Page 1

S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 1 8 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

Thursday • 11.08.2018 • $2.00

SESSIONS FORCED OUT

ACTING REPLACEMENT TO ASSUME OVERSIGHT OF SPECIAL COUNSEL By ErIC TuCKEr aNd MIChaEL BaLsaMO Associated Press

‘At your request I am submitting my resignation.’ Jeff Sessions

WashINGTON • Attorney General Jeff Sessions was pushed out Wednesday as the country’s chief law enforcement officer after enduring more than a year of blistering and personal attacks from President Donald Trump over Sessions’ recusal from the Russia investigation. Trump announced in a tweet that he was naming Sessions’ chief of staff, Matthew Whitaker, a former U.S. attorney from Iowa, as acting attorney

general. Whitaker has criticized special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into potential coordination between the president’s Republican campaign and Russia. Sessions, in a one-page letter to Trump, said he was resigning “at your request.” The resignation was the culmination of a toxic relationship that frayed just weeks into Sessions’ tumultuous tenure, when he stepped aside from Mueller’s investigation. Trump blamed Sessions’ decision see sEssIONs • Page a11

Matthew Whitaker (left) is taking charge of the Russia investigation and special counsel Robert Mueller from Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein (right).

FALLOUT FROM ELECTION

DEMOCRATS SEEK RELEVANCE

TRUMP FACES MORE OVERSIGHT

WashINGTON POsT

By KurT ErICKsON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Wa s h I N G T O N

Democrats in Missouri, once a potent force in state politics, were relegated to the wilderness by Missouri voters in Tuesday’s midterm elections. Just two years ago, the Show-Me state had Democratic officeholders spread throughout state government. Offices of the DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com governor, secretary of Daria Locher, a junior at Washington University from New state, treasurer, audi- York who supported Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., watches as tor, attorney general CNN reports poor numbers for McCaskill Tuesday night. and U.S. Senate were And, analysts say, there is no clear all in Democratic hands. Now, Auditor Nicole Galloway, who path back to relevance in a state in which won Tuesday over Republican Saundra rural red areas are becoming more domiMcDowell, is the lone Democrat stand- nant in deciding the outcome of stateing after U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill lost wide races. her re-election bid to Republican Attorney General Josh Hawley. see dEMOCraTs • Page a8

Democrats seized control of the House while Republicans held the Senate on Tuesday in a national referendum on President Donald Trump that drew record numbers of voters to the polls and opened the door to tougher oversight of the White House over the next two years. The dramatic conASSOCIATED PRESS clusion of the most House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., shown during expensive and con- a news conference on Capitol Hill on Wednesday, says she’s sequential midterms confident she will be elected House speaker. in modern times fell short of delivering the sweeping repu- sonal finances and potential ties to Rusdiation of Trump wished for by Demo- sia. Democrats have gained more than the crats and the “resistance” movement. But Democrats’ takeover in the House 23 House seats needed to win a majority. still portended serious changes in Wash- But some other key races remained too ington, as the party prepared to block Trump’s agenda and investigate his per- see OVErsIGhT • Page a6

RURAL VOTE BOOSTS HAWLEY

TAKEAWAYS FROM TUESDAY

JEFFErsON CITy •

By JaCK suNTruP St. Louis Post-Dispatch

By ChuCK raasCh St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFErsON CITy • Attorney General

WashINGTON • Re-

Josh Hawley trounced Sen. Claire McCaskill in Missouri’s rural and exurban areas on Tuesday, underscoring the Republican Party’s strength everywhere in the state outside of its largest cities. McCaskill, a Democrat, was counting on supporters to run up LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com her vote count in urban Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley celebrates his win and suburban areas — Tuesday over Democratic U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill at the and she needed at least University Plaza Hotel & Convention Center in Springfield, Mo. some voters in conservative areas to break away from the GOP percent and at 60 percent in the city, far exceeding 2014 levels. and depress Hawley’s outstate margins. But McCaskill’s high levels of support McCaskill won 62 percent of the vote in St. Louis County and 84 percent of in St. Louis, Kansas City and Columbia the vote in the city of St. Louis, accord- were no match for motivated rural and ing to unofficial results. Election officials pegged St. Louis County turnout at 68 see ruraL • Page a8

publicans in the St. Louis region bucked — in some cases narrowly — the national tide that brought Democrats to power in the House on Tuesday. But in victory, some regional Republicans also took a loss. T h e b l u e wave washed over the U.S. House, with DemoLAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com crats seizing control Supporters of Republican U.S. Senate candidate Josh from Republicans. Hawley wait for President Donald Trump to arrive at a rally But the U.S. Senate, on Thursday at the Columbia, Mo., Regional Airport. the proverbial saucer that is supposed to cool the heat of General Josh Hawley. Those are key takeaways of Tuesday the people’s House, will have a redder Republican hue. It will be more partisan night’s higher-octane midterm elections and polarized with the loss of several of that will lead to split government and set its most moderate members, including the stage for a rerun in 2020, when the two-term Claire McCaskill of Missouri, who was beaten by Republican Attorney see TaKEaWays • Page a9

FuLL ELECTION COVEraGE • a6-10

Stocks rally as elections largely go as expected •

A12

Girl Scouts sue Boy Scouts over name change • A17 O’Reilly’s play has been indispensable for Blues

• B1

Ankiel hits a bump in his comeback effort • B6

County’s port authority has dueling boards By JErEMy KOhLEr St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CLayTON • St. Louis County Executive

Steve Stenger and the County Council each made appointments Wednesday to their own versions of a port authority, another county government dust-up destined for court. The St. Louis County Port Authority has been in the council’s crosshairs since this summer, when the council attempted to hold

ethics hearings in the wake of Post-Dispatch stories that raised questions about its procurement policies and real estate transactions. The inquiry grew out of the council’s deep and growing distrust of Stenger, whom council members have accused of misleading them on several issues. The port authority did not cooperate, and the council considered but did not issue see POrT • Page a3

TODAY

46°/32°

Carrying the state

MOSTLY CLOUDY

TOMORROW

41°/23° PARTLY SUNNY

WEATHER AXX

POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

1 M Vol. 140, No. 312 ©2018


M 1 THURSDAY • 11.08.2018 • A2

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM HOLIDAY COOKIES

GM MEETINGS

UPCOMING CHATS

Sure, your family says your holiday cookies are the best, but how do you know? Enter your recipe into the 2018 Holiday Cookie Contest. stltoday.com/contests

Derrick Goold reports live from baseball’s GM Meetings this week in Carlsbad, Calif. stltoday.com/Cardinals

Thursday Friday Monday Tuesday Wednesday

MU sports with Dave Matter, 11 a.m. Talk STL sports with Jeff Gordon, 1 p.m. Talk Cardinals baseball, 1 p.m. Sports columnist Ben Frederickson, 11 a.m. Ask the Road Crew, 1 p.m. Jim Thomas talks Blues, 1 p.m.

CONCERT REVIEW

PEOPLE

Christina Aguilera’s Stifel Theatre show brings some luster back to her career

Elliott up for songwriting honor

PHOTO BY SEAN DERRICK

Christina Aguilera (center) performs Tuesday at the Stifel Theatre. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

At Christina Aguilera’s tour stop Tuesday night at the Stifel Theatre, imagery onstage declared that “the queen is back.” Aguilera is indeed back — but “queen”? The superstar diverted her recording career to spend six seasons as a coach on TV’s “The Voice.” Her last album before this summer was “Lotus” in 2012. Now in the post-“Voice” portion of her career, Aguilera is on the road with her “Liberation Tour,” named after her “Liberation” album, which was released in June. She’s performing in smaller venues than she may be used to, but the venues make sense. She’s still putting on big shows, including her near-sold-out stop at Stifel. “It’s a long time coming,” she said. “I’m glad to finally be back on the stage where I belong. Thanks for bringing me back.” From behind a screen while perched on a platform high above the stage, Aguilera opened the show with “Maria” (from “Liberation”) while wearing a red dress that was large enough to conceal several dancers underneath. The singer, who canceled some October dates on the recommendation of

her doctor, was back at her peak here. She noticeably cleared her throat several times while speaking. But her vocals packed punch without being over the top, as they often are, as she belted and pranced through many of the show’s big set pieces (one had an Asian motif, another a decadent dinner). The set included a recast “Genie in a Bottle” with a heavier bottom; an explosive “Dirrty” that actually should have opened the show; the rock-tinged “Sick of Sittin,” complete with Aguilera knocking over a chair; a quick memory lane detour with a medley of “What a Girl Wants” and “Come On Over (All I Want is You)”; and the strong sass of “Lady Marmalade” and “Ain’t No Other Man.” Some of the show’s quieter moments — “Say Something,” “It’s a Man’s Man’s Man’s World,” “Twice” and “Beautiful” — were actually among its biggest and nicely showcased more restrained vocals. Aguilera brought out her young daughter, Summer Rain, for the latter. Introducing “Keep on Singin’ My Song” from her “Stripped” album, she appeared to be referencing “The Voice” as she mentioned her need to do music for the right reasons instead of for a paycheck. During the encore that included “Un-

less It’s With You” and “Let There Be Love,” Aguilera introduced one of her former dancers, Tiana Gandelman. She congratulated the St. Louis native on her pregnancy and promised to be at the baby shower. Gandelman brought her parents (Jeff and Mary Clarke) onstage as everyone danced. That also included Tiffany T. Hunter and Nina DiAngelo, cast members at Hamburger Mary’s St. Louis. Opening for Aguilera was Big Boi, one half of classic rap act Outkast. Performing a shorter show than when he headlined earlier this year at the Ready Room, his set was mostly an excuse to run through some of Outkast’s biggest hits including “So Fresh, So Clean,” “Ms. Jackson,” “Bombs Over Baghdad,” “Rosa Parks” and “The Whole World.” He also included “All Night” from his latest project, “Boomiverse,” as well as “Kryptonite.” Aguilera’s fans didn’t seem too invested in the hip-hop legend, who performed with Sleepy Brown.

ST. FRANCOIS COUNTY, MO. • A woman who had claimed her Ku Klux Klan leader husband was shot to death by her son now says in a letter from jail that she was the one who pulled the trigger. Malissa Ancona originally told police that her son shot her husband with a 9 mm handgun, and agreed to testify against him last year, according to court documents and testimony. But in the Sept. 26 letter to Judge Wendy Wexler Horn, Ancona wrote that as a court date for her son approached, she wanted “to let the court know now, that he did not pull the trigger, (I DiD).” Her letter says that she was “under the influence” when she spoke to detectives and couldn’t recall what happened the night her husband was shot. Ancona also complains that she has not been given her medication and was deemed mentally ill by the state of Missouri in 2003. On Wednesday, the next hearing in Ancona’s case was set for April 19. It’s not clear from online court records whether there was any discussion of her claims or

Malissa Ancona

Paul E. Jinkerson Jr.

Frank Ancona

complaints. Ancona’s public defender, Stephanie Zipfel, declined to comment on the facts of the case in an email Wednesday. St. Francois County Prosecuting Attorney Jerrod Mahurin did not return a message seeking comment. Ancona, of Leadwood, and her son, Paul Edward Jinkerson Jr. of Belgrade, face charges of first-degree murder, armed criminal action, abandonment of a corpse and tampering with evidence in the death on Feb. 9, 2017, of Frank Ancona, 51, who was imperial wizard of the Traditionalist American Knights of the Ku Klux Klan. Malissa Ancona initially reported her husband missing, but charging documents say that she and her son cleaned up the crime scene after he was shot, and

No kiss from a dame • Oscar-winning actress Emma Thompson has received one of Britain’s highest awards from Prince William — and thought about giving him a kiss at the Buckingham Palace ceremony. Thompson received a damehood on Wednesday in recognition of her career, an event made special by the fact that it was given to her by William, a longtime friend. “I love Prince William. I’ve known him since he was little, and we just sniggered at each other,” she says. “I said, ‘I can’t kiss you, can I?’ And he said, ‘No don’t’!” Thompson was named for the female equivalent of a knighthood in the Queen’s Birthday Honors List in June. She plans to use the honor to focus attention on the plight of poor children who don’t get adequate food during school holidays.

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS

Actor Norman Lloyd is 104. Singer Bonnie Bramlett is 74. Singer Bonnie Raitt is 69. Actress Alfre Woodard is 66. Singer-actor Leif Garrett is 57. TV chef Gordon Ramsay is 52. Actress Courtney Thorne-Smith is 51. Actress Parker Posey is 50. Actor Matthew Rhys is 44. Actress Tara Reid is 43. TV personality Jack Osbourne is 33. Singer SZA is 29. Singer-actor Riker Lynch is 27. Actor Van Crosby is 16. From news services

Kevin C. Johnson • 314-340-8191 Pop music critic @kevincjohnson on Twitter kjohnson@post-dispatch.com

LOTTERY MULTISTATE GAMES

Who killed Missouri KKK leader? Wife who had blamed son now says she did BY ROBERT PATRICK AND JOEL CURRIER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Missy Elliott, one of rap’s greatest voices and also a songwriter and producer who has crafted songs for Beyoncé and Whitney Houston, is one of the nominees for the 2019 Songwriters Hall of Fame. Elliott is the first female rapper nominated for the prestigious prize and could also become the third rapper to enter the organization, following recent inductees Jay-Z and Jermaine Dupri. Joining Elliott as performing nominees are Mariah Carey, Chrissie Hynde, Vince Gill, Mike Love, Jimmy Cliff, Jeff Lynne, Cat Stevens, John Prine, Lloyd Price, Tommy James and the Eurythmics (Annie Lennox and Dave Stewart). Songwriters are eligible for induction after writing hit songs for at least 20 years. Six songwriters, or songwriting groups, will be inducted at the Hall’s 50th annual Induction & Awards Gala in New York on June 13.

then dumped the body near the Big River outside of Belgrade. She claimed that her son shot her husband while he was asleep and after he had asked for a divorce, according to officials and court records. Authorities have said that a shotgun also was used. Notified of the letter Wednesday, Eric Barnhart, one of Jinkerson’s attorneys, said Ancona’s claim in the letter was contrary to what she said in a deposition, when she did not admit pulling the trigger. Barnhart said Ancona told him that she had been offered a plea deal by prosecutors that would reduce her murder charge to second-degree and cap her potential prison time at 20 years, if she testifies truthfully. Asked if the letter could be used in Jinkerson’s defense, Barnhart replied, “I would say that.” But Ancona would have to admit that she sent it, he said. Barnhart rejected a plea deal with prosecutors. Jinkerson’s trial is set for May.

POWERBALL Wednesday: 26-28-34-42-50 Powerball: 25 Power play: 2 Estimated jackpot: $71 million MEGA MILLIONS Tuesday: 28-34-37-56-69 Mega ball: 12 Megaplier: 2 Friday’s estimated jackpot: $90 million

MISSOURI LOTTERIES

LOTTO Wednesday: 06-12-23-25-31-44 Estimated jackpot: $1.6 million SHOW ME CASH Wednesday: 16-24-26-36-38 Thursday’s estimated jackpot: $50,000 PICK-3 Wednesday Midday: 152 Evening: 266 PICK-4 Wednesday Midday: 8220 Evening: 2410

ILLINOIS LOTTERIES

LUCKY DAY LOTTO Wednesday Midday: 08-19-24-32-36 Evening: 06-21-28-30-32 LOTTO Thursday’s estimated jackpot: $20 million PICK-3 Wednesday Midday: 897 FB: 4 Evening: 539 FB: 1 PICK-4 Wednesday Midday: 6833 FB: 5 Evening: 3364 FB: 1

Robert Patrick • 314-621-5154 @rxpatrick on Twitter RPatrick@post-dispatch.com

JOE HOLLEMAN Joe’s St. Louis returns next week

GOT A STORY TIP? We want to hear from you. Submit news tips online. They are confidential, and you can choose to remain anonymous >>> stltoday.com/newstips CONTACT US

INSIDE Business ............... A12 Commentary......... A15 Editorial................ A14 Horoscopes...........EV2 Letters to editor ... A14 Obituaries............. A15

People ....................A2 Puzzles .................EV2 Sports calendar ......B2 Stocks ................... A13 TV listings .............EV3 Weather..................B8

The Post-Dispatch is a Lee Enterprises Newspaper and is published daily. USPS: 476-580. Postmaster send address changes to St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 900 N. Tucker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63101-1099. Periodical postage paid at St. Louis. Suggested average weekly retail prices for home delivery with full digital access are: Mon-Sun $10.25, Sun-Fri $9.00, Mon-Fri $7.75, Thu-Sun $8.50, Sat-Mon $7.50, Fri-Sun $7.50, Wed&Sun $7.00, Sun&Mon $7.00, Sat&Sun $7.00, Sunday Only $4.50. The subscription price includes all applicable sales tax and a charge for the convenience of having the paper delivered. To avoid delivery charges, call 314-340-8888 to arrange pick up of your paper at one of our local distribution centers. Rates are based on the annual charges for premium days and/or plus sections delivered on 10/21/18, 11/18/18,11/22/18,12/9/18,12/16/1 8, 1/13/19, 1/27/19, 2/17/19, 3/17/19, 3/24/19, 4/14/19, 4/21/19, 5/19/19, 5/26/19, 6/16/19, 6/23/19, 7/14/19, 7/21/19, 8/18/19, 8/25/19, 9/8/19, and timing of these charges may affect the length of the subscription. A nonrefundable account set up fee will be charged to qualifying new starts.

CUSTOMER SERVICE: 314-340-8888

For news tips only, phone ................................ 314-340-8222 Submit news tips ..........................metro@post-dispatch.com

Customer service hours

Submit events for our calendar ............ events.stltoday.com

6:30 a.m.–5 p.m. Monday-Friday, 7–11 a.m. Saturday-Sunday and 7–10 a.m. on holidays. service@stltoday.com

Main number....................................................314-340-8000

SUBSCRIBE

STLtoday.com/subscriberservices 888-785-3201

PLACE DEATH NOTICES

STLtoday.com

800-365-0820 ext. 8600

PLACE CLASSIFIED OR OTHER ADVERTISING

STLtoday.com

314-621-6666

FAX AD INFORMATION BUY REPRINTS

314-340-8664 STLtoday.mycapture.com

Editor: Gilbert Bailon.......................................314-340-8387 Features: Amy Bertrand ..................................314-340-8284 Local news: Marcia Koenig............................... 314-340-8142 Business: Lisa Brown ....................................... 314-340-8127 Online: Amanda St. Amand.............................. 314-340-8201 Projects: Jean Buchanan .................................. 314-340-8111 Sports: Roger Hensley...................................... 314-340-8301


LOCAL

11.08.2018 • Thursday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • A3

NEW LOCATION IN EDWARDSVILLE, IL

Our Quality Is Timeless. This Price Isn’t!

OFFER EXPIRES 11/30/2018

Miracle-Ear Quality For $895. Why Wait? Hearing is believing! Right now, for a very limited time, you can get a fully digital, genuine Miracle-Ear® hearing aid for less than $900. This is one of our smallest, most discreet hearing solutions. Complete with Miracle-Ear sound quality, custom fitting and a comprehensive service and warranty program. Don’t wait, this special offer is valid next week only! Monday - Friday! Getting Started. It’s Free and Easy. At Miracle-Ear, we make our process comfortable and convenient. We also offer you a variety of valuable services–at no charge.

Look inside your ear canal... It could just be wax! But more importantly, it might help you to understand why you may be experiencing problems like: • Frequently asking people to repeat themselves? • Hearing but not being able to distinguish certain words? • Difficulty hearing on the phone?

We can check for: • Excessive wax build-up • Damage to the eardrum • Fluid accumulation in the middle ear • Other conditions Now you can get a picture of what’s happening inside your ear - literally. It won’t cost you a penny. • Free Hearing Test • Free Video Otoscope Exam • Free Consultation

VALID NEXT WEEK ONLY! MONDAY - FRIDAY! Arnold 636-875-7645

Ballwin 636-875-7633

St. Peters Florissant 314-403-7639 636-487-5570 Columbia, MO 314-325-3186

Crystal City 636-875-7638

St. Charles 636-235-9169

South County 314-488-2711

Swansea, IL 618-857-3454

Creve Coeur O’Fallon, MO Arsenal Union 636-492-2966 314-666-7115 636-203-7053 314-325-3186 Waterloo IL Edwardsville IL - NEW LOCATION! 618-433-3620 618-433-3158

Why Wait? Take Advantage of This Offer Today! Custom digital hearing aids!

Now Only

895!

$

HURRY Offer Expires in 30 Days Valid on model Audiotone Pro CIC

Valid at participating Miracle-Ear locations only. Limit one coupon per purchase. May not be combined with other offers and does not apply to prior sales. Cash value 1/20 cent. Offer expires: 11/30/2018 1118THANKS - POST

FREE

HEARING AID BATTERIES†!

FREE BATTERY CHARGER* • Battery charge lasts all-day! • No Batteries to buy! *Free battery charger with the purchase of pair of select ME-1 or ME-2 hearing aids. Offer expires in 30 days. Offer expires: 11/30/2018 1118THANKS - POST

To receive your FREE pack of premium hearing aid batteries†, go to: www.FreeHearingBatteries.com Enter the Promo Code 100BATT If you don’t have access to the internet simply call our office and make sure to reference Promo Code 100BATT.

*Not valid on Audiotone© Pro. **If you are not completely satisfied, the aids may be returned for a full refund within 30 days of the completion of fitting, in satisfactory condition. Fitting fees may apply. See store for details. †No purchase necessary.

County now has dueling port authorities PORT • FROM A1

subpoenas to compel testimony or documents. Instead, the council passed ordinances in effect forcing all six members out of their seats and gave itself the right to make its own appointments to the board, a power that had been Stenger’s. The port authority went dormant after a meeting in June. The port authority stands out as one of the region’s most powerful economic development agencies. Since 2010, River City Casino has paid the port authority about $5 million per year in rent, a deal St. Louis County struck more than a decade ago. In exchange for a cleaned-up former lead site in Lemay, River City agreed to a 99-year lease that promised annual rent to the port authority. That money, and the port authority’s business, is mostly managed by staff from the St. Louis Economic Development Partnership, the joint citycounty economic development agency whose board is appointed by Stenger and St. Louis Mayor Lyda Krewson. Stenger, on certain redevelopment projects such as the Jamestown Mall, has used the port authority as an end run around the council. In a meeting on Wednesday, the County Council appointed three new port board members and said it planned to appoint four others soon. The three were former County Council member Richard “Skip” Mange, retired attorney John Maupin and Robert Birdsong, who retired from the Social Security Administration. Maupin agreed to chair the council’s version of the port authority. County Council Chairman Sam Page said some nonprofits were relying on port authority grants and

the council had to get the dormant agency jumpstarted. Page said it was not clear whether the council’s port authority would continue the same arrangement with the Economic Partnership. With millions in income per year of its own, it would not have to. In a letter to the County Council on Wednesday, County Executive Steve Stenger called the council’s actions unlawful and said the legislative branch “has no such authority under wellestablished legal precedent.” And he made six appointments to the port authority. In a prepared statement, Stenger said that he had tried in recent weeks to work collaboratively with the council but that its actions on Wednesday made it “clear that they continue to be more interested in petty political confrontation than in working together” for county residents. He said the council was acting “simply to disrupt the operations of a key economic development resource of the County.” By the end of the day, there were two boards claiming to be the St. Louis County Port Authority. Stenger’s port authority held an emergency meeting Wednesday night at the Partnership offices in Clayton, the first port board meeting in nearly five months. The board asked a Post-Dispatch reporter to leave the room so it could have a confidential discussion about “a legal issue.” Stenger’s version of the port board included four members from the board disbanded by the council — Greg Hayden, Edward C. James, Frank McHugh and Daniel Thies — and two new appointees, Jeffrey P. Aboussie and James J. Beck. Stenger’s version of the board met for about 90 minutes behind closed doors with the economic partnership’s lawyer, Kim Diamond, and Partnership CEO Sheila Sweeney. Asked whether the council’s or Stenger’s appointees constituted the real port authority, Diamond said, “we would like to know that at some point.”

You’re Invited to a

Free Diabetic Dinner Event Stunning Research now suggests Type II Diabetes can begin to be REVERSED In As Little As 1 WEEK. Topics Include: •

Common reasons diabetics get worse with time.

A unique clinical approach that allows the diabetes to reverse.

Is your treatment causing you to get worse over time?

Common drugs that may cause you to actually get worse.

The Old Spaghetti Factory - Chesterfield

17384 Chesterfield Airport Rd Chesterfield MO 63005

Tues., November 13 @ 6:15pm Free Parking

FREE ADMISSION & FREE GOURMET MEAL You will discover how Type II Diabetics have been able to reverse their disease, reduce & eliminate drugs (including insulin), lose weight without exercise, explode their energy levels, & become non-diabetic.

Please RSVP to 636-323-3646 - Reservation Required Call to Reserve Your Seat 9am-6pm Feel free to bring one (1) guest. Seating is extremely limited. Type II Diabetic Adults Only.

Dr. Olivia Joseph, DC, DCN


LOCAL

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

LAW & ORDER

DIGEST

ST. LOUIS > Firearms thief sentenced • A St. Louis man was sentenced to 18 months in prison for stealing rifles and shotguns from police cars in St. Louis County and a pistol from a civilian’s car in St. Charles County. Joshua John Pollard said in court that he knew he “made a mistake” and was “trying to Pollard get my life together.” In addition to the prison time, U.S. District Judge Henry Autrey ordered Pollard to repay St. Louis County police $5,600. Pollard, 20, of the 6100 block of Lucille Avenue, admitted in his guilty plea in July to three counts of possession of a stolen firearm, saying that he broke the window of a police vehicle on Jan. 12 and stole a Colt AR-15 and a Remington 870 pump-action shotgun. He broke into another police vehicle Jan. 29 and stole another AR-15 and shotgun, and stole a .40-caliber Glock G23 pistol early on Jan. 30, his plea says. Autrey ordered Pollard’s 18-month sentence to run at the same time as any prison sentences he received for related cases in state court.

WEBSTER GROVES > Council advances measure that would put $5 million bond issue on ballot • The Webster Groves City Council this week took the first steps toward putting a $5 million bond issue on the ballot in April to finance the replacement of the outdated firehouse at 1302 South Elm Avenue. At its meeting Tuesday, the council gave initial approval to two bills allowing the city to schedule the bond issue vote. The vote is scheduled for its meeting on Nov. 20. The firehouse is too small and outdated, said Mayor Gerry Welch and City Manager Steve Wylie. Among other things, a ladder truck can’t fit inside, and there is no space for greeting people or for meeting them or to separate hazardous materials.

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 11.08.2018

In other action, the council moved toward authorizing the city manager to execute a contract with Neil Bruntrager to provide legal services for the city. He will replace Nathan Nickolaus, who stepped down to move to Jefferson City. URBANA, ILL. > University to push for 16.5 percent more funding • University of Illinois officials are planning to seek a 16.5 percent funding boost from the state toward making up money it lost from the state’s long budget standoff. University administrators say they’ll ask the Board of Trustees next week to support a state funding request of $692.5 million. The (Champaign) News-Gazette reported university leaders say that would still fall below 2010 funding when

reptile as “gentle as a puppy” after animal control workers were called to the Kansas City home on Wednesday. The workers also found two boa constrictors and a rabbit. The Kansas City Star reported a specialist removed the alligator, which was at least 6 feet long. No one was injured. The tenant, Sean Casey, said he’d owned the alligator for four years and named it Catfish. He called the reptile “a big cuddly lizard.” A spokesman for the city’s Neighborhood and Housing Services Department said Kansas City doesn’t allow homeowners to have alligators. Catfish will be temporarily housed at the Monkey Island Rescue and Sanctuary in nearby Greenwood. The snakes and rabbit were taken to an animal shelter.

adjusted for inflation. The funding request will cover the university’s Urbana-Champaign, Chicago and Springfield campuses. Executive Vice President Barbara Wilson says the university system received only about 28 percent of its typical state funding in 2016. She says that shortfall hasn’t been replenished. About two-thirds of the funding increase would go toward pay raises and faculty recruitment and retention. KANSAS CITY > Landlord finds gator in hot tub • A Missouri landlord stumbled upon an unwanted house guest while evicting a tenant: a large alligator in a hot tub. The tenant described the 150-pound

EDWARDS CARPET

N ' S A R D E A T Y E V

FLOORING

A surveillance video shows a woman who police say fled a shooting scene.

ST. LOUIS COUNTY > Woman sought after fatal shooting • A doorbell camera captured video of a woman who ran from a neighborhood where two men were found shot Wednesday morning, one fatally. Police released the surveillance footage Wednesday afternoon in an attempt to find the woman, though they said her role in the homicide was unclear. The video shows a woman on the front porch of a home. St. Louis County police released few details in the shootings but said officers found the men about 11:15 a.m. after police were called and asked to check on someone at a home in the 1000 block of Leisure Lane. The winding residential street is off Schulte Road and Olive Boulevard. It wasn’t clear who placed the call for a welfare check. Officers arrived and discovered a dead man on the front porch of a home. His identity had not been released. They then found an injured man inside a nearby home, where investigators believe the shooting took place. That man was taken to a hospital, where he was in critical condition. Police said they found multiple weapons at the scene. Authorities asked anyone with information to call the St. Louis County Police Department at 636-529-8210 or contact CrimeStoppers at 866-3718477. Tipsters can remain anonymous and may be eligible for a reward. DELLWOOD > Man found fatally shot on sidewalk • The Major Case Squad is investigating the death of a man in Dellwood on Tuesday night. The man was found on a sidewalk in the 1500 block of Chambers Road, near West Florissant Avenue, by a passerby about 10:30 p.m., according to the Major Case Squad. He had been shot. Paramedics tried unsuccessfully to revive the man, later identified as Donald Lang, 21. Lang lived in unincorporated St. Louis County, but authorities did not provide an address. Authorities asked anyone with information to call police at 314-574-4043 or contact CrimeStoppers at 866-371-8477. Tipsters to CrimeStoppers can remain anonymous and may be eligible for a reward.

SALE

Sale Ends Nov 12th Open Veteran's Day

Edwards CarpEt WOUld likE TO THAnk All OUR COUnTRy'S VETERAnS GOd BlESS AMERiCA

12 Months Interest Free! We Take Up & Haul Away Old Carpet. Move Regular Furniture FREE!

Textured Carpet 99 Reg. 4 sq. ft.

2

$ 99

Now

sq. ft.

Includes 8 lb Pad and Installation

Tonal Plush 25 yr Warranty

Anso Nylon Carpet Non Pro Rated 20 yr Warranty

6

99 Reg. sq. ft.

4

Reg.

799sq. ft.

5

$ 99* Now$ 99 Now sq. ft.

Includes 8 lb Pad and Installation

sq. ft.

Includes 8 lb Pad and Installation

Last Chance at These Prices!

1000 N. Lindbergh (at Olive)

ELLISVILLE

15763 Manchester (just east of Clarkson)

SOUTH COUNTY

314-993-0808

636-391-8070

314-892-4499

CREVE COEUR

DES PERES

ST. CHARLES

314-909-7474

636-940-2244

13384 Manchester Rd. (Just west of 270)

Regency Plaza (Bogey Rd., West of 94)

6925 S. Lindbergh (Marshall’s Plaza)

STORE HOURS Mon-Fri 9-8 Sat 9-6 Sun 12-5 Open Veteran's Day

www.EdwardsCarpet.com

Previous sales excluded *On Approved Credit, 1/3 deposit required, minimum payment, See Store for full details. Extra charge for glue down pull up.


LOCAL

11.08.2018 • Thursday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • A5

PRINTS EXHIBIT TO OPEN AT ART MUSEUM

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

dave stapf, an engineer technician at the st. Louis art Museum, looks Wednesday at the work of andy Warhol that is part of an exhibit called Graphic revolution american Prints 1960-Now. stapf was waiting for a press tour to end so he could get back to adjusting the lighting for the show, which will open sunday.

KEEP UP WITH CRIME IN THE CITY OR COUNTY Use our St. Louis Crime Tracker to compare neighborhoods, look at incident maps and check per-capita crime rates. And our revamped tracker now features monthly crime stats, year-over-year trends, and incident maps for Chesterfield and dozens of other departments in the county. stltoday.com/crimetracker

Be an owner, not a manager A striking sterling silver bracelet from Italy This adjustable on-trend bolo is at the top of the wrist list. In brushed and polished sterling silver, with a mix of curb and popcorn links, it’s the ideal Fnishing touch for every outFt. So much style for so little!

49

$

Plus Free Shipping

Sterling Silver Bolo Bracelet from Italy H2" wide. Stationed on a box chain. Adjusts to Ft most wrists with a sliding bead closure. 1

Ross-Simons Item #904632 To receive this special offer, use offer code: ENCHANT39 1.800.556.7376 or visit www.ross-simons.com/enchant

50%

OF PROFITS GUARANTEED MINIMUM

$100K FIRST YEAR

*

*Under our New Franchisee Incentive Program Amendment.

EMAIL - franchise@steaknshake.com CALL - 877-747-5329 VISIT - www.steaknshakefranchise.com Note: This information is not intended as an offer to sell, or the solicitation of an offer to buy, a franchise. It is for information purposes only. This offering is made by prospectus only. For more information consult the Franchise Disclosure Document for the Steak ’n Shake Franchise Partner Program for Existing Company-Operated Restaurants available from the company. CERTAIN JURISDICTIONS REGULATE THE OFFER AND SALE OF FRANCHISES, AND WE WILL NOT OFFER OR SELL YOU A FRANCHISE IN THESE JURISDICTIONS UNLESS AND UNTIL WE HAVE COMPLIED WITH ALL APPLICABLE REQUIREMENTS. NP1018.036


ELECTION 2018

A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 11.08.2018

DEMOCRATS ON TRACK TO TAKE HOUSE, GOP RETAINS SENATE Democrat

Republican

Independent

46 *

Runoff

Not called

Darker shaded colors on the maps show party turnovers.

No races

THE SENATE

GOVERNORS

Republicans have retained Senate control for two more years, shattering Democrats’ hopes of an anti-Trump wave sweeping them into the majority. The map favored the GOP since Democrats were defending 25 seats while Republicans defended only nine.

Democrats lost 2 seats

Democrats received a handful of victories in their “blue wall” Midwestern states, electing or re-electing governors in Michigan, Pennsylvania, Minnesota and Wisconsin. The GOP prevailed in a few key races such as Ohio and Florida. Democrats gained seven governorships; Republicans lost six.

Majority line

*Two independents caucus with Democrats

51

Special elections MA

Republicans gained 2 seats

RI

DE

MN

MA

MS

CT

RI

MD

THE HOUSE

223

Democrats have regained control of the House from President Donald Trump's Republican Party in the midterm elections, powered by a suburban revolt that has threatened what's left of the president's governing agenda. But the Democrats’ edge is narrow. With 218 seats needed for a majority, Democrats have won 223 and the Republicans 197, with winners undetermined in several races.

Democrats gained 28 seats

WA

MT

ME

ND MN

OR

VT

ID SD

Majority line

PA IL

UT

RI CT

IA

NE

OH

AZ

MD

WV

KS

MO

OK

NJ DE

IN

CO

CA

MA

NY

MI

WY

NV

NH

WI

VA

KY

NC

TN SC

AR

NM

AL

GA

MS TX

197

LA

AK

Republicans lost 28 seats

FL HI SOURCE: Associated Press Election Services | NOTE: Results as of Wednesday afternoon.

Midterm results will change House in terms of age, gender, ethnicity OVERSIGHT • FROM A1

close to call, including Senate contests in Arizona and Florida and the gubernatorial matchup in Georgia. Republicans appeared to lead in all three as of Wednesday afternoon. House Democrats are prepared to launch investigations of Trump and to closely scrutinize his policies on immigration, education and health care. But they are wary of pursuing impeachment, concerned that such a move would undermine lawmakers who represent districts that Trump won in 2016. Trump said that investigations launched by the House would jeopardize prospects for bipartisan deals on issues such as trade, infrastructure and prescription drug costs. “They can play that game, but we can play it better, because we have a thing called the United States Senate,” Trump said, referring to GOP control of the upper chamber. “ ... I think I’m better at that game than they are, actually, but we’ll find out.” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., cautioned Democrats against engaging in “presidential harassment” in the form of overly aggressive oversight. “The Democrats in the House will have to decide just how much presidential harassment is good strategy. I’m not sure it will work for them,” he said Wednesday. At her own news conference, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., credited the Democratic victory in the House to the party’s focus on health care issues. She said Democrats had a “responsibility for oversight” but said committees’ efforts would not be “scattershot.”

HOUSE LEADERSHIP IN PLAY

Jockeying for House leadership positions began in earnest on Wednesday, though lawmakers are not due back in Washington until next week. Pelosi is widely considered to be the front-runner to retake the speaker’s gavel, though dozens of Democratic candidates had called during the campaign for new leadership. Trump himself threw support behind Pelosi’s bid, tweeting Wednesday that she “has earned this great honor!” On the Republican side, House Freedom Caucus Chairman Jim Jordan of Ohio said in an interview with Hill.TV that he would challenge Rep. Kevin McCarthy of California for the role of minority leader. The

move underscored conservatives’ desire to expand their power within the GOP conference after a bruising election. House GOP leadership elections are scheduled for Nov. 14. On Tuesday, Republicans won hotly contested Senate races in Missouri, Indiana, North Dakota, Tennessee and Texas, with Trump’s racially charged warnings about undocumented immigrants and demonization of Democrats appearing to help withstand the “blue wave” the GOP once feared. But Democrats — propelled by a rejection of Trumpism in the nation’s suburbs and from women and minority voters especially — notched victories in areas that just two years ago helped send Trump to the White House. Women played a pivotal role in Democratic victories. The Democratic Party won their support by 19 points, the largest margin in the history of midterm exit polling, compared with their margin of four points in 2014, according to network exit surveys from CNN. Independent women voted for Democratic candidates by a 17-point margin after narrowly supporting Republicans in 2014. And white women, a reliable voting bloc for the GOP, split their votes evenly between the two parties this year, after favoring Republicans by 14 points in 2014 and by 19 points in 2010. Voters under 30 also favored Democrats this year by a 35-point margin over Republicans, compared with an 11-point margin in 2014, the polls found. The Democrats’ new House majority was also propelled by a record number of female candidates. Women hold 84 House seats, but that share is projected to expand to 100 or more when all results are tallied. Across the country, 277 women were on the ballot Tuesday for Congress and governorships, an unprecedented number that included 210 House candidates. Overall, the party picked up at least seven governorships, performing well across much of the upper Midwest and even in Kansas, where Laura Kelly was elected governor over Trump’s handpicked candidate, Kris Kobach. In Wisconsin, Democrat Tony Evers bested Gov. Scott Walker, once a Republican star who ran for president in 2016. Walker survived a hard-fought recall vote in 2012 and was re-elected in 2014, only to be denied a third term by the state schools superintendent.

But Democrats were disappointed elsewhere. Sens. Joe Donnelly of Indiana, Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota and Claire McCaskill of Missouri were defeated, while Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Fla., his re-election in doubt, said his race was proceeding to a recount. Democrats kept two hotly contested Senate seats in West Virginia and Montana and picked up one in Nevada, where Democratic Rep. Jacky Rosen prevailed over Republican Sen. Dean Heller. Rosen, who by early Wednesday was the lone Democratic challenger to beat a Republican incumbent in the Senate, cast her victory as a counterpoint to the racist and anti-Semitic rhetoric that had marked the closing days of the midterm campaign. Two of the liberal movement’s greatest hopes for this election cycle, Democrats Stacey Abrams and Andrew Gillum, struggled to overcome some of the most overt racial attacks since the civil rights era and make history as the first black governors in Georgia and Florida, respectively. While Gillum conceded to Republican Ron DeSantis, a Trump ally, Abrams told supporters she would not concede to Republican Brian Kemp while the race was too close to call. If each candidate earns less than 50 percent of the vote, they would go head-to-head in a December runoff election. Another Democratic star, Rep. Beto O’Rourke of Texas, lost his spirited challenge to Republican Sen. Ted Cruz despite raising record sums of money and attracting grass-roots support throughout the country.

AN ELECTION ABOUT TRUMP

Midterm elections traditionally are referendums on the party in power, but Trump sought to ensure that this one would be a referendum on his presidency. Returning to his 2016 campaign playbook, the president delivered fiery speeches that drew massive crowds but contained a barrage of falsehoods, invective and demagoguery. Describing himself in the closing weeks as a “nationalist,” Trump made a caravan of Central American migrants preparing to seek asylum in the United States a dominant theme. The racial overtones put that explosive form of politics on the ballot, with major stakes for Republicans. The GOP is now overwhelmingly white, while Democrats have a much more multiethnic coalition

that represents the direction in which the country’s demographics are heading. Former president Barack Obama congratulated Democrats for “electing record numbers of women and young veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan, a surge of minority candidates and a host of outstanding young leaders.” “The more Americans who vote, the more our elected leaders look like America,” Obama said in a statement Wednesday. The Senate results underscored just how much the Republican Party has morphed into the party of Trump. The incoming class of Republicans is made up largely of Trump allies — including Mike Braun in Indiana, Josh Hawley in Missouri and Kevin Cramer in North Dakota — who campaigned as supporters of the president’s agenda and owe their jobs, at least in part, to his campaigning on their behalf.

A MORE DIVERSE HOUSE

Tuesday’s results were set to transform the House in terms of gender, age and ethnicity. The new Democratic majority will be more female and more ethnically diverse, while the House Republican Conference will be more white and male. Republican-held districts that Hillary Clinton carried in 2016 provided the backbone of Democratic efforts to win the House majority. But the momentum was not strong enough to help some recruits, such as former Marine fighter pilot Amy McGrath, who lost to Republican Rep. Garland “Andy” Barr in Kentucky. In some ways, the outcome was similar to that of 2016, with late polls overestimating the Democratic advantage and Republicans showing unexpected resilience. Racial tension that had been simmering beneath the surface for years came to a boil in the final weeks of the campaign. Robo-calls in Georgia featured a voice impersonating Oprah Winfrey and calling Abrams “a poor man’s Aunt Jemima.” In Florida, robo-calls mimicked Gillum as jungle sounds and chimpanzee noises were heard in the background. Trump called Gillum, the mayor of Tallahassee, “not equipped,” and Abrams, a leader in the Georgia state legislature, “not qualified” to be governors. On Monday, all the major television networks rejected a Trump campaign advertisement about immigration, calling it offensive.


11.08.2018 • Thursday • M 1

ELECTION 2018

Election officials defend efforts on voting snafus

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • A7

HOW MISSOURI’S VOTES WILL AFFECT YOU BY CELESTE BOTT st. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. LOUIS • Missouri voters decided a slew of consti-

tutional amendments on Tuesday. Here’s how they will affect you.

MEDICAL MARIJUANA

PHOTOS BY JOHANNA HUCKEBA • jhuckeba@post-dispatch.com

People wait in line to vote at First Presbyterian Church of Ferguson on Tuesday. BY MARK SCHLINKMANN st. Louis Post-dispatch

The long lines that kept a few polling places open past the normal 7 p.m. Tuesday closing time in St. Louis and St. Charles counties weren’t due to poor advance planning, election officials insisted on Wednesday. St. Charles County’s elections director, Rich Chrismer, also acknowledged that some of his poll workers erroneously asked voters for photo IDs despite a court ruling last month and his own pre-election instructions. He said that after getting such complaints about about eight polling places Tuesday morning, he had county police deliver an “emergency memo” to every voting location countywide reiterating that various nonphoto IDs also are acceptable. Grant Doty, an attorney with a national election watchdog group, said it received about 40 complaints from 23 precincts in the county. Regarding long lines, a major local delay point was at a polling place at the Washington University field house for students living on campus. About 200 people were still in line at 7 p.m. and the polling place didn’t close until about 8:30, the St. Louis County Election Board said. Eric Fey, the board’s Democratic director, said the lines and delays weren’t due to a lack of staff or voting equipment. Instead, he blamed the lines on the relatively large number of students with address issues. Most commonly, he said, students had moved from one dorm to an-

other. There also were students who showed up at the polling place despite being registered elsewhere in the St. Louis area or out of state. Poll workers, he said, were “just overwhelmed by the amount of paperwork by people changing addresses and (casting) provisional ballots.” He said there had been about 1,000 people registered to vote there before the election and that the county devoted the same amount of equipment and poll workers they did for any polling place with that number of voters. He disputed a statement Tuesday by a Washington University official, Provost Holden Thorp, that the delay occurred because the election board had planned on a turnout similar to that in 2014, the last nonpresidential November vote. Fey said that the board indeed had expected a larger turnout than 2014’s and had prepared for it countywide. The turnout Tuesday exceeded 67 percent. That’s up from about 44 percent in 2014. Thorp said Wednesday that he had based his statement, made in a letter to faculty and staff, on what university employees had been told by election workers there. Fey said he wasn’t aware of any particular reason for lines that kept three other St. Louis County polling places open until about 7:30. They were at the Black Jack and Maplewood city halls and Pattonville Heights Middle School in Maryland Heights. In St. Charles County, Chrismer

said, two polling places stayed open until about 9:30 to take care of everyone in line by 7. Those, he said, were at Frontier Middle School in the O’Fallon area and at the Wentzville Community Club. “I guess those people decided to vote late,” he said. He said his office always lined up enough workers for each polling place should 100 percent of registered voters show up — an unlikely occurrence. The reports of St. Charles County voters’ being asked to show photo IDs spurred the election watchdog group, Election Protection, to file a lawsuit to get a local judge to intervene. Doty said St. Charles County Associate Circuit Judge Matthew Thornhill issued an order shortly before 7 p.m. that told Chrismer to comply with the ruling last month in Jefferson City that prevented election officials from requiring photo IDs. Chrismer said Wednesday that he already had been doing so and that police had started delivering to poll workers about 11 a.m. his memo that reiterated his earlier pre-election instructions. “Whatever efforts they did was inadequate to ensure that the rights of voters were not infringed upon,” Doty said. He said the watchdog group didn’t get widespread complaints from any other election jurisdiction in the metro area. Mark Schlinkmann • 314-340-8265 @markschlinkmann on Twitter mschlinkmann@post-dispatch.com

There’s going to be a wait before anyone lights up. Missouri is now among 33 states that have legalized medical marijuana, with 65 percent of voters on Tuesday passing a measure allowing those with qualifying medical conditions to buy the drug here. But you probably won’t get it before late 2019, at the earliest. People with cancer, glaucoma, epilepsy, intractable migraines, HIV-AIDS, terminal illnesses and other chronic conditions can seek it. The amendment takes effect on Dec. 6, but it lays out a monthslong process for the state to approve licenses for marijuana sellers and identification cards for qualifying patients and caregivers. Within 180 days, which would be early June 2019, Missouri’s Department of Health and Senior Services must make public the application forms and instructions for both marijuana cultivation, testing and dispensary facilities and the patients who want to use the drug. By early July the department must begin accepting applications for identification cards, which must include certification from a physician. It’ll have no more than 30 days to issue a card or explain a denial. By early August, the department must begin accepting license applications. Applications must be approved or denied within 150 days of submission. An exact timeline isn’t clear for when dispensaries will be fully operational and qualifying patients will have cards that allow them to buy marijuana — but they won’t have clearance from the state to do either until the latter half of 2019. Patients will eventually also be able to grow as many as six of their own marijuana plants. The measure imposes a 4 percent tax on retail marijuana sales, which would go toward veterans’ health care. The state estimates it would generate $18 million in fees and sales tax each year. And because the change was made via the constitution, it will be much more difficult for the Republicancontrolled Legislature to alter the proposal.

MINIMUM-WAGE HIKE

Minimum-wage workers in Missouri will get the first of the raises in January that will increase the current $7.85 hourly wage to $12 by 2023, which voters approved on Tuesday. The January increase, to $8.60, will be the first increase of more than 15 cents since 2009. The change will happen incrementally. After the January increase, the minimum wage will go up 85 cents a year until it hits the $12 mark. Proposition B passed with more than 62 percent of the vote. That sends “a clear message that Missourians believe that no one who works full time should have to live in poverty and struggle just to raise their family and that it is well past time to give low-wage Missouri workers a raise,” said Carl Walz, campaign manager of Raise Up Missouri, which funded the initiative. The Missouri Legislature banned local minimum wages in 2017, after St. Louis raised its own minimum wage to $10 an hour. Proponents then began gathering signatures for a statewide change.

BINGO CHANGES

You might see or hear an ad for your favorite bingo game. Amendment 4 changes restrictions on the experience required for workers to run bingo games. Missouri’s Constitution currently requires a two-year membership in an organization before someone can run a bingo game for charity. It also prohibited advertising bingo games. Not anymore. In Tuesday’s election, 52 percent of voters approved lifting that ban and reducing the required membership to six months. Supporters say that will allow organizations to maintain bingo games with a greater pool of workers allowed to run them.

GAS TAX FAILURE

Voters line up at McKnight Crossings Church of Christ in Ladue on Tuesday.

County voters oust judge backed by bar BY JOEL CURRIER st. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. LOUIS COUNTY • Voters on

Tuesday said it was time for St. Louis County Associate Circuit Judge Judy Draper to step down from the bench. Draper needed a simple majority but received only 48 percent of the vote to retain her, an unusual outcome for judges on Election Day. She becomes only the fourth Missouri judge since 1940 to have been removed by voters. The last time it happened was in 2016 when nearly 60 percent of voters said St. Draper Louis County Associate Circuit Judge Dale Hood should not be retained. Missouri judges are evaluated by a 20-member judicial performance committee. The committee voted in 2010 that she should not be retained, but in 2014 and this year voted that she should be. Thirteen committee members voted that Draper substantially met overall judicial per-

formance standards. Her evaluation had the lowest marks for being prepared for court, that her rulings cited applicable law and that her decisions “followed logically from the evidence presented.” The Post-Dispatch editorial page recommended against keeping Draper, along with St. Louis Associate Circuit Judge Barbara Peebles, who was retained Tuesday with 55 percent of the vote. Draper could not be reached Wednesday for comment. “The Missouri bar has made a mistake that we won’t soon forget,” Adolphus M. Pruitt II, president of the St. Louis NAACP, said in a statement. “This outcome further solidified our desire to revisit the Missouri Plan ... and its impact on both the appointment of African Americans to the judiciary & the retention of such.” The Bar Association of Metropolitan St. Louis performance committee provides in-depth analysis of the work being done by judges serving under Missouri’s nonpartisan method of judicial selection and retention. The association, in a state-

ment, said it supported the committee’s findings that Draper should be retained. Gov. Bob Holden appointed Draper to the bench in St. Louis County in 2004. She earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of North Carolina and a law degree from Howard University. She previously served as a municipal judge in Berkeley and Northwoods. After clerking for the Department of Labor in Washington, Draper became the first female general counsel of the Missouri Department of Corrections and also worked as a St. Louis prosecutor, according to an August profile in Missouri Lawyers Weekly. She emigrated to the United States from South Korea as a young child. “Judges are public servants to the people,” Draper told the weekly. “Especially for those who are unrepresented, we need to make sure that they have confidence in their access to justice.” Joel Currier • 314-621-5804 @joelcurrier on Twitter jcurrier@post-dispatch.com

What happens to roads and bridges without a gas tax increase? The short answer? Triage. State officials had called the gas tax that Missouri voters rejected Tuesday a first step toward meeting more than $800 million a year in road and bridge needs. The measure would have raised the current state tax (17 cents a gallon) by 2.5 cents each year until it hit 27 cents in 2022. It would have assigned an estimated $123 million a year, when fully in effect, directly to cities and counties for local road and bridge improvements and $288 million to the Missouri Highway Patrol. That’s a significant amount of money transportation officials will just have do without, MoDOT Director Patrick McKenna said Tuesday night. So now, it means “setting priorities among the many equally important transportation projects will be a tough job with limited resources,” he said. Infrastructure remains a top priority for Gov. Mike Parson’s administration. Parson had traveled throughout the state to campaign for Proposition D. A spokesperson for the governor could not immediately be reached about Parson’s next steps for road and bridge improvement.

ETHICS OVERHAUL

The package of ethics law changes won 62 percent support, but the provision on how Missouri draws legislative maps has raised some questions. Amendment 1, known as the “Clean Missouri” initiative, tightens campaign contribution limits, mandates politicians wait two years before becoming lobbyists, bans lobbyist gifts over $5 and requires state lawmakers to adhere to the Sunshine law. It also changes how Missouri draws state legislative districts, with a model designed to have the number of seats won by each party more closely reflect its statewide vote. Some black Democrats said the provision would reduce their representation in the Legislature. Republicans worry the map would be gerrymandered in favor of Democrats because of a “partisan fairness” provision. Currently, state legislative districts are drawn by two bipartisan panels. Under the new model, the state auditor would appoint a nonpartisan state demographer to draw new districts after the 2020 U.S. Census, to be approved by legislative leaders. A citizen commission would review the lines. Clean Missouri’s success made the race for state auditor all the more significant. It’ll be incumbent Nicole Galloway vetting candidates for the demographer position. She’s the only Democrat holding statewide office. Celeste Bott • 314-340-8119 @celestebott on Twitter cbott@post-dispatch.com


ELECTION 2018

A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

U.S. SENATE RACE RESULTS

MISSOURI STATE AUDITOR

VOTE MARGIN KEY

Republican Josh Hawley defeated incumbent Sen. Claire McCaskill 51.4-45.5 percent.

10 pts. 20 30

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 11.08.2018

Josh Hawley − R Claire McCaskill − D

Incumbent Nicole Galloway defeated GOP challenger Saundra McDowell 50.4-44.6 percent.

VOTE MARGIN KEY

10 pts. 20 30

Nicole Galloway − D Saundra McDowell − R

AREA COUNTIES

AREA COUNTIES

St. Charles Co. R+6% STL Co. D+26%

St. Charles Co. D+0.2% STL Co. D+34%

Franklin Co. R+24%

Franklin Co. R+11%

Jefferson County R+12%

Jefferson County R+3% St. Louis D+73%

St. Louis D+70%

SOURCES: State and county government data | Post-Dispatch

SOURCES: State and county government data | Post-Dispatch

As Missouri turns red, Democrats search for relevance DEMOCRATS • FROM A1

“The playing field for Democrats looks terrible for Democrats this morning,” University of Missouri-St. Louis political scientist Dave Robertson said Wednesday. Up until two years ago, Democrats were able to win by cobbling together coalitions of urban and suburban voters and identifying with residents in some areas that have now turned deep red. In 2016, for example, then-Attorney General Chris Koster was able to gain the support of Republican-leaning organizations such as the Missouri Farm Bureau and the National Rifle Association in his quest to beat Republican Eric Greitens. But Trump’s 19-point victory that year, and Greitens’ outsider campaign, erased the crossover appeal of Koster’s candidacy. In the case of Galloway, her vote totals show her winning in the Democratic strongholds of the St. Louis, Kansas City and Columbia areas, but failing to pick up many counties in the rest of the state. If not for her Republican opponent’s welldocumented financial problems, Galloway’s election night might have mirrored McCaskill’s. Robertson said the future for Democrats would depend largely on picking the right candidates and finding cracks to fill in the

Republican agenda on issues such as economic stability. “Individual candidates have a way sometimes of finding a sweet spot, like (former Gov.) Jay Nixon did,” Robertson said. “In part, this is going to depend on the quality of the candidates and their skill at finding an agenda that appeals to a large number of Missourians.” To do that, Democrats will have to listen to people in rural areas to determine how they can fit in. Rep. Bruce Franks, a St. Louis Democrat, said members of his party must work with lawmakers from rural Missouri to forge better ties and bring the state together. “I think that’s a big part of it, being able to work across the aisle,” Franks said. “We do have a lot of commonalities. We do have a lot of common interests.” He said Democrats needed to find a way to motivate voters as they did in the city of St. Louis Tuesday, where more than 59 percent of the registered voters went to the polls. “How can we duplicate that across the state?” Franks said. “I am absolutely disappointed in the results. But, I know we still have to fight. We’ve got to patch it up and get out there. 2020 will be there before we know it.” Rep. Kip Kendrick, D-Columbia, said

the Democratic rebuilding process could take longer than two years. “The party infrastructure had really deteriorated over the years,” Kendrick said. “It’s going to take us a while.” Robertson said Democrats “need to find ways to make themselves credible in delivering on that agenda. The rejection of Claire McCaskill by just about every county in the state really speaks volumes about the condition of the Democratic Party at this point. Democrats need to find out what kinds of ways they are perceived as unsafe for voters,” he added. For the time being, Stephen Webber, the chairman of the Missouri Democratic Party, will be the one to lead the party out of its morass. Webber could not immediately be reached for comment Wednesday, but he did find some reasons to cheer Tuesday night. Webber retweeted a message offering congratulations to voters who approved a phased-in increase in the state’s minimum wage, long a Democratic initiative. “You just raised the minimum wage for 677,000 of your hardworking neighbors,” read the tweet from the campaign committee supporting the amendment. Franks said Webber’s two-year tenure at the helm of the party operation had been a

positive one. “I’ll be the first person to say this. I think our Democratic Party is years better than what it was in 2016,” Franks said. “I think Stephen Webber has done an excellent job. I think the Democratic Party and their entire staff has done a good job.” Kendrick, too, credited Webber for jump-starting the rebuilding process. “We feel like the foundation has been laid. It’s going to take time,” Kendrick said. But others could step up to bolster the party’s chances in the future. Cort VanOstran, who lost to incumbent Republican U.S. Rep. Ann Wagner of Ballwin, 51 percent to 47 percent, could be counted on to identify with suburban voters. McCaskill, who will leave office in January, also could become a motivating force for the party. On Tuesday, as she conceded the race, McCaskill hinted that she would be sticking around after her 36 years in office comes to an end. “It is good night, not goodbye,” McCaskill said before leaving the stage to a chant of “Claire” from her supporters. Kurt Erickson • 573-556-6181 @KurtEricksonPD on Twitter kerickson@post-dispatch.com

Hawley netted enough rural votes to sink McCaskill RURAL • FROM A1

exurban Republican voters. Preliminary results show that Hawley won 51.4 percent of the statewide vote; McCaskill won 45.5 percent. In some ways, the outstate tallies were no surprise. In 2016, when thenSecretary of State Jason Kander lost his bid to unseat incumbent Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., Kander lost out on rural votes just as McCaskill would. But McCaskill emphasized a rural strategy, hosting more than 50 town halls across the state. She toured red areas on her campaign bus, touting her support for workers’ issues, opposition to tariffs and support for other kitchen-table issues such as access to health care. The outreach was to no avail. “They are, for the most part, strongly Republican places these days,” Peverill Squire, a political science professor at the University of Missouri-Columbia, said of Missouri’s rural areas. “Democrats, even somebody who’s moderate like Claire McCaskill, or (Chris) Koster in 2016, find it very difficult to be competitive.” In the past, McCaskill enjoyed support in several rural enclaves. In 2006, she won or came close in four of the state’s deep Bootheel-area counties: Dunklin, Mississippi, New Madrid and Pemiscot. In 2012, she won all four

counties outright. Six years ago, in addition to the Bootheel counties, she won 10 rural or exurban counties generally south of St. Louis, and about two-dozen other outstate Missouri counties. This time, deep Bootheel voters, who historically supported Democrats, deserted McCaskill. Hawley netted between 66 and 73 percent of the vote in all four counties, according to preliminary returns. Voters there made up less than 1 percent of the total amount of votes cast Tuesday night. Whitney Smith, spokeswoman for the Republican National Committee, said that a recording of McCaskill telling campaign workers that she could afford to forfeit votes in the Bootheel also hurt her standing in the wider region. Smith said party strategists were surprised by the levels of support Hawley won in the wider Bootheel region, which includes counties surrounding Poplar Bluff and Cape Girardeau in southeast Missouri. “Obviously we expected Josh Hawley to take the Bootheel, but we didn’t expect him to take it by as much as he did,” she said. She also said President Donald Trump helped pump up Republicans ahead of the election by visiting Missouri multiple times. “It was huge,” Smith said of a rally Trump hosted in

Cape Girardeau Monday night. “I have never seen anything like that in my life. ... For a lot of people, if he’s (Hawley’s) got the support of the president then he’s got their support, too.” Smith also said local candidates in places such as Jefferson County helped energize voters. Also damaging for McCaskill was lackluster support in Missouri’s voterrich Lead Belt and other counties south of St. Louis. In 2012, McCaskill won Franklin, Iron, Jefferson, Madison, Reynolds, Shan-

S T. LO U I S

non, Ste. Genevieve, St. Francois, Washington and Wayne counties. On Tuesday, McCaskill lost all 10 counties. It wasn’t even close. The highest percentage of the vote that McCaskill won in any of the 10 counties was 45 percent in Ste. Genevieve County. Jefferson County voters gave Hawley 54 percent of their votes, with McCaskill winning just 42 percent in the mostly white, working-class county that Trump won by an almost 2-to-1 ratio in 2016. Jefferson County, where St.

Louis’ suburbs meet the country, used to be a Democratic bastion. Votes cast in those 10 counties made up about 7.8 percent of the total votes cast in Tuesday’s Senate race. Terry Smith, a political science professor at Columbia College, said Missouri wasn’t the only agricultural state that is trending red. Two other incumbent Democrats — Sens. Joe Donnelly of Indiana and Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota — both lost in states where the power base is also centered in ru-

ral areas. “They could’ve easily not been elected six years ago,” Smith said. In 2006, McCaskill won a narrow victory in a Democratic wave year. In 2012, her Republican opponent, Todd Akin, imploded after his comments on “legitimate rape.” McCaskill’s winning a third term “may have just been a bridge too far in a red state that continues to trend red,” Smith said. Jack Suntrup • 573-556-6184 @JackSuntrup on Twitter jsuntrup@post-dispatch.com

REPLACE YOUR OLD WINDOWS

And Save!

Increase Home Value Great Curb Appeal Energy Efficiency

Call Now for a FREE In-Home Consultation!

FREE

UPGRADE

To Triple Pane * High-Performance Glass!

NO INTEREST FINANCING for

18

*

MONTHS!

Products Available from Beldon St. Louis

314-312-1090 • 618-744-1720

LoansbySynchronyBank.Offerappliesonlytosingle-receiptqualifyingpurchases.Apromofeewillbechargedandincludedinthepromopurchasebalanceequalto$50.Nomonthlyinterestwillbechargedonthepromotionalbalanceifyoupaythefollowing(the “promotional balance”) in full within 18 Months: 1) the promotional purchase amount, and 2) any related promo fee. If you do not, monthly interest will be charged on the promotional balance from the purchase date. Depending on purchase amount, promotion length and payment allocation, the required minimum monthly payments may or may not pay off purchase by end of promotional period. Regular account terms apply to non-promotional purchases and, after promotion ends, to promotional balance. For new accounts: Purchase APR is 26.99%; Minimum Interest Charge is $2. Existing cardholders should see their credit card agreement for their applicable terms. Subject to credit approval. Minimum $3,000 purchase required. New orders only. Offer expires 11/30/18.

Ramps for safety & comfort. Specializing in Creating Safe, Accessible Homes

The inside scoop on local politics stltoday.com/political fix

Veteran-Owned and VA Certified

6 months same as cash noVemBeR onLY Call today and reCeive a free in home quote

314-325-3199 • 618-206-5963


ELECTION 2018

11.08.2018 • Thursday • M 1

ADVERTISEMENT

POLITICAL DIGEST Georgia race still undecided

Malfunctioning voting machines, missing power cords and hourslong lines at the polls are being scrutinized by candidates and election officials in Georgia, where the governor’s race is undecided while votes are still being tallied. Democrat Stacey Abrams, vying to become the nation’s first female black governor, trails Georgia’s GOP Secretary of State Brian Kemp, the state’s chief elections official. Ballots are still being counted, and Abrams’ campaign thinks she may have enough for a runoff. Multiple lawsuits have been filed in the contentious race, with voting rights groups contending that Kemp has used his office to interfere in the election for his own benefit. He has fiercely denied any impropriety. Colorado elects first openly gay governor • Colorado Democrats have flipped control of the state Senate, giving the party a trifecta of Statehouse control with the historic victory of U.S. Rep. Jared Polis as the nation’s first openly gay governor and a sweep of top statewide offices. With key wins by five women in toughly contested state Senate races in Denver’s suburbs, Tuesday’s election will produce a renewed Democratic push to strengthen former President Barack Obama’s health care law, adopt gun control legislation, increase funding for public education and stress environmental protections. Results were still trickling in, but

tweeting, campaigning President Donald Trump is expected to be on the ballot. Here are the impacts on the St. Louis region:

HAWLEY AND AN EMBOLDENED GOP MAJORITY

While Democrats will clearly be in control of the House, Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., will get reinforcements in the Senate more in line with Trumpism than traditional Republicanism. Races in Montana and Arizona were still too close to call Wednesday. If Republicans win one or two, they will further increase their pre-election 51-49 majority, and they will do so without purported moderate Democrats McCaskill, Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota and Joe Donnelly of Indiana. Those three senators all will be replaced by Trump devotees, including Hawley, for whom the president campaigned multiple times. And if Republicans extend their majority, it matters. “You can do a whole lot more with 53 Republican or 54 Republican senators than you can with 51,” said Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., a member of the Senate leadership.

KAVANAUGH COUNTED

The most prominent red-state Senate Democrat to survive Tuesday, and comfortably at that, was Joe Manchin of West Virginia. He also happened to be the only Democrat to vote for Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh after bitter and raucous confirmation hearings. Meanwhile, McCaskill, Heitkamp and Donnelly all lost, and Jon Tester in Montana was in limbo Wednesday. All four Democrats who represent states won by Trump in 2016 voted against Kavanaugh.

THE (UNDER CONSTRUCTION) DEMOCRATIC HOUSE

Democrats face several key questions going forward, including whether they want Nancy Pelosi, the San Francisco representative, to lead them as Speaker for a second time. Rep. William Lacy Clay, D-St. Louis, survived re-election easily, winning his 10th term in the House a day after the 50th anniversary that his father, Bill Clay, first won election to the seat the son now occupies. The younger Clay is a Pelosi ally and thinks she should lead House Democrats again. But many of the new Democrats elected to the House Tuesday have said they believe it’s time for new Democratic leadership in the House. Clay acknowledges that that is a key question facing his party’s freshly minted majority. “I am looking for people that can unite us,” said Clay, who insists Pelosi can do that. “And the test will be that first vote (to elect a speaker) that everyone has to take in January.” Some incoming Democratic chairs of key committees, including the outspoken Maxine Waters of California, have called for Trump’s impeachment. Others, such as incoming Judiciary Chair Jerald Nadler, D-N.Y., and incoming Intelligence Chair Adam Schiff, R-Calif., have said they will use investigative powers to further probe foreign influence on the 2016 elections, and go after things including Trump’s tax returns in that context. Clay, who voted to keep potential impeachment proceedings against Trump alive in the House, now says he thinks there is potential for compromise with Senate Republicans and Trump on infrastructure improvements and on fixes to the Affordable Care Act. McConnell seemed to agree on both those points in a Wednesday morning news conference. “The health care system is still a pretty big mess, and it is obviously now going to have to be addressed on a bipartisan basis,” he said. Looming over the health care debate is a lawsuit challenging the health law that could see a Texas judge’s decision any day. Hawley joined in that lawsuit, and if the judge throws out the act, Congress con-

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Democrats were poised to take a two-seat majority in the state Senate, erasing a one-vote GOP edge. In the state House, Democrats looked to increase their comfortable majority. Democrats also captured GOP-held positions of secretary of state, attorney general and state treasurer. CNN correspondent suspended from White House • The White House suspended on Wednesday the press pass of CNN correspondent Jim Acosta after he and President Donald Trump had a heated confrontation at a news conference. They began sparring after Acosta asked Trump about the caravan of migrants heading from Latin America to the southern U.S. border. When Acosta tried to ask another question, Trump said, “That’s enough!” and a female White House aide unsuccessfully tried to grab the microphone from Acosta. White House press secretary Sarah Sanders released a statement accusing Acosta of “placing his hands on a young woman just trying to do her job as a White House intern.” Acosta tweeted that Sanders’ statement that he put his hands on the aide was “a lie.” Journalists assigned to cover the White House apply for passes that allow them daily access to press areas in the West Wing. White House staff decide whether journalists are eligible. From news services

Takeaways from Tuesday’s midterm elections that leave Congress divided TAKEAWAYS • FROM A1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • A9

fronts having to replace popular parts of it, such as protections for those with preexisting conditions.

THE BATTLE FOR YOUR POCKETBOOK

Clay also said he expected House Democrats to try to repeal tax cuts passed by the current GOP Congress, raise taxes on corporations and wealthy individuals and give greater tax cuts to the middle class. And he expects big battles in the House Financial Services Committee over whether Congress has gone too far peeling back protections of the Dodd-Frank regulatory changes put in place after the 2008 financial crisis. “I don’t think we will be pushing impeachment,” said Clay, a ranking member of the Financial Services Committee. “But I do know this, as a member of the Financial Services Committee: We will reinstitute our oversight responsibilities … I know I will be pushing to reinvigorate the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, which (Republicans) have decided to make toothless.”

OPPORTUNITY LOST, EVEN IN VICTORY

Rep. Blaine Luetkemeyer, R-St. Elizabeth, cruised to re-election Tuesday. But when Republicans lost control of the House, his ambition to chair the Financial Services Committee also melted away. Luetkemeyer, a banker in civilian life, had spent a considerable amount of time this election cycle raising money and campaigning for other GOP candidates around the country. Now, he will be, at best, a ranking member of the committee, with Waters and Democrats setting the agenda for what that committee investigates and legislates on. Other area Republicans also will lose clout. Rep. John Shimkus, R-Collinsville, will lose his chairmanship of a House Energy and Commerce subcommittee that was instrumental in rewriting the nation’s chemical oversight laws. That committee now is likely to take a turn from more traditional forms of energy, and robust support of U.S. fossil fuel development, to renewables and greater government oversight on climate change issues. Rep. Ann Wagner. R-Ballwin, also used her position on the Financial Services Committee to push deregulation of the financial services industry. That ability now goes away with Waters holding the gavel.

REPUBLICAN DAM HELD IN ST. LOUIS SUBURBS

Rep. Mike Bost, R-Murphysboro, Ill., won a solid victory against one of the national Democrats’ top House recruits, St. Clair County Attorney Brendan Kelly. Rep. Rodney Davis, R-Taylorville, Ill., won by fewer than 4,000 votes over Democratic challenger Betsy Dirksen Londrigan. Wagner survived her closest election yet against Democrat Cort VanOstran, in a suburban district filled with professional women who many Democrats believed represented their prototypical target of 2018. Such districts will again be key in 2020 when Trump runs for re-election. Had any one of these Republicans lost, and especially if all three had, it would have been part of a much bigger Democratic wave that many were predicting earlier this year. That all three Republicans ran individualized races, and survived in a tough environment, is significant for the region and the country. Trump signaled out Bost and Davis by name on Wednesday as among those House Republicans who hung on with his help. Trump campaigned twice in the region for them. But at his post-election news conference, Trump also singled out Republicans who tried to run at a distance from him. Speaking of a Utah Republican, the only black GOP woman in the House, who lost, Trump said: “Mia Love gave me no love, and she lost. Too bad, Mia.” Chuck Raasch • 202-298-6880 @craasch on Twitter craasch@post-dispatch.com

Joint pain: top doctors agree, $2 pill works

1-year study produces 100% success rate; patients report no pain or stiffness, restful sleep and improved mobility By Debra Hampton Senior Health Writer A non-addictive pill is gaining popularity among joint pain sufferers nationwide because of its ability to successfully reduce pain. The pill, Xyndolor, brought to market earlier this year and already with close to half-a-million doses sold, is the culmination of over 40 years of clinical research. In hundreds of studies from around the world, the active ingredients in Xyndolor showed positive results for patients with even the most severe back, finger and SAFE JOINT PAIN RELIEF: Doctors are recommending knee pain. Xyndolor a new joint pain relief pill to patients after it has safely reduced discomfort in patients with even the most Optimum Life Labs, the maker of Xyndolor, severe cases of back, finger and knee pain. says patients have reported reduced pain, your stomach,” said in- active ingredient in Xymore restful sleep and ternist Dr. Georges M. ndolor, is not only an none of the unpleasant Halpern in Portola Val- anti-inflammatory but seems to be able to side-effects normally ley, CA. optimize other medicaassociated with joint PROVEN CLINICAL tions. In other words, pain medications. RESULTS it makes them work “It seems like every Xyndolor’s main inweek we hear from a gredient, Perna Can- better,” says Dr. Jack new patient who’s find- aliculus, is backed by Isler New Mexico Veting pain relief for the more than 40 years of eran’s Affairs Chief of first time ever,” said clinical and academic Anesthesiology/Critical Victor Urbina, CEO of research worldwide. In Care/Pain. “Any chronOptimum Life Labs. a clinical study over 20 ic pain patient should “Patients tell us it’s years ago, Dr. Hurley use Perna. Many have helping them with their proved its effective- been amazed at how it helped them, including hands, legs, feet and ness. shoulders.” myself. I now recomThe study of 121 paUrbina said his com- tients found that their mend it to my family as pany pored over 137 severe joint pain com- well as my patients.” published studies that pletely “It’s very important disappeared have been known in after just a few weeks to me that the prodthe industry for de- of taking Perna. X-rays ucts I recommend to cades to develop Xy- showed that cartilage my patients, family, and ndolor. Many doctors damage didn’t get friends are safe, bentell their patients that worse. But, the biggest eficial, and effective,” their only option is to revelation was that says Dr. Tara Michelle, take medications like some of his patients re- a naturopath from Haopioids or learn to live grew healthy cartilage. waii. “Xyndolor blends in pain. Urbina said this The findings proved three naturally beneis because big pharma something other doc- ficial compounds into is promoting them ag- tors had told these pa- one exceptional formugressively. tients was completely la. Proven both safe and effective, it’s the ‘Gold “Doctors believe joint out of the question. Standard’ in joint health pain is incurable, but “Medicine tells us and I recommend it with the evidence shows it you can’t heal or repair great confidence.” can be reversed,” said damaged cartilage, but “Clinical research Dr. Lloyd Hurley, an Al- I proved you can,” Dr. proves we’re ticking buquerque orthopedic Hurley said. timebombs. Our own surgeon. bodies often attack HOW IT WORKS HEALING FROM us from the inside out, “Xyndolor works by crippling us. Like with THE INSIDE doing three key things. joint pain and inflamWhat makes Xyn- First, within minutes it everyone will mation, dolor different from starts to reduce inflamall other pills on the mation all over your suffer to some degree,” market is it actually re- body. This is important said Dr. Rodriguez, “if verses joint pain. The because inflammation you do nothing, it’ll ruin patent-pending for- is what destroys carti- your life and rob you mulation stimulates lage and causes joint of your independence. healthy cells in your pain. It stops your cells But, you don’t just have body that make new from attacking your to learn to live with joint cartilage. At the same own body,” explained pain. You deserve to do everything you can to time, it counteracts CEO Urbina. stop it in its tracks.” harmful proteins that Second, after takdestroy cartilage. It HOW TO GET also lubricates critical ing care of the inflamXYNDOLOR mation, it helps cells joints. This is the nationregrow cartilage. With “It’s like taking your more new cartilage, wide release of Xynold kitchen counter- joints become smooth dolor to the general tops and resurfacing public. And so, for the again.” them to remove all the next 48-hours only, the Finally, it lubricracks, bumps and company is offering our imperfections,” said cates your joints. Like readers up to 2 FREE Dr. Georgia Rodriguez, you would do with a bottles with their order. director of research at squeaky door.” Starting at 5:00am Optimum Life Labs. Patients from all over “Just like the coun- the country are encour- today, the order hotline will be open for tertop, your joints are aged by Xyndolor. Hav- 48-hours. All you have smooth again and the ing experienced more to do is call TOLLpain goes away.” lasting pain relief in just FREE 1-800-693-6949 Patients report Xy- a few short weeks than and provide our phone ndolor works without they have in years. agent with this speany of the side-effects cial discount code: “I’ve tried every pain from typical pain pills XYN102018. The compill a doctor has ever like… prescribed me and Xy- pany will do the rest. • Heartburn ndolor is the only pill Very Important: Cur• High blood pressure that’s made the pain rent supplies of Xynpermanently stop,” dolor are limited. So • Colon pain said Astrid Hansen callers that don’t get • Esophagus & from Alberta, Canada. through to the order stomach ulcers hotline within the next • Holes in the small WHAT DOCTORS 48-hours will have to intestine ARE SAYING wait until more inven• Crohn’s disease “The search for the tory is produced. This • And even death perfect pill to relieve could take up to six “It’s totally safe. It’s chronic pain can be weeks or more. So call nothing like NSAIDs exhausting. Perna right now, 1-800-693and aspirin that destroy Canaliculus, the main 6949. THESE STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE FDA. THIS PRODUCT IS NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, CURE, OR PREVENT ANY DISEASE. RESULTS MAY VARY.


A10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

ELECTION 2018

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 11.08.2018

President takes victory lap after midterms that could easily widen during two years of divided control of Congress. Trump’s aggressive campaign blitz, which paid off in some key victories, suggests he is likely to continue leaning into the fray. Control of the House gives Democrats the ability to launch investigations into the president and stifle his agenda, but White House aides called on them to reach across the aisle. “I don’t know that there will be much of an appetite for Democrat lawmakers to spend all of their time, or most of their time or even a fraction of their time investigating, instigating, trying to impeach and subpoena people,” Trump adviser Kellyanne Conway said. In addition to his conversation with Pelosi, Trump called Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., as well as candidates he backed during the race, the White House said. And he played down reports of voter irregularity and suppression, particularly in Georgia, instead saying, “I heard it was very efficient in Georgia.” Trump had aggressively campaigned in the closing days of the race, his focus on boosting Republicans in states he carried in 2016. In the three races he targeted on the final day, Trump’s picks won Tuesday night, with Republican Josh Hawley defeating Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill in Missouri, Republican Mike Braun defeating Democratic Sen. Joe Donnelly in Indiana and Republican Attorney General Mike DeWine defeating Democrat Richard Cordray in the race for Ohio governor. Trump’s shadow loomed large over the results. Nearly 40 percent of voters cast their ballots to express opposition to the president, according to AP VoteCast, a national survey of the electorate, while about 25 percent said they voted to express support for Trump. Only about one-third of voters said Trump was not a factor in their votes.

BY JONATHAN LEMIRE, CATHERINE LUCEY AND DARLENE SUPERVILLE Associated Press

WASHINGTON • As Washington came to grips with its new divided reality, President Donald Trump reveled on Wednesday in his party’s Senate victories, mocked members of his own party who lost after not seeking his support and even suggested he may be able to govern more effectively after losing a chamber of Congress. Trump faces the prospect, starting early next year, of endless investigations after Democrats formally take control of the House, along with stymied policy efforts and fresh questions about the resilience of his unorthodox political coalition. Still, he celebrated Republicans’ success in retaining the Senate and seemed to blame losing GOP candidates for distancing themselves from him and his unorthodox methods. He took an unabashed victory lap and, despite the split decision, declared in a free-wheeling, combative, 90-minute White House news conference that “I thought it was very close to complete victory.” He also belittled the number of high-profile Democrats, including his predecessor, who crisscrossed the nation to support their candidates, while suggesting that he alone was responsible for the Republican triumphs. “I only had me. I didn’t have anybody else,” Trump said. Though boasting that Republicans appear likely to hold the highest number of Senate seats in 100 years, Trump was quick to distance himself from his party’s failure to maintain control of the House. In a remarkable scene, he called out defeated Republicans by name — “Too bad, Mike” at one moment, “Mia Love gave me no love and she lost” at another — and blamed them for not embracing his agenda. “Candidates who embraced our message of lower taxes, low regulation, low crime, strong borders and great judges excelled last night,” said Trump. “On the

ASSOCIATED PRESS

President Donald Trump answers a question from CNN journalist Jim Acosta during a news conference that turned combative in the White House on Wednesday.

other hand, you had some that decided to, ‘Let’s stay away. Let’s stay away.’ They did very poorly. I’m not sure that I should be happy or sad, but I feel just fine about it.” The president’s rebuke was felt on Capitol Hill. Rep. Ryan Costello, R-Pa., who announced his retirement earlier this year, tweeted his displeasure with the president’s diatribe, writing that his colleagues have had to “bite ur lip more times you’d care to; to disagree & separate from POTUS on principle & civility in ur campaign; to lose bc of POTUS & have him piss on u. Angers me to my core.” Trump suggested there could be room for bipartisanship, declaring that Democrats would, in fact, be eager to work with him on issues such as infrastructure. But the olive branch he extended was studded with thorns as he declared that Republicans would retaliate if Democrats used their control of the House to issue subpoenas to seek his tax returns and investigate his business dealings, his Cabinet’s

Democrats knock some holes in Republican wall of state control BY DAVID A. LIEB Associated Press

JEFFERSON CITY • The Republican wall

that has stood in state capitols for much of the past decade now has a few holes in it. Democrats flipped control of seven gubernatorial offices, marking their greatest gains in several decades, and picked up hundreds of state legislative seats in Tuesday’s first midterm elections of President Donald Trump’s tenure. Yet those victories didn’t quite reach the lofty goals of an anticipated blue wave, leaving both major parties with reason for hope on Wednesday as they look ahead to another pivotal battle in 2020. Some of the biggest wins for Democrats came in the Midwest, where Republicans had virtually wiped them out in prior elections. Democrats defeated Republican Govs. Bruce Rauner in Illinois and Scott Walker in Wisconsin while picking up open seats previously held by Republican governors in Michigan and Kansas. Democrats also flipped control of governors’ offices being vacated by Republicans in Maine, Nevada and New Mexico. The Democratic Governors Association said it was their greatest number of pickups since 1982, the first midterm election of Republican President Ronald Reagan. The Democratic group’s chairman, Washington Gov. Jay Inslee, called it “a broad-based win” and a historically big rejection of the president’s party. “For those who were troubled by the results of 2016 in the Midwest, we have proved that the Democrats can run and win,” Inslee said. Yet Republicans held on to the governor’s office in key swing states targeted by Democrats, including Florida, Ohio and Iowa. Republican Secretary of State Brian Kemp also was leading in Georgia’s gubernatorial race, though Democrat Stacey Abrams held out hope that absentee and the provisional ballots remaining to be counted could push Kemp’s percentage below 50 percent and force a runoff. Republicans entered Tuesday’s election controlling 33 governors’ offices and two-

thirds of the 99 state legislative chambers. The Democratic gubernatorial victories push that closer to an even split. The gubernatorial and legislative gains appeared to give Democrats new trifectas of power in Illinois, Colorado, Maine, Nevada, New Mexico and New York. Democrats also broke up current Republican trifectas in Kansas, Michigan, New Hampshire and Wisconsin. Democrats ended a Republican legislative supermajority in North Carolina, making it harder for the GOP to override vetoes by Gov. Roy Cooper, a Democrat. Yet even after Tuesday’s victories, Democrats will have full control of the governor’s office and legislature in about one-third fewer states than Republicans. The Democratic gains amount to a mere “ripple” in Republican legislative control, said Matt Walter, president of the Republican State Leadership Committee. “It is not a wave, and I would say it’s a far cry short of what they should have done” during a midterm election in which Republicans had to defend far more seats, Walter said. During the first midterm election of Democratic President Barack Obama’s tenure in 2010, Republicans picked up about 725 state legislative seats while flipping control of 21 chambers. Republicans then used that enhanced power in many states to redraw legislative districts to their favor after the 2010 Census. Tuesday’s shift of about a half-dozen chambers for Democrats is well below the average of 12 chamber changes per election cycle dating to 1900, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. Whereas “Obama’s first midterm was a wipeout for Democrats,” the Republican losses Tuesday are “relatively modest,” NCSL elections analyst Tim Storey said. That’s partly because Democrats are still “running on mostly Republicandrawn maps,” he said. Democrats and Republicans were trying to put themselves in a strong position for elections in two years, which will determine which party will have the upper hand in redrawing congressional and legislative districts after the 2020 Census.

conduct and his campaign’s ties to Russia. But the White House news conference was also quickly overtaken by Trump’s ongoing attacks on the media, as the president repeatedly flashed his temper as he insulted several reporters by name, interrupted their questions, ordered some to sit down and deemed one inquiry “racist.” On Tuesday, the president telephoned House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, DCalif., a conversation that her office said included congratulations and a nod to her pitch for bipartisanship. And on Wednesday, he said she deserved to be House speaker. “I give her a lot of credit. She works very hard and she’s worked long and hard. I give her a great deal of credit for what she’s done and what she’s accomplished,” Trump said. Widely viewed as a referendum on Trump’s presidency, Tuesday’s results offered a split decision that revealed deep tension in the American electorate — a rift

From legal pot to higher wages, slew of ballot issues were passed BY DAVID CRARY Associated Press

Even in deep-red states, voters embraced an array of liberal-backed ballot measures in Tuesday’s election — expanding Medicaid, targeting gerrymandering, boosting minimum wages, legalizing marijuana use. The results heartened left-of-center activists, who see a path going forward for circumventing Republican-controlled legislatures. With the new Congress split along partisan lines, the outcome ensured that the states will serve as pivotal battlegrounds for social issues heading toward the next election in 2020. One of the strongest messages emerging from the results is that voters are eager to make the political process, including voting, fairer and more accessible. Missouri, Michigan and Colorado approved changes in redistricting policy to reduce partisan gerrymandering through the use of independent map-drawers. Voters in Michigan, Maryland and Nevada supported measures calling for automatic or same-day voter registration. Several states approved oversight of politicians’ ethics. And in Florida, there was approval of a measure that will enable an estimated 1.4 million people with prior felony convictions to regain voting rights. “We see strong support for these initiatives from independents, Democrats and Republicans,” said Karen Hobert Flynn, president of Common Cause. “The question is whether incumbent officials will wake up to understand that people really do want democracy and that power belongs to the people.” In two Republican-leaning states, Idaho and Nebraska, voters approved measures to expand Medicaid health coverage to tens of thousands of low-income residents. In those states, Republican-led legislatures had refused to take advantage of expanded coverage offered under President Barack Obama’s health care law. Other notable results: • Michigan voters approved legalization of marijuana for recreational use, making it the first Midwestern state to do so. North Dakota rejected a similar measure,

WINDOWS • SIDING • DOORS • BEST WINDOW • FACTORY DIRECT • FREE, NO PRESSURE ESTIMATES • FREE FINANCING

DONATE YOUR CAR

40% OFF SIDING

Not valid with any other coupon or promotion. Does not apply to previous estimates. Call for details. Expires 11/30/18

$200 314-429-7000 25+

millswindow.com

yEA RS

while Missouri voters backed legalization of medical marijuana. • A minimum wage increase was approved in two states. Missouri’s hourly minimum will gradually rise to $12 from $7.85. An Arkansas measure will raise the wage to $11 an hour from $8.50 by 2021. • Louisiana voters overwhelmingly approved making a unanimous jury a requirement for convictions, scrapping a law dating from the era of racial segregation that allowed for split juries. • Arizona voters rejected a massive expansion of the state’s private school voucher program criticized as a move to drain money from public schools to fund students’ private school tuition. Abortion was on the ballot in three states — one voting to protect access to abortion, the two others backing antiabortion measures. In Oregon, voters soundly rejected a measure that would have banned the use of public money to pay for abortion coverage. The measure would have left lowincome women on the state’s Medicaid plan to pay out-of-pocket for abortions and would have eliminated abortion coverage for public employees such as teachers and firefighters who receive health coverage under a state plan. In contrast, West Virginia voters approved a constitutional amendment allowing lawmakers to restrict or outlaw state funding for Medicaid abortions. In Alabama, voters added anti-abortion language to the state’s 1901 constitution specifying that Alabama recognizes the “rights of unborn children.” The measure does not affect abortion access unless Roe v. Wade, the U.S. Supreme Court decision that legalized abortion, is reversed — an outcome considered more likely with the addition of conservative Justice Brett Kavanaugh. One of the biggest ballot-measure victories for liberal activists came in Massachusetts, where voters rejected a conservative-backed attempt to repeal a 2016 state law extending nondiscrimination protections to transgender people. In Oregon, voters rejected a measure that would have repealed the first-inthe-nation immigrant sanctuary law.

OFF

WINDOWS

Not valid with any other coupon or promotion. Does not apply to previous estimates. Call for details. Expires 11/30/18

x % Ta 100 tible uc Ded

Wheels For Wishes Benefiting

Make-A-Wish® Missouri *Free Vehicle Pickup ANYWHERE *We Accept All Vehicles Running or Not *We also accept Trucks, RVs, SUVs & Boats

WheelsForWishes.org Call: (314) 499-1300

*Wheels For Wishes is a DBA of Car Donation Foundation.


NATION

11.08.2018 • Thursday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • A11

Sessions’ replacement has criticized the Russia investigation SESSIONS • FROM A1

to recuse himself for the appointment of Mueller, who took over the Russia investigation and began examining whether Trump’s hectoring of Sessions was part of a broader effort to stymie the probe. The investigation has so far produced 32 criminal charges and guilty pleas from four former Trump aides. But the work is not done, and critical decisions await that could shape the remainder of Trump’s presidency. Trump had repeatedly been talked out of firing Sessions until after the midterms but told confidants in recent weeks that he wanted Sessions out as soon as possible after the elections, according to a Republican who was not authorized to publicly discuss private conversations. White House chief of staff John Kelly called Sessions before the president’s news conference on Wednesday and asked for his resignation. Sessions’ resignation letter was then sent to the White House. Asked whether Whitaker would assume control over Mueller’s investigation, Justice Department spokeswoman Sarah Flores said Whitaker would be “in charge of all matters under the purview of the Department of Justice.” The Justice Department did not announce a departure for Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, who appointed Mueller and has closely overseen his work. Whitaker once opined about a scenario in which Trump could fire Sessions and then appoint an acting attorney general who could stifle the funding of Mueller’s probe. In that scenario, Mueller’s budget could be reduced “so low that his investigation grinds to almost a halt,” Whitaker said in a July 2017 interview with CNN. In an op-ed for CNN, Whitaker wrote: “Mueller has come up to a red line in the Russia 2016 election-meddling investigation that he is dangerously close to crossing.”

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Jeff Sessions, shown at his home in Washington on Wednesday, was pushed out as attorney general. Sessions’ chief of staff, Matthew Whitaker, has been named acting attorney general.

Democrats, including House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., immediately called for Whitaker to recuse himself from the investigation, citing his public comments. Rep. Jerry Nadler, DN.Y., the top Democrat on the House Judiciary Committee, said he wanted “answers immediately” and tweeted that “we will hold people accountable.” Trump’s attacks on Sessions came even though the Alabama Republican was the first U.S. senator to endorse Trump and despite the fact that his crime-fighting agenda and priorities — particularly his hawkish immigration enforcement policies — largely mirrored the president’s. But the relationship was irreparably damaged in March 2017 when Sessions, acknowledging previously undisclosed meetings with the Russian ambassador

and citing his work as a campaign aide, recused himself from the Russia probe. Trump lamented that he would have never selected Sessions if he had known the attorney general would recuse himself. The recusal left the investigation in the hands of Rosenstein, who appointed Mueller two months later after Trump fired then-FBI Director James Comey. The rift lingered, and Sessions, despite praising the president’s agenda and hewing to his priorities, never managed to return to Trump’s good graces. The deteriorating relationship became a stalemate for the administration. Trump belittled Sessions but, perhaps following the advice of aides, didn’t fire him. Sessions, for his part, proved determined to remain until dismissed. A logjam broke when Republican senators who had backed Sessions signaled a willingness to consider a new attorney general. In attacks delivered on Twitter, in person and in interviews, Trump called Sessions weak and beleaguered, complained that he wasn’t aggressively pursuing allegations of corruption against Democratic rival Hillary Clinton and called it “disgraceful” that Sessions wasn’t more serious in scrutinizing the origins of the Russia investigation for potentital law enforcement bias — even though the attorney general did ask the Justice Department’s inspector general to examine those claims. The broadsides escalated in recent months, with Trump telling an interviewer that Sessions “never had control” of the Justice Department and accusing him on Twitter of not protecting Republican interests by allowing two GOP congressmen to be indicted before the election.

Sessions endured most of the namecalling in silence, though he did issue two public statements defending the department, including one in which he said he would serve “with integrity and honor” for as long as he was in the job. Sessions, who probably suspected his ouster was imminent, was spotted by reporters giving his grandchildren a tour of the White House over the weekend. He did not respond when asked why he was there. The recusal from the Russia investigation allowed Sessions to pursue conservative issues he had long championed as a senator. He found satisfaction in being able to reverse policies enacted under President Barack Obama that conservatives say flouted the will of Congress, including by encouraging prosecutors to pursue the most serious charges they could and by promoting more aggressive enforcement of federal marijuana law. He also announced media leak crackdowns and tougher policies against opioids, and his Justice Department defended a sinceabandoned administration policy that resulted in migrant parents’ being separated from their children at the border. Some Democrats also considered Sessions too eager to do Trump’s bidding. Sessions, for instance, directed senior prosecutors to examine potential corruption in a uranium field transaction that some Republicans have said may have implicated Clinton in wrongdoing and benefited donors of the Clinton Foundation. He also fired one of the president’s primary antagonists, former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe, just before he was to have retired — a move Trump hailed as a “great day for democracy.” Despite it all, Sessions never found himself back in favor with the president. The problems started after he told senators during his confirmation hearing that he had never met with Russians during the campaign. The Justice Department, responding to a Washington Post report, acknowledged that Sessions had actually had two encounters during the campaign with the then-Russian ambassador. He recused himself the next day. That set off a frenzy at the White House, with Trump directing his White House counsel to urge Sessions not to step aside. Sessions refused. Mueller’s team, which has interviewed Sessions, has been investigating the president’s attacks on him. Whitaker, an Iowa native, previously served as U.S. attorney for the Southern District of Iowa from 2004 until 2009. Most of his career had been spent in private practice, including at a Des Moines law firm he founded with other Republican Party activists in 2009. Whitaker, who briefly worked as a conservative legal commentator on CNN, twice failed in bids for statewide elected office.

STORE CLOSING SALE! - FINAL DAYS TO SAVE -

(618) 206-5699 | (314) 236-3349

MASSIVE SAVINGS!

Ask The experTs Dr. Barry Brace, DMD

Dr. Tim Grayem, DDS

Implant and Cosmetic Dentistry O'Fallon, MO 636-206-4376 myofallondds.com

&

Kirkwood, MO 314-474-7401 mystldds.com

Q:

I’m sick of my dentures and want permanent implant teeth but the cost is a barrier for me. I know I could manage the payments if I thought it was actually worth it, but it’s really hard for me to justify spending so much money on myself at 68 years of age.

A: Lets first put the cost into perspective: Today’s life

like materials are designed to last a lifetime. Replacing your dentures with permanent implant teeth can give you a lifetime of comfortable enjoyment and self-confidence for less than the cost of a new car that will only last a few years before it begins to breakdown. Recent innovations have made permanent implants better, faster and stronger than ever. Today we can replace a whole mouth of teeth with dental implants for less than half of what it would have cost just a few short years ago. Patients no longer have to wait months after surgery or see multiple specialists in different offices before they can have permanent teeth. Our patients can actually leave our office with beautiful permanent teeth in just a couple of hours. Legal Notice: Our success is built on long term relationships with our patients though genuine caring and unrivaled excellence in value, comfort, and service and the relentless quest for improvement. However, nothing stated herein should be construed as a claim of secret, superior or exclusive techniques, ability or equipment. All are well documented in the literature and training is widely available to any dentist who cares to pursue these goals. Our doctors are General Dentists. Cosmetic and Implant Dentistry are non-specialty interest areas not recognized by the ADA that require no specific educational training to advertise these services.

50 70

% OFF

*

STOREWIDE!

*LIMITED EXCEPTIONS APPLY. DISCOUNT EXCLUDES PHARMACY.

Meat & Seafood • Produce • Dairy Deli & Bakery • Floral • Beverages Personal Care • Pet Supplies Household Supplies • Much More!

TIME IS RUNNING OUT!

DISCOUNTS AT THESE CLOSING LOCATIONS ONLY: 175 FLOWER VALLEY CTR 4660 CHIPPEWA ST 196 MAYFAIR PLAZA 10805 OLD HALLS FERRY RD 1023 CROSSROADS PL 9521 LEWIS & CLARK BLVD STATION RD 1144 MERAMEC S 301 WATSON RD

4201 N BELT W 1028 CAMP JACKSON RD 943 S STATE ST 1755 WABASH AVE 200 N GRAND AVE 3521 NAMEOKI RD 15446 MANCHESTER RD 10461 MANCHESTER RD

WE ACCEPT VISA, MASTERCARD, AMERICAN EXPRESS, DISCOVER, DEBIT CARDS. ALL SALES FINAL. NO RETURNS OR EXCHANGES. COUPONS REDEEMED AT FACE VALUE ONLY. NO ADJUSTMENTS TO PRIOR PURCHASES. NO OTHER DISCOUNT OFFERS ACCEPTED. NO OTHER ADVERTISED OFFERS APPLY. DISCOUNTS VALID ONLY AT CLOSING LOCATIONS ONLY. SELECTION MAY VARY BY LOCATION. DISCOUNT ON CIGARETTES & SELECT DAIRY PRODUCTS MAY VARY AS DETERMINED BY LOCAL REGULATIONS.


M 1 Thursday • 11.08.2018 • a12

Tech and health care lead U.S. stock surge Investors relieved there were no surprises in vote By MarLEy Jay Associated Press

Stocks rallied Wednesday as investors were relieved to see that the U.S. midterm elections went largely as they expected they would. Big-name technology and consumer and health care companies soared as the S&P 500 index closed at its highest level in four weeks. Democrats won control of the House of Representatives while Republicans kept a majority in the Senate, as most polls had suggested. It’s not clear how the divided Congress will work with Republican President Donald Trump, but if the possibilities for compromise and big agenda items seem limited, Wall Street is fine with that because it means politics is that much less likely to crowd out the performance of the strong U.S. economy. “The market likes when what it expects to happen happens,” said JJ Kinahan, chief markets strategist for TD Ameritrade. “We haven’t had that happen in a little while, when you think about major events like Brexit or the presidential election.” The S&P 500 index climbed 58.44 points, or 2.1 percent, to 2,813.89. The index has risen six out of the last seven days to recover most of the losses it suffered in October. The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 545.29 points, or 2.1 percent, o 26,180.30. The

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Traders Vincent Napolitano (left) and Gregory Rowe smile at the close of trading Wednesday at the New York Stock Exchange. Stocks closed higher as investors were relieved that elections went as they had expected.

Nasdaq composite climbed 194.79 points, or 2.6 percent, to 7,570.75. The Russell 2000 index of smaller-company stocks added 26.06 points, or 1.7 percent, to 1,582.16. Three-fourths of the stocks on the New York Stock Exchange traded higher. Historically markets have performed well after midterm elections and with split control of Congress. Stocks are off to a strong start in November, and the S&P 500 is up 3.8 percent so far this month. That follows a swoon in October that knocked the S&P 500 down nearly 7 percent as investors worried about rising interest

rates and the U.S.-China trade dispute. On Wednesday, investors bet on growth. Amazon jumped 6.9 percent to $1,755.49 and Microsoft gained 3.9 percent to $111.96, while Google’s parent company, Alphabet, picked up 3.6 percent to $1,108.24. Steady, “defensive” stocks lagged the rest of the stock market. Those companies, which include utilities and household goods makers, tend to do well when stocks are in turmoil, but they’re less appealing when investors are betting on economic growth. Economists at S&P Global,

Oxford Economics and the Bank of America all agreed that government gridlock would probably result from the Democrats’ winning control of the House. But they don’t think a stalemate will automatically hinder economic growth. It’s more likely that government will play less of a role in spurring economic growth in 2019 and 2020. As a result, the health of the global economy, interest rates set by the Federal Reserve, and spending by U.S. consumers and companies will have a bigger impact on determining the pace of growth. The Federal Reserve is also

meeting Wednesday and Thursday. It’s not expected to raise interest rates this month, but investors believe it will do so in December. Bank stocks also didn’t rise as much as others. Republicans had discussed a new round of tax cuts if they maintained full control over Congress, which would have expanded the government’s deficits further and required it to issue more debt. Government bond yields spiked overnight after a batch of strong early results for some GOP candidates, but then headed lower as Democrats’ fortunes improved, making a new tax cut package unlikely. Democrats’ victory in the House also means that Rep. Maxine Waters, D-Calif., is likely to become chairwoman of the House Financial Services Committee, which oversees the nation’s banking system and its regulators. Waters has called for more regulation of banks and has been vocal about Trump political appointees moving to roll back regulations on banks and other financial services companies. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note rose slightly, to 3.22 percent. It spiked as high as 3.25 percent Tuesday night. October is historically a rough month for stocks, though markets usually rise after midterm elections regardless of how the political landscape may change because Wall Street is glad to have more certainty. Democrats’ win in the House means Republicans won’t be able to take another shot at repealing the 2010 Affordable Care Act, which extended health insurance coverage to millions.

Boeing warns of issue with sensor after crash Part provided erroneous data that could lead plane to stall and fall By daVId shEPardsON aNd TIM hEPhEr Reuters

The Federal Aviation Administration issued an emergency airworthiness directive on Wednesday to address how to handle erroneous data from a sensor on the new Boeing 737 MAX jet in the wake of last week’s Indonesian jetliner crash. Boeing Co. said in a statement that it had alerted pilots to the issue. The FAA said it was mandating that airlines follow the Boeing bulletin. The U.S. planemaker said investigators probing the Lion Air crash off the coast of Indonesia, in which all 189 on board were killed, had found that one of the “angle of attack” sensors on the Boeing 737 MAX jet had provided erroneous data. Experts have said the angle of attack is a crucial parameter

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

Acura

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Officials inspect an engine recovered Sunday from a Lion Air jet that crashed into the Java Sea after taking off from Jakarta on Oct. 29, killing all 189 people aboard. The jet was made by Boeing.

that helps the aircraft’s computers understand whether its nose is too high relative to the current of air — a phenomenon that can throw the plane into an aerodynamic stall and make it fall. The FAA said the “erroneous inputs can potentially make the horizontal stabilizers repeatedly pitch the nose of the airplane downward, making the aircraft difficult to control.” The agency said the order was effective immediately and

applied to nearly 250 aircraft worldwide, including 45 in the United States operated by carriers including Southwest Airlines Co., United Airlines and American Airlines Group Inc. The FAA directive ordered operators to revise the airplane flight manual to give flight crews horizontal stabilizer trim procedures to follow under certain conditions. Some modern aircraft have systems designed to correct the

posture of the aircraft automatically to keep flying safely. There are also procedures for pilots to follow in the event of missing data from damaged sensors on the fuselage, but it remained unclear how much time the crew of flight JT610 had to respond at the relatively low altitude of about 5,000 feet. An angle of attack sensor had been changed by mechanics on the ground in Bali the day before the crash, Indonesia’s National Transportation Safety Committee has said. The captain and first officer flying from Bali to Jakarta the night before the crash had indicators displaying differences in angle of 20 degrees, KNKT said, but that flight landed safely despite the issues in the air. Boeing said in a statement received at China’s largest air show in Zhuhai that its bulletin to airlines underscored “existing flight crew procedures” designed to address circumstances where information coming into the cockpit from the sensors was wrong. The Boeing 737 MAX has three such blade-shaped sensors. Erroneous readings can in

RIDES

some circumstances cause the 737 MAX to point the nose down sharply to keep air under the wings and avoid a stall, according to a person briefed on the matter. Boeing’s bulletin related only to the 737 MAX, the latest version of the world’s most-sold family of aircraft, which has been in service for just over a year. Boeing has delivered 219 737 MAX jets to customers globally, with 4,564 orders for jets yet to be delivered. The Boeing 737 MAX is a more fuel-efficient version of the manufacturer’s best-selling single-aisle 737 series. The Lion Air crash was the first involving the new version, which airlines introduced into service last year. Indonesian authorities have downloaded information from the flight data recorder that showed a cockpit indicator on the Lion Air jet was damaged for its last four flights. Authorities were still searching for the cockpit voice recorder, the second so-called “black box.” KNKT said it would attempt to reconstruct the jet’s last flight using Boeing simulators in Seattle.

Audi

Buick

Cadillac

Chevrolet

Chevrolet

'10 Acura TSX 2.4: FWD, 5-Speed Auto with Sequ, Clean Carfax, $11,490 #V18267A

'18 Audi A5 Coupe: Premium Plus, 4K Miles, Clean Carfax 1 Owner AWD, $41,400 #P9604

'13 Buick Encore: Convenience, FWD, Clean Carfax $9,990 #M18516A

'18 Cadillac XTS: Luxury, FWD, Clean Carfax, 15K Miles $33,000 #P9287

'10 Chevy Corvette: Grand Sport, Convertible, Local Trade!$30,490 #M18448A1

'13 Chevy Sonic: RS, One Owner, Leather, Clean Carfax $9,990 #420197A

'16 Acura ILX: Automatic, 4WD, Clean Carfax, $18,990 #V18376B

'18 Audi S5 Cabriolet: Prestige, 4K Miles, Tango Red Metallic $59,900 #P9434

'15 Buick Encore: Gray, FWD, Auto, Back-up Camera $14,220 #M17390RA

'17 Cadillac XT5 Platinum: AWD, 30K Miles, Clean Carfax 1 Owner $41,007 #80091A

'13 Chevy Corvette: 3LT, Conv, Only 13K Miles, New Tires, Clean Carfax $43,990 #P6646

'14 Chevy Cruze: LTZ, Black, M/R, Loaded!$10,990 #35241B

'16 Acura 1LX: Premium Pkg, 28K Miles, FWD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, $19,490 #B9181

'18 Audi A4 Premium Plus: 6K Miles, Certified, 1 Owner, Clean Carfax $39,007 #28606L

'16 Chevy Cruze: LTD, LS, Loaded, One Owner, GM Certified, $11,990 #P6593

Chrysler

Audi

'18 Audi A4 Premium Plus: 2.0T, 9K MIles, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $37,007 #28083L

'10 Acura TL: AWD w/Tech Pkg $11,490 #V18633A

'12 Audi A7: Prestige Quattro, Black, Has It All!! $28,990 #B9426A

'18 Audi Q7: Prestige, Quattro, 11K, Black, Just Arrived $64,490 #V18668A

'18 Audi S7: Prestige, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD, 3K Miles $85,007 #P9563

'18 Audi A4 Premium Plus: AWD, 6K Miles, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $39,007 #28604L

STLtoday.com/advertise

BMW '13 BMW 328: xDrive, 64K, Auto, Local Trade $17,490 #V17707B

'09 Buick LaCrosse: CXL, White Opal, FWD, $7,990 #C9353A

'14 Chrysler 300: "S" Pkg, Rare Color, A Must See, 50K Miles $19,990 #B9227A

'12 Buick Regal: FWD, Clean Carfax, One Owner $9,990 #C18107RA

Chevrolet

'12 Buick Regal: Leather, Auto, Just Arrived $7,490 #B9322

'15 Buick Regal: Loaded, Black, GM Certified! $15,750 #420131B

Cadillac '13 Cadillac CTS-V: Coupe, AWD, Clean Carfax One Owner, 19K Miles $40,500 #P9507

'12 Chevy Cruze: 1LT, FWD, 6-Speed, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, $4,990 #M18445B

'17 BMW M4 Coupe: 17K Miles, RWD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $57,900 #28748B

STLtoday.com/readerrewards

'12 Chevrolet Cruze: Sedan LS, $11,995 Stock #190049A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Chevrolet Malibu: 1LT, $15,685 Stock #P06978 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '18 Chevrolet Impala: LT, $20,645 Stock #P06999 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Chevrolet Volt: 5 Door Hatchback, $17,714 Stock #P06928 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '12 Chevy Impala: LT Fleet, Auto, $6,490 #M18107C

STLtoday.com/subscribe

'13 Chevy Cruze: LT, Loaded, Very Clean $9,990 #420068A

'15 Chrysler 200: 4 Door, LTD, FWD, $11,725 Stock #P06975A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Dodge '13 Dodge Challenger: SXT, Black, Automatic, 59K Miles $16,990 #M18600A

'15 Chevy Cruze: LS, Loaded, GM Certified! $10,990 #44077A

'14 Chevy Cruze: Auto, Loaded, 51K Miles, Black, $10,469 #35537A

Continued on Page B9

'14 Chevy Impala: LTZ, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, FWD $18,990 #44078A

'16 Chevy Cruze: LS, GM Certified, Loaded $10,990 #420071A

@stltoday ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH


MARKET WATCH

11.08.2018 • Thursday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • A13

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM /BUSINESS Stocks closed sharply higher Wednesday as investors expressed relief that the U.S. midterm elections went largely as expected, with split control of Congress. The benchmark S&P 500 index closed at its highest level in four weeks.

UnitedHealth

A

10 DAYS

S O N 52-week range $276.75

2,840

Close: 26,180.30 Change: 545.29 (2.1%)

24,120

10 DAYS

S&P 500

Close: 2,813.89 Change: 58.44 (2.1%)

2,600

25,600 24,800

StocksRecap NYSE Vol. (in mil.) Pvs. Volume Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows

NASD 2,574 2,211 2053 874 63 70

3,841 3,416 2173 668 74 50

A

S

DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

O

2,560

N

HIGH 26200.14 10723.52 747.72 12682.06 7572.93 2815.15 1911.39 29062.54 1582.16

LOW 25765.88 10503.00 738.87 12536.12 7435.87 2774.13 1884.26 28466.75 1556.27

Futures

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Corn

Dec 18 Nov 18 Dec 18

372.25 867.75 510.25

-1 -4.25 -1.75

CHICAGO MERC

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Feeder cattle

Nov 18 Dec 18 Dec 18 Nov 18 Nov 18

149.92 116.10 55.52 14.46 275.25

-.05 +.68 +1.42 -.06 +2.20

ICE

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Cotton

Dec 18 Dec 18 Jan 19

78.96 115.60 25.18

+1.53 +2.35 +.06

NEW YORK

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Crude oil

Dec 18 Dec 18 Dec 18 Dec 18

61.67 1.6474 223.71 3.555

-.54 -.0466 +4.88

Hogs Milk Copper

2,640 M CLOSE 26180.30 10714.49 747.10 12679.11 7570.75 2813.89 1910.12 29051.70 1582.16

J CHG. +545.29 +240.38 +6.95 +199.05 +194.79 +58.44 +28.17 +584.45 +26.06

J

A

S

%CHG. WK +2.13% s +2.30% s +0.94% s +1.59% s +2.64% s +2.12% s +1.50% s +2.05% s +1.67% s

O

MO QTR s s s t s s s t s t s t s t s t s t

N

Coffee

YTD +5.91% +0.96% +3.28% -1.01% +9.67% +5.25% +0.50% +4.52% +3.04%

Sugar

Gas blend Heating oil Natural gas

TKR

52-WK LO HI

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV NAME 6

AT&T Inc

T

28.85

39.32 31.10 +.14 +0.5 -20.0 +0.3

Aegion Corp

AEGN

18.27

28.19 20.70

Amdocs

DOX

60.50

71.72 64.37 +.22 +0.3

Ameren Corp

AEE

51.89

67.23 66.04 +.97 +1.5 +12.0 +7.7 23 1.90f Huttig Building Prod HBP 70.50 70.32

-.09 -0.4 -18.6 -22.9 18 -1.7 +3.0 17

2.00 FutureFuel

TKR

... General Motors 1.00 Home Depot

American Railcar

ARII

34.76

ABInBev

BUD

72.88 122.41 76.64 +.72 +0.9 -31.3 -33.5 19 3.19e Lowes

Arch Coal

ARCH

75.09 102.61 95.26 +1.36 +1.4

Avadel Pharma

AVDL

2.80

11.93

-.15 -0.2 +68.9 +80.0 +2.3 +19.3

9 7

3.21 +.22 +7.4 -60.9 -69.1 dd

Bank of America

BAC

25.81

33.05 28.54 +.33 +1.2

Belden Inc

BDC

50.71

87.15 56.53 +1.22 +2.2 -26.7 -32.5 11

Boeing

BA

Build-A-Bear Wkshp BBW

-3.3 +3.5 14

259.56 394.28 372.02 +5.55 +1.5 +26.1 +41.3 35 7.25

10.45

8.44 +.07 +0.8

-8.3 +9.4 26

-.53 -1.4 +10.1 +34.8 17

1.60 Lee Enterprises 1.60 Mallinckrodt plc ... MasterCard

EMR

57.47

79.70 69.87

-.66 -0.9

Energizer Holdings

ENR

40.64

65.57 61.38 +.78 +1.3 +27.9 +47.6 21

Enterprise Financial EFSC

40.47

58.15 45.45

Esco Technologies

ESE

51.55

70.20 65.11 +1.11 +1.7

Express Scripts

ESRX

59.17

98.98 99.48 +1.29 +1.3 +33.3 +62.0 13

Foresight Energy

FELP

3.28

4.71

3.77

-.30 -0.7

...

17.86

POST

70.66 101.43 91.24

0.28 Perficient ... Reinsurance Gp

RGA

... Reliv

RELV

0.04 Spire Inc

-7.6 12 1.80f Stifel Financial

+0.3 +12.3 23

-4.9

PRFT

+8.5 +4.5 21

Emerson

36.65 30.76 +1.12 +3.8 +36.3

47.84 35.82 +.52 +1.5

CI

-.36 -0.8 -20.1 -21.0 15

11.65

4.45

Cigna

62.72 47.44

...

6

+8.2 +28.3 21 1.92f

30.50

-2.3

39.50

-.08 -2.9 +13.6 +19.6

BTU

90.07 148.24 142.96+12.08 +9.2 +41.7 +37.3 20

EPC

2.67

SKIS

CHTR 250.10 396.64 328.36 +7.69 +2.4

Edgewell

3.30

... Peak Resorts

CNC

-8.3

1.95

77.14 117.70 100.60 +3.09 +3.2

6.84 Peabody Energy

Charter

72.55 66.26 +.53 +0.8 +18.7 +21.4 17

...

38.84 22.05 +.30 +1.4 -38.0 -37.1

Centene Corp.

80.70 68.26 +1.58 +2.4

-.12 -3.5 -52.1 -48.2 dd

18.49

41.09 36.87

52.07

3.19

146.84 182.86 184.25 +1.54 +0.8

74.49 67.85 +1.12 +1.7 +16.6 +15.0 33 1.04b Post Holdings

63.18

7.59

OLN

26.54

CBSH

3.08

MCD

54.37

C

1.52 4.12

0.60 McDonald’s

CAL

Citigroup

MNK

-9.9 dd

-1.2 +13.3 24

0.20 Olin

CASS

Commerce Banc.

LOW

162.29 215.43 187.23 +5.22 +2.9

140.61 225.35 208.24 +9.09 +4.6 +37.6 +33.4 48

Caleres Inc.

163.02 227.13 220.29 +6.05 +2.8

18.97 17.01 +.18 +1.1 +20.7 +13.4 21 0.24a 45.52 36.88 +.42 +1.2 -10.0

MA

Cass Info. Systems

-8.0 cc

11.32 30.56

LEE

0.94 Target Corp. ... UPS B

5

0.80

-9.0 +12.3

0.52

-3.7 +5.6 dd

0.28

31.09 25.73 +.82 +3.3 +34.9 +30.9 42

...

5.78

5.20 +.13 +2.6

-.46 -0.5 +15.2 +17.2 24

127.84 165.12 148.85 +3.13 +2.1 3.72

8.44

4.88

...

...

-4.5

60.09

82.85 75.52 +.93 +1.2

SF

42.51

68.76 49.55 +1.02 +2.1 -16.8

TGT

54.04

90.39 86.76 +1.17 +1.4 +33.0 +48.6 15

101.45 135.53 111.13 +2.48 +2.3

+0.5

-1.9 21

-1.5 19

3.64

-1.9

58.50 52.58

-1.7 14

1.20

1.16 US Steel

X

24.84

47.64 29.35 +.29 +1.0 -16.6 +6.4 17

0.20

58.80 57.65 +.44 +0.8

VZ

43.97

WMT

81.78 109.98 104.32 +.99 +1.0

WBA

59.07

80.68 81.91 +1.31 +1.6 +12.8 +24.7 15

WFC

50.02

66.31 53.58 +.03 +0.1 -11.7

... Walgreen Boots

+8.9 +30.9

7 2.41f

+5.6 +18.8 25 2.08f 1.76

-2.5 13 1.72f

Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months. Other: x - ex-dividend.

BUSINESS DIGEST Bank of America moving suburban offices to Centene Centre • Bank of America is consolidating its St. Louis County office space and will become a tenant at Centene’s new 27-story office tower under construction in Clayton. The Charlotte, N.C.-based bank said Wednesday that it would keep its office space in downtown St. Louis at 800 Market Street. In consolidating its suburban St. Louis office space, Bank of America plans to move multiple divisions to the new Centene Centre building at the end of 2020, bank spokeswoman Diane Wagner said. The amount of square feet it’s leasing was not immediately available. “As part of Bank of America’s focus on responsible growth, we continue to evaluate how we leverage real estate to support our goals to connect our lines of business to deliver for our customers,” the bank said in a statement. “In support of this effort, we are excited to announce a new lease at Centene Centre, 7700 Forsyth Boulevard in downtown Clayton to consolidate our suburban footprint and bring together business lines under one roof.” Centene Centre is part of a $772 million new office complex that will accommodate 2,000 additional Centene employees for the managed care company headquartered in Clayton. VW takes another shot at compact pickups • Volkswagen plans a renewed push into the lucrative pickup segment that’s eluded the German manufacturer for years. The compact Tarok will soon be offered in Brazil, the company said in a statement. The truck “has the potential to boost Volkswagen’s model range in other global markets,” it said without providing details. Volkswagen, the world’s biggest carmaker, has struggled to break through in the pickup category while rivals from General Motors to Toyota have raked in profits. VW Chief Executive Officer Herbert Diess recently told Automotive News that collaboration talks with Ford might provide access to technology from the Ranger, a compact pickup being revived

by Ford for the North American market. Besides the Ranger, other smaller pickups include the Chevy Colorado and GMC Canyon, which are both made in Wentzville, the Toyota Tacoma and Nissan Frontier. VW’s German rival Daimler AG entered the pickup segment in recent years with the premium X-Class. Square’s quarterly revenue rises • Payments company Square Inc. on Wednesday reported a 51 percent rise in total net revenue to $882.1 million for the third quarter. The company, founded and led by Twitter Inc. CEO Jack Dorsey, a St. Louis native, reported a higherthan-expected third-quarter profit, as it earned more from processing transactions and its push into financial services, including lending to small businesses. The San Francisco-based company, best known for its signature small white credit card readers that are plugged into smartphones, has been aggressively expanding into a wider range of financial services, such as lending. For 2018, the company raised its adjusted core earnings expectation to between $250 million and $255 million from $240 million to $250 million. It also raised its adjusted earnings per share and total net revenue forecast for the year. Net income was $19.6 million, or 4 cents per share, compared with a loss of $16.1 million, or 4 cents per share, a year earlier. On an adjusted basis, the company said it earned 13 cents per share, beating Wall Street estimates by 2 cents. Square said it expected earnings of 12 cents to 13 cents per share for the final three months of 2018, while analysts were projecting 15 cents, according to IBES data from Refinitiv. Square shares fell to $79.66 in extended trading from a close at $82.69. While visiting Square’s St. Louis office to launch the company’s new Terminal register last month, Dorsey said the company planned to add hundreds of jobs in St. Louis. Square plans to maintain its office space in the Cortex innovation district and is looking at opening a new office downtown. From staff and wire reports

+2.40 +.07 +7.30

TREASURIES

LAST

NET CHG

1YR AGO

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 52-wk T-bill 2-year T-note 5-year T-note 7-year T-note 10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

2.37 2.51 2.73 2.93 3.05 3.14 3.23 3.44

... -0.01 ... ... +0.01 +0.01 +0.02 +0.01

1.20 1.33 1.51 1.63 1.98 2.17 2.32 2.78

NET 1YR LAST CHG AGO

BONDS

2.13 1.63 1.13

5.25 4.75 4.25

Barclays Glob Agg Bd Barclays USAggregate Barclays US High Yield Moodys AAA Corp Idx Barclays US Corp 10-Yr. TIPS

2.25 3.65 6.80 4.24 4.31 1.14

+0.01 +0.01 -0.02 -0.01 ... ...

1.59 2.58 5.45 3.51 3.15 .43

GlobalMarkets

2.56

-6.7

48.49

0.13 Wells Fargo

Silver

PRIME FED RATE FUNDS

CHG

CLOSE

1226.20 14.53 878.80

Gold

...

USB

-.06 -0.1

.0281 .7217 .2657 1.3094 .7609 .1445 1.1413 .0137 .2712 .008818 .050582 .0151 .0707 .000891 .9968

PreciousMetals NEW YORK

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note rose to 3.23 percent Wednesday. Yields affect rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.

YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO

PREV

.0280 .7285 .2675 1.3147 .7634 .1445 1.1455 .0138 .2727 .008823 .050314 .0151 .0721 .000896 .9996

2.25

1.94 US Bancorp

0.32 WalMart

Argentina Australia Brazil Britain Canada China Euro India Israel Japan Mexico Russia So. Africa So. Korea Switzerland

-8.1 15 0.48f

+8.1 +8.9 20 -3.0 dd

...

-2.0 13 2.40f

+2.3 -14.5 dd

+0.7 +6.0 13 0.52f Verizon

-.20 -5.0 -13.7

1.00

+7.0 +9.8 28 4.64f

SR

UPS

ExchangeRates

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV

FF

PE: ... Yield: ...

FOREIGN CURRENCY IN DOLLARS CLOSE

Platinum

GM HD

S O N 52-week range $300.00

Vol.: 9.8m (1.2x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $10.7 b

Interestrates Interestrates 52-WK LO HI

A

$20.10

Chicago BOT is in cents.

Stocks of Local Interest NAME

0

S O N 52-week range $76.70

CHICAGO BOT

Live cattle

2,720

A

$46.80

Wheat

2,800

J

100

Soybeans

2,880

26,400

J

200

60

Vol.: 11.0m (2.5x avg.) PE: 20.6 Mkt. Cap: $29.2 b Yield: 1.7%

PE: 46.2 Yield: ...

2,960

M

$300

70 50

S O N 52-week range $154.06

Vol.: 1.9m (1.8x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $8.6 b

2,720

27,200

24,000

A

$71.07

Vol.: 5.8m (2.0x avg.) PE: 21.6 Mkt. Cap: $264.3 b Yield: 1.3%

Dow Jones industrials

25,180

120

TLRY

Close: $139.60 32.74 or 30.6% Voters in several states approved the legalization of recreational or medical marijuana.

$80

140

250

Tilray

APC

Close: $57.89 3.12 or 5.7% Voters in Colorado rejected a ballot measure that could have reduced oil and gas drilling.

$160

260

Charts show stocks that made the news yesterday.

Anadarko Petroleum

MOH

Close: $137.32 13.09 or 10.5% Medicaid companies rose after three states voted to expand the health care program.

270

$208.48

26,240

Molina Healthcare

UNH

Close: $274.63 11.09 or 4.2% Health insurers climbed after Democrats won control of the House of Representatives, likely safeguarding the Affordable Care Act. $280

INDEX S&P 500 Frankfurt DAX London FTSE 100 Hong Kong Hang Seng Paris CAC-40 Mexico City Bolsa Tokyo Nikkei 225 Sao Paolo Bovespa Toronto Zurich

LAST 2813.89 11579.10 7117.28 26147.69 5137.94 46917.40 22085.80 87686.07 15369.43 9050.53

CHG

CHG

YTD

+58.44 +94.76 +76.60 +26.73 +62.76 +589.05 -61.95 -982.85 +76.72 +58.46

+2.12% +0.83% +1.09% +0.10% +1.24% +1.27% -0.28% -1.11% +0.50% +0.65%

+5.25% -10.36% -7.42% -12.61% -3.29% -4.94% -2.98% +14.77% -5.18% -3.53%

Advance pay service may reduce use of payday loans Users can draw on some wages with no interest BY KEN SWEET associated Press

Americans take out roughly $50 billion in payday loans a year, each racking up hundreds of dollars in fees and interest. But a small and growing service that allows its users to take an advance on their paycheck might be giving the payday loan industry a run for its money. San Francisco-based financial technology company Even made headlines late last year when Walmart, the nation’s largest private employer, announced it would start offering Even’s service as part of its employee benefits package. Along with providing tools that allow employees to track their spending and save money, Even features Instapay, which allows users to advance some of their next paycheck up to 13 days before payday. Because the Even user is tapping into his or her already accumulated hours, Even doesn’t charge the employee interest on the advance. Even founder Jon Schlossberg said publicly that part of the company’s mission was to put the payday loan industry out of business, claiming it exploits the financially vulnerable. He shared internal usage data exclusively with The Associated Press that shows, at least preliminarily, that Even users are less likely to tap the payday loan market once they sign up for the company’s services. “You have this entire industry of financial institutions taking advantage of Americans struggling to live paycheck to paycheck, and payday lenders are really the most predatory,” Schlossberg said. Payday lenders say they provide a necessary service, with many Americans unable to come up with cash to cover an

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A financial services store manager in Ballwin counts cash being loaned to a client in August. The firm offers cash-based services including payday loans, installment loans and fund transfers.

unexpected financial emergency. They also say they lend to the country’s most desperate, who are often the highest risk for not paying back the loan. But critics say the rates and fees are exorbitant and can trap the borrower in a cycle of debt that can last months. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, under then-vPresident Barack Obama’s administration, was trying to regulate the payday lending industry nationwide; but under President Donald Trump’s administration the bureau has begun the process of reversing those rules. Even’s data show that roughly 28 percent of its users took out a payday loan in the months before signing up for the service. Four months after signing up for Even, that figure drops to less than 20 percent. Even calculated the figure by studying usage behavior of its members from December 2017 until September 2018. Even is able to tell which users are still using payday loans because users link their bank accounts to the app. The company is then able to tell what types of transactions a user is making and whether they bear the characteristics of a payday loan transaction or name a payday lender as the other party.

Schlossberg acknowledges that Even could be missing some payday loan transactions, particularly ones in which a check is used instead of a direct debit. The data are also limited by the fact that Walmart, by far its biggest customer, started using the product only on December 15, 2017. Schlossberg said the company was working with academic researchers on the efficacy of Even’s Instapay product versus payday loan usage, with the goal of publishing sometime in 2019. Walmart is the only company that publicly says it uses Even, but an Even spokesman says it has “more than” 10 companies signed up currently, with 400,000 active subscribers. Even charges Walmart employees a $6 monthly fee to use its premium features, which include Instapay. Consumer advocates, who have long targeted the payday lending industry, said they were glad to see alternatives to payday loans available but urged caution about their usage. “The decrease is interesting and potentially promising but too soon to draw any conclusions,” said Scott Astrada, director of federal advocacy at the left-leaning Center for Responsible Lending.


A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , 1 8 7 8

THURSDAy • 11.08.2018 • A14 RAY FARRIS PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER

• GILBERT BAILON EDITOR • TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

Loud and clear

Democrats’ House takeover contains important messages for both parties.

P

Still, Hawley decisively won, and he has earned the chance to be a successful senator. That will require him to discover the courage that eluded him as a candidate and stand up to this president when he knows he’s wrong. The new House Democratic majority, meanwhile, shouldn’t view its victory as a license to engage in scorched-earth partisanship. Voters are as tired of that as they are of Trump’s antics. Democrats’ mandate is to behave like grownups in a room that hasn’t had any for too long. This means imposing real oversight on Trump when he threatens to erode constitutional rights, damage America’s standing with allies or further interfere with the investigation of Special Prosecutor Robert Mueller — as he appeared to do Wednesday by forcing Attorney General Jeff Sessions to resign. It means preventing further sabotage of the Affordable Care Act, imposing fiscal discipline and blocking any new coddle-the-rich tax schemes. And it means promoting policy initiatives — a major infrastructure proASSOCIATED PRESS gram comes to mind — on which Democrats might find House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., (right) bipartisan support. dances to the music with other Democrats after It also means resisting the speaking about the Democratic takeover of the U.S. urge to engage in partisan House on Tuesday. stunts, such as an endless series of symbolic impeachment votes that health care. will be dead on arrival in the Republican We opposed Hawley’s candidacy Senate. Democrats should use their new because he has failed to call out Trump’s House majority to demonstrate that at egregious behavior, whether it was the least one of our two major parties isn’t president’s shameful apathy toward the driven entirely by animus and power lust. murderous racism on display in CharlotAs for continued Republican control of tesville, or his shameless siding with Rusthe Senate: No, this wasn’t a “split decisian President Vladimir Putin over U.S. sion” by voters. It was widely understood intelligence during their Helsinki summit, that accidents of the map virtually guaranor his repugnant midterm strategy to porteed a GOP Senate win this year. The GOP tray a Central American migrant caravan got a reprieve, not a mandate. These next as an “invasion.” Hawley himself garnered two years are the Republican Party’s last well-deserved national scorn for claimchance to show America that it can rein ing to be a protector of people with prein Trump’s worst impulses and, perhaps, existing medical conditions while suing to even work across the aisle. dismantle their coverage. resident Donald Trump told America to view the midterm elections as a referendum on him. On Tuesday, America did just that, and pulled the U.S. House decisively out of Republican hands. At last, there will be one chamber of Congress positioned to restrain rather than enable this president’s worst tendencies. Even Republicans who won should heed the broader message the voters sent. They include Senator-elect Josh Hawley, who unseated two-term Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., with a campaign that rested largely on the twin pillars of kowtowing to Trumpism and misleading voters about

See editorial cartoons from around the country online at stltoday.com/opinion

yOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS General with hometown ties should have been on front page

Make polling places accessible to disabled people

I agree with Susan Garrett’s letter regarding Post-Dispatch coverage of the rededication of Soldiers Memorial (“Disappointing print coverage of Soldiers Memorial reopening,” Nov. 6). What really concerned me was the lack of a picture of the keynote speaker, Brigadier Gen. Jeannie M. Leavitt. She is a hometown girl, the first female fighter pilot in the Air Force and a graduate of Bishop DuBourg High School. That the Post-Dispatch didn’t put Gen. Leavitt on the front page is truly remarkable. The paper prides itself on local news but missed this great part of the rededication ceremony. Very disappointed. Steven R. Bettlach • St. Louis

Shouldn’t all polling places be accessible to disabled people? The front-page photo on Monday showed a man in a wheelchair filling out his ballot outside the building (“Disabled often face hurdles when voting”). Stairs were involved. I wonder how many others went home without voting because they could not navigate stairs. Had that been my polling place, I would have been one of those. How many other places have a similar problem? Changes need to be made. All polling places need to be accessible. Dorothy Anderson • Spanish Lake

I know Missouri is so behind other states, but I think we should be voting by mail. How much would we save? No polling places to rent and no poll workers, just a mailing from the election board to every registered voter. Just a return envelope with no stamp; if they want to vote, they pay for the stamp. I think we have enough technology to know if a dead person would vote. Tom Scheibelhut • St. Louis County

The people have spoken

Follow the money behind the migrant caravan

Tuesday’s vote was a mandate for tighter checks and balances across the board.

T

uesday’s election result made one thing clear: American voters want greater checks and balances on their elected officials at all levels. From the national elections down to statewide ballot initiatives and the vote in St. Louis County, voters stepped across party lines to demand change when politicians wouldn’t make it happen. The decision by voters to give House control to the Democrats means they’re not satisfied with exclusive Republican Party management of the nation’s affairs. President Donald Trump and Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell now will have to give Democratic leaders a seat at the table, while Democrats must engage in a real give-and-take if they hope to have any record of accomplishment heading into the 2020 elections. Across Missouri, the result of major ballot initiatives sent a strong message to the GOP-dominated Legislature that if lawmakers won’t advance the kinds of reforms and initiatives Missourians want, the people will do it for them. Approval of Amendment 1 — the “Clean Missouri” initiative to force lobbying reforms and correct redistricting abuses — soon will become embedded in the state Constitution and cannot be undone by the Legislature. The vote is the people’s declaration that they will impose checks and balances on lawmakers if they won’t do it themselves. The same sentiment was clear with ballot initiatives on legalizing medical marijuana and increasing the state’s minimum wage. The Legislature could have approved such laws and moved the state into the 21st century. Instead, lawmakers preferred unrelenting marijuana prohibition and outdated wage laws that anchored too many working-class Missourians in poverty. When lawmakers wouldn’t act, the people united to do it for them. Locally, voters crossed party lines to mandate checks and balances after elected officials fail to do the job. In St. Louis County, the partisan split was pronounced regarding the county executive’s race, yet voters united overwhelmingly in their

desire to impose stricter limits on the executive’s powers. Because of several ballot initiatives, the County Council soon will have new authority to intervene when the county executive steps out of line. The vote is a rebuke to St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger, a Democrat who won re-election by a comfortable margin despite a barrage of revelations about evasion of accountability and backroom wheeling and dealing to reward politi-

JOHANNA HUCKEBA • Post-Dispatch

Brigadier Gen. Jeannie Leavitt of the Air Force gives the keynote address Saturday during the reopening ceremony at Soldiers Memorial. Born in St. Louis, Gen. Leavitt became the Air Force’s first female fighter pilot in 1993.

McCaskill should have attacked GOP plan to cut benefits

J.B. FORBES • Post-Dispatch

Madelyn Whitehead, 2, helps her father, Rob Whitehead, vote during absentee voting on Monday at the St. Louis County Board of Elections in St. Ann.

cal cronies. No longer will authorities be allowed to sell public park land without voter approval. They’ll have to abide by much stricter campaign-donation limits — including from companies or individuals seeking county contracts. The county executive also will be restricted from withholding or redirecting budgeted funds as a political weapon against the County Council or other agencies. Our preference is that officials do the governing on behalf of the people who elect them. But when they fail, the people deserve the right to force their own change of course.

Voting by mail would save a lot of trouble

Sen. Claire McCaskill did a good job of challenging Josh Hawley’s lie of claiming he supported insurance coverage of pre-existing medical conditions when he is a plaintiff in a lawsuit to throw out the Affordable Care Act. She voted against Judge Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the Supreme Court. She has emphasized protection of Social Security as she traveled Missouri in recent years. She is principled, and my husband and I phonebanked for her. However, I believe her biggest mistake was not going on a major attack against Hawley’s and the Republican plan to cut Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid. She played it safe, talking about bipartisanship. But an 81-year-old lady in Bismarck, Mo., with an Ozarkian twang said it all when she complained that the Democrats are not talking enough about the Republican plan to cut Social Security, as she told me how babysitting her greatgrandchildren might keep her home from the polls. I’ll bet that she has one source of income: probably a small Social Security check. Every Democrat should talk ceaselessly about how Republicans have handed huge tax cuts to the rich and are now claiming that Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid are the cause of the budget deficit, which is nothing short of outrageous. Suzanne Rechtin Reinhold • Des Peres

The migrant caravan through Mexico is a lose-lose situation for our country. On the one hand, if we don’t let them into our country, we look like ogres to many in our country and the rest of the world. If we do let them in, it looks like our government is backing down on protecting our borders, and the next caravan will have 10,000 people. The news media have been telling us that these are poor people seeking a better way of life. If that is the case, then who’s paying for all the food, shoes and transportation of the 5,000 or more people in the caravan? Sunday’s article on the caravan says they tried to rent buses for some of the trip. Who’s paying for buses? 5,000 people eat a lot of food; who’s paying for that? They are walking thousands of miles through Central America and Mexico. How long does a pair of shoes last — maybe 700 miles? Who’s providing the shoes? Who would sponsor this caravan and be willing to pay to hurt America? Venezuela’s Hugo Chavez is dead, but his government still hates this country. Drug cartels have the funds to do this too. Perhaps an enterprising investigative reporter can dig into and follow the money to get the answer. Eugene Hanneke • Ellisville

To honor veterans, protect our democratic institutions On Sunday, the country will honor our nation’s veterans with various events and ceremonies. It is fitting that a day be set aside to remember our veterans. But their dedicated service requires our support throughout the year. Veterans have preserved our democracy by taking an oath to support and defend the Constitution of the United States. We best commemorate their service when we protect those democratic institutions for which they faithfully gave their lives, blood and sacrifice. Bill Schoenhard • Kirkwood Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON Editorial Page Editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382

STLtoday.com/opinion Find us at facebook/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial I know that my retirement will make no difference in its cardinal principles, that it will always fight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always fight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisfied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

E-MAIL MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, letters@post-dispatch.com 900 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days.


11.08.2018 • THURSDAY • M 1 75 YEARS AGO TODAY ON THE EDITORIAL PAGE

OTHER VIEWS

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A15

WHY STALIN WAS CONFIDENT • Ever since the beginning of Russia’s struggle against the Nazi invaders, Joseph Stalin’s speeches have breathed a firm confidence. “A grave danger hangs over our country,” he said on July 3, 1941, but he predicted that Hitler’s “invincible” armies would be smashed in Russia. Today finds the prediction fulfilled. Stalin’s confidence has been fully justified. Access the full item at stltoday.com/opinion

Political parties can no longer harness their bases When you take political power out of the parties, other actors seize it. JONAH GOLDBERG Los Angeles Times

It is perhaps the central irony of our politics today: We live in an incredibly polarized and partisan moment, but our political parties have never been weaker. As odd as it sounds, political parties in democracies have an important antidemocratic function. Traditionally, the parties shaped the choices put to voters. Long before voters decided anything in the primary or general elections, party bosses worked to groom good candidates, weed out bad ones, organize interests and frame issues. In the modern era, the story of party decline usually begins in the aftermath of the 1968 presidential election. The move toward primaries and the democratic selection of delegates took power away from the bosses. After Watergate, there were more reforms, curbing the ability of the parties to raise and spend money freely. This led to the rise of political action committees, which raise cash independent of the formal party structure. As Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) said during the floor debate over the McCainFeingold campaign finance bill in 2001, “We haven’t taken a penny of money out of politics. We’ve only taken the parties out of politics.” Outside groups — the National Rifle Association, Planned Parenthood, unions, etc. — often do more to effectively organize voters around single issues or personalities than the parties do. The Kochs, Tom Steyer, George Soros and Sheldon Adelson serve as party bosses, only outside the parties. Technology is another, less obvious force siphoning power from the parties. For instance, as political historian Michael Barone has noted, the telephone dealt a grievous blow to political conventions, where insiders have outsize power. “Until the 1960s, the national convention was a communications medium,” Barone writes. “Political leaders in the various states seldom met each other, outside of sessions of Congress, during the four years between presidential elections.” The telephone eliminated the need for the face-to-face negotiations. Today, political conventions are little more than infomercials for presidential candidates. The internet and cable TV have accelerated the eclipsing of parties. Opinion websites and TV and radio

hosts now do more to shape issues and select candidates than the parties do. It’s a bit like comic books. Readership of comics has been in steady decline, but movie studios and toy manufacturers still feed off the brands created generations ago. The weird thing is that the American people didn’t seem to notice. The largest voting bloc in America today call themselves independents, but most of them tend to be as partisan as everybody else, while “pure independents” are less likely to vote at all. And yet, Americans keep talking about partisan politics as if the parties are in charge, and base voters on the left and the right keep railing against the party establishments like mobs unaware that they’re kicking dead horses. Among the many problems with the rotting out of the parties is that the rot spreads. The parties are supposed to be where politics happens. McConnell’s point about money in politics is analogous to the larger trend. When you take political power out of the parties, other actors seize it. When wielded by people who aren’t supposed to be in the politics business, that power corrupts. This is why every Academy Awards ceremony is peppered with asinine political jeremiads, and why late-night comedy hosts serve as de facto Democratic Party organizers. It’s why people like Jerry Falwell Jr., the president of Liberty University, act like social-gospel ward heelers. It’s why the cable news networks spend so much of their time rallying voters in one direction or another. And it’s why countless pundits and allegedly objective reporters serve as unofficial political consultants. It’s also why Donald Trump could leverage his celebrity to seize the GOP nomination, and why someone like Oprah Winfrey could be next. There are other, larger forces at work. The decline of strong independent institutions — religious, civic and familial — has people searching for other outlets to find a sense of meaning and belonging. Identity politics, populism and nationalism are filling that void. That’s happened before, but when it did, the parties were there to filter, constrain and channel those passions in a healthy direction. The Potemkin parties can’t, or won’t, do that anymore. The result is a nation of partisans decrying partisanship. Jonah Goldberg goldbergcolumn@gmail.com Copyright Tribune Content Agency

Trump, as of last week, had uttered no fewer than 6,420 falsehoods during his presidency, by the count of The Washington Post’s Fact Checker. But there is one truth it will do him no good to deny: The people on this Election Day rejected him.

CAROLYN KASTER • Associated Press

President Donald Trump pauses as the crowd cheers during a rally Monday in Cape Girardeau.

America steps back from the abyss Election results were a rebuke of the Trump presidency. DANA MILBANK Washington Post

On Tuesday night, America stepped back from the abyss. It was not, perhaps, the overwhelming repudiation of President Donald Trump’s vulgar, divisive, race-baiting and sometimes lawless tenure that Democrats had hoped for. But it was, at least, a correction, and a rebuke of the Trump presidency. Democrats recaptured the House, a monumental achievement in itself, given that they typically need to win the popular vote by about 7 percentage points to overcome the disadvantages of gerrymandering and the like. Republicans were routed in Pennsylvania, Virginia, New York and elsewhere, while prominent GOP figures such as Reps. Pete Sessions (Texas), Pete Roskam (Illinois) and Dave Brat (Virginia) went down. Republicans who held on generally won by less than Trump did two years ago. Though Democrats fell short in the Florida and Georgia gubernatorial races, they were set to flip five others — Democrat Laura Kelly triumphed in deep-red Kansas — and came closer to parity with Republicans nationally. Democrats were poised to take state legislative bodies in New York, Minnesota, New Hampshire and Colorado and to gain seats in Connecticut, Pennsylvania, Michigan and North Carolina. And though they didn’t prevail in the Senate — it was always a long shot, given that they were defending seats in 10 states that Trump won — they breezed in places that Trump carried two years ago, such as Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Ohio.

This was not a tsunami-size wave, but the tide has turned. Clearly, Trump has not realigned American politics. The laws of gravity have been restored. And there are abundant signs that the trends favoring Democrats are just beginning to be felt. Exit polls, Election Day polls and actual returns showed significant gains for Democrats in suburbs and among independents. In The Washington Post-Schar School Election Day poll of battleground district voters, independents preferred Democrats by double digits, and independent women favored Democrats by more than 20 points. Democrats have captured the middle. The polling also shows that young voters and racial minorities — the future American electorate — turned out in healthy numbers for Democrats. Also, the Democrats’ success came despite significant economic headwinds. The average gain for the opposition party since World War II has been 26 seats — the exact number Democrats gained Tuesday — even though the current unemployment rate is much lower, and economic growth much higher, than it was on average in the other post-war midterms. Nearly 8 in 10 voters in battleground states thought the economy to be good or excellent, Post polling showed, yet a majority believed the country was headed in the wrong direction. Why? They were registering their displeasure with Trump. More than 4 in 10 voters said Trump was one of the two most important factors in their votes — and three quarters of them supported Democrats. CNN’s exit polling found that two-thirds of voters thought Trump a factor in their vote for House candidates, and a lopsided number said their vote was in opposition to Trump rather than a show of support.

Trump was the top issue they cited, along with health care, the issue Democrats had made the centerpiece of the campaign. The issue Trump labored hard to inject into the campaign — immigration — lagged in importance to voters, and back further still were the issues Trump had also hoped to make central to the campaign: the Supreme Court, his tax cut and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif. Certainly, there were disappointments for Democrats. But there was far more to reassure Trump’s opponents. In the closing weeks of the campaign, Trump launched a vulgar appeal to rally his base, fabricating an emergency about a migrant “caravan,” releasing a racist ad, threatening to rewrite the Constitution by executive order and using the military as a political prop at the border. That did appear to bring his supporters to the polls; in exit surveys, those worried about immigration overwhelmingly supported Republicans. But the ugliness brought out more of Trump’s opponents. This time, unlike in 2016, there was a backlash. There are, happily, not enough racists in America to make Trump’s strategy work any longer. Trump, as of last week, had uttered no fewer than 6,420 falsehoods during his presidency, by the count of the Post’s Fact Checker. But there is one truth it will do him no good to deny: The people on this Election Day rejected him. Trump and his sycophants will no doubt continue, in the coming two years, to attempt to fool and to frighten the people. But on Tuesday the voters began to push back. Dana Milbank Twitter: @Milbank Copyright The Washington Post

Time to create positive change in Missouri Missouri Nondiscrimination Act would grant security and freedom to people in the workplace, housing. BY TERREL WHITE

Growing up I always learned about the American dream, the land of opportunity, a safe haven for expression and freedom. The reality that I have come to face is much bleaker than the sunshine and rainbows presented to me as a child. That is not because that opportunity does not exist, just that it is made much harder to obtain based on who I am. I am a gay African-American male living in St. Louis, and as such I have to fear for my life in more ways than one. We however can choose not to live with that fear but to stand up for the very things that would seek to

break us down. I am a new resident of Missouri, having moved here in August, but before ever stepping foot on Missouri soil, people tried planting seeds of doubt. In the time that I’ve been here, I haven’t had any negative experiences, but that doesn’t mean that it isn’t happening to someone else, perhaps a co-worker, a neighbor, a friend, but most certainly ... someone. That person may even be suffering in silence. Each year Missouri is offered an opportunity to help alleviate some of that fear, to embrace the changing demographics of the world and create positive change to reflect

the differences in people from the social norms and policies of 100 years ago. I am speaking of the Missouri Nondiscrimination Act. Every year for the past 20 years, Missouri activists and lawmakers struggle to bring the act to fruition, to bring justice and equal opportunity rights based not only on race, ethnicity, religion, sex and nationality, but to extend those privileges to people based on gender identity and sexual orientation. The protections that would be given through the Missouri Nondiscrimination Act grant security and freedom from discrimination in the workplace, housing and public accommodations for extended classifications of the Missouri Human Rights Act. This law has been 20 years in the

making, but even someone as new as me can be a part of the change to make it happen, and I would kindly ask you to join in the movement to create this change in our community. I come to learn more and more about Missouri every day that I am here. For instance, the state motto is “Salus Populi Suprema Lex Esto”, which means “Let the welfare of the people be the supreme law.” When this state was founded so many years ago, the people envisioned a state that would do right by all its inhabitants, to put the welfare of the people above all else. As one obtaining a master’s degree in social work, community welfare and promoting social justice and equal opportunity are at the core of my values. I empathize with the unfortunate

effects of poverty, homelessness and illiteracy; I act to help bring those who suffer from these plights despite not suffering from them myself. You may not suffer from the ramifications of discrimination based on gender identity or sexual orientation, but think of the pain and injustice that maybe a family member, a friend or member of your community might be suffering. As individuals we don’t have to experience the suffering to want to end suffering, but we can only do it as community. Think about this: Missouri was the 24th state of the Union as of 1821, and as of 2018 is one of the 29 states yet to join “the new union”; a new union that celebrates and protects the life, rights and freedoms of every human being

— despite their race, religion, age, gender identity, or sexual orientation — the very differences that make each person unique and every life of value. Help Missouri join the new union, to create a safer, more vibrant and accepting community for every person. Help make that American dream something that is attainable for all. Email and write to your state representatives, rally your coworkers and employer to be a part of the change; be the change you want to see. This isn’t just about gay rights, but human rights. For decades people, women, children and minorities have fought for their rights, civil rights. The fight isn’t over, so let’s fight together. Terrel White, 27, originally hails from Detroit and is a recent transplant to St. Louis.


A16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 11.08.2018

OBITUARIES

Balducci, Marie Claire - Kirkwood Becker, Michael Lee - St. Louis Blair, Lawrence H. "Larry" - St. Louis Blecha, Elizabeth Ann - St. Louis Burridge, Patricia Barnhart - St. Louis Duncan - see Stilwell Gruner, Laverne - Chesterfield Haefner, David Lee - St. Louis

Celebrations of Life

Hall, Karen Denise - Lexington, South Carolina Harris, Mildred "Millie" - Wentzville Klutho, Roy - St. Louis Lakin (Soete), Virginia "Gina" S. - St. Louis Levine, Robert Dennis - St. Louis Maloney - see Stilwell McDonough, Lisa Ann - St. Louis Nebel, John - Beaufort, MO

Hall, Karen Denise

Karen Denise Hall (nee Baker) passed away on Oct. 24, 2018 at her home in Lexington, SC. She was born Sept. 22, 1965 in St. Louis, MO. She was preceded in death by her parents, Noel and Elsie Baker, sisters, Janet Hamilton and Linda Davis. She is survived by her loving husband, Christopher Hall, son, Cameron Hall, daughter, Victoria Hall, granddaughter, Natalie Williamson (the true love of her life) and brother, David Baker. She loved the St. Louis Cardinals, the outdoors and roller skating. At 25, she followed her brother into taking the responsibility and honor of serving in the USAF. Karen obtained the rank of Staff Sergeant during her 10 years of service. She visited TX, Balducci, Marie Claire MD, CO, MS, OK, Korea, Japan, The Middle East, and finally 91, of Kirkwood, Missouri passed away peacefully on November ended up in SC. Karen met her husband while serving as a jour6, 2018. She was born in St. Louis on July 20, 1927 to the late nalist in the Public Affairs office in CO. Karen would separate Lambert "Albert" and Marie (Clervi) Balducci. She was preceded from the USAF while living in SC, and was a Marketing Flow Coin death by her brother, Lambert Balducci (Kathy) of Port ordinator for a forensics engineering firm. Karen was diagnosed Angeles, Washington, and her daughter Margaret "Peggy" with breast cancer on Dec.15, 2015. Karen showed poise and (Forrest) King. Marie is the dear mother of Richard (Linda) grace while fighting with all of her being against the cancer that Jones and Patrick (Nancy) Jones. Marie is also survived by her would ultimately take her away from the family she loved. granddaughters: Haley Jones Houston (Keith), Jamie Jones and Recently, she started to lose the battle against the aggressive Jordan Jones and great-granddaughter, Addison, as well as disease. Karen was in the care of her loving family and hospice nieces and nephews: Richard, Melissa, Stephanie, Christopher, services at the time of her passing. Karen will be missed by Anthony and their families. Marie remained deeply connected everyone who loved her. to the King family, her late daughter's in-laws, and their children and their families. Marie proudly attended Nerinx Hall and Webster College. She Services: The cremains of Karen D. Hall will be placed in the had a varied career in the business world finally retiring from "Columbarium" at the Jefferson Barracks Veteran Cemetery in the St. Louis Post Dispatch as a reference librarian. Marie loved St. Louis, MO on Friday the 9th of November 2018 at 2p.m. music and was a lifetime accomplished pianist. She was a longtime MUNY season ticket holder. She hosted wonderful parties at her Kirkwood home for family, friends, and neighbors. Harris, Mildred "Millie" Services: Visitation this Saturday, November 10, 2018 be96, of Wentzville, November 6, 2018. Visitation Friday, Novemginning at 10 a.m. and followed by a memorial service at 11 ber 9, 4-8 p.m., Pitman Funeral Home, 1545 Wentzville, Pkwy., a.m., at Bopp Chapel, 10610 Manchester Road in Kirkwood. Wentzville. Service private. www.pitmanfuneralhome.com Boppchapel.com

Becker, Michael Lee

Age 69, on Tuesday, November 6, 2018. Beloved husband of Debbie Becker; father of Jennifer Becker Ringer (Aaron), Steven Bancroft, Kelly Sim (Jason), Gregory Winter (Abby) and the late Benjamin Becker and the late Michael Lee Becker II; grandfather of Evann Ringer, Megan, Faith and Katie Bancroft, August and Jameson Winter, and Josephine Sim; dear colleague and friend. Michael retired from Barnwell Middle School. Services: Memorial Visitation 1 p.m. until service time at 5 p.m., Saturday, November 10 at AMBRUSTER Chapel, 6633 Clayton Rd. 63117. Interment private. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations to Heifer International or St. Louis Crisis Nursery.

Blair, Lawrence H. "Larry"

died Tuesday, November 6, 2018. Loving husband of Janet Blair; loving father of Phyllis (Mike) Salvaggio; loving grandfather of Ashley Marek; dear brother, uncle and friend to many. Services: Memorial service will be held on Friday, November 9, 2018 at 9:30 a.m. at Bethel United Methodist Church at. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations can be made to Bethel United Methodist Church. Cremation services handled by Cremation Society of St. Louis.

Blecha, Elizabeth Ann

Tuesday, November 6, 2018. Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON, 10151 Gravois Rd., Tuesday, November 13, 12 noon. Interment J.B. National. Visitation Monday, 4-8 p.m.

Klutho, Roy

HELEN KELLER

Rauth, Joseph R. - New Haven, MO Schneiderman, Darryl Ray - Studio City, CA Stilwell, Jimmy Elvis - St. Louis Trammell, Carol LeMoine - Willis, TX Wark, Frederick - Ballwin Werkmann, Emma Jean - St. Louis

Schneiderman, Darryl Ray

November 1, 2018 in Studio City, CA. Born in St.Louis, MO. Beloved son of Joyce and the late Stanley Schneiderman; dearest brother of Shari, Dr. Lowell (Judi), Dr. Jeffrey, and Jacqueline Schneiderman; adored nephew of Barbara Lancaster, Ellen and the late Ben Schneiderman, the late John Nevins, and the late Albert Schneiderman; dear grandson of the late Jacob and Adele Kelman, and the late Jake and Jeanette Schneiderman. Darryl earned a B.A. in Fine Arts from the University of Missouri-Columbia. He was a Digital Cinema Mastering Operator a t D e l u x e Tech n icol or D igit a l Cin ema . D a r r y l w a s a compassionate person who loved family, nature, animals, and the arts. He had a keen wit and enjoyed writing, drawing, photography, and filmmaking. He will always be in our hearts. Services: Graveside service Friday, November 9, 1:00 p.m. at Chevra Kadisha Cemetery, 1601 North and South Road. Contributions in his memory may be made to the Jewish National Fund (JNF), 1-800-542-8733 or to the charity of your choice. A RINDSKOPF-ROTH SERVICE

Stilwell, Jimmy Elvis

November 5, 2018. Beloved husband of the late Kathleen Stilwell (nee Maloney). Dear father of Adam Stilwell. Loving brother of Steve (Dania) Stilwell. Dear son of the late Albert E. and Remona (nee Duncan) Stilwell. Our dear nephew, brotherin-law, uncle, cousin and friend. Services: Memorial Service 12:00 p.m. Saturday, November 10, 2018 in the Chapel of Ortmann-Stipanovich Funeral Home, 12444 Olive Blvd., Creve Coeur, MO 63141. Visitation 10 a.m., until time of service at noon. Arrangements by Kevin and Ellen O'Sullivan. Ortmann Stipanovich Funeral Home osfuneralhomes.com

Trammell, Carol LeMoine

Carol LeMoine Trammell succumbed to brain cancer on Baptized into into the Hope of Christ's Resurrection on November 2, 2018, in her home Tuesday, November 6, 2018, at age 96. Loving father in Willis, Texas, holding her of Janet Klutho, James (Carol) Klutho, Joe (Toni) granddaughter's hands. She was Klutho, and Bill (Nikki) Klutho; loving grandfather of Will (Paula) a longtime resident of St. Louis Klutho, James Klutho, Adrienne (Jon) Farrow, and Anna Klutho; before moving to Texas in 2005. loving great-grandfather to Chelsea Klutho, Max Klutho, Lucy Services entrusted to Klutho, and Evelyn Farrow. www.conroefuneraldirectors.org. He was preceded in death by his beloved wife Eugenie "Shaney" Klutho; his parents Clara and Eugene Klutho; his grandson Daniel Klutho; and his daughter-in-law Jeanette Modrick. Roy was a devoted husband and father, a devout Catholic, and a self-described "golf nut." Services: Visitation at the ORTMANN STIPANOVICH Funeral Home, 12444 Olive Blvd., Creve Coeur, Fri., Nov. 9, 4-8 p.m. Funeral Mass at Mother of Good Counsel Home, 6825 Natural Wark, Frederick Bridge Rd., St. Louis, on Sat., Nov. 10 at 9:30 a.m. Born 12/27/1952 in Little Falls, New Jersey. His fight against Ortmann Stipanovich Funeral Home osfuneralhomes.com cancer ended on 11/4/2018 in Ballwin, MO. Services: A Memorial Gathering/Celebration of Life will be held 2 p.m. - 5 p.m. on Saturday, 11/10/2018 at the OrtmannLakin (Soete), Virginia "Gina" S. Stipanovich Funeral Home, 12444 Olive Blvd, St Louis, MO passed away on November 3, 2018. 63141. Memorial Donations can be made to Lafayette Industries, Services: Visitation Thursday, November 8th from 4-8 179 Gaywood Dr, St Louis, MO 63021, https://www.givedirect.p.m. at Hoffmeister Colonial Mortuary. Funeral Mass org/donate/?cid=12138 Friday, please see www.hoffmeistercolonial.com for Ortmann Stipanovich Funeral Home osfuneralhomes.com details

Levine, Robert Dennis

November 5, 2018. Beloved husband of Myra Levine; dear father and father-in-law of Lisa, Michael (Licia Terranova) and Scott (Margaretta Mendenhall) Levine and Paula McMaster; dear grandfather of Isabel, Gabrielle, Charles and Eliana Levine; dear Burridge, Patricia Barnhart brother and brother-in-law of Arthur (Marilyn) and the late passed away on Wednesday, Richard (Joanne) Levine; dear brother-in-law of Sondra (Ira) October 31, 2018, at the age of Gash; our dear uncle, cousin and friend. 87. Wife of the late Robert G. Services: Funeral service Friday, November 9, 12:00 p.m. at " L a l " B u r r i d g e ; m o t h e r o f Central Reform Congregation, 5020 Waterman at Kingshighway. Matthew G. S. Burridge (Christine I n t e r m e n t N e w M t . S i n a i C e m e t e r y . P l e a s e v i s i t Leifield Burridge); grandmother bergermemorialchapel.com for more information. of Patrick and Timothy Burridge. BERGER MEMORIAL SERVICE Pat graduated from Washington University in 1952, where she McDonough, Lisa Ann was elected to several honorary societies including Mortar Board. Peacefully at rest with family present on Tuesday, November Her teaching career included 6th, 2018. Lisa Ann McMillan McDonough, age 59, wife of Rich s e v e r a l y e a r s a t R e e d a n d McDonough, daughter of the late Frances and Charles McMillan, Central Schools in the Ladue sister of Paul McMillan (Kathleen), daughter-in-law of Sally School Systems, an English teacher at the old Deaconess McDonough, and Ruth and Rich McDonough. Sister-in-law of Hospital School of Nursing, faculty member of the Graduate Maureen Menendez (Steve), and Chuck McDonough (Michelle). School of Education at Washington University and The Forsyth Loving aunt, cousin, and dear friend. Services: A celebration of life is being scheduled at Jay B. Smith School. Her volunteer activities included the Missouri Historical Funeral Home in M a p l ew ood , MO. Please refer to Society, Arts and Education Council, Women's Division of the St. www.jaybsmith.com for the Funeral Service date and time. Louis Symphony Society where she co-chaired the Admiral Boat In lieu of flowers, contributions can be made to the Party Fundraiser and the Benefit Cardinal Baseball game. She American Cancer Society - Hope Lodge, St. Louis. was a docent for the Ephraim Wisconsin Foundation, where she and her family vacationed for many years. Nebel, John Services: A Memorial Service will be conducted at the Episcopal 75, Beaufort, MO 11/05/18. Funeral Service 11/10, 11:00 a.m. at Church of St. Michael and St. George, 6345 Wyd ow n at St. Gerald Catholic Church, Gerald. Burial Sts. Peter & Paul Cem. Ellenwood, Clayton, MO on Saturday, November 10, at 3:30 p.m. St. Louis. Arrangements Gottenstroeter Funeral Home in Gerald. The family will greet friends after the service in the Great Hall of the Church. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Delta Gamma Rauth, Joseph R. Center for Children with Visual Impairments, 1750 S. Big 83, of New Haven, Missouri, passed away Monday, November 5, B en d Rd . , Rich mon d Heights, M O 63117 or to the 2018 at Mercy Rehabilitation Hospital, Chesterfield, Missouri. Wednesday Club of St. Louis. Joseph was born in York, Nebraska on July 1, 1935 to Aaron & A SERVICE OF Theresa (Stander) Rauth. He is survived by Carol A. (Essner) THE LUPTON CHAPEL Rauth, his wife of 46 years, and their three children: Cindy Rauth & husband Tiho Buncic, Steve Rauth & wife Elizabeth (Genthe), and Chris Rauth; by three siblings, Sr. Vanna Rauth, Gruner, Laverne R e v . P h il l ip R a u t h , a n d H e r m a n R a u t h , a n d b y five 87, November 7, 2018. Funeral service at Schrader grandchildren: Gabriel, Maya, William, James and John Paul. Funeral Home, Ballwin, Saturday, 11:30 am. Visitation For over 60 years, Joe was a cabinet maker - remodeling 9:30-11:30 a.m. For more info see Schrader.com homes, creating furniture, and working with wood. He owned a successful home remodeling business in St. Louis for almost 25 years, J.R. Rauth Company. Haefner, David Lee Services: Visitation will be held Friday, November 9th from 66, passed away Nov. 6, 2018. Services: Funeral Nov. 8th 10:00 to 11:00 a.m. at Assumption Church, New Haven, where 11:00 a.m. at John L. Ziegenhein & Sons Funeral Home-South funeral services will follow at 11:00 a.m. with Father Dan Mosley County. Visit. 10-11 a.m. officiating. Memorials may be given to New Haven Senior Center or Assumption Cemetery. C/O Toedtmann & Grosse Funeral Home. “What we have once enjoyed, we can never lose. All that we love deeply becomes part of us.”

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

“There is no remedy for love but to love more.” HENRY DAVID THOREAU

Werkmann, Emma Jean

(nee Miller), age 90, of St. Louis, MO passed away peacefully at 7:00 a.m. on Saturday November 3, 2018. Emma Jean grew up in Soulard. As a young mother many Saturdays were spent at Soulard Market, Cherokee Street and visiting the family on Lami Street. After raising her children, E mma was a Nurse at Veterans Hospital in Jefferson Barracks for 23 years. Emma was an avid reader, loved to shop and was devoted to her grandchildren. Loving Mother, Grandmother, Great-Grandma, Greatgreat-Grandma, we love you. Many thanks to all at Mary Queen and Mother for their care and support.

Fraternal Notices Please be advised of the death of William Kiefer Passed away 10/27/18 Richard Kendall Passed away 10/24/18 Rest In Peace.

InMemorials Memoriam In Memory Of

Susan Fouke Pettus December 15, 1943 ~ November 8, 2013 "Each of the beings necessary to our existence who disappears takes away with them a whole world of feelings that no other relationship can revive." --Eugene Delacroix

Your Loving Family and Friends

Florists Dierbergs Florist

Order 24 Hours 314-692-2000 or 800-844-6007 Dierbergs.com

Schnucks Florist 65 Metro Locations 314-997-2444; 800-286-9557

SIGN THE ONLINE GUEST BOOK AND SEND YOUR CONDOLENCES

STLtoday.com/obits


NATION

11.08.2018 • Thursday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • A17

Jury is seated for accused Mexican drug lord’s trial El Chapo needs OK to hug his wife amid fears he will pass message to cohorts BY TOM HAYS associated Press

NEW YORK • Jury selection at the U.S.

trial for accused Mexican drug lord Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman was completed Wednesday with Guzman waiting for word on whether he can hug his wife for the first time in nearly two years. A jury of seven women and five men are to hear opening statements Tuesday in the drug-conspiracy case against Guzman in federal court in Brooklyn. Guzman has pleaded not guilty to charges accusing him of overseeing a

Girl Scouts sue Boy Scouts over program’s name change

DIGEST Former zookeeper, politician is accused of killing tigers

drug cartel known for violence and for an initial screening that they had heard of Guzman through news reports or TV breaking him out of Mexican jails. The notoriety has prompted security shows. They include a man and a woman measures that include keeping the ju- who said they were fluent in Spanish and rors anonymous. Guzman also has been a man who’s a retired corrections officer. The judge put off swearing in held in solitary confinement and the jurors until next week out of barred from seeing his wife out of concern some still might try to concern he could pass messages to duck duty for a trial expected to his cohorts. last into next year. He told lawEarlier this week, a defense lawyers that one of the jurors, after yer asked U.S. District Judge Brian learning she was picked, wept Cogan to grant a “humanitarian while privately telling him she was gesture” of letting Guzman greet Joaquin afraid of the unwanted attention his wife in the courtroom before “El Chapo” she would get if it was found out the jury enters. Guzman she was on the panel. Allowing “an embrace with the The woman was kept on after defense railing between them would not pose a threat to security,” the letter read. The judge attorney Jeffrey Lichtman argued that dismissing her would set the precedent didn’t immediately rule on the request. Most of the people picked either for the that jurors could get out service “with a jury or to serve as six alternates said in few tears.”

Task force wants boat tours of endangered orcas halted

BY TOM MCELROY associated Press

NEW YORK • The Girl Scouts of the United States of America filed a trademark infringement lawsuit Tuesday against the Boy Scouts of America for dropping the word “boy” from its flagship program in an effort to attract girls. In the complaint filed in Manhattan federal court, the Girls Scouts claim the program “does not have a right under either federal or New York law to use terms like scouts or scouting by themselves in connection with services offered to girls, or to rebrand itself as ‘the Scouts.’” “Such misconduct will not only cause confusion among the public, damage the goodwill of GSUSA’s Girl Scouts trademarks, and erode its core brand identity, but it will also marginalize the Girl Scouts movement by causing the public to believe that GSUSA’s extraordinarily successful services are not true or official ‘Scouting’ programs, but niche services with limited utility and appeal,” the complaint said. The Girl Scouts is among a number of major youth organizations in the nation seeing declines in membership in recent years due to competition from sports leagues and busy family schedules. The organization argued that only it has “the right to use the Girl Scouts and Scouts trademark with leadership development services for girls.” In a statement, the Boy Scouts said it was reviewing the lawsuit “carefully.” “We applaud every organization that builds character and leadership in children, including the Girl Scouts of the USA, and believe that there is an opportunity for both organizations to serve girls and boys in our communities,” the statement said. In May, the Boy Scouts — the program for 11- to 17-year-olds — announced it would change its name to Scouts BSA in February. The parent organization will remain the Boy Scouts of America, and the Cub Scouts — its program serving children from kindergarten through fifth grade — will keep its title, as well. The organization already has started admitting girls into the Cub Scouts, and Scouts BSA begins accepting girls next year. The Girls Scouts claim the group has already been damaged by the name change announcement, saying that “throughout the country, families, schools and communities have been told that GSUSA and BSA have merged, or even that GSUSA no longer exists.” “Parents interested in signing up for Girl Scouts programs have instead mistakenly signed up for the new girls’ programs offered by BSA,” the complaint said. The lawsuit seeks an injunction against trademark breaches and monetary damages.

A former Oklahoma zookeeper and candidate for governor already accused in a murderfor-hire plot has been indicted on 19 new counts accusing him of killing tigers and selling tiger cubs. A federal grand jury unsealed the charges Wednesday against Joseph MaldonadoPassage, 55, who’s known as “Joe Exotic” and formerly operated a zoo in Wynnewood, Okla. He ran unsuccessfully for Oklahoma governor this year. Maldonado-Passage was indicted in September for allegedly trying to hire someone to kill the operator of a Florida-based animal sanctuary. He has pleaded not guilty. Joseph The new charges accuse Maldonadohim of killing five tigers in Passage October 2017 and selling and offering to sell tiger cubs in violation of the Endangered Species Act. Texas judge releases juvenile defendants after election loss • A day after losing his re-election bid, a Texas judge released nearly all of the juvenile defendants who appeared before him after asking them whether they intended to kill anyone. Harris County prosecutors expressed concern after Judge Glenn Devlin, a Republican, made the decision Wednesday in Houston. The juveniles face charges ranging from misdemeanors to violent crimes. The Houston Chronicle reported that Devlin rescheduled the cases for the first week in January, after the Democrat who beat him during Tuesday’s election takes the bench. Officials said at least seven defendants were released. Death penalty will be sought in N.C. trooper’s death • Prosecutors say they’ll seek the death penalty for one of two men charged in the fatal shooting of a North Carolina Highway Patrol trooper during a traffic stop last month. The Columbus County district attorney’s office said in a statement that a grand jury indicted Chauncey Askew, 18, on a firstdegree murder charge Wednesday in the shooting death of Trooper Kevin Conner. District Attorney Jon David said his office intends to seek the death penalty. Authorities say Conner was shot early Oct. 17 after stopping a pickup on a rural highway. Raheem Cole Dashanell Davis, 20, was arrested hours after the shooting and charged with first-degree murder. Askew was arrested days later in South Carolina.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

An orca leaps out of the water near a whale-watching boat in the Salish Sea in the San Juan Islands, Wash., in 2015. Washington state is considering a series of proposals to help save the dwindling population of the endangered whales.

Washington state could impose proposals meant to help save population BY PHUONG LE associated Press

SEATTLE • A Washington state task

force on critically endangered Northwest orcas wants to temporarily suspend whale-watching boat tours focused on those whales, one of three dozen recommendations to save a population that is at its lowest point in more than 30 years. The group advising Gov. Jay Inslee voted Tuesday to recommend a threeto five-year moratorium on viewing southern resident killer whales by all boats in Puget Sound. Disturbances and noise from boats can interfere with the whale’s ability to find food or communicate, and supporters said it would protect the whales. Critics said that it didn’t address the larger issue of dwindling food supply and that it would be devastating for the industry. The proposed moratorium would not apply to boats viewing other whales in the region, including gray or transient whales. The endangered orcas struggle from pollution, boat noise and lack of chinook salmon, which have been declining because of dams, habitat loss and overfishing. The task force plans to forward its recommendations to the governor next week. He’ll consider the ideas as he proposes a budget and potential legislation that will also go before the Legislature.

Among the more contentious ideas, the task force is recommending that the state set up a stakeholder process to address issues related to the potential breaching or removal of the four Snake River dams in eastern Washington. Some argue the best way to get more salmon to the starving whales is to tear down four dams on the lower Snake River, a tributary of the Columbia River, to help migrating fish. Critics say doing so would hurt the livelihood of many who depend on those dams for navigation, recreation and hydropower. The group also recommended spilling more water over Columbia and Snake river dams when juvenile salmon are migrating so they can avoid harm going through the turbines. Other recommendations include supporting legislation before Congress that would make it easier for Washington, Idaho, Oregon and Native American tribes to kill more sea lions and seals in the lower Columbia River. Additional proposals being forwarded: establish an emergency rescue tug to respond to potential oil spills off San Juan Island; protect habitat for chinook salmon and the smaller forage fish that they eat; and boost production of hatchery chinook salmon preferred by the orcas. Brian Goodremont, representing the Pacific Whale Watch Association, told others on the task force Tuesday that a moratorium on watching the endangered orcas would be devastating financially to the industry, cost jobs and hurt many people. “Talking about prohibitions is the nuclear option for us,” he said.

Power fully restored to areas hit by Hurricane Michael • Utilities are reporting that all power has been restored in the Florida counties devastated by Hurricane Michael. The utility companies and cooperatives reported Tuesday to the Public Service Commission that they had zero outages for the first time since the Category 4 hurricane made landfall almost a month ago. Michael slammed into Florida’s Panhandle with 155 mph wind on Oct. 10. More than 380,000 homes and businesses lost power in Florida in the days after the storm. Anti-abortion activist who shot Kansas doctor freed • An anti-abortion activist who shot and wounded Kansas abortion doctor George Tiller in 1993 and committed clinic attacks in several states has been released from prison in Oregon. The U.S. Bureau of Prisons on Wednesday confirmed the release of Rachelle “Shelley” Shannon, 62. The bureau says she’ll be on supervised release for three years. Shannon received 11 years for shooting Tiller, who was fatally shot in Wichita in 2009 by another anti-abortion extremist, Scott Roeder, who visited Shannon several times in prison. The Kansas City Star reported Shannon had been staying at a halfway house in Portland, Ore., since May. Probation for man who smashed Trump’s star • A man who smashed Donald Trump’s star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame has been sentenced to three years’ probation after pleading no contest to a felony count of vandalism. City News Service reports a judge also sentenced Austin Mikel Clay on Wednesday to attend counseling and pay more than $9,400 to the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce. He must also perform community service. Clay took an ax to Trump’s star on Hollywood Boulevard in July. The star is for Trump’s work on TV show “The Apprentice. From news services

“A great soul serves everyone all the time. A great soul never dies. It brings us together again and again.” MAYA ANGELOU

Beautiful Memorials

SEND FLOWERS AND GIFTS, OR CREATE A MEMORIAL WEBSITE

SIGN THE ONLINE GUEST BOOK AND

SEND YOUR CONDOLENCES

At Schnucks Florist & Gifts, our experienced staff of floral designers is dedicated to the highest level of personal service.

Order 24 Hours schnucksfloral.com (314) 997-2444 or (800) 286-9557

STLtoday.com/obits

STLtoday.com/obits


WORLD

A18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 11.08.2018

KEEP UP WITH CRIME

Custom Closets • Garage Cabinets • Home Offices • Pantries • Laundries • and Hobby Rooms

SPECIAL FINANCING for 18 Months!

Bedroom Closet

With approved credit. Call or ask your Designer for details. Not available in all areas.

40% Off

Plus

Free Installation

+ Free Gift with Purchase

40% off any order of $1000 or more. 30% off any order of $700 or more. On any complete Closet, Garage or Home Office. Take an additional 15% off for on any complete system order. Not valid with any other offer. Free installation with any complete unit order of $500 or more. With incoming order, at time of purchase only. Expires 11/30/18

Home Office

Walk in Closet

Call for a free in home design consultation and estimate

314-230-8143

vls

www.closetsbydesign.com Follow us

Walk In Showers AFTer

before

• St. Louis Local • Veteran Owned - VA Certified

$500 OFF ShOWerS - nOvember Only

314-758-0594•618-857-3458

Credit Cards Accepted Licensed and Insured (GCL/WC)

Imagine your home, totally organized!

2018 © All Rights Reserved. Closets by Design, Inc.

Use our St. Louis Crime Tracker to compare neighborhoods, look at incident maps and check per-capita crime rates. stltoday.com/crimetracker

DIGEST Pakistani Christian woman moved to capital

A Christian woman acquitted by Pakistan’s Supreme Court eight years after being sentenced to death for blasphemy was flown Wednesday night to a facility in the capital, Islamabad, from an undisclosed location for security reasons, two senior government officials said. Officials said Asia Bibi would be safer at the new facility in Islamabad. Bibi’s transfer comes a week after the high court in a landmark ruling acquitted Bibi and ordered her released, a move that triggered nationwide protests. Bibi’s release was put on hold Friday after authorities held talks with radical Islamists who want her publicly hanged. Colombian police recover load of smuggled frogs • Police in Colombia’s capital have recovered 216 poisonous frogs from an airport restroom. Authorities say smugglers planned to illegally send them for sale in Germany. Authorities announced Wednesday they’d found the frogs hidden in small film containers that were buried in a bag filled with clothes. The rescued amphibians include endangered species such as the dark orange and black Lehmann’s poison frog. The creatures can fetch $2,000 each on the illegal wildlife market. Investigators believe the amphibians were moved by land but have not determined who is responsible. Canada apologizes for turning away Nazi-era ship of Jews • Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau formally apologized Wednesday on behalf of his nation for turning away a ship full of Jewish refugees trying to flee Nazi Germany in 1939. The German merchant ship St. Louis was carrying 907 German Jews fleeing Nazi persecution. It also had been rejected by Cuba and the United States. The passengers were forced to return to Europe, and more than 250 died in the Holocaust. Trudeau called the apology long overdue. Hitler “watched on as we refused their visas, ignored their letters and denied them entry,” Trudeau said in Parliament. Kidnapped students freed in Cameroon • The 79 students kidnapped by unidentified gunmen from a school in Cameroon have been released, but two of the three staff members abducted with them are still being held, a church official said Wednesday. The students, ages 11 to 17, were brought to a church near the regional capital of Bamenda, said Fonki Samuel Forba, moderator of the country’s Presbyterian Church. The students were abducted Sunday night in a part of Cameroon that is beset by violence and instability by armed separatists who want to create a breakaway state called Ambazonia. U.N. vows to tackle Congo rebels, contain Ebola • The head of United Nations peacekeeping operations vowed Wednesday to do more with Congo’s government to help improve security in the country’s east, where frequent attacks by rebels are undermining efforts to contain an Ebola outbreak that has killed more than 150 people. Jean-Pierre Lacroix said the U.N. “will do our best to contain the Ebola outbreak despite the security environment that is being degraded by armed groups.” Lacroix singled out the Allied Democratic Forces rebels. The group has killed more than 1,000 people in Beni and the surrounding region since October 2014. The ministry of health has said teams responding to the Ebola outbreak are attacked three or four times a week on average. From news services

There are many ways to

create your legacy — here’s one.— We invite you to join those who have created their personal legacy with a charitable gift annuity.

Single-Life Gift Annuity Rates* NEW RATES!

10.5%

10%

9.3% 8.3%

8% 6%

6.35%

7.2%

CONTACT US to learn more about tax benefits while helping our precious patients with your gift. SSM Health Cardinal Glennon Children’s Foundation Rose Brower, Director of Planned Giving 3800 Park Ave., St. Louis, MO 63110 Toll free: 1-800-269-0552 or 314-577-5605

5.6%

Age 65

70

75

80

85

90+

* Annuity rate and charitable deduction depend on your age at time of the gift. Rates subject to change.

The best gifts under the sun

for America’s only free-standing Catholic children’s hospital. Return tear-off for more information

Address _____________________________________________________ City___________________________ State/Zip _____________________ Phone ______________________________________________________ Email _______________________________________________________ PLEASE RETURN TO:

1-800-269-0552

! I have been impacted by the exceptional care provided by SSM Health Cardinal Glennon Children’s Hospital. ! I would like more information on how to make a gift today and/or after my lifetime to help children in need. ! If you already have included SSM Health Cardinal Glennon Children’s Foundation in your will or trust thank you! We want to acknowledge you if we haven’t already done so.

SSM Health Cardinal Glennon Children’s Foundation, 3800 Park Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63110

2018POST

Name ______________________________________________________

glennon.org


MICDS LEGEND RON HOLTMAN LEFT AN UNMATCHED LEGACY OBITUARY • PAGE B11

THURSDAY • 11.08.2018 • B

Boras talks up ‘global’ Harper

CARRYING THE LOAD

Agent calls him ‘an owner’s dream’ in prime of career

O’Reilly is giving Blues everything they had hoped to get and more

BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BY TOM TIMMERMANN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CARLSBAD, CALIF. • Once he had snapped off a few opening one-liners about Toronto’s “blue flu,” Minnesota fans going to games where “only one of the Twins show up,” and Marlins crowds putting “the MIA to Miami,” superagent Scott Boras got to the point in his program when, with a ringmaster’s grin, he introduced the main attraction. “Certainly Harper’s bazaar has begun,” he said. In a 65-minute chat with members of the media at baseball’s general manager meetings, Boras outlined his concerns about the game’s tanking culture and its miserly, uncompetitive teams. He also offered the first public glimpses of the case he’s making for his client, former MVP Bryce Harper, as interested teams line up for what is expected to end with the largest free-agent contract in baseball history. At least some teams are spending. The Cardinals’ front office has heard at least part of Boras’ presentation on Harper after meeting with the agent this week, in person, at the resort hosting the meetings. Other discussions are inevitable. The Cardinals have interest in multiple Boras clients, and they were described Wednesday by someone familiar with those talks as “a factor” in the courtship of the young slugger, in this Harper’s bazaar. The 26-year-old outfielder is intrigued by overtures from the Cardinals, multiple sources confirmed, and another source referred to the Cardinals as “in a better position than maybe they realize.”

Hockey nicknames are famously uninventive. Alex Pietrangelo becomes Petro, Vince Dunn is Dunner, and Jaden Schwartz is Schwartzie. Blues center Ryan O’Reilly invites variety. “I’ve gotten Riles before,” he said. “O’Ry. I’ve got a bunch. I get Factor, from the old Bill O’Reilly show. Not Rhino. Nobody calls me that, but I’ve heard it before.” For the Blues right now, you can call O’Reilly indispensable. Not a whole lot has gone right for the Blues in the early stages of the season, but the play of O’Reilly has been the unquestioned high point. He leads the team in scoring with seven goals and 12 assists for 19 points in 13 games, and currently has points in eight consecutive games, during which he has seven goals and eight assists. In four of the past seven games, he’s had two points or more and in three of them he’s had three, including Tuesday night’s hat trick. A factor indeed. O’Reilly went into Wednesday’s games tied for seventh in the league in points, and his point streak was the second-longest active streak. His hat trick was the first in his 10-season NHL career. See BLUES • Page B7 UP NEXT > 7 p.m. Friday vs. Sharks, FSM INSIDE > Johnson glad for his first win with Blues. B7

See CARDINALS • Page B6

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Sports agent Scott Boras has no shortage of adjectives when describing the effect Bryce Harper could have on a team.

Ryan O’Reilly skates after having his helmet knocked off during the third period Tuesday night.

> INSIDE: Rick Ankiel’s comeback bid runs into a delay. B6

ASSOCIATED PRESS

SLU women are rebuilding

MU has St. Louis connection

Talented recruits join two senior leaders

Tilmon, Smith should lead Tigers team

BY STU DURANDO St. Louis Post-Dispatch

As she set about restructuring her team for a new season, Lisa Stone leaned on two seniors and a group reading project outside of her own practices. Much of what the St. Louis University women’s basketball coach has known for four seasons is gone. What remains is a group that will try to build on the unprecedented accomplishments of recent years. That’s where guards Jordyn Frantz and Kerri McMahan and author Jon Gordon’s

“The Power of a Positive Team” come in. The players have brought contrasting approaches that elicit raves from their coach. The book was about helping a large influx of new talent to learn the principles of teamwork. “Kerri and Jordyn are playing like seniors on a mission,” Stone said. “They are two leaders in very different styles. Jordyn is going to take a player for a cup of coffee or ice cream if she needs to be picked up. Kerri is going to say, ‘Come on, See SLU • Page B5

Jordyn Frantz Senior, guard PPG: 8.2 RPG: 2.2

Kerri McMahan Senior, guard PPG: 4.4 RPG: 2.4

BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Jeremiah Tilmon wanted to make one thing clear before answering. “I mean, I’m from East St. Louis,” Missouri’s sophomore center said, emphasizing the importance of declaring which side of the Mississippi he will always represent. Got it? Good. Now, we can continue.

His answer, by the way, was yes. It does mean something to him that Tigers coach Cuonzo Martin’s rotation now heavily leans upon players who call the St. Louis area home. Tilmon, the Tigers’ catalyst now that knee surgery has sidelined Jontay Porter, was a no-doubt starter when the Tigers tipped off Tuesday against Central Arkansas. He was joined by Edwardsville native and sophomore guard Mark Smith, who went from expecting to sit out this

Mizzou basketball up next: 6 p.m. Friday at Iowa State INSIDE

Illinois hoops preview: Eight new players as Illini open against Evansville. B4

See FREDERICKSON • B4

SPORTS

1 M


SPORTS

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Friday 11/9 vs. Sharks 7 p.m. FSM

Sunday 11/11 vs. Wild 2 p.m. FSM

Wednesday 11/14 at Blackhawks 7 p.m. NBCSN

Friday 11/16 at Golden Knights 9 p.m. FSM

St. Louis U. • slubillikens.com | 314-977-4758 Men’s basketball Saturday 11/10 vs. Troy 7 p.m. FSM

Women’s basketball Tuesday 11/13 vs. No. Alabama 7 p.m. FSM

Friday 11/9 at Eastern Kentucky 11 a.m.

Tuesday 11/13 vs. Indiana State 4:30 p.m.

Football Saturday 11/10 vs. Vanderbilt 11 a.m. SEC Network

Saturday 11/17 at Tennessee 2:30 p.m. KMOV (4)

M. basketball

W. basketball

Friday 11/9 at Iowa State 6 p.m.

Tuesday 11/13 vs. Missouri State 7 p.m.

Illinois • fightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Football Saturday 11/10 at Nebraska 11 a.m. Big Ten Network

Men’s basketball Thursday 11/8 Saturday 11/17 vs. Evansville vs. Iowa 7 p.m. 11 a.m. or 2:30 p.m., TV TBA

Tuesday 11/13 vs. Georgetown 7:30 p.m. FS1

SIUE • siuecougars.com | 855-748-3849 Men’s basketball Saturday 11/10 vs. Winthrop 7 p.m.

NFL NOTEBOOK

Bryant heads to Saints Former Cowboys receiver provides Brees another target FROM NEWS SERVICES

Mizzou • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297

Women’s basketball Wednesday 11/21 Sunday 11/11 vs. Illinois State at Valparaiso 2 p.m. 7 p.m.

Wednesday 11/14 at Evansville 6 p.m.

OTHER EVENTS FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

ON THE AIR BASEBALL 5 p.m. MLB: Silver Slugger Awards, MLB Network 3:30 a.m. (Fri.) Japan All-Star Tour: MLB All-Stars vs. Japan, MLB Network BASKETBALL College: New Orleans at Northwestern, BTN 7 p.m. 7 p.m. College: Illinois vs. Evansville, KFNS (590 AM) 7 p.m. NBA: Rockets at Thunder, TNT 9:40 p.m. NBA: Bucks at Warriors, TNT BOXING 10 p.m. Junior middleweights: Neeco Macias vs. Jesus Soto Karass, ESPN2 FOOTBALL College: North Carolina Central at Bethune-Cookman, ESPNU 6 p.m. 6:30 p.m. College: Wake Forest at North Carolina State, ESPN 7:20 p.m. NFL: Panthers at Steelers, KTVI (2), NFL Network, WXOS (101.1 FM) GOLF Noon PGA: Mayakoba Golf Classic, first round, GOLF Champions: Charles Schwab Cup Championship, first round, GOLF 3 p.m. 10 p.m. LPGA: Blue Bay, third round, GOLF 2 a.m. (Fri.) European PGA: Nedbank Golf Challenge, second round, GOLF RODEO PBR: World finals, CBSSN 9 p.m. SOCCER Women’s exhibition: United States vs. Portugal, ESPN2 Noon USL Cup: Phoenix at Louisville, ESPN2 7 p.m. 9:30 p.m. MLS playoffs: Portland at Seattle, FS1 TENNIS USTA Women’s Pro Circuit: Las Vegas, Early round, Tennis Channel Noon USTA Women’s Pro Circuit: Las Vegas, Early round, Tennis Channel 7 p.m.

DIGEST FIFA threatens to ban key players from World Cup

Dez Bryant has found a new team, agreeing to join the already prolific offense of the surging New Orleans Saints. The former Dallas Cowboys wide receiver, who has been looking for an NFL home since becoming a free agent in April, will have a chance to catch passes from Drew Brees — one of the most prolific quarterbacks in NFL history. “There is certainly a skillset that he has that is going to be beneficial,” Brees said. “So I look forward to getting to work with him. ... I look forward to getting him involved in this offense and just become a complement to all the guys that we already have. He’ll be a great addition.” The Saints are averaging 34.9 points a game, trailing only the Rams (36.3) in the NFL. Bryant, 30, and the Saints agreed to contract terms on Wednesday, and it remains unclear to what extent he will play when New Orleans visits Cincinnati on Sunday. He spent his first eight years in the NFL with Dallas and last season caught 69 passes for 838 yards and six touchdowns, including a 50yard scoring play. However, his professional reputation has been marred at times

FAX 314-340-3070 E-MAIL soundoff@post-dispatch.com HOLE IN ONE Golf courses submit results to postsports@post-dispatch.com

MAIL Sports Sound Off St. Louis Post-Dispatch 900 North Tucker Boulevard St. Louis, MO 63101

CONTACT US

To e-mail editors, use first initial AND last name@post-dispatch.com For general information call 314-340-8222

Roger Hensley Cameron Hollway Don Reed Mike Smith Mike Reilly Chris Gove

Assistant Managing Editor | Sports Deputy Sports Editor Deputy Sports Editor | Nights Assistant Sports Editor | Online Assistant Sports Editor | Nights High School Sports

314-340-8301 314-340-8392 314-340-8313 314-340-8137 314-340-8178 314-744-5725

Elsewhere • Seahawks running back Chris Carson is dealing with a hip injury and could be sidelined Sunday, when the team faces the Rams. If Carson can’t play, Mike Davis probably will get the team’s bulk of the work at the position. • Darren Sproles returned to practice for the Eagles after missing seven games because of a hamstring injury and the veteran running back is expected to play Sunday night, against the Cowboys. • The Falcons made a move to bolster their lackluster pass rush by signing defensive end Bruce Irvin, who recently was cut by the Raiders. Atlanta is 27th in the league in sacks, with 17. • The Vikings claimed running back Ameer Abdullah off waivers from the Lions and waived tailback Roc Thomas.

EAST New England Miami NY Jets Buffalo SOUTH Houston Tennessee Jacksonville Indianapolis NORTH Pittsburgh Cincinnati Baltimore Cleveland WEST Kansas City LA Chargers Denver Oakland

GENEVA • It was Manchester’s night in the Champions League as United stunned Juventus with late goals and City routed Shakhtar Donetsk on Wednesday. Cristiano Ronaldo’s brilliant goal — a volley from a long pass that dropped into his path over his right shoulder — was set to give Juventus victory against his former club with minutes to play in Turin. But Man United hit back on Juan Mata’s free kick and a scrambled own-goal from a cross that bounced into the net off two defenders on the line for a 2-1 win. United boss Jose Mourinho, a former Inter Milan coach, taunted home fans after the final whistle by cupping his right hand to his ear, and was confronted by some Juve players. Mourinho is unpopular among Juventus fans after managing bitter rival Inter Milan for three years. “I came here to do my job and I was insulted for 90 minutes,” Mourinho said. “I wouldn’t do that gesture again but I don’t think I offended anyone and at the time it seemed like the appropriate response to those who had insulted all my family, apart from my Inter one too.” Man City’s 6-0 win over visiting Shakhtar will be remembered most for a comical penalty kick awarded for Raheem Sterling’s fall when kicking the turf in a failed attempt to shoot. He stubbed his left foot, untouched by a defender. “I just kicked the floor by accident,” Sterling said. “I didn’t mean to fall over, it was an absolute shambles from my behalf.” Their wins nicely set up a Manchester derby game in the Premier League on Sunday. Real Madrid, Bayern Munich and Roma also won yet no team joined Barcelona, which advanced to the knockout stage on Tuesday after

Must include name, address for verification. Letters may be edited for length and clarity.

Darnold is ailing • Jets quarterback Sam Darnold could be headed for the sideline this weekend, against the Bills, and maybe longer. He has a strained right foot, coach Todd Bowles announced.

Panthers, Steelers set to meet • Teams on the upswing meet Thursday night, when the Steelers entertain the Panthers. Carolina (6-2) has won three straight and five of six and is particularly strong running the ball, though Pittsburgh is stingy in that area on defense. The Steelers (52-1) have won four in a row and are favored by four points.

AMERICAN FOOTBALL CONFERENCE

World Cup schedule in 2022 could be tight • The 2022 World Cup must be played in just 28 days even if it is expanded to 48 teams, Infantino said, acknowledging that the compact schedule will make it even harder to push through his preferred vision of a bigger tournament. FIFA will decide in March whether to add 16 teams to its showcase tournament in 2022, but Infantino said the chances of an expansion are “certainly small” because of the scheduling issues — and the fact that host Qatar would need help from some neighboring countries to stage some games. A 48-team World Cup would entail playing 80 games in total, meaning up to six matches would have to be played on some days during the group stages to fit the 28-day schedule. Some knockout matches would have to be played simultaneously. FIFA has had to shorten the tournament by four days compared to this year’s World Cup, in Russia, because it will be played in November and December in order to avoid desert heat. European leagues, which are set to lose peak weeks from their 2022-23 season, insist they cannot compromise again by giving FIFA more days from their November schedule. (AP).

HOW TO SUBMIT A LETTER

Tannehill remains sidelined • Dolphins backup quarterback Brock Osweiler will start his fifth straight game in place of injured starter Ryan Tannehill when the team plays the Packers on Sunday. Tannehill continues to nurse an injury to his right shoulder and has not thrown a pass in the portion of Dolphins practice open to media in the last three weeks. The team hopes to have him back to start on Nov. 25, against the Colts. The NFL has fined the team $30,000 and coach Adam Gase $15,000 for an injury report violation a month ago involving Tannehill. The Dolphins listed him as participating fully in practice on the Thursday before their Week 6 game, against Chicago. But Tannehill was limited because of the shoulder injury and he hasn’t played since.

Bowles said it was too early to rule out Darnold for the game, and clarified that the injury was a strain — not a sprain, contrary to published reports. If Darnold can’t play Sunday, veteran Josh McCown will start.

NATIONAL FOOTBALL CONFERENCE

Thursday • Carolina at Pittsburgh, 7:20 p.m., KTVI-2, NFL Sunday Arizona at Kansas City, noon, KMOV-4 New Orleans at Cincinnati, noon, KTVI-2 Buffalo at NY Jets, noon

F1 to race in Vietnam • Formula One and Hanoi officials say a street race in the Vietnamese capital will be added to the F1 calendar starting with the 2020 season. (AP)

by public confrontations with coaches and teammates during games and practices. The Cowboys, seeking salarycap relief, released Bryant after last season with two years remaining on his five-year, $70 million contract. Last season was Bryant’s best since he caught 88 passes for 1,320 yards and 16 TDs in 2014.

EAST W L T Pct PF PA Home Away NFC AFC Div Washington 5 3 0 .625 160 172 3-2 2-1 5-2 0-1 2-0 2-2 2-2 2-3 2-1 1-0 Philadelphia 4 4 0 .500 178 156 3 5 0 .375 154 151 3-1 0-4 2-3 1-2 1-1 Dallas 1 7 0 .125 150 205 0-4 1-3 0-6 1-1 0-3 NY Giants W L T Pct PF PA Home Away NFC AFC Div SOUTH 3-1 4-0 5-1 2-0 1-1 New Orleans 7 1 0 .875 279 218 6 2 0 .750 220 180 5-0 1-2 4-2 2-0 1-1 Carolina 4 4 0 .500 228 226 3-2 1-2 4-2 0-2 2-1 Atlanta 3 5 0 .375 229 275 2-1 1-4 2-3 1-2 1-2 Tampa Bay W L T Pct PF PA Home Away NFC AFC Div NORTH Chicago 5 3 0 .625 235 153 3-1 2-2 3-1 2-2 0-1 5 3 1 .611 221 204 3-2 2-1-1 4-2-1 1-1 1-0-1 Minnesota Green Bay 3 4 1 .438 192 204 3-0-1 0-4 2-3-1 1-1 1-1-1 3 5 0 .375 180 210 2-2 1-3 1-4 2-1 1-1 Detroit W L T Pct PF PA Home Away NFC AFC Div WEST LA Rams 8 1 0 .889 299 200 4-0 4-1 5-1 3-0 3-0 4 4 0 .500 188 156 1-2 3-2 3-2 1-2 1-1 Seattle 2 6 0 .250 110 199 1-4 1-2 2-5 0-1 2-2 Arizona 2-2 0-5 1-5 1-2 0-3 San Francisco 2 7 0 .222 207 239

Soccer’s biggest names would be banned from the World Cup if they play in a breakaway European Super League, FIFA President Gianni Infantino said Wednesday. He said soccer’s governing body would punish players for clubs such as Barcelona, Manchester City and Bayern Munich if they leave to form a privately-owned league. “Either you are in or you are out,” Infantino said, listing the World Cup, European Championship and national leagues as competitions that players from breakaway teams could be excluded from. “This includes everything.” Talk of a long-threatened super league was revived Friday when German magazine Der Spiegel published confidential documents and emails from clubs and soccer bodies. Real Madrid was revealed to be working with consultants on a 16-team Super League to kick off in 2021 — effectively replacing the Champions League and outside the control of the Union of European Football Associations. The plan called for 11 storied clubs from Spain, England, Germany, Italy and France to get ownership stakes and risk-free Super League membership for 20 years, with five more clubs invited to play. The breakaway from soccer’s historic hierarchy — FIFA, the six continental bodies and 211 national federations — would allow FIFA to ban players from the 2022 World Cup in Qatar. (AP)

U.S. women win again in hockey tourney • Sydney Brodt scored with 1:38 left to break a 1-1 tie and send the United States to a 2-1 victory over Canada in the Four Nations Cup, in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. It was the first meeting between the women’s hockey powers since the Americans’ shootout victory in February in the Olympic final. Brodt scored when a rebound bounced off her and into the net. Both teams were coming off opening blowout victories Tuesday, the U.S. 5-1 over Finland, and Canada 6-1 over Sweden. Earlier Wednesday Finland beat Sweden 3-2. On Friday in the final round-robin games, the U.S. faces Sweden and Canada meets Finland. The top two advance to the final, on Saturday. The others will meet for third place. (AP)

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 11.08.2018

W 7 5 3 2 W 6 4 3 3 W 5 5 4 2 W 8 6 3 1

LT 20 40 60 70 LT 30 40 50 50 LT 2 1 30 50 6 1 LT 10 20 60 70

Detroit at Chicago, noon Jacksonville at Indianapolis, noon Washington at Tampa Bay, noon New England at Tennessee, noon Atlanta at Cleveland, noon LA Chargers at Oakland, 3:05 p.m.

Pct PF .778 270 .556 187 .333 198 .222 96 Pct PF .667 216 .500 134 .375 134 .375 231 Pct PF .688 227 .625 221 .444 213 .278 190 Pct PF .889 327 .750 220 .333 205 .125 141

PA 202 225 213 241 PA 184 141 170 213 PA 188 237 160 247 PA 226 180 213 252

Home 5-0 4-1 2-2 1-3 Home 3-1 2-1 2-3 1-2 Home 2-2 3-1 2-2 2-2-1 Home 4-0 3-1 2-3 1-3

Away 2-2 1-3 1-4 1-4 Away 3-2 2-3 1-2 2-3 Away 3-0-1 2-2 2-3 0-4 Away 4-1 3-1 1-3 0-4

AFC 5-1 4-3 2-4 1-5 AFC 5-2 2-4 2-3 2-4 AFC 3-2-1 3-2 4-3 2-4-1 AFC 7-1 4-1 1-5 1-4

NFC 2-1 1-1 1-2 1-2 NFC 1-1 2-0 1-2 1-1 NFC 2-0 2-1 0-2 0-2 NFC 1-0 2-1 2-1 0-3

Div 2-0 2-1 0-2 0-1 Div 2-1 2-0 0-2 0-1 Div 3-1-1 1-1 1-3 1-1-1 Div 3-0 1-1 1-2 0-2

Seattle at LA Rams, 3:25 p.m., KMOV-4 Miami at Green Bay, 3:25 p.m. Dallas at Philadelphia, 7:20 p.m., KSDK-5 Open: Minnesota, Denver, Baltimore, Houston Monday, Nov. 12 Giants at San Francisco, 7:15 p.m., ESPN

A banner night for Manchester United tops Juventus, City upends Shakhtar in Champions games ASSOCIATED PRESS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Manchester United’s Juan Mata celebrates after scoring in his team’s victory over Juventus in a Champions League match Wednesday night.

four rounds of group games. Three-time defending champion Madrid scored four times in the first half at Viktoria Plzen before ending a 5-0 winner for interim coach Santiago Solari. “It’s impossible to win 5-0 away in the Champions League and not play a great game,” said Solari, who hasn’t been ruled out as a candidate for the permanent job. “I’m very happy, but this was all about the players, it’s their merit.” Robert Lewandowski scored both Bayern’s goals in a routine 2-0 win over AEK Athens which has lost four straight. Juve still leads Group H by two points from Man United, and it is two more points back to Valencia which beat visiting Young Boys 3-1. United can advance by beating Young Boys at home on Nov. 27. Man City’s clinical six-goal win came with Gabriel Jesus sealed his hat trick in stoppage time. City moved three points ahead of Lyon in Group F after the French team wasted a two-goal lead in a 2-2 draw against Hoffenheim. The Germans were down to 10 men when Pavel Kaderabek levelled in stoppage time.

MADRID MOVES ON

Real Madrid and Roma won in eastern Europe to remain level on

points atop Group G. Madrid survived an early scare when Czech champion Viktoria Plzen hit the bar, but then scored four goals in a 20-minute span. Karim Benzema scored twice, and Casemiro and Gareth Bale also got goals. Toni Kroos scored in the second half for Madrid. It’s now three straight wins in all competitions for Madrid since coach Julen Lopetegui was fired and Solari took over. In an early kickoff, Roma won 2-1 at CSKA Moscow to move five points clear of the Russian team. Lorenzo Pellegrini scored the winning goal in the 59th, soon after CSKA had Iceland defender Hordur Magnusson sent off.

CLASSIC GROUP

The Group E table has a 1970s feel with Bayern Munich and Ajax looking good to advance. The teams each won a hat trick of European Cup titles from 1971-76. Bayern has a two-point lead over Ajax, which drew 1-1 at Benfica, and both could advance before they meet in Amsterdam on Dec. 12. Ajax next travels to Athens to play AEK, which is one of only two teams with zero points along with Group D’s Lokomotiv Moscow.


COLLEGE FOOTBALL

11.08.2018 • Thursday • M 1

NOTEBOOK Two trainers are dismissed at Maryland

The fallout at the University of Maryland following the death of Jordan McNair continued with the firing of two trainers involved in the player’s treatment after he collapsed on the practice field in late May. Coach DJ Durkin was ousted last week after being reinstated from paid administrative leave for one day. Football athletic trainer Wes Robinson and director of athletic training Steve Nordwall had been placed on leave following McNair’s death, and a university spokeswoman declined to comment specifically on them Wednesday because it’s a personnel matter but said in a statement: “The trainers that were previously on administrative leave are no longer employed at the university.” McNair, an offensive lineman, was overcome by heat and exhaustion on May 29 and died on June 13. Robinson and Nordwall, who were present when McNair fell ill during a team conditioning test, failed to follow what has become the standard protocol for victims of heatstroke, according to an independent review of the circumstances that led to McNair’s death. The trainers did not take his temperature nor apply cold-water immersion therapy to reduce his body temperature. Rick Court, the head of strength and conditioning, resigned in August. Since McNair’s death, the school has had several embarrassing missteps in efforts to address mistakes that were made. Florida QB Trask reportedly has broken foot • The father of Florida quarterback Kyle Trask says his son is out for the season because of a broken foot. Michael Trask posted on Facebook that Kyle fractured a foot practicing a trick play Wednesday. The 19th-ranked Gators (6-3, 4-3 Southeastern Conference, No. 15 CFP) declined comment when asked about Trask’s injury. “Gator Nation, I am sad to say that Kyle was injured today in practice while doing a trick play where he hands off to the RB and then goes out for a pass,” Michael Trask posted. “The throw to Kyle was low and when he planted his foot to catch the pass he felt a pop. Unfortunately he fractured his foot and will be out for the season. Just a freak injury.” Coach Dan Mullen had been deciding between Feleipe Franks and Trask to start against South Carolina (5-3, 4-3) in the Swamp on Saturday, but it now appears Franks will be the choice. Mullen has made it clear he wants to redshirt highly touted freshman Emory Jones. Red Raiders QB leaves hospital • Texas Tech quarterback Alan Bowman has been released from a hospital again after suffering a partially collapsed lung for the second time this season. The school said Bowman will return to team activities Thursday. The freshman was hospitalized four nights after both injuries. Coach Kliff Kingsbury hasn’t said when Bowman can play again. Sophomore Jett Duffey is expected to replace Bowman as the Red Raiders’ starter again Saturday night, against Texas. Kingsbury said Bowman’s injury in a 51-46 loss to sixthranked Oklahoma last weekend wasn’t as severe the first time. Bowman was injured on a hit late in the first half. The first injury happened when Bowman was sandwiched between a pair of defenders in a 42-34 loss to No. 7 West Virginia on Sept. 29. He was leading the nation in passing going into that game. From news services

Mizzou defense braces for another stellar back

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Vanderbilt’s Ke’Shawn Vaughn, a junior running back, carries the ball against Arkansas in a game Oct. 27.

Vanderbilt’s Vaughn has excelled since he transferred from Illinois BY DAVE MATTER st. Louis Post-dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • From

Georgia and Alabama’s fleet of five-star backs to Memphis’ Darrell Henderson, the nation’s top rusher at the time, to Kentucky All-SEC workhorse Benny Snell Jr., Missouri’s defense has prepared for a wave of prolific running backs this fall. Now comes another, Vanderbilt’s Ke’Shawn Vaughn, one of the SEC’s most explosive playmakers and a worthy candidate for the league’s top newcomer.

ARMSTRONG Installation starting at

Heating and Air Conditioning System!

$3,98000

(Based on a 2 ton system) 4SCU13LB124P PROMO PD 4 A80UH1E070B12

Installation includes new flue pipe for furnace only and flushed line set. Any upgrades will be an additional charge. Existing electrical, gas line shutoff and union will be reused. Offer Expires on 11/30/2018

CALL NOW FOR A FREE ESTIMATE

Aprilaire Humidifer

SAve $50

OFF the regular price. Cannot be combined with any other offers. Expires on 11/30/2018

Save Big

on a Complete furnace Maintenance Inspection

$42.00 Off

The regular price of a complete furnace system. Cannot be combined with any other offers. Expires on 11/30/2018

314-236-3352 Air Purification with “ Air Scrubber Plus”

SAve $100

Get RESULTS by attacking pet and cooking odors, air pollutants, VOC’s (chemical odors), smoke, bacteria, viruses, mold spores, in your home so that your Family can breathe easier! Cannot be combined with any other offers. Expires on 11/30/2018

Where Qualit uality Counts... Since 1977

SAVE UP TO

2,500!

$

*Financing available ailable ffor those who qualify qualify, minimums apply, apply cannot annot combine ombine with other off offers, see store for details. Expires November 30, 2018

Call Now For Your Free Estimate

314-236-9883

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • B3

618-215-7381

Vaughn spent his first two seasons at Illinois but saw his role diminish in 2016, after which he left Lovie Smith’s Big Ten program for a homecoming. The Nashville native enrolled at Vanderbilt, sat out last season and dazzled coaches on the scout team. “Man, he’d rip runs and make plays and you’d be like, ‘Whoa,’” Vanderbilt coach Derek Mason said Wednesday.“You’d just turn your head. So we knew what he was. There’s no secrets there. He’s just had to get his feet underneath him.” Heading into Saturday’s 11 a.m. visit to Mizzou (54, 1-4 SEC), Vaughn ranks second in the SEC with 6.8 yards a carry. He’s averaged 8 yards a carry in four games, including SEC contests against Georgia and Florida. Vanderbilt (4-5, 1-4) had been reluctant to give Vaughn the bulk of its carries, preferring a more balanced distribution with two other backs, but after Vaughn missed a 14-7 loss to Kentucky with an undisclosed injury, he lugged the ball 26 times for 172 yards and three scores against Arkansas. During what’s been an otherwise unspectacular year for the Commodores — their highlight to date is a five-point loss at No. 3 Notre Dame — Vaughn might give Vandy the program’s best shot at bowl eligibility. Mason’s team has to win two of its final three games against Mizzou, Ole Miss and Tennessee to reach six wins. The Commodores faced the exact situation two years ago against the same lineup of teams the final three weeks of the season. After a loss at Missouri, Vandy swept the Rebels and Volunteers to secure the first — and only — bowl under

Mason. Can the Commodores finish the same way? “I just want one win,” Mason said this week. “Let’s talk about that. This isn’t a team that can talk about the next three weeks.We have to talk about today.” These are tenuous times for Mason. He received a contract extension before the 2017 season, but while Vandy’s peers across the SEC continue to build lavish facilities, the conference’s only private institution continues to lag behind. Mason and athletics director David Williams had been pushing for upgrades to outdated Vanderbilt Stadium or a new facility altogether, but earlier this summer The Tennessean reported that university officials undercut athletics department fundraisers trying to solicit donations from school boosters. In September, Williams announced plans to step down, leaving Mason in limbo. Should the Commodores miss a bowl game this season, it will mark the fourth time in Mason’s five seasons — on the heels of the program’s back-to-back nine-win seasons under former coach James Franklin. Those issues aren’t Missouri’s problem this week. Vanderbilt has signed the SEC’s lowest-rated class four of the last five years, as ranked by 247Sports. com, but Mason’s team isn’t without talent. Jared Pinkney is one of the SEC’s most productive tight ends, with 30 catches for 485 yards and five touchdowns. Wideout Kalija Lipscomb is among the SEC leaders with 58 catches for 632 yards and six touchdowns. Quarterback Kyle Shurmur is a fouryear starter. “I feel like their quarterback, he and I played against each other,” Missouri coach Barry Odom joked. “He’s been around forever. He’s

playing really well, making smart throws.” Then there’s Vaughn, the Illini castoff. While coaching at Memphis, Odom was well aware of the Nashville native during his prep years at Pearl-Cohn High School. “We didn’t have a shot at him” at Memphis, Odom said. He’s since gotten reacquainted with Vandy’s bigplay back. Vaughn leads the SEC with five 40-yard runs. Only three players in the country have more, including, coincidentally, Illinois junior Reggie Corbin, who passed Vaughn on the Illini depth chart two years ago. “You look through the stats and you watch hours and hours of tape and he’s very impressive,” Odom said. “He’s explosive. … He’s dangerous in every area, between the tackles, on the perimeter. Once he gets to the second level he’s dangerous because he’s got speed. He’s got great quickness. I think maybe his vision is one of his strongest attributes because of some of the things he does on the backside cut and the zone action blocking scheme. He’s able to see things, anticipate, put his foot in the ground and go make a move and get yards.Overall,a total complete back.”

POST-DISPATCH SEC POWER RANKINGS

1. Alabama 2. Georgia 3. LSU 4. Kentucky 5. Mississippi State 6. Florida 7. Auburn 8. South Carolina 9. Missouri 10. Texas A&M 11. Tennessee 12. Ole Miss 13. Vanderbilt 14. Arkansas

Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com


COLLEGE BASKETBALL

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 11.08.2018

Illini have lots of new faces this season Eight newcomers are set to open play against Evansville

SCHEDULE vs. Evansville, 7 p.m.

Tue. 11/13

vs. Georgetown, 7:30 p.m.

Mon. 11/19 vs. Gonzaga (Maui), 10:30 p.m. Tue. 11/20 vs. Ariz./Iowa St. (Maui), TBA

BY JOEY WAGNER Decatur Herald & review

CHAMPAIGN, ILL. • Is there

an Illinois roster nearby? Good, you’ll need it. Brad Underwood begins his second season as coach of the Illini at 7 p.m. on Thursday when Missouri Valley Conference opponent Evansville comes to the State Farm Center. This iteration of Underwood’s Illini includes eight newcomers, six of whom are freshman. There are a few returning faces. Sophomore Trent Frazier is back and confident on his way to building on a strong freshman season. Kipper Nichols, Aaron Jordan and Da’Monte Williams all return with experience in Underwood’s system. They’ll try to impart that knowledge to the freshmen: Ayo Dosunmu, Tevian Jones, Alan Griffin, Samba Kane and Giorgi Bezhanishvili; and the newcomers: junior college transfer Andres Feliz and graduate transfer Adonis De La Rosa. Thursday is the kick start for the Illini as they navigate a rigorous nonconference schedule that includes Georgetown, the Maui Invitational, Notre Dame, UNLV and Missouri ahead of Big Ten play. “I think this team will continue to grow,” Underwood said. “We’ll be a team that’s better in December than in November and yet we’ve got to have a starting point and we’ve got to find out. We’re going to do that against some of the best teams in the country. It’s not a gradual learning curve. This is a pretty steep learning curve with the schedule. “This group is up for the challenge, and I think we’re excited about that and excited for the opportunity to go play.” In Friday’s exhibition win against Illinois Wesleyan, Underwood tinkered with a variety of lineups, including a three-guard lineup that included Dosunmu, a five-star guard from Chicago Morgan Park, Frazier and Feliz. There’s a need for creativity with

Thu. 11/8

Wed. 11/21

vs. TBA in Maui, TBA

Sun. 11/25

vs. Miss. Valley St., 1 p.m.

Tue. 11/27

at Notre Dame, 6 p.m.

Sun. 12/2

at Nebraska, 4 p.m.

Wed. 12/5

vs. Ohio St. (Chicago), 6 p.m. vs. UNLV, 1 p.m.

Sat. 12/8 Sat. 12/15

vs. East Tenn. St., 1 p.m.

Sat. 12/22 vs. Missouri (St. Louis), 7 p.m. ASSOCIATED PRESS

Sophomore guard Trent Frazier will look to build on a strong freshman season for the Illini.

ROSTER Hometown (previous)

Sat. 12/29

vs. Florida Atlantic, 2 p.m.

Thu. 1/3

at Indiana, 6 p.m.

Sun. 1/6

at Northwestern, TBA

Thu. 1/10

vs. Michigan, 7 p.m.

Wed. 1/16

vs. Minnesota, 8 p.m.

Sun. 1/20

at Iowa, 12 p.m.

# Name

Pos

Ht.,Wt.

Cl.

0 Alan Griffin

G

6-5, 180

Fr. Ossining, N.Y. (Archbishop Stepinac)

1 Trent Frazier

G

6-1, 170

So.

Wellington, Fla. (Wellington)

Wed. 1/23

vs. Wisconsin, 8 p.m.

2 Kipper Nichols

F

6-6, 220

Jr.

Cleveland, Ohio (St. Edward)

Sat. 1/26

at Maryland, 11 a.m.

Libertyville, Ill. (Creighton)

Wed. 1/30

at Minnesota, 8 p.m.

3 Drew Cayce

G

6-1, 175

Jr.

4 Zach Griffith

F

6-6, 210

So.

Fisher, Ill. (Fisher)

5 Tevian Jones

G

6-7, 205

Fr.

Chandler, Ariz. (Culver City, Calif.)

Sat. 2/2

vs. Nebraska, 1:15 p.m.

Tue. 2/5

vs. Michigan St., 6 p.m.

Sat. 2/9

vs. Rutgers, 3 p.m.

10 Andres Feliz

G

6-2, 185

Jr.

Guachupita, D.R. (NW Florida St.)

11 Ayo Dosunmu

G

6-5, 185

Fr.

Chicago (Morgan Park)

12 Adonis De La Rosa

C

7-0, 260

Gr.

The Bronx, N.Y. (Kent State)

Thu. 2/14

at Ohio St., 6 p.m.

15 Giorgi Bezhanishvili

F

6-9, 235

Fr. Rustavi, Georgia (Patrick School, N.J.)

Mon. 2/18

at Wisconsin, 7 p.m.

Sat. 2/23

vs. Penn St., 11 a.m.

Wed. 2/27

at Purdue, 7:30 p.m.

20 Da’Monte Williams

G

6-3, 200

So.

Peoria, Ill. (Manual)

22 Anthony Higgs

F

6-8, 235

Fr.

Baltimore, Md. (Perry Hall)

23 Aaron Jordan

G

6-5, 210

Sr.

Plainfield, Ill. (East)

32 Tyler Underwood

G

6-2, 180

Jr.

Champaign, Ill. (Oklahoma St.)

Sun. 3/3

vs. Northwestern, 5:30 p.m.

34 Samba Kane

C

7-0, 220

Fr.

Dakar, Senegal (Florida Prep)

Thu. 3/7

vs. Indiana, 7 p.m.

35 Samson Oladimeji

G

6-4, 200

Jr.

Rolling Meadows, Ill. (Fremd)

Sun. 3/10

at Penn St., 11 a.m.

a relative lack of size on the Illini. “I liked it,” Underwood said. “We worked on it quite a bit in practice this week. We’re still trying to clean up the rebounding piece of that a little bit, but there’s a certain effect when Trent’s not on the ball — Trent’s really, really fast — and him running the wing has got to scare some defenses. Dre being downhill and Ayo the same way, I like that from an offensive standpoint and I like it from a defensive standpoint.” Gone are Michael Finke, LeRon Black, Greg Eboigbodin and Matic Vesel, who all played in the post last season. Bezhanishvili figures to be planted into a starting role, and Underwood has

high marks for his game despite foul trouble he incurred against Wesleyan. Samba Kane is working up to speed after missing eight weeks in the summer before joining the team, and De La Rosa has just been cleared for contact and is “day-to-day” as he recovers from a torn knee ligament suffered at Kent State last year. The three-guard lineup presents problems for opposing teams if the Illini can figure out a way to rebound as an undersized unit. “We get out in transition and run,” Frazier said. “(Dosunmu and Feliz) both did an unbelievable job scoring in transition. Andres did an incredible job.

That’s one of the best skills he has is scoring in transition. It’s impossible to guard him in transition. Ayo, with his length, can get to the basket every time. “The biggest thing playing three guards right now is just rebounding. We have to get rebounds and help the bigger guys out.” Evansville is coming off of a 1715 season and is under new leadership in former Kentucky star Walter McCarty. There’s a little bit of unknown about the Purple Aces. No player on Evansville’s roster averaged more than 6.8 points per game, but the Purple Aces have size. Guards K.J. Riley and Marty Hall are each 6-foot-5, and Evans-

St. Louis area players big part of MU team FREDERICKSON • FROM B1

season after transferring from Illinois, to receiving a waiver for immediate eligibility, to starting. Perhaps the biggest surprise was the start of freshman guard Javon Pickett of Belleville East. Martin has been raving about the under-the-radar prospect. Turned out he wasn’t bluffing. The bench player who logged the most minutes (24) in the Tigers’ 68-55 win was another familiar face, freshman guard Torrence Watson of Whitfield. Maybe the columns on the waistband of Mizzou’s new uniforms should have an arch in the background. “It feels comfortable,” Tilmon said. “We all know each other. We have been playing against each other for the longest time now. And now we are on the same team. We are going to rock out.” The St. Louis (area) Tigers will be more than an interesting angle for Post-Dispatch readers to follow. Their development will play a significant role in the team’s goal of defying the expectations that fell after Porter’s season-ending knee surgery. More important, how this young core gels will help decide the Tigers’ trajectory — both on the court and in recruiting — for years to come. Here’s something to consider: Four of the six players who logged the most minutes in Mizzou’s first game have once occupied a spot on a Post-Dispatch AllMetro boys basketball team. The two not included in that group were senior stalwart starters Kevin Puryear and Jordan Geist, who wound up thankful their younger teammates spackled over the duo’s seven combined points on threeof-17 shooting. The future has to be now if the Tigers are going to be competitive in the daunting SEC. That future has a St. Louis accent. Mizzou will play through Tilmon. The 6-foot-10 center scored 16 points on an efficient eight-of-14 shooting. Despite Tilmon’s career-high 14 attempts, Martin said that was not enough. “Because he has a good spirit, and because he’s a good guy and has a big heart, he’s not the kind of guy who is going to demand the ball,” Martin said. “So, I have to force it. I have to call plays. I have to force guys to get him the ball, to see him. Then, he will make plays.” And passes. Tilmon is so unselfish, he can at times be too quick to share. In the smallest of sample sizes against an overmatched opponent, he looked more comfortable letting scoring opportunities develop. “He was young last year,” Martin said. “The one thing I said to him is, ‘You have to realize how strong you are.’ He can move you. Two steps, and he’s at the rim.”

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Mizzou sophomore guard Mark Smith drives towards the basket during Tuesday’s opener against Central Arkansas at Mizzou Arena. The Tigers won 68-55.

Central Arkansas had no chance of stopping Tilmon’s throwback hook-shot. Few teams will if he’s able to anchor near the rim. But two things must happen for the Tigers to maximize Tilmon’s potential. He has to stay off the bench. Foul trouble followed him like fog as a freshman. He logged 18 minutes before his first foul Tuesday. He seemed more proud of that than his point total. “I told y’all I was working on that,” Tilmon said with a smile. “It worked out for me. I was keeping my hands behind my ears. I was just going straight up.” The change was noted from the other sideline. Central Arkansas coach Russ Pennell watched foul-prone freshman Tilmon on film. This wasn’t him. “It was kind of surprising to me,” Pennell said. “I thought he played really good, positionally. So many fouls in the post are you jockeying for position. What he did a nice job of was getting position and then holding it. Because he is so strong, he was pushing our guys out of their comfort zone.” The second thing? Tilmon’s teammates must capitalize when defenses collapse to stop the center. “Jeremiah is so big and so skilled, he can dominate,” Pickett said. “He can score whenever he wants. That’s going

to make people double-team him. That opens up shots for us. We just have to be shot-ready and knock them down.” The Tigers made eight of 26 3-pointers on Tuesday. Ouch. But Pickett, Smith and Watson combined to make eight of 15 threes. Not bad. Pickett’s first of two 3’s gave the Tigers their first points. Tilmon was credited with that assist. The big man also assisted on one of the five 3’s Smith swished. “I was looking for him,” Tilmon said within earshot of Smith. “He came out of the gate stroking it.” Growing pains should be expected for this bunch. Chemistry, however, should not be an issue. These players grew up orbiting one another in high school and summer leagues. They have helped East St. Louis native Martin change Mizzou’s recruiting profile in the region. Future Tiger targets are watching Mizzou. Tilmon is determined to make sure they see wins. “Everybody is trying to say the season is over with Jontay down,” he said. “We are going to ignore all that and continue to play.” Ben Frederickson @Ben_Fred on Twitter bfrederickson@post-dispatch.com

ville has 6-foot-9 center Danius Chatkevicius patrolling the post. Bezhanishvili will probably draw the task of defensing Chatkevicius. Underwood needs more from Bezhanishvili than the 14 foul-trouble plagued minutes he played against Wesleyan. When he was on the floor, he added a different dynamic to the Illini. He had nine points, connecting on a pair of triples, and four rebounds while giving a deep passing element to the team. In the first half against Wesleyan, Bezhanishvili drew his first crowd-led chant of the game, diving on the floor and scrapping for a loose ball that resulted in a double-technical. “He’s definitely mature beyond his years,” Jordan said. “We need that from him, especially. Him not letting go of that ball, yeah, it resulted in a tech, but his energy and his presence was like: I don’t care who you are, I don’t care if you’re exhibition or Illinois Wesleyan, I’m not letting go of this ball because it’s mine. Him having that attitude out there gives us energy.” There are going to be mistakes Thursday and as the Illini move forward and mature. Underwood is prepared for that, as long as they’re isolated mistakes and don’t happen time after time. “I understand this group is going to do some things that are going to make you scratch your head, and I’m OK with that,” Underwood said. “As long as we continue to work in a positive way, I’m fine. We’re going to make mistakes and we’re going to try to eliminate them.”

ILLINOIS VS. EVANSVILLE

When • Thursday, 7 p.m. Where • State Farm Center, Champaign TV • No TV, Big Ten Plus (Streaming) Radio • KFNS (590 AM) Of note • Illinois has eight new faces on the roster, including two projected freshmen starters in Ayo Dosunmu and Giorgi Bezhanishvili. Evansville grad transfer Shea Feehan is from Eureka College, where he scored 30.6 points a game. He went to high school at Peoria Notre Dame.

NOTEBOOK Duke’s freshmen live up to hype

Duke’s freshman class was highly touted, but it was so dynamic in its debut Tuesday that it the college basketball world still was abuzz a day later. Zion Williamson, R.J. Barrett, Tre Jones and Cam Reddish were the Nos. 1, 3, 5 and 14 recruits nationally, according to Rivals, and they combined to demolish No. 2 Kentucky 118-84 in Indianapolis. It was coach John Calipari’s most lopsided loss in his tenure with the Wildcats. Barrett scored 33 points, Williamson had 28, Reddish added 22 and Jones, the point guard, ran things with scarce glitches. As a team, Kentucky needed two Immanuel Quickley free throws with 54 seconds left in the game to outscore Duke’s freshman “big three” 84-83. The freshmen impressed Mike Krzyzewski when it’s hard to surprise Krzyzewski — the septuagenarian coach in his 39th Duke season. “No matter how talented they are, you don’t know what they’re gonna do, in this environment, against an outstanding team and a great program,” said Krzyzewski. “... They were magnificent.” Later he said, “I shouldn’t say I’m surprised at how well these guys played, ‘cause I see ’em (in practice). To play on this stage right away, against Kentucky, was a little bit surprising.” Calipari was impressed, too. “I’ve got to give them credit,” he said. “I told Mike after the game ‘You guys played great.’” He couldn’t wait for the game to end. “When I looked up with eight minutes to go,” Calipari said, “I said, ‘We’re not calling a timeout, and if you foul, I’m taking you out. Let this (clock) run.’ “I told (our players), I got outcoached. You got outplayed. We will watch this tape, and then we will move on.”

GAMES WEDNESDAY

No. 20 TCU 66, CS Bakersfield 61 • Desmond Bane scored 13 of his 14 points after halftime, helping host Texas Christian overcome a 37-28 deficit at the intermission to win at home in the season opener for both teams. Bane’s tiebreaking driving layup with 2:48 left put TCU ahead to stay. Jarkel Joiner had 18 points and Damiyne Durham 11 for Bakersfield. TCU played an opener as a ranked team for the first time in 20 seasons, since 1998-99. That was after the Horned Frogs had gone to the 1998 NCAA Tournament, their last one before making it last March in the second season for coach Jamie Dixon at his alma mater. Ohio State 64, Cincinnati 56 • Kaleb Wesson scored 15 points, and C.J. Jackson hit a driving bank shot and a pair of free throws in the final 30 seconds to help the visiting Buckeyes, who last played in Cincinnati in 1920 (beating the Bearcats 35-13), win in a season opener. Cincinnati was back in its own building after playing last season at Northern Kentucky University while its on-campus arena underwent a 20-month renovation. The Bearcats were led by Jarron Cumberland’s 22 points. From news services


BASKETBALL

11.08.2018 • Thursday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • B5

New players aim to build on SLU’s success SLU • FROM B1

I’ll shoot with you.’ This summer their mission was that way.” The Billikens lost six players, including their top four scorers, top four rebounders and top three in assists. That group was the core that helped SLU reach unequaled heights, posting a record of 66-30 the last three seasons, reaching the WNIT twice and tying for the Atlantic 10 championship in 2016. Frantz and McMahan are the most experienced returning players. They give Stone a good backcourt tandem around which to build as she incorporates freshman point guard Ciaja Harbison into the spot held for four seasons by Jackie Kemph, the program’s all-time points and assists leader. SLU has five freshmen who form the highest-rated recruiting class in the program’s history. The group was ranked No. 33 in the country by Blue Star Basketball, and Stone said all will be asked to contribute, with two possibly taking spots in the starting lineup. To put the players on the right path, Stone had everyone read Gordon’s book. The team met weekly to discuss each chapter, finishing a week before the season opener Friday night at Eastern Kentucky. “The whole thing is we vs. me. We have to do this thing together,” Stone said. “So offensively and defensively, put your personal pride aside and sacrifice what you have to do for the team.” The Billikens will face a challenging schedule that includes a visit from No. 2-ranked Connecticut and No. 16 Missouri in a six-day span in early December. But Stone said the much-anticipated meeting with the 11-time national champion Huskies has not been mentioned. She is busy dealing with the unknown and how to handle the present. Frantz is the most proven scorer, having averaged 8.2 points as a junior and 11.5 as a sophomore. McMahan averaged 4.4 points last season and was one of the first two players off the

POST-DISPATCH PHOTO

St. Louis University coach Lisa Stone watches play during a game against Fordham in January. At left is Billikens guard Jordyn Frantz.

bench. Stone will have more height and more physicality to rely upon with three players who are 6-feet-5, including senior Tara Dusharm, transfer Amber Lindfors and freshman Brooke Flowers (Metro Academic and Classical High). Other returning players vying for time are guard Tasia Jeffries, forward Kendra Wilken and guard Lauryn Hughes. The freshman to watch is Harbison, a top-100 recruit from Louisville. “Ciaja is great in the open court,” Stone said. “Her pull-up is ridiculous. She’s fun to watch. Ciaja to me is going to be one of the best freshmen in the league. She’s little, but she’s tough and quick and likes to guard. But all of the freshmen are going to have to play, and I told them that.” As the season opens, freshman forward Evan Zars is among the starters. She is 6-2, moves well and is described by Stone as a “stretch four” — a power forward who can stretch defenses with her perimeter shooting. Meanwhile, Stone still was waiting Wednesday for a ruling from the NCAA on an appeal to

SCHEDULE

ROSTER #

Name

Pos

Ht.

Cl.

Hometown (previous)

1

Chloe Rice

G

5-11

Fr.

Marion, Iowa (Marion)

2

Ciaja Harbison

G

5-6

Fr.

Louisville, Ky. (Male)

4

Kerri McMahan

G

5-10 RSr.

Novi, Mich. (Univ. of Akron)

14 Tasia Jeffries

G

5-8

So.

Louisville, Ky. (Butler)

20 Jordyn Frantz

G

6-0

Sr.

Wakarusa, Ind. (NorthWood)

24 Amber Lindfors

C

6-4 RJr. Elk Grove Village, Ill. (Valparaiso U.)

30 Lauryn Hughes

G

5-9

So.

St. Louis (MICDS)

32 Myia Clark

G

5-7

Fr.

Schaumburg, Ill. (Saint Viator)

34 Kendra Wilken

F

6-2

Jr.

Bartelso, Ill. (Breese Central)

35 Myriama Smith Traore

F

6-2

So.

Whitewater, Wis. (Marquette U.)

F/C

6-5

Fr.

St. Louis (Metro Academic)

45 Tara Dusharm

C

6-5

Sr.

Foley, Minn. (Foley)

54 Evan Zars

F

6-2

Fr.

Shawnee, Kan. (Mill Valley)

42 Brooke Flowers

allow Marquette transfer Myriama Smith Traore to play this season. Stone believes she has a strong perimeter shooting team. Frantz is a proven 3-point threat. She said freshman Chloe Rice has a “textbook shot.” Freshman Myia Clark was an Illinois state qualifier in the Queen of the Hill 3-point shooting competition as

NBA SUMMARIES Thunder 95, Cavaliers 86

Grizzlies 89, Nuggets 87

EASTERN CONFERENCE

Denver: Craig 2-5 1-2 5, Millsap 1-7 0-0 2, Jokic 0-1 4-4 4, Murray 6-21 1-2 15, Harris 6-16 5-6 20, Hernangomez 3-6 0-0 7, Plumlee 4-6 2-2 10, Lyles 6-9 2-3 16, Morris 4-10 0-0 8, Beasley 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 32-82 15-19 87. Memphis: Anderson 5-9 3-4 14, Jackson Jr. 7-15 4-6 20, Gasol 6-13 7-7 20, Conley 2-9 0-0 4, Temple 1-4 3-4 5, Rabb 1-2 0-0 2, Mack 2-4 0-0 6, D.Brooks 1-5 2-2 4, M.Brooks 4-7 0-0 9, Selden 1-2 2-2 5. Totals 30-70 21-25 89. Denver 29 18 23 17 — 87 Memphis 22 28 20 19 — 89 3-point goals: Denver 8-32 (Harris 3-6, Lyles 2-5, Murray 2-9, Hernangomez 1-4, Beasley 0-1, Jokic 0-1, Millsap 0-1, Craig 0-2, Morris 0-3), Memphis 8-21 (Mack 2-3, Jackson Jr. 2-5, Gasol 1-2, Anderson 1-2, M.Brooks 1-2, Selden 1-2, D.Brooks 0-1, Conley 0-2, Temple 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Denver 41 (Lyles 9), Memphis 36 (Gasol 12). Assists: Denver 19 (Murray 7), Memphis 19 (Conley 8). Total fouls: Denver 22, Memphis 22. Technicals: Denver coach Nuggets (Defensive three second), Memphis coach Grizzlies (Defensive three second) 3. A: 15,832 (18,119).

Atlantic Toronto Boston Philadelphia Brooklyn New York Southeast Charlotte Miami Orlando Atlanta Washington Central Milwaukee Indiana Detroit Chicago Cleveland

Pistons 103, Magic 96

Pelicans 107, Bulls 98 Chicago: Ju.Holiday 6-16 2-2 17, Parker 7-14 6-8 20, Carter Jr. 7-11 2-3 17, Payne 2-7 0-0 4, LaVine 9-26 2-2 22, Hutchison 0-4 1-2 1, Felicio 0-0 0-0 0, Lopez 0-1 0-0 0, Arcidiacono 4-6 0-0 11, Blakeney 3-11 0-0 6. Totals 38-96 13-17 98. New Orleans: Johnson 5-7 0-0 12, Davis 13-24 4-7 32, Mirotic 4-14 0-0 9, Jr.Holiday 6-16 4-5 17, Moore 3-9 1-1 8, Miller 4-6 0-0 11, Randle 5-8 1-2 12, Diallo 1-1 2-2 4, Frazier 0-3 0-0 0, Clark 1-6 0-0 2, Williams 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 42-94 12-17 107. Chicago 26 24 22 26 — 98 New Orleans 29 29 27 22 — 107 3-point goals: Chicago 9-31 (Arcidiacono 3-4, Ju.Holiday 3-12, LaVine 2-5, Carter Jr. 1-2, Payne 0-2, Parker 0-3, Blakeney 0-3), New Orleans 11-30 (Miller 3-4, Johnson 2-3, Davis 2-4, Randle 1-2, Moore 1-3, Jr.Holiday 1-4, Mirotic 1-8, Clark 0-1, Frazier 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Chicago 46 (Parker 13), New Orleans 55 (Davis, Mirotic 15). Assists: Chicago 18 (LaVine 4), New Orleans 32 (Jr.Holiday 9). Total fouls: Chicago 16, New Orleans 18. Technicals: Chicago coach Fred Hoiberg. A: 15,514 (16,867).

Knicks 112, Hawks 107 New York: Dotson 1-1 0-0 3, Vonleh 4-10 1-2 11, Robinson 2-2 1-2 5, Ntilikina 5-10 2-2 14, Hardaway Jr. 8-22 16-20 34, Hezonja 0-2 1-2 1, Knox 0-6 0-0 0, Kanter 5-7 7-10 17, Mudiay 4-8 0-2 11, Trier 5-9 5-7 16. Totals 34-77 33-47 112. Atlanta: Bembry 3-6 0-0 7, Spellman 6-11 3-3 18, Len 3-8 2-4 9, Young 6-19 2-2 15, Bazemore 4-16 7-9 16, Prince 6-15 2-4 16, Poythress 2-3 0-0 4, Dedmon 1-3 0-0 2, Plumlee 4-5 0-0 8, Lin 1-3 6-7 9, Carter 1-3 0-0 6. Totals 37-92 22-29 107. New York 26 26 35 25 — 112 Atlanta 26 29 18 34 — 107 3-point goals: New York 11-30 (Mudiay 3-3, Ntilikina 2-4, Vonleh 2-5, Hardaway Jr. 2-11, Dotson 1-1, Trier 1-2, Hezonja 0-1, Knox 0-3), Atlanta 12-39 (Spellman 3-5, Carter 2-4, Prince 2-10, Lin 1-1, Bembry 1-2, Len 1-2, Bazemore 1-7, Young 1-7, Dedmon 0-1). Fouled out: Ntilikina. Rebounds: New York 48 (Vonleh 13), Atlanta 45 (Spellman 10). Assists: New York 15 (Mudiay, Hardaway Jr., Ntilikina 3), Atlanta 27 (Young 8). Total fouls: New York 30, Atlanta 30. Technicals: New York coach Knicks (Defensive three second), Atlanta coach Hawks (Defensive three second) 2, Prince. A: 12,412 (18,118).

Heat 95, Spurs 88 San Antonio: DeRozan 6-15 5-5 18, Cunningham 1-1 0-0 2, Aldridge 2-14 2-2 6, Forbes 4-12 2-2 12, White 0-3 0-0 0, Pondexter 0-0 0-0 0, Bertans 6-10 3-3 19, Poeltl 1-4 1-2 3, Mills 8-22 0-0 20, Belinelli 3-13 0-0 8. Totals 31-94 13-14 88. Miami: McGruder 2-9 0-0 4, Winslow 7-17 1-1 16, Whiteside 10-18 9-11 29, Richardson 6-22 0-0 14, Ellington 7-13 0-0 20, Jones Jr. 0-3 0-0 0, Olynyk 0-0 1-2 1, Adebayo 0-1 2-2 2, Dragic 0-0 0-0 0, T.Johnson 4-10 0-2 9. Totals 36-93 13-18 95. San Antonio 20 22 22 24 — 88 Miami 25 20 — 27 23 95 3-point goals: San Antonio 13-32 (Bertans 4-7, Mills 4-12, Forbes 2-5, Belinelli 2-6, DeRozan 1-2), Miami 10-32 (Ellington 6-10, Richardson 2-6, T.Johnson 1-5, Winslow 1-6, Whiteside 0-1, McGruder 0-4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: San Antonio 49 (Aldridge 16), Miami 60 (Whiteside 20). Assists: San Antonio 19 (DeRozan 8), Miami 21 (Richardson 5). Total fouls: San Antonio 19, Miami 17. A: 19,600 (19,600).

Stu Durando @studurando on Twitter sdurando@post-dispatch.com

NBA STANDINGS

Oklahoma City: George 7-16 3-4 18, Grant 4-9 2-2 12, Adams 3-6 3-6 9, Schroder 11-19 6-8 28, Ferguson 1-3 2-2 4, Noel 0-1 0-0 0, Patterson 1-5 0-2 3, Felton 2-6 0-0 4, Diallo 3-7 2-2 8, Abrines 3-12 0-0 9. Totals 35-84 18-26 95. Cleveland: Osman 0-1 0-0 0, Smith 5-17 0-0 13, Thompson 5-13 0-0 10, Sexton 7-14 0-0 15, Hood 3-7 3-3 11, Nance Jr. 3-6 0-0 6, Frye 0-0 0-0 0, Zizic 3-5 4-4 10, Hill 0-0 0-0 0, Korver 2-8 1-1 7, Nwaba 0-1 3-4 3, Clarkson 5-17 0-1 11. Totals 33-89 11-13 86. Oklahoma City 24 — 23 25 23 95 20 24 — 86 Cleveland 20 22 3-point goals: Oklahoma City 7-27 (Abrines 3-10, Grant 2-3, Patterson 1-3, George 1-3, Ferguson 0-1, Diallo 0-2, Felton 0-2, Schroder 0-3), Cleveland 9-31 (Smith 3-11, Hood 2-3, Korver 2-7, Sexton 1-2, Clarkson 1-7, Osman 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Oklahoma City 44 (Adams 13), Cleveland 51 (Thompson 15). Assists: Oklahoma City 10 (George, Adams, Ferguson, Felton 2), Cleveland 17 (Clarkson 8). Total fouls: Oklahoma City 23, Cleveland 26. Technicals: Oklahoma City coach Billy Donovan. A: 19,432 (20,562).

Detroit: Robinson III 2-7 4-4 9, Griffin 7-17 5-6 20, Drummond 10-16 2-2 23, Jackson 5-11 4-5 15, Bullock 0-6 1-1 1, Johnson 5-10 0-0 13, Pachulia 0-3 2-2 2, Smith 4-11 0-0 8, Galloway 4-8 0-0 12, Calderon 0-1 0-0 0, Brown 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 37-90 18-20 103. Orlando: Iwundu 2-3 0-0 4, Gordon 7-15 0-0 15, Vucevic 6-14 2-2 14, Augustin 6-10 1-1 16, Fournier 12-19 0-0 27, Martin 0-5 0-0 0, Bamba 1-2 0-0 2, Grant 0-2 0-0 0, Ross 6-12 1-2 15, Simmons 0-5 3-4 3. Totals 40-87 7-9 96. Detroit 20 25 — 103 26 32 Orlando 20 — 31 29 16 96 3-point goals: Detroit 11-37 (Galloway 4-8, Johnson 3-6, Drummond 1-1, Robinson III 1-4, Griffin 1-5, Jackson 1-6, Calderon 0-1, Bullock 0-2, Smith 0-4), Orlando 9-27 (Fournier 3-6, Augustin 3-6, Ross 2-5, Gordon 1-4, Bamba 0-1, Martin 0-2, Vucevic 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Detroit 50 (Drummond 19), Orlando 40 (Gordon 10). Assists: Detroit 21 (Smith, Jackson 4), Orlando 28 (Augustin 7). Total fouls: Detroit 15, Orlando 19. Technicals: Griffin, Orlando coach Magic (Defensive three second) 2. A: 16,103 (18,846).

a sophomore. “We’re in uncharted territory,” Stone said. “We were picked to finish seventh in the A-10, and I hope we can surprise some people. It’s certainly not where we want to end up.”

Fri. 11/9 at Eastern Kentucky, 11 a.m. vs. Indiana State, 4:30 p.m. Tue. 11/13 vs. Cincinnati, 2 p.m. Sun. 11/18 Tue. 11/20 at Tulsa, 7 p.m. at Chattanooga, 3:30 p.m. Sat. 11/24 Sun. 11/25 at Virginia, 2:30 p.m. Thu. 11/29 vs. Southern Illinois, 7 p.m. vs. SIUE, 7 p.m. Sat. 12/1 vs. UConn, 6 p.m. Tue. 12/4 vs. Missouri, 5 p.m. Sun. 12/9 Thu. 12/20 at Illinois State, 11 a.m. Fri. 12/28 vs. Yale at Boca Raton, 1:30 p.m. Sat. 12/29 TBA at Boca Raton, Fla. at UMass, 1 p.m. Sun. 1/6 at Saint Joseph’s, 10:30 a.m. Wed. 1/9 Sun. 1/13 vs. Fordham, 3 p.m. vs. Rhode Island, 7 p.m. Wed. 1/16 at St. Bonaventure, noon Sun. 1/20 Wed. 1/23 vs. Dayton, 11 a.m. Sun. 1/27 at VCU, noon Thu. 1/31 vs. George Mason, 7 p.m. Sun. 2/3 vs. George Washington, 1 p.m. Wed. 2/6 at Fordham, 6 p.m. Sun. 2/10 vs. La Salle, 2 p.m. Wed. 2/13 at Duquesne, 10 a.m. Sun. 2/17 vs. Richmond, 2 p.m. at Davidson, 1 p.m. Sat. 2/23 vs. VCU, 7 p.m. Wed. 2/27 Sat. 3/2 at Dayton, 1 p.m. March 5-10 Atlantic 10 Championship

76ers 100, Pacers 94 Philadelphia: Covington 5-9 1-1 13, Saric 6-13 2-2 18, Embiid 7-16 5-6 20, Simmons 7-12 2-4 16, Fultz 3-7 1-2 7, Chandler 1-3 0-0 2, Am.Johnson 1-2 0-0 2, Shamet 4-8 1-1 12, Redick 2-9 6-6 10. Totals 36-79 18-22 100. Indiana: Bogdanovic 4-11 2-2 13, Young 3-8 0-0 6, Turner 2-8 3-4 7, Collison 0-3 0-0 0, Oladipo 14-30 4-6 36, McDermott 0-2 0-1 0, Sabonis 7-14 2-2 16, O’Quinn 0-2 0-0 0, Joseph 4-6 0-0 9, Evans 3-10 1-2 7. Totals 37-94 12-17 94. Philadelphia 29 21 28 22 — 100 Indiana 23 27 21 23 — 94 3-point goals: Philadelphia 10-32 (Saric 4-6, Shamet 3-6, Covington 2-6, Embiid 1-5, Chandler 0-2, Redick 0-7), Indiana 8-31 (Oladipo 4-14, Bogdanovic 3-6, Joseph 1-3, McDermott 0-1, Sabonis 0-1, O’Quinn 0-1, Evans 0-2, Young 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Philadelphia 42 (Embiid, Simmons 10), Indiana 42 (Sabonis 11). Assists: Philadelphia 24 (Simmons 8), Indiana 19 (Oladipo 7). Total fouls: Philadelphia 18, Indiana 21. Technicals: Philadelphia coach 76ers (Defensive three second). A: 16,434 (20,000).

NBA LEADERS Through Tuesday’s games G Scoring 11 Curry, GOL 11 Embiid, PHL Griffin, DET 9 Walker, CHA 11 LaVine, CHI 11 11 Durant, GOL 9 DeRozan, SAN 10 James, LAL Lillard, POR 11 Antetokounmpo, MIL 9 7 Westbrook, OKC 10 Hardaway Jr., NYK 11 Oladipo, IND George, OKC 9 Beal, WAS 10 Mitchell, UTA 8 8 Butler, MIN Mirotic, NOR 10 Wall, WAS 10 Richardson, MIA 9 FG Percentage Gobert, UTA Sabonis, IND Jordan, DAL Harrell, LAC McGee, LAL Allen, Bro Siakam, TOR Capela, HOU Ibaka, TOR Ayton, PHX

FG 62 54 46 45 62 50 57 61 83 69

Rebounds Drummond, DET Whiteside, MIA Jordan, DAL Gobert, UTA Antetokounmpo, MIL Embiid, PHL Kanter, NYK Mirotic, NOR Capela, HOU Griffin, DET

G 9 8 10 10 9 11 11 10 9 9

Assists Lowry, TOR Paul, HOU Westbrook, OKC Holiday, NOR Young, ATL Green, GOL James, LAL Jokic, DEN Fox, SAC Rubio, UTA

G 11 7 7 10 10 11 10 10 10 10

FG 117 105 87 106 102 113 96 96 94 92 67 78 96 67 82 69 62 82 77 68

FT 48 88 56 51 77 62 50 61 76 46 33 42 33 43 34 23 40 30 47 29

PTS 344 312 253 309 307 305 246 268 294 232 169 233 253 204 226 179 176 218 215 193

FGA 87 79 71 70 101 82 94 101 140 117 OFF 52 28 32 38 25 25 44 26 38 18

DEF 95 89 109 96 95 114 85 88 64 84 AST 127 65 62 88 81 87 77 77 76 76

AVG 31.3 28.4 28.1 28.1 27.9 27.7 27.3 26.8 26.7 25.8 24.1 23.3 23.0 22.7 22.6 22.4 22.0 21.8 21.5 21.4 PCT .713 .684 .648 .643 .614 .610 .606 .604 .593 .590

TOT 147 117 141 134 120 139 129 114 102 102

AVG 16.3 14.6 14.1 13.4 13.3 12.6 11.7 11.4 11.3 11.3 AVG 11.5 9.3 8.9 8.8 8.1 7.9 7.7 7.7 7.6 7.6A

W 10 6 7 5 4 W 6 5 4 3 2 W 8 7 5 3 1

L 1 4 5 6 8 L 5 5 7 8 8 L 2 5 5 9 10

Pct .909 .600 .583 .455 .333 Pct .545 .500 .364 .273 .200 Pct .800 .583 .500 .250 .091

GB — 3½ 3½ 5 6½ GB — ½ 2 3 3½ GB — 2 3 6 7½

L10 9-1 6-4 6-4 5-5 3-7 L10 6-4 5-5 3-7 3-7 2-8 L10 8-2 6-4 5-5 3-7 1-9

Str W-4 L-2 W-1 W-2 W-1 Str W-2 W-2 L-1 L-2 L-1 Str L-1 L-2 W-1 L-1 L-4

Home 6-0 3-1 6-0 3-2 2-4 Home 4-2 3-2 2-5 2-3 1-3 Home 6-0 3-3 3-2 1-5 1-5

Away 4-1 3-3 1-5 2-4 2-4 Away 2-3 2-3 2-2 1-5 1-5 Away 2-2 4-2 2-3 2-4 0-5

Conf 5-1 5-3 6-5 4-3 3-7 Conf 6-4 3-4 3-4 2-6 1-2 Conf 6-1 5-2 5-5 3-4 1-7

Home 4-2 4-0 4-1 0-4 3-2 Home 6-0 5-2 3-2 1-4 4-1 Home 6-0 4-1 2-1 2-3 2-4

Away 2-2 2-4 1-5 4-1 0-6 Away 3-2 3-1 3-2 4-2 0-6 Away 4-1 2-3 4-3 2-3 0-4

Conf 6-1 4-3 3-6 1-5 1-5 Conf 6-2 5-1 3-3 5-5 2-5 Conf 6-1 4-3 2-3 4-5 2-6

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest San Antonio Memphis New Orleans Houston Dallas Northwest Denver Portland Oklahoma City Utah Minnesota Pacific Golden State LA Clippers Sacramento LA Lakers Phoenix

W 6 6 5 4 3 W 9 8 6 5 4 W 10 6 6 4 2

L 4 4 6 5 8 L 2 3 4 6 7 L 1 4 4 6 8

Pct .600 .600 .455 .444 .273 Pct .818 .727 .600 .455 .364 Pct .909 .600 .600 .400 .200

GB — — 1½ 1½ 3½ GB — 1 2½ 4 5 GB — 3½ 3½ 5½ 7½

L10 6-4 6-4 4-6 4-5 3-7 L10 8-2 7-3 6-4 4-6 4-6 L10 9-1 6-4 6-4 4-6 2-8

Str L-2 W-1 W-1 W-3 L-1 Str L-1 W-2 W-6 W-1 L-3 Str W-8 W-2 L-1 L-1 L-1

Wednesday Detroit 103, Orlando 96 Oklahoma City 95, Cleveland 86 Miami 95, San Antonio 88 New York 112, Atlanta 107 Memphis 89, Denver 87 New Orleans 107, Chicago 98 Philadelphia 100, Indiana 94 Utah 117, Dallas 102 Toronto at Sacramento, late Minnesota at LA Lakers, late Tuesday Charlotte 113, Atlanta 102 Dallas 119, Washington 100 Brooklyn 104, Phoenix 82 Portland 118, Milwaukee 103 Thursday Houston at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m. Boston at Phoenix, 8 p.m. LA Clippers at Portland, 9 p.m. Milwaukee at Golden State, 9:30 p.m. Friday Charlotte at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Washington at Orlando, 6 p.m. Detroit at Atlanta, 6:30 p.m. Indiana at Miami, 7 p.m. Brooklyn at Denver, 8 p.m. Boston at Utah, 8:30 p.m. Minnesota at Sacramento, 9 p.m. Saturday New York at Toronto, 2 p.m. Milwaukee at LA Clippers, 2:30 p.m. Phoenix at New Orleans, 6 p.m. Cleveland at Chicago, 7 p.m. Philadelphia at Memphis, 7 p.m. Washington at Miami, 7 p.m. Brooklyn at Golden State, 7:30 p.m. Houston at San Antonio, 7:30 p.m. Oklahoma City at Dallas, 8 p.m. LA Lakers at Sacramento, 9 p.m.

Schroder lifts Thunder over Cavaliers ASSOCIATED PRESS

Dennis Schroder scored a season-high 28 points in replacing injured star Russell Westbrook and the Oklahoma City Thunder beat the host Cleveland Cavaliers 95-86 on Wednesday night. Westbrook sprained his left ankle Monday, but the Thunder withstood Cleveland’s fourth-quarter run without the two-time MVP to win its sixth straight game after starting the season 0-4. Rookie point guard Collin Sexton scored a teamhigh 15 points for Cleveland (1-10). Schroder, starting in Westbrook’s place, was 11 for 19 from the field. Paul George scored 18 points and Jermai Grant had 12.

NOTEBOOK

Wade misses game • Dwyane Wade missed Miami’s game against San Antonio on Wednesday night for personal reasons. It was the first game Wade missed this season, his 16th and final in the NBA. He’s averaging 14.3 points on 45 percent shooting in nine games, all of them as a reserve. Jokic fined • The NBA fined Denver Nuggets center Nikola Jokic $25,000 for using derogatory and offensive language during a postgame interview on Oct. 31.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Thunder’s Dennis Schroder shoots over the Cavaliers’ Tristan Thompson during the second half of Wednesday night’s game. Schroder scored 28 points.


BASKETBALL

11.08.2018 • Thursday • M 2

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • B5

New players aim to build on SLU’s success SLU • FROM B1

I’ll shoot with you.’ This summer their mission was that way.” The Billikens lost six players, including their top four scorers, top four rebounders and top three in assists. That group was the core that helped SLU reach unequaled heights, posting a record of 66-30 the last three seasons, reaching the WNIT twice and tying for the Atlantic 10 championship in 2016. Frantz and McMahan are the most experienced returning players. They give Stone a good backcourt tandem around which to build as she incorporates freshman point guard Ciaja Harbison into the spot held for four seasons by Jackie Kemph, the program’s all-time points and assists leader. SLU has five freshmen who form the highest-rated recruiting class in the program’s history. The group was ranked No. 33 in the country by Blue Star Basketball, and Stone said all will be asked to contribute, with two possibly taking spots in the starting lineup. To put the players on the right path, Stone had everyone read Gordon’s book. The team met weekly to discuss each chapter, finishing a week before the season opener Friday night at Eastern Kentucky. “The whole thing is we vs. me. We have to do this thing together,” Stone said. “So offensively and defensively, put your personal pride aside and sacrifice what you have to do for the team.” The Billikens will face a challenging schedule that includes a visit from No. 2-ranked Connecticut and No. 16 Missouri in a six-day span in early December. But Stone said the much-anticipated meeting with the 11-time national champion Huskies has not been mentioned. She is busy dealing with the unknown and how to handle the present. Frantz is the most proven scorer, having averaged 8.2 points as a junior and 11.5 as a sophomore. McMahan averaged 4.4 points last season and was one of the first two players off the

POST-DISPATCH PHOTO

St. Louis University coach Lisa Stone watches play during a game against Fordham in January. At left is Billikens guard Jordyn Frantz.

bench. Stone will have more height and more physicality to rely upon with three players who are 6-feet-5, including senior Tara Dusharm, transfer Amber Lindfors and freshman Brooke Flowers (Metro Academic and Classical High). Other returning players vying for time are guard Tasia Jeffries, forward Kendra Wilken and guard Lauryn Hughes. The freshman to watch is Harbison, a top-100 recruit from Louisville. “Ciaja is great in the open court,” Stone said. “Her pull-up is ridiculous. She’s fun to watch. Ciaja to me is going to be one of the best freshmen in the league. She’s little, but she’s tough and quick and likes to guard. But all of the freshmen are going to have to play, and I told them that.” As the season opens, freshman forward Evan Zars is among the starters. She is 6-2, moves well and is described by Stone as a “stretch four” — a power forward who can stretch defenses with her perimeter shooting. Meanwhile, Stone still was waiting Wednesday for a ruling from the NCAA on an appeal to

SCHEDULE

ROSTER #

Name

Pos

Ht.

Cl.

Hometown (previous)

1

Chloe Rice

G

5-11

Fr.

Marion, Iowa (Marion)

2

Ciaja Harbison

G

5-6

Fr.

Louisville, Ky. (Male)

4

Kerri McMahan

G

5-10 RSr.

Novi, Mich. (Univ. of Akron)

14 Tasia Jeffries

G

5-8

So.

Louisville, Ky. (Butler)

20 Jordyn Frantz

G

6-0

Sr.

Wakarusa, Ind. (NorthWood)

24 Amber Lindfors

C

6-4 RJr. Elk Grove Village, Ill. (Valparaiso U.)

30 Lauryn Hughes

G

5-9

So.

St. Louis (MICDS)

32 Myia Clark

G

5-7

Fr.

Schaumburg, Ill. (Saint Viator)

34 Kendra Wilken

F

6-2

Jr.

Bartelso, Ill. (Breese Central)

35 Myriama Smith Traore

F

6-2

So.

Whitewater, Wis. (Marquette U.)

F/C

6-5

Fr.

St. Louis (Metro Academic)

45 Tara Dusharm

C

6-5

Sr.

Foley, Minn. (Foley)

54 Evan Zars

F

6-2

Fr.

Shawnee, Kan. (Mill Valley)

42 Brooke Flowers

allow Marquette transfer Myriama Smith Traore to play this season. Stone believes she has a strong perimeter shooting team. Frantz is a proven 3-point threat. She said freshman Chloe Rice has a “textbook shot.” Freshman Myia Clark was an Illinois state qualifier in the Queen of the Hill 3-point shooting competition as

Thunder 95, Cavaliers 86

Heat 95, Spurs 88

EASTERN CONFERENCE

Oklahoma City: George 7-16 3-4 18, Grant 4-9 2-2 12, Adams 3-6 3-6 9, Schroder 11-19 6-8 28, Ferguson 1-3 2-2 4, Noel 0-1 0-0 0, Patterson 1-5 0-2 3, Felton 2-6 0-0 4, Diallo 3-7 2-2 8, Abrines 3-12 0-0 9. Totals 35-84 18-26 95. Cleveland: Osman 0-1 0-0 0, Smith 5-17 0-0 13, Thompson 5-13 0-0 10, Sexton 7-14 0-0 15, Hood 3-7 3-3 11, Nance Jr. 3-6 0-0 6, Frye 0-0 0-0 0, Zizic 3-5 4-4 10, Hill 0-0 0-0 0, Korver 2-8 1-1 7, Nwaba 0-1 3-4 3, Clarkson 5-17 0-1 11. Totals 33-89 11-13 86. Oklahoma City 24 — 23 25 23 95 Cleveland 20 20 24 22 — 86 3-point goals: Oklahoma City 7-27 (Abrines 3-10, Grant 2-3, Patterson 1-3, George 1-3, Ferguson 0-1, Diallo 0-2, Felton 0-2, Schroder 0-3), Cleveland 9-31 (Smith 3-11, Hood 2-3, Korver 2-7, Sexton 1-2, Clarkson 1-7, Osman 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Oklahoma City 44 (Adams 13), Cleveland 51 (Thompson 15). Assists: Oklahoma City 10 (George, Adams, Ferguson, Felton 2), Cleveland 17 (Clarkson 8). Total fouls: Oklahoma City 23, Cleveland 26. Technicals: Oklahoma City coach Billy Donovan. A: 19,432 (20,562).

San Antonio: DeRozan 6-15 5-5 18, Cunningham 1-1 0-0 2, Aldridge 2-14 2-2 6, Forbes 4-12 2-2 12, White 0-3 0-0 0, Pondexter 0-0 0-0 0, Bertans 6-10 3-3 19, Poeltl 1-4 1-2 3, Mills 8-22 0-0 20, Belinelli 3-13 0-0 8. Totals 31-94 13-14 88. Miami: McGruder 2-9 0-0 4, Winslow 7-17 1-1 16, Whiteside 10-18 9-11 29, Richardson 6-22 0-0 14, Ellington 7-13 0-0 20, Jones Jr. 0-3 0-0 0, Olynyk 0-0 1-2 1, Adebayo 0-1 2-2 2, Dragic 0-0 0-0 0, T.Johnson 4-10 0-2 9. Totals 36-93 13-18 95. San Antonio 20 22 22 24 — 88 Miami 27 23 25 20 — 95 3-point goals: San Antonio 13-32 (Bertans 4-7, Mills 4-12, Forbes 2-5, Belinelli 2-6, DeRozan 1-2), Miami 10-32 (Ellington 6-10, Richardson 2-6, T.Johnson 1-5, Winslow 1-6, Whiteside 0-1, McGruder 0-4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: San Antonio 49 (Aldridge 16), Miami 60 (Whiteside 20). Assists: San Antonio 19 (DeRozan 8), Miami 21 (Richardson 5). Total fouls: San Antonio 19, Miami 17. A: 19,600 (19,600).

Atlantic Toronto Boston Philadelphia Brooklyn New York Southeast Charlotte Miami Orlando Atlanta Washington Central Milwaukee Indiana Detroit Chicago Cleveland

Pistons 103, Magic 96

Pelicans 107, Bulls 98 Chicago: Ju.Holiday 6-16 2-2 17, Parker 7-14 6-8 20, Carter Jr. 7-11 2-3 17, Payne 2-7 0-0 4, LaVine 9-26 2-2 22, Hutchison 0-4 1-2 1, Felicio 0-0 0-0 0, Lopez 0-1 0-0 0, Arcidiacono 4-6 0-0 11, Blakeney 3-11 0-0 6. Totals 38-96 13-17 98. New Orleans: Johnson 5-7 0-0 12, Davis 13-24 4-7 32, Mirotic 4-14 0-0 9, Jr.Holiday 6-16 4-5 17, Moore 3-9 1-1 8, Miller 4-6 0-0 11, Randle 5-8 1-2 12, Diallo 1-1 2-2 4, Frazier 0-3 0-0 0, Clark 1-6 0-0 2, Williams 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 42-94 12-17 107. 26 24 22 26 — 98 Chicago New Orleans 29 29 27 22 — 107 3-point goals: Chicago 9-31 (Arcidiacono 3-4, Ju.Holiday 3-12, LaVine 2-5, Carter Jr. 1-2, Payne 0-2, Parker 0-3, Blakeney 0-3), New Orleans 11-30 (Miller 3-4, Johnson 2-3, Davis 2-4, Randle 1-2, Moore 1-3, Jr.Holiday 1-4, Mirotic 1-8, Clark 0-1, Frazier 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Chicago 46 (Parker 13), New Orleans 55 (Davis, Mirotic 15). Assists: Chicago 18 (LaVine 4), New Orleans 32 (Jr.Holiday 9). Total fouls: Chicago 16, New Orleans 18. Technicals: Chicago coach Fred Hoiberg. A: 15,514 (16,867).

Knicks 112, Hawks 107 New York: Dotson 1-1 0-0 3, Vonleh 4-10 1-2 11, Robinson 2-2 1-2 5, Ntilikina 5-10 2-2 14, Hardaway Jr. 8-22 16-20 34, Hezonja 0-2 1-2 1, Knox 0-6 0-0 0, Kanter 5-7 7-10 17, Mudiay 4-8 0-2 11, Trier 5-9 5-7 16. Totals 34-77 33-47 112. Atlanta: Bembry 3-6 0-0 7, Spellman 6-11 3-3 18, Len 3-8 2-4 9, Young 6-19 2-2 15, Bazemore 4-16 7-9 16, Prince 6-15 2-4 16, Poythress 2-3 0-0 4, Dedmon 1-3 0-0 2, Plumlee 4-5 0-0 8, Lin 1-3 6-7 9, Carter 1-3 0-0 6. Totals 37-92 22-29 107. 26 26 35 25 — 112 New York Atlanta 26 29 18 34 — 107 3-point goals: New York 11-30 (Mudiay 3-3, Ntilikina 2-4, Vonleh 2-5, Hardaway Jr. 2-11, Dotson 1-1, Trier 1-2, Hezonja 0-1, Knox 0-3), Atlanta 12-39 (Spellman 3-5, Carter 2-4, Prince 2-10, Lin 1-1, Bembry 1-2, Len 1-2, Bazemore 1-7, Young 1-7, Dedmon 0-1). Fouled out: Ntilikina. Rebounds: New York 48 (Vonleh 13), Atlanta 45 (Spellman 10). Assists: New York 15 (Mudiay, Hardaway Jr., Ntilikina 3), Atlanta 27 (Young 8). Total fouls: New York 30, Atlanta 30. Technicals: New York coach Knicks (Defensive three second), Atlanta coach Hawks (Defensive three second) 2, Prince. A: 12,412 (18,118).

Grizzlies 89, Nuggets 87 Denver: Craig 2-5 1-2 5, Millsap 1-7 0-0 2, Jokic 0-1 4-4 4, Murray 6-21 1-2 15, Harris 6-16 5-6 20, Hernangomez 3-6 0-0 7, Plumlee 4-6 2-2 10, Lyles 6-9 2-3 16, Morris 4-10 0-0 8, Beasley 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 32-82 15-19 87. Memphis: Anderson 5-9 3-4 14, Jackson Jr. 7-15 4-6 20, Gasol 6-13 7-7 20, Conley 2-9 0-0 4, Temple 1-4 3-4 5, Rabb 1-2 0-0 2, Mack 2-4 0-0 6, D.Brooks 1-5 2-2 4, M.Brooks 4-7 0-0 9, Selden 1-2 2-2 5. Totals 30-70 21-25 89. — 29 18 23 17 87 Denver Memphis 28 20 19 — 89 22 3-point goals: Denver 8-32 (Harris 3-6, Lyles 2-5, Murray 2-9, Hernangomez 1-4, Beasley 0-1, Jokic 0-1, Millsap 0-1, Craig 0-2, Morris 0-3), Memphis 8-21 (Mack 2-3, Jackson Jr. 2-5, Gasol 1-2, Anderson 1-2, M.Brooks 1-2, Selden 1-2, D.Brooks 0-1, Conley 0-2, Temple 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Denver 41 (Lyles 9), Memphis 36 (Gasol 12). Assists: Denver 19 (Murray 7), Memphis 19 (Conley 8). Total fouls: Denver 22, Memphis 22. Technicals: Denver coach Nuggets (Defensive three second), Memphis coach Grizzlies (Defensive three second) 3. A: 15,832 (18,119).

Stu Durando @studurando on Twitter sdurando@post-dispatch.com

NBA STANDINGS

NBA SUMMARIES

Detroit: Robinson III 2-7 4-4 9, Griffin 7-17 5-6 20, Drummond 10-16 2-2 23, Jackson 5-11 4-5 15, Bullock 0-6 1-1 1, Johnson 5-10 0-0 13, Pachulia 0-3 2-2 2, Smith 4-11 0-0 8, Galloway 4-8 0-0 12, Calderon 0-1 0-0 0, Brown 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 37-90 18-20 103. Orlando: Iwundu 2-3 0-0 4, Gordon 7-15 0-0 15, Vucevic 6-14 2-2 14, Augustin 6-10 1-1 16, Fournier 12-19 0-0 27, Martin 0-5 0-0 0, Bamba 1-2 0-0 2, Grant 0-2 0-0 0, Ross 6-12 1-2 15, Simmons 0-5 3-4 3. Totals 40-87 7-9 96. Detroit 26 32 20 25 — 103 Orlando 31 29 16 96 20 — 3-point goals: Detroit 11-37 (Galloway 4-8, Johnson 3-6, Drummond 1-1, Robinson III 1-4, Griffin 1-5, Jackson 1-6, Calderon 0-1, Bullock 0-2, Smith 0-4), Orlando 9-27 (Fournier 3-6, Augustin 3-6, Ross 2-5, Gordon 1-4, Bamba 0-1, Martin 0-2, Vucevic 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Detroit 50 (Drummond 19), Orlando 40 (Gordon 10). Assists: Detroit 21 (Smith, Jackson 4), Orlando 28 (Augustin 7). Total fouls: Detroit 15, Orlando 19. Technicals: Griffin, Orlando coach Magic (Defensive three second) 2. A: 16,103 (18,846).

a sophomore. “We’re in uncharted territory,” Stone said. “We were picked to finish seventh in the A-10, and I hope we can surprise some people. It’s certainly not where we want to end up.”

Fri. 11/9 at Eastern Kentucky, 11 a.m. vs. Indiana State, 4:30 p.m. Tue. 11/13 vs. Cincinnati, 2 p.m. Sun. 11/18 Tue. 11/20 at Tulsa, 7 p.m. at Chattanooga, 3:30 p.m. Sat. 11/24 Sun. 11/25 at Virginia, 2:30 p.m. Thu. 11/29 vs. Southern Illinois, 7 p.m. vs. SIUE, 7 p.m. Sat. 12/1 vs. UConn, 6 p.m. Tue. 12/4 vs. Missouri, 5 p.m. Sun. 12/9 Thu. 12/20 at Illinois State, 11 a.m. Fri. 12/28 vs. Yale at Boca Raton, 1:30 p.m. Sat. 12/29 TBA at Boca Raton, Fla. at UMass, 1 p.m. Sun. 1/6 at Saint Joseph’s, 10:30 a.m. Wed. 1/9 Sun. 1/13 vs. Fordham, 3 p.m. vs. Rhode Island, 7 p.m. Wed. 1/16 at St. Bonaventure, noon Sun. 1/20 Wed. 1/23 vs. Dayton, 11 a.m. Sun. 1/27 at VCU, noon Thu. 1/31 vs. George Mason, 7 p.m. Sun. 2/3 vs. George Washington, 1 p.m. Wed. 2/6 at Fordham, 6 p.m. Sun. 2/10 vs. La Salle, 2 p.m. Wed. 2/13 at Duquesne, 10 a.m. Sun. 2/17 vs. Richmond, 2 p.m. at Davidson, 1 p.m. Sat. 2/23 vs. VCU, 7 p.m. Wed. 2/27 Sat. 3/2 at Dayton, 1 p.m. March 5-10 Atlantic 10 Championship

76ers 100, Pacers 94 Philadelphia: Covington 5-9 1-1 13, Saric 6-13 2-2 18, Embiid 7-16 5-6 20, Simmons 7-12 2-4 16, Fultz 3-7 1-2 7, Chandler 1-3 0-0 2, Am.Johnson 1-2 0-0 2, Shamet 4-8 1-1 12, Redick 2-9 6-6 10. Totals 36-79 18-22 100. Indiana: Bogdanovic 4-11 2-2 13, Young 3-8 0-0 6, Turner 2-8 3-4 7, Collison 0-3 0-0 0, Oladipo 14-30 4-6 36, McDermott 0-2 0-1 0, Sabonis 7-14 2-2 16, O’Quinn 0-2 0-0 0, Joseph 4-6 0-0 9, Evans 3-10 1-2 7. Totals 37-94 12-17 94. Philadelphia 29 21 28 22 — 100 Indiana 23 27 21 23 — 94 3-point goals: Philadelphia 10-32 (Saric 4-6, Shamet 3-6, Covington 2-6, Embiid 1-5, Chandler 0-2, Redick 0-7), Indiana 8-31 (Oladipo 4-14, Bogdanovic 3-6, Joseph 1-3, McDermott 0-1, Sabonis 0-1, O’Quinn 0-1, Evans 0-2, Young 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Philadelphia 42 (Embiid, Simmons 10), Indiana 42 (Sabonis 11). Assists: Philadelphia 24 (Simmons 8), Indiana 19 (Oladipo 7). Total fouls: Philadelphia 18, Indiana 21. Technicals: Philadelphia coach 76ers (Defensive three second). A: 16,434 (20,000).

Jazz 117, Mavericks 102 Dallas: Barnes 4-13 4-4 14, Doncic 7-14 7-7 24, Jordan 2-5 7-8 11, Smith Jr. 3-6 2-3 10, Matthews 4-10 5-6 13, Finney-Smith 0-3 0-0 0, Kleber 1-4 0-0 2, Powell 1-2 4-5 6, Mejri 0-1 0-0 0, Brunson 5-7 0-0 11, Barea 2-8 7-7 11. Totals 29-73 36-40 102. Utah: Ingles 2-9 0-0 6, Favors 5-9 2-4 13, Gobert 7-9 3-7 17, Rubio 3-13 3-4 10, Mitchell 9-17 2-2 23, O’Neale 3-6 1-1 7, Crowder 6-12 1-2 14, Udoh 0-0 0-0 0, Niang 0-1 0-0 0, Exum 2-3 4-4 9, Burks 6-10 2-2 18. Totals 43-89 18-26 117. Dallas 38 — 102 18 27 19 Utah 38 18 — 30 31 117 3-point goals: Dallas 8-24 (Doncic 3-4, Smith Jr. 2-2, Barnes 2-5, Brunson 1-2, Kleber 0-2, Barea 0-3, Matthews 0-3, Finney-Smith 0-3), Utah 13-37 (Burks 4-5, Mitchell 3-8, Ingles 2-8, Favors 1-1, Exum 1-2, Rubio 1-5, Crowder 1-6, O’Neale 0-1, Niang 0-1). Fouled out: Gobert. Rebounds: Dallas 49 (Jordan 12), Utah 35 (Gobert 10). Assists: Dallas 14 (Matthews 4), Utah 31 (Rubio 12). Total fouls: Dallas 27, Utah 32. Technicals: Mejri, Dallas coach Mavericks (Defensive three second), Smith Jr., Utah coach Jazz (Defensive three second), Favors, Rubio. A: 18,306 (18,306).

Raptors 114, Kings 105 Toronto: Leonard 7-17 9-9 25, Siakam 8-11 5-5 21, Ibaka 6-10 0-0 14, Lowry 6-13 2-3 16, Green 2-10 0-0 6, Anunoby 5-9 0-0 11, Valanciunas 4-6 3-4 11, Wright 0-3 2-2 2, VanVleet 3-9 0-0 8, Richardson 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 41-88 21-23 114. Sacramento: Shumpert 2-4 1-2 6, Bjelica 0-5 0-0 0, Cauley-Stein 10-15 4-5 24, Fox 8-15 2-4 20, Hield 9-22 3-3 24, Jackson 0-0 0-0 0, Bagley III 5-8 2-2 13, Koufos 1-6 0-0 2, Mason 1-3 0-0 2, Bogdanovic 3-7 0-0 7, Williams 3-3 1-2 7. Totals 42-88 13-18 105. Toronto 29 35 30 20 — 114 Sacramento 26 25 27 27 — 105 3-point goals: Toronto 11-36 (Ibaka 2-3, Leonard 2-5, VanVleet 2-6, Green 2-8, Lowry 2-8, Anunoby 1-3, Wright 0-1, Siakam 0-2), Sacramento 8-23 (Hield 3-9, Fox 2-4, Bagley III 1-1, Shumpert 1-3, Bogdanovic 1-3, Mason 0-1, Bjelica 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Toronto 53 (Ibaka 14), Sacramento 31 (Cauley-Stein 8). Assists: Toronto 17 (Lowry 8), Sacramento 27 (Shumpert 6). Total fouls: Toronto 20, Sacramento 26. Technicals: Sacramento coach David Joerger, Bjelica, Sacramento coach Kings (Defensive three second). A: 17,583 (17,608).

Lakers 114, T’Wolves 110 MINNESOTA (110): Wiggins 8-14 0-0 19, Gibson 6-14 1-2 16, Towns 5-16 2-2 13, Rose 11-17 2-2 31, Butler 9-18 1-1 24, Tolliver 1-2 0-0 3, Dieng 1-5 2-2 4, Jones 0-2 0-0 0, Okogie 0-3 0-0 0. Totals 41-91 8-9 110. L.A. LAKERS (114): James 10-21 1-2 24, Kuzma 8-15 1-2 21, McGee 8-10 0-0 16, Ball 1-6 1-2 3, Ingram 8-14 2-2 20, Chandler 1-4 0-0 2, Rondo 1-7 0-0 2, Caldwell-Pope 2-4 0-0 5, Hart 5-7 6-6 21, Stephenson 0-3 0-0 0. Totals 44-91 11-14 114. Minnesota 32 35 21 22 — 110 L.A. Lakers 30 35 21 28 — 114 3-Point Goals: Minnesota 20-40 (Rose 7-9, Butler 5-8, Gibson 3-5, Wiggins 3-7, Tolliver 1-2, Towns 1-6, Okogie 0-1, Dieng 0-2), L.A. Lakers 15-34 (Hart 5-7, Kuzma 4-7, James 3-9, Ingram 2-3, Caldwell-Pope 1-3, Stephenson 0-1, Rondo 0-1, Ball 0-3). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Minnesota 40 (Gibson 11), L.A. Lakers 47 (James 10). Assists: Minnesota 22 (Rose, Butler, Wiggins 5), L.A. Lakers 32 (Rondo 10). Total Fouls: Minnesota 17, L.A. Lakers 14. A: 1,897 (18,997).

NBA LEADERS Through Tuesday’s games Scoring G Curry, GOL 11 Embiid, PHL 11 Griffin, DET 9 Walker, CHA 11

FG 117 105 87 106

FT 48 88 56 51

PTS 344 312 253 309

AVG 31.3 28.4 28.1 28.1

W 11 6 7 5 4 W 6 5 4 3 2 W 8 7 5 3 1

L 1 4 5 6 8 L 5 5 7 8 8 L 2 5 5 9 10

Pct .917 .600 .583 .455 .333 Pct .545 .500 .364 .273 .200 Pct .800 .583 .500 .250 .091

GB — 4 4 5½ 7 GB — ½ 2 3 3½ GB — 2 3 6 7½

L10 9-1 6-4 6-4 5-5 3-7 L10 6-4 5-5 3-7 3-7 2-8 L10 8-2 6-4 5-5 3-7 1-9

Str W-5 L-2 W-1 W-2 W-1 Str W-2 W-2 L-1 L-2 L-1 Str L-1 L-2 W-1 L-1 L-4

Home 6-0 3-1 6-0 3-2 2-4 Home 4-2 3-2 2-5 2-3 1-3 Home 6-0 3-3 3-2 1-5 1-5

Away 5-1 3-3 1-5 2-4 2-4 Away 2-3 2-3 2-2 1-5 1-5 Away 2-2 4-2 2-3 2-4 0-5

Conf 5-1 5-3 6-5 4-3 3-7 Conf 6-4 3-4 3-4 2-6 1-2 Conf 6-1 5-2 5-5 3-4 1-7

L10 6-4 6-4 4-6 4-5 3-7 L10 8-2 7-3 6-4 4-6 3-7 L10 9-1 6-4 6-4 5-5 2-8

Str L-2 W-1 W-1 W-3 L-1 Str L-1 W-2 W-6 W-1 L-4 Str W-8 W-2 L-2 W-1 L-1

Home 4-2 4-0 4-1 0-4 3-2 Home 6-0 5-2 3-2 1-4 4-1 Home 6-0 4-1 2-2 3-3 2-4

Away 2-2 2-4 1-5 4-1 0-6 Away 3-2 3-1 3-2 4-2 0-7 Away 4-1 2-3 4-3 2-3 0-4

Conf 6-1 4-3 3-6 1-5 1-5 Conf 6-2 5-1 3-3 5-5 2-6 Conf 6-1 4-3 2-3 5-5 2-6

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest San Antonio Memphis New Orleans Houston Dallas Northwest Denver Portland Oklahoma City Utah Minnesota Pacific Golden State LA Clippers Sacramento LA Lakers Phoenix

W 6 6 5 4 3 W 9 8 6 5 4 W 10 6 6 5 2

L 4 4 6 5 8 L 2 3 4 6 8 L 1 4 5 6 8

Pct .600 .600 .455 .444 .273 Pct .818 .727 .600 .455 .333 Pct .909 .600 .545 .455 .200

GB — — 1½ 1½ 3½ GB — 1 2½ 4 5½ GB — 3½ 4 5 7½

Wednesday Detroit 103, Orlando 96 Oklahoma City 95, Cleveland 86 Miami 95, San Antonio 88 New York 112, Atlanta 107 Memphis 89, Denver 87 New Orleans 107, Chicago 98 Philadelphia 100, Indiana 94 Utah 117, Dallas 102 Toronto 114, Sacramento 105 LA Lakers 114, Minnesota 110 Tuesday Charlotte 113, Atlanta 102 Dallas 119, Washington 100 Brooklyn 104, Phoenix 82 Portland 118, Milwaukee 103 Thursday Houston at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m. Boston at Phoenix, 8 p.m. LA Clippers at Portland, 9 p.m. Milwaukee at Golden State, 9:30 p.m. Friday Charlotte at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Washington at Orlando, 6 p.m. Detroit at Atlanta, 6:30 p.m. Indiana at Miami, 7 p.m. Brooklyn at Denver, 8 p.m. Boston at Utah, 8:30 p.m. Minnesota at Sacramento, 9 p.m. Saturday New York at Toronto, 2 p.m. Milwaukee at LA Clippers, 2:30 p.m. Phoenix at New Orleans, 6 p.m. Cleveland at Chicago, 7 p.m. Philadelphia at Memphis, 7 p.m. Washington at Miami, 7 p.m. Brooklyn at Golden State, 7:30 p.m. Houston at San Antonio, 7:30 p.m. Oklahoma City at Dallas, 8 p.m. LA Lakers at Sacramento, 9 p.m.

Schroder lifts Thunder over Cavaliers ASSOCIATED PRESS

Dennis Schroder scored a season-high 28 points in replacing injured star Russell Westbrook and the Oklahoma City Thunder beat the host Cleveland Cavaliers 95-86 on Wednesday night. Westbrook sprained his left ankle Monday, but the Thunder withstood Cleveland’s fourth-quarter run without the two-time MVP to win its sixth straight game after starting the season 0-4. Rookie point guard Collin Sexton scored a teamhigh 15 points for Cleveland (1-10). Schroder, starting in Westbrook’s place, was 11 for 19 from the field. Paul George scored 18 points and Jermai Grant had 12.

NOTEBOOK

Wade misses game • Dwyane Wade missed Miami’s game against San Antonio on Wednesday night for personal reasons. It was the first game Wade missed this season, his 16th and final in the NBA. He’s averaging 14.3 points on 45 percent shooting in nine games, all of them as a reserve. Jokic fined • The NBA fined Denver Nuggets center Nikola Jokic $25,000 for using derogatory and offensive language during a postgame interview on Oct. 31.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Thunder’s Dennis Schroder shoots over the Cavaliers’ Tristan Thompson during the second half of Wednesday night’s game. Schroder scored 28 points.


BASEBALL

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 11.08.2018

CARDINALS NOTEBOOK

Ankiel hits a bump in his comeback effort Elbow surgery will keep him out until midseason BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CARLSBAD, CALIF. • The third act of Rick Ankiel’s career with the Cardinals has been delayed a few months as the lefty recovers from elbow surgery that has slowed his comeback attempt. On the verge of returning to the Cardinals and possibly joining spring training as a lefty reliever, Ankiel felt some soreness in his elbow that required a repair that halted his throwing. The Cardinals believe he will be ready to pitch by midseason, and they intend to be there with a minorleague contract offer when he’s available, according to multiple sources. “Expectations are he still wants to give it a try,” said John Mozeliak, the Cardinals’ president of baseball operations.” Ankiel, 39, has not thrown a pitch in professional competition since 2004, and during spring training 2005 with the Cardinals he was so besieged by control issues and uncertainty that he retired as a pitcher. The former top prospect reinvented himself as a slugging outfielder and emerged several years later as the Cardinals’ everyday center fielder. He has resisted overtures to pitch again, including one made a couple of years ago by a Cardinals coach, until this past fall, when he appeared on a team with other former bigleaguers. He faced one hitter, struck him out, and touched 89 mph with his fastball. He had a familiar snap to his curve. Ankiel, an employee of Fox Sports Midwest, the Cardinals’ rights holders, explained that he was curious about returning to competition as a pitcher, in part, so his children could see him play. He and Mozeliak met earlier this fall about an agreement, and the Cardinals intend to reach one with him when he’s healthy. Ankiel has been rehabbing and recovering at the Cardinals’ complex in Jupiter, Fla., and will continue to do so. Mozeliak referred to him as “part of the Cardinals’ family.”

POST-DISPATCH PHOTO

Former Cardinals pitcher and outfielder Rick Ankiel at spring training last February in Jupiter, Fla.

The surgery Ankiel had is similar to the one Seth Maness had to accelerate his recovery from an injury that had required Tommy John surgery in the past. The surgery reattaches the ligament to the bone instead of doing a complete reconstruction of the joint when there’s a rupture in the middle of the ligament. St. Louisbased surgeon Dr. George Paletta has researched and performed “primary repair,” and it has reduced the amount of recovery time from a year to far less. That will allow Ankiel to have a feel for his comeback attempt by May.

SHIFTY BUSINESS

No team in the majors was less likely to shift against a lefthanded batter this past season than the Cardinals, and that is something the front office believes will change in 2019 because new manager Mike Shildt has embraced an approach the Cardinals were slow to adopt at the major-league level. An increased use and

proficiency in shifts is seen by the team as one way to improve a defense that led the majors in errors. “I think it also has to do with a manager philosophy, too,” Mozeliak said. “We had a shift in our manager, and I would anticipate that you will see the Cardinals shift more in the future. It also does come into play with your personnel. Do you have a comfortable level of putting your third baseman behind second? We’re going to be more open-minded.” According to shifting statistics maintained by MLB.com, the Cardinals shifted 272 times, the second-fewest in the majors and the fewest in the National League. Houston, annually the most aggressive team when it comes to defensive shifts, had 2,192. The Cubs ranked 28th in the majors, at 316. The idea of clustering infielders on the right side of the diamond against lefthanded sluggers has been around at least since Cleveland realized Ted Wil-

Boras extols Harper’s virtues CARDINALS • FROM B1

Boras has referred repeatedly to Harper as a “generational talent,” and when he elaborated Wednesday his description was as much GQ, Forbes and Popular Mechanics as it was the title he borrowed, Harper’s Bazaar. “It’s fashionable. It’s historical. It’s elite. Global, certainly,” Boras said. “And it has inspirations that deal with great shoes and great hair. When you’re in a category of talent and player in the game that rarely, rarely is there, you’re talking about a process that I think is very unconventional. You’re dealing with a generational player, and what is a generational player? He holds the quality of elite performance. He’s … available for the greatest numbers of elite years for performance. “You’ve seen an owner’s dream happen before you,” Boras concluded. “For an owner to know that the rocket ship of economic opportunity is just blasting off — because the player is just entering the prime of his career.” The cover charge to enter the bidding on the “rocket ship” is not clear, though what it’s not was revealed Wednesday. The Washington Post reported that the Nationals presented Harper a 10-year, $300 million offer before their exclusive negotiating rights lapsed with their free agent. The deal did not include any opt-outs or a no-trade clause. The Washington Post made the point that it’s the largest contract ever offered a free agent in any of the continent’s four major sports. Harper’s side declined and reached open market. The decade-long length of the contract is coveted by Harper, and it’s long been believed that his side would aim to eclipse the $325 million value of Giancarlo Stanton’s record deal. Stanton was not a free agent, so that contract happened in single-team negotiations. Zack Greinke has the highest annual average value in history at $34 million per year, and it’s reasonable to expect Harper – younger than Greinke, and an everyday player – to seek a deal that surpasses that record as well. “He brings a dynamic to the clubhouse that few people can bring,” Washington general manager Mike Rizzo said. “He was a kid who played with his hair on fire the first three or four years of his career. What we didn’t realize was this guy has a huge baseball IQ. He wants to be great. We knew he was good. He wanted to be great. He wants to be the best. … He’s a young MVP, youngest All-Star ever. He’s got a shelf full of awards that show the type of player he is. He (was) a grizzled

liams was a pull hitter. Baseball has seen a pandemic of shift uses, however, in recent years, and the Cardinals have routinely shifted the least. The Cardinals were one of the few teams — and the only team in the National League Central — that did not regularly shift on Cubs first baseman Anthony Rizzo, and the Cardinals shifted on a league-low 6.8 percent of plate appearances by lefthanded batters. Mozeliak agreed that the stats were fair and that internal or propriety stats offer a similar view. One reason behind that is the subtle moves that don’t qualify as shifts that coach Jose Oquendo had his infielders make, especially shortstop, and another has been the range shown by second baseman Kolten Wong. Several Cardinals pitchers have also expressed a distaste for shifts behind them, and former manager Mike Matheny responded to those wishes. At the same time, the Cardinals were expanding the use of shifts in the minors to make players more comfortable with them. That includes pitchers. “It’s more the mindset of past employees and how they were thinking about trying to be aggressive,” Mozeliak said. “We’re not opposed to it.”

EXTRA BASES

Steve Turco, a longtime scout, coach and manager for the Cardinals, will be honored in December with Minor League Baseball’s Mike Coolbaugh Award. Turco, whose Gulf Coast League team won the league championship in 2017, has been selected for the award because of his “outstanding work ethic, knowledge of the game, and skill in mentoring young players on the field.” … Former Cardinals outfielder Matt Holliday intends to play in 2019. He finished this past season with Colorado after joining the Rockies’ organization late in the season. Houston had approached him in the past about a possible role at DH, and he has mentioned the appeal of being with an organization he knows well, like the Rockies. Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com

BASEBALL NOTEBOOK

Sabathia set to retire after one more season ASSOCIATED PRESS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Outfielder Bryce Harper is a ‘generational talent,’ according to his agent, Scott Boras.

veteran at 25 years old that’s done a lot in the game already. He’s just scratching the surface.” The Cardinals, by rule, do not discuss specific free agents or their pursuits. When it comes to a transcendent player like Harper, they do not have any reluctance to offer opt-out clauses in contracts — they did before with Jason Heyward — and they routinely provide players notrade clauses. In their pursuit of Stanton a year ago via trade, they proved willing to take on a salary greater than $255 million and a cost greater than $300 million. Three times in the past three offseasons, the Cardinals have made bids on players that would have cost them close to $200 million or more. They landed none. “I don’t think the fact that we haven’t gotten some big deals done changes whether we were able to offer another big deal going forward,” general manager Michael Girsch said. “Look, all of these markets for elite players have more than one team chasing them, and only one team gets them. That doesn’t affect our level of interest in doing that where we see an opportunity that makes sense for us.” Girsch did not need an analogy when making his list. “We want the best hitter we can get who fits in with our team,” he said. Boras said that he intends to meet with any team that expresses interest in Harper and every team Harper points him toward. Asked Wednesday if Harper had a preference for the size of city, location of city, or site of spring training, Boras insisted his client is open to all things. He specifically remarked how Harper enjoyed San Francisco — the Giants are a likely suitor — and the crowds that

gather at AT&T Park. He’d say a similar thing about the Cardinals, their history, and crowds that fill Busch Stadium. Boras, personally, has a fondness for the Cardinals franchise that goes deeper than any sales pitch, and he refers to the late George Kissell, a beloved Cardinals coach, as a mentor. After several highprofile players have rejected the Cardinals’ offers, there are reasons to believe Harper would entertain one. As he hopscotched from zinger to answers Wednesday, Boras hinted at the numbers he’s presenting teams about Harper. He contends Harper will increase franchise value, especially for teams that own their own networks or a share of their rights holders, as the Cardinals do. He suggested talent is better than “Andy and Mayberry reruns.” He notes how players at Harper’s age rarely hit the open market, and often zoom toward Cooperstown with their peak-year performance. Since 2005, there have been four 1.100 OPS seasons in baseball. Albert Pujols has three. Harper has the other one, in 2015. Asked after his meeting with the press if a major talent needs a major market to maximize his “rocket ship” of possibilities, Boras paused. Major players make markets major. “Because you hold an asset that no one else has when you have a generational player,” Boras said. “We saw Ken Griffey Jr. go to Seattle and make Seattle something very different than it was. I think the point is you can have oil wells in Midland, Texas, and it’s still an oil well.” Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com

CC Sabathia says 2019 will be his final season in the major leagues. “This will be it,” the 38-yearold lefthander said in a video posted on Twitter on Wednesday after the New York Yankees finalized his $8 million, oneyear contract. Sabathia and New York had reached the agreement Tuesday, subject to a successful physical. A six-time All-Star and the 2007 AL Cy Young Award winner, Sabathia went 9-7 with a 3.65 earned-run average in 29 starts this year. He had surgery on his right knee after the 2010 season, in July 2014, after the 2016 season and again last month. Sabathia pitches with a brace on the knee and needs periodic injections there during the season. He is 246-153 in 18 major league seasons with a 3.70 ERA and 2,986 strikeouts, including 129-80 in a decade with the Yankees. His new deal boosts his pay from New York to $229 million. Sabathia signed a $161 million, seven-year contract with the Yankees before the 2009 season and led New York to its first World Series title since 2000, then used the leverage of an opt-out provision after the 2011 season to get a new deal that added a $25 million salary for 2016 with a $25 million team option for 2017. Sabathia took a cut to $10 million this year. He missed a $500,000 performance bonus by two innings when he was ejected in his last regularseason start for hitting Tampa Bay’s Jesus Sucre after Rays pitcher Andrew Kittredge threw up and in to Austin Romine. Sabathia was suspended the first five games of 2019 but has appealed. The Yankees’ projected rotation for 2019 also includes righthanders Luis Severino and Masahiro Tanaka, and general manager Brian Cashman says he intends to add several pitchers. Cashman said Luke Voit (Lafeyette High) will head to spring training as the starter at first base, and it will be up to Greg Bird to earn the job back. Bird had ankle surgery in late March, returned in mid-May and hit .199 with 11 homers and 38 RBIs. Voit, acquired from the Cardinals on July 28, hit .333 with 14 homers and 33 RBIs in 39 games.

Dodgers exercise Roberts’ option • The Los Angeles Dodgers have exercised their option on Dave Roberts’ contract for 2019 while continuing to work on a long-term deal for the manager, who has taken the team to consecutive World Series. Andrew Friedman, the Dodgers’ president of baseball operations, says the team is “optimistic about working something out long-term.” “The reason that we’ve kind of slowed down a little bit is we’ve got a lot of coaching staff decisions to make and interviews,” Friedman said Wednesday at the general managers’ meetings. “I think it speaks more to the optimism that something is going to definitely get done and allows us to kind of focus on what we need to near-term.” Sanchez to have shoulder surgery • Gary Sanchez will have surgery on his left shoulder this week, but the Yankees catcher is expected to be ready by opening day. The procedure is to remove loose debris from Sanchez’s non-throwing shoulder. The recovery is expected to be about three months. Sanchez was an All-Star two seasons ago but had a disappointing 2018, batting .186 with 18 homers and 53 RBIs. He was limited by a groin injury for much of the season. Swanson has wrist surgery • Atlanta Braves shortstop Dansby Swanson is expected to be ready for spring training following surgery on his left wrist. The Braves said that Swanson had a procedure Monday to remove a “loose body” in the wrist. The 24-year-old Swanson hit .238 with 14 home runs and 59 RBIs in 136 games last season. He was left off the National League Division Series roster against the Los Angeles Dodgers after tearing a ligament in his left hand late in the season. Blue Jays hire Hudgens • Toronto hired Astros hitting coach Dave Hudgens as their bench coach under new manager Charlie Montoyo. The 61-year-old Hudgens spent the past four seasons with Houston, where he won a World Series in 2017. He previously worked as the hitting coach for the New York Mets and Oakland Athletics. DeMarlo Hale previously served as Toronto’s bench coach from 2013-2018.


HOCKEY

11.08.2018 • Thursday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • B7

BLUES NOTEBOOK

Johnson glad to get first win with Blues Goalie hasn’t played much with team’s light early schedule BY JIM THOMAS st. Louis Post-dispatch

It was a milestone of sorts for backup goalie Chad Johnson, turning aside 38 of 39 Carolina shots to post his first victory as a member of the Blues in Tuesday’s 4-1 triumph. “It’s just nice to get the first one out of the way,” Johnson said. “It was big for our team. I just wanted to come in and be solid with my game, try and get the two points, and it worked out for us.” He was all that and more against the Hurricanes. He tracked the puck well, limited rebounds, and although Carolina didn’t have a ton of prime scoring chances, he made the big saves when called upon. So did he commemorate the night by saving a puck from the game? As a veteran who’s played in at least parts of nine NHL seasons, Johnson’s enthusiasm for that was, uh, lukewarm at best.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Blues goaltender Chad Johnson is congratulated by teammates Zach Sanford and Alex Pietrangelo after the Blues beat the Carolina Hurricanes 4-1 on Tuesday night at Enterprise Center.

“I’ve played for a lot of teams, so I have a lot of first wins,” Johnson said. “Sometimes I save them. I might get a puck here, I’m not even sure.” Then, as if debating himself, he concluded: “Probably not. Ryan (O’Reilly) got the hat trick, he can have it.” The Blues have one of the lightest early-season schedules of anyone in the National Hockey League. Only Florida has played

fewer games (11) than the Blues’ 13. So opportunities for playing time have been scarce for Johnson, 32, who has appeared in regular-season games for the New York Rangers, the then-Phoenix Coyotes, Boston Bruins, New York Islanders, Buffalo Sabres, Calgary Flames and now the Blues. All after being drafted in the fifth round by the Pittsburgh Penguins in 2006. Memento or not, Johnson’s

work against Carolina had to be reassuring for Blues fans who might have wondered why the team would sign a goalie who posted a 3.55 goals-against average and a .891 save percentage last season for the Sabres. That easily was Johnson’s worst season statistically in the NHL, but he was playing for the NHL’s worst team — the Sabres finished with a mere 62 points. Entering last season, his career numbers were better than those of last year’s Blues backup, Carter Hutton, and not far off Jake Allen’s. “We’ve typically been a place where goalies can come in and do very well,” coach Mike Yeo said. “That’s why Chad signed here. So we’ve gotta shore up our game ... when we get real strong or solid in our defensive game, then we’ll give those guys a chance every night.” In four games this season, two in relief of Allen, Johnson has a 2.47 goals-against average and a save percentage of .919.

coaching staff that practice had been called off for the day. Some instructions were attached. “No practice,” said forward Ivan Barbashev, “(but) it would be a real good thing to do something as a team, like a workout or just some fun. I think it’s a good decision, to be honest.” The result was a game of twotouch soccer on the floor of Enterprise. The idea of the game is to keep the ball in the air. “If it hits the ground, the last guy who touched it, he’s out,” Barbashev said. “It was fun.” After a couple of tough losses, a tough game Tuesday against Carolina, and all sorts of speculation — including plenty involving the head coach’s job security — Yeo decided to hit the pause button. “There’s been a lot of emotion lately,” he said. “You can see in parts of our game sometimes, you can almost see some hesitation, just not quite as quick. So just kind of a mental reset day. Get the guys a chance to recover from last night and get prepared for a good, hard practice tomorrow.”

PAUSE BUTTON

Blues players were watching video Wednesday morning at Enterprise Center when informed by the

Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com

In first season with Blues, O’Reilly is leading scorer BLUES • FROM B1

“That’s surprising that’s his first hat trick,” said Blues backup goalie Chad Johnson, who has been a teammate of O’Reilly two of the previous three seasons in Buffalo. “He deserves it. He’s been through a lot over the course of the last few years. He’s been in some tough situations. It’s nice to see him get rewarded. He works so hard and he wants to win so bad.” “This is what we were hoping for from him,” Blues coach Mike Yeo said. “For me, that was just a reward of consistent good play. When he’s on top of his game, he’s engaged in battles, he’s winning faceoffs, he’s a strong two-way center, he’s impacting the game defensively in our zone and all over the ice, and obviously he’s impacting the game offensively. I think we’ve seen his value, what he’s brought to the power play. We’ve seen his power, what he brought to us in depth of offense. I feel that’s been consistent all year

long. He’s been giving those things. When you play consistent hockey, when you do the right thing, some nights the puck is going to bounce your way and some nights you might get three. Some nights you might not get anything. But you’re playing a real strong game, and you keep doing that over time, you’ll get rewarded.” O’Reilly spent the past three seasons in Buffalo, which can take its toll on anyone. While the Blues dealt three players and two draft picks to get him, they so far have come out ahead on the deal with the players dealt, Patrik Berglund, Vladimir Sobotka and Tage Thompson, combining for three goals and four assists. His point streak matches his career high. “Just kind of establishing our game, getting in on that forecheck and not worrying about the numbers,” he said. “Just kind of doing what I can do to win each battle and create. You don’t go out there thinking how many points I’m going to get in a night.

It’s doing what I can to win the game, and when I do the right things, I feel like I get rewarded for it, and you can see our line, too: When we do the right things, we get that pressure and we’re a tough line to play against.” O’Reilly has been the center of gravity for the Blues so far, and the team has used him to try to build strength by putting players in proximity to him. Schwartz is struggling offensively? Put him next to O’Reilly and let him pull him along. “When a guy is on top of his game like that, then guys want to play with him,” Yeo said. “Obviously it helps their game, helps them get to their game, and I think Schwartzie and Vladi (Tarasenko), both guys playing with him, it’s a good opportunity for them.” O’Reilly has been essential in the big steps taken by the team’s third-ranked power play. He has two goals and six assists when the team is up a man. O’Reilly has been going strong all season. The Blues have played 13 games,

Oshie returns after hit to get winner for Caps

on O’Reilly’s left before Schwartz pulled in. “He’s one of the hardest working guys on our team and in the league, and I think that’s a big part of his success. All the little stick skills might take some time to get to his level — he’s pretty good there — but the hard work and the positioning and being in the right spot at the right time, that’s been working for him, and that’s what I’m trying to get working for me.” “I want to always continue to grow my game,” O’Reilly said. “I always want to be a student of the game and find ways and challenge myself and get better. It’s nice here, you see the amount of guys that work after practice on different things. We’re all moving in the right direction.” That’s what the Blues need most right now. Moving in the right direction. Forward progress.

and he has points in 10 of them. Tarasenko has assists on four of O’Reilly’s seven goals, and O’Reilly has assists on four of Tarasenko’s six goals. It’s become a mutual appreciation society. “I think at the start of the year I wasn’t really myself and I think I’m slowly starting to find my game a bit. (Before I was) just kind of working and turning pucks over,” O’Reilly said. “From that, we’re finding each other. We’re playing quick, we’re being dangerous, and if we want to have success, we’ve got to be a line that’s leading that charge.” The other thing that continues to stand out about O’Reilly is how much he works. Long after most Blues forwards have returned to the dressing room, O’Reilly and his linemates will still be on the ice, working on things. It could be 15 or 20 minutes or more of extra time for the group. “He’s one of the first guys on the ice and he’s always one of the last guys,” said winger Zach Sanford, who played six games

Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com

NHL STANDINGS WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Nashville Minnesota Winnipeg Colorado Dallas Chicago Blues Pacific Calgary San Jose Vancouver Edmonton Anaheim Arizona Vegas Los Angeles

GP 14 14 14 14 15 15 13 GP 15 15 16 15 16 13 15 14

W 11 8 8 7 8 6 5 W 9 8 9 8 6 7 6 5

L 3 4 5 4 6 6 5 L 5 4 6 6 7 6 8 8

OT 0 2 1 3 1 3 3 OT 1 3 1 1 3 0 1 1

Pts 22 18 17 17 17 15 13 Pts 19 19 19 17 15 14 13 11

GF 47 43 41 52 42 46 46 GF 52 50 49 44 38 37 34 32

GA 30 40 38 40 40 56 48 GA 50 46 53 46 46 29 42 46

Home 5-3-0 5-0-2 5-2-1 3-1-1 5-2-0 3-2-2 4-4-1 Home 4-2-1 4-2-1 5-2-0 3-2-1 3-2-3 4-3-0 4-2-1 4-3-1

Away 6-0-0 3-4-0 3-3-0 4-3-2 3-4-1 3-4-1 1-1-2 Away 5-3-0 4-2-2 4-4-1 5-4-0 3-5-0 3-3-0 2-6-0 1-5-0

Div 2-0-0 4-2-0 2-2-0 1-1-0 1-1-0 2-1-1 1-2-3 Div 1-1-0 2-1-0 2-2-0 0-0-0 2-2-2 2-1-0 1-0-1 1-0-1

L 3 5 4 5 6 6 8 5 L 4 4 6 5 7 7 7 6

OT 1 0 2 2 2 3 2 3 OT 2 3 1 3 1 1 2 1

Pts 23 20 18 18 16 15 12 9 Pts 18 17 17 15 15 15 14 13

GF 55 51 39 48 43 52 40 34 GF 45 52 50 47 48 43 40 42

GA 40 40 31 45 44 62 55 41 GA 34 50 52 47 56 47 45 43

Home 6-2-0 4-5-0 5-1-0 5-3-0 4-2-1 5-2-2 3-4-1 0-3-1 Home 3-1-2 5-1-2 4-4-0 2-4-1 2-4-0 5-3-0 3-3-1 5-1-1

Away 5-1-1 6-0-0 3-3-2 3-2-2 3-4-1 1-4-1 2-4-1 3-2-2 Away 5-3-0 2-3-1 4-2-1 4-1-2 5-3-1 2-4-1 3-4-1 1-5-0

Div 4-0-0 2-1-0 4-1-0 2-2-2 2-2-0 3-3-1 1-4-0 0-0-2 Div 6-0-0 2-1-1 1-1-0 1-3-1 1-2-0 0-1-1 2-1-1 2-2-0

EASTERN CONFERENCE

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Capitals right wing T.J. Oshie celebrates his winning goal alongside center Evgeny Kuznetsov during the third period of Wednesday night’s game in Washington. ASSOCIATED PRESS

T.J. Oshie returned after taking Evgeni Malkin’s shoulder to the head and scored late to lift the Washington Capitals over the rival Pittsburgh Penguins 2-1 on Wednesday night in a meeting of the two most recent Stanley Cup champions. Alex Ovechkin and Sidney Crosby traded goals, and Oshie got the winner with 1:14 left following a dangerous hit from Malkin. The Penguins star was thrown out of the game 3:27 into the third period for an illegal check to the head and could get a hearing with the NHL’s department of player safety. Capitals goaltender Braden Holtby stopped 41 of 42 shots for his first victory since Oct. 22. The only goal he allowed was Crosby’s eighth of the season, which came on the power play. Pittsburgh’s Casey DeSmith stopped 20 of 22 shots in his first career start against Washington. The Penguins lost their fifth in a row and could be without Malkin in the near future. Oshie was also injured in the early few minutes of the game when he took an in-

advertent stick to the face from Penguins defenseman Olli Maatta and missed the rest of the first period getting stitches on the bridge of his nose. He returned for the second. An offensive-zone tripping penalty by Washington’s Jakub Vrana midway through the first opened the door for the Penguins’ power play. After Capitals defenseman Dmitry Orlov lost the puck, Jack Johnson swept it over to Crosby for a one-timer that made it 1-0 at the 12:16 mark. With Crosby in the penalty box for hooking, Ovechkin tied it 7:09 into the second period.

NOTEBOOK

Oilers’ Lucic fined • The NHL fined Edmonton Oilers forward Milan Lucic $10,000 for roughing Tampa Bay Lightning forward Mathieu Joseph. Lucic was assessed minor penalties for interference and roughing, as well as a 10-minute misconduct, for a hit on Joseph in the third period of Edmonton’s 5-2 road loss to the Lightning on Tuesday.

Atlantic Tampa Bay Toronto Boston Montreal Buffalo Ottawa Detroit Florida Metropolitan NY Islanders Washington Columbus Pittsburgh Philadelphia NY Rangers Carolina New Jersey

GP 15 15 14 15 15 15 15 11 GP 14 14 15 14 15 15 15 13

W 11 10 8 8 7 6 5 3 W 8 7 8 6 7 7 6 6

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss.

Wednesday Washington 2, Pittsburgh 1 Nashville at Colorado, late Calgary at Anaheim, late Tuesday Blues 4, Carolina 1 Columbus 4, Dallas 1 Toronto 3, Vegas 1 NY Rangers 5, Montreal 3 Ottawa 7, New Jersey 3 Detroit 3, Vancouver 2, SO Tampa Bay 5, Edmonton 2 San Jose 4, Minnesota 3 Los Angeles 4, Anaheim 1 Thursday Vancouver at Boston, 6 p.m. Edmonton at Florida, 6 p.m. Arizona at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Buffalo at Montreal, 6:30 p.m. Vegas at Ottawa, 6:30 p.m. NY Islanders at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m. Carolina at Chicago, 7:30 p.m. San Jose at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Minnesota at Los Angeles, 9:30 p.m. Friday New Jersey at Toronto, 6 p.m. Columbus at Washington, 6 p.m. NY Rangers at Detroit, 6:30 p.m. San Jose at Blues, 7 p.m. Colorado at Winnipeg, 7 p.m. Minnesota at Anaheim, 9 p.m. Saturday Chicago at Philadelphia, noon Vancouver at Buffalo, noon Nashville at Dallas, 1 p.m. Toronto at Boston, 6 p.m. NY Islanders at Florida, 6 p.m. Arizona at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. Vegas at Montreal, 6 p.m. Detroit at Carolina, 6 p.m. Ottawa at Tampa Bay, 6 p.m. NY Rangers at Columbus, 6 Calgary at Los Angeles, 9

NHL SUMMARIES Capitals 2, Penguins 1 Pittsburgh 1 0 0 — 1 Washington 0 1 1 — 2 First period: 1, Pittsburgh, Crosby 7 (Johnson), 12:16 (pp). Penalties: Oleksiak, PIT, (slashing), 2:17; Vrana, WSH, (tripping), 11:33; Hagelin, PIT, (interference), 15:09. Second period: 2, Washington, Ovechkin 12 (Backstrom, Carlson), 7:09 (pp). Penalties: Crosby, PIT, (hooking), 6:33; Kempny, WSH, (tripping), 9:35; Guentzel, PIT, (tripping), 11:27; Malkin, PIT, (roughing), 15:05. Third period: 3, Washington, Oshie 8 (Carlson, Kuznetsov), 18:46. Penalties: Boyd, WSH, (holding), 2:36; Malkin, PIT, served by Hornqvist, Misconduct (misconduct), 3:27. Shots: Pittsburgh 9-17-16: 42. Washington 7-10-5: 22. Power-plays: Pittsburgh 1 of 3; Washington 1 of 6. Goalies: Pittsburgh, DeSmith 2-1-2 (22 shots20 saves). Washington, Holtby 5-3-2 (42-41). A: 18,506. Referees: Wes McCauley, Chris Schlenker. Linesmen: Lonnie Cameron, Scott Cherrey.

GOALTENDING LEADERS

NHL SCORING LEADERS Through Tuesday’s games Player, team

GP

G

A PTS

Mikko Rantanen, COL

14

5 19

24

Connor McDavid, EDM

15 10 12

22

Nathan MacKinnon, COL

14

11 10

21

Patrice Bergeron, BOS

14

7 13

20

Evgeni Malkin, PIT

13

7 13

20

Thomas Chabot, OTT

15

4 16

20

Patrick Kane, CHI

14

11

8

19

Brayden Point, TB

15

9 10

19

Ryan O’Reilly, STL

13

7 12

19

Johnny Gaudreau, CGY

15

6 13

19

Mitchell Marner, TOR

15

5 14

19

7 tied with 18 pts.

WIN RECORD Player, team Frederik Andersen, TOR Andrei Vasilevskiy, TBL Martin Jones, SJS Craig Anderson, OTT Ben Bishop, DAL Devan Dubnyk, MIN Marc-Andre Fleury, VGK Keith Kinkaid, NJD Jacob Markstrom, VAN Juuse Saros, NSH Jack Campbell, LAK John Gibson, ANA Connor Hellebuyck, WPG Henrik Lundqvist, NYR Carey Price, MTL Antti Raanta, ARI Pekka Rinne, NSH Mike Smith, CGY Cam Talbot, EDM Matt Murray, PIT

GPI 13 11 11 14 11 11 13 12 10 8 11 13 11 12 11 9 7 10 11 9

MIN 770 665 661 775 650 666 752 673 615 432 576 772 657 726 661 543 405 549 655 496

W 8 8 7 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 4

L 5 2 3 4 5 3 6 4 3 2 5 5 5 6 4 4 1 4 5 4

OT 0 1 1 3 0 2 1 1 1 0 0 3 1 1 2 0 0 1 1 1


HOCKEY

11.08.2018 • Thursday • M 2

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • B7

BLUES NOTEBOOK

Johnson glad to get first win with Blues Goalie hasn’t played much with team’s light early schedule BY JIM THOMAS st. Louis Post-dispatch

It was a milestone of sorts for backup goalie Chad Johnson, turning aside 38 of 39 Carolina shots to post his first victory as a member of the Blues in Tuesday’s 4-1 triumph. “It’s just nice to get the first one out of the way,” Johnson said. “It was big for our team. I just wanted to come in and be solid with my game, try and get the two points, and it worked out for us.” He was all that and more against the Hurricanes. He tracked the puck well, limited rebounds, and although Carolina didn’t have a ton of prime scoring chances, he made the big saves when called upon. So did he commemorate the night by saving a puck from the game? As a veteran who’s played in at least parts of nine NHL seasons, Johnson’s enthusiasm for that was, uh, lukewarm at best.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Blues goaltender Chad Johnson is congratulated by teammates Zach Sanford and Alex Pietrangelo after the Blues beat the Carolina Hurricanes 4-1 on Tuesday night at Enterprise Center.

“I’ve played for a lot of teams, so I have a lot of first wins,” Johnson said. “Sometimes I save them. I might get a puck here, I’m not even sure.” Then, as if debating himself, he concluded: “Probably not. Ryan (O’Reilly) got the hat trick, he can have it.” The Blues have one of the lightest early-season schedules of anyone in the National Hockey League. Only Florida has played

fewer games (11) than the Blues’ 13. So opportunities for playing time have been scarce for Johnson, 32, who has appeared in regular-season games for the New York Rangers, the then-Phoenix Coyotes, Boston Bruins, New York Islanders, Buffalo Sabres, Calgary Flames and now the Blues. All after being drafted in the fifth round by the Pittsburgh Penguins in 2006. Memento or not, Johnson’s

work against Carolina had to be reassuring for Blues fans who might have wondered why the team would sign a goalie who posted a 3.55 goals-against average and a .891 save percentage last season for the Sabres. That easily was Johnson’s worst season statistically in the NHL, but he was playing for the NHL’s worst team — the Sabres finished with a mere 62 points. Entering last season, his career numbers were better than those of last year’s Blues backup, Carter Hutton, and not far off Jake Allen’s. “We’ve typically been a place where goalies can come in and do very well,” coach Mike Yeo said. “That’s why Chad signed here. So we’ve gotta shore up our game ... when we get real strong or solid in our defensive game, then we’ll give those guys a chance every night.” In four games this season, two in relief of Allen, Johnson has a 2.47 goals-against average and a save percentage of .919.

PAUSE BUTTON

Blues players were watching video Wednesday morning at Enterprise Center when informed by the

coaching staff that practice had been called off for the day. Some instructions were attached. “No practice,” said forward Ivan Barbashev, “(but) it would be a real good thing to do something as a team, like a workout or just some fun. I think it’s a good decision, to be honest.” The result was a game of twotouch soccer on the floor of Enterprise. The idea of the game is to keep the ball in the air. “If it hits the ground, the last guy who touched it, he’s out,” Barbashev said. “It was fun.” After a couple of tough losses, a tough game Tuesday against Carolina, and all sorts of speculation — including plenty involving the head coach’s job security — Yeo decided to hit the pause button. “There’s been a lot of emotion lately,” he said. “You can see in parts of our game sometimes, you can almost see some hesitation, just not quite as quick. So just kind of a mental reset day. Get the guys a chance to recover from last night and get prepared for a good, hard practice tomorrow.” Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com

In first season with Blues, O’Reilly is leading scorer BLUES • FROM B1

“That’s surprising that’s his first hat trick,” said Blues backup goalie Chad Johnson, who has been a teammate of O’Reilly two of the previous three seasons in Buffalo. “He deserves it. He’s been through a lot over the course of the last few years. He’s been in some tough situations. It’s nice to see him get rewarded. He works so hard and he wants to win so bad.” “This is what we were hoping for from him,” Blues coach Mike Yeo said. “For me, that was just a reward of consistent good play. When he’s on top of his game, he’s engaged in battles, he’s winning faceoffs, he’s a strong twoway center, he’s impacting the game defensively in our zone and all over the ice, and obviously he’s impacting the game offensively. “I think we’ve seen his value, what he’s brought to the power play. We’ve seen his power, what he brought to us in depth of offense. I feel that’s been consis-

tent all year long. He’s been giving those things. When you play consistent hockey, when you do the right thing, some nights the puck is going to bounce your way and some nights you might get three. Some nights you might not get anything. But you’re playing a real strong game, and you keep doing that over time, you’ll get rewarded.” O’Reilly spent the past three seasons in Buffalo, which can take its toll on anyone. While the Blues dealt three players and two draft picks to get him, they so far have come out ahead on the deal with the players dealt, Patrik Berglund, Vladimir Sobotka and Tage Thompson, combining for three goals and four assists. His point streak matches his career high. “Just kind of establishing our game, getting in on that forecheck and not worrying about the numbers,” he said. “Just kind of doing what I can do to win each battle and create. You don’t go out there thinking how many points I’m going to get in

a night. It’s doing what I can to win the game, and when I do the right things, I feel like I get rewarded for it, and you can see our line, too: When we do the right things, we get that pressure and we’re a tough line to play against.” O’Reilly has been the center of gravity for the Blues so far, and the team has used him to try to build strength by putting players in proximity to him. Schwartz is struggling offensively? Put him next to O’Reilly and let him pull him along. “When a guy is on top of his game like that, then guys want to play with him,” Yeo said. “Obviously it helps their game, helps them get to their game, and I think Schwartzie and Vladi (Tarasenko), both guys playing with him, it’s a good opportunity for them.” O’Reilly has been essential in the big steps taken by the team’s third-ranked power play. He has two goals and six assists when the team is up a man. O’Reilly has been going strong

Oshie returns after hit to get winner for Caps

all season. The Blues have played 13 games, and he has points in 10 of them. Tarasenko has assists on four of O’Reilly’s seven goals, and O’Reilly has assists on four of Tarasenko’s six goals. It’s become a mutual appreciation society. “I think at the start of the year I wasn’t really myself and I think I’m slowly starting to find my game a bit. (Before I was) just kind of working and turning pucks over,” O’Reilly said. “From that, we’re finding each other. We’re playing quick, we’re being dangerous, and if we want to have success, we’ve got to be a line that’s leading that charge.” The other thing that continues to stand out about O’Reilly is how much he works. Long after most Blues forwards have returned to the dressing room, O’Reilly and his linemates will still be on the ice, working on things. It could be 15 or 20 minutes or more of extra time for the group. “He’s one of the first guys on the ice and he’s always one of the

last guys,” said winger Zach Sanford, who played six games on O’Reilly’s left before Schwartz pulled in. “He’s one of the hardest working guys on our team and in the league, and I think that’s a big part of his success. All the little stick skills might take some time to get to his level — he’s pretty good there — but the hard work and the positioning and being in the right spot at the right time, that’s been working for him, and that’s what I’m trying to get working for me.” “I want to always continue to grow my game,” O’Reilly said. “I always want to be a student of the game and find ways and challenge myself and get better. It’s nice here, you see the amount of guys that work after practice on different things. We’re all moving in the right direction.” That’s what the Blues need most right now. Moving in the right direction. Forward progress. Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com

NHL STANDINGS WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Nashville Minnesota Winnipeg Colorado Dallas Chicago Blues Pacific Calgary San Jose Vancouver Edmonton Anaheim Arizona Vegas Los Angeles

GP 15 14 14 15 15 15 13 GP 16 15 16 15 17 13 15 14

W 12 8 8 7 8 6 5 W 9 8 9 8 7 7 6 5

L 3 4 5 5 6 6 5 L 6 4 6 6 7 6 8 8

OT 0 2 1 3 1 3 3 OT 1 3 1 1 3 0 1 1

Pts 24 18 17 17 17 15 13 Pts 19 19 19 17 17 14 13 11

GF 51 43 41 51 42 46 46 GF 54 50 49 44 41 37 34 32

GA 31 40 38 44 40 56 48 GA 53 46 53 46 48 29 42 46

Home 5-3-0 5-0-2 5-2-1 3-2-1 5-2-0 3-2-2 4-4-1 Home 4-2-1 4-2-1 5-2-0 3-2-1 4-2-3 4-3-0 4-2-1 4-3-1

Away 7-0-0 3-4-0 3-3-0 4-3-2 3-4-1 3-4-1 1-1-2 Away 5-4-0 4-2-2 4-4-1 5-4-0 3-5-0 3-3-0 2-6-0 1-5-0

Div 3-0-0 4-2-0 2-2-0 1-2-0 1-1-0 2-1-1 1-2-3 Div 1-2-0 2-1-0 2-2-0 0-0-0 3-2-2 2-1-0 1-0-1 1-0-1

L 3 5 4 5 6 6 8 5 L 4 4 6 5 7 7 7 6

OT 1 0 2 2 2 3 2 3 OT 2 3 1 3 1 1 2 1

Pts 23 20 18 18 16 15 12 9 Pts 18 17 17 15 15 15 14 13

GF 55 51 39 48 43 52 40 34 GF 45 52 50 47 48 43 40 42

GA 40 40 31 45 44 62 55 41 GA 34 50 52 47 56 47 45 43

Home 6-2-0 4-5-0 5-1-0 5-3-0 4-2-1 5-2-2 3-4-1 0-3-1 Home 3-1-2 5-1-2 4-4-0 2-4-1 2-4-0 5-3-0 3-3-1 5-1-1

Away 5-1-1 6-0-0 3-3-2 3-2-2 3-4-1 1-4-1 2-4-1 3-2-2 Away 5-3-0 2-3-1 4-2-1 4-1-2 5-3-1 2-4-1 3-4-1 1-5-0

Div 4-0-0 2-1-0 4-1-0 2-2-2 2-2-0 3-3-1 1-4-0 0-0-2 Div 6-0-0 2-1-1 1-1-0 1-3-1 1-2-0 0-1-1 2-1-1 2-2-0

EASTERN CONFERENCE

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Capitals right winger T.J. Oshie celebrates his winning goal alongside center Evgeny Kuznetsov during the third period of Wednesday night’s game in Washington. ASSOCIATED PRESS

T.J. Oshie returned after taking Evgeni Malkin’s shoulder to the head and scored late to lift the Washington Capitals over the rival Pittsburgh Penguins 2-1 on Wednesday night in a meeting of the two most recent Stanley Cup champions. Alex Ovechkin and Sidney Crosby traded goals, and Oshie got the winner with 1:14 left following a dangerous hit from Malkin. The Penguins star was thrown out of the game 3:27 into the third period for an illegal check to the head and could get a hearing with the NHL’s department of player safety. Capitals goaltender Braden Holtby stopped 41 of 42 shots for his first victory since Oct. 22. The only goal he allowed was Crosby’s eighth of the season, which came on the power play. Pittsburgh’s Casey DeSmith stopped 20 of 22 shots in his first career start against Washington. The Penguins lost their fifth in a row and could be without Malkin in the near future. Oshie was also injured in the early few

minutes of the game when he took an inadvertent stick to the face from Penguins defenseman Olli Maatta and missed the rest of the first period getting stitches on the bridge of his nose. He returned for the second. An offensive-zone tripping penalty by Washington’s Jakub Vrana midway through the first opened the door for the Penguins’ power play. After Capitals defenseman Dmitry Orlov lost the puck, Jack Johnson swept it over to Crosby for a one-timer that made it 1-0 at the 12:16 mark. With Crosby in the penalty box for hooking, Ovechkin tied it 7:09 into the second period.

NOTEBOOK

Oilers’ Lucic fined • The NHL fined Edmonton Oilers forward Milan Lucic $10,000 for roughing Tampa Bay Lightning forward Mathieu Joseph. Lucic was assessed minor penalties for interference and roughing, as well as a 10-minute misconduct, for a hit on Joseph in the third period of Edmonton’s 5-2 road loss to the Lightning on Tuesday.

Atlantic Tampa Bay Toronto Boston Montreal Buffalo Ottawa Detroit Florida Metropolitan NY Islanders Washington Columbus Pittsburgh Philadelphia NY Rangers Carolina New Jersey

GP 15 15 14 15 15 15 15 11 GP 14 14 15 14 15 15 15 13

W 11 10 8 8 7 6 5 3 W 8 7 8 6 7 7 6 6

Wednesday Washington 2, Pittsburgh 1 Nashville 4, Colorado 1 Anaheim 3, Calgary 2 Tuesday Blues 4, Carolina 1 Columbus 4, Dallas 1 Toronto 3, Vegas 1 NY Rangers 5, Montreal 3 Ottawa 7, New Jersey 3 Detroit 3, Vancouver 2, SO Tampa Bay 5, Edmonton 2 San Jose 4, Minnesota 3 Los Angeles 4, Anaheim 1 Thursday Vancouver at Boston, 6 p.m. Edmonton at Florida, 6 p.m. Arizona at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Buffalo at Montreal, 6:30 p.m. Vegas at Ottawa, 6:30 p.m. NY Islanders at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m. Carolina at Chicago, 7:30 p.m. San Jose at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Minnesota at Los Angeles, 9:30 p.m. Friday New Jersey at Toronto, 6 p.m. Columbus at Washington, 6 p.m. NY Rangers at Detroit, 6:30 p.m. San Jose at Blues, 7 p.m. Colorado at Winnipeg, 7 p.m. Minnesota at Anaheim, 9 p.m. Saturday Chicago at Philadelphia, noon Vancouver at Buffalo, noon Nashville at Dallas, 1 p.m. Toronto at Boston, 6 p.m. NY Islanders at Florida, 6 p.m. Arizona at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. Vegas at Montreal, 6 p.m. Detroit at Carolina, 6 p.m. Ottawa at Tampa Bay, 6 p.m. NY Rangers at Columbus, 6 Calgary at Los Angeles, 9

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss.

NHL SUMMARIES Capitals 2, Penguins 1

Predators 4, Avalanche 1

Ducks 3, Flames 2

Pittsburgh 1 0 0 — 1 Washington 0 1 1 — 2 First period: 1, Pittsburgh, Crosby 7 (Johnson), 12:16 (pp). Penalties: Oleksiak, PIT, (slashing), 2:17; Vrana, WSH, (tripping), 11:33; Hagelin, PIT, (interference), 15:09. Second period: 2, Washington, Ovechkin 12 (Backstrom, Carlson), 7:09 (pp). Penalties: Crosby, PIT, (hooking), 6:33; Kempny, WSH, (tripping), 9:35; Guentzel, PIT, (tripping), 11:27; Malkin, PIT, (roughing), 15:05. Third period: 3, Washington, Oshie 8 (Carlson, Kuznetsov), 18:46. Penalties: Boyd, WSH, (holding), 2:36; Malkin, PIT, served by Hornqvist, Misconduct (misconduct), 3:27. Shots: Pittsburgh 9-17-16: 42. Washington 7-10-5: 22. Power-plays: Pittsburgh 1 of 3; Washington 1 of 6. Goalies: Pittsburgh, DeSmith 2-1-2 (22 shots20 saves). Washington, Holtby 5-3-2 (42-41). A: 18,506. Referees: Wes McCauley, Chris Schlenker. Linesmen: Lonnie Cameron, Scott Cherrey.

Nashville 2 1 1 — 4 Colorado 0 1 0 — 1 First Period: 1, Nashville, Sissons 2 (Bonino, Ekholm), 13:39. 2, Nashville, Sissons 3 (Bonino, Josi), 17:21. Penalties: Josi, NSH, (slashing), 1:21. Second Period: 3, Colorado, Calvert 1 (Girard, MacKinnon), 7:08 (pp). 4, Nashville, Sissons 4 (Fiala, Turris), 19:57 (pp). Penalties: Zadorov, COL, (interference), 2:02; Sissons, NSH, (hooking), 6:17; Kamenev, COL, (holding), 9:22; Rantanen, COL, (slashing), 19:23. Third Period: 5, Nashville, Hartman 4 (Bonino, Subban), 17:06. Penalties: Bitetto, NSH, (delay of game), 9:57. Shots: Nashville 16-13-5: 34. Colorado 10-7-8: 25. Power-plays: Nashville 1 of 3; Colorado 1 of 3. Goalies: Nashville, Rinne 5-1-0 (25 shots-24 saves). Colorado, Varlamov 4-3-2 (33-30). A: 16,923

Calgary 1 0 1 — 2 Anaheim 2 0 1 — 3 First Period: 1, Anaheim, Silfverberg 5 (Cogliano, Larsson), 8:37. 2, Anaheim, Henrique 4 (Aberg, Manson), 11:53. 3, Calgary, Tkachuk 7 (E.Lindholm, Giordano), 17:10 (pp). Penalties: Ryan, CGY, (slashing), 3:44; Street, ANA, (tripping), 17:05; Tkachuk, CGY, (high sticking), 17:49. Second Period: None. Penalties: Pettersson, ANA, (hooking), 7:09. Third Period: 4, Calgary, Jankowski 1, 6:06 (sh). 5, Anaheim, Getzlaf 3 (Rakell, Fowler), 6:33. Penalties: Backlund, CGY, (tripping), 4:28; Rakell, ANA, (slashing), 18:46. Shots: Calgary 9-13-17: 39. Anaheim 11-10-3: 24. Power-plays: Calgary 1 of 3; Anaheim 0 of 3. Goalies: Calgary, Smith 5-5-1 (24 shots-21 saves). Anaheim, Miller 2-2-0 (39-37). A: 16,461


SPORTS

B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 11.08.2018

Penalty big blow to Harvick’s title hopes Loses spot in finale, needs big race on Sunday

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kevin Harvick celebrates with a burnout after winning the NASCAR Cup Series at Texas Motor Speedway on Sunday. His car failed inspection due to a modified spoiler and he was stripped of the title.

immediate focus to this weekend’s event in Phoenix and control our destiny on the racetrack.” Harvick’s win at Texas was his series-leading eighth in 2018 and qualified him for Homestead along with Joey Logano. Now, three spots in the finale will be up for grabs Sunday in Phoenix. Harvick won the 2014 Cup Series championship and went to Phoenix that season in a must-win situation to race for the title. He pulled it off and is a nine-time winner at Phoenix, including earlier this year. Harvick has been in NASCAR’s finale three of the last four years. The penalty is disastrous for SHR, which went into the third round of the playoffs with all four of its drivers eligible for the championship. Logano grabbed the first spot, which meant the best SHR could do was qualify three cars for Homestead. Now, SHR could wind up locked out of the finale outright if Harvick doesn’t advance past Phoenix. Aric Almirola, Kurt Busch and Clint Bowyer are all below the cutline and likely need to win at Phoenix to advance. The penalty against Harvick also closes a rough race for NASCAR, which erroneously penalized Jimmie Johnson moments before the race began. Johnson was sent to the back of the field because NASCAR believed his car failed inspection three times, but he had failed only twice. NASCAR announced the mistake during the race and said Monday it has updated its procedures to prevent a similar mistake moving forward. Later in the same event, Bowyer was penalized for a crew member being over the pit road wall too early. The crew member was sitting on the wall with his feet touching the asphalt on pit road, which was a violation, even if it seemed extreme. Now Harvick’s team has been rocked by a penalty that may change

ASSOCIATED PRESS

CHARLOTTE, N.C. • Kevin Harvick’s bid for a second NASCAR title suffered a massive setback Wednesday when he was stripped of his berth in the championship race because his winning car failed inspection after Texas Motor Speedway. The discovery of an illegally modified spoiler, made during a detailed post-race inspection after the No. 4 Ford returned to NASCAR’s Research and Development Center following Sunday’s race, negates the automatic berth Harvick earned into the final four. The rule violated states that spoilers must be used exactly as supplied from the manufacturer and not altered. On top of losing his spot in the Nov. 18 finale at Homestead-Miami Speedway, Harvick must also close out the final two races of the season without crew chief Rodney Childers and car chief Robert Smith. Both were suspended for two races, and Childers also was fined $75,000. Harvick was docked 40 driver points, and Stewart-Haas Racing was docked 40 owner points as well. Harvick enters this weekend’s race at Phoenix fourth among the remaining eight playoff drivers, three points above the cutline. Should there be a tie for the final transfer spot, Harvick would not be eligible to use the Texas victory in the tiebreaking procedure. Greg Zipadelli, vice president of competition at SHR, said the team will not appeal the penalties. Tony Gibson will be Harvick’s interim crew chief and Nick DeFazio will be interim car chief. “We work tirelessly across every inch of our race cars to create speed and, unfortunately, NASCAR determined we ventured into an area not accommodated by its rule book,” Zipadelli said. “We will not appeal the penalty. Instead, we will direct our

the composition of the final four drivers racing for the title. Harvick, along with Kyle Busch and Martin Truex Jr., is part of NASCAR’s socalled Big Three that dominated the season through a stretch of summer racing. All three were expected to race for the championship, and none is qualified for Homestead yet with one race remaining. “It is not our desire to issue any penalties, but we’ll do so when necessary to ensure each race and championship is contested on a level playing field,” said NASCAR senior vice president of competition Scott Miller. “We will now return our focus to Phoenix, and the battle for a championship.” Also Wednesday, NASCAR penalized the teams of Ryan Blaney and Erik Jones, who already have been eliminated from the playoffs. Blaney crew chief Jeremy Bullins was fined $50,000, and car chief Kirk Almquist was suspended for the next two races. Jones crew chief Chris Gayle was fined $50,000 and car chief Jason Overstreet was suspended the next two races. It took until Wednesday for the penalties to be announced because the cars were in transit to North Carolina. Inspection was on Tuesday, and the teams do the actual teardown themselves. Once the Harvick violation was discovered late Tuesday, NASCAR had to examine whether the violation was correct and didn’t release its findings until the next day.

FALL HEATING SPECIALS • Best warranty over all other brands* • Best Quality installation • Best 10 year parts & labor warranty (value $700*) • Best 2 year maintenance agreement (value $350*)

Must purchase a complete* Amana System 16 Seer A/C or better, and a 96% Gas Heater. *A/C and Furnace

10 YEAR PARTS & LABOR WARRANTY*

*On Select Models Only. Call for Details **With approved credit use either financing or rebate. Expires 12/5/18.

0% Financing for 18 Months** Rebate Stimulus Package $2,225.00 Rebates For You!

$150 - $700

Ameren Rebate

$150 - $325

Spire Rebate

$400 - $1200

Total Comfort Rebate

Totaling $2,225

Potential Savings

We are a locally owned & operated company with 36 years of experience behind us! Total Comfort Heating & Air Conditioning • Emergency Service: 8am-9pm • 7 Days A Week - No Overtime!

HEATING MAINTENANCE

$ 314-991-COOL (2665) 636-923-COOL (2665) 618-248-6400

www.totalcomfort-hvac.com

85

reg. $125

Total Comfort Heating & Air Conditioning 314-991-2665 • 636-923-2665 618-248-6400 Boilers are extra. For residential customers only. Valid only with coupon. Not valid with other offers or prior purchases. Expires 12/5/18.

Get ready to talk St. Louis sports with your favorite Post-Dispatch sports writers!

DECEMBER 3, 2018 | 5:30pm-8:30pm

PRESENTED BY

TICKETS $25

Kirkwood Station Brewing Co. TICKETS ON SALE NOW: STLTODAY.COM/OUREVENTS

ST. LOUIS FIVE-DAY FORECAST TODAY

TONIGHT

Mostly cloudy

Chilly with rain and snow WIND NNW 6-12 mph

WIND NNE 6-12 mph

46°

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

Partly sunny and Mostly sunny and cold cold WIND WIND WNW 10-20 mph NE 6-12 mph

SUNDAY

MONDAY

Mostly cloudy and chilly WIND SSE 7-14 mph

Colder with snow

REGIONAL OUTLOOK

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

An early taste of winter is on the way. First the chill: highs today will only be in the 40s. Watch for rain to build in tonight with a few wet flakes after midnight.

80

Peoria 55 74 Macomb 42/29 41/27 Bloomington Urbana 42/28 46/32

Kirksville 40/26

Quincy 41/27

Decatur 45/31 Springfield 57 45/29 Effingham 70 55 48/34

35

Joplin 44/31

Columbia 70 42/29 St. Louis Mount Jefferson Vernon 46/32 City 48/32 44/31 Union 55 45/33 57 44 Rolla Carbondale 43/32 49/34 Farmington 45/31 Cape Girardeau 50/35 Springfield 43/32 Poplar Bluff West Plains 49/37 55 45/34

44

RIVER AND LAKE LEVELS

Flood Stage 24 hour Stage (ft.) Wed. Change

Location

Missouri River Kansas City Jefferson City Hermann Washington St. Charles Mississippi River Hannibal Louisiana Dam 24 Dam 25 Grafton M.Price, Pool M.Price, Tail. St. Louis Chester Cape Girardeau Illinois River La Salle Peoria Beardstown

32 23 21 20 25

19.14 14.41 14.38 11.38 18.05

Flood Stage 24 hour Stage (ft.) Wed. Change

Location

Meramec River Sullivan Valley Park Arnold Bourbeuse River Union Ohio River Cairo Lake Levels Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

+0.20 -0.03 +0.21 +0.32 +0.21

16 16.98 -0.44 15 16.25 -0.01 25 26.59 +0.12 26 26.26 +0.29 18 17.48 +0.25 419 413.64 +0.03 21 15.91 +0.05 30 21.00 +0.17 27 23.69 +0.03 32 29.02 -0.02 20 18 14

14.22 +1.15 12.70 +0.20 10.12 +0.11

15 16 24

4.04 +0.46 1.56 +0.15 18.41 none

15

2.27 -0.34

40

38.35 +0.60 354.90 361.53 496.26 658.50 707.39 654.94 912.69 839.50 600.42 407.44 610.73 446.05

TEMPERATURE TRENDS

Daily Temperature

Other than a few lake-effect showers today, dry but chilly weather will settle into much of the Northeast. A storm will travel through Nebraska and Kansas with snow while rain and thunderstorms stretch from Texas to the Carolina coastline. Dry weather will continue across the West. Shown are noon positions of precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Chief Meteorologist Glenn Zimmerman

WIND N 8-16 mph

Forecast Temperature

Average High

+0.45 +0.33 -0.18 -0.07 +0.09 +0.03 +0.09 +0.08 +0.06 +0.17 +0.51 +0.15

Average Low

ALMANAC

70 50

48

40

44

30

56

54

57 49

38

39

52 43

60

53

46 35

20

T

F

S

S

M

T

W

46

41

32 T

23 F

48 38 30

31

S

S

40 24 M

46 37 24 T

30 W

Montreal 46/32

Billings 37/11

Minneapolis 33/21

San Francisco 73/48

Temperature High/low 53°/35° Normal high/low 60°/42° Last year high/low 50°/42° Record high 80° (1945) Record low 14° (1991) Precipitation 24 hrs through 5 p.m. Wed. 0.00” Month to date (normal) 1.57” (0.85”) Year to date (normal) 37.45” (35.06”) Record for this date 2.22” (1925)

Pollen Yesterday Trees Weeds Grass Mold

Low - 2 Absent Absent Moderate - 11489

Source: St. Louis County

Heating Degree Days Degree days are an indicator of energy needs. The more the total degree days, the more energy is necessary to heat.

Wednesday Month to date Normal month to date Since July 1 Normal since July 1

21 117 92 400 365

RealFeel Temperature® Today An exclusive index of effective temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure and elevation on the human body.

33° 8 a.m.

40° noon

39° 4 p.m.

31° 8 p.m.

UV Index Today Shown is the highest value of the day.

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11+

The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.

Today’s Air Quality

airnow.gov

Sun Moon

Rise

Set

6:36 a.m. 7:23 a.m.

4:54 p.m. 5:59 p.m.

First Quarter

Full Moon

Last Quarter

New Moon

Nov 15

Nov 22

Nov 29

Dec 7

©2018; forecasts and graphics, except for the KTVI forecasts, provided by

New York 55/42 Washington 58/45

Atlanta 62/54

El Paso 77/47 Houston 73/54

Chihuahua 83/47

Miami 86/74

Monterrey 85/65

Cold front

Warm front

City

Albany, N.Y. Albuquerque Anchorage Atlanta Austin Baltimore Birmingham Boise Boston Charleston, S.C. Charleston, W.Va. Charlotte Chicago Cincinnati Cleveland Dallas Daytona Beach Denver Des Moines Destin, Fla. Detroit Hartford Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock

50/32/pc 60/32/s 36/25/pc 62/54/c 66/48/r 56/41/s 65/56/r 46/23/s 55/38/s 70/59/sh 53/42/pc 61/46/c 42/30/pc 50/37/pc 44/34/pc 59/41/r 85/69/sh 39/21/pc 36/23/c 77/69/c 46/35/s 54/31/s 85/71/pc 73/54/r 47/35/pc 38/26/sn 67/43/s 51/39/c

National Extremes

Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Beijing Berlin Buenos Aires Cairo Cancun Dublin Hong Kong Jerusalem Johannesburg London Madrid Mecca

Stationary front

Today Hi/Lo/W

High: 94 Edinburg, Texas

City

Skywatch

Toronto 44/31

Kansas City 38/26

Los Angeles 79/56

Forecast index based on presence of manmade particulates affecting aspects of human health.

Good Moderate Unhealthy Unhealthy Very Hazardous (sensitive) Unhealthy

Detroit 46/35

Chicago 42/30

Denver 39/21

Statistics through 5 p.m. Wednesday

80 60

Winnipeg 23/10

Seattle 50/36

41° 23° 38° 30° 48° 31° 40° 24°

32°

Kansas City 38/26

NATIONAL OUTLOOK

.com

Friday Hi/Lo/W

45/38/r 52/33/s 37/23/sn 60/37/t 58/43/pc 52/38/r 59/33/t 50/28/s 49/47/r 73/58/c 50/30/r 54/39/t 38/23/sn 46/26/sh 43/29/r 56/35/c 84/67/pc 46/26/s 30/12/pc 76/50/t 42/26/sn 46/40/r 86/72/pc 59/46/r 42/23/c 35/14/s 67/42/s 55/26/pc

Showers

T-storms

City

Rain

Los Angeles Louisville Memphis Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Montgomery Nashville New Orleans New York City Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, Maine Portland, Ore. Sacramento Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Seattle Tampa Tucson Washington, D.C. Wichita

Flurries

Today Hi/Lo/W

79/56/pc 53/40/pc 53/42/c 86/74/sh 41/31/pc 33/21/c 71/63/t 55/44/pc 78/66/t 55/42/s 45/31/r 35/23/sf 87/69/t 56/42/s 82/56/s 47/34/pc 53/32/pc 56/33/s 75/35/s 46/25/s 70/49/r 76/57/pc 73/48/s 50/36/s 86/71/pc 79/51/s 58/45/s 38/28/c

Snow

Ice

Friday Hi/Lo/W

84/51/s 49/27/c 52/28/pc 86/71/s 37/24/sn 28/13/sf 67/40/t 50/27/c 69/48/r 53/44/r 50/24/s 29/12/s 86/67/pc 55/42/r 79/57/s 45/27/r 46/40/r 53/42/pc 72/34/s 48/29/s 57/46/sh 79/55/s 71/44/s 48/41/c 85/70/s 77/51/s 53/40/r 40/19/s

Wednesday in the 48 contiguous states Low: 0 Leadville, Colo.

WORLD FORECAST

Today Hi/Lo/W

56/42/pc 66/56/pc 71/55/pc 89/77/t 56/31/pc 56/44/pc 82/68/pc 78/63/pc 85/73/pc 51/44/r 81/71/pc 67/53/s 72/51/s 58/44/pc 56/41/pc 94/73/t

Friday Hi/Lo/W

56/49/pc 68/54/pc 73/55/c 86/77/c 59/29/s 54/44/pc 87/66/c 76/62/pc 86/73/pc 52/43/r 81/74/s 67/54/c 80/52/s 57/49/r 56/48/pc 93/73/pc

City

Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi Paris Rio de Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Sydney Tokyo Toronto Vancouver

Today Hi/Lo/W

76/51/pc 46/32/c 39/32/c 86/73/pc 81/58/s 83/57/pc 55/43/pc 76/69/r 67/51/pc 85/77/sh 90/53/s 61/48/r 66/56/s 69/62/pc 44/31/c 48/37/pc

Friday Hi/Lo/W

77/52/pc 41/35/c 39/32/c 86/73/pc 81/60/pc 84/58/pc 59/50/pc 77/71/sh 67/53/t 85/77/sh 87/55/pc 61/45/pc 72/59/pc 71/62/c 40/30/r 48/38/r

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, i-ice, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow


11.08.2018 • Thursday • M 1

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

Continued from Page A12

RIDES Jeep

Misc. Autos

Ford Trucks

Sport Utility

Sport Utility

'09 Jeep Wrangler: Unlimited, 4WD, 4 Door, X, Stock #190105A Contact Us DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'13 Tesla Model S: 4 Door, 12K Miles, RWD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $46,007 #P9597

'15 Ford F-150 Lariat: Super Crew Cab Styleside, 67K Miles, Clean Carfax $33,000 #P9460

'14 Cadillac Escalade: Black/Black, AWD, 56K Miles, Nav, Roof $39,490 #C9404

'15 Infiniti QX80: Clean Carfax, 8 Cyl 5.6L, AWD $38,900 #P9479

'14 Cadillac Escalade: Platinum, AWD, White Diamond, $41,990 #C9487

'18 Infiniti QX80: 33K Miles, Clean Carfax, One Owner, AWD $51,500 #P9495

'15 Cadillac Escalade: Luxury, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, 4WD $46,900 #98139A

'18 Infiniti QX60: Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, 22K Miles, AWD, $36,500 #P9500

'18 Cadillac Escalade: Luxury Package, 4WD, 20K Miles $60,400 #P9311

'18 Infiniti QX60: AWD, Certified, Clean Carfax 1 Owner $33,007 #P9611

'13 Chevrolet Equinox: FWD 1LT, $11,896 Stock #180656A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '18 Chevy Tahoe: LT, One Owner, Clean Carfax, GM Certified $43,990 #P6600

'18 Infiniti QX60: AWD, Certified, Clean Carfax 1 Owner $39,900 #97029L

Dodge

Kia

'11 Dodge Charger: SE, Redline, 5-Speed Auto, RWD $12,990 #B9332A

'07 Kia Spectra: Very Clean, Auto $4,750 #44153A

'16 Dodge Challenger: Hellcat!! 19K Miles, Red and Ready!$52,990 #B9463

Lexus '14 Lexus ES350: Black w/ Black Leather, 1 Owner, Local Trade, $22,990 #V18497A

'10 Dodge Challenger: R/T Plus, Roof & Nav, Auto $17,990 #C9433A

Fiat '17 Fiat Abarth: 13K, Celeste Blue, Auto, Local Trade $17,490 #V18667A

Ford '13 Ford Focus: $10,288 Stock #P06991 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '13 Ford Fusion: SE, FWD, Carfax One Owner $8,220 #V18579A

'13 Ford Fusion: SE, Very Clean, Full Power $10,550 #35062A

'14 Ford Mustang: GT, Loaded, Clean Carfax, Auto, $21,990 #35520A

'07 Ford Mustang: GT, Red, M/T, Loaded, Very Clean $12,777 #P6648

'03 Ford ZX2: 2 Door Coupe, Stock #180065B Call US! DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '09 Toyota Camry: Hybrid, One Owner, Clean Carfax $9,990 #420165A

Honda '15 Honda Civic: Coupe, FWD, 41K Miles, Clean Carfax 1 Owner $14,490 #M18492A

'17 Honda Accord: Sport, Black, Auto, $22,490 #C9412A

'18 Honda Accord: Sport, One Owner, Only 3K Miles $28,990 #37022A

'15 Hyundai Sonata: Limited, 31K, Red w/ Tan Leather $14,990 #V17800A

'12 Porsche 911: Black Edition, Convertible RWD, Clean Carfax $57,900 #P9511

'17 GMC Sierra 1500: SLT, 4WD, 8 Cyl 5.3L, Clean Carfax, One Owner $41,999 #79422A

'16 Lexus GS 350: 4 Door Sedan, 34K Miles, Clean Carfax $36,007 #P9588

Saturn

Infiniti '09 Infiniti G37 X: 7 Speed Auto Electroni, AWD, Clean Carfax, $10,990 #B9395

Subaru Lincoln

'18 Infiniti Q70: 3.7 Luxe, AWD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $33,007 #P9580

'17 Infiniti Q50: 3.0t Premium, Certified, Clean Carfax, One Owner, 11K Miles $34,007 #96135L

'15 Mazda 6: iSport, Auto, Local Trade $13,490 #M18236A

'17 Infiniti Q50: 3.0t Premium, AWD, Certified, One Owner $36,007 #96360L

'17 Infiniti Q50: 3.0t Premium, One Owner, Clean Carfax, 27K Miles, AWD $32,670 #96072L

'13 Toyota Yaris: LE, Automatic, 30+ MPG $7,290 #B9108A

'17 Toyota Corolla: SE, M/R, Black, Loaded, Only 9K Miles, $16,990 #35326A

'11 Mazda 6 iTouring Plus: Automatic, Black, $9,990 #M18282B

Volkswagen '09 Mazda 6i: Touring, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, FWD $5,490 #M18396A

'09 Mazda 6: Grand Touring, Leather, M/R, Only 69K Miles $10,990 #P6640

'16 Mazda3i: Sport, Hatchback, FWD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $16,973 #P6604

Mercedes Benz '09 Mercedes-Benz AMG: 6.0L V12, 81K Miles, RWD, Clean Carfax $34,900 #79807A

Mini Cooper '15 Mini Cooper: Roadster, FWD, Clean Carfax, Convertible $19,990 #B9461

'15 Mini Cooper: S, Paceman, All 4, 35K Miles, AWD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $17,900 #B9291

STLtoday.com/classifieds

Misc. Autos BOMMARITO ST. PETERS 1-866-244-9085

'11 EOS: Komfort, Auto, Navy Blue $9,990

'18 Volkswagen Beetle S: Hatchback, FWD, VW Certified, Clean Carfax 1 Owner $18,490 #V18521A

'12 Volkswagen Jetta: TDI, 6-Speed Auto DSG, FWD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, $10,990 #V9458

'17 GMC Sierra 1500: SLT, 4WD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, 8 Cyl 5.3L $32,999 #80245A

'16 GMC Sierra 1500: SLT, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD $35,007 #80179A

'11 Jetta Wagon: TDI, Auto, Red, 57K Miles $11,990 '18 Passat: 2.0 Turbo, 10K, Auto, Blue $17,490 '18 Beetle: 6K, Auto, Black $18,490

'12 Jetta Sedan: TDI, Auto, Blue, 51K Miles $11,990

BOMMARITO ST. PETERS CADILLAC CERTIFIED 6yr/100K 1-866-244-9085 '14 CTS: Luxury, AWD, $24,490

Misc Trucks '17 Ram 1500: Laramie Longhorn Edition, 7K Miles, 4WD $40,990 #C18259A

'12 Ram 1500: Lifted Wheels & Tires, Quad Cab, 4WD, $22,990 #C18044RC

'14 Ram 2500: 6.7 Diesel, Crew Cab Laramie, 4 New Tires, $44,990 #B9170

16 Ram 1500 Laramie: Crew Cab, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, 4WD $32,750 #P9436A

Nissan/Datsun Trucks '11 Volkswagen Eos: Komfort Edition, FWD, 6-Speed Auto with DSG $9,990 #V9486

'14 Volkswagen Passat: Wolfsburg Edition, 65K Miles, FWD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $10,972 #42917B

Chevrolet Trucks '18 Chevrolet Silverado 1500: Crew Cab, Short Box, 4WD, $43,640 Stock #190124A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Chevrolet Silverado 1500: Crew Cab, Short Box, 4WD, LT, $27,755 Stock #P06939 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '12 Chevrolet Silverado 1500: Crew Cab Short Box, 2WD, LT, $25,277 Stock #181123A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '11 Chevrolet Silverado 1500: EXT CAB, Std. Box, 2WD, LT, $19,796 Stock #180368A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '17 Chevrolet Colorado: Certified, EXT Cab, Long Box, 4WD, Z71, $29,963 Stock #P07009 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '17 Chevy Colorado: 4x4, "Black Out" Edition, Loaded $27,990 #35244A

'17 Chevy Silverado: Crew Cab, High Country, One Owner, Only 14K Miles $42,990 #P6541A

'17 Jetta: SE, 15K, Auto, Certified $15,890 '07 Chevy Silverado: LTZ, Leather, Loaded, $18,990 #44127A

'16 Chevy Silverado: 2500HD, Work Truck, 9K Miles, 4WD, 8 Cyl 6.0L $35,999 #98020A

'14 Chevy Silverado: 3500HD, LTZ, Crew Cab, 4WD, Clean Carfax $39,900 #79281A

'17 Chevy Silverado 1500: LT, 4WD, 19K Miles, Clean Carfax $33,999 #P9535

'15 Chevy Silverado 2500: HD, LTZ, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, 4WD $51,007 #79680A

'15 Nissan Titan: Pro, Crew Cab, 4WD, 1 Owner $28,990 #B9063

Sport Utility '18 Audi Q5: PremiumPlus, Quattro, 24K Miles, $41,490 #C18154B1

'16 Audi Q5: Premium, 24K Miles, AWD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner $32,999 #P9344

'18 Audi Q5 Premium: Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, Well Maintained $39,007 #P9607

'17 Audi Q7: Premium Plus, Quattro, AWD, Graphite Gray $54,500 #P9385

'18 Audi Q3 Premium: Certified, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, 8K Miles, $34,007 #28605L

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus: Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD, 8K Miles, Certified $44,500 #28175L

'05 Chevy Equinox: LT, Loaded, Clean Carfax $6,990 #42994B

'18 Chevy Traverse: Only 9K Miles, One Owner, GM Certified $27,770 #420054A

'14 Chevy Equinox: LS, One Owner, Clean Carfax $11,990 #420039A

'10 Chevy Equinox: LTZ, Loaded, Clean Carfax, Full Power $11,990 #44167A

'13 Chevy Equinox: Loaded, Very Clean, $13,750 #44008A

'15 Chevy Tahoe: LTZ, 4WD, Clean Carfax, 91k Miles $34,400 #P9461

'11 Ford Escape: Limited, 4WD, Carfax 1 Owner $10,490 #M18078A1

'09 Ford Explorer: XLT, 4WD, Dark Copper $10,990 #V9441A

'13 Ford Explorer: AWD, V6, Tow Package, Local Trade $13,490 #B9196A

'17 Ford Escape: $18,781 Stock #P07010 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '18 GMC Terrain: 1K Miles, White, Just Arrived! $26,490 #B9076B

'15 GMC Terrain: SLE2, Loaded, Very Clean $12,750 #44094A

'05 GMC Envoy: XL, Black, 4 Door $5,990 #420128A

'12 GMC Acadia: SLE, Loaded, Very Clean, Full Power $14,990 #P6555A

'15 GMC Yukon: Denali, White, GM Certified, Loaded $42,990 #420141B

'15 GMC Yukon Denali: 4WD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, White Diamond $41,007 #P9552 '18 Audi Q7: Premium, 11K Miles, Clean Carfax, One Owner, AWD $55,900 #28207L

'18 Audi Q3 Quattro: 7K Miles, Utopia Blue Metallic, AWD, $34,400 #28209L

'18 Audi Q5: 2.0T Quattro, Ibis White, AWD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $44,900 #28326L

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus: Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, 9K Miles, AWD $43,007 #28392L

'18 Audi Q7: Premium Plus, 11K Miles, AWD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $59,007 #28602L

15 BMW X5 35d: AWD, 30K Miles, Carfax 1 Owner, $38,900 #P9574

'16 GMC Yukon Denali: 4WD, Quicksilver Metallic $50,007 #P9606

'16 GMC Acadia Denali: AWD, Ebony Twilight, 24K Miles, Clean Carfax $35,400 #P9478

'17 GMC Yukon: SLT, Onxy Black, 20K Miles, 4x4, $46,000 #P9277

'16 XTS: Luxury Collection, Pano Roof, AWD, 12K Miles Call Today!

'18 XTS: White, Certified, Just Arrived $34,490 '18 XT5: FWD, 4K, Bronze $34,990 '15 SRX: Luxury Collection, Pano Roof, Navy Blue, 36K Call Today! '18 XT5: Premium Luxury, FWD, White $38,490 '14 Escalade: Black, 55K, Quad Seats $39,490 '15 Escalade: Platinum, 24K, Black, Local Trade $62,990

Dodge Plymouth Trucks '03 Dodge Ram: Automatic, 90K Miles, Nice Clean Truck $6,990 #M18150A

'98 Dodge Ram: 1500 2WD Reg Cab Stock #P07008 Call Us! DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Ford Trucks '13 Ford F-150: Raptor, Crew Cab, 4WD, White, Local Trade $42,490 #M18349B

'18 Buick Encore: Preferred, 1K Miles, Just Arrived $20,990 #C18022B

'18 Buick Envision: Premium II, Galaxy Silver, AWD, $38,999 #P9356

'15 Cadillac Escalade: ESV Premium, Dark Granite, Local Trade $47,990 #C19050A

'14 Cadillac Escalade: Premium, AWD, Certified, Black $37,290 #C9319A

STLtoday.com/homes

'18 Infiniti QX60: AWD, 7K Miles, Certified, Carfax 1 Owner $39,900 #97179L

'18 Infiniti QX60: AWD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, $34,007 #P9610

'15 Jeep Cherokee: Latitude, 61K Miles, Leather, Auto $15,490 #V18494A

'15 Jeep Grand Cherokee: Loredo, 4WD, 40K Miles, V6 $23,490 #B9340

'14 Jeep Cherokee: FWD, 4 Door, Latitude, Stock #181164N Call Us DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '11 Land Rover LR2: 4WD, Navigation, White, $12,990 #V9479A

'13 LR Range Rover HSE: 4WD, Firenze Red Metallic, 63K Miles $46,500 #P9203

'16 LR Range Rover: Sport V6 HSE, AWD, Clean Carfax $43,007 #79760A

'13 Mazda CX-5: Grand Touring, Power Sunroof, Great MPG $12,990 #V18631A

'17 Mazda CX-5: Touring, 4K, Certified, Like New FWD, $23,990 #M17390R

'18 Mazda CX-9: Grand Touring, AWD, Clean Carfax, Sonic Silver $35,900 #P9497

'14 Nissan Rogue: SV, Loaded, White $12,990 #35524A

'15 Nissan Pathfinder: AWD, 4 Door, Platinum, $18,995 Stock #P06899 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Nissan Rogue: $16,640 Stock #P07004 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Toyota Highlander: Limited, 31K Miles, Carfax 1 Owner, AWD $33,007 #P9566

'17 Toyota Sequoia: Platinum, 41K Miles, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $47,007 #97375A

'16 Volkswagen Touareg: VR6 FSI, 8-Speed Auto with Tipt, AWD, 31K Miles, $31,990 #V18546A

'16 Volvo XC60: T5, Premier, White, Sunroof & Nav, $27,990 #M18556A

'17 Volvo XC60: R-Design, AWD, Clean Carfax, One Owner, 12K Miles $36,007 #P9549

Mini vans '16 GMC Terrain: FWD, SLE, 57K Miles, $16,344 Stock #190039A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '14 Honda CR-V: EX, AWD, 17K Miles, $19,490 #C18230A2

'13 Hyundai Tucson: LTD, Loaded, Black $12,469 #42511A

'14 CTS-V: Sedan, White, Auto, Loaded $43,490

'16 ATS: Coupe, Luxury, AWD, 5K, Black $32,490 '17 Infiniti Q50: 3.0t Premium, Certified, 12K Miles, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $36,007 #96195L

'16 GMC Sierra 1500: SLT, 4WD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $34,999 #79838A

Toyota

'09 Jetta: SEL, Auto, White $5,990 '18 Infiniti Q60: 3.0t Luxe, Coupe, RWD, Clean Carfax, One Owner $32,999 #P9620

'17 Subaru Forester: 18K Miles, One Owner, Local Trade, White, #V18545B $28,490

'15 Lincoln MKZ: 44K, Pure Luxury, A Must See! $22,490 #B9389

'18 Tiguan: S, FWD, Blue Metallic, 7K $19,990 '18 Infiniti Q70L: 3.7Luxe, 5K Miles, AWD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $46,007 #97172L

'06 Saturn Ion: Auto, One Owner, Only 44K Miles $5,750 #420151B

'17 Lexus ES350: FWD, Clean Carfax, One Owner, 12K Miles $33,900 #P9498

'15 Jetta: SE, 44K, Auto, Gas, Certified $13,490 '16 Hyundai Accent: 4 Door, SE, Stock #P07016 Call Us DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'12 Nissan Altima: 2.5S, Loaded, One Owner, Clean Carfax $8,569 #420080A

'18 Ford F-150: 4WD, Platinum Super Crew, 5K Miles, Clean Carfax $53,500 #79725A

GMC Trucks

VOLKSWAGEN'S '13 Hyundai Genesis: Black, 32K, Loaded, Well Cared For $16,990 #B9360

'14 Nissan Maxima: 34K Miles, Black, Sunroof, Auto $19,990 #C18235C

'16 Ford F-150: 4WD, XLT, Supercrew, Clean Carfax, One Owner $33,007 #P9316A

Porsche

Hyundai '18 Hyunda Elantra: SEL Stock #P06992 $15,182 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '12 Hyundai Veloster: Automatic, Local Trade, Just Arrived $8,490 #V18419B

Nissan/Datsun

'17 Lexus RC: Black w/Red Leather, 21K Miles $35,490 #B9509

Mazda '17 Ford Mustang: Ecoboost, 6-Speed, RWD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $21,990 #C9077A

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • B9

'18 Infiniti QX60: AWD, Certified, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $35,400 #P9543

'17 Infiniti QX80: AWD, Clean Carfax, One Owner, 48K Miles $42,007 #P9546

'18 Infiniti QX60: AWD, Carfax 1 Owner, 20K Miles $38,007 #P9551

'16 Dodge Caravan: SE, 37K Miles, 1 Owner, Grey, $18,990 #V18457A

'16 Honda Odyssey: SE, Loaded, Full Power, Only 33K Miles $25,990 #35542A

Vans '14 Chevrolet Express 1500: Cargo Van, Reg Wheelbase, RWD $18,248 Stock #P07007 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '09 Chevrolet Express 3500: Passenger Van, Extended Wheelbase, RWD Stock #18T0463A Contact Us DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '17 Chevy Express 3500: LT, 15 Passenger Van, GM Certified! $24,490 #P6535

'15 Nissan NV200 S: Cargo Van, Clean Carfax, Full Power $13,990 #P6594

\'14 Infiniti QX80: AWD, Black Obsidian, 71K Miles, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $34,400 #P9432

STLtoday.com/jobs


B10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 11.08.2018

BOYS SOCCER • MISSOURI CLASS 2 STATE TOURNAMENT SPOTLIGHT

ATHLETES OF THE WEEK Tanner Berry Windsor soccer A junior forward, Berry came up big to lead the Owls to a Class 3 district championship. In the title game against Hillsboro, Berry scored the game-winning goal seven minutes into overtime to give Windsor a 2-1 victory. The goal came off a dead ball 40 yards from the Hillsboro goal. Jake Mahon passed the ball into the penalty box, where Berry redirected it with a header past the Hillsboro goalkeeper from 4 yards out. Berry helped the Owls advance to the title game by scoring three goals in a 5-1 win over De Soto in the semifinals. Berry, who led the Owls in scoring with 16 goals and three assists, earned first-team all-conference and all-district honors. Greg Carr Lutheran North soccer A senior goalkeeper, Carr has led the Crusaders to their first state semifinal soccer appearance in school history. In a Class 1 district championship match, Carr set the school’s single-game record for saves when he turned aside 27 Crossroads shots in a 4-1 victory. He started and played 60 minutes of the Crusaders’ 4-0 win district-semifinal win over Medicine and Bioscience, making 12 saves to earn a share of the shutout. Carr had nine saves in a 2-1 state quarterfinal win over Cole Camp. Carr has drawn interest from several schools to play collegiately. He also has kicked four extra points for the football team. Avery Crowder Eureka volleyball A 6-foot junior setter, Crowder led the Wildcats to their first state volleyball championship. In a 25-23, 25-23 win over Rockwood School District rival Lafayette in the Class 4 championship match, Crowder handed out a matchhigh 27 assists and made five digs. Crowder helped the Wildcats advance to the championship match with key contributions in pool-play matches against Lafayette (17 assists, 5 digs), Willard (24 assists, 8 digs, 4 kills) and St. Teresa’s (20 assists, 5 digs). For the season, the University of South Carolina recruit averaged 9.2 assists and 2.2 digs per set. She plays club volleyball for Rockwood Thunder. Brayden Escher Parkway South diving A freshman, Escher is undefeated in duals and invitational meets heading into the Missouri swimming and diving championships Thursday at St. Peters Rec-Plex. Escher set a school record for points in an 11-dive meet with 477.55 at the Cape Rock Invitational, which featured 16 divers, in September. Escher won the meet by 15 points. He placed first at the Suburban Red Swimming and Diving Championships at Summit, amassing 434 points. He also won the Parkway Quad, a six-dive meet, by 15 points. Escher excels in twisting dives and piles up points with his forward 1.5 summersault with two twists. He also competes for the Clayton Diving Alliance national team. Mercedes Schroer O’Fallon Christian cross country A sophomore, Schroer topped defending champ and fellow sophomore Kylie Goldfarb of John Burroughs for the individual title Saturday in the Class 3 state meet at Oak Hills Golf Center in Jefferson City. Schroer crossed first in 19 minutes, 36.26 seconds, on the muddy 5-kilometer course to beat Goldfarb by a little more than two seconds. With 160 meters left in the race, Schroer’s lead was just half a second and she won with an uphill sprint to finish. Schroer was coming off a dominating performance the district meet at McNair Park, where she won by a minute. In track last spring, she won state championships in the 1,600, 3,200 and placed second in the 800. She also plays soccer. Taryn Tkachuk Villa Duchesne field hockey A center forward, Tkachuk capped off her sophomore season by helping the Saints capture their second consecutive Midwest Field Hockey tournament championship. Nine minutes into the second half of the championship game against MICDS, Tkachuk took a pass on a corner from Sophia Schlattman and scored past MICDS goalkeeper Barbara Ribeiro to give the Saints a 1-0 lead for the only goal of the game. Tkachuk finished the season as the area’s top scorer with 29 goals and 18 assists for 76 points. Last season, she earned first-team All-Metro and Max Field Hockey all-region honors. She was an all-conference soccer player last spring. Ben Watson Fort Zumwalt East football A 5-foot-11, 180-pound senior quarterback, Watson carried the ball 19 times for 249 yards and four touchdowns in a 31-0 win over Priory in a Class 4 district semifinal. Watson found the end zone on runs of 60, 81, 13 and 3 yards. He also was 9 of 17 passing for 52 yards. The previous week in a 42-14 first-round win over Warrenton, Watson passed for 101 yards and two touchdowns. The GAC Central offensive player of the year this season and in 2017 and an all-state selection in the “athlete” category a year ago, Watson is among the area leaders in touchdowns (25), passing yards (1,462) and rushing yards (1,217). He also runs track. Compiled by Paul Kopsky based off stats reported to STLhighschoolsports.com. Please send nominations to pkopsky@stltoday.com by noon each Monday.

SOLACE ON THE PITCH

St. Charles West’s Champagne plays through heavy heart after mother’s death

RICK ULREICH • Special to STLhighschoolsports.com

St. Charles West senior midfielder Trent Champagne (10) celebrates his goal Saturday with teammate Nicholas Schreiber during a victory against O’Fallon Christian in a Class 2 quarterfinal boys soccer game. BY JIM FAASEN STLhighschoolsports.com

Trent Champagne has persevered through tragedy this fall. The senior midfielder has been a driving force during a dream season for the St. Charles West boys soccer team, all the while grieving the Oct. 2 death of his mother, Stacy, after her battle with kidney cancer. “It’s been really tough, but my mom was always the person to not (want anyone) to focus on her, she’d want you to go out and live your life,” Champagne said. “If she was here right now, she’d be the one to say, ‘Don’t worry about me, play hard.’ She was always my No. 1 supporter. Lucky for me, the soccer team has been really tight, like my family. Everyone’s been behind her. We even got the orange captain’s bands because she died of kidney cancer. It makes it easier when you have that kind of support.” St. Charles West (24-1, No. 1 in the STLhighschoolsports.com smallschools rankings) is in the state semifinals for only the second time in program history. The Warriors face Pembroke Hill (12-8) in a Class 2 semifinal at 10 a.m. Friday at Soccer Park in Fenton for a spot in the championship, scheduled for 2 p.m. Saturday. Monett (22-5) and John Burroughs (16-6-1) play in the second Class 2 semifinal at noon Friday. The efforts of Champagne have inspired those around him, senior forward Nick Schreiber said. “Trent’s one of the guys that will pick everyone up,” Schreiber said. “I never see him down. If he misses a ball

CLASS 2 STATE TOURNAMENT At Soccer Park Semifinals, Friday Monett (22-5) vs John Burroughs (16-6-1), noon Pembroke Hill (12-8) vs St. Charles West (24-1), 10 a.m. Placing games, Saturday Third place, 10 a.m. Championship, 2 p.m.

or shanks one out of bounds, there is still a smile on his face. He’s bringing everyone up all the time. It’s crazy how upbeat he is after going through what he did with his mom. I know I couldn’t do it. I just know it makes me a better person being around him.” In addition to soccer, Champagne also plays basketball, baseball and competes in track and field for the Warriors and serves as a team captain in each sport. Because of that, Champagne said he thinks leadership skills are his best asset. “I know what it takes to be (part of a) successful team,” Champagne said. “I just try to give my guys energy and talk to them. I just try to lift them up. I know when you want to look up to a leader on a team, he’s got to be energetic and positive. When you’re like that, the whole team is like that.” Champagne’s versatility just hasn’t been his ability to play different sports. The senior started his career playing left back before making his move to the midfield. He has four goals and 24 assists this season, with the assists total ranking second in the area. “We always joked that the only reason he made varsity was that his twomile time was the best in the program,”

Warriors coach Matt Dwyer said. “He lacked ball skills but could run for days. That’s why he got stuck at left back. The jump from sophomore year to last year was because he was able to control the ball at his feet. That’s why he went from left back to center mid. “This year, he has just taken another step forward. He plays basketball and I think that it really helps. Just being in the middle of the field and seeing everything, using his vision. He sees players making runs, players in space. His throw-ins are second to none. Every throw is like a corner kick. It’s been fantastic.” When St. Charles West takes to the Soccer Park pitch, Champagne said he knows his mom won’t be far away. After all, she had a hand in the team coming together during the successful season. “We’re playing for her,” Champagne said. “During the season, she was able to come to the games and everyone became closer. When she passed, everyone came together even more. I know she’s watching down on me and she’s really happy. She’s probably even critiquing me up there. It’s just fun because I want to go out with a bang for my mom and I want it to be this soccer season.” One way would be to make some program history. St. Charles West has never won a state soccer title, finishing third in 2001 in the Class 1A-3A tournament in its only other state appearance. “We haven’t won a state championship in any sport for 20 years,” Champagne said. “We’re hoping to be the ones that break through. It’s great to be around St. Charles West right now.”

POSTSEASON SCOREBOARD MISSOURI BOYS SOCCER

CLASS 4 STATE TOURNAMENT Quarterfinals, Saturday De Smet (20-3-2) at Marquette (20-3), 1 p.m. Lee’s Summit (20-1) at Rock Bridge (17-5-1), 1 p.m. CBC (22-2-2) at Chaminade (24-5), 1 p.m. Rockhurst (18-6-1) at Liberty North (14-11), noon At Soccer Park Semifinals Noon and 2 p.m. Nov. 16 Third place 10 a.m. Nov. 17 Championship 2 p.m. Nov. 17 CLASS 3 STATE TOURNAMENT Quarterfinals, Saturday Farmington (17-3) at Webster Groves (13-11-1), 2 p.m. Glendale (19-7) at Neosho (13-10-1), 1 p.m. Parkway Central (19-6-2) at Fort Zumwalt South (18-9), 6 p.m. Helias (19-7) at Van Horn (24-2), 5 p.m. At Soccer Park Semifinals 4 p.m. and 6 p.m. Nov. 16 Third place Noon Nov. 17 Championship 4:30 p.m. Nov. 17 CLASS 1 STATE TOURNAMENT At Soccer Park Semifinals, Friday Barstow (11-8) vs Lutheran North (10-15), 2 p.m. Fair Grove (20-5-1) vs Principia (7-8), 4 p.m. Placing games, Saturday Third place, noon Championship, 4 p.m.

ILLINOIS GIRLS VOLLEYBALL

At Redbird Arena, Normal CLASS 4A STATE TOURNAMENT Semifinals, Friday Benet Academy (35-5) vs. Chicago Marist (37-3), 7 p.m. Downers Grove North (29-11) vs. Crystal Lake Prairie Ridge (29-10), 8:30 p.m. Placing matches, Saturday Third place, 7:25 p.m. Championship, 8:55 p.m. CLASS 3A STATE TOURNAMENT Semifinals, Friday Sterling (39-1) vs Joliet Catholic (27-13), 4 p.m. Althoff (36-4) vs Chicago Latin (35-2), 5:30 p.m. Placing matches, Saturday Third place, 4 p.m. Championship, 5:30 p.m. CLASS 2A STATE TOURNAMENT Semifinals, Friday Pleasant Plains (32-6) vs. Champaign St. Thomas More (36-4), noon Nashville (32-8) vs. Galena (35-5), 1:30 p.m. Placing matches, Saturday Third place, noon Championship, 1:30 p.m. CLASS 1A STATE TOURNAMENT Semifinals, Friday Newark (38-2) vs. Grayville (27-9), 9 a.m. Hartsburg-Emden (35-4) vs.

Decatur St. Teresa (28-10), 10:30 a.m. Placing matches, Saturday Third place, 9 a.m. Championship, 10:30 a.m.

MISSOURI FOOTBALL

District finals; Friday unless noted CLASS 6 De Smet (9-2) at CBC (9-1), 7 p.m. Kirkwood (7-3) at Joplin (9-2), 7 p.m. Blue Springs (8-3) at Rock Bridge (9-2), 7 p.m. Rockhurst (9-2) at Lee’s Summit North (9-2), 7 p.m. CLASS 5 Fox (9-1) at Jackson (10-0), 7 p.m. Chaminade (6-5) at Vianney (7-3), 7 p.m. Willard (4-6) at Lebanon (8-2), 7 p.m. Parkview (6-4) at Carthage (9-1), 7 p.m. McCluer North (5-5) at Fort Zumwalt North (9-1), 7 p.m. Battle (6-4) at Timberland (8-2), 7 p.m. Belton (4-7) at Fort Osage (6-4), 7 p.m. North Kansas City (9-1) at Staley (8-2), 7 p.m. CLASS 4 Festus (7-4) at West Plains (11-0), 7 p.m. Summit (6-5) vs Ladue (11-0) at Kirkwood, 7 p.m. Borgia (10-1) at Camdenton (10-1), 7 p.m. Neosho (8-3) at Webb City (11-0), 7 p.m. MICDS (10-1) vs Hazelwood East (8-3) at SLUH, noon Saturday. Hannibal (8-3) at Fort Zumwalt East (9-2), 7 p.m. Harrisonville (4-7) at Warrensburg (8-3), 7 p.m. Smithville (9-2) at Platte County (10-1), 7 p.m. CLASS 3 Park Hills Central (6-5) at Kennett (10-1), 7 p.m. Lutheran South (6-4) vs Cardinal Ritter (11-0) at SLUH, 7 p.m. Buffalo (9-2) at Springfield Catholic (9-2), 7 p.m. Mount Vernon (10-1) at Cassville (11-0), 7 p.m. St. Charles West (8-3) at Trinity (9-2), 7 p.m. Southern Boone (9-2) at Moberly (8-3), 7 p.m. Pembroke Hill (11-0) at Odessa (11-0), 7 p.m. Savannah (8-3) at Maryville (10-1), 7 p.m. CLASS 2 Caruthersville (9-2) at Charleston (10-1), 7 p.m. Lift For Life (10-1) at Lutheran North (8-3), 7 p.m. South Callaway (10-1) at Blair Oaks (11-0), 7 p.m. Clark County (9-2) at Monroe City (10-1), 7 p.m. Fair Grove (8-1-1) at Ava (10-1), 7 p.m. Versailles (7-4) at Lamar (10-1), 7 p.m. Holden (8-3) at Summit Christian (9-2), 7 p.m. Lawson (10-1) at Lathrop (11-0), 7 p.m. CLASS 1 Valle Catholic (9-2) at Hayti (11-0), 7 p.m. Thayer (7-4) at Miller (9-2), 7 p.m. Sweet Springs (6-5) at Fayette (10-1), 7 p.m. South Shelby (5-6) at Westran (9-2), 7 p.m. Liberal (5-6) at Adrian (10-1), 7 p.m. Lincoln (10-1) at Cass Midway (11-0), 7 p.m. Mid-Buchanan (7-4) at Wellington-Napoleon (8-3), 7 p.m. Hamilton (8-3) at Marceline (10-1), 7 p.m.

ILLINOIS FOOTBALL

Quarterfinals; Saturday CLASS 8A Gurnee Warren (10-1) at Brother Rice (11-0), 6 p.m. Chicago Marist (10-1) at Homewood-Flossmoor (10-1), 1 p.m. Edwardsville (8-3) at Lincoln-Way East (11-0), 6 p.m. Loyola Academy (8-3) at Maine South (10-1), 1 p.m. CLASS 7A Nazareth Academy (10-1) vs

COLLEGE SIGNINGS Nov. 14 is the first date of the fall National Letter of Intent period for athletes signing with NCAA Divison I and II programs. Coaches, athletics directors and other administrators are asked to submit signings information by email to chollway@post-dispatch.com. In order to ensure accuracy, we cannot accept signings information from the public, and the email address must be associated with a high school or college. Please include the signee’s name, high school, sport he/she is signing to play, and the name of the college or university. Chicago Simeon (11-0) at Gately Stadium, 1 p.m. Willowbrook (11-0) at Batavia (11-0), 1 p.m. East St. Louis (9-2) vs Chicago Mount Carmel (10-1) at Gately Stadium, 5 p.m. St. Charles North (8-3) at Wheaton Warrenville South (10-1), 1 p.m. CLASS 6A Chicago Phillips (9-2) at Cary-Grove (11-0), 1:30 p.m. Antioch (11-0) at Niles Notre Dame (9-2), 4 p.m. Normal Community West (10-1) at Oak Lawn Richards (11-0), 6 p.m. Washington, Illinois (11-0) at Crete-Monee (8-3), 2 p.m. CLASS 5A Lombard Montini (10-1) at Evergreen Park (7-4), 2 p.m. Rockford Boylan (10-1) at Sterling (10-1), 1 p.m. Cahokia (10-1) at Country Club Hills Hillcrest (11-0), 3 p.m. Highland (11-0) at Joliet Catholic (7-4), 5 p.m. CLASS 4A Marengo (9-2) at IC Catholic (11-0), 7 p.m. Richmond-Burton (10-1) at Coal City (10-1), 1 p.m. Rochester (10-1) at Taylorville (11-0), 6 p.m. Kankakee McNamara (10-1) at Effingham (9-2), 2 p.m. CLASS 3A Lisle (10-1) at Byron (11-0), 2 p.m. Monmouth-Roseville (9-2) at Herscher (7-4), 2 p.m. Monticello (11-0) at Greenville (8-3), 2 p.m. Williamsville (10-1) at Carlinville (11-0), 2 p.m. CLASS 2A Gibson City (11-0) vs Newman Central Catholic (10-1) at Sterling, 6 p.m. Lanark Eastland (11-0) at Orion (11-0), 1 p.m. Downs Tri-Valley (7-4) at Decatur St. Teresa (11-0), 2:30 p.m. Tuscola (10-1) at Maroa-Forsyth (11-0), 1 p.m. CLASS 1A Lena-Winslow (10-1) at Aurora Christian (8-3), 3 p.m. Dakota (8-3) at Forreston (9-2), 5 p.m. Argenta-Oreana (11-0) at Central A&M (8-3), 1:30 p.m. Triopia (10-1) at Camp Point Central (10-1), 1 p.m.

Call 833-776-7767 24/7 to schedule an appointment. ©2018 SSM Health. All rights reserved. ACC-STL-17-320648 1/18


SPORTS

11.08.2018 • Thursday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • B11

FOOTBALL • OBITUARY

MICDS legend Holtman left unmatched legacy BY DAVID KVIDAHL sTLhighschoolsports.com

Josh Smith walked into Busch Stadium with Ron Holtman. The longtime, legendary football and golf coach at Country Day School and then MICDS, Holtman had great seats for the Cardinals game that night. So good in fact, Smith — then a young, up-and-coming assistant coach — was surprised to see who sat next to them. “It was one of the Bushes, I’m pretty sure it was Jeb,” Smith said. When Holtman excused himself for a moment, Smith leaned over and asked how Bush knew Holtman. “There’s two people you have to know in St. Louis,” Bush said. “Stan Musial and Ron Holtman.” Holtman died Wednesday. He was 90. Holtman’s accomplishments and recognitions in his 50 years as a coach are unrivaled. He guided Country Day School and MICDS to a combined seven state championships in 10 title game appearances. His last championship came in 2004 when the Rams rallied from a 25-point halftime deficit to stun defending state champion Harrisonville in double overtime. According to the Missouri State High School Activities Association record book, Holtman finished his career with a record of 382102-8. It was the secondmost wins by a coach at the time, trailing only Jefferson City’s Pete Adkins, who finished with 405. Rockhurst coach Tony Severino has since passed Holtman with 396 career coaching victories. Holtman coached the boys golf team to seven state championships, too. Holtman has been enshrined in the Missouri Sports Hall of Fame, the St. Louis Sports Hall of Fame, the Missouri Football Coaches Hall of Fame and the MICDS Hall of Fame. MICDS named its immaculate, new football facility Ron Holtman Stadium after an anonymous donor gave a large donation to start the project with the stipulation it be named for Holtman. It’s an honor Holtman never imagined would be bestowed upon him. “He was so humble,” former MICDS assistant coach Matt Irvin said. “He was much more than a football coach. He was a leader of people.” Irvin spent eight years on staff as an assistant to Holtman and then succeeded him at MICDS as head coach for three seasons. Irvin was the offensive coordinator at Kirkwood before he applied to join the MICDS staff. “I recognized it would be an opportunity to learn,” Irvin said.

POST-DISPATCH FILE PHOTO

MICDS quarterback Andrew Grumney embraces coach Ron Holtman on Nov. 27, 2004, after the Class 3 football championship between MICDS and Harrisonville at Edward Jones Dome. MICDS rallied for a 45-42 victory in two overtimes after trailing by 25 points in the fourth quarter. It was the final game in Holtman’s legendary 50-year coaching career. Holtman died Wednesday at the age of 90.

A lot of what Irvin learned at Holtman’s side had little to do with Xs and Os. It was the way Holtman found the thread that connected his players and made them understand personal sacrifice would lead to a greater good. “He had a unique talent to bring people together,” Irvin said. “It was always the team.” Jim Lemen had to prepare for Holtman’s teams for 35 years. His tenure at John Burroughs coincided with Holtman’s at MICDS. Holtman started at Country Day School in 1966 after an 11-year run at Alton Marquette. Lemen took the top job at Burroughs in 1970. As members of the powerful ABC League, now the Metro League, the two coaching legends crossed paths in the annual rivalry game between MICDS and Burroughs. Those matchups often went the Rams’ way, but that didn’t stop Lemen from appreciating the man on the opposite sideline. “The part I liked most about Ron was he was genuine,” Lemen said. “He thought athletics was a place to teach lessons. It wasn’t just winning and losing.” A former Marine, Holtman used football to prepare his players for life. Whether they went to play college football at the highest level, enrolled in the Ivy League or chose a path in a military academy, Holtman’s Rams would be ready for whatever came their way and they loved him for it. “He treated his players like they were very special,” Lemen said. Holtman’s memory is the stuff of legend. He could name all the players that came through his program and even many of those who didn’t. “He could tell you the kids that played on Lutheran North in 1965,” Smith said. On the field, Lemen said Holtman’s teams al-

ways were a challenge. No matter the makeup of the roster, Holtman had a way of tweaking his preferred scheme to fit his players. “He was a master of keeping it within his system but could adapt it year to year with his personnel,” Lemen said. “He had the ability to utilize a system to bring out the best in his players.” Even after he stepped down from coaching football, Holtman remained active in the community. He and his wife, Maggie, were honored in September with the Alzheimer’s Community Service Award. Holtman was able to watch two grandchildren graduate from MICDS. He and Lemen would see one another every year as their grandchildren took their turn participating in the MICDS-Burroughs rivalry. “It was nice we kept crossing paths to that extent, having our grandkids playing against each other,” Lemen said. When Smith replaced Irvin as MICDS’s coach in 2008, he said Holtman would routinely drop by his office and share things he saw during that week’s game. Smith was an assistant for Holtman for six years and then spent three years under Irvin. He currently serves as MICDS’s athletics director and the football team’s defensive coordinator. “You’d always wanted to listen,” Smith said. “One of my favorite parts of being at MICDS was my relationship with Ron.” Holtman spent last Saturday in the stadium that bears his name and watched MICDS beat Parkway North 21-18 in a playoff game. Holtman loved football and treasured his time at MICDS. “We’ve lost someone, not just MICDS but all of football in the St. Louis area and Missouri, that was special and someone you could look up to,” Lemen said.

BOYS SWIMMING AND DIVING • CLASS 2 STATE MEET At St. Peters Rec-Plex SCHEDULE Thursday: Swimming preliminaries, 12:30 p.m.; diving finals, 5 p.m. Friday: Swimming finals, 10 a.m. AREA QUALIFIERS Format: Eight to finals and eight to consolation race out of preliminaries — CBC Benjamin Bell (200 freestyle, 100 butterfly) August Brandt (100 butterfly, 100 backstroke) Brooks Cosman (50 freestyle, 100 freestyle) Dominic Cyr (100 butterfly, 100 breaststroke) Edward Rohan (50 freestyle, 100 freestyle) Max Wehrmann (200 freestyle, 100 backstroke) Michael Weiss (50 freestyle, 100 freestyle) Drew Willmann (200 IM, 100 backstroke) Relays: 200 medley, 200 freestyle, 400 freestyle — De Smet Aaron Lasek (500 freestyle) Relays: 200 medley, 200 freestyle, 400 freestyle — Eureka Jackson Phelps (50 freestyle) Relays: 200 medley, 200 freestyle, 400 freestyle — Fort Zumwalt West CJ Caldwell (200 freestyle, 500 freestyle) Braden Cearley (200 IM, 100 backstroke) Kevin McElfresh (50 freestyle) Alex Ostrem (100 freestyle) Relays: 200 medley, 200 freestyle, 400 freestyle — Francis Howell Cole Guffey (500 freestyle) Kaden Patterson (50 freestyle, 100 freestyle) Grant Reilmann (500 freestyle) David Yang (100 breaststroke) Relays: 200 medley, 200 freestyle, 400 freestyle — Francis Howell Central Alex Anderson (50 freestyle, 100 freestyle) Jackson Michaels (50 freestyle) Colin Williams (200 IM, 100 backstroke) Relays: 200 medley, 200 freestyle, 400 freestyle — Hazelwood West Relays: 200 medley, 200 freestyle, 400 freestyle — Holt Austin Mack (100 butterfly) Thomas Neveau (200 freestyle, 100 backstroke) Grant Owen (500 freestyle) Noah Scheuermann (200 freestyle, 100 butterfly) Relays: 200 medley, 200 freestyle, 400 freestyle — Kirkwood Alex Baynham (100 breaststroke) Noah Gross (50 freestyle) Nick Hepburn (200 IM, 100 butterfly) Alex Hughes (100 butterfly, 100 breaststroke)

Christopher Lilly (100 breaststroke) Nathan Lin (100 butterfly, 100 breaststroke) Caleb Munger (200 freestyle, 500 freestyle) Will Newland (200 IM, 100 backstroke) Brett Rog (100 freestyle) Jack Ullery (200 freestyle, 500 freestyle) Relays: 200 medley, 200 freestyle, 400 freestyle — Lafayette Benjamin Brim (200 IM, 100 breaststroke) Jacob Hepper (50 freestyle, 100 backstroke) Cameron Kratky (100 butterfly, 100 backstroke) Joshua Moellenhoff (200 IM, 100 butterfly) Relays: 200 medley, 200 freestyle, 400 freestyle — Lindbergh Patrick Akins (100 freestyle) Matt Deutchmann (100 freestyle) Will Doyle (200 freestyle, 100 butterfly) Sam Hunter (100 backstroke) Tyler Lewis (200 IM, 100 backstroke) Jackson Terrill (200 freestyle, 500 freestyle) Relays: 200 medley, 200 freestyle, 400 freestyle — Marquette Kyle Deutschmann (50 freestyle) Simon Hermansen (50 freestyle, 100 breaststroke) Sam Maniscalco (50 freestyle) Relays: 200 medley, 200 freestyle, 400 freestyle — Pattonville Chaska Cox-Potter (100 breaststroke) Philip Tso (100 butterfly) Relays: 200 medley, 200 freestyle, 400 freestyle — SLUH Garrett Baldes (200 IM, 100 breaststroke) Eli Butters (50 freestyle, 100 freestyle) Josh Brown (200 IM, 100 butterfly) Joseph Feder (200 freestyle, 100 freestyle) Daniel Fink (200 freestyle, 500 freestyle) Jonas Hostetler (100 butterfly) Evan Lu (200 IM, 100 breaststroke) Ned Mehmeti (500 freestyle) Patrick Moehn (500 freestyle) Sean Santoni (200 freestyle, 500 freestyle) Cooper Scharff (200 IM, 100 backstroke) Jarrett Schneider (100 backstroke) Mikhail Shulepov (100 breaststroke) William Slatin (50 freestyle, 100 freestyle) Andrew Zimmerman (50 freestyle, 100 freestyle) Relays: 200 medley, 200 freestyle, 400 freestyle — Timberland Relays: 200 medley, 200 freestyle, 400 freestyle — Vianney Logan Schafer (50 freestyle) Relays: 200 medley, 200 freestyle, 400 freestyle

FOR THE RECORD AMERICA’S LINE

COLLEGES

Men’s basketball scores

NFL Favorite

Area scores

Wednesday East Bucknell 88, St. Bon. 85, OT St. Francis Brooklyn 92, Medgar Evers College 42 St. Peter’s 93, Lafayette 86, OT South FAU 98, Florida Institute of Technology 52 FIU 110, Webber International 84 Ga. Southern 139, Carver 51 Howard 114, Washington Adventist University 91 Kennesaw St. 68, Oglethorpe 57 Marshall 105, E. Kentucky 77 Stetson 116, Johnson (FL) 66 William & Mary 79, High Point 69 Midwest Bradley 74, UW-Parkside 58 Dayton 78, North Florida 70 DePaul 80, Beth.-Cook. 58 Ohio 97, Wilberforce 61 Ohio St. 64, Cincinnati 56 South Dakota 83, York College (NE) 58 Wright St. 96, W. Carolina 73 Southwest Texas A&M-CC 81, Howard Payne 34

Points Underdog Open Current 5 4 Panthers

STEELERS > Sunday JETS 8 6.5 Bills Falcons 4 4 BROWNS Saints 4 5 BENGALS BUCS 2 3 Washington Patriots 7 6.5 TITANS PACKERS 9 9.5 Dolphins COLTS 3.5 3 Jaguars BEARS 6.5 6.5 Lions CHIEFS 16.5 16.5 Cards Chargers 9.5 10 RAIDERS RAMS 10 10 Seahawks EAGLES 6.5 7 Cowboys > Monday 49ERS 3 3 Giants Bye week: Cardinals, Bengals, Colts, Jaguars, Giants, Eagles. COLLEGE FOOTBALL Favorite Points Underdog Open Current NC STATE 16 17 Wake Forest > Friday SYRACUSE 21 21.5 Louisville Fresno St 2 2.5 BOISE ST > Saturday HOUSTON 4 4.5 Temple Michigan 39 40 RUTGERS PITTSBURGH 3.5 3 Va Tech Clemson 17 20 BOSTON COLL TEXAS A&M 12 12 Mississippi Kentucky 3.5 6 TENNESSEE Byu 13 14 MASS VIRGINIA 23.5 23.5 Liberty Troy 1 1 GA SOUTHERN IOWA ST 14.5 14.5 Baylor C FLORIDA 25.5 25.5 Navy W VIRGINIA 14.5 12.5 Tcu GA TECH 4.5 3.5 Miami-Fla KANSAS ST 12 10.5 Kansas E MICHIGAN 13 13 Akron INDIANA 3 1.5 Maryland Smu 18 19 CONNECTICUT DUKE 10.5 10.5 N Carolina OKLAHOMA 18 20 Oklahoma St IOWA 10 10.5 Northwestern CINCINNATI 12 13.5 S Florida Arkansas St 7 6.5 COASTAL CARO TULANE 14 14 E Carolina UTAH 3.5 3.5 Oregon Wash St 4.5 6 COLORADO MARSHALL 14.5 14 Charlotte N Texas 15 14.5 OLD DOMINION C MICHIGAN 9.5 7 Bowling Green NEVADA 13 14 Colorado St STANFORD 22.5 23.5 Oregon St Mid Tenn St 14 13.5 UTEP GEORGIA 14.5 14.5 Auburn PENN ST 8 9 Wisconsin ALABAMA 26 24 Miss St AIR FORCE 13.5 13.5 New Mexico MISSOURI 14 17 Vanderbilt NEBRASKA 18 17.5 Illinois Purdue 12.5 12 MINNESOTA MEMPHIS 14 15.5 Tulsa FLORIDA 6 6.5 S Carolina USC 5.5 5.5 California Texas PK 1.5 TEXAS TECH Lsu 14 13.5 ARKANSAS UTAH ST 31 31 San Jose St App’chian St 21.5 21 TEXAS ST UL-LAFAYETTE 13.5 13.5 Georgia St FLA ATLANTIC 18 20 W Kentucky UL-Monroe 4.5 6 S ALABAMA LA TECH 25.5 25 Rice Fla Int’l 10.5 10.5 UTSA NOTRE DAME 18 18 Florida St UAB 11.5 11.5 So Miss Ohio St 3.5 3.5 MICHIGAN ST ARIZONA ST 12.5 13 Ucla SAN DIEGO ST 18.5 22 Unlv NBA Favorite Points Underdog Rockets 4 THUNDER Celtics SUNS 9.5 BLAZERS 5 Clippers WARRIORS 6 Bucks COLLEGE BASKETBALL Favorite Points Underdog ILLINOIS 14 Evansville Added Games CONNECTICUT 12 Morehead St GEORGE WASH 7 Siena NHL Favorite Odds Underdog PANTHERS -$135/+$115 Oilers BRUINS -$230/+$190 Canucks FLYERS Coyotes -$125/+$105 CANADIENS -$135/+$115 Sabres LIGHTNING -$210/+$175 Islanders Vegas -$150/+$130 SENATORS BLACKHAWKS -$110/-$110 Hurricanes Sharks -$120/even STARS KINGS -$110/-$110 Wild Grand Salami: Over/under 51.5 goals. Home team in CAPS © 2018 Benjamin Eckstein

SOCCER Champions League Glance (Home teams listed first) FIRST ROUND Top two in each group advance GROUP A GP W D L GF GA Pts Borussia Dortmund 4 3 0 1 8 2 9 Atletico Madrid 4 301 7 6 9 Club Brugge 4 1 12 6 5 4 Monaco 4 0 1 3 2 10 1 Tuesday, Nov. 6 Monaco 0, Club Brugge 4 Aletico Madrid 2, Borussia Dortmund 0 GROUP B GP W D L GF GA Pts Barcelona 4 3 1 0 11 3 10 Inter Milan 4 2 1 1 5 5 7 Tottenham 4 1 1 2 7 9 4 PSV Eindhoven 4 0 1 3 4 10 1 Tuesday, Nov. 6 Inter Milan 1, Barcelona 1 Tottenham 2, PSV Eindhoven 1 GROUP C GP W D L GF GA Pts Liverpool 4 202 7 5 6 Napoli 4 1 30 4 3 6 Paris Saint-Germain 4 1 2 1 11 7 5 Red Star Belgrade 4 1 1 2 3 10 4 Tuesday, Nov. 6 Red Star Belgrade 2, Liverpool 0 Napoli 1, Paris Saint-Germain 1 GROUP D GP W D L GF GA Pts Porto 4 3 1 0 9 3 10 Schalke 4 2 20 4 1 8 Galatasaray 4 1 12 3 3 4 Lokomotiv Moscow 4 0 0 4 2 11 0 Tuesday, Nov. 6 Porto 4, Lokomotiv Moscow 1 Schalke 2, Galatasaray 0 GROUP E GP W D L GF GA Pts Bayern Munich 4 3 1 0 7 1 10 Ajax Amsterdam 4 2 2 0 6 2 8 Benfica 4 1 1 2 4 6 4 AEK Athens 4 0 0 4 2 10 0 Wednesday, Nov. 7 Bayern Munich 2, AEK Athens 0 Benfica 1, Ajax Amsterdam 1 GROUP F GP W D L GF GA Pts Manchester City 4 3 0 1 12 3 9 Lyon 4 1 30 9 8 6 Hoffenheim 4 0 3 1 8 9 3 Shaktar Donetsk 4 0 2 2 4 13 2 Wednesday, Nov. 7 Lyon 2, Hoffenheim 2 Manchester City 6, Shaktar Donetsk 0 GROUP G GP W D L GF GA Pts Real Madrid 4 3 0 1 10 2 9 Roma 4 3 0 1 10 4 9 CSKA Moscow 4 1 1 2 4 7 4 Viktoria Plzen 4 0 1 3 3 14 1 Wednesday, Nov. 7 CSKA Moscow 1, Roma 2 Viktoria Plzen 0, Real Madrid 5 GROUP H GP W D L GF GA Pts Juventus 4 301 7 2 9 Manchester United 4 2 1 1 5 2 7 Valencia 4 121 4 4 5 Young Boys Bern 4 0 1 3 2 10 1 Wednesday, Nov. 7 Valencia 3, Young Boys Bern 1 Juventus 1, Manchester United 2

USL playoffs Championship

Louisville vs. Phoenix, 7 p.m., Thursday

MLS playoffs > CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS

Home-and-home FIRST LEG Eastern Conference Columbus 1, New York 0 Atlanta 1, New York City FC 0 Western Conference Portland 2, Seattle 1 Sporting K.C. 1, Real Salt Lake 1 SECOND LEG Eastern Conference Sunday: NYC FC at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m. Sunday: Columbus at New York, 6:30 p.m. Western Conference Thursday: Portland at Seattle, 9:30 p.m. Sunday: Salt Lake at Sporting K.C., 2 p.m.

> CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIPS

Home-and-home, Nov. 25 and Nov. 29

> MLS CUP

7 p.m., Saturday, Dec. 8

HOLES-IN-ONE Landings at Spirit • Steve West, hole No. 13, 128 yards, 9-iron, Nov. 5 Dardenne • Jonathan Knight, hole No. 17, 145 yards, wedge, Nov. 4 Birch Creek • Dan Wood, hole No. 5, 144 yards, 8-iron, Nov. 6

Men’s soccer Missouri State vs. Evansville Women’s soccer Saint Louis U. 5, VCU 1 Women’s basketball Illinois 88, Alabama A&M 60 Culver-Stockton (Mo.) 79, St. Louis Pharm. 68

Area basketball schedule Thursday M: Harris-Stowe at Langston, 5 p.m. M: Webster at Illinois College, 7 p.m. M: Principia at Knox, 7 p.m. M: STL Pharmacy at Blackburn, 7 p.m. M: Crowley’s Ridge at Missouri Baptist, 7:30 p.m.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL How the top 25 fared Wednesday 1 Notre Dame (0-0) idle. Next: vs. Harvard, Friday. 2 UConn (0-0) idle. Next: vs. Ohio State, Sunday. 3 Oregon (1-0) idle. Next: vs. No. 18 Syracuse, Saturday. 4 Baylor (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Saint Francis (Pa.), Thursday. 5 Louisville (1-0) idle. Next: at Chattanooga, Friday. 6 Mississippi State (1-0) idle. Next: at Virginia, Friday. 7 Stanford (0-0) vs. UC Davis, late. Next: vs. Idaho, Sunday. 8 Oregon State (0-0) idle. Next: vs. Cal Poly, Friday. 9 Maryland (0-0) idle. Next: vs. Coppin State, Friday. 10 South Carolina (0-0) idle. Next: at Alabama State, Sunday. 11 Tennessee (0-0) idle. Next: vs. Presbyterian, Sunday. 11 Texas (0-0) idle. Next: vs. Duquesne, Thursday. 13 Iowa (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Oral Roberts, Friday. 14 Georgia (0-0) idle. Next: vs. St. Bonaventure, Friday. 15 DePaul (0-0) idle. Next: vs. Green Bay, Friday. 16 Missouri (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Missouri State, Tuesday. 17 N.C. State (1-0) beat Belmont 77-62. Next: vs. Kent State, Sunday. 18 Syracuse (1-0) idle. Next: at No. 3 Oregon, Saturday. 19 Marquette (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Montana State, Friday. 20 Texas A&M (1-0) beat Rice 65-54. Next: vs. Jacksonville, Sunday. 21 Duke (0-0) idle. Next: at Northwestern, Sunday. 22 South Florida (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Albany, Friday. 23 Arizona State (1-0) idle. Next: vs. No. 4 Baylor, Sunday. 24 California (1-0) idle. Next: at Penn State, Sunday. 25 Miami (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Stephen F. Austin, Friday.

MEN’S BASKETBALL How the top 25 fared 1 Kansas (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Vermont, Mon. 2 Kentucky (0-1) idle. Next: vs. Southern Illinois, Friday. 3 Gonzaga (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Texas Southern, Saturday. 4 Duke (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Army, Sunday. 5 Virginia ( 1-0) idle. Next: vs. George Washington, Sunday. 6 Tennessee (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Louisiana-Lafayette, Friday. 7 Nevada (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Pacific, Fri. 8 North Carolina (1-0) idle. Next: at Elon, Friday. 9 Villanova (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Quinnipiac, Saturday. 10 Michigan State (0-1) idle. Next: vs. Florida Gulf Coast, Sunday. 11 Auburn (1-0) idle. Next: vs. No. 25 Washington, Friday. 12 Kansas State (0-0) idle. Next: vs. Kennesaw State, Friday. 13 West Virginia (0-0) idle. Next: vs. Buffalo, Friday. 14 Oregon (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Eastern Washington, Friday. 15 Va. Tech (0-0) idle. Next: vs. Gardner-Webb, Friday. 16 Syracuse (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Morehead State, Saturday. 17 Florida State (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Tulane, Sunday. 18 Mississippi State (0-0) idle. Next: vs. Austin Peay, Friday. 19 Michigan (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Holy Cross, Saturday. 20 TCU (1-0) beat Cal State Bakersfield 66-61. Next: vs. Oral Roberts, Sunday. 21 UCLA (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Long Beach State, Friday. 22 Clemson (1-0) idle. Next: vs. N.C. Central, Friday. 23 LSU (01-0) idle. Next: vs. UNC Greensboro, Friday. 24 Purdue (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Ball State, Saturday. 25 Washington (1-0) idle. Next: at No. 11 Auburn, Friday.

Football scores Wednesday Miami (Ohio) 30, Ohio 28 Northern Illinois 38, Toledo 15

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL American League NEW YORK YANKEES — Re-signed LHP CC Sabathia to a one-year contract. National League ATLANTA BRAVES — Named Mike Fast special assistant to the general manager. MIAMI MARLINS — Named Adrian Lorenzo special assistant/baseball operations and scouting and Nate Adcock, Dana Duquette and Scott Fairbanks area scouts. MILWAUKEE BREWERS — Named Derek Hyde vice president of information technology and Sharon McNally vice president of marketing. SAN DIEGO PADRES — Assigned RHP Kazuhisa Makita outright to El Paso (PCL). BASKETBALL | NBA NBA — Fined Denver C Nikola Jokic $25,000 for using derogatory and offensive language during a postgame interview. DETROIT PISTONS — Assigned F Henry Ellenson and G Khyri Thomas to Grand Rapids (NBAGL). FOOTBALL | NFL ARIZONA CARDINALS — Released OL Kyle Friend from the practice squad. Signed WR Montay Crockett to the practice squad. ATLANTA FALCONS — Signed DE Bruce Irvin to a one-year contract. CLEVELAND BROWNS — Placed LB Christian Kirksey and DB E.J. Gaines on injured reserve. Waived DB Denzel Rice. Released OL Jake Eldrenkamp from the practice squad. Signed DB Juston Burris from the N.Y. Jets practice squad and DB Arrion Springs to the practice squad. Claimed DB Phillip Gaines off waivers from Buffalo and DB Jermaine Whitehead from Green Bay. DETROIT LIONS — Released TE Hakeem Valles from the practice squad. Signed WR Andy Jones to the practice squad. HOUSTON TEXANS — Waived RB Tyler Ervin. Claimed WR DeAndre Carter off waivers from Philadelphia. MINNESOTA VIKINGS — Claimed RB Ameer Abdullah off Detroit waivers. Waived RB Roc Thomas. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS — Signed OL Matt Tobin. Signed RB Josh Ferguson to the practice squad. NEW ORLEANS SAINTS — Agreed to terms with WR Dez Bryant. HOCKEY | NHL NHL — Fined Edmonton F Milan Lucic $10,000 for roughing Tampa Bay F Mathieu Joseph. ARIZONA COYOTES — Recalled G Hunter Miska from Tucson (AHL). BOSTON BRUINS — Recalled F Joona Koppanen from Atlanta (ECHL) to Providence (AHL). CALGARY FLAMES — Placed F Dillon Dube on injured reserve, retroactive to Saturday. Recalled F Anthony Peluso from Stockton (AHL). CAROLINA HURRICANES — Assigned F Nicolas Roy to Charlotte (AHL). Recalled Fs Clark Bishop and Phil Di Giuseppe from Charlotte. DETROIT RED WINGS — Assigned C Christoffer Ehn to Grand Rapids (AHL). EDMONTON OILERS — Assigned F Nolan Vesey from Bakersfield (AHL) to Wichita (ECHL). BLUES — Recalled Fs Austin Poganski and Tanner Kaspick from Tulsa (ECHL) to San Antonio (AHL). MOTORSPORTS NASCAR — Docked Kevin Harvick 40 points and stripped him of his automatic berth in NASCAR Monster Energy’s championship race because his winning car failed inspection after Sunday’s race.

NFL INJURY REPORT > Thursday CAROLINA at PITTSBURGH: PANTHERS: OUT: DE Marquis Haynes (illness), WR Torrey Smith (knee). QUESTIONABLE: DE Mario Addison (shoulder), C Ryan Kalil (ankle), LB David Mayo (groin), S Eric Reid (shoulder). DNP: DE Marquis Haynes (illness), C Ryan Kalil (ankle), WR Torrey Smith (knee). LIMITED: DE Mario Addison (shoulder), LB David Mayo (groin), S Eric Reid (shoulder). FULL: CB Captain Munnerlyn (chest), QB Cam Newton (right shoulder), TE Greg Olsen (foot). STEELERS: OUT: T Marcus Gilbert (knee), DT Daniel McCullers (ankle). FULL: WR Antonio Brown (not injury related), CB Joe Haden (not injury related), C Maurkice Pouncey (not injury related), QB Ben Roethlisberger (finger (left hand)), WR Ryan Switzer (ankle), WR James Washington (knee). > Sunday ARIZONA at KANSAS CITY: CARDINALS: DNP: WR Larry Fitzgerald (not injury related), WR Chad Williams (ankle). LIMITED: S Tre Boston (chest), TE Jermaine Gresham (back), G Mike Iupati (back), DT Robert Nkemdiche (calf), DT Corey Peters (ankle), G Justin Pugh (hand), G Jeremy Vujnovich (hamstring). CHIEFS: DNP: S Eric Berry (heel), G Cameron Erving (illness), LB Anthony Hitchens (rib), C Mitch Morse (concussion), WR Sammy Watkins (foot). LIMITED: LB Justin Houston (hamstring), S Daniel Sorensen (knee), LB Frank Zombo (hamstring). FULL: WR Tyreek Hill (groin), G Andrew Wylie (back). ATLANTA at CLEVELAND: FALCONS: DNP: K Matt Bryant (right hamstring), WR Mohamed Sanu (hip). LIMITED: CB Robert Alford (ankle), S Damontae Kazee (ankle), C Alex Mack (back), DT Deadrin Senat (shoulder). BROWNS: DNP: LB Jamie Collins (ankle), C J.C. Tretter (ankle), CB Denzel Ward (hip). LIMITED: T Desmond Harrison (illness), TE David Njoku (knee, ribs), S Damarious Randall (groin), LB Joe Schobert (ankle), WR Da’Mari Scott (shoulder), CB Tavierre Thomas (abdomen). FULL: WR Antonio Callaway (ankle), T Austin Corbett (foot), T Christopher Hubbard (toe), WR Jarvis Landry (wrist). BUFFALO at NY JETS: BILLS: DNP: LB Lorenzo Alexander (not injury related), QB Derek Anderson (concussion), TE Charles Clay (hamstring), RB Chris Ivory (shoulder), DE Trent Murphy (knee), DT Kyle Williams (not injury related). LIMITED: QB Josh Allen (right elbow), WR Kelvin Benjamin (knee), LB Tremaine Edmunds (concussion), WR Andre Holmes (neck). JETS: DNP: WR Robby Anderson (ankle), S Terrence Brooks (illness), QB Sam Darnold (foot), WR Quincy Enunwa (ankle), C Spencer Long (knee, finger), DT Steve McLendon (ankle), TE Neal Sterling (concussion). LIMITED: G James Carpenter (shoulder), CB Trumaine Johnson (quadricep), LB Frankie Luvu (neck), LB Kevin Pierre-Louis (foot). FULL: DE Tarell Basham (knee), T Kelvin Beachum (knee, ankle), CB Morris Claiborne (shoulder), LB Brandon Copeland (knee), RB Isaiah Crowell (ankle), LB Jordan Jenkins (ankle), S Marcus Maye (thumb), RB Elijah McGuire (foot), S Rontez Miles (knee, hip), WR Andre Roberts (back), T Brandon Shell (finger). DETROIT at CHICAGO: LIONS: DNP: G T.J. Lang (neck), CB Darius Slay (knee). LIMITED: DE Ezekiel Ansah (shoulder), RB LeGarrette Blount (knee), LB Eli Harold (shoulder), RB Kerryon Johnson (ankle), LB Jalen Reeves-Maybin (neck), TE Luke Willson (shoulder). BEARS: DNP: TE Dion Sims (concussion). LIMITED: WR Taylor Gabriel (knee). FULL: TE Ben Braunecker (concussion), G Eric Kush (neck), LB Khalil Mack (ankle), DT Bilal Nichols (knee), WR Allen Robinson (groin). JACKSONVILLE at INDIANAPOLIS: JAGUARS: DNP: CB A.J. Bouye (calf), CB Quenton Meeks (knee). LIMITED: DT Eli Ankou (calf), DE Lerentee McCray (hamstring), TE James O’Shaughnessy (hip). FULL: QB Blake Bortles (left shoulder), RB Leonard Fournette (hamstring), CB D.J. Hayden (toe). COLTS: DNP: S Clayton Geathers (knee), TE Ryan Hewitt (ankle), S Michael Mitchell (calf), DT Hassan Ridgeway (illness), TE Erik Swoope (knee). LIMITED: WR Ryan Grant (ankle), CB Nate Hairston (ankle), S Malik Hooker (hip), RB Marlon Mack (foot), DE Kemoko Turay (neck), RB Robert Turbin (shoulder). FULL: G Braden Smith (hand). LA CHARGERS at OAKLAND: CHARGERS: No Report. RAIDERS: No Report. MIAMI at GREEN BAY: DOLPHINS: DNP: WR Danny Amendola (not injury related), DE Charles Harris (calf), DE Cameron Wake (not injury related). LIMITED: WR Jakeem Grant (achilles), T Ja’Wuan James (knee), G Ted Larsen (neck), WR Kenny Stills (groin), QB Ryan Tannehill (right shoulder), T Laremy Tunsil (knee, ankle). FULL: LB Stephone Anthony (quadricep), G Jesse Davis (elbow), TE A.J. Derby (foot), RB Kenyan Drake (shoulder), CB Xavien Howard (ankle), S Reshad Jones (shoulder), S T.J. McDonald (knee), WR DeVante Parker (knee), DE Robert Quinn (ankle), C Travis Swanson (elbow). PACKERS: DNP: TE Jimmy Graham (knee), CB Kevin King (hamstring). LIMITED: S Kentrell Brice (knee), T Bryan Bulaga (knee), LB Blake Martinez (ankle). FULL: WR Randall Cobb (hamstring), LB Nick Perry (ankle), QB Aaron Rodgers (knee). NEW ENGLAND at TENNESSEE: PATRIOTS: DNP: OT Trent Brown (illness). LIMITED: LS Joe Cardona (shoulder), WR Julian Edelman (ankle), TE Rob Gronkowski (ankle/ back), LB Dont’a Hightower (knee), TE Jacob Hollister (hamstring), G Shaq Mason (calf), RB Sony Michel (knee), WR Cordarrelle Patterson (neck), DE John Simon (shoulder). TITANS: DNP: LB Darren Bates (illness), OT Jack Conklin (concussion), OT Dane Cruikshank (knee), WR Taywan Taylor (foot). LIMITED: LB Derrick Morgan (shoulder), WR Tajae Sharpe (ankle). FULL: LB Will Compton (hamstring). NEW ORLEANS at CINCINNATI: SAINTS: DNP: DE Marcus Davenport (toe), WR Cameron Meredith (knee), G Larry Warford (not injury related), CB P.J. Williams (hamstring). LIMITED: T Terron Armstead (knee), T Andrus Peat (hip), T Ryan Ramczyk (knee), C Max Unger (knee). BENGALS: DNP: LB Vontaze Burfict (hip), CB Darqueze Dennard (sternoclavicular), WR A.J. Green (toe), TE Tyler Kroft (foot), G Alex Redmond (hamstring), LB Nick Vigil (knee). LIMITED: RB Giovani Bernard (knee), TE C.J. Uzomah (clavicle). FULL: G Clint Boling (back), C Billy Price (foot), WR John Ross (groin). SEATTLE at LA RAMS: SEAHAWKS: No Report. RAMS: No Report. WASHINGTON at TAMPA BAY: REDSKINS: DNP: WR Jamison Crowder (ankle), CB Quinton Dunbar (shin), T Morgan Moses (knee), RB Chris Thompson (rib), T Trent Williams (thumb). LIMITED: RB Adrian Peterson (shoulder), TE Jordan Reed (back). FULL: LB Ryan Anderson (knee), RB Kapri Bibbs (shoulder), CB Danny Johnson (forearm), QB Colt McCoy (right thumb), S Montae Nicholson (hip), CB Greg Stroman (hip). BUCCANEERS: DNP: DE Vinny Curry (ankle), T Demar Dotson (knee, shoulder), WR Mike Evans (knee), RB Ronald Jones (hamstring), CB M.J. Stewart (foot). LIMITED: RB Peyton Barber (ankle), G Evan Smith (hip, wrist). FULL: DE Jason Pierre-Paul (shoulder, foot). DALLAS at PHILADELPHIA: COWBOYS: DNP: WR Tavon Austin (groin), DE Taco Charlton (shoulder), DE David Irving (ankle), LB Sean Lee (hamstring), TE Geoff Swaim (knee), LB Joe Thomas (foot), WR Deonte Thompson (ribs), G Connor Williams (knee). LIMITED: DE Randy Gregory (knee), G Zack Martin (knee). FULL: CB Chidobe Awuzie (ankle). EAGLES: DNP: CB Sidney Jones (hamstring), C Jason Kelce (not injury related), CB Jalen Mills (foot). LIMITED: LB Nathan Gerry (ankle, knee), S Corey Graham (hamstring), T Lane Johnson (knee), RB Darren Sproles (hamstring). FULL: LB Kamu Grugier-Hill (thumb), T Jason Peters (biceps)


SPORTS

11.08.2018 • Thursday • M 2

FOOTBALL • OBITUARY

MICDS legend Holtman left unmatched legacy BY DAVID KVIDAHL sTLhighschoolsports.com

Josh Smith walked into Busch Stadium with Ron Holtman. The longtime, legendary football and golf coach at Country Day School and then MICDS, Holtman had great seats for the Cardinals game that night. So good in fact, Smith — then a young, up-and-coming assistant coach — was surprised to see who sat next to them. “It was one of the Bushes, I’m pretty sure it was Jeb,” Smith said. When Holtman excused himself for a moment, Smith leaned over and asked how Bush knew Holtman. “There’s two people you have to know in St. Louis,” Bush said. “Stan Musial and Ron Holtman.” Holtman died Wednesday. He was 90. Holtman’s accomplishments and recognitions in his 50 years as a coach are unrivaled. He guided Country Day School and MICDS to a combined seven state championships in 10 title game appearances. His last championship came in 2004 when the Rams rallied from a 25-point halftime deficit to stun defending state champion Harrisonville in double overtime. According to the Missouri State High School Activities Association record book, Holtman finished his career with a record of 382102-8. It was the secondmost wins by a coach at the time, trailing only Jefferson City’s Pete Adkins, who finished with 405. Rockhurst coach Tony Severino has since passed Holtman with 396 career coaching victories. Holtman coached the boys golf team to seven state championships, too. Holtman has been enshrined in the Missouri Sports Hall of Fame, the St. Louis Sports Hall of Fame, the Missouri Football Coaches Hall of Fame and the MICDS Hall of Fame. MICDS named its immaculate, new football facility Ron Holtman Stadium after an anonymous donor gave a large donation to start the project with the stipulation it be named for Holtman. It’s an honor Holtman never imagined would be bestowed upon him. “He was so humble,” former MICDS assistant coach Matt Irvin said. “He was much more than a football coach. He was a leader of people.” Irvin spent eight years on staff as an assistant to Holtman and then succeeded him at MICDS as head coach for three seasons. Irvin was the offensive coordinator at Kirkwood before he applied to join the MICDS staff. “I recognized it would be an opportunity to learn,” Irvin said.

POST-DISPATCH FILE PHOTO

MICDS quarterback Andrew Grumney embraces coach Ron Holtman on Nov. 27, 2004, after the Class 3 football championship between MICDS and Harrisonville at Edward Jones Dome. MICDS rallied for a 45-42 victory in two overtimes after trailing by 25 points in the fourth quarter. It was the final game in Holtman’s legendary 50-year coaching career. Holtman died Wednesday at the age of 90.

A lot of what Irvin learned at Holtman’s side had little to do with Xs and Os. It was the way Holtman found the thread that connected his players and made them understand personal sacrifice would lead to a greater good. “He had a unique talent to bring people together,” Irvin said. “It was always the team.” Jim Lemen had to prepare for Holtman’s teams for 35 years. His tenure at John Burroughs coincided with Holtman’s at MICDS. Holtman started at Country Day School in 1966 after an 11-year run at Alton Marquette. Lemen took the top job at Burroughs in 1970. As members of the powerful ABC League, now the Metro League, the two coaching legends crossed paths in the annual rivalry game between MICDS and Burroughs. Those matchups often went the Rams’ way, but that didn’t stop Lemen from appreciating the man on the opposite sideline. “The part I liked most about Ron was he was genuine,” Lemen said. “He thought athletics was a place to teach lessons. It wasn’t just winning and losing.” A former Marine, Holtman used football to prepare his players for life. Whether they went to play college football at the highest level, enrolled in the Ivy League or chose a path in a military academy, Holtman’s Rams would be ready for whatever came their way and they loved him for it. “He treated his players like they were very special,” Lemen said. Holtman’s memory is the stuff of legend. He could name all the players that came through his program and even many of those who didn’t. “He could tell you the kids that played on Lutheran North in 1965,” Smith said. On the field, Lemen said Holtman’s teams al-

ways were a challenge. No matter the makeup of the roster, Holtman had a way of tweaking his preferred scheme to fit his players. “He was a master of keeping it within his system but could adapt it year to year with his personnel,” Lemen said. “He had the ability to utilize a system to bring out the best in his players.” Even after he stepped down from coaching football, Holtman remained active in the community. He and his wife, Maggie, were honored in September with the Alzheimer’s Community Service Award. Holtman was able to watch two grandchildren graduate from MICDS. He and Lemen would see one another every year as their grandchildren took their turn participating in the MICDS-Burroughs rivalry. “It was nice we kept crossing paths to that extent, having our grandkids playing against each other,” Lemen said. When Smith replaced Irvin as MICDS’s coach in 2008, he said Holtman would routinely drop by his office and share things he saw during that week’s game. Smith was an assistant for Holtman for six years and then spent three years under Irvin. He currently serves as MICDS’s athletics director and the football team’s defensive coordinator. “You’d always wanted to listen,” Smith said. “One of my favorite parts of being at MICDS was my relationship with Ron.” Holtman spent last Saturday in the stadium that bears his name and watched MICDS beat Parkway North 21-18 in a playoff game. Holtman loved football and treasured his time at MICDS. “We’ve lost someone, not just MICDS but all of football in the St. Louis area and Missouri, that was special and someone you could look up to,” Lemen said.

BOYS SWIMMING AND DIVING • CLASS 2 STATE MEET At St. Peters Rec-Plex SCHEDULE Thursday: Swimming preliminaries, 12:30 p.m.; diving finals, 5 p.m. Friday: Swimming finals, 10 a.m. AREA QUALIFIERS Format: Eight to finals and eight to consolation race out of preliminaries — CBC Benjamin Bell (200 freestyle, 100 butterfly) August Brandt (100 butterfly, 100 backstroke) Brooks Cosman (50 freestyle, 100 freestyle) Dominic Cyr (100 butterfly, 100 breaststroke) Edward Rohan (50 freestyle, 100 freestyle) Max Wehrmann (200 freestyle, 100 backstroke) Michael Weiss (50 freestyle, 100 freestyle) Drew Willmann (200 IM, 100 backstroke) Relays: 200 medley, 200 freestyle, 400 freestyle — De Smet Aaron Lasek (500 freestyle) Relays: 200 medley, 200 freestyle, 400 freestyle — Eureka Jackson Phelps (50 freestyle) Relays: 200 medley, 200 freestyle, 400 freestyle — Fort Zumwalt West CJ Caldwell (200 freestyle, 500 freestyle) Braden Cearley (200 IM, 100 backstroke) Kevin McElfresh (50 freestyle) Alex Ostrem (100 freestyle) Relays: 200 medley, 200 freestyle, 400 freestyle — Francis Howell Cole Guffey (500 freestyle) Kaden Patterson (50 freestyle, 100 freestyle) Grant Reilmann (500 freestyle) David Yang (100 breaststroke) Relays: 200 medley, 200 freestyle, 400 freestyle — Francis Howell Central Alex Anderson (50 freestyle, 100 freestyle) Jackson Michaels (50 freestyle) Colin Williams (200 IM, 100 backstroke) Relays: 200 medley, 200 freestyle, 400 freestyle — Hazelwood West Relays: 200 medley, 200 freestyle, 400 freestyle — Holt Austin Mack (100 butterfly) Thomas Neveau (200 freestyle, 100 backstroke) Grant Owen (500 freestyle) Noah Scheuermann (200 freestyle, 100 butterfly) Relays: 200 medley, 200 freestyle, 400 freestyle — Kirkwood Alex Baynham (100 breaststroke) Noah Gross (50 freestyle) Nick Hepburn (200 IM, 100 butterfly) Alex Hughes (100 butterfly, 100 breaststroke)

Christopher Lilly (100 breaststroke) Nathan Lin (100 butterfly, 100 breaststroke) Caleb Munger (200 freestyle, 500 freestyle) Will Newland (200 IM, 100 backstroke) Brett Rog (100 freestyle) Jack Ullery (200 freestyle, 500 freestyle) Relays: 200 medley, 200 freestyle, 400 freestyle — Lafayette Benjamin Brim (200 IM, 100 breaststroke) Jacob Hepper (50 freestyle, 100 backstroke) Cameron Kratky (100 butterfly, 100 backstroke) Joshua Moellenhoff (200 IM, 100 butterfly) Relays: 200 medley, 200 freestyle, 400 freestyle — Lindbergh Patrick Akins (100 freestyle) Matt Deutchmann (100 freestyle) Will Doyle (200 freestyle, 100 butterfly) Sam Hunter (100 backstroke) Tyler Lewis (200 IM, 100 backstroke) Jackson Terrill (200 freestyle, 500 freestyle) Relays: 200 medley, 200 freestyle, 400 freestyle — Marquette Kyle Deutschmann (50 freestyle) Simon Hermansen (50 freestyle, 100 breaststroke) Sam Maniscalco (50 freestyle) Relays: 200 medley, 200 freestyle, 400 freestyle — Pattonville Chaska Cox-Potter (100 breaststroke) Philip Tso (100 butterfly) Relays: 200 medley, 200 freestyle, 400 freestyle — SLUH Garrett Baldes (200 IM, 100 breaststroke) Eli Butters (50 freestyle, 100 freestyle) Josh Brown (200 IM, 100 butterfly) Joseph Feder (200 freestyle, 100 freestyle) Daniel Fink (200 freestyle, 500 freestyle) Jonas Hostetler (100 butterfly) Evan Lu (200 IM, 100 breaststroke) Ned Mehmeti (500 freestyle) Patrick Moehn (500 freestyle) Sean Santoni (200 freestyle, 500 freestyle) Cooper Scharff (200 IM, 100 backstroke) Jarrett Schneider (100 backstroke) Mikhail Shulepov (100 breaststroke) William Slatin (50 freestyle, 100 freestyle) Andrew Zimmerman (50 freestyle, 100 freestyle) Relays: 200 medley, 200 freestyle, 400 freestyle — Timberland Relays: 200 medley, 200 freestyle, 400 freestyle — Vianney Logan Schafer (50 freestyle) Relays: 200 medley, 200 freestyle, 400 freestyle

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • B11

FOR THE RECORD AMERICA’S LINE

COLLEGES

NFL Favorite

Area scores

Points Underdog Open Current 5 4 Panthers

STEELERS > Sunday 8 6.5 Bills JETS Falcons 4 4 BROWNS Saints 4 5 BENGALS BUCS 2 3 Washington 7 6.5 TITANS Patriots 9 9.5 Dolphins PACKERS COLTS 3.5 3 Jaguars BEARS 6.5 6.5 Lions CHIEFS 16.5 16.5 Cards Chargers 9.5 10 RAIDERS 10 10 Seahawks RAMS 6.5 7 Cowboys EAGLES > Monday 49ERS 3 3 Giants Bye week: Cardinals, Bengals, Colts, Jaguars, Giants, Eagles. COLLEGE FOOTBALL Points Underdog Favorite Open Current NC STATE 16 17 Wake Forest > Friday SYRACUSE 21 21.5 Louisville Fresno St 2 2.5 BOISE ST > Saturday 4 4.5 Temple HOUSTON Michigan 39 40 RUTGERS PITTSBURGH 3.5 3 Va Tech Clemson 17 20 BOSTON COLL TEXAS A&M 12 12 Mississippi 3.5 6 TENNESSEE Kentucky 13 14 MASS Byu VIRGINIA 23.5 23.5 Liberty Troy 1 1 GA SOUTHERN IOWA ST 14.5 14.5 Baylor C FLORIDA 25.5 25.5 Navy Tcu W VIRGINIA 14.5 12.5 4.5 3.5 Miami-Fla GA TECH KANSAS ST 12 10.5 Kansas E MICHIGAN 13 13 Akron INDIANA 3 1.5 Maryland Smu 18 19 CONNECTICUT DUKE 10.5 10.5 N Carolina 18 20 Oklahoma St OKLAHOMA 10 10.5 Northwestern IOWA CINCINNATI 12 13.5 S Florida Arkansas St 7 6.5 COASTAL CARO TULANE 14 14 E Carolina UTAH 3.5 3.5 Oregon 4.5 6 COLORADO Wash St Charlotte MARSHALL 14.5 14 N Texas 15 14.5 OLD DOMINION C MICHIGAN 9.5 7 Bowling Green NEVADA 13 14 Colorado St Oregon St STANFORD 22.5 23.5 14 13.5 UTEP Mid Tenn St GEORGIA 14.5 14.5 Auburn PENN ST 8 9 Wisconsin ALABAMA 26 24 Miss St AIR FORCE 13.5 13.5 New Mexico MISSOURI 14 17 Vanderbilt 18 17.5 Illinois NEBRASKA Purdue 12.5 12 MINNESOTA MEMPHIS 14 15.5 Tulsa FLORIDA 6 6.5 S Carolina USC 5.5 5.5 California Texas PK 1.5 TEXAS TECH 14 13.5 ARKANSAS Lsu 31 31 San Jose St UTAH ST App’chian St 21.5 21 TEXAS ST UL-LAFAYETTE 13.5 13.5 Georgia St FLA ATLANTIC 18 20 W Kentucky UL-Monroe 4.5 6 S ALABAMA 25.5 25 Rice LA TECH 10.5 10.5 UTSA Fla Int’l NOTRE DAME 18 18 Florida St UAB 11.5 11.5 So Miss Ohio St 3.5 3.5 MICHIGAN ST ARIZONA ST 12.5 13 Ucla Unlv SAN DIEGO ST 18.5 22 NBA Points Underdog Favorite Rockets 4 THUNDER Celtics 9.5 SUNS 5 Clippers BLAZERS WARRIORS 6 Bucks COLLEGE BASKETBALL Favorite Points Underdog ILLINOIS 14 Evansville Added Games CONNECTICUT 12 Morehead St GEORGE WASH 7 Siena NHL Favorite Odds Underdog PANTHERS -$135/+$115 Oilers BRUINS -$230/+$190 Canucks Coyotes FLYERS -$125/+$105 CANADIENS -$135/+$115 Sabres LIGHTNING -$210/+$175 Islanders Vegas -$150/+$130 SENATORS BLACKHAWKS -$110/-$110 Hurricanes Sharks -$120/even STARS KINGS -$110/-$110 Wild Grand Salami: Over/under 51.5 goals. Home team in CAPS © 2018 Benjamin Eckstein

SOCCER Champions League Glance (Home teams listed first) FIRST ROUND Top two in each group advance GP W D L GF GA Pts GROUP A Borussia Dortmund 4 3 0 1 8 2 9 4 301 7 6 9 Atletico Madrid Club Brugge 4 1 12 6 5 4 Monaco 4 0 1 3 2 10 1 Tuesday, Nov. 6 Monaco 0, Club Brugge 4 Aletico Madrid 2, Borussia Dortmund 0 GP W D L GF GA Pts GROUP B Barcelona 4 3 1 0 11 3 10 Inter Milan 4 2 1 1 5 5 7 Tottenham 4 1 1 2 7 9 4 PSV Eindhoven 4 0 1 3 4 10 1 Tuesday, Nov. 6 Inter Milan 1, Barcelona 1 Tottenham 2, PSV Eindhoven 1 GP W D L GF GA Pts GROUP C Liverpool 4 202 7 5 6 4 1 30 4 3 6 Napoli Paris Saint-Germain 4 1 2 1 11 7 5 Red Star Belgrade 4 1 1 2 3 10 4 Tuesday, Nov. 6 Red Star Belgrade 2, Liverpool 0 Napoli 1, Paris Saint-Germain 1 GP W D L GF GA Pts GROUP D Porto 4 3 1 0 9 3 10 Schalke 4 2 20 4 1 8 4 1 12 3 3 4 Galatasaray Lokomotiv Moscow 4 0 0 4 2 11 0 Tuesday, Nov. 6 Porto 4, Lokomotiv Moscow 1 Schalke 2, Galatasaray 0 GP W D L GF GA Pts GROUP E Bayern Munich 4 3 1 0 7 1 10 Ajax Amsterdam 4 2 2 0 6 2 8 Benfica 4 1 1 2 4 6 4 AEK Athens 4 0 0 4 2 10 0 Wednesday, Nov. 7 Bayern Munich 2, AEK Athens 0 Benfica 1, Ajax Amsterdam 1 GROUP F GP W D L GF GA Pts Manchester City 4 3 0 1 12 3 9 Lyon 4 1 30 9 8 6 Hoffenheim 4 0 3 1 8 9 3 Shaktar Donetsk 4 0 2 2 4 13 2 Wednesday, Nov. 7 Lyon 2, Hoffenheim 2 Manchester City 6, Shaktar Donetsk 0 GROUP G GP W D L GF GA Pts Real Madrid 4 3 0 1 10 2 9 Roma 4 3 0 1 10 4 9 CSKA Moscow 4 1 1 2 4 7 4 Viktoria Plzen 4 0 1 3 3 14 1 Wednesday, Nov. 7 CSKA Moscow 1, Roma 2 Viktoria Plzen 0, Real Madrid 5 GROUP H GP W D L GF GA Pts Juventus 4 301 7 2 9 Manchester United 4 2 1 1 5 2 7 Valencia 4 121 4 4 5 Young Boys Bern 4 0 1 3 2 10 1 Wednesday, Nov. 7 Valencia 3, Young Boys Bern 1 Juventus 1, Manchester United 2

USL playoffs Championship

Louisville vs. Phoenix, 7 p.m., Thursday

MLS playoffs > CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS

Home-and-home FIRST LEG Eastern Conference Columbus 1, New York 0 Atlanta 1, New York City FC 0 Western Conference Portland 2, Seattle 1 Sporting K.C. 1, Real Salt Lake 1 SECOND LEG Eastern Conference Sunday: NYC FC at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m. Sunday: Columbus at New York, 6:30 p.m. Western Conference Thursday: Portland at Seattle, 9:30 p.m. Sunday: Salt Lake at Sporting K.C., 2 p.m.

> CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIPS

Home-and-home, Nov. 25 and Nov. 29

> MLS CUP

7 p.m., Saturday, Dec. 8

HOLES-IN-ONE Landings at Spirit • Steve West, hole No. 13, 128 yards, 9-iron, Nov. 5 Dardenne • Jonathan Knight, hole No. 17, 145 yards, wedge, Nov. 4 Birch Creek • Dan Wood, hole No. 5, 144 yards, 8-iron, Nov. 6

Men’s soccer Missouri State vs. Evansville Women’s soccer Saint Louis U. 5, VCU 1 Women’s basketball Illinois 88, Alabama A&M 60 Culver-Stockton (Mo.) 79, St. Louis Pharm. 68

Area basketball schedule Thursday M: Harris-Stowe at Langston, 5 p.m. M: Webster at Illinois College, 7 p.m. M: Principia at Knox, 7 p.m. M: STL Pharmacy at Blackburn, 7 p.m. M: Crowley’s Ridge at Mo. Baptist, 7:30 p.m.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL How the top 25 fared Wednesday 1 Notre Dame (0-0) idle. Next: vs. Harvard, Friday. 2 UConn (0-0) idle. Next: vs. Ohio State, Sunday. 3 Oregon (1-0) idle. Next: vs. No. 18 Syracuse, Saturday. 4 Baylor (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Saint Francis (Pa.), Thursday. 5 Louisville (1-0) idle. Next: at Chattanooga, Friday. 6 Mississippi State (1-0) idle. Next: at Virginia, Friday. 7 Stanford (1-0) beat UC Davis 71-43. Next: vs. Idaho, Sunday. 8 Oregon State (0-0) idle. Next: vs. Cal Poly, Friday. 9 Maryland (0-0) idle. Next: vs. Coppin State, Friday. 10 South Carolina (0-0) idle. Next: at Alabama State, Sunday. 11 Tennessee (0-0) idle. Next: vs. Presbyterian, Sunday. 11 Texas (0-0) idle. Next: vs. Duquesne, Thursday. 13 Iowa (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Oral Roberts, Friday. 14 Georgia (0-0) idle. Next: vs. St. Bonaventure, Friday. 15 DePaul (0-0) idle. Next: vs. Green Bay, Friday. 16 Missouri (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Missouri State, Tuesday. 17 N.C. State (1-0) beat Belmont 77-62. Next: vs. Kent State, Sunday. 18 Syracuse (1-0) idle. Next: at No. 3 Oregon, Saturday. 19 Marquette (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Montana State, Friday. 20 Texas A&M (1-0) beat Rice 65-54. Next: vs. Jacksonville, Sunday. 21 Duke (0-0) idle. Next: at Northwestern, Sunday. 22 South Florida (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Albany, Friday. 23 Arizona State (1-0) idle. Next: vs. No. 4 Baylor, Sunday. 24 California (1-0) idle. Next: at Penn State, Sunday. 25 Miami (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Stephen F. Austin, Friday.

MEN’S BASKETBALL How the top 25 fared 1 Kansas (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Vermont, Mon. 2 Kentucky (0-1) idle. Next: vs. Southern Illinois, Friday. 3 Gonzaga (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Texas Southern, Saturday. 4 Duke (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Army, Sunday. 5 Virginia ( 1-0) idle. Next: vs. George Washington, Sunday. 6 Tennessee (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Louisiana-Lafayette, Friday. 7 Nevada (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Pacific, Fri. 8 North Carolina (1-0) idle. Next: at Elon, Friday. 9 Villanova (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Quinnipiac, Saturday. 10 Michigan State (0-1) idle. Next: vs. Florida Gulf Coast, Sunday. 11 Auburn (1-0) idle. Next: vs. No. 25 Washington, Friday. 12 Kansas State (0-0) idle. Next: vs. Kennesaw State, Friday. 13 West Virginia (0-0) idle. Next: vs. Buffalo, Friday. 14 Oregon (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Eastern Washington, Friday. 15 Va. Tech (0-0) idle. Next: vs. Gardner-Webb, Friday. 16 Syracuse (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Morehead State, Saturday. 17 Florida State (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Tulane, Sunday. 18 Mississippi State (0-0) idle. Next: vs. Austin Peay, Friday. 19 Michigan (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Holy Cross, Saturday. 20 TCU (1-0) beat Cal State Bakersfield 66-61. Next: vs. Oral Roberts, Sunday. 21 UCLA (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Long Beach State, Friday. 22 Clemson (1-0) idle. Next: vs. N.C. Central, Friday. 23 LSU (01-0) idle. Next: vs. UNC Greensboro, Friday. 24 Purdue (1-0) idle. Next: vs. Ball State, Saturday. 25 Washington (1-0) idle. Next: at No. 11 Auburn, Friday.

Men’s basketball scores Wednesday East Bucknell 88, St. Bon. 85, OT St. Francis Brooklyn 92, Medgar Evers College 42 St. Peter’s 93, Lafayette 86, OT South FAU 98, Florida Institute of Technology 52 FIU 110, Webber International 84 Ga. Southern 139, Carver 51 Howard 115, Washington Adventist University 91 Kennesaw St. 68, Oglethorpe 57 Marshall 105, E. Kentucky 77 Stetson 116, Johnson (FL) 66 William & Mary 79, High Point 69 Midwest Bradley 74, UW-Parkside 58 Dayton 78, North Florida 70 DePaul 80, Beth.-Cook. 58 Ohio 97, Wilberforce 61 Ohio St. 64, Cincinnati 56 South Dakota 83, York College (NE) 58 Wright St. 96, W. Carolina 73 Southwest St. Edwards 77, UTSA 76 TCU 66, CS Bakersfield 61 Texas A&M 98, Savannah St. 83 Texas A&M-CC 81, Howard Payne 34 Far West Arizona 90, Houston Bapt. 60 Cal Poly 82, Menlo 75 Colorado St. 100, Colorado Christian 66 Pepperdine 100, Cal State Dominguez Hills 66 Saint Mary’s (Cal) 87, McNeese St. 65 San Jose St. 89, Life Pacific College 72

Football scores Wednesday Miami (Ohio) 30, Ohio 28 Northern Illinois 38, Toledo 15

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL American League NEW YORK YANKEES — Re-signed LHP CC Sabathia to a one-year contract. National League ATLANTA BRAVES — Named Mike Fast special assistant to the general manager. MIAMI MARLINS — Named Adrian Lorenzo special assistant/baseball operations and scouting and Nate Adcock, Dana Duquette and Scott Fairbanks area scouts. MILWAUKEE BREWERS — Named Derek Hyde vice president of information technology and Sharon McNally vice president of marketing. SAN DIEGO PADRES — Assigned RHP Kazuhisa Makita outright to El Paso (PCL). BASKETBALL | NBA NBA — Fined Denver C Nikola Jokic $25,000 for using derogatory and offensive language during a postgame interview. DETROIT PISTONS — Assigned F Henry Ellenson and G Khyri Thomas to Grand Rapids (NBAGL). FOOTBALL | NFL ARIZONA CARDINALS — Released OL Kyle Friend from the practice squad. Signed WR Montay Crockett to the practice squad. ATLANTA FALCONS — Signed DE Bruce Irvin to a one-year contract. CLEVELAND BROWNS — Placed LB Christian Kirksey and DB E.J. Gaines on injured reserve. Waived DB Denzel Rice. Released OL Jake Eldrenkamp from the practice squad. Signed DB Juston Burris from the N.Y. Jets practice squad and DB Arrion Springs to the practice squad. Claimed DB Phillip Gaines off waivers from Buffalo and DB Jermaine Whitehead from Green Bay. DETROIT LIONS — Released TE Hakeem Valles from the practice squad. Signed WR Andy Jones to the practice squad. HOUSTON TEXANS — Waived RB Tyler Ervin. Claimed WR DeAndre Carter off waivers from Philadelphia. MINNESOTA VIKINGS — Claimed RB Ameer Abdullah off Detroit waivers. Waived RB Roc Thomas. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS — Signed OL Matt Tobin. Signed RB Josh Ferguson to the practice squad. NEW ORLEANS SAINTS — Agreed to terms with WR Dez Bryant. HOCKEY | NHL NHL — Fined Edmonton F Milan Lucic $10,000 for roughing Tampa Bay F Mathieu Joseph. ARIZONA COYOTES — Recalled G Hunter Miska from Tucson (AHL). BOSTON BRUINS — Recalled F Joona Koppanen from Atlanta (ECHL) to Providence (AHL). CALGARY FLAMES — Placed F Dillon Dube on injured reserve, retroactive to Saturday. Recalled F Anthony Peluso from Stockton (AHL). CAROLINA HURRICANES — Assigned F Nicolas Roy to Charlotte (AHL). Recalled Fs Clark Bishop and Phil Di Giuseppe from Charlotte. DETROIT RED WINGS — Assigned C Christoffer Ehn to Grand Rapids (AHL). EDMONTON OILERS — Assigned F Nolan Vesey from Bakersfield (AHL) to Wichita (ECHL). BLUES — Recalled Fs Austin Poganski and Tanner Kaspick from Tulsa (ECHL) to San Antonio (AHL). MOTORSPORTS NASCAR — Docked Kevin Harvick 40 points and stripped him of his automatic berth in NASCAR Monster Energy’s championship race because his winning car failed inspection after Sunday’s race.

NFL INJURY REPORT > Thursday CAROLINA at PITTSBURGH: PANTHERS: OUT: DE Marquis Haynes (illness), WR Torrey Smith (knee). QUESTIONABLE: DE Mario Addison (shoulder), C Ryan Kalil (ankle), LB David Mayo (groin), S Eric Reid (shoulder). DNP: DE Marquis Haynes (illness), C Ryan Kalil (ankle), WR Torrey Smith (knee). LIMITED: DE Mario Addison (shoulder), LB David Mayo (groin), S Eric Reid (shoulder). FULL: CB Captain Munnerlyn (chest), QB Cam Newton (right shoulder), TE Greg Olsen (foot). STEELERS: OUT: T Marcus Gilbert (knee), DT Daniel McCullers (ankle). FULL: WR Antonio Brown (not injury related), CB Joe Haden (not injury related), C Maurkice Pouncey (not injury related), QB Ben Roethlisberger (finger (left hand)), WR Ryan Switzer (ankle), WR James Washington (knee). > Sunday ARIZONA at KANSAS CITY: CARDINALS: DNP: WR Larry Fitzgerald (not injury related), WR Chad Williams (ankle). LIMITED: S Tre Boston (chest), TE Jermaine Gresham (back), G Mike Iupati (back), DT Robert Nkemdiche (calf), DT Corey Peters (ankle), G Justin Pugh (hand), G Jeremy Vujnovich (hamstring). CHIEFS: DNP: S Eric Berry (heel), G Cameron Erving (illness), LB Anthony Hitchens (rib), C Mitch Morse (concussion), WR Sammy Watkins (foot). LIMITED: LB Justin Houston (hamstring), S Daniel Sorensen (knee), LB Frank Zombo (hamstring). FULL: WR Tyreek Hill (groin), G Andrew Wylie (back). ATLANTA at CLEVELAND: FALCONS: DNP: K Matt Bryant (right hamstring), WR Mohamed Sanu (hip). LIMITED: CB Robert Alford (ankle), S Damontae Kazee (ankle), C Alex Mack (back), DT Deadrin Senat (shoulder). BROWNS: DNP: LB Jamie Collins (ankle), C J.C. Tretter (ankle), CB Denzel Ward (hip). LIMITED: T Desmond Harrison (illness), TE David Njoku (knee, ribs), S Damarious Randall (groin), LB Joe Schobert (ankle), WR Da’Mari Scott (shoulder), CB Tavierre Thomas (abdomen). FULL: WR Antonio Callaway (ankle), T Austin Corbett (foot), T Christopher Hubbard (toe), WR Jarvis Landry (wrist). BUFFALO at NY JETS: BILLS: DNP: LB Lorenzo Alexander (not injury related), QB Derek Anderson (concussion), TE Charles Clay (hamstring), RB Chris Ivory (shoulder), DE Trent Murphy (knee), DT Kyle Williams (not injury related). LIMITED: QB Josh Allen (right elbow), WR Kelvin Benjamin (knee), LB Tremaine Edmunds (concussion), WR Andre Holmes (neck). JETS: DNP: WR Robby Anderson (ankle), S Terrence Brooks (illness), QB Sam Darnold (foot), WR Quincy Enunwa (ankle), C Spencer Long (knee, finger), DT Steve McLendon (ankle), TE Neal Sterling (concussion). LIMITED: G James Carpenter (shoulder), CB Trumaine Johnson (quadricep), LB Frankie Luvu (neck), LB Kevin Pierre-Louis (foot). FULL: DE Tarell Basham (knee), T Kelvin Beachum (knee, ankle), CB Morris Claiborne (shoulder), LB Brandon Copeland (knee), RB Isaiah Crowell (ankle), LB Jordan Jenkins (ankle), S Marcus Maye (thumb), RB Elijah McGuire (foot), S Rontez Miles (knee, hip), WR Andre Roberts (back), T Brandon Shell (finger). DETROIT at CHICAGO: LIONS: DNP: G T.J. Lang (neck), CB Darius Slay (knee). LIMITED: DE Ezekiel Ansah (shoulder), RB LeGarrette Blount (knee), LB Eli Harold (shoulder), RB Kerryon Johnson (ankle), LB Jalen Reeves-Maybin (neck), TE Luke Willson (shoulder). BEARS: DNP: TE Dion Sims (concussion). LIMITED: WR Taylor Gabriel (knee). FULL: TE Ben Braunecker (concussion), G Eric Kush (neck), LB Khalil Mack (ankle), DT Bilal Nichols (knee), WR Allen Robinson (groin). JACKSONVILLE at INDIANAPOLIS: JAGUARS: DNP: CB A.J. Bouye (calf), CB Quenton Meeks (knee). LIMITED: DT Eli Ankou (calf), DE Lerentee McCray (hamstring), TE James O’Shaughnessy (hip). FULL: QB Blake Bortles (left shoulder), RB Leonard Fournette (hamstring), CB D.J. Hayden (toe). COLTS: DNP: S Clayton Geathers (knee), TE Ryan Hewitt (ankle), S Michael Mitchell (calf), DT Hassan Ridgeway (illness), TE Erik Swoope (knee). LIMITED: WR Ryan Grant (ankle), CB Nate Hairston (ankle), S Malik Hooker (hip), RB Marlon Mack (foot), DE Kemoko Turay (neck), RB Robert Turbin (shoulder). FULL: G Braden Smith (hand). LA CHARGERS at OAKLAND: CHARGERS: No Report. RAIDERS: No Report. MIAMI at GREEN BAY: DOLPHINS: DNP: WR Danny Amendola (not injury related), DE Charles Harris (calf), DE Cameron Wake (not injury related). LIMITED: WR Jakeem Grant (achilles), T Ja’Wuan James (knee), G Ted Larsen (neck), WR Kenny Stills (groin), QB Ryan Tannehill (right shoulder), T Laremy Tunsil (knee, ankle). FULL: LB Stephone Anthony (quadricep), G Jesse Davis (elbow), TE A.J. Derby (foot), RB Kenyan Drake (shoulder), CB Xavien Howard (ankle), S Reshad Jones (shoulder), S T.J. McDonald (knee), WR DeVante Parker (knee), DE Robert Quinn (ankle), C Travis Swanson (elbow). PACKERS: DNP: TE Jimmy Graham (knee), CB Kevin King (hamstring). LIMITED: S Kentrell Brice (knee), T Bryan Bulaga (knee), LB Blake Martinez (ankle). FULL: WR Randall Cobb (hamstring), LB Nick Perry (ankle), QB Aaron Rodgers (knee). NEW ENGLAND at TENNESSEE: PATRIOTS: DNP: OT Trent Brown (illness). LIMITED: LS Joe Cardona (shoulder), WR Julian Edelman (ankle), TE Rob Gronkowski (ankle/ back), LB Dont’a Hightower (knee), TE Jacob Hollister (hamstring), G Shaq Mason (calf), RB Sony Michel (knee), WR Cordarrelle Patterson (neck), DE John Simon (shoulder). TITANS: DNP: LB Darren Bates (illness), OT Jack Conklin (concussion), OT Dane Cruikshank (knee), WR Taywan Taylor (foot). LIMITED: LB Derrick Morgan (shoulder), WR Tajae Sharpe (ankle). FULL: LB Will Compton (hamstring). NEW ORLEANS at CINCINNATI: SAINTS: DNP: DE Marcus Davenport (toe), WR Cameron Meredith (knee), G Larry Warford (not injury related), CB P.J. Williams (hamstring). LIMITED: T Terron Armstead (knee), T Andrus Peat (hip), T Ryan Ramczyk (knee), C Max Unger (knee). BENGALS: DNP: LB Vontaze Burfict (hip), CB Darqueze Dennard (sternoclavicular), WR A.J. Green (toe), TE Tyler Kroft (foot), G Alex Redmond (hamstring), LB Nick Vigil (knee). LIMITED: RB Giovani Bernard (knee), TE C.J. Uzomah (clavicle). FULL: G Clint Boling (back), C Billy Price (foot), WR John Ross (groin). SEATTLE at LA RAMS: SEAHAWKS: No Report. RAMS: No Report. WASHINGTON at TAMPA BAY: REDSKINS: DNP: WR Jamison Crowder (ankle), CB Quinton Dunbar (shin), T Morgan Moses (knee), RB Chris Thompson (rib), T Trent Williams (thumb). LIMITED: RB Adrian Peterson (shoulder), TE Jordan Reed (back). FULL: LB Ryan Anderson (knee), RB Kapri Bibbs (shoulder), CB Danny Johnson (forearm), QB Colt McCoy (right thumb), S Montae Nicholson (hip), CB Greg Stroman (hip). BUCCANEERS: DNP: DE Vinny Curry (ankle), T Demar Dotson (knee, shoulder), WR Mike Evans (knee), RB Ronald Jones (hamstring), CB M.J. Stewart (foot). LIMITED: RB Peyton Barber (ankle), G Evan Smith (hip, wrist). FULL: DE Jason Pierre-Paul (shoulder, foot). DALLAS at PHILADELPHIA: COWBOYS: DNP: WR Tavon Austin (groin), DE Taco Charlton (shoulder), DE David Irving (ankle), LB Sean Lee (hamstring), TE Geoff Swaim (knee), LB Joe Thomas (foot), WR Deonte Thompson (ribs), G Connor Williams (knee). LIMITED: DE Randy Gregory (knee), G Zack Martin (knee). FULL: CB Chidobe Awuzie (ankle). EAGLES: DNP: CB Sidney Jones (hamstring), C Jason Kelce (not injury related), CB Jalen Mills (foot). LIMITED: LB Nathan Gerry (ankle, knee), S Corey Graham (hamstring), T Lane Johnson (knee), RB Darren Sproles (hamstring). FULL: LB Kamu Grugier-Hill (thumb), T Jason Peters (biceps)


B12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 11.08.2018

Bath Fitter will help you fall in love with your bath again!

AT TENTION:

Hearing Aid Field Trial You or your family member may be eligible for hearing g aids a ds at little or no cost to yyou! • Are you experiencing hearing difficulties? • Do people mumble? • Do you feel like a bother to others due to your problems hearing? If you answered yes to any of these questions, you may qualify for hearing aids at little or no cost to you. Speak One-on-One with our friendly hearing professionals. They are experts in hearing loss, and will work with you to help find the best DAY RISK solution for FREE TRIAL your hearing difficulties.

If you live with a hearing problem, you are needed to participate in a special consumer trial program.

30

BEFORE

We are seeking 100 people to outhwestern try a new, Completely Invisible Hearing Centers hearing aid, designed to improve hearing in noisy places, eliminate feedback, and make listening to family and friends enjoyable again. Call Immediately!

when whenyou youcall callbybyNovember October 30th 31st 2018!

• No demolition • Installed in as little as one day

Call for your FREE in-home CONSULTATION

• Premium quality, high gloss acrylic bathtub and wall

314-898-0170 & 636-203-7049

Bath Fitter Franchise. Independently owned and operated by Ideal Bathroom Solutions LLC ®Registered trademark of Bath Fitter Franchising Inc. *Special offer good on the purchase of a bathtub or shower, wall and faucet kit. Model # PLU3638CHR. One offer per customer. May not be combined with any other offer. Offer must be presented at the time of estimate. Discount applies to same day purchases only. Previous orders and estimates excluded. Offer valid only at the above locations. Offer expires November 30, 2018 † Subject to certain limitations. † For as long as you own your home. Subject to certain limitations.

DON’T WAIT - Please take a moment and call now. Even if you are not sure if you need hearing aids, don’t miss this chance to qualify for hearing aids, call now. A FREE hearing screening will determine if this program is right for you... Call Southwestern now to participate!

Call to be Connected to one of our 30 Locations

(314) 230-8120 (618) 206-5941 (636) 203-9843

You Tube

All hearing tests are conducted by a licensed hearing instrument specialist. *Level of invisibility will vary based on the

176 Auto Court, o’FAllon, Il 62269 SAleS: (618) 589-8744 ServICe: (618) 641-0005 NEw 2018 RAM 1500

TRADESMAN CREw CAb 4x4

NEw RAM 1500

MsRP $43,340 DeaLeR DIscOuNTs $4,887 ReBaTes $6,000

TOTaL saVINGs $10,887

Everyone Qualifies Price

NEw 2018 RAM 2500

32,456

CUMMINGS DIESEL

ALL NEw 2019 RAM 1500

ALL NEw 2019 RAM 1500

LIMITED CREw CAb v8 4x4 MsRP $61,065 DeaLeR DIscOuNT $8,609 ReBaTe $2,500

TOTaL saVINGs $11,109

55,152

$

Everyone Qualifies Price #99101

LARAMIE CREw CAb v8 4x4

NEw RAM 1500

bIGhoRN CREw CAb 4x4

TOTaL saVINGs $12,920

TOTaL saVINGs $12,018

NEw JEEP

47,982

$

#99068

GRAND ChERokEE LIMITED 4x4 MsRP $43,330 DeaLeR DIscOuNT $3,257 ReBaTe $4,000

Everyone Qualifies Price

NEw RAM

4” MoPAR LIFT 1500 ExPRESS QUAD CAb MsRP $50,805 DeaLeR DIscOuNT $6,319 ReBaTe $4,500

TOTaL saVINGs $10,819 TOT

36,073

$

Everyone Qualifies Price

$359/Month Lease Payment #89731

35,895

$

#89611

TOTaL saVINGs $7,257 $,

Everyone Qualifies Price

49,956

$

MsRP $48,815 DeaLeR DIscOuNT $6,420 ReBaTe $6,500

MsRP $60,000 DeaLeR DIscOuNT $8,018 ReBaTe $4,000

Everyone Qualifies Price

32,857

$

#89630

TOTaL saVINGs $11,488

#89902

MsRP $42,365 DeaLeR DIscOuNT $5,258 ReBaTe $4,250

Everyone Qualifies Price

MsRP $66,640 DeaLeR DIscOuNT $8,738 ReBaTe $2,750

Everyone Qualifies Price

CREw CAb

TOTaL saVINGs $9,508

$

#89641

$3,000 Plus TTL

#89092

39,986

$

NO Financing Required • NO Trade Required You WILL Qualify for Our Prices

176 Auto Court, o’FAllon, Il 62269 • SAleS: (618) 589-8744 ServICe: (618) 641-0005 • www.AuFFenberg.Com PLus Tax, TITLe & LIceNce. PLus DOc Fee. $3,000 down, first payment due at signing, does not include ttl and acq, 10,000 miles per year, 24 mo, with approved credit. *$3,000 down, first payment due at signing, does not include ttl and acq, 10,000 miles per year, 48 mo, with approved credit. *$4,000 down, first payment due at signing, does not include ttl and acq, 10,000 miles per year, 48 mo, with approved credit. **$2,000 down, first payment due at signing, does not include ttl and acq, 10,000 miles per year, $500 aqu. fee, 39 mo, with approved credit. ‡

anatomy of your ear. Offer expires in 2-weeks.

Our unique process and one-piece seamless wall provides a perfect, watertight fit.

Free Moen Shower Head*

At the conclusion of this program, the first 100 participants to qualify may keep these hearing aids and enjoy tremendous savings.


There’s no other store like

15977 Manchester Road St. Louis, MO 63011 636-527-7655 Mon.-Sat. 10-6 • Sunday 1-5

825 South Lindbergh, St. Louis, MO. 63131 314-993-5570

of St. Louis, Inc.®

www.forshaws.com

Mon.-Wed.-Thurs.-Sat. 10:00-5:30 Tues.-Fri. 10:00-8:00 • Sun. Noon-5:00

J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / C O M I C S

Thursday • 11.08.2018 • EV DUSTIN • By Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker

DILBERT • By Scott Adams

SALLY FORTH • By Francesco Marciuliano and Jim Keefe

BABY BLUES • By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE • By Stephan Pastis GARFIELD • By Jim Davis

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM • By Mike Peters

DEFLOCKED • By Jeff Corriveau

MUTTS • By Patrick McDonnell

PRICKLY CITY • By Scott Stantis

PICKLES • By Brian Crane

HI AND LOIS • By Brian and Greg Walker and Chance Browne

RHYMES WITH ORANGE • By Hilary B. Price

BEETLE BAILEY • By Mort and Greg Walker

BREAKING CAT NEWS • By Georgia Dunn

SUDOKU

THE PAJAMA DIARIES • By Terri Libenson

EVERYDAY


EVERYDAY

EV2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH BRIDGE TIPS • BOB JONES Both vulnerable, South deals NORTH ♠K 6 ♥A 9 7 2 ♦7 4 3 ♣8 7 4 3 WEST EAST ♠Void ♠Q 5 4 2 ♥K Q J 6 5 ♥8 4 3 ♦Q 5 ♦J 10 9 6 2 ♣A Q J 9 5 2 ♣10 SOUTH ♠A J 10 9 8 7 3 ♥10 ♦A K 8 ♣K 6 The bidding: SOUTH WEST NORTH EAST 1♠ 2♠* Pass 3♥ 3♠ 4♣ 4♠ All pass *5-5 or more in hearts and a minor Opening lead: King of ♥ West chose a Michael’s Cue Bid with his hand and then bid clubs to show his extra length there, as well as his extra values. As we’ve said before, these bids can be very effective when they catch a fit, but they can be expensive when they don’t. It’s not that they are easy to penalize — they are not — but they can give declarer a roadmap to the play of the hand. South won the opening heart lead with dummy’s ace

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD and made the far-sighted play of ruffing a heart with seven of spades. He planned the hand carefully to guard against East holding all four of the missing trumps — a strong possibility after West’s bidding. The eight of spades was led to dummy’s king and South ran the six of spades, under-playing it with his three. A heart was ruffed with the nine of spades before declarer cashed the ace and king of diamonds. Playing West for the 6-5 hand that he had promised in the auction, South exited with the king of clubs! West won with the ace and cashed another club, but he then had to play a heart or a club that declarer could ruff with the 10 of spades. South exited with his eight of diamonds and took the last two tricks with the ace-jack of spades. Very well played! (11/08/18)

Across

1 Pride Month inits. 5 Org. defending 1-Across rights 9 At full speed 14 This and that 15 “Yay!” 16 1930s vice president John ___ Garner 17 It might pop out of a kid’s mouth 19 Thus far 20 Seven-time AllStar Dave, who pitched for the Toronto Blue Jays 21 Wind instrument 23 Heavy metal band whose name is a euphemism for “Jesus Christ!” 27 Notable times 31 Pacific North-

32 34 39 40 42 43

44 47 48 53 54 59 60

west hub, informally Main connections, of a sort Going rates? Touching Carefully explained Profundity Fashion designer whose namesake brand features a rhinoceros in its logo “Count me in!” Distort Swinger’s club Eponymous regatta-winning yacht of 1851 Bumbling Occupy, as a table Ingredient in some cocktails ... or a hint to the last words in 17-, 23-,

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

tcaeditors@tribune.com

CRYPTOQUIP

If Nov. 8 is your birthday • This year you break past patterns that have held you back in the past. If you are single, you will notice a tendency to splurge more in an effort to impress others. If you are attached, you and your sweetie build more financial security and make some strong, positive investments. Sagittarius will be lucky for you.

WORD GAME November 8 WORD — CATHODE (CATHODE: KATH-ode: A negatively charged electrode.) Average mark 24 words. Time limit 30 minutes. Can you find 31 or more words in CATHODE? The list will be published tomorrow. YESTERDAY’S WORD — ODDMENTS smote nest dose oddest sodden node dote odds some noes mend omen sone nose meson onset stem note mode demo steno tend modest demon stone tome monte dent tone most does send mote dome sent endmost done RULES OF THE GAME: 1. Words must be of four or more letters. 2. Words that acquire four letters by the addition of “s,” such as “bats” or “dies,” are not allowed. 3. Additional words made by adding a “d” or an “s” may not be used. For example, if “bake” is used, “baked” or “bakes” are not allowed, but “bake” and “baking” are admissible. 4. Proper nouns, slang words, or vulgar or sexually explicit words are not allowed.

64 65 66 67 68

69

32-, 43- and 48-Across Occupied Long nap? Actress Dobrev of “The Vampire Diaries” Bounded “This is probably dumb but I’m doing it anyway” hashtag Online handicrafts marketplace

Down

1 High shots 2 Overabundance 3 Benjamin Netanyahu’s nickname 4 Choice A for Hamlet 5 Flabbergasted feeling 6 Minor player, metaphorically 7 Comedian Costello 8 Greatest extent 9 Southern, and then some 10 An official language of New Zealand 11 2014 movie musical starring Quvenzhané Wallis 12 Phone tapping targets? 13 Unused to 18 Great Society prez 22 Audit expert, for short

HOROSCOPE • JACQUELINE BIGAR Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. The stars show the kind of day you’ll have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult.

CROSSWORD

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 11.08.2018

ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHH You might find the morning tense and possibly even difficult. Do not allow a close associate to push you beyond your limits. Optimism surrounds you. Tonight: Say “yes.” TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHH Try as you might, you cannot deny the importance of a key person in your life. Opportunities emerge when you least expect it. An offer that could increase your income needs serious evaluation. Tonight: Defer to others. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHH Use the earlier part of the day for routine matters. You could be prone to push someone too hard in an attempt to have him or her see a situation as you do. Tonight: Accept an offer that seems too good to be true. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Your mind seems to be focused on a situation that could play out in several different ways. No matter how you look at this matter, you see tremendous potential. What is stopping you? Tonight: Play until you’re too tired to continue.

24 “We deliver for you” org. 25 Off! ingredient 26 Penlight powerers, often 27 “My word!” 28 Fury 29 Rush order 30 Stick in the fire? 33 Under restraint 35 “To ...” things 36 Stone-cold cinch 37 Gospel with the Prodigal Son parable

38 Put in a hold 40 Epitome of gentleness 41 Calculus calculation 43 Evil, in Laval 45 High Sierra runner 46 Like a blank stare 48 Herb with “sweet” and “holy” varieties 49 ___ acid 50 Institute 51 Wipe away

52 Senator Kaine of Virginia 55 Soccer striker’s jersey number, traditionally 56 Out 57 Female swans 58 Server load? 61 “Well, what have we here?!” 62 Indian lentil dish 63 Before this time

Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay. No. 1004

WORD SCRIMMAGE

to his or her voice. Allow your imagination to flourish, and keep your attitude positive. Good luck follows you. Tonight: Stay openminded and encouraging. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH You might be rightfully concerned over a matter that keeps rearing its ugly head. Let go of your reservations for now. Know that everything will work out just fine. Tonight: Hang out. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH You might feel as if you are on top of the world right now. Please note that you have a tendency to go overboard. You might have a close-to-impossible time reining yourself in. Tonight: Paint the town red. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH You enter one of the most significant days of the year. Jupiter, the planet associated with abundance, enters your sign and initiates a new 12-year luck cycle. The first year of this cycle is often unusually lucky. You have reason for celebration. Tonight: Beam in what you want.

Solutions at bottom of page

WONDERWORD

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHH A lot is going on behind the scenes, and you seem to be aware of what is happening. You will notice a tendency to land on your feet, no matter what happens. Honor your feelings, but give others the time to spill the beans or share with you first. Tonight: Play it cool. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH Deal with a boss directly. You would be welladvised to pursue a matter of interest as soon as you can. By midafternoon, a group or a one-on-one meeting seems to energize you. A friend roots for you to take a risk. Tonight: In the limelight.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH You might sense that someone is aggravated with you. You might be surprised by what you discover if you let your guard down. Tonight: Start the weekend early if you can.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH Look past the obvious to see the long-term implications of a certain decision. You know you must come to an understanding with a higher-up. In the next year, you will gain more prestige in your field. Tonight: Forward ho!

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Speak your mind without hesitation. At first, you might run into some restrictions. A partner could have a sharp tone

STLtoday.com/horoscopes Get expanded horoscope information: star charts, peak times, outlooks and Chinese Zodiac data.

Find more free games, or subscribe to get access to more than 50 others, at STLtoday.com/games, where you’ll also find a link to the Puzzle Society.

Puzzle by Joon Pahk

WORDY GURDY

JUMBLE


EVERYDAY

11.08.2018 • Thursday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • EV3

DEAR ABBY

WHAT’S THE DIFF? Find six differences between the panels.

Extra place at table helps fight the blues

Dear Full Of Gratitude • Please accept my sympathy for the tragic loss of your brother. I’m pleased to help spread the word. Isolation

can be a killer, and inclusion can be a lifesaver. Bless you for what you are doing. I hope other readers will consider it and follow your example. Dear Abby • I have a dilemma I don’t know how to maneuver through. I have been working as an intern at a company for about 18 months. During the summer, I completed a test I needed to become fully licensed in my field. However, I’m still working in my current position at intern wages, although I have repeatedly requested a meeting with my employer to talk money. He continues to say he doesn’t have time, and we will discuss it later. Should I continue to press the issue? Or just look for other work? — CONCERNED ABOUT MONEY Dear Concerned • You have done enough. Pushing your employer further won’t help. The ball is now in his court. Start quietly looking for another job — one in which your skills will be appropriately compensated.

Dear Abby • How can I tactfully tell an elementary school teacher in whose class I assist that she uses poor grammar and words that aren’t words (i.e., “I boughten this yesterday,” or, “Her and me went to the soccer game.”)? I am fond of this teacher but feel she’s doing a disservice to her pupils. — TACTFUL IN THE EAST Dear Tactful • Children model their behavior after the example the adults around them provide. That a teacher would consistently do what she’s doing in a classroom setting is shocking. How could she have become a licensed educator with such poor English skills? Politically speaking, I don’t think that as her subordinate you should take it upon yourself to correct the woman. I do think this is something you should discuss with the school principal. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, Calif. 90069.

CAROLYN HAX

Husband keeps parents at arm’s length Adapted from a recent online discussion. Hi, Carolyn: What are my obligations to help cultivate a good relationship between my daughter and her paternal grandparents? My husband is not close to his parents. There has been no abuse or fight over a major issue. My husband and I are just really different from his parents. We live in an urban area, they live in a rural area; we have white-collar jobs, they have blue-collar jobs; we’re liberal, they’re conservative, etc. So far, my husband is only willing to accommodate his family visiting for one weekend a year if they stay in a hotel. We do not visit them. Each visit causes my husband anxiety, so I have not pushed for more time. His parents are unwilling to try video chatting, and my daughter has no interest in talking on the phone. The grandparents periodically

express some frustration over not having a better relationship with her, but I’m not sure what I can do. Sending her to visit on her own is not an option — they’re a plane ride away and their area isn’t the sort of place I would leave a multiracial child without parental supervision. — Just Really Different Answer • Maybe I’m being obtuse, but, urban/rural, white collar/ blue collar, liberal/conservative and not being close are emotional apples and oranges. Maybe there’s more to it that you didn’t include, but if not, if it’s just city versus country mice, then seeing that as extra work versus unworkable could encourage rapprochement. And also in that case, the strict one-visit-per-year limit seems more cruel and unusual than healthy and warranted. And cheez, “no interest in talking on the phone” is not an ex-

cuse. Please teach your child that remaining connected on a grandparent’s terms is an act of love — and barely registers on the effort scale. Seriously. Now, if we’re to extrapolate from “multiracial child” that your husband’s position is a boundary he enforces against racial prejudice, then some of this makes sense — except, if this were about race, why wouldn’t that be in your first line? So here’s what I’ve got: If your husband’s anxiety is about the place and circumstances versus the people, then ask him whether you and he have built the guardrails too high. If his anxiety is about his parents themselves, then your obligation is to check in occasionally — “Are we handling this right?” — but otherwise be supportive of what he needs. tellme@washpost.com

Differences: 1. Hose is different. 2. House is wider. 3. Fork is bigger. 4. Window is smaller. 5. Fence board is shorter. 6. Side of crate is different.

Dear Abby • I read that there is a suicide somewhere in the world every 40 seconds. Numbers rise at holiday time. Feeling like a child whose nose is pressed against a window, seeing others from the outside as they enjoy the warmth of the moment, can lead to thoughts of abandonment and despair. That’s why I have a mission — I set an extra place at my table. I can attest that it works. One year I announced in church that my home would be open to anyone who didn’t have a family. A woman came forward and accepted my invitation. We spent the day getting to know each other and bonded in friendship. Please encourage your readers to set an extra place at their holiday table. My brother committed suicide. I move forward in his honor. — FULL OF GRATITUDE IN PHOENIX

TV THURSDAY For complete channels and 24-hour program information, customize your own TV listings at STLtoday.com/tv. 11/8/18

7:00

7:30

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30

FOX ÍNFL Football: Carolina Panthers at Pittsburgh Steelers. (N) 2 CBS The Big 4 Bang Theory

Young Sheldon (7:31) (N)

Mom (8:01) Murphy S.W.A.T.: Inheritance. (N) (cc) Brown (N) (N) (cc) (cc)

NBC Superstore The Good 5 (N) Place (N) PBS Donny9 brook CW 11

I Feel Bad Law & Order: Special (8:31) (N) Victims Unit: Hell’s Kitchen. (N)

Jamestown Alice turns The Doctor Blake MysDonnybrook: Your to James for help. (cc) teries (cc) Turn

News 11 at 7:00PM (N) (cc)

METV The Andy 24 Griffith Show

Will & Grace (N)

Supernatural Sam and Legacies Hope, Lizzie, Dean race to find Mag- Josie and MG are pungie. (N) (cc) ished. (N)

The Andy Griffith Show

Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C.

WKRP in Hogan’s Hogan’s Cincinnati Heroes (cc) Heroes (cc) (cc)

ABC Grey’s Anatomy A preg- Station 19: Last Day on How to Get Away With 30 nant nurse collapses. Earth. (8:01) (N) (cc) Murder: I Got Played. (N) (cc) (N) (cc) ION CSI: Crime Scene In46 vestigation: In Vino Veritas. (cc)

CSI: Crime Scene Investigation A Cuban singer’s sister dies.

CSI: Crime Scene Investigation: Forget Me Not. (cc)

There’s no other store like

of St. Louis, Inc.®

FIREPLA INSERTCE

Inserts by

SALE

Beautiful Gas Logs Start At $371

We are the experts in transforming that old, dirty fireplace into the beautiful focal point of your home Frontenac Store

825 South Lindbergh 63131 • 314-993-5570 Mon., Wed., Thurs., Sat. 10:00-5:30 Tues. & Fri. 10:00-8:00 • Sun. 12:00-5:00

Quality Since 1871

www.forshaws.com

Ellisville Summer Classics Store: 15977 Manchester Road 63011 636-527-7655 Mon-Sat. 10-6 • 1-5 Sunday


EVERYDAY

EV4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH THE FAMILY CIRCUS • By Bil Keane

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 11.08.2018

DR. KEITH ROACH

ZITS • By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

Man, 74, seeks cause of easy bruising FUNKY WINKERBEAN • By Tom Batiuk

Dear Dr. Roach • I’m a 74-year-old male. I take Zocor, flecainide and a baby aspirin each day. For the past year, whenever I bump either arm, I get a large blood bruise that lasts for about a week or two. Is there something lacking, such as vitamins, that I could take? I’m quite active. I golf twice a week, walk 3 miles four times a week, and I ride a bike with a bike club 35 miles once per week. — R.A.

SPEED BUMP • By Dave Coverly

BIZARRO • By Wayno and Piraro

Answer • A bruise is a collection of blood, in or below the skin. The medical term is “hematoma,” which means exactly that: “blood collection.” Older people are more likely to develop hematomas, and it happens with less trauma than in younger people. But some people are just more prone to develop them. Aspirin, because it works by disabling the blood clotting cells, increases the risk of developing a bruise, or having a larger bruise. There are medical conditions that can predispose a person to getting many bruises. Von Willebrand’s disease can go many years without ever being diagnosed, and should be considered in people with more-serious bleeding or a family history. Vitamin deficiencies are a very uncommon cause of bleeding disorders, but severe vitamin C deficiency, vitamin K deficiency and low protein intake can cause bleeding problems. Since the bruising is on your arms, seemingly always related to trauma, and because you are on aspirin, I think it unlikely that there is an unsuspected medical diagnosis causing your bruising.

CORNERED • By Mike Baldwin NON SEQUITUR • By Wiley Miller

DUPLEX • By Glenn McCoy MARMADUKE • By Brad Anderson

Dear Dr. Roach • My question is about when and how should a patient consume his medications when on 10 different prescribed medications. Some include instructions to take with water and food; some are taken with no food nor any liquid; some in the mornings, while others are taken in the afternoon or at bedtime. Some are supposed to be taken two to three hours before meals, and others two three hours after meals. I can’t keep up with such a rigid schedule when on the move, therefore I take all 10 medications in the morning over a three-hour period. Am I defeating the purpose of the effect of the medications? — K.J.S.

INTELLIGENT LIFE • By David Reddick

DRABBLE • By Kevin Fagan

MARK TRAIL • By James Allen

Answer • Without knowing the details of the medications, I can’t tell you how important it is to take each one as prescribed. The person who can best advise you on this is your pharmacist, who has special expertise on issues like this. Your physician is also able to do so, but if you are getting medications from multiple physicians, it’s important that you have someone look at all your medications.

LOLA • By Todd Clark ZIGGY • By Tom Wilson

Dr. Roach regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but will incorporate them in the column whenever possible. Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med. cornell.edu.

OTHER COAST • By Adrian Raeside

TAKE IT FROM THE TINKERSONS • By Bill Bettwy

THE ARGYLE SWEATER • By Scott

Hilburn

BLONDIE • By Dean Young and John Marshall

See more comics and play interactive games at STLtoday.com/comics

11.8.18  

11.8.18 St. Louis Post-Dispatch

11.8.18  

11.8.18 St. Louis Post-Dispatch