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Tears flow at hearing for teens in police killing BY CHRISTINE BYERS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • Fifteen. Sixteen. Sophomores at Confluence Academy. Tears fell from their eyes as they sat at a table with their parents, one after the other, in back-to-back juvenile detention hearings Thursday. It was the first time either of them had been to juvenile court, and they were there facing charges in the robbery and murder on Monday of a retired St. Louis police sergeant. Judge Robin Ransom had tears in her See SHOOTING • Page A5

BY CELESTE BOTT St. Louis Post-Dispatch

HILLARY LEVIN • hlevin@post-dispatch.com

A pedestrian uses an umbrella to block the rain Thursday outside the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts on the Washington University campus.

ST. LOUIS • A Missouri congressional district that’s long been solidly Republican has nonetheless drawn national attention heading into this Tuesday’s election, as political newcomer Cort VanOstran will attempt to unseat incumbent U.S. Rep. Ann Wagner in her bid for a fourth term. But even amid breathless predictions of a “blue wave” of victories for Democrats, it’ll be an uphill battle for VanOstran, a lawyer who has largely centered his campaign on health care. Not only is Wagner a prolific fundraiser with a deep political résumé, but President Donald Trump won the district — which includes suburbs spanning parts of St. Charles, Jefferson and St. Louis counties — by 10 percentage points in 2016. What has some Democrats hopeful for an upset is the district’s contingent of suburban women, who more than any other national demographic have soured on Trump since he took office two years ago. Wagner contends most of the voters

County lowers number of voters sent letter in error; not all know rector Eric Fey said Thursday night. Fey said about 150 people who had called to point out ST. LOUIS COUNTY • An the error over the past few election official in St. Louis Customized weeks had been added back County said Thursday night ballot to the rolls, but the problem that officials mistakenly available at did not trigger any addisent letters to 253 voters stltoday.com/ tional investigation by the telling them they were inboard until a reporter asked eligible to vote on Nov. 6. votersguide about it on Thursday. The Board of Elections Fey said the board for the revised the number on Thursday night after saying earlier in first time on Thursday looked into the the day that the number had been 600. 1,500 letters it had sent, and generated The problem was first discovered a list of voters who should not have reabout Oct. 15, when some voters who ceived the letter. Republican Director received the letter called to say they had received it in error, Democratic Di- See LETTER • Page A4 BY JEREMY KOHLER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

MISSOURI VOTERS GUIDE

See ELECTION • Page A4

Choose Hawley, Trump urges Missouri voters

President takes aim at caravans via asylum limits

BY CATHERINE LUCEY Associated Press

BY JILL COLVIN AND COLLEEN LONG Associated Press

COLUMBIA, MO. • President Donald

WASHINGTON • President Donald

Trump implored voters on Thursday to reject Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill and to instead install a Republican in her seat who would fully back his agenda. Trump appeared at a rollicking campaign rally in Columbia in an airline hangar draped in American flags. It was his second rally in an 11-stop, eightstate tour designed to boost Republican turnout ahead of Tuesday’s crucial midterm elections. The president, accompanied by

Trump said Thursday that he planned to sign an order next week that could lead to large-scale detention of migrants crossing the southern border and bar anyone caught crossing illegally from claiming asylum — two legally dubious proposals that mark his latest election-season barrage against illegal immigration. Trump also said he had told the U.S. military mobilizing at the southwestern border that if U.S. troops faced rock-throwing migrants, they should

See HAWLEY • Page A4

TODAY

LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley, the Republican candidate for U.S. Senate, addresses the crowd alongside President Donald Trump at a rally on Thursday at Hangar 350 at the Columbia Regional Airport.

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Lawyer indignant that prosecutor lets drug defendant languish in jail

Cornell’s family accuses doctor of overprescribing some drugs

TONY MESSENGER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

When it comes to standing up for his client, St. Louis lawyer Jeffrey Ernst gets straight to the point. On Monday, Ernst filed a motion seeking to disqualify St. Francois County Prosecuting Attorney Jerrod Mahurin from further prosecution of a drug case against Richard Clark, 59, of Farmington. “Mahurin is out of control,” Ernst writes. “In his quest to make Clark spend the rest of his life in jail based on a failed trafficking case, Mahurin trampled on his due process rights and willfully defied this Court’s order to produce evidence. He also ignored the boundaries of professional conduct by a prosecutor.” Ernst’s motion accuses Mahurin of “prosecutorial misconduct” and seeks to replace him with a special prosecutor. Mahurin, a Democrat who faces Republican Melissa Gilliam in Tuesday’s election, hasn’t responded in court to the motion. In an interview with the PostDispatch, Mahurin said Ernst is trying to have him removed from the case because Ernst doesn’t like the plea offers he’s made to Ernst’s client. “The attorneys in that case tried to take up that motion once already, and it was not successful,” Mahurin said. “There’s no standing or grounds for that to happen.” Clark, who has previous drug offenses on his record, was arrested Aug. 26, 2015. He was jailed overnight and eventually charged with “trafficking and possession of drug paraphernalia,” both felonies.

Like many defendants in St. Francois County, where bails are often high and even people not accused of violent offenses are sometimes detained for months before trial, Clark ended up spending 495 days in county jail awaiting a trial that still hasn’t come. At question, Ernst writes in his motion, is whether Clark was actually “arrested” on the day he was put in jail. At a hearing in June held in part to answer that question, and to see if an incriminating statement could be used against Clark at trial, Mahurin argued that Clark was not arrested. The officer who brought Clark to the jail agreed with the prosecutor. “He was not taken into custody,” Farmington police Officer Kelvin Clemons testified at that hearing. Fellow Officer Neil Jannin offered similar testimony, according to court records. “He did not go to jail,” Clemons testified. “He was left at the house.” Records Ernst obtained later from the St. Francois County Sheriff’s Department paint an entirely different picture. They show Clark arrested, fingerprinted and booked into the jail. Ernst writes in his brief that “defense counsel obtained the Sheriff’s Department ‘Days Served Report,’ which put the lie to Officers Clemons’ and Jannin’s testimony by showing that Clark was arrested on Aug. 26, 2015.” Now having evidence that the police officers’ testimony was inaccurate, Ernst called and emailed Mahurin. He sought more documents. “When asked what happened,” Ernst writes, “Mahurin pled ignorance and threw Officers Clemons and Jannin under the bus, saying ‘I was under the belief based on my officers’ testimony that (the arrest records) didn’t exist. Because

they had testified and told me multiple times.’” The issue of whether Clark was in custody when police questioned him is significant. If he was in custody and hadn’t been read his Miranda rights, any statements he made would likely be inadmissible, making it harder for Mahurin to make the case. Mahurin dropped the more serious trafficking charge in September, after trying to use it as “leverage” against Clark to obtain a plea deal in the possession case, Ernst wrote. “Mahurin never had any intention of continuing on with the trafficking case, but nevertheless took one last shot at squeezing Clark with it,” his motion argues. “Mahurin is compromised … The fact that he attempted to leverage a defective case — moments before he voluntarily dismissed it because of insurmountable evidentiary problems — to secure a plea deal in a different case smacks of impropriety.” Ernst was himself a prosecutor for 11 years. Like others who have complained of the lack of justice in St. Francois County, whether related to high bails or court costs or Mahurin’s alleged violation of court rules, such as failing to hand over arrest and jail records even after being directed to by a judge, he’s baffled by the prosecutor’s conduct in this case. “It’s not like I was asking him to climb Mount Everest to get the documents,” Ernst told me in an interview. “This is simple stuff. When a person goes to jail there are all sorts of documents that go with it. I’ve never seen anything like this before.” Tony Messenger • 314-340-8518 @tonymess on Twitter tmessenger@post-dispatch.com

ST. LOUIS • “Dopesick” from heroin

withdrawal, Cody Kaelin needed his second fix of the day. But his girlfriend, Jessica Paxton, didn’t want him to take her car. They argued, but she eventually agreed to drive him — along with their 2-yearold son Connor — to the Dutchtown parking lot where Kaelin always bought drugs. His cellphone depleted of minutes, Kaelin asked three men in the parking lot to borrow a phone to call his dealer, known as “J-Rock” and “Jizzle.” The men refused and told him he was in the wrong neighborhood. As Kaelin turned back toward Paxton’s car, one of the three pointed a gun and told him to empty his pockets. Kaelin tossed a lighter and a gift card and ran. The three men chased him and swarmed the car as the couple tried to speed away. The gunman fired a single shot that shattered the driver’s side window and hit Paxton in the side. She drove a couple of blocks before crashing into a box truck. Kaelin called 911, screaming that his girlfriend had been shot as Connor cried in fear. Kaelin and Connor were not injured. Paxton, 23, died a few hours later at a hospital. Kaelin, 27, introduced himself to the jury by saying “My name is Cody Kaelin and I am an addict.” He said he had been using drugs since he was 18 and was now in treatment. Prosecutors say Da’Twon Thompson, 21, of the 2300 block of Indiana Avenue, was the one who pulled the trigger shortly after 10 p.m. on June 12, 2016, in the park-

FAMILY PHOTO

Jessica Paxton, seen here with Cody Kaelin and their son, Connor, was killed in 2016.

ing lot of a run-down apartment complex at South Spring and Itaska avenues. Thompson stood trial this week for Paxton’s murder. The main evidence was Kaelin’s identification of Thompson as the shooter in a physical lineup about 10 days after Paxton’s death. Thompson’s public defender J. Matthew Shellenbergar told jurors the state’s case relied solely on a “crappy description” from Kaelin, who gave police an “inconsistent” description of the shooter’s clothing and complexion, and initially lied about why the couple and their son had gone to the lot. “That’s why this ID is so crucial and so

weak,” Shellenbergar said.“That’s all there is. The description is all over the place.” A St. Louis jury acquitted Thompson on Thursday on all charges: murder, armed criminal action, unlawful use of a weapon and attempted robbery. Paxton, 23, was a server at Biggies Restaurant and Bar on Watson Road in St. Louis. She grew up in Arnold and graduated from Fox Senior High School in 2010. Her parents have said she was not a drug user. Her son now splits time living with his grandparents. Paxton’s grandfather is Rodney Lincoln, who was released from prison in June after serving 34 years after his sentence was commuted for a murder he insists he did not commit. Lincoln watched parts of the trial this week. “I’m sick to my stomach,” said Kay Lincoln, Paxton’s mother, interviewed by phone after the verdict. “I know for a fact that this is the man who killed my daughter. But good old Missouri justice convicts the innocent and lets the guilty go free.” Kaelin’s alleged dealer, Davante Rejay Lindsey, 21, of the 4400 block of Neosho Street, has pending charges of heroin distribution and second-degree murder (also called felony murder) in connection with Paxton’s killing. Lindsey was on probation at the time of Paxton’s death for ramming a St. Louis police car. Thompson has another pending murder case in the June 9, 2016, shooting death of John Jerome Moore, 24, in the 3500 block of Bingham Avenue. Joel Currier • 314-621-5804 @joelcurrier on Twitter jcurrier@post-dispatch.com

Holy memorabilia auction, Batman • A longtime TV memorabilia collector is putting props and costumes from “Batman,” “Star Trek” and other shows up for auction. James Comisar said 400 items would be for sale. That includes the Riddler’s green jacket from the first episode of the 1960s “Batman” series. Also going on the block are the egg-shaped spaceship from “Mork & Mindy” and a bag of fake drugs from “Breaking Bad.” More than 50 lots of “Star Trek” costumes, sketches, jewelry and correspondence will be part of the sale. Prop Store, a movie and TV memorabilia company, is hosting the auction on Dec. 1 in California. Fox has no interest in rehiring Kelly • Lachlan Murdoch, chairman of 21st Century Fox Inc., has no plans to rehire Megyn Kelly after her departure from NBC’s “Today” show over racially insensitive remarks. “I’m a big fan of Megyn’s, we didn’t want her to leave Fox,” Murdoch said Thursday at the New York Times’ DealBook conference in New York. “Having said that, I’m very happy with our current lineup.” Kelly is negotiating her exit from NBC after defending wearing blackface at Halloween.

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS Singer Jay Black is 80. Actress Stefanie Powers is 76. Singer k.d. lang is 57. Actress Meta Golding is 47. Actress Marisol Nichols is 47. Rapper Nelly is 44. Actor-singer Kendall Schmidt is 28.

Jury acquits man in fatal shooting of woman, 23 BY JOEL CURRIER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Family members of Chris Cornell sued on Thursday a doctor they say overprescribed drugs to the rock singer, leading to his death. Cornell’s widow, Vicky Cornell, and their children are plaintiffs in the lawsuit filed in Los Angeles Superior Court alleging that prescription drugs led to erratic behavior from the Soundgarden frontman before his death in Detroit in 2017 at age 52. The lawsuit says Dr. Robert Koblin “negligently and repeatedly” prescribed “dangerous mind-altering controlled substances to Chris Cornell.” Coroner’s investigators ruled Cornell’s death a suicide by hanging. Toxicology tests showed the presence of Ativan along with barbiturates, caffeine and other drugs.

From news services

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LOCAL

11.02.2018 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A3

St. Louis offering more flexibility for when residents can use city dumps BY DOUG MOORE St. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. LOUIS • Residents now have more flexibility when it comes to using the two city dumps. Under a new policy made public Thursday, St. Louis city residents can now bring unwanted items to the two dumpsites 12 times a year instead of once a month. The change in wording is important, Director of Operations Todd Waelterman told the PostDispatch. For example, residents cleaning out their garages may find themselves with more than one load of trash per month. Now, they can use those 12 free dumps whenever they want instead of limiting them to one every 30 days. With the change, Waelterman said the city hoped to cut down on illegal dumping, a problem the city has struggled to control for decades and an issue the Post-Dispatch has highlighted as part of an ongoing series examining critical challenges facing St. Louis. In fiscal year 2017, residents dropped off 9,000 tons of refuse at the two city dumps. By comparison, city departments led by the forestry division picked up 22,000 tons of illegally dumped items. That does not include the 52,000 tires that had to be disposed of separately. “I’m in favor of anything we can do to make things a little easier on people,” Mayor Lyda Krewson said in a statement. That includes opening the dumpsites on Sundays, creating a seven-day-a-week opportunity to do away with unwanted items. The city dumps, officially called transfer stations, are situated at 201 North Humboldt Avenue and 4100 South First Street, and open from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Waelterman said the change in policy and the addition of Sunday would ideally reduce trash collection expenses. It costs the city more money to

BY JOEL CURRIER St. Louis Post-dispatch

CLAYTON • A former Parkway

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

City refuse workers Herman Falkner (left) and Andrew Johnson load a pile of mattresses and box springs into a trash truck in Baden while working their route in July.

send a crew to pick up a pile of illegally dumped items than to process the trash at one of the drop-off centers, he said. The changes at the transfer stations are the latest efforts by the city to try to reduce illegal dumping in the city. In July 2017, the St. Louis Board of Aldermen raised the monthly trash fee by $3 to $14, and in the first year it raised $2.7 million. This fiscal year, the number is expected to jump to $3.6 million. The largest chunk of the money has gone to purchase new trash trucks, replacing an aging fleet. Earlier this year, more than half of the city’s 84 garbage truck were out of service. With 55 trash routes a day, dumpsters were not being emptied regularly. Trash mounted, as did resident complaints. Krewson said last week that the city had gotten a better handle on its trash pickup problem, running enough trucks every day for the last month to pick up “100 percent” of residential dumpsters.

“That crisis, and I do believe it was a crisis, that crisis has been addressed,” Krewson said. From that increased trash fee, the city also bought more than 100 cameras, most of which were placed in alleys where dumping has been persistent. Another 100 are to be installed throughout the city in the next year, Waelterman said. The new trash funds also help pay for a trash task force, assigned with cracking down on illegal dumping. Since January, the city has issued 208 summonses for illegal dumping, with 58 people found guilty in municipal court and fined $500, Krewson said. In addition, most of those guilty pleas came with a sentence of 40 hours of community service — cleaning trash out of alleys. Of those 208 tickets, about half went to city residents, a fourth to St. Louis County residents and a fourth to those farther afield, Krewson said. About a fourth of the items brought to the city dumps come

in on a Saturday, Waelterman said, and city officials expect Sunday to become a popular day as well. In addition to trash, residents can drop off yard waste, recycling, bulk items, car batteries, motor oil, appliances and car tires. A list of accepted items can be found on the city’s website, at stlouis-mo.gov. The dumpsites are open to city residents only, and those who show up must present a driver’s license or state ID along with a recent water bill (which also includes a charge for trash service). Waelterman said that with the new policy, the city would keep track of when trash loads are coming in and consider tweaking hours if necessary. “Every little thing we can do to stop dumping,” Waelterman said. “We’ve got to provide service to our people. And we’ve got to stop being restrictive.” Doug Moore • 314-340-8125 @dougwmoore on Twitter dmoore@post-dispatch.com

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teacher and coach was sentenced Thursday to five years in prison after admitting to charges of statutory rape, sodomy and sexual abuse of a middle school student. Ronald “Ronnie” L. Smith Jr., 43, of the 2000 block of Painted L ea f D r ive i n Maryland Heights, Smith taught industrial technology at Parkway South Middle School and coached girls basketball and football at Parkway South High School. He was sentenced by Presiding Circuit Judge Gloria C. Reno. Smith pleaded guilty in September to three counts of statutory rape, one count of statutory sodomy and one count of sexual contact with a student by a teacher. Charges said he had sexual contact with a female student from 2015 to 2017. The victim, who was by then attending Parkway South High School, reported the sexual contact to a counselor earlier this year. A district spokeswoman said Smith was immediately removed from the middle school, placed on administrative leave after his arrest and then terminated April 4. The district has petitioned the state to have Smith’s teaching certification revoked. In her impact statement, the victim said the assaults caused headaches, anxiety, nightmares and other issues. “I would never want this to happen to anyone else,” she said. Smith began working for the district in 2005 when he joined Parkway South High School as a part-time substitute teacher, and football and basketball coach, the spokeswoman said.

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A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NEWS

M 1 • FrIDAy • 11.02.2018

VanOstran, Wagner cite health care and economy

DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

Democrat Cort VanOstran greets the crowd Wednesday at a rally featuring Joe Biden supporting Claire McCaskill and other local Democrats at the Machinists’ hall in Bridgeton.

ELECTION • FROM A1

she’s spoken to — many of them suburban women — feel Republicans and the president have done well to protect economic security, through cuts to taxes and regulations, and national security, by a push to secure borders. “They feel they’re keeping more of their hard-earned money, they feel their wages have gone up, that they’re saving some now finally for the future,” said Wagner, R-Ballwin. “They’re pleased their son or their daughter has job security and that their neighbor does, too. “They do feel the president has worked to make a safer world out there for them.” Still, even as Trump has campaigned in the St. Louis region multiple times this year, Wagner has not had the president in for a campaign rally. The Trump factor and the uproar over Brett Kavanaugh, his second nomination to the country’s top court, are certainly on voters’ minds, VanOstran said. He argues that while the president ran saying he was in favor of working people, his actions haven’t reflected that. “I’m somebody who is going to be happy to work with the president when he wants to get things done for people in this district. But I’m also somebody who’s not going to be afraid to stand up to him, to hold him accountable, and to call out embarrassing, errant behavior when I see it,” VanOstran said.

EXPERIENCE Wagner, 56, brings years of political experience to the table. As a Mizzou graduate with a small-business background, she got her start in politics in the 1990s, when she served as a local committeewoman in Lafayette Township in St. Louis County. She was later the chair of the Missouri Republican Party, the co-chair of the Republican National Committee and the United States ambassador to Luxembourg before winning her House seat. As achievements, she points to a law she sponsored that criminalizes the online advertising of sex-trafficking victims and

JOHANNA HUCKEBA • jhuckeba@post-dispatch.com

Republican Ann Wagner speaks with volunteers for her campaign as they fill out voting reminders on Thursday, just days before the election.

her legislative efforts to both protect retirement savings and support military veterans. The latter issue is close to her heart, as her son, Raymond Wagner, is a captain in the Army. She has two other children, Stephen and Mary Ruth, with her husband, Ray. She also highlights her service on the House Committee on Foreign Affairs committee — specifically, on the Middle East and Asia Pacific subcommittees — and on the Financial Services committee. Wagner said she believed congressional races were still very much local affairs. “I think congressional seats are not as subject to waves, if you’re running the right kind of campaign on your record and who you are,” she said. When people ask about his age, VanOstran, 30, has come to assume they’re really asking if he has enough experience to represent their interests in Congress. VanOstran, native of Joplin, has never before held political office, but he points to his experience growing up in rural Missouri and helping his mother to raise his young siblings after his father committed suicide. “I understand how the decisions made in Washington affect real people. I think that is in some ways my most important qualification,” he said. VanOstran, a Washington University and Harvard grad who practices law with Gray, Ritter and Graham, also teaches at Washington University’s law school. His top priorities if elected include gun reforms such as universal background checks, campaign finance reform and a plan to encourage states such as Missouri to expand Medicaid, he said.

her role in efforts to repeal it, highlighting in particular its popular provision protecting coverage for people with pre-existing conditions. That’s now on the chopping block, as Republican attorneys general throughout the country, including Missouri, are suing to repeal the law in its entirety. Wagner said, “While I’m certainly sad that we weren’t able to get more done in the Senate in terms of health care, our legislation has always made sure insurance companies cannot rescind coverage based on pre-existing conditions, and cannot exclude benefits based on pre-existing conditions.” VanOstran alleges that the Republican legislation would allow insurance companies to charge exorbitant amounts for those with pre-existing conditions, defeating its stated purpose. He wants Congress to shore up and expand the health care law, rather than gut its core protections. “It’s not a perfect bill. It wasn’t a perfect plan. But the ACA has given access to a lot more Americans and a lot more Missourians than had (health care) before,” he said. Wagner maintains that the current system under Obamacare is unworkable and unaffordable. “We need things that are patient-centered,” she said, adding that she would support things such as health savings accounts and association health care plans, which allow people to buy coverage pooled through groups such as a local farm bureau or chamber of commerce. “Those are a really great way to lower premiums and encourage choice,” Wagner said.

HEALTH CARE VanOstran has made health care the cornerstone for his campaign because the debate, for him, is a personal one. He said he was motivated to run for office after his mother died of breast cancer. She had bought health insurance through the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, and he has sharply criticized Wagner for

Wagner came into the final stretch of the congressional campaign with a sizable cash advantage. She had more than $2 million in her coffers, compared with less than $400,000 for VanOstran, though he outpaced her in summer fundraising. While she has acknowledged that this election marks a tougher challenge for her than in years past, Wagner and her

THE HOME STRETCH

Trump tells voters to drop McCaskill in favor of Hawley HAWLEY • FROM A1

McCaskill’s Republican challenger, Josh Hawley, declared that Hawley “will be a star.” Hawley, the current attorney general, sought to link McCaskill to Trump’s Democratic opponent, Hillary Clinton, who lost the state in 2016 by nearly 19 percentage points. “Claire McCaskill has spent her lifetime in politics just like Hillary,” Hawley said. “Claire McCaskill wanted us to call Hillary Clinton ‘Madam President.’ On Nov. 6, we’re going to call Claire McCaskill ‘fired.’” With four days to go until midterm elections that determine control of Congress, Republicans are optimistic they could make gains in the Senate, but they might struggle to maintain a majority in the House. McCaskill is among a number of vulnerable Democrats running in red states. She is a top target for Republicans seeking to expand the party’s slim 51-49 edge in the U.S. Senate.

More than 100 voters may believe letter that said registration had arrived too late LETTER • FROM A1

Rick Stream called the newspaper back to say that number was 600, and that the board still needed to contact almost all of them. But Fey called later to say that the number Stream provided had been an estimate, not an actual count, and the real number was 253. Fey said that meant there were still 103

LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

President Donald Trump campaigns for Josh Hawley at the Columbia Regional Airport on Thursday. Trump will be in Cape Girardeau, Mo., Monday to stump for him again.

McCaskill is pitching herself as a moderate as she seeks to hold onto her seat. She has sought to distance herself from “crazy Democrats” and said in an appearance on Fox News that she supported Trump’s efforts to secure the southern border. Hawley has dismissed her efforts and argues that she is not the right fit for

an increasingly conservative state. Trump said that McCaskill had been “saying nice things” but that she “wants to get elected and then she’ll always vote against us.” A check of her record, however, shows that McCaskill votes with the president about half the time, though she has op-

people in St. Louis County who still did not know they had received a letter in error. And he said he was “99 percent” sure that was the full extent of the problem. Any voter who received the letter was asked to call the election board at 314615-1800. Stream said earlier Thursday that the board should have acted more quickly to notify voters of the mistake. He said the error was committed while processing voter registration forms that came in after Missouri’s Oct. 10 deadline. The board sent letters to 1,500 voters indicating that their registrations had been received too late for the Nov. 6 election but that their names would be added to the rolls for future elections. Fey said the problem was attributable to a single election worker who did not know

that voter registration forms postmarked or signed by Oct. 10 should be counted, even if they arrived at the board office a few days later. Stream said Thursday morning that the board had not issued voter registration cards to voters who got letters in error. The cards are usually issued as part of an automatic system, “and we didn’t ensure that those changes were put into that automated system,” Stream said. But Fey said later Thursday night that the board had actually issued voter registration cards to the 150 voters who had called in and had been identified as receiving a letter in error. After a Post-Dispatch story about the problem was published online Thursday, one St. Louis County voter said she contacted the board to express her outrage.

aides expressed confidence in her victory on Tuesday. Earlier this year, she turned down fundraising help from the National Republican Congressional Committee. She has also opted not to debate her fellow 2nd District candidates. That has become a key talking point for her opponent, who says Wagner hasn’t spent enough time in her district. “People in this district are so ready for someone who will show up. That’s what I hear more than anything else,” VanOstran said. Wagner firmly pushed back on that assertion. “I’m in the district a lot interacting with my constituents,” Wagner said. “I’ve lived and worked and played in this community my whole life. I respect anyone willing to throw their hat in the arena to run for political office, but my Democratic opponent just moved to St. Louis a couple of years ago … I’ve been here my entire life.” At a packed town hall in Des Peres last month, VanOstran reminded attendees that he had held six town halls during his campaign, vowing to hold one once a quarter, or four times a year, if elected. He then took a series of unscreened questions on topics ranging from reproductive rights to the federal deficit. “I think if we want politicians who are truthful, we need politicians who will be accountable,” he said. Going into the final weekend before the election, Wagner wrapped up a rainy day of campaigning by sitting with volunteers in her Ballwin campaign office, making signs that workers will hand out at the polls on Tuesday. She said her campaign had already reached more than 260,000 voters going into the final days, through knocking on doors, phone banking or sending hand-written postcards. “I don’t know how many members of Congress knock on doors, but I actually do,” Wagner said. “This to me is a calling, it’s not a job. And I think there’s more work to be done.” Celeste Bott • 314-340-8119 @celestebott on Twitter cbott@post-dispatch.com

posed him on some key issues, including his tax cuts and the recent confirmation of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh. The president, who threatened this week to end a constitutional right that automatically grants citizenship to any baby born in the United States, railed against the 14th Amendment during the rally, calling it a “crazy, lunatic policy” supported by Democrats. “The Democrats want to continue giving automatic birthright citizenship to every child born to an illegal immigrant, even if they’ve been on our soil for a mere matter of seconds,” Trump said. “Hundreds of thousands of children born to illegal immigrants are made automatic citizens of the United States every year because of this crazy, lunatic policy that we can end.” Trump expressed optimism for the midterm elections, though he noted that Republican momentum had been blunted in recent days by “two maniacs” — a reference to a mail bomb scare and a mass shooting at a Pittsburgh synagogue. He added, “We don’t care about momentum when it comes to a disgrace like just happened to our country.” However, he said, “It did nevertheless stop a certain momentum. And now the momentum is picking up.” The president will return to Missouri before Election Day, rallying voters Monday in Cape Girardeau.

And another voter took to social media to post a picture of the letter, suggesting it was fake and an attempt to suppress voters. The letter wasn’t fake, it was just wrong, Stream said. It was the second snafu at the election board in recent days. Last week, the board acknowledged it had to reissue sample ballots to 12 percent of registered voters because the first version had errors. In 2016, issues that plagued voting at more than 60 polling places led to a twoweek suspension for Fey and the resignation of Republican Gary Fuhr. The board did not accept Fuhr’s resignation, and he retired later that year. Jeremy Kohler • 314-340-8337 @jeremykohler on Twitter jkohler@post-dispatch.com


NEWS

11.02.2018 • Friday • M 1

St. Louis recycling group has message about plastic bags — keep ’em out of bins BY LEAH THORSEN St. Louis Post-dispatch

A push is set for this month to spread the message that plastic bags and plastic film should not go in standard recycling bins and instead should be brought to grocery and other stores for recycling. It’s being organized by the OneSTL Materials and Recycling Working Group, which is made up of local organizations and governments working to promote recycling, and includes a new website with information on how to properly recycle: RecycleResponsibly.org. “Plastic bags are a big contaminant in recycling. They jam up the equipment at processing facilities, putting workers at risk and ruining baled paper and other items that could otherwise be recycled,” said Jean Ponzi, a member of the OneSTL group and a recycling educator at Missouri Botanical Garden, in a statement Thursday. “Many people are trying to do the right thing by recycling, but they simply don’t realize that plastic bags cannot be put in their bins at home.” The statement also cited the environmental costs of plastic bags, including the hundreds of thousands of sea turtles, birds, whales and other marine mammals that die each year from eating dis-

carded plastic bags mistaken for food. Cities around the region have been dealing with the pitfalls of single-stream recycling — the widely used system in which residents toss cans, paper, plastic and all types of recyclable material into a single container rather than sorting them — which can include paper streams’ being gummed up by plastic bags. Ponzi also stressed that people should not put their recyclables in plastic bags before putting them in a bin or cart — all plastic bags must stay out of recycling bins. OneSTL members will hand out flyers and some reusable shopping bags during the last three weekends of November at stores including all four Straub’s locations, Ruler Foods and Local Harvest in south St. Louis and the Walmart in Fenton. Other businesses, including some in the Delmar Loop, also will encourage using reusable shopping bags as part of the educational campaign. An art installation and event to tell people about the effects of plastic bags is set from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Nov. 15 at the World’s Fair Pavilion in Forest Park as part of America Recycles Day. Leah Thorsen • 314-340-8320 @leahthorsen on Twitter lthorsen@post-dispatch.com

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A5

White supremacist gang members from St. Louis area charged in assault BY ROBERT PATRICK St. Louis Post-dispatch

JEFFERSON COUNTY • Four men com-

mitted a brutal assault here in 2013 to either join or advance within the white supremacist Aryan Circle gang, a federal indictment unsealed Thursday claims. Thomas B. Wilson, 43, of Villa Ridge; Daniel B. Jerome, 31, of Wentzville; Thomas Tisher, 34, of St Louis; and Dustin M. Haney, 28, of Hermann, were indicted Wednesday on one felony count of aggravated assault in aid of racketeering and a gun charge. All but Jerome have been arrested, federal prosecutors said. The indictment says the four, as well as “others known and unknown,” assaulted someone identified only as “C.B.” in Jefferson County on Nov. 9, 2013. The attack resulted “in serious bodily injury,” the indictment says. No other details of the attack were provided in the indictment or by authorities. Three of the men have prior felony convictions. In 2015, Wilson was sentenced in U.S. District Court to 6½ years in prison on a carjacking charge. The sentence was to run at the same time as a seven-year sentence in Madison County Circuit Court for home invasion with a firearm and for violating his federal supervised release

Trump keeps his focus on immigration CARAVANS • FROM A1

react as though the rocks were “rifles.” “This is an invasion,” Trump declared, as he has previously on a subject that has been shown to resonate with his base of Republican supporters. He made his comments at the White House in a speech that was billed as a response to caravans of migrants traveling slowly by foot toward the U.S. border. But Trump offered few details on how exactly he planned to overhaul an asylum system he claimed was plagued by “endemic abuse” that he said “makes a mockery of our immigration system.” U.S. immigration laws make clear that migrants seeking asylum may do so either at or between border crossings. But Trump said he would limit that to official crossing points. The U.S. also doesn’t have space at the border to manage the large-scale detention of migrants, with most facilities at capacity. Trump said the government would erect “massive tents” instead. His announcement marked Trump’s latest attempt to keep immigration frontand-center before Tuesday’s elections. Trump has spent the waning days of the campaign hammering the issue as he tries to energize GOP voters using the playbook that helped him win in 2016. In addition to deploying the military to the southern border to stave off the caravan, Trump announced plans to try to end the constitutionally protected right of birthright citizenship for children born in the U.S. He brought up immigration issues several times during a political rally Thursday night in Columbia, Mo. He railed against

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Migrants hitch a ride in a truck as a thousands-strong caravan of Central Americans hoping to reach the U.S. border moves through Oaxaca state in Mexico on Thursday. President Donald Trump has proposed new limits on those who might seek asylum in the U.S.

“birth tourism,” where mothers from abroad travel to America to have babies so they will automatically be U.S. citizens. And he denounced “chain migration,” where these new citizens then bring their extended families into the country. “You come into the country — you’re like 2 months old ... and you’re going to bring ’em all — your aunts and uncles and grandfathers and lots of people,” he said. The president announced Wednesday that he was considering deploying as many as 15,000 troops to the U.S.-Mexican border in response to the caravans — roughly double the number the Pentagon said it currently planned for a mission that has been criticized as unnecessary, with the caravans hundreds of miles away. Trump said Thursday that he was “not going to put up with” any violence directed at U.S. forces, warning that the

military would fight back. Rules for use of force by military police and soldiers who will be operating near the border have not been disclosed, but in all cases troops have the right of self-defense. Still, Mark Hertling, a retired Army general, wrote on Twitter after Trump’s speech that no military officer would allow a soldier to shoot an individual throwing a rock. “It would be an unlawful order,” he wrote, citing the Law of Land Warfare. Trump said Thursday that, under his order, migrants who enter the country would be placed in “massive tent cities” he plans to build while cases are processed. “We’re going to catch, we’re not going to release,” he said. Under current protocol, many asylumseekers are released while their cases make their way through backlogged courts — a process that can take years.

on a 2009 case involving a methamphetamine manufacturing conspiracy. Illinois prison records show Wilson has a tattoo of a skull and the word “white” on his left arm and a skull and “pride” on his right arm. After receiving drug treatment, Jerome was sentenced to five years of probation for a 2015 methamphetamine possession charge in St. Charles County Circuit Court. Tisher was sentenced to five years in prison in 2015 after being convicted by a St. Louis jury of trafficking in meth. Court records show Wilson was in the car when Tisher and others were stopped by police. The Aryan Circle was born in the Texas prison system in the mid-1980s, officials said, and has now spread in and out of state and federal prisons with concentrations in Missouri, Texas, Oklahoma and Louisiana. The gang enforces its rules against cooperating with law enforcement and promotes discipline through murder, assault, robbery and threats, officials said. The case was being investigated by federal and local law enforcement in Missouri and Texas, they said. Robert Patrick • 314-621-5154 @rxpatrick on Twitter RPatrick@post-dispatch.com

Critics said the speech seemed mostly designed to scare, with no specifics on what mechanisms Trump intended to use to push through his desired changes. Administration officials have said Trump intends to invoke the same authority he used to push through his controversial travel ban, but it’s not clear if that’s what he was doing with Thursday’s speech. “He’s really trying to scare the American public into thinking these are thousands of dangerous thugs,” said Greg Chen, of the American Immigration Lawyers Association. Trump and other administration officials have said those seeking asylum should come through legal ports of entry. But many migrants are unaware of that guidance, and official border crossings have grown increasingly clogged. Migrants who cross illegally are generally arrested and often seek asylum or some other form of protection. There is currently a backlog of more than 800,000 cases pending in immigration court. It remains unclear how many people currently en route to the U.S. will even make it to the border. The main group of about 4,000 migrants remains in southern Mexico, hundreds of miles from the border. A second, smaller group of 1,000 or so is more than 200 miles behind the first. A third band of about 500 from El Salvador has made it to Guatemala, and a fourth group of about 700 set out from the Salvadoran capital Wednesday. Similar caravans have gathered over the years and have generally dwindled by the time they reach the southern U.S. border. Trump has rejected the idea that he has been “fearmongering” and using the issue for political purposes, but Thursday he blamed Democrats for “incompetent, very, very stupid laws that we have.” He noted at one point, “Women want security.” Trump also tweeted a video Wednesday alleging, without evidence, that Democrats were responsible for allowing a homicidal immigrant into the U.S.

‘It’s too late’ for teen suspects in police killing to go home SHOOTING • FROM A1

eyes, too. Normally, when juveniles appear before her on their first offenses, she allows them to go home, she said, hoping the moment will serve as a wake-up call and set them straight. “But in this case, it’s too late,” she said after the emotional hearings, each lasting about 20 minutes. She ordered the teens held in custody as their cases make their way through court. At some point, a Harper judge will decide whether they will stand trial as adults. The hearings took place a few hours before visitation began for retired police Sgt. Ralph E. Harper at a funeral home a few miles away. After a funeral Mass Friday morning at St. Wenceslaus Catholic Church, the 33-year veteran of the force will be buried at Resurrection Cemetery in south St. Louis County. Colleagues told the Post-Dispatch he was a mentor, a jokester, a “teddy bear,” but someone you’d want there “when it hit the fan.” He’d been retired since 2007. On Monday, Harper, 67, was parking his car on Lackland Avenue about 7:30 a.m. when he was approached by the 16-yearold, armed and intent on robbery, authorities said. Harper had his own gun and exchanged shots with the robber. It wasn’t clear who fired first, but both were struck in the shootout. The would-be robber ran to a waiting SUV — stolen last month — which sped to Barnes-Jewish Hospital, authorities said. The shooter was dropped off to be treated for a gunshot wound to the wrist. The 15-year-old fled in the SUV, authorities said. Meanwhile, Harper called 911. He was

This photo provided by Marissa Woods shows her with sons Julian Mathews (left) and Justin Mathews.

rushed to the same hospital, where he died about two hours after the shooting. Officers later spotted the SUV, which fled from police until crashing into a building off Jefferson Avenue near Interstate 44. The 15-year-old and his 17-yearold brother were arrested there, though police say the older teen wasn’t present for the shooting of Harper. Officers found a .40-caliber gun inside the SUV after it crashed and believe Harper was shot with a .40-caliber gun. Police also found blood inside the getaway car, a law enforcement source said. The alleged shooter appeared before Ransom on Thursday, his right arm wrapped and supported by a sling. The teen’s mother, Wendy Washington, and father, John Garner, sat beside him. His

mother said that he played a vital role in his household, tending to his two younger siblings, and that his father lived just blocks away. “He helps take care of his brothers,” she said. “He feeds them and makes sure they do their homework before I get home from work.” She disputed accusations from prosecutors that he had dropped out of Confluence Academy on Oct. 1. She said she had documents to prove he had been suspended after being caught loitering in the halls too many times and was to return to school Tuesday — the day after the shooting. Minutes later, George and Marissa Woods entered the courtroom. Her son, 15-year-old Justin Mathews, sat next to them as the judge heard the prosecutors and defense attorneys argue whether he should be allowed to go home. Marissa Woods held her son’s hand on the table where they sat. The Post-Dispatch is not using the 16-year-old’s name because he is a juvenile, but Woods has spoken publicly about her sons’ alleged involvement in the crime. Her older son, Julian Mathews, was charged Tuesday with second-degree motor vehicle tampering and resisting arrest. He remains in custody in lieu of $30,000 cash-only bail. At 17, Julian Mathews is an adult under Missouri criminal law. At Thursday’s hearing for Justin, defense attorney Sarah Johnson argued that there was not enough probable cause to prove he was in the car when the shooting happened, that he knew the shooter planned to commit the crime or that he encouraged the shooter to do it. But prosecutor Carolyn Whitehorn said Justin had admitted driving the getaway car as well as providing the gun to the al-

leged shooter, who had asked if he could borrow it because he was looking to rob someone. Marissa Woods, 38, expressed sorrow for Harper’s death. “I know, and my deepest condolences go out to his family, a life was taken … a veteran police officer,” Woods said. She told the judge she believed her son needed to be at home, surrounded by family, while he waited for a judge to determine whether he should stand trial as an adult for his alleged crimes. The judge told Justin’s family that when it comes to serious accusations such as murder, juveniles aren’t typically released before their certification hearings. “I love you,” Marissa Woods said as her son disappeared behind a door to the courtroom reserved for inmates. Stay strong, she told him. “I will,” he said, his voice cracking. Later, Ransom removed her glasses, set them on her bench and grabbed a box of tissues from her desk. She wiped tears from her own eyes. “I have a son who is 18,” the judge said after the hearings. “Most of the kids that come through here remind me of my kid, and I can’t imagine being in the position of either family involved in something like this, the family of the juvenile or the victim’s family. It’s really tough to preside over these kids who have their whole lives in front of them. The community is suffering because of this. “We know that kids make impulsive decisions,” she added. “It just seems like today, it’s ramped up. It used to be that the main crime was car theft, and now we have very heinous offenses, and I just don’t know how to fix it.” Christine Byers • 314-340-8087 @christinedbyers on Twitter cbyers@post-dispatch.com


LOCAL

A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 11.02.2018

PHOTOS BY ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

ST. LOUIS > Store clerk killed in robbery • An armed robber opened fire inside a Dollar General store in St. Louis on Thursday afternoon, hitting and killing a store clerk, police said. The gunman entered the Dollar General store at North Grand Boulevard and Kossuth Avenue just after 1 p.m., police said. The store is in the Fairground neighborhood near Fairground Park. The store employees told police that a man wearing sunglasses came inside and announced a robbery, then began firing shots. One of the bullets struck a male store clerk, 40, who was later pronounced dead at the scene. Police said they did not believe the clerk was targeted. The gunman then fled the store. He left with nothing from the robbery, according to St. Louis Police Lt. Col. Rochelle Jones. The man was described as a black male, medium build, wearing a dark blue hooded sweatshirt, purple or blue sweatpants and a baseball cap with a red bill. He was carrying a silver-and-black handgun with an extended magazine. Authorities asked anyone with information to contact CrimeStoppers at 866-371-8477. Tipsters can remain anonymous and may be eligible for a reward. ST. LOUIS > Man rescued after jumping into river from bridge • A man was pulled alive from the Mississippi River on Thursday morning after crashing a car on the Stan Musial Veterans Memorial Bridge and then jumping into the water. He was in critical but stable condition after firefighters with the department’s Marine Unit Task Force unit plucked him from the river near the Poplar Street Bridge. Authorities were first called to a car crash about 8:30 a.m. on the bridge. While officers were on the way, they got another call saying the driver had gotten out of the car, climbed over a railing and jumped into the river. The bridge deck is about 75 feet above the water. The man, 43, was conscious and breathing when pulled from the river, which was high and moving quickly because of rain, according to St. Louis Fire Chief Dennis Jenkerson. He applauded firefighters for “a very admirable rescue of this gentleman.” FLORISSANT > Woman charged in fatal stabbing • A 19-year-old woman has been accused of stabbing her boyfriend to death last week in a home in Florissant. Mykia Caldwell was originally charged with first-degree domestic assault and armed criminal action Oct. 23, but the assault charge was upgraded to second-degree murder Thursday after her boyfriend Demartez Evers, 25, died from his injuries. Police say Caldwell and Evers got into an argument that turned violent in their shared home in the 1900 block of Aqueduct Drive in Florissant about 1:20 p.m. Oct. 22. Caldwell stabbed Evers twice — in the abdomen and the groin area — during a struggle, according to court documents. The Caldwell groin wound punctured his femoral artery, causing Evers to lose a large amount of blood and lose consciousness, the documents say. Evers was taken to a hospital in critical condition and died Tuesday. Caldwell is being held at the St. Louis County Jail. Her bail was set Oct. 23 at $150,000.

had been tampered with, then returned a short time later claiming his three pounds of pot had been taken, his plea says. When the postal carrier denied any knowledge of the pot, Williams lifted his shirt to show a black semi-automatic handgun, placed his hand on it and told the carrier to find another route, his plea says. The mail carrier took a photo of Williams’ vehicle, and officers later found him with 40 grams of pot, a stolen black .40-caliber pistol and $1,128 in cash, his plea says. Investigators later learned that multiple packages containing pot had been intercepted en route to Williams, and that he had sent or received about $41,000 via Walmart money transfers. JENNINGS > Gun charge filed against man pulled from stolen car • A man from Jennings was in federal court in St. Louis Thursday facing a federal gun charge and a claim he carjacked someone last week. The 2015 Dodge Challenger had been carjacked in St. Louis County Oct. 26 and was spotted Monday outside a home in the 9100 block of Huiskamp Avenue, a federal criminal complaint says. When Otis L. Perkins, 23, left the home and got into the Dodge, St. Louis County police officers told him to get out of the car, the complaint says. Instead, Perkins started the engine and put the car into gear before being pulled from the car, the complaint says. Perkins had a .45-caliber pistol in his waistband, the charges say, despite “numerous” prior felonies that meant he was barred from possessing a weapon. Court records show those include convictions on drug and weapons offenses. EAST ST. LOUIS > Bicyclist is fatally shot • A man riding a bicycle in East St. Louis was shot to death early Thursday. Stanley M. McDougler, 62, was pronounced dead at 1:30 a.m., according to St. Clair County Coroner Calvin Dye. His body was found on a front porch in the 700 block of North 69th Street. McDougler lived a few blocks away in the 6700 block of Mary Avenue in East St. Louis. Illinois State Police are investigating. Authorities asked anyone with information to call Illinois State Police at 618346-3990 or CrimeStoppers at 866-371-8477. Tipsters to CrimeStoppers can remain anonymous and may be eligible for a reward. EAST ST. LOUIS > Man pleads guilty to child porn charge • A former resident of O’Fallon, Ill., pleaded guilty to a federal charge here and admitted sharing child porn online, prosecutors said Thursday. Christopher R. Buse, 42, pleaded guilty to knowingly receiving child pornography over the internet. Buse, who moved to Staunton, Ill., from O’Fallon after the investigation began, admitted offering child porn through a peer-to-peer file sharing application, prosecutors said. Buse pleaded guilty without a plea agreement and faces

five to 20 years in prison when sentenced in February, prosecutors said. ST. LOUIS > Four charged in fatal shooting • Four people have now been charged in a Bevo Mill killing that authorities say began as a fake drug deal. The four were part of a plot to lure Jerome Boyd Jr. to a meet-up in April, then robbed and killed him, police say. Rachel Nixon, 29, of Webster Groves was charged Tuesday. Late Wednesday, prosecutors charged three others: Ammizabad Johnson, 27, of Richmond Heights; Karen Ann Quinn, 40, of St. Louis; and Darean Marshall, 25, of St. Louis. All were charged with second-degree murder, first-degree robbery and two counts Johnson of armed criminal action. All but Quinn have been arrested. Boyd, 36, was shot in the head and back April 15 inside a vehicle in the 5400 block of Gravois Avenue. Police say Boyd was lured to a spot on Gravois Avenue under the guise of a drug deal. After he showed up, Nixon got into Marshall the front passenger seat of Boyd’s SUV and told him to drive to another location a short distance away. When he arrived at the new spot, one of the co-defendants shot up the front engine compartment of Boyd’s vehicle. Someone else jumped into the back seat and shot Boyd in the back of the head. He also had bullet Nixon wounds in his hand and back. Authorities have not said who fired the shots. The defendants robbed Boyd, taking drugs and a radio amplifier, according to court documents. Boyd died at the scene. ST. LOUIS > Shooting victim identified • A shooting victim was found dead in a garage in the Academy neighborhood Wednesday afternoon. Police on Thursday identified the victim as Percy Kinzer, 39. Kinzer, of the 2300 block of North Kingshighway, was found dead about 4:40 p.m. Wednesday in the 5000 block of Maple Avenue. Police were called to a rear garage on Maple and found Kinzer inside. He suffered apparent gunshot wounds, police say. Paramedics pronounced him dead at the scene. His death is being investigated as a homicide. Authorities asked anyone with information to contact CrimeStoppers at 866-371-8477. Tipsters can remain anonymous and may be eligible for a reward.

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ST. LOUIS > Man who threatened mail carrier is sentenced • A St. Louis man who flashed a gun, pretended to be an undercover cop and threatened a pregnant mail carrier to try to find three pounds of marijuana missing from a package was sentenced Thursday in federal court to 37 months in prison. Marvin Williams, 43, pleaded guilty in June to being a felon in possession of a firearm, forcible assault with a firearm and possession with intent to distribute marijuana. He admitted claiming to be an undercover Williams officer and confronting the postal carrier on Aug. 9, 2017, in the 4700 block of McMillan Avenue with an empty Priority Mail Express package. He said the package

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St. Louis firefighters rescue a man from the Mississippi River Thursday after his car crashed on the Stan Musial Veterans Memorial Bridge. Police say they received a call that the man jumped into the river after crashing his car about 8:30 a.m.

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LOCAL

11.02.2018 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A7

Belleville bishop’s talks to children Man is charged with about Santa, Halloween irk parents robbery, kidnapping ‘It’s something that just doesn’t need to happen,’ one father complains BY NASSIM BENCHAABANE St. Louis Post-dispatch

BELLEVILLE • Students at a Catho-

lic school here heard a startling story from their bishop this week just in time for Halloween when he told them Santa Claus wasn’t real. Boyd Ahlers, a father of two students in fifth and sixth grade at Our Lady Queen of Peace, took to Facebook to voice his concern after his children told him Belleville Bishop Edward Braxton told them during a school visit that Santa is made up. Ahlers was one of dozens of parents expressing frustration online Wednesday. His children had s t i l l b e l i eved i n Santa Claus and were “crushed,” he Braxton wrote. Ahlers shared the post with the Post-Dispatch on Wednesday but declined to comment further. “Many children still believed and came home crushed,” Ahlers wrote. “In many cases he took the last piece of childhood memories from many kids and their parents.” Braxton’s comments were apparently made to students during his visit to Our Lady Queen of Peace Grade School on Tuesday. He told an assembly of fifth- and sixth-grade students that Santa wasn’t real and told younger students at a separate assembly that it was wrong for them to dress up for Halloween. “It’s not the end of the world, but it’s something that just doesn’t need to happen,” said Todd Santanello,

whose daughter is a fourth-grade student at Our Lady Queen of Peace. “It’s very upsetting for parents and kids. “It has nothing to do with church or school or anything. It’s something for parents to talk to their kids about.” A representative of the Braxton’s office did not respond to a request for an interview and directed inquiries to the diocese education staff, who did not respond Wednesday. Officials with Our Lady Queen of Peace could not be reached for comment Wednesday evening. Santanello’s daughter had spent several days talking about how excited she was for the bishop’s first visit to her school in years, he said. Her mood had changed when he picked her up Tuesday. “The very first thing she talked about was Halloween and how kids shouldn’t be dressing up in costumes,” Santanello said. He said his daughter wasn’t visibly upset, but “her heart was a little broken,” because the bishop had told students not to celebrate Halloween. “He kind of chastised the kids for dressing up for Halloween,” Santanello said. “He treated the whole Halloween concept as something kids shouldn’t be doing.” Later that evening, Santanello talked in person and online with dozens of other upset parents. He learned the bishop had apparently told older students at a different assembly that Santa wasn’t real. Santanello wrote an email to school Principal Michelle Tidwell and she responded right away. He said he got the sense that school staff were “blindsided” by the bishop’s comments. “I’m quite sure that they were not aware of what was going to happen beforehand,” he said. “Consequently, today they had to field questions about stuff that wasn’t

necessary.” The school hosted a Halloween party for students Wednesday, but the bishop’s comments were the subject of conversation as parents took their children out to trick-ortreat in the evening, Santanello said. “They had a Halloween party at the school and so they were able to move on and take their minds off what was said the day before,” he said. “But kids don’t forget something like that. It just stirs up a big pot of trouble that nobody really needs.” Braxton also visited Blessed Sacrament school Wednesday but did not discuss Halloween or Santa Claus, Principal Claire Hatch said. She said that students from kindergarten through eighth grade asked Braxton a wide range of questions, with younger children asking about his hobbies and duties as bishop and older students asking about subjects as serious as the church abuse scandal. Hatch said the discussions had been “positive.” “It was a pretty positive visit,” Hatch said. “I think there may have been concerns before he came because of what he may have said at other schools, but at our school his visit went very well.” On Thursday, the diocese’s superintendent of schools, Jonathan Birdsong, released a statement that disputes the versions of what Braxton told students that have been circulating on social media. Birdsong’s statement says that he was with Braxton during the visit to Our Lady Queen of Peace and that the bishop talked with the students about how Santa Claus originated from the story of St. Nicholas and how Halloween’s roots went back to the All Hollow’s Eve, the day before the celebration of All Saints’ Day.

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co-defendants had been charged. Johnson lives in the ST. LOUIS • A man at- 4000 block of St. Louis ta c ke d whi l e r i d i n g Avenue. According to court MetroLink tried to crawl away after being stomped documents, the victim and punched, but his at- told police he got into a tackers pulled him back dispute with a group of onto the train so he people, including Johnson, while riding on a Metrocouldn’t escape. Link train. JohnOne of the atson and the others tackers even stole stomped, kicked the wallet of the and punched the victim, 45, who man, then stole his suffered scrapes wallet. and abrasions, acWhen he tried to cording to court crawl off the train, documents. Johnson the attackers pulled The attack was Oct. 2 and ended at the him back onto the train. Eighth and Pine streets Police didn’t say how the stop, where police were victim got away or how called. A surveillance long he was held. Associate Circuit Judge video supports the vicNicole Colbert-Botchway tim’s account, police say. On Wednesday, St. ordered that a condition Louis prosecutors charged of bail for Johnson was Ernest Darnell Johnson, that he stay away from the 20, with second-degree victim and all MetroLink robbery and second-de- property. gree kidnapping. John- Joel Currier of the Post-Dispatch son’s bail was set at contributed to this report. $100,000, cash only. Kim Bell • 314-340-8115 It wasn’t immedi- @kbellpd on Twitter ately clear whether any kbell@post-dispatch.com BY KIM BELL St. Louis Post-dispatch

Police said he was one of ‘top shooters,’ but charges didn’t stick — until now Roy has previously said that one of the guns matched the toddler’s ST. LOUIS • A Jennings shooting. The Hamptons were man once identified as one of the St. Louis area’s “top charged in St. Louis Cirshooters,” and blamed for cuit Court in that shoota road rage shooting that ing, but those charges injured a toddler, pleaded were dropped because of guilty Thursday to a fed- witness problems. That made William Hampton a eral gun charge. candidate for a list William Hampof so-called “top ton, 20, admitshooters,” federal ted that St. Louis prosecutors have police officers resaid. sponding to a reHe was indicted port of “suspicious in May in U.S. Disoccupants” of a trict Court on a felvehicle in the 3800 Hampton ony charge of being block of Ashland Avenue found him asleep a drug user in possession in the driver’s seat with a of a firearm and pleaded semiautomatic pistol with guilty to that charge an extended, 32-round Thursday. He could face clip in his lap. Hamp- years in prison when senton also admitted that he tenced in February, but his smoked pot before be- attorney and prosecutors ing found and had mari- did not agree on a range of juana and heroin in the bag possible prison time in the plea agreement. found with him. The “top shooters” list, Assistant U.S. Attorney Jennifer Roy said in court also known as the most that Hampton’s cousin violent offenders proJerry Hampton was found gram, is designed to adasleep in the back seat with dress gun violence, para gun in his hand and one ticularly nonfatal shootin his lap. The car, a gold ings, officials told the Toyota Avalon, was stolen Post-Dispatch earlier this and matched the descrip- year. Those on the list are tion of a car involved in a suspected of a shooting or road rage shooting the day the use of a gun in another before that left a 3-year- violent crime. old in critical condition. Robert Patrick • 314-621-5154 The toddler ultimately @rxpatrick on Twitter survived. RPatrick@post-dispatch.com BY ROBERT PATRICK St. Louis Post-dispatch

Nassim Benchaabane • 314-340-8167 @NassimBnchabane on Twitter nbenchaabane@post-dispatch.com

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NATION

A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 11.02.2018

Google workers say ‘time is up’ on harassment Around the world, thousands walk off job to push for women’s rights BY MICHAEL LIEDTKE Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO • Carrying signs that included a mocking reference to the company’s original “Don’t be evil” motto, thousands of Google employees around the world walked off the job Thursday to protest what they said was the tech giant’s mishandling of sexual misconduct allegations against executives. From Tokyo, Singapore and London to New York, Seattle and San Francisco, highly paid engineers and other workers staged walkouts of about an hour, reflecting rising #MeToo-era frustration among women over misconduct in heavily male Silicon Valley. In Dublin, organizers

used megaphones to address the outdoor crowd of men and women. In New York, there appeared to be as many men as women out in the streets, while in Cambridge, Mass., men outnumbered women by perhaps 6 to 1. “Time is up on sexual harassment!” organizer Vicki Tardif Holland shouted at a gathering of about 300 people in Cambridge. “Time is up on systemic racism. Time is up on abuses of power. Enough is enough!” About 1,000 Google workers in San Francisco swarmed into a plaza in front of the city’s historic Ferry Building, chanting, “Women’s rights are workers’ rights!” Thousands also turned out at Google’s

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Google employees walk off the job Thursday to protest what they said was the tech company’s mishandling of sexual misconduct allegations against executives.

Mountain View, Calif., headquarters. The demonstrations reflected a sense among some of the 94,000 employees at Google and its parent, Alphabet Inc., that the company isn’t living up to its professed ideals, as expressed in its “Don’t be evil” slogan and its corporate code of conduct: “Do

the right thing.” “We have the eyes of many companies looking at us,” Google employee Tanuja Gupta said in New York. “We’ve always been a vanguard company, so if we don’t lead the way, nobody else will.” The protests unfolded a week after The New York Times detailed allegations

of sexual misconduct about the creator of Google’s Android software, Andy Rubin. The newspaper said Rubin received a $90 million severance package in 2014 after Google concluded the accusations were credible. Rubin has denied the allegations. The story also disclosed allegations of sexual misconduct against other executives, including Richard DeVaul, a director at the Google-affiliated lab that created self-driving cars. DeVaul had remained at the lab after the accusations surfaced a few years ago but resigned on Tuesday without severance, Google said. In an unsigned statement, the Google protesters called for an end to forced arbitration in harassment and discrimination cases, a practice that requires employees to give up their right to sue and

often includes confidentiality agreements. Protest organizers also demanded aggressive steps for gender pay equity and inclusive hiring practices. In a statement, Google CEO Sundar Pichai said the company is reviewing all “constructive ideas.” Beyond Google, Facebook has faced criticism over pay inequity and discrimination. The protests at Google are the latest sign that f r u s t ra t i o n s a m o n g women are reaching a boiling point, said Stephanie Creary, a professor who specializes in workplace and diversity issues at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School. “People simply aren’t willing to put up with it anymore,” Creary said. “The workers at Google seem to be saying, ‘How is it that we are still having to have this conversation?’”

Winfrey, Pence offer competing visions of Georgia values

DIGEST Proposed campus abuse policies criticized Dozens of people who say they were victims of sexual assault by doctors at three major universities are urging Education Secretary Betsy DeVos to make campuses accountable for investigating abuse allegations. The Education Department is considering guidelines that could change the way allegations are investigated. DeVos has called for a “more balanced approach” that respects the rights of the accused, especially students. A letter signed by 80 people was released Thursday. They say they were assaulted by Larry Nassar of Michigan State University, George Tyndall of the University of Southern California or the late Richard Strauss of Ohio State University. Nassar is in prison, and Tyndall denies the allegations. Death toll hits 10 from viral outbreak in New Jersey • A 10th person died amid a viral outbreak at a pediatric care center while a different strain of the virus was found at another facility in the state, New Jersey health officials said Thursday. The state Health Department confirmed in a statement that a “medically fragile child” who died at Wanaque Center for Nursing and Rehabilitation had the adenovirus infection. There have been 28 cases associated with the respiratory virus at the center, where the affected children had compromised immune systems. Officials have said there is not a wider public health concern stemming from the outbreak. The outbreak won’t be considered over until four weeks without a new illness go by. Minnesota mine wins permits but faces challenges • Minnesota regulators granted on Thursday key permits to the long-planned PolyMet copper-mining project that’s opposed by environmentalists who fear it could someday foul waters, including Lake Superior. The state Department of Natural Resources issued permits to PolyMet Mining Inc. for its NorthMet project in northeastern Minnesota. The project needs permits from other agencies and is likely to face court challenges. Environmentalists have opposed the mine for fear it could pollute pristine waters and destroy habitat for gray wolves and Canada lynx. PolyMet contends it can operate the proposed mine near Hoyt Lakes and Babbitt without harming the environment while creating hundreds of jobs.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

MARIETTA, GA. • In a

rousing speech in the Republican-leaning suburbs of Atlanta, Oprah Winfrey urged voters on Thursday to make history by backing Democratic gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams in next week’s election. Winfrey called Abrams a “changemaker” who represents the values of all Georgians. “I am here today because Stacey Abrams cares about the things that matter,” she said to a mostly female audience north of downtown Atlanta. Seve n ty- f ive m i l e s north, Vice President Mike Pence stood alongside Abrams’ opponent, Brian Kemp, in Dalton, and mocked Winfrey, a billionaire media icon, as just another liberal outsider trying to impose on Republi-

can-run Georgia. “Stacey Abrams is being bankrolled by Hollywood liberals,” Pence said, after drawing boos when he mentioned that “Oprah is in town” and noted that actor Will Ferrell was recently in the state for Democrats. “I’d like to remind Stacey and Oprah and Will Ferrell, I’m kind of a big deal, too,” Pence said, adding “a message for all Stacey Abrams’ liberal friends: This ain’t Hollywood. This is Georgia.” The competing scenes — from the candidates, to the audiences, to the headliner guests — underscore the choice Georgia voters face Tuesday in one of the nation’s premier midterm matchups. After Thursday’s dueling outsiders, former President Barack Obama will follow on Friday for Abrams. President

bastes Abrams as a tool of “socialists” and “billionaires” who “want to turn Georgia into California.” Both candidates have taken to describing the race as a battle for “the soul of our state.” Winfrey sought to cut through the party-line framing. The entertainment icon, who rarely makes political endorsements, drew cheers when she said she was a registered independent who was not there at anyone’s request. “I paid to come here myself, and I approved this message,” Winfrey said, explaining that she had called Abrams to say she wanted to offer assistance. Kemp is trying to extend the Republican domination in Georgia, which hasn’t elected a Democrat as governor since 1998.

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Tennessee inmate put to death in electric chair • A Tennessee inmate’s final words were “let’s rock” before he became the first man executed in the electric chair in that state since 2007. He was put to death for the killings of two men during a drug deal-turned-robbery decades ago. Edmund Zagorski, 63, was pronounced dead at 7:26 p.m. Thursday at a Nashville maximum-security prison, officials said. In opting for the electric chair over a lethal injection as Tennessee allowed him, Zagorski had argued it would be a quicker and less painful way to die. Nationwide, only 14 other people have been put to death in the electric chair since 2000. Interior Department sets July 1 for reorganization • The U.S. Interior Department says it wants to have its newly reorganized regions up and running by July 1. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke’s plan calls for realigning the department in 12 unified regions and relocating many decision-makers from Washington to field offices. The new boundaries are based on rivers and ecosystems rather than state borders. Department officials say that will lead to better management. Critics say the reorganization will make it harder for state officials to communicate with department officials.

Donald Trump will appear with Kemp on Sunday. More than 1.5 million of the state’s almost 7 million registered voters have cast ballots already. Abrams would be the first black female governor in American history, and she has sought the post as an unapologetic liberal trying to draw new voters to the polls and prove that Georgia’s growth and diversity make it a legitimate two-party battleground. She touts her experience working with Republicans as a state legislative leader, but she doesn’t back down on her promises to expand Medicaid, prioritize public education and push for tighter gun restrictions. Kemp is a staunch conservative who has embraced Trump and the administration’s hard line on immigration. He wields guns in his ads and lam-

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Michigan forms team to address funeral home problems • Officials in Michigan announced Thursday that the governor has created a team to address funeral home problems after authorities recently found remains of dozens of fetuses at two Detroit funeral homes. The team will include members from multiple state agencies. Police have been investigating Detroit’s shuttered Cantrell Funeral Home after mummified remains of 10 fetuses and a full-term infant were found hidden last month in a ceiling. Another Detroit business, the Perry Funeral Home, is under investigation after authorities found 36 fetuses in boxes and 27 others in freezers. From news services

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NATION

11.02.2018 • FriDay • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-DiSPaTCH • A9

Synagogue suspect pleads not guilty BY MARYCLAIRE DALE associated Press

PITTSBURGH • The truck driver accused of gunning down 11 people at a Pittsburgh synagogue pleaded not guilty Thursday to federal charges that could put him on death row, as funerals for the victims of the deadliest anti-Semitic attack in American history continued for a third day. Robert Bowers, 46, was arraigned one day after a grand jury issued a 44-count indictment charging him with murder, hate crimes, obstructing the practice of religion and other crimes. It was his second brief appearance in a federal courtroom since the weekend massacre at the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh’s Squirrel Hill neighborhood. “Yes!” Bowers said in a loud voice when asked if he ASSOCIATED PRESS

Chatham University students comfort each other Thursday at a makeshift memorial outside the Tree of Life synagogue dedicated to the 11 people killed Oct. 27 while worshipping in Pittsburgh’s Squirrel Hill neighborhood.

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understood the charges. Authorities say Bowers raged against Jews during and after the massacre. He remains jailed without bail. Bowers, who was shot and wounded during a gunbattle that injured four police officers, walked into court under his own power, his left arm heavily bandaged. He was in a wheelchair at his first court appearance Monday. Bowers frowned as the charges were read but did not appear to have a reaction as a federal prosecutor announced he could face a death sentence. One of his federal pub-

lic defenders, Michael Novara, said Bowers pleaded not guilty, “as is typical at this stage of the proceedings.” Bowers had been set for a preliminary hearing on the evidence, but federal prosecutors instead took the case to a grand jury. The panel issued the indictment as funerals continued for the victims, including a husband and wife married at Tree of Life 62 years ago. Marc Simon, the son of Bernice and Sylvan Simon, recalled his parents as a “beacon of light” whose example can help “elimi-

nate the hate that led to their untimely deaths.” Hundreds of mourners turned out for the funeral, according to the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Family members recalled the Simons as dedicated to their faith and one another. Their daughter, Michelle Simon Weis, said she enjoyed going with her mother to Costco, where Bernice, 84, made sure to try the food samples. Weis said she dreamed her father, 86, could now drive a sports car as fast as he wanted without “Mom telling him to slow down.” The day’s other funeral was being held for Dr. Richard Gottfried, a dentist who worked part-time at a clinic treating refugees and immigrants. The oldest victim, Rose Mallinger, 97, will be honored at the last service Friday. Her daughter was injured in the attack. Meanwhile, 911 operators who were on duty Saturday morning described how they could hear gunshots and screaming as the rampage unfolded. The operators spoke to media outlets on Thursday. Bruce Carlton, who took the initial call from Tree of Life Rabbi Jeffrey Myers, said he wanted to keep Myers on the phone without revealing his position to the gunman. “I didn’t want him to speak. I tried not to speak. I didn’t want the gunman to hear him. I didn’t want the gunman to hear me,” Carlton told KDKA-TV. He said the call “seemed so surreal, like it wasn’t happening. Time seemed to speed up, time seemed to slow down.”

After massacre, painstaking and sacred care for the dead BY ADAM GELLER associated Press

PITTSBURGH • As the

first funerals for the victims of the Pittsburgh massacre began, two rabbis and five other volunteers approached the sawhorses cordoning off the Tree of Life synagogue, and an FBI agent led them into the crime scene. Inside the desecrated temple, the men donned white forensic coveralls, face masks and gloves, and set to work. Judaism asks the living to take special care of the dead, and this group had a sacred duty to fulfill: gather up every drop of blood and other bodily traces of the 11 people killed in the deadliest attack against Jews in U.S. history. “The Jewish law is that everything that belonged to the body needs to be buried, so we do our best,” one of the group’s leaders, Rabbi Elisar Admon, said Tuesday.

The work is meticulous and mentally taxing, carried out with implements as ordinary as wipes and paper towels. Judaism is very specific about death and how it should be handled, whatever the circumstances. When a loved one dies, religious law requires that representatives of the living accompany the body until burial. In a ritual known as tahara, the remains are carefully washed and placed in a white shroud. Jewish law mandates that the burial take place as soon as possible. But the scale of the violence wrought by a gunman Saturday has placed an extraordinary responsibility on those dedicated to this work, all volunteers. The victims included one of their own, Jerry Rabinowitz, a doctor who had worked with the group in the past to prepare bodies for burial. Recovering and preparing a body for burial are traditionally done by the local chapter of the burial society called Chevra Kadisha, led in Pittsburgh by an Orthodox rabbi, Daniel Wasserman. He works alongside Admon, who, as a member of Israel-based Zaka International, spent many years in his home country recovering bodies at the scenes of accidents and terrorist attacks. All those volunteering earn their living doing other jobs. In addition to Wasserman and Admon, who teaches at a local religious school, the group at

the Tree of Life included a doctor, a house painter and a paramedic. Their work began hours after Saturday’s attack. Late that night, the FBI allowed Wasserman and Admon inside the synagogue. The men drew themselves a map, showing the precise spot where each of the victims was killed. Then they spent most of the night accompanying the bodies as they were removed to the medical examiner’s office. “I’ll tell you the truth, Saturday night was very tough. I came home and I just started crying,” said Admon, choking back tears. The task of recovering remains, he said, is best undertaken with a minimum of thinking, and a focus on the work itself. FBI agents went to great lengths to accommodate the volunteers, bringing additional lighting into the room they were working in on Tuesday and providing safety clothing and other equipment, Admon said. As the investigation continued all around them, the volunteers finished removing remains from one room Tuesday but will be going back as allowed by the FBI. Most of the funerals will be over before the volunteers can complete their work. That means that the remnants recovered from the synagogue will probably not be placed in the victims’ caskets. They will instead be buried separately at the cemetery, with markers listing the names of the dead.

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A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , 1 8 7 8

FRIDAy • 11.02.2018 • A10 RAY FARRIS PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER

• GILBERT BAILON EDITOR • TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

Make Stenger behave County executive’s ongoing shenanigans underscore need to approve ballot propositions.

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Tuesday’s election easily. We hope his t. Louis County Executive Steve complacency isn’t misplaced, because Stenger seems to know no bounds in his obsession with thwarting the none of his challengers are fit for the job. Yet Stenger is willing to devote hundreds County Council’s will. He seems to be doing his best to convince county voters of thousands of campaign dollars to fight Prop B, which a strong bipartisan majority that they should vote for anyone but him, of the council approved for placement on which is a terrible idea considering how the ballot over Stenger’s veto. County Prop unacceptable his opponents on Tuesday’s B — not to be confused with ballot are. the Missouri statewide Prop This newspaper still B on raising the minimum recommends voting for wage — would place restricStenger in spite of Stenger. tions on some of the county But we also strongly recomexecutive’s fund-managemend that voters go to the ment powers, requiring him polls with their eyes wide to get council approval before open about his penchant for making certain intra-departmischief and political sabomental transfers. tage. They should vote for The council seeks these him, but they also should restrictions because Stenger vote yes for the ballot proprepeatedly tries to circumositions designed by the vent the council’s will and County Council to counter use his transfer authority to Stenger’s worst tendencies. Steve Stenger bludgeon council members Those are propositions 1, 2, B and C, whose approval we recommended into submission. He has tried to withhold council operating funds — necessary to the on Oct. 21. council’s ability to function — out of spite All indications are that the council and when members reject his pet projects. Stenger will have to work together for the Most local governments don’t need next four years. The only way to make the anything like Prop B because lawmakers relationship workable is for county votand the executive branch respect the need ers to issue the same stinging rebuke to for checks and balances between the two. Stenger at the polls that the council itself St. Louis County’s Republican and Demodid earlier this year with its repeated veto cratic council members are unusually overrides and other measures designed to united in their demand that Stenger stop restrict his power. A strong yes vote on the propositions would serve notice to Stenger meddling and allow them to conduct their business. that voters are tired of his antics and want A strong yes vote for these county a stronger system of checks and balances propositions would send a much-needed in place. message to Stenger that his expected reStenger appears reluctant to spend a election comes with a major caveat: Stay in dime of his own prolific campaign funds your lane. to promote his own re-election, complacent in the assumption that he will win

The ‘invasion’ that isn’t Trump is using troops at the border to promote a campaign stunt.

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for legal entry. No troops were needed. here is no “invasion” of the Trump and his surrogates have made United States underway by a various false assertions about what he stalled caravan of Central Amerihas called an “invasion.” They made cans gradually dissipating in unfounded claims that the migrants southern Mexico. There is no security purpose in sending thousands of American are primarily criminals, or diseased, or have been infiltrated by Middle Easterntroops to the Texas border. The exaggeraers. Some fear mongers have claimed, tions amount to nothing more than an bizarrely, that Democrats are “funding” insidious campaign stunt, a Trumpian the caravan. version of the “October surprise.” Others — including a guest on Fox BusiIn this nation of immigrants — who happen to include first lady Melania Trump and her parents — President Donald Trump is using the topic of immigration to divide Americans and inflame bigotry and fear. The goal is to drive up Republican turnout in Tuesday’s midterm elections. “There is no invasion. No one is coming to get you. There is nothing at all to worry CAROLYN VAN HOUTEN • Washington Post about,” Fox News Migrants traveling in a caravan toward the United States border anchor Shepard take a rest along a road in hopes of hitching a ride on a passing Smith told viewers vehicle in San Pedro Tapanatepec, Mexico, before continuing Monday, labeling their walk north on Monday. these hysterics a pre-election ploy. ness Network — have blamed philanthroThe implications go beyond policy, pist and Democratic mega-donor George beyond politics, to the very core of who Soros, who is Jewish. The anti-Semitic we are as a nation. It’s urgent that voters gunman accused of killing 11 people at a rebuke this divisive tactic, and rebuke it Pittsburgh synagogue Saturday referred to strongly. a migrant “invasion” before declaring his Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign intention to take action. drew heavily on tropes of “criminal” The Pentagon said it would start migrants invading America. With predeploying 5,200 troops this week to the election polls showing congressional southern border to confront walking Republicans in trouble, he is desperate migrants who won’t arrive for weeks, if at to make a campaign issue of the Central all. This will put the U.S. military presence American migrants. on the border at more than 7,000 troops Many plan to reach the United States. — about the number currently deployed in An estimated 2,200 have applied for asyIraq and Syria. Trump said Wednesday the lum in Mexico. Given the group’s rate of deployment could reach 15,000 troops. depletion, having dropped below 4,000 This isn’t about security. Trump is from a peak of about 7,000, it’s far from clear how many would actually make it the misusing the military for political optics in promotion of presidential deception. Votremaining 900 miles to the nearest U.S. ers of conscience on Tuesday should reject border point. each and every candidate who doesn’t A similar caravan last spring dissipated reject this spectacle of bigotry and lies. to a few hundred by the time they reached the U.S., where they were directed to apply

See editorial cartoons from around the country online at stltoday.com/opinion

yOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS Independent committee reviews judges’ performance

President’s rhetoric rouses people into violence

As chair of Missouri’s Judicial Performance Review Committee, I appreciate the editorial board encouraging voters to finish their ballot on Tuesday by voting on the retention of judges who were selected under Missouri’s Non-Partisan Court Plan. Information about the judges and the extent to which they complied with judicial performance standards during their current term of office can be found at YourMissouriJudges.org. However, I would like to clarify two matters in the Oct. 19 editorial on this subject. First, it is the Missouri Judicial Performance Review Committee — not the Missouri Bar — that reviews the performance of merit-selected judges up for retention and makes the findings (The Missouri Bar publishes the findings). We are an independent committee, established by Supreme Court rule under the court’s constitutional authority. The committee, which includes nonlawyers, lawyers and three retired judges, conducts extensive reviews based on surveys of jurors (where applicable) and lawyers who have appeared before the judge, as well as examples of each judge’s written opinions. Second, the committee’s work is about making sure the people of Missouri have the best judges who are fair, impartial and skilled. It’s in the people’s hands to make those decisions. That is why the committee does not make retention recommendations. The editorial noted low ratings concerning two St. Louis-area trial judges. Our committee found by majority vote that all the appellate judges and all but one of the trial judges complied with accepted judicial performance standards. How the voters act on that and other information when they cast their judicial retention election votes is up to them. Dale C. Doerhoff • Jefferson City Chair, Missouri Judicial Performance Review Committee

President Donald Trump’s violent rhetoric is giving energy to racists and antiSemites. Those who aren’t in denial would know that an increase in the number of hate crimes during the past two years has been the result. Now the former party of Lincoln has drawn white nationalists, neo-Nazis and their sympathizers into its orbit. The president’s defenders who dismiss the fact that haters have been roused into violence by his vitriolic language are either dishonest or morally blind. Robert McElyea • Chesterfield

Need more prosecutions of gun crimes Regarding the editorial “Death at the Tree of Life” (Nov. 1): If guns were the problem, there would be mass shootings of civilians daily in Israel. Here is a country that I have been to where 18-year-old adults walk around with automatic weapons, where bus drivers are armed and where many civilians have licenses to carry weapons. You go into a grocery store and you have your bag checked and there are security guards as well. But you don’t see mass shootings like we have here. Why? Because it’s not the guns. It’s the people. More people are killed by alcoholinduced drivers but all we do is say if you are 21, have at it. Buy as much as you want to drink. When someone kills someone in an alcohol-related incident we don’t go after the alcohol or the car, we go after the driver, yet when someone is shot we go after the gun. When will we face facts that a gun is a tool, and until you go after the people misusing the tool, nothing will change? If someone buys a gun legally to give to someone who can’t pass the background check, that is 10 years in prison, yet that crime is rarely prosecuted. Since that is how many criminals get their weapons, maybe it’s time we asked why so few prosecutions? We have zero tolerance for bullying in school but not zero tolerance for people buying guns for others that should not have them. Can you tell me why that makes sense? How about zero tolerance mandated by law for prosecutors and judges? Marc Schoenfeld • Chesterfield

Robinson abandons hope of finding common ground Believing that others are absolutely wrong and one’s own way is absolutely right does not give hope for a positive conversation at home, at work or in any political discussions. In his column Oct. 31, Eugene Robinson declares,“ ‘Both sides’ are not responsible for the horrific political terrorism we have seen this past week. Only the right is to blame.” Beyond the arrogance of this statement, Robinson leaves no room for acknowledging any point of view other than his own. He abandons any hope of finding common ground for resolving differences. So much for the “conversation.” Rather than attempt to reach out to solve a terrible problem this country faces, Robinson seems determined to stoke up emotions and promote disharmony. In that regard, perhaps Robinson and President Donald Trump have more in common than either would care to admit. Ray Edwards • Wildwood

U.S. is complicit in Saudis’ destruction of Yemeni families According to news reports, about onehalf of the Yemeni population is starving to death as a result of the Saudi war on Yemen, a war which is critically supported by arms sales from U.S. manufacturers. I have heard the rationale that we are supporting this carnage because Iran has ties to the Yemeni rebels, so that opposing the rebels in this tiny country somehow will adversely affect Iran. To me, it is simply beyond belief that this scale of suffering and death will influence Iranian politicians in any way that is positive for the United States. President Donald Trump’s other rationale for our role in this tragedy is that U.S. jobs will be lost if we stop selling arms to the Saudis. That may be true, but in my opinion, job retention is not a good enough excuse for our totally immoral complicity in the ongoing destruction of Yemeni families by starvation, disease and indiscriminate bombing. We have to stop supporting this war. Dr. Gail Ahumada • St. Louis

A reminder to see and appreciate the beauty of life Thank you for publishing Steve Givens’ commentary “Overcome issues by choosing joy” (Oct. 27). It is a reminder, not only for Catholics, but for people of all faiths, to see and appreciate the beauty of life. Givens challenges all of us to keep our minds and hearts open to accept and love people of all backgrounds. In spite of the hatred shown by the postal bombs and synagogue killings, we can find joy in the love, compassion and forgiveness that have followed. These gifts should help to bring us together. Joe Rabe • Kirkwood Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON Editorial Page Editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382

STLtoday.com/opinion Find us at facebook/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial I know that my retirement will make no difference in its cardinal principles, that it will always fight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always fight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisfied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, E-MAIL 900 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 letters@post-dispatch.com Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days.


OTHER VIEWS

11.02.2018 • FRIDAY • M 1

25 YEARS AGO TODAY ON THE EDITORIAL PAGE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A11

DEADBEAT DEVELOPERS IN ST. LOUIS COUNTY • Escrow accounts and performance bonds. Those terms probably mean little to the average residents of a new subdivision in St. Louis County — until promised street work isn’t done and the escrow accounts for the purpose come up empty. The real issue remains protecting homeowners and taxpayers from paying for deadbeat developers. Access the full item at stltoday.com/opinion

The latest lesson in Trumponomics 101 President takes credit for anything good, blames Democrats for anything bad. DANA MILBANK Washington Post

WILLIAM F. NICOL • Via CNN

William F. Nicol says he took these photos of a van in Hallandale Beach, Fla., on Feb. 12, 2017. The van was taken by authorities in connection with the arrest of Cesar Sayoc in a federal mail-bombing case on Oct. 26.

Kool-Aid charisma

A leader with the right charms can get some followers to do anything. jaywalking, or serious felonies, like shooting people in Manhattan. TOD ROBBERSON The president, Kavanaugh wrote, St. Louis shouldn’t be compelled to answer Post-Dispatch in court for his transgressions because he’s just too busy running the country. I have a Republican tennis buddy, Forty years ago this month in Dennis Ayden, who decided to Jonestown, Guyana, more than challenge Sen. Roy Blunt on this 900 people blindly followed very question. He wanted to know religious cult leader Jim Jones’ where Blunt draws the line. orders and drank themselves to “I am a ‘Never Trump’ conserdeath with cyanide-laced Koolvative,” Dennis wrote to Blunt. Aid. Seemingly smart, thinking, “I would like a specific response rational people can do incredibly … and not just the usual political dumb and irrational things when blah, blah response: Without passthey fall under the charms of a ing any judgment on the guilt or charismatic leader. innocence of the current president President Donald Trump is to any crime, if there is sufficient fully aware how powerful his evidence for an indictment, do charisma, popularity and powers you believe that a sitting president of persuasion can be. Luckily, the should be indicted for any, or all, vast majority of Americans are too of the following crimes: murder; smart to drink his brand of Koolviolation of his oath to defend the Aid. But if he didn’t understand Constitution by obstruction of his own manipulative powers, why justice; conspiracy with an enemy else would he state during the 2016 to interfere in a U.S. election; tax presidential campaign: “The polls, fraud; money laundering; or any they say I have the most loyal peolesser felony?” ple. Did you ever see that? Where Blunt’s “autoreply,” boilerplate I could stand in the middle of Fifth response was as blah, Avenue and shoot someblah as they get. He body, and I wouldn’t lose thanked Dennis for any voters, okay? It’s like sharing his thoughts incredible.” and recognized “that Yes, truly incredible. this is a critical time in And frightening. I speak our nation’s history.” regularly by phone to But he never got even a reader who firmly close to answering believes Trump was sent — or even acknowlby God to fulfill biblical edging — Dennis’ prophecy. question. Blunt’s Oct. In all likelihood, 6 confirmation vote Trump won’t shoot for Kavanaugh pretty anyone on Fifth Avenue. much provided the But the Supreme Court Jim Jones senator’s answer. Yes, could eventually find Trump can pretty itself weighing what, much do anything he wants. exactly, are the limits by which the The idea of a member of the president may be held accountable executive branch shooting someunder the law. Trump’s newest one — and getting away with it appointee to the Supreme Court, — isn’t as far-fetched as you might Justice Brett Kavanaugh, has writthink. Recall that only 12 years ago, ten that the president shouldn’t Vice President Dick Cheney shot a have to answer to the same laws as guy in the face. Cheney never had the rest of us. to answer in court. Even worse, Kavanaugh didn’t draw any victim Harry Whittington wound distinction between petty laws, up apologizing to Cheney. like spitting on the sidewalk and

Trump hasn’t shot anyone. Yet. But he has inspired others to engage in acts of terrorism on his behalf. Cesar Sayoc, the Florida man arrested last week after at least 14 explosive devices were mailed to various critics of Trump, almost certainly has mental issues that made him susceptible to charismatic influences. His van was a mobile billboard for Trump’s political agenda. The president declared who his enemies were, and Sayoc put several of them in his crosshairs. Rational people don’t slaughter worshippers at a Pittsburgh synagogue or open fire on Republicans practicing on a Virginia baseball field. Rational people don’t drink cyanide-laced Kool-Aid. The thing is, most politicians are mindful that their words can move certain people from mere political engagement to overt action. Most politicians know better than to stoke extremist tendencies. Trump, who basks in his adoring crowds, employs no such filters. He willingly turns crowds against journalist “enemies.” He praised a politician who attacked a reporter. He goads people to chant threats against Hillary Clinton. A small group of Trump’s diehard followers are in a trance. They don’t want to listen to reason. (Believe me, I’ve tried for hours to reason with the guy who thinks Trump is a messiah.) They don’t want to hear about his immorality or the damage he inflicts on our democracy. Criticism of Trump becomes justification to attack the critic. When Trump lies, anyone trying to correct the record is loudly denounced. Blunt was correct: This is a critical time in our nation’s history. Our president is using words that he knows can push unstable people over the edge. But when people like Blunt have the opportunity to counsel presidential restraint, they fall silent. Or, worse, they hide behind autoreply boilerplate. trobberson@post-dispatch.com Twitter: @trobberson 314-340-8382

Tuesday morning brought a textbook illustration of Trumponomics. Under this economic theory — defined roughly as “when it’s sunny, credit me; when it rains, blame them” — President Donald Trump has been claiming sole responsibility for a bull market that began nearly eight years before his presidency. But this month, wild swings in the market threaten to erase the year’s gains, and on Tuesday, Trump offered an explanation: The Democrats did it! The market “is now taking a little pause — people want to see what happens with the Midterms,” he tweeted.“If you want your Stocks to go down, I strongly suggest voting Democrat.” Most attribute the swoon to higher tariffs set off by Trump’s trade war and higher interest rates aggravated by Trump’s tax cut. But Trumponomics holds otherwise. Previous lessons from Trumponomics 101: During the campaign, Trump said that official unemployment figures were “phony” and a “hoax” and that the rate was really as high as 42 percent. Now he highlights the official figures as evidence of his success. During the campaign, the rising stock market was “a big, fat, ugly bubble.” After his election, it became a reflection of Trumpian genius — at least until Democrats caused it to tank. Less than three hours after his stock-market tweet Tuesday, Trump issued a new boast: “Consumer Confidence hits highest level since 2000.” To summarize: Blame Democrats for stocks going down but give Trump credit for confidence simultaneously going up. In fairness, the theory of Trumponomics is more complex than merely blaming Democrats (or the Federal Reserve) for bad things. It also rests on the presumption that Democrats are evil and their ideas ruinous. This can be seen in a report released by the White House last week, by the president’s Council of Economic Advisers. Titled “The Opportunity Costs of Socialism,” the report finds that Democrats who wish to expand the popular Medicare program into Medicare-for-all are in league with Vladimir Lenin, Mao Zedong and other leaders whose policies have resulted in “deaths in purges, massacres, concentration camps, forced migration, and both escape attempts and famines.” The White House economists’ evidence tying today’s Democrats to murderous figures from the 20th century? They used a similar word. Mao “described ‘the ruthless economic exploitation and political oppression of the peasants

by the landlord class,’” the White House writes.“Expressing similar concerns, current American senators Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren have stated that ‘large corporations … exploit human misery and insecurity.’” Further, the council argues, “The socialist narrative names the oppressors of the vulnerable, such as the bourgeoisie (Marx), kulaks (Lenin), landlords (Mao), and giant corporations (Sanders and Warren).” From there, the White House officials argue that certain Democrats’ health care proposals “are similar in spirit to Lenin and Mao” and on par with communist dictators’ disastrous attempts at forced collectivization of agriculture. With an intellectual rigor closer to Groucho than Karl, the White House lists socialists alternately as “Marx, Stalin, Senator Sanders, Senator Warren, and Fidel Castro,” and as “Karl Marx to Vladimir Lenin to Mao Zedong to current American socialists.” There may be sound reasons to oppose single-payer health care, but basing 21st-century health-care policy on an analysis of Soviet agriculture is like basing the Nuclear Posture Review on experiences in the Boer War. Unsurprisingly, this treatise has some problems. First, if it’s true that any whiff of socialism puts us on the slippery slope to the Killing Fields, then we’ll also have to do away with Social Security and Medicare — which Trump claims to love. The White House economists also have trouble dismissing modern-day socialism in the Nordic countries, which enjoy the world’s highest quality of life; they attempt to debunk Nordic success by pointing to the high price of pickup trucks there, a curious metric. If the same academic rigor were applied to Trump, we could use superficial similarities to come up with other compelling theories: Because Trump shoved the prime minister of Montenegro, he is virtually indistinguishable from Attila the Hun, who terrorized and destroyed Eastern Europe. Because Trump describes peaceful protesters as a “mob” that has to be defeated, he’s the same as Pol Pot, who said “he who protests is an enemy” — and killed one-fifth of his population. Trump is undiplomatic — just like Genghis Khan. Trump can be erratic — just like Ivan the Terrible. Trump can be cruel — just like Vlad the Impaler. (And let’s not create a Fuhrer by making Hitler comparisons.) When you start from a place of intellectual dishonesty, there is no telling where you’ll end up. That is the very foundation of Trumponomics. Dana Milbank Twitter: @Milbank Copyright The Washington Post

Passionate centrism A new center wing of politics could emerge as an alternative to the stark choices we have today. BY DAVE ANDERSON

About half of the public votes Democratic and about half votes Republican, but many of the Democrats and Republicans regard themselves as moderates. Moderate Democrats and moderate Republicans — call them the centrists — combined probably make up half of the voting population. The strong Democrats and strong Republicans — call them “purists” or “extremists” — make up the other half. The extremists and the centrists, as a rule, vote for Democrats and Republicans in local, state, and federal races, and they do because, as a rule, most of the candidates who run for office in all these races are

Democrats and Republicans. A tiny percentage of Independents and third-party candidates win elections; almost all politicians elected to office come from one of the two major parties. Many of the voters who are not extremists are passionate about their beliefs and values, but there are not many candidates for office who run as passionate centrists. It is usually assumed that if you are not an extremist about public policy, then you support moderate compromise policy positions and have a moderate temperament. It is important to point out from a logical point of view that it does not follow from the fact that you are not an extremist in your values that you are not

passionate about your centrist point of view. People who support moderate policies can be extremely passionate, even if they usually are not. Someone who stands for a $10 minimum wage can be just as passionate about his stance as someone who stands for a $15 minimum wage. We typically hear more from the second person than the first, but there is no reason in principle why someone who stands for the lower wage cannot be just as passionate, just as outspoken, just as driven. One of the chief reasons why we do not hear as much from the centrists is that their views are not as fixed as those on the extremes, whether the policy issue in question is immigration, trade, health care, family policy, Social Security reform, Iran, North Korea, or any number of other policy areas. Thus, if you have not made up your mind

what you think then you are less likely to voice your opinion or join a group that will voice your opinion for you. Indeed, it’s very hard to find an interest group or association that gives voice to those who are indecisive on critical policy issues, although there are an increasing number of organizations that are trying to motivate extremists in their thinking to find common ground, including No Labels, Better Angels, Voice of the People, and the Bipartisan Policy Center. What would happen, though, if there were organizations or a political movement that spoke up for the middle group of voters who express uncertainty about major policies, many of whom want politicians to craft bipartisan solutions to problems? What would happen if a national forum emerged that would essentially leverage the

uncertainty of those in the middle? This is all speculation, but one could certainly see passion grow as the new policies emerged from this forum. You would see millions of Americans rallying around the cry for unity, bipartisanship and community. A passionate new center could emerge as an alternative to the stark choices we have today: Trump and the hard right and an increasingly left-wing Democratic Party. Moreover, this new center would include those in the middle who do not regard themselves as moderates since they want new bold policies that synthesize the left and the right or in some way overcome this conflict. They may also be uncertain how to articulate the solutions to the problems, but they are looking for more than mere compromise between extremes.

This new coalition thus includes both traditional moderates and those who are not moderates but who want bold new centrist policies. Polarization, tribalism and Trumpism characterize our politics today. But the future of our great republic remains open. It is possible in principle for a vibrant, passionate, emotionally charged new center to emerge in American politics, one that unites moderates and those in the middle who want policies that go beyond mere compromise. If this will actually happen and how it will happen cannot be known in advance. Dave Anderson has taught at the University of Cincinnati, Johns Hopkins University and The George Washington University and was a candidate in the 2016 Democratic primary in Maryland’s 8th Congressional District. He is the editor of “Leveraging: A Political, Economic, and Societal Framework (Springer, 2014)”. He can be reached at dmamaryland@gmail.com.


A12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 11.02.2018

OBITUARIES Arens, Richard L. - Bridgeton Clemens, Joyce A. - St. Louis Contestabile - see Davis Corvera, Gonzalo - High Ridge

Davis, Glenda L. Contestabile - St. Louis Flahive - See Steger Horn - See Steger

Celebrations of Life

Kempf, Ray F. - Fenton Lohse, Arthur John - St. Louis Mergel, Ronald "Ron" - St. Peters Miller, William A. - St. Louis Mollerus, Elsie M. - St. Louis Poynter, Christopher "Seth" - St. Louis Renshaw, Wanda G. - St. Louis Robinson, Donnell - Austin, TX

Arens, Richard L.

Clemens, Joyce A. on Wed., Oct. 31, 2018. Visitation Sat., 11/3, 9 a.m. until time of Funeral Mass beginning at 11 a.m. at Mary Queen of Peace Church. Interment St. Paul Churchyard. www.boppchapel.com

Rodgers - See Steger Rosin, Rev. Dr. Wilbert - St. Louis Shackelford - See Steger Steger, Richard K. - St. Louis Stubbs, Patricia Louise - St. Louis Wilson, Mark W. - St. Louis Winkler - See Steger

Mollerus, Elsie M.

Steger, Richard K.

(nee Grelle) entered into eternal rest on Saturday, October 27, 2018 in her 95th year of life. Beloved wife of Raymond for 71 years; dear mother of Gary (Kathy) Mollerus, Barbara (Mike) Schwartzmeyer, and Dan (Kathleen) Mollerus; loving grandmother of 6 and great-grandmother of 3; dear sister to 11 brothers and 3 sisters. Our dear sister-in-law, aunt, great-aunt, greatgreat-aunt, Godmother, cousin and friend to many. Services: Visitation Saturday, November 3, 10 a.m. until time of Mass 11 a.m. at Holy Name of Jesus Catholic Church, 10235 Ashbrook Drive, St. Louis, MO 63137. Interment Calvary Cemetery. Online guestbook at buchholzmortuary.com.

65, of St. Louis, MO, born March 3, 1953, died Sun., Oct. 21, 2018. Richard was a longtime parishioner of St. Anthony of Padua, and current member of St. Gabriel the Archangel Catholic Church. Preceded in death by his parents, Richard A. and Marie (nee Plasmeier) Steger, his brothers, Lawrence and Edward Steger. Survived by his sisters, Mary Kay (Bill) Sh a ckel ford of Ft. Worth, TX, Anne (Mike) Flahive of Shiloh, IL, Martha (Ron) Winkler of St. Clair, MO, Theresa (Harland) Horn of St. Louis, Maggie Rodgers of Overland Park, KS, brothers, Gerard Steger of Oak Ridge, TN, and Paul (Sara Bucy) Steger of Blacksburg, VA; 19 nieces/nephews and 5 greatnieces/nephews; aunts, cousins, and numerous friends. Rick enjoyed being with his family, his work family at The Walking Cradle Co., and his friends at Charter Senior Living Center, where he lived. He enjoyed walking, sports of all kinds, and was especially proud of having attended the U.S. Open in Flushing Meadows, N.Y. with sister, Maggie, in 2013. Rick was the gentlest, giving brother, friend, uncle, and cousin! Donations: Knights of Columbus, Webster Groves 2119, P.O. Box 190197, St. Louis, MO 63119, or Legion of Mary, 336 E. Ripa Ave. 63125. Services: Memorial Visitation: 9-11 a.m. followed by Funeral Mass at 11 a.m., Sat., Nov. 3, at St. Anthony of Padua Catholic Church, 3140 Meramec St., 63118. Private burial.

Poynter, Christopher "Seth"

Vis. Sun., Nov. 4, 4-8 p.m. at Collier's Funeral Home, 3400 N. Lindbergh. Mass Monday, Nov. 5, 10:30 a.m. at St. John Bosco Church, 12934 Marine Ave. colliersfuneralhome.com

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

passed away, Wednesday, October 31, 2018, at the tender age of 32. Loving husband of Hannah Poynter (nee Stumpf); proud father of Benji; beloved son of Rich and Peggy Poynter (nee Wessels); grandson of Grace Poynter and the late Richard Poynter, and the late Bob and Claire Wessels; son-in-law of Richard and Paula Stumpf; loving brother-in-law, nephew, uncle, cousin and friend to everyone he

met. Services: There will be a Celebration of Life "time of sharing" age 70, died on Tuesday, October 30, 2018 at home in the loving for everyone to relate their happy memories and experiences care of his family. He was born in Cochabamba, Bolivia and is with Seth at the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory, the beloved husband of Barbara Corvera (nee Witt) of St. Louis, 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, Sunday, MO; loving father of Lara and Anna Corvera; and dear son-in- November 4, 2018, at 3 p.m. Interment, private. In lieu of Stubbs, Patricia Louise law of Helen Crawford. He was preceded in death by his adoring flowers, contributions may be made to Benji Walker Poynter parents Dr. Romulo Corvera and Elisa Rico de Corvera. He is the Education Fund in care of Hannah Poynter. Celebration of Life (nee Shankster), October 30, 2018. Pat was married 65 years to visitation Sunday 1-4 p.m. Friends may sign the family's on-line Chuck Stubbs. 3 children - Cathy (Casey) Geisz, Dennis cherished brother of Carlos (Argentina), Henry, and Oscar (Roxanne) Stubbs, Kevin (Jill) Stubbs; 6 grandchildren; 7, soon Corvera, Gloria Jacob, and Gladys Baker. Gonzalo came to the guestbook at Schrader.com. to be 8 great-grandchildren. Sister, aunt, RN, Rainbow Girl US as a student in the late 1960s, became a US citizen in the extraordinaire. 1980s, created a strong family with his wife, and built a successRenshaw, Wanda G. Services: Pat will be cremated at St. Louis Cremation. An inforful small business. He will be remembered as a loving husband, father, son, brother, uncle, nephew, cousin, godfather, and (nee Grossman) fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother mal gathering/celebration of life will take place at The Highfriend to many. The family expresses their gratitude to Siteman Church on Wed., Oct. 31, 2018. Beloved wife for 59 years of the lands of Forest Park/Keagan's Restaurant, 5163 Clayton Ave. Cancer Research for the care he received. He now rests in the late James T. Renshaw; dearest mother of Doreen Renshaw, 63110, 2-6 pm, Sunday, November 4. A service and interment Laura Renshaw (Tony Cornejo), Mary Comeau, Charles Renshaw, will be at St. Paul's Cemetery, Kahoka, Mo, on Saturday, Novemloving arms of our Lord Jesus Christ. Jennifer (Dan) Skillington, Catherine (Tom) Meeker and the late ber 10. In lieu of flowers please donate to International Order of James T. Renshaw Jr. (survived by Lou Ellen); cherished Rainbow for Girls, St. Louis Backstoppers. grandma of Chris (Ally), Matthew and Heather Renshaw, Megan Davis, Glenda L. Contestabile (nee Harris) Tuesday, October (T.J.) Sally, Teela Comeau, Samantha and Max Meeker, Darcy 30, 2018. Beloved mother of and Ryan Skillington; proud great-grandma of Austin James Wilson, Mark W. Teresa (Jim) Raines; dear grand- Sally; our dear aunt, cousin and friend. mot h er of D a w n a n d J a mes Services: Funeral from KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel 5255 Mon., Oct. 29, 2018. Visitation at Kutis Affton Chapel, 10151 Elder; dear step-grandmother of Lemay Ferry Rd., Tue., Nov. 6, 9:15 a.m. to Queen of All Saints Gravois, Fri., Nov 2, 4-9p.m. Funeral Mass Sat., Nov. 3, 11:30 a.m. St. John Paul II Catholic Church (formerly St. George). Sarah Raines; dear great-grand- Catholic Church for 10 a.m. Mass. Interment Resurrection mother of Kamryn Helfrich; dear Cemetery. Mases preferred. Visitation Mon., 4-8 p.m. sister of M a r l e n e "Patricia" Fraternal Notices Rotert, Kathy (Jim) Wade, Jim Robinson, Donnell ( G e r r y ) D u l y , D o n n a (Wa l t ) Beloved son, brother, uncle, Volkenannt, Tim (Kathy) Duly and LOCAL 1 - I.B.E.W. cousin and friend to so many, Bridget (Steve) Noblitt; our dear Please be advised of the death of Donnell Robinson passed aunt, great-aunt, cousin and Bro. Carl E. Winkler away too soon on September friend. Journeyman Wireman - Retired 12th, 2018. Services: Funeral from KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY CHAPEL, 5255 Member 59 Years Donnell was born August 5, 1969 Lemay Ferry Rd., Tuesday, November 6, 12:00 Noon. Interment October 27, 2018 JB National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions to in St. Louis, Missouri and graduVisitation; Sun., Nov. 4, 2018 the Parkinson's Disease Association appreciated. Visitation ated from Ladue Horton Watkins 1-4pm Monday, 3-8 p.m. High School in 1987. He moved to Memorial Service to follow at 4 p.m. Austin, Texas after graduation Heiligtag-Lang-Fendler Funeral Home and discovered a new 1081 Jeffco Blvd., Arnold, MO 63010 Kempf, Ray F. force in music that he identified Frank D. Jacobs, B.M. James C. Douglas, F.S. fortified with the Sacrawith -- hip-hop. With his booming ments of Holy Mother voice and street-smart verses, InMemorials Memoriam Church, Tuesday, OctoDon adopted the moniker MC Overlord and performed with a ber 30, 2018. Beloved husband live band when most hip-hop artists used recorded tracks or a for 59 years of Kay Kempf (nee In memory of DJ. Don embarked on a 30+ year career winning Austin Hip-Hop Bruns); loving father of Denise Artist of the year a record ten times, becoming a member of the Kempf and Lynn (Kevin) McArthy; LOUISE S. FLENS Austin Music Hall of Fame. dear grandfather of Cory, Ryan Jan. 21, 1947 - Nov. 2, 2014 He challenged himself later in his career to become a voice and and Connor McArthy; dear brothmentor for youth, creating four record albums as the bright and er of Benilda (Moritz) Gapsch; Those we love don't go away, fun hero Big Don. Using positive lyrics and a hip-hop beat that dear brother-in-law, uncle, greatthey walk beside us everyday, kids could connect with, Big Don performed at countless school uncle, cousin and friend. It broke our hearts to lose you, and youth events across Texas. Ray was a 60 year member of but you did not go alone. Don was devoted to his mother Mercedes who passed away this the Sheet Metal Worker's Union. Still loved, still missed summer. He was a beloved brother to four sisters: Debbie, VickServices: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois, ey, Kim and Tracy; and a brother Rickey. He was the beloved and very dear, Monday, November 5, 11:30 a.m. to St. Paul Catholic Church (Fe- uncle to six nephews: LaMarr, TaMarr, Rickey Jr., Miguel, Nico nton) for 12 noon Mass. Interment J.B. National Cemetery. In and Jacob; and a niece Lauren. Don leaves 15 first cousins and Your entire loving family. lieu of flowers, Masses or donations to St. Vincent DePaul Socie- many second and third cousins. ty at St. Paul (Fenton) preferred. Visitation Sunday, 3-8 p.m. A foundation is being created in Don's memory to serve Austin city youth and young artists. Florists Services: A Memorial Service will be held Saturday, November Lohse, Arthur John 3, 2018 from 11:00 am - 1:00 pm at Ladue Middle School, 9701 of St. Louis, Missouri, Dierbergs Florist Conway Road, St. Louis, Missouri 63124. was born July 26, 1923, Order 24 Hours in St. Louis, Missouri, to 314-692-2000 or 800-844-6007 George and Bertha (nee Rock) Dierbergs.com Rosin, Rev. Dr. Wilbert Lohse, and entered into rest, Sure of the resurrection, he was called home to his Savior Thursday, November 1, 2018, at on O c t . 29, 2018. See k u t i s f u n e r a l h o me s.c o m for Schnucks Florist the age of 95 years, 3 months and arrangements. 65 Metro Locations 6 days. 314-997-2444; 800-286-9557 He is preceded in death by his parents; his wife Myrtle (nee Midkiff) Lohse; his siblings the late Dorothy (Carl) Karcher and the late Lester (Violet) Lohse; one son, the late Steven (M a rt y) Lohse, and one grandson the late Kevin Lohse. He is survived by four (4) children, Karen (Don) Ritchey, Ken (Pat) Lohse, Rev. Scott (Lin) Lohse and Keith (Mary) Lohse; twelve (12) grandchildren, Colleen Williams, Carrie Roseman, Laura (the late Randy) Remming, Amy (Craig) Williams, Jeff Lohse, Dawn Lohse, Julie (Brian) Rickert, Daniel Lohse, Katie (Kevin) Jost, Heather (Kevin) Teague, Jessie ( Travis) Buck , and Tiffany Lohse; great grandchildren and many other friends and family members. Arthur was a WWII Air Force Veteran who enjoyed an Honor Flight to the Nation's Capitol several years ago. He was an Eagle Scout and Boy Scout leader for many years. He worked as a U.S. Postal Clerk and Administrator. He was a member of and past officer of National Association of Retired Federal Employees (NARFE) Chapter 112. Arthur was proud of his work for the St. Louis Cardinals for many years as the guard of the Red Bird Roost at Busch Stadium. Arthur was a committed churchman for decades who loved to sing in the choir. He loved to make people laugh and usually had a favorite joke ready to tell at every opportunity. Services: Funeral Service 10:30 a.m. on Monday, at JOHN L. ZIEGENHEIN & SONS Funeral Homes - South County Chapel (4830 Lemay Ferry Road). Interment Sunset Memorial Park. Visitation Sunday, 3-9 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations to charity of your choice.

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Mergel, Ronald "Ron" 79, on Oct. 27, 2018. Services: Vis Nov. 3, 11:30-12 pm at Harvester Church of Christ, 106 Willis Rd, (St. Peters) services immediately following at 12pm. www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com

Miller, William A. on Thursday, Nov. 1, 2018. Funeral Mass Monday, Nov. 5th, 10 a.m. at St. Agnes Home, 10341 Manchester Rd, Kirkwood. Interment Cincinnati, OH. www.boppchapel.com

“There is no remedy for love but to love more.” HENRY DAVID THOREAU


WORLD

11.02.2018 • FriDay • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-DiSPaTCH • A13

U.N. votes to condemn U.S. embargo of Cuba Sanctions have been in place since 1960 revolution by Castro BY EDITH M. LEDERER associated Press

UNITED NATIONS • The U.N.

General Assembly voted overwhelmingly Thursday to approve a resolution condemning the American economic embargo of Cuba after rejecting proposed U.S. amendments criticizing the lack of human rights in the country. Resolutions adopted by the 193-member world body are unenforceable, but they reflect world opinion, and the vote has given Cuba an annual stage for

the last 27 years to demonstrate the isolation of the U.S. on the embargo. It was imposed in 1960 after the revolution led by Fidel Castro and the nationalization of properties belonging to U.S. citizens and corporations. Two years later the embargo was strengthened. The General Assembly’s vote on the Cuban-sponsored resolution on the “Necessity of ending the economic, commercial and financial embargo imposed by the United States of America against Cuba” was 189-2 with no abstentions. The U.S. and Israel voted “no,” and Moldova and Ukraine did not vote. In earlier votes on the proposed U.S. amendments, Ukraine and Israel were the only countries to join the U.S. in voting “yes” on all

DIGEST Ethiopia names female high court leader Ethiopian lawmakers have approved the country’s first female Supreme Court president. The move Thursday came just a week after lawmakers elected Ethiopia’s first female president. Meaza Ashenafi, a prominent law practitioner in Ethiopia, assumed the top job at the Supreme Court after she was unanimously approved by lawmakers. Meaza has worked with the United Nations, helped establish an allfemale bank and was a judge on the country’s high court.

eight measures. Some 114 countries voted against the amendments and about 65 abstained. The proposed amendments expressed concern at the lack of freedom of expression and access to information in Cuba and the prohibition on workers’ right to strike. They called on Cuba to fully grant its citizens “internationally recognized civil, political and economic rights and freedoms.” Cuba’s Foreign Minister Bruno Rodriguez called the U.S. embargo “a flagrant, massive and systematic violation of the human rights of Cuban men and women” and denounced the U.S. amendments. “The government of the United States doesn’t have the least moral authority to criticize

Cuba or anyone when it comes to human rights,” he said. U.S. Ambassador Nikki Haley urged the General Assembly to use its “megaphone” and “send a moral message to the Cuban dictatorship” that could help improve the lives of the Cuban people. But the United States failed to get support even from Western nations. The European Union said the U.S. amendments did not belong in a resolution dealing with a trade embargo, and its members supported the resolution calling for the United States “to repeal or invalidate” the embargo. After the U.S. defeat, Haley told the General Assembly: “There are no winners here today, there are only losers.”

Cuban President Raul Castro and then-President Barack Obama officially restored relations in July 2016. But relations have steadily deteriorated during President Donald Trump’s administration. Haley and others have sharply criticized Cuba’s human rights record. Thursday’s vote came shortly before Trump’s national security adviser John Bolton announced in Florida that the administration was imposing new sanctions on Cuba and Venezuela and soon on Nicaragua, calling the three countries a “troika of tyranny.” Bolton condemned what he called the “destructive forces of oppression, socialism and totalitarianism” that he said the three countries represented.

Protests continue after woman is freed from death row in Pakistan

Macedonia, Greece restart direct flights • Macedonia and Greece have restarted direct commercial flights after more than a decade following an agreement to try to end a long-standing dispute over the Balkan republic’s name. Macedonian Deputy Prime Minister Bujar Osmani was on the Olympic Airlines flight to the Macedonian capital of Skopje on Thursday after talks in Athens. Greece and Macedonia have been at odds over the former Yugoslav republic’s name, which Athens says implies a territorial claim against Greek territory. In June the Macedonian government agreed to rename the country North Macedonia, but the deal requires a complicated ratification process. Direct flights were halted in 2007. Merkel wants anti-Russian sanctions to remain • German Chancellor Angela Merkel has visited Ukraine, pledging to uphold anti-Russian sanctions for Russian actions in Ukraine. Speaking after Thursday’s talks with Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko, Merkel said Germany would support extending the European Union’s restrictions against Russia over its support for rebels in eastern Ukraine. Merkel cited the lack of progress in fulfilling a 2015 peace deal. More than 10,000 people have been killed in fighting in eastern Ukraine that erupted in 2014 weeks after Russia’s annexation of Ukraine’s Crimean Peninsula. A peace agreement signed in Minsk in 2015 helped reduce the scope of fighting, but a political settlement has stalled. Israel battles measles outbreak • Israel is grappling with one of its worst measles outbreak in decades, with at least 1,200 cases reported since the beginning of 2018. Israeli media reported Thursday that an 18-month-old baby died of complications of the disease at a hospital in Jerusalem, the country’s first death from measles since 2003. The child had not been vaccinated. Measles is a highly contagious disease and one of the leading causes of death worldwide in young children, according to the World Health Organization. It is easily prevented with a vaccine. In Israel, several ultra-Orthodox Jewish sects oppose vaccination. Cuban president arrives in Moscow for talks • Cuban President Miguel Diaz-Canel arrived in Russia on Thursday for talks expected to focus on expanding economic ties between the two nations. As part of his three-day visit, Diaz-Canel is set to meet with Russian President Vladimir Putin in the Kremlin on Friday. During the Cold War, the Soviet Union gave billions of dollars in supplies and subsidies to Cuba, its staunchest Latin American ally. But ties withered after the 1991 Soviet collapse. Putin, who visited Cuba in 2000 and 2014, has sought to revive ties with Cuba. Blaze destroys hundreds of shops in Afghanistan capital • An apparent electrical fire late Thursday in the Afghan capital, Kabul, consumed hundreds of shops, most of them selling electronics and household appliances, police official Rahmat Amini said. Flames rapidly engulfed entire markets in the center of the city, destroying more than 500 stores, said Amini. There were no immediate reports of injuries because the fire broke out after most of the stores had closed. Interior Ministry officials were on the scene investigating the blaze to determine its exact cause and origination. The damage is estimated in the millions of dollars. From news services

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Protesters rally Thursday in Karachi, Pakistan, against a Supreme Court decision that acquitted Asia Bibi, a Christian woman who spent eight years on death row accused of blasphemy. Bibi plans to leave the country, her family said.

Christian convicted of blasphemy in 2010 plans to leave the country soon BY MUNIR AHMED AND ASIM TANVEER associated Press

ISLAMABAD • A Christian woman

acquitted in Pakistan after eight years on death row for blasphemy plans to leave the country soon, her family said Thursday, and authorities said they arrested two prisoners last month for conspiring to kill her. Radical Islamists mounted rallies across the country for a second day after Pakistan’s Supreme Court, in a landmark ruling, overturned the 2010 conviction against Asia Bibi for insulting Islam’s Prophet Muhammad. The charge of blasphemy carries the death penalty in this majority Muslim nation. Bibi’s acquittal posed a challenge to the government of Pakistan’s new Prime Minister Imran Khan, who came to power this summer partly by pursuing the Islamist agenda. He asked protesters not to “test the patience of the state.” On Thursday, Information Minister Fawad Chaudhry said the government was avoiding the use of force against demonstrators to resolve the issue peacefully. Bibi, 54, a mother of five, remained at an undisclosed location Thursday for security reasons, awaiting her formal release, her brother James Masih told The Associated Press. Masih said his sister simply would not be safe in Pakistan.

“She has no other option, and she will leave the country soon,” he said. Masih would not disclose the country of her destination, but both France and Spain have offered asylum. Also on Thursday, jail officials said two inmates were arrested last month at an undisclosed detention facility for planning to kill Bibi by strangling her. Officials said the men were still being questioned. The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak to the media. Bibi’s husband, Ashiq Masih, had returned from Britain with their children in October and has been waiting for her to join them, the brother said. Meanwhile, more than 1,000 Islamists blocked a road linking the capital, Islamabad, with the garrison city of Rawalpindi on Thursday, demanding Bibi be hanged. Authorities deployed troops, signaling they could move in to clear the roads. Hundreds also blocked another key motorway, linking Islamabad with major cities such as Lahore and Peshawar, chanting slogans against Bibi and demanding her execution. Later on Thursday, lawyer Ghulam Mustafa filed a petition in the Supreme Court requesting the judges review the acquittal as the government began talks with rally organizers to end their protests. Meanwhile, opposition lawmakers in parliament called Thursday for reforming the judicial system and

Pakistan’s controversial blasphemy law — so that people such as Bibi wouldn’t spend years languishing in jail. Hafiz Saeed, a radical cleric wanted by the United States, urged followers to hold rallies across Pakistan on Friday to condemn Bibi’s release. Saeed is the founder of the outlawed Lashkar-e-Taiba group, which was blamed for the attacks in Mumbai, India, in 2008 that killed 166 people. Protesters, rallied by firebrand cleric Khadim Hussain Rizvi, also set up roadblocks and burned tires in the southern port city of Karachi while hundreds clashed Thursday with police in various parts of eastern Punjab province. Many parents kept their children from school, fearing more violence. The Islamists also called for the killing of the high court judges, including Chief Justice Mian Saqib Nisar, who acquitted Bibi. Bibi’s acquittal has been seen as a hopeful sign by Christians in Pakistan, where the mere rumor of blasphemy can spark lynchings. Bibi was arrested in 2009 after she was accused of blasphemy after a quarrel with two fellow female farm workers who refused to drink from a water container used by a Christian. A few days later, a mob accused her of insulting Islam’s prophet, leading to her 2010 conviction. Bibi’s family has always maintained that she never insulted the prophet.

Flight recorder found from Lion Air jet ASSOCIATED PRESS

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JAKARTA, INDONESIA • Divers in Indonesia recovered one of the crashed Lion Air jet’s flight recorders from the seafloor on Thursday, a crucial development in the investigation into what caused the 2-month-old plane to plunge into the ocean earlier this week, killing 189 people. Relatives, meanwhile, buried the first victim to be identified and prayed at her flower-covered grave. TV showed footage of two divers after they surfaced, swimming to an inflatable vessel and placing a bright orange device into a large container that was transferred to a search-andrescue ship. The Boeing 737 MAX 8 plane crashed early Monday just minutes after takeoff from the Indonesian capital, Jakarta. It was the worst airline disaster in Indonesia in more than two decades and renewed concerns about safety in its fast-growing aviation industry, which was recently removed from European Union and U.S. blacklists.

Navy Col. Monang Sitompul told local TV an object believed to be part of the aircraft’s fuselage was also seen on the seafloor. Minutes after the device was taken out of the sea, Bambang Irawan, an investigator with the transport safety committee, said it was the flight data recorder. But at a later news conference, another investigator, Ony Soeryo Wibowo, said they hadn’t determined if it was the flight data or cockpit voice recorder. It was displayed inside a container submerged in water to prevent damage from rapidly drying out. The flight data recorder is expected to provide investigators with detailed information about the flight such as altitude, airspeed and heading. The voice recorder also provides valuable information — not only the cockpit crew’s voices but engine sounds, instrumentation warnings and other audio that investigators can interpret. The U.S. National Transportation Safety Board says high-tech computer and audio equipment is used to extract and translate the data

into an understandable format. The recorder was recovered from a depth of about 98 feet, some 1,640 feet from where the plane lost contact, said search and rescue agency head Muhammad Syaugi. Relatives of Jannatun Cintya Dewi, 24, whose remains were identified Wednesday, carried her body in a coffin covered in green cloth along a road in an East Java district to the burial place. Other families face a longer wait to bury loved ones. Police medical experts say DNA results needed for identification will take several days and remains are still being found. U.S. National Transportation Safety Board investigators including from Boeing visited the Jakarta port Thursday and picked through debris collected from the sea. Data from flight-tracking sites show the plane had erratic speed and altitude on Sunday and on its fatal flight Monday. Safety experts caution, however, that the data must be checked for accuracy against the flight data recorder.


NATION

A14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 11.02.2018

Chinese firm charged in trade secrets theft “predatory” economic policies. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo set the tone in a June speech where he accused China of an “unprecedented level of larceny” of intellectual property. Tension over trade in particular has exacerbated relations between the two world powers. Trump has imposed tariffs on $250 billion in Chinese products in an effort to narrow the U.S. trade deficit with China. China has retaliated with tariff increases on $110 billion of American products. The tension has extended into security issues. China has criticized U.S. arms sales to Taiwan, which Beijing considers a

U.S. ramps up its efforts to stop ‘predatory’ steps by the country BY ERIC TUCKER Associated Press

LO S A N G E L E S • The

United States has charged a government-controlled company in China with stealing trade secrets from an American semiconductor company, the Justice Department said Thursday as it outlined an initiative focused on what officials said was the growing threat of Chinese economic espionage. The prosecution comes amid heightened trade tension between China and the U.S. and as President Donald Trump’s administration raises alarms that Beijing remains intent on stealing technology and inventions to gain an economic upper hand. The two nations have each imposed billions of dollars in tariffs on each other in a reflection of a confrontation relationship with national security as well as economic ramifications. The case involves trade secrets worth up to $8.75 billion and allegedly stolen from Idaho-based Micron Technology Inc., and is the latest in a series of prosecutions targeting Chinese corporate espionage. On Tuesday, prosecutors in California announced charges against Chinese intelligence officers for trying to steal information on commercial jet engines. Other cases have involved stolen wind turbine technology and software source code. “China — like any advanced nation — must decide whether it wants to be a trusted partner on the world stage, or whether it wants to be known around

renegade province, and the U.S. has renewed its criticism of China’s islandbuilding in the disputed South China Sea. In recent weeks, Trump has accused China of meddling in U.S. elections but hasn’t presented substantive evidence of such interference. In a tweet Thursday, Trump said he had spoken with China’s President Xi Jinping and that they had talked about many topics, but mostly trade. He said U.S.-China discussions on trade are “moving along nicely” with a meeting being scheduled at the G-20 summit in Argentina, which begins late this month.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Attorney General Jeff Sessions, reflected in a portrait of President Donald Trump at the Justice Department in Washington, accused China of “strong-arm tactics” on Thursday.

the world as a dishonest regime running a corrupt economy founded on fraud, theft and strongarm tactics,” Attorney General Jeff Sessions said at a news conference. The charges name two companies, one in China and one in Taiwan, and three Taiwanese defendants. A Justice Department spokesman said the defendants were served summonses in Taiwan and that none is in custody. The Chinese Embassy did not immediately respond to a request seeking comment. One of the charged individuals had been president of a company that Micron acquired in 2013 and then went to work for the Taiwan semiconductor company, United Microelectronics Corp., where prosecutors say he orchestrated the theft. That man, identified by prosecutors as Chen Zhengkun, recruited both of his co-defendants to

join him at UMC. One, according to the Justice Department, downloaded more than 900 confidential and proprietary Micron files before he left and stored them in ways that he could access them at his new job. That company partnered with a Chinese-controlled business, Fujian Jinhua Integrated Circuit Co., to mass-produce technology memory storage products used in computer electronics. The technology at issue, known as dynamic random-access memory, is something that the Chinese government had identified as an important priority because its own companies could not develop such advanced capabilities and had to rely on companies outside of China. The indictment was announced one day after the Trump administration imposed limits on technology exports to the Chinese

company that was charged, citing national security concerns. Beijing has spent heavily to build up Jinhua and other chipmakers as part of efforts to transform China into a global leader in robotics, artificial intelligence and other technology industries. The United States also Thursday sued to block the transfer of trade secrets and to prevent the companies from exporting to the U.S. any products that they manufacture by exploiting stolen information. In addition, the Justice Department announced an initiative to target Chinese economic espionage by identifying priority cases and ensuring there are enough resources available. The administration has characterized China, along with Russia, as a strategic competitor of the United States. The U.S. has taken an increasingly confrontational stance toward what it characterizes as China’s

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Friday • 11.02.2018 • B

BRANCHING OUT Crafty woodworker shows students how to convert prolific, pesky bush honeysuckle into functional home furniture

Post Holdings plans new headquarters in Brentwood By JaCOB BarKEr St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Packaged food company Post Holdings plans a new office building at 200 Hanley Industrial Court, just north of its current corporate headquarters. Last week, Post Holdings acquired the Envelope Manufacturing Co. building, according to St. Louis County real estate records. It had housed Hampton Envelope but has been vacant for several years. The site had been listed for $3.84 million by Intelica CRE. “It’s kind of been one of the eyesores of our community,” Lisa Koerkenmeier, Brentwood’s Director of Planning and Development, said at a board of aldermen meeting Sept. 4. Plans, first reported by the St. Louis Business Journal, call for demolishing two of the current structures on the 3.6-acre site to make room for a new, three-story, 48,000-square-foot office building. A current one-story building would be rehabbed as 11,750 square feet of space. Post has made its corporate home at 2503 South Hanley Road in Brentwood since 2012, See POST • Page B4

RENDERING VIA CITY OF BRENTWOOD

Post Holdings plans a new office building at 200 Hanley Industrial Court.

West Lake Landfill owner targets yet another entity to share cleanup costs Republic Services adds zinc producer to lawsuit By BryCE Gray St. Louis Post-Dispatch

PHOTOS BY JOHANNA HUCKEBA • jhuckeba@post-dispatch.com

Dale Dufer, 66, makes adjustments this week to legs of a table made from bush honeysuckle in the backyard of his home near Forest Park. “This is not your typical woodworking. It’s kind of abstract,’’ he says.

By COLLEEN SCHraPPEN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Dale Dufer had spent four decades as a woodworker before realizing in 2014 that he had an abundant supply of sturdy, artistic material right in his St. Louis backyard. Actually, it was taking over his backyard. Dufer and his wife had spent the afternoon hacking away at an overgrowth of bush honeysuckle, an invasive plant that migrated to the United States from Asia and elbowed its way into Missouri about 40 years ago. “We had piles of it,” said Dufer, 66, who lives in the Franz Park neighborhood south of Forest Park. His business, Dale Dufer Studios, kept him busy building custom-designed cabinets, desks and accent pieces. He also occasionally made stick furniture as gifts for friends, and the bush honeysuckle See WOOd • Page B6

Dale Dufer levels what he plans to be table legs made from bush honeysuckle. He said he enjoys working with students on projects, and the wood is abundant. “Act now — supplies are unlimited!” he jokes.

Republic Services — the waste hauler whose subsidiary, Bridgeton Landfill, owns the radioactive West Lake Landfill Superfund site — may have signaled its strategy for coping with the $205 million cleanup that the Environmental Protection Agency ordered for the site in late September: lawsuits fought on multiple fronts, to help spread out costs. Building on a lawsuit filed last week against the historic chemical manufacturer and exuranium processor, Mallinckrodt, the landfill’s owners filed an amended suit Thursday in U.S. District Court that attempts to enlist yet another entity to bear liability at the site, and may hint at even more legal battles to come. EverZinc, a Belgian producer of zinc chemicals, joins Mallinckrodt as a defendant in the latest version of the lawsuit. The company is asked to pay for the alleged role of its predecessor, African Metals Corp., in the eventual contamination of the site, with Republic seeking recovery of costs that it “has incurred and will continue to incur,” associated with West Lake. In 1944, African Metals Corp. provided uranium ore and ore concentrates that were used as part of the Manhattan Project, according to the lawsuit. It states that the company underwent a series of name changes over the decades, and today is a part of EverZinc. See WEST LaKE • Page B5

Lower-price insurance could mean narrow networks, experts warn Consumers may be overwhelmed, not see trade-offs By STEVEN FiNdLay Kaiser Health News

As a breast cancer survivor, Donna Catanuchi said she knew she couldn’t go without health insurance. But her monthly premium of $855 was too high to afford. “It was my biggest expense and killing me,” said Catanuchi, 58, of Mullica Hill, N.J. A “navigator” who helps peo-

ple find coverage through the Affordable Care Act found a solution. But it required Catanuchi, who works part time cleaning offices, to switch to a less comprehensive plan, change doctors, drive farther to her appointments and pay $110 a visit outof-pocket — or about three times what she was paying for her follow-up cancer care. She now pays $40 a month for coverage, after she qualified for a substantial government subsidy. Catanuchi’s switch to a more affordable but restrictive plan reflects a broad trend in insurance plan design over the past few years. The cheaper plans offer

far narrower networks of doctors and hospitals and less coverage of out-of-network care. But many consumers are overwhelmed or unaware of the trade-offs they entail, insurance commissioners and policy experts say. With enrollment for ACA health plans now underway, they worry that consumers too often lack access to clear information about which health plans have “narrow networks” of medical providers or which hospitals and doctors are in or out of an insurer’s network, despite federal rules requiring plans to keep upto-date directories. “It’s very frustrating for con-

sumers,” said Betsy Imholz, who represents the advocacy group Consumers Union at the National Association of Insurance Commissioners. “Health plan provider directories are often inaccurate, and doctors are dropping in and out all the time.” These more restrictive plans expose people to larger outof-pocket costs, less access to out-of-network specialists and hospitals, and “surprise” medical bills from unforeseen out-ofnetwork care. More than 14 million people buy health insurance on the individual market — largely through the ACA exchanges, and they will

be shopping anew this month.

TrENd aPPEarS TO BE SLOWiNG For 2018, 73 percent of plans offered through the exchanges were either health maintenance organizations (HMOs) or exclusive provider organizations (EPOs), up from 54 percent in 2015. Both have more restrictive networks and offer less out-ofnetwork coverage compared with preferred provider organizations (PPOs), which represented 21 percent of health plans ofSee iNSUraNCE • Page B6

BUSINESS

1 M


NETWORKING

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 11.02.2018

Orangetheory plans new locations for studios in Creve Coeur, Fenton

PEOPLE IN BUSINESS

Tarlton exec named to lead national industry association

FROM STAFF REPORTS

Orangetheory Fitness is expanding in the St. Louis area with new locations opening this month in Creve Coeur and Fenton. Many more sites are planned. In the past three years, the Boca Raton, Fla.-based company with more than 1,000 locations opened multiple St. Louis-area studios. Founded in 2010, the company says it has more than 500 new locations in the pipeline worldwide. A local franchisee is opening a Fenton studio at 528 Old Smizer Mill Road in the Fenton Crossing center Friday. The Creve Coeur studio will open at 11457 Olive Boulevard in West Oak Square Nov. 30. “We are excited to continue to bring Orangetheory Fitness to the St. Louis community and help members live healthier, more vibrant lives,” Parrish Lamb, Orangetheory Fitness St. Louis franchisee, said in a statement. Lamb and Juan Ortega are the area developers who own three current Orangetheory locations — in Ellisville, the Central West End and Creve Coeur. Ortega and Lamb said they planned to open 20 to 24 Orangetheory Fitness studios in the St. Louis area and in other Missouri markets, including Springfield, Mo., and Columbia, Mo. A separate franchisee operates Orangetheory locations in Ladue, Chesterfield, Rock Hill, Fenton, south St. Louis County, Lake Saint Louis, Cottleville and St. Charles. Orangetheory specializes in one-hour, full-body workouts. The chain’s name is based on the “orange effect” theory that exercise keeps burning calories for participants for up to 36 hours after a 60-minute workout.

Orangetheory Fitness is touting expansion in the St. Louis area and other Missouri sites.

NOW AN AUDI SPORT DEALERSHIP!

Dirk Elsperman, executive vice president and chief operating officer of Tarlton Corp., was named president of Associated General Contractors of America. Elsperman, who has served as chairman of the AGC of Missouri, will take office in April. The national organization represents more than 26,000 firms, including more than 6,500 Elsperman general contractors and more than 9,000 specialty contracting firms. As president, Elsperman will work to promote workforce development and diversity in construction. A 30-year industry veteran, Elsperman has worked in all aspects of Tarlton’s operations, including apprenticing as a carpenter, estimating, project engineering and management, and executive management. He earned a bachelor’s degree in applied economics and business management from Cornell University and a master’s in business administration from Washington University. He serves on advisory boards for The Salvation Army, Olin Business School and the Foundation for St. Andrew’s Resources for Seniors.

2018 Audi A3

Pinnacle selected for midtown loft conversion project

259

$

Glik

Noble

Rainey

Berry

Jackson

Stone

PER MONTH FOR 36 MONTHS*

10,000 miles per year

2018 Audi A4

289

$

PER MONTH FOR 36 MONTHS*

10,000 miles per year COURTESY OF PINNACLE CONTRACTING

Pinnacle Contracting Inc. was tapped to renovate a historic midtown factory complex into lofts. Pinnacle was selected by developer Pier Property Group to transform the former Steelcote Manufacturing Co. paint factory, which dates to 1922. The 42,000-square-foot, $9 million conversion will create 31 units in the fivestory building. An adjoining structure will house the leasing office and bike storage, with two additional units in a third building. The Steelcote Lofts, expected to be completed in spring 2019, will include traditional loft floor plans with 10- to 12-foot ceilings as well as two-story units with rooftop terraces. The project team includes architect Trivers Associates and structural engineer KPFF Consulting Engineers.

AWARDS The Midwestern Society of Orthodontists recognized Dr. James G. Klarsch as the Earl E. Shepard Distinguished Service award winner for his contributions to the specialty of orthodontics through volunteer leadership positions. The Missouri Association of Manufacturers presented Ranken Technical College and TG Missouri with a Workforce Development Program Excellence Award for their collaborative initiatives to provide technical training and skills needed in manufacturing careers.

MERGERS AND ACQUISITIONS Neil M Footwear was acquired by Wallace McNeill. Perimeter Solutions, a producer of fire retardant products, agreed to acquire Solberg, the firefighting foam products division of Amerex Corp. KAI Design & Build acquired Atlantabased Dorsey Engineering Inc.

449

$

Williams

Politis

Wood

Fuller

Brummer

Laurentius

PER MONTH FOR 36 MONTHS*

10,000 miles per year

2018 Audi Q7

589

$

Arcturis added Judy Glik as director of brand experience. Midland States Bank promoted David Noble to director of community and economic development.

PER MONTH FOR 36 MONTHS*

10,000 miles per year *36 month closed end lease, 10,000 miles per year, more miles available. Includes $3,000 down payment. Must qualify for all rebates.Offers expire 11/30/18.

Audi West County

Jay Rainey was selected as head of school at MICDS (Mary Institute and St. Louis Country Day School). Operation Food Search added four dietitians to its Child & Family Nutrition Programs department: Carmen Berry, Katie Jackson, Brittney Stone and Hannah Thornburgh. Oculus Inc. hired Jack Bowe as a project manager and Justin Kanturek as a project designer.

15736 MANCHESTER ROAD • EAST OF CLARKSON • 636-391-7228 Emerson President Michael Train joined the Board of Trustees of Ranken Technical College.

Bommarito www.audiwestcounty.com

BUSINESS CALENDAR WEDNESDAY JOB FAIR • JobNewsUSA.com hosts this job fair featuring numerous employers such as Aldi, BJC HealthCare and GKN Aerospace. • 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Doubletree Hotel Westport, 1973 Craigshire, St. Louis • Free; register at www.JobNewsUSA.com THURSDAY GOVERNMENT CONTRACTING • The U.S. Small Business Administration hosts this seminar on government contracting.

• 10-11:30 a.m.; SBA District Office, Robert A. Young Federal Building, 1222 Spruce Street, Suite 10.103, St. Louis • Free; register at https://bit.ly/2Pvw7cF QUALITY CONTROL • The St. Louis Section of ASQ hosts its Quality Conference with presentations on topics such as supply chain/supplier quality, implementing a quality system, mentoring, and agile project management. • 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Millennium Student Center, University of Missouri-St. Louis, St. Louis • $199 for members, $249 for nonmembers; register at https://bit.ly/2Job9XQ

NEW BUSINESS Partners Terry Hurley, Todd Mitchell, Mark Arnold and Ben Goldman launched Bailey & Co., a purpose-led consultancy and branding firm. The firm’s website can be found at bailey-and-co.com.

Nero

2018 Audi Q5 Tech

Complimentary Service Pickup And Delivery BUSINESS BULLETIN BOARD

Thornburgh Train

POST-DISPATCH BUSINESS STAFF

SUBMIT AN ITEM

LISA BROWN

Business editor

314-340-8127

NEW WEBSITE

JACOB BARKER

Economic development

314-340-8291

United Access launched a new website: www.unitedaccess.com.

BRYCE GRAY

Energy and environment

314-340-8307

OPENINGS

DAVID NICKLAUS

Business columnist

314-340-8213

Sweet Poppins opened a gourmet popcorn shop: • 825 South Main Street, St. Charles, Mo.

MARK SCHLINKMANN Transportation and real estate

314-340-8265

To e-mail a staff member, use the first initial and last name, followed by @post-dispatch.com

Bulletin Board and People in Business submissions should be sent to: biznetworking@ post-dispatch.com. Or you can mail a release to: Business News, 900 NorthTucker Boulevard, St. Louis, Mo. 63101

The following were hired by Enterprise Bank & Trust: Michael Lemons as vice president, business banking; Dart Ford as community financial services representative; Karen Wiley as CRA loan officer; and Ethan Engele as commercial banking officer. Filomena Dean was promoted to regional retail market manager. Dr. Patrick Nero and Dr. Victor Williams joined SSM Health St. Joseph Hospital-St. Charles, and Dr. Demetrios “Jim” Politis joined SSM Health Outpatient Center on Kisker Road. The Strick Group at USA Mortgage added Jennifer Wood as sales manager area branch development; Jeff Fuller as sales manager/senior mortgage banker; and Von Brummer as senior mortgage banker. Robert J. Laurentius joined Schowalter & Jabouri PC.

GOT A STORY TIP? Have the scoop on a local news story? We want to hear from you. Submit news tips online. Tips are confidential, and you can choose to remain anonymous. stltoday.com/newstips


MARKET WATCH

11.02.2018 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • B3

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM /BUSINESS Stocks rose again Thursday, extending a rebound into a third day following a dismal October. Technology and consumerfocused companies put up some of the biggest gains. Strong earnings from U.S. companies have helped the market recover some of its footing.

Cigna

$227.13

Close: 25,380.74 Change: 264.98 (1.1%)

24,120

A S 52-week range

$15.55

10 DAYS

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Corn

Dec 18 Nov 18 Dec 18

366.75 869 508

+3.50 +30 +7.50

Wheat

2,960

CHICAGO MERC

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

26,400

2,880

Feeder cattle

25,600

2,800

Live cattle

24,800

2,720

24,000

2,640

Nov 18 Dec 18 Dec 18 Nov 18 Nov 18

153.30 117.12 58.20 14.88 272.15

-.17 +.17 -.25 +.09 +5.80

ICE

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Cotton

Dec 18 Dec 18 Jan 19

79.03 117.80 25.10

+2.17 +5.10

NEW YORK

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Crude oil

Dec 18 Dec 18 Dec 18 Dec 18

63.69 1.7165 220.08 3.237

-1.62 -.0349 -5.06 -.024

Hogs

M

J

J

Vol. (in mil.) Pvs. Volume Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows

NASD 2,591 2,781 2286 659 40 72

4,623 5,012 2139 679 22 62

S

2,560

O

Copper

M

J

J

A

S

O

Coffee

StocksRecap NYSE

A

Milk

DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

HIGH 25396.47 10407.49 736.01 12363.32 7435.88 2741.67 1863.35 28346.85 1547.14

LOW 25108.11 10173.77 724.60 12208.06 7286.50 2708.85 1831.95 27975.36 1512.68

CLOSE 25380.74 10368.52 729.11 12356.50 7434.06 2740.37 1861.66 28333.06 1544.98

CHG. +264.98 +177.34 -4.73 +148.44 +128.16 +28.63 +36.56 +352.16 +33.57

%CHG. WK +1.05% s +1.74% s -0.64% t +1.22% s +1.75% s +1.06% s +2.00% s +1.26% s +2.22% s

MO QTR t s t t s s t t t t t t t t t t t t

YTD +2.68% -2.30% +0.79% -3.53% +7.69% +2.50% -2.05% +1.94% +0.62%

Sugar

Gas blend Heating oil Natural gas

NAME

TKR

52-WK LO HI

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV NAME

AT&T Inc

T

28.85

39.32 30.49

-.19 -0.6 -21.6

Aegion Corp

AEGN

19.35

28.19 18.62

-.74 -3.8 -26.8 -16.9 16

Amdocs

DOX

60.50

71.72 63.82 +.55 +0.9

-2.5

Ameren Corp

AEE

51.89

67.23 64.35

-.23 -0.4

+9.1 +7.1 23 1.90f Huttig Building Prod HBP

70.50 69.86

-.05 -0.1 +67.8 +79.7

-2.9

6

-1.3 17

2.00 FutureFuel

TKR

... General Motors 1.00 Home Depot

34.76

72.88 123.24 76.68 +2.70 +3.6 -31.3 -36.3 19 3.19e Lowes

LOW

Arch Coal

ARCH

70.82 102.61 94.10 -1.80 -1.9

MNK

Avadel Pharma

AVDL

3.88

11.93

+1.0 +27.5

7

4.08 +.02 +0.5 -50.2 -57.3 dd

Bank of America

BAC

25.81

33.05 27.81 +.31 +1.1

Belden Inc

BDC

50.71

87.15 52.30 -1.75 -3.2 -32.2 -32.1 10

Boeing

BA

Build-A-Bear Wkshp BBW

-5.8 +2.3 13

255.33 394.28 363.07 +8.21 +2.3 +23.1 +40.1 34 7.25

10.45

8.50

-.06 -0.7

-7.6 +9.7 27 +5.6 +26.2 16

Caleres Inc.

CAL

26.54

41.09 35.34 +1.14 +3.3

Cass Info. Systems

CASS

54.37

74.49 65.45

90.07 148.24 131.13 +.81 +0.6 +30.0 +39.1 19

Centene Corp.

CNC

CHTR 250.10 396.64 324.58 +4.21 +1.3

Cigna

CI

163.02 227.13 216.28 +2.47 +1.2

-3.4

-4.1 cc

+6.5 +8.4 21

Citigroup

C

63.18

80.70 65.83 +.37 +0.6 -11.5

Commerce Banc.

CBSH

52.07

72.55 64.29 +.69 +1.1 +15.1 +16.5 17

Edgewell

EPC

39.50

65.69 48.03 +.05 +0.1 -19.1 -26.1 16

Emerson

EMR

57.47

79.70 69.95 +2.07 +3.0

Energizer Holdings

ENR

40.64

65.57 59.31 +.54 +0.9 +23.6 +39.4 21

Enterprise Financial EFSC

40.47

58.15 43.23

Esco Technologies

ESE

51.55

70.20 63.06 +1.84 +3.0

Express Scripts

ESRX

59.17

97.63 97.24 +.27 +0.3 +30.3 +58.2 13

Foresight Energy

FELP

3.28

3.90

1.60 Mallinckrodt plc ... MasterCard

-.22 -0.5

-.10 -2.5 -10.8

-1.9 dd

7.59

3.77 +.04 +1.1 -43.3 -44.5 dd

...

1.95

3.30

2.76 +.09 +3.4 +17.4 +18.7

...

75.36 117.70 97.44 +2.22 +2.3 11.65

36.65 26.80 +1.74 +6.9 +18.8 -20.9

140.61 225.35 199.71 +2.04 +1.0 +31.9 +33.5 46 146.84 178.96 174.88 -2.02 -1.1

38.84 21.64 +1.44 +7.1 -39.2 -42.5

6.84 Peabody Energy

BTU

30.26

47.84 34.15 -1.30 -3.7 -13.3 +16.3

... Peak Resorts

SKIS

4.25

5.00

5

0.80

-7.4 +16.5 dd

0.28

17.65

-.09 -0.4 +30.7 +28.6 40

... ...

RELV SR

127.84 165.12 143.66 +1.29 +0.9 3.72 60.09

8.44

4.99 +.32 +6.9

82.85 72.50

-.08 -0.1

-7.9

-3.3 13 2.40f

+4.6 -18.8 dd -3.5

-5.2 20

SF

42.51

68.76 46.66 +.94 +2.1 -21.7 -12.9 15 0.48f

54.04

90.39 84.23 +.60 +0.7 +29.1 +45.9 15

101.45 135.53 107.52 +.98 +0.9

-6.3 18

3.64

-2.7

48.49

58.50 52.13

-1.5 14

1.20

1.16 US Steel

X

24.82

47.64 27.17 +.64 +2.4 -22.8 +5.6 16

0.20

VZ

43.97

58.80 56.05 -1.04 -1.8

WMT

81.78 109.98 100.58 +.30 +0.3

... Walgreen Boots

+5.9 +24.2

7 2.41f

+1.9 +17.2 24 2.08f

WBA

59.07

80.68 79.90 +.13 +0.2 +10.0 +22.9 14

WFC

50.02

66.31 53.56 +.33 +0.6 -11.7

1.76

-2.3 13 1.72f

Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months. Other: x - ex-dividend.

BUSINESS DIGEST Belleville Schnucks closing • Schnucks plans to close one of its three stores in Belleville, the company announced Wednesday. The store that is closing, at 110 Carlyle Plaza Drive, is near a former Shop ’n Save that was among those recently acquired by and rebranded as Schnucks. “We have evaluated what we could do to make this store more successful for quite some time, and earlier this year, it became apparent that there was simply no path to profitability, so we made the difficult decision not to renew our lease,” Schnucks President and COO Dave Peacock said in a news release. The store will go dark early next year, the company said. The 70 workers will be offered jobs at other Schnucks stores. The company said it plans to renovate its newest Belleville store, at 800 Carlyle Avenue, before the other one closes. The store that is closing had originally opened as a National supermarket in 1995 before Schnucks bought out that chain in 1995. Icahn sues Dell over IPO plans • Activist investor Carl Icahn sued Dell Technologies Thursday, alleging that the computer maker did not disclose financial information related to its plans to go public by buying back its tracking stock. Icahn, who owns 9.3 percent of Dell, called the proposed deal a “conflicted transaction that benefits the controlling stockholders, at the expense of the DVMT stockholders.” Dell said in July that it would pay $21.7 billion in cash and stock to buy back shares tied to its interest in software company VMware Inc., returning it to the stock market without an initial public offering. Icahn and other hedge fund investors have resisted the plan, saying the proposed deal massively undervalues the tracking stock. Dell will hold a shareholder meeting on Dec. 11 to vote on the deal. A Dell spokesman said Icahn’s allegations were “unfounded.” Stifel acquiring New York’s First Empire • Stifel Financial Corp. is acquiring First Empire

Holding Corp. and its subsidiaries, including First Empire Securities Inc., an institutional broker-dealer specializing in the fixed income markets. Financial terms were not disclosed. Based in Hauppauge, N.Y., First Empire provides a fixed income products and services for credit unions, regional banks, insurance companies, pensions, and municipalities. “With this acquisition, we will be able to further grow and diversify our client base and also strengthen our offerings by delivering additional services and more robust loan trading capabilities,” Eric Needleman, head of fixed income at St. Louis-based Stifel, said in a statement. Express Scripts sale closing by year’s end • Cigna Corp. said Thursday that its $52 billion acquisition of St. Louis Countybased pharmacy benefits manager Express Scripts Holding Co. was on track to close by the end of the year. Cigna CEO David Cordani said on a conference call that the deal has won 23 state approvals, with six others pending. The Department of Justice cleared the deal in September. U.S. is now world’s top oil producer • The United States is pumping record amounts of oil, vaulting over Russia to become the world’s biggest producer of crude. The Energy Information Administration said Thursday that the U.S. produced more than 11.3 million barrels a day in August, a 4 percent increase over the old record set in July. Russia’s energy ministry estimates that country pumped 11.2 million barrels a day in August. OPEC reports Saudi Arabia pumped 10.4 million barrels a day. It’s the first time since 1973 that the U.S. leads the world in oil production. Several states hit record production in August, including Texas, which accounts for about 40 percent of U.S. crude. The energy agency says pipeline bottlenecks in Texas and New Mexico are causing more use of trucks and rail cars to haul oil. From staff and wire reports

YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO

2.13 1.63 1.13

5.25 4.75 4.25

LAST

NET CHG

1YR AGO

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 52-wk T-bill 2-year T-note 5-year T-note 7-year T-note 10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

2.31 2.49 2.65 2.83 2.96 3.05 3.14 3.39

-0.02 ... -0.01 -0.04 -0.02 -0.02 -0.01 -0.02

1.16 1.29 1.43 1.62 2.02 2.23 2.37 2.86

NET 1YR LAST CHG AGO

BONDS

PRIME FED RATE FUNDS

Barclays Glob Agg Bd Barclays USAggregate Barclays US High Yield Moodys AAA Corp Idx Barclays US Corp 10-Yr. TIPS

2.22 3.59 6.86 4.27 4.28 1.11

+0.02 +0.03 -0.06 +0.04 +0.04 +0.02

1.61 2.60 5.43 3.58 3.15 .49

GlobalMarkets

2.56

-9.8

USB

0.13 Wells Fargo

-.14 -0.3

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell to 3.14 percent Thursday. Yields affect rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.

TREASURIES

...

1.94 US Bancorp

0.32 WalMart

+23.70 +.50 +19.80

2.25

TGT UPS

Silver

0.52

70.66 101.43 91.43 +3.01 +3.4 +15.4 +6.6 24

RGA

31.09 24.93

-.15 -2.9

+1.6 +8.4 26 4.64f

PRFT

... Reinsurance Gp

... UPS B

5.78

1.00

POST

... Reliv

0.94 Target Corp.

...

MA

18.49

0.04 Spire Inc

6

+4.8 +21.3 20 1.92f

MCD

-4.3 +0.7 12 0.52f Verizon +4.7 +6.2 20

LEE

4.12

3.08

OLN

0.28 Perficient

CHG

CLOSE

1236.00 14.73 862.80

Gold

1.52

-4.8 +8.5 23

0.60 McDonald’s

-9.0 11 1.80f Stifel Financial

+0.4 +8.3 23

-.12 -0.3 -11.0 -11.3 dd

160.53 215.43 180.46 +4.58 +2.6

0.20 Olin

-.65 -1.0 +12.4 +14.4 32 1.04b Post Holdings

Charter

4.71

1.60 Lee Enterprises

18.97 16.86 +.46 +2.8 +19.7 +9.6 21 0.24a 45.52 36.47

ARII

.0279 .7074 .2696 1.2771 .7593 .1433 1.1314 .0135 .2686 .008845 .049294 .0152 .0679 .000877 .9917

PreciousMetals NEW YORK

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV

11.32

BUD

9

52-WK LO HI 30.56

American Railcar

PREV

.0280 .7207 .2709 1.3018 .7641 .1444 1.1409 .0137 .2701 .008874 .049684 .0152 .0692 .000889 .9979

Interestrates Interestrates

FF

ABInBev

Argentina Australia Brazil Britain Canada China Euro India Israel Japan Mexico Russia So. Africa So. Korea Switzerland

Platinum

GM HD

$56.51

Vol.: 9.0m (3.2x avg.) PE: 20.3 Mkt. Cap: $11.9 b Yield: 2.4%

FOREIGN CURRENCY IN DOLLARS CLOSE

Chicago BOT is in cents.

Stocks of Local Interest

O

ExchangeRates

CHICAGO BOT

Soybeans

A S 52-week range

$33.50

$23.33

Vol.: 16.2m (3.1x avg.) PE: 160.8 Mkt. Cap: $5.9 b Yield: 3.7%

27,200

23,200

40

O

Futures

Close: 2,740.37 Change: 28.63 (1.1%)

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Vol.: 22.5m (2.3x avg.) PE: 57.7 Mkt. Cap: $134.5 b Yield: 2.6%

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$51.32

Vol.: 3.9m (1.5x avg.) PE: 21.0 Mkt. Cap: $52.6 b Yield: 0.0%

Charts show stocks that made the news yesterday.

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CF

Close: $51.05 3.02 or 6.3% The company said higher fertilizer prices are helping its business in the latest quarter.

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CF Industries

HBI

Close: $16.22 -0.94 or -5.5% The underwear, t-shirt and sock maker reported weak revenue and cut its forecasts, citing the impact of Sears’ bankruptcy. $20

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Hanesbrands

DWDP

Close: $58.27 4.35 or 8.1% The chemicals giant posted a bigger-than-expected profit and forecast more savings from a cost-cutting program. $80

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DowDuPont

CI

Close: $216.28 2.47 or 1.2% The health insurer raised its annual forecasts after a strong quarterly report.

INDEX S&P 500 Frankfurt DAX London FTSE 100 Hong Kong Hang Seng Paris CAC-40 Mexico City Bolsa Tokyo Nikkei 225 Sao Paolo Bovespa Toronto Zurich

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+2.50% -11.22% -7.45% -15.05% -4.27% -7.92% -4.73% +15.73% -6.53% -3.89%

Trade optimism lifts stocks for third day in succession REUTERS

U.S. stocks rose for a third straight session on Thursday as President Donald Trump said trade talks with China were “moving along nicely,” reviving hopes that the two countries can resolve their trade dispute. Adding to the upbeat mood, the latest round of results from companies was mostly positive. Trump said he plans to meet with his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping at the G-20 summit in Argentina at the end of the month. The trade-sensitive S&P industrial sector rose 1.7 percent, with Boeing Co. and Caterpillar Inc. among companies leading the gains. “Maybe there’s going to be some hope that a trade deal with China will actually come through,” said Robert Pavlik, chief investment strategist and senior portfolio manager at SlateStone Wealth LLC in New York. Beyond that, investors are

feeling a bit more comfortable after gains this week, he said. “Now you get a little bit of fear of missing out, mixing in with, ‘I don’t believe this is actually happening,’” he said. “The fear of missing out seems to be on the winning side.” Despite ending higher on Wednesday, the S&P 500 closed its worst month in seven years, following fears of a widening global trade dispute, rising borrowing costs, and that U.S. earnings growth may slow more than forecast in 2019. The S&P materials index was up 3.0 percent, with DowDuPont Inc. surging after it reported strong results and plans for a $3 billion share buyback. Apple Inc. was up slightly ahead of its results, due after the bell. The technology index rose 1.2 percent, continuing to recover from the recent sell-off. The Dow Jones industrial average rose 264.98 points, or 1.06 percent, to 25,380.74, the S&P 500 gained 28.63 points,

or 1.06 percent, to 2,740.37 and the Nasdaq Composite added 128.16 points, or 1.75 percent, to 7,434.06. Also helping were robust earnings reports from three Apple suppliers, NXP Semiconductors, Dialog Semiconductor and Qorvo Inc. Technology-related stocks, which have led the stock market’s bull run in recent years, helped lead the selling in October, with the S&P 500 tech index down 8 percent last month. The Nasdaq is up 5.4 percent for the last three sessions, its biggest three-day gain since February 2016. Of the 348 companies in the S&P 500 that have reported results, 77 percent have reported earnings above analysts’ expectations, pushing the aggregate third-quarter earnings growth estimate for S&P 500 companies to 26.2 percent, according to IBES data from Refinitiv.

Enterprise Financial Services is buying one of New Mexico’s largest local banks for $213 million FROM STAFF REPORTS

Clayton-based Enterprise Financial Services Corp., the holding company of Enterprise Bank & Trust, is buying Trinity Capital Corporation, the holding company of Los Alamos National Bank, for $213 million. Los Alamos, N.M.-based Trinity had $1.3 billion in assets, $714 million in loans and $1.1 billion in deposits as of June 30. Los Alamos National Bank has six banking offices in Los Alamos, Santa Fe and Albuquerque, N.M. n the sale finalizes, the combined company will have about $7 billion in assets. The transaction has been unani-

mously approved by the board of directors of both banks, Enterprise Financial said Thursday, and is expected to close in early 2019, pending shareholder and regulatory approval. Lally Los Alamos National Bank “has a deep history and commitment to their employees, customers and communities that is demonstrated by a dominant market share and extraordinary customer loyalty. Enterprise has a similar philosophy of supporting its communities, and

encouraging its employees to do the same,” Enterprise Financial’s president and CEO Jim Lally said. “We believe this combination of like cultures positions us to better serve all our constituents for the foreseeable future.” Wells Fargo Securities was a financial adviser to Enterprise Financial, and Holland & Knight was Enterprise Financial’s legal counsel. Keefe, Bruyette & Woods, a Stifel company, was a financial adviser to Trinity Capital; Hunton Andrew Kurth was the company’s legal counsel. Enterprise Bank & Trust has 28 branches in St. Louis, Kansas City and Phoenix.


B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

BUSINESS

M 1 • FrIDAy • 11.02.2018

Phone battery life is getting worse Smartphones, constantly in use, are gobbling power more quickly BY GEOFFREY A. FOWLER Washington Post

If you recently bought a new flagship phone, chances are its battery life is worse than an older model’s. For the last few weeks, I’ve been performing the same battery test over and over again on 13 phones. With a few notable exceptions, this year’s top models underperformed last year’s. The new iPhone XS died 21 minutes earlier than last year’s iPhone X. Google’s Pixel 3 lasted nearly an hour and a half less than its Pixel 2. Phone makers tout all sorts of tricks to boost battery life, including more-efficient processors, low-power modes and artificial intelligence to manage app drain. Yet my results, and tests by other reviewers I spoke with, reveal an open secret in the industry: The lithium-ion batteries in smartphones are hitting an inflection point where they simply can’t keep up. “Batteries improve at a very slow pace, about 5 percent per year,” says Nadim Maluf, the CEO of a Silicon Valley firm called Qnovo that helps optimize batteries. “But phone power consumption is growing up faster than 5 percent.” Blame it on the demands of high-resolution screens, more complicated apps and, most of all, our seeming inability to put the darn phone down. Lithiumion batteries, for all their rechargeable wonder, also have some physical limitations, including capacity that declines over time — and the risk of explosion if they’re damaged or improperly disposed of. And the phone power situation is about to get worse. New ultrafast wireless technology called 5G, coming to the U.S. neighborhoods soon, will make even greater demands on our beleaguered batteries. My test has limitations. Your experience will depend on how you use your phone, and there are steps you can take to make your phone life stretch. Two phones that performed well in my tests, Samsung’s Note9 and Apple’s iPhone XR, offer ideas about how to design phones to last longer — at least until a totally new battery tech comes along. My results made me do a double take, so I called up a squad of other tech journalists also obsessed with testing at CNET, Tom’s Guide and Consumer Reports. “Our overall average battery life is coming down,” says Mark Spoonauer, the editor in chief of Tom’s Guide, who also found the iPhone XS battery died sooner

than the iPhone X. Many of the phones with the longest battery life, he adds, are a year old. But not all other reviewers have noticed the same declines — and the differences in our results help shed some light on what’s going on. Larger phones often last longer, but it’s not as simple as the size of the battery inside. Remember the BlackBerry? Those had much smaller batteries than today’s smartphones but could go days without being charged. There’s no perfect battery test. Mine, which I borrowed from an industry group called the Embedded Microprocessor Benchmark Consortium, particularly stresses the screen. I use a light meter to set all the phones at the same brightness and then force their web browsers to reload and scroll through a series of sites I serve through a local WiFi network. I rerun the tests as many times as possible, and then average the results. CNET, which like me found conspicuous dips in battery life between the iPhone 8 and iPhone X (and Samsung’s Galaxy S8 and S9), tests screens at 50 percent brightness playing a looping video with Airplane Mode turned on. What we both discovered: Phones with fancy screens that are especially high-resolution or use tech such as OLED perform worse. (That tech can require more power to push out light.) So if you want your phone to last longer, turn down the screen’s brightness. Or stop looking at your phone so many times each day, if you can break our nationwide spell of phone addiction. Tom’s Guide throws another factor into the mix: the cellular connection. It makes phones run through a series of websites streamed over LTE. Unlike me, it also saw a big battery life hit to the Pixel 3 XL versus the Pixel 2 XL. Another lesson: If you want the battery to last longer, use WiFi when possible — or even Airplane Mode when you don’t need to be reachable. Both Apple and Android phones also offer low-power modes (not reflected in our testing) that reduce some draining data functions without taking you offline. The counterexample is Consumer Reports, which found the new iPhone XS lasted 25 percent longer than last year’s iPhone X. Its test uses a finger robot — yes, you read that right — to make phones cycle through lots of different functions and apps, including pauses in use where the screen turns off. Consumer Reports is probably better testing the phone’s pro-

New HQ for Post Holdings POST • FROM B1

when the well-recognized cereal brand name separated from the former St. Louis-based Ralcorp Holdings into a standalone company. Some of Post Holdings’ brands include Honey Bunches of Oats, Raisin Bran and Malt-OMeal. In the ensuing years, Ralcorp was gobbled up by different

companies while Post Holdings bought other food companies and grew into a large consumer product company with a litany of brands and $5.2 billion in sales last year. In August, it engineered a separation of its non-brandname food division into a subsidiary that it said would net it $875 million in proceeds while still retaining a 60 percent stake in the new company, 8th Avenue Food

GEOFFREY A. FOWLER • Washington Post

The battery test makes phones set to equal brightness scroll through the same websites until running down.

WHEN ‘ALL DAY’ BATTERIES RUN OUT We tested 13 phones by making them surf the web constantly. Many 2018 models (in black) couldn’t keep up with their 2017 counterparts (in gray). iPhone XR

12:25

Samsung Note9

12:00

iPhone 8 Plus

10:10

Pixel 3 XL

10:07

iPhone XS Max

10:06

Pixel 2

9:57

iPhone 8

9:51

iPhone X

9:30

Pixel 2 XL

9:26

iPhone XS

9:09

Samsung S9+ Pixel 3 Samsung S9

8:57 8:28 8:17

SOURCE: Washington Post Gadget Lab | Washington Post

cessor, an area where a number of companies — but particularly Apple — have made efficiency gains. So overall, are battery lives decreasing or increasing? “You can’t make a straight trend,” says Consumer Reports director of electronics testing Maria Rerecich. I wish companies had more standardized ways to talk about battery life. Since the earliest days of the iPhone, Apple has described battery life through specific measures, including “talk time” and “internet use.” Recently it’s also taken on some more squishy language: The iPhone XS “lasts up to 30 minutes longer than iPhone X,” it says, a measure based on data about how long people go before

plugging back in. So what about the two 2018 phones that did better in my tests? Samsung’s Note9 succeeds by stuffing in more battery. It contains a battery capacity of 4,000 mAh, up from the already-huge 3,300 mAh in the Note8. (The iPhone XS battery is only 2,659 mAh, and actually slightly downgraded from the X.) Lots of phones have followed the bigger battery trend. iFixit, a repair group that performs teardown analysis of phone components, says battery capacities have almost doubled in the last five years. How much further can the size game go? Huawei just introduced a phone called Mate 20 Pro, not sold in the U.S., with a 4,200

& Provisions. Post declined to comment on the plans for the new building. Nor it would share its current headcount in St. Louis. In 2012, when it was first spun off, Brentwood officials said it employed some 50 people, according to an old database on the city’s website. Post Holdings’ new headquarters plans call for 169 parking spots on the site. Brentwood aldermen approved those plans in September. Koerkenmeier said then that no

residents had raised any concerns about the proposed new office campus, which she noted is surrounded by other commercial and industrial buildings on the Hanley Road corridor. When an alderman asked at the September meeting if the company was vacating its current location, which it owns, and consolidating on the new office site, Koerkenmeier responded: “That’s my understanding.” Post Holdings also rents space at 1335 Strassner Drive, another

mAh battery. Larger, denser batteries can be more dangerous (remember Samsung’s exploding Note7?), not to mention heavier. The Note9, which also has a giant screen and a stylus, weighs 7.1 oz — more than twice a deck of cards. Apple’s iPhone XR, the new phone I recommend to most people, has a different approach. It scales back on the screen tech — lower resolution, less bright and lower-quality color — in ways that benefit battery life tremendously: The XR lasted 3 hours longer than the top iPhone XS, even though the its screen is actually a smidge larger. (Bonus: It also costs $250 less.) “Consumers have to start getting ready for compromise,” said Maluf, the CEO of the battery optimization company. Perhaps the market will fragment further, making phones more like buying cars. That market was eventually upended by fuel-economy models; instead of the gas-guzzling Cadillac, you could choose the Honda. Apple’s iPhone XR is the Civic of smartphones. Our near-future choices are likely either to get an economy phone or plug in more often. Faster and more convenient charging is the strategy for some makers. Many phones now support wireless charging, though few cafes, offices and airport lounges now offer it. And then there’s the plug itself. Apple, which has shipped the same 5-watt charging brick for years, could take a lesson from Google, which sells its Pixel phones with an 18-watt charger and claims you can get 7 hours of use from just 15 minutes of charging. The one thing that’s almost as bad as running out of juice is being tethered to an outlet.

property in the Hanley Industrial Park area. Asked at the September meeting about the timeline for building the new office, Pauline Wiegrefe, who lists herself on LinkedIn as director of corporate facilities at Post Holdings, told the board: “I’d love to be in this area by the end of 2019. That may be very aggressive, but we can try for that.” Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com


BUSINESS

11.02.2018 • FriDay • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-DiSPaTCH • B5

U.S. average mortgage rates ease; 30-year at 4.83 percent

Bottled water, pizza bagels, gum want ‘healthy’ status BY CANDICE CHOI associated Press

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Pizza bagels, chewing gum and bottled water want to play a starring new role in our diets: Foods that can be called healthy. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is revamping its definition of healthy to reflect our changing understanding of nutrition science. The push is fueling debate about eating habits and what the new standard should say. Frozen food makers are seeking special rules for “mini meals,” citing little pizza bagels and dumplings as examples that might qualify. Chewing gum and bottled water companies say they should no longer be shut out from using the term just because their products don’t provide nutrients. Advocacy groups and health professionals are also weighing in, raising concern about ingredients such as sugar. Some say the word healthy is inherently misleading when applied to a single product instead of an overall diet. “The problem is that healthy is relative,” said Bruce Y. Lee, a professor of international health at Johns Hopkins. Subsisting on broccoli alone, for instance, wouldn’t be healthy. The federal standards for use of the word “healthy” on labels was established in 1994 and set limits on total fat and cholesterol. Susan Mayne, who heads the FDA’s food labeling division, said the definition reflected decades-old understanding of nutrition and needed to be updated. With the revamp, she said, people will be able to trust the word “healthy,” unlike many other terms on packages, is based in science.

NUTTY HEALTH The government’s dusty definition of healthy came under scrutiny in late 2015, when the FDA warned Kind that its snack bars had too much fat to use the term. Kind pushed back, saying the fat came from nuts. Since the rule was established more than two decades ago, nutrition experts have drawn a greater distinction between “good fats” such as those found in nuts and “bad fats” such as the trans fats in oils that are partially hydrogenated, an industrial process that gives foods a longer shelf life. The link between dietary cholesterol and heart disease is also no longer clear. Separate U.S. dietary guidelines, which are updated every five years, no longer set limits on total fat or cholesterol. They still

Long-term U.S. mortgage rates declined this week, in a quiet pause after weeks of market anxiety over rising interest rates. Home borrowing rates still remain at their highest levels in more than seven years, dampening the outlook for prospective homebuyers. Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac said Thursday the rate on 30-year, fixed-rate mortgages eased to an average 4.83 percent this week from 4.86 percent last week. A year ago, it stood at 3.94 percent. The average rate on 15-year, fixedrate loans slipped to 4.23 percent this week from 4.29 percent last week. Anxiety over rising interest rates, which result from strength in the economy, has buffeted financial markets in recent weeks and spilled over into the housing market. U.S. stocks rallied on Tuesday and Wednesday after falling sharply from early October through the last few days of the month — a skid that wiped out their gains from earlier in the year. The combination of higher mortgage rates and increasing home prices has made home ownership less affordable. Despite the higher borrowing costs, “the monthly mortgage payment remains affordable,” Freddie Mac chief economist Sam Khater said. For many buyers, he said, the persistent lack of available properties for first-time homebuyers is a bigger hurdle than higher mortgage rates because choices are limited. And the shortage of available homes has pushed prices higher. To calculate average mortgage rates, Freddie Mac surveys lenders across the country between Monday and Wednesday each week. The average doesn’t include extra fees, known as points, which most borrowers must pay to get the lowest rates. The average fee on 30-year fixedrate mortgages was unchanged from last week at 0.5 point. The fee on 15year mortgages rose to 0.5 point from 0.4 point. The average rate for five-year adjustable-rate mortgages dropped to 4.04 percent from 4.14 percent last week. The fee held steady at 0.3 point.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kind wants to label its snack bars, as seen last year at a supermarket in New York, as “healthy,” but the FDA says they have too much fat. Kind argues that the fat is from nuts.

recommend avoiding trans fats and limiting saturated fats, such as those found in meat and milk. But even the link between saturated fats and heart disease is now questioned . Now sugar has become more of a concern, with some health experts saying our past fear of fat led to people gobbling up low-fat products high in sugar. The shifting views reflect the pitfalls of nutrition science. Most food studies are based on links between what people say they eat and their health, which leaves the door open for flawed conclusions. Pinning down cause-and-effect relationships is harder. It’s why the effort to redefine “healthy” invites such debate. After launching the push in late 2016, the FDA received more than 1,140 public comments on the matter. The next step is for the FDA to propose a new definition, which would be subject to another round of public comment. The agency won’t say when it expects to establish a final rule with the new definition.

LIKE MOMMA USED TO MAKE “Healthy” was once just another generic marketing term, like “wholesome” or “like momma used to make,” said Xaq Frohlich, a professor of food history at Auburn University. After a proliferation of products making claims about health and disease, the FDA set ground rules for the word. “The reason why ‘healthy’ is getting

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attention is because a broad part of the American public really wants their food to be healthy,” Frohlich said. But beyond the regulatory definition, what people consider healthy varies. Among the notable dietary tribes today are adherents of paleo, gluten-free, organic and vegan diets. Some of their views are reflected in comments to the FDA last year. The Sierra Club wants “healthy” to exclude foods made with genetically engineered and artificial ingredients. The National Pasta Association wants to the option to call gluten-free pasta healthy. In addition to limiting fat and cholesterol, the current standard requires the presence of a nutrient such as calcium, fiber, iron or vitamin C. It’s partly why bottled water and sugar-free gum companies say they’re unfairly excluded. Richard Mann, a lawyer for the International Chewing Gum Association, said sugar-free gum had none of the nutrients people are supposed to limit. “It doesn’t have fat. It doesn’t have sugar. It has virtually no calories,” he said. Some question whether an updated definition will make a difference. The American Academy of Pediatrics says companies will probably just reformulate snacks to meet the new rules. Companies may have added incentive to do so: The FDA is also considering a symbol that would make it easier for people to identify products that meet the new definition.

Landfill looks to share in cleanup WEST LAKE • FROM B1

“They also retained ownership, for a period of time, of Manhattan Project residues from uranium refining activities,” said Richard Callow, a spokesman for Bridgeton Landfill. “Some of those residues, which were initially stored at the (St. Louis Airport Site) and later at Latty Avenue, led to the contamination of West Lake Landfill. We believe that EverZinc, like Mallinckrodt, should have a seat at the table.” EverZinc declined to comment and said it was not aware of the lawsuit when contacted by the Post-Dispatch. At present, the $205 million remediation plan chosen by the EPA is set to be divided among Republic Services and two other groups deemed liable at the site: the U.S. Department of Energy and the Chicago energy company Exelon, whose subsidiary ComEd once owned the uranium processor, Cotter Corp.

LAURIE SKRIVAN • P-D

A sign warns in 2012 of contamination at the West Lake Landfill in Bridgeton.

Superfund law lets those entities — formally identified as “potentially responsible parties” — decide how to divide remediation costs among themselves. The Post-Dispatch was told that mediation on the matter had not yet begun. Bryce Gray • 314-340-8307 @_BryceGray on Twitter bgray@post-dispatch.com

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BUSINESS

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 11.02.2018

Crafting in the backyard WOOD • FROM B1

scraps seemed to hold potential. They were strong and uniquely shaped, with branches that angled and curved like a baby deer finding its legs. And they were prolific. “You can get it anywhere. Act now — supplies are unlimited!” Dufer likes to joke. The construction process was a departure from the exacting measurements of furniture he is commissioned to build, for which “the right angle is king,” he said. “This is not your typical woodworking. It’s kind of abstract. You learn about the structure of nature, how amazingly strong a Y connection or branch connection is.” Soon, just like the plant itself, the bush honeysuckle tables he was making began to proliferate, spilling out of his crowded basement workshop and into his backyard. Some were small enough for a child’s playroom, one had a sculptural, mushroom-cap metal top, and others became benches sitting atop a jumble of intertwining legs. The centerpiece of the backyard — with its scalloped yellow top holding a basket of oversized wooden apples and an enormous blue pitcher — towers over the rest of the furniture like a prop from a scene in “Alice in Wonderland.” At 6 feet tall, it is the as-yet undisputed world’s largest bush honeysuckle table, said Dufer.

PROCESS OVER PRODUCT Once his idea had come to fruition, Dufer came up with a name: Think About Tables. “It came out of a conversation, of just, ‘What are you doing down there?’ I’m thinking about tables.” He contacted Shaw Nature Reserve about teaching a table-making workshop. Dufer was able to cut the process to just the basics, relying on the in-

Tight networks lower costs INSURANCE • FROM B1

fered through the ACA exchanges in 2018, according to Avalere, a health research firm in Washington. PPOs typically provide easier access to out-ofnetwork specialists and facilities, and partial — sometimes even generous — payment for such services. Measured another way, the number of ACA plans offering any out-of-network coverage declined to 29 percent in 2018 from 58 percent in 2015, according to a recent analysis by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. In contrast, PPOs have long been and remain the dominant type of health plan offered by employers nationwide. Forty-nine percent of the 152 million people and their dependents who were covered through work in 2018 were enrolled in a PPO-type plan. Only 16 percent were in HMOs, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation’s annual survey of employment-based health insurance. The good news for people buying health insurance on their own is that the trend toward narrow networks appears to be slowing. “When premiums shot up over the past few years, insurers shifted to more restrictive plans with smaller provider networks to try and lower costs and premiums,” said Chris Sloan, a director at Avalere. “With premium increases slowing, at least for now, that could stabilize.” Some research supports this prediction. Daniel Polsky, a health economist at the University of Pennsylvania, found that the number of ACA plans nationwide with narrow physician networks declined to 21 percent in 2017

BUSH HONEYSUCKLE SWEEP Invasive bush honeysuckle is harmful to woodlands, trails and stream banks, choking out native species and contributing to erosion. In the spring 2018 sweep, about 10 acres were cleared of the plant in six locations across the region. Area conservation organizations are hosting volunteer removal days for the fall sweep through Nov. 17 in locations including Shaw Nature Reserve, the Katy Trail, Forest Park, Kirkwood, Wildwood and Collinsville. Volunteers should wear sturdy shoes and work gloves. For more information and to register, go to missouribotanicalgarden. org.

herent stability of a threelegged structure, a handsaw, a drill and a few juryrigged steps. “I show the students a pile of sticks and away they go,” he said. He teaches classes at Shaw in the fall and spring, when honeysuckle removal is at its peak. Most of his students are adults, but he prefers to teach his techniques to youngsters who may have never built anything from scratch. “I love working with kids. They don’t have woodworking or shop classes anymore,” he said. “This is a chance to learn about structure, cutting wood, getting something to balance.” He has taught private sessions at schools that then sell the student’s pieces as a fundraiser, and has put on art shows alone and with his students’ work. This weekend, his Think About Tables pieces will be featured at Shaw Nature Reserve’s annual art show in Gray Summit. But earning money from the bush honeysuckle furniture — which have sold for less than $200 and up to $1,300 — is not Dufer’s priority. “It’s not really what I’m trying to do. It’s to teach people how to do it. You take (the table) home and you’re planting the seed for conversation about the damage bush honeysuckle does.”

Dale Dufer harvests wood this week from bush honeysuckle growing in his backyard near Forest Park. He plans to build the trimmed bushes into table legs.

PROMOTING BIODIVERSITY “Dale is a wonderful spokesperson for what we do and our mission,” said Jon Serfas, the event supervisor at the nature reserve. “He’s kind of a pioneer. You can’t build buildings out of the honeysuckle, but the material is really strong. It comes in many shapes and makes unique and functional furniture. “And it helps tell the story of the removal of the plant that causes so many problems to our woodlands.”

Bush honeysuckle was introduced to the United States as an ornamental plant, one that grows thick and tall to provide shade and privacy. But it takes over quickly, “greening out” in the spring earlier than native plants and staying green later in the fall. The leaves hog the sunlight, and the bush competes with native plants for nutrients. The plant’s red berries attract birds who spread the seeds far and wide. In the past several years, “honeysuckle sweeps”

IF YOU GO

hosted by organizations such as the Missouri Botanical Garden, Forest Park Forever and the Missouri Department of Conservation have helped loosen honeysuckle’s grip on area parks and woodlands.

“As you’re removing the invasive species and opening land to native plants, you’re seeing biodiversity go up, providing more habitats for native plants and pollinators,” Serfas said. Most of the honeysuckle

especially a paucity of specialists in immunology, dermatology and rheumatology. The $900,000 in potential fines continues to hang over the company’s head. Centene Corp, the Clayton, Mo.-based insurer that owns Coordinated Care, has pledged to improve its network. Pennsylvania Insurance Commissioner Jessica Altman said she expected

residents buying insurance in the individual marketplace for 2019 to have a wider choice of providers in their networks. “We think and hope insurers are gradually building more stable networks of providers,” Altman said.

their networks. About 20 states, including Missouri, now have laws that restrict surprise bills or balance billing, or that mandate mediation over disputed medical bills, especially those stemming from emergency care. Even more have rules on maintaining accurate, upto-date provider directories. The problem is the laws vary widely in the degree to

from 25 percent in 2016. Polsky is completing an analysis of 2018 plans and expects the percent of narrow network plans to remain “relatively constant” for this year and into 2019. “Fewer insurers are exiting the marketplace, and there’s less churn in the plans being offered,” Polsky said. “That’s good news for consumers.” Insurers may still be contracting with fewer hospitals, however, to constrain costs in that expensive arena of care, according to a report by the consulting firm McKinsey & Co. It found that 53 percent of plans had narrow hospital networks in 2017, up from 48 percent in 2014. “Narrow networks are a trade-off,” said Paul Ginsburg, a health care economist at the Brookings Institution. “They can be successful when done well. At a time when we need to find ways to control rising health care costs, narrow networks are one legitimate strategy.” Ginsburg also notes that there’s no evidence to date that the quality of care is any less in narrow versus broader networks, or that people are being denied access to needed care. Mike Kreidler, Washington state’s insurance commissioner, said ACA insurers in that state “are figuring out they can’t get away with provider networks that are inadequate to meet people’s needs.” “People have voted with their feet, moving to more affordable choices like HMOs, but they won’t tolerate draconian restrictions,” Kreidler said. The state is stepping in, too. In December 2017, Kreidler fined one insurer — Coordinated Care — $1.5 million for failing to maintain an adequate network of doctors. The state suspended $1 million of the fine if the insurer had no further violations. In March 2018, the plan was docked another $100,000 for similar gaps,

JOHANNA HUCKEBA • jhuckeba@post-dispatch.com

What: Art at the Shaw Nature Reserve Annual Show & Sale Where: Dana Brown Overnight Education Center, 307 Pinetum Loop Road, Gray Summit When: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday How much: $5 for adults; children and members are free More info: missouribotanicalgarden.org; 636-544-1014 To learn more about Dale Dufer’s Think About Tables project, go to woodworms.net.

NEW STATE LAWS Bad publicity and recent state laws are pushing insurers to modify their practices and shore up

that’s been removed gets burned or chipped, he said. But they set aside some interesting pieces for Dufer. Dufer often completes the tables with a top recovered from Lumber Logs in St. Louis. The urban tree recycler picks up trees that have been cut down and “gives them a better, more noble end,” said owner Tom Sontag. Without tree recycling, most would become mulch, he said. His business sells the majority of its reclaimed lumber to builders, but some trunks are cut into “cookies,” cross-section rounds that can be used for tabletops. “There’s a lot of different kinds of trees in the St. Louis area. There are a lot of species that are not commercially available,” Sontag said. “It’s a valuable resource that’s underused.” And making the most of resources that are already at hand has become Dufer’s career within a career. “I’m having fun,” he said. “What a treat to be able to find something at this stage in my life that can be fun. “I’m hoping someone does come along and goes after this in a monetary fashion. It’s a free resource, and it gives back in biodiversity.” Colleen Schrappen • 314-340-8072 @cschrappen on Twitter cschrappen@post-dispatch.com

which they “truly protect consumers,” said Claire McAndrew, a health policy analyst at Families USA, a consumer advocacy group in Washington. “It’s a patchwork system with some strong consumer protections and a lot of weaker ones.” Kaiser Health News is a national health policy news service. It is an editorially independent program of the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation.

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

FRIDAY • 11.02.2018 • C

WINNING RETURNS

Mizzou adjusting to change Tigers lose Porter but get to add Smith

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Coach Cuonzo Martin is trying to stay focused on the positive. BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • With less

PHOTOS BY J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

The Blues’ Tyler Bozak celebrates after scoring past Golden Knights goalie Marc-Andre Fleury in the third period Thursday night.

Days off for Allen, team no problem

BLUES

5

KNIGHTS

3

> 7 p.m. Saturday vs. Wild, FSM

BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

There was plenty for the Blues to be concerned about entering Thursday’s games with the Vegas Golden Knights. Just five days after being flattened in a goal-mouth collision and going through the concussion protocol, would Jake Allen be OK? How would forward Robby Fabbri and defenseman Carl Gunnarsson hold up in the first games back from injury? And with four days between games for the second time this young season, would the Blues be sluggish against Vegas? At least as far as the bottom line is concerned, there were no worries. The Blues put together consecutive wins for first time

Fabbri shows heart, skill in Blues’ return BE BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Blues players congratulate Oskar Sundqvist (70) after he scored his second goal of the game at Enterprise Center.

MUCH FASTER

CAREER

THURSDAY

Oskar Sundqvist’s career stats entering Thursday vs. Thursday’s game.

734

11:29

minutes on the ice

time on ice

2

2

goals

goals

See BLUES • Page C5

Tigers’ Gillespie grew up rooting for the Gators

than a week before Missouri’s first men’s basketball game of the season, Cuonzo Martin isn’t set on a starting lineup, but he’s got a good reason for the uncertainty. Two actually. Less than two weeks ago he lost his most celebrated player to a knee injury. A week later he learned one of his highly touted transfers was suddenly eligible. That’s a lot to process in a short amount of time. This much Martin knows heading into his second season at Mizzou: All-Southeastern Conference candidate Jontay Porter is done for the year, perhaps for his college career, while guard Mark Smith is now part of the rotation. The NCAA cleared Mizzou’s waiver request for the Illinois transfer, giving Smith an immediate role in the backcourt. It’s been a bittersweet couple weeks for the Tigers. Meeting with reporters Thursday for the first time since Porter’s injury, Martin savored the sweet. Smith is “a guy who can make shots,” he said. “He’s a guy who can handle the ball. He’s a physical driver. From an offensive standpoint he has a lot of tools to help our team.”

Their cheers became gasps. Then came the roar. Robby Fabbri has always prompted a range of emotions from Blues fans. It took him just seconds to spin cycle their emotions on Thursday night. The introductory applause for the returning forward was still rippling around the Enterprise Center when his first test arrived with bad intentions. Should he really be out there against these guys? If you wondered about it entering the game, you weren’t the

See MU HOOPS • Page C6

See FREDERICKSON • Page C5

> Opener • 7 p.m. Tuesday vs. Central Ark.

Billikens stumble but outlast Tritons Mental approach upsets coach Ford

BY ANNE ROGERS Special to the Post-Dispatch

BY STU DURANDO St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CO LU M B I A , M O. • Edwin Farmer

thought Tyree Gillespie’s eyes were going to pop right out of his head. Farmer, the head football coach at Vanguard High School in Ocala, Fla., had taken some of his players 45 minutes north to Gainesville one weekend to watch a Florida Gators game. Every player was excited to see the university and experience the atmosphere of Gillespie “The Swamp.” But Gillespie was on another level. “His eyes were so bright,” Farmer said. “He knew that one day he could play there or be a part of whatever university wanted him if he could do the right thing. I looked in that kid’s eyes and saw that he wanted See MU • Page C7

BILL BARRETT • St. Louis U. photo

> 3 p.m. Saturday at No. 13 Florida, SEC Network

St. Louis University’s Jordan Goodwin works against UMSL’s Eric Dust (42) and Steve Webb in the Billikens’ victory Thursday night at Chaifetz Arena.

There were many signs that Travis Ford was not happy with what he was witnessing Thursday night, but two timeouts he called in the second SLU 71 half spoke volumes. Missouri-St. Louis UMSL 49 had scored six quick > Opener • 7 p.m. points to pull within Tuesday vs. SEMO, 14 of St. Louis UniverFSM Plus sity when he waved for the first. Not long after, one of SLU’s 24 turnovers that led to a breakaway layup prompted the other. The Billikens might have defeated the Tritons 71-49 at Chaifetz Arena, but it was not the performance Ford wanted to see five days before the season opener against Southeast Missouri State. He didn’t emerge from the locker room until 45 minutes after the game, having spent that time sitting in front of the See SLU • Page C6

SPORTS

Is it ever okay to encourage kids to “tough it out”?

Our MomDocs know.

For more information, visit ChildrensMD.org/Sports for trusted health advice from pediatricians who are also moms. ©S

1 M


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

FRIDAY • 11.02.2018 • C

WINNING RETURNS

Mizzou adjusting to change Tigers lose Porter but get to add Smith

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Coach Cuonzo Martin is trying to stay focused on the positive. BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • With less

PHOTOS BY J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

The Blues’ Tyler Bozak celebrates after scoring past Golden Knights goalie Marc-Andre Fleury in the third period Thursday night.

Days off for Allen, team no problem

BLUES

5

KNIGHTS

3

> 7 p.m. Saturday vs. Wild, FSM

BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

There was plenty for the Blues to be concerned about entering Thursday’s game with the Vegas Golden Knights. Just five days after being flattened in a goal-mouth collision and going through the concussion protocol, would goalie Jake Allen be OK? Well, when the Blues needed him most in the third period, he was strong as could be. How would forward Robby Fabbri and defenseman Carl Gunnarsson hold up in the first games back from injury? Well, Fabbri had an assist on his first shift of the night; Gunnarsson, as is his M.O., was steady as can be. And with four days between

Fabbri shows heart, skill in Blues’ return BE BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Blues players congratulate Oskar Sundqvist (70) after he scored his second goal of the game at Enterprise Center.

MUCH FASTER

CAREER

THURSDAY

Oskar Sundqvist’s career stats entering Thursday vs. Thursday’s game.

734

11:29

minutes on the ice

time on ice

2

2

goals

goals

See BLUES • Page C5

Tigers’ Gillespie grew up rooting for the Gators

than a week before Missouri’s first men’s basketball game of the season, Cuonzo Martin isn’t set on a starting lineup, but he’s got a good reason for the uncertainty. Two actually. Less than two weeks ago he lost his most celebrated player to a knee injury. A week later he learned one of his highly touted transfers was suddenly eligible. That’s a lot to process in a short amount of time. This much Martin knows heading into his second season at Mizzou: All-Southeastern Conference candidate Jontay Porter is done for the year, perhaps for his college career, while guard Mark Smith is now part of the rotation. The NCAA cleared Mizzou’s waiver request for the Illinois transfer, giving Smith an immediate role in the backcourt. It’s been a bittersweet couple weeks for the Tigers. Meeting with reporters Thursday for the first time since Porter’s injury, Martin savored the sweet. Smith is “a guy who can make shots,” he said. “He’s a guy who can handle the ball. He’s a physical driver. From an offensive standpoint he has a lot of tools to help our team.”

Their cheers became gasps. Then came the roar. Robby Fabbri has always prompted a range of emotions from Blues fans. It took him just seconds to spin-cycle their feelings Thursday night. The introductory applause for the returning forward was still rippling around the Enterprise Center when his first test arrived with bad intentions. Should he really be out there against these guys? If you wondered about it entering the game, you weren’t the

See MU HOOPS • Page C6

See FREDERICKSON • Page C5

> Opener • 7 p.m. Tuesday vs. Central Ark.

Billikens stumble but outlast Tritons Mental approach upsets coach Ford

BY ANNE ROGERS Special to the Post-Dispatch

BY STU DURANDO St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CO LU M B I A , M O. • Edwin Farmer

thought Tyree Gillespie’s eyes were going to pop right out of his head. Farmer, the head football coach at Vanguard High School in Ocala, Fla., had taken some of his players 45 minutes north to Gainesville one weekend to watch a Florida Gators game. Every player was excited to see the university and experience the atmosphere of Gillespie “The Swamp.” But Gillespie was on another level. “His eyes were so bright,” Farmer said. “He knew that one day he could play there or be a part of whatever university wanted him if he could do the right thing. I looked in that kid’s eyes and saw that he wanted See MU • Page C7

BILL BARRETT • St. Louis U. photo

> 3 p.m. Saturday at No. 13 Florida, SEC Network

St. Louis University’s Jordan Goodwin works against UMSL’s Eric Dust (42) and Steve Webb in the Billikens’ victory Thursday night at Chaifetz Arena.

There were many signs that Travis Ford was not happy with what he was witnessing Thursday night, but two timeouts he called in the second SLU 71 half spoke volumes. Missouri-St. Louis UMSL 49 had scored six quick > Opener • 7 p.m. points to pull within Tuesday vs. SEMO, 14 of St. Louis UniverFSM Plus sity when he signaled for the first. Not long after, one of SLU’s 24 turnovers that led to a breakaway layup prompted the other. And the accompanying facial expressions emphasized his frustration. The Billikens might have beat the Tritons 71-49 at Chaifetz Arena, but it was not the performance Ford wanted to see five days before the season opener against Southeast Missouri State. He didn’t emerge from the locker room See SLU • Page C6

SPORTS

Is it ever okay to encourage kids to “tough it out”?

Our MomDocs know.

For more information, visit ChildrensMD.org/Sports for trusted health advice from pediatricians who are also moms. ©S

2 M


SPORTS

C2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Saturday 11/3 vs. Wild 7 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 11/6 vs. Hurricanes 7 p.m. FSM

Friday 11/9 vs. Sharks 7 p.m. FSM

Sunday 11/11 vs. Wild 2 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 11/6 vs. SEMO 7 p.m. FSM Plus

Women’s basketball Saturday 11/10 vs. Troy 7 p.m. FSM

Friday 11/2 vs. IllinoisSpringfield (exh.) 5 p.m.

MEDIA VIEWS

Buck shrugs off his epic run He says dad’s heavy workload showed him the way

St. Louis U. • slubillikens.com | 314-977-4758 Men’s basketball

M 1 • FRIDAY • 11.02.2018

Friday 11/9 at Eastern Kentucky 11 a.m.

Mizzou • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Football Saturday 11/3 at Florida 3 p.m. SEC Network

Saturday 11/10 vs. Vanderbilt 11 a.m. SEC Network

M. basketball

W. basketball

Tuesday 11/6 vs. Central Arkansas 7 p.m.

Tuesday 11/6 at Western Illinois 8 p.m.

Illinois • fightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Football Saturday 11/3 vs. Minnesota 2:30 p.m. BTN

Men’s basketball Saturday 11/10 at Nebraska Time TBA TV TBA

Friday 11/2 vs. Illinois Wesleyan (exh.) 7 p.m.

Thursday 11/8 vs. Evansville 7 p.m.

SIUE • siuecougars.com | 855-748-3849 Men’s basketball Friday 11/2 vs. Kentucky State (exh.) 7 p.m.

Women’s basketball Tuesday 11/6 vs. Pacific 7 p.m.

Monday 11/5 vs. Illinois Wesleyan (exh.) 7 p.m.

Sunday 11/11 vs. Illinois State 2 p.m.

OTHER EVENTS ASSOCIATED PRESS FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

Joe Buck (left) works with Troy Aikman on Oct. 11, when his run of doing 15 games in 18 days in six cities started.

ON THE AIR AUTO RACING 1 p.m. NASCAR: Texas 500, first practice, NBCSN 3 p.m. NASCAR trucks: JAG Metals 350, qualifying, FS2 6 p.m. NASCAR: Texas 500, qualifying, NBCSN 7:30 p.m. NASCAR trucks: JAG Metals 350, FS1 BASKETBALL 6 p.m. College exhibition: Indiana (Pa.) at Kentucky, SEC Network 7 p.m. NBA: Thunder at Wizards, ESPN 7 p.m. NBA: Pacers at Bulls, FSM 8 p.m. NBA: Grizzlies at Jazz, FSM Plus 9:30 p.m. NBA: Timberwolves at Warriors, ESPN FOOTBALL 5 p.m. College: Pennsylvania at Cornell, ESPNU 6:30 p.m. College: Pittsburgh at Virginia, ESPN2 7 p.m. College: Western Kentucky at Middle Tennessee State, CBSSN 8 p.m. High school: Img Academy (Fla.) vs. Hoover (Ala.), ESPNU 9:30 p.m. College: Colorado at Arizona, FS1 GOLF 3:30 p.m. PGA: Shriners Hospitals, second round, GOLF 10:30 p.m. LPGA: TOTO Japan Classic, second round, GOLF 4 a.m. (Sat.) European PGA: Turkish Airlines Open, third round, GOLF HOCKEY 1 p.m. Panthers vs. Jets, NHL Network 9 p.m. Avalanche at Canucks, NHL Network HORSE RACING 2 p.m. Thoroughbreds: Breeders’ Cup races, NBCSN Post times: Juvenile Turf Sprint, 2:21 p.m.; Juvenile Fillies Turf, 3 p.m.; Juvenile Fillies, 3:40 p.m.; Juvenile Turf, 4:22 p.m.; Juvenile, 5:05 p.m. 6:30 p.m. Thoroughbreds: Breeders’ Cup handicapping seminar for Classic, other Saturday races, with Doug Nachman and Jay Randolph, KTRS (550 AM) SOCCER 10 a.m. Women’s Big Ten Tournament: Penn State vs. Illinois, BTN Noon Women’s SEC tournament: Florida vs. Arkansas, SEC Network 12:30 p.m. Women’s Big Ten Tournament: Nebraska vs. Minnesota, BTN 2:30 p.m. Women’s SEC tournament: LSU vs. South Carolina, SEC Network TENNIS 12:30 a.m. (Sat.) WTA: Hengqin Life WTA Elite Trophy, semifinals, Tennis Ch. 5 a.m. (Sat.) WTA: Hengqin Life WTA Elite Trophy, semifinals, Tennis Ch. VOLLEYBALL 7 p.m. College women: Penn State at Nebraska, BTN

DIGEST Biles is first woman to win four all-around titles Simone Biles is still the best even when she’s not at her best. The 21-year-old star won her fourth world all-around championship Thursday in Doha, Qatar, surviving a series of uncharacteristic mistakes to become the first woman to earn four all-around titles. Biles had a score of 57.491, nearly 1.7 points in front of silver medalist Mai Murakami of Japan. Biles has finished first in every meet she’s entered since the 2013 US championships. (AP) Federer advances in Paris • Roger Federer’s bid for a 100th career title remains on track as he beat Fabio Fognini 6-4, 6-3 Thursday to reach the Paris Masters quarterfinals. If he wins that, against Kei Nishikori, he could face Novak Djokovic in the semifinals. Federer, 37, was hardly tested by Fognini. Djokovic, who will reclaim the No. 1 world ranking regardless of his finish this week, advanced when Damir Dzumhur retired trailing 6-1, 2-1 and will faces Marin Cilic in the quarterfinals. (AP) Key U.S. players to skip Fed Cup match • Four of the top five U.S. women in the WTA singles rankings will skip the country’s Fed Cup final against the Czech Republic, including No. 6 Sloane Stephens, No. 15 Serena Williams, No. 16 Madison Keys and No. 40 Venus Williams. Instead, the roster announced for the defending champions Nov. 10-11 in Prague by captain Kathy Rinaldi includes No. 35 Danielle Collins, No. 48 Sofia Kenin and No. 63 Alison Riske in singles, along with Nicole Melichar, who is ranked 15th in doubles. The Czech Republic seeks its sixth title in eight years with a roster that features two-time Wimbledon champion Petra Kvitova and 2016 U.S. Open runner-up Karolina Pliskova, who are both ranked in the top 10. (AP) Golf roundup • Peter Uihlein topped the leaderboard at 8-under 63 on Thursday in the Shriners Hospitals For Children Open in Las Vegas, with Jordan Spieth three strokes back. Uihlein birdied six of his final nine holes.... On the European Tour, Paul Dunne shot a bogey-free, 7-under 64 to take a one-stroke lead after the first round of the Turkish Airlines Open on Thursday in Antalya, Turkey, with Justin Rose one shot back as he bids to make the first successful title defense of his career. (AP) Columbus advances in PKs • Goalkeeper Zack Steffen made two stops and DC United’s Nick DeLeon shot over the goal in the final round of penalty kicks, allowing the visiting Crew to advance through the knockout round of the Major League Soccer playoffs following a 2-2 draw Thursday. (AP)

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It was a grueling 2½-week schedule for Joe Buck, perhaps the most arduous ever undertaken by a network television sportscaster given the magnitude of the games he covered. Buck, the lead baseball and football play-by-play announcer for Fox Sports, called 15 games in 18 days, working in six cities across all four time zones in the continental United States. Five times he bounced from one sport to the other, each time going to a different time zone without a day off to adjust. The journey began Oct. 11 with an NFL contest in East Rutherford, N.J., and ended Sunday night in Los Angeles with the final game of the World Series. He played down the grind, saying that when he was a kid he saw his father, legendary Cardinals radio announcer Jack Buck, do something similar on a regular basis for many falls. Jack Buck would leave the ballclub do a network football broadcast on Sundays then serve as the voice of “Monday Night Football” on national radio before going right back to his Cardinals duties. “My dad would laugh at the suggestion that this is some crazy schedule and something that is unheard of,” Buck said this week. “He did this stuff every year. ... This is along those same lines, its doable. “I watched my dad do this, sit at the kitchen table with his hand-written boards, smoking cigarettes, eating eggs and writing all the different lineups in. That’s the work ethic I was shown as a kid, and I’m proud to kind of try to carry it forward. It was a lot of work, but fun.” It took a lot of focus to pull off. “You compartmentalize,” he said. “I’m pretty good at figuring out what’s right in front of me, handling that, then going on to the next assignment. But it was strange being at Dodger Stadium and on a football conference call with the Arizona Cardinals and writing my (baseball) lineups in and talking to them about how they are going to beat the Denver Broncos. Then (while in Boston) talking to the Miami defensive coordinator and he wanted to talk about the Red Sox as I’m sitting there in a freezing Fenway Park trying to talk about football.” In the past he did not broadcast NFL games during his postseason baseball run. But Fox landed the full over-the-air rights to the Thursday night NFL package this year, a deal that had been split between CBS and NBC in previous seasons, and it placed Buck and analyst Troy Aikman on those games. It was a key property for Fox to obtain, so to keep continuity in that broadcast booth Buck undertook the demanding schedule. “I’m glad I did it,” he said. “I know Fox is glad I did it.”

SHORT HOMECOMING Buck, who lives in St. Louis, was able to slip home for a couple days after the World Series before on Wednesday flying back to the West Coast, for the Raiders-49ers game Thursday night in Santa Clara, Calif. It might have been easier just to stay on out west, but he wanted to see his family. He and his wife, Michelle Beisner-Buck, are parents of twins born in April. “I had to get back for sanity’s sake — to see the boys, and if for no other reason to switch out my clothes,” he said. “I had a bag full of dirty clothes.” The marathon was extended by the National League Championship Series going the full seven games, but Buck did catch a scheduling break with the World Series ending in five games, on Sunday night when the Red Sox

ousted the Dodgers. Had it continued, Buck would have flown from coast to coast, Los Angeles to Boston, for Game 6, on Tuesday, and possibly Game 7 on Wednesday. Then it would have been another cross-thecountry flight, Boston to San Jose, Calif., to call Thursday’s Raiders49ers football game. But Buck says he wishes he would have kept going. “I’m disappointed, with Fox also being disappointed, that it (the World Series) was only five games,” he said. “You don’t achieve what you want to achieve with the rating with a lopsided Series. Even though the games were all pretty close, it seemed pretty lopsided. I would have rather seen it go seven games. I can live with dirty clothes.” The Series was seen in an average of 8.3 percent of the nation’s homes with a TV, Nielsen reports, down from the 10.7 rating of last year’s Houston’s victory over the Dodgers. But that lasted seven games, and viewership traditionally rises as a series progress.

LANDING A ‘SOUVENIR’ Buck is back to this “normal” schedule for this time of the year, which because of the added Thursday night duties now generally entails him doing Sunday afternoon games only on weeks when Fox has a doubleheader. That’s the case this weekend, as he has the marquee Rams-Saints matchup, at 3:25 p.m., which goes to 96 percent of the country (including KTVI, Channel 2 locally). So he’ll make a brief pit stop in St. Louis as he makes his way from California to Louisiana. And he picked up a “souvenir” from his broadcasting marathon — a cold that was noticeable in a phone conversation Wednesday. “I at least was able to bring a cold home to my family,” he joked. “It’s (from) being on airplanes, in hotel rooms and just the general dirt I’ve been living in in ballparks and everywhere else over the last couple weeks. Everything has finally caught up to me. But it’s just a cold, I’m all right.” ENDURANCE TEST The epic World Series Game 3 tested Buck’s voice, and endurance, as the contest lasted 18 innings and ran for 7 hours 20 minutes — both postseason records. “It went from, ‘I can’t believe this game is going into the 14th inning’ to ‘Let’s see how far this can go,’” he said. “I love that kind of stuff. At the beginning of a network broadcast, everything is so buttoned up and everybody is trying to be perfect, and by the end it felt like doing local TV. That’s the most fun, when you can do the most stuff. We’re talking about the organist, doing different stats, talking about the number of foul balls. You get loose and a little weird, and the situation kind of exonerates you from any kind of criticism.” But the big picture is integral. “You can’t take those games lightly, because at some point — it could be in two innings, it could two pitches — the game is going to end and one of those teams is going to win, and it either was going to be three games to none or two games to one, and the World Series was going to shift.”

WAITING GAME There has been a big shift in how baseball games are played, with the pace of play slowing to a crawl. It was especially profound this season, when four-hour nine-inning games weren’t uncommon. Given the extra time to fill, Buck said he hasn’t prepared any differently than in recent seasons because he has had a lot of experience with slow-paced contests. “I was kind of weaned on Red Sox-Yankees, and even when the rest of the league wasn’t doing four-hour games, it seemed like they were,” he said. “That said, I

Sportscaster Ramsey goes from KTRS to KFNS Bob Ramsey is on the move again. Ramsey, who has been in the St. Louis sportscasting business for more than three decades, is shifting from KTRS (550 AM) to KFNS (590 AM). He had been working part time at KTRS while also serving as the point person for a youth baseball complex KFNS owner Randy Markel is trying to develop near the Lake of the Ozarks. Ramsey remains in that role and also will appear some on KFNS, as well as aiding in other projects in which Markel is involved. “I’ll be working simultaneous for several of his companies,” Ramsey said. “Having me under his entertainment umbrella, he can move me around as he sees fit.” That includes some on-air duties. T.J. Moe has been working with Cam Janssen in the 1-3 p.m. weekday slot, but the station recently gave Janssen his own show (6-7 p.m.). Although Janssen joins Moe sometimes, KFNS has put station general manager John Hadley on that program. Ramsey, a baseball aficionado who is beginning his 32nd season as the play-by-play voice of St. Louis University men’s basketball (on WXOS, 101.1 FM), now is set to join Moe and Hadley. “He brings not only baseball knowledge but college basketball knowledge,” Hadley said. “Not only is college basketball starting, but this offseason is the biggest the Cardinals have had in quite some time. They better do something. More so than ever, the Hot Stove League will be hot.” He said Ramsey also will fill in on other shows when hosts are absent. Ramsey’s departure from KTRS will open more air time there for Post-Dispatch sports columnist Ben Frederickson, who will continue to be on “The Big Sports Show” Tuesday nights and increase his role on other evenings in addition to making occasional appearances on daytime general talk shows hosted by McGraw Milhaven and Guy Phillips. HORSE SENSE • Local handicapper Doug Nachman and longtime St. Louis sportscaster Jay Randolph, who now is mostly retired, have done handicapping previews on local radio of major horse races in recent years and get together Friday to discuss the Breeders’ Cup Classic. They are to be on KTRS (550 AM) for a half-hour show that begins at 6:30 p.m. They also plan to hit on a few other key races on the Breeders’ Cup card that is to be run Saturday. “We’ve got a huge field of 14 horse for the Classic, there should be all kinds of good betting opportunities,’’ Randolph said.

think the game has a different feel to it because the starters aren’t going deep, managers now are looking for a reason to make a pitching change instead of being forced to make a pitching change. I don’t know if starting pitchers are conditioned to go deep anymore.” Buck certainly was conditioned for endurance in the last few weeks, and said he’s up to the challenge again next season. “I don’t know why I wouldn’t,” he said.

BUCK’S BLITZ Joe Buck’s whirlwind of recent assignments for Fox Sports: Oct. 11 • NFL, in East Rutherford, N.J. Oct. 12 • NLCS, in Milwaukee Oct. 13 • NLCS, in Milwaukee Oct. 15 • NLCS, in Los Angeles Oct. 16 • NLCS, in Los Angeles Oct. 17 • NLCS, in Los Angeles Oct. 18 • NFL, in Glendale, Ariz. Oct. 19 • NLCS, in Milwaukee Oct. 20 • NLCS, in Milwaukee Oct. 23 • World Series, in Boston Oct. 24 • World Series, in Boston Oct. 25 • NFL, in Houston Oct. 26 • World Series, in Los Angeles Oct. 27 • World Series, in Los Angeles Oct. 28 • World Series, in Los Angeles Dan Caesar • 314-340-8175 @caesardan on Twitter dcaesar@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

11.02.2018 • FRIDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • C3

BREEDERS’ CUP

BASEBALL NOTEBOOK

Baffert, Brown will have top contenders again

Padres pick up Garcia; Freese back to Dodgers

LEXINGTON (KY.) HERALD-LEADER

LEXINGTON, KY • Nearly six months to

the day after Justify repelled Good Magic in the Kentucky Derby, a rematch of sorts could play out over the same Churchill Downs track Friday evening. This one will also set the early buzz for next year’s Derby. Trainers Bob Baffert and Chad Brown have the top two contenders in the Breeders’ Cup Juvenile on Friday, the headline event on the first of two days of championship racing from Louisville. Brown saddled Good Magic to a victory in last year’s Juvenile — with Baffert’s Solomini finishing second — but six months later it was Justify who turned away Good Magic in the stretch to take the roses (and later the Triple Crown) for Baffert. Fast forward another six months and Baffert’s Game Winner and Brown’s Complexity come to Churchill Downs for the Juvenile as top two morning-line choices and the only undefeated contenders in the 14-horse field. Game Winner, who is 3-for-3 in California this year and coming off a victory in the Grade 1 American Pharoah Stakes, arrived in Kentucky on Tuesday and galloped a mile over the Churchill Downs track Wednesday morning. “He’s pretty good out of the gate,” Baffert said. “He has a lot of speed, tactical speed. I’m excited about him. He’s been working up a storm.” Game Winner is the morning-line favorite at 8-5 and will be ridden by Joel Rosario. His victory in the American Pharoah Stakes came at 1 1/16 miles, the same distance as Friday’s Juvenile. Complexity, 2-for-2 in New York this fall, most recently won the Grade 1 Champagne Stakes and checks in at 5-2 on the morning line. He’ll be ridden by Jose Ortiz, who was aboard Good Magic for his Breeders’ Cup Juvenile victory and his runner-up finish in the Kentucky Derby. “He’s one of the best 2-year-old dirt horses we’ve had, that’s for sure,” Brown said. “He’s an incredible talent. He’s got a lot of natural speed that I believe he can carry a distance of ground. How far, we’ll find out on Friday.” Complexity won the 1-mile Champagne Stakes by 3 lengths over Code of Honor, who stumbled badly at the start of that race before rallying from the back of the 10-horse field to finish second. Code of Honor is trained by Lexington native Shug McGaughey, who has a

ASSOCIATED PRESS LEXINGTON HERALD-LEADER

Bob Baffert has the favorite Friday in the Juvenile in Game Winner.

starter in the Juvenile for the first time in 17 years and has spoken highly of his 2-year-old colt in recent weeks. John Velazquez returns to the saddle after riding Code of Honor (5-1) to victory in his first start. Velazquez was not aboard for the Champagne Stakes. “In the Champagne, he had a lot of trouble for a young horse but he came out of it good and since then he is very good,” McGaughey said. “If he gets a clean trip in the Juvenile, we will see what happens.” The field also features four colts who ran in last month’s Grade 1 Breeders’ Futurity at Keeneland, including Knicks Go (who won that race at 70-1 odds) and Derby Date, a Calumet Farm homebred trained by D. Wayne Lukas, who has won the Juvenile a record five times. Both of those contenders are 30-1 shots. Street Sense in 2006 and Nyquist in 2015 remain the only two Juvenile winners to go on to win the Kentucky Derby, though the victors in this race are still often saddled with high expectations going into their 3-year-old seasons. “I always get excited about my young ones,” Baffert said. “We know what the other ones can do already. You’re just hoping for him to take the next step to the next level. There might be something in there that’s getting ready to explode, too. That’s what the Breeders’ Cup is all about. You hope that you’re the guy that’s exploding.”

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Greg Garcia hit .248 for his Cardinals career with his best season in 2016 when he hit .276 overall and .348 as a pinch hitter. BY STAFF AND WIRE REPORTS

San Diego area native Greg Garcia is going home to play. The utility infielder who has played the past four seasons for the Cardinals was claimed on waivers on Thursday by the Padres. The lefthanded-hitting Garcia was born in El Cajon, Calif., and is the grandson of the late Dave Garcia, former big-league manager, coach and scout. In 2018, Garcia hit a career-low .221 overall for the Cardinals with nine hits in 49 pinch-hit at-bats (.184). He hit .248 for his Cardinals career — his best season was in 2016, when he hit .276 overall and .348 as a pinch hitter. Garcia started 34 games this year — 16 at second base, 13 at shortstop and five at third base — and appeared in 114 total games, including one as a pitcher when he worked a scoreless inning. Garcia, 29, has 37 career pinch-hits, ranking sixth in Cardinals history. Since college at the University of Hawaii, he has been a teammate of Cardinals second baseman Kolten Wong at both the minorleague and major-league levels. This is Garcia’s first year to be eligible for salary arbitration and the Cardinals feel they are well-stocked with utility infielders. Already at the big-league level is Yairo Munoz, who was here most of the season. Then there is switch-hitting Tommy Edman, who excelled at Class AA Springfield and then finished the season at Class AAA Memphis, where he was the co-Most Valuable Player in the Pacific Coast League playoffs. For the moment, the Cardinals are at 35 players on their 40-man roster. But they will be at 40 by perhaps Friday, when four players who are on the 60-day disabled list are added, as well as pitcher Adam Wainwright, who was re-signed as a free agent. Those players coming off the DL are outfielder Dexter Fowler and pitchers Alex Reyes, Luke Gregerson and Michael Wacha. (Rick Hummel) Freese returning to Dodgers • Los Angeles agreed to terms with David Freese on a one-year contract after the team declined a $6 million club option. Terms of the new deal were not announced. The 35-year-old infielder, from Lafayette High and a former Cardinals player, joined the Dodgers in August after a trade from Pittsburgh. Freese was 8 for 22 with two home runs, six RBIs and a walk in 14 postseason games while platooning at first base. He hit .385 in 19 regular-season games with Los Angeles. With Chase Utley having just retired, Freese could fill his veteran leadership role in the clubhouse. Three-time NL Cy Young Award winner Clayton Kershaw and the team agreed to extend the deadline on Kershaw’s opt-out decision from Wednesday to Friday. Heyward, Melancon stay with teams • Chicago Cubs outfielder Jason Heyward

and San Francisco reliever Mark Melancon let the deadline pass for exercising optout provisions in their contracts. Doing the same were two Cuban outfielders who have been major disappointments and spent all of this season in the minor leagues: Boston’s Rusney Castillo and Arizona’s Yasmany Tomas. Heyward keeps the $184 million, eightyear deal that pays him $106 million in the next five seasons. The others all have two years left in their contracts: Melancon is owed $28 million, Tomas $32.5 million and Castillo $24.5 million. They all had to make their decisions by Wednesday night. The 29-year-old Heyward, who in 2016 helped the Cubs to their first title in 108 years, hit .270 with eight homers and 58 RBIs in 127 games this season. He is owed $20 million in 2019, $21 million in each of the following two seasons and $22 million apiece in the final two years. If he has 550 plate appearances next year, he would again have the right to void the deal and become a free agent. Melancon, 33, was 1-4 with a 3.23 ERA and three saves in 41 relief appearances, allowing 11.1 hits per nine innings for the second straight year and a .302 opponents’ batting average in 2018. He has made 73 appearances in the first two seasons of a $62 million, four-year deal and is due $14 million in each of the final two seasons. The 31-year-old Castillo has appeared in just 99 games since agreeing in August 2014 to a $72.5 million, seven-year contract and has not played in the major leagues since he was sent outright to the minors on June 20, 2016. He hit .319 with five homers and 59 RBIs for Triple-A Pawtucket this year and is owed $11 million next year and $13.5 million in 2020. Tomas, who turns 28 this month, was sent outright to the minors April 2 and hit .262 with 14 homers and 65 RBIs for Triple-A Reno. His $68.5 million, six-year deal calls for $15.5 million next year and $17 million in 2020. Cubs keeping Strop • The Chicago Cubs exercised their $6.25 million option for Pedro Strop. The 33-year-old Strop, one of the baseball’s most consistent relievers since he was acquired in a July 2013 trade with Baltimore, went 6-1 with 13 saves and a 2.26 ERA in 60 appearances last season. Chicago also claimed outfielder Johnny Field off waivers from Minnesota on Thursday. Field made his major league debut this year and hit .222 with nine homers and 21 RBIs in 83 games with the Twins and Tampa Bay Rays. Braves get catcher Lopez • Atlanta acquired catcher Raffy Lopez from the San Diego Padres in exchange for cash considerations. The 31-year-old Lopez hit .176 with three home runs in 37 games with the Padres in 2018. He also spent time with Triple-A El Paso.

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SPORTS

C4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NBA STANDINGS

NHL STANDINGS EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Tampa Bay Boston Montreal Toronto Buffalo Ottawa Detroit Florida Metropolitan Pittsburgh NY Islanders Carolina Columbus Washington New Jersey Philadelphia NY Rangers

GP 12 12 12 13 13 12 13 10 GP 11 12 12 11 11 10 12 12

W 8 7 7 8 6 5 4 2 W 6 7 6 6 5 5 5 4

L 3 3 3 5 5 5 7 5 L 2 4 5 5 4 4 7 7

OT 1 2 2 0 2 2 2 3 OT 3 1 1 0 2 1 0 1

Pts 17 16 16 16 14 12 10 7 Pts 15 15 13 12 12 11 10 9

GF 42 37 40 43 33 40 34 30 GF 45 39 36 39 43 34 35 32

GA 34 29 33 39 39 46 49 39 GA 35 30 34 43 43 32 48 41

Home 5-2-0 4-1-0 5-2-0 3-5-0 3-2-1 4-2-1 2-3-1 0-3-1 Home 2-2-1 2-1-1 3-3-1 3-4-0 3-1-1 5-1-1 2-4-0 3-3-0

Away 3-1-1 3-2-2 2-1-2 5-0-0 3-3-1 1-3-1 2-4-1 2-2-2 Away 4-0-2 5-3-0 3-2-0 3-1-0 2-3-1 0-3-0 3-3-0 1-4-1

Div 2-0-0 4-1-0 2-1-2 2-1-0 1-2-0 3-2-0 1-4-0 0-0-2 Div 1-1-1 5-0-0 2-1-1 1-1-0 1-1-1 1-1-0 1-2-0 0-1-1

L 3 4 3 4 5 5 4 L 5 6 4 3 5 6 7 7

OT 0 1 2 2 3 0 3 OT 1 0 1 3 0 2 1 1

Pts 20 17 16 16 15 14 11 Pts 17 16 15 15 12 12 11 7

GF 46 39 35 46 43 36 41 GF 47 40 36 41 31 32 30 22

GA 30 34 35 33 51 31 42 GA 47 44 34 36 21 37 39 39

Home 4-3-0 5-1-1 5-0-2 3-1-1 3-2-2 5-2-0 3-3-1 Home 3-2-1 4-2-0 3-2-1 2-1-1 3-2-0 2-2-2 3-2-1 2-2-1

Away 6-0-0 3-3-0 2-3-0 4-3-1 3-3-1 2-3-0 1-1-2 Away 5-3-0 4-4-0 4-2-0 4-2-2 3-3-0 3-4-0 2-5-0 1-5-0

Div 2-0-0 2-2-0 3-2-0 1-1-0 2-1-1 1-1-0 1-1-3 Div 1-1-0 2-2-0 0-0-0 2-1-0 2-1-0 2-1-2 1-0-1 0-0-1

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Nashville Winnipeg Minnesota Colorado Chicago Dallas Blues Pacific Calgary Vancouver Edmonton San Jose Arizona Anaheim Vegas Los Angeles

GP 13 13 12 13 14 12 11 GP 14 14 12 12 11 13 13 11

W 10 8 7 7 6 7 4 W 8 8 7 6 6 5 5 3

M 1 • FrIDAy • 11.02.2018

Thursday Winnipeg 4, Florida 2 NY Islanders 3, Pittsburgh 2, SO Dallas 2, Toronto 1 Detroit 4, New Jersey 3 Montreal 6, Washington 4 Nashville 4, Tampa Bay 1 Ottawa 4, Buffalo 2 Blues 5, Vegas 3 Calgary 6, Colorado 5 Edmonton 4, Chicago 0 Rangers at Anaheim, late Philadelphia at Los Angeles, late Columbus at San Jose, late Wednesday Vancouver 4, Chicago 2 Friday Florida vs. Winnipeg at Helsinki, 1 p.m. Colorado at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Carolina at Arizona, 9 p.m. Saturday Ottawa at Buffalo, 1 p.m. Edmonton at Detroit, 6 p.m. Tampa Bay at Montreal, 6 p.m. New Jersey at Islanders, 6 p.m. Toronto at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. Dallas at Washington, 6 p.m. Minnesota at Blues, 7 p.m. Boston at Nashville, 7 p.m. Chicago at Calgary, 9 p.m. Carolina at Vegas, 9 p.m. Columbus at LA, 9:30 p.m. Phila. at San Jose, 9:30 p.m.

Thursday Denver 110, Cleveland 91 Oklahoma City 111, Charlotte 107 Philadelphia 122, LA Clippers 113 Sacramento 146, Atlanta 115 Boston 117, Milwaukee 113 New Orleans at Portland, late

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Toronto Boston Philadelphia Brooklyn New York Southeast Charlotte Miami Orlando Atlanta Washington Central Milwaukee Indiana Detroit Chicago Cleveland

W 7 6 5 3 2 W 4 3 2 2 1 W 7 5 4 2 1

L 1 2 4 5 6 L 5 4 5 6 6 L 1 3 3 6 7

Pct .875 .750 .556 .375 .250 Pct .444 .429 .286 .250 .143 Pct .875 .625 .571 .250 .125

GB — 1 2½ 4 5 GB — — 1 1½ 2 GB — 2 2½ 5 6

L10 7-1 6-2 5-4 3-5 2-6 L10 4-5 3-4 2-5 2-6 1-6 L10 7-1 5-3 4-3 2-6 1-7

Str W-1 W-4 W-1 W-1 L-1 Str L-1 L-2 L-3 L-4 L-4 Str L-1 W-1 L-3 L-2 L-1

Home 6-0 3-1 5-0 2-1 2-3 Home 2-2 2-2 1-3 1-2 0-2 Home 5-0 2-1 3-1 1-3 1-4

Away 1-1 3-1 0-4 1-4 0-3 Away 2-3 1-2 1-2 1-4 1-4 Away 2-1 3-2 1-2 1-3 0-3

Conf 5-1 5-2 4-4 3-3 2-5 Conf 4-4 2-3 2-3 1-4 0-2 Conf 6-1 3-1 4-3 2-3 1-5

Pct .714 .667 .571 .250 .167 Pct .875 .714 .571 .500 .429 Pct .889 .667 .500 .375 .143

GB — ½ 1 3½ 3½ GB — 1½ 2½ 3 3½ GB — 2 3½ 4½ 6

L10 5-2 4-2 4-3 2-6 1-5 L10 7-1 5-2 4-3 4-4 3-4 L10 8-1 6-3 4-4 3-5 1-6

Str W-3 W-2 L-3 L-5 L-4 Str W-3 W-2 L-1 W-2 W-3 Str W-6 W-5 L-2 W-1 L-6

Home 3-1 3-0 3-1 2-1 0-4 Home 4-0 2-1 0-2 4-1 2-2 Home 4-0 2-1 3-1 2-2 1-2

Away 2-1 1-2 1-2 0-5 1-1 Away 3-1 3-1 4-1 0-3 1-2 Away 4-1 4-2 1-3 1-3 0-4

Conf 5-1 2-1 3-3 1-4 1-5 Conf 5-1 3-0 4-3 2-2 2-3 Conf 4-1 2-3 3-3 3-5 1-6

Wednesday Brooklyn 120, Detroit 119, OT Denver 108, Chicago 107, OT Indiana 107, New York 101 Minnesota 128, Utah 125 Golden State 131, New Orleans 121 LA Lakers 114, Dallas 113 San Antonio 120, Phoenix 90 Friday LA Clippers at Orlando, 6 p.m. Houston at Brooklyn, 6:30 p.m. Indiana at Chicago, 7 p.m. Oklahoma City at Washington, 7 p.m. New York at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Memphis at Utah, 8 p.m. Toronto at Phoenix, 9 p.m. Minnesota at Golden State, 9:30 p.m.

WESTERN CONFERENCE

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss.

Southwest San Antonio Memphis New Orleans Dallas Houston Northwest Denver Portland Utah Minnesota Oklahoma City Pacific Golden State Sacramento LA Clippers LA Lakers Phoenix

Laine has hat trick for Jets in Helsinki

Celtics hand Bucks first loss of season

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Finland native Patrik Laine had a hat trick as the Winnipeg Jets took a 4-2 victory over the Florida Panthers in a regularseason game in Helsinki on Thursday. Laine scored in the second period and twice in the third, including an emptynetter, for the Jets, who opened the backto-back series between the teams in front of a roaring sellout crowd of 13,500 at Hartwall Arena. He wristed a shot past goalie James Reimer on a power play to claim a 2-1 lead for the Jets with 4:46 left in the second, then slapped a one-timer for the winner on a two-man advantage from the top of the left circle 3:28 into the final period before scoring on an empty net. Mathieu Perreault scored the opening goal for the Jets (8-4-1) and defenseman

Sunday Buffalo at NY Rangers, 6 p.m. Tampa Bay at Ottawa, 6 p.m. Columbus at Anaheim, 8 p.m.

W 5 4 4 2 1 W 7 5 4 4 3 W 8 6 4 3 1

L 2 2 3 6 5 L 1 2 3 4 4 L 1 3 4 5 6

Saturday Detroit at Phila., noon Boston at Indiana, 6 p.m. Cleveland at Charlotte, 6 p.m. Miami at Atlanta, 6:30 p.m. Houston at Chicago, 7 p.m. New Orleans at San Antonio, 7:30 p.m. Utah at Denver, 8 p.m. Lakers at Portland, 9 p.m.

Dustin Byfuglien had three assists. The Panthers (2-5-3), who outshot Winnipeg 38-36, tied the score twice on goals by Keith Yandle and Evgenii Dadonov. Florida captain Aleksander Barkov, also a native of Finland, assisted on Perreault’s opener. Laine, whose 44 goals were second in the NHL last season to Alex Ovechkin’s 49, opened the season with just three goals and two assists in 12 games, but he made a clear statement on Thursday. The Panthers had the momentum early, outshooting the Jets 9-0 in the opening minutes. They controlled the play and the puck most of the opening period but goaltender Connor Hellebuyck kept them at bay, turning back 18 shots in the frame. The game was the 24th played in Europe during the regular season and the sixth in Finland.

NHL SUMMARIES Islanders 3, Penguins 2, SO

Predators 4, Lightning 1

Flames 6, Avalanche 5

Pittsburgh 1 0 1 0 — 2 NY Islanders 0 1 1 0 — 3 NY Islanders won shootout 1-0. First period: 1, Pittsburgh, Simon 3 (Guentzel, Maatta), 6:20 (pp). Penalties: Oleksiak, PIT, (roughing), 1:34; Komarov, NYI, (holding), 1:34; Barzal, NYI, (hooking), 4:30; Johnson, PIT, (hooking), 13:18. Second period: 2, NY Islanders, Bailey 3 (Cizikas), 14:46 (sh). Penalties: Dumoulin, PIT, (holding), 12:19; Bailey, NYI, (hooking), 12:33; Pelech, NYI, (interference), 13:42. Third period: 3, NY Islanders, Lee 5 (Hickey, Nelson), 10:11. 4, Pittsburgh, Malkin 7 (Kessel, Letang), 12:02 (pp). Penalties: Lee, NYI, (slashing), 11:01. Overtime: None. Penalties: None. Shootout: Pittsburgh 0 (Malkin NG, Crosby NG, Letang NG), NY Islanders 1 (Eberle NG, Nelson NG, Bailey G). Shots: Pittsburgh 9-13-6-3: 31. NY Islanders 10-8-6-2: 26. Power-plays: Pittsburgh 2 of 4; NY Islanders 0 of 2. Goalies: Pittsburgh, Murray 4-2-1 (26 shots24 saves). NY Islanders, Greiss 3-2-0 (31-29). A: 10,910. Referees: Tom Chmielewski, Justin St Pierre. Linesmen: Tim Nowak, Libor Suchanek.

Nashville 2 0 2 — 4 Tampa Bay 0 1 0 — 1 First period: 1, Nashville, Turris 3 (Jarnkrok, Ekholm), 6:02. 2, Nashville, Josi 3 (Ellis, Johansen), 19:53. Penalties: Point, TB, (holding stick), 1:41. Second period: 3, Tampa Bay, Koekkoek 1 (Cirelli, Killorn), 14:21. Penalties: Ekholm, NSH, (tripping), 5:48. Third period: 4, Nashville, Jarnkrok 3 (Johansen), 16:42. 5, Nashville, Salomaki 2 (Hartman, Turris), 17:36. Penalties: Josi, NSH, (cross checking), 4:30. Shots: Nashville 15-4-5: 24. Tampa Bay 13-17-13: 43. Power-plays: Nashville 0 of 1; Tampa Bay 0 of 2. Goalies: Nashville, Rinne 4-1-0 (43 shots-42 saves). Tampa Bay, Vasilevskiy 6-2-1 (23-20). A: 19,092. Referees: Brad Meier, Kyle Rehman. Linesmen: Darren Gibbs, Brad Kovachik.

Colorado 0 4 1 — 5 Calgary 0 1 5 — 6 First Period: None. Penalties: Frolik, CGY, (hooking), 0:34. Second Period: 1, Colorado, Kamenev 1, 3:22 (sh). 2, Colorado, Dries 1 (Barrie, Kerfoot), 5:12. 3, Calgary, Backlund 2 (Giordano, Tkachuk), 6:34. 4, Colorado, Wilson 4 (Dries, Cole), 11:04. 5, Colorado, Soderberg 5 (Bourque), 16:41. Penalties: Calvert, COL, (hooking), 1:31; Rantanen, COL, (high sticking), 8:20; Cole, COL, Major (fighting), 16:53; Bennett, CGY, Major (fighting), 16:53; Bennett, CGY, served by Dube, (instigator), 16:53; Bennett, CGY, Misconduct (misconduct), 16:53; Cole, COL, served by Dano, Major (charging), 16:53; Cole, COL, Misconduct (misconduct), 16:53. Third Period: 6, Calgary, Lindholm 9 (Giordano, Monahan), 0:47 (pp). 7, Calgary, Monahan 6 (Ryan, Hanifin), 5:21. 8, Calgary, Neal 3 (Gaudreau, Valimaki), 10:52. 9, Calgary, Giordano 2 (Tkachuk, Backlund), 13:47. 10, Calgary, Frolik 6 (Tkachuk, Brodie), 14:54. 11, Colorado, Landeskog 11 (Wilson, Kerfoot), 18:57 (pp). Penalties: Backlund, CGY, (slashing), 18:47. Shots: Colorado 4-10-12: 26. Calgary 13-13-11: 37. Power-plays: Colorado 1 of 2; Calgary 1 of 4. Goalies: Colorado, Varlamov 4-3-2 (37 shots-31 saves). Calgary, Smith 5-4-1 (26-21). A: 17,317 (19,289). Referees: TJ Luxmore, Chris Rooney. Linesmen: Lonnie Cameron, Trent Knorr.

Stars 2, Maple Leafs 1 Dallas 0 1 1 — 2 Toronto 0 0 1 — 1 First period: None. Penalties: Ritchie, DAL, (holding), 7:28. Second period: 1, Dallas, Benn 5 (Klingberg, Seguin), 11:55. Penalties: Lindholm, TOR, (holding), 9:53; Holl, TOR, (holding), 12:41; Methot, DAL, (tripping), 16:02. Third period: 2, Dallas, Shore 3 (Seguin, Janmark), 4:43. 3, Toronto, Marleau 2 (Tavares, Rielly), 16:51 (pp). Penalties: Ritchie, DAL, (holding), 1:12; Dickinson, DAL, (tripping), 5:30; Ritchie, DAL, (tripping), 16:29. Shots: Dallas 7-8-4: 19. Toronto 9-7-16: 32. Power-plays: Dallas 0 of 2; Toronto 1 of 5. Goalies: Dallas, Khudobin 2-1-0 (32 shots-31 saves). Toronto, Andersen 6-5-0 (19-17). A: 18,878. Referees: Garrett Rank, Francois St Laurent. Linesmen: Greg Devorski, Scott Driscoll.

Jets 4, Panthers 2 Winnipeg 1 1 2 — 4 Florida 0 2 0 — 2 First period: 1, Winnipeg, Perreault 2 (Little, Byfuglien), 18:34. Penalties: Kulikov, WPG, (high sticking), 12:31. Second period: 2, Florida, Yandle 2 (Hoffman, Barkov), 4:18 (pp). 3, Winnipeg, Laine 4 (Wheeler, Byfuglien), 15:14 (pp). 4, Florida, Dadonov 5 (Matheson, Bjugstad), 17:54. Penalties: Chiarot, WPG, (holding), 2:25; Trocheck, FLA, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 2:25; Trouba, WPG, (tripping), 4:03; Lowry, WPG, (elbowing), 6:29; Lowry, WPG, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 6:29; Petrovic, FLA, (tripping), 15:03; Dadonov, FLA, (tripping), 20:00. Third period: 5, Winnipeg, Laine 5 (Wheeler, Byfuglien), 3:28 (pp). 6, Winnipeg, Laine 6 (Wheeler, Scheifele), 19:17. Penalties: Yandle, FLA, (tripping), 2:45; Florida bench, served by Bjugstad (too many men on the ice), 2:45; Morrissey, WPG, (interference), 10:19; Hoffman, FLA, (slashing), 14:03; Ekblad, FLA, (interference), 15:32. Shots: Winnipeg 14-8-14: 36. Florida 18-14-6: 38. Power-plays: Winnipeg 2 of 6; Florida 1 of 5. Goalies: Winnipeg, Hellebuyck 5-4-1 (38 shots-36 saves). Florida, Reimer 1-4-1 (35-32). A: 13,490. Referees: Gord Dwyer, Dan O’Rourke. Linesmen: David Brisebois, Scott Cherrey.

Oilers 4, Blackhawks 0 Chicago 0 0 0 — 0 Edmonton 0 2 2 — 4 First Period: None. Penalties: Larsson, EDM, (holding), 15:03. Second Period: 1, Edmonton, Caggiula 3 (Nugent-Hopkins, McDavid), 0:18. 2, Edmonton, Garrison 1 (Rieder), 19:23 (pp). Penalties: Jokiharju, CHI, (slashing), 13:13; Martinsen, CHI, (interference), 18:13. Third Period: 3, Edmonton, Caggiula 4 (Benning, Khaira), 6:49 (sh). 4, Edmonton, Chiasson 5 (Draisaitl, Rieder), 10:38. Penalties: Larsson, EDM, (slashing), 4:54; Khaira, EDM, (holding), 7:29; Gustafsson, CHI, (cross checking), 12:07; Davidson, CHI, served by Fortin, Major (elbowing), 17:03; Nurse, EDM, (roughing), 17:03; Nurse, EDM, Misconduct (misconduct), 17:03; Davidson, CHI, Misconduct (misconduct), 17:03. Shots: Chicago 15-16-9: 40. Edmonton 8-9-12: 29. Power-plays: Chicago 0 of 3; Edmonton 1 of 4. Goalies: Chicago, Ward 3-2-3 (29 shots-25 saves). Edmonton, Koskinen 2-0-0 (40-40). A: 18,347 (18,641). Referees: Steve Kozari, Furman South. Linesmen: Tyson Baker, Kory Nagy.

Canadiens 6, Capitals 4 Washington 1 3 0 — 4 Montreal 1 2 3 — 6 First period: 1, Montreal, Kotkaniemi 1 (Armia), 2:28. 2, Washington, Eller 2 (Stephenson, Niskanen), 6:16. Penalties: Gallagher, MTL, (roughing), 8:23; Kuznetsov, WSH, (roughing), 8:23. Second period: 3, Montreal, Gallagher 8 (Tatar), 0:32. 4, Montreal, Gallagher 9 (Danault, Tatar), 3:06. 5, Washington, Ovechkin 9 (Kuznetsov, Vrana), 6:49. 6, Washington, Eller 3 (Connolly), 7:59. 7, Washington, Ovechkin 10 (Niskanen, Orlov), 12:53. Penalties: Kuznetsov, WSH, (holding), 16:16; Eller, WSH, (interference), 19:57. Third period: 8, Montreal, Kotkaniemi 2 (Lehkonen), 16:56. 9, Montreal, Domi 6 (Reilly), 19:38. 10, Montreal, Armia 3 (Danault), 19:40. Penalties: Hudon, MTL, (tripping), 13:01. Shots: Washington 13-13-5: 31. Montreal 19-8-17: 44. Power-plays: Washington 0 of 1; Montreal 0 of 2. Goalies: Washington, Holtby 4-3-1 (43 shots-38 saves). Montreal, Price 5-2-2 (31-27). A: 20,279. Referees: Pierre Lambert, Brad Watson. Linesmen: Brian Murphy, Mark Shewchyk.

Senators 4, Sabres 2 Buffalo 0 0 2 — 2 Ottawa 1 2 1 — 4 First period: 1, Ottawa, Dzingel 5 (Wideman, Boedker), 6:55 (pp). Penalties: McCabe, BUF, (slashing), 2:42; Scandella, BUF, (holding), 5:39; Wideman, OTT, (delay of game), 12:27. Second period: 2, Ottawa, DeMelo 2 (Duchene, Chabot), 1:00. 3, Ottawa, White 3 (Stone, Chabot), 14:47 (pp). Penalties: Eichel, BUF, (hooking), 4:22; DeMelo, OTT, (slashing), 7:42; Okposo, BUF, (delay of game), 12:58; Berglund, BUF, (high sticking), 17:00. Third period: 4, Buffalo, Pominville 6 (Eichel, Scandella), 0:59. 5, Buffalo, Skinner 7 (Eichel, Ristolainen), 3:55 (pp). 6, Ottawa, Ryan 3 (DeMelo, Stone), 19:40. Penalties: Stone, OTT, (slashing), 2:22; Ryan, OTT, (delay of game), 7:14. Shots: Buffalo 12-13-23: 48. Ottawa 12-12-8: 32. Power-plays: Buffalo 1 of 4; Ottawa 2 of 5. Goalies: Buffalo, Hutton 4-5-1 (31 shots-28 saves). Ottawa, Anderson 5-3-2 (48-46). A: 12,587. Referees: Marc Joannette, Ian Walsh. Linesmen: Steve Barton, Derek Nansen.

Red Wings 4, Devils 3 New Jersey 0 1 2 — 3 Detroit 1 0 3 — 4 First period: 1, Detroit, Frk 2 (Larkin, Green), 7:54 (pp). Penalties: Ericsson, DET, (tripping), 4:18; Lovejoy, NJ, (holding stick), 7:20; Boyle, NJ, (interference), 8:20. Second period: 2, New Jersey, Coleman 5 (Zajac, Johansson), 14:12. Penalties: Larkin, DET, (roughing), 14:33; Glendening, DET, Major (fighting), 19:14; Mueller, NJ, Major (fighting), 19:14; Severson, NJ, (holding), 19:44. Third period: 3, New Jersey, Vatanen 2 (Zajac, Hischier), 3:20 (pp). 4, Detroit, Rasmussen 3 (Nyquist, Cholowski), 4:59 (pp). 5, Detroit, Abdelkader 3 (Glendening), 12:50 (sh). 6, Detroit, Daley 2 (Larkin), 19:17 (sh). 7, New Jersey, Johansson 3 (Hall, Hischier), 19:56 (pp). Penalties: Larkin, DET, (interference), 1:40; Vatanen, NJ, (interference), 3:30; Kronwall, DET, (holding), 12:36; Ericsson, DET, (cross checking), 19:10; New Jersey bench, served by Johansson (unsportsmanlike conduct), 19:56. Shots: New Jersey 7-8-13: 28. Detroit 12-10-9: 31. Power-plays: New Jersey 2 of 5; Detroit 2 of 5. Goalies: New Jersey, Schneider 0-2-0 (30 shots-27 saves). Detroit, Howard 4-5-2 (28-25). A: 18,273. Referees: Frederick L’Ecuyer, Dan O’Halloran. Linesmen: Bryan Pancich, Pierre Racicot.

Points leaders Last Name Rantanen Malkin McDavid Bergeron Kane MacKinnon Aho Pastrnak Matthews Ovechkin Landeskog Kessel Gaudreau Kuznetsov Marner Rielly Panarin Marchand O’Reilly Chabot Burns Johansen Forsberg Palmieri Meier DeBrincat Point Draisaitl Tavares Crosby Couture Larkin Carlson Monahan Tkachuk Eichel Nugent-Hopkins Seguin Wheeler Lindholm Skinner Scheifele Marchessault Hertl Giroux Bailey Hall Backstrom Arvidsson Toews Domi Granlund Klingberg Kucherov Lee Letang Duchene Parise Gourde Voracek Suter Barzal Ferland Atkinson Pominville Connor Radulov Dadonov Tatar Teravainen Turris Tierney Giordano

Team COL PIT EDM BOS CHI COL CAR BOS TOR WSH COL PIT CGY WSH TOR TOR CBJ BOS STL OTT SJS NSH NSH NJD SJS CHI TBL EDM TOR PIT SJS DET WSH CGY CGY BUF EDM DAL WPG CGY BUF WPG VGK SJS PHI NYI NJD WSH NSH CHI MTL MIN DAL TBL NYI PIT OTT MIN TBL PHI MIN NYI CAR CBJ BUF WPG DAL FLA MTL CAR NSH OTT CGY

G 5 7 9 7 11 9 4 11 10 10 10 7 6 5 4 4 5 4 3 3 3 2 10 9 9 8 7 7 7 6 6 6 5 5 5 4 3 3 2 8 7 6 6 5 3 3 2 2 8 7 6 6 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 3 3 1 7 6 6 6 5 5 3 3 3 2 1

A 16 13 10 12 7 9 13 5 6 6 6 9 10 11 12 12 10 11 12 12 12 13 4 5 5 6 7 7 7 8 8 8 9 9 9 10 11 11 12 5 6 7 7 8 10 10 11 11 4 5 6 6 7 7 7 8 8 8 8 9 9 11 4 5 5 5 6 6 8 8 8 9 10

P 21 20 19 19 18 18 17 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 15 15 15 15 15 15 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Celtics’ Semi Ojeleye (left) and Jayson Tatum defend against the Bucks’ Giannis Antetokounmpo during the first half Thursday night in Boston. ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kyrie Irving scored 28 points, making six of Boston’s franchise record 24 3-pointers, as the host Celtics knocked off the last unbeaten team in the NBA with a 117-113 win over the Milwaukee Bucks on Thursday night. Gordon Hayward added a season-high 18 points, Al Horford also scored 18 and Marcus Morris had 17 points for the Celtics, who held off the Bucks in the final minute and put an end to Milwaukee’s unbeaten start. Giannis Antetokounmpo returned to the lineup after missing one game while in the NBA’s concussion protocol and led Milwaukee with 33 points and 11 rebounds. Down 15 entering the fourth quarter, the Bucks opened the final period on a 12-0 run and were within a point in the final minute, but the Celtics held on for their fourth straight win.

NOTEBOOK Howard set for Wizards debut • Dwight Howard is scheduled to make his Washington debut against Oklahoma City on Friday. The Wizards are off to a 1-6 start without Howard. He missed all of training camp, the preseason and the first seven games of the regular season because of a sore backside. Cavs’ Smith wants trade • J.R. Smith has added another tier to the Cavaliers’ mounting troubles. Dropped from the rotation and unhappy with his role on a team rebuilding through youth, Smith said Thursday that he wants to be traded. Grizzlies cut Harrison • Memphis waived Andrew Harrison after playing the guard only once this season. The 6-foot-6 Harrison started 64 of 129 games since joining Memphis for the 2016-17 season coming out of Kentucky.

NBA SUMMARIES Kings 146, Hawks 115

Thunder 111, Hornets 107

Celtics 117, Bucks 113

Sacramento: Shumpert 3-8 0-0 8, Bjelica 7-11 2-2 19, Cauley-Stein 6-8 0-1 12, Fox 9-13 10-11 31, Hield 10-17 2-3 27, Jackson 2-5 2-3 6, Bagley III 7-10 4-4 18, Giles III 2-3 0-0 4, Labissiere 2-3 2-2 6, Koufos 4-7 0-0 8, Ferrell 0-5 0-0 0, Mason 0-6 4-6 4, McLemore 1-2 0-0 3. Totals 53-98 26-32 146. Atlanta: Prince 3-12 0-0 7, Carter 1-3 0-0 3, Len 2-5 7-10 11, Young 6-13 2-3 14, Bazemore 6-12 0-0 14, Bembry 5-8 2-4 13, Poythress 3-6 3-4 9, Spellman 1-3 0-0 2, Dedmon 2-3 2-2 6, Plumlee 0-0 0-0 0, Lin 8-13 5-7 23, Huerter 1-1 0-0 3, Dorsey 4-8 2-4 10. Totals 42-87 23-34 115. Sacramento 35 34 46 31 — 146 Atlanta 29 35 23 28 — 115 3-point goals: Sacramento 14-35 (Hield 5-7, Fox 3-4, Bjelica 3-5, Shumpert 2-7, McLemore 1-1, Labissiere 0-1, Jackson 0-2, Ferrell 0-4, Mason 0-4), Atlanta 8-31 (Bazemore 2-5, Lin 2-7, Huerter 1-1, Bembry 1-2, Carter 1-3, Prince 1-7, Young 0-1, Spellman 0-1, Len 0-1, Dedmon 0-1, Dorsey 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Sacramento 46 (Fox 10), Atlanta 43 (Poythress 8). Assists: Sacramento 38 (Fox 15), Atlanta 26 (Young 10). Total fouls: Sacramento 29, Atlanta 28. Technicals: Bazemore. A: 12,095 (18,118).

Oklahoma City: George 4-20 3-4 11, Grant 3-7 3-4 10, Adams 1-5 3-4 5, Westbrook 12-24 5-7 29, Ferguson 0-1 0-0 0, Patterson 0-3 0-0 0, Noel 2-2 0-0 4, Schroder 7-15 5-8 21, Diallo 3-4 0-0 6, Abrines 9-15 2-2 25. Totals 41-96 21-29 111. Charlotte: Batum 4-8 0-0 10, Williams 2-6 0-0 4, Zeller 2-4 1-2 5, Walker 7-16 5-5 21, Lamb 5-12 2-2 13, Kidd-Gilchrist 3-10 3-3 9, Bridges 2-6 0-0 4, Hernangomez 1-4 0-0 3, Parker 5-12 6-7 17, Monk 7-15 3-3 21. Totals 38-93 20-22 107. Oklahoma City 24 20 29 38 — 111 Charlotte 22 26 29 30 — 107 3-point goals: Oklahoma City 8-37 (Abrines 5-10, Schroder 2-6, Grant 1-3, Ferguson 0-1, Diallo 0-1, Patterson 0-3, Westbrook 0-3, George 0-10), Charlotte 11-41 (Monk 4-12, Batum 2-4, Walker 2-8, Hernangomez 1-1, Parker 1-2, Lamb 1-7, Kidd-Gilchrist 0-2, Williams 0-2, Bridges 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Oklahoma City 49 (Adams 12), Charlotte 51 (Lamb, Kidd-Gilchrist 9). Assists: Oklahoma City 20 (Westbrook 10), Charlotte 26 (Walker, Batum 6). Total fouls: Oklahoma City 21, Charlotte 26. Technicals: Westbrook. A: 14,583 (19,077).

Milwaukee: Middleton 6-18 1-1 16, Antetokounmpo 13-22 7-11 33, Lopez 1-4 0-0 2, Bledsoe 3-9 6-9 13, Brogdon 6-10 2-2 16, Ilyasova 3-6 2-2 8, Henson 2-4 1-2 6, Connaughton 1-2 0-0 2, DiVincenzo 3-6 1-1 8, Snell 3-4 2-2 9. Totals 41-85 22-30 113. Boston: Hayward 6-11 3-3 18, Ojeleye 4-6 0-0 10, Horford 6-15 2-2 18, Irving 10-20 2-2 28, Tatum 4-9 2-2 12, Baynes 1-5 2-4 5, Williams III 0-0 0-0 0, Smart 1-4 0-0 2, Rozier 3-11 0-0 7, M.Morris 6-11 0-0 17, J.Brown 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 41-92 11-13 117. Milwaukee 16 37 25 35 — 113 Boston 23 32 38 24 — 117 3-point goals: Milwaukee 9-29 (Middleton 3-10, Brogdon 2-3, Henson 1-2, Snell 1-2, Bledsoe 1-2, DiVincenzo 1-4, Ilyasova 0-1, Connaughton 0-1, Antetokounmpo 0-1, Lopez 0-3), Boston 24-55 (Irving 6-12, M.Morris 5-8, Horford 4-11, Hayward 3-5, Tatum 2-3, Ojeleye 2-4, Rozier 1-4, Baynes 1-5, Smart 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Milwaukee 45 (Antetokounmpo 11), Boston 42 (Rozier 7). Assists: Milwaukee 20 (Bledsoe 7), Boston 30 (Horford 8). Total fouls: Milwaukee 20, Boston 23. Technicals: Boston coach Celtics (Defensive three second) 2. A: 18,624 (18,624).

76ers 122, Clippers 113

Nuggets 110, Cavaliers 91

L.A. Clippers: Harris 10-16 2-2 24, Gallinari 5-14 11-11 25, Gortat 0-1 0-0 0, Beverley 1-7 2-4 4, Bradley 1-6 0-0 2, Scott 1-1 0-0 3, Harrell 3-5 1-2 7, Marjanovic 5-7 5-6 15, Gilgeous-Alexander 3-8 1-1 7, Robinson 0-0 0-0 0, Teodosic 0-2 0-0 0, Williams 9-19 6-7 26, Wallace 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 38-86 28-33 113. Philadelphia: Covington 4-5 0-0 10, Saric 1-8 2-2 5, Embiid 16-32 6-9 41, Simmons 6-11 2-2 14, Fultz 5-10 2-4 12, Muscala 1-4 1-1 4, Johnson 2-3 1-1 5, Shamet 5-8 0-1 13, Redick 4-12 7-8 18. Totals 44-93 21-28 122. L.A. Clippers 30 27 29 27 — 113 Philadelphia 34 38 18 32 — 122 3-point goals: L.A. Clippers 9-23 (Gallinari 4-8, Harris 2-3, Williams 2-5, Scott 1-1, Bradley 0-1, Teodosic 0-1, Beverley 0-4), Philadelphia 13-27 (Shamet 3-6, Redick 3-6, Embiid 3-8, Covington 2-2, Muscala 1-2, Saric 1-3). Fouled out: Beverley. Rebounds: L.A. Clippers 42 (Marjanovic 11), Philadelphia 43 (Embiid 13). Assists: L.A. Clippers 19 (Beverley 4), Philadelphia 29 (Simmons 11). Total fouls: L.A. Clippers 28, Philadelphia 30. Technicals: Philadelphia coach 76ers (Defensive three second). A: 20,246 (20,478).

Scoring leaders

Denver: Craig 3-5 0-0 7, Millsap 6-9 3-4 16, Jokic 2-5 0-0 4, Murray 5-8 0-0 10, Harris 4-12 5-5 14, Hernangomez 6-10 6-7 23, Plumlee 5-8 1-1 11, Lydon 0-0 1-2 1, Lyles 5-13 2-2 12, Morris 3-7 0-0 7, Beasley 2-8 0-0 5, AkoonPurcell 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 41-85 18-21 110. Cleveland: Osman 5-13 1-1 13, Dekker 3-10 0-0 6, Thompson 4-6 2-2 10, Hill 4-7 0-0 10, Hood 1-9 6-6 8, Nance Jr. 3-8 2-2 8, Zizic 1-3 1-2 3, Sexton 5-11 1-1 12, Korver 0-1 0-0 0, Clarkson 7-14 3-3 17, Nwaba 1-1 2-2 4. Totals 34-83 18-19 91. Denver 15 35 33 27 — 110 Cleveland 27 15 24 25 — 91 3-point goals: Denver 10-26 (Hernangomez 5-8, Morris 1-1, Millsap 1-1, Craig 1-2, Beasley 1-4, Harris 1-5, Jokic 0-1, Murray 0-1, Lyles 0-3), Cleveland 5-18 (Hill 2-2, Osman 2-6, Sexton 1-1, Korver 0-1, Dekker 0-2, Clarkson 0-3, Hood 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Denver 44 (Lyles 8), Cleveland 35 (Thompson 7). Assists: Denver 22 (Beasley 4), Cleveland 18 (Hood, Thompson 4). Total fouls: Denver 18, Cleveland 22. A: 19,432 (20,562).

Player Curry Lillard Walker Embiid LaVine DeRozan Durant James Leonard Griffin Antetokounmpo Hardaway Jr. Davis George Mitchell Mirotic Beal Butler Oladipo Harris Wall Gallinari Aldridge Middleton

Team GSW POR CHA PHI CHI SAS GSW LAL TOR DET MIL NYK NOP OKC UTA NOP WAS MIN IND LAC WAS LAC SAS MIL

GP 9 7 9 9 8 7 9 8 6 7 7 8 5 7 7 7 7 6 8 8 7 8 7 8

PTS 33.0 29.6 29.1 28.6 28.1 27.9 27.8 27.8 27.3 27.3 26.1 26.0 25.2 23.4 23.3 23.1 22.6 22.5 22.0 21.3 20.9 20.6 20.6 20.1


SPORTS

C4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NBA STANDINGS

NHL STANDINGS EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Tampa Bay Boston Montreal Toronto Buffalo Ottawa Detroit Florida Metropolitan Pittsburgh N.Y. Islanders Columbus Carolina Washington Philadelphia New Jersey N.Y. Rangers

GP 12 12 12 13 13 12 13 10 GP 11 12 12 12 11 13 10 13

W 8 7 7 8 6 5 4 2 W 6 7 7 6 5 6 5 5

L 3 3 3 5 5 5 7 5 L 2 4 5 5 4 7 4 7

OT 1 2 2 0 2 2 2 3 OT 3 1 0 1 2 0 1 1

Pts 17 16 16 16 14 12 10 7 Pts 15 15 14 13 12 12 11 11

GF 42 37 40 43 33 40 34 30 GF 45 39 43 36 43 40 34 35

GA 34 29 33 39 39 46 49 39 GA 35 30 44 34 43 50 32 43

Home 5-2-0 4-1-0 5-2-0 3-5-0 3-2-1 4-2-1 2-3-1 0-3-1 Home 2-2-1 2-1-1 3-4-0 3-3-1 3-1-1 2-4-0 5-1-1 3-3-0

Away 3-1-1 3-2-2 2-1-2 5-0-0 3-3-1 1-3-1 2-4-1 2-2-2 Away 4-0-2 5-3-0 4-1-0 3-2-0 2-3-1 4-3-0 0-3-0 2-4-1

Div 2-0-0 4-1-0 2-1-2 2-1-0 1-2-0 3-2-0 1-4-0 0-0-2 Div 1-1-1 5-0-0 1-1-0 2-1-1 1-1-1 1-2-0 1-1-0 0-1-1

L 3 4 3 4 5 5 4 L 5 6 4 4 6 5 7 8

OT 0 1 2 2 3 0 3 OT 1 0 1 3 3 0 1 1

Pts 20 17 16 16 15 14 11 Pts 17 16 15 15 13 12 11 7

GF 46 39 35 46 43 36 41 GF 47 40 36 42 34 31 30 24

GA 30 34 35 33 51 31 42 GA 47 44 34 40 40 21 39 44

Home 4-3-0 5-1-1 5-0-2 3-1-1 3-2-2 5-2-0 3-3-1 Home 3-2-1 4-2-0 3-2-1 2-2-1 2-2-3 3-2-0 3-2-1 2-3-1

Away 6-0-0 3-3-0 2-3-0 4-3-1 3-3-1 2-3-0 1-1-2 Away 5-3-0 4-4-0 4-2-0 4-2-2 3-4-0 3-3-0 2-5-0 1-5-0

Div 2-0-0 2-2-0 3-2-0 1-1-0 2-1-1 1-1-0 1-1-3 Div 1-1-0 2-2-0 0-0-0 2-1-0 2-1-2 2-1-0 1-0-1 0-0-1

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Nashville Winnipeg Minnesota Colorado Chicago Dallas Blues Pacific Calgary Vancouver Edmonton San Jose Anaheim Arizona Vegas Los Angeles

GP 13 13 12 13 14 12 11 GP 14 14 12 13 14 11 13 12

W 10 8 7 7 6 7 4 W 8 8 7 6 5 6 5 3

M 2 • FrIDAy • 11.02.2018

Thursday Winnipeg 4, Florida 2 NY Islanders 3, Pittsburgh 2, SO Dallas 2, Toronto 1 Detroit 4, New Jersey 3 Montreal 6, Washington 4 Nashville 4, Tampa Bay 1 Ottawa 4, Buffalo 2 Blues 5, Vegas 3 Calgary 6, Colorado 5 Edmonton 4, Chicago 0 Rangers 3, Anaheim 2, SO Philadelphia 5, Los Angeles 2 Columbus 4, San Jose 1

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Toronto Boston Philadelphia Brooklyn New York Southeast Charlotte Miami Orlando Atlanta Washington Central Milwaukee Indiana Detroit Chicago Cleveland

Wednesday Vancouver 4, Chicago 2 Friday Florida vs. Winnipeg at Helsinki, 1 p.m. Colorado at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Carolina at Arizona, 9 p.m. Saturday Ottawa at Buffalo, 1 p.m. Edmonton at Detroit, 6 p.m. Tampa Bay at Montreal, 6 p.m. New Jersey at Islanders, 6 p.m. Toronto at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. Dallas at Washington, 6 p.m. Minnesota at Blues, 7 p.m. Boston at Nashville, 7 p.m. Chicago at Calgary, 9 p.m. Carolina at Vegas, 9 p.m. Columbus at LA, 9:30 p.m. Phila. at San Jose, 9:30 p.m.

W 7 6 5 3 2 W 4 3 2 2 1 W 7 5 4 2 1

L 1 2 4 5 6 L 5 4 5 6 6 L 1 3 3 6 7

Pct .875 .750 .556 .375 .250 Pct .444 .429 .286 .250 .143 Pct .875 .625 .571 .250 .125

GB — 1 2½ 4 5 GB — — 1 1½ 2 GB — 2 2½ 5 6

L10 7-1 6-2 5-4 3-5 2-6 L10 4-5 3-4 2-5 2-6 1-6 L10 7-1 5-3 4-3 2-6 1-7

Str W-1 W-4 W-1 W-1 L-1 Str L-1 L-2 L-3 L-4 L-4 Str L-1 W-1 L-3 L-2 L-1

Home 6-0 3-1 5-0 2-1 2-3 Home 2-2 2-2 1-3 1-2 0-2 Home 5-0 2-1 3-1 1-3 1-4

Away 1-1 3-1 0-4 1-4 0-3 Away 2-3 1-2 1-2 1-4 1-4 Away 2-1 3-2 1-2 1-3 0-3

Conf 5-1 5-2 4-4 3-3 2-5 Conf 4-4 2-3 2-3 1-4 0-2 Conf 6-1 3-1 4-3 2-3 1-5

Pct .714 .667 .500 .250 .167 Pct .875 .750 .571 .500 .429 Pct .889 .667 .500 .375 .143

GB — ½ 1½ 3½ 3½ GB — 1 2½ 3 3½ GB — 2 3½ 4½ 6

L10 5-2 4-2 4-4 2-6 1-5 L10 7-1 6-2 4-3 4-4 3-4 L10 8-1 6-3 4-4 3-5 1-6

Str W-3 W-2 L-4 L-5 L-4 Str W-3 W-3 L-1 W-2 W-3 Str W-6 W-5 L-2 W-1 L-6

Home 3-1 3-0 3-1 2-1 0-4 Home 4-0 3-1 0-2 4-1 2-2 Home 4-0 2-1 3-1 2-2 1-2

Away 2-1 1-2 1-3 0-5 1-1 Away 3-1 3-1 4-1 0-3 1-2 Away 4-1 4-2 1-3 1-3 0-4

Conf 5-1 2-1 3-4 1-4 1-5 Conf 5-1 4-0 4-3 2-2 2-3 Conf 4-1 2-3 3-3 3-5 1-6

WESTERN CONFERENCE

Friday LA Clippers at Orlando, 6 p.m. Houston at Brooklyn, 6:30 p.m. Indiana at Chicago, 7 p.m. Oklahoma City at Washington, 7 p.m. New York at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Memphis at Utah, 8 p.m. Toronto at Phoenix, 9 p.m. Minnesota at Golden State, 9:30 p.m.

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss.

Laine has hat trick for Jets in Helsinki

Celtics hand Bucks first loss of season

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Finland native Patrik Laine had a hat trick as the Winnipeg Jets took a 4-2 victory over the Florida Panthers in a regularseason game in Helsinki on Thursday. Laine scored in the second period and twice in the third, including an emptynetter, for the Jets, who opened the backto-back series between the teams in front of a roaring sellout crowd of 13,500 at Hartwall Arena. He wristed a shot past goalie James Reimer on a power play to claim a 2-1 lead for the Jets with 4:46 left in the second, then slapped a one-timer for the winner on a two-man advantage from the top of the left circle 3:28 into the final period before scoring on an empty net. Mathieu Perreault scored the opening goal for the Jets (8-4-1) and defenseman

L 2 2 4 6 5 L 1 2 3 4 4 L 1 3 4 5 6

Wednesday Brooklyn 120, Detroit 119, OT Denver 108, Chicago 107, OT Indiana 107, New York 101 Minnesota 128, Utah 125 Golden State 131, New Orleans 121 LA Lakers 114, Dallas 113 San Antonio 120, Phoenix 90

Southwest San Antonio Memphis New Orleans Dallas Houston Northwest Denver Portland Utah Minnesota Oklahoma City Pacific Golden State Sacramento LA Clippers LA Lakers Phoenix

Sunday Buffalo at NY Rangers, 6 p.m. Tampa Bay at Ottawa, 6 p.m. Columbus at Anaheim, 8 p.m.

W 5 4 4 2 1 W 7 6 4 4 3 W 8 6 4 3 1

Thursday Denver 110, Cleveland 91 Oklahoma City 111, Charlotte 107 Philadelphia 122, LA Clippers 113 Sacramento 146, Atlanta 115 Boston 117, Milwaukee 113 Portland 132, New Orleans 119

Saturday Detroit at Phila., noon Boston at Indiana, 6 p.m. Cleveland at Charlotte, 6 p.m. Miami at Atlanta, 6:30 p.m. Houston at Chicago, 7 p.m. New Orleans at San Antonio, 7:30 p.m. Utah at Denver, 8 p.m. Lakers at Portland, 9 p.m.

Dustin Byfuglien had three assists. The Panthers (2-5-3), who outshot Winnipeg 38-36, tied the score twice on goals by Keith Yandle and Evgenii Dadonov. Florida captain Aleksander Barkov, also a native of Finland, assisted on Perreault’s opener. Laine, whose 44 goals were second in the NHL last season to Alex Ovechkin’s 49, opened the season with just three goals and two assists in 12 games, but he made a clear statement on Thursday. The Panthers had the momentum early, outshooting the Jets 9-0 in the opening minutes. They controlled the play and the puck most of the opening period but goaltender Connor Hellebuyck kept them at bay, turning back 18 shots in the frame. The game was the 24th played in Europe during the regular season and the sixth in Finland.

NHL SUMMARIES Islanders 3, Penguins 2, SO

Predators 4, Lightning 1

Flames 6, Avalanche 5

Pittsburgh 1 0 1 0 — 2 NY Islanders 0 1 1 0 — 3 NY Islanders won shootout 1-0. First period: 1, Pittsburgh, Simon 3 (Guentzel, Maatta), 6:20 (pp). Penalties: Oleksiak, PIT, (roughing), 1:34; Komarov, NYI, (holding), 1:34; Barzal, NYI, (hooking), 4:30; Johnson, PIT, (hooking), 13:18. Second period: 2, NY Islanders, Bailey 3 (Cizikas), 14:46 (sh). Penalties: Dumoulin, PIT, (holding), 12:19; Bailey, NYI, (hooking), 12:33; Pelech, NYI, (interference), 13:42. Third period: 3, NY Islanders, Lee 5 (Hickey, Nelson), 10:11. 4, Pittsburgh, Malkin 7 (Kessel, Letang), 12:02 (pp). Penalties: Lee, NYI, (slashing), 11:01. Overtime: None. Penalties: None. Shootout: Pittsburgh 0 (Malkin NG, Crosby NG, Letang NG), NY Islanders 1 (Eberle NG, Nelson NG, Bailey G). Shots: Pittsburgh 9-13-6-3: 31. NY Islanders 10-8-6-2: 26. Power-plays: Pittsburgh 2 of 4; NY Islanders 0 of 2. Goalies: Pittsburgh, Murray 4-2-1 (26 shots24 saves). NY Islanders, Greiss 3-2-0 (31-29). A: 10,910. Referees: Tom Chmielewski, Justin St Pierre. Linesmen: Tim Nowak, Libor Suchanek.

Nashville 2 0 2 — 4 Tampa Bay 0 1 0 — 1 First period: 1, Nashville, Turris 3 (Jarnkrok, Ekholm), 6:02. 2, Nashville, Josi 3 (Ellis, Johansen), 19:53. Penalties: Point, TB, (holding stick), 1:41. Second period: 3, Tampa Bay, Koekkoek 1 (Cirelli, Killorn), 14:21. Penalties: Ekholm, NSH, (tripping), 5:48. Third period: 4, Nashville, Jarnkrok 3 (Johansen), 16:42. 5, Nashville, Salomaki 2 (Hartman, Turris), 17:36. Penalties: Josi, NSH, (cross checking), 4:30. Shots: Nashville 15-4-5: 24. Tampa Bay 13-17-13: 43. Power-plays: Nashville 0 of 1; Tampa Bay 0 of 2. Goalies: Nashville, Rinne 4-1-0 (43 shots-42 saves). Tampa Bay, Vasilevskiy 6-2-1 (23-20). A: 19,092. Referees: Brad Meier, Kyle Rehman. Linesmen: Darren Gibbs, Brad Kovachik.

Colorado 0 4 1 — 5 Calgary 0 1 5 — 6 First Period: None. Penalties: Frolik, CGY, (hooking), 0:34. Second Period: 1, Colorado, Kamenev 1, 3:22 (sh). 2, Colorado, Dries 1 (Barrie, Kerfoot), 5:12. 3, Calgary, Backlund 2 (Giordano, Tkachuk), 6:34. 4, Colorado, Wilson 4 (Dries, Cole), 11:04. 5, Colorado, Soderberg 5 (Bourque), 16:41. Penalties: Calvert, COL, (hooking), 1:31; Rantanen, COL, (high sticking), 8:20; Cole, COL, Major (fighting), 16:53; Bennett, CGY, Major (fighting), 16:53; Bennett, CGY, served by Dube, (instigator), 16:53; Bennett, CGY, Misconduct (misconduct), 16:53; Cole, COL, served by Dano, Major (charging), 16:53; Cole, COL, Misconduct (misconduct), 16:53. Third Period: 6, Calgary, Lindholm 9 (Giordano, Monahan), 0:47 (pp). 7, Calgary, Monahan 6 (Ryan, Hanifin), 5:21. 8, Calgary, Neal 3 (Gaudreau, Valimaki), 10:52. 9, Calgary, Giordano 2 (Tkachuk, Backlund), 13:47. 10, Calgary, Frolik 6 (Tkachuk, Brodie), 14:54. 11, Colorado, Landeskog 11 (Wilson, Kerfoot), 18:57 (pp). Penalties: Backlund, CGY, (slashing), 18:47. Shots: Colorado 4-10-12: 26. Calgary 13-13-11: 37. Power-plays: Colorado 1 of 2; Calgary 1 of 4. Goalies: Colorado, Varlamov 4-3-2 (37 shots-31 saves). Calgary, Smith 5-4-1 (26-21). A: 17,317 (19,289). Referees: TJ Luxmore, Chris Rooney. Linesmen: Lonnie Cameron, Trent Knorr.

Stars 2, Maple Leafs 1 Dallas 0 1 1 — 2 Toronto 0 0 1 — 1 First period: None. Penalties: Ritchie, DAL, (holding), 7:28. Second period: 1, Dallas, Benn 5 (Klingberg, Seguin), 11:55. Penalties: Lindholm, TOR, (holding), 9:53; Holl, TOR, (holding), 12:41; Methot, DAL, (tripping), 16:02. Third period: 2, Dallas, Shore 3 (Seguin, Janmark), 4:43. 3, Toronto, Marleau 2 (Tavares, Rielly), 16:51 (pp). Penalties: Ritchie, DAL, (holding), 1:12; Dickinson, DAL, (tripping), 5:30; Ritchie, DAL, (tripping), 16:29. Shots: Dallas 7-8-4: 19. Toronto 9-7-16: 32. Power-plays: Dallas 0 of 2; Toronto 1 of 5. Goalies: Dallas, Khudobin 2-1-0 (32 shots-31 saves). Toronto, Andersen 6-5-0 (19-17). A: 18,878. Referees: Garrett Rank, Francois St Laurent. Linesmen: Greg Devorski, Scott Driscoll.

Jets 4, Panthers 2 Winnipeg 1 1 2 — 4 Florida 0 2 0 — 2 First period: 1, Winnipeg, Perreault 2 (Little, Byfuglien), 18:34. Penalties: Kulikov, WPG, (high sticking), 12:31. Second period: 2, Florida, Yandle 2 (Hoffman, Barkov), 4:18 (pp). 3, Winnipeg, Laine 4 (Wheeler, Byfuglien), 15:14 (pp). 4, Florida, Dadonov 5 (Matheson, Bjugstad), 17:54. Penalties: Chiarot, WPG, (holding), 2:25; Trocheck, FLA, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 2:25; Trouba, WPG, (tripping), 4:03; Lowry, WPG, (elbowing), 6:29; Lowry, WPG, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 6:29; Petrovic, FLA, (tripping), 15:03; Dadonov, FLA, (tripping), 20:00. Third period: 5, Winnipeg, Laine 5 (Wheeler, Byfuglien), 3:28 (pp). 6, Winnipeg, Laine 6 (Wheeler, Scheifele), 19:17. Penalties: Yandle, FLA, (tripping), 2:45; Florida bench, served by Bjugstad (too many men on the ice), 2:45; Morrissey, WPG, (interference), 10:19; Hoffman, FLA, (slashing), 14:03; Ekblad, FLA, (interference), 15:32. Shots: Winnipeg 14-8-14: 36. Florida 18-14-6: 38. Power-plays: Winnipeg 2 of 6; Florida 1 of 5. Goalies: Winnipeg, Hellebuyck 5-4-1 (38 shots-36 saves). Florida, Reimer 1-4-1 (35-32). A: 13,490. Referees: Gord Dwyer, Dan O’Rourke. Linesmen: David Brisebois, Scott Cherrey.

Oilers 4, Blackhawks 0 Chicago 0 0 0 — 0 Edmonton 0 2 2 — 4 First Period: None. Penalties: Larsson, EDM, (holding), 15:03. Second Period: 1, Edmonton, Caggiula 3 (Nugent-Hopkins, McDavid), 0:18. 2, Edmonton, Garrison 1 (Rieder), 19:23 (pp). Penalties: Jokiharju, CHI, (slashing), 13:13; Martinsen, CHI, (interference), 18:13. Third Period: 3, Edmonton, Caggiula 4 (Benning, Khaira), 6:49 (sh). 4, Edmonton, Chiasson 5 (Draisaitl, Rieder), 10:38. Penalties: Larsson, EDM, (slashing), 4:54; Khaira, EDM, (holding), 7:29; Gustafsson, CHI, (cross checking), 12:07; Davidson, CHI, served by Fortin, Major (elbowing), 17:03; Nurse, EDM, (roughing), 17:03; Nurse, EDM, Misconduct (misconduct), 17:03; Davidson, CHI, Misconduct (misconduct), 17:03. Shots: Chicago 15-16-9: 40. Edmonton 8-9-12: 29. Power-plays: Chicago 0 of 3; Edmonton 1 of 4. Goalies: Chicago, Ward 3-2-3 (29 shots-25 saves). Edmonton, Koskinen 2-0-0 (40-40). A: 18,347 (18,641). Referees: Steve Kozari, Furman South. Linesmen: Tyson Baker, Kory Nagy.

Canadiens 6, Capitals 4 Washington 1 3 0 — 4 Montreal 1 2 3 — 6 First period: 1, Montreal, Kotkaniemi 1 (Armia), 2:28. 2, Washington, Eller 2 (Stephenson, Niskanen), 6:16. Penalties: Gallagher, MTL, (roughing), 8:23; Kuznetsov, WSH, (roughing), 8:23. Second period: 3, Montreal, Gallagher 8 (Tatar), 0:32. 4, Montreal, Gallagher 9 (Danault, Tatar), 3:06. 5, Washington, Ovechkin 9 (Kuznetsov, Vrana), 6:49. 6, Washington, Eller 3 (Connolly), 7:59. 7, Washington, Ovechkin 10 (Niskanen, Orlov), 12:53. Penalties: Kuznetsov, WSH, (holding), 16:16; Eller, WSH, (interference), 19:57. Third period: 8, Montreal, Kotkaniemi 2 (Lehkonen), 16:56. 9, Montreal, Domi 6 (Reilly), 19:38. 10, Montreal, Armia 3 (Danault), 19:40. Penalties: Hudon, MTL, (tripping), 13:01. Shots: Washington 13-13-5: 31. Montreal 19-8-17: 44. Power-plays: Washington 0 of 1; Montreal 0 of 2. Goalies: Washington, Holtby 4-3-1 (43 shots-38 saves). Montreal, Price 5-2-2 (31-27). A: 20,279. Referees: Pierre Lambert, Brad Watson. Linesmen: Brian Murphy, Mark Shewchyk.

Senators 4, Sabres 2 Buffalo 0 0 2 — 2 Ottawa 1 2 1 — 4 First period: 1, Ottawa, Dzingel 5 (Wideman, Boedker), 6:55 (pp). Penalties: McCabe, BUF, (slashing), 2:42; Scandella, BUF, (holding), 5:39; Wideman, OTT, (delay of game), 12:27. Second period: 2, Ottawa, DeMelo 2 (Duchene, Chabot), 1:00. 3, Ottawa, White 3 (Stone, Chabot), 14:47 (pp). Penalties: Eichel, BUF, (hooking), 4:22; DeMelo, OTT, (slashing), 7:42; Okposo, BUF, (delay of game), 12:58; Berglund, BUF, (high sticking), 17:00. Third period: 4, Buffalo, Pominville 6 (Eichel, Scandella), 0:59. 5, Buffalo, Skinner 7 (Eichel, Ristolainen), 3:55 (pp). 6, Ottawa, Ryan 3 (DeMelo, Stone), 19:40. Penalties: Stone, OTT, (slashing), 2:22; Ryan, OTT, (delay of game), 7:14. Shots: Buffalo 12-13-23: 48. Ottawa 12-12-8: 32. Power-plays: Buffalo 1 of 4; Ottawa 2 of 5. Goalies: Buffalo, Hutton 4-5-1 (31 shots-28 saves). Ottawa, Anderson 5-3-2 (48-46). A: 12,587. Referees: Marc Joannette, Ian Walsh. Linesmen: Steve Barton, Derek Nansen.

Red Wings 4, Devils 3 New Jersey 0 1 2 — 3 Detroit 1 0 3 — 4 First period: 1, Detroit, Frk 2 (Larkin, Green), 7:54 (pp). Penalties: Ericsson, DET, (tripping), 4:18; Lovejoy, NJ, (holding stick), 7:20; Boyle, NJ, (interference), 8:20. Second period: 2, New Jersey, Coleman 5 (Zajac, Johansson), 14:12. Penalties: Larkin, DET, (roughing), 14:33; Glendening, DET, Major (fighting), 19:14; Mueller, NJ, Major (fighting), 19:14; Severson, NJ, (holding), 19:44. Third period: 3, New Jersey, Vatanen 2 (Zajac, Hischier), 3:20 (pp). 4, Detroit, Rasmussen 3 (Nyquist, Cholowski), 4:59 (pp). 5, Detroit, Abdelkader 3 (Glendening), 12:50 (sh). 6, Detroit, Daley 2 (Larkin), 19:17 (sh). 7, New Jersey, Johansson 3 (Hall, Hischier), 19:56 (pp). Penalties: Larkin, DET, (interference), 1:40; Vatanen, NJ, (interference), 3:30; Kronwall, DET, (holding), 12:36; Ericsson, DET, (cross checking), 19:10; New Jersey bench, served by Johansson (unsportsmanlike conduct), 19:56. Shots: New Jersey 7-8-13: 28. Detroit 12-10-9: 31. Power-plays: New Jersey 2 of 5; Detroit 2 of 5. Goalies: New Jersey, Schneider 0-2-0 (30 shots-27 saves). Detroit, Howard 4-5-2 (28-25). A: 18,273. Referees: Frederick L’Ecuyer, Dan O’Halloran. Linesmen: Bryan Pancich, Pierre Racicot.

Rangers 3, Ducks 2, SO NY Rangers 0 2 0 0 — Anaheim 0 1 1 0 — NY Rangers won shootout 2-0. First period: None. Penalties: Kreider, NYR, (boarding), 17:52. Second period: 1, NY Rangers, Hayes 3 (Chytil, Howden), 1:42 (pp). 2, Anaheim, Silfverberg 4 (Getzlaf, Rakell), 12:31 (pp). 3, NY Rangers, Howden 3 (Vesey, Staal), 14:29. Penalties: Aberg, ANA, (hooking), 0:45; Welinski, ANA, (hooking), 8:20; DeAngelo, NYR, (interference), 11:28; Lindholm, ANA, (high sticking), 16:21. Third period: 4, Anaheim, Rakell 3 (Getzlaf, Fowler), 19:34. Penalties: Pionk, NYR, (interference), 11:07. Overtime: None. Penalties: None. Shootout: NY Rangers 2 (Zuccarello G, Zibanejad G), Anaheim 0 (Aberg NG, Getzlaf NG). Shots: NY Rangers 7-10-4-3: 24. Anaheim 7-11-11-1: 30. Power-plays: NY Rangers 1 of 3; Anaheim 1 of 3. Goalies: NY Rangers, Georgiev 2-1-0 (30 shots-28 saves). Anaheim, Gibson 4-4-3 (24-22). A: 16,101. Referees: Dean Morton, Graham Skilliter. Linesmen: Brandon Gawryletz, Ryan Gibbons.

3 2

Flyers 5, Kings 2 Philadelphia 1 2 2 — 5 Los Angeles 0 2 0 — 2 First Period: 1, PHI, Provorov 2 (Weal, Weise), 17:35. Penalties: Simmonds, PHI, (tripping), 1:49; Folin, PHI, (interference), 10:30; Lehtera, PHI, (hooking), 10:55. Second Period: 2, LA, Carter 3 (Kopitar, Kovalchuk), 10:04 (pp). 3, PHI, Simmonds 7 (Lindblom, Patrick), 10:53. 4, PHI, Lindblom 3 (Voracek, Patrick), 14:05. 5, LA, Kovalchuk 4 (Toffoli, Carter), 18:41. Penalties: Clifford, LA, (holding), 5:49; Konecny, PHI, (high sticking), 8:52. Third Period: 6, PHI, Giroux 4 (Couturier), 14:27. 7, PHI, Hagg 3 (Elliott), 16:49. Penalties: Laughton, PHI, (tripping), 2:35. Shots: PHI 13-10-8: 31. LA 7-14-6: 27. Power-plays: PHI 0 of 1; LA 1 of 5. Goalies: PHI, Elliott 4-5-0 (27 shots-25 saves). LA, Campbell 3-5-0 (30-26). A: 18,230 (18,230). Referees: Kevin Pollock, Chris Schlenker. Linesmen: Travis Gawryletz, Brian Mach.

Blue Jackets 4, Sharks 1 Columbus 1 2 1 — 4 San Jose 1 0 0 — 1 First Period: 1, San Jose, Labanc 2 (Couture, Vlasic), 11:50. 2, Columbus, Duclair 5 (Wennberg, Murray), 16:30. Penalties: Jenner, CBJ, (slashing), 19:49. Second Period: 3, Columbus, Jones 2 (Duclair, Sedlak), 9:15. 4, Columbus, Foligno 4 (Nutivaara), 18:40. Penalties: Meier, SJ, (hooking), 14:31. Third Period: 5, Columbus, Anderson 7, 18:59 (sh). Penalties: Duclair, CBJ, (slashing), 4:59; Dillon, SJ, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 4:59; Nash, CBJ, (delay of game), 18:51; Murray, CBJ, (hooking), 19:37. Shots: Columbus 11-8-8: 27. San Jose 10-10-25: 45. Power-plays: Columbus 0 of 1; San Jose 0 of 3. Goalies: Columbus, Bobrovsky 3-5-0 (45 shots-44 saves). San Jose, Dell 1-1-2 (26-23). A: 15,879 (17,562). Referees: Ghislain Hebert, Wes McCauley. Linesmen: Shandor Alphonso, Matt MacPherson.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Celtics’ Semi Ojeleye (left) and Jayson Tatum defend against the Bucks’ Giannis Antetokounmpo during the first half Thursday night in Boston. ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kyrie Irving scored 28 points, making six of Boston’s franchise record 24 3-pointers, as the host Celtics knocked off the last unbeaten team in the NBA with a 117-113 win over the Milwaukee Bucks on Thursday night. Gordon Hayward added a season-high 18 points, Al Horford also scored 18 and Marcus Morris had 17 points for the Celtics, who held off the Bucks in the final minute and put an end to Milwaukee’s unbeaten start. Giannis Antetokounmpo returned to the lineup after missing one game while in the NBA’s concussion protocol and led Milwaukee with 33 points and 11 rebounds. Down 15 entering the fourth quarter, the Bucks opened the final period on a 12-0 run and were within a point in the final minute, but the Celtics held on for their fourth straight win.

NOTEBOOK Howard set for Wizards debut • Dwight Howard is scheduled to make his Washington debut against Oklahoma City on Friday. The Wizards are off to a 1-6 start without Howard. He missed all of training camp, the preseason and the first seven games of the regular season because of a sore backside. Cavs’ Smith wants trade • J.R. Smith has added another tier to the Cavaliers’ mounting troubles. Dropped from the rotation and unhappy with his role on a team rebuilding through youth, Smith said Thursday that he wants to be traded. Grizzlies cut Harrison • Memphis waived Andrew Harrison after playing the guard only once this season. The 6-foot-6 Harrison started 64 of 129 games since joining Memphis for the 2016-17 season coming out of Kentucky.

NBA SUMMARIES Kings 146, Hawks 115

Thunder 111, Hornets 107

Blazers 132, Pelicans 119

Sacramento: Shumpert 3-8 0-0 8, Bjelica 7-11 2-2 19, Cauley-Stein 6-8 0-1 12, Fox 9-13 10-11 31, Hield 10-17 2-3 27, Jackson 2-5 2-3 6, Bagley III 7-10 4-4 18, Giles III 2-3 0-0 4, Labissiere 2-3 2-2 6, Koufos 4-7 0-0 8, Ferrell 0-5 0-0 0, Mason 0-6 4-6 4, McLemore 1-2 0-0 3. Totals 53-98 26-32 146. Atlanta: Prince 3-12 0-0 7, Carter 1-3 0-0 3, Len 2-5 7-10 11, Young 6-13 2-3 14, Bazemore 6-12 0-0 14, Bembry 5-8 2-4 13, Poythress 3-6 3-4 9, Spellman 1-3 0-0 2, Dedmon 2-3 2-2 6, Plumlee 0-0 0-0 0, Lin 8-13 5-7 23, Huerter 1-1 0-0 3, Dorsey 4-8 2-4 10. Totals 42-87 23-34 115. Sacramento 35 34 46 31 — 146 Atlanta 29 35 23 28 — 115 3-point goals: Sacramento 14-35 (Hield 5-7, Fox 3-4, Bjelica 3-5, Shumpert 2-7, McLemore 1-1, Labissiere 0-1, Jackson 0-2, Ferrell 0-4, Mason 0-4), Atlanta 8-31 (Bazemore 2-5, Lin 2-7, Huerter 1-1, Bembry 1-2, Carter 1-3, Prince 1-7, Young 0-1, Spellman 0-1, Len 0-1, Dedmon 0-1, Dorsey 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Sacramento 46 (Fox 10), Atlanta 43 (Poythress 8). Assists: Sacramento 38 (Fox 15), Atlanta 26 (Young 10). Total fouls: Sacramento 29, Atlanta 28. Technicals: Bazemore. A: 12,095 (18,118).

Oklahoma City: George 4-20 3-4 11, Grant 3-7 3-4 10, Adams 1-5 3-4 5, Westbrook 12-24 5-7 29, Ferguson 0-1 0-0 0, Patterson 0-3 0-0 0, Noel 2-2 0-0 4, Schroder 7-15 5-8 21, Diallo 3-4 0-0 6, Abrines 9-15 2-2 25. Totals 41-96 21-29 111. Charlotte: Batum 4-8 0-0 10, Williams 2-6 0-0 4, Zeller 2-4 1-2 5, Walker 7-16 5-5 21, Lamb 5-12 2-2 13, Kidd-Gilchrist 3-10 3-3 9, Bridges 2-6 0-0 4, Hernangomez 1-4 0-0 3, Parker 5-12 6-7 17, Monk 7-15 3-3 21. Totals 38-93 20-22 107. Oklahoma City 24 20 29 38 — 111 Charlotte 22 26 29 30 — 107 3-point goals: Oklahoma City 8-37 (Abrines 5-10, Schroder 2-6, Grant 1-3, Ferguson 0-1, Diallo 0-1, Patterson 0-3, Westbrook 0-3, George 0-10), Charlotte 11-41 (Monk 4-12, Batum 2-4, Walker 2-8, Hernangomez 1-1, Parker 1-2, Lamb 1-7, Kidd-Gilchrist 0-2, Williams 0-2, Bridges 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Oklahoma City 49 (Adams 12), Charlotte 51 (Lamb, Kidd-Gilchrist 9). Assists: Oklahoma City 20 (Westbrook 10), Charlotte 26 (Walker, Batum 6). Total fouls: Oklahoma City 21, Charlotte 26. Technicals: Westbrook. A: 14,583 (19,077).

New Orleans: Moore 7-12 3-3 19, Mirotic 6-20 5-6 18, Okafor 3-6 0-0 6, Frazier 3-7 1-2 8, Holiday 5-14 6-8 17, Hill 0-1 0-0 0, Randle 9-16 11-12 29, Diallo 1-5 3-4 5, Clark 3-6 2-2 10, Jackson 1-5 0-0 2, Williams 2-2 0-0 5. Totals 40-94 31-37 119. Portland: Layman 4-4 0-0 11, Aminu 6-11 3-3 17, Nurkic 7-9 5-6 20, Lillard 7-16 8-8 26, McCollum 2-8 4-6 8, Collins 3-8 1-2 9, Swanigan 2-6 1-2 6, Curry 3-5 0-0 9, Baldwin IV 0-1 0-0 0, Stauskas 4-6 0-0 10, Turner 5-11 4-4 14, Simons 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 44-87 26-31 132. New Orleans 31 34 34 20 — 119 Portland 35 35 32 30 — 132 3-Point Goals: New Orleans 8-29 (Moore 2-3, Clark 2-5, Williams 1-1, Holiday 1-4, Frazier 1-4, Mirotic 1-6, Hill 0-1, Randle 0-2, Jackson 0-3), Portland 18-35 (Lillard 4-7, Layman 3-3, Curry 3-4, Stauskas 2-3, Collins 2-4, Aminu 2-5, Nurkic 1-1, Swanigan 1-2, Simons 0-1, Turner 0-2, McCollum 0-3). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: New Orleans 44 (Mirotic 13), Portland 46 (Aminu 10). Assists: New Orleans 23 (Holiday 10), Portland 26 (Turner 7). Total Fouls: New Orleans 24, Portland 30. Technicals: Portland (Defensive three second). A: 18,921 (19,393).

76ers 122, Clippers 113 L.A. Clippers: Harris 10-16 2-2 24, Gallinari 5-14 11-11 25, Gortat 0-1 0-0 0, Beverley 1-7 2-4 4, Bradley 1-6 0-0 2, Scott 1-1 0-0 3, Harrell 3-5 1-2 7, Marjanovic 5-7 5-6 15, Gilgeous-Alexander 3-8 1-1 7, Robinson 0-0 0-0 0, Teodosic 0-2 0-0 0, Williams 9-19 6-7 26, Wallace 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 38-86 28-33 113. Philadelphia: Covington 4-5 0-0 10, Saric 1-8 2-2 5, Embiid 16-32 6-9 41, Simmons 6-11 2-2 14, Fultz 5-10 2-4 12, Muscala 1-4 1-1 4, Johnson 2-3 1-1 5, Shamet 5-8 0-1 13, Redick 4-12 7-8 18. Totals 44-93 21-28 122. L.A. Clippers 30 27 29 27 — 113 Philadelphia 34 38 18 32 — 122 3-point goals: L.A. Clippers 9-23 (Gallinari 4-8, Harris 2-3, Williams 2-5, Scott 1-1, Bradley 0-1, Teodosic 0-1, Beverley 0-4), Philadelphia 13-27 (Shamet 3-6, Redick 3-6, Embiid 3-8, Covington 2-2, Muscala 1-2, Saric 1-3). Fouled out: Beverley. Rebounds: L.A. Clippers 42 (Marjanovic 11), Philadelphia 43 (Embiid 13). Assists: L.A. Clippers 19 (Beverley 4), Philadelphia 29 (Simmons 11). Total fouls: L.A. Clippers 28, Philadelphia 30. Technicals: Philadelphia coach 76ers (Defensive three second). A: 20,246 (20,478).

eltics 117, Bucks 113 Milwaukee: Middleton 6-18 1-1 16, Antetokounmpo 13-22 7-11 33, Lopez 1-4 0-0 2, Bledsoe 3-9 6-9 13, Brogdon 6-10 2-2 16, Ilyasova 3-6 2-2 8, Henson 2-4 1-2 6, Connaughton 1-2 0-0 2, DiVincenzo 3-6 1-1 8, Snell 3-4 2-2 9. Totals 41-85 22-30 113. Boston: Hayward 6-11 3-3 18, Ojeleye 4-6 0-0 10, Horford 6-15 2-2 18, Irving 10-20 2-2 28, Tatum 4-9 2-2 12, Baynes 1-5 2-4 5, Williams III 0-0 0-0 0, Smart 1-4 0-0 2, Rozier 3-11 0-0 7, M.Morris 6-11 0-0 17, J.Brown 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 41-92 11-13 117. Milwaukee 16 37 25 35 — 113 Boston 23 32 38 24 — 117 3-point goals: Milwaukee 9-29 (Middleton 3-10, Brogdon 2-3, Henson 1-2, Snell 1-2, Bledsoe 1-2, DiVincenzo 1-4, Ilyasova 0-1, Connaughton 0-1, Antetokounmpo 0-1, Lopez 0-3), Boston 24-55 (Irving 6-12, M.Morris 5-8, Horford 4-11, Hayward 3-5, Tatum 2-3, Ojeleye 2-4, Rozier 1-4, Baynes 1-5, Smart 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Milwaukee 45 (Antetokounmpo 11), Boston 42 (Rozier 7). Assists: Milwaukee 20 (Bledsoe 7), Boston 30 (Horford 8). Total fouls: Milwaukee 20, Boston 23. Technicals: Boston (Defensive three second) 2. A: 18,624 (18,624).

Nuggets 110, Cavaliers 91 Denver: Craig 3-5 0-0 7, Millsap 6-9 3-4 16, Jokic 2-5 0-0 4, Murray 5-8 0-0 10, Harris 4-12 5-5 14, Hernangomez 6-10 6-7 23, Plumlee 5-8 1-1 11, Lydon 0-0 1-2 1, Lyles 5-13 2-2 12, Morris 3-7 0-0 7, Beasley 2-8 0-0 5, AkoonPurcell 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 41-85 18-21 110. Cleveland: Osman 5-13 1-1 13, Dekker 3-10 0-0 6, Thompson 4-6 2-2 10, Hill 4-7 0-0 10, Hood 1-9 6-6 8, Nance Jr. 3-8 2-2 8, Zizic 1-3 1-2 3, Sexton 5-11 1-1 12, Korver 0-1 0-0 0, Clarkson 7-14 3-3 17, Nwaba 1-1 2-2 4. Totals 34-83 18-19 91. Denver 15 35 33 27 — 110 Cleveland 27 15 24 25 — 91 3-point goals: Denver 10-26 (Hernangomez 5-8, Morris 1-1, Millsap 1-1, Craig 1-2, Beasley 1-4, Harris 1-5, Jokic 0-1, Murray 0-1, Lyles 0-3), Cleveland 5-18 (Hill 2-2, Osman 2-6, Sexton 1-1, Korver 0-1, Dekker 0-2, Clarkson 0-3, Hood 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Denver 44 (Lyles 8), Cleveland 35 (Thompson 7). Assists: Denver 22 (Beasley 4), Cleveland 18 (Hood, Thompson 4). Total fouls: Denver 18, Cleveland 22. A: 19,432 (20,562).


HOCKEY

11.02.2018 • Friday • M 1

Fabbri takes hit, sets up first goal FREDERICKSON • FROM C1

only one. The fourth line of the Vegas Golden Knights is a heavy, imposing bunch. William Carrier arrived in St. Louis with 59 hits, which were 11 more than any other player in the league. His teammate, former Blues bruiser Ryan Reaves, ranked second in the NHL with 48 hits. For a reference point, no other player had more than 41 hits. And this was the line the 180-pound Fabbri was facing in his first game in nearly 21 months. Gulp. Fabbri had not had time to break a sweat when Las Vegas defenseman Colin Miller crushed Fabbri and his twicerepaired left knee into the glass behind the Vegas net. Fabbri saw it coming. Everyone saw it coming. We cringed. He created. The left wing became a center, the football kind. With the crispness and accuracy of a long snapper, Fabbri hiked the puck behind him and embraced the contact. His sacrifice sparked a score. Right wing Oskar Sundqvist, whose presence Fabbri had sensed as Sundqvist sped up behind him, received the puck and made one of the prettier plays you will see, sending Vegas goalie Marc-Andre Fleury to his rear before firing the puck into the net. And the best part? Fabbri was on his feet before Fleury, two fists raised into the air. He’s back. Time will tell what, exactly, that means. The 22-year-old former firstround draft pick had two scary surgeries before he could log two full seasons. He’s Alex Reyes on ice. So much talent. So much unknown. Fabbri’s left knee and Reyes’ right elbow are scarier than anything St. Louis sports fans encountered on Halloween — and almost as scary as watching Jake Allen try to protect a lead. How will Fabbri recover? How will he hold up? How soon can Blues coach Mike Yeo expand his role? “I think he would probably say he would like to have a little more (playing time),” Yeo said before the Blues’ 5-3 win. “But players usually do. It’s an opportunity right now. It’s more than he had last year. It’s more than what he had two weeks ago. It’s more than what he had two years ago. Any shift he gets now is a blessing, and I think you are going to see that. I think that’s going to show up in his play.” Table the big-picture Fabbri questions for a moment, because the answers are not available right now, and this moment should mean something. If this talented Blues team is going to find a way to get the most out of its talent, there is no better example to follow than the one set by the tenacious, relentless Fabbri, who celebrated his long-awaited return by skating headfirst into the kind of situations you could not blame him for hoping to avoid. It’s wise to wonder about his knee. Don’t question the heart and its impact on a team that has too often lacked a pulse this season. The Blues desperately needed to start fast Thursday. They had pushed off what they hope to prove was rock bottom with a 7-3 win against Chicago on Saturday, but it had been four long days since that win, and if there is such a thing as momentum, it was gathering dust. In came Vegas, a team just as frustrated as the Blues. The Golden Knights, playing without injured forwards Paul Stastny and Max Pacioretty, had been terrible at scoring goals, and decent at stopping them. Their 22 goals ranked second-to-last in the league. An early lead would mean a big advantage. Fabbri helped provide one on his first shift, two minutes and two seconds into the game. And he continued to flash. His burst reminded us simultaneously of his speed and his team’s lack of it when he’s not out there. The wheels looked good. Perhaps the best example of his overall impact came early in the second period, when he blitzed down the ice on a breakaway that Fleury fizzled, then reversed and got back down to the other end in time to drive his shoulder into a Knight. He was out there, churning and burning, when his line created the Blues’ third goal as well. Good things tend to happen for the Blues when No. 15 is on the ice. Yes, it is best to temper expectations, and the Blues have been wise to point that out. Fabbri is going to have to prove himself on the fourth line before he climbs, though this fourth line looked pretty good Thursday. If teams like Las Vegas want bruisers out there, the Blues can counter with speed. “I don’t know how long it’s going to take him to get back on top of things,” Yeo said before Fabbri stirred and sparked. “I know that players that are relentless and tenacious and driven as he is usually find a way to get there quicker. I’m really excited for Robby. He’s been through a lot, and as a coach, it’s hard to see a player go through all that disappointment. The work that he’s put in, and he comes back last year and he has to go through it all over again. It’s not just the physical part of it, it’s the mental part. He’s been through an awful lot and so I’m really hopeful that things go well for him.” They did. Ben Frederickson @Ben_Fred on Twitter bfrederickson@post-dispatch.com

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C5

BLUES NOTEBOOK

Reaves gets power-play time Ex-Blue adapting his game, looking to make most of chances BY TOM TIMMERMANN St. Louis Post-dispatch

In his first eight NHL seasons, Vegas forward and longtime Blue Ryan Reaves played a whopping 1 minute, 26 seconds on the power play, and you can be sure that most of it came in dribs and drabs when he got sent out for the final two or three seconds while waiting for the manadvantage to end and the more defensive fourth line to take over. This season, Reaves has played 6:51 with a man advantage and has a point, a goal he scored Sunday for his first-ever point of any kind with a man advantage. Reaves playing, let alone scoring, on the power play is not something that anyone who saw him become a physical fan favorite with the Blues could have foreseen. In fact, it’s enough to make you think you’re seeing things. “You weren’t drunk, that’s for sure,” he said. “We got some banged-up bodies right now. I’m getting an opportunity to play in different situations and I’m trying to take advantage while I can because we’ve got some good players that will be coming back soon. It’s tough to put me in front of those guys, so I want to take advantage while the opportunity is there.” Reaves has become popular in Las Vegas the same way he became popular in St. Louis, and he’s loving it in the desert. “It seems to be working for me,” he said. “I’m getting a lot of opportunities there and that’s all anybody can ask for.”

Reaves was a free agent after last season, when the four-year, $4.5 million deal he signed with the Blues, ran out. Vegas gave him a two-year, $5.5 million deal. “I don’t think I was coming out of this summer expecting to play power play, but I worked hard every day in the summer and during the season so I can be ready for any situation,” he said. “This is the first time this kind of opportunity has risen. I’m trying to run with it. “I like playing in this league. I don’t want to leave. The league’s changing and I’ve got to change with it. I’ve cut some weight, worked on my hands a little bit more and doing a lot less weights in the gym. Working on my speed and working on my explosiveness, working on things in front of the net. That’s what’s keeping me here right now.”

THREE FOR THE FOURTH The Blues are, for the moment, set on their top three lines with nine established forwards, and the return of Robby Fabbri meant he had to be squeezed onto the fourth line. That led to a complicated turn of events where Robert Thomas stayed in the lineup and played in his seventh game, alongside Oskar Sundqvist. That led to Ivan Barbashev, who has played as well as anyone on the fourth line, being a healthy scratch for the first time and Nikita Soshnikov’s season debut being put on hold. “I thought Robby Thomas played the best game he’s played for us all year (against Chicago),” Blues coach Mike Yeo

said. “I said before last game that I felt he was in a place where he was ready to start really coming around. I thought his head was in a better place and it really seems to be. He’s moving his feet, he’s playing with more confidence, he’s playing with more urgency, he seems to understand the game, the NHL game, better. I didn’t want to take him out after playing his best game of the season. “Sunny had an assist last game, he’s doing a really good job on the penalty kill, he’s taking a step in his game right now, he’s playing with a lot more confidence, he’s playing with a lot more pace than he did last year. Obviously we have a lot of options. We still haven’t gotten Sosh in a game. We want to get him in and don’t want Barby sitting out for a long time. It was a tough decision but one that we went with.” Sundqvist had two goals Thursday with Thomas getting two assists and Fabbri one.

NOTES Carl Gunnarsson made his return to the lineup, making Jordan Schmaltz a healthy scratch after having played seven games in a row. … Paul Stastny, who signed with Vegas in the offseason, missed the game with a lower-body injury but another ex-Blue, Brad Hunt, a defenseman who played nine games during the 2016-17 season, was in the lineup for Vegas. Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com

PHOTOS BY J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

The Blues’ Vladimir Tarasenko (left) scores despite the diving effort of Golden Knights goalie Marc-Andre Fleury on Thursday night.

Sundqvist scores two goals in Blues’ victory BLUES • FROM C1

all season, defeating the reigning Western Conference champions 5-3 at Enterprise Center. So on a wet night in St. Louis the Blues reached sea level, with a .500 record at 4-4-3. Vegas, struggling early itself, fell to 5-7-1. For much of the season, the Blues haven’t been able to deal with prosperity, especially in the third period. Such was the case for the first 10 minutes of the third Thursday, when the Golden Knights outshot the Blues 9-1 with one of those goals going in to narrow the St. Louis lead to 4-3. Vegas entered the game ranked last in the NHL in power play success (12.2 percent), and was unsuccessful on its first two power plays. But the Golden Knights connected on power play No. 3 of the evening, when Alex Tuch jammed the puck past Allen on a wild scrum in front of the net. So with 11:58 left to play, there was an uneasy feeling in the building. But Tyler Bozak eased the concern with his third goal of the season, building the Blues’ lead to 5-3. Joel Edmundson did the simplest of things to set up the play — sending the puck toward the net. Bozak then scored with Tuch draped all over him. On his first shift of his first Blues regular-season game in 635 days, Fabbri had an assist on a goal by — surprise — Oskar Sundqvist. Playing on the Blues’ fourth line, Fabbri passed to rookie Robert Thomas behind the net. Thomas sent a perfect pass to the stick of Sundqvist in the slot, but Sundqvist fanned on his shot. However, he recovered quickly, spinning his body away from the net then turning to send a shot from one knee past Knights goalie Marc-Andre Fleury at the 2:02 mark of the opening period. But the Blues didn’t hold the lead for long. Left alone to Allen’s left, PierreEdouard Bellamare beat Allen with a roof shot from 13 feet to tie the game at 1-1. After taking an early 7-2 lead in shots on goal, the Blues spent much of the period bottled up in the neutral zone or trying to fend off the Golden Knights on defense. The Blues went 13 minutes without a shot on goal — from 4:52 to 17:52. By the end of the period, the shots were even at 9-9.

Vegas Blues

1 1

1 3

1 1

— —

First period B: Sundqvist 1 (Fabbri, Thomas), 2:02. V: Bellemare 2, 6:29. Penalties: Reaves, VGK, (roughing), 20:00; Maroon, STL, (roughing), 20:00. Second period B: Tarasenko 6 (Bozak, Maroon), 3:11 (pp). V: Haula 2 (Theodore, Tuch), 3:34. B: Sundqvist 2 (Thomas), 6:29. B: Parayko 3 (O’Reilly, Sanford), 14:49. Penalties: Hunt, VGK, (tripping), 3:03; Dunn, STL, (interference), 11:31; Sanford, STL, (tripping), 17:53. Third period V: Tuch 3 (Karlsson, Marchessault), 8:02 (pp). B: Bozak 3 (Edmundson), 11:47. Penalties: Nosek, VGK, (high sticking), 3:30; Schenn, STL, (boarding), 7:44; Eakin, VGK, (slashing), 14:10. Shots on goal 9 10 15 Vegas Blues 9 9 8 Power-plays Vegas 1 of 3; Blues 1 of 3. Goaltenders Vegas, Fleury 5-5-1 (26 shots-21 saves). Blues, Allen 4-2-3 (34-31). A: 16,813. Referees: Trevor Hanson, Kendrick Nicholson. Linesmen: Kiel Murchison, Tony Sericolo.

3 5

34 26

Blues goalie Jake Allen tries to glove the puck late in the game.

At the end of the period, Blues forward Pat Maroon and former Blues enforcer Ryan Reaves got into an extended jawing match, with a little shoving thrown in for good measure. With officials keeping them apart, this went on from one corner of the Vegas goal at the buzzer to the team benches near center ice. But there

was no fight, although both players sat out the first two minutes of the second period for roughing. It took the Blues until Nov. 25 of last season to score their 14th power play goal — in their 24th game of the season. They got No. 14 Thursday in Game 11 early in the second period. Just eight seconds after former Blue Brad Hunt was sent off for tripping Zach Sanford, Vladimir Tarasenko banged home a rebound of a Tyler Bozak shot giving St. Louis a 2-1 lead. It was Tarasenko’s sixth goal of the season and his fourth in his last three games. Again, the lead didn’t last long. Vegas’ Erik Haula got the equalizer at 3:34 of the second period. At first blush, it looked very much like a soft goal by Allen, trickling through his legs. But replays showed it was deflected in by Haula. But the Blues got the next two to gain a 4-2 cushion going into the third period. Sundqvist gave the Blues the lead with his second goal of the night, rifling a shot past Fleury from left wing at 6:29 of the second after a beautiful drop pass from Thomas. It was the second assist of the night for Thomas, who looks like he doesn’t want to go back to junior hockey. Sundqvist had only two career goals in 72 NHL regular-season games with St. Louis and Pittsburgh entering Thursday’s contest. Next the Blues’ defense got involved. On some gritty work in the corner by Sanford and Ryan O’Reilly, Colton Parayko scored his third goal of the season and the 10th of the young campaign by a Blues defenseman. After gaining control of the puck in the right corner, O’Reilly made a slick cross-ice pass to Parayko, all alone on left wing, who did the rest. The Blues were fourth in the league in goals by defensemen entering Thursday’s contest. The assists gave O’Reilly at least one point in his last six games and Sanford at least one point in his last five contests. Sanford had a great chance on a breakaway with two seconds left in the second period, just after the Blues killed off a penalty. Fabbri broke in alone early in the period but was turned aside by Fleury. Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com


HOCKEY

11.02.2018 • Friday • M 2

Fabbri takes hit, sets up first goal FREDERICKSON • FROM C1

only one. The fourth line of the Vegas Golden Knights is a heavy, imposing bunch. William Carrier arrived in St. Louis with 59 hits, which were 11 more than any other player in the league. His teammate, former Blues bruiser Ryan Reaves, ranked second in the NHL with 48 hits. For a reference point, no other player had more than 41 hits. And this was the line the 180-pound Fabbri was facing in his first NHL game in nearly 21 months. Gulp. Fabbri had not had time to break a sweat when Las Vegas defenseman Colin Miller crushed Fabbri and his twicerepaired left knee into the glass behind the Vegas net. Fabbri saw it coming. Everyone saw it coming. “With where that puck was, you have to take the hit,” Fabbri said. We cringed. He created. The left wing became a center, the football kind. With the crispness and accuracy of a long snapper, Fabbri hiked the puck behind him and embraced the contact. His sacrifice sparked a score. Right wing Oskar Sundqvist, whose presence Fabbri had sensed as Sundqvist sped up behind him, received the puck and made one of the prettier plays you will see, sending Vegas goalie Marc-Andre Fleury to his rear before firing the puck into the net. And the best part? Fabbri was on his feet before Fleury, two fists raised into the air. He’s back. “Remember how good of a player he was,” goalie Jake Allen said. “And how good of a player he can be.” Time will tell. The 22-year-old former first-round draft pick had two scary surgeries before he could log two full seasons. He’s Alex Reyes on ice. So much talent. So much unknown. Fabbri’s left knee and Reyes’ right elbow are scarier than anything St. Louis sports fans encountered on Halloween — and almost as scary as watching Allen try to protect a lead. The goalie was brilliant Thursday. So was Fabbri. How will he recover? How will he hold up? How soon can Blues coach Mike Yeo expand his role? “I think he would probably say he would like to have a little more (playing time),” Yeo said before the Blues’ 5-3 win. “But players usually do. It’s an opportunity right now. It’s more than he had last year. It’s more than what he had two weeks ago. It’s more than what he had two years ago. Any shift he gets now is a blessing, and I think you are going to see that. I think that’s going to show up in his play.” The coach called it. So, table the bigpicture Fabbri questions for a moment, because the answers are not available right now, and this moment should mean something. If this talented Blues team is going to find a way to get the most out of that talent, there is no better example to adhere to than the one set by the relentless Fabbri, who celebrated his long-awaited return by skating headfirst into the kind of situations you could not blame him for hoping to avoid. It’s wise to wonder about his knee. Don’t question the heart and its impact on a team that has too often lacked a pulse this season. The Blues desperately needed to start fast Thursday. They had pushed off what they hope to prove was rock bottom with a 7-3 win against Chicago on Saturday, but it had been four long days since that win, and if there is such a thing as momentum, it was gathering dust. In came Vegas, a team just as frustrated as the Blues. The Golden Knights, playing without injured forwards Paul Stastny and Max Pacioretty, had been terrible at scoring goals, and decent at stopping them. Their 22 goals ranked second-to-last in the league. An early lead would mean a big advantage. Fabbri helped provide one on his first shift, two minutes and two seconds into the game. And he continued to flash. His burst reminded us simultaneously of his speed and his team’s lack of it when he’s not out there. Perhaps the best example of his overall impact came early in the second period, when he blitzed down the ice on a breakaway that Fleury fizzled, then reversed and got back down to the other end in time to drive his shoulder into a Knight. He was out there, churning and burning, when his line created the Blues’ third goal as well. Good things tend to happen for the Blues when No. 15 is on the ice. Yeo called him a gamer. Sundqvist called him a wrecking ball, and added a fitting Yogi-ism. “For being gone that long, it didn’t look that long,” Sundqvist said. It’s best to temper expectations. Fabbri is going to have to prove himself on the fourth line before he climbs, though this fourth line looked pretty good Thursday. If teams like Las Vegas want bruisers out there, the Blues can counter with speed. “I don’t know how long it’s going to take him to get back on top of things,” Yeo said Thursday morning. The coach admitted Thursday night he was impressed by what he watched. “I’m ready to take off where I left off,” Fabbri said. The Blues should follow his lead. Ben Frederickson @Ben_Fred on Twitter bfrederickson@post-dispatch.com

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C5

BLUES NOTEBOOK

Reaves gets power-play time Ex-Blue adapting his game, looking to make most of chances BY TOM TIMMERMANN St. Louis Post-dispatch

In his first eight NHL seasons, Vegas forward and longtime Blue Ryan Reaves played a whopping 1 minute, 26 seconds on the power play, and you can be sure that most of it came in dribs and drabs when he got sent out for the final two or three seconds while waiting for the manadvantage to end and the more defensive fourth line to take over. This season, Reaves has played 6:51 with a man advantage and has a point, a goal he scored Sunday for his first-ever point of any kind with a man advantage. Reaves playing, let alone scoring, on the power play is not something that anyone who saw him become a physical fan favorite with the Blues could have foreseen. In fact, it’s enough to make you think you’re seeing things. “You weren’t drunk, that’s for sure,” he said. “We got some banged-up bodies right now. I’m getting an opportunity to play in different situations and I’m trying to take advantage while I can because we’ve got some good players that will be coming back soon. It’s tough to put me in front of those guys, so I want to take advantage while the opportunity is there.” Reaves has become popular in Las Vegas the same way he became popular in St. Louis, and he’s loving it in the desert. “It seems to be working for me,” he said. “I’m getting a lot of opportunities there and that’s all anybody can ask for.”

Reaves was a free agent after last season, when the four-year, $4.5 million deal he signed with the Blues, ran out. Vegas gave him a two-year, $5.5 million deal. “I don’t think I was coming out of this summer expecting to play power play, but I worked hard every day in the summer and during the season so I can be ready for any situation,” he said. “This is the first time this kind of opportunity has risen. I’m trying to run with it. “I like playing in this league. I don’t want to leave. The league’s changing and I’ve got to change with it. I’ve cut some weight, worked on my hands a little bit more and doing a lot less weights in the gym. Working on my speed and working on my explosiveness, working on things in front of the net. That’s what’s keeping me here right now.”

THREE FOR THE FOURTH The Blues are, for the moment, set on their top three lines with nine established forwards, and the return of Robby Fabbri meant he had to be squeezed onto the fourth line. That led to a complicated turn of events where Robert Thomas stayed in the lineup and played in his seventh game, alongside Oskar Sundqvist. That led to Ivan Barbashev, who has played as well as anyone on the fourth line, being a healthy scratch for the first time and Nikita Soshnikov’s season debut being put on hold. “I thought Robby Thomas played the best game he’s played for us all year (against Chicago),” Blues coach Mike Yeo

said. “I said before last game that I felt he was in a place where he was ready to start really coming around. I thought his head was in a better place and it really seems to be. He’s moving his feet, he’s playing with more confidence, he’s playing with more urgency, he seems to understand the game, the NHL game, better. I didn’t want to take him out after playing his best game of the season. “Sunny had an assist last game, he’s doing a really good job on the penalty kill, he’s taking a step in his game right now, he’s playing with a lot more confidence, he’s playing with a lot more pace than he did last year. Obviously we have a lot of options. We still haven’t gotten Sosh in a game. We want to get him in and don’t want Barby sitting out for a long time. It was a tough decision but one that we went with.” Sundqvist had two goals Thursday with Thomas getting two assists and Fabbri one.

NOTES Carl Gunnarsson made his return to the lineup, making Jordan Schmaltz a healthy scratch after having played seven games in a row. … Paul Stastny, who signed with Vegas in the offseason, missed the game with a lower-body injury but another ex-Blue, Brad Hunt, a defenseman who played nine games during the 2016-17 season, was in the lineup for Vegas. Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com

PHOTOS BY J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

The Blues’ Vladimir Tarasenko (left) scores despite the diving effort of Golden Knights goalie Marc-Andre Fleury on Thursday night.

Sundqvist scores two goals in Blues’ victory BLUES • FROM C1

games for the second time this season, would the Blues be sluggish against Vegas? Negative. They scored 122 seconds into the contest, and for the fifth game in a row scored at least four goals. So when all was said and done before 16,813 at Enterprise Center, no worries. The Blues put together consecutive wins for first time this season, defeating the reigning Western Conference champions 5-3 behind two goals by Oskar Sundqvist, another power-play goal (by Vladimir Tarasenko), another goal by a defenseman (Colton Parayko), and a clutch “cushion” tally by Tyler Bozak in the third period. So on a wet night in St. Louis the Blues reached sea level — a .500 record at 4-4-3. Vegas, struggling early itself, fell to 5-7-1. “Two in a row; 3-1-1 in our last five,” coach Mike Yeo said. “Not bad. I feel like we’re getting closer. We’re not there yet. For me, I still think that we’re still in the process of building and every game is a lesson.” One of the lessons Thursday: Don’t sleep on “Sunny” Sundqvist. He had only two goals in 72 NHL regular-season games with Pittsburgh and St. Louis prior to Vegas. He doubled his career total by the 6:29 mark of the second period, when his second goal of the night gave St. Louis a 3-2 lead. As he sat at his locker postgame, he had the “Bobby Plager Gloves” — which go to the Blues’ player of the game — draped over his shoulders. “Yeah, believe it or not,” Sundqvist said. After getting blindsided Sept. 30 by Washington’s Tom Wilson in the Blues’ preseason finale, suffering a concussion, facial cuts and a shoulder injury, Sundqvist didn’t know when he’d be back. He certainly didn’t think it would be this quick. “No, I didn’t,” he said, still bearing scars on his nose and right cheekbone from Wilson’s hit. “I’m happy to be able to be back and I’m mostly happy that my head is completely fine.” Other than an empty-net goal by Ivan Barbashev against Toronto with the goalie pulled, Sundqvist’s “deuce” marked the first goals scored by the team’s fourth line this season. It was a reconstituted fourth line, with Fabbri on left wing, Robert Thomas at center, and Sundqvist moving to right wing. This group had pizzazz Thursday night,

Vegas Blues

1 1

1 3

1 1

— —

First period B: Sundqvist 1 (Fabbri, Thomas), 2:02. V: Bellemare 2, 6:29. Penalties: Reaves, VGK, (roughing), 20:00; Maroon, STL, (roughing), 20:00. Second period B: Tarasenko 6 (Bozak, Maroon), 3:11 (pp). V: Haula 2 (Theodore, Tuch), 3:34. B: Sundqvist 2 (Thomas), 6:29. B: Parayko 3 (O’Reilly, Sanford), 14:49. Penalties: Hunt, VGK, (tripping), 3:03; Dunn, STL, (interference), 11:31; Sanford, STL, (tripping), 17:53. Third period V: Tuch 3 (Karlsson, Marchessault), 8:02 (pp). B: Bozak 3 (Edmundson), 11:47. Penalties: Nosek, VGK, (high sticking), 3:30; Schenn, STL, (boarding), 7:44; Eakin, VGK, (slashing), 14:10. Shots on goal 9 10 15 Vegas Blues 9 9 8 Power-plays Vegas 1 of 3; Blues 1 of 3. Goaltenders Vegas, Fleury 5-5-1 (26 shots-21 saves). Blues, Allen 4-2-3 (34-31). A: 16,813. Referees: Trevor Hanson, Kendrick Nicholson. Linesmen: Kiel Murchison, Tony Sericolo.

3 5

34 26

Blues goalie Jake Allen tries to glove the puck late in the game.

sizzle not seen earlier in the season by the fourth line. Thomas had primary assists on both of Sundqvist’s goals, definitely making a statement that he doesn’t want to be sent back to junior hockey this season. As for Fabbri, he played in his first NHL regular-season game in 635 days as he recovered from two left knee injuries and subsequent surgeries. The first knee injury came way back on Feb. 4, 2017, Yeo’s second game as head coach after Ken Hitchcock was fired.

Besides that assist on Sundqvist’s first goal, Fabbri nearly scored on a minibreakaway early in the second period, didn’t shy away from contact, and appeared no worse for the wear after 14 shifts and 8:45 of ice time. “For me, that was more than what I was expecting from Robby to be honest with you,” Yeo said. “Confidence-wise, I thought he looked good. The offensive part of his game, that’s going to keep coming along, I thought he made a couple plays and he looked dangerous.” Speaking of dangerous, the Blues scored their 14th power play goal of the season early in the second period, when Tarasenko banged home a rebound of a Bozak shot. That made it six goals for Tarasenko this season and four in his last three games. The Blues didn’t score their 14th power play last season until Game 24 on Nov. 25 against Minnesota. Later in the second, Parayko made it 4-2 with the 10th goal by a Blues defenseman this season. (The Blues were fourth in the league with nine D-goals entering the game.) But Vegas wouldn’t go quietly, tying the game at 1-1 and 2-all, and then scoring a power-play goal eight minutes into the third period to make it just a 4-3 Blues lead. Was another third-period collapse brewing for St. Louis? “I thought that after they scored (the power-play goal), they had a real push and we were on our heels,” Yeo. “And that’s when quite frankly, you need your goalie, and Jake was there. “They made it 4-3, there’s absolutely nothing he could do on that, but they had four quality chances after that. To me it was like attitude-wise, ‘OK, this is my job, here I go.’ And I thought he rose up to that challenge.” Bozak also rose to the challenge. His goal with 8:13 left to play, after Joel Edmundson sent the puck towards the net from the blue line, gave St. Louis its twogoal lead back at 5-3 and took some of the pressure off. “Whether it was a pass or a shot, either way (Edmundson) got it past the guy and to the net toward me so it was a great play by him,” Bozak said. “The goalie (MarcAndre Fleury) kind of went down thinking it was going to be a shot and I had quite a bit to shoot at.” Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com


C6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

M 1 • FrIDAy • 11.02.2018

New-look Illini ready to begin season Eight newcomers set for debut in Friday exhibition against DIII Illinois Wesleyan BY JOEY WAGNER Decatur (Ill.) Herald & review

CHAMPAIGN, ILL. • The wait

felt like forever. Maybe it’s been the increased summer hours, or the number of practices, or simply the eight months since the Illinois men’s basketball team has played at the State Farm Center, but the team can’t wait to take its home floor at 7 p.m. Friday for an exhibition against Division III Illinois Wesleyan. “It’s going to feel lovely to play in front of our home crowd and give them a glimpse of what’s to come,” redshirt junior Kipper Nichols said. Head coach Brad Underwood talked about Friday’s game in a way that would make a child on Christmas Eve look tame. Friday will mark the first glimpse of the eight newcomers, including six true freshmen, for Illinois hoops fans. “You’re curious to see how guys react and I think that’s very much the case,” Underwood said. “I’m equally as excited for them. I know why these guys are here. I know why they want to compete. They want to play for the name on the front of the jersey “There will be mistakes, and there will be a slew of them. I expect that. We’ve got to play though those and we’ve got to get some of those things out of the way and (Friday) night is a good starting point for that.” Friday is also the first action the Illini have had against teams in a different jersey in front of an audience. Illinois lost to Vanderbilt in a secret scrimmage on Sat-

THE NEWS-GAZETTE

Illinois forwards Giorgi Bezhanishvili (15) and Kipper Nichols share a laugh during the team’s media day.

urday. But that secret scrimmage didn’t carry the bright lights of an opening game at the State Farm Center. “It’s about time,” senior Aaron Jordan said. “I’m telling you, I love these guys and love playing against them, but you love seeing different color jerseys out there — different opponents, difference schemes and how competitive we are. It’s exciting.” Underwood has no shortage of lineup options swirling around

in his head. He’ll likely open the game with Trent Frazier, Ayo Dosunmu, Nichols, Jordan and Giorgi Bezhanishvili. After the starters, the possibilities of lineups for Underwood to trot on the court in his positionless scheme are nearly limitless. He experimented with the threeguard combination of Frazier, Dosunmu and Andres Feliz in Saturday’s scrimmage, and Feliz was arguably the Illini’s best statistical player, including drawing 11 fouls.

“You’ll see a plethora of different lineups throughout,” Underwood said. This team hardly resembles last season’s squad that finished 14-18 overall and 4-14 in Big Ten play. “I think it’s night and day; in terms of our mindset and how we go about everyday preparing and the knowledge that these guys have about what we do,” Nichols said. Judging the game on wins and losses isn’t the perfect way to

measure what this game stands for. Last season, Illinois traveled to Eastern Illinois University and lost that scrimmage. This game is more about us than anything,” Nichols said. “How we set the standard of preparing for our opponent moving forward and executing and doing what we do to the best of our abilities.” Underwood will get a chance to showcase his freshmen and the growth of his returners, but it’s also a chance to get out some of those prerequisite nerves that come with playing at home — even if the game won’t count on the season win-loss total. “The new guys being in front of this many people and will give them a little bit of a feel about what we’re going to go through this season,” Jordan said. This is the first time the Illini have had to put together a scouting report this year, and the first in a college setting for most of the players. It’s the first time they will have gone through a pregame routine at home. There are going to be firsts — and a lot of them. “I look for everything,” Underwood said. “I’m curious to see how they play under the lights and in front of fans. ... There’s a plethora of information out there to gather from something like this. I get it. They’re going to be nervous. There’s going to be jitters. There will probably be some for the veterans as well. It’s good to get that out of the way. That will be maybe the most important thing that happens tomorrow is we kind of get some of that stuff out of the way.”

Tigers have depth MU HOOPS • FROM C1

BILL BARRETT • St. Louis U.

St. Louis University’s Javon Bess works against UMSL’s Steve Webb on Thursday in the Bills’ 71-49 victory at Chaifetz Arena.

Ford has ‘family talk’ after lackluster win SLU • FROM C1

players, having a “family talk.” “In the first game I didn’t know what to expect, and now we’ve seen both sides of it,” Ford said. “You’ve got to take every opportunity to learn. Sometimes it’s easier to send a message when things don’t go the way you want. I wasn’t worried about winning and losing. It’s about how you approach the game. I didn’t think our mind was in the right place. We let a lot of things bother us, and we didn’t respond to not playing well.” Hasahn French had a big night after a lackluster first exhibition, scoring 21 points on 10-of-14 shooting. He capitalized on a big size advantage to overpower the Tritons inside after missing his first two shots. The rest of the Billikens shot 35 percent. On the positive side, SLU forced 28 turnovers and came up with 15 steals. They blocked nine shots and outrebounded UMSL 46-27. Jordan Goodwin led the way with 11 and completed a double-double with 14 points. Carte’Are Gordon moved into the starting lineup, and although he didn’t put up big numbers, the freshman from Webster Groves showed a lot of what will earn him big minutes this season.

He was active on defense with three steals and two blocks, showed deft moves in the post and displayed some impressive passing. Nevertheless, SLU’s offense had a familiar look as it struggled much of the night when French wasn’t muscling his way under the basket. The Billikens shot 43.5 percent and made only four of 18 3-pointers. They missed six of their first seven free throws and 10 for the game. UMSL put up more resistance than Quincy did in the previous game, but the lack of production for SLU and sloppy play against a Division II opponent was a step backward toward a season with big expectations. The crowd on the court during pregame warmups for SLU was unlike anything Ford has seen in his two seasons with the Billikens. Limited to eight available scholarships at the most through his first 66 games, Ford suddenly had a wealth of talent from which to choose. With everyone healthy, 11 players were at the ready. Determining how to manage that many became the question. After using 10 players in the first half, Ford tightened the rotation in the second half as UMSL remained close enough to keep him on edge.

SLU led from the outset but the offense ran into more problems than in the first exhibition. The Billikens shot 34 percent in the first half with nine turnovers. They struggled from every spot on the floor, including the freethrow line, missing six of their first seven. Defense kept them in the lead once they were on top 12-1. UMSL didn’t have a field goal until nearly eight minutes into the game. SLU had nine steals in the first half and the Billikens had many more deflections. But guard Shane Wissink kept the Tritons relatively close by scoring 11 consecutive points for his team, including three 3-pointers. And when Johnathan Matthews hit a pair of free throws and a 3 in the final minute of the half, UMSL went into the break trailing only by 10. Demarius Jacobs and KC Hankton made their first appearances after missing the first exhibition. Hankton came down awkwardly with a rebound early in the game and was limping but told Ford he did not need to come out of the game. Stu Durando @studurando on Twitter sdurando@post-dispatch.com

Smith, the 2017 Mr. Basketball in the state of Illinois from Edwardsville, lost his starting job midway through his freshman season at Illinois last year, after which he decided to join Martin’s program. He struggled shooting from 3-point range with the Illini (23.2 percent), but has sharpened his shot this summer and could play multiple positions on the perimeter, including some time as Martin’s ball-handler. He figures to play prominently in MU’s remodeled backcourt along with senior Jordan Geist and freshmen Javon Pickett, Xavier Pinson and Torrence Watson. “From a guy who wasn’t really too great of a shooter last year to now he’s developed his shot in a good way,” senior forward Kevin Puryear said. “He’s got a high basketball IQ. He loves to defend. He’s a rebounder. He just loves being in tough situations, loves the moment.” Smith and junior transfer guard Dru Smith, a spring addition from Evansville, have both taken part in preseason practices as if they’ll be part of the rotation, making for a smoother transition now that Mark Smith is eligible. Unlike Illinois in Mark’s case, Evansville has not cooperated in MU’s eligibility waiver request for Dru. For now, he’ll have to sit out the upcoming season. Mark Smith said he appreciates that Illinois coach Brad Underwood cooperated with his waiver request for immediate eligibility but is happy with his decision to change programs. “Coach Martin is truthful,” Smith said. “He tells us like it is. He’s never going to lie to us. That’s a big reason I came here. I just feel like I’m becoming a better player here.” Then there’s Porter. The 6-11 forward has not yet undergone surgery for the torn ACL and MCL he suffered in his right knee on Oct. 21, but unlike his brother Michael’s lingering back injury last year, the Tigers know Jontay won’t return again this season. Martin had planned to use Porter both in the post and on the perimeter and channel the offense through the sophomore. He was MU’s top returning scorer (9.9 points per game) and rebounder (6.8) from last season. “It’s hard to replace that caliber of talent and skill at that size,” Martin said. “People talk all the time about matchup problems. He created matchup problems, just his ability to dominate the low post.” As for Porter’s future — will he return or enter the 2019 NBA draft? — that’s a decision for another day. “I don’t even want to get into the debate of will he come back to school and all that,” Martin said. “That’s not even in my realm of thinking right now, as well as his. His whole goal is to get healthy.” With the season tipping off Tuesday against Central Arkansas, Mark Smith’s addition helps alleviate some of Martin’s depth concerns, though the second-year coach said he doesn’t envision playing more than nine regulars most games. That could mean a redshirt season for freshmen Parker Braun and Christian Guess, Martin said. The Tiger are also waiting for sophomore forward K.J. Santos to recover from a foot injury. The 6-8 transfer from Illinois-Chicago is off crutches and taking part in shooting drills but hasn’t been cleared to move laterally. Porter’s injury might dampen outside expectations for Mizzou’s season, though Puryear was quick to share a history lesson with reporters Thursday: A year ago the Tigers won 20 games and reached the NCAA Tournament despite getting all but 53 minutes out of Michael Porter Jr. “Of course, different situation,” Puryear said, “but this team is fully capable of winning games.” Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com


C6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

M 2 • FrIDAy • 11.02.2018

New-look Illini ready to begin season Eight newcomers set for debut in Friday exhibition against DIII Illinois Wesleyan BY JOEY WAGNER Decatur (Ill.) Herald & review

CHAMPAIGN, ILL. • The wait

felt like forever. Maybe it’s been the increased summer hours, or the number of practices, or simply the eight months since the Illinois men’s basketball team has played at the State Farm Center, but the team can’t wait to take its home floor at 7 p.m. Friday for an exhibition against Division III Illinois Wesleyan. “It’s going to feel lovely to play in front of our home crowd and give them a glimpse of what’s to come,” redshirt junior Kipper Nichols said. Head coach Brad Underwood talked about Friday’s game in a way that would make a child on Christmas Eve look tame. Friday will mark the first glimpse of the eight newcomers, including six true freshmen, for Illinois hoops fans. “You’re curious to see how guys react and I think that’s very much the case,” Underwood said. “I’m equally as excited for them. I know why these guys are here. I know why they want to compete. They want to play for the name on the front of the jersey “There will be mistakes, and there will be a slew of them. I expect that. We’ve got to play though those and we’ve got to get some of those things out of the way and (Friday) night is a good starting point for that.” Friday is also the first action the Illini have had against teams in a different jersey in front of an audience. Illinois lost to Vanderbilt in a secret scrimmage on Sat-

THE NEWS-GAZETTE

Illinois forwards Giorgi Bezhanishvili (15) and Kipper Nichols share a laugh during the team’s media day.

urday. But that secret scrimmage didn’t carry the bright lights of an opening game at the State Farm Center. “It’s about time,” senior Aaron Jordan said. “I’m telling you, I love these guys and love playing against them, but you love seeing different color jerseys out there — different opponents, difference schemes and how competitive we are. It’s exciting.” Underwood has no shortage of lineup options swirling around

in his head. He’ll likely open the game with Trent Frazier, Ayo Dosunmu, Nichols, Jordan and Giorgi Bezhanishvili. After the starters, the possibilities of lineups for Underwood to trot on the court in his positionless scheme are nearly limitless. He experimented with the threeguard combination of Frazier, Dosunmu and Andres Feliz in Saturday’s scrimmage, and Feliz was arguably the Illini’s best statistical player, including drawing 11 fouls.

“You’ll see a plethora of different lineups throughout,” Underwood said. This team hardly resembles last season’s squad that finished 14-18 overall and 4-14 in Big Ten play. “I think it’s night and day; in terms of our mindset and how we go about everyday preparing and the knowledge that these guys have about what we do,” Nichols said. Judging the game on wins and losses isn’t the perfect way to

measure what this game stands for. Last season, Illinois traveled to Eastern Illinois University and lost that scrimmage. This game is more about us than anything,” Nichols said. “How we set the standard of preparing for our opponent moving forward and executing and doing what we do to the best of our abilities.” Underwood will get a chance to showcase his freshmen and the growth of his returners, but it’s also a chance to get out some of those prerequisite nerves that come with playing at home — even if the game won’t count on the season win-loss total. “The new guys being in front of this many people and will give them a little bit of a feel about what we’re going to go through this season,” Jordan said. This is the first time the Illini have had to put together a scouting report this year, and the first in a college setting for most of the players. It’s the first time they will have gone through a pregame routine at home. There are going to be firsts — and a lot of them. “I look for everything,” Underwood said. “I’m curious to see how they play under the lights and in front of fans. ... There’s a plethora of information out there to gather from something like this. I get it. They’re going to be nervous. There’s going to be jitters. There will probably be some for the veterans as well. It’s good to get that out of the way. That will be maybe the most important thing that happens tomorrow is we kind of get some of that stuff out of the way.”

Tigers have depth MU HOOPS • FROM C1

SLU, Ford had 11 healthy players at the ready. After using 10 in the first half, he tightened the rotation in the second half as UMSL remained close enough to keep him visibly on edge. “Now we have enough weapons,” Ford said. “That didn’t help. Coaches kept reminding me I was playing a lot of people, so I probably didn’t let them get in a great flow.” SLU led from the outset but the offense ran into more problems than in the first exhibition. The Billikens shot 34 percent, struggling from every spot on the floor, in the first half with nine turnovers. Defense kept them in the lead once they were on top 12-1. UMSL didn’t have a field goal until nearly eight minutes into the game. SLU had nine steals in the first half and the Billikens had many more deflections. But guard Shane Wissink kept the Tritons relatively close by scoring 11 consecutive points for his team, including three 3-pointers. And when Johnathan Matthews hit a pair of free throws and a 3 in the final minute of the half, UMSL went into the break trailing by 10.

Smith, the 2017 Mr. Basketball in the state of Illinois from Edwardsville, lost his starting job midway through his freshman season at Illinois last year, after which he decided to join Martin’s program. He struggled shooting from 3-point range with the Illini (23.2 percent), but has sharpened his shot this summer and could play multiple positions on the perimeter, including some time as Martin’s ball-handler. He figures to play prominently in MU’s remodeled backcourt along with senior Jordan Geist and freshmen Javon Pickett, Xavier Pinson and Torrence Watson. “From a guy who wasn’t really too great of a shooter last year to now he’s developed his shot in a good way,” senior forward Kevin Puryear said. “He’s got a high basketball IQ. He loves to defend. He’s a rebounder. He just loves being in tough situations, loves the moment.” Smith and junior transfer guard Dru Smith, a spring addition from Evansville, have both taken part in preseason practices as if they’ll be part of the rotation, making for a smoother transition now that Mark Smith is eligible. Unlike Illinois in Mark’s case, Evansville has not cooperated in MU’s eligibility waiver request for Dru. For now, he’ll have to sit out the upcoming season. Mark Smith said he appreciates that Illinois coach Brad Underwood cooperated with his waiver request for immediate eligibility but is happy with his decision to change programs. “Coach Martin is truthful,” Smith said. “He tells us like it is. He’s never going to lie to us. That’s a big reason I came here. I just feel like I’m becoming a better player here.” Then there’s Porter. The 6-11 forward has not yet undergone surgery for the torn ACL and MCL he suffered in his right knee on Oct. 21, but unlike his brother Michael’s lingering back injury last year, the Tigers know Jontay won’t return again this season. Martin had planned to use Porter both in the post and on the perimeter and channel the offense through the sophomore. He was MU’s top returning scorer (9.9 points per game) and rebounder (6.8) from last season. “It’s hard to replace that caliber of talent and skill at that size,” Martin said. “People talk all the time about matchup problems. He created matchup problems, just his ability to dominate the low post.” As for Porter’s future — will he return or enter the 2019 NBA draft? — that’s a decision for another day. “I don’t even want to get into the debate of will he come back to school and all that,” Martin said. “That’s not even in my realm of thinking right now, as well as his. His whole goal is to get healthy.” With the season tipping off Tuesday against Central Arkansas, Mark Smith’s addition helps alleviate some of Martin’s depth concerns, though the second-year coach said he doesn’t envision playing more than nine regulars most games. That could mean a redshirt season for freshmen Parker Braun and Christian Guess, Martin said. The Tiger are also waiting for sophomore forward K.J. Santos to recover from a foot injury. The 6-8 transfer from Illinois-Chicago is off crutches and taking part in shooting drills but hasn’t been cleared to move laterally. Porter’s injury might dampen outside expectations for Mizzou’s season, though Puryear was quick to share a history lesson with reporters Thursday: A year ago the Tigers won 20 games and reached the NCAA Tournament despite getting all but 53 minutes out of Michael Porter Jr. “Of course, different situation,” Puryear said, “but this team is fully capable of winning games.”

Stu Durando @studurando on Twitter sdurando@post-dispatch.com

Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

BILL BARRETT • St. Louis U.

St. Louis University’s Javon Bess works against UMSL’s Steve Webb on Thursday in the Bills’ 71-49 victory at Chaifetz Arena.

Ford has ‘family talk’ after lackluster win SLU • FROM C1

until 45 minutes after the game, having spent that time sitting in front of the players having a “family talk.” “In the first game I didn’t know what to expect, and now we’ve seen both sides of it,” Ford said. “You’ve got to take every opportunity to learn. Sometimes it’s easier to send a message when things don’t go the way you want. I wasn’t worried about winning and losing. It’s about how you approach the game. I didn’t think our mind was in the right place. We let a lot of things bother us, and we didn’t respond to not playing well.” Hasahn French had a big night after a lackluster first exhibition, scoring 21 points on 10-of-14 shooting. He capitalized on a big size advantage to overpower the Tritons inside after missing his first two shots. The rest of the Billikens shot 35 percent. On the positive side, SLU forced 28 turnovers and came up with 15 steals. They blocked nine shots and outrebounded UMSL 46-27. Jordan Goodwin led the way with 11 rebounds and completed a double-double with 14 points. But French said the Billikens can’t allow themselves to be content with two

lopsided exhibition wins, and Ford let them know. “The talk was motivational, putting things in perspective, and to make sure we’re ready for the season,” French said. “We can’t be getting happy off things we’re supposed to do like beating Quincy and UMSL. We’re not supposed to be celebrating. It’s time to get back to grinding and making sure things are in the right place.” Nevertheless, SLU’s offense had an old familiar look as it struggled much of the night when French wasn’t muscling his way under the basket. The Billikens shot 43.5 percent and made only four of 18 3-pointers. They missed six of their first seven free throws and 10 for the game. UMSL put up more resistance than Quincy did in the previous game, but the lack of production and sloppy play against a Division II opponent was a step backward toward a season with big expectations. “I told them, ‘You can’t chase a championship. You have to let the championship chase you,’” Ford said. “You can’t say that you’re going to go do something. I’m not one of those guys. I never want to put the cart before the horse.” Limited to eight available scholarships at the most through his first 66 games at


FOOTBALL

11.02.2018 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C7

COLLEGE FOOTBALL NOTEBOOK

NFL NOTEBOOK

Central Florida rolls on

Mullens, 49ers romp vs. Raiders

Win against Temple is 21st in a row for No. 9 Knights

QB was making his debut in NFL

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McKenzie Milton threw for 312 yards and three touchdowns to help No. 9 Central Florida hold off Temple 52-40 and extend the nation’s longest winning streak to 21 games Thursday night in Orlando, Fla. Taj McGowan scored on runs of 1 and 10 yards, the latter finishing a long drive that put the Knights (8-0, 5-0 American Athletic Conference) up by nine points after Temple (5-4, 4-1) nearly rallied to tie it. Milton, returning to the lineup after missing a game with an undisclosed injury, finished 17 of 33 with one interception. Dredrick Snelson scored on a 19-yard reception and Michael Colubiale had TD catches of 9 and 19 yards to ensure the Knights gained sole possession of first place in the AAC East Division. Anthony Russo completed 31 of 52 passes for 444 yards and four touchdowns for Temple, which had a three-game winning streak snapped despite gaining 670 yards on a night the teams combined to gain over 1,300 yards. Ventell Bryant scored on receptions of 15 and 8 yards for the Owls. Russo also threw to Branden Mack and Randle Jones while building a 34-28 halftime lead that lasted less than a minute into the third quarter. UCF took a 42-34 lead into the fourth quarter and stopped a potential tying two-point conversion before pulling away for good. In addition to staying on top of the East Division standings, UCF remained on course to be part of the discussion about which teams deserve to be part of the College Football Playoff in December. The Knights, denied a spot in the four-team playoff field a year ago despite finishing as the only undefeated team in the FBS, were 12th in the initial CFP rankings released this week.

NOTEBOOK Chairman of Maryland board steps down • The chairman of the University System of Maryland board of regents has resigned following the furor over the decision to reinstate football coach DJ Durkin. The board’s decision to reinstate

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Central Florida quarterback McKenzie Milton celebrates after a touchdown in the first half of a 52-40 victory Thursday night.

Durkin on Tuesday drew harsh criticism from students, players and state politicians. As a result, University President Wallace Loh fired Durkin on Wednesday. On Thursday, board chairman James Brady stepped down from his post. “In my estimation, my continued presence on the board will inhibit its ability to move Maryland’s higher education agenda forward,” Brady said in a statement. “And I have no interest in serving as a distraction from that important work.” UConn cleared of nepotism • A Connecticut Superior Court judge ruled Thursday that UConn did not violate the state’s ban on nepotism when it hired football coach Randy Edsall’s son as an assistant coach. Judge Trial Referee Joseph Shortall on Thursday vacated the state Citizen Ethics Advisory Board’s ruling that would have forced Corey Edsall to leave his job when his contract expires in January. Shortall says Randy Edsall was not yet a state employee when he negotiated for his son to be hired as tight ends coach. The judge says the board made a mistake by determining that the head coach was hired on Dec. 28,

2016, finding that Edsall wasn’t a state employee until Jan. 3, 2018. “The parties agree that only if Randy Edsall was a ‘state employee’ on January 1, 2017 was his involvement in setting the terms of Corey’s employment a violation of the (ethics statue) i.e. an illegal use of his public position to obtain financial gain for his son,” Shortall wrote. Former kicker Hnida ailing • A former University of New Mexico kicker who was the first female to play and score in a Division I football game faces months of recovery after becoming seriously ill from an adverse reaction to a prescribed medicine. The Santa Fe New Mexican reports that the family of Katie Hnida says the 37-year-old’s condition has stabilized but that she might need a liver transplant. Hnida played three seasons, from 2002-2004, with New Mexico. She became the first woman to play in a Division I game in December 2002 when she unsuccessfully attempted an extra point against UCLA in the Las Vegas Bowl. She became the first woman to score in a Division I game in August 2003 when she kicked two extra points for New Mexico in a game against Texas State.

Sophomore is eager to learn, get better MU • FROM C1

to go somewhere.” That “somewhere” didn’t end up as Florida. Instead, Gillespie is now Missouri’s starting free safety. He’ll experience playing in “The Swamp” on Saturday when the Tigers (4-4, 0-4 Southeastern Conference) visit Gainesville, a homecoming of sorts for Gillespie, to play the No. 13 Gators (6-2, 4-2). “We’re glad he’s on our team this weekend,” Missouri defensive coordinator Ryan Walters said. Unlike last year’s 45-16 win over Florida, when Gillespie’s playing time came mostly on special teams, the sophomore will be expected to make an impact in Mizzou’s secondary on Saturday. He even played some running back for the Tigers last year in practice when Damarea Crockett was sidelined with a shoulder injury. This year, he’s back to defense and has been a staple in the secondary since securing the starting free safety spot when Mizzou played at Alabama on Oct. 13. “He’s about the most athletic kid we’ve got on the team right now,” Walters said. “I think he’s got a chance to be really special. It’s just up to him to how good he wants to be in terms of how much time he wants to put in for film study and taking care of his body.” Farmer, whose son Tye is a redshirt freshman linebacker at Central Florida and plays for former Mizzou offensive coordinator Josh Heupel, said that when Walters recruited

Gillespie, he saw the player’s potential at safety, even though he was a standout running back. Walters challenged Gillespie to begin to improve his game so he could be successful at Mizzou. “It was pretty much all on Tyree, and Tyree did his part,” Farmer said. “And today, it’s paying off.” Gillespie made six tackles in the Tigers’ 15-14 loss to Kentucky last Saturday. He was also the defender on the untimed down when Kentucky’s Terry Wilson connected with tight end C.J. Conrad for the game-winning touchdown — with the help of a shove from Conrad in the end zone. Missouri wanted a flag on the play for offensive pass interference. It never came. “Sometimes the best teachers are going through it on game day,” Walters said. “He’ll learn from that.” Gillespie said he wasn’t happy with his defense during the last Kentucky drive. On Sunday, he stopped by Walters’ office. Tigers coach Barry Odom happened to be there too, watching film with his coordinator. “Tyree said, ‘I want to learn how to watch video better,’” Odom said. “He’s so skilled and has the opportunity to be one of the best safeties we’ve had here. He’s just starting to figure it out, what it takes.” Gillespie has met with Walters one-on-one to learn how to effectively watch film. It’s not like watching Monday Night Football anymore, Odom said. Walters taught Gillespie what to

look for in formation tendencies, the personnel an offense uses with each play, what receivers are used to run specific routes and what clues to look for within each position to give away what play might be coming. It’s a lot of watching one tape over and over again until it’s engrained, but it pays off on Tuesday when Missouri begins running the plays it will use against the opponent that week. The mental reps Gillespie gets watching film makes him comfortable on the practice field, he said. With comfort comes confidence on game day. “It helps with what I’m reading and how I fit with the plays, leveraging and stuff like that,” Gillespie said. “Calling plays, seeing where we fit. And then after, we get back to the film room and show Coach (Walters) that we care.” Gillespie took an unofficial visit to Florida when he was being recruited, but he never got an official offer from the school he grew up cheering. He remembers touching the alligator head in the locker room and wondering if his future was there. Black and gold, he said, fits him better anyway. “It hurts a little bit, but I’m going to play hard not only to show (Florida) what they’re missing but also to thank Mizzou for taking me here,” Gillespie said. “It fuels me. But you can’t get a big head. You have to go out there and play your game.”

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49ers linebacker Elijah Lee tackles Raiders wide receiver Martavis Bryant during the second half Thursday night. ASSOCIATED PRESS

Nick Mullens threw for 262 yards and three touchdowns for the most productive NFL debut since the merger, leading the San Francisco 49ers to a 34-3 victory over the Oakland Raiders in a lopsided Battle of the Bay on Thursday night in Santa Clara, Calif. George Kittle made an impressive one-handed catch on a 71-yard play that set up his touchdown from Mullens and Pierre Garcon caught his first TD pass in two seasons with the 49ers (2-7), who snapped a six-game losing streak and won for just the second time in two years without Jimmy Garpppolo at quarterback. Mullens got the nod after C.J. Beathard injured his right wrist last week and made the most of his opportunity against a defense for the Raiders (1-7) that is one of the worst in the league. The former undrafted free agent out of Southern Mississippi got rid of the ball quickly and took advantages of several breakdowns in coverage for big plays, including the 24yard TD pass to a wide-open Garcon on the opening drive. Mullens finished 16 for 22 and had a 151.9 passer rating, the highest for a quarterback with at least 15 attempts in an NFL debut since the 1970 merger. He threw TD passes to Garcon and Kendrick Bourne on the opening two drives and coasted from there to the most lopsided win in this series since San Francisco won the first meeting 38-7 in 1970. Raheem Mostert added a 52-yard touchdown run and the Niners outgained the Raiders 405 to 248 for the game. In what was perhaps the worst prime-time matchup in NFL history, only the Raiders played down to expectations. They provided little resistance on defense against an undrafted quarterback making his NFL debut, did nothing offensively after driving for as field goal on the opening drive and put together the most listless performance yet in coach Jon Gruden’s second stint as coach. Raiders QB Derek Carr finished 16 of 22 for 171 yards and was sacked five times before being replaced by AJ McCarron in the fourth quarter. McCarron was sacked once. Owens gets ring at 49ers game • Terrell Owens came back to his roots to get his Hall of Fame ring. Owens was presented with the ring during a halftime ceremony during Thursday night’s game between the 49ers and the Raiders. Owens spent the first eight seasons with the 49ers, establishing himself as one of the best players in the game during his tenure in San Francisco. “This is awesome,” Owens said before the game, while wearing his gold Hall of Fame jacket. “This is an opportunity to give something to the fans. Ever since I left in 2003 and went on and did some great things, but this is where it started my first eight years of my career.” Owens was voted into the Hall of Fame earlier this year but skipped the induction ceremony in Canton, Ohio, to hold his own celebration at his college in Chattanooga, Tennessee. Owens said he was upset at the voters who made him wait three years for the honor, saying he believed they brought in off-field issues into their deliberations instead of focusing solely on what Owens did as a player. “No regrets at all,” Owens said about his decision to skip the ceremony. “If anybody knows who Terrell Owens is outside the media portrayal of me throughout the course of my career. They know what I did. I stand by what I did. ... When they tried to bring other things outside my body of work and my accomplishments, that was an issue for me. My stats spoke loudly. They spoke for themselves.”

NFL STANDINGS

49ers 34, Raiders 3

American Football Conference East W L T Pct PF PA New England 6 2 0 .750 239 185 Miami 4 4 0 .500 174 219 NY Jets 3 5 0 .375 192 200 Buffalo 2 6 0 .250 87 200 South W L T Pct PF PA Houston 5 3 0 .625 197 167 Tennessee 3 4 0 .429 106 127 Jacksonville 3 5 0 .375 134 170 Indianapolis 3 5 0 .375 231 213 North W L T Pct PF PA Pittsburgh 4 2 1 .643 204 172 Cincinnati 5 3 0 .625 221 237 Baltimore 4 4 0 .500 197 137 Cleveland 2 5 1 .313 169 210 West W L T Pct PF PA Kansas City 7 1 0 .875 290 205 LA Chargers 5 2 0 .714 195 163 Denver 3 5 0 .375 188 194 Oakland 1 7 0 .125 141 252 National Football Conference East W L T Pct PF PA Washington 5 2 0 .714 146 134 Philadelphia 4 4 0 .500 178 156 Dallas 3 4 0 .429 140 123 NY Giants 1 7 0 .125 150 205 South W L T Pct PF PA New Orleans 6 1 0 .857 234 183 Carolina 5 2 0 .714 178 152 Atlanta 3 4 0 .429 190 212 Tampa Bay 3 4 0 .429 201 233 North W L T Pct PF PA Chicago 4 3 0 .571 194 144 Minnesota 4 3 1 .563 197 195 Green Bay 3 3 1 .500 175 173 Detroit 3 4 0 .429 171 186 West W L T Pct PF PA LA Rams 8 0 0 1.000 264 155 Seattle 4 3 0 .571 171 131 Arizona 2 6 0 .250 110 199 San Francisco 2 7 0 .222 207 239 Thursday San Francisco 34, Oakland 3 Sunday Kansas City at Cleveland, noon, KMOV-4 Chicago at Buffalo, noon, KTVI-2 NY Jets at Miami, noon Atlanta at Washington, noon Detroit at Minnesota, noon Tampa Bay at Carolina, noon Pittsburgh at Baltimore, noon LA Chargers at Seattle, 3:05 p.m. Houston at Denver, 3:05 p.m. LA Rams at New Orleans, 3:25 p.m., KTVI-2 Green Bay at New England, 7:20 p.m., KSDK-5 Open: Indianapolis, Arizona, NY Giants, Jacksonville, Philadelphia, Cincinnati Monday Tennessee at Dallas, 7:15 p.m., ESPN

Oakland 3 0 0 0 — 3 San Francisco 7 10 14 3 — 34 First Quarter Oak: FG Carlson 37, 9:30. SF: Garcon 24 pass from Mullens (Gould kick), 6:47. Second Quarter SF: Bourne 4 pass from Mullens (Gould kick), 12:40. SF: FG Gould 39, :16. Third Quarter SF: Kittle 5 pass from Mullens (Gould kick), 12:36. SF: Mostert 52 run (Gould kick), 9:17. Fourth Quarter SF: FG Gould 25, 3:59. A: 69,592. Oak SF First downs 14 18 Total Net Yards 242 405 Rushes-yards 23-102 32-143 Passing 140 262 Punt Returns 0-0 2-6 Kickoff Returns 2-51 0-0 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 17-24-0 16-22-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 8-39 0-0 Punts 6-37.5 3-54.7 Fumbles-Lost 2-0 1-0 Penalties-Yards 6-40 3-23 Time of Possession 31:26 28:34 Rushing: Oakland, Martin 11-49, Washington 5-27, Bryant 1-17, Carr 3-5, Richard 2-4, McCarron 1-0. San Francisco, Mostert 7-86, Breida 12-44, Morris 7-13, Goodwin 1-2, Juszczyk 1-1, Mullens 4-(minus 3). Passing: Oakland, Carr 16-21-0-171, McCarron 1-3-0-8. San Francisco, Mullens 16-22-0-262. Receiving: Oakland, Richard 4-45, LaFell 3-20, Bryant 2-29, Cook 2-20, J.Nelson 2-16, Martin 1-20, D.Harris 1-13, Roberts 1-8, Carrier 1-8. San Francisco, Kittle 4-108, Garcon 3-56, James 2-60, Juszczyk 2-10, Bourne 2-6, Goodwin 1-11, Dwelley 1-8, Breida 1-3. Missed field goals: Oakland, Carlson 45.


SPORTS

C8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 11.02.2018

BOYS SOCCER • DISTRICT ROUNDUP Fort Zumwalt South gets quick goals, tops St. Dominic The Fort Zumwalt South team bus was eerily quiet on its way to Thursday’s soccer showdown at St. Dominic. Which is not normal for the high-energy Bulldogs. “Usually, there’s music, people talking, everyone yelling and getting ready,” junior forward Devin Livingstone said. South parlayed that steely focus into an impressive 2-0 triumph over the rival Crusaders in the Class 3 District 7 championship contest at St. Dominic. The Bulldogs (17-9) will face Liberty (16-9) in a sectional match at 6 p.m. Tuesday in Wentzville. Liberty beat Borgia 5-0 in the District 8 title tilt on Thursday. Livingstone and senior Bryce Gamache scored in a span of 4 minutes and 3 seconds midway through the opening half to grab control. Freshman goalkeeper Luke Dillon took over from there making several fine saves on the way to his eighth clean sheet of the season. CBC 2, Vianney 0 • Playing alongside fellow senior Nolan DeWeese, CBC defender Seth Kacich has helped form an air-tight backline for the Cadets. While DeWeese has had his name bantered about all season as one of the area’s best defenders and all-around players, Kacich also has made a name for himself — once again with his play Thursday in CBC’s 2-0 win over host Vianney in the Class 4 District 6 boys soccer championship. The defensive effort paved the way for CBC’s win thanks to a pair of goals from senior midfielders Nate Temm and Camden Starzyk in the second half. The Cadets (21-2-2, No. 2 in the STLhighschoolsports.com large-schools rankings) advanced to play host to Holt (19-4-2) on Tuesday in a Class 4 sectional. In a battle between two Class 4 state semifinalists from last season, Vianney (19-5-2, No. 7 LS) was in total control over the game’s first 10 minutes. Perhaps the best chance for the Griffins came in the game’s second minute when a corner kick was redirected past Cadets senior goalkeeper Dave Fitzgerald. However, Kacich cleared Vianney’s shot just before it crossed the CBC goal line. Fort Zumwalt West 1, Francis Howell 0 (OT) • Lots of high school soccer players have the kind of week Alex Hermann had. In their dreams. The Fort Zumwalt West sophomore midfielder already wrote his name in

AMERICA’S LINE NFL Favorite ....... Open/current ......Underdog Sunday VIKINGS.................5.5.... 5....................... Lions Chiefs .....................8..... 8................. BROWNS RAVENS..................3..... 3...................Steelers PANTHERS .............6....6.5...................... Bucs DOLPHINS..............3..... 3..........................Jets WASHINGTON......... 2.... 1.5 ..................Falcons Bears......................9.... 10......................BILLS BRONCOS ............... 2......1.....................Texans SEAHAWKS............. 2......1................. Chargers SAINTS ................... 1 .... PK .....................Rams PATRIOTS ...............6..... 6................... Packers Monday COWBOYS............. 4.5 ... 6...................... Titans l- London. Off: Cardinals, Bengals, Colts, Jaguars, Giants, Eagles. COLLEGE FOOTBALL Favorite ....... Open/current ......Underdog VIRGINIA ...............7.5... 7.5 .............Pittsburgh MID TENN ST........13.5. 13.5 ..........W Kentucky ARIZONA ...............3.5.... 3................. Colorado Saturday Houston ...............13.5...14........................SMU PURDUE ................2.5.... 3........................ Iowa GEORGIA ST ........... 7....6.5.................Texas St Syracuse.................4....6.5.......WAKE FOREST Georgia.................. 10...9.5 ............ KENTUCKY CINCINNATI ..........13.5. 13.5 .....................Navy OHIO ST................. 21 ....18............... Nebraska Ga Tech...................4..... 6........... N CAROLINA FLORIDA.................6..... 6.................. Missouri MIAMI-FLA .............8....9.5 ......................Duke NC STATE.............. 6.5 ... 9................ Florida St Memphis ..............12.5...13...........E CAROLINA Boston Coll............. 2..... 2.................. VA TECH Michigan St ............3....2.5 ...........MARYLAND Oklahoma ............10.5. 13.5 .........TEXAS TECH TEXAS....................2.5.... 2............... W Virginia WISCONSIN ......... 30.5 . 30 ................. Rutgers Notre Dame ...........8.... 10...NORTHWESTERN Minnesota..............9..... 9..................ILLINOIS E MICHIGAN .........13.5. 13.5 ........... C Michigan ARMY...................... 7..... 7................. Air Force S FLORIDA..............8.... 7.5 ................... Tulane App’chian St.........14.5.14.5 ....COASTAL CARO BOISE ST................ 14 .. 13.5 .......................Byu San Diego St.......... 11 ... 10......... NEW MEXICO WYOMING.............13.5...14.............San Jose St WASH ST...............10.5.. 10............... California Marshall................3.5.... 3...................SO MISS Ga Southern..........7.5... 7.5 ..........UL-MONROE Utah........................ 7..... 7............ ARIZONA ST OREGON ................ 13 ... 10........................Ucla Usc......................... 14 ....17............OREGON ST WASHINGTON.........9....9.5 ................Stanford Iowa St .................14.5.14.5 ................KANSAS AUBURN.................6..... 4.............. Texas A&M TENNESSEE........... 21 ....21................Charlotte MISS ST ............... 20.5 . 24...................La Tech Oklahoma St ..........8.... 7.5 .................BAYLOR UMASS ...................3....2.5 .................. Liberty TCU ........................8.5 ... 8................ Kansas St TULSA...................18.5. 17.5...........Connecticut CLEMSON ..............38... 39................Louisville MICHIGAN ............. 10..10.5 .................Penn St MISSISSIPPI ..........PK... PK ............. S Carolina RICE........................ 1 ......1........................ Utep TROY...................... 10..10.5 ........UL-Lafayette ARKANSAS ST ....... 17 .. 15.5 ........... S Alabama UAB ......................21.5.22.5 ......................Utsa FLA INT’L................3....2.5 ........... Fla Atlantic Alabama................ 14 ..14.5 .......................LSU Fresno St..............24.5 . 26...................... UNLV Utah St .................. 18 ... 20 ..................HAWAII Note: Utep opened as a favorite. NBA Favorite ............. Points ............Underdog Clippers.....................1.5........................ MAGIC Rockets .....................2.5 ..........................NETS WIZARDS.................... 3...................... Thunder Pacers ........................ 7..........................BULLS MAVERICKS................ 6......................... Knicks JAZZ........................... 10..................... Grizzlies Raptors ....................10.5 ........................ SUNS WARRIORS .................11 .................... T’Wolves NHL Favorite .............. Odds .............Underdog h-Jets................. -$135/+$115............ Panthers Avalanche ..........-$120/even............ CANUCKS COYOTES ...........-$125/+$105.........Hurricanes h- Helsinki, Finland Grand Salami: Over/under 18.5 goals. Home team in CAPS © 2018 Benjamin Eckstein

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL | American League BALTIMORE — Assigned LHP Sean Gilmartin, 3B Jace Peterson, 2B Corban Joseph and RHP Gabriel Ynoa outright to Norfolk (IL). BOSTON — Reinstated 2B Dustin Pedroia, INF Marco Hernandez and RHP Austin Maddox from the 60-day DL. Assigned INF Tony Renda and RHP Justin Haley outright. Reinstated RHP Carson Smith from the 60-day DL, who declined outright assignment and elected free agency. LOS ANGELES — Assigned C Joe

RANDY KEMP • Special to STLhighschoolsports.com

GORDON RADFORD • Special to STLhighschoolsports.com

Fort Zumwalt West’s Aiden Morgan and Francis Howell’s Sammy Gruener head the ball simutaneously during a Class 4 District 8 boys soccer championship Thursday at Fort Zumwalt West High School in O’Fallon, Mo.

Jaguars lore earlier in the week when he scored four second-half goals to lead his team to a come-from-behind victory in Tuesday’s district semifinals. On Thursday, in the 10th minute of overtime against Francis Howell, Hermann struck again, converting a follow-up shot to give the Jaguars a 1-0 sudden-death triumph in the Class 4 District 8 championship match at Zumwalt West. Marquette 3, Parkway South 1 • Jake Hansen gave his team the worst lead in soccer. A senior midfielder for the Marquette boys soccer team, Hansen leaped among the crowd in the Parkway South box. He got his head on a lengthy free kick played in by senior defender Jacob Quinn and flicked it into the goal in the 29th minute of the first half as Marquette beat Parkway South 3-1 for the Class 4 District 3 championship Thursday at Marquette. The No. 5 large school in the STLhighschoolsports.com rankings, Marquette (19-3) advanced to play Oakville (12-13) in the sectional round. It’s the first district championship for Marquette since 2014. Jackson 2, Northwest Cedar Hill 1 (PKs) • The Northwest boys soccer team is hoping history repeats itself. The Lions will have to wait until next year to find out if it does. Joe Noah gave Northwest an early lead, but the Lions couldn’t make it hold up, eventually falling to Jackson 2-1 in penalty kicks in the championship game of the Class 4 District 1 tournament at Seckman High. William Essner scored for Jackson (18-4-2) in regulation and Mason

Hudson outright to Salt Lake (PCL). OAKLAND — Reinstated RHP Kendall Graveman from the 60-day DL. SEATTLE — Promoted Justin Hollander to assistant general manager and Leslie Manning to director of professional development and assistant director, player development. TAMPA BAY — Agreed to terms with RHP Sandy Gaston on a minor league contract. Assigned Cs Jesus Sucre and Adam Moore outright to Durham (IL). Claimed RHP Oliver Drake off waivers from Minnesota. National League ATLANTA — Reinstated RHPs Darren O’Day and Mike Soroka and LHPs Grant Dayton and Luiz Gohara from the 60-day DL. CHICAGO — Claimed OF Johnny Field off waivers from Minnesota. Exercised their 2019 option on RHP Pedro Strop and RHP Brandon Kintzler exercised his 2019 option. LOS ANGELES — Traded LHP Manny Banuelos to the Chicago White Sox for INF Justin Yurchak. Signed RHP Jesen Therrien to a minor league contract. Agreed to terms with INF Davd Freese on a one-year contract. MIAMI — Reinstated OF Garrett Cooper, RHP Pablo Lopez, 3B Martin Prado and LHP Caleb Smith from the 60-day DL. MILWAUKEE — Reinstated C Stephen Vogt from the 60-day DL. SAN DIEGO — Traded C Raffy Lopez to Atlanta for cash. WASHINGTON — Announced C Jhonatan Solano declined outright assignment to Fresno (PCL) and elected free agency. BASKETBALL | NBA MEMPHIS — Waived G Andrew Harrison. Women’s NBA WNBA PLAYERS ASSOCIATION — Announced it will opt out of the current collective bargaining agreement, effective at the end of the 2019 season. FOOTBALL | National Football League DETROIT — Placed LB Garret Dooley on practice squad injured reserve. Signed TE Jerome Cunningham to the practice squad. HOCKEY | National Hockey League LOS ANGELES — Placed G Jonathan Quick on injured reserve. Recalled F Austin Wagner and D Sean Walker from Ontario (AHL) and D Austin Strand from Manchester (ECHL) to Ontario (AHL)> MINNESOTA — Signed F Colton Beck to a two-year, two-way contract. MONTREAL — Assigned F Hayden Verbeek from Laval (AHL) to Maine (ECHL). NASHVILLE — Loaned G Miroslav Svoboda from Milwaukee (AHL) to Atlanta (ECHL). Recalled F Tyler Moy from Atlanta (ECHL) to Milwaukee (AHL). BLUES — Assigned G Evan Fitzpatrick from San Antonio (AHL) to Tulsa (ECHL). American Hockey League BRIDGEPORT SOUND — Recalled G Mitch Gillam from Worcester (ECHL). CHICAGO — Assigned D Kevin Lough to Adirondack (ECHL). HERSHEY — Recalled G Parker Milner from South Carolina (ECHL). ROCHESTER — Assigned F Myles Powell to Cincinnati (ECHL). SPRINGFIELD — Recalled F Tony Turgeon from Manchester (ECHL). TORONTO — Assigned D Kristians Rubins to Newfoundland (ECHL). ECHL ATLANTA — Signed F Tyler Howe. GREENVILLE — Released D Kyle Chatham. Claimed F Kevin Miller off waivers from Fort Wayne. INDY — Signed F Brian Morgan. MANCHESTER — Returned D Chris Carlisle to Grand Rapids (AHL). Loaned G Charles Williams to Ontario (AHL). TULSA — Released G Ian Keserich. WORCESTER — Added G Jason San Antonio as emergency backup. COLLEGE HOFSTRA — Named Jamie Franco assistant wrestling coach.

COLLEGES Area basketball schedule FRIDAY W: SWIC vs. Independence, in Moberly, 1 p.m. M: Lindenwood vs. Azusa Pacific, in Anaheim, Calif., 3:30 p.m. W: SE Illinois at Maryville, 5:30 p.m. (exh.) W: Westminster at SIU C’dale, 6 p.m. (exh.) W: Jefferson at Rend Lake, 6 p.m. M: McKendree at Northwestern, 7 p.m. (exh.) W: Missouri Baptist vs. William Penn, in Des Moines, Iowa, 8 p.m. SATURDAY M: Lindenwood vs. West Texas A&M, in Anaheim, Calif., 11 a.m. W: Webster at Missouri S&T, 1 p.m. (exh.) M: Lincoln College at LU-Belleville, 3 p.m. M: Gateway Legacy at SW Illinois, 3 p.m. W: Missouri Baptist vs. Grand View,

POSTSEASON SCOREBOARD MISSOURI GIRLS VOLLEYBALL

Grindstaff, Tanner Walton and Caleb Dameron were successful in a 3-2 penalty kick session. The Indians will play De Smet (19-3-2) in a sectional Tuesday. De Smet beat Pattonville 1-0 to claim the District 2 championship. “That was one of the most fun games I’ve been a part of,” Northwest coach David Willis said. “It reminded me of our 2013 district champion game against Eureka and it went to penalty kicks and we rung a couple off the post in penalty kicks that game too and we came back the next season and won the district championship. That was a talking point tonight.” De Smet 1, Pattonville 0 • A goal by senior forward Avi Wesseh with eight minutes left made the difference as the Spartans held off Pattonville 1-0 to win the Class 4 District 2 championship. Parkway Central 2, St. Charles 1 • Senior Camden Dunne scored the gamewinning goal in overtime as Central, the defending Class 3 state champion, earned the win. Holt 2, Timberland 0 • Senior forward Clayton Waple scored a first half goal and Sam Rowan added an insurance goal in the second to push the Indians to the Class 4 District 5 title. Windsor 2, Hillsboro 1 (OT) • Tanner Berry’s goal seven minutes into overtime propelled the Owls to victory. Liberty 5, Borgia 0 • Senior midfielder Alex Meyer scored the first goal and Liberty (16-9) rolled from there to the Class 3 District 8 title. Jim Faasen, Steve Overbey, Brian Webster, David Kvidahl and Joe Harris contributed to this report

in Des Moines, Iowa, 4 p.m. W: Southwestern Illinois at Moberly, 5 p.m. W: LU-Belleville at Central Methodist, 7 p.m. SUNDAY M: Lindenwood vs. Embry-Riddle, in Anaheim, Calif., 11 a.m. W: Lincoln at Missouri State, 2 p.m. (exh.)

Area results Men’s soccer, SLIAC semifinal • Webster 0, Greenville 0 (2OT), Greenville advances 3-2 on PKs Men’s basketball Missouri Baptist 84, Culver-Stockton 79

Thursday’s college football Northern Illinois 36, Akron 26 Ohio 59, Western Michigan 14 No. 9 Central Florida 52, Temple 40

Friday’s college football East • Penn (5-2) at Cornell (3-4), 5 p.m. South Pittsburgh (4-4) at Virginia (6-2), 6:30 p.m. W. Kentucky (1-7) at Middle Tennessee (5-3), 7 p.m. Far West • Colorado (5-3) at Arizona (4-5), 9:30 p.m.

GOLF PGA | Shriners Open Thursday | Las Vegas Purse: $7M | Yards: 7,255 | Par: 71 (35-36) Partial First Round Peter Uihlein 30-33 — 63 Seth Reeves 33-31 — 64 Harold Varner III 34-31 — 65 Robert Streb 33-32 — 65 Jordan Spieth 33-33 — 66 Bryson DeChambeau 34-32 — 66 Si Woo Kim 35-31 — 66 Whee Kim 34-32 — 66 Sebastian Munoz 35-31 — 66 Sam Ryder 33-33 — 66 Abraham Ancer 33-33 — 66 Lucas Glover 34-33 — 67 Martin Laird 30-37 — 67 Kevin Tway 32-35 — 67 J.J. Spaun 36-31 — 67 Jose de Jesus Rodriguez 35-32 — 67 Scott Stallings 32-35 — 67 D.J. Trahan 33-35 — 68 Alex Prugh 34-34 — 68 Hudson Swafford 34-34 — 68 Danny Lee 35-33 — 68 Kevin Dougherty 36-32 — 68 Vaughn Taylor 34-34 — 68 Matt Jones 33-35 — 68 James Hahn 36-32 — 68 Webb Simpson 34-34 — 68 Rickie Fowler 36-32 — 68 Matt Kuchar 32-36 — 68 Jason Dufner 35-33 — 68 John Senden 36-33 — 69 Cameron Champ 35-34 — 69 Rod Pampling 33-36 — 69 Patrick Cantlay 35-34 — 69 Chris Stroud 35-34 — 69 Chesson Hadley 36-33 — 69 Scott Piercy 35-34 — 69 Scott Brown 35-34 — 69 Ollie Schniederjans 35-34 — 69 Beau Hossler 36-33 — 69 Roberto Diaz 36-33 — 69 Joaquin Niemann 34-35 — 69 Patrick Rodgers 35-34 — 69 Kevin Na 37-32 — 69 Tony Finau 35-34 — 69 Gary Woodland 36-33 — 69 Ryan Blaum 36-33 — 69 J.T. Poston 33-36 — 69 Chris Kirk 34-35 — 69 Josh Teater 35-35 — 70 Dominic Bozzelli 34-36 — 70 Brandon Hagy 34-36 — 70 Brandon Harkins 35-35 — 70 Curtis Luck 32-38 — 70 Davis Love III 34-36 — 70 Steve Marino 35-35 — 70 Anirban Lahiri 37-33 — 70 Roberto Castro 32-38 — 70 Cameron Davis 34-36 — 70 Kevin Streelman 35-35 — 70 Graeme McDowell 36-34 — 70 Scott Langley 38-32 — 70 Rory Sabbatini 37-33 — 70 Peter Malnati 35-35 — 70 Nick Watney 36-34 — 70 Richy Werenski 37-33 — 70 Michael Kim 34-36 — 70 Kelly Kraft 35-35 — 70 Harris English 36-35 — 71 Jason Kokrak 36-35 — 71 Satoshi Kodaira 33-38 — 71 Cody Gribble 39-32 — 71 Austin Cook 37-34 — 71 Jim Furyk 34-37 — 71 Ryan Palmer 34-37 — 71 Kyoung-Hoon Lee 36-35 — 71 Wes Roach 35-36 — 71 Kyle Jones 35-36 — 71

-8 -7 -6 -6 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 E E E E E E E E E E

Jonas Blixt Mackenzie Hughes Kevin Stadler Jhonattan Vegas Joel Dahmen Denny McCarthy Alex Cejka Wesley Bryan Aaron Wise Anders Albertson Martin Trainer Doug Ghim Nick Taylor Troy Merritt Brice Garnett Brendan Steele Hunter Mahan Shawn Stefani Sangmoon Bae Kenny Perry Freddie Jacobson Tyler Duncan Grayson Murray Ryan Moore Trey Mullinax Brian Gay John Huh Tom Hoge Carlos Ortiz Nick Hardy Russell Henley Seamus Power Shintaro Ban Brian Stuard Preston Otte

37-34 37-34 37-34 35-36 37-34 37-34 40-32 34-38 35-37 36-36 36-36 38-34 37-35 38-34 35-37 34-38 36-37 35-38 35-38 37-36 36-37 38-35 36-37 36-37 36-38 37-37 39-35 37-37 38-37 35-40 37-38 36-39 37-39 39-37 45-40

LEADERBOARD 1. Peter Uihlein 2. Seth Reeves 3. Harold Varner III 3. Robert Streb 5. Jordan Spieth 5. Bryson DeChambeau 5. Si Woo Kim 5. Whee Kim 5. Sebastian Munoz 5. Sam Ryder 5. Abraham Ancer 12. Lucas Glover 12. Martin Laird 12. Kevin Tway 12. J.J. Spaun 12. Jose de Jesus Rodriguez 12. Scott Stallings 12. Wyndham Clark

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71 E 71 E 71 E 71 E 71 E 71 E 72 +1 72 +1 72 +1 72 +1 72 +1 72 +1 72 +1 72 +1 72 +1 72 +1 73 +2 73 +2 73 +2 73 +2 73 +2 73 +2 73 +2 73 +2 74 +3 74 +3 74 +3 74 +3 75 +4 75 +4 75 +4 75 +4 76 +5 76 +5 85 +14

PAR -8 -7 -6 -6 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4

THRU F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F 15

Euro | Turkish Airlines Open Thursday | Antalya, Turkey Purse: $7 million | Yards: 7,159 | Par: 71 (34-37) First Round Paul Dunne, Ireland Thorbjorn Olesen, Denmark Padraig Harrington, Ireland Justin Rose, England Lee Westwood, England Kiradech Aphibarnrat, Thailand Martin Kaymer, Germany Sam Horsfield, England Haotong Li, China Thomas Detry, Belgium Ashun Wu, China Matt Wallace, England Jason Scrivener, Australia Danny Willett, England Julian Suri, United States Chris Paisley, England Erik van Rooyen, South Africa Alexander Levy, France Gavin Green, Malaysia Shane Lowry, Ireland Tommy Fleetwood, England Tapio Pulkkanen, Finland Darren Fichardt, South Africa Adrian Otaegui, Spain Pablo Larrazabal, Spain Andrea Pavan, Italy

32-32 31-34 30-35 30-35 31-35 31-35 33-33 30-36 31-35 31-35 31-35 32-35 33-34 32-35 32-35 32-35 33-34 31-36 33-34 32-36 32-36 33-35 33-35 32-36 33-35 34-34

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SOCCER USL playoffs Eastern Conference final Saturday New York at Louisville, 6:30 p.m.

Western Conference final Saturday Phoenix at Orange County, 9 p.m.

Championship Conference finals winners, 7 p.m., Nov. 8

MLS playoffs Knockout Round Wednesday New York City FC 3, Philadelphia 1 Portland 2, FC Dallas 1 Thursday Columbus 2, D.C. United 2, Columbus wins on penalty kicks 3-2 Real Salt Lake at Los Angeles FC, late

MICDS’ Kate Oliver looks for an open shot against Cor Jesu during a 40th Midwest Tournament field hockey semifinal Thursday at SportPort Athletic Complex in Maryland Heights. Please see story on STLhighschoolsports.com.

64 65 65 65 66 66 66 66 66 66 66 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 68 68 68 68 68 68 68

STATE TOURNAMENTS At Show Me Center, Cape Girardeau Friday’s pool play schedule — Class 4 St. Teresa’s (25-7) vs Willard (32-4), 4 p.m. Eureka (29-8-1) vs Lafayette (30-5-1), 4 p.m. Willard vs Eureka, 6 p.m. St. Teresa’s vs Lafayette, 6 p.m. Willard vs Lafayette, 8 p.m. Eureka vs St. Teresa’s, 8 p.m. — Class 3 Pleasant Hill (27-10-1) vs LoganRogersville (36-2) , 3 p.m. Borgia (26-7-1) vs Lutheran South (23-9-5), 3 p.m. Logan-Rogersville vs Borgia, 5 p.m. Pleasant Hill vs Lutheran South, 5 p.m. Logan-Rogersville vs Lutheran South, 7 p.m. Borgia vs Pleasant Hill, 7 p.m. — Class 2 St. Michael the Archangel vs Mountain View-Liberty, 10 a.m. Hermann vs Arcadia Valley, 10 a.m. Mountain View-Liberty at Hermann, noon St. Michael the Archangel vs Arcadia Valley, noon Mountain View-Liberty vs Arcadia Valley, 2 p.m. St. Michael the Archangel vs Hermann, 2 p.m. Saturday’s schedule — Class 4 3rd Place: 6 p.m. Championship: 7:30 p.m. — Class 3 3rd Place: 3 p.m. Championship: 4:30 p.m. — Class 2 3rd Place: Noon Championship: 1:30 p.m.

ILLINOIS GIRLS VOLLEYBALL SUPER-SECTIONALS (Friday) — Class 3A Civic Memorial Mount Zion (29-10) vs Althoff (35-4), 7 p.m. — Class 1A Okawville Grayville (26-9) vs Father McGivney (23-12), 6 p.m.

FIELD HOCKEY 40TH MIDWEST TOURNAMENT At SportPort Athletic Complex Semifinals, Thursday Villa Duchesne 2, Kirkwood 0 MICDS 4, Cor Jesu 2 Championship, Saturday MICDS (21-5) vs Villa Duchesne (21-5-1), 1 p.m.

ILLINOIS BOYS SOCCER STATE TOURNAMENTS At Hoffman Estates HS Semifinals, Friday — Class 3A Naperville North (18-4-2) vs Lake Park (21-3-3), 5 p.m. Collinsville (19-5-2) vs Libertyville (21-0), 7 p.m. — Class 2A Crystal Lake South (20-2-3) vs Gibault (17-4-5), 1 p.m.

Conference Semifinals HOME-AND-HOME EASTERN CONFERENCE | First leg Sunday: New York at Columbus Sunday: Atlanta at New York City FC WESTERN CONFERENCE | First leg Sunday: Sporting K.C. at Portland or Real Salt Lake Sunday: Seattle at Los Angeles FC or Portland EASTERN CONFERENCE | Second leg Sunday, Nov. 11: D.C. United or Columbus at New York Sunday, Nov. 11: New York City FC at Atlanta WESTERN CONFERENCE | Second leg Thursday, Nov. 8: Los Angeles FC or Portland at Seattle Sunday, Nov. 11: Portland or Real Salt Lake at Sporting K.C.

Champions League (Home teams listed first) FIRST ROUND • Top two per group advance GROUP A GP W D L GF GA Pts Borussia Dortmund 3 2 0 0 8 0 9 Atletico Madrid 3 2 0 1 5 6 6 Monaco 3 0 1 2 2 6 1 Club Brugge 3 0 1 2 2 5 1 Tuesday Monaco vs. Club Brugge, 11:55 a.m. Atletico Madrid vs. Borussia Dortmund, 2 p.m. GROUP B GP W D L GF GA Pts Barcelona 3 3 0 0 10 2 9 Inter Milan 3 2 0 1 4 4 6 Tottenham 3 0 1 2 5 8 1 PSV Eindhoven 3 0 1 2 3 8 1 Tuesday Inter Milan vs. Barcelona, 2 p.m. Tottenham vs. PSV Eindhoven, 2 p.m. GROUP C GP W D L GF GA Pts Liverpool 3 2 0 1 7 3 6 Napoli 3 1 2 0 3 2 5 Paris Saint-Germain 3 1 1 1 10 6 4 Red Star Belgrade 3 0 1 2 1 10 1 Tuesday Red Star Belgrade vs. Liverpool, 11:55 a.m. Napoli vs. Paris Saint-Germain, 2 p.m. GROUP D GP W D L GF GA Pts 3 2 1 0 5 2 7 Porto Schalke 3 1 2 0 2 1 5 Galatasaray 3 1 1 1 3 1 4 Lokomotiv Moscow 3 0 0 3 1 7 0 Tuesday Porto vs. Lokomotiv Moscow, 2 p.m. Schalke vs. Galatasaray, 2 p.m. GROUP E GP W D L GF GA Pts Ajax Amsterdam 3 2 1 0 5 1 7 Bayern Munich 3 2 1 0 5 1 7 Benfica 3 1 0 2 3 5 3 AEK Athens 3 0 0 3 2 8 0 Wednesday Bayern vs. AEK Athens, 2 p.m. Benfica vs. Ajax Amsterdam, 2 p.m. GROUP F GP W D L GF GA Pts Manchester City 3 2 0 1 6 3 6 Lyon 3 1 2 0 7 6 5 Hoffenheim 3 0 2 1 6 7 2 Shaktar Donetsk 3 0 2 1 4 7 2 Wednesday Bayern Munich vs. AEK Athens, 2 p.m. Benfica vs. Ajax Amsterdam, 2 p.m. GROUP G GP W D L GF GA Pts Roma 3 2 0 1 8 3 6 Real Madrid 3 2 0 1 5 2 6 CSKA Moscow 3 1 1 1 3 5 4 Viktoria Plzen 3 0 1 2 3 9 1 Wednesday CSKA Moscow vs. Roma, 11:55 a.m. Viktoria Plzen vs. Real Madrid, 2 p.m. GROUP H GP W D L GF GA Pts Juventus 3 3 0 0 6 0 9 Manchester United 2 1 1 1 3 1 4 Valencia 3 0 2 1 1 3 2 Young Boys Bern 3 0 1 2 1 7 1 Wednesday Valencia vs. Young Boys Bern, 11:55 a.m. Juventus vs. Manchester United, 2 p.m.

COLLEGE BASKETBALL SCHEDULES ST. LOUIS U. MEN Tue. 11/6 vs. SEMO, 7 p.m. Sat. 11/10 vs. Troy, 7 p.m. Tue. 11/13 vs. North Alabama, 7 p.m. Sat. 11/17 at Seton Hall, 7 p.m. Wed. 11/21 vs. Pitt. (Brooklyn), 11 a.m. Sat. 11/24 vs. Central Arkansas, 3 p.m. Sat. 12/1 vs. Butler, 4 p.m. Wed. 12/5 at SIU Carbondale, 7 p.m. Sun. 12/9 vs. Oregon St., 2:30 p.m. Sun. 12/16 at Houston, 2 p.m. Wed. 12/19 vs. N.C. Central, 7 p.m. Sat. 12/22 at Florida St., 1:30 p.m.

Chicago St. Ignatius (16-7) vs Peoria Notre Dame (22-2), 3 p.m.

MISSOURI BOYS SOCCER DISTRICT TOURNAMENTS (Thursday except where noted) — Class 4 District 1 Jackson 2, Northwest Cedar Hill 1 (PKs) — Class 4 District 2 De Smet 1, Pattonville 0 — Class 4 District 3 Marquette 3, Parkway South 1 — Class 4 District 5 Holt 2, Timberland 0 — Class 4 District 6 CBC 2, Vianney 0 — Class 4 District 8 Fort Zumwalt West 1, Francis Howell 0 (OT) — Class 3 District 2 Windsor 2, Hillsboro 1 (OT) — Class 3 District 3 At Gateway STEM Webster Groves 3, St. Mary’s 0 — Class 3 District 4 At Westminster Priory (16-6) vs Summit (20-3-1), 4 p.m. Friday — Class 3 District 6 Parkway Central 2, St. Charles 1 (OT) — Class 3 District 7 Fort Zumwalt South 2, St. Dominic 0 — Class 3 District 8 Liberty 5, Borgia 0 STATE TOURNAMENTS — Class 4 Sectionals, Tuesday De Smet (19-3-2) at Jackson (8-2-2), 6 p.m. Tuesday. Marquette (19-3) at Oakville (12-13) Rock Bridge (16-5-1) at Ozark (23-3) Joplin (9-16) at Lee’s Summit (19-1) Holt (19-4-2) at CBC (21-2-2) Chaminade (23-5) at Fort Zumwalt West (15-11) Blue Springs South (13-9) at Rockhurst (17-6-1) Liberty North (13-11) at Park Hill (14-9) — Class 3 Sectionals, Tuesday Farmington (15-3) at Windsor (14-11-1) Webster Groves (12-11-1) at Summit (20-3-1) Rolla (16-9-1) at Glendale (18-7), 6 p.m. Parkview (13-14) at Neosho (12-10-1) Ladue (15-10) at Parkway Central (18-6-2), 6 p.m. Fort Zumwalt South (17-9) at Liberty (16-9), 6 p.m. Helias (18-7) at Harrisonville (20-5-2) Van Horn (23-2) at Kearney (17-4) — Class 2 Quarterfinals, Saturday John Burroughs (15-6-1) at Cape Notre Dame (13-8-3), 1 p.m. Monett (21-5) at Southern Boone (20-4), 1 p.m. St. Charles West (23-1) at O’Fallon Christian (14-10), 4 p.m. Pembroke Hill (11-8) at St. Pius X KC (8-9-2), 1 p.m.

Sun. 12/30 Sun. 1/6 Wed. 1/9 Sat. 1/12 Tue. 1/15 Fri. 1/18 Wed. 1/23 Sat. 1/26 Wed. 1/30 Sat. 2/2 Tue. 2/5 Fri. 2/8 Wed. 2/13 Sat. 2/16 Sat. 2/23 Tue. 2/26 Sat. 3/2 Wed. 3/6 Sat. 3/9

vs. Appalachian St., 2 p.m. vs. Rhode Island, 3 p.m. vs. Massachusetts, 8 p.m. at La Salle, 5 p.m. at Fordham, 6 p.m. vs. St. Joseph’s, 6 p.m. at Duquesne, 7 p.m. vs. Davidson, 1 p.m. vs. Richmond, 6 p.m. at Rhode Island, 3 p.m. vs. Dayton, 8 p.m. at St. Joseph’s, 6 p.m. at George Wash., 5:30 p.m. vs. La Salle, 4 p.m. at Dayton, 3 p.m. at VCU, 6:30 p.m. vs. George Mason, 2 p.m. vs. Duquesne, 7 p.m. at St. Bonaventure, 12 p.m.

ST. LOUIS U. WOMEN Fri. 11/9 at Eastern Kentucky, 11 a.m. Tue. 11/13 vs. Indiana St., 4:30 p.m. Sun. 11/18 vs. Cincinnati, 2 p.m. Tue. 11/20 at Tulsa, 7 p.m. Sat. 11/24 vs. Chattanooga (Va.), 3:30 p.m. Sun. 11/25 at Virginia, 2:30 p.m. Thu. 11/29 vs. SIU Carbondale, 7 p.m. Sat. 12/1 vs. SIU Edwardsville, 7 p.m. Tue. 12/4 vs. Connecticut, 6 p.m. Sun. 12/9 vs. Missouri, 5 p.m. Thu. 12/20 at Illinois St., 11 a.m. Fri. 12/28 vs. Yale (Florida), 1:30 p.m. Sat. 12/29 vs. TBA (Florida), TBA Sun. 1/6 at UMass, 1 p.m. Wed. 1/9 at St. Joseph’s, 10:30 a.m. Sun. 1/13 vs. Fordham, 3 p.m. Wed. 1/16 vs. Rhode Island, 7 p.m. Sun. 1/20 at St. Bonaventure, 12 p.m. Wed. 1/23 vs. Dayton, 11 a.m. Sun. 1/27 at VCU, 12 p.m. Thu. 1/31 vs. George Mason, 7 p.m. Sun. 2/3 vs. George Washington, 1 p.m. Wed. 2/6 at Fordham, 6 p.m. Sun. 2/10 vs. La Salle, 2 p.m. Wed. 2/13 at Duquesne, 10 a.m. Sun. 2/17 vs. Richmond, 2 p.m. Sat. 2/23 at Davidson, 1 p.m. Wed. 2/27 vs. VCU, 7 p.m. Sat. 3/2 at Dayton, 1 p.m. MIZZOU MEN Tue. 11/6 vs. Central Arkansas, 7 p.m. Fri. 11/9 at Iowa St., 6 p.m. Fri. 11/16 vs. Kennesaw St. (USVI), 2 p.m. Sun. 11/18 vs. TBA (USVI), TBA Mon. 11/19 vs. TBA (USVI), TBA Tue. 11/27 vs. Temple, 8 p.m. Sun. 12/2 vs. UCF, 2 p.m. Tue. 12/4 vs. UT Arlington, 7 p.m. Fri. 12/7 vs. Oral Roberts, 6 p.m. Tue. 12/18 vs. Xavier, 6 p.m. Sat. 12/22 vs. Illinois (St. Louis), 7 p.m. Sat. 12/29 vs. Morehead St., 1 p.m. Tue. 1/8 vs. Tennessee, 6 p.m. Sat. 1/12 at South Carolina, 12 p.m. Wed. 1/16 vs. Alabama, 8 p.m. Sat. 1/19 at Texas A&M, 2:30 p.m. Wed. 1/23 at Arkansas, 8 p.m. Sat. 1/26 vs. LSU, 5 p.m. Wed. 1/30 at Auburn, 7:30 p.m. Sat. 2/2 vs. Vanderbilt, 7:30 p.m. Tue. 2/5 at Tennessee, 8 p.m. Sat. 2/9 vs. Texas A&M, 5 p.m. Tue. 2/12 vs. Arkansas, 8 p.m. Sat. 2/16 at Mississippi, 2:30 p.m. Tue. 2/19 vs. Kentucky, 8 p.m. Sat. 2/23 at Florida, 3 p.m. Tue. 2/26 at Mississippi St., 6 p.m. Sat. 3/2 vs. South Carolina, 2:30 p.m. Wed. 3/6 at Georgia, 5:30 p.m. Sat. 3/9 vs. Mississippi, 2:30 p.m. MIZZOU WOMEN Tue. 11/6 at Western Illinois, 8 p.m. Tue. 11/13 vs. Missouri St., 7 p.m. Fri. 11/16 vs. Green Bay, 6 p.m. Mon. 11/19 vs. SIU Edwardsville, 7 p.m. Fri. 11/23 vs. Michigan (Fla.), 6:30 p.m. Sat. 11/24 vs. TBA (Florida), TBA Sun. 11/25 vs. TBA (Florida), TBA Sun. 12/2 at West Virginia, 4 p.m. Thu. 12/6 vs. UMKC, 7 p.m. Sun. 12/9 at St. Louis U., 5 p.m. Sat. 12/15 vs. South Dakota, 3 p.m. Mon. 12/17 vs. Texas St., 7 p.m. Fri. 12/21 at Illinois, 12 p.m. Sun. 12/30 vs. Arkansas St., 2 p.m. Thu. 1/3 vs. Mississippi, 7 p.m. Sun. 1/6 at Tennessee, 1 p.m. Thu. 1/10 vs. Arkansas, 7 p.m. Sun. 1/13 at Florida, 2 p.m. Thu. 1/17 vs. Georgia, 6 p.m. Mon. 1/21 at South Carolina, 6 p.m. Thu. 1/24 at Kentucky, 5:30 p.m. Sun. 1/27 vs. Auburn, 2 p.m. Mon. 2/4 at LSU, 6 p.m. Thu. 2/7 vs. Texas A&M, 6 p.m. Sun. 2/10 vs. Vanderbilt, 3 p.m. Thu. 2/14 at Mississippi St., 8 p.m. Sun. 2/17 vs. Tennessee, 4 p.m. Sun. 2/24 at Auburn, 2 p.m. Thu. 2/28 at Arkansas, 8 p.m. Sun. 3/3 vs. Alabama, 2 p.m.


SPORTS

C8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • FrIDAy • 11.02.2018

BOYS SOCCER • DISTRICT ROUNDUP Fort Zumwalt South gets quick goals, tops St. Dominic The Fort Zumwalt South team bus was eerily quiet on its way to Thursday’s soccer showdown at St. Dominic. Which is not normal for the high-energy Bulldogs. “Usually, there’s music, people talking, everyone yelling and getting ready,” junior forward Devin Livingstone said. South parlayed that steely focus into an impressive 2-0 triumph over the rival Crusaders in the Class 3 District 7 championship contest at St. Dominic. The Bulldogs (17-9) will face Liberty (16-9) in a sectional match at 6 p.m. Tuesday in Wentzville. Liberty beat Borgia 5-0 in the District 8 title tilt on Thursday. Livingstone and senior Bryce Gamache scored in a span of 4 minutes and 3 seconds midway through the opening half to grab control. Freshman goalkeeper Luke Dillon took over from there making several fine saves on the way to his eighth clean sheet of the season. CBC 2, Vianney 0 • Playing alongside fellow senior Nolan DeWeese, CBC defender Seth Kacich has helped form an air-tight backline for the Cadets. While DeWeese has had his name bantered about all season as one of the area’s best defenders and all-around players, Kacich also has made a name for himself — once again with his play Thursday in CBC’s 2-0 win over host Vianney in the Class 4 District 6 boys soccer championship. The defensive effort paved the way for CBC’s win thanks to a pair of goals from senior midfielders Nate Temm and Camden Starzyk in the second half. The Cadets (21-2-2, No. 2 in the STLhighschoolsports.com large-schools rankings) advanced to play host to Holt (19-4-2) on Tuesday in a Class 4 sectional. In a battle between two Class 4 state semifinalists from last season, Vianney (19-5-2, No. 7 LS) was in total control over the game’s first 10 minutes. Perhaps the best chance for the Griffins came in the game’s second minute when a corner kick was redirected past Cadets senior goalkeeper Dave Fitzgerald. However, Kacich cleared Vianney’s shot just before it crossed the CBC goal line. Fort Zumwalt West 1, Francis Howell 0 (OT) • Lots of high school soccer players have the kind of week Alex Hermann had. In their dreams. The Fort Zumwalt West sophomore midfielder already wrote his name in

AMERICA’S LINE NFL Favorite ....... Open/current ......Underdog Sunday VIKINGS.................5.5.... 5....................... Lions Chiefs .....................8..... 8................. BROWNS RAVENS..................3..... 3...................Steelers PANTHERS .............6....6.5...................... Bucs DOLPHINS..............3..... 3..........................Jets WASHINGTON......... 2.... 1.5 ..................Falcons Bears......................9.... 10......................BILLS BRONCOS ............... 2......1.....................Texans SEAHAWKS............. 2......1................. Chargers SAINTS ................... 1 .... PK .....................Rams PATRIOTS ...............6..... 6................... Packers Monday COWBOYS............. 4.5 ... 6...................... Titans l- London. Off: Cardinals, Bengals, Colts, Jaguars, Giants, Eagles. COLLEGE FOOTBALL Favorite ....... Open/current ......Underdog VIRGINIA ...............7.5... 7.5 .............Pittsburgh MID TENN ST........13.5. 13.5 ..........W Kentucky ARIZONA ...............3.5.... 3................. Colorado Saturday Houston ...............13.5...14........................SMU PURDUE ................2.5.... 3........................ Iowa GEORGIA ST ........... 7....6.5.................Texas St Syracuse.................4....6.5.......WAKE FOREST Georgia.................. 10...9.5 ............ KENTUCKY CINCINNATI ..........13.5. 13.5 .....................Navy OHIO ST................. 21 ....18............... Nebraska Ga Tech...................4..... 6........... N CAROLINA FLORIDA.................6..... 6.................. Missouri MIAMI-FLA .............8....9.5 ......................Duke NC STATE.............. 6.5 ... 9................ Florida St Memphis ..............12.5...13...........E CAROLINA Boston Coll............. 2..... 2.................. VA TECH Michigan St ............3....2.5 ...........MARYLAND Oklahoma ............10.5. 13.5 .........TEXAS TECH TEXAS....................2.5.... 2............... W Virginia WISCONSIN ......... 30.5 . 30 ................. Rutgers Notre Dame ...........8.... 10...NORTHWESTERN Minnesota..............9..... 9..................ILLINOIS E MICHIGAN .........13.5. 13.5 ........... C Michigan ARMY...................... 7..... 7................. Air Force S FLORIDA..............8.... 7.5 ................... Tulane App’chian St.........14.5.14.5 ....COASTAL CARO BOISE ST................ 14 .. 13.5 .......................Byu San Diego St.......... 11 ... 10......... NEW MEXICO WYOMING.............13.5...14.............San Jose St WASH ST...............10.5.. 10............... California Marshall................3.5.... 3...................SO MISS Ga Southern..........7.5... 7.5 ..........UL-MONROE Utah........................ 7..... 7............ ARIZONA ST OREGON ................ 13 ... 10........................Ucla Usc......................... 14 ....17............OREGON ST WASHINGTON.........9....9.5 ................Stanford Iowa St .................14.5.14.5 ................KANSAS AUBURN.................6..... 4.............. Texas A&M TENNESSEE........... 21 ....21................Charlotte MISS ST ............... 20.5 . 24...................La Tech Oklahoma St ..........8.... 7.5 .................BAYLOR UMASS ...................3....2.5 .................. Liberty TCU ........................8.5 ... 8................ Kansas St TULSA...................18.5. 17.5...........Connecticut CLEMSON ..............38... 39................Louisville MICHIGAN ............. 10..10.5 .................Penn St MISSISSIPPI ..........PK... PK ............. S Carolina RICE........................ 1 ......1........................ Utep TROY...................... 10..10.5 ........UL-Lafayette ARKANSAS ST ....... 17 .. 15.5 ........... S Alabama UAB ......................21.5.22.5 ......................Utsa FLA INT’L................3....2.5 ........... Fla Atlantic Alabama................ 14 ..14.5 .......................LSU Fresno St..............24.5 . 26...................... UNLV Utah St .................. 18 ... 20 ..................HAWAII Note: Utep opened as a favorite. NBA Favorite ............. Points ............Underdog Clippers.....................1.5........................ MAGIC Rockets .....................2.5 ..........................NETS WIZARDS.................... 3...................... Thunder Pacers ........................ 7..........................BULLS MAVERICKS................ 6......................... Knicks JAZZ........................... 10..................... Grizzlies Raptors ....................10.5 ........................ SUNS WARRIORS .................11 .................... T’Wolves NHL Favorite .............. Odds .............Underdog h-Jets................. -$135/+$115............ Panthers Avalanche ..........-$120/even............ CANUCKS COYOTES ...........-$125/+$105.........Hurricanes h- Helsinki, Finland Grand Salami: Over/under 18.5 goals. Home team in CAPS © 2018 Benjamin Eckstein

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL | American League BALTIMORE — Assigned LHP Sean Gilmartin, 3B Jace Peterson, 2B Corban Joseph and RHP Gabriel Ynoa outright to Norfolk (IL). BOSTON — Reinstated 2B Dustin Pedroia, INF Marco Hernandez and RHP Austin Maddox from the 60-day DL. Assigned INF Tony Renda and RHP Justin Haley outright. Reinstated RHP Carson Smith from the 60-day DL, who declined outright assignment and elected free agency. LOS ANGELES — Assigned C Joe

RANDY KEMP • Special to STLhighschoolsports.com

GORDON RADFORD • Special to STLhighschoolsports.com

Fort Zumwalt West’s Aiden Morgan and Francis Howell’s Sammy Gruener head the ball simutaneously during a Class 4 District 8 boys soccer championship Thursday at Fort Zumwalt West High School in O’Fallon, Mo.

Jaguars lore earlier in the week when he scored four second-half goals to lead his team to a come-from-behind victory in Tuesday’s district semifinals. On Thursday, in the 10th minute of overtime against Francis Howell, Hermann struck again, converting a follow-up shot to give the Jaguars a 1-0 sudden-death triumph in the Class 4 District 8 championship match at Zumwalt West. Marquette 3, Parkway South 1 • Jake Hansen gave his team the worst lead in soccer. A senior midfielder for the Marquette boys soccer team, Hansen leaped among the crowd in the Parkway South box. He got his head on a lengthy free kick played in by senior defender Jacob Quinn and flicked it into the goal in the 29th minute of the first half as Marquette beat Parkway South 3-1 for the Class 4 District 3 championship Thursday at Marquette. The No. 5 large school in the STLhighschoolsports.com rankings, Marquette (19-3) advanced to play Oakville (12-13) in the sectional round. It’s the first district championship for Marquette since 2014. Jackson 2, Northwest Cedar Hill 1 (PKs) • The Northwest boys soccer team is hoping history repeats itself. The Lions will have to wait until next year to find out if it does. Joe Noah gave Northwest an early lead, but the Lions couldn’t make it hold up, eventually falling to Jackson 2-1 in penalty kicks in the championship game of the Class 4 District 1 tournament at Seckman High. William Essner scored for Jackson (18-4-2) in regulation and Mason

Hudson outright to Salt Lake (PCL). OAKLAND — Reinstated RHP Kendall Graveman from the 60-day DL. SEATTLE — Promoted Justin Hollander to assistant general manager and Leslie Manning to director of professional development and assistant director, player development. TAMPA BAY — Agreed to terms with RHP Sandy Gaston on a minor league contract. Assigned Cs Jesus Sucre and Adam Moore outright to Durham (IL). Claimed RHP Oliver Drake off waivers from Minnesota. National League ATLANTA — Reinstated RHPs Darren O’Day and Mike Soroka and LHPs Grant Dayton and Luiz Gohara from the 60-day DL. CHICAGO — Claimed OF Johnny Field off waivers from Minnesota. Exercised their 2019 option on RHP Pedro Strop and RHP Brandon Kintzler exercised his 2019 option. LOS ANGELES — Traded LHP Manny Banuelos to the Chicago White Sox for INF Justin Yurchak. Signed RHP Jesen Therrien to a minor league contract. Agreed to terms with INF Davd Freese on a one-year contract. MIAMI — Reinstated OF Garrett Cooper, RHP Pablo Lopez, 3B Martin Prado and LHP Caleb Smith from the 60-day DL. MILWAUKEE — Reinstated C Stephen Vogt from the 60-day DL. SAN DIEGO — Traded C Raffy Lopez to Atlanta for cash. WASHINGTON — Announced C Jhonatan Solano declined outright assignment to Fresno (PCL) and elected free agency. BASKETBALL | NBA MEMPHIS — Waived G Andrew Harrison. Women’s NBA WNBA PLAYERS ASSOCIATION — Announced it will opt out of the current collective bargaining agreement, effective at the end of the 2019 season. FOOTBALL | National Football League DETROIT — Placed LB Garret Dooley on practice squad injured reserve. Signed TE Jerome Cunningham to the practice squad. HOCKEY | National Hockey League LOS ANGELES — Placed G Jonathan Quick on injured reserve. Recalled F Austin Wagner and D Sean Walker from Ontario (AHL) and D Austin Strand from Manchester (ECHL) to Ontario (AHL)> MINNESOTA — Signed F Colton Beck to a two-year, two-way contract. MONTREAL — Assigned F Hayden Verbeek from Laval (AHL) to Maine (ECHL). NASHVILLE — Loaned G Miroslav Svoboda from Milwaukee (AHL) to Atlanta (ECHL). Recalled F Tyler Moy from Atlanta (ECHL) to Milwaukee (AHL). BLUES — Assigned G Evan Fitzpatrick from San Antonio (AHL) to Tulsa (ECHL). American Hockey League BRIDGEPORT SOUND — Recalled G Mitch Gillam from Worcester (ECHL). CHICAGO — Assigned D Kevin Lough to Adirondack (ECHL). HERSHEY — Recalled G Parker Milner from South Carolina (ECHL). ROCHESTER — Assigned F Myles Powell to Cincinnati (ECHL). SPRINGFIELD — Recalled F Tony Turgeon from Manchester (ECHL). TORONTO — Assigned D Kristians Rubins to Newfoundland (ECHL). ECHL ATLANTA — Signed F Tyler Howe. GREENVILLE — Released D Kyle Chatham. Claimed F Kevin Miller off waivers from Fort Wayne. INDY — Signed F Brian Morgan. MANCHESTER — Returned D Chris Carlisle to Grand Rapids (AHL). Loaned G Charles Williams to Ontario (AHL). TULSA — Released G Ian Keserich. WORCESTER — Added G Jason San Antonio as emergency backup. COLLEGE HOFSTRA — Named Jamie Franco assistant wrestling coach.

COLLEGES Area basketball schedule FRIDAY W: SWIC vs. Independence, in Moberly, 1 p.m. M: Lindenwood vs. Azusa Pacific, in Anaheim, Calif., 3:30 p.m. W: SE Illinois at Maryville, 5:30 p.m. (exh.) W: Westminster at SIU C’dale, 6 p.m. (exh.) W: Jefferson at Rend Lake, 6 p.m. M: McKendree at Northwestern, 7 p.m. (exh.) W: Missouri Baptist vs. William Penn, in Des Moines, Iowa, 8 p.m. SATURDAY M: Lindenwood vs. West Texas A&M, in Anaheim, Calif., 11 a.m. W: Webster at Missouri S&T, 1 p.m. (exh.) M: Lincoln College at LU-Belleville, 3 p.m. M: Gateway Legacy at SW Illinois, 3 p.m. W: Missouri Baptist vs. Grand View,

POSTSEASON SCOREBOARD MISSOURI GIRLS VOLLEYBALL

Grindstaff, Tanner Walton and Caleb Dameron were successful in a 3-2 penalty kick session. The Indians will play De Smet (19-3-2) in a sectional Tuesday. De Smet beat Pattonville 1-0 to claim the District 2 championship. “That was one of the most fun games I’ve been a part of,” Northwest coach David Willis said. “It reminded me of our 2013 district champion game against Eureka and it went to penalty kicks and we rung a couple off the post in penalty kicks that game too and we came back the next season and won the district championship. That was a talking point tonight.” De Smet 1, Pattonville 0 • A goal by senior forward Avi Wesseh with eight minutes left made the difference as the Spartans held off Pattonville 1-0 to win the Class 4 District 2 championship. Parkway Central 2, St. Charles 1 • Senior Camden Dunne scored the gamewinning goal in overtime as Central, the defending Class 3 state champion, earned the win. Holt 2, Timberland 0 • Senior forward Clayton Waple scored a first half goal and Sam Rowan added an insurance goal in the second to push the Indians to the Class 4 District 5 title. Windsor 2, Hillsboro 1 (OT) • Tanner Berry’s goal seven minutes into overtime propelled the Owls to victory. Liberty 5, Borgia 0 • Senior midfielder Alex Meyer scored the first goal and Liberty (16-9) rolled from there to the Class 3 District 8 title. Jim Faasen, Steve Overbey, Brian Webster, David Kvidahl and Joe Harris contributed to this report

in Des Moines, Iowa, 4 p.m. W: Southwestern Illinois at Moberly, 5 p.m. W: LU-Belleville at Central Methodist, 7 p.m. SUNDAY M: Lindenwood vs. Embry-Riddle, in Anaheim, Calif., 11 a.m. W: Lincoln at Missouri State, 2 p.m. (exh.)

Area results Men’s soccer, SLIAC semifinal • Webster 0, Greenville 0 (2OT), Greenville advances 3-2 on PKs Men’s basketball Missouri Baptist 84, Culver-Stockton 79

Thursday’s college football Northern Illinois 36, Akron 26 Ohio 59, Western Michigan 14 No. 9 Central Florida 52, Temple 40

Friday’s college football East • Penn (5-2) at Cornell (3-4), 5 p.m. South Pittsburgh (4-4) at Virginia (6-2), 6:30 p.m. W. Kentucky (1-7) at Middle Tennessee (5-3), 7 p.m. Far West • Colorado (5-3) at Arizona (4-5), 9:30 p.m.

GOLF PGA | Shriners Open Thursday | Las Vegas Purse: $7M | Yards: 7,255 | Par: 71 (35-36) Partial First Round Peter Uihlein 30-33 — 63 Seth Reeves 33-31 — 64 Harold Varner III 34-31 — 65 Robert Streb 33-32 — 65 Jordan Spieth 33-33 — 66 Bryson DeChambeau 34-32 — 66 Si Woo Kim 35-31 — 66 Whee Kim 34-32 — 66 Sebastian Munoz 35-31 — 66 Sam Ryder 33-33 — 66 Abraham Ancer 33-33 — 66 Lucas Glover 34-33 — 67 Martin Laird 30-37 — 67 Kevin Tway 32-35 — 67 J.J. Spaun 36-31 — 67 Jose de Jesus Rodriguez 35-32 — 67 Scott Stallings 32-35 — 67 D.J. Trahan 33-35 — 68 Alex Prugh 34-34 — 68 Hudson Swafford 34-34 — 68 Danny Lee 35-33 — 68 Kevin Dougherty 36-32 — 68 Vaughn Taylor 34-34 — 68 Matt Jones 33-35 — 68 James Hahn 36-32 — 68 Webb Simpson 34-34 — 68 Rickie Fowler 36-32 — 68 Matt Kuchar 32-36 — 68 Jason Dufner 35-33 — 68 John Senden 36-33 — 69 Cameron Champ 35-34 — 69 Rod Pampling 33-36 — 69 Patrick Cantlay 35-34 — 69 Chris Stroud 35-34 — 69 Chesson Hadley 36-33 — 69 Scott Piercy 35-34 — 69 Scott Brown 35-34 — 69 Ollie Schniederjans 35-34 — 69 Beau Hossler 36-33 — 69 Roberto Diaz 36-33 — 69 Joaquin Niemann 34-35 — 69 Patrick Rodgers 35-34 — 69 Kevin Na 37-32 — 69 Tony Finau 35-34 — 69 Gary Woodland 36-33 — 69 Ryan Blaum 36-33 — 69 J.T. Poston 33-36 — 69 Chris Kirk 34-35 — 69 Josh Teater 35-35 — 70 Dominic Bozzelli 34-36 — 70 Brandon Hagy 34-36 — 70 Brandon Harkins 35-35 — 70 Curtis Luck 32-38 — 70 Davis Love III 34-36 — 70 Steve Marino 35-35 — 70 Anirban Lahiri 37-33 — 70 Roberto Castro 32-38 — 70 Cameron Davis 34-36 — 70 Kevin Streelman 35-35 — 70 Graeme McDowell 36-34 — 70 Scott Langley 38-32 — 70 Rory Sabbatini 37-33 — 70 Peter Malnati 35-35 — 70 Nick Watney 36-34 — 70 Richy Werenski 37-33 — 70 Michael Kim 34-36 — 70 Kelly Kraft 35-35 — 70 Harris English 36-35 — 71 Jason Kokrak 36-35 — 71 Satoshi Kodaira 33-38 — 71 Cody Gribble 39-32 — 71 Austin Cook 37-34 — 71 Jim Furyk 34-37 — 71 Ryan Palmer 34-37 — 71 Kyoung-Hoon Lee 36-35 — 71 Wes Roach 35-36 — 71 Kyle Jones 35-36 — 71

-8 -7 -6 -6 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 E E E E E E E E E E

Jonas Blixt Mackenzie Hughes Kevin Stadler Jhonattan Vegas Joel Dahmen Denny McCarthy Alex Cejka Wesley Bryan Aaron Wise Anders Albertson Martin Trainer Doug Ghim Nick Taylor Troy Merritt Brice Garnett Brendan Steele Hunter Mahan Shawn Stefani Sangmoon Bae Kenny Perry Freddie Jacobson Tyler Duncan Grayson Murray Ryan Moore Trey Mullinax Brian Gay John Huh Tom Hoge Carlos Ortiz Nick Hardy Russell Henley Seamus Power Shintaro Ban Brian Stuard Preston Otte

37-34 37-34 37-34 35-36 37-34 37-34 40-32 34-38 35-37 36-36 36-36 38-34 37-35 38-34 35-37 34-38 36-37 35-38 35-38 37-36 36-37 38-35 36-37 36-37 36-38 37-37 39-35 37-37 38-37 35-40 37-38 36-39 37-39 39-37 45-40

LEADERBOARD 1. Peter Uihlein 2. Seth Reeves 3. Harold Varner III 3. Robert Streb 5. Jordan Spieth 5. Bryson DeChambeau 5. Si Woo Kim 5. Whee Kim 5. Sebastian Munoz 5. Sam Ryder 5. Abraham Ancer 12. Lucas Glover 12. Martin Laird 12. Kevin Tway 12. J.J. Spaun 12. Jose de Jesus Rodriguez 12. Scott Stallings 12. Wyndham Clark

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71 E 71 E 71 E 71 E 71 E 71 E 72 +1 72 +1 72 +1 72 +1 72 +1 72 +1 72 +1 72 +1 72 +1 72 +1 73 +2 73 +2 73 +2 73 +2 73 +2 73 +2 73 +2 73 +2 74 +3 74 +3 74 +3 74 +3 75 +4 75 +4 75 +4 75 +4 76 +5 76 +5 85 +14

PAR -8 -7 -6 -6 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4

THRU F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F 15

Euro | Turkish Airlines Open Thursday | Antalya, Turkey Purse: $7 million | Yards: 7,159 | Par: 71 (34-37) First Round Paul Dunne, Ireland Thorbjorn Olesen, Denmark Padraig Harrington, Ireland Justin Rose, England Lee Westwood, England Kiradech Aphibarnrat, Thailand Martin Kaymer, Germany Sam Horsfield, England Haotong Li, China Thomas Detry, Belgium Ashun Wu, China Matt Wallace, England Jason Scrivener, Australia Danny Willett, England Julian Suri, United States Chris Paisley, England Erik van Rooyen, South Africa Alexander Levy, France Gavin Green, Malaysia Shane Lowry, Ireland Tommy Fleetwood, England Tapio Pulkkanen, Finland Darren Fichardt, South Africa Adrian Otaegui, Spain Pablo Larrazabal, Spain Andrea Pavan, Italy

32-32 31-34 30-35 30-35 31-35 31-35 33-33 30-36 31-35 31-35 31-35 32-35 33-34 32-35 32-35 32-35 33-34 31-36 33-34 32-36 32-36 33-35 33-35 32-36 33-35 34-34

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SOCCER USL playoffs

MICDS’ Kate Oliver looks for an open shot against Cor Jesu during a 40th Midwest Tournament field hockey semifinal Thursday at SportPort Athletic Complex in Maryland Heights. Please see story on STLhighschoolsports.com.

64 65 65 65 66 66 66 66 66 66 66 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 68 68 68 68 68 68 68

STATE TOURNAMENTS At Show Me Center, Cape Girardeau Friday’s pool play schedule — Class 4 St. Teresa’s (25-7) vs Willard (32-4), 4 p.m. Eureka (29-8-1) vs Lafayette (30-5-1), 4 p.m. Willard vs Eureka, 6 p.m. St. Teresa’s vs Lafayette, 6 p.m. Willard vs Lafayette, 8 p.m. Eureka vs St. Teresa’s, 8 p.m. — Class 3 Pleasant Hill (27-10-1) vs LoganRogersville (36-2) , 3 p.m. Borgia (26-7-1) vs Lutheran South (23-9-5), 3 p.m. Logan-Rogersville vs Borgia, 5 p.m. Pleasant Hill vs Lutheran South, 5 p.m. Logan-Rogersville vs Lutheran South, 7 p.m. Borgia vs Pleasant Hill, 7 p.m. — Class 2 St. Michael the Archangel vs Mountain View-Liberty, 10 a.m. Hermann vs Arcadia Valley, 10 a.m. Mountain View-Liberty at Hermann, noon St. Michael the Archangel vs Arcadia Valley, noon Mountain View-Liberty vs Arcadia Valley, 2 p.m. St. Michael the Archangel vs Hermann, 2 p.m. Saturday’s schedule — Class 4 3rd Place: 6 p.m. Championship: 7:30 p.m. — Class 3 3rd Place: 3 p.m. Championship: 4:30 p.m. — Class 2 3rd Place: Noon Championship: 1:30 p.m.

ILLINOIS GIRLS VOLLEYBALL SUPER-SECTIONALS (Friday) — Class 3A Civic Memorial Mount Zion (29-10) vs Althoff (35-4), 7 p.m. — Class 1A Okawville Grayville (26-9) vs Father McGivney (23-12), 6 p.m.

FIELD HOCKEY 40TH MIDWEST TOURNAMENT At SportPort Athletic Complex Semifinals, Thursday Villa Duchesne 2, Kirkwood 0 MICDS 4, Cor Jesu 2 Championship, Saturday MICDS (21-5) vs Villa Duchesne (21-5-1), 1 p.m.

ILLINOIS BOYS SOCCER STATE TOURNAMENTS At Hoffman Estates HS Semifinals, Friday — Class 3A Naperville North (18-4-2) vs Lake Park (21-3-3), 5 p.m. Collinsville (19-5-2) vs Libertyville (21-0), 7 p.m. — Class 2A Crystal Lake South (20-2-3) vs Gibault (17-4-5), 1 p.m.

Conference Semifinals HOME-AND-HOME EASTERN CONFERENCE | First leg Sunday: New York at Columbus Sunday: Atlanta at New York City FC WESTERN CONFERENCE | First leg Sunday: Sporting KC at Real Salt Lake Sunday: Seattle at Portland EASTERN CONFERENCE | Second leg Sunday, Nov. 11: D.C. United or Columbus at New York Sunday, Nov. 11: New York City FC at Atlanta WESTERN CONFERENCE | Second leg Thursday, Nov. 8: Los Angeles FC or Portland at Seattle Sunday, Nov. 11: Portland or Real Salt Lake at Sporting K.C.

Champions League (Home teams listed first) FIRST ROUND • Top two per group advance GROUP A GP W D L GF GA Pts Borussia Dortmund 3 2 0 0 8 0 9 Atletico Madrid 3 2 0 1 5 6 6 Monaco 3 0 1 2 2 6 1 Club Brugge 3 0 1 2 2 5 1 Tuesday Monaco vs. Club Brugge, 11:55 a.m. Atletico Madrid vs. Borussia Dortmund, 2 p.m. GROUP B GP W D L GF GA Pts Barcelona 3 3 0 0 10 2 9 Inter Milan 3 2 0 1 4 4 6 Tottenham 3 0 1 2 5 8 1 PSV Eindhoven 3 0 1 2 3 8 1 Tuesday Inter Milan vs. Barcelona, 2 p.m. Tottenham vs. PSV Eindhoven, 2 p.m. GROUP C GP W D L GF GA Pts Liverpool 3 2 0 1 7 3 6 Napoli 3 1 2 0 3 2 5 Paris Saint-Germain 3 1 1 1 10 6 4 Red Star Belgrade 3 0 1 2 1 10 1 Tuesday Red Star Belgrade vs. Liverpool, 11:55 a.m. Napoli vs. Paris Saint-Germain, 2 p.m. GROUP D GP W D L GF GA Pts Porto 3 2 1 0 5 2 7 Schalke 3 1 2 0 2 1 5 Galatasaray 3 1 1 1 3 1 4 Lokomotiv Moscow 3 0 0 3 1 7 0 Tuesday Porto vs. Lokomotiv Moscow, 2 p.m. Schalke vs. Galatasaray, 2 p.m. GROUP E GP W D L GF GA Pts Ajax Amsterdam 3 2 1 0 5 1 7 Bayern Munich 3 2 1 0 5 1 7 Benfica 3 1 0 2 3 5 3 AEK Athens 3 0 0 3 2 8 0 Wednesday Bayern vs. AEK Athens, 2 p.m. Benfica vs. Ajax Amsterdam, 2 p.m. GROUP F GP W D L GF GA Pts Manchester City 3 2 0 1 6 3 6 Lyon 3 1 2 0 7 6 5 Hoffenheim 3 0 2 1 6 7 2 Shaktar Donetsk 3 0 2 1 4 7 2 Wednesday Bayern Munich vs. AEK Athens, 2 p.m. Benfica vs. Ajax Amsterdam, 2 p.m. GROUP G GP W D L GF GA Pts Roma 3 2 0 1 8 3 6 Real Madrid 3 2 0 1 5 2 6 CSKA Moscow 3 1 1 1 3 5 4 Viktoria Plzen 3 0 1 2 3 9 1 Wednesday CSKA Moscow vs. Roma, 11:55 a.m. Viktoria Plzen vs. Real Madrid, 2 p.m. GROUP H GP W D L GF GA Pts Juventus 3 3 0 0 6 0 9 Manchester United 2 1 1 1 3 1 4 Valencia 3 0 2 1 1 3 2 Young Boys Bern 3 0 1 2 1 7 1 Wednesday Valencia vs. Young Boys Bern, 11:55 a.m. Juventus vs. Manchester United, 2 p.m.

Eastern Conference final Saturday New York at Louisville, 6:30 p.m.

Western Conference final Saturday Phoenix at Orange County, 9 p.m.

Championship Conference finals winners, 7 p.m., Nov. 8

MLS playoffs Knockout Round Wednesday New York City FC 3, Philadelphia 1 Portland 2, FC Dallas 1 Thursday Columbus 2, D.C. United 2, Columbus wins on penalty kicks 3-2 Real Salt Lake 3, Los Angeles FC 2

COLLEGE BASKETBALL SCHEDULES ST. LOUIS U. MEN Tue. 11/6 vs. SEMO, 7 p.m. Sat. 11/10 vs. Troy, 7 p.m. Tue. 11/13 vs. North Alabama, 7 p.m. Sat. 11/17 at Seton Hall, 7 p.m. Wed. 11/21 vs. Pitt. (Brooklyn), 11 a.m. Sat. 11/24 vs. Central Arkansas, 3 p.m. Sat. 12/1 vs. Butler, 4 p.m. Wed. 12/5 at SIU Carbondale, 7 p.m. Sun. 12/9 vs. Oregon St., 2:30 p.m. Sun. 12/16 at Houston, 2 p.m. Wed. 12/19 vs. N.C. Central, 7 p.m. Sat. 12/22 at Florida St., 1:30 p.m. Sun. 12/30 vs. Appalachian St., 2 p.m. Sun. 1/6 vs. Rhode Island, 3 p.m.

Chicago St. Ignatius (16-7) vs Peoria Notre Dame (22-2), 3 p.m.

MISSOURI BOYS SOCCER DISTRICT TOURNAMENTS (Thursday except where noted) — Class 4 District 1 Jackson 2, Northwest Cedar Hill 1 (PKs) — Class 4 District 2 De Smet 1, Pattonville 0 — Class 4 District 3 Marquette 3, Parkway South 1 — Class 4 District 5 Holt 2, Timberland 0 — Class 4 District 6 CBC 2, Vianney 0 — Class 4 District 8 Fort Zumwalt West 1, Francis Howell 0 (OT) — Class 3 District 2 Windsor 2, Hillsboro 1 (OT) — Class 3 District 3 At Gateway STEM Webster Groves 3, St. Mary’s 0 — Class 3 District 4 At Westminster Priory (16-6) vs Summit (20-3-1), 4 p.m. Friday — Class 3 District 6 Parkway Central 2, St. Charles 1 (OT) — Class 3 District 7 Fort Zumwalt South 2, St. Dominic 0 — Class 3 District 8 Liberty 5, Borgia 0 STATE TOURNAMENTS — Class 4 Sectionals, Tuesday De Smet (19-3-2) at Jackson (8-2-2), 6 p.m. Tuesday. Marquette (19-3) at Oakville (12-13) Rock Bridge (16-5-1) at Ozark (23-3) Joplin (9-16) at Lee’s Summit (19-1) Holt (19-4-2) at CBC (21-2-2) Chaminade (23-5) at Fort Zumwalt West (15-11) Blue Springs South (13-9) at Rockhurst (17-6-1) Liberty North (13-11) at Park Hill (14-9) — Class 3 Sectionals, Tuesday Farmington (15-3) at Windsor (14-11-1) Webster Groves (12-11-1) at Summit (20-3-1) Rolla (16-9-1) at Glendale (18-7), 6 p.m. Parkview (13-14) at Neosho (12-10-1) Ladue (15-10) at Parkway Central (18-6-2), 6 p.m. Fort Zumwalt South (17-9) at Liberty (16-9), 6 p.m. Helias (18-7) at Harrisonville (20-5-2) Van Horn (23-2) at Kearney (17-4) — Class 2 Quarterfinals, Saturday John Burroughs (15-6-1) at Cape Notre Dame (13-8-3), 1 p.m. Monett (21-5) at Southern Boone (20-4), 1 p.m. St. Charles West (23-1) at O’Fallon Christian (14-10), 4 p.m. Pembroke Hill (11-8) at St. Pius X KC (8-9-2), 1 p.m.

Wed. 1/9 Sat. 1/12 Tue. 1/15 Fri. 1/18 Wed. 1/23 Sat. 1/26 Wed. 1/30 Sat. 2/2 Tue. 2/5 Fri. 2/8 Wed. 2/13 Sat. 2/16 Sat. 2/23 Tue. 2/26 Sat. 3/2 Wed. 3/6 Sat. 3/9

vs. Massachusetts, 8 p.m. at La Salle, 5 p.m. at Fordham, 6 p.m. vs. St. Joseph’s, 6 p.m. at Duquesne, 7 p.m. vs. Davidson, 1 p.m. vs. Richmond, 6 p.m. at Rhode Island, 3 p.m. vs. Dayton, 8 p.m. at St. Joseph’s, 6 p.m. at George Wash., 5:30 p.m. vs. La Salle, 4 p.m. at Dayton, 3 p.m. at VCU, 6:30 p.m. vs. George Mason, 2 p.m. vs. Duquesne, 7 p.m. at St. Bonaventure, 12 p.m.

ST. LOUIS U. WOMEN Fri. 11/9 at Eastern Kentucky, 11 a.m. Tue. 11/13 vs. Indiana St., 4:30 p.m. Sun. 11/18 vs. Cincinnati, 2 p.m. Tue. 11/20 at Tulsa, 7 p.m. Sat. 11/24 vs. Chattanooga (Va.), 3:30 p.m. Sun. 11/25 at Virginia, 2:30 p.m. Thu. 11/29 vs. SIU Carbondale, 7 p.m. Sat. 12/1 vs. SIU Edwardsville, 7 p.m. Tue. 12/4 vs. Connecticut, 6 p.m. Sun. 12/9 vs. Missouri, 5 p.m. Thu. 12/20 at Illinois St., 11 a.m. Fri. 12/28 vs. Yale (Florida), 1:30 p.m. Sat. 12/29 vs. TBA (Florida), TBA Sun. 1/6 at UMass, 1 p.m. Wed. 1/9 at St. Joseph’s, 10:30 a.m. Sun. 1/13 vs. Fordham, 3 p.m. Wed. 1/16 vs. Rhode Island, 7 p.m. Sun. 1/20 at St. Bonaventure, 12 p.m. Wed. 1/23 vs. Dayton, 11 a.m. Sun. 1/27 at VCU, 12 p.m. Thu. 1/31 vs. George Mason, 7 p.m. Sun. 2/3 vs. George Washington, 1 p.m. Wed. 2/6 at Fordham, 6 p.m. Sun. 2/10 vs. La Salle, 2 p.m. Wed. 2/13 at Duquesne, 10 a.m. Sun. 2/17 vs. Richmond, 2 p.m. Sat. 2/23 at Davidson, 1 p.m. Wed. 2/27 vs. VCU, 7 p.m. Sat. 3/2 at Dayton, 1 p.m. MIZZOU MEN Tue. 11/6 vs. Central Arkansas, 7 p.m. Fri. 11/9 at Iowa St., 6 p.m. Fri. 11/16 vs. Kennesaw St. (USVI), 2 p.m. Sun. 11/18 vs. TBA (USVI), TBA Mon. 11/19 vs. TBA (USVI), TBA Tue. 11/27 vs. Temple, 8 p.m. Sun. 12/2 vs. UCF, 2 p.m. Tue. 12/4 vs. UT Arlington, 7 p.m. Fri. 12/7 vs. Oral Roberts, 6 p.m. Tue. 12/18 vs. Xavier, 6 p.m. Sat. 12/22 vs. Illinois (St. Louis), 7 p.m. Sat. 12/29 vs. Morehead St., 1 p.m. Tue. 1/8 vs. Tennessee, 6 p.m. Sat. 1/12 at South Carolina, 12 p.m. Wed. 1/16 vs. Alabama, 8 p.m. Sat. 1/19 at Texas A&M, 2:30 p.m. Wed. 1/23 at Arkansas, 8 p.m. Sat. 1/26 vs. LSU, 5 p.m. Wed. 1/30 at Auburn, 7:30 p.m. Sat. 2/2 vs. Vanderbilt, 7:30 p.m. Tue. 2/5 at Tennessee, 8 p.m. Sat. 2/9 vs. Texas A&M, 5 p.m. Tue. 2/12 vs. Arkansas, 8 p.m. Sat. 2/16 at Mississippi, 2:30 p.m. Tue. 2/19 vs. Kentucky, 8 p.m. Sat. 2/23 at Florida, 3 p.m. Tue. 2/26 at Mississippi St., 6 p.m. Sat. 3/2 vs. South Carolina, 2:30 p.m. Wed. 3/6 at Georgia, 5:30 p.m. Sat. 3/9 vs. Mississippi, 2:30 p.m. MIZZOU WOMEN Tue. 11/6 at Western Illinois, 8 p.m. Tue. 11/13 vs. Missouri St., 7 p.m. Fri. 11/16 vs. Green Bay, 6 p.m. Mon. 11/19 vs. SIU Edwardsville, 7 p.m. Fri. 11/23 vs. Michigan (Fla.), 6:30 p.m. Sat. 11/24 vs. TBA (Florida), TBA Sun. 11/25 vs. TBA (Florida), TBA Sun. 12/2 at West Virginia, 4 p.m. Thu. 12/6 vs. UMKC, 7 p.m. Sun. 12/9 at St. Louis U., 5 p.m. Sat. 12/15 vs. South Dakota, 3 p.m. Mon. 12/17 vs. Texas St., 7 p.m. Fri. 12/21 at Illinois, 12 p.m. Sun. 12/30 vs. Arkansas St., 2 p.m. Thu. 1/3 vs. Mississippi, 7 p.m. Sun. 1/6 at Tennessee, 1 p.m. Thu. 1/10 vs. Arkansas, 7 p.m. Sun. 1/13 at Florida, 2 p.m. Thu. 1/17 vs. Georgia, 6 p.m. Mon. 1/21 at South Carolina, 6 p.m. Thu. 1/24 at Kentucky, 5:30 p.m. Sun. 1/27 vs. Auburn, 2 p.m. Mon. 2/4 at LSU, 6 p.m. Thu. 2/7 vs. Texas A&M, 6 p.m. Sun. 2/10 vs. Vanderbilt, 3 p.m. Thu. 2/14 at Mississippi St., 8 p.m. Sun. 2/17 vs. Tennessee, 4 p.m. Sun. 2/24 at Auburn, 2 p.m. Thu. 2/28 at Arkansas, 8 p.m. Sun. 3/3 vs. Alabama, 2 p.m.


STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

11.02.2018 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C9

FOOTBALL • WEEK 11 SPOTLIGHT

Lutheran St. Charles ready for rematch

That was his first season at defensive end. A year later, he’s become one of the top sophomores in the area. He has racked up 82 tackles and 11 tackles for loss to go with his record-breaking sack total. “I just worked hard in the offseason. Last year was my first year playing (defensive end) so I didn’t know that many moves. This year I know a lot,” Travion Ford said. “I started getting sacks like crazy.” There won’t be many sack opportunities against St. Charles West. The Warriors operate with a run-heavy offense that has piled up the yards and the points. Four players have at least 57 rushing at-

tempts. Junior running back Jamesen Reece has rushed for 948 yards and 13 touchdowns. Sophomore quarterback Dominic Flint has 906 rushing yards and 10 touchdowns. Senior running back Joey Echele has 744 rushing yards and 10 touchdowns. Flint has completed 36 of his 52 pass attempts for 595 yards, five touchdowns and one interception. St. Charles West is going to ground and pound all night long. Travion Ford and the other Cougars are ready for it. “They have some big guys up front. They’ve been running that offense and defense for years. They run it effectively,” Harris said. “They have a lot of good things going on over there. We’re going to try and play chess with them, not checkers.” Lutheran St. Charles knows a thing or two about pounding the rock. The Cougars lean on senior running back Anthony Heard III and freshman running back Arlen Harris Jr. Heard has powered his way to 1,034 yards and 16 touchdowns. Harris Jr. has 1,017 yards and 19 touchdowns. “Our linemen keep doing what they’re doing, opening up holes, it leaves opportunities for me and Arlen Harris Jr. to put points up on the board,” Heard said. That’s something the Cougars didn’t do last season against the Warriors. Lutheran St. Charles feels its offseason prepared it for this rematch. The Cougars are confident they will walk off that field with a different result this time around. “Our motto is we play five quarters no matter what. We play through the fourth quarter,” Heard said. “If we’re getting blown out it doesn’t matter we’re going to keep giving all our heart because that’s what champions do.”

but returned against Lutheran North. He rushed for 83 yards and a touchdown against Parkway South. On the season, he leads Chaminade with 622 rushing yards and has four touchdowns. Ten players have caught at least one touchdown pass. Senior Douglas Agnew has a team-best 28 receptions for 482 yards and five touchdowns. On Mehlville: Will play its first postseason home game since it beat St. Louis U. High in November of 2007 on its way to a Class 6 runner-up finish. Lost its last two meetings with Chaminade in 2014 and 2015. Won its last five regular season games. ...Offense relies on power rush attack. Five players have rushed 32 or more times. Junior running back Steven Haverstick has 474 yards and seven touchdowns. Senior Jai’ryn Pruitt has 269 yards and five touchdowns. Junior running back Will McCaine has 340 yards and five touchdowns. Junior quarterback Evan Robertson has completed 24 of 64 passes for 541 yards, 10 touchdowns and been intercepted three times. Pruitt has a team-high nine receptions for 261 yards and four scores. ...Senior linebacker Ibrahima Sy has 78 tackles and four sacks. Senior defensive tackle Tyler Hemmelgarn has 68 tackles. Senior defensive back Pierre Baker has 33 tackles and four interceptions. PARKWAY NORTH VIKINGS at MICDS RAMS What: Class 4 District 3 semifinal When: 1 p.m. Saturday Seeds, records: No. 4 Parkway North 6-4; No. 2 MICDS 9-1 Next week: Winner of Hazelwood East-Jennings in district championship Last week: Parkway North 56, Riverview Gardens 6; MICDS 42, McClueer 0 On Parkway North: Will play MICDS for the first time since at least 1999. Rallied to win six of its last seven games after losing its first three to Class 6 opponents Marquette, Pattonville and Class 5 Jackson. Longtime coach Bob Bunton announced in September this season would be his last with the program. ...Senior quarterback Cameron Foster has thrown for 1,276 yards, 16 touchdowns and three interceptions. Junior running back Nate Perkins has 786 rushing yards and eight touchdowns. Senior receiver and Missouri recruit CJ Boone has 30 recepetions for 613 yards and eight touchdowns. Senior receiver Jalani Williams has 20 receptions for 254 yards and four touchdowns. On MICDS: Posted fourth shutout of the season in last week’s win over McCluer. Finished with the best regular season record for the program since its Class 4 runner-up finish in 2011. Only loss this season was 21-20 to Lutheran North. Has advanced to the district championship game in back-to-back

seasons. ...Senior athlete Graham Bundy Jr. has scored a team-best 13 total touchdowns. He’s rushed for 457 yards and eight scores and caught 18 passes for 387 yards for three touchdowns. Bundy Jr. also has scored two return touchdowns. Senior running back Tyler Purdy has rushed for 654 yards and seven touchdowns. Freshman quarterback Reagan Andrew has rushed for 277 yards and seven touchdowns. He’s completed 55 of 113 passes for 1,008 yards, 11 touchdowns and been intercepted four times. Sophomore athlete Crawford Bundy has 12 receptions for 255 yards and four touchdowns. Purdy has 15 catches for 225 yards and three touchdowns. ...Senior linebacker Henry Carpenter has 117 tackles and three sacks. JENNINGS WARRIORS at HAZELWOOD EAST SPARTANS What: Class 4 District 3 semifinal When: 1 p.m. Saturday Seeds, records: No. 4 Jennings 7-3; No. 1 Hazelwood East 7-3 Next week: Winner of MICDS-Parkway North in district championship Last week: Jennings 26, Clayton 7; Hazelwood East 50, University City 6 On Jennings: Completed turnaround from last season’s 1-9 record with its first playoff win since 2014 last week. ...Juniors Markel Atkinson and Tyree Donelson split time at quarterback. They have combined to throw for 879 yards, 14 touchdowns and seven interceptions. Senior running back Anthony Boyland Jr. has rushed for 723 yards and eight touchdowns. Senior running back Daylen Shepherd has rushed for 493 yards and seven touchdowns while junior Stacey Taylor has rushed for 454 yards and six touchdowns. Senior receiver James Moore has 11 receptions for 348 yards and five touchdowns. Senior receiver Jordan Cummings has 18 receptions for 264 yards and three touchdowns. ...Taylor has 21 sacks, 91 tackles and five fumble recovers at defensive end. On Hazelwood East: Has won at least one postseason game for the fourth consecutive season. Will play Jennings for the first time since at least 1999. ...Senior quarterback Torre Dyson has thrown for 1,484 yards, 17 touchdowns and eight interceptions. Rushed for seven touchdowns as well. Senior running back Maurice Chavers has rushed for 462 yards and six touchdowns. Freshman running back Armon Hill has rushed for 278 yards and four scores. Senior receiver Jar’vion Hardimon has caught 32 passes for 642 yards and nine touchdowns. Junior receiver Jesse White has 23 receptions for 405 yards and six touchdowns. Dave Kvidahl, STLhighschoolsports.com

Mark Twain (5-5) at Westran (8-2), 7 p.m. Lockwood (6-4) at Adrian (9-1), 7 p.m. Liberal (4-6) at Greenfield (6-4), 7 p.m. Windsor (Sedalia) (7-3) at Cass Midway (10-0), 7 p.m. Cole Camp (6-4) at Lincoln (9-1), 7 p.m. North Platte (3-7) at Wellington-Napoleon (7-3), 7 p.m. Mid-Buchanan (6-4) at East Buchanan (8-2), 7 p.m. Hamilton (7-3) at Milan (10-0), 7 p.m. Gallatin (8-2) at Marceline (9-1), 7 p.m.

Sterling (9-1) at Chicago Brooks (7-3), 1 p.m. Wheaton St. Francis (8-2) at Rockford Boylan (9-1), 1 p.m. Decatur MacArthur (7-3) at Country Club Hills (Hillcrest) (10-0), 3 p.m. Carbondale (8-2) at Cahokia (9-1), 3 p.m. Mattoon (7-3) at Highland (10-0), 4 p.m. Marion (7-3) at Joliet Catholic (6-4), 5 p.m. — CLASS 4A Second Round IC Catholic (10-0) at Stillman Valley (7-3), 1 p.m. Marengo (8-2) vs Chicago Urban Prep-Bronzeville (9-1) at Gately Stadium, 4:30 p.m. Coal City (9-1) at Johnsburg (7-3), 1 p.m. Genoa-Kingston (8-2) at Richmond-Burton (9-1), 1 p.m. Columbia (8-2) at Taylorville (10-0), 5 p.m. Pontiac (9-1) at Rochester (9-1), 5:30 p.m. Paris, Illinois (10-0) at Effingham (8-2), 2 p.m. Murphysboro (8-2) at Kankakee (McNamara) (9-1), 3 p.m. — CLASS 3A Second Round Byron (10-0) at Princeton (7-3), 1 p.m. North Boone (8-2) at Lisle (9-1), 7 p.m. Friday Herscher (6-4) at Spring Valley (Hall) (7-3), 1 p.m. Monmouth-Roseville (8-2) at Eureka, Illinois (9-1), 5 p.m. Anna-Jonesboro (8-2) at Monticello (10-0), 3 p.m. Greenville (7-3) at Pleasant Plains (7-3), 2 p.m. Carlinville (10-0) at Paxton-Buckley-Loda (7-3), 2 p.m. Williamsville (9-1) at Fairfield (10-0), 1 p.m. — CLASS 2A Second Round Chicago Hope (8-2) at Gibson City (10-0), 2 p.m. Newman Central Catholic (9-1) at Illini West (10-0), 2 p.m. Orion (10-0) at Taylor Ridge Rockridge (7-3), 1 p.m. Lanark (Eastland) (10-0) at Chicago Christian (7-3), 3:30 p.m. Decatur St. Teresa (10-0) at Athens (8-2), 2 p.m. Pana (9-1) at Downs Tri-Valley (6-4), 1 p.m. Maroa-Forsyth (10-0) at Chester (7-3), 1 p.m. Bismarck-Henning (9-1) at Tuscola (9-1), 2 p.m. — CLASS 1A Second Round Princeville (10-0) at Aurora Christian (7-3), 4 p.m. Chicago Orr (9-1) at Lena-Winslow (9-1), 1 p.m. Ottawa Marquette (10-0) at Dakota (7-3), 2 p.m. Forreston (8-2) at Milledgeville (10-0), 3 p.m. Fisher (8-2) at Argenta-Oreana (10-0), 1 p.m. Central A&M (7-3) at Albion Edwards County (7-3), 2 p.m. Camp Point Central (9-1) at Carrollton (7-3), 1 p.m. Arcola (8-2) at Triopia (9-1), 2 p.m.

BY DAVID KVIDAHL STLhighschoolsports.com

ST. PETERS • Same place. Same round.

Same programs. The Lutheran St. Charles football team believes the result will be different. When the Cougars step onto the field at St. Charles West’s Steve Stahl Stadium, they’ll be out to prove just how different. “This one carries a little extra weight. Last year, I don’t know what happened. We just lost,” Lutheran St. Charles sophomore defensive end Travion Ford said. “We were not ready last year. This year we’re ready, we’re a better team.” The No. 10 small school in the STLhighschoolsports.com rankings and the No. 3 seed in the Class 3 District 3 tournament, Lutheran St. Charles (8-2) travels to No. 2 seed St. Charles West (7-3) for a district semifinal at 7 p.m. Friday. A year ago in their first meeting since at least 1999, St. Charles West hung a 55-0 loss on Lutheran St. Charles. The Warriors steamrolled the Cougars for their worst loss to any opponent not named Trinity. It’s the only time the Cougars have been shutout the last two seasons by an opponent not named Trinity. That loss stuck with Lutheran St. Charles. “The guys that got to experience that, it put a sour taste in their mouth,” Lutheran St. Charles coach Arlen Harris said. Getting smashed in their final game of the season played a part in spurring the returning Cougars in the offseason. They got after it for nine months. Now they’re here with the chance to show how much they have improved. “It made me train harder. It made me

RICK ULREICH • Special to STLhighschoolsports.com

Lutheran St. Charles quarterback Aaron Coffey directs his receiver during a game on Oct. 19. The Cougars will face St. Charles West on Friday in a rematch of last year’s district semifinal.

do more to get ready for the next season,” senior defensive back and receiver Robert Ford III said. “We don’t roll like that anymore.” Lutheran St. Charles has been rolling this season. It won its first five games of the season. In its eight wins, no opponent has broken 18 points. Only in its losses to Trinity and St. Clair were the Cougars unable to muzzle the opposing offense. Travion Ford has been a significant factor for that defense. The 6-foot-4, 215-pound defensive end’s 17 sacks this season set a new school record. This after he set the school record for tackle assists in a season and in a game as a freshman.

FOOTBALL • WEEK 11 GAMES TO WATCH KIRKWOOD PIONEERS at EUREKA WILDCATS What: Class 6 District 3 semifinal When: 7 p.m. Friday Seeds, records: No. 4 Kirkwood, 6-3; No. 1 Eureka 9-1 Next week: Winner of Joplin-Lindbergh in district championship Last week: Kirkwood 44, Lafayette 6; Eureka 41, Ozark 7 On Kirkwood: Lost three games in a season for the first time since 2010. Lost a regular-season game to Eureka for the first time. Has won both district championship game meetings in 2015 and 2016. ...Senior quarterback Cooper Wise has thrown for 1,798 yards, 17 touchdowns and four interceptions. He’s rushed for 556 yards and five touchdowns. Senior running back Martez Jones II has rushed for 1,012 yards and 11 touchdowns. Senior receiver Maurice Massey has caught 44 passes for 761 yards and 11 touchdowns. Junior receiver Jairus Maclin has 34 receptions for 648 yards and seven scores. ...Senior defensive end and Missouri recruit Arvell Ferguson Jr. has 55 tackles, seven sacks and 23 tackles for loss. On Eureka: Won first regular season meeting at Kirkwood 42-28 on Oct. 5 as it rallied for 21 fourthquarter points. Broke a two-game losing streak to Kirkwood. ...Sophomore quarterback Carter Davis has thrown for 1,767 yards, 22 touchdowns and two interceptions. Senior quarterback Tyler Kennedy has thrown for 169 yards, four touchdowns and been intercepted once. He’s also rushed for 105 yards and five touchdowns. Junior running back Jhalon Asher-Sanders has rushed for 825 yards and seven touchdowns. Junior running back Teddy Bielecki has rushed for 454 yards and four touchdowns. Senior tight end Avery Taggart has caught 31 passes for 458 yards and 11 touchdowns. Senior receiver Antonio Sanders has 26 receptions for 493 yards and five touchdowns. Junior receiver Zach Valentine returned to action with one catch for nine yards last week against Seckman. Valentine suffered a horrific knee injury last season. PATTONVILLE PIRATES at DE SMET SPARTANS What: Class 6 District 1 semifinal When: 7 p.m. Friday Seeds, records: No. 3 Pattonville 8-2; No. 2 De Smet 8-2 Next week: Winner of CBC-Hazelwood West in district championship Last week: Pattonville 21, Marquette 17; De Smet 49, Ritenour 7 On Pattonville: Class 5 runner up last season

moved into Class 6. Won rematch with Marquette in first round of districts. Won eight of its last nine games with Ladue — the only team to beat it in that stretch. ...Senior running back Sam Sanderson has rushed for 1,236 yards and 23 touchdowns. Senior quarterback Andre Webb has racked up 702 rushing yards and four touchdowns. Webb has completed 65 of 106 passes for 990 yards and nine touchdowns with three interceptions. Senior receiver Reggie Oliphant has 19 receptions for 297 yards and two touchdowns. …Senior linebacker Donovan Prott has 106 tackles, four sacks and six tackles for loss. Senior defensive end Isaiah Wilkes has 38 tackles, three sacks and 14 tackles for loss. Oliphant and junior defensive back Ricky Brooks have three interceptions each. On De Smet: Hosts back-to-back playoff games for the first time since 2010. Spartans have won five in a row after consecutive losses to Metro Catholic Conference rivals CBC and Vianney. Won its last three games against Pattonville, including a pair of postseason games in 2012 and 2013. ...Senior quarterback Nate Martens has completed 96 of 156 passes for 1,638 yards, 18 touchdowns and been intercepted six times. Sophomore running back Darez Snider has rushed for 861 yards and 11 touchdowns. Sophomore running back Taj Butts has rushed for 675 yards and 12 touchdowns. Sophomore receiver Ra’Shod Harvey-Smith has 42 receptions for 555 yards and four touchdowns. Junior receiver Jordan Johnson has 22 receptions for 628 yards and eight touchdowns. Senior receiver Grant Stegman has 16 receptions for 277 yards and four touchdowns. CHAMINADE RED DEVILS at MEHLVILLE PANTHERS What: Class 5 District 2 semifinal When: 7 p.m. Friday Seeds, records: No. 4 Chaminade 5-5; No. 1 Mehlville 7-2 Next week: Winner of Vianney-Parkway West in district championship Last week: Chaminade 62, Parkway South 0; Mehlville was idle On Chaminade: Won first meeting with Parkway South since at least 1999 with largest margin of victory this season. Junior quarterback and Missouri recruit Brady Cook has completed 111 of 205 passes for 1,516 yards, 10 touchdowns and been intercepted 11 times. Three other Chaminade players have thrown touchdown passes. Cook has rushed for 252 yards and five touchdowns. Sophomore running back Amar Johnson has rushed for 569 yards and five touchdowns. Junior running back LJ Fortune missed four weeks with an injury

FOOTBALL • POSTSEASON SCHEDULE MISSOURI — CLASS 6 District semifinals Friday unless noted Hazelwood West (7-3) at CBC (8-1), 7 p.m. Pattonville (8-2) at De Smet (8-2), 7 p.m. Kirkwood (6-3) at Eureka (9-1), 7 p.m. Lindbergh (7-3) at Joplin (8-2), 7 p.m. Francis Howell (7-3) at Rock Bridge (8-2), 7 p.m. Blue Springs (7-3) at Blue Springs South (3-7), 7 p.m. Liberty (KC) (7-3) at Lee’s Summit North (8-2), 7 p.m. Rockhurst (8-2) at Lee’s Summit West (9-1), 7:05 p.m. — CLASS 5 District semifinals Poplar Bluff (5-5) at Jackson (9-0), 7 p.m. Seckman (6-3) at Fox (8-1), 7 p.m. Chaminade (5-5) at Mehlville (7-2), 7 p.m. Parkway West (7-3) at Vianney (6-3), 7 p.m. Glendale (3-7) at Lebanon (7-2), 7 p.m. Waynesville (3-6) at Willard (3-6), 7 p.m. Republic (3-7) at Carthage (8-1), 7 p.m. Nixa (3-6) at Parkview (5-4), 7 p.m. Liberty (Wentzville) (4-6) at Fort Zumwalt North (8-1), 7 p.m. FZ South (4-5) at McCluer North (4-5), 1 p.m. Saturday 21. Smith-Cotton (5-5) at Timberland (7-2), 7 p.m. Holt (4-5) at Battle (5-4), 7 p.m. Belton (3-7) at Raytown (8-1), 7 p.m. William Chrisman (5-5) at Fort Osage (5-4), 7 p.m. Oak Park (4-6) at Staley (7-2), 7 p.m. Park Hill South (2-7) at North Kansas City (8-1), 7 p.m. — CLASS 4 District semifinals Sikeston (5-5) at West Plains (10-0), 7 p.m. Festus (6-4) at Farmington (7-3), 7 p.m. St. Mary’s (5-5) vs Ladue (10-0) at Kirkwood, 7 p.m. Roosevelt (8-2) at Summit (5-5), 7 p.m. Helias (4-6) at Camdenton (9-1), 7 p.m. Rolla (7-3) at Borgia (9-1), 7 p.m. Carl Junction (5-5) at Webb City (10-0), 7 p.m. Marshfield (8-2) at Neosho (7-3), 7 p.m. Jennings (7-3) at Hazelwood East (7-3), 1 p.m. Saturday Parkway North (6-4) at MICDS (9-1), 1 p.m. Saturday Priory (7-3) at Fort Zumwalt East (8-2), 7 p.m. Westminster (6-4) at Hannibal (7-3), 7 p.m. Grandview K.C. (5-5) at Warrensburg (7-3), 7 p.m. Harrisonville (3-7) at Van Horn (7-3), 7 p.m.

Excelsior Springs (8-2) at Platte County (9-1), 7 p.m. Kearney (8-2) at Kirksville (5-5), 7 p.m. — CLASS 3 District semifinals Potosi (5-5) at Kennett (9-1), 7 p.m. Dexter (5-4) at Park Hills Central (5-5), 7 p.m. Miller Career (5-5) at Cardinal Ritter (10-0), 7 p.m. Lutheran South (5-4) at St. Clair (9-1), 7 p.m. Eldon (6-4) at Springfield Catholic (8-2), 7 p.m. St. James (6-4) at Buffalo (8-2), 7 p.m. Seneca (5-5) at Cassville (10-0), 7 p.m. Mount Vernon (9-1) at Reeds Spring (7-3), 7 p.m. McCluer S-B (7-3) vs Trinity (8-2) at O’Fallon Christian, 7 p.m. Luth. St. Charles (8-2) at St. Charles West (7-3), 7 p.m. Mexico (6-4) at Moberly (7-3), 7 p.m. Winfield (7-3) at Southern Boone (8-2), 7 p.m. Pleasant Hill (8-2) at Odessa (10-0), 7 p.m. Hogan Prep (7-2) at Pembroke Hill (10-0), 7 p.m. Chillicothe (5-5) at Maryville (9-1), 7 p.m. St. Pius X (Kansas City) (5-5) at Savannah (7-3), 7 p.m. — CLASS 2 District semifinals St. Pius X (8-2) at Charleston (9-1), 7 p.m. Caruthersville (8-2) at Jefferson (9-1), 7 p.m. Duchesne (2-8) at Lutheran North (7-3), 7 p.m. Lift For Life (9-1) at Principia (5-3), 1 p.m. Saturday Tolton Catholic (4-6) at Blair Oaks (10-0), 7 p.m. North Callaway (7-3) at South Callaway (9-1), 7 p.m. Bowling Green (7-3) at Monroe City (9-1), 7 p.m. Palmyra (7-3) at Clark County (8-2), 7 p.m. Mountain View-Liberty (7-3) at Ava (9-1), 7 p.m. Strafford (9-1) at Fair Grove (7-1-1), 7 p.m. Sarcoxie (7-3) at Lamar (9-1), 7 p.m. Versailles (6-4) at El Dorado Springs (7-2-1), 7 p.m. Knob Noster (7-3) at Summit Christian (8-2), 7 p.m. Lafayette County (6-4) at Holden (7-3), 7 p.m. Macon (8-2) at Lathrop (10-0), 7 p.m. Lexington (9-1) at Lawson (9-1), 7 p.m. — CLASS 1 District semifinals St. Vincent (5-5) at Hayti (10-0), 7 p.m. Scott City (8-2) at Valle Catholic (8-2), 7 p.m. Thayer (6-4) at Pierce City (10-0), 7 p.m. Miller (8-2) at Skyline (7-3), 7 p.m. Slater (4-4) at Fayette (9-1), 7 p.m. Sweet Springs (5-5) at Tipton (5-5), 7 p.m. South Shelby (4-6) at Scotland County (8-2), 7 p.m.

ILLINOIS — CLASS 8A Second Round Saturday unless noted Oak Park-River Forest (8-2) at Brother Rice (10-0), 6 p.m. Hinsdale Central (8-2) at Gurnee Warren (9-1), 7 p.m. Homewood-Flossmoor (9-1) at Barrington (7-3), 1 p.m. Chicago Marist (9-1) at Naperville Central (7-3), 7 p.m. Lincoln-Way East (10-0) at Glenbard West (8-2), 1 p.m. West Aurora (9-1) at Edwardsville (7-3), 5 p.m. Oswego (10-0) at Loyola Academy (7-3), 1 p.m. Maine South (9-1) at Waubonsie Valley (7-3), 1 p.m. — CLASS 7A Second Round Chicago Simeon (10-0) at Lincoln-Way West (8-2), 1 p.m. Hersey (9-1) at Nazareth Academy (9-1), 1 p.m. Moline (9-1) at Batavia (10-0), 1 p.m. Maine West (9-1) at Willowbrook (10-0), 1 p.m. East St. Louis (8-2) at Glenbard East (10-0), 2 p.m. Chicago Mount Carmel (9-1) at Lake Zurich (7-3), 1 p.m. Wheaton Warrenville South (9-1) at Rockton Hononegah (10-0), 3 p.m. Rolling Meadows (10-0) at St. Charles North (7-3), 1 p.m. — CLASS 6A Second Round Kaneland (7-3) at Cary-Grove (10-0), 1 p.m. Chicago Phillips (8-2) vs Prairie Ridge (8-2) at Gately Stadium, 1 p.m. Lake Villa Lakes (8-2) at Antioch (10-0), 1 p.m. Niles Notre Dame (8-2) at Crystal Lake South (6-4), 7 p.m. Yorkville (8-2) at Oak Lawn Richards (10-0), 7 p.m. Friday. Palos Heights Shepard (8-2) at Normal Community West (9-1), 7:30 p.m. Friday. Sacred Heart-Griffin (8-2) at Washington (10-0), 1 p.m. Chatham Glenwood (9-1) at Crete-Monee (7-3), 2 p.m. — CLASS 5A Second Round Elmwood Park (8-2) at Evergreen Park (6-4), 5 p.m. Sycamore (8-2) at Lombard (Montini) (9-1), 2 p.m.

Get ready to talk St. Louis sports with your favorite Post-Dispatch sports writers!

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ST. LOUIS FIVE-DAY FORECAST

NATIONAL OUTLOOK

.com

TODAY

TONIGHT

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

Morning sun, then p.m. rain WIND WSW 4-8 mph

Partly cloudy

Partly sunny

Occasional rain

Rain

Low clouds

56°

41°

Rain and thunderstorms will dampen the East Coast today as cooler air plunges from the Midwest to the spine of the Appalachians and the northern Gulf Coast. The southern High Plains will turn milder ahead of a storm spreading rain, mountain snow and gusty winds across the Northwest. Another warm day is expected across California. Shown are noon positions of precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

WIND S 3-6 mph

WIND SSE 7-14 mph

WIND WSW 10-20 mph

WIND SE 7-14 mph

WIND W 8-16 mph

ALMANAC

REGIONAL OUTLOOK Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows. 80

Peoria 55 74 Macomb 54/38 55/38 Bloomington Urbana 53/35 54/36

Kirksville 56/38

Quincy 55/39

Decatur 55/36

Springfield 57 56/38 Effingham 70 55 54/38

35

Joplin 58/41

Columbia 53/40 St. Louis Mount Jefferson Vernon 56/41 City 54/34 55 54/38 Union 55/36 57 44 Rolla Carbondale 51/38 55/36 Farmington 53/34 Cape Girardeau 57/37 Springfield 54/38 Poplar Bluff West Plains 56/38 55 49/37 70

44

RIVER AND LAKE LEVELS Flood Stage 24 hour Stage (ft.) Thu. Change

Location

Missouri River Kansas City Jefferson City Hermann Washington St. Charles Mississippi River Hannibal Louisiana Dam 24 Dam 25 Grafton M.Price, Pool M.Price, Tail. St. Louis Chester Cape Girardeau Illinois River La Salle Peoria Beardstown

32 23 21 20 25

19.41 14.78 15.00 12.17 19.09

Flood Stage 24 hour Stage (ft.) Thu. Change

Location

Meramec River Sullivan Valley Park Arnold Bourbeuse River Union Ohio River Cairo Lake Levels Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

-0.13 +0.08 +0.22 +0.28 +0.94

16 17.50 -0.50 15 17.18 -0.40 25 27.44 -0.64 26 27.88 -0.43 18 18.97 -0.34 419 414.42 -0.02 21 18.19 +0.02 30 23.46 +0.06 27 25.43 -0.32 32 29.73 -0.36 20 18 14

11.30 none 12.00 none 9.94 +0.24

15 16 24

2.24 none 2.54 +0.10 20.71 -0.09

15

1.46 +0.06

40

30.43 +0.48 355.00 360.16 494.69 658.80 707.86 654.46 912.17 839.26 599.80 407.07 609.51 445.04

+0.21 +0.08 +0.09 -0.03 +0.04 +0.15 +0.04 -0.01 +0.08 +0.17 -0.09 +0.16

TEMPERATURE TRENDS Daily Temperature

Forecast Temperature 80

80 70

63

67

71

40

Average High

56 50 44

53 42

46

Average Low

48 48

41

45

61

62

52 46

41

59

59

S

S

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

56

52

49 41

30

F

Billings 54/37

Pollen Yesterday Low - 4 Absent Absent High - 15635 Source: St. Louis County

Heating Degree Days Degree days are an indicator of energy needs. The more the total degree days, the more energy is necessary to heat.

Thursday Month to date Normal month to date Since July 1 Normal since July 1

18 18 12 301 285

RealFeel Temperature® Today An exclusive index of effective temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure and elevation on the human body.

44° 8 a.m.

52° noon

53° 4 p.m.

48° 8 p.m.

UV Index Today Shown is the highest value of the day.

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11+

M

T

38 W

34 T

Denver 63/38

Los Angeles 88/61

-10s -0s

0s

Warm front

City

Albany, N.Y. Albuquerque Anchorage Atlanta Austin Baltimore Birmingham Boise Boston Charleston, S.C. Charleston, W.Va. Charlotte Chicago Cincinnati Cleveland Dallas Daytona Beach Denver Des Moines Destin, Fla. Detroit Hartford Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock

70/49/r 61/41/s 32/26/pc 63/43/c 76/49/s 71/50/r 56/42/c 59/37/pc 68/60/r 77/49/t 55/40/sh 71/44/t 49/36/c 50/37/c 49/40/sh 73/51/s 83/61/t 63/38/pc 56/39/c 68/51/c 49/37/c 69/56/r 87/72/pc 71/52/s 51/35/c 56/40/sh 81/59/s 61/40/pc

Rise

Set

6:00 p.m. 3:35 p.m.

New Moon

First Quarter

Full Moon

Last Quarter

Nov 7

Nov 15

Nov 22

Nov 29

©2018; forecasts and graphics, except for the KTVI forecasts, provided by

Saturday Hi/Lo/W

51/35/sh 60/36/s 36/24/c 66/46/s 77/58/s 60/37/pc 68/46/s 56/42/pc 64/41/r 69/49/s 56/36/pc 65/40/s 54/47/pc 57/42/s 50/37/c 74/53/pc 72/66/s 51/28/c 53/44/sh 70/56/s 51/38/pc 59/35/sh 84/75/sh 78/61/s 56/45/s 61/44/c 78/56/s 69/54/s

Showers

T-storms

Rain

Flurries

Snow

Ice

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Saturday Hi/Lo/W

Los Angeles Louisville Memphis Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Montgomery Nashville New Orleans New York City Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, Maine Portland, Ore. Sacramento Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Seattle Tampa Tucson Washington, D.C. Wichita

88/61/s 53/41/c 58/42/pc 87/73/pc 48/36/c 48/38/c 61/41/c 56/41/c 68/53/s 70/56/sh 63/45/pc 54/41/c 85/64/t 72/54/t 83/57/s 53/39/sh 59/51/r 62/50/r 82/55/s 62/41/c 73/51/s 82/62/s 70/51/s 59/50/r 82/62/t 80/51/s 72/53/r 59/43/s

85/62/s 60/47/s 67/53/pc 86/76/t 49/45/pc 45/39/r 70/44/s 64/47/s 75/63/s 59/43/sh 68/42/s 52/41/sh 74/66/pc 59/40/pc 84/58/s 50/34/c 58/35/r 59/52/pc 84/48/pc 52/39/pc 76/61/s 77/61/s 72/50/pc 56/50/r 76/66/pc 80/51/s 60/43/pc 62/40/pc

Thursday in the 48 contiguous states Low: 1 Bodie State Park, Calif.

WORLD FORECAST

Forecast index based on presence of manmade particulates affecting aspects of human health.

7:29 a.m. 1:45 a.m.

Stationary front

Today Hi/Lo/W

National Extremes

Sun Moon

Miami 87/73

10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

High: 92 Camarillo, Calif.

Skywatch

Houston 71/52 Monterrey 73/52

Today’s Air Quality

Good Moderate Unhealthy Unhealthy Very Hazardous (sensitive) Unhealthy

Washington 72/53

Atlanta 63/43

Chihuahua 74/46

The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. airnow.gov

New York 70/56

Detroit 49/37

Kansas City 56/40

El Paso 69/47

Cold front

Trees Weeds Grass Mold

Toronto 43/34

Chicago 49/36

Statistics through 5 p.m. Thursday Temperature High/low 48°/45° Normal high/low 63°/44° Last year high/low 52°/40° Record high 86° (1937) Record low 26° (1954) Precipitation 24 hrs through 5 p.m. Thu. 1.02” Month to date (normal) 0.72” (0.12”) Year to date (normal) 36.60” (34.33”) Record for this date 2.87” (1972)

Montreal 43/37

Minneapolis 48/38

San Francisco 70/51

71

60 50

Winnipeg 39/27

Chief Meteorologist Glenn Zimmerman

61° 52° 62° 46° 59° 49° 59° 41°

Today starts dry with some sun rays, then clouds build with a fast-moving cold front. Watch for a few scattered showers this afternoon and evening.

Kansas City 56/40

Seattle 59/50

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Beijing Berlin Buenos Aires Cairo Cancun Dublin Hong Kong Jerusalem Johannesburg London Madrid Mecca

51/38/pc 78/59/pc 84/59/c 91/70/s 65/39/s 56/41/pc 69/54/c 87/63/s 86/74/t 49/46/sh 74/69/pc 75/53/pc 71/49/t 52/36/pc 65/39/pc 93/74/pc

Saturday Hi/Lo/W

51/37/pc 72/58/pc 73/58/sh 92/72/c 66/43/pc 51/39/pc 78/56/s 85/63/s 83/76/t 59/46/sh 79/73/s 71/54/s 72/50/pc 55/47/pc 61/39/pc 93/75/pc

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi Paris Rio de Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Sydney Tokyo Toronto Vancouver

66/54/t 43/37/r 45/40/pc 86/76/pc 75/58/t 89/68/pc 54/33/pc 81/72/pc 68/61/r 86/78/pc 71/50/pc 62/37/s 94/75/t 66/55/s 43/34/r 57/49/pc

Saturday Hi/Lo/W

67/53/pc 43/32/r 46/43/r 86/76/pc 76/58/t 85/63/pc 53/36/s 88/74/pc 72/58/pc 85/76/sh 80/49/s 63/38/s 87/66/pc 67/57/s 45/32/c 54/47/r

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, i-ice, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow


Classified

M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

FRIDAY

NOVEMBER 2, 2018

D1

STLTODAY.COM

SAMPLE BALLOT GENERAL ELECTION NOVEMBER 6, 2018 ST. CHARLES COUNTY, MISSOURI NOTICE OF ELECTION Notice is hereby given that the General Election will be held in the County of St. Charles on Tuesday, November 6, 2018 as certified to this office by the participating entities of St. Charles County. The ballot for the Election shall be in substantially the following form. FOR UNITED STATES SENATOR Vote For One

JOSH HAWLEY

REP

CLAIRE McCASKILL

DEM LIB

JAPHETH CAMPBELL

GRN

JO CRAIN

FOR STATE REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT 63

FOR STATE REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT 105

Vote For One

Vote For One

BRYAN SPENCER

REP

PHIL CHRISTOFANELLI

REP

JANET KESTER

DEM

SCOTT CERNICEK

DEM

LIB

CARL-hERMAN FREESE

LIB

BILL SLANTZ

IND

CRAIG O'DEAR

WRITE IN

WRITE IN

WRITE IN

FOR STATE AUDITOR

FOR STATE REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT 64

FOR STATE REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT 106

Vote For One

Vote For One

Vote For One

SAUNDRA McDOWELL

REP

TONY LOVASCO

REP

CHRISSY SOMMER

REP

NICOLE GALLOWAY

DEM

SHAWN FINKLEIN

DEM

JACKIE SCLAIR

DEM

LIB

SEAN O'TOOLE

WRITE IN

DON FITZ

GRN

JACOB LUETKEMEYER

CST

FOR STATE REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT 65

FOR STATE REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT 107

Vote For One

Vote For One

WRITE IN

FOR UNITED STATES REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT 2

TOM HANNEGAN

REP

NICK SCHROER

REP

BILL OTTO

DEM

CURTIS WYLDE

DEM

WRITE IN

Vote For One

ANN WAGNER

REP

CORT VanOSTRAN

DEM LIB

LARRY A. KIRK DAVID JUSTUS ARNOLD

WRITE IN

GRN

WRITE IN

WRITE IN

FOR STATE REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT 70

FOR STATE REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT 108

Vote For One

Vote For One

MARK MATTHIESEN

REP

JUSTIN HILL

REP

PAULA BROWN

DEM

BETTY VINING

DEM

CAROL HEXEM

GRN WRITE IN

WRITE IN

FOR UNITED STATES REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT 3

FOR STATE REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT 102

Vote For One

Vote For One

BLAINE LUETKEMEYER

REP

KATY GEPPERT

DEM

BOB ONDER

REP

PATRICE BILLINGS

DEM

DEM

FOR CIRCUIT JUDGE CIRCUIT 11, DIVISION 4

FOR STATE REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT 42 Vote For One

JEFF PORTER

REP

JOSEPH WIDNER

DEM

MIKE FAGRAS

FOR ASSOCIATE CIRCUIT JUDGE DIVISION 6

JOHN D. WIEMANN

REP

JIM KLENC

DEM

FOR CIRCUIT JUDGE CIRCUIT 11, DIVISION 5 Vote For One

FOR STATE REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT 104 Vote For One

ADAM SCHNELTING

REP

PEGGY SHERWIN

DEM

Vote For One

REP

WRITE IN

Vote For One

REP

Vote For One

REP

Vote For One

REP

Shall Judge COLLEEN DOLAN of the Eastern District Court of Appeals be retained in office?

NO

Vote For One

JOHN WHITE

REP

PAUL WOODY

DEM

Shall Judge LISA P. PAGE of the Eastern District Court of Appeals be retained in office?

YES NO

FOR DIRECTOR OF ELECTIONS Vote For One

KURT BAHR

REP

JOHN CALLAHAN

DEM

WRITE IN

FOR CIRCUIT JUDGE CIRCUIT 11, DIVISION 7

YES

FOR COUNTY COUNCIL DISTRICT 7

WRITE IN

FOR ASSOCIATE CIRCUIT JUDGE DIVISION 9

WRITE IN

MISSOURI COURT OF APPEALS JUDGES, EASTERN DISTRICT

WRITE IN

FOR ASSOCIATE CIRCUIT JUDGE DIVISION 8

REP

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FOR COUNTY COUNCIL DISTRICT 5

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JON A. CUNNINGHAM

DANIEL PELIKAN

TERRY HOLLANDER

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ELIZABETH W. SWANN

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JOHN F. FOSTER

REP

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Vote For One

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ERIN S. BURLISON

REP

FOR STATE REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT 103

FOR STATE SENATOR DISTRICT 2

TERRY R CUNDIFF

RON HICKS

WRITE IN

WRITE IN

Vote For One

JACK BANAS

LIB

DONALD V. STOLLE

FOR CIRCUIT JUDGE CIRCUIT 11, DIVISION 3


D2

Classified

M 1

FOR ASSOCIATE CIRCUIT JUDGE DIVISION 10

FOR RECORDER OF DEEDS REP

AMENDMENT 1 WRITE IN

FOR ASSOCIATE CIRCUIT JUDGE DIVISION 11 Vote For One

Vote For One

TIM LOHMAR

REP

WRITE IN

REP

FOR COLLECTOR OF REVENUE Vote For One

WRITE IN

FOR ASSOCIATE CIRCUIT JUDGE DIVISION 12

MICHELLE D. McBRIDE

REP

WRITE IN

Vote For One

FOR SHERIFF REP

Vote For One

SCOTT A. LEWIS

REP

WRITE IN

WRITE IN

STATE OF MISSOURI Secretary of State

FOR COUNTY ASSESSOR Vote For One

I, John R. Ashcroft, Secretary of State of the State of Missouri, do hereby certify that the foregoing is a true and correct list, containing the name and address of each person who has filed a written declaration of candidacy in my office and is entitled to be voted on at the general election, together with a statement of the office for which he or she is a candidate and the party he or she represents, or that he or she is an independent candidate and the order in which the candidates’ names are to appear on the ballot. I further certify the foregoing party emblems of the Republican, Democratic, Libertarian, Green and Constitution parties, respectively, are in accordance with Section 115.385, RSMo.

SCOTT SHIPMAN

REP

WRITE IN

I, Rich Chrismer, Director of Elections within and for the county of St. Charles, State of Missouri, do hereby certify that the above and foregoing is a true and correct list as certified to me the candidate offices and issues for which are entitled to be voted for at the General Election to be held November 6, 2018. IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF: I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal on this 28th day of August 2018.

IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, I hereunto set my hand and affix the Seal of my office in the City of Jefferson, State of Missouri, this 28th day of August, 2018.

_________________________________ Rich Chrismer, Director of Elections St. Charles County, Missouri

OFFICIAL JUDICIAL BALLOT ___________________________ Secretary of State

Submitting to the voters whether the Judges named below, whose terms expire December 31, 2018, shall be retained in office for new terms.

VOTE ON EACH JUDGE I, Rich Chrismer, Election Authority within and for the county of St. Charles do hereby certify that the above and foregoing is a true and correct list as certified to me by John R. Ashcroft, Secretary of State, State of Missouri, of the offices for which candidates are entitled to be voted for at the GENERAL ELECTION to be held November 6, 2018. IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my Seal. Done at my office this 28th day of August, 2018.

_________________________________ ______________ Rich Chrismer, Director of Elections St. Charles County, Missouri

FOR COUNTY EXECUTIVE

MISSOURI SUPREME COURT JUDGES Shall Judge W. BRENT POWELL of the Missouri Supreme Court be retained in office?

REP

LORNA L. FRAHM

DEM

Vote For One

JOE CRONIN

REP

CHERYL HIBBELER

DEM

WRITE IN

FOR COUNTY COUNCIL DISTRICT 3 Vote For One

MIKE ELAM

REP

CHRISTINE HEDGES

DEM

State governmental entities estimate annual operating costs may increase by $189,000. Local governmental entities expect no fiscal impact.

YES NO AMENDMENT 2 Proposed by Initiative Petition Shall the Missouri Constitution be amended to: • allow the use of marijuana for medical purposes, and create regulations and licensing/certification procedures for marijuana and marijuana facilities; • impose a 4 percent tax on the retail sale of marijuana; and • use funds from these taxes for health and care services for military veterans by the Missouri Veterans Commission and to administer the program to license/certify and regulate marijuana and marijuana facilities? This proposal is estimated to generate annual taxes and fees of $18 million for state operating costs and veterans programs, and $6 million for local governments. Annual state operating costs are estimated to be $7 million.

NO

Shall Judge MARY RHODES RUSSELL of the Missouri Supreme Court be retained in office?

YES NO

PROPOSITION B

• increase the state minimum wage to $8.60 per hour with 85 cents per hour increase each year until 2023, when the state minimum wage would be $12.00 per hour; • exempt government employers from the above increase; and • increase the penalty for paying employees less than the minimum wage? State and local governments estimate no direct costs or savings from the proposal, but operating costs could increase by an unknown annual amount that could be significant. State and local government tax revenue could change by an unknown annual amount ranging from a $2.9 million decrease to a $214 million increase depending on business decisions.

YES NO

PROPOSITION D Proposed by the 99th General Assembly (Second Regular Session) SS 2 HB 1460

Do you want to amend Missouri law to:

FOR COUNTY COUNCIL DISTRICT 1

• change process and criteria for redrawing state legislative districts during reapportionment; • change limits on campaign contributions that candidates for state legislature can accept from individuals or entities; • establish a limit on gifts that state legislators, and their employees, can accept from paid lobbyists; • prohibit state legislators, and their employees, from serving as paid lobbyists for a period of time; • prohibit political fundraising by candidates for or members of the state legislature on State property; and • require legislative records and proceedings to be open to the public?

NO

Proposed by Initiative Petition

WRITE IN

Shall the Missouri Constitution be amended to:

YES

STATUTORY MEASURES

STEVE EHLMANN

Proposed by Initiative Petition

YES

Vote For One

WRITE IN

STLTODAY.COM

CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS

FOR PROSECUTING ATTORNEY

MATTHEW E.P. THORNHILL

NOVEMBER 2, 2018

REP

WRITE IN

PHILIP J. OHLMS

FRIDAY

Vote For One

MARY DEMPSEY

Vote For One

NORMAN C. STEIMEL III

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Shall Missouri law be amended to fund Missouri state law enforcement by increasing the motor fuel tax by two and one half cents per gallon annually for four years beginning July 1, 2019, exempt Special Olympic, Paralympic, and Olympic prizes from state taxes, and to establish the Emergency State Freight Bottleneck Fund? If passed, this measure will generate at least $288 million annually to the State Road Fund to provide for the funding of Missouri state law enforcement and $123 million annually to local governments for road construction and maintenance.

YES NO


Classified

M 1

AMENDMENT 3

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

PROPOSITION C

Proposed by Initiative Petition

Proposed by Initiative Petition

Shall the Missouri Constitution be amended to:

Do you want to amend Missouri law to:

• allow the use of marijuana for medical purposes, and create regulations and licensing procedures for marijuana and marijuana facilities; • impose a 15 percent tax on the retail sale of marijuana, and a tax on the wholesale sale of marijuana flowers and leaves per dry-weight ounce to licensed facilities; and • use funds from these taxes to establish and fund a state research institute to conduct research with the purpose of developing cures and treatments for cancer and other incurable diseases or medical conditions? This proposal is estimated to generate annual taxes and fees of $66 million. State governmental entities estimate initial implementation costs of $186,000 and increased annual operating costs of $500,000.

YES NO

FRIDAY

• remove state prohibitions on personal use and possession of medical cannabis (marijuana) with a written certification by a physician who treats a patient diagnosed with a qualifying medical condition; • remove state prohibitions on growth, possession, production, and sale of medical marijuana by licensed and regulated facilities, and a facility's licensed owners and employees; • impose a 2% tax on the retail sale of medical marijuana; and • use funds from this tax for veterans' services, drug treatment, early childhood education, and for public safety in cities with a medical marijuana facility? State government entities estimate initial and one-time costs of $2.6 million, annual costs of $10 million, and annual revenues of at least $10 million. Local government entities estimate no annual costs and are expected to have at least $152,000 in annual revenues.

YES NO AMENDMENT 4

Proposed by the 99th General Assembly (Second Regular Session) HJR 59 Do you want to amend the Missouri constitution to: • remove language limiting bingo game advertising that a court ruled unenforceable; and • allow a member of a licensed organization conducting bingo games to participate in the management of bingo games after being a member of the organization for six months instead of the current two years? State and local governmental entities estimate no costs or savings from this proposal.

YES

STATE OF MISSOURI Secretary of State

I, John R. Ashcroft, Secretary of State of the State of Missouri, do hereby certify that the foregoing is a true and correct list, containing the name and address of each person who has filed a written declaration of candidacy in my office and is entitled to be voted on at the general election, together with a statement of the office for which he or she is a candidate and the party he or she represents, or that he or she is an independent candidate and the order in which the candidates’ names are to appear on the ballot. I further certify the foregoing party emblems of the Republican, Democratic, Libertarian, Green and Constitution parties, respectively, are in accordance with Section 115.385, RSMo. IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, I hereunto set my hand and affix the Seal of my office in the City of Jefferson, State of Missouri, this 28th day of August, 2018.

NO ___________________________ John R. Ashcroft Secretary of State

I, Rich Chrismer, Election Authority within and for the county of St. Charles do hereby certify that the above and foregoing is a true and correct list as certified to me by John R. Ashcroft, Secretary of State, State of Missouri, of the offices for which candidates are entitled to be voted for at the GENERAL ELECTION to be held November 6, 2018. IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my Seal. Done at my office this 28th day of August, 2018.

_________________________________ Rich Chrismer, Director of Elections St. Charles County, Missouri

NOVEMBER 2, 2018

STLTODAY.COM

D3

ST. CHARLES COUNTY PROPOSITION SMOKE FREE WITH EXCEPTIONS Shall the Charter of St. Charles County be amended to add a new Section which prohibits smoking in enclosed public places or enclosed places of employment throughout St. Charles County, whether in the unincorporated area or within an incorporated municipality, with exceptions regarding smoking in places in which only persons 21 and over are present, and private clubs, tobacco-related businesses and casinos? Any municipality shall have the authority to ban smoking in additional places not herein enumerated pursuant to independent powers they may have by law. Enforcement of the prohibition shall be financed through the general revenues of St. Charles County.

YES NO

I, Rich Chrismer, Election Authority within and for the county of St. Charles do hereby certify that the above and foregoing is a true and correct list as certified to me by John R. Ashcroft, Secretary of State, State of Missouri, of the offices for which candidates are entitled to be voted for at the GENERAL ELECTION to be held November 6, 2018. IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my Seal. Done at my office this 28th day of August, 2018.

_________________________________ Rich Chrismer, Director of Elections St. Charles County, Missouri


Classified

D4

M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

FRIDAY

NOVEMBER 2, 2018

STLTODAY.COM

CLASSIFIED St. Charles County Master Polling Place List 122 Precinct Returns 1.001 Kampville 2.004 Orchard Farm 3.005 Rivers 4.014 Lincoln 5.015 Washington 6.016 Montclair 7.021 Truman 8.022 Cheshire 9.024 Wilshire 10.025 Shirewood 11.028 Treetop 12.031 Sibley 13.033 Canary 14.034 McNair 15.036 Sun Lake 16.041 Government 17.043 Marina 18.045 Mamelle 19.047 Covilli 20.051 St. Cletus 21.054 Coverdell 22.056 Edgewood 23.057 Hanover 24.062 Adams 25.063 St. Andrews 26.071 Fairways 27.080 Heritage 28.083 Woodcliff 29.084 Harvester 30.085 Sycamore 31.086 Arlington 32.087 River Bend 33.091 Katy Trail 34.100 McClay 35.101 Graybridge 36.102 Tanglewood 37.103 Cave Springs 38.104 Hi Point 39.106 Spencer 40.107 Oak Creek 41.111 Woodstream 42.113 Briarhill 43.121 St. Marys 44.122 Mid Rivers 45.124 Rabbit Run 46.126 Meadow Valley 47.128 Fairmount 48.129 Parkwood 49.130 Lakes 50.131 Shadow Creek 51.132 Country Hill 52.139 Discovery 53.140 Laura Hills 54.143 All Saints 55. 144 Fox 56.145 Salt Lick 57.146 St. Jude 58.147 Cottleville 59.148 Winds 60.149 Sunny Hill 61.150 Timberwood 62.151 Glengate 63.152 Woodglen 64.153 Aspen 65.154 Wheatfield 66.155 Green Forest 67.156 Oaks 68.157 Patriot 69.159 Hillcrest 70.160 Harmony 71.161 Montbrook 72.162 Elks 73.163 Civic 74.165 St. Paul 75.166 Mount Hope 76.167 Morningside 77.169 Highgrove 78.170 Starbuck 79.173 Turtle Creek 80.181 Community 81.182 Evergreen 82.183 Foristell 83.184 Flint Hill 84.185 Josephville 85.186 Twin Oaks 86.187 Fairview 87.189 Pioneer 88.190 Peine 89.193 Delmar 90.194 Amber Meadows 91.196 Phoenix 92.197 Feise 93.198 Cedar 94.199 Regatta Bay 95.200 Normandy 96.202 Ridgepoint 97.203 Fieldcrest 98.205 Bayfield 99.206 Monticello 100.207 Carriage Hills 101.208 Twin Chimneys 102.210 Freymuth 103.211 Summerset 104.212 Canvas Cove 105.213 Bryan 106.214 Hawk Ridge 107.215 Coachman 108.217 Keystone 109.218 Duvall 110.219 Westfield 111.220 Pitman 112.221 Weldon Springs 113.222 New Melle 114.225 Augusta 115.226 Hopewell 116.227 Whitmoor 117.228 Shoshone 118.229 Callaway 119.230 Claybrook 120.231 Wolfrum 121.234 Windcastle 122.Election Authority Pct.

OPEN SUNDAY NOV. 4, 1-3 PM

ICE D! PRUCE ED

St. Charles Christian Church, 3337 Rue Royale, St. Charles, MO 63301 Orchard Farm Fire Hall, 5045 Hwy. 94 North, St. Charles, MO 63301 St. Francis of Assisi School, 1360 Farnham St., Portage Des Sioux, MO 63373 St. John United Church of Christ (Fellowship Hall), 405 S. Fifth St., St. Charles 63301 St. Charles Convention Center, 1 Convention Center Plaza, St. Charles, MO 63303 The Family Arena, 2002 Arena Parkway, St. Charles, MO 63303 St. Charles County Association of Realtors, 110 Point West Blvd., St. Charles, MO 63301 Willie Harris School, 2800 Old Muegge Rd., St. Charles, MO 63303 Hope Lutheran Church, 1975 Old Hwy. 94 South, St. Charles, MO 63303 Gould Community Bldg. - Wapelhorst Park, 1875 Muegge Rd., St. Charles 63303 St. Charles First Baptist Church, 2701 Muegge Rd., St. Charles, MO 63303 Presbyterian Church, 131 Gamble St., St. Charles, MO 63301 Good Shepherd Church of Christ, 3115 W. Elm St., St. Charles, MO 63301 George Null School, 435 Yale Blvd., St. Charles, MO 63301 American Legion Post #312, 2500 Raymond Dr., St. Charles, MO 63301 Memorial Hall – Blanchette Park, 1900 W. Randolph St., St. Charles, MO 63301 Discovery Elementary School, 500 Discovery Path Ln., St. Charles, MO 63301 Discovery Elementary School, 500 Discovery Path Ln., St. Charles, MO 63301 Knights of Columbus Bldg. #823, 20 Westbury Dr., St. Charles, MO 63301 Trinity Episcopal Church, 318 S. Duchesne Dr., St. Charles, MO 63301 Mount Zion Baptist Church, 2100 W. Randolph St., St. Charles, MO 63301 Good Shepherd Church of Christ, 3115 W. Elm St., St. Charles, MO 63301 Faith United Methodist Church, 2950 Droste Rd., St. Charles, MO 63301 Christview Christian Church, 64 Terrie Ln., St. Charles, MO 63301 St. Charles West High School, 3601 Droste Rd., St. Charles, MO 63301 St. Charles Convention Center, 1 Convention Center Plaza, St. Charles, MO 63303 The Family Arena, 2002 Arena Parkway, St. Charles, MO 63303 Barnwell Junior High School, 1035 Jungs Station Rd., St. Charles, MO 63303 Zion Lutheran Church, 3866 Old Hwy. 94 South, St. Charles, MO 63304 First Baptist Church of Harvester, 4075 S. Old Hwy. 94, St. Charles, MO 63304 Harvester Christian Church, 2950 Kings Crossing (Community Lobby), St. Charles, MO 63303 Harvester Christian Church (Worship Lobby), 2950 Kings Crossing, St. Charles, MO 63303 Jungs Station Baptist Church, 1120 Jungs Station Rd., St. Charles, MO 63303 Calvary Temple, 3930 McClay Rd., St. Charles, MO 63304 Fairmount Elementary School, 1725 Thoele Rd., St. Peters, MO 63376 Chapel of the Cross Lutheran Church, 907 Jungermann Rd., St. Peters, MO 63376 Brookdale St. Peters, 363 Jungermann Rd., St. Peters, MO 63376 McClay Branch Library, 2760 McClay Rd., St. Charles, MO 63303 Chapel of the Cross Lutheran Church, 907 Jungermann Rd., St. Peters, MO 63376 St. Peters City Hall (Meeting Room C), 1 City Centre Blvd., St. Peters, MO 63376 St. Charles Elks Lodge #690, 560 St. Peters Howell Rd., St. Charles, MO 63304 Harvester Church of the Nazarene, 3115 McClay Rd., St. Peters, MO 63376 St. Peters Senior Center, 108 McMenamy Rd., St. Peters, MO 63376 St. Peters Elementary School, 400 McMenamy Rd., St. Peters, MO 63376 First Baptist Church of St. Peters, 3533 Mid Rivers Mall Dr., St. Peters, MO 63376 Calvary Church, 3998 Mid Rivers Mall Dr., St. Peters, MO 63376 Joachim & Ann Care Services, 4116 McClay Rd., St. Charles, MO 63304 Hollenbeck Middle School, 4555 Central School Rd., St. Charles, MO 63304 Joachim & Ann Care Services, 4116 McClay Rd., St. Charles, MO 63304 Spencer Road Branch Library, 427 Spencer Rd., St. Peters, MO 63376 DuBray Middle School, 100 DuBray Dr., St. Peters, MO 63376 Life Church, 8134 Mexico Rd., St. Peters, MO 63376 Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 5077, 8500 Veterans Memorial Parkway, O’Fallon, MO 63366 South Middle School, 300 Knaust Rd., St. Peters, MO 63376 Progress South Elementary School, 201 Knaust Rd., St. Peters, MO 63376 Gateway Church, 250 Salt Lick Rd., St. Peters, MO 63376 Warren Elementary School, 141 Weiss Rd., St. Peters, MO 63376 Cottleville City Hall, 5490 Fifth St., Cottleville, MO 63304 Mid Rivers Seventh Day Adventist Church, 600 Salt Lick Rd., St. Peters, MO 63376 Grace Community Chapel, 7661 Mexico Rd., St. Peters, MO 63376 Bethesda Baptist Church, 4700 Central School Rd., St. Charles, MO 63304 Rock Creek Elementary School, 8970 Mexico Rd., O’Fallon, MO 63366 Francis Howell Middle School, 825 O’Fallon Rd., Weldon Spring, MO 63304 Grace United Church of Christ of O’Fallon, 8326 Mexico Rd., St. Peters, MO 63376 Knights of Columbus Bldg. - Cottleville, 5701 Hwy. N, St. Charles, MO 63304 Mid Rivers Elementary School, 7479 Mexico Rd., St. Peters, MO 63376 Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 66 Oak Valley Dr., St. Peters, MO 63376 Fort Zumwalt West High School, 1251 Turtle Creek Dr., O’Fallon, MO 63366 Community of Christ Church, 2790 Hwy. K, O’Fallon, MO 63368 O’Fallon City Hall, 100 N. Main St., O’Fallon, MO 63366 Fort Zumwalt Hope High School, 307 W. Pitman St., O’Fallon, MO 63366 Cornerstone United Methodist Church, 1151 Tom Ginnever Ave., O’Fallon, MO 63366 Krekel Civic Center, 305 Civic Park Dr., O’Fallon, MO 63366 St. Paul Knights of Columbus, 1270 Church Rd., St. Paul, MO 63366 Mount Hope School, 1099 Mount Hope Ln., O’Fallon, MO 63366 Deer Run Branch Library, 1300 N. Main St., O’Fallon, MO 63366 Westhoff Elementary School, 900 Homefield Blvd., O’Fallon, MO 63366 Emge Elementary School, 250 Fallon Parkway, O’Fallon, MO 63368 First Baptist Church of O’Fallon, 8750 Veterans Memorial Parkway, O’Fallon, MO 63366 Wentzville Community Club, 500 W. Main St., Wentzville, MO 63385 Heritage Primary School (Academy Gym), 612 Blumhoff Ave., Wentzville, MO 63385 Foristell City Hall, 121 Mulberry St., Foristell, MO 63348 Knights of Columbus - Flint Hill #9023, 2061 Grothe Rd., Wentzville, MO 63385 St. Joseph School, 1410 Josephville Rd., Wentzville, MO 63385 Wentzville Christian Church, 1507 Hwy. Z, Wentzville, MO 63385 Progress Park Banquet Center, 968 Meyer Rd., Wentzville, MO 63385 Wentzville South Middle School, 561 E. Hwy. N, Wentzville, MO 63385 Wentzville City Hall, 1001 Schroeder Creek Blvd., Wentzville, MO 63385 Sunset Ridge Community Club, 1359 Sunburst Dr., O’Fallon, MO 63366 Prairie View Elementary School, 1550 Feise Rd., O’Fallon, MO 63368 Dardenne Presbyterian Church, 7400 S. Outer 364, O’Fallon, MO 63368 Immaculate Conception Church, 7701 Hwy. N, O’Fallon, MO 63368 Corporate Parkway Branch Library, 1200 Corporate Parkway, Wentzville, MO 63385 First Baptist Church of Lake St. Louis, 2230 Lake St. Louis Blvd., Lake St. Louis, MO 63367 Chapel of the Lake, 11000 Veterans Memorial Parkway, Lake St. Louis, MO 63367 Transfiguration Episcopal Church, 1860 Lake St. Louis Blvd., Lake St. Louis, MO 63367 Crossroads Elementary School, 7500 Hwy. N, O’Fallon, MO 63368 Middendorf-Kredell Library, 2750 Hwy. K, O’Fallon, MO 63368 Monticello Club House, 2 Dunmore Circle, O’Fallon, MO 63368 Park Place Senior Living, 2002 Boardwalk Place Dr., O’Fallon, MO 63368 Twin Chimneys Elementary School, 7396 Twin Chimneys Blvd., O’Fallon, MO 63368 St. Gianna Catholic Church, 450 E. Hwy. N, Wentzville, MO 63385 Renaud Spirit Center, 2650 Tri Sports Circle, O’Fallon, MO 63368 Ostmann Elementary School, 200 Meriwether Lewis Dr., O’Fallon, MO 63368 Holy Cross Lutheran Church, 8945 Veterans Memorial Parkway, O’Fallon, MO 63366 Frontier Middle School, 9233 Hwy. DD, O’Fallon, MO 63368 Pheasant Point Elementary School, 3450 Pheasant Meadow Dr., O’Fallon, MO 63368 Immaculate Conception Church, 7701 Hwy. N, O’Fallon, MO 63368 Christ Alone Lutheran Church, 2600 Bates Rd., Dardenne Prairie, MO 63368 John Weldon Elementary School, 7370 Weldon Spring Rd., Dardenne Prairie, MO 63368 Castlio Elementary School, 1020 Dingledine Rd., St. Charles, MO 63304 Messiah Lutheran Church, 5911 S. Hwy. 94, St. Charles, MO 63304 Daniel Boone Elementary School, 201 W. Hwy. D, Wentzville, MO 63385 Christ Lutheran Church, 123 Church Rd., Augusta, MO 63332 Hopewell Baptist Church, 1140 E. Hwy. N, Wentzville, MO 63385 St. John’s United Church of Christ, 945 Wolfrum Rd., St. Charles, MO 63304 New Hope Presbyterian Church, 1580 Kisker Rd., St. Charles, MO 63304 Friedens Peace United Church of Christ, 3560 Mill St., New Melle, MO 63365 Bethesda Baptist Church, 4700 Central School Rd., St Charles, MO 63304 Mary Emily Bryan Middle School, 605 Independence Rd., St. Charles, MO 63304 Kisker Branch Library, 1000 Kisker Rd., St. Charles, MO 63304 St. Charles County Election Authority, 397 Turner Blvd., St. Peters, MO 63376

R

630 KEHRS MILL RD. BALLWIN, MO 63011 Four bedrooms, three and a half baths, 1.5 Story, 4,084 square feet, three car garage, ingrade homesite on .28 acres in Rockwood School District. $599,900

Nickolas A. Dalba, Jr. Cell:

Jennifer Smerek NMLS# 260971 314-889-0667 jsmerek@gershman.com

Shari Wynn NMLS# 260167 314-889-0680 swynn@gershman.com

Call Jennifer Silver 636-978-1777 www.investors-title.com Paid Advertisement

- A SSELMEIER MAY A U C T I O N S -

AUCTION! HUGE 2-DAY ANTIQUE ESTATE AUCTION Early amEricana • Toys • Black amEricana saT. NOV. 3RD - 9:30am

200 VeterAns Dr. millstADt, il

Incl. Furniture, Primitives, Glassware and General Antiques. TH

sun. nov. 4

-10:00am

Incl. Toys, Children’s Items, Black Americana, Easter, Christmas & Holiday Items, & Post Cards.

(Preview Starting 8am Both Days)

More @ amantiqueauctions.com

This Outstanding Antique Auction is All From The Lifelong Private Collection of Betty Rosenburgh of Wayne City, IL. One Of The Finest Collections We Have Sold! Beautiful Antique Furniture, Incl. Jelly Hutch, Open Top Pewter Cupboard, Punch Tin Door & Screen Door Pie Cupboards, Period Lift Top Blanket Chest, Pine Hutch Table, Farm Tables Incl. Old Paint, Pine Dry Sink, Pub Table W/ Drawer, Crock Bench, Sugar Chest, Meal Bin, Dough Box, Chimney Cupboard, Walnut Bookcases, Walnut Dresser, Walnut Drop Leaf Stand Table, Rockers, Cedar Chest, Cobblers Bench W/ Tools, Drafting Table, Spinning Wheels, Yarn Winders, 100’s of Great Country Primitives, Folk Art, Blue Decorated Stoneware, Crockery Pitchers, Salt & Butter Crocks, Bowls, Beans Pot, Ice Water Coolers, Spongeware, Sleepy Eye, Blue & White Graniteware, Copper, Brass & Pewter, Early Baskets, Country Store & Advertising Items, Woodenware, Dough Bowls, Sugar Buckets, Churns, Coffee Grinders, Items In Old Paint, Butter Molds, Cast Iron Griswold & Wagnerware, Wooden Rake, Pitchfork, Peel, Over 25 Beautiful Handmade Quilts, Coverlets, Early Dated Samplers, Original Framed Prints, Yard Longs, Early Lighting, Fine Glassware & China, Blue Onion Meissen, Wavecrest, Carnival &Art Glass, Vintage Clothing, Hats, Shoes, Purses, Outstanding Collection of Black Americana Incl. Toys, Prints, Games, Golliwog & Rag Dolls, Early Tin Wind Up & Cast Iron Toys, Jazzbo Jim W/ Box, Battery Op. Toys, Early Wooden, Celluloid Toys, Rocking & Hobby Horses, Sleds, Rocker, High Chair, Doll Furniture, Bisque, Compo & Cloth Dolls, Chalkboards, Game Boards, Blocks, Games, Candy Containers, Christmas, Disney Items, Animals, Folk Art Villages & Noah’s Ark By Virgil Myer, Fabulous Collection of Over 1000 Postcards And Much More!

Terms: 2 Forms of ID, Cash, Good Check if Known to Auctioneer, Credit Card (13% Buyers Premium With 3% Discount for Cash Or Check) Asselmeier May Auctions* P.O. Box 1198* Columbia, IL 62236 * (618) 210-7574

Asselmeier mAy Auctions • ( 6 1 8 ) 2 1 0 - 7 5 7 4 Rental-MO

Meadow Woods 710 E. Woods • 636-456-0895 Village of Warrenton Southside Court • 636-456-7243 Warrenton I & II N. West & Oak Street • 636-456-7243

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE Notice is hereby given that the City of Saint Charles, Missouri, will conduct a Public Hearing at a meeting of the City Council which is scheduled to be held on Tuesday, November 20, 2018 at 7:00 p.m. on the Fourth Floor of the City Hall Building, 200 North Second Street, in the City of Saint Charles, Missouri, for the purpose of giving parties in interest and citizens an opportunity to be heard on the following: The following budget is proposed for calendar year 2019: Total of All Funds ESTIMATED FUND BALANCE 01/01/2019.....................................................$ 140,244,564 Projected Revenues........................................................................................... 136,660,310 Projected Transfers and Other Financing Sources.......................................... 1,651,550 TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS ..........................................................................$ 278,556,424

If you have any questions regarding the above items scheduled for the public hearing, please contact the City Clerk at 949-3282. The City of Saint Charles offers all interested citizens the opportunity to give written and/or oral comment on public matters. Citizens with disabilities needing assistance or auxiliary aids should contact the City sufficiently in advance to assure that accommodations may be made. For the hearing impaired, City Hall can be contacted on TTY system by calling 949-3289. Requests for other assistance or aids may be made by contacting the City in writing at the City Hall, 200 North Second Street or phone 949-3282. Laura Whitehead City Clerk

19.27 ac. on the Courtois PLUS less than 5 miles from the Huzzah. 2 br, 1 ba. www.resultsREA.com MLS# 18080427

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

STLtoday.com/readerrewards

High above the Mississippi River is this 4 bed 5 bath like-new home, perfect for entertaining, provides unparalleled views of the river. Asking Price - $369,900.00 MLS# 18062377 Broker - Duff Corbett (314) 616.1145

STLtoday.com/jobs

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE Notice is hereby given that the City of Saint Charles, Missouri, will conduct a Public Hearing at a meeting of the City Council which is scheduled to be held on Tuesday, November 20, 2018, at 7:00 p.m. on the Fourth Floor of the City Hall Building, 200 North Second Street, in the City of Saint Charles, Missouri, for the purpose of giving parties in interest and citizens an opportunity to be heard on the following: The following is a summary of the capital program:

2019

2020

2021

2022

2023

2024

$3,337,631

$5,143,812

$3,205,893

$2,994,691

$3,904,407

$4,086,722

124,500

107,000

98,000

104,500

116,000

108,000

Public Works

15,413,874

14,175,099

15,120,576

15,263,332

14,304,453

13,595,364

Engineering

10,658,557

8,760,532

7,318,332

8,944,882

8,948,582

5,372,331

Parks

2,804,438

2,956,613

2,949,313

2,850,213

2,735,138

2,733,688

Total

$32,339,000

$31,143,056

$28,692,114

$30,157,618

$30,008,580

$25,896,105

General & Public Safety Tourism

University City, 68xx Corbitt, 2br bungalow for rent, Section 8 welcome, $685/mo. Sec. dep. negotiable. 314-255-4733 no text.

Wildwood/Balwin area.6bd 4.5 bath on beautiful lot. 1523 Quail Hollow dr. 1yr lease. $4700 a month. Pets neg no aggressive bread. Good credit a must. Non smokers (317) 498-6148

Land for Sale 21 acres of the Mississippi River Bluffs. Only 35 min from downtown St L o u is , 1 5 min So u t h o f J B Bridge. City water. Lots of privacy. Bu ild y o u r d r e a m home here. $549K (618)281-6169 253 acres of recreation/hunting/pasture land in northwest Macon County, Missouri. Rolling hills with beautiful views and building sites. Can divide. $1,800.00/acre. 660-676-0710

Skyline Towers Senior Living Apartments Applicants must be 62 or older. Rent based on income. All 1 bdrm units, great location & located on bus route. Call 618-465-1444, Mon-Fri 9-5. 3113 Washington, Alton, IL

Land for Lease Hunting Land for LeaseNE Missouri, 200+ ac., two tracts, elec. avail., hardwoods, meadows, crops. Call 573-406-4757. Hunting Lease for the 2018-19 season available in Northeast MO, prime hunting with cabin on property, room for 4-5 hunters for self guided hunts, ready to lease Call 660-341-1178

OZARK FLOAT STREAM FRONTAGE!

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

St. Charles for Rent: 2 bdrm, 2 bath, LL, secure building, good credit. $750/mo. Call 314-805-2896.

Evergreen Real Estate, LLC OPEN HOUSE The Community of Winneberg 206 Quarry Rd. Golden Eagle, IL 62036 Sunday, November 4 1:00 to 3:00

Resort, Lake and River Property

@stltoday

Secure, fully-furnished 1.5 bath, 3 bdrm house for lease, close to UM -St. Louis, 1 8 minutes from Wash. U, 8 minutes from Airport, 1 0 minutes from downtown. All utilities paid. Washer/ dryer, cable, theater room, secure lighting around property. Off-street gated parking. 3 blocks from bike trail to UM -St. Louis. $1,700/mo. 3 1 4 382-8244.

Rental-IL All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, as amended which makes it illegal to advertise ‘any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.’ This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertising in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.

PROPOSED APPROPRIATIONS: Operating Budget .............................................................................................$ 96,243,201 Capital Budget ..................................................................................................... 20,084,174 Debt Service........................................................................................................24,838,300 Interfund Transfers .......................................................................................... 1,651,550 TOTAL PROPOSED APPROPRIATIONS .......................................................$ 142,817,225 ESTIMATED FUND BALANCE 12/31/2019 ...................................................$ 135,739,199

@stltoday

314-574-8304

Nick@NickDalba.com www.stcharlesrealestatesearch.com

If you have any questions regarding the above items scheduled for the public hearing, please contact the City Clerk at 949-3282. The City of Saint Charles offers all interested citizens the opportunity to give written and/or oral comment on public matters. Citizens with disabilities needing assistance or auxiliary aids should contact the City sufficiently in advance to assure that accommodations may be made. For the hearing impaired, City Hall can be contacted on TTY system by calling 949-3289. Requests for other assistance or aids may be made by contacting the City in writing at the City Hall, 200 North Second Street or phone 949-3282. Laura Whitehead City Clerk

R E Auctions

Service/Repair If you are needing Interior or Exterior PAINTING for your home, call CV. Wallpainting now 314-4133173.

Dogs Cockalierpoos, Peekapoos, Golden Retriever, Cockashihs, Weimaraners, Schnoodles, Mini Labradoodles, Shiba Inu, Boston Terriers, and Other Cute Poos.

CHECK OUR WEBSITE FOR OTHERS.

AUCTION: 1,148 Acres Waterfowl, Whitetail Deer & Upland Bird Hunting • Income Producing Farmland • 2 Miles of R iver Frontage • 217.398.6400 Visit MWAauctions.com

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Rental-MO

DOODLES & RETRIEVERS:

4220 Ellenwood, 63116. 5 Large Rooms, 2 BR, Eat-in Kitchen, W/D Hookups, Fenced in Yard. $565/mo. Call (314)307-2361 Ballwin, 2sty, 4bd, 2.5ba, updates, finished LL/walkout, Parkway S, close to Hwy 141 & 44, Parkway South Schools 636-394-7887

636-240-3647

Puppies Ready Now & Through Christmas! LABRADOODLES, GOLDENDOODLES, GOLDADORS, GOLDEN RETRIEVERS & LABS

Jennings- 2 br house for rent, 5228 Hamilton. W/d hookup. Appliances incl. $500/mo, req. 1st & last mo rent. 314-388-4642.

All Colors & Sizes, Health Guarantee. Top Rated Breeder

********* MARK TWAIN HOTEL Short Term Rentals from $121.00/wk

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314-421-2980 ********* Overland, MO Tri Level 2-3 bedroom apt a/c, dishw., clothes w/d, lge family rm, cpt $775-$850/mo Call for more info 314-423-0236.

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sieversretrievers.com French Bulldog babies, 9wks, Lovable & friendly, shots, AKC, healthy, EM AI L kg a r y 8 9 0 @ g ma il.c o m $800 314-335-7318

French Bulldog Puppies, Males & Females, AKC, white & cream, 636-364-3066

M i n i a t u r e Sc h n a u z e r Pu p p ie s (REG) 8 weeks old. Hypoallergenic and does not shed. UTD shots. $600 573-205-0504 Standard Golden Poodles, AKC, health tested champion bloodline. Up to date on all health/ shots $1200. 573-631-5190 Yorkshire Terrier Pups, AKC, Health Guarantee, $750-$1000. Call Cora (417)458-1665


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FALL SALE SAVE

$100 Cannot be combined with any other discounts. Minimum purchase of $500 required. * Offer expires 11/30/18

Rental • Sales • Service Short & Long Term Rentals

618-433-3589 • 636-492-2515 314-376-3272

Med X Change, LLC Supplying You With The Best In Home Medical Equipment & Supplies Cannot be combined with any other discounts.Minimum purchase of $500 required.*Offer expires 11/30/18

Garage Sales 63123-Huge garage sale. Plenty of items. 7924 Oakdale, Afton MO. Open 7-1. Saturday 11/3

Firewood/Fuel Seasoned Oak & Hickory Delivered & Stacked. Over 25 yrs of service 573-513-6510

Merchandise Wanted WANTED: Historian will pay top $$ for German-Japanese WW II relics 314-438-8665

Tools and Hardware Mark V Shopsmith with accessories, Band Saw, Beltr Sander $1000 (314)434-0482

Craft Fairs/Flea Markets BELLEVILLE FLEA MARKET Sat., Nov 3 9am-4pm Sun., Nov 4 9am-3pm Free Parking & Admission Antiques, Collectibles, Vintage Items and Much More! St. Clair County Event Center 1550 E. State Rt 15 Belleville, IL 62221 618-830-7552

Come early for breakfast at the Country Cafe!

Write Your Own Best Seller

On October 9, 2018, an application was filed with the Federal Communications Commission, Washington, D.C., seeking its consent to the assignment of the broadcast licenses of radio stations KATZ, ST. LOUIS, MO, KATZ-FM, BRIDGETON, MO, KLLT, COLUMBIA, IL, KLOU, ST. LOUIS, MO, KSD, ST. LOUIS, MO and KSLZ, ST. LOUIS, MO, from CITICASTERS LICENSES, INC, AS DEBTOR IN POSSESSION, to CITICASTERS LICENSES, INC. KATZ operates on 1600 AM. KATZ-FM operates on 100.3 FM. KLLT operates on 104.9 FM. KLOU operates on 103.3 FM. KSD operates on 93.7 FM. KSLZ operates on 107.7 FM. CITICASTERS LICENSES, INC is an indirect subsidiary of iHeartCommunications, Inc., which in turn is an indirect subsidiary of iHeartMedia, Inc. iHeartMedia, Inc. is controlled by Clear Channel Capital IV, LLC, the members of which are Bain Capital (CC) IX, L.P. and Thomas H. Lee Equity Fund VI, L.P. Bain Capital (CC) IX, L.P. is ultimately controlled by Bain Capital Investors, LLC, and Thomas H. Lee Equity Fund VI, L.P. is ultimately controlled by THL Holdco, LLC. The individual officers, directors, and voting members of one or more of these entities are Robert Walls, Jr., Scott Bick, Brian Coleman, Jeff Littlejo h n , S t e p h e n D a v i s , L a u r e n Dean, Steve Macri, Scott Wells, Gay le Troberman, Steve Mills, Paul M cNicol, Frederic Brace, Charles Cremens, John Belitsos, Matthew Freeman, Juliana Hill, Scott Hamilton, Jessica Marventano, Melissa Fleming, William Eccleshare, Wendy Goldberg, Robert Pittman, Duaine Smith, Steven Barnes, John Connaughton, Ian Loring, Blair H e n d r ix , R ic h a r d Bressler, Laura Grattan, Scott Sperling, David Abrams, Jonathon Jacobson, James Carlisle, Joshua Nelson, Joshua Bekenstein, Philip Loughlin IV, Stephen Pagliuca, Mic h a e l Wa r d , T o d d A b b r e c h t , Thomas Hagerty, Soren Oberg, Kent Weldon and Anthony DiNovi. A copy of the application and related materials are available for public inspection online at www.fcc.gov.

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Bids/Proposals

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Bids/Proposals

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CITY OF ST. LOUIS BOARD OF PUBLIC SERVICE

REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL(S) BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE CITY OF ST LOUIS MUNICIPAL LIBRARY DISTRICT DBA ST. LOUIS PUBLIC LIBRARY RFP 19-12325 WIDE AREA NETWORK AND INTERNET SERVICES

Sealed Bid Proposals Request for:

Sealed bids will be received by Wentzville R-IV School District, at the Wentzville Central Office, 280 Interstate Drive, Wentzville, MO 63385, until THURSDA Y, DECEMBER 6, 2018 AT 2 P.M. C D T , for the Wentz ville N e w H ig h Sc h o o l at North Po in t e Prairie and West Meyer Roads. Bids will be opened publicly at that time. Bids will be receiv ed at that t i m e f o r t h e Si t e Pa c k a g e , Building Package and Combined Site/Building Package. Drawings and specifications for this project are on file at the office of the Architect, Hoener Associates, Inc., 6707 Plainview Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63109, (314) 781-9855, FAX (314) 7810163. Information as to bidding instructions and requirements for procuring bidding documents may be obtained from the Architect. Not less than the prevailing hourly wage rates, as determined by the State of Missouri, Division of Labor Standards, shall be paid all workers employed on this project. The Board of Education reserves the right to waive technicalities, to select any contractor filing a proposal, and to reject any or all bids. THERE IS NO PRE-BID MEETING SCHEDULED FOR THIS PROJECT

OTC Republic Education Center TO BE LOCATED AT 584 W. US Hwy 60 Republic, MO 65738 Owner: Ozarks Technical Community College 1001 East Chestnut Expressway Springfield, Missouri 65802 All endorsed "Proposals" shall be mailed to or delivered to the office of Rob Rector, the Vice Chancellor for Administrative Services, 2nd floor of the Information Commons, Ozarks Technical Community College, 1001 E. Chestnut Expressway - Suite 204, Springfield, MO 65802, no later than 2:00 p.m., CST, November 20, 2018. All received and qualified proposals w ill be opened and read aloud publicly in the OTC board room on the second floor of the Information Commons. Construction Drawings and Specifications will be available on N o vember 1, 2018 and may be purchased or downloaded through Springfield Blueprint, 219 E. Pershing, Springfield, Missouri 65806 (417) 869-7316 w w w .s p f d b lu e.com and Engineers Repro graphics, 1600 E. Saint Louis St, Springfield, MO 65802-3130, 417869-2222 www.erdigital.com/. Direct all questions to the Architect: Bates & Associates, Inc., 433 W. Walnut Ave. Springfield, Missouri 6 5 8 0 6 , Ph o n e : 417-865-2065, Fax: 417-865-8313, E-mail: newmana@ batesforum.com The bidder understands that Ozarks Technical Community College reserves the right to award the contract to the lowest responsible bidder and to reject any or all bids and / or to waive any technicalities or informalities in the bidding.

Get more out of your Post-Dispatch subscription.

PRE-BID CONFERENCE: A prebid conference is scheduled for 2:00pm, Tuesday, November 6, 2018, in Lincoln Hall - room 211, 815 N. Sherman Ave Springfield, MO 65802 on the OTC Springfield campus. PREVAILING WAGES: Prevailing wages shall be paid in accordance with the Missouri Division of Labor Standards, Annual Wage Order in effect at the time of construction.

Sealed bids for Retrofit Anti-Ligature, Multiple Buildings, Southeast Missouri Mental Health Center and Sex Offender Rehabilitation and Treatment Services, Farmington, Missouri, Project No. M1807-01 will be received by FMDC, State of MO, UNTIL 1:30 PM, 11/29/2018. For specific project information and ordering plans, go to: http://oa.mo.gov/facilities

314-621-6666 STLtoday.com/classifieds

Public Notices "Anyone knowing the whereabouts of Iesha Jackson, contact attorney Elizabeth Toca at (504) 439-8151"

Bids/Proposals

@stltoday ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

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Estate Sale St. Peter's Estate Sale St. Peter's Episcopal Church, 110 N Warson Rd. November 2nd 4-7 Early Bird/Rush Hour Sale. $5 Admission November 3rd: 8-3. No Admission Fee Antiques, Collectibles, quality home goods and crafts. Proceeds benefit local charities.

SUBSTANTIAL COMPLETION: All Work for this project shall be substantially complete by May 1, 2020.

R E Q U E S T F O R Q U A L I F I C ATIONS for Engineering Design Services for the Reconstruction of Taxiway Delta from Runway 6/24 to Taxiway Charlie at St. Louis Lambert International Airport. Statements of Qualifications due by 5:00 P.M., CT, November 13, 2018 at Board of Public Service, 1200 Market, Room 301 City Hall, St. Louis, MO 63103. RFQ may be obtained from w ebsite w w w .stl-bps.org, under the On Line Plan Room, or call the City of St. Louis, Board of Public Service at 314-622-3535. DBE participation goal is 13.88%.

INVITATION TO BID #18-102 SPORTS PARK WELL & IRRIGATION PANEL REPAIR CITY OF O’FALLON, MISSOURI The City of O’Fallon, Missouri is soliciting sealed bids for services related to a well and irrigation panel repair at Sports Park. Specifications are available at www.ofallon.mo.us under Bid Opportunities. Interested vendors should submit sealed bids clearly marked ìS ports Park Well & Irrigation Panel Repair“ to the City of O’Fallon attn, Julie Moellering 1 0 0 North Main Street, O’Fallon, MO 63366 by 2:00 P.M. CST, November 15, 2018. Bids will be publicly opened at that time in the Councilman’s Conference Room. The City of O’Fallon reserves the right to reject any and all bids and waive any informality. The City of O’Fallon also reserves the right to select the lowest and/or best bidder as determined by the City in its sole discretion.

INVITATION TO BID #18-103 ½ TON PICKUP TRUCKS CITY OF O’FALLON, MISSOURI The City of O’Fallon, Missouri is soliciting sealed bids for services related to purchasing ½ ton pickup trucks. S pecifications are available at www.ofallon.mo.us under Bid Opportunities.

The St Louis Public Library is requesting proposal submissions from qualified proposers for the procurement of Wide Area Network and Internet Services. Seale d propos al packe ts will be received by the Purchasing Manager, St . Louis Public Library, 1415 Olive St, St. Louis, Missouri, 63103, until 4:00 p.m. CDT, Monday, November 19, 2018. In order to obtain a copy of the Request for Proposal(s), please contact Don Gillum during regular business hours by phone, 3 1 4 . 5 3 9 . 0312, email, dgillum@slpl.org , or at the above address.

S aint Louis Zoo Primate Canopy Trails Demolition Package2018 S COPE OF WORK: This project will consist of demolition of the Former Sea Lion Arena and associated structures, demolition of site paving, as well as fence and tree removal. Additionally, fill and grading in place of the former structure, replacement of a portion of the Perimeter S ecurity fence, and seeding the site are also included. Coordination with adjacent simultaneous train tunnel remediation project and tree protection is also required. See enclosed documents and details for further information. Bid Documents will be available o n 1 0 /3 1 /2 0 1 8 a t: https://www.stlzoo.org/about/ contact/vendoropportunities/ MANDATORY PRE-BID MEETING & SITE INSPECTION: On 11/13/2018 at 2:00 PM in The Living World building on Government Drive in Forest Park, lower level.

"S ealed Proposals for B1 9 -1 1 6 0 Nat'l Radio Programming will be received at Lincoln Univ's Purchasing Dept 1 0 0 2 Chestnut St, R M 1 0 1 S hipping & Receiving Bldg, JCMO 6 5 1 0 1 until 2PM CT on 07Nov2018. Download RFP at http://www .lincolnu.edu/web/purchasing/ bids"

Interested vendors should submit sealed bids clearly marked ì1/2 Ton Pickup Trucks“ to the City of O’Fallon attn, Julie Moellering 100 North Main Street, O’Fallon, MO 6 3 3 6 6 by 1 0 : 0 0 A. M. CS T, November 14, 2018. Bids will be publicly opened at that time in the Councilman’s Conference Room. The City of O’Fallon reserves the right to reject any and all bids and waive any informality. The City of O’Fallon also reserves the right to select the lowest and/or best bidder as determined by the City in its sole discretion.

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FRIDAY

NOVEMBER 2, 2018

STLTODAY.COM

! d n e k e e w s i h T

BRIDAL SHOW The Best Weddings Start Here

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4 NOON - 3:30

SAINT CHARLES CONVENTION CENTER

FIRST BRIDE 100 S - TO - B E RECEI VE FREE G A IFT

WIN A FUNJET VACATION FOR 2!* SPONSORED BY:

*Brides-to-be must submit a printed registration form and be present at the St. Louis’ Best Bridal Show on October 8, 2017, to be eligible to win the Funjet Vacation.

Special packages and discounts from our vendors. Sample delicious hors d’oeuvres. Refreshments available. Guidance and services of local area’s best wedding specialists. Current fashions, featuring the most elegant gowns. Free! issue of our latest St. Louis’ Best Bridal Magazine and Planner.

Bride-to-be receives FREE ENTRY for the wedding couple by preregistering for the Bridal Show at

stlbestbridal.com/showoffer Complimentary tickets are available at local Savvi Formalwear locations, while supplies last. Day-of-show fee for the public: $5 (cash only) at the door.

SHO W SPO NSO R S


Page 24

Th Thee Frisco Barroom is a big, appealing addition to Webster Groves Page 28 PLUS! Cedric the Entertainer • ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ • David Cross

11.02.18–11.08.18 • STLTODAY.COM/GO •

ST. LOUIS’ GUIDE TO THINGS TO DO

John Goodman on life, laughs, Lebowski

REFRESHED MEMORIES After a $30 million overhaul, Soldiers Memorial is ready to shine for its grand reopening Page 14 BY VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN


11.02.18–11.08.18 ▼

ON SALE MONDAY AT 10AM

SATURDAY, APRIL 13

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 20

Visit EnterpriseCenter.com for the complete upcoming events schedule.

The iconic Walker Hancock sculptures at the entrances to Soldiers Memorial are cleaned and ready for the grand reopening.

Cover story

See & Do

After a $40 million overhaul, Soldiers Memorial shines for its grand reopening. Page 14

“The Gospel at Colonus” at the Black Rep puts a unique spin on Oedipus. Page 12

Datebook Our critics pick the best events in the week ahead, including Christina Aguilera at Stifel Theatre, Keri Hilson at Ballpark Village and Nick Cannon at Enterprise Center. Plus, what to look forward to in the coming weeks. Page 4

ON SALE TODAY AT 10AM

ON SALE TODAY AT 10AM

Music & Clubs Blues Traveler regains a garage-band vibe on its new album. Page 6 “Things Have Changed” — and for the better — for veteran singer Bettye LaVette. Page 7

SATURDAY, JANUARY 12

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17

ON SALE TODAY AT 1OAM

Upstairs Lounge is closing, but not without a big last dance. Page 8 Ticket Tracker. Page 10 Taynka gets back in formation as Beyoncé at Ballpark Village. Page 11

After a disastrous St. Louis show in 2001, David Cross makes a long-overdue return. Page 13 Recently reviewed theater. Page 13

Screens

Recently reviewed movies. Page 23 John Goodman talks about life, laughs and a laid-back Lebowski. Page 24 Cedric the Entertainer’s new CBS sitcom laughs at race relations. Page 26 TV Q&A. Page 27

Fuel

“Bohemian Rhapsody” is a bad movie, but boy, is it entertaining. Page 19 “The Nutcracker and the Four Realms” is a shell of the ballet. Page 20 A literary forgery becomes a funny, sad, fascinating Melissa McCarthy vehicle. Page 21 Even Susan Sarandon can’t save cliched thriller “Viper Club.” Page 21

Frisco Barroom is a big, beautiful addition to Webster Groves. Page 28

Tiffany Haddish tests her hot streak with “Nobody’s Fool.” Page 22

Six Mile Bridge ramps up its barrel-aging program with Big 5 Series. Page 30

ON THE COVER • Soldiers Memorial downtown. Photo by Robert Cohen, Post-Dispatch

SUNDAY, MARCH 17

SUNDAY

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6

Visit StifelTheatre.com for the complete upcoming events schedule. EnterpriseCenter.com StLouisBlues.com StifelTheatre.com Enterprise Center Group Sales: 314-622-5454 | Stifel Theatre Group Sales: 314-499-7676 Ticketmaster: 800-745-3000

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GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 11.02.18-11.08.18

WHAT’S HOT AT STLTODAY.COM ➨ Check out some of the hidden gems in Creve Coeur Lake Memorial Park. stltoday.com/hiddengems ➨ Shakespeare Festival St. Louis increases its sphere of influence with a new “In the Works” series. stltoday.com/arts ➨ We picked a must-see screening for each day of the St. Louis International Film Festival. stltoday.com/movies ➨ Share your best cookie recipes in our 2018 Holiday Cookie Recipe Contest. stltoday.com/contests

stltoday.com/go

P H O T O S ; D AV I D C A R S O N / P O S T- D I S PAT C H ( S O L D I E R S M E M O R I A L ) ; J O H A N N A H U C K E B A / P O S T- D I S PAT C H ( F R I S C O )

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 10

TONIGHT


HERE’S WHAT WE’RE LOOKING FORWARD TO THIS WEEK ▼

“Heading to Chicago to check out some new things along the newish Riverwalk.” • “Relishing the daylight before we turn back time Saturday night.” •

OUR TEAM Gabe Hartwig • Go! Magazine editor, 314-340-8353, ghartwig@post-dispatch.com Amy Bertrand • Post-Dispatch features editor, 314-340-8284, abertrand@post-dispatch.com Frank Reust • copy editor, 314-340-8356, freust@post-dispatch.com Jon Naso • photo editor, 314-340-8775, jnaso@post-dispatch.com

“I’ll be attending a wedding!” •

Elaine Vydra • online news editor and audience development manager, 314-340-8917, evydra@post-dispatch.com “The grand reopening of Soldiers Memorial on Saturday!” •

Emily Tintera • event and sponsorship manager, 314-340-8510, etintera@post-dispatch.com Donna Bischoff • Post-Dispatch vice president of sales and marketing, 314-340-8529, dbischoff@post-dispatch.com

CONTRIBUTORS

“The Jewish Book Festival with Peter Sagal!” •

Cara DeMichele • designer Ian Froeb • restaurant critic Valerie Schremp Hahn • feature writer Jane Henderson • book editor Kevin C. Johnson • pop music critic Norma Klingsick • designer Jon Lewis • features intern Sarah Bryan Miller • classical music critic Daniel Neman • food writer Aisha Sultan • feature writer Calvin Wilson • theater critic

“‘Say Her Name: The Life and Death of Sandra Bland’ on Sunday at the Tivoli as part of the St. Louis International Film Festival. And Christina Aguilera on Tuesday at the Stifel Theatre.” •

CONTACT US Tell us about your events ae@post-dispatch.com • stltoday.com/events Advertise with us 314-340-8500 • stltoday.com/advertise “All SLIFF, all the time.” •

Subscribe to us 314-340-8888 • stltoday.com/subscribe

“I’m welcoming a childhood friend for her first visit to St. Louis.” •

Write to us ae@post-dispatch.com Go! Magazine, St. Louis Post-Dispatch 900 N. Tucker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63101

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COPYRIGHT 2018 • Go! Magazine is published Fridays by the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and Lee Enterprises. No part of Go! Magazine may be reproduced without prior written consent. For permissions requests, reprints, back issues and more information, call 314-340-8000, or visit STLTODAY.COM/CONTACT.

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11.02.18-11.08.18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

3


STLTODAY.COM/EVENTS ▼

showcasing the best in St. Louis female impersonation from the African-American community. The reigning Miss Fannie is Sharrissa. The event will feature performances by past winners with Vicki Valentino as host. Lou Thimes Jr. (radio personality the Real JR), who runs the event, says the title of Miss Fannie is an honorable one. “They work hard at projecting someone other than themselves that’s also an expression of themselves.”

BEST BETS FRIDAY ‘Wild ’N Out Live’

BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

WHEN 8 p.m. Friday • WHERE Enterprise Center, 1401 Clark Avenue • HOW MUCH $30-$119 • MORE INFO 1-800-7453000; ticketmaster.com

Ultimate Ninjas opening WHEN 4-7 p.m. Friday, 9 a.m.-noon Saturday, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Sunday • WHERE Ultimate Ninjas St. Louis, 140 Long Road, Chesterfield • HOW MUCH $12 per hour, $20 for two hours (registration recommended) • MORE INFO ultimateninjas.com/st_louis

Try your hand at the jumping spider, the salmon ladder and the four-level warped wall you’ve seen on the television show “American Ninja Warrior” at the grand opening of Ultimate Ninjas in Chesterfield. During the weekend-long celebration, meet competitors from the NBC series: Jesse “Flex” Labreck, Chris DiGangi,

WHEN 5 p.m. Sunday • WHERE Ballpark Village, 601 Clark Avenue • HOW MUCH $15-$50 • MORE INFO ticketfly.com

Keri Hilson and Bobby Valentino come together for the latest edition of the District Rhythm Series. Hilson is poised to remind us all that “Pretty Girls Rock.” BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON Keri Hilson

Ethan “The Swan” Swanson, Michael Torres, Karen Sabo, Mike “The Stallion” Silenzi and St. Louisan Kirsti Pratt, who is also general manager of the venue. BY VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN

Kevin Gates, Yung Bleu WHEN 8 p.m. Friday • WHERE Pop’s Nightclub, 401 Monsanto Avenue, Sauget • HOW MUCH Sold out • MORE INFO ticketweb.com

Rapper Kevin Gates is promoting his new mixtape, “Luca Brasi 3.” The third part of his “The Luca Brasi Story,” it’s his first mixtape since being released from prison this year on gun charges. Tracks include “Me Too,” “Money Long,” “Adding Up” and “Great Man.” The set is

Quincy Troupe completely free of guest artists. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

St. Louis Ballet: ‘Romeo & Juliet’ WHEN 8 p.m. Friday, 2 and 8 p.m. Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday • WHERE Blanche M. Touhill Performing Arts Center, University of Missouri-St. Louis, 1 University Boulevard • HOW MUCH $35$69 • MORE INFO touhill.org

Shakespeare’s tale of a star-crossed couple, one of his most popular works, inspired this ballet that’s sure to be cast in a new light through the language of dance. It’s another fairy tale adventure for St. Louis Ballet. BY CALVIN WILSON

Carrie St. Louis WHEN 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday • WHERE Gaslight Theater, 358 North Boyle Avenue • HOW MUCH $35-$45 • MORE INFO gaslightcabaretfestival.com

Singer and Broadway star Carrie St. Louis (love that last name) comes to the Gaslight Cabaret Festival with backstage stories and some of her favorite songs. Accompanying her will be pianist Benjamin Rauhala. BY CALVIN WILSON

‘The Nightmare Before Christmas’ WHEN 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday • WHERE Powell Symphony Hall, 718 North Grand Boulevard • HOW MUCH $38-$73 • MORE INFO 314-534-1700; slso.org

This is the 25th anniversary

of Tim Burton’s classic “The Nightmare Before Christmas,” and now you can see it with the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra playing Danny Elfman’s score. SLSO resident conductor Gemma New conducts the orchestra while the movie plays on the big screen. It’s a whole new way to appreciate Jack Skellington, Oogie Boogie (voiced by St. Louis native Ken Page) and the rest of the ghoulish troupe.

MUCH $5 for adults, $3 for seniors and students, free for children under 12 and Missouri Botanical Garden members • MORE INFO 636-451-3512; shawnature.org

BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER

BY VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN

SATURDAY Art Show and Sale at Shaw Nature Reserve WHEN 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday • WHERE Shaw Nature Reserve, 307 Pinetum Loop Road, Gray Summit • HOW

Peruse the paintings, photography, folk art, woodworking and more at the Dana Brown Overnight Education Center, and pick up something for yourself or for a holiday gift. When you’re finished, take a hike — the Shaw Nature Reserve has 2,400 acres to explore.

‘Laumeier After Dark: Light the Way’ WHEN 5-10 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Laumeier Sculpture Park, 12580 Rott Road • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO 314-615-5278; laumeiersculpturepark.org

Refresh your flashlight

batteries: This nighttime event at Laumeier Sculpture Park has activities for the whole family, including a sculpture scavenger hunt, live music, fire pits and s’mores, lawn games and more. This installment of “Laumeier After Dark” is inspired by the park’s current exhibition, “David Hutson, Memory & Desire: A Personal Exploration of Neon Art, Past and Present.” BY VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN

Miss Fannie’s Ball WHEN 8 p.m. Saturday • WHERE The Ambassador, 9800 Halls Ferry Road • HOW MUCH $20-$25 • MORE INFO 314-534-1111; metrotix.com

One event that’s never a drag is Miss Fannie’s Ball, an annual competition

WHEN 4 p.m. Sunday • WHERE Left Bank Books, 399 North Euclid Avenue • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO 314-367-6731

St. Louis-born poet and journalist Quincy Troupe discusses his newest book, a memoir about his connections with Miles Davis, “Miles and Me,” assessing how the jazz great influenced him and other artists. BY JANE HENDERSON

Great Candy Exchange WHEN Noon-4 p.m. Sunday • WHERE HealthWorks! Kids’ Museum, 1100 Macklind Avenue • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO hwstl.org

Explore the HealthWorks! Kids’ Museum for free and bring along your unopened Halloween candy for chances to win prizes,

FAST FORWARD The List and Holiday Arts Guide, Nov. 11 in the Post-Dispatch: Get ready for our one-stop holiday guide, packed with hundreds of great gift ideas and hundreds of fun things to do during the holiday season • “An Evening of Ballet Stars,” Nov. 11 at the Edison Theatre: Dance St. Louis presents a performance of local premieres by leading dancers from American Ballet Theatre, English National Ballet/American Ballet Theatre, the Joffrey Ballet and San Francisco Ballet/New York City Ballet • Maxwell, Nov. 15 at Stifel Theatre: The R&B singer-songwriter debuted new music this year — his first since 2016 — and a 20th anniversary reissue of his 1998 “Embrya” album was released in September • “A Christmas Carol,” Dec. 6-9 at the Fox Theatre: Nebraska Theatre Caravan celebrates its 40th anniversary of touring with this beloved holiday musical, adapted from the classic story of Ebenezer Scrooge’s life-changing ghostly encounters

4

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 11.02.18-11.08.18

Find more events, and get your own events listed for free ➙ stltoday.com/events STLTODAY.COM/GO

P H O T O S : PA U L R . G I U N TA / I N V I S I O N /A P ( K E R I H I L S O N ) ; C H A R L E S S Y K E S / I N V I S I O N /A P ( C H R I S T I N A A G U I L E R A )

You know the long-running TV show “Wild ’N Out”; now it’s time for “Wild ’N Out Live.” The show is on the road with its gang of improvisors that includes host Nick Cannon along with Rip Michaels, Hitman Holla, Conceited, Justina Valentina, Iamzoie, Charlie Clips, Emmanuel Hudson, Chico Bean, DJ D-Wreck and a special musical guest. Also, Katt Williams has been added to the show. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

SUNDAY Keri Hilson, Bobby V


Christina Aguilera

Coheed and Cambria with Maps and Atlases, Thank You Scientist WHEN 7:30 p.m. Wednesday • WHERE The Pageant, 6161 Delmar Boulevard • HOW MUCH $35-$40 • MORE INFO 1-800745-3000; ticketmaster.com

Rock band Coheed and Cambria has just taken the lid off its latest album, “The Unheavenly Creatures,” which features “Old Flames,” “The Gutter,” “The Dark Sentencer” and the title track. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

including a Nintendo Switch with a LABO Variety Kit. Each pound of candy will be worth one raffle ticket. The museum will send the candy to active military, along with toothbrushes.

grieving woman haunted by memories of Buddha. “Bhuvaneswar tackles the intricate interactions of race, class, and sexuality in this enticing debut,” Publishers Weekly says.

BY VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN

BY JANE HENDERSON

Cathedral Concerts: Jennifer Pascual

Chamber Music Society of St. Louis: ‘For the Birds’

WHEN 2:30 p.m. Sunday • WHERE Cathedral Basilica of St. Louis, 4431 Lindell Boulevard • HOW MUCH $17 • MORE INFO 314-5337662; cathedralconcerts.org

Organist Jennifer Pascual became the first female director of music at St. Patrick’s Cathedral in New York City in 2003. She has a raft of prestigious degrees, including a doctorate in musical arts in organ performance from the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, N.Y., and an impressive résumé. Pascual’s recital Sunday afternoon features music by female composers, including Clara Schumann, Jeanne Demessieux and Fanny Hensel-Mendelssohn, along with works by J.S. Bach, Luigi Cherubini, Maurice Ravel and others.

WHEN 7:30 p.m. Monday and Tuesday • WHERE Sheldon Concert Hall & Art Galleries, 3648 Washington Boulevard • HOW MUCH $38 • MORE INFO 314941-6309; chambermusicstl.org

Birds, some scientists think, inspired early human beings to try out their own singing voices in imitation. It stands to reason that they’ve been a source of fascination for more recent composers. This program by the Chamber Music Society of St. Louis includes birdsongbased music by Haydn, Vaughan-Williams, Daquin, Saint-Saëns, Schumann, Smetana and Grieg. The society offers cabaretstyle seating, where you can enjoy a beverage while enjoying the music.

BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER

BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER

MONDAY Chaya Bhuvaneswar

TUESDAY Valerie Battle Kienzle

WHEN 7 p.m. Monday • WHERE Left Bank Books, 399 North Euclid Avenue • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO 314-367-6731

WHEN 7 p.m. Tuesday • WHERE Left Bank Books, 399 North Euclid Avenue • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO 314-367-6731

With her first book, a paperback collection of short stories, Chaya Bhuvaneswar explores subjects including orphans in India, two women who have a love affair and a

Local author Valerie Battle Kienzle discusses the updated, second edition of our fair city’s quirks and history. In “What’s With St. Louis?” she seeks answers to questions such as “Why

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are pieces of metal track imbedded in some local streets?” BY JANE HENDERSON

Christina Aguilera, Big Boi WHEN 8 p.m. Tuesday • WHERE Stifel Theatre, 1400 Market Street • HOW MUCH $46.50$156.50 • MORE INFO 1-800745-3000; ticketmaster.com

There’s life after “The Voice” for Christina Aguilera. After spending time being judgy in the NBC competition show’s spinning chairs, she’s back in the music game for real with her new album, “Liberation,” a fierce reminder that her voice hasn’t gone anywhere. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

THURSDAY St. Louis Classical Guitar: LAGQ WHEN 8 p.m. Thursday • WHERE Sheldon Concert Hall & Art Galleries, 3648 Washington Boulevard • HOW MUCH $35-$45 • MORE INFO 314567-5566; guitarstlouis.net

The Grammy-winning Los Angeles Guitar Quartet has long been established as one of the most innovative and versatile classical ensembles around. Its members — John Dearman, William Kanengiser, Scott Tennant and Matthew Greif — perform in every genre from Baroque to rock, transcribing and arranging music composed for other instruments. They’re technically outstanding and consistently entertaining. BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER

WEDNESDAY Hanson WHEN 8 p.m. Wednesday • WHERE Stifel Theatre, 1400 Market Street • HOW MUCH $36.50-$86.50 • MORE INFO 1-800-745-3000; ticketmaster.com

Hanson is flipping the script on its fans. The group’s new album, “String Theory,” casts the group in a new symphonic setting. The new record is described as more than a coming-ofage record for the band of brothers. Instead, it’s actually a dream realized. David Campbell (Adele, Justin Timberlake, Linkin Park) was brought on to handle the arrangements. The set includes old songs reimagined along with new ones. The project is a double set.

Carol Burnett WHEN 7:30 p.m. Thursday • WHERE Stifel Theatre, 1400 Market Street • HOW MUCH $65-$175 • MORE INFO 1-800745-3000; ticketmaster.com

After leaving Carol Burnett’s show Thursday night at the Stifel Theatre, there’s no doubt fans will be glad to have had the time together with her. Her “An Evening of Laughter and Reflection” will be a true trip down memory lane with the legendary comedian, who will take questions from the audience. “I love the spontaneity of these evenings,” Burnett said in a statement. “I never know what anyone is going to ask, or say, or do, so it keeps me on my toes.” BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

11.02.18-11.08.18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

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STLTODAY.COM/MUSIC ▼

“WE COULD HAVE TAKEN A DUMP ON THE MICROPHONE, CALLED IT AN ALBUM AND SAID ‘HERE,’ AND PEOPLE WOULD JUST PAT US ON THE HEAD AND SAY ‘NICE TRY.’”

John Popper of Blues Traveler

Blues Traveler gets into its garage-band vibe The making of its latest album, ‘Hurry Up & Hang Around,’ brought back a special feeling for the long-running rock band BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON | POST-DISPATCH POP MUSIC CRITIC

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n Blues Traveler’s last album, “Blow Up the Moon” (2015), the long-running rock band collaborated with acts including Hanson, the Dirty Heads, Jewel, Bowling for Soup, kjohnson@post-dispatch.com

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3OH!3, JC Chasez and Plain White T’s. Like the previous Blues Traveler album, it was a mix of “weird combinations,” frontman John Popper says. It also was a challenging album for the group to make. “You have to put yourself second to the process,” he says. “We were saving our good stuff — the stuff that was true to us. This

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GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 11.02.18-11.08.18

time we got to make up for that with a bunch of material.” The result is “Hurry Up & Hang Around,” which was released in October. “I was ready for the album to suck, but it really came together,” he says. “After a 30-year career, we’re all getting older. We could have taken a dump on the microphone, called it an album and said ‘Here,’ and people would just pat us on the head and say ‘Nice try.’ “But somehow we got excited about it and put out our best effort. Our performances on it are very impressive. We stretched ourselves, played harder and we were more focused.” Approaching its 30th anniversary, Blues Traveler figured it was time to make a new album. At the same time, the band was in the process of switching management teams.

“They couldn’t deal with us for more than three months,” Popper says. “We’re old and set in our ways.” But one of the things the last manager did was make arrangements for the band to record “Hurry Up & Hang Around” in Nashville, Tenn. “We got together and started fleshing out ideas to make the album,” Popper says. The band worked with producer Matt Rollings on the album; Rollings has also worked with Willie Nelson, Billy Joel and Reba McEntire. “He’s so great at sounds and pushing for the sound we were going after but didn’t know how to get,” Popper says. “He finds that extra bit you know you have to give. “A good producer sees something in you you don’t see in yourself. He sees us for who we are.” The making of the album brought back a special feeling for Blues Traveler: that garage-band vibe from back in the day. “That’s where you really learn stuff — in the garage in the parents’ basement,” Popper says. “You go in there, and somehow the way you communicate with each other, either it moves really slow or it moves well. This time it moved well.” A year ago, the “Run-Around” band brought its 30th anniversary tour to St. Louis, stopping at Delmar Hall for a sold-out show. Popper says the fans are responsible for the band’s long career. “There’s a connection out there that’s live and well, and they responded to it,” he says. “We’re really grateful. It energizes us and fuels us. The last song on the album (‘Ode From the Aspect’) is a long-overdue song — a love letter to the audience. They give us so much room and power, and it’s a real gift and opportunity.” Popper also embarked on a solo tour last year, as he sometimes does. He says it was a fun experience. “It was a chance to tell stories and have fun. I’m just funny enough as a comedian to know I’m not good enough to be a comedian.” WHAT Blues Traveler with Con Brio • WHEN 8 p.m. Friday • WHERE The Pageant, 6161 Delmar Boulevard • HOW MUCH $30-$35 • MORE INFO 1-800-745-3000; ticketmaster.com

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P H O T O : A M Y H A R R I S / I N V I S I O N /A P

BLUES TRAVELER FRONTMAN JOHN POPPER


‘Things Have Changed’ — for the better — for Bettye LaVette

Bettye LaVette

BY DANIEL DURCHHOLZ SPECIAL TO GO! MAGAZINE

here have been many — maybe too many — albums by artists covering Bob Dylan songs, but don’t count Bettye LaVette’s latest album, “Things Have Changed,” as one of them. To be sure, it’s filled with songs written by Dylan. But LaVette — a veteran singer whose sometimes roughand-tumble career stretches back over a half-century — is no mere cover artist. She prefers the term “interpreter,” and it’s easy to see why. LaVette does whatever it takes to make any song she commits to her own, whether it is the Who’s “Love Reign O’er Me” — her version of which brought Pete Townshend to tears when she performed it for him at the Kennedy Center Honors in 2008 — or a naked, a cappella reading of Sinead O’Connor’s “I Do Not Want What I Haven’t Got” from 2005’s “I’ve Got My Own Hell to Raise,” effectively LaVette’s comeback album after too many years in the wilderness. She’s taken on several Dylan tracks before attempting an entire album of them, but the lesson was the same then as it is now. Some might treat the rock bard’s works like sacred texts, but LaVette waves that notion away quickly. “They’re just songs,” she says. “They’re songs, and I’m a singer, and I have to make them fit into my mouth.” On “Things Have Changed,” her attempts to do just that take intriguing twists and turns. In one instance, she cuts out whole chunks of Dylan’s lumbering nineversed song, “Ain’t Talkin’.”

P H O T O : PA U L A . H E B E R T / I N V I S I O N /A P

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“He’s so eloquent with words. He will say the same thing five or six times different ways. So I just took the strongest one and said it,” she says, adding with a laugh, “Because, you know, if you have an argument with a black woman, I can do it in four verses.” To interpret “Mama, You Been on My Mind,” LaVette imagined she was singing the song to her own mother, who in years past spent many nights walking the floor worrying over her daughter’s safety and wellbeing. It’s a decidedly different spin than Dylan’s original. “He’s just talkin’ about some chick he met,” she says. “And I said, ‘These words are just too wonderful to be given to some chick!’” Of the song’s opening line — “Perhaps it’s the color of the sun cut flat” — LaVette says, “That’s so poetic! How you gonna make some chick go to bed and then write something like that about her? Please! Move along.” LaVette finds Dylan’s words endlessly inventive but his own performances strangely bloodless. “He’s a great writer, but he never reveals any emotion,” she says. “He’ll say, ‘This is what happened, and this is what you should think,’ but he never says, ‘That hurt me’ or, ‘That made me feel so small.’ None of that.” Initially, that vexed her. “I

knew there was something somewhere,” she says. “I couldn’t believe he could have lived all this time and knew all these words and had nothing that ever touched him. As I began to place the words in my mouth, I had to place them in my heart as well.” She finally found the connection she sought for the project in Dylan’s song “Emotionally Yours.” “With (that one),” she says, “I said, ‘There he is. And he’s crying.’” The album was produced by Steve Jordan, and among the players he brought in was guitarist Larry Campbell, who for years was a member of Dylan’s band. Serving as he does as drummer and bassist in Keith Richards’ Rolling Stones side project, the X-Pensive Winos, Jordan also asked his famous friend to sit in on the sessions. “We weren’t together long, but we could tell immediately that if we had known each other in the ’60s, we would have gotten into a lot of trouble,” LaVette says of Richards. “We got into trouble in the two hours that he was there. “He had his glass of vodka, I had my glass of Champagne. We blew smoke into each other’s mouths. We were immediately close. It was just fun. And the next day, he sent me two dozen beautiful roses.” At 72, LaVette is still enjoying her late-career surge of more than a dozen years now. And she’s thankful that it’s still going on. “I’m grateful that I’m in reasonably good health, that I can wear tight clothes and stand up on really high heels and dance,” she says. “And I’m very grateful that my voice seems to be getting stronger. My husband tells me to stop looking a gift horse in the mouth and to stop even talking about it.”

C H R I S T M A S T O U R 2018

DAVEKOZ .COM

WHAT Bettye LaVette • WHEN 8 p.m. Friday • WHERE Delmar Hall, 6133 Delmar Boulevard • HOW MUCH $35-$37.50 • MORE INFO 1-800-745-3000; ticketmaster.com

11.02.18-11.08.18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

7


Upstairs Lounge is closing, but not without a last dance The staple of South Grand Boulevard has been a longtime destination for dance music

club with his childhood friend Tran in 1992. Taca left the club in 2012 but returned to help run it after Tran’s death. “Tu wasn’t here anymore,” Taca says. “He took care of everything. I offered my help, BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON | POST-DISPATCH POP MUSIC CRITIC but I had limited time to be here. It really just got harder and harder to keep it going as pstairs Lounge is having one last dance. This the months went by.” Losing its 3 a.m. and 1 a.m. liweekend, the staple censes was another signal that the of underground club club was on its way out. Mekong, music, electronic the restaurant beneath the club, sounds and more is closing. had already closed. The club long ago cemented “Now that this is closing, it’s kind its role as a leader of dance music Tu Tien Tran of cathartic,” Taca says.“It culture in St. Louis. Upstairs Lounge says. “It feels like we’re washing our hands of it. At the same owner Tu Tien Tran, who often was time, I’m really sad. This was Tu’s dream, and called the Godfather of St. Louis EDM, died he wasn’t finished with it. There was so much in January at 47. more he wanted to do,” such as expanding into “The writing was on the wall when he the shuttered pawn shop next door. died,” says Dino Taca, who helped open the

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GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 11.02.18-11.08.18

having an unflinching acceptance of everyone, something he believes the community will miss. And it has a great sound system. “Others don’t take the sound that seriously,” he says. “The bathrooms may have been a little grungy — it’s a hole in the wall — but we always took the sound seriously.” Upstairs Lounge has featured a number of DJs over the years spinning hip-hop, house, techno, dubstep, drum and bass, and more. “It’s gone through a lot of changes (and) identities,” Taca says, adding that Upstairs Lounge opened as a punk rock club. Around 2000, the focus flipped from live bands to DJs. “It found us more than we found it,” Taca says of the change. “It was a real rebirth of this place. That’s where the real story starts.” Taca gives a nod to hip-hop for being key — “one of the things that really put us on the map” during the late ’90s, he says. Hip-hop DJ James Biko, formerly known as DJ Needles, was part of a hip-hop night with DJ K-Nine and DJ O.B. Juan. “I can’t even remember how it came to be, but I do believe, as most dope rap (stuff) does in St. Louis, John Harrington (of Midwest Avengers) had something to do with it,” Biko says. “We’d rotate all night and rock our sets to a consistent turnout every week. It was pretty dope to be a part of something like that, especially being that I was only about a couple years into DJing professionally. I definitely miss those Adrian Gough, who for the past six years days and will forever hold up the Upstairs has been the booking agent, promoter and Lounge as one of the all-time great social media manager for Upstairs venues.” Lounge, says the closing is tough to Upstairs Lounge isn’t going digest. away without making some noise. “I spent a lot of my life here,” A “Last Dance” party is Friday Gough says. “It was always great night, wrapping up a weeklong because it was a 3 a.m. bar, which series of events. were kind of scarce in the early DJ Needles “We’re bringing back some of 2000s. It was always somewhere I the old nights with all the people who called home. have curated underground music in “I wouldn’t be as successful as I am St. Louis — people who will carry as a promoter if it wasn’t for this the torch,” Gough says. place. Tu gave me an opportunity Friday’s event brings back when no one else would.” Luke Hansen, Don Tinsley, T/ Gough’s company, Yo! Adrian! Lec, Scooby Blue, Future Ex Wife, Presents, has done shows at the ATZ, Brandon B, Cory Thomas Old Rock House, 2720 Cherokee, DJ O.B. Juan and Bacon Beatz. The Oct. 27 kickUtopia Studios and St. Louis off featured Ron S, Marc Buxton, Gary Skatium. He fondly recalls his first Mac, Scotty Mac, the Amigos, Mark Lewis, event at Upstairs Lounge working with Narcosis, Brian R, Dave9 and Alex Jensen. Scotty Mac. Tran presented the opportunity “There were so many times I really enjoyed to him, though it didn’t go as expected. myself DJing and connecting with people “It was exciting to be doing an event, and everyone meshing together,” Gough says. but Tu overbooked it. I didn’t have a spot “It will be difficult to fill this void.” upstairs. I had to move my event downstairs. ... But I was happy. Who knows, I may have WHAT “Last Dance” • WHEN 7 p.m. Friday • WHERE Upstairs never gotten another chance.” Lounge, 3131 South Grand Boulevard • HOW MUCH $5 • MORE INFO facebook.com/upstairsloungestl Gough also credits Upstairs Lounge with stltoday.com/go

P H O T O S : S A R A H H AY S ( I N I C I O PA R T Y ) ; U P S TA I R S L O U N G E ( T R A N ) ; E R I C A B R O W N ( D J N E E D L E S , D J O . B . J U A N )

Inicio Party at Upstairs Lounge


SAINT L OR

THE SHELDON 2018-2019 SEASON

Four performances only NOVEMBER 2 - 4

Los Angeles Guitar Quartet November 8 at 8 p.m. Co-presented with St. Louis Classical Guitar

Lila Downs November 11 at 7:30 p.m. Made possible by the WH ITAKE R FO U N DATI O N

An extremely physical and emotional rendition of the world’s greatest love story by artistic director Gen Horiuchi. As powerful and relevant today as ever before.

TICKETS 314-516-4949 TICKETS: TICKETS 3 314-516-4 94 | TOUHILL. TOUHILL.ORG OUHILL.ORG ORG

The Feyza Eren Group “A Dozen Divas” November 14 at 10 a.m. Sponsored by Anne Bannister

Looprat w/Mathias and The Pirates November 16 at 8 p.m. Hip Hop Live in The Sheldon Ballroom

Dee Dee Bridgewater & The Memphis Soulphony November 17 at 8 p.m. Sponsored by The Steward Family Foundation and World Wide Technology, Inc. Welcomed by 88.7 The Sound

Nathan Carter: Celtic Country November 23 at 8 p.m. Call MetroTix at 314.534.1111 or visit THESHELDON.ORG

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11.02.18-11.08.18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

9


TICKET TRACKER ▼

SEEN ON THE SCENE

Chaifetz Arena

ticketmaster.com

KATHY GRIFFIN • OCT. 27 • TOUHILL PERFORMING ARTS CENTER 1 Kathy and Jim Wright of Richmond Heights 2 Oscar Reynaga (left) and Bryon Owen, both of Ottumya, Iowa 3 Leigh Berning (left) and Suzanne Cowman, both of Springfield, Ill. 4 Sean Gardner of Overland, Kan., and Lisa Snowden of Kansas City, Mo. 5 Kevin Bowlds (left) and Chad Benefield, both of Owensboro, Ky. 6 Jesse Fowler (left) of St. Charles and Brad Allen of O’Fallon, Mo. ELTON JOHN • OCT. 30 • ENTERPRISE CENTER 7 Annette Hunt (left) of Jackson, Mo., and Angie Smith of Park Hills 8 Katie McKenna (left) and Karen McKenna, both of Chesterfield 9 Nicole and Jason Vaughn of Granite City 10 Amy and Justin Grimm of Columbus, Ohio 11 Donna Hoskins (left) and Tina Snipes, both of Kennett, Mo. 12 Angela Carnes (left) of Sullivan, Ill., and Brandee Bloome, of Carlinville, Ill.

• St. Louis Music Festival with Charlie Wilson, Babyface, Joe, 7:30 p.m. Feb. 15, $52.50-$253, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday.

Delmar Hall ticketmaster.com

Duck Room at Blueberry Hill ticketmaster.com • The Aces, 8 p.m. March 12, $15-$18, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday.

Enterprise Center ticketmaster.com • Ariana Grande’s “Sweetener World Tour,” April 13, $31.95-$221.95, on sale at 10 a.m. Monday.

Friendly Temple Missionary Baptist Church friendlytemple.org • Kirk Whalum presents Seventh Annual Gospel According to Jazz Concert with Sheila E., John Stoddart, Kevin Whalum, Lynn Mabry, 7 p.m. Dec. 14, $20-$50.

Ariana Grande

• Turnpike Troubadours, Nov. 17, canceled.

• Maggie Rogers’ “Heard It in a Past Life Tour,” 8 p.m. April 7, $29.50$32.50, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday.

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Stifel Theatre ticketmaster.com • Chris D’Elia’s “Follow the Leader Tour,” 8 p.m. Jan. 12, $29-$39, meet-andgreet available, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday.

• Janson D. Williams, 8 p.m. Dec. 26, $15.

Pop’s Nightclub

• The Devon Allman Project with special guest Duane Betts, 8 p.m. Dec. 26, $30-$35.

• Action Bronson’s Oct. 24 concert will be rescheduled.

• Dead Horses, the Brother Brothers, 8 p.m. Jan. 31, $10-$12.

Sheldon Concert Hall & Art Galleries

• Keller Williams’ PettyGrass featuring the HillBenders, 9 p.m. March 23, $30.

metrotix.com

The Pageant

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• Smino’s “Kri3mas,” 8 p.m. Dec. 14, $25-$27.50.

• Aaron Kamm & the One Drops, 9 p.m. Nov. 21, $10.

metrotix.com

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• State Property Reunion Tour with Beanie Sigel, Freeway, Young GUNZ and Peedi Crakk, 8 p.m. Nov. 21, $25-$35.

• Lalah Hathaway’s “Sophisticated Soul Tour” with Raheem DeVaughn, Lyfe Jennings, 7 p.m. Feb. 17, $59-$99, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday.

Old Rock House

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ticketweb.com

• Paula Poundstone, 8 p.m. Feb. 2, $41.50$44.50, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday.

PHOTOS: JON GITCHOFF (SEEN); CHRIS PIZZELLO (GRANDE)

• Mississippi Nights Reunion: A Gathering of Musicians, Fans and Staff, 7:30 p.m. Jan. 5, $10.

ticketmaster.com • Ben Rector, 8 p.m. Nov. 9, sold out.

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Find more photos from these events and more around town, and order photo reprints and keepsake merchandise: stltoday.com/photos

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 11.02.18-11.08.18

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THE BLENDER ▼

Taynka gets back into formation for Beyoncé show

Mayberry and Metropolis is Maplewood

St. Louis singer reprises her tribute as part of Ballpark Village series OUTDOOR DINING: cityofmaplewood.com/alfresco

Taynka is getting back in formation. The St. Louis singer made a splash when she debuted her Beyoncé tribute at the Missouri History Museum’s Twilight Tuesdays series in May. Now she’s bringing it back. Friday night at Ballpark Village, as part of its Tribute Series, Taynka revisits Beyoncé with a bigger show. She’s stepping it up, adding video, lighting, pyro, a horn section, a new opening and more songs. “It’s a bigger show, for sure,” says Taynka, who has performed with Dr. Zhivegas for nine years. She’ll perform more than 30 Beyoncé songs. And she’s even adding a Destiny’s Child medley. “I was going to do it the first time, but I got talked out of it,” she says. Taynka’s approach to the show rests in her faithful re-creations of some iconic Beyoncé performances. She’s big on everything from the star’s signature choreography to her hair tossing — and, of course, vocals. Her favorite part of the show is “Don’t Hurt Yourself,” a song from the Grammywinning album “Lemonade.” “I can’t wait until we get there,” Taynka kjohnson@post-dispatch.com

says. “It’s perfect with the choreography, and I love the message of that song. I was secondguessing myself about the Malcolm X narration. Should I keep it in there or not? I really wanted to.” Her choreographer eventually convinced her to keep it. Taynka only introduced Beyoncé into her repertoire last year as part of the Dr. Zhivegas set. “I thought we should’ve been doing it, but the band was slow to catch up,” she says. “We did it, and people loved it. They’d been asking for that and ‘Single Ladies.’ Song selection and pacing were the first hurdles she needed to cross. She figured it was best to hit listeners over the head right out of the gate. “It’s a very high-energy song selection,” she says. “And it was difficult because there are so many songs to choose from. We started with 45 and narrowed it down. It’s still a lot. But we might do two verses of this, a verse of that, one verse of that, a hook of that.” But the real task was learning choreography. “I had zero choreography before,” she says. “I entertain, but I’m not a dancer. I don’t dance like that. It was an uphill battle.” She recruited choreographer Lucretia “SupaNova” Johnson of Urban Amethyst to get her in step. “I told her as long as she has rhythm and a two-step, I can turn (her) into a dancer,” Johnson says. “I was really proud of her. She was going to keep doing it until she got it. She

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worked really hard.” The Beyoncé tribute puts Taynka front and center. “It feels fantastic and gives me a new energy,” she says. “I’m actually able to produce this and make it come to life.” She’d like to keep the Beyoncé tribute going after the Ballpark Village show, possibly taking it to other cities, but she doesn’t know when she could do it in St. Louis again. “I don’t want to wear St. Louis out,” she says. Dr. Zhivegas plays a tribute to Prince and the Revolution at Delmar Hall on Dec. 22. It will be the band’s fourth time doing the show. “I enjoy the spirit of the Prince show we do — the energy that we share onstage for the love of the that music,” Taynka says. “And I love dressing the part. I get to pull out the lingerie and boots.” If you’re trying to remember how else you may know Taynka, she was one of the 44 finalists on “American Idol” in 2004.

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11.02.18-11.08.18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

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Q&A ▼

‘The Gospel at Colonus’ puts a unique spin on Oedipus The Black Rep will present a concert version of the musical this weekend at its third annual gala BY CALVIN WILSON | POST-DISPATCH THEATER CRITIC

calvinwilson@post-dispatch.com

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@calvinwilsonstl

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 11.02.18-11.08.18

Ron Himes, founder of the Black Rep and director of “The Gospel at Colonus”

known actors. How difficult was it great vehicle for telling the story. to put the cast together? Q • How does the show take A • It was just a matter of shape as a concert? coordinating some schedules. A • In concert, we’re going Actually, the last time we did the to do it in tuxedos and gowns. full production of “The Gospel There’ll be no costumes and no Ted Lange at Colonus,” Antonio played the scenery, so it won’t be fully staged. role Lincoln Center does concert versions ro of Creon, so he’s coming back to reprise a role that he’s done for us and of musicals on a regular basis like that. with us. Ted and I are old friends, and we’re It’s a format that, in some instances, allows always looking for an opportunity to work a theater or a company to pay homage to together. older shows, or be able to mount something contemporary without doing a full WHAT “The Gospel at Colonus” • WHEN 8 p.m. Saturday; awards production of it. ceremony at 7:30 p.m. • WHERE 560 Music Center, 560 Trinity Q • Ted Lange and Antonio Fargas are well- Avenue • HOW MUCH $50-$250 • MORE INFO theblackrep.org stltoday.com/go

P H O T O S : J . B . F O R B E S / P O S T- D I S PAT C H ( R O N H I M E S ) ; C O U R T E S Y O F T H E B L A C K R E P ( L A N G E , FA R G A S )

A

mong the most strikingly original works in American theater is “The Gospel at Colonus,” a musical that reimagines Sophocles’ “Oedipus at Colonus” within the context of a black Pentecostal church service. With book and lyrics by Lee Breuer and music by Bob Telson, the show was a finalist for the 1985 Pulitzer Prize for drama. The Black Rep, which staged the musical during its 1996-97 season, will present a concert version this weekend for the company’s third annual gala. Dr. Donald Suggs and Andreal Hoosman will receive the Frankie Muse Freeman Spirit Award, and actor Stephen McKinley Henderson will be honored with the Woodie King Lifetime Achievement Award. The cast will include Antonio Fargas, who is perhaps best known for his role as the streetwise Huggy Bear in the 1970s crime series “Starsky and Hutch,” and Ted Two years ago we did “Dreamgirls,” and Lange, who portrayed bartender Isaac Washington in the 1970s-’80s last year we did “Crossin’ Over.” Just working on “The Gospel at comedy-drama series “The Love Colonus” again reminded me of Boat.” what a wonderful piece it is and Recently, Ron Himes, director has me thinking about remounting of the show and founder and the whole production sometime in producing director of the Black the near future. Rep, spoke with Go! Magazine. Antonio Fargas Q • What makes the Sophocles play Q • Why did you choose “The a good fit for gospel music? Gospel at Colonus” for this year’s A • I really think it’s the creativity of Lee gala? Breuer and Bob Telson, who were geniuses A • What we’ve started doing with the in translating it as such. A church service is a galas is a concert version of a musical.


RECENTLY REVIEWED THEATER David Cross

After a disastrous 2001 St. Louis show, David Cross makes long-overdue return BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON POST-DISPATCH POP MUSIC CRITIC

belly-flop of a show at St. Louis University in 2001 left a bitter taste in comedian-actor David Cross’ mouth, not to mention those in the audience. Cross, booked to perform as part of the school’s Welcome Week, delivered his usual set. But it was deemed offensive by concertgoers and by the university. (Anti-Catholic jokes didn’t fare well at the Catholic university.) He hasn’t performed in St. Louis since. But the “Arrested

PHOTO: JUST FOR LAUGHS

A

kjohnson@post-dispatch.com

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Development” actor makes his return Sunday night with his “Oh Come On” tour at the Pageant. “I truly don’t have any grudges,” Cross says. “I always said I wanted to wait until the (Boston) Red Sox took the (Los Angeles) Dodgers in five games, and that was a long time coming. Of course the Red Sox played in multiple World Series but never against the Dodgers and in five games. So everything fell into place,” Cross jokes. He says his friend Brendan O’Malley, who lives in St. Louis, helped convince him to return. Though Cross acknowledges his show at SLU was crap (our @kevincjohnson

word; not his), he says he never really had a problem with the city itself; the issue was with the university. “That was really on them,” he says. “They didn’t do their due diligence. They had no idea what my stand-up was. That doesn’t reflect on the city. I want everybody to understand I never said I hated St. Louis and that I was never going back.” Cross’ lack of St. Louis shows since 2001 was more a result of the way tours work. Routing, which he doesn’t control, never pointed him to St. Louis. His track record with audiences here wasn’t good anyway. “It’s a city (where) I’ve never done well,” he says. “So it was a very easy thing to go, ‘If St Louis isn’t on there, I’m not going to fight to bring it back.’ It’s easier to go somewhere else. That’s how it is with most stand-ups. America is a big

country, and there are lots of places to do comedy.” But this time, when St. Louis wasn’t on his schedule, he requested it. He didn’t want his friend to have to drive to Kansas to see him. “I’m looking forward to this,” he says of Sunday’s show. “It’s a fun set to do. I’m getting toward the end of it. St. Louis is the third -to-last show that I will ever do this set. So I’m gonna enjoy it and have a good time. And I’m looking forward to performing in St. Louis for years to come.” Cross, whose latest stand-up album is “... America ... Great” (2016), says his current live set is made up three parts. One third is “jokey jokes, some of it dark, some of it silly. It doesn’t matter what your politics are. You can just enjoy it.” Another third is anecdotal, and another third is topical. “Trump is a part of that,” he says of the latter. “But this has

always been the recipe — a little something for everyone. I imagine there will be a handful of people who won’t like what I have to say. It always happens. It would be weird if it didn’t.” The show has evolved a bit from when he released “... America ... Great” in 2016. He says the mood of the country was different, and Trump was “just a silly clown” amid a bunch of Republican candidates. “Now he’s the president, and things for a lot of people are markedly worse and demonstrably awful. I have plenty to say about him, though it’s less about him and more about his fans.” His young daughter with wife Amber Tamblyn is part of the set. “I talk about what it’s like having a kid in the country right now, watching that evolution.” Earlier on the tour, Cross discussed actress Charlyne Yi’s accusation in 2017 that Cross had made racial comments to her and remarked on her “tattered pants” 10 years ago. “I did talk about it, but it didn’t last more than four shows,” he says. “I don’t think anybody gave a (crap) and didn’t know what the reference was. It felt like a huge speed bump in the show. Perhaps I was too close to it then, or maybe it wasn’t funny enough or universal enough. Maybe I just need to re-approach it. “I made the terrible mistake of apologizing to her in private, not public, within 48 or 24 hours. The whole thing kind of blindsided me. To this day I don’t remember the event. And I want to be clear, I believe she experienced the things she experienced. The thing about making fun of her being poor for the way she was dressed — do you see how I dress? I would never make fun of somebody for being poor. “It was an ill-fated attempt at a joke that didn’t go over and anybody who knows me knows I am not that.” WHAT David Cross • WHEN 8 p.m. Sunday • WHERE The Pageant, 6161 Delmar Boulevard • HOW MUCH $37.50 ($5 from each ticket goes to Let America Vote) • MORE INFO 1-800-745-3000; ticketmaster.com

‘Admissions’ WHEN Through Nov. 11 • WHERE Loretto-Hilton Center for the Performing Arts, 130 Edgar Road, Webster Groves • HOW MUCH $46-$71 • MORE INFO repstl.org

Henny Russell (“Orange Is the New Black”) stars in Joshua Harmon’s outrageously hilarious comedy about race, class and the increasingly unbridgeable American cultural divide. The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis production is directed by Steven Woolf. BY CALVIN WILSON

‘A Doll’s House, Part 2’ WHEN Through Sunday • WHERE Loretto-Hilton Center for the Performing Arts, 130 Edgar Road, Webster Groves • HOW MUCH $19-$92 • MORE INFO repstl.org

Playwright Lucas Hnath’s sequel to the classic Ibsen drama, presented by the Repertory Theatre of St. Louis, is clever, provocative and terrifically entertaining. Directed by Timothy Near. BY CALVIN WILSON

‘Macbeth: Come Like Shadows’ WHEN Wednesday to Saturday through Nov. 10; arrive by 7:20 p.m. for buses to and from performance site • WHERE Pickup location is 1615 South Broadway • HOW MUCH $35-$45 • MORE INFO rebelandmisfitsproductions.com

Shakespeare’s play is at the core of this flawed but fascinating immersive Rebel and Misfits production featuring actors who clearly have the chops to perform “Macbeth” straight. Maybe next time. BY CALVIN WILSON

‘Silent Sky’ WHEN Through Sunday • WHERE Kranzberg Arts Center, 501 North Grand Boulevard • HOW MUCH $15-$35 • MORE INFO 314-534-1111; metrotix.com

Lauren Gunderson’s play about Henrietta Leavitt, an influential early 20th century astronomer, is engaging, inspirational and poignant and benefits from an excellent cast. The Insight Theatre Company production is directed by artistic director Maggie Ryan. BY CALVIN WILSON Find more performances in our calendar, and add your own group’s upcoming events. stltoday.com/events

11.02.18-11.08.18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

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A reflecting pool and Five Branches Fountain are new additions at the renovated Soldiers Memorial Military Museum.

After a $30 million overhaul, Soldiers Memorial shines for its grand reopening

O

on a bunting-draped platform in front of Soldiers Memorial in downtown St. Louis. The building was under construction to honor the 1,075 local service members who had died in the Great War. • “Here is

rising a fitting structure, a symbol of devoted patriotism and unselfish service,” Roosevelt said to the crowd of 75,000 people who packed the grounds. “We in America do not build monuments to war. We do not build monuments to conquest. We build monuments to commemorate

BY VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN | ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

the spirit of sacrifice in war — reminders of our desire for peace.” ➼ 14

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 11.02.18-11.08.18

stltoday.com/go

PHOTO ROBERT COHEN

REFRESHING OUR MEMORIES

n Oct. 14, 1936, President Franklin D. Roosevelt stood


P H O T O : D AV I D C A R S O N

Andrew Holder cleans the top of a display case at Soldiers Memorial. The results of a two-year, $30 million renovation will be revealed to the public Saturday.

ABOVE • Several hundred missing tiles on the Gold Star Mothers ceiling mosaic have been replaced. Below it is a black granite cenotaph, built to honor those killed in World War I. LEFT • “Courage,” one of four iconic Walker Hancock sculptures at the entrances to Soldiers Memorial that have been cleaned of dirt and pollutants.

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The structure, which cost just over $1 million at the time, opened on Memorial Day 1938. The years since took a toll. In World War II, more than 2,700 more local soldiers died. In Korea and Vietnam, about 400. In the wars and conflicts since, about 200. At the memorial, coal dust stained the four Walker Hancock sculptures framing the entrances. Sunlight streamed through the unfiltered windows and faded uniforms and ribbons on display in the un-airconditioned exhibit halls. Donations of papers, photographs and other military memorabilia piled up in the basement, which offered little protection from moisture. Visitors to downtown overlooked the memorial, often assuming it was closed. On Saturday, Soldiers Memorial will reopen to the public after a twoyear, $30 million renovation that more than doubled its exhibit space. Workers dug 18 inches from the basement floor and turned the lowerlevel space into galleries. There’s air conditioning, new wiring, a new wheelchair ramp and elevator, assembly and classroom spaces, display cases with sensors that will alert curators when temperature and humidity aren’t just right, textured photos and models to touch, break rooms and family restrooms — everything needed to serve as a functional, LEED-certified, ADA-compliant museum. It’s one of only 3 percent of museums in the country accredited by the American Alliance of Museums. “I feel like St. Louisans are going to have one more cultural institution they can brag about, and we have a lot to brag about here,” Mark Sundlov, the new director of the museum, said on a recent tour, as workers bustled around display cases that were still covered in sheets of plastic. “One of the top goals is to become part of a dynamic downtown,” he said. The city had sought a museum face lift for years. In 2015, it signed over control of the museum to the Missouri Historical Society but retains ownership of the building and artifacts. The money for the renovation and a $25 million endowment came from the Crawford Taylor Foundation and the Taylor family, which until this week had stayed anonymous.

11.02.18-11.08.18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

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The setting sun casting a shadow of an American flag on the World War II monument by Hilis Arnold.

The Guth Foundation contributed $300,000. Only the assembly hall has a Taylor name on it: that of Jack C. Taylor, who piloted an F6F Hellcat fighter in World War II before founding Enterprise Rent-A-Car, headquartered in St. Louis. Taylor died in 2016.

LEFT • New exhibits, like this one with Braille and tactile elements for visitors with low vision, are ADA-compliant.

R O B E R T C O H E N / P O S T- D I S PAT C H

BELOW • The west wing at Soldiers Memorial includes information about U.S. Marine Rocky Sickmann, who was held captive in Iran. PHOTOS: HILLARY LEVIN / P-D

SHINING ONCE AGAIN

As visitors approach the memorial entrance and loggia, they’ll see the black granite cenotaph, inscribed with the names of those who died in World War I. The cenotaph, which resembles a tomb, is now lit from its base, which makes the names more visible and gives it a haunting, striking glow at night. Hundreds of red and gold tiles that had fallen from the Gold Star Mothers ceiling mosaic above the cenotaph were replaced. “It looked beautiful because it was beautiful,” said Leigh Walters, director of marketing and communications for the Missouri Historical Society. “But now, it just shines.” The same can be said for the rest of the building: Marble panels on the walls and wood panels under windows had to be removed to abate asbestos underneath, and terrazzo floors were re-created in break rooms to match existing floors. Storm windows were added inside to show off the unique metalwork outside. Old light fixtures were rewired and fitted with LED bulbs. Only five old-fashioned bulbs remain: four in the mahogany-lined elevator and one in a phone booth, which has been outfitted with a vintage pay telephone. Time took its toll, but it could have been worse. “The building itself was so wellbuilt,” said Karen Goering, managing

ABOVE • Mark Sundlove (left) and Mikall Venso remove protective plastic from the gun turret of a B-24 bomber. The turret was manufactured by Emerson Electric in St. Louis during WWII. The photo hanging high in the background is of Emerson workers assembling turrets. RIGHT • The stairway to the basement at Soldiers Memorial, where new exhibit space was made available. P H O T O S : D AV I D C A R S O N / P - D

D AV I D C A R S O N / P O S T- D I S PAT C H H I L L A R Y L E V I N / P O S T- D I S PAT C H

Names of people who died in World War II are engraved on the Memorial Wall in the Court of Honor.

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A mahogany-lined elevator with art deco metal doors has been restored at Soldiers Memorial.

director of administration and operations for the memorial. “It was in remarkably good condition because of the original construction.” The two main galleries on the first level will house “St. Louis in Service,” a long-term exhibit that explores local involvement in military history, from the American Revolution to today. Fabric shades cover the windows, about 19 feet tall; they not only help protect the artifacts inside but also show off giant portraits of St. Louisans who served: Gen. Daniel Bissell (American Revolutionary War and the War of 1812) and Brig. Gen. Jeannie M. Leavitt among them. Leavitt is the U.S. Air Force’s first female fighter pilot and the first woman to command an Air Force combat fighter wing. She will be the keynote speaker at the memorial’s opening. A bell from the cruiser St. Louis, commissioned in 1906, is the centerpiece of one wing, and a rotating collection of military uniforms stands in the middle of the other wing. An Emerson airplane turret that once sat on the nose of a B-21 bomber now rests with the uniforms. The turrets were made in a Ferguson factory that made fans and electric motors but converted during wartime. “People think of military history as far away — it happened overseas,” Walters said. “But it happened in your community. It was a part of daily life. And the community had an impact on military warfare.” The museum’s basement used to serve as storage and offices for the city’s Emergency Management Agency. Now, the space is weatherproofed and climatecontrolled, with a recording studio where veterans can tell their stories.

stltoday.com/go

stltoday.com/go

December December11-16 11-16

December December2626January January66 11.02.18-11.08.18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

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Outside the museum, the Court of Honor got an overhaul. It includes a reflecting pool and fountains.

The lower level’s first exhibit, “St. Louis and the Great War,” commemorates the centennial of the end of World War I and shows off more than 200 artifacts that have never been displayed, such as a carrier pigeon message capsule, a portable reed organ and a German gas mask. An oversize photo on the wall shows a remarkable view of downtown during a parade for soldiers returning from the war in 1919. Though the war ended Nov. 11, 1918, it took months to get the troops home. AREAS FOR REFLECTION

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Saturday 8 a.m.-2 p.m. • Food trucks 9 a.m. • The grand reopening begins with a concert honoring veterans, followed by a flag raising. 10 a.m. • Formal ceremony 11 a.m. • Soldiers Memorial opens to the public, and the first 5,000 visitors will receive a commemorative pin. The U.S. Postal Service will offer a stamp cancellation commemorating the event from until 1 p.m. 5 p.m. • Flag-lowering ceremony

Monday-Wednesday 10 a.m. • Flagraising ceremony 3 and 7 p.m. • “All Is Calm: The Christmas Truce of 1914,” presented by Mustard Seed Theatre, tells the stories of soldiers who defied their commanders with a night of peace in the battlefield. Tickets are free for veterans and active military but should be reserved in advance. All other tickets are $10, $5 for Missouri Historical Society members and $5 for children. American Sign Language interpretation will be provided at the 7 p.m. Nov. 6 program.

Sunday

5 p.m. • Flag-lowering ceremony

10 a.m. • Flagraising ceremony

Thursday

11 a.m.-3 p.m. • Food trucks

7:30-9:30 a.m. • St. Louis University Dean’s Breakfast Honoring Military Service, St. Louis University

1:30-2:30 p.m. • Performance by Oakville

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 11.02.18-11.08.18

10 a.m. • Flagraising ceremony

SOLDIERS MEMORIAL

Pine St.

1. “Vision” by Walker Hancock

11 a.m.-2 p.m. • Missouri Athletic Club and Rotary Club of St. Louis Annual Veterans Day Commemoration Luncheon, Missouri Athletic Club

2. “Courage” by Walker Hancock

5

6

3. Cenotaph

Soldiers Memorial

5 p.m. • Flag-lowering ceremony

3 4 1

More events to follow Nov. 9-11. Find a complete schedule at mohistory. org/memorial.

2

4. Gold Star Mothers mosaic 5. “Sacrifice” by Walker Hancock 6. “Loyalty” by Walker Hancock

COURT OF HONOR

WHERE Soldiers Memorial, 1315 Chestnut Street • MORE INFO 314-818-6780; mohistory.org/ memorial • HOURS “St. Louis in Service” and “WWI: St. Louis and the Great War” will be open 10 a.m.-5 p.m. daily and immediately following major ceremonies.

7. Blue Star memorial

Chestnut St.

7

Court of Honor

14 13 12

11 8

10 8

8. World War II Memorial Wall 9. World War II monument by Hillis Arnold 10. Reflecting pool

9

11. Five Branches fountain 12. Korea Memorial Wall 13. Vietnam Memorial Wall

Market St.

14. U.S.S. Langley Anchor

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PHOTO: HILLARY LEVIN

High School Tiger band 5 p.m. • Flag-lowering ceremony

13th St.

SOLDIERS MEMORIAL REOPENING EVENTS

14th St.

The top floor is devoted to meeting space and offices, with new cork floors in the Taylor Assembly Hall and the original electric fans still hanging from the walls. The fans no longer function — and wouldn’t be up to code if they did — but they remain because visitors had fond memories of them. The spaces will be used for programming for students and the public. Outside, in the same area where Roosevelt made his dedication speech 82 years ago, a Court of Honor that was created in 1948 as the city’s World War II memorial got an overhaul. It now includes a reflecting pool and fountain to represent the five branches of the armed forces. Chestnut Street was narrowed to a single vehicle lane with a bike lane, and a grassy area between the street and fountain can be used for programming or as a reflective space. The alterations will make the area more noticeable to visitors downtown. “One of the things we were able to do is make the site work together like it hadn’t before,” Goering said. Monuments to those who died in Korea and Vietnam were moved to their own spots on a walkway between the museum and Court of Honor, and names for those who died in more recent conflicts will be added, with a dedication planned for Memorial Day. After that, there will be room for more names. And when they’re added, it might be fitting to remember President Roosevelt’s closing words from dedication day years ago: “No place could be more fitting to reaffirm that faith and confidence than a monument to those who have died in a gallant effort to save democracy to the world. ... May we keep the faith.”


STLTODAY.COM/MOVIES ▼

From left: Gwilym Lee, Rami Malek and Joe Mazzello in “Bohemian Rhapsody”

‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ is bad, but boy, is it entertaining Rami Malek’s performance transcends shallow material that doesn’t move beyond what the audience already knows ★★½

P H O T O : A L E X B A I L E Y, T W E N T I E T H C E N T U R Y F O X

BY ANN HORNADAY | WASHINGTON POST

e can stipulate a few things about “Bohemian Rhapsody.” We can stipulate that it’s not a great movie. We can stipulate that, in many ways, it’s not even a very good movie. As a trite, often laughably cliched biopic of Queen frontman Freddie Mercury, an enterprise that should have been as daring and flamboyantly theatrical as its subject winds up being bowdlerized, Wiki-fied, distortingly compressed and unforgivably conventional. And yet. We can also stipulate that, despite the myriad shortcomings of its parts, the sum

W

stltoday.com/go ★ Skip it ★ ★ So-so ★ ★ ★ Good ★ ★ ★ ★ Excellent

of “Bohemian Rhapsody” winds up being giddily entertaining, first as an exercise in so-bad-it’s-funny kitsch, and ultimately as something far more meaningful and thrilling. Every now and then, a film comes along that defies the demands of taste, formal sophistication, even artistic honesty to succeed simply on the level of pure, inexplicable pleasure. “Bohemian Rhapsody” is just that cinematic unicorn: the bad movie that works, even when it shouldn’t. As a whirligig tour through Mercury’s rise and tragic end (he died from AIDS-related pneumonia in 1991), “Bohemian Rhapsody” hits all the expected notes: We meet young Farrokh Bulsara (Rami Malek), the son of immigrants from Zanzibar, when he’s working as a baggage handler at Heathrow Airport,

writing songs on the fly and making pilgrimages to a local club to hear his favorite band, Smile. When that group’s lead singer quits, Bulsara holds his own impromptu audition in the parking lot, wowing guitarist Brian May (Gwilym Lee) and drummer Roger Taylor (Ben Hardy) with his soaring range and instant harmonizability. Not since Ally sang “Shallow” for Jackson Maine outside Super A Foods have the musical gods smiled so fortuitously. What follows is the stuff of familiar history: Renamed Queen at the suggestion of Bulsara (who already called himself Freddie and went on to adopt the stage name Mercury), the band becomes hugely popular throughout the 1970s and ‘80s, creating pop anthems and an extravagant stage show that defies rock’s grittily macho self-image and proves improbably galvanizing. Meanwhile, Freddie proposes to the love of his life, Mary Austin (Lucy Boynton), even though deep in both their hearts, they know that he’s gay. As Freddie’s fame grows, so do his conflicts: with his own sexual identity, with an unscrupulous manager, with isolation and drugs and, finally, with the band that made him a star. These bullet points are dramatized with a metronomic sense of duty in “Bohemian Rhapsody,” which was directed by Bryan Singer until he was fired from the production, at which point Dexter Fletcher stepped in to finish filming and edit. That hiccup doesn’t entirely account for the pitfalls of a film that primary suffers from an eye-rollingly obvious script, in which real human beings utter expository dreck like “The album’s hit the charts in the U.S.!” Part of what makes the plot of “Bohemian Rhapsody” so dreary is that it doesn’t illuminate anything beyond what the audience probably already knows (or, just as likely,

knows more about). Schematic and shallow, it flits from one hoary set piece to the next with all of the insight, surprise and psychological depth of a sanitized “Behind the Music” episode or unironic remake of “Walk Hard.” And yet. If anyone doubted that cinema is an actor’s medium, “Bohemian Rhapsody” arrives as indisputable proof. Even behind a set of distracting prosthetic teeth simulating Freddie’s famous overbite, Malek delivers a committed, thoroughly inhabited performance, which winds up transcending the regrettably thin material at hand. Considerably shorter than his character, Malek nonetheless masters the muscular swagger and captivating stage presence of a man who, when he sings in front of his first big crowd, announces that he’s finally discovered his life’s calling. Happily — and crucially — the supporting roles in “Bohemian Rhapsody” are just as well-judged, As an end-credits montage suggests, the actors playing May, Taylor and bassist John Deacon (Joseph Mazzello) look eerily like their real-life analogues. (Watch out for an amusing cameo by Mike Myers as a recalcitrant EMI executive and for the great Tom Hollander and Allen Leech as the managerial equivalent of good and bad angels.) The best parts of “Bohemian Rhapsody” have less to do with Freddie’s tribulations than the mysterious alchemy of a collaboration between four self-described misfits that on paper never would have worked, but yielded uncanny and enduring results. “Bohemian Rhapsody” ends with one of the most memorable movie finales in recent memory, when the filmmakers restage, almost note for note, Queen’s appearance at Live Aid in 1985, a performance that went down in history as perhaps the finest live set ever, and one that convinced those who had dismissed Queen as a camp event of the group’s technical prowess and electrifying showmanship. It’s a bravura passage, in which Malek’s physical presence fuses seamlessly with Freddie’s slightly ragged voice. As he gains strength, so does the scene and, by extension, the movie, which take on weight and emotion and an inescapable, infectious joy. “Bohemian Rhapsody” might have started out as an ode to the supernatural talent of one man. It ends as a testament to a band and simply how good they made their fans feel. WHAT “Bohemian Rhapsody” • RUN TIME 2:15 • RATING PG-13 • CONTENT Mature thematic elements, suggestive material, drug use and strong language

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‘Nutcracker’ adaptation short on holiday (or any) magic Disney’s ‘The Nutcracker and the Four Realms’ is a mere shadow of the classic ballet by Tchaikovsky ★½ BY KATIE WALSH | TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

‘T

he Nutcracker and the Four Realms”? What in the cuckoo Christmas blasphemy is this? Disney, continuing its inexorable death march to add more war to classic childhood stories, has plucked all the feathers from Tchaikovsky and Petipa’s holiday ballet and tossed a bunch of glitter and circus clowns at its quivering carcass. This is your warning that if you have any affinity for the ballet, avoid this movie at all costs. This take on “The Nutcracker,” written by Ashleigh Powell in her screenwriting debut, somehow directed by both Lasse Hallstrom

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and Joe Johnston, takes merely a few key elements of the ballet and then tosses them into a blender, along with “Alice and Wonderland,” “The Greatest Showman” and Stanley Tucci in “The Hunger Games,” to create something wildly kooky and more violent. And yet it’s got incredibly low stakes, and it’s a mere shadow of what “The Nutcracker” actually is. Sure, “girl falls asleep on Christmas Eve and dreams an awesome dance show” isn’t a whole lot of plot. But the story this team has come up with is rife with insidious Disney story fetishes, including the addition of the requisite dead mother to offer pathos and motivation for our heroine. Clara (Mackenzie Foy) is obsessed

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with science and is an engineering genius, which will come in handy later when facing another Disney obsession of late (giant clock gears). Set off on a wild goose chase by a mysterious gift from her mother, guided by her godfather Drosselmeyer (Morgan Freeman), Clara happens into a magical passageway and ends up in the snowy world of the Four Realms, which was invented for this movie and truly has no consequence on the story at all. They are the Realm of Flowers, headed up by Hawthorne (Eugenio Derbez), the Realm of Snowflakes, led by Shivers (Richard E. Grant in truly disfiguring icicle bangs), and the Realm of Sweets, ruled by a squeaky-voiced, cotton candy-haired Sugarplum (Keira Knightley, making some odd choices). The last realm is the Realm of Amusements, where Mother Ginger (Helen Mirren) has been banished with her team of Russian nesting doll clowns. Turns out Clara’s mother was somehow the absentee queen of the tiny world that exists in a clock, and there’s a power struggle in her absence. Civil war, deceit and laserzapped reanimated tin soldiers abound, but

Clara realizes everything she needs to lead as princess is inside, which takes her entirely too long to figure out, since her mother wrote that exact phrase on a note. Subtext is text, which means even in this wacky-as-heck “Nutcracker: Rise of the Machines,” moments drag. A film adaptation of “The Nutcracker” doesn’t have to be faithful, but the story that’s been concocted is so lazily tossed off, the style so derivative, and the lessons so mundane they would have been better off sticking to the original story by E.T.A. Hoffmann and throwing a razzle-dazzle production budget at the choreography, as the best part of “Nutcracker and the Four Realms” is the oh-so-short sequence where ballerina Misty Copeland dances through an abridged version of the ballet. To salt the wound, the filmmakers only use a few excerpts of Tchaikovsky’s music. Turns out the excess of realms (and cooks in the kitchen) results in hardly any holiday magic at all. WHAT “The Nutcracker and the Four Realms” • RUN TIME 1:39 • RATING PG • CONTENT Some mild peril

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Mackenzie Foy (front, left) and Keira Knightley (front, right) in “The Nutcracker and the Four Realms”


P H O T O S : F O X S E A R C H L I G H T P I C T U R E S ( “ C A N Y O U E V E R F O R G I V E M E ? ” ) ; WA LT E R T H O M S O N / Y O U T U B E P R E M I U M A N D R O A D S I D E AT T R A C T I O N S ( “ V I P E R C L U B ” )

Melissa McCarthy in “Can You Ever Forgive Me?”

Literary forgery is a funny, sad, fascinating vehicle for Melissa McCarthy ★★★★ BY MICHAEL PHILLIPS | CHICAGO TRIBUNE

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certain faction of Melissa McCarthy’s fans won’t know what hit ‘em when they get a look at “Can You Ever Forgive Me?” I’m not suggesting they, or anyone, skip it; it’s one of my favorite pictures of the year. But McCarthy is taking on a role in a different comic (and dramatic) register than the ones that made her famous. McCarthy knows a lot about a lot as a performer, and she’s smart enough to widen her range. One of her standout vehicles, “Spy,” took advantage of her less brash, more interior qualities, as did the earlier Bill Murray-led heartwarmer “St. Vincent.” Plainly McCarthy was more than ready for this unlikely triumph of a biopic. The whole movie’s terrific — a little funny, a little sad, a sharp evocation of early 1990s literary Manhattan as seen from both sides of the window pane. Looking out. And looking in. In 1991, celebrity biographer and multidirectional crank Lee Israel found herself desperate,

between projects, unable to get her calls returned, alone with her cats and behind on her rent. Then she hit on a moneymaking idea that also scratched her literary itch: Across nearly two years, with the help of a barfly accomplice, she carefully forged 400odd letters presumably written by her literary and show business idols, Noel Coward, Marlene Dietrich and Fanny Brice among them. The scam worked until it didn’t. After the feds caught up with her, and she paid her debt to society, Israel published her confessional memoir “Can You Ever Forgive Me?” in 2008. More recently screenwriters Nicole Holofcener and Jeff Whitty began developing a script, which for a time was to co-star Julianne Moore and Chris O’Dowd. That didn’t work out, but McCarthy and Richard E. Grant did. With the guidance of director Marielle Heller, everything else did, too. Heller’s first film, “Diary of a Teenage Girl” (2015), qualifies as the best American comingof-age picture hardly anyone saw. “Can You Ever Forgive

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Me?” is a different story, but both her films to date succeed by finessing each scene, each relationship, every little slight and grace note. The analog, early-‘90s world, before eBay, Amazon and the digital insurrection, comes to life in subtle but indelible ways, from the grating hum of an electric Smith-Corona typewriter to the burnished glow of Brandon Trost’s cinematography. Grant plays Israel’s sometime friend and sometime partner in deception, a gadabout named Jack Hock. The role has been embellished a good deal for the film version; Grant’s outre comic flourishes are pretty priceless, and he works off McCarthy’s dour, cynical demeanor like a master. The script requires more than comic wiles, though, and this is where Heller’s film pays off. A tentative romance between Israel and an openhearted bookseller (Dolly Wells, excellent) generates a world of feeling just outside Israel’s grasp. Jane Curtin plays Israel’s socialite agent, with just enough edge to make her interesting. Stephen Spinella and Ben Falcone portray two very different sorts of used-books memorabilia experts, both alert to the possibilities afforded by Israel and her latest finds. Wisely, Heller doesn’t inflate the tone or impart an overt message. But by the end, “Can You Ever Forgive Me?” has truly brought you into this woman’s life, headspace, longings and tastes, and the whole of it is quite moving. The lovely, delicate jazz-based musical score by Nate Heller (the director’s brother) doesn’t hurt; nor does a judicious use of standards and covers from earlier times, and a more elegant, romantic Manhattan. More than once we hear from the vocalist and pianist Blossom Dearie on the soundtrack. That’s practically four stars right there. WHAT “Can You Ever Forgive Me?” • RUN TIME 1:47 • RATING R • CONTENT Language including some sexual references and brief drug use

Susan Sarandon in “Viper Club”

Even Susan Sarandon can’t rescue cliched thriller ‘Viper Club’ ★½ BY ALAN ZILBERMAN SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON POST

‘V

iper Club” has all the right ingredients: a topical premise, ripped from the headlines; a likable lead character; and the highly relatable theme of frustration with bureaucracy. But good intentions only go so far, especially when they mask tawdry melodrama. Even the best movies push emotional buttons, but they work because viewers become wrapped up in the story. This one is so manipulative you can hear the gears grinding — until they lock up. Susan Sarandon plays Helen, an emergency room nurse with a double life. At work, her colleagues rely on her because she’s always happy to cover an extra shift. But in private, Helen is desperate because Syrian terrorists have captured her journalist son, Andrew (Julian Morris). Functionaries at the departments of Justice and State have instructed Helen that she cannot tell anyone about what has happened, explaining that any attempt to pay a ransom herself would be illegal. Soon, however, Helen

makes contact with an informal collective of journalists and their families — known as the Viper Club — who make ransom money available through shadowy back channels. As the government stalls and Helen’s frustrations grow, this club seems like the more attractive option — even if it comes with considerable risk. Director Maryam Keshavarz, who wrote the film with Jonathan Mastro, uses a parallel scene structure to covey Helen’s divided mental state: in the E.R., she’s cool and collected; at home, she’s barely keeping it together. As if her family’s troubles aren’t enough, there’s also a subplot in which Helen rescues a little girl who has been shot, offering comfort to her worried mother (Lola Kirke). “Viper Club” is storytelling at its most heavy-handed. Helen, for instance, engages in imaginary conversations with her missing son. While the Oscar-winning actress elevates the material — delivering a nervy, understated performance — there is not much she can do to save the film from its own tonal incongruity, as when Helen

takes a break from worrying by engaging in a snowball fight. Theatrically distributed by Roadside Attractions in partnership with YouTube, which plans to show the film on its YouTube Premium streaming platform, “Viper Club” prominently features YouTube videos as a plot point. Helen uses the service, for instance, to watch Andrew’s reporting from Syria, and those clips make for a disturbing glimpse of life in a war zone. Coupled with another scene in which Helen records a video for Andrew’s captors, the films suggests that online video is a vital, if potentially risky, communication tool. This seeming plug for YouTube as the go-to platform for social change is echoed by the portrayal of the film’s bureaucrats as inept cartoons who treat Helen with a mix of frustration and disdain. There’s a deep cynicism here. Few, if any, of the film’s characters — even the journalists — seem capable of making a difference. Sarandon attracted a lot of attention during the 2016 presidential election when she suggested that Donald Trump could be good for America — assuming he creates enough domestic chaos to jump-start a political revolution. How perfect, then, that the actress has chosen to make such an overtly political film, one in which Helen and Andrew are portrayed as collateral damage in exactly the sort of chaotic situation that she predicted. Her comments hang in the air, creating a polemical subtext that prevents the film from feeling like anything genuine is at stake. By the time “Viper” arrives at its predictable conclusion, its hackneyed foreshadowing ensures a halfhearted ending that has all the impact of a shrug. If the movie doesn’t care about the real Helens and Andrews of the world, how can we be expected to? WHAT “Viper Club” • RUN TIME 1:49 • RATING R • CONTENT Strong language and some disturbing images

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Tiffany Haddish’s hot streak continues with ‘Nobody’s Fool’ The new Tyler Perry comedy joins two other recent movies starring Haddish: ‘Night School’ and ‘The Oath’ BY JAKE COYLE | ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK

hat’s the best thing that’s happened to Tiffany Haddish in the past year? Tough question. She takes a deep breath. “Meeting Oprah, getting a Tesla, hosting the MTV Movie and TV Awards, winning awards, going on trips, staying in different countries, getting an award in Canada. Going to Africa was really super awesome. Getting to meet my aunties and cousins that I hadn’t met before. Having the funds to get my mother out of a mental institution — that’s freaking amazing — and getting her the best doctors. Being able to afford to take care of my grandmother. That’s really better than everything.” She pauses. “I could keep going because it’s been a pretty phenomenal year,” says Haddish, laughing. But she has one more to add. “Being able to see my ex-boyfriends in

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passing, them saying, ‘Hey, I’d like to take you to dinner some time,’ and me saying, ‘I’m sorry. I’m busy.’ That’s pretty awesome too.” A year after her breakout role in “Girl’s Trip,” Haddish is indeed busy. Up next is the Tyler Perry written-and-directed comedy “Nobody’s Fool,” which pairs her with Tika Sumpter. They play sisters, with Whoopi Goldberg as their mom. Once Haddish’s character gets out of jail, they discover that Sumpter’s boyfriend is catfishing her. “ Nobody’s Fool,” out Friday, will test just how much Haddish audiences want. It’s her third film in theaters in just the last month, following “Night School” (which paired her with her longtime mentor, Kevin Hart) and Ike Barinholtz’s dark indie comedy “The Oath.” Plus, last month, she was a standout at the Emmys, where she won for hosting “Saturday Night Live.” (She was the first black female comic to host.) With blistering speed, Haddish has become one of Hollywood’s most in-

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demand talents. Everyone from Paul Thomas Anderson to Judd Apatow (who’s interested in adapting Haddish’s memoir, “The Last Black Unicorn”) wants to work with her. She’s also prepping a Netflix stand-up special, developing a sitcom with Danielle Sanchez-Witzel (“The Carmichael Show”) and readying Season 2 of “The Last O.G.,” with Tracy Morgan. And that’s to say nothing of her litany of projects due next year. Haddish’s ubiquity this fall has been the culmination of her inspiring rise from a difficult upbringing to the highest reaches of show business. The 38-year-old comedian has said she was abused a child before entering foster care, and later was briefly homeless while trying to make it as a stand-up in Los Angeles. But her confidence in her future never wavered; Haddish’s production company is named after her personal slogan: She Ready. “People always say, ‘Are you surprised?’ No, I’m not surprised. I manifested this,” Haddish said in an interview earlier this fall. “This is part of my list of goals. I’m grateful I’ve accomplished this much so far, but there’s so much more I want to do. I want to build my own studio one day. I’ve got my little production company going and I want to create things that inspire people to be their best selves.” Yet as much as Haddish has been accomplishing, some objectives have remained elusive. “Still trying to get pregnant by Leon-

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From left: Amber Riley, Tiffany Haddish and Tika Sumpter in “Nobody’s Fool”

ardo DiCaprio,” she says. “He’s not giving me the time of day right now, but he’ll come around.” Haddish’s telling of her encounter with DiCaprio is exactly what has made her so beloved: She’s radically unfiltered and unapologetically herself. If she wants to wear an Alexander McQueen red-carpet dress over and over again, she will. And if she has a good story about meeting a celebrity, she’ll tell it. Of her DiCaprio-like flirtation with Michael B. Jordan, Haddish says that at the Met Gala the two decided “it’s probably best just to work together.” (One tight-lipped exception: She won’t comment anymore on that infamous Beyoncé party scene: “Don’t ask me who bit Beyoncé because I’m not gonna snitch!” Haddish says, laughing.) But, as Sumpter found out, it can be quite a whirlwind joining Haddish’s world. While making “Nobody’s Fool,” the pair crashed a prom in their hotel, dancing in a sea of awe-struck teenagers while streaming it on Instagram. “She just does what she does,” says Sumpter. “Tiffany is going to be Tiffany, you just let her run with it. It felt like real sisters. We had each other’s backs. She’s very supportive. I feel like our chemistry was pretty grand.” Haddish acknowledges some things have changed for her. Now, she gets up every morning at 4 or 5 a.m. “I work every single day. I’ve always worked every day, just not as hard,” she says. But the overwhelming interest in all things Haddish (she also signed a first-look deal with HBO earlier this year) has also been exhausting. “I turn down things every day,” she says. How does it feel to be so loved? “It feels just like when I was in high school and I was a mascot. I was the most popular girl in school because I was the goofiest girl in school,” says Haddish. “It feels just like high school but amplified.” But at a time when comedy has struggled mightily at the box office, Haddish has proven the great exception. “Night School” was the first traditional comedy in more than two years to open at No. 1. “Nobody’s Fool” isn’t expected to manage the same feat; it opens against “Bohemian Rhapsody” and “The Nutcracker and the Four Realms,” and unlike those films, “Nobody’s Fool” isn’t being screened in advance for critics. But there could be considerable potency still in the combination of Haddish and Perry, a box-office powerhouse, himself. Regardless, Haddish has her sights set on bigger goals. She has visions of her own studio and self-help center, sitting on the corner of two streets: Tiffany and Haddish. She will make it happen, she insists. “And I will be changing people’s lives for the better.”


‘A Star Is Born’ ★★★½

ALSO IN THEATERS

R • 2:17 • Bradley Cooper

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makes his directorial debut with a lavishly delightful remake that stars Lady Gaga as an unknown singer who becomes a pop sensation. WASHINGTON POST

By ‘Bad Times at the El Royale’ ★★ R • 2:22 • Screenwriterturned-director Drew Goddard’s pulpy but artificial motel thriller is kind of a slog. It may be the unusual Hollywood thriller to not live up to the reallife drama of its pseudo setting. ASSOCIATED PRESS

‘Venom’ PG-13 • 1:52 • Tom Hardy

stars as a journalist who becomes the host to an extraterrestrial Symbiote giving him superpowers and a terrifying alter ego. Directed by Ruben Fleischer. Not reviewed.

‘Beautiful Boy’ ★★★ R • 2:00 • The national

epidemic of substance abuse is told in intimate personal terms, exploring the real-life struggles of journalist David Sheff (Steve Carell) and his teen junkie son, Nic (Timothée Chalamet). Directed by Felix Van Groeningen. STAR TRIBUNE

‘Christopher Robin’ ★★½ PG • 1:44 • Now all grown

up and frustrated by life, Christopher Robin (Ewan McGregor) is reunited with his stuffed childhood pal Winnie the Pooh (voiced by Jim Cummings), who reminds him what really matters in life. WASHINGTON POST

LOS ANGELES TIMES

‘What They Had’ ★★½ R • 1:41 • Grown siblings

Timothée Chalamet and Steve Carell in “Beautiful Boy”

‘Goosebumps 2: Haunted Halloween’ ★★

‘The House With a Clock in Its Walls’ ZERO STARS

PG • 1:30 • The follow-up to

PG • 1:39 • Supernatural

“Goosebumps” (2015) is a serious disappointment, mostly because it doesn’t include Jack Black. The plot, which involves a scary ventriloquist dummy, is of little consequence.

thriller manages to find the perfect un-sweet spot — it’s too scary for little kids, not scary enough for older ones, not funny or clever enough for their parents, and too redundant for everyone. ASSOCIATED PRESS

‘Colette’ ★★½

TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

R • 1:51 • Keira Knightley

‘Halloween’ ★★★

‘Hunter Killer’ ★★

stars as Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette, the prolific and trailblazing author whose life is condensed in this sprightly, relevant biopic.

R • 1:44 • Decades after

R • 2:01 • This includes so

John Carpenter’s slasher landmark, David Gordon Green resurrects the faceless boogeyman of “Halloween” and sets him loose on another Halloween night. Starring original cast members Jamie Lee Curtis and Nick Castle. ASSOCIATED PRESS

many hackneyed military action stereotypes that you have to wonder if this is the “Scary Movie” of submarine movies. Just this side of a parody. Starring Gerard Butler. TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

ASSOCIATED PRESS

‘First Man’ ★★★ PG-13 • 2:21 • Director

Damien Chazelle’s tense, distinctive Neil Armstrong biopic manages to offer some fresh points of view on its famously tight-lipped subject. Starring Ryan Gosling. CHICAGO TRIBUNE

‘Free Solo’ ★★★½ PG-13 • 1:37 • Jimmy Chin and

Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyi chronicle the exploits of champion climber Alex Honnold as he sets out to be the first person to solo climb El Capitan in Yosemite National Park. WASHINGTON POST

‘The Hate U Give’ ★★★★ PG-13 • 2:12 • This powerful, timely and deeply moving tale — based on Angie Thomas’ acclaimed young adult best-seller — is a powerful look at Black Lives Matter and an essential movie for 2018. WASHINGTON POST

‘Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation’ ★★★ PG • 1:37 • Dracula returns in this second sequel to the 2012 animated hit. Directed by Genndy Tartakovsky. TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

‘Incredibles 2’ ★★★½ PG • 1:58 • Holly Hunter

and Catherine Keener are among the voice talent in this fine sequel to the 2004 film about a superpowered family. Directed by Brad Bird. CALVIN WILSON

‘Johnny English Strikes Again’ ★★½ PG • 1:28 • The charming third

chapter in the surprisingly durable spy-spoof franchise about an inept secret agent (Rowan Atkinson) is called back into service — but only after a cyberattack exposes the identities of every other agent in the field. WASHINGTON POST

‘The Meg’ ★★★ PG-13 • 1:53 • Our hero Jonas

(Jason Statham) takes on a prehistoric shark bigger than a tour bus. Based on the novel “Meg” by Steve Alten. TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

‘Mid90s’ ★★½ R • 1:24 • In Jonah Hill’s

With Tiffany Haddish, Tika Sumpter, Omari Hardwick, Mehcad Brooks, Amber Riley, Whoopi Goldberg. Written and directed by Tyler Perry. Not reviewed.

‘The Nun’ ★★½ R • 1:36 • Spinoff takes on the backstory of the demon in a habit that terrorized a real-life ghost hunter depicted in “The Conjuring.”

directorial debut, a young boy named Stevie (Sunny Suljic) is groomed in the ways of manhood by a group of skateboarding teens he admires.

‘The Oath’ ★★½

TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

R • 1:33 • Written and

‘Mission: Impossible — Fallout’ ★★★½ PG-13 • 2:27 • Christopher

McQuarrie’s second “M:I” assignment comes with just enough twists in the narrative to justify 147 minutes of summer movie. CHICAGO TRIBUNE

TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

directed by Ike Barinholtz, “The Oath” imagines a plausibly dystopian near future in which civilians are urged to publicly declare loyalty to a thin-skinned, conservative commander in chief. WASHINGTON POST

‘The Old Man and the Gun’ ★★★ PG-13 • 1:33 • Robert Redford and Sissy Spacek star in a low-keyed outing written and directed by David Lowery, who has yet to make an uninteresting picture. If this is actually Redford’s farewell film, it’s a pretty fetching one. CHICAGO TRIBUNE

‘Peppermint’ ★★ R • 1:42 • Jennifer Garner

plays a mother who transforms herself into a vigilante after her family is brutally murdered. With John Ortiz, John Gallagher Jr., Juan Pablo Raba. Directed by Pierre Morel. ASSOCIATED PRESS

‘Pick of the Litter’ ★★★ NR • 1:20 • Excessively cute

documentary follows five puppies born at Guide Dogs

for the Blind, a guide dog school in San Rafael, Calif. It teaches viewers a lot about the training process and about the everyday miracles the trained dogs bring for their humans. SEATTLE TIMES

‘Searching’ ★★★ PG-13 • 1:41 • Smart and

fascinating thriller starring John Cho and Debra Messing immerses the viewer in the action as a mystery is unraveled. TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

‘Smallfoot’ ★★½ PG • 1:36 • In a reverseBigfoot tale, a happygo-lucky Himalayan Yeti (voiced by Channing Tatum) finds evidence of humans. It’s predictable, but the journey is worth watching. TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

(Michael Shannon and Hilary Swank) come home to tend to their mother (Blythe Danner), who has dementia. They also end up dealing with the damage done to them by their father (Robert Forster). Written and directed by Elizabeth Chomko. WASHINGTON POST

‘White Boy Rick’ ★★★ R • 1:46 • Newcomer Richie

Merritt stars as 15-year-old Rick Wershe, who sells guns to drug dealers, sells drugs for the dealers and then acts as an informant for the FBI. Remarkably, his is a true story. DANIEL NEMAN

‘The Wife’ ★★★½ R • 1:40 • The effortless

interaction of Glenn Close and Jonathan Pryce make this unusually good adaptation of an unusually good novel seem like a two-person show. CHICAGO TRIBUNE Use our calendar to find theaters and showtimes near you. stltoday.com/events

‘Night School’ ★★½ PG-13 • 1:51 • Kevin Hart is funny as a night-school student in a class led by a shockingly violent teacher (Tiffany Haddish). But it’s the group of beloved comic character actors surrounding them who carry the movie through its bumpy patches.

EXPERIENCE THE MOST TIMELY, HEARTFELT AND ESSENTIAL FILM OF THE YEAR “AN EMOTIONAL POWERHOUSE TOO POWERFUL TO RESIST… IMPOSSIBLE TO FORGET”

TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

‘Nobody’s Fool’

BASED ON THE ACCLAIMED MEMOIRS OF DAVID SHEFF AND NIC SHEFF

R • 1:50 • A young woman

just out of jail reconnects with her straight-arrow sister in this comedy.

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John Goodman (left) and Jeff Bridges in “The Big Lebowski”

“IT WAS A LITTLE DIFFICULT AT FIRST BECAUSE EVERYBODY MISSED ROSEANNE. WE’RE STILL GETTING OVER THAT. BUT THE WORK IS GOOD. IT’S BEEN FUN. WE HAVE FIVE MORE LEFT TO DO THIS YEAR. I LOOK FORWARD TO GOING TO WORK EVERY DAY.”

John Goodman on life, laughs and a laid-back Lebowski

Steve Buscemi, the three become involved in unlikely adventures when Bridges’ character, whose name is Jeffrey Lebowski, is mistaken for another, richer Jeffrey Lebowski. The movie is shown frequently on television, but Goodman said he does not watch it every time he comes across it The St. Louis-born actor will receive lifetime achievement because he does not want to burn out. But award from the St. Louis International Film Festival when he does decide to see it, he watches it from start to finish. “I kind of make a deal out of it,” he said. screening of one of the films with which he is BY DANIEL NEMAN | ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH He will be watching it Friday night. “I want most associated: the 1998 comedy “The Big to see it with an audience,” he said. Lebowski.” ur phone interview with actor “Steve Buscemi, Bridges and myself “There’s only a handful of things John Goodman was ending did this one time. It was like a that I’m in that I can watch,” when the publicist who had Lebowski festival in New York. We Goodman said from Los Angearranged it got on the line. wanted to stay, but wiser heads les, where he is working on “The She asked how it went. prevailed. It was getting rowdy.” Conners.” “Did you hear the part about the Russian In February, Goodman begins The ones he does watch include hookers?” Goodman asked her. work on his next project, a comedy “Argo” and any of the several movGoodman, who grew up in Affton, has a John Goodman series for HBO called “The Righteous sense of humor. (For the record, no part of the ies he made with the Coen Brothers, Gemstones.” Goodman will star as the including “Barton Fink” — and “The Big conversation had anything to do with Russia patriarch of a family of televangelists, with Lebowski.” or women who work there.) Humor has Danny McBride as his son. McBride is also “I knew I liked it from the first reading carried him far in his career, from the farcical the show’s co-creator, writer, producer and down to the last day of shooting. I just befilm “Raising Arizona” to “The Conners,” the more. lieved in it. It made me laugh, to the point current reboot of last year’s reboot of the TV “I’m pretty sure he’s not paying me out where you don’t really care whether everysitcom “Roseanne,” in which he also starred. of his own pocket, but he could,” Goodman body else likes it,” he said. It is also carrying him back to St. Louis, said, meaning not just that the pay is low but In the movie, he plays the hotheaded, where Friday evening the 66-year-old actor also that he jumped at the chance to work Vietnam-veteran, bowling-crazed friend of will receive the lifetime achievement award with McBride, “because I think he’s funny.” from the St. Louis International Film Festival. Jeff Bridges, who is in the running to be the Before then, though, Goodman has a few most laid-back man in the world. Along with The event, which is sold out, also includes a episodes of “The Conners” to shoot. As of last week, they were waiting to hear if the DNEMAN@POST-DISPATCH.COM @DNEMANFOOD

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GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 11.02.18-11.08.18

series would be picked up for another season. “It’s going good,” he said about the show, which is the follow-up to “Roseanne” after Roseanne Barr was removed from the series. “Boy, it’s different; you can’t top Roseanne, really,” he said. “There’s a lot of new characters, a lot of people have love interests. We have new little kids, so new mouths to feed, new lines to speak. So my lines have gotten fewer. “It was a little difficult at first because everybody missed Roseanne. We’re still getting over that. But the work is good. It’s been fun. We have five more left to do this year. I look forward to going to work every day.” If work is better for him than it used to be, perhaps it is because Goodman has enjoyed 11 years of sobriety after three decades of increasingly problematic alcoholism. “It’s going great. I finally grew up out of diapers. I’m in the big-boy pants. It was killing me, and on top of that I was lying, and most of it was directed toward myself. It’s just more fun” being sober, he said. He went to rehab, where stopping drinking “was easy. I just surrendered. That frame of mind just made everything easier. Life just progressively got easier. It takes a lot of work to be a drunk, and I’m very lazy.” For the sake of sobriety, he moved out of Los Angeles. He had to decide between coming back to St. Louis or going to New Orleans, near his wife’s parents. New Orleans won out, and he loves it there. “It’s a city of neighborhoods,” he said. “I like my neighborhood. It’s a great place to walk the dog, see something different every time you go out. It’s been comfortable for me. I like the people. I like the culture.” There is only one problem with New Orleans. “They serve the same dishes at every restaurant, until recently. That’s changing. But how many times can you have jambalaya?” Meanwhile, St. Louis is still on his mind. “I wish I was there more. I love it. But after about three weeks of winter, you can keep it.” WHAT St. Louis International Film Festival tribute to John Goodman with a screening of “The Big Lebowski” • WHERE Tivoli Theatre, 6350 Delmar Boulevard • WHEN 7:30 p.m. Friday • HOW MUCH Sold out • MORE INFO cinemastlouis.org/sliff

STLTODAY.COM/GO

PHOTOS: COURTESY OF SLIFF

JOHN GOODMAN


“Where the Pavement Ends”

St. Louis’s Military Museum Reopens Saturday! Opening Week Events November 3–12: mohistory.org/memorial/reopening-week-events/

Many of the students come from war-torn areas and suffer from symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder.

ST. LOUIS INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL ▼

Here are reviews of selected films screening this week at the St. Louis International Film Festival, which continues at various venues through Nov. 11. Find more information at cinemastlouis.org/sliff.

‘Where the Pavement Ends’ RUN TIME 1:25 • WHEN 2:30 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Tivoli Theatre, 6350 Delmar Boulevard • HOW MUCH $13

P H O T O C O U R T E S Y O F T H E S T. L O U I S I N T E R N AT I O N A L F I L M F E S T I VA L

If you squint, you could see the documentary “Where the Pavement Ends” as a searing indictment of systemic racism that led from the institutionalized segregation of the mid20th century to the shooting of Michael Brown. But if you look at it with clearer eyes, you may see it as a collection of images of fields and flowers, streets and cars, trucks and planes, a boy riding a bike, people walking and, for some reason, a man endlessly looking for the architectural plans of his house. It is a film that is full of the stuff that gets cut out of other documentaries: phones ringing, people clearing their throats before speaking, the pleasantries exchanged before the conversation truly begins.

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“We’re receiving them with open arms and we’re helping them heal,” says teacher Keary Ritchie.

“Day One”

At the movie’s heart is the literal divide that once kept the all-black town of Kinloch — then a thriving city of thousands — separate from the neighboring, all-white Ferguson. What would be the main road between the towns, Suburban Avenue, was barricaded at the border, and most of the other streets dead-ended before venturing into the other municipality. Director Jane Gillooly, who grew up in Ferguson, presents scene after scene (after scene after scene after scene) of razed Kinloch homesites now given over to nature. Our assumption, understandably, is that the physical barriers between the cities led somehow to Kinloch’s abandonment. Only late in the film is it mentioned, briefly, that much of the town was actually bought out and destroyed for an expansion of the airport that was later canceled. The enforced segregation of Kinloch was a tragedy, the near-total devastation

of the town was a tragedy and the events in Ferguson in 2014 were a tragedy. But a specific relationship between them all is tenuous, at best. BY DANIEL NEMAN

‘Day One’ RUN TIME 1:21 • WHEN 7 p.m. Saturday • WHERE The Gathering, 2360 McCausland Avenue • HOW MUCH Free

Fourteen-year-old Liza came to St. Louis from Afghanistan because her uncle and cousins wanted to kill her family. They did not like the fact that she was going to school. When she first got here, she went to the Nahed Chapman New American Academy, a little-known local school that caters entirely to children who are immigrants and refugees. Lori Miller’s documentary about the school, “Day One,” delves into the workings of the school, from the commitment and dedication of the teachers to the desire of the students to learn, to improve their lives and become normal again.

Downtown St. Louis • Open daily: 10am–5pm Free admission • mohistory.org/memorial

The stories told are inspirational and even, at the end, triumphant. We see friendships made, school lessons learned — and past traumas overcome. We also see about the lives of the now-retired principal Donnie Harris and a few of the teachers, which frankly comes off as filler.

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As it is, there isn’t quite enough information of sufficient interest to hold our attention for a short 80 minutes. But even so, the many parts that grab us do not let go, such as the story of one student who is tired in school because he works two jobs in order to help his mother pay the rent. Another student is trapped in the bureaucracy when a lie about his age, which was made to help him in some respects, winds up hurting him at school. You can’t help but be inspired by “Day One.” It’s a story of truly good people doing truly good work. BY DANIEL NEMAN

DECEMBER 3, 2018 5:30pm-8:30pm GENERAL ADMISSION $25

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Cedric the Entertainer’s new sitcom laughs at race relations On CBS’ ‘The Neighborhood,’ St. Louis native stars as a gruff patriarch who gets new next-door neighbors BY DANIEL NEMAN | ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

he show is called “The Neighborhood,” as in “There goes the neighborhood.” The new Monday-night sitcom, which was recently picked up by CBS for a full 22-episode season, is like a Norman Lear show for the 21st century. It’s “The Jeffersons,” with the races reversed. And the star is the St. Louis area’s own

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Cedric the Entertainer (aka Cedric Kyles). “It was a concept that was something that is very prevalent in the America that we live in — the idea of gentrification,” Cedric said by phone during a brief break on the set. “It’s from the point of view of the people that (already) live there. We never look at it from that side. … We think that (the neighborhood) is going to be better because there is going to be a Starbucks.” Cedric stars as Calvin Butler, a gruffbut-lovable patriarch both of his family and

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 11.02.18-11.08.18

essentially of his pleasant neighborhood — or at least his pleasant street. It’s a historically all-black neighborhood, which is just the way he likes it, until a new family moves in next door. The family, of course, is white. There goes the neighborhood. Cedric said that he’d had a development deal with CBS, and that he had worked on three potential projects for them. Then the network came to him with this show, and he jumped at the chance to do it. Perhaps that is because of his own background. The 54-year-old Cedric grew up in Berkeley, where, he said, “people aspired to live in a nice neighborhood. There was a big pool down the street. My mother was a schoolteacher. It was what I thought of as a nice, middle-class neighborhood.” Middle class, but changing. “When we first moved in, in the early ‘80s, it was probably 70-30 or 60-40 white. By the

WHAT “The Neighborhood” • WHEN 7 p.m. Mondays • WHERE CBS • MORE INFO cbs.com/shows/the-neighborhood

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P H O T O : B I L L I N O S H I TA / C B S

Cedric the Entertainer (left) and Max Greenfield in “The Neighborhood”

time I finished high school, it was predominately a black neighborhood,” he said. On the show, his character, Calvin, is not happy with the thought of change. He is set in his ways and is comfortable with his prejudices. His ideas are set in stone and, Cedric said, “my character has the most to grow.” Naturally, in typical sitcom fashion, the man who moves in next door is Calvin’s opposite. Not only is he white, but he tries too hard to be nice and has the ultimate touchyfeely job as a professional conflict mediator. Calvin immediately dismisses him and everything about him. Any substantive change in Calvin’s attitude over the course of the show will be incremental and slow. The neighbor is played by Max Greenfield (“The New Girl”). “He’s a very funny guy — a very great collaborator,” Cedric said. Tichina Arnold (“Everybody Hates Chris,” “Martin”) plays Calvin’s wife. “She is extremely funny, creative, fast, offthe-cuff,” he said. As much as Calvin dislikes and distrusts his new male neighbor, their wives hit it off instantly. The new neighbor Gemma is played by Beth Behrs (“2 Broke Girls”). “It’s a real all-star cast,” Cedric said. “Everybody is just good at their job all the way around.” Calvin’s two sons are played by Sheaun McKinney and Marcel Spears. One is chronically unemployed; the other is more of a man-child. In real life, Cedric has a 29-year-old daughter, an 18-year-old son and a 14-yearold daughter. He is definitely not a Calvin at home. “You get an 18-year-old son, you have moments when you put your foot down, but in general I’m a very compassionate father,” he said. “I try to lead and motivate.” Yes, but no one will ever make a sitcom out of that.


Q • What’s happened to the Conan O’Brien show on TBS? Is he coming back on a different network? I hope he’s not gone for good! A • He will be back, though in different form. In early October “Conan” took a break while working on an overhaul — and while O’Brien is on a nationwide tour, “Conan & Friends: An Evening of Standup and Investment Tips.” When new episodes arrive in January, telecasts will be half an hour instead of an hour and, as Deadline. com put it, less structured and less traditional. According to Variety, O’Brien said: “I was looking for something more lean and agile. I’ve been pushing for something that fits the modern landscape, certainly fits the way I interact with my fans more.” He has reached out to audiences outside of conventional TV via other projects such as podcasts. As for finding O’Brien in older ways, you can see the tour dates and locations at teamcoco.com. And TBS lists repeats of “Conan” in its late-night schedule. Q • Is Theresa who heard from the dead ever coming back to TLC? I watched her all the time. She was great. A • “Long Island Medium” and Theresa Caputo returned Oct. 8, but on a different night, Mondays. You should be able to find the new episodes you’ve missed on your On Demand channels or on tlc.com/

Conan O’Brien

longislandmedium. Q • I remember two short-lived comic book TV shows called “Sable” and “Nightman.” Could you please advise who the leads were and how many episodes were produced? A • According to “The Complete Directory to Prime Time Network and Cable TV Shows,” the ABC series “Sable” starred Lewis Van Bergen as children’s-book author who at night was the crime-fighting Jon Sable. Also in the regular cast were Ken Page (of St. Louis), Holly Fulger and Marge Kotlisky — and, as Sable’s girlfriend/agent, Rene Russo in her screen-acting debut. The series ran for just seven episodes in 198788; things would get much better for Russo in 1989 when she co-starred in the beloved “Major League.” “Nightman,” again according to the “Complete Directory,” aired in syndica-

Q • Why do some shows last one minute longer than the DVR is aware? Many times for shows such as “Will & Grace,” I have to reset the DVR for 31 minutes or miss the last joke. A • The short answer to why shows run a little long is that it keeps you from changing the channel at the half-hour, possibly boosting the show that follows the extended telecast, as well as making possible more ads in a hit show without reducing content even

Trip includes: or f s u oin Cardinals Spring Training!

March 7th through March 12th 2019

1665

$

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per person

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Not that this is the only reason shows run long. Especially on non-broadcast channels, programs are often given the creative license for running times that don’t fit the standard half-hour or hour, if that’s what they want to tell their stories. A related but separate issue involves shows whose times get moved to odd starts and stops because of live sports events airing before them. (Yes, I’m looking at Sunday nights.) Again, the best idea is to add lots of extra time to your scheduled recordings.

Don't Miss Out! Only 24 Spaces are Available. This Trip Fills Up Quickly.

Friday, November 9, 2018 • 6:00pm - 8:00pm

Preview Night Tick ets

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NOV 17-18 & 23-25 9am-3pm The Largest Fair Trade Market in the U.S. 129 Woods Mill Rd., Manchester, MO 63011

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A MINISTRY OF F

BY RICH HELDENFELS, TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Send questions to Rich Heldenfels, P.O. Box 417, Mogadore, OH 44260, or brenfels@gmail.com.

• Round Trip Airfare to Ft. Lauderdale (2 bags included) • Five Nights at the LaQuinta Inn and Suites in Jupiter FL • Continental Breakfast Daily • All Hotel Taxes • Reserved Seats on March 8th (vs Nationals) 9th (vs Astros) 11th (vs Nationals) • One Day Cassidy Cool Zone Lunch Buffet • Transportation To and From the Ball Park and the Airport • Free Day on Sunday, March 10th to Explore the Area (Rental Cars Offered)

J P H O T O : E VA N A G O S T I N I / I N V I S I O N /A P

tion for 44 episodes from 1997 to ‘99. Matt McColm starred as a jazz musician who was also the superhero Nightman. McColm was the only regular for the entire series run as it underwent changes in casting and tone; veteran character actor Earl Holliman played Nightman’s father, a retired police officer, for about half of the show’s run.

Although, years ago, one critic said the practice made DVRs “lose their minds,” these days your device should know about time extensions — if the networks have notified it accordingly. With the four current shows mentioned above, my DVR has the comedies running 31 minutes and the drama at 61 minutes. Still, I find some shows ooze past their end time (assuming the clock in my DVR is right) without the DVR schedule accounting for it, losing a bit when recorded. As a rule, I add a minute or two to the end of a scheduled recording so as not to miss something.

Join us for our 2018 Estate Sale Preview Night

On

more. “Modern Family,” “The Big Bang Theory,” “Will & Grace” and “Grey’s Anatomy” are all hits that run long. And NBC was notorious years ago for “supersizing” episodes of its hits, stretching half-hour comedies to as much as 45 minutes.

TV Q&A

Sunday, November 18th 12-3pm @ Moulin Events tickets start at $10 Shop from 45+ area vendors, enjoy brunch bites and sip on cozy cocktails provided by Beam Suntory. Live music by DJ Alexis Tucci, and the Wayward Souls. for event details, visit STLtoday.com/ourevents proudly sponsored by

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STLTODAY.COM/DINING ▼

The Frisco Barroom is a big, beautiful addition to Webster Groves Executive chef Tim Montgomery oversees a menu that distinguishes its comfort-food fare from similar spots ★★½ BY IAN FROEB | POST-DISPATCH RESTAURANT CRITIC

M

ifroeb@post-dispatch.com

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Cornish pasty

Hunter’s Board

This would be a decent slogan for the Frisco Barroom if this 4-month-old restaurant needed a slogan to advertise itself. It doesn’t. It’s big, gorgeous and, by my back-of-the-napkin math, poised to make $1

stltoday.com/offthemenu

@ianfroeb

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 11.02.18-11.08.18

bajillion in the heart of Webster Groves’ Old Orchard district. Owners John Barr and Kelley Hall-Barr also operate the nearby contemporary general store Civil Alchemy, and Hall-Barr founded the candle and personal-care-product company K. Hall Studio (which they have since

sold). The couple know the neighborhood, and they know how to build a successful business, and the Frisco Barroom showcases an investment of time and consideration as well as money. The restaurant sprawls across two floors, a patio and a rooftop deck. The main floor by itself is impressive in size, with the spacious bar-dining area and the adjacent dining room. Burnished wood both dark and light could have evoked a generic gastropub feel, but the Frisco Barroom distinguishes itself with details of décor and quirks of operation: At the bar, the hardwood floor gives way to checkerboard and floral patterns of white and black tile; children receive the kids menu with its obligatory box of generic crayons, but also a full-size Etch A Sketch (not to keep). Did I say gastropub? Executive chef Tim Montgomery oversees a menu that, at a glance, lands squarely in that ascendant trend of gastropub, upscale bar-and-grill or (if you must) “elevated comfort” fare. I’ve written recently of my discomfort with that trend’s prevalence among new restaurants, and there were a few moments here where I felt that unease. Crucially, though, Hall and Hall-Barr have drawn inspiration from some of their favorite restaurant haunts in HallBarr’s native northern Michigan, and those stltoday.com/go ★ Fair ★ ★ Good ★ ★ ★ Excellent ★ ★ ★ ★ Extraordinary

P H O T O S : J O H A N N A H U C K E B A / P O S T- D I S PAT C H

y son, all of 10 months old, wanted more duck rillettes. He was drooling with excitement. Literally. Now, granted, drooling is his default state when awake, but he was also staring at the duck rillettes with an unnerving intensity and sometimes slapping the table for emphasis. My 5-year-old daughter, whose culinary aesthetic is “Can I dip this in ketchup or ranch dressing?” refused the duck rillettes. She did, however, declare the slices of venison sausage that shared space with the rillettes on the Frisco Barroom’s Hunter’s Board ($24) “delicious.” I didn’t tell her what venison is. We haven’t gotten $25 worth of viewings out of our “Bambi” Blu-ray yet. My wife and I liked the duck rillettes, which were silky with fat, but not fatty, and especially good with a dollop of raspberrygeranium jam. We liked the venison sausage too. The deer meat wasn’t gamy, but its flavor was definitely distinct, spiced like a crisp autumn evening of woodsmoke and turning leaves. We liked the flaky smoked trout and the blue and cheddar cheeses and the candied nuts and all the other bits that made up the Hunter’s Board. The Frisco Barroom: where your family can bond over a charcuterie platter.


The Frisco Barroom in Webster Groves

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Pastrami sandwich

dishes — the Hunter’s Board chief among them — help set the Frisco Barroom apart. In fact, the Hunter’s Board is one of four charcuterie platters — or, if you like, “charcuterie” platters, as the others include the meat-free Gatherer’s Board (based around a mushroom-walnut pate, $20) and the Fisherman’s Board ($22), with the aforementioned smoked trout, lox and a smoked-whitefish dip. That dip, thick with cream cheese but not so thick as to obscure the whitefish’s smoky essence, is also available on its own ($10). The Cornish pasty ($11), a British classic, is another dish Hall and Hall-Barr brought down from their Michigan retreats: an oversized hand pie with an alluring goldenbrown crust and a stuffing of ground beef, potato, onion and rutabaga. The stuffing in my order could have used a more generous salting, but on the side is a thick, perfectly seasoned beef gravy for dipping. The pasty was also a welcome change of pace from more conventional appetizers like French onion soup ($7) with a too restrained cap of melted Gruyere or mussels ($15) in a thin beer broth with tomato, a hint of chipotle and enough garlic to wipe Transylvania off the map. This is America in 2018, so of course there is a smashed burger with one ($8) or two ($12) patties. These patties are a quarter-pound each, and despite the menu’s “smashed” billing, each is just thick enough to offset its grill char with the flavor of well-done beef. I much preferred the Frisco Barroom’s sandwiches, including housemade pastrami ($13), perfectly balanced between salty, smoky and meaty, sliced thick and simply stltoday.com/go

accented with stone-ground mustard on rye, and a French dip ($12) with tender, herbkissed top round of beef and, optional but recommended, a biting horseradish cream in a baguette. (The bread is made in house by Jonathan Craft. It is a highlight, whether as the base for a sandwich or on its own, as a freshly baked sourdough pretzel, $7.) The Frisco Barroom didn’t introduce its entrees until it had been open for two months. These aren’t an afterthought, but their late addition to the menu and a buildyour-own format where you choose a main dish and two separate sides puts an outer limit on the restaurant’s ambition. There are no surprises, and the pleasures are straightforward: a 10-ounce tri-tip steak ($24) with béarnaise sauce; grilled shrimp in a sauce of garlic, lemon, butter and white wine. Chicken ($17) promises a “Peruvian-style” dish with a lime-cilantro marinade and a side of pepper, lime and cilantro sauce. Neither the flavor of the chicken nor the sauce popped, though, and after being roasted and then grilled, the chicken was a touch dry. Still, I’d rather the kitchen take more chances like this Peruvian-inspired chicken or the Cornish pasty or game-focused charcuterie plates than rely solely on obvious crowd-pleasers. (This is especially true of the sides, a fine, if uninspiring range: fries, wild rice, green beans, broccoli. Only a potatocheese casserole topped with Corn Flakes shows any verve, and it’s a $2 upcharge.) I didn’t expect the Frisco Barroom to bring together my family from 10 months through 40-some years old. A restaurant that can accomplish that and transcend its gastropub

and comfort-food roots would be downright miraculous. WHERE The Frisco Barroom, 8110 Big Bend Boulevard, Webster Groves • MORE INFO 314-455-1090; thefriscostl.com • MENU Classic pub fare • HOURS Lunch and dinner Tuesday-Sunday (closed Monday)

MUST TRY BACKYARD DOG

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HIP HOPS ▼

Six Mile Bridge ramps up its barrel aging with Big 5 Series Clever marketing campaign and an homage to South Africa should help Maryland Heights brewer make a name among beer fans BY BRIAN FELDT | SPECIAL TO THE POST-DISPATCH

In the beer world, barrel-aged has become all the rage over the last couple of decades. The trend, of course, was pioneered by Goose Island’s Bourbon County Stout series, which has found incredible success stltoday.com/hiphops

30

@bfeldt

among consumers — so much so that its annual Black Friday release has become as popular among beer drinkers as the day is with holiday shoppers. Goose Island, which is based in Chicago, was sold to St. Louis’ Anheuser-Busch InBev in 2011, and the beer behemoth did not veer from the popular stout series. In fact, the company has ramped up production, adding new flavors and varieties. It’s an example of how the barrel-aged beer category has become crowded and hard

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 11.02.18-11.08.18

to navigate for consumers. More than 600 types of barrel-aged brews were exhibited at last year’s Great American Beer Festival in Denver, up from just 289 in 2012 and 119 a decade ago. This type of beer is expensive to make — made apparent by the price you pay before taking a sip. So given those market factors, it can be daunting for a fledgling brewery to come up with a worthwhile barrel-aging program. But when done right, it can make tremendous beer that beer drinkers will demand in strong quantities. See: Maplewood-based Side Project Brewing. Another local brewery also appears to be on the right track. Six Mile Bridge this weekend will debut its newest barrel-aged beer, part of its Big 5 Series — the Deviant, an 8 percent ABV Imperial Saison aged for more than a year in Pinckney Bend Gin Barrels and finished on 250 pounds of peaches. According to the Maryland Heights-

WHERE Six Mile Bridge, 11841 Dorsett Road, Maryland Heights • MORE INFO 314-942-2211; sixmilebridgebeer.com • HOURS 5-10 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday, 5-11 p.m. Friday, 2-11 p.m. Saturday

stltoday.com/go

PHOTO: SID HASTINGS

Brewer Ryan Sherring and his wife and business partner, Lindsay Sherring

based brewer, the barrel character is evident upon drinking and, thanks to the fruit, has a smooth and creamy mouthfeel with hints of vanilla. Without having tasted it yet, it sounds like a perfect beer to drink after a Thanksgiving dinner. The beer, in and of itself, doesn’t immediately stand out. But a clever marketing campaign should help Deviant make a name for itself among beer enthusiasts. The Big 5 Series is an homage to brewery cofounder Ryan Sherring’s international roots. Sherring is a native of South Africa. Along with his wife, Lindsay, Ryan founded 021 Brewing Co. in Cape Town in 2012. And the husband and wife in 2015 moved to St. Louis. The Big 5 Series refers to the big five game animals of South Africa — the lion, leopard, rhinoceros, elephant and buffalo. Already, Six Mile Bridge has released beers associated with the rhino and buffalo — the Reverent and the Marauder, respectively. The Deviant’s mascot, so to speak, is the leopard. The Reverent, released in May 2017, was an imperial stout aged in bourbon barrels on Indian vanilla beans. The Marauder, which debuted in March, was an imperial stout aged in Woodford Reserve Rye Whiskey Barrels and coffee beans roasted by Blueprint Coffee. Six Mile Bridge, which gets its name from a city in Ireland called Sixmilebridge, was one of the fastest-growing breweries in the St. Louis area over the past several years, growing by 73 percent from 2016 to 2017, to 902 barrels from 520 barrels. The brewery has been ramping up its barrel-aging program, which could signal good things to come for fans of the Big 5 Series. Six Mile Bridge will release its Deviant brew at noon Saturday at its brewery.


D I S C O V E R P O S T- D I S PAT C H R E A D E R R E W A R D S AS A SUBSCRIBER, YOU RECEIVE SPECIAL ACCE SS TO EVENTS , DE AL S AND MORE . S T LT O D AY. C O M / R E A D E R R E W A R D S

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31


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Thursday, 8th of November 2018 – 8:00 PM The Sheldon Concert Hall • 3648 Washington Blvd. The Grammy Award-winning LAGQ is one of the most multifaceted groups in any genre. Comprised of four guitarists with equally as impressive solo careers, their forces combined are nothing short of magical.

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32

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2019 BMW 3 Series

DRIVING WITH DAN

It's recapturing its youthful exuberance

Brand Ave. Studios Contributing Writer drivingwithdan@gmail.com

It may be that even BMW thinks the current 3 Series has lost its edge. As Exhibit A, we offer the current car's upcoming replacement -- the all-new 2019 3, which seems intent on recapturing the legend that was built by 3's first five generations. Here, after all, is a car whose great granddaddy -- the 1968 BMW 2002 -- virtually invented the sports-sedan category. Evolving into the 3 Series by 1975, this compact sedan retained and advanced its performance acumen with each new generation. It was the yardstick by which all other sport sedans were measured. Then Gen 6 arrived in 2012, and 3, in the view of more than one fan, seemed to put more emphasis on "sedan" and less on "sport." Its legendary point-and-shoot steering seemed tamed and its suspension responded with more cushion and less passion. In an effort to recapture some of the old mojo, BMW for 3's 2016 refresh gave the car more than a tweaked grille. It also got significant chassis revisions designed to sharpen performance. That updated 2016 car was a place-holder. Now, in generation seven, comes the revelation. "The latest edition of the car sees BMW building on the sporting tradition of the 3 Series . . .," BMW says in a statement. "The seventh generation . . . moves the game on once again in terms of driving dynamics . . ." In other words, like the guy in the old soul rocker "Do You Love Me" proclaimed, "Now I'm back to let you know I can really shake 'em down!" That shakin' down -- "game changing driving dynamics," in BMW parlance -- includes a 25-percent stiffer chassis, a lower center of gravity and a perfect 50/50 front/rear weight distribution, all contributing to a more athletic demeanor. That athleticism initially will be available in two versions: 330i and M340i, both available with rear- or all-wheel drive. (A plug-in hybrid, dubbed 330e, will bow for the 2020 model year.)

By DAN WIESE

2019 BMW 3 SERIES

The all-new 2019 BMW 3 Series arrives stateside in March.

The 330i is powered by a 2.0-liter turbo four that makes 255 hp and 295 lb.-ft. of torque -increases of 10 and 37, respectively, compared to its predecessor. You'll greet 60 mph in the mid-5's, BMW figures. 04

RIDES MAGAZINE

M340i gets a straight-six turbo that generates 382 hp and 369 lb.-ft. of twist -- a new engine that initially will arrive stateside in the 2019 BMW Z4 roadster. Alas, the reality of manual-transmission resistance exhibited by us Yanks has limited this new 3 Series in its U.S. incarnations to an eight-speed automatic. A manual will be offered in international markets but not here, where the take rate, BMW figures, would be even lower than the 10 percent anticipated globally. Ain't worth the effort. What is worth the effort is a notably improved interior -- improved in room, design and technology. The 330i gets a 5.7-inch digital display in the gauge pod and an 8.8-inch touch screen atop the center stack. Not enough? No problem. It can be upgraded to a 12.3-inch gauge display and 10.3-inch center stack screen with navigation -- perks that are standard on the M340i. And, thanks to an overall shadow that stretches 3.3 inches longer, this new 3 Series

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

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DRIVE FORMAT: Rear- or all-wheel drive BASE PRICE: RWD: $41,245; AWD: $43,245 ENGINE: 330i: Turbocharged 2.0-liter I-4; M340i: turbocharged 3.0-liter inline 6 HORSEPOWER: 330i: 255; M340i: 382 TORQUE: 330i: 295 lb.-ft.; M340i: 369 lb.-ft. RECOMMENDED FUEL: Premium TRANSMISSION: Eight-speed automatic EPA MPG: Not yet certiďŹ ed WHEELBASE: 112.2 inches LENGTH: 185.7 inches BASE CURB WEIGHT: RWD: 3,582 lbs.; FWD: 3,764 lbs. TRUNK: 17 cu. ft. WHERE BUILT: DingolďŹ ng, Germany

boasts more head room front and rear, more front shoulder room and more rear leg room. But, don't worry, the extra size doesn't translate to extra pounds. This 3 is about 121 pounds lighter than its predecessor thanks to more extensive use of aluminum and highstrength steel, BMW promises. Finally, there's styling. Still undeniably a 3, this guy shows a wider grille, bigger headlights, standard LED lighting and a shorter front overhang. Look for the 330i to arrive in March, with the M340i to follow soon thereafter. Prices will start at $41,245. *** This content was produced by Brand Ave. Studios. The news and editorial departments of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch had no role in its creation or display. For more information about Brand Ave. Studios, contact tgriffin@ stltoday.com.


YOUR VIEWS. PUBLISHED. Become a contributor to an ongoing conversation about the best ways to address problems, right wrongs and make our society better. Your input can generate useful ideas that catalyze positive action. Let your view be known and voice be heard in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

Write a letter to the editor at STLtoday.com/letters

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Top-notch mechanical service can be rewarded with a tip DEAR CAR TALK: Here’s a question you haven’t answered yet. I recently used a mobile mechanic -- a guy who came to me where my car was, rather than me bringing my car to him at his shop. How much of a tip should I give to a mobile mechanic? -- Mark DEAR MARK: Good question, Mark. I would say that, unlike a server at a restaurant, who gets paid 75 cents an hour and counts on tips to af-

ford his or her daily gruel, tips for mechanics really are optional. They’re a “thank you” for particularly good service. So if you call a mobile mechanic, and he goes above and beyond what he has to do, that’s when you would say “thanks” with a tip. For instance, if he arrives right away, is friendly, fixes your car in the rain, takes the time to give you some good advice about how to avoid problems in the future, charges a very fair price and doesn’t break anything else or clean out the change in your cup

06

RIDES MAGAZINE

holder, those all can be reasons to tip him. I would not base it on a percentage of the bill, like you would at a restaurant. Instead, I would offer something between $5 and $20, depending on just how grateful you feel. Giving a mechanic an extra $5 is a nice way to say, “Thank you for getting here on time and fixing the problem.” Giving a mechanic an extra $20 is an unmistakable way of saying, “Wow, this was great service, and I am very thankful for your extra effort.” Of course, nothing beats a pan of fresh,

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

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CAR TALK By RAY MAGLIOZZI King Features Content cartalk@gmail.com

warm brownies, but not everybody drives around with one of those just in case, Mark. That’s why the $20 bill was invented. *** Got a question about cars? Write to Ray in care of King Features, 628 Virginia Drive, Orlando, FL 32803, at www.cartalk. com. (c) 2018 by Ray Magliozzi and Doug Berman. Distributed by King Features Syndicate, Inc.


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6 Years / 100,000 Miles 12 Months / 12,000 Miles 24 Months / 24,000 Miles

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2017 BMW M3

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Bommaritostpeters.com 09

RIDES MAGAZINE

$64,990

Sale prices cannot be combined with any other offers. ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

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Find your next certified pre-owned vehicle at

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2017 CHEVROLET CAMARO LT

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www.LouFuszChevrolet.com 10

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2007 Ford Escape XLT

2007 Ford Edge SEL

2010 Toyota Camry SE

2012 Ford Fusion SEL

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2013 Chrysler 200 Touring

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$

6,007

SALE PRICE

$

6,500

2010 Acura TSX 2.4

2012 Ford Focus SE

2008 Mazda CX-9 Touring

Stk# 28935A

Stk# 12661A

Stk# 28869B

SALE PRICE

$

8,007

SALE PRICE

$

8,007

SALE PRICE

$

8,007

2004 Chevrolet Tahoe LT

2011 Mazda CX-9 Touring

2013 Dodge Dart Rallye

2010 Nissan Maxima 3.5 SV

Stk# 79762A

Stk# 12394A

Stk# 12467A

Stk# P9593

$

8,900

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$

8,900

SALE PRICE

$

9,400

SALE PRICE

$

9,900

1997 Ford Mustang Cobra

2013 Hyundai Sonata SE

2011 Kia Optima SX

2015 Ford Taurus SE

2009 Lexus RX 350

2009 Infiniti EX35 Journey

Stk# 79232A

Stk# P9441A

Stk# P9469A

Stk# 11524M

Stk# P9504A

Stk# P9474A

SALE PRICE

$

9,900

SALE PRICE

$

10,007

2015 Mini Cooper

2012 Honda CR-V LX

Stk# P9457

Stk# 28830A

SALE PRICE

$

11,000

2013 GMC Terrain SLT Stk# 79612B

SALE PRICE

$

12,007

SALE PRICE

$

11,007

SALE PRICE

$

10,007

SALE PRICE

$

10,400

SALE PRICE

$

10,900

SALE PRICE

$

10,900

2008 Mercedes Benz SLK

2014 Chevy Equinox LT

2012 GMC Terrain SLE-2

2011 Honda Pilot EX

Stk# P9396

Stk# 79782B

Stk# 97015M

Stk# 79174B

SALE PRICE

$

11,400

SALE PRICE

$

11,400

SALE PRICE

$

11,500

SALE PRICE

$

12,007

2012 Chrysler Town & Country

2011 Jeep Grand Cherokee

2014 VW Routan SE

2011 Jeep Grand Cherokee

2013 Kia Sorento EX

Stk# 79734A

Stk# P9562

Stk# 79265A

Stk# P9401A

Stk# 28967A

SALE PRICE

$

12,007

SALE PRICE

$

12,007

SALE PRICE

$

12,007

SALE PRICE

$

12,500

• We'll buy every car we appraise regardless of year, make, model or condition.

SALE PRICE

$

12,900

*Excludes model year 2008 and older and any vehicle with 80,000 or more miles.

Bommarito

2005 Dodge Caravan SXT

West County Pre-Owned Center

AND FACTORY CERTIFIED

CERTIFIED VEHICLES

2006 Dodge Stratus SXT

15736 Manchester at Clarkson Rd. • 636-391-7200 11

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2015 HYUNDAI SANTA FE $ Stk. #70084-1, Sport

Stk. #68752-2, EX-L

2009 VOLVO C70

2016 FORD FOCUS $

13,797

Stk. #95915, SE

Stk. #51329-2, T5 M Conv.

6,995

2012 HONDA CR-V $

8,397

2006 HYUNDAI SONATA $

$

2005 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER $

$

2007 AUDI Q7

6,997

2008 HONDA PILOT

13,297

8,397

Stk. #95859-1, Limited

$

Stk. #95788-1, 3.6 Premium

2006 HYUNDAI ELANTRA $

2013 HYUNDAI TUCSON $

2008 LINCOLN NAVIGATOR $

2010 FORD MUSTANG $

2015 KIA SOUL

2006 HYUNDAI SONATA$

3,995

Stk. #70093-1, GLS

Stk. #70019-1

10,697

Stk. #68742-1, Limited

12,995

Stk. #68907-1, FWD

ST. CHARLES HYUNDAI

$

11,697

Stk. #95595-1, SUV

Stk. #51183-1, GLS

9,397

4,995

370

70 270

HYUNDAI 40/64

12

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

11-02-18

stltoday.com/RIDES

13,697

Stk. #51275-1, EX-L, AWD

4,995

Stk. #51183-1 GLS

2015 FORD ESCAPE $ Stk. #95647-1, SE

10,997

2008 DODGE DAKOTA SLT $ Stk. #69465-1

5,397


StCharlesHyundai.com 2014 HYUNDAI SONATA

2012 BUICK REGAL Stk. #69234-1

844-467-9452

$9,297

Stk. #69312-1

$11,297

2013 HONDA ACCORD LX

2011 CHEVROLET CRUZE ECO

$7,995

Stk. #69498-1

Stk. #70069-1

2014 DODGE AVANGER SE Stk. #69951-1

$10,397

Stk. #70205-1

$12,995

2016 NISSAN SENTRA S

$11,397

Stk. #96044

2013 HYUNDAI SANTA FE SPORT Stk. #50686-1

$12,397

2012 KIA SORENTO EX (A6)

2014 NISSAN MAXIMA 3.5 Stk. #95810-2

Family Owned and Operated Since 1979!

$12,995

2013 KIA SPORTAGE LX

$12,397

Stk. #51710-1

$10,397

5701 Veterans Memorial Pkwy Saint Peters, MO 63376 2015 NISSAN SENTRA SR Stk. #95735

2012 HYUNDAI SANTA FE SPORT

$12,897

370

ST. CHARLES HYUNDAI

844-467-9452

Stk. #50686-1

70 270

StCharlesHyundai.com

40/64

2015 HYUNDAI SANTA FE SPORT Stk. #70084-1

2016 HYUNDAI ELANTRA GT

$13,297

Stk. #95349-1

2015 NISSAN SENTRA S

2012 CHEVROLET CRUZE LTZ Stk. #69901-1

$12,397

$9,995 13

Stk. #51377-1

$12,995

RIDES MAGAZINE

2008 TOYOTA RAV4 LIMITED Stk. #51587-2

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

11-02-18

$7,995

$12,197

2011 FORD TAURUS LIMITED Stk. #70011-2

stltoday.com/RIDES

$8,995


14410 MANCHESTER ROAD MANCHESTER, MO 63011 SALES (636) 200-2822 SERVICE (877) 589-2738 • PARTS (877) 606-3265 CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED SALE

Suntrup 100K Warranty 2.9% Apr financing on All 2015 & 2016 Certified Volvos

$4,500

$11,720

$17,785

$20,855

2006 VolVo S60 2.5t

2008 lexUS rx 350 bASe SUV

2013 bMW 335i

2013 linColn MKx fWd

Stk # 192203

Stk # 193931

Stk # 195511

Stk # 196751

$22,740

$22,832

$25,922

$26,781

2016 VolVo V60 t5 driVe-e preMier WAGon

2015 CAdillAC xtS lUxUrY

2015 niSSAn pAtHfinder plAtinUM

2015 ford expedition el ltd

Stk # L1518

Stk # L14961

Stk # P4325

Stk # 196671

$26,850

$29,550

$29,933

$29,933

2016 CHeVrolet ColorAdo z71 CreW CAb

2015 toYotA HiGHlAnder ltd V6

2018 VolVo V60 CroSS CoUntrY t4 AWd

Stk # 192052

2018 VolVo V60 CroSS CoUntrY t5 AWd WAGon

Stk # 192382

Stk # L1462

Stk # L1462

$30,000

$37,500

$37,820

$54,800

2016 VolVo xC90 t5 MoMentUM

2017 GMC SierrA 1500 Slt CreW CAb

2017 ACUrA Mdx AWd

Stk # 195402

2012 MASerAti GrAntUriSMo MC CoUpe

Stk # 193801

Stk# P4300

Stk # 196451

www.wcvolvo.com 14

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Bommarito GM D! IFIE R CE T

2016 Chevy Cruze LS

A MAZDIFIED! T CER

Pre-Owned Center 2015 Mazda 3 i Sport

GM D! IFIE R E C T

2015 Chevrolet Equinox LS

Stk. #420071A, GM Certified

Stk. #P6581, Auto, Mazda Certified

Stk. #42994A, 27K Miles, GM Certified

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

2015 Buick Regal Premium

$15,990

$14,763

$12,890 GM D! IFIE CERT

South County

GM D! IFIE R E C T

2015 Chevy Camaro LT

GM D! IFIE CERT

2018 Chevrolet Impala LT

Stk. #P6550, Clean Carfax, GM Certified

Stk. #420100A, 58K Miles, GM Certified

Stk. #P6606, 45K Miles, GM Certified

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$16,296 UNDER $10,000 2007 Pontiac Vibe Stk. #42495A ............. SALE PRICE $3,990 2007 Kia Spectra Stk.#44153A ......................SALE PRICE $4,770 2005 Ford Focus Stk.#42889B.......................SALE PRICE $4,990 2005 GMC Envoy XL Stk. #420128A ...... SALE PRICE $6,550 2006 Saturn Ion Stk.#42015B.........................SALE PRICE $6,990 2006 Chevy Impala LTZ Stk. #420098A SALE PRICE $7,990 2012 Nissan Altima S Stk. #420080A....... SALE PRICE $9,252 2007 Nissan Frontier XE Stk. #42195A.. SALE PRICE $9,469 2013 Ford Fusion SE Stk.#44067B..............SALE PRICE $9,990

UNDER $15,000 2013 Ford Focus SE Stk.#35062A ...........SALE PRICE $10,776 2014 VW Passat Stk. #42917B.............. SALE PRICE $10,972 2014 Chevy Cruze LTZ Stk. #35241B . SALE PRICE $11,369 2013 Chevy Sonic RS Stk. #420197A .. SALE PRICE $11,420 2015 Chevy Cruze LS Stk. #420197A .. SALE PRICE $11,420 2009 Mazda 6 Stk.#P6640...................... SALE PRICE $11,469 2014 Chevy Cruze Stk.#35537A................SALE PRICE $11,990 2013 Chevy Equinox Stk.#44127A...........SALE PRICE $12,469 2014 Chevy Equinox LS Stk. #420039A SALE PRICE $12,770 2016 Chevy Cruze LS Stk. #420071A SALE PRICE $12,890 2013 Hyundai Tucson LTD Stk. #42511A SALE PRICE $12,990 2014 Ford Escape S Stk. #44006A..... SALE PRICE $13,469 2014 Nissan Rogue SV Stk. #35524A. SALE PRICE $13,770 2015 Chevy Cruze LTD Stk.#P6593.. SALE PRICE $13,890 2015 GMC Terrain SLE-2 Stk.#44094A.SALE PRICE $13,990 2018 Chevy Cruze LS Stk. #42793A.. SALE PRICE $13,990

$18,990

$18,990

2016 Chevy Cruze LT Stk. #P6547 .... SALE PRICE $14,490 2016 Nissan Sentra SV Stk. #P6608 SALE PRICE $14,697 2015 Mazda 3 i Sport Stk. #P6581 .... SALE PRICE $14,763 2016 Nissan Sentra S Stk. #P6607.... SALE PRICE $14,770 2015 Nissan NV200 S Stk.#P6594..... SALE PRICE $14,950 2015 Nissan Altima SV Stk. #P6609. SALE PRICE $14,990

2015 Chevy Camaro LT Stk. #420100A SALE PRICE $18,990 2018 Mazda 3 Touring Stk. #35435A SALE PRICE $18,993 2017 Chevy Equinox LT Stk. #P6570 SALE PRICE $19,455 2016 Chevy Equinox LT Stk. #P6623 SALE PRICE $19,490 2016 Chevy Equinox LT Stk. #P6615 SALE PRICE $19,690 2018 Mazda 3 Touring Stk. #35364A SALE PRICE $19,739 2018 Ford Escape SE Stk. #P6596.... SALE PRICE $19,750 2018 Mazda 3 Touring Stk. #35332A SALE PRICE $19,769 2014 Chevy Impala Stk.#44078A ........ SALE PRICE $19,990 2017 Dodge Gr. Caravan SE Stk.#420041A .SALE PRICE $19,990

UNDER $20,000 2012 GMC Acadia SLE Stk. #P6555A . SALE PRICE $15,469 2015 Chevy Equinox LS Stk.#42994A ...SALE PRICE $15,990 2017 Dodge Gr. Caravan Stk. #P6564 SALE PRICE $15,990 2015 Buick Regal Stk.#420131B................SALE PRICE $16,269 2015 Buick Regal Premium Stk. #P6550 SALE PRICE $16,296 2016 Mazda 6 i Sport Stk. #P6560 .... SALE PRICE $16,463 2016 Mazda 3 i Sport Stk. #P6604 .... SALE PRICE $16,973 2015 Chevy Equinox LT Stk. #44044A SALE PRICE $17,469 2017 Chevy Equinox LS Stk. #P6565 SALE PRICE $17,990 2016 Ford Edge SEL Stk. #35180A .... SALE PRICE $18,370 2011 Jeep Wrangler Unltd Stk.#44076A SALE PRICE $18,469 2018 Chevy Malibu LS Stk. #42587A SALE PRICE $18,590 2015 Jeep Renegade Trailhawk Stk. #42839A SALE PRICE $18,770 2015 Jeep Renegade Stk. #42839A..... SALE PRICE $18,770 2015 Buick Regal GS Stk. #420074A. SALE PRICE $18,990 2018 Chevy Malibu LT Stk. #P6524 .... SALE PRICE $18,990 2017 Chevy Impala LT Stk. #P6606 .. SALE PRICE $18,990 2007 Chevy Silverado LTZ Stk.#44127ASALE PRICE $18,990 2016 Chevy Equinox LT Stk. #P6614 SALE PRICE $18,990 2015 Dodge Charger Stk. #P6612..... SALE PRICE $18,990

UNDER $25,000

2017 Chevy Equinox LT Stk.#P6620 SALE PRICE $20,760 2016 Mazda CX-5 Touring Stk. #P6602 SALE PRICE $20,793 2018 Mazda 3 Touring Stk. #35290A SALE PRICE $20,973 2017 Nissan Pathfinder SV Stk. #P6589 SALE PRICE $20,990 2018 Chevy Impala LT Stk. #P6598 .. SALE PRICE $21,750 2018 Chevy Impala LT Stk. #P6586 .. SALE PRICE $21,992 2018 Dodge Gr. Caravan Stk. #P6601 SALE PRICE $22,990 2015 GMC Canyon SLT Stk. #44028A SALE PRICE $23,569 2018 Mazda CX-3 Gr. Touring Stk. #35334A SALE PRICE $24,593 2017 Chevy Express Passenger Stk. #P6535 ... SALE PRICE $24,770

OVER $25,000 2017 Chevy Traverse Stk. #P6574..... SALE PRICE $26,770 2017 Chevy Colorado Stk.#35244A ........SALE PRICE $27,997 2018 Chevy Traverse Stk.#420054A ........SALE PRICE $28,990 2016 Mazda CX-9 Stk. #310178A........... SALE PRICE $32,977 2015 GMC Yukon Denali Stk. #420141B SALE PRICE $44,770

6127 S. Lindbergh Blvd. • BommaritoChevy.com • 314-487-9800 15

RIDES MAGAZINE

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To Check Out These Great Cars and More!

Visit stltoday.com/RIDES

2015 DODGE CHALLENGER R/T PLUS Stk# B9465

SALE PRICE

2012 CHEVROLET IMPALA LT

$

33,990

2017 NISSAN ROGUE SL

Stk# V18623A

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$

25,990

SALE PRICE

6,490

Stk# V18461A

SALE PRICE

$

9,990

Stk# M19007A

SALE PRICE

$

16,490

18,990

Stk# B9360

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$

62,990

Stk# B9425

SALE PRICE

$

64,990

$

44,990

$

31,490

2016 CHEVROLET TAHOE LT

$

18,990

2013 HYUNDAI GENESIS

$

Stk# C9434

2017 BMW M3

2015 MINI COOPER HARDTOP S

2014 VOLKSWAGEN BEETLE

Stk# V9460

SALE PRICE

$

2015 JEEP PATRIOT LATITUDE

2012 FORD FOCUS SEL

Stk# C18228C

Stk# M18107C

2015 CADILLAC ESCALADE PLATINUM

Stk# C18262B

SALE PRICE 2009 CADILLAC ESCALADE EXT

$

16,990

Stk# C9467

SALE PRICE

BommaritoSt. Peters PRE-OWNED CENTER 4190 N. Service Rd. • I-70 & Cave Springs View Additional Vehicles At: Bommaritostpeters.com 16

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

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TOLL FREE

1-866-244-9085

stltoday.com/RIDES


To Check Out These Great Cars and More!

Visit stltoday.com/RIDES

2014 MINI COOPER CONVERTIBLE

Stk# P9613

SALE PRICE

2014 INFINITI QX80

14,007

$

2017 MAZDA MAZDA6 GRAND TOURING Stk# 11577L

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

34,400

$

2018 GMC ACADIA SLT SLT-1

25,400

$

2015 AUDI A4 PREMIUM PLUS Stk# P9616

Stk# P9432

2007 FORD ESCAPE XLT

Stk# P9609

SALE PRICE

25,999

2010 ACURA TSX

Stk# P9612

SALE PRICE

32,007

$

8,007

$

SALE PRICE

Stk# P9610

SALE PRICE

5,007

$

Stk# 98086A

SALE PRICE

17,007

$

2008 CHEVROLET EQUINOX LT LT1

30,007

$

2018 INFINITI QX60

Stk# 28935A

SALE PRICE

2014 NISSAN PATHFINDER SL

2018 AUDI Q3 PREMIUM

$

Stk# 80143B

Stk# 78778B

SALE PRICE

8,500

$

2017 GMC ACADIA SLT SLT-1

34,007

$

Stk# P9608

SALE PRICE

28,007

$

BommaritoWest County PRE-OWNED CENTER

15736 MANCHESTER AT CLARKSON RD. TOLL

View Additional Vehicles At: Bommaritowestcounty.com FREE 17

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

11-02-18

1-866-726-4126

stltoday.com/RIDES


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2017 Audi Q7

2013 BMW 328

2018 Buick Envision

2016 Cadillac CTS

2018 Cadillac Escalade

2017 Cadillac XTS

Premium Plus, AWD, 31K Miles, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner #28833A

xDrive, Sunroof, Auto #V17707B

Premium II, Galaxy Silver, AWD, #P9356

3K Miles, Savings #C16150R

Luxury Package, 4WD, 20K Miles #P9311

Stock #P06963

$45,400

$16,990

$38,999

$32,990

$60,400

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2018 Audi Q7

2014 BMW I3

2009 Buick LaCrosse

2011 Cadillac CTS-V

2007 Cadillac STS

2012 Chevrolet Cruze

Premium, 11K Miles, Clean Carfax, One Owner, AWD #28207L

Range, 19K Miles #196541

28K Miles, Nav, Manual #C18238A1

White Diamond, V6, Just Arrived #C18090B

Stock #180568A

$55,900

CXL, White Opal, FWD, #C9353A

$7,990

$39,990

$7,990

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2018 Audi Q7

2017 BMW M4 Coupe

2009 Buick LaCrosse

2013 Cadillac CTS-V

2017 Cadillac XT5 Platinum

2012 Chevrolet Cruze

Premium Plus, 11K Miles, AWD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner #28602L

17K Miles, RWD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner #28748B

Stock #181111A

AWD, 30K Miles, Clean Carfax 1 Owner #80091A

Stock #190049A

$59,007

$57,900

Coupe, AWD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, 19K Miles #P9507

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$41,007

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2018 Audi S5 Cabriolet

2015 BMW X5 35d

2012 Buick Regal

2014 Cadillac Escalade

2015 Cadillac XTS

2016 Chevrolet Cruze

Prestige, 4K Miles, Tango Red Metallic #P9434

AWD, 30K Miles, Carfax 1 Owner, #P9574

Leather, Auto, Just Arrived #B9322

$38,900

$7,490

Premium, AWD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner #C18253A

LTD, LS, Stock #180731A

$59,900

Premium, AWD, Certified, Black #C9319A

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

$37,490

$23,990

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2018 Audi S7

2013 Buick Encore

2015 Buick Regal

2015 Cadillac Escalade

2018 Cadillac XTS

2011 Chevrolet HHR

Prestige, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD, 3K Miles #P9563

Convenience, FWD, Clean Carfax #M18516A

Loaded, Black, GM Certified! #420131B

Luxury, FWD, Clean Carfax, 15K Miles #P9287

Stock #180674A

$9,990

$15,790

Luxury, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, 4WD #98139A

$46,900

$34,000

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$85,007 Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

$17,800

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

18

$6,670

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

RIDES MAGAZINE

$40,500

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

11-02-18

stltoday.com/RIDES

$24,100

$7,350

$11,995

$12,700

Call Us!


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2014 Chevy Camaro

2018 Chevy Camaro

2017 Chevy Cruze

2015 Chevy Cruze

2018 Chevy Cruze

2017 Chevy Equinox

Certified, V6, Auto, Red and Ready #C18260C

LT, Low Miles, Sunroof, Backup Camera #C180221A

17K, Auto, Black #B9215

LS, Loaded, GM Certified! #44077A

LT, Stock #P06956

LT, Stock #P06990

$25,999

$11,990

$15,018

$17,990

$14,990

$16,692

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2015 Chevy Camaro

1995 Chevy C/K 1500

2012 Chevy Cruze

2014 Chevy Cruze

2017 Chevy Cruze

2017 Chevy Equinox

LT, Clean Carfax, One Owner, 28K Miles, #420100A

Stock #P06908

1LT, FWD, 6-Speed, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, #M18445B

LTZ, Black, M/R, Loaded! #35241B

Premier, Red Hot, 8K Miles, Certified , Clean Carfax 1 Owner #C11726P

Stock #P07005

$18,770

$12,996

$4,990

$11,369

$15,600

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2010 Chevy Camaro

2017 Chevy Colorado

2016 Chevy Cruze

2016 Chevy Cruze

2015 Chevy Equinox

2015 Chevy Equinox

1LT Stk #P06852

4x4, "Black Out" Edition, Loaded #35244A

LTD, LS, Loaded, One Owner, GM Certified, #P6593

Stock #P06967

LS, Only 27K Miles, GM Certified! #42994A

1LT, Stock #P06948

$12,975 Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$27,990

$12,990

$15,770

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2016 Chevy Camaro

2015 Chevy Colorado

2016 Chevy Cruze

2016 Chevy Cruze

2014 Chevy Equinox

2017 Chevy Equinox

Stock #180640A

Z71, Crew Cab Long Box, #P06854

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$11,990

$12,700

LS, One Owner, Clean Carfax #420039A

FWD, LT Stock #181128M

$24,876

LS, GM Certified, Loaded #420071A

LT Stock #180731A

$23,171

$12,490

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2012 Chevy Camaro

2016 Chevy Colorado

2014 Chevy Cruze

2017 Chevy Cruze

2013 Chevy Equinox

2015 Chevy Equinox

2LT, Stock #181105A

4x4 #192382

$28,800

Auto, Loaded, 51K Miles, Black, #35537A

LT, Stock #P06968

$15,647

Loaded, Very Clean, #44008A

LS, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, Fuel Efficient, #C11812DTP

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

$11,990

$13,986

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

19

RIDES MAGAZINE

$13,187

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

11-02-18

$12,469

stltoday.com/RIDES

$19,742

$19,995

$22,000

$12,900 Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2017 Chevy Express 3500

2007 Chevy Silverado

2018 Chevy Silverado

2017 Chevy Sonic

2018 Chevy Tahoe

2015 Chevy Traverse

LT, 15 Passenger Van, GM Certified! #P6535

LTZ, Leather, Loaded, #44127A

2500HD, Crew, 4WD, LTZ, Certified Stock #P06985

LT, #P06987

LT, One Owner, Clean Carfax, GM Certified #P6600

LS, Stock #P06974

$24,490

$18,990

$58,994

$45,550 Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$11,991

$16,096

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2012 Chevy Impala

2017 Chevy Silverado

2018 Chevy Silverado

2017 Chevy Sonic

2015 Chevy Tahoe

2015 Chevy Traverse

#V18588B

Crew Cab, High Country, One Owner, Only 14K Miles #P6541A

1500 Crew Cab, Short Box, 4WD, LT , Certified Stock #P06798

LT, Stock #P06977

$11,913

LTZ, 4WD, Clean Carfax, 91K Miles #P9461

AWD, 2LT, Stock #P06945

$6,990 Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

$43,790

$31,865

$34,400

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2014 Chevy Impala

2017 Chevy Silverado 1500

2017 Chevy Silverado 2500

2017 Chevy Sonic

2014 Chevy Tahoe

2015 Chevy Traverse

LTZ, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, FWD #44078A

HD Crew Std Box, 4WD, Certified Stock #180785B

Stock #P06982

LT, 4WD, 19K Miles, Clean Carfax #P9535

LT, Stock #P06879

FWD, 2LT, Stock #P06949

$19,469

$34,007

$42,589

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2016 Chevy Malibu

2014 Chevy Silverado

2013 Chevy Sonic

1LT Stock #P06978

$15,685

3500HD, LTZ, Crew Cab, 4WD, Clean Carfax #79281A

RS, One Owner, Leather, Clean Carfax #420197A

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$39,900 Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

2016 Chevy Malibu

2015 Chevy Silverado 2500

2017 Chevy Sonic

$10,990

$13,379

$46,977

$26,714

$23,900

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2017 Chevy Sonic

2018 Chevy Traverse

2014 Chevy Traverse

Only 9K Miles, One Owner, GM Certified #420054A

LT, Backup Camera, Heated Front Seats, #C181676W

LT, Stock #P06977

$11,913 Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2017 Chevy Suburban

$28,990

$12,500

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

2012 Chevy Traverse

EVERYTHING ST. LOUIS ORDER ONLINE 24/7

New Tires, Backup Camera, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner #C11787JEP

$16,100 Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

HD, LTZ, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, 4WD #79680A

$51,007 Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

20

LT, Stock #P06912

$34,982

LT, Silver, Loaded, Clean Carfax #44009A

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Stock #P06987

$11,991 Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

11-02-18

Only $15,990

stltoday.com/RIDES

thepost-dispatchstore.com 1-877-POST-STL (1-877-767-8785) MONDAY - FRIDAY 9 A.M. - 5 P.M.


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2015 Chevy Volt

2016 Dodge Caravan

2016 Dodge Dart

2015 Ford Explorer

2011 Ford Fiesta

2013 Ford Fusion

Stock #P06928

SE, 37K Miles, 1 Owner, Grey, #V18457A

Stock #P06922

$17,714

XLT, 3rd Row Seating, Parking Assist, #C190621A

SE, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, Fuel Efficient #C11769JEQ

SE, #L14971

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$18,990

$10,074 Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$18,999

$5,900

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

2015 Chrysler 200

2015 Dodge Challenger

1998 Dodge Ram 1500

2013 Ford F-150

2005 Ford Focus

2015 Ford Mustang

Rapter, Crew Cab, 4WD, Nav, Sunroof #M18349B

4 Door, Auto, Only 87K Miles! #42889B

Fastback Ecoboost, #180732A

LTD, FWD, Stk #P06975A

$12,500

#B9465

2WD Reg Cab Stock #P07008

Call Us!

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$34,490 Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$42,490

$4,444

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2015 Chrysler 200

2010 Dodge Challenger

2014 Ford Escape

2015 Ford F-150 Lariat

2013 Ford Focus

2015 Ford Mustang

S, Low Miles, Carfax 1 Owner, #C11805P

R/T #C9433A

One Owner, Clean Carfax #44006A

Super Crew Cab Styleside, 67K Miles, Clean Carfax #P9460

Stock #P06991

$17,990

2 Door, Fastback, EcoBoost Stock #180732A

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

$33,000

$10,288

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2014 Chrysler 300

2011 Dodge Charger

2017 Ford Expedition

2016 Ford F-150

2013 Ford Fusion

2017 Ford T-350

$19,990

#B9227A

SE, Redline, 5-Speed Auto, RWD #B9332A

Stock #P06965

4WD, XLT, Supercrew, Clean Carfax, One Owner #P9316A

SE, FWD, Carfax One Owner #V18579A

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

$12,990

$25,200

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2014 Chrysler 300C

2016 Dodge Dart SXT

2013 Ford Explorer

2018 Ford F-150

2013 Ford Fusion

2003 Ford ZX2

AWD, Stock #180928B

Stock #P06922

$10,074

AWD, V6, Tow Package, Local Trade #B9196A

4WD, Platinum Super Crew, 5K Miles, Clean Carfax #79725A

SE, Very Clean, Full Power #35062A

2 Door Coupe, Stock #180065B

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

$10,770

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$12,558

$14,100

$18,026 Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

21

$12,849

$13,490

RIDES MAGAZINE

$33,007

$53,500 Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

11-02-18

$8,220

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

stltoday.com/RIDES

$16,945

$16,945

#B9367

$30,990

Call US!


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2012 GMC Acadia

2016 GMC Sierra 2500HD

2015 GMC Terrain

2017 GMC Yukon

2010 Hyundai Elantra

2015 Hyundai Sonata

SLE, Loaded, Very Clean, Full Power #P6555A

Denali, 4WD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner #79844A

FWD Stock #P06970B

SLT, Onxy Black, 20K Miles, 4x4, #P9277

SE, FWD, Clean Carfax #V18330B

Stock #P06804

$15,469

$52,900

$46,000

$5,490

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2016 GMC Acadia Denali

2016 GMC Sierra 1500

2017 GMC Terrain

2017 Honda Accord

2013 Hyundai Genesis

2013 Hyundai Tucson

Ebony Twilight,AWD, 24K Miles, Clean Carfax #P9478

SLT, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD #80179A

Stock #P06880

Sport, 26K Miles, Auto, Local Trade #C9412A

Black, 32K, Loaded, Well Cared For #B9360

LTD, Loaded, Black #42511A

$35,007

$16,775

$35,400

$17,600

$22,490

$16,990

$13,996

$12,770

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

2015 GMC Acadia

2018 GMC Terrain

2015 GMC Yukon

2018 Honda Ridgeline

2009 Hyundai Genesis

2017 Hyundai Veloster

FWD, Stock #P06884

1K Miles, FWD, White #B9076B

Denali, White, GM Certified, Loaded #420141B

RTL-E, 12K Miles, Just Arrived #B9517

Silver, Auto, Leather, Sunroof, #B9132B

Stock #P06931

$22,175 Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$26,490

Call Today! Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

$6,490

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2005 GMC Envoy

2015 GMC Terrain

2015 GMC Yukon Denali

2018 Hyunda Elantra

2017 Hyundai Santa Fe

2009 Infiniti G37x

XL, Black, 4 Door #420128A

SLE2 #C18043RA

4WD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, White Diamond #P9552

SEL Stock #P06992

Stock #P06966

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

$41,007 Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$18,863

Automatic, AWD, Clean Carfax, #B9395

$6,369

$15,182

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2016 GMC Sierra 1500

2015 GMC Terrain

2016 GMC Yukon Denali

2017 Hyundai Accent

2015 Hyundai Sonata

2018 Infiniti Q50

SLT, 4WD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner #79838A

SLE-2, Loaded, Very Clean #44094A

4WD, Quicksilver Metallic #P9606

SE, Hatchback, Auto Stock #P07011

$13,990

$50,007

$10,675

Limited, 31K, Red, Local Trade #V17800A

3.0 Turbo, AWD, Loaded #B9519

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

$32,900 Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

$43,990

$14,220

22

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

11-02-18

$14,990

stltoday.com/RIDES

$12,310

$10,990

$31,990 Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2017 Infiniti Q50

2018 Infiniti QX60

2018 Infiniti QX60

2018 Infiniti QX80

2015 Jeep Renegade

2018 Kia Rio

3.0t Premium, AWD, Certified, One Owner #96360L

AWD, Certified, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner #P9543

AWD, 7K Miles, Certified, Carfax 1 Owner #97179L

33K Miles, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD #P9495

Trailhawk, Loaded, Very Clean, M/R #42839A

2xxx Miles, 4 Door, Hatchback, Auto, #V18419A

$36,007

$35,400

$39,900

$51,500

$18,469

$15,890

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2017 Infiniti Q50

2018 Infiniti QX60

2018 Infiniti QX60

2016 Jeep Cherokee

2010 Jeep Wrangler

2015 Kia Soul

3.0t Premium, Certified, Clean Carfax, One Owner, 11K Miles #96135L

AWD, Carfax 1 Owner, 20K Miles #P9551

AWD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, #P9610

Stock #180069A

Sahara, Auto, Soft Top, 4WD #C9282A

Exclaim Package, 30K Miles, Sunroof, Auto #V18606A

$34,007

$18,741

$38,007

$16,490

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$18,990

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2017 Infiniti Q50

2018 Infiniti QX60

2017 Infiniti QX80

2015 Jeep Cherokee

2014 Jeep Wrangler

2017 Kia Soul

3.0t Premium, Certified, 12K Miles, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner #96195L

Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, 22K Miles, AWD, #P9500

Latitude, 26K Miles, Backup Camera, Carfax 1 Owner, #C11806P

Unlimited, Saraha, 4WD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, #V18400B

Low Miles, Carfax 1 Owner, 6-Speed Manual #C11809ICO

$34,007

$36,500

AWD, Clean Carfax, One Owner, 48K Miles #P9546

$16,800

$23,990

$13,485

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

$42,007

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Lou Fusz Chewy (866) 602-1770

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

2018 Infiniti Q70

2018 Infiniti QX60

2014 Infiniti QX80

2015 Jeep Cherokee

2011 Jeep Wrangler

2007 Kia Spectra

3.7 Luxe, AWD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner #P9580

AWD, Certified, Clean Carfax 1 Owner #P9611

AWD, Black Obsidian, 71K Miles, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner #P9432

Trailhawk, 39K Miles #196111

Unlimited, 4x4, Sport, Auto, Hard/Soft Top #44076A

Very Clean, Auto #44153A

$33,007

$4,770

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

$17,990

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

$34,400

$25,000

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

2018 Infiniti Q70L

2018 Infiniti QX60

2015 Infiniti QX80

2008 Jeep Commander

2017 Jeep Wrangler

2013 Lexus ES350

3.7Luxe, 5K Miles, AWD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner #97172L

AWD, Certified, Clean Carfax 1 Owner #97029L

Clean Carfax, 8 Cyl 5.6L, AWD #P9479

Sport, 4WD #V18496A

ULTD #P4297

Loaded!! Just Arrived #C9118A

$38,900

$7,490

$31,910

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

$36,007

$33,007

$46,007

$39,900

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

23

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

11-02-18

stltoday.com/RIDES

$18,990


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2014 Lexus ES350

2007 Lexus RX350

2016 Mazda3i

2012 Mazda CX-9

2015 Mazda 3 i Sport

2015 Mini Cooper

Black w/ Black Leather, 1 Owner, Local Trade, #V18497A

AWD, #195821

Sport, Hatchback, FWD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner #P6604

Touring #M18259C

$9,990

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

$17,463

FWD, 30K Miles, Clean Carfax, One Owner, #P6581

Countryman, Auto, "S" Pkg, Leather #B9243

$22,990

$10,850

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2017 Lexus ES350

2008 Lexus RX350

2009 Mazda 6i

2018 Mazda CX-9

2009 Mercedes-Benz AMG

2015 Mini Cooper

FWD, Clean Carfax, One Owner, 12K Miles #P9498

AWD, #193931

Touring, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, FWD #M18396A

Grand Touring, AWD, Clean Carfax, Sonic Silver #P9497

6.0L V12, 81K Miles, RWD, Clean Carfax #79807A

Roadster, FWD, Clean Carfax, Convertible #B9461

$33,900

$12,550

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2016 Lexus GS 350

2013 LR Range Rover HSE

2015 Mazda CX-5

2009 Mazda 6

2015 Mini Cooper S

2015 Mitsubishi Outlander

4 Door, 34K Miles, Clean Carfax #P9588

4WD, Firenze Red Metallic, 63K Miles #P9203

Grand Touring, Leather, M/R, Only 69K Miles #P6640

$46,500

Hardtop, Hatchback, FWD, 20K Miles #B9326

Stock #P06923

$36,007

Backup Camera, One Owner, Blind Spot Sensor #C11774Q

$18,990

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$7,990

$11,488

$35,900

$11,469

$14,763

$34,900

$17,990

$19,990

$13,468

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2017 Lexus RC

2016 LR Range Rover

2007 Mazda CX-7

2006 Mazda 3

2015 Mini Cooper S

2015 Mitsubishi Outlander

Black w/Red Leather, 21K Miles #B9509

Sport V6 HSE, AWD, Clean Carfax #79760A

Local Trade, Clean Carfax, Just Arrived #M18426A

S, Grand Touring, #M18286A

Paceman, AWD, 35xxx Miles, Automatic, Pano Roof, #B9291

Sport, 39K Miles, Backup Camera, Heated Front Seats, #C11804P

$35,490 Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

$43,007 Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

$7,490 Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

$5,990 Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

YOUR 24/7 NEWS SOURCE 24

RIDES MAGAZINE

$17,990 Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

$15,499 Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

(INSTANT ACCESS TO STORIES YOU NEED TO KNOW)

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

11-02-18

stltoday.com/RIDES


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2006 Nissan 350Z

2017 Nissan Frontier

2015 Nissan Pathfinder

2015 Nissan Rogue

2012 Porsche 911

2013 Ram 1500

Stock #181164A

King Cab, Stock #P06997

Platinum #P4328

37K Miles, #P4324

$12,281

$16,187

$26,850

$18,680

Black Edition, Convertible RWD, Clean Carfax #P9511

Sport, Heated Front Seats, Backup Camera #C11808ICO

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

2017 Nissan 370Z

2016 Nissan Frontier

2014 Nissan Rogue

2010 Nissan Sentra

2015 Ram 1500

2014 Ram 2500

8K Miles, Keyless Start, Brilliant Silver #C11798Q

S, Stock #P06998

SV, Loaded, White #35524A

Auto, A/C, Black, Power Pkg #V18409A

$23,259

$16,371

Laramie Longhorn Edition, 36K Miles, 4WD, #C18245A

6.7 Diesel, Crew Cab Laramie, 4 New Tires, #B9170

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

$33,900

$44,990

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2012 Nissan Altima

2017 Nissan Murano

2016 Nissan Rogue

2016 Nissan Sentra

2012 Ram 1500

2006 Saturn Ion

2.5S, Loaded, One Owner, Clean Carfax #420080A

Stock #P07003

Stock #P07004

Stock #P06936

$15,994

Auto, One Owner, Only 44K Miles #420151B

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$16,640

4WD, Auto, Hemi, V8 #C18044RC

$8,990

$31,249

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$23,490

$6,990

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

2007 Nissan Frontier

2015 Nissan NV200 S

2016 Nissan Rogue

2015 Nissan Titan

2012 Ram 1500

2017 Subaru Forester

XE, Ext Cab, Silver, Very Clean #42195A

Cargo Van, Clean Carfax, Full Power #P6594

Stock #P06935

4 Door, Crew Cab, 4WD, 52K Miles, #B9063

Lifted Wheels & Tires, Quad Cab, 4WD, #C18044RC

Touring #V18545B

$13,490

$17,557

$7,990

$28,990

$57,900

$25,999

$8,990

$14,750

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

$22,990

$28,490

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2017 Nissan Frontier

2015 Nissan Pathfinder

2016 Nissan Rogue

2017 Nissan Versa

2017 Ram 1500

2015 Subaru Forester

King Cab, Stock #P06996

Platinum #P4325

$25,922

Low Miles, Backup Camera, 1 Owner #C190562A

Note, Stock #P06975

$18,102

Laramie Longhorn #C18259A

Eyesite, 38K Miles #195521

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

$16,800

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$40,990

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

25

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

RIDES MAGAZINE

$12,558

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

11-02-18

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

stltoday.com/RIDES

$19,820


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2009 Suzuki Grand Vitara

2016 Toyota Highlander

2014 Toyota Rav4

2018 Volkswagen Beetle S

2009 Volkswagen Jetta

2017 Volvo XC60

XSport, 4WD, Automatic Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, #V18410A

Limited, 31K Miles, Carfax 1 Owner, AWD #P9566

LE, Backup Camera, Low Mileage #C190024B

Hatchback, FWD, VW Certified, Clean Carfax 1 Owner #V18521A

SEL #V18538A

R-Design, AWD, Clean Carfax, One Owner, 12K Miles #P9549

$18,490

$5,990

$36,007

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

$17,500

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Y GAME. EVERY GOAL. EVERY COLD, ICY DETAIL. WE DELIVER IT ALL.

oday

WEDNESDAY • 04.12.2017 • B

JAKE ALLEN 33-20-5 SAVE PERCENTAGE

.915 GOALS AGAINST AVERAGE

2.42 SHUTOUTS

4 ASSOCIATED PRESS

ON ALLEN’S SHOULDERS Yeo’s focus is on playoffs, not revenge against Wild JOSE de JESUS ORTIZ St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Mike Yeo had been among the

a map out the door when his dreams of playing in the National Hockey League faded. He merely headed for the exit ramp before he was sent there. As a coach, whether in the American Hockey League as the head man or in the NHL as an assistant, he

NHL PLAYOFFS: FIRST ROUND

BLUES VS. WILD

1 2 3 4

8:30 p.m. Wednesday at Minnesota, NBCSN, FSM

5

TBA April 22 at Minnesota,

7 p.m. Friday at Minnesota, NBCSN, FSM 2 p.m. Sunday at Scottrade, KSDK (Ch. 5) 8:30 p.m. April 19 at Scottrade, NBCSN, FSM

Blues goalie finds consistency, confidence after rough start BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

It was mid-January and Jake Allen couldn’t stop anything coming his way — not the puck or the questions. There may have been some

brought a dated approach to the position that didn’t suit Allen. In the back of his mind, he, too, might have been thinking about the little help that he was getting from teammates in the defensive zone. But Allen knew that he wasn’t

J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / C O M I C S

Friday • 11.02.2018 • EV DUSTIN • By Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker

DILBERT • By Scott Adams

SALLY FORTH • By Francesco Marciuliano and Jim Keefe

BABY BLUES • By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE • By Stephan Pastis GARFIELD • By Jim Davis

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM • By Mike Peters MUTTS • By Patrick McDonnell

DEFLOCKED • By Jeff Corriveau PRICKLY CITY • By Scott Stantis

PICKLES • By Brian Crane

HI AND LOIS • By Brian and Greg Walker and Chance Browne

RHYMES WITH ORANGE • By Hilary B. Price

BEETLE BAILEY • By Mort and Greg Walker

BREAKING CAT NEWS • By Georgia Dunn

SUDOKU

THE PAJAMA DIARIES • By Terri Libenson

EVERYDAY


EVERYDAY

EV2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH BRIDGE TIPS • BOB JONES Both vulnerable, East deals NORTH ♠Q 8 5 4 ♥K 10 5 4 ♦10 7 ♣A J 6 WEST EAST ♠9 7 3 2 ♠J 6 ♥Q 9 3 ♥A 7 ♦8 6 5 ♦A Q J 9 4 3 ♣10 5 2 ♣9 7 4 SOUTH ♠A K 10 ♥J 8 6 2 ♦K 2 ♣K Q 8 3 The bidding: EAST SOUTH WEST NORTH 1♦ Dbl Pass 2♦ Pass 2♥ Pass ? How do you respond to partner’s takeout double? The traditional scheme is that you bid your best suit without jumping with 0-8 points, jump in your best suit with 9-11 points (might be a fourcard suit), and jump to game in your best suit with 12 or more points. You will sometimes not know the correct game to bid and so you will cue bid the opponent’s suit. This allows the partnership to proceed slowly until a good fit is found or you settle on playing in no trump. A player will sometimes cue bid with less

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD than game-forcing values and length in both majors. Does that relieve him of responsibility to bid again? We don’t think so. South could not have done anything to show his extra values over the cue bid as he couldn’t be sure that hearts was the right strain for his side. However, he would happily go on to game after a raise by North. Today’s deal is from a team game. At the other table, South overcalled one no trump and reached game in hearts, making easily. At this table, South doubled — the action that most experts would prefer. He missed game when partner passed his twoheart bid. We agree with North’s cue bid, but he owed his partner another bid. Three hearts would have been perfect. (11/02/18) tcaeditors@tribune.com

CRYPTOQUIP

Across 1 Suzanne Somers’ role on “Three’s Company” 8 Wind River tribe 15 Cornmeal treat 16 Crescent-shaped 17 Called things off 18 Star-studded event held annually at the Anna Wintour Costume Center in New York 19 Highway divider 20 Marriott competitor 21 “You ain’t ___!” 22 Six-time All-Star Ron 23 Where college students might take a stand?

November 2 WORD — DALLIES (DALLIES: DAL-eez: Wastes time.) Average mark 31 words. Time limit 40 minutes. Can you find 39 or more words in DALLIES? The list will be published tomorrow. YESTERDAY’S WORD — BURDENS nude rebus bend nurse rend bred send rude bund snub rued burn sued rune burned suer ruse bused sunder drub under surd dues used sure dune user RULES OF THE GAME: 1. Words must be of four or more letters. 2. Words that acquire four letters by the addition of “s,” such as “bats” or “dies,” are not allowed. 3. Additional words made by adding a “d” or an “s” may not be used. For example, if “bake” is used, “baked” or “bakes” are not allowed, but “bake” and “baking” are admissible. 4. Proper nouns, slang words, or vulgar or sexually explicit words are not allowed.

45 Big name in house paint 46 Gizmodo or Engadget 50 Autobiographer who wrote that tennis is “the loneliest sport” 52 Preferred seating, for some 53 Wreck 54 Colorful beach sighting 55 Started fuming 56 King’s staff 57 Marched

Down 1 Place to get solutions, in brief 2 Spy who trades sex for secrets, informally 3 User of a popular social news site 4 Strand during the winter, say 5 Actress Thompson of “Family” 6 Hide 7 Besides 8 Revlon cosmetics brand 9 Wanted to take back, say 10 Not having 11 Boxers 12 Setting for the 1996 best-seller “Into the Wild” 13 Symbols of innocence

HOROSCOPE • JACQUELINE BIGAR

If Nov. 2 is your birthday • This year you break past set patterns, which encourages you to make some significant changes. If you are single, the type of person you choose to relate to is likely to support your transformation. If you are attached, the two of you become more comfortable together than ever. Virgo is a trusted friend.

WORD GAME

24 Inclined 25 Some acts 27 Mercedes line 30 2001 Destiny’s Child #1 hit with the lyric “I don’t think you ready for this jelly” 33 Notoriously spoiled sort 36 Figures in the Edda 38 Peak that marks the eastern boundary of Yosemite Natl. Park 41 LP, e.g. 42 Dennings of “2 Broke Girls” 43 Apple picker 44 Writer whose room at the University of Virginia is now a mini-museum

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. The stars show the kind of day you’ll have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult.

CROSSWORD

M 1 • FrIDAy • 11.02.2018

ARIES (March 21-April 19) ★★★★ You might opt to let go of pressure and judgments. Flow with the moment, and attempt to clean up after an unexpected event that might have thrown some of your life structure into chaos. Tonight: Christen the weekend. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) ★★★★ Your creativity emerges, causing you to change direction. You might want to slow down some, as you likely don’t have all the facts. Tonight: Be as naughty as you want! GEMINI (May 21-June 20) ★★★ You could be unusually quiet and withdrawn. A partner or loved one might be misreading the source of a situation as well as your attitude. As a result, you might not be particularly forthcoming. Tonight: Head home early. CANCER (June 21-July 22) ★★★★ You want to get past a problem and understand what is happening with various people surrounding you. You might feel as if someone is misreading you. Tonight: Have an important chat.

14 Jungle swingers, for short 20 Certain adopted pet 22 Salon jobs 25 Vacuum brand 26 Super-super 27 Does some computer work 28 Like the equation ax3 + bx2 + cx + d = 0 29 What the Clintons each

31 32 34

35 37 38 39 40 44

took before they met, in brief ___ steak Nonmainstream Store that really should have a spokesperson “Why not!” Zebralike Olympic marks Network VIP Call Remote button

45 The assassin Sparafucile, in “Rigoletto” 47 Online lead-in 48 One who’s “knackered” when exhausted, informally 49 Big vein 50 Spanish sweetheart 51 Cancún kitty 53 Drill master: abbr.

Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay. No. 0928

WORD SCRIMMAGE

different way. Verify that you are on the same page as a partner. Tonight: Get together with a friend. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) ★★ You might be mulling over an ongoing issue as you seek out answers. You also might decide not to share as much as usual, at least until you’ve sorted through all the facts. Tonight: Do what works best for you. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) ★★★★★ Zero in on a workrelated matter. You smile, and another person responds, perhaps with the exception of a grouchy roommate or family member. Tonight: Meet up with loved ones. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) ★★★ You often are flamboyant, but right now you are efficient and serious. You might not have your normal tolerance for chitchat and sharing news. Clear out your responsibilities and mandatory to-dos. Tonight: Out late.

Solutions at bottom of page

WONDERWORD

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) ★★★★ Reach out to a friend or loved one who lives at a distance. You could feel confused by everything you are hearing. Be clear about your choices. You might get together with a favorite person in the near future. Tonight: Say yes to an offer. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) ★★★★ You could be exhausted from doing what a partner requests. You like relating to this person in general, but you might sense a demanding attitude that could revolve around timesensitive issues. Tonight: Make it a party.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) ★★★★ Get past a misunderstanding. Prevent a hassle by confirming a meeting place and time when making plans. Tonight: Accept that you are not the Energizer Bunny.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) ★★★★ Defer to a partner or loved one. Often you miss a detail or two, especially when it comes to making plans. The other party involved might feel as though he or she can take the lead, so hand this person the reins. Tonight: Do what makes you smile!

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) ★★★★ You are coming from a different mental space than many of the people around you. You also communicate in a very

STLtoday.com/horoscopes Get expanded horoscope information: star charts, peak times, outlooks and Chinese Zodiac data.

Find more free games, or subscribe to get access to more than 50 others, at STLtoday.com/games, where you’ll also find a link to the Puzzle Society.

Puzzle by Kameron Austin Collins

WORDY GURDY

JUMBLE


EVERYDAY

11.02.2018 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • EV3

DEAR ABBY

WHAT’S THE DIFF? Find six differences between the panels.

Mom’s death leads to sibling war Dear Double Loss • Please accept my sympathy for the loss of your mother. If it’s any comfort, estate problems like you’re experiencing aren’t all that unusual. Not knowing your brother or the degree to which he is self-centered, I’m having trouble understanding his overreaction. Was he desperate for a place to stay for a year? I wish you had mentioned what your other brother thinks about this regrettable situation and whether he, too, was disowned. If he and your angry sibling are on speaking terms, perhaps he can help to mend fences. Dear Abby • “Addicted in Kansas City” (Aug. 24) asked you for secular alternatives to Alcoholics Anonymous. There are parts of your response that I feel need clarification. First of all, AA doesn’t require lifetime attendance at meetings. AA doesn’t “require” anything. (The third tradition states the only requirement for membership is a desire to stop drinking.) Regular attendance at meetings is encour-

aged but certainly not a requirement. Many people continue to go to meetings one or more times a week, while others might stop or go only occasionally. The other point is tougher — and perhaps more subtle. AA encourages individuals trying to get sober to find a “God of their own understanding,” a Higher Power, SOMETHING bigger than themselves. Many agnostics and atheists get and stay sober in AA. AA is a spiritual program, not a religious one. In many cities there are meetings expressly for atheists and other nonbelievers. — SOBER AND HAPPY IN ATLANTA Dear Sober • Thank you for writing to clarify this. However, there are different programs, which is why I also encourage anyone trying to achieve sobriety to research and explore the alternatives. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, Calif. 90069.

Differences: 1. Window is smaller. 2. Neckline is different. 3. Tie clip is moved. 4. Lapel is missing. 5. Hair is shorter. 6. Purse is longer

Dear Abby • My mom recently passed away at 91. She had a great life and went peacefully at home in bed during the night. I took charge of her medical care and finances after Dad died 10 years ago. After Mom’s funeral, my brother insisted he would move into her house while he remodeled it, which could tie up the house for a year. It made no sense to me. I am Mom’s executor, and I felt it was unfair to me and my other brother. When I said no, he got really angry, accused me of many mean, untrue things and announced that he disowned me. I responded that I love him and he will always be my brother, but it was his choice. The pain of losing my mom AND my brother has been awful. Now I’m working to sell the house, and he interferes and is mean every step of the way. But I have to move ahead. I don’t respond to anything negative he writes. Have you some advice on how to repair our relationship? — DOUBLE LOSS IN CALIFORNIA

MISS MANNERS

TV FRIDAY

Leave me out of wedding photo debate

For complete channels and 24-hour program information, customize your own TV listings at STLtoday.com/tv.

Dear Miss Manners • When did the practice of having the groom pose for pictures with his hand in his pocket begin, and why? Every Sunday, I see pictures of beautiful brides, perfectly groomed, standing beside slobs with their hands in their pockets. This really irritates me. Gentle Reader • Who is to say these gentlemen would not be proven even more slovenly by displaying what their hands are hiding? Surprising as it may be, Miss Manners does not have a firm ruling on the placement of hands when posing for pictures. She leaves that to the photographers. As long as these bridegrooms are not making rude gestures, she considers herself — and their brides — fortunate enough. Dear Miss Manners • I am a professor and the director of a small

graduate program at a large university. Each year, we select a group of applicants who, on top of admittance, receive a teaching assistantship. This comes with a tuition waiver and a stipend, together amounting to tens of thousands of dollars. Even smaller groups are offered merit fellowships of several thousand dollars. I personally send notifications via email to these applicants, give them a decision deadline, and ask them to send me a note in response. I am shocked, every year, that many of the recipients simply ignore the offer. I receive no acknowledgment of the offer, let alone an expression of gratitude. Their silence communicates to me that they feel entitled. Clearly, they have not been mentored correctly. After the decision date, I send follow-up emails to the applicants from whom I have yet to hear a word,

letting them know that the decision date has passed, that the offer has been retracted and that we have moved to our waitlist. I am tempted to add a line saying that I would have appreciated an acknowledgment of the offer. I know that good manners dictate that one does not point out the rudeness of others. But I am wondering if my role as a professor offers me some leeway here, as it is my job to teach students the ways of the profession. Gentle Reader • While these adult students should clearly know better, they are obviously in need of some guidance. Miss Manners is loath to employ the overused phrase “a teaching moment,” but that is what this is. Send questions to Miss Manners, aka Judith Martin, on her website, missmanners.com; to her email, dearmissmanners@gmail.com; or through postal mail to Miss Manners, Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut Street, Kansas City, Mo. 64106.

11/2/18

7:00

7:30

FOX Last Man 2 Standing (N)

The Cool Kids (N)

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30

Hell’s Kitchen: Fish Out FOX 2 News at 9:00pm of Water. (N) (cc) (N) (cc)

Hawaii Five-0 McGar- Blue Bloods: Trust. CBS MacGyver Murdoc 4 forces Mac to help him. rett is arrested. (N) (cc) Eddie and her new part(N) (cc) ner fail. (N) NBC Blindspot A bio weapon Midnight, Texas: The Dateline NBC (N) (cc) Monster of the Week Is 5 puts the FBI on lockPatriarchy. (N) down. (N) PBS Washing9 ton Week (N) (cc) CW 11

Donnybrook

Father Brown Father Brown is blamed for a murder. (cc)

News 11 at 7:00PM (N) (cc)

Midsomer Murders Sinister secrets are revealed. (cc)

Dynasty Fallon plays Crazy Ex-Girlfriend: the role of peacemaker. I’m Making up for Lost Time. (N) (cc) (N) (cc) Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C.

WKRP in Hogan’s Hogan’s Cincinnati Heroes (cc) Heroes (cc) (cc)

METV The Andy 24 Griffith Show

The Andy Griffith Show

ABC Fresh Off 30 the Boat (N)

Speechless Child Support Contes- 20/20 (9:01) (N) (cc) (N) tants compete for the prize. (N)

Law & Order: Bitch. A ION Law & Order A jewelry Law & Order A car 46 store customer stands salesman is murdered. makeup mogul is emtrial. (cc) (cc) broiled in scandal.

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EVERYDAY

EV4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

THE FAMILY CIRCUS • By Bil Keane

M 1 • FrIDAy • 11.02.2018

DR. KEITH ROACH

ZITS • By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

What causes nighttime urination that’s not a daytime problem? FUNKY WINKERBEAN • By Tom Batiuk Dear Dr. Roach • I am a 68-year-old female. I’m in good health, take no medications and work at a desk job all day. I urinate at 5:30 a.m., once at lunch and once before bed, and I do not drink any beverages after 6 p.m. If I can go that many hours without urinating during the day, why do I have to get up in the night to urinate two to four hours after lying down? — AJ

SPEED BUMP • By Dave Coverly

BIZARRO • By Wayno and Piraro

Answer • You have already made one important change recommended for a person with annoying nighttime urination (nocturia), which is not drinking after 6 p.m. So let’s explore other reasons you still might be having this problem. Needing to urinate at night is common, especially for older people of both sexes. For men, prostate issues are one problem, while in women, it is loss of estrogen that seems to be the predisposing factor. Treatment with vaginal estrogen often is effective for women with nocturia. Both men and women can have other causes. Swollen ankles and feet is a symptom in people with kidney or heart disease, but it can be present in many older people without known disease. Lying down allows this fluid to go back into the blood (that’s why the fluid is gone in the morning), at which point the kidneys will excrete that extra fluid as urine. Support stockings can reduce this effect. The body also uses a hormone (arginine vasopressin, also called anti-diuretic hormone) to reduce nighttime urination. In some older people, that system stops working properly and the body actually increases urine output at night. Younger people can be treated with a nasal preparation of this hormone, but that is not recommended in people over 65 due to the unacceptably high rate of low blood sodium levels.

CORNERED • By Mike Baldwin NON SEQUITUR • By Wiley Miller

DUPLEX • By Glenn McCoy

MARMADUKE • By Brad Anderson

INTELLIGENT LIFE • By David Reddick

Dear Dr. Roach • My husband has severe allergies as well as gastric reflux. His allergist recommended taking Prilosec because reflux can amplify allergy symptoms. My father, who is an oncologist, has theorized that one of the reasons for the rise in the rates of pancreatic cancer is the longterm use of drugs like Prilosec for reflux. I was curious as to what the data suggest before he starts taking Prilosec long term. — D.L.G.

DRABBLE • By Kevin Fagan

MARK TRAIL • By James Allen

Answer • Your father-inlaw may have read a 2017 study that suggested a small increase in pancreatic cancer rates among people who took proton pump inhibitors like omeprazole (Prilosec). A larger 2018 study concluded that there was no increased risk in pancreatic cancer among users of PPIs.

LOLA • By Todd Clark ZIGGY • By Tom Wilson

Dr. Roach regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but will incorporate them in the column whenever possible. Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med. cornell.edu.

OTHER COAST • By Adrian Raeside

TAKE IT FROM THE TINKERSONS • By Bill Bettwy

THE ARGYLE SWEATER • By Scott Hilburn

BLONDIE • By Dean Young and John Marshall

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