 1.75 2.87

FRIDAY $CHG CLOSE 1WK

%CHG %CHG %RTN 1WK 1MO 1YR

10.18 -28.48 -73.7 -71.0 99976321| -58.1 3.00 -4.80 -61.5 -62.3 999987531| -82.5 2.34 -3.32 -58.7 -65.4 9999865| -80.0 2.33 -2.73 -54.0 -45.9 9998765321| -67.7 16.97 -14.82 -46.6 -46.0 99752| -39.6 0.97 -0.70 -42.1 -52.6 99999521| -86.6 7.02 -4.57 -39.4 -33.1 873| -13.1 1.45 -0.92 -38.8 -31.1 986541| -29.4 1.82 -1.14 -38.5 -33.1 9996432| -54.3 4.48 -2.53 -36.0 8.2 9998763| -66.4

Note: Stocks classified by market capitalization, the product of the current stock price and total shares outstanding. Ranges are $100 million to $1 billion (small); $1 billion to $8 billion (mid); greater than $8 billion (large).

S&P 500

NAME

HOW TO READ THE TABLES Dividend: Expected cash payment to shareholders. PE ratio: Multiple of stock price to company earnings. 52-week high/low: Trading range over the past year. Last: Selling price at end of week. Net change: Dollar change in price of stock from previous week. Percent change: From the previous week.

NAME

DIV

PE

rt Right to buy security at a specified price. s Split increased shares by at least 20% in last year. t Paid in stock. Approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. wi Trades will be settled when the stock is issued. wd When distributed. wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of stock. un Unit, including more than one security. v Trading halted on primary market. vj In bankruptcy or receivership. x Ex-dividend.

j Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent omitted or deferred. k Declared or paid this year. Cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. lf Late filing with SEC. m Current annual rate, decreased by most recent dividend announcement. n New issue in the last year. p Initial dividend. Annual rate not known. Yield not shown. pf Preferred-stock issue. pr Preferences. r Declared or paid in last 12 months plus stock dividend. rs Reverse split decreased outstanding shares by at least 50% in last year.

FOOTNOTES a Extra dividends paid but not included. b Annual rate plus stock dividend. c Liquidating dividend. cc P/E greater than 99 cld Issue recalled for redemption by company. dd loss in last 12 months e Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f Annual rate, increased on most recent dividend announcement. g Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h Doesn’t meet continued-listing standards. i Sum of dividends paid after stock split. 52-WEEK HIGH LOW

WK WK LAST CHG %CHG

AES Corp .55 14 18.52 13.55 17.64 +.13 +.7 AFLAC 1.08 17 57.18 41.88 54.14 +.53 +1.0 AT&T Inc 2.33f 8 39.58 26.80 39.38 +.43 +1.1 AbbottLab 1.28 44 88.76 65.44 83.74 +1.08 +1.3 AbbVie 4.72f 14 94.98 62.66 85.21 +3.46 +4.2 Abiomed 56 427.70 155.02 219.62 +2.83 +1.3 Accenture 1.60m 26 202.80 132.63 189.70 +1.48 +.8 ActivsBliz .37f 24 68.30 39.85 54.30 -1.52 -2.7 AdobeInc 60 313.11 204.95 292.46+14.64 +5.3 AdvAuto .24 29 186.15 130.09 167.40 +2.58 +1.6 cc 37.18 16.03 36.29 +1.40 +4.0 AMD AffilMgrs 1.28 7 115.75 71.09 86.86 +5.03 +6.1 Agilent .66 78 82.27 62.00 76.64 -.33 -.4 AirProd 4.64 33 232.47 149.64 233.87+20.31 +9.5 AkamaiT 33 93.12 57.18 84.53 -2.97 -3.4 AlaskaAir 1.40 20 74.83 53.39 71.17 +1.02 +1.5 Albemarle 1.47 11 103.37 58.63 67.98 +3.49 +5.4 AlexREE 4.00f 34 160.25 109.04 153.91 -4.51 -2.8 17 141.86 92.56 110.79 +1.41 +1.3 Alexion lf AlignTech 50 334.64 169.84 259.92 +2.88 +1.1 Allegion 1.08 ... 119.40 74.83 115.65 -2.54 -2.1 Allergan 2.96 27 179.88 114.27 181.28 +2.99 +1.7 AlliData 2.52 6 207.98 99.20 107.90 +6.84 +6.8 1.42 26 54.59 40.75 51.68 -1.35 -2.5 AlliantEg s Allstate 2.00 16 109.55 77.00 108.19 +2.29 +2.2 Alphabet C 33 1323.74 970.11 1311.37+37.63 +3.0 Alphabet A 39 1322.65 977.66 1309.00+36.75 +2.9 Altria 3.36f 15 62.95 39.30 46.41 +1.35 +3.0 Amazon 86 2035.801307.00 1785.88 -5.56 -.3 Ameren 1.98 26 80.85 62.51 73.81 -3.55 -4.6 AmAirlines .40 10 40.58 24.23 30.76 +.30 +1.0 AEP 2.80f 23 96.22 72.26 89.07 -3.79 -4.1 AmExp 1.72f 16 129.34 89.05 121.47 +2.33 +2.0 AmIntlGrp 1.28 dd 58.66 36.16 55.91 +2.15 +4.0 AmTower 3.80f 77 242.00 150.66 205.87 -9.65 -4.5 AmWtrWks 2.00 50 129.90 85.89 116.30 -5.98 -4.9 Ameriprise 3.88 12 160.63 95.69 158.54 +5.65 +3.7 AmeriBrgn 1.60 10 94.75 69.36 86.07 -.80 -.9 Ametek .56 40 97.30 63.14 96.54 +2.34 +2.5 Amgen 5.80 18 219.84 166.30 221.11 +3.16 +1.4 Amphenol 1.00 27 105.51 74.95 102.70 -.08 -.1 AnalogDev 2.16 28 124.79 80.08 113.02 +3.65 +3.3 Ansys 62 229.20 136.80 224.31 +4.31 +2.0 Anthem 3.20 18 317.99 227.16 282.09+11.34 +4.2 1.76 40 198.61 135.30 194.57 -1.28 -.7 Aon plc Apache 1.00 15 38.12 19.44 24.43 +.62 +2.6 AptInv rs 1.56 30 55.49 43.32 53.17 -2.06 -3.7 Apple Inc 3.08 24 260.35 142.00 260.14 +5.09 +2.0 ApldMatl .84 17 57.29 28.79 56.03 +.57 +1.0 Aptiv .22 19 97.64 58.80 96.88 +4.75 +5.2 ArchDan 1.40 13 48.66 36.45 43.31 +.88 +2.1 Arconic .08 22 29.55 15.63 28.97 +.45 +1.6 AristaNetw 18 331.27 173.31 192.61 +7.31 +3.9 Assurant 2.52f 64 128.88 82.31 130.07 +2.37 +1.9 ATMOS 2.10 20 115.19 87.88 107.32 -4.38 -3.9 Autodesk dd 178.95 117.72 152.96 +2.71 +1.8 AutoData 3.16 43 174.50 121.40 162.73 -.25 -.2 AutoZone 21 1186.60 790.07 1165.86 +9.58 +.8 AvalonBay 6.08 35 222.87 167.01 209.85 -7.39 -3.4 AveryD 2.32 38 133.36 82.89 133.83 +4.43 +3.4 1.80f 14 55.66 40.68 54.94 +1.29 +2.4 BB&T Cp

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

WK WK LAST CHG %CHG

NAME

DIV

PE

BakHugh BallCorp BkofAm BkNYMel Baxter BectDck BerkH B BestBuy Biogen BlackRock BlockHR Boeing BookingHl BorgWarn BostProp BostonSci BrMySq BroadcInc BroadrdgF BrownFB CBOE Glb CBRE Grp CBS B CDW Corp CF Inds CH Robins CME Grp CMS Eng CSX CVS Health CabotO&G Cadence CampSp CapOne CapriHld CardnlHlth CarMax Carnival Caterpillar Celanese Celgene Centene s CenterPnt CntryLink Cerner ChartCm Chevron Chipotle ChubbLtd ChurchDwt Cigna Cimarex CinnFin Cintas Cisco Citigroup CitizFincl CitrixSy Clorox CocaCola CognizTch

.72 .60 .72 1.24f .88 3.08

84 28.65 20.09 21.90 33 81.88 42.24 64.65 -3.71 -5.4 12 33.60 22.66 33.26 +1.46 +4.6 13 54.27 40.52 49.20 +2.04 +4.3 37 89.93 61.40 78.51 +.60 +.8 99 264.74 208.62 244.79 -13.36 -5.2 30 223.59 186.10 221.31 +5.48 +2.5 24 78.53 47.72 76.85 +3.93 +5.4 14 344.00 215.78 293.25 -5.95 -2.0 18 495.39 360.79 490.21+21.04 +4.5 12 29.62 22.96 24.42 -.53 -2.1 33 446.01 292.47 351.00 +7.87 +2.3 26 2081.811606.27 1879.19-152.83 -7.5 13 46.29 30.71 46.31 +2.66 +6.1 43 140.35 107.84 138.34 +.90 +.7 31 43.84 31.56 40.51 -1.00 -2.4 19 58.46 42.48 58.02 +.86 +1.5 ... 323.20 213.71 313.41+16.82 +5.7 35 136.99 91.34 119.58 -6.23 -5.0 41 66.15 44.57 64.50 -1.40 -2.1 47 122.88 87.87 114.88 +.03 21 56.60 37.45 54.89 +.10 +.2 9 57.95 35.02 38.11 +1.37 +3.7 47 136.31 74.32 133.52 +2.32 +1.8 dd 55.15 38.90 46.63 +.36 +.8 16 94.34 74.12 78.06 +3.36 +4.5 43 224.91 161.05 198.17 -3.34 -1.7 36 65.31 47.63 59.61 -3.73 -5.9 18 80.73 58.47 74.03 +1.76 +2.4 13 82.15 51.72 72.47 +5.23 +7.8 12 27.65 16.01 18.37 +.04 +.2 57 77.08 40.31 67.10 +1.62 +2.5 17 48.38 32.04 46.25 -.29 -.6 8 99.62 69.90 97.26 +2.41 +2.5 10 50.10 25.25 36.62 +4.32 +13.4 dd 58.31 41.03 53.75 +3.31 +6.6 19 96.36 55.24 93.88 -.98 -1.0 10 62.52 39.92 45.05 +2.10 +4.9 13 148.41 111.75 148.16 +3.67 +2.5 12 127.15 82.91 127.31 +4.81 +3.9 15 109.07 58.59 109.54 +1.01 +.9 16 74.49 41.63 55.06 +2.93 +5.6 21 31.42 26.81 28.78 -.24 -.8 6 19.53 9.64 14.79 +1.47 +11.0 37 76.47 48.78 67.31 -.22 -.3 93 479.18 272.91 469.75 -6.73 -1.4 17 127.34 100.22 120.93 +4.72 +4.1 cc 857.90 383.20 731.62 -37.01 -4.8 18 162.44 119.54 151.51 +1.07 +.7 ... 80.99 59.64 67.58 -1.20 -1.7 18 226.61 141.95 188.20 +8.69 +4.8 7 91.22 37.19 46.54 +2.56 +5.8 10 118.19 71.21 108.70 -3.40 -3.0 37 277.85 155.98 260.88 -5.46 -2.1 20 58.26 40.25 48.83 +1.80 +3.8 11 76.28 48.42 76.12 +2.28 +3.1 10 38.54 27.62 38.52 +2.47 +6.9 25 112.27 90.28 110.73 +1.19 +1.1 24 167.70 143.58 148.00 +.96 +.7 32 55.92 44.42 52.21 -1.69 -3.1 18 74.85 56.73 62.86 +1.63 +2.7

2.00 13.20 1.04 8.22 .68 3.80 1.64 10.60 2.16f .66f 1.44f .20 .72 1.52f 1.20 2.00 3.00 1.48 .96 2.00 .40f 1.40 1.60 1.92 2.00 4.12 2.48 1.15 1.00 .72 4.76 3.00e .91 .04 .80 2.24 2.55f 1.40 2.04f 1.44f 1.40 4.24 1.60 .80

Mutual funds GL: Long Government GR: Global Real Estate GS: Short Government HM: High-Yield Muni HY: High-Yield Bond IB: World Bond IC: Trading-Inverse Commodities ID: Industrials IE: Trading-Inverse Equity IH: World Allocation IP: Inflation-Protected Bond IS: Trading-Miscellaneous JS: Japan Stock LB: Large Blend LC: Trading-Leveraged Commodities LE: Trading-Leveraged Equity LG: Large Growth LO: Long-Short Equity LP: Energy Limited Partnership LS: Latin America Stock LV: Large Value MA: Allocation - 50-70% Equity MB: Mid-Cap Blend MG: Mid-Cap Growth MI: Muni National Intermediate ML: Muni National Long MQ: Miscellaneous Region MR: Miscellaneous Sector MS: Muni National Short MU: Multisector Bond MV: Mid-Cap Value ND: Trading-Inverse Debt NE: Market Neutral NT: Nontraditional Bond PJ: Pacific/Asia ex-Japan Stock RI: Target-Date Retirement RR: Preferred Stock SB: Small Blend SC: Communications SF: Financial SG: Small Growth SH: Health SI: Muni Single State Intermediate SL: Muni Single State Long SN: Natural Resources SP: Equity Precious Metals

HOW TO READ THE TABLES Friday value: Price at which shares can be sold. Year-to-date return: Figures don’t reflect sales charges and assume reinvestment of dividends. Three-year and five-year annualized return: Figures don’t reflect sales charges and assume reinvestment of dividends. Objective: Fund’s investment category. 1-yr Rank: On a 1-to-5 scale, with 1 meaning the fund ranks in the top 20% of its category. FUND OBJECTIVES: AL: Allocation - 70-85% Equity AM: Multialternative BB: Commodities Broad Basket BL: Bank Loan BM: Bear Market CA: Allocation - 30-50% Equity CC: Consumer Defense CD: Consumer Cyclical CH: China Region CI: Intermediate-Term Bond CL: Long-Term Bond CR: Multicurrency CS: Short-Term Bond CV: Convertibles DP: Diversified Pacific/Asia EB: Emerging-Markets Bond EE: Equity Energy EI: India Equity EM: Diversified Emerging Markets ES: Europe Stock FA: Foreign Small/Mid-Value FB: Foreign Large-Blend FF: Managed Futures FG: Foreign Large-Growth FQ: Foreign Small/Mid-Blend FR: Foreign Small/Mid-Growth FV: Foreign Large-Value FX: Single Currency GI: Intermediate Government NAME

FRI NAV

WK - PCT RETURN RNK CHG YTD 3YR 5YR OBJ 1YR

AB DiversMunicipal 14.51 -.06 GlbBdAdv 8.55 -.07 ReltvValA m 5.77 +.05 AMG YacktmanI 21.61 +.14 Akre 45.40 -.72 FocInstl d FocRetail m 44.31 -.71 AllianzGI NFJDivValA m 12.79 +.22 American Century EqIncI 9.33 +.02 EqIncInv 9.32 +.02 GrInv 36.37 +.30 HeritageA m 19.76 -.05 IntlGrA m 12.30 -.02 SelA m 77.52 +.26 UltraInv 51.19 +.35 American Funds AMCpA m 32.93 +.29 AmrcnBalA m 28.33 +.09 AmrcnHiIncA m 9.92 -.02 AmrcnMutA m 43.39 +.32 BdfAmrcA m 13.18 -.11 CptWldGrIncA m 50.46 +.30 CptlIncBldrA m 62.51 +.18 CptlWldBdA m 20.17 -.24 EuroPacGrA m 54.58 +.28 FdmtlInvsA m 62.30 +.82 GlbBalA m 33.27 +.15 GrfAmrcA m 51.74 +.46 HiIncMuniBdA m16.34 -.09 IncAmrcA m 23.24 +.05 IntlGrIncA m 34.61 +.20 IntrmBdfAmrA m13.53 -.06 InvCAmrcA m 39.50 +.53 NewWldA m 70.13 +.33 NwPrspctvA m 46.46 +.21 SmCpWldA m 57.55 +.16 TheNewEcoA m 46.47 +.41 TxExBdA m 13.24 -.08 WAMtInvsA m 48.02 +.58 Angel Oak MltStratIncIns 11.06 -.01 Artisan IntlSmMdInv 14.36 +.02 IntlValueInstl 36.38 +.26 SmCpInvs 34.50 +.24 Baird AggrgateBdInstl 11.16 -.09 CorPlusBdInstl 11.50 -.09 ShrtTrmBdInstl 9.77 -.01 BlackRock AlCpEngyRsInvA m9.72 +.25 EqDivInstl 20.71 +.31 EqDivInvA m 20.63 +.30 GlbAllcIncInstl 19.45 -.02 GlbAllcIncInvA m19.31 -.02 HYBdInstl 7.67 -.01 HYBdK 7.68 LowDurBdInstl 9.63 -.01 StrIncOpIns 9.93 -.01 StratMuOpIns 11.68 -.04 TtlRetInstl 11.85 -.10 CGM Rlty 25.40 -1.00

+4.8 +6.7 +20.7

+2.1 +3.1 +13.2

+2.1 MS 1 +3.5 WH 4 +9.0 LV 3

+13.7

+11.9

+8.3 LV

+30.9 +30.6

+22.6 +15.4 LG +22.2 +15.1 LG

+21.2

+11.2

+20.0 +19.9 +27.9 +28.2 +22.1 +27.9 +26.6

+11.2 +9.9 LV 1 +11.0 +9.6 LV 1 +18.5 +12.8 LG 2 +14.6 +9.5 MG 3 +10.2 +4.6 FG 4 +17.4 +12.6 LG 2 +19.6 +13.5 LG 3

+18.7 +15.4 +9.0 +17.4 +7.0 +19.7 +13.7 +6.3 +21.2 +21.3 +13.1 +21.0 +7.6 +15.2 +20.9 +4.0 +18.3 +22.3 +23.3 +22.7 +19.7 +6.1 +20.8

+13.8 +9.8 +5.2 +12.3 +2.6 +10.9 +7.0 +2.3 +9.8 +13.3 +6.5 +15.1 +4.6 +8.4 +8.9 +1.5 +11.3 +11.4 +14.4 +12.6 +15.9 +3.2 +14.3

+4.5 +27.2 +18.4 +32.4

+4.7

+6.0 LV

1 1

+9.4 +7.7 +3.8 +8.7 +2.7 +6.7 +4.6 +1.8 +5.8 +10.5 +4.2 +11.3 +5.0 +6.2 +3.6 +1.5 +8.3 +6.0 +10.1 +9.1 +10.5 +3.4 +10.0

LG MA HY LV CI WS IH IB FG LB IH LG HM AL FB CS LB EM WS SW LG MI LB

+3.4 +3.7 +2.3

+10.4 +23.2 +23.0 +13.9 +13.6 +12.8 +13.0 +4.3 +6.5 +5.4 +8.6

-.2 +13.3 +13.0 +6.7 +6.4 +6.7 +6.8 +2.4 +3.9 +3.7 +3.3

+2.1

+4.6

5 2 5 3 4 3 3 1 3 4 2 5 3 2 1 1 5 1 2 3 4 2 3

+4.0 MU

+11.3 +6.3 FR +8.2 +5.4 FB +20.4 +13.5 SG

+8.4 +8.9 +4.2

3

1 3 1

+3.4 CI +3.7 PI +2.0 CS

1 1 2

-6.3 +9.4 +9.2 +4.3 +4.0 +5.0 +5.1 +2.0 +2.9 +4.0 +3.3

EE LV LV IH IH HY HY CS NT MI PI

1 2 2

+2.7 LB

5

2 1 2 5 1

NAME

FRI NAV

Calamos MktNetrlIncIns 13.32 Causeway IntlValInstl 15.86 ClearBridge AggresivGrA m 188.54 ApprecA m 27.05 LgCpGrI 54.54 Cohen & Steers PrfrdScInc,IncI 14.18 RlEsttSecIncIns 17.19 Columbia DivIncIns 23.93 GlbDivOppA m 18.85 SelM/CValA m 11.09 DFA EMktCorEqI 20.93 EMktSCInstl 20.22 EmMktsInstl 28.09 EmMktsValInstl 27.95 FvYrGlbFIIns 10.96 GlbEqInstl 24.10 GlbRlEsttSec 12.31 InflProtSecIns 11.97 IntlCorEqIns 13.43 IntlRlEsttScIns 5.49 IntlSmCoInstl 18.51 IntlSmCpValIns 18.96 IntlValInstl 17.69 ItmGovtFIIns 12.80 LgCpIntlInstl 23.17 OneYearFIInstl 10.31 RlEsttSecInstl 40.35 ShTrmExQtyI 10.95 TAUSCorEq2Instl 19.76 TMdUSMktwdVl 32.01 TMdUSTrgtedVal 35.33 TwYrGlbFIIns 10.03 USCorEq1Instl 25.34 USCorEqIIInstl 23.28 USLgCo 23.92 USLgCpValInstl 38.51 USMicroCpInstl 21.43 USSmCpInstl 34.86 USSmCpValInstl 34.05 USTrgtedValIns 23.23 Davis NYVentureA m 29.64 Delaware Inv ValInstl 22.45 Dodge & Cox Bal 103.80 GlbStk 13.17 Inc 14.08 IntlStk 43.64 Stk 197.32 DoubleLine CorFII 11.03 LowDurBdI 10.03 TtlRetBdI 10.66 TtlRetBdN b 10.65 Eaton Vance AtlntCptSMIDCI 38.61 FltngRtInstl 8.76 Edgewood GrInstl 35.86

SR: Real Estate SS: Muni Single State Short ST: Technology SU: Utilities SV: Small Value TA: Target-Date 2000-2010 TD: Target-Date 2015 TE: Target-Date 2020 TG: Target-Date 2025 TH: Target-Date 2030 TI: Target-Date 2035 TJ: Target-Date 2040 TK: Target-Date 2045 TL: Target-Date 2055 TN: Target-Date 2050 TW: Corporate Bond TV: Tactical Allocation UB: Ultrashort Bond VD: Trading-Leveraged Debt VL: Stable Value VO: Volatility WS: World Stock XM: Allocation - 85+% Equity XO: Infrastructure XQ: Target-Date 2060+ XR: Option Writing XS: Long-Short Credit XP: Emerging-Markets LocalCurrency Bond XY: Allocation - 15-30% Equity. FOOTNOTES b -Fee covering market costs is paid from fund assets. d -Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. f -front load (sales charges). m -Multiple fees are charged, usually a marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. NA-not available. p -previous day´s net asset value. s -fund split shares during the week. x - fund paid a distribution during the week. WK - PCT RETURN RNK CHG YTD 3YR 5YR OBJ 1YR +.01 +6.2

+4.6

+3.8 NE

2

+.44 +16.5

+7.4

+2.9 FV

3

+2.43 +17.3 +.27 +24.1 +.46 +25.8

+9.6 +4.7 LG +15.2 +10.3 LB +17.2 +13.7 LG

2

-.02 +16.1 -1.05 +27.6

+6.5 +6.6 RR +10.7 +10.0 SR

1 2

+.23 +23.5 +.05 +19.8 +.13 +25.7

+14.6 +10.5 LV 1 +8.4 +3.8 WS 4 +10.0 +6.0 MV 1

+.34 +.15 +.53 +.61

+6.7 +3.6 EM +5.0 +3.8 EM +7.3 +3.7 EM +6.3 +3.0 EM +2.1 +2.2 WH +11.6 +7.7 WS +9.5 +7.4 GR +2.3 +2.2 IP +8.2 +5.1 FB +8.0 +5.4 GR +7.6 +6.5 FQ +5.2 +4.9 FA +7.3 +3.4 FV +2.2 +2.7 GI +9.1 +4.6 FB +1.7 +1.2 UB +10.0 +8.3 SR +2.2 +2.1 CS +13.4 +9.0 LB +12.4 +8.5 LV +8.7 +6.1 SV +1.7 +1.3 WH +14.3 +9.8 LB +13.2 +8.9 LB +15.3 +11.0 LB +11.9 +8.3 LV +10.4 +7.3 SB +9.5 +6.9 SB +7.0 +4.6 SV +8.3 +5.6 SV

+.53 -.40 -.06 +.24 -.12 +.30 +.38 +.51 -.19 +.39 -1.55 +.52 +1.06 +1.31 +.63 +.62 +.44 +1.38 +.65 +1.06 +1.26 +.92

+10.9 +9.2 +11.0 +5.7 +3.9 +21.7 +23.1 +7.3 +17.4 +20.1 +17.3 +15.3 +14.2 +6.7 +18.7 +2.2 +24.7 +4.2 +24.4 +23.4 +19.2 +2.5 +24.8 +24.1 +25.4 +21.8 +16.6 +18.1 +14.4 +18.4

4 4 4 5 5 4 2 1 4 2 3 3 4 1 3 3 3 2 4 3 3 5 4 4 2 4 5 4 5 4

+.62 +26.6

+12.8

+9.5 LB

2

+.35 +16.3

+10.6

+8.3 LV

5

+1.26 +.29 -.07 +.79 +3.81

+16.1 +19.3 +8.7 +18.2 +19.9

+9.7 +10.2 +3.8 +6.9 +12.9

+7.4 +6.4 +3.5 +2.5 +9.3

MA WS PI FV LV

4 5 3 1 4

-.09 -.01 -.07 -.08

+7.1 +4.3 +5.5 +5.2

+3.2 +2.7 +3.2 +2.9

+3.3 +2.4 +3.2 +2.9

PI CS PI PI

4 5 5

+.06 +29.4 +.01 +5.1

+17.5 +13.4 MG 2 +4.0 +3.7 BL 4

-.33 +24.6

+19.8 +14.7 LG

3

ColgPalm Comcast Comerica ConAgra ConchoRes ConocoPhil ConEd ConstellA CooperCo Copart Corning Corteva n Costco Coty CrwnCstle Cummins DR Horton DTE DXC Tch Danaher Darden DaVita Inc Deere DeltaAir Dentsply DevonE DiambkEn DigitalRlt Discover DiscIncA DiscIncC DishNetw h Disney DollarGen DollarTree DomEngy Dover Dow Inc n Dupont rs DukeEngy DukeRlty E-Trade eBay EOG Rescs EastChem Eaton Ecolab EdisonInt EdwLfSci ElectArts EliLilly EmersonEl Entergy Equifax Equinix EqtyRsd EssexPT EsteeLdr EverestRe Evergy EversrceE Exelon Expedia ExpdIntl ExtraSpce ExxonMbl F5 Netwks FLIR Sys FMC Corp Facebook Fastenal s FedExCp FedRlty FidNatInfo FifthThird FstRepBk FirstEngy Fiserv Fleetcor Flowserve FordM Fortinet Fortive FBHmSec FoxCpA n FoxCpB n FrankRes FrptMcM Gallaghr Gap Garmin Gartner GenDynam GenElec GenMills GenMotors

DIV

1.72 .84 2.68 .85 .50 1.68f 2.96 3.00 .06 .80 2.60 .50 4.80f 5.24 .60 4.05f .84 .68 3.52 3.04 1.61 .40f .36f .75 4.32 1.76

1.76 1.28 3.67 1.96 2.80 1.20 3.78 .86 .56 .56 1.15 2.48 2.84 1.84 2.45 2.58 2.00f 3.72f 1.56 9.84 2.27 7.80 1.92f 5.60 1.60 2.14 1.45 1.36f 1.00 3.60 3.48 .68 1.60 .88 2.60 4.20f 1.40 .96 .76 1.52 .76 .60a .28 .88 .92 .92 1.04 .20 1.72 .97 2.28 4.08 .04 1.96 1.52

PE

25 22 9 18 11 10 18 15 92 36 13 ... 43 ... 76 52 13 22 33 40 21 17 17 9 dd 15 10 56 11 16 15 13 19 23 14 16 28 ... 8 22 27 15 8 dd 11 21 41 14 78 22 dd 24 50 23 cc 53 55 62 10 28 26 18 46 23 26 16 19 26 19 36 28 88 23 24 11 29 10 52 37 cc 7 52 ... 21 44 ... 9 8 35 7 26 49 19 dd 18 dd

FRI NAME NAV FPA Crescent d 34.00 NewInc 9.99 USVal 11.26 Federated InsHYBdIns 9.77 StratValDivIns 5.91 TtlRetBdInstl 10.98 Fidelity 500IdxInsPrm 107.67 AsstMgr20% x 13.56 AsstMgr50% 18.59 AsstMgr70% 22.94 BCGrowth 101.06 BCGrowth 14.17 BCGrowthK 101.27 Balanced 24.25 BalancedK 24.25 Cap&Inc 10.09 ChinaRegion 37.79 CmdtyStrat 4.73 Contrafund 13.40 ContrafundK 13.42 ConvertibleSecs 30.25 CptlApprec 36.55 DivGro 30.66 DiversIntl 38.87 EmergMketsOpps19.83 EmergingAsia 46.22 EqDividendInc 26.49 EqIncome 61.31 ExMktIdxInPr 63.92 FltngRtHiInc 9.39 FourinOneIdx 48.41 Frdm 2015 13.09 Frdm 2020 16.36 Frdm 2025 14.32 Frdm 2030 17.80 Frdm 2035 14.92 Frdm 2040 10.41 Frdm 2045 11.82 GlbexUSIdxInsPr 13.31 GlobalexUSIdx 12.99 GrDiscv 37.73 GroCo 18.21 GroCo 20.50 GroCoK 20.53 Growth&Inc 41.39 IntlDiscv 44.09 IntlGr 17.26 IntlIdxInstlPrm 42.96 IntlVal 10.01 InvmGradeBd 11.51 InvmGradeBd 8.14 LowPrStk 47.79 LowPrStkK 47.74 Magellan 10.95 MidCapStock 36.40 NasdCmpIdx 111.03 NewMktsInc 14.73 OTCPortfolio 12.09 OTCPortfolioK 12.29 Overseas 49.80 Puritan 22.11 PuritanK 22.09 SCValue 15.31 SmCpOpps 13.53 StkSelorAllCp 48.20 TotalBond 10.83 TtlMktIdxInsPrm 87.83 USBdIdxInsPrm 11.86 Value 11.06 Worldwide 28.02 Fidelity Advisor NewInsA m 32.56 NewInsC m 27.72 NewInsI 33.42 StgInc 12.46 StgIncC m 12.26 StgIncI 12.46 TotalBondI 10.82 Fidelity Select Biotechnology 20.52 ConsumerStaples87.41 Energy 35.05 HealthCare 25.75 MedTech&Devcs 56.24 NaturalRes 25.38 Swre&ITSvcs 19.31 Technology 18.84 First Eagle GlbA m 59.61 Franklin Templeton CATxFrIncA1 m 7.57 FdrTFIncA1 m 11.92 GlbBdA m 10.71 GlbBdAdv 10.67 GlbBdR6 10.67 Gr,IncA m 23.46 GrA m 112.98 IncA1 m 2.30 IncAdv 2.28 IncC m 2.33 MsrTxFrIncA1 m 11.73 MutBeaconA m 16.02 MutBeaconC m 15.95 MutBeaconZ 16.21 MutEuropeanC m20.96 MutGlbDiscvA m31.12 MutGlbDiscvZ 31.85 MutZ 28.06 RisingDivsA m 68.27 UtlsA1 m 21.38 GE RSPUSEq 57.85 Gabelli SmCpGrAAA m 55.86 Goldman Sachs SmCpValA m 50.70 Guggenheim MgdFutsStratP b19.16 Harbor CptlApprecInstl 77.23

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

76.41 47.27 88.96 35.72 139.99 71.01 94.97 214.48 344.32 85.31 35.34 32.78 307.34 14.14 149.47 184.52 54.42 134.37 69.45 147.33 128.41 70.51 179.70 63.44 60.15 35.39 119.55 136.32 92.98 34.89 31.55 44.66 147.15 166.98 119.71 83.73 110.81 60.52 85.66 97.37 36.04 54.44 42.00 108.78 86.18 92.15 209.87 76.45 241.82 108.80 132.13 75.54 122.09 148.59 609.97 89.55 334.17 207.50 268.95 67.81 86.55 51.18 144.00 81.15 124.46 83.49 190.08 55.54 98.17 208.66 37.91 234.49 141.35 141.35 30.89 111.67 49.07 111.46 304.65 54.16 10.56 96.96 89.48 62.60 41.95 41.73 35.82 14.68 92.74 31.39 96.44 171.78 193.76 11.75 56.40 41.90

57.51 32.61 58.54 20.22 61.37 50.13 73.30 150.37 228.65 44.61 26.75 24.35 189.51 5.91 103.21 124.40 32.39 107.22 26.02 94.59 95.83 43.40 132.68 45.08 34.58 19.72 74.55 100.05 54.36 23.79 21.99 23.22 100.35 98.08 81.02 67.41 65.83 40.44 62.87 82.46 24.67 34.68 26.01 64.33 61.22 64.46 135.77 45.50 139.64 73.91 101.36 55.39 82.06 88.68 335.29 63.17 235.51 121.47 201.09 54.57 62.61 42.44 97.05 62.90 86.99 64.65 121.36 40.52 60.10 123.02 24.61 137.78 115.09 94.53 22.12 79.42 35.33 68.45 172.18 35.88 7.41 64.41 62.89 35.27 29.70 29.61 25.57 8.43 68.19 15.11 59.98 120.89 143.87 6.66 36.42 31.46

WK WK LAST CHG %CHG

66.63 -.18 -.3 45.19 +.44 +1.0 71.83 +4.21 +6.2 27.44 -.03 -.1 72.75 +3.58 +5.2 59.16 +2.01 +3.5 87.92 -3.20 -3.5 187.56 -2.69 -1.4 291.40 -.43 -.1 81.46 -1.45 -1.7 30.37 +.79 +2.7 26.20 +.02 +.1 302.62 +6.53 +2.2 12.84 +1.17 +10.0 130.81 -6.61 -4.8 186.27 +9.70 +5.5 51.15 -2.15 -4.0 120.49 -6.51 -5.1 30.08 +1.71 +6.0 135.23 -1.34 -1.0 114.91 +2.74 +2.4 69.85+10.31 +17.3 178.36 +2.25 +1.3 57.58 +1.56 +2.8 57.42 +1.97 +3.6 22.91 +1.74 +8.2 75.43 -11.36 -13.1 116.57 -10.23 -8.1 84.71 +2.99 +3.7 30.91 +3.65 +13.4 28.62 +3.13 +12.3 35.32 +.46 +1.3 137.96 +5.21 +3.9 157.86 -2.04 -1.3 110.35 -1.39 -1.2 80.28 -2.99 -3.6 109.35 +2.72 +2.6 55.99 +3.68 +7.0 71.13 +1.49 +2.1 89.95 -4.43 -4.7 34.59 -.75 -2.1 43.48 +1.07 +2.5 35.14 -.11 -.3 74.70 +3.55 +5.0 83.90 +4.93 +6.2 92.22 +3.61 +4.1 190.39 -.59 -.3 66.30 +.72 +1.1 234.16 -2.58 -1.1 98.27 +2.97 +3.1 113.53 +1.02 +.9 73.88 +2.09 +2.9 114.90 -3.83 -3.2 133.96 -4.74 -3.4 530.31 -31.93 -5.7 83.98 -4.16 -4.7 314.92 -9.79 -3.0 187.27 +.69 +.4 265.35 +6.00 +2.3 63.06 -.78 -1.2 79.41 -3.38 -4.1 44.71 -.63 -1.4 101.32 -36.48 -26.5 77.27 +3.66 +5.0 106.29 -4.93 -4.4 70.77 +2.04 +3.0 148.41 +2.31 +1.6 53.24 -.06 -.1 97.70 +2.69 +2.8 190.84 -2.78 -1.4 37.07 -.08 -.2 163.22 +6.70 +4.3 131.48 -4.16 -3.1 130.69 -3.46 -2.6 30.56 +1.00 +3.4 110.22 +1.86 +1.7 46.59 -1.39 -2.9 110.61 +3.76 +3.5 293.45 -.89 -.3 49.13 9.04 +.15 +1.7 96.23 +6.10 +6.8 72.88 +1.08 +1.5 62.06 +.66 +1.1 35.14 +2.75 +8.5 34.43 +2.57 +8.1 28.28 +.23 +.8 11.52 +1.00 +9.5 91.15 -.37 -.4 16.68 -.26 -1.5 95.89 +1.43 +1.5 160.36 +4.27 +2.7 185.08 +5.35 +3.0 11.52 +1.14 +11.0 52.50 +1.32 +2.6 38.67 +.70 +1.8

WK - PCT RETURN RNK CHG YTD 3YR 5YR OBJ 1YR +.52 +17.3 -.02 +3.5 +.10 +27.7

+8.0 +2.9 +10.8

-.01 +12.3 +16.6 -.10 +8.3

+5.8 +7.7 +3.4

+.98 -.08 +.01 +.08 +.98 +.13 +.98 +.08 +.08 +.01 +1.03 -.01 +.07 +.08 -.03 +.06 +.91 -.16 +.17 +.65 +.62 +.70 +.37

+5.6 MA 4 +2.2 CS 4 +4.6 LB 1 +5.3 HY +6.9 LV +3.3 PI

+.23 +.01 +.03 +.04 +.08 +.11 +.09 +.10 +.09 +.09 +.08 +.13 +.13 +.14 +1.12 +.05 -.01 +.21 +.11 -.11 -.09 +.97 +.96 -.08 +.19 +1.19 -.10 +.14 +.14 -.14 +.01 +.01 +.13 +.07 +.48 -.10 +.76 -.12 +.26 +.06

+25.5 +8.7 +14.6 +17.9 +24.7 +24.1 +24.8 +19.6 +19.6 +15.5 +28.2 +6.0 +22.8 +23.0 +21.7 +23.1 +25.5 +22.8 +20.8 +25.0 +22.9 +23.2 +22.2 +6.6 +20.6 +13.3 +14.6 +15.7 +17.5 +19.4 +19.9 +20.0 +17.2 +17.2 +25.5 +28.9 +28.0 +28.1 +26.4 +20.9 +28.8 +18.5 +16.4 +8.6 +8.7 +19.0 +19.1 +23.4 +21.4 +29.0 +7.6 +30.2 +30.3 +21.8 +16.5 +16.6 +19.0 +24.8 +25.4 +8.6 +25.0 +7.6 +27.1 +21.2

+15.3 +4.5 +7.7 +9.7 +20.3 +21.5 +20.4 +11.1 +11.2 +7.5 +14.6 -.2 +17.0 +17.1 +10.6 +14.7 +13.5 +9.4 +10.6 +13.7 +10.6 +11.1 +12.8 +4.0 +11.7 +7.8 +8.5 +9.0 +10.4 +11.3 +11.3 +11.3 +8.8 +8.8 +19.3 +21.4 +20.6 +20.7 +13.1 +9.3 +13.7 +9.3 +6.1 +3.6 +3.4 +10.7 +10.8 +15.3 +12.6 +18.8 +2.2 +21.7 +21.8 +10.4 +10.4 +10.5 +8.6 +12.9 +14.6 +3.5 +14.9 +2.9 +9.5 +14.6

LB XY CA MA LG LG LG MA MA HY CH BB LG LG CV LG LV FG EM PJ LV LV MB BL AL TD TE TG TH TI TJ TK FB FB LG LG LG LG LB FG FG FB FV CI CI MV MV LG MB LG EB LG LG FG MA MA SV SB LG PI LB CI MV WS

2 3 2 3 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 2 4 4 1 4 1 3 1 1 2 2 3 1 1 3 2 2 2 3 4 3 2 2 3 2 3 3 4 4 1 2 2 1 1 4 4 4 2 2 5 2 2 4 4 4 3 1 4 2 3 1 2 3

+.28 +.23 +.29 -.07 -.07 -.07 -.10

+23.6 +22.8 +23.8 +9.0 +8.1 +9.0 +8.7

+15.4 +10.7 LG +14.5 +9.8 LG +15.7 +11.0 LG NA NA MU +3.5 +2.9 MU +4.5 +3.9 MU +3.4 +3.4 PI

4 4 3 3 4 3 3

+.26 +.56 +.98 +.15 -.48 +.53 +.17 +.24

+19.9 +27.0 +6.0 +16.8 +19.0 +12.9 +31.2 +40.4

+11.6 +4.9 SH +6.4 +5.1 CC -4.8 -6.2 EE +16.1 +9.2 SH +19.2 +16.6 SH -2.2 -5.0 EE +22.9 +18.8 ST +24.2 +18.6 ST

4 1 2 3 1 1 3 2

-.01 +17.1 -.08 -.09 +.03 +.03 +.03 +.49 +.47 -.01 -.01 -.01 -.07 +.33 +.33 +.34 +.52 +.66 +.68 +.49 +.53 -.81

+7.6 +5.7 -.8 -.5 -.4 +13.2 +25.6 +12.8 +13.0 +12.1 +5.7 +20.6 +19.8 +20.8 +19.8 +20.8 +21.0 +18.8 +24.4 +20.4

+.42 +25.6

+7.1

+11.0 +3.7 +5.6 +6.7 +13.6 +14.5 +13.8 +7.7 +7.8 +5.8 +8.7 -6.9 +12.1 +12.2 +5.4 +8.9 +8.8 +5.4 +5.9 +8.7 +7.7 +7.7 +8.5 +3.5 +8.0 +5.8 +6.2 +6.5 +7.2 +7.7 +7.7 +7.7 +4.4 +4.4 +12.6 +14.9 +14.4 +14.5 +9.0 +5.2 +8.3 +4.9 +2.7 +3.4 +3.2 +7.3 +7.4 +10.4 +8.8 +13.9 +4.0 +15.4 +15.5 +7.6 +7.5 +7.6 +7.1 +8.7 +9.7 +3.5 +10.6 +2.9 +6.0 +8.9

3 3

+5.9 IH

+3.2 +4.0 MC +2.4 +2.8 ML +1.9 +0.5 NT +2.2 +0.8 NT +2.3 +1.0 NT +6.2 +3.0 WS +16.7 +11.6 LG +6.6 +4.0 CA +6.8 +4.2 CA +6.1 +3.4 CA +2.4 +2.8 SL +10.2 +7.1 WS +9.3 +6.3 WS +10.4 +7.4 WS +7.2 +3.5 ES +7.7 +5.2 WS +8.0 +5.5 WS +7.7 +5.6 XM +13.3 +9.9 LB +11.3 +8.8 SU +15.2 +10.0 LB

2 1 5 5 5 5 5 3 5 5 5 3

3 2

+.75 +18.5

+9.4

+6.5 SB

2

+.44 +18.8

+8.9

+6.2 SB

3

+2.7

-0.7

-.14 +8.1 +.75 +24.6

+18.9 +13.2 LG

4 3

NAME

GenuPrt GileadSci GlobPay GoldmanS Graingr HCA Hldg HCP Inc HP Inc Hallibrtn Hanesbds HarleyD HartfdFn Hasbro HelmPayne HSchein Hershey Hess HP Ent Hilton HollyFront Hologic HomeDp HonwllIntl Hormel HostHotls Humana HuntJB HuntBncsh HuntgtnIng IdexxLab IHS Mark IPG Photon IQVIA Hldg IDEX ITW Illumina Incyte IngerRd Intel IntcntlExc IBM IntFlav IntPap Interpublic Intuit IntSurg Invesco IronMtn JPMorgCh JackHenry JacobsEng JohnJn JohnContl JnprNtwk KLA Cp KC Southn Kellogg Keycorp Keysight KimbClk Kimco KindMorg Kohls KraftHnz Kroger L Brands LKQ Corp LabCp LamResrch LambWst LVSands LeggPlat LeidosHld LennarA LincNat Linde LockhdM Loews Lowes LyonBas A M&T Bk MGM Rsts MSCI Inc Macerich Macys MarathnO MarathPt MktAxess MarIntA MarshM MartMM Masco MasterCrd MaximIntg McCorm McDnlds

DIV

3.05 2.52 .78f 5.00f 5.76 1.60 1.48 .64 .72 .60 1.50 1.20 2.72 2.80f 3.09 1.00 .45e .60 1.32 5.44 3.60f .84 .85a 2.20 1.04 .60 4.12f

2.00 4.28 2.12 1.26 1.10 6.48 3.00f 2.05f .94 2.12f 1.24 2.47f 3.20 1.60 .68 3.80 1.04 .76 3.40f 1.44 2.28 .74f 4.12 1.12 1.00 2.68 1.60 .56f 1.20 4.60 .80 3.08 1.60 1.36 .16 1.48 3.50 9.60f .25 2.20 4.20 4.00 .48 2.72 3.00 1.51 .20 2.12 2.04 1.92 1.82 2.20 .54f 1.32 1.92 2.28 5.00f

PE

20 13 57 9 23 21 20 6 11 8 13 21 56 dd 19 31 dd 42 50 13 dd 23 20 22 42 27 26 14 23 61 38 26 20 35 32 47 53 30 20 21 14 36 15 14 42 73 7 28 13 42 35 22 29 15 22 25 16 11 cc 33 21 20 12 9 13 7 20 20 29 25 16 26 26 10 9 40 46 14 25 9 12 9 38 15 5 dd 10 77 30 29 37 24 64 13 31 29

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

115.20 72.90 175.95 224.77 324.92 147.42 37.93 24.86 35.43 19.38 43.69 61.63 126.87 64.80 72.81 162.20 71.06 17.35 101.14 65.24 52.19 238.99 181.99 46.26 20.35 339.43 122.29 15.16 254.14 294.57 64.85 182.17 164.13 173.84 179.29 380.76 89.30 132.42 59.59 95.56 152.95 152.95 48.24 24.68 295.78 589.32 22.18 37.32 131.29 151.66 98.08 148.99 44.82 29.47 175.43 155.52 65.59 19.48 105.62 143.50 21.82 21.50 83.28 54.87 31.98 38.00 36.11 178.44 282.88 83.86 69.60 55.23 89.00 62.63 67.52 206.82 399.96 56.20 118.23 98.91 176.11 31.68 249.25 51.95 38.35 18.93 69.65 421.45 144.24 104.86 275.99 46.95 293.69 65.73 171.10 221.93

87.26 60.32 94.81 151.70 255.09 110.31 26.58 15.93 16.97 11.57 30.17 40.54 76.84 35.74 56.58 100.80 35.59 12.09 65.64 37.73 37.48 158.09 123.48 37.00 15.51 225.65 83.64 11.12 173.80 176.11 44.52 104.64 104.90 117.72 117.75 263.30 57.00 85.15 42.86 69.69 105.94 104.86 36.45 19.56 182.61 430.24 15.15 29.28 91.11 120.20 55.17 121.00 28.30 22.42 80.65 90.55 51.34 13.66 53.21 106.59 14.29 14.62 43.33 24.86 20.70 15.82 22.74 119.38 122.64 58.83 47.39 33.48 50.33 37.29 48.07 145.95 241.18 42.06 84.75 68.61 133.78 21.62 134.28 26.87 14.11 11.06 43.96 199.04 100.62 74.30 160.60 27.03 171.89 46.64 119.00 169.04

WK WK LAST CHG %CHG

106.15 +1.44 65.38 +.72 170.26 -2.09 222.91 +5.52 324.92 +8.69 136.84 +3.19 35.78 -.93 19.52 +1.74 21.28 +1.19 15.86 +.53 39.39 +.06 61.09 +3.57 95.53 -.91 40.75 +1.28 68.91 +5.61 140.97 -2.10 71.85 +2.94 17.43 +.93 99.09 +2.93 54.14 -.20 46.56 -2.10 232.84 -4.50 181.21 +5.09 41.97 +.71 17.17 +.41 317.58+21.38 119.98 +.34 14.98 +.64 251.21+20.98 254.74 -22.13 64.61 147.25 +7.56 137.59 -9.15 159.62 +.58 176.41 +3.62 293.39 -7.06 85.10 +1.52 130.44 +1.57 58.27 +2.08 90.47 -2.46 137.61 +3.70 132.81+11.07 46.21 +2.25 22.97 +1.02 256.85 +.37 548.95 -10.42 17.82 +.92 32.54 -.98 130.38 +2.58 149.51 +7.77 94.60 -1.47 133.00 +1.80 42.52 -1.30 26.17 +1.68 174.21 +1.79 153.31 +7.12 63.99 +.31 19.36 +1.07 105.25 +3.35 131.46 -.58 20.85 -.88 20.03 -.47 57.04 +4.95 32.85 +.24 27.02 +2.03 17.75 +.21 35.20 +.06 168.41 +1.88 272.68 -5.58 78.95 +1.38 64.08 +1.03 55.18 +3.90 87.20 +1.87 57.80 -3.08 60.38 +2.36 203.00 +4.20 381.86 +2.69 51.00 +1.21 114.00 +1.05 97.39 +3.79 167.59 +6.86 31.41 +2.58 245.00 -.91 27.74 +.30 15.88 +.30 12.53 +.48 66.23 -.24 347.15 -18.48 133.20 +5.12 103.31 -.96 256.90 -6.45 46.30 -.36 274.89 -4.16 59.55 -1.00 159.69 -.94 193.61 -.33

+1.4 +1.1 -1.2 +2.5 +2.7 +2.4 -2.5 +9.8 +5.9 +3.5 +.2 +6.2 -.9 +3.2 +8.9 -1.5 +4.3 +5.6 +3.0 -.4 -4.3 -1.9 +2.9 +1.7 +2.4 +7.2 +.3 +4.5 +9.1 -8.0 +5.4 -6.2 +.4 +2.1 -2.3 +1.8 +1.2 +3.7 -2.6 +2.8 +9.1 +5.1 +4.6 +.1 -1.9 +5.4 -2.9 +2.0 +5.5 -1.5 +1.4 -3.0 +6.9 +1.0 +4.9 +.5 +5.9 +3.3 -.4 -4.0 -2.3 +9.5 +.7 +8.1 +1.2 +.2 +1.1 -2.0 +1.8 +1.6 +7.6 +2.2 -5.1 +4.1 +2.1 +.7 +2.4 +.9 +4.0 +4.3 +8.9 -.4 +1.1 +1.9 +4.0 -.4 -5.1 +4.0 -.9 -2.4 -.8 -1.5 -1.7 -.6 -.2

FRI WK - PCT RETURN RNK NAME NAV CHG YTD 3YR 5YR OBJ 1YR Harding Loevner IntlEqInstl d 23.33 +.34 +20.8 +9.9 +6.7 FG Hartford CptlApprecA m 37.41 +.01 +24.2 +13.8 +8.8 LB 1 Heartland SelValInv m 26.30 +.52 +16.0 +11.3 +7.6 LV 5 Hodges Retail m 34.69 -.27 +16.8 -.3 +0.8 MG 5 INVESCO ComStkA m 25.87 +.75 +21.8 +11.7 +7.1 LV 4 CptlIncA m 10.23 -.04 +8.9 +4.4 +3.5 CA DevMktsA m 45.12 +.38 +18.2 +10.1 +3.7 EM 2 DevMktsY 44.53 +.38 +18.5 +10.4 +4.0 EM 2 DiversDivA m 20.70 +.20 +20.5 +8.1 +7.4 LV 2 EqandIncA m 10.58 +.16 +17.3 +7.7 +6.0 MA 5 GlbA m 93.10 +1.36 +26.0 +14.6 +9.2 WS 2 GlbAllcA m 18.51 +.12 +13.8 +5.6 +4.4 IH 3 GoldSpecMnralA m18.40 -.94 +30.2 +4.1 +9.1 SP HYMuniA m 10.22 -.06 +8.2 +4.6 +5.6 HM 2 IntlGrA m 34.53 +.43 +23.4 +8.6 +4.3 FG 2 IntlGrY 42.33 +.34 +22.0 +7.6 +5.0 FG 3 LtdTrmGvtA m 4.38 -.01 +3.1 +1.4 +1.2 GS MnStrA m 49.83 +.21 +25.7 +12.4 +9.4 LB 2 Ivy GlbGrA m 45.68 +.23 +19.7 +11.7 +6.8 WS 4 JPMorgan CPBondR6 8.43 -.08 +8.1 +3.5 +3.4 PI 2 CoreBondI 11.85 -.12 +7.6 +3.1 +3.0 CI 2 CoreBondR6 11.87 -.12 +7.8 +3.3 +3.2 CI 1 EqIncI 18.96 +.19 +21.4 +13.4 +9.3 LV 1 MCapValA m 39.29 +.14 +21.9 +8.7 +6.8 MV 3 MCapValL 40.36 +.15 +22.4 +9.3 +7.3 MV 3 Janus Henderson BalancedT 36.14 +.18 +18.3 +13.2 +8.4 MA 1 EnterpriseT 140.47 -.01 +29.0 +18.6 +14.0 MG 1 FlexibleBondT 10.49 -.09 +8.3 +2.8 +2.6 PI 3 GlobalLifeSciT 58.97 +.78 +17.4 +14.7 +8.8 SH 3 John Hancock BdR6 16.13 -.15 +9.4 +4.0 +3.7 PI 1 DiscpValI 21.33 +.30 +19.1 +11.8 +7.3 LV 5 DiscpValMCI 21.98 +.13 +25.4 +10.1 +8.3 MV 2 FdmtlLgCpCorA m47.73 +.59 +28.9 +12.8 +9.5 LB 1 IntlGrI 28.70 +.04 +21.1 +11.5 +8.4 FG 4 MltMgLsBlA b 14.81 +.01 +15.3 +8.1 +5.6 MA 4 MltmgrLsGr1 b 15.48 +.06 +17.6 +9.6 +6.4 AL 3 Lazard EMEqInstl 17.92 +.18 +12.6 +4.6 +1.4 EM 4 GlbLtdInfrsIns 15.80 -.05 +21.2 +14.0 +11.5 XO 4 IntlStratEqIns 15.12 +.10 +17.5 +9.9 +4.2 FG 5 Leuthold CorInvmRetail d 18.95 -.12 +9.0 +7.1 +4.6 TV 4 Loomis Sayles BdInstl 13.67 -.08 +9.4 +4.4 +2.8 MU 4 GrY 17.87 +.28 +25.0 +17.0 +13.9 LG 1 Lord Abbett AffiliatedA m 15.78 +.26 +21.8 +12.0 +8.5 LV 2 BdDebA m 8.03 -.04 +11.4 +6.0 +5.2 MU 3 BdDebF b 8.02 -.03 +11.6 +6.1 +5.3 MU 2 ShrtDurIncA m 4.20 -.01 +4.7 +2.7 +2.4 CS 2 ShrtDurIncC m 4.23 -.01 +4.1 +2.1 +1.8 CS 3 ShrtDurIncF b 4.20 -.01 +4.8 +2.9 +2.5 CS 2 ShrtDurIncI 4.20 -.01 +4.9 +3.0 +2.6 CS 1 MFS GrA m 113.66 -.16 +29.3 +19.8 +14.0 LG 1 GrI 121.37 -.16 +29.6 +20.1 +14.3 LG 1 InstlIntlEq 27.72 +.30 +23.8 +12.4 +7.1 FG 1 TtlRetA m 19.73 +.07 +16.8 +8.0 +6.2 MA 2 ValA m 43.32 +.41 +24.5 +11.4 +8.7 LV 1 ValI 43.58 +.42 +24.8 +11.7 +9.0 LV 1 Mairs & Power BalInv 99.69 +.86 +16.8 +9.2 +6.9 MA 1 GrInv 130.53 +2.04 +23.4 +13.0 +9.4 LB 2 MassMutual SelectMdCpGrI 23.72 -.02 +25.6 +16.0 +11.8 MG 3 Matthews AsianGrIncInv 15.83 +.20 +15.0 +5.8 +3.1 PJ 4 ChinaInv 18.32 +.56 +27.5 +14.6 +9.1 CH 2 Meridian ContrarianLgcy d 36.36 +.59 +17.7 +13.4 +9.4 MB 5 GrLegacy d 40.88 +1.09 +23.3 +15.3 +10.3 SG 3 Metropolitan West TtlRetBdI 10.97 -.10 +8.2 +3.2 +3.0 PI 1 TtlRetBdM b 10.97 -.10 +8.0 +3.0 +2.8 PI 2 TtlRetBdPlan 10.33 -.09 +8.3 +3.3 +3.1 PI 1 Northeast Investors NorthstInvTrust 4.16 +.02 +.7 +2.5 -2.4 HY 5 Northern IntlEqIdx d 12.75 +.06 +18.5 +9.1 +4.7 FB 2 StkIdx 35.81 +.33 +25.4 +15.2 +10.9 LB 2 Nuveen HYMuniBdA m 17.82 -.12 +10.1 +6.1 +6.3 HM 1 HYMuniBdI 17.82 -.12 +10.3 +6.3 +6.5 HM 1 IntermDrMnBdI 9.44 -.06 +6.1 +3.5 +3.4 MI 2 Oakmark EqAndIncInv 31.42 +.37 +16.9 +9.1 +5.6 MA 4 IntlInv 24.92 +.48 +21.8 +8.3 +4.8 FB 2 Inv 83.73 +2.00 +22.6 +11.9 +8.4 LB 5 SelInv 42.36 +1.29 +23.8 +5.8 +3.8 LB 5 Old Westbury GlbSmMdCpStrat15.56 +.05 +18.8 +8.3 +6.6 SW 4 LgCpStrats 15.18 +.08 +20.0 +9.7 +6.5 WS 3 Osterweis StrInc 10.89 -.03 +4.4 +3.8 +3.5 HY 5 PGIM Investments HighYieldZ 5.50 +.01 +13.2 +7.0 +5.8 HY 1 TtlRetBdZ 14.82 -.16 +9.8 +4.4 +4.1 PI PIMCO AlAstInstl 11.78 +.06 +10.1 +6.0 +3.7 TV HYInstl 8.93 +.01 +12.7 +6.1 +5.1 HY 1 IBdUSDHI 11.15 -.09 +6.8 +4.2 +4.6 WH 5 IncA m 11.98 +.01 +6.0 +5.0 +4.8 MU IncC m 11.98 +.01 +5.3 +4.2 +4.0 MU IncI2 11.98 +.01 +6.2 +5.3 +5.1 MU IncInstl 11.98 +.01 +6.3 +5.4 +5.2 MU InvtGrdCdtBdI 10.81 -.13 +13.0 +5.4 +5.2 TW InvtGrdCdtBdI-2 10.81 -.13 +12.9 +5.3 +5.1 TW LowDrInstl 9.80 -.04 +4.0 +2.1 +1.7 CS 3 RlRetInstl 11.14 -.04 +7.3 +2.3 +1.8 IP ShrtTrmIns 9.78 +2.4 +2.3 +2.0 UB 5 TtlRetA m 10.38 -.14 +7.3 +3.1 +2.8 PI 4 TtlRetIns 10.38 -.14 +7.6 +3.5 +3.2 PI 3

NAME

McKesson Medtrnic Merck MetLife MettlerT Microchp MicronT Microsoft MidAApt Mohawk MolsCoorB Mondelez MonstrBv Moodys MorgStan Mosaic MotrlaSolu Mylan NV NRG Egy NVR Nasdaq NOilVarco NetApp Netflix NewellBr NewmtM NewsCpA NewsCpB NextEraEn NiSource Nielsen plc NikeB NobleEngy Nordstrm NorflkSo NorTrst NorthropG NortonLife NorwCruis Nucor Nvidia OReillyAu OcciPet Omnicom ONEOK Oracle PNC PPG PPL Corp PVH Corp Paccar PackAmer ParkerHan Paychex PayPal Pentair PeopUtdF PepsiCo PerkElm Perrigo Pfizer PhilipMor Phillips66 PinWst PioNtrl PriceTR PrinFncl ProLogis ProctGam ProgsvCp Prudentl PSEG PubStrg PulteGrp Qorvo Qualcom QuantaSvc QstDiag RLauren RJamesFn Raytheon RltyInco RgcyCtrs Regenrn RegionsFn RepubSvc ResMed RobtHalf RockwlAut Rollins s Roper RossStrs RylCarb S&P Glbl SBA Com SLGreen

DIV

1.64 2.16 2.20 1.76 1.46 2.04f 3.84 2.28f 1.14f 2.00 1.40 .20 2.28 .12 1.88 .20 1.92 .92 .56 .20 .20 5.00 .80 1.40 .88 .48 1.48a 3.76 2.80 5.28 .50f 1.60 .64 3.16 2.60 3.66f .96 4.60 2.04 1.65 .15 1.28 3.16 3.52 2.48 .72 .71 3.82 .40 .84 1.44 4.68f 3.60 2.95 .88 3.04 2.20 2.12 2.98 .10e 4.00 1.88 6.80 .44 2.48 .16 2.12 2.75 .88f 3.77 2.71f 2.34 .62 1.62 1.56f 1.24 3.88 .42 1.85 1.02 2.80 2.28 1.48 3.40

PE

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

WK WK LAST CHG %CHG

12 153.30 106.11 140.20 +3.09 +2.3 65 112.05 81.66 107.03 -1.54 -1.4 31 87.35 70.89 83.59 -1.35 -1.6 11 51.16 37.76 49.32 +2.50 +5.3 49 873.51 500.74 708.86 -5.32 -.7 50 101.57 65.67 96.21 -.78 -.8 6 51.39 28.39 47.19 -1.19 -2.5 29 145.67 93.96 145.96 +2.24 +1.6 24 140.15 91.21 133.99 -5.16 -3.7 11 156.60 108.93 152.03 +9.00 +6.3 9 67.24 49.92 53.79 +1.09 +2.1 13 56.72 38.79 51.73 -.30 -.6 31 66.38 47.74 58.16 +1.91 +3.4 32 223.82 129.26 218.13 -2.37 -1.1 10 49.89 36.74 49.15 +1.82 +3.8 33 37.33 17.36 20.81 +.15 +.7 31 182.28 108.25 164.96 -2.60 -1.6 5 37.56 16.63 17.61 -2.07 -10.5 62 43.66 32.63 38.44 -2.25 -5.5 18 3946.502257.04 3423.25-246.26 -6.7 24 105.26 75.49 100.66 +1.43 +1.4 dd 35.60 18.05 23.38 +.23 +1.0 9 83.95 44.55 59.41 +2.32 +4.1 cc 385.99 231.23 291.57 +4.76 +1.7 dd 23.80 13.04 20.37 -.23 -1.1 28 41.23 29.77 36.61 -3.00 -7.6 dd 14.66 10.65 12.90 -.86 -6.3 ... 15.01 10.85 13.23 -.95 -6.7 16 239.89 164.78 222.08 -13.63 -5.8 33 30.67 24.37 26.41 -1.24 -4.5 dd 28.50 17.94 20.35 -.09 -.4 36 96.87 66.53 89.81 +.63 +.7 dd 28.40 17.11 21.43 +1.41 +7.0 15 66.60 25.01 36.65 -.04 -.1 21 211.46 138.65 195.44 +5.52 +2.9 19 108.45 75.96 107.65 +6.23 +6.1 37 383.89 223.63 350.11 -2.02 -.6 12 26.07 17.43 24.83 +1.42 +6.1 13 59.71 39.36 51.82 +.49 +1.0 11 64.11 46.10 55.56 +.21 +.4 48 217.41 124.46 207.78 +5.19 +2.6 29 446.78 324.81 439.23 +2.22 +.5 31 74.29 38.47 40.10 -2.19 -5.2 14 85.05 68.58 80.77 +3.72 +4.8 51 77.21 50.26 70.48 +.23 +.3 58 60.50 42.40 56.49 +1.49 +2.7 14 154.75 108.45 152.20 +3.39 +2.3 23 130.42 94.41 128.92 +3.99 +3.2 15 33.83 27.31 33.72 +.13 +.4 11 134.24 67.41 97.96 +7.87 +8.7 12 80.57 53.43 80.07 +2.34 +3.0 14 113.68 77.90 113.90 +2.59 +2.3 25 201.38 140.82 199.54 +4.52 +2.3 32 88.43 61.32 83.25 -.64 -.8 65 121.48 75.47 101.42 -3.56 -3.4 13 45.70 34.50 43.37 +.97 +2.3 13 18.03 13.66 16.96 +.51 +3.1 15 140.45 105.03 133.13 -3.80 -2.8 34 103.00 71.83 87.30 -.79 -.9 25 66.15 36.28 50.05 -4.55 -8.3 15 46.47 33.97 37.05 -.98 -2.6 17 92.74 64.67 83.57 +.60 +.7 10 119.89 78.44 119.70 +1.30 +1.1 20 99.81 81.63 86.39 -7.10 -7.6 cc 178.22 114.79 134.99 +7.43 +5.8 22 121.80 84.59 119.58 +2.61 +2.2 11 60.81 40.42 55.30 +.75 +1.4 32 92.49 55.21 87.07 -.37 -.4 28 125.77 86.74 119.70 -4.17 -3.4 30 84.96 56.71 73.67 +3.89 +5.6 10 106.40 75.61 92.89 -.08 -.1 21 63.88 49.23 61.43 -1.56 -2.5 23 266.76 193.89 211.35 -7.91 -3.6 22 41.22 23.21 38.18 -1.85 -4.6 64 102.88 54.74 104.04 +6.82 +7.0 dd 92.50 49.10 94.03+10.45 +12.5 29 44.09 27.90 42.93 -.15 -.3 19 107.97 78.95 101.57 -.02 16 133.63 82.69 113.77+15.78 +16.1 13 92.00 69.11 89.29 +4.11 +4.8 31 218.00 144.27 215.84 -.25 -.1 43 82.17 59.93 76.32 -4.76 -5.9 23 70.26 55.50 64.66 -1.84 -2.8 16 442.00 271.37 341.79+31.31 +10.1 12 17.37 12.39 16.88 +.33 +2.0 39 90.62 68.94 86.18 -.50 -.6 45 149.96 90.64 143.85 -3.19 -2.2 21 69.08 51.90 57.94 -.77 -1.3 26 191.48 141.46 177.82 +1.14 +.6 39 43.91 31.36 38.68 +.19 +.5 32 385.51 245.59 337.50 -4.61 -1.3 28 114.83 75.91 111.82 +.83 +.7 15 131.04 89.48 114.53 +3.35 +3.0 39 269.57 156.68 255.30 -3.50 -1.4 cc 270.42 155.19 228.46 -11.72 -4.9 31 97.59 75.46 86.00 +1.90 +2.3

FRI WK - PCT RETURN RNK NAME NAV CHG YTD 3YR 5YR OBJ 1YR PRIMECAP Odyssey AgrsGr 45.10 +.91 +17.8 +15.7 +12.2 MG 5 Gr 41.28 +1.01 +18.9 +16.2 +12.0 LG 5 Stk 35.43 +.74 +23.1 +15.3 +11.1 LB 4 Parnassus CorEqInv 48.51 +.37 +25.1 +14.9 +10.3 LB 1 Pioneer Am 31.00 +.33 +25.9 +16.6 +10.7 LB 1 CorEqA m 20.17 +.23 +26.6 +15.2 +9.3 LB 2 Putnam DiversIncA m 7.01 +.02 +9.8 +5.6 +3.1 NT 2 EqIncA m 26.27 +.41 +25.5 +13.3 +8.8 LV 1 IncA m 7.19 -.05 +9.9 +5.0 +3.2 PI 1 SustLeadersA m 95.42 +.49 +28.1 +18.8 +12.3 LG 1 Royce SmlrCoGrSvc m 7.84 -.11 +17.2 +11.5 +6.2 SG 5 SpecEqInvm d 19.14 +.10 +9.8 +7.3 +4.7 SV 4 Schwab FdmtlUSLgCIdx 18.11 +.31 +24.5 +13.1 +9.1 LV 2 HC 25.18 +.01 +9.8 +11.9 +7.5 SH 5 IntlIdx 20.76 +.10 +18.4 +9.3 +4.8 FB 2 SP500Idx 48.07 +.44 +25.5 +15.3 +11.0 LB 2 Schwab1000Idx 70.00 +.63 +25.5 +15.1 +10.6 LB 2 TtlStkMktIdx 54.45 +.47 +24.9 +14.9 +10.5 LB 3 Segall Bryant & Hami PlusBdRtl 10.82 -.10 +7.9 +3.4 +3.3 PI 3 State Farm Gr 87.86 +1.28 +22.2 +12.3 +8.6 LB 2 T. Rowe Price BCGr 117.62 +.30 +22.5 +19.5 +14.1 LG 4 Comm&TeInv 117.11 -1.39 +25.2 +17.1 +14.4 SC 1 CptlAprc 31.84 -.03 +20.0 +12.1 +10.0 MA 1 DivGr 51.27 +.11 +24.8 +15.0 +11.5 LB 1 EMBd 11.41 -.08 +8.4 +2.3 +4.2 EB 5 EMStk 44.72 +.39 +19.3 +10.4 +6.4 EM 2 EmergEurope 16.16 +.14 +24.6 +11.5 +3.3 MQ 2 EqIdx500 82.51 +.76 +25.3 +15.1 +10.8 LB 2 EqInc 32.95 +.59 +22.8 +11.5 +7.8 LV 2 FinclSvcs 28.28 +.36 +25.4 +15.7 +9.9 SF 1 GrStk 70.52 +.42 +23.5 +17.8 +13.1 LG 3 HY 6.61 +12.6 +6.0 +4.8 HY 1 HlthSci 78.99 +.49 +17.9 +15.4 +10.3 SH 3 InsLgCpGr 43.32 +.18 +21.3 +20.9 +14.9 LG 4 InsMdCpEqGr 60.99 -.05 +26.3 +17.1 +12.8 MG 3 InsSmCpStk 26.08 -.06 +28.5 +16.8 +11.3 SG 1 IntlDiscv 65.78 +.14 +18.6 +10.3 +8.8 FR 3 IntlStk 18.15 +.16 +21.2 +9.7 +5.9 FG 3 IntlValEq 14.11 +.15 +16.9 +5.2 +1.9 FV 1 LatinAmerica 24.86 -.95 +13.1 +6.4 +3.0 LS 4 MdCpGr 95.53 -.08 +25.1 +16.4 +12.2 MG 3 MdCpVal 27.95 +.38 +14.5 +7.2 +6.9 MV 5 NewHorizons 62.51 -.23 +29.7 +22.5 +15.4 MG 3 NewInc 9.66 -.08 +8.3 +3.1 +2.9 CI 1 OverseasStk 11.08 +.12 +19.1 +9.3 +4.9 FB 2 QMUSSmCpGrEq 39.37 +.09 +26.3 +15.5 +10.9 SG 2 RlEstt 29.43 -.66 +21.1 +6.3 +5.9 SR 5 Rtr2015 14.84 +14.2 +7.8 +5.7 TD 2 Rtr2020 22.60 +.03 +15.7 +8.8 +6.4 TE 1 Rtr2025 18.04 +.04 +16.9 +9.6 +6.9 TG 2 Rtr2030 26.33 +.07 +18.1 +10.3 +7.3 TH 2 Rtr2035 19.34 +.07 +18.9 +10.9 +7.6 TI 2 Rtr2040 27.57 +.11 +19.7 +11.3 +7.9 TJ 2 Rtr2045 18.81 +.09 +20.2 +11.5 +8.0 TK 2 Rtr2050 15.86 +.08 +20.2 +11.5 +8.0 TN 2 SciandTech 43.06 +.24 +37.2 +20.1 +16.9 ST 1 SmCpStk 52.89 -.13 +28.1 +16.5 +11.0 SG 1 SmCpVal 48.38 +.10 +21.4 +11.9 +8.5 SB 2 SpectrumInc 12.65 -.04 +9.8 +4.4 +3.8 MU 1 TFInc 10.19 -.07 +6.1 +3.0 +3.3 ML 5 Val 37.15 +.19 +21.5 +11.1 +7.8 LV 2 TCW EMIncIns 8.28 -.08 +12.7 +4.7 +4.6 EB 2 TtlRetBdI 9.96 -.10 +6.7 +2.8 +2.8 PI 3 TIAA-CREF BdIdxIns 11.06 -.12 +7.5 +2.8 +2.9 CI 2 EqIdxIns 22.74 +.43 +24.9 +14.9 +10.6 LB 3 IntlEqIdxIns 20.05 +.28 +18.4 +9.3 +4.9 FB 2 LgCpGrIdxIns 35.15 +.52 +28.6 +19.2 +13.6 LG 2 LgCpValIdxIns 21.03 +.49 +22.2 +11.0 +7.8 LV 2 Thornburg LtdTrmMnI 14.43 -.04 +3.5 +1.7 +1.8 MS 2 Thrivent LgCpStkA m 26.68 +.28 +17.9 +10.5 +6.8 WS MidCpStkA m 23.98 +.10 +18.8 +12.0 +10.5 MB MnBdA m 11.39 -.08 +6.2 +2.7 +3.0 ML Torray Torray 50.59 +1.06 +17.8 +7.8 +6.3 LV 4 Tweedy, Browne GlbVal 28.22 +.29 +13.4 +8.0 +5.0 FV 1 USAA Gr 31.13 +.19 +20.6 +14.5 +11.4 LG 4 Inc 13.38 -.11 +9.7 +4.0 +3.7 PI 1 PrcMtlsMnral 14.67 -1.01 +25.8 +1.7 +5.4 SP 1 TEIntermTrm 13.56 -.07 +6.0 +3.3 +3.2 MI 2 VALIC Co I StkIdx 44.42 +.40 +25.2 +15.0 +10.7 LB 2 Vanguard 500IdxAdmrl 286.00 +2.63 +25.5 +15.3 +11.0 LB 2 BalIdxAdmrl 38.30 +.04 +18.0 +10.2 +7.7 MA 1 BalIdxIns 38.31 +.05 +18.0 +10.2 +7.7 MA 1 CAITTxExAdm 12.01 -.07 +5.7 +3.0 +3.2 MF 1 CptlOppAdmrl 160.11 +2.86 +21.3 +17.1 +12.1 LG 5 DevMIdxAdmrl 13.83 +.09 +18.2 +9.0 +5.1 FB 3 DevMIdxIns 13.84 +.08 +18.2 +9.0 +5.1 FB 3 DivGrInv 30.44 +.11 +25.5 +15.8 +11.0 LB 1 EMStkIdxInAdm 35.63 +.36 +14.6 +7.0 +3.3 EM 3 EMStkIdxIns 27.09 +.27 +14.6 +7.0 +3.3 EM 3 EngyAdmrl 89.31 +1.55 +10.0 +.7 -2.8 EE 1 EqIncAdmrl 78.93 +.81 +21.2 +12.8 +9.6 LV 1 EqIncInv 37.65 +.38 +21.1 +12.7 +9.5 LV 2 EuStkIdxAd 70.24 +.21 +18.7 +9.8 +4.4 ES 3 ExplorerAdmrl 97.18 +.89 +25.0 +17.4 +10.6 SG 2 ExtMktIdxAdmrl 91.79 +.54 +22.3 +12.8 +8.4 MB 3 ExtMktIdxIns 91.79 +.55 +22.3 +12.8 +8.5 MB 3 ExtMktIdxInsPls226.52 +1.34 +22.3 +12.8 +8.5 MB 3 FAWexUSIAdmr 32.60 +.24 +17.4 +8.8 +4.7 FB 2 FAWexUSIIns 103.34 +.74 +17.5 +8.8 +4.7 FB 2 GNMAAdmrl 10.53 -.05 +5.3 +2.2 +2.4 GI 3 GNMAInv 10.53 -.05 +5.3 +2.1 +2.3 GI 3 GlbEqInv 32.20 +.33 +22.7 +13.3 +8.7 WS 2 GrIdxAdmrl 88.70 +.16 +29.4 +17.6 +12.2 LG 1 GrIdxIns 88.70 +.16 +29.4 +17.6 +12.2 LG 1

NAME

SVB FnGp Salesforce Schlmbrg Schwab SeagateT SealAir SempraEn Sherwin SimonProp SkywksSol SmithAO Smucker SnapOn SouthnCo SwstAirl StanBlkDk Starbucks StateStr Stryker SunTrst Synchrony Synopsys Sysco T-MobileUS TE Connect TJX TakeTwo Tapestry Target Technip Teleflex TexInst Textron ThermoFis 3M Co Tiffany TractSupp TransDigm Travelers TripAdvis Twitter Tyson UDR UltaBeauty UndrArm UnAr C wi UnionPac UtdAirlHl UPS B UtdRentals US Bancrp UtdTech UtdhlthGp UnivHlthS UnumGrp VF Corp ValeroE VarianMed Ventas Verisign Verisk VerizonCm VertxPh ViacomB Visa Vornado VulcanM WEC Engy Wabtec WalMart WalgBoots WsteMInc Waters Wellcare WellsFargo Welltower WDigital WstnUnion WestRck Weyerhsr Whrlpl WmsCos WillisTwW Wynn XcelEngy Xilinx Xylem YumBrnds ZimmerBio ZionsBcp Zoetis

DIV

2.00 .68 2.60f .64 3.87 4.52 8.40 1.76f .96f 3.52 3.80 2.48f .72 2.76 1.64f 2.08f 2.08 2.24 .88 1.56 1.84 .92 1.35 2.64 .13 1.36 3.60f .08 .76 5.76 2.32 1.40 24.00 3.28f 3.50e 1.50 1.37f

3.88f 3.84 1.68f 2.94 4.32 .80f 1.14 1.72e 3.60 3.17 1.00 2.46f .80 1.00 2.64 1.24 2.36 .48 2.12f 1.83 2.05 2.04 1.68e 2.00 .80 1.86f 1.36 4.80 1.52 2.60 4.00 1.62 1.48 .96 1.68 .96 1.36 .66

PE

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

WK WK LAST CHG %CHG

18 cc 22 17 12 20 22 44 21 16 21 14 16 29 13 35 36 11 34 12 10 45 32 13 11 20 22 17 18 12 41 21 9 37 24 27 26 36 14 50 75 15 55 22 30 dd 22 11 21 12 14 23 20 18 1 25 27 32 53 38 42 8 30 5 59 40 29 28 24 69 11 24 27 36 12 19 19 15 12 22 dd 8 38 21 26 48 32 35 27 14 54

263.16 167.56 50.95 48.23 58.74 47.13 148.90 589.00 191.49 99.95 56.66 128.43 174.00 63.09 58.77 162.15 99.72 77.00 223.45 71.76 37.33 146.66 81.60 85.22 97.99 60.89 135.70 42.43 114.83 28.57 373.90 132.20 58.00 306.00 219.75 130.40 114.25 555.27 155.09 69.00 45.86 94.07 50.61 368.83 27.72 24.55 180.54 97.85 124.66 152.45 59.71 149.35 287.94 157.79 38.84 96.20 101.99 142.50 75.40 221.78 164.97 61.58 202.94 33.35 187.05 72.50 152.49 98.19 96.50 120.92 86.31 121.77 255.21 301.06 55.04 93.17 65.31 28.00 48.55 30.28 163.64 29.55 200.93 151.50 66.05 141.60 85.67 119.72 144.44 51.81 130.20

238.60 +7.71 161.11 +1.37 36.34 +1.90 43.54 +1.93 58.79 +1.17 40.02 -2.18 142.12 -5.17 581.35 +1.71 154.49 +.39 100.44 +2.14 52.08 +1.80 106.27 +.69 166.94 +.07 61.26 -1.00 58.18 +1.92 157.84 +1.95 81.77 -1.44 73.10 +5.34 199.78 -12.99 71.04 +1.71 36.94 +1.20 136.21 +.11 80.40 -.88 80.94 -1.53 93.90 +2.38 59.23 +1.22 116.96 +.06 27.23 +.94 110.15 +2.33 20.60 +.09 331.18 -14.82 120.11 +2.07 46.61 -.59 294.65 -8.95 173.15 +3.06 125.67 -1.33 94.82 -.96 541.08 +2.80 133.29 +2.57 31.96 -8.44 29.21 -.41 82.63 -1.07 47.37 -2.36 239.29 +6.18 17.56 -3.58 15.88 -3.03 176.10 +3.57 93.44 +1.79 124.30 +4.79 155.32+13.46 58.90 +1.32 148.88 +2.20 256.97 +4.76 141.13 +2.38 30.00 +1.36 87.07 +4.18 100.86 +1.00 124.76 +1.46 59.54 -4.49 183.79 -4.28 136.75 -8.61 59.35 -1.02 201.31 +.37 22.75 +.76 178.97 -1.96 65.77 +.80 136.44 -7.21 87.83 -5.70 78.85 +4.16 119.44 +1.82 59.24 +1.86 111.03 -.20 210.08 -5.01 302.96 +9.63 54.10 +2.43 82.88 -7.15 52.02 -1.81 27.87 +1.39 39.75 +.95 29.63 -.36 154.77 +4.70 22.09 -.80 185.10 -3.89 126.47 +3.28 60.08 -3.02 95.50 +3.16 77.33 -1.79 98.90 -.75 144.00 +5.78 51.07 +1.73 117.86 -7.48

FRI NAME NAV GrandIncAdmrl 83.91 HCAdmrl 87.18 HCInv 206.69 HYCorpAdmrl 5.90 HYTEAdmrl 11.68 InTrBdIdxAdmrl 11.76 InTrInGdAdm 9.99 InTrTEAdmrl 14.38 InTrTrsAdmrl 11.32 InflPrtScAdmrl 25.91 InflPrtScIns 10.55 InsIdxIns 280.44 InsIdxInsPlus 280.46 InsTrgRt2020Ins 24.13 InsTtlSMIInPls 66.46 IntlGrAdmrl 97.23 IntlGrInv 30.55 IntlValInv 37.30 LTInGrdAdm 10.92 LTInGrdInv 10.92 LTTEAdmrl 11.86 LfStrCnsrGrInv 20.82 LfStrGrInv 35.37 LfStrIncInv 16.18 LfStrModGrInv 28.49 LgCpIdxAdmrl 71.65 LtdTrmTEAdmrl 11.05 MCpGrIdxAdm 64.86 MCpVlIdxAdm 60.20 MdCpIdxAdmrl 212.33 MdCpIdxIns 46.91 MdCpIdxInsPlus 231.33 PrmCpAdmrl 147.74 PrmCpCorInv 28.83 PrmCpInv 142.48 RlEstIdxAdmrl 129.15 RlEstIdxInstl 19.99 SCpGrIdxAdm 66.37 SCpValIdxAdm 57.66 STBdIdxAdmrl 10.55 STBdIdxIns 10.55 STBdIdxInsPlus 10.55 STInfPrScIdAdmr24.66 STInfPrScIdIns 24.68 STInfPrScIdxInv 24.63 STInvmGrdAdmrl 10.71 STInvmGrdIns 10.71 STInvmGrdInv 10.71 STTEAdmrl 15.83 STTrsAdmrl 10.57 SeledValInv 28.26 SmCpIdxAdmrl 76.69 SmCpIdxIns 76.69 SmCpIdxInsPlus 221.36 StarInv 27.81 StrEqInv 32.95 TMCapApAdm 159.12 TMSmCpAdm 65.74 TrgtRtr2015Inv 15.60 TrgtRtr2020Inv 32.85 TrgtRtr2025Inv 19.79 TrgtRtr2030Inv 36.18 TrgtRtr2035Inv 22.28 TrgtRtr2040Inv 38.60 TrgtRtr2045Inv 24.30 TrgtRtr2050Inv 39.10 TrgtRtr2055Inv 42.44 TrgtRtrIncInv 13.96 TtBMIdxAdmrl 11.00 TtBMIdxIns 11.00 TtBMIdxInsPlus 11.00 TtInBIdxAdmrl 23.14 TtInBIdxIns 34.73 TtInBIdxInv 11.58 TtInSIdxAdmrl 29.13 TtInSIdxIns 116.51 TtInSIdxInsPlus 116.53 TtInSIdxInv 17.42 TtlSMIdxAdmrl 76.49 TtlSMIdxIns 76.50 TtlSMIdxInv 76.45 TxMgBalAdmrl 33.49 USGrAdmrl 108.58 USGrInv 41.89 ValIdxAdmrl 45.52 ValIdxIns 45.52 WlngtnAdmrl 74.80 WlngtnInv 43.31 WlslyIncAdmrl 66.04 WlslyIncInv 27.26 WndsrAdmrl 75.86 WndsrIIAdmrl 68.30 WndsrIIInv 38.49 Victory RSPtnrsA m 25.52 Virtus VontobelEMOppI 11.25 Voya IntermBdI 10.33 WCM FocIntGrIns 17.77 Weitz ValInv 46.16 sHickory 52.70 Wells Fargo CommonStkA f 21.80 SpMCpValIns 42.43 Western Asset CorBdI 12.98 CorPlusBdI 12.00 CorPlusBdIS 11.99 Mgd Mns A m 16.27 iShares S&P500IdxK 367.92

177.70 113.60 30.65 34.58 35.38 32.34 104.88 365.20 145.28 60.12 40.38 91.32 135.29 42.50 44.28 110.54 60.42 48.62 144.75 46.05 21.78 79.14 59.44 59.96 69.84 41.49 84.41 18.54 60.15 18.20 226.02 87.70 42.30 208.34 150.58 73.04 78.67 311.46 111.08 29.27 26.26 49.77 38.14 224.43 16.52 15.05 128.08 77.02 89.89 94.28 43.14 100.48 208.07 112.79 24.71 67.18 68.81 103.92 56.52 138.77 102.74 52.28 151.80 20.93 121.60 58.60 90.04 66.75 61.00 85.78 49.03 83.49 173.41 220.63 43.02 65.94 33.83 16.42 31.94 20.52 99.40 20.36 144.13 90.06 47.70 79.22 60.65 86.10 96.99 38.08 78.90

+3.3 +.9 +5.5 +4.6 +2.0 -5.2 -3.5 +.3 +.3 +2.2 +3.6 +.7 -1.6 +3.4 +1.3 -1.7 +7.9 -6.1 +2.5 +3.4 +.1 -1.1 -1.9 +2.6 +2.1 +.1 +3.6 +2.2 +.4 -4.3 +1.8 -1.3 -2.9 +1.8 -1.0 -1.0 +.5 +2.0 -20.9 -1.4 -1.3 -4.7 +2.7 -16.9 -16.0 +2.1 +2.0 +4.0 +9.5 +2.3 +1.5 +1.9 +1.7 +4.7 +5.0 +1.0 +1.2 -7.0 -2.3 -5.9 -1.7 +.2 +3.5 -1.1 +1.2 -5.0 -6.1 +5.6 +1.5 +3.2 -.2 -2.3 +3.3 +4.7 -7.9 -3.4 +5.2 +2.4 -1.2 +3.1 -3.5 -2.1 +2.7 -4.8 +3.4 -2.3 -.8 +4.2 +3.5 -6.0

WK - PCT RETURN RNK CHG YTD 3YR 5YR OBJ 1YR +.71 +24.0 +14.7 +10.7 LB 3 +.39 +13.4 +11.4 +7.8 SH 3 +.92 +13.4 +11.3 +7.7 SH 3 +13.9 +6.1 +5.2 HY 1 -.08 +7.8 +4.4 +4.7 ML 1 -.15 +9.3 +3.2 +3.5 CI 1 -.09 +9.4 +3.5 +3.8 TW 4 -.08 +5.8 +3.0 +3.1 MI 2 -.13 +5.9 +2.0 +2.4 GI 1 -.17 +7.0 +2.1 +2.0 IP 1 -.07 +7.0 +2.1 +2.0 IP 1 +2.57 +25.5 +15.3 +11.0 LB 2 +2.57 +25.5 +15.3 +11.0 LB 2 +.01 +14.7 +8.3 NA TE 1 +.56 +24.9 +15.0 +10.6 LB 3 +1.05 +22.7 +14.2 +8.9 FG 3 +.33 +22.6 +14.0 +8.7 FG 3 +.32 +16.2 +8.7 +3.7 FV 1 -.27 +18.0 +6.3 +6.3 CL 2 -.27 +17.9 +6.2 +6.2 CL 3 -.09 +7.3 +3.8 +4.1 ML 1 -.04 +13.3 +7.0 +5.4 CA 1 +.17 +18.9 +10.6 +7.3 AL 1 -.08 +10.6 +5.1 +4.3 XY 1 +.04 +16.1 +8.8 +6.4 MA 1 +.63 +25.4 +15.3 +10.9 LB 2 -.02 +3.5 +1.9 +1.7 MS 2 -.67 +26.7 +14.4 +9.4 MG 3 +.64 +23.8 +10.6 +8.1 MV 3 +.06 +25.4 +12.5 +8.8 MB 1 +.02 +25.4 +12.5 +8.8 MB 1 +.07 +25.4 +12.5 +8.8 MB 1 +2.89 +22.1 +17.6 +12.5 LG 4 +.54 +23.2 +16.2 +11.5 LB 3 +2.78 +22.1 +17.5 +12.4 LG 4 -4.48 +25.2 +8.9 +7.4 SR 3 -.69 +25.3 +8.9 +7.4 SR 3 +.37 +25.8 +15.7 +9.7 SG 1 +.49 +19.3 +9.8 +7.3 SV 2 -.05 +4.3 +2.0 +1.8 CS 1 -.05 +4.3 +2.0 +1.8 CS 1 -.05 +4.4 +2.0 +1.8 CS 1 -.02 +4.0 +1.7 +1.2 IP 5 -.02 +4.0 +1.7 +1.3 IP 5 -.02 +3.9 +1.6 +1.2 IP 5 -.04 +5.2 +2.5 +2.4 CS 1 -.04 +5.2 +2.5 +2.5 CS 1 -.04 +5.1 +2.4 +2.3 CS 1 -.01 +2.1 +1.5 +1.2 MS 4 -.04 +3.2 +1.5 +1.3 GS 2 +.24 +25.7 +9.6 +6.4 MV 2 +.55 +22.4 +12.5 +8.4 SB 1 +.56 +22.4 +12.5 +8.4 SB 1 +1.61 +22.4 +12.5 +8.5 SB 1 +.11 +18.1 +10.2 +7.2 MA 1 +.15 +21.3 +11.1 +7.7 MB 4 +1.33 +25.5 +15.4 +11.0 LB 2 +.54 +19.0 +12.4 +9.3 SB 4 -.02 +12.6 +7.1 +5.3 TD 2 +.02 +14.7 +8.3 +6.0 TE 1 +.03 +16.3 +9.2 +6.5 TG 1 +.10 +17.4 +9.9 +6.9 TH 2 +.09 +18.4 +10.5 +7.2 TI 2 +.21 +19.5 +11.2 +7.5 TJ 2 +.16 +20.2 +11.5 +7.7 TK 2 +.24 +20.2 +11.5 +7.7 TN 2 +.26 +20.2 +11.5 +7.7 TL 2 -.04 +11.2 +5.8 +4.5 RI 2 -.11 +7.8 +3.0 +3.0 CI 1 -.11 +7.8 +3.0 +3.0 CI 1 -.11 +7.8 +3.0 +3.0 CI 1 -.18 +7.7 +4.1 +4.1 WH 3 -.26 +7.7 +4.1 +4.2 WH 2 -.08 +7.7 +4.1 +4.1 WH 2 +.20 +17.2 +8.6 +4.6 FB 3 +.83 +17.2 +8.6 +4.7 FB 3 +.83 +17.2 +8.7 +4.7 FB 3 +.13 +17.1 +8.6 +4.6 FB 3 +.65 +24.9 +14.9 +10.6 LB 3 +.65 +24.9 +14.9 +10.6 LB 3 +.64 +24.7 +14.8 +10.4 LB 3 +.05 +14.8 +8.8 +6.9 CA 1 +.03 +24.9 +18.2 +12.8 LG 3 +.01 +24.8 +18.0 +12.6 LG 3 +.70 +21.5 +13.2 +9.7 LV 2 +.70 +21.5 +13.2 +9.7 LV 2 +.23 +19.0 +11.2 +8.2 MA 1 +.13 +19.0 +11.1 +8.1 MA 1 -.35 +14.1 +7.3 +6.2 CA 1 -.14 +14.0 +7.2 +6.2 CA 1 +1.34 +24.9 +11.9 +7.7 LV 2 +1.41 +25.1 +12.7 +8.3 LV 1 +.80 +25.0 +12.6 +8.2 LV 1 +.50 +27.1

+12.0

+6.9 SB

1

+.03 +13.0

+6.0

+3.1 EM

2

+3.8

+3.7 PI

1

-.12 +26.7

-.10 +9.0

+14.8 +10.3 FG

1

-.10 +29.4 -.84 +31.6

+13.5 +8.5

+7.4 LG 1 +4.8 MB 1

+.22 +24.0 +.63 +30.8

+12.5 +11.3

+8.3 MB 2 +8.5 MV 1

-.13 -.16 -.17 -.14

+9.1 +10.5 +10.5 +6.1

+3.38 +25.5

+3.7 +4.5 +4.6 +3.0

+3.9 +4.4 +4.5 +3.1

CI PI PI ML

+15.3 +11.0 LB

2


BUSINESS

C6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 11.10.2019

AUTOS

RUST IN

PEACE

BMW 3 Series Gran Turismo, 6 Series Gran Turismo

Buick Cascada

These ungainly byproducts were neither fish nor fowl, not quite a car but not an SUV. Not knowing what to make of them, buyers stayed away.

Like most Buick sedans, this tarted-up Opel, an already old design when introduced stateside, lacked the sizzle required of a drop-top. Poor sales and GM’s sale of Opel ensured its eventual demise.

Buick LaCrosse

Cadillac XTS

As traditional Buick buyers die off, so do the products they prefer. Buyers snubbed this beautifully modern full-size sedan.

The XTS was never a convincing interpretation of a traditional Cadillac. This sedan’s mission is better filled by the newer CT6.

A look at models that have been discontinued this year LARRY PRINTZ | Tribune News Service

T

he 2020 model year has begun, and along with it come the obituaries of cars and trucks that have reached the end of the assembly line. Predictably, given low gas prices and consumer infatuation with SUVs and crossovers, the list is filled mostly with large sedans and economy cars, some beloved. Here’s a list of the casualties:

Chevrolet Cruze

Chevrolet Impala

Chevrolet Volt

Fiat 500/500e

Its popularity has diminished, as the Trax, Sonic and Spark show that practical hatchbacks are the economy cars of choice in the 21st century, not compact sedans.

Like its siblings, the Buick LaCrosse and Cadillac XTS, Chevrolet’s last traditional large sedan, and a truly wonderful one, bites the dust in favor of SUVs and crossovers.

The first plug-in hybrid car disappears, a victim of GM’s pathetically lackluster marketing efforts.

The retro-styled Cinquecento dies, the victim of a lack of change, dependability woes and a buying public no longer interested in tiny, fuel-sipping cars.

Ford Fiesta

Ford Taurus

Infiniti QX30

Nissan 370Z Roadster

Low fuel prices have killed demand for the fun-loving Fiesta despite its handling chops.

The nameplate that revolutionized American car design in the 1980s succumbs to bad design and inept marketing.

The stylish U.K.-built QX30 is being axed as Infiniti exits the Western European market.

While the coupe survives, Nissan has killed the convertible. Will anyone notice?

Smart ForTwo

Toyota Prius C

Volkswagen Beetle

Never very fuel-efficient despite its Lilliputian size, this two-seat hatchback’s raison d’etre no longer exists thanks to low fuel prices and consumers’ distaste for economy cars.

Toyota’s smallest, cheapest hybrid, based on the previous-generation Yaris platform, is being replaced by the larger, better-looking Toyota Corolla Hybrid, which also yields better fuel economy.

Having long lost its fashionable cachet, it’s time to bid farewell to the modern Beetle, which never proved as popular as the original people’s car first introduced by Adolf Hitler.

Volkswagen Golf SportWagen/ Alltrack It seemed like a good idea: Offer a cargo-friendly alternative to the ubiquitous SUV. Sadly, consumer herd mentality prevented buyers from considering it.

Larry Printz is an automotive journalist based in South Florida. Readers may send him email at TheDrivingPrintz@gmail.com.

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

SUNDAY • 11.10.2019 • D

BELIEVERS IN FLECK STACY BENGS, AP PHOTO

Minnesota head coach P.J. Fleck leads him team on the field prior to a game against Maryland last month in Minneapolis.

Skeptical of P.J. Fleck and his slogans? So were others, but Minnesota is 8-0. BY EMILY GIAMBALVO

The Washington Post

Every morning before most of the surrounding world has woken up, P.J. Fleck carves out 45 quiet minutes, time that begins as he drives toward Minnesota’s football facility and continues after he settles into his office. As Fleck sinks into his zone, it’s hard to know he’s even arrived at the facility. He usually keeps his office dark during this time, apart from the glow of candles he lights upon entering. Fleck loves candles, and so does his wife. But that’s not all of it, because everything inside Fleck’s highly positive, excessively energetic mind has layers, each revealing

a new element of symbolism, some metaphor or maybe one of those catchy slogans. Light represents beginnings, so each morning, Fleck thinks: “OK, I’ve got to now light the fire of the program.” Fleck drives Minnesota football with the relentless belief in this culture as his guide — but not in the way every other coach in America throws around that buzzword. His cultural blueprint is detailed and complex. He preaches precise definitions for words such as “energy” and “success.” It’s easy to be skeptical. Maybe the “Row the Boat” mantra, the one Fleck thrust into the national college football lexicon a few years MICHAEL CONROY, AP PHOTO Please see FLECK, Page D14

Pair of Ivy League unbeatens do battle in a sporting temple

P.J. Fleck celebrates a touchdown against Purdue earlier this season.

Hachimura ‘has Japan on his back’: Inside the media storm

NICK WASS, AP PHOTO

GREGORY PAYAN, AP PHOTO

Princeton head coach Bob Surace and the Tigers battle Dartmouth at Yankee Stadium, a game that will likely decide the Ivy League title. BY JOHN FEINSTEIN

The Washington Post

About 95% of this week’s college football hype will surround this season’s game of the century between LSU and Alabama, with the remaining 5% being heaped on Penn State at Minnesota, both also undefeated. But there’s another meeting of unbeatens Saturday that will go largely unnoticed despite being, in its own way, at least as intriguing: Princeton vs. Dartmouth. There’s no at in the matchup because the game will be played at Yankee Stadium in part because the two coaches are baseball

fans. “I’m a Yankee fan,” Princeton coach Bob Surace said. “When the chance to play there came up, I jumped at it.” Dartmouth coach Buddy Teevens grew up a Boston Red Sox fan, but when Surace called him three years ago to propose moving Dartmouth’s home game against the Tigers this fall to New York, he said yes instantly. “Took about two minutes,” he said. “I’m a big believer in life experiences. Playing in Yankee Stadium will be a life experience for our players.” Please see IVY, Page D6

Through the first few weeks of his NBA career, Rui Hachimura, the league’s first Japaneseborn lottery pick, has been one of the most covered athletes in the sport. BY CANDACE BUCKNER

The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — After the Washington Wizards’ second game of the season, Rui Hachimura mania descended upon the heart of America. The Wizards were in Oklahoma City for the Oct. 25 game against the Thunder, as were a traveling mass of Japanese reporters assigned to cover Hachimura’s every move. A reporter stumbled across the scene — 18 credentialed reporters from 14 different Japanese outlets — and commented on the NBA’s latest phenomenon.

“Damn! Is this the Finals?” the reporter said. “This is crazy.” But for Hachimura, a 21-year-old Wizards rookie, this is life. Through the first few weeks of his NBA career, Hachimura, the league’s first Japanese-born lottery pick, has been one of the most covered athletes in the sport. After every game, the 6-foot-8 forward conducts interviews away from the Wizards’ locker room while standing in front of an NEC banner, one of his many sponsors. He tries to be cautious yet courteous; Please see HACHIMURA , Page D6

SPORTS

It’s easy to see why you should choose GEICO. With great rates to save you money, access to a licensed agent anytime 24/7, and a 97% customer satisfaction rating, there are a lot of great reasons why GEICO is the easy choice for your insurance needs. Get a fast, no-obligation quote and nd out for yourself.

geico.com | 1-800-947-AUTO | Local Office Limitations apply. See geico.com for more details. Customer satisfaction based on an independent study conducted by Alan Newman Research, 2018. GEICO & affiliates. Washington, DC 20076 © 2019 GEICO

1 M


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

SUNDAY • 11.10.2019 • D

In the Cards? It’s not likely Slow-moving free-agent market may not interest the Redbirds

BY RICK HUMMEL

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Unlike pro hockey, pro football and pro basketball, when the clock starts for free agency and you can see a rash of deals completed on the first eligible day as early as 12:01 p.m. or 4:01 p.m. or 6:01 p.m., depending on the sport, baseball assumes more of a sundial approach. Free agency began five days after the World Series, which ended 10 days ago. There has been talk and speculation. But you probably won’t hear any signings of note until later this month. Or next month. Or maybe not even until next year. Or maybe not even until spring training is in session. This is the way baseball operates, with powerful agents such as Scott Boras controlling numerous high-ticket clients like the top three in this year’s class — pitchers Gerrit Cole (Houston) and Stephen Strasburg (Washington) and Nationals third baseman Anthony Rendon. Often, the lesser tiers of free agents don’t get signed until the top-tiered players go, or until those players’ wives get tired of not knowing where they’re going to be in spring training. But the top players

aren’t going anywhere for a while. Eventually, most will get deals, even if it takes until June, as it did earlier this year for reliever Craig Kimbrel and lefthander Dallas Keuchel, who is back on the dance floor again this year. The media attention will be severe in the next week or so as the general managers gather beginning Monday in Arizona. And it will increase during baseball’s winter meetings in San Diego in the second week of December. But given the recent history of slow-developing marketplaces, outside interest in the free agent market will decline a bit later in December if little of substance takes place at the winter meetings. Last year, for instance, when both Bryce Harper and Manny Machado didn’t sign until spring training had started, fans — and media people — had wearied of guessing where those two were taking their talents, other than saying, “Just take them somewhere.” Here is a brief primer on this year’s free agent crop and a look at how it might relate to the Cardinals:

GOOSE EGG FOR MU

Please see CARDINALS, Page D14

Win erases a foul mood for St. Louis U.

ST. LOUIS U. PHOTO

St. Louis U. guard Demarius Jacobs puts up a shot over a Valparaiso defender Saturday at Chaifetz Arena. Jacobs scored a career-high 20 points. BY STU DURANDO

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The first wave of foul trouble for St. Louis University was brushed aside by the Billikens on Saturday night as a non-issue. Playing without Hasahn French and Fred Thatch Jr. most of the first half, they built a doubledigit lead and held it comfortably midway through the second half. Depth, it ap> Up next: peared, was working 7 p.m. in SLU’s favor. But as the fouls Wednesday piled up, the Billikvs. Eastern ens showed cracks. Washington, However, they were FSM enough for Valparaiso to only get within a point as the Billikens held on for an 81-70 win at Chaifetz Arena. French was on and off the floor the whole game and fouled out with KC Hankton. Thatch was plagued by fouls quickly.

SLU 81, Valpo 70

JOHN AMIS PHOTOS, AP

Georgia wide receiver George Pickens dives for a touchdown as Missouri safety Tyree Gillespie defends in the first quarter Saturday night.

With Bryant out, Tigers are easy pickings for Georgia’s defense BY DAVE MATTER

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Georgia 27, Mizzou 0 > Up next: 11 a.m. Saturday vs. Florida, KMOV (4) Powell starts for Bryant. D4 Defense hangs tough. D4 50: Mizzou’s 50 rushing yards were its worst since a 2015 loss at Georgia.

ATHENS, Ga. — This was always supposed to be Missouri’s biggest challenge of the season, a road showdown against a Southeastern Conference heavyweight and playoff contender. No matter how the Tigers’ first two months unfolded, they’d come to Georgia’s Sanford Stadium as decided underdogs with nothing to lose and a chance to shake up the SEC East. After all, November is Barry Odom’s month. Of course, the Tigers strayed from that script weeks ago with

unexpected losses at Wyoming, Vanderbilt and Kentucky, making this visit to Athens just another speed bump on the No. 6 Bulldogs’ path to another division crown. Underdogs for the first time all season, the Tigers stayed on brand with a 27-0 loss, dropping them one step closer to .500 with three games to play. The defeat was Mizzou’s sixth in a row against Georgia and snapped the Tigers’ nine-game winning streak in November games. The Tigers (5-4, 2-3 Georgia running back Zamir White (3) rushes as tight end Charlie Woerner (89) blocks Please see MU, Page D4 Mizzou’s Nick Bolton.

Party time for Lindenwood as Lions capture grid glory BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

When it was over, there was a smorgasbord of smiles — the teeth-gleaming, the tonguewagging, the tonsil-revealing — and all of the football players’ great grins looked like they were stretched out by first-down

BIGGEST COMEBACK IN ILLINI HISTORY EARNS BOWL BID Illinois can play in a bowl for first time since 2014. D5 No. 1 LSU outlasts No. 2 Alabama. D5

markers. Lindenwood did it. The NCAA Division II team from St. Charles won at least a share of its conference title. And for a team that won the lion’s share of its big wins in nerve-wracking ways, this was the granddaddy of doozies. It took a blocked field goal to force overtime, followed by a Lindenwood touchdown and defensive stop to secure the 37-31

Please see SLU, Page D3

Goodwin learns to lead Billikens when it’s tough BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Poor John Kiser. Saturday night belonged to Jordan Goodwin, and there was nothing the Valparaiso senior and his teammates could do about it. Stop Goodwin? Kiser could not even bounce a ball off of him. Did you catch it? It happened during the first-half blitz, when Goodwin was backing down Crusaders like Shaq in his prime. He was climbing Valparaiso forwards like trees, snatching the ball from them before they blinked. He was greedy on defense and charitable with his passes. Before our eyes, he turned a game that

ASSOCIATED PRESS Please see HOCHMAN, Page D7

Illinois players celebrate their 37-34 win over Michigan State.

Please see FREDERICKSON, Page D3

SPORTS

It’s easy to see why you should choose GEICO. With great rates to save you money, access to a licensed agent anytime 24/7, and a 97% customer satisfaction rating, there are a lot of great reasons why GEICO is the easy choice for your insurance needs. Get a fast, no-obligation quote and nd out for yourself.

geico.com | 1-800-947-AUTO | Local Office Limitations apply. See geico.com for more details. Customer satisfaction based on an independent study conducted by Alan Newman Research, 2018. GEICO & affiliates. Washington, DC 20076 © 2019 GEICO

2 M


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

SUNDAY • 11.10.2019 • D

In the Cards? It’s not likely Slow-moving free-agent market may not interest the Redbirds

BY RICK HUMMEL

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Unlike pro hockey, pro football and pro basketball, when the clock starts for free agency and you can see a rash of deals completed on the first eligible day as early as 12:01 p.m. or 4:01 p.m. or 6:01 p.m., depending on the sport, baseball assumes more of a sundial approach. Free agency began five days after the World Series, which ended 10 days ago. There has been talk and speculation. But you probably won’t hear any signings of note until later this month. Or next month. Or maybe not even until next year. Or maybe not even until spring training is in session. This is the way baseball operates, with powerful agents such as Scott Boras controlling numerous high-ticket clients like the top three in this year’s class — pitchers Gerrit Cole (Houston) and Stephen Strasburg (Washington) and Nationals third baseman Anthony Rendon. Often, the lesser tiers of free agents don’t get signed until the top-tiered players go, or until those players’ wives get tired of not knowing where they’re going to be in spring training. But the top players

aren’t going anywhere for a while. Eventually, most will get deals, even if it takes until June, as it did earlier this year for reliever Craig Kimbrel and lefthander Dallas Keuchel, who is back on the dance floor again this year. The media attention will be severe in the next week or so as the general managers gather beginning Monday in Arizona. And it will increase during baseball’s winter meetings in San Diego in the second week of December. But given the recent history of slow-developing marketplaces, outside interest in the free agent market will decline a bit later in December if little of substance takes place at the winter meetings. Last year, for instance, when both Bryce Harper and Manny Machado didn’t sign until spring training had started, fans — and media people — had wearied of guessing where those two were taking their talents, other than saying, “Just take them somewhere.” Here is a brief primer on this year’s free agent crop and a look at how it might relate to the Cardinals:

GOOSE EGG FOR MU

Please see CARDINALS, Page D14

Win erases a foul mood for St. Louis U.

ST. LOUIS U. PHOTO

St. Louis U. guard Demarius Jacobs puts up a shot over a Valparaiso defender Saturday at Chaifetz Arena. Jacobs scored a career-high 20 points. BY STU DURANDO

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The first wave of foul trouble for St. Louis University was brushed aside by the Billikens on Saturday night as a non-issue. Playing without Hasahn French and Fred Thatch Jr. most of the first half, they built a doubledigit lead and held it comfortably midway through the second half. Depth, it ap> Up next: peared, was working 7 p.m. in SLU’s favor. But as the fouls Wednesday piled up, the Billikvs. Eastern ens showed cracks. Washington, However, they were FSM enough for Valparaiso to only get within a point as the Billikens held on for an 81-70 win at Chaifetz Arena. French was on and off the floor the whole game and fouled out with KC Hankton. Thatch was plagued by fouls quickly.

SLU 81, Valpo 70

JOHN AMIS PHOTOS, AP

Georgia wide receiver George Pickens dives for a touchdown as Missouri safety Tyree Gillespie defends in the first quarter Saturday night.

With Bryant out, Tigers are easy pickings for Georgia’s defense BY DAVE MATTER

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Georgia 27, Mizzou 0 > Up next: 11 a.m. Saturday vs. Florida, KMOV (4) Powell starts for Bryant. D4 Defense hangs tough. D4 50: Mizzou’s 50 rushing yards were its worst since a 2015 loss at Georgia.

ATHENS, Ga. — This was always supposed to be Missouri’s biggest challenge of the season, a road showdown against a Southeastern Conference heavyweight and playoff contender. No matter how the Tigers’ first two months unfolded, they’d come to Georgia’s Sanford Stadium as decided underdogs with nothing to lose and a chance to shake up the SEC East. After all, November is Barry Odom’s month. Of course, the Tigers strayed

from that script weeks ago with unexpected losses at Wyoming, Vanderbilt and Kentucky, making this visit to Athens just another speed bump on the No. 6 Bulldogs’ path to another division crown. Underdogs for the first time all season, the Tigers stayed on brand with a 27-0 loss, dropping them one step closer to .500 with three games to play. The defeat was Mizzou’s sixth in a row against Georgia and snapped the Tigers’ nine-game winning streak in November Georgia running back Zamir White (3) rushes as tight end Charlie Woerner (89) blocks Please see MU, Page D4 Mizzou’s Nick Bolton.

Party time for Lindenwood as Lions capture grid glory BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

When it was over, there was a smorgasbord of smiles — the teeth-gleaming, the tonguewagging, the tonsil-revealing — and all of the football players’ great grins looked like they were stretched out by first-down

BIGGEST COMEBACK IN ILLINI HISTORY EARNS BOWL BID Illinois can play in a bowl for first time since 2014. D5 No. 1 LSU outlasts No. 2 Alabama. D5

markers. Lindenwood did it. The NCAA Division II team from St. Charles won at least a share of its conference title. And for a team that won the lion’s share of its big wins in nerve-wracking ways, this was the granddaddy of doozies. It took a blocked field goal to force overtime, followed by a Lindenwood touchdown and defensive stop to secure the 37-31

Please see SLU, Page D3

Goodwin learns to lead Billikens when it’s tough BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Poor John Kiser. Saturday night belonged to Jordan Goodwin, and there was nothing the Valparaiso senior and his teammates could do about it. Stop Goodwin? Kiser could not even bounce a ball off of him. Did you catch it? It happened during the first-half blitz, when Goodwin was backing down Crusaders like Shaq in his prime. He was climbing Valparaiso forwards like trees, snatching the ball from them before they blinked. He was greedy on defense and charitable with his passes. Before our eyes, he turned a game that

ASSOCIATED PRESS Please see HOCHMAN, Page D7

Illinois players celebrate their 37-34 win over Michigan State.

Please see FREDERICKSON, Page D3

SPORTS

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Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Saturday 11/9 at Flames 9 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 11/12 vs. Coyotes 7 p.m. FSM

Friday 11/15 at Blue Jackets 6 p.m. FSM

Saturday 11/16 vs. Ducks 7 p.m. FSM

St. Louis U. • slubillikens.com | 314-977-4758 Men’s basketball Saturday 11/9 vs. Valparaiso 6 p.m. FSM

Women’s basketball Wednesday 11/13 Sunday 11/10 vs. Eastern Wash. at Cincinnati 1 p.m. 7 p.m. FSM

Wednesday 11/13 vs. Northern Iowa 7 p.m.

M 1 • SUnDAy • 11.10.2019

MEN’S BASKETBALL | TOP 25

No. 14 Memphis, Wiseman prevail on, off the court

Mizzou • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Football Saturday 11/9 at Georgia 6 p.m. ESPN

Saturday 11/16 vs. Florida 11 a.m. KMOV (4)

M. basketball

W. basketball

Tuesday 11/12 at Xavier 6 p.m. CBSSN

Sunday 11/10 vs. Nebraska 2 p.m.

SIUE • siuecougars.com | 855-748-3849 Men’s basketball Tuesday 11/12 vs. Valparaiso 7 p.m.

Women’s basketball Saturday 11/16 at Incarnate Word 1 p.m.

Wednesday 11/13 Sunday 11/17 at Nebraska vs. Evansville 2 p.m. 7 p.m.

Illinois • fightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Football

Men’s basketball

Saturday 11/23 Saturday 11/9 at Michigan State at Iowa Time, TV TBA 2:30 p.m. Fox Sports 1

Sunday 11/10 at Arizona 8 p.m. Pac-12 Network

Monday 11/18 vs. Hawaii 7 p.m. ESPNU

OTHER EVENTS MAJOR ARENA SOCCER • St. Louis Ambush home games Sat. 11/16: vs. Dallas (exh.), 7:05 p.m. Fri. 11/29: vs. Milwaukee, 7:05 p.m.

KAREN PULFER FOCHT, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Memphis center James Wiseman (32) prepares to try to block a shot by UIC guard Godwin Boahen in the first half Friday night in Memphis, Tenn. Wiseman, who was ruled ineligible by the NCAA, played after securing a court order.

FAIRMOUNT PARK • Simulcasting: 11 a.m-11:30 p.m. daily.

ON THE AIR

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Saturday AUTO RACING 11:30 a.m. NASCAR Xfinity: West Valley 200, qualifying, NBCSN 1 p.m. NASCAR: Bluegreen Vacations 500, qualifying, NBCSN 2:30 p.m. NASCAR Xfinity: West Valley 200, KSDK (5) BASKETBALL 11 a.m. College: Central Arkansas at Georgetown, FSM 1:30 p.m. College: Stony Brook vs. Seton Hall, FSM 2 p.m. College: SIUC vs. Delaware in Florida, KATZ (1600 AM) 3 p.m. College: Central Connecticut State at St. John’s, FS2 3 p.m. College: Iona at La Salle, NBCSN 3:30 p.m. College: NJIT at Providence, FSM College: St. Louis U. vs. Valparaiso, FSM, WARH (106.5 FM) 6 p.m. 6 p.m. College: Texas at Purdue, FS1 7 p.m. College: Oklahoma vs. Minnesota, BTN 7 p.m. NBA: Mavericks at Grizzlies, FSM Plus 8 p.m. College: Rhode Island at Maryland, FS1 FOOTBALL • College 11 a.m. Penn State at Minnesota, KDNL (30) 11 a.m. Maryland at Ohio State, KTVI (2) 11 a.m. Purdue at Northwestern, BTN 11 a.m. Vanderbilt at Florida, ESPN 11 a.m. Texas Tech at West Virginia, ESPN2 11 a.m. Baylor at Texas Christian, FS1 11 a.m. Western Kentucky at Arkansas, SEC Network 11 a.m. Massachusetts at Army, CBSSN 11 a.m. East Carolina at Southern Methodist, ESPNU 11:30 a.m. Georgia Tech at Virginia, FSM Plus 2 p.m. Missouri State at SIU Carbondale, KXFN (1380 AM), KYRO (1280 AM), KATZ (1600 AM) 2:30 p.m. Illinois at Michigan State, FS1, KFNS (590 AM) 2:30 p.m. Southern California at Arizona State, KDNL (30) 2:30 p.m. Kansas State at Texas, ESPN 2:30 p.m. Louisville at Miami, ESPN2 2:30 p.m. Connecticut at Cincinnati, CBSSN 2:30 p.m. Princeton vs. Dartmouth, ESPNU 2:30 p.m. Alabama-Birmingham at Southern Mississippi, NFL Network 2:40 p.m. Louisiana State at Alabama, KMOV (4) 3 p.m. Iowa at Wisconsin, KTVI (2) 3 p.m. New Mexico State at Mississippi, SEC Network 6 p.m. Missouri at Georgia, ESPN, KTRS (550 AM) 6 p.m. Appalachian State at South Carolina, ESPN2 6 p.m. Utah State at Fresno State, CBSSN 6:30 p.m. Clemson at North Carolina State, KDNL (30) 6:30 p.m. Tennessee at Kentucky, SEC Network 6:30 p.m. Liberty at Brigham Young, ESPNU 7 p.m. Iowa State at Oklahoma, KTVI (2) 9:15 p.m. Wyoming at Boise State, ESPN 9:30 p.m. Nevada at San Diego State, ESPN2 GOLF 2:30 p.m. Champions: Schwab Cup, third round, GOLF 8:30 p.m. LPGA: Japan Classic, final round, GOLF 2:30 a.m. (Sun.) European PGA: Turkish Airlines Open, final round, GOLF HOCKEY Noon Sabres vs. Lightning, NHL Network 4 p.m. College: Minnesota at Michigan, BTN 6 p.m. Blackhawks at Penguins, NHL Network 9 p.m. Blues at Flames, FSM, WXOS (101.1 FM) RODEO 10 p.m. PBR: World finals, CBSSN SOCCER 6:25 a.m. English Premier League: Chelsea vs. Crystal Palace, NBCSN 8:30 a.m. Bundesliga: Hertha Berlin vs. Leipzig, FS1 8:30 a.m. Bundesliga: Schalke vs. Fortuna DŸsseldorf, FS2 8:55 a.m. English Premier League: Tottenham Hotspur vs. Sheffield United, NBCSN 11:30 a.m. English Premier League: Leicester City vs. Arsenal, KSDK (5) 11:30 a.m. Bundesliga: Bayern Munich vs. Borussia Dortmund, FS2 TENNIS 10 a.m. USTA Men’s Pro Circuit Knoxville, Tennis Channel 4 p.m. USTA Women’s Pro Circuit Las Vegas, Tennis Channel 9 p.m. Fed Cup: Australia vs. France, Tennis Channel

Sunday’s highlights AUTO RACING 1:30 p.m. NASCAR: Bluegreen Vacations 500, KSDK (5) BASKETBALL 8 p.m. College: Illinois at Arizona, Pac-12 Network, KFNS (590 AM) FOOTBALL Noon NFL: Chiefs at Titans, KMOV (4), KFNS (590 AM) Noon NFL: Falcons at Saints, KTVI (2) 3:25 p.m. NFL: Panthers at Packers, KTVI (2) 7:20 p.m. NFL: Vikings at Cowboys, KSDK (5), WXOS (101.1 FM) SOCCER 2 p.m. MLS Cup: Toronto at Seattle, KDNL (30) 7 p.m. Women’s exhibition: United States vs. Costa Rica, ESPN2

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314-340-8301 314-340-8392 314-340-8313 314-340-8137 314-744-5725

MEMPHIS, Tenn. — James Wiseman had 17 points and nine rebounds hours after getting a temporary restraining order to play amid an NCAA ineligibility ruling, leading No. 14 Memphis past Illinois-Chicago 92-46 on Friday night. Memphis said Wiseman — the potential No. 1 pick in the NBA draft — was declared eligible by the NCAA in May but further details and investigation by the university and the NCAA found coach Penny Hardaway gave $11,500 in moving expenses to help Wiseman’s family move from Nashville to Memphis in the summer of 2017. The university said Wiseman didn’t know about the money given to his family. At the time, Hardaway was the coach of East High School. Wiseman was a standout junior, helping Hardaway win his third straight Tennessee Class AAA title before being hired by Memphis as in March 2018. Wiseman committed to Memphis and Hardaway again in November 2018. Wiseman started and Memphis (2-0) immediately took a double-digit lead leaving the only doubt of the night the status of the 7-foot freshman who could be the top pick in next summer in the NBA draft. There were several hours of drama prior to tipoff. Less than two hours before the game, Wiseman’s attorney, Leslie Ballin, announced that the NCAA had ruled Wiseman ineligible. The lower court ruling reinstating him came a short time later. With all of the attention on Wiseman, Boogie Ellis — another freshman among Hardaway’s highly touted class — scored 22 points. He made eight of his 11 shots, going 6 of 9 from 3-point range, and helped Memphis shoot 59% for the game. No. 2 KENTUCKY 91, EASTERN KENTUCKY 49: Nick Richards had 21 points and 10 rebounds, Immanuel Quickley added 16 and the host Wildcats (2-0) scored the game’s first 14 points to cruise past the Colonels (1-1) in Lexington. Kentucky had some sloppy stretches that allowed EKU to get within 37-23 before regrouping to lead 46-25 at the break. NO. 3 KANSAS 74, UNC GREENSBORO 62: Devon Dotson had 22 points and six assists and Udoka Azubuike added 10 points and 10 rebounds as host Kansas rebounded from a loss to No. 4 Duke on Monday night. After leading by four points at the half, the Jayhawks shot 41.7% from beyond the arc in the second half to pull away. No. 4 DUKE 89, COLORADO STATE 55: Tre Jones had 15 points and eight assists, and the host Blue Devils (2-0) routed the Rams (1-1) in Durham, North Carolina. Alex O’Connell had 14 points while three freshmen also reached double figures — Cassius Stanley led the way with 19 points, Vernon Carey had 11 before fouling out and Wendell Moore Jr. finished with 10 — for the Blue Devils.

How the top 25 fared 1. Michigan State (0-1) idle. Next: vs. Binghamton, Sunday. 2. Kentucky (2-0) beat E. Kentucky 91-49. Next: vs. Evansville, Tuesday. 3. Kansas (1-1) beat UNC Greensboro 74-62. Next: vs. Monmouth, Friday. 4. Duke (2-0) beat Colorado St. 89-55. Next: vs. Cent.Arkansas, Tuesday. 5. Louisville (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Youngstown State, Sunday. 6. Florida (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Florida State, Sunday. 7. Maryland (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Rhode Island, Saturday. 8. Gonzaga (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Arkansas-Pine Bluff, Saturday. 9. N. Carolina (2-0) beat UNC Wilm. 78-62. Next: vs. Gardner-Webb, Friday. 10. Villanova (1-0) idle. Next: at No. 18 Ohio State, Wednesday. 11. Virginia (1-0) idle. Next: vs. James Madison, Wednesday. 12. Seton Hall (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Stony Brook, Saturday. 13. Texas Tech (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Bethune-Cookman, Saturday. 14. Memphis (2-0) beat UIC 92-46. Next: vs. No. 15 Oregon, Tuesday. 15. Oregon (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Boise State, Saturday. 16. Baylor (1-1) lost to Washington 64-67. Next: vs. Texas State, Friday. 17. Utah State (2-0) beat Weber State 89-34. Next: vs. Denver, Tuesday. 18. Ohio State (1-0) idle. Next: vs. UMass Lowell, Sunday. 19. Xavier (2-0) beat Siena 81-63. Next: vs. Missouri, Tuesday. 20. Saint Mary’s (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Winthrop, Monday. 21. Arizona ( 1-0) idle. Next: vs. Illinois, Sunday. 22. LSU (1-0) beat Bowling Green 88-79. Next: at No. 25 VCU, Wednesday. 23. Purdue (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Texas, Saturday. 24. Auburn (2-0) beat Davidson 76-66. Next: at South Alabama, Tuesday. 25. VCU (2-0) beat North Texas 59-56. Next: vs. No. 22 LSU, Wednesday.

No. 9 NORTH CAROLINA 78, UNC WILMINGTON 62: Freshman star Cole Anthony had 20 points and 10 rebounds to help the Tar Heels (2-0) defeat the host Seahawks (1-1). Graduate transfer Justin Pierce had 18 points and 12 rebounds to offset a bad shooting night (7-for-24) for Anthony, who had 34 points in his college debut against Notre Dame on Wednesday. WASHINGTON 67, NO. 16 BAYLOR 64: Nahziah Carter scored 23 points to help Washington win in Anchorage, Alaska. Jaden McDaniels had 18 points and seven rebounds. Jared Butler had 18 points for the Bears (1-1). NO. 17 UTAH STATE 89, WEBER STATE 35: Justin Bean had 18 points and nine rebounds, and Sam Merrill added 14 points, six rebounds and six assists as Utah State rolled to the home victory in Logan, Utah. No. 19 XAVIER 81, SIENA 63: Tyrique Jones and Naji Marshall each scored 20 points and the host Musketeers (2-0) beat the Saints in Cincinnati. No. 22 LSU 88, BOWLING GREEN 79: Javonte Smart and Emmitt Williams each scored 21 points, and the host Tigers opened their season by beating the Falcons (1-1) in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. No. 24 AUBURN 76, DAVIDSON 66: Isaac Okoro scored 17 points, Danjel Purifoy had 14 and the Tigers (2-0) won the opener of the Veterans Classic in Annapolis, Maryland. Returning two starters from a team that reached the Final Four last season, Auburn never trailed.

DIGEST two-time defending champion Justin Rose (67). Fired up by his selection by Tiger Woods for the Jeff Maggert shot a 6-under 65 on Friday to increase United States’ 12-man Presidents Cup team, Patrick his lead to four strokes in the Charles Schwab Cup Championship, with Bernhard Langer second in a Reed shot 7-under 65 to trail Schwab by four shots. bid for his record sixth PGA Tour Champions season Braves re-sign O’Day: Right-handed reliever Darren points title. O’Day has signed a $2.25 million, one-year deal to Maggert birdied three of the first four holes in a return to the Atlanta Braves. front-nine 31 and capped the bogey-free round with The 37-year-old O’Day appeared in just eight a birdie on the par-4 17th in perfect conditions at games for the Braves last season due to a right forearm Phoenix Country Club. He has a 14-under 128 total. strain. He allowed one earned run in 5 1/3 innings in The 55-year-old Texan entered the season-ending the regular season, then pitched two scoreless innings event 34th in the Charles Schwab Cup standings, just in the playoffs. three spots from failing to qualify. He won three times The sidearmer has pitched in 12 big league seasons on the PGA Tour and has five senior victories, one in and was an All-Star with Baltimore in 2015. He also 2014 and four in 2015. missed much of the 2018 season due to injury. Langer closed with a double bogey after hitting his approach into the water on the par-5 18th. Coming Rick Pitino to coach Greek national squad: Rick Pioff a playoff loss to Colin Montgomerie on Sunday tino has agreed to coach the Greek national basketball in California, Langer is third in the standings behind team and lead the country’s effort to qualify for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. Scott McCarron and Jerry Kelly. The Greek basketball federation said Friday that To take the season title, the 62-year-old German star needs to win the event and have McCarron finish Pitino will be officially presented on Monday, when in a two-way tie for fifth or worse and Kelly finish in a details of his agreement will be announced. The 67-year-old Pitino coached Greek club Pantwo-way tie for second or worse. McCarron (71) and athinaikos last season and guided the team to victory Kelly (74) were tied for 25th at 2 under. in the country’s cup competition before returning to Green, Suzuki tied for LPGA lead: Australian Hannah the United States. He remains popular among Greek Green shot a 5-under 67 on Friday to finish the first fans despite his outspoken criticism of smoking and round of the LPGA Japan Classic in Shiga tied for the rowdy behavior by spectators at games. lead with local favorite Ai Suzuki. NBA MVP Giannis Antetokounmpo and his brother Green carded five birdies at the par-72 Seta Golf Thanasis Antetokounmpo both play for Greece and Course to finish one stroke ahead of six golfers in- the Milwaukee Bucks. cluding Lydia Ko and Jennifer Kupcho. In September, the Greeks narrowly missed reaching Ko had an erratic round that featured seven birdies, the quarterfinals at the World Cup. a double bogey and a bogey in the final event of the Pitino spent much of his career jumping between LPGA Tour’s Asia Swing. the college ranks and the NBA, coaching the Boston Defending champion Nasa Hataoka shot a 71 and was Celtics and the New York Knicks as well as Kentucky tied for 35th place. Lexi Thompson, making her first and Louisville. start since the Indy Women in Tech Championship in Torrent out as MLS coach: Major League Soccer’s New September, struggled with her game and shot a 74. York City team will have its fourth coach in six seasons. Schwab up by one stroke in Turkey: Matthias Schwab The team said Friday it has reached an agreement started with an eagle and finished with a birdie to lead for coach Domènec Torrent to depart, a decision that by one shot after the second round of the Turkish Airfollowed a loss to Toronto in Major League Soccer’s lines Open in Antalya on Friday. Eastern Conference semifinals. The 24-year-old Austrian shot 5-under 67 to move NYC vice chairman Marty Edelman says in a stateto 12 under overall, leading a four-man group that ment the team spoke with Torrent and “we’ve decided includes Danny Willett (66) and Alex Noren (67). Schwab, who has a tour-best nine top-10 finishes that this is the right moment for both parties to focus this season, begins the weekend with five more play- on new opportunities.”

Maggert extends lead in Schwab Cup golf

ers within two shots. The 10-under group includes

— Associated Press


SPORTS

D2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Friday 11/15 at Blue Jackets 6 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 11/12 vs. Coyotes 7 p.m. FSM

Saturday 11/16 vs. Ducks 7 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 11/19 vs. Lightning 7 p.m. FSM, NBCSN

M 2 • SUnDAy • 11.10.2019

BLUES NOTEBOOK

Fond memories of Calgary

St. Louis U. • slubillikens.com | 314-977-4758 Men’s basketball

Women’s basketball Sunday 11/17 vs. Seton Hall 3 p.m. ESPNU

Wednesday 11/13 vs. Eastern Wash. 7 p.m. FSM

Sunday 11/10 at Cincinnati 1 p.m.

Wednesday 11/13 vs. Northern Iowa 7 p.m.

Mizzou • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Football Saturday 11/23 vs. Tennessee 2:30, 6 or 6:30 TV TBA

Saturday 11/16 vs. Florida 11 a.m. KMOV (4)

M. basketball

W. basketball

Tuesday 11/12 at Xavier 6 p.m. CBSSN

Sunday 11/10 vs. Nebraska 2 p.m.

SIUE • siuecougars.com | 855-748-3849 Men’s basketball

Women’s basketball Saturday 11/16 at Incarnate Word 1 p.m.

Tuesday 11/12 vs. Valparaiso 7 p.m.

Wednesday 11/13 Sunday 11/17 at Nebraska vs. Evansville 2 p.m. 7 p.m.

Illinois • fightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Football

Men’s basketball Saturday 11/30 Sunday 11/10 vs. Northwestern at Arizona 8 p.m. Time, TV TBA Pac-12 Network

Saturday 11/23 at Iowa Time, TV TBA

Monday 11/18 vs. Hawaii 7 p.m. ESPNU

OTHER EVENTS MAJOR ARENA SOCCER • St. Louis Ambush home games Sat. 11/16: vs. Dallas (exh.), 7:05 p.m. Fri. 11/29: vs. Milwaukee, 7:05 p.m. FAIRMOUNT PARK • Simulcasting: 11 a.m-11:30 p.m. daily.

ON THE AIR

RON FREHM, AP PHOTO

AUTO RACING 1:30 p.m. NASCAR: Bluegreen Vacations 500, KSDK (5) BASKETBALL 11 a.m. College: Wyoming at South Carolina, SEC Network 11 a.m. College: Boston College at South Florida, CBSSN Noon College: Florida State at Florida, ESPN Noon College: SIUC vs. Oakland in Florida, KATZ (1600 AM) 1 p.m. College: Youngstown State at Louisville, FSM 2 p.m. College: Missouri State vs. Alabama State, KPLR (11), KXFN (1380 AM), KYRO (1280 AM) 2 p.m. College women: South Carolina at Maryland, ESPN 3 p.m. College: Detroit at North Carolina State, FSM 3 p.m. College: UMass-Lowell at Ohio State, ESPNU 5 p.m. NBA: Pacers at Magic, FSM Plus 6 p.m. College: Binghamton at Michigan State, BTN 8 p.m. College: Illinois at Arizona, Pac-12 Network, KFNS (590 AM) FOOTBALL Noon NFL: Chiefs at Titans, KMOV (4), KFNS (590 AM) Noon NFL: Falcons at Saints, KTVI (2) Noon CFL: Edmonton at Montreal, ESPN2 3:25 p.m. NFL: Panthers at Packers, KTVI (2) 3:30 p.m. CFL: Winnipeg at Calgary, ESPN2 7:20 p.m. NFL: Vikings at Cowboys, KSDK (5), WXOS (101.1 FM) GOLF 2 p.m. Champions: Schwab Cup, final round, GOLF HOCKEY Noon Panthers at Rangers, NHL Network 6 p.m. Maple Leafs at Blackhawks, NHL Network RODEO 3 p.m. PBR: World finals, CBSSN SKATING 11 a.m. ISU Grand Prix: Cup of China, KSDK (5) SOCCER 6:20 a.m. Bundesliga: Borussia Monchengladbach vs. Werder Bremen, FS1 7:55 a.m. English Premier League: Manchester Utd. vs. Brighton, NBCSN 8:30 a.m. Bundesliga: Wolfsburg vs. Bayer Leverkusen, FS1 10:25 a.m. English Premier League: Liverpool vs. Man. City, NBCSN 10:50 a.m. Bundesliga: SC Freiburg vs. Eintracht Frankfurt, FS2 10:55 a.m. Serie A: Parma vs. AS Roma, ESPNews 11 a.m. Women’s Big Ten final: Penn St. vs. Michigan, BTN 11 a.m. Women’s ACC final: North Carolina vs. Virginia, ESPNU 12:30 p.m. Women’s Big 12 final: Kansas vs. TCU, FS1 1 p.m. Women’s SEC final: Arkansas vs. South Carolina, SEC Network 1 p.m. Women’s American final: South Florida at Memphis, ESPNU 1:20 p.m. U-17 World Cup: Netherlands vs. Paraguay, FS2 2 p.m. MLS Cup: Toronto at Seattle, KDNL (30) 3 p.m. Big Ten Tournament: Michigan State at Michigan, BTN 3 p.m. Women’s Big East final: Xavier vs. Georgetown, FS1 4:50 p.m. U-17 World Cup: South Korea vs. Mexico, FS1 6:30 p.m. Primera Division: Club Santos Laguna vs. Cruz Azul, FS2 7 p.m. Women’s exhibition: United States vs. Costa Rica, ESPN2 TENNIS 6 a.m. ATP: World Tour finals, round robin, Tennis Channel 10 a.m. USTA Men’s Pro Circuit Knoxville, Tennis Channel 4 p.m. USTA Women’s Pro Circuit Las Vegas, Tennis Channel VOLLEYBALL 3 p.m. College women: Texas A&M at LSU, SEC Network

DIGEST Fordham eliminates SLU in A-10 tourney A defensive error by St. Louis University allowed Fordham’s Filippo Ricopati to score in the 87th minute Saturday and the Rams beat the Billikens 1-0 in the quarterfinals of the Atlantic 10 men’s soccer tournament at Hermann Stadium. SLU was eliminated and fell to 10-7. (Stu Durando) Illini play at No. 21 Arizona: The Illinois men’s basketball team, off to a 2-0 start, will get a big test Sunday night when it travels to Tucson, Arizona, to meet No. 21 Arizona (1-0). The Illini are coming off an 83-71 victory Friday night over Grand Canyon in Phoenix. Seven-foot freshman center Kofi Cockburn led the Illini with 23 points and 14 rebounds, his second consecutive doubledouble. Arizona won its season opener over visiting Northern Arizona 91-52 Wednesday. U.S. women’s soccer team wins court ruling: The U.S. women’s national team has been granted class status in its lawsuit against U.S. Soccer that alleges gender discrimination in compensation and working conditions. U.S. District Court Judge R. Gary Klausner’s ruling Friday in Los Angeles expands the case beyond the 28 players who originally brought the lawsuit to include all players who had been called up to camp or played in a game over a multiyear period. U.S. Soccer had opposed the move to certify the class. Sinner nets first ATP title: Italian teenager Jannik Sinner beat top-seeded Alex de Minaur in straight sets at the Next Gen Finals on Saturday in Milan to claim his first ATP title. From staff and wire reports

HOW TO SUBMIT A LETTER FAX 314-340-3070 E-MAIL soundoff@post-dispatch.com HOLE IN ONE Golf courses submit results to postsports@post-dispatch.com

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MAIL Sports Sound Off St. Louis Post-Dispatch 901 N 10th Street St. Louis MO 63101-1250

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To e-mail editors, use first initial AND last name@post-dispatch. com For general information call 314-340-8222

Roger Hensley Cameron Hollway Don Reed Mike Smith Chris Gove

Assistant Managing Editor | Sports Deputy Sports Editor Deputy Sports Editor | Nights Assistant Sports Editor | Online High School Sports

314-340-8301 314-340-8392 314-340-8313 314-340-8137 314-744-5725

The Flames’ Craig Berube, now the Blues’ coach, readies to throw a punch at the Rangers’ Tie Domi in 1992. Saturday’s Blues game was not complete at press time. Visit STLtoday.com for coverage. BY JIM THOMAS

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CALGARY, Alberta — In a long, meandering career as a player, Craig Berube played 17 years, encompassing 1,054 regular-season games with five teams. The rough and tumble forward was around long enough to make two stops in Calgary, playing a combined 234 games with the Flames. “Good hockey town,” Berube said Saturday after the Blues’ morning skate. “It was a lot of fun. I enjoyed my time here. One was fairly early on in my career. … When I came back I was pretty much done as a player but got a couple more years out of it.” Berube spent 1½ seasons in Calgary during the 1991-92 and ’92-93 seasons. A decade later, he played two full seasons with the Flames (2001-03) to close out his career. “The first time, we had a good team here,” Berube said. “It was fun to play with Al MacInnis, Gary Roberts, (Joe) Nieuwendyk, (Theoren) Fleury. Mike Vernon was the goalie. That was a good team. I was a pretty young guy. Just playing with some of those good players and veterans was pretty special.” He was pretty much on fumes for the return engagement. “I probably shouldn’t have been in the league,” he said. Then he joked: “I was good in the locker room, I just wouldn’t stay in there.”

That goal Flames forward and St. Louisan Matthew Tkachuk is still hearing about that amazing goal he scored with 2 seconds left in overtime to beat Nashville 6-5 on Halloween. “I get asked about it a fair bit,” he said. “(But) it’s starting to die down a little.” With time winding down and still about 20 feet from the net, Tkachuk shot the puck through his own legs and past Predators goalie Pekka Rinne to snap a 5-5 tie. “Every now and then I’ll screw around and do something like that,” Tkachuk said. “That’s not something I practice or whatever. I mainly just do it like in games when I probably shouldn’t do it. But it worked, and I was happy it worked out there.”

Advice for de la Rose Berube talked to Jacob de la Rose twice Friday morning before his first practice as a member of the Blues. But it had nothing to do with the specifics of the Blues’ system. It was all about how Berube wanted him to play. “We’re a heavy team,” Berube told him. “You’ve got to be physical and aggressive. We get in the way of people. We’re a forecheck team and control pucks in the offensive zone.” Can de la Rose play that style? “He’s a big guy. So he can play

(heavy),” Berube said.

High-ankle sprains Saturday’s game was the Blues’ first since alternate captain Alexander Steen suffered a high-ankle sprain. He will be sidelined for at least four weeks. But as Tyler Bozak can attest, nothing’s for certain with such an injury. “The first couple years in the league I had one,” Bozak said. “They’re kind of weird injuries — tiny little things can just mess it up. You’ve got to be really careful.” Bozak said the ankle can feel strong and healthy … ”and then one little thing and you’re back on the shelf. So you’ve got to be patient. He’s a smart guy. He’s been through injuries, so he’ll know what to do to take care of himself. We’re hoping he’s back sooner than later.” De la Rose took Steen’s spot on the Bozak line Saturday night and also handled some of Steen’s penalty kill duties. But as Bozak said of Steen: “Not a guy you can replace on or off the ice. A big-time leader in here and does all the little things right on the ice. The things that might go unnoticed by some people … but we notice them each and every day in this room.” Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com

Title could keep Bradley in Toronto BY TIM BOOTH

Associated Press

SEATTLE — When Michael Bradley left AS Roma in Italy and returned to Major League Soccer to join Toronto FC, he was the secondary attraction. Most of the attention was on Toronto’s simultaneous acquisition of striker Jermain Defoe. Six seasons later, Defoe is long gone and Bradley is secondary to no one in Toronto. For the third time since making the move back to MLS in 2014, Bradley will captain Toronto in the MLS Cup final Sunday against the Seattle Sounders. As much as Bradley has become synonymous with Toronto, there is a bit of lingering unknown about the 32-year-old midfielder. His contract with Toronto is thought to be expiring at the end of the season, although a report this summer indicated Bradley may not be going anywhere, especially if his underdog team can win a second championship trophy. “We don’t pay whole lot of attention to who the favorites are, who the underdogs are. We feel good about the group that we have,” Bradley said. “We feel like we continue to improve even as the season gets toward the end. And if we can continue to do all the things that we’ve done over this last stretch, then we’re going to walk on that field with confidence and a real feeling that we can be the team lifting the trophy at the end of the day.” The concern about Bradley’s future may become a moot point if Toronto wins. The Athletic reported over the summer that Bradley’s contract — which paid him $6.5 million this season — has an option for the 2020 season and will be automatically triggered if Toronto wins the title. Both the player and the team have stayed quiet about Bradley’s contract situation and the option seemed unlikely at the time of the report with Toronto loitering in the middle of the Eastern Conference

TED S. WARREN, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Toronto FC midfielder Michael Bradley talks to reporters Thursday ahead of Sunday’s MLS Cup soccer match against the host Seattle Sounders. Bradley’s contract will automatically renew should his team win the title. standings for most of the season. Even when Toronto got hot the second-half of the season and earned the No. 4 seed for the playoffs it still didn’t seem highly possible. But after upsets of New York City FC and Atlanta United on the road, Toronto and Bradley are on the cusp of an unlikely championship run. “When July came around and we finally felt like we had our group back together, everybody was back from the Gold Cup, we’d started to add a few new faces, that was more or less the halfway point,” Bradley said. “And everybody looked at each other and understood that if we wanted to have a real chance at the end of the season that we had no time to waste. So we had to take every game and play it like it was a playoff game and our season was on the line because that was our reality at that point.” Bradley is right about the turnaround that started after players returned from the Gold Cup. Toronto is undefeated in its past 13 matches, regular season and playoffs (7-0-6) and has won four straight overall going back to the

final day of the regular season. Toronto’s most recent league loss was a 2-0 defeat Aug. 3 at the New York Red Bulls. Toronto has been without Jozy Altidore for the past month because of a quad injury that has him as a major question for Sunday’s final. Alejandro Pozuelo is the latest European star added to Toronto’s lineup and was at his best in the playoff upset of NYCFC. But it’s been the likes of Jonathan Osorio, Nick DeLeon and Nicolas Benezet scoring critical goals during the postseason to get Toronto into the final. But the midfield drives Toronto’s success and Bradley is the conductor of that group. “With their three midfielders, with Osorio and Marky Delgado, they understand him completely,” Seattle midfielder Cristian Roldan said. “They play the game that he wants them to play in that they cover a lot of ground and all the gaps that needs to be covered. The fact that those three have been so solid in the midfield for the playoffs is what is making their team so much better.”


SPORTS

D2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Friday 11/15 at Blue Jackets 6 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 11/12 vs. Coyotes 7 p.m. FSM

Saturday 11/16 vs. Ducks 7 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 11/19 vs. Lightning 7 p.m. FSM, NBCSN

St. Louis U. • slubillikens.com | 314-977-4758 Men’s basketball

Women’s basketball Sunday 11/17 vs. Seton Hall 3 p.m. ESPNU

Wednesday 11/13 vs. Eastern Wash. 7 p.m. FSM

Sunday 11/10 at Cincinnati 1 p.m.

Wednesday 11/13 vs. Northern Iowa 7 p.m.

Mizzou • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Football Saturday 11/23 vs. Tennessee 2:30, 6 or 6:30 TV TBA

Saturday 11/16 vs. Florida 11 a.m. KMOV (4)

M. basketball

W. basketball

Tuesday 11/12 at Xavier 6 p.m. CBSSN

Sunday 11/10 vs. Nebraska 2 p.m.

SIUE • siuecougars.com | 855-748-3849 Men’s basketball

Women’s basketball Saturday 11/16 at Incarnate Word 1 p.m.

Tuesday 11/12 vs. Valparaiso 7 p.m.

Wednesday 11/13 Sunday 11/17 at Nebraska vs. Evansville 2 p.m. 7 p.m.

Illinois • fightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Football

Men’s basketball Saturday 11/30 Sunday 11/10 vs. Northwestern at Arizona 8 p.m. Time, TV TBA Pac-12 Network

Saturday 11/23 at Iowa Time, TV TBA

Monday 11/18 vs. Hawaii 7 p.m. ESPNU

OTHER EVENTS MAJOR ARENA SOCCER • St. Louis Ambush home games Sat. 11/16: vs. Dallas (exh.), 7:05 p.m. Fri. 11/29: vs. Milwaukee, 7:05 p.m. FAIRMOUNT PARK • Simulcasting: 11 a.m-11:30 p.m. daily.

ON THE AIR AUTO RACING 1:30 p.m. NASCAR: Bluegreen Vacations 500, KSDK (5) BASKETBALL 11 a.m. College: Wyoming at South Carolina, SEC Network 11 a.m. College: Boston College at South Florida, CBSSN Noon College: Florida State at Florida, ESPN Noon College: SIUC vs. Oakland in Florida, KATZ (1600 AM) 1 p.m. College: Youngstown State at Louisville, FSM 2 p.m. College: Missouri State vs. Alabama State, KPLR (11), KXFN (1380 AM), KYRO (1280 AM) 2 p.m. College women: South Carolina at Maryland, ESPN 3 p.m. College: Detroit at North Carolina State, FSM 3 p.m. College: UMass-Lowell at Ohio State, ESPNU 5 p.m. NBA: Pacers at Magic, FSM Plus 6 p.m. College: Binghamton at Michigan State, BTN 8 p.m. College: Illinois at Arizona, Pac-12 Network, KFNS (590 AM) FOOTBALL Noon NFL: Chiefs at Titans, KMOV (4), KFNS (590 AM) Noon NFL: Falcons at Saints, KTVI (2) Noon CFL: Edmonton at Montreal, ESPN2 3:25 p.m. NFL: Panthers at Packers, KTVI (2) 3:30 p.m. CFL: Winnipeg at Calgary, ESPN2 7:20 p.m. NFL: Vikings at Cowboys, KSDK (5), WXOS (101.1 FM) GOLF 2 p.m. Champions: Schwab Cup, final round, GOLF HOCKEY Noon Panthers at Rangers, NHL Network 6 p.m. Maple Leafs at Blackhawks, NHL Network RODEO 3 p.m. PBR: World finals, CBSSN SKATING 11 a.m. ISU Grand Prix: Cup of China, KSDK (5) SOCCER 6:20 a.m. Bundesliga: Borussia Monchengladbach vs. Werder Bremen, FS1 7:55 a.m. English Premier League: Manchester Utd. vs. Brighton, NBCSN 8:30 a.m. Bundesliga: Wolfsburg vs. Bayer Leverkusen, FS1 10:25 a.m. English Premier League: Liverpool vs. Man. City, NBCSN 10:50 a.m. Bundesliga: SC Freiburg vs. Eintracht Frankfurt, FS2 10:55 a.m. Serie A: Parma vs. AS Roma, ESPNews 11 a.m. Women’s Big Ten final: Penn St. vs. Michigan, BTN 11 a.m. Women’s ACC final: North Carolina vs. Virginia, ESPNU 12:30 p.m. Women’s Big 12 final: Kansas vs. TCU, FS1 1 p.m. Women’s SEC final: Arkansas vs. South Carolina, SEC Network 1 p.m. Women’s American final: South Florida at Memphis, ESPNU 1:20 p.m. U-17 World Cup: Netherlands vs. Paraguay, FS2 2 p.m. MLS Cup: Toronto at Seattle, KDNL (30) 3 p.m. Big Ten Tournament: Michigan State at Michigan, BTN 3 p.m. Women’s Big East final: Xavier vs. Georgetown, FS1 4:50 p.m. U-17 World Cup: South Korea vs. Mexico, FS1 6:30 p.m. Primera Division: Club Santos Laguna vs. Cruz Azul, FS2 7 p.m. Women’s exhibition: United States vs. Costa Rica, ESPN2 TENNIS 6 a.m. ATP: World Tour finals, round robin, Tennis Channel 10 a.m. USTA Men’s Pro Circuit Knoxville, Tennis Channel 4 p.m. USTA Women’s Pro Circuit Las Vegas, Tennis Channel VOLLEYBALL 3 p.m. College women: Texas A&M at LSU, SEC Network

M 4 • SUnDAy • 11.10.2019

Blues win 7th in a row BY JIM THOMAS

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CALGARY, Alberta — Vancouver, Edmonton and now Calgary. The Blues have taken on the best that western Canada could throw at them during this hockey trip — with Minnesota added on for good measure. And beaten them all. On Saturday night at the Scotiabank Saddledome, they were playing without Vladimir Tarasenko once again, and were minus Alexander Steen for the first time, due to injuries. That’s both of their alternate captains. Robby Fabbri is a Blue no more, a loss possibly more emotional than anything else to his former teammates. But nothing seems to slow these Blues, who defeated Calgary 3-2 on David Perron’s overtime powerplay goal to run their Western Conference-leading record to 123-3 with their seventh consecutive victory overall and fifth in a row on the road. They remain unbeaten in regulation play against the West at 8-01, the only team in the NHL that can make that claim. Perron’s one-timer on a feed from Ryan O’Reilly at the 2:46 mark of extra time was his fifth game-winner of the season, three of which have come in overtime. As for Craig Berube, who’s closing in on the first anniversary of his tenure as Blues coach, it was his 50th win. In just his 81st game. Only one coach in Blues history has reached 50 wins quicker. Surprise! Mike Yeo did so in 80 games, not that it did him much good when things went south a year ago at this time. Jordan Binnington has flirted with a shutout several times. Over his past seven games he has had three occasions — all victories — where he yielded only one goal. And back on Oct. 14, Binnington was working on a shutout with a 2-0 lead and just 5:31 left, but the Islanders scored twice to send the game into overtime and then beat the Blues 3-2 in extra time. On Saturday, the shutout disappeared with 9:01 to play in the third when St. Louisan Matthew Tkachuk maneuvered through the slot, then scored his 10th goal of the season to make it a 2-1 game. It was the league-leading eighth goal of the season scored by Tkachuk in the third period or overtime this season. It looked even more like the Islanders game when Colton Parayko had the puck checked away from him in the St. Louis zone and Binnington mishandled it, resulting in a backhand goal by Flames defenseman Travis Hamonic with 3:56 left, tying the game at 2-all. For the seventh game in a row, Berube started his fourth line of Mackenzie MacEachern-Ivan Barbashev-Oskar Sundqvist, and the unit quickly rewarded him although not on the game-opening shift. First Sundqvist had a shot that was blocked, then MacEachern followed with a shot that Barbashev grabbed from behind the net and beat Calgary goalie David Rittich with a wraparound move. So

JEFF MCINTOSH, CANADIAN PRESS VIA AP

David Perron, left, celebrates his game-winning overtime goal with Ryan O’Reilly Saturday in Calgary. Blues 3, Flames 2 (OT) Blues Calgary

1 0

1 0

0 2

1 0

— —

3 2

First period B: Barbashev 2 (MacEachern, Sundqvist), 3:17. Penalties: Sanford, STL, (tripping), 3:58; Schenn, STL, (boarding), 9:42; Bennett, CGY, (hooking), 11:28. Second period B: O’Reilly 5 (Perron, Pietrangelo), 13:06 (pp). Penalties: Jankowski, CGY, (delay of game), 9:54; Giordano, CGY, (high sticking), 12:49. Third period C: Tkachuk 10 (Mangiapane, Backlund), 10:59. C: Hamonic 1 (Giordano), 16:04. Penalties: MacEachern, STL, (roughing), 15:39; Bennett, CGY, (charging), 15:39. Overtime B: Perron 8 (Pietrangelo, O’Reilly), 2:46 (pp). Penalties: Brodie, CGY, (holding), 1:47. Shots on goal Blues 12 Calgary 10

10 10

4 7

2 2

28 29

Power-plays Blues 2 of 4; Calgary 0 of 2. Goaltenders Blues, Binnington 9-2-3 (29 shots-27 saves). Calgary, Rittich 9-4-3 (28-25). A: 19,289. Referees: Jean Hebert, Kelly Sutherland. Linesmen: Trent Knorr, Brian Murphy.

just 3:17 into the game, the Blues were up 1-0. For Barbashev it was his second goal of the season, and his second goal in the Blues’ last 3:50 of clock time. He had a shorthanded, empty-net goal with 33 seconds left in Wednesday’s 5-2 victory in Edmonton. After the morning skate, defenseman Vince Dunn said a prime focus was to start fast Saturday night. The Blues have been hampered by slow starts in most of their recent games even though they’ve been winning. “We want to try to control that,” Dunn said. “We need to be able to match their intensity and outcompete them all over the ice.” That certainly was the case in the early going and proved to be the case all night. The Blues had a lot of bounce in their step, and had several solid-to-strong chances in the opening period. None better than O’Reilly’s attempt at the 5:53 mark of the first. Rittich was doing some housekeeping behind the net, couldn’t control the puck, and got back just in time to stop an O’Reilly shot from relatively close range. But the best chance of the period

Berube has fond Calgary memories “We’re a heavy team,” Berube told him. “You’ve got to be physical and aggressive. We get in the way of people. We’re a forecheck team and control pucks in the offensive zone.” Can de la Rose play that style? “He’s a big guy. So he can play (heavy),” Berube said.

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Fordham eliminates SLU in A-10 tourney A defensive error by St. Louis University allowed Fordham’s Filippo Ricopati to score in the 87th minute Saturday and the Rams beat the Billikens 1-0 in the quarterfinals of the Atlantic 10 men’s soccer tournament at Hermann Stadium. SLU was eliminated and fell to 10-7. (Stu Durando) Illini play at No. 21 Arizona: The Illinois men’s basketball team, off to a 2-0 start, will get a big test Sunday night when it travels to Tucson, Arizona, to meet No. 21 Arizona (1-0). The Illini are coming off an 83-71 victory Friday night over Grand Canyon in Phoenix. Seven-foot freshman center Kofi Cockburn led the Illini with 23 points and 14 rebounds, his second consecutive doubledouble. Arizona won its season opener over visiting Northern Arizona 91-52 Wednesday. U.S. women’s soccer team wins court ruling: The U.S. women’s national team has been granted class status in its lawsuit against U.S. Soccer that alleges gender discrimination in compensation and working conditions. U.S. District Court Judge R. Gary Klausner’s ruling Friday in Los Angeles expands the case beyond the 28 players who originally brought the lawsuit to include all players who had been called up to camp or played in a game over a multiyear period. U.S. Soccer had opposed the move to certify the class. Sinner nets first ATP title: Italian teenager Jannik Sinner beat top-seeded Alex de Minaur in straight sets at the Next Gen Finals on Saturday in Milan to claim his first ATP title. From staff and wire reports

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Assistant Managing Editor | Sports Deputy Sports Editor Deputy Sports Editor | Nights Assistant Sports Editor | Online High School Sports

314-340-8301 314-340-8392 314-340-8313 314-340-8137 314-744-5725

Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com

BLUES NOTEBOOK

BY JIM THOMAS

DIGEST

belonged to Calgary’s Sean Monahan, who split two Blues defenders in the neutral zone for a breakaway but couldn’t get his wrist shot past Binnington with 10½ minutes left before intermission. It was a wide-open first period by Blues standards, with crisp passing and several rushes by St. Louis. Skating with a skilled, swift squad such as Calgary might be seen as playing into the Flames’ hands. And sure enough, the Flames started to get more oddman rushes in the second period. But still, Calgary couldn’t dent the scoreboard. On just about every occasion the Blues were able to get back and break up the rush. On the one occasion they didn’t, when the Flames came screaming down the ice on a 3-on-2 break, an uncovered Michael Stone in the slot blasted a shot over the net. The Blues got a power play midway through the second when Mark Jankowski was penalized for delay of game after his clearing attempt sailed into the stands. The Blues had several good chances, including one by Jaden Schwartz in close and successive shots from the left and right wings by Perron and Brayden Schenn respectively. Schenn, by the way, wore the letter “A” on his jersey as one of the Blues’ alternate captains. He had the “A” in place of injured alternate captain Alexander Steen, who’s out for at least a month with a high-ankle sprain. The Blues didn’t score on that power play, but they did on their next one, after Calgary’s Mark Giordano went to the box for highsticking Barbashev with 7:11 left in the second. The Blues worked the puck quickly and confidently, and needed just 17 seconds of the man advantage to make it 2-0. Perron, working near the left boards, zipped a pass to O’Reilly, who beat Rittich with a quick onetimer.

CALGARY, Alberta — In a long, meandering career as a player, Craig Berube played 17 years, encompassing 1,054 regular-season games with five teams. The rough and tumble forward was around long enough to make two stops in Calgary, playing a combined 234 games with the Flames. “Good hockey town,” Berube said Saturday after the Blues’ morning skate. “It was a lot of fun. I enjoyed my time here. One was fairly early on in my career. … When I came back I was pretty much done as a player but got a couple more years out of it.” Berube spent 1½ seasons in Calgary during the 1991-92 and ’92-93 seasons. A decade later, he played two full seasons with the Flames (2001-03) to close out his career. “The first time, we had a good team here,” Berube said. “It was fun to play with Al MacInnis, Gary Roberts, (Joe) Nieuwendyk, (Theoren) Fleury. Mike Vernon was the goalie. That was a good team. I was a pretty young guy. Just playing with some of those good players and veterans was pretty special.” He was pretty much on fumes for the return engagement. “I probably shouldn’t have been in the league,” he said. Then he joked: “I was good in the locker room, I just wouldn’t stay in there.”

That goal Flames forward and St. Louisan Matthew Tkachuk is still hearing about that amazing goal he scored with 2 seconds left in overtime to

High-ankle sprains

RON FREHM, AP PHOTO

The Flames’ Craig Berube, now the Blues’ coach, readies to throw a punch at the Rangers’ Tie Domi in 1992. beat Nashville 6-5 on Halloween. “I get asked about it a fair bit,” he said. “(But) it’s starting to die down a little.” With time winding down and still about 20 feet from the net, Tkachuk shot the puck through his own legs and past Predators goalie Pekka Rinne to snap a 5-5 tie. “Every now and then I’ll screw around and do something like that,” Tkachuk said. “That’s not something I practice or whatever. I mainly just do it like in games when I probably shouldn’t do it. But it worked, and I was happy it worked out there.”

Advice for de la Rose Berube talked to Jacob de la Rose twice Friday morning before his first practice as a member of the Blues. But it had nothing to do with the specifics of the Blues’ system. It was all about how Berube wanted him to play.

Saturday’s game was the Blues’ first since alternate captain Alexander Steen suffered a high-ankle sprain. He will be sidelined for at least four weeks. But as Tyler Bozak can attest, nothing’s for certain with such an injury. “The first couple years in the league I had one,” Bozak said. “They’re kind of weird injuries — tiny little things can just mess it up. You’ve got to be really careful.” Bozak said the ankle can feel strong and healthy … ”and then one little thing and you’re back on the shelf. So you’ve got to be patient. He’s a smart guy. He’s been through injuries, so he’ll know what to do to take care of himself. We’re hoping he’s back sooner than later.” De la Rose took Steen’s spot on the Bozak line Saturday night and also handled some of Steen’s penalty kill duties. But as Bozak said of Steen: “Not a guy you can replace on or off the ice. A big-time leader in here and does all the little things right on the ice. The things that might go unnoticed by some people … but we notice them each and every day in this room.” Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com


11.10.2019 • Sunday • M 1

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

SCREEN PLAY YOUR TV GUIDE TO THE WEEK IN COLLEGE FOOTBALL TUBE RATINGS:

Take the batteries out of the remote It’s getting cold out; stay inside

Worthy of your full attention Give it a shot

Main attraction No. 2 LSU at No. 3 Alabama, 2:30 p.m., CBS: What other game would it be this week? This will be Alabama’s first big test of the season, while LSU already has defeated three top-10 teams this season. The Tigers probably could afford a loss Saturday and still be in contention for a spot in the College Football Playoff, but here is guessing LSU sees a great chance to break an eight-game losing streak to ’Bama. By the way, the quarterback battle in this one is

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D3

COLLEGE FOOTBALL PLAYOFF TOP 25 All games on Saturday 1. Ohio State (8-0) 2. LSU (8-0) 3. Alabama (8-0) 4. Penn State (8-0) 5. Clemson (9-0) 6. Georgia (7-1) 7. Oregon (8-1) 8. Utah (8-1) 9. Oklahoma (7-1) 10. Florida (7-2) 11. Auburn (7-2) 12. Baylor (8-0) 13. Wisconsin (6-2) 14. Michigan (7-2) 15. Notre Dame (6-2) 16. Kansas State (6-2) 17. Minnesota (8-0) 18. Iowa (6-2) 19. Wake Forest (7-1) 20. Cincinnati (7-1) 21. Memphis (8-1) 22. Boise State (7-1) 23. Oklahoma State (6-3) 24. Navy (7-1) 25. SMU (8-1)

Maryland, 11 a.m. at No. 3 Alabama, 2:30 p.m. No. 2 LSU, 2:30 p.m. at No. 17 Minnesota, 11 a.m. at NC State, 6:30 p.m. Missouri, 6 p.m. bye bye Iowa State, 7 p.m. Vanderbilt, 11 a.m. bye at TCU, 11 a.m. No. 18 Iowa, 3 p.m. bye at Duke, 6:30 p.m. at Texas, 2:30 p.m. No. 4 Penn State, 11 a.m. at No. 13 Wisconsin, 3 p.m. at Virginia Tech, 2:30 p.m. Connecticut, 2:30 p.m. bye Wyoming, 9:15 p.m. bye bye East Carolina, 11 a.m.

GERALD HERBERT, ASSOCIATED PRESS

LSU’s Terrace Marshall Jr., left, and O.C. Brothers try to down a punt near the goal line against Auburn during their game earlier this season in Baton Rouge, La.

AROUND THE SOUTHEASTERN EAST

4-1

7-1

Missouri, 6 p.m.

Florida

4-2

7-2

Vanderbilt, 11 a.m.

Missouri

2-2

5-3

at Georgia, 6 p.m.

South Carolina

3-4

4-5

Appalachian State, 6 p.m.

Tennessee

2-3

4-5

at Kentucky, 6:30 p.m.

Kentucky

2-4

4-4

Tennessee, 6:30 p.m.

1-4

2-6

at Florida, 11 a.m.

Vanderbilt

VASHA HUNT, ASSOCIATED PRESS

not too shabby either. Tube rating:

Kicking off your day (Hey, it’s gameday! Grab the coffee and boneless wings.) No. 4 Penn State at No. 17 Minnesota, 11 a.m., ABC: Penn State is for real, and the College Football Playoff voters see it, too. Minnesota is trying to show it’s for real. This is the Gophers’ first big test in eight games and likely one of the biggest games in program history. Tube rating: No. 12 Baylor at TCU, 11 a.m., FS1: This kick-starts a key stretch for the Bears, who have Oklahoma and Texas next. Baylor has won 11 straight dating back to last season. TCU has lost three of four games, but the victory came against then-No. 15 Texas. Expect the Horned Frogs to put up a big fight at home. Tube rating: Commercial check-ins: Maryland at No. 1 Ohio State, 11 a.m., Fox; Texas Tech at West Virginia, 11 a.m., ESPN2

Some afternoon delight (A little warmup for a big night.) No. 16 Kansas State at Texas, 2:30 p.m., ESPN: How well are things going for K-State right now? The Wildcats ran for 342 yards at Kansas last week despite missing their top two running backs. Texas still is alive for a potential berth in the Big 12 championship game. Another loss likely knocks out the Longhorns. Tube rating: No. 18 Iowa at No. 13 Wisconsin, 3 p.m., Fox: It’s Wisconsin’s powerful running game vs. Iowa’s stout run defense. The Badgers are the only team to have run for 200 yards against the Hawkeyes twice since 2017, and Jonathan Taylor is looking to bounce back after Ohio State held him under 100 yards two weeks ago. Both teams got two weeks to prepare for this one. Tube rating: Commercial check-ins: No. 19 Wake Forest at Virginia Tech, 2:30 p.m., ACC; Southern Cal at Arizona State, 2:30 p.m., ABC; Illinois at Michigan State, 2:30 p.m., FS1

In prime time (The stadium lights — and your TV — should shine bright.) No. 5 Clemson at NC State, 6:30 p.m., ABC: The reigning national champion Tigers are in good position to reach the College Football Playoff, but they must keep winning. The Tigers have won four games by a combined 163 points (40.8 average) since escaping against North Carolina (21-20). Tube rating: Iowa State at No. 9 Oklahoma, 7 p.m., Fox: Oklahoma likely will need to win out to keep its College Football Playoff hopes alive, and it will face a Cyclones team that has won in Norman in recent years. Iowa State has something to play for, too. A victory would make for a very interesting Big 12 title picture. Oklahoma leads the nation in total offense with 598.4 yards per game. Tube rating: Commercial check-ins: Appalachian State at South Carolina, 6 p.m., ESPN; No. 15 Notre Dame at Duke, 6:30 p.m., ACC

Peeking ahead

Next week’s big games:

„ No. 6 Georgia at No. 11 Auburn

THIS WEEK

Georgia

WEST

Alabama defensive backs Xavier McKinney, left, and Jared Mayden celebrate after a 35-13 win over Tennessee last month in Tuscaloosa, Ala.

CONF ALL

CONF ALL

Alabama

5-0

8-0

LSU, 2:30 p.m.

LSU

4-0 8-0

at Alabama, 2:30 p.m.

Auburn

4-2

7-2

bye

Texas A&M

3-2

6-3

bye

Mississippi State

2-4

4-5

bye

Mississippi

2-4

3-6

New Mexico State, 3 p.m.

Arkansas

0-6

2-7

Western Kentucky, 11 a.m.

AROUND THE BIG TEN EAST

CONF ALL

THIS WEEK

Ohio State

5-0

8-0

Maryland, 11 a.m.

Penn State

5-0

8-0

at Minnesota, 11 a.m.

Indiana

4-2

7-2

bye

Setting the scene SEC teams battle on field, in classroom for bowls

Michigan

4-2

7-2

bye

Michigan State

2-3

4-4

Illinois, 2:30 p.m.

Maryland

1-5

3-6

at Ohio State, 11 a.m.

0-6

2-7

bye

TUSCALOOSA, Ala. — While LSU, Alabama and Georgia are working on their playoff credentials, much of the Southeastern Conference has more humble goals. Teams like South Carolina, Tennessee and Mississippi State are battling for bowl eligibility with 4-5 records. Ditto for Kentucky at 4-4. Missouri’s fighting for that status on two fronts: The Tigers’ record (5-3) and, more importantly, their appeal of an NCAA postseason ban for academic misconduct involving a former tutor. Vanderbilt, Arkansas and Mississippi have little or no margin for error — but could get a boost from their Academic Progress Rate scores to get into the postseason if they make it to five wins. The SEC has six teams that already are bowl eligible and four more spots to fill, not counting the College Football Playoffs. Potential playoff berths and titles are at stake when No. 1 LSU (No. 2 College Football Playoff rankings) visits No. 2 Alabama (No. 3, CFP) on Saturday. If two SEC teams were to get into the playoffs, it would make it even more of an uphill climb for the league to fill those bowl slots, which include a New Year’s Six game, with teams that have at least a .500 record. Of course the SEC gladly would embrace that predicament. Georgia is No. 6 in both the CFP and Associated Press rankings. Other SEC games might not be worthy of a presidential visit — President Donald Trump is expected to attend the game at Alabama. But they’re meaningful games for the teams and their fans,including the Kentucky-Tennessee matchup Saturday night. The stretch run could make or break a team’s season. If the SEC can’t fill all its bowl slots with teams that are 6-6 or better, it can turn to a 5-7 team based on its APR scores. Vanderbilt is only 2-6 but leads the league in that category, ranking fifth nationally.

WEST

— Associated Press

Rutgers

CONF ALL

Minnesota

5-0

8-0

Penn State, 11 a.m.

Iowa

3-2

6-2

at Wisconsin, 3 p.m.

Wisconsin

3-2

6-2

Iowa, 3 p.m.

Illinois

3-3

5-4

at Michigan State, 2:30 p.m.

Nebraska

2-4

4-5

bye

Purdue

2-4

3-6

at Northwestern, 11 a.m.

Northwestern

0-6

1-7

Purdue, 11 a.m.

AROUND THE BIG 12 SCHOOL

CONF ALL

THIS WEEK

Baylor

5-0

8-0

at TCU, 11 a.m.

Oklahoma

4-1

7-1

Iowa State, 7 p.m.

Kansas State

3-2

6-2

at Texas, 2:30 p.m.

Iowa State

3-2

5-3

at Oklahoma, 7 p.m.

Texas

3-2

5-3

Kansas State, 2:30 p.m.

Oklahoma State

3-3

6-3

bye

TCU

2-3

4-4

Baylor, 11 a.m.

Texas Tech

1-4

3-5

at West Virginia, 11 a.m.

West Virginia

1-4

3-5

Texas Tech, 11 a.m.

Kansas

1-5

3-6

bye

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY Nov. 8, 2003: John Gagliardi became college football’s career victory leader when St. John’s rallied to beat Bethel 29-26. Gagliardi, in his 55th season and his 51st at the Minnesota school, earned his 409th victory, passing Eddie Robinson, who retired in 1997 after winning 408 games at Grambling. Nov. 9, 1912: The lateral pass was used as an offensive weapon for the first time by Worcester Tech coach William F. Carney. Carney’s team beat Amherst 14-13. Nov. 9, 2011: Joe Paterno was fired by the Penn State board of trustees despite saying he would retire as coach after the football season ended. Paterno was brought down by the growing furor over the handling of child sex abuse allegations against assistant coach Jerry Sandusky. Penn State president Graham Spanier also was ousted.


COLLEGE BASKETBALL

11.10.2019 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D3

TOP 25

No. 12 Seton Hall loses Powell in win ASSOCIATED PRESS

SOUTH ORANGE, N.J. — Seton Hall welcomed back its coach, but lost Myles Powell for the foreseeable future after he sprained his ankle. Romaro Gill had 10 points and 10 assists while Sandro Mamukelashvili scored 17 points as the 12th-ranked Pirates withstood the injury to Powell and beat Stony Brook 74-57 in a game that marked the return of coach Kevin Willard. Powell, the Big East preseason player of the year and an Associated Press preseason All-America selection, sprained his left ankle five minutes into the game and didn’t return. Afterward, Willard said Powell was undergoing Xrays on a “serious” ankle sprained that “might be a prolonged absence.” “I thought we did OK at first, and then when the news trickle down the bench that he wasn’t coming back I just think everyone kind of understood if as tough as he is if he’s not coming back, he had to be hurt and I think that kind of shook us a little bit,” Willard said. “And in the second half I think everyone kind of understood what they needed to do and did what they needed to do.” Seton Hall guard Quincy McKnight added 14 points. “It affected us a lot,” McKnight

How the top 25 fared 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25.

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Seton Hall guard Myles Powell (13) drives to the basket past Stony Brook guard Andrew Garcia during the first half Saturday in South Orange, N.J. Powell, an Associated Press preseason All-America selection, left with a “serious” sprained ankle. The Pirates visit SLU next Sunday. said of Powell’s injury. “All- 25-plus points for us, yeah, it’s American, Big East Preaseason hard when he goes down that early Player of the year, guy who scores and it’s only the second game of

Michigan State (0-1) idle. Next: vs. Binghamton, Sunday. Kentucky (2-0) idle. Next: vs. Evansville, Tuesday. Kansas (1-1) idle. Next: vs. Monmouth, Friday. Duke (2-0) idle. Next: vs. Central Arkansas, Tuesday. Louisville (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Youngstown State, Sunday. Florida (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Florida State, Sunday. Maryland (1-0) vs. Rhode Island, late. Next: vs. Oakland, Saturday. Gonzaga (2-0) beat Arkansas-Pine Bluff 110-60. Next: vs. North Dakota, Tuesday. North Carolina (2-0) idle. Next: vs. Gardner-Webb, Friday. Villanova (1-0) idle. Next: at No. 18 Ohio State, Wednesday. Virginia (1-0) idle. Next: vs. James Madison, Wednesday. Seton Hall (2-0) beat Stony Brook 74-57. Next: vs. No. 1 Michigan State, Thursday. Texas Tech (2-0) beat Bethune-Cookman 79-44. Next: vs. Houston Baptist, Wednesday. Memphis (2-0) idle. Next: vs. No. 15 Oregon, Tuesday. Oregon (1-0) vs. Boise State, late. Next: vs. No. 14 Memphis, Tuesday. Baylor (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Texas State, Friday. Utah State (2-0) idle. Next: vs. Denver, Tuesday. Ohio State (1-0) idle. Next: vs. UMass Lowell, Sunday. Xavier (2-0) idle. Next: vs. Missouri, Tuesday. Saint Mary’s (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Winthrop, Monday. Arizona ( 1-0) idle. Next: vs. Illinois, Sunday. LSU (1-0) idle. Next: at No. 25 VCU, Wednesday. Purdue (1-1) lost to Texas 66-70. Next: at Marquette, Wednesday. Auburn (2-0) idle. Next: at South Alabama, Tuesday. VCU (2-0) idle. Next: vs. No. 22 LSU, Wednesday.

the season.” Seton Hall (2-0) announced Oct. 29 that the NCAA is investigating the program and Willard would be sitting out two games. The school said it was cooperating but didn’t specify what the NCAA was investigating. US women lose to Oregon: Topranked Oregon stunned the U.S. women’s national team 93-86 on Saturday in Eugene, Oregon, to

hand the Americans’ their second loss to a college team in program history. The Americans haven’t lost a major international game since 2006. Sabrina Ionescu scored 25 of her 30 points in the second half to lead the Ducks. Her layup to end the third quarter gave Oregon a 68-67 lead and started a 15-2 run that Satou Sabally capped with a layup with 6:26 left.

Frederickson From D1

BILL BARRETT, ST. LOUIS U.

St. Louis U. forward Hasahn French throws down a dunk over a Valparaiso defender. French was plagued by foul trouble and eventually fouled out.

SLU From D1

But Jordan Goodwin weathered his four fouls to score 22 points and grab nine rebounds and Demarius Jacobs scored a careerhigh 20 points as SLU reached 80 points for the second consecutive game. That’s a rare feat for this program. “I loved what Jordan said with three and a half minutes left. He said ‘This is the best thing that could happen to us,’” coach Travis Ford said. “It was a great way to look at it. It was so good to see us respond and finish a game when we were trying to piece it together.” SLU’s fouls led to Valparaiso getting to the free-throw line with regularity. The Crusaders shot 35, but the freebies failed them down the stretch as they missed their last seven, helping the Billikens extend the lead after it dwindled to 66-65 with seven minutes left. SLU outrebounded Valpo 40-32 but needed a late surge to do so. The Crusaders led on the boards by two until the Billikens awoke in the final five minutes with Goodwin leading the team for the second game. The junior guard did a little of everything as he finished with six assists and three steals and could have had more steals attributed to him. He also brought a load of leadership, Ford said. “I felt like we had a bad practice Thursday, and we got a little comfortable,” Goodwin said. “I got a little comfortable. We won by 20 against Florida Gulf Coast, and I think we were still riding high on

SLU 81, Valparaiso 70 FG FT Reb VALPARAISO Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS McMillan 14 1-3 0-1 2-3 1 5 2 Freeman-Liberty 27 7-16 4-6 1-4 2 4 19 Robinson 27 1-4 4-8 2-5 1 4 7 Sackey 33 7-9 5-9 0-1 4 3 22 Fazekas 10 1-2 0-0 0-1 3 1 3 Kiser 33 2-4 4-5 3-8 2 2 9 Gordon 19 1-6 2-4 0-4 1 4 4 Clay 18 1-3 0-0 0-3 0 1 3 Freese-Vilien 7 0-0 0-0 1-1 1 0 0 Krikke 6 0-0 1-2 0-1 0 1 1 Lorange 2 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Totals 200 21-47 20-35 9-31 15 25 70 Percentages: FG.447, FT.571. 3-point goals: 8-17, .471 (Sackey 3-3, Clay 1-1, Fazekas 1-2, Kiser 1-2, Robinson 1-2, Freeman-Liberty 1-4, McMillan 0-1, Gordon 0-2). Team rebounds: 2. Team Turnovers: 19 (15 PTS). Blocked shots: 4 (Gordon 2, Clay, FreeseVilien). Turnovers: 19 (Kiser 4, Sackey 4, Krikke 3, Gordon 2, Robinson 2, Clay, Freeman-Liberty, Lorange, McMillan). Steals: 6 (Clay 2, Freeman-Liberty, McMillan, Robinson, Sackey). Technical fouls: None. FG FT Reb ST. LOUIS U. Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Bell 7 1-1 0-0 2-2 0 2 2 French 17 3-10 1-3 2-7 1 5 7 Goodwin 38 10-18 1-3 4-8 6 4 22 Jacobs 34 5-8 8-11 1-3 1 2 20 Thatch 17 1-2 2-2 0-2 0 4 4 Collins 30 4-9 1-4 1-6 5 1 9 Hankton 22 3-5 2-3 1-2 2 5 8 Jimerson 19 2-5 0-0 0-0 0 1 5 Weaver 14 2-3 0-0 0-3 0 0 4 Perkins 2 0-2 0-0 0-0 0 2 0 Hargrove 1 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Totals 200 31-63 15-26 11-33 15 26 81 Percentages: FG.492, FT.577. 3-point goals: 4-13, .308 (Jacobs 2-3, Goodwin 1-2, Jimerson 1-4, Perkins 0-1, Weaver 0-1, Hankton 0-2). Team rebounds: 6. Team Turnovers: 16 (18 PTS). Blocked shots: 3 (Goodwin, Hankton, Jacobs). Turnovers: 16 (Goodwin 5, Collins 4, Bell 2, Hankton 2, Jimerson 2, Jacobs). Steals: 11 (Goodwin 3, Hankton 3, Collins 2, Jacobs 2, Weaver). Technical fouls: None. Valparaiso 33 37 — 70 St. Louis U. 44 37 — 81

that win. We needed to humble ourselves and get back down to basics.” Freshman Yuri Collins became scoring-minded in the second half, repeatedly driving to his right and lofting soft layups over outstretched hands to account for all of his four field goals. Jacobs got himself going immediately by hitting two 3-pointers in the first minute. By the time he was done, he had more points than in his first 20 college games combined. He also proved valuable at the line, making eight of 11 while the rest of his teammates

combined to make seven of 15. “He and I had a long conversation yesterday and he responded,” Ford said. “I challenged him and he did a little more than I expected. I didn’t think he had been playing up to his capabilities. I put some numbers in front of him and said, ‘This is what I need.’” Jacobs said Ford asked him to score 12 points, attempt at least six free throws and make a couple of 3-pointers. All were achieved and then some. The foul issues developed quickly as Thatch and French played a combined 11 minutes in the first half after picking up two each. The Billikens were able to put together a run without them as Goodwin took over and Jacobs continued to contribute. Goodwin scored 11 during a 17-2 Billikens burst that pushed them to a 38-25 lead. But as Ford was shuffling players in and out of the game due to foul issues in the second half, the Crusaders began to make a move. Ford felt there was more of a problem with the Billikens simply not maintaining their level of play for extended periods of time. “Right now we’re playing in spurts, for whatever reason,” Ford said. “We’re really, really good and really, really bad. You’re not going to play at your highest level all the time, but we can’t slip as far as we’re slipping.” Valpo was able to hang around despite losing Ryan Fazekas at halftime to a hand injury. Stu Durando @studurando on Twitter sdurando@post-dispatch.com

was tied into a game that should have been — but wasn’t — over by intermission. Poor John Kiser was on the wrong end of it more than anyone. This play won’t show up in the highlights, but it said everything about the all-around impact St. Louis University’s star junior guard can have on a game when he finds one of his zones. It happened on a loose ball beneath the Crusaders’ basket. Poor John Kiser grabbed it, but he was in the air and headed out of bounds. A light bulb went off above his head. He would just bounce the ball of Goodwin’s shin. This almost always works. But Goodwin just grabbed the ball and went the other way, like someone shared the secret. Poor John Kiser laughed and shook his head. What could he do? “It was him just riding his passion for the game,” Billikens coach Travis Ford said about Goodwin. “His leadership, he took it upon himself. He can get in those modes, and you just need to feed him.” Those who know SLU best believe the Billikens could be special next season, when the tag-team of guard Goodwin and forward Hasahn French become seniors. But Goodwin and French are playing like seniors now, and Ford has added some pieces who can shoot from deep, something this bunch struggled to do last season. If the Billikens mix these components with the trademark tough defense and figure out how to not fall asleep in second halves, this team, off to a 2-0 start, could be going places. The score was locked at 2323 with a little more than nine minutes left in the first half when Goodwin requested to set up in French’s paint. He made a strong post move against a smaller defender and scored. Why not do it again? Crusaders crashed in on Goodwin’s next attempt down there. No worries. Goodwin corralled his own miss and went right back up to put it in. The Billikens were up by four. Over time, freshman guard Yuri Collins will learn that when Goodwin has scored back-toback baskets, you find a way to get him the ball. But Collins, while promising, is still green, so he steamrolled to the basket on the next Billikens’ possession and tossed a rushed shot toward the rim. Goodwin, because he was everywhere, grabbed it and put it up and in despite being fouled in the process. He made the free throw that followed. SLU led by seven. It became 32-23 SLU when Goodwin kept a fast break alive with a beautiful behindthe-back dribble and perfectly placed runner that rolled around and around and around the rim before falling in. Down on the other end, a cratering Crusaders possession ended when poor John Kiser’s great idea became a Goodwin steal. Just like that, SLU led 32-23 with 7:16 left in the first. Goodwin had scored nine points in less than two minutes. He

ST. LOUIS U. PHOTO

St. Louis U. guard Demarius Jacobs tries to navigate around Valparaiso’s John Kiser on Saturday at Chaifetz Arena. wasn’t done, and that was a good thing, because the Crusaders weren’t either. “We are not playing very smart!” Ford screamed at his players during a second-half collapse. Valparaiso chiseled the Billikens’ 11-point lead at intermission into the danger zone more than once. Javon FreemanLiberty (19 points) and Daniel Sackey (22) were doing damage. SLU’s fouls were piling up. Goodwin, who committed five turnovers, had made some careless decisions. Ford has been challenging Goodwin to lead when it’s not easy. The former Althoff star told his teammates during a second-half huddle that they needed this kind of test. He answered his coach’s challenge. He helped his teammates ace the test. Moments after being called for a charge on a hard drive, Goodwin shrugged off any sense of hesitation and attacked again, dropping in a layup that stopped a 7-2 Valparaiso run and inched the Billikens ahead 68-65 with 6:24 to go. Playing with four fouls, Goodwin clamped down on Valparaiso forward Donovan Clay to help force a key turnover minutes later. And it was Goodwin who turned a broken play that could have dissolved on French’s near travel into a baseline floater with two seconds on the shot clock that sent SLU ahead 7468 with 2:45 to go. Goodwin had 13 points on six-of-eight shooting, three rebounds, three assists a block and a steal by the time he committed his first foul in his 15th minute on the court. He finished with 22 points on 10-of-19 shooting, nine rebounds, six assists, a block and three steals in 38 minutes.. And that’s just the stuff that showed up in the box score. Goodwin chased an errant Valparaiso pass to the last possible second, only pulling up before he ran into his own bench. He was the first to help pull teammates from the floor. His basketball IQ made it possible for Ford to call a play with a nod, leading Goodwin to clear the lane of teammates before he punched the gas, hit the clutch for a one-second pause, then revved again, leaving poor John Kiser in the dust on the way toward another bucket. You could only shake your head and laugh. Ben Frederickson @Ben_Fred on Twitter bfrederickson@post-dispatch.com


COLLEGE BASKETBALL

11.10.2019 • Sunday • M 3

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D3

TOP 25

No. 12 Seton Hall loses Powell in win ASSOCIATED PRESS

SOUTH ORANGE, N.J. — Seton Hall welcomed back its coach, but lost Myles Powell for the foreseeable future after he sprained his ankle. Romaro Gill had 10 points and 10 assists while Sandro Mamukelashvili scored 17 points as the 12th-ranked Pirates withstood the injury to Powell and beat Stony Brook 74-57 in a game that marked the return of coach Kevin Willard. Powell, the Big East preseason player of the year and an Associated Press preseason All-America selection, sprained his left ankle five minutes into the game and didn’t return. Afterward, Willard said Powell was undergoing Xrays on a “serious” ankle sprained that “might be a prolonged absence.” “I thought we did OK at first, and then when the news trickle down the bench that he wasn’t coming back I just think everyone kind of understood if as tough as he is if he’s not coming back, he had to be hurt and I think that kind of shook us a little bit,” Willard said. “And in the second half I think everyone kind of understood what they needed to do and did what they needed to do.” No. 7 MARYLAND 73, RHODE ISLAND 55: Sophomore forward

How the top 25 fared 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25.

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Seton Hall guard Myles Powell (13) drives to the basket past Stony Brook guard Andrew Garcia during the first half Saturday in South Orange, N.J. Powell, an Associated Press preseason All-America selection, left with a “serious” sprained ankle. The Pirates visit SLU next Sunday. Jalen Smith scored 19 points and senior Anthony Cowan Jr. scored 14 to lead the host Terrapins (20) over the Rams (1-1) in College Park.

No. 8 GONZAGA 110, ARKANSAS-PINE BLUFF 60: Forward Filip Petrusev scored a careerhigh 25 points on 9-for-10 shooting as the host Bulldogs (2-0) de-

Michigan State (0-1) idle. Next: vs. Binghamton, Sunday. Kentucky (2-0) idle. Next: vs. Evansville, Tuesday. Kansas (1-1) idle. Next: vs. Monmouth, Friday. Duke (2-0) idle. Next: vs. Central Arkansas, Tuesday. Louisville (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Youngstown State, Sunday. Florida (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Florida State, Sunday. Maryland (2-0) beat Rhode Island 73-55 . Next: vs. Oakland, Saturday. Gonzaga (2-0) beat Arkansas-Pine Bluff 110-60. Next: vs. North Dakota, Tuesday. North Carolina (2-0) idle. Next: vs. Gardner-Webb, Friday. Villanova (1-0) idle. Next: at No. 18 Ohio State, Wednesday. Virginia (1-0) idle. Next: vs. James Madison, Wednesday. Seton Hall (2-0) beat Stony Brook 74-57. Next: vs. No. 1 Michigan State, Thursday. Texas Tech (2-0) beat Bethune-Cookman 79-44. Next: vs. Houston Baptist, Wednesday. Memphis (2-0) idle. Next: vs. No. 15 Oregon, Tuesday. Oregon (1-0) vs. Boise State, late. Next: vs. No. 14 Memphis, Tuesday. Baylor (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Texas State, Friday. Utah State (2-0) idle. Next: vs. Denver, Tuesday. Ohio State (1-0) idle. Next: vs. UMass Lowell, Sunday. Xavier (2-0) idle. Next: vs. Missouri, Tuesday. Saint Mary’s (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Winthrop, Monday. Arizona ( 1-0) idle. Next: vs. Illinois, Sunday. LSU (1-0) idle. Next: at No. 25 VCU, Wednesday. Purdue (1-1) lost to Texas 66-70. Next: at Marquette, Wednesday. Auburn (2-0) idle. Next: at South Alabama, Tuesday. VCU (2-0) idle. Next: vs. No. 22 LSU, Wednesday.

feated the Golden Lions (0-2) in Spokane. TEXAS 70, No. 23 PURDUE 66: Matt Coleman III scored 22 points and Gerald Liddell added a career high 14 to help the Longhorns (20) upset the host Boilermakers (11) in West Lafayette, Ind. US women lose to Oregon: Topranked Oregon stunned the U.S. women’s national team 93-86 on Saturday in Eugene, Oregon, to

hand the Americans’ their second loss to a college team in program history. The Americans haven’t lost a major international game since 2006. Sabrina Ionescu scored 25 of her 30 points in the second half to lead the Ducks. Her layup to end the third quarter gave Oregon a 6867 lead and started a 15-2 run that Satou Sabally capped with a layup with 6:26 left.

Frederickson From D1

BILL BARRETT, ST. LOUIS U.

St. Louis U. forward Hasahn French throws down a dunk over a Valparaiso defender. French was plagued by foul trouble and eventually fouled out.

SLU From D1

But Jordan Goodwin weathered his four fouls to score 22 points and grab nine rebounds and Demarius Jacobs scored a careerhigh 20 points as SLU reached 80 points for the second consecutive game. That’s a rare feat for this program. “I loved what Jordan said with three and a half minutes left. He said ‘This is the best thing that could happen to us,’” coach Travis Ford said. “It was a great way to look at it. It was so good to see us respond and finish a game when we were trying to piece it together.” SLU’s fouls led to Valparaiso getting to the free-throw line with regularity. The Crusaders shot 35, but the freebies failed them down the stretch as they missed their last seven, helping the Billikens extend the lead after it dwindled to 66-65 with seven minutes left. SLU outrebounded Valpo 40-32 but needed a late surge to do so. The Crusaders led on the boards by two until the Billikens awoke in the final five minutes with Goodwin leading the team for the second game. The junior guard did a little of everything as he finished with six assists and three steals and could have had more steals attributed to him. He also brought a load of leadership, Ford said. “I felt like we had a bad practice Thursday, and we got a little comfortable,” Goodwin said. “I got a little comfortable. We won by 20 against Florida Gulf Coast, and I think we were still riding high on

SLU 81, Valparaiso 70 FG FT Reb VALPARAISO Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS McMillan 14 1-3 0-1 2-3 1 5 2 Freeman-Liberty 27 7-16 4-6 1-4 2 4 19 Robinson 27 1-4 4-8 2-5 1 4 7 Sackey 33 7-9 5-9 0-1 4 3 22 Fazekas 10 1-2 0-0 0-1 3 1 3 Kiser 33 2-4 4-5 3-8 2 2 9 Gordon 19 1-6 2-4 0-4 1 4 4 Clay 18 1-3 0-0 0-3 0 1 3 Freese-Vilien 7 0-0 0-0 1-1 1 0 0 Krikke 6 0-0 1-2 0-1 0 1 1 Lorange 2 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Totals 200 21-47 20-35 9-31 15 25 70 Percentages: FG.447, FT.571. 3-point goals: 8-17, .471 (Sackey 3-3, Clay 1-1, Fazekas 1-2, Kiser 1-2, Robinson 1-2, Freeman-Liberty 1-4, McMillan 0-1, Gordon 0-2). Team rebounds: 2. Team Turnovers: 19 (15 PTS). Blocked shots: 4 (Gordon 2, Clay, FreeseVilien). Turnovers: 19 (Kiser 4, Sackey 4, Krikke 3, Gordon 2, Robinson 2, Clay, Freeman-Liberty, Lorange, McMillan). Steals: 6 (Clay 2, Freeman-Liberty, McMillan, Robinson, Sackey). Technical fouls: None. FG FT Reb ST. LOUIS U. Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Bell 7 1-1 0-0 2-2 0 2 2 French 17 3-10 1-3 2-7 1 5 7 Goodwin 38 10-18 1-3 4-8 6 4 22 Jacobs 34 5-8 8-11 1-3 1 2 20 Thatch 17 1-2 2-2 0-2 0 4 4 Collins 30 4-9 1-4 1-6 5 1 9 Hankton 22 3-5 2-3 1-2 2 5 8 Jimerson 19 2-5 0-0 0-0 0 1 5 Weaver 14 2-3 0-0 0-3 0 0 4 Perkins 2 0-2 0-0 0-0 0 2 0 Hargrove 1 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Totals 200 31-63 15-26 11-33 15 26 81 Percentages: FG.492, FT.577. 3-point goals: 4-13, .308 (Jacobs 2-3, Goodwin 1-2, Jimerson 1-4, Perkins 0-1, Weaver 0-1, Hankton 0-2). Team rebounds: 6. Team Turnovers: 16 (18 PTS). Blocked shots: 3 (Goodwin, Hankton, Jacobs). Turnovers: 16 (Goodwin 5, Collins 4, Bell 2, Hankton 2, Jimerson 2, Jacobs). Steals: 11 (Goodwin 3, Hankton 3, Collins 2, Jacobs 2, Weaver). Technical fouls: None. Valparaiso 33 37 — 70 St. Louis U. 44 37 — 81

that win. We needed to humble ourselves and get back down to basics.” Freshman Yuri Collins became scoring-minded in the second half, repeatedly driving to his right and lofting soft layups over outstretched hands to account for all of his four field goals. Jacobs got himself going immediately by hitting two 3-pointers in the first minute. By the time he was done, he had more points than in his first 20 college games combined. He also proved valuable at the line, making eight of 11 while the rest of his teammates

combined to make seven of 15. “He and I had a long conversation yesterday and he responded,” Ford said. “I challenged him and he did a little more than I expected. I didn’t think he had been playing up to his capabilities. I put some numbers in front of him and said, ‘This is what I need.’” Jacobs said Ford asked him to score 12 points, attempt at least six free throws and make a couple of 3-pointers. All were achieved and then some. The foul issues developed quickly as Thatch and French played a combined 11 minutes in the first half after picking up two each. The Billikens were able to put together a run without them as Goodwin took over and Jacobs continued to contribute. Goodwin scored 11 during a 17-2 Billikens burst that pushed them to a 38-25 lead. But as Ford was shuffling players in and out of the game due to foul issues in the second half, the Crusaders began to make a move. Ford felt there was more of a problem with the Billikens simply not maintaining their level of play for extended periods of time. “Right now we’re playing in spurts, for whatever reason,” Ford said. “We’re really, really good and really, really bad. You’re not going to play at your highest level all the time, but we can’t slip as far as we’re slipping.” Valpo was able to hang around despite losing Ryan Fazekas at halftime to a hand injury. Stu Durando @studurando on Twitter sdurando@post-dispatch.com

was tied into a game that should have been — but wasn’t — over by intermission. Poor John Kiser was on the wrong end of it more than anyone. This play won’t show up in the highlights, but it said everything about the all-around impact St. Louis University’s star junior guard can have on a game when he finds one of his zones. It happened on a loose ball beneath the Crusaders’ basket. Poor John Kiser grabbed it, but he was in the air and headed out of bounds. A light bulb went off above his head. He would just bounce the ball of Goodwin’s shin. This almost always works. But Goodwin just grabbed the ball and went the other way, like someone shared the secret. Poor John Kiser laughed and shook his head. What could he do? “It was him just riding his passion for the game,” Billikens coach Travis Ford said about Goodwin. “His leadership, he took it upon himself. He can get in those modes, and you just need to feed him.” Those who know SLU best believe the Billikens could be special next season, when the tag-team of guard Goodwin and forward Hasahn French become seniors. But Goodwin and French are playing like seniors now, and Ford has added some pieces who can shoot from deep, something this bunch struggled to do last season. If the Billikens mix these components with the trademark tough defense and figure out how to not fall asleep in second halves, this team, off to a 2-0 start, could be going places. The score was locked at 2323 with a little more than nine minutes left in the first half when Goodwin requested to set up in French’s paint. He made a strong post move against a smaller defender and scored. Why not do it again? Crusaders crashed in on Goodwin’s next attempt down there. No worries. Goodwin corralled his own miss and went right back up to put it in. The Billikens were up by four. Over time, freshman guard Yuri Collins will learn that when Goodwin has scored back-toback baskets, you find a way to get him the ball. But Collins, while promising, is still green, so he steamrolled to the basket on the next Billikens’ possession and tossed a rushed shot toward the rim. Goodwin, because he was everywhere, grabbed it and put it up and in despite being fouled in the process. He made the free throw that followed. SLU led by seven. It became 32-23 SLU when Goodwin kept a fast break alive with a beautiful behindthe-back dribble and perfectly placed runner that rolled around and around and around the rim before falling in. Down on the other end, a cratering Crusaders possession ended when poor John Kiser’s great idea became a Goodwin steal. Just like that, SLU led 32-23 with 7:16 left in the first. Goodwin had scored nine points in less than two minutes. He

ST. LOUIS U. PHOTO

St. Louis U. guard Demarius Jacobs tries to navigate around Valparaiso’s John Kiser on Saturday at Chaifetz Arena. wasn’t done, and that was a good thing, because the Crusaders weren’t either. “We are not playing very smart!” Ford screamed at his players during a second-half collapse. Valparaiso chiseled the Billikens’ 11-point lead at intermission into the danger zone more than once. Javon FreemanLiberty (19 points) and Daniel Sackey (22) were doing damage. SLU’s fouls were piling up. Goodwin, who committed five turnovers, had made some careless decisions. Ford has been challenging Goodwin to lead when it’s not easy. The former Althoff star told his teammates during a second-half huddle that they needed this kind of test. He answered his coach’s challenge. He helped his teammates ace the test. Moments after being called for a charge on a hard drive, Goodwin shrugged off any sense of hesitation and attacked again, dropping in a layup that stopped a 7-2 Valparaiso run and inched the Billikens ahead 68-65 with 6:24 to go. Playing with four fouls, Goodwin clamped down on Valparaiso forward Donovan Clay to help force a key turnover minutes later. And it was Goodwin who turned a broken play that could have dissolved on French’s near travel into a baseline floater with two seconds on the shot clock that sent SLU ahead 7468 with 2:45 to go. Goodwin had 13 points on six-of-eight shooting, three rebounds, three assists a block and a steal by the time he committed his first foul in his 15th minute on the court. He finished with 22 points on 10-of-19 shooting, nine rebounds, six assists, a block and three steals in 38 minutes.. And that’s just the stuff that showed up in the box score. Goodwin chased an errant Valparaiso pass to the last possible second, only pulling up before he ran into his own bench. He was the first to help pull teammates from the floor. His basketball IQ made it possible for Ford to call a play with a nod, leading Goodwin to clear the lane of teammates before he punched the gas, hit the clutch for a one-second pause, then revved again, leaving poor John Kiser in the dust on the way toward another bucket. You could only shake your head and laugh. Ben Frederickson @Ben_Fred on Twitter bfrederickson@post-dispatch.com


COLLEGE BASKETBALL

11.10.2019 • Sunday • M 4

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D3

TOP 25

No. 12 Seton Hall loses Powell in win ASSOCIATED PRESS

SOUTH ORANGE, N.J. — Seton Hall welcomed back its coach, but lost Myles Powell for the foreseeable future after he sprained his ankle. Romaro Gill had 10 points and 10 assists while Sandro Mamukelashvili scored 17 points as the 12th-ranked Pirates withstood the injury to Powell and beat Stony Brook 74-57 in a game that marked the return of coach Kevin Willard. Powell, the Big East preseason player of the year and an Associated Press preseason All-America selection, sprained his left ankle five minutes into the game and didn’t return. Afterward, Willard said Powell was undergoing Xrays on a “serious” ankle sprained that “might be a prolonged absence.” “I thought we did OK at first, and then when the news trickle down the bench that he wasn’t coming back I just think everyone kind of understood if as tough as he is if he’s not coming back, he had to be hurt and I think that kind of shook us a little bit,” Willard said. “And in the second half I think everyone kind of understood what they needed to do and did what they needed to do.” No. 7 MARYLAND 73, RHODE ISLAND 55: Sophomore forward

How the top 25 fared 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25.

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Seton Hall guard Myles Powell (13) drives to the basket past Stony Brook guard Andrew Garcia during the first half Saturday in South Orange, N.J. Powell, an Associated Press preseason All-America selection, left with a “serious” sprained ankle. The Pirates visit SLU next Sunday. Jalen Smith scored 19 points and senior Anthony Cowan Jr. scored 14 to lead the host Terrapins (20) over the Rams (1-1) in College Park.

No. 8 GONZAGA 110, ARKANSAS-PINE BLUFF 60: Forward Filip Petrusev scored a careerhigh 25 points on 9-for-10 shooting as the host Bulldogs (2-0) de-

Michigan State (0-1) idle. Next: vs. Binghamton, Sunday. Kentucky (2-0) idle. Next: vs. Evansville, Tuesday. Kansas (1-1) idle. Next: vs. Monmouth, Friday. Duke (2-0) idle. Next: vs. Central Arkansas, Tuesday. Louisville (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Youngstown State, Sunday. Florida (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Florida State, Sunday. Maryland (2-0) beat Rhode Island 73-55 . Next: vs. Oakland, Saturday. Gonzaga (2-0) beat Arkansas-Pine Bluff 110-60. Next: vs. North Dakota, Tuesday. North Carolina (2-0) idle. Next: vs. Gardner-Webb, Friday. Villanova (1-0) idle. Next: at No. 18 Ohio State, Wednesday. Virginia (1-0) idle. Next: vs. James Madison, Wednesday. Seton Hall (2-0) beat Stony Brook 74-57. Next: vs. No. 1 Michigan State, Thursday. Texas Tech (2-0) beat Bethune-Cookman 79-44. Next: vs. Houston Baptist, Wednesday. Memphis (2-0) idle. Next: vs. No. 15 Oregon, Tuesday. Oregon (2-0) beat Boise State 106-75. Next: vs. No. 14 Memphis, Tuesday. Baylor (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Texas State, Friday. Utah State (2-0) idle. Next: vs. Denver, Tuesday. Ohio State (1-0) idle. Next: vs. UMass Lowell, Sunday. Xavier (2-0) idle. Next: vs. Missouri, Tuesday. Saint Mary’s (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Winthrop, Monday. Arizona ( 1-0) idle. Next: vs. Illinois, Sunday. LSU (1-0) idle. Next: at No. 25 VCU, Wednesday. Purdue (1-1) lost to Texas 66-70. Next: at Marquette, Wednesday. Auburn (2-0) idle. Next: at South Alabama, Tuesday. VCU (2-0) idle. Next: vs. No. 22 LSU, Wednesday.

feated the Golden Lions (0-2) in Spokane. TEXAS 70, No. 23 PURDUE 66: Matt Coleman III scored 22 points and Gerald Liddell added a career high 14 to help the Longhorns (20) upset the host Boilermakers (11) in West Lafayette, Ind. US women lose to Oregon: Topranked Oregon stunned the U.S. women’s national team 93-86 on Saturday in Eugene, Oregon, to

hand the Americans’ their second loss to a college team in program history. The Americans haven’t lost a major international game since 2006. Sabrina Ionescu scored 25 of her 30 points in the second half to lead the Ducks. Her layup to end the third quarter gave Oregon a 6867 lead and started a 15-2 run that Satou Sabally capped with a layup with 6:26 left.

Frederickson From D1

BILL BARRETT, ST. LOUIS U.

St. Louis U. forward Hasahn French throws down a dunk over a Valparaiso defender. French was plagued by foul trouble and eventually fouled out.

SLU From D1

But Jordan Goodwin weathered his four fouls to score 22 points and grab nine rebounds and Demarius Jacobs scored a careerhigh 20 points as SLU reached 80 points for the second consecutive game. That’s a rare feat for this program. “I loved what Jordan said with three and a half minutes left. He said ‘This is the best thing that could happen to us,’” coach Travis Ford said. “It was a great way to look at it. It was so good to see us respond and finish a game when we were trying to piece it together.” SLU’s fouls led to Valparaiso getting to the free-throw line with regularity. The Crusaders shot 35, but the freebies failed them down the stretch as they missed their last seven, helping the Billikens extend the lead after it dwindled to 66-65 with seven minutes left. SLU outrebounded Valpo 40-32 but needed a late surge to do so. The Crusaders led on the boards by two until the Billikens awoke in the final five minutes with Goodwin leading the team for the second game. The junior guard did a little of everything as he finished with six assists and three steals and could have had more steals attributed to him. He also brought a load of leadership, Ford said. “I felt like we had a bad practice Thursday, and we got a little comfortable,” Goodwin said. “I got a little comfortable. We won by 20 against Florida Gulf Coast, and I think we were still riding high on

SLU 81, Valparaiso 70 FG FT Reb VALPARAISO Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS McMillan 14 1-3 0-1 2-3 1 5 2 Freeman-Liberty 27 7-16 4-6 1-4 2 4 19 Robinson 27 1-4 4-8 2-5 1 4 7 Sackey 33 7-9 5-9 0-1 4 3 22 Fazekas 10 1-2 0-0 0-1 3 1 3 Kiser 33 2-4 4-5 3-8 2 2 9 Gordon 19 1-6 2-4 0-4 1 4 4 Clay 18 1-3 0-0 0-3 0 1 3 Freese-Vilien 7 0-0 0-0 1-1 1 0 0 Krikke 6 0-0 1-2 0-1 0 1 1 Lorange 2 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Totals 200 21-47 20-35 9-31 15 25 70 Percentages: FG.447, FT.571. 3-point goals: 8-17, .471 (Sackey 3-3, Clay 1-1, Fazekas 1-2, Kiser 1-2, Robinson 1-2, Freeman-Liberty 1-4, McMillan 0-1, Gordon 0-2). Team rebounds: 2. Team Turnovers: 19 (15 PTS). Blocked shots: 4 (Gordon 2, Clay, FreeseVilien). Turnovers: 19 (Kiser 4, Sackey 4, Krikke 3, Gordon 2, Robinson 2, Clay, Freeman-Liberty, Lorange, McMillan). Steals: 6 (Clay 2, Freeman-Liberty, McMillan, Robinson, Sackey). Technical fouls: None. FG FT Reb ST. LOUIS U. Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Bell 7 1-1 0-0 2-2 0 2 2 French 17 3-10 1-3 2-7 1 5 7 Goodwin 38 10-18 1-3 4-8 6 4 22 Jacobs 34 5-8 8-11 1-3 1 2 20 Thatch 17 1-2 2-2 0-2 0 4 4 Collins 30 4-9 1-4 1-6 5 1 9 Hankton 22 3-5 2-3 1-2 2 5 8 Jimerson 19 2-5 0-0 0-0 0 1 5 Weaver 14 2-3 0-0 0-3 0 0 4 Perkins 2 0-2 0-0 0-0 0 2 0 Hargrove 1 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Totals 200 31-63 15-26 11-33 15 26 81 Percentages: FG.492, FT.577. 3-point goals: 4-13, .308 (Jacobs 2-3, Goodwin 1-2, Jimerson 1-4, Perkins 0-1, Weaver 0-1, Hankton 0-2). Team rebounds: 6. Team Turnovers: 16 (18 PTS). Blocked shots: 3 (Goodwin, Hankton, Jacobs). Turnovers: 16 (Goodwin 5, Collins 4, Bell 2, Hankton 2, Jimerson 2, Jacobs). Steals: 11 (Goodwin 3, Hankton 3, Collins 2, Jacobs 2, Weaver). Technical fouls: None. Valparaiso 33 37 — 70 St. Louis U. 44 37 — 81

that win. We needed to humble ourselves and get back down to basics.” Freshman Yuri Collins became scoring-minded in the second half, repeatedly driving to his right and lofting soft layups over outstretched hands to account for all of his four field goals. Jacobs got himself going immediately by hitting two 3-pointers in the first minute. By the time he was done, he had more points than in his first 20 college games combined. He also proved valuable at the line, making eight of 11 while the rest of his teammates

combined to make seven of 15. “He and I had a long conversation yesterday and he responded,” Ford said. “I challenged him and he did a little more than I expected. I didn’t think he had been playing up to his capabilities. I put some numbers in front of him and said, ‘This is what I need.’” Jacobs said Ford asked him to score 12 points, attempt at least six free throws and make a couple of 3-pointers. All were achieved and then some. The foul issues developed quickly as Thatch and French played a combined 11 minutes in the first half after picking up two each. The Billikens were able to put together a run without them as Goodwin took over and Jacobs continued to contribute. Goodwin scored 11 during a 17-2 Billikens burst that pushed them to a 38-25 lead. But as Ford was shuffling players in and out of the game due to foul issues in the second half, the Crusaders began to make a move. Ford felt there was more of a problem with the Billikens simply not maintaining their level of play for extended periods of time. “Right now we’re playing in spurts, for whatever reason,” Ford said. “We’re really, really good and really, really bad. You’re not going to play at your highest level all the time, but we can’t slip as far as we’re slipping.” Valpo was able to hang around despite losing Ryan Fazekas at halftime to a hand injury. Stu Durando @studurando on Twitter sdurando@post-dispatch.com

was tied into a game that should have been — but wasn’t — over by intermission. Poor John Kiser was on the wrong end of it more than anyone. This play won’t show up in the highlights, but it said everything about the all-around impact St. Louis University’s star junior guard can have on a game when he finds one of his zones. It happened on a loose ball beneath the Crusaders’ basket. Poor John Kiser grabbed it, but he was in the air and headed out of bounds. A light bulb went off above his head. He would just bounce the ball of Goodwin’s shin. This almost always works. But Goodwin just grabbed the ball and went the other way, like someone shared the secret. Poor John Kiser laughed and shook his head. What could he do? “It was him just riding his passion for the game,” Billikens coach Travis Ford said about Goodwin. “His leadership, he took it upon himself. He can get in those modes, and you just need to feed him.” Those who know SLU best believe the Billikens could be special next season, when the tag-team of guard Goodwin and forward Hasahn French become seniors. But Goodwin and French are playing like seniors now, and Ford has added some pieces who can shoot from deep, something this bunch struggled to do last season. If the Billikens mix these components with the trademark tough defense and figure out how to not fall asleep in second halves, this team, off to a 2-0 start, could be going places. The score was locked at 2323 with a little more than nine minutes left in the first half when Goodwin requested to set up in French’s paint. He made a strong post move against a smaller defender and scored. Why not do it again? Crusaders crashed in on Goodwin’s next attempt down there. No worries. Goodwin corralled his own miss and went right back up to put it in. The Billikens were up by four. Over time, freshman guard Yuri Collins will learn that when Goodwin has scored back-toback baskets, you find a way to get him the ball. But Collins, while promising, is still green, so he steamrolled to the basket on the next Billikens’ possession and tossed a rushed shot toward the rim. Goodwin, because he was everywhere, grabbed it and put it up and in despite being fouled in the process. He made the free throw that followed. SLU led by seven. It became 32-23 SLU when Goodwin kept a fast break alive with a beautiful behindthe-back dribble and perfectly placed runner that rolled around and around and around the rim before falling in. Down on the other end, a cratering Crusaders possession ended when poor John Kiser’s great idea became a Goodwin steal. Just like that, SLU led 32-23 with 7:16 left in the first. Goodwin had scored nine points in less than two minutes. He

ST. LOUIS U. PHOTO

St. Louis U. guard Demarius Jacobs tries to navigate around Valparaiso’s John Kiser on Saturday at Chaifetz Arena. wasn’t done, and that was a good thing, because the Crusaders weren’t either. “We are not playing very smart!” Ford screamed at his players during a second-half collapse. Valparaiso chiseled the Billikens’ 11-point lead at intermission into the danger zone more than once. Javon FreemanLiberty (19 points) and Daniel Sackey (22) were doing damage. SLU’s fouls were piling up. Goodwin, who committed five turnovers, had made some careless decisions. Ford has been challenging Goodwin to lead when it’s not easy. The former Althoff star told his teammates during a second-half huddle that they needed this kind of test. He answered his coach’s challenge. He helped his teammates ace the test. Moments after being called for a charge on a hard drive, Goodwin shrugged off any sense of hesitation and attacked again, dropping in a layup that stopped a 7-2 Valparaiso run and inched the Billikens ahead 68-65 with 6:24 to go. Playing with four fouls, Goodwin clamped down on Valparaiso forward Donovan Clay to help force a key turnover minutes later. And it was Goodwin who turned a broken play that could have dissolved on French’s near travel into a baseline floater with two seconds on the shot clock that sent SLU ahead 7468 with 2:45 to go. Goodwin had 13 points on six-of-eight shooting, three rebounds, three assists a block and a steal by the time he committed his first foul in his 15th minute on the court. He finished with 22 points on 10-of-19 shooting, nine rebounds, six assists, a block and three steals in 38 minutes.. And that’s just the stuff that showed up in the box score. Goodwin chased an errant Valparaiso pass to the last possible second, only pulling up before he ran into his own bench. He was the first to help pull teammates from the floor. His basketball IQ made it possible for Ford to call a play with a nod, leading Goodwin to clear the lane of teammates before he punched the gas, hit the clutch for a one-second pause, then revved again, leaving poor John Kiser in the dust on the way toward another bucket. You could only shake your head and laugh. Ben Frederickson @Ben_Fred on Twitter bfrederickson@post-dispatch.com


COLLEGES

D4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 11.10.2019

A-10 WOMEN’S SOCCER SEMIFINAL

Reimer’s goal is just enough for SLU BY STU DURANDO

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

After scoring a goal in the first minute against Duquesne, the St. Louis University women’s soccer team piled on to tally five times in the Atlantic 10 quarterfinals. It took the Billikens much longer to get on the scoreboard in Friday’s semifinal against La Salle. And there weren’t many chances to add to the lead in a 1-0 victory at Hermann Stadium. Courtney Reimer scored in the 27th minute on a header and SLU made it stand up to extend its unbeaten streak to a program-record 15 games. The top-seeded Billikens will face George Washington in the championship game Sunday at

1 p.m., with the winner earning an automatic berth in the NCAA Tournament. “We had a feeling they’d come out and press us like they did and make the game disruptive,” SLU coach Katie Shields said. “They’ve had a lot of success like that. We prepared the team in the scout that this was not going to be an easy game, and it wasn’t.” The Billikens (16-3-2) outshot La Salle (11-8-1) 17-6 but put only four shots on goal. They entered the game averaging two goals per game and nearly three goals in the previous 11 games. But with A-10 defensive player of the year Alli Klug and firstteam goalkeeper Mary Niehaus,

SLU was prepared to handle the final 62 minutes. Six players and Niehaus played the full 90 minutes in a game that started with a temperature of 33 degrees. “We’re seniors, so keep us out there as long as we can and we’ll keep going,” Reimer said. SLU is trying to win the A-10 tournament for the second consecutive year. The opportunity to play all three tourney games at home is a clear advantage for a team that is 36-1-5 at home in the last 42 games, with the only loss coming to St. Joseph’s in the A-10 tourney in 2017. “The atmosphere we get at home with the community, little girls, the clubs, relatives and par-

ents is a little different and more special here,” Klug said. Niehaus continued her stellar play as SLU recorded its 13th shutout of the season for another school record. She saved the only two shots she faced and La Salle generated only one corner kick. SLU was struggling to produce scoring opportunities when sophomore forward Hannah Friedrich lofted a pass into the box. Reimer read the play perfectly and headed the ball into the left side of the goal as goalkeeper Claudia Jenkins dove in the other direction. “I know Hannah likes to cut in, so when I saw her I just took a chance, got in the box and she

played an awesome ball that I got my head on,” Reimer said. After that, the flow of play didn’t favor the Billikens. “I did not love the first half,” Shields said. “The goal was brilliant, but it was so choppy that we never found a lot of rhythm. In the second half we did for a few spells. But it’s the playoffs and margins are tight. Not our best performance, but credit to La Salle for making it hard.” The assist for Friedrich was her team-leading 25th point of the season and the 55th of her career, moving her into a tie for eighth on SLU’s all-time list. Stu Durando @studurando on Twitter sdurando@post-dispatch.com

Washington U.’s Kindbom nears coaching finale

AREA COLLEGE ATHLETES

PHOTO COURTESY MISSOURI STATE UNIVERSITY

Missouri State junior goalkeeper Michael Creek, from Lindbergh High, is a second-year starter for the Bears, who enter Saturday’s regular-season finale at Drake with a 15-0 record. Creek is among the nation’s leaders with a 0.60 goals-against average and a Missouri Valley Conference-leading 0.769 save percentage.

Bears men’s soccer team relishing banner season JAMES BYARD, WUSTL PHOTOS BY JOE LYONS

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

With a chance to close out a perfect regular season, Missouri State men’s soccer team plays Saturday afternoon at Drake. The Bears, ranked 10th nationally, are 15-0 overall and 9-0 atop the Missouri Valley Conference. Drake is 7-7-1, 4-4-1. Missouri State, the top seed in the postseason tournament Nov. 13-17 in Chicago, is the only Division I squad without a loss this season. The Bears have outscored opponents 36-9 and trailed in just four matches this season. Junior goalkeeper Michael Creek (Lindbergh) has made all 15 starts and is ranked seventh nationally with a goals-against average of 0.60. Other St. Louis-area players on the roster include sophomore keeper Gage Steiner (Alton), sophomore defender Evan DeGreeff (De Smet) and senior midfielder Aaron Jones (Alton), who’s played in all 15 games and has three goals and an assist. Senior Matthew Bentley leads the team in scoring with 12 goals and three assists. Other key attackers include Josh Dolling (5 goals, 4 assists), Stuart Wilkin (5 goals, 4 assists) and midfielder Jack Denton (0 goals, 8 assists). Eight Bears have earned weekly MVC honors this season. The MVC women’s tournament is being played this weekend in Springfield, Missouri. Secondseeded Illinois State (14-5) knocked off No. 3 Missouri State (10-5-2) in overtime, winning 4-3. Top-seeded Loyola (13-4-1) beat Drake 1-0 in the other semifinal. The title game is scheduled for Sunday at 1 p.m. Bears sophomore Anna Durnin (Fort Zumwalt North) joined senior Ashley Coonfield and junior goalie Kaitlin Maxwell on the all-conference squad. Other area players on the Missouri State roster include senior Brittney Robinson (Eureka), junior Jacqueline Baetz (Webster Groves), sophomores Cammie Robinson (Eureka) and Josie Meeks (Kirkwood) and freshman Emma Hensley (Edwardsville). In other soccer tournaments: • The Great Lakes Valley Conference begins tourney action this weekend, with McKendree securing both No. 1 seeds. In men’s action Sunday, McKendree (13-2-2) hosts No. 8 Drury (97-2) at 2:30 p.m., No. 2 Bellarmine (13-0-4) hosts Lindenwood (7-64) at 2:30 p.m., No. 3 Maryville (14-2-2) hosts No. 6 IllinoisSpringfield (9-7-2) at 1 p.m. and No. 4 Indianapolis (12-4-1) hosts No. 5 Southern Indiana (8-6-3) at 2:30 p.m.

Saturday’s area football schedule Robert Morris (Ill.) at Missouri Baptist (CBC), noon Eastern Kentucky at Southeast Missouri, 1 p.m. Missouri S&T at Lindenwood, 1 p.m. Quincy at McKendree, 1 p.m. Millikin at Washington U., 1 p.m. Missouri St. at SIU Carbondale, 2 p.m. In the women’s bracket Sunday at noon, McKendree (13-3-2) hosts No. 8 Lewis (8-7-3), No. 2 Indianapolis (13-3-1) hosts No. 7 Southern Indiana (10-6-1), No. 3 Rockhurst (13-4) hosts No. 6 Maryville (10-5-1). In a game scheduled for 1 p.m., No. 4 Truman State (10-61) hosts No. 5 Bellarmine (11-4-3). The tournaments will continue Nov.15-17 in Jeffersonville,Indiana. •All-conference forward MacKenzie Litzsinger (Summit) scored in the first half and Megan Keeven (St. Charles West) added a second-half goal while goalkeeper J.J. Schoch (Eureka) stopped nine shots as fourth-seeded SIU Edwardsville upended top-seeded and host SEMO 2-1 in the Ohio Valley Conference semifinals Friday night. SEMO finished 11-5-1. The Cougars (10-5-4) will meet sixth-seeded Belmont (8-8-4) for the championship 2 p.m.Sunday in Cape Girardeau,Missouri.Belmont upended second-seeded Murray State 2-1 in Friday’s other semifinal. Murray State finished 11-8. • After finishing 7-1 atop the St. Louis Intercollegiate Athletic Conference soccer standings this season, the women’s teams from Webster (14-4-1) and Greenville (11-6-2) will meet for the postseason tournament title 1 p.m. Saturday at Soccer Park in Fenton. In the regular-season finale last weekend, Webster beat visiting Greenville 1-0. • St. Louis Community College’s Maggie Tovar (Marquette) scored first, but visiting Lewis and Clark had the next six goals, coming away with a 6-1 win in the NJCAA Central District championship match Friday in Kirkwood. Rabale Boitumelo had the hat trick for the Trailblazers (19-2), who also got goals from Candice Parziani, Emma Lucas (Roxana) and Ella Kiely (Fort Zumwalt West). SLCC finished 14-5. Lewis and Clark advances to the National Tournament Nov. 18-23 in Melbourne, Florida. In the men’s Central District title game, St. Louis Community College (12-7-1) plays 6 p.m. Saturday at Central Illinois College (10-3-3).

HONOR ROLL Lindenwood quarterback Cade Brister (Fort Zumwalt North) and Missouri S&T senior Tershawn Wharton (University City) were named Great Lakes Valley Conference football players of the week. Brister threw for a school-record 541yardsandthreetouchdownsand also ran for a score in a 34-27 upset of No. 8 Indianapolis in St. Charles. Wharton led the Miners with eight tackles, including six solos, and 2½ sacks in a 62-0 rout of Southwest Baptist for S&T’s first shutout win since 2016. Wharton also returned a fumble 81 yards for a touchdown in the rout. Missouri S&T (6-3, 3-2) plays at Lindenwood (6-3, 5-0) Saturday at 1 p.m. • The St. Louis Intercollegiate Athletic Conference volleyball championship will be held Saturday in Greenville, Ill. Top-seeded Greenville (22-8) hosts No. 4 MacMurray (17-15) at 2 p.m., with the match between No. 2 seed Westminster (17-8) and No. 3 seed Webster (17-11) at 4 p.m. The championship is at 7 p.m. • SIUE junior Jordyn Klein (Lutheran St. Charles) recorded the 1,000th dig of her career in a sweep of Eastern Illinois last week. • Southern Indiana setter Casey Cepicky (Ursuline Academy) was namedGLVCoffensiveplayerofthe weeklafterhelpingherteamtoapair ofvolleyballwins,includinganupset of No. 8 Lewis. She averaged 10.86 assistsand3.86digsinthevictories. •TheWebsterwomenandGreenvillemenwontheSLIACcrosscountry titles in Louisville, Kentucky. A pair of Timberland High grads, Greenville senior Dylan Goodyear and Webster junior Kalleigh Linthicum, finished first in their respective races. Webster’s Nathan Freyling (Fox) was runner-up in the men’s race while Gorloks freshman Kaitlin Higgins (Summit) finished third in the women’s race and was named newcomer of the year. • Washington University had four athletes honored as University Athletic Association athletes of the week: Paige Lawler won her second consecutive UAA individual title, helping the cross country team capture its sixth straight UAA title; Taylor Cohen had a goal and two assists as women’s soccer beat No. 23 Carnegie Mellon and Case Western Reserve; goalkeeper Connor Mathes picked up a pair of wins in men’s soccer; football’s Will Hurley earned UAA honors and was also named the College Conference of Illinois and Wisconsin special teams player of the week after scoring on a blocked punt and picking off a pair of passes. Joe Lyons @joelyonspd on twitter jlyons@post-dispatch.com

Larry Kindbom is in his 31st and final season as the Washington University head football coach. BY STU DURANDO

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The first time Larry Kindbom’s parents saw him on the sideline as a coach, he was a graduate assistant under Woody Hayes at Ohio State in 1977. The Buckeyes and Oklahoma were two of the top teams in the country. Ohio Stadium had a record crowd that day. And the Kindboms had prime seats. “With that atmosphere, I knew my dad was going to love it,” Kindbom recalled. “After the game – and we lost a heartbreaker – my dad comes down as the stadium is clearing out. He looks at me and says, ‘Now are you ready to go out and get a job?’ “I looked at him and said, ‘People do get paid to do this.’ It was almost like saying, ‘You know what? I think I really want to do this.’” Kindbom relishes the memory as a meaningful moment with his parents and the time at which he decided that coaching and not law school would be his path. Now in his 31st season at Washington University, he has decided this will be his last year as a head coach. Kindbom will walk the sideline at a home game for the last time Saturday when the Bears face Millikin at 1 p.m. He has a career record of 219148-1 and is 191-118 with the Bears. But while coach has been his title, he always has been about much more than the sport. “Football has never ruled my life,” he said, “although it’s certainly been a major part of the template.” For Kindbom, coaching has always been a mix of football and relationships. That’s why he cherishes the one painting that hangs in his house. As he helped Hayes clean out his office in 1978, the hall of fame coach told Kindbom he could take anything he wanted. The only thing he asked for was the painting done by former Illinois coach Robert Zuppke. “It’s the most beautiful picture to me because I know a coach painted that and gave it to a competitor because he respected Woody,” Kindbom said. Learning from a legend like Hayes was a nice launching point, but Kindbom went on to create his own legacy in the quiet of Division III football. He has left a mark but likes to think that his players — the lawyers, the CEOs, the 65 doctors — have had an even more indelible impact on his life.

“Football has never ruled my life, although it’s certainly been a major part of the template.” Larry Kindbom “I really do enjoy when they come back and talk about their journey,” Kindbom said. “I’m such a small part of it. If anything, I’m just a guy who sat and applauded as they went through.” Kindbom’s teams won 12 University Athletic Association championships and one in the Southern Athletic Association. He has coached 33 All-Americans and 15 academic All-Americans. Washington University won the coaching staff of the year eight times in the UAA. Just last season Kindbom was coach of the year in the program’s first season in the College Conference of Illinois and Wisconsin. But he said his most cherished award was the 2009 Breaking the Silence award for his work involving childhood depression and suicide. Kindbom ran a marathon and raised money for the Jason Foundation, created to combat youth suicide. He was struck by a conversation with a former player after reading that one in eight kids has thought about or committed suicide. “I asked what he thought about those numbers, and he goes ‘Coach, that’s probably about right,’” Kindbom said. “I said, ‘OK, how about on our team?’ He thought about it and said, ‘That’s probably about right.’ I was floored.” Since that time, Kindbom and his players have worked each year with local schools on a program focusing on teamwork with the message of inclusion to aid the Jason Foundation effort. Kindbom doesn’t know what he will do next. He hasn’t ruled out coaching in some form, maybe as a volunteer at a high school or some other role. Maybe the next move will be a surprise, just like his coaching career. “It’s time and I love coaching so I don’t know what’s going to happen,” he said. “It’s just time. I just feel it.” Stu Durando @studurando on Twitter sdurando@post-dispatch.com


D4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

M 2 • SUnDAy • 11.10.2019

Defense hangs tough for MU BY CHRISTINA LONG

Special to the Post-Dispatch

ATHENS, Ga. — If a bright spot could be found in Missouri’s 27-0 loss to Georgia, it was the Tigers’ defense. Although the offense looked abysmal, the defense did its best to make it a manageable game most of the night Saturday. Georgia fans got to see plenty of their celebrated kicker, Rodrigo Blankenship, thanks to the Missouri defense forcing the Bulldogs to try five field goals. He made all but one, the miss from 43 yards out. Missouri’s ability to make Georgia bring out Blankenship kept the game from getting out of hand, but the offense could provide no relief. Georgia’s side of the final score could’ve been a much bigger number. The Bulldogs reached the red zone three times in the game; twice, the Tigers defense held them to a field goal. The third time went for six. By contrast, the Mizzou of-

fense crossed midfield twice and reached the red zone once, and even that didn’t come until midway through the fourth quarter. The opponent red zone conversion rate was a slight improvement on Mizzou’s last two losses. Vanderbilt reached the red zone twice and found the end zone once, but still pulled out the 21-7 win as Mizzou couldn’t contain an explosive run play and a long touchdown pass by the Commodores. Kentucky, on the other hand, had touchdowns in all three of its trips to the red zone. Saturday after Georgia’s first possession, it looked like it could be a long night for the Tigers. Well, even longer than it turned out to be. Georgia got the ball following a three-and-out on Mizzou’s first possession, then drove 60 yards, including a 32-yard pass from Fromm to star wideout Lawrence Cager and ending with a 25-yard touchdown grab by Pickens.

But after that, the defense settled in. The results of Georgia’s next six drives of the first half alternated between field goals and punts. The Bulldogs’ second drive ended in a punt after an impressive pass breakup by DeMarkus Acy on third and 5. Then Blankenship made a 20-yard field goal to put Georgia up 10-0 early in the second quarter. A Nick Bolton sack for a loss of 9 yards in Georgia’s second possession of the second quarter was just the fifth sack allowed by Georgia all season. Bolton’s name was called often at Sanford Stadium, as he finished with nine tackles, including two behind the line of scrimmage. Another field goal followed, this time from 48 yards. The next series was all Tre Williams for Missouri. He stuffed a second-down rush attempt by Georgia’s Zamir White before pressuring Fromm on third and 6 to force another Bulldog punt.

But Blankenship followed that poor drive with a 47-yard field goal to make it 16-0 at halftime. The second half looked like it would start the same as the first, as Georgia running back D’Andre Swift broke away for a 47-rush right out of the gate. Fromm marched the Bulldogs offense downfield, but safety Tyree Gillespie made an impressive play to break up what would have been a touchdown pass to Eli Wolf. The stop forced Blankenship to trot out yet again and attempt his fifth field goal of the night. He made it from 29 yards, and the Bulldogs pushed their lead to 19-0. Georgia’s second touchdown came after Acy was called for pass interference to put Georgia at the Mizzou 18. Fromm followed with a touchdown pass to George Pickens. The two-point conversion attempt was good, and another nail was drilled into the coffin as Georgia went up 27-0.

MIZZOU NOTEBOOK

Powell gets start at QB when Bryant can’t play BY DAVE MATTER

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ATHENS, Ga. — For the first time since 2013, an injury forced Missouri to start its backup quarterback. After a week of uncertainty, an answer came shortly after kickoff at Georgia’s Sanford Stadium when Taylor Powell took the field to make his first career start for the Tigers on Saturday night. Kelly Bryant, nursing a strained hamstring suffered two weeks ago, went through his normal pregame routine with the other quarterbacks, but it was Powell in the starting lineup for the Tigers against Georgia. The redshirt sophomore made his first start since his senior season at Fayetteville (Ark.) High School in 2016 and became the first Mizzou backup QB to replace an injured starter since Maty Mauk took over for James Franklin for four starts in 2013. As late as Thursday, Missouri coach Barry Odom said Bryant’s status would come down to a game-time decision. The Tigers featured a new-look starting lineup in other places, too. Tyler Badie was in for the first possession instead of regular starter Larry Rountree, while backup tight end Daniel Parker Jr. got the start over Albert Okwuegbunam, though Okwuegbunam came in for the second snap. Slot receiver Johnathon Johnson did not play for the first time this season. He was considered day to day earlier in the week with an illness. Missouri kept things conservative for Powell on his first series with a run up the middle and two short throws to Badie, neither of which moved the chains. On the next series, Powell connected with Okwuegbunam for a 7-yard gain on first down but couldn’t convert a third down pass to the tight end, a pass knocked down by safety J.R. Reed. Rountree ran for 6 yards on first down of the next series, but again the Tigers couldn’t move the chains as Powell misfired for Jalen Knox on third down. The Tigers didn’t earn their initial first down until the first play of the fifth series, an 11-yard completion to slot receiver Barrett Banister, Powell’s former high school teammate.

ALBERT O SIGHTING JOSHUA L. JONES, ATHENS BANNER-HERALD

Georgia wide receiver Lawrence Cager looks to haul in a pass ahead of Missouri’s Christian Holmes.

MU

Georgia 27, Missouri 0

From D1

SEC) also dropped their fourth straight road game and fell to 1-9 against ranked teams under Odom. Georgia became the first team to hold the Tigers scoreless since … Georgia in 2014, a 34-0 wipeout in Columbia, Mo. That year Gary Pinkel’s Tigers recovered to capture the SEC East and win 11 games, all of which is well beyond this team’s grasp. Instead, the Tigers are home next Saturday to host No. 10 Florida, their first game in Columbia since Oct. 12, when they beat Ole Miss for a fifth consecutive win that vaulted Odom’s team to No. 22 in the Associated Press poll. That may seem like a lifetime ago. To salvage a winning record in the regular season, the Tigers have to take two of three from Florida, Tennessee and Arkansas. Coming off the season’s second bye week, Mizzou was shorthanded from the start, playing without starting quarterback Kelly Bryant for the first time all season. Hobbled by a strained hamstring suffered two weeks ago at Kentucky, Bryant was in uniform and went through his normal pregame routine on the field with the other quarterbacks, but it was redshirt sophomore Taylor Powell behind center to start the night, the first injury replacement quarterback to start for the Tigers since 2013. He didn’t get much help from another stagnant running game, and any brief momentum the Tigers captured evaporated quickly. Powell finished the game completing 10 of 22 passes for 84 yards and an interception. Early in the fourth quarter, Odom turned to freshman quarterback Connor Bazelak, his second appearance of the season. Under the NCAA’s redshirt rule, Bazelak can appear in as many as four games without costing him a year of eligibility. With some Georgia defensive starters still in the game, Bazelak delivered Mizzou’s best drive of the day, getting the Tigers all the way to the Georgia 2-yard line, but they couldn’t punch in the touchdown as Bazelak’s fourth-down pass

Missouri Georgia

0 0 0 — 0 9 3 8 — 27 First Quarter UGA: Pickens 25 pass from Fromm (Blankenship kick), 10:43 Second Quarter UGA: FG Blankenship 20, 14:05 UGA: FG Blankenship 48, 6:06 UGA: FG Blankenship 47, :00 Third Quarter UGA: FG Blankenship 29, 6:56 Fourth Quarter UGA: Pickens 18 pass from Fromm (J.Cook pass from Fromm), 14:02 MIZ UGA First downs 11 17 Rushes-yards 24-50 38-166 Passing 148 173 Comp-Att-Int 18-34-1 13-29-0 Return Yards 35 39 Punts-Avg. 9-38.88 5-45.4 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 0-0 Penalties-Yards 5-47 3-15 Time of Possession 24:33 35:27 Rushing: Missouri, Rountree 9-24, Badie 8-19, Downing 4-12, Powell 3-(minus 5). Georgia, Swift 12-83, Herrien 10-42, Z.White 6-24, Robertson 1-16, J.Cook 6-7, Fromm 3-(minus 6). Passing: Missouri, Powell 10-22-1-84, Bazelak 8-12-0-64. Georgia, Fromm 13-29-0-173. Receiving: Missouri, Nance 4-45, Okwuegbunam 4-30, Banister 3-31, Badie 3-17, K.Scott 1-10, Rountree 1-8, Gicinto 1-6, Downing 1-1. Georgia, Cager 6-93, Pickens 5-67, K.Jackson 1-13, Swift 1-0. Missed Field Goals: Georgia, Blankenship 43.

JOHN AMIS, AP PHOTO

Georgia wide receiver Lawrence Cager makes a catch as Missouri safety Tyree Gillespie defends in the first half. missed Dominic Gicinto in the back of the end zone. The Tigers mustered only 198 yards of offense, their fewest since the 2015 season finale loss to Arkansas, when they moved the ball 171 yards in Pinkel’s final game. Missouri’s defense bent often but only broke occasionally as Georgia (8-1, 5-1) settled for four field goals and visited the end zone only once after its opening drive. Powell became the 17th starting quarterback in the seventeam SEC East this season. By no coincidence, Georgia is the only team to start the same QB every week. That would be Jake Fromm, who was more steady than spectacular but safely stood behind his mighty offensive line and made enough plays to keep the Bulldogs in charge all night. On Georgia’s first possession, Fromm continued his thirddown wizardry from last week’s

win over Florida. Against the Tigers, he converted his first two third-down passes, zinging a 25-yard touchdown pass to George Pickens on third and 11 for the game’s first score. Fromm’s third-down magic show led to Georgia’s second touchdown. He scrambled for 15 yards on third and 11, then completed a 16-yard pass to Lawrence Cager on third and 7. Fromm proved he was mortal when his next third-down throw, a crossing route to Pickens, came up short of the sticks. But the Tigers did Fromm’s work for him as defensive tackle Markell Utsey hit the QB late, giving Georgia 15 yards and a new set of downs with the personal foul. Mizzou managed a thirddown stop deep in the red zone, forcing Georgia to settle for a 20-yard field goal and a 10-0 lead to open the second quarter. Powell got something going on Mizzou’s fifth series, driv-

0 7

After an invisible performance at Kentucky two weeks ago, Okwuegbunam became a central part of the passing offense in the first half Saturday night. By Mizzou’s fifth drive, Powell had targeted his tight end six times, three going for completions, including the Tigers’ second first down of the game. Okwuegbunam was targeted just twice in the Kentucky game and finished the game without a catch for the first time since midway through the 2017 season. Offensive coordinator Derek Dooley said last week he’d have to do a better job designing plays for the preseason All-American, but Okwuegbunam needed to do more to get open. He wasn’t nearly open enough on Powell’s sixth target. With the ball just outside the red zone, Georgia kept a defender in front and behind Okwuegbunam, but Powell threw it to him anyway — and watched safety Richard LeCounte easily snatch the ball and nearly return the interception the length of the field. UGA turned the half’s only takeaway into a field goal. Okwuegbunam ended the first half with a team-high three catches for 24 yards.

PENALTIES DOOM LATE DRIVE Just as in the Kentucky game two weeks ago, Missouri’s offense made some costly mistakes deep in its own territory shortly before halftime. Taking over at the 12-yard line with 2:32 left, the Tigers committed two penalties — a false start by Okwuegbunam and an unsportsmanlike conduct on wideout Kam Scott — that kept the offense from extending the drive. Scott shoved a defender to the ground after the whistle and drew the flag. Instead of heading into the locker room down 13-0, Mizzou punted the ball to Georgia with 36 seconds left. On cue, Jake Fromm got UGA into fieldgoal range with a 30-yard completion, and Rodrigo Blankenship did his job with a 47-yard field goal to put the Bulldogs ahead 16-0 at halftime.

ing the offense past midfield for the first time with a couple first-down completions to Albert Okwuegbunam and Kam Scott. But Powell forced one to his tight end just outside of the red zone and safety Richard LeCounte was there to snag the interception and dash 71 yards deep into Mizzou territory. Wideout Jonathan Nance tackled LeCounte to prevent the touchdown, but the Bulldogs could manage only a field goal out of the field position, good for a 13-0 lead. Georgia added another field goal, a 47-yarder, on the final play of the half to cruise into intermission with a 16-0 lead. The rest of the night was more of the same: Missouri struggling to move the chains and Georgia adding to its lead. Fromm connected with Pickens for an 18-yard touchdown to open the fourth quarter and got the 2-point conversion pass for a 27-0 lead, burying the Tigers in their deepest hole of a season that continued to spiral beyond their wildest fears.

Missouri returns home next Saturday for the first time in five weeks and puts its two-game winning streak over Florida on the line in an 11 a.m. kickoff on CBS. It will be Mizzou’s first home game since Oct. 12. The Tigers took down the Gators 4516 in 2017 in Columbia and 38-17 last year in Gainesville, Fla. Florida (8-2, 5-2 SEC), ranked No. 10 in The Associated Press poll and the College Football Playoff standings, clobbered Vanderbilt 56-0 on Saturday. The Gators are still alive in the SEC East race but need to beat Mizzou and hope Georgia finishes with more SEC defeats.

Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

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D4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

M 3 • SUnDAy • 11.10.2019

Defense hangs tough for MU BY CHRISTINA LONG

Special to the Post-Dispatch

ATHENS, Ga. — If a bright spot could be found in Missouri’s 27-0 loss to Georgia, it was the Tigers’ defense. Although the offense looked abysmal, the defense did its best to make it a manageable game most of the night Saturday. Georgia fans got to see plenty of their celebrated kicker, Rodrigo Blankenship, thanks to the Missouri defense forcing the Bulldogs to try five field goals. He made all but one, the miss from 43 yards out. Missouri’s ability to make Georgia bring out Blankenship kept the game from getting out of hand, but the offense could provide no relief. Georgia’s side of the final score could’ve been a much bigger number. The Bulldogs reached the red zone three times in the game; twice, the Tigers defense held them to a field goal. The third time went for six. By contrast, the Mizzou of-

fense crossed midfield twice and reached the red zone once, and even that didn’t come until midway through the fourth quarter. The opponent red zone conversion rate was a slight improvement on Mizzou’s last two losses. Vanderbilt reached the red zone twice and found the end zone once, but still pulled out the 21-7 win as Mizzou couldn’t contain an explosive run play and a long touchdown pass by the Commodores. Kentucky, on the other hand, had touchdowns in all three of its trips to the red zone. Saturday after Georgia’s first possession, it looked like it could be a long night for the Tigers. Well, even longer than it turned out to be. Georgia got the ball following a three-and-out on Mizzou’s first possession, then drove 60 yards, including a 32-yard pass from Fromm to star wideout Lawrence Cager and ending with a 25-yard touchdown grab by Pickens.

But after that, the defense settled in. The results of Georgia’s next six drives of the first half alternated between field goals and punts. The Bulldogs’ second drive ended in a punt after an impressive pass breakup by DeMarkus Acy on third and 5. Then Blankenship made a 20-yard field goal to put Georgia up 10-0 early in the second quarter. A Nick Bolton sack for a loss of 9 yards in Georgia’s second possession of the second quarter was just the fifth sack allowed by Georgia all season. Bolton’s name was called often at Sanford Stadium, as he finished with nine tackles, including two behind the line of scrimmage. Another field goal followed, this time from 48 yards. The next series was all Tre Williams for Missouri. He stuffed a second-down rush attempt by Georgia’s Zamir White before pressuring Fromm on third and 6 to force another Bulldog punt.

But Blankenship followed that poor drive with a 47-yard field goal to make it 16-0 at halftime. The second half looked like it would start the same as the first, as Georgia running back D’Andre Swift broke away for a 47-rush right out of the gate. Fromm marched the Bulldogs offense downfield, but safety Tyree Gillespie made an impressive play to break up what would have been a touchdown pass to Eli Wolf. The stop forced Blankenship to trot out yet again and attempt his fifth field goal of the night. He made it from 29 yards, and the Bulldogs pushed their lead to 19-0. Georgia’s second touchdown came after Acy was called for pass interference to put Georgia at the Mizzou 18. Fromm followed with a touchdown pass to George Pickens. The two-point conversion attempt was good, and another nail was drilled into the coffin as Georgia went up 27-0.

JOSHUA L. JONES, ATHENS BANNER-HERALD

Georgia wide receiver Lawrence Cager looks to haul in a pass ahead of Missouri’s Christian Holmes.

MU

Georgia 27, Missouri 0

From D1

Missouri Georgia

games. The Tigers (5-4, 2-3 SEC) also dropped their fourth straight road game and fell to 1-9 against ranked teams under Odom. “I knew they were good, but I think they’re better than they get credit for nationally,” Odom said. “They’re as solid a team as I’ve gone against in a long time.” Georgia became the first team to hold the Tigers scoreless since … Georgia in 2014, a 34-0 wipeout in Columbia.That year Gary Pinkel’s Tigers recovered to capture the SEC East and win 11 games, all of which is well beyond this team’s grasp. Instead, the Tigers are home next Saturday to host No. 10 Florida, their first game in Columbia since Oct. 12, when they beat Ole Miss for a fifth consecutive win and the next day surged to No. 22 in the Associated Press poll. That might seem like a lifetime ago. To salvage a winning record in the regular season, the Tigers have to take two of three from Florida, Tennessee and Arkansas. “Offensively we’ve got to figure some things out because we’re going to have to score some points in these last three weeks to have a chance in each one of the games,” Odom said. “We’ve got enough playmakers to go do that. We’ve got to find answers and get it fixed.” Since the fourth quarter of the Ole Miss game, the Tigers have scored just three touchdowns on their last 41 possessions. On Saturday, the Tigers mustered only 198 yards of offense, their fewest under Odom and the program’s least productive day since the 2015 season finale loss to Arkansas, when the Tigers moved the ball 171 yards in Pinkel’s final game. For the last three games, a once-balanced offense that controlled the line of scrimmage and created explosive plays has inexplicably struggled to function. Saturday’s 11 first downs were Mizzou’s fewest since a 2017 loss on the same field at Sanford Stadium. “This is a shock to everybody,” left tackle Yasir Durant said. “It’s really frustrating,” receiver Barrett Banister said. “To put zero points on the board, one, is inexcusable. We’ve got to get something right. I think we’re close, closer than a lot of

0 0 0 — 0 9 3 8 — 27 First Quarter UGA: Pickens 25 pass from Fromm (Blankenship kick), 10:43 Second Quarter UGA: FG Blankenship 20, 14:05 UGA: FG Blankenship 48, 6:06 UGA: FG Blankenship 47, :00 Third Quarter UGA: FG Blankenship 29, 6:56 Fourth Quarter UGA: Pickens 18 pass from Fromm (J.Cook pass from Fromm), 14:02 A: 92,746. MIZ UGA First downs 11 17 Rushes-yards 24-50 38-166 Passing 148 173 Comp-Att-Int 18-34-1 13-29-0 Return Yards 35 39 Punts-Avg. 9-38.88 5-45.4 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 0-0 Penalties-Yards 5-47 3-15 Time of Possession 24:33 35:27 Rushing: Missouri, Rountree 9-24, Badie 8-19, Downing 4-12, Powell 3-(minus 5). Georgia, Swift 12-83, Herrien 10-42, Z.White 6-24, Robertson 1-16, J.Cook 6-7, Fromm 3-(minus 6). Passing: Missouri, Powell 10-22-1-84, Bazelak 8-12-0-64. Georgia, Fromm 13-29-0-173. Receiving: Missouri, Nance 4-45, Okwuegbunam 4-30, Banister 3-31, Badie 3-17, K.Scott 1-10, Rountree 1-8, Gicinto 1-6, Downing 1-1. Georgia, Cager 6-93, Pickens 5-67, K.Jackson 1-13, Swift 1-0. Missed Field Goals: Georgia, Blankenship 43.

JOHN AMIS, AP PHOTO

Georgia wide receiver Lawrence Cager makes a catch as Missouri safety Tyree Gillespie defends in the first half. people think we are. But we’ve got to look at what’s causing this to happen.” Coming off the season’s second bye week,Mizzou was shorthanded from the start, playing without starting quarterback Kelly Bryant for the first time all season. Hobbled by a strained hamstring suffered two weeks ago at Kentucky, Bryant was in uniform and went through his normal pregame routine on the field with the other quarterbacks, but it was redshirt sophomore Taylor Powell behind center to start the night, the first injury replacement quarterback to start for the Tigers since 2013. He didn’t get much help from another stagnant running game — the Tigers ran 24 times for 50 yards — and any brief momentum the Tigers captured evaporated quickly. Powell finished the game completing 10 of 22 passes for 84 yards and an interception. Early in the fourth quarter, Odom turned to freshman quarterback Connor Bazelak, his second appearance of the season. Under the NCAA’s redshirt rule, Bazelak can appear in as many as four games without costing him a year of eligibility.

With some Georgia defensive starters still in the game, Bazelak delivered Mizzou’s best drive of the day, getting the Tigers all the way to the Georgia 2-yard line, but they couldn’t punch in the touchdown as Bazelak’s fourthdown pass missed Dominic Gicinto in the back of the end zone. It was only the Tigers’ second possession that ended in Georgia territory. “I am certain we’ll get Kelly back and ready to go,” Odom said. “He’ll get really close to 100%, which we’re going to need.” Missouri’s defense bent often but broke only occasionally as Georgia (8-1, 5-1) settled for four Rodrigo Blankenship field goals and visited the end zone only once after its opening drive. Powell became the 17th different starting quarterback in the seven-team SEC East this season. By no coincidence, Georgia is the only team to start the same QB every week. That would be Jake Fromm, who was more steady than spectacular but safely stood behind his mighty offensive line and made enough plays to keep the Bulldogs in charge all night.

0 7

MIZZOU NOTEBOOK

Powell gets start at QB when Bryant can’t play BY DAVE MATTER

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ATHENS, Ga. — For the first time since 2013, an injury forced Missouri to start its backup quarterback. After a week of uncertainty, an answer came shortly after kickoff at Georgia’s Sanford Stadium when Taylor Powell took the field to make his first career start for the Tigers in what unraveled into a 27-0 loss. Kelly Bryant, nursing a strained hamstring suffered two weeks ago, went through his normal pregame routine with the other quarterbacks, but it was Powell in the starting lineup for the Tigers. The redshirt sophomore made his first start since his senior season at Fayetteville (Ark.) High School in 2016 and became the first Mizzou backup QB to replace an injured starter since Maty Mauk took over for James Franklin for four starts in 2013. As late as Thursday, Missouri coach Barry Odom said Bryant’s status would come down to a game-time decision, but Powell said he was told Wednesday he would make the start. Odom said he “had a pretty good indication (Friday) night” that Bryant wouldn’t play. “It’s a fine line there,” Odom added. “Kelly is such a great kid and a tremendous competitor, but he wanted to play and felt like he could. But the percentage of being able to run and function and do the things you need to do at that position, I don’t know that it would have been wise to put him out there.” The Tigers featured a new-look starting lineup in other places, too. Tyler Badie was in for the first possession instead of regular starter Larry Rountree, while backup tight end Daniel Parker Jr. got the start over Albert Okwuegbunam, though Okwuegbunam came out for the second snap. Slot receiver Johnathon Johnson, the team’s leading receiver going into the game, did not make the trip while recovering from an illness. Odom indicated that Bryant and Johnson would both be available next week against Florida. Missouri kept things conservative for Powell on his first series with a run up the middle and two short throws to Badie, neither of which moved the chains. On the next series, Powell connected with Okwuegbunam for a 7-yard gain on first down but couldn’t convert a third down pass to the tight end, a pass knocked down by safety J.R. Reed. Rountree ran for 6 yards on first down on the next series, but again the Tigers couldn’t move the chains as Powell misfired for Jalen Knox on third down. The Tigers didn’t earn their first first down until the first play of the fifth series, an 11-yard completion to slot receiver Barrett Banister, Powell’s former high school teammate. Powell completed 10 of 22 passes for 84 yards and an interception. “I saw a guy who was decisive,” Banister said of Powell. “He’s able to read coverages on the fly and know what’s going on. I saw someone who was tough. He got pressure back there a little bit, but it was fun to see him back out there doing his thing.”

ALBERT O SIGHTING After an invisible performance at Kentucky two weeks ago, Okwuegbunam became a central part of the passing offense in the first half Saturday. By Mizzou’s fifth drive, Powell had targeted his tight end six times, three going for completions, including the Tigers’ second first down of the game. Okweugbunam was targeted just twice in the Kentucky game and finished the game without a catch for the first time since midway through the 2017 season. Okwuegbunam ended the first half with a team-high three catches for 24 yards but caught just one more pass in the second half for 6 yards. He was targeted a team-high nine times.

Powell got something going on Mizzou’s fifth series, driving the offense past midfield for the first time all night with a couple of first-down completions to Albert Okwuegbunam and Kam Scott. But Powell forced one to his tight end just outside of the red zone and safety Richard LeCounte was there to snag the interception and dash 71 yards deep into Mizzou territory. The Bulldogs could manage only a field goal, good for a 13-0 lead. Georgia added another field goal, a 47-yarder, on the final play of the half to cruise into halftime with a 16-0 lead. The rest of the night was more of the same. After the game, Odom insisted that he hasn’t lost his locker room and that he believes in the character of a team that’s looked lost on the field the last month. The season is not lost, he said. “We’re not where we want to be, but we’ve got three games left,” Odom said. “We’re going to go push. We’re going to keep swinging and come up with a way with the guys we’ve got to go get a win.” “We’ve still got three games left, three games that we can win,” cornerback DeMarkus Acy said. “It’s put up or shut up time.”

Missouri returns home next Saturday for the first time in five weeks and puts its two-game winning streak over Florida on the line in an 11 a.m. kickoff on CBS. It will be Mizzou’s first home game since Oct. 12. The Tigers took down the Gators 4516 in 2017 in Columbia and 38-17 last year in Gainesville, Fla. Florida (8-2, 5-2 SEC) clobbered Vanderbilt 56-0 on Saturday.

Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

PENALTIES DOOM MU DRIVE Just as in the Kentucky game two weeks ago, Missouri’s offense made some costly mistakes deep in its own territory shortly before halftime. Taking over at the 12-yard line with 2:32 left, the Tigers committed two penalties — a false start by Okwuegbunam and a unsportsmanlike conduct on wideout Kam Scott — that kept the offense from extending the drive. Scott shoved a defender to the ground after the whistle to draw the flag. For the game, Mizzou committed five penalties for 47 yards.

NEXT UP


D4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

M 4 • SUnDAy • 11.10.2019

Defense hangs tough for MU BY CHRISTINA LONG

Special to the Post-Dispatch

ATHENS, Ga. — If a bright spot could be found in Missouri’s 27-0 loss to Georgia, it was the Tigers’ defense. The offense looked abysmal, but coach Barry Odom’s defense did its best to make it a manageable game. Georgia fans got to see plenty of their celebrated kicker, Rodrigo Blankenship, thanks to the Missouri defense forcing the Bulldogs to try field goals five times. He made all but one, from 43 yards out. Mizzou’s ability to make Georgia bring out Blankenship kept the game from getting out of hand, but the offense could provide no relief. The Bulldogs reached the red zone four times in the game but settled for field goals on three of those visits. Bycontrast,theMizzouoffense crossed midfield only twice and reached the red zone once, and even that didn’t come until midway through the fourth quarter. “If we would have given up touchdowns instead of field goals in those situations, it never would have been a game,” Odom

said.“But defensively, they hung in there and they fought, they competed, and I was proud of the way that they played at times.” The opponent red zone conversion rate was a slight improvement on Mizzou’s last two losses. Vanderbilt reached the red zone twice and found the end zone once, but still pulled out the 21-7 win as Mizzou couldn’t contain a couple explosive plays from the Commodores. Two weeks ago Kentucky had touchdowns on all three of its trips to the red zone. “It was a field position battle all game,” defensive lineman Jordan Elliott said after Saturday night’s loss. “They had the advantage a lot, so us keeping them to field goals was a plus. We don’t believe in moral victories, but it’s just something.” After the Bulldogs’ first possession, it looked as if it could be a long night for the Tigers. Well, even longer than it turned out to be. Georgia got the ball following a three-and-out on Mizzou’s first possession. The Bulldogs then drove 60 yards, including a 32-yard pass from Jake Fromm

to star wideout Lawrence Cager and a 25-yard touchdown grab by George Pickens. But after that, the defense settled in. The results of Georgia’s next six drives of the first half alternated between field goals and punts. “We were good on first and second down most of the night,” linebacker Nick Bolton said. “We’ve got to find ways to get off the field on third down. We sent blitzes, played tight man coverage and we’ve just got to get home on those.” Bolton was key in getting the defense off the field on one particular drive. He sacked Fromm for a loss of 9 yards in Georgia’s second possession of the second quarter. It was his first sack of the season and just the fifth sack allowed by Bulldogs all year. Georgia went three-and-out on that possession. Bolton’s name was called often at Sanford Stadium, as he finished with nine tackles, including two behind the line of scrimmage. Another field goal followed, this time from 48 yards. The next series was all Tre Williams for

Missouri. He stuffed a seconddown rush attempt by Georgia’s Zamir White before pressuring Fromm on third and 6 to force another Bulldog punt. But Blankenship followed that poor drive with a 47-yard field goal to make it 16-0 at halftime. Georgia’s second touchdown came after Jarvis Ware was called for pass interference to put Georgia at the Mizzou 18. A snap later, Fromm followed with a touchdown pass to Pickens. The two-point conversion attempt was good, and another nail was drilled into the coffin as Georgia went up 27-0. That score would hold, giving Missouri its third loss in as many games. “(Georgia’s receivers have) some opportunities to make plays down the field; their size, strength, speed, long catch radius — that’s a great group,” Odom said.“You’d always like to get a couple back, but I thought that we played with an aggressive nature defensively in the way that we covered, and we’re going to need a little bit more next week and a little bit more the next week.”

JOSHUA L. JONES, ATHENS BANNER-HERALD

Georgia wide receiver Lawrence Cager looks to haul in a pass ahead of Missouri’s Christian Holmes.

MU

Georgia 27, Missouri 0

From D1

Missouri Georgia

games. The Tigers (5-4, 2-3 SEC) also dropped their fourth straight road game and fell to 1-9 against ranked teams under Odom. “I knew they were good, but I think they’re better than they get credit for nationally,” Odom said. “They’re as solid a team as I’ve gone against in a long time.” Georgia became the first team to hold the Tigers scoreless since … Georgia in 2014, a 34-0 wipeout in Columbia. That year Gary Pinkel’s Tigers recovered to capture the SEC East and win 11 games, all of which is well beyond this team’s grasp. Instead, the Tigers are home next Saturday to host No. 10 Florida, their first game in Columbia since Oct. 12, when they beat Ole Miss for a fifth consecutive win and the next day surged to No. 22 in the Associated Press poll. That might seem like a lifetime ago. To salvage a winning record in the regular season, the Tigers have to take two of three from Florida, Tennessee and Arkansas. “Offensively we’ve got to figure some things out because we’re going to have to score some points in these last three weeks to have a chance in each one of the games,” Odom said. “We’ve got enough playmakers to go do that. We’ve got to find answers and get it fixed.” Since the fourth quarter of the Ole Miss game, the Tigers have scored just three touchdowns on their last 41 possessions. On Saturday, the Tigers mustered only 198 yards of offense, their fewest under Odom and the program’s least productive day since the 2015 season finale loss to Arkansas, when the Tigers moved the ball 171 yards in Pinkel’s final game. For the last three games, a once-balanced offense that controlled the line of scrimmage and created explosive plays has inexplicably struggled to function. Saturday’s 11 first downs were Mizzou’s fewest since a 2017 loss on the same field at Sanford Stadium. “This is a shock to everybody,” left tackle Yasir Durant said. “It’s really frustrating,” receiver Barrett Banister said. “To put zero points on the board, one, is inexcusable. We’ve got to get something right. I think

0 0 0 — 0 9 3 8 — 27 First Quarter UGA: Pickens 25 pass from Fromm (Blankenship kick), 10:43 Second Quarter UGA: FG Blankenship 20, 14:05 UGA: FG Blankenship 48, 6:06 UGA: FG Blankenship 47, :00 Third Quarter UGA: FG Blankenship 29, 6:56 Fourth Quarter UGA: Pickens 18 pass from Fromm (J.Cook pass from Fromm), 14:02 A: 92,746. MIZ UGA First downs 11 17 Rushes-yards 24-50 38-166 Passing 148 173 Comp-Att-Int 18-34-1 13-29-0 Return Yards 35 39 Punts-Avg. 9-38.88 5-45.4 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 0-0 Penalties-Yards 5-47 3-15 Time of Possession 24:33 35:27 Rushing: Missouri, Rountree 9-24, Badie 8-19, Downing 4-12, Powell 3-(minus 5). Georgia, Swift 12-83, Herrien 10-42, Z.White 6-24, Robertson 1-16, J.Cook 6-7, Fromm 3-(minus 6). Passing: Missouri, Powell 10-22-1-84, Bazelak 8-12-0-64. Georgia, Fromm 13-29-0-173. Receiving: Missouri, Nance 4-45, Okwuegbunam 4-30, Banister 3-31, Badie 3-17, K.Scott 1-10, Rountree 1-8, Gicinto 1-6, Downing 1-1. Georgia, Cager 6-93, Pickens 5-67, K.Jackson 1-13, Swift 1-0. Missed Field Goals: Georgia, Blankenship 43.

JOHN AMIS, AP PHOTO

Georgia wide receiver Lawrence Cager makes a catch as Missouri safety Tyree Gillespie defends in the first half. we’re close, closer than a lot of people think we are. But we’ve got to look at what’s causing this to happen.” Coming off the season’s second bye week,Mizzou was shorthanded from the start, playing without starting quarterback Kelly Bryant for the first time all season. Hobbled by a strained hamstring suffered two weeks ago at Kentucky, Bryant was in uniform and went through his normal pregame routine on the field with the other quarterbacks, but it was redshirt sophomore Taylor Powell behind center to start the night, the first injury replacement quarterback to start for the Tigers since 2013. He didn’t get much help from another stagnant running game — the Tigers ran 24 times for 50 yards — and any brief momentum the Tigers captured evaporated quickly. Powell finished the game completing 10 of 22 passes for 84 yards and an interception. Early in the fourth quarter, Odom turned to freshman quarterback Connor Bazelak, his second appearance of the season. Under the NCAA’s redshirt rule, Bazelak can appear in as many as four games without costing him

a year of eligibility. With some Georgia defensive starters still in the game, Bazelak delivered Mizzou’s best drive of the day, getting the Tigers all the way to the Georgia 2-yard line, but they couldn’t punch in the touchdown as Bazelak’s fourthdown pass missed Dominic Gicinto in the back of the end zone. It was only the Tigers’ second possession that ended in Georgia territory. “I am certain we’ll get Kelly back and ready to go,” Odom said. “He’ll get really close to 100%, which we’re going to need.” Missouri’s defense bent often but broke only occasionally as Georgia (8-1, 5-1) settled for four Rodrigo Blankenship field goals and visited the end zone only once after its opening drive. Powell became the 17th different starting quarterback in the seven-team SEC East this season. By no coincidence, Georgia is the only team to start the same QB every week. That would be Jake Fromm, who was more steady than spectacular but safely stood behind his mighty offensive line and made enough plays to keep the Bulldogs in charge all night.

0 7

MIZZOU NOTEBOOK

Powell gets start at QB when Bryant can’t play BY DAVE MATTER

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ATHENS, Ga. — For the first time since 2013, an injury forced Missouri to start its backup quarterback. After a week of uncertainty, an answer came shortly after kickoff at Georgia’s Sanford Stadium when Taylor Powell took the field to make his first career start for the Tigers in what unraveled into a 27-0 loss. Kelly Bryant, nursing a strained hamstring suffered two weeks ago, went through his normal pregame routine with the other quarterbacks, but it was Powell in the starting lineup for the Tigers. The redshirt sophomore made his first start since his senior season at Fayetteville (Ark.) High School in 2016 and became the first Mizzou backup QB to replace an injured starter since Maty Mauk took over for James Franklin for four starts in 2013. As late as Thursday, Missouri coach Barry Odom said Bryant’s status would come down to a game-time decision, but Powell said he was told Wednesday he would make the start. Odom said he “had a pretty good indication (Friday) night” that Bryant wouldn’t play. “It’s a fine line there,” Odom added. “Kelly is such a great kid and a tremendous competitor, but he wanted to play and felt like he could. But the percentage of being able to run and function and do the things you need to do at that position, I don’t know that it would have been wise to put him out there.” The Tigers featured a new-look starting lineup in other places, too. Tyler Badie was in for the first possession instead of regular starter Larry Rountree, while backup tight end Daniel Parker Jr. got the start over Albert Okwuegbunam, though Okwuegbunam came out for the second snap. Slot receiver Johnathon Johnson, the team’s leading receiver going into the game, did not make the trip while recovering from an illness. Odom indicated that Bryant and Johnson would both be available next week against Florida. Missouri kept things conservative for Powell on his first series with a run up the middle and two short throws to Badie, neither of which moved the chains. On the next series, Powell connected with Okwuegbunam for a 7-yard gain on first down but couldn’t convert a third down pass to the tight end, a pass knocked down by safety J.R. Reed. Rountree ran for 6 yards on first down on the next series, but again the Tigers couldn’t move the chains as Powell misfired for Jalen Knox on third down. The Tigers didn’t earn their first first down until the first play of the fifth series, an 11-yard completion to slot receiver Barrett Banister, Powell’s former high school teammate. Powell completed 10 of 22 passes for 84 yards and an interception. “I saw a guy who was decisive,” Banister said of Powell. “He’s able to read coverages on the fly and know what’s going on. I saw someone who was tough. He got pressure back there a little bit, but it was fun to see him back out there doing his thing.”

ALBERT O SIGHTING After an invisible performance at Kentucky two weeks ago, Okwuegbunam became a central part of the passing offense in the first half Saturday. By Mizzou’s fifth drive, Powell had targeted his tight end six times, three going for completions, including the Tigers’ second first down of the game. Okweugbunam was targeted just twice in the Kentucky game and finished the game without a catch for the first time since midway through the 2017 season. Okwuegbunam ended the first half with a team-high three catches for 24 yards but caught just one more pass in the second half for 6 yards. He was targeted a team-high nine times.

Powell got something going on Mizzou’s fifth series, driving the offense past midfield for the first time all night with a couple of first-down completions to Albert Okwuegbunam and Kam Scott. But Powell forced one to his tight end just outside of the red zone and safety Richard LeCounte was there to snag the interception and dash 71 yards deep into Mizzou territory. The Bulldogs could manage only a field goal, good for a 13-0 lead. Georgia added another field goal, a 47-yarder, on the final play of the half to cruise into halftime with a 16-0 lead. The rest of the night was more of the same. After the game, Odom insisted that he hasn’t lost his locker room and that he believes in the character of a team that’s looked lost on the field the last month. The season is not lost, he said. “We’re not where we want to be, but we’ve got three games left,” Odom said. “We’re going to go push. We’re going to keep swinging and come up with a way with the guys we’ve got to go get a win.” “We’ve still got three games left, three games that we can win,” cornerback DeMarkus Acy said.“It’s put up or shut up time.”

Missouri returns home next Saturday for the first time in five weeks and puts its two-game winning streak over Florida on the line in an 11 a.m. kickoff on CBS. It will be Mizzou’s first home game since Oct. 12. The Tigers took down the Gators 4516 in 2017 in Columbia and 38-17 last year in Gainesville, Fla. Florida (8-2, 5-2 SEC) clobbered Vanderbilt 56-0 on Saturday.

Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

PENALTIES DOOM MU DRIVE Just as in the Kentucky game two weeks ago, Missouri’s offense made some costly mistakes deep in its own territory shortly before halftime. Taking over at the 12-yard line with 2:32 left, the Tigers committed two penalties — a false start by Okwuegbunam and a unsportsmanlike conduct on wideout Kam Scott — that kept the offense from extending the drive. Scott shoved a defender to the ground after the whistle to draw the flag. For the game, Mizzou committed five penalties for 47 yards.

NEXT UP


SPORTS

11.10.2019 • Sunday • M 1

NHL ROUNDUP

STANDINGS & SCHEDULE Atlantic GP Boston 16 Toronto 17 Buffalo 16 Florida 15 Montreal 16 Tampa Bay 14 Ottawa 15 Detroit 18 Metropolitan GP Washington 17 N.Y. Islanders 15 Pittsburgh 16 Carolina 16 Philadelphia 15 N.Y. Rangers 14 Columbus 16 New Jersey 15

EASTERN CONFERENCE W L OT Pts GF GA Home 11 3 2 24 58 40 7-0-1 9 5 3 21 58 54 6-2-3 9 5 2 20 47 43 5-2-1 7 3 5 19 55 56 3-1-2 8 5 3 19 58 52 4-3-0 7 5 2 16 47 49 2-1-1 5 9 1 11 41 50 4-4-0 5 12 1 11 39 70 3-5-1 W L OT Pts GF GA Home 12 2 3 27 69 53 4-1-2 11 3 1 23 47 34 7-2-1 9 6 1 19 55 42 5-3-1 9 6 1 19 52 46 6-3-0 8 5 2 18 50 48 6-1-1 7 6 1 15 46 45 4-4-1 6 7 3 15 38 54 3-5-1 4 7 4 12 40 60 2-2-4

Away 4-3-1 3-3-0 4-3-1 4-2-3 4-2-3 5-4-1 1-5-1 2-7-0 Away 8-1-1 4-1-0 4-3-0 3-3-1 2-4-1 3-2-0 3-2-2 2-5-0

Div 2-2-2 3-3-1 3-1-0 2-1-1 3-2-1 5-2-0 2-2-0 2-4-0 Div 2-0-1 2-2-1 3-0-0 2-4-1 4-2-0 1-2-0 2-2-1 2-1-1

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div St. Louis 17 11 3 3 25 54 49 5-1-2 6-2-1 4-0-0 Nashville 16 9 5 2 20 64 52 6-2-2 3-3-0 3-1-0 Colorado 16 9 5 2 20 58 47 5-2-1 4-3-1 2-3-0 Winnipeg 17 9 7 1 19 48 52 4-4-1 5-3-0 2-0-0 Dallas 17 8 8 1 17 41 42 5-3-1 3-5-0 3-1-0 Chicago 15 5 7 3 13 38 46 4-3-2 1-4-1 0-1-1 Minnesota 16 5 10 1 11 42 57 3-1-1 2-9-0 0-6-1 Pacific GP W L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div Edmonton 18 11 5 2 24 52 46 6-2-1 5-3-1 2-0-1 Calgary 19 10 7 2 22 57 55 6-1-1 4-6-1 3-3-1 Vegas 17 9 5 3 21 52 48 4-3-2 5-2-1 5-1-0 Vancouver 17 9 5 3 21 57 45 4-0-2 5-5-1 3-2-1 Arizona 16 9 5 2 20 46 37 4-3-0 5-2-2 2-1-1 Anaheim 17 9 7 1 19 45 43 6-2-1 3-5-0 3-2-0 San Jose 17 6 10 1 13 46 63 4-4-0 2-6-1 1-4-0 Los Angeles 16 5 10 1 11 41 63 3-4-0 2-6-1 2-4-0 Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Top three teams in each division and two wild cards per conference advance to playoffs. Thursday’s results

N.Y. Rangers 4, Carolina 2 Pittsburgh 4, N.Y. Islanders 3, OT Philadelphia 3, Montreal 2, OT Washington 5, Florida 4, OT Toronto 2, Vegas 1, OT Ottawa 3, Los Angeles 2, OT Chicago 5, Vancouver 2 Columbus 3, Arizona 2 Colorado 9, Nashville 4 Calgary 5, New Jersey 2 San Jose 6, Minnesota 5 Friday’s results

Tampa Bay 3, Buffalo 2 Detroit 4, Boston 2 Winnipeg 4, Vancouver 1 Edmonton 4, New Jersey 0 Saturday’s games

Florida at N.Y. Islanders, noon

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D5

Buffalo vs. Tampa Bay at Stockholm, noon Los Angeles at Montreal, 6 p.m. Chicago at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. Philadelphia at Toronto, 6 p.m. Carolina at Ottawa, 6 p.m. Vegas at Washington, 6 p.m. Minnesota at Arizona, 7 p.m. Columbus at Colorado, 8 p.m. St. Louis at Calgary, 9 p.m. Nashville at San Jose, 9:30 p.m. Sunday’s games

Florida at N.Y. Rangers, noon Dallas at Winnipeg, 1 p.m. New Jersey at Vancouver, 3 p.m. Vegas at Detroit, 4 p.m. Toronto at Chicago, 6 p.m. Philadelphia at Boston, 6 p.m. Edmonton at Anaheim, 8 p.m.

STAT OF THE DAY

78

There were 78 goals across 11 games in the league Thursday night (7.09 per game). It’s the fourth-most goals scored in a day this season, trailing only Oct. 10 (79), Oct. 5 (84) and Oct. 12 (90). — NHL.com

STANDINGS & SCHEDULE

Kucherov, Lightning top Sabres ASSOCIATED PRESS

STOCKHOLM — Nikita Kucherov scored, and Andrei Vasilevskiy made 20 saves to help the Tampa Bay Lightning beat the Buffalo Sabres 3-2 on Friday night in the first of their two regularseason games in the Swedish capital. The sold-out games at Ericsson Globe are part of the NHL Global Series. Alex Killorn and Yanni Gourde also scored for the Lightning. Sam Reinhart scored twice for Buffalo. The Sabres have lost four straight. Kucherov opened the scoring at 3:19 of the first period. Brayden Point and Kevin Shattenkirk set up the play for Kucherov to sweep in on a one-timer. The reigning NHL MVP has five goals and seven assists this season. He had 41 goals and 128 points last season. “That’s a world-class finish,” Tampa Bay coach Jon Cooper said.“Great play. Great for Shatty to recognize that and wrap that around. I’ll have to see, but I don’t know if that puck hit the ice. Not a lot of guys can do that, but he’s one of them. I thought he had a great game after that.” Kucherov made his presence felt again later in the period when Buffalo forward Vladimir Sobotka needed assistancefromhisteammates togetofftheiceafterahitfrom

TT VIA AP

Sabres forward Johan Larsson, left, and Lightning center Anthony Cirelli go after the puck Friday in Stockholm, Sweden. the Lightning star. Killorn scored on a power play with 3:46 remaining in the period, tipping home favorite Victor Hedman’s slap shot from the blue line past goalie Linus Ullmark. Hedman, the only Swede on Tampa Bay, recovered from a lower-body injury in time to play. Reinhart cut the deficit to 2-1 with 4:17 left in the second, redirecting Rasmus Ristolainen’s wrist shot.

Gourde scored at 7:45 Connor had a goal and an of the third, and Reinhart assist as host Winnipeg beat struck again with 8:30 to go. Vancouver. Connor Hellebuyck made 31 saves for his RED WINGS 4, BRUINS 2: ninth consecutive victory Robby Fabbri scored twice over the Canucks. in his first game with Detroit, and the host Red Wings beat OILERS 4, DEVILS 0: Alex Boston to snap a four-game Chiasson had a goal and an skid. Fabbri was acquired assist, and Mikko Koskifrom St. Louis on Wednesday nen made 26 saves as host and quickly got his second Edmonton snapped a twoand third goals of the season. game losing streak with a victory over New Jersey. The JETS 4, CANUCKS 1: Kyle Devils have lost two straight.

AROUND THE LEAGUE

Bettman: NHL to return to Europe STOCKHOLM — NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman said the NHL plans to return to Europe for games in the next two years. Citing huge demand, Bettman said on Friday that the Boston Bruins and the Nashville Predators will open the regular season next year with a game in Prague, in the Czech Republic. The Colorado Avalanche and the Co-

lumbus Blue Jackets will play a set of games in the Finnish capital of Helsinki. Bettman did not specify dates for the games. He added that he is “pretty certain” that the NHL will return to Sweden in two years but gave no details about the teams involved and venue.

dorov will be out indefinitely for Colorado after the defenseman was hit in the face by a puck during a 9-4 victory over Nashville on Thursday. Zadorov was defending along the wall on the right side of the Avalanche zone when a puck shot by Predators forward Ryan Johansen hit him. Zadorov remained down on the ice for a moment Zadorov to be but was able to skate to the bench on his own and left the out indefinitely game in the second period. DENVER — Nikita ZaIn 15 games this season,

NBA ROUNDUP

L 1 2 3 4 7 L 3 4 5 6 6 L 3 4 6 5 6

Pct. GB .857 — .750 ½ .625 1½ .500 2½ .222 5 Pct GB .667 — .500 2 .375 3 .333 3½ .250 4 Pct GB .667 — .556 1 .400 2½ .375 2½ .333 3

L10 6-1 6-2 5-3 4-4 2-7 L10 6-3 4-4 3-5 3-6 2-6 L10 6-3 5-4 4-6 3-5 3-6

L 3 3 3 6 7 L 2 3 3 5 6 L 1 3 3 6 7

Pct GB .625 — .625 — .625 — .250 3 .125 4 Pct GB .750 — .667 ½ .625 1 .375 3 .333 3½ Pct GB .875 — .667 1½ .625 2 .333 4½ .222 5½

Thursday’s results Boston 108, Charlotte 87 San Antonio 121, Okla. City 112 Miami 124, Phoenix 108 L.A. Clippers 107, Portland 101 Friday’s results Cleveland 113, Washington 100 Indiana 112, Detroit 106 Orlando 118, Memphis 86 Sacramento 121, Atlanta 109 Minnesota 125, Golden St. 119, OT Toronto 122, New Orleans 104 New York 106, Dallas 102 Utah 103, Milwaukee 100 Denver 100, Philadelphia 97 Brooklyn 119, Portland 115 L.A. Lakers 95, Miami 80

STAT OF THE DAY

900

Los Angeles Clippers coach Doc Rivers earned his 900th career victory in a 107101 decision over the visiting Portland Trail Blazers on Thursday night. He’s the 13th coach in NBA history to reach 900 wins. — Associated Press

L10 5-3 5-3 5-3 2-6 1-7 L10 6-2 6-3 5-3 3-5 3-6 L10 7-1 6-3 5-3 3-6 2-7

Str Home Away Conf W-2 3-1 2-2 4-0 L-1 2-3 3-0 2-2 W-1 4-1 1-2 3-2 L-1 2-3 0-3 1-3 L-3 1-3 0-4 1-4 Str Home Away Conf W-3 3-1 3-1 3-2 W-2 5-0 1-3 4-3 W-1 2-1 3-2 1-1 L-1 3-2 0-3 2-4 L-4 0-3 3-3 3-4 Str Home Away Conf W-7 4-0 3-1 4-1 W-1 5-1 1-2 5-2 L-1 3-2 2-1 4-2 W-1 1-3 2-3 1-4 L-2 1-4 1-3 2-6

Saturday’s games Boston at San Antonio, 4 p.m. New Orleans at Charlotte, 6 p.m. Dallas at Memphis, 7 p.m. Golden State at Okla. City, 7 p.m. Houston at Chicago, 7 p.m. Sunday’s games Denver at Minnesota, 2:30 p.m. Charlotte at Philadelphia, 5 p.m. Indiana at Orlando, 5 p.m. Milwaukee at Okla. City, 6 p.m. Cleveland at New York, 6:30 p.m. Brooklyn at Phoenix, 7 p.m. Atlanta at Portland, 8 p.m. Toronto at L.A. Lakers, 8:30 p.m.

— Wire reports

Heat’s Winslow has concussion

Str Home Away Conf W-6 3-0 3-1 6-1 W-2 4-0 2-2 3-2 L-3 2-0 3-3 3-0 W-2 3-2 1-2 1-2 W-1 1-2 1-5 1-5 Str Home Away Conf L-1 3-0 3-3 3-0 L-1 2-2 2-2 2-1 L-2 2-4 1-1 2-4 W-1 3-2 0-4 2-3 L-2 1-3 1-3 1-2 Str Home Away Conf L-1 2-1 4-2 3-2 W-2 4-1 1-3 5-4 L-1 3-2 1-4 4-6 W-1 2-2 1-3 3-4 W-1 1-2 2-4 2-5

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W Houston 5 Dallas 5 San Antonio 5 Memphis 2 New Orleans 1 Northwest W Denver 6 Utah 6 Minnesota 5 Oklahoma City 3 Portland 3 Pacific W L.A. Lakers 7 L.A. Clippers 6 Phoenix 5 Sacramento 3 Golden State 2

BRIEFLY PENGUINS: Kris Letang will be week to week for Pittsburgh with a lower-body injury. The defenseman will miss a second straight game when the Penguins host Chicago on Saturday. He did not practice Friday after missing Pittsburgh’s 4-3 overtime win at the New York Islanders on Thursday.

AROUND THE NBA

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W Boston 6 Toronto 6 Philadelphia 5 Brooklyn 4 New York 2 Southeast W Miami 6 Charlotte 4 Atlanta 3 Orlando 3 Washington 2 Central W Milwaukee 6 Indiana 5 Detroit 4 Cleveland 3 Chicago 3

Zadorov has one goal and two assists.

JIM MONE, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Timberwolves center Karl-Anthony Towns, left, drives against Warriors forward Omari Spellman in the first half Friday in Minneapolis.

Wolves outlast Warriors ASSOCIATED PRESS

MINNEAPOLIS — Andrew Wiggins scored 40 points, hitting the tying basket late in regulation, and the Minnesota Timberwolves overcame D’Angelo Russell’s career-high 52 points to beat the Golden State Warriors 125-119 in overtime Friday night. Russell and the Warriors led 110-106 with 29 seconds left in regulation. But after two free throws by Karl-Anthony Towns and a forced jump ball by Robert Covington, Wiggins tied it on a drive with 5.6 seconds left. Russell’s 3-pointer at the buzzer missed. In overtime, Wiggins hit a clinching 3 with 23 seconds to help the Timberwolves snap a two-game losing streak. CAVALIERS 113, WIZARDS 100: Tristan Thompson had 21 points and 12 rebounds, Kevin Love added 16 points and 12 boards, and Cleveland beat host Washington to end a three-game skid. Seven Cavaliers scored at

least 10 points, and Cleveland recorded its first road victory this season. Thomas Bryant led Washington with 23 points.

PACERS 112, PISTONS 106: T.J. McConnell, Domantas Sabonis and T.J. Warren scored 17 points apiece, and host Indiana moved above .500 for the first time this MAGIC 118, GRIZZLIES 86: season by beating Detroit. Nikola Vucevic had 23 points and 16 rebounds, and Jona- KNICKS 106, MAVERICKS than Isaac added 22 points 102: Marcus Morris scored and eight rebounds as host 29 points, and Julius Randle Orlando snapped a four- had 21 as New York defeated game losing streak with a host Dallas. Luka Doncic victory over Memphis. finished with 38 points for the Mavericks. RAPTORS 122, PELICANS 104: Pascal Siakam matched NUGGETS 100, 76ERS 97: his career high with 44 Nikola Jokic hit an off-balpoints, and Toronto beat anced 20-foot shot with 1.2 host New Orleans. The Rap- seconds remaining, helptors used a 45-point second ing host Denver rally from quarter to take control of a 21-point, fourth-quarter the game. deficit to stun Philadelphia. KINGS 121, HAWKS 109: Bogdan Bogdanovic scored 20 points and hit two 3-pointers in a key fourth-quarter flurry, and Sacramento fought off host Atlanta’s comeback attempt. Trae Young finished with 30 points, including 16 in the third quarter, for the Hawks.

JAZZ 103, BUCKS 100: Bojan Bogdanovic hit a 3-pointer at the buzzer to lift host Utah over Milwaukee. Bogdanovic finished with 33 points. Giannis Antetokounmpo had 30 points, 13 rebounds and four assists for the Bucks before fouling out with under four minutes left.

LOS ANGELES — Although Justise Winslow was formally listed in the official box score as missing Thursday night’s 124-108 victory over the Phoenix Suns due to a “headache,” both Winslow and the Miami Heat came to suspect it was something more. Those suspicions were confirmed, with Winslow entering the NBA’s concussion protocol Friday. Winslow sustained a blow to the head in Tuesday’s blowout loss to the Denver Nuggets in a collision that left Nuggets forward Paul Millsap requiring stitches. “He didn’t have really any symptoms until (Thursday),” Heat coach Erik Spoelstra said.

Anthony wants to get back in game NEW YORK — Carmelo Anthony is 35, and a man without an NBA team, but he still wants to play basketball. “Two thousand percent,” he said on Thursday night. Regarding his free agent status, the 10-time All-Star and former Knick said, “I don’t really want to get into all that. I’m surprised, of course. But it is what it is at this point, though. “I’m sitting back waiting to see what happens, spending time with the family right now,and that’s all I can focus on, and other things I have going on.” Anthony played for the New York Knicks from 201117, then for the Oklahoma City Thunder in 2017-18 and the Houston Rockets last season before he was traded to the Chicago Bulls. BRIEFLY CELTICS: Boston guard Marcus Smart was fined $15,000 by the NBA for public criticism of the officiating after comments following the Celtics’ 108-87 victory Thursday at Charlotte. — Wire reports


COLLEGE FOOTBALL

11.10.2019 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D5

Illini stun Spartans, seal bowl bid through at the time. It added up to Saturday’s win against the Spartans, the biggest win in Smith’s tenure with the Illini. There won’t be the hope of a bowl game lingering for the next two games: At Iowa and home against Northwestern. That has all been sealed. They’re playing for a better bowl, and suddenly, football still matters for the Illini in early November. In the post-game media room, Harding walked in with his blue hood up and an orange and white bowling ball clutched in his arms. He doesn’t entirely know where it came from or how it got from Champaign to East Lansing, but he found it and held it as a symbol of where this team came from, and where the program is going. Right now, that’s to a bowl. “It’s about time,’ he said. “It’s about time. That’s it. Especially in the recent years and what not, the program hasn’t been where it wanted to be, but we definitely made a turnaround and a change and I’m proud of the guys.”

BY JOEY WAGNER

Decatur (Ill.) Herald & Review

EAST LANSING, Mich. — Lovie Smith entered his postgame press conference donning a drenched, gray-hooded sweatshirt, a smile poking through his white beard. He then took his seat behind a microphone. Smith leaned in to the mic, less than a half hour after his team mounted the biggest comeback in program history, and knew exactly what he was going to say first. “We’re going bowling,” the fourth-year Illinois coach said. In fact, Illinois is going bowling after overcoming a 25-point first-half deficit and a 21-point deficit in the beginning of the fourth quarter to stun Michigan State with a 37-34 win Saturday evening at Spartan Stadium. As the players flooded near the Spartan logo at the 50-yard line, senior linebacker Dele Harding wrapped his arms around Smith and hoisted him into the air — a first for Smith, but players say the plan to lift him above everyone else had been in place for weeks. “This is, of course, the biggest win we’ve had,” Smith said. “As we went into this week, we talked about this being the biggest game that we’ve played since we’ve been here. This group of people. Definitely, this is the biggest win, and the way we won the game, that was tough duty. We’ll remember this one.” Illinois (6-4, 4-3 Big Ten) went 9-27 in Smith’s first three years as the head coach, taking lopsided loss after lopsided loss as younger players developed into veteran playmakers. Finally, Illinois broke through for its first bowl berth since 2014 and still has two games to go in the season. It’s the fourth Big Ten win in a row for Illinois, the first time that’s been done since the 2001 season when they won the conference title en route to a Sugar Bowl appearance. The Illini are in the midst of a season-changing turnaround after starting the season 2-4 with close losses to Nebraska and Eastern Michigan. Now, Illinois is rolling and has the chance to advance to a better bowl game if

CARLOS OSORIO, AP PHOTO

Illinois wide receiver Caleb Reams hugs tight end Daniel Barker after Barker scored in the closing seconds to defeat Michigan State on Saturday in East Lansing, Mich. they can keep winning after next week’s bye. “Everybody didn’t believe in us, there it is,” senior running back Reggie Corbin said. “It’s good. I hugged Coach Smith, and he said, ‘This is what you stayed for.’ My stats haven’t been the greatest. I expected that when I came back. I would trade this year for last year any day of the week. We played great team football. I’m so glad I stayed. I finally get to experience a bowl game. It’s not over. We’ve got to win more and go to a better bowl game.” Thing was, the magic almost dried up time after time on Saturday, when the three-game winning streak that turned the program around suddenly seemed in jeopardy. Illinois trailed 31-10 entering the fourth quarter before Peters and the offense turned a corner. Peters threw for two of his three touchdowns in the fourth

quarter, but none bigger than his five-yard pass to Daniel Barker with five seconds left on the clock to give Illinois a two-point lead and, effectively, a bowl bid. He finished the game 22-of-42 for 369 yards, three touchdowns and an interception. The interception came at a crucial time. Illinois trailed by one point, and Peters attempted a 12-yard pass to the corner of the end zone, looking for receiver Josh Imatorbhebhe. The drive ended abruptly and the Spartans got a field goal on the other end. Then, Peters led the gamewinning drive that came with a massive 37-yard pass on fourthand-17 from Illinois 44-yard line to Imatorbhebhe (four catches, 178 yards, two touchdowns) to keep the drive alive and set up the touchdown pass to Barker. “That’s BP, man,” Corbin said. “BP is a savage. He’s not a physical

Burrow, No. 1 LSU top No. 2 Tide in shootout ASSOCIATED PRESS

TUSCALOOSA, Ala. — Joe Burrrow sprinted toward the LSU fans to celebrate a monumental victory, and moments later was hoisted on the shoulders of two beefy teammates. They carried him only partway across the field. The ride isn’t finished for Burrow and LSU, ranked No. 1 by the Associated Press, but the quarterback’s masterful performance Saturday in a 46-41 victory over nemesis and second-ranked Alabama marked a huge step toward the Tigers’ championship goals. Burrow passed for 393 yards and three touchdowns, answered challenge after challenge and helped end the eight-year string of futility that started with the national title game in January 2012. Now, their sights are set on another shot at national and Southeastern Conference championships. LSU coach Ed Orgeron said that for the first time he told his players pre-Alabama, “You’re the better team.” “We’ve finally got the tools that we need to beat those guys,” Orgeron said. “To have a championship team, you’ve got to have a championship quarterback.” The Tigers (9-0, 5-0 SEC, No. 2 CFP) are no longer second fiddle in the SEC West, or maybe in the playoff rankings. And Burrow stamped himself as the Heisman Trophy front-runner with a gutty performance when he answered every challenge from ‘Bama. And the challenges were plentiful. That came as no surprise to Burrow. “I knew they were going to come back,” he said. “That’s Alabama on the other side, dynasty. I was really happy with the way we responded.” The Crimson Tide (8-1, 5-1, No. 3 CFP) rallied from a 33-13 halftime deficit to three times pull within a touchdown in the fourth quarter. It kept going from game seemingly over to game on.

dude, but his mentality is.” Peters stayed composed, and came through when Illinois needed him most, completing 7 of his 10 final passes. “It is his personality,” Smith said. “There’s so much emotion in the game. Certain positions can’t get too high or too low. You guys know Brandon, that’s who he is. You need to quarterback to be even-keeled and to know it’s about the next play.” The 25-point comeback (down 28-3) is the largest in program history. The previous record was 20 points, which had been done twice: at Michigan in 1999, and against Rutgers in 2005. The never-say-die attitude was crafted in the summer, when strength and conditioning coach Lou Hernandez helped cultivate a mindset shift, and the players pushed through runs they simply didn’t think they’d make it

AREA ROUNDUP

SEMO ends on 24-0 run to turn back E. Kentucky BY STAFF AND WIRE REPORTS

JOHN BAZEMORE, AP PHOTO

LSU quarterback Joe Burrow is carried off the field by his teammates after defeating Alabama. The showdown lived up to its billing as a duel between two high-powered offenses and star quarterbacks with President Donald Trump attending. Tua Tagovailoa launched an 85-yard touchdown pass to DeVonta Smith with 1:21 left after the Tigers’ own scoring march. Justin Jefferson recovered the onside kick and LSU ran out the clock, finally triumphant over their SEC West nemesis. Burrow completed 31 of 39 passes. ran for 64 yards and was carried most of the way off the field by two teammates. The ride isn’t over for LSU. Burrow said titles are what he was after when he transferred to LSU from Ohio State. “We’re not done yet,” the two-year starter said. “It’s Game 9. We’ve got three more regular-season ones and the SEC championship. This was never our goal. We’ve got bigger goals than this.” Clyde Edwards-Helaire ran for three touchdowns and caught a scoring pass, getting emotional on the sideline after a late touchdown that appeared once again to put the game away. Tagovailoa, 20 days removed from ankle surgery, was 21 of 40 for 418 yards and four touchdowns with an interception and a fumble. He was called a “game-time decision” all week, looked shaky early and appeared to be limping after the game, but he kept Alabama in it.

Coach Nick Saban said Tagovailoa practiced all week without any issues. “He said he could play in the game, he wanted to play in the game and he thought he could go out and do a good job,” Saban said. “I think he was a warrior in terms of what he did.” Smith had 213 yards and a pair of touchdowns on seven catches for Alabama. LSU outgained Alabama by a slender 559-541. The Tigers had scored just 39 combined points in the last five meetings, but this was an entirely different offense.

The takeaway LSU: Has eight wins over Top 10 teams in the past two seasons, none bigger than this. Burrow & Co. faced down 101,000-plus mostly hostile fans and a strong pass rush. Scored two touchdowns in the final 26 seconds of the first half in a pivotal flurry that threatened to be overshadowed by the second-half drama. Alabama: Didn’t wilt under the adversity of a season previously characterized by lopsided wins over unranked teams. Could be shut out of the playoffs barring some upsets elsewhere, mostly because of that schedule. Tagovailoa had a fumble and an interception in the first half. “We don’t really control our own destiny but if we finish the season the right way, we can see where it takes us,” Saban said.

Illinois 37, Michigan St. 34 Illinois 3 7 0 27—37 Michigan St. 14 14 3 3—34 First Quarter MSU: Collins 1 run (Coghlin kick), 10:07 ILL: FG McCourt 40, 7:10 MSU: Lewerke 42 run (Coghlin kick), 5:39 Second Quarter MSU: Mosley 18 pass from Lewerke (Coghlin kick), 12:41 MSU: Collins 6 run (Coghlin kick), 11:24 ILL: Imatorbhebhe 46 pass from Peters (McCourt kick), :00 Third Quarter MSU: FG Coghlin 23, 10:59 Fourth Quarter ILL: Imatorbhebhe 83 pass from Peters (McCourt kick), 14:48 ILL: Corbin 6 run (McCourt kick), 11:06 ILL: Sy.Brown 76 interception return (kick failed), 4:53 MSU: FG Coghlin 46, 3:17 ILL: Barker 5 pass from Peters (McCourt kick), :05 A: 63,370. ILL MSU First downs 16 27 Rushes-yards 27-36 51-275 Passing 369 251 Comp-Att-Int 22-42-1 19-36-3 Return Yards 121 43 Punts-Avg. 9-41.0 6-35.66 Fumbles-Lost 2-1 2-1 Penalties-Yards 9-94 3-30 Time of Possession 22:16 37:44 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING: Illinois, Corbin 7-29, D.Brown 9-19, Bonner 1-1, Peters 8-(minus 4), (Team) 2-(minus 9). Michigan St., Collins 28-170, Lewerke 11-96, Williams Jr. 5-19, Barnett 1-9, Wright 3-5, White 1-(minus 3), (Team) 2-(minus 21). PASSING: Illinois, Peters 22-42-1-369. Michigan St., Lewerke 19-36-3-251. RECEIVING: Illinois, Navarro 7-49, Imatorbhebhe 4-178, J.Williams 2-42, Reams 2-31, Corbin 2-28, Barker 2-21, D.Brown 2-16, Washington 1-4. Michigan St., White 7-128, Mosley 3-32, Seybert 3-27, Nelson 2-20, Collins 2-7, Barnett 1-19, Dotson 1-18. MISSED FIELD GOALS: None.

Kristian Wilkerson had 10 receptions for 254 yards and two touchdowns, sparking Southeast Missouri State to a comeback victory at home, 38-31 Saturday against Eastern Kentucky. The Redhawks (7-3, 5-1 Ohio Valley), ranked 18th in the FCS coaches poll, trailed 31-14 with 10:11 remaining in the third quarter before scoring 24 unanswered points. Zion Custis ran 12 yards for a touchdown with 37 seconds left to cap the win over the upset-minded Colonels (5-5, 3-3). EKU’s lead crested at 17 points when Tre Turner recovered a fumble in the end zone that was forced by an Aaron Patrick sack of Daniel Santacaterina early in the third quarter. From there it was all SEMO. Santacaterina pulled the Redhawks within 10 points by the end of the third with a 7-yard TD toss to Zack Smith. Custis made it 31-28 on a 4-yard TD run early in the fourth that ended a nine-play, 75yard drive, and Kendrick Tiller’s 40-yard field goal with 5:55 left to play knotted the score at 31 and set the stage for Custis’ second TD run. EKU took a 7-0 lead on Daryl McCleskey Jr.’s 7-yard run, but Santacaterina connected with Wilkerson for a 68yard scoring strike to pull SEMO even after one quarter. Samuel Hayworth’s 27-yard field goal put EKU up 10-7, but Santacaterina and Wilkerson hooked up for a 45-yard score and a 14-10 lead. The Colonels scored two TDs in the final 5:45 of the second quarter — Parker McKinney’s 6-yard run and Alonzo Booth’s 12yard run — to grab a 24-14 halftime lead. Santacaterina completed 17 of 27 passes for 295 yards with three TDs and two interceptions. Custis had 83 yards rushing on 16 carries and two TDs. EKU’s Parker McKinney was 13-of-28 passing for 167 yards with two picks. SIU Carbondale 37, Missouri State 14: Kare Lyles threw for four touchdowns — two each to Landon Lenoir and Avante Cox — and the Salukis rolled in Carbondale for their fourth consecutive victory. Lenoir had nine catches for 124 yards, and Javon Williams Jr. had 113 yards rushing on 10 carries. SIUC (6-4, 4-2 Missouri Valley) scored on five of six possessions in the first half and built a 30-0 lead by intermission. The Salukis piled up 555 yards of offense and 26 first downs, which helped offset three turnovers. Southern Illinois has won four straight following a three-game losing streak. Peyton Huslig threw for 193 yards and two touchdowns for Missouri State (1-8, 1-5), which has lost 13 of its last 14 games.

McKendree 62, Quincy 34: Turner Pullen passed for 302 yards and three touchdowns, and the freshman from Shelbyville, Ill., ran for two more scores to help the Bearcats win their final home game of the season. Pullen averaged more than 20 yards per completed pass, going 15 for 21 and without an interception. The Bearcats ran the ball at ease, with six ball carriers combining for 260 yards and a 5.0 percarry average. Jayden Mitchell (Parkway Central) ran for 84 yards, and Jace Franklin had 81 on 21 carries. Steven Towns caught seven passes for 110 yards and a touchdown for McKendree (5-5, 3-3 Great Lakes Valley), which closes its season next Saturday at Missouri S&T. Andrew Rund, a senior from Priory, threw for 367 yards and four touchdowns for Quincy (4-6, 1-5), which lost big despite posting 529 yards of offense and 28 first downs. Millikin 35, Washington U. 28, OT: Cal Pohrte’s 5-yard quarterback keeper for a touchdown in overtime spoiled Senior Day for the Bears. Pohrte connected with Colton Lockwood for a 6-yard TD pass with 6:56 remaining, capping an epic 16-play, 75yard drive and tying the game. Pohrte passed for 297 yards and three scores, and Richard Cosey ran for 126 yards on the WU defense, which gave up 451 total yards to Millikin (5-4, 4-4 CCIW). Johnny Davidson threw for 272 yards and four touchdowns for WU (6-3, 5-3), but a Bears running game that has been anemic again had a rough day, finishing with 47 yards on 23 carries. It was the fourth time WU has been held to 63 yards rushing or less, and the team has a season high of 155 yards on the ground, back in its season opener against Chicago. Barring an unexpected at-large bid into the Division III playoffs, Washington U. coach Larry Kindbom will lead the Bears onto the field for the last time next Saturday at Carroll, Wis., ending a 31-year tenure. Robert Morris 25, Missouri Baptist 13: Ke’Von Johnson ran for 206 yards on 33 carries, and the Eagles dominated time of possession in an NAIA game played at CBC High. Johnson’s workload and 6.2 per-carry average helped the RMU (4-5, 3-2 MidStates) offense stay on the field for almost twice as long as MBU, a 39:53 to 20:07 margin. Freshman Josh Munn passed for 274 yards for the Spartans (2-8, 1-5), and Isaiah King (Belleville East) had five catches for 122 yards. MBU managed only 49 yards rushing on 24 attempts.


D6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

SPORTS

M 1 • SUnDAy • 11.10.2019

Ivy From D1

It will also, in all likelihood, decide the Ivy League title. Both teams are 7-0 overall, 4-0 in conference play. A year ago, when they played at Princeton, both were 7-0, 4-0. In fact, each team’s last loss came to the other: The Tigers have won 17 straight games since losing to Dartmouth in their 2017 finale. The Big Green has won nine in a row since losing to Princeton, 14-9, a year ago. Throw in the fact that both coaches are graduates of their schools — Teevens, Dartmouth ‘79; Surace, Princeton ‘90 — and you have a matchup unlike any other at any level of college football. “It’s kind of cool that we’re both coming in undefeated again,” Surace said, “and playing the game in such a historic venue.” The story of how the game came to be played in a stadium built for baseball is a complicated one. Wednesday marked the 150th anniversary of the first college football game ever played — Princeton losing at Rutgers by six goals to four. Those schools began talking several years ago about a rematch on the closest Saturday to the anniversary. Like the 1869 matchup, the game would be played at Rutgers. But Rutgers tried to lowball Princeton on the guarantee for playing on the road. In the midst of the negotiations, Yankee Stadium officials, who are always looking for offseason events — the building has hosted a number of college football games, including an annual second-tier bowl game since 2010 — approached the schools. Surace loved the idea. Initially, so did Rutgers, but with the athletic department in complete disarray, the idea fell apart. “The Yankee Stadium people called and said, ‘We still want to do this, even without Rutgers,’ “ Surace said. “That’s when I called Buddy.” As luck would have it, Dartmouth is celebrating its 250th anniversary this year and this was a way to publicize that, in addition to being part of the 150th anniversary celebration. The schools are hoping to draw a crowd of about 20,000. Both coaches played football for their schools, left and came back. Surace was an assistant coach with the Cincinnati Bengals, steadily climbing the NFL coach-

HOWARD SIMMONS, AP PHOTO

Players warm up before a game between Notre Dame and Syracuse last year at Yankee Stadium.

MEL EVANS, AP PHOTO

Dartmouth coach Buddy Teevens graduated from that school in 1979. Both coaches in Saturday’s game are graduates for their schools. ing ladder, when he was convinced to return to his alma mater before the 2010 season. Teevens is in his second stint as head coach at Dartmouth, having won two Ivy League titles during his first tour (1987-91). He returned in 2005 after several positions that including head coaching tenures at Tulane and Stanford. Ivy League teams rarely turn around quickly. It almost always takes players a couple of years to get comfortable academically and improve enough as football players to succeed. It took until

Surace’s fourth season to produce a winning record, and the Tigers finished 8-2 that year and tied for the league title. They haven’t had a losing season since; last year’s championship was their second outright since 1964, when Cosmo Iacavazzi ran the wing-T offense for a team that went 9-0. Teevens, in his return, had to spend a lot of time fundraising to upgrade substandard facilities. In his first five seasons back, Dartmouth was 9-41, including 0-10 in 2008. Slowly, things got better. The Big Green made

a breakthrough in 2010 by going 6-4. Since that season, they are 68-29, including tying for the Ivy title in 2015 and a 24-3 record the past two-plus seasons. It took some luck to make Saturday’s game a battle of unbeatens. Harvard led Dartmouth 6-3 with six seconds left this past weekend and Dartmouth at the Harvard 43-yard-line. There was nothing left to do but have quarterback Derek Kyler throw a Hail Mary into the end zone. Kyler had to scramble just to get the pass off, dodging three tacklers. When he finally released the ball, receiver Masaki Aerts lost it in the sun. At the last possible second, he saw the ball deflect off one of the Crimson players and wobble in the direction of his left elbow. He cradled it, hung on and fell to the turf in the end zone. Game over: Dartmouth 9, Harvard 6. Teevens, whose coaching record at Harvard Stadium had been 0-9-1, wondered for a moment if he was dreaming. “I’ve called a lot of Hail Marys in a lot of years,” he said. “That’s the first one that’s been answered.” Watching his jubilant players celebrate was, he said, “one of those priceless moments you

Hachimura From D1

he’s polite but reveals little while staring above reporters’ heads. Hachimura understands his unusual responsibilities but doesn’t want to lose sight of why people care in the first place. “It’s been like this and it’s getting bigger, but for me, it’s not a big deal for me. It’s just what it is,” Hachimura said. “But I really have to focus on what I have to do in the game of basketball.Basketball is my priority.” Born in Japan’s Toyama prefecture to a Japanese mother and a father from Benin, Hachimura grew up speaking Japanese and only started speaking English regularly when he went to college to play for Gonzaga in Washington state three years ago. He is only the third Japanese player to appear in a regular season NBA game,and the first with star potential. He still represents his home country in international tournaments with the 2020 Olympics to be held in Tokyo. In terms of popularity in Japan, basketball ranks beneath baseball and sumo wrestling. Huge hordes of Japanese media have tailed baseball star Shohei Ohtani through his first two MLB seasons — 120 were credentialed for his first starts — and long followed legendary player Ichiro Suzuki before his retirement this year.Now Hachimura is receiving similar treatment,showing that his presence — even before a solid start that saw him average 12.6 points and six rebounds across his first seven games — has boosted the nation’s interest in the sport. The Wizards have also looked to capitalize on Hachimura’s popularity in his home country, launching a Japanese-language team site and a Japanese Twitter feed. They also hired a bilingual correspondent who hosts a targeted podcast and covers Hachimura closely. Before the start of the season, Hachimura was the subject of an 50-minute documentary on NHK, a Japanese public broadcaster. Following his Oct. 23 regular season debut against the Dallas Mavericks, Hachimura appeared on the front page of several major nationwide papers’ print evening editions. One special section unfurled into the size of a poster, declaring in kanjiand hiragana: “[Hachimura] Opened the door to the NBA.” “I guess,” Hachimura mumbled in English,recently reading the notso-subtle headline. Hachimura,at least publicly,sees himself as just another player,not a

NICK WASS, AP PHOTO

Wizards forward Rui Hachimura is only the third Japanese player to appear in a regular season NBA game, and the first with star potential. pioneer. During his first road trip, he had to bring Chick-fil-A for the veterans and carry Thomas Bryant’s sneakers to the bus after shootaround in Dallas. He doesn’t really enjoy taking late-night charter flights, and playing in the NBA has been an adjustment. “It kind of feels weird to me every day, you know, just [coming] to the practice. Playing in the NBA games,” Hachimura said. “It feels weird.” Living in the fishbowl has also been a strange experience. “I think just them being ahead of the curve knowing where we’re going to be before we know is kind of cool . . . it’s insane but cool at the same time,” said rookie teammate Justin Robinson about the Japanese media. “[Hachimura] knows — I wouldn’t say it this way — but he kind of has Japan on his back in a way.And I think,obviously I think there is internal pressure.” TheintenseinterestinHachimura parallels Chinese star Yao Ming’s rookie season in the NBA. On Nov. 2, 2002, the third game of the season, 10 Chinese journalists made the trip while nine Chinese television networks and 18 international broadcasters showed the game between the Houston Rockets and Toronto Raptors, according to reports. Yao’s Hall of Fame career in Houston continues to drive massive interest in the NBA in China. Nineteen years later, for Hachimura’s Oct. 30 home debut against the Rockets,the NBA issued 38 credentials to Japanese media members.

NICK WASS, AP PHOTO

For Rui Hachimura’s Oct. 30 home debut against the Rockets, the NBA issued 38 credentials to Japanese media members. Japanese wire service Kyodo News will be at all 82 Wizards regular season games — the first time the agency has covered a single player in the NBA.One Tokyo-based photographer who has been in Washington for the last two weeks estimates his company will spend at least $10,000 in expenses. “Obviously our focus is on Rui, more than the team,” said Daisuke Sugiura, a veteran NBA freelance reporter who lives in New York City, usually covering the New York Knicks and Brooklyn Nets,but who has been sent to Washington this season. “A few outlets have already asked me to do a one-onone. I told them it’s not easy. Yeah, I don’t think it’s going to happen. They want his quotes as much as possible.”

Much like when he’s on the floor, Hachimura keeps a game face on during interviews. He’s used to it — even at Gonzaga, four to six Japanese reporters would attend each game, rising to almost 20 during March Madness, according to the school’s sports information director Barrett Henderson. Only by watching Hachimura closely can a trace of media fatigue be seen. When the questions pause, he does not linger. Catching eye contact with a familiar face like a Wizards staffer or his agent,Hachimura will squeeze through the scrum and walk away. After his Nov. 2 postgame media session, Hachimura moved away from reporters then noticed one strolling alongside him.Hachimura examined the reporter from head

never forget.” Both coaches have worked at levels of football very different from the Ivy League. Both understand that. “When we’re on the practice field, I tell my guys, they better not be thinking about their physics class,” Surace said. “But I also tell them when they’re in physics class, they better not be thinking about football. Both are important.” Teevens likes to ask his players to raise their hands if they aspire to play in the NFL. “Pretty much every hand goes up,” he said. “I say, ‘That’s fine. There’s nothing wrong with dreaming that dream.’ But then I also say, ‘You need an academic dream, too. Something you aspire to after football. Because football will end.’” Saturday, they will all be focused on football and their dreams of continuing their winning streaks and taking a giant step in the direction of an Ivy League title. It won’t be a throwback to 1869, but it will be a very different kind of college game than the ones taking place in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, Minneapolis or any other so-called big-time venue. It will be, as Surace so eloquently put it, “very cool.” For everyone.

to toe, never broke stride nor responded to whatever was said in Japanese. “He’s testing how much he can open up.He doesn’t know what the media does yet, right?” said Yuka Chujo,who interviewed Hachimura for the NHK documentary.“Maybe positive.Maybe negative.He has to be very careful right now. He’s very careful, which is understood.” Some who know Hachimura worry about all this attention.They sense the weight of expectations placed upon his shoulders, even if he doesn’t acknowledge it. “After he came back to Japan [after the draft], everybody was watching him, everybody was curious about each word he said. Those words he said, all the media picked up and put it on Internet or newspaper.He never told me about this, but he was a little stressed that everyone was watching him in Japan,” said Yosuke Takahashi, Hachimura’s assistant basketball coach in high school.“I think Japanese people expect that he succeeds in the NBA from the first year. But in reality, it’s not that easy.” Joji Sakamoto,Hachimura’s middle school coach, shared a similar sentiment. “Honestly, I am a little afraid of the pressure he’s under. He is still only 21 year old,”’ he said. “I just hope he’ll keep playing basketball as long as he can.” For his part,Hachimura performs like an old pro inside the media vortex. He mostly wears Jordan Brand, another sponsor, when in front of cameras. While speaking in Japanese, Hachimura has been known to repeat a variation of the same response that he and the team must play better in offense, defense and rebounding. Most personal questions he will interpret as an opportunity to talk about the Wizards. In a rare quiet moment away from the clicks of the cameras, Hachimura admitted the media obligations can grow tiresome but that he keeps his mission at the front of his mind. “Yeah, of course. But I can’t do anything. This is not what I can control. Outside things. I just have to focus on what I have to do,” Hachimura said. “I feel like one thing I really try to focus on is how much I can focus on playing basketball,” he continued. “Even though the outside things, like the media, my endorsements and stuff. Like all that stuff. Those for me are nothing. But basketball is the first priority.” The Washington Post’s Akiko Kashiwagi and Rick Maese contributed reporting from Japan.


COLLEGE FOOTBALL

D6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 11.10.2019

Finally on big stage, Gophers prove they belong ASSOCIATED PRESS

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Minnesota defensive back Antoine Winfield Jr., right, intercepts a pass intended for Penn State receiver Justin Shorter, , one of the Gophers’ three picks in Saturday’s 31-26 win in Minneapolis.

HOW THE TOP 25 FARED

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MINNEAPOLIS — The progress made by Minnesota in coach P.J. Fleck’s third season had been met by natural skepticism outside the long-languishing program, with even the most ardent fans in full prove-it mode for this game of unbeaten teams against Penn State. From start to finish, the Gophers matched the moment. They took down the Nittany Lions with a narrative-altering performance. Jordan Howden picked off Sean Clifford’s pass in the end zone with 1:01 left, the third interception thrown by Penn State’s quarterback, and 13th-ranked Minnesota held on for a 31-26 victory on Saturday afternoon for its first win over a top-five team in 20 years. “I’m just so proud to be a Gopher, and I speak for our whole team when I say that,” said Fleck, who declared the game ball he handed afterward to the school president for the entire state. Tanner Morgan passed for 339 yards and three touchdowns in a

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NO. 1 LSU (9-0) 46, NO. 2 ALABAMA (8-1) 41 The Tigers scored 2 TDs in the final 26 seconds of the first half in a pivotal flurry to gain the inside track to the SEC title game.

NO. 1 LSU (9-0) 46, NO. 2 ALABAMA (8-1) 41 The Crimson Tide simply didn’t have enough time — and couldn’t get the one stop it needed — to overcome a horrific first half.

NO. 3 OHIO STATE (9-0) 73, MARYLAND (3-7) 14 Justin Fields threw for 3 TDs and ran for another in the first half as the Buckeyes hardly missed suspended defensive star Chase Young.

NO. 4 CLEMSON (10-0) 55, NC STATE (4-5) 10 Since escaping with a 2120 win at North Carolina on Sept. 28, the Tigers have won the past four games by an average of 40.8 points.

NO. 13 MINNESOTA (9-0) 31, NO. 5 PENN STATE (8-1) 26 The Nittany Lions watched a defense that had allowed the second-fewest points in the FBS give up 321 yards and 24 points in the first half.

NEXT: at Mississippi

NEXT: at Mississippi State

NEXT: at Rutgers

NEXT: vs. Wake Forest

NEXT: vs. Indiana

NO. 6 GEORGIA (8-1) 27, MISSOURI (5-4) 0 | Jake Fromm threw 2 TD passes to George Pickens and the Bulldogs dominating a Missouri offense missing its biggest playmakers. NEXT: at Auburn

NO. 16 WISCONSIN (7-2) 24, NO. 18 IOWA (6-3) 22 | Jonathan Taylor rushed for a season-high 250 yards for the Badgers, who kept their Big Ten West title hopes alive. NEXT: at Nebraska

NO. 7 OREGON (8-1), IDLE | Over the course of quarterback Justin Herbert’s career, the high-flying Ducks are averaging 38.2 points when he starts. NEXT: vs. Arizona

NO. 17 CINCINNATI (8-1) 48, CONNECTICUT (2-8) 3 | Desmond Ridder threw for a pair of touchdowns and Michael Warren II ran for two more in a blowout victory. NEXT: at South Florida

NO. 8 UTAH (8-1), IDLE | The Utes and Oregon are on a clear path to a Pac-12 championship game matching 11-1 teams, with the winner a serious playoff contender. NEXT: vs. UCLA

NO. 16 WISCONSIN (7-2) 24, NO. 18 IOWA (6-3) 22 | The Hawkeyes trailed 21-6 after three quarters but failed on a two-point conversion with 3:12 remaining. NEXT: vs. Minnesota

NO. 9 OKLAHOMA (7-1) VS. IOWA STATE (5-3), LATE | The Sooners, coming off a bye, were trying to avoid a second straight loss with league-leading Baylor looming. NEXT: at Baylor

NO. 19 MEMPHIS (8-1), IDLE | The Tigers, who moved up five spots from last week, went into their open date averaging 41.1 points and 475.4 yards a game. NEXT: vs. East Carolina

NO. 10 FLORIDA (8-1) 56, VANDERBILT (2-6) 0 | Quarterback Kyle Trask threw for a career-high 363 yards — the most by a Florida quarterback since Tim Tebow’s finale. NEXT: at Missouri

TEXAS (6-3) 27, NO. 20 KANSAS STATE (6-3) 24 | The Wildcats led 14-0 early but couldn’t hold the lead, losing on Cameron Dicker’s 26-yard field goal as time expired. NEXT: vs. West Virginia

NO. 11 BAYLOR (9-0) 29, TCU (4-5) 23, 3OT | The Bears kept their undefeated season intact after the Frogs, with first-and-goal from the 1, failed to score in the third OT. NEXT: vs. Oklahoma

NO. 21 BOISE STATE (7-1) VS. WYOMING (6-2), LATE | The Broncos no longer control their path to a New Year’s Six bowl game, as they trail Cincinnati and Memphis. NEXT: vs. New Mexico

NO. 12 AUBURN(7-2),IDLE|The Tigers dominated the stat sheet but needed a defensive stop last week to beat Ole Miss. They’ll have to cash in those opportunities next week. NEXT: vs. Georgia

VIRGINIA TECH (6-3) 36, NO. 22 WAKE FOREST (7-2) 17 | The Demon Deacons struggled against Tech’s defense, finishing with season lows in yards (310) and points. NEXT: at Clemson

NO. 13 MINNESOTA (9-0) 31, NO. 5 PENN STATE (8-1) 26 | Jordan Howden’s interception, the Gophers’ third, sealed their first win over a top-five team in 20 years. NEXT: at Iowa

NO. 23 SMU (9-1) 59, EAST CAROLINA (3-7) 51 | The Mustangs played from ahead and kept it that way in a second straight game with more than 1,000 combined yards. NEXT: Idle

NO. 14 MICHIGAN (7-2), IDLE | The Wolverines appear to be playing their best football of the season, with a pair of blowout victories heading into their bye week. NEXT: vs. Michigan State

NO. 24 SAN DIEGO STATE (7-1) VS. NEVADA (5-4), LATE | The Aztecs began a stretch of four straight games against Mountain West rivals that beat them last year. NEXT: vs. Fresno State

NO. 15 NOTRE DAME (7-2) 38, DUKE (4-5), 10 | The Irish are out of the College Football Playoff discussion but a New Year’s Six bowl remains a possibility. NEXT: vs. Navy

NO. 25 NAVY (7-1), IDLE | The Midshipmen are ranked for the first time since 2017 and already have more than doubled their win total from last season’s 3-9 finish. NEXT: at Notre Dame

MAJOR COLLEGE SCORES & STANDINGS

NOTES WEST CONF San Diego State 4-1 Hawaii 2-3 Nevada 2-3 Fresno State 2-3 San Jose State 1-4 UNLV 0-5 Saturday’s results Utah State 37, Fresno State 35 Wyoming at Boise State, late Nevada at San Diego State, late San Jose State at Hawaii, late Air Force at New Mexico, ppd.

AMERICAN ATHLETIC EAST CONF Cincinnati 5-0 UCF 4-2 Temple 3-2 South Florida 2-3 East Carolina 0-6 Connecticut 0-6 WEST CONF SMU 5-1 Navy 5-1 Memphis 4-1 Tulane 3-2 Houston 1-4 Tulsa 1-5 Thursday’s result Temple 17, South Florida 7 Friday’s result Tulsa 34, UCF 31 Saturday’s results SMU 59, East Carolina 51 Cincinnati 48, Connecticut 3

ALL 8-1 7-3 6-3 4-5 3-7 2-8 ALL 9-1 7-1 8-1 6-3 3-6 3-7

BIG 12 SCHOOL CONF Baylor 6-0 Oklahoma 4-1 Texas 4-2 Iowa State 3-2 Oklahoma State 3-3 Kansas State 3-3 TCU 2-4 Texas Tech 2-4 West Virginia 1-5 Kansas 1-5 Saturday’s results Baylor 29, TCU 23, 3OT Texas Tech 38, West Virginia 17 Texas 27, Kansas State 24 Iowa State at Oklahoma, late

ALL 9-0 7-1 6-3 5-3 6-3 6-3 4-5 4-5 3-6 3-6

BIG TEN EAST CONF Ohio State 6-0 Penn State 5-1 Michigan 4-2 Indiana 4-2 Michigan State 2-4 Maryland 1-6 Rutgers 0-6 WEST CONF Minnesota 6-0 Wisconsin 4-2 Illinois 4-3 Iowa 3-3 Nebraska 2-4 Purdue 3-4 Northwestern 0-7 Saturday’s results Ohio State 73, Maryland 14 Minnesota 31, Penn State 26 Purdue 24, Northwestern 22 Illinois 37, Michigan State 34 Wisconsin 24, Iowa 22

ALL 9-0 8-1 7-2 7-2 4-5 3-7 2-7 ALL 9-0 7-2 6-4 6-3 4-5 4-6 1-8

CONF 5-1 4-1 4-2 3-4 3-3 2-3 0-5

AP PHOTO

Saturday’s stars Denzel Mims (ABOVE), Baylor, WR: Mims made a leaping 4-yard touchdown catch in the third overtime for a 29-23 victory over TCU that keeps the Bears undefeated.

Shane Buechele, SMU, QB: Buechele threw five touchdown passes, three to tight end Kylen Granson, and 414 yards as the Mustangs outlasted East Carolina 59-51. Evan Price, Colorado, PK: The freshman kicker made a 37-yard field goal with no time remaining to beat Stanford 16-13 and snap the Buffaloes’ five-game skid. Jarren Williams, Miami, QB: Williams set a school record with six touchdown passes as the Hurricanes clinched bowl-eligibility with a 52-27 win over Louisville.

ALL 7-3 6-3 6-4 5-5 5-5 3-6 1-8

SCHOOL ALL Notre Dame 6-2 Liberty 6-3 BYU 4-4 Army 4-6 Massachusetts 1-9 New Mexico State 0-9 Saturday’s results Army 63, Massachusetts 7 Mississippi 41, New Mexico State 3 Notre Dame at Duke, late Liberty at BYU, late

EAST CONF ALL Georgia 5-1 8-1 Florida 5-2 8-2 South Carolina 3-4 4-5 Missouri 2-3 5-4 Tennessee 2-3 4-5 Kentucky 2-4 4-4 Vanderbilt 1-5 2-7 WEST CONF ALL LSU 5-0 9-0 Alabama 5-1 8-1 Auburn 4-2 7-2 Texas A&M 3-2 6-3 Mississippi State 2-4 4-5 Mississippi 2-4 4-6 Arkansas 0-6 2-8 Saturday’s results LSU 46, Alabama 41 Florida 56, Vanderbilt 0 Western Kentucky 45, Arkansas 19 Mississippi 41, New Mexico State 3 Georgia 27, Missouri 0 Appalachian State at South Carolina, late Tennessee at Kentucky, late

SUN BELT

Brandon Peters, Illinois, QB: Peters threw for 369 yards and three touchdowns in rallying the Illini from a 31-10 fourth-quarter deficit to stun Michigan State 37-34. WEST CONF ALL Louisiana Tech 5-0 8-1 Southern Miss 4-1 6-3 North Texas 3-3 4-6 UAB 3-2 6-3 UTSA 3-2 4-5 UTEP 0-6 1-8 Rice 0-5 0-9 Saturday’s results Western Kentucky 45, Arkansas 19 UTSA 24, Old Dominion 23 Charlotte 28, UTEP 21 Southern Mississippi 37, UAB 2 Louisiana Tech 52, North Texas 17 Florida Atlantic 37, Florida International 7

NORTH CONF ALL Oregon 6-0 8-1 Oregon State 3-3 4-5 Washington 3-4 6-4 Stanford 3-4 4-5 California 2-4 5-4 Washington State 1-5 4-5 SOUTH CONF ALL Utah 5-1 8-1 Southern Cal 5-2 6-4 UCLA 4-2 4-5 Arizona State 2-4 5-4 Arizona 2-4 4-5 Colorado 2-5 4-6 Friday’s result Washington 19, Oregon State 7 Saturday’s results Colorado 16, Stanford 13 Southern Cal 31, Arizona State 26 California 33, Washington State 20

EAST Appalachian State Georgia State Georgia Southern Troy Coastal Carolina WEST Louisiana Arkansas State Louisiana Monroe Texas State South Alabama

CONF 4-1 3-2 3-2 2-3 1-5 CONF 5-1 3-2 3-2 2-3 0-5

Thursday’s result Louisiana 48, Coastal Carolina 7 Saturday’s results Texas State 30, South Alabama 28 Troy 49, Georgia Southern 28 UL Monroe 45, Georgia State 31 Appalachian State at South Carolina, late

Saturday’s other results

SOUTHEASTERN

Tanner Morgan, Minnesota, QB: Morgan passed for 339 yards and three touchdowns to direct a dismantling of Penn State’s staunch defense in a 31-26 victory that kept the Gophers undefeated.

INDEPENDENTS

CONFERENCE USA

ALL 7-1 5-4 5-4 4-5 4-5 2-7

PAC-12

ATLANTIC COAST ATLANTIC CONF ALL Clemson 7-0 10-0 Wake Forest 3-2 7-2 Florida State 4-4 5-5 Louisville 3-3 5-4 Boston College 3-4 5-5 NC State 1-3 4-4 Syracuse 0-5 3-6 COASTAL CONF ALL Virginia 5-2 7-3 Virginia Tech 3-2 6-3 Pittsburgh 3-2 6-3 Miami 4-3 6-4 North Carolina 3-3 4-5 Duke 2-4 4-5 Georgia Tech 1-5 2-7 Saturday’s results Florida State 38, Boston College 31 Virginia 33, Georgia Tech 28 Virginia Tech 36, Wake Forest 17 Miami 52, Louisville 27 Clemson 55, NC State 10 Notre Dame 38, Duke 7

EAST Florida Atlantic Marshall Western Kentucky Florida International Charlotte Middle Tennessee Old Dominion

dismantling of fifth-ranked Penn State’s staunch defense, as Minnesota (9-0, 6-0, No. 17 CFP) stayed on track for its first trip to the Big Ten championship game. For a program has not won the conference since a shared title in 1967, this is a whole new world. “As an athlete and just in life,” Morgan said, “you should want pressure because that means your life is significant.” The first sellout crowd for the Gophers at home in four years swarmed the field after the clock ran out, reveling in the first win at home over a top-five team since a shutout of No. 1 Michigan in 1977. The Gophers scrambled the College Football Playoff picture a bit, too, after Penn State (8-1, 5-1, No. 4 CFP) emerged with a topfour spot in the first edition of the rankings. Rashod Bateman got the Gophers going with a 66-yard score on their first possession that covered 95 yards. He finished with seven catches for 203 yards, the second-most in program history.

ALL 7-1 6-3 5-4 4-5 4-6 ALL 8-2 5-4 4-5 3-6 1-8

EAST Albany (NY) 21, Delaware 17 Bucknell 20, Lehigh 10 CCSU 38, St. Francis (Pa.) 31, OT Colgate 24, Fordham 13 Columbia 17, Harvard 10, OT Dartmouth 27, Princeton 10 Delaware St. 16, Bethune-Cookman 13 Lafayette 23, Holy Cross 20 Monmouth (NJ) 49, North Alabama 38 Morgan St. 22, NC A&T 16 Penn 21, Cornell 20 Robert Morris 41, Duquesne 21 Sacred Heart 41, Wagner 7 Texas Tech 38, West Virginia 17 Towson 31, Stony Brook 14 Villanova 35, Richmond 28 Yale 59, Brown 35 SOUTH Alabama A&M 48, Jackson St. 43 Austin Peay 38, UT Martin 24 Chattanooga 35, Samford 27 E. Illinois 49, Tennessee St. 38 FAU 37, FIU 7 Furman 60, VMI 21 Grambling St. 19, Alcorn St. 16, OT James Madison 54, New Hampshire 16 Kennesaw St. 38, Campbell 35 Maine 31, Elon 17 Miami 52, Louisville 27 Mississippi 41, New Mexico St. 3 Nicholls 48, Houston Baptist 27 Norfolk St. 38, NC Central 21 Presbyterian 24, Gardner-Webb 14 SC State 62, Howard 21 San Diego 51, Stetson 7 Southern U. 58, Va. Lynchburg 7 Tennessee Tech 37, Jacksonville St. 27 W. Carolina 23, ETSU 20, OT William & Mary 55, Rhode Island 19 Wofford 41, Mercer 7 MIDWEST Cincinnati 48, UConn 3 Davidson 52, Butler 10 Dayton 59, Marist 35 Drake 28, Jacksonville 14 Illinois St. 27, S. Dakota St. 18 Morehead St. 27, Valparaiso 21 N. Dakota St. 57, W. Illinois 21 N. Iowa 17, Indiana St. 9 S. Illinois 37, Missouri St. 14 SE Missouri 38, E. Kentucky 31 South Dakota 56, Youngstown St. 21 SOUTHWEST Alabama St. 27, Texas Southern 21 Charlotte 28, UTEP 21 Prairie View 37, Ark.-Pine Bluff 20 SE Louisiana 34, Cent. Arkansas 0 Sam Houston St. 24, Abilene Christian 10 Stephen F. Austin 31, Incarnate Word 24 FAR WEST E. Washington 48, Idaho St. 5 Montana 42, Idaho 17 Montana St. 45, N. Colorado 14 Sacramento St. 38, N. Arizona 34 UC Davis 45, Portland St. 28 Weber St. 30, North Dakota 27

ALL 5-4 5-4 4-5 3-6 3-6 0-9 ALL 6-4 6-4 6-3 4-5 3-6 4-5

CONF 4-0 4-1 4-1 3-1 3-2 0-5

Trump get s a warm welcome in Alabama TUSCALOOSA, Ala. — President Donald Trump knew where to go Saturday for home field advantage, finding comfort in the Deep South with college football fans cheering the nation’s top two teams — and him. His reception at the showdown between LSU and Alabama contrasted with the scene at Game 5 of the World Series in Washington, where he was booed, and the mixed response to his appearance at a martial arts fight in New York. BRIEFLY FLORIDA STATE beat Boston College 38-31 to win their first game without fired coach Willie Taggart. Odell Haggins improved to 3-0 as an interim head coach. WILLIAM AND MARY broke a 49-year-old school record with 462 yards rushing in a 5-19 victory over Rhode Island.

NORTH DAKOTA STATE won its 31st game in a row. The top-ranked FCS team routed Western Illinois 57-21. — Associated Press

THE NUMBER

19

MOUNTAIN WEST MOUNTAIN Boise State Air Force Utah State Wyoming Colorado State New Mexico

Ohio State expects star defensive end Chase Young to be handed a four-game suspension for accepting a loan from a family friend, ESPN reported Saturday. The Buckeyes are hopeful that an appeal of Young’s case with the NCAA will yield a reduction in the number of games, sources said. The length of the suspe nsion is tied to the monetary value of the loan Young said he took out in 2018, a loan he says he has since repaid.

COLUMBIA beat Harvard for the first time since 2003, beating the Crimson 17-10 in overtime.

MID-AMERICAN EAST CONF Miami (Ohio) 4-1 Buffalo 3-2 Ohio 3-2 Kent State 2-3 Bowling Green 2-3 Akron 0-5 WEST CONF Central Michigan 4-2 Western Michigan 4-2 Toledo 3-2 Ball State 3-2 Northern Illinois 2-3 Eastern Michigan 1-4 Tuesday’s results Toledo 35, Kent State 33 Western Michigan 35, Ball State 31 Wednesday’s result Miami (Ohio) 24, Ohio 21

Ohio St. expects 4-game suspension for Young

ALL 7-1 7-2 5-4 6-2 4-5 2-7

Texas’ Cameron Dicker watches as his last-second field goal gives the Longhorns a 27-24 victory over Kansas State on Saturday in Austin, Texas.

Minnesota has scored touchdowns on all 19 of its goalto-go possessions this season. They were 1-for-1 in Saturday’s victory over Penn State, with the rest of the Gophers’ touchdowns coming on long gains.


COLLEGE FOOTBALL

D6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 3 • SUnDAy • 11.10.2019

Finally on big stage, Gophers prove they belong ASSOCIATED PRESS

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Minnesota defensive back Antoine Winfield Jr., right, intercepts a pass intended for Penn State receiver Justin Shorter, one of the Gophers’ three picks in Saturday’s 31-26 win in Minneapolis.

HOW THE TOP 25 FARED

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MINNEAPOLIS — The progress made by Minnesota in coach P.J. Fleck’s third season had been met by natural skepticism outside the long-languishing program, with even the most ardent fans in full prove-it mode for this game of unbeaten teams against Penn State. From start to finish, the Gophers matched the moment. They took down the Nittany Lions with a narrative-altering performance. Jordan Howden picked off Sean Clifford’s pass in the end zone with 1:01 left, the third interception thrown by Penn State’s quarterback, and 13th-ranked Minnesota held on for a 31-26 victory on Saturday afternoon for its first win over a top-five team in 20 years. “I’m just so proud to be a Gopher, and I speak for our whole team when I say that,” said Fleck, who declared the game ball he handed afterward to the school president for the entire state. Tanner Morgan passed for 339 yards and three touchdowns in a

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NO. 1 LSU (9-0) 46, NO. 2 ALABAMA (8-1) 41 The Tigers scored 2 TDs in the final 26 seconds of the first half in a pivotal flurry to gain the inside track to the SEC title game.

NO. 1 LSU (9-0) 46, NO. 2 ALABAMA (8-1) 41 The Crimson Tide simply didn’t have enough time — and couldn’t get the one stop it needed — to overcome a horrific first half.

NO. 3 OHIO STATE (9-0) 73, MARYLAND (3-7) 14 Justin Fields threw for 3 TDs and ran for another in the first half as the Buckeyes hardly missed suspended defensive star Chase Young.

NO. 4 CLEMSON (10-0) 55, NC STATE (4-5) 10 Trevor Lawrence threw for 2 TDs and ran for another in a dominating first quarter as Clemson clinchd a trip to the ACC title game.

NO. 13 MINNESOTA (9-0) 31, NO. 5 PENN STATE (8-1) 26 The Nittany Lions watched a defense that had allowed the second-fewest points in the FBS give up 321 yards and 24 points in the first half.

NEXT: at Mississippi

NEXT: at Mississippi State

NEXT: at Rutgers

NEXT: vs. Wake Forest

NEXT: vs. Indiana

NO. 6 GEORGIA (8-1) 27, MISSOURI (5-4) 0 | Jake Fromm threw 2 TD passes to George Pickens and the Bulldogs dominated a Missouri offense missing its biggest playmakers. NEXT: at Auburn

NO. 16 WISCONSIN (7-2) 24, NO. 18 IOWA (6-3) 22 | Jonathan Taylor rushed for a season-high 250 yards for the Badgers, who kept their Big Ten West title hopes alive. NEXT: at Nebraska

NO. 7 OREGON (8-1), IDLE | Over the course of quarterback Justin Herbert’s career, the high-flying Ducks are averaging 38.2 points when he starts. NEXT: vs. Arizona

NO. 17 CINCINNATI (8-1) 48, CONNECTICUT (2-8) 3 | Desmond Ridder threw for a pair of touchdowns and Michael Warren II ran for two more in a blowout victory. NEXT: at South Florida

NO. 8 UTAH (8-1), IDLE | The Utes and Oregon are on a clear path to a Pac-12 championship game matching 11-1 teams, with the winner a serious playoff contender. NEXT: vs. UCLA

NO. 16 WISCONSIN (7-2) 24, NO. 18 IOWA (6-3) 22 | The Hawkeyes trailed 21-6 after three quarters but failed on a two-point conversion with 3:12 remaining. NEXT: vs. Minnesota

NO. 9 OKLAHOMA (8-1) 42, IOWA STATE (5-4) 41 | The Sooners avoided a second straight upset loss when Iowa State failed on a two-point conversion in the final minute. NEXT: at Baylor

NO. 19 MEMPHIS (8-1), IDLE | The Tigers, who moved up five spots from last week, went into their open date averaging 41.1 points and 475.4 yards a game. NEXT: vs. East Carolina

NO. 10 FLORIDA (8-1) 56, VANDERBILT (2-6) 0 | Quarterback Kyle Trask threw for a career-high 363 yards — the most by a Florida quarterback since Tim Tebow’s finale. NEXT: at Missouri

TEXAS (6-3) 27, NO. 20 KANSAS STATE (6-3) 24 | The Wildcats led 14-0 early but couldn’t hold the lead, losing on Cameron Dicker’s 26-yard field goal as time expired. NEXT: vs. West Virginia

NO. 11 BAYLOR (9-0) 29, TCU (4-5) 23, 3OT | The Bears kept their undefeated season intact after the Frogs, with first-and-goal from the 1, failed to score in the third OT. NEXT: vs. Oklahoma

NO. 21 BOISE STATE (7-1) VS. WYOMING (6-2), LATE | The Broncos no longer control their path to a New Year’s Six bowl game, as they trail Cincinnati and Memphis. NEXT: vs. New Mexico

NO. 12 AUBURN(7-2),IDLE|The Tigers dominated the stat sheet but needed a defensive stop last week to beat Ole Miss. They’ll have to cash in those opportunities next week. NEXT: vs. Georgia

VIRGINIA TECH (6-3) 36, NO. 22 WAKE FOREST (7-2) 17 | The Demon Deacons struggled against Tech’s defense, finishing with season lows in yards (310) and points. NEXT: at Clemson

NO. 13 MINNESOTA (9-0) 31, NO. 5 PENN STATE (8-1) 26 | Jordan Howden’s interception, the Gophers’ third, sealed their first win over a top-five team in 20 years. NEXT: at Iowa

NO. 23 SMU (9-1) 59, EAST CAROLINA (3-7) 51 | The Mustangs played from ahead and kept it that way in a second straight game with more than 1,000 combined yards. NEXT: Idle

NO. 14 MICHIGAN (7-2), IDLE | The Wolverines appear to be playing their best football of the season, with a pair of blowout victories heading into their bye week. NEXT: vs. Michigan State

NO. 24 SAN DIEGO STATE (7-1) VS. NEVADA (5-4), LATE | The Aztecs began a stretch of four straight games against Mountain West rivals that beat them last year. NEXT: vs. Fresno State

NO. 15 NOTRE DAME (7-2) 38, DUKE (4-5) 7 | The Irish stayed in the hunt for a New Year’s Six bowl behind Ian Book’s career-best 139 yards rushing and 4 TD passes. NEXT: vs. Navy

NO. 25 NAVY (7-1), IDLE | The Midshipmen are ranked for the first time since 2017 and already have more than doubled their win total from last season’s 3-9 finish. NEXT: at Notre Dame

MAJOR COLLEGE SCORES & STANDINGS

NOTES WEST CONF San Diego State 4-1 Hawaii 2-3 Nevada 2-3 Fresno State 2-3 San Jose State 1-4 UNLV 0-5 Saturday’s results Utah State 37, Fresno State 35 Wyoming at Boise State, late Nevada at San Diego State, late San Jose State at Hawaii, late Air Force at New Mexico, ppd.

AMERICAN ATHLETIC EAST CONF Cincinnati 5-0 UCF 4-2 Temple 3-2 South Florida 2-3 East Carolina 0-6 Connecticut 0-6 WEST CONF SMU 5-1 Navy 5-1 Memphis 4-1 Tulane 3-2 Houston 1-4 Tulsa 1-5 Thursday’s result Temple 17, South Florida 7 Friday’s result Tulsa 34, UCF 31 Saturday’s results SMU 59, East Carolina 51 Cincinnati 48, Connecticut 3

ALL 8-1 7-3 6-3 4-5 3-7 2-8 ALL 9-1 7-1 8-1 6-3 3-6 3-7

BIG 12 SCHOOL CONF Baylor 6-0 Oklahoma 5-1 Texas 4-2 Iowa State 3-3 Oklahoma State 3-3 Kansas State 3-3 TCU 2-4 Texas Tech 2-4 West Virginia 1-5 Kansas 1-5 Saturday’s results Baylor 29, TCU 23, 3OT Texas Tech 38, West Virginia 17 Texas 27, Kansas State 24 Oklahoma 42, Iowa State 41

ALL 9-0 8-1 6-3 5-4 6-3 6-3 4-5 4-5 3-6 3-6

BIG TEN EAST CONF Ohio State 6-0 Penn State 5-1 Michigan 4-2 Indiana 4-2 Michigan State 2-4 Maryland 1-6 Rutgers 0-6 WEST CONF Minnesota 6-0 Wisconsin 4-2 Illinois 4-3 Iowa 3-3 Nebraska 2-4 Purdue 3-4 Northwestern 0-7 Saturday’s results Ohio State 73, Maryland 14 Minnesota 31, Penn State 26 Purdue 24, Northwestern 22 Illinois 37, Michigan State 34 Wisconsin 24, Iowa 22

ALL 9-0 8-1 7-2 7-2 4-5 3-7 2-7 ALL 9-0 7-2 6-4 6-3 4-5 4-6 1-8

CONF 5-1 4-1 4-2 3-4 3-3 2-3 0-5

AP PHOTO

Saturday’s stars Denzel Mims (ABOVE), Baylor, WR: Mims made a leaping 4-yard touchdown catch in the third overtime for a 29-23 victory over TCU that keeps the Bears undefeated.

Shane Buechele, SMU, QB: Buechele threw five touchdown passes, three to tight end Kylen Granson, and 414 yards as the Mustangs outlasted East Carolina 59-51. Evan Price, Colorado, PK: The freshman kicker made a 37-yard field goal with no time remaining to beat Stanford 16-13 and snap the Buffaloes’ five-game skid. Jarren Williams, Miami, QB: Williams set a school record with six touchdown passes as the Hurricanes clinched bowl-eligibility with a 52-27 win over Louisville.

ALL 7-3 6-3 6-4 5-5 5-5 3-6 1-8

SCHOOL ALL Notre Dame 7-2 Liberty 6-4 BYU 5-4 Army 4-6 Massachusetts 1-9 New Mexico State 0-9 Saturday’s results Army 63, Massachusetts 7 Mississippi 41, New Mexico State 3 Notre Dame 38, Duke 7 BYU 31, Liberty 24

EAST CONF ALL Georgia 5-1 8-1 Florida 5-2 8-2 Tennessee 3-3 5-5 South Carolina 3-4 4-6 Missouri 2-3 5-4 Kentucky 2-5 4-5 Vanderbilt 1-5 2-7 WEST CONF ALL LSU 5-0 9-0 Alabama 5-1 8-1 Auburn 4-2 7-2 Texas A&M 3-2 6-3 Mississippi State 2-4 4-5 Mississippi 2-4 4-6 Arkansas 0-6 2-8 Saturday’s results LSU 46, Alabama 41 Florida 56, Vanderbilt 0 Western Kentucky 45, Arkansas 19 Mississippi 41, New Mexico State 3 Georgia 27, Missouri 0 Appalachian State 20, South Carolina 15 Tennessee 17, Kentucky 13

SUN BELT

Brandon Peters, Illinois, QB: Peters threw for 369 yards and three touchdowns in rallying the Illini from a 31-10 fourth-quarter deficit to stun Michigan State 37-34. WEST CONF ALL Louisiana Tech 5-0 8-1 Southern Miss 4-1 6-3 North Texas 3-3 4-6 UAB 3-2 6-3 UTSA 3-2 4-5 UTEP 0-6 1-8 Rice 0-5 0-9 Saturday’s results Western Kentucky 45, Arkansas 19 UTSA 24, Old Dominion 23 Charlotte 28, UTEP 21 Southern Mississippi 37, UAB 2 Louisiana Tech 52, North Texas 17 Florida Atlantic 37, Florida International 7

NORTH CONF ALL Oregon 6-0 8-1 Oregon State 3-3 4-5 Washington 3-4 6-4 Stanford 3-4 4-5 California 2-4 5-4 Washington State 1-5 4-5 SOUTH CONF ALL Utah 5-1 8-1 Southern Cal 5-2 6-4 UCLA 4-2 4-5 Arizona State 2-4 5-4 Arizona 2-4 4-5 Colorado 2-5 4-6 Friday’s result Washington 19, Oregon State 7 Saturday’s results Colorado 16, Stanford 13 Southern Cal 31, Arizona State 26 California 33, Washington State 20

EAST Appalachian State Georgia State Georgia Southern Troy Coastal Carolina WEST Louisiana Arkansas State Louisiana Monroe Texas State South Alabama

CONF 4-1 3-2 3-2 2-3 1-5 CONF 5-1 3-2 3-2 2-3 0-5

Thursday’s result Louisiana 48, Coastal Carolina 7 Saturday’s results Texas State 30, South Alabama 28 Troy 49, Georgia Southern 28 UL Monroe 45, Georgia State 31 Appalachian State at South Carolina, late

Saturday’s other results

SOUTHEASTERN

Tanner Morgan, Minnesota, QB: Morgan passed for 339 yards and three touchdowns to direct a dismantling of Penn State’s staunch defense in a 31-26 victory that kept the Gophers undefeated.

INDEPENDENTS

CONFERENCE USA

ALL 7-1 5-4 5-4 4-5 4-5 2-7

PAC-12

ATLANTIC COAST ATLANTIC CONF ALL Clemson 7-0 10-0 Wake Forest 3-2 7-2 Florida State 4-4 5-5 Louisville 3-3 5-4 Boston College 3-4 5-5 NC State 1-4 4-5 Syracuse 0-5 3-6 COASTAL CONF ALL Virginia 5-2 7-3 Virginia Tech 3-2 6-3 Pittsburgh 3-2 6-3 Miami 4-3 6-4 North Carolina 3-3 4-5 Duke 2-4 4-5 Georgia Tech 1-5 2-7 Saturday’s results Florida State 38, Boston College 31 Virginia 33, Georgia Tech 28 Virginia Tech 36, Wake Forest 17 Miami 52, Louisville 27 Clemson 55, NC State 10 Notre Dame 38, Duke 7

EAST Florida Atlantic Marshall Western Kentucky Florida International Charlotte Middle Tennessee Old Dominion

dismantling of fifth-ranked Penn State’s staunch defense, as Minnesota (9-0, 6-0, No. 17 CFP) stayed on track for its first trip to the Big Ten championship game. For a program has not won the conference since a shared title in 1967, this is a whole new world. “As an athlete and just in life,” Morgan said, “you should want pressure because that means your life is significant.” The first sellout crowd for the Gophers at home in four years swarmed the field after the clock ran out, reveling in the first win at home over a top-five team since a shutout of No. 1 Michigan in 1977. The Gophers scrambled the College Football Playoff picture a bit, too, after Penn State (8-1, 5-1, No. 4 CFP) emerged with a topfour spot in the first edition of the rankings. Rashod Bateman got the Gophers going with a 66-yard score on their first possession that covered 95 yards. He finished with seven catches for 203 yards, the second-most in program history.

ALL 7-1 6-3 5-4 4-5 4-6 ALL 8-2 5-4 4-5 3-6 1-8

EAST Albany (NY) 21, Delaware 17 Bucknell 20, Lehigh 10 CCSU 38, St. Francis (Pa.) 31, OT Colgate 24, Fordham 13 Columbia 17, Harvard 10, OT Dartmouth 27, Princeton 10 Delaware St. 16, Bethune-Cookman 13 Lafayette 23, Holy Cross 20 Monmouth (NJ) 49, North Alabama 38 Morgan St. 22, NC A&T 16 Penn 21, Cornell 20 Robert Morris 41, Duquesne 21 Sacred Heart 41, Wagner 7 Texas Tech 38, West Virginia 17 Towson 31, Stony Brook 14 Villanova 35, Richmond 28 Yale 59, Brown 35 SOUTH Alabama A&M 48, Jackson St. 43 Austin Peay 38, UT Martin 24 Chattanooga 35, Samford 27 E. Illinois 49, Tennessee St. 38 FAU 37, FIU 7 Furman 60, VMI 21 Grambling St. 19, Alcorn St. 16, OT James Madison 54, New Hampshire 16 Kennesaw St. 38, Campbell 35 Maine 31, Elon 17 Miami 52, Louisville 27 Mississippi 41, New Mexico St. 3 Nicholls 48, Houston Baptist 27 Norfolk St. 38, NC Central 21 Presbyterian 24, Gardner-Webb 14 SC State 62, Howard 21 San Diego 51, Stetson 7 Southern U. 58, Va. Lynchburg 7 Tennessee Tech 37, Jacksonville St. 27 W. Carolina 23, ETSU 20, OT William & Mary 55, Rhode Island 19 Wofford 41, Mercer 7 MIDWEST Cincinnati 48, UConn 3 Davidson 52, Butler 10 Dayton 59, Marist 35 Drake 28, Jacksonville 14 Illinois St. 27, S. Dakota St. 18 Morehead St. 27, Valparaiso 21 N. Dakota St. 57, W. Illinois 21 N. Iowa 17, Indiana St. 9 S. Illinois 37, Missouri St. 14 SE Missouri 38, E. Kentucky 31 South Dakota 56, Youngstown St. 21 SOUTHWEST Alabama St. 27, Texas Southern 21 Charlotte 28, UTEP 21 Prairie View 37, Ark.-Pine Bluff 20 SE Louisiana 34, Cent. Arkansas 0 Sam Houston St. 24, Abilene Christian 10 Stephen F. Austin 31, Incarnate Word 24 FAR WEST E. Washington 48, Idaho St. 5 Montana 42, Idaho 17 Montana St. 45, N. Colorado 14 Sacramento St. 38, N. Arizona 34 UC Davis 45, Portland St. 28 Weber St. 30, North Dakota 27

ALL 5-4 5-4 4-5 3-6 3-6 0-9 ALL 6-4 6-4 6-3 4-5 3-6 4-5

CONF 4-0 4-1 4-1 3-1 3-2 0-5

Trump gets a warm welcome in Alabama TUSCALOOSA, Ala. — President Donald Trump knew where to go Saturday for home field advantage, finding comfort in the Deep South with college football fans cheering the nation’s top two teams — and him. His reception at the showdown between LSU and Alabama contrasted with the scene at Game 5 of the World Series in Washington, where he was booed, and the mixed response to his appearance at a martial arts fight in New York. BRIEFLY FLORIDA STATE beat Boston College 38-31 to win their first game without fired coach Willie Taggart. Odell Haggins improved to 3-0 as an interim head coach. WILLIAM AND MARY broke a 49-year-old school record with 462 yards rushing in a 5-19 victory over Rhode Island.

NORTH DAKOTA STATE won its 31st game in a row. The top-ranked FCS team routed Western Illinois 57-21. — Associated Press

THE NUMBER

19

MOUNTAIN WEST MOUNTAIN Boise State Air Force Utah State Wyoming Colorado State New Mexico

Ohio State expects star defensive end Chase Young to be handed a four-game suspension for accepting a loan from a family friend, ESPN reported Saturday. The Buckeyes are hopeful that an appeal of Young’s case with the NCAA will yield a reduction in the number of games, sources said. The length of the suspe nsion is tied to the monetary value of the loan Young said he took out in 2018, a loan he says he has since repaid.

COLUMBIA beat Harvard for the first time since 2003, beating the Crimson 17-10 in overtime.

MID-AMERICAN EAST CONF Miami (Ohio) 4-1 Buffalo 3-2 Ohio 3-2 Kent State 2-3 Bowling Green 2-3 Akron 0-5 WEST CONF Central Michigan 4-2 Western Michigan 4-2 Toledo 3-2 Ball State 3-2 Northern Illinois 2-3 Eastern Michigan 1-4 Tuesday’s results Toledo 35, Kent State 33 Western Michigan 35, Ball State 31 Wednesday’s result Miami (Ohio) 24, Ohio 21

Ohio St. expects 4-game suspension for Young

ALL 7-1 7-2 5-4 6-2 4-5 2-7

Texas’ Cameron Dicker watches as his last-second field goal gives the Longhorns a 27-24 victory over Kansas State on Saturday in Austin, Texas.

Minnesota has scored touchdowns on all 19 of its goalto-go possessions this season. They were 1-for-1 in Saturday’s victory over Penn State, with the rest of the Gophers’ touchdowns coming on long gains.


BASEBALL

11.10.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D7

In the Cards? Not likely Slow-moving free-agent market may not interest Redbirds BY RICK HUMMEL

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Unlike pro hockey, pro football and pro basketball, when the clock starts for free agency and you can see a rash of deals completed on the first eligible day as early as 12:01 p.m. or 4:01 p.m. or 6:01 p.m., depending on the sport, baseball assumes more of a sundial approach. Free agency began five days after the World Series, which ended 10 days ago. There has been talk and speculation. But you probably won’t hear any signings of note until later this month. Or next month. Or maybe not even until next year. Or maybe not even until spring training is in session. This is the way baseball operates, with powerful agents such as Scott Boras controlling numerous high-ticket clients like the top three in this year’s class — pitchers Gerrit Cole (Houston) and Stephen Strasburg (Washington) and Nationals third baseman Anthony Rendon. Often, the lesser tiers of free agents don’t get signed until the top-tiered players go, or until those players’ wives get tired of not knowing where they’re going to be in spring training. But the top players aren’t going anywhere for a while. Eventually, most will get deals, even it takes until June, as it did in 2019 for reliever Craig Kimbrel and lefthander Dallas Keuchel, who is back on the dance floor again this year. The media attention will be severe in the next week or so as the general managers gather beginning Monday in Arizona. And it will increase during baseball’s winter meetings in San Diego in the second week of December. But, given the recent history of slow-developing marketplaces, outside interest in the free agent market will peter a bit later in December if little of substance takes place at the winter meetings. Last year, for instance, when

JEFF ROBERSON, AP PHOTO

Milwaukee’s Mike Moustakas heads to first on a single against the Cardinals in September. both Bryce Harper and Manny Machado didn’t sign until spring training had started, fans — and media people — had wearied of guessing where those two were taking their talents, other than saying, “Just take them somewhere.” Here is a brief primer on this year’s free agent crop and a look at how it might relate to the Cardinals: The Big Three: There is a good chance that Strasburg, who opted out of the remaining four years of his deal, which would have paid him $100 million, could return to Washington, and Rendon, too. But to re-sign Rendon might end up costing $35 million a year and World Series Most Valuable Player Strasburg’s deal might start with a “30-something,” as, of course, will Cole’s. Cole, 29, would seem to be in play for big-ticket teams on both coasts — Los Angeles Dodgers and Angels and New York Yankees. But a couple of sleepers could be the Chicago White Sox, who have a load of young talent and who were in the high-stakes bidding for Machado last year, and even San Francisco, which has no staff ace with Madison Bumgarner leaving for free agency. Since Strasburg, 31, has a San Diego background — he pitched at San Diego State — the Padres will make a move on making another big splash although their

plunge into the deep water with Machado last year didn’t pay off in the standings. Rendon, 29, will be appealing to the Dodgers and Texas Rangers — Rendon is a native Texan — among others. The New York Mets also need at help at third, and in their offense, in general, as they try to help their strong starting pitching. The Cardinals’ chances of signing any of the above: 0 to 3 percent. The next three: Lefthander Hyun-Jin Ryu (Dodgers), lefthander Bumgarner, catcher Yasmani Grandal (Milwaukee). As lefthanded starting pitchers, something of a rarity, the first two might command more than they are worth. Ryu, 32, could turn up with the Dodgers as he did last year, when he accepted their qualifying offer after battling shoulder problems for two years. Bumgarner, a 30-year-old native of North Carolina, might favor Atlanta as a destination although, in the past, he has shown an affinity for St. Louis. The Cardinals may be in the market for a starting pitcher but likely not a high salaried one, given some payroll restrictions. Grandal is a power-hitting, switch-hitting catcher on whom the Brewers haven’t given up on signing. The 30-year-old, who had 28 homers this past season, also might work well in Cincinnati or Houston.

Chances of the Cardinals signing any of these: Bumgarner, 10 percent; Ryu, 5 percent; Grandal, 0-2 percent. Three who could help the Cardinals: Marcell Ozuna certainly has helped — and could help — the Cardinals if the two sides can agree on a multi-year deal or he accepts their one-year, qualifying offer of $17.8 million. Ozuna had 51 homers in two seasons here and was compromised physically in both of them. A park that might favor him is Great American Ballpark in Cincinnati if the Reds want to enter the bidding. His defense in left field here has been inconsistent, at best. Mike Moustakas, who signed a one-year deal for the second successive year (Kansas City, Milwaukee) had 35 homers this past season for the Brewers after hitting 28 the year before. He does not require a qualifying offer, meaning it wouldn’t cost a draft pick to sign him. He is a lefthanded hitter with pop, which the Cardinals could use if Matt Carpenter isn’t going to be that guy consistently. But Milwaukee might still be interested and Washington surely will be if it loses Rendon. Moustakas will be of less interest to the Cardinals if they sign Ozuna. Keuchel wasn’t overly impressive against the Cardinals in the postseason for Atlanta but doesn’t require a qualifying offer and could be a solid member of any rotation. But if the Cardinals, indeed, put Carlos Martinez back into the rotation and, if, as expected, they re-sign 38-yearold veteran Adam Wainwright, they, in effect, would have their five starters in those two plus Jack Flaherty, Miles Mikolas and Dakota Hudson. Then they would have pitchers such as Daniel Ponce de Leon, Genesis Cabrera, Jake Woodford, Austin Gomber, Alex Reyes and even Ryan Helsley as possibilities for starting depth, some more possible than others. The Cardinals’ chances of signing Ozuna, 40 percent; Keuchel, 15 percent; Moustakas, 30 percent. Three more who could help the Cardinals: Wainwright, of course,

who isn’t likely to play anywhere but St. Louis if he plays. This would be his 15th season, although he missed all of 2011 after elbow surgery. Highland native Jake Odorizzi, who was 15-7 for Minnesota this past season, long has wanted to play for the Cardinals but if Wainwright returns, the club may not feel the need to sign a starter outside the organization to a big, multi-year deal. The Cardinals could even look at starting pitching help later on this off-season. Matt Wieters didn’t hit much for average (.214) but he did hit for power for the Cardinals with 11 homers in 168 at-bats this past season as he provided a solid bridge until injured Yadier Molina returned. At age 33, Wieters doesn’t fashion himself as a regular catcher any more and may like to return here as a backup and take one more chance at winning a ring. If the Cardinals kept Andrew Knizner as a third catcher, the switch-hitting Wieters could be a lefthanded bat off the bench. But, if this happens, it wouldn’t happen for a while because teams customarily construct their benches after they have tried to fill all their major needs. The Cardinals’ chances of signing Wainwright, 80 percent; Odorizzi, 15 percent; Wieters 25 percent. There are three other notable free agents undiscussed here — third baseman Josh Donaldson, righthander Zack Wheeler and shortstop Didi Gregorius. At one time, in the last year or so with Donaldson and Wheeler, the Cardinals had considerable interest in all three. But it would be a stretch to see them invest in any of the above on a multi-year basis now. All those three will wind up somewhere else and a couple even back with their most recent teams, Atlanta, Mets and Yankees, respectively. The process for all the free agents has begun. But, a caution: Don’t hold your breath waiting for daily updates. Rick Hummel @cmshhummel on Twitter rhummel@post-dispatch.com


COLLEGE FOOTBALL

11.10.2019 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D7

Hochman From D1

victory against Missouri S&T. The Lions won’t sleep tonight. “Just rushing on the field, it reassured everything why I came here,” said quarterback Cade Brister, who was part of Lindenwood coach Jed Stugart’s first recruiting class. The victory was a culmination of an accumulation — Stugart brought in new coaches, players, plays and attitudes. When he was hired, he told the school president and athletics director that by his third season, the Lions would be conference champs. This is his third season. And with a game to play, they have at least a share of the Great Lakes Valley Conference title — in Lindenwood’s first season in the GLVC. “We needed to change the culture, the belief that we can win,” Stugart said from the the field at Hunter Stadium, after his smiling players dumped a water jug on his head. “And then last year, we were in games like this when sometimes we didn’t come out on the winning end, but we fought. And this year, we’ve been so resilient to figure out ways (to win). We didn’t play well today in a lot of elements, but at this point, our guys fight.” The Lions went 4-7 in each of the past two years, including 0-5 at home last year. But this year, they’re 7-3, 6-0 in conference play, and 5-1 at home. By building a culture, the coach also built a fan base. And it was such a welcoming scene on campus Saturday, as the sun illuminated the stadium and the temperatures looked like linebackers’ numbers. Before the game, as the cheerleaders warmed up in Evans Commons, and the marching band echoed from afar, the tailgaters partied like it was 2012 (the last time the Lions had a winning season). “This team has just been growing over the last three seasons and this year, finally, brought it together,” Andy Seers said. “And you can see it — like a football Saturday is supposed to be.” Undergrads and granddads drank beers with Seers. The father of a Lindenwood linebacker took an old pop-up trailer used for camping and converted it into a tailgating rig. Painted it black with LINDENWOOD screaming across in gold. “We’ve got anything you want,” said Seers, showcasing his own

PHOTOS COURTESY DON ADAMS JR.

The Lindenwood Lions celebrate their Great Lakes Valley Conference championship Saturday after beating Missouri S&T 37-31 in overtime. The Lions won the conference title in their first year as a GLVC member.

Lindenwood receiver Glen Gibbons dives into the end zone for a 12-yard touchdown in overtime, the winning play in the Lions’ 37-31 home win Saturday against Missouri S&T. smorgasbord. “Brats, hamburgers, hot ham-and-cheese sandwiches, meatballs, chili, Gus’s Pretzels and desserts.” Attached to the trailer was a 42inch television, on which Seers played the replay of last week’s triumphant win against No. 8 Indianapolis. Nearby on the black-

top, one youngster refined his own Cade Brister moves, practicing his drop step, then heaving a football to a receiver who caught the ball like he was trying to stay in bounds. Seers’ son is Drew, the Parkway West grad who is the thumping heart of the Lions’ defense. He

entered the game with a teamhigh 120 tackles. The guy with the second-most? Seventy-one. And on Saturday afternoon, Drew tallied 18 more to his season total. The Lindenwood defense was brilliant in the second half, allowing just seven points (and none in overtime). But the defensive hero was a different St. Louis kid — Jordan Perry from University City High. The game was tied with two ticks left. Missouri S&T lined up for a 41yard field goal. On the bench, numerous bench players literally stood on a metal bench, encouraging the fans to cheer and rattle the kicker. And from the left side, No. 6 in all black curled around the corner and soared toward the ball. “I had faith in myself that I was going to get it,” he said, “because I was kind of timing it up all day, and I was missing, but was a split-second off. I knew that this was the perfect moment — the perfect time — and I just went for it.” And then, he was the hero again. This time at cornerback, on fourth-and-four on overtime,

he broke up a pass in the end zone. The Lions anticipated the play, acknowledging that the opponent threw the fade often against press coverage. “It was crazy, man,” Perry said of the final play. “Everyone was screaming, heart-racing, my heart was racing as well. But I just had to make the play when it counted.” And as he often does, Brister blistered through the opposing defense. The quarterback from Fort Zumwalt North ran for 143 yards and two touchdowns, shaking loose from defenders with elusive moves. He also threw for 187 yards, an interception and three touchdowns (including the go-ahead score in overtime — the point after was blocked). After the game, Lindenwood branded the wood. There is this large, cut tree stump, and someone responsible out there uses a BernzOmatic propane torch to stamp the stump with a Lindenwood logo. Perry said it was the 162nd time in school history. And the first as GLVC champs. Benjamin Hochman @hochman on Twitter bhochman@post-dispatch.com


D8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

FOOTBALL

M 1 • SUNDAY • 11.10.2019

THE BLITZ

YOUR QUICK-HIT GUIDE TO WEEK 10 IN THE NFL

Richard Sherman

AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PA Home Away AFC NFC Div New England 8 1 0 .889 270 98 4-0-0 4-1-0 6-1-0 2-0-0 4-0-0 Buffalo 6 2 0 .750 158 131 3-2-0 3-0-0 4-1-0 2-1-0 2-1-0 Miami 1 7 0 .125 103 256 1-4-0 0-3-0 1-5-0 0-2-0 1-2-0 N.Y. Jets 1 7 0 .125 96 211 1-3-0 0-4-0 0-6-0 1-1-0 0-4-0 South W L T Pct PF PA Home Away AFC NFC Div Houston 6 3 0 .667 238 191 3-1-0 3-2-0 5-1-0 1-2-0 2-1-0 Indianapolis 5 3 0 .625 182 177 3-1-0 2-2-0 4-3-0 1-0-0 2-0-0 Jacksonville 4 5 0 .444 176 189 2-3-0 2-2-0 4-3-0 0-2-0 1-2-0 Tennessee 4 5 0 .444 168 165 2-2-0 2-3-0 2-4-0 2-1-0 0-2-0 North W L T Pct PF PA Home Away AFC NFC Div Baltimore 6 2 0 .750 251 176 3-1-0 3-1-0 4-2-0 2-0-0 2-1-0 Pittsburgh 4 4 0 .500 176 169 3-2-0 1-2-0 4-2-0 0-2-0 1-1-0 Cleveland 2 6 0 .250 152 205 0-3-0 2-3-0 2-3-0 0-3-0 1-0-0 Cincinnati 0 8 0 .000 124 210 0-3-0 0-5-0 0-4-0 0-4-0 0-2-0 West W L T Pct PF PA Home Away AFC NFC Div Kansas City 6 3 0 .667 252 204 2-3-0 4-0-0 4-2-0 2-1-0 2-0-0 Oakland 5 4 0 .556 208 240 4-1-0 1-3-0 3-2-0 2-2-0 2-1-0 L.A. Chargers 4 6 0 .400 207 194 2-3-0 2-3-0 2-5-0 2-1-0 0-2-0 Denver 3 6 0 .333 149 170 2-3-0 1-3-0 3-4-0 0-2-0 1-2-0

NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PA Home Away AFC NFC Div Dallas 5 3 0 .625 227 142 3-1-0 2-2-0 1-1-0 4-2-0 4-0-0 Philadelphia 5 4 0 .556 224 213 3-1-0 2-3-0 2-0-0 3-4-0 1-1-0 N.Y. Giants 2 7 0 .222 176 255 1-4-0 1-3-0 0-2-0 2-5-0 1-2-0 Washington 1 8 0 .111 108 219 0-4-0 1-4-0 1-2-0 0-6-0 0-3-0 South W L T Pct PF PA Home Away AFC NFC Div New Orleans 7 1 0 .875 195 156 4-0-0 3-1-0 2-0-0 5-1-0 1-0-0 Carolina 5 3 0 .625 209 204 2-2-0 3-1-0 3-0-0 2-3-0 1-1-0 Tampa Bay 2 6 0 .250 230 252 0-3-0 2-3-0 0-1-0 2-5-0 1-2-0 Atlanta 1 7 0 .125 165 250 1-3-0 0-4-0 0-3-0 1-4-0 0-0-0 North W L T Pct PF PA Home Away AFC NFC Div Green Bay 7 2 0 .778 226 189 4-1-0 3-1-0 3-1-0 4-1-0 3-0-0 Minnesota 6 3 0 .667 234 158 4-0-0 2-3-0 1-1-0 5-2-0 1-2-0 Detroit 3 4 1 .438 204 217 2-2-0 1-2-1 1-2-0 2-2-1 0-2-0 Chicago 3 5 0 .375 142 144 1-3-0 2-2-0 1-2-0 2-3-0 1-1-0 West W L T Pct PF PA Home Away AFC NFC Div San Francisco 8 0 0 1.000 235 102 3-0-0 5-0-0 3-0-0 5-0-0 2-0-0 Seattle 7 2 0 .778 248 230 3-2-0 4-0-0 3-1-0 4-1-0 2-0-0 L.A. Rams 5 3 0 .625 214 174 2-2-0 3-1-0 2-0-0 3-3-0 0-2-0 Arizona 3 5 1 .389 195 251 1-3-1 2-2-0 1-1-0 2-4-1 0-2-0 ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

SCORES AND SCHEDULE

Seahawks (7-2) at 49ers (8-0) Richard Sherman is on San Francisco’s side now, playing a huge role for the top-ranked defense. The three-time All-Pro cornerback is part of a secondary that’s No. 1 against the pass. The Niners have allowed the fewest yards per game (241) and second-fewest points (12.1). QB Jimmy Garoppolo has played well and his offense features the league’s second-ranked rushing attack. They’ll face a defense that ranks 22nd in points allowed, 25th in yards allowed and 25th in sacks.

Bills (6-2) at Browns (2-6)

Dolphins (1-7) at Colts (5-3)

The Bills are off to their best start in 26 years, feasting off losing teams. Their wins have come against clubs that are a combined 9-43 while both losses were to teams currently with winning records. They’ll face the Browns, who’ve proved to be overhyped. Baker Mayfield, Odell Beckham Jr. and Co. were a fashionable pick to win the AFC North, but these are the same old Browns.

Brian Hoyer is expected to make his first start of the season filling in for Jacoby Brissett as the Colts host the no longer winless Dolphins. Hoyer stepped in after Brissett injured his knee and tossed three TD passes, but Adam Vinatieri missed a 43-yard FG with 1:14 left in a 26-24 loss at Pittsburgh. Indy likely will have to rely on the 11-year veteran for a while until Brissett returns.

Lions (3-4-1) at Bears (3-5) The battle for last place in the NFC North features a pair of teams that combined for one win in October. The Lions have lost four of five after a 2-0-1 start. Their only win in that span came against the Giants two weeks ago. The Bears have lost four in a row following a 3-1 start. Detroit QB Matthew Stafford is second in the league in TD passes (19) and fifth in passer rating (106.0).

Amari Cooper

Vikings (6-3) at Cowboys (5-3) Dallas features the league’s top-ranked offense led by Dak Prescott, Ezekiel Elliott and Amari Cooper while the Vikings have the No. 7 defense. On the flip side, Minnesota’s eighth-ranked offense takes on Dallas’ sixth-ranked defense. The Cowboys are seeking their third straight victory. Minnesota’s Kirk Cousins has 14 TD passes and only one pick in the past seven games, and Dalvin Cook leads the NFL in rushing with 894 yards.

Christian McCaffrey

Ravens (6-2) at Bengals (0-8) Bengals QB Ryan Finley makes his first NFL start, replacing Andy Dalton. He and his poor offensive line will face the firstplace Ravens and their blitzing defense. The Ravens downed the previously unbeaten Patriots last week. Their defense held Tom Brady in check and Lamar Jackson threw for a TD and ran for two more. Jackson had 153 yards rushing in Baltimore’s win over the Bengals last month.

The Packers are coming off their worst game this season, a 26-11 rout at the Chargers. The Panthers are Kyle Allen’s team now that Cam Newton is officially out for the season. Allen is 5-1 as the starter and getting his sixth win won’t be easy at Lambeau Field. He’ll rely on Christian McCaffrey, who could be in for a big day. McCaffrey is second in the league in rushing and the Packers allow 127.7 yards rushing per game.

Minkah Fitzpatrick

Chiefs (6-3) at Titans (4-5) The Titans are 2-1 since Ryan Tannehill replaced Marcus Mariota, but they were sloppy in a loss to Carolina last week. They also lost cornerback Malcolm Butler to a wrist injury. Tennessee will have to rely on Derrick Henry’s running to limit Kansas City’s offense. The Chiefs have the fourth-worst run defense in the league and allowed 161.7 yards per game on the ground in their three losses.

Rookie QB Kyler Murray has helped Arizona look promising. Murray hasn’t thrown an INT in five games and has been a threat passing and running. Kenyan Drake ran for 110 yards and caught four passes for 52 yards in his Arizona debut last week, though David Johnson could return this week. Tampa Bay has had trouble finishing games, taking a lead into the fourth quarter in three of its six losses.

Both teams are coming off a bye. Drew Brees returned after missing five games and picked up where he left off, throwing for 373 yards and three TDs against Arizona. Not much has gone right for the Falcons, but they do have the league’s topranked passing offense. Matt Ryan is expected to return from an ankle injury that sidelined him one game. Atlanta has allowed 31.3 points per game.

Giants (2-7) at Jets (1-7)

Rams (5-3) at Steelers (4-4) The Rams offense has a tough task against Pittsburgh’s defense. The Steelers are second in the league with 22 takeaways and third in sacks with 29. Minkah Fitzpatrick already has four interceptions since joining the team. The Rams won’t have receiver Brandin Cooks, who is out with a concussion. Todd Gurley hasn’t rushed for more than 65 yards since Week 1, but L.A. has relied on its passing attack, ranked fifth in the league.

North Jersey bragging rights are on the line when the Giants switch locker rooms at their home stadium to be the “road” team against the Jets. Things are only slightly better for the Giants, who briefly enjoyed success after rookie Daniel Jones replaced Eli Manning. But they’ve lost five in a row. The real loser in this game might be the team that hurts its draft positioning by winning.

Thursday, Nov. 14 Pittsburgh at Cleveland, 7:20 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 17 Dallas at Detroit, noon N.Y. Jets at Washington, noon New Orleans at Tampa Bay, noon Denver at Minnesota, noon Houston at Baltimore, noon Buffalo at Miami, noon Jacksonville at Indianapolis, noon Atlanta at Carolina, noon Arizona at San Francisco, 3:05 New England at Philadelphia, 3:25 p.m. Cincinnati at Oakland, 3:25 p.m. Chicago at L.A. Rams, 7:20 p.m. Monday, Nov. 18 Kansas City vs L.A. Chargers at Mexico City, MEX, 7:15 p.m.

SEASON LEADERS Stats through Week 9 TOP PASSERS Player, team P. Rivers, LAC T. Brady, NE R. Wilson, SEA M. Stafford, DET

Cardinals (3-5-1) at Buccaneers (2-6)

Falcons (1-7) at Saints (7-1) Panthers (5-3) at Packers (7-2)

Thursday’s result Oakland 26, L.A. Chargers 24 Sunday’s games Arizona at Tampa Bay, noon Kansas City at Tennessee, noon Buffalo at Cleveland, noon Baltimore at Cincinnati, noon N.Y. Giants at N.Y. Jets, noon Atlanta at New Orleans, noon Detroit at Chicago, noon Miami at Indianapolis, 3:05 p.m. Carolina at Green Bay, 3:25 p.m. L.A. Rams at Pittsburgh, 3:25 p.m. Minnesota at Dallas, 7:20 p.m. Monday’s game Seattle at San Francisco, 7:15 p.m.

Cp-At 223-333 230-355 200-293 187-291

Yards 2,609 2,536 2,505 2,499

TD 12 14 22 19

TOP RECEIVERS Player, team Mi. Thomas, NO M. Evans, TB C. Kupp, LAR T. Lockett, SEA

Rec 73 50 58 59

Yards 875 842 792 767

TD 4 7 5 6

TOP RUSHERS Player, team D. Cook, MIN C. McCaffrey, CAR L. Fournette, JAX N. Chubb, CLE

Att 177 165 174 154

Yards 894 881 831 803

TD 9 10 1 6

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY Nov. 7, 1965: The Detroit Lions sacked quarterback Bart Starr 11 times in a 12-7 win over the Green Bay Packers. Nov. 7, 2010: Indianapolis quarterback Peyton Manning started his 200th consecutive game, a 26-24 loss at Philadelphia. Manning joined Brett Favre as the only quarterbacks in NFL history to start 200 consecutive games. Nov. 8, 1942: Parker Hall of the Cleveland Rams threw seven interceptions against the Green Bay Packers. Nov. 8, 1970: Tom Dempsey of New Orleans kicked an NFL-record 63yard field goal on the final play of the game to give the Saints a 19-17 victory over the Detroit Lions. The previous record was 56 yards, set by Baltimore’s Bert Rechichar in 1953. Nov. 8, 1981: Don Shula recorded his 200th NFL victory when the Miami Dolphins edged the New England Patriots 30-27 in overtime.

THE NUMBER

6

Mike Thomas needs six receptions in New Orleans’ game against Atlanta this week to become the fastest player to reach 400 receptions in league history. Thomas has played 55 games. Odell Beckham Jr. reached 400 in 61 games, the fastest to accomplish the feat so far. — Associated Press


D8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

FOOTBALL

M 2 • SUNDAY • 11.10.2019

THE BLITZ

YOUR QUICK-HIT GUIDE TO WEEK 10 IN THE NFL

Richard Sherman

AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PA Home Away AFC NFC Div New England 8 1 0 .889 270 98 4-0-0 4-1-0 6-1-0 2-0-0 4-0-0 Buffalo 6 2 0 .750 158 131 3-2-0 3-0-0 4-1-0 2-1-0 2-1-0 Miami 1 7 0 .125 103 256 1-4-0 0-3-0 1-5-0 0-2-0 1-2-0 N.Y. Jets 1 7 0 .125 96 211 1-3-0 0-4-0 0-6-0 1-1-0 0-4-0 South W L T Pct PF PA Home Away AFC NFC Div Houston 6 3 0 .667 238 191 3-1-0 3-2-0 5-1-0 1-2-0 2-1-0 Indianapolis 5 3 0 .625 182 177 3-1-0 2-2-0 4-3-0 1-0-0 2-0-0 Jacksonville 4 5 0 .444 176 189 2-3-0 2-2-0 4-3-0 0-2-0 1-2-0 Tennessee 4 5 0 .444 168 165 2-2-0 2-3-0 2-4-0 2-1-0 0-2-0 North W L T Pct PF PA Home Away AFC NFC Div Baltimore 6 2 0 .750 251 176 3-1-0 3-1-0 4-2-0 2-0-0 2-1-0 Pittsburgh 4 4 0 .500 176 169 3-2-0 1-2-0 4-2-0 0-2-0 1-1-0 Cleveland 2 6 0 .250 152 205 0-3-0 2-3-0 2-3-0 0-3-0 1-0-0 Cincinnati 0 8 0 .000 124 210 0-3-0 0-5-0 0-4-0 0-4-0 0-2-0 West W L T Pct PF PA Home Away AFC NFC Div Kansas City 6 3 0 .667 252 204 2-3-0 4-0-0 4-2-0 2-1-0 2-0-0 Oakland 5 4 0 .556 208 240 4-1-0 1-3-0 3-2-0 2-2-0 2-1-0 L.A. Chargers 4 6 0 .400 207 194 2-3-0 2-3-0 2-5-0 2-1-0 0-2-0 Denver 3 6 0 .333 149 170 2-3-0 1-3-0 3-4-0 0-2-0 1-2-0

NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PA Home Away AFC NFC Div Dallas 5 3 0 .625 227 142 3-1-0 2-2-0 1-1-0 4-2-0 4-0-0 Philadelphia 5 4 0 .556 224 213 3-1-0 2-3-0 2-0-0 3-4-0 1-1-0 N.Y. Giants 2 7 0 .222 176 255 1-4-0 1-3-0 0-2-0 2-5-0 1-2-0 Washington 1 8 0 .111 108 219 0-4-0 1-4-0 1-2-0 0-6-0 0-3-0 South W L T Pct PF PA Home Away AFC NFC Div New Orleans 7 1 0 .875 195 156 4-0-0 3-1-0 2-0-0 5-1-0 1-0-0 Carolina 5 3 0 .625 209 204 2-2-0 3-1-0 3-0-0 2-3-0 1-1-0 Tampa Bay 2 6 0 .250 230 252 0-3-0 2-3-0 0-1-0 2-5-0 1-2-0 Atlanta 1 7 0 .125 165 250 1-3-0 0-4-0 0-3-0 1-4-0 0-0-0 North W L T Pct PF PA Home Away AFC NFC Div Green Bay 7 2 0 .778 226 189 4-1-0 3-1-0 3-1-0 4-1-0 3-0-0 Minnesota 6 3 0 .667 234 158 4-0-0 2-3-0 1-1-0 5-2-0 1-2-0 Detroit 3 4 1 .438 204 217 2-2-0 1-2-1 1-2-0 2-2-1 0-2-0 Chicago 3 5 0 .375 142 144 1-3-0 2-2-0 1-2-0 2-3-0 1-1-0 West W L T Pct PF PA Home Away AFC NFC Div San Francisco 8 0 0 1.000 235 102 3-0-0 5-0-0 3-0-0 5-0-0 2-0-0 Seattle 7 2 0 .778 248 230 3-2-0 4-0-0 3-1-0 4-1-0 2-0-0 L.A. Rams 5 3 0 .625 214 174 2-2-0 3-1-0 2-0-0 3-3-0 0-2-0 Arizona 3 5 1 .389 195 251 1-3-1 2-2-0 1-1-0 2-4-1 0-2-0 ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

SCORES AND SCHEDULE

Seahawks (7-2) at 49ers (8-0) Richard Sherman is on San Francisco’s side now, playing a huge role for the top-ranked defense. The three-time All-Pro cornerback is part of a secondary that’s No. 1 against the pass. The Niners have allowed the fewest yards per game (241) and second-fewest points (12.1). QB Jimmy Garoppolo has played well and his offense features the league’s second-ranked rushing attack. They’ll face a defense that ranks 22nd in points allowed, 25th in yards allowed and 25th in sacks.

Bills (6-2) at Browns (2-6)

Dolphins (1-7) at Colts (5-3)

The Bills are off to their best start in 26 years, feasting off losing teams. Their wins have come against clubs that are a combined 9-43 while both losses were to teams currently with winning records. They’ll face the Browns, who’ve proved to be overhyped. Baker Mayfield, Odell Beckham Jr. and Co. were a fashionable pick to win the AFC North, but these are the same old Browns.

Brian Hoyer will make his first start of the season filling in for Jacoby Brissett as the Colts host the no longer winless Dolphins. Hoyer stepped in after Brissett injured his knee and tossed three TD passes, but Adam Vinatieri missed a 43-yard FG with 1:14 left in a 26-24 loss at Pittsburgh. Indy likely will have to rely on the 11-year veteran for a while until Brissett returns.

Lions (3-4-1) at Bears (3-5) The battle for last place in the NFC North features a pair of teams that combined for one win in October. The Lions have lost four of five after a 2-0-1 start. Their only win in that span came against the Giants two weeks ago. The Bears have lost four in a row following a 3-1 start. Detroit QB Matthew Stafford is second in the league in TD passes (19) and fifth in passer rating (106.0).

Amari Cooper

Vikings (6-3) at Cowboys (5-3) Dallas features the league’s top-ranked offense led by Dak Prescott, Ezekiel Elliott and Amari Cooper while the Vikings have the No. 7 defense. On the flip side, Minnesota’s eighth-ranked offense takes on Dallas’ sixth-ranked defense. The Cowboys are seeking their third straight victory. Minnesota’s Kirk Cousins has 14 TD passes and only one pick in the past seven games, and Dalvin Cook leads the NFL in rushing with 894 yards.

Christian McCaffrey

Ravens (6-2) at Bengals (0-8) Bengals QB Ryan Finley makes his first NFL start, replacing Andy Dalton. He and his poor offensive line will face the firstplace Ravens and their blitzing defense. The Ravens downed the previously unbeaten Patriots last week. Their defense held Tom Brady in check and Lamar Jackson threw for a TD and ran for two more. Jackson had 153 yards rushing in Baltimore’s win over the Bengals last month.

The Packers are coming off their worst game this season, a 26-11 rout at the Chargers. The Panthers are Kyle Allen’s team now that Cam Newton is officially out for the season. Allen is 5-1 as the starter and getting his sixth win won’t be easy at Lambeau Field. He’ll rely on Christian McCaffrey, who could be in for a big day. McCaffrey is second in the league in rushing and the Packers allow 127.7 yards rushing per game.

Minkah Fitzpatrick

Chiefs (6-3) at Titans (4-5) The Titans are 2-1 since Ryan Tannehill replaced Marcus Mariota, but they were sloppy in a loss to Carolina last week. They also lost cornerback Malcolm Butler to a wrist injury. Tennessee will have to rely on Derrick Henry’s running to limit Kansas City’s offense. The Chiefs have the fourth-worst run defense in the league and allowed 161.7 yards per game on the ground in their three losses.

Rookie QB Kyler Murray has helped Arizona look promising. Murray hasn’t thrown an INT in five games and has been a threat passing and running. Kenyan Drake ran for 110 yards and caught four passes for 52 yards in his Arizona debut last week, though David Johnson could return this week. Tampa Bay has had trouble finishing games, taking a lead into the fourth quarter in three of its six losses.

Both teams are coming off a bye. Drew Brees returned after missing five games and picked up where he left off, throwing for 373 yards and three TDs against Arizona. Not much has gone right for the Falcons, but they do have the league’s topranked passing offense. Matt Ryan is expected to return from an ankle injury that sidelined him one game. Atlanta has allowed 31.3 points per game.

Giants (2-7) at Jets (1-7)

Rams (5-3) at Steelers (4-4) The Rams offense has a tough task against Pittsburgh’s defense. The Steelers are second in the league with 22 takeaways and third in sacks with 29. Minkah Fitzpatrick already has four interceptions since joining the team. The Rams won’t have receiver Brandin Cooks, who is out with a concussion. Todd Gurley hasn’t rushed for more than 65 yards since Week 1, but L.A. has relied on its passing attack, ranked fifth in the league.

North Jersey bragging rights are on the line when the Giants switch locker rooms at their home stadium to be the “road” team against the Jets. Things are only slightly better for the Giants, who briefly enjoyed success after rookie Daniel Jones replaced Eli Manning. But they’ve lost five in a row. The real loser in this game might be the team that hurts its draft positioning by winning.

Thursday, Nov. 14 Pittsburgh at Cleveland, 7:20 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 17 Dallas at Detroit, noon N.Y. Jets at Washington, noon New Orleans at Tampa Bay, noon Denver at Minnesota, noon Houston at Baltimore, noon Buffalo at Miami, noon Jacksonville at Indianapolis, noon Atlanta at Carolina, noon Arizona at San Francisco, 3:05 New England at Philadelphia, 3:25 p.m. Cincinnati at Oakland, 3:25 p.m. Chicago at L.A. Rams, 7:20 p.m. Monday, Nov. 18 Kansas City vs L.A. Chargers at Mexico City, MEX, 7:15 p.m.

SEASON LEADERS Stats through Week 9 TOP PASSERS Player, team P. Rivers, LAC T. Brady, NE R. Wilson, SEA M. Stafford, DET

Cardinals (3-5-1) at Buccaneers (2-6)

Falcons (1-7) at Saints (7-1) Panthers (5-3) at Packers (7-2)

Thursday’s result Oakland 26, L.A. Chargers 24 Sunday’s games Arizona at Tampa Bay, noon Kansas City at Tennessee, noon Buffalo at Cleveland, noon Baltimore at Cincinnati, noon N.Y. Giants at N.Y. Jets, noon Atlanta at New Orleans, noon Detroit at Chicago, noon Miami at Indianapolis, 3:05 p.m. Carolina at Green Bay, 3:25 p.m. L.A. Rams at Pittsburgh, 3:25 p.m. Minnesota at Dallas, 7:20 p.m. Monday’s game Seattle at San Francisco, 7:15 p.m.

Cp-At 223-333 230-355 200-293 187-291

Yards 2,609 2,536 2,505 2,499

TD 12 14 22 19

TOP RECEIVERS Player, team Mi. Thomas, NO M. Evans, TB C. Kupp, LAR T. Lockett, SEA

Rec 73 50 58 59

Yards 875 842 792 767

TD 4 7 5 6

TOP RUSHERS Player, team D. Cook, MIN C. McCaffrey, CAR L. Fournette, JAX N. Chubb, CLE

Att 177 165 174 154

Yards 894 881 831 803

TD 9 10 1 6

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY Nov. 7, 1965: The Detroit Lions sacked quarterback Bart Starr 11 times in a 12-7 win over the Green Bay Packers. Nov. 7, 2010: Indianapolis quarterback Peyton Manning started his 200th consecutive game, a 26-24 loss at Philadelphia. Manning joined Brett Favre as the only quarterbacks in NFL history to start 200 consecutive games. Nov. 8, 1942: Parker Hall of the Cleveland Rams threw seven interceptions against the Green Bay Packers. Nov. 8, 1970: Tom Dempsey of New Orleans kicked an NFL-record 63yard field goal on the final play of the game to give the Saints a 19-17 victory over the Detroit Lions. The previous record was 56 yards, set by Baltimore’s Bert Rechichar in 1953. Nov. 8, 1981: Don Shula recorded his 200th NFL victory when the Miami Dolphins edged the New England Patriots 30-27 in overtime.

THE NUMBER

6

Mike Thomas needs six receptions in New Orleans’ game against Atlanta this week to become the fastest player to reach 400 receptions in league history. Thomas has played 55 games. Odell Beckham Jr. reached 400 in 61 games, the fastest to accomplish the feat so far. — Associated Press


MOTOR SPORTS

11.10.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D9

NASCAR

Accusations of intentional cautions fly BY JENNA FRYER

Associated Press

AVONDALE, Ariz. — Denny Hamlin thought he was the favorite to win NASCAR’s championship but now finds himself in danger of not even making it to the title round. Chase Elliott is fairly certain he’s backed himself into such a hole that his only chance at a championship is by winning Sunday in the penultimate race of the season. There are two spots left to claim to qualify for next week’s title-deciding race and six drivers jockeying for the position. An added wrinkle headed into Sunday at ISM Raceway outside Phoenix is a brewing controversy over drivers deliberately spinning the last two weeks and altering the outcome of others’ races. Joey Logano spun two weeks ago at Martinsville Speedway with a flat tire and brought out a race-saving caution for the reigning NASCAR champion. Many questioned if he deliberately helped himself. Then Bubba Wallace spun at Texas last weekend and the caution ruined the race for title contender Kyle Larson. He complained Wallace’s spin was intentional and NASCAR needs to act when a driver deliberately causes a caution. “I understand it’s a judgment call, but there’s so much data out there now that I don’t think it’s as much of a judgment call as people think it might be,” Larson said Friday, adding his Chip Ganassi Racing team had pulled Wallace’s data from last Sunday and is convinced Wallace spun to help himself. “I know people say Joey spun out on purpose at Martinsville but I don’t think he did. We looked at Bubba’s data and you can definitely see him swerving, he turns right and then at the same time he turns left and stabs the throttle and spins out. It’s whatever at this point.” What should be a self-policing issue outside of NASCAR’s reach has now turned into the hottest topic of this third round of the playoffs. Clint Bowyer in 2014 intentionally spun during the final regular season race to help then-teammate Martin Truex Jr.

LARRY PAPKE, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Denny Hamlin (11) spins into the grass on the front stretch during the NASCAR Cup Series race Sunday at Texas Motor Speedway in Fort Worth.

STEVE HELBER, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Chase Elliott is convinced he must win Sunday to advance to the season finale at Homestead on Nov. 17. make the playoff field — an action that set in motion a chain of events that created one of the biggest cheating scandals in at least 20 years.

NASCAR strongly penalized teams involved and made clear that integrity and honesty was being closely monitored, more so in the playoffs.

ST. LOUIS FIVE-DAY FORECAST TODAY

TONIGHT

MONDAY

TUESDAY

Increasing clouds

Showers late

WIND WNW 5-10 mph

WIND N 5-10 mph

A little rain, then snow WIND NNW 10-15 mph

Sunny and very cold WIND NW 5-10 mph

56°

32°

Now the issue has come roaring back with drivers split on what NASCAR should do. “I would say the more NASCAR is in a position to make tough calls like that, the worse it is,” Elliott said. “That’s such a tough thing and it’s such a tough call. I don’t know how you would ever get that right. I don’t know what the answer is or whether someone spun out on purpose or not, I really don’t know. I’m not smart enough to tell you what the solution is either.” The title contenders are trying to stay out of the issue while hoping it doesn’t change the course of racing this weekend or in the Nov. 17 finale at Homestead-Miami Speedway. “It’s been getting pretty popular to have a flat tire and spin out on purpose. It’s definitely not good, it could affect a championship race,” Truex said. “If last week were Homestead, a lot of people would be pretty upset.” Truex and Kevin Harvick are the only two drivers locked into the finale, while regular-season champion Kyle Busch and Logano are both above the cutline

NATIONAL OUTLOOK

.com

WEDNESDAY

before Sunday. Hamlin had a huge drop in the standings after he spun through the infield grass and Texas and dropped below the cutline. Now he’s unsure how to save his season — he’s won five races, including the Daytona 500 — but might not be among the title contenders next week. “No matter what, I will not consider this year any sort of a failure,” Hamlin said. “As Mark Martin would say ‘We just didn’t score enough points.’ We had a great year, we won races, we led more laps than we have in a long time ... it’s been a really good year and I’m just not going to let the outcome of this weekend, or last weekend, decide whether it’s a good season or not.” Elliott has the same mindset after crashing early at Texas to ruin his race and likely his title hopes. “I hate that I messed up last week as bad as I did, there’s really no excuse for that,” Elliott said. “But we’re in the position we’re in, we’re there, it’s reality and we certainly will have to win to have a shot next week.”

Snow will spread from Montana and South Dakota into Nebraska and Wyoming on Sunday, with cold following behind. The storm will dive into Missouri on Monday bringing snow and ice from Texas to Maine.

THURSDAY

Shown are noon positions of precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Partly cloudy and Partly sunny; not as cold cold WIND WIND W 5-10 mph S 5-10 mph

80

Peoria 55 74 Macomb 47/27 48/27 Bloomington Urbana 48/28 51/33

Kirksville 49/26

Quincy 50/28

Decatur 51/32 Springfield 57 51/30 Effingham 70 55 55/37

35

Columbia 70 58/30 St. Louis Mount Jefferson Vernon 56/32 City 60/39 60/32 Union 55 60/34 57 44 Rolla Carbondale 65/33 62/40 Farmington 64/37 Cape Girardeau 62/44 Springfield 68/34 Poplar Bluff West Plains 64/44 55 66/40

44

RIVER AND LAKE LEVELS Flood Stage 24 hour Stage (ft.) Fri. Change

Location

Missouri River Kansas City Jefferson City Hermann Washington St. Charles Mississippi River Hannibal Louisiana Dam 24 Dam 25 Grafton M.Price, Pool M.Price, Tail. St. Louis Chester Cape Girardeau Illinois River La Salle Peoria Beardstown

32 23 21 20 25

Meramec River Sullivan Valley Park Arnold Bourbeuse River Union Ohio River Cairo Lake Levels Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

21.96 +0.16 17.70 -0.16 17.74 -0.48 13.91 -0.33 21.28 -0.50

16 16.89 -0.30 15 15.80 -0.22 25 25.89 -0.26 26 26.15 -0.21 18 19.30 -0.17 419 415.44 -0.54 21 19.49 -0.21 30 25.47 -0.73 27 27.68 -0.49 32 32.32 -0.22 20 18 14

Flood Stage 24 hour Stage (ft.) Fri. Change

Location

20.06 -0.91 19.15 -0.28 17.04 +0.02

15 16 24

2.30 +0.01 4.13 -0.64 22.59 -0.73

15

2.21 -0.08

40

34.28 354.80 360.52 494.67 659.06 706.85 665.54 919.84 841.29 600.45 406.27 607.86 446.88

-0.72 +0.10 +0.34 +0.20 -0.24 +1.32 +1.84 +1.32 -0.15 -0.08 -0.02 -0.13 -0.11

TEMPERATURE TRENDS Daily Temperature

Forecast Temperature

Average High

Average Low

San Francisco 65/50

Statistics through 5 p.m. Friday Temperature High/low 39°/21° Normal high/low 60°/41° Last year high/low 41°/33° Record high 82° (2005) Record low 8° (1991) Precipitation 24 hrs through 5 p.m. Fri. 0.00” Month to date (normal) 0.07” (0.97”) Year to date (normal) 48.64” (35.18”) Record for this date 1.35” (1888)

70

62 53

56

55

50

46

40 30

35

40

32

59 48

44 27

20 10

S

S

M

T

39

38

W

T

56

44

34 32

21 F

S

S

28

17

18

M

T

35

40

45

28

26

28

W

T

F

Toronto 43/28

Denver 61/17

New York 52/43

Detroit 47/28

Kansas City 55/27

Washington 59/43

Los Angeles 82/56 Atlanta 65/44 El Paso 77/56 Houston 75/59

Chihuahua 81/57

Miami 83/71

Monterrey 75/61

Cold front

Warm front

Stationary front

Showers

T-storms

Rain

Flurries

Snow

Ice

Pollen Yesterday Trees Weeds Grass Mold

Absent Absent Absent Low - 4862 Source: St. Louis County

Heating Degree Days Degree days are an indicator of energy needs. The more the total degree days, the more energy is necessary to heat.

Friday Month to date Normal month to date Since July 1 Normal since July 1

35 178 107 452 380

RealFeel Temperature® Today An exclusive index of effective temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure and elevation on the human body.

45° 8 a.m.

55° noon

53° 4 p.m.

44° 8 p.m.

UV Index Today Shown is the highest value of the day.

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11+

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Monday Hi/Lo/W

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Monday Hi/Lo/W

Albany, N.Y. Albuquerque Anchorage Atlanta Austin Baltimore Birmingham Boise Boston Charleston, S.C. Charleston, W.Va. Charlotte Chicago Cincinnati Cleveland Dallas Daytona Beach Denver Des Moines Destin, Fla. Detroit Hartford Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock

48/35/c 65/39/pc 38/31/pc 65/44/s 75/61/pc 58/38/pc 66/44/s 59/33/pc 53/40/pc 68/46/s 60/41/s 64/41/s 43/26/c 54/42/pc 50/38/c 73/59/pc 76/61/pc 61/17/pc 40/19/c 68/57/s 47/28/c 51/33/pc 86/72/pc 75/59/pc 51/37/c 55/27/s 77/52/s 68/50/s

43/31/c 54/26/s 37/32/c 67/45/pc 72/33/r 63/45/c 67/35/pc 56/35/s 50/45/c 72/55/pc 61/30/c 68/50/pc 30/12/sn 47/20/r 41/27/sn 61/26/r 79/63/pc 31/22/pc 25/8/pc 73/60/pc 34/20/sn 50/39/c 87/72/pc 75/41/t 38/15/r 30/12/c 78/51/s 53/23/r

Los Angeles Louisville Memphis Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Montgomery Nashville New Orleans New York City Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, Maine Portland, Ore. Sacramento Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Seattle Tampa Tucson Washington, D.C. Wichita

82/56/s 60/46/s 66/50/s 83/71/pc 39/24/c 32/13/sf 69/42/s 66/45/s 71/58/s 52/43/pc 71/35/pc 42/18/c 80/61/pc 56/40/pc 85/59/pc 50/38/c 49/34/pc 62/46/pc 77/44/s 60/37/s 70/62/pc 74/55/s 65/50/s 58/45/c 81/62/s 83/56/pc 59/43/pc 66/29/s

80/56/s 53/22/r 55/24/r 84/73/pc 29/13/sn 22/7/pc 73/46/pc 61/23/r 77/49/pc 57/47/c 39/17/r 26/9/pc 82/65/pc 61/46/c 86/59/s 47/27/c 42/33/sh 60/43/c 77/45/s 55/33/s 71/35/r 72/55/s 69/53/s 59/46/pc 82/67/pc 81/54/s 64/47/pc 35/13/c

The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.

National Extremes Friday in the 48 contiguous states

Today’s Air Quality

High: 95 Thermal, Calif.

airnow.gov

Good Moderate Unhealthy Unhealthy Very Hazardous (sensitive) Unhealthy

Skywatch Sun Moon

Rise

Set

6:38 a.m. 4:17 p.m.

4:52 p.m. 4:32 a.m.

Full Moon

Last Quarter

New Moon

First Quarter

Nov 12

Nov 19

Nov 26

Dec 4

©2019; forecasts and graphics, except for the KTVI forecasts, provided by

Low: -8 Black River Falls, STL.

WORLD FORECAST

Forecast index based on presence of manmade particulates affecting aspects of human health.

80 60

Montreal 42/24

Minneapolis 32/13 Chicago 43/26

ALMANAC

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Increasing clouds Sunday afternoon, highs in the 50s. Night rain will change to snow as a cold front arrives Monday morning. Expect Veterans Day temperatures in the low 30s before dropping with gusty winds.

Joplin 69/33

Billings 30/8

34° 17° 28° 18° 35° 28° 40° 26°

REGIONAL OUTLOOK

Kansas City 55/27

Winnipeg 17/3

Seattle 58/45

Chief Meteorologist Glenn Zimmerman

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Monday Hi/Lo/W

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Monday Hi/Lo/W

Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Beijing Berlin Buenos Aires Cairo Cancun Dublin Hong Kong Jerusalem Johannesburg London Madrid Mecca

49/38/pc 72/58/sh 85/55/s 90/70/pc 64/40/pc 46/34/pc 73/62/pc 85/67/pc 83/75/t 45/37/pc 78/69/s 76/62/c 77/58/pc 49/38/pc 53/38/sh 95/72/s

45/40/sh 72/62/pc 84/56/s 91/71/pc 62/40/s 45/36/pc 74/64/c 87/68/s 83/74/t 46/36/sh 79/71/s 75/60/pc 80/60/pc 49/37/sh 53/37/pc 94/73/t

Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi Paris Rio de Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Sydney Tokyo Toronto Vancouver

73/53/pc 42/24/r 50/43/c 83/75/pc 78/61/pc 81/57/pc 47/36/sh 83/74/sh 64/54/sh 88/76/pc 93/59/s 59/46/r 73/57/pc 63/53/s 43/28/c 52/40/pc

74/52/pc 30/21/sn 51/37/c 84/74/pc 78/62/t 81/57/pc 46/40/sh 80/73/r 64/53/r 87/77/pc 86/56/s 60/37/pc 79/63/pc 65/55/r 31/16/sn 51/43/c

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, i-ice, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow


FOOTBALL

11.10.2019 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D9

NFL NOTEBOOK

Brissett out; Hoyer to start for Colts BY WIRE REPORTS

INDIANAPOLIS — Colts quarterback Jacoby Brissett won’t be playing against the Dolphins because of an ailing knee. Brissett suffered a sprained medial collateral ligament in his left knee during last weekend’s loss at Pittsburgh. He did limited work in practice this week. The Colts announced Saturday that Brissett wouldn’t play and promoted third-string quarterback Chad Kelly from the practice squad to the active roster. Indy also promoted receiver Marcus Johnson to the active roster. Indianapolis released receiver Deon Cain and defensive tackle Kyle Peko. The late scratch means Brian Hoyer will make his first start in more than two years. But Miami coach Brian Flores doesn’t need to scramble through game tape for a scouting report. He saw up close for the better part of the last two seasons when both were with New England. Hoyer, who finished last week’s game after Brissett was injured, knows what he’s up against in Flores. “Brian Flores is an incredible coach. I’ve known him since my rookie year,” Hoyer said. “I was away from him and then I came back to see him as the defensive coordinator. I know their offensive staff and their scheme.” The Colts (5-3) have plenty at stake Sunday. They have struggled to score the past two weeks and their vaunted offensive line has allowed nine sacks during the span. Penalties have been costly and so have special team miscues. And now Indy has lost Brissett , who sprained the medial collateral ligament of his left knee in last weekend’s loss at Pittsburgh . The defeat knocked the Colts out of the AFC South lead. “This business is brutal,” Colts coach Frank Reich said. “You lose and you feel the sting of it and you feel like your back is against the wall and we have to respond.” Flores has faced the same scenario — seven times this season. It’s a stark contrast from his days of routine victory celebrations in New England, for whom he was a longtime assistant. Instead, he’s running the rebuilding

DON WRIGHT, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Colts quarterback Jacoby Brissett suffered a sprained medial collateral ligament in his left knee during last weekend’s loss at Pittsburgh. He will not play this week, the team announced Saturday. Dolphins (1-7) who are trying to build momentum after their first win last week. But Flores knows it will be a tough task against a quarterback who earned his respect backing up Tom Brady. “He is as smart as they come at the quarterback position,” Flores said. “He understands defense, has been in a few different systems and understands different ways to protect, to schematically put together different concepts. He and I would go back and forth, talk about defense, talk about offense, talk about protections, talk about route concepts — another impressive guy.”

The Raiders signed safety D.J. • The Chicago Bears release running back Mike Davis. Swearinger to replace Joseph and also added former Dolphins firstRaiders’ Joseph on IR round edge rusher Dion Jordan. The Oakland Raiders (5-4) Jordan was suspended for the placed safety Karl Joseph on in- first 10 games this season, the jured reserve with a foot injury third suspension of his career. after he made the game-sealing defensive play the past two Smith on Falcons’ IR weeks. The Atlanta Falcons (1-7) Joseph hurt his foot while in- placed running back Ito Smith, tercepting a Philip Rivers pass the team’s second-leading in the final minute of Oakland’s rusher, on injured reserve. 26-24 win over the Chargers on Smith already had been ruled Thursday night. Joseph broke up out of Sunday’s game at New Ora fourth-down pass in the end leans (7-1) with a neck injury. He zone in the final seconds of the suffered the neck injury, as well as Raiders’ 31-24 win over Detroit a concussion, against the Los Anon Nov. 3. geles Rams on Oct. 20 and missed

ST. LOUIS FIVE-DAY FORECAST TODAY

TONIGHT

MONDAY

Mostly sunny WIND NW 6-12 mph

Mostly cloudy and chilly WIND N 7-14 mph

A little rain, then snow WIND NNW 10-20 mph

62°

35°

TUESDAY

the team’s Oct. 27 loss to Seattle. Smith also finished his 2018 rookie season on IR with a knee injury.

49ers’ Kittle doubtful San Francisco 49ers tight end George Kittle is doubtful to play Monday night against the Seattle Seahawks. Kittle hasn’t practiced all week for the 49ers (8-0) because of injuries to his knee and ankle and is unlikely to play in the NFC West showdown against Seattle (7-2). Coach Kyle Shanahan said Saturday any other player would have been ruled out of the game but he will hold out hope for Kittle.

NATIONAL OUTLOOK

.com

A system moving through southeastern Canada today will bring isolated rain showers to the interior Northeast. Meanwhile, high pressure will keep the mid-Atlantic and Southeast dry. A storm sinking south out of Canada is forecast to spread snow from Montana to the Dakotas. The Southwest will remain warm and unusually dry.

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

Sunlit and very Partly sunny; not as cold cold WIND WIND S 8-16 mph NNW 10-20 mph

Sunny to partly cloudy WIND WNW 6-12 mph

Shown are noon positions of precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows. 80

Peoria 55 74 Macomb 50/28 50/27 Bloomington Urbana 50/28 51/31

Kirksville 51/25

Quincy 52/28

Decatur 53/32 Springfield 57 54/31 Effingham 70 55 59/36

35

Columbia 70 60/30 St. Louis Mount Jefferson Vernon 62/35 City 61/39 63/32 Union 55 64/35 57 44 Rolla Carbondale 66/33 63/40 Farmington 66/38 Cape Girardeau 62/43 Springfield 69/35 Poplar Bluff West Plains 64/44 55 67/39

44

RIVER AND LAKE LEVELS Flood Stage 24 hour Stage (ft.) Sat. Change

Location

Missouri River Kansas City Jefferson City Hermann Washington St. Charles Mississippi River Hannibal Louisiana Dam 24 Dam 25 Grafton M.Price, Pool M.Price, Tail. St. Louis Chester Cape Girardeau Illinois River La Salle Peoria Beardstown

32 23 21 20 25

Flood Stage 24 hour Stage (ft.) Sat. Change

Location

Meramec River Sullivan Valley Park Arnold Bourbeuse River Union Ohio River Cairo Lake Levels Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

21.94 -0.02 17.74 +0.04 17.76 +0.02 13.80 -0.11 21.12 -0.16

16 16.49 -0.40 15 15.60 -0.20 25 25.72 -0.17 26 25.92 -0.23 18 19.06 -0.24 419 415.05 -0.39 21 19.08 -0.41 30 24.89 -0.58 27 27.04 -0.64 32 31.75 -0.57 20 18 14

19.50 -0.56 18.60 -0.55 17.30 +0.26

15 16 24

2.31 +0.01 3.68 -0.45 22.09 -0.50

15

2.14

-0.07

40

33.21

-1.07

355.00 360.64 495.04 658.99 707.09 666.55 920.03 841.11 600.30 406.19 607.45 446.73

+0.20 +0.12 +0.37 -0.07 +0.19 +1.01 +0.19 -0.18 -0.15 -0.08 -0.41 -0.15

TEMPERATURE TRENDS Daily Temperature

Forecast Temperature

Average High

Average Low

70

62

56

63 55

50

46

40 30

40

32

48

44 27

10

S

M

T

39

38

20

W

T

62

33

S

28

35

21 F

39

37

S

46

30 15 M

50

49

34

35

F

S

26

18 T

W

T

Montreal 40/23

Minneapolis 31/12

Toronto 42/28

Chicago 43/25 Detroit 46/29

San Francisco 65/50

Statistics through 5 p.m. Saturday Temperature High/low 63°/33° Normal high/low 59°/41° Last year high/low 37°/23° Record high 78° (1975) Record low 16° (1991) Precipitation 24 hrs through 5 p.m. Sat. 0.00” Month to date (normal) 0.07” (1.09”) Year to date (normal) 48.64” (35.30”) Record for this date 1.18” (1946)

Denver 63/20

Washington 59/44

Kansas City 56/25

Los Angeles 82/56

New York 53/43

Atlanta 66/44 El Paso 77/57 Houston 74/60

Chihuahua 81/58

Miami 83/71

Monterrey 76/61

Cold front

Warm front

Stationary front

Showers

T-storms

Rain

Flurries

Snow

Ice

Pollen Yesterday Trees Weeds Grass Mold

Absent Absent Absent Low - 4862 Source: St. Louis County

Heating Degree Days Degree days are an indicator of energy needs. The more the total degree days, the more energy is necessary to heat.

Saturday Month to date Normal month to date Since July 1 Normal since July 1

17 195 122 469 395

RealFeel Temperature® Today An exclusive index of effective temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure and elevation on the human body.

46° 8 a.m.

59° noon

56° 4 p.m.

43° 8 p.m.

UV Index Today Shown is the highest value of the day.

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11+

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Monday Hi/Lo/W

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Monday Hi/Lo/W

Albany, N.Y. Albuquerque Anchorage Atlanta Austin Baltimore Birmingham Boise Boston Charleston, S.C. Charleston, W.Va. Charlotte Chicago Cincinnati Cleveland Dallas Daytona Beach Denver Des Moines Destin, Fla. Detroit Hartford Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock

47/36/c 66/40/pc 39/31/pc 66/44/s 76/61/pc 58/38/pc 66/43/s 60/34/pc 53/42/pc 66/43/s 62/42/s 64/41/s 43/25/c 56/42/pc 49/38/c 74/58/pc 75/62/pc 63/20/pc 40/17/c 68/56/s 46/29/c 51/36/pc 86/74/pc 74/60/pc 52/36/c 56/25/s 77/50/s 68/48/s

42/28/r 53/26/s 36/30/c 68/41/pc 69/33/r 63/43/pc 67/35/pc 57/34/s 54/41/pc 72/52/pc 58/27/c 69/49/pc 29/11/sn 46/19/r 40/26/sn 59/24/r 80/64/pc 33/22/pc 25/8/pc 73/57/pc 34/16/sn 54/37/pc 87/73/s 75/41/t 38/15/r 30/11/c 79/52/s 53/22/r

Los Angeles Louisville Memphis Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Montgomery Nashville New Orleans New York City Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, Maine Portland, Ore. Sacramento Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Seattle Tampa Tucson Washington, D.C. Wichita

82/56/s 62/46/s 65/48/s 83/71/pc 41/21/c 31/12/sf 70/41/s 66/43/s 71/57/s 53/43/pc 70/35/pc 42/19/c 79/62/pc 56/41/pc 87/62/pc 50/40/c 47/35/pc 62/47/pc 76/44/s 61/36/s 75/62/pc 73/56/pc 65/50/s 58/46/c 80/63/s 84/59/pc 59/44/pc 67/28/s

81/57/s 50/20/r 54/22/r 85/72/pc 29/11/sn 21/6/pc 71/45/pc 59/23/r 74/47/r 57/39/pc 38/17/sh 27/10/pc 83/64/pc 62/43/pc 86/61/s 44/26/r 44/30/sh 62/43/c 76/45/s 55/34/s 68/33/r 72/55/pc 70/53/s 60/44/pc 82/66/pc 79/54/s 65/45/pc 35/14/c

The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.

National Extremes Saturday in the 48 contiguous states

Today’s Air Quality

High: 94 Palm Springs, Calif.

airnow.gov

Good Moderate Unhealthy Unhealthy Very Hazardous (sensitive) Unhealthy

Skywatch Sun Moon

Rise

Set

6:38 a.m. 4:17 p.m.

4:52 p.m. 4:32 a.m.

Full Moon

Last Quarter

New Moon

First Quarter

Nov 12

Nov 19

Nov 26

Dec 4

©2019; forecasts and graphics, except for the KTVI forecasts, provided by

Low: 5 Bodie State Park, Calif.

WORLD FORECAST

Forecast index based on presence of manmade particulates affecting aspects of human health.

80 60

Billings 29/7

ALMANAC

REGIONAL OUTLOOK

Joplin 68/33

Winnipeg 17/3

37° 15° 28° 18° 39° 30° 46° 26°

A strong cold front moving into the area will bring some clouds to the area later today and some rain at night. This rain will change to some snow before ending Monday.

Kansas City 56/25

Seattle 58/46

Chief Meteorologist Glenn Zimmerman

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Monday Hi/Lo/W

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Monday Hi/Lo/W

Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Beijing Berlin Buenos Aires Cairo Cancun Dublin Hong Kong Jerusalem Johannesburg London Madrid Mecca

48/35/pc 73/58/sh 85/53/s 90/72/s 64/40/pc 46/33/pc 73/61/s 85/67/pc 83/74/t 46/37/pc 78/69/pc 75/62/pc 77/58/pc 50/39/sh 53/36/sh 95/72/s

46/40/sh 72/61/pc 84/55/s 91/72/c 62/39/pc 45/36/pc 73/64/c 87/68/s 83/74/t 45/36/sh 79/71/pc 74/59/s 78/60/pc 48/37/sh 54/36/pc 95/73/t

Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi Paris Rio de Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Sydney Tokyo Toronto Vancouver

73/52/pc 40/23/r 50/43/c 83/72/pc 78/60/pc 83/58/s 48/37/sh 82/75/sh 63/52/sh 88/76/pc 95/57/s 59/47/r 74/57/pc 63/55/s 42/28/c 52/41/c

75/51/pc 29/20/sn 49/41/c 85/74/pc 78/61/t 81/58/pc 48/39/sh 82/73/r 64/53/r 87/76/pc 84/56/s 60/37/pc 79/63/c 67/55/r 30/16/sn 52/44/c

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, i-ice, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow


MOTOR SPORTS

D10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUNDAY • 11.10.2019

NASCAR WEEKLY THIS WEEK’S CUP RACE

Harvick’s luck in Texas comes through again

FAMILIAR FOOTING

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Bluegreen Vacations 500 Distance: 312 laps, or 312 miles Where: ISM Raceway, a 1-mile asphalt oval in Avondale, Arizona When: 1:30 p.m. Sunday. TV: NBC Radio: Motor Racing Network Last year’s winner: Kyle Busch Worth mentioning: All three series are one week away from championship-deciding races at Homestead. Christopher Bell has clinched a spot in the Xfinity final four and has an 11-point lead over Cole Custer followed by Tyler Reddick and Justin Allgaier. ... No one has clinched in trucks, with Brett Moffitt, Stewart Friesen, Ross Chastain and Austin Hill in the top four.

HOT OR NOT Who’s hot Kevin Harvick: He’s back in the final four, ready to go for another title. Roger Penske: Team owner is now a track owner (Indianapolis Motor Speedway).

Kevin Harvick celebrates after winning a NASCAR Cup Series race at Texas Motor Speedway in Fort Worth, Texas.

Who’s not hot

STEPHEN HAWKINS

Denny Hamlin: Another poor finish (28th) leaves him 20 points out of fourth.

Orlando Sentinel

— David Scott

K

evin Harvick and the Stewart-Haas Racing team already had been preparing for NASCAR’s finale. They now know they will be racing for a Cup title in two weeks after their win at Texas. Harvick won the fall race at Texas for the third year in a row Sunday, again securing one of the championship-contending spots for the Nov. 17 season-ending race at Homestead-Miami Speedway. “Well, we’ve already been going down the road,” Harvick said from victory lane in Texas. “We’ve already been to the simulator, we’ve already built the car and now we’ve just got to make sure that we do what we think is right and go with our gut and see what happens.” After starting from the pole, Harvick led 119 of 334 laps and paced a 1-2-3 finish for Stewart-Haas. He went to Texas fifth in points, below the cutline for a championship run. “It’s a scenario that takes a lot of pressure off next week,” car owner Tony Stewart said. “It does take that edge off. It’s big for the organization.” Harvick led six times in the No. 4 Ford, including the final 21 laps and 73 of the last 80, and he finished 1.5 seconds ahead of teammate Aric Almirola. Daniel Suarez, the Stewart-Haas driver still unsigned for next season, was third. With Martin Truex Jr. already locked in for the final four at Homestead, the final two spots for the title run will

STANDINGS Monster Energy Cup series The top 20 drivers as of Nov. 3 Playoff drivers in bold. Rank/Driver Points 1 Martin Truex Jr. 4133 2 Kyle Busch 4113 3 Kevin Harvick 4113 4 Joey Logano 4111 5 Denny Hamlin 4091 6 Ryan Blaney 4088 7 Kyle Larson 4088 8 Chase Elliott 4033 9 Brad Keselowski 2265 10 William Byron 2247

Rank/Driver Points 11 Clint Bowyer 2225 12 Alex Bowman 2215 13 Aric Almirola 2204 14 Kurt Busch 2193 15 Ryan Newman 2170 16 Erik Jones 2127 17 Daniel Suarez 801 18 Jimmie Johnson 784 19 Paul Menard 732 20 Chris Buescher 687

Xfinity series The top 20 drivers as of Nov. 2 Playoff drivers in bold.

Kevin Harvick celebrates in victory lane after winning Sunday’s NASCAR Cup Series race at Texas Motor Speedway in Fort Worth, Texas. be determined this week at Phoenix. At least one driver will get in on points. “It is going to be a good battle for sure,” said Joey Logano, the defending Cup champion who remained in fourth in points after finishing fourth in the No. 22 Team Penske Ford at Texas. “We are definitely racing for that last spot just in case someone behind us outside of the top four wins. It’s going to be fun.” Kyle Busch is third in the standings, only two points ahead of Logano. “We all know one guy is going to move through on points, and we have to do whatever we have to do in order to be that

guy,” Busch said. Truex finished sixth at Texas a week after clinching his title chance with a win at Martinsville. Playoff contenders Busch and Ryan Blaney were seventh and eighth, with Kyle Larson 12th. The other contenders, Denny Hamlin and Chase Elliott, had crashes that put them deep in the field. Hamlin’s 28th-place finish, six laps behind Harvick, dropped him from second to fifth in the standings. He is 20 points behind Logano and only three ahead of both Larson and Blaney. Elliott is 78 points outside the final four. Harvick’s fourth win this season was the 49th of his

career, matching Stewart for 14th on NASCAR’s career list. Harvick’s only championship in his 19 Cup seasons came after a win in the finale at Miami five years ago. “I think every year is different. For me, I would tell you that I don’t think we’ve run as well as we probably wanted to run week in and week out compared to the things that we expect,” Harvick said. “But this particular year has been neat for me to sit back and watch the evolution of how we progressed with the race cars, how the conversations have progressed, how my theories and things I think are right and wrong have changed.”

Rank/Driver Points Rank/Driver Points 2122 1 Chris Bell 3166 11 Ryan Sieg 2112 2 Cole Custer 3135 12 Justin Haley 3 Tyler Reddick 3119 13 Gray Gaulding 668 656 4 Justin Allgaier 3101 14 Jer Clements 5 Chase Briscoe 3083 15 Brandon Brown 533 523 6 Michael Annett 3073 16 Ray Black Jr. 486 7 Austin Cindric 3070 17 Josh Williams 8 Noah Gragson 3054 18 Garrett Smithley 428 9 J. H. Nemechek 2174 19 Stephen Leicht 420 408 10 Brandon Jones 2143 20 BJ McLeod UP NEXT • Desert Diamond West Valley Casino 200: ISM Raceway, 2:30 p.m. Saturday (NBC)

Trucks series The top 12 drivers as of Oct. 26 Playoff drivers in bold. Rank/Driver 1 Brett Moffitt 2 Stew Friesen 3 Ross Chastain 4 Austin Hill 5 Matt Crafton 6 Tyler Ankrum

Points 3107 3097 3082 3071 3062 3056

Rank/Driver Points 7 Johnny Sauter 2172 8 Grant Enfinger 2164 9 Ben Rhodes 705 10 Sheldon Creed 664 11 Todd Gilliland 662 12 Harrison Burton 647

UP NEXT • Lucas Oil 150: ISM Raceway, Avondale, Arizona

John Hunter Nemechek makes his mark on Cup circuit ZACH STURNIOLO

Pocono Record

John Hunter Nemechek wasn’t planning on making his NASCAR Cup Series debut this soon. The results from Texas Motor Speedway say the 22-year-old was ready for his chance. Nemechek, filling in for Matt Tifft in the No. 36 Ford, qualified 29th and finished 21st in the NASCAR Cup Series race Sunday. Those numbers are not particularly impressive or noteworthy. To finish 21st in a 40car field is the definition of mediocre, especially when eight cars dropped out of the race either due to damage or mechanical failures. But that he managed to avoid trouble, stay out of the leaders’ way and bring the car home unscathed is notable. Denny Hamlin, a favorite to win this season’s championship, made a mistake in Turn 4 early in the race, spun into the grass and took himself out of contention. The same can be said for 2012 champion Brad Keselowski, who piled into the Turn 4 wall and subsequently was hit by a crashing Ricky Stenhouse Jr. All three of those drivers have won at the top level, and mistakes are bound to happen. Sometimes we forget that these drivers are human. The point is that Nemechek,

John Hunter Nemechek stands in the pits before practice for an NASCAR Xfinity Series earlier this season in Bristol, Tenn. in his first race behind the wheel of equipment at the sport’s top level, didn’t push the issue. The temptation likely was there to mash the gas and pass everybody ahead of him, proving from the drop of the green flag that he belonged in a Cup car. He instead let the car and the event come to him. He adapted and adjusted, communicating with his spotter and crew chief and left Texas without a scratch

on the car. Perhaps it runs in his blood. Nemechek, a one-race winner in the NASCAR Xfinity Series and a six-time victor in the Gander Outdoors Truck Series, is the son of 31-year NASCAR veteran Joe Nemechek. In fact, the Nemecheks on Sunday became the first father-son duo to compete in the same Cup Series race since Bobby Hamilton and Bobby

Hamilton Jr. both started a race at Atlanta in October 2005. The elder Nemechek is a four-time Cup Series winner and a 16-time Xfinity winner, claiming the 1992 Xfinity Series championship. He has made five Cup starts this season, his first Cup endeavors since 2015, albeit all in backmarker rides. Those slower teams hire Joe Nemechek for two reasons — experience and ability. The cars

he wheels always come back to the hauler as clean as they left. The younger Nemechek generally is known for doing the same, despite five DNFs due to wrecks this season in the Xfinity Series. To decide someone is ready for the big leagues based off one race seems silly, rushed and at best ill-advised. Much remains to be seen once Nemechek is tasked with mid-race adversity. But he at least has a shortterm chance to prove himself. Tifft, a rookie in the Cup Series this season, was sidelined for the final four races of the season after suffering a seizure at Martinsville Speedway on Oct. 23. While Tifft, who had a noncancerous brain tumor removed in 2016, works to figure out what went wrong, Nemechek got the call to fill in for the final three races starting at Texas. The first endeavor went well, besting his Front Row Motorsports teammates Michael McDowell, who finished 25th, and David Ragan, who crashed on lap 190. Ragan is retiring from fulltime racing in 2020, opening the door to the No. 38 Ford. If Nemechek strings together more runs like the one he had at Texas, perhaps he can find himself in a full-time ride next season.


SPORTS

D10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NHL ROUNDUP

STANDINGS & SCHEDULE Atlantic GP Boston 16 Toronto 18 17 Montreal Buffalo 17 Florida 16 Tampa Bay 15 Ottawa 16 Detroit 18 Metropolitan GP Washington 18 N.Y. Islanders 16 Pittsburgh 17 Philadelphia 16 Carolina 17 N.Y. Rangers 14 Columbus 16 New Jersey 15

EASTERN CONFERENCE W L OT Pts GF GA Home 11 3 2 24 58 40 7-0-1 9 5 4 22 60 57 6-2-4 9 5 3 21 61 54 5-3-0 9 6 2 20 50 48 5-2-1 7 4 5 19 56 58 3-1-2 8 5 2 18 52 52 3-1-1 6 9 1 13 45 51 5-4-0 5 12 1 11 39 70 3-5-1 W L OT Pts GF GA Home 13 2 3 29 74 55 5-1-2 12 3 1 25 49 35 8-2-1 10 6 1 21 58 44 6-3-1 9 5 2 20 53 50 6-1-1 9 7 1 19 53 50 6-3-0 7 6 1 15 46 45 4-4-1 6 7 3 15 38 54 3-5-1 4 7 4 12 40 60 2-2-4

Away 4-3-1 3-3-0 4-2-3 4-4-1 4-3-3 5-4-1 1-5-1 2-7-0 Away 8-1-1 4-1-0 4-3-0 3-4-1 3-4-1 3-2-0 3-2-2 2-5-0

Div 2-2-2 3-3-1 3-2-1 3-2-0 2-1-1 6-2-0 2-2-0 2-4-0 Div 2-0-1 2-2-1 3-0-0 4-2-0 2-4-1 1-2-0 2-2-1 2-1-1

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div St. Louis 17 11 3 3 25 54 49 5-1-2 6-2-1 4-0-0 Colorado 16 9 5 2 20 58 47 5-2-1 4-3-1 2-3-0 Nashville 16 9 5 2 20 64 52 6-2-2 3-3-0 3-1-0 Winnipeg 17 9 7 1 19 48 52 4-4-1 5-3-0 2-0-0 Dallas 17 8 8 1 17 41 42 5-3-1 3-5-0 3-1-0 Chicago 16 5 7 4 14 40 49 4-3-2 1-4-2 0-1-1 Minnesota 16 5 10 1 11 42 57 3-1-1 2-9-0 0-6-1 Pacific GP W L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div Edmonton 18 11 5 2 24 52 46 6-2-1 5-3-1 2-0-1 Calgary 19 10 7 2 22 57 55 6-1-1 4-6-1 3-3-1 17 9 5 3 21 57 45 4-0-2 5-5-1 3-2-1 Vancouver Vegas 18 9 6 3 21 54 53 4-3-2 5-3-1 5-1-0 Arizona 16 9 5 2 20 46 37 4-3-0 5-2-2 2-1-1 Anaheim 17 9 7 1 19 45 43 6-2-1 3-5-0 3-2-0 San Jose 17 6 10 1 13 46 63 4-4-0 2-6-1 1-4-0 Los Angeles 17 5 11 1 11 43 66 3-4-0 2-7-1 2-4-0 Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Top three teams in each division and two wild cards per conference advance to playoffs.

Friday’s results

Tampa Bay 3, Buffalo 2 Detroit 4, Boston 2 Winnipeg 4, Vancouver 1 Edmonton 4, New Jersey 0 Saturday’s results

N.Y. Islanders 2, Florida 1 Tampa Bay 5, Buffalo 3 Montreal 3, Los Angeles 2 Pittsburgh 3, Chicago 2, SO Philadelphia 3, Toronto 2, SO Ottawa 4, Carolina 1 Washington 5, Vegas 2

Minnesota at Arizona, (n) Columbus at Colorado, (n) St. Louis at Calgary, (n) Nashville at San Jose, (n) Sunday’s games

Florida at N.Y. Rangers, noon Dallas at Winnipeg, 1 p.m. New Jersey at Vancouver, 3 p.m. Vegas at Detroit, 4 p.m. Toronto at Chicago, 6 p.m. Philadelphia at Boston, 6 p.m. Edmonton at Anaheim, 8 p.m.

STAT OF THE DAY Jonathan Bernier stopped 26 shots and also had two assists as the host Detroit Red Wings beat Boston Bruins 4-2 Friday night. It was the first time a Red Wings goaltender had two assists in a game since the NHL-World Hockey Association merger in 197980.

STANDINGS & SCHEDULE EASTERN CONFERENCE L 1 2 3 4 7 L 3 5 5 6 6 L 3 4 6 5 6

Pct. GB .875 — .750 1 .625 2 .500 3 .222 5½ Pct GB .667 — .444 2 .375 2½ .333 3 .250 3½ Pct GB .667 — .556 1 .400 2½ .375 2½ .333 3

L10 7-1 6-2 5-3 4-4 2-7 L10 6-3 4-5 3-5 3-6 2-6 L10 6-3 5-4 4-6 3-5 3-6

Str Home Away Conf W-7 3-0 4-1 6-1 W-2 4-0 2-2 3-2 L-3 2-0 3-3 3-0 W-2 3-2 1-2 1-2 W-1 1-2 1-5 1-5 Str Home Away Conf L-1 3-0 3-3 3-0 L-2 2-3 2-2 2-1 L-2 2-4 1-1 2-4 W-1 3-2 0-4 2-3 L-2 1-3 1-3 1-2 Str Home Away Conf L-1 2-1 4-2 3-2 W-2 4-1 1-3 5-4 L-1 3-2 1-4 4-6 W-1 2-2 1-3 3-4 W-1 1-2 2-4 2-5

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W Houston 5 Dallas 5 San Antonio 5 Memphis 2 New Orleans 2 Northwest W Denver 6 Utah 6 Minnesota 5 Oklahoma City3 Portland 3 Pacific W L.A. Lakers 7 L.A. Clippers 6 Phoenix 5 Sacramento 3 Golden State 2

L 3 3 4 6 7 L 2 3 3 5 6 L 1 3 3 6 7

Pct GB .625 — .625 — .556 ½ .250 3 .222 3½ Pct GB .750 — .667 ½ .625 1 .375 3 .333 3½ Pct GB .875 — .667 1½ .625 2 .333 4½ .222 5½

Friday’s results Cleveland 113, Washington 100 Indiana 112, Detroit 106 Orlando 118, Memphis 86 Sacramento 121, Atlanta 109 Minnesota 125, Golden St. 119, OT Toronto 122, New Orleans 104 New York 106, Dallas 102 Utah 103, Milwaukee 100 Denver 100, Philadelphia 97 Brooklyn 119, Portland 115 L.A. Lakers 95, Miami 80 Saturday’s results Boston 135, San Antonio 115 New Orleans 115, Charlotte 110 Dallas at Memphis, (n) Golden State at Okla. City, (n) Houston at Chicago, (n)

L10 5-3 5-3 5-4 2-6 2-7 L10 6-2 6-3 5-3 3-5 3-6 L10 7-1 6-3 5-3 3-6 2-7

Islanders rebound from loss

Str Home Away Conf W-2 3-1 2-2 4-0 L-1 2-3 3-0 2-2 L-1 4-2 1-2 3-2 L-1 2-3 0-3 1-3 W-1 1-3 1-4 1-4 Str Home Away Conf W-3 3-1 3-1 3-2 W-2 5-0 1-3 4-3 W-1 2-1 3-2 1-1 L-1 3-2 0-3 2-4 L-4 0-3 3-3 3-4 Str Home Away Conf W-7 4-0 3-1 4-1 W-1 5-1 1-2 5-2 L-1 3-2 2-1 4-2 W-1 1-3 2-3 1-4 L-2 1-4 1-3 2-6

Sunday’s games Denver at Minnesota, 2:30 p.m. Charlotte at Philadelphia, 5 p.m. Indiana at Orlando, 5 p.m. Milwaukee at Okla. City, 6 p.m. Cleveland at New York, 6:30 p.m. Brooklyn at Phoenix, 7 p.m. Atlanta at Portland, 8 p.m. Toronto at L.A. Lakers, 8:30 p.m. Monday’s games Minnesota at Detroit, 6 p.m. Dallas at Boston, 6:30 p.m. Memphis at San Antonio, 6:30 p.m. Houston at New Orleans, 7 p.m. Toronto at L.A. Clippers, 9:30 p.m. Utah at Golden State, 9:30 p.m.

STAT OF THE DAY

60

Damian Lillard scored a career-high 60 points for Portland in the Trail Blazers’ 119-115 loss to the Brooklyn Nets on Friday night. Meanwhile, D’Angelo Russell scored 52 points in Golden State’s loss at Minnesota. It was just the second night in NBA history in which multiple players scored at least 50 points in losses. — Associated Press

consecutive victory. Washington has won 10 of 11.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Thomas Greiss came through with some big saves. Johnny Boychuk and Jordan Eberle had a couple key blocks when Greiss was out of position, and Scott Mayfield got the winning goal for New York right after Florida tied it in the third period. The Islanders bounced back from a disappointing loss with a team victory. Greiss stopped 37 shots and Mathew Barzal had a goal and an assist, helping the Islanders beat the Panthers 2-1 Saturday for their 11th win in 12 games. New York rebounded nicely after it blew a threegoal lead in the third period of a 4-3 overtime loss to Pittsburgh on Thursday. “Last game was a tough last period,” Greiss said. “So we wanted to win that one for sure and everybody battled hard, it was a good comeback.” The Islanders earned a point